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Sample records for root 3ag due

  1. CORRIGENDUM: Thermal switching of the electrical conductivity of Si(111)(√3 × √3)Ag due to a surface phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, J. W.; Kallehauge, J. F.; Hofmann, Ph

    2008-04-01

    Our recent paper on the surface conductivity of Si(111)(√3 × √3)Ag [1] contains an error in the numerical simulation of the space charge layer conductance presented in figure 2(b) of the paper. A new version of the figure is presented here as figure 1. The incorrect version of this figure suggested that the space charge layer conductivity of Si(111)(√3 × √3)Ag is very similar to that of the clean Si(111)(7 × 7) surface but actually this is not the case. The space charge layer for Si(111)(7 × 7) becomes strongly insulating at low temperatures whereas it is rather conductive over the whole temperature range for Si(111)(√3 × √3)Ag. Figure 1 Figure 1. Experimental results (broken lines and markers) together with simulations (solid lines) of the conductance. The simulation in (b) has now been corrected, but the figure is otherwise the same as figure 2 from [1]. The model calculation shows the expected conductance of the bulk and space charge layer in (a) and (b) and for the expected conductance of a 3 ML Ag film with bulk properties in (c). The error in the calculation of the space charge layer conductivity has an impact on the interpretation of the low temperature measurements. Based on the incorrect calculation, it was concluded that the measurements are always surface sensitive, but this is not the case. In fact, the measured conductance in the low temperature regime is now quite similar to the conductance one could expect for the bulk and space charge layer.The interpretation of the data as a switching due to the surface phase transition is still consistent with results, especially since the transition in conductivity is much steeper than one would expect for a mechanism involving the freezing of carriers in the space charge region. However, we would also like to mention an alternative interpretation at this point. The free-electron like surface state on Si(111)(√3 × √3)Ag is unoccupied at zero temperature because the bottom of the band

  2. Atrial fibrillation due to licorice root syrup.

    PubMed

    Erkuş, Musluhittin Emre; Altıparmak, İbrahim Halil; Demirbağ, Recep; Günebakmaz, Özgür

    2016-04-01

    While it is known that consumption of licorice may lead to cardiac arrhythmias, there have been no reports of atrial fibrillation resulting from the consumption of licorice root syrup. A 57-year-old male with no prior history of cardiovascular disease was admitted to the emergency department with palpitation. His electrocardiogram showed atrial fibrillation with a moderate to rapid ventricular rate. In laboratory assessment, potassium was 2.0 mmol/L and plasma renin activity and aldosterone level were suppressed (<300 ng/L/hour, 42 ng/L respectively). Volumes of the heart chambers were within normal range and functions and structures of the heart valves were normal in echocardiographic assessment. The arrhythmia was resolved with propafenone infusion. PMID:27138313

  3. Secondary chronic cluster headache due to trigeminal nerve root compression.

    PubMed

    Mjåset, Christer; Russell, M B; Russell, M Bjørn

    2010-12-01

    A 50-year-old woman had a gradual onset of chronic headache located in the right temporal region and a burning sensation in the root of the tongue which over a year evolved into chronic cluster headache with a milder chronic headache in-between the severe cluster headache attacks. A cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve root on the pain side. Neurosurgery microvascular decompression relieved the patient's chronic cluster headache, the chronic intermittent headache and the burning tongue sensation. The effect was persistent at a 1 year follow-up. Patients with atypical symptoms of cluster headache should be examined with cerebral MRI angiography of arteries and veins to exclude symptomatic causes. PMID:20384588

  4. Effect of Aggregates Compaction in Soil Hydraulic Properties, due to Root Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravena, J. E.; Tyler, S. W.; Berli, M.

    2009-12-01

    The rhizosphere is critical for soil-root interactions, however, physical processes within the soil around roots and implications of these processes, such as plant water and nutrient uptake, continue to raise questions. Soil compaction, due to root growth, results in favorable physical conditions in the rhizosphere to foster plant growth by providing aeration under wet conditions and improving water storage and flow toward the roots under dry conditions. In unsaturated conditions, the air transfer occurs through the macropores, while the water transfer occurs through the aggregates; providing the plant with these two vital elements, continuously. At the aggregate-scale, compaction gives connectivity within the aggregates. As the contact area between the aggregates increases, more water may be transfer to the plant. As result, the hydraulic conductivity of the rhizosphere may be higher than that at initial conditions (i.e., before compaction). This idea is important, as usually compaction is associated with decreasing water conductivity. This study focuses on understanding the role of roots to modify the soil, and in particular, their impact on rhizosphere hydraulic properties at the aggregate-scale. Using HYDRUS 3D, an aggregate system was modeled. It was found that the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the system increased following an S-shape as contact area increased due to compaction. This result differs from previous studies that assumed a quadratic relation. In addition, it was found that the compaction of big pores within the aggregates will be more beneficial for water extraction purposes, than the change in pore-size distribution within the aggregates due to compaction.

  5. Metabolic Profile and Root Development of Hypericum perforatum L. In vitro Roots under Stress Conditions Due to Chitosan Treatment and Culture Time

    PubMed Central

    Brasili, Elisa; Miccheli, Alfredo; Marini, Federico; Praticò, Giulia; Sciubba, Fabio; Di Cocco, Maria E.; Cechinel, Valdir Filho; Tocci, Noemi; Valletta, Alessio; Pasqua, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    The responses of Hypericum perforatum root cultures to chitosan elicitation had been investigated through 1H-NMR-based metabolomics associated with morpho-anatomical analyses. The root metabolome was influenced by two factors, i.e., time of culture (associated with biomass growth and related “overcrowding stress”) and chitosan elicitation. ANOVA simultaneous component analysis (ASCA) modeling showed that these factors act independently. In response to the increase of biomass density over time, a decrease in the synthesis of isoleucine, valine, pyruvate, methylamine, etanolamine, trigonelline, glutamine and fatty acids, and an increase in the synthesis of phenolic compounds, such as xanthones, epicatechin, gallic, and shikimic acid were observed. Among the xanthones, brasilixanthone B has been identified for the first time in chitosan-elicited root cultures of H. perforatum. Chitosan treatment associated to a slowdown of root biomass growth caused an increase in DMAPP and a decrease in stigmasterol, shikimic acid, and tryptophan levels. The histological analysis of chitosan-treated roots revealed a marked swelling of the root apex, mainly due to the hypertrophy of the first two sub-epidermal cell layers. In addition, periclinal divisions in hypertrophic cortical cells, resulting in an increase of cortical layers, were frequently observed. Most of the metabolic variations as well as the morpho-anatomical alterations occurred within 72 h from the elicitation, suggesting an early response of H. perforatum roots to chitosan elicitation. The obtained results improve the knowledge of the root responses to biotic stress and provide useful information to optimize the biotechnological production of plant compounds of industrial interest. PMID:27148330

  6. Plant growth promotion may compensate for losses due to moderate Aphanomyces root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A two-year study was conducted to investigate the use of chemically-induced resistance and biocontrol bacteria for reducing sugar beet root rot disease caused by the oomycete organism Aphanomyces cochlioides. Stand establishment, yield, and quality analysis of sugarbeets from replicated field plots...

  7. Root zone salinity and sodicity under seasonal rainfall due to feedback of decreasing hydraulic conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Zee, S. E. A. T. M.; Shah, S. H. H.; Vervoort, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    Soil sodicity, where the soil cation exchange complex is occupied for a significant fraction by Na+, may lead to vulnerability to soil structure deterioration. With a root zone flow and salt transport model, we modeled the feedback effects of salt concentration (C) and exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP) on saturated hydraulic conductivity Ks(C, ESP) for different groundwater depths and climates, using the functional approach of McNeal (1968). We assume that a decrease of Ks is practically irreversible at a time scale of decades. Representing climate with a Poisson rainfall process, the feedback hardly affects salt and sodium accumulation compared with the case that feedback is ignored. However, if salinity decreases, the much more buffered ESP stays at elevated values, while Ks decreases. This situation may develop if rainfall has a seasonal pattern where drought periods with accumulation of salts in the root zone alternate with wet rainfall periods in which salts are leached. Feedback that affects both drainage/leaching and capillary upward flow from groundwater, or only drainage, leads to opposing effects. If both fluxes are affected by sodicity-induced degradation, this leads to reduced salinity (C) and sodicity (ESP), which suggests that the system dynamics and feedback oppose further degradation. Experiences in the field point in the same direction.

  8. Negligible shift of 3Ag- potential in longer-chain carotenoids as revealed by a single persistent peak of 3Ag-→1Ag- stimulated emission followed by 3Ag-←1Ag- transient-absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunyong; Miki, Takeshi; Kakitani, Yoshinori; Koyama, Yasushi; Nagae, Hiroyoshi

    2007-12-01

    Upon excitation of lycopene, anhydrorhodovibrin or spirilloxanthin to the 1Bu+(0) state, stimulated emission followed by transient-absorption was observed as a single peak with the 3Ag-(0) energy that had been determined by measurement of resonance-Raman excitation profiles. This observation was explained in terms of negligible shift of the 3Ag- potential, in reference to the 1Ag- potential, where only the 3Ag-(υ)→1Ag-(υ) emission and the 3Ag-(υ)←1Ag-(υ) absorption become allowed during the vibrational relaxation of υ = 2 → 1 → 0, starting from the 3Ag-(2) level generated by diabatic internal conversion from the 1Bu+(0) level, in anhydrorhodovibrin, for example.

  9. Oxygen-Ozone Therapy for Herniated Lumbar Disc in Patients with Subacute Partial Motor Weakness Due to Nerve Root Compression

    PubMed Central

    Dall'Olio, Massimo; Princiotta, Ciro; Cirillo, Luigi; Budai, Caterina; de Santis, Fabio; Bartolini, Stefano; Serchi, Elena; Leonardi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Summary Intradiscal oxygen-ozone (O2-O3) chemonucleolysis is a well-known effective treatment for pain caused by protruding disc disease and nerve root compression due to bulging or herniated disc. The most widely used therapeutic combination is intradiscal injection of an O2-O3 mixture (chemonucleolysis), followed by periradicular injection of O2-O3, steroid and local anaesthetic to enhance the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect. The treatment is designed to resolve pain and is administered to patients without motor weakness, whereas patients with acute paralysis caused by nerve root compression undergo surgery 24-48h after the onset of neurological deficit. This paper reports on the efficacy of O2-O3 chemonucleolysis associated with anti-inflammatory foraminal injection in 13 patients with low back pain and cruralgia, low back pain and sciatica and subacute partial motor weakness caused by nerve root compression unresponsive to medical treatment. All patients were managed in conjunction with our colleagues in the Neurosurgery Unit of Bellaria Hospital and the IRCCS Institute of Neurological Sciences, Bologna. The outcomes obtained are promising: 100% patients had a resolution of motor weakness, while 84.6% had complete pain relief. Our results demonstrate that O2-O3 therapy can be considered a valid treatment option for this category of patients. PMID:25363257

  10. Increased nitrogen leaching following soil freezing is due to decreased root uptake in a northern hardwood forest.

    PubMed

    Campbell, John L; Socci, Anne M; Templer, Pamela H

    2014-08-01

    The depth and duration of snow pack is declining in the northeastern United States as a result of warming air temperatures. Since snow insulates soil, a decreased snow pack can increase the frequency of soil freezing, which has been shown to have important biogeochemical implications. One of the most notable effects of soil freezing is increased inorganic nitrogen losses from soil during the following growing season. Decreased nitrogen retention is thought to be due to reduced root uptake, but has not yet been measured directly. We conducted a 2-year snow-removal experiment at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, USA to determine the effects of soil freezing on root uptake and leaching of inorganic nitrogen simultaneously. Snow removal significantly increased the depth of maximal soil frost by 37.2 and 39.5 cm in the first and second winters, respectively (P < 0.001 in 2008/2009 and 2009/2010). As a consequence of soil freezing, root uptake of ammonium declined significantly during the first and second growing seasons after snow removal (P = 0.023 for 2009 and P = 0.005 for 2010). These observed reductions in root nitrogen uptake coincided with significant increases in soil solution concentrations of ammonium in the Oa horizon (P = 0.001 for 2009 and 2010) and nitrate in the B horizon (P < 0.001 and P = 0.003 for 2009 and 2010, respectively). The excess flux of dissolved inorganic nitrogen from the Oa horizon that was attributable to soil freezing was 7.0 and 2.8 kg N ha(-1) in 2009 and 2010, respectively. The excess flux of dissolved inorganic nitrogen from the B horizon was lower, amounting to 1.7 and 0.7 kg N ha(-1) in 2009 and 2010, respectively. Results of this study provide direct evidence that soil freezing reduces root nitrogen uptake, demonstrating that the effects of winter climate change on root function has significant consequences for nitrogen retention and loss in forest ecosystems. PMID:24574104

  11. Localized application of soil organic matter shifts distribution of cluster roots of white lupin in the soil profile due to localized release of phosphorus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai-Gang; Shen, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Fu-Suo; Lambers, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Phosphorus (P) is a major factor controlling cluster-root formation. Cluster-root proliferation tends to concentrate in organic matter (OM)-rich surface-soil layers, but the nature of this response of cluster-root formation to OM is not clear. Cluster-root proliferation in response to localized application of OM was characterized in Lupinus albus (white lupin) grown in stratified soil columns to test if the stimulating effect of OM on cluster-root formation was due to (a) P release from breakdown of OM; (b) a decrease in soil density; or (c) effects of micro-organisms other than releasing P from OM. Methods Lupin plants were grown in three-layer stratified soil columns where P was applied at 0 or 330 mg P kg−1 to create a P-deficient or P-sufficient background, and OM, phytate mixed with OM, or perlite was applied to the top or middle layers with or without sterilization. Key Results Non-sterile OM stimulated cluster-root proliferation and root length, and this effect became greater when phytate was supplied in the presence of OM. Both sterile OM and perlite significantly decreased cluster-root formation in the localized layers. The OM position did not change the proportion of total cluster roots to total roots in dry biomass among no-P treatments, but more cluster roots were concentrated in the OM layers with a decreased proportion in other places. Conclusions Localized application of non-sterile OM or phytate plus OM stimulated cluster-root proliferation of L. albus in the localized layers. This effect is predominantly accounted for by P release from breakdown of OM or phytate, but not due to a change in soil density associated with OM. No evidence was found for effects of micro-organisms in OM other than those responsible for P release. PMID:20150198

  12. Semitransparent inverted polymer solar cells with MoO3/Ag/MoO3 as transparent electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Chen; Xie, Guohua; Liu, Caixia; Zhang, Xindong; Dong, Wei; Meng, Fanxu; Kong, Xiangzi; Shen, Liang; Ruan, Shengping; Chen, Weiyou

    2009-08-01

    Semitransparent inverted polymer solar cells were developed using thermally evaporable MoO3/Ag/MoO3 as transparent anode. The ultrathin inner MoO3 layer was introduced as a buffer layer to improve hole collection, while the outer MoO3 layer served as a light coupling layer to enhance optical transmittance of the device. The dependence of the device performances on the thickness of the outer MoO3 layer was investigated. The results showed that the addition of the outer MoO3 layer improves the transmittance of the anode compared to MoO3/Ag anode and the performances of the semitransparent devices with the outer MoO3 layer are improved due to the reduced series resistance.

  13. Sm3+:Ag NPs assisted modification in absorption features of magnesium tellurite glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusoff, N. M.; Sahar, M. R.; Ghoshal, S. K.

    2015-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles (NPs) assisted enhancements in absorption and emission cross-section of tellurite glass is the present challenge. The influences of samarium (Sm3+) ions and silver (Ag) NPs ratio on physical and optical absorption properties of melt quench synthesized magnesium tellurite glasses are reported. XRD patterns verify the amorphous nature of glasses. Glass density, molar volume and ionic packing fraction are discerned to be in the range of 4.92-5.0 g cm-3, 29.82-30.26 cm3 mol-1 and 0.452-0.446, respectively. Moderate reduction potential of tellurite glass converted Ag1+ to Ag0 via single step process and NPs are formed. TEM image manifest the existence of NPs of average diameter ∼16.94 nm having Gaussian size distribution. The significant changes in structural properties in the presence of Ag NPs are discussed in terms of TeO4 tetrahedra distortion and network depolymerization process. The Sm3+:Ag NPs dependent variation in physical properties are ascribed to the alteration in the number of bridging oxygen to non bridging (NB) one. Enhancement in absorption intensity due to the local field effects of Ag NPs is attributed to the changes in Sm-O bond strength. Optical energy band gap (2.81-3.18 eV) and Urbach energy (0.18-0.24 eV) are found increase and decrease, respectively with the increase of Sm3+:Ag NPs up to 1.33 then quenches and enhances, respectively thereafter which are related to the changes in cross-link and NBO numbers. The FTIR spectra reveal modification in network structures evidenced from vibrational wave-number shifts of TeO4 and TeO3 structural units. The observed notable increase in HOH vibration mode suggests its helpfulness in promoting the absorption of water and light. It is asserted that the physical, optical and structural properties of magnesium tellurite glass can be tuned by controlling Sm3+:Ag NPs.

  14. Highly luminescent material based on Alq3:Ag nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Salah, Numan; Habib, Sami S; Khan, Zishan H

    2013-09-01

    Tris (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) is an organic semiconductor molecule, widely used as an electron transport layer, light emitting layer in organic light-emitting diodes and a host for fluorescent and phosphorescent dyes. In this work thin films of pure and silver (Ag), cupper (Cu), terbium (Tb) doped Alq3 nanoparticles were synthesized using the physical vapor condensation method. They were fabricated on glass substrates and characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscope (AFM), UV-visible absorption spectra and studied for their photoluminescence (PL) properties. SEM and AFM results show spherical nanoparticles with size around 70-80 nm. These nanoparticles have almost equal sizes and a homogeneous size distribution. The maximum absorption of Alq3 nanoparticles is observed at 300 nm, while the surface plasmon resonant band of Ag doped sample appears at 450 nm. The PL emission spectra of Tb, Cu and Ag doped Alq3 nanoparticles show a single broad band at around 515 nm, which is similar to that of the pure one, but with enhanced PL intensity. The sample doped with Ag at a concentration ratio of Alq3:Ag = 1:0.8 is found to have the highest PL intensity, which is around 2 times stronger than that of the pure one. This enhancement could be attributed to the surface plasmon resonance of Ag ions that might have increased the absorption and then the quantum yield. These remarkable result suggest that Alq3 nanoparticles incorporated with Ag ions might be quite useful for future nano-optoelectronic devices. PMID:23653126

  15. Toxicity of canavanine in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) roots is due to alterations in RNS, ROS and auxin levels.

    PubMed

    Krasuska, Urszula; Andrzejczak, Olga; Staszek, Paweł; Borucki, Wojciech; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2016-06-01

    Canavanine (CAN) is non-proteinogenic aminoacid and a structural analog of arginine (Arg). Naturally, CAN occurs in legumes e.g. jack bean and is considered as a strong allelochemical. As a selective inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase in mammalians, it could act as a modifier of nitric oxide (NO) concentration in plants. Modifications in the content of endogenous reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) influence root structure and architecture, being also under hormonal control. The aim of the work was to investigate regulation of root growth in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. cv. Malinowy Ożarowski) seedling by application of CAN at concentration (10 and 50 μM) leading to 50% or 100% restriction of root elongation. CAN at higher concentration led to slight DNA fragmentation, increased total RNA and protein level. Decline in total respiration rate after CAN supplementation was not associated with enhanced membrane permeability. Malformations in root morphology (shorter and thicker roots, limited number of lateral roots) were accompanied by modification in NO and ONOO(-) localization; determined mainly in peridermal cells and some border cells. Although, CAN resulted in low RNS production, addition of exogenous NO by usage of NO donors did not reverse its negative effect, nor recovery effect was detected after roots imbibition in Arg. To build up a comprehensive view on mode of action of CAN as root growth inhibitor, it was shown an elevated level of auxin. To summarize, we demonstrated several secondary mode of action of CAN, indicating its toxicity in plants linked to restriction in RNS formation accompanied by simultaneous overaccumulation of ROS. PMID:26986929

  16. Spectra of surface plasmon polariton enhanced electroluminescence from electroformed Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hickmott, T. W.

    2015-03-07

    Narrow band-pass filters have been used to measure the spectral distribution of electroluminescent photons with energies between 1.8 eV and 3.0 eV from electroformed Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag diodes with anodic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thicknesses between 12 nm and 18 nm. Electroforming of metal-insulator-metal (MIM) diodes is a non-destructive dielectric breakdown that results in a conducting channel in the insulator and changes the initial high resistance of the MIM diode to a low resistance state. It is a critical step in the development of resistive-switching memories that utilize MIM diodes as the active element. Electroforming of Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag diodes in vacuum results in voltage-controlled negative resistance (VCNR) in the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. Electroluminescence (EL) and electron emission into vacuum (EM) develop simultaneously with the current increase that results in VCNR in the I-V characteristics. EL is due to recombination of electrons injected at the Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface with radiative defect centers in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Measurements of EL photons between 1.8 eV and 3.0 eV using a wide band-pass filter showed that EL intensity is exponentially dependent on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thickness for Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag diodes between 12 nm and 20 nm thick. Enhanced El intensity in the thinnest diodes is attributed to an increase in the spontaneous emission rate of recombination centers due to high electromagnetic fields generated in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} when EL photons interact with electrons in Ag or Al to form surface plasmon polaritons at the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al interface. El intensity is a maximum at 2.0–2.2 eV for Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag diodes with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thicknesses between 12 nm and 18 nm. EL in diodes with 12 nm or 14 nm of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is enhanced by factors of 8–10 over EL from a diode with 18 nm of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The extent of EL enhancement in

  17. Reduced Deep Root Hydraulic Redistribution Due to Climate Change Impacts Carbon and Water Cycling in Southern US Pine Plantations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domec, J.; Noormets, A.; King, J. S.; Sun, G.; McNulty, S.; Gavazzi, M. J.; Treasure, E.; Caldwell, P.

    2010-12-01

    It is well known that plants lose water from the canopy through transpiration, and also lose a portion of water drawn up at night from deep, moist soil layers through roots and deposited to shallow, dry soil layers. This process is termed hydraulic redistribution (HR). Deep root water uptake and HR have been a major discovery during the last 15 years, but little is known about the impact of future climatic and environmental conditions on deep root water uptake and its impact on water balance and carbon sequestration. We investigated the temporal variability of soil moisture dynamics in three AmeriFlux sites and used data from the Duke Free-Air CO2 Enrichment site to forecast future environmental impacts on HR and its impact on water cycling and carbon sequestration. Our results showed that HR played a critical role in delaying the drying of upper soil layers by replacing more than 25% of the water utilized during the day with water taken up by deep roots at night. Furthermore, HR mitigated the effects of soil drying in the understory and had important implications for net primary productivity and carbon sink potential of young plantations. A warming climate is associated with higher vapor pressure deficits, which will increase nighttime evapotranspiration and reduce HR because trees will act as a competitor with the upper soil for water. We predicted that increases in temperature, vapor pressure deficit and CO2 would reduce HR and limit shallow soil rewetting, thus decreasing net ecosystem productivity (NEP) especially in young and in shallow rooted forest plantations. Modeled carbon flux showed that in the absence of HR, gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) would be reduced by more than 30%, or 200 g C m-2 yr-1 and 750 g C m-2 yr-1 in a young and in a mid-rotation plantation, respectively. HR-induced decrease of GEP outweighed the decrease of ecosystem respiration, thus leading to a lower NEP. For these two types of managed forests, NEP would also be reduced by 100

  18. Properties of a new type Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy composite anode for zinc electrowinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hai-tao; Liu, Huan-rong; Zhang, Yong-chun; Chen, Bu-ming; Guo, Zhong-cheng; Xu, Rui-dong

    2013-10-01

    An Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy composite anode was produced via composite casting. Its electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen evolution reaction and corrosion resistance was evaluated by anodic polarization curves and accelerated corrosion test, respectively. The microscopic morphologies of the anode section and anodic oxidation layer during accelerated corrosion test were obtained by scanning electron microscopy. It is found that the composite anode (hard anodizing) displays a more compact interfacial combination and a better adhesive strength than plating tin. Compared with industrial Pb-0.3%Ag anodes, the oxygen evolution overpotentials of Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy (hard anodizing) and Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy (plating tin) at 500 A·m-2 were lower by 57 and 14 mV, respectively. Furthermore, the corrosion rates of Pb-0.3%Ag alloy, Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy (hard anodizing), and Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy (plating tin) were 13.977, 9.487, and 11.824 g·m-2·h-1, respectively, in accelerated corrosion test for 8 h at 2000 A·m-2. The anodic oxidation layer of Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy (hard anodizing) is more compact than Pb-0.3%Ag alloy and Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy (plating tin) after the test.

  19. Mitigation of antagonistic effects on plant growth due to root co-colonization by dark septate endophytes and ectomycorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Reininger, Vanessa; Sieber, Thomas N

    2013-12-01

    Dark septate endophytes (DSE) are very common root colonizers of woody plant species. Ascomycetes of the Phialocephala fortinii s.l.-Acephala applanata species complex (PAC) are the main representatives of DSE fungi in forest ecosystems. PAC and mycorrhizal fungi share the same habitat, but interactions among PAC, mycorrhizal fungi and plants are poorly understood. We compared the effects of single and dual inoculation of Norway spruce seedlings with PAC and the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungus Hebeloma crustuliniforme on host growth, degree of mycorrhization and density of endophytic PAC biomass. Single colonization by H. crustuliniforme or PAC significantly reduced plant biomass. Dual colonization reduced or neutralized plant growth depression caused by single fungal colonization. The degree of mycorrhization was independent on PAC colonization, and mycorrhization significantly reduced endophytic PAC biomass. Plant biomass of dually colonized plants positively correlated with PAC biomass. These results demonstrate the ability of dual inoculation of PAC and H. crustuliniforme to neutralize plant growth depression caused by single fungal inoculation. Our explanations of enhanced plant growth in dually inoculated plants are the inhibition of PAC during root colonization by the ECM mantle and ECM-mediated access to plant growth-promoting nutrients resulting from the mineralization of the potting medium by PAC. PMID:24249297

  20. Inhibition of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) root growth by cyanamide is due to altered cell division, phytohormone balance and expansin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Soltys, Dorota; Rudzińska-Langwald, Anna; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka; Wiśniewska, Anita; Bogatek, Renata

    2012-11-01

    Cyanamide (CA) has been reported as a natural compound produced by hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth.) and it was shown also to be an allelochemical, responsible for strong allelopathic potential in this species. CA phytotoxicity has been demonstrated on various plant species, but to date little is known about its mode of action at cellular level. Treatment of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) roots with CA (1.2 mM) resulted in inhibition of growth accompanied by alterations in cell division, and imbalance of plant hormone (ethylene and auxin) homeostasis. Moreover, the phytotoxic effect of CA was also manifested by modifications in expansin gene expression, especially in expansins responsible for cell wall remodeling after the cytokinesis (LeEXPA9, LeEXPA18). Based on these results the phytotoxic activity of CA on growth of roots of tomato seedlings is likely due to alterations associated with cell division. PMID:22847024

  1. ITO-free flexible organic photovoltaics with multilayer MoO3/LiF/MoO3/Ag/MoO3 as the transparent electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shilin; Dai, Yunjie; Zhao, Dewei; Zhang, Hongmei

    2016-05-01

    We present efficient flexible organic photovoltaics (OPVs) with multiple layers of molybdenum oxide (MoO3)/LiF/MoO3/Ag/MoO3 as the transparent electrode, where the thin Ag layer yields high conductivity and the dielectric layer MoO3/LiF/MoO3 has high transparency due to optical interference, leading to improved power conversion efficiency compared with indium tin oxide (ITO) based devices. The MoO3 contacting organic active layer is used as a buffer layer for good hole extraction. Thus, the multilayer MoO3/LiF/MoO3/Ag/MoO3 can improve light transmittance and also facilitate charge carrier extraction. Such an electrode shows excellent mechanical bendability with a 9% reduction of efficiency after 1000 cycles of bending due to the ductile nature of the thin metal layer and dielectric layer used. Our results suggest that the MoO3/LiF/MoO3/Ag/MoO3 multilayer electrode is a promising alternative to ITO as an electrode in OPVs.

  2. Composition-Dependent Luminescent Properties of GeO2-Eu2O3-Ag Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokshyts, Yu. V.

    2013-05-01

    An effect of Eu3+-precursor on the luminescent properties of GeO2-Eu2O3-Ag films was studied. This effect can be attributed to the different phase compositions of europium compounds after heat treatment and the change of structural parameters of the environment for europium ions.

  3. Highly active WO3-Ag-ZnO photocatalyst driven by day light illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subash, B.; Krishnakumar, B.; Sreedhar, B.; Swaminathan, M.; Shanthi, M.

    2013-02-01

    The WO3 loaded Ag-ZnO (WO3-Ag-ZnO) was successfully synthesized by precipitation-decomposition method. The catalyst was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) images, energy dispersive spectrum (EDS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS), photoluminescence spectra (PL), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and BET surface area measurements. The photocatalytic activity of WO3-Ag-ZnO was investigated for the degradation of Naphthol Blue Black (NBB) in aqueous solution using solar light. WO3-Ag-ZnO is found to be more efficient than Ag-ZnO, WO3-ZnO, Ag-WO3, WO3, commercial ZnO, bare ZnO, TiO2-P25 and TiO2 (Merck) at pH 9 for the mineralization of NBB dye. The effects of operational parameters such as the amount of photocatalyst, dye concentration, initial pH on photo mineralization of NBB dye have been analyzed. The mineralization of NBB has been confirmed by Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) measurements. A degradation mechanism is proposed for the degradation of NBB under solar light. This catalyst is found to be reusable.

  4. Alterations of physiology and gene expression due to long-term magnesium-deficiency differ between leaves and roots of Citrus reticulata.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiao-Lin; Ma, Cui-Lan; Yang, Lin-Tong; Chen, Li-Song

    2016-07-01

    Seedlings of Ponkan (Citrus reticulata) were irrigated with nutrient solution containing 0 (Mg-deficiency) or 1mM MgSO4 (control) every two day for 16 weeks. Thereafter, we examined magnesium (Mg)-deficiency-induced changes in leaf and root gas exchange, total soluble proteins and gene expression. Mg-deficiency lowered leaf CO2 assimilation, and increased leaf dark respiration. However, Mg-deficient roots had lower respiration. Total soluble protein level was not significantly altered by Mg-deficiency in roots, but was lower in Mg-deficient leaves than in controls. Using cDNA-AFLP, we obtained 70 and 71 differentially expressed genes from leaves and roots. These genes mainly functioned in signal transduction, stress response, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, cell transport, cell wall and cytoskeleton metabolism, nucleic acid, and protein metabolisms. Lipid metabolism (Ca(2+) signals)-related Mg-deficiency-responsive genes were isolated only from roots (leaves). Although little difference existed in the number of Mg-deficiency-responsive genes between them both, most of these genes only presented in Mg-deficient leaves or roots, and only four genes were shared by them both. Our data clearly demonstrated that Mg-deficiency-induced alterations of physiology and gene expression greatly differed between leaves and roots. In addition, we focused our discussion on the causes for photosynthetic decline in Mg-deficient leaves and the responses of roots to Mg-deficiency. PMID:27163764

  5. Crystal structures of the La 3AgSnSe 7 and R3Ag 1-δSnS 7 ( R=La, Ce; δ=0.18-0.19) compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daszkiewicz, M.; Gulay, L. D.; Pietraszko, A.; Shemet, V. Ya.

    2007-07-01

    The crystal structures of new quaternary compounds La 3AgSnSe 7 (space group P6 3, Pearson symbol hP24, a=1.0805(4) nm, c=0.6245(1) nm, R1=0.0315), La 3Ag 0.82SnS 7 (space group P6 3, Pearson symbol hP23.64, a=1.0399(1) nm, c=0.6016(1) nm, R1=0.0149) and Ce 3Ag 0.81SnS 7 (space group P6 3, Pearson symbol hP23.62, a=1.0300(1) nm, c=0.6002(1) nm, R1=0.0151) were determined by means of X-ray single crystal diffraction. Structural investigations of the R3Ag 1-δSnS 7 ( R=La, Ce; δ=0.18-0.19(1)) compounds at 450 and 530 K were performed. Low temperature data (12 K) for Ce 3Ag 0.81SnS 7 were also collected. The nearest neighbours of the La(Ce), Ag and Sn atoms are exclusively Se(S) atoms. The latter form distorted trigonal prisms around the La(Ce) atoms, and distorted tetrahedrons around the Sn atoms. The Ag (Ag1) atoms have triangular surroundings: they are located very close to the planes built of three Se(S) atoms. The Ag2 atoms in the structures of the La 3Ag 0.82SnS 7, Ce 3Ag 0.81SnS 7 compounds are located practically in the centres of trigonal antiprisms. The pseudo-potentials determined through the Ag atoms show relatively low barrier between two nearest positions which decreases when temperature rises.

  6. Si(111)-( 3× 3)-Ag surface at low temperatures: symmetry breaking and surface twin boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, N.; Nagao, T.; Hasegawa, S.

    1999-11-01

    In contrast to the honeycomb pattern observed at room temperature in empty-state scanning-tunneling-microscopy (STM) images corresponding to the generally accepted honeycomb-chained-triangle (HCT) structure, the Si(111)- ( 3× 3)-Ag surface at low temperatures (62 and 6 K) shows a hexagonal-lattice pattern. This is consistent with an 'inequivalent-triangle (IET) model' recently proposed as the most stable structure for the ( 3× 3)-Ag surface in which two Ag triangles in the unit cell are different in size. Because of the asymmetry of the IET structure, two types of domains whose structures are in the relation of twins to each other are created only at low temperatures, between which surface twin boundaries (TB) appear. The neighboring domains, separated by a conventional out-of-phase boundary (OPB), tend to have the IET structures of the opposite symmetry. The interaction between the OPB and TB is discussed. The TB is observed to fluctuate and to be pinned by some defects.

  7. Visible-light-driven photocatalytic inactivation of Escherichia coli by magnetic Fe2O3-AgBr.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tsz Wai; Zhang, Lisha; Liu, Jianshe; Huang, Guocheng; Wang, Wei; Wong, Po Keung

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial inactivation by magnetic photocatalyst receives increasing interests for the ease recovery and reuse of photocatalysts. This study investigated bacterial inactivation by a magnetic photocatalysts, Fe2O3-AgBr, under the irradiation of a commercially available light emitting diode lamp. The effects of different factors on the inactivation of Escherichia coli were also evaluated, in term of the efficiency in inactivation. The results showed that Fe2O3-AgBr was able to inactivate both Gram negative (E. coli) and Gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria. Bacterial inactivation by Fe2O3-AgBr was more favorable under high temperature and alkaline pH. Presence of Ca(2+) promoted the bacterial inactivation while the presence of [Formula: see text] was inhibitory. The mechanisms of photocatalytic bacterial inactivation were systemically studied and the effects of the presence of various specific reactive species scavengers and argon suggest that Fe2O3-AgBr inactivate bacterial cells by the oxidation of H2O2 generated from the photo-generated electron and direct oxidation of photo-generated hole. The detection of different reactive species further supported the proposed mechanisms. The results provide information for the evaluation of bacterial inactivation performance of Fe2O3-AgBr under different conditions. More importantly, bacterial inactivation for five consecutive cycles demonstrated Fe2O3-AgBr exhibited highly stable bactericidal activity and suggest that the magnetic Fe2O3-AgBr has great potential for water disinfection. PMID:26724445

  8. Electroforming and Ohmic contacts in Al-Al2O3-Ag diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickmott, T. W.

    2012-03-01

    Electroforming of metal-insulator-metal (MIM) diodes is a non-destructive dielectric breakdown process that changes the diode from its initial high resistance state (HRS) to a low resistance state (LRS). After electroforming, resistance switching memories (RSMs) use voltages to switch from HRS to LRS and back. Many MIM combinations are proposed for use in RSMs. In many cases conduction in the LRS is nearly temperature independent at low temperatures; an Ohmic contact with a barrier to electron injection of ˜0 eV results from electroforming. Electroforming of Al-Al2O3-Ag diodes with amorphous anodic Al2O3 thicknesses between 12 and 41 nm has been studied. Two anodizing electrolytes have been used; 0.1 M ammonium pentaborate (bor-H2O) and a solution of 0.1 M of ammonium pentaborate per liter of ethylene glycol (bor-gly). Polarization of Al2O3 and negative charge in Al2O3 are much larger when Al2O3 is formed in bor-H2O solution than when Al is anodized in bor-gly solution. Electroforming of Al-Al2O3-Ag diodes results in an Ohmic contact at the Al-Al2O3 interface, voltage-controlled negative resistance (VCNR) in the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, electroluminescence (EL), and electron emission into vacuum (EM) from filamentary conducting channels. Two distinct modes of electroforming occur for Al-Al2O3-Ag diodes. α-forming occurs for 2.5 V ≲ VS ≲ 5 V, where VS is the applied voltage. It is characterized by an abrupt current jump with the simultaneous appearance of EL and EM. β-forming occurs for VS ≳ 7 V. I-V curves, EL, and EM develop gradually and are smaller than for α-forming. Electroforming occurs more readily for diodes with Al2O3 formed in bor-H2O that have greater defect densities. Fully developed I-V curves have similar VCNR, EL, and EM after α-forming or β-forming. A model is proposed in which excited states of F-centers, oxygen vacancies in amorphous anodic Al2O3, form defect conduction bands. Electroforming that results in an Ohmic

  9. Heterogeneity and topsoil depletion due to tillage erosion and soil co-extraction with root vegetables: a serious threat to sustainable agricultural land use in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quine, Timothy; van Oost, Kristof

    2010-05-01

    The term soil erosion has become almost synonymous with water erosion and yet tillage erosion and soil loss with root crop harvest, although less visible, may be responsible for the majority of the on-site costs of soil erosion in many arable areas of the UK. The study reported here is a first attempt to model soil erosion associated with these processes in England and Wales, at the National scale. A GIS-based modelling approach in the Arc/Info environment is employed in order to meet the requirement for large-scale evaluation of erosion severity. Existing models that have been subject to independent test are used or adapted and widely available data is employed in model parameterisation. Tillage erosion is simulated using a diffusion-type model and a slope curvature index derived from coarse-scale topographic data. The curvature index is calibrated by statistical comparison to curvature values derived from a high resolution digital terrain model. Soil loss with root crop harvest is simulated using information concerning patterns of sugar beet and potato cultivation and estimation of soil moisture during the crop harvest season. Soil loss associated with root crop harvest may be as high as 1 t ha-1 year-1 if land is permanently used for root crops in a 3 year rotation. However, when the arable area of the UK is considered as a whole root crop harvest is responsible for a mean rate of soil loss of approximately 0.1 t ha-1 year-1. Tillage erosion is found to be the dominant process of soil redistribution and onsite erosion on arable land, in comparison with both soil loss through root crop harvest and with long-term water erosion rates. Mean gross rates of tillage erosion were found to be 3.7 t ha-1 year-1, representing approximately 7.4 t ha-1 year-1 erosion and the same rate of deposition. Soil redistribution at these rates is generating an heterogeneous soilscape in which continued functioning for food and fibre production may be jeopardized. These problems may be

  10. The fabrication of In2O3/In2S3/Ag nanocubes for efficient photoelectrochemical water splitting.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rui; Li, Haohua; Zhang, Wenwen; Yang, Zepeng; Liu, Guiwu; Xu, Ziwei; Shao, Haicheng; Qiao, Guanjun

    2016-01-28

    In this work, for the first time, a three-component In2O3/In2S3/Ag nanocomposite heterostructured photoanode is prepared on a F-doped SnO2 (FTO) glass substrate. The three-component photoanode exhibits significantly enhanced photoelectrochemical properties compared with the single-component (In2O3) and two-component (In2O3/In2S3 or In2O3/Ag) systems. Ag nanoparticles deposited on the surface of In2O3/In2S3 nanocubes can facilitate the separation of photogenerated charge carriers and enhance the absorption of visible light. In I-V curves, the In2O3/In2S3/Ag photoanode generates a remarkable photocurrent density of 8.75 mA cm(-2) (at 0 V vs. SCE), which is higher than those of the two-component In2O3/In2S3 (4.47 mA cm(-2)) and In2O3/Ag (3.50 mA cm(-2)). Furthermore, it also gives efficiency as high as 67% around 350 nm in the incident photon to electron conversion efficiency (IPCE) spectrum. These results open up a promising avenue for the design and fabrication of novel heterojunctions for photoelectrochemical water splitting. PMID:26725370

  11. The inhibitory effect of a Platycodon root extract on ultraviolet B-induced pigmentation due to a decrease in Kit expression.

    PubMed

    Kasamatsu, Shinya; Hachiya, Akira; Shimotoyodome, Yoshie; Kameyama, Akiyo; Miyauchi, Yuki; Higuchi, Kazuhiko; Fujimori, Taketoshi; Ohuchi, Atsushi; Shibuya, Yusuke; Kitahara, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    The signaling of stem cell factor (SCF) through its receptor Kit is known to play an important role in regulating cutaneous melanogenesis. In the course of UVB-induced pigmentation, the expression of membrane-bound SCF by epidermal keratinocytes is upregulated at an early phase and subsequently activates neighboring melanocytes via their Kit receptors. In order to identify effective skin-lightening materials, we screened botanical extracts to determine their abilities to diminish Kit expression in melanocytes. A Platycodon root extract was consequently found to have a remarkable inhibitory activity on Kit expression. When the extract was applied to three-dimensional human skin substitutes in vitro and to human skin in vivo after UVB irradiation, their pigmentation was significantly reduced, confirming the substantial contribution of the suppression of SCF/Kit signaling to preventing or inhibiting melanin synthesis. These data demonstrate that a Platycodon root extract is a promising material for a skin-lightening product to improve pigmentation-related diseases. PMID:24799080

  12. Roots Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Barnabas

    1998-01-01

    Offers historical information about square roots. Presents three different methods--Hero's method, visual method, and remainder method--which can be used to teach the finding of square roots and one method for determining cube roots. (ASK)

  13. Flooding impairs Fe uptake and distribution in Citrus due to the strong down-regulation of genes involved in Strategy I responses to Fe deficiency in roots.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cuenca, Mary-Rus; Quiñones, Ana; Primo-Millo, Eduardo; Forner-Giner, M Ángeles

    2015-01-01

    This work determines the ffects of long-term anoxia conditions--21 days--on Strategy I responses to iron (Fe) deficiency in Citrus and its impact on Fe uptake and distribution. The study was carried out in Citrus aurantium L. seedlings grown under flooding conditions (S) and in both the presence (+Fe) and absence of Fe (-Fe) in nutritive solution. The results revealed a strong down-regulation (more than 65%) of genes HA1 and FRO2 coding for enzymes proton-ATPase and Ferric-Chelate Reductase (FC-R), respectively, in -FeS plants when compared with -Fe ones. H+-extrusion and FC-R activity analyses confirmed the genetic results, indicating that flooding stress markedly repressed acidification and reduction responses to Fe deficiency (3.1- and 2.0-fold, respectively). Waterlogging reduced by half Fe concentration in +FeS roots, which led to 30% up-regulation of Fe transporter IRT1, although this effect was unable to improve Fe absorption. Consequently, flooding inhibited 57Fe uptake in +Fe and -Fe seedlings (29.8 and 66.2%, respectively) and 57Fe distribution to aerial part (30.6 and 72.3%, respectively). This evidences that the synergistic action of both enzymes H+-ATPase and FC-R is the preferential regulator of the Fe acquisition system under flooding conditions and, hence, their inactivation implies a limiting factor of citrus in their Fe-deficiency tolerance in waterlogged soils. PMID:25897804

  14. Potential for post-closure radionuclide redistribution due to biotic intrusion: aboveground biomass, litter production rates, and the distribution of root mass with depth at material disposal area G, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    French, Sean B; Christensen, Candace; Jennings, Terry L; Jaros, Christopher L; Wykoff, David S; Crowell, Kelly J; Shuman, Rob

    2008-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated at the Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL) is disposed of at LANL's Technical Area (T A) 54, Material Disposal Area (MDA) G. The ability of MDA G to safely contain radioactive waste during current and post-closure operations is evaluated as part of the facility's ongoing performance assessment (PA) and composite analysis (CA). Due to the potential for uptake and incorporation of radio nuclides into aboveground plant material, the PA and CA project that plant roots penetrating into buried waste may lead to releases of radionuclides into the accessible environment. The potential amount ofcontamination deposited on the ground surface due to plant intrusion into buried waste is a function of the quantity of litter generated by plants, as well as radionuclide concentrations within the litter. Radionuclide concentrations in plant litter is dependent on the distribution of root mass with depth and the efficiency with which radionuclides are extracted from contaminated soils by the plant's roots. In order to reduce uncertainties associated with the PA and CA for MDA G, surveys are being conducted to assess aboveground biomass, plant litter production rates, and root mass with depth for the four prominent vegetation types (grasses, forbs, shrubs and trees). The collection of aboveground biomass for grasses and forbs began in 2007. Additional sampling was conducted in October 2008 to measure root mass with depth and to collect additional aboveground biomass data for the types of grasses, forbs, shrubs, and trees that may become established at MDA G after the facility undergoes final closure, Biomass data will be used to estimate the future potential mass of contaminated plant litter fall, which could act as a latent conduit for radionuclide transport from the closed disposal area. Data collected are expected to reduce uncertainties associated with the PA and CA for MDA G and ultimately aid in the assessment and subsequent

  15. Flooding Impairs Fe Uptake and Distribution in Citrus Due to the Strong Down-Regulation of Genes Involved in Strategy I Responses to Fe Deficiency in Roots

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Cuenca, Mary-Rus; Quiñones, Ana; Primo-Millo, Eduardo; Forner-Giner, M. Ángeles

    2015-01-01

    This work determines the ffects of long-term anoxia conditions—21 days—on Strategy I responses to iron (Fe) deficiency in Citrus and its impact on Fe uptake and distribution. The study was carried out in Citrus aurantium L. seedlings grown under flooding conditions (S) and in both the presence (+Fe) and absence of Fe (-Fe) in nutritive solution. The results revealed a strong down-regulation (more than 65%) of genes HA1 and FRO2 coding for enzymes proton-ATPase and Ferric-Chelate Reductase (FC-R), respectively, in –FeS plants when compared with –Fe ones. H+-extrusion and FC-R activity analyses confirmed the genetic results, indicating that flooding stress markedly repressed acidification and reduction responses to Fe deficiency (3.1- and 2.0-fold, respectively). Waterlogging reduced by half Fe concentration in +FeS roots, which led to 30% up-regulation of Fe transporter IRT1, although this effect was unable to improve Fe absorption. Consequently, flooding inhibited 57Fe uptake in +Fe and –Fe seedlings (29.8 and 66.2%, respectively) and 57Fe distribution to aerial part (30.6 and 72.3%, respectively). This evidences that the synergistic action of both enzymes H+-ATPase and FC-R is the preferential regulator of the Fe acquisition system under flooding conditions and, hence, their inactivation implies a limiting factor of citrus in their Fe-deficiency tolerance in waterlogged soils. PMID:25897804

  16. Redox Imbalance in the Peripheral Mechanism Underlying the Mirror-Image Neuropathic Pain Due to Chronic Compression of Dorsal Root Ganglion.

    PubMed

    Lv, H; Chen, H; Xu, J J; Jiang, Y S; Shen, Y J; Zhou, S Z; Xu, H; Xiong, Y C

    2016-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain, but few studies have examined the role of oxidative stress in the mirror-image neuropathic pain (MINP). The present study was to investigate the role of ROS in MINP caused by chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) (CCD) in a rat model. SD rats were randomly divided into sham group and CCD group. CCD was conducted to induce MINP. CCD rats were intraperitoneally injected with α-Phenyl-N-tert-butyl-nitrone (PBN) at 7 days after surgery. Paw withdrawal mechanical threshold (PWMT) was measured at -1, 1, 3, 5 and 7 days after surgery in sham group and CCD group, and at 8 time points after PBN injection. Rats were sacrificed at 3 and 7 days after surgery in sham group and CCD group and at 0.5 and 2 h after PBN injection, and the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities, as well as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malonaldehyde (MDA) contents were determined in the contralateral DRGs. Results showed bilateral PWMT reduced significantly in sham group and CCD group, but it returned to nearly normal level in sham group. MDA content, H2O2 content and SOD activity increased significantly, while catalase activity remained unchanged in CCD rats. PBN at 100 mg/kg significantly attenuated bilateral mechanical hyperalgesia accompanied by the improvement of oxidative stress in the contralateral DRGs. Our results demonstrate that ROS produced in the contralateral DRG are involved in the pathogenesis of CCD induced MINP, and ROS scavenger may be a promising drug for the therapy of MINP. PMID:26471165

  17. Quantitative measurements of root water uptake and root hydraulic conductivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Javaux, Mathieu; Meunier, Felicien; Couvreur, Valentin; Carminati, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    uptake by laterals decreased towards the root tips due to a dissipation of water potential along the root and it had a maximum at a distance of 10 cm from the root tip; (3) water uptake by the taproot was higher in the distal segments and was negligible in the proximal parts, which had a low radial conductivity. The method introduced here enabled us to reconstruct the water fluxes and the profile of hydraulic conductivities of a root system. This method can help to better understand root development and function in response to varying soil conditions. The method can also be used to calibrate and test existing models of root water uptake.

  18. HCV NS3Ag: a reliable and clinically useful predictor of antiviral outcomes in genotype 1b hepatitis C virus-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Ren, S; Jin, Y; Huang, Y; Ma, L; Liu, Y; Meng, C; Guan, S; Xie, L; Chen, X

    2016-07-01

    Since hepatitis C virus (HCV) non-structural 3 (NS3) protease inhibitor (PI) combined with pegylated interferon/ribavirin (PR) has been approved for chronic HCV genotype (GT) 1b infection, a reliable and clinically useful predictor combining with serum HCV RNA to predict early virologic response, breakthrough, and relapse is important during HCV antiviral treatment. We evaluated the role of HCV NS3 antigen (HCV NS3Ag) on the prediction of virologic response in patients with HCV GT1b during PR or PR/simeprevir (triple) therapy. Three hundred patients were recruited, and HCV RNA and HCV NS3Ag were tested at baseline and weeks 2, 4, 12, 24, 48, and 72. NS3Ag and HCV RNA were significantly related (r(2) = 0.67) in the whole patient selection. The kinetic pattern of HCV RNA and HCV NS3Ag during triple treatment was similar. HCV NS3Ag levels in the triple group closely followed those of HCV RNA; the r(2) values were 0.756 (baseline), 0.837 (2 weeks), 0.989 (4 weeks), and 0.993 (12 weeks), respectively. For patients treated with PR, the positive and negative predictive values (PPVs and NPVs) for viral response were 96.31 % and 67.19 %, respectively, at week 4 by using the decrease of NS3Ag (dHCV NS3Ag) combined with HCV RNA. At week 12, the PPV was similar at 94.16 %, while the NPV reached 87.26 %. The PPV and NPV for the prediction of relapse and breakthrough were 90.6 % and 76.7 %, respectively. HCV NS3Ag is a valuable marker and could be a supplementary predictor of HCV RNA for the prediction of antiviral response, breakthrough, or relapse during HCV antiviral treatment. PMID:27173787

  19. Modeling root reinforcement using root-failure Weibull survival function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, M.; Giadrossich, F.; Cohen, D.

    2013-03-01

    Root networks contribute to slope stability through complicated interactions that include mechanical compression and tension. Due to the spatial heterogeneity of root distribution and the dynamic of root turnover, the quantification of root reinforcement on steep slope is challenging and consequently the calculation of slope stability as well. Although the considerable advances in root reinforcement modeling, some important aspect remain neglected. In this study we address in particular to the role of root strength variability on the mechanical behaviors of a root bundle. Many factors may contribute to the variability of root mechanical properties even considering a single class of diameter. This work presents a new approach for quantifying root reinforcement that considers the variability of mechanical properties of each root diameter class. Using the data of laboratory tensile tests and field pullout tests, we calibrate the parameters of the Weibull survival function to implement the variability of root strength in a numerical model for the calculation of root reinforcement (RBMw). The results show that, for both laboratory and field datasets, the parameters of the Weibull distribution may be considered constant with the exponent equal to 2 and the normalized failure displacement equal to 1. Moreover, the results show that the variability of root strength in each root diameter class has a major influence on the behavior of a root bundle with important implications when considering different approaches in slope stability calculation. Sensitivity analysis shows that the calibration of the tensile force and the elasticity of the roots are the most important equations, as well as the root distribution. The new model allows the characterization of root reinforcement in terms of maximum pullout force, stiffness, and energy. Moreover, it simplifies the implementation of root reinforcement in slope stability models. The realistic quantification of root reinforcement for

  20. Supramolecular structures of halogenated oligothiophenes on the Si(111)-√3 ×√3-Ag surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, R.; Fu, C.; Perepichka, D. F.; Gallagher, M. C.

    2016-05-01

    We have studied the adsorption of brominated tetrathienoanthracene (TBTTA) molecules onto the Si(111)-√3 × √ 3-Ag surface at room temperature. The two-dimensional √ 3 silver adlayer acts to passivate the silicon surface and provides a high-mobility template for TBTTA adsorption. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images reveal that at low coverage, the molecules readily migrate to step edges and defects in the √ 3 overlayer. With increasing coverage, the molecules eventually form compact supramolecular structures. In terms of the hexagonal √ 3 lattice vectors (a√ 3 and b√ 3), the oblique unit cell of these structures can be defined by lattice vectors am = 3a√ 3 + 2b√ 3, and bm = - a√ 3 + b√ 3. The structures are quite fragile and can decompose under repeated STM imaging. This is particularly true at higher bias and suggests an electric field-induced dissociation in these instances. With increasing molecular dose, the size and stability of the structures increases. At higher coverage, the spatial extent of the supramolecular structures is often limited by defects in the underlying √ 3 layer. Our results suggest that the √ 3-Ag surface provides a relatively inert substrate for the adsorption of TBTTA molecules, and that the supramolecular structures are held together by relatively weak intermolecular forces.

  1. The change of coverage and structure of the Si(111)-√3 × √3-Ag surface by isothermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishigami, Ryoya; Yuhara, Junji; Morita, Kenji

    1994-12-01

    The thermal stability of the Si(111)-√3 × √3-Ag surface has been studied by means of low energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry techniques. The initial coverages of Ag, which was deposited on the Si(111)-7 × 7 surface at room temperature, are 0.8-1.0 ML ( 1 ML = 7.84 × 10 14{atoms}/{cm 2}). It is found that on isothermal annealing the coverage of Ag decreases exponentially with increasing time when only the √3 × √3 spots continue to be observed and that the Ag coverage shifts to another slower exponential function at about 0.5 ML, at which the 3 × 1 spots begin to appear between the √3 × √3 spots. The activation energies for Ag atoms to decay from the Si(111)-√3 × √3-Ag and √3 × √3 + 3 × 1-Ag surfaces are determined from the two exponential decay curves to be 0.89 ± 0.21 and 2.6 ± 0.3 eV, respectively. The experimental values are compared with those obtained by other authors.

  2. Mechanical Properties of Ca0.9Yb0.1MnO3/Ag Composites for n-Type Legs of Thermoelectric Oxide Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosuga, Atsuko; Urata, Saori; Kurosaki, Ken; Yamanaka, Shinsuke; Funahashi, Ryoji

    2008-08-01

    CaMnO3 systems are known to exhibit excellent thermoelectric (TE) performance at high temperature in air and are, therefore, good candidates for the n-type legs of TE oxide devices. In previous studies, however, several CaMnO3 system legs have fractured easily after the power generation test. The fractures were probably caused by the inherently low mechanical strength of CaMnO3, due to which it developed a great thermal stress arising from the big difference in thermal expansion coefficient between the Ag electrode and the CaMnO3 leg. In the present study, Ag particles were dispersed in a Ca0.9Yb0.1MnO3 matrix to mitigate the problems mentioned above. The incorporation of Ag particles into the matrix led to both improvement of the mechanical strength of Ca0.9Yb0.1MnO3 and to reduction in the thermal stress at the junction between the Ag electrode and the Ca0.9Yb0.1MnO3/Ag composite leg. Additionally, the ability of TE oxides to withstand application of a maximum temperature gradient without impairment of their mechanical strength could be significantly improved as a result.

  3. Square Root +

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederiksen, John G.

    1969-01-01

    A rational presentation of the so-called long division method for extracting the square root of a number. Diagrams are used to show relationship of this technique to the binomial theorem. Presentation exposes student to many facets of mathematics in addition to the mechanics of funding square root and cube root. Geometry, algebraic statements,…

  4. Root Hairs

    PubMed Central

    Grierson, Claire; Nielsen, Erik; Ketelaarc, Tijs; Schiefelbein, John

    2014-01-01

    Roots hairs are cylindrical extensions of root epidermal cells that are important for acquisition of nutrients, microbe interactions, and plant anchorage. The molecular mechanisms involved in the specification, differentiation, and physiology of root hairs in Arabidopsis are reviewed here. Root hair specification in Arabidopsis is determined by position-dependent signaling and molecular feedback loops causing differential accumulation of a WD-bHLH-Myb transcriptional complex. The initiation of root hairs is dependent on the RHD6 bHLH gene family and auxin to define the site of outgrowth. Root hair elongation relies on polarized cell expansion at the growing tip, which involves multiple integrated processes including cell secretion, endomembrane trafficking, cytoskeletal organization, and cell wall modifications. The study of root hair biology in Arabidopsis has provided a model cell type for insights into many aspects of plant development and cell biology. PMID:24982600

  5. Synthesis of Strong Light Scattering Absorber of TiO₂-CMK-3/Ag for Photocatalytic Water Splitting under Visible Light Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hung, Wei Hsuan; Lai, Sz Nian; Lo, An Ya

    2015-04-29

    The enhanced water splitting photocurrent has been observed through plasmonic mesoporous composite electrode TiO2-CMK-3/Ag under visible light irradiation. Strong light absorption achieved from the integrations of ordered mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) and silver plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) layer in the TiO2, which significantly increased the effective optical depth of TiO2-CMK-3/Ag photoelectrode. The carbon-based CMK-3 also increased the surface wetting behavior and conductivity of the photoelectrodes, which resulted in a higher ion exchange rate and faster electron transport. The synthesis of high crystalline TiO2-CMK-3/Ag composite photocatalyst was verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Pronounced enhancement of light absorption of TiO2-CMK-3/Ag photoelectrode was confirmed by UV/vis spectrophotometers. Two orders of magnitude of the enhanced water splitting photocurrent were obtained in the TiO2-CMK-3/Ag composite photoelectrode with respect to TiO2 only. Finally, spatially resolved mapping photocurrents were also demonstrated in this study. PMID:25848834

  6. Adatom-induced variations of the atomic and electronic structures of Si(111)3×3-Ag : A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hojin; Yeom, Han Woong; Jeong, Sukmin

    2008-06-01

    Using a first-principles calculation method, we study the changes in the atomic and electronic structures of the Si(111)3×3-Ag surface (hereafter 3-Ag ) via doping of extra Ag adatoms. We present a structural model for the adatom-induced 21×21 superstructure (21-Ag) , which has three Ag adatoms immersed into the substrate Ag layer within a unit cell. The present structural model reproduces well the measured scanning-tunneling-microscopy images as well as the electronic band structure measured by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. We find out that the complex band structure seen on the 21-Ag phase basically arises from the band folding of the original surface bands of 3-Ag . The extra Ag adatoms doped on 3-Ag modify only the band alignment without any additional adatom-induced surface state. The almost unoccupied two-dimensional free-electron-like band, generally called S1 , at pristine 3-Ag is gradually filled and shifted downward with an increase in the dopant coverage. As this shifted S1 band crosses other surface bands, it loses its free-electron nature.

  7. Optical microcavities and enhanced electroluminescence from electroformed Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hickmott, T. W.

    2013-12-21

    Electroluminescence (EL) and electron emission into vacuum (EM) occur when a non-destructive dielectric breakdown of Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag diodes, electroforming, results in the development of a filamentary region in which current-voltage (I-V) characteristics exhibit voltage-controlled negative resistance. The temperature dependence of I-V curves, EM, and, particularly, EL of Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag diodes with anodic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thicknesses between 12 nm and 30 nm, has been studied. Two filters, a long-pass (LP) filter with transmission of photons with energies less than 3.0 eV and a short-pass (SP) filter with photon transmission between 3.0 and 4.0 eV, have been used to characterize EL. The voltage threshold for EL with the LP filter, V{sub LP}, is ∼1.5 V. V{sub LP} is nearly independent of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thickness and of temperature and is 0.3–0.6 V less than the threshold voltage for EL for the SP filter, V{sub SP}. EL intensity is primarily between 1.8 and 3.0 eV when the bias voltage, V{sub S} ≲ 7 V. EL in the thinnest diodes is enhanced compared to EL in thicker diodes. For increasing V{sub S}, for diodes with the smallest Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thicknesses, there is a maximum EL intensity, L{sub MX}, at a voltage, V{sub LMX}, followed by a decrease to a plateau. L{sub MX} and EL intensity at 4.0 V in the plateau region depend exponentially on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thickness. The ratio of L{sub MX} at 295 K for a diode with 12 nm of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to L{sub MX} for a diode with 25 nm of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is ∼140. The ratio of EL intensity with the LP filter to EL intensity with the SP filter, LP/SP, varies between ∼3 and ∼35; it depends on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thickness and V{sub S}. Enhanced EL is attributed to the increase of the spontaneous emission rate of a dipole in a non-resonant optical microcavity. EL photons interact with the Ag and Al films to create surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) at the metal-Al{sub 2}O

  8. A study of the microstructure, thermal properties and wetting kinetics of Sn-3Ag- xZn lead-free solders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yulong; Yu, Xiao; Sekulic, Dusan P.; Hu, Xiaowu; Yan, Ming; Hu, Ronghua

    2016-06-01

    Microstructure, thermal properties and wetting kinetics of Sn-3Ag- xZn solders ( x = 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1, 2 and 4 wt%) were systematically investigated. The results indicate that a small amount of Zn (Zn wt% ≤ 1 wt%) has a rather moderate effect on the microstructure morphology of the Sn-3Ag- xZn solders. The microstructures are composed of a β-Sn phase and the mixture of Ag3Sn and ζ-AgZn particles. However, the β-Sn phase reduces its volume fraction in the entire microstructure and the intermetallic compounds population increases with the increasing of Zn content. The microstructure is dramatically changed with a further increase in the Zn content. The γ-AgZn phase is formed in a Sn-3Ag-2Zn solder. The ɛ-AgZn phase is formed in a Sn-3Ag-4Zn solder. The melting temperature and the undercooling of the Sn-3Ag- xZn solder alloys decrease with the increase in Zn content, reach to a minimum value when the content of Zn is 1 wt%, and then increase with further increase in Zn content. The Sn-3Ag-1Zn demonstrates the minimum value of 228.13 °C in the melting temperature and 13.87 °C in undercooling. The wetting kinetics of the main spreading stage features the power law of R n ~ t ( n = 1), which is controlled by chemical reactions at the triple line.

  9. Surfactant role of Ag atoms in the growth of Si layers on Si(111)√3×√3-Ag substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagami, Tsuyoshi; Sone, Junki; Nakatsuji, Kan; Hirayama, Hiroyuki

    2014-10-13

    The growth of Si layers on Si(111)√3×√3-Ag substrates was studied for coverages of up to a few mono-layers. Atomically flat islands were observed to nucleate in the growth at 570 K. The top surfaces of the islands were covered in Ag atoms and exhibited a √3×√3 reconstruction with the same surface state dispersions as Si(111)√3×√3-Ag substrates. These results indicate that the Ag atoms on the substrate always hop up to the top of the Si layers.

  10. Visualization of Thermally Fluctuating Surface Structure in Noncontact Atomic-Force Microscopy and Tip Effects on Fluctuation: Theoretical Study of Si(111)-( √3 ×√3)-Ag Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Naruo; Watanabe, Satoshi; Tsukada, Masaru

    2002-01-01

    We investigated noncontact atomic-force microscopy (NC-AFM) images of a thermally fluctuating surface structure together with tip effects based on the first-principles electronic state calculation. As an example the Si(111)-( (3)×(3))-Ag ( (3)-Ag) surface is studied. We have succeeded in theoretically visualizing the thermal fluctuation of the (3)-Ag surface at room temperature, and in reproducing the observed NC-AFM image for the first time. Further, the pinning effect of the thermal fluctuation of the (3)-Ag surface by the tip is clarified, which shows a novel ability of NC-AFM to modify the surface structure.

  11. Roots and Root Function: Introduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A number of current issues related to water management, ecohydrology, and climate change are giving impetus to new research aimed at understanding roots and their functioning. Current areas of research include: use of advanced imaging technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging to observe roots...

  12. Adsorbate-Induced Segregation in a PdAg Membrane Model System: Pd3Ag(1 1 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Svenum, I. H.; Herron, Jeffrey A.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Venvik, H. J.

    2012-10-15

    Thin PdAg alloy membranes with 20–25% Ag are being developed for hydrogen separation technology. Despite many investigations on such membranes as well as representative experimental and theoretical model systems, unresolved issues remain concerning the effect of the alloy surface structure and composition on adsorption and vice versa. Therefore, the interaction between hydrogen, carbon monoxide or oxygen with the surface of a PdAg model alloy was studied using periodic self-consistent density functional theory (DFT-GGA) calculations. In particular, the adsorption structure, coverage dependence and possible adsorption-induced segregation phenomena were addressed using Pd3Ag(1 1 1) model surfaces with varying degrees of surface segregation. In agreement with previous experimental and theoretical investigations, we predict Ag surface termination to be energetically favorable in vacuum. The segregation of Ag is then reversed upon adsorption of H, CO or O. For these adsorbates, the binding is strongest on Pd three-fold hollow sites, and hence complete Pd termination is favored at high coverage of H or CO, while 25% Ag may remain under oxygen because of the lower O-saturation coverage. CO adsorption provides a somewhat stronger driving force for Pd segregation when compared to H, and this may have implications with respect to permeation properties of PdAg alloy surfaces. Our predictions for high coverage are particularly relevant in underlining the importance of segregation phenomena to the hydrogen transport properties of thin PdAg alloy membranes.

