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Sample records for root ganglion embryonic

  1. Receptor-mediated uptake of labeled transferrin by embryonic chicken dorsal root ganglion neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Markelonis, G J; Oh, T H; Park, L P; Azari, P; Max, S R

    1985-01-01

    Transferrin is a growth-promoting plasma protein which is known to occur within developing neurons. Since little information exists on the process by which transferrin is internalized by neurons, we studied this process using dissociated embryonic chicken dorsal root ganglion neurons in culture. Cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons were incubated in the presence of 3.75 nM (125)I-transferrin at 37°C, the cultures were extensively washed, the neurons were solubilized in a Triton-containing buffer and internalized (125)I-transferrin was quantified with a gamma counter. (125)I-transferrin was internalized in a linear fashion for at least 60 min, and this uptake was abolished by the presence of 1.25 μM unlabeled transferrin. No competition for the uptake of (125)I-transferrin was observed in the presence of 1.25 μM ovalbumin, cytochrome c, hemoglobin, insulin, horseradish peroxidase, aldolase or the carboxyl-terminal fragment ('half-site') of transferrin. By contrast, uptake was inhibited by approximately 50% in the presence of the ammo-terminal fragment ('half-site') of transferrin (1.25 μM) or in the presence of concanavalin A (1.25 μM). The binding of transferrin conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate to neurons at 4°C and its subsequent internalization at 37°C was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy of unfixed cells following incubation of the neurons in the presence of the fluorescently labeled protein. Furthermore, the transferrin receptors were visualized immunocytochemically on the surface membranes of dorsal root ganglion neurons using rabbit antibodies directed against transferrin receptors from chicken reticulocytes. From these data, we conclude that transferrin is internalized by neurons via receptor-mediated endocytosis, and suggest that this protein may serve an important role in the development and survival of dorsal root ganglion neurons. PMID:24874753

  2. Action potentials of embryonic dorsal root ganglion neurones in Xenopus tadpoles.

    PubMed Central

    Baccaglini, P I

    1978-01-01

    1. Several classes of action potentials can be distinguished in dorsal root ganglion cells, studied by intracellular recording techniques in Xenopus laevis tadpoles 4.5--51 days old. The ionic basis of the action potential was investigated by changing the ionic environment of the cells and applying various blocking agents. 2. The Ca2+-dependent action potential is a plateau of relatively long duration (mean 8.7 msec). It is unaffected by removal of Na+ but blocked by mM quantities of Co2+. It is present only in small cells. 3. Ca2+/Na+-dependent action potentials. Type I is a spike followed by a plateau or hump of different durations (mean 8.1 msec). The spike is selectively blocked by removal of Na+, leaving the plateau which is in turn blocked by Co2+. It is present in cells of small and intermediate size. Type II is a spike of short duration (mean 2.0 msec) with only an inflection on the falling phase. The spike is blocked by removal of Na+ and no other components can be elicited. The inflection is blocked by Co2+. It is present in cells of all sizes. Type III is similar to type I but is seen only in solutions in which the outward current is blocked. It was observed only very infrequently. 4. Na+-dependent action potentials. Type I a is a short duration spike (mean 1.1 msec). It is abolished by removal of Na+ or addition of tetrodotoxin (TTX), but largely unaffected by Co2+ or La3+. It is present in cells of all sizes. When the outward current channels are blocked and cells exposed to Na+-free solutions, all cells are capable of producing an action potential in which the inward current is carried by divalent cations. Type I b is a spike with a smooth, more slowly falling phase. It has the same pharmacological properties as type I a action potential and is present in cells of small size. 5. Na+-dependent action potentials. Type II is a spike with an inflection on the falling phase (mean duration 3.4 msec). It is prolonged by Co2+ and La3+. Removal of Na

  3. Developmentally Regulated Expression of HDNF/NT-3 mRNA in Rat Spinal Cord Motoneurons and Expression of BDNF mRNA in Embryonic Dorsal Root Ganglion.

    PubMed

    Ernfors, Patrik; Persson, Håkan

    1991-01-01

    Northern blot analysis was used to demonstrate high levels of hippocampus-derived neurotrophic factor/neurotrophin-3 (HDNF/NT-3) mRNA in the embryonic day (E) 13 - 14 and 15 - 16 spinal cord. The level decreased at E18 - 19 and remained the same until postnatal day (P) 1, after which it decreased further to a level below the detection limit in the adult. In situ hybridization revealed that the NT-3 mRNA detected in the developing spinal cord was derived from motoneurons and the decrease seen at E18 - 19 was caused by a reduction in the number of motoneurons expressing NT-3 mRNA. The distribution of NT-3 mRNA-expressing cells in the E15 spinal cord was very similar to the distribution of cells expressing choline acetyltransferase or nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR) mRNA. Moreover, a striking similarity between the developmentally regulated expression of NT-3 and NGFR mRNA was noted in spinal cord motoneurons. A subpopulation of all neurons in the dorsal root ganglia expressed brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA from E13, the earliest time examined, to adulthood. These results are consistent with a trophic role of NT-3 for proprioceptive sensory neurons innervating the ventral horn, and imply a local action of BDNF for developing sensory neurons within the dorsal root ganglia. PMID:12106253

  4. Neuronal cell lines as model dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Kathleen; Baillie, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Background Dorsal root ganglion neuron-derived immortal cell lines including ND7/23 and F-11 cells have been used extensively as in vitro model systems of native peripheral sensory neurons. However, while it is clear that some sensory neuron-specific receptors and ion channels are present in these cell lines, a systematic comparison of the molecular targets expressed by these cell lines with those expressed in intact peripheral neurons is lacking. Results In this study, we examined the expression of RNA transcripts in the human neuroblastoma-derived cell line, SH-SY5Y, and two dorsal root ganglion hybridoma cell lines, F-11 and ND7/23, using Illumina next-generation sequencing, and compared the results with native whole murine dorsal root ganglions. The gene expression profiles of these three cell lines did not resemble any specific defined dorsal root ganglion subclass. The cell lines lacked many markers for nociceptive sensory neurons, such as the Transient receptor potential V1 gene, but expressed markers for both myelinated and unmyelinated neurons. Global gene ontology analysis on whole dorsal root ganglions and cell lines showed similar enrichment of biological process terms across all samples. Conclusions This paper provides insights into the receptor repertoire expressed in common dorsal root ganglion neuron-derived cell lines compared with whole murine dorsal root ganglions, and illustrates the limits and potentials of these cell lines as tools for neuropharmacological exploration. PMID:27130590

  5. Enriched retinal ganglion cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Katherine P.; Hung, Sandy S. C.; Sharov, Alexei; Lo, Camden Y.; Needham, Karina; Lidgerwood, Grace E.; Jackson, Stacey; Crombie, Duncan E.; Nayagam, Bryony A.; Cook, Anthony L.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C. B.

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuropathies are characterised by a loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that lead to vision impairment. Development of cell therapy requires a better understanding of the signals that direct stem cells into RGCs. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an unlimited cellular source for generation of human RGCs in vitro. In this study, we present a 45-day protocol that utilises magnetic activated cell sorting to generate enriched population of RGCs via stepwise retinal differentiation using hESCs. We performed an extensive characterization of these stem cell-derived RGCs by examining the gene and protein expressions of a panel of neural/RGC markers. Furthermore, whole transcriptome analysis demonstrated similarity of the hESC-derived RGCs to human adult RGCs. The enriched hESC-RGCs possess long axons, functional electrophysiological profiles and axonal transport of mitochondria, suggestive of maturity. In summary, this RGC differentiation protocol can generate an enriched population of functional RGCs from hESCs, allowing future studies on disease modeling of optic neuropathies and development of cell therapies. PMID:27506453

  6. Enriched retinal ganglion cells derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gill, Katherine P; Hung, Sandy S C; Sharov, Alexei; Lo, Camden Y; Needham, Karina; Lidgerwood, Grace E; Jackson, Stacey; Crombie, Duncan E; Nayagam, Bryony A; Cook, Anthony L; Hewitt, Alex W; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C B

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuropathies are characterised by a loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that lead to vision impairment. Development of cell therapy requires a better understanding of the signals that direct stem cells into RGCs. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an unlimited cellular source for generation of human RGCs in vitro. In this study, we present a 45-day protocol that utilises magnetic activated cell sorting to generate enriched population of RGCs via stepwise retinal differentiation using hESCs. We performed an extensive characterization of these stem cell-derived RGCs by examining the gene and protein expressions of a panel of neural/RGC markers. Furthermore, whole transcriptome analysis demonstrated similarity of the hESC-derived RGCs to human adult RGCs. The enriched hESC-RGCs possess long axons, functional electrophysiological profiles and axonal transport of mitochondria, suggestive of maturity. In summary, this RGC differentiation protocol can generate an enriched population of functional RGCs from hESCs, allowing future studies on disease modeling of optic neuropathies and development of cell therapies. PMID:27506453

  7. EVALUATION OF HYPERALGESIA AND HISTOLOGICAL CHANGES OF DORSAL ROOT GANGLION INDUCED BY NUCLEUS PULPOSUS

    PubMed Central

    Grava, André Luiz de Souza; Ferrari, Luiz Fernando; Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Defino, Helton Luiz Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the hyperalgesia and histological abnormalities induced by contact between the dorsal root ganglion and the nucleus pulposus. Methods: Twenty Wistar rats were used, divided into two experimental groups. In one of the groups, a fragment of autologous nucleus pulposus was removed from the sacrococcygeal region and deposited on the L5 dorsal root ganglia. In the other group (control), a fragment of adipose tissue was deposited on the L5 dorsal root ganglia. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia was evaluated on the third day and the first, third, fifth and seventh weeks after the operation. A L5 dorsal root ganglion was removed in the first, third, fifth and seventh weeks after the operation for histological study using HE staining and histochemical study using specific labeling for iNOS. Results: Higher intensity of mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia was observed in the group of animals in which the nucleus pulposus was placed in contact with the dorsal root ganglion. In this group, the histological study showed abnormalities of the dorsal root ganglion tissue, characterized by an inflammatory process and axonal degeneration. The histopathological abnormalities of the dorsal root ganglion tissue presented increasing intensity with increasing length of observation, and there was a correlation with maintenance of the hyperalgesia observed in the behavioral assessment. Immunohistochemistry using specific labeling for iNOS in the group of animals in which the nucleus pulposus was placed in contact with the dorsal root ganglion showed higher expression of this enzyme in the nuclei of the inflammatory cells (glial cells) surrounding the neurons. Conclusion: Contact between the nucleus pulposus and the dorsal root ganglion induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and caused histological abnormalities in the dorsal root ganglion components. These abnormalities were characterized by an inflammatory and degenerative process in the structures of the dorsal root

  8. Changes in the electrical properties of chick ciliary ganglion neurones during embryonic development.

    PubMed Central

    Dourado, M M; Dryer, S E

    1992-01-01

    1. Whole-cell recording techniques were used to examine the expression of ionic currents in chick ciliary ganglion neurones dissociated acutely at various stages of embryonic development. Currents were also examined in dissociated cells that had been maintained in vitro for several days. 2. Voltage-activated, tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive Na+ currents (INa) could be detected in all cells tested between stage 25 and stage 40 (embryonic days 4.5-14). INa increased in both amplitude and density throughout development, but no obvious changes in kinetics or sensitivity to TTX were observed. 3. High-threshold Ca2+ currents (ICa) were also detectable between stage 25 and stage 40. ICa increased in both amplitude and density throughout this time. No obvious changes in kinetics or voltage dependence were observed. 4. Delayed rectifier K+ currents (IDR) and A-currents (IA) could be detected in Ca(2+)-free salines, and distinguished on the basis of differences in kinetics, voltage dependence, and sensitivity to tetraethylammonium (TEA). IA was either absent, or present at very low densities at stages 26-30, but showed a sharp increase in density thereafter. In contrast, IDR was detectable as early as stage 25, and did not display a significant increase in density during development. 5. Ca(2+)-activated K+ currents (IK(Ca)) were either undetectable or present at very low density between stage 26 and stage 30 (embryonic days 5-9) but showed a large increase in amplitude and density thereafter. 6. Ionic currents were examined in age-matched cells dissociated acutely on embryonic day 13, or isolated on embryonic day 9 and maintained in vitro for an additional 4 days. Most of the cells maintained in culture for 4 days did not express detectable IK(Ca), and had significantly reduced IA compared to acutely isolated controls. The cultured cells expressed normal densities of IDR, ICa and INa. 7. All ionic currents increased in amplitude during normal embryonic development, and all but

  9. The place of ganglion or root alcohol injection in trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed Central

    Sharr, M M; Garfield, J S

    1977-01-01

    Of 157 patients with trigeminal neuralgia, referred for neurosurgery, 81 underwent 85 ganglion or root injections. The results, which are analysed with regard to pain relief and sensory loss, compare favourably with results from the literature of other forms of surgery, particularly open temporal root section. PMID:886354

  10. Teratogenic effects of pyridoxine on the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia of embryonic chickens.

