Sample records for root 3ag due

  1. Si 111 1 Ag Si 111 !3 !3 -Ag Si

    E-print Network

    Hasegawa, Shuji

    Fig. 1 1.2 ML Ag 7 7 520 Process 1 RHEED 7 7 !3 !3 540 2 Process 2 600 15 Process 3 30 Process 4 60 Process 5 90 Proc- ess 6 120 Process 7 Fig. 1 Sample preparation procedures. 557 33 #12;3 STM CLPES Fig. 1 Process 1 Process 3 Process 3 Ag 520 0.1 ML Fig. 2 Fig. 1 STM 300 nm Fig. 2 a Process 1 !3 !3 -Ag 7 7 !3

  2. Negligible shift of 3Ag- potential in longer-chain carotenoids as revealed by a single persistent peak of 3Ag-?1Ag- stimulated emission followed by 3Ag-?1Ag- transient-absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunyong; Miki, Takeshi; Kakitani, Yoshinori; Koyama, Yasushi; Nagae, Hiroyoshi

    2007-12-01

    Upon excitation of lycopene, anhydrorhodovibrin or spirilloxanthin to the 1Bu+(0) state, stimulated emission followed by transient-absorption was observed as a single peak with the 3Ag-(0) energy that had been determined by measurement of resonance-Raman excitation profiles. This observation was explained in terms of negligible shift of the 3Ag- potential, in reference to the 1Ag- potential, where only the 3Ag-(?)?1Ag-(?) emission and the 3Ag-(?)?1Ag-(?) absorption become allowed during the vibrational relaxation of ? = 2 ? 1 ? 0, starting from the 3Ag-(2) level generated by diabatic internal conversion from the 1Bu+(0) level, in anhydrorhodovibrin, for example.

  3. Comparative spatiotemporal analysis of root aerenchyma formation processes in maize due to sulphate, nitrate or phosphate deprivation.

    PubMed

    Siyiannis, Vassilis F; Protonotarios, Vassilis E; Zechmann, Bernd; Chorianopoulou, Styliani N; Müller, Maria; Hawkesford, Malcolm J; Bouranis, Dimitris L

    2012-07-01

    Nitrate (N), phosphate (P) or sulphate (S) deprivation causes aerenchyma formation in maize (Zea mays L.) nodal roots. The exact mechanisms that trigger the formation of aerenchyma under these circumstances are unclear. We have compared aerenchyma distribution across the nodal roots of first whorl (just emerging in 10-day-old seedlings), which were subject to S, N or P deprivation over a period of 10 days in connection with oxygen consumption, ATP concentration, cellulase and polygalacturonase activity in the whole root. The effect of deprivation on aerenchyma formation was examined using light and electron microscopy, along with in situ detection of calcium and of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by fluorescence microscopy. Aerenchyma was not found in the root base regardless of the deprivation. Programmed cell death (PCD) was observed near the root tip, either within the first two days (-N) or a few days later (-S, -P) of the treatment. Roots at day 6 under all three nutrient-deprived conditions showed signs of PCD 1 cm behind the cap, whereas only N-deprived root cells 0.5 cm behind the cap showed severe ultrastructural alterations, due to advanced PCD. The lower ATP concentration and the higher oxygen consumptions observed at day 2 in N-, P- and S-deprived roots compared to the control indicated that PCD may be triggered by perturbations in energy status of the root. The peaks of cellulase activity located between days 3 (-N) and 6 (-P), along with the respective alterations in polygalacturonase activity, indicated a coordination which preceded aerenchyma formation. ROS and calcium seemed to contribute to PCD initiation, with ROS possessing dual roles as signals and eliminators. All the examined parameters presented both common features and characteristic variations among the deprivations. PMID:21870204

  4. [Sciatica due to unusual causes: Tarlov cysts and nerve roots anomalies].

    PubMed

    Younes, M; Korbaa, W; Zrour, S; Bejia, I; Touzi, M; Bergaoui, N

    2009-03-01

    Tarlov cysts and nerve roots anomalies usually involve lumbosacral roots and are often asymptomatic. MRI has enabled recognition of many conditions that used to be missed by CT or myelography investigations performed for back and leg pain. However, even without additional compressive impingement (disc hernia, spondylolisthesis or lumbar canal stenosis) these anomalies can be responsible for sciatica, motor deficit and bladder sphincter dysfunction. Tarlov cysts are perinervous dilatations of the dorsal root ganglion. CT and especially MRI can reveal these cysts and their precise relations with the neighboring structures. Delayed filling of the cysts can be visualized on the myelogram. MRI is more sensitive than CT myelography for a positive diagnosis of nerve root anomalies, a differential diagnosis with disc hernia and classification of these anomalies. Surgical treatment is indicated for symptomatic Tarlov cysts and nerve root anomalies resistant to conservative treatment. Better outcome is observed in patients with an additional compressive impingement component. We report two cases of sciatica: one caused by Tarlov cysts diagnosed by MRI and the other by nerve root anomalies diagnosed by CT myelography. In both cases, conservative treatment was undertaken. The clinical, radiological and therapeutic aspects of these disorders are discussed. PMID:18809189

  5. Root cause identification in yield degradation due to nickel-silicide disconnection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masaki Kitabata; Yuji Kawabata; Shin-ichi Imai

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the yield degradation caused by nickel silicide (NiSi) disconnection in a salicide formation process used in system on chip (SoC) manufacturing. Physical analysis revealed that the failure was caused by a NiSi disconnection on a gate electrode. To identify the root cause in such a complicated issue, “Semimetrics,” which integrates a statistical analysis and the equipment data

  6. Highly luminescent material based on Alq3:Ag nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Salah, Numan; Habib, Sami S; Khan, Zishan H

    2013-09-01

    Tris (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) is an organic semiconductor molecule, widely used as an electron transport layer, light emitting layer in organic light-emitting diodes and a host for fluorescent and phosphorescent dyes. In this work thin films of pure and silver (Ag), cupper (Cu), terbium (Tb) doped Alq3 nanoparticles were synthesized using the physical vapor condensation method. They were fabricated on glass substrates and characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscope (AFM), UV-visible absorption spectra and studied for their photoluminescence (PL) properties. SEM and AFM results show spherical nanoparticles with size around 70-80 nm. These nanoparticles have almost equal sizes and a homogeneous size distribution. The maximum absorption of Alq3 nanoparticles is observed at 300 nm, while the surface plasmon resonant band of Ag doped sample appears at 450 nm. The PL emission spectra of Tb, Cu and Ag doped Alq3 nanoparticles show a single broad band at around 515 nm, which is similar to that of the pure one, but with enhanced PL intensity. The sample doped with Ag at a concentration ratio of Alq3:Ag = 1:0.8 is found to have the highest PL intensity, which is around 2 times stronger than that of the pure one. This enhancement could be attributed to the surface plasmon resonance of Ag ions that might have increased the absorption and then the quantum yield. These remarkable result suggest that Alq3 nanoparticles incorporated with Ag ions might be quite useful for future nano-optoelectronic devices. PMID:23653126

  7. Properties of a new type Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy composite anode for zinc electrowinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hai-tao; Liu, Huan-rong; Zhang, Yong-chun; Chen, Bu-ming; Guo, Zhong-cheng; Xu, Rui-dong

    2013-10-01

    An Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy composite anode was produced via composite casting. Its electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen evolution reaction and corrosion resistance was evaluated by anodic polarization curves and accelerated corrosion test, respectively. The microscopic morphologies of the anode section and anodic oxidation layer during accelerated corrosion test were obtained by scanning electron microscopy. It is found that the composite anode (hard anodizing) displays a more compact interfacial combination and a better adhesive strength than plating tin. Compared with industrial Pb-0.3%Ag anodes, the oxygen evolution overpotentials of Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy (hard anodizing) and Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy (plating tin) at 500 A·m-2 were lower by 57 and 14 mV, respectively. Furthermore, the corrosion rates of Pb-0.3%Ag alloy, Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy (hard anodizing), and Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy (plating tin) were 13.977, 9.487, and 11.824 g·m-2·h-1, respectively, in accelerated corrosion test for 8 h at 2000 A·m-2. The anodic oxidation layer of Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy (hard anodizing) is more compact than Pb-0.3%Ag alloy and Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy (plating tin) after the test.

  8. The analysis of Lupinus albus root proteome revealed cytoskeleton altered features due to long-term boron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Alves, M; Moes, S; Jenö, P; Pinheiro, C; Passarinho, J; Ricardo, C P

    2011-08-12

    Boron (B) deficiency greatly limits plants' growth and development. Since the root is the organ that first senses the deficiency, we have analyzed the adaptive responses of Lupinus albus roots to long-term B deficiency. Large morphological differences were observed between plants grown with or without B, and 265 polypeptides were found to be responsive to B deficiency out of a total of 406 polypeptides detected by two-dimensional electrophoresis in the L. albus root proteome. By using mass spectrometry techniques we were able to securely identify 128 of the responsive polypeptides that are related to cell wall metabolism, cell structure, defense, energy pathways and protein metabolism. The detection of multiple peptide isoforms is striking, suggesting that protein modification may have an important contribution during the plant response to long-term B deficiency. Furthermore, detected changes in cytoskeletal associated proteins indicate altered cytoskeletal biosynthesis and suggest that B may have an important contribution in this process. PMID:21406259

  9. Inhibition of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) root growth by cyanamide is due to altered cell division, phytohormone balance and expansin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Soltys, Dorota; Rudzi?ska-Langwald, Anna; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka; Wi?niewska, Anita; Bogatek, Renata

    2012-11-01

    Cyanamide (CA) has been reported as a natural compound produced by hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth.) and it was shown also to be an allelochemical, responsible for strong allelopathic potential in this species. CA phytotoxicity has been demonstrated on various plant species, but to date little is known about its mode of action at cellular level. Treatment of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) roots with CA (1.2 mM) resulted in inhibition of growth accompanied by alterations in cell division, and imbalance of plant hormone (ethylene and auxin) homeostasis. Moreover, the phytotoxic effect of CA was also manifested by modifications in expansin gene expression, especially in expansins responsible for cell wall remodeling after the cytokinesis (LeEXPA9, LeEXPA18). Based on these results the phytotoxic activity of CA on growth of roots of tomato seedlings is likely due to alterations associated with cell division. PMID:22847024

  10. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of Bi2O3-Ag2O hybrid photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinjuan; Liu, Junying; Chu, Haipeng; Li, Jinliang; Yu, Wei; Zhu, Guang; Niu, Lengyuan; Sun, Zhuo; Pan, Likun; Sun, Chang Q.

    2015-08-01

    Bi2O3-Ag2O hybrid photocatalysts were successfully synthesized via a co-precipitation method. The morphology, structure and photocatalytic performance in the degradation of phenol were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, electrochemical impedance spectra and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, respectively. The results show that Bi2O3-Ag2O hybrid photocatalysts exhibit enhanced photocatalytic performance in the degradation of phenol with a maximum degradation rate of 92% for 60 min under visible light irradiation compared with pure Bi2O3 (57%), which is ascribed to the increase in light adsorption and the reduction in electron-hole pair recombination with the introduction of Ag2O.

  11. Optical microcavities and enhanced electroluminescence from electroformed Al-Al2O3-Ag diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickmott, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    Electroluminescence (EL) and electron emission into vacuum (EM) occur when a non-destructive dielectric breakdown of Al-Al2O3-Ag diodes, electroforming, results in the development of a filamentary region in which current-voltage (I-V) characteristics exhibit voltage-controlled negative resistance. The temperature dependence of I-V curves, EM, and, particularly, EL of Al-Al2O3-Ag diodes with anodic Al2O3 thicknesses between 12 nm and 30 nm, has been studied. Two filters, a long-pass (LP) filter with transmission of photons with energies less than 3.0 eV and a short-pass (SP) filter with photon transmission between 3.0 and 4.0 eV, have been used to characterize EL. The voltage threshold for EL with the LP filter, VLP, is ˜1.5 V. VLP is nearly independent of Al2O3 thickness and of temperature and is 0.3-0.6 V less than the threshold voltage for EL for the SP filter, VSP. EL intensity is primarily between 1.8 and 3.0 eV when the bias voltage, VS ? 7 V. EL in the thinnest diodes is enhanced compared to EL in thicker diodes. For increasing VS, for diodes with the smallest Al2O3 thicknesses, there is a maximum EL intensity, LMX, at a voltage, VLMX, followed by a decrease to a plateau. LMX and EL intensity at 4.0 V in the plateau region depend exponentially on Al2O3 thickness. The ratio of LMX at 295 K for a diode with 12 nm of Al2O3 to LMX for a diode with 25 nm of Al2O3 is ˜140. The ratio of EL intensity with the LP filter to EL intensity with the SP filter, LP/SP, varies between ˜3 and ˜35; it depends on Al2O3 thickness and VS. Enhanced EL is attributed to the increase of the spontaneous emission rate of a dipole in a non-resonant optical microcavity. EL photons interact with the Ag and Al films to create surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) at the metal-Al2O3 interfaces. SPPs generate large electromagnetic fields in the filamentary region of the electroformed Al-Al2O3-Ag diode, which then acts as an optical microcavity. A model is proposed for electronic processes in electroformed Al-Al2O3-Ag diodes.

  12. Electromigration of Sn37Pb and Sn3Ag1.5Cu\\/Sn3Ag0.5Cu composite flip-chip solder bumps with Ti\\/Ni(V)\\/Cu under bump metallurgy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yi-Shao Lai; Kuo-Ming Chen; Chin-Li Kao; Chiu-Wen Lee; Ying-Ta Chiu

    2007-01-01

    We examine electromigration fatigue reliability and morphological patterns of Sn–37Pb and Sn–3Ag–1.5Cu\\/Sn–3Ag–0.5Cu composite solder bumps in a flip–chip package assembly with Ti\\/Ni(V)\\/Cu UBM. The flip–chip test vehicle was subjected to test conditions of five combinations of applied electric currents and ambient temperatures, namely, 0.4A\\/150°C, 0.5A\\/150°C, 0.6A\\/125°C, 0.6A\\/135°C, and 0.6A\\/150°C. The electrothermal coupling analysis was employed to investigate the current crowding

  13. CoTiO3/Ag3VO4 composite: A study on the role of CoTiO3 and the active species in the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Wangkawong, Kanlayawat; Phanichphant, Sukon; Tantraviwat, Doldet; Inceesungvorn, Burapat

    2015-09-15

    The role of CoTiO3 and the possible active species in the methylene blue (MB) degradation over the visible-light-driven CoTiO3/Ag3VO4 catalyst have firstly been investigated in this work. CoTiO3 is found to play important roles in enhancing the visible light-harvesting ability of the composite and increasing electron-hole separation efficiency due to the hybrid effect between Ag3VO4 and CoTiO3. The indirect probe experiments reveal that CoTiO3/Ag3VO4 heterostructure provides large amount of active species, therefore a high photocatalytic activity could be obtained. The results clearly suggest that the photocatalytic MB degradation over this hybrid catalyst is mainly governed by direct hole oxidation. PMID:26037270

  14. Surfactant role of Ag atoms in the growth of Si layers on Si(111)?3×?3-Ag substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagami, Tsuyoshi; Sone, Junki; Nakatsuji, Kan; Hirayama, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hirayama.h.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, J1-3, 4259 Nagatsuda, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan)

    2014-10-13

    The growth of Si layers on Si(111)?3×?3-Ag substrates was studied for coverages of up to a few mono-layers. Atomically flat islands were observed to nucleate in the growth at 570?K. The top surfaces of the islands were covered in Ag atoms and exhibited a ?3×?3 reconstruction with the same surface state dispersions as Si(111)?3×?3-Ag substrates. These results indicate that the Ag atoms on the substrate always hop up to the top of the Si layers.

  15. Structure and fluorescent properties of TiO 2:Sm 3+-Ag composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgov, L.; Reedo, V.; Kiisk, V.; Pikker, S.; Sildos, I.; Kikas, J.

    2010-09-01

    Composite based on TiO 2 host doped with Sm 3+ ions and co-doped with silver nanoparticles is proposed as new fluorescent material. The co-doped samples were prepared from titanium alkoxide precursor by sol-gel method adjusted for addition of Sm 3+ ions and Ag nanoparticles. Commercial samarium nitrate salt and silver nanopowder (size of primary particle 30-50 nm) were used as dopant and co-dopant. Raman measurements revealed that crystalline anatase TiO 2 phase is typical for the TiO 2:Sm 3+ films, whereas TiO 2:Sm 3+-Ag samples contain regions of rutile and brookite phases distributed in the predominantly amorphous TiO 2 surrounding. Samarium ions were excited either directly ( ?exc = 488 nm) or through the TiO 2 host ( ?exc = 355 nm). Enhancement of Sm 3+ fluorescence up to 20 times was revealed in the vicinity of silver aggregates. Combined plasmonic and sensitizing influences of silver on the Sm 3+ ions are considered as reasons for enhanced Sm 3+ fluorescence.

  16. Effects of defect size in root region on fatigue strength of fillet welded joints—root failure of non?load?carrying cruciform fillet welded joints due to toe treatment (2 report)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Ohta; H. Kitamura

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation of the effects of the defect size in the root region on the fatigue strength of non?load?carrying cruciform fillet welded joints by FEM analysis, fatigue tests, and hardness tests. The results may be summarised as follows. 1. Through TIG dressing of the toe region of fillet welded joints, joints have a fatigue limit of 1.4?2.5

  17. Changes in root growth and relationships between plant organs and root hydraulic traits in American elm ( Ulmus americana L.) and red oak ( Quercus rubra L.) seedlings due to elevated CO 2 level

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Song Cheng

    2009-01-01

    The relationships between plant organs and root hydrological traits are not well known and the question arises whether elevated\\u000a CO2 changes these relationships. This study attempted to answer this question. A pseudo-replicated experiment was conducted with\\u000a two times 24 American elm (Ulmus americana L.) and 23 and 24 red oak (Quercus rubra L.) seedlings growing in ambient CO2 (around 360

  18. Root canal

    MedlinePLUS

    A root canal is a dental procedure to remove dead or dying nerve tissue and bacteria from inside a tooth. ... A root canal is done if you have an infection that affects the nerve in the root of a tooth. ...

  19. Root systems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    N/A N/A (U.S. Government; )

    2004-10-30

    One purpose that roots serve is that of anchoring the plant in the ground. Roots also take up water and nutrients for the plant. Plants all have different root system types to fit their individual needs and locations.

  20. The inhibitory effect of a Platycodon root extract on ultraviolet B-induced pigmentation due to a decrease in Kit expression.

    PubMed

    Kasamatsu, Shinya; Hachiya, Akira; Shimotoyodome, Yoshie; Kameyama, Akiyo; Miyauchi, Yuki; Higuchi, Kazuhiko; Fujimori, Taketoshi; Ohuchi, Atsushi; Shibuya, Yusuke; Kitahara, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    The signaling of stem cell factor (SCF) through its receptor Kit is known to play an important role in regulating cutaneous melanogenesis. In the course of UVB-induced pigmentation, the expression of membrane-bound SCF by epidermal keratinocytes is upregulated at an early phase and subsequently activates neighboring melanocytes via their Kit receptors. In order to identify effective skin-lightening materials, we screened botanical extracts to determine their abilities to diminish Kit expression in melanocytes. A Platycodon root extract was consequently found to have a remarkable inhibitory activity on Kit expression. When the extract was applied to three-dimensional human skin substitutes in vitro and to human skin in vivo after UVB irradiation, their pigmentation was significantly reduced, confirming the substantial contribution of the suppression of SCF/Kit signaling to preventing or inhibiting melanin synthesis. These data demonstrate that a Platycodon root extract is a promising material for a skin-lightening product to improve pigmentation-related diseases. PMID:24799080

  1. [Mn(en)3]CdSnTe4 and [Mn(en)3]Ag6Sn2Te8: New Intermetallic Tellurides Synthesized in Superheated

    E-print Network

    Li, Jing

    [Mn(en)3]CdSnTe4 and [Mn(en)3]Ag6Sn2Te8: New Intermetallic Tellurides Synthesized in Superheated intermetallic tellurides, Mn(en)3]CdSnTe4 (I) and [Mn(en)3]Ag6Sn2Te8 (II), have been synthesized in superheated is composed of one-dimensional Zintl chains of alternating edge-sharing MTe4 (M ) Cd, Sn) tetrahedra and [Mn

  2. Potential for post-closure radionuclide redistribution due to biotic intrusion: aboveground biomass, litter production rates, and the distribution of root mass with depth at material disposal area G, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    French, Sean B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Christensen, Candace [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jennings, Terry L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jaros, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wykoff, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Crowell, Kelly J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shuman, Rob [URS

    2008-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated at the Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL) is disposed of at LANL's Technical Area (T A) 54, Material Disposal Area (MDA) G. The ability of MDA G to safely contain radioactive waste during current and post-closure operations is evaluated as part of the facility's ongoing performance assessment (PA) and composite analysis (CA). Due to the potential for uptake and incorporation of radio nuclides into aboveground plant material, the PA and CA project that plant roots penetrating into buried waste may lead to releases of radionuclides into the accessible environment. The potential amount ofcontamination deposited on the ground surface due to plant intrusion into buried waste is a function of the quantity of litter generated by plants, as well as radionuclide concentrations within the litter. Radionuclide concentrations in plant litter is dependent on the distribution of root mass with depth and the efficiency with which radionuclides are extracted from contaminated soils by the plant's roots. In order to reduce uncertainties associated with the PA and CA for MDA G, surveys are being conducted to assess aboveground biomass, plant litter production rates, and root mass with depth for the four prominent vegetation types (grasses, forbs, shrubs and trees). The collection of aboveground biomass for grasses and forbs began in 2007. Additional sampling was conducted in October 2008 to measure root mass with depth and to collect additional aboveground biomass data for the types of grasses, forbs, shrubs, and trees that may become established at MDA G after the facility undergoes final closure, Biomass data will be used to estimate the future potential mass of contaminated plant litter fall, which could act as a latent conduit for radionuclide transport from the closed disposal area. Data collected are expected to reduce uncertainties associated with the PA and CA for MDA G and ultimately aid in the assessment and subsequent prevention of radionuclide transport within the environment from the closed disposal area and potential exposure to site workers and the public.

  3. Flooding Impairs Fe Uptake and Distribution in Citrus Due to the Strong Down-Regulation of Genes Involved in Strategy I Responses to Fe Deficiency in Roots

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Cuenca, Mary-Rus; Quiñones, Ana; Primo-Millo, Eduardo; Forner-Giner, M. Ángeles

    2015-01-01

    This work determines the ffects of long-term anoxia conditions—21 days—on Strategy I responses to iron (Fe) deficiency in Citrus and its impact on Fe uptake and distribution. The study was carried out in Citrus aurantium L. seedlings grown under flooding conditions (S) and in both the presence (+Fe) and absence of Fe (-Fe) in nutritive solution. The results revealed a strong down-regulation (more than 65%) of genes HA1 and FRO2 coding for enzymes proton-ATPase and Ferric-Chelate Reductase (FC-R), respectively, in –FeS plants when compared with –Fe ones. H+-extrusion and FC-R activity analyses confirmed the genetic results, indicating that flooding stress markedly repressed acidification and reduction responses to Fe deficiency (3.1- and 2.0-fold, respectively). Waterlogging reduced by half Fe concentration in +FeS roots, which led to 30% up-regulation of Fe transporter IRT1, although this effect was unable to improve Fe absorption. Consequently, flooding inhibited 57Fe uptake in +Fe and –Fe seedlings (29.8 and 66.2%, respectively) and 57Fe distribution to aerial part (30.6 and 72.3%, respectively). This evidences that the synergistic action of both enzymes H+-ATPase and FC-R is the preferential regulator of the Fe acquisition system under flooding conditions and, hence, their inactivation implies a limiting factor of citrus in their Fe-deficiency tolerance in waterlogged soils. PMID:25897804

  4. Optical microcavities and enhanced electroluminescence from electroformed Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hickmott, T. W. [Department of Physics, State University of New York at Albany, Albany, New York 12222 (United States)

    2013-12-21

    Electroluminescence (EL) and electron emission into vacuum (EM) occur when a non-destructive dielectric breakdown of Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag diodes, electroforming, results in the development of a filamentary region in which current-voltage (I-V) characteristics exhibit voltage-controlled negative resistance. The temperature dependence of I-V curves, EM, and, particularly, EL of Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag diodes with anodic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thicknesses between 12?nm and 30?nm, has been studied. Two filters, a long-pass (LP) filter with transmission of photons with energies less than 3.0?eV and a short-pass (SP) filter with photon transmission between 3.0 and 4.0?eV, have been used to characterize EL. The voltage threshold for EL with the LP filter, V{sub LP}, is ?1.5?V. V{sub LP} is nearly independent of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thickness and of temperature and is 0.3–0.6?V less than the threshold voltage for EL for the SP filter, V{sub SP}. EL intensity is primarily between 1.8 and 3.0?eV when the bias voltage, V{sub S} ? 7?V. EL in the thinnest diodes is enhanced compared to EL in thicker diodes. For increasing V{sub S}, for diodes with the smallest Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thicknesses, there is a maximum EL intensity, L{sub MX}, at a voltage, V{sub LMX}, followed by a decrease to a plateau. L{sub MX} and EL intensity at 4.0?V in the plateau region depend exponentially on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thickness. The ratio of L{sub MX} at 295?K for a diode with 12?nm of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to L{sub MX} for a diode with 25?nm of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is ?140. The ratio of EL intensity with the LP filter to EL intensity with the SP filter, LP/SP, varies between ?3 and ?35; it depends on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thickness and V{sub S}. Enhanced EL is attributed to the increase of the spontaneous emission rate of a dipole in a non-resonant optical microcavity. EL photons interact with the Ag and Al films to create surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) at the metal-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interfaces. SPPs generate large electromagnetic fields in the filamentary region of the electroformed Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag diode, which then acts as an optical microcavity. A model is proposed for electronic processes in electroformed Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag diodes.

  5. [Application of minirhizotron in fine root studies].

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianwei; Yu, Lizhong; Yu, Shuiqiang; Han, Youzhi; Wang, Zhengquan; Guo, Dali

    2006-04-01

    Due to the production, death, and decomposition of fine root, its turnover plays an important role in carbon allocation and nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Some methods such as sequential root coring, compartmental flow model, and ingrowth core have been widely used in collecting root biomass data and estimating fine root turnover, but failed in monitoring the dynamics of fine root due to its simultaneous production and death. Minirhizotron is a nondestructive in situ method for studying the dynamics of fine root, which allows the simultaneous measurement of fine root growth and mortality. This paper reviewed the application of minirhizotron in fine root studies, with the focus on minirhizotron tube installation, image collection, data extraction, and calculation parameters. In a case study, the total fine root length, fine root length density per unit volume, fine root length density per unit area, fine root biomass density, and fine root production and mortality of Fraxinus mandshurica and Larix gmelini were calculated, and the results showed that minirhizotron method was feasible in studying the processes of fine root development, eclipse, death, and decomposition. The factors affecting fine root measurement and its precision mainly included the quality and quantity of tube installation, sampling interval and quantity, and analysis technique of images, etc. Soil texture, tube material, and disturbance of light on root were also the factors affecting the precision of the method. How to improve the measurement precision of minirhizotron would be the critical problem in future study. PMID:16836108

  6. Licorice Root

    MedlinePLUS

    ... sweet root, gan zao (Chinese licorice) Latin Name: Glycyrrhiza glabra, Glycyrrhiza uralensis (Chinese licorice) licorice_foster.jpg © Steven Foster ... Sources Armanini D, Fiore C, Bielenberg J. Licorice ( Glycyrrhiza glabra ). In: Coates P, Blackman M, Cragg G, ...

  7. Licorice Root

    MedlinePLUS

    ... sweet root, gan zao (Chinese licorice) Latin Name: Glycyrrhiza glabra, Glycyrrhiza uralensis (Chinese licorice) licorice_foster.jpg © Steven Foster ... References Armanini D, Fiore C, Bielenberg J. Licorice ( Glycyrrhiza glabra ). In: Coates P, Blackman M, Cragg G, ...

  8. Adsorbate-Induced Segregation in a PdAg Membrane Model System: Pd3Ag(1 1 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Svenum, I. H.; Herron, Jeffrey A.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Venvik, H. J.

    2012-10-15

    Thin PdAg alloy membranes with 20–25% Ag are being developed for hydrogen separation technology. Despite many investigations on such membranes as well as representative experimental and theoretical model systems, unresolved issues remain concerning the effect of the alloy surface structure and composition on adsorption and vice versa. Therefore, the interaction between hydrogen, carbon monoxide or oxygen with the surface of a PdAg model alloy was studied using periodic self-consistent density functional theory (DFT-GGA) calculations. In particular, the adsorption structure, coverage dependence and possible adsorption-induced segregation phenomena were addressed using Pd3Ag(1 1 1) model surfaces with varying degrees of surface segregation. In agreement with previous experimental and theoretical investigations, we predict Ag surface termination to be energetically favorable in vacuum. The segregation of Ag is then reversed upon adsorption of H, CO or O. For these adsorbates, the binding is strongest on Pd three-fold hollow sites, and hence complete Pd termination is favored at high coverage of H or CO, while 25% Ag may remain under oxygen because of the lower O-saturation coverage. CO adsorption provides a somewhat stronger driving force for Pd segregation when compared to H, and this may have implications with respect to permeation properties of PdAg alloy surfaces. Our predictions for high coverage are particularly relevant in underlining the importance of segregation phenomena to the hydrogen transport properties of thin PdAg alloy membranes.

  9. How Roots Perceive and Respond to Gravity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Randy

    1984-01-01

    Discusses graviperception and gravitropism by plant roots. Indicates that graviperception occurs via sedimentation of amyloplasts in columella cells of the root cap and that the minimal graviresponsiveness of lateral roots may be due to the intensity of their caps to establish a concentration gradient of inhibitor(s) sufficient to affect…

  10. Root fortification.

    PubMed

    Seghi, Robert R; Nasrin, Sadia; Draney, Jonathan; Katsube, Noriko

    2013-03-01

    An incompletely formed tooth is left with thin dentin walls and experiences a higher incidence of cervical root fracture that reduces the long-term overall prognosis of the tooth. Faced with these situations, clinicians have attempted to use various restorative methods to reinforce the remaining root. Various techniques have been reported, and the scientific evidence for each has been reviewed. The biomechanical considerations of reinforcing a weakened root are also reviewed, and the most current information about failure analysis, fracture characteristics of natural dentin, and in vitro test configurations used have been considered. In light of these additional considerations, some recommendations for future understanding of this complex problem have been proposed. PMID:23439045

  11. Automated Root Tracking with "Root System Analyzer"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Jin, Meina; Ockert, Charlotte; Bol, Roland; Leitner, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Crucial factors for plant development are water and nutrient availability in soils. Thus, root architecture is a main aspect of plant productivity and needs to be accurately considered when describing root processes. Images of root architecture contain a huge amount of information, and image analysis helps to recover parameters describing certain root architectural and morphological traits. The majority of imaging systems for root systems are designed for two-dimensional images, such as RootReader2, GiA Roots, SmartRoot, EZ-Rhizo, and Growscreen, but most of them are semi-automated and involve mouse-clicks in each root by the user. "Root System Analyzer" is a new, fully automated approach for recovering root architectural parameters from two-dimensional images of root systems. Individual roots can still be corrected manually in a user interface if required. The algorithm starts with a sequence of segmented two-dimensional images showing the dynamic development of a root system. For each image, morphological operators are used for skeletonization. Based on this, a graph representation of the root system is created. A dynamic root architecture model helps to determine which edges of the graph belong to an individual root. The algorithm elongates each root at the root tip and simulates growth confined within the already existing graph representation. The increment of root elongation is calculated assuming constant growth. For each root, the algorithm finds all possible paths and elongates the root in the direction of the optimal path. In this way, each edge of the graph is assigned to one or more coherent roots. Image sequences of root systems are handled in such a way that the previous image is used as a starting point for the current image. The algorithm is implemented in a set of Matlab m-files. Output of Root System Analyzer is a data structure that includes for each root an identification number, the branching order, the time of emergence, the parent identification number, the distance between branching point to the parent root base, the root length, the root radius and the nodes that belong to each individual root path. This information is relevant for the analysis of dynamic root system development as well as the parameterisation of root architecture models. Here, we show results of Root System Analyzer applied to analyse the root systems of wheat plants grown in rhizotrons. Different treatments with respect to soil moisture and apatite concentrations were used to test the effects of those conditions on root system development. Photographs of the root systems were taken at high spatial and temporal resolution and root systems are automatically tracked.

  12. Effect of indium addition on the microstructural formation and soldered interfaces of Sn-2.5Bi-1Zn-0.3Ag lead-free solder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ming-jie; Gao, Zhi-ming; Liu, Yong-chang; Wang, Xun; Yu, Li-ming

    2012-11-01

    The microstructural formation and properties of Sn-2.5Bi- xIn-1Zn-0.3Ag (in wt%) alloys and the evolution of soldered interfaces on a Cu substrate were investigated. Apart from the relatively low melting point (about 195°C), which is close to that of conventional eutectic Sn-Pb solder, the investigated solder presents superior wettability, solderability, and ductility. The refined equiaxial grains enhance the mechanical properties, and the embedded bulk intermetallic compounds (IMCs) (Cu6Sn5 and Cu5Zn8) and granular Bi particles improve the joint reliability. The addition of In reduces the solubility of Zn in the ?-Sn matrix and strongly influences the separation and growth behaviors of the IMCs. The soldered interface of Sn-2.5Bi- xIn-1Zn-0.3Ag/Cu consists of Cu-Zn and Cu-Sn IMC layers.

  13. Chemically deposited In2S3-Ag2S layers to obtain AgInS2 thin films by thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugo, S.; Peña, Y.; Calixto-Rodriguez, M.; López-Mata, C.; Ramón, M. L.; Gómez, I.; Acosta, A.

    2012-12-01

    AgInS2 thin films were obtained by the annealing of chemical bath deposited In2S3-Ag2S layers at 400 °C in N2 for 1 h. According to the XRD and EDX results the chalcopyrite structure of AgInS2 has been obtained. These films have an optical band gap, Eg, of 1.86 eV and an electrical conductivity value of 1.2 × 10-3 (? cm)-1.

  14. Effect of the chemical state of silver on the luminescence properties of GeO 2 Eu 2 O 3 Ag films

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. E. Malashkevich; G. P. Shevchenko; S. V. Serezhkina; P. P. Pershukevich; G. I. Semkova; G. K. Glushonok

    2007-01-01

    A sol-gel method is used to prepare GeO2-Eu2O3-Ag films in which the luminescence efficiency of Eu3+ ions during UV excitation is comparable to that in films activated by organic europium complexes. The luminescence spectra\\u000a of these films are recorded, and the films are also studied using EPR and x-ray diffraction. The main origin of this effect\\u000a is found to be

  15. Atomic Arrangement of the Si(111)-\\\\sqrt{3}×\\\\sqrt{3}Ag Structure Derived from Low-Energy Ion-Scattering Spectroscopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mitsuchika Saitoh; Fumiya Shoji; Kenjiro Oura; Teruo Hanawa

    1980-01-01

    Si(111)-\\\\sqrt{3}×\\\\sqrt{3}-Ag surface structure has been studied by low-energy ion-scattering spectroscopy using neon ions with an energy of 500 eV, combined with LEED-AES. It has been proposed that Ag atoms giving rise to the \\\\sqrt{3} structure are slightly embedded below the outermost Si layer, including consequent displacements of the substrate Si atoms.

  16. Root gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, P. H.

    1995-01-01

    When a plant root is reoriented within the gravity field, it responds by initiating a curvature which eventually results in vertical growth. Gravity sensing occurs primarily in the root tip. It may involve amyloplast sedimentation in the columella cells of the root cap, or the detection of forces exerted by the mass of the protoplast on opposite sides of its cell wall. Gravisensing activates a signal transduction cascade which results in the asymmetric redistribution of auxin and apoplastic Ca2+ across the root tip, with accumulation at the bottom side. The resulting lateral asymmetry in Ca2+ and auxin concentration is probably transmitted to the elongation zone where differential cellular elongation occurs until the tip resumes vertical growth. The Cholodny-Went theory proposes that gravity-induced auxin redistribution across a gravistimulated plant organ is responsible for the gravitropic response. However, recent data indicate that the gravity-induced reorientation is more complex, involving both auxin gradient-dependent and auxin gradient-independent events.

  17. Sensitivity of the "Root Bundle Model" to root mechanical properties and root distribution: Implication for shallow landslide stability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Massimiliano; Giadrossich, Filippo; Cohen, Denis

    2015-04-01

    Root reinforcement is recognized as an important factor for shallow landslides stability. Due to the complexity of root reinforcement mechanisms and the heterogeneity of the root-soil system, the estimation of parameters used in root reinforcement models is difficult, time consuming, and often highly uncertain. For practical applications, it is necessary to focus on the estimation of the most relevant parameters. The objective of the present contribution is to review the state of the art in the development of root reinforcement models and to discuss the sensitivity of the "Root Bundle Model" (RBM) when considering the variability of root mechanical properties and the heterogeneity of root distributions. The RBM is a strain-step loading fiber bundle model extended to include the mechanical and geometrical properties of roots. The model allows the calculation of the force-displacement behavior of a root bundle. In view of new results of field pullout tests performed on coarse roots of spruce (Picea abies) and considering a consistent dataset of root distribution of alpine tree species, we quantify the sensitivity of the RBM and the uncertainty associated with the most important input parameters. Preliminary results show that the extrapolation of force-diameter values from incomplete datasets (i.e., when only small roots are tested and values for coarse roots are extrapolated) may result in considerable errors. In particular, in the case of distributions with root diameters larger than 5 mm, root reinforcement tends to be dominated by coarse roots and their mechanical properties need to be quantified. In addition to the results of the model sensitivity, we present a possible best-practice method for the quantification of root reinforcement in view of its application to slope stability calculations and implementations in numerical models.

  18. Root Communication: The Role of Root Exudates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Prithiviraj; Mark W. Paschke; Jorge M. Vivanco

    Plants communicate with neighboring plants and other organisms surrounding them. Aboveground communication isarticulatedthroughstems,leaves,orflowerswhilebelow-groundcommunication ismedi- ated by roots. The plant root is capable of secreting chemicals into the rhizosphere through root exudates. Thechemicalconstituentsoftherootexudatesarecharacteristicofaparticularplantspeciesandalsodepend on the surrounding biotic and abiotic environment. Recent research suggests that the root exudates act as a sort of chemical 'language' between the secreting plant and other organisms

  19. Image analysis from root system pictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casaroli, D.; Jong van Lier, Q.; Metselaar, K.

    2009-04-01

    Root research has been hampered by a lack of good methods and by the amount of time involved in making measurements. In general the studies from root system are made with either monolith or minirhizotron method which is used as a quantitative tool but requires comparison with conventional destructive methods. This work aimed to analyze roots systems images, obtained from a root atlas book, to different crops in order to find the root length and root length density and correlate them with the literature. Five crops images from Zea mays, Secale cereale, Triticum aestivum, Medicago sativa and Panicum miliaceum were divided in horizontal and vertical layers. Root length distribution was analyzed for horizontal as well as vertical layers. In order to obtain the root length density, a cuboidal volume was supposed to correspond to each part of the image. The results from regression analyses showed root length distributions according to horizontal or vertical layers. It was possible to find the root length distribution for single horizontal layers as a function of vertical layers, and also for single vertical layers as a function of horizontal layers. Regression analysis showed good fits when the root length distributions were grouped in horizontal layers according to the distance from the root center. When root length distributions were grouped according to soil horizons the fits worsened. The resulting root length density estimates were lower than those commonly found in literature, possibly due to (1) the fact that the crop images resulted from single plant situations, while the analyzed field experiments had more than one plant; (2) root overlapping may occur in the field; (3) root experiments, both in the field and image analyses as performed here, are subject to sampling errors; (4) the (hand drawn) images used in this study may have omitted some of the smallest roots.

  20. Enhancement of room-temperature magnetoresistance in La 0.5 Sm 0.2 Sr 0.3 MnO 3 \\/(Ag 2 O) x \\/2

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhensheng Peng; Guiying Wang; Yonggang Tang; Peng Liu; Xiaofei Niu

    2010-01-01

    La0.5Sm0.2Sr0.3MnO3\\/(Ag2O)\\u000a x\\/2 (x = 0.00, 0.04, 0.08, 0.25, 0.30) samples were prepared by the solid-state reaction method, and their transport behaviors,\\u000a transport mechanism, and magnetoresistance effect were studied through the measurement and fitting of ?-T curves. The results show that the element Ag takes part in reaction when the doping amount is small. Ag is mainly distributed\\u000a at the grain

  1. Synthesis and electro-magnetic properties of flower-like Fe2O3-Ag nanocomposite using direct subsidence loading method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xing; Wu, Zhengying; Xu, Nan; Liu, Shouqing; Zhao, Guizhe; Liu, Yaqing

    2015-10-01

    Novel flower-like Fe2O3/Ag nanocomposites were synthesized by a simple direct subsidence loading method. The composition and morphology of the obtained samples were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SEAD) techniques. The Ag nanoparticles which loaded on the surface of petals exhibit spherical morphology. Further, the magnetic and electrical conductive properties reveal the well controllable performance. Room temperature magnetic measurement of the flower-like nanocomposites demonstrated its ferromagnetic properties and the saturation magnetization (Ms) decreased from 0.6 to 0.11 emu/g.

  2. Reconstructed structures of nanosized co islands on Ag/Ge(111) mean square root of 3 x mean square root of 3 surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fu, Tsu-Yi; Tsay, Sung-Lin; Lin, Chun-Liang

    2008-02-01

    Structural evolution of Co/Ag/Ge(111) at high temperatures was studied by using scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron diffraction. The mean square root of 3 x mean square root of 3-Ag layer between the substrate Ge( 11) and Co adatoms can avoid the formation of Co-Ge compounds below 800 K. The Co atoms nucleate to form islands where mean square root of 13 x mean square root of 13 or 2 x 2 reconstructions were observed after annealing between 373 K and 737 K. The mean square root of 13 x mean square root of 13 structure with mirror symmetry relative to [-211], [11-2], and [1-21] axes was observed for 1-2 layer Co islands. Co islands with over 2 layers appear 2 x 2 structure. All reconstruction structures of the nano-sized Co islands and substrate Ag/Ge(111) mean square root of 3 x mean square root of 3 surface were analyzed using the atomic hard sphere model. The bright protrusions of these reconstructions all sit in the centers of Ag or Ge trimers, which were predicted to have maximum binding energy. PMID:18464378

  3. Size Effect of Rare-Earth Intermetallics in Sn9Zn0.5Ce and Sn3Ag0.5Cu0.5Ce Solders on the Growth of Tin Whiskers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. H. Chuang; H. J. Lin

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to the large cluster-shaped CeSn3 peritectic phase formed in Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu-0.5Ce solder, Sn-9Zn-0.5Ce possesses very fine (Ce0.8Zn0.2)Sn3 intermetallics. Image analyses indicate that the total exposed area of fine peritectic intermetallics in Sn-9Zn-0.5Ce solder is near that of coarse clusters in Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu-0.5Ce. However, long fiber-type and coarse hillock-type whiskers have been observed on the surface of Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu-0.5Ce after air storage

  4. Size Effect of Rare-Earth Intermetallics in Sn9Zn0.5Ce and Sn3Ag0.5Cu0.5Ce Solders on the Growth of Tin Whiskers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. H. Chuang; H. J. Lin

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to the large cluster-shaped CeSn3 peritectic phase formed in Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu-0.5Ce solder, Sn-9Zn-0.5Ce possesses very fine (Ce0.8Zn0.2)Sn3 intermetallics. Image analyses indicate that the total exposed area of fine peritectic intermetallics in Sn-9Zn-0.5Ce solder\\u000a is near that of coarse clusters in Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu-0.5Ce. However, long fiber-type and coarse hillock-type whiskers have been\\u000a observed on the surface of Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu-0.5Ce after air storage

  5. Energies and excited-state dynamics of 1Bu+, 1Bu- and 3Ag- states of carotenoids bound to LH2 antenna complexes from purple photosynthetic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiana, Rebecca; Miki, Takeshi; Kakitani, Yoshinori; Aoyagi, Shiho; Koyama, Yasushi; Limantara, Leenawaty

    2009-10-01

    Time-resolved pump-probe stimulated-emission and transient-absorption spectra were recorded after excitation with ˜30 fs pulses to the 1Bu+(0) and optically-forbidden diabatic levels of carotenoids, neurosporene, spheroidene and lycopene having n = 9-11 double bonds, bound to LH2 antenna complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides G1C, 2.4.1 and Rhodospirillum molischianum. The low-energy shift of stimulated emission from the covalent 1Bu-(0) and 3Ag-(0) levels slightly larger than that from the ionic 1Bu+(0) state suggests the polarization, whereas more efficient triplet generation suggests the twisting of the conjugated chain in Cars bound to the LH2 complexes, when compared to Cars free in solution.

  6. Vibrational relaxation and internal conversion in the overlapped optically-allowed 1Bu+ and optically-forbidden 1Bu- or 3Ag- vibronic levels of carotenoids: Effects of diabatic mixing as determined by Kerr-gate fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakitani, Yoshinori; Miki, Takeshi; Koyama, Yasushi; Nagae, Hiroyoshi; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Kanematsu, Yasuo

    2009-07-01

    The time constants of the vibrational relaxation, ? = 2 ? ? = 1 and ? = 1 ? ? = 0, in the 1Bu+ manifold and those of internal conversion from the 1Bu+(0) level, which is isoenergetic (so-called 'diabatic') with the 1Bu- vibronic levels in neurosporene and spheroidene and with the 3Ag- vibronic levels in lycopene and anhydrorhodovibrin, were determined by Kerr-gate fluorescence spectroscopy. The time constants of the vibrational relaxation were in the ˜1:2 ratio, and those of internal conversion agreed with the lifetimes of the diabatic counterparts, i.e., the 1Bu- and 3Ag- electronic states, respectively.

  7. Singlet internal conversion processes in the order of 1Bu+?3Ag-?1Bu-?2Ag-?1Ag- in all- trans-spheroidene and lycopene as revealed by subpicosecond time-resolved Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondonuwu, Ferdy S.; Kakitani, Yoshinori; Tamura, Hiroshi; Koyama, Yasushi

    2006-09-01

    Key Raman lines ascribable to the 1Bu+, 3Ag-, 1Bu- and 2Ag- states were identified in the subpicosecond time-resolved Raman spectra of spheroidene and lycopene having 10 and 11 conjugated double bonds, respectively. The sequential rise-and-decay of the key Raman lines showed the internal conversion processes of 1Bu+?3Ag-?1Bu-?2Ag-?1Ag- (ground). The time constant in each step of internal conversion reflects the energy gap between the relevant states that had been determined by measurement of resonance - Raman excitation profiles [K. Furuichi, T. Sashima, Y. Koyama, Chem. Phys. Lett. 356 (2002) 547].

  8. A statistical approach to root system classification

    PubMed Central

    Bodner, Gernot; Leitner, Daniel; Nakhforoosh, Alireza; Sobotik, Monika; Moder, Karl; Kaul, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Plant root systems have a key role in ecology and agronomy. In spite of fast increase in root studies, still there is no classification that allows distinguishing among distinctive characteristics within the diversity of rooting strategies. Our hypothesis is that a multivariate approach for “plant functional type” identification in ecology can be applied to the classification of root systems. The classification method presented is based on a data-defined statistical procedure without a priori decision on the classifiers. The study demonstrates that principal component based rooting types provide efficient and meaningful multi-trait classifiers. The classification method is exemplified with simulated root architectures and morphological field data. Simulated root architectures showed that morphological attributes with spatial distribution parameters capture most distinctive features within root system diversity. While developmental type (tap vs. shoot-borne systems) is a strong, but coarse classifier, topological traits provide the most detailed differentiation among distinctive groups. Adequacy of commonly available morphologic traits for classification is supported by field data. Rooting types emerging from measured data, mainly distinguished by diameter/weight and density dominated types. Similarity of root systems within distinctive groups was the joint result of phylogenetic relation and environmental as well as human selection pressure. We concluded that the data-define classification is appropriate for integration of knowledge obtained with different root measurement methods and at various scales. Currently root morphology is the most promising basis for classification due to widely used common measurement protocols. To capture details of root diversity efforts in architectural measurement techniques are essential. PMID:23914200

  9. PHIV-RootCell: a supervised image analysis tool for rice root anatomical parameter quantification

    PubMed Central

    Lartaud, Marc; Perin, Christophe; Courtois, Brigitte; Thomas, Emilie; Henry, Sophia; Bettembourg, Mathilde; Divol, Fanchon; Lanau, Nadege; Artus, Florence; Bureau, Charlotte; Verdeil, Jean-Luc; Sarah, Gautier; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Dievart, Anne

    2015-01-01

    We developed the PHIV-RootCell software to quantify anatomical traits of rice roots transverse section images. Combined with an efficient root sample processing method for image acquisition, this program permits supervised measurements of areas (those of whole root section, stele, cortex, and central metaxylem vessels), number of cell layers and number of cells per cell layer. The PHIV-RootCell toolset runs under ImageJ, an independent operating system that has a license-free status. To demonstrate the usefulness of PHIV-RootCell, we conducted a genetic diversity study and an analysis of salt stress responses of root anatomical parameters in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Using 16 cultivars, we showed that we could discriminate between some of the varieties even at the 6 day-olds stage, and that tropical japonica varieties had larger root sections due to an increase in cell number. We observed, as described previously, that root sections become enlarged under salt stress. However, our results show an increase in cell number in ground tissues (endodermis and cortex) but a decrease in external (peripheral) tissues (sclerenchyma, exodermis, and epidermis). Thus, the PHIV-RootCell program is a user-friendly tool that will be helpful for future genetic and physiological studies that investigate root anatomical trait variations. PMID:25646121

  10. A simple template-free synthesis of nanoporous ZnS-In2S3-Ag2S solid solutions for highly efficient photocatalytic H2 evolution under visible light.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingxuan; Chen, Gang; Zhou, Chao; Sun, Jingxue

    2009-04-21

    Nanoporous ZnS-In(2)S(3)-Ag(2)S solid solutions synthesized by a facile template-free method showed relatively high activities for photocatalytic H(2) evolution under visible-light irradiation (lambda >400 nm) even in the absence of co-catalysts. PMID:19333477

  11. Root Biomass of Individual Species, and Root Size Characteristics After Five Years of CO 2 Enrichment on Native Shortgrass Steppe

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. R. LeCain; J. A. Morgan; D. G. Milchunas; A. R. Mosier; J. A. Nelson; D. P. Smith

    2006-01-01

    Information from field studies investigating the responses of roots to increasing atmospheric CO2 is limited and somewhat inconsistent, due partly to the difficulty in studying root systems in situ. In this report, we present standing root biomass of species and root length and diameter after five years of CO2 enrichment (?720 ?mol mol?1) in large (16 m2 ground area) open-top chambers placed over

  12. BLACK ROOT ROT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Black Root Rot Prepared by G. S. Abawi, Revised by L.E. Hanson Black root rot is caused by Thielaviopsis basicola (syn. Chalara elegans). The pathogen is widely distributed, can infect more than 130 plant species in 15 families, and causes severe black root rot diseases in ornamentals and crops suc...

  13. Why fine tree roots are stronger than thicker roots: The role of cellulose and lignin in relation to slope stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao-Bo; Chen, Li-Hua; Jiang, Jing

    2014-02-01

    Plant roots help to reinforce the soil, increase slope stability and decrease water erosion. Root tensile strength plays an important role in soil reinforcement and slope stabilization. The relationship between tensile strength and internal chemical composition of roots is unknown due to limited studies. Thus, it is difficult to determine why root tensile strength tends to decrease with increasing root diameter. In this study, biomechanical and biochemical tests were performed on the roots of Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis) to determine the relationships among tensile strength and the contents of the main chemical composition: cellulose, alpha-cellulose and lignin in the roots with different diameters. Our results confirmed that the tensile strength of Chinese pine roots decreased with increasing root diameter, and this relationship might be a power function. The chemical contents of the roots and root diameter were also related to each other with significant power regression. With increasing root diameter, the cellulose content and alpha-cellulose content increased, but the lignin content decreased. In addition, the lignin content exhibited a significantly positive relationship with tensile strength. Furthermore, the ratios of lignin/cellulose and lignin/alpha-cellulose decreased with increasing root diameter following significant power regressions, and they also demonstrated a positive relationship with tensile strength. Taken together, these results may be useful for studies on root tensile strength, soil reinforcement and slope stability.

  14. Reciprocation, Square Root, Inverse Square Root, and Some Elementary Functions

    E-print Network

    Muller, Jean-Michel

    Reciprocation, Square Root, Inverse Square Root, and Some Elementary Functions Using Small with the computation of reciprocals, square roots, inverse square roots, and some elementary functions using small/number of multipliers and compare with other related methods. Index TermsÐReciprocal, square root, inverse square root

  15. Investigation of VEGGIE Root Mat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbiah, Arun M.

    2013-01-01

    VEGGIE is a plant growth facility that utilizes the phenomenon of capillary action as its primary watering system. A cloth made of Meta Aramid fiber, known as Nomex is used to wick water up from a reservoir to the bottom of the plants roots. This root mat system is intended to be low maintenance with no moving parts and requires minimal crew interface time. Unfortunately, the water wicking rates are inconsistent throughout the plant life cycle, thus causing plants to die. Over-wicking of water occurs toward the beginning of the cycle, while under-wicking occurs toward the middle. This inconsistency of wicking has become a major issue, drastically inhibiting plant growth. The primary objective is to determine the root cause of the inconsistent wicking through experimental testing. Suspect causes for the capillary water column to break include: a vacuum effect due to a negative pressure gradient in the water reservoir, contamination of material due to minerals in water and back wash from plant fertilizer, induced air bubbles while using syringe refill method, and material limitations of Nomex's ability to absorb and retain water. Experimental testing will be conducted to systematically determine the cause of under and over-wicking. Pressure gages will be used to determine pressure drop during the course of the plant life cycle and during the water refill process. A debubbler device will be connected to a root mat in order to equalize pressure inside the reservoir. Moisture and evaporation tests will simultaneously be implemented to observe moisture content and wicking rates over the course of a plant cycle. Water retention tests will be performed using strips of Nomex to determine materials wicking rates, porosity, and absorptivity. Through these experimental tests, we will have a better understanding of material properties of Nomex, as well as determine the root cause of water column breakage. With consistent test results, a forward plan can be achieved to resolve the issue and give valuable insight for the next generation of VEGGIE.

  16. Distinct modes of adventitious rooting in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Correa, L da Rocha; Troleis, J; Mastroberti, A A; Mariath, J E A; Fett-Neto, A G

    2012-01-01

    The literature describes different rooting protocols for Arabidopsis thaliana as models to study adventitious rooting, and results are generally perceived as comparable. However, there is a lack of investigations focusing on the distinct features, advantages and limitations of each method in the study of adventitious rooting with both wild-type (WT) ecotypes and their respective mutants. This investigation was undertaken to evaluate the adventitious rooting process in three different experimental systems, all using A. thaliana, analysing the same rooting parameters after transient exposure to auxin (indole-3-acetic acid) and control conditions: excised leaves, de-rooted plants and etiolated seedlings. The founding tissues and sites of origin of roots differed depending on the system used, whereas all rooting patterns were of the direct type (i.e., without callus formation). None of the systems had an absolute requirement for exogenous auxin, although rooting was enhanced by this phytohormone, with the exception of de-rooted plants, which had adventitious rooting strongly inhibited by exogenous auxin. Root elongation was much favoured in isolated leaves. Auxin-overproducing mutants could not be used in the detached leaf system due to precocious senescence; in the de-rooted plant system, these mutants had a WT-like rooting response, whereas the expression of the 'rooty' phenotype was only evident in the etiolated seedling system. Adventitious rooting of etiolated WT seedlings in the presence of exogenous auxin was inhibited by exogenous flavonoids, which act as auxin transport inhibitors; surprisingly, the flavonoid-deficient mutant chs had a lower rooting response compared to WT. Although Arabidopsis is an excellent model system to study adventitious rooting, physiological and developmental responses differed significantly, underlining the importance of avoiding data generalisation on rooting responses derived from different experimental systems with this species. PMID:21974782

  17. Root canal irrigants

    PubMed Central

    Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu

    2010-01-01

    Successful root canal therapy relies on the combination of proper instrumentation, irrigation, and obturation of the root canal. Of these three essential steps of root canal therapy, irrigation of the root canal is the most important determinant in the healing of the periapical tissues. The primary endodontic treatment goal must thus be to optimize root canal disinfection and to prevent reinfection. In this review of the literature, various irrigants and the interactions between irrigants are discussed. We performed a Medline search for English-language papers published untill July 2010. The keywords used were ‘root canal irrigants’ and ‘endodontic irrigants.’ The reference lists of each article were manually checked for additional articles of relevance. PMID:21217955

  18. Presence and absence of electronic mixing in shorter-chain and longer-chain carotenoids: Assignment of the symmetries of 1Bu- and 3Ag- states located just below the 1Bu+ state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutresno, Adita; Kakitani, Yoshinori; Zuo, Ping; Li, Chunyong; Koyama, Yasushi; Nagae, Hiroyoshi

    2007-10-01

    In spheroidene (having the number of conjugated double bonds n = 10), stimulated emission was observed from the mixed vibronic levels of 1Bu+(0)+1Bu-(2) and 1Bu+(1)+1Bu-(3), whereas in lycopene, anhydrorhodovibrin and spirilloxanthin ( n = 11-13), stimulated emission, from the pure vibronic levels of 1Bu+(0) and 1Bu+(1). Thus, the 1Bu+ state can mix with the 1Bu- state but not with the 3Ag- state, both being located just below the 1Bu+ state. The presence and absence of the mixing of the neighboring diabatic states support the symmetries of the next low-lying 1Bu- and 3Ag- states.