  13. Reactive Sputter Deposition of WO3/Ag/WO3 Film for Indium Tin Oxide (ITO)-Free Electrochromic Devices.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yi; Lan, Changyong; Guo, Huayang; Li, Chun

    2016-02-17

    Functioning both as electrochromic (EC) and transparent-conductive (TC) coatings, WO3/Ag/WO3 (WAW) trilayer film shows promising potential application for ITO-free electrochromic devices. Reports on thermal-evaporated WAW films revealed that these bifunctional WAW films have distinct EC characteristics; however, their poor adhesive property leads to rapid degradation of coloring-bleaching cycling. Here, we show that WAW film with improved EC durability can be prepared by reactive sputtering using metal targets. We find that, by introducing an ultrathin tungsten (W) sacrificial layer before the deposition of external WO3, the oxidation of silver, which leads to film insulation and apparent optical haze, can be effectively avoided. We also find that the luminous transmittance and sheet resistance were sensitive to the thicknesses of tungsten and silver layers. The optimized structure for TC coating was obtained to be WO3 (45 nm)/Ag (10 nm)/W (2 nm)/WO3 (45 nm) with a sheet resistance of 16.3 Ω/□ and a luminous transmittance of 73.7%. Such film exhibits compelling EC performance with decent luminous transmittance modulation ΔTlum of 29.5%, fast switching time (6.6 s for coloring and 15.9 s for bleaching time), and long-term cycling stability (2000 cycles) with an applied potential of ±1.2 V. Thicker external WO3 layer (45/10/2/100 nm) leads to larger modulation with maximum ΔTlum of 46.4%, but at the cost of significantly increasing the sheet resistance. The strategy of introducing ultrathin metal sacrificial layer to avoid silver oxidation could be extended to fabricating other oxide-Ag-oxide transparent electrodes via low-cost reactive sputtering. PMID:26726834

  14. Automated Root Tracking with "Root System Analyzer"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Jin, Meina; Ockert, Charlotte; Bol, Roland; Leitner, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Crucial factors for plant development are water and nutrient availability in soils. Thus, root architecture is a main aspect of plant productivity and needs to be accurately considered when describing root processes. Images of root architecture contain a huge amount of information, and image analysis helps to recover parameters describing certain root architectural and morphological traits. The majority of imaging systems for root systems are designed for two-dimensional images, such as RootReader2, GiA Roots, SmartRoot, EZ-Rhizo, and Growscreen, but most of them are semi-automated and involve mouse-clicks in each root by the user. "Root System Analyzer" is a new, fully automated approach for recovering root architectural parameters from two-dimensional images of root systems. Individual roots can still be corrected manually in a user interface if required. The algorithm starts with a sequence of segmented two-dimensional images showing the dynamic development of a root system. For each image, morphological operators are used for skeletonization. Based on this, a graph representation of the root system is created. A dynamic root architecture model helps to determine which edges of the graph belong to an individual root. The algorithm elongates each root at the root tip and simulates growth confined within the already existing graph representation. The increment of root elongation is calculated assuming constant growth. For each root, the algorithm finds all possible paths and elongates the root in the direction of the optimal path. In this way, each edge of the graph is assigned to one or more coherent roots. Image sequences of root systems are handled in such a way that the previous image is used as a starting point for the current image. The algorithm is implemented in a set of Matlab m-files. Output of Root System Analyzer is a data structure that includes for each root an identification number, the branching order, the time of emergence, the parent

  15. Root gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, P. H.

    1995-01-01

    When a plant root is reoriented within the gravity field, it responds by initiating a curvature which eventually results in vertical growth. Gravity sensing occurs primarily in the root tip. It may involve amyloplast sedimentation in the columella cells of the root cap, or the detection of forces exerted by the mass of the protoplast on opposite sides of its cell wall. Gravisensing activates a signal transduction cascade which results in the asymmetric redistribution of auxin and apoplastic Ca2+ across the root tip, with accumulation at the bottom side. The resulting lateral asymmetry in Ca2+ and auxin concentration is probably transmitted to the elongation zone where differential cellular elongation occurs until the tip resumes vertical growth. The Cholodny-Went theory proposes that gravity-induced auxin redistribution across a gravistimulated plant organ is responsible for the gravitropic response. However, recent data indicate that the gravity-induced reorientation is more complex, involving both auxin gradient-dependent and auxin gradient-independent events.

  16. Root canal

    MedlinePlus

    Endodontic therapy ... the root of a tooth. Generally, there is pain and swelling in the area. The infection can ... You may have some pain or soreness after the procedure. An over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drug, such as ibuprofen or naproxen, can help relieve ...

  17. Facile synthesis of hybrid nanorods with the Sb2Se3/AgSbSe2 heterojunction structure for high performance photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuo; Qiao, Xvsheng; Wang, Fengxia; Luo, Qun; Zhang, Xianghua; Wan, Xia; Xu, Yang; Fan, Xianping

    2016-01-28

    An effective colloidal process involving the hot-injection method is developed to synthesize uniform single-crystalline Sb2Se3 nanorods in high yields. The photoconductive characteristics of the as-synthesized Sb2Se3 nanorods are investigated by developing a film-based photodetector and this device displays a remarkable response to visible light with an "ON/OFF" ratio as high as 50 (with an incident light density of 12.05 mW cm(-2)), short response/recovery times and long-term durability. To overcome the challenge of the intrinsic low electrical conductivity of Sb2Se3, hybrid nanorods with the Sb2Se3/AgSbSe2 heterojunction structure having a type-II band alignment are firstly prepared. The electric current of the photodetector based on the Sb2Se3/AgSbSe2 hybrid nanorod film has been significantly increased both in the dark and under light illumination. The responsivity of the photodetector based on the Sb2Se3/AgSbSe2 hybrid nanorod film is about 4.2 times as much as that of the photodetector based on the Sb2Se3 nanorod film. This improvement can be considered as an important step to promote Sb2Se3 based semiconductors for applications in high performance photodetectors. PMID:26743461

  18. Geophysical Imaging of Root Architecture and Root-soil Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Dafflon, B.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Roots play a critical role in controlling water and nutrient uptake, soil biogeochemical processes, as well as the physical anchorage for plants. While important processes, such as root hydraulic redistribution for optimal growth and survival have been recognized, representation of roots in climate models, e.g. its carbon storage, carbon resilience, root biomass, and role in regulating water and carbon fluxes across the rhizosphere and atmosphere interface is still challenging. Such a challenge is exacerbated because of the large variations of root architecture and function across species and locations due to both genetic and environmental controls and the lack of methods for quantifying root mass, distribution, dynamics and interaction with soils at field scales. The scale, complexity and the dynamic nature of plant roots call for minimally invasive methods capable of providing quantitative estimation of root architecture, dynamics over time and interactions with the soils. We present a study on root architecture and root-soil interactions using geophysical methods. Parameters and processes of interests include (1) moisture dynamics around root zone and its interaction with plant transpiration and environmental controls and (2) estimation of root structure and properties based on geophysical signals. Both pot and field scale studies were conducted. The pot scale experiments were conducted under controlled conditions and were monitored with cross-well electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), TDR moisture sensors and temperature probes. Pots with and without a tree were compared and the moisture conditions were controlled via a self regulated pumping system. Geophysical monitoring revealed interactions between roots and soils under dynamic soil moisture conditions and the role of roots in regulating the response of the soil system to changes of environmental conditions, e.g. drought and precipitation events. Field scale studies were conducted on natural trees using

  19. Sensitivity of the "Root Bundle Model" to root mechanical properties and root distribution: Implication for shallow landslide stability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Massimiliano; Giadrossich, Filippo; Cohen, Denis

    2015-04-01

    Root reinforcement is recognized as an important factor for shallow landslides stability. Due to the complexity of root reinforcement mechanisms and the heterogeneity of the root-soil system, the estimation of parameters used in root reinforcement models is difficult, time consuming, and often highly uncertain. For practical applications, it is necessary to focus on the estimation of the most relevant parameters. The objective of the present contribution is to review the state of the art in the development of root reinforcement models and to discuss the sensitivity of the "Root Bundle Model" (RBM) when considering the variability of root mechanical properties and the heterogeneity of root distributions. The RBM is a strain-step loading fiber bundle model extended to include the mechanical and geometrical properties of roots. The model allows the calculation of the force-displacement behavior of a root bundle. In view of new results of field pullout tests performed on coarse roots of spruce (Picea abies) and considering a consistent dataset of root distribution of alpine tree species, we quantify the sensitivity of the RBM and the uncertainty associated with the most important input parameters. Preliminary results show that the extrapolation of force-diameter values from incomplete datasets (i.e., when only small roots are tested and values for coarse roots are extrapolated) may result in considerable errors. In particular, in the case of distributions with root diameters larger than 5 mm, root reinforcement tends to be dominated by coarse roots and their mechanical properties need to be quantified. In addition to the results of the model sensitivity, we present a possible best-practice method for the quantification of root reinforcement in view of its application to slope stability calculations and implementations in numerical models.

  20. Descendant root volume varies as a function of root type: estimation of root biomass lost during uprooting in Pinus pinaster

    PubMed Central

    Danjon, Frédéric; Caplan, Joshua S.; Fortin, Mathieu; Meredieu, Céline

    2013-01-01

    Root systems of woody plants generally display a strong relationship between the cross-sectional area or cross-sectional diameter (CSD) of a root and the dry weight of biomass (DWd) or root volume (Vd) that has grown (i.e., is descendent) from a point. Specification of this relationship allows one to quantify root architectural patterns and estimate the amount of material lost when root systems are extracted from the soil. However, specifications of this relationship generally do not account for the fact that root systems are comprised of multiple types of roots. We assessed whether the relationship between CSD and Vd varies as a function of root type. Additionally, we sought to identify a more accurate and time-efficient method for estimating missing root volume than is currently available. We used a database that described the 3D root architecture of Pinus pinaster root systems (5, 12, or 19 years) from a stand in southwest France. We determined the relationship between CSD and Vd for 10,000 root segments from intact root branches. Models were specified that did and did not account for root type. The relationships were then applied to the diameters of 11,000 broken root ends to estimate the volume of missing roots. CSD was nearly linearly related to the square root of Vd, but the slope of the curve varied greatly as a function of root type. Sinkers and deep roots tapered rapidly, as they were limited by available soil depth. Distal shallow roots tapered gradually, as they were less limited spatially. We estimated that younger trees lost an average of 17% of root volume when excavated, while older trees lost 4%. Missing volumes were smallest in the central parts of root systems and largest in distal shallow roots. The slopes of the curves for each root type are synthetic parameters that account for differentiation due to genetics, soil properties, or mechanical stimuli. Accounting for this differentiation is critical to estimating root loss accurately. PMID

  1. Pythium Root Rot (and Feeder Root Necrosis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pythium species cause a number of diseases on corn. Among the Pythium diseases, root rot presents the least conspicuous aboveground symptoms. Broadly defined, root rot also includes feeder root necrosis. At least 16 species of Pythium are known to cause root rot of corn. These include P. acanthicu...

  2. Modeling root reinforcement using a root-failure Weibull survival function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, M.; Giadrossich, F.; Cohen, D.

    2013-11-01

    Root networks contribute to slope stability through complex interactions with soil that include mechanical compression and tension. Due to the spatial heterogeneity of root distribution and the dynamics of root turnover, the quantification of root reinforcement on steep slopes is challenging and consequently the calculation of slope stability also. Although considerable progress has been made, some important aspects of root mechanics remain neglected. In this study we address specifically the role of root-strength variability on the mechanical behavior of a root bundle. Many factors contribute to the variability of root mechanical properties even within a single class of diameter. This work presents a new approach for quantifying root reinforcement that considers the variability of mechanical properties of each root diameter class. Using the data of laboratory tensile tests and field pullout tests, we calibrate the parameters of the Weibull survival function to implement the variability of root strength in a numerical model for the calculation of root reinforcement (RBMw). The results show that, for both laboratory and field data sets, the parameters of the Weibull distribution may be considered constant with the exponent equal to 2 and the normalized failure displacement equal to 1. Moreover, the results show that the variability of root strength in each root diameter class has a major influence on the behavior of a root bundle with important implications when considering different approaches in slope stability calculation. Sensitivity analysis shows that the calibration of the equations of the tensile force, the elasticity of the roots, and the root distribution are the most important steps. The new model allows the characterization of root reinforcement in terms of maximum pullout force, stiffness, and energy. Moreover, it simplifies the implementation of root reinforcement in slope stability models. The realistic quantification of root reinforcement for tensile

  3. In situ observation of thermomigration of Sn atoms to the hot end of 96.5Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu flip chip solder joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Fan-Yi; Kao, C.-L.

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the phenomenon of thermomigration in 96.5Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu flip chip solder joints at an ambient temperature of 150 °C. We observed mass protrusion on the chip side (hot end), indicating that Sn atoms moved to the hot end, and void formation on the substrate side (cold end). The diffusion markers also moved to the substrate side, in the same direction of the vacancy flux, indicating that the latter played a dominant role during the thermomigration process. The molar heat of transport (Q*) of the Sn atoms was 3.38 kJ/mol.

  4. Nutritional regulation of root development.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Herrera, León Francisco; Shane, Michael W; López-Bucio, José

    2015-01-01

    Mineral nutrients such as nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and iron (Fe) are essential for plant growth, development, and reproduction. Adequate provision of nutrients via the root system impacts greatly on shoot biomass and plant productivity and is therefore of crucial importance for agriculture. Nutrients are taken up at the root surface in ionic form, which is mediated by specific transport proteins. Noteworthy, root tips are able to sense the local and internal concentrations of nutrients to adjust growth and developmental processes, and ultimately, to increase or decrease the exploratory capacity of the root system. Recently, important progress has been achieved in identifying the mechanisms of nutrient sensing in wild- and cultivated species, including Arabidopsis, bean, maize, rice, lupin as well as in members of the Proteaceae and Cyperaceae families, which develop highly sophisticated root clusters as adaptations to survive in soils with very low fertility. Major findings include identification of transporter proteins and transcription factors regulating nutrient sensing, miRNAs as mobile signals and peptides as repressors of lateral root development under heterogeneous nutrient supply. Understanding the roles played by N, P, and Fe in gene expression and biochemical characterization of proteins involved in root developmental responses to homogeneous or heterogeneous N and P sources has gained additional interest due to its potential for improving fertilizer acquisition efficiency in crops. PMID:25760021

  5. Rhizosphere biophysics and root water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carminati, Andrea; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Ahmed, Mutez A.; Passioura, John

    2016-04-01

    The flow of water into the roots and the (putative) presence of a large resistance at the root-soil interface have attracted the attention of plant and soil scientists for decades. Such resistance has been attributed to a partial contact between roots and soil, large gradients in soil matric potential around the roots, or accumulation of solutes at the root surface creating a negative osmotic potential. Our hypothesis is that roots are capable of altering the biophysical properties of the soil around the roots, the rhizosphere, facilitating root water uptake in dry soils. In particular, we expect that root hairs and mucilage optimally connect the roots to the soil maintaining the hydraulic continuity across the rhizosphere. Using a pressure chamber apparatus we measured the relation between transpiration rate and the water potential difference between soil and leaf xylem during drying cycles in barley mutants with and without root hairs. The samples were grown in well structured soils. At low soil moistures and high transpiration rates, large drops in water potential developed around the roots. These drops in water potential recovered very slowly, even after transpiration was severely decreased. The drops in water potential were much bigger in barley mutants without root hairs. These mutants failed to sustain high transpiration rates in dry conditions. To explain the nature of such drops in water potential across the rhizosphere we performed high resolution neutron tomography of the rhizosphere of the barleys with and without root hairs growing in the same soil described above. The tomograms suggested that the hydraulic contact between the soil structures was the highest resistance for the water flow in dry conditions. The tomograms also indicate that root hairs and mucilage improved the hydraulic contact between roots and soil structures. At high transpiration rates and low water contents, roots extracted water from the rhizosphere, while the bulk soil, due its

  6. Root Canal Treatment of a Two-Rooted C-Shaped Maxillary First Molar: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Paksefat, Sara; Rahimi, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    The most difficult maxillary teeth for endodontic treatment are the maxillary first molars (MFM) due to their complex root canal anatomy. The presence of two roots and C-shaped canals in MFMs has been reported in rare cases. The present case reports root canal treatment of MFM with two roots, where the palatal and buccal roots were joined together in a C-shaped configuration. PMID:25386214

  7. Spin and orbital magnetism of coinage metal trimers (Cu{sub 3}, Ag{sub 3}, Au{sub 3}): A relativistic density functional theory study

    SciTech Connect

    Afshar, Mahdi; Sargolzaei, Mohsen

    2013-11-15

    We have demonstrated electronic structure and magnetic properties of Cu{sub 3}, Ag{sub 3} and Au{sub 3} trimers using a full potential local orbital method in the framework of relativistic density functional theory. We have also shown that the non-relativistic generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation energy functional gives reliable magnetic properties in coinage metal trimers compared to experiment. In addition we have indicated that the spin-orbit coupling changes the structure and magnetic properties of gold trimer while the structure and magnetic properties of copper and silver trimers are marginally affected. A significant orbital moment of 0.21μ{sub B} was found for most stable geometry of the gold trimer whereas orbital magnetism is almost quenched in the copper and silver trimers.

  8. Energies and excited-state dynamics of 1Bu+, 1Bu- and 3Ag- states of carotenoids bound to LH2 antenna complexes from purple photosynthetic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiana, Rebecca; Miki, Takeshi; Kakitani, Yoshinori; Aoyagi, Shiho; Koyama, Yasushi; Limantara, Leenawaty

    2009-10-01

    Time-resolved pump-probe stimulated-emission and transient-absorption spectra were recorded after excitation with ˜30 fs pulses to the 1Bu+(0) and optically-forbidden diabatic levels of carotenoids, neurosporene, spheroidene and lycopene having n = 9-11 double bonds, bound to LH2 antenna complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides G1C, 2.4.1 and Rhodospirillum molischianum. The low-energy shift of stimulated emission from the covalent 1Bu-(0) and 3Ag-(0) levels slightly larger than that from the ionic 1Bu+(0) state suggests the polarization, whereas more efficient triplet generation suggests the twisting of the conjugated chain in Cars bound to the LH2 complexes, when compared to Cars free in solution.

  9. Affine root systems and dual numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyakov, I. V.; Gromov, N. A.; Kuratov, V. V.

    The root systems in Carroll spaces with degenerate metric are defined. It is shown that their Cartan matrices and reflection groups are affine. Due to the geometric consideration the root system structure of affine algebras is determined by a sufficiently simple algorithm.

  10. Vibrational relaxation and internal conversion in the overlapped optically-allowed 1Bu+ and optically-forbidden 1Bu- or 3Ag- vibronic levels of carotenoids: Effects of diabatic mixing as determined by Kerr-gate fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakitani, Yoshinori; Miki, Takeshi; Koyama, Yasushi; Nagae, Hiroyoshi; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Kanematsu, Yasuo

    2009-07-01

    The time constants of the vibrational relaxation, υ = 2 → υ = 1 and υ = 1 → υ = 0, in the 1Bu+ manifold and those of internal conversion from the 1Bu+(0) level, which is isoenergetic (so-called 'diabatic') with the 1Bu- vibronic levels in neurosporene and spheroidene and with the 3Ag- vibronic levels in lycopene and anhydrorhodovibrin, were determined by Kerr-gate fluorescence spectroscopy. The time constants of the vibrational relaxation were in the ˜1:2 ratio, and those of internal conversion agreed with the lifetimes of the diabatic counterparts, i.e., the 1Bu- and 3Ag- electronic states, respectively.

  11. Root-Gel Interactions and the Root Waving Behavior of Arabidopsis1[w

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Matthew V.; Holbrook, N. Michele

    2004-01-01

    Arabidopsis roots grown on inclined agarose gels exhibit a sinusoidal growth pattern known as root waving. While root waving has been attributed to both intrinsic factors (e.g. circumnutation) and growth responses to external signals such as gravity, the potential for physical interactions between the root and its substrate to influence the development of this complex phenotype has been generally ignored. Using a rotating stage microscope and time-lapse digital imaging, we show that (1) root tip mobility is impeded by the gel surface, (2) this impedance causes root tip deflections by amplifying curvature in the elongation zone in a way that is distinctly nontropic, and (3) root tip impedance is augmented by normal gravitropic pressure applied by the root tip against the gel surface. Thus, both lateral corrective bending near the root apex and root tip impedance could be due to different vector components of the same graviresponse. Furthermore, we speculate that coupling between root twisting and bending is a mechanical effect resulting from root tip impedance. PMID:15247406

  12. Charge carrier mobility and concentration as a function of composition in AgPO3-AgI glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Ana Candida Martins; Nascimento, Marcio Luis Ferreira; Bragatto, Caio Barca; Souquet, Jean-Louis

    2011-12-01

    Conductivity data of the xAgI(1 - x)AgPO3 system (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.5) were collected in the liquid and glassy states. The difference in the dependence of ionic conductivity on temperature below and above their glass transition temperatures (Tg) is interpreted by a discontinuity in the charge carrier's mobility mechanisms. Charge carrier displacement occurs through an activated mechanism below Tg and through a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-Hesse mechanism above this temperature. Fitting conductivity data with the proposed model allows one to determine separately the enthalpies of charge carrier formation and migration. For the five investigated compositions, the enthalpy of charge carrier formation is found to decrease, with x, from 0.86 to 0.2 eV, while the migration enthalpy remains constant at ≈0.14 eV. Based on these values, the charge carrier mobility and concentration in the glassy state can then be calculated. Mobility values at room temperature (≈10-4 cm2 V-1 s-1) do not vary significantly with the AgI content and are in good agreement with those previously measured by the Hall-effect technique. The observed increase in ionic conductivity with x would thus only be due to an increase in the effective charge carrier concentration. Considering AgI as a weak electrolyte, the change in the effective charge carrier concentration is justified and is correlated to the partial free energy of silver iodide forming a regular solution with AgPO3.

  13. A statistical approach to root system classification

    PubMed Central

    Bodner, Gernot; Leitner, Daniel; Nakhforoosh, Alireza; Sobotik, Monika; Moder, Karl; Kaul, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Plant root systems have a key role in ecology and agronomy. In spite of fast increase in root studies, still there is no classification that allows distinguishing among distinctive characteristics within the diversity of rooting strategies. Our hypothesis is that a multivariate approach for “plant functional type” identification in ecology can be applied to the classification of root systems. The classification method presented is based on a data-defined statistical procedure without a priori decision on the classifiers. The study demonstrates that principal component based rooting types provide efficient and meaningful multi-trait classifiers. The classification method is exemplified with simulated root architectures and morphological field data. Simulated root architectures showed that morphological attributes with spatial distribution parameters capture most distinctive features within root system diversity. While developmental type (tap vs. shoot-borne systems) is a strong, but coarse classifier, topological traits provide the most detailed differentiation among distinctive groups. Adequacy of commonly available morphologic traits for classification is supported by field data. Rooting types emerging from measured data, mainly distinguished by diameter/weight and density dominated types. Similarity of root systems within distinctive groups was the joint result of phylogenetic relation and environmental as well as human selection pressure. We concluded that the data-define classification is appropriate for integration of knowledge obtained with different root measurement methods and at various scales. Currently root morphology is the most promising basis for classification due to widely used common measurement protocols. To capture details of root diversity efforts in architectural measurement techniques are essential. PMID:23914200

  14. A statistical approach to root system classification.

    PubMed

    Bodner, Gernot; Leitner, Daniel; Nakhforoosh, Alireza; Sobotik, Monika; Moder, Karl; Kaul, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Plant root systems have a key role in ecology and agronomy. In spite of fast increase in root studies, still there is no classification that allows distinguishing among distinctive characteristics within the diversity of rooting strategies. Our hypothesis is that a multivariate approach for "plant functional type" identification in ecology can be applied to the classification of root systems. The classification method presented is based on a data-defined statistical procedure without a priori decision on the classifiers. The study demonstrates that principal component based rooting types provide efficient and meaningful multi-trait classifiers. The classification method is exemplified with simulated root architectures and morphological field data. Simulated root architectures showed that morphological attributes with spatial distribution parameters capture most distinctive features within root system diversity. While developmental type (tap vs. shoot-borne systems) is a strong, but coarse classifier, topological traits provide the most detailed differentiation among distinctive groups. Adequacy of commonly available morphologic traits for classification is supported by field data. Rooting types emerging from measured data, mainly distinguished by diameter/weight and density dominated types. Similarity of root systems within distinctive groups was the joint result of phylogenetic relation and environmental as well as human selection pressure. We concluded that the data-define classification is appropriate for integration of knowledge obtained with different root measurement methods and at various scales. Currently root morphology is the most promising basis for classification due to widely used common measurement protocols. To capture details of root diversity efforts in architectural measurement techniques are essential. PMID:23914200

  15. Using Square Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, William Wynne

    1976-01-01

    This article describes techniques which enable the user of a comparatively simple calculator to perform calculations of cube roots, nth roots, trigonometric, and inverse trigonometric functions, logarithms, and exponentials. (DT)

  16. The Root Pressure Phenomenon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    Describes experiments demonstrating that root pressure in plants is probably controlled by a circadian rhythm (biological clock). Root pressure phenomenon plays significant part in water transport in contradiction with prevalent belief. (PS)

  17. Impact of Heterobasidion root-rot on fine root morphology and associated fungi in Picea abies stands on peat soils.

    PubMed

    Gaitnieks, Talis; Klavina, Darta; Muiznieks, Indrikis; Pennanen, Taina; Velmala, Sannakajsa; Vasaitis, Rimvydas; Menkis, Audrius

    2016-07-01

    We examined differences in fine root morphology, mycorrhizal colonisation and root-inhabiting fungal communities between Picea abies individuals infected by Heterobasidion root-rot compared with healthy individuals in four stands on peat soils in Latvia. We hypothesised that decreased tree vitality and alteration in supply of photosynthates belowground due to root-rot infection might lead to changes in fungal communities of tree roots. Plots were established in places where trees were infected and in places where they were healthy. Within each stand, five replicate soil cores with roots were taken to 20 cm depth in each root-rot infected and uninfected plot. Root morphological parameters, mycorrhizal colonisation and associated fungal communities, and soil chemical properties were analysed. In three stands root morphological parameters and in all stands root mycorrhizal colonisation were similar between root-rot infected and uninfected plots. In one stand, there were significant differences in root morphological parameters between root-rot infected versus uninfected plots, but these were likely due to significant differences in soil chemical properties between the plots. Sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer of fungal nuclear rDNA from ectomycorrhizal (ECM) root morphotypes of P. abies revealed the presence of 42 fungal species, among which ECM basidiomycetes Tylospora asterophora (24.6 % of fine roots examined), Amphinema byssoides (14.5 %) and Russula sapinea (9.7 %) were most common. Within each stand, the richness of fungal species and the composition of fungal communities in root-rot infected versus uninfected plots were similar. In conclusion, Heterobasidion root-rot had little or no effect on fine root morphology, mycorrhizal colonisation and composition of fungal communities in fine roots of P. abies growing on peat soils. PMID:26861482

  18. Root Traits and Phenotyping Strategies for Plant Improvement.

    PubMed

    Paez-Garcia, Ana; Motes, Christy M; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Chen, Rujin; Blancaflor, Elison B; Monteros, Maria J

    2015-01-01

    Roots are crucial for nutrient and water acquisition and can be targeted to enhance plant productivity under a broad range of growing conditions. A current challenge for plant breeding is the limited ability to phenotype and select for desirable root characteristics due to their underground location. Plant breeding efforts aimed at modifying root traits can result in novel, more stress-tolerant crops and increased yield by enhancing the capacity of the plant for soil exploration and, thus, water and nutrient acquisition. Available approaches for root phenotyping in laboratory, greenhouse and field encompass simple agar plates to labor-intensive root digging (i.e., shovelomics) and soil boring methods, the construction of underground root observation stations and sophisticated computer-assisted root imaging. Here, we summarize root architectural traits relevant to crop productivity, survey root phenotyping strategies and describe their advantages, limitations and practical value for crop and forage breeding programs. PMID:27135332

  19. Root Traits and Phenotyping Strategies for Plant Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Paez-Garcia, Ana; Motes, Christy M.; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Chen, Rujin; Blancaflor, Elison B.; Monteros, Maria J.

    2015-01-01

    Roots are crucial for nutrient and water acquisition and can be targeted to enhance plant productivity under a broad range of growing conditions. A current challenge for plant breeding is the limited ability to phenotype and select for desirable root characteristics due to their underground location. Plant breeding efforts aimed at modifying root traits can result in novel, more stress-tolerant crops and increased yield by enhancing the capacity of the plant for soil exploration and, thus, water and nutrient acquisition. Available approaches for root phenotyping in laboratory, greenhouse and field encompass simple agar plates to labor-intensive root digging (i.e., shovelomics) and soil boring methods, the construction of underground root observation stations and sophisticated computer-assisted root imaging. Here, we summarize root architectural traits relevant to crop productivity, survey root phenotyping strategies and describe their advantages, limitations and practical value for crop and forage breeding programs. PMID:27135332

  20. Morphology of the Tin Whiskers on the Surface of a Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu-0.5Nd Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Tung-Han; Jain, Chao-Chi

    2011-03-01

    Rapid growth of tin whiskers has been observed on the surface of rosette-shaped NdSn3 intermetallic phase in a Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu-0.5Nd alloy after air storage. It is shown that various cross sections of NdSn3 rosettes in the solder matrix reveal different morphologies of tin whiskers, which can be classified as four types: long fibers, short fibers, tiny sprouts, and hillocks. The fibrous whiskers and tiny sprouts are found on the surfaces of specimens exposed to air at room temperature and 423 K (150 °C), while hillocks appear only after storage at 423 K (150 °C). In addition, it is observed that, in most cases, each oxidized NdSn3 intermetallic phase contains only a single whisker at its center. Through metallographic observations and chemical analyses on the cross sections of the oxidized NdSn3 intermetallics, a "successive compressive stress model" has been proposed to interpret the tin whisker growth on the surface of a rare earth (RE)-containing solder.

  1. Influence of heat treatment on characteristics of In2O3/Ag/MoO3 multilayer films as transparent anode for optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnamkhasti, Mohsen Ghasemi; Shahriari, Esmaeil

    2015-09-01

    In this study, In2O3/Ag/MoO3 (IAM) nano-multilayer films are designed, and optimum thickness of each layer is calculated. These films were deposited by thermal evaporation technique and then annealed in air atmosphere at different temperatures for 1 h. The effects of annealing temperature on electrical, optical, and structural properties of the IAM system were investigated. The UV-visible-near-IR transmittance and reflectance spectra confirmed that the annealing temperature has significant influence on the electro-optical characteristics of IAM films. High-quality IAM films with a low sheet resistance of 8.2 (Ω/□) and the maximum optical transmittance of 85 % at 120 °C annealing temperature were obtained. The effect of heat treatment on surface roughness of the layers was also investigated. Figure-of-merit quantity showed that the IAM films annealed at 120 °C have the best performance. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the crystallinity of the structures enhanced with increase in annealing temperature. Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) were fabricated on IAM anodes. The current density-voltage-luminance (J-V-L) characteristic measurements show that the electroluminescence performances of OLED with IAM anode are improved compared with the conventional ITO-based device. The results indicate that the designed system is suitable for use as transparent conductive anode in optoelectronic devices.

  2. Effect of Joint Scale and Processing on the Fracture of Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu Solder Joints: Application to Micro-bumps in 3D Packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebanpour, B.; Huang, Z.; Chen, Z.; Dutta, I.

    2016-01-01

    In 3-dimensional (3D) packages, a stack of dies is vertically connected to each other using through-silicon vias and very thin solder micro-bumps. The thinness of the micro-bumps results in joints with a very high volumetric proportion of intermetallic compounds (IMCs), rendering them much more brittle compared to conventional joints. Because of this, the reliability of micro-bumps, and the dependence thereof on the proportion of IMC in the joint, is of substantial concern. In this paper, the growth kinetics of IMCs in thin Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu joints attached to Cu substrates were analyzed, and empirical kinetic laws for the growth of Cu6Sn5 and Cu3Sn in thin joints were obtained. Modified compact mixed mode fracture mechanics samples, with adhesive solder joints between massive Cu substrates, having similar thickness and IMC content as actual micro-bumps, were produced. The effects of IMC proportion and strain rate on fracture toughness and mechanisms were investigated. It was found that the fracture toughness G C decreased with decreasing joint thickness ( h Joint). In addition, the fracture toughness decreased with increasing strain rate. Aging also promoted alternation of the crack path between the two joint-substrate interfaces, possibly proffering a mechanism to enhance fracture toughness.

  3. Omnidirectional and broadband optical absorption enhancement in small molecule organic solar cells by a patterned MoO3/Ag/MoO3 transparent anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ximin; Hao, Yuying; Zhang, Ye; Cui, Yanxia; Ji, Ting; Wang, Hua; Wei, Bin; Huang, Wei

    2015-03-01

    We designed and calculated a novel organic solar cell (OSC) with MoO3/Ag/MoO3 (MAM) grating as transparent anode and the patterned copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/fullerence (C60) as active layer. The numerical results indicate that a broadband, omnidirectional light absorption enhancement is realized by utilizing such a one-dimensional (1D) grating with core-shell structure. The total absorption efficiency of the active layer over the wavelength range from 400 to 900 nm is enhanced by 178.88%, 19.44% and 99.16% relative to the equivalent planar cell considering the weight of air-mass 1.5 global (AM 1.5G) solar spectrum at normally incident transverse magnetic (TM), transverse electric (TE) and TM/TE hybrid polarized light, respectively. The improved light trapping is attributed to the multiple modes hybridization of propagating surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), localized surface plasmons (LSPs) and the strong coupling of SPP waves at TM polarization along with the Floquet modes at TE polarization. Furthermore, the proposed optimized architecture also exhibits an expected short-circuit current density (Jsc) with the value of 11.11 mA/cm2 in theory, which is increased by 116.6% compared with that of the planar control device.

  4. Semitransparent inverted organic solar cell with improved absorption and reasonable transparency perception based on the nanopatterned MoO3/Ag/MoO3 anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ximin; Zhang, Ye; Hao, Yuying; Cui, Yanxia; Wang, Wenyan; Shi, Fang; Wang, Hua; Wei, Bin; Huang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate an inverted low bandgap semitransparent organic solar cell with improved absorption as well as reasonable transparency perception based on a nanopatterned MoO3/Ag/MoO3 (MAM) multilayer film as the transparent anode under illumination from the MAM side. The integrated absorption efficiency of the active layer at normal hybrid-polarized incidence considering an AM 1.5G solar spectrum is up to 51.69%, increased by 18.53% as compared to that of the equivalent planar device (43.61%) and reaching 77.3% of that of the corresponding opaque nanopatterned device (66.90%). Detailed investigations reveal that the excitation of plasmonic waveguide modes (at transverse magnetic polarization) and photonic modes (at transverse electric polarization) are responsible for the observed enhancement in absorption. Importantly, the proposed device exhibits an average transmittance of up to 28.4% and an average transparency perception of 26.3% for the human eyes under hybrid-polarized light illumination along with a good color rendering property. Additionally, our proposal works very well over a fairly wide angular range.

  5. Corky root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corky root rot (corchosis) was first reported in Argentina in 1985, but the disease was presumably present long before that. The disease occurs in most alfalfa-growing areas of Argentina but is more common in older stands. In space-planted alfalfa trials scored for root problems, corky root rot was ...

  6. WHY ROOTING FAILS.

    SciTech Connect

    CREUTZ,M.

    2007-07-30

    I explore the origins of the unphysical predictions from rooted staggered fermion algorithms. Before rooting, the exact chiral symmetry of staggered fermions is a flavored symmetry among the four 'tastes.' The rooting procedure averages over tastes of different chiralities. This averaging forbids the appearance of the correct 't Hooft vertex for the target theory.

  7. Armillaria root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    First described on grapevines in California in the 1880s, Armillaria root rot occurs in all major grape-growing regions of the state. The causal fungus, Armillaria mellea, infects woody grapevine roots and the base of the trunk (the root collar), resulting in a slow decline and eventual death of the...

  8. BLACK ROOT ROT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Black Root Rot Prepared by G. S. Abawi, Revised by L.E. Hanson Black root rot is caused by Thielaviopsis basicola (syn. Chalara elegans). The pathogen is widely distributed, can infect more than 130 plant species in 15 families, and causes severe black root rot diseases in ornamentals and crops suc...

  9. Investigation of VEGGIE Root Mat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbiah, Arun M.

    2013-01-01

    VEGGIE is a plant growth facility that utilizes the phenomenon of capillary action as its primary watering system. A cloth made of Meta Aramid fiber, known as Nomex is used to wick water up from a reservoir to the bottom of the plants roots. This root mat system is intended to be low maintenance with no moving parts and requires minimal crew interface time. Unfortunately, the water wicking rates are inconsistent throughout the plant life cycle, thus causing plants to die. Over-wicking of water occurs toward the beginning of the cycle, while under-wicking occurs toward the middle. This inconsistency of wicking has become a major issue, drastically inhibiting plant growth. The primary objective is to determine the root cause of the inconsistent wicking through experimental testing. Suspect causes for the capillary water column to break include: a vacuum effect due to a negative pressure gradient in the water reservoir, contamination of material due to minerals in water and back wash from plant fertilizer, induced air bubbles while using syringe refill method, and material limitations of Nomex's ability to absorb and retain water. Experimental testing will be conducted to systematically determine the cause of under and over-wicking. Pressure gages will be used to determine pressure drop during the course of the plant life cycle and during the water refill process. A debubbler device will be connected to a root mat in order to equalize pressure inside the reservoir. Moisture and evaporation tests will simultaneously be implemented to observe moisture content and wicking rates over the course of a plant cycle. Water retention tests will be performed using strips of Nomex to determine materials wicking rates, porosity, and absorptivity. Through these experimental tests, we will have a better understanding of material properties of Nomex, as well as determine the root cause of water column breakage. With consistent test results, a forward plan can be achieved to resolve

  10. Why fine tree roots are stronger than thicker roots: The role of cellulose and lignin in relation to slope stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao-Bo; Chen, Li-Hua; Jiang, Jing

    2014-02-01

    Plant roots help to reinforce the soil, increase slope stability and decrease water erosion. Root tensile strength plays an important role in soil reinforcement and slope stabilization. The relationship between tensile strength and internal chemical composition of roots is unknown due to limited studies. Thus, it is difficult to determine why root tensile strength tends to decrease with increasing root diameter. In this study, biomechanical and biochemical tests were performed on the roots of Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis) to determine the relationships among tensile strength and the contents of the main chemical composition: cellulose, alpha-cellulose and lignin in the roots with different diameters. Our results confirmed that the tensile strength of Chinese pine roots decreased with increasing root diameter, and this relationship might be a power function. The chemical contents of the roots and root diameter were also related to each other with significant power regression. With increasing root diameter, the cellulose content and alpha-cellulose content increased, but the lignin content decreased. In addition, the lignin content exhibited a significantly positive relationship with tensile strength. Furthermore, the ratios of lignin/cellulose and lignin/alpha-cellulose decreased with increasing root diameter following significant power regressions, and they also demonstrated a positive relationship with tensile strength. Taken together, these results may be useful for studies on root tensile strength, soil reinforcement and slope stability.

  11. Pressure induced silver ion displacement in La{sub 3}Ag{sub 0.82}SnS{sub 7}

    SciTech Connect

    Daszkiewicz, Marek; Gulay, Lubomir D.

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The silver ion shifts with increasing pressure in the direction of the central-point of sulphur trigonal antiprism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coordination number changes from CN = 3 to CN = 6 at {approx}3 GPa. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zero-pressure bulk modulus is B{sub 0} = 61.74 GPa and the pressure derivative is B{sup Prime }{sub 0}=4.02. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No phase transition up to 4.5 GPa was detected. -- Abstract: The compounds with the general formula Ln{sub 3}MTX{sub 7} (space group P6{sub 3}) (Ln - rare-earth element, M - monovalent element (Cu, Ag), T - Si, Ge, Sn and X - S, Se) are interesting owing to the possible application in the field of ionic conductivity. In the crystal structure the face-sharing [Ag(S){sub 6}] triangular antiprisms form the channels where the Ag{sup +} ion can migrate along the crystallographic c axis. High-pressure X-ray diffraction shows that Ag{sup +} ion moves towards the central-point of [Ag(S){sub 6}] when pressure is risen. As a consequence, the coordination number of Ag{sup +} changes from CN = 3 to CN = 6 at {approx}3 GPa. The La{sub 3}Ag{sub 0.82}SnS{sub 7} has stiff structure; zero-pressure bulk modulus is B{sub 0} = 61.74 GPa and the pressure derivative is B{sup Prime }{sub 0}=4.02.

  12. Malformations of the tooth root in humans.

    PubMed

    Luder, Hans U

    2015-01-01

    The most common root malformations in humans arise from either developmental disorders of the root alone or disorders of radicular development as part of a general tooth dysplasia. The aim of this review is to relate the characteristics of these root malformations to potentially disrupted processes involved in radicular morphogenesis. Radicular morphogenesis proceeds under the control of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) which determines the number, length, and shape of the root, induces the formation of radicular dentin, and participates in the development of root cementum. Formation of HERS at the transition from crown to root development appears to be very insensitive to adverse effects, with the result that rootless teeth are extremely rare. In contrast, shortened roots as a consequence of impaired or prematurely halted apical growth of HERS constitute the most prevalent radicular dysplasia which occurs due to trauma and unknown reasons as well as in association with dentin disorders. While odontoblast differentiation inevitably stops when growth of HERS is arrested, it seems to be unaffected even in cases of severe dentin dysplasias such as regional odontodysplasia and dentin dysplasia type I. As a result radicular dentin formation is at least initiated and progresses for a limited time. The only condition affecting cementogenesis is hypophosphatasia which disrupts the formation of acellular cementum through an inhibition of mineralization. A process particularly susceptible to adverse effects appears to be the formation of the furcation in multirooted teeth. Impairment or disruption of this process entails taurodontism, single-rooted posterior teeth, and misshapen furcations. Thus, even though many characteristics of human root malformations can be related to disorders of specific processes involved in radicular morphogenesis, precise inferences as to the pathogenesis of these dysplasias are hampered by the still limited knowledge on root formation

  13. Malformations of the tooth root in humans

    PubMed Central

    Luder, Hans U.

    2015-01-01

    The most common root malformations in humans arise from either developmental disorders of the root alone or disorders of radicular development as part of a general tooth dysplasia. The aim of this review is to relate the characteristics of these root malformations to potentially disrupted processes involved in radicular morphogenesis. Radicular morphogenesis proceeds under the control of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) which determines the number, length, and shape of the root, induces the formation of radicular dentin, and participates in the development of root cementum. Formation of HERS at the transition from crown to root development appears to be very insensitive to adverse effects, with the result that rootless teeth are extremely rare. In contrast, shortened roots as a consequence of impaired or prematurely halted apical growth of HERS constitute the most prevalent radicular dysplasia which occurs due to trauma and unknown reasons as well as in association with dentin disorders. While odontoblast differentiation inevitably stops when growth of HERS is arrested, it seems to be unaffected even in cases of severe dentin dysplasias such as regional odontodysplasia and dentin dysplasia type I. As a result radicular dentin formation is at least initiated and progresses for a limited time. The only condition affecting cementogenesis is hypophosphatasia which disrupts the formation of acellular cementum through an inhibition of mineralization. A process particularly susceptible to adverse effects appears to be the formation of the furcation in multirooted teeth. Impairment or disruption of this process entails taurodontism, single-rooted posterior teeth, and misshapen furcations. Thus, even though many characteristics of human root malformations can be related to disorders of specific processes involved in radicular morphogenesis, precise inferences as to the pathogenesis of these dysplasias are hampered by the still limited knowledge on root formation

  14. High resolution modeling of water and nutrient uptake by plant roots: at a scale from single root to root system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abesha, Betiglu; Vanderborght, Jan; Javaux, Mathieu; Schnepf, Andrea; Vereecken, Harry

    2014-05-01

    The uptake of nutrients by plant roots is a multiscale problem. At the small scale, nutrient fluxes towards single roots lead to strong gradients in nutrient concentrations around single roots. At the scale of the root system and soil profile, nutrient fluxes are generated by water fluxes and variations in nutrient uptake due to spatially varying root density, nutrient concentrations and water contents. In this contribution, we present a numerical simulation model that describes the processes at the scale of a single root and the scale of the entire root system simultaneously. Water flow and nutrient transport in the soil are described by the 3-D Richards and advection-dispersion equations, respectively. Water uptake by a root segment is simulated based on the difference between the soil water potential at the soil root interface and in the xylem tissue. The xylem water potential is derived from solving a set of flow equations that describe flow in the root network (Javaux et al., 2008). Nutrient uptake by a segment is simulated as a function of the nutrient concentration at the soil-root interface using a nonlinear Michaelis-Menten equation. An accurate description of the nutrient concentrations gradients around single roots requires a spatial resolution in the sub mm scale and is therefore not feasible for simulations of the entire root system or soil profile. In order to address this problem, a 1-D axisymmetric model (Barber and Cushman, 1981) was used to describe nutrient transport towards a single root segment. The network of connected cylindrical models was coupled to a 3-D regular grid that was used to solve the flow and transport equations at the root system scale. The coupling was done by matching the fluxes across the interfaces of the voxels of the 3-D grid that contain root segments with the fluxes at the outer boundaries of the cylindrical domains and by matching the sink terms in these voxels with uptake by the root segments. To demonstrate the

  15. Root canal irrigants

    PubMed Central

    Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu

    2010-01-01

    Successful root canal therapy relies on the combination of proper instrumentation, irrigation, and obturation of the root canal. Of these three essential steps of root canal therapy, irrigation of the root canal is the most important determinant in the healing of the periapical tissues. The primary endodontic treatment goal must thus be to optimize root canal disinfection and to prevent reinfection. In this review of the literature, various irrigants and the interactions between irrigants are discussed. We performed a Medline search for English-language papers published untill July 2010. The keywords used were ‘root canal irrigants’ and ‘endodontic irrigants.’ The reference lists of each article were manually checked for additional articles of relevance. PMID:21217955

  16. Presence and absence of electronic mixing in shorter-chain and longer-chain carotenoids: Assignment of the symmetries of 1Bu- and 3Ag- states located just below the 1Bu+ state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutresno, Adita; Kakitani, Yoshinori; Zuo, Ping; Li, Chunyong; Koyama, Yasushi; Nagae, Hiroyoshi

    2007-10-01

    In spheroidene (having the number of conjugated double bonds n = 10), stimulated emission was observed from the mixed vibronic levels of 1Bu+(0)+1Bu-(2) and 1Bu+(1)+1Bu-(3), whereas in lycopene, anhydrorhodovibrin and spirilloxanthin ( n = 11-13), stimulated emission, from the pure vibronic levels of 1Bu+(0) and 1Bu+(1). Thus, the 1Bu+ state can mix with the 1Bu- state but not with the 3Ag- state, both being located just below the 1Bu+ state. The presence and absence of the mixing of the neighboring diabatic states support the symmetries of the next low-lying 1Bu- and 3Ag- states.

  17. Fabrication of a Homogeneous, Integrated, and Compact Film of Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Ni(en)3Ag2I4 with Near-Infrared Absorbance and Semiconducting Features.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tian-Yu; Shi, Lei; Yang, Hao; Ren, Xiao-Ming; Xiao, Chen; Jin, Wanqin

    2016-02-01

    The organic-inorganic hybrid crystal Ni(en)3Ag2I4 (where en represents 1,2-ethylenediamine) crystallizes in hexagonal space group P63, in which the AgI4(3-) tetrahedra connect into a diamondlike inorganic framework via sharing of the vertex and the Ni(en)3(2+) octahedra fill in the pores of the framework. UV-vis-near-IR (NIR) spectroscopy disclosed that this hybrid shows intense NIR absorbance centered at ca. 870 nm, and the variable-temperature conductivity measurement revealed that the hybrid is a semiconductor with Ea = 0.46 eV. The electronic band structure of Ni(en)3Ag2I4 was calculated using the density functional theory method, indicating that the NIR absorbance arises from d-d transition within the Ni(2+) cation of Ni(en)3(2+). The homogeneous, compact, and transparent crystalline film of Ni(en)3Ag2I4 was fabricated via a secondary seed growth strategy, which has promising application in NIR devices. PMID:26771538

  18. Root conditioning in periodontology — Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Tarun; Jain, Sanjeev; Kaur, Harjit; Kapoor, Daljit; Nanda, Sonia; Jain, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Root surfaces of periodontitis-affected teeth are hypermineralized and contaminated with cytotoxic and other biologically active substances. To achieve complete decontamination of the tooth surfaces, various methods including root conditioning following scaling and root planning are present. The main objective of this article is to throw light on the different root conditioning agents used and the goals accomplished by root conditioning in the field of periodontology. Materials and Methods: 20 human maxillary anterior teeth indicated for extraction due to chronic periodontitis were collected and root planned. The teeth were sectioned and specimens were divided into two groups — Group I and II. Group I dentin specimens were treated with EDTA and group II specimens were treated with tetracycline HCl solution at concentration of 10% by active burnishing technique for 3 minutes. The root surface samples were then examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results: The results of the study showed that EDTA and tetracycline HCl were equally effective in removing the smear layer. It was observed that the total and patent dentinal tubules were more in number in teeth treated with tetracycline as compared to EDTA group. However, EDTA was found to be much more effective as root conditioning agent because it enlarged the diameter of dentinal tubules more than that of tetracycline HCl. Conclusion: Results of in-vitro study showed that both the agents are good root conditioning agents if applied in addition to periodontal therapy. However, further studies are required to establish the in-vivo importance of EDTA and tetracycline HCL as root conditioners. PMID:25097414

  19. Comparative behavior of root pathogens in stems and roots of southeastern Pinus species.

    PubMed

    Matusick, George; Nadel, Ryan L; Walker, David M; Hossain, Mohammad J; Eckhardt, Lori G

    2016-04-01

    Root diseases are expected to become a greater threat to trees in the future due to accidental pathogen introductions and predicted climate changes, thus there is a need for accurate and efficient pathogenicity tests. For many root pathogens, these tests have been conducted in stems instead of roots. It, however, remains unclear whether stem and root inoculations are comparable for most fungal species. In this study we compared the growth and damage caused by five root pathogens (Grosmannia huntii, Grosmannia alacris, Leptographium procerum, Leptographium terebrantis, and Heterobasidion irregulare) in root and stem tissue of two Pinus species by inoculating mature trees and tissue amended agar in the laboratory. Most fungal species tested caused greater damage in roots of both pine hosts following inoculation. The relationship between root and stem damage was, however, similar when most combinations of pathogens were compared. These results suggest that although stem inoculations are not suitable for determining the actual damage potential of a given species, they may be viewed as a useful surrogate for root inoculations when comparing the relative pathogenicity of multiple species. When grown on amended agar, fungal species generally had greater growth in stem tissue, contrasting with the findings from tree inoculations. PMID:27020149

  20. The Roots of Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Yetta M.

    This review of research with children aged two to six on their reading, writing, and oral language development speaks of five roots of a tree of literate life that require nourishment in the soil of a written language environment. The roots discussed are the development of print awareness in situational contexts, the development of print awareness…

  1. Cylindrocarpon root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cylindrocarpon root rot of alfalfa has been found sporadically in Canada and the northern United States. The etiology of this disease is not fully understood, but the priority for research has not been high because of its infrequent occurrence. The infected area of the root initially has a water-soa...

  2. Irrational Square Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misiurewicz, Michal

    2013-01-01

    If students are presented the standard proof of irrationality of [square root]2, can they generalize it to a proof of the irrationality of "[square root]p", "p" a prime if, instead of considering divisibility by "p", they cling to the notions of even and odd used in the standard proof?

  3. Pythium Root Rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pythium root rot is a disease that is found in agricultural and nursery soils throughout the United States and Canada. It is caused by several Pythium species, and the symptoms are typified by leaf or needle chlorosis, stunting, root rot, and plant death. The disease is favored by wet soils, overc...

  4. Root-knot nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne species) can reduce crop yields worldwide, methods for their identification are often difficult to implement. This review summarizes the diagnostic morphological and molecular features for distinguishing the ten major previously described root-knot nematode ...

  5. Trees and Roots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lethonee A.

    Constructing a family history can be significant in helping persons understand and appreciate the root system that supports and sustains them. Oral history can be a valuable resource in family research as Alex Haley demonstrated in writing "Roots." The major difficulty of using oral tradition in tracing a family history is that family members with…

  6. Sugarbeet root aphid on postharvest root storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sugarbeet root aphid (SBRA), Pemphigus betae Doane, is a serious insect pest of sugarbeet in several North American sugarbeet production areas; however, it is rarely an economic pest in the Red River Valley (RRV). In 2012 and 2013, all RRV factory districts were impacted by SBRA outbreaks, and ...

  7. Root Nutrient Foraging1

    PubMed Central

    Giehl, Ricardo F.H.; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2014-01-01

    During a plant's lifecycle, the availability of nutrients in the soil is mostly heterogeneous in space and time. Plants are able to adapt to nutrient shortage or localized nutrient availability by altering their root system architecture to efficiently explore soil zones containing the limited nutrient. It has been shown that the deficiency of different nutrients induces root architectural and morphological changes that are, at least to some extent, nutrient specific. Here, we highlight what is known about the importance of individual root system components for nutrient acquisition and how developmental and physiological responses can be coupled to increase nutrient foraging by roots. In addition, we review prominent molecular mechanisms involved in altering the root system in response to local nutrient availability or to the plant's nutritional status. PMID:25082891

  8. How to bond to root canal dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nica, Luminita; Todea, Carmen; Furtos, Gabriel; Baldea, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Bonding to root canal dentin may be difficult due to various factors: the structural characteristic of the root canal dentin, which is different from that of the coronal dentin; the presence of the organic tissue of the dental pulp inside the root canal, which has to be removed during the cleaning-shaping of the root canal system; the smear-layer resulted after mechanical instrumentation, which may interfere with the adhesion of the filling materials; the type of the irrigants used in the cleaning protocol; the type of the sealer and core material used in the obturation of the endodontic space; the type of the materials used for the restoration of the endodontically treated teeth. The influence of the cleaning protocol, of the root canal filling material, of the type of the adhesive system used in the restoration of the treated teeth and of the region of the root canal, on the adhesion of several filling and restorative materials to root canal dentin was evaluated in the push-out bond strength test on 1-mm thick slices of endodontically treated human teeth. The results showed that all these factors have a statistically significant influence on the push-out bond strength. Formation of resin tags between radicular dentin and the investigated materials was observed in some of the samples at SEM analysis.

  9. Root cap-dependent gravitropic U-turn of maize root requires light-induced auxin biosynthesis via the YUC pathway in the root apex.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiromi; Yokawa, Ken; Nakano, Sayuri; Yoshida, Yuriko; Fabrissin, Isabelle; Okamoto, Takashi; Baluška, František; Koshiba, Tomokazu

    2016-08-01

    Gravitropism refers to the growth or movement of plants that is influenced by gravity. Roots exhibit positive gravitropism, and the root cap is thought to be the gravity-sensing site. In some plants, the root cap requires light irradiation for positive gravitropic responses. However, the mechanisms regulating this phenomenon are unknown. We herein report that maize roots exposed to white light continuously for ≥1-2h show increased indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels in the root tips, especially in the transition zone (1-3mm from the tip). Treatment with IAA biosynthesis inhibitors yucasin and l-kynurenine prevented any increases in IAA content and root curvature under light conditions. Analyses of the incorporation of a stable isotope label from tryptophan into IAA revealed that some of the IAA in roots was synthesized in the root apex. Furthermore, Zmvt2 and Zmyuc gene transcripts were detected in the root apex. One of the Zmyuc genes (ZM2G141383) was up-regulated by light irradiation in the 0-1mm tip region. Our findings suggest that IAA accumulation in the transition zone is due to light-induced activation of Zmyuc gene expression in the 0-1mm root apex region. Light-induced changes in IAA levels and distributions mediate the maize root gravitropic U-turn. PMID:27307546

  10. Root cap-dependent gravitropic U-turn of maize root requires light-induced auxin biosynthesis via the YUC pathway in the root apex

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hiromi; Yokawa, Ken; Nakano, Sayuri; Yoshida, Yuriko; Fabrissin, Isabelle; Okamoto, Takashi; Baluška, František; Koshiba, Tomokazu

    2016-01-01

    Gravitropism refers to the growth or movement of plants that is influenced by gravity. Roots exhibit positive gravitropism, and the root cap is thought to be the gravity-sensing site. In some plants, the root cap requires light irradiation for positive gravitropic responses. However, the mechanisms regulating this phenomenon are unknown. We herein report that maize roots exposed to white light continuously for ≥1–2h show increased indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels in the root tips, especially in the transition zone (1–3mm from the tip). Treatment with IAA biosynthesis inhibitors yucasin and l-kynurenine prevented any increases in IAA content and root curvature under light conditions. Analyses of the incorporation of a stable isotope label from tryptophan into IAA revealed that some of the IAA in roots was synthesized in the root apex. Furthermore, Zmvt2 and Zmyuc gene transcripts were detected in the root apex. One of the Zmyuc genes (ZM2G141383) was up-regulated by light irradiation in the 0–1mm tip region. Our findings suggest that IAA accumulation in the transition zone is due to light-induced activation of Zmyuc gene expression in the 0–1mm root apex region. Light-induced changes in IAA levels and distributions mediate the maize root gravitropic U-turn. PMID:27307546

  11. DMA thermal analysis of yacon tuberous roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blahovec, J.; Lahodová, M.; Kindl, M.; Fernández, E. C.

    2013-12-01

    Specimens prepared from yacon roots in first two weeks after harvest were tested by dynamic mechanical analysis thermal analysis at temperatures between 30 and 90°C. No differences between different parts of roots were proved. There were indicated some differences in the test parameters that were caused by short time storage of the roots. One source of the differences was loss of water during the roots storage. The measured modulus increased during short time storage. Detailed study of changes of the modulus during the specimen dynamic mechanical analysis test provided information about different development of the storage and loss moduli during the specimen heating. The observed results can be caused by changes in cellular membranes observed earlier during vegetable heating, and by composition changes due to less stable components of yacon like inulin.

  12. Developmental anatomy and branching of roots of four Zeylanidium species (podostemaceae), with implications for evolution of foliose roots.

    PubMed

    Hiyama, Y; Tsukamoto, I; Imaichi, R; Kato, M

    2002-12-01

    Podostemaceae have markedly specialized and diverse roots that are adapted to extreme habitats, such as seasonally submerged or exposed rocks in waterfalls and rapids. This paper describes the developmental anatomy of roots of four species of Zeylanidium, with emphasis on the unusual association between root branching and root-borne adventitious shoots. In Z. subulatum and Z. lichenoides with subcylindrical or ribbon-like roots, the apical meristem distal (exterior) to a shoot that is initiated within the meristem area reduces and loses meristematic activity. This results in a splitting into two meristems that separate the parental root and lateral root (anisotomous dichotomy). In Z. olivaceum with lobed foliose roots, shoots are initiated in the innermost zone of the marginal meristem, and similar, but delayed, meristem reduction usually occurs, producing a parenchyma exterior to shoots located between root lobes. In some extreme cases, due to meristem recovery, root lobing does not occur, so the margin is entire. In Z. maheshwarii with foliose roots, shoots are initiated proximal to the marginal meristem and there is no shoot-root lobe association. Results suggest that during evolution from subcylindrical or ribbon-like roots to foliose roots, reduction of meristem exterior to a shoot was delayed and then arrested as a result of inward shifting of the sites of shoot initiation. The evolutionary reappearance of a protective tissue or root cap in Z. olivaceum and Z. maheshwarii in the Zeylanidium clade is implied, taking into account the reported molecular phylogeny and root-cap development in Hydrobryum. PMID:12451029

  13. Economic strategies of plant absorptive roots vary with root diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, D. L.; Wang, J. J.; Kardol, P.; Wu, H. F.; Zeng, H.; Deng, X. B.; Deng, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Plant roots typically vary along a dominant ecological axis, the root economics spectrum, depicting a tradeoff between resource acquisition and conservation. For absorptive roots, which are mainly responsible for resource acquisition, we hypothesized that root economic strategies differ with increasing root diameter. To test this hypothesis, we used seven plant species (a fern, a conifer, and five angiosperms from south China) for which we separated absorptive roots into two categories: thin roots (thickness of root cortex plus epidermis < 247 µm) and thick roots. For each category, we analyzed a range of root traits related to resource acquisition and conservation, including root tissue density, different carbon (C), and nitrogen (N) fractions (i.e., extractive, acid-soluble, and acid-insoluble fractions) as well as root anatomical traits. The results showed significant relationships among root traits indicating an acquisition-conservation tradeoff for thin absorptive roots while no such trait relationships were found for thick absorptive roots. Similar results were found when reanalyzing data of a previous study including 96 plant species. The contrasting economic strategies between thin and thick absorptive roots, as revealed here, may provide a new perspective on our understanding of the root economics spectrum.

  14. Deep rooting conferred by DEEPER ROOTING 1 enhances rice yield in paddy fields.

    PubMed

    Arai-Sanoh, Yumiko; Takai, Toshiyuki; Yoshinaga, Satoshi; Nakano, Hiroshi; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kondo, Motohiko; Uga, Yusaku

    2014-01-01

    To clarify the effect of deep rooting on grain yield in rice (Oryza sativa L.) in an irrigated paddy field with or without fertilizer, we used the shallow-rooting IR64 and the deep-rooting Dro1-NIL (a near-isogenic line homozygous for the Kinandang Patong allele of DEEPER ROOTING 1 (DRO1) in the IR64 genetic background). Although total root length was similar in both lines, more roots were distributed within the lower soil layer of the paddy field in Dro1-NIL than in IR64, irrespective of fertilizer treatment. At maturity, Dro1-NIL showed approximately 10% higher grain yield than IR64, irrespective of fertilizer treatment. Higher grain yield of Dro1-NIL was mainly due to the increased 1000-kernel weight and increased percentage of ripened grains, which resulted in a higher harvest index. After heading, the uptake of nitrogen from soil and leaf nitrogen concentration were higher in Dro1-NIL than in IR64. At the mid-grain-filling stage, Dro1-NIL maintained higher cytokinin fluxes from roots to shoots than IR64. These results suggest that deep rooting by DRO1 enhances nitrogen uptake and cytokinin fluxes at late stages, resulting in better grain filling in Dro1-NIL in a paddy field in this study. PMID:24988911

  15. Roots in plant ecology.

    PubMed

    Cody, M L

    1986-09-01

    In 1727 the pioneer vegetation scientist Stephen Hales realized that I much that was of importance to his subject material took place below on ground. A good deal of descriptive work on plant roots and root systems was done in the subsequent two centuries; in crop plants especially, the gross morphology of root systems was well known by the early 20th century. These descriptive studies were extended to natural grasslands by Weaver and his associates and to deserts by Cannon by the second decade of this century, but since that time the study of subterranean growth form appears to have lapsed, as a recent review by Kummerow indicates. Nevertheless, growth form is an important aspect of plant ecology, and subterranean growth form is especially relevant to the study of vegetation in and areas (which is the main subject of this commentary). Moreover, there is a real need for more research to be directed towards understanding plant root systems in general. PMID:21227785

  16. Grass Rooting the System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Janice E.

    1976-01-01

    Suggests a taxonomy of the grass roots movement and gives a general descriptive over view of the 60 groups studied with respect to origin, constituency, size, funding, issues, and ideology. (Author/AM)

  17. Reading with Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Margaret I.

    1986-01-01

    Recommends a method of teaching Russian vocabulary that focuses on new words in context and on their structure: root, prefix, suffix, sound changes, and borrowings. Sources for teachers are given in the bibliography. (LMO)

  18. The phenomenology of rooting.

    PubMed

    Kerievsky, Bruce Stephen

    2010-09-01

    This paper examines the attractions of passionate involvement in wanting particular outcomes, which is popularly known as rooting. The author's lifelong personal experience is the source of his analysis, along with the insights provided by spiritual literature and especially the work of Dr. Thomas Hora, with whom the author studied for 30 years. The phrase "choiceless awareness," utilized by J. Krishnamurti, and attained via meditation, is seen as the means of transcending a rooting mode of being in the world. PMID:20165983

  19. The root cap: a short story of life and death.

    PubMed

    Kumpf, Robert P; Nowack, Moritz K

    2015-09-01

    Over 130 years ago, Charles Darwin recognized that sensory functions in the root tip influence directional root growth. Modern plant biology has unravelled that many of the functions that Darwin attributed to the root tip are actually accomplished by a particular organ-the root cap. The root cap surrounds and protects the meristematic stem cells at the growing root tip. Due to this vanguard position, the root cap is predisposed to receive and transmit environmental information to the root proper. In contrast to other plant organs, the root cap shows a rapid turnover of short-lived cells regulated by an intricate balance of cell generation, differentiation, and degeneration. Thanks to these particular features, the root cap is an excellent developmental model system, in which generation, differentiation, and degeneration of cells can be investigated in a conveniently compact spatial and temporal frame. In this review, we give an overview of the current knowledge and concepts of root cap biology, focusing on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:26068468

  20. Neighbor influences on root morphology and mycorrhizal fungus colonization in tallgrass prairie plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jastrow, J.D. Univ. of Illinois, Chicago ); Miller, R.M. )

    1993-03-01

    A field study was conducted across a chronosequence of tallgrass prairie restorations to investigate the influence a plant's neighbor may have on its gross root morphology and association with mycorrhizal fungi. The root systems of a warm-season grass, Andropogon gerardii, and two perennial forbs, Coreopsis tripteris and Solidago altissima, were sampled by excavating soil blocks representing all pairwise inter- and intra-specific combinations of these species. With forb neighbors, Andropogon had higher percentages of its firbrous roots colonized by mycorrhizal fungi than with conspecific neighbors. Andropogon root morphology (as measured by average root radius, specific root length, and root branching) did not vary with neighbor growth form; however, Andropogon roots did become finer as restoration age and root densities increased. For Coreopsis and Solidago, colonization of fibrous roots did not vary with neighbor species, but both forbs had coarser roots with interspecific neighbors than with conspecifics. With interspecific neighbors, Coreopsis almost doubled the number of branches per centimetre of root observed in conspecific pairs. Although some of the variations in colonization and root morphology may be attributable specifically to neighbor root mass, others were related to the overall root mass of the target-neighbor pair. The observed variations in mycorrhizal colonization may be related to increased opportunities for colonization by the fungus that are due not only to higher root densities but also to some sort of interaction between the root systems of Andropogon and the forbs. 44 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. The "Green" Root Beer Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2010-01-01

    No, your students will not be drinking green root beer for St. Patrick's Day--this "green" root beer laboratory promotes environmental awareness in the science classroom, and provides a venue for some very sound science content! While many science classrooms incorporate root beer-brewing activities, the root beer lab presented in this article has…

  2. Modelling increased soil cohesion by plant roots with EUROSEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Baets, S.; Poesen, J.; Torri, D.; Salvador, M. P.