    PubMed

    Sharp, A A; Fedorovich, Y

    2015-03-19

    Our understanding of the role of somatosensory feedback in regulating motility during chicken embryogenesis and fetal development in general has been hampered by the lack of an approach to selectively alter specific sensory modalities. In adult mammals, pyridoxine overdose has been shown to cause a peripheral sensory neuropathy characterized by a loss of both muscle and cutaneous afferents, but predominated by a loss of proprioception. We have begun to explore the sensitivity of the nervous system in chicken embryos to the application of pyridoxine on embryonic days 7 and 8, after sensory neurons in the lumbosacral region become post-mitotic. Upon examination of the spinal cord, dorsal root ganglion and peripheral nerves, we find that pyridoxine causes a loss of neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 3-positive neurons, a decrease in the diameter of the muscle innervating nerve tibialis, and a reduction in the number of large diameter axons in this nerve. However, we found no change in the number of Substance P or calcitonin gene-related peptide-positive neurons, the number of motor neurons or the diameter or axonal composition of the femoral cutaneous nerve. Therefore, pyridoxine causes a peripheral sensory neuropathy in embryonic chickens largely consistent with its effects in adult mammals. However, the lesion may be more restricted to proprioception in the chicken embryo. Therefore, pyridoxine lesion induced during embryogenesis in the chicken embryo can be used to assess how the loss of sensation, largely proprioception, alters spontaneous embryonic motility and subsequent motor development. PMID:25592428

  11. Erythrocyte nuclei resemble dying neurons in embryonic dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Coggeshall, R E; Pover, C M; Kwiat, G C; Fitzgerald, M

    1993-07-01

    Cell death or apoptosis is regarded as an important feature of mammalian neural development, but the evidence for this generalization depends on the assumption that cell death can be clearly recognized. The usual profile of a dying neuron is a deeply stained pyknotic homogeneous sphere. In this paper we present evidence that such profiles in embryonic rat T6 and L4 dorsal root ganglia are not dying neurons but rather nuclei of immature red blood cells. This observation, combined with recent work showing that the methods previously used for counting normal or dying neurons are biased, indicates that the classic work establishing the importance of apoptosis needs to be repeated. PMID:8233029

  12. Survey of inward ionic currents acquired by the cochleovestibular ganglion of the early-aged embryonic chick.

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, Bernd H A

    2006-03-01

    The acquisition of ion channels is critical to the formation of neuronal pathways in the peripheral and central nervous systems. This study describes the different types of inward currents (Ii) recorded from the soma of isolated cochleovestibular ganglion (CVG) cells of the embryonic chicken, Gallus gallus. Cells were isolated for whole-cell tight-seal recording from embryonic day (ED) 3, an age when the CVG is a cell cluster, to ED 9, an age when the cochlear and vestibular ganglia (CG, VG) are distinct structures. Results show Na+ and Ca2+ currents (INa and ICa) are acquired by ED 3, although INa dominates with greater density levels that peak by ED 6-7 in VG neurons. In the CG, INa acquisition is slower, reaching peak values by ED 8-9. Isolation of ICa, using Ba2+ as the charge carrier, showed both transient (IBaT)- and sustained (IBaL)-type currents on ED 3. Unlike INa, IBa density varied with age and ganglion. Total IBa increased steadily, showing a decline only in CG cells on ED 8-9 as a result of a decrease in IBaT. IBaL density increased over time, reaching a maximum on ED 6-7 in VG cells, followed by a decline on ED 8-9. In comparison, IBaL in CG neurons, did not increase significantly beyond mean values measured on ED 5. The early onset of these currents and the variations in Ca2+ channel expression between the ganglia suggests that intracellular signals relevant to phenotypic differentiation begin within these early time frames. PMID:16447282

  13. Multiple sodium channels and their roles in electrogenesis within dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rush, Anthony M; Cummins, Theodore R; Waxman, Stephen G

    2007-01-01

    Dorsal root ganglion neurons express an array of sodium channel isoforms allowing precise control of excitability. An increasing body of literature indicates that regulation of firing behaviour in these cells is linked to their patterns of expression of specific sodium channel isoforms, which have been discovered to possess distinct biophysical characteristics. The pattern of expression of sodium channels differs in different subclasses of DRG neurons and is not fixed but, on the contrary, changes in response to a variety of disease insults. Moreover, modulation of channels by their environment has been found to play an important role in the response of these neurons to stimuli. In this review we illustrate how excitability can be finely tuned to provide contrasting firing templates in different subclasses of DRG neurons by selective deployment of various sodium channel isoforms, by plasticity of expression of these proteins, and by interactions of these sodium channel isoforms with each other and with other modulatory molecules. PMID:17158175

  14. A role for Runx transcription factor signaling in dorsal root ganglion sensory neuron diversification.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Ina; Sigrist, Markus; de Nooij, Joriene C; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Jessell, Thomas M; Arber, Silvia

    2006-02-01

    Subpopulations of sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) can be characterized on the basis of sensory modalities that convey distinct peripheral stimuli, but the molecular mechanisms that underlie sensory neuronal diversification remain unclear. Here, we have used genetic manipulations in the mouse embryo to examine how Runx transcription factor signaling controls the acquisition of distinct DRG neuronal subtype identities. Runx3 acts to diversify an Ngn1-independent neuronal cohort by promoting the differentiation of proprioceptive sensory neurons through erosion of TrkB expression in prospective TrkC+ sensory neurons. In contrast, Runx1 controls neuronal diversification within Ngn1-dependent TrkA+ neurons by repression of neuropeptide CGRP expression and controlling the fine pattern of laminar termination in the dorsal spinal cord. Together, our findings suggest that Runx transcription factor signaling plays a key role in sensory neuron diversification. PMID:16446142

  15. Control of action potential propagation by intracellular Ca2+ in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lüscher, C; Lipp, P; Lüscher, H R; Niggli, E

    1996-01-01

    1. To assess the role of intracellular Ca2+ in action potential (AP) propagation, whole-cell recordings of cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells were carried out while Ca2+ was simultaneously measured with a laser-scanning confocal microscope. 2. Flash photolytic liberation of a Ca2+ buffer during trains of APs which partly failed to invade the DRG cell body immediately lowered intracellular Ca2+ and restored safe AP propagation. Furthermore, the speed of the propagated AP was reduced considerably when intracellular Ca2+ was increased by flash photolysis of caged Ca2+. 3. Both results suggest that intracellular Ca2+ regulates the safety factor for AP propagation and may thus provide a control mechanism for synaptic integration, which acts pre- as well as postsynaptically. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8821131

  16. Prokineticin 2 potentiates acid-sensing ion channel activity in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prokineticin 2 (PK2) is a secreted protein and causes potent hyperalgesia in vivo, and is therefore considered to be a new pronociceptive mediator. However, the molecular targets responsible for the pronociceptive effects of PK2 are still poorly understood. Here, we have found that PK2 potentiates the activity of acid-sensing ion channels in the primary sensory neurons. Methods In the present study, experiments were performed on neurons freshly isolated from rat dorsal root ganglion by using whole-cell patch clamp and voltage-clamp recording techniques. Results PK2 dose-dependently enhanced proton-gated currents with an EC50 of 0.22 ± 0.06 nM. PK2 shifted the proton concentration-response curve upwards, with a 1.81 ± 0.11 fold increase of the maximal current response. PK2 enhancing effect on proton-gated currents was completely blocked by PK2 receptor antagonist. The potentiation was also abolished by intracellular dialysis of GF109203X, a protein kinase C inhibitor, or FSC-231, a protein interacting with C-kinase 1 inhibitor. Moreover, PK2 enhanced the acid-evoked membrane excitability of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons and caused a significant increase in the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of spikes induced by acid stimuli. Finally, PK2 exacerbated nociceptive responses to the injection of acetic acid in rats. Conclusion These results suggest that PK2 increases the activity of acid-sensing ion channels via the PK2 receptor and protein kinase C-dependent signal pathways in rat primary sensory neurons. Our findings support that PK2 is a proalgesic factor and its signaling likely contributes to acidosis-evoked pain by sensitizing acid-sensing ion channels. PMID:22642848

  17. The Effects of Target Skeletal Muscle Cells on Dorsal Root Ganglion Neuronal Outgrowth and Migration In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiwei; Li, Zhenzhong

    2013-01-01

    Targets of neuronal innervations play a vital role in regulating the survival and differentiation of innervating neurotrophin-responsive neurons. During development, neurons extend axons to their targets, and then their survival become dependent on the trophic substances secreted by their target cells. Sensory endings were present on myoblasts, myotubes, and myofibers in all intrafusal bundles regardless of age. The interdependence of sensory neurons and skeletal muscle (SKM) cells during both embryonic development and the maintenance of the mature functional state has not been fully understood. In the present study, neuromuscular cocultures of organotypic dorsal root ganglion (DRG) explants and dissociate SKM cells were established. Using this culture system, the morphological relationship between DRG neurons and SKM cells, neurites growth and neuronal migration were investigated. The migrating neurons were determined by fluorescent labeling of microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP-2) and neurofilament 200 (NF-200) or growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43). The expression of NF-200 and GAP-43 and their mRNAs was evaluated by Western blot assay and real time-PCR analysis. The results reveal that DRG explants showed more dense neurites outgrowth in neuromuscular cocultures as compared with that in the culture of DRG explants alone. The number of total migrating neurons (the MAP-2-expressing neurons) and the percentage NF-200-immunoreactive (IR) and GAP-43-IR neurons increased significantly in the presence of SKM cells. The levels of NF-200 and GAP-43 and their mRNAs increased significantly in neuromuscular cocultures as compared with that in the culture of DRG explants alone. These results suggested that target SKM cells play an important role in regulating neuronal protein synthesis, promoting neuritis outgrowth and neuronal migration of DRG explants in vitro. These results not only provide new clues for a better understanding of the association of SKM cells with

  18. The Dorsal Root Ganglion as a Therapeutic Target for Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Liem, Liong; van Dongen, Eric; Huygen, Frank J; Staats, Peter; Kramer, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain is a widespread problem with negative personal and societal consequences. Despite considerable clinical neuroscience research, the goal of developing effective, reliable, and durable treatments has remained elusive. The critical role played by the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the induction and maintenance of chronic pain has been largely overlooked in these efforts, however. It may be that, by targeting this site, robust new options for pain management will be revealed. This review summarizes recent advances in the knowledge base for DRG-targeted treatments for neuropathic pain:• Pharmacological options including the chemical targeting of voltage-dependent calcium channels, transient receptor potential channels, neurotrophin production, potentiation of opioid transduction pathways, and excitatory glutamate receptors.• Ablation or modulation of the DRG via continuous thermal radiofrequency and pulsed radiofrequency treatments.• Implanted electrical neurostimulator technologies.• Interventions involving the modification of DRG cellular function at the genetic level by using viral vectors and gene silencing methods. PMID:27224659

  19. Decreased voltage-gated potassium currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons after chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yun; Wu, Yang; Zhao, Bo; Xia, Zhongyuan

    2016-01-20

    Voltage-gated potassium channels (KV) regulate pain transmission by controlling neuronal excitability. Changes in KV expression patterns may thus contribute toward hyperalgesia following nerve injury. The aim of this study was to characterize KV current density in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons following chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the right sciatic nerve, a robust model of post-traumatic neuropathic pain. The study examined changes in small-diameter potassium ion currents (<30 µm) in neurons in the L4-L6 DRG following CCI by whole-cell patch-clamping and the association with post-CCI mechanical and thermal nociceptive thresholds. Compared with the control group, 7 days after CCI, the mechanical force and temperature required to elicit ipsilateral foot withdrawal decreased significantly, indicating tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Post-CCI neurons had a significantly lower rheobase current and depolarized resting membrane potential than controls, suggesting KV current downregulation. Some ipsilateral DRG neurons also had spontaneous action potentials and repetitive firing. There was a 55% reduction in the total KV current density caused by a 55% decrease in the sustained delayed rectifier potassium ion current (IK) density and a 17% decrease in the transient A-type potassium ion current (IA) density. These results indicated that changes in DRG neuron IK and IA current density and concomitant afferent hyperexcitability may contribute toward neuropathic pain following injury. The rat CCI model may prove valuable for examining pathogenic mechanisms and potential therapies, such as KV channel modulators. PMID:26671526

