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Sample records for root epidermal cells

  1. Increased symplasmic permeability in barley root epidermal cells correlates with defects in root hair development.

    PubMed

    Marzec, M; Muszynska, A; Melzer, M; Sas-Nowosielska, H; Kurczynska, E U

    2014-03-01

    It is well known that the process of plant cell differentiation depends on the symplasmic isolation of cells. Before starting the differentiation programme, the individual cell or group of cells should restrict symplasmic communication with neighbouring cells. We tested the symplasmic communication between epidermal cells in the different root zones of parental barley plants Hordeum vulgare L., cv. 'Karat' with normal root hair development, and two root hairless mutants (rhl1.a and rhl1.b). The results clearly show that symplasmic communication was limited during root hair differentiation in the parental variety, whereas in both root hairless mutants epidermal cells were still symplasmically connected in the corresponding root zone. This paper is the first report on the role of symplasmic isolation in barley root cell differentiation, and additionally shows that a disturbance in the restriction of symplasmic communication is present in root hairless mutants. PMID:23927737

  2. Increased symplasmic permeability in barley root epidermal cells correlates with defects in root hair development

    PubMed Central

    Marzec, M; Muszynska, A; Melzer, M; Sas-Nowosielska, H; Kurczynska, E U; Wick, S

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the process of plant cell differentiation depends on the symplasmic isolation of cells. Before starting the differentiation programme, the individual cell or group of cells should restrict symplasmic communication with neighbouring cells. We tested the symplasmic communication between epidermal cells in the different root zones of parental barley plants Hordeum vulgare L., cv. ‘Karat’ with normal root hair development, and two root hairless mutants (rhl1.a and rhl1.b). The results clearly show that symplasmic communication was limited during root hair differentiation in the parental variety, whereas in both root hairless mutants epidermal cells were still symplasmically connected in the corresponding root zone. This paper is the first report on the role of symplasmic isolation in barley root cell differentiation, and additionally shows that a disturbance in the restriction of symplasmic communication is present in root hairless mutants. PMID:23927737

  3. Asymmetric growth of root epidermal cells is related to the differentiation of root hair cells in Hordeum vulgare (L.)

    PubMed Central

    Marzec, Marek

    2013-01-01

    The root epidermis of most vascular plants harbours two cell types, namely trichoblasts (capable of producing a root hair) and atrichoblasts. Here, in vivo analysis, confocal laser-scanning microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, histological analysis, and three-dimensional reconstruction were used to characterize the cell types present in the barley root epidermis and their distribution in the tissue. Both trichoblasts and atrichoblasts were present in the wild-type cultivars and could be distinguished from one another at an early stage. Trichoblast/atrichoblast differentiation depended on asymmetric cell expansion after a period of symmetrical cell division. After asymmetric growth, only the shorter epidermal cells could produce root hairs, whereas the longer cells became atrichoblasts. Moreover, the root epidermis did not develop root hairs at all if the epidermal cells did not differentiate into two asymmetric cell types. The root hairless phenotype of bald root barley (brb) and root hairless 1.b (rhl1.b) mutants was caused by a mutation in a gene related to the asymmetric expansion of the root epidermal cells. Additionally, the results showed that the mechanism of trichoblast/atrichoblast differentiation is not evolutionally conserved across the subfamilies of the Poaceae; in the Pooideae subfamily, both asymmetric division and asymmetric cell expansion have been observed. PMID:24043851

  4. Cell Fate Determination and the Switch from Diffuse Growth to Planar Polarity in Arabidopsis Root Epidermal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Balcerowicz, Daria; Schoenaers, Sébastjen; Vissenberg, Kris

    2015-01-01

    Plant roots fulfill important functions as they serve in water and nutrient uptake, provide anchorage of the plant body in the soil and in some species form the site of symbiotic interactions with soil-living biota. Root hairs, tubular-shaped outgrowths of specific epidermal cells, significantly increase the root’s surface area and aid in these processes. In this review we focus on the molecular mechanisms that determine the hair and non-hair cell fate of epidermal cells and that define the site on the epidermal cell where the root hair will be initiated (=planar polarity determination). In the model plant Arabidopsis, trichoblast and atrichoblast cell fate results from intra- and intercellular position-dependent signaling and from complex feedback loops that ultimately regulate GL2 expressing and non-expressing cells. When epidermal cells reach the end of the root expansion zone, root hair promoting transcription factors dictate the establishment of polarity within epidermal cells followed by the selection of the root hair initiation site at the more basal part of the trichoblast. Molecular players in the abovementioned processes as well as the role of phytohormones are discussed, and open areas for future experiments are identified. PMID:26779192

  5. Synergistic action of auxin and ethylene on root elongation inhibition is caused by a reduction of epidermal cell length.

    PubMed

    Alarcón, M Victoria; Lloret, Pedro G; Salguero, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Auxin and ethylene have been largely reported to reduce root elongation in maize primary root. However the effects of auxin are greater than those caused by ethylene. Although auxin stimulates ethylene biosynthesis through the specific increase of ACC synthase, the auxin inhibitory effect on root elongation is not mediated by the auxin-induced increase of ethylene production. Recently it has been demonstrated that root inhibition by the application of the synthetic auxin NAA (1-naphtalenacetic acid) is increased if combined with the ethylene precursor ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxilic acid) when both compounds are applied at very low concentrations.   Root elongation is basically the result of two processes: a) cell divisions in the meristem where meristematic cells continuously generate new cells and b) subsequently polarized growth by elongation along the root axis as cells leave the meristem and enter the root elongation zone. Our results indicate that exogenous auxin reduced both root elongation and epidermal cell length. In a different way, ethylene at very low concentrations only inhibited root elongation without affecting significantly epidermal cell length. However, these concentrations of ethylene increased the inhibitory effect of auxin on root elongation and cell length. Consequently the results support the hypothesis that ethylene acts synergistically with auxin in the regulation of root elongation and that inhibition by both hormones is due, at least partially, to the reduction of cell length in the epidermal layer. PMID:24598313

  6. Does salinity reduce growth in maize root epidermal cells by inhibiting their capacity for cell wall acidification?

    PubMed

    Zidan, I; Azaizeh, H; Neumann, P M

    1990-05-01

    The reduction in growth of maize (Zea mays L.) seedling primary roots induced by salinization of the nutrient medium with 100 millimolar NaCl was accompanied by reductions in the length of the root tip elongation zone, the length of fully elongated epidermal cells, and the apparent rate of cell production: Each was partially restored when calcium levels in the salinized growth medium were increased from 0.5 to 10.0 millimolar. We investigated the possibility that the inhibition of elongation growth by salinity might be associated with an inhibition of cell wall acidification, such as that which occurs when root growth is inhibited by IAA. A qualitative assay of root surface acidification, using bromocresol purple pH indicator in agar, showed that salinized roots, with and without extra calcium, produced a zone of surface acidification which was similar to that produced by control roots. The zone of acidification began 1 to 2 millimeters behind the tip and coincided with the zone of cell elongation. The remainder of the root alkalinized its surface. Kinetics of surface acidification were assayed quantitatively by placing a flat tipped pH electrode in contact with the elongation zone. The pH at the epidermal surfaces of roots grown either with 100 millimolar NaCl (growth inhibitory), or with 10 millimolar calcium +/- NaCl (little growth inhibition), declined from 6.0 to 5.1 over 30 minutes. We conclude that NaCl did not inhibit growth by reducing the capacity of epidermal cells to acidify their walls. PMID:16667468

  7. Mechanical properties of epidermal cells of whole living roots of Arabidopsis thaliana: An atomic force microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Anwesha N.; Chen, Xinyong; Scotchford, Colin A.; Walker, James; Wells, Darren M.; Roberts, Clive J.; Everitt, Nicola M.

    2012-02-01

    The knowledge of mechanical properties of root cell walls is vital to understand how these properties interact with relevant genetic and physiological processes to bring about growth. Expansion of cell walls is an essential component of growth, and the regulation of cell wall expansion is one of the ways in which the mechanics of growth is controlled, managed and directed. In this study, the inherent surface mechanical properties of living Arabidopsis thaliana whole-root epidermal cells were studied at the nanoscale using the technique of atomic force microscopy (AFM). A novel methodology was successfully developed to adapt AFM to live plant roots. Force-Indentation (F-I) experiments were conducted to investigate the mechanical properties along the length of the root. F-I curves for epidermal cells of roots were also generated by varying turgor pressure. The F-I curves displayed a variety of features due to the heterogeneity of the surface. Hysteresis is observed. Application of conventional models to living biological systems such as cell walls in nanometer regimes tends to increase error margins to a large extent. Hence information from the F-I curves were used in a preliminary semiquantitative analysis to infer material properties and calculate two parameters. The work done in the loading and unloading phases (hysteresis) of the force measurements were determined separately and were expressed in terms of “Index of Plasticity” (η), which characterized the elasticity properties of roots as a viscoelastic response. Scaling approaches were used to find the ratio of hardness to reduced modulus ((H)/(E*)).

  8. Arabidopsis IRT2 cooperates with the high-affinity iron uptake system to maintain iron homeostasis in root epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Vert, Grégory; Barberon, Marie; Zelazny, Enric; Séguéla, Mathilde; Briat, Jean-François; Curie, Catherine

    2009-05-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all organisms but toxic when present in excess. Consequently, plants carefully regulate their iron uptake, dependent on the FRO2 ferric reductase and the IRT1 transporter, to control its homeostasis. Arabidopsis IRT2 gene, whose expression is induced in root epidermis upon iron deprivation, was shown to encode a functional iron/zinc transporter in yeast, and proposed to function in iron acquisition from the soil. In this study, we demonstrate that, unlike its close homolog IRT1, IRT2 is not involved in iron absorption from the soil since overexpression of IRT2 does not rescue the iron uptake defect of irt1-1 mutant and since a null irt2 mutant shows no chlorosis in low iron. Consistently, an IRT2-green fluorescent fusion protein, transiently expressed in culture cells, localizes to intracellular vesicles. However, IRT2 appears strictly co-regulated with FRO2 and IRT1, supporting the view that IRT2 is an integral component of the root response to iron deficiency in root epidermal cells. We propose a model where IRT2 likely prevents toxicity from IRT1-dependent iron fluxes in epidermal cells, through compartmentalization. PMID:19252923

  9. Transient proliferation of proanthocyanidin-accumulating cells on the epidermal apex contributes to highly aluminum-resistant root elongation in camphor tree.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Hiroki; Endo, Izuki; Hara, Yukari; Matsushima, Yuki; Tange, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) is a harmful element that rapidly inhibits the elongation of plant roots in acidic soils. The release of organic anions explains Al resistance in annual crops, but the mechanisms that are responsible for superior Al resistance in some woody plants remain unclear. We examined cell properties at the surface layer of the root apex in the camphor tree (Cinnamomum camphora) to understand its high Al resistance mechanism. Exposure to 500 μm Al for 8 d, more than 20-fold higher concentration and longer duration than what soybean (Glycine max) can tolerate, only reduced root elongation in the camphor tree to 64% of the control despite the slight induction of citrate release. In addition, Al content in the root apices was maintained at low levels. Histochemical profiling revealed that proanthocyanidin (PA)-accumulating cells were present at the adjacent outer layer of epidermis cells at the root apex, having distinctive zones for cell division and the early phase of cell expansion. Then the PA cells were gradually detached off the root, leaving thin debris behind, and the root surface was replaced with the elongating epidermis cells at the 3- to 4-mm region behind the tip. Al did not affect the proliferation of PA cells or epidermis cells, except for the delay in the start of expansion and the accelerated detachment of the former. In soybean roots, the innermost lateral root cap cells were absent in both PA accumulation and active cell division and failed to protect the epidermal cell expansion at 25 μm Al. These results suggest that transient proliferation and detachment of PA cells may facilitate the expansion of epidermis cells away from Al during root elongation in camphor tree. PMID:21045123

  10. Microsurgical removal of epidermal and cortical cells: evidence that the gravitropic signal moves through the outer cell layers in primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, R. L.; Evans, M. L.; Moore, R.

    1990-01-01

    There is general agreement that during root gravitropism some sort of growth-modifying signal moves from the cap to the elongation zone and that this signal ultimately induces the curvature that leads to reorientation of the root. However, there is disagreement regarding both the nature of the signal and the pathway of its movement from the root cap to the elongation zone. We examined the pathway of movement by testing gravitropism in primary roots of maize (Zea mays L.) from which narrow (0.5 mm) rings of epidermal and cortical tissue were surgically removed from various positions within the elongation zone. When roots were girdled in the apical part of the elongation zone gravitropic curvature occurred apical to the girdle but not basal to the girdle. Filling the girdle with agar allowed curvature basal to the girdle to occur. Shallow girdles, in which only two or three cell layers (epidermis plus one or two cortical cell layers) were removed, prevented or greatly delayed gravitropic curvature basal to the girdle. The results indicate that the gravitropic signal moves basipetally through the outermost cell layers, perhaps through the epidermis itself.

  11. PIN2 Turnover in Arabidopsis Root Epidermal Cells Explored by the Photoconvertible Protein Dendra2

    PubMed Central

    Jásik, Ján; Boggetti, Barbara; Baluška, František; Volkmann, Dieter; Gensch, Thomas; Rutten, Twan; Altmann, Thomas; Schmelzer, Elmon

    2013-01-01

    The steady state level of integral membrane proteins is dependent on a strictly controlled delivery and removal. Here we show that Dendra2, a green-to-red photoconvertible fluorescent protein, is a suitable tool to study protein turnover in plants. We characterized the fluorescence properties of Dendra2 expressed either as a free protein or as a tag in Arabidopsis thaliana roots and optimized photoconversion settings to study protein turnover. Dendra2 was fused to the PIN2 protein, an auxin transporter in the root tip, and by time-lapse imaging and assessment of red and green signal intensities in the membrane after photoconversion we quantified directly and simultaneously the rate of PIN2 delivery of the newly synthesized protein into the plasma membrane as well as the disappearance of the protein from the plasma membrane due to degradation. Additionally we have verified several factors which are expected to affect PIN2 protein turnover and therefore potentially regulate root growth. PMID:23637828

  12. Turgor Regulation in Osmotically Stressed Arabidopsis Epidermal Root Cells. Direct Support for the Role of Inorganic Ion Uptake as Revealed by Concurrent Flux and Cell Turgor Measurements1

    PubMed Central

    Shabala, Sergey N.; Lew, Roger R.

    2002-01-01

    Hyperosmotic stress is known to significantly enhance net uptake of inorganic ions into plant cells. Direct evidence for cell turgor recovery via such a mechanism, however, is still lacking. In the present study, we performed concurrent measurements of net ion fluxes (with the noninvasive microelectrode ion flux estimation technique) and cell turgor changes (with the pressure-probe technique) to provide direct evidence that inorganic ion uptake regulates turgor in osmotically stressed Arabidopsis epidermal root cells. Immediately after onset of hyperosmotic stress (100/100 mm mannitol/sorbitol treatment), the cell turgor dropped from 0.65 to about 0.25 MPa. Turgor recovery started within 2 to 10 min after the treatment and was accompanied by a significant (30–80 nmol m−2 s−1) increase in uptake of K+, Cl−, and Na+ by root cells. In most cells, almost complete (>90% of initial values) recovery of the cell turgor was observed within 40 to 50 min after stress onset. In another set of experiments, we combined the voltage-clamp and the microelectrode ion flux estimation techniques to show that this process is, in part, mediated by voltage-gated K+ transporters at the cell plasma membrane. The possible physiological significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:12011359

  13. Investigation of triterpene synthesis and regulation in oats reveals a role for β-amyrin in determining root epidermal cell patterning.

    PubMed

    Kemen, Ariane C; Honkanen, Suvi; Melton, Rachel E; Findlay, Kim C; Mugford, Sam T; Hayashi, Keiko; Haralampidis, Kosmas; Rosser, Susan J; Osbourn, Anne

    2014-06-10

    Sterols have important functions in membranes and signaling. Plant sterols are synthesized via the isoprenoid pathway by cyclization of 2,3-oxidosqualene to cycloartenol. Plants also convert 2,3-oxidosqualene to other sterol-like cyclization products, including the simple triterpene β-amyrin. The function of β-amyrin per se is unknown, but this molecule can serve as an intermediate in the synthesis of more complex triterpene glycosides associated with plant defense. β-Amyrin is present at low levels in the roots of diploid oat (Avena strigosa). Oat roots also synthesize the β-amyrin-derived triterpene glycoside avenacin A-1, which provides protection against soil-borne diseases. The genes for the early steps in avenacin A-1 synthesis [saponin-deficient 1 and 2 (Sad1 and Sad2)] have been recruited from the sterol pathway by gene duplication and neofunctionalization. Here we show that Sad1 and Sad2 are regulated by an ancient root developmental process that is conserved across diverse species. Sad1 promoter activity is dependent on an L1 box motif, implicating sterol/lipid-binding class IV homeodomain leucine zipper transcription factors as potential regulators. The metabolism of β-amyrin is blocked in sad2 mutants, which therefore accumulate abnormally high levels of this triterpene. The accumulation of elevated levels of β-amyrin in these mutants triggers a "superhairy" root phenotype. Importantly, this effect is manifested very early in the establishment of the root epidermis, causing a greater proportion of epidermal cells to be specified as root hair cells rather than nonhair cells. Together these findings suggest that simple triterpenes may have widespread and as yet largely unrecognized functions in plant growth and development. PMID:24912185

  14. Investigation of triterpene synthesis and regulation in oats reveals a role for β-amyrin in determining root epidermal cell patterning

    PubMed Central

    Kemen, Ariane C.; Honkanen, Suvi; Melton, Rachel E.; Findlay, Kim C.; Mugford, Sam T.; Hayashi, Keiko; Haralampidis, Kosmas; Rosser, Susan J.; Osbourn, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Sterols have important functions in membranes and signaling. Plant sterols are synthesized via the isoprenoid pathway by cyclization of 2,3-oxidosqualene to cycloartenol. Plants also convert 2,3-oxidosqualene to other sterol-like cyclization products, including the simple triterpene β-amyrin. The function of β-amyrin per se is unknown, but this molecule can serve as an intermediate in the synthesis of more complex triterpene glycosides associated with plant defense. β-Amyrin is present at low levels in the roots of diploid oat (Avena strigosa). Oat roots also synthesize the β-amyrin–derived triterpene glycoside avenacin A-1, which provides protection against soil-borne diseases. The genes for the early steps in avenacin A-1 synthesis [saponin-deficient 1 and 2 (Sad1 and Sad2)] have been recruited from the sterol pathway by gene duplication and neofunctionalization. Here we show that Sad1 and Sad2 are regulated by an ancient root developmental process that is conserved across diverse species. Sad1 promoter activity is dependent on an L1 box motif, implicating sterol/lipid-binding class IV homeodomain leucine zipper transcription factors as potential regulators. The metabolism of β-amyrin is blocked in sad2 mutants, which therefore accumulate abnormally high levels of this triterpene. The accumulation of elevated levels of β-amyrin in these mutants triggers a “superhairy” root phenotype. Importantly, this effect is manifested very early in the establishment of the root epidermis, causing a greater proportion of epidermal cells to be specified as root hair cells rather than nonhair cells. Together these findings suggest that simple triterpenes may have widespread and as yet largely unrecognized functions in plant growth and development. PMID:24912185

  15. Morphometric analysis of epidermal differentiation in primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; Smith, H. S.

    1990-01-01

    Epidermal differentiation in primary roots of Zea mays was divided into six cell types based on cellular shape and cytoplasmic appearance. These six cell types are: 1) apical protoderm, located at the tip of the root pole and characterized by periclinally flattened cells; 2) cuboidal protoderm, located approximately 230 microns from the root pole and characterized by cuboidal cells; 3) tabular epidermis, located approximately 450 microns from the root pole and characterized by anticlinally flattened cells; 4) cuboidal epidermis, located approximately 900 microns from the root pole and characterized by cuboidal cells having numerous small vacuoles; 5) vacuolate cuboidal epidermis, located approximately 1,500 microns from the root pole and characterized by cuboidal cells containing several large vacuoles; and 6) columnar epidermis, located approximately 2,200 microns from the root pole (i.e., at the beginning of the zone of elongation) and characterized by elongated cells. We also used stereology to quantify the cellular changes associated with epidermal differentiation. The quiescent center and the apical protoderm have significantly different ultrastructures. The relative volume of dictyosomes increases dramatically during the early stages of epidermal differentiation. This increase correlates inversely with the amount of coverage provided by the root cap and mucilage.

  16. 25 YEARS OF EPIDERMAL STEM CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Ghadially, Ruby

    2012-01-01

    This is a chronicle of concepts in the field of epidermal stem cell biology and a historic look at their development over time. The last 25 years have seen the evolution of epidermal stem cell science, from first fundamental studies to a sophisticated science. The study of epithelial stem cell biology was aided by the ability to visualize the distribution of stem cells and their progeny through lineage analysis studies. The excellent progress we have made in understanding epidermal stem cell biology is discussed in this article. The challenges we still face in understanding epidermal stem cell include defining molecular markers for stem and progenitor subpopulations, determining the locations and contributions of the different stem cell niches, and mapping regulatory pathways of epidermal stem cell proliferation and differentiation. However, our rapidly evolving understanding of epidermal stem cells has many potential uses that promise to translate into improved patient therapy. PMID:22205306

  17. Epidermal Stem Cells in Orthopaedic Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin; Zhen, Gehua; Tsai, Shin-Yi; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, great advances have been made in epidermal stem cell studies at the cellular and molecular level. These studies reported various subpopulations and differentiations existing in the epidermal stem cell. Although controversies and unknown issues remain, epidermal stem cells possess an immune-privileged property in transplantation together with easy accessibility, which is favorable for future clinical application. In this review, we will summarize the biological characteristics of epidermal stem cells, and their potential in orthopedic regenerative medicine. Epidermal stem cells play a critical role via cell replacement, and demonstrate significant translational potential in the treatment of orthopedic injuries and diseases, including treatment for wound healing, peripheral nerve and spinal cord injury, and even muscle and bone remodeling. PMID:23727934

  18. Mechanotransduction in epidermal Merkel cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakatani, Masashi; Maksimovic, Srdjan; Baba, Yoshichika; Lumpkin, Ellen A.

    2014-01-01

    The cellular and molecular basis of vertebrate touch reception remains least understood among the traditional five senses. Somatosensory afferents that innervate the skin encode distinct tactile qualities, such as flutter, slip and pressure. Gentle touch is thought to be transduced by somatosensory afferents whose tactile end organs selectively filter mechanical stimuli. These tactile end organs comprise afferent terminals in association with non-neuronal cell types such as Merkel cells, keratinocytes and Schwann cells. An open question is whether these non-neuronal cells serve primarily as passive mechanical filters or whether they actively participate in mechanosensory transduction. This question has been most extensively studied in Merkel cells, which are epidermal cells that complex with sensory afferents in regions of high tactile acuity such as fingertips, whisker follicles, and touch domes. Merkel cell-neurite complexes mediate slowly adapting type I (SAI) responses, which encode sustained pressure and represent object features with high fidelity. How Merkel cells contribute to unique SAI firing patterns has been debated for decades; however, three recent studies in rodent models provide some direct answers. First, whole-cell recordings demonstrate that Merkel cells are touch-sensitive cells with fast, mechanically activated currents that require Piezo2. Second, optogenetics and intact recordings show that Merkel cells mediate sustained SAI firing. Finally, loss-of-function studies in transgenic mouse models reveal that SAI afferents are also touch sensitive. Together, these studies identify molecular mechanisms of mechanotransduction in Merkel cells, reveal unexpected functions for these cells in touch and support a revised, two-receptor site model of mechanosensory transduction. PMID:25053537

  19. Cell motion predicts human epidermal stemness

    PubMed Central

    Toki, Fujio; Tate, Sota; Imai, Matome; Matsushita, Natsuki; Shiraishi, Ken; Sayama, Koji; Toki, Hiroshi; Higashiyama, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    Image-based identification of cultured stem cells and noninvasive evaluation of their proliferative capacity advance cell therapy and stem cell research. Here we demonstrate that human keratinocyte stem cells can be identified in situ by analyzing cell motion during their cultivation. Modeling experiments suggested that the clonal type of cultured human clonogenic keratinocytes can be efficiently determined by analysis of early cell movement. Image analysis experiments demonstrated that keratinocyte stem cells indeed display a unique rotational movement that can be identified as early as the two-cell stage colony. We also demonstrate that α6 integrin is required for both rotational and collective cell motion. Our experiments provide, for the first time, strong evidence that cell motion and epidermal stemness are linked. We conclude that early identification of human keratinocyte stem cells by image analysis of cell movement is a valid parameter for quality control of cultured keratinocytes for transplantation. PMID:25897083

  20. [Biology of epidermal stem cells: impact on medicine].

    PubMed

    Pikuła, Michał; Trzonkowski, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    The epidermis is a self-renewing tissue which regenerates constantly. It consists mainly of keratinocytes of various degree of differentiation, from the proliferative basal layer to the terminally differentiated horny layer. Keratinocytes are specialized cells responsible for cohesion, barrier functions, and immunological reactions. The maintenance of homeostasis in the epidermis is possible via the self-renewing ability of the epidermal stem-cell population, which gives rise to differentiated keratinocytes. It is believed that epidermal stem cells play an important role in cellular regeneration, wound healing, and the pathogenesis of skin cancers. Epidermal stem cells reside in the basal layer of the epidermis, the bulge region of the hair follicle, and the germinal hair follicle matrix. Epidermal stem cells are relatively quiescent, slow-cycling cells defined by their great proliferative potential and unlimited capacity for self-renewal. Adult human epidermal stem cells can be activated and expanded in vitro under appropriate conditions. Cultured human keratinocytes and epidermal stem cells may be then transplanted as a biological dressing in burn injuries, chronic wounds, and various skin diseases. Additionally, epidermal stem cells have become a target for gene therapy and drug testing. In this review the fundamental characteristics of epidermal stem cells and the signaling pathways involved in the regulation of their proliferation and differentiation are discussed. The possibilities of using epidermal stem cells in medicine are also presented. PMID:19837987

  1. Metabolic profiling of Arabidopsis thaliana epidermal cells

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Berit; Zöller, Daniela; Erban, Alexander; Fehrle, Ines; Hartmann, Jürgen; Niehl, Annette; Kopka, Joachim; Fisahn, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic phenotyping at cellular resolution may be considered one of the challenges in current plant physiology. A method is described which enables the cell type-specific metabolic analysis of epidermal cell types in Arabidopsis thaliana pavement, basal, and trichome cells. To achieve the required high spatial resolution, single cell sampling using microcapillaries was combined with routine gas chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS) based metabolite profiling. The identification and relative quantification of 117 mostly primary metabolites has been demonstrated. The majority, namely 90 compounds, were accessible without analytical background correction. Analyses were performed using cell type-specific pools of 200 microsampled individual cells. Moreover, among these identified metabolites, 38 exhibited differential pool sizes in trichomes, basal or pavement cells. The application of an independent component analysis confirmed the cell type-specific metabolic phenotypes. Significant pool size changes between individual cells were detectable within several classes of metabolites, namely amino acids, fatty acids and alcohols, alkanes, lipids, N-compounds, organic acids and polyhydroxy acids, polyols, sugars, sugar conjugates and phenylpropanoids. It is demonstrated here that the combination of microsampling and GC-MS based metabolite profiling provides a method to investigate the cellular metabolism of fully differentiated plant cell types in vivo. PMID:20150518

  2. Establishment of a Protein Reference Map for Soybean Root Hair Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root hairs are single tubular cells formed from the differentiation of epidermal cells on roots. They are involved in water and nutrient uptake, and represent the infection site on leguminous roots by rhizobia, soil bacteria that establish a nitrogen fixing symbiosis. Root hairs develop by polar cel...

  3. Hair matrix germinative epidermal cells confer follicle-inducing capabilities on dermal sheath and high passage papilla cells.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, A J; Jahoda, C A

    1996-10-01

    Low passage cultured dermal papilla cells from adult rats stimulate complete hair follicle neogenesis when re-implanted into heterotypic skin. In contrast, cultured sheath cells are non-inductive despite sharing other behavioural characteristics (a common lineage and in situ proximity) with papilla cells. However, since sheath cells can behave inductively in amputated follicles after regenerating the papilla, this poses the question of what influences the sheath to papilla cell transition? During reciprocal tissue interactions specific epidermal cues are crucial to skin appendage development, and while in vivo assays to date have focussed on dermal interactive influence, our aim was to investigate epidermal potential. We have previously observed that hair follicle epidermal cells display exceptional interactive behaviour when combined with follicle dermal cells in vitro. Thus in the present study, hair follicle germinative, outer root sheath or skin basal epidermal cells were separately combined with each of three non-inductive dermal cell types (high passage papilla, low passage sheath or fibroblast) and then implanted into small ear skin wounds. The sheath/germinative and papilla/germinative cell implants repeatedly induced giant vibrissa-type follicles and fibres. In complete contrast, any single cell type and all other forms of recombination were consistently non-inductive. Hence, the adult germinative epidermal cells enable non-inductive adult dermal cells to stimulate hair follicle neogenesis, effectively, by altering their 'status', causing the sheath cells to 'specialise' and the 'aged' papilla cells to 'rejuvenate'. PMID:8898222

  4. Epidermal growth factor signaling in transformed cells

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephan; Langhans, Sigrid A.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/ErbB) family play a critical role in normal cell growth and development. However, many ErbB family members, especially EGFR, are aberrantly expressed or deregulated in tumors and are thought to play crucial roles in cancer development and metastatic progression. In this chapter, we provide an overview of key mechanisms contributing to aberrant EGFR/ErbB signaling in transformed cells which results in many phenotypic changes associated with the earliest stages of tumor formation, including several hallmarks of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). These changes often occur through interaction with other major signaling pathways important to tumor progression resulting in a multitude of transcriptional changes that ultimately impact cell morphology, proliferation and adhesion, all of which are crucial for tumor progression. The resulting mesh of signaling networks will need to be taken into account as new regimens are designed for targeting EGFR for therapeutic intervention. As new insights into the molecular mechanisms of the cross-talk of EGFR signaling with other signaling pathways and their role in therapeutic resistance to anti-EGFR therapies are gained a continual reassessment of clinical therapeutic regimes and strategies will be required. Understanding the consequences and complexity of EGF signaling and how it relates to tumor progression is critical for the development of clinical compounds and establishing clinical protocols for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25619714

  5. Specification of epidermal cell fate in plant shoots.

    PubMed

    Takada, Shinobu; Iida, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Land plants have evolved a single layer of epidermal cells, which are characterized by mostly anticlinal cell division patterns, formation of a waterproof coat called cuticle, and unique cell types such as stomatal guard cells and trichomes. The shoot epidermis plays important roles not only to protect plants from dehydration and pathogens but also to ensure their proper organogenesis and growth control. Extensive molecular genetic studies in Arabidopsis and maize have identified a number of genes that are required for epidermal cell differentiation. However, the mechanism that specifies shoot epidermal cell fate during plant organogenesis remains largely unknown. Particularly, little is known regarding positional information that should restrict epidermal cell fate to the outermost cell layer of the developing organs. Recent studies suggested that certain members of the HD-ZIP class IV homeobox genes are possible master regulators of shoot epidermal cell fate. Here, we summarize the roles of the regulatory genes that are involved in epidermal cell fate specification and discuss the possible mechanisms that limit the expression and/or activity of the master transcriptional regulators to the outermost cell layer in plant shoots. PMID:24616724

  6. Anti-epidermal-cell-surface pemphigus antibody detaches viable epidermal cells from culture plates by activation of proteinase.

    PubMed Central

    Farb, R M; Dykes, R; Lazarus, G S

    1978-01-01

    Immunoglobulin from pemphigus patients binds to the surface of mouse epidermal cells in culture. Cells incubated with the pemphigus antibody are easily detached from culture plates whereas cells incubated with serum from normal patients remain on the plate. Pemphigus antibody-mediated cell detachment is blocked by the addition of the proteinase inhibitors soybean trypsin inhibitor and alpha2-macroglobulin to the culture media. Detachable cells are viable, and activation of the complement cascade is not necessary for cell detachment. The anti-cell-surface antibody of pemphigus appears to disrupt adhesion between viable epidermal cells by activation of proteinase. Images PMID:272663

  7. Do epidermal lens cells facilitate the absorptance of diffuse light?

    PubMed

    Brodersen, Craig R; Vogelmann, Thomas C

    2007-07-01

    Many understory plants rely on diffuse light for photosynthesis because direct light is usually scattered by upper canopy layers before it strikes the forest floor. There is a considerable gap in the literature concerning the interaction of direct and diffuse light with leaves. Some understory plants have well-developed lens-shaped epidermal cells, which have long been thought to increase the absorption of diffuse light. To assess the role of epidermal cell shape in capturing direct vs. diffuse light, we measured leaf reflectance and transmittance with an integrating sphere system using leaves with flat (Begonia erythrophylla, Citrus reticulata, and Ficus benjamina) and lens-shaped epidermal cells (B. bowerae, Colocasia esculenta, and Impatiens velvetea). In all species examined, more light was absorbed when leaves were irradiated with direct as opposed to diffuse light. When leaves were irradiated with diffuse light, more light was transmitted and more was reflected in both leaf types, resulting in absorptance values 2-3% lower than in leaves irradiated with direct light. These data suggest that lens-shaped epidermal cells do not aid the capture of diffuse light. Palisade and mesophyll cell anatomy and leaf thickness appear to have more influence in the capture and absorption of light than does epidermal cell shape. PMID:21636475

  8. Basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors and epidermal cell fate determination in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongtao; Li, Xia; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-01-01

    Cell fate determination is an important process in multicellular organisms. Plant epidermis is a readily-accessible, well-used model for the study of cell fate determination. Our knowledge of cell fate determination is growing steadily due to genetic and molecular analyses of root hairs, trichomes, and stomata, which are derived from the epidermal cells of roots and aerial tissues. Studies have shown that a large number of factors are involved in the establishment of these cell types, especially members of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) superfamily, which is an important family of transcription factors. In this mini-review, we focus on the role of bHLH transcription factors in cell fate determination in Arabidopsis. PMID:23073001

  9. Fate by Chance, not by Choice: Epidermal Stem Cells Go Live.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Celeiro, Meryem; Zhang, Bing; Hsu, Ya-Chieh

    2016-07-01

    The skin epidermis is constantly renewed by epidermal stem cells. In a recent Science paper, Rompolas et al. utilize live imaging to track epidermal stem cells over their lifetimes. Their findings provide new insights into epidermal stem cell behaviors and unravel how newly generated cells are integrated into pre-existing tissues. PMID:27392221

  10. Why do so many petals have conical epidermal cells?

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Heather M.; Bennett, K. M. Veronica; Dorling, Matthew; Sandbach, Lucy; Prince, David; Chittka, Lars; Glover, Beverley J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The conical epidermal cells found on the petals of most Angiosperm species are so widespread that they have been used as markers of petal identity, but their function has only been analysed in recent years. This review brings together diverse data on the role of these cells in pollination biology. Scope The published effects of conical cells on petal colour, petal reflexing, scent production, petal wettability and pollinator grip on the flower surface are considered. Of these factors, pollinator grip has been shown to be of most significance in the well-studied Antirrhinum majus/bumble-bee system. Published data on the relationship between epidermal cell morphology and floral temperature were limited, so an analysis of the effects of cell shape on floral temperature in Antirrhinum is presented here. Statistically significant warming by conical cells was not detected, although insignificant trends towards faster warming at dawn were found, and it was also found that flat-celled flowers could be warmer on warm days. The warming observed is less significant than that achieved by varying pigment content. However, the possibility that the effect of conical cells on temperature might be biologically significant in certain specific instances such as marginal habitats or weather conditions cannot be ruled out. Conclusions Conical epidermal cells can influence a diverse set of petal properties. The fitness benefits they provide to plants are likely to vary with pollinator and habitat, and models are now required to understand how these different factors interact. PMID:21470973

  11. Estimating the Size of Onion Epidermal Cells from Diffraction Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groff, Jeffrey R.

    2012-10-01

    Bioscience and premedical profession students are a major demographic served by introductory physics courses at many colleges and universities. Exposing these students to biological applications of physical principles will help them to appreciate physics as a useful tool for their future professions. Here I describe an experiment suitable for introductory physics where principles of wave optics are applied to probe the size of onion epidermal cells. The epidermis tissue is composed of cells of relatively uniform size and shape (Fig. 1) so the tissue acts like a one-dimensional transmission diffraction grating. The diffraction patterns generated when a laser beam passes through the tissue (Fig. 2) are analyzed and an estimate of the average width of individual onion epidermal cells is calculated. The results are compared to direct measurements taken using a light microscope. The use of microscopes and plant-cell tissue slides creates opportunities for cross-discipline collaboration between physics and biology instructors.

  12. Spatiotemporal coordination of stem cell commitment during epidermal homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Rompolas, Panteleimon; Mesa, Kailin R; Kawaguchi, Kyogo; Park, Sangbum; Gonzalez, David; Brown, Samara; Boucher, Jonathan; Klein, Allon M; Greco, Valentina

    2016-06-17

    Adult tissues replace lost cells via pools of stem cells. However, the mechanisms of cell self-renewal, commitment, and functional integration into the tissue remain unsolved. Using imaging techniques in live mice, we captured the lifetime of individual cells in the ear and paw epidermis. Our data suggest that epidermal stem cells have equal potential to either divide or directly differentiate. Tracking stem cells over multiple generations reveals that cell behavior is not coordinated between generations. However, sibling cell fate and lifetimes are coupled. We did not observe regulated asymmetric cell divisions. Lastly, we demonstrated that differentiating stem cells integrate into preexisting ordered spatial units of the epidermis. This study elucidates how a tissue is maintained by both temporal and spatial coordination of stem cell behaviors. PMID:27229141

  13. Spatiotemporal coordination of stem cell commitment during epidermal homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Rompolas, Panteleimon; Mesa, Kailin R.; Kawaguchi, Kyogo; Park, Sangbum; Gonzalez, David; Brown, Samara; Boucher, Jonathan; Klein, Allon M.; Greco, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Adult tissues replace lost cells via pools of stem cells. However, the mechanisms of cell self-renewal, commitment, and functional integration into the tissue remain unsolved. Using imaging techniques in live mice, we captured the lifetime of individual cells in the ear and paw epidermis. Our data suggest that epidermal stem cells have equal potential to either divide or directly differentiate. Tracking stem cells over multiple generations reveals that cell behavior is not coordinated between generations. However, sibling cell fate and lifetimes are coupled. We did not observe regulated asymmetric cell divisions. Lastly, we demonstrated that differentiating stem cells integrate into preexisting ordered spatial units of the epidermis. This study elucidates how a tissue is maintained by both temporal and spatial coordination of stem cell behaviors. PMID:27229141

  14. Axonal transport of herpes simplex virions to epidermal cells: evidence for a specialized mode of virus transport and assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Penfold, M E; Armati, P; Cunningham, A L

    1994-01-01

    To examine the transmission of herpes simplex virus (HSV) from axon to epidermal cell, an in vitro model was constructed consisting of human fetal dorsal root ganglia cultured in the central chamber of a dual-chamber tissue culture system separated from autologous skin explants in an exterior chamber by concentric steel cylinders adhering to the substratum through silicon grease and agarose. Axons grew through the agarose viral diffusion barrier and terminated on epidermal cells in the exterior chamber. After inoculation of HSV onto dorsal root ganglia, anterograde axonal transport of glycoprotein and nucleocapsid antigen was observed by confocal microscopy to appear in exterior chamber axons within 12 h and in epidermal cells within 16 h, moving at 2-3 mm/h. Although both enveloped and unenveloped nucleocapsids were observed in the neuronal soma by transmission electron microscopy, only nucleocapsids were observed in the axons, closely associated with microtubules. Nodule formation at the surface of HSV-infected axons, becoming more dense at the axon terminus on epidermal cells, and patches of axolemmal HSV glycoprotein D expression were observed by scanning (immuno)electron microscopy, probably representing virus emerging from the axolemma. These findings strongly suggest a specialized mode of viral transport, assembly, and egress in sensory neurons: microtubule-associated intermediate-fast anterograde axonal transport of unenveloped nucleocapsids with separate transport of glycoproteins to the distal regions of the axon and assembly prior to virus emergence at the axon terminus. Images PMID:7517552

  15. Isolation of genes predominantly expressed in guard cells and epidermal cells of Nicotiana glauca.

    PubMed

    Smart, L B; Cameron, K D; Bennett, A B

    2000-04-01

    Guard cells are specialized and metabolically active cells which arise during the differentiation of the epidermis. Using Nicotiana glauca epidermal peels as a source of purified guard cells, we have constructed a cDNA library from guard cell RNA. In order to isolate genes that are predominantly expressed in guard cells, we performed a differential screen of this library, comparing the hybridization of a radiolabeled cDNA probe synthesized from guard cell RNA to that from a mesophyll cell cDNA probe. Sixteen clones were isolated based on their greater level of hybridization with the guard cell probe. Of these, eight had high homology to lipid transfer protein (LTP), two were similar to glycine-rich protein (GRP), and one displayed high homology to proline-rich proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPRP2, AtPRP4) and from potato guard cells (GPP). Northern analysis confirmed that one or more NgLTP genes, NgGRP1, and NgGPP1 are all differentially expressed, with highest levels in guard cells, and low or undetectable levels in mesophyll cells and in roots. In addition, all are induced to some degree in drought-stressed guard cells. NgLTP and NgGRP1 expression was localized by in situ hybridization to the guard cells and pavement cells in the epidermis. NgGRP1 expression was also detected in cells of the vasculature. Genomic Southern analysis indicated that LTP is encoded by a family of highly similar genes in N. glauca. This work has identified members of a subset of epidermis- and guard cell-predominant genes, whose protein products are likely to contribute to the unique properties acquired by guard cells and pavement cells during differentiation. PMID:10890533

  16. Heterogeneity and plasticity of epidermal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Schepeler, Troels; Page, Mahalia E.; Jensen, Kim B.