    2009-04-01

    analysis performed with EUROSEM for different vegetation treatments, indicates that runoff and soil loss on root-permeated topsoils are slightly higher as compared to fully covered grass fields or harvested grass fields with some plant residue left, but much smaller as compared to bare topsoils. Moreover, when re-vegetating bare soils, roots are responsible for a large part of the reduction in soil loss and runoff by concentrated flow. Hence, this analysis shows that the contribution of roots to soil cohesion is very important for preventing soil loss and reducing runoff volume. The increase in soil shear strength due to the binding effect of roots on soil particles is two orders of magnitude lower as compared with soil reinforcement achieved when roots mobilize their tensile strength during soil shearing and root breakage.

  3. The root economics spectrum: divergence of absorptive root strategies with root diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, D.; Wang, J.; Kardol, P.; Wu, H.; Zeng, H.; Deng, X.; Deng, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Plant roots usually vary along a dominant ecological axis, the root economics spectrum (RES), depicting a tradeoff between resource acquisition and conservation. For absorptive roots, which are mainly responsible for resource acquisition, we hypothesized that root strategies as predicted from the RES shift with increasing root diameter. To test this hypothesis, we used seven contrasting plant species for which we separated absorptive roots into two categories: thin roots (< 247 μm diameter) and thick roots. For each category, we analyzed a~range of root traits closely related to resource acquisition and conservation, including root tissue density, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) fractions as well as root anatomical traits. The results showed that trait relationships for thin absorptive roots followed the expectations from the RES while no clear trait relationships were found in support of the RES for thick absorptive roots. Our results suggest divergence of absorptive root strategies in relation to root diameter, which runs against a single economics spectrum for absorptive roots.

  4. Arabidopsis alcohol dehydrogenase expression in both shoots and roots is conditioned by root growth environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, H. J.; Ferl, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the Arabidopsis Adh (alcohol dehydrogenase) gene is constitutively expressed at low levels in the roots of young plants grown on agar media, and that the expression level is greatly induced by anoxic or hypoxic stresses. We questioned whether the agar medium itself created an anaerobic environment for the roots upon their growing into the gel. beta-Glucuronidase (GUS) expression driven by the Adh promoter was examined by growing transgenic Arabidopsis plants in different growing systems. Whereas roots grown on horizontal-positioned plates showed high Adh/GUS expression levels, roots from vertical-positioned plates had no Adh/GUS expression. Additional results indicate that growth on vertical plates closely mimics the Adh/GUS expression observed for soil-grown seedlings, and that growth on horizontal plates results in induction of high Adh/GUS expression that is consistent with hypoxic or anoxic conditions within the agar of the root zone. Adh/GUS expression in the shoot apex is also highly induced by root penetration of the agar medium. This induction of Adh/GUS in shoot apex and roots is due, at least in part, to mechanisms involving Ca2+ signal transduction.

  5. Root architecture and root and tuber crop productivity.

    PubMed

    Villordon, Arthur Q; Ginzberg, Idit; Firon, Nurit

    2014-07-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that optimization of root architecture for resource capture is vital for enabling the next green revolution. Although cereals provide half of the calories consumed by humans, root and tuber crops are the second major source of carbohydrates globally. Yet, knowledge of root architecture in root and tuber species is limited. In this opinion article, we highlight what is known about the root system in root and tuber crops, and mark new research directions towards a better understanding of the relation between root architecture and yield. We believe that unraveling the role of root architecture in root and tuber crop productivity will improve global food security, especially in regions with marginal soil fertility and low-input agricultural systems. PMID:24630073

  6. Growth in Turface® clay permits root hair phenotyping along the entire crown root in cereal crops and demonstrates that root hair growth can extend well beyond the root hair zone.

    PubMed

    Goron, Travis L; Watts, Sophia; Shearer, Charles; Raizada, Manish N

    2015-01-01

    In cereal crops, root hairs are reported to function within the root hair zone to carry out important roles in nutrient and water absorption. Nevertheless, these single cells remain understudied due to the practical challenges of phenotyping these delicate structures in large cereal crops growing on soil or other growth systems. Here we present an alternative growth system for examining the root hairs of cereal crops: the use of coarse Turface® clay alongside fertigation. This system allowed for root hairs to be easily visualized along the entire lengths of crown roots in three different cereal crops (maize, wheat, and finger millet). Surprisingly, we observed that the root hairs in these crops continued to grow beyond the canonical root hair zone, with the most root hair growth occurring on older crown root segments. We suggest that the Turface® fertigation system may permit a better understanding of the changing dynamics of root hairs as they age in large plants, and may facilitate new avenues for crop improvement below ground. However, the relevance of this system to field conditions must be further evaluated in other crops. PMID:25889276

  7. Simulating root-induced rhizosphere deformation and its effect on water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravena, J. E.; Ruiz, S.; Mandava, A.; Regentova, E. E.; Ghezzehei, T.; Berli, M.; Tyler, S. W.

    2011-12-01

    Soil structure in the rhizosphere is influenced by root activities, such as mucilage production, microbial activity and root growth. Root growth alters soil structure by moving and deforming soil aggregates, affecting water and nutrient flow from the bulk soil to the root surface. In this study, we utilized synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography (XMT) and finite element analysis to quantify the effect of root-induced compaction on water flow through the rhizosphere to the root surface. In a first step, finite element meshes of structured soil around the root were created by processing rhizosphere XMT images. Then, soil deformation by root expansion was simulated using COMSOL Multiphysics° (Version 4.2) considering the soil an elasto-plastic porous material. Finally, fluid flow simulations were carried out on the deformed mesh to quantify the effect of root-induced compaction on water flow to the root surface. We found a 31% increase in water flow from the bulk soil to the root due to a 56% increase in root diameter. Simulations also show that the increase of root-soil contact area was the dominating factor with respect to the calculated increase in water flow. Increase of inter-aggregate contacts in size and number were observed within a couple of root diameters away from the root surface. But their influence on water flow was, in this case, rather limited compared to the immediate soil-root contact.

  8. Improving predictions of root biomechanical properties, is age a better determinant than diameter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loades, Kenneth; Hallett, Paul; Lynch, Jonathan; Chimungu, Joseph; Bengough, Anthony

    2014-05-01

    Roots mechanically reinforce many soils. Root tensile strength and stiffness is critical for soil stabilisation with plants potentially providing civil engineers a 'green' alternative for soil stabilisation. Relatively little is known on factors influencing root tensile strength. Through a better understanding of these factors the adoption of 'green engineering' techniques by civil engineers will improve. Existing models are limited in their accuracy due to simplistic assumptions to derive root contributions to the resistance of soil to failure. Current models typically use relationships between strength and diameter, however, there are a number of other factors potentially influencing root biomechanical properties. The effects of root age on biomechanical properties have largely been overlooked. Barley (Hordeum vulgare) was grown under differing soil conditions, waterlogged, moderate mechanical impedance and in unimpeded, control, conditions. The root system was excavated and tensile tests performed on root sections along the length of each root axis. Root tensile strength increased with increasing distance along the root axes in control soil from 0.5 MPa to 7.0 MPa at a distance of 800mm from the root tip and from 1.0 Mpa to 8.0 MPa, 500mm from the root tip when under moderate mechanical impedance. Increases in strength were also observed when plants were subjected to waterlogging with tensile strength increasing from 1.0 MPa to 3.0 MPa, 200mm from the root tip. Young's modulus increased from ~10 MPa at the root tip to ~60 MPa 400mm and 800mm from the root tip in mechanically impeded and control treatments respectively. Distance from root tip explained over 47% of the variance in root tensile strength and 34% of root stiffness. Including root diameter in the model led to further improvements in predicting root properties, explaining ~54% of root strength variance and ~49% of root stiffness. Root age has been shown to improve predictions of root tensile strength

  9. Geoperception in primary and lateral roots of Phaseolus vulgaris (Fabaceae). III. A model to explain the differential georesponsiveness of primary and lateral roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, J. S.; Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    Half-tipped primary and lateral roots of Phaseolus vulgaris bend toward the side of the root on which the intact half tip remains. Therefore, tips of lateral and primary roots produce growth effectors capable of inducing gravicurvature. The asymmetrical placement of a tip of a lateral root onto a detipped primary root results in the root bending toward the side of the root onto which the tip was placed. That is, the lesser graviresponsiveness of lateral roots as compared with primary roots is not due to the inability of their caps to produce growth inhibitors. The more pronounced graviresponsiveness of primary roots is positively correlated with the presence of columella tissues that are 3.8 times longer, 1.7 times wider, and 10.5 times more voluminous than the columellas of lateral roots. We propose that the lack of graviresponsiveness exhibited by lateral roots is due to the fact that they (i) produce smaller amounts of the inhibitor than primary (i.e., strongly graviresponsive) roots and (ii) are unable to redistribute the inhibitor so as to be able to create a concentration gradient sufficient to induce a pronounced gravitropic response.

  10. Side-Branching Statistics of Plant Root Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollen, N.; Malamud, B.

    2001-12-01

    Many studies exist that characterise plant root architecture by calculating the fractal dimension of the root network, but few studies quantify the branching characteristics of the root network. This paper examines the Tokunaga side-branching statistics for the root systems of four plants--Sugar Beet (Beta vulgaris), Lucern (Medicago sativa), Common Wheat (Triticum aestivum) and White Clover (Trifolium michelianum)--and compares the resulting statistics to those calculated by similar means (by other authors) for the Kentucky and Powder River drainage basins and several Diffusion Limited Aggregation (DLA) models. The plant root networks studied all contained similar numbers of different order roots, but the side-branching statistics differed, offering one explanation for the differing visual appearance of the branching root networks. The White Clover plant had similar Tokunaga branching statistics to the drainage networks and DLA models. This may be due to the dichotomous root structure of the White Clover plant, which produces a network that is much more similar in appearance to the two drainage networks and DLA models than the other three plants, which had herringbone root. All of the root networks, drainage basins, and DLA models had branching networks that could be quantified well to very well by Tokunaga side-branching statistics. For many years, engineers have avoided implementation of stabilisation schemes involving vegetation, due to the inherent problems involved in the quantification of their dynamic and complex root structures. The use of Tokunaga statistics as a simplifying measure of root branching characteristics, may aid in this aspect, as well as others, such as the modelling of nutrient or water uptake.

  11. Stachbotrys Root Rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stachybotrys root rot is caused by Stachybotrys chartarum, a cellulytic saprophytic hyphomycete fungus. The pathogen produces mycotoxins including a host of immunosupressant compounds for human and is one of the causes of the "sick building syndrome." Although S. chartarum is rarely known as a plan...

  12. Violet root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus causing violet root rot, Helicobasidium brebissonii (anamorph Rhizoctonia crocorum), is widely distributed in Europe and North America but is rarely of much economic importance on alfalfa. The disease has also been reported in Australia, Argentina, and Iran. The disease is characterized b...

  13. "Roots": Medium and Message.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnamon, Keneth

    A national telephone survey indicated that audiences rated the television production of "Roots" positively in terms of the following: realistic portrayal of the people and the times; relevance for contemporary race relations; perceived emotional effect; and increased understanding of the psychology of black people. However, a comparison of the…

  14. Great Plains Roots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Jennifer

    2001-01-01

    Sandy White Hawk, Sicangu Lakota, was adopted by white missionaries as an infant and suffered child abuse. After 33 years, she found her birth family and formed First Nations Orphans Association, which uses songs and ceremonies to help adoptees return to their roots. Until the 1970s, federal agencies and welfare organizations facilitated removal…

  15. The Roots of Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montoya, Colleen, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This newsletter covers educational issues affecting schools in the Western Regional Educational Laboratory's 4-state region (Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah) and nationwide. The following articles appear in the Volume 4, Number 1 issue: (1) "The Roots of Reading"; (2) "Breaking the Code: Reading Literacy in K-3"; (3) "Improving Secondary…

  16. Fine root turnover: a story of root production and root phenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormack, M. L.; Adams, T. S.; Smithwick, E. A.; Eissenstat, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    Fine root turnover in terrestrial ecosystems partially controls carbon flow from plants into soils as well the amount of roots available for nutrient and water uptake. However, we have poor understanding of basic patterns and variability in fine root turnover. We address this shortfall through the use of a heuristic model and analysis of a multi-year minirhizotron dataset exploring the impacts of fine root phenology and production on fine root turnover rates across 12 temperate tree species in a common garden experiment. The heuristic model allowed us to calculate fine root turnover given different patterns of root production and different fine root lifespans. Using the model we found that patterns of phenology characterized by a single, concentrated peak resulted in slower calculated root turnover rates while broader and bi-modal production patterns resulted in faster turnover rates. For example, for roots with median lifespans of 91 days, estimates of root turnover increased from 1.5 yr-1 to 4.0 yr-1 between the pattern of concentrated root production and the pattern with root production spread equally throughout the year. Turnover rates observed in the common garden ranged from 0.75 yr-1 to 1.33 yr-1 and 0.93 yr-1 to 2.14 yr-1 when calculated as annual production divided by maximum standing root crop or average standing root crop, respectively. Turnover varied significantly across species and interannual variability in root production and turnover was high. Patterns of root phenology observed at the common garden included concentrated root production in late spring as well as several examples of bi-modal and broader patterns of root production with roots produced across spring, summer and fall. Overall, both phenology and total root production impacted estimates of root turnover, particularly for short-lived fine roots with median lifespans of less than one year. Our results suggest that better understanding fine root phenology and production will improve our

  17. The Physiology of Adventitious Roots.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Bianka; Rasmussen, Amanda

    2016-02-01

    Adventitious roots are plant roots that form from any nonroot tissue and are produced both during normal development (crown roots on cereals and nodal roots on strawberry [Fragaria spp.]) and in response to stress conditions, such as flooding, nutrient deprivation, and wounding. They are important economically (for cuttings and food production), ecologically (environmental stress response), and for human existence (food production). To improve sustainable food production under environmentally extreme conditions, it is important to understand the adventitious root development of crops both in normal and stressed conditions. Therefore, understanding the regulation and physiology of adventitious root formation is critical for breeding programs. Recent work shows that different adventitious root types are regulated differently, and here, we propose clear definitions of these classes. We use three case studies to summarize the physiology of adventitious root development in response to flooding (case study 1), nutrient deficiency (case study 2), and wounding (case study 3). PMID:26697895

  18. Dichotomization of mycorrhizal and NPA-treated short roots in Pinus sylvestris.

    PubMed

    Raudaskoski, Marjatta; Salo, Vanamo

    2008-02-01

    Conifers like Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) have a complicated root system consisting of morphologically and anatomically different root types, of which the short roots have a very limited ability to elongate. Short roots have an important role in nature since they are able to establish ectomycorrhizal symbiosis, in which the growth of fungal mycelium between the epidermal cells and in the intercellular space between cortical cells leads to formation of dichotomous short roots, which may, through further splitting of the meristem, form coralloid root structures. Dichotomous short roots have been suggested to result from changes in either auxin or ethylene concentrations due to the fungal growth inside the root. NPA, the inhibitor of polar auxin transport, enhances the dichotomization of P. sylvestris short root tips similarly to the fungal growth in the root, thus confirming that auxin plays a role in short root morphogenesis. Ethylene is also known to have an important role in the regulation of root morphogenesis. In future the research dealing with the root system and ectomycorrhiza development in P. sylvestris must take into account that both auxin and ethylene are involved and that there is no contradiction in obtaining the same phenotype with both hormones. The expression analysis of PIN proteins, auxin efflux carriers, could give valuable information about the role of auxin transport in regulating the root growth and morphogenesis of coniferous root system and mycorrhiza. PMID:19704726

  19. Evaluating Ecohydrological Theories of Woody Root Distribution in the Kalahari

    PubMed Central

    Bhattachan, Abinash; Tatlhego, Mokganedi; Dintwe, Kebonye; O'Donnell, Frances; Caylor, Kelly K.; Okin, Gregory S.; Perrot, Danielle O.; Ringrose, Susan; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of savannas to global carbon storage is poorly understood, in part due to lack of knowledge of the amount of belowground biomass. In these ecosystems, the coexistence of woody and herbaceous life forms is often explained on the basis of belowground interactions among roots. However, the distribution of root biomass in savannas has seldom been investigated, and the dependence of root biomass on rainfall regime remains unclear, particularly for woody plants. Here we investigate patterns of belowground woody biomass along a rainfall gradient in the Kalahari of southern Africa, a region with consistent sandy soils. We test the hypotheses that (1) the root depth increases with mean annual precipitation (root optimality and plant hydrotropism hypothesis), and (2) the root-to-shoot ratio increases with decreasing mean annual rainfall (functional equilibrium hypothesis). Both hypotheses have been previously assessed for herbaceous vegetation using global root data sets. Our data do not support these hypotheses for the case of woody plants in savannas. We find that in the Kalahari, the root profiles of woody plants do not become deeper with increasing mean annual precipitation, whereas the root-to-shoot ratios decrease along a gradient of increasing aridity. PMID:22470506

  20. Accounting carbon storage in decaying root systems of harvested forests.

    PubMed

    Wang, G Geoff; Van Lear, David H; Hu, Huifeng; Kapeluck, Peter R

    2012-05-01

    Decaying root systems of harvested trees can be a significant component of belowground carbon storage, especially in intensively managed forests where harvest occurs repeatedly in relatively short rotations. Based on destructive sampling of root systems of harvested loblolly pine trees, we estimated that root systems contained about 32% (17.2 Mg ha(-1)) at the time of harvest, and about 13% (6.1 Mg ha(-1)) of the soil organic carbon 10 years later. Based on the published roundwood output data, we estimated belowground biomass at the time of harvest for loblolly-shortleaf pine forests harvested between 1995 and 2005 in South Carolina. We then calculated C that remained in the decomposing root systems in 2005 using the decay function developed for loblolly pine. Our calculations indicate that the amount of C stored in decaying roots of loblolly-shortleaf pine forests harvested between 1995 and 2005 in South Carolina was 7.1 Tg. Using a simple extrapolation method, we estimated 331.8 Tg C stored in the decomposing roots due to timber harvest from 1995 to 2005 in the conterminous USA. To fully account for the C stored in the decomposing roots of the US forests, future studies need (1) to quantify decay rates of coarse roots for major tree species in different regions, and (2) to develop a methodology that can determine C stock in decomposing roots resulting from natural mortality. PMID:22535427

  1. Intentional retention of vital submerged roots in dogs.

    PubMed

    Plata, R L; Kelln, E E; Linda, L

    1976-07-01

    In this study, intact and untreated roots of twelve teeth in three dogs were submerged 2 mm. below the alveolar bone crest. On eight regeneration of alveolar bone was seen in 3 weeks, with complete bone coverage in 5 weeks. A complete lamina dura surrounded the buried roots, the original root canal tissue remained vital, and vessels and other structures now entered (or exited) from both ends. Cementum covered the cut end, making the end similar to a normal apex. Bone failed to regenerate completely over four of the twelve roots. Two of these had dentinal spicules which impeded complete bone coverage (Fig 9). Another was a case of delayed healing due to the early loss of sutures and subsequent infection where a sinus tract developed, connecting the oral environment with the resected root. This led to bone resorption and a partial pulp necrosis. In the fourth case the decreased depth of root burial and subsequent lack of bone cover led to external resorption of the cut dentin. Histologic examination after 12 weeks revealed the regeneration of bone, a regenerated periodontal membrane, and a layer of cementoblasts over the cut and exposed root dentin in a typical manner. This study suggests that when healthy bone and roots are present, particularly in an otherwise edentulous mandible retaining only a few nonrestorable anterior teeth, the roots can be retained in a nonpathologic state by means of a simple surgical technique. PMID:1065830

  2. Hairy roots are more sensitive to auxin than normal roots

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wen Hui; Petit, Annik; Guern, Jean; Tempé, Jacques

    1988-01-01

    Responses to auxin of Lotus corniculatus root tips or protoplasts transformed by Agrobacterium rhizogenes strains 15834 and 8196 were compared to those of their normal counterparts. Three different types of experiments were performed, involving long-term, medium-term, or short-term responses to a synthetic auxin, 1-naphthaleneacetic acid. Root tip elongation, proton excretion by root tips, and transmembrane electrical potential difference of root protoplasts were measured as a function of exogenous auxin concentration. The sensitivity of hairy root tips or protoplasts to exogenous auxin was found to be 100-1000 times higher than that of untransformed material. PMID:16593928

  3. Hairy roots are more sensitive to auxin than normal roots.

    PubMed

    Shen, W H; Petit, A; Guern, J; Tempé, J

    1988-05-01

    Responses to auxin of Lotus corniculatus root tips or protoplasts transformed by Agrobacterium rhizogenes strains 15834 and 8196 were compared to those of their normal counterparts. Three different types of experiments were performed, involving long-term, medium-term, or short-term responses to a synthetic auxin, 1-naphthaleneacetic acid. Root tip elongation, proton excretion by root tips, and transmembrane electrical potential difference of root protoplasts were measured as a function of exogenous auxin concentration. The sensitivity of hairy root tips or protoplasts to exogenous auxin was found to be 100-1000 times higher than that of untransformed material. PMID:16593928

  4. Root canal retained restorations: 3. Root-face attachments.

    PubMed

    Dummer, P M; Edmunds, D H; Gidden, J R

    1990-10-01

    It has been common practice for many years to use retained roots to provide support and stability for partial or full dentures. The retention of such overdentures is greatly enhanced if the remaining roots are modified and restored with posts and root-face attachments. The final article in this series on root canal retained restorations classifies and describes some of the root-face attachments currently available, and also describes a number of prefabricated post systems with integral overdenture attachments. Guidelines for clinical and laboratory procedures are given. PMID:2097234

  5. Strigolactones Effects on Root Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltai, Hinanit

    2012-07-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) were defined as a new group of plant hormones that suppress lateral shoot branching. Our previous studies suggested SLs to be regulators of root development. SLs were shown to alter root architecture by regulating lateral root formation and to affect root hair elongation in Arabidopsis. Another important effect of SLs on root growth was shown to be associated with root directional growth. Supplementation of SLs to roots led to alterations in root directional growth, whereas associated mutants showed asymmetrical root growth, which was influenced by environmental factors. The regulation by SLs of root development was shown to be conducted via a cross talk of SLs with other plant hormones, including auxin. SLs were shown to regulate auxin transport, and to interfere with the activity of auxin-efflux carriers. Therefore, it might be that SLs are regulators of root directional growth as a result of their ability to regulated auxin transport. However, other evidences suggest a localized effect of SLs on cell division, which may not necessarily be associated with auxin efflux. These and other, recent hypothesis as to the SLs mode of action and the associated root perception and response to environmental factors will be discussed.

  6. Aquaporins and root water relations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water is one of the most critical resources limiting plant growth and crop productivity, and root water uptake is an important aspect of plant physiology governing plant water use and stress tolerance. Pathways of root water uptake are complex and are affected by root structure and physiological res...

  7. Springback in root gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leopold, A. C.; Wettlaufer, S. H.

    1989-01-01

    Conditions under which a gravistimulus of Merit corn roots (Zea mays L.) is withdrawn result in a subsequent loss of gravitropic curvature, an effect which we refer to as springback.' This loss of curvature begins within 1 to 10 minutes after removal of the gravistimulus. It occurs regardless of the presence or absence of the root cap. It is insensitive to inhibitors of auxin transport (2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid, naphthylphthalamic [correction of naphthylphthalmaic] acid) or to added auxin (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid). Springback is prevented if a clinostat treatment is interjected to neutralize gravistimulation during germination, which suggests that the change in curvature is a response to a memory' effect carried over from a prior gravistimulation.

  8. Springback in root gravitropism.

    PubMed

    Leopold, A C; Wettlaufer, S H

    1989-01-01

    Conditions under which a gravistimulus of Merit corn roots (Zea mays L.) is withdrawn result in a subsequent loss of gravitropic curvature, an effect which we refer to as springback.' This loss of curvature begins within 1 to 10 minutes after removal of the gravistimulus. It occurs regardless of the presence or absence of the root cap. It is insensitive to inhibitors of auxin transport (2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid, naphthylphthalamic [correction of naphthylphthalmaic] acid) or to added auxin (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid). Springback is prevented if a clinostat treatment is interjected to neutralize gravistimulation during germination, which suggests that the change in curvature is a response to a memory' effect carried over from a prior gravistimulation. PMID:11537456

  9. Diagravitropism in corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leopold, A. C.; Wettlaufer, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    The diagravitropic behavior of Merit corn (Zea mays L.) roots grown in darkness provides an opportunity for comparison of two qualitatively different gravitropic systems. As with positive gravitropism, diagravitropism is shown to require the presence of the root cap, have a similar time course for the onset of curvature, and a similar presentation time. In contrast with positive gravitropism, diagravitropism appears to have a more limited requirement for calcium, for it is insensitive to the elution of calcium by EGTA and insensitive to the subsequent addition of a calcium/EGTA complex. These results are interpreted as indicating that whereas the same sensing system is shared by the two types of gravitropism, separate transductive systems are involved, one for diagravitropism, which is relatively independent of calcium, and one for positive gravitropism, which is markedly dependent on calcium.

  10. Control of Arabidopsis Root Development

    PubMed Central

    Petricka, Jalean J.; Winter, Cara M.; Benfey, Philip N.

    2013-01-01

    The Arabidopsis root has been the subject of intense research over the past decades. This research has led to significantly improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying root development. Key insights into the specification of individual cell types, cell patterning, growth and differentiation, branching of the primary root, and responses of the root to the environment have been achieved. Transcription factors and plant hormones play key regulatory roles. Recently, mechanisms involving protein movement and the oscillation of gene expression have also been uncovered. Root gene regulatory networks controlling root development have been reconstructed from genome-wide profiling experiments, revealing novel molecular connections and models. Future refinement of these models will lead to a more complete description of the complex molecular interactions that give rise to a simple growing root. PMID:22404466

  11. Factors influencing the future need for treatment of root surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, R L; Hand, J S

    1994-10-01

    This paper discusses the current status of root surface caries in the elderly population and the need for treatment of this condition in the future. Although root surface exposure and root caries have been reported for adults at all ages, the people at greatest risk for these conditions are the elderly. In the United States, life expectancy and the population aged 65 years and older has increased substantially, and the proportion of the elderly population who are dentate has increased and is projected to increase further. Utilization of dental services by the elderly is similar to that of employed adults. Interpretation of studies of the prevalence and incidence of root surface caries are difficult due to differences in sampling, definition of lesions, and reporting conventions. Root surface caries prevalence is related to age and continues to be a significant problem for this population as they age. Factors that may affect the future need for treatment are explored. PMID:7986448

  12. Root growth and development in response to CO2 enrichment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Frank P., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    A non-destructive technique (minirhizotron observation tubes) was used to assess the effects of CO2 enrichment on root growth and development in experimental plots in a scrub oak-palmetto community at the Kennedy Space Center. Potential effects of CO2 enrichment on plants have a global significance in light of concerns over increasing CO2 concentrations in the Earth's atmosphere. The study at Kennedy Space Center focused on aboveground physiological responses (photosynthetic efficiency and water use efficiency), effects on process rates (litter decomposition and nutrient turnover), and belowground responses of the plants. Belowground dynamics are an exceptionally important component of total plant response but are frequently ignored due to methodological difficulties. Most methods used to examine root growth and development are destructive and, therefore, severely compromise results. Minirhizotrons allow nondestructive observation and quantification of the same soil volume and roots through time. Root length density and root phenology were evaluated for CO2 effects with this nondestructive technique.

  13. Safety of CT-Guided Lumbar Nerve Root Infiltrations

    PubMed Central

    Gossner, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Summary Selective nerve root infiltrations are frequently performed in patients with lumbar radiculopathy. Computed tomography (CT) is now commonly used for image guidance. Despite the widespread use of CT-guided lumbar nerve root infiltrations few studies have systematically examined the safety of this approach. In a two-year period, 231 lumbar nerve root infiltrations were performed on in-patients and were retrospectively reviewed. No major complications like inflammation (especially spondylodiscitis), large haematomas requiring surgery, severe allergic reactions or spinal ischaemia occurred. In accordance with other published studies, CT-guided lumbar nerve root infiltrations seem to be safe. To minimize the risk of catastrophic neurological complications due to spinal ischaemia, careful needle placement dorsal to the nerve root and the use of a non-particulate corticosteroid, like dexamethasone, are advocated. PMID:25363255

  14. Quantitative Distribution and Metabolism of Auxin Herbicides in Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Peter C.; Morris, Roy O.

    1970-01-01

    The internal concentrations of four auxin herbicides— 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, dicamba, picloram, and naphthaleneacetic acid—were measured in the roots of treated pea seedlings. Intact seedlings were immersed in solutions of labeled herbicides at concentrations sufficient to produce toxic symptoms (inhibition of elongation, radial enlargement, and lateral root proliferation). Measurements of volume and herbicide content of segments taken sequentially along the root showed that an acropetal concentration gradient of each herbicide was established within the root immediately following treatment. Although there was a net loss of herbicide in the following 24 hours, the gradient was maintained. Initially, the concentration of herbicide in the root tips exceeded that in the external medium. In support of the contention that toxic symptoms due to herbicide treatment are caused by the presence of unmetabolized chemical at the site of action, it was found that metabolism was negligible for all herbicides except naphthaleneacetic acid. PMID:16657529

  15. Can diversity in root architecture explain plant water use efficiency? A modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Tron, Stefania; Bodner, Gernot; Laio, Francesco; Ridolfi, Luca; Leitner, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Drought stress is a dominant constraint to crop production. Breeding crops with adapted root systems for effective uptake of water represents a novel strategy to increase crop drought resistance. Due to complex interaction between root traits and high diversity of hydrological conditions, modeling provides important information for trait based selection. In this work we use a root architecture model combined with a soil-hydrological model to analyze whether there is a root system ideotype of general adaptation to drought or water uptake efficiency of root systems is a function of specific hydrological conditions. This was done by modeling transpiration of 48 root architectures in 16 drought scenarios with distinct soil textures, rainfall distributions, and initial soil moisture availability. We find that the efficiency in water uptake of root architecture is strictly dependent on the hydrological scenario. Even dense and deep root systems are not superior in water uptake under all hydrological scenarios. Our results demonstrate that mere architectural description is insufficient to find root systems of optimum functionality. We find that in environments with sufficient rainfall before the growing season, root depth represents the key trait for the exploration of stored water, especially in fine soils. Root density, instead, especially near the soil surface, becomes the most relevant trait for exploiting soil moisture when plant water supply is mainly provided by rainfall events during the root system development. We therefore concluded that trait based root breeding has to consider root systems with specific adaptation to the hydrology of the target environment. PMID:26412932

  16. Redefining fine roots improves understanding of belowground contributions to terrestrial biosphere processes

    SciTech Connect

    McCormack, M. Luke; Dickie, Ian A.; Eissenstat, David M.; Fahey, Timothy J.; Fernandez, Christopher W.; Guo, Dali; Helmisaari, Helja -Sisko; Hobbie, Erik A.; Iversen, Colleen M.; Jackson, Robert B.; Leppälammi-Kujansuu, Jaana; Norby, Richard J.; Phillips, Richard P.; Pregitzer, Kurt S.; Pritchard, Seth G.; Rewald, Boris; Zadworny, Marcin

    2015-03-10

    Fine roots acquire essential soil resources and mediate biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Estimates of carbon and nutrient allocation to build and maintain these structures remain uncertain due to challenges in consistent measurement and interpretation of fine-root systems. We define fine roots as all roots less than or equal to 2 mm in diameter, yet it is now recognized that this approach fails to capture the diversity of form and function observed among fine-root orders. We demonstrate how order-based and functional classification frameworks improve our understanding of dynamic root processes in ecosystems dominated by perennial plants. In these frameworks, fine roots are separated into either individual root orders or functionally defined into a shorter-lived absorptive pool and a longer-lived transport fine root pool. Furthermore, using these frameworks, we estimate that fine-root production and turnover represent 22% of terrestrial net primary production globally a ca. 30% reduction from previous estimates assuming a single fine-root pool. In the future we hope to develop tools to rapidly differentiate functional fine-root classes, explicit incorporation of mycorrhizal fungi in fine-root studies, and wider adoption of a two-pool approach to model fine roots provide opportunities to better understand belowground processes in the terrestrial biosphere.

  17. Redefining fine roots improves understanding of belowground contributions to terrestrial biosphere processes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McCormack, M. Luke; Dickie, Ian A.; Eissenstat, David M.; Fahey, Timothy J.; Fernandez, Christopher W.; Guo, Dali; Helmisaari, Helja -Sisko; Hobbie, Erik A.; Iversen, Colleen M.; Jackson, Robert B.; et al

    2015-03-10

    Fine roots acquire essential soil resources and mediate biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Estimates of carbon and nutrient allocation to build and maintain these structures remain uncertain due to challenges in consistent measurement and interpretation of fine-root systems. We define fine roots as all roots less than or equal to 2 mm in diameter, yet it is now recognized that this approach fails to capture the diversity of form and function observed among fine-root orders. We demonstrate how order-based and functional classification frameworks improve our understanding of dynamic root processes in ecosystems dominated by perennial plants. In these frameworks, finemore » roots are separated into either individual root orders or functionally defined into a shorter-lived absorptive pool and a longer-lived transport fine root pool. Furthermore, using these frameworks, we estimate that fine-root production and turnover represent 22% of terrestrial net primary production globally a ca. 30% reduction from previous estimates assuming a single fine-root pool. In the future we hope to develop tools to rapidly differentiate functional fine-root classes, explicit incorporation of mycorrhizal fungi in fine-root studies, and wider adoption of a two-pool approach to model fine roots provide opportunities to better understand belowground processes in the terrestrial biosphere.« less

  18. Redefining fine roots improves understanding of below-ground contributions to terrestrial biosphere processes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McCormack, M. Luke; Dickie, Ian A.; Eissenstat, David M.; Fahey, Timothy J.; Fernandez, Christopher W.; Guo, Dali; Helmisaari, Heljä-Sisko; Hobbie, Erik A.; Iversen, Colleen M.; Jackson, Robert B.; et al

    2015-03-10

    Fine roots acquire essential soil resources and mediate biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Estimates of carbon and nutrient allocation to build and maintain these structures remain uncertain due to challenges in consistent measurement and interpretation of fine-root systems. Traditionally, fine roots have been defined as all roots less than or equal to 2 mm in diameter, yet it is now recognized that this approach fails to capture the diversity of form and function observed among fine-root orders. Here, we demonstrate how order-based and functional classification frameworks improve our understanding of dynamic root processes in ecosystems dominated by perennial plants. Inmore » these frameworks, fine roots are separated into either individual root orders or functionally defined into a shorter-lived absorptive pool and a longer-lived transport fine root pool. Using these frameworks, we estimate that fine-root production and turnover represent 22% of terrestrial net primary production globally a ca. 30% reduction from previous estimates assuming a single fine-root pool. Future work developing tools to rapidly differentiate functional fine-root classes, explicit incorporation of mycorrhizal fungi in fine-root studies, and wider adoption of a two-pool approach to model fine roots provide opportunities to better understand belowground processes in the terrestrial biosphere.« less

  19. Unresolving the "real age" of fine roots in forest ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solly, Emily; Brunner, Ivano; Herzog, Claude; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Schweigruber, Fritz; Trumbore, Susan; Hagedorn, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Estimating the turnover time of tree fine roots is crucial for modelling soil organic matter dynamics, but it is one of the biggest challenges in soil ecology and one of the least understood aspects of the belowground carbon cycle. The methods used - ranging from radiocarbon to ingrowth cores and root cameras (minirhizotrons) - yield very diverse pictures of fine root dynamics in forest ecosystems with turnover rates reaching from less than one year to decades. These have huge implications on estimates of carbon allocation to root growth and maintenance and on the persistence of root carbon in soils before it is decomposed or leached. We will present a new approach, involving techniques to study plant anatomy, which unravels the "real age" of fine roots. For a range of forests with diverse water and nutrient limitations located at different latitudes, we investigated the annual growth rings in the secondary xylem of thin transversal sections of fine roots belonging to tree species which form distinct growth rings. In temperate forests we find mean root "ring ages" of 1-2 years while in sub-arctic forests living fine roots can also persist for several years. The robustness of these results were tested by counting the maximum yearly growth rings in tree seedlings of known age and by counting the maximum number of growth rings of fine roots grown in ingrowth cores which were kept in temperate forest soils for one and two years. Radiocarbon estimates of mean "carbon ages", which define the time elapsed since structural carbon was fixed from the atmosphere, instead average around a decade in root systems of temperate forests (mixture of newly produced and older living roots). This dramatic difference may not be related to methodological bias, but to a time lag between C assimilation and production of a portion of fine root tissues due to the storage of older carbon components. The time lag depends very likely on tree species and environmental conditions. We further

  20. Root Mediation of Soil Organic Matter Feedbacks to Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendall, E.; Carrillo, Y.; Nie, M.; Osanai, Y.; Nelson, L. C.; Sanderman, J.; Baldock, J.; Hovenden, M.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of plant roots in carbon cycling and especially soil organic matter (SOM) formation and decomposition has been recently recognized. Up to eighty percent of net primary production may be allocated to roots in ecosystems such as grasslands, where they contribute substantially to SOM formation. On the other hand, root induced priming of SOM decomposition has been implicated in the loss of soil C stocks. Thus, the accurate prediction of climate change impacts on C sequestration in soils largely depends upon improved understanding of root-mediated SOM formation and loss in the rhizosphere. This presentation represents an initial attempt to synthesize belowground observations from free-air CO2 enrichment and warming experiments in two grassland ecosystems. We found that the chemical composition of root carbon is similar to particulate organic matter (POM), but not to mineral associated organic matter (MOM), suggesting less microbial modification during formation of POM than MOM. While root biomass and production rates increased under elevated CO2, POM and MOM fractions did not increase proportionally. We also observed increased root decomposition with elevated CO2, which was likely due to increased soil water and substrate availability, since root C quality (determined by NMR) and decomposition (in laboratory incubations) were unaltered. Further, C quality and decomposition rates of roots differed between C3 and C4 functional types. Changes in root morphology with elevated CO2 have altered root functioning. Increased root surface area and length per unit mass allow increased exploration for nutrients, and potentially enhanced root exudation, rhizodeposition, and priming of SOM decomposition. Controlled chamber experiments demonstrated that uptake of N from SOM was linearly correlated with specific root length. Taken together, these results indicate that root morphology, chemistry and function all play roles in affecting soil C storage and loss, and that

  1. Defective secretion of mucilage is the cellular basis for agravitropism in primary roots of Zea mays cv. Ageotropic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, I.; Moore, R.

    1990-01-01

    Root caps of primary, secondary, and seminal roots of Z. mays cv. Kys secrete large amounts of mucilage and are in close contact with the root all along the root apex. These roots are strongly graviresponsive. Secondary and seminal roots of Z. mays cv. Ageotropic are also strongly graviresponsive. Similarly, their caps secrete mucilage and closely appress the root all along the root apex. However, primary roots of Z. mays cv. Ageotropic are non-responsive to gravity. Their caps secrete negligible amounts of mucilage and contact the root only at the extreme apex of the root along the calyptrogen. These roots become graviresponsive when their tips are coated with mucilage or mucilage-like materials. Peripheral cells of root caps of roots of Z. mays cv. Kys contain many dictyosomes associated with vesicles that migrate to and fuse with the plasmalemma. Root-cap cells of secondary and seminal (i.e. graviresponsive) roots of Z. mays cv. Ageotropic are similar to those of primary roots of Z. mays cv. Kys. However, root-cap cells of primary (i.e. non-graviresponsive) roots of Z. mays cv. Ageotropic have distended dictyosomal cisternae filled with an electron-dense, granular material. Large vesicles full of this material populate the cells and apparently do not fuse with the plasmalemma. Taken together, these results suggest that non-graviresponsiveness of primary roots of Z. mays cv. Ageotropic results from the lack of apoplastic continuity between the root and the periphery of the root cap. This is a result of negligible secretion of mucilage by cells along the edge of the root cap which, in turn, appears to be due to the malfunctioning of dictyosomes in these cells.

  2. The Roots of Beowulf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The first Beowulf Linux commodity cluster was constructed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in 1994 and its origins are a part of the folklore of high-end computing. In fact, the conditions within Goddard that brought the idea into being were shaped by rich historical roots, strategic pressures brought on by the ramp up of the Federal High-Performance Computing and Communications Program, growth of the open software movement, microprocessor performance trends, and the vision of key technologists. This multifaceted story is told here for the first time from the point of view of NASA project management.

  3. Philosophical Roots of Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovic, M.

    2008-10-01

    We shall consider the philosophical roots of cosmology in the earlier Greek philosophy. Our goal is to answer the question: Are earlier Greek theories of pure philosophical-mythological character, as often philosophers cited it, or they have scientific character. On the bases of methodological criteria, we shall contend that the latter is the case. In order to answer the question about contemporary situation of the relation philosophy-cosmology, we shall consider the next question: Is contemporary cosmology completely independent of philosophical conjectures? The answer demands consideration of methodological character about scientific status of contemporary cosmology. We also consider some aspects of the relation contemporary philosophy-cosmology.

  4. Investigation of the structural aspects in the formation of optical properties of the GeO2-Eu2O3-Ag nanosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belushkin, A. V.; Kichanov, S. E.; Kozlenko, D. P.; Lukin, E. V.; Savenko, B. N.; Rakhmanov, S. K.; Shevchenko, G. P.; Gurin, V. S.; Malashkevich, G. E.; Haramus, V.; Pogoreliy, D. K.; Podurets, K. M.

    2010-07-01

    The structural characteristics of the 95GeO2-5Eu2O3, 94.9GeO2-5Eu2O3-0.1Ag, and 99.9GeO2-0.1Ag xerogels annealed in air at the temperature T an = 850°C have been studied using X-ray diffraction and small-angle neutron scattering. It has been established that the significant change in the relative intensity of the 7 F 0 → 5 L 6 and 7 F 0 → 5 H 6 luminescence excitation bands of Eu3+ ions upon introduction of silver correlates with the decrease in the characteristic sizes of polydisperse clusters formed during annealing. The character of the changes in chemical bonds in the system due to the clustering and their role in the formation of optical properties have been analyzed.

  5. Graviresponsiveness of surgically altered primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maimon, E.; Moore, R.

    1991-01-01

    We examined the gravitropic responses of surgically altered primary roots of Zea mays to determine the route by which gravitropic inhibitors move from the root tip to the elongating zone. Horizontally oriented roots, from which a 1-mm-wide girdle of epidermis plus 2-10 layers of cortex were removed from the apex of the elongating zone, curve downward. However, curvature occurred only apical to the girdle. Filling the girdle with mucilage-like material transmits curvature beyond the girdle. Vertically oriented roots with a half-girdle' (i.e. the epidermis and 2-10 layers of the cortex removed from half of the circumference of the apex of the elongating zone) curve away from the girdle. Inserting the half-girdle at the base of the elongating zone induces curvature towards the girdle. Filling the half-circumference girdles with mucilage-like material reduced curvature significantly. Stripping the epidermis and outer 2-5 layers of cortex from the terminal 1.5 cm of one side of a primary root induces curvature towards the cut, irrespective of the root's orientation to gravity. This effect is not due to desiccation since treated roots submerged in water also curved towards their cut surface. Coating a root's cut surface with a mucilage-like substance minimizes curvature. These results suggest that the outer cell-layers of the root, especially the epidermis, play an important role in root gravicurvature, and the gravitropic signals emanating from the root tip can move apoplastically through mucilage.

  6. Periodontal healing after bonding treatment of vertical root fracture.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, T; Kawanami, M; Noguchi, H; Kato, H; Masaka, N

    2001-08-01

    Vertical root fractures lead to advanced periodontal breakdown with deep periodontal pockets and vertical bone defects. The purpose of this study is to evaluate clinically the periodontal healing of root fracture treatment using adhesive resin cement. In 22 patients, 23 teeth with vertical root fractures were treated with 4-META/MMA-TBB resin cement. Eleven fractured roots were bonded through the root canal (group A) and 12 fractured roots were bonded extra-orally and replanted (group B). All teeth were then restored with full cast crowns (n=20) or coping (n=3). Mean probing depth was 6.6 mm at pre-treatment and 4.4 mm 6 months after the treatment in group A, and 7.4 mm and 4.6 mm, respectively, in group B. Bleeding scores were 100% at pre-treatment and 36.4% after 6 months in group A and 91.7% and 8.3%, respectively in group B. Radiographic bone level was 56.8% at pretreatment and 59.1% after 6 months in group A, and 18.8% and 29.2%, respectively, in group B. Two roots of group A and three roots of group B were extracted due to refracture, deterioration of periodontal inflammation, mobility, and luxation. The remaining roots (n=18) presented no discomfort to the patients and there was no deterioration of periodontal conditions over a mean period of 33 months (range 14-74 months) in group A and over a mean period of 22 months (range 6-48 months) in group B. There was no ankylosed teeth nor was any root resorption detected. The results suggested that the treatment of vertical root fracture using 4-META/MMA-TBB resin has good prognostic possibilities. PMID:11585144

  7. Matching roots to their environment

    PubMed Central

    White, Philip J.; George, Timothy S.; Gregory, Peter J.; Bengough, A. Glyn; Hallett, Paul D.; McKenzie, Blair M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Plants form the base of the terrestrial food chain and provide medicines, fuel, fibre and industrial materials to humans. Vascular land plants rely on their roots to acquire the water and mineral elements necessary for their survival in nature or their yield and nutritional quality in agriculture. Major biogeochemical fluxes of all elements occur through plant roots, and the roots of agricultural crops have a significant role to play in soil sustainability, carbon sequestration, reducing emissions of greenhouse gasses, and in preventing the eutrophication of water bodies associated with the application of mineral fertilizers. Scope This article provides the context for a Special Issue of Annals of Botany on ‘Matching Roots to Their Environment’. It first examines how land plants and their roots evolved, describes how the ecology of roots and their rhizospheres contributes to the acquisition of soil resources, and discusses the influence of plant roots on biogeochemical cycles. It then describes the role of roots in overcoming the constraints to crop production imposed by hostile or infertile soils, illustrates root phenotypes that improve the acquisition of mineral elements and water, and discusses high-throughput methods to screen for these traits in the laboratory, glasshouse and field. Finally, it considers whether knowledge of adaptations improving the acquisition of resources in natural environments can be used to develop root systems for sustainable agriculture in the future. PMID:23821619

  8. Arabidopsis thaliana root growth kinetics and lunisolar tidal acceleration.

    PubMed

    Fisahn, Joachim; Yazdanbakhsh, Nima; Klingele, Emile; Barlow, Peter

    2012-07-01

    • All living organisms on Earth are continually exposed to diurnal variations in the gravitational tidal force due to the Sun and Moon. • Elongation of primary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings maintained at a constant temperature was monitored for periods of up to 14 d using high temporal- and spatial-resolution video imaging. The time-course of the half-hourly elongation rates exhibited an oscillation which was maintained when the roots were placed in the free-running condition of continuous illumination. • Correlation between the root growth kinetics collected from seedlings initially raised under several light protocols but whose roots were subsequently in the free-running condition and the lunisolar tidal profiles enabled us to identify that the latter is the probable exogenous determinant of the rhythmic variation in root elongation rate. Similar observations and correlations using roots of Arabidopsis starch mutants suggest a central function of starch metabolism in the response to the lunisolar tide. The periodicity of the lunisolar tidal signal and the concomitant adjustments in root growth rate indicate that an exogenous timer exists for the modulation of root growth and development. • We propose that, in addition to the sensitivity to Earthly 1G gravity, which is inherent to all animals and plants, there is another type of responsiveness which is attuned to the natural diurnal variations of the lunisolar tidal force. PMID:22583121

  9. Drought alters interactions between root and foliar herbivores.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Muhammad; Rossiter, John T; Wright, Denis J; Staley, Joanna T

    2013-08-01

    Drought can alter plant quality and the strength of trophic interactions between herbivore groups, and is likely to increase in occurrence and severity under climate change. We hypothesized that changes in plant chemistry due to root herbivory and drought stress would affect the performance of a generalist and a specialist aphid species feeding on a Brassica plant. High drought stress increased the negative effect of root herbivory on the performance of both aphid species (30% decrease in fecundity and 15% reduction in intrinsic rate of increase). Aphid performance was greatest at moderate drought stress, though the two species differed in which treatment combination maximized performance. Nitrogen concentration was greatest in high and moderately drought-stressed plants without root herbivores and moderately drought-stressed plants under low root herbivore density, and correlated positively with aphid fecundity for both species. Glucosinolate concentrations increased 62% under combined drought stress and root herbivory, and were positively correlated with extended aphid development time. Root herbivory did not influence relative water content and foliar biomass under normal water regimes but they decreased 24 and 63%, respectively, under high drought stress. This study shows that drought can alter the strength of interactions between foliar and root herbivores, and that plant chemistry is key in mediating such interactions. The two aphid species responded in a broadly similar way to root herbivore and drought-stress treatments, which suggests that generalized predictions of the effects of abiotic factors on interactions between above- and below-ground species may be possible. PMID:23292454

  10. Perennial roots to immortality.

    PubMed

    Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2014-10-01

    Maximum lifespan greatly varies among species, and it is not strictly determined; it can change with species evolution. Clonal growth is a major factor governing maximum lifespan. In the plant kingdom, the maximum lifespans described for clonal and nonclonal plants vary by an order of magnitude, with 43,600 and 5,062 years for Lomatia tasmanica and Pinus longaeva, respectively. Nonclonal perennial plants (those plants exclusively using sexual reproduction) also present a huge diversity in maximum lifespans (from a few to thousands of years) and even more interestingly, contrasting differences in aging patterns. Some plants show a clear physiological deterioration with aging, whereas others do not. Indeed, some plants can even improve their physiological performance as they age (a phenomenon called negative senescence). This diversity in aging patterns responds to species-specific life history traits and mechanisms evolved by each species to adapt to its habitat. Particularities of roots in perennial plants, such as meristem indeterminacy, modular growth, stress resistance, and patterns of senescence, are crucial in establishing perenniality and understanding adaptation of perennial plants to their habitats. Here, the key role of roots for perennial plant longevity will be discussed, taking into account current knowledge and highlighting additional aspects that still require investigation. PMID:24563283

  11. Cold Temperature Delays Wound Healing in Postharvest Sugarbeet Roots.

    PubMed

    Fugate, Karen K; Ribeiro, Wellington S; Lulai, Edward C; Deckard, Edward L; Finger, Fernando L

    2016-01-01

    Storage temperature affects the rate and extent of wound-healing in a number of root and tuber crops. The effect of storage temperature on wound-healing in sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) roots, however, is largely unknown. Wound-healing of sugarbeet roots was investigated using surface-abraded roots stored at 6 and 12°C for 28 days. Surface abrasions are common injuries of stored roots, and the storage temperatures used are typical of freshly harvested or rapidly cooled roots. Transpiration rate from the wounded surface and root weight loss were used to quantify wound healing. At 12°C, transpiration rate from the wounded surface declined within 14 days and wounded roots lost weight at a rate similar to unwounded controls. At 6°C, transpiration rate from the wounded surface did not decline in the 28 days after injury, and wounded roots lost 44% more weight than controls after 28 days storage. Melanin formation, lignification, and suberization occurred more rapidly at 12°C than at 6°C, and a continuous layer of lignified and suberized cells developed at 12°C, but not at 6°C. Examination of enzyme activities involved in melanin, lignin, and suberin formation indicated that differences in melanin formation at 6 and 12°C were related to differences in polyphenol oxidase activity, although no relationships between suberin or lignin formation and phenylalanine ammonia lyase or peroxidase activity were evident. Wound-induced respiration was initially greater at 12°C than at 6°C. However, with continued storage, respiration rate of wounded roots declined more rapidly at 12°C, and over 28 days, the increase in respiration due to injury was 52% greater in roots stored at 6°C than in roots stored at 12°C. The data indicate that storage at 6°C severely slowed and impaired wound-healing of surface-abraded sugarbeet roots relative to roots stored at 12°C and suggest that postharvest losses may be accelerated if freshly harvested roots are cooled too quickly. PMID

  12. Cold Temperature Delays Wound Healing in Postharvest Sugarbeet Roots

    PubMed Central

    Fugate, Karen K.; Ribeiro, Wellington S.; Lulai, Edward C.; Deckard, Edward L.; Finger, Fernando L.

    2016-01-01

    Storage temperature affects the rate and extent of wound-healing in a number of root and tuber crops. The effect of storage temperature on wound-healing in sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) roots, however, is largely unknown. Wound-healing of sugarbeet roots was investigated using surface-abraded roots stored at 6 and 12°C for 28 days. Surface abrasions are common injuries of stored roots, and the storage temperatures used are typical of freshly harvested or rapidly cooled roots. Transpiration rate from the wounded surface and root weight loss were used to quantify wound healing. At 12°C, transpiration rate from the wounded surface declined within 14 days and wounded roots lost weight at a rate similar to unwounded controls. At 6°C, transpiration rate from the wounded surface did not decline in the 28 days after injury, and wounded roots lost 44% more weight than controls after 28 days storage. Melanin formation, lignification, and suberization occurred more rapidly at 12°C than at 6°C, and a continuous layer of lignified and suberized cells developed at 12°C, but not at 6°C. Examination of enzyme activities involved in melanin, lignin, and suberin formation indicated that differences in melanin formation at 6 and 12°C were related to differences in polyphenol oxidase activity, although no relationships between suberin or lignin formation and phenylalanine ammonia lyase or peroxidase activity were evident. Wound-induced respiration was initially greater at 12°C than at 6°C. However, with continued storage, respiration rate of wounded roots declined more rapidly at 12°C, and over 28 days, the increase in respiration due to injury was 52% greater in roots stored at 6°C than in roots stored at 12°C. The data indicate that storage at 6°C severely slowed and impaired wound-healing of surface-abraded sugarbeet roots relative to roots stored at 12°C and suggest that postharvest losses may be accelerated if freshly harvested roots are cooled too quickly. PMID

  13. [Changes of root biomass, root surface area, and root length density in a Populus cathayana plantation].

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Liu, Guang-quan; Li, Hong-sheng

    2010-11-01

    By using soil core method, the biomass, surface area, and length density of roots < or =2 mm and 2-5 mm in diameter in a 50-year-old Populus cathayana plantation on the northern slope of Qinling Mountains were determined during growth season. Among the roots <5 mm in diameter, those < or =2 mm and 2-5 mm in diameter accounted for 77.8% and 22.2% of the total root biomass, respectively. The surface area and length density of the roots < or =2 mm in diameter accounted for more than 97% of the total, and those of the roots 2-5 mm in diameter only occupied less than 3%. The biomass, surface area, and root length density of roots < or =2 mm in diameter decreased with soil depth, while those of the roots 2-5 mm in diameter were the least in 20-30 cm soil layer. The biomass, surface area, and length density of roots < or =2 mm in diameter were significantly correlated with soil organic matter and available nitrogen, but no significant correlations were found for the roots 2-5 mm in diameter. PMID:21360997

  14. Calcium enriched mixture cement for primary molars exhibiting root perforations and extensive root resorption: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Tavassoli-Hojjati, Sara; Kameli, Somayeh; Rahimian-Emam, Sara; Ahmadyar, Maryam; Asgary, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    In primary molars with root perforations of endodontic origin, tooth extraction and space maintainer are recommended. Calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement is a new biomaterial demonstrating favorable sealability/biocompatibility. This report presents a novel treatment modality for cases of primary molar teeth with root perforations associated with a periodontal lesion due to extensive inflammatory root resorption, whereby CEM was used as a perforation repair/pulpotomy biomaterial. Three cases of primary molar root perforations due to inflammatory resorption were selected; all cases were associated with furcal lesions of endodontic origin. Pulp chambers were accessed/irrigated with NaOCl; the root canal orifices were filled with CEM and restored with stainless steel crowns. Clinical/radiographic examinations up to 17 months revealed that all teeth were functional and free of signs/symptoms of infection and all had complete bone healing. Further trials are suggested to confirm CEM use for management of root perforations in primary molars exhibiting root perforation. PMID:24717704

  15. Transgene expression in regenerated roots.

    PubMed

    Malamy, Jocelyn

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTIONThis procedure, which uses a root transformation protocol, provides a rapid method for assessing gene expression in Arabidopsis roots. It is useful for testing promoter:reporter gene constructs, for expressing genes, the overexpression of which is lethal in whole plants, and for transforming the roots of plants that are recalcitrant to conventional transformation techniques. The protocol has been used successfully with Ws, No-0, and RLD ecotypes. PMID:21357026

  16. Quantifying root-reinforcement of river bank soils by four Australian tree species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Docker, B. B.; Hubble, T. C. T.

    2008-08-01

    The increased shear resistance of soil due to root-reinforcement by four common Australian riparian trees, Casuarina glauca, Eucalyptus amplifolia, Eucalyptus elata and Acacia floribunda, was determined in-situ with a field shear-box. Root pull-out strengths and root tensile-strengths were also measured and used to evaluate the utility of the root-reinforcement estimation models that assume simultaneous failure of all roots at the shear plane. Field shear-box results indicate that tree roots fail progressively rather than simultaneously. Shear-strengths calculated for root-reinforced soil assuming simultaneous root failure, yielded values between 50% and 215% higher than directly measured shear-strengths. The magnitude of the overestimate varies among species and probably results from differences in both the geometry of the root-system and tensile strengths of the root material. Soil blocks under A. floribunda which presents many, well-spread, highly-branched fine roots with relatively higher tensile strength, conformed most closely with root model estimates; whereas E. amplifolia, which presents a few, large, unbranched vertical roots, concentrated directly beneath the tree stem and of relatively low tensile strength, deviated furthest from model-estimated shear-strengths. These results suggest that considerable caution be exercised when applying estimates of increased shear-strength due to root-reinforcement in riverbank stability modelling. Nevertheless, increased soil shear strength provided by tree roots can be calculated by knowledge of the Root Area Ratio ( RAR) at the shear plane. At equivalent RAR values, A. floribunda demonstrated the greatest earth reinforcement potential of the four species studied.

  17. A Split-Root Technique for Measuring Root Water Potential

    PubMed Central

    Adeoye, Kingsley B.; Rawlins, Stephen L.

    1981-01-01

    Water encounters various resistances in moving along a path of decreasing potential energy from the soil through the plant to the atmosphere. The reported relative magnitudes of these pathway resistances vary widely and often these results are conflicting. One reason for such inconsistency is the difficulty in measuring the potential drop across various segments of the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. The measurement of water potentials at the soil-root interface and in the root xylem of a transpiring plant remains a challenging problem. In the divided root experiment reported here, the measured water potential of an enclosed, nonabsorbing branch of the root system of young corn (Bonanza) plants to infer the water potential of the remaining roots growing in soil was used. The selected root branch of the seedling was grown in a specially constructed Teflon test tube into which a screen-enclosed thermocouple psychrometer was inserted and sealed to monitor the root's water potential. The root and its surrounding atmosphere were assumed to be in vapor equilibrium. Images PMID:16661886

  18. [A case of appendicular supplementary root with external root resorption].

    PubMed

    González Bahillo, J; Martínez Insua, A; Varela Patiño, P; Rivas Lombardero, P; Paz Pumpido, F

    1991-01-01

    The case of a lateral maxillary incisor with a supplementary root fractured by external root resorption, is presented. The role played for the periodontal disease is shown in the clinical and radiographic achievements, and their implications in the pulpal disease. Endodontic therapy was performed and the diagnosis confirmed in the specimen histological research. PMID:1858059

  19. The roots of predictivism.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Eric Christian

    2014-03-01

    In The Paradox of Predictivism (2008, Cambridge University Press) I tried to demonstrate that there is an intimate relationship between predictivism (the thesis that novel predictions sometimes carry more weight than accommodations) and epistemic pluralism (the thesis that one important form of evidence in science is the judgments of other scientists). Here I respond to various published criticisms of some of the key points from Paradox from David Harker, Jarret Leplin, and Clark Glymour. Foci include my account of predictive novelty (endorsement novelty), the claim that predictivism has two roots, the prediction per se and predictive success, and my account of why Mendeleev's predictions carried special weight in confirming the Periodic Law of the Elements. PMID:24984449

  20. [Modeling of Cs-137 vertical soil transfer by a tree root system].

    PubMed

    Bulgakov, A A; Konoplev, A V

    2002-01-01

    A model of 137Cs vertical soil transport by a tree root system is presented. As distinct from other models the radionuclide root uptake is described as a reversible process and depth distribution of roots is given as a function of time. The model was used for prediction of 137Cs release from a surface disposal site located in a territory with conditions similar to that in the Chernobyl NPP exclusion zone. Prediction indicates that during several decades 137Cs transport from the waste layer by the root system of pine can lead to significant contamination of the soil surface due to needles fallout and, probably, ionic leakage from roots. PMID:12449825

  1. New roots for agriculture: exploiting the root phenome

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Jonathan P.; Brown, Kathleen M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in root biology are making it possible to genetically design root systems with enhanced soil exploration and resource capture. These cultivars would have substantial value for improving food security in developing nations, where yields are limited by drought and low soil fertility, and would enhance the sustainability of intensive agriculture. Many of the phenes controlling soil resource capture are related to root architecture. We propose that a better understanding of the root phenome is needed to effectively translate genetic advances into improved crop cultivars. Elementary, unique root phenes need to be identified. We need to understand the ‘fitness landscape’ for these phenes: how they affect crop performance in an array of environments and phenotypes. Finally, we need to develop methods to measure phene expression rapidly and economically without artefacts. These challenges, especially mapping the fitness landscape, are non-trivial, and may warrant new research and training modalities. PMID:22527403

  2. A novel bioassay using root re-growth in Lemna.

    PubMed

    Park, Areum; Kim, Youn-Jung; Choi, Eun-Mi; Brown, Murray T; Han, Taejun

    2013-09-15

    A new phytotoxicity test method based on root elongation of three Lemna species (Lemna gibba, L. minor, and L. paucicostata) has been developed. Tests with aquatic plants have, typically, favored measurements on fronds (e.g. frond number, area, biomass) rather than on roots, due, in part, to issues associated with handling fragile roots and the time-consuming procedures of selecting roots with identical root lengths. The present method differs in that roots were excised prior to exposure with subsequent measurements on newly developed roots. Results show that there were species-specific difference in sensitivity to the five metals tested (Ag, Cd, Cr, Cu and Hg), with Ag being the most toxic (EC50=5.3-37.6 μgL(-1)) to all three species, and Cr the least toxic for L. gibba and L. minor (1148.3 and 341.8 μgL(-1), respectively) and Cu for L. paucicostata (470.4 μgL(-1)). Direct comparisons were made with measurements of frond area, which were found to be less sensitive. More generally, root re-growth was shown to reflect the toxic responses of all three Lemna species to these five important metals. The root growth bioassay differs from three internationally standardized methods (ISO, OCED and US EPA) in that it is completed in 48 h, the required volume of test solutions is only 3 ml and non-axenic plants are used. Our results show that the Lemna root method is a simple, rapid, cost-effective, sensitive and precise bioassay to assess the toxic risks of metals and has practical application for monitoring municipal and industrial waste waters where metals are common constituents. PMID:23917640

  3. [Microbial decontamination of the root canals of devitalized teeth].

    PubMed

    Kováč, Ján; Kováč, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    The primary goal of endodontic therapy is the reduction or elimination of microorganisms and their by-products from the root canal system. Although a number of instrumentation and irrigation techniques exist, debris is often left behind in the root canal system and proper canal cleaning, shaping, and irrigation are needed to reduce significantly or sometimes even eliminate microorganisms from the canals. Residual microbes in the root canal system are the primary cause of post-treatment apical periodontitis that may persist in both poorly and properly treated cases. Apical periodontitis is a sequel to endodontic infection and manifests itself as the host defense response to microbial challenge emanating from the root canal system to the periapical tissue. It results in local inflammation, resorption of hard tissues, destruction of other periapical tissues, and eventual formation of various histopathological categories of apical periodontitis, commonly referred to as periapical lesions. When the root canal treatment is carried out properly, healing of the periapical lesion usually follows, with bone regeneration. In certain cases, post-treatment apical periodontitis still persists, the condition being commonly referred to as endodontic failure. It is widely acknowledged that such post-treatment apical periodontitis occurs when root canal treatment has not adequately controlled and eliminated the infection. However, complete elimination of microorganisms is not always achieved in clinical practice due to the anatomical complexities of root canals and consequent limitations in access by instruments and irrigants. The use of antimicrobial medication has been advocated to disinfect the root canal system. The recovery of Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis is common after failed root canal treatment. Therefore, when testing different antimicrobial agents for efficacy in endodontic treatment, 100% inhibition of the growth of the two microorganisms is required. The

  4. Compensatory Root Water Uptake of Overlapping Root Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agee, E.; Ivanov, V. Y.; He, L.; Bisht, G.; Shahbaz, P.; Fatichi, S.; Gough, C. M.; Couvreur, V.; Matheny, A. M.; Bohrer, G.

    2015-12-01

    Land-surface models use simplified representations of root water uptake based on biomass distributions and empirical functions that constrain water uptake during unfavorable soil moisture conditions. These models fail to capture the observed hydraulic plasticity that allows plants to regulate root hydraulic conductivity and zones of active uptake based on local gradients. Recent developments in root water uptake modeling have sought to increase its mechanistic representation by bridging the gap between physically based microscopic models and computationally feasible macroscopic approaches. It remains to be demonstrated whether bulk parameterization of microscale characteristics (e.g., root system morphology and root conductivity) can improve process representation at the ecosystem scale. We employ the Couvreur method of microscopic uptake to yield macroscopic representation in a coupled soil-root model. Using a modified version of the PFLOTRAN model, which represents the 3-D physics of variably saturated soil, we model a one-hectare temperate forest stand under natural and synthetic climatic forcing. Our results show that as shallow soil layers dry, uptake at the tree and stand level shift to deeper soil layers, allowing the transpiration stream demanded by the atmosphere. We assess the potential capacity of the model to capture compensatory root water uptake. Further, the hydraulic plasticity of the root system is demonstrated by the quick response of uptake to rainfall pulses. These initial results indicate a promising direction for land surface models in which significant three-dimensional information from large root systems can be feasibly integrated into the forest scale simulations of root water uptake.