  19. Microleakage of root restorations.

    PubMed

    Wenner, K K; Fairhurst, C W; Morris, C F; Hawkins, I K; Ringle, R D

    1988-12-01

    This study evaluated the microleakage of various restorative materials placed in root surfaces. A minimum of 20 freshly extracted single-rooted teeth were used for each combination of restorative materials. Four preparations were made on the root surface and each restored with a different material. After thermocycling in dye, the root was cut transversely in several sections through the restoration, and microscopically examined to record the microleakage at the interface between restorative materials and tooth. Results indicated that fewer composite resin specimens allowed microleakage into dentin as compared with either amalgam or glass ionomer materials. PMID:3060508

  20. How to bond to root canal dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nica, Luminita; Todea, Carmen; Furtos, Gabriel; Baldea, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Bonding to root canal dentin may be difficult due to various factors: the structural characteristic of the root canal dentin, which is different from that of the coronal dentin; the presence of the organic tissue of the dental pulp inside the root canal, which has to be removed during the cleaning-shaping of the root canal system; the smear-layer resulted after mechanical instrumentation, which may interfere with the adhesion of the filling materials; the type of the irrigants used in the cleaning protocol; the type of the sealer and core material used in the obturation of the endodontic space; the type of the materials used for the restoration of the endodontically treated teeth. The influence of the cleaning protocol, of the root canal filling material, of the type of the adhesive system used in the restoration of the treated teeth and of the region of the root canal, on the adhesion of several filling and restorative materials to root canal dentin was evaluated in the push-out bond strength test on 1-mm thick slices of endodontically treated human teeth. The results showed that all these factors have a statistically significant influence on the push-out bond strength. Formation of resin tags between radicular dentin and the investigated materials was observed in some of the samples at SEM analysis.

  1. Irrational Square Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misiurewicz, Michal

    2013-01-01

    If students are presented the standard proof of irrationality of [square root]2, can they generalize it to a proof of the irrationality of "[square root]p", "p" a prime if, instead of considering divisibility by "p", they cling to the notions of even and odd used in the standard proof?

  2. Root numbers of curves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MARIA SABITOVA

    2004-01-01

    We generalize a theorem of D. Rohrlich concerning root numbers of elliptic curves over the field of rational numbers. Our result applies to curves of all higher genera over number fields. Namely, under certain conditions which naturally extend the conditions used by D. Rohrlich, we show that the root number associated to a smooth projective curve over a number field

  3. Production of hairy root cultures and transgenic plants by Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation.

    PubMed

    Christey, Mary C; Braun, Robert H

    2005-01-01

    Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation results in the development of hairy roots at the site of infection. The production of hairy roots involves cocultivation of explants with A. rhizogenes and the subsequent selection of hairy roots on hormone-free medium. Hairy roots have many applications for research including secondary product production and for the study of biochemical pathways. In addition, transgenic plants regenerated from hairy roots often show an altered phenotype due to the presence of the rol genes. In this chapter we describe how to produce and grow hairy root cultures, how to regenerate shoots from these hairy roots, and how to conduct molecular analysis of these cultures. PMID:15310912

  4. Deep rooting conferred by DEEPER ROOTING 1 enhances rice yield in paddy fields

    PubMed Central

    Arai-Sanoh, Yumiko; Takai, Toshiyuki; Yoshinaga, Satoshi; Nakano, Hiroshi; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kondo, Motohiko; Uga, Yusaku

    2014-01-01

    To clarify the effect of deep rooting on grain yield in rice (Oryza sativa L.) in an irrigated paddy field with or without fertilizer, we used the shallow-rooting IR64 and the deep-rooting Dro1-NIL (a near-isogenic line homozygous for the Kinandang Patong allele of DEEPER ROOTING 1 (DRO1) in the IR64 genetic background). Although total root length was similar in both lines, more roots were distributed within the lower soil layer of the paddy field in Dro1-NIL than in IR64, irrespective of fertilizer treatment. At maturity, Dro1-NIL showed approximately 10% higher grain yield than IR64, irrespective of fertilizer treatment. Higher grain yield of Dro1-NIL was mainly due to the increased 1000-kernel weight and increased percentage of ripened grains, which resulted in a higher harvest index. After heading, the uptake of nitrogen from soil and leaf nitrogen concentration were higher in Dro1-NIL than in IR64. At the mid-grain-filling stage, Dro1-NIL maintained higher cytokinin fluxes from roots to shoots than IR64. These results suggest that deep rooting by DRO1 enhances nitrogen uptake and cytokinin fluxes at late stages, resulting in better grain filling in Dro1-NIL in a paddy field in this study. PMID:24988911

  5. Proanthocyanidins from Krameria triandra root.

    PubMed

    Scholz, E; Rimpler, H

    1989-08-01

    Oligomeric proanthocyanidins were isolated from rhatany root (Krameria triandra) and characterised by acid hydrolysis, thiolytic degradation, and spectroscopic methods. They consisted of 2-14 flavanol units with mainly 2,3-cis configuration and with a propelagonidin:procyanidin ratio of 65:35. The predominant interflavan linkage was [4,8]. [4,6]-Bonds were present in the higher oligomers, presumably forming branched chain units. The astringency of the drug was mainly due to proanthocyanidins with degrees of polymerization from 5-10, and these were also the astringent compounds of rhatany tea and tincture. A pharmacological screening of the extract revealed a significant antimicrobial effect. PMID:2813572

  6. Neighbor influences on root morphology and mycorrhizal fungus colonization in tallgrass prairie plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jastrow, J.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States) Univ. of Illinois, Chicago (United States)); Miller, R.M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1993-03-01

    A field study was conducted across a chronosequence of tallgrass prairie restorations to investigate the influence a plant's neighbor may have on its gross root morphology and association with mycorrhizal fungi. The root systems of a warm-season grass, Andropogon gerardii, and two perennial forbs, Coreopsis tripteris and Solidago altissima, were sampled by excavating soil blocks representing all pairwise inter- and intra-specific combinations of these species. With forb neighbors, Andropogon had higher percentages of its firbrous roots colonized by mycorrhizal fungi than with conspecific neighbors. Andropogon root morphology (as measured by average root radius, specific root length, and root branching) did not vary with neighbor growth form; however, Andropogon roots did become finer as restoration age and root densities increased. For Coreopsis and Solidago, colonization of fibrous roots did not vary with neighbor species, but both forbs had coarser roots with interspecific neighbors than with conspecifics. With interspecific neighbors, Coreopsis almost doubled the number of branches per centimetre of root observed in conspecific pairs. Although some of the variations in colonization and root morphology may be attributable specifically to neighbor root mass, others were related to the overall root mass of the target-neighbor pair. The observed variations in mycorrhizal colonization may be related to increased opportunities for colonization by the fungus that are due not only to higher root densities but also to some sort of interaction between the root systems of Andropogon and the forbs. 44 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Host Plant Resistance to Root-Knot Nematode in Cotton.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host-plant resistance is economic and highly effective for root-knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne incognita control in cotton Gossypium hirsutum. Nematode resistance can protect cotton plants from direct injury due to nematode infection, and can protect against the root-knot nematode-Fusarium wilt dis...

  8. Topics In Primitive Roots

    E-print Network

    N. A. Carella

    2015-03-12

    This monograph considers a few topics in the theory of primitive roots g(p) modulo a prime p>=2. A few estimates of the least primitive roots g(p) and the least prime primitive roots g^*(p) modulo p, a large prime, are determined. One of the estimate here seems to sharpen the Burgess estimate g(p) 0, to the smaller estimate g(p) 2. The expected order of magnitude is g(p) 1 constant. The corresponding estimates for least prime primitive roots g^*(p) are slightly higher. Anotrher topic deals with an effective lower bound #{p > x/log x for the number of primes p 1. The current results in the literature claim the lower bound #{p > x/(log x)^2, and have restrictions on the minimal number of fixed integers to three or more.

  9. Cotton Root-rot. 

    E-print Network

    Pammel, L. H. (Louis Herman)

    1889-01-01

    121 2 -16 1 t I i 6' /t AS AGRICULTURAL EXY ERIMENT STATI( BULLETIN No. 7, C. NOVEMBER, 1889. COTTON ROOT-ROT AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE, College Station, Brazos County, Texas. BY ORDER OF THE COUNCIL: F. A. GULLEY, DIRECTOR..... ....................... .Assistant to Director. D. ADRIANCE .......................... Asst. Chemist and Meteorologist. J. M. Ca~son. ........................ .Assistant to Agriculturist. C. K. FUQUA.. ........................ .Sugar Chemist. COTTON ROOT-ROT. sout It =ng...

  10. Experimentally reduced root–microbe interactions reveal limited plasticity in functional root traits in Acer and Quercus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract. Background and Aims Interactions between roots and soil microbes are critical components of below-ground ecology. It is essential to quantify the magnitude of root trait variation both among and within species, including variation due to plasticity. In addition to contextualizing the mag...

  11. Identification of soil-borne pathogens in a common bean root rot nursery in Isabela, Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limited research has been completed on the root rot complex of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in the Caribbean, while yield losses of over 50% due to root rot disease have been reported worldwide. In this study, the predominant root rot pathogens in a 40-year old common bean root rot nurser...

  12. Root architecture impacts on root decomposition rates in switchgrass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaff, M.; Schadt, C.; Garten, C. T.; Jastrow, J. D.; Phillips, J.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2010-12-01

    Roots strongly contribute to soil organic carbon accrual, but the rate of soil carbon input via root litter decomposition is still uncertain. Root systems are built up of roots with a variety of different diameter size classes, ranging from very fine to very coarse roots. Since fine roots have low C:N ratios and coarse roots have high C:N ratios, root systems are heterogeneous in quality, spanning a range of different C:N ratios. Litter decomposition rates are generally well predicted by litter C:N ratios, thus decomposition of roots may be controlled by the relative abundance of fine versus coarse roots. With this study we asked how root architecture (i.e. the relative abundance of fine versus coarse roots) affects the decomposition of roots systems in the biofuels crop switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.). To understand how root architecture affects root decomposition rates, we collected roots from eight switchgrass cultivars (Alamo, Kanlow, Carthage, Cave-in-Rock, Forestburg, Southlow, Sunburst, Blackwell), grown at FermiLab (IL), by taking 4.8-cm diameter soil cores from on top of the crown and directly next to the crown of individual plants. Roots were carefully excised from the cores by washing and analyzed for root diameter size class distribution using WinRhizo. Subsequently, root systems of each of the plants (4 replicates per cultivar) were separated in 'fine' (0-0.5 mm), 'medium' (0.5-1 mm) and 'coarse' roots (1-2.5 mm), dried, cut into 0.5 cm (medium and coarse roots) and 2 mm pieces (fine roots), and incubated for 90 days. For each of the cultivars we established five root-treatments: 20g of soil was amended with 0.2g of (1) fine roots, (2) medium roots, (3) coarse roots, (4) a 1:1:1 mixture of fine, medium and coarse roots, and (5) a mixture combining fine, medium and coarse roots in realistic proportions. We measured CO2 respiration at days 1, 3, 7, 15, 30, 60 and 90 during the experiment. The 13C signature of the soil was -26‰, and the 13C signature of plants was -12‰, enabling us to differentiate between root-derived C and native SOM-C respiration. We found that the relative abundance of fine, medium and coarse roots were significantly different among cultivars. Root systems of Alamo, Kanlow and Cave-in-Rock were characterized by a large abundance of coarse-, relative to fine roots, whereas Carthage, Forestburg and Blackwell had a large abundance of fine, relative to coarse roots. Fine roots had a 28% lower C:N ratio than medium and coarse roots. These differences led to different root decomposition rates. We conclude that root architecture should be taken into account when predicting root decomposition rates; enhanced understanding of the mechanisms of root decomposition will improve model predictions of C input to soil organic matter.

  13. Improving predictions of root biomechanical properties, is age a better determinant than diameter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loades, Kenneth; Hallett, Paul; Lynch, Jonathan; Chimungu, Joseph; Bengough, Anthony

    2014-05-01

    Roots mechanically reinforce many soils. Root tensile strength and stiffness is critical for soil stabilisation with plants potentially providing civil engineers a 'green' alternative for soil stabilisation. Relatively little is known on factors influencing root tensile strength. Through a better understanding of these factors the adoption of 'green engineering' techniques by civil engineers will improve. Existing models are limited in their accuracy due to simplistic assumptions to derive root contributions to the resistance of soil to failure. Current models typically use relationships between strength and diameter, however, there are a number of other factors potentially influencing root biomechanical properties. The effects of root age on biomechanical properties have largely been overlooked. Barley (Hordeum vulgare) was grown under differing soil conditions, waterlogged, moderate mechanical impedance and in unimpeded, control, conditions. The root system was excavated and tensile tests performed on root sections along the length of each root axis. Root tensile strength increased with increasing distance along the root axes in control soil from 0.5 MPa to 7.0 MPa at a distance of 800mm from the root tip and from 1.0 Mpa to 8.0 MPa, 500mm from the root tip when under moderate mechanical impedance. Increases in strength were also observed when plants were subjected to waterlogging with tensile strength increasing from 1.0 MPa to 3.0 MPa, 200mm from the root tip. Young's modulus increased from ~10 MPa at the root tip to ~60 MPa 400mm and 800mm from the root tip in mechanically impeded and control treatments respectively. Distance from root tip explained over 47% of the variance in root tensile strength and 34% of root stiffness. Including root diameter in the model led to further improvements in predicting root properties, explaining ~54% of root strength variance and ~49% of root stiffness. Root age has been shown to improve predictions of root tensile strength and modulus with the inclusion of root diameter improving predictions further. Laser sectioning of maize (Zea mays) roots demonstrate the damage caused during biomechanical testing and help explain potential reasons for poor relationships between diameter and strength due to stress localisation within the stele. Furthermore, changes in biomechanical root properties associated with age maybe as a result of lignin deposition but this remains to be established.

  14. Treating root-surface caries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John O. Burgess; John R. Gallo

    2002-01-01

    Gingival recession associated with aging and periodontal therapy exposes root surfaces, which are then susceptible to root caries. Resin-modified glass ionomer, glass ionomer, compomer, composite resin, and amalgam restora- tive materials are frequently used to restore carious root lesions. Amalgam continues to be used successfully to restore root caries. Resin composites, compomers, glass ionomers, and resin-modified glass ionomers are increas-

  15. The "Green" Root Beer Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2010-01-01

    No, your students will not be drinking green root beer for St. Patrick's Day--this "green" root beer laboratory promotes environmental awareness in the science classroom, and provides a venue for some very sound science content! While many science classrooms incorporate root beer-brewing activities, the root beer lab presented in this article has…

  16. Arabidopsis alcohol dehydrogenase expression in both shoots and roots is conditioned by root growth environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, H. J.; Ferl, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the Arabidopsis Adh (alcohol dehydrogenase) gene is constitutively expressed at low levels in the roots of young plants grown on agar media, and that the expression level is greatly induced by anoxic or hypoxic stresses. We questioned whether the agar medium itself created an anaerobic environment for the roots upon their growing into the gel. beta-Glucuronidase (GUS) expression driven by the Adh promoter was examined by growing transgenic Arabidopsis plants in different growing systems. Whereas roots grown on horizontal-positioned plates showed high Adh/GUS expression levels, roots from vertical-positioned plates had no Adh/GUS expression. Additional results indicate that growth on vertical plates closely mimics the Adh/GUS expression observed for soil-grown seedlings, and that growth on horizontal plates results in induction of high Adh/GUS expression that is consistent with hypoxic or anoxic conditions within the agar of the root zone. Adh/GUS expression in the shoot apex is also highly induced by root penetration of the agar medium. This induction of Adh/GUS in shoot apex and roots is due, at least in part, to mechanisms involving Ca2+ signal transduction.

  17. Phosphate starvation of maize inhibits lateral root formation and alters gene expression in the lateral root primordium zone

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Phosphorus (P) is an essential macronutrient for all living organisms. Maize (Zea mays) is an important human food, animal feed and energy crop throughout the world, and enormous quantities of phosphate fertilizer are required for maize cultivation. Thus, it is important to improve the efficiency of the use of phosphate fertilizer for maize. Results In this study, we analyzed the maize root response to phosphate starvation and performed a transcriptomic analysis of the 1.0-1.5?cm lateral root primordium zone. In the growth of plants, the root-to-shoot ratio (R/L) was reduced in both low-phosphate (LP) and sufficient-phosphate (SP) solutions, but the ratio (R/L) exhibited by the plants in the LP solution was higher than that of the SP plants. The growth of primary roots was slightly promoted after 6?days of phosphate starvation, whereas the numbers of lateral roots and lateral root primordia were significantly reduced, and these differences were increased when associated with the stress caused by phosphate starvation. Among the results of a transcriptomic analysis of the maize lateral root primordium zone, there were two highlights: 1) auxin signaling participated in the response and the modification of root morphology under low-phosphate conditions, which may occur via local concentration changes due to the biosynthesis and transport of auxin, and LOB domain proteins may be an intermediary between auxin signaling and root morphology; and 2) the observed retardation of lateral root development was the result of co-regulation of DNA replication, transcription, protein synthesis and degradation and cell growth. Conclusions These results indicated that maize roots show a different growth pattern than Arabidopsis under low-phosphate conditions, as the latter species has been observed to halt primary root growth when the root tip comes into contact with low-phosphate media. Moreover, our findings enrich our understanding of plant responses to phosphate deficits and of root morphogenesis in maize. PMID:22704465

  18. Developmental Changes in Peanut Root Structure during Root Growth and Root-structure Modification by Nodulation

    PubMed Central

    Tajima, Ryosuke; Abe, Jun; Lee, O. New; Morita, Shigenori; Lux, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Basic information about the root and root nodule structure of leguminous crop plants is incomplete, with many aspects remaining unresolved. Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) forms root nodules in a unique process. Structures of various peanut root types were studied with emphasis on insufficiently characterized lateral roots, changes in roots during their ontogenesis and root modification by nodule formation. Methods Peanut plants were grown in the field, in vermiculite or in filter paper. The taproot, first-order and second-order lateral roots and root nodules were analysed using bright-field and fluorescence microscopy with hand sections and resin sections. Key Results Three root categories were recognized. The primary seminal root was thick, exhibiting early and intensive secondary thickening mainly on its base. It was tetrarch and contained broad pith. First-order lateral roots were long and thin, with limited secondary thickening; they contained no pith. Particularly different were second- and higher-order lateral roots, which were anatomically simple and thin, with little or no secondary growth. Unusual wall ingrowths were visible in the cells of the central part of the cortex in the first-order and second-order lateral roots. The nodule body was formed at the junction of the primary and lateral roots by the activity of proliferating cells derived originally from the pericycle. Conclusions Two morphologically and anatomically distinct types of lateral roots were recognized: long, first-order lateral roots, forming the skeleton of the root system, and thin and short second- and higher-order lateral roots, with an incomplete second state of endodermal development, which might be classified as peanut ‘feeder roots’. Formation of root nodules at the base of the lateral roots was the result of proliferating cell divisions derived originally from the pericycle. PMID:18256023

  19. Geoperception in primary and lateral roots of Phaseolus vulgaris (Fabaceae). III. A model to explain the differential georesponsiveness of primary and lateral roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, J. S.; Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    Half-tipped primary and lateral roots of Phaseolus vulgaris bend toward the side of the root on which the intact half tip remains. Therefore, tips of lateral and primary roots produce growth effectors capable of inducing gravicurvature. The asymmetrical placement of a tip of a lateral root onto a detipped primary root results in the root bending toward the side of the root onto which the tip was placed. That is, the lesser graviresponsiveness of lateral roots as compared with primary roots is not due to the inability of their caps to produce growth inhibitors. The more pronounced graviresponsiveness of primary roots is positively correlated with the presence of columella tissues that are 3.8 times longer, 1.7 times wider, and 10.5 times more voluminous than the columellas of lateral roots. We propose that the lack of graviresponsiveness exhibited by lateral roots is due to the fact that they (i) produce smaller amounts of the inhibitor than primary (i.e., strongly graviresponsive) roots and (ii) are unable to redistribute the inhibitor so as to be able to create a concentration gradient sufficient to induce a pronounced gravitropic response.

  20. Electrical properties of solid solutions in the Na/sub 2/O x 6Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-Ag/sub 2/O x 6Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ system

    SciTech Connect

    Barkovskii, A.I.; Volkova, N.F.; Kaul', A.R.; Tret'yakov, Yu.D.

    1987-04-01

    A four-probe ac method over a wide frequency range was used to study the resistivity in ceramic samples of solid solutions of Na/sub 2/O x 6Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-Ag/sub 2/O x 6Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. It was found that the change in the conductivity for a transition from sodium b-alumina to silver b-alumina is characterized by the existence of a polyalkali effect.

  1. Cytosolic pH regulates root water transport during anoxic stress through gating of aquaporins

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Colette Tournaire-Roux; Moira Sutka; Hélène Javot; Elisabeth Gout; Patricia Gerbeau; Doan-Trung Luu; Richard Bligny; Christophe Maurel

    2003-01-01

    Flooding of soils results in acute oxygen deprivation (anoxia) of plant roots during winter in temperate latitudes, or after irrigation, and is a major problem for agriculture. One early response of plants to anoxia and other environmental stresses is downregulation of water uptake due to inhibition of the water permeability (hydraulic conductivity) of roots (Lpr). Root water uptake is mediated

  2. The distribution and strength of riparian tree roots in relation to riverbank reinforcement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce Abernethy; Ian D. Rutherfurd

    2001-01-01

    The main influences of plants on the mass stability of riverbanks are those that affect the strength of bank sediments. Plants enhance bank strength by reducing pore-water pressures and by directly reinforcing bank material with their roots. In this paper we do not consider bank hydrology but focus on quantifying increases in sediment strength due to root reinforcement. Root reinforcement

  3. Z .Lithos 48 1999 153170 The evolution of continental roots in numerical thermo-chemical

    E-print Network

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Z .Lithos 48 1999 153­170 The evolution of continental roots in numerical thermo-chemical mantle continental root remains stable on a billion year time scale due to the combined effects of its intrinsically by a thick depleted root. q 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Thermo-chemical

  4. Wired to the roots

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amutha Sampath; Bais, Harsh P.

    2012-01-01

    Often, plant-pathogenic microbe interactions are discussed in a host-microbe two-component system, however very little is known about how the diversity of rhizospheric microbes that associate with plants affect host performance against pathogens. There are various studies, which specially direct the importance of induced systemic defense (ISR) response in plants interacting with beneficial rhizobacteria, yet we don’t know how rhizobacterial associations modulate plant physiology. In here, we highlight the many dimensions within which plant roots associate with beneficial microbes by regulating aboveground physiology. We review approaches to study the causes and consequences of plant root association with beneficial microbes on aboveground plant-pathogen interactions. The review provides the foundations for future investigations into the impact of the root beneficial microbial associations on plant performance and innate defense responses. PMID:23073006

  5. Dichotomization of mycorrhizal and NPA-treated short roots in Pinus sylvestris

    PubMed Central

    Salo, Vanamo

    2008-01-01

    Conifers like Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) have a complicated root system consisting of morphologically and anatomically different root types, of which the short roots have a very limited ability to elongate. Short roots have an important role in nature since they are able to establish ectomycorrhizal symbiosis, in which the growth of fungal mycelium between the epidermal cells and in the intercellular space between cortical cells leads to formation of dichotomous short roots, which may, through further splitting of the meristem, form coralloid root structures. Dichotomous short roots have been suggested to result from changes in either auxin or ethylene concentrations due to the fungal growth inside the root. NPA, the inhibitor of polar auxin transport, enhances the dichotomization of P. sylvestris short root tips similarly to the fungal growth in the root, thus confirming that auxin plays a role in short root morphogenesis. Ethylene is also known to have an important role in the regulation of root morphogenesis. In future the research dealing with the root system and ectomycorrhiza development in P. sylvestris must take into account that both auxin and ethylene are involved and that there is no contradiction in obtaining the same phenotype with both hormones. The expression analysis of PIN proteins, auxin efflux carriers, could give valuable information about the role of auxin transport in regulating the root growth and morphogenesis of coniferous root system and mycorrhiza. PMID:19704726

  6. Fine root turnover: a story of root production and root phenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormack, M. L.; Adams, T. S.; Smithwick, E. A.; Eissenstat, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    Fine root turnover in terrestrial ecosystems partially controls carbon flow from plants into soils as well the amount of roots available for nutrient and water uptake. However, we have poor understanding of basic patterns and variability in fine root turnover. We address this shortfall through the use of a heuristic model and analysis of a multi-year minirhizotron dataset exploring the impacts of fine root phenology and production on fine root turnover rates across 12 temperate tree species in a common garden experiment. The heuristic model allowed us to calculate fine root turnover given different patterns of root production and different fine root lifespans. Using the model we found that patterns of phenology characterized by a single, concentrated peak resulted in slower calculated root turnover rates while broader and bi-modal production patterns resulted in faster turnover rates. For example, for roots with median lifespans of 91 days, estimates of root turnover increased from 1.5 yr-1 to 4.0 yr-1 between the pattern of concentrated root production and the pattern with root production spread equally throughout the year. Turnover rates observed in the common garden ranged from 0.75 yr-1 to 1.33 yr-1 and 0.93 yr-1 to 2.14 yr-1 when calculated as annual production divided by maximum standing root crop or average standing root crop, respectively. Turnover varied significantly across species and interannual variability in root production and turnover was high. Patterns of root phenology observed at the common garden included concentrated root production in late spring as well as several examples of bi-modal and broader patterns of root production with roots produced across spring, summer and fall. Overall, both phenology and total root production impacted estimates of root turnover, particularly for short-lived fine roots with median lifespans of less than one year. Our results suggest that better understanding fine root phenology and production will improve our ability to describe and predict key processes of root turnover and resource uptake belowground in terrestrial ecosystems.

  7. Root Canal Irrigants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthias Zehnder

    2006-01-01

    Local wound debridement in the diseased pulp space is the main step in root canal treatment to prevent the tooth from being a source of infection. In this review article, the specifics of the pulpal microenvironment and the resulting requirements for irrigating solutions are spelled out. Sodium hypochlorite solutions are recommended as the main irrigants. This is because of their

  8. PESTICIDE ROOT ZONE MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    PRZM3 is a modeling system that links two subordinate models - PRZM and VADOFT to predict pesticide transport and transformation down through the crop root and unsaturated zone. PRZM3 includes modeling capabilities for such phenomena as soil temperature simulation, vo...

  9. Root Action and Bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Spencer Pickering

    1907-01-01

    THE remarkable and all but fatal effect of growing grass over the roots of freshly planted apple trees has been studied at the Woburn Experimental Fruit Farm since 1894, and formed the subject-matter of the third report of that station (1903). No satisfactory explanation of the action was obtained. Experiment showed that it could not be attributed to the abstraction

  10. Violet root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus causing violet root rot, Helicobasidium brebissonii (anamorph Rhizoctonia crocorum), is widely distributed in Europe and North America but is rarely of much economic importance on alfalfa. The disease has also been reported in Australia, Argentina, and Iran. The disease is characterized b...

  11. Root lattices and quasicrystals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Baake; D. Joseph; P. Kramer; M. Schlottmann

    2000-01-01

    It is shown how root lattices and their reciprocals might serve as the right\\u000apool for the construction of quasicrystalline structure models. All\\u000anon-periodic symmetries observed so far are covered in minimal embedding with\\u000amaximal symmetry.

  12. Root halotropism: Salinity effects on Bassia indica root

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Shelef; N. Lazarovitch; B. Rewald; S. Rachmilevitch

    2010-01-01

    Plant roots are responsible for the acquisition of nutrients and water from the soil and have an important role in plant response to soil stress conditions. The direction of root growth is gravitropic in general. Gravitropic responses have been widely studied; however, studies about other root tropisms are scarce. Soil salinity is a major environmental response factor for plants, sensed

  13. Macroinvertebrates associated with water hyacinth roots and a root analog

    E-print Network

    Hutchens, John

    Macroinvertebrates associated with water hyacinth roots and a root analog Julie E. Barker1,3 , John of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes), an introduced macrophyte, in freshwa- ter systems depend on the growth and extent of floating mats. We studied macroinvertebrates associated with roots of water hyacinth

  14. Angles of multivariable root loci

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, P. M.; Stein, G.; Laub, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    A generalized eigenvalue problem is demonstrated to be useful for computing the multivariable root locus, particularly when obtaining the arrival angles to finite transmission zeros. The multivariable root loci are found for a linear, time-invariant output feedback problem. The problem is then employed to compute a closed-loop eigenstructure. The method of computing angles on the root locus is demonstrated, and the method is extended to a multivariable optimal root locus.

  15. Defective secretion of mucilage is the cellular basis for agravitropism in primary roots of Zea mays cv. Ageotropic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, I.; Moore, R.

    1990-01-01

    Root caps of primary, secondary, and seminal roots of Z. mays cv. Kys secrete large amounts of mucilage and are in close contact with the root all along the root apex. These roots are strongly graviresponsive. Secondary and seminal roots of Z. mays cv. Ageotropic are also strongly graviresponsive. Similarly, their caps secrete mucilage and closely appress the root all along the root apex. However, primary roots of Z. mays cv. Ageotropic are non-responsive to gravity. Their caps secrete negligible amounts of mucilage and contact the root only at the extreme apex of the root along the calyptrogen. These roots become graviresponsive when their tips are coated with mucilage or mucilage-like materials. Peripheral cells of root caps of roots of Z. mays cv. Kys contain many dictyosomes associated with vesicles that migrate to and fuse with the plasmalemma. Root-cap cells of secondary and seminal (i.e. graviresponsive) roots of Z. mays cv. Ageotropic are similar to those of primary roots of Z. mays cv. Kys. However, root-cap cells of primary (i.e. non-graviresponsive) roots of Z. mays cv. Ageotropic have distended dictyosomal cisternae filled with an electron-dense, granular material. Large vesicles full of this material populate the cells and apparently do not fuse with the plasmalemma. Taken together, these results suggest that non-graviresponsiveness of primary roots of Z. mays cv. Ageotropic results from the lack of apoplastic continuity between the root and the periphery of the root cap. This is a result of negligible secretion of mucilage by cells along the edge of the root cap which, in turn, appears to be due to the malfunctioning of dictyosomes in these cells.

  16. Hairy roots are more sensitive to auxin than normal roots

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wen Hui; Petit, Annik; Guern, Jean; Tempé, Jacques

    1988-01-01

    Responses to auxin of Lotus corniculatus root tips or protoplasts transformed by Agrobacterium rhizogenes strains 15834 and 8196 were compared to those of their normal counterparts. Three different types of experiments were performed, involving long-term, medium-term, or short-term responses to a synthetic auxin, 1-naphthaleneacetic acid. Root tip elongation, proton excretion by root tips, and transmembrane electrical potential difference of root protoplasts were measured as a function of exogenous auxin concentration. The sensitivity of hairy root tips or protoplasts to exogenous auxin was found to be 100-1000 times higher than that of untransformed material. PMID:16593928

  17. Square Root SAM Frank Dellaert

    E-print Network

    Dellaert, Frank

    Square Root SAM Frank Dellaert College of Computing Georgia Institute of Technology Abstract information matrix or the measurement matrix into square root form. Such techniques have several significant that square root information smoothing (SRIS) is a fundamentally better approach to the problem of SLAM than

  18. Nitrogen Regulation of Root Branching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    PIA W ALCH-LIU; I GOR I. I VANOV; S OPHIE F ILLEUR; T ONY R EMANS; BRIAN G. F ORDE

    2006-01-01

    ? Background Many plant species can modify their root architecture to enable them to forage for heterogeneously distributed nutrients in the soil. The foraging response normally involves increased proliferation of lateral roots within nutrient-rich soil patches, but much remains to be understood about the signalling mechanisms that enable roots to sense variations in the external concentrations of different mineral nutrients

  19. Soil losses due to mechanized potato harvesting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Ruysschaert; J. Poesen; G. Verstraeten; G. Govers

    2006-01-01

    Soil loss due to crop harvesting (SLCH) is a soil erosion process that occurs during the harvest of crops such as sugar beet, potato, chicory root, carrot and black salsify. Soil adhering to these crops and loose soil are harvested and exported from the field together with these crops, which consequently leads to lowering of the soil profile. Some studies

  20. Root Mediation of Soil Organic Matter Feedbacks to Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendall, E.; Carrillo, Y.; Nie, M.; Osanai, Y.; Nelson, L. C.; Sanderman, J.; Baldock, J.; Hovenden, M.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of plant roots in carbon cycling and especially soil organic matter (SOM) formation and decomposition has been recently recognized. Up to eighty percent of net primary production may be allocated to roots in ecosystems such as grasslands, where they contribute substantially to SOM formation. On the other hand, root induced priming of SOM decomposition has been implicated in the loss of soil C stocks. Thus, the accurate prediction of climate change impacts on C sequestration in soils largely depends upon improved understanding of root-mediated SOM formation and loss in the rhizosphere. This presentation represents an initial attempt to synthesize belowground observations from free-air CO2 enrichment and warming experiments in two grassland ecosystems. We found that the chemical composition of root carbon is similar to particulate organic matter (POM), but not to mineral associated organic matter (MOM), suggesting less microbial modification during formation of POM than MOM. While root biomass and production rates increased under elevated CO2, POM and MOM fractions did not increase proportionally. We also observed increased root decomposition with elevated CO2, which was likely due to increased soil water and substrate availability, since root C quality (determined by NMR) and decomposition (in laboratory incubations) were unaltered. Further, C quality and decomposition rates of roots differed between C3 and C4 functional types. Changes in root morphology with elevated CO2 have altered root functioning. Increased root surface area and length per unit mass allow increased exploration for nutrients, and potentially enhanced root exudation, rhizodeposition, and priming of SOM decomposition. Controlled chamber experiments demonstrated that uptake of N from SOM was linearly correlated with specific root length. Taken together, these results indicate that root morphology, chemistry and function all play roles in affecting soil C storage and loss, and that these properties are altered by climate change and by species composition in grasslands. Ecosystem C cycling models can be improved by incorporating root-mediated mechanisms of plant community dynamics, nutrient uptake, priming of SOM decomposition, and rhizodeposition to SOM pools.

  1. The nutritional control of root development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian Forde; Helena Lorenzo

    2001-01-01

    Root development is remarkably sensitive to variations in the supply and distribution of inorganic nutrients in the soil. Here we review examples of the ways in which nutrients such as N, P, K and Fe can affect developmental processes such as root branching, root hair production, root diameter, root growth angle, nodulation and proteoid root formation. The nutrient supply can

  2. Ground penetrating radar for monitoring tree roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, M.; Parsekian, A.

    2014-12-01

    The critical zone is a complex part of the shallow subsurface that hosts the majority of subsurface reactive processes, which are affected by heterogeneous properties. Trees are an important component of the critical zone due to their significant effects on carbon, water, and oxygen cycles. They also constitute a significant portion of the biomass that relies on water and minerals from the soils. However it is a challenging task to monitor their interaction with the critical zone without damaging the trees. Geophysical methods are highly effective tools to monitor near surface processes that have the potential to provide in-situ images of the root structure. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is an efficient method to map the root structure, monitor the soil moisture distributions around root systems as they respond to the temporal drivers. This study introduces a novel and fast measurement technique to collect and process GPR data. Images of three-dimensional root structure and the soil moisture distribution in the surrounding volume provide insights into the fundamentals of plant-soil-water interactions.

  3. Quantifying root-reinforcement of river bank soils by four Australian tree species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Docker, B. B.; Hubble, T. C. T.

    2008-08-01

    The increased shear resistance of soil due to root-reinforcement by four common Australian riparian trees, Casuarina glauca, Eucalyptus amplifolia, Eucalyptus elata and Acacia floribunda, was determined in-situ with a field shear-box. Root pull-out strengths and root tensile-strengths were also measured and used to evaluate the utility of the root-reinforcement estimation models that assume simultaneous failure of all roots at the shear plane. Field shear-box results indicate that tree roots fail progressively rather than simultaneously. Shear-strengths calculated for root-reinforced soil assuming simultaneous root failure, yielded values between 50% and 215% higher than directly measured shear-strengths. The magnitude of the overestimate varies among species and probably results from differences in both the geometry of the root-system and tensile strengths of the root material. Soil blocks under A. floribunda which presents many, well-spread, highly-branched fine roots with relatively higher tensile strength, conformed most closely with root model estimates; whereas E. amplifolia, which presents a few, large, unbranched vertical roots, concentrated directly beneath the tree stem and of relatively low tensile strength, deviated furthest from model-estimated shear-strengths. These results suggest that considerable caution be exercised when applying estimates of increased shear-strength due to root-reinforcement in riverbank stability modelling. Nevertheless, increased soil shear strength provided by tree roots can be calculated by knowledge of the Root Area Ratio ( RAR) at the shear plane. At equivalent RAR values, A. floribunda demonstrated the greatest earth reinforcement potential of the four species studied.

  4. How the soil-root interface affects water availability to plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carminati, Andrea; Moradi, Ahmad

    2010-05-01

    Water supply to roots is essential for plant life. To sustain the root water uptake, a continuous liquid phase has to be maintained at the interface between soil and roots. Gaps between soil and roots may interrupt the liquid-phase continuity across the soil-root interface, acting as capillary barriers for the water flow. Additionally, due to the radial geometry of the flow to roots and the non-linearity of the soil hydraulic conductivity, a drop in water potential and consequently of water content is expected to occur next to the roots, in particular when soil dries and transpiration demand is high. Such a drop in water content may limit water and nutrient uptake by roots. How plants can overcome these mechanical and hydraulic flow resistances at the root-soil interface? Recent experiments with neutron radiography showed that during transpiration the water content next to roots was larger than in the bulk soil. Immediately after rewetting, the picture reversed and the soil next to roots remained markedly dry. During the following days the water content next to roots increased, exceeding that of the bulk soil. These water dynamics cannot be described by models assuming homogeneous soil around roots. Our hypothesis is that the observed moisture dynamics at the soil-root interface were caused by mucilage exuded by roots. Mucilage is mainly composed of polymeric substances and has a high water holding capacity. Mucilage is known to be exuded by roots but its effect on water uptake is not known. By calculating the water flux to roots we demonstrate that mucilage weakens the drop in water potential at the root-soil interface, increasing the conductivity of the flow path across soil and roots and reducing the energy needed to take up water. Additionally, mucilage improves the mechanical contact between soil and roots, avoiding formation of gaps as roots shrink in response to high transpiration demand or drought stress. In conclusion, mucilage works as hydraulic and mechanical connector between soil and roots, favoring water availability to plants. However, under severe drought conditions, mucilage becomes dehydrated and reduces the wettability of the soil next to roots. Such a temporary low wettability may have harmful consequences for the water storage in the root zone and should be taken into account in irrigation policy.

  5. The Roots of Beowulf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The first Beowulf Linux commodity cluster was constructed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in 1994 and its origins are a part of the folklore of high-end computing. In fact, the conditions within Goddard that brought the idea into being were shaped by rich historical roots, strategic pressures brought on by the ramp up of the Federal High-Performance Computing and Communications Program, growth of the open software movement, microprocessor performance trends, and the vision of key technologists. This multifaceted story is told here for the first time from the point of view of NASA project management.

  6. Alfalfa Root Rot. 

    E-print Network

    Curtis, Geo. W.

    1892-01-01

    . ........................ .Assistant in Chemil Texas Agtriaultutral Expe~iment Station. ALFALFA ROOT ROT A comparatively new trouble which occurs in growing alfalfa is the tendency to die in spots which has been reported from various sections of the state. By many this has been... alfalfa apread out into it a fern feet. * *" Another letter from Mr. Farley dated May 24, 1892 contains this statement: " * * I notice a few stalks of dead alfalfa now, but will ad- vise yon later in June or July, and think it mill be a benefit...

  7. Alfalfa Root Rot.

    E-print Network

    Curtis, Geo. W.

    1892-01-01

    . ........................ .Assistant in Chemil Texas Agtriaultutral Expe~iment Station. ALFALFA ROOT ROT A comparatively new trouble which occurs in growing alfalfa is the tendency to die in spots which has been reported from various sections of the state. By many this has been... alfalfa apread out into it a fern feet. * *" Another letter from Mr. Farley dated May 24, 1892 contains this statement: " * * I notice a few stalks of dead alfalfa now, but will ad- vise yon later in June or July, and think it mill be a benefit...

  8. Role of NINJA in root jasmonate signaling.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Iván F; Gasperini, Debora; Chételat, Aurore; Stolz, Stéphanie; Santuari, Luca; Farmer, Edward E

    2013-09-17

    Wound responses in plants have to be coordinated between organs so that locally reduced growth in a wounded tissue is balanced by appropriate growth elsewhere in the body. We used a JASMONATE ZIM DOMAIN 10 (JAZ10) reporter to screen for mutants affected in the organ-specific activation of jasmonate (JA) signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Wounding one cotyledon activated the reporter in both aerial and root tissues, and this was either disrupted or restricted to certain organs in mutant alleles of core components of the JA pathway including COI1, OPR3, and JAR1. In contrast, three other mutants showed constitutive activation of the reporter in the roots and hypocotyls of unwounded seedlings. All three lines harbored mutations in Novel Interactor of JAZ (NINJA), which encodes part of a repressor complex that negatively regulates JA signaling. These ninja mutants displayed shorter roots mimicking JA-mediated growth inhibition, and this was due to reduced cell elongation. Remarkably, this phenotype and the constitutive JAZ10 expression were still observed in backgrounds lacking the ability to synthesize JA or the key transcriptional activator MYC2. Therefore, JA-like responses can be recapitulated in specific tissues without changing a plant's ability to make or perceive JA, and MYC2 either has no role or is not the only derepressed transcription factor in ninja mutants. Our results show that the role of NINJA in the root is to repress JA signaling and allow normal cell elongation. Furthermore, the regulation of the JA pathway differs between roots and aerial tissues at all levels, from JA biosynthesis to transcriptional activation. PMID:24003128

  9. Perennial roots to immortality.

    PubMed

    Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2014-10-01

    Maximum lifespan greatly varies among species, and it is not strictly determined; it can change with species evolution. Clonal growth is a major factor governing maximum lifespan. In the plant kingdom, the maximum lifespans described for clonal and nonclonal plants vary by an order of magnitude, with 43,600 and 5,062 years for Lomatia tasmanica and Pinus longaeva, respectively. Nonclonal perennial plants (those plants exclusively using sexual reproduction) also present a huge diversity in maximum lifespans (from a few to thousands of years) and even more interestingly, contrasting differences in aging patterns. Some plants show a clear physiological deterioration with aging, whereas others do not. Indeed, some plants can even improve their physiological performance as they age (a phenomenon called negative senescence). This diversity in aging patterns responds to species-specific life history traits and mechanisms evolved by each species to adapt to its habitat. Particularities of roots in perennial plants, such as meristem indeterminacy, modular growth, stress resistance, and patterns of senescence, are crucial in establishing perenniality and understanding adaptation of perennial plants to their habitats. Here, the key role of roots for perennial plant longevity will be discussed, taking into account current knowledge and highlighting additional aspects that still require investigation. PMID:24563283

  10. Control of root meristem size by DA1-RELATED PROTEIN2 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yuancheng; Ma, Wenying; Chen, Liangliang; Yang, Lei; Li, Shengjun; Zhao, Hongtao; Zhao, Yankun; Jin, Weihuan; Li, Na; Bevan, Michael W; Li, Xia; Tong, Yiping; Li, Yunhai

    2013-03-01

    The control of organ growth by coordinating cell proliferation and differentiation is a fundamental developmental process. In plants, postembryonic root growth is sustained by the root meristem. For maintenance of root meristem size, the rate of cell differentiation must equal the rate of cell division. Cytokinin and auxin interact to affect the cell proliferation and differentiation balance and thus control root meristem size. However, the genetic and molecular mechanisms that determine root meristem size still remain largely unknown. Here, we report that da1-related protein2 (dar2) mutants produce small root meristems due to decreased cell division and early cell differentiation in the root meristem of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). dar2 mutants also exhibit reduced stem cell niche activity in the root meristem. DAR2 encodes a Lin-11, Isl-1, and Mec-3 domain-containing protein and shows an expression peak in the border between the transition zone and the elongation zone. Genetic analyses show that DAR2 functions downstream of cytokinin and SHORT HYPOCOTYL2 to maintain normal auxin distribution by influencing auxin transport. Further results indicate that DAR2 acts through the PLETHORA pathway to influence root stem cell niche activity and therefore control root meristem size. Collectively, our findings identify the role of DAR2 in root meristem size control and provide a novel link between several key regulators influencing root meristem size. PMID:23296689

  11. Root functional diversity in C3 and C4 grasslands in Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelo, C. L.; Pau, S.

    2014-12-01

    Root systems play an integral role in grassland ecosystem functioning due to their resource acquisition and conservation strategies. A considerable gap in our knowledge of C3 and C4 grasslands is our understanding of belowground root functional diversity. Our aim was to determine whether root system traits allowed for the identification of functional strategies of grass species and to see if these traits differed along resource gradients (precipitation and nitrogen). The functional root traits (specific root length, diameter, root tissue density, root length density, and % of fine roots) of nine grass species, four C3 and five C4, were evaluated from root samples collected from field plots at 100 -150 m intervals along an elevation gradient in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. An analysis of variance found that there were significant differences in individual root trait values between species (P < 0.000) and photosynthetic pathway (P < 0.025). There was also evidence that the relationships between individual root traits and gradient resources were influenced by photosynthetic pathway (P and r2-values for all interactions were < 0.001 and > 0.625, respectively). A principal component analysis (PCA) found that two components accounted for 86 % of the explainable variation in our data. PCA found that C4 species had larger root diameters, whereas, C3 species had higher % of fine roots and specific root lengths. C3 and C4 species diverged less in root tissue density. C3 species had more resource acquisition root traits, while C4 grasses had a more conservative resource strategy. These results have important implications for how grassland ecosystem dynamics may be altered by shifting patterns of C3-C4 grasses with global change.

  12. Nitrogen Additions Affect Root Dynamics in a Boreal Forest Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, K. M.; Treseder, K. K.

    2004-12-01

    As with many ecosystems, North American boreal forests are increasingly subjected to anthropogenic nitrogen deposition. To examine potential effects on plant growth, we created nitrogen fertilization plots in three sites along an Alaskan fire chronosequence composed of forests aged 5, 17, and 80 years. Each site had been exposed to two years of nitrogen fertilization, with four control plots and four nitrogen plots per site. General observations indicate that aboveground net primary productivity appears to be nitrogen limited in each site. We hypothesized that nitrogen fertilization would positively influence root dynamics as well, with nitrogen additions resulting in an increase in standing root biomass and length. To test our hypothesis, we used a minirhizotron camera to collect sequential images of roots in the top 10 cm of soil in both nitrogen fertilized and control plots in each site. Images were collected monthly during the growing season, with a total of five sampling times between May 2003 and May 2004. We then analyzed the images with WinRhizotron root measurement software. Nitrogen fertilization had varying effects on root biomass among the three sites, with a significant site by N interaction (P = 0.039). A decrease in root biomass was observed in the 5 and 80 year old sites, dropping from 207 g/m2 to 79 g/m2 and from 230 g/m2 to 129 g/m2 for the youngest and oldest sites, respectively. In contrast, root biomass increased from 52 g/m2 to 107 g/m2 in the 17 year old site. (Values are for the top 10 cm of soil only, and likely underestimate total root stocks.) Patterns in standing root lengths diverged from those of root biomass, with a 2.5-fold overall increase under nitrogen fertilization across all sites (P = 0.004). There were no significant differences among sites in nitrogen response. Standing root biomass and length differed from one another in their responses to nitrogen fertilization because nitrogen additions decreased specific root weight (as g per unit length) (P = 0.008). The divergent responses of root biomass and root length under nitrogen addition suggest a shift in root structure to finer roots. One possible mechanism is that phosphorus may have become limiting to plant growth following nitrogen additions. Fine-structured roots can better exploit soil phosphorus due to an increased surface area:volume ratio. Among the sites, standing root biomass was greatest in the oldest site (P = 0.014) but no significant difference occurred in standing root length. This pattern implies that roots become coarser with age, a possible consequence of plant succession from deciduous and annual species in the younger two sites to black spruce in the oldest. Altogether, forest fires could elicit a long-term reduction in carbon stocks in belowground plant biomass; nitrogen fertilization could reduce these stocks even further, but not necessarily at every successional stage.

  13. Exogenous polyamines improve rooting of hazel microshoots

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manuel Rey; Carmen Díaz-Sala; Roberto Rodríguez

    1994-01-01

    A strong positive effect of polyamines on rooting of microshoots of adult hazel (Corylus avellana L., cv. Gironell) is described. The effect of polyamines, both in the root induction solution and in the actual rooting medium, was assessed in order to study the effect on the successive rooting phases. Polyamines improved rooting of indole-3-butyric acid-treated microshoots in a synergistic fashion,

  14. Withanolides from Withania somnifera roots

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laxminarain Misra; Priyanka Mishra; Archana Pandey; Rajender S. Sangwan; Neelam S. Sangwan; Rakesh Tuli

    2008-01-01

    Two new and seven known withanolides along with ?-sitosterol, stigmasterol, ?-sitosterol glucoside, stigmasterol glucoside, ?+? glucose were isolated from the roots of Withania somnifera. Among the known compounds, Viscosa lactone B, stigmasterol, stigmasterol glucoside and ?+? glucose are being reported from the roots of W. somnifera for the first time. One of the new compounds contained the rare 16?-acetoxy-17(20)-ene the

  15. PLANT ROOTS, THE HIDDEN HALF

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Roots are a critcally important part of the plant, and are little understood. This book provides the reader with the latest knowledge available about roots, their growth, functioning, and impact on the soil. The material is presented in a way that is useful for the novice as well as the expert in ...

  16. The "Green" Root Beer Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    James Wandersee

    2010-02-01

    No, your students will not be drinking green root beer for St. Patrick's Day--this "green" root beer laboratory promotes environmental awareness in the science classroom, and provides a venue for some very sound science content! While many science classroo

  17. Multiple idiopathic apical root resorption.

    PubMed

    Kanungo, Manish; Khandelwal, Vishal; Nayak, Ullal Anand; Nayak, Prathibha Anand

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic external root resorption is a rarely reported condition which has been observed in single or multiple teeth. This is a rare case of multiple idiopathic apical root resorption (MIARR) in a 16-year-old boy. External root resorption of the permanent teeth is a multifactorial process. Well-recognised causes of apical root resorption in permanent teeth include orthodontic therapy, trauma, periapical or periodontal inflammation, tumours, cysts, occlusal stresses, impacted teeth, systemic conditions, endocrine imbalances and dietary habits. When none of these causes are present, it is termed idiopathic root resorption which may be either cervical or apical. MIARR is a rare condition which is usually detected as an incidental radiographic finding. However, it may cause pain and mobility in severe cases. PMID:23616336

  18. Aerenchyma formation in roots of maize during sulphate starvation.

    PubMed

    Bouranis, D L; Chorianopoulou, S N; Siyiannis, V F; Protonotarios, V E; Hawkesford, M J

    2003-07-01

    Young maize ( Zea mays L., Poaceae) plants were grown in a complete, well-oxygenated nutrient solution and then deprived of their external source of sulphate. This treatment induced the formation of aerenchyma in roots. In addition to the effect of sulphate starvation on root anatomy, the presence and location of superoxide anions and hydrogen peroxide, and changes in calcium and pH were examined. By day 6 of sulphate deprivation, aerenchyma started to form in the roots of plants and the first aerenchymatous spaces were apparent in the middle of the cortex. S-starvation also induced thickening of the cell walls of the endodermis. Active oxygen species appeared in groups of intact mid-cortex cells. Formation of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide was found in degenerating cells of the mid-cortex. Very few nuclei in the cortex of S-starved roots fluoresced, being shrunken and near to the cell wall. By day 12 of S-deprivation, a fully developed aerenchyma was apparent and there were only a few 'chains' of cells bridging hypodermis to endodermis and stele of roots. Cell walls of endodermis of S-starved roots increased 68% in thickness. Intensive fluorescence in the cell walls of the endodermal, hypodermal and to a lesser extent of epidermal cells was observed due to the formation of active oxygen species, while there was no fluorescence in the cortical cells. There was a higher Ca concentration in the cells walls of the endodermis and epidermis, compared to the rest of the S-starved root tissues. A higher pH was observed, mainly in the cell walls of the hypodermis and to a lesser extent in the cell walls of the endodermis. Superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide was found in degenerating cells of the root cortex. There was no fluorescence of nuclei in the cortex of S-starved roots. PMID:12728316

  19. Plant root distributions and nitrogen uptake predicted by a hypothesis of optimal root foraging

    E-print Network

    Plant root distributions and nitrogen uptake predicted by a hypothesis of optimal root foraging-uptake fraction, nitrogen-uptake model, nitrogen-use efficiency, optimal foraging by roots, optimal rooting depth, root distributions, root strategies. Correspondence Ross E. McMurtrie, School of Biological, Earth

  20. Breakage of transgenic tobacco roots for monoclonal antibody release in an ultra-scale down shearing device

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Sally; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli; Ma, Julian; Thomas, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco roots offer a potential alternative to leaves for monoclonal antibody (MAb) production. A possible method for extraction of MAbs from roots is by homogenization, breaking the roots into fragments to release the antibody. This process was assessed by shearing 10?mm root sections (“roots”) in a 24?mL ultra-scale down shearing device, including an impeller with serrated blade edges, intended to mimic the action of a large-scale homogenizer. Size distributions of the remaining intact roots and root fragments were obtained as a function of shearing time. The data suggest that about 36% of the roots could not be broken under the prevailing conditions and, beyond these unbreakable roots, the fragmentation was approximately first order with respect to intact root number. It was postulated that root breakage in such a high shearing device was due to root-impeller collisions and the particle size data suggest that roots colliding with the impeller were completely fragmented into debris particles of the order of 0.1?mm in length. IgG release normalized to release by grinding appeared to lag behind the number of roots that had fragmented, suggesting that a process of leakage followed fragmentation in the ultra-scale down shearing device. PMID:23860965

  1. Random root movements in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsson, A.; Karlsson, C.; Iversen, T. H.; Chapman, D. K.

    1996-01-01

    The dynamics of root growth was studied in weightlessness. In the absence of the gravitropic reference direction during weightlessness, root movements could be controlled by spontaneous growth processes, without any corrective growth induced by the gravitropic system. If truly random of nature, the bending behavior should follow so-called 'random walk' mathematics during weightlessness. Predictions from this hypothesis were critically tested. In a Spacelab ESA-experiment, denoted RANDOM and carried out during the IML-2 Shuttle flight in July 1994, the growth of garden cress (Lepidium sativum) roots was followed by time lapse photography at 1-h intervals. The growth pattern was recorded for about 20 h. Root growth was significantly smaller in weightlessness as compared to gravity (control) conditions. It was found that the roots performed spontaneous movements in weightlessness. The average direction of deviation of the plants consistently stayed equal to zero, despite these spontaneous movements. The average squared deviation increased linearly with time as predicted theoretically (but only for 8-10 h). Autocorrelation calculations showed that bendings of the roots, as determined from the 1-h photographs, were uncorrelated after about a 2-h interval. It is concluded that random processes play an important role in root growth. Predictions from a random walk hypothesis as to the growth dynamics could explain parts of the growth patterns recorded. This test of the hypothesis required microgravity conditions as provided for in a space experiment.