    2014-01-01

    The epidermis is an integral part of our largest organ, the skin, and protects us against the hostile environment. It is a highly dynamic tissue that, during normal steady-state conditions, undergoes constant turnover. Multiple stem cell populations residing in autonomously maintained compartments facilitate this task. In this Review, we discuss stem cell behaviour during normal tissue homeostasis, regeneration and disease within the pilosebaceous unit, an integral structure of the epidermis that is responsible for hair growth and lubrication of the epithelium. We provide an up-to-date view of the pilosebaceous unit, encompassing the heterogeneity and plasticity of multiple discrete stem cell populations that are strongly influenced by external cues to maintain their identity and function. PMID:24961797

  17. Gatekeeper Tyrosine Phosphorylation of SYMRK Is Essential for Synchronizing the Epidermal and Cortical Responses in Root Nodule Symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sudip; Paul, Anindita; Herring, Laura; Dutta, Ayan; Bhattacharya, Avisek; Samaddar, Sandip; Goshe, Michael B; DasGupta, Maitrayee

    2016-05-01

    Symbiosis receptor kinase (SYMRK) is indispensable for activation of root nodule symbiosis (RNS) at both epidermal and cortical levels and is functionally conserved in legumes. Previously, we reported SYMRK to be phosphorylated on "gatekeeper" Tyr both in vitro as well as in planta. Since gatekeeper phosphorylation was not necessary for activity, the significance remained elusive. Herein, we show that substituting gatekeeper with nonphosphorylatable residues like Phe or Ala significantly affected autophosphorylation on selected targets on activation segment/αEF and β3-αC loop of SYMRK. In addition, the same gatekeeper mutants failed to restore proper symbiotic features in a symrk null mutant where rhizobial invasion of the epidermis and nodule organogenesis was unaffected but rhizobia remain restricted to the epidermis in infection threads migrating parallel to the longitudinal axis of the root, resulting in extensive infection patches at the nodule apex. Thus, gatekeeper phosphorylation is critical for synchronizing epidermal/cortical responses in RNS. PMID:26960732

  18. Effects of Nitrogen on Mesophyll Cell Division and Epidermal Cell Elongation in Tall Fescue Leaf Blades 1

    PubMed Central

    MacAdam, Jennifer W.; Volenec, Jeffrey J.; Nelson, Curtis J.

    1989-01-01

    Leaf elongation rate (LER) in grasses is dependent on epidermal cell supply (number) and on rate and duration of epidermal cell elongation. Nitrogen (N) fertilization increases LER. Longitudinal sections from two genotypes of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.), which differ by 50% in LER, were used to quantify the effects of N on the components of epidermal cell elongation and on mesophyll cell division. Rate and duration of epidermal cell elongation were determined by using a relationship between cell length and displacement velocity derived from the continuity equation. Rate of epidermal cell elongation was exponential. Relative rates of epidermal cell elongation increased by 9% with high N, even though high N increased LER by 89%. Duration of cell elongation was approximately 20 h longer in the high- than in the low-LER genotype regardless of N treatment. The percentage of mesophyll cells in division was greater in the high- than in the low-LER genotype. This increased with high N in both genotypes, indicating that LER increased with cell supply. Division of mesophyll cells adjacent to abaxial epidermal cells continued after epidermal cell division stopped, until epidermal cells had elongated to a mean length of 40 micrometers in the high-LER and a mean length of 50 micrometers in the low-LER genotype. The cell cycle length for mesophyll cells was calculated to be 12 to 13 hours. Nitrogen increased mesophyll cell number more than epidermal cell number: in both genotypes, the final number of mesophyll cells adjacent to each abaxial epidermal cell was 10 with low N and 14 with high N. A spatial model is used to describe three cell development processes relevant to leaf growth. It illustrates the overlap of mesophyll cell division and epidermal cell elongation, and the transition from epidermal cell elongation to secondary cell wall deposition. PMID:16666581

  19. Human epidermal neural crest stem cells as a source of Schwann cells

    PubMed Central

    Sakaue, Motoharu; Sieber-Blum, Maya

    2015-01-01

    We show that highly pure populations of human Schwann cells can be derived rapidly and in a straightforward way, without the need for genetic manipulation, from human epidermal neural crest stem cells [hEPI-NCSC(s)] present in the bulge of hair follicles. These human Schwann cells promise to be a useful tool for cell-based therapies, disease modelling and drug discovery. Schwann cells are glia that support axons of peripheral nerves and are direct descendants of the embryonic neural crest. Peripheral nerves are damaged in various conditions, including through trauma or tumour-related surgery, and Schwann cells are required for their repair and regeneration. Schwann cells also promise to be useful for treating spinal cord injuries. Ex vivo expansion of hEPI-NCSC isolated from hair bulge explants, manipulating the WNT, sonic hedgehog and TGFβ signalling pathways, and exposure of the cells to pertinent growth factors led to the expression of the Schwann cell markers SOX10, KROX20 (EGR2), p75NTR (NGFR), MBP and S100B by day 4 in virtually all cells, and maturation was completed by 2 weeks of differentiation. Gene expression profiling demonstrated expression of transcripts for neurotrophic and angiogenic factors, as well as JUN, all of which are essential for nerve regeneration. Co-culture of hEPI-NCSC-derived human Schwann cells with rodent dorsal root ganglia showed interaction of the Schwann cells with axons, providing evidence of Schwann cell functionality. We conclude that hEPI-NCSCs are a biologically relevant source for generating large and highly pure populations of human Schwann cells. PMID:26251357

  20. Growth of melanocytes in human epidermal cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Staiano-Coico, L.; Hefton, J.M.; Amadeo, C.; Pagan-Charry, I.; Madden, M.R.; Cardon-Cardo, C. )

    1990-08-01

    Epidermal cell cultures were grown in keratinocyte-conditioned medium for use as burn wound grafts; the melanocyte composition of the grafts was studied under a variety of conditions. Melanocytes were identified by immunohistochemistry based on a monoclonal antibody (MEL-5) that has previously been shown to react specifically with melanocytes. During the first 7 days of growth in primary culture, the total number of melanocytes in the epidermal cultures decreased to 10% of the number present in normal skin. Beginning on day 2 of culture, bipolar melanocytes were present at a mean cell density of 116 +/- 2/mm2; the keratinocyte to melanocyte ratio was preserved during further primary culture and through three subpassages. Moreover, exposure of cultures to mild UVB irradiation stimulated the melanocytes to proliferate, suggesting that the melanocytes growing in culture maintained their responsiveness to external stimuli. When the sheets of cultured cells were enzymatically detached from the plastic culture flasks before grafting, melanocytes remained in the basal layer of cells as part of the graft applied to the patient.

  1. Aluminum chloride and membrane potentials of barley root cells

    SciTech Connect

    Etherton, B.; Shane, M.

    1986-04-01

    Aluminum chloride at pH 4 hyperpolarizes the membrane potentials of barley root epidermal cells. The authors tested to see whether this hyperpolarization could be caused by an aluminum induced alteration of the permeability of the membrane to potassium or sodium ions by measuring the effect of .04 mM aluminum ions (the Ca/sup + +/ conc. was 0.1 mM) on the membrane potential changes induced by changing the potassium or sodium concentrations in the medium bathing the roots. Aluminum ions did not change the magnitude of potassium or sodium induced changes in membrane potentials but significantly altered the rates of potassium and sodium induced changes of the potential. The results indicate that aluminum ions did not change sodium or potassium ion permeabilities of barley root cells.

  2. Microtubules CLASP to Adherens Junctions in epidermal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Marta N; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-01-01

    Cadherin-mediated cell adhesion at Adherens Junctions (AJs) and its dynamic connections with the microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton are important regulators of cellular architecture. However, the functional relevance of these interactions and the molecular players involved in different cellular contexts and cellular compartments are still not completely understood. Here, we comment on our recent findings showing that the MT plus-end binding protein CLASP2 interacts with the AJ component p120-catenin (p120) specifically in progenitor epidermal cells. Absence of either protein leads to alterations in MT dynamics and AJ functionality. These findings represent a novel mechanism of MT targeting to AJs that may be relevant for the maintenance of proper epidermal progenitor cell homeostasis. We also discuss the potential implication of other MT binding proteins previously associated to AJs in the wider context of epithelial tissues. We hypothesize the existence of adaptation mechanisms that regulate the formation and stability of AJs in different cellular contexts to allow the dynamic behavior of these complexes during tissue homeostasis and remodeling. PMID:24522006

  3. Microtubules CLASP to Adherens Junctions in epidermal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Marta N; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-01-01

    Cadherin-mediated cell adhesion at Adherens Junctions (AJs) and its dynamic connections with the microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton are important regulators of cellular architecture. However, the functional relevance of these interactions and the molecular players involved in different cellular contexts and cellular compartments are still not completely understood. Here, we comment on our recent findings showing that the MT plus-end binding protein CLASP2 interacts with the AJ component p120-catenin (p120) specifically in progenitor epidermal cells. Absence of either protein leads to alterations in MT dynamics and AJ functionality. These findings represent a novel mechanism of MT targeting to AJs that may be relevant for the maintenance of proper epidermal progenitor cell homeostasis. We also discuss the potential implication of other MT binding proteins previously associated to AJs in the wider context of epithelial tissues. We hypothesize the existence of adaptation mechanisms that regulate the formation and stability of AJs in different cellular contexts to allow the dynamic behavior of these complexes during tissue homeostasis and remodeling. PMID:24522006

  4. Epidermal cell growth-dependent arylhydrocarbon-hydroxylase (AHH) activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Thiele, B; Merk, H F; Bonnekoh, B; Mahrle, G; Steigleder, G K

    1987-01-01

    Cytochrome P-450-dependent arylhydrocarbon-hydroxylase (AHH) activity and inducibility by benzanthracene (BA) was measured in cultured guinea pig and human epidermal cells. Basal AHH-activity (AHHb) in guinea pig epidermal cells was much higher than in human epidermal cells. AHHb in guinea pig epidermal cells was directly related to the labeling index and decreased to the original level between the 5th and 7th day of cell culturing. On the other hand, the induction-ratio of AHH reached its maximum level when the number of cells began to rise (proliferation phase) and remained high at day 7 of the cell culture. These results suggest a cell growth dependent activity and inducibility of carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes, such as AHH, in isolated epidermal cells. PMID:3435181

  5. In vitro transformation of Syrian hamster epidermal cells by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, N.C.; Sun, C.R.Y.; Chao, L.; Fung, W.P.; Tennant, R.W.; Hsie, A.W.

    1981-05-01

    The selection of Syrian hamster epidermal cells which do not terminally differentiate has provided a quantitative focus assay for in vitro chemical transformation. One-day-old Syrian hamster epidermal cells plated at 5 x 10/sup 6//100-mm dish were treated for 5 hr with various concentrations of N-methyl-N-nitro-N'-nitrosoguanidine. After 4 weeks, the normal epidermal cells began to terminally differentiate to keratinized squamous cells and died, but transformed epidermal colonies grew to higher cell densities and appeared as darker areas against a lightly stained normal cell background. Transformed epidermal foci were isolated and subcultured for at least 15 passages, whereas normal epidermal cells could not be subcultured under the same conditions. The transformed cells assumed the typical cobblestone-like morphology of epithelial cells, retained desmosomes and tonofilaments, and were able to use citrulline in place of arginine. Argininosuccinate synthetase (EC 6.3.4.5) activity was significantly higher in the epidermal cells than in fibroblasts. The injection of 5 x 10/sup 6/ cells of two transformed epidermal cell lines into athymic nude mice resulted in the formation of tumors which were identified as keratinizing squamous carcinomas.

  6. Programmed Cell Death Progresses Differentially in Epidermal and Mesophyll Cells of Lily Petals.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki-Kawai, Hiroko; Niki, Tomoko; Shibuya, Kenichi; Ichimura, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    In the petals of some species of flowers, programmed cell death (PCD) begins earlier in mesophyll cells than in epidermal cells. However, PCD progression in each cell type has not been characterized in detail. We separately constructed a time course of biochemical signs and expression patterns of PCD-associated genes in epidermal and mesophyll cells in Lilium cv. Yelloween petals. Before visible signs of senescence could be observed, we found signs of PCD, including DNA degradation and decreased protein content in mesophyll cells only. In these cells, the total proteinase activity increased on the day after anthesis. Within 3 days after anthesis, the protein content decreased by 61.8%, and 22.8% of mesophyll cells was lost. A second peak of proteinase activity was observed on day 6, and the number of mesophyll cells decreased again from days 4 to 7. These biochemical and morphological results suggest that PCD progressed in steps during flower life in the mesophyll cells. PCD began in epidermal cells on day 5, in temporal synchrony with the time course of visible senescence. In the mesophyll cells, the KDEL-tailed cysteine proteinase (LoCYP) and S1/P1 nuclease (LoNUC) genes were upregulated before petal wilting, earlier than in epidermal cells. In contrast, relative to that in the mesophyll cells, the expression of the SAG12 cysteine proteinase homolog (LoSAG12) drastically increased in epidermal cells in the final stage of senescence. These results suggest that multiple PCD-associated genes differentially contribute to the time lag of PCD progression between epidermal and mesophyll cells of lily petals. PMID:26605547

  7. Programmed Cell Death Progresses Differentially in Epidermal and Mesophyll Cells of Lily Petals

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki-Kawai, Hiroko; Niki, Tomoko; Shibuya, Kenichi; Ichimura, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    In the petals of some species of flowers, programmed cell death (PCD) begins earlier in mesophyll cells than in epidermal cells. However, PCD progression in each cell type has not been characterized in detail. We separately constructed a time course of biochemical signs and expression patterns of PCD-associated genes in epidermal and mesophyll cells in Lilium cv. Yelloween petals. Before visible signs of senescence could be observed, we found signs of PCD, including DNA degradation and decreased protein content in mesophyll cells only. In these cells, the total proteinase activity increased on the day after anthesis. Within 3 days after anthesis, the protein content decreased by 61.8%, and 22.8% of mesophyll cells was lost. A second peak of proteinase activity was observed on day 6, and the number of mesophyll cells decreased again from days 4 to 7. These biochemical and morphological results suggest that PCD progressed in steps during flower life in the mesophyll cells. PCD began in epidermal cells on day 5, in temporal synchrony with the time course of visible senescence. In the mesophyll cells, the KDEL-tailed cysteine proteinase (LoCYP) and S1/P1 nuclease (LoNUC) genes were upregulated before petal wilting, earlier than in epidermal cells. In contrast, relative to that in the mesophyll cells, the expression of the SAG12 cysteine proteinase homolog (LoSAG12) drastically increased in epidermal cells in the final stage of senescence. These results suggest that multiple PCD-associated genes differentially contribute to the time lag of PCD progression between epidermal and mesophyll cells of lily petals. PMID:26605547

  8. Host cell reactivation studies with epidermal cells of mice sensitive and resistant to carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.E.; Strickland, A.G.

    1984-03-01

    Primary epidermal cells from AKR, BALB/c, CD-1, and SENCAR mice, listed in order of least to most sensitive to epidermal carcinogenesis by initiation and promotion protocols, were found to be equally competent to ''reactivate'' herpes simplex virus type 1 irradiated by germicidal ultraviolet radiation. Nontumorigenic BALB/c epidermal cell lines selected in vitro for resistance to terminal differentiation after in vivo or in vitro treatment with initiating doses of carcinogens showed virus survival curves similar to those of primary cells. Similarly, primary cultures which were allowed to grow to confluency following a single treatment with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (100 ng/ml) retained normal host cell reactivation. Host cell reactivation studies with mouse dermal fibroblasts could not be done because of the failure of the herpes simplex virus to infect these cells and produce plaques. These results demonstrate that survival of ultraviolet light-damaged virus in primary epidermal cells in culture is unrelated to whether the cells are derived from mice sensitive or resistant to epidermal carcinogenesis. Furthermore, virus survival is not changed by tumor promoter treatment or by treatment with initiating doses of carcinogens which results in differentiation-resistant cells.

  9. Vertebrate epidermal cells are broad-specificity phagocytes that clear sensory axon debris.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Jeffrey P; Sack, Georgeann S; Martin, Seanna M; Sagasti, Alvaro

    2015-01-14

    Cellular debris created by developmental processes or injury must be cleared by phagocytic cells to maintain and repair tissues. Cutaneous injuries damage not only epidermal cells but also the axonal endings of somatosensory (touch-sensing) neurons, which must be repaired to restore the sensory function of the skin. Phagocytosis of neuronal debris is usually performed by macrophages or other blood-derived professional phagocytes, but we have found that epidermal cells phagocytose somatosensory axon debris in zebrafish. Live imaging revealed that epidermal cells rapidly internalize debris into dynamic phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate-positive phagosomes that mature into phagolysosomes using a pathway similar to that of professional phagocytes. Epidermal cells phagocytosed not only somatosensory axon debris but also debris created by injury to other peripheral axons that were mislocalized to the skin, neighboring skin cells, and macrophages. Together, these results identify vertebrate epidermal cells as broad-specificity phagocytes that likely contribute to neural repair and wound healing. PMID:25589751

  10. Water Relations of Leaf Epidermal Cells of Tradescantia virginiana12

    PubMed Central

    Tomos, Alun Deri; Steudle, Ernst; Zimmermann, Ulrich; Schulze, Ernst-Detlev

    1981-01-01

    Water-relation parameters (cell turgor pressure [P], volumetric elastic modulus [ε] and hydraulic conductivity [Lp]) of individual leaf epidermal cells of Tradescantia virginiana have been determined with the pressure-probe technique. Turgor was 4.5 ± 2.1 [41] bar (mean ± sd; in brackets the number of cells) and ranged from 0.9 to 9.6 bar. By vacuum infiltration with nutrient solution, it was raised to 7.5 ± 1.5 [5] bar (range: 5.3-8.8 bar). There was a large variability in the absolute value of ε of individual cells. ε ranged from 40 to 360 bar; mean ± sd: 135 ± 83 bar; n = 50 cells. ε values of individual cells seemed to be rather independent of changes in cell turgor. A critical assessment of the errors incurred in determining ε by the technique is included. The half-times of water exchange of individual cells ranged from 1 to 35 seconds, which gave values of 0.2 to 11 × 10−6 centimeters per second per bar for Lp (mean ± sd: 3.1 ± 2.3 × 10−6 centimeters per second per bar; n = 39 cells). The large range in Lp and ε is believed to be due to the difficulties in determining the effective surface area of water exchange of the cells. Lp is not influenced by active salt pumping driven by respiration energy inasmuch as it was not altered by 0.1 millimolar KCN. The temperature dependence of Lp (T½) was measured for the first time in individual higher-plant cells. Lp increased by a factor of 2 to 4, when the temperature was increased by 10 C. The activation energy of water exchange was found to be between 50 and 186 kilojoules per mole. Within the large range of variation it was found that T½, Lp, and ε did not change under various experimental conditions (intact and excised tissue, water content and turgidity, age, etc.). Similar results were obtained for the epidermal cells of Tradescantia andersoniana. The measurements suggest that the entire epidermis would respond very rapidly (i.e. with a half-time of 1 to 30 s) to a demand for water from the

  11. Effects of Wnt3a on proliferation and differentiation of human epidermal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jia Liwei; Zhou Jiaxi; Peng Sha; Li Juxue; Cao Yujing; Duan Enkui

    2008-04-11

    Epidermal stem cells maintain development and homeostasis of mammalian epidermis throughout life. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the proliferation and differentiation of epidermal stem cells are far from clear. In this study, we investigated the effects of Wnt3a and Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling on proliferation and differentiation of human fetal epidermal stem cells. We found both Wnt3a and active {beta}-catenin, two key members of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling, were expressed in human fetal epidermis and epidermal stem cells. In addition, Wnt3a protein can promote proliferation and inhibit differentiation of epidermal stem cells in vitro culture. Our results suggest that Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling plays important roles in human fetal skin development and homeostasis, which also provide new insights on the molecular mechanisms of oncogenesis in human epidermis.

  12. [Wound treatment with autogenous epidermal cell expansion culture].

    PubMed

    Bonnekoh, B; Müller, R P; Mahrle, G; Steigleder, G K

    1988-11-11

    Sheets of autologous epidermal cells grown by expansion culture were used to cover small skin defects in seven patients with postoperative necroses, necroses due to temporal arteritis, varicose ulcers or after tangential excision of tattoos. Several transplantation techniques were used: backing of the cultured epithelia with vaseline gauze, Surfasoft, Adaptic, Silastic foil, culturing directly from Petriperm-foil. Meshed Silastic-foil proved to give the best support. Optimal take of the in-vitro epithelia (more than 80% of their surface area) was achieved only for fresh dermal wound-beds. The take was only moderate on chronic granulation tissue, but the transplants reduced the formation of fibrinous-necrotic material and favoured the formation of fresh granulation tissue. PMID:3181024

  13. Langerhans Cells Facilitate UVB-induced Epidermal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Julia M.; Bürgler, Christina D.; Freudzon, Marianna; Golubets, Kseniya; Gibson, Juliet F.; Filler, Renata B.; Girardi, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) light is considered the major environmental inducer of human keratinocyte DNA mutations, including within the tumor-suppressor gene p53, and chronic exposure is associated with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) formation. Langerhans cells (LC) comprise a dendritic network within the suprabasilar epidermis, yet the role of LC in UVB-induced carcinogenesis is largely unknown. Herein, we show that LC-intact epidermis develops UVB-induced tumors more readily than LC-deficient epidermis. While levels of epidermal cyclopyrimidine dimers (CPD) following acute UVB exposure are equivalent in the presence or absence of LC, chronic UVB-induced p53 mutant clonal islands expand more readily in association with LC which remain largely intact and are preferentially found in proximity to the expanding mutant keratinocyte populations. The observed LC facilitation of mutant p53 clonal expansion is completely αβ and γδ T-cell independent, and is associated with increased intraepidermal expression of interleukin (IL)-22 and the presence of group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3). These data demonstrate that LC play a key role in UVB-induced cutaneous carcinogenesis, and suggest that LC locally stimulate keratinocyte proliferation and innate immune cells that provoke tumor outgrowth. PMID:26053049

  14. Intra-epidermal nerve fibres in human skin: back to the roots.

    PubMed

    Abels, Christoph

    2014-04-01

    Regarding the existence and the role of intra-epidermal nerve fibres, the literature is ambiguous. However, performing a literature search, a landmark paper turned up that even many dermatologists seem to have forgotten, or may not even know at all. This paper is entitled 'The innervation of human epidermis' written by Arthur and Shelley (J Invest Dermatol, 32, 1959, 397). The full text is available via http://www.nature.com/jid/journal/v32/n3/pdf/jid195969a.pdf. The authors present data on intra-epidermal nerves at 16 representative body areas. The existence of intra-epidermal nerve fibres is undisputable and does not only explain clinical symptoms but may even provide a promising target for drug development. PMID:24450967

  15. Epigenetic Regulation of Epidermal Stem Cell Biomarkers and Their Role in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Saldanha, Sabita N.; Royston, Kendra J.; Udayakumar, Neha; Tollefsbol, Trygve O.

    2015-01-01

    As an actively renewable tissue, changes in skin architecture are subjected to the regulation of stem cells that maintain the population of cells responsible for the formation of epidermal layers. Stems cells retain their self-renewal property and express biomarkers that are unique to this population. However, differential regulation of the biomarkers can initiate the pathway of terminal cell differentiation. Although, pockets of non-clarity in stem cell maintenance and differentiation in skin still exist, the influence of epigenetics in epidermal stem cell functions and differentiation in skin homeostasis and wound healing is clearly evident. The focus of this review is to discuss the epigenetic regulation of confirmed and probable epidermal stem cell biomarkers in epidermal stratification of normal skin and in diseased states. The role of epigenetics in wound healing, especially in diseased states of diabetes and cancer, will also be conveyed. PMID:26712738

  16. CD133 Is a Marker For Long-Term Repopulating Murine Epidermal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Charruyer, A; Strachan, LR; Yue, L; Toth, AS; Mancianti, ML; Ghadially, R

    2012-01-01

    Maintenance, repair and renewal of the epidermis are thought to depend on a pool of dedicated epidermal stem cells. Like for many somatic tissues, isolation of a nearly pure population of stem cells is a primary goal in cutaneous biology. We used a quantitative transplantation assay, using injection of keratinocytes into subcutis combined with limiting dilution analysis, to assess the long-term repopulating ability of putative murine epidermal stem populations. Putative epidermal stem cell populations were isolated by FACS sorting. The CD133+ population and the subpopulation of CD133+ cells that exhibits high mitochondrial membrane potential (DΨmhi), were enriched for long-term repopulating epidermal stem cells vs. unfractionated cells (3.9 and 5.2-fold, respectively). Evidence for self-renewal capacity was obtained by serial transplantation of long-term epidermal repopulating units derived from CD133+ and CD133+ΔΨmhi keratinocytes. CD133+ keratinocytes were multipotent and produced significantly more hair follicles than CD133− cells. CD133+ cells were a subset of the previously described integrin α6+CD34+ bulge cell population and 28.9±8.6% were label retaining cells. Thus, murine keratinocytes within the CD133+ and CD133+ΔΨmhi populations contain epidermal stem cells that regenerate epidermis for the long-term, are self-renewing, multipotent, and label-retaining cells. PMID:22763787

  17. Gloss, colour and grip: multifunctional epidermal cell shapes in bee- and bird-pollinated flowers.

    PubMed

    Papiorek, Sarah; Junker, Robert R; Lunau, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Flowers bear the function of filters supporting the attraction of pollinators as well as the deterrence of floral antagonists. The effect of epidermal cell shape on the visual display and tactile properties of flowers has been evaluated only recently. In this study we quantitatively measured epidermal cell shape, gloss and spectral reflectance of flowers pollinated by either bees or birds testing three hypotheses: The first two hypotheses imply that bee-pollinated flowers might benefit from rough surfaces on visually-active parts produced by conical epidermal cells, as they may enhance the colour signal of flowers as well as the grip on flowers for bees. In contrast, bird-pollinated flowers might benefit from flat surfaces produced by flat epidermal cells, by avoiding frequent visitation from non-pollinating bees due to a reduced colour signal, as birds do not rely on specific colour parameters while foraging. Moreover, flat petal surfaces in bird-pollinated flowers may hamper grip for bees that do not touch anthers and stigmas while consuming nectar and thus, are considered as nectar thieves. Beside this, the third hypothesis implies that those flower parts which are vulnerable to nectar robbing of bee- as well as bird-pollinated flowers benefit from flat epidermal cells, hampering grip for nectar robbing bees. Our comparative data show in fact that conical epidermal cells are restricted to visually-active parts of bee-pollinated flowers, whereas robbing-sensitive parts of bee-pollinated as well as the entire floral surface of bird-pollinated flowers possess on average flat epidermal cells. However, direct correlations between epidermal cell shape and colour parameters have not been found. Our results together with published experimental studies show that epidermal cell shape as a largely neglected flower trait might act as an important feature in pollinator attraction and avoidance of antagonists, and thus may contribute to the partitioning of flower

  18. Gloss, Colour and Grip: Multifunctional Epidermal Cell Shapes in Bee- and Bird-Pollinated Flowers

    PubMed Central

    Papiorek, Sarah; Junker, Robert R.; Lunau, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Flowers bear the function of filters supporting the attraction of pollinators as well as the deterrence of floral antagonists. The effect of epidermal cell shape on the visual display and tactile properties of flowers has been evaluated only recently. In this study we quantitatively measured epidermal cell shape, gloss and spectral reflectance of flowers pollinated by either bees or birds testing three hypotheses: The first two hypotheses imply that bee-pollinated flowers might benefit from rough surfaces on visually-active parts produced by conical epidermal cells, as they may enhance the colour signal of flowers as well as the grip on flowers for bees. In contrast, bird-pollinated flowers might benefit from flat surfaces produced by flat epidermal cells, by avoiding frequent visitation from non-pollinating bees due to a reduced colour signal, as birds do not rely on specific colour parameters while foraging. Moreover, flat petal surfaces in bird-pollinated flowers may hamper grip for bees that do not touch anthers and stigmas while consuming nectar and thus, are considered as nectar thieves. Beside this, the third hypothesis implies that those flower parts which are vulnerable to nectar robbing of bee- as well as bird-pollinated flowers benefit from flat epidermal cells, hampering grip for nectar robbing bees. Our comparative data show in fact that conical epidermal cells are restricted to visually-active parts of bee-pollinated flowers, whereas robbing-sensitive parts of bee-pollinated as well as the entire floral surface of bird-pollinated flowers possess on average flat epidermal cells. However, direct correlations between epidermal cell shape and colour parameters have not been found. Our results together with published experimental studies show that epidermal cell shape as a largely neglected flower trait might act as an important feature in pollinator attraction and avoidance of antagonists, and thus may contribute to the partitioning of flower

  19. Epidermal Merkel cells are mechanosensory cells that tune mammalian touch receptors.

    PubMed

    Maksimovic, Srdjan; Nakatani, Masashi; Baba, Yoshichika; Nelson, Aislyn M; Marshall, Kara L; Wellnitz, Scott A; Firozi, Pervez; Woo, Seung-Hyun; Ranade, Sanjeev; Patapoutian, Ardem; Lumpkin, Ellen A

    2014-05-29

    Touch submodalities, such as flutter and pressure, are mediated by somatosensory afferents whose terminal specializations extract tactile features and encode them as action potential trains with unique activity patterns. Whether non-neuronal cells tune touch receptors through active or passive mechanisms is debated. Terminal specializations are thought to function as passive mechanical filters analogous to the cochlea's basilar membrane, which deconstructs complex sounds into tones that are transduced by mechanosensory hair cells. The model that cutaneous specializations are merely passive has been recently challenged because epidermal cells express sensory ion channels and neurotransmitters; however, direct evidence that epidermal cells excite tactile afferents is lacking. Epidermal Merkel cells display features of sensory receptor cells and make 'synapse-like' contacts with slowly adapting type I (SAI) afferents. These complexes, which encode spatial features such as edges and texture, localize to skin regions with high tactile acuity, including whisker follicles, fingertips and touch domes. Here we show that Merkel cells actively participate in touch reception in mice. Merkel cells display fast, touch-evoked mechanotransduction currents. Optogenetic approaches in intact skin show that Merkel cells are both necessary and sufficient for sustained action-potential firing in tactile afferents. Recordings from touch-dome afferents lacking Merkel cells demonstrate that Merkel cells confer high-frequency responses to dynamic stimuli and enable sustained firing. These data are the first, to our knowledge, to directly demonstrate a functional, excitatory connection between epidermal cells and sensory neurons. Together, these findings indicate that Merkel cells actively tune mechanosensory responses to facilitate high spatio-temporal acuity. Moreover, our results indicate a division of labour in the Merkel cell-neurite complex: Merkel cells signal static stimuli, such as

  20. Emodin Suppresses Maintenance of Stemness by Augmenting Proteosomal Degradation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor/Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Variant III in Glioma Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongyub; Lee, Jong-Seon; Jung, Jieun; Lim, Inhye; Lee, Ji-Yun

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that small subpopulations of cells with stem cell-like characteristics within most solid tumors are responsible for the malignancy of aggressive cancer cells and that targeting these cells might be a good therapeutic strategy to reduce the risk of tumor relapse after therapy. Here, we examined the effects of emodin (1,3,8-trihydroxy-6-methylanthraquinone), an active component of the root and rhizome of Rheum palmatum that has several biological activities, including antitumor effects, on primary cultured glioma stem cells (GSCs). Emodin inhibited the self-renewal activity of GSCs in vitro as evidenced by neurosphere formation, limiting dilution, and soft agar clonogenic assays. Emodin inhibited the maintenance of stemness by suppressing the expression of Notch intracellular domain, nonphosphorylated β-catenin, and phosphorylated STAT3 proteins. In addition, treatment with emodin partially induced apoptosis, reduced cell invasiveness, and sensitized GSCs to ionizing radiation. Intriguingly, emodin induced proteosomal degradation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/EGFR variant III (EGFRvIII) by interfering with the association of EGFR/EGFRvIII with heat shock protein 90, resulting in the suppression of stemness pathways. Based on these data, we propose that emodin could be considered as a potent therapeutic adjuvant that targets GSCs. PMID:25229646

  1. Epidermal Viral Immunity Induced by CD8α+ Dendritic Cells But Not by Langerhans Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Rhys S.; Smith, Chris M.; Belz, Gabrielle T.; van Lint, Allison L.; Wakim, Linda M.; Heath, William R.; Carbone, Francis R.

    2003-09-01

    The classical paradigm for dendritic cell function derives from the study of Langerhans cells, which predominate within skin epidermis. After an encounter with foreign agents, Langerhans cells are thought to migrate to draining lymph nodes, where they initiate T cell priming. Contrary to this, we show here that infection of murine epidermis by herpes simplex virus did not result in the priming of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes by Langerhans cells. Rather, the priming response required a distinct CD8α+ dendritic cell subset. Thus, the traditional view of Langerhans cells in epidermal immunity needs to be revisited to accommodate a requirement for other dendritic cells in this response.

  2. Root Hairs

    PubMed Central

    Grierson, Claire; Nielsen, Erik; Ketelaarc, Tijs; Schiefelbein, John

    2014-01-01

    Roots hairs are cylindrical extensions of root epidermal cells that are important for acquisition of nutrients, microbe interactions, and plant anchorage. The molecular mechanisms involved in the specification, differentiation, and physiology of root hairs in Arabidopsis are reviewed here. Root hair specification in Arabidopsis is determined by position-dependent signaling and molecular feedback loops causing differential accumulation of a WD-bHLH-Myb transcriptional complex. The initiation of root hairs is dependent on the RHD6 bHLH gene family and auxin to define the site of outgrowth. Root hair elongation relies on polarized cell expansion at the growing tip, which involves multiple integrated processes including cell secretion, endomembrane trafficking, cytoskeletal organization, and cell wall modifications. The study of root hair biology in Arabidopsis has provided a model cell type for insights into many aspects of plant development and cell biology. PMID:24982600

  3. Analysis of Cell Division and Elongation Underlying the Developmental Acceleration of Root Growth in Arabidopsis thaliana1

    PubMed Central

    Beemster, Gerrit T.S.; Baskin, Tobias I.

    1998-01-01

    To investigate the relation between cell division and expansion in the regulation of organ growth rate, we used Arabidopsis thaliana primary roots grown vertically at 20°C with an elongation rate that increased steadily during the first 14 d after germination. We measured spatial profiles of longitudinal velocity and cell length and calculated parameters of cell expansion and division, including rates of local cell production (cells mm−1 h−1) and cell division (cells cell−1 h−1). Data were obtained for the root cortex and also for the two types of epidermal cell, trichoblasts and atrichoblasts. Accelerating root elongation was caused by an increasingly longer growth zone, while maximal strain rates remained unchanged. The enlargement of the growth zone and, hence, the accelerating root elongation rate, were accompanied by a nearly proportionally increased cell production. This increased production was caused by increasingly numerous dividing cells, whereas their rates of division remained approximately constant. Additionally, the spatial profile of cell division rate was essentially constant. The meristem was longer than generally assumed, extending well into the region where cells elongated rapidly. In the two epidermal cell types, meristem length and cell division rate were both very similar to that of cortical cells, and differences in cell length between the two epidermal cell types originated at the apex of the meristem. These results highlight the importance of controlling the number of dividing cells, both to generate tissues with different cell lengths and to regulate the rate of organ enlargement. PMID:9536070

  4. Getting to the root of plant iron uptake and cell-cell transport: Polarity matters!

    PubMed Central

    Dubeaux, Guillaume; Zelazny, Enric; Vert, Grégory

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins play pivotal roles in mediating responses to endogenous and environmental cues. Regulation of membrane protein levels and establishment of polarity are fundamental for many cellular processes. In plants, IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER 1 (IRT1) is the major root iron transporter but is also responsible for the absorption of other divalent metals such as manganese, zinc and cobalt. We recently uncovered that IRT1 is polarly localized to the outer plasma membrane domain of plant root epidermal cells upon depletion of its secondary metal substrates. The endosome-recruited FYVE1 protein interacts with IRT1 in the endocytic pathway and plays a crucial role in the establishment of IRT1 polarity, likely through its recycling to the cell surface. Our work sheds light on the mechanisms of radial transport of nutrients across the different cell types of plant roots toward the vascular tissues and raises interesting parallel with iron transport in mammals. PMID:26479146

  5. Potent endogenous allelopathic compounds in Lepidium sativum seed exudate: effects on epidermal cell growth in Amaranthus caudatus seedlings.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Amjad; Fry, Stephen C

    2012-04-01

    Many plants exude allelochemicals--compounds that affect the growth of neighbouring plants. This study reports further studies of the reported effect of cress (Lepidium sativum) seed(ling) exudates on seedling growth in Amaranthus caudatus and Lactuca sativa. In the presence of live cress seedlings, both species grew longer hypocotyls and shorter roots than cress-free controls. The effects of cress seedlings were allelopathic and not due to competition for resources. Amaranthus seedlings grown in the presence of cress allelochemical(s) had longer, thinner hypocotyls and shorter, thicker roots--effects previously attributed to lepidimoide. The active principle was more abundant in cress seed exudate than in seedling (root) exudates. It was present in non-imbibed seeds and releasable from heat-killed seeds. Release from live seeds was biphasic, starting rapidly but then continuing gradually for 24 h. The active principle was generated by aseptic cress tissue and was not a microbial digestion product or seed-treatment chemical. Crude seed exudate affected hypocotyl and root growth at ~25 and ~450 μg ml(-1) respectively. The exudate slightly (28%) increased epidermal cell number along the length of the Amaranthus hypocotyl but increased total hypocotyl elongation by 129%; it resulted in a 26% smaller hypocotyl circumference but a 55% greater epidermal cell number counted round the circumference. Therefore, the effect of the allelochemical(s) on organ morphology was imposed primarily by regulation of cell expansion, not cell division. It is concluded that cress seeds exude endogenous substances, probably including lepidimoide, that principally regulate cell expansion in receiver plants. PMID:22268144

  6. Epidermal Micrografts Produced via an Automated and Minimally Invasive Tool Form at the Dermal/Epidermal Junction and Contain Proliferative Cells That Secrete Wound Healing Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Sandra N.; Schmidt, Marisa A.; Derrick, Kathleen; Harper, John R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: The aim of this scientific study was to assess epidermal micrografts for formation at the dermal-epidermal (DE) junction, cellular outgrowth, and growth factor secretion. Epidermal harvesting is an autologous option that removes only the superficial epidermal layer of the skin, considerably limiting donor site damage and scarring. Use of epidermal grafting in wound healing has been limited because of tedious, time-consuming, and inconsistent methodologies. Recently, a simplified, automated epidermal harvesting tool (CelluTome Epidermal Harvesting System; Kinetic Concepts Inc, San Antonio, Texas) that applies heat and suction concurrently to produce epidermal micrografts has become commercially available. The new technique of epidermal harvesting was shown to create viable micrografts with minimal patient discomfort and no donor-site scarring. DESIGN: This study was a prospective institutional review board–approved healthy human study. SETTING: This study was conducted at the multispecialty research facility, Clinical Trials of Texas, Inc, in San Antonio, Texas. PATIENTS: The participants were 15 healthy human volunteers. RESULTS: Epidermal micrografts formed at the DE junction, and migratory basal layer keratinocytes and melanocytes were proliferative in culture. Basement membrane–specific collagen type IV was also found to be present in the grafts, suggesting that the combination of heat and vacuum might cause partial delamination of the basement membrane. Viable basal cells actively secreted key growth factors important for modulating wound healing responses, including vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and transforming growth factor α. CONCLUSIONS: Harvested epidermal micrografts retained their original keratinocyte structure, which is critical for potential re-epithelialization and repigmentation of a wound environment. PMID:26258460

  7. Role of Pin1 in UVA-induced cell proliferation and malignant transformation in epidermal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Chang Yeob; Hien, Tran Thi; Lim, Sung Chul; Kang, Keon Wook

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} Pin1 expression is enhanced by low energy UVA irradiation in both skin tissues of hairless mice and JB6 C141 epidermal cells. {yields} UVA irradiation increases activator protein-1 activity and cyclin D1 in a Pin1-dependent manner. {yields} UVA potentiates EGF-inducible, anchorage-independent growth of epidermal cells, and this is suppressed by Pin1 inhibition or by anti-oxidant. -- Abstract: Ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation ({lambda} = 320-400 nm) is considered a major cause of human skin cancer. Pin1, a peptidyl prolyl isomerase, is overexpressed in most types of cancer tissues and plays an important role in cell proliferation and transformation. Here, we demonstrated that Pin1 expression was enhanced by low energy UVA (300-900 mJ/cm{sup 2}) irradiation in both skin tissues of hairless mice and JB6 C141 epidermal cells. Exposure of epidermal cells to UVA radiation increased cell proliferation and cyclin D1 expression, and these changes were blocked by Pin1 inhibition. UVA irradiation also increased activator protein-1 (AP-1) minimal reporter activity and nuclear levels of c-Jun, but not c-Fos, in a Pin1-dependent manner. The increases in Pin1 expression and in AP-1 reporter activity in response to UVA were abolished by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) treatment. Finally, we found that pre-exposure of JB6 C141 cells to UVA potentiated EGF-inducible, anchorage-independent growth, and this effect was significantly suppressed by Pin1inhibition or by NAC.