  5. Mucilage exudation facilitates root water uptake in dry soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mutez; Kroener, Eva; Holz, Maire; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Carminati, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    As plant roots take up water and the soil dries, water depletion is expected to occur in the rhizosphere. However, recent experiments showed that the rhizosphere of lupines was wetter than the bulk soil during root water uptake. On the other hand, after irrigation the rhizosphere remained markedly dry and it rewetted only after one-two days. We hypothesize that: 1) drying/wetting rates of the rhizosphere are controlled by mucilage exuded by roots; 2) mucilage alters the soil hydraulic conductivity: in particular, wet mucilage increases the soil hydraulic conductivity and dry mucilage makes the soil water repellent; 3) mucilage exudation favors root water uptake in dry soil; and 4) dry mucilage limits water loss from roots to dry soils. We used a root pressure probe to measure the hydraulic conductance of artificial roots sitting in soils. As an artificial root we employed a suction cup with a diameter of 2 mm and a length of 45 mm. The root pressure probe gave the hydraulic conductance of the soil-root continuum during pulse experiments in which water was injected into or sucked from the soil. First, we performed experiments with roots in a relatively dry soil with a volumetric water content of 0.03. Then, we repeated the experiment with artificial roots covered with mucilage and then placed into the soil. As a model for mucilage, we collected mucilage from Chia seeds. The water contents (including that of mucilage) in the experiments with and without mucilage were equal. The pressure curves were fitted with a model of root water that includes rhizosphere dynamics. We found that the artificial roots covered with wet mucilage took up water more easily. In a second experimental set-up we measured the outflow of water from the artificial roots into dry soils. We compared two soils: 1) a sandy soil and 2) the same soil wetted with mucilage from Chia seeds and then let dry. The latter soil became water repellent. Due to the water repellency, the outflow of water from

  6. Density of the continental roots: Compositional and thermal contributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaban, M.K.; Schwintzer, P.; Artemieva, I.M.; Mooney, W.D.

    2003-01-01

    The origin and evolution of cratonic roots has been debated for many years. Precambrian cratons are underlain by cold lithospheric roots that are chemically depleted. Thermal and petrologic data indicate that Archean roots are colder and more chemically depleted than Proterozoic roots. This observation has led to the hypothesis that the degree of depletion in a lithospheric root depends mostly on its age. Here we test this hypothesis using gravity, thermal, petrologic, and seismic data to quantify differences in the density of cratonic roots globally. In the first step in our analysis we use a global crustal model to remove the crustal contribution to the observed gravity. The result is the mantle gravity anomaly field, which varies over cratonic areas from -100 to +100 mGal. Positive mantle gravity anomalies are observed for cratons in the northern hemisphere: the Baltic shield, East European Platform, and the Siberian Platform. Negative anomalies are observed over cratons in the southern hemisphere: Western Australia, South America, the Indian shield, and Southern Africa. This indicates that there are significant differences in the density of cratonic roots, even for those of similar age. Root density depends on temperature and chemical depletion. In order to separate these effects we apply a lithospheric temperature correction using thermal estimates from a combination of geothermal modeling and global seismic tomography models. Gravity anomalies induced by temperature variations in the uppermost mantle range from -200 to +300 mGal, with the strongest negative anomalies associated with mid-ocean ridges and the strongest positive anomalies associated with cratons. After correcting for thermal effects, we obtain a map of density variations due to lithospheric compositional variations. These maps indicate that the average density decrease due to the chemical depletion within cratonic roots varies from 1.1% to 1.5%, assuming the chemical boundary layer has the same

  7. Determinants and Polynomial Root Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Pillis, L. G.

    2005-01-01

    A little known property of determinants is developed in a manner accessible to beginning undergraduates in linear algebra. Using the language of matrix theory, a classical result by Sylvester that describes when two polynomials have a common root is recaptured. Among results concerning the structure of polynomial roots, polynomials with pairs of…

  8. Investigation of electrochemical migration on Sn-0.7Cu-0.3Ag-0.03P-0.005Ni solder alloy in HNO{sub 3} solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sarveswaran, C.; Othman, N. K.; Ali, M. Yusuf Tura; Ani, F. Che; Samsudin, Z.

    2015-09-25

    Current issue in lead-free solder in term of its reliability is still under investigation. This high impact research attempts to investigate the electrochemical migration (ECM) on Sn-0.7Cu-0.3Ag-0.03P-0.005Ni solder alloy by Water Drop Test (WDT) in different concentration of HNO{sub 3} solution. The concentration of HNO{sub 3} solution used in this research was 0.05, 0.10, 0.50 and 1M. Optical Microscope (OM), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDX) were carried out in order to analysis the ECM behavior based on the growth of dendrite formation after WDT. In general, the results demonstrated that dendrite growth is faster in higher concentration compared with low concentration of HNO{sub 3}. The concentration of HNO{sub 3} solution used has a strong correlation with Mean-Time-To-Failure (MTTF). As the concentration of HNO{sub 3} increases, the MTTF value decreases. Based on the MTTF results the solder alloy in 1M HNO{sub 3} solution is most susceptible to ECM. SnO{sub 2} forms as a corrosion by-product in the samples proved by EDX analysis. The solder alloy poses a high reliability risk in microelectronic devices during operation in 1M HNO{sub 3} solution.

  9. Resistive switching and electrical control of ferromagnetism in a Ag/HfO2/Nb:SrTiO3/Ag resistive random access memory (RRAM) device at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Shaoqing; Zhu, Gengchang; Xie, Jihao; Bu, Jianpei; Qin, Hongwei; Hu, Jifan

    2016-02-01

    Electrically induced resistive switching and modulated ferromagnetism are simultaneously found in a Ag/HfO2/Nb:SrTiO3/Ag resistive random access memory device at room temperature. The bipolar resistive switching (RS) can be controlled by the modification of a Schottky-like barrier with an electron injection-trapped/detrapped process at the interface of HfO2-Nb:SrTiO3. The multilevel RS transition can be observed in the reset process with larger negative voltage sweepings, which is connected to the different degree of electron detrapping in the interfacial depletion region of the HfO2 layer during the reset process. The origin of the electrical control of room-temperature ferromagnetism may be connected to the change of density of oxygen vacancies in the HfO2 film. The multilevel resistance states and the electric field controlled ferromagnetism have potential for applications in ultrahigh-density storage and magnetic logic device.

  10. Response of millet and sorghum to a varying water supply around the primary and nodal roots

    PubMed Central

    Rostamza, M.; Richards, R. A.; Watt, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Cereals have two root systems. The primary system originates from the embryo when the seed germinates and can support the plant until it produces grain. The nodal system can emerge from stem nodes throughout the plant's life; its value for yield is unclear and depends on the environment. The aim of this study was to test the role of nodal roots of sorghum and millet in plant growth in response to variation in soil moisture. Sorghum and millet were chosen as both are adapted to dry conditions. Methods Sorghum and millet were grown in a split-pot system that allowed the primary and nodal roots to be watered separately. Key Results When primary and nodal roots were watered (12 % soil water content; SWC), millet nodal roots were seven times longer than those of sorghum and six times longer than millet plants in dry treatments, mainly from an 8-fold increase in branch root length. When soil was allowed to dry in both compartments, millet nodal roots responded and grew 20 % longer branch roots than in the well-watered control. Sorghum nodal roots were unchanged. When only primary roots received water, nodal roots of both species emerged and elongated into extremely dry soil (0·6–1·5 % SWC), possibly with phloem-delivered water from the primary roots in the moist inner pot. Nodal roots were thick, short, branchless and vertical, indicating a tropism that was more pronounced in millet. Total nodal root length increased in both species when the dry soil was covered with plastic, suggesting that stubble retention or leaf mulching could facilitate nodal roots reaching deeper moist layers in dry climates. Greater nodal root length in millet than in sorghum was associated with increased shoot biomass, water uptake and water use efficiency (shoot mass per water). Millet had a more plastic response than sorghum to moisture around the nodal roots due to (1) faster growth and progression through ontogeny for earlier nodal root branch length and (2

  11. Glutamate Oxaloacetate Transaminase in Pea Root Nodules 1

    PubMed Central

    Appels, Michiel A.; Haaker, Huub

    1991-01-01

    Glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (l-glutamate: oxaloacetate aminotransferase, EC 2.6.1.1 [GOT]), a key enzyme in the flow of carbon between the organic acid and amino acid pools in pea (Pisum sativum L.) root nodules, was studied. By ion exchange chromatography, the presence of two forms of GOT in the cytoplasm of pea root nodule cells was established. The major root nodule form was present in only a small quantity in the cytoplasm of root cells. Fractionation of root nodule cell extracts demonstrated that the increase in the GOT activity during nodule development was due to the increase of the activity in the cytoplasm of the plant cells, and not to an increase in activity in the plastids or in the mitochondria. The kinetic properties of the different cytoplasmic forms of GOT were studied. Some of the Km values differed, but calculations indicated that not the kinetic properties but a high concentration of the major root nodule form caused the observed increase in GOT activity in the pea root nodules. It was found that the reactions of the malate/aspartate shuttle are catalyzed by intact bacteroids, and that these reactions can support nitrogen fixation. It is proposed that the main function of the nodule-stimulated cytoplasmic form of GOT is participation in this shuttle. PMID:16668048

  12. Cassava root membrane proteome reveals activities during storage root maturation.

    PubMed

    Naconsie, Maliwan; Lertpanyasampatha, Manassawe; Viboonjun, Unchera; Netrphan, Supatcharee; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Ogasawara, Naotake; Narangajavana, Jarunya

    2016-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is one of the most important crops of Thailand. Its storage roots are used as food, feed, starch production, and be the important source for biofuel and biodegradable plastic production. Despite the importance of cassava storage roots, little is known about the mechanisms involved in their formation. This present study has focused on comparison of the expression profiles of cassava root proteome at various developmental stages using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS. Based on an anatomical study using Toluidine Blue, the secondary growth was confirmed to be essential during the development of cassava storage root. To investigate biochemical processes occurring during storage root maturation, soluble and membrane proteins were isolated from storage roots harvested from 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month-old cassava plants. The proteins with differential expression pattern were analysed and identified to be associated with 8 functional groups: protein folding and degradation, energy, metabolism, secondary metabolism, stress response, transport facilitation, cytoskeleton, and unclassified function. The expression profiling of membrane proteins revealed the proteins involved in protein folding and degradation, energy, and cell structure were highly expressed during early stages of development. Integration of these data along with the information available in genome and transcriptome databases is critical to expand knowledge obtained solely from the field of proteomics. Possible role of identified proteins were discussed in relation with the activities during storage root maturation in cassava. PMID:26547558

  13. “Internal root resorption: An endodontic challenge”: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Sunandan; Kumar, Tarun; Mittal, Shifali; Sharma, Jyotika

    2014-01-01

    Management of internal root resorption is a challenge to the endodontists. It may occur in cases with chronic pulpal inflammation, following caries or due to trauma in the form of an accidental blow. Most cases of internal root resorption are seen in anterior teeth, due to their susceptibility to trauma. However, it may be seen in posterior teeth, most likely because of carious involvement of the pulp. Early diagnosis, removal of the cause, proper treatment of the resorbed root is mandatory for successful treatment outcome. This paper is an attempt to summarize the knowledge on internal root resorption and present various cases, which were successfully managed with different treatment modalities. PMID:25506152

  14. Gravisensing in roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perbal, G.

    1999-01-01

    The mode of gravisensing in higher plants is not yet elucidated. Although, it is generally accepted that the amyloplasts (statoliths) in the root cap cells (statocytes) are responsible for susception of gravity. However, the hypothesis that the whole protoplast acts as gravisusceptor cannot be dismissed. The nature of the sensor that is able to transduce and amplify the mechanical energy into a biochemical factor is even more controversial. Several cell structures could potentially serve as gravireceptors: the endoplasmic reticulum, the actin network, the plasma membrane, or the cytoskeleton associated with this membrane. The nature of the gravisusceptors and gravisensors is discussed by taking into account the characteristics of the gravitropic reaction with respect to the presentation time, the threshold acceleration, the reciprocity rule, the deviation from the sine rule, the movement of the amyloplasts, the pre-inversion effect, the response of starch free and intermediate mutants and the effects of cytochalasin treatment. From this analysis, it can be concluded that both the amyloplasts and the protoplast could be the gravisusceptors, the former being more efficient than the latter since they can focus pressure on limited areas. The receptor should be located in the plasma membrane and could be a stretch-activated ion channel.

  15. Root functional diversity in C3 and C4 grasslands in Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelo, C. L.; Pau, S.

    2014-12-01

    Root systems play an integral role in grassland ecosystem functioning due to their resource acquisition and conservation strategies. A considerable gap in our knowledge of C3 and C4 grasslands is our understanding of belowground root functional diversity. Our aim was to determine whether root system traits allowed for the identification of functional strategies of grass species and to see if these traits differed along resource gradients (precipitation and nitrogen). The functional root traits (specific root length, diameter, root tissue density, root length density, and % of fine roots) of nine grass species, four C3 and five C4, were evaluated from root samples collected from field plots at 100 -150 m intervals along an elevation gradient in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. An analysis of variance found that there were significant differences in individual root trait values between species (P < 0.000) and photosynthetic pathway (P < 0.025). There was also evidence that the relationships between individual root traits and gradient resources were influenced by photosynthetic pathway (P and r2-values for all interactions were < 0.001 and > 0.625, respectively). A principal component analysis (PCA) found that two components accounted for 86 % of the explainable variation in our data. PCA found that C4 species had larger root diameters, whereas, C3 species had higher % of fine roots and specific root lengths. C3 and C4 species diverged less in root tissue density. C3 species had more resource acquisition root traits, while C4 grasses had a more conservative resource strategy. These results have important implications for how grassland ecosystem dynamics may be altered by shifting patterns of C3-C4 grasses with global change.

  16. Root development during soil genesis: effects of root-root interactions, mycorrhizae, and substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, A.; Zaharescu, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    A major driver of soil formation is the colonization and transformation of rock by plants and associated microbiota. In turn, substrate chemical composition can also influence the capacity for plant colonization and development. In order to better define these relationships, a mesocosm study was set up to analyze the effect mycorrhizal fungi, plant density and rock have on root development, and to determine the effect of root morphology on weathering and soil formation. We hypothesized that plant-plant and plant-fungi interactions have a stronger influence on root architecture and rock weathering than the substrate composition alone. Buffalo grass (Bouteloua dactyloides) was grown in a controlled environment in columns filled with either granular granite, schist, rhyolite or basalt. Each substrate was given two different treatments, including grass-microbes and grass-microbes-mycorrhizae and incubated for 120, 240, and 480 days. Columns were then extracted and analyzed for root morphology, fine fraction, and pore water major element content. Preliminary results showed that plants produced more biomass in rhyolite, followed by schist, basalt, and granite, indicating that substrate composition is an important driver of root development. In support of our hypothesis, mycorrhizae was a strong driver of root development by stimulating length growth, biomass production, and branching. However, average root length and branching also appeared to decrease in response to high plant density, though this trend was only present among roots with mycorrhizal fungi. Interestingly, fine fraction production was negatively correlated with average root thickness and volume. There is also slight evidence indicating that fine fraction production is more related to substrate composition than root morphology, though this data needs to be further analyzed. Our hope is that the results of this study can one day be applied to agricultural research in order to promote the production of crops

  17. Random root movements in weightlessness.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, A; Karlsson, C; Iversen, T H; Chapman, D K

    1996-02-01

    The dynamics of root growth was studied in weightlessness. In the absence of the gravitropic reference direction during weightlessness, root movements could be controlled by spontaneous growth processes, without any corrective growth induced by the gravitropic system. If truly random of nature, the bending behavior should follow so-called 'random walk' mathematics during weightlessness. Predictions from this hypothesis were critically tested. In a Spacelab ESA-experiment, denoted RANDOM and carried out during the IML-2 Shuttle flight in July 1994, the growth of garden cress (Lepidium sativum) roots was followed by time lapse photography at 1-h intervals. The growth pattern was recorded for about 20 h. Root growth was significantly smaller in weightlessness as compared to gravity (control) conditions. It was found that the roots performed spontaneous movements in weightlessness. The average direction of deviation of the plants consistently stayed equal to zero, despite these spontaneous movements. The average squared deviation increased linearly with time as predicted theoretically (but only for 8-10 h). Autocorrelation calculations showed that bendings of the roots, as determined from the 1-h photographs, were uncorrelated after about a 2-h interval. It is concluded that random processes play an important role in root growth. Predictions from a random walk hypothesis as to the growth dynamics could explain parts of the growth patterns recorded. This test of the hypothesis required microgravity conditions as provided for in a space experiment. PMID:11541141

  18. Hypocotyl adventitious root organogenesis differs from lateral root development

    PubMed Central

    Verstraeten, Inge; Schotte, Sébastien; Geelen, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Wound-induced adventitious root (AR) formation is a requirement for plant survival upon root damage inflicted by pathogen attack, but also during the regeneration of plant stem cuttings for clonal propagation of elite plant varieties. Yet, adventitious rooting also takes place without wounding. This happens for example in etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyls, in which AR initiate upon de-etiolation or in tomato seedlings, in which AR initiate upon flooding or high water availability. In the hypocotyl AR originate from a cell layer reminiscent to the pericycle in the primary root (PR) and the initiated AR share histological and developmental characteristics with lateral roots (LRs). In contrast to the PR however, the hypocotyl is a determinate structure with an established final number of cells. This points to differences between the induction of hypocotyl AR and LR on the PR, as the latter grows indeterminately. The induction of AR on the hypocotyl takes place in environmental conditions that differ from those that control LR formation. Hence, AR formation depends on differentially regulated gene products. Similarly to AR induction in stem cuttings, the capacity to induce hypocotyl AR is genotype-dependent and the plant growth regulator auxin is a key regulator controlling the rooting response. The hormones cytokinins, ethylene, jasmonic acid, and strigolactones in general reduce the root-inducing capacity. The involvement of this many regulators indicates that a tight control and fine-tuning of the initiation and emergence of AR exists. Recently, several genetic factors, specific to hypocotyl adventitious rooting in A. thaliana, have been uncovered. These factors reveal a dedicated signaling network that drives AR formation in the Arabidopsis hypocotyl. Here we provide an overview of the environmental and genetic factors controlling hypocotyl-born AR and we summarize how AR formation and the regulating factors of this organogenesis are distinct from LR

  19. Amyloplast Distribution Directs a Root Gravitropic Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordyum, Elizabeth

    Immobile higher plants are oriented in the gravitational field due to gravitropim that is a physiological growth reaction and consists of three phases: reception of a gravitational signal by statocytes, its transduction to the elongation zone, and finally the organ bending. As it is known, roots are characterized with positive gravitropism, i. e. they grow in the direction of a gravitational vector, stems - with negative gravitropism, i. e. they grow in the direction opposite to a gravitational vector. According to the Nemec’s and Haberlandt’s starch-statolith hypothesis, amyloplasts in diameter of 1.5 - 3 μ in average, which appear to act as gravity sensors and fulfill a statolythic function in the specialized graviperceptive cells - statocytes, sediment in the direction of a gravitational vector in the distal part of a cell, while a nucleus is in the proximal one. There are reasonable data that confirm the amyloplasts-statoliths participation in gravity perception: 1) correlation between the statoliths localization and the site of gravity sensing, 2) significant redistribution (sedimentation) of amyloplasts in statocytes under gravistimulation in comparison with other cell organelles, 3) root decreased ability to react on gravity under starch removal from amyloplasts, 4) starchless Arabidopsis thaliana mutants are agravitropic, 5) amyloplasts-statoliths do not sediment in the absence of the gravitational vector and are in different parts or more concentrated in the center of statocytes. Plant tropisms have been intensively studied for many decades and continue to be investigated. Nevertheless, the mechanisms by which plants do so is still not clearly explained and many questions on gravisensing and graviresponse remain unanswered. Even accepted hypotheses are now being questioned and recent data are critically evaluated. Although the available data show the Ca2+ and cytoskeleton participation in graviperception and signal transduction, the clear evidence

  20. Amyloplast Distribution Directs a Root Gravitropic Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordyum, Elizabeth

    Immobile higher plants are oriented in the gravitational field due to gravitropim that is a physiological growth reaction and consists of three phases: reception of a gravitational signal by statocytes, its transduction to the elongation zone, and finally the organ bending. As it is known, roots are characterized with positive gravitropism, i. e. they grow in the direction of a gravitational vector, stems - with negative gravitropism, i. e. they grow in the direction opposite to a gravitational vector. According to the Nemec’s and Haberlandt’s starch-statolith hypothesis, amyloplasts in diameter of 1.5 - 3 μ in average, which appear to act as gravity sensors and fulfill a statolythic function in the specialized graviperceptive cells - statocytes, sediment in the direction of a gravitational vector in the distal part of a cell, while a nucleus is in the proximal one. There are reasonable data that confirm the amyloplasts-statoliths participation in gravity perception: 1) correlation between the statoliths localization and the site of gravity sensing, 2) significant redistribution (sedimentation) of amyloplasts in statocytes under gravistimulation in comparison with other cell organelles, 3) root decreased ability to react on gravity under starch removal from amyloplasts, 4) starchless Arabidopsis thaliana mutants are agravitropic, 5) amyloplasts-statoliths do not sediment in the absence of the gravitational vector and are in different parts or more concentrated in the center of statocytes. Plant tropisms have been intensively studied for many decades and continue to be investigated. Nevertheless, the mechanisms by which plants do so is still not clearly explained and many questions on gravisensing and graviresponse remain unanswered. Even accepted hypotheses are now being questioned and recent data are critically evaluated. Although the available data show the Ca2+ and cytoskeleton participation in graviperception and signal transduction, the clear evidence

  1. IAA transport in corn roots includes the root cap

    SciTech Connect

    Hasenstein, K.H. )

    1989-04-01

    In earlier reports we concluded that auxin is the growth regulator that controls gravicurvature in roots and that the redistribution of auxin occurs within the root cap. Since other reports did not detect auxin in the root cap, we attempted to confirm the IAA does move through the cap. Agar blocks containing {sup 3}H-IAA were applied to the cut surface of 5 mm long apical segments of primary roots of corn (mo17xB73). After 30 to 120 min radioactivity (RA) of the cap and root tissue was determined. While segments suspended in water-saturated air accumulated very little RA in the cap, application of 0.5 {mu}1 of dist. water to the cap (=controls) increased RA of the cap dramatically. Application to the cap of 0.5 {mu}1 of sorbitol or the Ca{sup 2+} chelator EGTA reduced cap RA to 46% and 70% respectively compared to water, without affecting uptake. Control root segments gravireacted faster than non-treated or osmoticum or EGTA treated segments. The data indicate that both the degree of hydration and calcium control the amount of auxin moving through the cap.

  2. Towards a multidimensional root trait framework: a tree root review.

    PubMed

    Weemstra, Monique; Mommer, Liesje; Visser, Eric J W; van Ruijven, Jasper; Kuyper, Thomas W; Mohren, Godefridus M J; Sterck, Frank J

    2016-09-01

    Contents 1159 I. 1159 II. 1161 III. 1164 IV. 1166 1167 References 1167 SUMMARY: The search for a root economics spectrum (RES) has been sparked by recent interest in trait-based plant ecology. By analogy with the one-dimensional leaf economics spectrum (LES), fine-root traits are hypothesised to match leaf traits which are coordinated along one axis from resource acquisitive to conservative traits. However, our literature review and meta-level analysis reveal no consistent evidence of an RES mirroring an LES. Instead the RES appears to be multidimensional. We discuss three fundamental differences contributing to the discrepancy between these spectra. First, root traits are simultaneously constrained by various environmental drivers not necessarily related to resource uptake. Second, above- and belowground traits cannot be considered analogues, because they function differently and might not be related to resource uptake in a similar manner. Third, mycorrhizal interactions may offset selection for an RES. Understanding and explaining the belowground mechanisms and trade-offs that drive variation in root traits, resource acquisition and plant performance across species, thus requires a fundamentally different approach than applied aboveground. We therefore call for studies that can functionally incorporate the root traits involved in resource uptake, the complex soil environment and the various soil resource uptake mechanisms - particularly the mycorrhizal pathway - in a multidimensional root trait framework. PMID:27174359

  3. Papilledema Due to Mirtazapine

    PubMed Central

    Ceylan, Mehmet Emin; Evrensel, Alper; Cömert, Gökçe

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mirtazapine is a tetracyclic antidepressant that enhances both noradrenergic and serotonergic transmission. The most common cause of papilledema is increased intracranial pressure due to brain tumor. Also it may occur as a result of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH, pseudo tumor cerebri). Moreover, papilledema may also develop due to retinitis, vasculitis, Graves’ disease, hypertension, leukemia, lymphoma, diabetes mellitus and radiation. Case Report: In this article, a patient who developed papilledema while under treatment with mirtazapine (30 mg/day) for two years and recovered with termination of mirtazapine treatment was discussed to draw the attention of clinicians to this side effect of mirtazapine. Conclusion: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension and papilledema due to psychotropic drugs has been reported in the literature. Mirtazapine may rarely cause peripheral edema. However, papilledema due to mirtazapine has not been previously reported. Although papilledema is a very rare side effect of an antidepressant treatment, fundoscopic examinations of patients must be performed regularly. PMID:27308085

  4. Root hairs improve root penetration, root-soil contact, and phosphorus acquisition in soils of different strength.

    PubMed

    Haling, Rebecca E; Brown, Lawrie K; Bengough, A Glyn; Young, Iain M; Hallett, Paul D; White, Philip J; George, Timothy S

    2013-09-01

    Root hairs are a key trait for improving the acquisition of phosphorus (P) by plants. However, it is not known whether root hairs provide significant advantage for plant growth under combined soil stresses, particularly under conditions that are known to restrict root hair initiation or elongation (e.g. compacted or high-strength soils). To investigate this, the root growth and P uptake of root hair genotypes of barley, Hordeum vulgare L. (i.e. genotypes with and without root hairs), were assessed under combinations of P deficiency and high soil strength. Genotypes with root hairs were found to have an advantage for root penetration into high-strength layers relative to root hairless genotypes. In P-deficient soils, despite a 20% reduction in root hair length under high-strength conditions, genotypes with root hairs were also found to have an advantage for P uptake. However, in fertilized soils, root hairs conferred an advantage for P uptake in low-strength soil but not in high-strength soil. Improved root-soil contact, coupled with an increased supply of P to the root, may decrease the value of root hairs for P acquisition in high-strength, high-P soils. Nevertheless, this work demonstrates that root hairs are a valuable trait for plant growth and nutrient acquisition under combined soil stresses. Selecting plants with superior root hair traits is important for improving P uptake efficiency and hence the sustainability of agricultural systems. PMID:23861547

  5. Substantive due process after Gonzales v. Carhart.

    PubMed

    Calabresi, Steven G

    2008-06-01

    This Article begins in Part I with a doctrinal evaluation of the status of Washington v. Glucksberg ten years after that decision was handed down. Discussion begins with consideration of the Roberts Court's recent decision in Gonzales v. Carhart and then turns to the subject of Justice Kennedy's views in particular on substantive due process. In Part II, the Article goes on to consider whether the Glucksberg test for substantive due process decision making is correct in light of the original meaning of the Fourteenth Amendment. The Article concludes in Parts II and III that Glucksberg is right to confine substantive due process rights recognition to recognition only of those rights that are deeply rooted in history and tradition. PMID:18595213

  6. Power and Roots by Recursion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aieta, Joseph F.

    1987-01-01

    This article illustrates how questions from elementary finance can serve as motivation for studying high order powers, roots, and exponential functions using Logo procedures. A second discussion addresses a relatively unknown algorithm for the trigonometric exponential and hyperbolic functions. (PK)

  7. Ultrasonic cleaning of root canals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaagen, Bram; Boutsioukis, Christos; Jiang, Lei-Meng; Macedo, Ricardo; van der Sluis, Luc; Versluis, Michel

    2011-11-01

    A crucial step during a dental root canal treatment is irrigation, where an antimicrobial fluid is injected into the root canal system to eradicate all bacteria. Agitation of the fluid using an ultrasonically vibrating miniature file has shown significant improvement in cleaning efficacy over conventional syringe irrigation. However, the physical mechanisms underlying the cleaning process, being acoustic streaming, cavitation or chemical activity, and combinations thereof, are not fully understood. High-speed imaging allows us to visualize the flow pattern and cavitation in a root canal model at microscopic scales, at timescales relevant to the cleaning processes (microseconds). MicroPIV measurements of the induced acoustic streaming are coupled to the oscillation characteristics of the file as simulated numerically and measured with a laser vibrometer. The results give new insight into the role of acoustic streaming and the importance of the confinement for the cleaning of root canals.

  8. Root Patterns in Heterogeneous Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dara, A.; Moradi, A. B.; Carminati, A.; Oswald, S. E.

    2010-12-01

    Heterogeneous water availability is a typical characteristic of soils in which plant roots grow. Despite the intrinsic heterogeneity of soil-plant water relations, we know little about the ways how plants respond to local environmental quality. Furthermore, increasing use of soil amendments as partial water reservoirs in agriculture calls for a better understanding of plant response to soil heterogeneity. Neutron radiography is a non-invasive imaging that is highly sensitive to water and root distribution and that has high capability for monitoring spatial and temporal soil-plant water relations in heterogeneous systems. Maize plants were grown in 25 x 30 x 1 cm aluminum slabs filled with sandy soil. On the right side of the compartments a commercial water absorbent (Geohumus) was mixed with the soil. Geohumus was distributed with two patterns: mixed homogeneously with the soil, and arranged as 1-cm diameter aggregates (Fig. 1). Two irrigation treatments were applied: sufficient water irrigation and moderate water stress. Neutron radiography started 10 days after planting and has been performed twice a day for one week. At the end of the experiment, the containers were opened, the root were removed and dry root weight in different soil segments were measured. Neutron radiography showed root growth tendency towards Geohumus treated parts and preferential water uptake from Geohumus aggregates. Number and length of fine lateral roots were lower in treated areas compared to the non-treated zone and to control soil. Although corn plants showed an overall high proliferation towards the soil water sources, they decreased production of branches and fine root when water was more available near the main root parts. However there was 50% higher C allocation in roots grown in Geohumus compartments, as derived by the relative dry weight of root. The preferential C allocation in treated regions was higher when plants grew under water stress. We conclude that in addition to the

  9. Root Caries in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Dick; Hyde, Susan

    2015-08-01

    Older adults are retaining an increasing number of natural teeth, and nearly half of all individuals aged 75 and older have experienced root caries. Root caries is a major cause of tooth loss in older adults, and tooth loss is the most significant negative impact on oral health-related quality of life for the elderly. The need for improved preventive efforts and treatment strategies for this population is acute. PMID:26357814

  10. Formation of AgFeO2, α-FeOOH, and Ag2O from mixed Fe(NO3)3-AgNO3 solutions at high pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krehula, Stjepko; Musić, Svetozar

    2013-07-01

    Precipitation of ternary oxide silver ferrite (AgFeO2), iron oxyhydroxide goethite (α-FeOOH) and silver(I) oxide (Ag2O) from mixed Fe(NO3)3-AgNO3 solutions in a whole [Ag+]:[Fe3+] concentration ratio range at high pH was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), 57Fe Mössbauer, FT-IR and UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopies and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Strong alkalis organic tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) or inorganic NaOH were used as precipitating agents. Monodispersed lath-like α-FeOOH particles were formed from a pure Fe(NO3)3 solution. The presence of Ag+ ions influenced the formation of the delafossite-type ternary oxide AgFeO2 beside α-FeOOH. The positions of XRD and Mössbauer lines did not suggest any significant incorporation of Ag+ ions into the α-FeOOH structure. AgFeO2 was formed in the precipitation system with the equimolar initial [Ag+]:[Fe3+] concentration ratio. The size and shape of AgFeO2 particles, as well as their structural polytype (2H or 3R), were dependent on reaction temperature, aging time and alkali used. In systems with an excess of Ag+ ions mixtures of AgFeO2 and Ag2O were formed. Single phase Ag2O precipitated from a pure AgNO3 solution.

  11. Breakage of transgenic tobacco roots for monoclonal antibody release in an ultra-scale down shearing device.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Sally; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli; Ma, Julian; Thomas, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco roots offer a potential alternative to leaves for monoclonal antibody (MAb) production. A possible method for extraction of MAbs from roots is by homogenization, breaking the roots into fragments to release the antibody. This process was assessed by shearing 10 mm root sections ("roots") in a 24 mL ultra-scale down shearing device, including an impeller with serrated blade edges, intended to mimic the action of a large-scale homogenizer. Size distributions of the remaining intact roots and root fragments were obtained as a function of shearing time. The data suggest that about 36% of the roots could not be broken under the prevailing conditions and, beyond these unbreakable roots, the fragmentation was approximately first order with respect to intact root number. It was postulated that root breakage in such a high shearing device was due to root-impeller collisions and the particle size data suggest that roots colliding with the impeller were completely fragmented into debris particles of the order of 0.1 mm in length. IgG release normalized to release by grinding appeared to lag behind the number of roots that had fragmented, suggesting that a process of leakage followed fragmentation in the ultra-scale down shearing device. PMID:23860965

  12. Effect of parameter choice in root water uptake models - the arrangement of root hydraulic properties within the root architecture affects dynamics and efficiency of root water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechmann, M.; Schneider, C.; Carminati, A.; Vetterlein, D.; Attinger, S.; Hildebrandt, A.

    2014-10-01

    Detailed three-dimensional models of root water uptake have become increasingly popular for investigating the process of root water uptake. However, they suffer from a lack of information on important parameters, particularly on the spatial distribution of root axial and radial conductivities, which vary greatly along a root system. In this paper we explore how the arrangement of those root hydraulic properties and branching within the root system affects modelled uptake dynamics, xylem water potential and the efficiency of root water uptake. We first apply a simple model to illustrate the mechanisms at the scale of single roots. By using two efficiency indices based on (i) the collar xylem potential ("effort") and (ii) the integral amount of unstressed root water uptake ("water yield"), we show that an optimal root length emerges, depending on the ratio between roots axial and radial conductivity. Young roots with high capacity for radial uptake are only efficient when they are short. Branching, in combination with mature transport roots, enables soil exploration and substantially increases active young root length at low collar potentials. Second, we investigate how this shapes uptake dynamics at the plant scale using a comprehensive three-dimensional root water uptake model. Plant-scale dynamics, such as the average uptake depth of entire root systems, were only minimally influenced by the hydraulic parameterization. However, other factors such as hydraulic redistribution, collar potential, internal redistribution patterns and instantaneous uptake depth depended strongly on the arrangement on the arrangement of root hydraulic properties. Root systems were most efficient when assembled of different root types, allowing for separation of root function in uptake (numerous short apical young roots) and transport (longer mature roots). Modelling results became similar when this heterogeneity was accounted for to some degree (i.e. if the root systems contained between

  13. Modelling Rooting Depth and Soil Strength in a Drying Soil Profile

    PubMed

    Bengough

    1997-06-01

    A combined root growth and water extraction model is described that simulates the affects of mechanical impedance on root elongation in soil. The model simulates the vertical redistribution of water in the soil profile, water uptake by plant roots, and the effects of decreasing water content on increasing soil strength and decreasing the root elongation rate. The modelling approach is quite general and can be applied to any soil for which a relation can be defined between root elongation and penetrometer resistance. By definition this excludes soils that contain a large proportion of continuous channels through which roots can grow unimpeded. Root elongation rate is calculated as a function of the penetrometer resistance which is determined by the soil water content. Use of the model is illustrated using input data for a sandy loam soil. The results confirm reports in the literature that the depth of water extraction can exceed the rooting depth. The increase in mechanical impedance to root growth due to this water extraction restricted the maximum rooting depth attained, and this limited the depth of soil from which a crop could extract water and nutrients. This study highlighted the lack of published data sets for single crop/soil combinations containing both the strength/root growth information and the hydraulic conductivity characteristics necessary for this type of model. Copyright 1997 Academic Press Limited PMID:9344728

  14. Rootin, a compound that inhibits root development through modulating PIN-mediated auxin distribution.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Suyeong; Kim, Jun-Young; Choi, Hyunmo; Kim, Hyunmin; Lee, Ilhwan; Soh, Moon-Soo; Nam, Hong Gil; Chang, Young-Tae; Lim, Pyung Ok; Woo, Hye Ryun

    2015-04-01

    Plant roots anchor the plant to the soil and absorb water and nutrients for growth. Understanding the molecular mechanisms regulating root development is essential for improving plant survival and agricultural productivity. Extensive molecular genetic studies have provided important information on crucial components for the root development control over the last few decades. However, it is becoming difficult to identify new regulatory components in root development due to the functional redundancy and lethality of genes involved in root development. In this study, we performed a chemical genetic screen to identify novel synthetic compounds that regulate root development in Arabidopsis seedlings. The screen yielded a root growth inhibitor designated as 'rootin', which inhibited Arabidopsis root development by modulating cell division and elongation, but did not significantly affect shoot development. Transcript analysis of phytohormone marker genes revealed that rootin preferentially altered the expression of auxin-regulated genes. Furthermore, rootin reduced the accumulation of PIN1, PIN3, and PIN7 proteins, and affected the auxin distribution in roots, which consequently may lead to the observed defects in root development. Our results suggest that rootin could be utilized to unravel the mechanisms underlying root development and to investigate dynamic changes in PIN-mediated auxin distribution. PMID:25711819

  15. Mechanisms of waterlogging tolerance in wheat - a review of root and shoot physiology.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Max; Striker, Gustavo G; Colmer, Timothy D; Pedersen, Ole

    2016-05-01

    We review the detrimental effects of waterlogging on physiology, growth and yield of wheat. We highlight traits contributing to waterlogging tolerance and genetic diversity in wheat. Death of seminal roots and restriction of adventitious root length due to O2 deficiency result in low root:shoot ratio. Genotypes differ in seminal root anoxia tolerance, but mechanisms remain to be established; ethanol production rates do not explain anoxia tolerance. Root tip survival is short-term, and thereafter, seminal root re-growth upon re-aeration is limited. Genotypes differ in adventitious root numbers and in aerenchyma formation within these roots, resulting in varying waterlogging tolerances. Root extension is restricted by capacity for internal O2 movement to the apex. Sub-optimal O2 restricts root N uptake and translocation to the shoots, with N deficiency causing reduced shoot growth and grain yield. Although photosynthesis declines, sugars typically accumulate in shoots of waterlogged plants. Mn or Fe toxicity might occur in shoots of wheat on strongly acidic soils, but probably not more widely. Future breeding for waterlogging tolerance should focus on root internal aeration and better N-use efficiency; exploiting the genetic diversity in wheat for these and other traits should enable improvement of waterlogging tolerance. PMID:26565998

  16. Genetic analysis of the gravitropic set-point angle in lateral roots of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, J. L.; Hangarter, R. P.; Kiss, J. Z. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Research on gravity responses in plants has mostly focused on primary roots and shoots, which typically orient to a vertical orientation. However, the distribution of lateral organs and their characteristically non-vertical growth orientation are critical for the determination of plant form. For example, in Arabidopsis, when lateral roots emerge from the primary root, they grow at a nearly horizontal orientation. As they elongate, the roots slowly curve until they eventually reach a vertical orientation. The regulation of this lateral root orientation is an important component affecting overall root system architecture. We found that this change in orientation is not simply due to the onset of gravitropic competence, as non-vertical lateral roots are capable of both positive and negative gravitropism. Thus, the horizontal growth of new lateral roots appears to be determined by what is called the gravitropic set-point angle (GSA). This developmental control of the GSA of lateral roots in Arabidopsis provides a useful system for investigating the components involved in regulating gravitropic responses. Using this system, we have identified several Arabidopsis mutants that have altered lateral root orientations but maintain normal primary root orientation. c2003 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Root foraging influences plant growth responses to earthworm foraging.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Erin K; Cahill, James F; Bayne, Erin M

    2014-01-01

    Interactions among the foraging behaviours of co-occurring animal species can impact population and community dynamics; the consequences of interactions between plant and animal foraging behaviours have received less attention. In North American forests, invasions by European earthworms have led to substantial changes in plant community composition. Changes in leaf litter have been identified as a critical indirect mechanism driving earthworm impacts on plants. However, there has been limited examination of the direct effects of earthworm burrowing on plant growth. Here we show a novel second pathway exists, whereby earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris L.) impact plant root foraging. In a mini-rhizotron experiment, roots occurred more frequently in burrows and soil cracks than in the soil matrix. The roots of Achillea millefolium L. preferentially occupied earthworm burrows, where nutrient availability was presumably higher than in cracks due to earthworm excreta. In contrast, the roots of Campanula rotundifolia L. were less likely to occur in burrows. This shift in root behaviour was associated with a 30% decline in the overall biomass of C. rotundifolia when earthworms were present. Our results indicate earthworm impacts on plant foraging can occur indirectly via physical and chemical changes to the soil and directly via root consumption or abrasion and thus may be one factor influencing plant growth and community change following earthworm invasion. More generally, this work demonstrates the potential for interactions to occur between the foraging behaviours of plants and soil animals and emphasizes the importance of integrating behavioural understanding in foraging studies involving plants. PMID:25268503

  18. Root Foraging Influences Plant Growth Responses to Earthworm Foraging

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Erin K.; Cahill, James F.; Bayne, Erin M.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions among the foraging behaviours of co-occurring animal species can impact population and community dynamics; the consequences of interactions between plant and animal foraging behaviours have received less attention. In North American forests, invasions by European earthworms have led to substantial changes in plant community composition. Changes in leaf litter have been identified as a critical indirect mechanism driving earthworm impacts on plants. However, there has been limited examination of the direct effects of earthworm burrowing on plant growth. Here we show a novel second pathway exists, whereby earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris L.) impact plant root foraging. In a mini-rhizotron experiment, roots occurred more frequently in burrows and soil cracks than in the soil matrix. The roots of Achillea millefolium L. preferentially occupied earthworm burrows, where nutrient availability was presumably higher than in cracks due to earthworm excreta. In contrast, the roots of Campanula rotundifolia L. were less likely to occur in burrows. This shift in root behaviour was associated with a 30% decline in the overall biomass of C. rotundifolia when earthworms were present. Our results indicate earthworm impacts on plant foraging can occur indirectly via physical and chemical changes to the soil and directly via root consumption or abrasion and thus may be one factor influencing plant growth and community change following earthworm invasion. More generally, this work demonstrates the potential for interactions to occur between the foraging behaviours of plants and soil animals and emphasizes the importance of integrating behavioural understanding in foraging studies involving plants. PMID:25268503

  19. Providers get their due.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, J

    1994-11-01

    Providers are getting their due, but only after employing computer software programs to help sort through the complex managed-care contracts they've negotiated. More and more accounting departments are relying on contract management systems to ensure accurate billing. PMID:10138187

  20. Paying Their Dues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scalzo, Teresa

    1995-01-01

    Some colleges and universities have found that alumni prefer to have ownership of their alumni association, and such a membership program can raise revenues for the institution while providing a valuable communication tool. A strong dues program can work well with an annual giving campaign. A variety of membership structures is possible. Details…

  1. Plant root-microbe communication in shaping root microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Lareen, Andrew; Burton, Frances; Schäfer, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    A growing body of research is highlighting the impacts root-associated microbial communities can have on plant health and development. These impacts can include changes in yield quantity and quality, timing of key developmental stages and tolerance of biotic and abiotic stresses. With such a range of effects it is clear that understanding the factors that contribute to a plant-beneficial root microbiome may prove advantageous. Increasing demands for food by a growing human population increases the importance and urgency of understanding how microbiomes may be exploited to increase crop yields and reduce losses caused by disease. In addition, climate change effects may require novel approaches to overcoming abiotic stresses such as drought and salinity as well as new emerging diseases. This review discusses current knowledge on the formation and maintenance of root-associated microbial communities and plant-microbe interactions with a particular emphasis on the effect of microbe-microbe interactions on the shape of microbial communities at the root surface. Further, we discuss the potential for root microbiome modification to benefit agriculture and food production. PMID:26729479

  2. Aphanomyces root rot of alfalfa: widespread distribution of race 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The early spring of 2012 with prolonged wet soil conditions in many parts of the country resulted in reports of poor performance of alfalfa due to Aphanomyces root rot (ARR). Varieties with resistance to ARR are available, although fewer varieties have resistance to both race 1 and race 2 of the pat...

  3. Proteome changes induced by aluminum stress in tomato roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth inhibition in acid soils due to Al stress affects crop production worldwide. To understand mechanisms in sensitive crops that are affected by Al stress, a proteomic analysis of primary tomato root tissue, grown in Alamended and non-amended liquid cultures, was performed. DIGE-SDS-MALDI-TOF-TO...

  4. Quantifying bank retreat rates with exposed tree roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stotts, S. N.; O'Neal, M. A.; Pizzuto, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we use a biometric approach based on anatomical changes in the wood of exposed tree roots to quantify riverbank erosion along South River, Va, a site where commonly applied techniques for determining bank erosion rates are either not appropriate due to the required spatial scale of analysis (i.e., erosion pins, traditional surveys, LiDAR analysis) or have failed to detect obvious erosion (i.e. photogrammetric techniques). We sampled 78 exposed roots from 24 study reaches and processed them both macroscopically (2 to 20 times magnification) and microscopically (20 to 100 times magnification), comparing the estimated erosion rates between levels of magnification and to those obtained with photogrammetric techniques. We found no statistical differences between the output of macroscopic and microscopic analyses (t-test, alpha =0.01) but encountered difficulty in identifying the year of root exhumation in some samples. Therefore, we suggest analyzing roots at both levels of magnification to increase confidence and obtain erosion rate estimates from every sample. When comparing exposed root analysis to photogrammetric techniques, the results indicate that the exposed root approach is a feasible and effective method for estimating decadal to centennial scale bank erosion. In addition to producing erosion rates statistically indistinguishable from photogrammetric techniques (t-test, alpha = 0.01), exposed root analysis demonstrated more consistent detection of erosion. The results of this study indicate that exposed tree root analysis is a robust tool that provides insights into decadal scale erosion where other commonly applied techniques may not be appropriate or easily applied.

  5. Characterization of Root-Knot Nematode Resistance in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Dhandaydham, Murali; Charles, Lauren; Zhu, Hongyan; Starr, James L.; Huguet, Thierry; Cook, Douglas R.; Prosperi, Jean-Marie; Opperman, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Root knot (Meloidogyne spp.) and cyst (Heterodera and Globodera spp.) nematodes infect all important crop species, and the annual economic loss due to these pathogens exceeds $90 billion. We screened the worldwide accession collection with the root-knot nematodes Meloidogyne incognita, M. arenaria and M. hapla, soybean cyst nematode (SCN-Heterodera glycines), sugar beet cyst nematode (SBCN-Heterodera schachtii) and clover cyst nematode (CLCN-Heterodera trifolii), revealing resistant and susceptible accessions. In the over 100 accessions evaluated, we observed a range of responses to the root-knot nematode species, and a non-host response was observed for SCN and SBCN infection. However, variation was observed with respect to infection by CLCN. While many cultivars including Jemalong A17 were resistant to H. trifolii, cultivar Paraggio was highly susceptible. Identification of M. truncatula as a host for root-knot nematodes and H. trifolii and the differential host response to both RKN and CLCN provide the opportunity to genetically and molecularly characterize genes involved in plant-nematode interaction. Accession DZA045, obtained from an Algerian population, was resistant to all three root-knot nematode species and was used for further studies. The mechanism of resistance in DZA045 appears different from Mi-mediated root-knot nematode resistance in tomato. Temporal analysis of nematode infection showed that there is no difference in nematode penetration between the resistant and susceptible accessions, and no hypersensitive response was observed in the resistant accession even several days after infection. However, less than 5% of the nematode population completed the life cycle as females in the resistant accession. The remainder emigrated from the roots, developed as males, or died inside the roots as undeveloped larvae. Genetic analyses carried out by crossing DZA045 with a susceptible French accession, F83005, suggest that one gene controls resistance in DZA

  6. Fruit removal increases root-zone respiration in cucumber

    PubMed Central

    Kläring, H.-P.; Hauschild, I.; Heißner, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Many attempts have been made to avoid the commonly observed fluctuations in fruit initiation and fruit growth in crop plants, particularly in cucumber (Cucumis sativus). Weak sinks of the fruit have been assumed to result in low sink/source ratios for carbohydrates, which may inhibit photosynthesis. This study focuses on the effects of low sink–source ratios on photosynthesis and respiration, and in particular root-zone respiration. Methods Mature fruit-bearing cucumber plants were grown in an aerated nutrient solution. The root containers were designed as open chambers to allow measurement of CO2 gas exchange in the root zone. A similar arrangement in a gas-exchange cuvette enabled simultaneous measurements of CO2 exchange in the shoot and root zones. Key Results Reducing the sinks for carbohydrates by removing all fruit from the plants always resulted in a doubling of CO2 exchange in the root zone within a few hours. However, respiration of the shoot remained unaffected and photosynthesis was only marginally reduced, if at all. Conclusions The results suggest that the increased level of CO2 gas exchange in the root zone after removing the carbon sinks in the shoot is due primarily to the exudation of organic compounds by the roots and their decomposition by micro-organisms. This hypothesis must be tested in further experiments, but if proved correct it would make sense to include carbon leakage by root exudation in cucumber production models. In contrast, inhibition of photosynthesis was measurable only at zero fruit load, a situation that does not occur in cucumber production systems, and models that estimate production can therefore ignore (end-product) inhibition of photosynthesis. PMID:25301817

  7. Root anatomical phenes predict root penetration ability and biomechanical properties in maize (Zea Mays)

    PubMed Central

    Chimungu, Joseph G.; Loades, Kenneth W.; Lynch, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of roots to penetrate hard soil is important for crop productivity but specific root phenes contributing to this ability are poorly understood. Root penetrability and biomechanical properties are likely to vary in the root system dependent on anatomical structure. No information is available to date on the influence of root anatomical phenes on root penetrability and biomechanics. Root penetration ability was evaluated using a wax layer system. Root tensile and bending strength were evaluated in plant roots grown in the greenhouse and in the field. Root anatomical phenes were found to be better predictors of root penetrability than root diameter per se and associated with smaller distal cortical region cell size. Smaller outer cortical region cells play an important role in stabilizing the root against ovalization and reducing the risk of local buckling and collapse during penetration, thereby increasing root penetration of hard layers. The use of stele diameter was found to be a better predictor of root tensile strength than root diameter. Cortical thickness, cortical cell count, cortical cell wall area and distal cortical cell size were stronger predictors of root bend strength than root diameter. Our results indicate that root anatomical phenes are important predictors for root penetrability of high-strength layers and root biomechanical properties. PMID:25903914

  8. How Can Science Education Foster Students' Rooting?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Østergaard, Edvin

    2015-01-01

    The question of how to foster rooting in science education points towards a double challenge; efforts to "prevent" (further) uprooting and efforts to "promote" rooting/re-rooting. Wolff-Michael Roth's paper discusses the uprooting/rooting pair of concepts, students' feeling of alienation and loss of fundamental sense of the…

  9. Singlet internal conversion processes in the order of 1Bu+→3Ag-→1Bu-→2Ag-→1Ag- in all- trans-spheroidene and lycopene as revealed by subpicosecond time-resolved Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondonuwu, Ferdy S.; Kakitani, Yoshinori; Tamura, Hiroshi; Koyama, Yasushi

    2006-09-01

    Key Raman lines ascribable to the 1Bu+, 3Ag-, 1Bu- and 2Ag- states were identified in the subpicosecond time-resolved Raman spectra of spheroidene and lycopene having 10 and 11 conjugated double bonds, respectively. The sequential rise-and-decay of the key Raman lines showed the internal conversion processes of 1Bu+→3Ag-→1Bu-→2Ag-→1Ag- (ground). The time constant in each step of internal conversion reflects the energy gap between the relevant states that had been determined by measurement of resonance - Raman excitation profiles [K. Furuichi, T. Sashima, Y. Koyama, Chem. Phys. Lett. 356 (2002) 547].

  10. Stem and root carbohydrate dynamics in modern vs obsolete cotton cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The lower stem and root starch reserve is a necessary source of photoassimilates for completion of reproductive development in cotton. The objectives of this research was to determine if carbohydrate levels in the lower stem and roots have been altered due to over 100 years of breeding efforts. In ...

  11. ROOT GROWTH AND TURNOVER IN DIFFERENT AGED PONDEROSA PINE STANDS IN OREGON, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impacts of pollution and climate change on soil carbon dynamics are poorly understood, in part due to a lack of information regarding root production and turnover in natural ecosystems. In order to examine how root dynamics change with stand age in ponderosa pine forests (...

  12. RESPONSE OF SOYBEAN ISOLINES DIFFERING IN PHYTOPHTHORA ROOT ROT RESISTANCE TO FIELD FLOODING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora root rot (PRR) and flooding in soybeans is often a problem on heavy clays or poorly drained soils. Phytophthora root rot (PRR) resistance could decrease losses due to flooding? Alleles for PRR resistance in soybean have been found at eight loci with some loci having more than one all...

  13. MES Buffer Affects Arabidopsis Root Apex Zonation and Root Growth by Suppressing Superoxide Generation in Root Apex

    PubMed Central

    Kagenishi, Tomoko; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František

    2016-01-01

    In plants, growth of roots and root hairs is regulated by the fine cellular control of pH and reactive oxygen species (ROS). MES, 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid as one of the Good’s buffers has broadly been used for buffering medium, and it is thought to suit for plant growth with the concentration at 0.1% (w/v) because the buffer capacity of MES ranging pH 5.5–7.0 (for Arabidopsis, pH 5.8). However, many reports have shown that, in nature, roots require different pH values on the surface of specific root apex zones, namely meristem, transition zone, and elongation zone. Despite the fact that roots always grow on a media containing buffer molecule, little is known about impact of MES on root growth. Here, we have checked the effects of different concentrations of MES buffer using growing roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results show that 1% of MES significantly inhibited root growth, the number of root hairs and length of meristem, whereas 0.1% promoted root growth and root apex area (region spanning from the root tip up to the transition zone). Furthermore, superoxide generation in root apex disappeared at 1% of MES. These results suggest that MES disturbs normal root morphogenesis by changing the ROS homeostasis in root apex. PMID:26925066

  14. MES Buffer Affects Arabidopsis Root Apex Zonation and Root Growth by Suppressing Superoxide Generation in Root Apex.

    PubMed

    Kagenishi, Tomoko; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František

    2016-01-01

    In plants, growth of roots and root hairs is regulated by the fine cellular control of pH and reactive oxygen species (ROS). MES, 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid as one of the Good's buffers has broadly been used for buffering medium, and it is thought to suit for plant growth with the concentration at 0.1% (w/v) because the buffer capacity of MES ranging pH 5.5-7.0 (for Arabidopsis, pH 5.8). However, many reports have shown that, in nature, roots require different pH values on the surface of specific root apex zones, namely meristem, transition zone, and elongation zone. Despite the fact that roots always grow on a media containing buffer molecule, little is known about impact of MES on root growth. Here, we have checked the effects of different concentrations of MES buffer using growing roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results show that 1% of MES significantly inhibited root growth, the number of root hairs and length of meristem, whereas 0.1% promoted root growth and root apex area (region spanning from the root tip up to the transition zone). Furthermore, superoxide generation in root apex disappeared at 1% of MES. These results suggest that MES disturbs normal root morphogenesis by changing the ROS homeostasis in root apex. PMID:26925066

  15. The bHLH transcription factor SPATULA regulates root growth by controlling the size of the root meristem

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Arabidopsis thaliana gene SPATULA (SPT), encoding a bHLH transcription factor, was originally identified for its role in pistil development. SPT is necessary for the growth and development of all carpel margin tissues including the style, stigma, septum and transmitting tract. Since then, it has been shown to have pleiotropic roles during development, including restricting the meristematic region of the leaf primordia and cotyledon expansion. Although SPT is expressed in roots, its role in this organ has not been investigated. Results An analysis of embryo and root development showed that loss of SPT function causes an increase in quiescent center size in both the embryonic and postembryonic stem cell niches. In addition, root meristem size is larger due to increased division, which leads to a longer primary root. spt mutants exhibit other pleiotropic developmental phenotypes, including more flowers, shorter internodes and an extended flowering period. Genetic and molecular analysis suggests that SPT regulates cell proliferation in parallel to gibberellic acid as well as affecting auxin accumulation or transport. Conclusions Our data suggest that SPT functions in growth control throughout sporophytic growth of Arabidopsis, but is not necessary for cell fate decisions except during carpel development. SPT functions independently of gibberellic acid during root development, but may play a role in regulating auxin transport or accumulation. Our data suggests that SPT plays a role in control of root growth, similar to its roles in above ground tissues. PMID:23280064

  16. Human due diligence.

    PubMed

    Harding, David; Rouse, Ted

    2007-04-01

    Most companies do a thorough job of financial due diligence when they acquire other companies. But all too often, deal makers simply ignore or underestimate the significance of people issues in mergers and acquisitions. The consequences are severe. Most obviously, there's a high degree of talent loss after a deal's announcement. To make matters worse, differences in decision-making styles lead to infighting; integration stalls; and productivity declines. The good news is that human due diligence can help companies avoid these problems. Done early enough, it helps acquirers decide whether to embrace or kill a deal and determine the price they are willing to pay. It also lays the groundwork for smooth integration. When acquirers have done their homework, they can uncover capability gaps, points of friction, and differences in decision making. Even more important, they can make the critical "people" decisions-who stays, who goes, who runs the combined business, what to do with the rank and file-at the time the deal is announced or shortly thereafter. Making such decisions within the first 30 days is critical to the success of a deal. Hostile situations clearly make things more difficult, but companies can and must still do a certain amount of human due diligence to reduce the inevitable fallout from the acquisition process and smooth the integration. This article details the steps involved in conducting human due diligence. The approach is structured around answering five basic questions: Who is the cultural acquirer? What kind of organization do you want? Will the two cultures mesh? Who are the people you most want to retain? And how will rank-and-file employees react to the deal? Unless an acquiring company has answered these questions to its satisfaction, the acquisition it is making will be very likely to end badly. PMID:17432159

  17. Applicability of optical scanner method for fine root dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kume, Tomonori; Ohashi, Mizue; Makita, Naoki; Khoon Kho, Lip; Katayama, Ayumi; Matsumoto, Kazuho; Ikeno, Hidetoshi

    2016-04-01

    Fine root dynamics is one of the important components in forest carbon cycling, as ~60 % of tree photosynthetic production can be allocated to root growth and metabolic activities. Various techniques have been developed for monitoring fine root biomass, production, mortality in order to understand carbon pools and fluxes resulting from fine roots dynamics. The minirhizotron method is now a widely used technique, in which a transparent tube is inserted into the soil and researchers count an increase and decrease of roots along the tube using images taken by a minirhizotron camera or minirhizotron video camera inside the tube. This method allows us to observe root behavior directly without destruction, but has several weaknesses; e.g., the difficulty of scaling up the results to stand level because of the small observation windows. Also, most of the image analysis are performed manually, which may yield insufficient quantitative and objective data. Recently, scanner method has been proposed, which can produce much bigger-size images (A4-size) with lower cost than those of the minirhizotron methods. However, laborious and time-consuming image analysis still limits the applicability of this method. In this study, therefore, we aimed to develop a new protocol for scanner image analysis to extract root behavior in soil. We evaluated applicability of this method in two ways; 1) the impact of different observers including root-study professionals, semi- and non-professionals on the detected results of root dynamics such as abundance, growth, and decomposition, and 2) the impact of window size on the results using a random sampling basis exercise. We applied our new protocol to analyze temporal changes of root behavior from sequential scanner images derived from a Bornean tropical forests. The results detected by the six observers showed considerable concordance in temporal changes in the abundance and the growth of fine roots but less in the decomposition. We also examined

  18. Root traits for infertile soils

    PubMed Central

    White, Philip J.; George, Timothy S.; Dupuy, Lionel X.; Karley, Alison J.; Valentine, Tracy A.; Wiesel, Lea; Wishart, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Crop production is often restricted by the availability of essential mineral elements. For example, the availability of N, P, K, and S limits low-input agriculture, the phytoavailability of Fe, Zn, and Cu limits crop production on alkaline and calcareous soils, and P, Mo, Mg, Ca, and K deficiencies, together with proton, Al and Mn toxicities, limit crop production on acid soils. Since essential mineral elements are acquired by the root system, the development of crop genotypes with root traits increasing their acquisition should increase yields on infertile soils. This paper examines root traits likely to improve the acquisition of these elements and observes that, although the efficient acquisition of a particular element requires a specific set of root traits, suites of traits can be identified that benefit the acquisition of a group of mineral elements. Elements can be divided into three Groups based on common trait requirements. Group 1 comprises N, S, K, B, and P. Group 2 comprises Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn, and Ni. Group 3 contains mineral elements that rarely affect crop production. It is argued that breeding for a limited number of distinct root ideotypes, addressing particular combinations of mineral imbalances, should be pursued. PMID:23781228

  19. Electrotropism of Maize Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Hideo; Evans, Michael L.

    1990-01-01

    We examined the kinetics of electrotropic curvature in solutions of low electrolyte concentration using primary roots of maize (Zea mays L., variety Merit). When submerged in oxygenated solution across which an electric field was applied, the roots curved rapidly and strongly toward the positive electrode (anode). The strength of the electrotropic response increased and the latent period decreased with increasing field strength. At a field strength of 7.5 volts per centimeter the latent period was 6.6 minutes and curvature reached 60 degrees in about 1 hour. For electric fields greater than 10 volts per centimeter the latent period was less than 1 minute. There was no response to electric fields less than 2.8 volts per centimeter. Both electrotropism and growth were inhibited when indoleacetic acid (10 micromolar) was included in the medium. The auxin transport inhibitor pyrenoylbenzoic acid strongly inhibited electrotropism without inhibiting growth. Electrotropism was enhanced by treatments that interfere with gravitropism, e.g. decapping the roots or pretreating them with ethyleneglycol-bis-[β-ethylether]-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid. Similarly, roots of agravitropic pea (Pisum sativum, variety Ageotropum) seedlings were more responsive to electrotropic stimulation than roots of normal (variety Alaska) seedlings. The data indicate that the early steps of gravitropism and electrotropism occur by independent mechanisms. However, the motor mechanisms of the two responses may have features in common since auxin and auxin transport inhibitors reduced both gravitropism and electrotropism. PMID:11537481

  20. Magnetophoretic Induction of Root Curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, Karl H.

    1997-01-01

    The last year of the grant period concerned the consolidation of previous experiments to ascertain that the theoretical premise apply not just to root but also to shoots. In addition, we verified that high gradient magnetic fields do not interfere with regular cellular activities. Previous results have established that: (1) intracellular magnetophoresis is possible; and (2) HGMF lead to root curvature. In order to investigate whether HGMF affect the assembly and/or organization of structural proteins, we examined the arrangement of microtubules in roots exposed to HGMF. The cytoskeletal investigations were performed with fomaldehyde-fixed, nonembedded tissue segments that were cut with a vibratome. Microtubules (MTs) were stained with rat anti-yeast tubulin (YOL 1/34) and DTAF-labeled antibody against rat IgG. Microfilaments (MFs) were visualized by incubation in rhodamine-labeled phalloidin. The distribution and arrangement of both components of the cytoskeleton were examined with a confocal microscope. Measurements of growth rates and graviresponse were done using a video-digitizer. Since HGMF repel diamagnetic substances including starch-filled amyloplasts and most The second aspect of the work includes studies of the effect of cytoskeletal inhibitors on MTs and MFs. The analysis of the effect of micotubular inhibitors on the auxin transport in roots showed that there is very little effect of MT-depolymerizing or stabilizing drugs on auxin transport. This is in line with observations that application of such drugs is not immediately affecting the graviresponsiveness of roots.

  1. Root standing crop and chemistry after six years of soil warming in a temperate forest.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yumei; Tang, Jianwu; Melillo, Jerry M; Butler, Sarah; Mohan, Jacqueline E

    2011-07-01

    Examining the responses of root standing crop (biomass and necromass) and chemistry to soil warming is crucial for understanding root dynamics and functioning in the face of global climate change. We assessed the standing crop, total nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) compounds in tree roots and soil net N mineralization over the growing season after 6 years of experimental soil warming in a temperate deciduous forest in 2008. Roots were sorted into four different categories: live and dead fine roots (≤1mm in diameter) and live and dead coarse roots (1-4 mm in diameter). Total root standing crop (live plus dead) in the top 10 cm of soil in the warmed area was 42.5% (378.4 vs. 658.5 g m(-2)) lower than in the control area, while live root standing crop in the warmed area was 62% lower than in the control area. Soil net N mineralization over the growing season increased by 79.4% in the warmed relative to the control area. Soil warming did not significantly change the concentrations of C and C compounds (sugar, starch, hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin) in the four root categories. However, total N concentration in the live fine roots in the warmed area was 10.5% (13.7 vs. 12.4 mg g(-1)) higher and C:N ratio was 8.6% (38.5 vs. 42.1) lower than in the control area. The increase in N concentration in the live fine roots could be attributed to the increase in soil N availability due to soil warming. Net N mineralization was negatively correlated with both live and dead fine roots in the mineral soil that is home to the majority of roots, suggesting that soil warming increases N mineralization, decreases fine root biomass and thus decreases C allocation belowground. PMID:21813516

  2. Root dynamics in native grassland exposed to elevated CO2 and warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendall, E.; Carrillo, Y.; Morgan, J. A.; Newcomb, J.

    2011-12-01

    Responses of belowground processes to global change play a major role in terrestrial ecosystem carbon (C) storage and feedbacks to climate, but remain understudied in comparison to aboveground processes. In grasslands, roots comprise about 75 percent of the biomass, and are responsible for increased inputs of C to soil pools under elevated CO2. Root exudation may also be responsible for increased rates of soil organic matter decomposition, or priming, potentially offsetting inputs of new C. Understanding the fate of belowground C allocation requires a better understanding of root processes including growth, rhizodeposition, turnover and decomposition. We studied root dynamics in mixed C3/C4 grassland at the Prairie Heating and CO2 Enrichment experiment near Cheyenne, WY, where Free-Air CO2 Enrichment is applied at 600 ppm during daytime in the growing season, and temperature is elevated by 1.5/3 deg C day/night all year. We applied several belowground techniques, including direct biomass measurements coupled with C isotope labeling, root litter decomposition measured in litter bags and in plots with herbicide applied, and image analysis of intact and harvested root systems . Direct measurements indicated that elevated CO2 increased root biomass, a trend that became increasingly significant over the first four years of treatments. Warming by itself tended to decrease root biomass in the first two years, and this effect declined in the next two years of the experiment, suggesting a transient negative response of root growth to warming. Continuous 13C labeling in elevated CO2 plots allowed detection of a greater proportion of new C in warmed than ambient temperature plots, demonstrating greater allocation of C to roots exposed to both elevated CO2 and warming. A root litter bag decomposition experiment showed that C3 grass roots decomposed more rapidly with elevated CO2 alone, but more slowly when elevated CO2 was combined with warming, possibly due to soil drying. C4

  3. Using thermodynamics to assess biotic and abiotic impediments to root water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechmann, Marcel; Hildebrandt, Anke; Kleidon, Axel

    2016-04-01

    evaluate energy fluxes afterwards. The results show that a minimum of energy is exported in mixed root systems, but a wide range of root systems act near the optimum. A great loss of efficiency only occurs in the extreme cases (only young or only old roots). In all systems near the optimum root water uptake is impeded equally by abiotic and biotic factors in moist conditions, whereas abiotic factors become the limiting factor in dry conditions. The abiotic factors depend on the soil type and are either due to the water retention function or water flow towards individual roots. Small changes in the distribution of root resistance shift the impediments from radial to axial flow path within the root, but without much affecting overall energy export. This suggests that abiotic factors are a dominant control for efficient root water uptake, while morphology only has a comparatively smaller effect, as long as the root system contains a minimum mixture of uptake and transport roots.