  2. Assessing the patterns and controls of fine root dynamics: an empirical test and methodological review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JOSEPH J. HENDRICKS; RONALD L. HENDRICK; CARLOS A. WILSON; ROBERT J. MITCHELL; STEPHEN D. PECOT; DALI GUO

    2006-01-01

    Summary 1 Elucidation of the patterns and controls of forest net primary production at ecosystem scales has been hindered by a poor understanding of fine root production, due largely to technical limitations. 2 Fine root ( ? 0.5 mm diameter) production was assessed using minirhizotron, soil core, ingrowth core, nitrogen budget and carbon budget techniques in three longleaf pine- wiregrass

  3. Effect of fluoride on nucleotides and ribonucleic acid in germinating corn seedling roots

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. W. Chang

    1968-01-01

    Investigation was made for the effect of fluoride on plant growth, acid soluble nucleotides, and RNA in germinating corn seedling roots. Fluoride suppresses root growth as measured by changes in fresh weight. Column chromatographic analyses demonstrated that fluoride modifies ratios of acid soluble nucleotide species. The relative amount of nucleotides is altered mainly due to triphosphate nucleotides of which ATP

  4. Systemic anti-inflammatory effect induced by antidromic stimulation of the dorsal roots in the rat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erika Pintér; János Szolcsányi

    1996-01-01

    Neurogenic inflammation and other local efferent functions of the capsaicin-sensitive nerve endings is well established. Here, we describe evidence for a systemic neurogenic anti-inflammatory effect initiated in the rat by this local response. A preceding local neurogenic inflammatory induced by antidromic stimulation of lumbar dorsal roots inhibited a subsequent inflammatory response due to antidromic stimulation of the contralateral dorsal roots

  5. Root Foraging Influences Plant Growth Responses to Earthworm Foraging

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Erin K.; Cahill, James F.; Bayne, Erin M.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions among the foraging behaviours of co-occurring animal species can impact population and community dynamics; the consequences of interactions between plant and animal foraging behaviours have received less attention. In North American forests, invasions by European earthworms have led to substantial changes in plant community composition. Changes in leaf litter have been identified as a critical indirect mechanism driving earthworm impacts on plants. However, there has been limited examination of the direct effects of earthworm burrowing on plant growth. Here we show a novel second pathway exists, whereby earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris L.) impact plant root foraging. In a mini-rhizotron experiment, roots occurred more frequently in burrows and soil cracks than in the soil matrix. The roots of Achillea millefolium L. preferentially occupied earthworm burrows, where nutrient availability was presumably higher than in cracks due to earthworm excreta. In contrast, the roots of Campanula rotundifolia L. were less likely to occur in burrows. This shift in root behaviour was associated with a 30% decline in the overall biomass of C. rotundifolia when earthworms were present. Our results indicate earthworm impacts on plant foraging can occur indirectly via physical and chemical changes to the soil and directly via root consumption or abrasion and thus may be one factor influencing plant growth and community change following earthworm invasion. More generally, this work demonstrates the potential for interactions to occur between the foraging behaviours of plants and soil animals and emphasizes the importance of integrating behavioural understanding in foraging studies involving plants. PMID:25268503

  6. Root foraging influences plant growth responses to earthworm foraging.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Erin K; Cahill, James F; Bayne, Erin M

    2014-01-01

    Interactions among the foraging behaviours of co-occurring animal species can impact population and community dynamics; the consequences of interactions between plant and animal foraging behaviours have received less attention. In North American forests, invasions by European earthworms have led to substantial changes in plant community composition. Changes in leaf litter have been identified as a critical indirect mechanism driving earthworm impacts on plants. However, there has been limited examination of the direct effects of earthworm burrowing on plant growth. Here we show a novel second pathway exists, whereby earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris L.) impact plant root foraging. In a mini-rhizotron experiment, roots occurred more frequently in burrows and soil cracks than in the soil matrix. The roots of Achillea millefolium L. preferentially occupied earthworm burrows, where nutrient availability was presumably higher than in cracks due to earthworm excreta. In contrast, the roots of Campanula rotundifolia L. were less likely to occur in burrows. This shift in root behaviour was associated with a 30% decline in the overall biomass of C. rotundifolia when earthworms were present. Our results indicate earthworm impacts on plant foraging can occur indirectly via physical and chemical changes to the soil and directly via root consumption or abrasion and thus may be one factor influencing plant growth and community change following earthworm invasion. More generally, this work demonstrates the potential for interactions to occur between the foraging behaviours of plants and soil animals and emphasizes the importance of integrating behavioural understanding in foraging studies involving plants. PMID:25268503

  7. Cytokinin producing bacteria stimulate amino acid deposition by wheat roots.

    PubMed

    Kudoyarova, Guzel R; Melentiev, Alexander I; Martynenko, Elena V; Timergalina, Leila N; Arkhipova, Tatiana N; Shendel, Galina V; Kuz'mina, Ludmila Yu; Dodd, Ian C; Veselov, Stanislav Yu

    2014-10-01

    Phytohormone production is one mechanism by which rhizobacteria can stimulate plant growth, but it is not clear whether the bacteria gain from this mechanism. The hypothesis that microbial-derived cytokinin phytohormones stimulate root exudation of amino acids was tested. The rhizosphere of wheat plants was drenched with the synthetic cytokinin trans-zeatin or inoculated with Bacillus subtilis IB-22 (which produces zeatin type cytokinins) or B. subtilis IB-21 (which failed to accumulate cytokinins). Growing plants in a split root system allowed spatial separation of zeatin application or rhizobacterial inoculation to one compartment and analyses of amino acid release from roots (rhizodeposition) into the other compartment (without either microbial inoculation or treatment with exogenous hormone). Supplying B. subtilis IB-22 or zeatin to either the whole root system or half of the roots increased concentrations of amino acids in the soil solution although the magnitude of the increase was greater when whole roots were treated. There was some similarity in amino acid concentrations induced by either bacterial or zeatin treatment. Thus B. subtilis IB-22 increased amino acid rhizodeposition, likely due to its ability to produce cytokinins. Furthermore, B. subtilis strain IB-21, which failed to accumulate cytokinins in culture media, did not significantly affect amino acid concentrations in the wheat rhizosphere. The ability of rhizobacteria to produce cytokinins and thereby stimulate rhizodeposition may be important in enhancing rhizobacterial colonization of the rhizoplane. PMID:25201567

  8. MANZANITA Fall 2009 Getting the Dirt on Roots

    E-print Network

    Bruns, Tom

    ") and enzymatic capacities ideal for penetrating dense substrates, such as soil or wood, degrading them primarily mineral forms of nitrogen and phosphorus that are essential for plant growth. These fungi reproduce by forming microscopic, ornamented spores directly in the soil or inside the plant root. Due

  9. MOLECULAR APPROACHES FOR CONTROL OF THE SUGAR BEET ROOT MAGGOT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sugar beet root maggot (Tetanops myopaeformis Roder) is a major insect pest of sugar beet in the United States and Canada accounting for yield losses in the range of 10 to 100%. Currently no biological control measures exist and crop rotation has been ineffective due to the mobility of the adul...

  10. On the re-rooting invariance property of Levy trees

    E-print Network

    Le Gall, Jean-François

    On the re-rooting invariance property of L´evy trees Thomas Duquesne and Jean-Fran¸cois Le Gall of the continuous random trees called L´evy trees. This extends previous results due to several authors. 1 Introduction Continuous random trees have been studied extensively in the last fifteen years and have found

  11. Goal trees and fault trees for root cause analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qin Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Typical enterprise applications are built upon different platforms, operate in a heterogeneous, distributed environment, and utilize different technologies, such as middleware, databases and Web services. Diagnosing the root causes of problems in such systems is difficult in part due to the number of possible configuration and tuning parameters. Today a variety of tools are used to aid operators of enterprise

  12. Development of Root Cause & Consequence Analyzer for Intelligent Fault Diagnosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. A. Gabbar; R. Datu; H. Hayashi; D. Akinlade; A. Suzue; M. Kamel

    2006-01-01

    Fault propagation analysis is an important task that can be used to analyze and predict abnormal situations in chemical and petrochemical plants. It is difficult to identify all possible fault propagation scenarios due to plant complexity, operating condition changes, and computation limitations. In this paper, development of root cause and consequence analysis is proposed. Computational intelligence algorithm is proposed to

  13. Proteome changes induced by aluminum stress in tomato roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth inhibition in acid soils due to Al stress affects crop production worldwide. To understand mechanisms in sensitive crops that are affected by Al stress, a proteomic analysis of primary tomato root tissue, grown in Alamended and non-amended liquid cultures, was performed. DIGE-SDS-MALDI-TOF-TO...

  14. Ultrasonic cleaning of root canals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaagen, Bram; Boutsioukis, Christos; Jiang, Lei-Meng; Macedo, Ricardo; van der Sluis, Luc; Versluis, Michel

    2011-11-01

    A crucial step during a dental root canal treatment is irrigation, where an antimicrobial fluid is injected into the root canal system to eradicate all bacteria. Agitation of the fluid using an ultrasonically vibrating miniature file has shown significant improvement in cleaning efficacy over conventional syringe irrigation. However, the physical mechanisms underlying the cleaning process, being acoustic streaming, cavitation or chemical activity, and combinations thereof, are not fully understood. High-speed imaging allows us to visualize the flow pattern and cavitation in a root canal model at microscopic scales, at timescales relevant to the cleaning processes (microseconds). MicroPIV measurements of the induced acoustic streaming are coupled to the oscillation characteristics of the file as simulated numerically and measured with a laser vibrometer. The results give new insight into the role of acoustic streaming and the importance of the confinement for the cleaning of root canals.

  15. Swarming Behavior in Plant Roots

    PubMed Central

    Ciszak, Marzena; Comparini, Diego; Mazzolai, Barbara; Baluska, Frantisek; Arecchi, F. Tito; Vicsek, Tamás; Mancuso, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between individuals that are guided by simple rules can generate swarming behavior. Swarming behavior has been observed in many groups of organisms, including humans, and recent research has revealed that plants also demonstrate social behavior based on mutual interaction with other individuals. However, this behavior has not previously been analyzed in the context of swarming. Here, we show that roots can be influenced by their neighbors to induce a tendency to align the directions of their growth. In the apparently noisy patterns formed by growing roots, episodic alignments are observed as the roots grow close to each other. These events are incompatible with the statistics of purely random growth. We present experimental results and a theoretical model that describes the growth of maize roots in terms of swarming. PMID:22272246

  16. Swarming behavior in plant roots.

    PubMed

    Ciszak, Marzena; Comparini, Diego; Mazzolai, Barbara; Baluska, Frantisek; Arecchi, F Tito; Vicsek, Tamás; Mancuso, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between individuals that are guided by simple rules can generate swarming behavior. Swarming behavior has been observed in many groups of organisms, including humans, and recent research has revealed that plants also demonstrate social behavior based on mutual interaction with other individuals. However, this behavior has not previously been analyzed in the context of swarming. Here, we show that roots can be influenced by their neighbors to induce a tendency to align the directions of their growth. In the apparently noisy patterns formed by growing roots, episodic alignments are observed as the roots grow close to each other. These events are incompatible with the statistics of purely random growth. We present experimental results and a theoretical model that describes the growth of maize roots in terms of swarming. PMID:22272246

  17. Root Canal Morphology of Permanent Three-rooted Mandibular First Molars: Part II—Measurement of Root Canal Curvatures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yongchun Gu; Qun Lu; Ping Wang; Longxing Ni

    2010-01-01

    IntroductionThe distolingual (DL) roots of three-rooted mandibular molars often challenge clinicians during root canal therapy. This study investigated canal curvatures in permanent three-rooted mandibular first molars by using micro–computed tomography (micro-CT) scans.

  18. Characterization of Root-Knot Nematode Resistance in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Dhandaydham, Murali; Charles, Lauren; Zhu, Hongyan; Starr, James L; Huguet, Thierry; Cook, Douglas R; Prosperi, Jean-Marie; Opperman, Charles

    2008-03-01

    Root knot (Meloidogyne spp.) and cyst (Heterodera and Globodera spp.) nematodes infect all important crop species, and the annual economic loss due to these pathogens exceeds $90 billion. We screened the worldwide accession collection with the root-knot nematodes Meloidogyne incognita, M. arenaria and M. hapla, soybean cyst nematode (SCN-Heterodera glycines), sugar beet cyst nematode (SBCN-Heterodera schachtii) and clover cyst nematode (CLCN-Heterodera trifolii), revealing resistant and susceptible accessions. In the over 100 accessions evaluated, we observed a range of responses to the root-knot nematode species, and a non-host response was observed for SCN and SBCN infection. However, variation was observed with respect to infection by CLCN. While many cultivars including Jemalong A17 were resistant to H. trifolii, cultivar Paraggio was highly susceptible. Identification of M. truncatula as a host for root-knot nematodes and H. trifolii and the differential host response to both RKN and CLCN provide the opportunity to genetically and molecularly characterize genes involved in plant-nematode interaction. Accession DZA045, obtained from an Algerian population, was resistant to all three root-knot nematode species and was used for further studies. The mechanism of resistance in DZA045 appears different from Mi-mediated root-knot nematode resistance in tomato. Temporal analysis of nematode infection showed that there is no difference in nematode penetration between the resistant and susceptible accessions, and no hypersensitive response was observed in the resistant accession even several days after infection. However, less than 5% of the nematode population completed the life cycle as females in the resistant accession. The remainder emigrated from the roots, developed as males, or died inside the roots as undeveloped larvae. Genetic analyses carried out by crossing DZA045 with a susceptible French accession, F83005, suggest that one gene controls resistance in DZA045. PMID:19259519

  19. Root waving and skewing: unexpectedly in micro-g.

    PubMed

    Roux, Stanley J

    2012-01-01

    Gravity has major effects on both the form and overall length of root growth. Numerous papers have documented these effects (over 300 publications in the last 5 years), the most well-studied being gravitropism, which is a growth re-orientation directed by gravity toward the earth's center. Less studied effects of gravity are undulations due to the regular periodic change in the direction root tips grow, called waving, and the slanted angle of growth roots exhibit when they are growing along a nearly-vertical surface, called skewing. Although diverse studies have led to the conclusion that a gravity stimulus is needed for plant roots to show waving and skewing, the novel results just published by Paul et al. (2012) reveal that this conclusion is not correct. In studies carried out in microgravity on the International Space Station, the authors used a new imaging system to collect digital photographs of plants every six hours during 15 days of spaceflight. The imaging system allowed them to observe how roots grew when their orientation was directed not by gravity but by overhead LED lights, which roots grew away from because they are negatively phototropic. Surprisingly, the authors observed both skewing and waving in spaceflight plants, thus demonstrating that both growth phenomena were gravity independent. Touch responses and differential auxin transport would be common features of root waving and skewing at 1-g and micro-g, and the novel results of Paul et al. will focus the attention of cell and molecular biologists more on these features as they try to decipher the signaling pathways that regulate root skewing and waving. PMID:23217095

  20. Characterization of Root-Knot Nematode Resistance in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Dhandaydham, Murali; Charles, Lauren; Zhu, Hongyan; Starr, James L.; Huguet, Thierry; Cook, Douglas R.; Prosperi, Jean-Marie; Opperman, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Root knot (Meloidogyne spp.) and cyst (Heterodera and Globodera spp.) nematodes infect all important crop species, and the annual economic loss due to these pathogens exceeds $90 billion. We screened the worldwide accession collection with the root-knot nematodes Meloidogyne incognita, M. arenaria and M. hapla, soybean cyst nematode (SCN-Heterodera glycines), sugar beet cyst nematode (SBCN-Heterodera schachtii) and clover cyst nematode (CLCN-Heterodera trifolii), revealing resistant and susceptible accessions. In the over 100 accessions evaluated, we observed a range of responses to the root-knot nematode species, and a non-host response was observed for SCN and SBCN infection. However, variation was observed with respect to infection by CLCN. While many cultivars including Jemalong A17 were resistant to H. trifolii, cultivar Paraggio was highly susceptible. Identification of M. truncatula as a host for root-knot nematodes and H. trifolii and the differential host response to both RKN and CLCN provide the opportunity to genetically and molecularly characterize genes involved in plant-nematode interaction. Accession DZA045, obtained from an Algerian population, was resistant to all three root-knot nematode species and was used for further studies. The mechanism of resistance in DZA045 appears different from Mi-mediated root-knot nematode resistance in tomato. Temporal analysis of nematode infection showed that there is no difference in nematode penetration between the resistant and susceptible accessions, and no hypersensitive response was observed in the resistant accession even several days after infection. However, less than 5% of the nematode population completed the life cycle as females in the resistant accession. The remainder emigrated from the roots, developed as males, or died inside the roots as undeveloped larvae. Genetic analyses carried out by crossing DZA045 with a susceptible French accession, F83005, suggest that one gene controls resistance in DZA045. PMID:19259519

  1. Roots: Its Impact and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Jefferson, Roland S.

    1979-01-01

    What is contained in Roots, the 587-page narrative that captured an entire world population? The answer is not simple, nor is it overly complex, but rather an admixture of significant psychological, sociological, and timing factors that served to ignite the fuse of human fascination for the unknown, the hidden truths, the obscure, and the forbidden. This paper analyzes the impact and implications of Roots on many facets of American society. PMID:480399

  2. Abscisic acid biosynthesis in roots

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew D. Parry; Roger Horgan

    1992-01-01

    The pathway of water-stress-induced abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis in etiolated and light-grown leaves has been elucidated (see A.D. Parry and R. Horgan, 1991, Physiol. Plant. 82, 320–326). Roots also have the ability to synthesise ABA in response to stress and it was therefore of interest to examine root extracts for the presence of carotenoids, including those known to be ABA

  3. Drying of Echinacea angustifolia Roots

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Kabganian; D. J. Carrier; S. Sokansanj

    2003-01-01

    Echinacea angustifolia roots were dried at 23, 30, 40, 50, and 60°C to determine the effect of drying on chemical constituency. During drying, the concentrations of the alkamides, cis or trans undeca-2-en 8, 10-diyonic acid isobutylamide and cis or trans dodeca-2E, 4E, 8Z, 10-tetraenoic acid isobutylamide, did not decrease at any of the drying temperatures as compared with roots dried

  4. Nerve and Nerve Root Biomechanics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kristen J. Nicholson; Beth A. Winkelstein

    \\u000a Together, the relationship between the mechanical response of neural tissues and the related mechanisms of injury provide\\u000a a foundation for defining relevant thresholds for injury. The nerves and nerve roots are biologic structures with specific\\u000a and important functions, and whose response to mechanical loading can have immediate, long-lasting and widespread consequences.\\u000a In particular, when nerves or nerve roots are mechanically

  5. The bHLH transcription factor SPATULA regulates root growth by controlling the size of the root meristem

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Arabidopsis thaliana gene SPATULA (SPT), encoding a bHLH transcription factor, was originally identified for its role in pistil development. SPT is necessary for the growth and development of all carpel margin tissues including the style, stigma, septum and transmitting tract. Since then, it has been shown to have pleiotropic roles during development, including restricting the meristematic region of the leaf primordia and cotyledon expansion. Although SPT is expressed in roots, its role in this organ has not been investigated. Results An analysis of embryo and root development showed that loss of SPT function causes an increase in quiescent center size in both the embryonic and postembryonic stem cell niches. In addition, root meristem size is larger due to increased division, which leads to a longer primary root. spt mutants exhibit other pleiotropic developmental phenotypes, including more flowers, shorter internodes and an extended flowering period. Genetic and molecular analysis suggests that SPT regulates cell proliferation in parallel to gibberellic acid as well as affecting auxin accumulation or transport. Conclusions Our data suggest that SPT functions in growth control throughout sporophytic growth of Arabidopsis, but is not necessary for cell fate decisions except during carpel development. SPT functions independently of gibberellic acid during root development, but may play a role in regulating auxin transport or accumulation. Our data suggests that SPT plays a role in control of root growth, similar to its roles in above ground tissues. PMID:23280064

  6. Root dynamics in native grassland exposed to elevated CO2 and warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendall, E.; Carrillo, Y.; Morgan, J. A.; Newcomb, J.

    2011-12-01

    Responses of belowground processes to global change play a major role in terrestrial ecosystem carbon (C) storage and feedbacks to climate, but remain understudied in comparison to aboveground processes. In grasslands, roots comprise about 75 percent of the biomass, and are responsible for increased inputs of C to soil pools under elevated CO2. Root exudation may also be responsible for increased rates of soil organic matter decomposition, or priming, potentially offsetting inputs of new C. Understanding the fate of belowground C allocation requires a better understanding of root processes including growth, rhizodeposition, turnover and decomposition. We studied root dynamics in mixed C3/C4 grassland at the Prairie Heating and CO2 Enrichment experiment near Cheyenne, WY, where Free-Air CO2 Enrichment is applied at 600 ppm during daytime in the growing season, and temperature is elevated by 1.5/3 deg C day/night all year. We applied several belowground techniques, including direct biomass measurements coupled with C isotope labeling, root litter decomposition measured in litter bags and in plots with herbicide applied, and image analysis of intact and harvested root systems . Direct measurements indicated that elevated CO2 increased root biomass, a trend that became increasingly significant over the first four years of treatments. Warming by itself tended to decrease root biomass in the first two years, and this effect declined in the next two years of the experiment, suggesting a transient negative response of root growth to warming. Continuous 13C labeling in elevated CO2 plots allowed detection of a greater proportion of new C in warmed than ambient temperature plots, demonstrating greater allocation of C to roots exposed to both elevated CO2 and warming. A root litter bag decomposition experiment showed that C3 grass roots decomposed more rapidly with elevated CO2 alone, but more slowly when elevated CO2 was combined with warming, possibly due to soil drying. C4 grass roots decomposed more slowly than C3 roots, probably due to higher C/N values, and were less responsive to global change treatments. Recent research has shown that C4 grasses become more competitive with elevated CO2 and warming, which together with their lower decomposition rates and higher root growth under these conditions, suggests that roots are likely to play an increasingly important role in belowground C storage in grasslands in the coming century. Changes in root system structure detected in minirhizotron and harvested root images, including lengths, diameters, and demography, will contribute further understanding of how belowground ecosystems will respond to global change.

  7. Changes in the risk of fine-root mortality with age: a case study in peach, Prunus persica (Rosaceae).

    PubMed

    Wells, Christina E; Glenn, D Michael; Eissenstat, David M

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that younger roots are more vulnerable to mortality than older roots. We analyzed minirhizotron data using a mixed-age, proportional hazards regression approach to determine whether the risk of mortality (or "hazard") was higher for younger roots than for older roots in a West Virginia peach orchard. While root age apparently had a strong effect on the hazard when considered alone, this effect was largely due to different rates of mortality among roots of different orders, diameters, and depths. Roots with dependent laterals (higher order roots) had a lower hazard than first-order roots in 1996 and 1997. Greater root diameter was also associated with a decreased hazard in both 1996 and 1997. In both years, there was a significant decrease in the hazard with depth. When considered alone, age appeared to be a strong predictor of risk: a 1-d increase in initial root age was associated with a 1.26-2.62% decrease in the hazard. However, when diameter, order, and depth were incorporated into the model, the effect of root age disappeared or was greatly reduced. Baseline hazard function plots revealed that the timing of high-risk periods was generally related to seasonal factors rather than individual root age. PMID:21669714

  8. Community composition of root-associated fungi in a Quercus-dominated temperate forest: “codominance” of mycorrhizal and root-endophytic fungi

    PubMed Central

    Toju, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Sato, Hirotoshi; Tanabe, Akifumi S; Gilbert, Gregory S; Kadowaki, Kohmei

    2013-01-01

    In terrestrial ecosystems, plant roots are colonized by various clades of mycorrhizal and endophytic fungi. Focused on the root systems of an oak-dominated temperate forest in Japan, we used 454 pyrosequencing to explore how phylogenetically diverse fungi constitute an ecological community of multiple ecotypes. In total, 345 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of fungi were found from 159 terminal-root samples from 12 plant species occurring in the forest. Due to the dominance of an oak species (Quercus serrata), diverse ectomycorrhizal clades such as Russula, Lactarius, Cortinarius, Tomentella, Amanita, Boletus, and Cenococcum were observed. Unexpectedly, the root-associated fungal community was dominated by root-endophytic ascomycetes in Helotiales, Chaetothyriales, and Rhytismatales. Overall, 55.3% of root samples were colonized by both the commonly observed ascomycetes and ectomycorrhizal fungi; 75.0% of the root samples of the dominant Q. serrata were so cocolonized. Overall, this study revealed that root-associated fungal communities of oak-dominated temperate forests were dominated not only by ectomycorrhizal fungi but also by diverse root endophytes and that potential ecological interactions between the two ecotypes may be important to understand the complex assembly processes of belowground fungal communities. PMID:23762515

  9. Root anatomical phenes predict root penetration ability and biomechanical properties in maize (Zea Mays).

    PubMed

    Chimungu, Joseph G; Loades, Kenneth W; Lynch, Jonathan P

    2015-06-01

    The ability of roots to penetrate hard soil is important for crop productivity but specific root phenes contributing to this ability are poorly understood. Root penetrability and biomechanical properties are likely to vary in the root system dependent on anatomical structure. No information is available to date on the influence of root anatomical phenes on root penetrability and biomechanics. Root penetration ability was evaluated using a wax layer system. Root tensile and bending strength were evaluated in plant roots grown in the greenhouse and in the field. Root anatomical phenes were found to be better predictors of root penetrability than root diameter per se and associated with smaller distal cortical region cell size. Smaller outer cortical region cells play an important role in stabilizing the root against ovalization and reducing the risk of local buckling and collapse during penetration, thereby increasing root penetration of hard layers. The use of stele diameter was found to be a better predictor of root tensile strength than root diameter. Cortical thickness, cortical cell count, cortical cell wall area and distal cortical cell size were stronger predictors of root bend strength than root diameter. Our results indicate that root anatomical phenes are important predictors for root penetrability of high-strength layers and root biomechanical properties. PMID:25903914

  10. Root anatomical phenes predict root penetration ability and biomechanical properties in maize (Zea Mays)

    PubMed Central

    Chimungu, Joseph G.; Loades, Kenneth W.; Lynch, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of roots to penetrate hard soil is important for crop productivity but specific root phenes contributing to this ability are poorly understood. Root penetrability and biomechanical properties are likely to vary in the root system dependent on anatomical structure. No information is available to date on the influence of root anatomical phenes on root penetrability and biomechanics. Root penetration ability was evaluated using a wax layer system. Root tensile and bending strength were evaluated in plant roots grown in the greenhouse and in the field. Root anatomical phenes were found to be better predictors of root penetrability than root diameter per se and associated with smaller distal cortical region cell size. Smaller outer cortical region cells play an important role in stabilizing the root against ovalization and reducing the risk of local buckling and collapse during penetration, thereby increasing root penetration of hard layers. The use of stele diameter was found to be a better predictor of root tensile strength than root diameter. Cortical thickness, cortical cell count, cortical cell wall area and distal cortical cell size were stronger predictors of root bend strength than root diameter. Our results indicate that root anatomical phenes are important predictors for root penetrability of high-strength layers and root biomechanical properties. PMID:25903914

  11. A root Cheat Sheet A. Stephen Beach

    E-print Network

    Gilfoyle, Jerry

    A root Cheat Sheet A. Stephen Beach June 9, 1998 Abstract This is a quick guide to root programming, but has no experience with root or C++. Its goal is to get the user up and running quickly? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2 Basic Questions 4 2.1 What is root

  12. Fine Root Longevity Still Under Debate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. G. Keel; M. Blackburn; C. Campbell; M. N. Högberg; A. Richter; B. Wild; P. Högberg

    2008-01-01

    Assuming that fine roots (< 2 mm in diameter) turn over once per year, they represent a third of the global annual net primary productivity. These turnover estimates are based on rhizotron studies, where root longevity is determined by monitoring the appearance\\/disappearance of roots on a screen, which is inserted into the soil. Much slower fine root turnover rates were

  13. ROOT AND BUTT ROTS OF FOREST TREES

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    ROOT AND BUTT ROTS OF FOREST TREES 12th International Conference on Root and Butt Rots IUFRO Medford, Oregon (USA) CONFERENCEPROCEEDINGS #12;ROOT AND BUTT ROTS OF FOREST TREES 12th International Conference on Root and Butt Rots IUFRO Working Party 7.02.01 CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS M. Garbelotto & P

  14. How Can Science Education Foster Students' Rooting?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Østergaard, Edvin

    2015-01-01

    The question of how to foster rooting in science education points towards a double challenge; efforts to "prevent" (further) uprooting and efforts to "promote" rooting/re-rooting. Wolff-Michael Roth's paper discusses the uprooting/rooting pair of concepts, students' feeling of alienation and loss of fundamental sense of the…

  15. Orthodontic treatment in patient with idiopathic root resorption: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Diego; Smit, Rosana Martínez; Gamboa, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Multiple idiopathic external root resorption is a rare pathological condition usually detected as an incidental radiographic finding. External root resorption of permanent teeth is a multifactorial process related to several local and systemic factors. If an etiological factor cannot be identified for root resorption, the term "idiopathic" is applied. This report presents a case of multiple idiopathic apical root resorption. The condition was found in a young female patient seeking orthodontic treatment due to malocclusion. This kind of resorption starts apically and progresses coronally, causing a gradual shortening and rounding of the remaining root. Patients with this condition are not the ideal candidates for orthodontic treatment; however, the aim of this report is to describe an unusual case of idiopathic root resorption involving the entire dentition, and to present the orthodontic treatment of this patient. It describes the progress and completion of orthodontic therapy with satisfactory end results. PMID:25741832

  16. Orthodontic treatment in patient with idiopathic root resorption: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rey, Diego; Smit, Rosana Martínez; Gamboa, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Multiple idiopathic external root resorption is a rare pathological condition usually detected as an incidental radiographic finding. External root resorption of permanent teeth is a multifactorial process related to several local and systemic factors. If an etiological factor cannot be identified for root resorption, the term "idiopathic" is applied. This report presents a case of multiple idiopathic apical root resorption. The condition was found in a young female patient seeking orthodontic treatment due to malocclusion. This kind of resorption starts apically and progresses coronally, causing a gradual shortening and rounding of the remaining root. Patients with this condition are not the ideal candidates for orthodontic treatment; however, the aim of this report is to describe an unusual case of idiopathic root resorption involving the entire dentition, and to present the orthodontic treatment of this patient. It describes the progress and completion of orthodontic therapy with satisfactory end results. PMID:25741832

  17. Elderly at Greater Risk for Root Caries: A Look at the Multifactorial Risks with Emphasis on Genetics Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Gati, Daniel; Vieira, Alexandre R.

    2011-01-01

    Root caries is one of the most significant dental problems among older adults today. Many studies have demonstrated that older adults are at greater risk for developing root caries. Here we examine what risk factors older adults are prone to and explain how they contribute to higher rates of oral disease, in particular root caries. The elderly are at risk for root caries due to dentures, lack of dexterity, a shift from complex to simple sugars, and poor oral hygiene. Decreased salivary flow and its manifestations with other social/behavioral and medical factors may provide a more comprehensive explanation to a higher frequency of root caries in older adults. PMID:21754932

  18. TIME FOR COFFEE controls root meristem size by changes in auxin accumulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Li-Wei; Yan, Da-Wei; Liu, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Hong-Guo; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2014-01-01

    Roots play important roles in plant survival and productivity as they not only anchor the plants in the soil but are also the primary organ for the uptake of nutrients from the outside. The growth and development of roots depend on the specification and maintenance of the root meristem. Here, we report a previously unknown role of TIME FOR COFFEE (TIC) in controlling root meristem size in Arabidopsis. The results showed that loss of function of TIC reduced root meristem length and cell number by decreasing the competence of meristematic cells to divide. This was due to the repressed expression of PIN genes for decreased acropetal auxin transport in tic-2, leading to low auxin accumulation in the roots responsible for reduced root meristem, which was verified by exogenous application of indole-3-acetic acid. Downregulated expression of PLETHORA1 (PLT1) and PLT2, key transcription factors in mediating the patterning of the root stem cell niche, was also assayed in tic-2. Similar results were obtained with tic-2 and wild-type plants at either dawn or dusk. We also suggested that the MYC2-mediated jasmonic acid signalling pathway may not be involved in the regulation of TIC in controlling the root meristem. Taken together, these results suggest that TIC functions in an auxin-PLTs loop for maintenance of post-embryonic root meristem. PMID:24277277

  19. A METHOD TO SEPARATE PLANT ROOTS FROM SOIL AND ANALYZE ROOT SURFACE AREA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analysis of the effects of soil management practices on crop production requires a knowledge of these effects on plant roots. Much time is required to wash plant roots from soil and separate the living plant roots from organic debris and previous years' roots. We developed a root washer that can acc...

  20. Root filtration spaces from Lie algebras and abstract root groups 1

    E-print Network

    Cohen, Arjeh M.

    Root filtration spaces from Lie algebras and abstract root groups 1 Arjeh M. Cohen a, G subgroups and simple Lie algebras generated by extremal elements lead to root filtration spaces of buildings. Here we show how to obtain the root filtration space axioms from root subgroups and classical Lie

  1. Resonance dependence of gravitropicreactionof cress roots in weak combined magnetic fields.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogatina, N. I.; Sheykina, N. V.; Kordyum, E. L.

    The gravitropic reaction of cress was studied in combined magnetic fields, that is the static magnetic field of the order of Earth's one and parallel to it alternating magnetic field. The frequency region for alternating magnetic field was varied in wide diapason ( from 1 Hz up to 45 Hz). The magnitude of alternating magnetic field was equal to 6 microT. The magnetic field conditions were well reproducible. For this purpose the external magnetic field was shielded in the work volume and artificial magnetic field was created in the volume. Both ferromagnetic metal shield and superconductive one with warm volume for work were used. The magnetic noises inside both of ferromagnetic metal and superconductive shields were measured to provide the well reproducible characteristics of artificial field created in the work volume. The objects of investigation were the roots of cress after 2-3-days germination. They were located in the closed humid room, that was located inside the shield in the artificially created magnetic field. All roots were in the darkness. For control we used the analogous roots located in the analogous volume but only in the static magnetic field of the Earth. We measured the divergence angle of the root from its primary direction of growing. We obtained the following results. The curve of dependence of measured angles on the frequency of alternating component of magnetic field had series of sharp peaks. These peaks were well reproducible and their location depended on the magnitude of the static component of magnetic field. The frequency of peak location is in direct proportion with its magnitude. The analysis showed that the location of peaks coincided very well with the cyclotron frequencies of the following ions: Ca+2, Cu+1 , K+1: Fe+3: Ag+1: and with the cyclotron frequencies of ions of phytohormons such as ions of indolile-acetic acid, abscise acid and gibberellins. Some quantitive analogies between the gravitropic process and the effect of combined magnetic field are discussed at the molecular level. In particularly it was shown that in the gravity field the pressure difference between the upper and down parts of the root was of the order of the pressure difference created by the Lorenz force. The displacement of the point where the pressure approached the maximum value on membrane surface could lead to the changes in the ion transport direction and so to the changes of the gravitropic reaction direction. The possibilities of the method for the studying the gravitropic reaction were discussed.

  2. Root status and future developments

    SciTech Connect

    Rene Brun et al.

    2003-10-01

    In this talk the authors review the major additions and improvements made to the ROOT system in the last 18 months and present their plans for future developments. The additions and improvements range from modifications to the I/O sub-system to allow users to save and restore objects of classes that have not been instrumented by special ROOT macros, to the addition of a geometry package designed for building, browsing, tracking and visualizing detector geometries. Other improvements include enhancements to the quick analysis sub-system (TTree::Draw()), the addition of classes that allow inter-file object references (TRef, TRefArray), better support for templates and STL classes, amelioration of the Automatic Script Compiler and the incorporation of new fitting and mathematical tools. Efforts have also been made to increase the modularity of the ROOT system with the introduction of more abstract interfaces and the development of a plug-in manager. In the near future, they intend to continue the development of PROOF and its interfacing with GRID environments. They plan on providing an interface between Geant3, Geant4 and Fluka and the new geometry package. The ROOT-GUI classes will finally be available on Windows and they plan to release a GUI inspector and builder. In the last year, ROOT has drawn the endorsement of additional experiments and institutions. It is now officially supported by CERN and used as key I/O component by the LCG project.

  3. Root traits for infertile soils

    PubMed Central

    White, Philip J.; George, Timothy S.; Dupuy, Lionel X.; Karley, Alison J.; Valentine, Tracy A.; Wiesel, Lea; Wishart, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Crop production is often restricted by the availability of essential mineral elements. For example, the availability of N, P, K, and S limits low-input agriculture, the phytoavailability of Fe, Zn, and Cu limits crop production on alkaline and calcareous soils, and P, Mo, Mg, Ca, and K deficiencies, together with proton, Al and Mn toxicities, limit crop production on acid soils. Since essential mineral elements are acquired by the root system, the development of crop genotypes with root traits increasing their acquisition should increase yields on infertile soils. This paper examines root traits likely to improve the acquisition of these elements and observes that, although the efficient acquisition of a particular element requires a specific set of root traits, suites of traits can be identified that benefit the acquisition of a group of mineral elements. Elements can be divided into three Groups based on common trait requirements. Group 1 comprises N, S, K, B, and P. Group 2 comprises Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn, and Ni. Group 3 contains mineral elements that rarely affect crop production. It is argued that breeding for a limited number of distinct root ideotypes, addressing particular combinations of mineral imbalances, should be pursued. PMID:23781228

  4. Magnetophoretic Induction of Root Curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, Karl H.

    1997-01-01

    The last year of the grant period concerned the consolidation of previous experiments to ascertain that the theoretical premise apply not just to root but also to shoots. In addition, we verified that high gradient magnetic fields do not interfere with regular cellular activities. Previous results have established that: (1) intracellular magnetophoresis is possible; and (2) HGMF lead to root curvature. In order to investigate whether HGMF affect the assembly and/or organization of structural proteins, we examined the arrangement of microtubules in roots exposed to HGMF. The cytoskeletal investigations were performed with fomaldehyde-fixed, nonembedded tissue segments that were cut with a vibratome. Microtubules (MTs) were stained with rat anti-yeast tubulin (YOL 1/34) and DTAF-labeled antibody against rat IgG. Microfilaments (MFs) were visualized by incubation in rhodamine-labeled phalloidin. The distribution and arrangement of both components of the cytoskeleton were examined with a confocal microscope. Measurements of growth rates and graviresponse were done using a video-digitizer. Since HGMF repel diamagnetic substances including starch-filled amyloplasts and most The second aspect of the work includes studies of the effect of cytoskeletal inhibitors on MTs and MFs. The analysis of the effect of micotubular inhibitors on the auxin transport in roots showed that there is very little effect of MT-depolymerizing or stabilizing drugs on auxin transport. This is in line with observations that application of such drugs is not immediately affecting the graviresponsiveness of roots.

  5. Root reinforcement and its contribution to slope stability in the Western Ghats of Kerala, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukose Kuriakose, Sekhar; van Beek, L. P. H.

    2010-05-01

    The Western Ghats of Kerala, India is prone to shallow landslides and consequent debris flows. An earlier study (Kuriakose et al., DOI:10.1002/esp.1794) with limited data had already demonstrated the possible effects of vegetation on slope hydrology and stability. Spatially distributed root cohesion is one of the most important data necessary to assess the effects of anthropogenic disturbances on the probability of shallow landslide initiation, results of which are reported in sessions GM6.1 and HS13.13/NH3.16. Thus it is necessary to the know the upper limits of reinforcement that the roots are able to provide and its spatial and vertical distribution in such an anthropogenically intervened terrain. Root tensile strength and root pull out tests were conducted on nine species of plants that are commonly found in the region. They are 1) Rubber (Hevea Brasiliensis), 2) Coconut Palm (Cocos nucifera), 3) Jackfruit trees (Artocarpus heterophyllus), 4) Teak (Tectona grandis), 5) Mango trees (Mangifera indica), 6) Lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus), 7) Gambooge (Garcinia gummi-gutta), 8) Coffee (Coffea Arabica) and 9) Tea (Camellia sinensis). About 1500 samples were collected of which only 380 could be tested (in the laboratory) due to breakage of roots during the tests. In the successful tests roots failed in tension. Roots having diameters between 2 mm and 12 mm were tested. Each sample tested had a length of 15 cm. Root pull out tests were conducted in the field. Root tensile strength vs root diameter, root pull out strength vs diameter, root diameter vs root depth and root count vs root depth relationships were derived. Root cohesion was computed for nine most dominant plants in the region using the perpendicular root model of Wu et al. (1979) modified by Schimidt et al. (2001). A soil depth map was derived using regression kriging as suggested by Kuriakose et al., (doi:10.1016/j.catena.2009.05.005) and used along with the land use map of 2008 to distribute the computed root tensile strength both vertically and spatially. Root cohesion varies significantly with the type of land use and the depth of soil. The computation showed that a maximum root reinforcement of 40 kPa was available in the first 30 cm of soil while exponentially decreased with depth to just about 3 kPa at 3 m depth. Mixed crops land use unit had the maximum root cohesion while fallow land, degraded forest and young rubber plantation had the lowest root reinforcement. These are the upper limits of root reinforcement that the vegetation can provide. When the soil is saturated, the bond between soil and roots reduces and thus the applicable root reinforcement is limited by the root pullout strength. Root reinforcement estimated from pullout strength vs diameter relationships was significantly lower than those estimated from tensile strength vs diameter relationships.

  6. Root system patterning: auxin synthesis at the root periphery.

    PubMed

    Van Norman, Jaimie M

    2015-06-01

    Plasticity in plant form is achieved through differential elaboration of developmental pre-patterns during postembryonic organ development. A new report links the output of the root clock, an oscillatory transcriptional pre-patterning mechanism, with cell-type-specific production of the plant hormone auxin, and identifies a downstream component required for elaboration of the pre-pattern. PMID:26035789

  7. Colonization of lettuce rhizosphere and roots by tagged Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Bonaldi, Maria; Chen, Xiaoyulong; Kunova, Andrea; Pizzatti, Cristina; Saracchi, Marco; Cortesi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Beneficial microorganisms are increasingly used in agriculture, but their efficacy often fails due to limited knowledge of their interactions with plants and other microorganisms present in rhizosphere. We studied spatio-temporal colonization dynamics of lettuce roots and rhizosphere by genetically modified Streptomyces spp. Five Streptomyces strains, strongly inhibiting in vitro the major soil-borne pathogen of horticultural crops, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, were transformed with pIJ8641 plasmid harboring an enhanced green fluorescent protein marker and resistance to apramycin. The fitness of transformants was compared to the wild-type strains and all of them grew and sporulated at similar rates and retained the production of enzymes and selected secondary metabolites as well as in vitro inhibition of S. sclerotiorum. The tagged ZEA17I strain was selected to study the dynamics of lettuce roots and rhizosphere colonization in non-sterile growth substrate. The transformed strain was able to colonize soil, developing roots, and rhizosphere. When the strain was inoculated directly on the growth substrate, significantly more t-ZEA17I was re-isolated both from the rhizosphere and the roots when compared to the amount obtained after seed coating. The re-isolation from the rhizosphere and the inner tissues of surface-sterilized lettuce roots demonstrated that t-ZEA17I is both rhizospheric and endophytic. PMID:25705206

  8. Characterizing pathways by which gravitropic effectors could move from the root cap to the root of primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; McClelen, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    Plasmodesmata linking the root cap and root in primary roots Zea mays are restricted to approx. 400 protodermal cells bordering approx. 110000 microns2 of the calyptrogen of the root cap. This area is less than 10% of the cross-sectional area of the root-tip at the cap junction. Therefore, gravitropic effectors moving from the root cap to the root can move symplastically only through a relatively small area in the centre of the root. Decapped roots are non-responsive to gravity. However, decapped roots whose caps are replaced immediately after decapping are strongly graviresponsive. Thus, gravicurvature occurs only when the root cap contacts the root, and symplastic continuity between the cap and root is not required for gravicurvature. Completely removing mucilage from the root tip renders the root non-responsive to gravity. Taken together, these data suggest that gravitropic effectors move apoplastically through mucilage from the cap to the root.

  9. Root system stabilization of sugarcane fertigated by subsurface drip using a minirhizotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukitaka Pessinatti Ohashi, Augusto; Célia de Matos Pires, Regina; Barros de Oliveira Silva, Andre Luiz; Vasconcelos Ribeiro, Rafael

    2013-04-01

    To improve the efficiency of water use in irrigation practices and to provide information for modeling the knowledge of plants root system becomes necessary. The use of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) in sugarcane cultivation is an interesting cultural practice to improve production and allow cultivation in marginal lands due to water deficits conditions. The SDI provides better water use efficiency, due to the water and nutrients application in root zone plants. However, despite of the agronomic importance, few studies about the root system of sugarcane were performed. The use of root scanner is an alternative to the evaluation of the root system, which enables the continuous study of the roots throughout the cycle and for many years, but data about the use of this method for sugarcane are still scarce. The aim of this study was to determine the time required for stabilization of the root system growth of sugarcane cultivar IACSP-5000 around the access tube in which images were captured. The field experiment was carried out in Campinas, São Paulo State, Brazil. The fertigation was applied by a subsurface drip system.. The soil moisture was monitored by capacitance probes. The pH and electrical conductivity of the soil solution were monitored through solution extractor. Two access tubes with 1.05 m length were used, with 7 days difference between installations. The images were captured at 110, 128, 136, 143 and 151 days after harvest cane-plant, in the second cycle (1st cane ratoon), with the Root Scanner CI-600 ™ and were analyzed the number of roots and root length in each layer in different depths in the soil profile by software RootSnap! ™. The results show that the highest rates of increase in the number and length of roots were observed in the first 27 days. Absolute growth rates of up to 81 mm day-1 and 38 mm day-1 were presented in 0-20 and 20-40 cm layer respectively. The number of roots stabilized from 27 days after installation of the tube, while the length of the root system stabilized between 30 and 40 days. Root growth was more intense in the first two layers (0 to 0.4 m depth) of soil profile, which presented more than 80% of the total root length after the stabilization.

  10. Deep phenotyping of coarse root architecture in R. pseudoacacia reveals that tree root system plasticity is confined within its architectural model.

    PubMed

    Danjon, Frédéric; Khuder, Hayfa; Stokes, Alexia

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at assessing the influence of slope angle and multi-directional flexing and their interaction on the root architecture of Robinia pseudoacacia seedlings, with a particular focus on architectural model and trait plasticity. 36 trees were grown from seed in containers inclined at 0° (control) or 45° (slope) in a glasshouse. The shoots of half the plants were gently flexed for 5 minutes a day. After 6 months, root systems were excavated and digitized in 3D, and biomass measured. Over 100 root architectural traits were determined. Both slope and flexing increased significantly plant size. Non-flexed trees on 45° slopes developed shallow roots which were largely aligned perpendicular to the slope. Compared to the controls, flexed trees on 0° slopes possessed a shorter and thicker taproot held in place by regularly distributed long and thin lateral roots. Flexed trees on the 45° slope also developed a thick vertically aligned taproot, with more volume allocated to upslope surface lateral roots, due to the greater soil volume uphill. We show that there is an inherent root system architectural model, but that a certain number of traits are highly plastic. This plasticity will permit root architectural design to be modified depending on external mechanical signals perceived by young trees. PMID:24386227

  11. Cotton Root-Rot and Its Control. 

    E-print Network

    Taubenhaus, J. J. (Jacob Joseph); Ezekiel, (Walter Naphtali) Walter N.

    1931-01-01

    in later bulletins. ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE OF ROOT-ROT Root-rot is one of the moat destructive plant diseases known. An- nual losses from root-rot to the cotton crop of Texas are estimated at 10 to 15 per cent. This direct reduction in yield results from... Conditions Affecting Root-rot t While root-rot occurs extensively throughout Texas, there are cer- tain sections in which it has as yet been less destructive than it is else- where. For instance, in East Texas root-rot has been less prevalent than...

  12. Do increased summer precipitation and N deposition alter fine root dynamics in a Mojave Desert ecosystem?

    PubMed

    Verburg, Paul S J; Young, Andrew C; Stevenson, Bryan A; Glanzmann, Isabelle; Arnone, John A; Marion, Giles M; Holmes, Christopher; Nowak, Robert S

    2013-03-01

    Climate change is expected to impact the amount and distribution of precipitation in the arid southwestern United States. In addition, nitrogen (N) deposition is increasing in these regions due to increased urbanization. Responses of belowground plant activity to increases in soil water content and N have shown inconsistent patterns between biomes. In arid lands, plant productivity is limited by water and N availability so it is expected that changes in these factors will affect fine root dynamics. The objectives of this study were to quantify the effects of increased summer precipitation and N deposition on fine root dynamics in a Mojave Desert ecosystem during a 2-year field experiment using minirhizotron measurements. Root length density, production, and mortality were measured in field plots in the Mojave Desert receiving three 25 mm summer rain events and/or 40 kg N ha(-1)  yr(-1) . Increased summer precipitation and N additions did not have an overall significant effect on any of the measured root parameters. However, differences in winter precipitation resulting from interannual variability in rainfall appeared to affect root parameters with root production and turnover increasing following a wet winter most likely due to stimulation of annual grasses. In addition, roots were distributed more deeply in the soil following the wet winter. Root length density was initially higher under canopies compared to canopy interspaces, but converged toward the end of the study. In addition, roots tended to be distributed more deeply into the soil in canopy interspace areas. Results from this study indicated that increased summer precipitation and N deposition in response to climate change and urbanization are not likely to affect fine root dynamics in these Mojave Desert ecosystems, despite studies showing aboveground plant physiological responses to these environmental perturbations. However, changes in the amount and possibly distribution of winter precipitation may affect fine root dynamics. PMID:23504850

  13. Root resistance to cavitation is accurately measured using a centrifuge technique.

    PubMed

    Pratt, R B; MacKinnon, E D; Venturas, M D; Crous, C J; Jacobsen, A L

    2015-02-01

    Plants transport water under negative pressure and this makes their xylem vulnerable to cavitation. Among plant organs, root xylem is often highly vulnerable to cavitation due to water stress. The use of centrifuge methods to study organs, such as roots, that have long vessels are hypothesized to produce erroneous estimates of cavitation resistance due to the presence of open vessels through measured samples. The assumption that roots have long vessels may be premature since data for root vessel length are sparse; moreover, recent studies have not supported the existence of a long-vessel artifact for stems when a standard centrifuge technique was used. We examined resistance to cavitation estimated using a standard centrifuge technique and compared these values with native embolism measurements for roots of seven woody species grown in a common garden. For one species we also measured vulnerability using single-vessel air injection. We found excellent agreement between root native embolism and the levels of embolism measured using a centrifuge technique, and with air-seeding estimates from single-vessel injection. Estimates of cavitation resistance measured from centrifuge curves were biologically meaningful and were correlated with field minimum water potentials, vessel diameter (VD), maximum xylem-specific conductivity (Ksmax) and vessel length. Roots did not have unusually long vessels compared with stems; moreover, root vessel length was not correlated to VD or to the vessel length of stems. These results suggest that root cavitation resistance can be accurately and efficiently measured using a standard centrifuge method and that roots are highly vulnerable to cavitation. The role of root cavitation resistance in determining drought tolerance of woody species deserves further study, particularly in the context of climate change. PMID:25716876

  14. Ecophysiology of wetland plant roots: A modelling comparison of aeration in relation to species distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorrell, B.K.; Mendelssohn, I.A.; McKee, K.L.; Woods, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the potential for inter-specific differences in root aeration to determine wetland plant distribution in nature. We compared aeration in species that differ in the type of sediment and depth of water they colonize. Differences in root anatomy, structure and physiology were applied to aeration models that predicted the maximum possible aerobic lengths and development of anoxic zones in primary adventitious roots. Differences in anatomy and metabolism that provided higher axial fluxes of oxygen allowed deeper root growth in species that favour more reducing sediments and deeper water. Modelling identified factors that affected growth in anoxic soils through their effects on aeration. These included lateral root formation, which occurred at the expense of extension of the primary root because of the additional respiratory demand they imposed, reducing oxygen fluxes to the tip and stele, and the development of stelar anoxia. However, changes in sediment oxygen demand had little detectable effect on aeration in the primary roots due to their low wall permeability and high surface impedance, but appeared to reduce internal oxygen availability by accelerating loss from laterals. The development of pressurized convective gas flow in shoots and rhizomes was also found to be important in assisting root aeration, as it maintained higher basal oxygen concentrations at the rhizome-root junctions in species growing into deep water. (C) 2000 Annals of Botany Company.

  15. Canopy and environmental control of root dynamics in a long-term study of Concord grape.

    PubMed

    Comas, L H; Anderson, L J; Dunst, R M; Lakso, A N; Eissenstat, D M

    2005-09-01

    Below-ground carbon allocation represents a substantial fraction of net photosynthesis in plants, yet timing of below-ground allocation and endogenous and exogenous factors controlling it are poorly understood. Minirhizotron techniques were used to examine root populations of Vitis labruscana Bailey cv. Concord under two levels of dormant-season canopy removal and irrigation. Root production, pigmentation, death and disappearance to a depth of 110 cm were determined over two wet and two dry years (1997-2000). There was continual root production and senescence, with peak root production rates occurring by midseason. Later in the season, when reproductive demands for carbon were highest and physical conditions limiting, few roots were produced, especially in dry years in nonirrigated vines. Root production under minimal canopy pruning was generally greater and occurred several weeks earlier than root production under heavy pruning, corresponding to earlier canopy development. Initial root production occurred in shallow soils, likely due to temperatures at shallow depths being warmer early in the season. Our study showed intricate relationships between internal carbon demands and environmental conditions regulating root allocation. PMID:16101919

  16. Classifying stages of third molar development: crown length as a predictor for the mature root length.

    PubMed

    Altalie, Salem; Thevissen, Patrick; Willems, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Multiple tooth development staging techniques were reported based on arbitrarily set borderlines between succeeding stages. Anatomic tooth features or predictions of future tooth part dimensions were described to identify the thresholds between the established stages. The need to predict mature tooth dimensions, while the tooth considered is still in development, is a drawback to use this staging technique for dental age estimations. Using the fully mature crown length as a predictor for the future root length could provide a tool for undisputable staging. The aim of this study was first to measure the crown and root length of fully mature third molars and second to investigate whether the crown length could be used as a predictor of the root length, in order to classify the observed root length as a proportion of the future mature root. The crown and root lengths of all present third molars were digitally measured on dental panoramic radiographs of 1,000 subjects. The included subjects were equally distributed in gender, and their age ranged between 22 and 40 years. Two occlusal borders, the cement enamel junction and the root apices, were defined as landmarks for standardized measurements. Regression models with root length as response and crown length as predictor were established and revealed low R (2) and high RMSE values. Due to the small explained variance by the prediction models and the high variation in prediction errors, the observed crown length cannot be used to predict the final root length of a developing third molar. PMID:24801360

  17. Assessment of Ustilago maydis as a fungal model for root infection studies.

    PubMed

    Mazaheri-Naeini, Mahta; Sabbagh, Seyed Kazem; Martinez, Yves; Séjalon-Delmas, Nathalie; Roux, Christophe

    2015-03-01

    Ustilago maydis is a fungus infecting aerial parts of maize to form smutted galls. Due to its interest as a genetic tool in plant pathology, we evaluated its ability to penetrate into plant roots. The fungus can penetrate between epidermic root cells, forming inter and intracellular pseudohyphae. Root infection didn't provoke gall formation on the maize lines tested, and targeted PCR detection showed that U. maydis, unlike the other maize smut fungus Sporisorium reilianum, has a weak aptitude to grow from the roots up to the aerial part of maize. We also observed that U. maydis can infect Medicago truncatula hairy roots as an alternative host. This plant species is a model host to study root symbiosis, and this pathosystem can provide new insights on root-microbe interactions. Considering that U. maydis could be a soil fungus, we tested its responsiveness to GR24, a strigolactone analogue. Strigolactones are root exuded molecules which activate mitochondrial metabolism of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Physiologic and molecular analysis revealed that GR24 also increases cell respiration of U. maydis. This result points out that strigolactones could have an incidence on several rhizospheric microbes. These data provide evidences that the biotrophic pathogen U. maydis has to be considered for studying root infection. PMID:25749366

  18. Excising the Root from STEM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lock, Roger

    2009-01-01

    There are a number of well-intentioned STEM initiatives, some designed to improve the recruitment and retention of science teachers. Sometimes it appears that the initiators are remote from direct contact with the "grass roots" issues that feed the "stem" on which the blossoms of young enthusiastic recruits to the science teaching profession are…

  19. Brown Root Rot of Alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This bulletin describes the disease of alfalfa called brown root rot (BRR) including: the disease symptoms, the fungal pathogen and its biology, its distribution, and disease management. Since the 1920s, BRR has been regarded as an important disease of forage legumes, including alfalfa, in northern ...

  20. Lesson 10: Extraction of Roots

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-01-01

    This lesson introduces quadratic equations and graphs. Equations of the form ax^2 + c = 0 are solved via extraction of roots. Later application problems involving volume and surface area and compound interest (problems of the form a(x - p)^2 = q ) are presented.

  1. Cutting the Roots of Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koziey, Paul W.

    1996-01-01

    Violence is rooted in obedience to authority and in comparisons--foundations of our institutions of parenting and schooling. Obedience brings reward and punishment, comparison perpetuates a cycle of competition and conflict. Television violence is especially harmful because children easily understand visual images. The Reality Research approach to…

  2. Cylindrocladium root and crown rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several species of Cylindrocladium have been shown to cause damping-off, seedling blight, and a black crown and root rot of mature plants. In Hawaii, seedling disease was caused by Calonectria ilicicola (anamorph: Cylindrocladium parasiticum) and Cylindrocladium clavatum. A third species, C. scopari...