  8. Mechanosensory calcium-selective cation channels in epidermal cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, J. P.; Pickard, B. G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper explores the properties and likely functions of an epidermal Ca(2+)-selective cation channel complex activated by tension. As many as eight or nine linked or linkable equivalent conductance units or co-channels can open together. Open time for co-channel quadruplets and quintuplets tends to be relatively long with millimolar Mg2+ (but not millimolar Ca2+) at the cytosolic face of excised plasma membrane. Sensitivity to tension is regulated by transmembrane voltage and temperature. Under some circumstances channel activity is sychronized in rhythmic pulses. Certain lanthanides and a cytoskeleton-disturbing herbicide that inhibit gravitropic reception act on the channel system at low concentrations. Specifically, ethyl-N-phenylcarbamate promotes tension-dependent activity at micromolar levels. With moderate suction, Gd3+ provided at about 0.5 micromole at the extracellular face of the membrane promotes for several seconds but may then become inhibitory. Provision at 1-2 micromoles promotes and subsequently inhibits more vigorously (often abruptly and totally), and at high levels inhibits immediately. La3+, a poor gravitropic inhibitor, acts similarly but much more gradually and only at much higher concentrations. These properties, particularly these susceptibilities to modulation, indicate that in vivo the mechanosensitive channel must be mechanosensory and mechanoregulatory. It could serve to transduce the shear forces generated in the integrated wall-membrane-cytoskeleton system during turgor changes and cell expansion as well as transducing the stresses induced by gravity, touch and flexure. In so far as such transduction is modulated by voltage and temperature, the channels would also be sensors for these modalities as long as the wall-membrane-cytoskeleton system experiences mechanical stress.

  9. Plasmodesmal-mediated cell-to-cell transport in wheat roots is modulated by anaerobic stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleland, R. E.; Fujiwara, T.; Lucas, W. J.

    1994-01-01

    Cell-to-cell transport of small molecules and ions occurs in plants through plasmodesmata. Plant roots are frequently subjected to localized anaerobic stress, with a resultant decrease in ATP. In order to determine the effect of this stress on plasmodesmal transport, fluorescent dyes of increasing molecular weight (0.46 to 1OkDa) were injected into epidermal and cortical cells of 3-day-old wheat roots, and their movement into neighboring cells was determined by fluorescence microscopy. Anaerobiosis was generated by N2 gas or simulated by the presence of sodium azide, both of which reduced the ATP levels in the tissue by over 80%. In the absence of such stress, the upper limit for movement, or size exclusion limit (SEL), of cortical plasmodesmata was <1 kDa. The ATP analogue TNP-ADP (mw 681) moved across the plasmodesmata of unstressed roots, indicating that plasmodesmata may be conduits for nucleotide (ATP and ADP) exchange between cells. Upon imposition of stress, the SEL rose to between 5 and 10 kDa. This response of plasmodesmata to a decrease in the level of ATP suggests that they are constricted by an ATP-dependent process so as to maintain a restricted SEL. When roots are subjected to anaerobic stress, an increase in SEL may permit enhanced delivery of sugars to the affected cells of the root where anaerobic respiration could regenerate the needed ATP.

  10. c-Rel in Epidermal Homeostasis: A Spotlight on c-Rel in Cell Cycle Regulation.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Verena N; Schön, Michael P; Seitz, Cornelia S

    2016-06-01

    To maintain proper skin barrier function, epidermal homeostasis requires a subtly governed balance of proliferating and differentiating keratinocytes. While differentiation takes place in the suprabasal layers, proliferation, including mitosis, is usually restricted to the basal layer. Only recently identified as an important regulator of epidermal homeostasis, c-Rel, an NF-κB transcription factor subunit, affects the viability and proliferation of epidermal keratinocytes. In human keratinocytes, decreased expression of c-Rel causes a plethora of dysregulated cellular functions including impaired cell viability, increased apoptosis, and abnormalities during mitosis and cell cycle regulation. On the other hand, c-Rel shows aberrant expression in many epidermal tumors. Here, in the context of its role in different cell types and compared with other NF-κB subunits, we discuss the putative function of c-Rel as a regulator of epidermal homeostasis and mitotic progression. In addition, implications for disease pathophysiology with perturbed c-Rel function and abnormal homeostasis, such as epidermal carcinogenesis, will be discussed. PMID:27032306

  11. Epidermal Th22 and Tc17 cells form a localized disease memory in clinically healed psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Cheuk, Stanley; Wikén, Maria; Blomqvist, Lennart; Nylén, Susanne; Talme, Toomas; Ståhle, Mona; Eidsmo, Liv

    2014-04-01

    Psoriasis is a common and chronic inflammatory skin disease in which T cells play a key role. Effective treatment heals the skin without scarring, but typically psoriasis recurs in previously affected areas. A pathogenic memory within the skin has been proposed, but the nature of such site-specific disease memory is unknown. Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells have been ascribed a role in immunity after resolved viral skin infections. Because of their localization in the epidermal compartment of the skin, TRM may contribute to tissue pathology during psoriasis. In this study, we investigated whether resolved psoriasis lesions contain TRM cells with the ability to maintain and potentially drive recurrent disease. Three common and effective therapies, narrowband-UVB treatment and long-term biologic treatment systemically inhibiting TNF-α or IL-12/23 signaling were studied. Epidermal T cells were highly activated in psoriasis and a high proportion of CD8 T cells expressed TRM markers. In resolved psoriasis, a population of cutaneous lymphocyte-associated Ag, CCR6, CD103, and IL-23R expressing epidermal CD8 T cells was highly enriched. Epidermal CD8 T cells expressing the TRM marker CD103 responded to ex vivo stimulation with IL-17A production and epidermal CD4 T cells responded with IL-22 production after as long as 6 y of TNF-α inhibition. Our data suggest that epidermal TRM cells are retained in resolved psoriasis and that these cells are capable of producing cytokines with a critical role in psoriasis pathogenesis. We provide a potential mechanism for a site-specific T cell-driven disease memory in psoriasis. PMID:24610014

  12. Identification of Candidate Transcriptional Regulators of Epidermal Transfer Cell Development in Vicia faba Cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Arun-Chinnappa, Kiruba S; McCurdy, David W

    2016-01-01

    Transfer cells (TCs) are anatomically-specialized cells formed at apoplasmic-symplasmic bottlenecks in nutrient transport pathways in plants. TCs form invaginated wall ingrowths which provide a scaffold to amplify plasma membrane surface area and thus increase the density of nutrient transporters required to achieve enhanced nutrient flow across these bottlenecks. Despite their importance to nutrient transport in plants, little is known of the transcriptional regulation of wall ingrowth formation. Here, we used RNA-Seq to identify transcription factors putatively involved in regulating epidermal TC development in cotyledons of Vicia faba. Comparing cotyledons cultured for 0, 3, 9, and 24 h to induce trans-differentiation of epidermal TCs identified 43 transcription factors that showed either epidermal-specific or epidermal-enhanced expression, and 10 that showed epidermal-specific down regulation. Members of the WRKY and ethylene-responsive families were prominent in the cohort of transcription factors showing epidermal-specific or epidermal-enhanced expression, consistent with the initiation of TC development often representing a response to stress. Members of the MYB family were also prominent in these categories, including orthologs of MYB genes involved in localized secondary wall deposition in Arabidopsis thaliana. Among the group of transcription factors showing down regulation were various homeobox genes and members of the MADs-box and zinc-finger families of poorly defined functions. Collectively, this study identified several transcription factors showing expression characteristics and orthologous functions that indicate likely participation in transcriptional regulation of epidermal TC development in V. faba cotyledons. PMID:27252730

  13. Regenerative and reparative effects of human chorion-derived stem cell conditioned medium on photo-aged epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiankun; Chen, Yan; Ma, Kui; Zhao, Along; Zhang, Cuiping; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-04-17

    Epidermal cells are an important regenerative source for skin wound healing. Aged epidermal cells have a low ability to renew themselves and repair skin injury. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation, particularly UVB, can cause photo-aging of the skin by suppressing the viability of human epidermal cells. A chorion-derived stem cell conditioned medium (CDSC-CNM) is thought to have regenerative properties. This study aimed to determine the regenerative effects of CDSC-CNM on UVB-induced photo-aged epidermal cells. Epidermal cells were passaged four times and irradiated with quantitative UVB, and non-irradiated cells served as a control group. Cells were then treated with different concentrations of CDSC-CNM. Compared to the non-irradiated group, the proliferation rates and migration rates of UVB-induced photo-aged epidermal cells significantly decreased (p < 0.05) with increasing intracellular radical oxygen species (ROS) generation and DNA damage. After treatment with CDSC-CNM, photo-aged epidermal cells significantly improved their viability, and their ROS generation and DNA damage decreased. The secretory factors in CDSC-CNM, including epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-8 and the related signaling pathway protein levels, increased compared to the control medium (CM). The potential regenerative and reparative effects of CDSC-CNM indicate that it may be a candidate material for the treatment of prematurely aged skin. The functions of the secretory factors and the mechanisms of CDSC-CNM therapy deserve further attention. PMID:27097375

  14. Single-cell gene expression profiling reveals functional heterogeneity of undifferentiated human epidermal cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, David W. M.; Jensen, Kim B.; Trotter, Matthew W. B.; Connelly, John T.; Broad, Simon; Watt, Fiona M.

    2013-01-01

    Human epidermal stem cells express high levels of β1 integrins, delta-like 1 (DLL1) and the EGFR antagonist LRIG1. However, there is cell-to-cell variation in the relative abundance of DLL1 and LRIG1 mRNA transcripts. Single-cell global gene expression profiling showed that undifferentiated cells fell into two clusters delineated by expression of DLL1 and its binding partner syntenin. The DLL1+ cluster had elevated expression of genes associated with endocytosis, integrin-mediated adhesion and receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. Differentially expressed genes were not independently regulated, as overexpression of DLL1 alone or together with LRIG1 led to the upregulation of other genes in the DLL1+ cluster. Overexpression of DLL1 and LRIG1 resulted in enhanced extracellular matrix adhesion and increased caveolin-dependent EGFR endocytosis. Further characterisation of CD46, one of the genes upregulated in the DLL1+ cluster, revealed it to be a novel cell surface marker of human epidermal stem cells. Cells with high endogenous levels of CD46 expressed high levels of β1 integrin and DLL1 and were highly adhesive and clonogenic. Knockdown of CD46 decreased proliferative potential and β1 integrin-mediated adhesion. Thus, the previously unknown heterogeneity revealed by our studies results in differences in the interaction of undifferentiated basal keratinocytes with their environment. PMID:23482486

  15. Determining the Contribution of Epidermal Cell Shape to Petal Wettability Using Isogenic Antirrhinum Lines

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Heather M.; Poetes, Rosa; Steiner, Ullrich; Chittka, Lars; Glover, Beverley J.

    2011-01-01

    The petal epidermis acts not only as a barrier to the outside world but also as a point of interaction between the flower and potential pollinators. The presence of conical petal epidermal cells has previously been shown to influence the attractiveness of the flower to pollinating insects. Using Antirrhinum isogenic lines differing only in the presence of a single epidermal structure, conical cells, we were able to investigate how the structure of the epidermis influences petal wettability by measuring the surface contact angle of water drops. Conical cells have a significant impact on how water is retained on the flower surface, which may have indirect consequences for pollinator behaviour. We discuss how the petal epidermis is a highly multifunctional one and how a battery of methods, including the use of isogenic lines, is required to untangle the impacts of specific epidermal properties in an ecological context. PMID:21423738

  16. Persistence of skin-resident memory T cells within an epidermal niche.

    PubMed

    Zaid, Ali; Mackay, Laura K; Rahimpour, Azad; Braun, Asolina; Veldhoen, Marc; Carbone, Francis R; Manton, Jonathan H; Heath, William R; Mueller, Scott N

    2014-04-01

    Barrier tissues such as the skin contain various populations of immune cells that contribute to protection from infections. These include recently identified tissue-resident memory T cells (TRM). In the skin, these memory CD8(+) T cells reside in the epidermis after being recruited to this site by infection or inflammation. In this study, we demonstrate prolonged persistence of epidermal TRM preferentially at the site of prior infection despite sustained migration. Computational simulation of TRM migration within the skin over long periods revealed that the slow rate of random migration effectively constrains these memory cells within the region of skin in which they form. Notably, formation of TRM involved a concomitant local reduction in dendritic epidermal γδ T-cell numbers in the epidermis, indicating that these populations persist in mutual exclusion and may compete for local survival signals. Accordingly, we show that expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, a transcription factor important for dendritic epidermal γδ T-cell maintenance in skin, also contributes to the persistence of skin TRM. Together, these data suggest that skin tissue-resident memory T cells persist within a tightly regulated epidermal T-cell niche. PMID:24706879

  17. [Epidermal cell cultures--significance for wound coverage in the human].

    PubMed

    Bonnekoh, B; Thiele, B; Mahrle, G; Steigleder, G K

    1986-10-15

    Epithelial sheets can be cultivated from isolated epidermal cells; in this way, it is possible to increase the cell number considerably. H. Green and co-workers were the first to make use of such epithelia for the autologous covering of burn wounds. We modified this method and report on our experiences with this technique in a patient with small skin defects. PMID:2432733

  18. Persistence of skin-resident memory T cells within an epidermal niche

    PubMed Central

    Zaid, Ali; Mackay, Laura K.; Rahimpour, Azad; Braun, Asolina; Veldhoen, Marc; Carbone, Francis R.; Manton, Jonathan H.; Heath, William R.; Mueller, Scott N.

    2014-01-01

    Barrier tissues such as the skin contain various populations of immune cells that contribute to protection from infections. These include recently identified tissue-resident memory T cells (TRM). In the skin, these memory CD8+ T cells reside in the epidermis after being recruited to this site by infection or inflammation. In this study, we demonstrate prolonged persistence of epidermal TRM preferentially at the site of prior infection despite sustained migration. Computational simulation of TRM migration within the skin over long periods revealed that the slow rate of random migration effectively constrains these memory cells within the region of skin in which they form. Notably, formation of TRM involved a concomitant local reduction in dendritic epidermal γδ T-cell numbers in the epidermis, indicating that these populations persist in mutual exclusion and may compete for local survival signals. Accordingly, we show that expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, a transcription factor important for dendritic epidermal γδ T-cell maintenance in skin, also contributes to the persistence of skin TRM. Together, these data suggest that skin tissue-resident memory T cells persist within a tightly regulated epidermal T-cell niche. PMID:24706879

  19. Polyamines interact with hydroxyl radicals in activating Ca(2+) and K(+) transport across the root epidermal plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Zepeda-Jazo, Isaac; Velarde-Buendía, Ana María; Enríquez-Figueroa, René; Bose, Jayakumar; Shabala, Sergey; Muñiz-Murguía, Jesús; Pottosin, Igor I

    2011-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are integral components of the plant adaptive responses to environment. Importantly, ROS affect the intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics by activating a range of nonselective Ca(2+)-permeable channels in plasma membrane (PM). Using patch-clamp and noninvasive microelectrode ion flux measuring techniques, we have characterized ionic currents and net K(+) and Ca(2+) fluxes induced by hydroxyl radicals (OH(•)) in pea (Pisum sativum) roots. OH(•), but not hydrogen peroxide, activated a rapid Ca(2+) efflux and a more slowly developing net Ca(2+) influx concurrent with a net K(+) efflux. In isolated protoplasts, OH(•) evoked a nonselective current, with a time course and a steady-state magnitude similar to those for a K(+) efflux in intact roots. This current displayed a low ionic selectivity and was permeable to Ca(2+). Active OH(•)-induced Ca(2+) efflux in roots was suppressed by the PM Ca(2+) pump inhibitors eosine yellow and erythrosine B. The cation channel blockers gadolinium, nifedipine, and verapamil and the anionic channel blockers 5-nitro-2(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoate and niflumate inhibited OH(•)-induced ionic currents in root protoplasts and K(+) efflux and Ca(2+) influx in roots. Contrary to expectations, polyamines (PAs) did not inhibit the OH(•)-induced cation fluxes. The net OH(•)-induced Ca(2+) efflux was largely prolonged in the presence of spermine, and all PAs tested (spermine, spermidine, and putrescine) accelerated and augmented the OH(•)-induced net K(+) efflux from roots. The latter effect was also observed in patch-clamp experiments on root protoplasts. We conclude that PAs interact with ROS to alter intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis by modulating both Ca(2+) influx and efflux transport systems at the root cell PM. PMID:21980172

  20. Examination of endothelial cell-induced epidermal regeneration in a mice-based chimney wound model.

    PubMed

    Seo, Joseph; Park, Soon-Jung; Choi, Jong-Jin; Kang, Sun-Woong; Lim, Joa-Jin; Lee, Hye-Jin; Kim, Jong-Soo; Yang, Heung-Mo; Kim, Sung-Joo; Kim, Eun-Young; Park, Se-Pil; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Chung, Hyung-Min

    2016-07-01

    As wound contraction in the cutaneous layer occurs rapidly in mice, mechanical means are typically used to deliberately expose the wound to properly investigate healing by secondary intention. Previously, silicon rings and splinting models were attempted to analyze histological recovery but prevention of surrounding epidermal cell migration and subsequent closure was minimal. Here, we developed an ideal chimney wound model to evaluate epidermal regeneration in murine under hESC-EC transplantation through histological analysis encompassing the three phases of regeneration: migration, proliferation, and remodeling. Human embryonic stem cell derived endothelial cells (hESC-EC) were transplanted due to possessing a well-known therapeutic effect in angiogenesis which also enhances epidermal repair to depict the process of regeneration. Following a standard 1 mm biopsy punch, a chimney manufactured by modifying a 1.7 mL microtube was simply inserted into the excisional wound to complete the modeling process. Under this model, the excisional wound remained fully exposed for 14 days and even after 4 weeks, only a thin transparent layer of epidermal tissue covered the wound site. This approach is able to more accurately depict epidermal repair in relation to histology while also being a user-friendly and cost-effective way to mimic human recovery in rodents and evaluate epithelial repair induced by a form of therapy. PMID:27237949

  1. Epidermal Merkel cells in psoriatic lesions: immunohistochemical investigations on neuroendocrine antigen expression.

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Mahrle, G

    1992-05-01

    Biopsy specimens from lesional psoriatic skin and from normal controls were investigated by immunohistochemistry for the presence of epidermal Merkel cells (MC). MC were defined as epidermal cells expressing simple-type keratins, i.e. nos. 8, 18, and 19. A significant number of MC could be found at the bottom of the rete ridges of psoriatic lesions (about 19.6 MC per square mm skin surface area) and of normal skin (about 14.0 MC per square mm surface area). In contrast to normal skin, MC of psoriatic lesions were positive for synaptophysin (21.7% of simple-type keratin positive epidermal cells, i.e. MC), pancreatic polypeptide (14.8%), somatostatin (7.0%), and chromogranin A (less than 3%). The immunostaining was rather faint though significantly different from normal skin. The findings suggest that in psoriasis, epidermal MC show variations of the expression of neuropeptides compared to normal skin. Since some of the neuropeptides are thought to be involved in hyperproliferation and/or skin immunology, our findings might suggest a functional activity of epidermal MC in psoriatic lesions different from normal controls. PMID:1498093

  2. The histone deacetylase HDA19 controls root cell elongation and modulates a subset of phosphate starvation responses in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Ying; Wu, Keqiang; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The length of root epidermal cells and their patterning into files of hair-bearing and non-hair cells are genetically determined but respond with high plasticity to environmental cues. Limited phyto-availability of the essential mineral nutrient phosphate (Pi) increases the number of root hairs by longitudinal shortening of epidermal cells and by reprogramming the fate of cells in positions normally occupied by non-hair cells. Through analysis of the root morphology and transcriptional profiles from transgenic Arabidopsis lines with altered expression of the histone deacetylase HDA19, we show that in an intricate interplay of Pi availability and intrinsic factors, HDA19 controls the epidermal cell length, probably by altering the positional bias that dictates epidermal patterning. In addition, HDA19 regulates several Pi-responsive genes that encode proteins with important regulatory or metabolic roles in the acclimation to Pi deficiency. In particular, HDA19 affects genes encoding SPX (SYG1/Pho81/XPR) domain-containing proteins and genes involved in membrane lipid remodeling, a key response to Pi starvation that increases the free Pi in plants. Our data add a novel, non-transcriptionally regulated component of the Pi signaling network and emphasize the importance of reversible post-translational histone modification for the integration of external signals into intrinsic developmental and metabolic programs. PMID:26508133

  3. Genetics Home Reference: epidermal nevus

    MedlinePlus

    ... primarily of a specific cell type called a keratinocyte. One group of epidermal nevi, called keratinocytic or nonorganoid epidermal nevi, includes nevi that involve only keratinocytes. Keratinocytic epidermal nevi are typically found on the ...

  4. SNAI2 controls the undifferentiated state of human epidermal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Devendra S; Chen, Yifang; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Kang; Sen, George L

    2014-12-01

    The transcription factor, SNAI2, is an inducer of the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) which mediates cell migration during development and tumor invasion. SNAI2 can also promote the generation of mammary epithelial stem cells from differentiated luminal cells when overexpressed. How SNAI2 regulates these critical and diverse functions is unclear. Here, we show that the levels of SNAI2 expression are important for epidermal cell fate decisions. The expression of SNAI2 was found to be enriched in the basal layer of the interfollicular epidermis where progenitor cells reside and extinguished upon differentiation. Loss of SNAI2 resulted in premature differentiation whereas gain of SNAI2 expression inhibited differentiation. SNAI2 controls the differentiation status of epidermal progenitor cells by binding to and repressing the expression of differentiation genes with increased binding leading to further transcriptional silencing. Thus, the levels of SNAI2 binding to genomic targets determine the differentiation status of epithelial cells with increased levels triggering EMT and dedifferentiation, moderate (physiological) levels promoting epidermal progenitor function, and low levels leading to epidermal differentiation. PMID:25100569

  5. A rapid procedure for flow cytometric DNA analysis in cultures of normal and transformed epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Tennenbaum, T; Giloh, H; Fusenig, N E; Kapitulnik, J

    1988-06-01

    A simple, rapid, and highly reproducible procedure for flow cytometric DNA analysis has been adapted for studying cell cycle kinetics in epidermal cell cultures. The preparation of cell nuclei and their staining with the fluorescent dye propidium iodide were performed directly on the culture dish, without prior suspension and fixation of the cells. Singly dispersed nuclei were produced by mild trypsinization of cells in the presence of the nonionic detergent Nonidet P-40 and spermine. The culture dishes could be kept frozen for prolonged periods of time before trypsinization and staining, without affecting either the recovery of nuclei or the cell cycle distribution profiles. This remarkable stability of cell nuclei greatly simplified the analysis of multiple samples in cell cycle kinetic studies. This method was used to analyze the cell cycle distribution in cultures of normal and transformed mouse epidermal cells, human colon carcinoma cells, primary bovine aortic endothelial cells, and fibroblastic and myogenic cell lines. This procedure should be very useful in studying growth kinetics, differentiation, and transformation of epidermal as well as other adherent cell types. PMID:2453587

  6. Epidermal cell proliferation in guinea pigs with experimental dermatophytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Tagami, H.

    1985-08-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the self-healing process of experimental dermatophytosis produced in guinea pigs by an occlusive method with Trichophyton mentagrophytes, epidermal proliferative activity was evaluated by the in vivo tritiated thymidine-labeling technique performed at various intervals after the first and second infections. Determination of labeling indices disclosed that an increased epidermal proliferation correlated well with the severity of inflammatory changes, i.e., a peak activity was noted after 10 days in primary infection and at 2 days in reinfection, respectively, and was followed by subsequent spontaneous lesion clearance after 10 days. Application of a heat-killed spore suspension produced inflammatory changes with enhanced epidermopoiesis, similar to those induced by reinoculation of living spores, only in immune animals. The present results indicate that the dermatitic changes occurring in experimental dermatophytosis increase epidermopoiesis which facilitates elimination of the fungus from the stratum corneum and that host immune activity, particularly contact sensitivity to fungal antigen, exerts a crucial role to induce these changes.

  7. Cortical microtubule patterning in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana primary cell wall mutants reveals the bidirectional interplay with cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Daras, Gerasimos; Rigas, Stamatis

    2014-04-01

    Cell elongation requires directional deposition of cellulose microfibrils regulated by transverse cortical microtubules. Microtubules respond differentially to suppression of cell elongation along the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex. Cortical microtubule orientation is particularly affected in the fast elongation zone but not in the meristematic or transition zones of thanatos and pom2-4 cellulose-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we report that a uniform phenotype is established among the primary cell wall mutants, as cortical microtubules of root epidermal cells of rsw1 and prc1 mutants exhibit the same pattern described in thanatos and pom2-4. Whether cortical microtubules assume transverse orientation or not is determined by the demand for cellulose synthesis, according to each root zone's expansion rate. It is suggested that cessation of cell expansion may provide a biophysical signal resulting in microtubule reorientation. PMID:24717634

  8. Cortical microtubule patterning in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana primary cell wall mutants reveals the bidirectional interplay with cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Daras, Gerasimos; Rigas, Stamatis

    2014-01-01

    Cell elongation requires directional deposition of cellulose microfibrils regulated by transverse cortical microtubules. Microtubules respond differentially to suppression of cell elongation along the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex. Cortical microtubule orientation is particularly affected in the fast elongation zone but not in the meristematic or transition zones of thanatos and pom2–4 cellulose-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we report that a uniform phenotype is established among the primary cell wall mutants, as cortical microtubules of root epidermal cells of rsw1 and prc1 mutants exhibit the same pattern described in thanatos and pom2–4. Whether cortical microtubules assume transverse orientation or not is determined by the demand for cellulose synthesis, according to each root zone’s expansion rate. It is suggested that cessation of cell expansion may provide a biophysical signal resulting in microtubule reorientation. PMID:24717634

  9. Cortical microtubule patterning in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana primary cell wall mutants reveals the bidirectional interplay with cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Daras, Gerasimos; Rigas, Stamatis

    2015-01-01

    Cell elongation requires directional deposition of cellulose microfibrils regulated by transverse cortical microtubules. Microtubules respond differentially to suppression of cell elongation along the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex. Cortical microtubule orientation is particularly affected in the fast elongation zone but not in the meristematic or transition zones of thanatos and pom2–4 cellulose-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we report that a uniform phenotype is established among the primary cell wall mutants, as cortical microtubules of root epidermal cells of rsw1 and prc1 mutants exhibit the same pattern described in thanatos and pom2–4. Whether cortical microtubules assume transverse orientation or not is determined by the demand for cellulose synthesis, according to each root zone's expansion rate. It is suggested that cessation of cell expansion may provide a biophysical signal resulting in microtubule reorientation. PMID:26042727

  10. Cortical microtubule patterning in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana primary cell wall mutants reveals the bidirectional interplay with cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Daras, Gerasimos; Rigas, Stamatis

    2015-01-01

    Cell elongation requires directional deposition of cellulose microfibrils regulated by transverse cortical microtubules. Microtubules respond differentially to suppression of cell elongation along the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex. Cortical microtubule orientation is particularly affected in the fast elongation zone but not in the meristematic or transition zones of thanatos and pom2-4 cellulose-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we report that a uniform phenotype is established among the primary cell wall mutants, as cortical microtubules of root epidermal cells of rsw1 and prc1 mutants exhibit the same pattern described in thanatos and pom2-4. Whether cortical microtubules assume transverse orientation or not is determined by the demand for cellulose synthesis, according to each root zone's expansion rate. It is suggested that cessation of cell expansion may provide a biophysical signal resulting in microtubule reorientation. PMID:26042727

  11. Cellular processes involved in human epidermal cells exposed to extremely low frequency electric fields.

    PubMed

    Collard, J-F; Hinsenkamp, M

    2015-05-01

    We observed on different tissues and organisms a biological response after exposure to pulsed low frequency and low amplitude electric or electromagnetic fields but the precise mechanism of cell response remains unknown. The aim of this publication is to understand, using bioinformatics, the biological relevance of processes involved in the modification of gene expression. The list of genes analyzed was obtained after microarray protocol realized on cultures of human epidermal explants growing on deepidermized human skin exposed to a pulsed low frequency electric field. The directed acyclic graph on a WebGestalt Gene Ontology module shows six categories under the biological process root: "biological regulation", "cellular process", "cell proliferation", "death", "metabolic process" and "response to stimulus". Enriched derived categories are coherent with the type of in vitro culture, the stimulation protocol or with the previous results showing a decrease of cell proliferation and an increase of differentiation. The Kegg module on WebGestalt has highlighted "cell cycle" and "p53 signaling pathway" as significantly involved. The Kegg website brings out interactions between FoxO, MAPK, JNK, p53, p38, PI3K/Akt, Wnt, mTor or NF-KappaB. Some genes expressed by the stimulation are known to have an exclusive function on these pathways. Analyses performed with Pathway Studio linked cell proliferation, cell differentiation, apoptosis, cell cycle, mitosis, cell death etc. with our microarrays results. Medline citation generated by the software and the fold change variation confirms a diminution of the proliferation, activation of the differentiation and a less well-defined role of apoptosis or wound healing. Wnt and DKK functional classes, DKK1, MACF1, ATF3, MME, TXNRD1, and BMP-2 genes proposed in previous publications after a manual analysis are also highlighted with other genes after Pathway Studio automatic procedure. Finally, an analysis conducted on a list of genes

  12. Wdr1-mediated cell shape dynamics and cortical tension are essential for epidermal planar cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Pasolli, H. Amalia; Chai, Sophia; Nikolova, Maria; Stokes, Nicole; Fuchs, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    During mouse development, core planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins become polarized in the epidermal plane to guide angling/morphogenesis of hair follicles. How PCP is established is poorly understood. Here, we identify a key role for Wdr1 (also known as Aip1), an F-actin-binding protein that enhances cofilin/destrin-mediated F-actin disassembly. We show that cofilin and destrin function redundantly in developing epidermis, but their combined depletion perturbs cell adhesion, cytokinesis, apicobasal polarity and PCP. Although Wdr1 depletion accentuates single-loss-of-cofilin/destrin phenotypes, alone it resembles core PCP mutations. Seeking a mechanism, we find that Wdr1 and cofilin/destrin-mediated actomyosin remodelling are essential for generating or maintaining cortical tension within the developing epidermal sheet and driving the cell shape and planar orientation changes that accompany establishment of PCP in mammalian epidermis. Our findings suggest intriguing evolutionary parallels but mechanistic modifications to the distal wing hinge-mediated mechanical forces that drive cell shape change and orient PCP in the Drosophila wing disc. PMID:25915128

  13. Establishment of epidermal cell lines derived from the skin of the Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Yu, Jin; Kindy, Mark S; Ellis, Blake C; Baatz, John E; Peden-Adams, Margie; Ellingham, Tara J; Wolff, Daynna J; Fair, Patricia A; Gattoni-Celli, Sebastiano

    2005-12-01

    The Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus), a marine mammal found off the Atlantic coast, has become the focus of considerable attention because of an increasing number of mortality events witnessed in this species over the last several years along the southeastern United States. Assessment of the impact of environmental stressors on bottlenose dolphins (BND) has been difficult because of the protected status of these marine mammals. The studies presented herein focused on establishing epidermal cell cultures and cell lines as tools for the in vitro evaluation of environmental stressors on BND skin. Epidermal cell cultures were established from skin samples obtained from Atlantic BND and subjected to karyotype analysis. These cultures were further characterized using immunohistochemical methods demonstrating expression of cytokeratins. By two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), we observed that the proteomic profile of BND skin tissue samples shared distinct similarities with that of skin-derived cultures. Epidermal cell cultures were transfected with a plasmid encoding the SV40 small t- and large T-antigens, as well as the neomycin-resistance gene. Five neomycin-resistant clones were isolated and expanded, and all of them proliferated at a faster rate than nontransfected BND epidermal cultures, which exhibited signs of senescence. Cell lysates prepared from two transfected clones were shown to express, by Western blot analysis, both SV40 tumor antigens. These experimental results are consistent with the concept that transfected clones expressing SV40 tumor antigens represent immortalized BND cell lines. Epidermal cell lines derived from Tursiops truncatus will provide a unique tool for studying key features of the interaction occurring between dolphins and the environment in which they live at their most crucial interface: the skin. PMID:16281302

  14. Mast Cells Regulate Epidermal Barrier Function and the Development of Allergic Skin Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sehra, Sarita; Serezani, Ana P M; Ocaña, Jesus A; Travers, Jeffrey B; Kaplan, Mark H

    2016-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by infiltration of eosinophils, T helper cells, and mast cells. The role of mast cells in atopic dermatitis is not completely understood. To define the effects of mast cells on skin biology, we observed that mast cells regulate the homeostatic expression of epidermal differentiation complex and other skin genes. Decreased epidermal differentiation complex gene expression in mice that genetically lack mast cells (Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice) is associated with increased uptake of protein antigens painted on the skin by dendritic cells (DCs) compared with similarly treated wild-type mice, suggesting a protective role for mast cells in exposure to nominal environmental allergens. To test this further, we crossed Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice with signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (i.e., Stat6) VT transgenic mice that develop spontaneous atopic dermatitis-like disease that is dependent on T helper cell 2 cytokines and is associated with high serum concentrations of IgE. We observed that Stat6VT × Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice developed more frequent and more severe allergic skin inflammation than Stat6VT transgenic mice that had mast cells. Together, these studies suggest that mast cells regulate epidermal barrier function and have a potential protective role in the development of atopic dermatitis-like disease. PMID:27021404

  15. A Theoretical Model of Jigsaw-Puzzle Pattern Formation by Plant Leaf Epidermal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Higaki, Takumi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Akita, Kae; Takigawa-Imamura, Hisako; Yoshimura, Kenji; Miura, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Plant leaf epidermal cells exhibit a jigsaw puzzle–like pattern that is generated by interdigitation of the cell wall during leaf development. The contribution of two ROP GTPases, ROP2 and ROP6, to the cytoskeletal dynamics that regulate epidermal cell wall interdigitation has already been examined; however, how interactions between these molecules result in pattern formation remains to be elucidated. Here, we propose a simple interface equation model that incorporates both the cell wall remodeling activity of ROP GTPases and the diffusible signaling molecules by which they are regulated. This model successfully reproduces pattern formation observed in vivo, and explains the counterintuitive experimental results of decreased cellulose production and increased thickness. Our model also reproduces the dynamics of three-way cell wall junctions. Therefore, this model provides a possible mechanism for cell wall interdigitation formation in vivo. PMID:27054467

  16. A Theoretical Model of Jigsaw-Puzzle Pattern Formation by Plant Leaf Epidermal Cells.

    PubMed

    Higaki, Takumi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Akita, Kae; Takigawa-Imamura, Hisako; Yoshimura, Kenji; Miura, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    Plant leaf epidermal cells exhibit a jigsaw puzzle-like pattern that is generated by interdigitation of the cell wall during leaf development. The contribution of two ROP GTPases, ROP2 and ROP6, to the cytoskeletal dynamics that regulate epidermal cell wall interdigitation has already been examined; however, how interactions between these molecules result in pattern formation remains to be elucidated. Here, we propose a simple interface equation model that incorporates both the cell wall remodeling activity of ROP GTPases and the diffusible signaling molecules by which they are regulated. This model successfully reproduces pattern formation observed in vivo, and explains the counterintuitive experimental results of decreased cellulose production and increased thickness. Our model also reproduces the dynamics of three-way cell wall junctions. Therefore, this model provides a possible mechanism for cell wall interdigitation formation in vivo. PMID:27054467

  17. In vivo ultraviolet-exposed human epidermal cells activate T suppressor cell pathways that involve CD4+CD45RA+ suppressor-inducer T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Baadsgaard, O.; Salvo, B.; Mannie, A.; Dass, B.; Fox, D.A.; Cooper, K.D. )

    1990-11-01

    In vivo UV exposure of human epidermis abrogates the function of CD1+DR+ Langerhans cells and induces the appearance of CD1-DR+ Ag-presenting macrophages. Epidermal cells from UV-exposed skin, in contrast to epidermal cells from normal skin, potently activate autologous CD4+ T cells, and, in particular, the CD45RA+ (2H4+) (suppressor-inducer) subset. We therefore determined whether UV-exposure in humans leads to a T cell response in which suppression dominates. Autologous blood T cells were incubated with epidermal cell suspensions from in vivo UV-irradiated skin. After activation, repurified T cells were transferred in graded numbers to autologous mononuclear cells (MNC) stimulated with PWM and the resultant IgG production analyzed by ELISA. Relative to T cells activated by unirradiated control epidermal cells, T cells activated by UV-exposed epidermal cells demonstrated enhanced capacity to suppress IgG production (n = 6; p less than or equal to 0.03). Within the T cell population, CD8+ cells stimulated by UV-exposed epidermal cells could be directly activated to suppress PWM-stimulated MNC Ig production if IL-2 was provided in the reaction mixture. The suppressive activity was also transferable with purified CD4+ T cells stimulated by UV-exposed epidermal cells (n = 10; p less than or equal to 0.01), and was radiosensitive. Suppression was decreased when PWM-stimulated MNC were depleted of CD8+ T cells before mixing with CD4+ T cells activated by UV-exposed epidermal cells, suggesting indirect induction of CD8+ Ts cells contained within the responding MNC populations. Indeed, physical depletion of CD45RA+ cells resulted in total abrogation of the suppressor function contained in the CD4+ T cells. Activation of suppressor function was critically dependent on DR+ APC contained in UV-exposed epidermis.

  18. Proteins deposited in the dermis are rapidly captured and presented by epidermal Langerhans cells

    PubMed Central

    Flacher, Vincent; Tripp, Christoph H.; Stoitzner, Patrizia; Haid, Bernhard; Ebner, Susanne; Koch, Franz; Park, Chae Gyu; Steinman, Ralph M.; Idoyaga, Juliana; Romani, Nikolaus

    2010-01-01

    Antigen-presenting cells can capture antigens that are deposited in the skin, including vaccines given subcutaneously. These include different dendritic cells (DC) such as epidermal Langerhans cells (LC), dermal DC and dermal langerin+ DC. To evaluate access of dermal antigens to skin DC, we used mAb to two C-type lectin endocytic receptors, DEC-205/CD205 and langerin/CD207. When applied to murine and human skin explant cultures, these mAb were efficiently taken up by epidermal LC. Additionally, anti-DEC-205 targeted langerin+ CD103+ and langerin− CD103− mouse dermal DC. Unexpectedly, intradermal injection of either mAb, but not isotype control, resulted in strong and rapid labelling of LC in situ, implying that large molecules can diffuse through the basement membrane into the epidermis. Epidermal LC targeted in vivo by ovalbumin-coupled anti-DEC-205 potently presented antigen to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Thus, epidermal LC play a major role in uptake of lectin-binding ligands under standard vaccination conditions. PMID:19890348

  19. Genetic ablation of root cap cells in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsugeki, R.; Fedoroff, N. V.