  4. Evidence of Differences between the Communities of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Colonizing Galls and Roots of Prunus persica Infected by the Root-Knot Nematode Meloidogyne incognita▿

    PubMed Central

    Alguacil, Maria del Mar; Torrecillas, Emma; Lozano, Zenaida; Roldán, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) play important roles as plant protection agents, reducing or suppressing nematode colonization. However, it has never been investigated whether the galls produced in roots by nematode infection are colonized by AMF. This study tested whether galls produced by Meloidogyne incognita infection in Prunus persica roots are colonized by AMF. We also determined the changes in AMF composition and biodiversity mediated by infection with this root-knot nematode. DNA from galls and roots of plants infected by M. incognita and from roots of noninfected plants was extracted, amplified, cloned, and sequenced using AMF-specific primers. Phylogenetic analysis using the small-subunit (SSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) data set revealed 22 different AMF sequence types (17 Glomus sequence types, 3 Paraglomus sequence types, 1 Scutellospora sequence type, and 1 Acaulospora sequence type). The highest AMF diversity was found in uninfected roots, followed by infected roots and galls. This study indicates that the galls produced in P. persica roots due to infection with M. incognita were colonized extensively by a community of AMF, belonging to the families Paraglomeraceae and Glomeraceae, that was different from the community detected in roots. Although the function of the AMF in the galls is still unknown, we hypothesize that they act as protection agents against opportunistic pathogens. PMID:21984233

  5. Community composition of root-associated fungi in a Quercus-dominated temperate forest: “codominance” of mycorrhizal and root-endophytic fungi

    PubMed Central

    Toju, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Sato, Hirotoshi; Tanabe, Akifumi S; Gilbert, Gregory S; Kadowaki, Kohmei

    2013-01-01

    In terrestrial ecosystems, plant roots are colonized by various clades of mycorrhizal and endophytic fungi. Focused on the root systems of an oak-dominated temperate forest in Japan, we used 454 pyrosequencing to explore how phylogenetically diverse fungi constitute an ecological community of multiple ecotypes. In total, 345 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of fungi were found from 159 terminal-root samples from 12 plant species occurring in the forest. Due to the dominance of an oak species (Quercus serrata), diverse ectomycorrhizal clades such as Russula, Lactarius, Cortinarius, Tomentella, Amanita, Boletus, and Cenococcum were observed. Unexpectedly, the root-associated fungal community was dominated by root-endophytic ascomycetes in Helotiales, Chaetothyriales, and Rhytismatales. Overall, 55.3% of root samples were colonized by both the commonly observed ascomycetes and ectomycorrhizal fungi; 75.0% of the root samples of the dominant Q. serrata were so cocolonized. Overall, this study revealed that root-associated fungal communities of oak-dominated temperate forests were dominated not only by ectomycorrhizal fungi but also by diverse root endophytes and that potential ecological interactions between the two ecotypes may be important to understand the complex assembly processes of belowground fungal communities. PMID:23762515

  6. Breakage of transgenic tobacco roots for monoclonal antibody release in an ultra-scale down shearing device

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Sally; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli; Ma, Julian; Thomas, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco roots offer a potential alternative to leaves for monoclonal antibody (MAb) production. A possible method for extraction of MAbs from roots is by homogenization, breaking the roots into fragments to release the antibody. This process was assessed by shearing 10 mm root sections (“roots”) in a 24 mL ultra-scale down shearing device, including an impeller with serrated blade edges, intended to mimic the action of a large-scale homogenizer. Size distributions of the remaining intact roots and root fragments were obtained as a function of shearing time. The data suggest that about 36% of the roots could not be broken under the prevailing conditions and, beyond these unbreakable roots, the fragmentation was approximately first order with respect to intact root number. It was postulated that root breakage in such a high shearing device was due to root-impeller collisions and the particle size data suggest that roots colliding with the impeller were completely fragmented into debris particles of the order of 0.1 mm in length. IgG release normalized to release by grinding appeared to lag behind the number of roots that had fragmented, suggesting that a process of leakage followed fragmentation in the ultra-scale down shearing device. PMID:23860965

  7. The role of roots in the accumulation and removal of cadmium by the aquatic plant Hydrilla verticillata.

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Rui, Haiyun; Chen, Chen; Chen, Yahua; Shen, Zhenguo

    2016-07-01

    Aquatic macrophytes can absorb heavy metals either from sediments via the root system, from the water phase by leaves, or from both sources. In this study, cadmium accumulation and distribution in the aquatic plant Hydrilla verticillata were investigated, with a focus on the role of roots. Results showed that leaves of H. verticillata had a higher Cd concentration than roots when intact plants were grown in sediments and solutions containing Cd. Cadmium can significantly decrease the leaf chlorophyll content, and the leaves of intact plants with roots had lower chlorophyll contents than the leaves of detached ones without roots due to the transfer effect of roots. The majority of the Cd accumulated in leaves of H. verticillata was bound to the cell walls. When roots were submerged in a solution containing Cd, with shoots in a control solution without Cd, the Cd concentrations in leaves were considerably lower than in roots. In contrast, Cd was almost undetectable in roots when the shoots were submerged in a solution containing Cd, with roots in the control solution. Compared to the leaves and stems of detached shoots without roots, the concentrations of Cd were much higher in the leaves and stems of intact plants with roots. It is suggested that the roots of intact plants absorb Cd and transfer it to leaves and that more Cd is removed from the solution by intact plants. PMID:27023818

  8. Cache Complexity and Multicore Implementation for Univariate Real Root Isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changbo; Moreno Maza, Marc; Xie, Yuzhen

    2012-02-01

    We present parallel algorithms with optimal cache complexity for the kernel routine of many real root isolation algorithms, namely the Taylor shift by 1. We then report on multicore implementation for isolating the real roots of univariate polynomials with integer coefficients based on a classical algorithm due to Vincent, Collins and Akritas. For processing some well-known benchmark examples with sufficiently large size, our software tool reaches linear speedup on an 8-core machine. In addition, we show that our software is able to fully utilize the many cores and the memory space of a 32-core machine to tackle large problems that are out of reach for a desktop implementation.

  9. Efficient hydraulic properties of root systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechmann, Marcel; Schneider, Christoph; Carminati, Andrea; Hildebrandt, Anke

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of ecosystem root water uptake (RWU) is paramount for parameterizing hydrological models. With the increase in computational power it is possible to calculate RWU explicitly up to the single plant scale using physical models. However, application of these models for increasing our understanding of ecosystem root water uptake is hindered by the deficit in knowledge about the detailed hydraulic parameter distribution within root systems. However, those physical models may help us to identify efficient parameterizations and to describe the influence of these hydraulic parameters on RWU profiles. In this research, we investigated the combined influence of root hydraulic parameters and different root topologies on shaping efficient root water uptake. First, we use a conceptual model of simple branching structures to understand the influence of branching location and transitions in root hydraulic properties on the RWU patterns in typical sub root structures. Second, we apply a physical model called "aRoot" to test our conclusions on complex root system architectures of single plants. aRoot calculates the distribution of xylem potential within arbitrary root geometries to satisfy a given water demand depending on the available water in the soil. Redistribution of water within the bulk soil is calculated using the Richards equation. We analyzed results using a measure of uptake efficiency, which describes the effort necessary for transpiration. Simulations with the conceptual model showed that total transpiration in sub root structures is independent of root hydraulic properties over a wide range of hydraulic parameters. On the other hand efficiency of root water uptake depends crucially on distribution hydraulic parameters in line with root topology. At the same time, these parameters shape strongly the distribution of RWU along the roots, and its evolution in time, thus leading to variable individual root water uptake profiles. Calculating

  10. Elicitation Approaches for Withanolide Production in Hairy Root Culture of Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal.

    PubMed

    Sivanandhan, Ganeshan; Selvaraj, Natesan; Ganapathi, Andy; Manickavasagam, Markandan

    2016-01-01

    Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal is a versatile medicinal plant extensively utilized for production of phytochemical drug preparations. The roots and whole plants are traditionally used in Ayurveda, Unani, and Siddha medicines, as well as in homeopathy. Several studies provide evidence for an array of pharmaceutical properties due to the presence of steroidal lactones named "withanolides." A number of research groups have focused their attention on the effects of biotic and abiotic elicitors on withanolide production using cultures of adventitious roots, cell suspensions, shoot suspensions, and hairy roots in large-scale bioreactor for producing withanolides. This chapter explains the detailed procedures for induction and establishment of hairy roots from leaf explants of W. somnifera, proliferation and multiplication of hairy root cultures, estimation of withanolide productivity upon elicitation with salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate, and quantification of major withanolides by HPLC. The protocol herein described could be implemented for large-scale cultivation of hairy root biomass to improve withanolide production. PMID:26843160

  11. Orthodontic treatment in patient with idiopathic root resorption: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rey, Diego; Smit, Rosana Martínez; Gamboa, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Multiple idiopathic external root resorption is a rare pathological condition usually detected as an incidental radiographic finding. External root resorption of permanent teeth is a multifactorial process related to several local and systemic factors. If an etiological factor cannot be identified for root resorption, the term "idiopathic" is applied. This report presents a case of multiple idiopathic apical root resorption. The condition was found in a young female patient seeking orthodontic treatment due to malocclusion. This kind of resorption starts apically and progresses coronally, causing a gradual shortening and rounding of the remaining root. Patients with this condition are not the ideal candidates for orthodontic treatment; however, the aim of this report is to describe an unusual case of idiopathic root resorption involving the entire dentition, and to present the orthodontic treatment of this patient. It describes the progress and completion of orthodontic therapy with satisfactory end results. PMID:25741832

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Adventitious Root Growth Phenotypes in Carnation Stem Cuttings

    PubMed Central

    Birlanga, Virginia; Villanova, Joan; Cano, Antonio; Cano, Emilio A.; Acosta, Manuel; Pérez-Pérez, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Carnation is one of the most important species on the worldwide market of cut flowers. Commercial carnation cultivars are vegetatively propagated from terminal stem cuttings that undergo a rooting and acclimation process. For some of the new cultivars that are being developed by ornamental breeders, poor adventitious root (AR) formation limits its commercial scaling-up, due to a significant increase in the production costs. We have initiated a genetical-genomics approach to determine the molecular basis of the differences found between carnation cultivars during adventitious rooting. The detailed characterization of AR formation in several carnation cultivars differing in their rooting losses has been performed (i) during commercial production at a breeders’ rooting station and (ii) on a defined media in a controlled environment. Our study reveals the phenotypic signatures that distinguishes the bad-rooting cultivars and provides the appropriate set-up for the molecular identification of the genes involved in AR development in this species. PMID:26230608

  13. A Clinical Update on the Different Methods to Decrease the Occurrence of Missed Root Canals.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Asgary, Saeed; Shalavi, Sousan; V Abbott, Paul

    2016-01-01

    One of the main causes of endodontic treatment failure is the clinician's inability to localize all the root canals. Due to the complex anatomy of the root canal system, missed canals are not uncommon. There are several strategies to decrease the possibility of missed root canals starting with good pre-operative radiographies. In order to overcome the limitations of conventional radiographies, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) can be considered. A correct access cavity preparation is of pivotal importance in localizing the orifices of the root canals. Furthermore, ultrasonics are very important devices to find missed canals. Increasing magnification and illumination enhance the possibility of finding all root canals during root canal treatment. The purpose of the present paper was to review all of the above techniques and devices. PMID:27471533

  14. A Clinical Update on the Different Methods to Decrease the Occurrence of Missed Root Canals

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Asgary, Saeed; Shalavi, Sousan; V. Abbott, Paul

    2016-01-01

    One of the main causes of endodontic treatment failure is the clinician’s inability to localize all the root canals. Due to the complex anatomy of the root canal system, missed canals are not uncommon. There are several strategies to decrease the possibility of missed root canals starting with good pre-operative radiographies. In order to overcome the limitations of conventional radiographies, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) can be considered. A correct access cavity preparation is of pivotal importance in localizing the orifices of the root canals. Furthermore, ultrasonics are very important devices to find missed canals. Increasing magnification and illumination enhance the possibility of finding all root canals during root canal treatment. The purpose of the present paper was to review all of the above techniques and devices. PMID:27471533

  15. Orthodontic treatment in patient with idiopathic root resorption: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Diego; Smit, Rosana Martínez; Gamboa, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Multiple idiopathic external root resorption is a rare pathological condition usually detected as an incidental radiographic finding. External root resorption of permanent teeth is a multifactorial process related to several local and systemic factors. If an etiological factor cannot be identified for root resorption, the term "idiopathic" is applied. This report presents a case of multiple idiopathic apical root resorption. The condition was found in a young female patient seeking orthodontic treatment due to malocclusion. This kind of resorption starts apically and progresses coronally, causing a gradual shortening and rounding of the remaining root. Patients with this condition are not the ideal candidates for orthodontic treatment; however, the aim of this report is to describe an unusual case of idiopathic root resorption involving the entire dentition, and to present the orthodontic treatment of this patient. It describes the progress and completion of orthodontic therapy with satisfactory end results. PMID:25741832

  16. Characterising root density of peach trees in a semi-arid Chernozem to increase plant density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paltineanu, Cristian; Septar, Leinar; Gavat, Corina; Chitu, Emil; Oprita, Alexandru; Moale, Cristina; Calciu, Irina; Vizitiu, Olga; Lamureanu, Gheorghe

    2016-01-01

    The available information on root system in fully mature peach orchards in semi-arid regions is insufficient. This paper presents a study on the root system density in an irrigated peach orchard from Dobrogea, Romania, using the trench technique. The old orchard has clean cultivation in inter-row and in-row. The objectives of the study were to: test the hypothesis that the roots of fully mature peach trees occupy the whole soil volume; find out if root repulsive effect of adjacent plants occurred for the rootstocks and soil conditions; find relationships between root system and soil properties and analyse soil state trend. Some soil physical properties were significantly deteriorated in inter-row versus in-row, mainly due to soil compaction induced by technological traffic. Density of total roots was higher in-row than inter-row, but the differences were not significant. Root density decreased more intensely with soil depth than with distance from tree trunks. Root density correlated with some soil properties. No repulsive effect of the roots of adjacent peach trees was noted. The decrease of root density with distance from trunk can be used in optimising tree arrangement. The conclusions could also be used in countries with similar growth conditions.

  17. Enzymes hydrolyzing structural components and ferrous ion cause rusty-root symptom on ginseng (Panax ginseng).

    PubMed

    Lee, Chanyong; Kim, Kwang Yup; Lee, Jo-Eun; Kim, Sunghan; Ryu, Dongkul; Choi, Jae-Eul; An, Gilhwan

    2011-02-01

    Microbial induction of rusty-root was proved in this study. The enzymes hydrolyzing plant structural materials, including pectinase, pectolyase, ligninase, and cellulase, caused the rusty-root in ginseng. Pectinase and pectolyase produced the highest rusty-color formation. Ferrous ion (Fe+++) caused the synergistic effect on rusty-root formation in ginseng when it was used with pectinase. The effect of ferric ion (Fe++) on rusty-root formation was slow, compared with Fe+++, probably due to gradual oxidation to Fe+++. Other metal ions including the ferric ion (Fe++) did not affect rusty-root formation. The endophytic bacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Lysobacter gummosus, Pseudomonas veronii, Pseudomonas marginalis, Rhodococcus erythropolis, and Rhodococcus globerulus, and the rotten-root forming phytophathogenic fungus Cylindrocarpon destructans, caused rusty-root. The polyphenol formation (rusty color) was not significantly different between microorganisms. The rotten-root-forming C. destructans produced large quantities of external cellulase activity (about 2.3 U[micronM/min/mg protein]), which indicated the pathogenecity of the fungus, whereas the bacteria produced 0.1-0.7 U. The fungal external pectinase activities (0.05 U) and rusty-root formation activity were similar to those of the bacteria. In this report, we proved that microbial hydrolyzing enzymes caused rusty-root (Hue value 15 degrees) of ginseng, and ferrous ion worsened the symptom. PMID:21364303

  18. Extracting multiple interacting root systems using X-ray microcomputed tomography.

    PubMed

    Mairhofer, Stefan; Sturrock, Craig J; Bennett, Malcolm J; Mooney, Sacha J; Pridmore, Tony P

    2015-12-01

    Root system interactions and competition for resources are active areas of research that contribute to our understanding of how roots perceive and react to environmental conditions. Recent research has shown this complex suite of processes can now be observed in a natural environment (i.e. soil) through the use of X-ray microcomputed tomography (μCT), which allows non-destructive analysis of plant root systems. Due to their similar X-ray attenuation coefficients and densities, the roots of different plants appear as similar greyscale intensity values in μCT image data. Unless they are manually and carefully traced, it has not previously been possible to automatically label and separate different root systems grown in the same soil environment. We present a technique, based on a visual tracking approach, which exploits knowledge of the shape of root cross-sections to automatically recover from X-ray μCT data three-dimensional descriptions of multiple, interacting root architectures growing in soil. The method was evaluated on both simulated root data and real images of two interacting winter wheat Cordiale (Triticumaestivum L.) plants grown in a single soil column, demonstrating that it is possible to automatically segment different root systems from within the same soil sample. This work supports the automatic exploration of supportive and competitive foraging behaviour of plant root systems in natural soil environments. PMID:26461469

  19. TIME FOR COFFEE controls root meristem size by changes in auxin accumulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Li-Wei; Yan, Da-Wei; Liu, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Hong-Guo; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2014-01-01

    Roots play important roles in plant survival and productivity as they not only anchor the plants in the soil but are also the primary organ for the uptake of nutrients from the outside. The growth and development of roots depend on the specification and maintenance of the root meristem. Here, we report a previously unknown role of TIME FOR COFFEE (TIC) in controlling root meristem size in Arabidopsis. The results showed that loss of function of TIC reduced root meristem length and cell number by decreasing the competence of meristematic cells to divide. This was due to the repressed expression of PIN genes for decreased acropetal auxin transport in tic-2, leading to low auxin accumulation in the roots responsible for reduced root meristem, which was verified by exogenous application of indole-3-acetic acid. Downregulated expression of PLETHORA1 (PLT1) and PLT2, key transcription factors in mediating the patterning of the root stem cell niche, was also assayed in tic-2. Similar results were obtained with tic-2 and wild-type plants at either dawn or dusk. We also suggested that the MYC2-mediated jasmonic acid signalling pathway may not be involved in the regulation of TIC in controlling the root meristem. Taken together, these results suggest that TIC functions in an auxin-PLTs loop for maintenance of post-embryonic root meristem. PMID:24277277

  20. Elderly at Greater Risk for Root Caries: A Look at the Multifactorial Risks with Emphasis on Genetics Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Gati, Daniel; Vieira, Alexandre R.

    2011-01-01

    Root caries is one of the most significant dental problems among older adults today. Many studies have demonstrated that older adults are at greater risk for developing root caries. Here we examine what risk factors older adults are prone to and explain how they contribute to higher rates of oral disease, in particular root caries. The elderly are at risk for root caries due to dentures, lack of dexterity, a shift from complex to simple sugars, and poor oral hygiene. Decreased salivary flow and its manifestations with other social/behavioral and medical factors may provide a more comprehensive explanation to a higher frequency of root caries in older adults. PMID:21754932

  1. Unintentional root fragment retention in proximity to dental implants: a series of six human case reports.

    PubMed

    Langer, Laureen; Langer, Burton; Salem, Daliah

    2015-01-01

    There has been renewed interest in intentionally placing dental implants in proximity to or in contact with tooth root fragments. In clinical practice, human teeth are usually extracted due to nonrestorable caries, vertical or horizontal root fractures, periodontal disease, or endodontic failure, which is commonly accompanied by inflammation and bacterial contamination. The aim of this case series is to present the adverse effects in humans of clinically undetected root-to-implant contact (CURIC), where implants were unintentionally placed in proximity to undetected retained root fragments. The adverse effects of small (3 to 5 mm) root fragments were detectible 6 to 48 months post implant placement. Three out of seven implants in six patients were removed due to severe coronal bone loss. This differs from retrograde peri-implantitis, where only the apical area of the implant is affected and the coronal portion remains integrated. The detrimental effect of root fragment-to-implant contact is described along with its clinical management. Based on the review of currently relevant data, mixed results have been documented regarding the success of dental implants in proximity to tooth-root fragments. Careful evaluation of long-term, postloading results in humans where hopeless teeth have been extracted due to infection and significant bone loss are required before intentional root fragment retention is considered a safe and reliable clinical option for implant placement. PMID:25909518

  2. Root branching: mechanisms, robustness, and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Dastidar, Mouli Ghosh; Jouannet, Virginie; Maizel, Alexis

    2012-01-01

    Plants are sessile organisms that must efficiently exploit their habitat for water and nutrients. The degree of root branching impacts the efficiency of water uptake, acquisition of nutrients, and anchorage. The root system of plants is a dynamic structure whose architecture is determined by modulation of primary root growth and root branching. This plasticity relies on the continuous integration of environmental inputs and endogenous developmental programs controlling root branching. This review focuses on the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of lateral root distribution, initiation, and organogenesis with the main focus on the root system of Arabidopsis thaliana. We also examine the mechanisms linking environmental changes to the developmental pathways controlling root branching. Recent progress that emphasizes the parallels to the formation of root branches in other species is discussed. PMID:23801487

  3. New theories of root growth modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landl, Magdalena; Schnepf, Andrea; Vanderborght, Jan; Huber, Katrin; Javaux, Mathieu; Bengough, A. Glyn; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-04-01

    In dynamic root architecture models, root growth is represented by moving root tips whose line trajectory results in the creation of new root segments. Typically, the direction of root growth is calculated as the vector sum of various direction-affecting components. However, in our simulations this did not reproduce experimental observations of root growth in structured soil. We therefore developed a new approach to predict the root growth direction. In this approach we distinguish between, firstly, driving forces for root growth, i.e. the force exerted by the root which points in the direction of the previous root segment and gravitropism, and, secondly, the soil mechanical resistance to root growth or penetration resistance. The latter can be anisotropic, i.e. depending on the direction of growth, which leads to a difference between the direction of the driving force and the direction of the root tip movement. Anisotropy of penetration resistance can be caused either by microscale differences in soil structure or by macroscale features, including macropores. Anisotropy at the microscale is neglected in our model. To allow for this, we include a normally distributed random deflection angle α to the force which points in the direction of the previous root segment with zero mean and a standard deviation σ. The standard deviation σ is scaled, so that the deflection from the original root tip location does not depend on the spatial resolution of the root system model. Similarly to the water flow equation, the direction of the root tip movement corresponds to the water flux vector while the driving forces are related to the water potential gradient. The analogue of the hydraulic conductivity tensor is the root penetrability tensor. It is determined by the inverse of soil penetration resistance and describes the ease with which a root can penetrate the soil. By adapting the three dimensional soil and root water uptake model R-SWMS (Javaux et al., 2008) in this way

  4. Root growth, secondary root formation and root gravitropism in carotenoid-deficient seedlings of Zea mays L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Y. K.; Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of ABA on root growth, secondary-root formation and root gravitropism in seedlings of Zea mays was investigated by using Fluridone-treated seedlings and a viviparous mutant, both of which lack carotenoids and ABA. Primary roots of seedlings grown in the presence of Fluridone grew significantly slower than those of control (i.e. untreated) roots. Elongation of Fluridone-treated roots was inhibited significantly by the exogenous application of 1 mM ABA. Exogenous application of 1 micromole and 1 nmole ABA had either no effect or only a slight stimulatory effect on root elongation, depending on the method of application. The absence of ABA in Fluridone-treated plants was not an important factor in secondary-root formation in seedlings less than 9-10 d old. However, ABA may suppress secondary-root formation in older seedlings, since 11-d-old control seedlings had significantly fewer secondary roots than Fluridone-treated seedlings. Roots of Fluridone-treated and control seedlings were graviresponsive. Similar data were obtained for vp-9 mutants of Z. mays, which are phenotypically identical to Fluridone-treated seedlings. These results indicate that ABA is necessary for neither secondary-root formation nor for positive gravitropism by primary roots.

  5. Four cuspal maxillary second premolar with single root and three root canals: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Parul; Nikhil, Vineeta; Goyal, Ayush; Singh, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    Traditional configuration of maxillary second premolars has been described to have two cusps, one root and one or two root canals. The endodontic literature reports considerable anatomic aberrations in the root canal morphology of maxillary second premolar but the literature available on the variation in cuspal anatomy and its relationship to the root canal anatomy is sparse. The purpose of this clinical report was to describe the root and root canal configuration of a maxillary second premolar with four cusps. PMID:27563190

  6. Four cuspal maxillary second premolar with single root and three root canals: Case report.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Parul; Nikhil, Vineeta; Goyal, Ayush; Singh, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    Traditional configuration of maxillary second premolars has been described to have two cusps, one root and one or two root canals. The endodontic literature reports considerable anatomic aberrations in the root canal morphology of maxillary second premolar but the literature available on the variation in cuspal anatomy and its relationship to the root canal anatomy is sparse. The purpose of this clinical report was to describe the root and root canal configuration of a maxillary second premolar with four cusps. PMID:27563190

  7. At the Root of the Wood Wide Web

    PubMed Central

    Avio, Luciano; Fortuna, Paola; Pellegrino, Elisa; Sbrana, Cristiana; Strani, Patrizia

    2006-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are mutualistic symbionts living in the roots of 80% of land plant species, and developing extensive, below-ground extraradical hyphae fundamental for the uptake of soil nutrients and their transfer to host plants. Since AM fungi have a wide host range, they are able to colonize and interconnect contiguous plants by means of hyphae extending from one root system to another. Such hyphae may fuse due to the widespread occurrence of anastomoses, whose formation depends on a highly regulated mechanism of self recognition. Here, we examine evidences of self recognition and non-self incompatibility in hyphal networks formed by AM fungi and discuss recent results showing that the root systems of plants belonging to different species, genera and families may be connected by means of anastomosis formation between extraradical mycorrhizal networks, which can create indefinitely large numbers of belowground fungal linkages within plant communities. PMID:19521468

  8. Using Hairy Roots for Production of Valuable Plant Secondary Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Tian, Li

    2015-01-01

    Plants synthesize a wide variety of natural products, which are traditionally termed secondary metabolites and, more recently, coined specialized metabolites. While these chemical compounds are employed by plants for interactions with their environment, humans have long since explored and exploited plant secondary metabolites for medicinal and practical uses. Due to the tissue-specific and low-abundance accumulation of these metabolites, alternative means of production in systems other than intact plants are sought after. To this end, hairy root culture presents an excellent platform for producing valuable secondary metabolites. This chapter will focus on several major groups of secondary metabolites that are manufactured by hairy roots established from different plant species. Additionally, the methods for preservations of hairy roots will also be reviewed. PMID:25583225

  9. A weak combined magnetic field changes root gravitropism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordyum, E. L.; Bogatina, N. I.; Kalinina, Ja. M.; Sheykina, N. V.

    Immobile higher plants are oriented in the gravitational field due to gravitropim that is a physiological growth reaction and consists of three phases: reception of a gravitational signal by statocytes, its transduction to the elongation zone, and finally the organ bending. According to the starch-statolith hypothesis, amyloplasts in the specialized graviperceptive cells - statocytes sediment in the direction of a gravitational vector in the distal part of a cell. The polar arrangement of organelles is maintained by means of the cytoskeleton. On the Kholodny-Went's, theory the root bending is provided by the polar movement of auxin from a root cap to the elongation zone. It is also known that gravistimulation initiates a rapid Ca2+ redistribution in a root apex. Calcium ions modify an activity of many cytoskeletal proteins and clustering of calcium channels may be directed by actin microfilaments. Although the available data show the Ca2+ and cytoskeleton participation in graviperception and signal transduction, the clear evidence with regard to the participation of cytoskeletal elements and calcium ions in these processes is therefore substantial but still circumstantial and requires new experimental data. Roots are characterized with positive gravitropism, i. e. they grow in the direction of a gravitational vector. It was first shown by us that roots change the direction of a gravitropic reaction under gravistimulation in the weak combined magnetic field with a frequency of 32 Hz. 2-3-day old cress seedlings were gravistimulated in moist chambers, which are placed in μ-metal shields. Inside μ -metal shields, combined magnetic fields have been created. Experiments were performed in darkness at temperature 20±10C. Measurements of the magnitude of magnetic fields were carried out with a flux-gate magnetometer. Cress roots reveal negative gravitropism, i. e. they grow in the opposite direction to a gravitational vector, during 2 h of gravistimulation and then

  10. Brown Root Rot of Alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This bulletin describes the disease of alfalfa called brown root rot (BRR) including: the disease symptoms, the fungal pathogen and its biology, its distribution, and disease management. Since the 1920s, BRR has been regarded as an important disease of forage legumes, including alfalfa, in northern ...

  11. Dry root rot of chickpea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dry root rot of chickpea is a serious disease under dry hot summer conditions, particularly in the semi-arid tropics of Ethiopia, and in central and southern India. It usually occurs at reproductive stages of the plant. Symptoms include drooping of petioles and leaflets of the tips, but not the low...

  12. Rhizoctonia root rot of lentil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia root rot is a soilborne disease of lentil caused by the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, and is favored by cool (11-19 C or 52 - 66 F) and wet soil conditions. The disease starts as reddish or dark brown lesions on lentil plants near the soil line, and develops into sunken lesions an...

  13. [Root arthrosis of the thumb].

    PubMed

    Hautefeuille, P; Duquesnoy, B

    1991-12-15

    Root arthrosis of the thumb results from a degenerative lesion of the trapezometacarpal joint. It is particularly frequent in menopausal women. The often prolonged pain it produces sometimes raises therapeutic problems. Treatment is always medical at first, but when it fails several surgical operations will ensure permanent painlessness. PMID:1808686

  14. Disease notes - Bacterial root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial root rot initiated by lactic acid bacteria, particularly Leuconostoc, occurs every year in Idaho sugarbeet fields. Hot fall weather seems to make the problem worse. Although Leuconostoc initiates the rot, other bacteria and yeast frequently invade the tissue as well. The acetic acid bac...

  15. Cutting the Roots of Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koziey, Paul W.

    1996-01-01

    Violence is rooted in obedience to authority and in comparisons--foundations of our institutions of parenting and schooling. Obedience brings reward and punishment, comparison perpetuates a cycle of competition and conflict. Television violence is especially harmful because children easily understand visual images. The Reality Research approach to…

  16. Excising the Root from STEM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lock, Roger

    2009-01-01

    There are a number of well-intentioned STEM initiatives, some designed to improve the recruitment and retention of science teachers. Sometimes it appears that the initiators are remote from direct contact with the "grass roots" issues that feed the "stem" on which the blossoms of young enthusiastic recruits to the science teaching profession are…

  17. Influence of soil and climate on root zone storage capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer-Euser, Tanja; McMillan, Hilary; Hrachowitz, Markus; Winsemius, Hessel; Savenije, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    The catchment representative root zone storage capacity (Sr), i.e. the plant available soil water, is an important parameter of hydrological systems. It does not only influence the runoff from catchments, by controlling the partitioning of water fluxes but it also influences the local climate, by providing the source for transpiration. Sr is difficult to observe at catchment scale, due to heterogeneities in vegetation and soils. Sr estimates are traditionally derived from soil characteristics and estimates of root depths. In contrast, a recently suggested method allows the determination of Sr based on climate data, i.e. precipitation and evaporation, alone (Gao et al., 2014). By doing so, the time-variable size of Sr, is explicitly accounted for, which is not the case for traditional soil based methods. The time-variable size of Sr reflects root growth and thus the vegetation's adaption to medium-term fluctuations in the climate. Thus, we tested and compared Sr estimates from this 'climate based method' with estimates from soil data for 32 catchments in New Zealand. The results show a larger range in climate derived Sr than in soil derived Sr. Using a model experiment, we show that a model using the climate derived Sr is more accurately able to reproduce a set of hydrological regime signatures, in particular for humid catchments. For more arid catchments, the two methods provide similar model results. This implies that, although soil database information has some predictive power for model soil storage capacity, climate has a similar or greater control on Sr, as climate affects the evolving hydrological functioning of the root zone at the time scale of hydrological interest. In addition, Sr represents the plant available water and thus root surface, volume and density, and is therefore a more complete descriptor of vegetation influence on water fluxes than mere root depth. On balance, the results indicate that climate has a higher explanatory power than soils for

  18. Molecular regulatory mechanism of tooth root development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao-Feng; Chai, Yang

    2012-01-01

    The root is crucial for the physiological function of the tooth, and a healthy root allows an artificial crown to function as required clinically. Tooth crown development has been studied intensively during the last few decades, but root development remains not well understood. Here we review the root development processes, including cell fate determination, induction of odontoblast and cementoblast differentiation, interaction of root epithelium and mesenchyme, and other molecular mechanisms. This review summarizes our current understanding of the signaling cascades and mechanisms involved in root development. It also sets the stage for de novo tooth regeneration. PMID:23222990

  19. Root reinforcement and its contribution to slope stability in the Western Ghats of Kerala, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukose Kuriakose, Sekhar; van Beek, L. P. H.

    2010-05-01

    The Western Ghats of Kerala, India is prone to shallow landslides and consequent debris flows. An earlier study (Kuriakose et al., DOI:10.1002/esp.1794) with limited data had already demonstrated the possible effects of vegetation on slope hydrology and stability. Spatially distributed root cohesion is one of the most important data necessary to assess the effects of anthropogenic disturbances on the probability of shallow landslide initiation, results of which are reported in sessions GM6.1 and HS13.13/NH3.16. Thus it is necessary to the know the upper limits of reinforcement that the roots are able to provide and its spatial and vertical distribution in such an anthropogenically intervened terrain. Root tensile strength and root pull out tests were conducted on nine species of plants that are commonly found in the region. They are 1) Rubber (Hevea Brasiliensis), 2) Coconut Palm (Cocos nucifera), 3) Jackfruit trees (Artocarpus heterophyllus), 4) Teak (Tectona grandis), 5) Mango trees (Mangifera indica), 6) Lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus), 7) Gambooge (Garcinia gummi-gutta), 8) Coffee (Coffea Arabica) and 9) Tea (Camellia sinensis). About 1500 samples were collected of which only 380 could be tested (in the laboratory) due to breakage of roots during the tests. In the successful tests roots failed in tension. Roots having diameters between 2 mm and 12 mm were tested. Each sample tested had a length of 15 cm. Root pull out tests were conducted in the field. Root tensile strength vs root diameter, root pull out strength vs diameter, root diameter vs root depth and root count vs root depth relationships were derived. Root cohesion was computed for nine most dominant plants in the region using the perpendicular root model of Wu et al. (1979) modified by Schimidt et al. (2001). A soil depth map was derived using regression kriging as suggested by Kuriakose et al., (doi:10.1016/j.catena.2009.05.005) and used along with the land use map of 2008 to distribute the

  20. Characterizing pathways by which gravitropic effectors could move from the root cap to the root of primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; McClelen, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    Plasmodesmata linking the root cap and root in primary roots Zea mays are restricted to approx. 400 protodermal cells bordering approx. 110000 microns2 of the calyptrogen of the root cap. This area is less than 10% of the cross-sectional area of the root-tip at the cap junction. Therefore, gravitropic effectors moving from the root cap to the root can move symplastically only through a relatively small area in the centre of the root. Decapped roots are non-responsive to gravity. However, decapped roots whose caps are replaced immediately after decapping are strongly graviresponsive. Thus, gravicurvature occurs only when the root cap contacts the root, and symplastic continuity between the cap and root is not required for gravicurvature. Completely removing mucilage from the root tip renders the root non-responsive to gravity. Taken together, these data suggest that gravitropic effectors move apoplastically through mucilage from the cap to the root.

  1. Colonization of lettuce rhizosphere and roots by tagged Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Bonaldi, Maria; Chen, Xiaoyulong; Kunova, Andrea; Pizzatti, Cristina; Saracchi, Marco; Cortesi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Beneficial microorganisms are increasingly used in agriculture, but their efficacy often fails due to limited knowledge of their interactions with plants and other microorganisms present in rhizosphere. We studied spatio-temporal colonization dynamics of lettuce roots and rhizosphere by genetically modified Streptomyces spp. Five Streptomyces strains, strongly inhibiting in vitro the major soil-borne pathogen of horticultural crops, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, were transformed with pIJ8641 plasmid harboring an enhanced green fluorescent protein marker and resistance to apramycin. The fitness of transformants was compared to the wild-type strains and all of them grew and sporulated at similar rates and retained the production of enzymes and selected secondary metabolites as well as in vitro inhibition of S. sclerotiorum. The tagged ZEA17I strain was selected to study the dynamics of lettuce roots and rhizosphere colonization in non-sterile growth substrate. The transformed strain was able to colonize soil, developing roots, and rhizosphere. When the strain was inoculated directly on the growth substrate, significantly more t-ZEA17I was re-isolated both from the rhizosphere and the roots when compared to the amount obtained after seed coating. The re-isolation from the rhizosphere and the inner tissues of surface-sterilized lettuce roots demonstrated that t-ZEA17I is both rhizospheric and endophytic. PMID:25705206

  2. Competition for water between deep- and shallow-rooted grasses

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, J.L.; Black, R.A. ); Link, S.O. )

    1994-06-01

    Competition between root systems of neighboring plants may be altered by seasonal variation in precipitation and soil moisture. Competitive effects of a deep-rooted, perennial grass, Pseudoroegneria spicata, on a shallow-rooted, perennial grass, Poa sandbergii, were monitored over two growing seasons by isolating the root system of P. sandbergii individuals within PVC tubes and comparing plant and soil characteristics to controls. When isolated for the entire growing season, P. sandbergii continued vegetative growth three weeks longer and later season soil water content was significantly greater than controls. Differences in soil water content were greatest between 30 and 50cm, below P. sandbergii's typical rooting depth. Flowering phenology was unchanged. When plants were isolated late in the season, treated plants showed more negative predown xylem pressure potential the morning after isolatron. Compared to controls, soil water content was reduced the day after tube insertion. These immediate effects on plant and soil water status may be due to removal of water supplied nightly by hydraulic lift.

  3. Fluorescence Imaging of the Cytoskeleton in Plant Roots.

    PubMed

    Dyachok, Julia; Paez-Garcia, Ana; Yoo, Cheol-Min; Palanichelvam, Karuppaiah; Blancaflor, Elison B

    2016-01-01

    During the past two decades the use of live cytoskeletal probes has increased dramatically due to the introduction of the green fluorescent protein. However, to make full use of these live cell reporters it is necessary to implement simple methods to maintain plant specimens in optimal growing conditions during imaging. To image the cytoskeleton in living Arabidopsis roots, we rely on a system involving coverslips coated with nutrient supplemented agar where the seeds are directly germinated. This coverslip system can be conveniently transferred to the stage of a confocal microscope with minimal disturbance to the growth of the seedling. For roots with a larger diameter such as Medicago truncatula, seeds are first germinated in moist paper, grown vertically in between plastic trays, and roots mounted on glass slides for confocal imaging. Parallel with our live cell imaging approaches, we routinely process fixed plant material via indirect immunofluorescence. For these methods we typically use non-embedded vibratome-sectioned and whole mount permeabilized root tissue. The clearly defined developmental regions of the root provide us with an elegant system to further understand the cytoskeletal basis of plant development. PMID:26498783

  4. Colonization of lettuce rhizosphere and roots by tagged Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Bonaldi, Maria; Chen, Xiaoyulong; Kunova, Andrea; Pizzatti, Cristina; Saracchi, Marco; Cortesi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Beneficial microorganisms are increasingly used in agriculture, but their efficacy often fails due to limited knowledge of their interactions with plants and other microorganisms present in rhizosphere. We studied spatio-temporal colonization dynamics of lettuce roots and rhizosphere by genetically modified Streptomyces spp. Five Streptomyces strains, strongly inhibiting in vitro the major soil-borne pathogen of horticultural crops, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, were transformed with pIJ8641 plasmid harboring an enhanced green fluorescent protein marker and resistance to apramycin. The fitness of transformants was compared to the wild-type strains and all of them grew and sporulated at similar rates and retained the production of enzymes and selected secondary metabolites as well as in vitro inhibition of S. sclerotiorum. The tagged ZEA17I strain was selected to study the dynamics of lettuce roots and rhizosphere colonization in non-sterile growth substrate. The transformed strain was able to colonize soil, developing roots, and rhizosphere. When the strain was inoculated directly on the growth substrate, significantly more t-ZEA17I was re-isolated both from the rhizosphere and the roots when compared to the amount obtained after seed coating. The re-isolation from the rhizosphere and the inner tissues of surface-sterilized lettuce roots demonstrated that t-ZEA17I is both rhizospheric and endophytic. PMID:25705206

  5. Soil bacteria hold the key to root cluster formation.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Byron B; Pérez-Fernández, Maria; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Jesús

    2015-05-01

    Root clusters are bunches of hairy rootlets that enhance nutrient uptake among many plants. Since first being reported in 1974, the involvement of rhizobacteria in their formation has received conflicting support. Attempts to identify specific causative organisms have failed and their role has remained speculative. We set up a gnotobiotic experiment using two root-clustered species, Viminaria juncea (Fabaceae) and Hakea laurina (Proteaceae), and inoculated them with two plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), Bradyrhizobium elkanii and Bacillus mageratium, that produce indole-3-acetic-acid (IAA). Plants were suspended in water culture with four combinations of nitrogen and phosphorus. Clusters only developed in the presence of PGPR in two treatments, were greatly enhanced in another four, suppressed in five, and unaffected in five. Nitrogen amendment was associated with a higher density of clusters. Bradyrhizobium promoted cluster formation in Hakea, whereas Bacillus promoted cluster formation in Viminaria and suppressed it in Hakea. Greater root cluster numbers were due either to a larger root system induced by PGPR (indirect resource effect) and/or to more clusters per unit length of parent root (direct morphogenetic effect). The results are interpreted in terms of greater IAA production by Bradyrhizobium than Bacillus and greater sensitivity of Viminaria to IAA than Hakea. PMID:25534068

  6. Sowing Density: A Neglected Factor Fundamentally Affecting Root Distribution and Biomass Allocation of Field Grown Spring Barley (Hordeum Vulgare L.).

    PubMed

    Hecht, Vera L; Temperton, Vicky M; Nagel, Kerstin A; Rascher, Uwe; Postma, Johannes A

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the function of root traits and the genetic variation in these traits are often conducted under controlled conditions using individual potted plants. Little is known about root growth under field conditions and how root traits are affected by agronomic practices in particular sowing density. We hypothesized that with increasing sowing density, root length density (root length per soil volume, cm cm(-3)) increases in the topsoil as well as specific root length (root length per root dry weight, cm g(-1)) due to greater investment in fine roots. Therefore, we studied two spring barley cultivars at ten different sowing densities (24-340 seeds m(-2)) in 2 consecutive years in a clay loam field in Germany and established sowing density dose-response curves for several root and shoot traits. We took soil cores for measuring roots up to a depth of 60 cm in and between plant rows (inter-row distance 21 cm). Root length density increased with increasing sowing density and was greatest in the plant row in the topsoil (0-10 cm). Greater sowing density increased specific root length partly through greater production of fine roots in the topsoil. Rooting depth (D50) of the major root axes (root diameter class 0.4-1.0 mm) was not affected. Root mass fraction decreased, while stem mass fraction increased with sowing density and over time. Leaf mass fraction was constant over sowing density but greater leaf area was realized through increased specific leaf area. Considering fertilization, we assume that light competition caused plants to grow more shoot mass at the cost of investment into roots, which is partly compensated by increased specific root length and shallow rooting. Increased biomass per area with greater densities suggest that density increases the efficiency of the cropping system, however, declines in harvest index at densities over 230 plants m(-2) suggest that this efficiency did not translate into greater yield. We conclude that plant density is a

  7. Sowing Density: A Neglected Factor Fundamentally Affecting Root Distribution and Biomass Allocation of Field Grown Spring Barley (Hordeum Vulgare L.)

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Vera L.; Temperton, Vicky M.; Nagel, Kerstin A.; Rascher, Uwe; Postma, Johannes A.

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the function of root traits and the genetic variation in these traits are often conducted under controlled conditions using individual potted plants. Little is known about root growth under field conditions and how root traits are affected by agronomic practices in particular sowing density. We hypothesized that with increasing sowing density, root length density (root length per soil volume, cm cm−3) increases in the topsoil as well as specific root length (root length per root dry weight, cm g−1) due to greater investment in fine roots. Therefore, we studied two spring barley cultivars at ten different sowing densities (24–340 seeds m−2) in 2 consecutive years in a clay loam field in Germany and established sowing density dose-response curves for several root and shoot traits. We took soil cores for measuring roots up to a depth of 60 cm in and between plant rows (inter-row distance 21 cm). Root length density increased with increasing sowing density and was greatest in the plant row in the topsoil (0–10 cm). Greater sowing density increased specific root length partly through greater production of fine roots in the topsoil. Rooting depth (D50) of the major root axes (root diameter class 0.4–1.0 mm) was not affected. Root mass fraction decreased, while stem mass fraction increased with sowing density and over time. Leaf mass fraction was constant over sowing density but greater leaf area was realized through increased specific leaf area. Considering fertilization, we assume that light competition caused plants to grow more shoot mass at the cost of investment into roots, which is partly compensated by increased specific root length and shallow rooting. Increased biomass per area with greater densities suggest that density increases the efficiency of the cropping system, however, declines in harvest index at densities over 230 plants m−2 suggest that this efficiency did not translate into greater yield. We conclude that plant density is a

  8. Acclimation of fine root respiration to soil warming involves starch deposition in very fine and fine roots: a case study in Fagus sylvatica saplings.

    PubMed

    Di Iorio, Antonino; Giacomuzzi, Valentino; Chiatante, Donato

    2016-03-01

    Root activities in terms of respiration and non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) storage and mobilization have been suggested as major physiological roles in fine root lifespan. As more frequent heat waves and drought periods within the next decades are expected, to what extent does thermal acclimation in fine roots represent a mechanism to cope with such upcoming climatic conditions? In this study, the possible changes in very fine (diameter < 0.5 mm) and fine (0.5-1 mm) root morphology and physiology in terms of respiration rate and NSC [soluble sugars (SS) and starch] concentrations, were investigated on 2-year-old Fagus sylvatica saplings subjected to a simulated long-lasting heat wave event and to co-occurring soil drying. For both very fine and fine roots, soil temperature (ST) resulted inversely correlated with specific root length, respiration rates and SSs concentration, but directly correlated with root mass, root tissue density and starch concentration. In particular, starch concentration increased under 28 °C for successively decreasing under 21 °C ST. These findings showed that thermal acclimation in very fine and fine roots due to 24 days exposure to high ST (∼ 28 °C), induced starch accumulation. Such 'carbon-savings strategy' should bear the maintenance costs associated to the recovery process in case of restored favorable environmental conditions, such as those occurring at the end of a heat wave event. Drought condition seems to affect the fine root vitality much more under moderate than high temperature condition, making the temporary exposure to high ST less threatening to root vitality than expected. PMID:26263877

  9. Control of root system architecture by DEEPER ROOTING 1 increases rice yield under drought conditions.

    PubMed

    Uga, Yusaku; Sugimoto, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Satoshi; Rane, Jagadish; Ishitani, Manabu; Hara, Naho; Kitomi, Yuka; Inukai, Yoshiaki; Ono, Kazuko; Kanno, Noriko; Inoue, Haruhiko; Takehisa, Hinako; Motoyama, Ritsuko; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Wu, Jianzhong; Matsumoto, Takashi; Takai, Toshiyuki; Okuno, Kazutoshi; Yano, Masahiro

    2013-09-01

    The genetic improvement of drought resistance is essential for stable and adequate crop production in drought-prone areas. Here we demonstrate that alteration of root system architecture improves drought avoidance through the cloning and characterization of DEEPER ROOTING 1 (DRO1), a rice quantitative trait locus controlling root growth angle. DRO1 is negatively regulated by auxin and is involved in cell elongation in the root tip that causes asymmetric root growth and downward bending of the root in response to gravity. Higher expression of DRO1 increases the root growth angle, whereby roots grow in a more downward direction. Introducing DRO1 into a shallow-rooting rice cultivar by backcrossing enabled the resulting line to avoid drought by increasing deep rooting, which maintained high yield performance under drought conditions relative to the recipient cultivar. Our experiments suggest that control of root system architecture will contribute to drought avoidance in crops. PMID:23913002

  10. Nicotiana Roots Recruit Rare Rhizosphere Taxa as Major Root-Inhabiting Microbes.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Muhammad; Law, Audrey D; Moe, Luke A

    2016-02-01

    Root-associated microbes have a profound impact on plant health, yet little is known about the distribution of root-associated microbes among different root morphologies or between rhizosphere and root environments. We explore these issues here with two commercial varieties of burley tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing from rhizosphere soil, as well as from primary, secondary, and fine roots. While rhizosphere soils exhibited a fairly rich and even distribution, root samples were dominated by Proteobacteria. A comparison of abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) between rhizosphere and root samples indicated that Nicotiana roots select for rare taxa (predominantly Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Acidobacteria) from their corresponding rhizosphere environments. The majority of root-inhabiting OTUs (~80 %) exhibited habitat generalism across the different root morphological habitats, although habitat specialists were noted. These results suggest a specific process whereby roots select rare taxa from a larger community. PMID:26391804

  11. Constructing the Uncertainty of Due Dates

    PubMed Central

    Vos, Sarah C.; Anthony, Kathryn E.; O'Hair, H. Dan

    2015-01-01

    By its nature, the date that a baby is predicted to be born, or the due date, is uncertain. How women construct the uncertainty of their due dates may have implications for when and how women give birth. In the United States as many as 15% of births occur before 39 weeks because of elective inductions or cesarean sections, putting these babies at risk for increased medical problems after birth and later in life. This qualitative study employs a grounded theory approach to understand the decisions women make of how and when to give birth. Thirty-three women who were pregnant or had given birth within the past two years participated in key informant or small group interviews. The results suggest that women interpret the uncertainty of their due dates as a reason to wait on birth and as a reason to start the process early; however, information about a baby's brain development in the final weeks of pregnancy may persuade women to remain pregnant longer. The uncertainties of due dates are analyzed using Babrow's problematic integration, which distinguishes between epistemological and ontological uncertainty. The results point to a third type uncertainty, axiological uncertainty. Axiological uncertainty is rooted in the values and ethics of outcomes. PMID:24266788

  12. The evolutionary root of flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Goremykin, Vadim V; Nikiforova, Svetlana V; Biggs, Patrick J; Zhong, Bojian; Delange, Peter; Martin, William; Woetzel, Stefan; Atherton, Robin A; McLenachan, Patricia A; Lockhart, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Correct rooting of the angiosperm radiation is both challenging and necessary for understanding the origins and evolution of physiological and phenotypic traits in flowering plants. The problem is known to be difficult due to the large genetic distance separating flowering plants from other seed plants and the sparse taxon sampling among basal angiosperms. Here, we provide further evidence for concern over substitution model misspecification in analyses of chloroplast DNA sequences. We show that support for Amborella as the sole representative of the most basal angiosperm lineage is founded on sequence site patterns poorly described by time-reversible substitution models. Improving the fit between sequence data and substitution model identifies Trithuria, Nymphaeaceae, and Amborella as surviving relatives of the most basal lineage of flowering plants. This finding indicates that aquatic and herbaceous species dominate the earliest extant lineage of flowering plants. [; ; ; ; ; .]. PMID:22851550

  13. Modeling Root Zone Effects on Preferred Pathways for the Passive Transport of Ions and Water in Plant Roots.

    PubMed

    Foster, Kylie J; Miklavcic, Stanley J

    2016-01-01

    We extend a model of ion and water transport through a root to describe transport along and through a root exhibiting a complexity of differentiation zones. Attention is focused on convective and diffusive transport, both radially and longitudinally, through different root tissue types (radial differentiation) and root developmental zones (longitudinal differentiation). Model transport parameters are selected to mimic the relative abilities of the different tissues and developmental zones to transport water and ions. For each transport scenario in this extensive simulations study, we quantify the optimal 3D flow path taken by water and ions, in response to internal barriers such as the Casparian strip and suberin lamellae. We present and discuss both transient and steady state results of ion concentrations as well as ion and water fluxes. We find that the peak in passive uptake of ions and water occurs at the start of the differentiation zone. In addition, our results show that the level of transpiration has a significant impact on the distribution of ions within the root as well as the rate of ion and water uptake in the differentiation zone, while not impacting on transport in the elongation zone. From our model results we infer information about the active transport of ions in the different developmental zones. In particular, our results suggest that any uptake measured in the elongation zone under steady state conditions is likely to be due to active transport. PMID:27446144

  14. Modeling Root Zone Effects on Preferred Pathways for the Passive Transport of Ions and Water in Plant Roots

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Kylie J.; Miklavcic, Stanley J.

    2016-01-01

    We extend a model of ion and water transport through a root to describe transport along and through a root exhibiting a complexity of differentiation zones. Attention is focused on convective and diffusive transport, both radially and longitudinally, through different root tissue types (radial differentiation) and root developmental zones (longitudinal differentiation). Model transport parameters are selected to mimic the relative abilities of the different tissues and developmental zones to transport water and ions. For each transport scenario in this extensive simulations study, we quantify the optimal 3D flow path taken by water and ions, in response to internal barriers such as the Casparian strip and suberin lamellae. We present and discuss both transient and steady state results of ion concentrations as well as ion and water fluxes. We find that the peak in passive uptake of ions and water occurs at the start of the differentiation zone. In addition, our results show that the level of transpiration has a significant impact on the distribution of ions within the root as well as the rate of ion and water uptake in the differentiation zone, while not impacting on transport in the elongation zone. From our model results we infer information about the active transport of ions in the different developmental zones. In particular, our results suggest that any uptake measured in the elongation zone under steady state conditions is likely to be due to active transport. PMID:27446144

  15. Deep Phenotyping of Coarse Root Architecture in R. pseudoacacia Reveals That Tree Root System Plasticity Is Confined within Its Architectural Model

    PubMed Central

    Danjon, Frédéric; Khuder, Hayfa; Stokes, Alexia

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at assessing the influence of slope angle and multi-directional flexing and their interaction on the root architecture of Robinia pseudoacacia seedlings, with a particular focus on architectural model and trait plasticity. 36 trees were grown from seed in containers inclined at 0° (control) or 45° (slope) in a glasshouse. The shoots of half the plants were gently flexed for 5 minutes a day. After 6 months, root systems were excavated and digitized in 3D, and biomass measured. Over 100 root architectural traits were determined. Both slope and flexing increased significantly plant size. Non-flexed trees on 45° slopes developed shallow roots which were largely aligned perpendicular to the slope. Compared to the controls, flexed trees on 0° slopes possessed a shorter and thicker taproot held in place by regularly distributed long and thin lateral roots. Flexed trees on the 45° slope also developed a thick vertically aligned taproot, with more volume allocated to upslope surface lateral roots, due to the greater soil volume uphill. We show that there is an inherent root system architectural model, but that a certain number of traits are highly plastic. This plasticity will permit root architectural design to be modified depending on external mechanical signals perceived by young trees. PMID:24386227

  16. Deep phenotyping of coarse root architecture in R. pseudoacacia reveals that tree root system plasticity is confined within its architectural model.

    PubMed

    Danjon, Frédéric; Khuder, Hayfa; Stokes, Alexia

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at assessing the influence of slope angle and multi-directional flexing and their interaction on the root architecture of Robinia pseudoacacia seedlings, with a particular focus on architectural model and trait plasticity. 36 trees were grown from seed in containers inclined at 0° (control) or 45° (slope) in a glasshouse. The shoots of half the plants were gently flexed for 5 minutes a day. After 6 months, root systems were excavated and digitized in 3D, and biomass measured. Over 100 root architectural traits were determined. Both slope and flexing increased significantly plant size. Non-flexed trees on 45° slopes developed shallow roots which were largely aligned perpendicular to the slope. Compared to the controls, flexed trees on 0° slopes possessed a shorter and thicker taproot held in place by regularly distributed long and thin lateral roots. Flexed trees on the 45° slope also developed a thick vertically aligned taproot, with more volume allocated to upslope surface lateral roots, due to the greater soil volume uphill. We show that there is an inherent root system architectural model, but that a certain number of traits are highly plastic. This plasticity will permit root architectural design to be modified depending on external mechanical signals perceived by young trees. PMID:24386227

  17. The role of strigolactones in root development

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Huwei; Tao, Jinyuan; Gu, Pengyuan; Xu, Guohua; Zhang, Yali

    2016-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) and their derivatives were recently defined as novel phytohormones that orchestrate shoot and root growth. Levels of SLs, which are produced mainly by plant roots, increase under low nitrogen and phosphate levels to regulate plant responses. Here, we summarize recent work on SL biology by describing their role in the regulation of root development and hormonal crosstalk during root deve-lopment. SLs promote the elongation of seminal/primary roots and adventitious roots (ARs) and they repress lateral root formation. In addition, auxin signaling acts downstream of SLs. AR formation is positively or negatively regulated by SLs depending largely on the plant species and experimental conditions. The relationship between SLs and auxin during AR formation appears to be complex. Most notably, this hormonal response is a key adaption that radically alters rice root architecture in response to nitrogen- and phosphate-deficient conditions. PMID:26515106

  18. Environmental Control of Root System Biology.

    PubMed

    Rellán-Álvarez, Rubén; Lobet, Guillaume; Dinneny, José R

    2016-04-29

    The plant root system traverses one of the most complex environments on earth. Understanding how roots support plant life on land requires knowing how soil properties affect the availability of nutrients and water and how roots manipulate the soil environment to optimize acquisition of these resources. Imaging of roots in soil allows the integrated analysis and modeling of environmental interactions occurring at micro- to macroscales. Advances in phenotyping of root systems is driving innovation in cross-platform-compatible methods for data analysis. Root systems acclimate to the environment through architectural changes that act at the root-type level as well as through tissue-specific changes that affect the metabolic needs of the root and the efficiency of nutrient uptake. A molecular understanding of the signaling mechanisms that guide local and systemic signaling is providing insight into the regulatory logic of environmental responses and has identified points where crosstalk between pathways occurs. PMID:26905656

  19. An L-system model for root system mycorrhization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Schweiger, Peter; Jansa, Jan; Leitner, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Mineral phosphate fertilisers are a non-renewable resource; rock phosphate reserves are estimated to be depleted in 50 to 100 years. In order to prevent a severe phosphate crisis in the 21st century, there is a need to decrease agricultural inputs such as P fertilisers by making use of plant mechanisms that increase P acquisition efficiency. Most plants establish mycorrhizal symbiosis as an adaptation to increase/economize their P acquisition from the soil. However, there is a great functional diversity in P acquisition mechanisms among different fungal species that colonize the roots (Thonar et al. 2011), and the composition of mycorrhizal community is known to depend strongly on agricultural management practices. Thus, the agroecosystem management may substantially affect the mycorrhizal functioning and also the use of P fertilizers. To date, it is still difficult to quantify the potential input savings for the agricultural crops through manipulation of their symbiotic microbiome, mainly due to lack of mechanistic understanding of P uptake dynamics by the fungal hyphae. In a first attempt, Schnepf et al. (2008b) have used mathematical modelling to show on the single root scale how different fungal growth pattern influence root P uptake. However, their approach was limited by the fact that it was restricted to the scale of a single root. The goal of this work is to advance the dynamic, three-dimensional root architecture model of Leitner et al. (2010) to include root system infection with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and growth of external mycelium. The root system infection model assumes that there is an average probability of infection (primary infection), that the probability of infection of a new root segment immediately adjacent to an existing infection is much higher than the average (secondary infection), that infected root segments have entry points that are the link between internal and external mycelium, that only uninfected root segments are susceptible

  20. Single-rooted primary first mandibular molar

    PubMed Central

    Haridoss, SelvaKumar; Swaminathan, Kavitha; Rajendran, Vijayakumar; Rajendran, Bharathan

    2014-01-01

    Morphological variations like single-rooted molar in primary dentition are scarce. Understanding the root canal anatomy and variations is necessary for successful root canal therapy. The purpose of the present article is to report successful endodontic treatment of primary left mandibular first molar with an abnormal morphology of a single root. This case report highlights the importance of knowledge and its applications in the management of anomalous anatomic variants which play a crucial role in the success of endodontic treatment. PMID:25150245

  1. Root proliferation in decaying roots and old root channels: A nutrient conservation mechanism in oligotrophic mangrove forests?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, K.L.

    2001-01-01

    1. In oligotrophic habitats, proliferation of roots in nutrient-rich microsites may contribute to overall nutrient conservation by plants. Peat-based soils on mangrove islands in Belize are characterized by the presence of decaying roots and numerous old root channels (0.1-3.5 cm diameter) that become filled with living and highly branched roots of Rhizophora mangle and Avicennia germinans. The objectives of this study were to quantify the proliferation of roots in these microsites and to determine what causes this response. 2. Channels formed by the refractory remains of mangrove roots accounted for only 1-2% of total soil volume, but the proportion of roots found within channels varied from 9 to 24% of total live mass. Successive generations of roots growing inside increasingly smaller root channels were also found. 3. When artificial channels constructed of PVC pipe were buried in the peat for 2 years, those filled with nutrient-rich organic matter had six times more roots than empty or sand-filled channels, indicating a response to greater nutrient availability rather than to greater space or less impedance to root growth. 4. Root proliferation inside decaying roots may improve recovery of nutrients released from decomposing tissues before they can be leached or immobilized in this intertidal environment. Greatest root proliferation in channels occurred in interior forest zones characterized by greater soil waterlogging, which suggests that this may be a strategy for nutrient capture that minimizes oxygen losses from the whole root system. 5. Improved efficiency of nutrient acquisition at the individual plant level has implications for nutrient economy at the ecosystem level and may explain, in part, how mangroves persist and grow in nutrient-poor environments.

  2. Do increased summer precipitation and N deposition alter fine root dynamics in a Mojave Desert ecosystem?

    PubMed

    Verburg, Paul S J; Young, Andrew C; Stevenson, Bryan A; Glanzmann, Isabelle; Arnone, John A; Marion, Giles M; Holmes, Christopher; Nowak, Robert S

    2013-03-01

    Climate change is expected to impact the amount and distribution of precipitation in the arid southwestern United States. In addition, nitrogen (N) deposition is increasing in these regions due to increased urbanization. Responses of belowground plant activity to increases in soil water content and N have shown inconsistent patterns between biomes. In arid lands, plant productivity is limited by water and N availability so it is expected that changes in these factors will affect fine root dynamics. The objectives of this study were to quantify the effects of increased summer precipitation and N deposition on fine root dynamics in a Mojave Desert ecosystem during a 2-year field experiment using minirhizotron measurements. Root length density, production, and mortality were measured in field plots in the Mojave Desert receiving three 25 mm summer rain events and/or 40 kg N ha(-1)  yr(-1) . Increased summer precipitation and N additions did not have an overall significant effect on any of the measured root parameters. However, differences in winter precipitation resulting from interannual variability in rainfall appeared to affect root parameters with root production and turnover increasing following a wet winter most likely due to stimulation of annual grasses. In addition, roots were distributed more deeply in the soil following the wet winter. Root length density was initially higher under canopies compared to canopy interspaces, but converged toward the end of the study. In addition, roots tended to be distributed more deeply into the soil in canopy interspace areas. Results from this study indicated that increased summer precipitation and N deposition in response to climate change and urbanization are not likely to affect fine root dynamics in these Mojave Desert ecosystems, despite studies showing aboveground plant physiological responses to these environmental perturbations. However, changes in the amount and possibly distribution of winter precipitation

  3. Assessment of Ustilago maydis as a fungal model for root infection studies.

    PubMed

    Mazaheri-Naeini, Mahta; Sabbagh, Seyed Kazem; Martinez, Yves; Séjalon-Delmas, Nathalie; Roux, Christophe

    2015-03-01

    Ustilago maydis is a fungus infecting aerial parts of maize to form smutted galls. Due to its interest as a genetic tool in plant pathology, we evaluated its ability to penetrate into plant roots. The fungus can penetrate between epidermic root cells, forming inter and intracellular pseudohyphae. Root infection didn't provoke gall formation on the maize lines tested, and targeted PCR detection showed that U. maydis, unlike the other maize smut fungus Sporisorium reilianum, has a weak aptitude to grow from the roots up to the aerial part of maize. We also observed that U. maydis can infect Medicago truncatula hairy roots as an alternative host. This plant species is a model host to study root symbiosis, and this pathosystem can provide new insights on root-microbe interactions. Considering that U. maydis could be a soil fungus, we tested its responsiveness to GR24, a strigolactone analogue. Strigolactones are root exuded molecules which activate mitochondrial metabolism of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Physiologic and molecular analysis revealed that GR24 also increases cell respiration of U. maydis. This result points out that strigolactones could have an incidence on several rhizospheric microbes. These data provide evidences that the biotrophic pathogen U. maydis has to be considered for studying root infection. PMID:25749366

  4. A global analysis of fine root production as affected by soil nitrogen and phosphorus

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Z. Y.; Chen, Han Y. H.

    2012-01-01

    Fine root production is the largest component of belowground production and plays substantial roles in the biogeochemical cycles of terrestrial ecosystems. The increasing availability of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) due to human activities is expected to increase aboveground net primary production (ANNP), but the response of fine root production to N and P remains unclear. If roots respond to nutrients as ANNP, fine root production is anticipated to increase with increasing soil N and P. Here, by synthesizing data along the nutrient gradient from 410 natural habitats and from 469 N and/or P addition experiments, we showed that fine root production increased in terrestrial ecosystems with an average increase along the natural N gradient of up to 0.5 per cent with increasing soil N. Fine root production also increased with soil P in natural conditions, particularly at P < 300 mg kg−1. With N, P and combined N + P addition, fine root production increased by a global average of 27, 21 and 40 per cent, respectively. However, its responses differed among ecosystems and soil types. The global average increases in fine root production are lower than those of ANNP, indicating that above- and belowground counterparts are coupled, but production allocation shifts more to aboveground with higher soil nutrients. Our results suggest that the increasing fertilizer use and combined N deposition at present and in the future will stimulate fine root production, together with ANPP, probably providing a significant influence on atmospheric CO2 emissions. PMID:22764168

  5. Ecophysiology of wetland plant roots: A modelling comparison of aeration in relation to species distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorrell, B.K.; Mendelssohn, I.A.; McKee, K.L.; Woods, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the potential for inter-specific differences in root aeration to determine wetland plant distribution in nature. We compared aeration in species that differ in the type of sediment and depth of water they colonize. Differences in root anatomy, structure and physiology were applied to aeration models that predicted the maximum possible aerobic lengths and development of anoxic zones in primary adventitious roots. Differences in anatomy and metabolism that provided higher axial fluxes of oxygen allowed deeper root growth in species that favour more reducing sediments and deeper water. Modelling identified factors that affected growth in anoxic soils through their effects on aeration. These included lateral root formation, which occurred at the expense of extension of the primary root because of the additional respiratory demand they imposed, reducing oxygen fluxes to the tip and stele, and the development of stelar anoxia. However, changes in sediment oxygen demand had little detectable effect on aeration in the primary roots due to their low wall permeability and high surface impedance, but appeared to reduce internal oxygen availability by accelerating loss from laterals. The development of pressurized convective gas flow in shoots and rhizomes was also found to be important in assisting root aeration, as it maintained higher basal oxygen concentrations at the rhizome-root junctions in species growing into deep water. (C) 2000 Annals of Botany Company.