  3. An L-system model for root system mycorrhization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Schweiger, Peter; Jansa, Jan; Leitner, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Mineral phosphate fertilisers are a non-renewable resource; rock phosphate reserves are estimated to be depleted in 50 to 100 years. In order to prevent a severe phosphate crisis in the 21st century, there is a need to decrease agricultural inputs such as P fertilisers by making use of plant mechanisms that increase P acquisition efficiency. Most plants establish mycorrhizal symbiosis as an adaptation to increase/economize their P acquisition from the soil. However, there is a great functional diversity in P acquisition mechanisms among different fungal species that colonize the roots (Thonar et al. 2011), and the composition of mycorrhizal community is known to depend strongly on agricultural management practices. Thus, the agroecosystem management may substantially affect the mycorrhizal functioning and also the use of P fertilizers. To date, it is still difficult to quantify the potential input savings for the agricultural crops through manipulation of their symbiotic microbiome, mainly due to lack of mechanistic understanding of P uptake dynamics by the fungal hyphae. In a first attempt, Schnepf et al. (2008b) have used mathematical modelling to show on the single root scale how different fungal growth pattern influence root P uptake. However, their approach was limited by the fact that it was restricted to the scale of a single root. The goal of this work is to advance the dynamic, three-dimensional root architecture model of Leitner et al. (2010) to include root system infection with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and growth of external mycelium. The root system infection model assumes that there is an average probability of infection (primary infection), that the probability of infection of a new root segment immediately adjacent to an existing infection is much higher than the average (secondary infection), that infected root segments have entry points that are the link between internal and external mycelium, that only uninfected root segments are susceptible (since new infection can only be detected in previously uninfected root) and that there is a maximum percentage of overall root system infection. Growth of external mycelium is based on the model of Schnepf et al. (2008a) but translated into L-system form. Different hypotheses about the effect of inoculum position (dispersed vs. localized) and about root system infection mechanisms can be tested with this model. This will help to quantify the role of the complex geometric structure of external mycelia in plant P acquisition and to gain mechanistic insights into whole-plant processes affected by mycorrhizal symbiosis. Literature Leitner, D., Klepsch, S., Bodner, G., Schnepf, A., 2010a. A dynamic root system growth model based on L-Systems. Plant Soil 332, 177-192. Schnepf, A., Roose, T., Schweiger, P., 2008a. Growth model for arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. J R Soc Interface 5, 773-784. Schnepf, A., Roose, T., Schweiger, P., 2008b. Impact of growth and uptake patterns of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on plant phosphorus uptake - a modelling study. Plant Soil 312, 85-99. Thonar C, Schnepf A, Frossard E, Roose T, Jansa J (2011) Traits related to differences in function among three arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Plant and Soil 339: 231-245. Acknowledgements This research was partly supported by the Austrian Science Fund FWF (Grant No.: V220-N13) and by an APART fellowship of the Austrian Academy of Sciences at the Computational Science Center, University of Vienna (to D.L.).

  4. Root strength of tropical plants - An investigation in the Western Ghats of Kerala, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukose Kuriakose, S.; van Beek, L. P. H.; van Westen, C. J.

    2009-04-01

    Earlier research on debris flows in the Tikovil River basin of the Western Ghats concluded that root cohesion is significant in maintaining the overall stability of the region. In this paper we present the most recent results (December 2008) of root tensile strength tests conducted on nine species of plants that are commonly found in the region. They are 1) Rubber (Hevea Brasiliensis), 2) Coconut Palm (Cocos nucifera), 3) Jackfruit trees (Artocarpus heterophyllus), 4) Teak (Tectona grandis), 5) Mango trees (Mangifera indica), 6) Lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus), 7) A variety of Tamarind (Garcinia gummigutta), 8) Coffee (Coffea Arabica) and Tea (Camellia sinensis). About 1500 samples were collected of which only 380 could be tested (in the laboratory) due to breakage of roots during the tests. In the successful tests roots failed in tension. Roots having diameters between 2 mm and 12 mm were tested. Each sample tested has a length of 15 cm. Results indicate that the roots of Coffee, Tamarind, Lemon grass and Jackfruit are the strongest of the nine plant types tested whereas Tea and Teak plants had the most fragile roots. Coconut roots behaved atypical to the others, as the bark of the roots was crushed and slipped from the clamp when tested whereas its internal fiber was the strongest of all tested. Root tensile strength decreases with increasing diameters, Rubber showing more ductile behaviour than Coffee and Tamarind that behaved more brittle, root tensile strength increasing exponentially for finer roots. Teak and Tea showed almost a constant root tensile strength over the range of diameters tested and little variability. Jack fruit and mango trees showed the largest variability, which may be explained by the presence of root nodules, preventing the derivation of an unequivocal relationship between root diameters and tensile strength. This results in uncertainty of root strength estimates that are applicable. These results provide important information to quantify the upper limit of the root cohesion at the stand level in combination with land use maps. This is an indispensable component in the evaluation of slope stability in the region.

  5. Growth and respiration of aspen roots exposed to ozone and elevated carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, M.D.; Dickson, R.E.; Isebrands, J.G. (USDA Forest Service, Rhinelander, WI (United States))

    1994-06-01

    Rooted cuttings of three aspen clones (271, O[sub 3] tolerant; 216, intermediate; and 259, O[sub 3] sensitive) were exposed to ambient air (control), ozone (160 ppm O[sub 3] 8 h daily), CO[sub 2] (ambient +350 ppm CO[sub 2]), and O[sub 3] + CO[sub 2], and O[sub 3] + CO[sub 2]. Root growth, root respiration, and soil respiration were measured periodically for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks, O[sub 3] caused up to a 48% decrease in root dry weight and 53% decrease in root respiration ([mu]mol plant[sup [minus]1]s[sup [minus]1]) compared to control treatments. Changes in root dry weight and respiration rate generally followed the O[sub 3] sensitivity rankings of the clones. In contrast, elevated CO[sub 2] vs. control plants caused up to a 63% increase rate generally followed the O[sub 3] sensitivity rankings of the clones. In contrast, elevated CO[sub 2] vs. control plants caused up to a 63% increase in root dry weight and a 47% increase in root respiration; again there were big clonal differences in response. Compared to the control treatment, there were no consistent changes in root weight due to the combined O[sub 3] and CO[sub 2] treatment, by root system respiration declined slightly. There were no consistent treatment or clonal effects on specific root respiration (SRR) ([mu]mol g[sup [minus]1]s[sup [minus]1]); however, SRR respiration declined with age. SRR increased with either O[sub 3] or elevated CO[sub 2]for clones 216 and 259, but decreased for clone 217. Aboveground environmental stress affects aspen root growth and physiology in complex ways, and the response obtained has a strong genetic component.

  6. Dynamics of heterorhizic root systems: protoxylem groups within the fine-root system of Chamaecyparis obtusa.

    PubMed

    Hishi, Takuo; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2005-08-01

    To understand the physiology of fine-root functions in relation to soil organic sources, the heterogeneity of individual root functions within a fine-root system requires investigation. Here the heterogeneous dynamics within fine-root systems are reported. The fine roots of Chamaecyparis obtusa were sampled using a sequential ingrowth core method over 2 yr. After color categorization, roots were classified into protoxylem groups from anatomical observations. The root lengths with diarch and triarch groups fluctuated seasonally, whereas the tetrarch root length increased. The percentage of secondary root mortality to total mortality increased with increasing amounts of protoxylem. The carbon : nitrogen ratio indicated that the decomposability of primary roots might be greater than that of secondary roots. The position of diarch roots was mostly apical, whereas tetrarch roots tended to be distributed in basal positions within the root architecture. We demonstrate the heterogeneous dynamics within a fine-root system of C. obtusa. Fine-root heterogeneity should affect soil C dynamics. This heterogeneity is determined by the branching position within the root architecture. PMID:15998402

  7. Evaluation of variation of root shape of Japanese radish (Raphanus sativus L.) based on image analysis using elliptic Fourier descriptors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroyoshi Iwata; Satoshi Niikura; Seiji Matsuura; Yasushi Takano; Yasuo Ukai

    1998-01-01

    Variation was of root shape in Japanese radish, due to genotypes, soil types and growth stages, were quantitatively evaluated\\u000a by principal components scores based on elliptic Fourier descriptors. Photographic images of sampled roots on 35mm color reversal\\u000a films were converted into digital images. After image processing, the contour of each root was expressed as chain-code and\\u000a then described by 77

  8. The Compact Root Architecture1 Gene Regulates Lignification, Flavonoid Production, and Polar Auxin Transport in Medicago truncatula1[W

    PubMed Central

    Laffont, Carole; Blanchet, Sandrine; Lapierre, Catherine; Brocard, Lysiane; Ratet, Pascal; Crespi, Martin; Mathesius, Ulrike; Frugier, Florian

    2010-01-01

    The root system architecture is crucial to adapt plant growth to changing soil environmental conditions and consequently to maintain crop yield. In addition to root branching through lateral roots, legumes can develop another organ, the nitrogen-fixing nodule, upon a symbiotic bacterial interaction. A mutant, cra1, showing compact root architecture was identified in the model legume Medicago truncatula. cra1 roots were short and thick due to defects in cell elongation, whereas densities of lateral roots and symbiotic nodules were similar to the wild type. Grafting experiments showed that a lengthened life cycle in cra1 was due to the smaller root system and not to the pleiotropic shoot phenotypes observed in the mutant. Analysis of the cra1 transcriptome at a similar early developmental stage revealed few significant changes, mainly related to cell wall metabolism. The most down-regulated gene in the cra1 mutant encodes a Caffeic Acid O-Methyl Transferase, an enzyme involved in lignin biosynthesis; accordingly, whole lignin content was decreased in cra1 roots. This correlated with differential accumulation of specific flavonoids and decreased polar auxin transport in cra1 mutants. Exogenous application of the isoflavone formononetin to wild-type plants mimicked the cra1 root phenotype, whereas decreasing flavonoid content through silencing chalcone synthases restored the polar auxin transport capacity of the cra1 mutant. The CRA1 gene, therefore, may control legume root growth through the regulation of lignin and flavonoid profiles, leading to changes in polar auxin transport. PMID:20522723

  9. Root canal filling using Resilon: a review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Shanahan; H. F. Duncan

    2011-01-01

    Root canal treatment is achieved by chemo-mechanical debridement of the root canal system followed by filling. The filling material 'entombs' residual bacteria and acts as a barrier which prevents the entrance of oral microorganisms and reinfection of the root canal system through microleakage. However, filling with contemporary root filling materials such as gutta-percha offers limited long-term resistance to microorganisms; as

  10. Development and function of Azospirillum -inoculated roots

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Okon; Y. Kapulnik

    1986-01-01

    Summary  The surface distribution ofAzospirillum on inoculated roots of maize and wheat is generally similar to that of other members of the rhizoplane microflora. During the first three days, colonization takes place mainly on the root elongation zone, on the base of root hairs and, to a lesser extent, on the surface of young root hairs.Azospirillum has been found in cortical

  11. Root induction by Agrobacterium rhizogenes in walnut

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emilia Caboni; Paola Lauri; Mariagrazia Tonelli; Giuseppina Falasca; Carmine Damiano

    1996-01-01

    Agrobacterium rhizogenes (wild-type, strain 1855), when applied to the basal part of microcuttings of walnut (J. regia L.), produced numerous adventitious roots in vitro: 58.6% of rooting was induced in microcuttings in hormone free medium and 62.9% and abundant callus formation in the presence of IBA. A. rhizogenes did not induce rooting when IAA was present in the rooting medium.

  12. Root distribution and interactions between intercropped species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Long Li; Jianhao Sun; Fusuo Zhang; Tianwen Guo; Xingguo Bao; F. Andrew Smith; Sally E. Smith

    2006-01-01

    Even though ecologists and agronomists have considered the spatial root distribution of plants to be important for interspecific\\u000a interactions in natural and agricultural ecosystems, few experimental studies have quantified patterns of root distribution\\u000a dynamics and their impacts on interspecific interactions. A field experiment was conducted to investigate the relationship\\u000a between root distribution and interspecific interactions between intercropped plants. Roots were

  13. Root branching responses to phosphate and nitrate.

    PubMed

    Desnos, Thierry

    2008-02-01

    Plant roots favour colonization of nutrient-rich zones in soil. Molecular genetic evidences demonstrate that roots sense and respond to local and global concentrations of inorganic phosphate and nitrate, in a fashion that depends on the shoot nutrient status. Recent investigations in Arabidopsis highlighted the role of the root tip in phosphate sensing and attributed to already known proteins (multicopper oxidases and nitrate transporters) new and unexpected functions in the root growth response to phosphate or nitrate. PMID:18024148

  14. Calcium movement, graviresponsiveness and the structure of columella cells and columella tissues in roots of Allium cepa L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    Roots of Allium cepa L. cv. Yellow are differentially responsive to gravity. Long (e.g. 40 mm) roots are strongly graviresponsive, while short (c.g. 4 mm) roots are minimally responsive to gravity. Although columella cells of graviresponsive roots are larger than those of nongraviresponsive roots, they partition their volumes to cellular organelles similarly. The movement of amyloplasts and nuclei in columella cells of horizontally-oriented roots correlates positively with the onset of gravicurvature. Furthermore, there is no significant difference in the rates of organellar redistribution when graviresponsive and nongraviresponsive roots are oriented horizontally. The more pronounced graviresponsiveness of longer roots correlates positively with (1) their caps being 9-6 times more voluminous, (2) their columella tissues being 42 times more voluminous, (3) their caps having 15 times more columella cells, and (4) their columella tissues having relative volumes 4.4 times larger than those of shorter, nongraviresponsive roots. Graviresponsive roots that are oriented horizontally are characterized by a strongly polar movement of 45Ca2+ across the root tip from the upper to the lower side, while similarly oriented nongraviresponsive roots exhibit only a minimal polar transport of 45Ca2+. These results indicate that the differential graviresponsiveness of roots of A. cepa is probably not due to either (1) ultrastructural differences in their columella cells, (2) differences in the rates of organellar redistribution when roots are oriented horizontally. Rather, these results indicate the graviresponsiveness may require an extensive columella tissue, which, in turn, may be necessary for polar movement of 45Ca2+ across the root tip.

  15. Colonization of Wheat Root Hairs and Roots by Agrobacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. V. Kalaptur; G. K. Solovova; V. I. Panasenko; M. I. Chumakov

    2004-01-01

    Formation of extracellular structures in pure culture and in interaction with wheat root surface was studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The effects of various factors (growth temperature as well as pretreatment of agrobacteria with kalanchoe extract, acetosyringone, and centrifugation) on formation of extracellular structures was tested. The data on Agrobacterium tumefaciens (wild-type strain C58 and mutants LBA2525 (virB2::lacZ)

  16. Bell pepper responses to root restriction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. S. NeSmith; D. C. Bridges; J. C. Barbour

    1992-01-01

    Various container sizes were used to induce root restriction on ‘Jupiter’ bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.). There was little or no effect of container size on plant growth up to 23 days after transplanting (DAT). By 45 DAT, leaf area and plant dry weight was diminished proportional to container volume. Root?to?shoot ratio was constant among the various root restricting conditions

  17. Efficient Real Root Approximation Michael Kerber

    E-print Network

    Efficient Real Root Approximation Michael Kerber IST (Institute of Science and Technology) Austria real roots of a square- free polynomial f. Given isolating intervals, our algorithm refines each of them to a certain width 2-L, that is, each of the roots is approximated to L bits after the binary

  18. Square Root Propagation Andrew G. Howard

    E-print Network

    Jebara, Tony

    Square Root Propagation Andrew G. Howard Department of Computer Science Columbia University New caused by finite numerical precision. We adapt square root algo- rithms, popular in Kalman filtering that involve the square root of precision matrices. Combining this with the machinery of the junction tree

  19. Efficient Real Root Approximation Michael Kerber

    E-print Network

    Efficient Real Root Approximation Michael Kerber IST (Institute of Science and Technology) Austria real roots of a square- free polynomial f . Given isolating intervals, our algorithm refines each of them to a width at most 2-L, that is, each of the roots is approximated to L bits after the binary

  20. Square Root Propagation Andrew G. Howard

    E-print Network

    Square Root Propagation Andrew G. Howard Department of Computer Science Columbia University New caused by finite numerical precision. We adapt square root algo­ rithms, popular in Kalman filtering that involve the square root of precision matrices. Combining this with the machinery of the junction tree

  1. Sugarbeet root rot in the Intermountain West

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root rot in sugarbeets caused by fungi and bacteria is a considerable problem in the western United States. In October 2004 and 2005, a survey was conducted on recently harvested sugarbeet roots throughout southern Idaho and eastern Oregon to identify the fungi and bacteria associated with root rot...

  2. Root Cause Analysis: Methods and Mindsets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kluch, Jacob H.

    This instructional unit is intended for use in training operations personnel and others involved in scram analysis at nuclear power plants in the techniques of root cause analysis. Four lessons are included. The first lesson provides an overview of the goals and benefits of the root cause analysis method. Root cause analysis techniques are covered…

  3. FOREST PATHOLOGY Root and Butt Rot Diseases

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    FOREST PATHOLOGY Root and Butt Rot Diseases M Garbelotto, University of California ­ Berkeley. Indeed, root and butt rots cause more economic damage to commercial forestry in the temperate world than, and basidiomycetes. Root and butt rots, instead, are exclusively caused by fungi belonging to the homo

  4. Chemical reduction at the root surface

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. C. Uren

    1982-01-01

    A “sandwich” of moist filter paper impregnated with an insoluble hydrous Fe(III)oxide (or an insoluble Mn oxide) was used to investigate chemical reduction taking place near root surfaces. It was felt that these systems were more similar to soil conditions than solution cultures, particularly because root hairs developed. After sterile roots of sunflower seedlings had brown across the filter paper

  5. Effect of scapling on root respiration rate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scalping improves root quality at harvest since impurities such as potassium, sodium, amino nitrogen and invert sugars that hinder sugarbeet processing are concentrated in the upper root crown. The effect of scalping on root storage properties, however, is less clear. A small study was conducted t...

  6. Root Cap and the Perception of Gravity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. E. Juniper; Suzanne Groves; BRURIA LANDAU-SCHACHAR; L. J. AUDUS

    1966-01-01

    DURING investigations into the fine structure of apical meristems under the electron microscope, one of us (S. G.) discovered that it was possible, in maize and barley, to detach the intact root cap cleanly from the rest of the root tip. This is shown in Fig. 1. The roots of grasses are characterized by having a discrete cap meristem and,

  7. The problem with root cause analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Robert Nelms

    2007-01-01

    An 800 person forum comprised of Root Cause Analysis (RCA) practitioners from all over the world tried to define “Root Cause Analysis.” They could not agree on an answer. A smaller group was formed, composed in part by at least 5 major RCA consultants. They could not agree either. Several major Professional Societies have tried to define root cause analysis

  8. Root-shoot interaction in the greening of wheat seedlings grown under red light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathy, B. C.; Brown, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Wheat seedlings grown with roots exposed to constant red light (300-500 micromoles m-2 s-1) did not accumulate chlorophyll in the leaves. In contrast, seedlings grown with their roots shielded from light accumulated chlorophylls. Chlorophyll biosynthesis could be induced in red-light-grown chlorophyll-deficient yellow plants by either reducing the red-light intensity at the root surface to 100 micromoles m-1 s-1 or supplementing with 6% blue light. The inhibition of chlorophyll biosynthesis was due to impairment of the Mg-chelatase enzyme working at the origin of the Mg-tetrapyrrole pathway. The root-perceived photomorphogenic inhibition of shoot greening demonstrates root-shoot interaction in the greening process.

  9. Indirect Methods Produce Higher Estimates of Fine Root Production and Turnover Rates than Direct Methods

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Z. Y.; Chen, Han Y. H.

    2012-01-01

    The production and turnover of fine roots play substantial roles in the biogeochemical cycles of terrestrial ecosystems. However, the disparity among the estimates of both production and turnover, particularly due to technical limitations, has been debated for several decades. Here, we conducted a meta-analysis to compare published estimates of fine root production and turnover rates derived from different methods at the same sites and at the same sampling time. On average, the estimates of fine root production and turnover rates were 87% and 124% higher, respectively, by indirect methods than by direct methods. The substantially higher fine root production and turnover estimated by indirect methods, on which most global carbon models are based, indicate the necessity of re-assessing the global carbon model predictions for atmospheric carbon sequestration in soils as a result of the production and turnover of fine roots. PMID:23166603

  10. Hydraulic lift: water efflux from upper roots improves effectiveness of water uptake by deep roots

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. M. Caldwell; J. H. Richards

    1989-01-01

    Deuterated water absorbed by deep roots of Artemisia tridentata appeared in the stem water of neighboring Agropyron desertorum tussocks. This supports the hypothesis that water absorbed by deep roots in moist soil moves through the roots, is released in the upper soil profile at night, and is stored there until it is resorbed by roots the following day. This phenomenon

  11. Update on Root Chemical Defenses In Defense of Roots: A Research Agenda for Studying

    E-print Network

    Agrawal, Anurag

    Update on Root Chemical Defenses In Defense of Roots: A Research Agenda for Studying Plant and Evolutionary Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853­2701 Interest in root biology research (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants, along with a sequenced genome, has led to valuable insights into root

  12. Auxin fluxes in the root apex co-regulate gravitropism and lateral root1 initiation2

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Auxin fluxes in the root apex co-regulate gravitropism and lateral root1 initiation2 Running title: Co-regulation of root gravitropism and branching by auxin3 transport4 Lucas, M.1,2 , Godin, C.2: 27 June 200718 6 figures19 6 supplementary figures20 21 hal-00831806,version1- #12;2 ABSTRACT1 Root

  13. ROOT FUNCTIONAL ARCHITECTURE: A FRAMEWORK FOR MODELLING THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN ROOTS AND SOIL

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ROOT FUNCTIONAL ARCHITECTURE: A FRAMEWORK FOR MODELLING THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN ROOTS AND SOIL Alain biological activity and associated processes are concentrated in the soil located around living plant roots and influenced by root activity, an environment known as the rhizosphere. Consequently, among the wide array

  14. Root Growth and Yield of Differing Alfalfa Rooting Populations under Increasing Salinity and Zero Leaching

    E-print Network

    Smith, Steven E.

    Root Growth and Yield of Differing Alfalfa Rooting Populations under Increasing Salinity and Zero-rootedAccumulation of salinity in the root zone can be detrimental to crops such as alfalfa to exploit the lower average salinitysustained crop production. Irrigation, even with moderately saline water, pushes accumulated salts deeper

  15. Exploring mechanisms of root erosion by flood in laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmaier, Katharina; Perona, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    Riparian vegetation developing on the bare alluvial sediment may strongly contribute to the local stabilization of river bedforms and, in turn to the resulting river morphodynamics. Both seedlings from germinated seeds or woody debris deposits that start taking roots in the gravel sediment eventually develop into vegetation patches depending on the frequency and magnitude of floods. Ultimately, the interaction between river hydrology and vegetation growth time scales depends on the anchoring mechanism of certain root type and age within the non-cohesive alluvial soil. Recently, we started to explore the mechanisms of flow erosion in the presence of vegetation roots at the laboratory scale, in order to help explaining some observations that have been made at the laboratory scale (Perucca et al., this Session) and in the field, that is a restored river reach (Pasquale et al., this Session). In this paper, we propose a conceptual mechanism showing that root erosion by floods depends on root architecture (age and structure), and that uprooting is essentially of two types. The first type is relevant to young vegetation and is mainly due to a balance between flow drag force and resistance to uprooting. The second type concerns more mature vegetation and implies that considerable localized erosion additionally takes place in order to produce uprooting. Such two processes occur at completely different time scales, being quite instantaneous the first, and rather delayed the second. Although made at laboratory scale, the results of our preliminary experiments seem to support the idea ursued by the conceptual model. Future test will aim at better unravel the details of the root erosion dynamics and at formulating a modelling theory therof, the implications of which range from ecohydrology to river restoration practice.

  16. Rapid automated detection of roots in minirhizotron images

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guang Zeng; Stanley T. Birchfield; Christina E. Wells

    2010-01-01

    An approach for rapid, automatic detection of plant roots in minirhizotron images is presented. The problem is modeled as\\u000a a Gibbs point process with a modified Candy model, in which the energy functional is minimized using a greedy algorithm whose\\u000a parameters are determined in a data-driven manner. The speed of the algorithm is due in part to the selection of

  17. Rapid induction of Agrobacterium   tumefaciens -mediated transgenic roots directly from adventitious roots in Panax   ginseng

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jung Yeon Han; Yong Eui Choi

    2009-01-01

    Root segments from seedlings of Panax ginseng produced adventitious roots directly when cultured on 1\\/2 MS solid medium lacking NH4NO3 and containing 3.0 mg l?1 IBA. Using this adventitious root formation, we developed rapid and efficient transgenic root formation directly from adventitious\\u000a root segments in P. ginseng. Root segments were co-cultivated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens (GV3101) caring ?-glucuronidase (GUS) gene. Putative transgenic adventitious roots were formed

  18. The pattern of secondary root formation in curving roots of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.

    PubMed

    Fortin, M C; Pierce, F J; Poff, K L

    1989-01-01

    A gravitational stimulus was used to induce the curvature of the main root of Arabidopsis thaliana. The number of secondary roots increased on the convex side and decreased on the concave side of any curved main root axes in comparison with straight roots used as the control. The same phenomenon was observed with the curved main roots of plants grown on a clinostat and of mutant plants exhibiting random root orientation. The data suggest that the pattern of lateral root formation is associated with curvature but is independent of the environmental stimuli used to induce curvature. PMID:11539812

  19. Local root apex hypoxia induces NO-mediated hypoxic acclimation of the entire root.

    PubMed

    Mugnai, Sergio; Azzarello, Elisa; Baluska, Frantisek; Mancuso, Stefano

    2012-05-01

    Roots are very sensitive to hypoxia and adapt effectively to a reduced availability of oxygen in the soil. However, the site of the root where oxygen availability is sensed and how roots acclimate to hypoxia remain unclear. In this study, we found that the root apex transition zone plays central roles in both sensing and adapting to root hypoxia. The exposure of cells of the root apex to hypoxia is sufficient to achieve hypoxic acclimation of the entire root; particularly relevant in this respect is that, of the entire root apex, the transition zone cells show the highest demand for oxygen and also emit the largest amount of nitric oxide (NO). Local root apex-specific oxygen deprivation dramatically inhibits the oxygen influx peak in the transition zone and simultaneously stimulates a local increase in NO emission. The hypoxia-induced efflux of NO is strictly associated with the transition zone and is essential for hypoxic acclimation of the entire root. PMID:22422934

  20. Mueller matrix roots depolarization parameters.

    PubMed

    Noble, Hannah D; McClain, Stephen C; Chipman, Russell A

    2012-02-20

    The Mueller matrix roots decomposition recently proposed by Chipman in [1] and its three associated families of depolarization (amplitude depolarization, phase depolarization, and diagonal depolarization) are explored. Degree of polarization maps are used to differentiate among the three families and demonstrate the unity between phase and diagonal depolarization, while amplitude depolarization remains a distinct class. Three families of depolarization are generated via the averaging of different forms of two nondepolarizing Mueller matrices. The orientation of the resulting depolarization follows the cyclic permutations of the Pauli spin matrices. The depolarization forms of Mueller matrices from two scattering measurements are analyzed with the matrix roots decomposition-a sample of ground glass and a graphite and wood pencil tip. PMID:22358163

  1. Root systems of chaparral shrubs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jochen Kummerow; David Krause; William Jow

    1977-01-01

    Root systems of chaparral shrubs were excavated from a 70 m2 plot of a mixed chaparral stand located on a north-facing slope in San Diego County (32°54' N; 900 m above sea level). The main shrub species present were Adenostoma fasciculatum, Arctostaphylos pungens, Ceanothus greggii, Erigonum fasciculatum, and Haplopappus pinifolius. Shrubs were wired into their positions, and the soil was

  2. Integrating Root Cause Analysis Methodologies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leith Hitchcock

    Many Root Cause Analysis (RCA) methodologies have specific applications and limitations and in some case for complex machinery\\u000a investigations they can be combined and enhanced for better results. Typical methodologies that can be combined effectively\\u000a are Kepner Tregoe, Causal Tree Analysis (Apollo), Fault Tree Analysis, Logic Tree Analysis, Barrier Analysis, and Human Performance\\u000a Evaluation amongst others.\\u000a \\u000a The difficulty with many

  3. Site and clone effects on the potato-root associated core microbiome and its relationship to tuber yield and nutrients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to describe the variability in the root-associated bacterial community due to location and clone, and to determine whether an underlying core bacterial community exists that might benefit the quality of the potato crop. Root-associated bacterial communities were examined wi...

  4. A method for counting roots observed in minirhizotrons and their theoretical conversion to root length density

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. T. Buckland; C. D. Campbell; L. A. Mackie-Dawson; G. W. Horgan; E. I. Duff

    1993-01-01

    A method for counting root intersections with observation tubes (mini- or micro-rhizotrons) is proposed that allows a theoretical\\u000a conversion of root counts to estimated root length density and which is robust to the effects of tracking along the tubes.\\u000a A field test showed that the method agreed well with measured root length densities in cores for wild cherry roots but

  5. Induction of branch roots by cutting method in t Hyoscyamus niger root culture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seung Han Woo; Jong Moon Park; Ji-Won Yang

    1997-01-01

    Root tips of Hyoscyamus niger were cultivated on agar or in liquid medium, and patterns of elongation and branching were investigated.\\u000a The elongation of roots compared to branching, particularly tertiary root branching, was more effective in liquid medium than\\u000a on agar medium. The number (0.06 per cm) of tertiary roots which branched out from secondary roots was far less than

  6. Shoot regeneration capacity from roots and transgenic hairy roots of tomato cultivars and wild related species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lázaro E. P. Peres; Patrícia G. Morgante; Cláudia Vecchi; Jane E. Kraus; Marie-Anne van Sluys

    2001-01-01

    The organogenetic competence of roots and Agrobacterium rhizogenes-induced hairy roots of twelve Lycopersicon genotypes was investigated. Both roots and hairy roots of L. peruvianum, L. chilense, L. hirsutum and two L. peruvianum-derived genotypes regenerated shoots after 2–4 weeks of incubation on zeatin-contained medium. Anatomical analysis showed\\u000a that shoot regeneration in roots could be direct or indirect, depending on the genotype

  7. Phytotoxic cyanamide affects maize (Zea mays) root growth and root tip function: from structure to gene expression.

    PubMed

    Soltys, Dorota; Rudzi?ska-Langwald, Anna; Kurek, Wojciech; Szajko, Katarzyna; Sliwinska, Elwira; Bogatek, Renata; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2014-05-01

    Cyanamide (CA) is a phytotoxic compound produced by four Fabaceae species: hairy vetch, bird vetch, purple vetch and black locust. Its toxicity is due to complex activity that involves the modification of both cellular structures and physiological processes. To date, CA has been investigated mainly in dicot plants. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of CA in the restriction of the root growth of maize (Zea mays), representing the monocot species. CA (3mM) reduced the number of border cells in the root tips of maize seedlings and degraded their protoplasts. However, CA did not induce any significant changes in the organelle structure of other root cells, apart from increased vacuolization. CA toxicity was also demonstrated by its effect on cell cycle activity, endoreduplication intensity, and modifications of cyclins CycA2, CycD2, and histone HisH3 gene expression. In contrast, the arrangement of microtubules was not altered by CA. Treatment of maize seedlings with CA did not completely arrest mitotic activity, although the frequency of dividing cells was reduced. Furthermore, prolonged CA treatment increased the proportion of endopolyploid cells in the root tip. Cytological malformations were accompanied by an induction of oxidative stress in root cells, which manifested as enhanced accumulation of H2O2. Exposure of maize seedlings to CA resulted in an increased concentration of auxin and stimulated ethylene emission. Taken together, these findings suggested that the inhibition of root growth by CA may be a consequence of stress-induced morphogenic responses. PMID:24709147

  8. An interdisciplinary approach to decipher different phases of soil formation using root abundances and geochemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesenberg, Guido; Gocke, Martina

    2015-04-01

    Pedogenic processes are commonly thought to be restricted mainly to the uppermost few dm of soils. However, often processes like water infiltration and - more obviously - rooting lead to much deeper penetration of soil, soil parent material and, if present, paleosols. The extent to which root penetration and subsequent organic matter incorporation, release of root exudates and microbial activity influence the general chemical and physical properties of deeper soil horizons remains largely unknown. We determined the lateral extent of root-derived overprint of the soil parent material as well as the overprint of the chemical properties in paleosols by combining root quantities obtained in the field with a large variety of inorganic and organic chemical as well as microbial properties in bulk soils and rhizosphere samples. Soils, soil parent material and paleosols were sampled along a transect from The Netherlands via Germany and Hungary towards Serbia, where soil and underlying loess, sand, and paleosol profiles were excavated in pits of 2 m to 13 m depth. Root counting on horizontal levels and profile walls during field campaigns, assisted by three-dimensional X-ray microtomographic scanning of undisturbed samples, enabled the quantitative assessment of recent and ancient root systems. Ages were determined by 14C dating for the latter, and by OSL dating for sediments, respectively. The bulk elemental composition of soils, sediments and paleosols and molecular structure of organic matter therein helped to quantitatively assess the root-related overprint in different depth intervals. The results point to the significance of deep roots as a soil forming factor extending into soil parent material, as well as the overprint of geochemical proxies in paleosols due to intense root penetration at various phases after burial. The shown examples highlight potential pitfalls in assessing rooted soil and paleosol profiles and their ages, and provide potential solutions for proper data interpretation.

  9. Soil Penetration by Earthworms and Plant Roots—Mechanical Energetics of Bioturbation of Compacted Soils

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We quantify mechanical processes common to soil penetration by earthworms and growing plant roots, including the energetic requirements for soil plastic displacement. The basic mechanical model considers cavity expansion into a plastic wet soil involving wedging by root tips or earthworms via cone-like penetration followed by cavity expansion due to pressurized earthworm hydroskeleton or root radial growth. The mechanical stresses and resulting soil strains determine the mechanical energy required for bioturbation under different soil hydro-mechanical conditions for a realistic range of root/earthworm geometries. Modeling results suggest that higher soil water content and reduced clay content reduce the strain energy required for soil penetration. The critical earthworm or root pressure increases with increased diameter of root or earthworm, however, results are insensitive to the cone apex (shape of the tip). The invested mechanical energy per unit length increase with increasing earthworm and plant root diameters, whereas mechanical energy per unit of displaced soil volume decreases with larger diameters. The study provides a quantitative framework for estimating energy requirements for soil penetration work done by earthworms and plant roots, and delineates intrinsic and external mechanical limits for bioturbation processes. Estimated energy requirements for earthworm biopore networks are linked to consumption of soil organic matter and suggest that earthworm populations are likely to consume a significant fraction of ecosystem net primary production to sustain their subterranean activities. PMID:26087130

  10. Stress-induced accumulation of wheat germ agglutinin and abscisic acid in roots of wheat seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Cammue, B.P.A.; Broekaert, W.F.; Kellens, J.T.C.; Peumans, W.J. (Laboratorium voor Plantenbiochemie K. U. Leuven (Belgium)); Raikhel, N.V. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) levels in roots of 2-day-old wheat seedlings increased up to three-fold when stressed by air-drying. Similar results were obtained when seedling roots were incubated either in 0.5 molar mannitol or 180 grams per liter polyethylene glycol 6,000, with a peak level of WGA after 5 hours of stress. Longer periods of osmotic treatment resulted in a gradual decline of WGA in the roots. Since excised wheat roots incorporate more ({sup 35}S)cysteine into WGA under stress conditions, the observed increase of lectin levels is due to de novo synthesis. Measurement of abscisic acid (ABA) levels in roots of control and stressed seedlings indicated a 10-fold increase upon air-drying. Similarly, a five- and seven-fold increase of ABA content of seedling roots was found after 2 hours of osmotic stress by polyethylene glycol 6,000 and mannitol, respectively. Finally, the stress-induced increase of WGA in wheat roots could be inhibited by growing seedlings in the presence of fluridone, an inhibitor of ABA synthesis. These results indicate that roots of water-stressed wheat seedlings (a) contain more WGA as a result of an increased de novo synthesis of this lectin, and (b) exhibit higher ABA levels. The stress-induced increase of lectin accumulation seems to be under control of ABA.

  11. Hydrotropism in pea roots in a porous-tube water delivery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, H.; Brown, C. S.; Dreschel, T. W.; Scott, T. K.; Knott, W. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Orientation of root growth on earth and under microgravity conditions can possibly be controlled by hydrotropism--growth toward a moisture source in the absence of or reduced gravitropism. A porous-tube water delivery system being used for plant growth studies is appropriate for testing this hypothesis since roots can be grown aeroponically in this system. When the roots of the agravitropic mutant pea ageotropum (Pisum sativum L.) were placed vertically in air of 91% relative humidity and 2 to 3 mm from the water-saturated porous tube placed horizontally, the roots responded hydrotropically and grew in a continuous arch along the circular surface of the tube. By contrast, normal gravitropic roots of Alaska' pea initially showed a slight transient curvature toward the tube and then resumed vertical downward growth due to gravitropism. Thus, in microgravity, normal gravitropic roots could respond to a moisture gradient as strongly as the agravitropic roots used in this study. Hydrotropism should be considered a significant factor responsible for orientation of root growth in microgravity.

  12. Cytokinin-dependent secondary growth determines root biomass in radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Jang, Geupil; Lee, Jung-Hun; Rastogi, Khushboo; Park, Suhyoung; Oh, Sang-Hun; Lee, Ji-Young

    2015-08-01

    The root serves as an essential organ in plant growth by taking up nutrients and water from the soil and supporting the rest of the plant body. Some plant species utilize roots as storage organs. Sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas), cassava (Manihot esculenta), and radish (Raphanus sativus), for example, are important root crops. However, how their root growth is regulated remains unknown. In this study, we characterized the relationship between cambium and radial root growth in radish. Through a comparative analysis with Arabidopsis root expression data, we identified putative cambium-enriched transcription factors in radish and analysed their expression in representative inbred lines featuring distinctive radial growth. We found that cell proliferation activities in the cambium positively correlated with radial growth and final yields of radish roots. Expression analysis of candidate transcription factor genes revealed that some genes are differentially expressed between inbred lines and that the difference is due to the distinct cytokinin response. Taken together, we have demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that cytokinin-dependent radial growth plays a key role in the yields of root crops. PMID:25979997

  13. Hydrotropism in pea roots in a porous-tube water delivery system.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, H; Brown, C S; Dreschel, T W; Scott, T K

    1992-05-01

    Orientation of root growth on earth and under microgravity conditions can possibly be controlled by hydrotropism--growth toward a moisture source in the absence of or reduced gravitropism. A porous-tube water delivery system being used for plant growth studies is appropriate for testing this hypothesis since roots can be grown aeroponically in this system. When the roots of the agravitropic mutant pea ageotropum (Pisum sativum L.) were placed vertically in air of 91% relative humidity and 2 to 3 mm from the water-saturated porous tube placed horizontally, the roots responded hydrotropically and grew in a continuous arch along the circular surface of the tube. By contrast, normal gravitropic roots of Alaska' pea initially showed a slight transient curvature toward the tube and then resumed vertical downward growth due to gravitropism. Thus, in microgravity, normal gravitropic roots could respond to a moisture gradient as strongly as the agravitropic roots used in this study. Hydrotropism should be considered a significant factor responsible for orientation of root growth in microgravity. PMID:11537612

  14. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy surface analysis of aluminum ion stress in barley roots. [Hordeum vulgare

    SciTech Connect

    Millard, M.M.; Foy, C.D.; Coradetti, C.A.; Reinsel, M.D. (Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD (USA))

    1990-06-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to analyze root surface changes when Dayton barley (Hordeum vulgare) (Al tolerant) and Kearney barley (Al sensitive) seedlings were grown in nutrient solution in the presence and absence of 37.0 micromolar Al. The electron spectra from root surfaces contained strong lines in order of decreasing intensity from organic forms of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen and weak lines due to inorganic elements in the form of anions and cations on the surface. The surface composition of root tips from Kearney was C, 65.6%; 0, 26.8%; N, 4.4% and tips from Dayton was C, 72.7%; O, 23.6%; N, 1.9%, grown in the absence of aluminum. Electron lines characteristic of nitrate, potassium, chloride, phosphate were also present in the spectra from those roots. Dayton roots grown in the presence of 37.0 micromolar aluminum contained 2.1% aluminum while Kearney contained 1.3% aluminum. The ratio of aluminum to phosphate was close to 1.0. Dayton roots usually contained twice as much aluminum phosphate in the surface region as Kearney. Dayton may be less susceptible to Al toxic effects by accumulation of aluminum phosphate on the root surface which then acts as a barrier to the transport of aluminum into the interior of the roots.

  15. Complex Square Root with Operand Prescaling Milos D. Ercegovac

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Complex Square Root with Operand Prescaling Milos D. Ercegovac Computer Science Department, 3732-recurrence algorithm for complex square-root. The operand is prescaled to allow the selection of square-root digits routines for complex square root. 1 Introduction 1.1 Complex square-root Complex square-root appears

  16. Sites and Regulation of Auxin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis Roots

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karin Ljung; Anna K. Hull; John Celenza; Masashi Yamada; Mark Estelle; Jennifer Normanly; Goran Sandberga

    2005-01-01

    Auxin has been shown to be important for many aspects of root development, including initiation and emergence of lateral roots, patterning of the root apical meristem, gravitropism, and root elongation. Auxin biosynthesis occurs in both aerial portions of the plant and in roots; thus, the auxin required for root development could come from either source, or both. To monitor putative

  17. Linking carbon supply to root cell-wall chemistry and mechanics at high altitudes in Abies georgei

    PubMed Central

    Genet, Marie; Li, Mingcai; Luo, Tianxiang; Fourcaud, Thierry; Clément-Vidal, Anne; Stokes, Alexia

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The mobile carbon supply to different compartments of a tree is affected by climate, but its impact on cell-wall chemistry and mechanics remains unknown. To understand better the variability in root growth and biomechanics in mountain forests subjected to substrate mass movement, we investigated root chemical and mechanical properties of mature Abies georgei var. smithii (Smith fir) growing at different elevations on the Tibet–Qinghai Plateau. Methods Thin and fine roots (0·1–4·0 mm in diameter) were sampled at three different elevations (3480, 3900 and 4330 m, the last corresponding to the treeline). Tensile resistance of roots of different diameter classes was measured along with holocellulose and non-structural carbon (NSC) content. Key Results The mean force necessary to break roots in tension decreased significantly with increasing altitude and was attributed to a decrease in holocellulose content. Holocellulose was significantly lower in roots at the treeline (29·5 ± 1·3 %) compared with those at 3480 m (39·1 ± 1·0 %). Roots also differed significantly in NSC, with 35·6 ± 4·1 mg g?1 dry mass of mean total soluble sugars in roots at 3480 m and 18·8 ± 2·1 mg g?1 dry mass in roots at the treeline. Conclusions Root mechanical resistance, holocellulose and NSC content all decreased with increasing altitude. Holocellulose is made up principally of cellulose, the biosynthesis of which depends largely on NSC supply. Plants synthesize cellulose when conditions are optimal and NSC is not limiting. Thus, cellulose synthesis in the thin and fine roots measured in our study is probably not a priority in mature trees growing at very high altitudes, where climatic factors will be limiting for growth. Root NSC stocks at the treeline may be depleted through over-demand for carbon supply due to increased fine root production or winter root growth. PMID:21186240

  18. A methodology for root cause analysis of poor performance in fixed-wireless data networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dogu Arifler

    2007-01-01

    In fixed-wireless data networks, poor performance experienced by users, such as excessive delays during file transfers, might be due to a heavily utilized base station or due to the location of the users relative to the base station. A principal component analysis based methodology that may be used by content providers for analyzing the root cause of performance problems is

  19. Anaphylaxis due to caffeine

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Tatsurai; Tatewaki, Masamitsu; Onishi, Shogo; Yokoyama, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Naruo; Fujimatsu, Takayoshi; Hirata, Hirokuni; Fukuda, Takeshi; Fukushima, Yasutsugu

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of anaphylaxis due to caffeine intake. A 27-year-old woman suffered her first episode of anaphylaxis and a positive skin prick test suggested that the anaphylaxis was due to an IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reaction to caffeine. She was diagnosed with caffeine allergy and has not had an allergic reaction after avoiding foods and drinks containing caffeine. Although caffeine is known to have antiallergic effects, this case shows that caffeine can be an allergen and cause anaphylaxis. PMID:25653922

  20. An outflow of acetylcholine from normal and regenerating ventral roots of the cat

    PubMed Central

    Evans, C. A. N.; Saunders, N. R.

    1974-01-01

    1. An outflow of acetylcholine (ACh) has been measured from cat ventral roots in situ and in vitro, using standard bio-assay techniques. The ACh was collected in chambers, filled with physiological solution containing anticholinesterase, which surrounded the root. 2. The outflow fell rapidly at first and then progressively more slowly, taking several hours to fall to a level near the assay threshold. The outflow of ACh resulted from cutting a root or from such conventional manipulations as stretching the root or teasing apart root filaments. The outflow could occur either from the end of a root (following cutting) or from along the length of the root (following stretching or teasing). The outflow was only detected in the presence of an anticholinesterase. 3. ACh was resynthesized by roots at a rate which was usually rapid enough to maintain their ACh content at its original level in spite of a considerable ACh outflow. In roots subjected to a minimum of interference their ACh content built up to about twice the initial content after 5-7 hr soaking in eserinized Krebs solution although the total ACh outflow was equivalent to the original ACh content. Roots which were cut or stretched several times within a few hours put out a large amount of ACh and showed a fall in their ACh content below the initial level. 4. The time course of sealing of the damaged ends of axons following crushing was assessed by measuring the injury potential for 1-2 hr after crushing at room temperature; in normal roots the half-time for decline of the injury potential was 91 ± 10 min. This was slower than the rate of decline of the ACh outflow. 5. An explanation for the observed outflow of ACh is discussed in terms of diffusion of ACh and sealing of axon ends. It is concluded that much of the ACh in normal ventral root axons is present in a readily diffusible form. 6. Similar experiments on roots regenerating 9-10 days after crushing showed that the ACh outflow from regenerating roots was much smaller than from normal axons, although their ACh content was similar. This could have been due to more rapid sealing of the cut regenerating axons since the half-time for the decline of the injury potential following crushing of the regenerating axons was less than half that in control roots. The alternative possibility is considered that a high proportion of the ACh might be much less diffusible than in normal axons. 7. The subcellular distribution of ACh in normal and regenerating peripheral axons is discussed. PMID:4850555

  1. Foraging strategies in trees of different root morphology: the role of root lifespan.

    PubMed

    Adams, Thomas S; McCormack, M Luke; Eissenstat, David M

    2013-09-01

    Resource exploitation of patches is influenced not simply by the rate of root production in the patches but also by the lifespan of the roots inhabiting the patches. We examined the effect of sustained localized nitrogen (N) fertilization on root lifespan in four tree species that varied widely in root morphology and presumed foraging strategy. The study was conducted in a 12-year-old common garden in central Pennsylvania using a combination of data from minirhizotron and root in-growth cores. The two fine-root tree species, Acer negundo L. and Populus tremuloides Michx., exhibited significant increases in root lifespan with local N fertilization; no significant responses were observed in the two coarse-root tree species, Sassafras albidum Nutt. and Liriodendron tulipifera L. Across species, coarse-root tree species had longer median root lifespan than fine-root tree species. Localized N fertilization did not significantly increase the N concentration or the respiration of the roots growing in the N-rich patch. Our results suggest that some plant species appear to regulate the lifespan of different portions of their root system to improve resource acquisition while other species do not. Our results are discussed in the context of different strategies of foraging of nutrient patches in species of different root morphology. PMID:24128849

  2. Soil bacterial diversity responses to root colonization by an ectomycorrhizal fungus are not root-growth-dependent.

    PubMed

    Assigbetse, Komi; Gueye, Mariama; Thioulouse, Jean; Duponnois, Robin

    2005-10-01

    The hypothesis tested in this present study was that the ectomycorrhizosphere effect on the bacterial community was not root-growth-dependent. The impacts of ectomycorrhizal infection (Pisolithus albus COI007) and a chemical fertilization to reproduce the fungal effect on root growth were examined on (1) the structure of bacterial community and (2) fluorescent pseudomonad and actinomycete populations in the mycorrhizosphere of Acacia auriculiformis using both culture-independent and culture-dependent methods. A. auriculiformis plants were grown in disinfested soil in pots with or without addition of the ectomycorrhizal fungus or N/P/K fertilization (to reproduce the fungal effect on root growth) for 4 months and then transferred to 20-L pots filled with nondisinfested sandy soil. The fungal and fertilizer applications significantly improved the plant growth after 4-month culture in the disinfested soil. In the nondisinfested cultural substrate, these positive effects on plant growth were maintained. The total soil microbiota was significantly different within the treatments as revealed from DNA analysis [denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE)]. The structure of fluorescent pseudomonad populations was also affected by fungal and fertilizer applications. In contrast, no qualitative effect was observed for the actinomycete communities within each treatment, but fungal inoculation significantly decreased the number of actinomycetes compared to the fertilizer application treatment. These results show that the mycorrhizosphere effect is not root-growth-dependent but is mainly due to the presence of the ectomycorrhizal fungus and more particularly to the extramatrical mycelium. PMID:16254760

  3. American Psychological Association Dues

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles R. Kelley

    1967-01-01

    This commentary criticizes the recent American Psychological Association dues increase. APA is obviously two things, a scientific organization and a psychologist's union. While the author wishes to support the national scientific organization in psychology, he is opposed to almost all of the activities of the psychologist's union, including certification, standardization of training for psychologists, \\

  4. 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) concentration and ACC synthase expression in soybean roots and root tips and soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) colonized root pieces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It's fairly well established that a functional ethylene response path is important to root knot and cyst nematode colonization of plant roots. However, ethylene plays many roles in root development and the role of ethylene in nematode colonization of roots may be indirect, e.g. lateral root initiati...

  5. Root exudates mediate kin recognition in plants

    PubMed Central

    Biedrzycki, Meredith L; Jilany, Tafari A

    2010-01-01

    Though recent work has demonstrated that plants can recognize species, kin versus strangers, and self/non-self roots, no mechanism for identity recognition in plants has yet been found. Here we examined the role of soluble chemicals in signaling among roots. Utilizing Arabidopsis thaliana, we exposed young seedlings to liquid media containing exudates from siblings, strangers (non-siblings), or only their own exudates. In one experiment, root secretions were inhibited by sodium orthovanadate and root length and number of lateral roots were measured. In a second experiment, responses to siblings, strangers, and their own exudates were measured for several accessions (genotypes), and the traits of length of the longest lateral root and hypocotyl length were also measured. The exposure of plants to the root exudates of strangers induced greater lateral root formation than exposure of plants to sibling exudates. Stranger recognition was abolished upon treatment with the secretion inhibitor. In one experiment, plants exposed to sibling or stranger exudates have shorter roots than plants only exposed to their own exudates. This self/non-self recognition response was not affected by the secretion inhibitor. The results demonstrate that that kin recognition and self/non-self are two separate identity recognition systems involving soluble chemicals. Kin recognition requires active secretion by roots. PMID:20539778

  6. Analysis of changes in relative elemental growth rate patterns in the elongation zone of Arabidopsis roots upon gravistimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, J. L.; Ishikawa, H.; Evans, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    Although Arabidopsis is an important system for studying root physiology, the localized growth patterns of its roots have not been well defined, particularly during tropic responses. In order to characterize growth rate profiles along the apex of primary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh (ecotype Columbia) we applied small charcoal particles to the root surface and analyzed their displacement during growth using an automated video digitizer system with custom software for tracking the markers. When growing vertically, the maximum elongation rate occurred 481 +/- 50 microns back from the extreme tip of the root (tip of root cap), and the elongation zone extended back to 912 +/- 137 microns. The distal elongation zone (DEZ) has previously been described as the apical region of the elongation zone in which the relative elemental growth rate (REGR) is < or = 30% of the peak rate in the central elongation zone. By this definition, our data indicate that the basal limit of the DEZ was located 248 +/- 30 microns from the root tip. However, after gravistimulation, the growth patterns of the root changed. Within the first hour of graviresponse, the basal limit of the DEZ and the position of peak REGR shifted apically on the upper flank of the root. This was due to a combination of increased growth in the DEZ and growth inhibition in the central elongation zone. On the lower flank, the basal limit of the DEZ shifted basipetally as the REGR decreased. These factors set up the gradient of growth rate across the root, which drives curvature.

  7. Rhizoslides: paper-based growth system for non-destructive, high throughput phenotyping of root development by means of image analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A quantitative characterization of root system architecture is currently being attempted for various reasons. Non-destructive, rapid analyses of root system architecture are difficult to perform due to the hidden nature of the root. Hence, improved methods to measure root architecture are necessary to support knowledge-based plant breeding and to analyse root growth responses to environmental changes. Here, we report on the development of a novel method to reveal growth and architecture of maize root systems. Results The method is based on the cultivation of different root types within several layers of two-dimensional, large (50 × 60 cm) plates (rhizoslides). A central plexiglass screen stabilizes the system and is covered on both sides with germination paper providing water and nutrients for the developing root, followed by a transparent cover foil to prevent the roots from falling dry and to stabilize the system. The embryonic roots grow hidden between a Plexiglas surface and paper, whereas crown roots grow visible between paper and the transparent cover. Long cultivation with good image quality up to 20 days (four fully developed leaves) was enhanced by suppressing fungi with a fungicide. Based on hyperspectral microscopy imaging, the quality of different germination papers was tested and three provided sufficient contrast to distinguish between roots and background (segmentation). Illumination, image acquisition and segmentation were optimised to facilitate efficient root image analysis. Several software packages were evaluated with regard to their precision and the time investment needed to measure root system architecture. The software 'Smart Root’ allowed precise evaluation of root development but needed substantial user interference. 'GiaRoots’ provided the best segmentation method for batch processing in combination with a good analysis of global root characteristics but overestimated root length due to thinning artefacts. 'WhinRhizo’ offered the most rapid and precise evaluation of root lengths in diameter classes, but had weaknesses with respect to image segmentation and analysis of root system architecture. Conclusion A new technique has been established for non-destructive root growth studies and quantification of architectural traits beyond seedlings stages. However, automation of the scanning process and appropriate software remains the bottleneck for high throughput analysis. PMID:25093035

  8. Meta-analysis of the effects of plant roots in controlling concentrated flow erosion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannoppen, Wouter; Poesen, Jean; Vanmaercke, Matthias; De Baets, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation is often used in ecological restoration programs to control various soil erosion processes. During the last two decades several studies reported on the effects of plant roots in controlling concentrated flow erosion rates. However a global analysis of the now available data on root effects is still lacking. Yet, a meta-data analysis will contribute to a better understanding of the soil-root interactions as our capability to assess the effectiveness of roots in reducing soil erosion rates due to concentrated flow in different environments remains difficult. The objectives of this study are therefore i) to provide a state of the art on studies quantifying the effectiveness of roots in reducing soil erosion rates due to concentrated flow; and ii) to explore the overall trends in erosion reduction as a function of the root (length) density, root system architecture and soil texture, based on a global analysis of published research data. We therefore compiled a dataset of measured relative soil detachment rates (RSD) for the root density (RD; 822 observations) as well as the root length density (RLD; 274 observations). Non-linear regression analyses showed that decreases in RSD as a function of RD and RLD could be best described with the Hill curve model. However, a large proportion of the variability in RSD could not be attributed to RD or RLD, resulting in a relatively low predictive accuracy of the Hill curve model with model efficiencies of 0.11 and 0.17 for RD and RLD respectively. Considering root architecture and soil texture yielded a better predictive model especially for RLD with ME of 0.37 for fibrous roots in a non-sandy soil. The unexplained variance is to a large extent attributable to measuring errors and differences in experimental set ups that could not be explicitly accounted for (e.g. tested plant species, soil and flow characteristics). However, using a Monte Carlo simulation approach, we were able to establish relationships that allow assessing the likely erosion-reducing effects of plant roots, while taking these uncertainties into account. Our analyses further showed that compared to RD, RLD is a much more suitable variable to estimate RSD, because it is indirectly correlated to root system architecture.

  9. Human due diligence.

    PubMed

    Harding, David; Rouse, Ted

    2007-04-01

    Most companies do a thorough job of financial due diligence when they acquire other companies. But all too often, deal makers simply ignore or underestimate the significance of people issues in mergers and acquisitions. The consequences are severe. Most obviously, there's a high degree of talent loss after a deal's announcement. To make matters worse, differences in decision-making styles lead to infighting; integration stalls; and productivity declines. The good news is that human due diligence can help companies avoid these problems. Done early enough, it helps acquirers decide whether to embrace or kill a deal and determine the price they are willing to pay. It also lays the groundwork for smooth integration. When acquirers have done their homework, they can uncover capability gaps, points of friction, and differences in decision making. Even more important, they can make the critical "people" decisions-who stays, who goes, who runs the combined business, what to do with the rank and file-at the time the deal is announced or shortly thereafter. Making such decisions within the first 30 days is critical to the success of a deal. Hostile situations clearly make things more difficult, but companies can and must still do a certain amount of human due diligence to reduce the inevitable fallout from the acquisition process and smooth the integration. This article details the steps involved in conducting human due diligence. The approach is structured around answering five basic questions: Who is the cultural acquirer? What kind of organization do you want? Will the two cultures mesh? Who are the people you most want to retain? And how will rank-and-file employees react to the deal? Unless an acquiring company has answered these questions to its satisfaction, the acquisition it is making will be very likely to end badly. PMID:17432159

  10. Genetic ablation of root cap cells in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsugeki, R.; Fedoroff, N. V.