    1999-01-01

    The root cap is increasingly appreciated as a complex and dynamic plant organ. Root caps sense and transmit environmental signals, synthesize and secrete small molecules and macromolecules, and in some species shed metabolically active cells. However, it is not known whether root caps are essential for normal shoot and root development. We report the identification of a root cap-specific promoter and describe its use to genetically ablate root caps by directing root cap-specific expression of a diphtheria toxin A-chain gene. Transgenic toxin-expressing plants are viable and have normal aerial parts but agravitropic roots, implying loss of root cap function. Several cell layers are missing from the transgenic root caps, and the remaining cells are abnormal. Although the radial organization of the roots is normal in toxin-expressing plants, the root tips have fewer cytoplasmically dense cells than do wild-type root tips, suggesting that root meristematic activity is lower in transgenic than in wild-type plants. The roots of transgenic plants have more lateral roots and these are, in turn, more highly branched than those of wild-type plants. Thus, root cap ablation alters root architecture both by inhibiting root meristematic activity and by stimulating lateral root initiation. These observations imply that the root caps contain essential components of the signaling system that determines root architecture.

  20. Identification of Candidate Transcriptional Regulators of Epidermal Transfer Cell Development in Vicia faba Cotyledons

    PubMed Central

    Arun-Chinnappa, Kiruba S.; McCurdy, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Transfer cells (TCs) are anatomically-specialized cells formed at apoplasmic-symplasmic bottlenecks in nutrient transport pathways in plants. TCs form invaginated wall ingrowths which provide a scaffold to amplify plasma membrane surface area and thus increase the density of nutrient transporters required to achieve enhanced nutrient flow across these bottlenecks. Despite their importance to nutrient transport in plants, little is known of the transcriptional regulation of wall ingrowth formation. Here, we used RNA-Seq to identify transcription factors putatively involved in regulating epidermal TC development in cotyledons of Vicia faba. Comparing cotyledons cultured for 0, 3, 9, and 24 h to induce trans-differentiation of epidermal TCs identified 43 transcription factors that showed either epidermal-specific or epidermal–enhanced expression, and 10 that showed epidermal-specific down regulation. Members of the WRKY and ethylene-responsive families were prominent in the cohort of transcription factors showing epidermal-specific or epidermal–enhanced expression, consistent with the initiation of TC development often representing a response to stress. Members of the MYB family were also prominent in these categories, including orthologs of MYB genes involved in localized secondary wall deposition in Arabidopsis thaliana. Among the group of transcription factors showing down regulation were various homeobox genes and members of the MADs-box and zinc-finger families of poorly defined functions. Collectively, this study identified several transcription factors showing expression characteristics and orthologous functions that indicate likely participation in transcriptional regulation of epidermal TC development in V. faba cotyledons. PMID:27252730

  1. Short communication: Initial evidence supporting existence of potential rumen epidermal stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Yohe, T T; Tucker, H L M; Parsons, C L M; Geiger, A J; Akers, R M; Daniels, K M

    2016-09-01

    The bovine rumen epidermis is a keratinized multilayered tissue that experiences persistent cell turnover. Because of this constant cell turnover, epidermal stem cells and their slightly more differentiated daughter cells, epidermal progenitor cells, must exist in the stratum basale of rumen epidermis. To date, these 2 epidermal cell populations and any unique cellular markers they may possess remain completely uncharacterized in the bovine rumen. An important first step in this new research area is the demonstration of the relative abundance and existence of markers for these cells in rumen tissue. A related second step is to document rumen epidermal proliferative responses to an extrinsic signal such as nutrient concentration within the rumen. The objectives of this experiment were to evaluate the extrinsic effect of diet on (1) gene expression of 6 potential rumen epidermal stem or progenitor cell markers and (2) rumen epidermal cell proliferation within the stratum basale. Twelve preweaned Holstein heifers were fed either a restricted diet (R) or an enhanced diet (EH). Animals on R received a milk replacer (MR) diet fed at 0.44kg of powder dry matter (DM)/d (20.9% crude protein, 29.8% fat, DM basis) and EH received MR at 1.08kg of powder dry matter/d (28.9% crude protein, 26.2% fat, DM basis). All calves had access to a 20% crude protein starter and were weaned during wk 7 of the experiment. Lifetime DM intake was 0.73kg of DM/calf per day for R (5.88 Mcal of net energy/calf per day) and 1.26kg of DM/calf per day for EH (10.68 Mcal of net energy/calf per day). Twenty-four hours before slaughter heifers received an intravenous dose of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine to label proliferating cells. Heifers were slaughtered at 8 wk of age, and rumen samples from the ventral sac region were obtained and stored in RNA preservative and processed for routine histology. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR was used to analyze relative abundance of genes. Candidate

  2. CD166-mediated epidermal growth factor receptor phosphorylation promotes the growth of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jia, Guodong; Wang, Xu; Yan, Ming; Chen, Wantao; Zhang, Ping

    2016-08-01

    CD166 has been considered a relatively specific marker of stem cells and cancer stem cells, and the altered expression of CD166 has also been reported as a prognostic marker of several other types of cancer. However, the molecular functions of CD166 in these cancer cells are largely unknown. In this study, we found that CD166 significantly enhanced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation and prolonged epidermal growth factor (EGF)/EGFR signalling activation. In addition, EGF stimulation in CD166-overexpressing oral squamous carcinoma cells led to enhanced colony formation, invasion capacity and cytoskeletal re-organization in vitro and elevated tumourigenesis in vivo. Taken together, the results of our study identify CD166 as an intriguing therapeutic target for patients suffering from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). PMID:27424177

  3. Epidermal Cells Expressing Putative Cell Markers in Nonglabrous Skin Existing in Direct Proximity with the Distal End of the Arrector Pili Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Rufaut, N. W.; Jones, L.; Sinclair, R.

    2016-01-01

    Inconsistent with the view that epidermal stem cells reside randomly spread along the basal layer of the epidermal rete ridges, we found that epidermal cells expressing stem cell markers in nonglabrous skin exist in direct connection with the distal end of the arrector pili muscle. The epidermal cells that express stem cell markers consist of a subpopulation of basal keratinocytes located in a niche at the lowermost portion of the rete ridges at the distal arrector pili muscle attachment site. Keratinocytes in the epidermal stem cell niche express K15, MCSP, and α6 integrin. α5 integrin marks the distal end of the APM colocalized with basal keratinocytes expressing stem cell markers located in a well-protected and nourished environment at the lowermost point of the epidermis; these cells are hypothesized to participate directly in epidermal renewal and homeostasis and also indirectly in wound healing through communication with the hair follicle bulge epithelial stem cell population through the APM. Our findings, plus a reevaluation of the literature, support the hierarchical model of interfollicular epidermal stem cell units of Fitzpatrick. This new view provides insights into epidermal control and the possible involvement of epidermal stem cells in nonmelanoma skin carcinogenesis. PMID:27375744

  4. Cadmium induces acidosis in maize root cells.

    PubMed

    Nocito, Fabio Francesco; Espen, Luca; Crema, Barbara; Cocucci, Maurizio; Sacchi, Gian Attilio

    2008-01-01

    * Cadmium (Cd) stress increases cell metabolic demand for sulfur, reducing equivalents, and carbon skeletons, to sustain phytochelatin biosynthesis for Cd detoxification. In this condition the induction of potentially acidifying anaplerotic metabolism in root tissues may be expected. For these reasons the effects of Cd accumulation on anaplerotic metabolism, glycolysis, and cell pH control mechanisms were investigated in maize (Zea mays) roots. * The study compared root apical segments, excised from plants grown for 24 h in a nutrient solution supplemented, or not, with 10 microM CdCl(2), using physiological, biochemical and (31)P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) approaches. * Cadmium exposure resulted in a significant decrease in both cytosolic and vacuolar pH of root cells and in a concomitant increase in the carbon fluxes through anaplerotic metabolism leading to malate biosynthesis, as suggested by changes in dark CO2 fixation, metabolite levels and enzyme activities along glycolysis, and mitochondrial alternative respiration capacity. This scenario was accompanied by a decrease in the net H(+) efflux from the roots, probably related to changes in plasma membrane permeability. * It is concluded that anaplerotic metabolism triggered by Cd detoxification processes might lead to an imbalance in H(+) production and consumption, and then to cell acidosis. PMID:18537888

  5. Epidermal stem cells: markers, patterning and the control of stem cell fate.

    PubMed Central

    Watt, F M

    1998-01-01

    Within the epidermis, proliferation takes place in the basal layer of keratinocytes that are attached to an underlying basement membrane. Cells that leave the basal layer undergo terminal differentiation as they move towards the tissue surface. The basal layer contains two types of proliferative keratinocyte: stem cells, which have unlimited self-renewal capacity, and transit amplifying cells, those daughters of stem cells that are destined to withdraw from the cell cycle and terminally differentiate after a few rounds of division. Stem cells express higher levels of the beta 1-integrin family of extracellular matrix receptors than transit amplifying cells and this can be used to isolate each subpopulation of keratinocyte and to determine its location within the epidermis. Variation in the levels of E-cadherin, beta-catenin and plakoglobin within the basal layer suggests that stem cells may also differ from transit amplifying cells in intercellular adhesiveness. Stem cells have a patterned distribution within the epidermal basal layer and patterning is subject to autoregulation. Constitutive expression of the transcription factor c-Myc promotes terminal differentiation by driving keratinocytes from the stem cell compartment into the transit amplifying compartment. PMID:9684280

  6. Effects of Telomerase and Telomere Length on Epidermal Stem Cell Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Ignacio; Cayuela, María L.; Blasco, María A.

    2005-08-01

    A key process in organ homeostasis is the mobilization of stem cells out of their niches. We show through analysis of mouse models that telomere length, as well as the catalytic component of telomerase, Tert, are critical determinants in the mobilization of epidermal stem cells. Telomere shortening inhibited mobilization of stem cells out of their niche, impaired hair growth, and resulted in suppression of stem cell proliferative capacity in vitro. In contrast, Tert overexpression in the absence of changes in telomere length promoted stem cell mobilization, hair growth, and stem cell proliferation in vitro. The effects of telomeres and telomerase on stem cell biology anticipate their role in cancer and aging.

  7. Transient Expression of P-type ATPases in Tobacco Epidermal Cells.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Lisbeth R; Palmgren, Michael G; López-Marqués, Rosa L

    2016-01-01

    Transient expression in tobacco cells is a convenient method for several purposes such as analysis of protein-protein interactions and the subcellular localization of plant proteins. A suspension of Agrobacterium tumefaciens cells carrying the plasmid of interest is injected into the intracellular space between leaf epidermal cells, which results in DNA transfer from the bacteria to the plant and expression of the corresponding proteins. By injecting mixes of Agrobacterium strains, this system offers the possibility to co-express a number of target proteins simultaneously, thus allowing for example protein-protein interaction studies. In this chapter, we describe the procedure to transiently express P-type ATPases in tobacco epidermal cells, with focus on subcellular localization of the protein complexes formed by P4-ATPases and their β-subunits. PMID:26695049

  8. Colorimetric growth assay for epidermal cell cultures by their crystal violet binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Bonnekoh, B; Wevers, A; Jugert, F; Merk, H; Mahrle, G

    1989-01-01

    The application of a simple, rapid, and inexpensive colorimetric growth assay was tested for human epidermal cells subcultured in uncoated plastic dishes. Cell layers were incubated with a crystal violet (CV) solution (0.2% with ethanol 2% in 0.5 M Tris-Cl buffer, pH 7.8) for 10 min at room temperature. After rinsing with 0.5 M Tris-Cl (pH 7.8) the cell layer was dried and decolorized with a sodium-dodecylsulfate solution (0.5% with ethanol 50% in 0.5 M Tris-Cl, pH 7.8) for 60 min at 37 degrees C. The extinction of the supernatant was read at the absorption maximum of 586 nm. The protein content of attached cells as classical parameter for quantifying cell growth was strongly related to CV extinction with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.98. Furthermore, the subcellular protein binding qualities of CV were analyzed. The water-soluble protein fraction of cultured epidermal cells was separated by sodium-dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and stained with CV. We found a staining pattern which was qualitatively very similar to that of Coomassie blue, however less intense. Keratin electrophoresis revealed an affinity of CV to the 48, 50, and 56 kD cytokeratins. In conclusion, this CV assay is a reliable and simple method for the monitoring of epidermal cell growth in cultures. PMID:2482013

  9. Three-dimensional culture of epidermal cells on ordered cellulose scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Seyama, Tomoko; Suh, Eun Young; Kondo, Tetsuo

    2013-06-01

    An ordered cellulose film scaffold, termed a nematic ordered cellulose (NOC) template, had unique surface properties and successfully induced the establishment of a three-dimensional (3D), hierarchical structure of epidermal cells by cell attachment and subsequent culture. Initially, the scaffold surface properties were characterized through contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy to evaluate appropriate hydrophobicity and orientation of molecular chains for 3D culture. The template surfaces exhibited higher hydrophobicity, in the range of 70-75°, than usual cellulose films and appeared suitable for surface cell adhesion. In fact, epidermal cells successfully attached and proliferated favorably on the NOC templates, similar to development in normal culture flasks. Furthermore, the NOC film, as a semipermeable template, was also employed to allow 3D proliferation of epidermal cell layers in the perpendicular direction. The template proved to be suitable as a 3D cell culture device, resulting in the proposal that the construction processes of these 3D cell layers followed the basic concept of skin formation. PMID:23624420

  10. Single cell-type comparative metabolomics of epidermal bladder cells from the halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum

    PubMed Central

    Barkla, Bronwyn J.; Vera-Estrella, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    One of the remarkable adaptive features of the halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum are the specialized modified trichomes called epidermal bladder cells (EBC) which cover the leaves, stems, and peduncle of the plant. They are present from an early developmental stage but upon salt stress rapidly expand due to the accumulation of water and sodium. This particular plant feature makes it an attractive system for single cell type studies, with recent proteomics and transcriptomics studies of the EBC establishing that these cells are metabolically active and have roles other than sodium sequestration. To continue our investigation into the function of these unusual cells we carried out a comprehensive global analysis of the metabolites present in the EBC extract by gas chromatography Time-of-Flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF) and identified 194 known and 722 total molecular features. Statistical analysis of the metabolic changes between control and salt-treated samples identified 352 significantly differing metabolites (268 after correction for FDR). Principal components analysis provided an unbiased evaluation of the data variance structure. Biochemical pathway enrichment analysis suggested significant perturbations in 13 biochemical pathways as defined in KEGG. More than 50% of the metabolites that show significant changes in the EBC, can be classified as compatible solutes and include sugars, sugar alcohols, protein and non-protein amino acids, and organic acids, highlighting the need to maintain osmotic homeostasis to balance the accumulation of Na+ and Cl− ions. Overall, the comparison of metabolic changes in salt treated relative to control samples suggests large alterations in M. crystallinum epidermal bladder cells. PMID:26113856

  11. Genetically Induced Cell Death in Bulge Stem Cells Reveals Their Redundancy for Hair and Epidermal Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Driskell, Iwona; Oeztuerk-Winder, Feride; Humphreys, Peter; Frye, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Adult mammalian epidermis contains multiple stem cell populations in which quiescent and more proliferative stem and progenitor populations coexist. However, the precise interrelation of these populations in homeostasis remains unclear. Here, we blocked the contribution of quiescent keratin 19 (K19)-expressing bulge stem cells to hair follicle formation through genetic ablation of the essential histone methyltransferase Setd8 that is required for the maintenance of adult skin. Deletion of Setd8 eliminated the contribution of bulge cells to hair follicle regeneration through inhibition of cell division and induction of cell death, but the growth and morphology of hair follicles were unaffected. Furthermore, ablation of Setd8 in the hair follicle bulge blocked the contribution of K19-postive stem cells to wounded epidermis, but the wound healing process was unaltered. Our data indicate that quiescent bulge stem cells are dispensable for hair follicle regeneration and epidermal injury in the short term and support the hypothesis that quiescent and cycling stem cell populations are equipotent. Stem Cells 2015;33:988–998 PMID:25447755

  12. Proliferative and toxic effects of ultraviolet light and inflammation on epidermal pigment cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nordlund, J.J.; Ackles, A.E.; Traynor, F.F.

    1981-10-01

    The ear of the mouse is useful for studying the effects of ultraviolet light on epidermal pigment cells. The quantity of light penetrating into the skin causing an inflammatory response can be assessed easily by measuring with an engineering calipers the swelling of the ear. The inflammatory response of the ear exhibits a linear relationship to the dose of light delivered. We observed that doses of shortwave ultraviolet light which are noninflammatory when repeated at daily intervals induce moderate to severe inflammation. Small doses of psoralen and prolonged exposure to UVA (PUVA) were more inflammatory than larger amounts of psoralen and short exposure to light. Doses of shortwave ultraviolet light and PUVA which produce only a minimal inflammation of the skin stimulate the proliferation of epidermal melanocytes. In contrast, PUVA in doses sufficiently large to cause a marked inflammatory reaction in the skin seems injurious to pigment cells and kills them or causes only a minimal proliferative response. The inflammatory reaction itself does not seem to stimulate or inhibit the proliferation of melanocytes. Prostaglandins A, E, and F2 alpha have no effect on the proliferation of epidermal pigment cells. In contrast, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and allergic contact dermatitis increase the numerical density of pigment cells. Steroids may block the function of the enzyme tyrosinase. Our experiments indicate that pigment cells, like many other varieties of cells, are susceptible to injury and can be killed at least by large doses of PUVA.

  13. The Androgen Receptor Antagonizes Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling in Epidermal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kretzschmar, Kai; Cottle, Denny L; Schweiger, Pawel J; Watt, Fiona M

    2015-01-01

    Activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in adult mouse epidermis leads to expansion of the stem cell compartment and redirects keratinocytes in the interfollicular epidermis and sebaceous glands (SGs) to differentiate along the hair follicle (HF) lineages. Here we demonstrate that during epidermal development and homeostasis there is reciprocal activation of the androgen receptor (AR) and β-catenin in cells of the HF bulb. AR activation reduced β-catenin-dependent transcription, blocked β-catenin-induced induction of HF growth, and prevented β-catenin-mediated conversion of SGs into HFs. Conversely, AR inhibition enhanced the effects of β-catenin activation, promoting HF proliferation and differentiation, culminating in the formation of benign HF tumors and a complete loss of SG identity. We conclude that AR signaling has a key role in epidermal stem cell fate selection by modulating responses to β-catenin in adult mouse skin. PMID:26121213

  14. Neuropilin 1 expression correlates with differentiation status of epidermal cells and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Shahrabi-Farahani, Shokoufeh; Wang, Lili; Zwaans, Bernadette M M; Santana, Jeans M; Shimizu, Akio; Takashima, Seiji; Kreuter, Michael; Coultas, Leigh; D'Amore, Patricia A; Arbeit, Jeffrey M; Akslen, Lars A; Bielenberg, Diane R

    2014-07-01

    Neuropilins (NRPs) are cell surface receptors for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and SEMA3 (class 3 semaphorin) family members. The role of NRPs in neurons and endothelial cells has been investigated, but the expression and role of NRPs in epithelial cells is much less clear. Herein, the expression and localization of NRP1 was investigated in human and mouse skin and squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Results indicated that NRP1 mRNA and protein was expressed in the suprabasal epithelial layers of the skin sections. NRP1 staining did not overlap with that of keratin 14 (K14) or proliferating cell nuclear antigen, but did co-localize with staining for keratin 1, indicating that differentiated keratinocytes express NRP1. Similar to the expression of NRP1, VEGF-A was expressed in suprabasal epithelial cells, whereas Nrp2 and VEGFR2 were not detectable in the epidermis. The expression of NRP1 correlated with a high degree of differentiation in human SCC specimens, human SCC xenografts, and mouse K14-HPV16 transgenic SCC. UVB irradiation of mouse skin induced Nrp1 upregulation. In vitro, Nrp1 was upregulated in primary keratinocytes in response to differentiating media or epidermal growth factor-family growth factors. In conclusion, the expression of NRP1 is regulated in the skin and is selectively produced in differentiated epithelial cells. NRP1 may function as a reservoir to sequester VEGF ligand within the epithelial compartment, thereby modulating its bioactivity. PMID:24791743

  15. Epidermal Notch1 recruits RORγ(+) group 3 innate lymphoid cells to orchestrate normal skin repair.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Hodgkinson, Tom; Gothard, Elizabeth J; Boroumand, Soulmaz; Lamb, Rebecca; Cummins, Ian; Narang, Priyanka; Sawtell, Amy; Coles, Jenny; Leonov, German; Reboldi, Andrea; Buckley, Christopher D; Cupedo, Tom; Siebel, Christian; Bayat, Ardeshir; Coles, Mark C; Ambler, Carrie A

    2016-01-01

    Notch has a well-defined role in controlling cell fate decisions in the embryo and the adult epidermis and immune systems, yet emerging evidence suggests Notch also directs non-cell-autonomous signalling in adult tissues. Here, we show that Notch1 works as a damage response signal. Epidermal Notch induces recruitment of immune cell subsets including RORγ(+) ILC3s into wounded dermis; RORγ(+) ILC3s are potent sources of IL17F in wounds and control immunological and epidermal cell responses. Mice deficient for RORγ(+) ILC3s heal wounds poorly resulting from delayed epidermal proliferation and macrophage recruitment in a CCL3-dependent process. Notch1 upregulates TNFα and the ILC3 recruitment chemokines CCL20 and CXCL13. TNFα, as a Notch1 effector, directs ILC3 localization and rates of wound healing. Altogether these findings suggest that Notch is a key stress/injury signal in skin epithelium driving innate immune cell recruitment and normal skin tissue repair. PMID:27099134

  16. Epidermal Notch1 recruits RORγ+ group 3 innate lymphoid cells to orchestrate normal skin repair

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Hodgkinson, Tom; Gothard, Elizabeth J.; Boroumand, Soulmaz; Lamb, Rebecca; Cummins, Ian; Narang, Priyanka; Sawtell, Amy; Coles, Jenny; Leonov, German; Reboldi, Andrea; Buckley, Christopher D.; Cupedo, Tom; Siebel, Christian; Bayat, Ardeshir; Coles, Mark C.; Ambler, Carrie A.

    2016-01-01

    Notch has a well-defined role in controlling cell fate decisions in the embryo and the adult epidermis and immune systems, yet emerging evidence suggests Notch also directs non-cell-autonomous signalling in adult tissues. Here, we show that Notch1 works as a damage response signal. Epidermal Notch induces recruitment of immune cell subsets including RORγ+ ILC3s into wounded dermis; RORγ+ ILC3s are potent sources of IL17F in wounds and control immunological and epidermal cell responses. Mice deficient for RORγ+ ILC3s heal wounds poorly resulting from delayed epidermal proliferation and macrophage recruitment in a CCL3-dependent process. Notch1 upregulates TNFα and the ILC3 recruitment chemokines CCL20 and CXCL13. TNFα, as a Notch1 effector, directs ILC3 localization and rates of wound healing. Altogether these findings suggest that Notch is a key stress/injury signal in skin epithelium driving innate immune cell recruitment and normal skin tissue repair. PMID:27099134

  17. Prevention of skin tumorigenesis and impairment of epidermal cell proliferation by targeted aquaporin-3 gene disruption.

    PubMed

    Hara-Chikuma, Mariko; Verkman, A S

    2008-01-01

    Aquaporin-3 (AQP3) is a water/glycerol-transporting protein expressed strongly at the plasma membranes of basal epidermal cells in skin. We found that human skin squamous cell carcinoma strongly overexpresses AQP3. A novel role for AQP3 in skin tumorigenesis was discovered using mice with targeted AQP3 gene disruption. We found that AQP3-null mice were remarkably resistant to the development of skin tumors following exposure to a tumor initiator and phorbol ester promoter. Though tumor initiator challenge produced comparable apoptotic responses in wild-type and AQP3-null mice, promoter-induced cell proliferation was greatly impaired in the AQP3-null epidermis. Reductions of epidermal cell glycerol, its metabolite glycerol-3-phosphate, and ATP were found in AQP3 deficiency without impairment of mitochondrial function. Glycerol supplementation corrected the reduced proliferation and ATP content in AQP3 deficiency, with cellular glycerol, ATP, and proliferative ability being closely correlated. Our data suggest involvement of AQP3-facilitated glycerol transport in epidermal cell proliferation and tumorigenesis by a novel mechanism implicating cellular glycerol as a key determinant of cellular ATP energy. AQP3 may thus be an important determinant in skin tumorigenesis and hence a novel target for tumor prevention and therapy. PMID:17967887

  18. Sensitivity of human granulosa cell tumor cells to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Noora; Anttonen, Mikko; Färkkilä, Anniina; Pihlajoki, Marjut; Bützow, Ralf; Unkila-Kallio, Leila; Heikinheimo, Markku

    2014-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is implicated in the progression of many human cancers, but its significance in ovarian granulosa cell tumor (GCT) pathobiology remains poorly understood. We assessed the EGFR gene copy number, surveyed the mRNA and protein expression patterns of EGFR in 90 adult GCTs, and assessed the in vitro sensitivity of GCT cells to EGFR inhibition. Low-level amplification of EGFR gene was observed in five GCTs and high-level amplification in one sample. EGFR mRNA was robustly expressed in GCTs. Most tumors expressed both unphosphorylated and phosphorylated EGFR protein, but the protein expression did not correlate with clinical parameters, including the risk of recurrence. Small-molecule EGFR inhibitors reduced the EGF-induced activation of EGFR and its downstream signaling molecules at nanomolar doses, but cell viability was reduced, and caspase-3/7 was activated in GCT cells only at micromolar doses. Based on the present results, EGFR is active and abundantly expressed in the majority of GCTs, but probably has only minor contribution to GCT cell growth. Given the high doses of EGFR inhibitors required to reduce GCT cell viability in vitro, they are not likely to be effective for GCT treatment as single agents; they should rather be tested as part of combination therapies for these malignancies. PMID:24463098

  19. Correction of junctional epidermolysis bullosa by transplantation of genetically modified epidermal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mavilio, Fulvio; Pellegrini, Graziella; Ferrari, Stefano; Di Nunzio, Francesca; Di Iorio, Enzo; Recchia, Alessandra; Maruggi, Giulietta; Ferrari, Giuliana; Provasi, Elena; Bonini, Chiara; Capurro, Sergio; Conti, Andrea; Magnoni, Cristina; Giannetti, Alberto; De Luca, Michele

    2006-12-01

    The continuous renewal of human epidermis is sustained by stem cells contained in the epidermal basal layer and in hair follicles. Cultured keratinocyte stem cells, known as holoclones, generate sheets of epithelium used to restore severe skin, mucosal and corneal defects. Mutations in genes encoding the basement membrane component laminin 5 (LAM5) cause junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB), a devastating and often fatal skin adhesion disorder. Epidermal stem cells from an adult patient affected by LAM5-beta3-deficient JEB were transduced with a retroviral vector expressing LAMB3 cDNA (encoding LAM5-beta3), and used to prepare genetically corrected cultured epidermal grafts. Nine grafts were transplanted onto surgically prepared regions of the patient's legs. Engraftment was complete after 8 d. Synthesis and proper assembly of normal levels of functional LAM5 were observed, together with the development of a firmly adherent epidermis that remained stable for the duration of the follow-up (1 year) in the absence of blisters, infections, inflammation or immune response. Retroviral integration site analysis indicated that the regenerated epidermis is maintained by a defined repertoire of transduced stem cells. These data show that ex vivo gene therapy of JEB is feasible and leads to full functional correction of the disease. PMID:17115047

  20. Meis1 Regulates Epidermal Stem Cells and Is Required for Skin Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Kazuhiro; Saito, Megumi; Isogai, Eriko; Aoto, Yoshimasa; Hachiya, Tsuyoshi; Sakakibara, Yasubumi; Katsuragi, Yoshinori; Hirose, Satoshi; Kominami, Ryo; Goitsuka, Ryo; Nakamura, Takuro; Wakabayashi, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that Meis1 plays an important role in blood development and vascular homeostasis, and can induce blood cancers, such as leukemia. However, its role in epithelia remains largely unknown. Here, we uncover two roles for Meis1 in the epidermis: as a critical regulator of epidermal homeostasis in normal tissues and as a proto-oncogenic factor in neoplastic tissues. In normal epidermis, we show that Meis1 is predominantly expressed in the bulge region of the hair follicles where multipotent adult stem cells reside, and that the number of these stem cells is reduced when Meis1 is deleted in the epidermal tissue of mice. Mice with epidermal deletion of Meis1 developed significantly fewer DMBA/TPA-induced benign and malignant tumors compared with wild-type mice, suggesting that Meis1 plays a role in both tumor development and malignant progression. This is consistent with the observation that Meis1 expression increases as tumors progress from benign papillomas to malignant carcinomas. Interestingly, we found that Meis1 localization was altered to neoplasia development. Instead of being localized to the stem cell region, Meis1 is localized to more differentiated cells in tumor tissues. These findings suggest that, during the transformation from normal to neoplastic tissues, a functional switch occurs in Meis1. PMID:25013928

  1. Epidermal cells are the primary phagocytes in the fragmentation and clearance of degenerating dendrites in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Hui; Wang, Denan; Franc, Nathalie C.; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh-Nung

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY During developmental remodeling, neurites destined for pruning often degenerate on-site. Physical injury also induces degeneration of neurites distal to the injury site. Prompt clearance of degenerating neurites is important for maintaining tissue homeostasis and preventing inflammatory responses. Here we show that in both dendrite pruning and dendrite injury of Drosophila sensory neurons, epidermal cells rather than hemocytes are the primary phagocytes in clearing degenerating dendrites. Epidermal cells act via Draper-mediated recognition to facilitate dendrite degeneration and to engulf and degrade degenerating dendrites. Using multiple dendritic membrane markers to trace phagocytosis, we show that two members of the CD36 family, croquemort (crq) and debris buster (dsb), act at distinct stages of phagosome maturation for dendrite clearance. Our finding reveals the physiological importance of coordination between neurons and their surrounding epidermis, for both dendrite fragmentation and clearance. PMID:24412417

  2. Effects of topical pimecrolimus 1% on high-dose ultraviolet B-irradiated epidermal Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, ZhiQiang; Xu, JiaLi; Zhang, ZhiHong; Luo, Dan

    2012-12-01

    Some studies reported no changes in the number of epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) that were observed in mice treated with pimecrolimus, and low-dose stimulated solar radiation (once)-induced changers in LC are minimally affected by pimecrolimus. This study is to investigate the effects of topical pimecrolimus 1% on high-dose ultraviolet B (UVB)-irradiated epidermal LC. Forty human foreskin tissues were randomly divided into 4 groups of 10 tissues each: Group A, control; Group B, pimecrolimus 1% (once)-only; Group C, 180 mJ/cm(2) UVB (once)-only; Group D, UVB+pimecrolimus. Each tissue was cut into 4 pieces corresponding to 4 time points. All the tissues were cultured at 37 °C. After being treated, the tissues were collected respectively and processed for immunohistochemical staining and immunofluorescence staining. For UVB-only group, epidermal CD1a(+) LC number at 18h decreased from 39.6 ± 8.30 to 22.3 ± 2.26/5 high magnification, compared to CD1a(+) LC number at 0 h (P<0.01). The CD1a(+) LC number of UVB-only group was significantly less than other groups at 18 h, 24h and 48 h (P<0.05, respectively). Similar results were obtained with immunofluorescence staining for CD 1a and immunohistochemical staining for Langerin. The numbers of epidermal HLA-DR(+) LC had no significant differences among all groups at different time points. Our study found a single 180 mJ/cm(2) UVB irradiation significantly reduced epidermal LC numbers at 18 h, 24h and 48 h, however, topical pimecrolimus could reverse these changes. UVB plus pimecrolimus treatment did not affect human LC maturation. PMID:23079131

  3. Cell-Specific Production and Antimicrobial Activity of Naphthoquinones in Roots of Lithospermum erythrorhizon1

    PubMed Central

    Brigham, Lindy A.; Michaels, Paula J.; Flores, Hector E.

    1999-01-01

    Pigmented naphthoquinone derivatives of shikonin are produced at specific times and in specific cells of Lithospermum erythrorhizon roots. Normal pigment development is limited to root hairs and root border cells in hairy roots grown on “noninducing” medium, whereas induction of additional pigment production by abiotic (CuSO4) or biotic (fungal elicitor) factors increases the amount of total pigment, changes the ratios of derivatives produced, and initiates production of pigment de novo in epidermal cells. When the biological activity of these compounds was tested against soil-borne bacteria and fungi, a wide range of sensitivity was recorded. Acetyl-shikonin and β-hydroxyisovaleryl-shikonin, the two most abundant derivatives in both Agrobacterium rhizogenes-transformed “hairy-root” cultures and greenhouse-grown plant roots, were the most biologically active of the seven compounds tested. Hyphae of the pathogenic fungi Rhizoctonia solani, Pythium aphanidermatum, and Nectria hematococca induced localized pigment production upon contact with the roots. Challenge by R. solani crude elicitor increased shikonin derivative production 30-fold. We have studied the regulation of this suite of related, differentially produced, differentially active compounds to understand their role(s) in plant defense at the cellular level in the rhizosphere. PMID:9952436

  4. Skin Stem Cells: At the Frontier Between the Laboratory and Clinical Practice. Part 1: Epidermal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Pastushenko, I; Prieto-Torres, L; Gilaberte, Y; Blanpain, C

    2015-11-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their ability to self-renew and differentiate into the different cell lineages of their tissue of origin. The discovery of stem cells in adult tissues, together with the description of specific markers for their isolation, has opened up new lines of investigation, expanding the horizons of biomedical research and raising new hope in the treatment of many diseases. In this article, we review in detail the main characteristics of the stem cells that produce the specialized cells of the skin (epidermal, mesenchymal, and melanocyte stem cells) and their potential implications and applications in diseases affecting the skin. Part I deals with the principal characteristics and potential applications of epidermal stem cells in dermatology. PMID:26189363

  5. A barley ROP GTPase ACTIVATING PROTEIN associates with microtubules and regulates entry of the barley powdery mildew fungus into leaf epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Hoefle, Caroline; Huesmann, Christina; Schultheiss, Holger; Börnke, Frederik; Hensel, Götz; Kumlehn, Jochen; Hückelhoven, Ralph

    2011-06-01

    Little is known about the function of host factors involved in disease susceptibility. The barley (Hordeum vulgare) ROP (RHO of plants) G-protein RACB is required for full susceptibility of the leaf epidermis to invasion by the biotrophic fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp hordei. Stable transgenic knockdown of RACB reduced the ability of barley to accommodate haustoria of B. graminis in intact epidermal leaf cells and to form hairs on the root epidermis, suggesting that RACB is a common element of root hair outgrowth and ingrowth of haustoria in leaf epidermal cells. We further identified a barley MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED ROP-GTPASE ACTIVATING PROTEIN (MAGAP1) interacting with RACB in yeast and in planta. Fluorescent MAGAP1 decorated cortical microtubules and was recruited by activated RACB to the cell periphery. Under fungal attack, MAGAP1-labeled microtubules built a polarized network at sites of successful defense. By contrast, microtubules loosened where the fungus succeeded in penetration. Genetic evidence suggests a function of MAGAP1 in limiting susceptibility to penetration by B. graminis. Additionally, MAGAP1 influenced the polar organization of cortical microtubules. These results add to our understanding of how intact plant cells accommodate fungal infection structures and suggest that RACB and MAGAP1 might be antagonistic players in cytoskeleton organization for fungal entry. PMID:21685259

  6. Epidermal growth factor receptor in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Following the identification of a group of patients in the initial tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) trials for lung cancer, there has been detailed focus on which patients may benefit from inhibitor therapy. This article reviews the background, genetics and prevalence of epidermal growth factor mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Additionally, the prevalence in unselected patients is compared against various other reviews. PMID:25870793

  7. Infection of Cultured Thin Cell Layer Roots of Lycopersicon esculentum by Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Radin, D N; Eisenback, J D

    1991-10-01

    A new aseptic culture system for studying interactions between tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and Meloidogyne incognita is described. Epidermal thin cell layer explants from peduncles of tomato produced up to 20 adventitious roots per culture in 4-9 days on Murashige &Scoog medium plus kinetin and indole acetic acid. Rooted cultures were transferred to Gamborg's B-5 medium and inoculated with infective second-stage juveniles. Gall formation was apparent 5 days after inoculation and egg production by mature females occurred within 25 days at 25 C in the susceptible genotypes Rutgers and Red Alert. Resistant genotypes LA655, LA656, and LA1022 exhibited a characteristic hypersensitive response. This system provides large numbers of cultured root tips for studies on the molecular basis of the host-parasite relationship. PMID:19283152

  8. Substance P combined with epidermal stem cells promotes wound healing and nerve regeneration in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fei-Bin; Fang, Xiang-Jing; Liu, De-Wu; Shao, Ying; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Peng, Yan; Zhong, Qing-Ling; Li, Yong-Tie; Liu, De-Ming

    2016-03-01

    Exogenous substance P accelerates wound healing in diabetes, but the mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we established a rat model by intraperitoneally injecting streptozotocin. Four wounds (1.8 cm diameter) were drilled using a self-made punch onto the back, bilateral to the vertebral column, and then treated using amniotic membrane with epidermal stem cells and/or substance P around and in the middle of the wounds. With the combined treatment the wound-healing rate was 100% at 14 days. With prolonged time, type I collagen content gradually increased, yet type III collagen content gradually diminished. Abundant protein gene product 9.5- and substance P-immunoreactive nerve fibers regenerated. Partial nerve fiber endings extended to the epidermis. The therapeutic effects of combined substance P and epidermal stem cells were better than with amniotic membrane and either factor alone. Our results suggest that the combination of substance P and epidermal stem cells effectively contributes to nerve regeneration and wound healing in diabetic rats. PMID:27127492

  9. Substance P combined with epidermal stem cells promotes wound healing and nerve regeneration in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fei-bin; Fang, Xiang-jing; Liu, De-wu; Shao, Ying; Zhang, Hong-yan; Peng, Yan; Zhong, Qing-ling; Li, Yong-tie; Liu, De-ming

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous substance P accelerates wound healing in diabetes, but the mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we established a rat model by intraperitoneally injecting streptozotocin. Four wounds (1.8 cm diameter) were drilled using a self-made punch onto the back, bilateral to the vertebral column, and then treated using amniotic membrane with epidermal stem cells and/or substance P around and in the middle of the wounds. With the combined treatment the wound-healing rate was 100% at 14 days. With prolonged time, type I collagen content gradually increased, yet type III collagen content gradually diminished. Abundant protein gene product 9.5- and substance P-immunoreactive nerve fibers regenerated. Partial nerve fiber endings extended to the epidermis. The therapeutic effects of combined substance P and epidermal stem cells were better than with amniotic membrane and either factor alone. Our results suggest that the combination of substance P and epidermal stem cells effectively contributes to nerve regeneration and wound healing in diabetic rats. PMID:27127492

  10. A sensitive electrochemiluminescence cytosensor for quantitative evaluation of epidermal growth factor receptor expressed on cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yanjuan; Zhang, Shaolian; Wen, Qingqing; Huang, Hongxing; Yang, Peihui

    2015-06-30

    A sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) strategy for evaluating the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression level on cell surfaces was designed by integrating the specific recognition of EGFR expressed on MCF-7 cell surfaces with an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-funtionalized CdS quantum dots (CdSQDs)-capped magnetic bead (MB) probe. The high sensitivity of ECL probe of EGF-funtionalized CdSQD-capped-MB was used for competitive recognition with EGFR expressed on cell surfaces with recombinant EGFR protein. The changes of ECL intensity depended on both the cell number and the expression level of EGFR receptor on cell surfaces. A wide linear response to cells ranging from 80 to 4×10(6)cellsmL(-1) with a detection limit of 40cellsmL(-1) was obtained. The EGF-cytosensor was used to evaluate EGFR expression levels on MCF-7 cells, and the average number of EGFR receptor on single MCF-7 cells was 1.35×10(5) with the relative standard deviation of 4.3%. This strategy was further used for in-situ and real-time evaluating EGFR receptor expressed on cell surfaces in response to drugs stimulation at different concentration and incubation time. The proposed method provided potential applications in the detection of receptors on cancer cells and anticancer drugs screening. PMID:26041531

  11. Effects of epidermal growth factor on neural crest cells in tissue culture

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, C.A.; Turley, E.A.

    1987-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates the release of hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) from quail trunk neural crest cultures in a dose-dependent fashion. It also promotes the expression of cell-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) as detected by immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation of the /sup 3/H-labeled proteoglycan. Furthermore, EGF stimulates (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation into total cell DNA. These results raise the possibility that EGF or an analogous growth factor is involved in regulation of neural crest cell morphogenesis.