  6. Internal hydraulic redistribution prevents the loss of root conductivity during drought.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Iván; Ryel, Ronald J

    2014-01-01

    Shrubs of the Great Basin desert in Utah are subjected to a prolonged summer drought with the potential consequence of reduced water transport capability of the xylem due to drought-induced cavitation. Hydraulic redistribution (HR) is the passive movement of water from deep to shallow soil through plant roots. Hydraulic redistribution can increase water availability in shallow soil and ameliorate drought stress, providing better soil and root water status, which could affect shallow root conductivity (Ks) and native root embolism. We tested this hypothesis in an Artemisia tridentata Nutt. mono-specific stand grown in a common garden in Utah. We enhanced HR artificially by applying a once a week deep-irrigation treatment increasing the water potential gradient between deep and shallow soil layers. Plants that were deep-watered had less negative water potentials and greater stomatal conductance and transpiration rates than non-watered control plants. After irrigation with labeled water (δD), xylem water in stems and shallow roots of watered shrubs was enriched with respect to control shrubs, a clear indication of deep water uptake and HR. Shallow root conductivity was threefold greater and shrubs experienced lower native embolism when deep-watered. We found clear evidence of water transfer between deep and shallow roots through internal HR that delayed depletion of shallow soil water content, maintained Ks and prevented root embolism. Overall, our results show a positive effect of HR on root water transport capacity in otherwise dry soil, with important implications for plant water status. PMID:24436338

  7. Soil moisture depletion under simulated drought in the Amazon: impacts on deep root uptake.

    PubMed

    Markewitz, Daniel; Devine, Scott; Davidson, Eric A; Brando, Paulo; Nepstad, Daniel C

    2010-08-01

    *Deep root water uptake in tropical Amazonian forests has been a major discovery during the last 15 yr. However, the effects of extended droughts, which may increase with climate change, on deep soil moisture utilization remain uncertain. *The current study utilized a 1999-2005 record of volumetric water content (VWC) under a throughfall exclusion experiment to calibrate a one-dimensional model of the hydrologic system to estimate VWC, and to quantify the rate of root uptake through 11.5 m of soil. *Simulations with root uptake compensation had a relative root mean square error (RRMSE) of 11% at 0-40 cm and < 5% at 350-1150 cm. The simulated contribution of deep root uptake under the control was c. 20% of water demand from 250 to 550 cm and c. 10% from 550 to 1150 cm. Furthermore, in years 2 (2001) and 3 (2002) of throughfall exclusion, deep root uptake increased as soil moisture was available but then declined to near zero in deep layers in 2003 and 2004. *Deep root uptake was limited despite high VWC (i.e. > 0.30 cm(3) cm(-3)). This limitation may partly be attributable to high residual water contents (theta(r)) in these high-clay (70-90%) soils or due to high soil-to-root resistance. The ability of deep roots and soils to contribute increasing amounts of water with extended drought will be limited. PMID:20659251

  8. EFFECTS OF OZONE ON ROOT PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone alters root growth and root processes by first reducing photosynthesis and altering foliar metabolic pathways. The alteration in foliar metabolism is reflected in lowered carbohydrate levels in the roots. This can reduce key metabolic processes such as mineral uptake and sy...

  9. Cultivar selection for sugarbeet root rot resistance.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal and bacterial root rots in sugar beet caused by Rhizoctonia solani (Rs) and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum (Lm) can lead to root yield losses greater than 50%. To reduce the impact of these root rots on sucrose loss in the field, storage, and factories, studies were conducted t...

  10. Effect of scapling on root respiration rate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scalping improves root quality at harvest since impurities such as potassium, sodium, amino nitrogen and invert sugars that hinder sugarbeet processing are concentrated in the upper root crown. The effect of scalping on root storage properties, however, is less clear. A small study was conducted t...

  11. [Root caries--scanning electron microscopic observations].

    PubMed

    Heinrich, R; Hornová, J; Kneist, S; Künzel, W

    1990-01-01

    Sound and carious root surfaces of 24 extracted human teeth with extensive periodontal attachment loss were examined by SEM. The microflora covering the radicular surfaces was a complex flora consisting of filamentous and fusiform bacteria, short and long rods. Cocci and coccoid bacteria were observed on root surfaces. Bacterial invasion in the exposed peripheral root dentin was delayed by sclerotic dentin. PMID:2150459

  12. Springback in Root Gravitropism 1

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, A. Carl; Wettlaufer, Scott H.

    1989-01-01

    Conditions under which a gravistimulus of Merit corn roots (Zea mays L.) is withdrawn result in a subsequent loss of gravitropic curvature, an effect which we refer to as `springback.' This loss of curvature begins within 1 to 10 minutes after removal of the gravistimulus. It occurs regardless of the presence or absence of the root cap. It is insensitive to inhibitors of auxin transport (2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid, naphthylphthalmaic acid) or to added auxin (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid). Springback is prevented if a clinostat treatment is interjected to neutralize gravistimulation during germination, which suggests that the change in curvature is a response to a `memory' effect carried over from a prior gravistimulation. PMID:11537456

  13. The rhizosphere revisited: root microbiomics

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, Peter A. H. M.; Berendsen, Roeland L.; Doornbos, Rogier F.; Wintermans, Paul C. A.; Pieterse, Corné M. J.

    2013-01-01

    The rhizosphere was defined over 100 years ago as the zone around the root where microorganisms and processes important for plant growth and health are located. Recent studies show that the diversity of microorganisms associated with the root system is enormous. This rhizosphere microbiome extends the functional repertoire of the plant beyond imagination. The rhizosphere microbiome of Arabidopsis thaliana is currently being studied for the obvious reason that it allows the use of the extensive toolbox that comes with this model plant. Deciphering plant traits that drive selection and activities of the microbiome is now a major challenge in which Arabidopsis will undoubtedly be a major research object. Here we review recent microbiome studies and discuss future research directions and applicability of the generated knowledge. PMID:23755059

  14. Efficient solution techniques for simulation nutrient uptake by plant roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abesha, Betiglu; Vanderborght, Jan; Javaux, Mathieu; Schnepf, Andrea; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Water and nutrient transfer to plant roots is determined by processes occurring from the single root to the entire root system. A mechanistic spatially distributed description of these processes would require a sub mm discretization which is computationally not feasible. In this contribution, we present efficient solution techniques to represent accurate nutrient uptake by plant roots. The first solution technique describes nutrient transport towards a single root segment using a 1-D radially axisymmetric model (Barber and Cushman 1981). Transport to the entire root system is represented by a network of connected cylindrical models around the roots. This network of cylinders was coupled to a 3-D regular grid that was used to solve the flow and transport equations in the soil at the root system scale (Javaux et al. 2008). The second technique was a modified time compression approximation (TCA), which can be a simple and reasonably accurate semi-analytical method for predicting cumulative nutrient uptake when the convection flux and diffusion coefficient change over time due to for instance soil drying. The analytical approach presented by Roose et al. (2001) to calculate solute cumulative uptake provides means to analyze cumulative nutrient uptake at a changing diffusive-convective flux over time but with constant convection and diffusion coefficient. This analytical solution was used in TCA framework to predict uptake when convection and diffusion coefficient change over time. We compared cumulative nutrient uptake by the 1D / 3D coupled model with results obtained by spatially highly resolved 3-D model and the approximate analytical solution of Roose et al. (2001). The good agreement between both model approaches allows the use of the 1D/3D coupling approach to simulate water and nutrient transport at the a root system scale with minimal computational cost and good accuracy. This approach also accounts for the effect of transpiration and soil drying on nutrient

  15. Root strength of tropical plants - An investigation in the Western Ghats of Kerala, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukose Kuriakose, S.; van Beek, L. P. H.; van Westen, C. J.

    2009-04-01

    Earlier research on debris flows in the Tikovil River basin of the Western Ghats concluded that root cohesion is significant in maintaining the overall stability of the region. In this paper we present the most recent results (December 2008) of root tensile strength tests conducted on nine species of plants that are commonly found in the region. They are 1) Rubber (Hevea Brasiliensis), 2) Coconut Palm (Cocos nucifera), 3) Jackfruit trees (Artocarpus heterophyllus), 4) Teak (Tectona grandis), 5) Mango trees (Mangifera indica), 6) Lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus), 7) A variety of Tamarind (Garcinia gummigutta), 8) Coffee (Coffea Arabica) and Tea (Camellia sinensis). About 1500 samples were collected of which only 380 could be tested (in the laboratory) due to breakage of roots during the tests. In the successful tests roots failed in tension. Roots having diameters between 2 mm and 12 mm were tested. Each sample tested has a length of 15 cm. Results indicate that the roots of Coffee, Tamarind, Lemon grass and Jackfruit are the strongest of the nine plant types tested whereas Tea and Teak plants had the most fragile roots. Coconut roots behaved atypical to the others, as the bark of the roots was crushed and slipped from the clamp when tested whereas its internal fiber was the strongest of all tested. Root tensile strength decreases with increasing diameters, Rubber showing more ductile behaviour than Coffee and Tamarind that behaved more brittle, root tensile strength increasing exponentially for finer roots. Teak and Tea showed almost a constant root tensile strength over the range of diameters tested and little variability. Jack fruit and mango trees showed the largest variability, which may be explained by the presence of root nodules, preventing the derivation of an unequivocal relationship between root diameters and tensile strength. This results in uncertainty of root strength estimates that are applicable. These results provide important information to

  16. Tracking soil structural changes during root growth with sequential X-Ray CT scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Sonja; Bengough, Glyn; Hallett, Paul

    2014-05-01

    Crop productivity is highly dependent on a good supply of water and nutrients. With increasing demand for food and variable water regimes due to climate change, it is important to get a better understanding on the processes involved in water and nutrient uptake by roots. Changes in soil structure affect water and nutrient availabilities for plants. It is known that roots change their environment during growth but little is known on how soil structural properties change as roots penetrate soils. More detailed information on root growth induced changes in the rhizosphere will help us to model water and nutrient uptake by plants. The objective of this study was to measure directly how soil structure changes in close proximity to the root as a seedling root penetrates through the soil. 3D volumetric images of maize root growth during six hours were obtained using X-ray microtomography at a resolution of 21 μm. Roots were grown in soils of two different compaction levels (50 kPa and 200 kPa uniaxial load) and matric potentials (10 kPa and 100 kPa). Changes in porosity, pore connectivity and root-soil contact were determined from 2D cross sections for each time step. The 2D cross sections were chosen at 4 different positions in the sample, and each section was divided into sections of 64 voxels (1.3 mm2) to determine changes in porosity and connectivity with distance from the root. Soil movement caused by root growth was quantified from 2D cross sections at different positions along the sample using Particle image velocimetry (PIV). Changes in soil structure during root growth were observed. Porosity in close proximity to the root decreased whereas root-soil contact increased with time. The PIV showed a radial deformation of the soil. Greatest deformation was found close to the root. Some aggregates fractured during root growth whereas others were pushed into the pore space. These data on the changes in soil structure will help us to predict water and nutrient

  17. Coarse root distribution of a semi-arid oak savanna estimated with ground penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raz-Yaseef, N.; Koteen, L. E.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2012-12-01

    North California enjoys wet and mild winters, but experiences extreme hot, dry summer conditions, with occasional drought years. Despite the severity of summer conditions, blue oaks are winter-deciduous. We hypothesized that the binary nature of water availability would be reflected in blue oak root architecture. Our objective was to understand how the form of the root system facilitates ecosystem functioning. To do this, we sought to characterize the structure of the root system, and survey coarse root distribution with ground penetrating radar (GPR), due to its advantages in covering large areas rapidly and non-destructively. Because GPR remains a relatively new technology for examining root distribution, an ancillary objective was to test this methodology, and help facilitate its application more broadly. A third objective was to test the potential for upscaling coarse root biomass by developing allometric relations based on LIDAR measurements of above ground canopy structure. We surveyed six 8x8 m locations with trees varying in size, age and clumping (i.e. isolated trees vs. tree clusters). GPR signals were transformed to root biomass by calibrating them against excavated roots. Toward this goal, we positioned two rectangles of size 60x100 cm in each of the grids, excavated and sieved soil to harvest roots. Our results indicate that coarse roots occupy the full soil profile, and that root biomass of old large trees peaks just above the bedrock. As opposed to other semi-arid regions, where trees often develop extensive shallow coarse lateral roots, in order to exploit the entire wet-soil medium, we found that coarse root density decreased with distance from the bole, and dropped sharply at a distance of 2 m. We upscaled root biomass to stand-scale (2.8±0.4 kg m-2) based on LiDAR analysis of the relative abundance of each tree configuration. We argue that the deep and narrow root structure we observed reflects the ecohydrology of oaks in this ecosystem, because

  18. Phene Synergism between Root Hair Length and Basal Root Growth Angle for Phosphorus Acquisition1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Miguel, Magalhaes Amade

    2015-01-01

    Shallow basal root growth angle (BRGA) increases phosphorus acquisition efficiency by enhancing topsoil foraging because in most soils, phosphorus is concentrated in the topsoil. Root hair length and density (RHL/D) increase phosphorus acquisition by expanding the soil volume subject to phosphorus depletion through diffusion. We hypothesized that shallow BRGA and large RHL/D are synergetic for phosphorus acquisition, meaning that their combined effect is greater than the sum of their individual effects. To evaluate this hypothesis, phosphorus acquisition in the field in Mozambique was compared among recombinant inbred lines of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) having four distinct root phenotypes: long root hairs and shallow basal roots, long root hairs and deep basal roots, short root hairs and shallow basal roots, and short root hairs and deep basal roots. The results revealed substantial synergism between BRGA and RHL/D. Compared with short-haired, deep-rooted phenotypes, long root hairs increased shoot biomass under phosphorus stress by 89%, while shallow roots increased shoot biomass by 58%. Genotypes with both long root hairs and shallow roots had 298% greater biomass accumulation than short-haired, deep-rooted phenotypes. Therefore, the utility of shallow basal roots and long root hairs for phosphorus acquisition in combination is twice as large as their additive effects. We conclude that the anatomical phene of long, dense root hairs and the architectural phene of shallower basal root growth are synergetic for phosphorus acquisition. Phene synergism may be common in plant biology and can have substantial importance for plant fitness, as shown here. PMID:25699587

  19. Root-cubing and general root-powering methods for finding the zeros of polynomials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bareiss, E. H.

    1969-01-01

    Mathematical analysis technique generalizes a root squaring and root cubing method into a general root powering method. The introduction of partitioned polynomials into this general root powering method simplifies the coding of the polynomial transformations into input data suitable for processing by computer. The method includes analytic functions.

  20. Application of glutathione to roots selectively inhibits cadmium transport from roots to shoots in oilseed rape

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Shin-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione is a tripeptide involved in various aspects of plant metabolism. This study investigated the effects of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) applied to specific organs (source leaves, sink leaves, and roots) on cadmium (Cd) distribution and behaviour in the roots of oilseed rape plants (Brassica napus) cultured hydroponically. The translocation ratio of Cd from roots to shoots was significantly lower in plants that had root treatment of GSH than in control plants. GSH applied to roots reduced the Cd concentration in the symplast sap of root cells and inhibited root-to-shoot Cd translocation via xylem vessels significantly. GSH applied to roots also activated Cd efflux from root cells to the hydroponic solution. Inhibition of root-to-shoot translocation of Cd was visualized, and the activation of Cd efflux from root cells was also shown by using a positron-emitting tracer imaging system (PETIS). This study investigated a similar inhibitory effect on root-to-shoot translocation of Cd by the oxidized form of glutathione, GSSG. Inhibition of Cd accumulation by GSH was abolished by a low-temperature treatment. Root cells of plants exposed to GSH in the root zone had less Cd available for xylem loading by actively excluding Cd from the roots. Consequently, root-to-shoot translocation of Cd was suppressed and Cd accumulation in the shoot decreased. PMID:23364937

  1. Estimate of fine root production including the impact of decomposed roots in a Bornean tropical rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Ayumi; Khoon Koh, Lip; Kume, Tomonori; Makita, Naoki; Matsumoto, Kazuho; Ohashi, Mizue

    2016-04-01

    Considerable carbon is allocated belowground and used for respiration and production of roots. It is reported that approximately 40 % of GPP is allocated belowground in a Bornean tropical rainforest, which is much higher than those in Neotropical rainforests. This may be caused by high root production in this forest. Ingrowth core is a popular method for estimating fine root production, but recent study by Osawa et al. (2012) showed potential underestimates of this method because of the lack of consideration of the impact of decomposed roots. It is important to estimate fine root production with consideration for the decomposed roots, especially in tropics where decomposition rate is higher than other regions. Therefore, objective of this study is to estimate fine root production with consideration of decomposed roots using ingrowth cores and root litter-bag in the tropical rainforest. The study was conducted in Lambir Hills National Park in Borneo. Ingrowth cores and litter bags for fine roots were buried in March 2013. Eighteen ingrowth cores and 27 litter bags were collected in May, September 2013, March 2014 and March 2015, respectively. Fine root production was comparable to aboveground biomass increment and litterfall amount, and accounted only 10% of GPP in this study site, suggesting most of the carbon allocated to belowground might be used for other purposes. Fine root production was comparable to those in Neotropics. Decomposed roots accounted for 18% of fine root production. This result suggests that no consideration of decomposed fine roots may cause underestimate of fine root production.

  2. The pattern of secondary root formation in curving roots of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortin, M. C.; Pierce, F. J.; Poff, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    A gravitational stimulus was used to induce the curvature of the main root of Arabidopsis thaliana. The number of secondary roots increased on the convex side and decreased on the concave side of any curved main root axes in comparison with straight roots used as the control. The same phenomenon was observed with the curved main roots of plants grown on a clinostat and of mutant plants exhibiting random root orientation. The data suggest that the pattern of lateral root formation is associated with curvature but is independent of the environmental stimuli used to induce curvature.

  3. Nanodiamond-Gutta Percha Composite Biomaterials for Root Canal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Keun; Kim, Sue Vin; Limansubroto, Adelheid Nerisa; Yen, Albert; Soundia, Akrivoula; Wang, Cun-Yu; Shi, Wenyuan; Hong, Christine; Tetradis, Sotirios; Kim, Yong; Park, No-Hee; Kang, Mo K; Ho, Dean

    2015-11-24

    Root canal therapy (RCT) represents a standard of treatment that addresses infected pulp tissue in teeth and protects against future infection. RCT involves removing dental pulp comprising blood vessels and nerve tissue, decontaminating residually infected tissue through biomechanical instrumentation, and root canal obturation using a filler material to replace the space that was previously composed of dental pulp. Gutta percha (GP) is typically used as the filler material, as it is malleable, inert, and biocompatible. While filling the root canal space with GP is the standard of care for endodontic therapies, it has exhibited limitations including leakage, root canal reinfection, and poor mechanical properties. To address these challenges, clinicians have explored the use of alternative root filling materials other than GP. Among the classes of materials that are being explored as novel endodontic therapy platforms, nanodiamonds (NDs) may offer unique advantages due to their favorable properties, particularly for dental applications. These include versatile faceted surface chemistry, biocompatibility, and their role in improving mechanical properties, among others. This study developed a ND-embedded GP (NDGP) that was functionalized with amoxicillin, a broad-spectrum antibiotic commonly used for endodontic infection. Comprehensive materials characterization confirmed improved mechanical properties of NDGP over unmodified GP. In addition, digital radiography and microcomputed tomography imaging demonstrated that obturation of root canals with NDGP could be achieved using clinically relevant techniques. Furthermore, bacterial growth inhibition assays confirmed drug functionality of NDGP functionalized with amoxicillin. This study demonstrates a promising path toward NDGP implementation in future endodontic therapy for improved treatment outcomes. PMID:26452304

  4. Nanodiamond–Gutta Percha Composite Biomaterials for Root Canal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Root canal therapy (RCT) represents a standard of treatment that addresses infected pulp tissue in teeth and protects against future infection. RCT involves removing dental pulp comprising blood vessels and nerve tissue, decontaminating residually infected tissue through biomechanical instrumentation, and root canal obturation using a filler material to replace the space that was previously composed of dental pulp. Gutta percha (GP) is typically used as the filler material, as it is malleable, inert, and biocompatible. While filling the root canal space with GP is the standard of care for endodontic therapies, it has exhibited limitations including leakage, root canal reinfection, and poor mechanical properties. To address these challenges, clinicians have explored the use of alternative root filling materials other than GP. Among the classes of materials that are being explored as novel endodontic therapy platforms, nanodiamonds (NDs) may offer unique advantages due to their favorable properties, particularly for dental applications. These include versatile faceted surface chemistry, biocompatibility, and their role in improving mechanical properties, among others. This study developed a ND-embedded GP (NDGP) that was functionalized with amoxicillin, a broad-spectrum antibiotic commonly used for endodontic infection. Comprehensive materials characterization confirmed improved mechanical properties of NDGP over unmodified GP. In addition, digital radiography and microcomputed tomography imaging demonstrated that obturation of root canals with NDGP could be achieved using clinically relevant techniques. Furthermore, bacterial growth inhibition assays confirmed drug functionality of NDGP functionalized with amoxicillin. This study demonstrates a promising path toward NDGP implementation in future endodontic therapy for improved treatment outcomes. PMID:26452304

  5. Analysis of Maize (Zea mays L.) Seedling Roots with the High-Throughput Image Analysis Tool ARIA (Automatic Root Image Analysis)

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Jordon; Lee, Nigel; Naik, Hsiang Sing; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar; Lübberstedt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The maize root system is crucial for plant establishment as well as water and nutrient uptake. There is substantial genetic and phenotypic variation for root architecture, which gives opportunity for selection. Root traits, however, have not been used as selection criterion mainly due to the difficulty in measuring them, as well as their quantitative mode of inheritance. Seedling root traits offer an opportunity to study multiple individuals and to enable repeated measurements per year as compared to adult root phenotyping. We developed a new software framework to capture various traits from a single image of seedling roots. This framework is based on the mathematical notion of converting images of roots into an equivalent graph. This allows automated querying of multiple traits simply as graph operations. This framework is furthermore extendable to 3D tomography image data. In order to evaluate this tool, a subset of the 384 inbred lines from the Ames panel, for which extensive genotype by sequencing data are available, was investigated. A genome wide association study was applied to this panel for two traits, Total Root Length and Total Surface Area, captured from seedling root images from WinRhizo Pro 9.0 and the current framework (called ARIA) for comparison using 135,311 single nucleotide polymorphism markers. The trait Total Root Length was found to have significant SNPs in similar regions of the genome when analyzed by both programs. This high-throughput trait capture software system allows for large phenotyping experiments and can help to establish relationships between developmental stages between seedling and adult traits in the future. PMID:25251072

  6. Optimal root arrangement of cereal crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Yeonsu; Park, Keunhwan; Kim, Ho-Young

    2015-11-01

    The plant root absorbs water from the soil and supplies it to the rest part of the plant. It consists of a number of root fibers, through whose surfaces water uptake occurs. There is an intriguing observation that for most of cereal crops such as maize and wheat, the volume density of root in the soil declines exponentially as a function of depth. To understand this empirical finding, we construct a theoretical model of root water uptake, where mass transfer into root surface is modeled just as heat flux around a fin. Agreement between the theoretically predicted optimal root distribution in vertical direction and biological data supports the hypothesis that the plant root has evolved to achieve the optimal water uptake in competition with neighbors. This study has practical implication in the agricultural industry as well as optimal design of water transport networks in both micro- and macroscales. Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea.

  7. The compact root architecture1 gene regulates lignification, flavonoid production, and polar auxin transport in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Laffont, Carole; Blanchet, Sandrine; Lapierre, Catherine; Brocard, Lysiane; Ratet, Pascal; Crespi, Martin; Mathesius, Ulrike; Frugier, Florian

    2010-08-01

    The root system architecture is crucial to adapt plant growth to changing soil environmental conditions and consequently to maintain crop yield. In addition to root branching through lateral roots, legumes can develop another organ, the nitrogen-fixing nodule, upon a symbiotic bacterial interaction. A mutant, cra1, showing compact root architecture was identified in the model legume Medicago truncatula. cra1 roots were short and thick due to defects in cell elongation, whereas densities of lateral roots and symbiotic nodules were similar to the wild type. Grafting experiments showed that a lengthened life cycle in cra1 was due to the smaller root system and not to the pleiotropic shoot phenotypes observed in the mutant. Analysis of the cra1 transcriptome at a similar early developmental stage revealed few significant changes, mainly related to cell wall metabolism. The most down-regulated gene in the cra1 mutant encodes a Caffeic Acid O-Methyl Transferase, an enzyme involved in lignin biosynthesis; accordingly, whole lignin content was decreased in cra1 roots. This correlated with differential accumulation of specific flavonoids and decreased polar auxin transport in cra1 mutants. Exogenous application of the isoflavone formononetin to wild-type plants mimicked the cra1 root phenotype, whereas decreasing flavonoid content through silencing chalcone synthases restored the polar auxin transport capacity of the cra1 mutant. The CRA1 gene, therefore, may control legume root growth through the regulation of lignin and flavonoid profiles, leading to changes in polar auxin transport. PMID:20522723

  8. Long-term fate of carbon in deeply rooted terrestrial sediment assessed by molecular proxies: sequestration vs. mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesenberg, G. L.; Gocke, M. I.; Huguet, A.; Derenne, S.; Kolb, S.

    2014-12-01

    Considerable amounts of atmospheric CO2 are incorporated in plant belowground biomass and thus contribute to soil OM. However, associated with rooting, microorganisms enter the soil and, due to priming effects, might improve C mineralisation. Although these processes are well known for recent topsoils, it remains unclear if and how microorganisms contribute to long-term C dynamics in the subsoil and underlying soil parent material. This study comprises several state-of-the-art techniques like bacterial DNA and lipid molecular proxies to trace living and fossil microbial biomass in modern and ancient root systems. Throughout a 13 m thick loess-paleosol sequence in SW Germany, which has been penetrated by several generations of roots since the last glacial maximum, both bulk (Corg and Ccarb) and molecular changes in the rhizosphere were assessed at different depth intervals. Phospholipid fatty acids, DNA and intact polar glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers argue for the presence of living microorganisms in the rhizosphere not only of living but also ancient (≥3 ky) roots, which is associated with long-term C dynamics after the lifetime of the root. In the surrounding of living and ancient roots either C enrichment or C depletion was determined, depending on depth and rooting intensity. Especially in areas with high root densities (up to 20.000 root features like biopores, recent and calcified roots m-2), rhizomicrobial degradation led to decrease of C contents. In depth intervals of lower root feature densities (<<100 m-2), C accumulation was observed in the rhizosphere and rhizomicrobial degradation was limited. The penetration of subsoil and underlying sediment by roots does not necessarily lead to additional C stabilization in the long-term, despite locally abundant root features and high portions of incorporated root- and rhizomicrobial-derived OM on a molecular level. At the contrary, priming effects may lead to considerable C loss in densely rooted sediment.

  9. Calcium movement, graviresponsiveness and the structure of columella cells and columella tissues in roots of Allium cepa L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    Roots of Allium cepa L. cv. Yellow are differentially responsive to gravity. Long (e.g. 40 mm) roots are strongly graviresponsive, while short (c.g. 4 mm) roots are minimally responsive to gravity. Although columella cells of graviresponsive roots are larger than those of nongraviresponsive roots, they partition their volumes to cellular organelles similarly. The movement of amyloplasts and nuclei in columella cells of horizontally-oriented roots correlates positively with the onset of gravicurvature. Furthermore, there is no significant difference in the rates of organellar redistribution when graviresponsive and nongraviresponsive roots are oriented horizontally. The more pronounced graviresponsiveness of longer roots correlates positively with (1) their caps being 9-6 times more voluminous, (2) their columella tissues being 42 times more voluminous, (3) their caps having 15 times more columella cells, and (4) their columella tissues having relative volumes 4.4 times larger than those of shorter, nongraviresponsive roots. Graviresponsive roots that are oriented horizontally are characterized by a strongly polar movement of 45Ca2+ across the root tip from the upper to the lower side, while similarly oriented nongraviresponsive roots exhibit only a minimal polar transport of 45Ca2+. These results indicate that the differential graviresponsiveness of roots of A. cepa is probably not due to either (1) ultrastructural differences in their columella cells, (2) differences in the rates of organellar redistribution when roots are oriented horizontally. Rather, these results indicate the graviresponsiveness may require an extensive columella tissue, which, in turn, may be necessary for polar movement of 45Ca2+ across the root tip.

  10. Rescue Surgery 19 Years after Composite Root and Hemiarch Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Seeburger, Joerg; Etz, Christian D.; Sauer, Matthias; Lehmkuhl, Lukas; Misfeld, Martin; Mohr, Friedrich W.

    2013-01-01

    A 59-year-old male patient with Marfan's syndrome was referred to our clinic due to acute chest pain. His medical history contains complex surgery for type A aortic dissection 19 years ago including composite root replacement using a mechanical aortic valve. Immediate computed tomography indicated perforation at the distal ascending aortic anastomosis plus complete avulsion of both coronary ostia. The patient underwent successful rescue surgery with ascending aortic and arch replacement using a modified Cabrol technique. PMID:23662240

  11. Root-shoot interaction in the greening of wheat seedlings grown under red light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathy, B. C.; Brown, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Wheat seedlings grown with roots exposed to constant red light (300-500 micromoles m-2 s-1) did not accumulate chlorophyll in the leaves. In contrast, seedlings grown with their roots shielded from light accumulated chlorophylls. Chlorophyll biosynthesis could be induced in red-light-grown chlorophyll-deficient yellow plants by either reducing the red-light intensity at the root surface to 100 micromoles m-1 s-1 or supplementing with 6% blue light. The inhibition of chlorophyll biosynthesis was due to impairment of the Mg-chelatase enzyme working at the origin of the Mg-tetrapyrrole pathway. The root-perceived photomorphogenic inhibition of shoot greening demonstrates root-shoot interaction in the greening process.

  12. Effect of pH and zinc stress on micropore system of rye roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szatanik-Kloc, A.

    2012-07-01

    After zinc stress the total micropore volume decreased remarkably while the average micropore radius increased remarkably for the rye roots. Pore size distribution functions of the roots after the additional zinc application showed the decrease of the small micropore fraction from ca 2 to 10 nm and the increase of the large micropore from ca 22 to 50 nm. The root surface pores were fractal. After the stress pore fractal dimension increased. The changes of the microporosity observed in the roots surface can be related to the high content of zinc in the cell wall and/or due to the shortage of Ca+2 the intercellular spaces particularly in the tissues of seminal cortex of the studied roots might have grown.

  13. Studies on anti-hyperglycemic effect of Euphorbia antiquorum L. root in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, Varadharajan; Murali, Anita; Lalitha, Doppalapudi Sree; Yoganarasimhan, Sunkam

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim: To determine the anti-hyperglycemic effect of Euphorbia antiquorum L. root. Materials and Methods: The study evaluates the anti-hyperglycemic effect of E. antiquorum root in streptozotocin-nicotinamide-induced Type 2 diabetes mellitus and fructose-induced insulin resistance models. Alcohol and aqueous extracts of E. antiquorum root were administered at doses 200 and 400 mg/kg p.o. Serum levels of glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb), and hepatic levels of malondialdehyde, glutathione, and glycogen were estimated. Results: Treatment with the alcohol and aqueous extracts of E. antiquorum roots resulted in significant (P < 0.001) lowering of serum blood glucose and GHb levels in both the models. Flavonoids, phenolic compounds, and glycosides were detected in the preliminary phytochemical screening. Conclusion: Root of E. antiquorum showed promising anti-hyperglycemic effect which may be due to the presence of important phytochemicals. PMID:26649236

  14. Symbiosis of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Robinia pseudoacacia L. Improves Root Tensile Strength and Soil Aggregate Stability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haoqiang; Liu, Zhenkun; Chen, Hui; Tang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Robinia pseudoacacia L. (black locust) is a widely planted tree species on Loess Plateau for revegetation. Due to its symbiosis forming capability with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, we explored the influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on plant biomass, root morphology, root tensile strength and soil aggregate stability in a pot experiment. We inoculated R. pseudoacacia with/without AM fungus (Rhizophagus irregularis or Glomus versiforme), and measured root colonization, plant growth, root morphological characters, root tensile force and tensile strength, and parameters for soil aggregate stability at twelve weeks after inoculation. AM fungi colonized more than 70% plant root, significantly improved plant growth. Meanwhile, AM fungi elevated root morphological parameters, root tensile force, root tensile strength, Glomalin-related soil protein (GRSP) content in soil, and parameters for soil aggregate stability such as water stable aggregate (WSA), mean weight diameter (MWD) and geometric mean diameter (GMD). Root length was highly correlated with WSA, MWD and GMD, while hyphae length was highly correlated with GRSP content. The improved R. pseudoacacia growth, root tensile strength and soil aggregate stability indicated that AM fungi could accelerate soil fixation and stabilization with R. pseudoacacia, and its function in revegetation on Loess Plateau deserves more attention. PMID:27064570

  15. Synergistic action of auxin and ethylene on root elongation inhibition is caused by a reduction of epidermal cell length.

    PubMed

    Alarcón, M Victoria; Lloret, Pedro G; Salguero, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Auxin and ethylene have been largely reported to reduce root elongation in maize primary root. However the effects of auxin are greater than those caused by ethylene. Although auxin stimulates ethylene biosynthesis through the specific increase of ACC synthase, the auxin inhibitory effect on root elongation is not mediated by the auxin-induced increase of ethylene production. Recently it has been demonstrated that root inhibition by the application of the synthetic auxin NAA (1-naphtalenacetic acid) is increased if combined with the ethylene precursor ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxilic acid) when both compounds are applied at very low concentrations.   Root elongation is basically the result of two processes: a) cell divisions in the meristem where meristematic cells continuously generate new cells and b) subsequently polarized growth by elongation along the root axis as cells leave the meristem and enter the root elongation zone. Our results indicate that exogenous auxin reduced both root elongation and epidermal cell length. In a different way, ethylene at very low concentrations only inhibited root elongation without affecting significantly epidermal cell length. However, these concentrations of ethylene increased the inhibitory effect of auxin on root elongation and cell length. Consequently the results support the hypothesis that ethylene acts synergistically with auxin in the regulation of root elongation and that inhibition by both hormones is due, at least partially, to the reduction of cell length in the epidermal layer. PMID:24598313

  16. Symbiosis of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Robinia pseudoacacia L. Improves Root Tensile Strength and Soil Aggregate Stability

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haoqiang; Liu, Zhenkun; Chen, Hui; Tang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Robinia pseudoacacia L. (black locust) is a widely planted tree species on Loess Plateau for revegetation. Due to its symbiosis forming capability with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, we explored the influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on plant biomass, root morphology, root tensile strength and soil aggregate stability in a pot experiment. We inoculated R. pseudoacacia with/without AM fungus (Rhizophagus irregularis or Glomus versiforme), and measured root colonization, plant growth, root morphological characters, root tensile force and tensile strength, and parameters for soil aggregate stability at twelve weeks after inoculation. AM fungi colonized more than 70% plant root, significantly improved plant growth. Meanwhile, AM fungi elevated root morphological parameters, root tensile force, root tensile strength, Glomalin-related soil protein (GRSP) content in soil, and parameters for soil aggregate stability such as water stable aggregate (WSA), mean weight diameter (MWD) and geometric mean diameter (GMD). Root length was highly correlated with WSA, MWD and GMD, while hyphae length was highly correlated with GRSP content. The improved R. pseudoacacia growth, root tensile strength and soil aggregate stability indicated that AM fungi could accelerate soil fixation and stabilization with R. pseudoacacia, and its function in revegetation on Loess Plateau deserves more attention. PMID:27064570

  17. Root Herbivores Drive Changes to Plant Primary Chemistry, but Root Loss Is Mitigated under Elevated Atmospheric CO2.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Scott W; Johnson, Scott N; Jones, T Hefin; Ostle, Nick J; Hails, Rosemary S; Vanbergen, Adam J

    2016-01-01

    Above- and belowground herbivory represents a major challenge to crop productivity and sustainable agriculture worldwide. How this threat from multiple herbivore pests will change under anthropogenic climate change, via altered trophic interactions and plant response traits, is key to understanding future crop resistance to herbivory. In this study, we hypothesized that atmospheric carbon enrichment would increase the amount (biomass) and quality (C:N ratio) of crop plant resources for above- and belowground herbivore species. In a controlled environment facility, we conducted a microcosm experiment using the large raspberry aphid (Amphorophora idaei), the root feeding larvae of the vine weevil (Otiorhynchus sulcatus), and the raspberry (Rubus idaeus) host-plant. There were four herbivore treatments (control, aphid only, weevil only and a combination of both herbivores) and an ambient (aCO2) or elevated (eCO2) CO2 treatment (390 versus 650 ± 50 μmol/mol) assigned to two raspberry cultivars (cv Glen Ample or Glen Clova) varying in resistance to aphid herbivory. Contrary to our predictions, eCO2 did not increase crop biomass or the C:N ratio of the plant tissues, nor affect herbivore abundance either directly or via the host-plant. Root herbivory reduced belowground crop biomass under aCO2 but not eCO2, suggesting that crops could tolerate attack in a CO2 enriched environment. Root herbivory also increased the C:N ratio in leaf tissue at eCO2, potentially due to decreased N uptake indicated by lower N concentrations found in the roots. Root herbivory greatly increased root C concentrations under both CO2 treatments. Our findings confirm that responses of crop biomass and biochemistry to climate change need examining within the context of herbivory, as biotic interactions appear as important as direct effects of eCO2 on crop productivity. PMID:27379129

  18. Root Herbivores Drive Changes to Plant Primary Chemistry, but Root Loss Is Mitigated under Elevated Atmospheric CO2

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Scott W.; Johnson, Scott N.; Jones, T. Hefin; Ostle, Nick J.; Hails, Rosemary S.; Vanbergen, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Above- and belowground herbivory represents a major challenge to crop productivity and sustainable agriculture worldwide. How this threat from multiple herbivore pests will change under anthropogenic climate change, via altered trophic interactions and plant response traits, is key to understanding future crop resistance to herbivory. In this study, we hypothesized that atmospheric carbon enrichment would increase the amount (biomass) and quality (C:N ratio) of crop plant resources for above- and belowground herbivore species. In a controlled environment facility, we conducted a microcosm experiment using the large raspberry aphid (Amphorophora idaei), the root feeding larvae of the vine weevil (Otiorhynchus sulcatus), and the raspberry (Rubus idaeus) host-plant. There were four herbivore treatments (control, aphid only, weevil only and a combination of both herbivores) and an ambient (aCO2) or elevated (eCO2) CO2 treatment (390 versus 650 ± 50 μmol/mol) assigned to two raspberry cultivars (cv Glen Ample or Glen Clova) varying in resistance to aphid herbivory. Contrary to our predictions, eCO2 did not increase crop biomass or the C:N ratio of the plant tissues, nor affect herbivore abundance either directly or via the host-plant. Root herbivory reduced belowground crop biomass under aCO2 but not eCO2, suggesting that crops could tolerate attack in a CO2 enriched environment. Root herbivory also increased the C:N ratio in leaf tissue at eCO2, potentially due to decreased N uptake indicated by lower N concentrations found in the roots. Root herbivory greatly increased root C concentrations under both CO2 treatments. Our findings confirm that responses of crop biomass and biochemistry to climate change need examining within the context of herbivory, as biotic interactions appear as important as direct effects of eCO2 on crop productivity. PMID:27379129

  19. The Course of Due Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getty, Laura A.; Summy, Sarah E.

    2004-01-01

    Discussion of due process rights for children with disabilities considers common issues leading to due process requests, due process procedures, hearing officers, procedural violations, effects of due process meetings, and areas for improvement (i.e., accountability, paperwork). Tables list categories of procedural violations with examples and…

  20. Natural variation of the root morphological response to nitrate supply in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    De Pessemier, Jérôme; Chardon, Fabien; Juraniec, Michal; Delaplace, Pierre; Hermans, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen fertilization increases crop yield but excessive nitrate use can be a major environmental problem due to soil leaching or greenhouse gas emission. Root traits have been seldom considered as selection criteria to improve Nitrogen Use Efficiency of crops, due to the difficulty of measuring root traits under field conditions. Nonetheless, learning about mechanisms of lateral root (LR) growth stimulation or repression by nitrate availability could help to redesign root system architecture (RSA), a strategy aimed at developing plants with a dense and profound root system and with higher N uptake efficiency. Here, we explored the genetic diversity provided by natural populations of the model species Arabidopsis thaliana to identify potentially adaptive differences in biomass production and root morphology in response to nitrate availability. A core collection of 24 accessions that maximizes the genetic diversity within the species and Col-0 (the reference accession) were grown vertically on agar medium at moderate (N+) nitrate level for 6 days and then transferred to the same condition or to low (N-) nitrate concentration for 7 days. There was a major nutritional effect on the shoot biomass and root to shoot biomass ratio. The variation of the root biomass and RSA traits (primary root length, LRs number, LR mean length, total LRs length and LR densities) was primarily genetically determined. Differences in RSA traits between accessions were somewhat more pronounced at N-. Some accessions produced almost no visible LRs (Pyl-1, N13) at N-, while other produced up to a dozen (Kn-0). Taken together our data illustrate that natural variation exists within Arabidopsis for the studied traits. The identification of RSA ideotypes in the N response will facilitate further analysis of quantitative traits for root morphology. PMID:22683348

  1. General complex polynomial root solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skowron, J.; Gould, A.

    2012-12-01

    This general complex polynomial root solver, implemented in Fortran and further optimized for binary microlenses, uses a new algorithm to solve polynomial equations and is 1.6-3 times faster than the ZROOTS subroutine that is commercially available from Numerical Recipes, depending on application. The largest improvement, when compared to naive solvers, comes from a fail-safe procedure that permits skipping the majority of the calculations in the great majority of cases, without risking catastrophic failure in the few cases that these are actually required.

  2. Xanthones from Garcinia propinqua Roots.

    PubMed

    Meesakul, Pornphimol; Pansanit, Acharavadee; Maneerat, Wisanu; Sripisut, Tawanun; Ritthiwigrom, Thunwadee; Machana, Theeraphan; Cheenpracha, Sarot; Laphookhieo, Surat

    2016-01-01

    Phytochemical investigation of Garcinia propinqua roots led to the isolation and identification of a new xanthone, doitunggarcinone D (1), together with 15 known compounds (2-16). Their structures were elucidated by intensive analysis of spectroscopic data. Compounds 3, 6, 7, 14, 15 and 16 exhibited strong antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis TISTR 088 with MIC values in the range of 1-4 µg/mL. Compounds 3, 7, 10 and 14 also showed good antibacterial activity against B. cereus TISTR 688 with MIC values ranging from 4-8 µg/mL. PMID:26996028

  3. An interdisciplinary approach to decipher different phases of soil formation using root abundances and geochemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesenberg, Guido; Gocke, Martina

    2015-04-01

    Pedogenic processes are commonly thought to be restricted mainly to the uppermost few dm of soils. However, often processes like water infiltration and - more obviously - rooting lead to much deeper penetration of soil, soil parent material and, if present, paleosols. The extent to which root penetration and subsequent organic matter incorporation, release of root exudates and microbial activity influence the general chemical and physical properties of deeper soil horizons remains largely unknown. We determined the lateral extent of root-derived overprint of the soil parent material as well as the overprint of the chemical properties in paleosols by combining root quantities obtained in the field with a large variety of inorganic and organic chemical as well as microbial properties in bulk soils and rhizosphere samples. Soils, soil parent material and paleosols were sampled along a transect from The Netherlands via Germany and Hungary towards Serbia, where soil and underlying loess, sand, and paleosol profiles were excavated in pits of 2 m to 13 m depth. Root counting on horizontal levels and profile walls during field campaigns, assisted by three-dimensional X-ray microtomographic scanning of undisturbed samples, enabled the quantitative assessment of recent and ancient root systems. Ages were determined by 14C dating for the latter, and by OSL dating for sediments, respectively. The bulk elemental composition of soils, sediments and paleosols and molecular structure of organic matter therein helped to quantitatively assess the root-related overprint in different depth intervals. The results point to the significance of deep roots as a soil forming factor extending into soil parent material, as well as the overprint of geochemical proxies in paleosols due to intense root penetration at various phases after burial. The shown examples highlight potential pitfalls in assessing rooted soil and paleosol profiles and their ages, and provide potential solutions for

  4. Canopy Composition and Topographic Controls on Root Cohesion in Landslide-Prone Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, T. C.; Ford, C. R.; Hwang, T.; Vose, J.; Band, L. E.

    2009-12-01

    Steep, forested landscapes are commonly the source of devastating shallow landslides and debris flows. The magnitude and frequency of these slides is dependent on the distribution of steep slopes, the frequency of prolonged and/or intense precipitation, and the resistive properties of soil and roots. Most studies of the human influence on shallow landslide frequency focus on the effects of forestry and associated road building. Humans also influence the species composition of forests through management and introductions of exotic species. Forest composition affects the magnitude of root reinforcement of largely cohesionless colluvial soils that resist landsliding. We investigated how topographically controlled changes in forest composition affected the distribution of root reinforcement along a catenery sequence in a forested catchment, southern Appalachian Mountains, North Carolina. The magnitude of reinforcement is estimated based on the vertical distribution and tensile strength of roots from soil pits dug downslope of fifteen native woody species. Root tensile strengths from different hardwood tree species were similar and consistently higher than the only native shrub species measured (Rhododendron maximum). Roots were stronger in trees found on noses relative to those in hollows coincident with the variability in cellulose content. This cellulose variability is likely an ecophysiologic response to differences in soil moisture potential along our catena. For all species, roots were concentrated close to the soil surface, with the majority of R. maximum roots located in the shallow, O-horizon. R. maximum had lower mean root cohesion than trees because of a lower root tensile force and a shallow rooting structure. Our results highlight the need to quantify how changes in canopy composition, particularly the expansion of R. maximum due to fire suppression, affect shallow landslide potential. We suggest that a combination of simple topographic analysis and leaf

  5. Morphometric data of canine sacral nerve roots with reference to electrical sacral root stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rijkhoff, N J; Koldewijn, E L; d'Hollosy, W; Debruyne, F M; Wijkstra, H

    1996-01-01

    Experiments to investigate restoration of lower urinary tract control by electrical stimulation of the sacral nerve roots are mostly performed on dogs, yet little morphometric data (such as canine root and fiber diameter distributions) are available. The aim of this study was to acquire morphometric data of the intradural canine sacral dorsal and ventral roots (S1-S3). Cross-sections of sacral roots of two beagle dogs were analyzed using a light microscope and image processing software. The cross-sectional area of each root was measured. The diameters of the fibers and the axons in the cross-sections of the S2 and S3 roots were measured and used to construct nerve fiber diameter frequency distribution histograms. The results show a unimodal diameter distribution for the dorsal roots and a bimodal distribution for the ventral roots. In addition the average ratio g of the axon diameter to fiber diameter was calculated for each root. PMID:8732990

  6. Root canal treatment of a maxillary first premolar with three roots

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Josey; Devadathan, Aravindan; Syriac, Gibi; Shamini, Sai

    2015-01-01

    Successful root canal treatment needs a thorough knowledge of both internal and external anatomy of a tooth. Variations in root canal anatomy constitute an impressive challenge to the successful completion of endodontic treatment. Undetected extra roots and canals are a major reason for failed root canal treatment. Three separate roots in a maxillary first premolar have a very low incidence of 0.5–6%. Three rooted premolars are anatomically similar to molars and are sometimes called “small molars or radiculous molars.” This article explains the diagnosis and endodontic management of a three rooted maxillary premolar with separate canals in each root highlighting that statistics may indicate a low incidence of abnormal variations in root canal morphology of a tooth, but aberrant anatomy is a possibility in any tooth. Hence, modern diagnostics like cone beam computed tomography, and endodontic operating microscope may have to be used more for predictable endodontic treatment. PMID:26538958

  7. Inhibition of auxin movement from the shoot into the root inhibits lateral root development in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, R. C.; Brady, S. R.; Muday, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    In roots two distinct polar movements of auxin have been reported that may control different developmental and growth events. To test the hypothesis that auxin derived from the shoot and transported toward the root controls lateral root development, the two polarities of auxin transport were uncoupled in Arabidopsis. Local application of the auxin-transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) at the root-shoot junction decreased the number and density of lateral roots and reduced the free indoleacetic acid (IAA) levels in the root and [3H]IAA transport into the root. Application of NPA to the basal half of or at several positions along the root only reduced lateral root density in regions that were in contact with NPA or in regions apical to the site of application. Lateral root development was restored by application of IAA apical to NPA application. Lateral root development in Arabidopsis roots was also inhibited by excision of the shoot or dark growth and this inhibition was reversible by IAA. Together, these results are consistent with auxin transport from the shoot into the root controlling lateral root development.

  8. Foraging strategies in trees of different root morphology: the role of root lifespan.

    PubMed

    Adams, Thomas S; McCormack, M Luke; Eissenstat, David M

    2013-09-01

    Resource exploitation of patches is influenced not simply by the rate of root production in the patches but also by the lifespan of the roots inhabiting the patches. We examined the effect of sustained localized nitrogen (N) fertilization on root lifespan in four tree species that varied widely in root morphology and presumed foraging strategy. The study was conducted in a 12-year-old common garden in central Pennsylvania using a combination of data from minirhizotron and root in-growth cores. The two fine-root tree species, Acer negundo L. and Populus tremuloides Michx., exhibited significant increases in root lifespan with local N fertilization; no significant responses were observed in the two coarse-root tree species, Sassafras albidum Nutt. and Liriodendron tulipifera L. Across species, coarse-root tree species had longer median root lifespan than fine-root tree species. Localized N fertilization did not significantly increase the N concentration or the respiration of the roots growing in the N-rich patch. Our results suggest that some plant species appear to regulate the lifespan of different portions of their root system to improve resource acquisition while other species do not. Our results are discussed in the context of different strategies of foraging of nutrient patches in species of different root morphology. PMID:24128849

  9. PATTERNS IN SOIL FERTILITY AND ROOT HERBIVORY INTERACT TO INFLUENCE FINE-ROOT DYNAMICS.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Glen, N.; Jones, Robert, H.

    2006-03-01

    Fine-scale soil nutrient enrichment typically stimulates root growth, but it may also increase root herbivory, resulting in trade-offs for plant species and potentially influencing carbon cycling patterns. We used root ingrowth cores to investigate the effects of microsite fertility and root herbivory on root biomass in an aggrading upland forest in the coastal plain of South Carolina, USA. Treatments were randomly assigned to cores from a factorial combination of fertilizer and insecticide. Soil, soil fauna, and roots were removed from the cores at the end of the experiment (8–9 mo), and roots were separated at harvest into three diameter classes. Each diameter class responded differently to fertilizer and insecticide treatments. The finest roots (,1.0 mm diameter), which comprised well over half of all root biomass, were the only ones to respond significantly to both treatments, increasing when fertilizer and when insecticide were added (each P , 0.0001), with maximum biomass found where the treatments were combined (interaction term significant, P , 0.001). These results suggest that root-feeding insects have a strong influence on root standing crop with stronger herbivore impacts on finer roots and within more fertile microsites. Thus, increased vulnerability to root herbivory is a potentially significant cost of root foraging in nutrient-rich patches.

  10. Site and clone effects on the potato-root associated core microbiome and its relationship to tuber yield and nutrients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to describe the variability in the root-associated bacterial community due to location and clone, and to determine whether an underlying core bacterial community exists that might benefit the quality of the potato crop. Root-associated bacterial communities were examined wi...

  11. Experimentally reduced root–microbe interactions reveal limited plasticity in functional root traits in Acer and Quercus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract. Background and Aims Interactions between roots and soil microbes are critical components of below-ground ecology. It is essential to quantify the magnitude of root trait variation both among and within species, including variation due to plasticity. In addition to contextualizing the mag...

  12. Response of cucurbit rootstocks for grafted melon (Cucumis melo) to southern root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root-knot nematodes (RKN) are an important re-emerging pest of melon (Cucumis melo), due largely to the loss of methyl bromide as a pre-plant soil fumigant. Melon is highly susceptible to southern RKN, Meloidogyne incognita, which causes severe root galling and reduced melon fruit yields. Cucurbit...

  13. Root hairs aid soil penetration by anchoring the root surface to pore walls

    PubMed Central

    Bengough, A. Glyn; Loades, Kenneth; McKenzie, Blair M.

    2016-01-01

    The physical role of root hairs in anchoring the root tip during soil penetration was examined. Experiments using a hairless maize mutant (Zea mays: rth3–3) and its wild-type counterpart measured the anchorage force between the primary root of maize and the soil to determine whether root hairs enabled seedling roots in artificial biopores to penetrate sandy loam soil (dry bulk density 1.0–1.5g cm−3). Time-lapse imaging was used to analyse root and seedling displacements in soil adjacent to a transparent Perspex interface. Peak anchorage forces were up to five times greater (2.5N cf. 0.5N) for wild-type roots than for hairless mutants in 1.2g cm−3 soil. Root hair anchorage enabled better soil penetration for 1.0 or 1.2g cm−3 soil, but there was no significant advantage of root hairs in the densest soil (1.5g cm−3). The anchorage force was insufficient to allow root penetration of the denser soil, probably because of less root hair penetration into pore walls and, consequently, poorer adhesion between the root hairs and the pore walls. Hairless seedlings took 33h to anchor themselves compared with 16h for wild-type roots in 1.2g cm−3 soil. Caryopses were often pushed several millimetres out of the soil before the roots became anchored and hairless roots often never became anchored securely.The physical role of root hairs in anchoring the root tip may be important in loose seed beds above more compact soil layers and may also assist root tips to emerge from biopores and penetrate the bulk soil. PMID:26798027

  14. Root hairs aid soil penetration by anchoring the root surface to pore walls.

    PubMed

    Bengough, A Glyn; Loades, Kenneth; McKenzie, Blair M

    2016-02-01

    The physical role of root hairs in anchoring the root tip during soil penetration was examined. Experiments using a hairless maize mutant (Zea mays: rth3-3) and its wild-type counterpart measured the anchorage force between the primary root of maize and the soil to determine whether root hairs enabled seedling roots in artificial biopores to penetrate sandy loam soil (dry bulk density 1.0-1.5g cm(-3)). Time-lapse imaging was used to analyse root and seedling displacements in soil adjacent to a transparent Perspex interface. Peak anchorage forces were up to five times greater (2.5N cf. 0.5N) for wild-type roots than for hairless mutants in 1.2g cm(-3) soil. Root hair anchorage enabled better soil penetration for 1.0 or 1.2g cm(-3) soil, but there was no significant advantage of root hairs in the densest soil (1.5g cm(-3)). The anchorage force was insufficient to allow root penetration of the denser soil, probably because of less root hair penetration into pore walls and, consequently, poorer adhesion between the root hairs and the pore walls. Hairless seedlings took 33h to anchor themselves compared with 16h for wild-type roots in 1.2g cm(-3) soil. Caryopses were often pushed several millimetres out of the soil before the roots became anchored and hairless roots often never became anchored securely.The physical role of root hairs in anchoring the root tip may be important in loose seed beds above more compact soil layers and may also assist root tips to emerge from biopores and penetrate the bulk soil. PMID:26798027

  15. Stress-induced accumulation of wheat germ agglutinin and abscisic acid in roots of wheat seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Cammue, B.P.A.; Broekaert, W.F.; Kellens, J.T.C.; Peumans, W.J. ); Raikhel, N.V. )

    1989-12-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) levels in roots of 2-day-old wheat seedlings increased up to three-fold when stressed by air-drying. Similar results were obtained when seedling roots were incubated either in 0.5 molar mannitol or 180 grams per liter polyethylene glycol 6,000, with a peak level of WGA after 5 hours of stress. Longer periods of osmotic treatment resulted in a gradual decline of WGA in the roots. Since excised wheat roots incorporate more ({sup 35}S)cysteine into WGA under stress conditions, the observed increase of lectin levels is due to de novo synthesis. Measurement of abscisic acid (ABA) levels in roots of control and stressed seedlings indicated a 10-fold increase upon air-drying. Similarly, a five- and seven-fold increase of ABA content of seedling roots was found after 2 hours of osmotic stress by polyethylene glycol 6,000 and mannitol, respectively. Finally, the stress-induced increase of WGA in wheat roots could be inhibited by growing seedlings in the presence of fluridone, an inhibitor of ABA synthesis. These results indicate that roots of water-stressed wheat seedlings (a) contain more WGA as a result of an increased de novo synthesis of this lectin, and (b) exhibit higher ABA levels. The stress-induced increase of lectin accumulation seems to be under control of ABA.

  16. Cytokinin-dependent secondary growth determines root biomass in radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Jang, Geupil; Lee, Jung-Hun; Rastogi, Khushboo; Park, Suhyoung; Oh, Sang-Hun; Lee, Ji-Young

    2015-08-01

    The root serves as an essential organ in plant growth by taking up nutrients and water from the soil and supporting the rest of the plant body. Some plant species utilize roots as storage organs. Sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas), cassava (Manihot esculenta), and radish (Raphanus sativus), for example, are important root crops. However, how their root growth is regulated remains unknown. In this study, we characterized the relationship between cambium and radial root growth in radish. Through a comparative analysis with Arabidopsis root expression data, we identified putative cambium-enriched transcription factors in radish and analysed their expression in representative inbred lines featuring distinctive radial growth. We found that cell proliferation activities in the cambium positively correlated with radial growth and final yields of radish roots. Expression analysis of candidate transcription factor genes revealed that some genes are differentially expressed between inbred lines and that the difference is due to the distinct cytokinin response. Taken together, we have demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that cytokinin-dependent radial growth plays a key role in the yields of root crops. PMID:25979997

  17. Hydrotropism in pea roots in a porous-tube water delivery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, H.; Brown, C. S.; Dreschel, T. W.; Scott, T. K.; Knott, W. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Orientation of root growth on earth and under microgravity conditions can possibly be controlled by hydrotropism--growth toward a moisture source in the absence of or reduced gravitropism. A porous-tube water delivery system being used for plant growth studies is appropriate for testing this hypothesis since roots can be grown aeroponically in this system. When the roots of the agravitropic mutant pea ageotropum (Pisum sativum L.) were placed vertically in air of 91% relative humidity and 2 to 3 mm from the water-saturated porous tube placed horizontally, the roots responded hydrotropically and grew in a continuous arch along the circular surface of the tube. By contrast, normal gravitropic roots of Alaska' pea initially showed a slight transient curvature toward the tube and then resumed vertical downward growth due to gravitropism. Thus, in microgravity, normal gravitropic roots could respond to a moisture gradient as strongly as the agravitropic roots used in this study. Hydrotropism should be considered a significant factor responsible for orientation of root growth in microgravity.

  18. Hydrotropism in pea roots in a porous-tube water delivery system.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, H; Brown, C S; Dreschel, T W; Scott, T K

    1992-05-01

    Orientation of root growth on earth and under microgravity conditions can possibly be controlled by hydrotropism--growth toward a moisture source in the absence of or reduced gravitropism. A porous-tube water delivery system being used for plant growth studies is appropriate for testing this hypothesis since roots can be grown aeroponically in this system. When the roots of the agravitropic mutant pea ageotropum (Pisum sativum L.) were placed vertically in air of 91% relative humidity and 2 to 3 mm from the water-saturated porous tube placed horizontally, the roots responded hydrotropically and grew in a continuous arch along the circular surface of the tube. By contrast, normal gravitropic roots of Alaska' pea initially showed a slight transient curvature toward the tube and then resumed vertical downward growth due to gravitropism. Thus, in microgravity, normal gravitropic roots could respond to a moisture gradient as strongly as the agravitropic roots used in this study. Hydrotropism should be considered a significant factor responsible for orientation of root growth in microgravity. PMID:11537612

  19. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy surface analysis of aluminum ion stress in barley roots. [Hordeum vulgare

    SciTech Connect

    Millard, M.M.; Foy, C.D.; Coradetti, C.A.; Reinsel, M.D. )

    1990-06-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to analyze root surface changes when Dayton barley (Hordeum vulgare) (Al tolerant) and Kearney barley (Al sensitive) seedlings were grown in nutrient solution in the presence and absence of 37.0 micromolar Al. The electron spectra from root surfaces contained strong lines in order of decreasing intensity from organic forms of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen and weak lines due to inorganic elements in the form of anions and cations on the surface. The surface composition of root tips from Kearney was C, 65.6%; 0, 26.8%; N, 4.4% and tips from Dayton was C, 72.7%; O, 23.6%; N, 1.9%, grown in the absence of aluminum. Electron lines characteristic of nitrate, potassium, chloride, phosphate were also present in the spectra from those roots. Dayton roots grown in the presence of 37.0 micromolar aluminum contained 2.1% aluminum while Kearney contained 1.3% aluminum. The ratio of aluminum to phosphate was close to 1.0. Dayton roots usually contained twice as much aluminum phosphate in the surface region as Kearney. Dayton may be less susceptible to Al toxic effects by accumulation of aluminum phosphate on the root surface which then acts as a barrier to the transport of aluminum into the interior of the roots.

  20. Cytokinin-dependent secondary growth determines root biomass in radish (Raphanus sativus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Geupil; Lee, Jung-Hun; Rastogi, Khushboo; Park, Suhyoung; Oh, Sang-Hun; Lee, Ji-Young

    2015-01-01

    The root serves as an essential organ in plant growth by taking up nutrients and water from the soil and supporting the rest of the plant body. Some plant species utilize roots as storage organs. Sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas), cassava (Manihot esculenta), and radish (Raphanus sativus), for example, are important root crops. However, how their root growth is regulated remains unknown. In this study, we characterized the relationship between cambium and radial root growth in radish. Through a comparative analysis with Arabidopsis root expression data, we identified putative cambium-enriched transcription factors in radish and analysed their expression in representative inbred lines featuring distinctive radial growth. We found that cell proliferation activities in the cambium positively correlated with radial growth and final yields of radish roots. Expression analysis of candidate transcription factor genes revealed that some genes are differentially expressed between inbred lines and that the difference is due to the distinct cytokinin response. Taken together, we have demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that cytokinin-dependent radial growth plays a key role in the yields of root crops. PMID:25979997

  1. An index for plant water deficit based on root-weighted soil water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jianchu; Li, Sen; Zuo, Qiang; Ben-Gal, Alon

    2015-03-01

    Governed by atmospheric demand, soil water conditions and plant characteristics, plant water status is dynamic, complex, and fundamental to efficient agricultural water management. To explore a centralized signal for the evaluation of plant water status based on soil water status, two greenhouse experiments investigating the effect of the relative distribution between soil water and roots on wheat and rice were conducted. Due to the significant offset between the distributions of soil water and roots, wheat receiving subsurface irrigation suffered more from drought than wheat under surface irrigation, even when the arithmetic averaged soil water content (SWC) in the root zone was higher. A significant relationship was found between the plant water deficit index (PWDI) and the root-weighted (rather than the arithmetic) average SWC over root zone. The traditional soil-based approach for the estimation of PWDI was improved by replacing the arithmetic averaged SWC with the root-weighted SWC to take the effect of the relative distribution between soil water and roots into consideration. These results should be beneficial for scheduling irrigation, as well as for evaluating plant water consumption and root density profile.

  2. Soil Penetration by Earthworms and Plant Roots--Mechanical Energetics of Bioturbation of Compacted Soils.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Siul; Or, Dani; Schymanski, Stanislaus J

    2015-01-01

    We quantify mechanical processes common to soil penetration by earthworms and growing plant roots, including the energetic requirements for soil plastic displacement. The basic mechanical model considers cavity expansion into a plastic wet soil involving wedging by root tips or earthworms via cone-like penetration followed by cavity expansion due to pressurized earthworm hydroskeleton or root radial growth. The mechanical stresses and resulting soil strains determine the mechanical energy required for bioturbation under different soil hydro-mechanical conditions for a realistic range of root/earthworm geometries. Modeling results suggest that higher soil water content and reduced clay content reduce the strain energy required for soil penetration. The critical earthworm or root pressure increases with increased diameter of root or earthworm, however, results are insensitive to the cone apex (shape of the tip). The invested mechanical energy per unit length increase with increasing earthworm and plant root diameters, whereas mechanical energy per unit of displaced soil volume decreases with larger diameters. The study provides a quantitative framework for estimating energy requirements for soil penetration work done by earthworms and plant roots, and delineates intrinsic and external mechanical limits for bioturbation processes. Estimated energy requirements for earthworm biopore networks are linked to consumption of soil organic matter and suggest that earthworm populations are likely to consume a significant fraction of ecosystem net primary production to sustain their subterranean activities. PMID:26087130

  3. 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) concentration and ACC synthase expression in soybean roots and root tips and soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) colonized root pieces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It's fairly well established that a functional ethylene response path is important to root knot and cyst nematode colonization of plant roots. However, ethylene plays many roles in root development and the role of ethylene in nematode colonization of roots may be indirect, e.g. lateral root initiati...

  4. Roots at the percolation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, Eva; Ahmed, Mutez Ali; Carminati, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The rhizosphere is the layer of soil around the roots where complex and dynamic interactions between plants and soil affect the capacity of plants to take up water. The physical properties of the rhizosphere are affected by mucilage, a gel exuded by roots. Mucilage can absorb large volumes of water, but it becomes hydrophobic after drying. We use a percolation model to describe the rewetting of dry rhizosphere. We find that at a critical mucilage concentration the rhizosphere becomes impermeable. The critical mucilage concentration depends on the radius of the soil particle size. Capillary rise experiments with neutron radiography prove that for concentrations below the critical mucilage concentration water could easily cross the rhizosphere, while above the critical concentration water could no longer percolate through it. Our studies, together with former observations of water dynamics in the rhizosphere, suggest that the rhizosphere is near the percolation threshold, where small variations in mucilage concentration sensitively alter the soil hydraulic conductivity. Is mucilage exudation a plant mechanism to efficiently control the rhizosphere conductivity and the access to water?