    1999-01-01

    The root cap is increasingly appreciated as a complex and dynamic plant organ. Root caps sense and transmit environmental signals, synthesize and secrete small molecules and macromolecules, and in some species shed metabolically active cells. However, it is not known whether root caps are essential for normal shoot and root development. We report the identification of a root cap-specific promoter and describe its use to genetically ablate root caps by directing root cap-specific expression of a diphtheria toxin A-chain gene. Transgenic toxin-expressing plants are viable and have normal aerial parts but agravitropic roots, implying loss of root cap function. Several cell layers are missing from the transgenic root caps, and the remaining cells are abnormal. Although the radial organization of the roots is normal in toxin-expressing plants, the root tips have fewer cytoplasmically dense cells than do wild-type root tips, suggesting that root meristematic activity is lower in transgenic than in wild-type plants. The roots of transgenic plants have more lateral roots and these are, in turn, more highly branched than those of wild-type plants. Thus, root cap ablation alters root architecture both by inhibiting root meristematic activity and by stimulating lateral root initiation. These observations imply that the root caps contain essential components of the signaling system that determines root architecture.

  11. Genotypic recognition and spatial responses by rice roots

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Suqin; Clark, Randy T.; Zheng, Ying; Iyer-Pascuzzi, Anjali S.; Weitz, Joshua S.; Kochian, Leon V.; Edelsbrunner, Herbert; Liao, Hong; Benfey, Philip N.

    2013-01-01

    Root system growth and development is highly plastic and is influenced by the surrounding environment. Roots frequently grow in heterogeneous environments that include interactions from neighboring plants and physical impediments in the rhizosphere. To investigate how planting density and physical objects affect root system growth, we grew rice in a transparent gel system in close proximity with another plant or a physical object. Root systems were imaged and reconstructed in three dimensions. Root–root interaction strength was calculated using quantitative metrics that characterize the extent to which the reconstructed root systems overlap each other. Surprisingly, we found the overlap of root systems of the same genotype was significantly higher than that of root systems of different genotypes. Root systems of the same genotype tended to grow toward each other but those of different genotypes appeared to avoid each other. Shoot separation experiments excluded the possibility of aerial interactions, suggesting root communication. Staggered plantings indicated that interactions likely occur at root tips in close proximity. Recognition of obstacles also occurred through root tips, but through physical contact in a size-dependent manner. These results indicate that root systems use two different forms of communication to recognize objects and alter root architecture: root-root recognition, possibly mediated through root exudates, and root-object recognition mediated by physical contact at the root tips. This finding suggests that root tips act as local sensors that integrate rhizosphere information into global root architectural changes. PMID:23362379

  12. Simple analytical model of evapotranspiration in the presence of roots.

    PubMed

    Cejas, Cesare M; Hough, L A; Castaing, Jean-Christophe; Frétigny, Christian; Dreyfus, Rémi

    2014-10-01

    Evaporation of water out of a soil involves complicated and well-debated mechanisms. When plant roots are added into the soil, water transfer between the soil and the outside environment is even more complicated. Indeed, plants provide an additional process of water transfer. Water is pumped by the roots, channeled to the leaf surface, and released into the surrounding air by a process called transpiration. Prediction of the evapotranspiration of water over time in the presence of roots helps keep track of the amount of water that remains in the soil. Using a controlled visual setup of a two-dimensional model soil consisting of monodisperse glass beads, we perform experiments on actual roots grown under different relative humidity conditions. We record the total water mass loss in the medium and the position of the evaporating front that forms within the medium. We then develop a simple analytical model that predicts the position of the evaporating front as a function of time as well as the total amount of water that is lost from the medium due to the combined effects of evaporation and transpiration. The model is based on fundamental principles of evaporation fluxes and includes empirical assumptions on the quantity of open stomata in the leaves, where water transpiration occurs. Comparison between the model and experimental results shows excellent prediction of the position of the evaporating front as well as the total mass loss from evapotranspiration in the presence of roots. The model also provides a way to predict the lifetime of a plant. PMID:25375532

  13. Simple analytical model of evapotranspiration in the presence of roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cejas, Cesare M.; Hough, L. A.; Castaing, Jean-Christophe; Frétigny, Christian; Dreyfus, Rémi

    2014-10-01

    Evaporation of water out of a soil involves complicated and well-debated mechanisms. When plant roots are added into the soil, water transfer between the soil and the outside environment is even more complicated. Indeed, plants provide an additional process of water transfer. Water is pumped by the roots, channeled to the leaf surface, and released into the surrounding air by a process called transpiration. Prediction of the evapotranspiration of water over time in the presence of roots helps keep track of the amount of water that remains in the soil. Using a controlled visual setup of a two-dimensional model soil consisting of monodisperse glass beads, we perform experiments on actual roots grown under different relative humidity conditions. We record the total water mass loss in the medium and the position of the evaporating front that forms within the medium. We then develop a simple analytical model that predicts the position of the evaporating front as a function of time as well as the total amount of water that is lost from the medium due to the combined effects of evaporation and transpiration. The model is based on fundamental principles of evaporation fluxes and includes empirical assumptions on the quantity of open stomata in the leaves, where water transpiration occurs. Comparison between the model and experimental results shows excellent prediction of the position of the evaporating front as well as the total mass loss from evapotranspiration in the presence of roots. The model also provides a way to predict the lifetime of a plant.

  14. Truffles regulate plant root morphogenesis via the production of auxin and ethylene.

    PubMed

    Splivallo, Richard; Fischer, Urs; Göbel, Cornelia; Feussner, Ivo; Karlovsky, Petr

    2009-08-01

    Truffles are symbiotic fungi that form ectomycorrhizas with plant roots. Here we present evidence that at an early stage of the interaction, i.e. prior to physical contact, mycelia of the white truffle Tuber borchii and the black truffle Tuber melanopsorum induce alterations in root morphology of the host Cistus incanus and the nonhost Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; i.e. primary root shortening, lateral root formation, root hair stimulation). This was most likely due to the production of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and ethylene by the mycelium. Application of a mixture of the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid and IAA fully mimicked the root morphology induced by the mycelium for both host and nonhost plants. Application of the single hormones only partially mimicked it. Furthermore, primary root growth was not inhibited in the Arabidopsis auxin transport mutant aux1-7 by truffle metabolites while root branching was less effected in the ethylene-insensitive mutant ein2-LH. The double mutant aux1-7;ein2-LH displayed reduced sensitivity to fungus-induced primary root shortening and branching. In agreement with the signaling nature of truffle metabolites, increased expression of the auxin response reporter DR5GFP in Arabidopsis root meristems subjected to the mycelium could be observed, confirming that truffles modify the endogenous hormonal balance of plants. Last, we demonstrate that truffles synthesize ethylene from l-methionine probably through the alpha-keto-gamma-(methylthio)butyric acid pathway. Taken together, these results establish the central role of IAA and ethylene as signal molecules in truffle/plant interactions. PMID:19535471

  15. Constructing the Uncertainty of Due Dates

    PubMed Central

    Vos, Sarah C.; Anthony, Kathryn E.; O'Hair, H. Dan

    2015-01-01

    By its nature, the date that a baby is predicted to be born, or the due date, is uncertain. How women construct the uncertainty of their due dates may have implications for when and how women give birth. In the United States as many as 15% of births occur before 39 weeks because of elective inductions or cesarean sections, putting these babies at risk for increased medical problems after birth and later in life. This qualitative study employs a grounded theory approach to understand the decisions women make of how and when to give birth. Thirty-three women who were pregnant or had given birth within the past two years participated in key informant or small group interviews. The results suggest that women interpret the uncertainty of their due dates as a reason to wait on birth and as a reason to start the process early; however, information about a baby's brain development in the final weeks of pregnancy may persuade women to remain pregnant longer. The uncertainties of due dates are analyzed using Babrow's problematic integration, which distinguishes between epistemological and ontological uncertainty. The results point to a third type uncertainty, axiological uncertainty. Axiological uncertainty is rooted in the values and ethics of outcomes. PMID:24266788

  16. Measurements of water uptake of maize roots: the key function of lateral roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. A.; Zarebanadkouki, M.; Kroener, E.; Kaestner, A.; Carminati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is one of the most important crop worldwide. Despite its importance, there is limited information on the function of different root segments and root types of maize in extracting water from soils. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate locations of root water uptake in maize. We used neutron radiography to: 1) image the spatial distribution of maize roots in soil and 2) trace the transport of injected deuterated water (D2O) in soil and roots. Maizes were grown in aluminum containers (40×38×1 cm) filled with a sandy soil. When the plants were 16 days old, we injected D2O into selected soil regions containing primary, seminal and lateral roots. The experiments were performed during the day (transpiring plants) and night (not transpiring plants). The transport of D2O into roots was simulated using a new convection-diffusion numerical model of D2O transport into roots. By fitting the observed D2O transport we quantified the diffusional permeability and the water uptake of the different root segments. The maize root architecture consisted of a primary root, 4-5 seminal roots and many lateral roots connected to the primary and seminal roots. Laterals emerged from the proximal 15 cm of the primary and seminal roots. Water uptake occurred primarily in lateral roots. Lateral roots had the highest diffusional permeability (9.4×10-7), which was around six times higher that the diffusional permeability of the old seminal segments (1.4×10-7), and two times higher than the diffusional permeability of the young seminal segments (4.7×10-7). The radial flow of D2O into the lateral (6.7×10-5 ) was much higher than in the young seminal roots (1.1×10-12). The radial flow of D2O into the old seminal was negligible. We concluded that the function of the primary and seminal roots was to collect water from the lateral roots and transport it to the shoot. A maize root system with lateral roots branching from deep primary and seminal roots would be efficient in extracting water from the subsoil and better tolerate periods of water shortage. However, in this case the xylem axial resistance could be the limiting factor for the uptake of water.

  17. Roots at the percolation threshold.

    PubMed

    Kroener, Eva; Ahmed, Mutez Ali; Carminati, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The rhizosphere is the layer of soil around the roots where complex and dynamic interactions between plants and soil affect the capacity of plants to take up water. The physical properties of the rhizosphere are affected by mucilage, a gel exuded by roots. Mucilage can absorb large volumes of water, but it becomes hydrophobic after drying. We use a percolation model to describe the rewetting of dry rhizosphere. We find that at a critical mucilage concentration the rhizosphere becomes impermeable. The critical mucilage concentration depends on the radius of the soil particle size. Capillary rise experiments with neutron radiography prove that for concentrations below the critical mucilage concentration water could easily cross the rhizosphere, while above the critical concentration water could no longer percolate through it. Our studies, together with former observations of water dynamics in the rhizosphere, suggest that the rhizosphere is near the percolation threshold, where small variations in mucilage concentration sensitively alter the soil hydraulic conductivity. Is mucilage exudation a plant mechanism to efficiently control the rhizosphere conductivity and the access to water? PMID:25974526

  18. Temperature sensing by primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poff, K. L.

    1990-01-01

    Zea mays L. seedlings, grown on agar plates at 26 degrees C, reoriented the original vertical direction of their primary root when exposed to a thermal gradient applied perpendicular to the gravity vector. The magnitude and direction of curvature can not be explained simply by either a temperature or a humidity effect on root elongation. It is concluded that primary roots of maize sense temperature gradients in addition to sensing the gravitational force.

  19. An approach to minirhizotron root image analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Vamerali; A. Ganis; S. Bona; G. Mosca

    1999-01-01

    Minirhizotrons speed up research on root demography, but image quality often hampers standardization of the image processing\\u000a method. A simple procedure working on the blue band of colour images was tested on fibrous roots of sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris\\u000a var. saccharifera). With respect to green and red, the blue band allows better detection of roots when their luminance is\\u000a very similar

  20. Root-knot Nematodes and Giant Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael G. K. Jones; Derek B. Goto

    \\u000a Of all the economically important plant parasitic nematodes, root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne species) are amongst the most widespread, the best recognized and most widely studied. This is partly because infected roots\\u000a develop galls where the nematodes feed, which with severe infection give roots a ‘knotted’ appearance. They have a remarkably\\u000a wide host range, and are ubiquitous especially in tropical and sub-tropical

  1. Cluster Roots: A Curiosity in Context

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael W. Shane; Hans Lambers

    2005-01-01

    Cluster roots are an adaptation for nutrient acquisition from nutrient-poor soils. They develop on root systems of a range\\u000a of species belonging to a number of different families (e.g., Proteaceae, Casuarinaceae, Fabaceae and Myricaceae) and are\\u000a also found on root systems of some crop species (e.g., albus, Macadamia integrifoliaandCucurbita pepo). Their morphology is variable but typically, large numbers of determinate

  2. Use of a lux-based procedure to rapidly visualize root colonisation by Pseudomonas fluorescens in the wheat rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    de Weger, L A; Kuiper, I; van der Bij, A J; Lugtenberg, B J

    1997-11-01

    The bioluminescently marked Pseudomonas fluorescens strain 5RL, has been used previously to follow colonisation of soy bean roots (De Weger et al. [1991] Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 57:36-41). In the present paper the method has been further developed and optimized for wheat roots and it is used to get a quick overview of the colonisation patterns of many different root systems at the same time. Colonisation was followed on wheat plants grown in our gnotobiotic sand system (Simons et al., 1996. Mol Plant Microbe Interact 9: 600-607) and the following results were obtained. (i) A spatio-temporal analysis of the colonisation of wheat roots showed that 4 days after planting the highest bacterial activity was observed at the upper part of the root. After 6 days the high bacterial activity at the upper part was further increased, whereas spot-like activities were observed on the lower root parts, possibly due to micro-colonies. (ii) Bacterial mutations causing lack of motility or auxotrophy for amino acids resulted in impaired colonisation of the lower root parts, indicating that motility and prototrophy for the involved amino acid(s) are important factors for wheat root colonisation by strain 5RL. (iii) Coinoculation of strain 5RL with other wild type Pseudomonas strains on the root influenced the colonisation pattern observed for strain 5RL. Colonisation was not visually affected when the competing strain was a poor root coloniser, but was severely reduced when the competing strain was a good root coloniser. The results show that the spatio-temporal colonisation of wheat root by P. fluorescens strain 5RL and derivatives is similar to that of strain WCS365 on tomato. The advantage of the use of lux-marked strains is that the results are obtained much quicker than when conventional methods are used and that the result is supplied as an image of the colonisation pattern of many different roots. PMID:9442276

  3. New stopping criteria for iterative root finding

    PubMed Central

    Nikolajsen, Jorgen L.

    2014-01-01

    A set of simple stopping criteria is presented, which improve the efficiency of iterative root finding by terminating the iterations immediately when no further improvement of the roots is possible. The criteria use only the function evaluations already needed by the root finding procedure to which they are applied. The improved efficiency is achieved by formulating the stopping criteria in terms of fractional significant digits. Test results show that the new stopping criteria reduce the iteration work load by about one-third compared with the most efficient stopping criteria currently available. This is achieved without compromising the accuracy of the extracted roots. PMID:26064544

  4. Effect of acute nerve root compression on endoneurial fluid pressure and blood flow in rat dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Tamaki; Yabuki, Shoji; Kikuchi, Shinichi; Myers, Robert R

    2005-03-01

    The objective of the current study was to test the hypothesis that crush injury to nerve root increases endoneurial fluid pressure (EFP) and decreases blood flow in the associated dorsal root ganglion (DRG). A total of 21 adult, female Sprague-Dawley rats had their left L5 nerve root and DRG exposed. The L5 nerve root was clamped for 2 s with a vascular suture clip just proximal to the DRG (compression group). Sham-operated animals without compression were used for control (control group). EFP was recorded with a servo-null micropipette system using a glass micropipette with tip diameter of 4 mum before and after 3 h of treatment. After the final measurement of EFP, DRG was excised and processed for histology. Blood flow in the DRG was continuously monitored by laser Doppler flow meter for 3 h. Three hours after treatment, EFP was 4.7+/-2.7 cm H(2)O in the compression group and 2.2+/-1.2 cm H(2)O in the control group (P<0.05). Edema was the principal pathologic findings seen consistently in the DRG from animals in the compression group. Blood flow in the compression group was reduced 10 min after compression. This reduction was statistically significant compared with that of the control (P<0.01). An acute compression to the nerve root increased endoneurial edema, increased EFP in the associated DRG, and reduced DRG blood flow. This combination of increased EFP and decreased blood flow in the DRG may result in neuronal ischemia and sensory dysfunction. These acute pathophysiologic changes may thus have a role in the pathogenesis of low back pain and sciatica due to disc herniation and spinal canal stenosis. PMID:15734257

  5. OZONE DECREASES SPRING ROOT GROWTH AND ROOT CARBOHYDRATE CONTENT IN PONDEROSA PINE THE YEAR FOLLOWING EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Storage carbohydrates are extremely important for new shoot and root development following dormancy or during periods of high stress. he hypothesis that ozone decreases carbohydrate storage and decreases new root growth during the year following exposure was investigated. eedling...

  6. Chemical root pruning and its effects on water relations and root morphology of photinia 

    E-print Network

    Vartak, Diptish Ramesh

    1993-01-01

    -treated containers. The effects of chemical root pruning on water relations and root morphology were studied. A model was developed to predict transpiration in greenhouse grown photinia. A separate experiment was conducted to test accuracy of stem gauges...

  7. Increased symplasmic permeability in barley root epidermal cells correlates with defects in root hair development.

    PubMed

    Marzec, M; Muszynska, A; Melzer, M; Sas-Nowosielska, H; Kurczynska, E U

    2014-03-01

    It is well known that the process of plant cell differentiation depends on the symplasmic isolation of cells. Before starting the differentiation programme, the individual cell or group of cells should restrict symplasmic communication with neighbouring cells. We tested the symplasmic communication between epidermal cells in the different root zones of parental barley plants Hordeum vulgare L., cv. 'Karat' with normal root hair development, and two root hairless mutants (rhl1.a and rhl1.b). The results clearly show that symplasmic communication was limited during root hair differentiation in the parental variety, whereas in both root hairless mutants epidermal cells were still symplasmically connected in the corresponding root zone. This paper is the first report on the role of symplasmic isolation in barley root cell differentiation, and additionally shows that a disturbance in the restriction of symplasmic communication is present in root hairless mutants. PMID:23927737

  8. Increased symplasmic permeability in barley root epidermal cells correlates with defects in root hair development

    PubMed Central

    Marzec, M; Muszynska, A; Melzer, M; Sas-Nowosielska, H; Kurczynska, E U; Wick, S

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the process of plant cell differentiation depends on the symplasmic isolation of cells. Before starting the differentiation programme, the individual cell or group of cells should restrict symplasmic communication with neighbouring cells. We tested the symplasmic communication between epidermal cells in the different root zones of parental barley plants Hordeum vulgare L., cv. ‘Karat’ with normal root hair development, and two root hairless mutants (rhl1.a and rhl1.b). The results clearly show that symplasmic communication was limited during root hair differentiation in the parental variety, whereas in both root hairless mutants epidermal cells were still symplasmically connected in the corresponding root zone. This paper is the first report on the role of symplasmic isolation in barley root cell differentiation, and additionally shows that a disturbance in the restriction of symplasmic communication is present in root hairless mutants. PMID:23927737

  9. ROOT LOCUS TECHNIQUE 325 7.6.2 DiscreteTime Root Locus Experiment

    E-print Network

    Gajic, Zoran

    ROOT LOCUS TECHNIQUE 325 7.6.2 Discrete­Time Root Locus Experiment Part 1. Give interpretation of the root locus rules from Table 7.1 in the context of discrete­time systems. Note that the imaginary axis(A,B,C,D,K) to draw the root locus for a fifth­order discrete­time model of a steam power control system considered

  10. Abscisic acid and gibberellin-like substances in roots and root nodules of Glycine max

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. M. Williams; Margarita Sicardi De Mallorca

    1982-01-01

    Summary  The content of endogenous gibberellin (GA)-like substances of roots and root nodules of SOya, and GA production byRhizobium japonicum cultures, were investigated by a combined thin layer chromatographic (TLC)-dwarf pea epicotyl bioassay technique. GAs were\\u000a more concentrated in root nodules than in the roots, totalling 1.34 and 0.16 nM GA3 equivalents g?1 dry wt. respectively. GA production byR. japonicum cultures

  11. Mercury content of sprouts and harvested roots from treated sweet potato mother roots. [Ipomoea batatas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Huisingh; L. W. Nielsen

    1972-01-01

    Mercury containing fungicides have been used extensively for seed and root disease control, but data on the fate of the mercury (Hg) are scarce. Experiments were designed to see if Hg applied to propagative sweet potato roots increased the Hg-content of edible roots. Roots were treated with Semesan Bel(hydroxymercurinitrophenol + hydroxymercurichlorophenol), Mertect (Thiabendazole: 2-(4-Thiazolyl)-benzimidazole), or Botran (2,6-Dichloro-4-nitroanaline) at recommended rates

  12. Essential oils from hairy root cultures and from plant roots of Achillea millefolium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. M. L Lourenço; A. C Figueiredo; J. G Barroso; L. G Pedro; M. M Oliveira; S. G Deans; J. J. C Scheffer

    1999-01-01

    The essential oils isolated from roots of two Achillea millefolium populations (BGL and CGA) and from two hairy root cultures (A4 and LBA) derived from one of these were analysed by GC and GC–mass spectrometry. The essential oils from the plant roots were obtained in a yield of 0.10% (BGL) and 0.05% (CGA) (v\\/w), whereas that of both hairy root

  13. Image-Based High-Throughput Field Phenotyping of Crop Roots1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Bucksch, Alexander; Burridge, James; York, Larry M.; Das, Abhiram; Nord, Eric; Weitz, Joshua S.; Lynch, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Current plant phenotyping technologies to characterize agriculturally relevant traits have been primarily developed for use in laboratory and/or greenhouse conditions. In the case of root architectural traits, this limits phenotyping efforts, largely, to young plants grown in specialized containers and growth media. Hence, novel approaches are required to characterize mature root systems of older plants grown under actual soil conditions in the field. Imaging methods able to address the challenges associated with characterizing mature root systems are rare due, in part, to the greater complexity of mature root systems, including the larger size, overlap, and diversity of root components. Our imaging solution combines a field-imaging protocol and algorithmic approach to analyze mature root systems grown in the field. Via two case studies, we demonstrate how image analysis can be utilized to estimate localized root traits that reliably capture heritable architectural diversity as well as environmentally induced architectural variation of both monocot and dicot plants. In the first study, we show that our algorithms and traits (including 13 novel traits inaccessible to manual estimation) can differentiate nine maize (Zea mays) genotypes 8 weeks after planting. The second study focuses on a diversity panel of 188 cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) genotypes to identify which traits are sufficient to differentiate genotypes even when comparing plants whose harvesting date differs up to 14 d. Overall, we find that automatically derived traits can increase both the speed and reproducibility of the trait estimation pipeline under field conditions. PMID:25187526

  14. Iron- and ferritin-dependent reactive oxygen species distribution: impact on Arabidopsis root system architecture.

    PubMed

    Reyt, Guilhem; Boudouf, Soukaina; Boucherez, Jossia; Gaymard, Frédéric; Briat, Jean-Francois

    2015-03-01

    Iron (Fe) homeostasis is integrated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and distribution at the root tip participates in the control of root growth. Excess Fe increases ferritin abundance, enabling the storage of Fe, which contributes to protection of plants against Fe-induced oxidative stress. AtFer1 and AtFer3 are the two ferritin genes expressed in the meristematic zone, pericycle and endodermis of the Arabidopsis thaliana root, and it is in these regions that we observe Fe stained dots. This staining disappears in the triple fer1-3-4 ferritin mutant. Fe excess decreases primary root length in the same way in wild-type and in fer1-3-4 mutant. In contrast, the Fe-mediated decrease of lateral root (LR) length and density is enhanced in fer1-3-4 plants due to a defect in LR emergence. We observe that this interaction between excess Fe, ferritin, and root system architecture (RSA) is in part mediated by the H2O2/O2·- balance between the root cell proliferation and differentiation zones regulated by the UPB1 transcription factor. Meristem size is also decreased in response to Fe excess in ferritin mutant plants, implicating cell cycle arrest mediated by the ROS-activated SMR5/SMR7 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors pathway in the interaction between Fe and RSA. PMID:25624148

  15. Conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots: observations on three cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Artico, M; Carloia, S; Piacentini, M; Ferretti, G; Dazzi, M; Franchitto, S; Bronzetti, E

    2006-02-01

    Lumbosacral nerve root anomalies are a rare group of congenital anatomical anomalies. Various types of anomalies of the lumbosacral nerve roots have been documented in the available international literature. Generally speaking, these anomalies may consist of a bifid, conjoined structure, of a transverse course or of a characteristic anastomized appearance. Firstly described as an incidental finding during autopsies or surgical procedures performed for lumbar disk herniations and often asymptomatic, lumbosacral nerve root anomalies have been more frequently described in the last years due to the advances made in radiological diagnosis (metrizamide myelography and CT, MRI). Our study comprised three patients with conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots, representing 0.25% of a total of 1200 patients who underwent lumbosacral CT/MRI procedures in the Addolorata Hospital and in the Service of Neuroradiology of the University of Rome "La Sapienza" during the last three years (March 2001-March 2004). We report our experience with three cases of conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots and analyze the most important literature on this topic. MR imaging is a better diagnostic procedure (in comparison to CT) for the differentiation of nerve root anomalies and, in particular, coronal sections furnish a precise definition of the profile of the conjoined/enlarged rootlets. In fact, the accurate information derived from MRI of multiple planes may be priceless for the preoperative and diagnostic evaluation of lumbosacral nerve root anomalies. PMID:16565781

  16. Reconcilable differences: a joint calibration of fine-root turnover times with radiocarbon and minirhizotrons.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Bernhard; Hansson, Karna; Solly, Emily F; Schrumpf, Marion

    2014-12-01

    We used bomb-radiocarbon and raw minirhizotron lifetimes of fine roots (< 0.5 mm in diameter) in the organic layer of Norway spruce (Picea abies) forests in southern Sweden to test if different models are able to reconcile the apparently contradicting turnover time estimates from both techniques. We present a framework based on survival functions that is able to jointly model bomb-radiocarbon and minirhizotron data. At the same time we integrate prior knowledge about biases of both techniques--the classification of dead roots in minirhizotrons and the use of carbon reserves to grow new roots. Two-pool models, either in parallel or in serial setting, were able to reconcile the bomb-radiocarbon and minirhizotron data. These models yielded a mean residence time of 3.80 ± 0.16 yr (mean ± SD). On average 60 ± 2% of fine roots turned over within 0.75 ± 0.10 yr, while the rest was turning over within 8.4 ± 0.2 yr. Bomb-radiocarbon and minirhizotron data alone give a biased estimate of fine-root turnover. The two-pool models allow a mechanistic interpretation for the coexistence of fast- and slow-cycling roots--suberization and branching for the serial-two-pool model and branching due to ectomycorrhizal fungi-root interactions for the parallel-two-pool model. PMID:25196967

  17. Spatial separation of light perception and growth response in maize root phototropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, J. L.; Wolverton, C.; Ishikawa, H.; Hangarter, R. P.; Evans, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    Although the effects of gravity on root growth are well known and interactions between light and gravity have been reported, details of root phototropic responses are less documented. We used high-resolution image analysis to study phototropism in primary roots of Zea mays L. Similar to the location of perception in gravitropism, the perception of light was localized in the root cap. Phototropic curvature away from the light, on the other hand, developed in the central elongation zone, more basal than the site of initiation of gravitropic curvature. The phototropic curvature saturated at approximately 10 micromoles m-2 s-1 blue light with a peak curvature of 29 +/- 4 degrees, in part due to induction of positive gravitropism following displacement of the root tip from vertical during negative phototropism. However, at higher fluence rates, development of phototropic curvature is arrested even if gravitropism is avoided by maintaining the root cap vertically using a rotating feedback system. Thus continuous illumination can cause adaptation in the signalling pathway of the phototropic response in roots.

  18. In situ speciation and distribution of toxic selenium in hydrated roots of cowpea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Menzies, Neal W; Lombi, Enzo; McKenna, Brigid A; de Jonge, Martin D; Paterson, David J; Howard, Daryl L; Glover, Chris J; James, Simon; Kappen, Peter; Johannessen, Bernt; Kopittke, Peter M

    2013-09-01

    The speciation and spatial distribution of selenium (Se) in hydrated plant tissues is not well understood. Using synchrotron-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray fluorescence microscopy (two-dimensional scanning [and associated mathematical model] and computed tomography), the speciation and distribution of toxic Se were examined within hydrated roots of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) exposed to either 20 µM selenite or selenate. Based upon bulk solution concentrations, selenate was 9-fold more toxic to the roots than selenite, most likely due to increased accumulation of organoselenium (e.g. selenomethionine) in selenate-treated roots. Specifically, uptake of selenate (probably by sulfate transporters) occurred at a much higher rate than for selenite (apparently by both passive diffusion and phosphate transporters), with bulk root tissue Se concentrations approximately 18-fold higher in the selenate treatment. Although the proportion of Se converted to organic forms was higher for selenite (100%) than for selenate (26%), the absolute concentration of organoselenium was actually approximately 5-fold higher for selenate-treated roots. In addition, the longitudinal and radial distribution of Se in roots differed markedly: the highest tissue concentrations were in the endodermis and cortex approximately 4 mm or more behind the apex when exposed to selenate but in the meristem (approximately 1 mm from the apex) when exposed to selenite. The examination of the distribution and speciation of Se in hydrated roots provides valuable data in understanding Se uptake, transport, and toxicity. PMID:23835408

  19. Root water uptake model based on water potential gradient with water redistribution via roots: application to coniferous forest site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votrubova, Jana; Vogel, Tomas; Dohnal, Michal; Dusek, Jaromir; Tesar, Miroslav

    2013-04-01

    A simple macroscopic vertically distributed plant root water uptake (RWU) model based on traditional water-potential-gradient formulation (Vogel et al., 2013), in which the uptake rates are directly proportional to the potential gradient and indirectly proportional to the local soil and root resistances to water flow, was tested. This RWU modeling approach was implemented in a one-dimensional dual-continuum model of soil water flow based on Richards' equation and used to simulate soil water distribution changes during a vegetation season at a forest site located in a temperate humid climate of central Europe. The main objectives were to test the ability of the presented RWU model to simulate the observed soil-plant-atmosphere interactions, and to examine the differences between empirical and more physically-based RWU modeling approaches (accommodated in the same soil water flow model). The tested RWU model was capable of simulating both the compensatory root water uptake, in situations when reduced uptake from dry layers was compensated for by increased uptake from wetter layers, and the root-mediated hydraulic redistribution of soil water, contributing to more natural soil moisture distribution throughout the root zone. Comparison of the model results with the sap flow observed reveals some limitations related to the quasi-steady-state assumption for the plant xylem and zero transpiration rates prescribed during nights and precipitation. This stated, the model seems to simulate adequately both the regular nightly hydraulic redistribution, due to reduced night transpiration, and the episodic daytime hydraulic redistribution during wet canopy events. The model results were compared to simulations produced using the semi-empirical RWU model of Feddes. Based on both an improved agreement between the observed and simulated soil water pressure responses to daily variations of transpiration, and a more realistic seasonal distribution of the transpiration rate reduction, we concluded that the physically based root water uptake model with negative RWU rates enabled substantially better approximation of the soil water extraction by spruce trees under moderate water scarcity. Vogel T., M. Dohnal, J. Dusek, J. Votrubova, and M. Tesar. 2013. Macroscopic modeling of plant water uptake in a forest stand involving root-mediated soil-water redistribution. Vadose Zone Journal, accepted.

  20. Pseudomonas putida strain PCL1444, selected for efficient root colonization and naphthalene degradation, effectively utilizes root exudate components.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, Irene; Kravchenko, Lev V; Bloemberg, Guido V; Lugtenberg, Ben J J

    2002-07-01

    Previously, we have described the selection of a plant-bacterium pair that is efficient in rhizoremediating naphthalene pollution in microcosm studies. After repeated selection for efficient root tip colonization upon inoculation of seeds of grass cv. Barmultra and for stable and efficient growth on naphthalene, Pseudomonas putida PCL1444 was selected as the most efficient colonizer of Barmultra roots. Here, we report the analysis of Barmultra root exudate composition and our subsequent tests of the growth rate of the bacterium and of the expression of the naphthalene degradation genes on individual exudate components. High performance liquid chromatography analysis of the organic acid and sugar root-exudate components revealed that glucose and fructose are the most abundant sugars, whereas succinic acid and citric acid are the most abundant organic acids. Tn5luxAB mutants of PCL1444 impaired in naphthalene degradation appeared to be impaired in genes homologous to genes of the upper naphthalene degradation pathway present in various Pseudomonas strains and to genes of the lower pathway genes for naphthalene degradation in P. stutzeri. Highest expression for both pathways involved in naphthalene degradation during growth in minimal medium with the carbon source to be tested was observed at the start of the logarithmic phase. Naphthalene did not induce the upper pathway, but a different pattern of expression was observed in the lower pathway reporter, probably due to the conversion of naphthalene to salicylic acid. Salicylic acid, which is described as an intermediate of the naphthalene degradation pathway in many Pseudomonas strains, did induce both pathways, resulting in an up to sixfold higher expression level at the start of the logarithmic phase. When expression levels during growth on the different carbon sources present in root exudate were compared, highest expression was observed on the two major root exudate components, glucose and succinic acid. These results show an excellent correlation between successful naphthalene rhizoremediation by the Barmultra-P. putida PCL1444 pair and both efficient utilization of the major exudate components for growth and high transcription of the naphthalene catabolic genes on the major exudate components. Therefore, we hypothesize that efficient root colonizing and naphthalene degradation is the result of the applied colonization enrichment procedure. PMID:12118890

  1. An unusual root tip formation in hairy root culture of Hyoscyamus muticus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mondher Jaziri; Jacques Homes; Koichiro Shimomura

    1994-01-01

    Summary  Hairy root cultures of Hyoscyamus muticus were established using Agrobacterium rhizogenes ATCC 15834. In one out of 8 clones established, an unusual root tip formation was observed after transfer of cultures from half-strength Murashige and Skoog (1962) to White's medium (1939). This phenomenon was associated with the production of a fine brownish cell suspension culture. Hairy root development resumed after

  2. Human Root Caries: Microbiota in Plaque Covering Sound, Carious and Arrested Carious Root Surfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Schüpbach; V. Osterwalder; B. Guggenheim

    1995-01-01

    The plaque microbiota covering sound or carious root surfaces were studied and compared with that covering arrested root caries lesions. From each of these categories five extracted teeth were examined. The experimental design of the study allowed us to relate the qualitative and quantitative microbial composition to the degree of integrity of the root surface. Plaque was sampled by a

  3. Kinetics of short-term root-carbon mineralization in roots of biofuel crops in soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To better understand and document the rates of root decomposition in biofuel cropping systems, we compared the evolution of CO2 from roots incubated with samples of two Iowa Mollisols. Root samples were collected from experimental plots for four cropping systems: a multispecies reconstructed prairie...

  4. Shoot-root defense signaling and activation of root defense by leaf damage in poplar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian T. Major; C. Peter Constabel

    2007-01-01

    Shoot-root systemic defense signaling of hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & A. Gray Populus del- toides Bartr. ex Marsh.) was investigated with molecular techniques to extend existing knowledge of poplar defense. Treat- ment of roots with methyl jasmonate demonstrated that transcripts of PtdTI3, a poplar trypsin inhibitor and marker of poplar defense responses, can be induced in poplar roots as

  5. Regulation of shoot\\/root ratio by cytokinins from roots in Urtica dioica : Opinion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erwin H. Beck

    1996-01-01

    According to current knowledge, cytokinins are predominantly root-born phytohormones which are transported into the shoot by the transpiration stream. In the “hormone message concept” they are considered the root signals, which mediate the flux of the photosynthates to the various sinks of the plant. In this review, experiments are assessed, in which changes of the shoot to root ratio of

  6. Root susceptibility and inoculum production from roots of eastern oak species to Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about root susceptibility of eastern tree species to Phytophthora ramorum. In this study, we examined root susceptibility and inoculum production from roots. Oak radicles of several eastern oak species were exposed to zoospore suspensions of 1, 10, 100, or 1000 zoospores per ml at ...

  7. The position and growth of lateral roots on cultured root axes of tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum ( Solanaceae )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. W. Barlow; J. S. Adam

    1988-01-01

    Root axes of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) were cultured in vitro in three different concentrations of sucrose in order to vary their growth rate. Lateral root growth and the initiation of lateral root primordia were studied on each group of axes. Various aspects of primordium initiation, positioning, and emergence were quantified with a view to discovering variable and constant features of

  8. Advancing fine root research with minirhizotrons.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M G.; Tingey, D T.; Phillips, D L.; Storm, M J.

    2001-06-01

    Minirhizotrons provide a nondestructive, in situ method for directly viewing and studying fine roots. Although many insights into fine roots have been gained using minirhizotrons, a review of the literature indicates a wide variation in how minirhizotrons and minirhizotron data are used. Tube installation is critical, and steps must be taken to insure good soil/tube contact without compacting the soil. Ideally, soil adjacent to minirhizotrons will mimic bulk soil. Tube installation causes some degree of soil disturbance and has the potential to create artifacts in subsequent root data and analysis. We therefore recommend a waiting period between tube installation and image collection of 6-12 months to allow roots to recolonize the space around the tubes and to permit nutrients to return to pre-disturbance levels. To make repeated observations of individual roots for the purposes of quantifying their dynamic properties (e.g. root production, turnover or lifespan), tubes should be secured to prevent movement. The frequency of image collection depends upon the root parameters being measured or calculated and the time and resources available for collecting images and extracting data. However, long sampling intervals of 8 weeks or more can result in large underestimates of root dynamic properties because more fine roots will be born and die unobserved between sampling events. A sampling interval of 2 weeks or less reduces these underestimates to acceptable levels. While short sample intervals are desirable, they can lead to a potential trade-off between the number of minirhizotron tubes used and the number of frames analyzed per tube. Analyzing fewer frames per minirhizotron tube is one way to reduce costs with only minor effects on data variation. The quality of minirhizotron data should be assessed and reported; procedures for quantifying the quality of minirhizotron data are presented here. Root length is a more sensitive metric for dynamic root properties than the root number. To make minirhizotron data from separate experiments more easily comparable, idiosyncratic units should be avoided. Volumetric units compatible with aboveground plant measures make minirhizotron-based estimates of root standing crop, production and turnover more useful. Methods for calculating the volumetric root data are discussed and an example presented. Procedures for estimating fine root lifespan are discussed. PMID:11323033

  9. Root-soil relationships and terroir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasi, Diego

    2015-04-01

    Soil features, along with climate, are among the most important determinants of a succesful grape production in a certain area. Most of the studies, so far, investigated the above-ground vine response to differente edaphic and climate condition, but it is clearly not sufficient to explain the vine whole behaviour. In fact, roots represent an important part of the terroir system (soil-plant-atmosphere-man), and their study can provide better comprehension of vine responses to different environments. The root density and distribution, the ability of deep-rooting and regenerating new roots are good indicators of root well-being, and represents the basis for an efficient physiological activity of the root system. Root deepening and distribution are strongly dependent and sensitive on soil type and soil properties, while root density is affected mostly by canopy size, rootstock and water availability. According to root well-being, soil management strategies should alleviate soil impediments, improving aeration and microbial activity. Moreover, agronomic practices can impact root system performance and influence the above-ground growth. It is well known, for example, that the root system size is largely diminished by high planting densities. Close vine spacings stimulate a more effective utilization of the available soil, water and nutrients, but if the competition for available soil becomes too high, it can repress vine growth, and compromise vineyard longevity, productivity and reaction to growing season weather. Development of resilient rootstocks, more efficient in terms of water and nutrient uptake and capable of dealing with climate and soil extremes (drought, high salinity) are primary goals fore future research. The use of these rootstocks will benefit a more sustainable use of the soil resources and the preservation and valorisation of the terroir.

  10. Gene for a protein capable of enhancing lateral root formation.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Y; Horiike, G; Kuroyanagi, M; Noguchi, H; Shimizu, M; Niwa, Y; Kobayashi, H

    1999-05-14

    Analysis of genes preferentially expressed in hairy roots caused by infection with Agrobacterium rhizogenes has provided insights into the regulation of lateral root formation. A hairy root preferential cDNA, HR7, has been cloned from hairy roots of Hyoscyamus niger. HR7 encodes a novel protein partially homologous to a metallocarboxypeptidase inhibitor and is expressed exclusively in the primordium and base of lateral roots in hairy roots. Overexpression of HR7 in transgenic roots of H. niger dramatically enhances the frequency of lateral root formation. The results of this study indicate that expression of HR7 plays a critical role in initiating lateral root formation. PMID:10356981

  11. Root-growth-inhibiting sheet

    DOEpatents

    Burton, Frederick G. (Stansbury Park, UT); Cataldo, Dominic A. (Kennewick, WA); Cline, John F. (Prosser, WA); Skiens, W. Eugene (Wilsonville, OR); Van Voris, Peter (Richland, WA)

    1993-01-01

    In accordance with this invention, a porous sheet material is provided at intervals with bodies of a polymer which contain a 2,6-dinitroaniline. The sheet material is made porous to permit free passage of water. It may be either a perforated sheet or a woven or non-woven textile material. A particularly desirable embodiment is a non-woven fabric of non-biodegradable material. This type of material is known as a "geotextile" and is used for weed control, prevention of erosion on slopes, and other landscaping purposes. In order to obtain a root repelling property, a dinitroaniline is blended with a polymer which is attached to the geotextile or other porous material.

  12. Root-growth-inhibiting sheet

    DOEpatents

    Burton, F.G.; Cataldo, D.A.; Cline, J.F.; Skiens, W.E.; Van Voris, P.

    1993-01-26

    In accordance with this invention, a porous sheet material is provided at intervals with bodies of a polymer which contain a 2,6-dinitroaniline. The sheet material is made porous to permit free passage of water. It may be either a perforated sheet or a woven or non-woven textile material. A particularly desirable embodiment is a non-woven fabric of non-biodegradable material. This type of material is known as a geotextile'' and is used for weed control, prevention of erosion on slopes, and other landscaping purposes. In order to obtain a root repelling property, a dinitroaniline is blended with a polymer which is attached to the geotextile or other porous material.

  13. ROOT CAUSE ANALYSIS PROGRAM MANUAL

    SciTech Connect

    Gravois, Melanie C.

    2007-05-02

    Root Cause Analysis (RCA) identifies the cause of an adverse condition that, if corrected, will preclude recurrence or greatly reduce the probability of recurrence of the same or similar adverse conditions and thereby protect the health and safety of the public, the workers, and the environment. This procedure sets forth the requirements for management determination and the selection of RCA methods and implementation of RCAs that are a result of significant findings from Price-Anderson Amendments Act (PAAA) violations, occurrences/events, Significant Adverse Conditions, and external oversight Corrective Action Requests (CARs) generated by the Office of Enforcement (PAAA headquarters), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and other oversight entities against Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Performance of an RCA may result in the identification of issues that should be reported in accordance with the Issues Management Program Manual.

  14. X-ray computed tomography uncovers root-root interactions: quantifying spatial relationships between interacting root systems in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Paya, Alexander M; Silverberg, Jesse L; Padgett, Jennifer; Bauerle, Taryn L

    2015-01-01

    Research in the field of plant biology has recently demonstrated that inter- and intra-specific interactions belowground can dramatically alter root growth. Our aim was to answer questions related to the effect of inter- vs. intra-specific interactions on the growth and utilization of undisturbed space by fine roots within three dimensions (3D) using micro X-ray computed tomography. To achieve this, Populus tremuloides (quaking aspen) and Picea mariana (black spruce) seedlings were planted into containers as either solitary individuals, or inter-/intra-specific pairs, allowed to grow for 2 months, and 3D metrics developed in order to quantify their use of belowground space. In both aspen and spruce, inter-specific root interactions produced a shift in the vertical distribution of the root system volume, and deepened the average position of root tips when compared to intra-specifically growing seedlings. Inter-specific interactions also increased the minimum distance between root tips belonging to the same root system. There was no effect of belowground interactions on the radial distribution of roots, or the directionality of lateral root growth for either species. In conclusion, we found that significant differences were observed more often when comparing controls (solitary individuals) and paired seedlings (inter- or intra-specific), than when comparing inter- and intra-specifically growing seedlings. This would indicate that competition between neighboring seedlings was more responsible for shifting fine root growth in both species than was neighbor identity. However, significant inter- vs. intra-specific differences were observed, which further emphasizes the importance of biological interactions in competition studies. PMID:25972880

  15. X-ray computed tomography uncovers root–root interactions: quantifying spatial relationships between interacting root systems in three dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Paya, Alexander M.; Silverberg, Jesse L.; Padgett, Jennifer; Bauerle, Taryn L.

    2015-01-01

    Research in the field of plant biology has recently demonstrated that inter- and intra-specific interactions belowground can dramatically alter root growth. Our aim was to answer questions related to the effect of inter- vs. intra-specific interactions on the growth and utilization of undisturbed space by fine roots within three dimensions (3D) using micro X-ray computed tomography. To achieve this, Populus tremuloides (quaking aspen) and Picea mariana (black spruce) seedlings were planted into containers as either solitary individuals, or inter-/intra-specific pairs, allowed to grow for 2 months, and 3D metrics developed in order to quantify their use of belowground space. In both aspen and spruce, inter-specific root interactions produced a shift in the vertical distribution of the root system volume, and deepened the average position of root tips when compared to intra-specifically growing seedlings. Inter-specific interactions also increased the minimum distance between root tips belonging to the same root system. There was no effect of belowground interactions on the radial distribution of roots, or the directionality of lateral root growth for either species. In conclusion, we found that significant differences were observed more often when comparing controls (solitary individuals) and paired seedlings (inter- or intra-specific), than when comparing inter- and intra-specifically growing seedlings. This would indicate that competition between neighboring seedlings was more responsible for shifting fine root growth in both species than was neighbor identity. However, significant inter- vs. intra-specific differences were observed, which further emphasizes the importance of biological interactions in competition studies. PMID:25972880

  16. Extended Affine Root Systems III ( Elliptic Weyl Groups )

    E-print Network

    Saito, Kyoji

    Extended Affine Root Systems III ( Elliptic Weyl root system*)R) in terms of the elliptic Dynkin diagram (R, * *G) for the elliptic root system of W (R). *) an elliptic root system = a 2-extended affine root system (see the int* *roduction

  17. ROOT AND BUTT ROTS OF FOREST TREES International Conference

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    #12;ROOT AND BUTT ROTS OF FOREST TREES 12th International Conference on Root and Butt Rots IUFRO;Proceedings of the 12 th International Conference on Root and Butt Rots of Forest Trees ROOT AND BUTT ROTS OF FOREST TREES 12th International Conference on Root and Butt Rots IUFRO Working Party 7.02.01 M

  18. PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS AND DRYING RATE OF ECHINACEA ROOT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reza Kabganian; Danielle Julie Carrier; Shahab Sokhansanj

    2002-01-01

    Echinacea angustifolia or the purple coneflower is an important medicinal plant that boosts the immune system. It is believed that the active ingredients are predominantly located in the root. Physical characteristics and drying rates of the root of E. angustifolia from a farm in Saskatchewan, Canada were studied. Root consisted of a main (central) root and secondary root branches. Cleaned

  19. GiA Roots: software for the high throughput analysis of plant root system architecture

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Characterizing root system architecture (RSA) is essential to understanding the development and function of vascular plants. Identifying RSA-associated genes also represents an underexplored opportunity for crop improvement. Software tools are needed to accelerate the pace at which quantitative traits of RSA are estimated from images of root networks. Results We have developed GiA Roots (General Image Analysis of Roots), a semi-automated software tool designed specifically for the high-throughput analysis of root system images. GiA Roots includes user-assisted algorithms to distinguish root from background and a fully automated pipeline that extracts dozens of root system phenotypes. Quantitative information on each phenotype, along with intermediate steps for full reproducibility, is returned to the end-user for downstream analysis. GiA Roots has a GUI front end and a command-line interface for interweaving the software into large-scale workflows. GiA Roots can also be extended to estimate novel phenotypes specified by the end-user. Conclusions We demonstrate the use of GiA Roots on a set of 2393 images of rice roots representing 12 genotypes from the species Oryza sativa. We validate trait measurements against prior analyses of this image set that demonstrated that RSA traits are likely heritable and associated with genotypic differences. Moreover, we demonstrate that GiA Roots is extensible and an end-user can add functionality so that GiA Roots can estimate novel RSA traits. In summary, we show that the software can function as an efficient tool as part of a workflow to move from large numbers of root images to downstream analysis. PMID:22834569

  20. Rational Roots of Polynomials with Integer Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combs, Randel; Walls, Gary L.

    2004-01-01

    In this note the authors investigate ways to shorten the amount of work involved in using the Rational Roots Theorem to find the rational roots of a polynomial with integral coefficients. The first result is a proof of a fact that we had long suspected, but were never able to find the statement of in any of the college algebra textbooks we had…

  1. Astroculture ™ root metabolism and cytochemical analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. M. Porterfield; D. J. Barta; D. W. Ming; R. C. Morrow; M. E. Musgrave

    2000-01-01

    Physiology of the root system is dependent upon oxygen availability and tissue respiration. During hypoxia nutrient and water acquisition may be inhibited, thus affecting the overall biochemical and physiological status of the plant. For the Astroculture™ plant growth hardware, the availability of oxygen in the root zone was measured by examining the changes in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity within the

  2. A Grass Root Proposal for Carbon Sequestration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen Salter; Tony Lovell; Bruce Ward

    2010-01-01

    The mass of invisible root material below ground is related to the amount of visible plant material above ground as would have been shown below except for EGU rules. However in many countries modern livestock management methods involve constant grazing which keeps grass short and so leaves very little root mass. This paper will show photographic comparisons, such as the

  3. Growth and development of root system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The growth and development of root systems of cotton plants is under genetic control but may be modified by the environment. There are many factors that influence root development in cotton. These range from abiotic factors such as soil temperature, soil water, and soil aeration to biotic factors ...

  4. Advancing fine root research with minirhizotrons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. G. Johnson; D. T. Tingey; D. L. Phillips; M. J. Storm

    2001-01-01

    Minirhizotrons provide a nondestructive, in situ method for directly viewing and studying fine roots. Although many insights into fine roots have been gained using minirhizotrons, a review of the literature indicates a wide variation in how minirhizotrons and minirhizotron data are used. Tube installation is critical, and steps must be taken to insure good soil\\/tube contact without compacting the soil.

  5. Method for Constructing Standardized Simulated Root Canals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz-Bongert, Udo; Weine, Franklin S.

    1990-01-01

    The construction of visual and manipulative aids, clear resin blocks with root-canal-like spaces, for simulation of root canals is explained. Time, materials, and techniques are discussed. The method allows for comparison of canals, creation of any configuration of canals, and easy presentation during instruction. (MSE)

  6. ADVANCING FINE ROOT RESEARCH WITH MINIRHIZOTRONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Minirhizotrons provide a nondestructive, in situ method for directly viewing and studying fine roots. Although many insights into fine roots have been gained using minirhizotrons, it is clear from the literature that there is still wide variation in how minirhizotrons and minirhi...

  7. Root-L Geneaology Discussion List

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1987-01-01

    ROOTS-L is a mailing list for genealogical researchers. Topics include surname queries, discussions of methodology and interesting genealogical web sites, etc. send email to: LISTSERV@MAIL.EWORLD.COM in the body of the message type: SUBSCRIBE ROOTS-L yourfirstname yourlastname

  8. Gravity Signal Transduction in Primary Roots

    PubMed Central

    PERRIN, ROBYN M.; YOUNG, LI-SEN; NARAYANA MURTHY, U.M.; HARRISON, BENJAMIN R.; WANG, YAN; WILL, JESSICA L.; MASSON, PATRICK H.

    2005-01-01

    • Aims The molecular mechanisms that correlate with gravity perception and signal transduction in the tip of angiosperm primary roots are discussed. • Scope Gravity provides a cue for downward orientation of plant roots, allowing anchorage of the plant and uptake of the water and nutrients needed for growth and development. Root gravitropism involves a succession of physiological steps: gravity perception and signal transduction (mainly mediated by the columella cells of the root cap); signal transmission to the elongation zone; and curvature response. Interesting new insights into gravity perception and signal transduction within the root tip have accumulated recently by use of a wide range of experimental approaches in physiology, biochemistry, genetics, genomics, proteomics and cell biology. The data suggest a network of signal transduction pathways leading to a lateral redistribution of auxin across the root cap and a possible involvement of cytokinin in initial phases of gravicurvature. • Conclusion These new discoveries illustrate the complexity of a highly redundant gravity-signalling process in roots, and help to elucidate the global mechanisms that govern auxin transport and morphogenetic regulation in roots. PMID:16033778

  9. Root canal sealers induce cytotoxicity and necrosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tsui-Hsien Huang; Shinn-Jyh Ding; Ting-Zen Hsu; Zen-Dar Lee; Chia-Tze Kao

    2004-01-01

    There are three types of the root canal sealers commonly used in clinical applications. They are calcium hydroxide base (Sealapex), zinc oxide–eugenol base (Canals), and epoxy-resin base (AH Plus). Elutable substances and degradation products from root canal sealers may gain access to periodontal tissue in a number of ways. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the biologic

  10. 2001 NORTH AMERICAN ROOT WEEVIL WORKSHOP PREFACE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The First North American Root Weevil Workshop was held at the Oregon State University North Willamette Research and Extension Center in Aurora, Oregon, November 1-2, 2001. The participants discussed a range of topics about root weevil biology, detection, and monitoring, as well as the population dy...

  11. Sporulation on plant roots by Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora ramorum has been shown to infect the roots of many of the pathogen’s foliar hosts. Methods of detecting inoculum in runoff and of quantifying root colonization were tested using Viburnum tinus, Camellia oleifera, Quercus prinus, Umbellularia californica, and Epilobium ciliatum. Plants...

  12. ACETOGENIC BACTERIA ASSOCIATED WITH SEAGRASS ROOTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seagrasses are adapted to being rooted in reduced, anoxic sediments with high rates of sulfate reduction. During the day, an oxygen gradient is generated around the roots, becoming anoxic at night. Thus, obligate anaerobic bacteria in the rhizosphere have to tolerate elevated oxy...

  13. Gravitropism and Autotropism in Cress Roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sack, Fred D.

    1998-01-01

    The overall purpose of this experiment was to study how cress roots respond to a withdrawal of a gravity stimulus i.e. when and how much the roots straighten (autotropism) after curving (gravitropism). This question was studied both in extensive ground-based research and in microgravity on BioRack.

  14. Cytological and ultrastructural studies on root tissues.

    PubMed

    Slocum, R D; Gaynor, J J; Galston, A W

    1984-11-01

    The anatomy and fine structure of roots from oat and mung bean seedlings, grown under microgravity conditions for 8 days aboard the Space Shuttle, was examined and compared to that of roots from ground control plants grown under similar conditions. Roots from both sets of oat seedlings exhibited characteristic monocotyledonous tissue organization and normal ultrastructural features, except for cortex cell mitochondria, which exhibited a 'swollen' morphology. Various stages of cell division were observed in the meristematic tissues of oat roots. Ground control and flight-grown mung bean roots also showed normal tissue organization, but root cap cells in the flight-grown roots were collapsed and degraded in appearance, especially at the cap periphery. At the ultrastructural level, these cells exhibited a loss of organelle integrity and a highly-condensed cytoplasm. This latter observation perhaps suggests a differing tissue sensitivity for the two species to growth conditions employed in space flight. The basis for abnormal root cap cell development is not understood, but the loss of these putative gravity-sensing cells holds potential significance for long term plant growth orientation during space flight. PMID:11538824

  15. Topographic and ecologic controls on root reinforcement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. C. Hales; C. R. Ford; T. Hwang; J. M. Vose; L. E. Band

    2009-01-01

    Shallow landslides are a significant hazard in steep, soil-mantled landscapes. During intense rainfall events, the distribution of shallow landslides is controlled by variations in landscape gradient, the frictional and cohesive properties of soil and roots, and the subsurface hydrologic response. While gradients can be estimated from digital elevation models, information on soil and root properties remains sparse. We investigated whether

  16. Nitrate contra auxin: nutrient sensing by roots.

    PubMed

    Beeckman, Tom; Friml, Jirí

    2010-06-15

    In a new study published in this issue of Developmental Cell, Krouk et al. reveal a surprising mechanism by which plant root systems adapt their architecture for soil exploitation. The dual transporter NRT1.1 uses both nitrate and the plant hormone auxin as substrates, enabling soil nitrate availability to regulate auxin-driven lateral root development. PMID:20627068

  17. CORTICAL CELL DEATH DURING LATERAL ROOT FORMATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    HOWARD T. BONNETT

    1969-01-01

    Root segments of Convolvulus arvensis, the field bindweed, were examined with the electron microscope to make possible a description of the fine structural correlates of lateral root protrusion through cortical parenchyma. Particular attention was directed to the outermost primordium cells, derived by meristematic activity from the endodermis, and to the con- tiguous cortical parenchyma cells. By following the fate of

  18. Root cause localization in large scale systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emre Kiciman; Lakshminarayanan Subramanian

    2005-01-01

    Root cause localization, the process of identifying the source of problems in a system using purely external observations, is a significant challenge in many large-scale systems. In this pa- per, we propose an abstract model that captures the common issues underlying root cause localization and hence provides the ability to leverage solutions across different systems. The primary motivation of this

  19. Take-All Root Rot of Turfgrass

    E-print Network

    Krausz, Joseph P.