  20. Glutaminase Increases in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons after Unilateral Adjuvant-Induced Hind Paw Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, E. Matthew; Zhang, Zijia; Schechter, Ruben; Miller, Kenneth E.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is a neurotransmitter used at both the peripheral and central terminals of nociceptive primary sensory neurons, yet little is known concerning regulation of glutamate metabolism during peripheral inflammation. Glutaminase (GLS) is an enzyme of the glutamate-glutamine cycle that converts glutamine into glutamate for neurotransmission and is implicated in producing elevated levels of glutamate in central and peripheral terminals. A potential mechanism for increased levels of glutamate is an elevation in GLS expression. We assessed GLS expression after unilateral hind paw inflammation by measuring GLS immunoreactivity (ir) with quantitative image analysis of L4 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons after one, two, four, and eight days of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) compared to saline injected controls. No significant elevation in GLS-ir occurred in the DRG ipsilateral to the inflamed hind paw after one or two days of AIA. After four days AIA, GLS-ir was elevated significantly in all sizes of DRG neurons. After eight days AIA, GLS-ir remained elevated in small (<400 µm2), presumably nociceptive neurons. Western blot analysis of the L4 DRG at day four AIA confirmed the elevated GLS-ir. The present study indicates that GLS expression is increased in the chronic stage of inflammation and may be a target for chronic pain therapy. PMID:26771651

  1. Inflammatory mediators release calcitonin gene-related peptide from dorsal root ganglion neurons of the rat.

    PubMed

    Averbeck, B; Izydorczyk, I; Kress, M

    2000-01-01

    The interactions between the inflammatory mediators bradykinin, serotonin, prostaglandin E(2) and acid pH were studied in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons in culture. For this purpose, the cultures were stimulated by inflammatory mediators (bradykinin, serotonin, prostaglandin E(2), 10(-5)M each) or acid solution (pH 6.1) for 5 min and the content of calcitonin gene-related peptide was determined in the supernatant before, during and after stimulation, using an enzyme immunoassay. Acid solution resulted in a threefold increase of the basal calcitonin gene-related peptide release which was entirely dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium. The release could not be blocked by the addition of the capsaicin antagonist capsazepine (10(-5)M). Bradykinin (10(-5)M) caused a 50% increase of the basal calcitonin gene-related peptide release which was again dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium, whereas serotonin and prostaglandin E(2) were each ineffective at 10(-5)M concentration. The combination of bradykinin, serotonin and prostaglandin E(2) led to a fivefold increase of the calcitonin gene-related peptide release which could not be further enhanced by acidification. The competitive capsaicin receptor antagonist capsazepine (10(-5)M) significantly reduced the release induced by the combination of bradykinin, serotonin and prostaglandin E(2). It is suggested that the inflammatory mediators co-operate and together may act as endogenous agonists at the capsaicin receptor to cause calcium influx and consecutive neuropeptide release. PMID:10858619

  2. Cold shock induces apoptosis of dorsal root ganglion neurons plated on infrared windows.

    PubMed

    Aboualizadeh, Ebrahim; Mattson, Eric C; O'Hara, Crystal L; Smith, Amanda K; Stucky, Cheryl L; Hirschmugl, Carol J

    2015-06-21

    The chemical status of live sensory neurons is accessible with infrared microspectroscopy of appropriately prepared cells. In this paper, individual dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons have been prepared with two different protocols, and plated on glass cover slips, BaF2 and CaF2 substrates. The first protocol exposes the intact DRGs to 4 °C for between 20-30 minutes before dissociating individual neurons and plating 2 hours later. The second protocol maintains the neurons at 23 °C for the entire duration of the sample preparation. The visual appearance of the neurons is similar. The viability was assessed by means of trypan blue exclusion method to determine the viability of the neurons. The neurons prepared under the first protocol (cold exposure) and plated on BaF2 reveal a distinct chemical signature and chemical distribution that is different from the other sample preparations described in the paper. Importantly, results for other sample preparation methods, using various substrates and temperature protocols, when compared across the overlapping spectral bandwidth, present normal chemical distribution within the neurons. The unusual chemically specific spatial variation is dominated by a lack of protein and carbohydrates in the center of the neurons and signatures of unraveling DNA are detected. We suggest that cold shock leads to apoptosis of DRGs, followed by osmotic stress originating from ion gradients across the cell membrane leading to cell lysis. PMID:26000346

  3. An Approach to Enhance Alignment and Myelination of Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun; Chan, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Axon regeneration is a chaotic process due largely to unorganized axon alignment. Therefore, in order for a sufficient number of regenerated axons to bridge the lesion site, properly organized axonal alignment is required. Since demyelination after nerve injury strongly impairs the conductive capacity of surviving axons, remyelination is critical for successful functioning of regenerated nerves. Previously, we demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) aligned on a pre-stretch induced anisotropic surface because the cells can sense a larger effective stiffness in the stretched direction than in the perpendicular direction. We also showed that an anisotropic surface arising from a mechanical pre-stretched surface similarly affects alignment, as well as growth and myelination of axons. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for preparing a pre-stretched anisotropic surface, the isolation and culture of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons on a pre-stretched surface, and show the myelination behavior of a co-culture of DRG neurons with Schwann cells (SCs) on a pre-stretched surface. PMID:27585118

  4. An improved method for patch clamp recording and calcium imaging of neurons in the intact dorsal root ganglion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hayar, Abdallah; Gu, Chunping; Al-Chaer, Elie D.

    2008-01-01

    The properties of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons have been mostly investigated in culture of dissociated cells, and it is uncertain whether these cells maintain the electrophysiological properties of the intact DRG neurons. Few attempts have been made to record from DRG neurons in the intact ganglion using the patch clamp technique. In this study, rat DRGs were dissected and incubated for at least 1 hour at 37°C in collagenase (10 mg/ml). We used oblique epi-illumination to visualize DRG neurons and perform patch clamp recordings. All DRG neurons exhibited strong delayed rectifier potassium current and a high threshold for spike generation (−15 mV) that rendered the cells very weakly excitable, generating only one action potential upon strong current injection (>300 pA). It is therefore possible that cultured DRG neurons, commonly used in studies of pain processing, may be hyperexcitable because they acquired "neuropathic" properties due to the injury induced by their dissociation. Electrical stimulation of the attached root produced an antidromic spike in the soma that could be blocked by intracellular hyperpolarization or high frequency stimulation. Imaging intracellular calcium concentration with Oregon Green BAPTA-1 indicates that antidromic stimulation caused a long-lasting increase in intracellular calcium concentration mostly near the cell membrane. This study describes a simple approach to examine the electrophysiological and pharmacological properties and intracellular calcium signaling in DRG neurons in the intact ganglion where the effects of somatic spike invasion can be studied as well. PMID:18588915

  5. Intracellular calcium regulation among subpopulations of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shao-Gang; Zhang, Xiulin; Gold, Michael S

    2006-01-01

    Primary afferent neurons are functionally heterogeneous. To determine whether this functional heterogeneity reflects, in part, heterogeneity in the regulation of the concentration of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), the magnitude and decay of evoked Ca2+ transients were assessed in subpopulations of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons with voltage clamp and fura-2 ratiometric imaging. To determine whether differences in evoked Ca2+ transients among subpopulations of DRG neurons reflected differences in the contribution of Ca2+ regulatory mechanisms, pharmacological techniques were employed to assess the contribution of influx, efflux, release and uptake pathways. Subpopulations of DRG neurons were defined by cell body size, binding of the plant lectin IB4 and responsiveness to the algogenic compound capsaicin (CAP). Ca2+ transients were evoked with 30 mm K+ or voltage steps to 0 mV. There were marked differences between subpopulations of neurons with respect to both the magnitude and decay of the Ca2+ transient, with the largest and most slowly decaying Ca2+ transients in small-diameter, IB4-positive, CAP-responsive neurons. The smallest and most rapidly decaying transients were in large-diameter, IB4-negative and CAP-unresponsive DRG neurons. These differences were not due to a differential distribution of voltage-gated Ca2+ currents. However, these differences did appear to reflect a differential contribution of other influx, efflux, release and uptake mechanisms between subpopulations of neurons. These results suggest that electrical activity in subpopulations of DRG neurons will have a differential influence on Ca2+-regulated phenomena such as spike adaptation, transmitter release and gene transcription. Significantly more activity should be required in large-diameter non-nociceptive afferents than in small-diameter nociceptive afferents to have a comparable influence on these processes. PMID:16945973

  6. Pannexin-1 Up-regulation in the Dorsal Root Ganglion Contributes to Neuropathic Pain Development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuhao; Laumet, Geoffroy; Chen, Shao-Rui; Hittelman, Walter N; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2015-06-01

    Pannexin-1 (Panx1) is a large-pore membrane channel involved in the release of ATP and other signaling mediators. Little is known about the expression and functional role of Panx1 in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the development of chronic neuropathic pain. In this study, we determined the epigenetic mechanism involved in increased Panx1 expression in the DRG after nerve injury. Spinal nerve ligation in rats significantly increased the mRNA and protein levels of Panx1 in the DRG but not in the spinal cord. Immunocytochemical labeling showed that Panx1 was primarily expressed in a subset of medium and large DRG neurons in control rats and that nerve injury markedly increased the number of Panx1-immunoreactive DRG neurons. Nerve injury significantly increased the enrichment of two activating histone marks (H3K4me2 and H3K9ac) and decreased the occupancy of two repressive histone marks (H3K9me2 and H3K27me3) around the promoter region of Panx1 in the DRG. However, nerve injury had no effect on the DNA methylation level around the Panx1 promoter in the DRG. Furthermore, intrathecal injection of the Panx1 blockers or Panx1-specific siRNA significantly reduced pain hypersensitivity induced by nerve injury. In addition, siRNA knockdown of Panx1 expression in a DRG cell line significantly reduced caspase-1 release induced by neuronal depolarization. Our findings suggest that nerve injury increases Panx1 expression levels in the DRG through altered histone modifications. Panx1 up-regulation contributes to the development of neuropathic pain and stimulation of inflammasome signaling. PMID:25925949

  7. Altered Purinergic Signaling in Colorectal Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Contributes to Colorectal Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    La, Jun-Ho; Bielefeldt, Klaus; Gebhart, G. F.

    2010-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by pain and hypersensitivity in the relative absence of colon inflammation or structural changes. To assess the role of P2X receptors expressed in colorectal dorsal root ganglion (c-DRG) neurons and colon hypersensitivity, we studied excitability and purinergic signaling of retrogradely labeled mouse thoracolumbar (TL) and lumbosacral (LS) c-DRG neurons after intracolonic treatment with saline or zymosan (which reproduces 2 major features of IBS—persistent colorectal hypersensitivity without inflammation) using patch-clamp, immunohistochemical, and RT-PCR techniques. Although whole cell capacitances did not differ between LS and TL c-DRG neurons and were not changed after zymosan treatment, membrane excitability was increased in LS and TL c-DRG neurons from zymosan-treated mice. Purinergic agonist adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) and α,β-methylene ATP [α,β-meATP] produced inward currents in TL c-DRG neurons were predominantly P2X3-like fast (∼70% of responsive neurons); P2X2/3-like slow currents were more common in LS c-DRG neurons (∼35% of responsive neurons). Transient currents were not produced by either agonist in c-DRG neurons from P2X3−/− mice. Neither total whole cell Kv current density nor the sustained or transient Kv components was changed in c-DRG neurons after zymosan treatment. The number of cells expressing P2X3 protein and its mRNA and the kinetic properties of ATP- and α,β-meATP-evoked currents in c-DRG neurons were not changed by zymosan treatment. However, the EC50 of α,β-meATP for the fast current decreased significantly in TL c-DRG neurons. These findings suggest that colorectal hypersensitivity produced by intracolonic zymosan increases excitability and enhances purinergic signaling in c-DRG neurons. PMID:20861433

  8. Altered purinergic signaling in colorectal dorsal root ganglion neurons contributes to colorectal hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Masamichi; La, Jun-Ho; Bielefeldt, Klaus; Gebhart, G F