  5. Roots at the percolation threshold.

    PubMed

    Kroener, Eva; Ahmed, Mutez Ali; Carminati, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The rhizosphere is the layer of soil around the roots where complex and dynamic interactions between plants and soil affect the capacity of plants to take up water. The physical properties of the rhizosphere are affected by mucilage, a gel exuded by roots. Mucilage can absorb large volumes of water, but it becomes hydrophobic after drying. We use a percolation model to describe the rewetting of dry rhizosphere. We find that at a critical mucilage concentration the rhizosphere becomes impermeable. The critical mucilage concentration depends on the radius of the soil particle size. Capillary rise experiments with neutron radiography prove that for concentrations below the critical mucilage concentration water could easily cross the rhizosphere, while above the critical concentration water could no longer percolate through it. Our studies, together with former observations of water dynamics in the rhizosphere, suggest that the rhizosphere is near the percolation threshold, where small variations in mucilage concentration sensitively alter the soil hydraulic conductivity. Is mucilage exudation a plant mechanism to efficiently control the rhizosphere conductivity and the access to water? PMID:25974526

  6. Reduction of Hydraulic Conductivity during Inhibition of Exudation from Excised Maize and Barley Roots 12

    PubMed Central

    Pitman, Michael G.; Wellfare, Dale; Carter, Carolyn

    1981-01-01

    The uncoupler, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP) is shown to reduce the hydraulic conductivity of barley, maize, mung bean, and onion roots. In barley and maize, the reduction in exudation from excised roots is partly due to the reduction in the permeability of the root to water (Ip), but it can be inferred that the rate of salt release to the xylem, is also inhibited. The action of CCCP on Lp is suggested to be mainly in blocking the symplasmic pathway at the plasmodesmata. PMID:16661758

  7. Root Water Uptake and Tracer Transport in a Lupin Root System: Integration of Magnetic Resonance Images and the Numerical Model RSWMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Vanderborght, Jan; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Wienke, Sandra; Vereecken, Harry; Javaux, Mathieu

    2010-05-01

    Combination of experimental studies with detailed deterministic models help understand root water uptake processes. Recently, Javaux et al. developed the RSWMS model by integration of Doussańs root model into the well established SWMS code[1], which simulates water and solute transport in unsaturated soil [2, 3]. In order to confront RSWMS modeling results to experimental data, we used Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technique to monitor root water uptake in situ. Non-invasive 3-D imaging of root system architecture, water content distributions and tracer transport by MR were performed and compared with numerical model calculations. Two MRI experiments were performed and modeled: i) water uptake during drought stress and ii) transport of a locally injected tracer (Gd-DTPA) to the soil-root system driven by root water uptake. Firstly, the high resolution MRI image (0.23x0.23x0.5mm) of the root system was transferred into a continuous root system skeleton by a combination of thresholding, region-growing filtering and final manual 3D redrawing of the root strands. Secondly, the two experimental scenarios were simulated by RSWMS with a resolution of about 3mm. For scenario i) the numerical simulations could reproduce the general trend that is the strong water depletion from the top layer of the soil. However, the creation of depletion zones in the vicinity of the roots could not be simulated, due to a poor initial evaluation of the soil hydraulic properties, which equilibrates instantaneously larger differences in water content. The determination of unsaturated conductivities at low water content was needed to improve the model calculations. For scenario ii) simulations confirmed the solute transport towards the roots by advection. 1. Simunek, J., T. Vogel, and M.T. van Genuchten, The SWMS_2D Code for Simulating Water Flow and Solute Transport in Two-Dimensional Variably Saturated Media. Version 1.21. 1994, U.S. Salinity Laboratory, USDA, ARS: Riverside, California

  8. Linking carbon supply to root cell-wall chemistry and mechanics at high altitudes in Abies georgei

    PubMed Central

    Genet, Marie; Li, Mingcai; Luo, Tianxiang; Fourcaud, Thierry; Clément-Vidal, Anne; Stokes, Alexia

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The mobile carbon supply to different compartments of a tree is affected by climate, but its impact on cell-wall chemistry and mechanics remains unknown. To understand better the variability in root growth and biomechanics in mountain forests subjected to substrate mass movement, we investigated root chemical and mechanical properties of mature Abies georgei var. smithii (Smith fir) growing at different elevations on the Tibet–Qinghai Plateau. Methods Thin and fine roots (0·1–4·0 mm in diameter) were sampled at three different elevations (3480, 3900 and 4330 m, the last corresponding to the treeline). Tensile resistance of roots of different diameter classes was measured along with holocellulose and non-structural carbon (NSC) content. Key Results The mean force necessary to break roots in tension decreased significantly with increasing altitude and was attributed to a decrease in holocellulose content. Holocellulose was significantly lower in roots at the treeline (29·5 ± 1·3 %) compared with those at 3480 m (39·1 ± 1·0 %). Roots also differed significantly in NSC, with 35·6 ± 4·1 mg g−1 dry mass of mean total soluble sugars in roots at 3480 m and 18·8 ± 2·1 mg g−1 dry mass in roots at the treeline. Conclusions Root mechanical resistance, holocellulose and NSC content all decreased with increasing altitude. Holocellulose is made up principally of cellulose, the biosynthesis of which depends largely on NSC supply. Plants synthesize cellulose when conditions are optimal and NSC is not limiting. Thus, cellulose synthesis in the thin and fine roots measured in our study is probably not a priority in mature trees growing at very high altitudes, where climatic factors will be limiting for growth. Root NSC stocks at the treeline may be depleted through over-demand for carbon supply due to increased fine root production or winter root growth. PMID:21186240

  9. Experimentally reduced root–microbe interactions reveal limited plasticity in functional root traits in Acer and Quercus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mei-Ho; Comas, Louise H.; Callahan, Hilary S.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Interactions between roots and soil microbes are critical components of below-ground ecology. It is essential to quantify the magnitude of root trait variation both among and within species, including variation due to plasticity. In addition to contextualizing the magnitude of plasticity relative to differences between species, studies of plasticity can ascertain if plasticity is predictable and whether an environmental factor elicits changes in traits that are functionally advantageous. Methods To compare functional traits and trait plasticities in fine root tissues with natural and reduced levels of colonization by microbial symbionts, trimmed and surface-sterilized root segments of 2-year-old Acer rubrum and Quercus rubra seedlings were manipulated. Segments were then replanted into satellite pots filled with control or heat-treated soil, both originally derived from a natural forest. Mycorrhizal colonization was near zero in roots grown in heat-treated soil; roots grown in control soil matched the higher colonization levels observed in unmanipulated root samples collected from field locations. Key Results Between-treatment comparisons revealed negligible plasticity for root diameter, branching intensity and nitrogen concentration across both species. Roots from treated soils had decreased tissue density (approx. 10–20 %) and increased specific root length (approx. 10–30 %). In contrast, species differences were significant and greater than treatment effects in traits other than tissue density. Interspecific trait differences were also significant in field samples, which generally resembled greenhouse samples. Conclusions The combination of experimental and field approaches was useful for contextualizing trait plasticity in comparison with inter- and intra-specific trait variation. Findings that root traits are largely species dependent, with the exception of root tissue density, are discussed in the context of current literature on root

  10. Biological effects due to weak magnetic fields on plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyavskaya, N.

    In the evolution process, living organisms have experienced the action of the Earth's magnetic field (MF) that is a natural component of our environment. It is known that a galactic MF induction does not exceed 0.1 nT, since investigations of weak magnetic field (WMF) effects on biological systems have attracted attention of biologists due to planning long-term space flights to other planets where the magnetizing force is near 10-5 Oe. However, the role of WMF and its influence on organisms' functioning are still insufficiently investigated. A large number of experiments with seedlings of different plant species placed in WMF has found that the growth of their primary roots is inhibited during the early terms of germination in comparison with control. The proliferation activity and cell reproduction are reduced in meristem of plant roots under WMF application. The prolongation of total cell reproductive cycle is registered due to the expansion of G phase in1 different plant species as well as of G phase in flax and lentil roots along with2 relative stability of time parameters of other phases of cell cycle. In plant cells exposed to WMF, the decrease in functional activity of genome at early prereplicate period is shown. WMF causes the intensification in the processes of proteins' synthesis and break-up in plant roots. Qualitative and quantitative changes in protein spectrum in growing and differentiated cells of plant roots exposed to WMF are revealed. At ultrastructural level, there are observed such ultrastructural peculiarities as changes in distribution of condensed chromatin and nucleolus compactization in nuclei, noticeable accumulation of lipid bodies, development of a lytic compartment (vacuoles, cytosegresomes and paramural bodies), and reduction of phytoferritin in plastids in meristem cells of pea roots exposed to WMF. Mitochondria are the most sensitive organelle to WMF application: their size and relative volume in cells increase, matrix is electron

  11. Salt stress signals shape the plant root.

    PubMed

    Galvan-Ampudia, Carlos S; Testerink, Christa

    2011-06-01

    Plants use different strategies to deal with high soil salinity. One strategy is activation of pathways that allow the plant to export or compartmentalise salt. Relying on their phenotypic plasticity, plants can also adjust their root system architecture (RSA) and the direction of root growth to avoid locally high salt concentrations. Here, we highlight RSA responses to salt and osmotic stress and the underlying mechanisms. A model is presented that describes how salinity affects auxin distribution in the root. Possible intracellular signalling pathways linking salinity to root development and direction of root growth are discussed. These involve perception of high cytosolic Na+ concentrations in the root, activation of lipid signalling and protein kinase activity and modulation of endocytic pathways. PMID:21511515

  12. Leiomyosarcoma of the Mesenteric Root: A Strategic Location of a Rare Tumor.

    PubMed

    Kluger, Yoram; Ben-Ishay, Offir

    2015-01-01

    High mesenteric root sarcomas are difficult to manage due to their proximity to the superior mesenteric vessels. Resection of these tumors along with the blood vessels may lead to a complicated and protracted convalescence for the patient. Resection remains the main treatment modality for these tumors. During operation on high mesenteric root sarcomas, sound clinical judgment is needed for the decision not to sacrifice vital blood vessels. PMID:26464571

  13. Root phenology in a changing climate.

    PubMed

    Radville, Laura; McCormack, M Luke; Post, Eric; Eissenstat, David M

    2016-06-01

    Plant phenology is one of the strongest indicators of ecological responses to climate change, and altered phenology can have pronounced effects on net primary production, species composition in local communities, greenhouse gas fluxes, and ecosystem processes. Although many studies have shown that aboveground plant phenology advances with warmer temperatures, demonstration of a comparable association for belowground phenology has been lacking because the factors that influence root phenology are poorly understood. Because roots can constitute a large fraction of plant biomass, and root phenology may not respond to warming in the same way as shoots, this represents an important knowledge gap in our understanding of how climate change will influence phenology and plant performance. We review studies of root phenology and provide suggestions to direct future research. Only 29% of examined studies approached root phenology quantitatively, strongly limiting interpretation of results across studies. Therefore, we suggest that researchers emphasize quantitative analyses in future phenological studies. We suggest that root initiation, peak growth, and root cessation may be under different controls. Root initiation and cessation may be more constrained by soil temperature and the timing of carbon availability, whereas the timing of peak root growth may represent trade-offs among competing plant sinks. Roots probably do not experience winter dormancy in the same way as shoots: 89% of the studies that examined winter phenology found evidence of growth during winter months. More research is needed to observe root phenology, and future studies should be careful to capture winter and early season phenology. This should be done quantitatively, with direct observations of root growth utilizing rhizotrons or minirhizotrons. PMID:26931171

  14. Root Doctors as Providers of Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Stitt, Van J.

    1983-01-01

    Physicians in primary care recognize that as many as 65 percent of the patients seen in their offices are there for psychological reasons. In any southern town with a moderate population of blacks, there are at least two “root doctors.” These root doctors have mastered the power of autosuggestion and are treating these patients with various forms of medication and psychological counseling. This paper updates the practicing physician on root doctors who practice primary care. PMID:6887277

  15. Root doctors as providers of primary care.

    PubMed

    Stitt, V J

    1983-07-01

    Physicians in primary care recognize that as many as 65 percent of the patients seen in their offices are there for psychological reasons. In any southern town with a moderate population of blacks, there are at least two "root doctors." These root doctors have mastered the power of autosuggestion and are treating these patients with various forms of medication and psychological counseling. This paper updates the practicing physician on root doctors who practice primary care. PMID:6887277

  16. Temperature sensing by primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poff, K. L.

    1990-01-01

    Zea mays L. seedlings, grown on agar plates at 26 degrees C, reoriented the original vertical direction of their primary root when exposed to a thermal gradient applied perpendicular to the gravity vector. The magnitude and direction of curvature can not be explained simply by either a temperature or a humidity effect on root elongation. It is concluded that primary roots of maize sense temperature gradients in addition to sensing the gravitational force.

  17. Advanced Techniques for Root Cause Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2000-09-19

    Five items make up this package, or can be used individually. The Chronological Safety Management Template utilizes a linear adaptation of the Integrated Safety Management System laid out in the form of a template that greatly enhances the ability of the analyst to perform the first step of any investigation which is to gather all pertinent facts and identify causal factors. The Problem Analysis Tree is a simple three (3) level problem analysis tree whichmore » is easier for organizations outside of WSRC to use. Another part is the Systemic Root Cause Tree. One of the most basic and unique features of Expanded Root Cause Analysis is the Systemic Root Cause portion of the Expanded Root Cause Pyramid. The Systemic Root Causes are even more basic than the Programmatic Root Causes and represent Root Causes that cut across multiple (if not all) programs in an organization. the Systemic Root Cause portion contains 51 causes embedded at the bottom level of a three level Systemic Root Cause Tree that is divided into logical, organizationally based categorie to assist the analyst. The Computer Aided Root Cause Analysis that allows the analyst at each level of the Pyramid to a) obtain a brief description of the cause that is being considered, b) record a decision that the item is applicable, c) proceed to the next level of the Pyramid to see only those items at the next level of the tree that are relevant to the particular cause that has been chosen, and d) at the end of the process automatically print out a summary report of the incident, the causal factors as they relate to the safety management system, the probable causes, apparent causes, Programmatic Root Causes and Systemic Root Causes for each causal factor and the associated corrective action.« less

  18. Springback and diagravitropism in Merit corn roots.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, M O; Leopold, A C

    1992-01-01

    Dark-treated Merit corn (Zea mays L.) roots are diagravitropic and lose curvature upon withdrawal of the gravity stimulus (springback). Springback was not detected in a variety of corn that is orthogravitropic in the dark, nor in Merit roots in which tropistic response was enhanced either with red light or with abscisic acid. A possible interpretation is that springback may be associated with a weak growth response of diagravitropic roots. PMID:11537884

  19. Springback and diagravitropism in Merit corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, M. O.; Leopold, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    Dark-treated Merit corn (Zea mays L.) roots are diagravitropic and lose curvature upon withdrawal of the gravity stimulus (springback). Springback was not detected in a variety of corn that is orthogravitropic in the dark, nor in Merit roots in which tropistic response was enhanced either with red light or with abscisic acid. A possible interpretation is that springback may be associated with a weak growth response of diagravitropic roots.

  20. Springback and diagravitropism in Merit corn roots.

    PubMed

    Kelly, M O; Leopold, A C

    1992-06-01

    Dark-treated Merit corn (Zea mays L.) roots are diagravitropic and lose curvature upon withdrawal of the gravity stimulus (springback). Springback was not detected in a variety of corn that is orthogravitropic in the dark, nor in Merit roots in which tropistic response was enhanced either with red light or with abscisic acid. A possible interpretation is that springback may be associated with a weak growth response of diagravitropic roots. PMID:11537884

  1. Temperature sensing by primary roots of maize

    SciTech Connect

    Fortin, M.C.A.; Poff, K.L. )

    1990-09-01

    Zea mays L. seedlings, grown on agar plates at 26{degree}C, reoriented the original vertical direction of their primary root when exposed to a thermal gradient applied perpendicular to the gravity vector. The magnitude and direction of curvature can not be explained simply by either a temperature or a humidity effect on root elongation. It is concluded that primary roots of maize sense temperature gradients in addition to sensing the gravitational force.

  2. Behavioral response of grape root borer (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) neonates to grape root volatiles.

    PubMed

    Rijal, J P; Zhang, A; Bergh, J C

    2013-12-01

    Grape root borer, Vitacea polistiformis (Harris), is an oligophagous and potentially destructive pest of grape in commercial vineyards throughout much of the eastern United States. Larvae feed on vine roots, although little is known about their below-ground interactions with host plants. The behavioral response of groups of grape root borer neonates to stimuli from host and nonhost roots was evaluated in single and paired stimuli bioassays in which stimuli were presented in opposing wells attached to the bottom of petri dish arenas. Stimulus sources included root pieces and root headspace volatiles from 3309 and 420-A grape rootstocks (host) and apple (nonhost) and ethanol-based extracts of 3309 and 420-A roots. In single stimulus assays, significantly more larvae were recovered from wells containing grape roots, apple roots, grape extracts, and grape root volatiles than from control wells, but there was no significant response to volatiles collected from the headspace of apple roots. In paired stimuli assays, significantly more larvae were recovered from wells containing grape than apple roots. There was no difference in larval distribution between wells when 420-A and 3309 roots were presented simultaneously, although a significantly greater response to 3309 than 420-A root extract was recorded. When soil was added to the assays, significantly more larvae were recovered from wells containing grape roots than from those containing only soil, but this response was not detected in assays using buried apple roots. These results are discussed in relation to the plant-insect interactions between grape root borer larvae and their Vitaceae hosts. PMID:24216488

  3. Characterization of Pearl Millet Root Architecture and Anatomy Reveals Three Types of Lateral Roots

    PubMed Central

    Passot, Sixtine; Gnacko, Fatoumata; Moukouanga, Daniel; Lucas, Mikaël; Guyomarc’h, Soazig; Ortega, Beatriz Moreno; Atkinson, Jonathan A.; Belko, Marème N.; Bennett, Malcolm J.; Gantet, Pascal; Wells, Darren M.; Guédon, Yann; Vigouroux, Yves; Verdeil, Jean-Luc; Muller, Bertrand; Laplaze, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Pearl millet plays an important role for food security in arid regions of Africa and India. Nevertheless, it is considered an orphan crop as it lags far behind other cereals in terms of genetic improvement efforts. Breeding pearl millet varieties with improved root traits promises to deliver benefits in water and nutrient acquisition. Here, we characterize early pearl millet root system development using several different root phenotyping approaches that include rhizotrons and microCT. We report that early stage pearl millet root system development is characterized by a fast growing primary root that quickly colonizes deeper soil horizons. We also describe root anatomical studies that revealed three distinct types of lateral roots that form on both primary roots and crown roots. Finally, we detected significant variation for two root architectural traits, primary root lenght and lateral root density, in pearl millet inbred lines. This study provides the basis for subsequent genetic experiments to identify loci associated with interesting early root development traits in this important cereal. PMID:27379124

  4. Root-to-Root Travel of the Beneficial Bacterium Azospirillum brasilense†

    PubMed Central

    Bashan, Yoav; Holguin, Gina

    1994-01-01

    The root-to-root travel of the beneficial bacterium Azospirillum brasilense on wheat and soybean roots in agar, sand, and light-textured soil was monitored. We used a motile wild-type (Mot+) strain and a motility-deficient (Mot-) strain which was derived from the wild-type strain. The colonization levels of inoculated roots were similar for the two strains. Mot+ cells moved from inoculated roots (either natural or artificial roots in agar, sand, or light-textured soil) to noninoculated roots, where they formed a band-type colonization composed of bacterial aggregates encircling a limited part of the root, regardless of the plant species. The Mot- strain did not move toward noninoculated roots of either plant species and usually stayed at the inoculation site and root tips. The effect of attractants and repellents was the primary factor governing the motility of Mot+ cells in the presence of adequate water. We propose that interroot travel of A. brasilense is an essential preliminary step in the root-bacterium recognition mechanism. Bacterial motility might have a general role in getting Azospirillum cells to the site where firmer attachment favors colonization of the root system. Azospirillum travel toward plants is a nonspecific active process which is not directly dependent on nutrient deficiency but is a consequence of a nonspecific bacterial chemotaxis, influenced by the balance between attractants and possibly repellents leaked by the root. PMID:16349297

  5. Characterization of Pearl Millet Root Architecture and Anatomy Reveals Three Types of Lateral Roots.

    PubMed

    Passot, Sixtine; Gnacko, Fatoumata; Moukouanga, Daniel; Lucas, Mikaël; Guyomarc'h, Soazig; Ortega, Beatriz Moreno; Atkinson, Jonathan A; Belko, Marème N; Bennett, Malcolm J; Gantet, Pascal; Wells, Darren M; Guédon, Yann; Vigouroux, Yves; Verdeil, Jean-Luc; Muller, Bertrand; Laplaze, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Pearl millet plays an important role for food security in arid regions of Africa and India. Nevertheless, it is considered an orphan crop as it lags far behind other cereals in terms of genetic improvement efforts. Breeding pearl millet varieties with improved root traits promises to deliver benefits in water and nutrient acquisition. Here, we characterize early pearl millet root system development using several different root phenotyping approaches that include rhizotrons and microCT. We report that early stage pearl millet root system development is characterized by a fast growing primary root that quickly colonizes deeper soil horizons. We also describe root anatomical studies that revealed three distinct types of lateral roots that form on both primary roots and crown roots. Finally, we detected significant variation for two root architectural traits, primary root lenght and lateral root density, in pearl millet inbred lines. This study provides the basis for subsequent genetic experiments to identify loci associated with interesting early root development traits in this important cereal. PMID:27379124

  6. Measurements of water uptake of maize roots: the key function of lateral roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. A.; Zarebanadkouki, M.; Kroener, E.; Kaestner, A.; Carminati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is one of the most important crop worldwide. Despite its importance, there is limited information on the function of different root segments and root types of maize in extracting water from soils. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate locations of root water uptake in maize. We used neutron radiography to: 1) image the spatial distribution of maize roots in soil and 2) trace the transport of injected deuterated water (D2O) in soil and roots. Maizes were grown in aluminum containers (40×38×1 cm) filled with a sandy soil. When the plants were 16 days old, we injected D2O into selected soil regions containing primary, seminal and lateral roots. The experiments were performed during the day (transpiring plants) and night (not transpiring plants). The transport of D2O into roots was simulated using a new convection-diffusion numerical model of D2O transport into roots. By fitting the observed D2O transport we quantified the diffusional permeability and the water uptake of the different root segments. The maize root architecture consisted of a primary root, 4-5 seminal roots and many lateral roots connected to the primary and seminal roots. Laterals emerged from the proximal 15 cm of the primary and seminal roots. Water uptake occurred primarily in lateral roots. Lateral roots had the highest diffusional permeability (9.4×10-7), which was around six times higher that the diffusional permeability of the old seminal segments (1.4×10-7), and two times higher than the diffusional permeability of the young seminal segments (4.7×10-7). The radial flow of D2O into the lateral (6.7×10-5 ) was much higher than in the young seminal roots (1.1×10-12). The radial flow of D2O into the old seminal was negligible. We concluded that the function of the primary and seminal roots was to collect water from the lateral roots and transport it to the shoot. A maize root system with lateral roots branching from deep primary and seminal roots would be

  7. Genetic ablation of root cap cells in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsugeki, R.; Fedoroff, N. V.

    1999-01-01

    The root cap is increasingly appreciated as a complex and dynamic plant organ. Root caps sense and transmit environmental signals, synthesize and secrete small molecules and macromolecules, and in some species shed metabolically active cells. However, it is not known whether root caps are essential for normal shoot and root development. We report the identification of a root cap-specific promoter and describe its use to genetically ablate root caps by directing root cap-specific expression of a diphtheria toxin A-chain gene. Transgenic toxin-expressing plants are viable and have normal aerial parts but agravitropic roots, implying loss of root cap function. Several cell layers are missing from the transgenic root caps, and the remaining cells are abnormal. Although the radial organization of the roots is normal in toxin-expressing plants, the root tips have fewer cytoplasmically dense cells than do wild-type root tips, suggesting that root meristematic activity is lower in transgenic than in wild-type plants. The roots of transgenic plants have more lateral roots and these are, in turn, more highly branched than those of wild-type plants. Thus, root cap ablation alters root architecture both by inhibiting root meristematic activity and by stimulating lateral root initiation. These observations imply that the root caps contain essential components of the signaling system that determines root architecture.

  8. Deriving the unit hydrograph by root selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, J. E.; Dooge, J. C. I.; Bree, T.

    1989-09-01

    De Laine's method of deriving the unit hydrograph from the common roots of polynomials corresponding to different storms is used as a basis for proposing a new procedure in which the unit hydrograph roots can be selected from among the polynomial roots for the runoff of a single storm. The selection is made on the basis that the complex unit hydrograph roots form a characteristic "skew circle" pattern when plotted on an Argand diagram. The application of the procedure to field data is illustrated for both a single-peaked and a double-peaked event.

  9. New substitution models for rooting phylogenetic trees

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Tom A.; Heaps, Sarah E.; Cherlin, Svetlana; Nye, Tom M. W.; Boys, Richard J.; Embley, T. Martin

    2015-01-01

    The root of a phylogenetic tree is fundamental to its biological interpretation, but standard substitution models do not provide any information on its position. Here, we describe two recently developed models that relax the usual assumptions of stationarity and reversibility, thereby facilitating root inference without the need for an outgroup. We compare the performance of these models on a classic test case for phylogenetic methods, before considering two highly topical questions in evolutionary biology: the deep structure of the tree of life and the root of the archaeal radiation. We show that all three alignments contain meaningful rooting information that can be harnessed by these new models, thus complementing and extending previous work based on outgroup rooting. In particular, our analyses exclude the root of the tree of life from the eukaryotes or Archaea, placing it on the bacterial stem or within the Bacteria. They also exclude the root of the archaeal radiation from several major clades, consistent with analyses using other rooting methods. Overall, our results demonstrate the utility of non-reversible and non-stationary models for rooting phylogenetic trees, and identify areas where further progress can be made. PMID:26323766

  10. Maxillary First Molar with Two Root Canals

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Saeed; Ghasemi, Negin

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge regarding the anatomic morphology of maxillary molars is absolutely essential for the success of endodontic treatment. The morphology of the permanent maxillary first molar has been reviewed extensively; however, the presence of two canals in a two-rooted maxillary first molar has rarely been reported in studies describing tooth and root canal anatomies. This case report presents a patient with a maxillary first molar with two roots and two root canals, who was referred to the Department of Endodontics, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. PMID:23862051

  11. The nth root of sequential effect algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jun; Wu, Junde

    2010-06-01

    In 2005, Gudder [Int. J. Theor. Phys. 44, 2219 (2005)] presented 25 problems of sequential effect algebras, the 20th problem asked: In a sequential effect algebra, if the square root of some element exists, is it unique? In this paper, we show that for each given positive integer n >1, there is a sequential effect algebra such that the nth root of its some element c is not unique, and the nth root of c is not the kth root of c (k

  12. New substitution models for rooting phylogenetic trees.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tom A; Heaps, Sarah E; Cherlin, Svetlana; Nye, Tom M W; Boys, Richard J; Embley, T Martin

    2015-09-26

    The root of a phylogenetic tree is fundamental to its biological interpretation, but standard substitution models do not provide any information on its position. Here, we describe two recently developed models that relax the usual assumptions of stationarity and reversibility, thereby facilitating root inference without the need for an outgroup. We compare the performance of these models on a classic test case for phylogenetic methods, before considering two highly topical questions in evolutionary biology: the deep structure of the tree of life and the root of the archaeal radiation. We show that all three alignments contain meaningful rooting information that can be harnessed by these new models, thus complementing and extending previous work based on outgroup rooting. In particular, our analyses exclude the root of the tree of life from the eukaryotes or Archaea, placing it on the bacterial stem or within the Bacteria. They also exclude the root of the archaeal radiation from several major clades, consistent with analyses using other rooting methods. Overall, our results demonstrate the utility of non-reversible and non-stationary models for rooting phylogenetic trees, and identify areas where further progress can be made. PMID:26323766

  13. Chemiluminescence Detection of Nitric Oxide from Roots, Leaves, and Root Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Wany, Aakanksha; Gupta, Alok Kumar; Kumari, Aprajita; Gupta, Shika; Mishra, Sonal; Jaintu, Ritika; Pathak, Pradeep K; Gupta, Kapuganti Jagadis

    2016-01-01

    NO is a free radical with short half-life and high reactivity; due to its physiochemical properties it is very difficult to detect the concentrations precisely. Chemiluminescence is one of the robust methods to quantify NO. Detection of NO by this method is based on reaction of nitric oxide with ozone which leads to emission of light and amount of light is proportional to NO. By this method NO can be measured in the range of pico moles to nano moles range. Using direct chemiluminescence method, NO emitted into the gas stream can be detected whereas using indirect chemiluminescence oxidized forms of NO can also be detected. We detected NO using purified nitrate reductase, mitochondria, cell suspensions, and roots; detail measurement method is described here. PMID:27094407

  14. Simple analytical model of evapotranspiration in the presence of roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cejas, Cesare M.; Hough, L. A.; Castaing, Jean-Christophe; Frétigny, Christian; Dreyfus, Rémi

    2014-10-01

    Evaporation of water out of a soil involves complicated and well-debated mechanisms. When plant roots are added into the soil, water transfer between the soil and the outside environment is even more complicated. Indeed, plants provide an additional process of water transfer. Water is pumped by the roots, channeled to the leaf surface, and released into the surrounding air by a process called transpiration. Prediction of the evapotranspiration of water over time in the presence of roots helps keep track of the amount of water that remains in the soil. Using a controlled visual setup of a two-dimensional model soil consisting of monodisperse glass beads, we perform experiments on actual roots grown under different relative humidity conditions. We record the total water mass loss in the medium and the position of the evaporating front that forms within the medium. We then develop a simple analytical model that predicts the position of the evaporating front as a function of time as well as the total amount of water that is lost from the medium due to the combined effects of evaporation and transpiration. The model is based on fundamental principles of evaporation fluxes and includes empirical assumptions on the quantity of open stomata in the leaves, where water transpiration occurs. Comparison between the model and experimental results shows excellent prediction of the position of the evaporating front as well as the total mass loss from evapotranspiration in the presence of roots. The model also provides a way to predict the lifetime of a plant.

  15. Increased symplasmic permeability in barley root epidermal cells correlates with defects in root hair development.

    PubMed

    Marzec, M; Muszynska, A; Melzer, M; Sas-Nowosielska, H; Kurczynska, E U

    2014-03-01

    It is well known that the process of plant cell differentiation depends on the symplasmic isolation of cells. Before starting the differentiation programme, the individual cell or group of cells should restrict symplasmic communication with neighbouring cells. We tested the symplasmic communication between epidermal cells in the different root zones of parental barley plants Hordeum vulgare L., cv. 'Karat' with normal root hair development, and two root hairless mutants (rhl1.a and rhl1.b). The results clearly show that symplasmic communication was limited during root hair differentiation in the parental variety, whereas in both root hairless mutants epidermal cells were still symplasmically connected in the corresponding root zone. This paper is the first report on the role of symplasmic isolation in barley root cell differentiation, and additionally shows that a disturbance in the restriction of symplasmic communication is present in root hairless mutants. PMID:23927737

  16. Increased symplasmic permeability in barley root epidermal cells correlates with defects in root hair development

    PubMed Central

    Marzec, M; Muszynska, A; Melzer, M; Sas-Nowosielska, H; Kurczynska, E U; Wick, S

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the process of plant cell differentiation depends on the symplasmic isolation of cells. Before starting the differentiation programme, the individual cell or group of cells should restrict symplasmic communication with neighbouring cells. We tested the symplasmic communication between epidermal cells in the different root zones of parental barley plants Hordeum vulgare L., cv. ‘Karat’ with normal root hair development, and two root hairless mutants (rhl1.a and rhl1.b). The results clearly show that symplasmic communication was limited during root hair differentiation in the parental variety, whereas in both root hairless mutants epidermal cells were still symplasmically connected in the corresponding root zone. This paper is the first report on the role of symplasmic isolation in barley root cell differentiation, and additionally shows that a disturbance in the restriction of symplasmic communication is present in root hairless mutants. PMID:23927737

  17. OZONE DECREASES SPRING ROOT GROWTH AND ROOT CARBOHYDRATE CONTENT IN PONDEROSA PINE THE YEAR FOLLOWING EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Storage carbohydrates are extremely important for new shoot and root development following dormancy or during periods of high stress. he hypothesis that ozone decreases carbohydrate storage and decreases new root growth during the year following exposure was investigated. eedling...

  18. Analysis of changes in relative elemental growth rate patterns in the elongation zone of Arabidopsis roots upon gravistimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, J. L.; Ishikawa, H.; Evans, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    Although Arabidopsis is an important system for studying root physiology, the localized growth patterns of its roots have not been well defined, particularly during tropic responses. In order to characterize growth rate profiles along the apex of primary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh (ecotype Columbia) we applied small charcoal particles to the root surface and analyzed their displacement during growth using an automated video digitizer system with custom software for tracking the markers. When growing vertically, the maximum elongation rate occurred 481 +/- 50 microns back from the extreme tip of the root (tip of root cap), and the elongation zone extended back to 912 +/- 137 microns. The distal elongation zone (DEZ) has previously been described as the apical region of the elongation zone in which the relative elemental growth rate (REGR) is < or = 30% of the peak rate in the central elongation zone. By this definition, our data indicate that the basal limit of the DEZ was located 248 +/- 30 microns from the root tip. However, after gravistimulation, the growth patterns of the root changed. Within the first hour of graviresponse, the basal limit of the DEZ and the position of peak REGR shifted apically on the upper flank of the root. This was due to a combination of increased growth in the DEZ and growth inhibition in the central elongation zone. On the lower flank, the basal limit of the DEZ shifted basipetally as the REGR decreased. These factors set up the gradient of growth rate across the root, which drives curvature.

  19. Root-growth-inhibiting sheet

    DOEpatents

    Burton, Frederick G.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Cline, John F.; Skiens, W. Eugene; Van Voris, Peter

    1993-01-01

    In accordance with this invention, a porous sheet material is provided at intervals with bodies of a polymer which contain a 2,6-dinitroaniline. The sheet material is made porous to permit free passage of water. It may be either a perforated sheet or a woven or non-woven textile material. A particularly desirable embodiment is a non-woven fabric of non-biodegradable material. This type of material is known as a "geotextile" and is used for weed control, prevention of erosion on slopes, and other landscaping purposes. In order to obtain a root repelling property, a dinitroaniline is blended with a polymer which is attached to the geotextile or other porous material.

  20. Root-growth-inhibiting sheet

    DOEpatents

    Burton, F.G.; Cataldo, D.A.; Cline, J.F.; Skiens, W.E.; Van Voris, P.

    1993-01-26

    In accordance with this invention, a porous sheet material is provided at intervals with bodies of a polymer which contain a 2,6-dinitroaniline. The sheet material is made porous to permit free passage of water. It may be either a perforated sheet or a woven or non-woven textile material. A particularly desirable embodiment is a non-woven fabric of non-biodegradable material. This type of material is known as a geotextile'' and is used for weed control, prevention of erosion on slopes, and other landscaping purposes. In order to obtain a root repelling property, a dinitroaniline is blended with a polymer which is attached to the geotextile or other porous material.

  1. ROOT CAUSE ANALYSIS PROGRAM MANUAL

    SciTech Connect

    Gravois, Melanie C.

    2007-05-02

    Root Cause Analysis (RCA) identifies the cause of an adverse condition that, if corrected, will preclude recurrence or greatly reduce the probability of recurrence of the same or similar adverse conditions and thereby protect the health and safety of the public, the workers, and the environment. This procedure sets forth the requirements for management determination and the selection of RCA methods and implementation of RCAs that are a result of significant findings from Price-Anderson Amendments Act (PAAA) violations, occurrences/events, Significant Adverse Conditions, and external oversight Corrective Action Requests (CARs) generated by the Office of Enforcement (PAAA headquarters), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and other oversight entities against Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Performance of an RCA may result in the identification of issues that should be reported in accordance with the Issues Management Program Manual.

  2. Meta-analysis of the effects of plant roots in controlling concentrated flow erosion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannoppen, Wouter; Poesen, Jean; Vanmaercke, Matthias; De Baets, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation is often used in ecological restoration programs to control various soil erosion processes. During the last two decades several studies reported on the effects of plant roots in controlling concentrated flow erosion rates. However a global analysis of the now available data on root effects is still lacking. Yet, a meta-data analysis will contribute to a better understanding of the soil-root interactions as our capability to assess the effectiveness of roots in reducing soil erosion rates due to concentrated flow in different environments remains difficult. The objectives of this study are therefore i) to provide a state of the art on studies quantifying the effectiveness of roots in reducing soil erosion rates due to concentrated flow; and ii) to explore the overall trends in erosion reduction as a function of the root (length) density, root system architecture and soil texture, based on a global analysis of published research data. We therefore compiled a dataset of measured relative soil detachment rates (RSD) for the root density (RD; 822 observations) as well as the root length density (RLD; 274 observations). Non-linear regression analyses showed that decreases in RSD as a function of RD and RLD could be best described with the Hill curve model. However, a large proportion of the variability in RSD could not be attributed to RD or RLD, resulting in a relatively low predictive accuracy of the Hill curve model with model efficiencies of 0.11 and 0.17 for RD and RLD respectively. Considering root architecture and soil texture yielded a better predictive model especially for RLD with ME of 0.37 for fibrous roots in a non-sandy soil. The unexplained variance is to a large extent attributable to measuring errors and differences in experimental set ups that could not be explicitly accounted for (e.g. tested plant species, soil and flow characteristics). However, using a Monte Carlo simulation approach, we were able to establish relationships that allow

  3. Long term adjustment of canopy root depth and strength: Implications catchment hydrology and slope stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, T. C.; Taehee, H.; Band, L.; Vose, J.

    2007-12-01

    The species composition of southern Appalachian forests is changing rapidly due to fire suppression, residential expansion and introduced parasites, such as the woody adelgid. Changes in the distribution and age of tree and understory species cause changes in rooting characteristics and therefore the stability of slopes. Roots increase soil cohesive strength and fail in tension during debris flows. The amount of root reinforcement to the soil mass is dependent on the number, size and tensile strength of the roots. We have characterized how changes in the composition of southern Appalachian forests, particularly the expansion of Rhododenron maximum due to fire suppression, may affect the potential for slope failure. We measured the vertical distribution and tensile strength of roots for fifteen individual trees and two mixed species locations in the Coweeta Hydrological Laboratory, North Carolina. The individual pits were chosen to capture variations in species (10 species total), topographic position (nose, side slope, hollow), and age (a range of DBH between 5 cm and 60 cm). Root tensile strengths from different hardwood species were very similar, while rhododendron, a woody shrub, has considerably weaker roots. Roots are concentrated close to the soil surface (at least 70% of biomass occurs within 50 cm of the surface) and variations in this pattern occur primarily as a function of age. R. maximum roots are shallower and weaker than tree roots, which when coupled with low transpiration rates, lowers the total cohesive strength and makes them susceptible to high pore pressure events. We have investigated the potential for mapping R. maximum based on the ratio of near-infrared to red within leaf-off color infrared images. When we combine the remotely-sensed distribution of R. maximum with the root cohesion data from individual pits, we can produce a realistic spatial distribution of root cohesion for southern Appalachian forests. The spatial distribution of root

  4. Root hair formation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) differs between root types and is altered in artificial growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Nestler, Josefine; Keyes, Samuel David; Wissuwa, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Root hairs are important sites for nutrient uptake, especially in P limiting conditions. Here we provide first insights into root hair development for the diverse root types of rice grown under different conditions, and show the first in situ images of rice root hairs in intact soil. Roots of plants grown in upland fields produced short root hairs that showed little responsiveness to P deficiency, and had a higher root hair density in the high P condition. These results were reproducible in rhizoboxes under greenhouse conditions. Synchrotron-based in situ analysis of root hairs in intact soil further confirmed this pattern of root hair formation. In contrast, plants grown in nutrient solution produced more and longer root hairs in low P conditions, but these were unequally distributed among the different root types. While nutrient solution-grown main roots had longer hairs compared to upland field-grown main roots, second order lateral roots did not form any root hairs in nutrient solution-grown plants. Furthermore, root hair formation for plants grown in flooded lowland fields revealed few similarities with those grown in nutrient solution, thus defining nutrient solution as a possible measure of maximal, but not natural root hair development. By combining root hair length and density as a measure for root hair impact on the whole soil-grown root system we show that lateral roots provided the majority of root hair surface. PMID:26976815

  5. 't Hooft vertices, partial quenching, and rooted staggered QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Claude; Golterman, Maarten; Shamir, Yigal; Sharpe, Stephen R.

    2008-06-01

    We discuss the properties of 't Hooft vertices in partially quenched and rooted versions of QCD in the continuum. These theories have a physical subspace, equivalent to ordinary QCD, that is contained within a larger space that includes many unphysical correlation functions. We find that the 't Hooft vertices in the physical subspace have the expected form, despite the presence of unphysical 't Hooft vertices appearing in correlation functions that have an excess of valence quarks (or ghost quarks). We also show that, due to the singular behavior of unphysical correlation functions as the massless limit is approached, order parameters for nonanomalous symmetries can be nonvanishing in finite volume if these symmetries act outside of the physical subspace. Using these results, we demonstrate that arguments recently given by Creutz - claiming to disprove the validity of rooted staggered QCD - are incorrect. In particular, the unphysical 't Hooft vertices do not present an obstacle to the recovery of taste symmetry in the continuum limit.

  6. Truffles regulate plant root morphogenesis via the production of auxin and ethylene.

    PubMed

    Splivallo, Richard; Fischer, Urs; Göbel, Cornelia; Feussner, Ivo; Karlovsky, Petr

    2009-08-01

    Truffles are symbiotic fungi that form ectomycorrhizas with plant roots. Here we present evidence that at an early stage of the interaction, i.e. prior to physical contact, mycelia of the white truffle Tuber borchii and the black truffle Tuber melanopsorum induce alterations in root morphology of the host Cistus incanus and the nonhost Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; i.e. primary root shortening, lateral root formation, root hair stimulation). This was most likely due to the production of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and ethylene by the mycelium. Application of a mixture of the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid and IAA fully mimicked the root morphology induced by the mycelium for both host and nonhost plants. Application of the single hormones only partially mimicked it. Furthermore, primary root growth was not inhibited in the Arabidopsis auxin transport mutant aux1-7 by truffle metabolites while root branching was less effected in the ethylene-insensitive mutant ein2-LH. The double mutant aux1-7;ein2-LH displayed reduced sensitivity to fungus-induced primary root shortening and branching. In agreement with the signaling nature of truffle metabolites, increased expression of the auxin response reporter DR5GFP in Arabidopsis root meristems subjected to the mycelium could be observed, confirming that truffles modify the endogenous hormonal balance of plants. Last, we demonstrate that truffles synthesize ethylene from l-methionine probably through the alpha-keto-gamma-(methylthio)butyric acid pathway. Taken together, these results establish the central role of IAA and ethylene as signal molecules in truffle/plant interactions. PMID:19535471

  7. Environmental effects on the maturation of the endodermis and multiseriate exodermis of Iris germanica roots

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Chris J.; Seago, James L.; Peterson, Carol A.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Most studies of exodermal structure and function have involved species with a uniseriate exodermis. To extend this work, the development and apoplastic permeability of Iris germanica roots with a multiseriate exodermis (MEX) were investigated. The effects of different growth conditions on MEX maturation were also tested. In addition, the exodermises of eight Iris species were observed to determine if their mature anatomy correlated with habitat. Methods Plants were grown in soil, hydroponics (with and without a humid air gap) or aeroponics. Roots were sectioned and stained with various dyes to detect MEX development from the root apical meristem, Casparian bands, suberin lamellae and tertiary wall thickenings. Apoplastic permeability was tested using dye (berberine) and ionic (ferric) tracers. Key Results The root apical meristem was open and MEX development non-uniform. In soil-grown roots, the exodermis started maturing (i.e. Casparian bands and suberin lamellae were deposited) 10 mm from the tip, and two layers had matured by 70 mm. In both hydro- and aeroponically grown roots, exodermal maturation was delayed. However, in areas of roots exposed to an air gap in the hydroponic system, MEX maturation was accelerated. In contrast, maturation of the endodermis was not influenced by the growth conditions. The mature MEX had an atypical Casparian band that was continuous around the root circumference. The MEX prevented the influx and efflux of berberine, but had variable resistance to ferric ions due to their toxic effects. Iris species living in well-drained soils developed a MEX, but species in water-saturated substrates had a uniseriate exodermis and aerenchyma. Conclusions MEX maturation was influenced by the roots' growth medium. The MEX matures very close to the root tip in soil, but much further from the tip in hydro- and aeroponic culture. The air gap accelerated maturation of the second exodermal layer. In Iris, the type of exodermis was

  8. The Molecular Mechanism of Ethylene-Mediated Root Hair Development Induced by Phosphate Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Li; Yu, Haopeng; Dong, Jinsong; Liu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced root hair production, which increases the root surface area for nutrient uptake, is a typical adaptive response of plants to phosphate (Pi) starvation. Although previous studies have shown that ethylene plays an important role in root hair development induced by Pi starvation, the underlying molecular mechanism is not understood. In this work, we characterized an Arabidopsis mutant, hps5, that displays constitutive ethylene responses and increased sensitivity to Pi starvation due to a mutation in the ethylene receptor ERS1. hps5 accumulates high levels of EIN3 protein, a key transcription factor involved in the ethylene signaling pathway, under both Pi sufficiency and deficiency. Pi starvation also increases the accumulation of EIN3 protein. Combined molecular, genetic, and genomic analyses identified a group of genes that affect root hair development by regulating cell wall modifications. The expression of these genes is induced by Pi starvation and is enhanced in the EIN3-overexpressing line. In contrast, the induction of these genes by Pi starvation is suppressed in ein3 and ein3eil1 mutants. EIN3 protein can directly bind to the promoter of these genes, some of which are also the immediate targets of RSL4, a key transcription factor that regulates root hair development. Based on these results, we propose that under normal growth conditions, the level of ethylene is low in root cells; a group of key transcription factors, including RSL4 and its homologs, trigger the transcription of their target genes to promote root hair development; Pi starvation increases the levels of the protein EIN3, which directly binds to the promoters of the genes targeted by RSL4 and its homologs and further increase their transcription, resulting in the enhanced production of root hairs. This model not only explains how ethylene mediates root hair responses to Pi starvation, but may provide a general mechanism for how ethylene regulates root hair development under both stress

  9. Root-soil relationships and terroir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasi, Diego

    2015-04-01

    Soil features, along with climate, are among the most important determinants of a succesful grape production in a certain area. Most of the studies, so far, investigated the above-ground vine response to differente edaphic and climate condition, but it is clearly not sufficient to explain the vine whole behaviour. In fact, roots represent an important part of the terroir system (soil-plant-atmosphere-man), and their study can provide better comprehension of vine responses to different environments. The root density and distribution, the ability of deep-rooting and regenerating new roots are good indicators of root well-being, and represents the basis for an efficient physiological activity of the root system. Root deepening and distribution are strongly dependent and sensitive on soil type and soil properties, while root density is affected mostly by canopy size, rootstock and water availability. According to root well-being, soil management strategies should alleviate soil impediments, improving aeration and microbial activity. Moreover, agronomic practices can impact root system performance and influence the above-ground growth. It is well known, for example, that the root system size is largely diminished by high planting densities. Close vine spacings stimulate a more effective utilization of the available soil, water and nutrients, but if the competition for available soil becomes too high, it can repress vine growth, and compromise vineyard longevity, productivity and reaction to growing season weather. Development of resilient rootstocks, more efficient in terms of water and nutrient uptake and capable of dealing with climate and soil extremes (drought, high salinity) are primary goals fore future research. The use of these rootstocks will benefit a more sustainable use of the soil resources and the preservation and valorisation of the terroir.

  10. Root reinforcement of soils under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, M.; Rist, A.; Cohen, D.; Giadrossich, F.; Egorov, P.; Büttner, D.; Stolz, M.; Thormann, J.-J.

    2015-10-01

    It is well recognized that roots reinforce soils and that the distribution of roots within vegetated hillslopes strongly influences the spatial distribution of soil strength. Previous studies have focussed on the contribution of root reinforcement under conditions of tension or shear. However, no systematic investigation into the contribution of root reinforcement to soils experiencing compression, such as the passive Earth forces at the toe of a landslide, is found in the literature. An empirical-analytical model (CoRoS) for the quantification of root reinforcement in soils under compression is presented and tested against experimental data. The CoRoS model describes the force-displacement behavior of compressed, rooted soils and can be used to provide a framework for improving slope stability calculations. Laboratory results showed that the presence of 10 roots with diameters ranging from 6 to 28 mm in a rectangular soil profile 0.72 m by 0.25 m increased the compressive strength of the soil by about 40% (2.5 kN) at a displacement of 0.05 m, while the apparent stiffness of the rooted soil was 38% higher than for root-free soil. The CoRoS model yields good agreement with experimentally determined values of maximum reinforcement force and compression force as a function of displacement. These results indicate that root reinforcement under compression has a major influence on the mechanical behavior of soil and that the force-displacement behavior of roots should be included in analysis of the compressive regimes that commonly are present in the toe of landslides.

  11. Root susceptibility and inoculum production from roots of Eastern United States oak species to Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about root susceptibility of eastern U.S. tree species to Phytophthora ramorum. In this study, we examined root susceptibility and inoculum production from roots. Sprouted acorns of Q. rubra, Q. palustrus, Q. coccinia, Q. alba, Q. michauxii and Q. prinus were exposed to motile zoos...

  12. RootScan: Software for high-throughput analysis of root anatomical traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RootScan is a program for semi-automated image analysis of anatomical phenes in root cross-sections. RootScan uses pixel value thresholds to separate the cross-section from its background and to visually dissect it into tissue regions. Area measurements and object counts are performed within various...

  13. Effect of Root Moisture Content and Diameter on Root Tensile Properties

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuanjun; Chen, Lihua; Li, Ning; Zhang, Qiufen

    2016-01-01

    The stabilization of slopes by vegetation has been a topical issue for many years. Root mechanical characteristics significantly influence soil reinforcement; therefore it is necessary to research into the indicators of root tensile properties. In this study, we explored the influence of root moisture content on tensile resistance and strength with different root diameters and for different tree species. Betula platyphylla, Quercus mongolica, Pinus tabulaeformis, and Larix gmelinii, the most popular tree species used for slope stabilization in the rocky mountainous areas of northern China, were used in this study. A tensile test was conducted after root samples were grouped by diameter and moisture content. The results showedthat:1) root moisture content had a significant influence on tensile properties; 2) slightly loss of root moisture content could enhance tensile strength, but too much loss of water resulted in weaker capacity for root elongation, and consequently reduced tensile strength; 3) root diameter had a strong positive correlation with tensile resistance; and4) the roots of Betula platyphylla had the best tensile properties when both diameter and moisture content being controlled. These findings improve our understanding of root tensile properties with root size and moisture, and could be useful for slope stabilization using vegetation. PMID:27003872

  14. Root susceptibility and inoculum production from roots of eastern oak species to Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about root susceptibility of eastern tree species to Phytophthora ramorum. In this study, we examined root susceptibility and inoculum production from roots. Oak radicles of several eastern oak species were exposed to zoospore suspensions of 1, 10, 100, or 1000 zoospores per ml at ...

  15. Kinetics of short-term root-carbon mineralization in roots of biofuel crops in soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To better understand and document the rates of root decomposition in biofuel cropping systems, we compared the evolution of CO2 from roots incubated with samples of two Iowa Mollisols. Root samples were collected from experimental plots for four cropping systems: a multispecies reconstructed prairie...

  16. Effect of Root Moisture Content and Diameter on Root Tensile Properties.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuanjun; Chen, Lihua; Li, Ning; Zhang, Qiufen

    2016-01-01

    The stabilization of slopes by vegetation has been a topical issue for many years. Root mechanical characteristics significantly influence soil reinforcement; therefore it is necessary to research into the indicators of root tensile properties. In this study, we explored the influence of root moisture content on tensile resistance and strength with different root diameters and for different tree species. Betula platyphylla, Quercus mongolica, Pinus tabulaeformis, and Larix gmelinii, the most popular tree species used for slope stabilization in the rocky mountainous areas of northern China, were used in this study. A tensile test was conducted after root samples were grouped by diameter and moisture content. The results showedthat:1) root moisture content had a significant influence on tensile properties; 2) slightly loss of root moisture content could enhance tensile strength, but too much loss of water resulted in weaker capacity for root elongation, and consequently reduced tensile strength; 3) root diameter had a strong positive correlation with tensile resistance; and4) the roots of Betula platyphylla had the best tensile properties when both diameter and moisture content being controlled. These findings improve our understanding of root tensile properties with root size and moisture, and could be useful for slope stabilization using vegetation. PMID:27003872

  17. Relations between Roots and Coefficients of Cubic Equations with One Root Negative the Reciprocal of Another

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asiru, M. A.

    2007-01-01

    Under predetermined conditions on the roots and coefficients, necessary and sufficient conditions relating the coefficients of a given cubic equation x[cubed] + ax[squared] + bx + c = 0 can be established so that the roots possess desired properties. In this note, the condition for one root of a cubic equation to be "the negative reciprocal of…

  18. Dynamics of air gap formation around roots with changing soil water content.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetterlein, D.; Carminati, A.; Weller, U.; Oswald, S.; Vogel, H.-J.

    2009-04-01

    Most models regarding uptake of water and nutrients from soil assume intimate contact between roots and soil. However, it is known for a long time that roots may shrink under drought conditions. Due to the opaque nature of soil this process could not be observed in situ until recently. Combining tomography of the entire sample (field of view of 16 x 16 cm, pixel side 0.32 mm) with local tomography of the soil region around roots (field of view of 5 x 5 cm, pixel side 0.09 mm), the high spatial resolution required to image root shrinkage and formation of air-filled gaps around roots could be achieved. Applying this technique and combining it with microtensiometer measurements, measurements of plant gas exchange and microscopic assessment of root anatomy, a more detailed study was conducted to elucidate at which soil matric potential roots start to shrink in a sandy soil and which are the consequences for plant water relations. For Lupinus albus grown in a sandy soil tomography of the entire root system and of the interface between taproot and soil was conducted from day 11 to day 31 covering two drying cycles. Soil matric potential decreased from -36 hPa at day 11 after planting to -72, -251, -429 hPa, on day 17, 19, 20 after planting. On day 20 an air gap started to occur around the tap root and extended further on day 21 with matric potential below -429 hPa (equivalent to 5 v/v % soil moisture). From day 11 to day 21 stomatal conductivity decreased from 467 to 84 mmol m-2 s-1, likewise transpiration rate decreased and plants showed strong wilting symptoms on day 21. Plants were watered by capillary rise on day 21 and recovered completely within a day with stomatal conductivity increasing to 647 mmol m-2 s-1. During a second drying cycle, which was shorter as plants continuously increased in size, air gap formed again at the same matric potential. Plant stomatal conductance and transpiration decreased in a similar fashion with decreasing matric potential and

  19. Coupling root architecture and pore network modeling - an attempt towards better understanding root-soil interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Daniel; Bodner, Gernot; Raoof, Amir

    2013-04-01

    Understanding root-soil interactions is of high importance for environmental and agricultural management. Root uptake is an essential component in water and solute transport modeling. The amount of groundwater recharge and solute leaching significantly depends on the demand based plant extraction via its root system. Plant uptake however not only responds to the potential demand, but in most situations is limited by supply form the soil. The ability of the plant to access water and solutes in the soil is governed mainly by root distribution. Particularly under conditions of heterogeneous distribution of water and solutes in the soil, it is essential to capture the interaction between soil and roots. Root architecture models allow studying plant uptake from soil by describing growth and branching of root axes in the soil. Currently root architecture models are able to respond dynamically to water and nutrient distribution in the soil by directed growth (tropism), modified branching and enhanced exudation. The porous soil medium as rooting environment in these models is generally described by classical macroscopic water retention and sorption models, average over the pore scale. In our opinion this simplified description of the root growth medium implies several shortcomings for better understanding root-soil interactions: (i) It is well known that roots grow preferentially in preexisting pores, particularly in more rigid/dry soil. Thus the pore network contributes to the architectural form of the root system; (ii) roots themselves can influence the pore network by creating preferential flow paths (biopores) which are an essential element of structural porosity with strong impact on transport processes; (iii) plant uptake depend on both the spatial location of water/solutes in the pore network as well as the spatial distribution of roots. We therefore consider that for advancing our understanding in root-soil interactions, we need not only to extend our root models

  20. Effect of Root System Morphology on Root-sprouting and Shoot-rooting Abilities in 123 Plant Species from Eroded Lands in North-east Spain

    PubMed Central

    GUERRERO-CAMPO, JOAQUÍN; PALACIO, SARA; PÉREZ-RONTOMÉ, CARMEN; MONTSERRAT-MARTÍ, GABRIEL

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims The objective of this study was to test whether the mean values of several root morphological variables were related to the ability to develop root-borne shoots and/or shoot-borne roots in a wide range of vascular plants. • Methods A comparative study was carried out on the 123 most common plant species from eroded lands in north-east Spain. After careful excavations in the field, measurements were taken of the maximum root depth, absolute and relative basal root diameter, specific root length (SRL), and the root depth/root lateral spread ratio on at least three individuals per species. Shoot-rooting and root-sprouting were observed in a large number of individuals in many eroded and sedimentary environments. The effect of life history and phylogeny on shoot-rooting and root-sprouting abilities was also analysed. • Key Results The species with coarse and deep tap-roots tended to be root-sprouting and those with fine, fasciculate and long main roots (which generally spread laterally), tended to be shoot-rooting. Phylogeny had an important influence on root system morphology and shoot-rooting and root-sprouting capacities. However, the above relations stood after applying analyses based on phylogenetically independent contrasts (PICs). • Conclusions The main morphological features of the root system of the study species are related to their ability to sprout from their roots and form roots from their shoots. According to the results, such abilities might only be functionally viable in restricted root system morphologies and ecological strategies. PMID:16790468

  1. Meniscal Root Tears: Identification and Repair.

    PubMed

    Doherty, David B; Lowe, Walter R

    2016-01-01

    Intact menisci are capable of converting the axial load of tibiofemoral contact into hoop stress that protects the knee joint. Total meniscectomy leads to rapid degeneration of the knee. Strong clinical and biomechanical data show meniscal root tears and avulsions are the functional equivalent of total meniscectomy. Lateral root tears commonly occur with knee ligament sprains and tears. Medial root tears are generally more chronic, and can be caused by preexisting knee arthritis. Meniscal root repair is indicated when there is identification of a meniscal root tear in a knee with minimal to no arthritis. Chronic root tears in the setting of osteoarthritis are treated conservatively. Meniscal root tears can acutely occur with cruciate ligament tears, can exaggerate symptoms of instability, and will have negative ramifications on outcomes of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction if not addressed concomitantly. In this review, we describe the importance of the menisci for knee joint longevity through anatomy and biomechanics, the diagnostic workup, and ultimately a transosseous technique for repair of meniscal root tears and avulsions. PMID:27004274

  2. ADVANCING FINE ROOT RESEARCH WITH MINIRHIZOTRONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Minirhizotrons provide a nondestructive, in situ method for directly viewing and studying fine roots. Although many insights into fine roots have been gained using minirhizotrons, it is clear from the literature that there is still wide variation in how minirhizotrons and minirhi...

  3. Fate of HERS during Tooth Root Development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaofeng; Bringas, Pablo; Slavkin, Harold C.; Chai, Yang

    2009-01-01

    Tooth root development begins after the completion of crown formation in mammals. Previous studies have shown that Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) plays an important role in root development, but the fate of HERS has remained unknown. In order to investigate the morphological fate and analyze the dynamic movement of HERS cells in vivo, we generated K14-Cre;R26R mice. HERS cells are detectable on the surface of the root throughout root formation and do not disappear. Most of the HERS cells are attached to the surface of the cementum, and others separate to become the epithelial rest of Malasez. HERS cells secrete extracellular matrix components onto the surface of the dentin before dental follicle cells penetrate the HERS network to contact dentin. HERS cells also participate in the cementum development and may differentiate into cementocytes. During root development, the HERS is not interrupted, and instead the HERS cells continue to communicate with each other through the network structure. Furthermore, HERS cells interact with cranial neural crest derived mesenchyme to guide root development. Taken together, the network of HERS cells is crucial for tooth root development. PMID:19576204

  4. 33 CFR 117.1095 - Root River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Root River. 117.1095 Section 117.1095 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Wisconsin § 117.1095 Root River. (a) The draw of the Main...

  5. 33 CFR 117.1095 - Root River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Root River. 117.1095 Section 117.1095 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Wisconsin § 117.1095 Root River. (a) The draw of the Main...

  6. 33 CFR 117.1095 - Root River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Root River. 117.1095 Section 117.1095 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Wisconsin § 117.1095 Root River. (a) The draw of the Main...

  7. 33 CFR 117.1095 - Root River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Root River. 117.1095 Section 117.1095 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Wisconsin § 117.1095 Root River. (a) The draw of the Main...

  8. Enhancing Students' Understanding of Square Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiesman, Jeff L.

    2015-01-01

    Students enrolled in a middle school prealgebra or algebra course often struggle to conceptualize and understand the meaning of radical notation when it is introduced. For example, although it is important for students to approximate the decimal value of a number such as [square root of] 30 and estimate the value of a square root in the form of…

  9. Sporulation on plant roots by Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora ramorum has been shown to infect the roots of many of the pathogen’s foliar hosts. Methods of detecting inoculum in runoff and of quantifying root colonization were tested using Viburnum tinus, Camellia oleifera, Quercus prinus, Umbellularia californica, and Epilobium ciliatum. Plants...

  10. Cytological and ultrastructural studies on root tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, R. D.; Gaynor, J. J.; Galston, A. W.

    1984-01-01

    The anatomy and fine structure of roots from oat and mung bean seedlings, grown under microgravity conditions for 8 days aboard the Space Shuttle, was examined and compared to that of roots from ground control plants grown under similar conditions. Roots from both sets of oat seedlings exhibited characteristic monocotyledonous tissue organization and normal ultrastructural features, except for cortex cell mitochondria, which exhibited a 'swollen' morphology. Various stages of cell division were observed in the meristematic tissues of oat roots. Ground control and flight-grown mung bean roots also showed normal tissue organization, but root cap cells in the flight-grown roots were collapsed and degraded in appearance, especially at the cap periphery. At the ultrastructural level, these cells exhibited a loss of organelle integrity and a highly-condensed cytoplasm. This latter observation perhaps suggests a differing tissue sensitivity for the two species to growth conditions employed in space flight. The basis for abnormal root cap cell development is not understood, but the loss of these putative gravity-sensing cells holds potential significance for long term plant growth orientation during space flight.

  11. Growth and development of root system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The growth and development of root systems of cotton plants is under genetic control but may be modified by the environment. There are many factors that influence root development in cotton. These range from abiotic factors such as soil temperature, soil water, and soil aeration to biotic factors ...

  12. Field investigation of rooting potential in sorghum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The differential influence of root systems on plant development under field conditions is very difficult. A field experiment was devised using three different row spacings (101,152 and 203 cm ) to screen sorghum germplasm for rooting potential based on the relative ability to explore additional soil...

  13. Black streak root rot of lentil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Black streak root rot of lentil is caused by the soil borne fungus Thielaviopsis basicola. The pathogen is widespread. The disease shows symptoms of black streaking on root, and stunted plants. The disease is favored by cool and moist weather. Management of the disease rely on avoiding fields wi...

  14. Root phenotypic characterization of lesquerella genetic resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root systems are crucial for optimizing plant growth and productivity. There has been a push to better understand root morphological and architectural traits and their plasticity because these traits determine the capacity of plants to effectively acquire available water and soil nutrients in the so...

  15. Maize root characteristis that enhance flooding tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant root systems have several cellular and molecular adaptations that are important in reducing stress caused by flooding. Of these, two physical properties of root systems provide an initial barrier toward the avoidance of stress. These are the presence of aerenchyma cells and rapid adventitious ...

  16. Sugarbeet Cultivar Evaluation for Bacterial Root Rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial root rot of sugarbeet caused by Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum is a disease problem recently described in the United States. To ameliorate the impact of bacterial root rot on sucrose loss in the field, storage piles, and factories, studies were conducted to establish an assa...

  17. 33 CFR 117.1095 - Root River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Root River. 117.1095 Section 117.1095 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Wisconsin § 117.1095 Root River. (a) The draw of the Main...

  18. Rapid phenotyping of alfalfa root system architecture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root system architecture (RSA) influences the capacity of an alfalfa plant for symbiotic nitrogen fixation, nutrient uptake and water use efficiency, resistance to frost heaving, winterhardiness, and some pest and pathogen resistance. However, we currently lack a basic understanding of root system d...

  19. Roots as a source of food.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous plant species produce edible roots that are an important source of calories and that contribute to human nutrition. This book chapter discusses the origin and domestication, production aspects and nutritional aspects of a number of root crops including; cassava (Manioc), sweetpotato (Ipomo...

  20. A new approach to root formation

    PubMed Central

    Vatanpour, Mehdi; Zarei, Mina; Javidi, Maryam; Shirazian, Shiva

    2008-01-01

    In endodontics, treatment of an open apex tooth with necrotic pulp is a problem. It seems that with promotion of remnants of Hertwig’s epithelial sheath or rest of malassez accompany with a good irrigation of root canal we can expect root formation. (Iranian Endodontic Journal 2008;3:42-43) PMID:24171018

  1. ACETOGENIC BACTERIA ASSOCIATED WITH SEAGRASS ROOTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seagrasses are adapted to being rooted in reduced, anoxic sediments with high rates of sulfate reduction. During the day, an oxygen gradient is generated around the roots, becoming anoxic at night. Thus, obligate anaerobic bacteria in the rhizosphere have to tolerate elevated oxy...

  2. Dehydration Accelerates Respiration in Postharvest Sugarbeet Roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) roots lose water during storage and often become severely dehydrated after prolonged storage and at the outer regions of storage piles which have greater wind and sun exposure. Sucrose loss is known to be elevated in dehydrated roots, although the metabolic processes re...

  3. Method for Constructing Standardized Simulated Root Canals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz-Bongert, Udo; Weine, Franklin S.