    2005-04-21

    the growing season, Take-all Root Rot of Turfgrass Joseph P. Krausz* L-5170 4-05 *Professor and Extension Program Leader for Plant Pathology, The Texas A&M University System. Characteristic infection pads (hypho - podia) of the take-all root rot fungus...

  20. Cytological and ultrastructural studies on root tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, R. D.; Gaynor, J. J.; Galston, A. W.

    1984-01-01

    The anatomy and fine structure of roots from oat and mung bean seedlings, grown under microgravity conditions for 8 days aboard the Space Shuttle, was examined and compared to that of roots from ground control plants grown under similar conditions. Roots from both sets of oat seedlings exhibited characteristic monocotyledonous tissue organization and normal ultrastructural features, except for cortex cell mitochondria, which exhibited a 'swollen' morphology. Various stages of cell division were observed in the meristematic tissues of oat roots. Ground control and flight-grown mung bean roots also showed normal tissue organization, but root cap cells in the flight-grown roots were collapsed and degraded in appearance, especially at the cap periphery. At the ultrastructural level, these cells exhibited a loss of organelle integrity and a highly-condensed cytoplasm. This latter observation perhaps suggests a differing tissue sensitivity for the two species to growth conditions employed in space flight. The basis for abnormal root cap cell development is not understood, but the loss of these putative gravity-sensing cells holds potential significance for long term plant growth orientation during space flight.

  1. Aetiology, incidence and morphology of the C-shaped root canal system and its impact on clinical endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Kato, A; Ziegler, A; Higuchi, N; Nakata, K; Nakamura, H; Ohno, N

    2014-01-01

    The C-shaped root canal constitutes an unusual root morphology that can be found primarily in mandibular second permanent molars. Due to the complexity of their structure, C-shaped root canal systems may complicate endodontic interventions. A thorough understanding of root canal morphology is therefore imperative for proper diagnosis and successful treatment. This review aims to summarize current knowledge regarding C-shaped roots and root canals, from basic morphology to advanced endodontic procedures. To this end, a systematic search was conducted using the MEDLINE, BIOSIS, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Google Scholar, Web of Science, PLoS and BioMed Central databases, and many rarely cited articles were included. Furthermore, four interactive 3D models of extracted teeth are introduced that will allow for a better understanding of the complex C-shaped root canal morphology. In addition, the present publication includes an embedded best-practice video showing an exemplary root canal procedure on a tooth with a pronounced C-shaped root canal. The survey of this unusual structure concludes with a number of suggestions concerning future research efforts. PMID:24483229

  2. Aetiology, incidence and morphology of the C-shaped root canal system and its impact on clinical endodontics.

    PubMed

    Kato, A; Ziegler, A; Higuchi, N; Nakata, K; Nakamura, H; Ohno, N

    2014-11-01

    The C-shaped root canal constitutes an unusual root morphology that can be found primarily in mandibular second permanent molars. Due to the complexity of their structure, C-shaped root canal systems may complicate endodontic interventions. A thorough understanding of root canal morphology is therefore imperative for proper diagnosis and successful treatment. This review aims to summarize current knowledge regarding C-shaped roots and root canals, from basic morphology to advanced endodontic procedures. To this end, a systematic search was conducted using the MEDLINE, BIOSIS, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Google Scholar, Web of Science, PLoS and BioMed Central databases, and many rarely cited articles were included. Furthermore, four interactive 3D models of extracted teeth are introduced that will allow for a better understanding of the complex C-shaped root canal morphology. In addition, the present publication includes an embedded best-practice video showing an exemplary root canal procedure on a tooth with a pronounced C-shaped root canal. The survey of this unusual structure concludes with a number of suggestions concerning future research efforts. PMID:24483229

  3. Anatomical and hydraulic properties of sorghum roots exposed to water deficit. [Sorghum bicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, R.T.; Jordan, W.R.; Drew, M.C. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station (United States))

    1991-05-01

    The effects of a severe water stress in the upper 0-0.15 m rooting zone on development of the exodermis, endodermis and xylem and on radial (Lp) and axial (Ls) hydraulic conductances were studied for Sorghum bicolor. Lp and Lx were based on water flow rates obtained by applying a negative hydrostatic pressure to the proximal xylem ends of excised roots placed in aerated nutrient solution. The same roots were stained with fluorescent berberine and acid phloroglucinol to describe the development of the exodermal and endodermal cell walls from formation of the Casparian band (State I), to deposition of suberin lamellae (State II), and lignification (State III). Lp of 1.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} m{sup 3}s{sup {minus}1}MPa{sup {minus}1} was 80% lower in stressed roots than in unstressed controls. At 0.01 and 0.07 m from the root apex, stressed roots were in State III while control roots were in States I and II, respectively. SEM-image analysis for stressed roots indicated that in the exodermis a greater proportion of the cross sectional area was occupied by lignified walls than in the endodermis. Cellufluor, an apoplastic tracer, was blocked at the lignified exodermis even at 0.01 m from the apex in stressed roots. Uranin, a symplastic tracer, was taken up only in the apical region in stressed roots but farther from the apex in the controls. Lx of 7.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}11}m{sup 3}s{sup {minus}1}MPa{sup {minus}1} was 90% lower in stressed roots compared with the controls. Cellufluor test and image analysis showed that although the protoxylem and early metaxylem were conductive in both treatments, stress caused more than a 50% reduction in the diameter of the xylem elements. Results suggest that lignification of the exodermis and endodermis to a large extent decreased apoplastic and symplastic flows and hence Lp in stressed roots. The low Lx in stressed roots was due to a decrease in the diameters of the conductive xylem elements.

  4. Hydrogen peroxide staining to visualize intracellular bacterial infections of seedling root cells.

    PubMed

    White, James F; Torres, Mónica S; Somu, Mohini P; Johnson, Holly; Irizarry, Ivelisse; Chen, Qiang; Zhang, Ning; Walsh, Emily; Tadych, Mariusz; Bergen, Marshall

    2014-08-01

    Visualization of bacteria in living plant cells and tissues is often problematic due to lack of stains that pass through living plant cell membranes and selectively stain bacterial cells. In this article, we report the use of 3,3'-diaminobenzidine tetrachloride (DAB) to stain hydrogen peroxide associated with bacterial invasion of eukaryotic cells. Tissues were counterstained with aniline blue/lactophenol to stain protein in bacterial cells. Using this staining method to visualize intracellular bacterial (Burkholderia gladioli) colonization of seedling roots of switch grass (Panicum virgatum), we compared bacterial free seedling roots and those inoculated with the bacterium. To further assess application of the technique in multiple species of vascular plants, we examined vascular plants for seedling root colonization by naturally occurring seed-transmitted bacteria. Colonization by bacteria was only observed to occur within epidermal (including root hairs) and cortical cells of root tissues, suggesting that bacteria may not be penetrating deeply into root tissues. DAB/peroxidase with counter stain aniline blue/lactophenol was effective in penetration of root cells to selectively stain bacteria. Furthermore, this stain combination permitted the visualization of the bacterial lysis process. Before any evidence of H2 O2 staining, intracellular bacteria were seen to stain blue for protein content with aniline blue/lactophenol. After H2 O2 staining became evident, bacteria were often swollen, without internal staining by aniline blue/lactophenol; this suggests loss of protein content. This staining method was effective for seedling root tissues; however, it was not effective at staining bacteria in shoot tissues due to poor penetration. PMID:24825573

  5. Effect of lead on root growth

    PubMed Central

    Fahr, Mouna; Laplaze, Laurent; Bendaou, Najib; Hocher, Valerie; Mzibri, Mohamed El; Bogusz, Didier; Smouni, Abdelaziz

    2013-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is one of the most widespread heavy metal contaminant in soils. It is highly toxic to living organisms. Pb has no biological function but can cause morphological, physiological, and biochemical dysfunctions in plants. Plants have developed a wide range of tolerance mechanisms that are activated in response to Pb exposure. Pb affects plants primarily through their root systems. Plant roots rapidly respond either (i) by the synthesis and deposition of callose, creating a barrier that stops Pb entering (ii) through the uptake of large amounts of Pb and its sequestration in the vacuole accompanied by changes in root growth and branching pattern or (iii) by its translocation to the aboveground parts of plant in the case of hyperaccumulators plants. Here we review the interactions of roots with the presence of Pb in the rhizosphere and the effect of Pb on the physiological and biochemical mechanisms of root development. PMID:23750165

  6. How roots perceive and respond to gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; Evans, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    Graviperception by plant roots is believed to occur via the sedimentation of amyloplasts in columella cells of the root cap. This physical stimulus results in an accumulation of calcium on the lower side of the cap, which in turn induces gravicurvature. In this paper we present a model for root gravitropism integrating gravity-induced changes in electrical potential, cytochemical localization of calcium in cells of gravistimulated roots, and the interdependence of calcium and auxin movement. Key features of the model are that 1) gravity-induced redistribution of calcium is an early event in the transduction mechanism, and 2) apoplastic movement of calcium through the root-cap mucilage may be an important component of the pathway for calcium movement.

  7. Alfalfa Root Flavonoid Production Is Nitrogen Regulated.

    PubMed Central

    Coronado, C.; Zuanazzi, JAS.; Sallaud, C.; Quirion, J. C.; Esnault, R.; Husson, H. P.; Kondorosi, A.; Ratet, P.

    1995-01-01

    Flavonoids produced by legume roots are signal molecules acting both as chemoattractants and nod gene inducers for the symbiotic Rhizobium partner. Combined nitrogen inhibits the establishment of the symbiosis. To know whether nitrogen nutrition could act at the level of signal production, we have studied the expression of flavonoid biosynthetic genes as well as the production of flavonoids in the roots of plants grown under nitrogen-limiting or nonlimiting conditions. We show here that growth of the plant under nitrogen-limiting conditions results in the enhancement of expression of the flavonoid biosynthesis genes chalcone synthase and isoflavone reductase and in an increase of root flavonoid and isoflavonoid production as well as in the Rhizobium meliloti nod gene-inducing activity of the root extract. These results indicate that in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) roots, the production of flavonoids can be influenced by the nitrogen nutrition of the plant. PMID:12228491

  8. Photosynthesis of Root Chloroplasts Developed in Arabidopsis Lines Overexpressing GOLDEN2-LIKE Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Sasaki, Daichi; Noguchi, Ko; Fujinuma, Daiki; Komatsu, Hirohisa; Kobayashi, Masami; Sato, Mayuko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Sugimoto, Keiko; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Wada, Hajime; Masuda, Tatsuru

    2013-01-01

    In plants, genes involved in photosynthesis are encoded separately in nuclei and plastids, and tight cooperation between these two genomes is therefore required for the development of functional chloroplasts. Golden2-like (GLK) transcription factors are involved in chloroplast development, directly targeting photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes for up-regulation. Although overexpression of GLKs leads to chloroplast development in non-photosynthetic organs, the mechanisms of coordination between the nuclear gene expression influenced by GLKs and the photosynthetic processes inside chloroplasts are largely unknown. To elucidate the impact of GLK-induced expression of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes on the construction of photosynthetic systems, chloroplast morphology and photosynthetic characteristics in greenish roots of Arabidopsis thaliana lines overexpressing GLKs were compared with those in wild-type roots and leaves. Overexpression of GLKs caused up-regulation of not only their direct targets but also non-target nuclear and plastid genes, leading to global induction of chloroplast biogenesis in the root. Large antennae relative to reaction centers were observed in wild-type roots and were further enhanced by GLK overexpression due to the increased expression of target genes associated with peripheral light-harvesting antennae. Photochemical efficiency was lower in the root chloroplasts than in leaf chloroplasts, suggesting that the imbalance in the photosynthetic machinery decreases the efficiency of light utilization in root chloroplasts. Despite the low photochemical efficiency, root photosynthesis contributed to carbon assimilation in Arabidopsis. Moreover, GLK overexpression increased CO2 fixation and promoted phototrophic performance of the root, showing the potential of root photosynthesis to improve effective carbon utilization in plants. PMID:23749810

  9. Monitoring of root zone water content in the lab by 2D geoelectrical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werban, U.; Al Hagrey, S. A.; Rabbel, W.

    2009-12-01

    Studying the simulation of plant behaviour under water stress conditions becomes more and more important as a consequence of the increasing water shortage in many countries. Therefore monitoring of soil moisture is essential to validate results of hydrological models and for balancing of water flow processes. One of the fundamental processes in this context is the root water uptake. Based on field studies we recognized the importance to observe the water content at different time steps. We present a method for monitoring soil water redistributions due to water uptake by roots. Our aim was to image and monitor diurnal soil water redistribution in a small scale indoor experiment (cm-dm range) using techniques of geoelectrical resistivity tomography of high resolution, and to correlate results of the applied geoelectrical time-lapse imaging techniques with single point TDR-method. The measured time-lapses were inverted in 2D resistivity models, which were transferred in moisture distributions within the root-zone and surrounding soils using a geophysical pedotransfer (pedophysical) function. The distribution of water content was observed over several weeks. We imaged significant heterogeneity of soil moisture in space and time, even whereas no irrigation was applied. We monitored highest moisture variability during the morning hours, whereas nearly no changes accrued during the night. In our presentation we will focus also on the development of a model for root zone media which has been established based on the Archie’s equation. Until now, the Archie equation has been applied successfully for granular media with full or partial water saturation (mixture of three phases: grain, water and air). However if roots are involved we have to consider a media of four phases (mixture of sand grain, water, air and root) The model of the electric resistivity versus water content for root zones has been validated by experimental laboratory data for fine sand with plant roots as well as by data for the same material without roots.

  10. [Keratitis due to Acanthamoeba].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Irezábal, Julio; Martínez, Inés; Isasa, Patricia; Barrón, Jorge

    2006-10-01

    Free-living amebae appertaining to the genus Acanthamoeba, Naegleria and Balamuthia are the most prevalent protozoa found in the environment. These amebae have a cosmopolitan distribution in soil, air and water, providing multiple opportunities for contacts with humans and animals, although they only occasionally cause disease. Acanthamoeba spp. are the causative agent of granulomatous amebic encephalitis, a rare and often fatal disease of the central nervous system, and amebic keratitis, a painful disease of the eyes. Keratitis usually follows a chronic course due to the delay in diagnosis and subsequent treatment. The clear increase in Acanthamoeba keratitis in the last 20 years is related to the use and deficient maintenance of contact lenses, and to swimming while wearing them. The expected incidence is one case per 30,000 contact lens wearers per year, with 88% of cases occurring in persons wearing hydrogel lenses. This review presents information on the morphology, life-cycle and epidemiology of Acanthamoeba, as well as on diagnostic procedures (culture), appropriate antimicrobial therapy, and prevention measures. PMID:17125668

  11. Transcript expression profiling for adventitious roots of Panax ginseng Meyer.

    PubMed

    Subramaniyam, Sathiyamoorthy; Mathiyalagan, Ramya; Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Kim, Yu-Jin; Jang, Moon-Gi; Park, Jun-Hyung; Yang, Deok Chun

    2014-08-01

    Panax ginseng Meyer is one of the major medicinal plants in oriental countries belonging to the Araliaceae family which are the primary source for ginsenosides. However, very few genes were characterized for ginsenoside pathway, due to the limited genome information. Through this study, we obtained a comprehensive transcriptome from adventitious roots, which were treated with methyl jasmonic acids for different time points (control, 2h, 6h, 12h, and 24h) and sequenced by RNA 454 pyrosequencing technology. Reference transcriptome 39,304,529 (0.04GB) was obtained from 5,724,987,880 bases (5.7GB) of 22 libraries by de novo assembly and 35,266 (58.5%) transcripts were annotated with biological schemas (GO and KEGG). The digital gene expression patterns were obtained from in vitro grown adventitious root sequences which mapped to reference, from that, 3813 (6.3%) unique transcripts were involved in ?2 fold up and downregulations. Finally, candidates for ginsenoside pathway genes were predicted from observed expression patterns. Among them, 30 transcription factors, 20 cytochromes, and 11 glycosyl transferases were predicted as ginsenoside candidates. These data can remarkably expand the existing transcriptome resources of Panax, especially to predict existence of gene networks in P. ginseng. The entity of the data provides a valuable platform to reveal more on secondary metabolism and abiotic stresses from P. ginseng in vitro grown adventitious roots. PMID:24831831

  12. Characterization of a chondroitin sulfate hydrogel for nerve root regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conovaloff, Aaron; Panitch, Alyssa

    2011-10-01

    Brachial plexus injury is a serious medical problem that affects many patients annually, with most cases involving damage to the nerve roots. Therefore, a chondroitin sulfate hydrogel was designed to both serve as a scaffold for regenerating root neurons and deliver neurotrophic signals. Capillary electrophoresis showed that chondroitin sulfate has a dissociation constant in the micromolar range with several common neurotrophins, and this was determined to be approximately tenfold stronger than with heparin. It was also revealed that nerve growth factor exhibits a slightly stronger affinity for hyaluronic acid than for chondroitin sulfate. However, E8 chick dorsal root ganglia cultured in the presence of nerve growth factor revealed that ganglia cultured in chondroitin sulfate scaffolds showed more robust growth than those cultured in control gels of hyaluronic acid. It is hypothesized that, despite the stronger affinity of nerve growth factor for hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate serves as a better scaffold for neurite outgrowth, possibly due to inhibition of growth by hyaluronic acid chains.

  13. Variation of the Linkage of Root Function with Root Branch Order

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhengxia; Zeng, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Mounting evidence has shown strong linkage of root function with root branch order. However, it is not known whether this linkage is consistent in different species. Here, root anatomic traits of the first five branch order were examined in five species differing in plant phylogeny and growth form in tropical and subtropical forests of south China. In Paramichelia baillonii, one tree species in Magnoliaceae, the intact cortex as well as mycorrhizal colonization existed even in the fifth-order root suggesting the preservation of absorption function in the higher-order roots. In contrast, dramatic decreases of cortex thickness and mycorrhizal colonization were observed from lower- to higher-order roots in three other tree species, Cunninghamia lanceolata, Acacia auriculiformis and Gordonia axillaries, which indicate the loss of absorption function. In a fern, Dicranopteris dichotoma, there were several cortex layers with prominently thickened cell wall and no mycorrhizal colonization in the third- and fourth-order roots, also demonstrating the loss of absorptive function in higher-order roots. Cluster analysis using these anatomic traits showed a different classification of root branch order in P. baillonii from other four species. As for the conduit diameter-density relationship in higher-order roots, the mechanism underpinning this relationship in P. baillonii was different from that in other species. In lower-order roots, different patterns of coefficient of variance for conduit diameter and density provided further evidence for the two types of linkage of root function with root branch order. These linkages corresponding to two types of ephemeral root modules have important implication in the prediction of terrestrial carbon cycling, although we caution that this study was pseudo-replicated. Future studies by sampling more species can test the generality of these two types of linkage. PMID:23451168

  14. Retinal Glia Promote Dorsal Root Ganglion Axon Regeneration

    E-print Network

    Lorber, Barbara; Chew, Daniel J.; Hauck, Stefanie M.; Chong, Rachel S.; Fawcett, James W.; Martin, Keith R.

    2015-03-27

    growth and branching of adult rat dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG) in culture. Furthermore, transplantation of retinal glia significantly enhanced regeneration of DRG axons past the dorsal root entry zone after root crush in adult rats. To identify...

  15. Bitter Root Irrigation district canal, looking east, typical section and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bitter Root Irrigation district canal, looking east, typical section and crossing - Bitter Root Irrigation Project, Bitter Root Irrigation Canal, Heading at Rock Creek Diversion Dam, West of U.S. Highway 93, Darby, Ravalli County, MT

  16. Bitter Root Irrigation district canal, looking east, typical section (canal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bitter Root Irrigation district canal, looking east, typical section (canal full) - Bitter Root Irrigation Project, Bitter Root Irrigation Canal, Heading at Rock Creek Diversion Dam, West of U.S. Highway 93, Darby, Ravalli County, MT

  17. ANCHORAGE MECHANICS OF DIFFERENT TYPES OF ROOT SYSTEMS

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ANCHORAGE MECHANICS OF DIFFERENT TYPES OF ROOT SYSTEMS A thesis submitted to the University..........................................................................................................................................................11 1.1.1 Types of Root Systems ...................................................................................................................................11 1.1.2 Factors Influencing Root System Form

  18. Locally finite root systems Ottmar Loos Erhard Neher

    E-print Network

    Locally finite root systems Ottmar Loos Erhard Neher Institut ......................................... * *14 3. Locally finite root systems .............................................. * * 21 4 ............................................................ 38 6. Integral bases, root bases and Dynkin diagrams ......................... 47 7. Weights

  19. Establishment of willow cuttings grown in porous membrane root envelopes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Allan P. Drew

    1993-01-01

    Small diameter fine, fibrous roots of willow are exceedingly difficult to remove from most soils. Where field retrieval of entire plants including clean roots may be important, porous membrane rooting envelopes are a method of choice.

  20. Root Hypoxia Reduces Leaf Growth 1

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Barbara A.; Neuman, Dawn S.; Stachowiak, Matthew L.

    1990-01-01

    This study examined the potential role of restricted phloem export, or import of substances from the roots in the leaf growth response to root hypoxia. In addition, the effects of root hypoxia on abscisic acid (ABA) and zeatin riboside (ZR) levels were measured and their effects on in vitro growth determined. Imposition of root hypoxia in the dark when transpirational water flux was minimal delayed the reduction in leaf growth until the following light period. Restriction of phloem transport by stem girdling did not eliminate the hypoxia-induced reduction in leaf growth. In vitro growth of leaf discs was inhibited in the presence of xylem sap collected from hypoxic roots, and also by millimolar ABA. Disc growth was promoted by sap from aerated roots and by 0.1 micromolar ZR. The flux of both ABA and ZR was reduced in xylem sap from hypoxic roots. Leaf ABA transiently increased twofold after 24 hours of hypoxia exposure but there were no changes in leaf cytokinin levels. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:16667366

  1. Ecology of Root Colonizing Massilia (Oxalobacteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Ofek, Maya; Hadar, Yitzhak; Minz, Dror

    2012-01-01

    Background Ecologically meaningful classification of bacterial populations is essential for understanding the structure and function of bacterial communities. As in soils, the ecological strategy of the majority of root-colonizing bacteria is mostly unknown. Among those are Massilia (Oxalobacteraceae), a major group of rhizosphere and root colonizing bacteria of many plant species. Methodology/Principal Findings The ecology of Massilia was explored in cucumber root and seed, and compared to that of Agrobacterium population, using culture-independent tools, including DNA-based pyrosequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative real-time PCR. Seed- and root-colonizing Massilia were primarily affiliated with other members of the genus described in soil and rhizosphere. Massilia colonized and proliferated on the seed coat, radicle, roots, and also on hyphae of phytopathogenic Pythium aphanidermatum infecting seeds. High variation in Massilia abundance was found in relation to plant developmental stage, along with sensitivity to plant growth medium modification (amendment with organic matter) and potential competitors. Massilia absolute abundance and relative abundance (dominance) were positively related, and peaked (up to 85%) at early stages of succession of the root microbiome. In comparison, variation in abundance of Agrobacterium was moderate and their dominance increased at later stages of succession. Conclusions In accordance with contemporary models for microbial ecology classification, copiotrophic and competition-sensitive root colonization by Massilia is suggested. These bacteria exploit, in a transient way, a window of opportunity within the succession of communities within this niche. PMID:22808103

  2. Meniscal root tears: significance, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Sanjeev; LaPrade, Christopher M; Ellman, Michael B; LaPrade, Robert F

    2014-12-01

    Meniscal root tears, less common than meniscal body tears and frequently unrecognized, are a subset of meniscal injuries that often result in significant knee joint disorders. The meniscus root attachment aids meniscal function by securing the meniscus in place and allowing for optimal shock-absorbing function in the knee. With root tears, meniscal extrusion often occurs, and the transmission of circumferential hoop stresses is impaired. This alters knee biomechanics and kinematics and significantly increases tibiofemoral contact pressure. In recent years, meniscal root tears, which by definition include direct avulsions off the tibial plateau or radial tears adjacent to the root itself, have attracted attention because of concerns that significant meniscal extrusion dramatically inhibits normal meniscal function, leading to a condition biomechanically similar to a total meniscectomy. Recent literature has highlighted the importance of early diagnosis and treatment; fortunately, these processes have been vastly improved by advances in magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopy. This article presents a review of the clinically relevant anatomic, biomechanical, and functional descriptions of the meniscus root attachments, as well as current strategies for accurate diagnosis and treatment of common injuries to these meniscus root attachments. PMID:24623276

  3. Root damage analysis of aircraft engine blade subject to ice impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, E. S.; Abumeri, G. H.; Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.

    1992-01-01

    The blade root response due to ice impact on an engine blade is simulated using the NASA in-house code BLASIM. The ice piece is modeled as an equivalent spherical object impacting on the leading edge of the blade and has the velocity opposite to that of the aircraft with direction parallel to the engine axis. The effect of ice impact is considered to be an impulse load on the blade with its amplitude computed based on the momentum transfer principle. The blade response due to the impact is carried out by modal superposition using the first three modes. The maximum dynamic stresses at the blade root are computed at the quarter cycle of the first natural frequency. A combined stress failure function based on modified distortion energy is used to study the spanwise bending damage response at the blade root. That damage function reaches maximum value for very low ice speeds and increases steeply with increases in engine speed.

  4. Effects and mechanisms of the combined pollution of lanthanum and acid rain on the root phenotype of soybean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhaoguo; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2013-09-01

    Rare earth pollution and acid rain pollution are both important environmental issues worldwide. In regions which simultaneously occur, the combined pollution of rare earth and acid rain becomes a new environmental issue, and the relevant research is rarely reported. Accordingly, we investigated the combined effects and mechanisms of lanthanum ion (La(3+)) and acid rain on the root phenotype of soybean seedlings. The combined pollution of low-concentration La(3+) and acid rain exerted deleterious effects on the phenotype and growth of roots, which were aggravated by the combined pollution of high-concentration La(3+) and acid rain. The deleterious effects of the combined pollution were stronger than those of single La(3+) or acid rain pollution. These stronger deleterious effects on the root phenotype and growth of roots were due to the increased disturbance of absorption and utilization of mineral nutrients in roots. PMID:23726884

  5. Surgical Treatment of an Immature Short-Rooted Traumatized Incisor with an Extensive Apical Lesion Using CEM Cement.

    PubMed

    Asgary, Saeed; Fazlyab, Mahta

    2015-01-01

    Severe traumatic injuries to immature teeth often cause damage to periodontal ligament as well as dental pulp; pulp necrosis, root resorption and subsequent apical lesion are common consequences. This article reports the surgical management of an infected immature maxillary central incisor associated with a gigantic periradicular lesion and severe root resorption. The tooth had a history of trauma and the patient suffered from purulent sinus tract and tooth mobility. After unsuccessful multi-session disinfection with calcium hydroxide, root end surgery was planned. During flap surgery and lesion enucleation, the root end was cleaned and filled with calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement. After one year, the radiographic examination revealed that the lesion was almost completely replaced with newly formed bone. In addition, clinical examination showed favorable outcomes; the tooth was symptom-free and in function. Due to chemical, physical and biological properties of CEM cement, this biomaterial might be considered as the root-end filling material of choice. PMID:25834603

  6. Getting to the roots of it: Genetic and hormonal control of root architecture

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Janelle K. H.; McCouch, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Root system architecture (RSA) – the spatial configuration of a root system – is an important developmental and agronomic trait, with implications for overall plant architecture, growth rate and yield, abiotic stress resistance, nutrient uptake, and developmental plasticity in response to environmental changes. Root architecture is modulated by intrinsic, hormone-mediated pathways, intersecting with pathways that perceive and respond to external, environmental signals. The recent development of several non-invasive 2D and 3D root imaging systems has enhanced our ability to accurately observe and quantify architectural traits on complex whole-root systems. Coupled with the powerful marker-based genotyping and sequencing platforms currently available, these root phenotyping technologies lend themselves to large-scale genome-wide association studies, and can speed the identification and characterization of the genes and pathways involved in root system development. This capability provides the foundation for examining the contribution of root architectural traits to the performance of crop varieties in diverse environments. This review focuses on our current understanding of the genes and pathways involved in determining RSA in response to both intrinsic and extrinsic (environmental) response pathways, and provides a brief overview of the latest root system phenotyping technologies and their potential impact on elucidating the genetic control of root development in plants. PMID:23785372

  7. Light as stress factor to plant roots – case of root halotropism

    PubMed Central

    Yokawa, Ken; Fasano, Rossella; Kagenishi, Tomoko; Baluška, František

    2014-01-01

    Despite growing underground, largely in darkness, roots emerge to be very sensitive to light. Recently, several important papers have been published which reveal that plant roots not only express all known light receptors but also that their growth, physiology and adaptive stress responses are light-sensitive. In Arabidopsis, illumination of roots speeds-up root growth via reactive oxygen species-mediated and F-actin dependent process. On the other hand, keeping Arabidopsis roots in darkness alters F-actin distribution, polar localization of PIN proteins as well as polar transport of auxin. Several signaling components activated by phytohormones are overlapping with light-related signaling cascade. We demonstrated that the sensitivity of roots to salinity is altered in the light-grown Arabidopsis roots. Particularly, light-exposed roots are less effective in their salt-avoidance behavior known as root halotropism. Here we discuss these new aspects of light-mediated root behavior from cellular, physiological and evolutionary perspectives. PMID:25566292

  8. Roots of algebraic equations and Clifford algebra

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gaston Casanova

    1999-01-01

    If an algebraic equation onIR admits real roots it admits hyperbolic roots which are elements of the set (x\\u000a 0 + ?y\\u000a 0) where ? is a Clifford number having a square equal to 1. The equation can have hyperbolic or real roots\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a $${{(a_1 + a_2 )} \\\\over 2} + \\\\varepsilon {{(a_1 - a_2 )} \\\\over 2}$$\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a ifa\\u000a 1 anda

  9. Selenium Absorption by Excised Astragalus Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Jane M.; Shrift, Alex

    1968-01-01

    Absorption of selenate and selenite by excised roots of Astragalus Crotalariae, a selenium accumulator, and of A. lentiginosus, a non-accumulator, was favored by CaCl2 and a pH of 4.0. The uptake of selenate and possibly selenite, is metabolically linked. Roots of a number of Astragalus species were examined, and in all cases selenate entered the roots much faster than selenite. In these short-term experiments there was no relation between uptake of the 2 ions and classification of a species as selenium-accumulator or non-accumulator. PMID:5638040

  10. Selenium absorption by excised Astragalus roots.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, J M; Shrift, A

    1968-01-01

    Absorption of selenate and selenite by excised roots of Astragalus Crotalariae, a selenium accumulator, and of A. lentiginosus, a non-accumulator, was favored by CaCl(2) and a pH of 4.0. The uptake of selenate and possibly selenite, is metabolically linked. Roots of a number of Astragalus species were examined, and in all cases selenate entered the roots much faster than selenite. In these short-term experiments there was no relation between uptake of the 2 ions and classification of a species as selenium-accumulator or non-accumulator. PMID:5638040

  11. Plant roots use a patterning mechanism to position lateral root branches toward available water.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yun; Aggarwal, Pooja; Robbins, Neil E; Sturrock, Craig J; Thompson, Mark C; Tan, Han Qi; Tham, Cliff; Duan, Lina; Rodriguez, Pedro L; Vernoux, Teva; Mooney, Sacha J; Bennett, Malcolm J; Dinneny, José R

    2014-06-24

    The architecture of the branched root system of plants is a major determinant of vigor. Water availability is known to impact root physiology and growth; however, the spatial scale at which this stimulus influences root architecture is poorly understood. Here we reveal that differences in the availability of water across the circumferential axis of the root create spatial cues that determine the position of lateral root branches. We show that roots of several plant species can distinguish between a wet surface and air environments and that this also impacts the patterning of root hairs, anthocyanins, and aerenchyma in a phenomenon we describe as hydropatterning. This environmental response is distinct from a touch response and requires available water to induce lateral roots along a contacted surface. X-ray microscale computed tomography and 3D reconstruction of soil-grown root systems demonstrate that such responses also occur under physiologically relevant conditions. Using early-stage lateral root markers, we show that hydropatterning acts before the initiation stage and likely determines the circumferential position at which lateral root founder cells are specified. Hydropatterning is independent of endogenous abscisic acid signaling, distinguishing it from a classic water-stress response. Higher water availability induces the biosynthesis and transport of the lateral root-inductive signal auxin through local regulation of tryptophan aminotransferase of Arabidopsis 1 and PIN-formed 3, both of which are necessary for normal hydropatterning. Our work suggests that water availability is sensed and interpreted at the suborgan level and locally patterns a wide variety of developmental processes in the root. PMID:24927545

  12. Assessing the importance of genotype x environment interaction for root traits in rice using a mapping population. I: a soil-filled box screen

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. MacMillan; K. Emrich; H.-P. Piepho; C. E. Mullins; A. H. Price

    2006-01-01

    Altering root system architecture is considered a method of improving crop water and soil nutrient capture. The analysis of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for root traits has revealed inconsistency in the same population evaluated in different environments. It must be clarified if this is due to genotype × environment interaction or considerations of statistics if the value of QTLs for marker-assisted breeding

  13. Lauric acid in crown daisy root exudate potently regulates root-knot nematode chemotaxis and disrupts Mi-flp-18 expression to block infection

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Yuanmei

    2014-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) crops can be severely damaged due to parasitism by the root-knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne incognita, but are protected when intercropped with crown daisy (Chrysanthemum coronarium L.). Root exudate may be the determining factor for this protection. An experiment using pots linked by a tube and Petri dish experiments were undertaken to confirm that tomato–crown daisy intercropping root exudate decreased the number of nematodes and alleviated nematode damage, and to determine crown daisy root exudate-regulated nematode chemotaxis. Following a gas chromatography–mass spectrometry assay, it was found that the intercropping protection was derived from the potent bioactivity of a specific root exudate component of crown daisy, namely lauric acid. The Mi-flp-18 gene, encoding an FMRFamide-like peptide neuromodulator, regulated nematode chemotaxis and infection by RNA interference. Moreover, it was shown that lauric acid acts as both a lethal trap and a repellent for M. incognita by specifically regulating Mi-flp-18 expression in a concentration-dependent manner. Low concentrations of lauric acid (0.5–2.0mM) attract M. incognita and consequently cause death, while high concentrations (4.0mM) repel M. incognita. This study elucidates how lauric acid in crown daisy root exudate regulates nematode chemotaxis and disrupts Mi-flp-18 expression to alleviate nematode damage, and presents a general methodology for studying signalling systems affected by plant root exudates in the rhizosphere. This could lead to the development of economical and feasible strategies for controlling plant-parasitic nematodes, and provide an alternative to the use of pesticides in farming systems. PMID:24170741

  14. Iron and ferritin dependent ROS distribution impact Arabidopsis root system architecture.

    PubMed

    Reyt, Guilhem; Boudouf, Soukaina; Boucherez, Jossia; Gaymard, Frédéric; Briat, Jean-Franois

    2014-11-01

    Iron (Fe) homeostasis is integrated with the production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) whose distribution at the root tip participates in the control of root growth. Excess Fe increases ferritin abundance, enabling the storage of Fe which contributes to protection of plants against Fe-induced oxidative stress. AtFer1 and AtFer3 are the two ferritin genes expressed in the meristematic zone, pericycle and endodermis of the Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) root, and it is in these regions that we observe Fe stained dots. This staining disappears in the triple fer1-3-4 ferritin mutant. Fe excess decreases primary root length in the same way in wild-type and in fer1-3-4 mutant. In contrast, the Fe mediated decrease of lateral root (LR) length and density is enhanced in fer1-3-4 plants due to a defect in LR emergence. We observe that this interaction between excess Fe, ferritin and RSA is in part mediated by the H2O2/O2 (.-) balance between the root cell proliferation and differentiation zones regulated by the UPB1 transcription factor. Further, meristem size is also decreased in response to Fe excess in ferritin mutant plants, implicating cell cycle arrest mediated by the ROS-activated SMR5/SMR7 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors pathway in the interaction between Fe and RSA. PMID:25385697

  15. Inhibitory Action of Auxin on Root Elongation Not Mediated by Ethylene

    PubMed Central

    Eliasson, Lennart; Bertell, Gertrud; Bolander, Eva

    1989-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) on elongation growth of pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedling roots were investigated in relation to the effects of these compounds on ethylene production by the root tips. When added to the growth solution both compounds caused a progressively increasing inhibition of growth within the concentration range of 0.01 to 1 micromolar. However, only ACC increased ethylene production in root tips excised from the treated seedlings after 24 hours. High auxin concentrations caused a transitory increase of ethylene production during a few hours in the beginning of the treatment period, but even in 1 micromolar IAA this increase was too low to have any appreciable effect on growth. ACC, but not IAA, caused growth curvatures, typical of ethylene treatment, in the root tips. IAA caused conspicuous swelling of the root tips while ACC did not. Cobalt and silver ions reversed the growth inhibitory effects induced by ACC but did not counteract the inhibition of elongation or swelling caused by IAA. The growth effects caused by the ACC treatments were obviously due to ethylene production. We found no evidence to indicate that the growth inhibition or swelling caused by IAA is mediated by ethylene. It is concluded that the inhibitory action of IAA on root growth is caused by this auxin per se. PMID:16667017

  16. Simplifying the decision matrix for estimating fine root production by the sequential soil coring approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Z. Y.; Chen, Han Y. H.

    2013-04-01

    Sequential soil coring is a commonly used approach to measure seasonal root biomass and necromass, from which root production can be estimated by maximum-minimum, sum of changes, compartment-flow model, and/or decision matrix methods. Among these methods, decision matrix is the most frequently used. However, the decision matrix, often underestimating fine root production, is frequently misused in research due to inadequate documentation of its underlying logic. In this paper, we reviewed the decision matrix method and provided mathematical logic for the development of the matrix, by which not only root production but also mortality and decomposition rates can be calculated. To ease its use for large datasets, we developed simplified equations to facilitate computation of root production, mortality and decomposition to be used in MS Excel or R. We also presented results from calculations by an example using empirical data from boreal forests to show proper calculations of root production, mortality and decomposition. The simplified decision matrix presented here shall promote its application in ecology, especially for large datasets.

  17. Soybean phytophthora root rot: {\\\\it Phytophthora sojae\\\\\\/} races in Indiana and factors affecting disease resistance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jose Cristino Melgar

    1997-01-01

    Phytophthora root rot of soybeans caused by Phytophthora sojae has been one of the most important diseases throughout the soybean growing areas of the United States and Canada since the 1950's. Documenting the current physiological diversity of P. sojae and the role of factors affecting disease resistance are important in reducing yield losses due to this disease. Prevalence and distribution

  18. First report of root rot of Chicory caused by Phytophthora cryptogea in Chile

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chicory (Cichorium intybus L. var sativum Bisch.), a relatively new high value crop in Chile, was introduced for commercial production of inulin. Inulins are polysaccharides extracted from chicory tap roots that are used in processed foods due to their beneficial gastrointestinal properties. Approxi...

  19. Enrichment and proteomic analysis of plasma membrane from rat dorsal root ganglions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xia Xiong; Sha Huang; Hai Zhang; Jianjun Li; Jianying Shen; Jixian Xiong; Yong Lin; Liping Jiang; Xianchun Wang; Sonping Liang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons are primary sensory neurons that conduct neuronal impulses related to pain, touch and temperature senses. Plasma membrane (PM) of DRG cells plays important roles in their functions. PM proteins are main performers of the functions. However, mainly due to the very low amount of DRG that leads to the difficulties in PM sample collection,

  20. ROOT-KNOT NEMATODE RESISTANT BELL PEPPERS: AN ALTERNATIVE TO METHYL BROMIDE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are a major constraint to global production of bell pepper (Capsicum spp.). The effects of these ubiquitous pests are becoming more important on pepper in the U.S. and worldwide due to reduced methyl bromide production with pending removal of this fumigant for...

  1. Tomato root transcriptome response to a nitrogen-enriched soil patch

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel R Ruzicka; Felipe H Barrios-Masias; Natasha T Hausmann; Louise E Jackson; Daniel P Schachtman

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nitrogen (N), the primary limiting factor for plant growth and yield in agriculture, has a patchy distribution in soils due to fertilizer application or decomposing organic matter. Studies in solution culture over-simplify the complex soil environment where microbial competition and spatial and temporal heterogeneity challenge roots' ability to acquire adequate amounts of nutrients required for plant growth. In this

  2. Deciduous and evergreen trees differ in juvenile biomass allometries because of differences in allocation to root storage

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, Kyle W.; van Langevelde, Frank; Ward, David; Bongers, Frans; da Silva, Dulce Alves; Prins, Herbert H. T.; de Bie, Steven; Sterck, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Biomass partitioning for resource conservation might affect plant allometry, accounting for a substantial amount of unexplained variation in existing plant allometry models. One means of resource conservation is through direct allocation to storage in particular organs. In this study, storage allocation and biomass allometry of deciduous and evergreen tree species from seasonal environments were considered. It was expected that deciduous species would have greater allocation to storage in roots to support leaf regrowth in subsequent growing seasons, and consequently have lower scaling exponents for leaf to root and stem to root partitioning, than evergreen species. It was further expected that changes to root carbohydrate storage and biomass allometry under different soil nutrient supply conditions would be greater for deciduous species than for evergreen species. Methods Root carbohydrate storage and organ biomass allometries were compared for juveniles of 20 savanna tree species of different leaf habit (nine evergreen, 11 deciduous) grown in two nutrient treatments for periods of 5 and 20 weeks (total dry mass of individual plants ranged from 0·003 to 258·724 g). Key Results Deciduous species had greater root non-structural carbohydrate than evergreen species, and lower scaling exponents for leaf to root and stem to root partitioning than evergreen species. Across species, leaf to stem scaling was positively related, and stem to root scaling was negatively related to root carbohydrate concentration. Under lower nutrient supply, trees displayed increased partitioning to non-structural carbohydrate, and to roots and leaves over stems with increasing plant size, but this change did not differ between leaf habits. Conclusions Substantial unexplained variation in biomass allometry of woody species may be related to selection for resource conservation against environmental stresses, such as resource seasonality. Further differences in plant allometry could arise due to selection for different types of biomass allocation in response to different environmental stressors (e.g. fire vs. herbivory). PMID:23877001

  3. Euphorbia escula L. Root and Root Bud Indole-3-Acetic Acid Levels at Three Phenologic Stages.

    PubMed

    Nissen, S J; Foley, M E

    1987-06-01

    Endogenous indoleacetic acid (IAA) levels of Euphorbia esula L. primary root and root buds were examined at three phenologic stages. High performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, using (13)C(6)[benzene ring]-indole-3-acetic acid as internal standard, were used to measure root bud free and bound IAA levels in vegetative, full flower, and post-flower plants. Highest levels of free IAA (103 nanograms per gram fresh weight) were found in root buds during full flower. Esterified and amide IAA increased significantly in root buds of full flower and post-flower plants, but were not detectable in root buds of vegetative plants. Primary rootfree IAA was highest in vegetative and full flower plants (34.5 nanograms per gram fresh weight) and decreased by 50% in post-flower plants. PMID:16665432

  4. Root Apex Transition Zone As Oscillatory Zone

    PubMed Central

    Baluška, František; Mancuso, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Root apex of higher plants shows very high sensitivity to environmental stimuli. The root cap acts as the most prominent plant sensory organ; sensing diverse physical parameters such as gravity, light, humidity, oxygen, and critical inorganic nutrients. However, the motoric responses to these stimuli are accomplished in the elongation region. This spatial discrepancy was solved when we have discovered and characterized the transition zone which is interpolated between the apical meristem and the subapical elongation zone. Cells of this zone are very active in the cytoskeletal rearrangements, endocytosis and endocytic vesicle recycling, as well as in electric activities. Here we discuss the oscillatory nature of the transition zone which, together with several other features of this zone, suggest that it acts as some kind of command center. In accordance with the early proposal of Charles and Francis Darwin, cells of this root zone receive sensory information from the root cap and instruct the motoric responses of cells in the elongation zone. PMID:24106493

  5. Environmentally alterable additive genetic effects Root Gorelick*

    E-print Network

    Gorelick, Root

    Environmentally alterable additive genetic effects Root Gorelick* School of Life Sciences, Arizona environmentally alterable additive genetic variance confounds prediction of evolutionary trajectories, but (1 phenotypically plastic than animals. Conclusion: Environmentally alterable additive genetic effects place

  6. LCD ROOT Simulation and Analysis Tools

    E-print Network

    Masako Iwasaki; Toshinori Abe

    2001-02-07

    The North American Linear Collider Detector group has developed a simulation program package based on the ROOT system. The package consists of Fast simulation, the reconstruction of the Full simulated data, and physics analysis utilities.

  7. LCD ROOT Simulation and Analysis Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, Masako

    2001-02-08

    The North American Linear Collider Detector group has developed a simulation program package based on the ROOT system. The package consists of Fast simulation, the reconstruction of the Full simulated data, and physics analysis utilities.

  8. Irregular sesquiterpenoids from Ligusticum grayi roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root oil of Ligusticum grayi (Apiaceae) contains numerous irregular sesquiterpenoids. In addition to the known acyclic sesquilavandulol and a new sesquilavandulyl aldehyde, two thapsanes, one epithapsane, and fourteen sesquiterpenoids representing eight novel carbon skeletons were found. The new sk...

  9. Flavonoids in roots of Sophora prostrata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Munekazu Iinuma; Masayoshi Ohyama; Toshiyuki Tanaka

    1995-01-01

    Further investigation of the phenolic constituents in the roots of Sophora prostrata gave 14 phenolic compounds, including four new ones, prostratols D-G. Structures were characterized by means of spectral data involving 2D NMR techniques.

  10. Building and tracking root shapes.

    PubMed

    Jacq, Jean-José; Schwartz, Cédric; Burdin, Valérie; Gérard, Romain; Lefèvre, Christian; Roux, Christian; Rémy-Néris, Olivier

    2010-03-01

    An algorithm aiming at robust and simultaneous registrations of a sequence of 3-D shapes was recently presented by Jacq et al. [IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng., vol. 55, no. 5, 2008]. This algorithm has to carry out an implicit representation of their common root shape (RS). A particular emphasis was put on the median consensus shape, which is a specific type of RS. Unlike this previous study, mainly focusing on the algorithm foundations while dealing with very specific applications examples, this paper attempts to show the versatility of the RS concept through a set of three problems involving a wider scope of application. The first problem copes with the design of prosthetic cortical plates for the hip joint. It shows how an explicit reconstruction of the RS, coming with its consensus map, could bring out an intermediary anatomical support from which pragmatic choices could be made, thereby performing a tradeoff between morphological, surgical, and production considerations. The second problem addresses in vivo real-time shoulder biomechanics through a miniature 3-D video camera. This new protocol implicitly operates through RS tracking of the content of virtual spotlights. It is shown that the current medical-oriented protocol, while operating within expert offices through low-cost equipments, could challenge high-end professional equipments despite some limitations of the 3-D video cameras currently available. The last problem deals with respiratory motions. This is an auxiliary measurement required by some medical imaging systems that can be handled as a basic application case of the former new protocol. PMID:19457742

  11. Root growth and metal uptake in four grasses grown on zinc-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, Antonio J; Cary, Timothy J; Hardy, Susan E; Lee, C Richard

    2003-01-01

    Depth and area of rooting are important to long-term survival of plants on metal-contaminated, steep-slope soils. We evaluated shoot and root growth and metal uptake of four cool-season grasses grown on a high-Zn soil in a greenhouse. A mixture of biosolids, fly ash, and burnt lime was placed either directly over a Zn-contaminated soil or over a clean, fine-grained topsoil and then the Zn-contaminated soil; the control was the clean topsoil. The grasses were 'Reliant' hard fescue (Festuca brevipila R. Tracey), 'Oahe' intermediate wheatgrass [Elytrigia intermedia (Host) Nevski subsp. intermedia], 'Ruebens' Canada bluegrass (Poa compressa L.), and 'K-31' tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.). Root growth in the clean soil and biosolids corresponded to the characteristic rooting ability of each species, while rooting into the Zn-contaminated soil was related to the species' tolerance to Zn. While wheatgrass and tall fescue had the strongest root growth in the surface layers (0-5 cm) of clean soil or biosolids, wheatgrass roots were at least two times more dense than those of the other grasses in the second layer (5-27 cm) of Zn-contaminated soil. When grown over Zn-contaminated soil in the second layer, hard fescue (with 422 mg/kg Zn) was the only species not to have phytotoxic levels of Zn in shoots; tall fescue had the highest Zn uptake (1553 mg/kg). Thus, the best long-term survivors in high-Zn soils should be wheatgrass, due to its ability to root deeply into Zn-contaminated soils, and hard fescue, with its ability to effectively exclude toxic Zn uptake. PMID:12809284

  12. Abscisic acid and hypoxic induction of anoxia tolerance in roots of lettuce seedlings.

    PubMed

    Kato-Noguchi, H

    2000-11-01

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seedlings were subjected to anoxic stress after ABA-pretreatment (ABA-PT) or hypoxic-pretreatment (H-PT). The H-PT increased the survivability of the anoxia in roots of the seedlings by 5.2-fold compared to that of non-pretreated (N-PT) seedlings. ABA-PT also increased the survivability at concentrations greater than 1 microM, and the survivability increased with increasing ABA doses. At 100 microM ABA, the survivability was 4.5-fold greater than that of N-PT seedlings. During pretreatment periods, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, EC 1.1.1.1) activity in the roots became 3.1- and 3.4-fold greater than that of N-PT seedlings following 100 microM ABA-PT and H-PT seedlings, respectively. After the onset of anoxic stress, ADH activities in all roots increased, but the activities in H-PT and ABA-PT roots remained much greater than that in N-PT roots, and the average ethanol production rate for the initial 6 h was 5.3, 4.0 and 1.4 micromol g(-1) FW h(-1) for H-PT, ABA-PT and N-PT roots, respectively. Roots of the seedlings lost ATP rapidly under anoxic stress; however, the decrease in ATP was much slower in the ABA-PT and H-PT seedlings than in the N-PT seedlings. These results suggest that the ABA-PT and H-PT may maintain ATP levels due to activation of ethanolic fermentation, which may be one of the causes of the increasing anoxia tolerance in the seedling roots. Measurement of endogenous ABA levels, however, showed that ABA levels did not increase during the H-PT, suggesting that the H-PT does not increase tolerance through an increase in ABA levels. PMID:11113172

  13. Estimating variation in rooting depth and belowground biomass at the continental scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everhart, J. C.; Meier, C. L.; Spencer, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    The production of belowground biomass plays an important role in the total carbon balance and net primary productivity (NPP) of an ecosystem. In particular, fine root biomass, due to rapid turnover rates, contributes a disproportionate amount of annual belowground net primary productivity (BNPP). The NEON Terrestrial Observation System will quantify above- and below-ground biomass at 60 sites distributed across 20 eco-climatic regions. Routine belowground observations include collecting fine root biomass samples to a maximum depth of 30 cm. Because substantial fine root biomass exists below 30 cm, NEON is also characterizing the distribution of fine root biomass with depth down to a maximum of 2 m below the surface in one excavated soil pit per site. The soil pit is dug in the site's dominant vegetation, and samples are wet sieved to extract roots. In conjunction with physical and chemical properties analyzed within each soil horizon, the soil pit characterization dataset will provide valuable information about the distribution of belowground biomass as a function of depth, as well as differences in total belowground biomass across NEON's 60 sites. Here, we analyzed differences in total belowground mass across sites, and we evaluated factors that may contribute to differences in total fine root biomass, such as precipitation, evapotranspiration, soil chemical and physical properties, and aboveground phenology. Soil pit characterization is complete at approximately 50% of sites, and the relatively large sample size allows us to test which factors best predict both the proportion of fine root biomass at depth, as well as total fine root biomass. These characterization data help inform development of NEON data products, and they also illustrate the scope of research possibilities that independent researchers may pursue with free-access to this novel, continental-scale dataset.

  14. Root anatomy of grasses and clovers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathleen Soper

    1959-01-01

    Comparisons are made of the anatomy of the mature parts of roots of the grasses Lolium perenne, Dactylis glomerata, Glyceria fluitans, and Alopecurus pratensis.Noteworthy features include a well-marked exodermis and a subjacent layer of sclerenchyma in Glyceria; the greater lignification of the Dactylis root as compared with Lolium; the greater total cross-sectional area of metaxylem vessels in Dactylis compared with

  15. Operated semigroups, Motzkin paths and rooted trees

    E-print Network

    Guo, Li

    2007-01-01

    Combinatorial objects such as rooted trees that carry a recursive structure have found important applications recently in both mathematics and physics. We put such structures in an algebraic framework of operated semigroups. This framework provides the concept of operated semigroups with intuitive and convenient combinatorial descriptions, and at the same time endows the familiar combinatorial objects with a precise algebraic interpretation. As an application, we obtain constructions of free Rota-Baxter algebras in terms of Motzkin paths and rooted trees.

  16. High throughput phenotyping of root growth dynamics, lateral root formation, root architecture and root hair development enabled by PlaRoM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nima YazdanbakhshA; Joachim FisahnA

    Plant organ phenotyping by non-invasive video imaging techniques provides a powerful tool to assess physiological traits and biomass production. We describe here a range of applications of a recently developed plant root monitoring platform (PlaRoM). PlaRoM consists of an imaging platform and a root extension profiling software application.Thisplatformhasbeendevelopedformultiparallelrecordingsofrootgrowthphenotypesofupto50individual seedlings over several days, with high spatial and temporal resolution. PlaRoM can

  17. Soil physical conditions affecting seedling root growth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. W. Eavis

    1972-01-01

    Summary  The role of mechanical impedance, poor aeration and water availability in restricting pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedling root growth in sandy loam soil at three bulk densities and six matric potentials was studied. Mechanical impedance\\u000a increased both with bulk density and —matric potential. In certain treatments the roots were shorter and thicker as impedance\\u000a increased but in others shorter, thicker

  18. Root water uptake by kiwifruit vines following partial wetting of the root zone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. R. Green; B. E. Clothier

    1995-01-01

    Rates of sap flow and root-water uptake by two 7-year old kiwifruit vines (Acinidia deliciosa) were studied in an orchard with the aim of determining the ability of the vines to alter their spatial pattern of root-water uptake following differential wetting of the root zone. Time-domain reflectometry (TDR) was used to monitor changes in the soil's volumetric water content, p.