    2010-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by pain and hypersensitivity in the relative absence of colon inflammation or structural changes. To assess the role of P2X receptors expressed in colorectal dorsal root ganglion (c-DRG) neurons and colon hypersensitivity, we studied excitability and purinergic signaling of retrogradely labeled mouse thoracolumbar (TL) and lumbosacral (LS) c-DRG neurons after intracolonic treatment with saline or zymosan (which reproduces 2 major features of IBS-persistent colorectal hypersensitivity without inflammation) using patch-clamp, immunohistochemical, and RT-PCR techniques. Although whole cell capacitances did not differ between LS and TL c-DRG neurons and were not changed after zymosan treatment, membrane excitability was increased in LS and TL c-DRG neurons from zymosan-treated mice. Purinergic agonist adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) and α,β-methylene ATP [α,β-meATP] produced inward currents in TL c-DRG neurons were predominantly P2X(3)-like fast (∼70% of responsive neurons); P2X(2/3)-like slow currents were more common in LS c-DRG neurons (∼35% of responsive neurons). Transient currents were not produced by either agonist in c-DRG neurons from P2X(3)(-/-) mice. Neither total whole cell Kv current density nor the sustained or transient Kv components was changed in c-DRG neurons after zymosan treatment. The number of cells expressing P2X(3) protein and its mRNA and the kinetic properties of ATP- and α,β-meATP-evoked currents in c-DRG neurons were not changed by zymosan treatment. However, the EC(50) of α,β-meATP for the fast current decreased significantly in TL c-DRG neurons. These findings suggest that colorectal hypersensitivity produced by intracolonic zymosan increases excitability and enhances purinergic signaling in c-DRG neurons. PMID:20861433

  9. Dorsal root ganglion myeloid zinc finger protein 1 contributes to neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve trauma

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Lingli; Cao, Jing; Lutz, Brianna Marie; Bekker, Alex; Zhang, Wei; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury-induced changes in gene transcription and translation in primary sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) are considered to contribute to neuropathic pain genesis. Transcription factors control gene expression. Peripheral nerve injury increases the expression of myeloid zinc finger protein 1 (MZF1), a transcription factor, and promotes its binding to the voltage-gated potassium 1.2 (Kv1.2) antisense RNA gene in the injured DRG. However, whether DRG MZF1 participates in neuropathic pain is still unknown. Here, we report that blocking the nerve injury-induced increase of DRG MZF1 through microinjection of MZF1 siRNA into the injured DRG attenuated the initiation and maintenance of mechanical, cold, and thermal pain hypersensitivities in rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve, without affecting locomotor functions and basal responses to acute mechanical, heat, and cold stimuli. Mimicking the nerve injury-induced increase of DRG MZF1 through microinjection of recombinant adeno-associated virus 5 expressing full-length MZF1 into the DRG produced significant mechanical, cold, and thermal pain hypersensitivities in naïve rats. Mechanistically, MZF1 participated in CCI-induced reductions in Kv1.2 mRNA and protein and total Kv current and the CCI-induced increase in neuronal excitability through MZF1-triggered Kv1.2 antisense RNA expression in the injured DRG neurons. MZF1 is likely an endogenous trigger of neuropathic pain and might serve as a potential target for preventing and treating this disorder. PMID:25630025

  10. Sigma-1 receptor expression in the dorsal root ganglion: Reexamination using a highly specific antibody.

    PubMed

    Mavlyutov, Timur A; Duellman, Tyler; Kim, Hung Tae; Epstein, Miles L; Leese, Charlotte; Davletov, Bazbek A; Yang, Jay

    2016-09-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a unique pluripotent modulator of living systems and has been reported to be associated with a number of neurological diseases including pathological pain. Intrathecal administration of S1R antagonists attenuates the pain behavior of rodents in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain models. However, the S1R localization in the spinal cord shows a selective ventral horn motor neuron distribution, suggesting the high likelihood of S1R in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) mediating the pain relief by intrathecally administered drugs. Since primary afferents are the major component in the pain pathway, we examined the mouse and rat DRGs for the presence of the S1R. At both mRNA and protein levels, quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western confirmed that the DRG contains greater S1R expression in comparison to spinal cord, cortex, or lung but less than liver. Using a custom-made highly specific antibody, we demonstrated the presence of a strong S1R immuno-fluorescence in all rat and mouse DRG neurons co-localizing with the Neuron-Specific Enolase (NSE) marker, but not in neural processes or GFAP-positive glial satellite cells. In addition, S1R was absent in afferent terminals in the skin and in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Using immuno-electron microscopy, we showed that S1R is detected in the nuclear envelope and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of DRG cells. In contrast to other cells, S1R is also located directly at the plasma membrane of the DRG neurons. The presence of S1R in the nuclear envelope of all DRG neurons suggests an exciting potential role of S1R as a regulator of neuronal nuclear activities and/or gene expression, which may provide insight toward new molecular targets for modulating nociception at the level of primary afferent neurons. PMID:27339730

  11. Cannabinoids Inhibit Acid-Sensing Ion Channel Currents in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Chun-Yu; Cai, Qi; Zou, Pengcheng; Wu, Heming; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Local acidosis has been found in various pain-generating conditions such as inflammation and tissue injury. Cannabinoids exert a powerful inhibitory control over pain initiation via peripheral cognate receptors. However, the peripheral molecular targets responsible for the antinociceptive effects of cannabinoids are still poorly understood. Here, we have found that WIN55,212-2, a cannabinoid receptor agonist, inhibits the activity of native acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. WIN55,212-2 dose-dependently inhibited proton-gated currents mediated by ASICs. WIN55,212-2 shifted the proton concentration–response curve downwards, with an decrease of 48.6±3.7% in the maximum current response but with no significant change in the EC50 value. The inhibition of proton-gated current induced by WIN55,212-2 was almost completely blocked by the selective CB1 receptor antagonist AM 281, but not by the CB2 receptor antagonist AM630. Pretreatment of forskolin, an AC activator, and the addition of cAMP also reversed the inhibition of WIN55,212-2. Moreover, WIN55,212-2 altered acid-evoked excitability of rat DRG neurons and decreased the number of action potentials induced by acid stimuli. Finally, WIN55,212-2 attenuated nociceptive responses to injection of acetic acid in rats. These results suggest that WIN55,212-2 inhibits the activity of ASICs via CB1 receptor and cAMP dependent pathway in rat primary sensory neurons. Thus, cannabinoids can exert their analgesic action by interaction with ASICs in the primary afferent neurons, which was novel analgesic mechanism of cannabinoids. PMID:23029075

  12. Pannexin-1 Up-regulation in the Dorsal Root Ganglion Contributes to Neuropathic Pain Development*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuhao; Laumet, Geoffroy; Chen, Shao-Rui; Hittelman, Walter N.; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Pannexin-1 (Panx1) is a large-pore membrane channel involved in the release of ATP and other signaling mediators. Little is known about the expression and functional role of Panx1 in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the development of chronic neuropathic pain. In this study, we determined the epigenetic mechanism involved in increased Panx1 expression in the DRG after nerve injury. Spinal nerve ligation in rats significantly increased the mRNA and protein levels of Panx1 in the DRG but not in the spinal cord. Immunocytochemical labeling showed that Panx1 was primarily expressed in a subset of medium and large DRG neurons in control rats and that nerve injury markedly increased the number of Panx1-immunoreactive DRG neurons. Nerve injury significantly increased the enrichment of two activating histone marks (H3K4me2 and H3K9ac) and decreased the occupancy of two repressive histone marks (H3K9me2 and H3K27me3) around the promoter region of Panx1 in the DRG. However, nerve injury had no effect on the DNA methylation level around the Panx1 promoter in the DRG. Furthermore, intrathecal injection of the Panx1 blockers or Panx1-specific siRNA significantly reduced pain hypersensitivity induced by nerve injury. In addition, siRNA knockdown of Panx1 expression in a DRG cell line significantly reduced caspase-1 release induced by neuronal depolarization. Our findings suggest that nerve injury increases Panx1 expression levels in the DRG through altered histone modifications. Panx1 up-regulation contributes to the development of neuropathic pain and stimulation of inflammasome signaling. PMID:25925949

  13. Bilateral mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia after chronic compression of dorsal root ganglion in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong-Gui; Kong, Wei-Wei; Ge, Da-Long; Luo, Ceng; Hu, San-Jue

    2011-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Low back pain is one of the most inextricable problems encountered in clinics. Animal models that imitate symptoms in humans are valuable tools for investigating low back pain mechanisms and the possible therapeutic applications. With the development of genetic technology in pain field, the possibility of mutating specific genes in mice has provided a potent tool for investigating the specific mechanisms of pain. The aim of the present study was to develop a mouse model of chronic compression of dorsal root ganglion (CCD), in which gene mutation can be applied to facilitate the studies of chronic pain. METHODS Chronic compression of L4 and L5 dorsal root ganglia was conducted in mice by inserting fine stainless steel rods into the intervertebral foramina, one at L4 and the other at L5. Mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were examined with von Frey filaments and radiating heat stimulator, respectively. RESULTS The CCD mice displayed dramatic mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia as well as tactile allodynia in the hindpaw ipsilateral to CCD. In addition, this mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia as well as tactile allodynia was also found to spread to the contralateral hindpaw. CONCLUSION This model, combined with the possible genetic modification, will strengthen our knowledge of the underlying mechanisms of low back pain. It also favors the development of new treatment strategies for pain and hyperalgesia after spinal injury and other disorders which affect the dorsal root ganglion in humans. PMID:21788994

  14. An investigation of herpes simplex virus type 1 latency in a novel mouse dorsal root ganglion model suggests a role for ICP34.5 in reactivation.

    PubMed

    Mattila, R K; Harila, K; Kangas, S M; Paavilainen, H; Heape, A M; Mohr, I J; Hukkanen, V

    2015-08-01

    After a primary lytic infection at the epithelia, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) enters the innervating sensory neurons and translocates to the nucleus, where it establishes a quiescent latent infection. Periodically, the virus can reactivate and the progeny viruses spread back to the epithelium. Here, we introduce an embryonic mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) culture system, which can be used to study the mechanisms that control the establishment, maintenance and reactivation from latency. Use of acyclovir is not necessary in our model. We examined different phases of the HSV-1 life cycle in DRG neurons, and showed that WT HSV-1 could establish both lytic and latent form of infection in the cells. After reactivating stimulus, the WT viruses showed all markers of true reactivation. In addition, we showed that deletion of the γ(1)34.5 gene rendered the virus incapable of reactivation, even though the virus was clearly able to replicate and persist in a quiescent form in the DRG neurons. PMID:25854552

  15. Anterograde Glycoprotein-Dependent Transport of Newly Generated Rabies Virus in Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Anja; Nolden, Tobias; Schröter, Josephine; Römer-Oberdörfer, Angela; Gluska, Shani; Perlson, Eran

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rabies virus (RABV) spread is widely accepted to occur only by retrograde axonal transport. However, examples of anterograde RABV spread in peripheral neurons such as dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons indicated a possible bidirectional transport by an uncharacterized mechanism. Here, we analyzed the axonal transport of fluorescence-labeled RABV in DRG neurons by live-cell microscopy. Both entry-related retrograde transport of RABV after infection at axon endings and postreplicative transport of newly formed virus were visualized in compartmentalized DRG neuron cultures. Whereas entry-related transport at 1.5 μm/s occurred only retrogradely, after 2 days of infection, multiple particles were observed in axons moving in both the anterograde and retrograde directions. The dynamics of postreplicative retrograde transport (1.6 μm/s) were similar to those of entry-related retrograde transport. In contrast, anterograde particle transport at 3.4 μm/s was faster, indicating active particle transport. Interestingly, RABV missing the glycoproteins did not move anterogradely within the axon. Thus, anterograde RABV particle transport depended on the RABV glycoprotein. Moreover, colocalization of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) and glycoprotein in distal axonal regions as well as cotransport of labeled RNPs with membrane-anchored mCherry reporter confirmed that either complete enveloped virus particles or vesicle associated RNPs were transported. Our data show that anterograde RABV movement in peripheral DRG neurons occurs by active motor protein-dependent transport. We propose two models for postreplicative long-distance transport in peripheral neurons: either transport of complete virus particles or cotransport of RNPs and G-containing vesicles through axons to release virus at distal sites of infected DRG neurons. IMPORTANCE Rabies virus retrograde axonal transport by dynein motors supports virus spread over long distances and

  16. Carbon disulfide inhibits neurite outgrowth and neuronal migration of dorsal root ganglion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ning; Xiang, Yujuan; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Weiwei; Liu, Huaxiang; Li, Zhenzhong