  12. Development of a laser capture microscope-based single-cell-type proteomics tool for studying proteomes of individual cell layers of plant roots

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yingde; Li, Hui; Bhatti, Sarabjit; Zhou, Suping; Yang, Yong; Fish, Tara; Thannhauser, Theodore W

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell-type proteomics provides the capability to revealing the genomic and proteomics information at cell-level resolution. However, the methodology for this type of research has not been well-developed. This paper reports developing a workflow of laser capture microdissection (LCM) followed by gel-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS)-based proteomics analysis for the identification of proteomes contained in individual cell layers of tomato roots. Thin-sections (~10-μm thick, 10 sections per root tip) were prepared for root tips of tomato germinating seedlings. Epidermal and cortical cells (5000–7000 cells per tissue type) were isolated under a LCM microscope. Proteins were isolated and then separated by SDS–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by in-gel-tryptic digestion. The MS and MS/MS spectra generated using nanoLC-MS/MS analysis of the tryptic peptides were searched against ITAG2.4 tomato protein database to identify proteins contained in each single-cell-type sample. Based on the biological functions, proteins with proven functions in root hair development were identified in epidermal cells but not in the cortical cells. Several of these proteins were found in Al-treated roots only. The results demonstrated that the cell-type-specific proteome is relevant for tissue-specific functions in tomato roots. Increasing the coverage of proteomes and reducing the inevitable cross-contamination from adjacent cell layers, in both vertical and cross directions when cells are isolated from slides prepared using intact root tips, are the major challenges using the technology in proteomics analysis of plant roots. PMID:27280026

  13. Development of a laser capture microscope-based single-cell-type proteomics tool for studying proteomes of individual cell layers of plant roots.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingde; Li, Hui; Bhatti, Sarabjit; Zhou, Suping; Yang, Yong; Fish, Tara; Thannhauser, Theodore W

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell-type proteomics provides the capability to revealing the genomic and proteomics information at cell-level resolution. However, the methodology for this type of research has not been well-developed. This paper reports developing a workflow of laser capture microdissection (LCM) followed by gel-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS)-based proteomics analysis for the identification of proteomes contained in individual cell layers of tomato roots. Thin-sections (~10-μm thick, 10 sections per root tip) were prepared for root tips of tomato germinating seedlings. Epidermal and cortical cells (5000-7000 cells per tissue type) were isolated under a LCM microscope. Proteins were isolated and then separated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by in-gel-tryptic digestion. The MS and MS/MS spectra generated using nanoLC-MS/MS analysis of the tryptic peptides were searched against ITAG2.4 tomato protein database to identify proteins contained in each single-cell-type sample. Based on the biological functions, proteins with proven functions in root hair development were identified in epidermal cells but not in the cortical cells. Several of these proteins were found in Al-treated roots only. The results demonstrated that the cell-type-specific proteome is relevant for tissue-specific functions in tomato roots. Increasing the coverage of proteomes and reducing the inevitable cross-contamination from adjacent cell layers, in both vertical and cross directions when cells are isolated from slides prepared using intact root tips, are the major challenges using the technology in proteomics analysis of plant roots. PMID:27280026

  14. Mechanisms of Chemical Cooperative Carcinogenesis by Epidermal Langerhans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Julia M.; Bürgler, Christina D.; Fraser, Juliet A.; Liao, Haihui; Golubets, Kseniya; Kucher, Cynthia L.; Zhao, Peter Y.; Filler, Renata B.; Tigelaar, Robert E.; Girardi, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most prevalent invasive malignancy with metastatic potential. The epidermis is exposed to a variety of environmental DNA-damaging chemicals, principal among which are polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) ubiquitous in the environment, tobacco smoke, and broiled meats. Langerhans cells (LC) comprise a network of dendritic cells situated adjacent to basal, suprabasal, and follicular infundibular keratinocytes that when mutated can give rise to SCC, and LC-intact mice are markedly more susceptible than LC-deficient mice to chemical carcinogenesis provoked by initiation with the model PAH, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). LC rapidly internalize and depot DMBA as numerous membrane-independent cytoplasmic foci. Repopulation of LC-deficient mice using fetal liver LC-precursors restores DMBA-induced tumor susceptibility. LC expression of p450 enzyme CYP1B1 is required for maximal rapid induction of DNA-damage within adjacent keratinocytes and their efficient neoplastic transformation; however, effects of tumor progression also attributable to the presence of LC were revealed as CYP1B1-independent. Thus, LC make multifaceted contributions to cutaneous carcinogenesis, including via the handling and metabolism of chemical mutagens. Such findings suggest a cooperative carcinogenesis role for myeloid-derived cells resident within cancer susceptible epithelial tissues principally by influencing early events in malignant transformation. PMID:25233073

  15. Corrective transduction of human epidermal stem cells in laminin-5-dependent junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Dellambra, E; Vailly, J; Pellegrini, G; Bondanza, S; Golisano, O; Macchia, C; Zambruno, G; Meneguzzi, G; De Luca, M

    1998-06-10

    Laminin-5 is composed of three distinct polypeptides, alpha3, beta3, and gamma2, which are encoded by three different genes, LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2, respectively. We have isolated epidermal keratinocytes from a patient presenting with a lethal form of junctional epidermolysis bullosa characterized by a homozygous mutation of the LAMB3 gene, which led to complete absence of the beta3 polypeptide. In vitro, beta3-null keratinocytes were unable to synthesize laminin-5 and to assemble hemidesmosomes, maintained the impairment of their adhesive properties, and displayed a decrease of their colony-forming ability. A retroviral construct expressing a human beta3 cDNA was used to transduce primary beta3-null keratinocytes. Clonogenic beta3-null keratinocytes were transduced with an efficiency of 100%. Beta3-transduced keratinocytes were able to synthesize and secrete mature heterotrimeric laminin-5. Gene correction fully restored the keratinocyte adhesion machinery, including the capacity of proper hemidesmosomal assembly, and prevented the loss of the colony-forming ability, suggesting a direct link between adhesion to laminin-5 and keratinocyte proliferative capacity. Clonal analysis demonstrated that holoclones expressed the transgene permanently, suggesting stable correction of epidermal stem cells. Because cultured keratinocytes are used routinely to make autologous grafts for patients suffering from large skin or mucosal defects, the full phenotypic reversion of primary human epidermal stem cells defective for a structural protein opens new perspectives in the long-term treatment of genodermatoses. PMID:9650620

  16. Effect of microtubule-associated protein-4 on epidermal cell migration under different oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Zhou, Xin; Mao, Tong-Chun; Shi, Xiao-Hua; Fan, Dong-Li; Zhang, Yi-Ming

    2016-06-01

    After skin trauma, regional epidermal cell migration mediates the re-epithelialization of the wound surface, which is an important step for wound healing, yet the underlying molecular regulatory mechanism is unclear. In the current study, HaCaT cells were maintained under different oxygen concentrations (1%, 21%, 40% and 65%). Technologies including immunofluorescence staining, wound scratch, transwell invasion, western blot and low-expression lentiviral vector were utilized to observe the changes in microtubule dynamics and the microtubule-associated protein (MAP)4 expression. MAP4's effect on cell migration under different oxygen concentrations was also studied. The results showed that under hyperoxic (40% and 65%) and hypoxic (1%) conditions, HaCaT cells were able to regulate cell microtubule dynamics by MAP4, thus promoting cell migration. On the other hand, MAP4 silencing through targeted shRNA attenuated HaCaT cell migration under the above oxygen concentrations. These results imply that MAP4 plays an important role in epidermal cell migration under different oxygen concentrations. PMID:26602869

  17. Low calcium culture condition induces mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in normal human epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Murakami, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Hiroaki; Okano, Teruo

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Normal human epidermal keratinocytes serially cultured under low calcium concentration were cytokeratin and vimentin double positive cells. {yields} The human keratinocytes expressed some epithelial stem/progenitor cell makers, mesenchymal cell markers, and markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. {yields} Mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in the keratinocytes was suppressed under high-calcium condition. -- Abstract: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important cellular phenomenon in organ developments, cancer invasions, and wound healing, and many types of transformed cell lines are used for investigating for molecular mechanisms of EMT. However, there are few reports for EMT in normal human epithelial cells, which are non-transformed or non-immortalized cells, in vitro. Therefore, normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) serially cultured in low-calcium concentration medium (LCM) were used for investigating relations between differentiation and proliferation and mesenchymal-like phenotype in the present study, since long-term cultivation of NHEK is achieved in LCM. Interestingly, NHEK serially cultured in LCM consisted essentially of cytokeratin-vimentin double positive cells (98%), although the NHEK exhibited differentiation under high-calcium culture condition with 3T3 feeder layer. The vimentin expression was suppressed under high-calcium condition. These results may indicate the importance of mesenchymal-like phenotype for serially cultivation of NHEK in vitro.

  18. Model system for plant cell biology: GFP imaging in living onion epidermal cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, A.; Wyatt, S.; Tsou, P. L.; Robertson, D.; Allen, N. S.

    1999-01-01

    The ability to visualize organelle localization and dynamics is very useful in studying cellular physiological events. Until recently, this has been accomplished using a variety of staining methods. However, staining can give inaccurate information due to nonspecific staining, diffusion of the stain or through toxic effects. The ability to target green fluorescent protein (GFP) to various organelles allows for specific labeling of organelles in vivo. The disadvantages of GFP thus far have been the time and money involved in developing stable transformants or maintaining cell cultures for transient expression. In this paper, we present a rapid transient expression system using onion epidermal peels. We have localized GFP to various cellular compartments (including the cell wall) to illustrate the utility of this method and to visualize dynamics of these compartments. The onion epidermis has large, living, transparent cells in a monolayer, making them ideal for visualizing GFP. This method is easy and inexpensive, and it allows for testing of new GFP fusion proteins in a living tissue to determine deleterious effects and the ability to express before stable transformants are attempted.

  19. Cell type-specific responses to salinity - the epidermal bladder cell transcriptome of Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dong-Ha; Barkla, Bronwyn J; Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Pantoja, Omar; Lee, Sang-Yeol; Bohnert, Hans J; Dassanayake, Maheshi

    2015-08-01

    Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (ice plant) exhibits extreme tolerance to salt. Epidermal bladder cells (EBCs), developing on the surface of aerial tissues and specialized in sodium sequestration and other protective functions, are critical for the plant's stress adaptation. We present the first transcriptome analysis of EBCs isolated from intact plants, to investigate cell type-specific responses during plant salt adaptation. We developed a de novo assembled, nonredundant EBC reference transcriptome. Using RNAseq, we compared the expression patterns of the EBC-specific transcriptome between control and salt-treated plants. The EBC reference transcriptome consists of 37 341 transcript-contigs, of which 7% showed significantly different expression between salt-treated and control samples. We identified significant changes in ion transport, metabolism related to energy generation and osmolyte accumulation, stress signalling, and organelle functions, as well as a number of lineage-specific genes of unknown function, in response to salt treatment. The salinity-induced EBC transcriptome includes active transcript clusters, refuting the view of EBCs as passive storage compartments in the whole-plant stress response. EBC transcriptomes, differing from those of whole plants or leaf tissue, exemplify the importance of cell type-specific resolution in understanding stress adaptive mechanisms. PMID:25944243

  20. Communication is key: Reducing DEK1 activity reveals a link between cell-cell contacts and epidermal cell differentiation status.

    PubMed

    Galletti, Roberta; Ingram, Gwyneth C

    2015-01-01

    Plant epidermis development requires not only the initial acquisition of tissue identity, but also the ability to differentiate specific cell types over time and to maintain these differentiated states throughout the plant life. To set-up and maintain differentiation, plants activate specific transcriptional programs. Interfering with these programs can prevent differentiation and/or force differentiated cells to lose their identity and re-enter a proliferative state. We have recently shown that the Arabidopsis Defective Kernel 1 (DEK1) protein is required both for the differentiation of epidermal cells and for the maintenance of their fully differentiated state. Defects in DEK1 activity lead to a deregulation of the expression of epidermis-specific differentiation-promoting HD-ZIP IV transcription factors. Here we propose a working model in which DEK1, by maintaining cell-cell contacts, and thus communication between neighboring cells, influences HD-ZIP IV gene expression and epidermis differentiation. PMID:27064205

  1. Lewisy Promotes Migration of Oral Cancer Cells by Glycosylation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Ling; Lin, Yi-Shiuan; Shi, Guey-Yueh; Chang, Chuan-Fa; Wu, Hua-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation changes normal cellular functions and represents a specific hallmark of cancer. Lewisy (Ley) carbohydrate upregulation has been reported in a variety of cancers, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). A high level of Ley expression is related to poor prognosis of patients with oral cancer. However, it is unclear how Ley mediates oral cancer progression. In this study, the role of Ley in OSCC was explored. Our data showed that Ley was upregulated in HSC-3 and OC-2 OSCC cell lines. Particularly, glycosylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with Ley was found in OC-2 cells, and this modification was absent upon inhibition of Ley synthesis. The absence of Ley glycosylation of EGFR weakened phosphorylation of AKT and ERK in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF). Additionally, EGF-triggered cell migration was reduced, but cell proliferation was not affected. Ley modification stabilized EGFR upon ligand activation. Conversely, absence of Ley glycosylation accelerated EGFR degradation. In summary, these results indicate that increased expression of Ley in OSCC cells is able to promote cell migration by modifying EGFR which in turn stabilizes EGFR expression and downstream signaling. Targeting Ley on EGFR could have a potential therapeutic effect on oral cancer. PMID:25799278

  2. Cell population kinetic parameters for acute epidermal reactions in man

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, L.

    1986-11-01

    Cell population kinetic parameters for acute reactions in squamous epithelium were estimated using available data on skin tolerance doses. Roughly equivalent doses for kilovoltage radiation delivered in equal daily fractions, as reported by F. Ellis (Br. J. Radiol. 15, 348-350 (1942)) and by R. Paterson (The Treatment of Malignant Disease by Radium and X-Rays. Edward Arnold, London, 1948), were combined with data for nonstandard fractionation at longer intervals of 1 or 2 weeks. By analyzing the combined data set, well-determined parameters could be derived. The data show that repopulation, with a potential cell doubling time of about 7 days, must occur in irradiated human skin, though this may possibly be limited to no more than seven doublings. The parameters derived are distinctly different from those associated with late-reacting dose-limiting tissues. The main difference is the steeper initial slope of the computed survival curve, that is a larger J parameter (multitarget model) or a larger alpha component (linear-quadratic model).

  3. Amphiregulin enhances regulatory T cell-suppressive function via the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Zaiss, Dietmar M W; van Loosdregt, Jorg; Gorlani, Andrea; Bekker, Cornelis P J; Gröne, Andrea; Sibilia, Maria; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M P; Roovers, Rob C; Coffer, Paul J; Sijts, Alice J A M

    2013-02-21

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is known to be critically involved in tissue development and homeostasis as well as in the pathogenesis of cancer. Here we showed that Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells express EGFR under inflammatory conditions. Stimulation with the EGF-like growth factor Amphiregulin (AREG) markedly enhanced Treg cell function in vitro, and in a colitis and tumor vaccination model we showed that AREG was critical for efficient Treg cell function in vivo. In addition, mast cell-derived AREG fully restored optimal Treg cell function. These findings reveal EGFR as a component in the regulation of local immune responses and establish a link between mast cells and Treg cells. Targeting of this immune regulatory mechanism may contribute to the therapeutic successes of EGFR-targeting treatments in cancer patients. PMID:23333074

  4. Cell wall pectic (1-->4)-beta-d-galactan marks the acceleration of cell elongation in the Arabidopsis seedling root meristem.

    PubMed

    McCartney, Lesley; Steele-King, Clare G; Jordan, Emillie; Knox, J Paul

    2003-02-01

    Here we demonstrate that the pectic rhamnogalacturonan-I-associated LM5 (1-->4)-beta-d-galactan epitope occurs in a restricted manner at the root surface of intact Arabidopsis seedlings. The root surface occurrence of (1-->4)-beta-d-galactan marks the transition zone at or near the onset of rapid cell elongation and the epitope is similarly restricted in occurrence in epidermal, cortical and endodermal cell walls. The extent of surface (1-->4)-beta-d-galactan occurrence is reduced in response to genetic mutations (stp-1, ctr-1) and hormone applications that reduce root cell elongation. In contrast, the application of the arabinogalactan-protein (AGP) binding beta-glucosyl Yariv reagent (betaGlcY) that disrupts cell elongation results in the persistence of (1-->4)-beta-d-galactan at the root surface and in epidermal, cortical and endodermal cell walls. This latter observation indicates that modulation of pectic (1-->4)-beta-d-galactan may be an event downstream of AGP function during cell expansion in the Arabidopsis seedling root. PMID:12581303

  5. Expression of an Exogenous Growth Hormone Gene by Transplantable Human Epidermal Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Jeffrey R.; Barrandon, Yann; Green, Howard; Mulligan, Richard C.

    1987-09-01

    Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer was used to introduce a recombinant human growth hormone gene into cultured human keratinocytes. The transduced keratinocytes secreted biologically active growth hormone into the culture medium. When grafted as an epithelial sheet onto athymic mice, these cultured keratinocytes reconstituted an epidermis that was similar in appearance to that resulting from normal cells, but from which human growth hormone could be extracted. Transduced epidermal cells may prove to be a general vehicle for the delivery of gene products by means of grafting.

  6. Vanadate induces apoptosis in epidermal JB6 P+ cells via hydrogen peroxide-mediated reactions.

    PubMed

    Ye, J; Ding, M; Leonard, S S; Robinson, V A; Millecchia, L; Zhang, X; Castranova, V; Vallyathan, V; Shi, X

    1999-12-01

    Apoptosis is a physiological mechanism for the control of DNA integrity in mammalian cells. Vanadium induces both DNA damage and apoptosis. It is suggested that vanadium-induced apoptosis serves to eliminate DNA-damaged cells. This study is designed to clarify a role of reactive oxygen species in the mechanism of apoptosis induced by vanadium. We established apoptosis model with murine epidermal JB6 P+ cells in the response to vanadium stimulation. Apoptosis was detected by a cell death ELISA assay and morphological analysis. The result shows that apoptosis induced by vanadate is dose-dependent, reaching its saturation level at a concentration of 100 microM vanadate. Vanadyl (IV) can also induce apoptosis albeit with lesser potency. A role of reactive oxygen species was analyzed by multiple reagents including specific scavengers of different reactive oxygen species. The result shows that vanadate-induced apoptosis is enhanced by NADPH, superoxide dismutase and sodium formate, but was inhibited by catalase and deferoxamine. Cells exposed to vanadium consume more molecular oxygen and at the same time, produce more H2O2 as measured by the change in fluorescence of scopoletin in the presence of horseradish peroxidase. This change in oxygen consumption and H2O2 production is enhanced by NADPH. Taken together, these results show that vanadate induces apoptosis in epidermal cells and H2O2 induced by vanadate plays a major role in this process. PMID:10705990

  7. Protein profiling of epidermal bladder cells from the halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

    PubMed

    Barkla, Bronwyn J; Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Pantoja, Omar

    2012-09-01

    Plant epidermal trichomes are as varied in morphology as they are in function. In the halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, specialized trichomes called epidermal bladder cells (EBC) line the surface of leaves and stems, and increase dramatically in size and volume upon plant salt-treatment. These cells have been proposed to have roles in plant defense and UV protection, but primarily in sodium sequestration and as water reservoirs. To gain further understanding into the roles of EBC, a cell-type-specific proteomics approach was taken in which precision single-cell sampling of cell sap from individual EBC was combined with shotgun peptide sequencing (LC-MS/MS). Identified proteins showed diverse biological functions and cellular locations, with a high representation of proteins involved in H(+)-transport, carbohydrate metabolism, and photosynthesis. The proteome of EBC provides insight into the roles of these cells in ion and water homeostasis and raises the possibility that they are photosynthetically active and functioning in Crassulacean acid metabolism. PMID:22848050

  8. Ultrastructure of the Epidermal Cell Wall and Cuticle of Tomato Fruit (Solanum lycopersicum L.) during Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Segado, Patricia; Domínguez, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The epidermis plays a pivotal role in plant development and interaction with the environment. However, it is still poorly understood, especially its outer epidermal wall: a singular wall covered by a cuticle. Changes in the cuticle and cell wall structures are important to fully understand their functions. In this work, an ultrastructure and immunocytochemical approach was taken to identify changes in the cuticle and the main components of the epidermal cell wall during tomato fruit development. A thin and uniform procuticle was already present before fruit set. During cell division, the inner side of the procuticle showed a globular structure with vesicle-like particles in the cell wall close to the cuticle. Transition between cell division and elongation was accompanied by a dramatic increase in cuticle thickness, which represented more than half of the outer epidermal wall, and the lamellate arrangement of the non-cutinized cell wall. Changes in this non-cutinized outer wall during development showed specific features not shared with other cell walls. The coordinated nature of the changes observed in the cuticle and the epidermal cell wall indicate a deep interaction between these two supramolecular structures. Hence, the cuticle should be interpreted within the context of the outer epidermal wall. PMID:26668335

  9. Skin mucus of Cyprinus carpio inhibits cyprinid herpesvirus 3 binding to epidermal cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) is the aetiological agent of a mortal and highly contagious disease in common and koi carp. The skin is the major portal of entry of CyHV-3 in carp after immersion in water containing the virus. In the present study, we used in vivo bioluminescence imaging to investigate the effect of skin mucus removal and skin epidermis lesion on CyHV-3 entry. Physical treatments inducing removal of the mucus up to complete erosion of the epidermis were applied on a defined area of carp skin just before inoculation by immersion in infectious water. CyHV-3 entry in carp was drastically enhanced on the area of the skin where the mucus was removed with or without associated epidermal lesion. To investigate whether skin mucus inhibits CyHV-3 binding to epidermal cells, tail fins with an intact mucus layer or without mucus were inoculated ex vivo. While electron microscopy examination revealed numerous viral particles bound on the fins inoculated after mucus removal, no particle could be detected after infection of mucus-covered fins. Finally, anti-CyHV-3 neutralising activity of mucus extract was tested in vitro. Incubation of CyHV-3 with mucus extract reduced its infectivity in a dose dependent manner. The present study demonstrates that skin mucus removal and epidermal lesions enhance CyHV-3 entry in carp. It highlights the role of fish skin mucus as an innate immune protection against viral epidermal entry. PMID:21816061

  10. Epidermal growth factor increases LRF/Pokemon expression in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Himanshu; Aggarwal, Anshu; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2011-10-01

    Leukemia/lymphoma related factor/POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor (LRF/Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of proteins that promotes oncogenesis in several forms of cancer. Recently, we found higher LRF expression in human breast and prostate carcinomas compared to the corresponding normal tissues. The aim of this study was to examine the regulation of LRF expression in human prostate cells. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptors mediate several tumorigenic cascades that regulate cell differentiation, proliferation, migration and survival of prostate cancer cells. There was significantly higher level of LRF expression in the nucleus of LNCaP and PC-3 cells than RWPE-1 cells. A significant increase in LRF expression was observed with increasing doses of EGF in more aggressive and androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells suggesting that EGF signaling pathway is critical in upregulating the expression of LRF/Pokemon to promote oncogenesis. PMID:21640721

  11. Response of mouse epidermal cells to single doses of heavy-particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leith, J. T.; Schilling, W. A.; Welch, G. P.

    1972-01-01

    The survival of mouse epidermal cells to heavy-particles has been studied In Vivo by the Withers clone technique. Experiments with accelerated helium, lithium and carbon ions were performed. The survival curve for the helium ion irradiations used a modified Bragg curve method with a maximum tissue penetration of 465 microns, and indicated that the dose needed to reduce the original cell number to 1 surviving cell/square centimeters was 1525 rads with a D sub o of 95 rads. The LET at the basal cell layer was 28.6 keV per micron. Preliminary experiments with lithium and carbon used treatment doses of 1250 rads with LET's at the surface of the skin of 56 and 193 keV per micron respectively. Penetration depths in skin were 350 and 530 microns for the carbon and lithium ions whose Bragg curves were unmodified. Results indicate a maximum RBE for skin of about 2 using the skin cloning technique. An attempt has been made to relate the epidermal cell survival curve to mortality of the whole animal for helium ions.

  12. A GFP-MAP4 reporter gene for visualizing cortical microtubule rearrangements in living epidermal cells

    PubMed

    Marc; Granger; Brincat; Fisher; Kao; McCubbin; Cyr

    1998-11-01

    Microtubules influence morphogenesis by forming distinct geometrical arrays in the cell cortex, which in turn affect the deposition of cellulose microfibrils. Although many chemical and physical factors affect microtubule orientation, it is unclear how cortical microtubules in elongating cells maintain their ordered transverse arrays and how they reorganize into new geometries. To visualize these reorientations in living cells, we constructed a microtubule reporter gene by fusing the microtubule binding domain of the mammalian microtubule-associated protein 4 (MAP4) gene with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene, and transient expression of the recombinant protein in epidermal cells of fava bean was induced. The reporter protein decorates microtubules in vivo and binds to microtubules in vitro. Confocal microscopy and time-course analysis of labeled cortical arrays along the outer epidermal wall revealed the lengthening, shortening, and movement of microtubules; localized microtubule reorientations; and global microtubule reorganizations. The global microtubule orientation in some cells fluctuates about the transverse axis and may be a result of a cyclic self-correcting mechanism to maintain a net transverse orientation during cellular elongation. PMID:9811799

  13. Transdifferentiation of Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Into Epidermal-Like Cells by the Mimicking Skin Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Deyun; Hao, Haojie; Tong, Chuan; Liu, Jiejie; Dong, Liang; Ti, Dongdong; Hou, Qian; Liu, Huiling; Han, Weidong; Fu, Xiaobing

    2015-06-01

    Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) are multipotent, primitive, and have been widely used for skin tissue engineering. Their transdifferentiation is determined by the local microenvironment. In this study, we investigated the potential epidermal differentiation of UC-MSCs and the formation of epidermis substitutes in a 3-dimensional (3D) microenvironment, which was fabricated by UC-MSCs embedded into collagen-chitosan scaffolds (CCSs) combined with an air-liquid interface (ALI) culture system. Using fluorescence microscope, we observed that UC-MSCs were spindle-shaped and evenly distributed in the scaffold. Methyl thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide assay and Live/Dead assay indicated that the CCSs have good biocompatibility with UC-MSCs. Immunohistochemistry and western blotting assay showed that UC-MSCs on the surface of the CCSs were positive for the epidermal markers cytokeratin 19 and involucrin at 14 days. In addition, hematoxylin-eosin staining indicated that multilayered epidermis substitutes were established. The constructed epidermis substitutes were applied to treat full-thickness wounds in rats and proved to promote wound healing. In conclusion, manipulating the 3D microenvironment is a novel method for inducing the epidermal differentiation of MSCs to engineer epidermal substitutes, which provides an alternative strategy for skin tissue engineering. PMID:25700709

  14. IL-31-Driven Skin Remodeling Involves Epidermal Cell Proliferation and Thickening That Lead to Impaired Skin-Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Brijendra; Jegga, Anil G.; Shanmukhappa, Kumar S.; Edukulla, Ramakrishna; Khurana, Gurjit H.; Medvedovic, Mario; Dillon, Stacey R.; Madala, Satish K.

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-31 (IL-31) is a type 2 helper T-cell-derived cytokine that has recently been shown to cause severe inflammation and tissue remodeling in multiple chronic diseases of the skin and lungs. IL-31 is upregulated in allergic and inflammatory diseases, including atopic dermatitis, asthma, cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, and allergic rhinitis, as well as autoimmune diseases such as systemic erythematosus. Overexpression of IL-31 in T cells causes severe inflammation, with histological features similar to skin lesions of patients with atopic dermatitis. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in IL31-driven pathological remodeling in skin diseases remain largely unknown. Here, we studied the role of IL-31 in skin damage as a result of intradermal administration of recombinant IL-31 into mice. Notably, IL-31 was sufficient to increase epidermal basal-cell proliferation and thickening of the epidermal skin layer. Our findings demonstrate a progressive increase in transepidermal water loss with chronic administration of IL-31 into the skin. Further, analysis of the skin transcriptome indicates a significant increase in the transcripts involved in epidermal-cell proliferation, epidermal thickening, and mechanical integrity. In summary, our findings demonstrate an important role for IL-31 signaling in epidermal cell proliferation and thickening that together may lead to impaired skin-barrier function in pathological remodeling of the skin. PMID:27556734

  15. Transcriptional mechanisms link epithelial plasticity to adhesion and differentiation of epidermal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Briana; Villarreal-Ponce, Alvaro; Fallahi, Magid; Ovadia, Jeremy; Sun, Peng; Yu, Qian-Chun; Ito, Seiji; Sinha, Satrajit; Nie, Qing; Dai, Xing

    2014-01-01

    During epithelial tissue morphogenesis, developmental progenitor cells undergo dynamic adhesive and cytoskeletal remodeling to trigger proliferation and migration. Transcriptional mechanisms that restrict such mild form of epithelial plasticity to maintain lineage-restricted differentiation in committed epithelial tissues are poorly understood. Here we report that simultaneous ablation of transcriptional repressor-encoding Ovol1 and Ovol2 results in expansion and blocked terminal differentiation of embryonic epidermal progenitor cells. Conversely, mice overexpressing Ovol2 in their skin epithelia exhibit precocious differentiation accompanied by smaller progenitor cell compartments. We show that Ovol1/2-deficient epidermal cells fail to undertake α-catenin–driven actin cytoskeletal reorganization and adhesive maturation, and exhibit changes that resemble epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Remarkably, these alterations as well as defective terminal differentiation are reversed upon depletion of EMT-promoting transcriptional factor Zeb1. Collectively, our findings reveal Ovol-Zeb1-α-catenin sequential repression and highlight functions of Ovol as gatekeepers of epithelial adhesion and differentiation by inhibiting progenitor-like traits and epithelial plasticity. PMID:24735878

  16. The expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in human skin: the relationship with epidermal cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Stoebner, P E; Carayon, P; Penarier, G; Fréchin, N; Barnéon, G; Casellas, P; Cano, J P; Meynadier, J; Meunier, L

    1999-06-01

    The peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) is a protein of mitochondrial outer membranes utilizing porphyrins as endogenous ligands. PBR is part of a heteromeric receptor complex involved in the formation of mitochondrial permeability transition pores and in the early events of apoptosis. PBR may function as an oxygen-dependent signal generator; recent data indicate that these receptors may preserve the mitochondria of haematopoietic cell lines from damage caused by oxygen radicals. To identify PBRs in human skin, we used a specific monoclonal antibody directed against the C-terminus fragment of the human receptor. PBR immunoreactivity was found in keratinocytes, Langerhans cells, hair follicles and dermal vascular endothelial cells. Interestingly, confocal microscopic examination of skin sections revealed that PBR expression was strongly upregulated in the superficial differentiated layers of the epidermis. Ultrastructurally, PBRs were distributed throughout the cytoplasm but were selectively expressed on the mitochondrial membranes of epidermal cells. The elevated level of PBRs in the spinous layer was not associated with an increased number of mitochondria nor with an increased amount of mRNA as assessed by in situ hybridization on microautoradiographed skin sections. The present work provides, for the first time, evidence of PBR immunoreactivity in human skin. This mitochondrial receptor may modulate apoptosis in the epidermis; its increased expression in differentiated epidermal layers may represent a novel mechanism of natural skin protection against free radical damage generated by ultraviolet exposure. PMID:10354064

  17. Epidermal Neural Crest Stem Cell (EPI-NCSC)—Mediated Recovery of Sensory Function in a Mouse Model of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yao Fei; Gourab, Krishnaj; Wells, Clive; Clewes, Oliver; Schmit, Brian D.

    2010-01-01

    Here we show that epidermal neural crest stem cell (EPI-NCSC) transplants in the contused spinal cord caused a 24% improvement in sensory connectivity and a substantial recovery of touch perception. Furthermore we present a novel method for the ex vivo expansion of EPI-NCSC into millions of stem cells that takes advantage of the migratory ability of neural crest stem cells and is based on a new culture medium and the use of microcarriers. Functional improvement was shown by two independent methods, spinal somatosensory evoked potentials (SpSEP) and the Semmes-Weinstein touch test. Subsets of transplanted cells differentiated into myelinating oligodendrocytes. Unilateral injections of EPI-NCSC into the lesion of midline contused mouse spinal cords elicited bilateral improvements. Intraspinal EPI-NCSC did not migrate laterally in the spinal cord or invade the spinal roots and dorsal root ganglia, thus implicating diffusible factors. EPI-NCSC expressed neurotrophic factors, angiogenic factors, and metalloproteases. The strength of EPI-NCSC thus is that they can exert a combination of pertinent functions in the contused spinal cord, including cell replacement, neuroprotection, angiogenesis and modulation of scar formation. EPI-NCSC are uniquely qualified for cell-based therapy in spinal cord injury, as neural crest cells and neural tube stem cells share a higher order stem cell and are thus ontologically closely related. PMID:20414748

  18. Targeting epidermal growth factor receptor for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: still lost in translation?

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Christopher H.; Saba, Nabil F.

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is preferentially expressed in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), and is a promising therapeutic target. Yet other than cetuximab, no agent targeting EGFR has been approved for this disease, and none has shown benefit over the standard of care. Several randomized trials of antibody and small molecule agents have found no new indication for these agents, despite their initial promise. In this review, we examine the major clinical evidence and discuss potential future developments of translational science in this area, including use of these agents in risk-stratified subgroups, inhibition of downstream/parallel targets, and combination with immunotherapy. PMID:27004227

  19. In Situ Measurement of Epidermal Cell Turgor, Leaf Water Potential, and Gas Exchange in Tradescantia virginiana L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Shackel, Kenneth A.; Brinckmann, Enno

    1985-01-01

    A combined system has been developed in which epidermal cell turgor, leaf water potential, and gas exchange were determined for transpiring leaves of Tradescantia virginiana L. Uniform and stable values of turgor were observed in epidermal cells (stomatal complex cells were not studied) under stable environmental conditions for both upper and lower epidermises. The changes in epidermal cell turgor that were associated with changes in leaf transpiration were larger than the changes in leaf water potential, indicating the presence of transpirationally induced within-leaf water potential gradients. Estimates of 3 to 5 millimoles per square meter per second per megapascal were obtained for the value of within-leaf hydraulic conductivity. Step changes in atmospheric humidity caused rapid changes in epidermal cell turgor with little or no initial change in stomatal conductance, indicating little direct relation between stomatal humidity response and epidermal water status. The significance of within-leaf water potential gradients to measurements of plant water potential and to current hypotheses regarding stomatal response to humidity is discussed. PMID:16664210

  20. Effect of Storage Temperature on Cultured Epidermal Cell Sheets Stored in Xenobiotic-Free Medium

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Catherine; Aabel, Peder; Eidet, Jon R.; Messelt, Edward B.; Lyberg, Torstein; von Unge, Magnus; Utheim, Tor P.

    2014-01-01

    Cultured epidermal cell sheets (CECS) are used in regenerative medicine in patients with burns, and have potential to treat limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD), as demonstrated in animal models. Despite widespread use, short-term storage options for CECS are limited. Advantages of storage include: flexibility in scheduling surgery, reserve sheets for repeat operations, more opportunity for quality control, and improved transportation to allow wider distribution. Studies on storage of CECS have thus far focused on cryopreservation, whereas refrigeration is a convenient method commonly used for whole skin graft storage in burns clinics. It has been shown that preservation of viable cells using these methods is variable. This study evaluated the effect of different temperatures spanning 4°C to 37°C, on the cell viability, morphology, proliferation and metabolic status of CECS stored over a two week period in a xenobiotic–free system. Compared to non-stored control, best cell viability was obtained at 24°C (95.2±9.9%); reduced cell viability, at approximately 60%, was demonstrated at several of the temperatures (12°C, 28°C, 32°C and 37°C). Metabolic activity was significantly higher between 24°C and 37°C, where glucose, lactate, lactate/glucose ratios, and oxygen tension indicated increased activation of the glycolytic pathway under aerobic conditions. Preservation of morphology as shown by phase contrast and scanning electron micrographs was best at 12°C and 16°C. PCNA immunocytochemistry indicated that only 12°C and 20°C allowed maintenance of proliferative function at a similar level to non-stored control. In conclusion, results indicate that 12°C and 24°C merit further investigation as the prospective optimum temperature for short-term storage of cultured epidermal cell sheets. PMID:25170754

  1. Cell Wall Heterogeneity in Root Development of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Somssich, Marc; Khan, Ghazanfar Abbas; Persson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls provide stability and protection to plant cells. During growth and development the composition of cell walls changes, but provides enough strength to withstand the turgor of the cells. Hence, cell walls are highly flexible and diverse in nature. These characteristics are important during root growth, as plant roots consist of radial patterns of cells that have diverse functions and that are at different developmental stages along the growth axis. Young stem cell daughters undergo a series of rapid cell divisions, during which new cell walls are formed that are highly dynamic, and that support rapid anisotropic cell expansion. Once the cells have differentiated, the walls of specific cell types need to comply with and support different cell functions. For example, a newly formed root hair needs to be able to break through the surrounding soil, while endodermal cells modify their walls at distinct positions to form Casparian strips between them. Hence, the cell walls are modified and rebuilt while cells transit through different developmental stages. In addition, the cell walls of roots readjust to their environment to support growth and to maximize nutrient uptake. Many of these modifications are likely driven by different developmental and stress signaling pathways. However, our understanding of how such pathways affect cell wall modifications and what enzymes are involved remain largely unknown. In this review we aim to compile data linking cell wall content and re-modeling to developmental stages of root cells, and dissect how root cell walls respond to certain environmental changes. PMID:27582757

  2. Cell Wall Heterogeneity in Root Development of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Somssich, Marc; Khan, Ghazanfar Abbas; Persson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls provide stability and protection to plant cells. During growth and development the composition of cell walls changes, but provides enough strength to withstand the turgor of the cells. Hence, cell walls are highly flexible and diverse in nature. These characteristics are important during root growth, as plant roots consist of radial patterns of cells that have diverse functions and that are at different developmental stages along the growth axis. Young stem cell daughters undergo a series of rapid cell divisions, during which new cell walls are formed that are highly dynamic, and that support rapid anisotropic cell expansion. Once the cells have differentiated, the walls of specific cell types need to comply with and support different cell functions. For example, a newly formed root hair needs to be able to break through the surrounding soil, while endodermal cells modify their walls at distinct positions to form Casparian strips between them. Hence, the cell walls are modified and rebuilt while cells transit through different developmental stages. In addition, the cell walls of roots readjust to their environment to support growth and to maximize nutrient uptake. Many of these modifications are likely driven by different developmental and stress signaling pathways. However, our understanding of how such pathways affect cell wall modifications and what enzymes are involved remain largely unknown. In this review we aim to compile data linking cell wall content and re-modeling to developmental stages of root cells, and dissect how root cell walls respond to certain environmental changes. PMID:27582757

  3. A theoretical approach to the relationship between wettability and surface microstructures of epidermal cells and structured cuticles of flower petals

    PubMed Central

    Taneda, Haruhiko; Watanabe-Taneda, Ayako; Chhetry, Rita; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The epidermal surface of a flower petal is composed of convex cells covered with a structured cuticle, and the roughness of the surface is related to the wettability of the petal. If the surface remains wet for an excessive amount of time the attractiveness of the petal to floral visitors may be impaired, and adhesion of pathogens may be promoted. However, it remains unclear how the epidermal cells and structured cuticle contribute to surface wettability of a petal. Methods By considering the additive effects of the epidermal cells and structured cuticle on petal wettability, a thermodynamic model was developed to predict the wetting mode and contact angle of a water droplet at a minimum free energy. Quantitative relationships between petal wettability and the geometries of the epidermal cells and the structured cuticle were then estimated. Measurements of contact angles and anatomical traits of petals were made on seven herbaceous species commonly found in alpine habitats in eastern Nepal, and the measured wettability values were compared with those predicted by the model using the measured geometries of the epidermal cells and structured cuticles. Key Results The model indicated that surface wettability depends on the height and interval between cuticular steps, and on a height-to-width ratio for epidermal cells if a thick hydrophobic cuticle layer covers the surface. For a petal epidermis consisting of lenticular cells, a repellent surface results when the cuticular step height is greater than 0·85 µm and the height-to-width ratio of the epidermal cells is greater than 0·3. For an epidermis consisting of papillate cells, a height-to-width ratio of greater than 1·1 produces a repellent surface. In contrast, if the surface is covered with a thin cuticle layer, the petal is highly wettable (hydrophilic) irrespective of the roughness of the surface. These predictions were supported by the measurements of petal wettability made on flowers of

  4. Epidermal growth factor receptors in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Veale, D.; Ashcroft, T.; Marsh, C.; Gibson, G. J.; Harris, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor is homologous to the oncogene erb-beta and is the receptor for a class of tumour growth factors (TGF-alpha). The clinical correlations with its expression were studied in 77 non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). They were stained for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) by means of an indirect immunoperoxidase technique using a monoclonal antibody against the receptor. Normal lung tissue and normal bronchus were stained for comparison. Cancer tissue showed significantly increased staining compared to normal lung (P less than 0.05). Staining for EGFr in 40 squamous carcinomas was significantly stronger than in 37 specimens of other types of NSCLC (P less than 0.05), and staining in stage three NSCLC was stronger than in stage 1 and 2 (P less than 0.05). These results suggest that the presence of a high intensity of staining for EGF receptor is associated with spread of human non-small cell lung cancer and this receptor may be a suitable target for therapy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3038157

  5. Colonization of root cells and plant growth promotion by Piriformospora indica occurs independently of plant common symbiosis genes

    PubMed Central

    Banhara, Aline; Ding, Yi; Kühner, Regina; Zuccaro, Alga; Parniske, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) fungi (Glomeromycota) form symbiosis with and deliver nutrients via the roots of most angiosperms. AM fungal hyphae are taken up by living root epidermal cells, a program which relies on a set of plant common symbiosis genes (CSGs). Plant root epidermal cells are also infected by the plant growth-promoting fungus Piriformospora indica (Basidiomycota), raising the question whether this interaction relies on the AM-related CSGs. Here we show that intracellular colonization of root cells and intracellular sporulation by P. indica occurred in CSG mutants of the legume Lotus japonicus and in Arabidopsis thaliana, which belongs to the Brassicaceae, a family that has lost the ability to form AM as well as a core set of CSGs. A. thaliana mutants of homologs of CSGs (HCSGs) interacted with P. indica similar to the wild-type. Moreover, increased biomass of A. thaliana evoked by P. indica was unaltered in HCSG mutants. We conclude that colonization and growth promotion by P. indica are independent of the CSGs and that AM fungi and P. indica exploit different host pathways for infection. PMID:26441999

  6. Regulation of human epidermal stem cell proliferation and senescence requires polycomb- dependent and -independent functions of Cbx4.