  19. Fine root biomass and turnover in southern taiga estimated by root inclusion nets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Lukac; Douglas L. Godbold

    2010-01-01

    Fine roots play an important part in forest carbon, nutrient and water cycles. The turnover of fine roots constitutes a major\\u000a carbon input to soils. Estimation of fine root turnover is difficult, labour intensive and is often compounded by artefacts\\u000a created by soil disturbance. In this work, an alternative approach of using inclusion nets installed in an undisturbed soil\\u000a profile

  20. Suppression of Photosynthetic Gene Expression in Roots Is Required for Sustained Root Growth under Phosphate Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jun; Yu, Haopeng; Tian, Caihuan; Zhou, Wenkun; Li, Chuanyou; Jiao, Yuling; Liu, Dong

    2014-05-27

    Plants cope with inorganic phosphate (Pi) deficiencies in their environment by adjusting their developmental programs and metabolic activities. For Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the developmental responses include the inhibition of primary root growth and the enhanced formation of lateral roots and root hairs. Pi deficiency also inhibits photosynthesis by suppressing the expression of photosynthetic genes. Early studies showed that photosynthetic gene expression was also suppressed in Pi-deficient roots, a nonphotosynthetic organ; however, the biological relevance of this phenomenon remains unknown. In this work, we characterized an Arabidopsis mutant, hypersensitive to Pi starvation7 (hps7), that is hypersensitive to Pi deficiency; the hypersensitivity includes an increased inhibition of root growth. HPS7 encodes a tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase. Accumulation of HPS7 proteins in root tips is enhanced by Pi deficiency. Comparative RNA sequencing analyses indicated that the expression of many photosynthetic genes is activated in roots of hps7. Under Pi deficiency, the expression of photosynthetic genes in hps7 is further increased, which leads to enhanced accumulation of chlorophyll, starch, and sucrose. Pi-deficient hps7 roots also produce a high level of reactive oxygen species. Previous research showed that the overexpression of GOLDEN-like (GLK) transcription factors in transgenic Arabidopsis activates photosynthesis in roots. The GLK overexpressing (GLK OX) lines also exhibit increased inhibition of root growth under Pi deficiency. The increased inhibition of root growth in hps7 and GLK OX lines by Pi deficiency was completely reversed by growing the plants in the dark. Based on these results, we propose that suppression of photosynthetic gene expression is required for sustained root growth under Pi deficiency. PMID:24868033

  1. Proximal root diameter as predictor of total root size for fractal branching models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louise Y. Spek; Meine van Noordwijk

    1994-01-01

    If root systems have scale-independent branching rules, the total number of links in the root system can be predicted from\\u000a the ratio of the largest and smallest root diameter. In Paper I we presented an algebraic model for a dicho-syntomous pattern\\u000a (the simplest form of proportionate branching forming two equal branches at each node) and a herringbone branching model (the

  2. Vertical root fractures and their management

    PubMed Central

    Khasnis, Sandhya Anand; Kidiyoor, Krishnamurthy Haridas; Patil, Anand Basavaraj; Kenganal, Smita Basavaraj

    2014-01-01

    Vertical root fractures associated with endodontically treated teeth and less commonly in vital teeth represent one of the most difficult clinical problems to diagnose and treat. In as much as there are no specific symptoms, diagnosis can be difficult. Clinical detection of this condition by endodontists is becoming more frequent, where as it is rather underestimated by the general practitioners. Since, vertical root fractures almost exclusively involve endodontically treated teeth; it often becomes difficult to differentiate a tooth with this condition from an endodontically failed one or one with concomitant periodontal involvement. Also, a tooth diagnosed for vertical root fracture is usually extracted, though attempts to reunite fractured root have been done in various studies with varying success rates. Early detection of a fractured root and extraction of the tooth maintain the integrity of alveolar bone for placement of an implant. Cone beam computed tomography has been shown to be very accurate in this regard. This article focuses on the diagnostic and treatment strategies, and discusses about predisposing factors which can be useful in the prevention of vertical root fractures. PMID:24778502

  3. Astroculture™ Root Metabolism and Cytochemical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porterfield, D. M.; Barta, D. J.; Ming, D. W.; Morrow, R. C.; Musgrave, M. E.

    Physiology of the root system is dependent upon oxygen availability and tissue respiration. During hypoxia nutrient and water acquisition may be inhibited, thus affecting the overall biochemical and physiological status of the plant. For the Astroculture™ plant growth hardware, the availability of oxygen in the root zone was measured by examining the changes in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity within the root tissue. ADH activity is a sensitive biochemical indicator of hypoxic conditions in plants and was measured in both spaceflight and control roots. In addition to the biochemical enzyme assays, localization of ADH in the root tissue was examined cytochemically. The results of these analyses showed that ADH activity increased significantly as a result of spaceflight exposure. Enzyme activity increased 248% to 304% in dwarf wheat when compared with the ground controls and Brassica showed increases between 334% and 579% when compared with day zero controls. Cytochemical staining revealed no differences in ADH tissue localization in any of the dwarf wheat treatments. These results show the importance of considering root system oxygenation in designing and building nutrient delivery hardware for spaceflight plant cultivation and confirm previous reports of an ADH response associated with spaceflight exposure

  4. ASTROCULTURE (TM) root metabolism and cytochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Porterfield, D M; Barta, D J; Ming, D W; Morrow, R C; Musgrave, M E

    2000-01-01

    Physiology of the root system is dependent upon oxygen availability and tissue respiration. During hypoxia nutrient and water acquisition may be inhibited, thus affecting the overall biochemical and physiological status of the plant. For the Astroculture (TM) plant growth hardware, the availability of oxygen in the root zone was measured by examining the changes in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity within the root tissue. ADH activity is a sensitive biochemical indicator of hypoxic conditions in plants and was measured in both spaceflight and control roots. In addition to the biochemical enzyme assays, localization of ADH in the root tissue was examined cytochemically. The results of these analyses showed that ADH activity increased significantly as a result of spaceflight exposure. Enzyme activity increased 248% to 304% in dwarf wheat when compared with the ground controls and Brassica showed increases between 334% and 579% when compared with day zero controls. Cytochemical staining revealed no differences in ADH tissue localization in any of the dwarf wheat treatments. These results show the importance of considering root system oxygenation in designing and building nutrient delivery hardware for spaceflight plant cultivation and confirm previous reports of an ADH response associated with spaceflight exposure. PMID:11543169

  5. Profiling Gene Expression in Germinating Brassica Roots.

    PubMed

    Park, Myoung Ryoul; Wang, Yi-Hong; Hasenstein, Karl H

    2014-01-01

    Based on previously developed solid-phase gene extraction (SPGE) we examined the mRNA profile in primary roots of Brassica rapa seedlings for highly expressed genes like ACT7 (actin7), TUB (tubulin1), UBQ (ubiquitin), and low expressed GLK (glucokinase) during the first day post-germination. The assessment was based on the mRNA load of the SPGE probe of about 2.1 ng. The number of copies of the investigated genes changed spatially along the length of primary roots. The expression level of all genes differed significantly at each sample position. Among the examined genes ACT7 expression was most even along the root. UBQ was highest at the tip and root-shoot junction (RS). TUB and GLK showed a basipetal gradient. The temporal expression of UBQ was highest in the MZ 9 h after primary root emergence and higher than at any other sample position. Expressions of GLK in EZ and RS increased gradually over time. SPGE extraction is the result of oligo-dT and oligo-dA hybridization and the results illustrate that SPGE can be used for gene expression profiling at high spatial and temporal resolution. SPGE needles can be used within two weeks when stored at 4 °C. Our data indicate that gene expression studies that are based on the entire root miss important differences in gene expression that SPGE is able to resolve for example growth adjustments during gravitropism. PMID:24563578

  6. Defining the core Arabidopsis thaliana root microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Gehring, Jase; Malfatti, Stephanie; Tremblay, Julien; Engelbrektson, Anna; Kunin, Victor; del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Edgar, Robert C.; Eickhorst, Thilo; Ley, Ruth E.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Tringe, Susannah Green; Dangl, Jeffery L.

    2014-01-01

    Land plants associate with a root microbiota distinct from the complex microbial community present in surrounding soil. The microbiota colonizing therhizosphere(immediately surroundingthe root) and the endophytic compartment (within the root) contribute to plant growth, productivity, carbon sequestration and phytoremediation1-3. Colonization of the root occurs despite a sophisticated plant immune system4,5, suggesting finely tuned discrimination of mutualists and commensals from pathogens. Genetic principles governing the derivation of host-specific endophyte communities from soil communities are poorly understood. Here we report the pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene of more than 600 Arabidopsis thaliana plants to test the hypotheses that the root rhizosphere and endophytic compartment microbiota of plants grown under controlled conditions in natural soils are sufficiently dependent on the host to remain consistent across different soil types and developmental stages, and sufficiently dependent on host genotype to vary between inbred Arabidopsis accessions. We describe different bacterial communities in two geochemically distinct bulk soils and in rhizosphere and endophytic compartments prepared from roots grown in these soils. The communities in each compartment are strongly influenced by soil type. Endophytic compartments from both soils feature overlapping, low-complexity communities that are markedly enriched in Actinobacteria and specific families from other phyla, notably Proteobacteria. Some bacteria vary quantitatively between plants of different developmental stage and genotype. Our rigorous definition of an endophytic compartment microbiome should facilitate controlled dissection of plantmicrobe interactions derived from complex soil communities. PMID:22859206

  7. New insights into root gravitropic signalling.

    PubMed

    Sato, Ethel Mendocilla; Hijazi, Hussein; Bennett, Malcolm J; Vissenberg, Kris; Swarup, Ranjan

    2015-04-01

    An important feature of plants is the ability to adapt their growth towards or away from external stimuli such as light, water, temperature, and gravity. These responsive plant growth movements are called tropisms and they contribute to the plant's survival and reproduction. Roots modulate their growth towards gravity to exploit the soil for water and nutrient uptake, and to provide anchorage. The physiological process of root gravitropism comprises gravity perception, signal transmission, growth response, and the re-establishment of normal growth. Gravity perception is best explained by the starch-statolith hypothesis that states that dense starch-filled amyloplasts or statoliths within columella cells sediment in the direction of gravity, resulting in the generation of a signal that causes asymmetric growth. Though little is known about the gravity receptor(s), the role of auxin linking gravity sensing to the response is well established. Auxin influx and efflux carriers facilitate creation of a differential auxin gradient between the upper and lower side of gravistimulated roots. This asymmetric auxin gradient causes differential growth responses in the graviresponding tissue of the elongation zone, leading to root curvature. Cell biological and mathematical modelling approaches suggest that the root gravitropic response begins within minutes of a gravity stimulus, triggering genomic and non-genomic responses. This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of root gravitropism in Arabidopsis thaliana and identifies current challenges and future perspectives. PMID:25547917

  8. Plant root distributions and nitrogen uptake predicted by a hypothesis of optimal root foraging

    PubMed Central

    McMurtrie, Ross E; Iversen, Colleen M; Dewar, Roderick C; Medlyn, Belinda E; Näsholm, Torgny; Pepper, David A; Norby, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    CO2-enrichment experiments consistently show that rooting depth increases when trees are grown at elevated CO2 (eCO2), leading in some experiments to increased capture of available soil nitrogen (N) from deeper soil. However, the link between N uptake and root distributions remains poorly represented in forest ecosystem and global land-surface models. Here, this link is modeled and analyzed using a new optimization hypothesis (MaxNup) for root foraging in relation to the spatial variability of soil N, according to which a given total root mass is distributed vertically in order to maximize annual N uptake. MaxNup leads to analytical predictions for the optimal vertical profile of root biomass, maximum rooting depth, and N-uptake fraction (i.e., the proportion of plant-available soil N taken up annually by roots). We use these predictions to gain new insight into the behavior of the N-uptake fraction in trees growing at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory free-air CO2-enrichment experiment. We also compare MaxNup with empirical equations previously fitted to root-distribution data from all the world's plant biomes, and find that the empirical equations underestimate the capacity of root systems to take up N. PMID:22833797

  9. Root tip contact with low-phosphate media reprograms plant root architecture.

    PubMed

    Svistoonoff, Sergio; Creff, Audrey; Reymond, Matthieu; Sigoillot-Claude, Cécile; Ricaud, Lilian; Blanchet, Aline; Nussaume, Laurent; Desnos, Thierry

    2007-06-01

    Plant roots are able to sense soil nutrient availability. In order to acquire heterogeneously distributed water and minerals, they optimize their root architecture. One poorly understood plant response to soil phosphate (P(i)) deficiency is a reduction in primary root growth with an increase in the number and length of lateral roots. Here we show that physical contact of the Arabidopsis thaliana primary root tip with low-P(i) medium is necessary and sufficient to arrest root growth. We further show that loss-of-function mutations in Low Phosphate Root1 (LPR1) and its close paralog LPR2 strongly reduce this inhibition. LPR1 was previously mapped as a major quantitative trait locus (QTL); the molecular origin of this QTL is explained by the differential allelic expression of LPR1 in the root cap. These results provide strong evidence for the involvement of the root cap in sensing nutrient deficiency, responding to it, or both. LPR1 and LPR2 encode multicopper oxidases (MCOs), highlighting the essential role of MCOs for plant development. PMID:17496893

  10. TripNet: A Method for Constructing Rooted Phylogenetic Networks from Rooted Triplets

    PubMed Central

    Poormohammadi, Hadi; Eslahchi, Changiz; Tusserkani, Ruzbeh

    2014-01-01

    The problem of constructing an optimal rooted phylogenetic network from an arbitrary set of rooted triplets is an NP-hard problem. In this paper, we present a heuristic algorithm called TripNet, which tries to construct a rooted phylogenetic network with the minimum number of reticulation nodes from an arbitrary set of rooted triplets. Despite of current methods that work for dense set of rooted triplets, a key innovation is the applicability of TripNet to non-dense set of rooted triplets. We prove some theorems to clarify the performance of the algorithm. To demonstrate the efficiency of TripNet, we compared TripNet with SIMPLISTIC. It is the only available software which has the ability to return some rooted phylogenetic network consistent with a given dense set of rooted triplets. But the results show that for complex networks with high levels, the SIMPLISTIC running time increased abruptly. However in all cases TripNet outputs an appropriate rooted phylogenetic network in an acceptable time. Also we tetsed TripNet on the Yeast data. The results show that Both TripNet and optimal networks have the same clustering and TripNet produced a level-3 network which contains only one more reticulation node than the optimal network. PMID:25208028

  11. Effects of Nutrient Heterogeneity and Competition on Root Architecture of Spruce Seedlings: Implications for an Essential Feature of Root Foraging

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Hongwei; Liu, Qing; Chen, Jinsong; Cheng, Xinying; Yin, Huajun; Yin, Chunying; Zhao, Chunzhang

    2013-01-01

    Background We have limited understanding of root foraging responses when plants were simultaneously exposed to nutrient heterogeneity and competition, and our goal was to determine whether and how plants integrate information about nutrients and neighbors in root foraging processes. Methodology/Principal Findings The experiment was conducted in split-containers, wherein half of the roots of spruce (Picea asperata) seedlings were subjected to intraspecific root competition (the vegetated half), while the other half experienced no competition (the non-vegetated half). Experimental treatments included fertilization in the vegetated half (FV), the non-vegetated half (FNV), and both compartments (F), as well as no fertilization (NF). The root architecture indicators consisted of the number of root tips over the root surface (RTRS), the length percentage of diameter-based fine root subclasses to total fine root (SRLP), and the length percentage of each root order to total fine root (ROLP). The target plants used novel root foraging behaviors under different combinations of neighboring plant and localized fertilization. In addition, the significant increase in the RTRS of 0–0.2 mm fine roots after fertilization of the vegetated half alone and its significant decrease in fertilizer was applied throughout the plant clearly showed that plant root foraging behavior was regulated by local responses coupled with systemic control mechanisms. Conclusions/Significance We measured the root foraging ability for woody plants by means of root architecture indicators constructed by the roots possessing essential nutrient uptake ability (i.e., the first three root orders), and provided new evidence that plants integrate multiple forms of environmental information, such as nutrient status and neighboring competitors, in a non-additive manner during the root foraging process. The interplay between the responses of individual root modules (repetitive root units) to localized environmental signals and the systemic control of these responses may well account for the non-additive features of the root foraging process. PMID:23762405

  12. Root Exudates from Grafted-Root Watermelon Showed a Certain Contribution in Inhibiting Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongsheng; Mao, Jiugeng; Huang, Qiwei; Guo, Shiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2013-01-01

    Grafting watermelon onto bottle gourd rootstock is commonly used method to generate resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (FON), but knowledge of the effect of the root exudates of grafted watermelon on this soil-borne pathogen in rhizosphere remains limited. To investigate the root exudate profiles of the own-root bottle gourd, grafted-root watermelon and own-root watermelon, recirculating hydroponic culture system was developed to continuously trap these root exudates. Both conidial germination and growth of FON were significantly decreased in the presence of root exudates from the grafted-root watermelon compared with the own-root watermelon. HPLC analysis revealed that the composition of the root exudates released by the grafted-root watermelon differed not only from the own-root watermelon but also from the bottle gourd rootstock plants. We identified salicylic acid in all 3 root exudates, chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid in root exudates from own-root bottle gourd and grafted-root watermelon but not own-root watermelon, and abundant cinnamic acid only in own-root watermelon root exudates. The chlorogenic and caffeic acid were candidates for potentiating the enhanced resistance of the grafted watermelon to FON, therefore we tested the effects of the two compounds on the conidial germination and growth of FON. Both phenolic acids inhibited FON conidial germination and growth in a dose-dependent manner, and FON was much more susceptible to chlorogenic acid than to caffeic acid. In conclusion, the key factor in attaining the resistance to Fusarium wilt is grafting on the non-host root stock, however, the root exudates profile also showed some contribution in inhibiting FON. These results will help to better clarify the disease resistance mechanisms of grafted-root watermelon based on plant-microbe communication and will guide the improvement of strategies against Fusarium-mediated wilt of watermelon plants. PMID:23700421

  13. Root profile in Multi-layered Dehesas: an approach to plant-to-plant Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolo, V.; Moreno, G.

    2009-04-01

    Assessing plant-to-plant relationship is a key issue in agroforestry systems. Due to the sessile feature of plants most of these interactions take place within a restricted space, so characterizing the zone where the plant alters its environment is important to find overlapping areas where the facilitation or competition could occur. Main part of plan-to-plant interactions in the dehesa are located at belowground level, thus the main limited resources in Mediterranean ecosystems are soil nutrient and water. Hence a better knowledge of rooting plant profile can be useful to understand the functioning of the dehesa. The Iberian dehesa has always been considered as a silvopastoral system where, at least, two strata of vegetation coexist: native grasses and trees. However the dehesa is also a diverse system where cropland and encroached territories have been systematically combined, more or less periodically, with native pasture in order to obtain agricultural, pastoral and forestry outputs. These multipurpose mosaic-type systems generate several scenarios where the plant influence zone may be overlapped and the interaction, competition or facilitation, between plants can play an important role in the ecosystem functioning in terms of productivity and stability. In the present study our aim was to characterize the rooting profile of multi-layered dehesas in order to understand the competitive, and/or facilitative, relationships within the different plant strata. The root profile of Quercus ilex subsp. ballota, Cistus ladanifer, Retama spaherocarpa and natural grasses was studied. So 48 trenches, up to 2 meters deep, were excavated in 4 different environments: (i) grass; (ii) tree-grass; (iii) tree-shrub and (iv) tree-shrub-grass (12 trenches in each environment). The study was carried out in 4 dehesas, 2 encroached with C. ladanifer and 2 with R. spaherocarpa. In every trench soil samples were taken each 20 cm. Subsequently, all samples were sieved using different mesh size filters in order to avoid fine root loosing. Different plant roots were separated visually. Q. ilex roots were identified by their black cork, pasture roots were white, C. ladanifer roots were dark red and R. spaherocarpa roots were yellow clear. Besides, all them exhibited a different texture. Weight, length, surface and average diameter were measured in each root sample using the WinRHIZOpro program. The results showed a clear rooting pattern, high root density in the first soil layers decreasing in depth, in all the plant strata studied. The coexistence of, at least, two plant stratas modified most of the rooting profiles. In this way, natural grasses growing alone kept 90% of root density in the first 30 cm. In R. sphaerocarpa dehesas pasture reached up to 170 cm although the root density decreased much faster than in C. ladanifer dehesas where pasture had a higher density in the overall profile, but reaching a much lower depth. The introduction of shrubs lowered highly the pasture root density. This effect was higher growing with C. ladanifer than with R. sphaerocarpa, which slightly modified the pasture rooting profile. The effect of trees in the pasture root system was less clear. Trees growing alone stored 70 % of their root density in the first 30 cm. The tree root system reached the deepest soil layer explored in all the profiles. The introduction of shrub reduced highly the tree root density in the first soil layer. This effect was higher in presence of C. ladanifer whose influence reduced 40 % of tree root density in the first soil layer; nevertheless tree root density increased in deep layers when growing with C. ladanifer while it decreased throughout the profile when growing with R. sphaerocarpa. R. sphaerocarpa root system stored less root density in the first soil layer than C. ladanifer, reaching up to 190 cm depth. The influence of the tree increased a 20% the R. sphaerocarpa root density in the first soil layers; however the rest of the profile was highly overlapped. The C. ladanifer root density decreased much faster growing alone tha

  14. Root growth inhibition by NH4 in Arabidopsis is mediated

    E-print Network

    Kronzucker, Herbert J.

    Root growth inhibition by NH4 + in Arabidopsis is mediated by the root tip and is linked to NH4 Military Trail, Toronto, Ontario, M1C 1A4, Canada ABSTRACT Root growth in higher plants is sensitive to excess ammo- nium (NH4 + ). Our study shows that contact of NH4 + with the primary root tip is both

  15. Original article Measuring the impact of Collybiafusipes on the root

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Measuring the impact of Collybiafusipes on the root system of oak trees Benoit - This work describes the aetiology of Collybia fusipes root rot and the impact of the parasite on the structure of mature oak root systems. The collar roots were examined and rated for C. fusipes infection

  16. A Root Isolation Algorithm for Sparse Univariate Polynomials

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Root Isolation Algorithm for Sparse Univariate Polynomials Maria Emilia Alonso Garcia root smaller or equal to d. Our target is to find for each real root of f an interval isolating this root from the others. The usual subdivision methods

  17. ROOT GROWTH: HOMOGENIZATION IN DOMAINS WITH TIME DEPENDENT PARTIAL PERFORATIONS

    E-print Network

    Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule Aachen (RWTH)

    ROOT GROWTH: HOMOGENIZATION IN DOMAINS WITH TIME DEPENDENT PARTIAL PERFORATIONS YVES CAPDEBOSCQ AND MARIYA PTASHNYK Abstract. In this article we derive a macroscopic model for root length density evolution, starting from a discrete mesh of roots, using homogenization techniques. In the microscopic model each root

  18. Seedling traits of maize as indicators of root lodging

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Agronomy Seedling traits of maize as indicators of root lodging P Stamp, C Kiel Swiss Federal whether root lodging of maize (Zea mays L) can be predicted at the seedling stage. In the first experiment-leaf stage, the diameter of the primary root was closely and negatively correlated with root lodging

  19. ROOT SYSTEMS AND THE QUANTUM COHOMOLOGY OF ADE RESOLUTIONS

    E-print Network

    Bryan, Jim

    ROOT SYSTEMS AND THE QUANTUM COHOMOLOGY OF ADE RESOLUTIONS JIM BRYAN AND AMIN GHOLAMPOUR Abstract root system canonically associated to G. We generalize the resulting Frobenius manifold to non-simply laced root systems to obtain an n parameter family of algebra structures on the affine root lattice

  20. In Situ Root System Architecture Extraction from Magnetic Resonance

    E-print Network

    Behnke, Sven

    the calculation of root parameter profiles as root length, surface and apex densities. The obtained root system stress, nutrient acquisition and plant yield are strongly influenced by the plant's capacity been developed for simulating nutrient and water uptake or root growth and performing "in situ

  1. Disturbances during minirhizotron installation can affect root observation data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Devereux Joslin; Mark H. Wolfe

    1999-01-01

    Use of minirhizotrons in forested ecosystems has produced considerable information on production, mortality, distribution, and the phenology of root growth. But installation of minirhizotrons severs roots and disturbs soil, which can cause root proliferation in perennial plants. The authors compared the magnitude and vertical distribution of root growth observations in a mature hardwood forest during the growing season immediately after

  2. Production of scopolamine by normal root culture of Hyoscyamus niger

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seung Han Woo; Jong Moon Park; Ji-Won Yang

    1995-01-01

    Normal root of Hyoscyamus niger was cultivated in various nutrient conditions to optimize root growth and scopolamine production. Nitrate or phosphate concentration had little effect on root growth, while the low levels of nitrate or phosphate enhanced specific scopolamine content by 44% and 39%, respectively. Glucose or fructose was not adequate for the root culture as a carbon source, while

  3. Root Morphology of Drought Resistance in Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) 

    E-print Network

    Dewi, Elvira Sari

    2011-02-22

    , and shoots. The drought selections in these genotypes affected the tap root fresh weight, and the number and weight of lateral roots. TAM 94L-25 averaged higher tap root fresh and dry weight, lateral root fresh weight and shoot fresh weight. DPL 50 exhibited...

  4. Some observations from the excavation of honey mesquite root systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. K. HEITSCHMIDT; R. J. ANSLEY; S. L. DOWHOWER; P. W. JACOBY; D. L. PRICE

    A single, mature and 12 smaller honey mesquite (Prosopisglan- duloso Ton. var. glandulosa) trees were partinlly excavated during 1986 to examine root distributional pntterns. The mature tree bad an extensive lateral ruut system and P large tap root that subdi- vided into 3 smaller tap roots at P depth near 1 m. The lateral root system of all trees was

  5. Root hairs confer a competitive advantage under low phosphorus availability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Terence R. Bates; Jonathan P. Lynch

    2001-01-01

    Root hairs are presumably important in the acquisition of immobile soil resources such as phosphorus. The density and length of root hairs vary substantially within and between species, and are highly regulated by soil phosphorus availability, which suggests that at high nutrient availability, root hairs may have a neutral or negative impact on fitness. We used a root-hairless mutant of

  6. Disentangling root system responses to neighbours: identification of novel root behavioural strategies

    PubMed Central

    Belter, Pamela R.; Cahill, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Plants live in a social environment, with interactions among neighbours a ubiquitous aspect of life. Though many of these interactions occur in the soil, our understanding of how plants alter root growth and the patterns of soil occupancy in response to neighbours is limited. This is in contrast to a rich literature on the animal behavioural responses to changes in the social environment. For plants, root behavioural changes that alter soil occupancy patterns can influence neighbourhood size and the frequency or intensity of competition for soil resources; issues of fundamental importance to understanding coexistence and community assembly. Here we report a large comparative study in which individuals of 20 species were grown with and without each of two neighbour species. Through repeated root visualization and analyses, we quantified many putative root behaviours, including the extent to which each species altered aspects of root system growth (e.g. rooting breadth, root length, etc.) in response to neighbours. Across all species, there was no consistent behavioural response to neighbours (i.e. no general tendencies towards root over-proliferation nor avoidance). However, there was a substantial interspecific variation showing a continuum of behavioural variation among the 20 species. Multivariate analyses revealed two novel and predominant root behavioural strategies: (i) size-sensitivity, in which focal plants reduced their overall root system size in response to the presence of neighbours, and (ii) location-sensitivity, where focal plants adjusted the horizontal and vertical placement of their roots in response to neighbours. Of these, size-sensitivity represents the commonly assumed response to competitive encounters—reduced growth. However, location sensitivity is not accounted for in classic models and concepts of plant competition, though it is supported from recent work in plant behavioural ecology. We suggest that these different strategies could have important implications for the ability of a plant to persist in the face of strong competitors, and that location sensitivity may be a critical behavioural strategy promoting competitive tolerance and coexistence. PMID:26019230

  7. How can science education foster students' rooting?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Østergaard, Edvin

    2015-06-01

    The question of how to foster rooting in science education points towards a double challenge; efforts to prevent (further) uprooting and efforts to promote rooting/re-rooting. Wolff-Michael Roth's paper discusses the uprooting/rooting pair of concepts, students' feeling of alienation and loss of fundamental sense of the earth as ground, and potential consequences for teaching science in a rooted manner. However, the argumentation raises a number of questions which I try to answer. My argumentation rests on Husserl's critique of science and the "ontological reversal", an ontological position where abstract models from science are considered as more real than the everyday reality itself, where abstract, often mathematical, models are taken to be the real causes behind everyday experiences. In this paper, measures towards an "ontological re-reversal" are discussed by drawing on experiences from phenomenon-based science education. I argue that perhaps the most direct and productive way of promoting rooting in science class is by intentionally cultivating the competencies of sensing and aesthetic experience. An aesthetic experience is defined as a precognitive, sensuous experience, an experience that is opened up for through sensuous perception. Conditions for rooting in science education is discussed against three challenges: Restoring the value of aesthetic experience, allowing time for open inquiry and coping with curriculum. Finally, I raise the question whether dimensions like "reality" or "nature" are self-evident for students. In the era of constructivism, with its focus on cognition and knowledge building, the inquiry process itself has become more important than the object of inquiry. I argue that as educators of science teachers we have to emphasize more explicitly "the nature of nature" as a field of exploration.

  8. The evolution of root hairs and rhizoids

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Victor A.S.; Dolan, Liam

    2012-01-01

    Background Almost all land plants develop tip-growing filamentous cells at the interface between the plant and substrate (the soil). Root hairs form on the surface of roots of sporophytes (the multicellular diploid phase of the life cycle) in vascular plants. Rhizoids develop on the free-living gametophytes of vascular and non-vascular plants and on both gametophytes and sporophytes of the extinct rhyniophytes. Extant lycophytes (clubmosses and quillworts) and monilophytes (ferns and horsetails) develop both free-living gametophytes and free-living sporophytes. These gametophytes and sporophytes grow in close contact with the soil and develop rhizoids and root hairs, respectively. Scope Here we review the development and function of rhizoids and root hairs in extant groups of land plants. Root hairs are important for the uptake of nutrients with limited mobility in the soil such as phosphate. Rhizoids have a variety of functions including water transport and adhesion to surfaces in some mosses and liverworts. Conclusions A similar gene regulatory network controls the development of rhizoids in moss gametophytes and root hairs on the roots of vascular plant sporophytes. It is likely that this gene regulatory network first operated in the gametophyte of the earliest land plants. We propose that later it functioned in sporophytes as the diploid phase evolved a free-living habit and developed an interface with the soil. This transference of gene function from gametophyte to sporophyte could provide a mechanism that, at least in part, explains the increase in morphological diversity of sporophytes that occurred during the radiation of land plants in the Devonian Period. PMID:22730024

  9. for estimates of root production and the ca-pacity of soils to store carbon. If most root

    E-print Network

    von der Linde, D.

    1345 for estimates of root production and the ca- pacity of soils to store carbon. If most root biomass is long-lived, the amount of plant carbon used to grow roots has been overes- timated in the past. However, if root popu- lations are skewed significantly, the rela- tionship between the mean age

  10. Contrasting rooting patterns of some arid-zone fruit tree species from Botswana – II. Coarse root distribution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Armin L. Oppelt; Winfried Kurth; Douglas L. Godbold

    2005-01-01

    Spatial coarse root distribution of the in situ grown species Strychnos cocculoides Bak., Strychnos spinosa Lam. (Loganiaceae), Vangueria infausta Burch. (Rubiaceae) and Grewia flava DC. (Tiliaceae) was investigated. The woody roots provide the scaffolding for fine roots, and thus underpin potential competition with fine\\u000a roots of other species. We developed a method for quantitative description of spatial patterns of coarse

  11. Variability of Root Traits in Spring Wheat Germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Sruthi; Mohan, Amita; Gill, Kulvinder S.; Prasad, P. V. Vara

    2014-01-01

    Root traits influence the amount of water and nutrient absorption, and are important for maintaining crop yield under drought conditions. The objectives of this research were to characterize variability of root traits among spring wheat genotypes and determine whether root traits are related to shoot traits (plant height, tiller number per plant, shoot dry weight, and coleoptile length), regions of origin, and market classes. Plants were grown in 150-cm columns for 61 days in a greenhouse under optimal growth conditions. Rooting depth, root dry weight, root: shoot ratio, and shoot traits were determined for 297 genotypes of the germplasm, Cultivated Wheat Collection (CWC). The remaining root traits such as total root length and surface area were measured for a subset of 30 genotypes selected based on rooting depth. Significant genetic variability was observed for root traits among spring wheat genotypes in CWC germplasm or its subset. Genotypes Sonora and Currawa were ranked high, and genotype Vandal was ranked low for most root traits. A positive relationship (R2?0.35) was found between root and shoot dry weights within the CWC germplasm and between total root surface area and tiller number; total root surface area and shoot dry weight; and total root length and coleoptile length within the subset. No correlations were found between plant height and most root traits within the CWC germplasm or its subset. Region of origin had significant impact on rooting depth in the CWC germplasm. Wheat genotypes collected from Australia, Mediterranean, and west Asia had greater rooting depth than those from south Asia, Latin America, Mexico, and Canada. Soft wheat had greater rooting depth than hard wheat in the CWC germplasm. The genetic variability identified in this research for root traits can be exploited to improve drought tolerance and/or resource capture in wheat. PMID:24945438

  12. Clustered Distribution of Tree Roots and Soil Water Exploitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Kazda; I. Schmid

    A substantial number of experiments have shown root proliferation and concentration in nutrient-rich patches. This article\\u000a focuses on root clustering observed on tree roots in forest stands and water uptake within these zones. Root clustering is\\u000a seen as a rule in natural soils for optimized exploitation of aggregated resources. In summary, root distribution in nature\\u000a is caused by two factors:

  13. Effect of root canal preparation, type of endodontic post and mechanical cycling on root fracture strength

    PubMed Central

    RIPPE, Marília Pivetta; SANTINI, Manuela Favarin; BIER, Carlos Alexandre Souza; BALDISSARA, Paolo; VALANDRO, Luiz Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of the type of root canal preparation, intraradicular post and mechanical cycling on the fracture strength of roots. Material and Methods eighty human single rooted teeth were divided into 8 groups according to the instruments used for root canal preparation (manual or rotary instruments), the type of intraradicular post (fiber posts- FRC and cast post and core- CPC) and the use of mechanical cycling (MC) as follows: Manual and FRC; Manual, FRC and MC; Manual and CPC; Manual, CPC and MC; Rotary and FRC; Rotary, FRC and MC; Rotary and CPC; Rotary, CPC and MC. The filling was performed by lateral compactation. All root canals were prepared for a post with a 10 mm length, using the custom #2 bur of the glass fiber post system. For mechanical cycling, the protocol was applied as follows: an angle of incidence of 45°, 37°C, 88 N, 4 Hz, 2 million pulses. All groups were submitted to fracture strength test in a 45° device with 1 mm/ min cross-head speed until failure occurred. Results The 3-way ANOVA showed that the root canal preparation strategy (p<0.03) and post type (p<0.0001) affected the fracture strength results, while mechanical cycling (p=0.29) did not. Conclusion The root canal preparation strategy only influenced the root fracture strength when restoring with a fiber post and mechanical cycling, so it does not seem to be an important factor in this scenario. PMID:25025556

  14. On Infinitely Precise Rounding for Division, Square Root, Reciprocal and Square Root Reciprocal

    E-print Network

    California at Davis, University of

    difficult when the re- sult is at or near exact Ô-bit points or midpoints of the Ô-bit binary discrete range roots and square root re- ciprocals all have the property that infinitely precise Ô-bit rounded results for Ô-bit input operands can be obtained from approximate results of bounded accuracy. We investi- gate

  15. Root traits associated with Phytophthora root rot resistance in red raspberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora root rot is a serious problem for commercial production of red raspberry. A study was initiated in 2009 to identify root traits in raspberry associated with little or no Phytophthora infection so that the traits can be selected and incorporated into breeding material to develop new cul...

  16. Viewing Polynomial Roots With Matrix Eyes: Part 1: Irrational Roots via Matrix Dynamics

    E-print Network

    Kalman, Dan

    1 Viewing Polynomial Roots With Matrix Eyes: Part 1: Irrational Roots via Matrix Dynamics Part 2 that converges to 0 #12;8 Dynamical View · Consider the orbits under repeated application of A starting from entries · Orbits from lattice points all converge to the line L · Let v be any integer vector. Let vn = A

  17. White lupin cluster root acclimation to phosphorus deficiency and root hair development involve unique glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White lupin (Lupinus albus L.) is a phosphate (Pi) deficiency tolerant legume which develops short, densely clustered tertiary lateral roots (cluster/proteoid roots) in response to Pi limitation. In this report we characterize two glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase (GPX-PDE) genes (GPX-PDE1 and...

  18. Response of grape root borer (lepidoptera: sesiidae) neonates to root extracts from vitaceae species and rootstocks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Observations at regular intervals of the location of newly hatched grape root borer larvae moving freely within Petri dish bioassays were used to measure and compare their response to filter paper discs treated with ethanol- and hexane-based extracts of roots from known and potential Vitaceae hosts ...

  19. Endophytic Occupation of Root Nodules and Roots of Melilotus dentatus by Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ling Ling Wang; En Tao Wang; Jie Liu; Ying Li; Wen Xin Chen

    2006-01-01

    Agrobacterium strains have been frequently isolated from the root nodules of different legumes. Various possible mechanisms have been proposed to explain the existence of these bacteria in nodules, but there is no sufficient experimental evidence to support the estimations. In this work, we proved that the Agrobacterium strain CCBAU 81181, which was originally isolated from the root nodules of Onobrychis

  20. Plants colonized by AM fungi regulate further root colonization by AM fungi through altered root exudation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexandra Pinior; Urs Wyss; Yves Piché; Horst Vierheilig

    1999-01-01

    The effect of root exudates from non-mycorrhizal and mycorrhizal cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) plants colonized by one of three arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Gigaspora rosea Nicolson & Schenck, Glomus intraradices Smith & Schenck, or Glomus mosseae (Nicolson & Gerdemann) Gerd. & Trappe) on hyphal growth of Gi. rosea and G. intraradices in axenic culture and on root colonization by G. mosseae

  1. Simulation of Impacts of Annosus Root Disease with the Western Root Disease Model1

    E-print Network

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Simulation of Impacts of Annosus Root Disease with the Western Root Disease Model1 Charles G. Shaw is described, and the assumptions that were made to adapt the model to simulate attack by Heterobasidion annosum in coniferous forests of south-central Oregon are defined. Some simulations produced

  2. Posttranscriptional gene silencing of root-knot nematode in transformed soybean roots

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heba M. M. Ibrahim; Nadim W. Alkharouf; Susan L. F. Meyer; Mohammed A. M. Aly; Abd El Kader Y. Gamal El-Din; Ebtissam H. A. Hussein; Benjamin F. Matthews

    2011-01-01

    RNAi constructs targeted to four different genes were examined to determine their efficacy to reduce galls formed by Meloidogyne incognita in soybean roots. These genes have high similarity with essential soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) and Caenorhabditis elegans genes. Transformed roots were challenged with M. incognita. Two constructs, targeted to genes encoding tyrosine phosphatase (TP) and mitochondrial stress-70 protein precursor

  3. Reactive Oxygen Species and Root Hairs in Arabidopsis Root Response to Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium Deficiency

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ryoung Shin; R. Howard Berg; Daniel P. Schachtman

    2005-01-01

    ; Plant root sensing and adaptation to changes in the nutrient status of soils is vital for long-term productivity and growth. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to play a role in root response to potassium depriva- tion. To determine the role of ROS in plant response to nitrogen and phosphorus deficiency, studies were con- ducted using wild-type Arabidopsis

  4. Investigating Whole Root Systems: Advances in Root Quantification Tools and Techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficient quantification of root traits remains a critical factor in exploiting many genetic resources during the study of root function and development. This is particularly true for the high throughput phenotyping of large populations for acid soil tolerance, including aluminum (Al) tolerance...

  5. Soil coring at multiple field environments can directly quantify variation in deep root traits to select wheat genotypes for breeding

    PubMed Central

    Wasson, A. P.; Rebetzke, G. J.; Kirkegaard, J. A.; Christopher, J.; Richards, R. A.; Watt, M.

    2014-01-01

    We aim to incorporate deep root traits into future wheat varieties to increase access to stored soil water during grain development, which is twice as valuable for yield as water captured at younger stages. Most root phenotyping efforts have been indirect studies in the laboratory, at young plant stages, or using indirect shoot measures. Here, soil coring to 2 m depth was used across three field environments to directly phenotype deep root traits on grain development (depth, descent rate, density, length, and distribution). Shoot phenotypes at coring included canopy temperature depression, chlorophyll reflectance, and green leaf scoring, with developmental stage, biomass, and yield. Current varieties, and genotypes with breeding histories and plant architectures expected to promote deep roots, were used to maximize identification of variation due to genetics. Variation was observed for deep root traits (e.g. 111.4–178.5cm (60%) for depth; 0.09–0.22cm/°C day (144%) for descent rate) using soil coring in the field environments. There was significant variation for root traits between sites, and variation in the relative performance of genotypes between sites. However, genotypes were identified that performed consistently well or poorly at both sites. Furthermore, high-performing genotypes were statistically superior in root traits than low-performing genotypes or commercial varieties. There was a weak but significant negative correlation between green leaf score (–0.5), CTD (0.45), and rooting depth and a positive correlation for chlorophyll reflectance (0.32). Shoot phenotypes did not predict other root traits. This study suggests that field coring can directly identify variation in deep root traits to speed up selection of genotypes for breeding programmes. PMID:24963000

  6. Truffles Regulate Plant Root Morphogenesis via the Production of Auxin and Ethylene1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Splivallo, Richard; Fischer, Urs; Göbel, Cornelia; Feussner, Ivo; Karlovsky, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Truffles are symbiotic fungi that form ectomycorrhizas with plant roots. Here we present evidence that at an early stage of the interaction, i.e. prior to physical contact, mycelia of the white truffle Tuber borchii and the black truffle Tuber melanopsorum induce alterations in root morphology of the host Cistus incanus and the nonhost Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; i.e. primary root shortening, lateral root formation, root hair stimulation). This was most likely due to the production of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and ethylene by the mycelium. Application of a mixture of the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid and IAA fully mimicked the root morphology induced by the mycelium for both host and nonhost plants. Application of the single hormones only partially mimicked it. Furthermore, primary root growth was not inhibited in the Arabidopsis auxin transport mutant aux1-7 by truffle metabolites while root branching was less effected in the ethylene-insensitive mutant ein2-LH. The double mutant aux1-7;ein2-LH displayed reduced sensitivity to fungus-induced primary root shortening and branching. In agreement with the signaling nature of truffle metabolites, increased expression of the auxin response reporter DR5?GFP in Arabidopsis root meristems subjected to the mycelium could be observed, confirming that truffles modify the endogenous hormonal balance of plants. Last, we demonstrate that truffles synthesize ethylene from l-methionine probably through the ?-keto-?-(methylthio)butyric acid pathway. Taken together, these results establish the central role of IAA and ethylene as signal molecules in truffle/plant interactions. PMID:19535471

  7. Soil coring at multiple field environments can directly quantify variation in deep root traits to select wheat genotypes for breeding.

    PubMed

    Wasson, A P; Rebetzke, G J; Kirkegaard, J A; Christopher, J; Richards, R A; Watt, M

    2014-11-01

    We aim to incorporate deep root traits into future wheat varieties to increase access to stored soil water during grain development, which is twice as valuable for yield as water captured at younger stages. Most root phenotyping efforts have been indirect studies in the laboratory, at young plant stages, or using indirect shoot measures. Here, soil coring to 2 m depth was used across three field environments to directly phenotype deep root traits on grain development (depth, descent rate, density, length, and distribution). Shoot phenotypes at coring included canopy temperature depression, chlorophyll reflectance, and green leaf scoring, with developmental stage, biomass, and yield. Current varieties, and genotypes with breeding histories and plant architectures expected to promote deep roots, were used to maximize identification of variation due to genetics. Variation was observed for deep root traits (e.g. 111.4-178.5cm (60%) for depth; 0.09-0.22cm/°C day (144%) for descent rate) using soil coring in the field environments. There was significant variation for root traits between sites, and variation in the relative performance of genotypes between sites. However, genotypes were identified that performed consistently well or poorly at both sites. Furthermore, high-performing genotypes were statistically superior in root traits than low-performing genotypes or commercial varieties. There was a weak but significant negative correlation between green leaf score (-0.5), CTD (0.45), and rooting depth and a positive correlation for chlorophyll reflectance (0.32). Shoot phenotypes did not predict other root traits. This study suggests that field coring can directly identify variation in deep root traits to speed up selection of genotypes for breeding programmes. PMID:24963000

  8. The Arabidopsis NRT1.1 transporter participates in the signaling pathway triggering root colonization of nitrate-rich patches.

    PubMed

    Remans, Tony; Nacry, Philippe; Pervent, Marjorie; Filleur, Sophie; Diatloff, Eugene; Mounier, Emmanuelle; Tillard, Pascal; Forde, Brian G; Gojon, Alain

    2006-12-12

    Localized proliferation of lateral roots in NO(3)(-)-rich patches is a striking example of the nutrient-induced plasticity of root development. In Arabidopsis, NO(3)(-) stimulation of lateral root elongation is apparently under the control of a NO(3)(-)-signaling pathway involving the ANR1 transcription factor. ANR1 is thought to transduce the NO(3)(-) signal internally, but the upstream NO(3)(-) sensing system is unknown. Here, we show that mutants of the NRT1.1 nitrate transporter display a strongly decreased root colonization of NO(3)(-)-rich patches, resulting from reduced lateral root elongation. This phenotype is not due to lower specific NO(3)(-) uptake activity in the mutants and is not suppressed when the NO(3)(-)-rich patch is supplemented with an alternative N source but is associated with dramatically decreased ANR1 expression. These results show that NRT1.1 promotes localized root proliferation independently of any nutritional effect and indicate a role in the ANR1-dependent NO(3)(-) signaling pathway, either as a NO(3)(-) sensor or as a facilitator of NO(3)(-) influx into NO(3)(-)-sensing cells. Consistent with this model, the NRT1.1 and ANR1 promoters both directed reporter gene expression in root primordia and root tips. The inability of NRT1.1-deficient mutants to promote increased lateral root proliferation in the NO(3)(-)-rich zone impairs the efficient acquisition of NO(3)(-) and leads to slower plant growth. We conclude that NRT1.1, which is localized at the forefront of soil exploration by the roots, is a key component of the NO(3)(-)-sensing system that enables the plant to detect and exploit NO(3)(-)-rich soil patches. PMID:17148611

  9. Root Age-Dependent Changes in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Communities Colonizing Roots of Panax ginseng

    PubMed Central

    Kil, Yi-Jong; Eo, Ju-Kyeong; Lee, Eun-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) community structure colonizing field-cultivated ginseng roots according of different ages, such as 1- to 5-year-old plant, collected from Geumsan-gun, Korea. A total of seven AMF species namely, Funnelliformis caledonium, F. moseae, Gigaspora margarita, Paraglomus laccatum, P. occultum, Rhizophagus irregularis, and Scutellospora heterogama were identified from the roots using cloning, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analysis of the large subunit region in rDNA. AMF species diversity in the ginseng roots decreased with the increase in root age because of the decreased species evenness. In addition, the community structures of AMF in the roots became more uniform. These results suggest that the age of ginseng affects mycorrhizal colonization and its community structure. PMID:25606018

  10. Root Age-Dependent Changes in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Communities Colonizing Roots of Panax ginseng.

    PubMed

    Kil, Yi-Jong; Eo, Ju-Kyeong; Lee, Eun-Hwa; Eom, Ahn-Heum

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we examined arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) community structure colonizing field-cultivated ginseng roots according of different ages, such as 1- to 5-year-old plant, collected from Geumsan-gun, Korea. A total of seven AMF species namely, Funnelliformis caledonium, F. moseae, Gigaspora margarita, Paraglomus laccatum, P. occultum, Rhizophagus irregularis, and Scutellospora heterogama were identified from the roots using cloning, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analysis of the large subunit region in rDNA. AMF species diversity in the ginseng roots decreased with the increase in root age because of the decreased species evenness. In addition, the community structures of AMF in the roots became more uniform. These results suggest that the age of ginseng affects mycorrhizal colonization and its community structure. PMID:25606018

  11. Metabolic transition in mycorrhizal tomato roots

    PubMed Central

    Rivero, Javier; Gamir, Jordi; Aroca, Ricardo; Pozo, María J.; Flors, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Beneficial plant–microorganism interactions are widespread in nature. Among them, the symbiosis between plant roots and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) is of major importance, commonly improving host nutrition and tolerance against environmental and biotic challenges. Metabolic changes were observed in a well-established symbiosis between tomato and two common AMF: Rhizophagus irregularis and Funneliformis mosseae. Principal component analysis of metabolites, determined by non-targeted liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry, showed a strong metabolic rearrangement in mycorrhizal roots. There was generally a negative impact of mycorrhizal symbiosis on amino acid content, mainly on those involved in the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids. On the other hand, many intermediaries in amino acid and sugar metabolism and the oxylipin pathway were among the compounds accumulating more in mycorrhizal roots. The metabolic reprogramming also affected other pathways in the secondary metabolism, mainly phenyl alcohols (lignins and lignans) and vitamins. The results showed that source metabolites of these pathways decreased in mycorrhizal roots, whilst the products derived from ?-linolenic and amino acids presented higher concentrations in AMF-colonized roots. Mycorrhization therefore increased the flux into those pathways. Venn-diagram analysis showed that there are many induced signals shared by both mycorrhizal interactions, pointing to general mycorrhiza-associated changes in the tomato metabolome. Moreover, fungus-specific fingerprints were also found, suggesting that specific molecular alterations may underlie the reported functional diversity of the symbiosis. Since most positively regulated pathways were related to stress response mechanisms, their potential contribution to improved host stress tolerance is discussed.

  12. Metabolic transition in mycorrhizal tomato roots.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Javier; Gamir, Jordi; Aroca, Ricardo; Pozo, María J; Flors, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Beneficial plant-microorganism interactions are widespread in nature. Among them, the symbiosis between plant roots and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) is of major importance, commonly improving host nutrition and tolerance against environmental and biotic challenges. Metabolic changes were observed in a well-established symbiosis between tomato and two common AMF: Rhizophagus irregularis and Funneliformis mosseae. Principal component analysis of metabolites, determined by non-targeted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, showed a strong metabolic rearrangement in mycorrhizal roots. There was generally a negative impact of mycorrhizal symbiosis on amino acid content, mainly on those involved in the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids. On the other hand, many intermediaries in amino acid and sugar metabolism and the oxylipin pathway were among the compounds accumulating more in mycorrhizal roots. The metabolic reprogramming also affected other pathways in the secondary metabolism, mainly phenyl alcohols (lignins and lignans) and vitamins. The results showed that source metabolites of these pathways decreased in mycorrhizal roots, whilst the products derived from ?-linolenic and amino acids presented higher concentrations in AMF-colonized roots. Mycorrhization therefore increased the flux into those pathways. Venn-diagram analysis showed that there are many induced signals shared by both mycorrhizal interactions, pointing to general mycorrhiza-associated changes in the tomato metabolome. Moreover, fungus-specific fingerprints were also found, suggesting that specific molecular alterations may underlie the reported functional diversity of the symbiosis. Since most positively regulated pathways were related to stress response mechanisms, their potential contribution to improved host stress tolerance is discussed. PMID:26157423

  13. an evaluation of techniques for root observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Awaz; Monnier, Yogan; Stokes, Alexia

    2015-04-01

    An evaluation of techniques for root observations Below-ground processes play an essential role in ecosystem nutrient cycling and the global carbon budget (C) cycle because they regulate storage of large quantities of carbon. Quantifying root dynamics, that is, production, longevity, mortality and decomposition, is crucial to the understanding of ecosystem structure and function, and in predicting how ecosystems respond to climate variability. The necessity for accumulating information about root system growth is thus clear. However, we have a relatively poor understanding of the best method of observation, especially in the natural soil environment. The objective of this study is to compare four techniques of root observation, that is, manual scanner, smartphone scanner, flatbed scanner and classical observations, for determining the best technique. Root growth dynamics were measured in Rhizotrons. The project involves several field-sites situated in agroforests comprising hybrid walnut trees and pasture/crops along a climatic gradient in France. The results of this project will provide data allowing researchers to facilitate the choice of the most suitable observation method for their research.

  14. Distribution of expansins in graviresponding maize roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, N.; Hasenstein, K. H.

    2000-01-01

    To test if expansins, wall loosening proteins that disrupt binding between microfibrils and cell wall matrix, participate in the differential elongation of graviresponding roots, Zea mays L. cv. Merit roots were gravistimulated and used for immunolocalization with anti-expansin. Western blots showed cross-reaction with two proteins of maize, one of the same mass as cucumber expansin (29 kDa), the second slightly larger (32 kDa). Maize roots contained mainly the larger protein, but both were found in coleoptiles. The expansin distribution in cucumber roots and hypocotyls was similar to the distribution in maize. Roots showed stronger expansin signals on the expanding convex side than the concave flank as early as 30 min after gravistimulation. Treatment with brefeldin A, a vesicle transport inhibitor, or the auxin transport inhibitor, naphthylphthalamic acid, showed delayed graviresponse and the appearance of differential staining. Our results indicate that expansins may be transported and secreted to cell walls via vesicles and function in wall expansion.

  15. Inhibition of Syncytia Formation and Root-knot Nematode Development on Cultures of Excised Tomato Roots.

    PubMed

    Orion, D; Wergin, W P; Endo, B Y

    1980-07-01

    Two different defined growth media were used to culture aseptically the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita, on excised roots of tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum cv 'Marglobe.' One of these media, STW, was a formulation by Skoog, Tsui, and White and the other, MS, a formulation by Murashige and Skoog. From 1 through 4 weeks, inoculated tissues were fractured to observe root infection, giant-cell formation, and nematode development with the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Four weeks after inoculation, the fresh weights of roots and developmental stages of nematodes were recorded. SEM observations indicated that roots cultured on the STW medium had normal growth and infection sites with galls that supported the development of mature females by 4 weeks. Roots cultured on the MS medium were less vigorous and had infection sites with galls containing only one to four syncytialike cells that did not support the development of mature females. Eighty percent of the larvae infecting roots cultured on the MS medium failed to develop into mature females. To determine which factor(s) affected root growth and nematode development, inoculated and uninoculated roots were grown on media consisting of different combinations of the organic and inorganic fractions of the STW and MS formulations. These experiments indicated that the organic fraction of STW was essential for normal root growth; however, the inorganic fraction of MS inhibited normal gall formation and nematode development. Further testing of the inorganic fractions revealed that the high concentration of ammonium nitrate in the MS medium was a factor that inhibited giant-cell formation and nematode development. PMID:19300696

  16. Influence of root structure on root survivorship: an analysis of 18 tree species using a minirhizotron method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jiacun GuShuiqiang; Shuiqiang Yu; Yue Sun; Zhengquan Wang; Dali Guo

    Fine root survivorship is an important aspect of root ecology and is known to be influenced by a suite of covariates. However,\\u000a the relative importance of each covariate on root survivorship is not clear. Here, we used minirhizotron-based data from 18\\u000a woody species to evaluate the relative strength of influence on root survivorship by root diameter, branch order, soil depth,

  17. Rhizogenesis: Exploring the physical development of the emerging root:soil interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, Sacha; Helliwell, Jon; Sturrock, Craig; Whalley, Richard; Miller, Tony

    2015-04-01

    The rhizosphere is a distinct zone of soil directly influenced by a plant root, with all below ground resources passing through this dynamic zone prior to capture by plants. Therefore the physical nature of the interface between the rhizosphere and the bulk soil is crucial for plant development. It is well known that the soil microbial community play a significant role in the evolution of the rhizosphere and some studies have shown that it is structurally a very different environment to the surrounding bulk soil. However how this evolution or genesis is influenced by the underlying soil physical properties and how this interacts with different plant species is less well understood. Actually examining the undisturbed rhizosphere has represented a major obstacle to research, due to its microscopic size and often fragile nature. Here we have employed high resolution X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) to successfully map the physical architecture of the developing rhizosphere in natural soils for the first time. We compared the temporal changes to the intact porous structure of the rhizosphere during the emergence of a developing root system, by assessing changes to the soil porous architecture across a range of soil textures and plant species. Our results indicate the physical zone of influence of a root at an early stage is more localised than previously thought possible (at the µm rather than mm scale). Soil porosity increases at the immediate root surface due to localised crack formation in both fine and coarse textured soils. As such the soil porous architecture at the root interface is enhanced and not compacted as previously considered. Subsequent densification of the soil system in response to an expanding root diameter was still observed, however this at some distance away from the root, and is primarily governed by soil particle size, soil bulk density and root diameter. This 'rhizosphere structure' and associated dynamics have important consequences for several important root-soil processes including water uptake efficiency and gaseous exchange pathways between individual aggregates and subsequently our efforts to model their behaviour.

  18. Phytochemical evaluation of the wild and cultivated varieties of Eranda Mula (Roots of Ricinus communis Linn.)

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Krunal A.; Acharya, Rabinarayan; Shukla, V. J.; Kalyani, Renuka; Khanpara, Komal

    2013-01-01

    In Ayurveda, the roots of Eranda (Ricinus communis Linn.) are used in the treatment Amavata (rheumatism), Sotha (inflammation), Katisula (backache), Udararoga (disease of abdomen), Jwara (fever), etc, Due to high demand, root of the cultivated variety is mainly used in place of wild. But, a comparative phytochemical profile of both varieties is not available till date. Considering this, a preliminary study has been done to ensure basic phytochemical profile of both the varieties. Preliminary physicochemical parameters, phytochemical screening, quantitative estimation of alkaloid, high-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC), and heavy metal analysis were carried-out in the study. Analysis of physicochemical data reveals no significant difference in between both varieties of roots, while alkaloid was found to be more in cultivated variety (0.34%) than wild one (0.15%). Though, the analytical profiles are almost identical, except the quantity of alkaloid; inferences should be made through well designed pharmacological and clinical studies. PMID:24250131

  19. Exclusion of grass roots from soil organic layers by Calluna: the role of ericoid mycorrhizas.

    PubMed

    Genney, D R; Alexander, I J; Hartley, S E

    2000-06-01

    The role of ericoid mycorrhizal colonization in competition between the dwarf shrub Calluna vulgaris and coarse grass Nardus stricta was investigated. Nardus was grown alone, or in competition with Calluna, in a layered organic/sand substrate with and without inoculation with the ericoid mycorrhizal endophyte Hymenoscyphus ericae, and with and without the addition of nitrogen. Root length and allocation between different substrate layers was assessed along with plant biomass, nutrient uptake and mycorrhizal colonization. Calluna was the superior competitor for nutrients, probably because of its ability to concentrate root growth in the upper organic layer. In the presence of Calluna both the absolute amount and proportion of Nardus root length in the organic layer were reduced, and this reduction was greatest when Calluna was mycorrhizal. The presence of ericoid mycorrhizal colonization did not reduce Nardus shoot nutrient content or concentration, suggesting that ericoid mycorrhizal suppression of Nardus growth was not due to nutrient competition: alternative mechanisms of interference are discussed. PMID:10948239

  20. Extending the square root method to account for additive forecast noise in ensemble methods

    E-print Network

    Raanes, Patrick N; Bertino, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    A square root approach is considered for the problem of accounting for model noise in the forecast step of the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and related algorithms. The primary aim is to replace the method of simulated, pseudo-random, additive noise so as to eliminate the associated sampling errors. The core method is based on the analysis step of ensemble square root filters, and consists in the deterministic computation of a transform matrix. The theoretical advantages regarding dynamical consistency are surveyed, applying equally well to the square root method in the analysis step. A fundamental problem due to the limited size of the ensemble subspace is discussed, and novel solutions that complement the core method are suggested and studied. Benchmarks from twin experiments with simple, low-order dynamics indicate improved performance over standard approaches such as additive, simulated noise and multiplicative inflation.