    2011-12-01

    Carbon disulfide (CS₂) is a neurotoxic industrial solvent and widely used in the vulcanization of rubber, rayon, cellophane, and adhesives. Although the neurotoxicity of CS₂ has been recognized for over a century, the precise mechanism of neurotoxic action of CS₂ remains unknown. In the present study, a embryonic rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) explants culture model was established. Using the organotypic DRG cultures, the direct neurotoxic effects of CS₂ on outgrowth of neurites and migration of neurons from DRG explants were investigated. The organotypic DRG cultures were exposed to different concentrations of CS₂ (0.01 mmol/L, 0.1 mmol/L, 1 mmol/L). The number of nerve fiber bundles extended from DRG explants decreased significantly in the presence of CS₂ (0.01 mmol/L, 15.00 ± 2.61, p < .05; 0.1 mmol/L, 11.17 ± 1.47, p < .001; 1 mmol/L, 8.00 ± 1.41, p < .001) as compared with that in the absence of CS₂ (17.83 ± 2.48). The number of neurons migrated from DRG explants decreased significantly in the presence of CS₂ (0.01 mmol/L, 79.50 ± 9.40, p < .01; 0.1 mmol/L, 62.50 ± 14.15, p < .001; 1 mmol/L, 34.67 ± 7.58, p < .001) as compared with that in the absence of CS₂ (99.33 ± 15.16). And also, the decreases in the number of nerve fiber bundles and migrated DRG neurons were in a dose-dependent manner of CS₂. These data implicated that CS₂ could inhibit neurite outgrowth and neuronal migration from DRG explants in vitro. PMID:21777162

  17. Opiate receptor agonists regulate phosphorylation of synapsin I in cocultures of rat spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed Central

    Nah, S Y; Saya, D; Barg, J; Vogel, Z

    1993-01-01

    Kappa opiate receptor agonists applied to cocultures of spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion neurons have been previously shown to inhibit voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx and adenylate cyclase activity. Here we describe the effect of kappa opiate receptor agonists on phosphorylation of synapsin I, a synaptic-vesicle-associated protein whose phosphorylation was shown to be regulated by cAMP and Ca2+ concentrations. Depolarization of spinal cord-dorsal root ganglion cocultured cells (by high K+ or veratridine) and the addition of forskolin (which activates adenylate cyclase) led to increased phosphorylation of synapsin I. Addition of kappa opiate agonists attenuated both the depolarization- and the forskolin-induced phosphorylation of synapsin I. This attenuation was blocked by the opiate antagonist naloxone. mu and delta opiate receptor agonists had much weaker effects on the depolarization-induced phosphorylation of synapsin I. Similarly, kappa opiate agonists decreased (by 40-60%) the high-K+- or veratridine-induced phosphorylation of synapsin I in spinal cord synaptosomes. These results show that opiate ligands modulate synapsin I phosphorylation. Moreover, the data could explain the reduction in synaptic efficacy observed after opiate treatment. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 Fig. 7 PMID:8097883

  18. MAPK Pathways Are Involved in Neuropathic Pain in Rats with Chronic Compression of the Dorsal Root Ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Lei; Zhang, Xiao; Wei, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the MAPK pathways were involved in the mechanism of neuropathic pain in rats with chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion. We determined the paw withdrawal mechanical threshold (PWMT) of rats before and after CCD surgery and then after p38, JNK, or ERK inhibitors administration. Western blotting, RT-PCR, and immunofluorescence of dorsal root ganglia were performed to investigate the protein and mRNA level of MAPKs and also the alternation in distributions of positive neurons in dorsal root ganglia. Intrathecal administration of MAPKs inhibitors, SB203580 (p38 inhibitor), SP600125 (JNK inhibitor), and U0126 (ERK inhibitor), resulted in a partial reduction in CCD-induced mechanical allodynia. The reduction of allodynia was associated with significant depression in the level of both MAPKs mRNA and protein expression in CCD rats and also associated with the decreased ratios of large size MAPKs positive neurons in dorsal root ganglia. In conclusion, the specific inhibitors of MAPKs contributed to the attenuation of mechanical allodynia in CCD rats and the large size MAPKs positive neurons in dorsal root ganglia were crucial. PMID:27504140

  19. S3 Dorsal Root Ganglion/Nerve Root Stimulation for Refractory Postsurgical Perineal Pain: Technical Aspects of Anchorless Sacral Transforaminal Lead Placement

    PubMed Central

    Zuidema, X.; Breel, J.; Wille, F.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic perineal pain limits patients in physical and sexual activities, leading to social and psychological distress. In most cases, this pain develops after surgery in the urogenital area or as a consequence of trauma. Neuromodulation is one of the options in chronic postsurgical perineal pain treatment. We present a case of refractory perineal pain after right sided surgical resection of a Bartholin's cyst which was treated with third sacral nerve root/dorsal root ganglion stimulation using the transforaminal approach. We describe a new anchorless lead placement technique using a unique curved lead delivery sheath. We postulate that this new posterior foraminal technique of lead placement is simple, safe, and reversible and may lower the occurrence of lead related complications. PMID:27123351

  20. S3 Dorsal Root Ganglion/Nerve Root Stimulation for Refractory Postsurgical Perineal Pain: Technical Aspects of Anchorless Sacral Transforaminal Lead Placement.

    PubMed

    Zuidema, X; Breel, J; Wille, F

    2016-01-01

    Chronic perineal pain limits patients in physical and sexual activities, leading to social and psychological distress. In most cases, this pain develops after surgery in the urogenital area or as a consequence of trauma. Neuromodulation is one of the options in chronic postsurgical perineal pain treatment. We present a case of refractory perineal pain after right sided surgical resection of a Bartholin's cyst which was treated with third sacral nerve root/dorsal root ganglion stimulation using the transforaminal approach. We describe a new anchorless lead placement technique using a unique curved lead delivery sheath. We postulate that this new posterior foraminal technique of lead placement is simple, safe, and reversible and may lower the occurrence of lead related complications. PMID:27123351

  1. Slit1 promotes regenerative neurite outgrowth of adult dorsal root ganglion neurons in vitro via binding to the Robo receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai Ying; Zheng, Lin Feng; Yi, Xi Nan; Chen, Zhi Bin; He, Zhong Ping; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Xian Fang; Ma, Zhi Jian

    2010-07-01

    Secreted Slit proteins have previously been shown to signal through Roundabout (Robo) receptors to negatively regulate axon guidance and cell migration. During vertebrate development, Slit proteins have also been shown to stimulate branching and elongation of sensory axons and cortical dendrites. In this study, Slit1/Robo2 mRNA and protein expressions were detected in adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and in cultured DRG neurons. Treatment of both models with recombinant, soluble Slit1 protein was found to promote neurite outgrowth and elongation. In contrast, treatment with a recombinant human Robo2/Fc chimera inhibited neurite outgrowth and elongation. When adult DRG and cultured DRG neurons were pretreated with soluble recombinant human Robo2/Fc chimera, neurite outgrowth and elongation was not induced. These findings indicate that Slit1/Robo2 signaling may have a role in regulating peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:20172023

  2. Tityus bahiensis toxin IV-5b selectively affects Na channel inactivation in chick dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Trequattrini, C; Zamudio, F Z; Petris, A; Prestipino, G; Possani, L D; Franciolini, F

    1995-09-01

    A novel toxin was isolated from the venom of the Brazilian scorpion Tityus (T.) bahiensis. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of this toxin was shown to be 80% identical to the corresponding segment of T. serrulatus toxin IV-5. The new toxin was thus named toxin IV-5b. Toxin IV-5b was found to markedly slow inactivation of Na channel in dorsal root ganglion neurons from chick embryo. By contrast, Na channel activation was only negligibly delayed, and deactivation completely unaffected. Similarly unaffected by the toxin were K and Ca currents. The slowing effect of the toxin starts to appear at concentrations of c. 80 nM, and shows a KD of 143 nM. With a toxin concentration of 2.4 microM, the Na channel inactivation time constant was increased c. 3-fold with respect to the control. The slowing of inactivation was voltage dependent, and increased with depolarization. PMID:7553331

  3. Modulating nitric oxide levels in dorsal root ganglion neurons of rat with low-level laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Li-qin; Wang, Yu-hua; He, Yi-peng; Zhou, Jie; Yang, Hong-qin; Zhang, Yan-ding; Xie, Shu-sen

    2015-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) have an important role in pain signaling transmission in animal models. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is known to have an analgesic effect, but the mechanism is unclear. The aim of the study is to investigate the influence of LLLT on NO release and NOS synthesis in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, in order to find whether LLLI can ameliorate pain through modulating NO production at the cellular level. The results show that in stress conditions, the laser irradiation at 658 nm can modulate NO production in DRG neurons with soma diameter of about 20 μm in a short time after illumination, and affect NOS synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. It is demonstrated that LLLT might treat pain by altering NO release directly and indirectly in DRG neurons.

  4. Repression of apical homeobox genes is required for embryonic root development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Grigg, Stephen P; Galinha, Carla; Kornet, Noortje; Canales, Claudia; Scheres, Ben; Tsiantis, Miltos

    2009-09-15

    Development of seed plant embryos is polarized along the apical-basal axis. This polarization occurs in the absence of cell migration and culminates in the establishment of two distinct pluripotent cell populations: the shoot apical meristem (SAM) and root meristem (RM), which postembryonically give rise to the entire shoot and root systems of the plant. The acquisition of genetic pathways that delimit root from shoot during embryogenesis must have played a pivotal role during land plant evolution because roots evolved after shoots in ancestral vascular plants and may be shoot-derived organs. However, such pathways are very poorly understood. Here we show that RM establishment in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana requires apical confinement of the Class III HOMEODOMAIN-LEUCINE ZIPPER (HD-ZIP III) proteins PHABULOSA (PHB) and PHAVOLUTA (PHV), which direct both SAM development and shoot lateral organ polarity. Failure to restrict PHB and PHV expression apically via a microRNA-dependent pathway prevents correct elaboration of the embryonic root development program and results in embryo lethality. As such, repression of a fundamental shoot development pathway is essential for correct root development. Additionally, our data suggest that a single patterning process, based on HD-ZIP III repression, mediates both apical-basal and radial polarity in the embryo and lateral organ polarity in the shoot. PMID:19646874

  5. An experimental model for chronic compression of dorsal root ganglion produced by intervertebral foramen stenosis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hu, S J; Xing, J L

    1998-07-01

    Under anesthesia and sterile surgery, a small stainless steel rod (4 mm in length and 0.5-0.8 mm in diameter) was inserted into the L5 intervertebral foramen in the rat, developing intervertebral foramen stenosis and hence producing a chronic steady compression of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). The hind paw on the injured side exhibited a significant reduction in the latency of foot withdrawal to noxious heat and manifested a persistent heat hyperalgesia 5-35 days after surgery. Injection of 1% carrageenan into the intervertebral foramen, presumably causing inflammation of the DRG, also produced hyperalgesia to heat on the hind paw of the injured side 5-21 days after surgery. Extracellular electrophysiological recordings from myelinated dorsal root fibers were performed in vivo. Spontaneous activity was present in 21.5% of the fibers recorded from DRG neurons injured with chronic compression in contrast to 1.98% from uninjured DRG neurons. The pattern of spontaneous activity was periodic and bursting in 75.3% of the spontaneously active fibers. These neurons had a greatly enhanced sensitivity to mechanical stimulation of the injured DRG and a prolonged after discharge. In response to TEA, topically applied to the DRG, excitatory responses were evoked in the injured, but not the uninjured, DRG neurons. Application of this experimental model may further our understanding of the neural mechanisms by which chronic compression of DRG induces low back pain and sciatica. PMID:9755014

  6. Inhibitory Activity of Yokukansankachimpihange against Nerve Growth Factor-Induced Neurite Growth in Cultured Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Chiaki; Watanabe, Shimpei; Nakamura, Motokazu; Norimoto, Hisayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pruritus is a major and distressing symptom of many cutaneous diseases, however, the treatment remains a challenge in the clinic. The traditional Chinese-Japanese medicine (Kampo medicine) is a conservative and increasingly popular approach to treat chronic pruritus for both patients and medical providers. Yokukansankachimpihange (YKH), a Kampo formula has been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of itching of atopic dermatitis in Japan although its pharmacological mechanism is unknown clearly. In an attempt to clarify its pharmacological actions, in this study, we focused on the inhibitory activity of YKH against neurite growth induced with nerve growth factor (NGF) in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons because epidermal hyperinnervation is deeply related to itch sensitization. YKH showed approximately 200-fold inhibitory activity against NGF-induced neurite growth than that of neurotropin (positive control), a drug used clinically for treatment of chronic pruritus. Moreover, it also found that Uncaria hook, Bupleurum root and their chemical constituents rhynchophylline, hirsutine, and saikosaponin a, d showed inhibitory activities against NGF-induced neurite growth, suggesting they should mainly contribute to the inhibitory activity of YKH. Further study on the effects of YKH against epidermal nerve density in "itch-scratch" animal models is under investigation. PMID:26287150