    PubMed

    Luis, Nuno Miguel; Morey, Lluis; Mejetta, Stefania; Pascual, Gloria; Janich, Peggy; Kuebler, Bernd; Cozutto, Luca; Roma, Guglielmo; Nascimento, Elisabete; Frye, Michaela; Di Croce, Luciano; Benitah, Salvador Aznar

    2011-09-01

    Human epidermal stem cells transit from a slow cycling to an actively proliferating state to contribute to homeostasis. Both stem cell states differ in their cell cycle profiles but must remain guarded from differentiation and senescence. Here we show that Cbx4, a Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1)-associated protein, maintains human epidermal stem cells as slow-cycling and undifferentiated, while protecting them from senescence. Interestingly, abrogating the polycomb activity of Cbx4 impairs its antisenescent function without affecting stem cell differentiation, indicating that differentiation and senescence are independent processes in human epidermis. Conversely, Cbx4 inhibits stem cell activation and differentiation through its SUMO ligase activity. Global transcriptome and chromatin occupancy analyses indicate that Cbx4 regulates modulators of epidermal homeostasis and represses factors such as Ezh2, Dnmt1, and Bmi1 to prevent the active stem cell state. Our results suggest that distinct Polycomb complexes balance epidermal stem cell dormancy and activation, while continually preventing senescence and differentiation. PMID:21885019

  7. Recurrent exposure to nicotine differentiates human bronchial epithelial cells via epidermal growth factor receptor activation

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Garcia, Eva; Irigoyen, Marta; Anso, Elena; Martinez-Irujo, Juan Jose; Rouzaut, Ana

    2008-05-01

    Cigarette smoking is the major preventable cause of lung cancer in developed countries. Nicotine (3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-pyridine) is one of the major alkaloids present in tobacco. Besides its addictive properties, its effects have been described in panoply of cell types. In fact, recent studies have shown that nicotine behaves as a tumor promoter in transformed epithelial cells. This research focuses on the effects of acute repetitive nicotine exposure on normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE cells). Here we show that treatment of NHBE cells with recurrent doses of nicotine up to 500 {mu}M triggered cell differentiation towards a neuronal-like phenotype: cells emitted filopodia and expressed neuronal markers such as neuronal cell adhesion molecule, neurofilament-M and the transcription factors neuronal N and Pax-3. We also demonstrate that nicotine treatment induced NF-kB translocation to the nucleus, phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and accumulation of heparin binding-EGF in the extracellular medium. Moreover, addition of AG1478, an inhibitor of EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation, or cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody that precludes ligand binding to the same receptor, prevented cell differentiation by nicotine. Lastly, we show that differentiated cells increased their adhesion to the extracellular matrix and their protease activity. Given that several lung pathologies are strongly related to tobacco consumption, these results may help to better understand the damaging consequences of nicotine exposure.

  8. The effect of the state of differentiation on labeling of epidermal cell surface glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Brysk, M.M.; Snider, J.M.

    1982-05-01

    Epidermal cells were grown in a medium in which the Ca++ concentration controlled the stage of differentiation. Cell surface molecules of differentiated and undifferentiated cells were compared by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination, by the interaction with /sup 125/I-lectins, and by the metabolic incorporation of L-(/sup 3/H)-fucose. Molecular weights of the labeled components were determined by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. After lactoperoxidase iodination, most of the radioactivity was found in polypeptide bands of 79,000, 65,000 and 56,000 daltons. The 79,000 band is the most intense for undifferentiated cells but disappears as differentiation proceeds. The 56,000 band is present in normal cells at all stages of differentiation but is absent from neoplastic cells. Glycoproteins reacted with /sup 125/I-lectins were found at 180,000, 130,000 and 85,000 daltons. The 130,000 band was the most prominent for differentiated cells labeled with wheat germ agglutinin but was essentially absent from the undifferentiated cells. With Ricinus communis agglutinin, this band was weaker for undifferentiated than for differentiated cells but was the most intense for both. After metabolic incorporation of tritiated fucose, radioactive glycoproteins were found at 130,000 and 85,000 daltons, with comparable intensities for differentiated and undifferentiated cells.

  9. [Nitric oxide and electrogenic metals (Ca, Na, K) in epidermal cells].

    PubMed

    Petukhov, V I; Baumane, L K; Dmitriev, E V; Vanin, A F

    2015-01-01

    Using atomic emission spectrometry and EPR analysis metal-ligand homeostasis (MLH) has been studied in epidermal cells of 954 liquidators of the Chernobyl accident and 947 healthy individuals. A possible association of the redox status with the quantitative changes in the MLH, which could be used as discriminators of oxidative/nitrosative stress, attracts special interest. Characteristic features of oxidative stress mainly related to electrogenic metals (Ca, K, Na), were found not only among the liquidators examined, but also in some healthy individuals (18.1%); this suggests the presence of oxidative/nitrosative stress of non-radiation origin. Correlation between intracellular production of nitric oxide (NO) with quantitative changes in the electrogenic metals may indicate the possible involvement of NO in the generation of an electric potential of the cell. PMID:26350742

  10. Epidermal wound repair is regulated by the planar cell polarity signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Caddy, Jacinta; Wilanowski, Tomasz; Darido, Charbel; Dworkin, Sebastian; Ting, Stephen B; Zhao, Quan; Rank, Gerhard; Auden, Alana; Srivastava, Seema; Papenfuss, Tony A; Murdoch, Jennifer N; Humbert, Patrick O; Parekh, Vishwas; Boulos, Nidal; Weber, Thomas; Zuo, Jian; Cunningham, John M; Jane, Stephen M

    2010-07-20

    The mammalian PCP pathway regulates diverse developmental processes requiring coordinated cellular movement, including neural tube closure and cochlear stereociliary orientation. Here, we show that epidermal wound repair is regulated by PCP signaling. Mice carrying mutant alleles of PCP genes Vangl2, Celsr1, PTK7, and Scrb1, and the transcription factor Grhl3, interact genetically, exhibiting failed wound healing, neural tube defects, and disordered cochlear polarity. Using phylogenetic analysis, ChIP, and gene expression in Grhl3(-)(/-) mice, we identified RhoGEF19, a homolog of a RhoA activator involved in PCP signaling in Xenopus, as a direct target of GRHL3. Knockdown of Grhl3 or RhoGEF19 in keratinocytes induced defects in actin polymerization, cellular polarity, and wound healing, and re-expression of RhoGEF19 rescued these defects in Grhl3-kd cells. These results define a role for Grhl3 in PCP signaling and broadly implicate this pathway in epidermal repair. PMID:20643356

  11. Epidermal wound repair is regulated by the planar cell polarity signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Caddy, Jacinta; Wilanowski, Tomasz; Darido, Charbel; Dworkin, Sebastian; Ting, Stephen B.; Zhao, Quan; Rank, Gerhard; Auden, Alana; Srivastava, Seema; Papenfuss, Tony A.; Murdoch, Jennifer N.; Humbert, Patrick O.; Boulos, Nidal; Weber, Thomas; Zuo, Jian; Cunningham, John M.; Jane, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The mammalian PCP pathway regulates diverse developmental processes requiring coordinated cellular movement, including neural tube closure and cochlear stereociliary orientation. Here, we show that epidermal wound repair is regulated by PCP signaling. Mice carrying mutant alleles of PCP genes Vangl2, Celsr1, PTK7, and Scrb1, and the transcription factor Grhl3, interact genetically, exhibiting failed wound healing, neural tube defects and disordered cochlear polarity. Using phylogenetic analysis, ChIP, and gene expression in Grhl3−/− mice, we identified RhoGEF19, a homologue of a RhoA activator involved in PCP signaling in Xenopus, as a direct target of GRHL3. Knockdown of Grhl3 or RhoGEF19 in keratinocytes induced defects in actin polymerisation, cellular polarity and wound healing, and re-expression of RhoGEF19 rescued these defects in Grhl3-kd cells. These results define a role for Grhl3 in PCP signaling, and broadly implicate this pathway in epidermal repair. PMID:20643356

  12. aPKCλ controls epidermal homeostasis and stem cell fate through regulation of division orientation

    PubMed Central

    Niessen, Michaela T.; Scott, Jeanie; Zielinski, Julia G.; Vorhagen, Susanne; Sotiropoulou, Panagiota A.; Blanpain, Cédric

    2013-01-01

    The atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) is a key regulator of polarity and cell fate in lower organisms. However, whether mammalian aPKCs control stem cells and fate in vivo is not known. Here we show that loss of aPKCλ in a self-renewing epithelium, the epidermis, disturbed tissue homeostasis, differentiation, and stem cell dynamics, causing progressive changes in this tissue. This was accompanied by a gradual loss of quiescent hair follicle bulge stem cells and a temporary increase in proliferating progenitors. Lineage tracing analysis showed that loss of aPKCλ altered the fate of lower bulge/hair germ stem cells. This ultimately led to loss of proliferative potential, stem cell exhaustion, alopecia, and premature aging. Inactivation of aPKCλ produced more asymmetric divisions in different compartments, including the bulge. Thus, aPKCλ is crucial for homeostasis of self-renewing stratifying epithelia, and for the regulation of cell fate, differentiation, and maintenance of epidermal bulge stem cells likely through its role in balancing symmetric and asymmetric division. PMID:24019538

  13. aPKCλ controls epidermal homeostasis and stem cell fate through regulation of division orientation.

    PubMed

    Niessen, Michaela T; Scott, Jeanie; Zielinski, Julia G; Vorhagen, Susanne; Sotiropoulou, Panagiota A; Blanpain, Cédric; Leitges, Michael; Niessen, Carien M

    2013-09-16

    The atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) is a key regulator of polarity and cell fate in lower organisms. However, whether mammalian aPKCs control stem cells and fate in vivo is not known. Here we show that loss of aPKCλ in a self-renewing epithelium, the epidermis, disturbed tissue homeostasis, differentiation, and stem cell dynamics, causing progressive changes in this tissue. This was accompanied by a gradual loss of quiescent hair follicle bulge stem cells and a temporary increase in proliferating progenitors. Lineage tracing analysis showed that loss of aPKCλ altered the fate of lower bulge/hair germ stem cells. This ultimately led to loss of proliferative potential, stem cell exhaustion, alopecia, and premature aging. Inactivation of aPKCλ produced more asymmetric divisions in different compartments, including the bulge. Thus, aPKCλ is crucial for homeostasis of self-renewing stratifying epithelia, and for the regulation of cell fate, differentiation, and maintenance of epidermal bulge stem cells likely through its role in balancing symmetric and asymmetric division. PMID:24019538

  14. Application of Microneedles to Skin Induces Activation of Epidermal Langerhans Cells and Dermal Dendritic Cells in Mice.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Asuka; Nomoto, Yusuke; Watanabe, Mai; Kimura, Soichiro; Morimoto, Yasunori; Ueda, Hideo

    2016-08-01

    An adequate immune response to percutaneous vaccine application is generated by delivery of sufficient amounts of antigen to skin and by administration of toxin adjuvants or invasive skin abrasion that leads to an adjuvant effect. Microneedles penetrate the stratum corneum, the outermost layer of the skin, and enable direct delivery of vaccines from the surface into the skin, where immunocompetent dendritic cells are densely distributed. However, whether the application of microneedles to the skin activates antigen-presenting cells (APCs) has not been demonstrated. Here we aimed to demonstrate that microneedles may act as a potent physical adjuvant for successful transcutaneous immunization (TCI). We prepared samples of isolated epidermal and dermal cells and analyzed the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and costimulatory molecules on Langerhans or dermal dendritic cells in the prepared samples using flow cytometry. The expression of MHC class II and costimulatory molecules demonstrated an upward trend in APCs in the skin after the application of 500- and 300-µm microneedles. In addition, in the epidermal cells, application of microneedles induced more effective activation of Langerhans cells than did an invasive tape-stripping (positive control). In conclusion, the use of microneedles is likely to have a positive effect not only as an antigen delivery system but also as a physical technique inducing an adjuvant-like effect for TCI. PMID:27251665

  15. Salinity Stiffens the Epidermal Cell Walls of Salt-Stressed Maize Leaves: Is the Epidermis Growth-Restricting?

    PubMed Central

    Zörb, Christian; Mühling, Karl H.; Kutschera, Ulrich; Geilfus, Christoph-Martin

    2015-01-01

    As a result of salt (NaCl)-stress, sensitive varieties of maize (Zea mays L.) respond with a strong inhibition of organ growth. The reduction of leaf elongation investigated here has several causes, including a modification of the mechanical properties of the cell wall. Among the various tissues that form the leaf, the epidermis plays a special role in controlling organ growth, because it is thought to form a rigid outer leaf coat that can restrict elongation by interacting with the inner cell layers. This study was designed to determine whether growth-related changes in the leaf epidermis and its cell wall correspond to the overall reduction in cell expansion of maize leaves during an osmotic stress-phase induced by salt treatment. Two different maize varieties contrasting in their degree of salt resistance (i.e., the hybrids Lector vs. SR03) were compared in order to identify physiological features contributing to resistance towards salinity. Wall loosening-related parameters, such as the capacity of the epidermal cell wall to expand, β-expansin abundance and apoplastic pH values, were analysed. Our data demonstrate that, in the salt-tolerant maize hybrid which maintained leaf growth under salinity, the epidermal cell wall was more extensible under salt stress. This was associated with a shift of the epidermal apoplastic pH into a range more favourable for acid growth. The more sensitive hybrid that displayed a pronounced leaf growth-reduction was shown to have stiffer epidermal cell walls under stress. This may be attributable to the reduced abundance of cell wall-loosening β-expansin proteins following a high salinity-treatment in the nutrient solution (100 mM NaCl, 8 days). This study clearly documents that salt stress impairs epidermal wall-loosening in growth-reduced maize leaves. PMID:25760715

  16. Growth and differentiation in cultured human thyroid cells: effects of epidermal growth factor and thyrotropin.

    PubMed

    Errick, J E; Ing, K W; Eggo, M C; Burrow, G N

    1986-01-01

    Human thyroid cells were grown and subcultured in vitro to examine their responses to known hormones and growth factors, and to serum. The cells were obtained from surgical specimens and were either neoplastic or nonneoplastic. The effects of culture conditions on cell growth were measured by changes in cell numbers and by stimulation of [3H]thymidine incorporation. The results showed that serum (0.5%) was essential for cell proliferation, and that a mixture of insulin (10 micrograms/ml), transferrin (5 micrograms/ml), hydrocortisone (10 micrograms/ml), somatostatin (10 ng/ml), and glycyl-histidyl-lysine (10 ng/ml) enhanced the effect of serum. Maximum growth of the cells was obtained when epidermal growth factor was present at 10(-9) M. Differentiation was measured by production of thyroglobulin, which was found to be stimulated by thyrotropin. This system provides a means to study the hormonal control of growth and differentiation in human thyroid cells. PMID:3511027

  17. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in primary cultured human colorectal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tong, W. M.; Ellinger, A.; Sheinin, Y.; Cross, H. S.

    1998-01-01

    In situ hybridization on human colon tissue demonstrates that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA expression is strongly increased during tumour progression. To obtain test systems to evaluate the relevance of growth factor action during carcinogenesis, primary cultures from human colorectal carcinomas were established. EGFR distribution was determined in 2 of the 27 primary cultures and was compared with that in well-defined subclones derived from the Caco-2 cell line, which has the unique property to differentiate spontaneously in vitro in a manner similar to normal enterocytes. The primary carcinoma-derived cells had up to three-fold higher total EGFR levels than the Caco-2 subclones and a basal mitotic rate at least fourfold higher. The EGFR affinity constant is 0.26 nmol l(-1), which is similar to that reported in Caco-2 cells. The proliferation rate of Caco-2 cells is mainly induced by EGF from the basolateral cell surface where the majority of receptors are located, whereas primary cultures are strongly stimulated from the apical side also. This corresponds to a three- to fivefold higher level of EGFR at the apical cell surface. This redistribution of EGFR to apical plasma membranes in advanced colon carcinoma cells suggests that autocrine growth factors in the colon lumen may play a significant role during tumour progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9667648

  18. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Enhances Expression of Cadherin-5 in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; Lung, Jr-Hau; Lin, Paul-Yann; Li, Ya-Chin; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation has been shown to play a critical role in tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we investigate the correlation between EGFR mutations and cadherin-5 (CDH5), which is an angiogenic factor, in lung cancer cells. Increased expression CDH5 is observed in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutations. Stable lung cancer cell lines expressing mutant (exon 19 deletion E746-A750, and exon 21 missense mutation L858R) and wild type EGFR genes are established. A significantly higher expression of CDH5 is observed in exon 19 deletion stable lung cancer cells and mouse xenografts. Further studies show that expression of CDH5 is decreased after the inhibition of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutation. In addition, mutant EGFR genes potentiates angiogenesis in lung cancer cells, which is inhibited by CDH5 siRNA, and potentiates migration and invasion in lung cancer cells. Our study shows that mutant EGFR genes are associated with overexpression of CDH5 through increased phosphorylation of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways. Our result may provide an insight into the association of mutant EGFR and CDH5 expression in lung cancer and aid further development of target therapy for NSCLC in the future. PMID:27362942

  19. Nitric oxide stimulates the proliferation of neural stem cells bypassing the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Bruno Pereira; Morte, Maria Inês; Inácio, Angela; Costa, Gabriel; Rosmaninho-Salgado, Joana; Agasse, Fabienne; Carmo, Anália; Couceiro, Patrícia; Brundin, Patrik; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Carvalho, Caetana Monteiro; Araújo, Inês Maria

    2010-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) was described to inhibit the proliferation of neural stem cells. Some evidence suggests that NO, under certain conditions, can also promote cell proliferation, although the mechanisms responsible for a potential proliferative effect of NO in neural stem cells have remained unaddressed. In this work, we investigated and characterized the proliferative effect of NO in cell cultures obtained from the mouse subventricular zone. We found that the NO donor NOC-18 (10 microM) increased cell proliferation, whereas higher concentrations (100 microM) inhibited cell proliferation. Increased cell proliferation was detected rapidly following exposure to NO and was prevented by blocking the mitogen-activated kinase (MAPK) pathway, independently of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. Downstream of the EGF receptor, NO activated p21Ras and the MAPK pathway, resulting in a decrease in the nuclear presence of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1, p27(KIP1), allowing for cell cycle progression. Furthermore, in a mouse model that shows increased proliferation of neural stem cells in the hippocampus following seizure injury, we observed that the absence of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS(-/-) mice) prevented the increase in cell proliferation observed following seizures in wild-type mice, showing that NO from iNOS origin is important for increased cell proliferation following a brain insult. Overall, we show that NO is able to stimulate the proliferation of neural stem cells bypassing the EGF receptor and promoting cell division. Moreover, under pathophysiological conditions in vivo, NO from iNOS origin also promotes proliferation in the hippocampus. PMID:20506358

  20. Neuronal cell lines as model dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Kathleen; Baillie, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Background Dorsal root ganglion neuron-derived immortal cell lines including ND7/23 and F-11 cells have been used extensively as in vitro model systems of native peripheral sensory neurons. However, while it is clear that some sensory neuron-specific receptors and ion channels are present in these cell lines, a systematic comparison of the molecular targets expressed by these cell lines with those expressed in intact peripheral neurons is lacking. Results In this study, we examined the expression of RNA transcripts in the human neuroblastoma-derived cell line, SH-SY5Y, and two dorsal root ganglion hybridoma cell lines, F-11 and ND7/23, using Illumina next-generation sequencing, and compared the results with native whole murine dorsal root ganglions. The gene expression profiles of these three cell lines did not resemble any specific defined dorsal root ganglion subclass. The cell lines lacked many markers for nociceptive sensory neurons, such as the Transient receptor potential V1 gene, but expressed markers for both myelinated and unmyelinated neurons. Global gene ontology analysis on whole dorsal root ganglions and cell lines showed similar enrichment of biological process terms across all samples. Conclusions This paper provides insights into the receptor repertoire expressed in common dorsal root ganglion neuron-derived cell lines compared with whole murine dorsal root ganglions, and illustrates the limits and potentials of these cell lines as tools for neuropharmacological exploration. PMID:27130590

  1. Parabens and Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Ligand Cross-Talk in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Shawn; Yuan, Chaoshen; Tagmount, Abderrahmane; Rudel, Ruthann A.; Ackerman, Janet M.; Yaswen, Paul; Vulpe, Chris D.; Leitman, Dale C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Xenoestrogens are synthetic compounds that mimic endogenous estrogens by binding to and activating estrogen receptors. Exposure to estrogens and to some xenoestrogens has been associated with cell proliferation and an increased risk of breast cancer. Despite evidence of estrogenicity, parabens are among the most widely used xenoestrogens in cosmetics and personal-care products and are generally considered safe. However, previous cell-based studies with parabens do not take into account the signaling cross-talk between estrogen receptor α (ERα) and the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family. Objectives: We investigated the hypothesis that the potency of parabens can be increased with HER ligands, such as heregulin (HRG). Methods: The effects of HER ligands on paraben activation of c-Myc expression and cell proliferation were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blots, flow cytometry, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in ERα- and HER2-positive human BT-474 breast cancer cells. Results: Butylparaben (BP) and HRG produced a synergistic increase in c-Myc mRNA and protein levels in BT-474 cells. Estrogen receptor antagonists blocked the synergistic increase in c-Myc protein levels. The combination of BP and HRG also stimulated proliferation of BT-474 cells compared with the effects of BP alone. HRG decreased the dose required for BP-mediated stimulation of c-Myc mRNA expression and cell proliferation. HRG caused the phosphorylation of serine 167 in ERα. BP and HRG produced a synergistic increase in ERα recruitment to the c-Myc gene. Conclusion: Our results show that HER ligands enhanced the potency of BP to stimulate oncogene expression and breast cancer cell proliferation in vitro via ERα, suggesting that parabens might be active at exposure levels not previously considered toxicologically relevant from studies testing their effects in isolation. Citation: Pan S, Yuan C, Tagmount A, Rudel RA, Ackerman JM

  2. Contact-stimulated proliferation of cultured mouse epidermal cells by 3T3 feeder layers: inhibition of proliferation by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.R.; Hamby, K.M.; Slaga, T.J.

    1982-07-01

    Mouse epidermal cells can be subcultured at 31/sup 0/C onto an irradiated BALB/c 3T3 clone A31 feeder layer. A31 cells (supposedly derived from embryonic fibroblasts) were found to be specifically required for the optimal production of keratinizing epidermal colonies in secondary culture. This effect was not transmitted through the medium nor by the culture surface, since A31 cells plated on one end of a flask did not stimulate epidermal cell proliferation at the other end, even if the other end had previously held A31 cells. Epidermal cell contact with metabolizing A31 cells was probably necessary for the effect; fixed or freeze-thawed A31 cells were ineffective. The tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, recently shown to interfere with contact-mediated transfer of label (metabolic cooperation) between Swiss 3T3 cells and cells of an established epidermal line in vitro, also blocked epidermal colony formation. The A31-epidermal cell interaction is apparently not a typical mesenchymal-epithelial interaction, since the basement membrane would prevent this contact in intact skin.

  3. Root Border Cells and Their Role in Plant Defense.

    PubMed

    Hawes, Martha; Allen, Caitilyn; Turgeon, B Gillian; Curlango-Rivera, Gilberto; Minh Tran, Tuan; Huskey, David A; Xiong, Zhongguo

    2016-08-01

    Root border cells separate from plant root tips and disperse into the soil environment. In most species, each root tip can produce thousands of metabolically active cells daily, with specialized patterns of gene expression. Their function has been an enduring mystery. Recent studies suggest that border cells operate in a manner similar to mammalian neutrophils: Both cell types export a complex of extracellular DNA (exDNA) and antimicrobial proteins that neutralize threats by trapping pathogens and thereby preventing invasion of host tissues. Extracellular DNases (exDNases) of pathogens promote virulence and systemic spread of the microbes. In plants, adding DNase I to root tips eliminates border cell extracellular traps and abolishes root tip resistance to infection. Mutation of genes encoding exDNase activity in plant-pathogenic bacteria (Ralstonia solanacearum) and fungi (Cochliobolus heterostrophus) results in reduced virulence. The study of exDNase activities in plant pathogens may yield new targets for disease control. PMID:27215971

  4. Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors for non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Asami, Kazuhiro; Atagi, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    First-generation epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), including gefitinib and erlotinib, have proven to be highly effective agents for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients harboring an activating EGFR mutation such as the exon 19 deletion mutation and L858R. Although those reversible small molecular targeted agents provide a significant response and survival benefit, all responders eventually acquire resistance. Second-generation EGFR-targeting agents, such as irreversible EGFR/HER2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors and pan-HER TKIs, may improve survival further and be useful for patients who acquired resistance to first-generation EGFR-TKIs. This review discusses novel therapeutic strategies for EGFR-mutated advanced NSCLC using first- and second-generation EGFR-TKIs. PMID:25302168

  5. Gefitinib in the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer with activating epidermal growth factor receptor mutation

    PubMed Central

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Takahashi, Fumiyuki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is still the main cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, with most patients present with advanced disease and poor long-term prognosis. The aim of lung cancer treatment is to slow down the progression of the disease, to relieve the patients from the lung cancer symptoms and whenever possible, to increase the overall survival. The discovery of small molecule targeting tyrosine kinase of epidermal growth factor receptor opens a new way in the management of advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This review will discuss several Phase II and III trials evaluated the clinical efficacy of gefitinib as monotherapy in pretreated patients with advanced NSCLC, as well as both monotherapy and combined with chemotherapy in chemotherapy-naive patients. PMID:27433059

  6. A novel component of epidermal cell-matrix and cell-cell contacts: transmembrane protein type XIII collagen.

    PubMed

    Peltonen, S; Hentula, M; Hägg, P; Ylä-Outinen, H; Tuukkanen, J; Lakkakorpi, J; Rehn, M; Pihlajaniemi, T; Peltonen, J

    1999-10-01

    Type XIII collagen is a short chain collagen which has recently been shown to be a transmembrane protein. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the presence and localization of type XIII collagen in normal human skin and cultured keratinocytes. Expression of type XIII collagen was demonstrated in normal human skin and epidermis at the RNA level using reverse transcription followed by polymerase chain reaction and at the protein level using western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence labeling. Immunolabeling of epidermis revealed type XIII collagen both in the cell-cell contact sites and in the dermal-epidermal junction. In cultured keratinocytes type XIII collagen epitopes were detected in focal contacts and in intercellular contacts. The results of this study show very little colocalization of type XIII collagen and desmosomal components at the light microscopic level. Thus, these results suggest that type XIII collagen is unlikely to be a component of desmosomes. Instead, the punctate labeling pattern of type XIII collagen at the cell-cell contact sites and high degree of colocalization with E-cadherin suggests that type XIII collagen is very likely to be closely associated with adherens type junctions, and may, in fact, be a component of these junctions. PMID:10504453

  7. Effects of Epidermal Cell Shape and Pigmentation on Optical Properties of Antirrhinum Petals at Visible and Ultraviolet Wavelengths.

    PubMed Central

    Gorton, H. L.; Vogelmann, T. C.

    1996-01-01

    We used the Mixta+ and mixta- lines of Antirrhinum majus as a model system to investigate the effects of epidermal cell shape and pigmentation on tissue optical properties in the visible and ultraviolet (UV) spectral regions. Adaxial epidermal cells of Mixta+ flowers have a conical-papillate shape; in the mixta- line the cells are slightly domed. Mixta+ cells contained significantly more anthocyanin and other flavonoids than mixta- cells when plants were grown under either high- or low-UV conditions. Mixta+ cells focused light (3.5-4.7 times incident) within their pigmented interiors, whereas mixta- cells focused light (2.1-2.7 times incident) in the unpigmented mesophyll. UV light penetrated the epidermis (commonly 20-50% transmittance at 312 nm) mainly through the unpigmented peripheral regions of the cells that were similar for the two lines, so that overall penetration through Mixta+ and mixta- epidermises was equal. However, maximum UV absorption in the central region of epidermal cells was slightly greater in Mixta+ than mixta-, and intact Mixta+ flowers reflected less light in the spectral regions with intermediate flavonoid absorbance. In both cases, about 50 to 75% of the difference could be attributed to cell shape and resulting changes in the optical pathlength or focusing. PMID:12226425

  8. Ambivalent Effects of Atorvastatin on Angiogenesis, Epidermal Cell Proliferation and Tumorgenesis in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Garjani, Alireza; Rezazadeh, Hassan; Andalib, Sina; Ziaee, Mojtaba; Doustar, Yousef; Soraya, Hamid; Garjani, Mehraveh; Khorrami, Arash; Asadpoor, Mostafa; Maleki-Dizaji, Nasrin

    2012-01-01

    Background: A growing body of preclinical data indicates that statins may possess antineoplastic properties; however, some studies have raised the possibility that statins may also have carcinogenic potential. Methods: An air pouch model was used for angiogenesis. Single or multiple applications of croton oil on the back of Swiss albino mice with or without initiation by dimethylbenz(a)antheracene (DMBA) were used to evaluate the skin tumorgenesis, ultrastructural and histological alterations. Results: Atorvastatin (orally, 10 mg/kg/day) produced a significant (P<0.05) reduction in angiogenesis. Concurrent administration of mevalonate reversed the anti-angiogenic effect of atorvastatin. However, local injection of atorvastatin (200 µg) into the pouches induced a significant (P<0.5) increase in angiogenesis that was not reversed by co-administration of mevalonate. The disturbance of cell polarity, inflammatory response, thickness of epidermal layer, and mitotic index induced by croton oil were inhibited markedly and dose-dependently (P<0.001) by pre-treatment with atorvastatin. In spite of the strong anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects of atorvastatin on epidermal cell proliferation, it was identified that the same doses of atorvastatin in DMBA-initiated and croton oil-promoted skin tumorgenesis in mice increased the incidence of tumors and their conversion into malignant carcinoma. Conclusion: The reasons for these discrepancies remain unclear, and could be related to ambivalent effects of atorvastatin on angiogenesis or to specific differences in the experimental conditions. It is suggested that the pro-angiogenic effect of the drug, which could be responsible for promotion of skin tumors, is independent of the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibition that can be mediated directly by atorvastatin. PMID:22801278

  9. INSULIN INDUCED EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR ACTIVATION IN VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS IS ADAM-DEPENDENT

    PubMed Central

    Roztocil, Elisa; Nicholl, Suzanne M.; Davies, Mark G.

    2008-01-01

    Background With the rise in metabolic syndrome, understanding the role of insulin signaling within the cells of vasculature has become more important but yet remains poorly defined. The study examines the role of insulin actions on a pivotal cross-talk receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR). EGFR is transactivated by both G-protein-coupled receptors and receptor linked tyrosine kinases and is key to many of their responses. Objective To determine the pathway of EGFR transactivation by insulin in human coronary smooth muscle cells (VSMC) Methods VSMC were cultured in vitro. Assays of EGFR phosphorylation were examined in response to insulin in the presence and absence of the plasmin inhibitors (e-aminocaproic acid and aprotinin) matrix metalloprotease (MMP) inhibitor GM6001, the ADAM (A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase Domain) inhibitors TAPI-0 and TAPI-1, Heparin binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) inhibitor, CRM197, HB-EGF inhibitory antibodies, EGF inhibitory antibodies and the EGFR inhibitor AG1478. Results Insulin induced time-dependent EGFR phosphorylation, which was inhibited by AG1478 in a concentration dependent manner. Application of the plasmin inhibitors did not block the response. EGFR phosphorylation by insulin was blocked by inhibition of MMP activity and the ligand HB-EGF. The presence of the ADAM inhibitors, TAPI-0 and TAPI-1 significantly decreased EGFR activation. EGFR phosphorylation by EGF was not interrupted by inhibition of plasmin, MMPs TAPIs, or HB-EGF. Direct blockade of the EGFR prevented activation by both insulin and EGF. Conclusion Insulin can induce transactivation of EGFR by an ADAM-mediated, HB-EGF dependent process. This is the first description of crosstalk via ADAM between insulin and EGFR in vascular SMC. Targeting a pivotal cross-talk receptor such as EGFR, which can be transactivated by both G-protein-coupled receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases is an attractive molecular target. PMID:18656632

  10. Epoc-1: a POU-domain gene expressed in murine epidermal basal cells and thymic stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, K; Yasui, T; Yamamoto, A; Shiku, H; Kishimoto, T; Kikutani, H

    1993-11-15

    POU-domain transcription factors are known as developmental regulators which control organ development and cell phenotypes. In order to clarify the roles of POU-domain transcription factors in cell differentiation, we cloned a novel POU family gene, Epoc-1, from a murine thymus cDNA library. The amino acid (aa) sequence of the POU-specific domain of Epoc-1 is almost identical to those of Oct-1 and Oct-2. However, within the POU-homeodomain, 13 out of 60 aa differ between Epoc-1 and Oct-2. Recombinant Epoc-1 products were found to bind specifically to the octamer sequence. Epoc-1 was found to be expressed in skin, thymus, stomach and testis. In situ hybridization experiments and RNase protection assays indicated that Epoc-1 is expressed in the epidermal basal cells of the skin, which contain stem cells unipotent for keratinocyte differentiation and in thymic stromal elements. These results suggest that Epoc-1 might be one of the developmental regulators which controls epidermal development and thymic organogenesis. PMID:8224904

  11. Sequential cultivation of human epidermal keratinocytes and dermal mesenchymal like stromal cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mahabal, Shyam; Konala, Vijay Bhaskar Reddy; Mamidi, Murali Krishna; Kanafi, Mohammad Mahboob; Mishra, Suniti; Shankar, Krupa; Pal, Rajarshi; Bhonde, Ramesh

    2016-08-01

    Human skin has continuous self-renewal potential throughout adult life and serves as first line of defence. Its cellular components such as human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKs) and dermal mesenchymal stromal cells (DMSCs) are valuable resources for wound healing applications and cell based therapies. Here we show a simple, scalable and cost-effective method for sequential isolation and propagation of HEKs and DMSCs under defined culture conditions. Human skin biopsy samples obtained surgically were cut into fine pieces and cultured employing explant technique. Plated skin samples attached and showed outgrowth of HEKs. Gross microscopic examination displayed polygonal cells with a granular cytoplasm and H&E staining revealed archetypal HEK morphology. RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry authenticated the presence of key HEK markers including trans-membrane protein epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin), keratins and cytokeratin. After collection of HEKs by trypsin-EDTA treatment, mother explants were left intact and cultured further. Interestingly, we observed the appearance of another cell type with fibroblastic or stromal morphology which were able to grow up to 15 passages in vitro. Growth pattern, expression of cytoskeletal protein vimentin, surface proteins such as CD44, CD73, CD90, CD166 and mesodermal differentiation potential into osteocytes, adipocytes and chondrocytes confirmed their bonafide mesenchymal stem cell like status. These findings albeit preliminary may open up significant opportunities for novel applications in wound healing. PMID:25698160

  12. Intracellular processing of epidermal growth factor by early wound healing cells

    SciTech Connect

    Seyfer, A.E.; Nassaux, P.; Emory, R.; Wray, H.L.; Schaudies, R.P. )

    1990-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a potent 53-amino-acid residue polypeptide that has been implicated in normal wound healing. Although past studies have shown that locally applied EGF accelerates wound healing, these studies have not examined intracellular events related to the processing of the growth factor. The objective of this study was to characterize both initial and later postbinding intracellular processing of EGF by a responsive cell line (osteoblasts) that is important in the healing of wounds. Cloned mouse calvarial osteoblasts (MC-3TC-E1) were incubated with radiolabeled EGF, with and without preincubation with nonlabeled EGF, for specific time intervals. Cell-associated radioactivity was characterized by nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results showed that EGF is processed as three distinct species and that the relative proportions of these species are altered at later time periods when compared with initial processing. The patterns, similar to those reported for human fibroblasts, indicate a possible common pathway for the mitogenic signal in cells associated with the early events of wound healing. In addition, these data represent the first direct evidence that preexposure of cells to nonlabeled EGF alters the processing of radiolabeled EGF. This is significant, because cells must be exposed to EGF for 5 to 8 hours to elicit a growth response. Such data may help to explain the lag phase of wound healing.