  1. Root graviresponsiveness and columella cell structure in carotenoid-deficient seedlings of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; McClelen, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Root graviresponsiveness in normal and carotenoid-deficient mutant seedlings of Zea mays was not significantly different. Columella cells in roots of mutant seedlings were characterized by fewer, smaller, and a reduced relative volume of plastids as compared to columella cells of normal seedlings. Plastids in columella cells of mutant seedlings possessed reduced amounts of starch. Although approximately 10 per cent of the columella cells in mutant seedlings lacked starch, their plastids were located at the bottom of the cell. These results suggest that (i) carotenoids are not necessary for root gravitropism, (ii) graviresponsiveness is not necessarily proportional to the size, number, or relative volume of plastids in columella cells, and (iii) sedimentation of plastids in columella cells may not result directly from their increased density due to starch content. Plastids in columella cells of normal and mutant seedlings were associated with bands of microtubule-like structures, suggesting that these structures may be involved in 'positioning' plastids in the cell.

  2. What is the Best Root Surface Treatment for Avulsed Teeth?

    PubMed Central

    Tuna, Elif B; Yaman, Duygu; Yamamato, Seiko

    2014-01-01

    Dental avulsion is the most severe type of traumatic tooth injuries since it causes damage to several structures and results in avulsion of the tooth from its socket. Management protocols for avulsed teeth should include management of the pulp and periodontal ligament (PDL) cells in order to improve the long-term prognosis and survival of these teeth. The prognosis of the treatment as well as the survival of an avulsed tooth depends on intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as the duration of the tooth’s extra-alveolar period, replantation time, the type of storage medium, PDL status and duration of splinting. Recent research has led to the development of storage media. However, there is not yet a single solution that fulfills all requirements to be considered as the ideal medium for temporary storage of avulsed teeth, and research on this field should carry on. On the other hand in case of delayed replantation, due to the great risk of tooth loss after avulsion, different root surface treatments have been proposed to prevent and delay root resorption before replantation. For this purpose, researchers have applied some different root surface treatment modalities in delayed replantation of avulsed teeth. Several protocols have been used to maintain PDL viability; some involve fluorides, steroids, sodium alendronate, enamel matrix derivatives (EMD) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, FGF-2). Among these applications, bFGF shows promising results in the regeneration of natural tooth structures and tissues. Better understanding of mechanism of bFGF may help to improve new technologies of regeneration of tooth structures. PMID:25317212

  3. Shallow cumulus rooted in photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilá-Guerau de Arellano, Jordi; Ouwersloot, Huug G.; Baldocchi, Dennis; Jacobs, Cor M. J.

    2014-03-01

    We study the interactions between plant evapotranspiration, controlled by photosynthesis (C3 and C4 grasses), and moist thermals responsible for the formation of shallow cumulus clouds (SCu). Our findings are based on a series of systematic numerical experiments at fine spatial and temporal scales using large eddy simulations explicitly coupled to a plant-physiology model. The shading provided by SCu leads to strong spatial variability in photosynthesis and the surface energy balance. This in turn results in SCu characterized by less extreme and less skewed values of liquid water path. The larger water use efficiency of C4 grass leads to two opposite effects that influence boundary layer clouds: more vigorous and deeper thermals due to the larger buoyancy surface flux (positive effect) characterized by less moisture content (negative). We find that under these midlatitude and well-watered soil conditions, SCu are characterized by a larger cloud cover and liquid water path over C4 grass fields.

  4. Root architecture responses: in search of phosphate.

    PubMed

    Péret, Benjamin; Desnos, Thierry; Jost, Ricarda; Kanno, Satomi; Berkowitz, Oliver; Nussaume, Laurent

    2014-12-01

    Soil phosphate represents the only source of phosphorus for plants and, consequently, is its entry into the trophic chain. This major component of nucleic acids, phospholipids, and energy currency of the cell (ATP) can limit plant growth because of its low mobility in soil. As a result, root responses to low phosphate favor the exploration of the shallower part of the soil, where phosphate tends to be more abundant, a strategy described as topsoil foraging. We will review the diverse developmental strategies that can be observed among plants by detailing the effect of phosphate deficiency on primary and lateral roots. We also discuss the formation of cluster roots: an advanced adaptive strategy to cope with low phosphate availability observed in a limited number of species. Finally, we will put this work into perspective for future research directions. PMID:25341534

  5. Analysis of gene expression profiles for cell wall modifying proteins and ACC synthases in soybean cyst nematode colonized roots, adventitious rooting hypocotyls, root tips, flooded roots, and IBA and ACC treatment roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that soybean cyst nematode (SCN) co-opts a part or all of one or more innate developmental process in soybean to establish its feeding structure, syncytium, in soybean roots. The syncytium in soybean roots is formed in a predominantly lateral direction within the vascular bundle by ...

  6. Measurements of oxygen permeability coefficients of rice (Oryza sativa L.) roots using a new perfusion technique

    PubMed Central

    Kotula, Lukasz; Steudle, Ernst

    2009-01-01

    A new approach is described to analyse the barrier properties of the outer part of rice (Oryza sativa L.) roots towards oxygen. By using a root-sleeving O2 electrode, radial oxygen loss at different distances from the root apex was measured and related to the corresponding root structure. In addition, internal oxygen concentrations were precisely adjusted using a newly developed perfusion technique. Thus, the oxygen permeability coefficient of the outer part of the root (OPR) could be calculated, since both (i) the oxygen flow across the OPR and (ii) the oxygen concentration gradient across the OPR from inside to outside were known. On the basis of the permeability coefficient, it can be decided whether or not different rates of oxygen loss across the OPR are due to changes in the OPR structure and/or to changes in the concentration gradient. The technique was applied to rice root segments, which enabled rapid perfusion of aerenchyma. In the present study, roots of rice grown under aerobic conditions were used which should have a higher O2 permeability compared with that of plants grown in deoxygenated solution. Both radial oxygen losses and permeability coefficients decreased along the root, reaching the lowest values at the basal positions. Values of oxygen permeability coefficients of the OPR were corrected for external unstirred layers. They decreased from (2.8±0.2)×10?6?m s?1 at 30?mm to (1.1±0.2)×10?6?m s?1 at 60?mm from the apex (n=5; ±SE). They were similar to those measured previously for cuticles. Low diffusional oxygen permeability of the OPR suggested that the barrier to radial oxygen loss was effective. This may help to retain oxygen within the root and enhance diffusion of oxygen towards the apex in the presence of a relatively high water permeability. The results are discussed in terms of the inter-relationship between the water and oxygen permeabilities as roots develop in either aerated or deoxygenated (stagnant) media. PMID:19088333

  7. Fine root dynamics and forest production across a calcium gradient in northern hardwood and conifer ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, B.B.; Yanai, R.D.; Fahey, T.J.; Bailey, S.W.; Siccama, T.G.; Shanley, J.B.; Cleavitt, N.L.

    2008-01-01

    Losses of soil base cations due to acid rain have been implicated in declines of red spruce and sugar maple in the northeastern USA. We studied fine root and aboveground biomass and production in five northern hardwood and three conifer stands differing in soil Ca status at Sleepers River, VT; Hubbard Brook, NH; and Cone Pond, NH. Neither aboveground biomass and production nor belowground biomass were related to soil Ca or Ca:Al ratios across this gradient. Hardwood stands had 37% higher aboveground biomass (P = 0.03) and 44% higher leaf litter production (P < 0.01) than the conifer stands, on average. Fine root biomass (<2 mm in diameter) in the upper 35 cm of the soil, including the forest floor, was very similar in hardwoods and conifers (5.92 and 5.93 Mg ha-1). The turnover coefficient (TC) of fine roots smaller than 1 mm ranged from 0.62 to 1.86 y-1 and increased significantly with soil exchangeable Ca (P = 0.03). As a result, calculated fine root production was clearly higher in sites with higher soil Ca (P = 0.02). Fine root production (biomass times turnover) ranged from 1.2 to 3.7 Mg ha-1 y-1 for hardwood stands and from 0.9 to 2.3 Mg ha-1 y -1 for conifer stands. The relationship we observed between soil Ca availability and root production suggests that cation depletion might lead to reduced carbon allocation to roots in these ecosystems. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  8. Root signalling and modulation of stomatal closure in flooded citrus seedlings.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gamir, Juan; Ancillo, Gema; González-Mas, M Carmen; Primo-Millo, Eduardo; Iglesias, Domingo J; Forner-Giner, M Angeles

    2011-06-01

    In this work, we studied the sequence of responses induced by flooding in citrus plants, with the aim of identifying the signals that lead to stomatal closure. One-year-old seedlings of Carrizo citrange, grown in sand under greenhouse conditions, were waterlogged for 35 d and compared with normally watered well-drained plants. Significant decreases in stomatal conductance and transpiration were detected between flooded and control seedlings from a week after the beginning of the experiment. However ABA concentration in leaves only started to increase after three weeks of flooding, suggesting that stomata closed in the absence of a rise in foliar ABA. Therefore, stomatal closure in waterlogged seedlings does not appear to be induced by ABA, at least during the early stages of flood-stress. The low levels of ABA detected in roots and xylem sap from flooded seedlings indicated that it is very unlikely that the ABA increase in the leaves of these plants is due to ABA translocation from roots to shoots. We propose that ABA is produced in old leaves and transported to younger leaves. Flooding had no effect on water potential or the relative water content of leaves. Soil flooding reduced root hydraulic conductance in citrus seedlings. This effect was already evident after a week of waterlogging, and at the end of the experiment, flood-stressed seedlings reached values of root hydraulic conductance below 12% of that of control plants. This reduction was related to down-regulation of the expression of PIP aquaporins. In addition, whole plant transpiration was reduced by 56% after 35 d under flooding conditions. Flood-stress also decreased the pH of sap extracted from citrus roots. Evidence is presented suggesting that acidosis induced by anoxic stress in roots causes gating of aquaporins, thereby decreasing hydraulic conductance. Additionally, stomatal closure finely balances-out low pH-mediated losses of root hydraulic conductance therefore maintaining stable leaf hydration. PMID:21459591

  9. Water uptake by a maize root system - An explicit numerical 3-dimensional simulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Daniel; Schnepf, Andrea; Klepsch, Sabine; Roose, Tiina

    2010-05-01

    Water is one of the most important resources for plant growth and function. An accurate modelling of the unsaturated flow is not only substantial to predict water uptake but also important to describe nutrient movement regarding water saturation and transport. In this work we present a model for water uptake. The model includes the simultaneous flow of water inside the soil and inside the root network. Water saturation in the soil volume is described by the Richards equation. Water flow inside the roots' xylem is calculated using the Poiseuille law for water flow in a cylindrical tube. The water saturation in the soil as well as water uptake of the root system is calculated numerically in three dimensions. We study water uptake of a maize plant in a confined pot under different supply scenarios. The main improvement of our approach is that the root surfaces act as spatial boundaries of the soil volume. Therefore water influx into the root is described by a surface flux instead of a volume flux, which is commonly given by an effective sink term. For the numerical computation we use the following software: The 3-dimensional maize root architecture is created by a root growth model based on L-Systems (Leitner et al 2009). A mesh of the surrounding soil volume is created using the meshing software DistMesh (Persson & Strang 2004). Using this mesh the partial differential equations are solved with the finite element method using Comsol Multiphysics 3.5a. Modelling results are related to accepted water uptake models from literature (Clausnitzer & Hopmans 1994, Roose & Fowler 2004, Javaux et al 2007). This new approach has several advantages. By considering the individual roots it is possible to analyse the influence of overlapping depletion zones due to inter root competition. Furthermore, such simulations can be used to estimate the influence of simplifying assumptions that are made in the development of effective models. The model can be easily combined with a nutrient uptake model. In this way the proposed method will be capable of analysing nutrient uptake considering inter root competition as well as the solubilising effect of combined root exudation. References Leitner D, Klepsch S, Bodner G and Schnepf A (2010). A dynamic root system growth model based on L-Systems - Tropisms and coupling to nutrient uptake from soil. Plant and Soil DOI: 10.1007/s11104-010-0284-7 Persson P O and Strang G (2004). A Simple Mesh Generator in MATLAB. SIAM Review 46 (2): 329-345 Clausnitzer V and Hopmans J W (1994). Simultaneous modeling of transient three-dimensional root growth and soil water flow. Plant and Soil 164(2): 299-314. Roose T and Fowler A C (2004). A model for water uptake by plant roots. Journal of Theoretical Biology 228(2): 155-171. Javaux M, Schröder T, Vanderborght J and Vereecken H (2008). Use of a three-dimensional detailed modeling approach for predicting root water uptake. Vadose Zone Journal 7(3): 1079-1088.

  10. Organization of cytoskeleton during differentiation of gravisensitive root sites under clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, G. V.; Kordyum, E. L.

    Key role in cell gravisensing is attributed to the actin cytoskeleton which acts as a mediator in signaling reactions, including graviperception. Despite of increased attention to the actin cytoskeleton, major gaps in our understanding of its functioning in plant gravisensing still remain. To fill these gaps, we propose a novel approach focused on the investigation of actin involvement in the development of columella cells and cells in the transition zone of roots submitted to clinorotation. Both statocytes and cells in the transition zone represent the postmitotic cells which take origin in root meristems and are specified into graviperceptive (root cap) and gravireacting (transition zone) root tissues. The aim of the research was to investigate and compare the microfilament arrangements in root cap statocytes and peripheral root tissues (epidermis and cortex cells) in the transition zone and to find out how the actin cytoskeleton is involved in their specification under clinostat conditions. So far, our experiments have shown that under clinorotation the cytoplasmic microfilament network in the cortex cells in the transition zone is significantly enhanced. It is suggested that more abundant cytoplasmic microfilaments could strengthen the cortical actin cytoskeleton arranged parallel with the cortical microtubules, which are found to be partially disorganized in this area. Due to microtubule disorganization, the functioning of cellulose-synthesizing machinery and proper deposition of cell wall might be affected and could cause the alterations in the growth mode. But, in our case growth of the cells in the transition zone under clinorotation was rather stable. Due to our opinion, general stability of cell growth under clinorotation is promoted by mutual functional interrelation between actin and tubulin cytoskeletons. It is suggested that a strengthened cortical actin cytoskeleton restricts the cell growth instead of disorganized microtubules.

  11. Cranial Neuropathy due to Intradural Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Rapoport, Benjamin I.; Hartl, Roger; Schwartz, Theodore H.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Importance Herniated intervertebral disc fragments rarely penetrate the thecal sac, and intracranial hypotension attributable to such penetrating fragments is even more unusual. We describe the first reported case of a cranial neuropathy due to intradural herniation of a disc fragment, in which intracranial hypotension from a resulting cerebrospinal fluid leak caused bilateral abducens palsies. Clinical Presentation A 45-year-old man presented with a positional headache after having experienced a “popping” sensation in his back while lifting a heavy object. He also complained of blurred vision and was noted to have lateral gaze palsies bilaterally. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed bilateral subdural collections, abnormal pachymeningeal enhancement, and cerebellar tonsillar herniation, suggesting intracranial hypotension. T2-weighted MRI of the spine revealed extrusion of the T12-L1 disc and suggested the presence of a disc fragment in the intradural space, displacing the caudal nerve roots. A myelogram demonstrated a filling defect extending into the subarachnoid space adjacent to the disc herniation, consistent with a free disc fragment in the intradural space. A diagnosis of intracranial hypotension due to a cerebrospinal fluid leak resulting from an intradural herniated disc was made. The diagnosis was confirmed intraoperatively. Conclusion Surgical removal of the herniated disc fragment and repair of the dural defect resulted in complete resolution of the cranial neuropathy. This rare etiology of a cranial neuropathy, arising from pathology in the thoracolumbar spine, illustrates the clinical teaching that the sixth cranial nerves are highly sensitive to deformation induced by intracranial hypotension. PMID:24535263

  12. Effect of water table fluctuations on phreatophytic root distribution.

    PubMed

    Tron, Stefania; Laio, Francesco; Ridolfi, Luca

    2014-11-01

    The vertical root distribution of riparian vegetation plays a relevant role in soil water balance, in the partition of water fluxes into evaporation and transpiration, in the biogeochemistry of hyporheic corridors, in river morphodynamics evolution, and in bioengineering applications. The aim of this work is to assess the effect of the stochastic variability of the river level on the root distribution of phreatophytic plants. A function describing the vertical root profile has been analytically obtained by coupling a white shot noise representation of the river level variability to a description of the dynamics of root growth and decay. The root profile depends on easily determined parameters, linked to stream dynamics, vegetation and soil characteristics. The riparian vegetation of a river characterized by a high variability turns out to have a rooting system spread over larger depths, but with shallower mean root depths. In contrast, a lower river variability determines root profiles with higher mean root depths. PMID:25014476

  13. Parthenolide: from plant shoots to cancer roots.

    PubMed

    Ghantous, Akram; Sinjab, Ansam; Herceg, Zdenko; Darwiche, Nadine

    2013-09-01

    Parthenolide (PTL), a sesquiterpene lactone (SL) originally purified from the shoots of feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium), has shown potent anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities. It is currently being tested in cancer clinical trials. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies of parthenolide revealed key chemical properties required for biological activities and epigenetic mechanisms, and led to the derivatization of an orally bioavailable analog, dimethylamino-parthenolide (DMAPT). Parthenolide is the first small molecule found to be selective against cancer stem cells (CSC), which it achieves by targeting specific signaling pathways and killing cancer from its roots. In this review, we highlight the exciting journey of parthenolide, from plant shoots to cancer roots. PMID:23688583

  14. Root approach for estimation of statistical distributions

    E-print Network

    Yu. I. Bogdanov; N. A. Bogdanova

    2014-12-06

    Application of root density estimator to problems of statistical data analysis is demonstrated. Four sets of basis functions based on Chebyshev-Hermite, Laguerre, Kravchuk and Charlier polynomials are considered. The sets may be used for numerical analysis in problems of reconstructing statistical distributions by experimental data. Based on the root approach to reconstruction of statistical distributions and quantum states, we study a family of statistical distributions in which the probability density is the product of a Gaussian distribution and an even-degree polynomial. Examples of numerical modeling are given. The results of present paper are of interest for the development of tomography of quantum states and processes.

  15. Study of soybean and lentil root exudates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Agnès d'Arcy-Lameta

    1986-01-01

    Summary  Some polyphenolic compounds have been identified in root exudates of two species of legumes (both cultivated in sterile conditions):\\u000a for lentil, three desoxy-5 flavones (4?,7-dihydroxy, 3?,4?,7-trihydroxy and 4?,7-dihydroxy, 3?-methoxyflavones) and for soybean:\\u000a two isoflavonoids, coumestrol and daidzein (or 4?,7-dihydroxyisoflavone). Identified compounds are polyphenolic aglycones\\u000a whereas roots contain the corresponding glycosides, showing that a hydrolysis takes place at the time of

  16. Apical organization of the roots of dicotyledons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. K. Pillai; P. Vijayalekshmi; Omana M. George

    1965-01-01

    Summary and Conclusions  The root apical organisation of nine species of dicotyledons belonging to some primitive and some advanced families has been\\u000a investigated.\\u000a \\u000a The structural configurations of these species fall under three types: (i) with four superimposed tiers, a common tier for\\u000a the dermatogen and the peripheral region of the root-cap—the dermocalyptrogen—hypodermis, periblem and plerome, (ii) with\\u000a three tiers of initials,

  17. Disturbances during minirhizotron installation can affect root observation data

    SciTech Connect

    Joslin, J.D.; Wolfe, M.H. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Norris, TN (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Use of minirhizotrons in forested ecosystems has produced considerable information on production, mortality, distribution, and the phenology of root growth. But installation of minirhizotrons severs roots and disturbs soil, which can cause root proliferation in perennial plants. The authors compared the magnitude and vertical distribution of root growth observations in a mature hardwood forest during the growing season immediately after minirhizotron installation with observations more than two years later. They also compared the vertical root growth distribution during these two different years with the preinstallation distribution of fine root biomass. Before minirhizotron installation and again two years later, about 74% of fine root biomass was in the upper 30 cm of soil, but immediately after installation, 98% of the root elongation was in the upper 30 cm. Large differences in the quantity of root elongation were observed across different slope positions in the minirhizotron data from the first growing season (approximately four times greater on the upper slope as the lower slope). Such differences with slope position were not sen in the later minirhizotron data, nor in the preinstallation fine root biomass data. The evidence suggests that the minirhizotron data collected immediately after installation can be biased by disturbance of roots and soil during installation, which result in excessive root proliferation, particularly near the soil surface. Root proliferation appears to be the result of a response to both root pruning and to nutrient release in microsites near the newly installed minirhizotron.

  18. In Situ Speciation and Distribution of Toxic Selenium in Hydrated Roots of Cowpea1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Menzies, Neal W.; Lombi, Enzo; McKenna, Brigid A.; de Jonge, Martin D.; Paterson, David J.; Howard, Daryl L.; Glover, Chris J.; James, Simon; Kappen, Peter; Johannessen, Bernt; Kopittke, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    The speciation and spatial distribution of selenium (Se) in hydrated plant tissues is not well understood. Using synchrotron-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray fluorescence microscopy (two-dimensional scanning [and associated mathematical model] and computed tomography), the speciation and distribution of toxic Se were examined within hydrated roots of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) exposed to either 20 µm selenite or selenate. Based upon bulk solution concentrations, selenate was 9-fold more toxic to the roots than selenite, most likely due to increased accumulation of organoselenium (e.g. selenomethionine) in selenate-treated roots. Specifically, uptake of selenate (probably by sulfate transporters) occurred at a much higher rate than for selenite (apparently by both passive diffusion and phosphate transporters), with bulk root tissue Se concentrations approximately 18-fold higher in the selenate treatment. Although the proportion of Se converted to organic forms was higher for selenite (100%) than for selenate (26%), the absolute concentration of organoselenium was actually approximately 5-fold higher for selenate-treated roots. In addition, the longitudinal and radial distribution of Se in roots differed markedly: the highest tissue concentrations were in the endodermis and cortex approximately 4 mm or more behind the apex when exposed to selenate but in the meristem (approximately 1 mm from the apex) when exposed to selenite. The examination of the distribution and speciation of Se in hydrated roots provides valuable data in understanding Se uptake, transport, and toxicity. PMID:23835408

  19. Altered cell wall properties are responsible for ammonium-reduced aluminium accumulation in rice roots.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhao, Xue Qiang; Chen, Rong Fu; Dong, Xiao Ying; Lan, Ping; Ma, Jian Feng; Shen, Ren Fang

    2015-07-01

    The phytotoxicity of aluminium (Al) ions can be alleviated by ammonium (NH4 (+) ) in rice and this effect has been attributed to the decreased Al accumulation in the roots. Here, the effects of different nitrogen forms on cell wall properties were compared in two rice cultivars differing in Al tolerance. An in vitro?Al-binding assay revealed that neither NH4 (+) nor NO3 (-) altered the Al-binding capacity of cell walls, which were extracted from plants not previously exposed to N sources. However, cell walls extracted from NH4 (+) -supplied roots displayed lower Al-binding capacity than those from NO3 (-) -supplied roots when grown in non-buffered solutions. Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy analysis revealed that, compared with NO3 (-) -supplied roots, NH4 (+) -supplied roots possessed fewer Al-binding groups (-OH and COO-) and lower contents of pectin and hemicellulose. However, when grown in pH-buffered solutions, these differences in the cell wall properties were not observed. Further analysis showed that the Al-binding capacity and properties of cell walls were also altered by pHs alone. Taken together, our results indicate that the NH4 (+) -reduced Al accumulation was attributed to the altered cell wall properties triggered by pH decrease due to NH4 (+) uptake rather than direct competition for the cell wall binding sites between Al(3+) and NH4 (+) . PMID:25444246

  20. Root cortical aerenchyma inhibits radial nutrient transport in maize (Zea mays)

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bo; Henry, Amelia; Brown, Kathleen M.; Lynch, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Formation of root cortical aerenchyma (RCA) can be induced by nutrient deficiency. In species adapted to aerobic soil conditions, this response is adaptive by reducing root maintenance requirements, thereby permitting greater soil exploration. One trade-off of RCA formation may be reduced radial transport of nutrients due to reduction in living cortical tissue. To test this hypothesis, radial nutrient transport in intact roots of maize (Zea mays) was investigated in two radiolabelling experiments employing genotypes with contrasting RCA. Methods In the first experiment, time-course dynamics of phosphate loading into the xylem were measured from excised nodal roots that varied in RCA formation. In the second experiment, uptake of phosphate, calcium and sulphate was measured in seminal roots of intact young plants in which variation in RCA was induced by treatments altering ethylene action or genetic differences. Key Results In each of three paired genotype comparisons, the rate of phosphate exudation of high-RCA genotypes was significantly less than that of low-RCA genotypes. In the second experiment, radial nutrient transport of phosphate and calcium was negatively correlated with the extent of RCA for some genotypes. Conclusions The results support the hypothesis that RCA can reduce radial transport of some nutrients in some genotypes, which could be an important trade-off of this trait. PMID:24249807

  1. Short term uptake and transport process for metformin in roots of Phragmites australis and Typha latifolia.

    PubMed

    Cui, H; Hense, B A; Müller, J; Schröder, P

    2015-09-01

    Metformin (MET) as an emerging contaminant has been detected in surface water and wastewater in numerous countries, due to insufficient retention in classical waste water treatment plants. In order to characterize the uptake of the compound during phytotreatment of waste water, a short term Pitman chamber experiment was carried out to assess the characteristics of MET uptake and transport by roots. Three different concentrations (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0mmolL(-)(1)) were applied to cattail (Typha latifolia) and reed (Phragmites australis) roots which were used to investigate the uptake mechanism because they are frequently utilized in phytoremediation. In addition, quinidine was used as an inhibitor to assess the role of organic cation transporters (OCTs) in the uptake of MET by T. latifolia. The transport process of MET is different from carbamazepine (CBZ) and caffeine (CFN). In both T. latifolia and P. australis, the uptake processes were independent of initial concentrations. Quinidine, a known inhibitor of organic cation transporters, can significantly affect MET uptake by T. latifolia roots with inhibition ratios of 70-74%. Uptake into the root could be characterized by a linear model with R(2) values in the range of 0.881-0.999. Overall, the present study provides evidence that MET is taken up by plant roots and has the potential for subsequent translocation. OCTs could be one of the important pathways for MET uptake into the plant. PMID:25966936

  2. Comparative study of two surgical techniques for root coverage of large recessions in heavy smokers.

    PubMed

    Reino, Danilo M; Maia, Luciana P; Novaes, Arthur B; Souza, Sérgio L S

    2015-01-01

    Reduced root coverage due to diminished periodontal vascularity can be expected in heavy smokers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the root coverage obtained for large gingival recessions in heavy smokers using two different surgical techniques. Twenty heavy smokers were selected. Each patient had large, bilateral Miller class I or II gingival recessions (Control Group (CG): 3.30 ± 1.29; Test Group (TG): 3.45 ± 0.80) on nonmolar teeth. Clinical measurements of probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL), recession height (RH), keratinized mucosa height (KMH), and keratinized mucosa thickness (KMT) were determined at baseline and after 12 months. One side received a coronally positioned flap (CPF), while the contralateral side received the extended flap technique (EFT), both procedures carried out in conjunction with a subepithelial connective tissue graft (SCTG). Saliva samples to measure cotinine levels were taken at baseline and after 12 months as an indicator of the level of exposure to nicotine. Intergroup and intragroup analysis showed no statistical differences for the evaluated clinical parameters. Patients maintained the same exposure to smoke during the evaluation period. Both techniques resulted in low root coverage (CPF: 48.60%; EFT: 54.28%), but both techniques were effective in decreasing the gingival recessions (P ? 0.01). The variables smoke exposure, root coverage, and the thickness and height of keratinized tissue were subjected to linear regression. Regardless of the surgical technique used, heavy smoking strongly limits root coverage, especially for large recessions. PMID:26171447

  3. Rice cultivars with differing salt tolerance contain similar cation channels in their root cells

    PubMed Central

    Kavitha, P. G.; Miller, A. J.; Mathew, M. K.; Maathuis, Frans J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Salinity poses a major threat for agriculture worldwide. Rice is one of the major crops where most of the high-yielding cultivars are highly sensitive to salinity. Several studies on the genetic variability across rice cultivars suggest that the activity and composition of root plasma membrane transporters could underlie the observed cultivar-specific salinity tolerance in rice. In the current study, it was found that the salt-tolerant cultivar Pokkali maintains a higher K+/Na+ ratio compared with the salt-sensitive IR20 in roots as well as in shoots. Using Na+ reporter dyes, IR20 root protoplasts showed a much faster Na+ accumulation than Pokkali protoplasts. Membrane potential measurements showed that root cells exposed to Na+ in IR20 depolarized considerably further than those of Pokkali. These results suggest that IR20 has a larger plasma membrane Na+ conductance. To assess whether this could be due to different ion channel properties, root protoplasts from both Pokkali and IR20 rice cultivars were patch-clamped. Voltage-dependent K+ inward rectifiers, K+ outward rectifiers, and voltage-independent, non-selective channels with unitary conductances of around 35, 40, and 10 pS, respectively, were identified. Only the non-selective channel showed significant Na+ permeability. Intriguingly, in both cultivars, the activity of the K+ inward rectifier was drastically down-regulated after plant growth in salt but gating, conductance, and activity of all channel types were very similar for the two cultivars. PMID:22345644

  4. Microbial growth and carbon use efficiency in the rhizosphere and root-free soil.

    PubMed

    Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Blagodatsky, Sergey; Anderson, Traute-Heidi; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-01-01

    Plant-microbial interactions alter C and N balance in the rhizosphere and affect the microbial carbon use efficiency (CUE)-the fundamental characteristic of microbial metabolism. Estimation of CUE in microbial hotspots with high dynamics of activity and changes of microbial physiological state from dormancy to activity is a challenge in soil microbiology. We analyzed respiratory activity, microbial DNA content and CUE by manipulation the C and nutrients availability in the soil under Beta vulgaris. All measurements were done in root-free and rhizosphere soil under steady-state conditions and during microbial growth induced by addition of glucose. Microorganisms in the rhizosphere and root-free soil differed in their CUE dynamics due to varying time delays between respiration burst and DNA increase. Constant CUE in an exponentially-growing microbial community in rhizosphere demonstrated the balanced growth. In contrast, the CUE in the root-free soil increased more than three times at the end of exponential growth and was 1.5 times higher than in the rhizosphere. Plants alter the dynamics of microbial CUE by balancing the catabolic and anabolic processes, which were decoupled in the root-free soil. The effects of N and C availability on CUE in rhizosphere and root-free soil are discussed. PMID:24722409

  5. Fungal hypaphorine reduces growth and induces cytosolic calcium increase in root hairs of Eucalyptus globulus.

    PubMed

    Dauphin, A; Gérard, J; Lapeyrie, F; Legué, V

    2007-01-01

    Root hairs are tubular cells resulting from a tip-localized growth in which calcium ions play a key role. Hypaphorine, an indole alkaloid secreted by the fungus Pisolithus microcarpus during the formation of ectomycorrhizae with the host plant Eucalyptus globulus, inhibits root hair tip growth. Hypaphorine-induced inhibition is linked to a transient depolarization of the plasma membrane and a reorganization of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. Here we investigated the activity of hypaphorine on calcium distribution in E. globulus root hairs with the ratiometric fluorochrome calcium indicator Indo-1. In 85% of actively growing root hairs, a significant but modest calcium gradient between the apex and the base was observed due to an elevated cytoplasmic calcium concentration at the apical tip. Following exposure to 1 mM hypaphorine, the apical and basal cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration increased in 70 and 77% of the hairs, respectively, 10 min after treatment. This led to a reduced calcium gradient in 81% of the cells. The hypothetical links between calcium concentration elevation, regulation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics, and root hair growth inhibition in response to hypaphorine treatment are discussed. PMID:17370110

  6. Root defense analysis against Fusarium oxysporum reveals new regulators to confer resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi Chung; Wong, Chin Lin; Muzzi, Frederico; Vlaardingerbroek, Ido; Kidd, Brendan N.; Schenk, Peer M.

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is a root-infecting fungal pathogen that causes wilt disease on a broad range of plant species, including Arabidopsis thaliana. Investigation of the defense response against this pathogen had primarily been conducted using leaf tissue and little was known about the root defense response. In this study, we profiled the expression of root genes after infection with F. oxysporum by microarray analysis. In contrast to the leaf response, root tissue did not show a strong induction of defense-associated gene expression and instead showed a greater proportion of repressed genes. Screening insertion mutants from differentially expressed genes in the microarray uncovered a role for the transcription factor ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR72 (ERF72) in susceptibility to F. oxysporum. Due to the role of ERF72 in suppressing programmed cell death and detoxifying reactive oxygen species (ROS), we examined the pub22/pub23/pub24 U-box type E3 ubiquitin ligase triple mutant which is known to possess enhanced ROS production in response to pathogen challenge. We found that the pub22/23/24 mutant is more resistant to F. oxysporum infection, suggesting that a heightened innate immune response provides protection against F. oxysporum. We conclude that root-mediated defenses against soil-borne pathogens can be provided at multiple levels. PMID:24998294

  7. Molecular farming in tobacco hairy roots by triggering the secretion of a pharmaceutical antibody.

    PubMed

    Häkkinen, Suvi T; Raven, Nicole; Henquet, Maurice; Laukkanen, Marja-Leena; Anderlei, Tibor; Pitkänen, Juha-Pekka; Twyman, Richard M; Bosch, Dirk; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja; Schillberg, Stefan; Ritala, Anneli

    2014-02-01

    Recombinant pharmaceutical proteins expressed in hairy root cultures can be secreted into the medium to improve product homogeneity and to facilitate purification, although this may result in significant degradation if the protein is inherently unstable or particularly susceptible to proteases. To address these challenges, we used a design of experiments approach to develop an optimized induction protocol for the cultivation of tobacco hairy roots secreting the full-size monoclonal antibody M12. The antibody yield was enhanced 30-fold by the addition of 14?g/L KNO3 , 19?mg/L 1-naphthaleneacetic acid and 1.5?g/L of the stabilizing agent polyvinylpyrrolidone. Analysis of hairy root cross sections revealed that the optimized medium induced lateral root formation and morphological changes in the inner cortex and pericycle cells, indicating that the improved productivity was at least partially based on the enhanced efficiency of antibody secretion. We found that 57% of the antibody was secreted, yielding 5.9?mg of product per liter of induction medium. Both the secreted and intracellular forms of the antibody could be isolated by protein A affinity chromatography and their functionality was confirmed using vitronectin-binding assays. Glycan analysis revealed three major plant complex-type glycans on both forms of the antibody, although the secreted form was more homogeneous due to the predominance of a specific glycoform. Tobacco hairy root cultures therefore offer a practical solution for the production of homogeneous pharmaceutical antibodies in containment. PMID:24030771

  8. Allometry of root branching and its relationship to root morphological and functional traits in three range grasses

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo, J. Tulio; Johnson, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    The study of proportional relationships between size, shape, and function of part of or the whole organism is traditionally known as allometry. Examination of correlative changes in the size of interbranch distances (IBDs) at different root orders may help to identify root branching rules. Root morphological and functional characteristics in three range grasses {bluebunch wheatgrass [Pseudoroegneria spicata (Pursh) Löve], crested wheatgrass [Agropyron desertorum (Fisch. ex Link) Schult.×A. cristatum (L.) Gaert.], and cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.)} were examined in response to a soil nutrient gradient. Interbranch distances along the main root axis and the first-order laterals as well as other morphological and allocation root traits were determined. A model of nutrient diffusivity parameterized with root length and root diameter for the three grasses was used to estimate root functional properties (exploitation efficiency and exploitation potential). The results showed a significant negative allometric relationship between the main root axis and first-order lateral IBD (P ?0.05), but only for bluebunch wheatgrass. The main root axis IBD was positively related to the number and length of roots, estimated exploitation efficiency of second-order roots, and specific root length, and was negatively related to estimated exploitation potential of first-order roots. Conversely, crested wheatgrass and cheatgrass, which rely mainly on root proliferation responses, exhibited fewer allometric relationships. Thus, the results suggested that species such as bluebunch wheatgrass, which display slow root growth and architectural root plasticity rather than opportunistic root proliferation and rapid growth, exhibit correlative allometry between the main axis IBD and morphological, allocation, and functional traits of roots. PMID:21868398

  9. Allometry of root branching and its relationship to root morphological and functional traits in three range grasses.

    PubMed

    Arredondo, J Tulio; Johnson, Douglas A

    2011-11-01

    The study of proportional relationships between size, shape, and function of part of or the whole organism is traditionally known as allometry. Examination of correlative changes in the size of interbranch distances (IBDs) at different root orders may help to identify root branching rules. Root morphological and functional characteristics in three range grasses {bluebunch wheatgrass [Pseudoroegneria spicata (Pursh) Löve], crested wheatgrass [Agropyron desertorum (Fisch. ex Link) Schult.×A. cristatum (L.) Gaert.], and cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.)} were examined in response to a soil nutrient gradient. Interbranch distances along the main root axis and the first-order laterals as well as other morphological and allocation root traits were determined. A model of nutrient diffusivity parameterized with root length and root diameter for the three grasses was used to estimate root functional properties (exploitation efficiency and exploitation potential). The results showed a significant negative allometric relationship between the main root axis and first-order lateral IBD (P ? 0.05), but only for bluebunch wheatgrass. The main root axis IBD was positively related to the number and length of roots, estimated exploitation efficiency of second-order roots, and specific root length, and was negatively related to estimated exploitation potential of first-order roots. Conversely, crested wheatgrass and cheatgrass, which rely mainly on root proliferation responses, exhibited fewer allometric relationships. Thus, the results suggested that species such as bluebunch wheatgrass, which display slow root growth and architectural root plasticity rather than opportunistic root proliferation and rapid growth, exhibit correlative allometry between the main axis IBD and morphological, allocation, and functional traits of roots. PMID:21868398

  10. Endophytic occupation of root nodules and roots of Melilotus dentatus by Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling Ling; Wang, En Tao; Liu, Jie; Li, Ying; Chen, Wen Xin

    2006-10-01

    Agrobacterium strains have been frequently isolated from the root nodules of different legumes. Various possible mechanisms have been proposed to explain the existence of these bacteria in nodules, but there is no sufficient experimental evidence to support the estimations. In this work, we proved that the Agrobacterium strain CCBAU 81181, which was originally isolated from the root nodules of Onobrychis viciaefolia, and a symbiotic strain of Sinorhizobium meliloti CCBAU 10062 could coinhabit the root nodules of Melilotus dentatus. Analyses were performed by using a fluorescence marker, reisolation of bacteria from nodules, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of whole cellular proteins, and polymerase chain reaction amplification of symbiotic genes. The inoculation of A. tumefaciens CCBAU 81181 did not affect the growth and nodulation of plants. CCBAU 81181 and 24 other Agrobacterium strains isolated from nodules were incapable of nodulating on their original or alternative host and 22 strains of these strains were endophytes in the roots and stems of their hosts. Also, the tumor-inducing A. tumefaciens strains IAM 13129(T) and C58 were found capable of entering the roots of Glycyrrhiza pallidiflora, but did not cause pathogenic symptoms. With these results, we conclude that A. tumefaciens strains could be endophytic bacteria in the roots, stems, and root nodules. This finding partially explains why Agrobacterium strains were frequently isolated from the surface-sterilized nodules. PMID:16897296

  11. Hairy Root Induction in Helicteres isora L. and Production of Diosgenin in Hairy Roots.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinay; Desai, Dnyanada; Shriram, Varsha

    2014-04-01

    Mature seeds of Helicteres isora L. were collected from seven geographical locations of Maharashtra and Goa (India) and evaluated for diosgenin (a bioactive steroidal sapogenin of prime importance) extraction and quantification. Chemotypic variations were evidenced with diosgenin quantity ranging from 33 ?g g(-1) seeds (Osmanabad forests) to 138 ?g g(-1) (Khopoli region). Nodal and leaf explants from in vitro-raised seedlings were used for callus and Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, respectively. Compact, hard, whitish-green callus (2.65 g explant(-1)) was obtained on MS + 13.32 ?M BAP + 2.32 ?M Kin after 30 days of inoculation. Various parameters including types of explant and Agrobacterium strain, culture density, duration of infection and various medium compositions were optimized for hairy root production. A. rhizogenes strain ATCC-15834 successfully induced hairy roots from leaf explants (1 cm(2)) with 42 % efficiency. Transgenic status of the roots was confirmed by PCR using rolB and VirD specific primers. Hairy roots showed an ability to synthesize diosgenin. Diosgenin yield was increased ~8 times in hairy roots and ~5 times in callus than the seeds of wild plants. Enhanced diosgenin content was associated with proline accumulation in hairy roots. This is the first report on induction of hairy roots in H. isora. PMID:24859054

  12. Functional traits and root morphology of alpine plants

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Mandy; Stroude, Raphaël; Buttler, Alexandre; Rixen, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Vegetation has long been recognized to protect the soil from erosion. Understanding species differences in root morphology and functional traits is an important step to assess which species and species mixtures may provide erosion control. Furthermore, extending classification of plant functional types towards root traits may be a useful procedure in understanding important root functions. Methods In this study, pioneer data on traits of alpine plant species, i.e. plant height and shoot biomass, root depth, horizontal root spreading, root length, diameter, tensile strength, plant age and root biomass, from a disturbed site in the Swiss Alps are presented. The applicability of three classifications of plant functional types (PFTs), i.e. life form, growth form and root type, was examined for above- and below-ground plant traits. Key Results Plant traits differed considerably among species even of the same life form, e.g. in the case of total root length by more than two orders of magnitude. Within the same root diameter, species differed significantly in tensile strength: some species (Geum reptans and Luzula spicata) had roots more than twice as strong as those of other species. Species of different life forms provided different root functions (e.g. root depth and horizontal root spreading) that may be important for soil physical processes. All classifications of PFTs were helpful to categorize plant traits; however, the PFTs according to root type explained total root length far better than the other PFTs. Conclusions The results of the study illustrate the remarkable differences between root traits of alpine plants, some of which cannot be assessed from simple morphological inspection, e.g. tensile strength. PFT classification based on root traits seems useful to categorize plant traits, even though some patterns are better explained at the individual species level. PMID:21795278

  13. Anchorage of mature conifers: resistive turning moment, root-soil plate geometry and root growth orientation.

    PubMed

    Lundström, Tor; Jonas, Tobias; Stöckli, Veronika; Ammann, Walter

    2007-09-01

    Eighty-four mature Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst), silver fir (Abies alba Mill) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees were winched over to determine the maximum resistive turning moment (M(a)) of the root-soil system, the root-soil plate geometry, the azimuthal orientation of root growth, and the occurrence of root rot. The calculation of M(a), based on digital image tracking of stem deflection, accounted not only for the force application and its changing geometry, but also for the weight of the overhanging tree, representing up to 42% of M(a). Root rot reduced M(a) significantly and was detected in 25% of the Norway spruce and 5% of the silver fir trees. Excluding trees with root rot, differences in M(a) between species were small and insignificant. About 75% of the variance in M(a) could be explained by one of the four variables--tree mass, stem mass, stem diameter at breast height squared times tree height, and stem diameter at breast height squared. Among the seven allometric variables assessed above ground, stem diameter at breast height best described the root-soil plate dimensions, but the correlations were weak and the differences between species were insignificant. The shape of the root-soil plate was well described by a depth-dependent taper model with an elliptical cross section. Roots displayed a preferred azimuthal orientation of growth in the axis of prevailing winds, and the direction of frequent weak winds matched the orientation of growth better than that of rare strong winds. The lack of difference in anchorage parameters among species probably reflects the similar belowground growth conditions of the mature trees. PMID:17545122

  14. Treatment of Strip Perforation Using Root MTA: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Froughreyhani, Mohammad; Salem Milani, Amin; Barakatein, Behnaz; Shiezadeh, Vahhab

    2013-01-01

    Root perforations are an undesired complication of endodontic treatment which result in loss of integrity of the root, and adversely affect the prognosis of the treatment. Recently, Iranian mineral trioxide aggregate [Root MTA] has been introduced as an ideal material for perforation repair. In this article a successful repair of strip root perforation of mandibular molar using Root MTA is presented with 15-month follow-up. This case suggests that Root MTA may be a substitute material for the treatment of strip perforation; however, more clinical studies with larger sample size and longer follow-ups are needed. PMID:23717336

  15. Food reserves in mountain longleaf pine roots during shoot elongation.

    SciTech Connect

    Walkinshaw, C.H.; W.J. Otrosina

    2001-03-20

    Roots of saplings appear to be models for healthy tissues in longleaf pines. Results show that roots of mountain longleaf pine have a normal anatomy, but also have unusual amounts of starch when compared to loblolly pine roots growing during phenologiexecy equal time periods. Roots appear large in diameter and grow much nearer the soil surface than roots observed from Coastal Plain longleaf pine. Starch grains are large in size and uniformly filled root cells. These results yield methodology potentially useful in assessment of health and productivity of longleaf pine.

  16. Plant regeneration, genetic fidelity, and active ingredient content of encapsulated hairy roots of Picrorhiza kurrooa Royle ex Benth.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Janhvi Mishra; Rawat, Balwant; Mehrotra, Shakti

    2013-06-01

    Among five hairy root lines of Picrorhiza kurrooa that were established through Agrobacterium rhizogenes, one (H7) was selected for encapsulation due to high accumulation of picrotin and picrotoxinin (8.3 and 47.6 ?g/g DW, respectively). Re-grown encapsulated roots induced adventitious shoots with 73 % frequency on MS medium supplemented with 0.1 ?M 6-benzylaminopurine, following 6 months of storage at 25 °C. Regenerated plantlets had 85 % survival after 2 months. Regenerants were of similar morphotype having increased leaf number and branched root system as compared to non-transformed plants. The transformed nature of the plants was confirmed through PCR and Southern blot analysis. Genetic fidelity analysis of transformed plants using RAPD and ISSR showed 5.2 and 3.6 % polymorphism, respectively. Phytochemical analysis also showed that picrotin and picrotoxinin content were similar in hairy root line and its regenerants. PMID:23397268

  17. Patterns in root trait variation among 25 co-existing North American forest species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. H. Comas; D. M. Eissenstat

    2009-01-01

    Summary • Ephemeral roots have essential roles in plant and ecosystem functioning. In forests, roots account for a major component of carbon cycling, yet few studies have examined ranges of root trait variation and how different species vary in root form and function in these communities.  Root branching intensity, specific root length (SRL; root length per unit dry mass),

  18. Glutathione depletion due to copper-induced phytochelatin synthesis causes oxidative stress in Silene cucubalus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. H. Ric De Vos; M. J. Vonk; R. Vooijs; H. Schat

    1992-01-01

    The relation between loss of glutathione due to metal-induced phytochelatin synthesis and oxidative stress was studied in the roots of copper-sensitive and tolerant Silene cucubalus (L.) Wib., resistant to 1 and 40 micromolar Cu, respectively. The amount of nonprotein sulfhydryl compounds other then glutathione was taken as a measure of phytochelatins. At a supply of 20 micromolar Cu, which is

  19. Rooting greenwood tip cuttings of several Populus clones hydroponically (hydroponic rooting of Populus cuttings)

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, H.M.; Hansen, E.A.; Tolsted, D.N.

    1980-01-01

    Greenwood cuttings of several Populus clones were successfully rooted with a relatively simple hydroponic method. Indolebutyric acid and naphthaleneacetic acid at concentrations of 500 to 5000 ppM applied as a quick dip to the cutting bases, a complete nutrient solution at 20 to 40% of full strength, and a solution temperature between 27 and 30/sup 0/C generally produced the best rooting performance of most clones. Cuttings propagated by the hydroponic procedure rooted faster and generally outgrew those produced by a standard method after being transplanted to pots and grown in the greenhouse.

  20. Vanishing Roots: First Case Report of Idiopathic Multiple Cervico–Apical External Root Resorption

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Priyadarshini; Maragathavalli; Panigrahi, Antarmayee; Patra, Padma Charan

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic root resorption is a very rare phenomenon. Resorption in tooth is brought about by odontoclastic activity. Special mechanisms in the periodontal ligament exist to prevent mineralization of the periodontal ligament and these periodontal ligament cells produce factors that inhibit mineralized tissue resorption and are capable of regulating bone and cementum formation. When this mechanism is disturbed it manifests in resorption of root structure. This case report is of a 28-year-old male with a very rare phenomenon where external resorption of both cervical and apical portion of root of multiple teeth was observed and it is documented for the first time. PMID:25954713

  1. Vanishing roots: first case report of idiopathic multiple cervico-apical external root resorption.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Priyadarshini; Panigrahi, Rajat G; Maragathavalli; Panigrahi, Antarmayee; Patra, Padma Charan

    2015-03-01

    Idiopathic root resorption is a very rare phenomenon. Resorption in tooth is brought about by odontoclastic activity. Special mechanisms in the periodontal ligament exist to prevent mineralization of the periodontal ligament and these periodontal ligament cells produce factors that inhibit mineralized tissue resorption and are capable of regulating bone and cementum formation. When this mechanism is disturbed it manifests in resorption of root structure. This case report is of a 28-year-old male with a very rare phenomenon where external resorption of both cervical and apical portion of root of multiple teeth was observed and it is documented for the first time. PMID:25954713

  2. Announcement due to MSVE Department

    E-print Network

    Announcement due to MSVE Department 2 weeks prior to defense Student revises Thesis GPD Announcement due to MSVE Department 2 weeks prior to defense Student revises Dissertation GPD revises's Office by appropriate deadline for binding Student graduates! Master's Thesis Completion Process

  3. The conscious roots of selfless, unconscious goals.

    PubMed

    Moskowitz, Gordon B; Balcetis, Emily

    2014-04-01

    We counter Huang & Bargh's (H&B's) metaphoric description of the unconscious, selfish goal on three points. First, we argue, unconscious goals are rooted in conscious choices related to well-being. Second, unconscious goal pursuit occurs through early-stage orienting mechanisms that promote individuals' well-being. Third, unconscious goals work selflessly, resulting in their own demise. PMID:24775138

  4. Time Series Regression with a Unit Root

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. C. B. Phillips

    1987-01-01

    This paper studies the random walk in a general time series setting that allows for weakly dependent and heterogeneously distributed innovations. It is shown that simple least squares regression consistently estimates a unit root under very general conditions in spite of the presence of autocorrelated errors. The limiting distribution of the standardized estimator and the associated regression t statistic are

  5. Root region airfoil for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, James L. (Boulder, CO); Somers, Dan M. (State College, PA)

    1995-01-01

    A thick airfoil for the root region of the blade of a wind turbine. The airfoil has a thickness in a range from 24%-26% and a Reynolds number in a range from 1,000,000 to 1,800,000. The airfoil has a maximum lift coefficient of 1.4-1.6 that has minimum sensitivity to roughness effects.

  6. Plant Disease Lesson: Root-knot nematode

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Nathaniel A. Mitkowski (University of Rhode Island; )

    2003-09-17

    This plant disease lesson on Root-knot nematode (caused by Meloidogyne ) includes information on symptoms and signs, pathogen biology, disease cycle and epidemiology, disease management, and the significance of the disease. Selected references are listed and a glossary is also available for use with this resource.

  7. Paraplegia after lumbosacral nerve root block

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John K Houten; Thomas J Errico

    2002-01-01

    Background context: Lumbar nerve root blocks and epidural steroid injections are frequently employed in the management of degenerative conditions of the lumbar spine, but relatively few papers have been published that address the complications associated with these interventions. Serious complications include epidural abscess, arachnoiditis, epidural hematoma, cerebrospinal fluid fistula and hypersensitivity reaction to injectate. Although transient paraparesis has been described

  8. Gene expression in physically impeded maize roots 

    E-print Network

    Huang, Ying-Fei

    1996-01-01

    Two approaches were used to search for genes which respond to physical impedance. First, cDNA clones induced by mechanical stress or drought stress of other plant species were hybridized to mRNA from maize root tips. The results showed that only two...

  9. Grass roots of soil carbon sequestration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soils rooted with perennial grasses have high organic matter content, and therefore, can contribute to an agricultural future with high soil quality; a condition that can help to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions through soil carbon sequestration and improve a multitude of other ecosystem responses,...

  10. Some Roots of Terrorism Paul R. Ehrlich

    E-print Network

    Some Roots of Terrorism Paul R. Ehrlich Stanford University Jianguo Liu Michigan State University Although various hypotheses about the causes of terrorism have been proposed, a number of important factors are likely contributors to such terrorism. We show that those factors will not ameliorate soon without

  11. D: the infinite square roots of -1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernard M Diaz; Peter Rowlands

    We present D, a symbol that can be used in the universal alphabet that provides a computational path to the nilpotent Dirac equation (Diaz & Rowlands, 2004) and which results in a tractable computer representation of the infinite square roots of -1. We outline how the representation is derived, the properties of the representation, and how the form can be

  12. Chapter 16. Fine-root Growth Response

    SciTech Connect

    J. Devereux Joslin; Mark H. Wolfe

    2002-07-31

    As part of a multiyear study to evaluate the affects of altered water inputs to an upland forest many aspects of tree growth physiology were studied. Chapter 16 of this book deals with fine root growth as studied over a 7 year period using a variety of methods. This chapter summarizes the results and conclusions from those efforts.

  13. Gene expression in physically impeded maize roots

    E-print Network

    Huang, Ying-Fei

    1996-01-01

    Two approaches were used to search for genes which respond to physical impedance. First, cDNA clones induced by mechanical stress or drought stress of other plant species were hybridized to mRNA from maize root tips. The results showed that only two...

  14. Advanced Review Patterns of root growth acclimation

    E-print Network

    Baskin, Tobias

    role for the plant, this incessant growth endows Earth with gigatons of biomass, sustains food chains I. Baskin Plasticity, the hallmark of plant morphogenesis, extends to kinetics. To enhance acclimation, growing plant organs adeptly adjust their growth rate, up or down. In roots, rates of division

  15. Quest for Continual Growth Takes Root

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surdey, Mary M.; Hashey, Jane M.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how the quest for continual growth has taken its root at Vestal Central School district. Located at the heart of upstate New York, educators at Vestal Central School district have created a spirit of "kaizen," a Japanese word meaning the relentless quest for continual improvement and higher-quality…

  16. Tapping Ancient Roots: Plaited Paper Baskets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Jane

    2011-01-01

    With ancient roots, basket making has been practiced since the earliest civilizations, and according to textile experts, probably pre-dates pottery. This is partly conjecture since few baskets remain. It is through evidence found in clay impressions that the earliest baskets reveal themselves. Basically, basketry construction is like flat weaving.…

  17. Towards Understanding the Roots of Reflective Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, James B.

    1983-01-01

    Curricula involving reflective inquiry are always dynamic, have a problem orientation, afford introspection, require personal decisions, and recognize that living socially is a basic human condition. Such a curriculum, which views education as a liberating force, has its roots in humanism and existentialism. (RM)

  18. The Roots of Lisp paul graham

    E-print Network

    Valtorta, Marco

    The Roots of Lisp paul graham Draft, January 18, 2002. In 1960, John McCarthy published programming language. He called this language Lisp, for \\List Process- ing," because one of his key ideas of programming so far: the C model and the Lisp model. These two seem points of high ground, with swampy lowlands

  19. On duality for square root convex programs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. H. Scott; T. R. Jefferson

    2007-01-01

    Conjugate function theory is used to develop dual programs for nonseparable convex programs involving the square root function.\\u000a This function arises naturally in finance when one measures the risk of a portfolio by its variance–covariance matrix, in\\u000a stochastic programming under chance constraints and in location theory.

  20. Neo-Lamarckian medicine Root Gorelick*

    E-print Network

    Gorelick, Root

    Neo-Lamarckian medicine Root Gorelick* School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-4501, USA Received 18 August 2003; accepted 4 November 2003 Summary Darwinian medicine. Neo-Lamarckian medicine would thereby shift emphasis from cure to prevention of diseases. c 2003