    1990-01-01

    The construction of visual and manipulative aids, clear resin blocks with root-canal-like spaces, for simulation of root canals is explained. Time, materials, and techniques are discussed. The method allows for comparison of canals, creation of any configuration of canals, and easy presentation during instruction. (MSE)

  4. Arabidopsis: An Adequate Model for Dicot Root Systems?

    PubMed

    Zobel, Richard W

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis root system is frequently considered to have only three classes of root: primary, lateral, and adventitious. Research with other plant species has suggested up to eight different developmental/functional classes of root for a given plant root system. If Arabidopsis has only three classes of root, it may not be an adequate model for eudicot plant root systems. Recent research, however, can be interpreted to suggest that pre-flowering Arabidopsis does have at least five (5) of these classes of root. This then suggests that Arabidopsis root research can be considered an adequate model for dicot plant root systems. PMID:26904040

  5. GiA Roots: software for the high throughput analysis of plant root system architecture

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Characterizing root system architecture (RSA) is essential to understanding the development and function of vascular plants. Identifying RSA-associated genes also represents an underexplored opportunity for crop improvement. Software tools are needed to accelerate the pace at which quantitative traits of RSA are estimated from images of root networks. Results We have developed GiA Roots (General Image Analysis of Roots), a semi-automated software tool designed specifically for the high-throughput analysis of root system images. GiA Roots includes user-assisted algorithms to distinguish root from background and a fully automated pipeline that extracts dozens of root system phenotypes. Quantitative information on each phenotype, along with intermediate steps for full reproducibility, is returned to the end-user for downstream analysis. GiA Roots has a GUI front end and a command-line interface for interweaving the software into large-scale workflows. GiA Roots can also be extended to estimate novel phenotypes specified by the end-user. Conclusions We demonstrate the use of GiA Roots on a set of 2393 images of rice roots representing 12 genotypes from the species Oryza sativa. We validate trait measurements against prior analyses of this image set that demonstrated that RSA traits are likely heritable and associated with genotypic differences. Moreover, we demonstrate that GiA Roots is extensible and an end-user can add functionality so that GiA Roots can estimate novel RSA traits. In summary, we show that the software can function as an efficient tool as part of a workflow to move from large numbers of root images to downstream analysis. PMID:22834569

  6. Effect of lead on root growth

    PubMed Central

    Fahr, Mouna; Laplaze, Laurent; Bendaou, Najib; Hocher, Valerie; Mzibri, Mohamed El; Bogusz, Didier; Smouni, Abdelaziz

    2013-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is one of the most widespread heavy metal contaminant in soils. It is highly toxic to living organisms. Pb has no biological function but can cause morphological, physiological, and biochemical dysfunctions in plants. Plants have developed a wide range of tolerance mechanisms that are activated in response to Pb exposure. Pb affects plants primarily through their root systems. Plant roots rapidly respond either (i) by the synthesis and deposition of callose, creating a barrier that stops Pb entering (ii) through the uptake of large amounts of Pb and its sequestration in the vacuole accompanied by changes in root growth and branching pattern or (iii) by its translocation to the aboveground parts of plant in the case of hyperaccumulators plants. Here we review the interactions of roots with the presence of Pb in the rhizosphere and the effect of Pb on the physiological and biochemical mechanisms of root development. PMID:23750165

  7. Systems approaches to study root architecture dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta, Candela; Wabnik, Krzysztof; Benková, Eva

    2013-01-01

    The plant root system is essential for providing anchorage to the soil, supplying minerals and water, and synthesizing metabolites. It is a dynamic organ modulated by external cues such as environmental signals, water and nutrients availability, salinity and others. Lateral roots (LRs) are initiated from the primary root post-embryonically, after which they progress through discrete developmental stages which can be independently controlled, providing a high level of plasticity during root system formation. Within this review, main contributions are presented, from the classical forward genetic screens to the more recent high-throughput approaches, combined with computer model predictions, dissecting how LRs and thereby root system architecture is established and developed. PMID:24421783

  8. The origin and early evolution of roots.

    PubMed

    Kenrick, Paul; Strullu-Derrien, Christine

    2014-10-01

    Geological sites of exceptional fossil preservation are becoming a focus of research on root evolution because they retain edaphic and ecological context, and the remains of plant soft tissues are preserved in some. New information is emerging on the origins of rooting systems, their interactions with fungi, and their nature and diversity in the earliest forest ecosystems. Remarkably well-preserved fossils prove that mycorrhizal symbionts were diverse in simple rhizoid-based systems. Roots evolved in a piecemeal fashion and independently in several major clades through the Devonian Period (416 to 360 million years ago), rapidly extending functionality and complexity. Evidence from extinct arborescent clades indicates that polar auxin transport was recruited independently in several to regulate wood and root development. The broader impact of root evolution on the geochemical carbon cycle is a developing area and one in which the interests of the plant physiologist intersect with those of the geochemist. PMID:25187527

  9. Long-term control of root growth

    DOEpatents

    Burton, Frederick G.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Cline, John F.; Skiens, W. Eugene

    1992-05-26

    A method and system for long-term control of root growth without killing the plants bearing those roots involves incorporating a 2,6-dinitroaniline in a polymer and disposing the polymer in an area in which root control is desired. This results in controlled release of the substituted aniline herbicide over a period of many years. Herbicides of this class have the property of preventing root elongation without translocating into other parts of the plant. The herbicide may be encapsulated in the polymer or mixed with it. The polymer-herbicide mixture may be formed into pellets, sheets, pipe gaskets, pipes for carrying water, or various other forms. The invention may be applied to other protection of buried hazardous wastes, protection of underground pipes, prevention of root intrusion beneath slabs, the dwarfing of trees or shrubs and other applications. The preferred herbicide is 4-difluoromethyl-N,N-dipropyl-2,6-dinitro-aniline, commonly known as trifluralin.

  10. Long-term control of root growth

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, F.G.; Cataldo, D.A.; Cline, J.F.; Skiens, W.E.

    1992-05-26

    A method and system for long-term control of root growth without killing the plants bearing those roots involves incorporating a 2,6-dinitroaniline in a polymer and disposing the polymer in an area in which root control is desired. This results in controlled release of the substituted aniline herbicide over a period of many years. Herbicides of this class have the property of preventing root elongation without translocating into other parts of the plant. The herbicide may be encapsulated in the polymer or mixed with it. The polymer-herbicide mixture may be formed into pellets, sheets, pipe gaskets, pipes for carrying water, or various other forms. The invention may be applied to other protection of buried hazardous wastes, protection of underground pipes, prevention of root intrusion beneath slabs, the dwarfing of trees or shrubs and other applications. The preferred herbicide is 4-difluoromethyl-N,N-dipropyl-2,6-dinitro-aniline, commonly known as trifluralin. 7 figs.

  11. Clinical management of infected root canal dentin.

    PubMed

    Love, R M

    1996-08-01

    Several hundred different species of bacteria are present in the human intraoral environment. Bacterial penetration of root canal dentin occurs when bacteria invade the root canal system. These bacteria may constitute a reservoir from which root canal reinfection may occur during or after endodontic treatment. The learning objective of this article is to review endodontic microbiology, update readers on the role of bacteria in pulp and periapical disease, and discuss the principles of management of infected root canal dentin. Complete debridement, removal of microorganisms and affected dentin, and chemomechanical cleansing of the root canal are suggested as being the cornerstones of successful endodontic therapy, followed by intracanal medication to remove residual bacteria, when required. PMID:9242125

  12. Management of Six Root Canals in Mandibular First Molar

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Fabio de Almeida; Sousa, Bruno Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    Success in root canal treatment is achieved after thorough cleaning, shaping, and obturation of the root canal system. This clinical case describes conventional root canal treatment of an unusual mandibular first molar with six root canals. The prognosis for endodontic treatment in teeth with abnormal morphology is unfavorable if the clinician fails to recognize extra root canals. PMID:25685156

  13. Root Canal Treatment of a Maxillary Second Premolar with Two Palatal Root Canals: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Golmohammadi, Maryam; Jafarzadeh, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of the root canal morphology and anatomy is essential for thorough shaping and cleaning of the entire root canal system and consequent successful treatment. This report describes a case of maxillary second premolar with two roots and three root canals (two mesial and distal palatal canals). The case report underlines the importance of complete knowledge about root canal morphology and possible variations, coupled with clinical and radiographic examination in order to increase the ability of clinicians to treat difficult cases. PMID:27471538

  14. Root Canal Treatment of a Maxillary Second Premolar with Two Palatal Root Canals: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Golmohammadi, Maryam; Jafarzadeh, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of the root canal morphology and anatomy is essential for thorough shaping and cleaning of the entire root canal system and consequent successful treatment. This report describes a case of maxillary second premolar with two roots and three root canals (two mesial and distal palatal canals). The case report underlines the importance of complete knowledge about root canal morphology and possible variations, coupled with clinical and radiographic examination in order to increase the ability of clinicians to treat difficult cases. PMID:27471538

  15. Variation in root density along stream banks.

    PubMed

    Wynn, Theresa M; Mostaghimi, Saied; Burger, James A; Harpold, Adrian A; Henderson, Marc B; Henry, Leigh-Anne

    2004-01-01

    While it is recognized that vegetation plays a significant role in stream bank stabilization, the effects are not fully quantified. The study goal was to determine the type and density of vegetation that provides the greatest protection against stream bank erosion by determining the density of roots in stream banks. To quantify the density of roots along alluvial stream banks, 25 field sites in the Appalachian Mountains were sampled. The riparian buffers varied from short turfgrass to mature riparian forests, representing a range of vegetation types. Root length density (RLD) with depth and aboveground vegetation density were measured. The sites were divided into forested and herbaceous groups and differences in root density were evaluated. At the herbaceous sites, very fine roots (diameter < 0.5 mm) were most common and more than 75% of all roots were concentrated in the upper 30 cm of the stream bank. Under forested vegetation, fine roots (0.5 mm < diameter < 2.0 mm) were more common throughout the bank profile, with 55% of all roots in the top 30 cm. In the top 30 cm of the bank, herbaceous sites had significantly greater overall RLD than forested sites (alpha = 0.01). While there were no significant differences in total RLD below 30 cm, forested sites had significantly greater concentrations of fine roots, as compared with herbaceous sites (alpha = 0.01). As research has shown that erosion resistance has a direct relationship with fine root density, forested vegetation may provide better protection against stream bank erosion. PMID:15537925

  16. Modeling the Influence of Vegetation Root Distribution for a Changed Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, J.; Hatzis, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate modeling of the carbon and water budget requires a dynamic vegetation module that can link carbon and water belowground. Root distribution determines the capacity for water uptake and nutrient absorption. Vegetation development belowground in semi-arid regions can be especially sensitive to climate change due to its important role in vegetation survival. The authors have developed a fine root allocation scheme in response to the relative availabilities of soil water and nutrients. A global soil nitrogen and phosphorus data set has been interpolated spatially at each grid point and incorporated into the Community Land Model (CLM). For each plant functional type, its fine root carbon in each soil layer is updated with input from photosynthesis and output to respiration and turnover. The results show that the simulated root distribution is reasonable in comparison with the observed carbon distribution. Simulated fine root carbon will be shifted to the moist lower soil layers as climate becomes drier. Further,influences of the dynamic root distribution scheme to net primary productivity (NPP) and air temperature are evaluated for different climate periods (1990-2004 vs. 1950-1964), and are compared with the results using current static root schemes.

  17. Iron- and ferritin-dependent reactive oxygen species distribution: impact on Arabidopsis root system architecture.

    PubMed

    Reyt, Guilhem; Boudouf, Soukaina; Boucherez, Jossia; Gaymard, Frédéric; Briat, Jean-Francois

    2015-03-01

    Iron (Fe) homeostasis is integrated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and distribution at the root tip participates in the control of root growth. Excess Fe increases ferritin abundance, enabling the storage of Fe, which contributes to protection of plants against Fe-induced oxidative stress. AtFer1 and AtFer3 are the two ferritin genes expressed in the meristematic zone, pericycle and endodermis of the Arabidopsis thaliana root, and it is in these regions that we observe Fe stained dots. This staining disappears in the triple fer1-3-4 ferritin mutant. Fe excess decreases primary root length in the same way in wild-type and in fer1-3-4 mutant. In contrast, the Fe-mediated decrease of lateral root (LR) length and density is enhanced in fer1-3-4 plants due to a defect in LR emergence. We observe that this interaction between excess Fe, ferritin, and root system architecture (RSA) is in part mediated by the H2O2/O2·- balance between the root cell proliferation and differentiation zones regulated by the UPB1 transcription factor. Meristem size is also decreased in response to Fe excess in ferritin mutant plants, implicating cell cycle arrest mediated by the ROS-activated SMR5/SMR7 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors pathway in the interaction between Fe and RSA. PMID:25624148

  18. Spatial separation of light perception and growth response in maize root phototropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, J. L.; Wolverton, C.; Ishikawa, H.; Hangarter, R. P.; Evans, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    Although the effects of gravity on root growth are well known and interactions between light and gravity have been reported, details of root phototropic responses are less documented. We used high-resolution image analysis to study phototropism in primary roots of Zea mays L. Similar to the location of perception in gravitropism, the perception of light was localized in the root cap. Phototropic curvature away from the light, on the other hand, developed in the central elongation zone, more basal than the site of initiation of gravitropic curvature. The phototropic curvature saturated at approximately 10 micromoles m-2 s-1 blue light with a peak curvature of 29 +/- 4 degrees, in part due to induction of positive gravitropism following displacement of the root tip from vertical during negative phototropism. However, at higher fluence rates, development of phototropic curvature is arrested even if gravitropism is avoided by maintaining the root cap vertically using a rotating feedback system. Thus continuous illumination can cause adaptation in the signalling pathway of the phototropic response in roots.

  19. Image-Based High-Throughput Field Phenotyping of Crop Roots1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Bucksch, Alexander; Burridge, James; York, Larry M.; Das, Abhiram; Nord, Eric; Weitz, Joshua S.; Lynch, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Current plant phenotyping technologies to characterize agriculturally relevant traits have been primarily developed for use in laboratory and/or greenhouse conditions. In the case of root architectural traits, this limits phenotyping efforts, largely, to young plants grown in specialized containers and growth media. Hence, novel approaches are required to characterize mature root systems of older plants grown under actual soil conditions in the field. Imaging methods able to address the challenges associated with characterizing mature root systems are rare due, in part, to the greater complexity of mature root systems, including the larger size, overlap, and diversity of root components. Our imaging solution combines a field-imaging protocol and algorithmic approach to analyze mature root systems grown in the field. Via two case studies, we demonstrate how image analysis can be utilized to estimate localized root traits that reliably capture heritable architectural diversity as well as environmentally induced architectural variation of both monocot and dicot plants. In the first study, we show that our algorithms and traits (including 13 novel traits inaccessible to manual estimation) can differentiate nine maize (Zea mays) genotypes 8 weeks after planting. The second study focuses on a diversity panel of 188 cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) genotypes to identify which traits are sufficient to differentiate genotypes even when comparing plants whose harvesting date differs up to 14 d. Overall, we find that automatically derived traits can increase both the speed and reproducibility of the trait estimation pipeline under field conditions. PMID:25187526

  20. The Effects of High Steady State Auxin Levels on Root Cell Elongation in Brachypodium.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Villalobos, David; Díaz-Moreno, Sara M; van der Schuren, Alja; Tamaki, Takayuki; Kang, Yeon Hee; Gujas, Bojan; Novak, Ondrej; Jaspert, Nina; Li, Zhenni; Wolf, Sebastian; Oecking, Claudia; Ljung, Karin; Bulone, Vincent; Hardtke, Christian S

    2016-05-01

    The long-standing Acid Growth Theory of plant cell elongation posits that auxin promotes cell elongation by stimulating cell wall acidification and thus expansin action. To date, the paucity of pertinent genetic materials has precluded thorough analysis of the importance of this concept in roots. The recent isolation of mutants of the model grass species Brachypodium distachyon with dramatically enhanced root cell elongation due to increased cellular auxin levels has allowed us to address this question. We found that the primary transcriptomic effect associated with elevated steady state auxin concentration in elongating root cells is upregulation of cell wall remodeling factors, notably expansins, while plant hormone signaling pathways maintain remarkable homeostasis. These changes are specifically accompanied by reduced cell wall arabinogalactan complexity but not by increased proton excretion. On the contrary, we observed a tendency for decreased rather than increased proton extrusion from root elongation zones with higher cellular auxin levels. Moreover, similar to Brachypodium, root cell elongation is, in general, robustly buffered against external pH fluctuation in Arabidopsis thaliana However, forced acidification through artificial proton pump activation inhibits root cell elongation. Thus, the interplay between auxin, proton pump activation, and expansin action may be more flexible in roots than in shoots. PMID:27169463

  1. The Effects of High Steady State Auxin Levels on Root Cell Elongation in Brachypodium[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco-Villalobos, David; Tamaki, Takayuki; Gujas, Bojan; Jaspert, Nina; Oecking, Claudia; Bulone, Vincent; Hardtke, Christian S.

    2016-01-01

    The long-standing Acid Growth Theory of plant cell elongation posits that auxin promotes cell elongation by stimulating cell wall acidification and thus expansin action. To date, the paucity of pertinent genetic materials has precluded thorough analysis of the importance of this concept in roots. The recent isolation of mutants of the model grass species Brachypodium distachyon with dramatically enhanced root cell elongation due to increased cellular auxin levels has allowed us to address this question. We found that the primary transcriptomic effect associated with elevated steady state auxin concentration in elongating root cells is upregulation of cell wall remodeling factors, notably expansins, while plant hormone signaling pathways maintain remarkable homeostasis. These changes are specifically accompanied by reduced cell wall arabinogalactan complexity but not by increased proton excretion. On the contrary, we observed a tendency for decreased rather than increased proton extrusion from root elongation zones with higher cellular auxin levels. Moreover, similar to Brachypodium, root cell elongation is, in general, robustly buffered against external pH fluctuation in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, forced acidification through artificial proton pump activation inhibits root cell elongation. Thus, the interplay between auxin, proton pump activation, and expansin action may be more flexible in roots than in shoots. PMID:27169463

  2. Identification of key genes involved in root development of tomato using expressed sequence tag analysis.

    PubMed

    Kalidhasan, N; Joshi, Deepti; Bhatt, Tarun Kumar; Gupta, Aditya Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Root system of plants are actually fascinating structures, not only critical for plant development, but also important for storage and conduction. Due to its agronomic importance, identification of genes involved in root development has been a subject of intense study. Tomato is the one of the most consumed vegetables in the world. Tomato has been used as model system for dicot plants because of its small genome, well-established transformation techniques and well-constructed physical map. The present study is targeted to identify of root specific genes expressed temporally and also gene(s) involved in lateral root and profuse root development. A total of 890 ESTs were identified from five EST libraries constructed using SSH approach which included temporal gene regulation (early and late) and genes involved in morphogenetic traits (lateral and profuse rooting). One hundred sixty-one unique ESTs identified from various libraries were categorized based on their putative functions and deposited in NCBI-dbEST database. In addition, 36 ESTs were selected for validation of their expression by RT-PCR. The present findings will help in shedding light to the unexplored developmental process of root growth in tomato and plant in general. PMID:26600676

  3. Image-based high-throughput field phenotyping of crop roots.

    PubMed

    Bucksch, Alexander; Burridge, James; York, Larry M; Das, Abhiram; Nord, Eric; Weitz, Joshua S; Lynch, Jonathan P

    2014-10-01

    Current plant phenotyping technologies to characterize agriculturally relevant traits have been primarily developed for use in laboratory and/or greenhouse conditions. In the case of root architectural traits, this limits phenotyping efforts, largely, to young plants grown in specialized containers and growth media. Hence, novel approaches are required to characterize mature root systems of older plants grown under actual soil conditions in the field. Imaging methods able to address the challenges associated with characterizing mature root systems are rare due, in part, to the greater complexity of mature root systems, including the larger size, overlap, and diversity of root components. Our imaging solution combines a field-imaging protocol and algorithmic approach to analyze mature root systems grown in the field. Via two case studies, we demonstrate how image analysis can be utilized to estimate localized root traits that reliably capture heritable architectural diversity as well as environmentally induced architectural variation of both monocot and dicot plants. In the first study, we show that our algorithms and traits (including 13 novel traits inaccessible to manual estimation) can differentiate nine maize (Zea mays) genotypes 8 weeks after planting. The second study focuses on a diversity panel of 188 cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) genotypes to identify which traits are sufficient to differentiate genotypes even when comparing plants whose harvesting date differs up to 14 d. Overall, we find that automatically derived traits can increase both the speed and reproducibility of the trait estimation pipeline under field conditions. PMID:25187526

  4. Accessory roots and root canals in human anterior teeth: a review and clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, H M A; Hashem, A A

    2016-08-01

    Anterior teeth may have aberrant anatomical variations in the number of roots and root canals. A review of the literature was conducted using appropriate key words in major endodontic journals to identify the available reported cases as well as experimental and clinical investigations on accessory roots and root canals in anterior teeth. After retrieving the full text of related articles, cross-citations were identified, and the pooled data were then discussed. Results revealed a higher prevalence in accessory root/root canal variations in mandibular anterior teeth than in maxillary counterparts. However, maxillary incisor teeth revealed the highest tendency for accessory root/root canal aberrations caused by anomalies such as dens invaginatus and palato-gingival groove. Primary anterior teeth may also exhibit external and internal anatomical variations in the root, especially maxillary canines. Therefore, dental practitioners should thoroughly assess all teeth scheduled for root canal treatment to prevent the undesirable consequences caused by inadequate debridement of accessory configurations of the root canal system. PMID:26174943

  5. RootGraph: a graphic optimization tool for automated image analysis of plant roots

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jinhai; Zeng, Zhanghui; Connor, Jason N.; Huang, Chun Yuan; Melino, Vanessa; Kumar, Pankaj; Miklavcic, Stanley J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper outlines a numerical scheme for accurate, detailed, and high-throughput image analysis of plant roots. In contrast to existing root image analysis tools that focus on root system-average traits, a novel, fully automated and robust approach for the detailed characterization of root traits, based on a graph optimization process is presented. The scheme, firstly, distinguishes primary roots from lateral roots and, secondly, quantifies a broad spectrum of root traits for each identified primary and lateral root. Thirdly, it associates lateral roots and their properties with the specific primary root from which the laterals emerge. The performance of this approach was evaluated through comparisons with other automated and semi-automated software solutions as well as against results based on manual measurements. The comparisons and subsequent application of the algorithm to an array of experimental data demonstrate that this method outperforms existing methods in terms of accuracy, robustness, and the ability to process root images under high-throughput conditions. PMID:26224880

  6. Root hair-specific expansins modulate root hair elongation in rice.

    PubMed

    ZhiMing, Yu; Bo, Kang; XiaoWei, He; ShaoLei, Lv; YouHuang, Bai; WoNa, Ding; Ming, Chen; Hyung-Taeg, Cho; Ping, Wu

    2011-06-01

    Root hair growth requires intensive cell-wall modification. This study demonstrates that root hair-specific expansin As, a sub-clade of the cell wall-loosening expansin proteins, are required for root hair elongation in rice (Oryza sativa L.). We identified a gene encoding EXPA17 (OsEXPA17) from a rice mutant with short root hairs. Promoter::reporter transgenic lines exhibited exclusive OsEXPA17 expression in root hair cells. The OsEXPA17 mutant protein (OsexpA17) contained a point mutation, causing a change in the amino acid sequence (Gly104→Arg). This amino acid alteration is predicted to disrupt a highly conserved disulfide bond in the mutant. Suppression of OsEXPA17 by RNA interference further confirmed requirement for the gene in root hair elongation. Complementation of the OsEXPA17 mutant with other root hair EXPAs (OsEXPA30 and Arabidopsis EXPA7) can restore root hair elongation, indicating functional conservation of these root hair EXPAs in monocots and dicots. These results demonstrate that members of the root hair EXPA sub-clade play a crucial role in root hair cell elongation in Graminaceae. PMID:21309868

  7. GLO-Roots: an imaging platform enabling multidimensional characterization of soil-grown root systems

    PubMed Central

    Rellán-Álvarez, Rubén; Lobet, Guillaume; Lindner, Heike; Pradier, Pierre-Luc; Sebastian, Jose; Yee, Muh-Ching; Geng, Yu; Trontin, Charlotte; LaRue, Therese; Schrager-Lavelle, Amanda; Haney, Cara H; Nieu, Rita; Maloof, Julin; Vogel, John P; Dinneny, José R

    2015-01-01

    Root systems develop different root types that individually sense cues from their local environment and integrate this information with systemic signals. This complex multi-dimensional amalgam of inputs enables continuous adjustment of root growth rates, direction, and metabolic activity that define a dynamic physical network. Current methods for analyzing root biology balance physiological relevance with imaging capability. To bridge this divide, we developed an integrated-imaging system called Growth and Luminescence Observatory for Roots (GLO-Roots) that uses luminescence-based reporters to enable studies of root architecture and gene expression patterns in soil-grown, light-shielded roots. We have developed image analysis algorithms that allow the spatial integration of soil properties, gene expression, and root system architecture traits. We propose GLO-Roots as a system that has great utility in presenting environmental stimuli to roots in ways that evoke natural adaptive responses and in providing tools for studying the multi-dimensional nature of such processes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07597.001 PMID:26287479

  8. Resistance to compression of weakened roots subjected to different root reconstruction protocols

    PubMed Central

    ZOGHEIB, Lucas Villaça; SAAVEDRA, Guilherme de Siqueira Ferreira Anzaloni; CARDOSO, Paula Elaine; VALERA, Márcia Carneiro; de ARAÚJO, Maria Amélia Máximo

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated, in vitro, the fracture resistance of human non-vital teeth restored with different reconstruction protocols. Material and methods Forty human anterior roots of similar shape and dimensions were assigned to four groups (n=10), according to the root reconstruction protocol: Group I (control): non-weakened roots with glass fiber post; Group II: roots with composite resin by incremental technique and glass fiber post; Group III: roots with accessory glass fiber posts and glass fiber post; and Group IV: roots with anatomic glass fiber post technique. Following post cementation and core reconstruction, the roots were embedded in chemically activated acrylic resin and submitted to fracture resistance testing, with a compressive load at an angle of 45º in relation to the long axis of the root at a speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture. All data were statistically analyzed with bilateral Dunnett's test (α=0.05). Results Group I presented higher mean values of fracture resistance when compared with the three experimental groups, which, in turn, presented similar resistance to fracture among each other. None of the techniques of root reconstruction with intraradicular posts improved root strength, and the incremental technique was suggested as being the most recommendable, since the type of fracture that occurred allowed the remaining dental structure to be repaired. Conclusion The results of this in vitro study suggest that the healthy remaining radicular dentin is more important to increase fracture resistance than the root reconstruction protocol. PMID:22231002

  9. Root cap influences root colonisation by Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 on maize.

    PubMed

    Humphris, Sonia N; Bengough, A Glyn; Griffiths, Bryan S; Kilham, Ken; Rodger, Sheena; Stubbs, Vicky; Valentine, Tracy A; Young, Iain M

    2005-09-01

    We investigated the influence of root border cells on the colonisation of seedling Zea mays roots by Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 in sandy loam soil packed at two dry bulk densities. Numbers of colony forming units (CFU) were counted on sequential sections of root for intact and decapped inoculated roots grown in loose (1.0 mg m(-3)) and compacted (1.3 mg m(-3)) soil. After two days of root growth, the numbers of P. fluorescens (CFU cm(-1)) were highest on the section of root just below the seed with progressively fewer bacteria near the tip, irrespective of density. The decapped roots had significantly more colonies of P. fluorescens at the tip compared with the intact roots: approximately 100-fold more in the loose and 30-fold more in the compact soil. In addition, confocal images of the root tips grown in agar showed that P. fluorescens could only be detected on the tips of the decapped roots. These results indicated that border cells, and their associated mucilage, prevented complete colonization of the root tip by the biocontrol agent P. fluorescens, possibly by acting as a disposable surface or sheath around the cap. PMID:16329978

  10. Lateral root initiation in Marsilea quadrifolia. I. Origin and histogensis of lateral roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, B. L.; Raghavan, V.

    1991-01-01

    In Marsilea quadrifolia, lateral roots arise from modified single cells of the endodermis located opposite the protoxylem poles within the meristematic region of the parent root. The initial cell divides in four specific planes to establish a five-celled lateral root primordium, with a tetrahedral apical cell in the centre and the oldest merophytes and the root cap along the sides. The cells of the merophyte divide in a precise pattern to give rise to the cells of the cortex, endodermis, pericycle, and vascular tissues of the emerging lateral root. Although the construction of the parent root is more complicated than that of lateral roots, patterns of cell division and tissue formation are similar in both types of roots, with the various tissues being arranged in similar positions in relation to the central axis. Vascular connection between the lateral root primordium and the parent root is derived from the pericycle cells lying between the former and the protoxylem members of the latter. It is proposed that the central axis of the root is not only a geometric centre, but also a physiological centre which determines the fate of the different cell types.

  11. Effects of aortic root motion on wall stress in the Marfan aorta before and after personalised aortic root support (PEARS) surgery.

    PubMed

    Singh, S D; Xu, X Y; Pepper, J R; Izgi, C; Treasure, T; Mohiaddin, R H

    2016-07-01

    Aortic root motion was previously identified as a risk factor for aortic dissection due to increased longitudinal stresses in the ascending aorta. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of aortic root motion on wall stress and strain in the ascending aorta and evaluate changes before and after implantation of personalised external aortic root support (PEARS). Finite element (FE) models of the aortic root and thoracic aorta were developed using patient-specific geometries reconstructed from pre- and post-PEARS cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) images in three Marfan patients. The wall and PEARS materials were assumed to be isotropic, incompressible and linearly elastic. A static load on the inner wall corresponding to the patients' pulse pressure was applied. Cardiovascular MR cine images were used to quantify aortic root motion, which was imposed at the aortic root boundary of the FE model, with zero-displacement constraints at the distal ends of the aortic branches and descending aorta. Measurements of the systolic downward motion of the aortic root revealed a significant reduction in the axial displacement in all three patients post-PEARS compared with its pre-PEARS counterparts. Higher longitudinal stresses were observed in the ascending aorta when compared with models without the root motion. Implantation of PEARS reduced the longitudinal stresses in the ascending aorta by up to 52%. In contrast, the circumferential stresses at the interface between the supported and unsupported aorta were increase by up to 82%. However, all peak stresses were less than half the known yield stress for the dilated thoracic aorta. PMID:27255604

  12. Root phenology at Harvard Forest and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramoff, R. Z.; Finzi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Roots are hidden from view and heterogeneously distributed making them difficult to study in situ. As a result, the causes and timing of root production are not well understood. Researchers have long assumed that above and belowground phenology is synchronous; for example, most parameterizations of belowground carbon allocation in terrestrial biosphere models are based on allometry and represent a fixed fraction of net C uptake. However, using results from metaanalysis as well as empirical data from oak and hemlock stands at Harvard Forest, we show that synchronous root and shoot growth is the exception rather than the rule. We collected root and shoot phenology measurements from studies across four biomes (boreal, temperate, Mediterranean, and subtropical). General patterns of root phenology varied widely with 1-5 production peaks in a growing season. Surprisingly, in 9 out of the 15 studies, the first root production peak was not the largest peak. In the majority of cases maximum shoot production occurred before root production (Offset>0 in 32 out of 47 plant sample means). The number of days offset between maximum root and shoot growth was negatively correlated with median annual temperature and therefore differs significantly across biomes (ANOVA, F3,43=9.47, p<0.0001). This decline in offset with increasing temperature may reflect greater year-round coupling between air and soil temperature in warm biomes. Growth form (woody or herbaceous) also influenced the relative timing of root and shoot growth. Woody plants had a larger range of days between root and shoot growth peaks as well as a greater number of growth peaks. To explore the range of phenological relationships within woody plants in the temperate biome, we focused on above and belowground phenology in two common northeastern tree species, Quercus rubra and Tsuga canadensis. Greenness index, rate of stem growth, root production and nonstructural carbohydrate content were measured beginning in April

  13. OsSNDP1, a Sec14-nodulin domain-containing protein, plays a critical role in root hair elongation in rice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Kim, Chul Min; Xuan, Yuan-hu; Park, Soon Ju; Piao, Hai Long; Je, Byoung Il; Liu, Jingmiao; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Bo-Kyeong; Han, Chang-Deok

    2013-05-01

    Rice is cultivated in water-logged paddy lands. Thus, rice root hairs on the epidermal layers are exposed to a different redox status of nitrogen species, organic acids, and metal ions than root hairs growing in drained soil. To identify genes that play an important role in root hair growth, a forward genetics approach was used to screen for short-root-hair mutants. A short-root-hair mutant was identified and isolated by using map-based cloning and sequencing. The mutation arose from a single amino acid substitution of OsSNDP1 (Oryza sativa Sec14-nodulin domain protein), which shows high sequence homology with Arabidopsis COW1/AtSFH1 and encodes a phosphatidylinositol transfer protein (PITP). By performing complementation assays with Atsfh1 mutants, we demonstrated that OsSNDP1 is involved in growth of root hairs. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy was utilized to further characterize the effect of the Ossndp1 mutation on root hair morphology. Aberrant morphogenesis was detected in root hair elongation and maturation zones. Many root hairs were branched and showed irregular shapes due to bulged nodes. Many epidermal cells also produced dome-shaped root hairs, which indicated that root hair elongation ceased at an early stage. These studies showed that PITP-mediated phospholipid signaling and metabolism is critical for root hair elongation in rice. PMID:23456248

  14. Variation of the Linkage of Root Function with Root Branch Order

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhengxia; Zeng, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Mounting evidence has shown strong linkage of root function with root branch order. However, it is not known whether this linkage is consistent in different species. Here, root anatomic traits of the first five branch order were examined in five species differing in plant phylogeny and growth form in tropical and subtropical forests of south China. In Paramichelia baillonii, one tree species in Magnoliaceae, the intact cortex as well as mycorrhizal colonization existed even in the fifth-order root suggesting the preservation of absorption function in the higher-order roots. In contrast, dramatic decreases of cortex thickness and mycorrhizal colonization were observed from lower- to higher-order roots in three other tree species, Cunninghamia lanceolata, Acacia auriculiformis and Gordonia axillaries, which indicate the loss of absorption function. In a fern, Dicranopteris dichotoma, there were several cortex layers with prominently thickened cell wall and no mycorrhizal colonization in the third- and fourth-order roots, also demonstrating the loss of absorptive function in higher-order roots. Cluster analysis using these anatomic traits showed a different classification of root branch order in P. baillonii from other four species. As for the conduit diameter-density relationship in higher-order roots, the mechanism underpinning this relationship in P. baillonii was different from that in other species. In lower-order roots, different patterns of coefficient of variance for conduit diameter and density provided further evidence for the two types of linkage of root function with root branch order. These linkages corresponding to two types of ephemeral root modules have important implication in the prediction of terrestrial carbon cycling, although we caution that this study was pseudo-replicated. Future studies by sampling more species can test the generality of these two types of linkage. PMID:23451168

  15. Do ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal temperate tree species systematically differ in root order-related fine root morphology and biomass?

    PubMed Central

    Kubisch, Petra; Hertel, Dietrich; Leuschner, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    While most temperate broad-leaved tree species form ectomycorrhizal (EM) symbioses, a few species have arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM). It is not known whether EM and AM tree species differ systematically with respect to fine root morphology, fine root system size and root functioning. In a species-rich temperate mixed forest, we studied the fine root morphology and biomass of three EM and three AM tree species from the genera Acer, Carpinus, Fagus, Fraxinus, and Tilia searching for principal differences between EM and AM trees. We further assessed the evidence of convergence or divergence in root traits among the six co-occurring species. Eight fine root morphological and chemical traits were investigated in root segments of the first to fourth root order in three different soil depths and the relative importance of the factors root order, tree species and soil depth for root morphology was determined. Root order was more influential than tree species while soil depth had only a small effect on root morphology All six species showed similar decreases in specific root length and specific root area from the 1st to the 4th root order, while the species patterns differed considerably in root tissue density, root N concentration, and particularly with respect to root tip abundance. Most root morphological traits were not significantly different between EM and AM species (except for specific root area that was larger in AM species), indicating that mycorrhiza type is not a key factor influencing fine root morphology in these species. The order-based root analysis detected species differences more clearly than the simple analysis of bulked fine root mass. Despite convergence in important root traits among AM and EM species, even congeneric species may differ in certain fine root morphological traits. This suggests that, in general, species identity has a larger influence on fine root morphology than mycorrhiza type. PMID:25717334

  16. Scalable encryption using alpha rooting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wharton, Eric J.; Panetta, Karen A.; Agaian, Sos S.

    2008-04-01

    Full and partial encryption methods are important for subscription based content providers, such as internet and cable TV pay channels. Providers need to be able to protect their products while at the same time being able to provide demonstrations to attract new customers without giving away the full value of the content. If an algorithm were introduced which could provide any level of full or partial encryption in a fast and cost effective manner, the applications to real-time commercial implementation would be numerous. In this paper, we present a novel application of alpha rooting, using it to achieve fast and straightforward scalable encryption with a single algorithm. We further present use of the measure of enhancement, the Logarithmic AME, to select optimal parameters for the partial encryption. When parameters are selected using the measure, the output image achieves a balance between protecting the important data in the image while still containing a good overall representation of the image. We will show results for this encryption method on a number of images, using histograms to evaluate the effectiveness of the encryption.

  17. Thermal measurement of root surface temperatures during application of intracanal laser energy in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodis, Harold E.; White, Joel M.; Neev, Joseph

    1993-07-01

    The use of laser energy to clean, shape, and sterilize a root canal system space involves the generation of heat due to the thermal effect of the laser on the organic tissue contents and dentin walls of that space. If heat generation is above physiologic levels, irreparable damage may occur to the periodontal ligament and surrounding bone. This study measured temperature rise on the outer root surfaces of extracted teeth during intracanal laser exposure. Thirty single rooted, recently extracted teeth free of caries and restorations were accessed pulps extirpated and divided into three groups. Each root canal system was treated with a 1.06 micrometers pulsed Nd:YAG laser with quartz contact probes. Temperatures were recorded for all surfaces (mesial distal, buccal, lingual, apical) with infrared thermography utilizing a detector response time of 1 (mu) sec, sensitivity range (infrared) of 8 to 12 micrometers and a scan rate of 30 frames/sec.

  18. Surgical intervention for treating an extensive internal resorption with unfavorable crown-to-root ratio

    PubMed Central

    Ashouri, Rezvan; Rekabi, Ali R; Parirokh, Masoud

    2012-01-01

    Internal resorption is a rare lesion in permanent teeth. Managing perforating internal resorption is a great challenge for dentists. This report presents a successful surgical treatment of a maxillary central incisor that had extensive root perforation due to internal resorption. After unsuccessful nonsurgical approach, during surgical intervention apical part of the resorption defect was removed and the coronal part was filled with mineral trioxide aggregate. Three years later the tooth was symptom free with normal mobility and pocket depth despite unfavorable crown-to-root ratio. This case report have shown that surgical intervention and using mineral trioxide aggregate as root canal filling material in a tooth with extensive internal resorption and unfavorable crown-to-root ratio can be considered as a treatment option. PMID:23112490

  19. An in situ approach to detect tree root ecology: linking ground-penetrating radar imaging to isotope-derived water acquisition zones

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, Marney E; Anglaaere, Luke C N

    2013-01-01

    Tree root distribution and activity are determinants of belowground competition. However, studying root response to environmental and management conditions remains logistically challenging. Methodologically, nondestructive in situ tree root ecology analysis has lagged. In this study, we tested a nondestructive approach to determine tree coarse root architecture and function of a perennial tree crop, Theobroma cacao L., at two edaphically contrasting sites (sandstone and phyllite–granite derived soils) in Ghana, West Africa. We detected coarse root vertical distribution using ground-penetrating radar and root activity via soil water acquisition using isotopic matching of δ18O plant and soil signatures. Coarse roots were detected to a depth of 50 cm, however, intraspecifc coarse root vertical distribution was modified by edaphic conditions. Soil δ18O isotopic signature declined with depth, providing conditions for plant–soil δ18O isotopic matching. This pattern held only under sandstone conditions where water acquisition zones were identifiably narrow in the 10–20 cm depth but broader under phyllite–granite conditions, presumably due to resource patchiness. Detected coarse root count by depth and measured fine root density were strongly correlated as were detected coarse root count and identified water acquisition zones, thus validating root detection capability of ground-penetrating radar, but exclusively on sandstone soils. This approach was able to characterize trends between intraspecific root architecture and edaphic-dependent resource availability, however, limited by site conditions. This study successfully demonstrates a new approach for in situ root studies that moves beyond invasive point sampling to nondestructive detection of root architecture and function. We discuss the transfer of such an approach to answer root ecology questions in various tree-based landscapes. PMID:23762519

  20. Anatomical and hydraulic properties of sorghum roots exposed to water deficit. [Sorghum bicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, R.T.; Jordan, W.R.; Drew, M.C. )

    1991-05-01

    The effects of a severe water stress in the upper 0-0.15 m rooting zone on development of the exodermis, endodermis and xylem and on radial (Lp) and axial (Ls) hydraulic conductances were studied for Sorghum bicolor. Lp and Lx were based on water flow rates obtained by applying a negative hydrostatic pressure to the proximal xylem ends of excised roots placed in aerated nutrient solution. The same roots were stained with fluorescent berberine and acid phloroglucinol to describe the development of the exodermal and endodermal cell walls from formation of the Casparian band (State I), to deposition of suberin lamellae (State II), and lignification (State III). Lp of 1.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} m{sup 3}s{sup {minus}1}MPa{sup {minus}1} was 80% lower in stressed roots than in unstressed controls. At 0.01 and 0.07 m from the root apex, stressed roots were in State III while control roots were in States I and II, respectively. SEM-image analysis for stressed roots indicated that in the exodermis a greater proportion of the cross sectional area was occupied by lignified walls than in the endodermis. Cellufluor, an apoplastic tracer, was blocked at the lignified exodermis even at 0.01 m from the apex in stressed roots. Uranin, a symplastic tracer, was taken up only in the apical region in stressed roots but farther from the apex in the controls. Lx of 7.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}11}m{sup 3}s{sup {minus}1}MPa{sup {minus}1} was 90% lower in stressed roots compared with the controls. Cellufluor test and image analysis showed that although the protoxylem and early metaxylem were conductive in both treatments, stress caused more than a 50% reduction in the diameter of the xylem elements. Results suggest that lignification of the exodermis and endodermis to a large extent decreased apoplastic and symplastic flows and hence Lp in stressed roots. The low Lx in stressed roots was due to a decrease in the diameters of the conductive xylem elements.

  1. Evaluation of the Root and Canal Morphology of Maxillary Permanent Molars and the Incidence of the Second Mesiobuccal Root Canal in Greek Population Using Cone-beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nikoloudaki, Georgia E.; Kontogiannis, Taxiarchis G.; Kerezoudis, Nikolaos P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Cone-Beam Computed Tomography is an alternative imaging technique which has been recently introduced in the field of Oral & Maxillofacial Radiology. It has rapidly gained great popularity among clinicians due to its ability to detect lesions and defects of the orofacial region and provide three-dimensional information about them. In the field of Endodontics, CBCT can be a useful tool to reveal tooth morphology irregularities, additional root canals and vertical root fractures. The objective of this study is to evaluate the root and root canal morphology of the maxillary permanent molars in Greek population using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography. Materials and Methods : 273 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were examined. The number of roots and root canals of the first and second maxillary molars were evaluated. Root canal configuration was classified according to Weine’s classification by two independent examiners and statistical analysis was performed. Results : A total of 812 molars (410 first and 402 second ones) were evaluated. The vast majority of both first and second molars had three roots (89.26% and 85.07%, respectively). Most first molars had four canals, while most second molars had three. In the mesiobuccal roots, one foramen was recorded in 80.91% of all teeth. Other rare morphologic variations were also found, such as fusion of a maxillary second molar with a supernumerary tooth. Conclusion : Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that more attention should be given to the detection of additional canals during root canal treatment in maxillary permanent molars. Towards this effort, CBCT can provide the clinician with supplemental information about the different root canal configurations for successful Root Canal Treatment. PMID:26464594

  2. Ecology of Root Colonizing Massilia (Oxalobacteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Ofek, Maya; Hadar, Yitzhak; Minz, Dror

    2012-01-01

    Background Ecologically meaningful classification of bacterial populations is essential for understanding the structure and function of bacterial communities. As in soils, the ecological strategy of the majority of root-colonizing bacteria is mostly unknown. Among those are Massilia (Oxalobacteraceae), a major group of rhizosphere and root colonizing bacteria of many plant species. Methodology/Principal Findings The ecology of Massilia was explored in cucumber root and seed, and compared to that of Agrobacterium population, using culture-independent tools, including DNA-based pyrosequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative real-time PCR. Seed- and root-colonizing Massilia were primarily affiliated with other members of the genus described in soil and rhizosphere. Massilia colonized and proliferated on the seed coat, radicle, roots, and also on hyphae of phytopathogenic Pythium aphanidermatum infecting seeds. High variation in Massilia abundance was found in relation to plant developmental stage, along with sensitivity to plant growth medium modification (amendment with organic matter) and potential competitors. Massilia absolute abundance and relative abundance (dominance) were positively related, and peaked (up to 85%) at early stages of succession of the root microbiome. In comparison, variation in abundance of Agrobacterium was moderate and their dominance increased at later stages of succession. Conclusions In accordance with contemporary models for microbial ecology classification, copiotrophic and competition-sensitive root colonization by Massilia is suggested. These bacteria exploit, in a transient way, a window of opportunity within the succession of communities within this niche. PMID:22808103

  3. 13. PHOTOCOPY OF ILLUSTRATED CIRCULAR OF 'ROOTS NEW IRON POSITIVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. PHOTOCOPY OF ILLUSTRATED CIRCULAR OF 'ROOTS NEW IRON POSITIVE BLAST BLOWER,' CA. JAN. 1880, FROM FILES OF ROOTS-CONNERSVILLE BLOWER CO., CONNERSVILLE, IND. - P. H. & F. M. Roots Company, Eastern Avenue, Connersville, Fayette County, IN

  4. Bitter Root Irrigation district canal, looking east, typical section (canal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bitter Root Irrigation district canal, looking east, typical section (canal full) - Bitter Root Irrigation Project, Bitter Root Irrigation Canal, Heading at Rock Creek Diversion Dam, West of U.S. Highway 93, Darby, Ravalli County, MT

  5. Bitter Root Irrigation district canal, looking east, typical section and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bitter Root Irrigation district canal, looking east, typical section and crossing - Bitter Root Irrigation Project, Bitter Root Irrigation Canal, Heading at Rock Creek Diversion Dam, West of U.S. Highway 93, Darby, Ravalli County, MT

  6. 10. PHOTOCOPY OF 'P. H. & F. M. ROOTS FOUNDARY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. PHOTOCOPY OF 'P. H. & F. M. ROOTS FOUNDARY MANUFACTURERS OF ROOTS BLOWERS' FROM INDIANAPOLIS STAR, June 13, 1926, Gravure Section, p. 2 - P. H. & F. M. Roots Company, Eastern Avenue, Connersville, Fayette County, IN

  7. Aetiology, incidence and morphology of the C-shaped root canal system and its impact on clinical endodontics.

    PubMed

    Kato, A; Ziegler, A; Higuchi, N; Nakata, K; Nakamura, H; Ohno, N

    2014-11-01

    The C-shaped root canal constitutes an unusual root morphology that can be found primarily in mandibular second permanent molars. Due to the complexity of their structure, C-shaped root canal systems may complicate endodontic interventions. A thorough understanding of root canal morphology is therefore imperative for proper diagnosis and successful treatment. This review aims to summarize current knowledge regarding C-shaped roots and root canals, from basic morphology to advanced endodontic procedures. To this end, a systematic search was conducted using the MEDLINE, BIOSIS, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Google Scholar, Web of Science, PLoS and BioMed Central databases, and many rarely cited articles were included. Furthermore, four interactive 3D models of extracted teeth are introduced that will allow for a better understanding of the complex C-shaped root canal morphology. In addition, the present publication includes an embedded best-practice video showing an exemplary root canal procedure on a tooth with a pronounced C-shaped root canal. The survey of this unusual structure concludes with a number of suggestions concerning future research efforts. PMID:24483229

  8. Aetiology, incidence and morphology of the C-shaped root canal system and its impact on clinical endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Kato, A; Ziegler, A; Higuchi, N; Nakata, K; Nakamura, H; Ohno, N

    2014-01-01

    The C-shaped root canal constitutes an unusual root morphology that can be found primarily in mandibular second permanent molars. Due to the complexity of their structure, C-shaped root canal systems may complicate endodontic interventions. A thorough understanding of root canal morphology is therefore imperative for proper diagnosis and successful treatment. This review aims to summarize current knowledge regarding C-shaped roots and root canals, from basic morphology to advanced endodontic procedures. To this end, a systematic search was conducted using the MEDLINE, BIOSIS, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Google Scholar, Web of Science, PLoS and BioMed Central databases, and many rarely cited articles were included. Furthermore, four interactive 3D models of extracted teeth are introduced that will allow for a better understanding of the complex C-shaped root canal morphology. In addition, the present publication includes an embedded best-practice video showing an exemplary root canal procedure on a tooth with a pronounced C-shaped root canal. The survey of this unusual structure concludes with a number of suggestions concerning future research efforts. PMID:24483229

  9. Direct and indirect effects of glomalin, mycorrhizal hyphae, and roots on aggregate stability in rhizosphere of trifoliate orange.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiang-Sheng; Cao, Ming-Qin; Zou, Ying-Ning; He, Xin-hua

    2014-01-01

    To test direct and indirect effects of glomalin, mycorrhizal hyphae, and roots on aggregate stability, perspex pots separated by 37-μm nylon mesh in the middle were used to form root-free hyphae and root/hyphae chambers, where trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata) seedlings were colonized by Funneliformis mosseae or Paraglomus occultum in the root/hyphae chamber. Both fungal species induced significantly higher plant growth, root total length, easily-extractable glomalin-related soil protein (EE-GRSP) and total GRSP (T-GRSP), and mean weight diameter (an aggregate stability indicator). The Pearson correlation showed that root colonization or soil hyphal length significantly positively correlated with EE-GRSP, difficultly-extractable GRSP (DE-GRSP), T-GRSP, and water-stable aggregates in 2.00-4.00, 0.50-1.00, and 0.25-0.50 mm size fractions. The path analysis indicated that in the root/hyphae chamber, aggregate stability derived from a direct effect of root colonization, EE-GRSP or DE-GRSP. Meanwhile, the direct effect was stronger by EE-GRSP or DE-GRSP than by mycorrhizal colonization. In the root-free hyphae chamber, mycorrhizal-mediated aggregate stability was due to total effect but not direct effect of soil hyphal length, EE-GRSP and T-GRSP. Our results suggest that GRSP among these tested factors may be the primary contributor to aggregate stability in the citrus rhizosphere. PMID:25059396

  10. Exploring Arabidopsis thaliana Root Endophytes via Single-Cell Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, Derek; Woyke, Tanja; Tringe, Susannah; Dangl, Jeff

    2014-03-19

    Land plants grow in association with microbial communities both on their surfaces and inside the plant (endophytes). The relationships between microbes and their host can vary from pathogenic to mutualistic. Colonization of the endophyte compartment occurs in the presence of a sophisticated plant immune system, implying finely tuned discrimination of pathogens from mutualists and commensals. Despite the importance of the microbiome to the plant, relatively little is known about the specific interactions between plants and microbes, especially in the case of endophytes. The vast majority of microbes have not been grown in the lab, and thus one of the few ways of studying them is by examining their DNA. Although metagenomics is a powerful tool for examining microbial communities, its application to endophyte samples is technically difficult due to the presence of large amounts of host plant DNA in the sample. One method to address these difficulties is single-cell genomics where a single microbial cell is isolated from a sample, lysed, and its genome amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA) to produce enough DNA for genome sequencing. This produces a single-cell amplified genome (SAG). We have applied this technology to study the endophytic microbes in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Extensive 16S gene profiling of the microbial communities in the roots of multiple inbred A. thaliana strains has identified 164 OTUs as being significantly enriched in all the root endophyte samples compared to their presence in bulk soil.

  11. Characterization of a chondroitin sulfate hydrogel for nerve root regeneration.

    PubMed

    Conovaloff, Aaron; Panitch, Alyssa

    2011-10-01

    Brachial plexus injury is a serious medical problem that affects many patients annually, with most cases involving damage to the nerve roots. Therefore, a chondroitin sulfate hydrogel was designed to both serve as a scaffold for regenerating root neurons and deliver neurotrophic signals. Capillary electrophoresis showed that chondroitin sulfate has a dissociation constant in the micromolar range with several common neurotrophins, and this was determined to be approximately tenfold stronger than with heparin. It was also revealed that nerve growth factor exhibits a slightly stronger affinity for hyaluronic acid than for chondroitin sulfate. However, E8 chick dorsal root ganglia cultured in the presence of nerve growth factor revealed that ganglia cultured in chondroitin sulfate scaffolds showed more robust growth than those cultured in control gels of hyaluronic acid. It is hypothesized that, despite the stronger affinity of nerve growth factor for hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate serves as a better scaffold for neurite outgrowth, possibly due to inhibition of growth by hyaluronic acid chains. PMID:21804177

  12. Characterization of a chondroitin sulfate hydrogel for nerve root regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conovaloff, Aaron; Panitch, Alyssa

    2011-10-01

    Brachial plexus injury is a serious medical problem that affects many patients annually, with most cases involving damage to the nerve roots. Therefore, a chondroitin sulfate hydrogel was designed to both serve as a scaffold for regenerating root neurons and deliver neurotrophic signals. Capillary electrophoresis showed that chondroitin sulfate has a dissociation constant in the micromolar range with several common neurotrophins, and this was determined to be approximately tenfold stronger than with heparin. It was also revealed that nerve growth factor exhibits a slightly stronger affinity for hyaluronic acid than for chondroitin sulfate. However, E8 chick dorsal root ganglia cultured in the presence of nerve growth factor revealed that ganglia cultured in chondroitin sulfate scaffolds showed more robust growth than those cultured in control gels of hyaluronic acid. It is hypothesized that, despite the stronger affinity of nerve growth factor for hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate serves as a better scaffold for neurite outgrowth, possibly due to inhibition of growth by hyaluronic acid chains.

  13. A thermodynamic formulation of root water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, A.; Kleidon, A.; Bechmann, M.

    2015-12-01

    By extracting bound water from the soil and lifting it to the canopy, root systems of vegetation perform work. Here we describe how the energetics involved in root water uptake can be quantified. The illustration is done using a simple, four-box model of the soil-root system to represent heterogeneity and a parameterization in which root water uptake is driven by the xylem potential of the plant with a fixed flux boundary condition. We use this approach to evaluate the effects of soil moisture heterogeneity and root system properties on the dissipative losses and export of energy involved in root water uptake. For this, we derive an expression that relates the energy export at the root collar to a sum of terms that reflect all fluxes and storage changes along the flow path in thermodynamic terms. We conclude that such a thermodynamic evaluation of root water uptake conveniently provides insights into the impediments of different processes along the entire flow path and explicitly accounting not only for the resistances along the flow path and those imposed by soil drying but especially the role of heterogenous soil water distribution. The results show that least energy needs to be exported and dissipative losses are minimized by a root system if it extracts water uniformly from the soil. This has implications for plant water relations in forests where canopies generate heterogenous input patterns. Our diagnostic in the energy domain should be useful in future model applications for quantifying how plants can evolve towards greater efficiency in their structure and function, particularly in heterogenous soil environments. Generally, this approach may help to better describe heterogeneous processes in the soil in a simple, yet physically-based way.

  14. Transcriptional profile of maize roots under acid soil growth

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Aluminum (Al) toxicity is one of the most important yield-limiting factors of many crops worldwide. The primary symptom of Al toxicity syndrome is the inhibition of root growth leading to poor water and nutrient absorption. Al tolerance has been extensively studied using hydroponic experiments. However, unlike soil conditions, this method does not address all of the components that are necessary for proper root growth and development. In the present study, we grew two maize genotypes with contrasting tolerance to Al in soil containing toxic levels of Al and then compared their transcriptomic responses. Results When grown in acid soil containing toxic levels of Al, the Al-sensitive genotype (S1587-17) showed greater root growth inhibition, more Al accumulation and more callose deposition in root tips than did the tolerant genotype (Cat100-6). Transcriptome profiling showed a higher number of genes differentially expressed in S1587-17 grown in acid soil, probably due to secondary effects of Al toxicity. Genes involved in the biosynthesis of organic acids, which are frequently associated with an Al tolerance response, were not differentially regulated in both genotypes after acid soil exposure. However, genes related to the biosynthesis of auxin, ethylene and lignin were up-regulated in the Al-sensitive genotype, indicating that these pathways might be associated with root growth inhibition. By comparing the two maize lines, we were able to discover genes up-regulated only in the Al-tolerant line that also presented higher absolute levels than those observed in the Al-sensitive line. These genes encoded a lipase hydrolase, a retinol dehydrogenase, a glycine-rich protein, a member of the WRKY transcriptional family and two unknown proteins. Conclusions This work provides the first characterization of the physiological and transcriptional responses of maize roots when grown in acid soil containing toxic levels of Al. The transcriptome profiles highlighted

  15. Root Cohesion Controls on Shallow Landslide Size, Shape and Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, M.; Bellugi, D. G.; Perron, J.; Coe, J. A.; Schmidt, K. M.

    2013-12-01

    Many environmental factors, including ground cover, local hydrology, and recent weather events interact to cause shallow landslides and determine landslide characteristics. Vegetation is of particular interest, because changes in vegetation density, age, and composition are expected consequences of human land use and climate change. These changes alter effective cohesion due to root reinforcement, which is known to impact landslide abundance, but the effects of root cohesion on landslide size, shape and location have not been quantified. The Elliott State Forest, a 376 km2 managed forest in Douglas County, Oregon, provides an ideal venue to study these effects. There, a single storm in November 1996 triggered 154 shallow landslides, which were subsequently mapped using aerial images onto laser altimetry data, in an area with a range of vegetation ages but relatively uniform soil properties, topography, and lithology. We used aerial imagery to categorize areas with different land use histories into 3 vegetation classes, ranging from clear-cuts to forest with mature trees over 100 years old. Each mapped landslide was then assigned to a class, and its size, shape and location was recorded. Our results show that, in addition to the expected decrease in landslide abundance in more-vegetated areas (which could be influenced by a bias against detecting landslides under trees), landslides in those areas were also larger and more elongated in the down-slope direction. Although landslides in all three classes generally occurred at locations with similar drainage area and slope, we observed that slides with a larger ratio of drainage area to slope were slightly more abundant in areas with lower vegetation cover. To investigate the causes of these variations, we used a new shallow landslide model calibrated for the Oregon Coast Range to predict the size, shape and location of landslides triggered by the 1996 storm under a range of root cohesion values in a subset of the study

  16. Genome Networks Root the Tree of Life between Prokaryotic Domains

    PubMed Central

    Dagan, Tal; Roettger, Mayo; Bryant, David; Martin, William

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotes arose from prokaryotes, hence the root in the tree of life resides among the prokaryotic domains. The position of the root is still debated, although pinpointing it would aid our understanding of the early evolution of life. Because prokaryote evolution was long viewed as a tree-like process of lineage bifurcations, efforts to identify the most ancient microbial lineage split have traditionally focused on positioning a root on a phylogenetic tree constructed from one or several genes. Such studies have delivered widely conflicting results on the position of the root, this being mainly due to methodological problems inherent to deep gene phylogeny and the workings of lateral gene transfer among prokaryotes over evolutionary time. Here, we report the position of the root determined with whole genome data using network-based procedures that take into account both gene presence or absence and the level of sequence similarity among all individual gene families that are shared across genomes. On the basis of 562,321 protein-coding gene families distributed across 191 genomes, we find that the deepest divide in the prokaryotic world is interdomain, that is, separating the archaebacteria from the eubacteria. This result resonates with some older views but conflicts with the results of most studies over the last decade that have addressed the issue. In particular, several studies have suggested that the molecular distinctness of archaebacteria is not evidence for their antiquity relative to eubacteria but instead stems from some kind of inherently elevated rate of archaebacterial sequence change. Here, we specifically test for such a rate elevation across all prokaryotic lineages through the analysis of all possible quartets among eight genes duplicated in all prokaryotes, hence the last common ancestor thereof. The results show that neither the archaebacteria as a group nor the eubacteria as a group harbor evidence for elevated evolutionary rates in the sampled

  17. Hydraulic properties and fine root mass of Larix sibirica along forest edge-interior gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenlemuge, Tselmeg; Dulamsuren, Choimaa; Hertel, Dietrich; Schuldt, Bernhard; Leuschner, Christoph; Hauck, Markus

    2015-02-01

    At its southernmost distribution limit in Inner Asia, the boreal forest disintegrates into forest fragments on moist sites (e.g. north-facing slopes), which are embedded in grasslands. This landscape mosaic is characterized by a much higher forest edge-to-interior ratio than in closed boreal forests. Earlier work in the forest-steppe ecotone of Mongolia has shown that Larix sibirica trees at forest edges grow faster than in the forest interior, as the more xeric environment at the edge promotes self-thinning and edges are preferentially targeted by selective logging and livestock grazing. Lowered stand density reduces competition for water in these semi-arid forests, where productivity is usually limited by summer drought. We studied how branch and coarse root hydraulic architecture and xylem conductivity, fine root biomass and necromass, and fine root morphology of L. sibirica respond to sites differing in water availability. Studying forest edge-interior gradients in two regions of western Mongolia, we found a significant reduction of branch theoretical (Kp) and empirical conductivity (Ks) in the putatively more drought-affected forest interior in the Mongolian Altai (mean precipitation: 120 mm yr-1), while no branch xylem modification occurred in the moister Khangai Mountains (215 mm yr-1). Kp and Ks were several times larger in roots than in branches, but root hydraulics were not influenced by stand density or mean annual precipitation. Very low fine root biomass: necromass ratios at all sites, and in the forest interior in particular, suggest that L. sibirica seeks to maintain a relatively high root conductivity by producing large conduits, which results in high root mortality due to embolism during drought. Our results suggest that L. sibirica is adapted to the semi-arid climate at its southernmost distribution limit by considerable plasticity of the branch hydraulic system and a small but apparently dynamic fine root system.

  18. Root profile in Multi-layered Dehesas: an approach to plant-to-plant Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolo, V.; Moreno, G.

    2009-04-01

    Assessing plant-to-plant relationship is a key issue in agroforestry systems. Due to the sessile feature of plants most of these interactions take place within a restricted space, so characterizing the zone where the plant alters its environment is important to find overlapping areas where the facilitation or competition could occur. Main part of plan-to-plant interactions in the dehesa are located at belowground level, thus the main limited resources in Mediterranean ecosystems are soil nutrient and water. Hence a better knowledge of rooting plant profile can be useful to understand the functioning of the dehesa. The Iberian dehesa has always been considered as a silvopastoral system where, at least, two strata of vegetation coexist: native grasses and trees. However the dehesa is also a diverse system where cropland and encroached territories have been systematically combined, more or less periodically, with native pasture in order to obtain agricultural, pastoral and forestry outputs. These multipurpose mosaic-type systems generate several scenarios where the plant influence zone may be overlapped and the interaction, competition or facilitation, between plants can play an important role in the ecosystem functioning in terms of productivity and stability. In the present study our aim was to characterize the rooting profile of multi-layered dehesas in order to understand the competitive, and/or facilitative, relationships within the different plant strata. The root profile of Quercus ilex subsp. ballota, Cistus ladanifer, Retama spaherocarpa and natural grasses was studied. So 48 trenches, up to 2 meters deep, were excavated in 4 different environments: (i) grass; (ii) tree-grass; (iii) tree-shrub and (iv) tree-shrub-grass (12 trenches in each environment). The study was carried out in 4 dehesas, 2 encroached with C. ladanifer and 2 with R. spaherocarpa. In every trench soil samples were taken each 20 cm. Subsequently, all samples were sieved using different mesh

  19. Root type matters: measurements of water uptake by seminal, crown and lateral roots of maize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mutez Ali; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kaestner, Anders; Carminati, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Roots play a key role in water acquisition and are a significant component of plant adaptation to different environmental conditions. Although maize (Zea mays L.) is one of the most important crops worldwide, there is limited information on the function of different root segments and types in extracting water from soils. Aim of this study was to investigate the location of root water uptake in mature maize. We used neutron radiography to image the spatial distribution of maize roots and trace the transport of injected deuterated water (D2O) in soil and roots. Maize plants were grown in aluminum containers filled with a sandy soil that was kept homogeneously wet throughout the experiment. When the plants were five weeks-old, we injected D2O into selected soil regions. The transport of D2O was simulated using a diffusion-convection numerical model. By fitting the observed D2O transport we quantified the diffusion coefficient and the water uptake of the different root segments. The model was initially developed and tested with two weeks-old maize (Ahmed et. al. 2015), for which we found that water was mainly taken up by lateral roots and the water uptake of the seminal roots was negligible. Here, we used this method to measure root water uptake in a mature maize root system. The root architecture of five weeks-old maize consisted of primary and seminal roots with long laterals and crown (nodal) roots that emerged from the above ground part of the plant two weeks after planting. The crown roots were thicker than the seminal roots and had fewer and shorter laterals. Surprisingly, we found that the water was mainly taken up by the crown roots and their laterals, while the lateral roots of seminal roots, which were the main location of water uptake of younger plants, stopped to take up water. Interestingly, we also found that in contrast to the seminal roots, the crown roots were able to take up water also from their distal segments. We conclude that for the two weeks

  20. Adventitious root induction in Arabidopsis thaliana as a model for in vitro root organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Verstraeten, Inge; Beeckman, Tom; Geelen, Danny

    2013-01-01

    Adventitious root formation, the development of roots on non-root tissue (e.g. leaves, hypocotyls and stems) is a critical step during micropropagation. Although root induction treatments are routinely used for a large number of species micropropagated in vitro as well as for in vivo cuttings, the mechanisms controlling adventitious rooting are still poorly understood. Researchers attempt to gain better insight into the molecular aspects by studying adventitious rooting in Arabidopsis thaliana. The existing assay involves etiolation of seedlings and measurements of de novo formed roots on the elongated hypocotyl. The etiolated hypocotyls express a novel auxin-controlled signal transduction pathway in which auxin response factors (ARFs), microRNAs and environmental conditions that drive adventitious rooting are integrated. An alternative assay makes use of so-called thin cell layers (TCL), excised strips of cells from the inflorescence stem of Arabidopsis thaliana. However, both the etiolated seedling system and the TCL assay are only distantly related to industrial rooting processes in which roots are induced on adult stem tissue. Here, we describe an adventitious root induction system that uses segments of the inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis thaliana, which have a histological structure similar to cuttings or in vitro micropropagated shoots. The system allows multiple treatments with chemicals as well as the evaluation of different environmental conditions on a large number of explants. It is therefore suitable for high throughput chemical screenings and experiments that require numerous data points for statistical analysis. Using this assay, the adventitious root induction capacity of classical auxins was evaluated and a differential response to the different auxins could be demonstrated. NAA, IBA and IAA stimulated adventitious rooting on the stem segment, whereas 2,4-D and picloram did not. Light conditions profoundly influenced the root induction capacity