  7. Pine Oil Effects on Chemical and Thermal Injury in Mice and Cultured Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Clark, SP; Bollag, WB; Westlund, KN; Ma, F; Falls, G; Xie, D; Johnson, M; Isales, CM; Bhattacharyya, MH

    2013-01-01

    A commercial resin-based pine oil derived from Pinus palustris and Pinus elliottii was the major focus of this investigation. Extracts of pine resins, needles and bark are folk medicines commonly used to treat skin ailments, including burns. The American Burn Association estimates that 500,000 people with burn injuries receive medical treatment each year; one-half of US burn victims are children, most with scald burns. This systematic study was initiated as follow-up to personal anecdotal evidence acquired over more than 10 years by MH Bhattacharyya regarding pine oil’s efficacy for treating burns. The results demonstrate that pine oil counteracted dermal inflammation in both a mouse ear model of contact irritant-induced dermal inflammation and a 2nd degree scald burn to the mouse paw. Furthermore, pine oil significantly counteracted the tactile allodynia and soft tissue injury caused by the scald burn. In mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuronal cultures, pine oil added to the medium blocked ATP-activated, but not capsaicin-activated, pain pathways, demonstrating specificity. These results together support the hypothesis that a pine-oil-based treatment can be developed to provide effective in-home care for 2nd degree burns. PMID:23595692

  8. Coculture of dorsal root ganglion neurons and differentiated human corneal stromal stem cells on silk-based scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Siran; Ghezzi, Chiara E; White, James D; Kaplan, David L

    2015-10-01

    Corneal tissue displays the highest peripheral nerve density in the human body. Engineering of biomaterials to promote interactions between neurons and corneal tissue could provide tissue models for nerve/cornea development, platforms for drug screening, as well as innovative opportunities to regenerate cornea tissue. The focus of this study was to develop a coculture system for differentiated human corneal stromal stem cells (dhCSSCs) and dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG) to mimic the human cornea tissue interactions. Axon extension, connectivity, and neuron cell viability were studied. DRG neurons developed longer axons when cocultured with dhCSSCs in comparison to neuron cultures alone. To assess the mechanism involved in the coculture response, nerve growth factors (NGF) secreted by dhCSSCs including NGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and neurotrophin-3 were characterized with greater focus on BDNF secretion. DhCSSCs also secreted collagen type I, an extracellular matrix molecule favorable for neuronal outgrowth. This coculture system provides a slowly degrading silk matrix to study neuronal responses in concert with hCSSCs related to innervation of corneal tissue with utility toward human corneal nerve regeneration and associated diseases. PMID:25809662

  9. Nesfatin-1 increases intracellular calcium concentration by protein kinase C activation in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Mete; Gok, Zeynep Betul; Kacar, Emine; Serhatlioglu, Ihsan; Kelestimur, Haluk

    2016-04-21

    Nesfatin-1 is a recently identified anorexigenic hypothalamic polypeptide derived from the posttranslational processing of nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2). Several studies have indicated that this neuropeptide may be participated in somatosensory and visceral transmission including pain signals in addition to energy metabolism. The aim of this study was to explore the possible role of nesfatin-1 in the transmission of peripheral neural signals by investigating the effects of nesfatin-1 on intracellular free calcium levels ([Ca(2+)]i) in cultured neonatal rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The effects of nesfatin-1 on [Ca(2+)]i in DRG neurons were investigated by using an in vitro calcium imaging system. DRG neurons were grown in primary culture following enzymatic and mechanical dissociation of ganglia from 1-or 2-day-old neonatal Wistar rats. Using the fura-2-based calcium imaging technique, the effects of nesfatin-1 on [Ca(2+)]i and role of the protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated pathway in nesfatin-1 effect were assessed. Nesfatin-1 elevated [Ca(2+)]i in cultured DRG neurons. The response was prevented by pretreating the cells with pertussis toxin. The protein kinase C inhibitor chelerythrine chloride suppressed nesfatin-1-induced rise in [Ca(2+)]i. The result shows that nesfatin-1 interacts with a G protein-coupled receptor, leading to an increase of [Ca(2+)]i, which is linked to protein kinase C activation in cultured rat DRG neurons. PMID:26975784

  10. Overexpression of GRK6 attenuates neuropathic pain via suppression of CXCR2 in rat dorsal root ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuan; Li, Rong-Ji; Li, Meng; Liu, Xuelian; Zhu, Hong-Yan; Ju, Zhong; Miao, Xiuhua

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled kinase (GRK) 6 is a member of the GRK family that mediates agonist-induced desensitization and signaling of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), thus involving in a wide variety of processes including inflammation and nociception. Recent studies have indicated that chemokines play an important role in chronic pain via increased expression of respective GPCRs. This study was designed to investigate the role of GRK6 and its interaction with substrate chemokine receptors in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI). Following induction of CCI, GRK6 expression was significantly downregulated in rat DRGs at L4-L6 segments. Overexpression of GRK6 using lentiviral-mediated production strategy via sciatic nerve injection markedly attenuated mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in CCI rats. Overexpression of GRK6 also drastically reversed the hyperexcitability of DRG neurons innervating the hind paw and suppressed the enhanced expression of CXCR2 in DRGs of CCI rats. In addition, co-immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence, and correlation analysis supported the interaction between GRK6 and CXCR2. These results suggest that GRK6 might be a key molecular involved in peripheral mechanism of neuropathic pain and that overexpression of GRK6 might be a potential strategy for treatment for neuropathic pain through inhibition of CXCR2 signal pathway. PMID:27145805

  11. Upregulation of EMMPRIN (OX47) in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Contributes to the Development of Mechanical Allodynia after Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qun; Sun, Yanyuan; Ren, Yingna; Gao, Yandong; Tian, Li; Liu, Yang; Pu, Yanan; Gou, Xingchun; Chen, Yanke; Lu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are widely implicated in inflammation and tissue remodeling associated with various neurodegenerative diseases and play an important role in nociception and allodynia. Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer (EMMPRIN) plays a key regulatory role for MMP activities. However, the role of EMMPRIN in the development of neuropathic pain is not clear. Western blotting, real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), and immunofluorescence were performed to determine the changes of messenger RNA and protein of EMMPRIN/OX47 and their cellular localization in the rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) after nerve injury. Paw withdrawal threshold test was examined to evaluate the pain behavior in spinal nerve ligation (SNL) model. The lentivirus containing OX47 shRNA was injected into the DRG one day before SNL. The expression level of both mRNA and protein of OX47 was markedly upregulated in ipsilateral DRG after SNL. OX47 was mainly expressed in the extracellular matrix of DRG. Administration of shRNA targeted against OX47 in vivo remarkably attenuated mechanical allodynia induced by SNL. In conclusion, peripheral nerve injury induced upregulation of OX47 in the extracellular matrix of DRG. RNA interference against OX47 significantly suppressed the expression of OX47 mRNA and the development of mechanical allodynia. The altered expression of OX47 may contribute to the development of neuropathic pain after nerve injury. PMID:26697232

  12. Evaluation of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/carbon nanotube neural electrode coatings for stimulation in the dorsal root ganglion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolarcik, Christi L.; Catt, Kasey; Rost, Erika; Albrecht, Ingrid N.; Bourbeau, Dennis; Du, Zhanhong; Kozai, Takashi D. Y.; Luo, Xiliang; Weber, Douglas J.; Cui, X. Tracy

    2015-02-01

    Objective. The dorsal root ganglion is an attractive target for implanting neural electrode arrays that restore sensory function or provide therapy via stimulation. However, penetrating microelectrodes designed for these applications are small and deliver low currents. For long-term performance of microstimulation devices, novel coating materials are needed in part to decrease impedance values at the electrode-tissue interface and to increase charge storage capacity. Approach. Conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were coated on the electrode surface and doped with the anti-inflammatory drug, dexamethasone. Electrode characteristics and the tissue reaction around neural electrodes as a result of stimulation, coating and drug release were characterized. Hematoxylin and eosin staining along with antibodies recognizing Iba1 (microglia/macrophages), NF200 (neuronal axons), NeuN (neurons), vimentin (fibroblasts), caspase-3 (cell death) and L1 (neural cell adhesion molecule) were used. Quantitative image analyses were performed using MATLAB. Main results. Our results indicate that coated microelectrodes have lower in vitro and in vivo impedance values. Significantly less neuronal death/damage was observed with coated electrodes as compared to non-coated controls. The inflammatory response with the PEDOT/CNT-coated electrodes was also reduced. Significance. This study is the first to report on the utility of these coatings in stimulation applications. Our results indicate PEDOT/CNT coatings may be valuable additions to implantable electrodes used as therapeutic modalities.

  13. TRPV1 channels are functionally coupled with BK(mSlo1) channels in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Liu, Yongfeng; Hou, Panpan; Yan, Zonghe; Kong, Wenjuan; Liu, Beiying; Li, Xia; Yao, Jing; Zhang, Yuexuan; Qin, Feng; Ding, Jiuping

    2013-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) channel is a nonselective cation channel activated by a variety of exogenous and endogenous physical and chemical stimuli, such as temperature (≥42 °C), capsaicin, a pungent compound in hot chili peppers, and allyl isothiocyanate. Large-conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels regulate the electric activities and neurotransmitter releases in excitable cells, responding to changes in membrane potentials and elevation of cytosolic calcium ions (Ca(2+)). However, it is unknown whether the TRPV1 channels are coupled with the BK channels. Using patch-clamp recording combined with an infrared laser device, we found that BK channels could be activated at 0 mV by a Ca(2+) influx through TRPV1 channels not the intracellular calcium stores in submilliseconds. The local calcium concentration around BK is estimated over 10 μM. The crosstalk could be affected by 10 mM BAPTA, whereas 5 mM EGTA was ineffectual. Fluorescence and co-immunoprecipitation experiments also showed that BK and TRPV1 were able to form a TRPV1-BK complex. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the TRPV1-BK coupling also occurs in dosal root ganglion (DRG) cells, which plays a critical physiological role in regulating the "pain" signal transduction pathway in the peripheral nervous system. PMID:24147119

  14. Anisatin modulation of the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor-channel in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Tomoko; Ozoe, Yoshihisa; Okuyama, Emi; Nagata, Keiichi; Honda, Hiroshi; Shono, Toshio; Narahashi, Toshio

    1999-01-01

    Anisatin, a toxic, insecticidally active component of Sikimi plant, is known to act on the GABA system. In order to elucidate the mechanism of anisatin interaction with the GABA system, whole-cell and single-channel patch clamp experiments were performed with rat dorsal root ganglion neurons in primary culture.Repeated co-applications of GABA and anisatin suppressed GABA-induced whole-cell currents with an EC50 of 1.10 μM. No recovery of currents was observed after washout with anisatin-free solution.However, pre-application of anisatin through the bath had no effect on GABA-induced currents. The decay phase of currents was accelerated by anisatin. These results indicate that anisatin suppression of GABA-induced currents requires opening of the channels and is use-dependent.Anisatin suppression of GABA-induced currents was not voltage dependent.Picrotoxinin attenuated anisatin suppression of GABA-induced currents. [3H]-EBOB binding to rat brain membranes was competitively inhibited by anisatin. These data indicated that anisatin bound to the picrotoxinin site.At the single-channel level, anisatin did not alter the open time but prolonged the closed time. The burst duration was reduced and channel openings per burst were decreased indicating that anisatin decreased the probability of openings. PMID:10455311

  15. Inhibition of acid-sensing ion channels by levo-tetrahydropalmatine in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting-Ting; Qu, Zu-Wei; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Qiu, Fang; Ren, Cuixia; Gan, Xiong; Peng, Fang; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2015-02-01