  13. Osmotic induction of fluid-phase endocytosis in onion epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Oparka, K J; Prior, D A; Harris, N

    1990-03-01

    A transient plasmolysis/deplasmolysis (plasmolytic cycle) of onion epidermal cells has been shown to induce the formation of fluid-phase endocytic vesicles. Plasmolysis in the presence of the membrane-impermeant fluorescent probes Lucifer Yellow CH (LYCH) and Cascade Blue hydrazide resulted in the uptake of these probes by fluid-phase endocytosis. Following deplasmolysis, many of the dye-containing vesicles left their parietal positions within the cell and underwent vigorous streaming in the cytoplasm. Vesicles were observed to move within transvacuolar strands and their movements were recorded over several hours by video-microscopy. Within 2 h of deplasmolysis several of the larger endocytic vesicles had clustered around the nuclear membrane, apparently lodged in the narrow zone of cytoplams surrounding the nucleus. In further experiments LYCH was endocytically loaded into the cells during the first plasmolytic cycle and Cascade Blue subsequently loaded during a second plasmolytic cycle. This resulted in the introduction of two populations of endocytic vesicles into the cells, each containing a different probe. Both sets of vesicles underwent cytoplasmic streaming. The data are discussed in the light of previous observations of fluid-phase endocytosis in plant cells. PMID:24202101

  14. Tumor cells can follow distinct evolutionary paths to become resistant to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hata, Aaron N; Niederst, Matthew J; Archibald, Hannah L; Gomez-Caraballo, Maria; Siddiqui, Faria M; Mulvey, Hillary E; Maruvka, Yosef E; Ji, Fei; Bhang, Hyo-eun C; Krishnamurthy Radhakrishna, Viveksagar; Siravegna, Giulia; Hu, Haichuan; Raoof, Sana; Lockerman, Elizabeth; Kalsy, Anuj; Lee, Dana; Keating, Celina L; Ruddy, David A; Damon, Leah J; Crystal, Adam S; Costa, Carlotta; Piotrowska, Zofia; Bardelli, Alberto; Iafrate, Anthony J; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Stegmeier, Frank; Getz, Gad; Sequist, Lecia V; Faber, Anthony C; Engelman, Jeffrey A

    2016-03-01

    Although mechanisms of acquired resistance of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutant non-small-cell lung cancers to EGFR inhibitors have been identified, little is known about how resistant clones evolve during drug therapy. Here we observe that acquired resistance caused by the EGFR(T790M) gatekeeper mutation can occur either by selection of pre-existing EGFR(T790M)-positive clones or via genetic evolution of initially EGFR(T790M)-negative drug-tolerant cells. The path to resistance impacts the biology of the resistant clone, as those that evolved from drug-tolerant cells had a diminished apoptotic response to third-generation EGFR inhibitors that target EGFR(T790M); treatment with navitoclax, an inhibitor of the anti-apoptotic factors BCL-xL and BCL-2 restored sensitivity. We corroborated these findings using cultures derived directly from EGFR inhibitor-resistant patient tumors. These findings provide evidence that clinically relevant drug-resistant cancer cells can both pre-exist and evolve from drug-tolerant cells, and they point to therapeutic opportunities to prevent or overcome resistance in the clinic. PMID:26828195

  15. Oak ellagitannins suppress the phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fridrich, Diana; Glabasnia, Arne; Fritz, Jessica; Esselen, Melanie; Pahlke, Gudrun; Hofmann, Thomas; Marko, Doris

    2008-05-14

    The ellagitannins castalagin and vescalagin, and the C-glycosides grandinin and roburin E as well as ellagic acid were found to potently inhibit the growth of human colon carcinoma cells (HT29) in vitro. In a cell-free system these compounds were identified as potent inhibitors of the protein tyrosine kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with IC 50 values in the low nanomolar range. To address the question of whether the interference with the activity of the isolated EGFR also plays a role within intact cells, effects on the phosphorylation status of the EGFR, as a measure for its activity, were determined in HT29 cells. As exemplified for castalagin and grandinin, both the nonglycosylated and the glycosylated ellagitannins effectively suppressed EGFR phosphorylation, but only at concentrations > or =10 microM, thus, in a concentration range where growth inhibition was observed. These results indicate that the suppression of EGFR-mediated signaling might contribute to the growth inhibitory effects of these compounds present in oak-matured wines and spirits such as whiskey. In contrast, despite substantial growth inhibitory properties, ellagic acid did not significantly affect EGFR phosphorylation in HT29 cells up to 100 microM. PMID:18419129

  16. Epidermal growth factor promotes proliferation of dermal papilla cells via Notch signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haihua; Nan, Weixiao; Wang, Shiyong; Zhang, Tietao; Si, Huazhe; Wang, Datao; Yang, Fuhe; Li, Guangyu

    2016-08-01

    The effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the development and growth of hair follicle is controversial. In the present study, 2-20 ng/ml EGF promoted the growth of mink hair follicles in vitro, whereas 200 ng/ml EGF inhibited follicle growth. Further, dermal papilla (DP) cells, a group of mesenchymal cells that govern hair follicle development and growth, were isolated and cultured in vitro. Treatment with or forced expression of EGF accelerated proliferation and induced G1/S transition in DP cells. Moreover, EGF upregulated the expression of DP mesenchymal genes, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), as well as the Notch pathway molecules including Notch1, Jagged1, Hes1 and Hes5. In addition, inhibition of Notch signaling pathway by DAPT significantly reduced the basal and EGF-enhanced proliferation rate, and also suppressed cell cycle progression. We also show that the expression of several follicle-regulatory genes, such as Survivin and Msx2, were upregulated by EGF, and was inhibited by DAPT. In summary, our study demonstrates that the concentration of EGF is critical for the switch between hair follicle growth and inhibition, and EGF promotes DP cell proliferation via Notch signaling pathway. PMID:27109378

  17. Phosphatidylinositol kinase is activated in membranes derived from cells treated with epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, D H; Pike, L J

    1987-01-01

    The ability of epidermal growth factor (EGF) to stimulate phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) kinase activity in A431 cells was examined. The incorporation of 32P from [gamma-32P]ATP into PtdIns by A431 membranes was increased in membranes prepared from cells that had been pretreated with EGF. Demonstration of a stimulation of the PtdIns kinase activity by EGF required the use of subconfluent cultures and was dependent on the inclusion of protease inhibitors in the buffers used to prepare the membranes. Stimulation of the PtdIns kinase activity was rapid. The activation peaked 2 min after the addition of EGF and declined slowly thereafter. Half-maximal stimulation of the PtdIns kinase occurred at 7 nM EGF. Kinetic analyses of the reaction indicated that treatment of the cells with EGF resulted in a decrease in the Km for PtdIns with no change in the Vmax. The kinetic parameters for the utilization of ATP were unchanged in the EGF-treated membranes compared to the control membranes. Pretreatment of the cells with the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate blocked the ability of EGF to stimulate PtdIns kinase activity. These findings demonstrate that a PtdIns kinase activity in A431 cells is regulated by EGF and provide a good system for examining the mechanism by which EGF stimulates the activity of this intracellular enzyme. PMID:2823265

  18. Is there a role for epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in epidermal growth factor receptor wild-type non-small cell lung cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Arriola, Edurne; Taus, Álvaro; Casadevall, David

    2015-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer with a world-wide annual incidence of around 1.3 million. The majority of patients are diagnosed with advanced disease and survival remains poor. However, relevant advances have occurred in recent years through the identification of biomarkers that predict for benefit of therapeutic agents. This is exemplified by the efficacy of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of EGFR mutant patients. These drugs have also shown efficacy in unselected populations but this point remains controversial. Here we have reviewed the clinical data that demonstrate a small but consistent subgroup of EGFR wild-type patients with NSCLC that obtain a clinical benefit from these drugs. Moreover, we review the biological rationale that may explain this benefit observed in the clinical setting. PMID:26266101

  19. Selective early innervation of a subset of epidermal cells in Xenopus may be mediated by chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Somasekhar, T; Nordlander, R H

    1997-04-18

    The epidermis of early Xenopus embryos is innervated by the Rohon-Beard (RB) neurons lying within the spinal cord and by extramedullary (EM) neurons lying outside of the cord. We have examined the innervation patterns of the three epidermal cell types using wholemount preparations of skin double-labelled with the HNK-1 antibody as a marker for neurons and with antibodies to chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG). Cells of one of the three epidermal cell types, here termed conical cells, are innervated well before the other two. In wholemounts of embryonic skin incubated with antibodies to chondroitin-6-sulfate (C6S), all epidermal cells except conical cells show CSPG immunoreactivity in their basal lamina. Double-labelling of skin preparations with HNK-1 and anti-C6S confirmed that these conical cells which lack C6S immunoreactivity are the first to be innervated by RB axons. It is proposed that C6S-bearing proteoglycan initially inhibits innervation of cells whose basal lamina contain the proteoglycan, thus favoring innervation of the conical cells which lack it. PMID:9125474

  20. The Antiaging Properties of Andrographis paniculata by Activation Epidermal Cell Stemness.

    PubMed

    You, Jiyoung; Roh, Kyung-Baeg; Li, Zidan; Liu, Guangrong; Tang, Jian; Shin, Seoungwoo; Park, Deokhoon; Jung, Eunsun

    2015-01-01

    Andrographis paniculata (A. paniculata, Chuanxinlian), a medicinal herb with an extremely bitter taste that is native to China and other parts of Southeast Asia, possesses immense therapeutic value; however, its therapeutic properties have rarely been applied in the field of skin care. In this study, we investigated the effect of an A. paniculata extract (APE) on human epidermal stem cells (EpSCs), and confirmed its anti-aging effect through in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo study. An MTT assay was used to determine cell proliferation. A flow cytometric analysis, with propidium iodide, was used to evaluate the cell cycle. The expression of integrin β1 (CD29), the stem cell marker, was detected with antibodies, using flow cytometry in vitro, and immunohistochemical assays in ex vivo. Type 1 collagen and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). During the clinical study, skin hydration, elasticity, wrinkling, sagging, and dermal density were evaluated before treatment and at four and eight weeks after the treatment with the test product (containing the APE) on the face. The proliferation of the EpSCs, treated with the APE, increased significantly. In the cell cycle analysis, the APE increased the G2/M and S stages in a dose-dependent manner. The expression of integrin β1, which is related to epidermal progenitor cell expansion, was up-regulated in the APE-treated EpSCs and skin explants. In addition, the production of VEGF in the EpSCs increased significantly in response to the APE treatment. Consistent with these results, the VEGF and APE-treated EpSCs conditioned medium enhanced the Type 1 collagen production in normal human fibroblasts (NHFs). In the clinical study, the APE improved skin hydration, dermal density, wrinkling, and sagging significantly. Our findings revealed that the APE promotes a proliferation of EpSCs, through the up-regulation of the integrin β1 and VEGF expression. The VEGF

  1. Sphingosine-1-phosphate mediates epidermal growth factor-induced muscle satellite cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Yosuke Ohashi, Kazuya; Wada, Eiji; Yuasa, Yuki; Shiozuka, Masataka; Nonomura, Yoshiaki; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2014-08-01

    Skeletal muscle can regenerate repeatedly due to the presence of resident stem cells, called satellite cells. Because satellite cells are usually quiescent, they must be activated before participating in muscle regeneration in response to stimuli such as injury, overloading, and stretch. Although satellite cell activation is a crucial step in muscle regeneration, little is known of the molecular mechanisms controlling this process. Recent work showed that the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) plays crucial roles in the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of muscle satellite cells. We investigated the role of growth factors in S1P-mediated satellite cell activation. We found that epidermal growth factor (EGF) in combination with insulin induced proliferation of quiescent undifferentiated mouse myoblast C2C12 cells, which are also known as reserve cells, in serum-free conditions. Sphingosine kinase activity increased when reserve cells were stimulated with EGF. Treatment of reserve cells with the D-erythro-N,N-dimethylsphingosine, Sphingosine Kinase Inhibitor, or siRNA duplexes specific for sphingosine kinase 1, suppressed EGF-induced C2C12 activation. We also present the evidence showing the S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. Moreover, we demonstrated a combination of insulin and EGF promoted activation of satellite cells on single myofibers in a manner dependent on SPHK and S1P2. Taken together, our observations show that EGF-induced satellite cell activation is mediated by S1P and its receptor. - Highlights: • EGF in combination with insulin induces proliferation of quiescent C2C12 cells. • Sphingosine kinase activity increases when reserve cells are stimulated with EGF. • EGF-induced activation of reserve cells is dependent on sphingosine kinase and ERK. • The S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. • EGF-induced reserve cell activation is mediated by S1P and its

  2. Formation of embryogenic cell clumps from carrot epidermal cells is suppressed by 5-azacytidine, a DNA methylation inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nozomi; Kobayashi, Hatsumi; Togashi, Takashi; Mori, Yukiko; Kikuchi, Koji; Kuriyama, Kyoko; Tokuji, Yoshihiko

    2005-01-01

    Using a direct somatic embryogenesis system in carrot, we examined the role of DNA methylation in the change of cellular differentiation state, from somatic to embryogenic. 5-Azacytidine (aza-C), an inhibitor of DNA methylation suppressed the formation of embryogenic cell clumps from epidermal carrot cells. Aza-C also downregulated the expression of DcLEC1c, a LEC1-like embryonic gene in carrot, during morphogenesis of embryos. A carrot DNA methyltransferase gene, Met1-5 was expressed transiently after the induction of somatic embryogenesis by 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), before the formation of embryogenic cell clumps. These findings suggested the significance of DNA methylation in acquiring the embryogenic competence in somatic cells in carrot. PMID:15700420

  3. UV Radiation Induces the Epidermal Recruitment of Dendritic Cells that Compensate for the Depletion of Langerhans Cells in Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Achachi, Amine; Vocanson, Marc; Bastien, Philippe; Péguet-Navarro, Josette; Grande, Sophie; Goujon, Catherine; Breton, Lionel; Castiel-Higounenc, Isabelle; Nicolas, Jean-François; Gueniche, Audrey

    2015-08-01

    UVR causes skin injury and inflammation, resulting in impaired immune function and increased skin cancer risk. Langerhans cells (LCs), the immune sentinels of the epidermis, are depleted for several days following a single UVR exposure and can be reconstituted from circulating monocytes. However, the differentiation pathways leading to the recovery of a normal pool of LCs is still unclear. To study the dynamic changes in human skin with UV injury, we exposed a cohort of 29 healthy human volunteers to a clinically relevant dose of UVR and analyzed sequential epidermal biopsies for changes in leukocyte and dendritic cell (DC) subsets. UV-induced depletion of CD1a(high) LC was compensated by sequential appearance of various epidermal leukocytes. CD14(+) monocytes were recruited as early as D1 post exposure, followed by recruitment of two inflammatory DC subsets that may represent precursors of LCs. These CD1a(low) CD207(-) and the heretofore unknown CD1a(low) CD207(+) DCs appeared at day 1 and day 4 post UVR, respectively, and were endowed with T-cell-activating properties similar to those of LCs. We conclude that recruitment of monocytes and inflammatory DCs appear as a physiological response of the epidermis in order to repair UVR-induced LC depletion associated with immune suppression. PMID:25806853

  4. Trafficking of epidermal growth factor receptor ligands in polarized epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhuminder; Coffey, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    A largely unilamellar epithelial layer lines body cavities and organ ducts such as the digestive tract and kidney tubules. This polarized epithelium is composed of biochemically and functionally separate apical and basolateral surfaces. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway is a critical regulator of epithelial homeostasis and is perturbed in a number of epithelial disorders. It is underappreciated that in vivo EGFR signaling is most often initiated by cell-surface delivery and processing of one of seven transmembrane ligands, resulting in release of the soluble form that binds EGFR. In polarized epithelial cells, EGFR is restricted largely to the basolateral surface, and apical or basolateral ligand delivery therefore has important biological consequences. In vitro approaches have been used to study the biosynthesis, cell-surface delivery, proteolytic processing, and release of soluble EGFR ligands in polarized epithelial cells. We review these results, discuss their relevance to normal physiology, and demonstrate the pathophysiological consequences of aberrant trafficking. These studies have uncovered a rich diversity of apico-basolateral trafficking mechanisms among the EGFR ligands, provided insights into the pathogenesis of an inherited magnesium-wasting disorder of the kidney (isolated renal hypomagnesemia), and identified a new mode of EGFR ligand signaling via exosomes. PMID:24215440

  5. Trafficking of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Ligands in Polarized Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhuminder; Coffey, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    A largely unilamellar epithelial layer lines body cavities and organ ducts such as the digestive tract and kidney tubules. This polarized epithelium is composed of biochemically and functionally separate apical and basolateral surfaces. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway is a critical regulator of epithelial homeostasis and is perturbed in a number of epithelial disorders. It is underappreciated that in vivo EGFR signaling is most often initiated by cell-surface delivery and processing of one of seven transmembrane ligands, resulting in release of the soluble form that binds EGFR. In polarized epithelial cells, EGFR is restricted largely to the basolateral surface, and apical or basolateral ligand delivery therefore has important biological consequences. In vitro approaches have been used to study the biosynthesis, cell-surface delivery, proteolytic processing, and release of soluble EGFR ligands in polarized epithelial cells. We review these results, discuss their relevance to normal physiology, and demonstrate the pathophysiological consequences of aberrant trafficking. These studies have uncovered a rich diversity of apico-basolateral trafficking mechanisms among the EGFR ligands, provided insights into the pathogenesis of an inherited magnesium-wasting disorder of the kidney (isolated renal hypomagnesemia), and identified a new mode of EGFR ligand signaling via exosomes. PMID:24215440

  6. IL-1β-dependent activation of dendritic epidermal T cells in contact hypersensitivity1

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten M.; Lovato, Paola; MacLeod, Amanda S.; Witherden, Deborah A.; Skov, Lone; Dyring-Andersen, Beatrice; Dabelsteen, Sally; Woetmann, Anders; Ødum, Niels; Havran, Wendy L.; Geisler, Carsten; Bonefeld, Charlotte M.

    2014-01-01

    Substances that penetrate the skin surface can act as allergens and induce a T cell-mediated inflammatory skin disease called contact hypersensitivity (CHS). IL-17 is a key cytokine in CHS and was originally thought to be produced solely by CD4+ T cells. However, it is now known that several cell types including γδ T cells can produce IL-17. Here, we determine the role of γδ T cells, especially the dendritic epidermal T cells (DETC), in CHS. By use of a well-established model for CHS where dinitroflourobenzen (DNFB) is used as allergen, we found that γδ T cells are important players in CHS. Thus, an increased number of IL-17 producing DETC appear in the skin following exposure to DNFB in WT mice, and DNFB-induced ear-swelling is reduced by approximately 50% in TCRδ−/− mice compared to WT mice. In accordance, DNFB-induced ear-swelling was reduced by approximately 50% in IL-17−/− mice. We show that DNFB triggers DETC activation and IL-1β production in the skin, and that keratinocytes produce IL-1β when stimulated with DNFB. We find that DETC activated in vitro by incubation with anti-CD3 and IL-1β produce IL-17. Importantly, we demonstrate that the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra significantly reduces CHS responses as measured by decreased ear-swelling, inhibition of local DETC activation and a reduction in the number of IL-17+ γδ T cells and DETC in the draining lymph nodes. Taken together, we show that DETC become activated and produce IL-17 in an IL-1β-dependent manner during CHS suggesting a key role for DETC in CHS. PMID:24600030

  7. Modulation of cultured porcine granulosa cell responsiveness to follicle stimulating hormone and epidermal growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    Ovarian follicular development is dependent upon the coordinated growth and differentiation of the granulosa cells which line the follicle. Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) induces granulosa cell differentiation both in vivo and in vitro. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates granulosa cell proliferation in vitro. The interaction of these two effectors upon selected parameters of growth and differentiation was examined in monolayer cultures of porcine granulose cells. Analysis of the EGF receptor by /sup 125/I-EGF binding revealed that the receptor was of high affinity with an apparent dissociation constant of 4-6 x 10/sup -10/ M. The average number of receptors per cell varied with the state of differentiation both in vivo and in vitro; highly differentiated cells bound two-fold less /sup 125/I-EGF and this effect was at least partially induced by FSH in vitro. EGF receptor function was examined by assessing EGF effects on cell number and /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation. EGF stimulated thymidine incorporation in both serum-free and serum-supplemented culture, but only in serum-supplemented conditions was cell number increased. EGF receptor function was inversely related to the state of differentiation and was attenuated by FSH. The FSH receptor was examined by /sup 125/I-FSH binding. EGF increased FSH receptor number, and lowered the affinity of the receptor. The function of these receptors was assessed by /sup 125/I-hCG binding and progesterone radioimmunoassay. If EGF was present continuously in the cultures. FSH receptor function was attenuated regardless of FSH receptor number. A preliminary effort to examine the mechanism of this interaction was performed by analyzing hormonally controlled protein synthesis with /sup 35/S-methionine labeling, SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography. FSH promoted the expression of a 27,000 dalton protein. This effect was attenuated by EGF.

  8. Stem cell factor rescues dark epidermal pigmentation in discreet anatomic locations in albino and fair-skinned mice

    PubMed Central

    Vanover, Jillian C.; Spry, Malinda L.; Hamilton, Laura; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Ito, Shosuke; D’Orazio, John A.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported a transgenic animal model of variant pigmentation based on epidermal expression of stem cell factor (SCF) and well-characterized coat color genes bred into the C57Bl/6 background. In this system, constitutive expression of SCF by epidermal keratinocytes results in the maintenance of epidermal melanocytes in the interfollicular basal epidermal layer and subsequent pigmentation of the epidermis itself. In this report, we describe extending this animal model by developing a compound mutant transgenic amelanotic animal defective at both the melanocortin 1 receptor (Mc1r) and tyrosinase (Tyr) loci. We have observed SCF-dependent pigment deposition in specific anatomic regions regardless of tyrosinase (Tyr) or Mc1r genetic status. Thus, in the presence of K14-Scf, tyrosinase-null animals (previously thought incapable of synthesizing melanin) exhibited progressive robust epidermal pigmentation with age in the ears and tails. Furthermore, in the presence of the K14-Scf transgene, Tyr-defective animals demonstrated tyrosinase activity, suggesting that the c2j Tyr promoter defect is leaky and that Tyr expression can be rescued in part by SCF in the ears and tail. Lastly, we found that UV sensitivity of K14-Scf congenic animals differing only at the Mc1r or Tyr loci depended mainly on the amount of eumelanin present in the skin. These findings suggest that c-kit signaling can overcome the c2j Tyr promoter mutation in the ears and tails of aging animals but that UV resistance depends on accumulation of epidermal eumelanin. PMID:19682281

  9. Ethylene Inhibits Cell Proliferation of the Arabidopsis Root Meristem.

    PubMed

    Street, Ian H; Aman, Sitwat; Zubo, Yan; Ramzan, Aleena; Wang, Xiaomin; Shakeel, Samina N; Kieber, Joseph J; Schaller, G Eric

    2015-09-01

    The root system of plants plays a critical role in plant growth and survival, with root growth being dependent on both cell proliferation and cell elongation. Multiple phytohormones interact to control root growth, including ethylene, which is primarily known for its role in controlling root cell elongation. We find that ethylene also negatively regulates cell proliferation at the root meristem of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Genetic analysis indicates that the inhibition of cell proliferation involves two pathways operating downstream of the ethylene receptors. The major pathway is the canonical ethylene signal transduction pathway that incorporates CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1, ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2, and the ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 family of transcription factors. The secondary pathway is a phosphorelay based on genetic analysis of receptor histidine kinase activity and mutants involving the type B response regulators. Analysis of ethylene-dependent gene expression and genetic analysis supports SHORT HYPOCOTYL2, a repressor of auxin signaling, as one mediator of the ethylene response and furthermore, indicates that SHORT HYPOCOTYL2 is a point of convergence for both ethylene and cytokinin in negatively regulating cell proliferation. Additional analysis indicates that ethylene signaling contributes but is not required for cytokinin to inhibit activity of the root meristem. These results identify key elements, along with points of cross talk with cytokinin and auxin, by which ethylene negatively regulates cell proliferation at the root apical meristem. PMID:26149574

  10. Rapid and dynamic subcellular reorganization following mechanical stimulation of Arabidopsis epidermal cells mimics responses to fungal and oomycete attack

    PubMed Central

    Hardham, Adrienne R; Takemoto, Daigo; White, Rosemary G

    2008-01-01

    Background Plant cells respond to the presence of potential fungal or oomycete pathogens by mounting a basal defence response that involves aggregation of cytoplasm, reorganization of cytoskeletal, endomembrane and other cell components and development of cell wall appositions beneath the infection site. This response is induced by non-adapted, avirulent and virulent pathogens alike, and in the majority of cases achieves penetration resistance against the microorganism on the plant surface. To explore the nature of signals that trigger this subcellular response and to determine the timing of its induction, we have monitored the reorganization of GFP-tagged actin, microtubules, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and peroxisomes in Arabidopsis plants – after touching the epidermal surface with a microneedle. Results Within 3 to 5 minutes of touching the surface of Arabidopsis cotyledon epidermal cells with fine glass or tungsten needles, actin microfilaments, ER and peroxisomes began to accumulate beneath the point of contact with the needle. Formation of a dense patch of actin was followed by focusing of actin cables on the site of contact. Touching the cell surface induced localized depolymerization of microtubules to form a microtubule-depleted zone surrounding a dense patch of GFP-tubulin beneath the needle tip. The concentration of actin, GFP-tubulin, ER and peroxisomes remained focused on the contact site as the needle moved across the cell surface and quickly dispersed when the needle was removed. Conclusion Our results show that plant cells can detect the gentle pressure of a microneedle on the epidermal cell surface and respond by reorganizing subcellular components in a manner similar to that induced during attack by potential fungal or oomycete pathogens. The results of our study indicate that during plant-pathogen interactions, the basal defence response may be induced by the plant's perception of the physical force exerted by the pathogen as it attempts to

  11. Role of epidermal Langerhans' cells in the induction of protective immunity to Schistosoma mansoni in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, H; Kamiya, H

    1995-01-01

    Percutaneous exposure of guinea-pigs to attenuated or normal larvae of Schistosoma mansoni induced proliferative T-cell responses in the skin-draining lymph nodes (SLN). The responses elicited by attenuated larvae were stronger and more prolonged [2-12 days post-infection (p.i.)] than those by normal larvae (3-8 days p.i.). The former were coincident with greater and more sustained increases in numbers of SLN dendritic cells. During this event, epidermal Langerhans' cells (LC) showed marked changes in their distribution and morphology. Resident LC were similarly exhausted by either attenuated or normal larvae between 12 hr and 1 day p.i., but thereafter more blood-borne LC were recruited around the former, since reaggregation of LC around these persisted larvae was more frequent and intensive, and enhanced replenishment of epidermal LC was achieved by 8 days p.i. When the skin depleted of epidermal LC by short-wavelength ultraviolet (UVC) irradiation was exposed to attenuated larvae, consequent T-cell responses were delayed. Excision of the whole exposed skin on day 4 p.i. also reduced T-cell responses to marginal levels. These results indicate that during the afferent phase of immunity to S. mansoni, efficient T-cell responses in the SLN need an active involvement of not only resident LC but also blood-borne LC as immunostimulatory cells. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:7750999

  12. An epidermal stem cells niche microenvironment created by engineered human amniotic membrane.

    PubMed

    Ji, Shi-zhao; Xiao, Shi-chu; Luo, Peng-fei; Huang, Guo-feng; Wang, Guang-yi; Zhu, Shi-hui; Wu, Min-juan; Xia, Zhao-fan

    2011-11-01

    How to amplify epidermal stem cells (ESCs) rapidly is a challenging crux in skin tissue engineering research. The present study describes the preparation of 3D micronized (300-600 μm) amniotic membrane (mAM) by means of repeated freeze-thawing cycles to deplete cell components and homogenized with a macrohomogenizer in liquid nitrogen. This newly prepared mAM not only possessed the characteristics of a microcarrier but completely retained the basement membrane structure and abundant active substances such as NGF, HGF, KGF, bFGF, TGF-β1 and EGF in the AM matrix. The result showed that mAM combined with rotary cell culture system (RCCS) was able to amplify ESCs quickly. The relative cell viability at day 7 and 14 was significantly higher than that of the conventional 2D plate culture (326 ± 28% and 535 ± 47% versus 232 ± 21% and 307 ± 32%, P < 0.05). In addition, the new method was able to prevent cell differentiation effectively and retain the characteristics of stem cells. When mAM loaded with ESCs (ESC-mAM) was further transplanted to full-thickness skin defects in nude mice, ESCs survived well and formed a new epidermis. Four weeks after transplantation, papilla-like structures were observed, and collagen fibers were well and regularly arranged in the newly formed dermal layer. In conclusion, the mAM as a novel natural microcarrier possesses an intact basement membrane structure and bioactivities. It not only provides the microenvironment similar to the stem cell niche within the human body favorable for ex vivo culture and amplification of ESCs but can be used as the dermal scaffold in constructing a skin substitute containing ESCs for the repair of full-thickness skin defects. PMID:21803416

  13. Epidermal growth factor precursor in mouse lactating mammary gland alveolar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.F.; Teng, C.T.; Pentecost, B.T.; DiAugustine, R.P. )

    1989-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that high levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) occur in human and rodent milk and that oral administration of this polypeptide stimulates rodent gastrointestinal development. It is not known whether EGF in milk originates from cells of the lactating mammary gland or is sequestered from an extramammary source. In the present study, prepro-EGF mRNA (approximately 4.7 kilobases) was detected in the CD-1 mouse mammary gland throughout the period of lactation; by comparison, negligible levels of this EGF transcript were found in the gland during pregnancy. Low levels of EGF immunoreactivity (4-5 ng/g wet wt tissue) were extracted from lactating (day 18) mammary glands with dilute acetic acid. Immunolocalization was evident with antisera to either EGF or two other regions of the EGF precursor in essentially all alveolar cells of the lactating gland. The most prominent staining with antiserum to EGF was observed along the luminal borders of cells; this pattern of cellular staining required proteolytic pretreatment of tissue sections. Western blot analyses of cell membranes isolated from the day 16 lactating mammary gland revealed an EGF-immunoreactive band at about 145K, which was equivalent in size to the EGF precursor found in mouse kidney cell membranes. Despite these findings, labeling of lactating mammary gland mince with L-(35S)methionine and cysteine for up to 4 h did not reveal any specific bands in immunoprecipitates. These cumulative findings suggest that the precursor form of EGF occurs in alveolar cells of lactating mammary gland and that this protein is translocated to the cell membrane.

  14. Autoradiographic localization of epidermal growth factor receptors to all major uterine cell types

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, T.H.; Mukku, V.R.; Verner, G.; Kirkland, J.L.; Stancel, G.M.

    1988-03-01

    We have recently studied the structure and function of the uterine epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, its hormonal regulation, and its possible role in estrogen-induced uterine DNA synthesis. Since the uterus is composed of multiple cell types, we sought, in the work reported here, to localize EGF binding in this organ by autoradiography. Prior to the actual autoradiography, we performed a companion series of experiments to insure that EGF binding to uterine tissue in situ represented a true receptor interaction. Uteri from immature female rats were incubated in vitro with 125I-EGF at 25 degrees C. Tissue binding was maximal within 120 min and remained constant for at least an additional 120 min. This binding of labeled EGF was largely abolished by excess unlabeled EGF but not by other growth factors, indicating that binding was to specific receptors. The binding of 125I-EGF was saturable and reached a plateau at 4-8 nM; specific binding was half-maximal at 1-2 nM EGF. In situ cross-linking studies revealed that 125I-EGF was bound predominantly to a 170,000 MW EGF receptor similar to that seen in isolated uterine membranes. Incubation of uteri with 125I-EGF followed by autoradiography revealed binding to epithelial cells, stroma, and myometrium. These results provide evidence for the presence of specific EGF receptors in all major uterine cell types of the immature rat.

  15. Amplification of Coronary Arteriogenic Capacity of Multipotent Stromal Cells by Epidermal Growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Belmadani, Souad; Matrougui, Khalid; Kolz, Chris; Pung, Yuh Fen; Palen, Desiree; Prockop, Darwin J; Chilian, William M

    2009-01-01

    Objective We determined if increasing adherence of multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) would amplify their effects on coronary collateral growth (CCG). Methods and Results Adhesion was established in cultured coronary endothelials cells (CECS) or MSCs treated with epidermal growth factor (EGF). EGF increased MSCs adhesion to CECs, and increased intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) or vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) expression. Increased adherence was blocked by EGF receptor antagonism or antibodies to the adhesion molecules. To determine if adherent MSCs, treated with EGF, would augment CCG, repetitive episodes of myocardial ischemia (RI) were introduced and CCG was measured from the ratio of collateral-dependent (CZ) and normal zone (NZ) flows. CZ/NZ was increased by MSCs without treatment vs RI-control and was further increased by EGF-treated MSCs. EGF-treated MSCs significantly improved myocardial function vs RI or RI+ MSCs demonstrating that the increase in collateral flow was functionally significant. Engraftment of MSCs into myocardium was also increased by EGF treatment. Conclusions These results reveal the importance of EGF in MSCs adhesion to endothelium and suggest that MSCs may be effective therapies for the stimulation of coronary collateral growth when interventions are employed to increase their adhesion and homing (in vitro EGF treatment) to the jeopardized myocardium. PMID:19342596

  16. The Potential of Menstrual Blood-Derived Stem Cells in Differentiation to Epidermal Lineage: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Faramarzi, Hossein; Mehrabani, Davood; Fard, Maryam; Akhavan, Maryam; Zare, Sona; Bakhshalizadeh, Shabnam; Manafi, Amir; Kazemnejad, Somaieh; Shirazi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Menstrual blood-derived stem cells (MenSCs) are a novel source of stem cells that can be easily isolated non-invasively from female volunteered donor without ethical consideration. These mesenchymal-like stem cells have high rate of proliferation and possess multi lineage differentiation potency. This study was undertaken to isolate the MenSCs and assess their potential in differentiation into epidermal lineage. METHODS About 5-10 ml of menstrual blood (MB) was collected using sterile Diva cups inserted into vagina during menstruation from volunteered healthy fertile women aged between 22-30 years. MB was transferred into Falcon tubes containing phosphate buffered saline (PBS) without Ca2+ or Mg2+ supplemented with 2.5 µg/ml fungizone, 100 µg/mL streptomycin, 100 U/mL penicillin and 0.5 mM EDTA. Mononuclear cells were separated using Ficoll-Hypaque density gradient centrifugation and washed out in PBS. The cell pellet was suspended in DMEM-F12 medium supplemented with 10% FBS and cultured in tissue culture plates. The isolated cells were co-cultured with keratinocytes derived from the foreskin of healthy newborn male aged 2-10 months who was a candidate for circumcision for differentiation into epidermal lineage. RESULTS The isolated MenSCs were adhered to the plate and exhibited spindle-shaped morphology. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the expression of mesenchymal markers of CD10, CD29, CD73, and CD105 and lack of hematopoietic stem cells markers. An early success in derivation of epidermal lineage from MenSCs was visible. CONCLUSION The MenSCs are a real source to design differentiation to epidermal cells that can be used non-invasively in various dermatological lesions and diseases. PMID:27308237

  17. Differentiation of ionic currents in CNS progenitor cells: dependence upon substrate attachment and epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed

    Feldman, D H; Thinschmidt, J S; Peel, A L; Papke, R L; Reier, P J

    1996-08-01

    Multipotential progenitor cells grown from central nervous system (CNS) tissues in defined media supplemented with epidermal growth factor (EGF), when attached to a suitable substratum, differentiate to express neural and glial histochemical markers and morphologies. To assess the functional characteristics of such cells, expression of voltage-gated Na+ and K+ currents (INa, IK) was studied by whole-cell patch clamp methods in progenitors raised from postnatal rat forebrain. Undifferentiated cells were acutely dissociated from proliferative "spheres," and differentiated cells were studied 1-25 days after plating spheres onto polylysine/laminin-treated coverslips. INa and IK were detected together in 58%, INa alone in 11%, and IK alone in 19% of differentiated cells recorded with K(+)-containing pipettes. With internal Cs+ (to isolate INa), INa up to 45 pA/pF was observed in some cells within 1 day after plating. I Na ranged up to 150 pA/pF subsequently. Overall, 84% of cells expressed I Na, with an average of 38 pA/pF. INa had fast kinetics, as in neurons, but steadystate inactivation curves were strongly negative, resembling those of glial INa. Inward tail currents sensitive to [K+]out were observed upon repolarization after the 10-ms test pulse with internal Cs+, indicating the expression of K+ channels in 82% of cells. In contrast to the substantial currents observed in differentiating cells, little or no INa or Ik-tail currents were detected in recordings from cells acutely dissociated from spheres. Thus, in the presence of EGF, ionic currents develop early during differentiation induced by attachment to an appropriate substratum. Cells switched from EGF to basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) when plated onto coverslips showed greatly reduced proliferation and developed less neuron-like morphologies than cells plated in the presence of EGF. INa was observed in only 53% of bFGF-treated cells, with an average of 9 pA/pF. Thus, in contrast to reports that b

  18. A Study of Noncultured Extracted Hair Follicle Outer Root Sheath Cell Suspension for Transplantation in Vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aarti N; Marfatia, Ritu K; Saikia, Siddhartha S

    2016-01-01

    Context: Vitiligo surgeries have come a long way from tissue grafts to cultured and non cultured cell transplantation. Extracted hair follicle outer root sheath cell transplantation (EHF ORS) suspension is more enriched with melanocyte. In a hair bulb, there is one melanocyte for every five keratinocytes which is much higher than the epidermal melanin unit. Aims: To analyse the effectiveness of cultured EHF ORS and to perform objective evaluation based on clinical improvement & photographic evidence. To observe any untoward events or side effects. Settings and Design: The study was open and uncontrolled. All the patients were screened at preliminary visit. Reviews were done every two weeks. The endpoint selected was six months post procedure. Materials and Methods: Twenty five patients of stable Vitiligo were included in the study and follicular unit were harvested by Follicular Unit Extraction method. Outer root sheath cells were extracted by trypsinization. The solution was transplanted over dermabraded recipient site. Pressure dressing was given. Patients were followed up regularly. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive Statistics, Chi-Square. Results: Mean ± SD repigmentation was 80.15% ± 22.9% with excellent repigmentation (90-100%) in 60% of patients. Conclusions: This method is safe, effective, and simpler than the other methods involving cell culturing and requiring a laboratory set-up but selection of patients is crucial for the success of the outcome. PMID:27601859

  19. The carboxy-terminus of p63 links cell cycle control and the proliferative potential of epidermal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Sahu, Raju; Leu, N. Adrian; Senoo, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor p63 (Trp63) plays a key role in homeostasis and regeneration of the skin. The p63 gene is transcribed from dual promoters, generating TAp63 isoforms with growth suppressive functions and dominant-negative ΔNp63 isoforms with opposing properties. p63 also encodes multiple carboxy (C)-terminal variants. Although mutations of C-terminal variants have been linked to the pathogenesis of p63-associated ectodermal disorders, the physiological role of the p63 C-terminus is poorly understood. We report here that deletion of the p63 C-terminus in mice leads to ectodermal malformation and hypoplasia, accompanied by a reduced proliferative capacity of epidermal progenitor cells. Notably, unlike the p63-null condition, we find that p63 C-terminus deficiency promotes expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Waf1/Cip1 (Cdkn1a), a factor associated with reduced proliferative capacity of both hematopoietic and neuronal stem cells. These data suggest that the p63 C-terminus plays a key role in the cell cycle progression required to maintain the proliferative potential of stem cells of many different lineages. Mechanistically, we show that loss of Cα, the predominant C-terminal p63 variant in epithelia, promotes the transcriptional activity of TAp63 and also impairs the dominant-negative activity of ΔNp63, thereby controlling p21Waf1/Cip1 expression. We propose that the p63 C-terminus links cell cycle control and the proliferative potential of epidermal progenitor cells via mechanisms that equilibrate TAp63 and ΔNp63 isoform function. PMID:25503409

  20. Quercetin 3-O-glucoside suppresses epidermal growth factor-induced migration by inhibiting EGFR signaling in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungwhoi; Han, Song-I; Yun, Jeong-Hun; Kim, Jae Hoon

    2015-12-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most dangerous cancers and is associated with a grave prognosis. Despite increased knowledge of the complex signaling networks responsible for progression of pancreatic cancer, many challenging therapies have fallen short of expectations. In this study, we examined the anti-migratory effect of quercetin 3-O-glucoside in epidermal growth factor-induced cell migration by inhibiting EGF receptor (EGFR) signaling in several human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Treatment with quercetin, quercetin 3-O-glucoside, and quercetin 7-O-glucoside differentially suppressed epidermal growth factor-induced migration activity of human pancreatic cancer cells. In particular, quercetin 3-O-glucoside strongly inhibited the infiltration activity of pancreatic cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, quercetin 3-O-glucoside exerted the anti-migratory effect even at a relatively low dose compared with other forms of quercetin. The anti-tumor effects of quercetin 3-O-glucoside were mediated by selectively inhibiting the EGFR-mediated FAK, AKT, MEK1/2, and ERK1/2 signaling pathway. Combinatorial treatment with quercetin 3-O-glucoside plus gemcitabine showed the synergistic anti-migratory effect on epidermal growth factor-induced cell migration in human pancreatic cancer cell lines. These results suggest that quercetin 3-O-glucoside has potential for anti-metastatic therapy in human pancreatic cancer. PMID:26109002

  1. Epidermal growth factor receptor is overexpressed in neuroblastoma tissues and cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chao; Shen, Ruling; Li, Kai; Zheng, Na; Zong, Yuqing; Ye, Danrong; Wang, Qingcheng; Wang, Zuopeng; Chen, Lian; Ma, Yangyang

    2016-08-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common abdominal malignant tumor in childhood. Immunotoxin (IT) that targets the tumor cell surface receptor is a new supplementary therapeutic treatment approach. The purpose of this study is to detect the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in neuroblastoma cell lines and tissues, and to explore if IT therapy can be used to treat refractory neuroblastoma. The EGFR expression in human neuroblastoma tissue samples was detected by immunohistochemistry staining. The positive rate of EGFR expression was 81.0% in neuroblastoma tissue and 50.0% in gangliocytoma, respectively, but without statistical significance between them (P > 0.05). The positive rate of EGFR expression in favorable type and unfavorable type was 62.5% and 92.3%, respectively, but they were not statistically different (P > 0.05). Results from pre-chemotherapy and post-chemotherapy samples showed that there was no significant statistical difference (P > 0.05) between them in the EGFR expression. Furthermore, the EGFR expression levels in five neuroblastoma cell lines were measured using cell-based ELISA assay and western blot analysis. The results showed that the expression of EGFR was higher in KP-N-NS and BE(2)-C than those in other cell lines. Our results revealed that there are consistent and widespread expressions of EGFR in neuroblastoma tissues as well as in neuroblastoma cell lines, suggesting that it is possible to develop future treatment strategies of neuroblastoma by targeting at the EGFR. PMID:27353319