    Levo-tetrahydropalmatine (l-THP), a main bioactive Chinese herbal constituent from the genera Stephania and Corydalis, has been in use in clinical practice for years in China as a traditional analgesic agent. However, the mechanism underlying the analgesic action of l-THP is poorly understood. This study shows that l-THP can exert an inhibitory effect on the functional activity of native acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), which are believed to mediate pain caused by extracellular acidification. l-THP dose dependently decreased the amplitude of proton-gated currents mediated by ASICs in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. l-THP shifted the proton concentration-response curve downward, with a decrease of 40.93% ± 8.45% in the maximum current response to protons, with no significant change in the pH0.5 value. Moreover, l-THP can alter the membrane excitability of rat DRG neurons to acid stimuli. It significantly decreased the number of action potentials and the amplitude of the depolarization induced by an extracellular pH drop. Finally, peripherally administered l-THP inhibited the nociceptive response to intraplantar injection of acetic acid in rats. These results indicate that l-THP can inhibit the functional activity of ASICs in dissociated primary sensory neurons and relieve acidosis-evoked pain in vivo, which for the first time provides a novel peripheral mechanism underlying the analgesic action of l-THP. PMID:25395088

  16. Modulation of Spinal GABAergic Inhibition and Mechanical Hypersensitivity following Chronic Compression of Dorsal Root Ganglion in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Moon Chul; Nam, Taick Sang; Jung, Se Jung; Gwak, Young S.; Leem, Joong Woo

    2015-01-01

    Chronic compression of dorsal root ganglion (CCD) results in neuropathic pain. We investigated the role of spinal GABA in CCD-induced pain using rats with unilateral CCD. A stereological analysis revealed that the proportion of GABA-immunoreactive neurons to total neurons at L4/5 laminae I–III on the injured side decreased in the early phase of CCD (post-CCD week 1) and then returned to the sham-control level in the late phase (post-CCD week 18). In the early phase, the rats showed an increase in both mechanical sensitivity of the hind paw and spinal WDR neuronal excitability on the injured side, and such increase was suppressed by spinally applied muscimol (GABA-A agonist, 5 nmol) and baclofen (GABA-B agonist, 25 nmol), indicating the reduced spinal GABAergic inhibition involved. In the late phase, the CCD-induced increase in mechanical sensitivity and neuronal excitability returned to pre-CCD levels, and such recovered responses were enhanced by spinally applied bicuculline (GABA-A antagonist, 15 nmol) and CGP52432 (GABA-B antagonist, 15 nmol), indicating the regained spinal GABAergic inhibition involved. In conclusion, the alteration of spinal GABAergic inhibition following CCD and leading to a gradual reduction over time of CCD-induced mechanical hypersensitivity is most likely due to changes in GABA content in spinal GABA neurons. PMID:26451259

  17. Overexpression of GRK6 attenuates neuropathic pain via suppression of CXCR2 in rat dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuan; Li, Rong-Ji; Li, Meng; Liu, Xuelian; Zhu, Hong-Yan; Ju, Zhong; Miao, Xiuhua; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled kinase (GRK) 6 is a member of the GRK family that mediates agonist-induced desensitization and signaling of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), thus involving in a wide variety of processes including inflammation and nociception. Recent studies have indicated that chemokines play an important role in chronic pain via increased expression of respective GPCRs. This study was designed to investigate the role of GRK6 and its interaction with substrate chemokine receptors in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI). Following induction of CCI, GRK6 expression was significantly downregulated in rat DRGs at L4-L6 segments. Overexpression of GRK6 using lentiviral-mediated production strategy via sciatic nerve injection markedly attenuated mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in CCI rats. Overexpression of GRK6 also drastically reversed the hyperexcitability of DRG neurons innervating the hind paw and suppressed the enhanced expression of CXCR2 in DRGs of CCI rats. In addition, co-immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence, and correlation analysis supported the interaction between GRK6 and CXCR2. These results suggest that GRK6 might be a key molecular involved in peripheral mechanism of neuropathic pain and that overexpression of GRK6 might be a potential strategy for treatment for neuropathic pain through inhibition of CXCR2 signal pathway. PMID:27145805

  18. Effect of nano-hydroxyapatite-coated magnetic nanoparticles on axonal guidance growth of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meili; Zhou, Gang; Hou, Yongzhao; Kuang, Gang; Jia, Zhengtai; Li, Ping; Fan, Yubo

    2015-09-01

    Proper extracellular substrate can stimulate neural regeneration in nerve tissue engineering, including magnetic nanoparticles (iron oxide nanoparticles, Fe3 O4 ), but they are always neurotoxic, with low saturation magnetization and so on. These nanomaterials cannot be used to stimulate the growth and elongation of axons. Therefore, this work attempts to overcome these deficiencies. Nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) coated magnetic nanoparticles were using an ultrasound-assisted co-precipitation method. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the structure and chemical composition of the produced samples. These synthesized nanomaterials were added into the primary cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons; our results showed that n-HA-coated magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3 O4 +n-HA) can effectively increase cell viability and promote axonal elongation, which enhanced saturation magnetization. In addition, we demonstrated that axonal guidance cues Netrin-1 increase significantly after n-HA-coated magnetic nanoparticles treatment by Western blots assay. n-HA-coated magnetic particles maybe applied to enhance or accelerate nerve regeneration, and it may provide guidance for regenerating axons in future. PMID:25690555

  19. Exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor relieves pain symptoms of diabetic rats by reducing excitability of dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Yu, Ting; Yu, Liling; Li, Haijun; Liu, Yongjuan; Wang, Dongqin

    2016-08-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common complication of diabetes lacking of effective treatments. Enhanced excitability of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron plays a crucial role in the progression of diabetic neuropathic hyperalgesia. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is known as a neuromodulator of nociception, but whether and how BDNF modulates the excitability of DRG neurons in the development of DPN remain to be clarified. This study investigated the role of exogenous BDNF and its high-affinity tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetic neuropathic pain. The results showed that continued intrathecal administration of BDNF to diabetic rats dramatically alleviated mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, as well as inhibited hyperexcitability of DRG neurons. These effects were blocked by pretreatment with TrkB Fc (a synthetic fusion protein consisting of the extracellular ligand-binding domain of the TrkB receptor). The expression of BDNF and TrkB was upregulated in the DRG of diabetic rats. Intrathecal administration of BDNF did not affect this upregulation. These data provide novel information that exogenous BDNF relieved pain symptoms of diabetic rats by reducing hyperexcitability of DRG neurons and might be the potential treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. PMID:26441011

  20. Tentonin 3/TMEM150c Confers Distinct Mechanosensitive Currents in Dorsal-Root Ganglion Neurons with Proprioceptive Function.

    PubMed

    Hong, Gyu-Sang; Lee, Byeongjun; Wee, Jungwon; Chun, Hyeyeon; Kim, Hyungsup; Jung, Jooyoung; Cha, Joo Young; Riew, Tae-Ryong; Kim, Gyu Hyun; Kim, In-Beom; Oh, Uhtaek

    2016-07-01

    Touch sensation or proprioception requires the transduction of mechanical stimuli into electrical signals by mechanoreceptors in the periphery. These mechanoreceptors are equipped with various transducer channels. Although Piezo1 and 2 are mechanically activated (MA) channels with rapid inactivation, MA molecules with other inactivation kinetics have not been identified. Here we report that heterologously expressed Tentonin3 (TTN3)/TMEM150C is activated by mechanical stimuli with distinctly slow inactivation kinetics. Genetic ablation of Ttn3/Tmem150c markedly reduced slowly adapting neurons in dorsal-root ganglion neurons. The MA TTN3 currents were inhibited by known blockers of mechanosensitive ion channels. Moreover, TTN3 was localized in muscle spindle afferents. Ttn3-deficient mice exhibited the loss of coordinated movements and abnormal gait. Thus, TTN3 appears to be a component of a mechanosensitive channel with a slow inactivation rate and contributes to motor coordination. Identification of this gene advances our understanding of the various types of mechanosensations, including proprioception. PMID:27321926

  1. Evaluation of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/carbon nanotube neural electrode coatings for stimulation in the dorsal root ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Kolarcik, Christi L.; Catt, Kasey; Rost, Erika; Albrecht, Ingrid N.; Bourbeau, Dennis; Du, Zhanhong; Kozai, Takashi D.Y.; Luo, Xiliang; Weber, Douglas J.; Cui, X. Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Objective The dorsal root ganglion (DRG) is an attractive target for implanting neural electrode arrays that restore sensory function or provide therapy via stimulation. However, penetrating microelectrodes designed for these applications are small and deliver low currents. For long-term performance of microstimulation devices, novel coating materials are needed in part to decrease impedance values at the electrode-tissue interface and to increase charge storage capacity. Approach Conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were coated on the electrode surface and doped with the anti-inflammatory drug, dexamethasone. Electrode characteristics and the tissue reaction around neural electrodes as the result of stimulation, coating and drug release were characterized. Hematoxylin and eosin staining along with antibodies recognizing Iba1 (microglia/macrophages), NF200 (neuronal axons), NeuN (neurons), vimentin (fibroblasts), caspase-3 (cell death) and L1 (neural cell adhesion molecule) were used. Quantitative image analyses were performed using MATLAB. Main Results Our results indicate that coated microelectrodes have lower in vitro and in vivo impedance values. Significantly less neuronal death/damage was observed with coated electrodes as compared to non-coated controls. The inflammatory response with the PEDOT/CNT-coated electrodes was also reduced. Significance This study is the first to report on the utility of these coatings in stimulation applications. Our results indicate PEDOT/CNT coatings may be valuable additions to implantable electrodes used as therapeutic modalities. PMID:25485675

  2. Chronic Compression of the Dorsal Root Ganglion Enhances Mechanically Evoked Pain Behavior and the Activity of Cutaneous Nociceptors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Hurwitz, Olivia; Shimada, Steven G.; Qu, Lintao; Fu, Kai; Zhang, Pu; Ma, Chao; LaMotte, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Radicular pain in humans is usually caused by intraforaminal stenosis and other diseases affecting the spinal nerve, root, or dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Previous studies discovered that a chronic compression of the DRG (CCD) induced mechanical allodynia in rats and mice, with enhanced excitability of DRG neurons. We investigated whether CCD altered the pain-like behavior and also the responses of cutaneous nociceptors with unmyelinated axons (C-fibers) to a normally aversive punctate mechanical stimulus delivered to the hairy skin of the hind limb of the mouse. The incidence of a foot shaking evoked by indentation of the dorsum of foot with an aversive von Frey filament (tip diameter 200 μm, bending force 20 mN) was significantly higher in the foot ipsilateral to the CCD surgery as compared to the contralateral side on post-operative days 2 to 8. Mechanically-evoked action potentials were electrophysiologically recorded from the L3 DRG, in vivo, from cell bodies visually identified as expressing a transgenically labeled fluorescent marker (neurons expressing either the receptor MrgprA3 or MrgprD). After CCD, 26.7% of MrgprA3+ and 32.1% MrgprD+ neurons exhibited spontaneous activity (SA), while none of the unoperated control neurons had SA. MrgprA3+ and MrgprD+ neurons in the compressed DRG exhibited, in comparison with neurons from unoperated control mice, an increased response to the punctate mechanical stimuli for each force applied (6, 20, 40, and 80 mN). We conclude that CCD produced both a behavioral hyperalgesia and an enhanced response of cutaneous C-nociceptors to aversive punctate mechanical stimuli. PMID:26356638

  3. A comparison of peripheral and central axotomy effects on neurofilament and tubulin gene expression in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J.; Oblinger, M.M. )

    1990-07-01

    The expression of major cytoskeletal protein mRNAs was studied in adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons after crushing either their central or peripheral branch axons. mRNA levels in DRG neurons were examined by quantitative in situ hybridization with radiolabeled cDNA probes specific for the low-molecular-weight neurofilament protein (NF-L) and beta-tubulin. The large-sized (greater than 1000 microns 2) neurons which give rise to myelinated axons in lumbar ganglia (L4 and L5) were studied 1 d through 8 weeks after either dorsal root or sciatic nerve crush. NF-L and beta-tubulin mRNA levels in axotomized DRG neurons were compared to those in contralateral control DRG neurons, as well as to those in normal (completely untreated) DRG cells. In the case of NF-L mRNA, changes were observed after central as well as peripheral branch axotomy and the time course and magnitude of changes were similar after both types of axotomy. NF-L mRNA levels initially decreased (first 2 weeks after crush) and then began to return towards control levels at longer survival times. Similar, but less pronounced, changes in NF-L mRNA levels also occurred in contralateral DRG neurons (which were uninjured); the changes in contralateral neurons were not simply a result of surgical stress since no changes in NF-L mRNA levels were observed in sham-operated DRG neurons. In the case of tubulin mRNA, changes were observed after central as well as peripheral branch axotomy by in situ hybridization, but the time course and magnitude of changes were different after each type of axotomy.