  2. Polarity of Water Transport across Epidermal Cell Membranes in Tradescantia virginiana1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Hiroshi; Fei, Jiong; Knipfer, Thorsten; Matthews, Mark A.; Gambetta, Greg; Shackel, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Using the automated cell pressure probe, small and highly reproducible hydrostatic pressure clamp (PC) and pressure relaxation (PR) tests (typically, applied step change in pressure = 0.02 MPa and overall change in volume = 30 pL, respectively) were applied to individual Tradescantia virginiana epidermal cells to determine both exosmotic and endosmotic hydraulic conductivity (LpOUT and LpIN, respectively). Within-cell reproducibility of measured hydraulic parameters depended on the method used, with the PR method giving a lower average coefficient of variation (15.2%, 5.8%, and 19.0% for half-time, cell volume [Vo], and hydraulic conductivity [Lp], respectively) than the PC method (25.4%, 22.0%, and 24.2%, respectively). Vo as determined from PC and PR tests was 1.1 to 2.7 nL and in the range of optically estimated Vo values of 1.5 to 4.9 nL. For the same cell, Vo and Lp estimates were significantly lower (about 15% and 30%, respectively) when determined by PC compared with PR. Both methods, however, showed significantly higher LpOUT than LpIN (LpOUT/LpIN ≅ 1.20). Because these results were obtained using small and reversible hydrostatically driven flows in the same cell, the 20% outward biased polarity of water transport is most likely not due to artifacts associated with unstirred layers or to direct effects of externally applied osmotica on the membrane, as has been suggested in previous studies. The rapid reversibility of applied flow direction, particularly for the PR method, and the lack of a clear increase in LpOUT/LpIN over a wide range of Lp values suggest that the observed polarity is an intrinsic biophysical property of the intact membrane/protein complex. PMID:24495955

  3. IgG and IgA with potential microbial-binding activity are expressed by normal human skin epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dongyang; Ge, Jing; Liao, Qinyuan; Ma, Junfan; Liu, Yang; Huang, Jing; Wang, Chong; Xu, Weiyan; Zheng, Jie; Shao, Wenwei; Lee, Gregory; Qiu, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system of the skin is thought to depend largely on a multi-layered mechanical barrier supplemented by epidermis-derived antimicrobial peptides. To date, there are no reports of antimicrobial antibody secretion by the epidermis. In this study, we report the expression of functional immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin A (IgA), previously thought to be only produced by B cells, in normal human epidermal cells and the human keratinocyte line HaCaT. While B cells express a fully diverse Ig, epidermal cell-expressed IgG or IgA showed one or two conservative VHDJH rearrangements in each individual. These unique VDJ rearrangements in epidermal cells were found neither in the B cell-derived Ig VDJ databases published by others nor in our positive controls. IgG and IgA from epidermal cells of the same individual had different VDJ rearrangement patterns. IgG was found primarily in prickle cells, and IgA was mainly detected in basal cells. Both epidermal cell-derived IgG and IgA showed potential antibody activity by binding pathogens like Staphylococcus aureus, the most common pathogenic skin bacteria, but the microbial-binding profile was different. Our data indicates that normal human epidermal cells spontaneously express IgG and IgA, and we speculate that these Igs participate in skin innate immunity. PMID:25625513

  4. Preparation of Epidermal Peels and Guard Cell Protoplasts for Cellular, Electrophysiological, and -Omics Assays of Guard Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mengmeng; Jeon, Byeong Wook; Geng, Sisi; Yu, Yunqing; Balmant, Kelly; Chen, Sixue; Assmann, Sarah M

    2016-01-01

    Bioassays are commonly used to study stomatal phenotypes. There are multiple options in the choice of plant materials and species used for observation of stomatal and guard cell responses in vivo. Here, detailed procedures for bioassays of stomatal responses to abscisic acid (ABA) in Arabidopsis thaliana are described, including ABA promotion of stomatal closure, ABA inhibition of stomatal opening, and ABA promotion of reaction oxygen species (ROS) production in guard cells. We also include an example of a stomatal bioassay for the guard cell CO2 response using guard cell-enriched epidermal peels from Brassica napus. Highly pure preparations of guard cell protoplasts can be produced, which are also suitable for studies on guard cell signaling, as well as for studies on guard cell ion transport. Small-scale and large-scale guard cell protoplast preparations are commonly used for electrophysiological and -omics studies, respectively. We provide a procedure for small-scale guard cell protoplasting from A. thaliana. Additionally, a general protocol for large-scale preparation of guard cell protoplasts, with specifications for three different species, A. thaliana, B. napus, and Vicia faba is also provided. PMID:26577784

  5. p53 Acts as a Co-Repressor to Regulate Keratin 14 Expression during Epidermal Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chung-Faye; Lu, Mei-Hua; Lin, Hwang-Chi; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Tao, Pao-Luh; Chen, Jang-Yi

    2012-01-01

    During epidermal cell differentiation, keratin 14 (K14) expression is down-regulated, p53 expression varies, and the expression of the p53 target genes, p21 and 14-3-3σ, increases. These trends suggest that the relative transcriptional activity of p53 is increased during epidermal cell differentiation. To determine the relationship between K14 and p53, we constructed K14 promoters of various sizes and found that wild-type p53 could repress the promoter activity of all of the K14 promoter constructs in H1299 cells. K14-p160 contains an SP1 binding site mutation that prevents p53 from repressing K14 expression. Using a DNA affinity precipitation assay, we confirmed that p53 forms a complex with SP1 at the SP1 binding site between nucleotides -48 and -43 on the K14 promoter. Thus, our data indicate that p53 acts as a co-repressor to down-regulate K14 expression by binding to SP1. Next, we used a 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced epidermal cell differentiation model to examine the inhibition of K14 expression caused by increased p53 activity. Human ovarian teratocarcinoma C9 cells were treated with TPA to induce differentiation. Over-expression of the dominant negative p53 mutant ΔTAp53, which inhibits p53 activity, prevented the TPA-induced K14 down-regulation in C9 cells. Furthermore, treatment of normal primary human foreskin keratinocytes (PHFK) with the p53 inhibitor pifithrin-α (PFT-α) showed that the inhibition of p53 activity relieves K14 repression during epidermal cell differentiation. Finally, we found that TPA induces the phosphorylation of p53 at residue 378, which enhances the affinity of p53 to bind to Sp1 and repress K14 expression. PMID:22911849

  6. Role of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath cells in tooth root development.

    PubMed

    Zeichner-David, Margarita; Oishi, Keiji; Su, Zhengyan; Zakartchenko, Vassili; Chen, Li-Sha; Arzate, Higinio; Bringas, Pablo

    2003-12-01

    During tooth development, after the completion of crown formation, the apical mesenchyme forms the developing periodontium while the inner and outer enamel epithelia fuse below the level of the crown cervical margin to produce a bilayered epithelial sheath termed Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS). The role of HERS cells in root formation is widely accepted; however, the precise function of these cells remains controversial. Functions suggested have ranged from structural (subdivide the dental ectomesenchymal tissues into dental papilla and dental follicle), regulators of timing of root development, inducers of mesenchymal cell differentiation into odontoblasts and cementoblasts, to cementoblast cell precursors. The characterization of the HERS phenotype has been hindered by the small amount of tissue present at a given time during root formation. In this study, we report the establishment of an immortal HERS-derived cell line that can be maintained in culture and then induced to differentiate in vitro. Characterization of the HERS phenotype using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot immunostaining suggests that HERS cells initially synthesize and secrete some enamel-related proteins such as ameloblastin, and then these cells appear to change their morphology and produce a mineralized extracellular matrix resembling acellular cementum. These studies suggest that the acellular and cellular cementum are synthesized by two different types of cells, the first one by HERS-derived cementoblasts and the later by neural crest-derived cementoblasts. PMID:14648842

  7. Arabidopsis thaliana RALF1 opposes brassinosteroid effects on root cell elongation and lateral root formation

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid alkalinization factor (RALF) is a peptide signal that plays a basic role in cell biology and most likely regulates cell expansion. In this study, transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines with high and low levels of AtRALF1 transcripts were used to investigate this peptide’s mechanism of action. Overexpression of the root-specific isoform AtRALF1 resulted in reduced cell size. Conversely, AtRALF1 silencing increased root length by increasing the size of root cells. AtRALF1-silenced plants also showed an increase in the number of lateral roots, whereas AtRALF1 overexpression produced the opposite effect. In addition, four AtRALF1-inducible genes were identified: two genes encoding proline-rich proteins (AtPRP1 and AtPRP3), one encoding a hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein (AtHRPG2), and one encoding a xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (TCH4). These genes were expressed in roots and involved in cell-wall rearrangement, and their induction was concentration dependent. Furthermore, AtRALF1-overexpressing plants were less sensitive to exogenous brassinolide (BL); upon BL treatment, the plants showed no increase in root length and a compromised increase in hypocotyl elongation. In addition, the treatment had no effect on the number of emerged lateral roots. AtRALF1 also induces two brassinosteroid (BR)-downregulated genes involved in the BR biosynthetic pathway: the cytochrome P450 monooxygenases CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHISM AND DWARFISM (CPD) and DWARF4 (DWF4). Simultaneous treatment with both AtRALF1 and BL caused a reduction in AtRALF1-inducible gene expression levels, suggesting that these signals may compete for components shared by both pathways. Taken together, these results indicate an opposing effect of AtRALF1 and BL, and suggest that RALF’s mechanism of action could be to interfere with the BR signalling pathway. PMID:24620000

  8. Epidermal stem cells (ESCs) accelerate diabetic wound healing via the Notch signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rong-Hua; Qi, Shao-Hai; Shu, Bin; Ruan, Shu-Bin; Lin, Ze-Peng; Lin, Yan; Shen, Rui; Zhang, Feng-Gang; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Xie, Ju-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic, non-healing wounds are a major complication of diabetes. Recently, various cell therapies have been reported for promotion of diabetic wound healing. Epidermal stem cells (ESCs) are considered a powerful tool for tissue therapy. However, the effect and the mechanism of the therapeutic properties of ESCs in the diabetic wound healing are unclear. Herein, to determine the ability of ESCs to diabetic wound healing, a dorsal skin defect in a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes mellitus (DM) mouse model was used. ESCs were isolated from mouse skin. We found that both the mRNA and protein levels of a Notch ligand Jagged1 (Jag1), Notch1 and Notch target gene Hairy Enhancer of Split-1 (Hes1) were significantly increased at the wound margins. In addition, we observed that Jag1 was high expressed in ESCs. Overexpression of Jag1 promotes ESCs migration, whereas knockdown Jag1 resulted in a significant reduction in ESCs migration in vitro. Importantly, Jag1 overexpression improves diabetic wound healing in vivo. These results provide evidence that ESCs accelerate diabetic wound healing via the Notch signalling pathway, and provide a promising potential for activation of the Notch pathway for the treatment of diabetic wound. PMID:27129289

  9. Epidermal stem cells (ESCs) accelerate diabetic wound healing via the Notch signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rong-Hua; Qi, Shao-Hai; Shu, Bin; Ruan, Shu-Bin; Lin, Ze-Peng; Lin, Yan; Shen, Rui; Zhang, Feng-Gang; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Xie, Ju-Lin

    2016-08-01

    Chronic, non-healing wounds are a major complication of diabetes. Recently, various cell therapies have been reported for promotion of diabetic wound healing. Epidermal stem cells (ESCs) are considered a powerful tool for tissue therapy. However, the effect and the mechanism of the therapeutic properties of ESCs in the diabetic wound healing are unclear. Herein, to determine the ability of ESCs to diabetic wound healing, a dorsal skin defect in a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes mellitus (DM) mouse model was used. ESCs were isolated from mouse skin. We found that both the mRNA and protein levels of a Notch ligand Jagged1 (Jag1), Notch1 and Notch target gene Hairy Enhancer of Split-1 (Hes1) were significantly increased at the wound margins. In addition, we observed that Jag1 was high expressed in ESCs. Overexpression of Jag1 promotes ESCs migration, whereas knockdown Jag1 resulted in a significant reduction in ESCs migration in vitro Importantly, Jag1 overexpression improves diabetic wound healing in vivo These results provide evidence that ESCs accelerate diabetic wound healing via the Notch signalling pathway, and provide a promising potential for activation of the Notch pathway for the treatment of diabetic wound. PMID:27129289

  10. Transient expression of minimum linear gene cassettes in onion epidermal cells via direct transformation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yun-Qing; Yang, Jun; Xu, Feng-Ping; An, Li-Jia; Liu, Jian-Feng; Chen, Zhi-Wen

    2009-12-01

    A new method without any special devices for direct transformation of linear gene cassettes was developed. Its feasibility was verified through 5'-fluorescent dye (fluorescein isothiocyanate, FITC)-labeled fluorescent tracing and transient expression of a gus reporter gene. Minimal linear gene cassettes, containing necessary regulation elements and a gus reporter gene, was prepared by polymerase chain reaction and dissolved in transformation buffer solution to 100 ng/mL. The basic transformation solution used was Murashige and Skoog basal salt mixture (MS) liquid medium. Hypertonic pretreatment of explants and transformation cofactors, including Ca(2+), surfactant assistants, Agrobacterium LBA4404 cell culture on transformation efficiency were evaluated. Prior to the incubation of the explants and target linear cassette in each designed transformation solution for 3 h, the onion low epidermal explants were pre-cultured in darkness at 27 degrees C for 48 h and then transferred to MS solid media for 72 h. FITC-labeled linear DNA was used to trace the delivery of DNA entry into the cell and the nuclei. By GUS staining and flow-cytometry-mediated fluorescent detection, a significant increase of the ratios of fluorescent nuclei as well as expression of the gus reporter gene was observed by each designed transformation solution. This potent and feasible method showed prospective applications in plant transgenic research. PMID:19255730

  11. Nitric oxide promotes epidermal stem cell migration via cGMP-Rho GTPase signalling

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Rixing; He, Weifeng; Wang, Fan; Yao, Zhihui; Tan, Jianglin; Xu, Rui; Zhou, Junyi; Wang, Yuzhen; Li, Haisheng; Wu, Jun; LUO, Gaoxing

    2016-01-01

    The migration and reepithelization of epidermal stem cells (ESCs) are the most critical processes in wound healing. The gaseous messenger nitric oxide (NO) has multiple biological effects, but its actions on ESCs are poorly understood. In this study, an NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), was found to facilitate the in vitro migration of human ESCs (huESCs) in both live-imaging and scratch models. In addition, pull-down assays demonstrated that SNAP could activate the small GTPases RhoA and Rac1 of the Rho family, but not Cdc42. Moreover, the effects of SNAP on the migration and F-actin polymerization of ESCs could be blocked by inhibitors of cGMP, PKG, RhoA or Rac1, and by a specific siRNA of RhoA or Rac1, but not by a Cdc42 inhibitor or siRNA. Furthermore, the roles of NO in ESC migration via cGMP-Rho GTPase signalling in vivo were confirmed by tracing 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-labelled cells in a superficial, partial-thickness scald mouse model. Thus, the present study demonstrated that the NO donor SNAP could promote huESC migration in vitro. Furthermore, NO was found to induce ESC migration via cGMP-Rho GTPase RhoA and Rac1 signalling, but not Cdc42 signalling, both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:27469024

  12. Differential Requirements of TCR Signaling in Homeostatic Maintenance and Function of Dendritic Epidermal T Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baojun; Wu, Jianxuan; Jiao, Yiqun; Bock, Cheryl; Dai, Meifang; Chen, Benny; Chao, Nelson; Zhang, Weiguo; Zhuang, Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Dendritic epidermal T cells (DETCs) are generated exclusively in the fetal thymus and maintained in the skin epithelium throughout postnatal life of the mouse. DETCs have restricted antigenic specificity as a result of their exclusive usage of a canonical TCR. Although the importance of the TCR in DETC development has been well established, the exact role of TCR signaling in DETC homeostasis and function remains incompletely defined. In this study, we investigated TCR signaling in fully matured DETCs by lineage-restricted deletion of the Lat gene, an essential signaling molecule downstream of the TCR. We found that Lat deletion impaired TCR-dependent cytokine gene activation and the ability of DETCs to undergo proliferative expansion. However, linker for activation of T cells-deficient DETCs were able to maintain long-term population homeostasis, although with a reduced proliferation rate. Mice with Lat deletion in DETCs exhibited delayed wound healing accompanied by impaired clonal expansion within the wound area. Our study revealed differential requirements for TCR signaling in homeostatic maintenance of DETCs and in their effector function during wound healing. PMID:26408667

  13. Optical characterization of epidermal cells and their relationship to DNA recovery from touch samples

    PubMed Central

    Stanciu, Cristina E.; Philpott, M. Katherine; Kwon, Ye Jin; Bustamante, Eduardo E.; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the relative contributions of different cellular and genetic components to biological samples created by touch or contact with a surface – one of the most challenging forms of forensic evidence. Touch samples were generated by having individuals hold an object for five minutes and analyzed for quantity of intact epidermal cells, extracellular DNA, and DNA from pelleted cell material after elution from the collection swab. Comparisons were made between samples where individuals had washed their hands immediately prior to handling and those where hand washing was not controlled. The vast majority (84-100%) of DNA detected in these touch samples was extracellular and was uncorrelated to the number of epidermal cells detected. Although little to no extracellular or cell pellet-associated DNA was detected when individuals washed their hands prior to substrate handling, we found that a significant number of epidermal cells (between ~5x10 3 and ~1x10 5) could still be recovered from these samples, suggesting that other types of biological information may be present even when no amplifiable nuclear DNA is present. These results help to elucidate the biological context for touch samples and characterize factors that may contribute to patterns of transfer and persistence of genetic material in forensic evidence. PMID:26870321

  14. Microenvironmental stiffness enhances glioma cell proliferation by stimulating epidermal growth factor receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Umesh, Vaibhavi; Rape, Andrew D; Ulrich, Theresa A; Kumar, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    The aggressive and rapidly lethal brain tumor glioblastoma (GBM) is associated with profound tissue stiffening and genomic lesions in key members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that increasing microenvironmental stiffness in culture can strongly enhance glioma cell behaviors relevant to tumor progression, including proliferation, yet it has remained unclear whether stiffness and EGFR regulate proliferation through common or independent signaling mechanisms. Here we test the hypothesis that microenvironmental stiffness regulates cell cycle progression and proliferation in GBM tumor cells by altering EGFR-dependent signaling. We began by performing an unbiased reverse phase protein array screen, which revealed that stiffness modulates expression and phosphorylation of a broad range of signals relevant to proliferation, including members of the EGFR pathway. We subsequently found that culturing human GBM tumor cells on progressively stiffer culture substrates both dramatically increases proliferation and facilitates passage through the G1/S checkpoint of the cell cycle, consistent with an EGFR-dependent process. Western Blots showed that increasing microenvironmental stiffness enhances the expression and phosphorylation of EGFR and its downstream effector Akt. Pharmacological loss-of-function studies revealed that the stiffness-sensitivity of proliferation is strongly blunted by inhibition of EGFR, Akt, or PI3 kinase. Finally, we observed that stiffness strongly regulates EGFR clustering, with phosphorylated EGFR condensing into vinculin-positive focal adhesions on stiff substrates and dispersing as microenvironmental stiffness falls to physiological levels. Our findings collectively support a model in which tissue stiffening promotes GBM proliferation by spatially and biochemically amplifying EGFR signaling. PMID:25000176

  15. [Transplanted epidermal neural crest stem cell in a peripheral nerve gap].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Jieyuan; Li, Bingcang; Liu, Zheng; Liu, Bin

    2014-04-01

    Neural crest stem cells originated from hair follicle (epidermal neural crest stem cell, EPI-NCSC) are easy to obtain and have potentials to differentiate into various tissues, which make them eminent seed cells for tissue engineering. EPI-NCSC is now used to repair nerve injury, especially, the spinal cord injury. To investigate their effects on repairing peripheral nerve injury, EPI-NCSC from a GFP-SD rat were primarily cultured on coated dishes and on a poly lactic acid coglycolic acid copolymer (PLGA) membrane. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay showed that the initial adhesion rate of EPI-NCSC was 89.7% on PLGA membrane, and the relative growth rates were 89.3%, 87.6%, 85.6%, and 96.6% on the 1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th day respectively. Cell cycles and DNA ploidy analysis demonstrated that cell cycles and proliferation indexes of cultured EPI-NCSC had the same variation pattern on coated dishes and PLGA membrane. Then cultured EPI-NCSC were mixed with equal amount of extracellular matrix and injected into a PLGA conduit to connect a 10 mm surgery excision gap of rat sciatic nerve, Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) was used to substitute EPI-NCSC in the control group. After four weeks of transplantation, the defected sciatic nerve achieved a histological restoration, the sensory function of rat hind limb was partly recovered and the sciatic nerve index was also improved. The above results showed that a PLGA conduit filled with EPI-NCSC has a good repair effect on the peripheral nerve injury. PMID:25195250

  16. The influence of stromal cells on the pigmentation of tissue-engineered dermo-epidermal skin grafts.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, Thomas; Böttcher-Haberzeth, Sophie; Klar, Agnieszka S; Widmer, Daniel S; Pontiggia, Luca; Weber, Andreas D; Weber, Daniel M; Schiestl, Clemens; Meuli, Martin; Reichmann, Ernst

    2015-03-01

    It has been shown in vitro that melanocyte proliferation and function in palmoplantar skin is regulated by mesenchymal factors derived from fibroblasts. In this study, we investigated in vivo the influence of mesenchymal-epithelial interactions in human tissue-engineered skin substitutes reconstructed from palmar- and nonpalmoplantar-derived fibroblasts. Tissue-engineered dermo-epidermal analogs based on collagen type I hydrogels were populated with either human palmar or nonpalmoplantar fibroblasts and seeded with human nonpalmoplantar-derived melanocytes and keratinocytes. These skin substitutes were transplanted onto full-thickness skin wounds of immunoincompetent rats. Four weeks after transplantation the development of skin color was measured and grafts were excised and analyzed with regard to epidermal characteristics, in particular melanocyte number and function. Skin substitutes containing palmar-derived fibroblasts in comparison to nonpalmoplantar-derived fibroblasts showed (a) a significantly lighter pigmentation; (b) a reduced amount of epidermal melanin granules; and (c) a distinct melanosome expression. However, the number of melanocytes in the basal layer remained similar in both transplantation groups. These findings demonstrate that human palmar fibroblasts regulate the function of melanocytes in human pigmented dermo-epidermal skin substitutes after transplantation, whereas the number of melanocytes remains constant. This underscores the influence of site-specific stromal cells and their importance when constructing skin substitutes for clinical application. PMID:25300246

  17. The Influence of Stromal Cells on the Pigmentation of Tissue-Engineered Dermo-Epidermal Skin Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Biedermann, Thomas; Böttcher-Haberzeth, Sophie; Klar, Agnieszka S.; Widmer, Daniel S.; Pontiggia, Luca; Weber, Andreas D.; Weber, Daniel M.; Schiestl, Clemens; Meuli, Martin

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown in vitro that melanocyte proliferation and function in palmoplantar skin is regulated by mesenchymal factors derived from fibroblasts. In this study, we investigated in vivo the influence of mesenchymal–epithelial interactions in human tissue-engineered skin substitutes reconstructed from palmar- and nonpalmoplantar-derived fibroblasts. Tissue-engineered dermo-epidermal analogs based on collagen type I hydrogels were populated with either human palmar or nonpalmoplantar fibroblasts and seeded with human nonpalmoplantar-derived melanocytes and keratinocytes. These skin substitutes were transplanted onto full-thickness skin wounds of immunoincompetent rats. Four weeks after transplantation the development of skin color was measured and grafts were excised and analyzed with regard to epidermal characteristics, in particular melanocyte number and function. Skin substitutes containing palmar-derived fibroblasts in comparison to nonpalmoplantar-derived fibroblasts showed (a) a significantly lighter pigmentation; (b) a reduced amount of epidermal melanin granules; and (c) a distinct melanosome expression. However, the number of melanocytes in the basal layer remained similar in both transplantation groups. These findings demonstrate that human palmar fibroblasts regulate the function of melanocytes in human pigmented dermo-epidermal skin substitutes after transplantation, whereas the number of melanocytes remains constant. This underscores the influence of site-specific stromal cells and their importance when constructing skin substitutes for clinical application. PMID:25300246

  18. Tricho- and atrichoblast cell files show distinct PIN2 auxin efflux carrier exploitations and are jointly required for defined auxin-dependent root organ growth.

    PubMed

    Löfke, Christian; Scheuring, David; Dünser, Kai; Schöller, Maria; Luschnig, Christian; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen

    2015-08-01

    The phytohormone auxin is a vital growth regulator in plants. In the root epidermis auxin steers root organ growth. However, the mechanisms that allow adjacent tissues to integrate growth are largely unknown. Here, the focus is on neighbouring epidermal root tissues to assess the integration of auxin-related growth responses. The pharmacologic, genetic, and live-cell imaging approaches reveal that PIN2 auxin efflux carriers are differentially controlled in tricho- and atrichoblast cells. PIN2 proteins show lower abundance at the plasma membrane of trichoblast cells, despite showing higher rates of intracellular trafficking in these cells. The data suggest that PIN2 proteins display distinct cell-type-dependent trafficking rates to the lytic vacuole for degradation. Based on this insight, it is hypothesized that auxin-dependent processes are distinct in tricho- and atrichoblast cells. Moreover, genetic interference with epidermal patterning supports this assumption and suggests that tricho- and atrichoblasts have distinct importance for auxin-sensitive root growth and gravitropic responses. PMID:26041320

  19. The regulation and plasticity of root hair patterning and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Henao, Jorge E; Vélez-Bermúdez, Isabel Cristina; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    Root hairs are highly specialized cells found in the epidermis of plant roots that play a key role in providing the plant with water and mineral nutrients. Root hairs have been used as a model system for understanding both cell fate determination and the morphogenetic plasticity of cell differentiation. Indeed, many studies have shown that the fate of root epidermal cells, which differentiate into either root hair or non-hair cells, is determined by a complex interplay of intrinsic and extrinsic cues that results in a predictable but highly plastic pattern of epidermal cells that can vary in shape, size and function. Here, we review these studies and discuss recent evidence suggesting that environmental information can be integrated at multiple points in the root hair morphogenetic pathway and affects multifaceted processes at the chromatin, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. PMID:27246711

  20. Regulation of epidermal cell interleukin-6 production by UV light and corticosteroids

    SciTech Connect

    Kirnbauer, R.; Koeck, A.N.; Neuner, P.; Foerster, E.K.; Krutmann, J.; Urbanski, A.; Schauer, E.; Ansel, J.C.; Schwarz, T.; Luger, T.A. )

    1991-04-01

    Epidermal cells (EC) are well known as a source of cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-6. In the present study, we investigated whether ultraviolet (UV) light and corticosteroids (CS) affect IL-6 production by normal (HNK) or malignant (KB) human keratinocytes. Supernatants derived from UVB (100 J/m2)- but not from UVA (100-1500 kJ/m2)-exposed EC (HNK and KB) contained significantly increased levels of IL-6 activity. This was also confirmed by Western blot analysis, resulting in specific bands at 23 kD and 27 kD. Northern blot analysis revealed an enhanced IL-6 mRNA expression after UVB exposure. Addition of hydrocortisone, prednisolone, or dexamethasone immediately after UVB irradiation significantly blocked UVB or IL-1-induced IL-6 mRNA expression and production by EC. The suppressive effect was observed at doses in the physiologic (10(-7)-10(-9) M) as well as pharmacologic (10(-5)-10(-7) M) range. In contrast, the nonactive steroid prednisone did not affect EC IL-6 mRNA expression. These findings indicate that increased IL-6 production by EC after UVB irradiation may mediate local and systemic inflammatory reactions following extensive sun exposure. Thus, the therapeutic effect of corticosteroids observed in various inflammatory diseases may be partly due to their downregulating capacity of IL-6 production.

  1. Unraveling the Influence of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Colonization on Arsenic Tolerance in Medicago: Glomus mosseae is More Effective than G. intraradices, Associated with Lower Expression of Root Epidermal Pi Transporter Genes

    PubMed Central

    Christophersen, Helle M.; Smith, F. Andrew; Smith, Sally E.

    2012-01-01

    We used medic (Medicago truncatula) to investigate effects of inoculation with two arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and application of arsenate (AsV) and phosphate (Pi) on mechanisms underlying increased tolerance (in terms of growth) of AM plants to AsV. We tested the hypotheses that (1) inoculation with AM fungi results in down-regulation of MtPht1;1 and MtPht1;2 genes (encoding high-affinity Pi and AsV uptake systems in the direct root epidermal pathway) and up-regulation of the AM-induced MtPht1;4 (responsible for transfer of Pi from the arbuscular interface to cortical cells), and (2) these changes are involved in decreased As uptake relative to P uptake and hence increased As tolerance. We also measured expression of MtMT4, a Pi starvation-inducible gene, other genes encoding Pi uptake systems (MtPht 1;5 and MtPht1;6) and arsenate reductase (MtACR) and phytochelatin synthase (MtPCS), to gain insights into broader aspects of P transfers in AM plants and possible detoxification mechanisms. Medic responded slightly to AM colonization in terms of growth in the absence of As, but positively in terms of P uptake. Both growth and P responses in AM plants were positive when As was applied, indicating As tolerance relative to non-mycorrhizal (NM) plants. All AM plants showed high expression of MtPT4 and those inoculated with Glomus mosseae showed higher selectivity against As (shown by P/As molar ratios) and much lower expression of MtPht1;1 (and to some extent MtPht1;2) than Glomus intraradices-inoculated or NM plants. Results are consistent with increased P/As selectivity in AM plants (particularly those inoculated with G. mosseae) as a consequence of high P uptake but little or no As uptake via the AM pathway. However, the extent to which selectivity is dependent on down-regulation of direct Pi and AsV uptake through epidermal cells is still not clear. Marked up-regulation of a PCS gene and an ACR gene in AM plants may also be involved and requires further

  2. Multiple requirements for SHPTP2 in epidermal growth factor-mediated cell cycle progression.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, A M; Hausdorff, S F; O'Reilly, A M; Freeman, R M; Neel, B G

    1996-01-01

    Using transient overexpression and microinjection approaches, we examined SHPTP2's function in growth factor signaling. Overexpression of catalytically inactive SHPTP2 (PTP2CS) but not catalytically inactive SHPTP1, inhibited mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation and Elk-1 transactivation following epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation of 293 cells. An SHPTP2 mutant with both C-terminal tyrosyl phosphorylation sites converted to phenylalanine (PTP2YF) was also without effect; moreover, PTP2YF rescued PTP2CS-induced inhibition of EGF-induced Elk-1 transactivation. PTP2CS did not inhibit transactivation by activated Ras, suggesting that SHPTP2 acts upstream of or parallel to Ras. Neither PTP2CS nor PTP2YF inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced Elk-1 transactivation. Thus, protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity, but not tyrosyl phosphorylation of SHPTP2, is required for the immediate-early responses to EGF but not to PDGF. To determine whether SHPTP2 is required later in the cell cycle, we assessed S-phase entry in NIH 3T3 cells microinjected with anti-SHPTP2 antibodies or with a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein encoding both SH2 domains (GST-SH2). Microinjection of anti-SHPTP2 antibodies prior to stimulation inhibited EGF- but no PDGF- or serum-induced S-phase entry. Anti-SHPTP2 antibodies or GST-SH2 fusion protein could inhibit EGF-induced S-phase entry for up to 8 h after EGF addition. Although MAP kinase activation was detected shortly after EGF stimulation, no MAP kinase activation was detected around the restriction point. Therefore, SHPTP2 is absolutely required for immediate-early and late events induced by some, but not all, growth factors, and the immediate-early and late signal transduction pathways regulated by SHPTP2 are distinguishable. PMID:8622663

  3. Crosstalk between Src and major vault protein in epidermal growth factor-dependent cell signalling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Euikyung; Lee, Seunghwan; Mian, Md Firoz; Yun, Sang Uk; Song, Minseok; Yi, Kye-Sook; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2006-02-01

    Vaults are highly conserved, ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles with an unidentified function. For the three protein species (TEP1, VPARP, and MVP) and a small RNA that comprises vault, expression of the unique 100-kDa major vault protein (MVP) is sufficient to form the basic vault structure. To identify and characterize proteins that interact with the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain of Src and potentially regulate Src activity, we used a pull-down assay using GST-Src-SH2 fusion proteins. We found MVP as a Src-SH2 binding protein in human stomach tissue. Interaction of Src and MVP was also observed in 253J stomach cancer cells. A subcellular localization study using immunofluorescence microscopy shows that epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation triggers MVP translocation from the nucleus to the cytosol and perinuclear region where it colocalizes with Src. We found that the interaction between Src and MVP is critically dependent on Src activity and protein (MVP) tyrosyl phosphorylation, which are induced by EGF stimulation. Our results also indicate MVP to be a novel substrate of Src and phosphorylated in an EGF-dependent manner. Interestingly, purified MVP inhibited the in vitro tyrosine kinase activity of Src in a concentration-dependent manner. MVP overexpression downregulates EGF-dependent ERK activation in Src overexpressing cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report of MVP interacting with a protein tyrosine kinase involved in a distinct cell signalling pathway. It appears that MVP is a novel regulator of Src-mediated signalling cascades. PMID:16441665

  4. Barley disease susceptibility factor RACB acts in epidermal cell polarity and positioning of the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Scheler, Björn; Schnepf, Vera; Galgenmüller, Carolina; Ranf, Stefanie; Hückelhoven, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    RHO GTPases are regulators of cell polarity and immunity in eukaryotes. In plants, RHO-like RAC/ROP GTPases are regulators of cell shaping, hormone responses, and responses to microbial pathogens. The barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) RAC/ROP protein RACB is required for full susceptibility to penetration by Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei (Bgh), the barley powdery mildew fungus. Disease susceptibility factors often control host immune responses. Here we show that RACB does not interfere with early microbe-associated molecular pattern-triggered immune responses such as the oxidative burst or activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases. RACB also supports rather than restricts expression of defence-related genes in barley. Instead, silencing of RACB expression by RNAi leads to defects in cell polarity. In particular, initiation and maintenance of root hair growth and development of stomatal subsidiary cells by asymmetric cell division is affected by silencing expression of RACB. Nucleus migration is a common factor of developmental cell polarity and cell-autonomous interaction with Bgh. RACB is required for positioning of the nucleus near the site of attack from Bgh. We therefore suggest that Bgh profits from RACB’s function in cell polarity rather than from immunity-regulating functions of RACB. PMID:27056842

  5. Barley disease susceptibility factor RACB acts in epidermal cell polarity and positioning of the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Scheler, Björn; Schnepf, Vera; Galgenmüller, Carolina; Ranf, Stefanie; Hückelhoven, Ralph

    2016-05-01

    RHO GTPases are regulators of cell polarity and immunity in eukaryotes. In plants, RHO-like RAC/ROP GTPases are regulators of cell shaping, hormone responses, and responses to microbial pathogens. The barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) RAC/ROP protein RACB is required for full susceptibility to penetration by Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei (Bgh), the barley powdery mildew fungus. Disease susceptibility factors often control host immune responses. Here we show that RACB does not interfere with early microbe-associated molecular pattern-triggered immune responses such as the oxidative burst or activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases. RACB also supports rather than restricts expression of defence-related genes in barley. Instead, silencing of RACB expression by RNAi leads to defects in cell polarity. In particular, initiation and maintenance of root hair growth and development of stomatal subsidiary cells by asymmetric cell division is affected by silencing expression of RACB. Nucleus migration is a common factor of developmental cell polarity and cell-autonomous interaction with Bgh RACB is required for positioning of the nucleus near the site of attack from Bgh We therefore suggest that Bgh profits from RACB's function in cell polarity rather than from immunity-regulating functions of RACB. PMID:27056842

  6. Lysine-specific demethylase 1 mediates epidermal growth factor signaling to promote cell migration in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Genbao; Wang, Jie; Li, Yuanxia; Liu, Xiuwen; Xie, Xiaodong; Wan, Xiaolei; Yan, Meina; Jin, Jie; Lin, Qiong; Zhu, Haitao; Zhang, Liuping; Gong, Aihua; Shao, Qixiang; Wu, Chaoyang

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic abnormalities play a vital role in the progression of ovarian cancer. Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1/KDM1A) acts as an epigenetic regulator and is overexpressed in ovarian tumors. However, the upstream regulator of LSD1 expression in this cancer remains elusive. Here, we show that epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling upregulates LSD1 protein levels in SKOV3 and HO8910 ovarian cancer cells overexpressing both LSD1 and the EGF receptor. This effect is correlated with a decrease in the dimethylation of H3K4, a major substrate of LSD1, in an LSD1-dependent manner. We also show that inhibition of PI3K/AKT, but not MEK, abolishes the EGF-induced upregulation of LSD1 and cell migration, indicating that the PI3K/PDK1/AKT pathway mediates the EGF-induced expression of LSD1 and cell migration. Significantly, LSD1 knockdown or inhibition of LSD1 activity impairs both intrinsic and EGF-induced cell migration in SKOV3 and HO8910 cells. These results highlight a novel mechanism regulating LSD1 expression and identify LSD1 as a promising therapeutic target for treating metastatic ovarian cancer driven by EGF signaling. PMID:26489763

  7. Movement of endogenous calcium in the elongating zone of graviresponding roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; Cameron, I. L.; Smith, N. K.

    1989-01-01

    Endogenous calcium (Ca) accumulates along the lower side of the elongating zone of horizontally oriented roots of Zea mays cv. Yellow Dent. This accumulation of Ca correlates positively with the onset of gravicurvature, and occurs in the cytoplasm, cell walls and mucilage of epidermal cells. Corresponding changes in endogenous Ca do not occur in cortical cells of the elongating zone of intact roots. These results indicate that the calcium asymmetries associated with root gravicurvature occur in the outermost layers of the root.

  8. Hdac1 and Hdac2 act redundantly to control p63 and p53 functions in epidermal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    LeBoeuf, Matthew; Terrell, Anne; Trivedi, Sohum; Sinha, Satrajit; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Olson, Eric N.; Morrisey, Edward E.; Millar, Sarah E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Epidermal and hair follicle development from surface ectodermal progenitor cells require coordinated changes in gene expression. Histone deacetylases alter gene expression programs through modification of chromatin and transcription factors. We find that deletion of ectodermal Hdac1 and Hdac2 results in dramatic failure of hair follicle specification and epidermal proliferation and stratification, phenocopying loss of the key ectodermal transcription factor p63. While expression of p63 and its positively regulated basal cell targets is maintained in Hdac1/2 deficient ectoderm, targets of p63-mediated repression, including p21, 14-3-3σ and p16/INK4a, are ectopically expressed, and HDACs bind and are active at their promoter regions in normal undifferentiated keratinocytes. Mutant embryos display increased levels of acetylated p53, which opposes p63 functions, and p53 is required for HDAC inhibitor-mediated p21 expression in keratinocytes. Our data identify critical requirements for HDAC1/2 in epidermal development, and indicate that HDAC1/2 directly mediate repressive functions of p63, and suppress p53 activity. PMID:21093383

  9. Althaea rosea Cavanil and Plantago major L. suppress neoplastic cell transformation through the inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor kinase.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Sun; Cho, Sung-Dae; Shin, Ji-Ae; Kwon, Ki Han; Cho, Nam-Pyo; Shim, Jung-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    For thousands of years in Asia, Althaea rosea Cavanil (ARC) and Plantago major L. (PML) have been used as powerful non-toxic therapeutic agents that inhibit inflammation. However, the anticancer mechanisms and molecular targets of ARC and PML are poorly understood, particularly in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced neoplastic cell transformation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemopreventive effects and mechanisms of the methanol extracts from ARC (MARC) and PML (MPML) in EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation of JB6 P+ mouse epidermal cells using an MTS assay, anchorage-independent cell transformation assay and western blotting. Our results showed that MARC and MPML significantly suppressed neoplastic cell transformation by inhibiting the kinase activity of the EGF receptor (EGFR). The activation of EGFR by EGF was suppressed by MARC and MPML treatment in EGFR(+/+) cells, but not in EGFR(-/-) cells. In addition, MARC and MPML inhibited EGF-induced cell proliferation in EGFR-expressing murine embryonic fibroblasts (EGFR(+/+)). These results strongly indicate that EGFR targeting by MARC and MPML may be a good strategy for chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic applications. PMID:22767187

  10. WOX5 is Shining in the Root Stem Cell Niche.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangpei; Lu, Songchong; Tian, Huiyu; Ding, Zhaojun

    2015-10-01

    The WUS-RELATED HOMEOBOX 5 (WOX5) gene is expressed in the quiescent center (QC) to regulate the columella stem cell (CSC) identity. Three recent reports not only show how WOX5 is controlled but also highlight the key role of WOX5 in root stem cell niche maintenance. PMID:26440429