  4. Dorsal root ganglion transcriptome analysis following peripheral nerve injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shaogen; Marie Lutz, Brianna; Miao, Xuerong; Liang, Lingli; Mo, Kai; Chang, Yun-Juan; Du, Peicheng; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Tian, Bin; Kaufman, Andrew G.; Bekker, Alex; Hu, Yali

    2016-01-01

    Background Peripheral nerve injury leads to changes in gene expression in primary sensory neurons of the injured dorsal root ganglia. These changes are believed to be involved in neuropathic pain genesis. Previously, these changes have been identified using gene microarrays or next generation RNA sequencing with poly-A tail selection, but these approaches cannot provide a more thorough analysis of gene expression alterations after nerve injury. Methods The present study chose to eliminate mRNA poly-A tail selection and perform strand-specific next generation RNA sequencing to analyze whole transcriptomes in the injured dorsal root ganglia following spinal nerve ligation. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay was carried out to verify the changes of some differentially expressed RNAs in the injured dorsal root ganglia after spinal nerve ligation. Results Our results showed that more than 50 million (M) paired mapped sequences with strand information were yielded in each group (51.87 M–56.12 M in sham vs. 51.08 M–57.99 M in spinal nerve ligation). Six days after spinal nerve ligation, expression levels of 11,163 out of a total of 27,463 identified genes in the injured dorsal root ganglia significantly changed, of which 52.14% were upregulated and 47.86% downregulated. The largest transcriptional changes were observed in protein-coding genes (91.5%) followed by noncoding RNAs. Within 944 differentially expressed noncoding RNAs, the most significant changes were seen in long interspersed noncoding RNAs followed by antisense RNAs, processed transcripts, and pseudogenes. We observed a notable proportion of reads aligning to intronic regions in both groups (44.0% in sham vs. 49.6% in spinal nerve ligation). Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, we confirmed consistent differential expression of selected genes including Kcna2, Oprm1 as well as lncRNAs Gm21781 and 4732491K20Rik following spinal nerve

  5. Direct injection into the dorsal root ganglion: Technical, behavioral, and histological observations

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Gregory; Kostic, Sandra; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Park, Frank; Sapunar, Damir; Yu, Hongwei; Hogan, Quinn

    2013-01-01

    Direct injection of agents into the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) offers the opportunity to manipulate sensory neuron function at a segmental level to explore pathophysiology of painful conditions. However, there is no described method that has been validated in detail for such injections in adult rats. We have found that 2 (µl of dye injected through a pulled glass pipette directly into the distal DRG, exposed by a minimal foraminotomy, produces complete filling of the DRG with limited extension into the spinal roots. Injection into the spinal nerve required 3 µl to achieve comparable DRG filling, produced preferential spread into the ventral root, and was accompanied by substantial leakage of injected solution from the injection site. Injections into the sciatic nerve of volumes up to 10 (µl did not reach the DRG. Transient hypersensitivity to mechanical stimulation at threshold (von Frey) and noxious levels (pin) developed after 2 µl saline injection directly into the DRG that was in part attributable to the surgical exposure procedure alone. Only minimal astrocyte activation in the spinal dorsal horn was evident after DRG saline injections. Injection of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector conveying green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene resulted in expression as soon as 1 day after injection into the DRG, including fibers in the spinal dorsal horn and columns. AAV injection into the DRG produced additional thermal hypersensitivity and withdrawal from the stroke of a brush and compromised motor performance. These findings demonstrate a method for selective injection of agents into single DRGs for anatomically restricted actions. PMID:21540055

  6. In Vitro Modeling of Cancerous Neural Invasion: The Dorsal Root Ganglion Model.

    PubMed

    Na'ara, Shorook; Gil, Ziv; Amit, Moran

    2016-01-01

    One way that solid tumors disseminate is through neural invasion. This route is well-known in cancers of the head and neck, prostate, and pancreas. These neurotropic cancer cells have a unique ability to migrate unidirectionally along nerves towards the central nervous system (CNS). The dorsal root ganglia (DRG)/cancer cell model is a three dimensional (3D) in vitro model frequently used for studying the interaction between neural stroma and cancer cells. In this model, mouse or human cancer cell lines are grown in ECM adjacent to preparations of freshly dissociated cultured DRG. In this article, the DRG isolation protocol from mice, and implantation in petri dishes for co-culturing with pancreatic cancer cells are demonstrated. Five days after implantation, the cancer cells made contact with the DRG neurites. Later, these cells formed bridgeheads to facilitate more extensive polarized, neurotropic migration of cancer cells. PMID:27167037

  7. Effect of low level laser therapy on chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Jen; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Wang, Chau-Zen; Ho, Mei-Ling; Kuo, Po-Lin; Huang, Mao-Hsiung; Chen, Chia-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) are vulnerable to physical injury of the intervertebral foramen, and chronic compression of the DRG (CCD) an result in nerve root damage with persistent morbidity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of low level laser therapy (LLLT) on the DRG in a CCD model and to determine the mechanisms underlying these effects. CCD rats had L-shaped stainless-steel rods inserted into the fourth and fifth lumbar intervertebral foramen, and the rats were then subjected to 0 or 8 J/cm2 LLLT for 8 consecutive days following CCD surgery. Pain and heat stimuli were applied to test for hyperalgesia following CCD. The levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression were measured via real-time PCR, and protein expression levels were analyzed through immunohistochemical analyses. Our data indicate that LLLT significantly decreased the tolerable sensitivity to pain and heat stimuli in the CCD groups. The expression levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β were increased following CCD, and we found that these increases could be reduced by the application of LLLT. Furthermore, the expression of GAP-43 was enhanced by LLLT. In conclusion, LLLT was able to enhance neural regeneration in rats following CCD and improve rat ambulatory behavior. The therapeutic effects of LLLT on the DRG during CCD may be exerted through suppression of the inflammatory response and induction of neuronal repair genes. These results suggest potential clinical applications for LLLT in the treatment of compression-induced neuronal disorders. PMID:24594641

  8. Ganglion Cyst of the Wrist and Hand

    MedlinePlus

    ... frequently fails to eliminate the ganglion because the “root” or connection to the joint or tendon sheath ... a weed which will grow back if the root is not removed. In many cases, the ganglion ...

  9. Roles of syndecan-4 and relative kinases in dorsal root ganglion neuron adhesion and mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Jou; Lu, Kung-Wen; Chen, Wei-Hsin; Cheng, Chao-Min; Lin, Yi-Wen

    2015-04-10

    Mechanical stimuli elicit a biological response and initiate complex physiological processes, including neural feedback schemes associated with senses such as pain, vibration, touch, and hearing. The syndecans (SDCs), a group of adhesion receptors, can modulate adhesion and organize the extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, we cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) on controlled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates coated with poly-l-lysine (poly) or fibronectin (FN) to investigate cell adhesion and mechanotransduction mechanisms by mechanical stretching on PDMS using DRG neurons. Our results demonstrated that neuronal density, neurite length, and neurite branching were lower in the PDMS group and could be further reversed through activating SDC-4 by FN. The expression of the SDC-4 pathway decreased but with increased pPKCα in the PDMS-poly group. After mechanical stretching, pPKCα-FAKpTyr397-pERK1/2 expression was increased in both poly- and FN-coated PDMS. These results indicate that SDC4-pPKCα-FAKpTyr397-pERK1/2 may play a crucial role in DRG adhesion and mechanotransduction. PMID:25757361

  10. Riboflavin Arrests Cisplatin-Induced Neurotoxicity by Ameliorating Cellular Damage in Dorsal Root Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Maria; Naseem, Imrana; Khan, Aijaz A.; Alhazza, Ibrahim M.

    2015-01-01

    Cis-Diamminedichloroplatinum II- (CP-) induced neurotoxicity is one of the least explored aspects of this drug. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells are considered as the primary target, and their damage plays a vital role in pathogenesis and etiology of CP-induced neurotoxicity. The present study is aimed at confirming if riboflavin (RF) has any protective role in shielding the DRG from CP-induced toxicity. After conducting the established treatment strategy on mice under photoillumination, it was observed that, despite the fact that RF alone is partially toxic, its combination with CP significantly ameliorated the drug-induced damage in DRG cells as evidenced by histological analysis. In addition, it was interesting to observe that the combination group (RF + CP) was able to induce apoptosis in the target cells up to a significant extent which is considered as the most preferred way of countering cancer cells. Therefore, RF can act as an effective adjuvant compound in CP-based chemoradiotherapy to improve clinical outcomes in the contemporary anticancer treatment regimes. PMID:26759811

  11. Cells of origin in the embryonic nerve roots for NF1-associated plexiform neurofibroma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiguo; Liu, Chiachi; Patel, Amish J; Liao, Chung-Ping; Wang, Yong; Le, Lu Q

    2014-11-10

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a tumor-predisposing genetic disorder. Plexiform neurofibromas are common NF1 tumors carrying a risk of malignant transformation, which is typically fatal. Little is known about mechanisms mediating initiation and identity of specific cell type that gives rise to neurofibromas. Using cell-lineage tracing, we identify a population of GAP43(+) PLP(+) precursors in embryonic nerve roots as the cells of origin for these tumors and report a non-germline neurofibroma model for preclinical drug screening to identify effective therapies. The identity of the tumor cell of origin and facility for isolation and expansion provides fertile ground for continued analysis to define factors critical for neurofibromagenesis. It also provides unique approaches to develop therapies to prevent neurofibroma formation in NF1 patients. PMID:25446898

  12. Neuregulin-1β Regulates the migration of Different Neurochemical Phenotypic Neurons from Organotypically Cultured Dorsal Root Ganglion Explants.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunfeng; Liu, Guixiang; Li, Hao; Bi, Yanwen

    2016-01-01

    Neuregulin-1β (NRG-1β) has multiple roles in the development and function in the nervous system and exhibits potent neuroprotective properties. In the present study, organotypically cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) explants were used to evaluate the effects of NRG-1β on migration of two major phenotypic classes of DRG neurons. The signaling pathways involved in these effects were also determined. Organotypically cultured DRG explants were exposed to NRG-1β (20 nmol/L), the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 (10 μmol/L) plus NRG-1β (20 nmol/L), the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2) inhibitor PD98059 (10 μmol/L) plus NRG-1β (20 nmol/L), and LY294002 (10 μmol/L) plus PD98059 (10 μmol/L) plus NRG-1β (20 nmol/L), respectively, for 3 days. The DRG explants were continuously exposed to culture media as a control. After that, all above cultures were processed for detecting the mRNA levels of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and neurofilament-200 (NF-200) by real-time PCR analysis. CGRP and NF-200 expression in situ was determined by fluorescent labeling technique. The results showed that NRG-1β elevated the mRNA and protein levels of CGRP and NF-200. NRG-1β also increased the number and the percentage of CGRP-immunoreactive (IR) migrating neurons and NF-200-IR migrating neurons. Inhibitors (LY294002, PD98059) either alone or in combination blocked the effects of NRG-1β. The contribution of NRG-1β on modulating distinct neurochemical phenotypic plasticity of DRG neurons suggested that NRG-1β signaling system might play an important role on the biological effects of primary sensory neurons. PMID:26093851

  13. Oxaliplatin-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy via TRPA1 Stimulation in Mice Dorsal Root Ganglion Is Correlated with Aluminum Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Hee; Chae, Jisook; Roh, Kangsan; Kil, Eui-Joon; Lee, Minji; Auh, Chung-Kyun; Lee, Myung-Ah; Yeom, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Sukchan

    2015-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a platinum-based anticancer drug used to treat metastatic colorectal, breast, and lung cancers. While oxaliplatin kills cancer cells effectively, it exhibits several side effects of varying severity. Neuropathic pain is commonly experienced during treatment with oxaliplatin. Patients describe symptoms of paresthesias or dysesthesias that are triggered by cold (acute neuropathy), or as abnormal sensory or motor function (chronic neuropathy). In particular, we found that aluminum levels were relatively high in some cancer patients suffering from neuropathic pain based on clinical observations. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that aluminum accumulation in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the course of oxaliplatin treatment exacerbates neuropathic pain. In mice injected with oxaliplatin (three cycles of 3 mg/kg i.p. daily for 5 days, followed by 5 days of rest), we detected cold allodynia using the acetone test, but not heat hyperalgesia using a hot plate. However, co-treatment with aluminum chloride (AlCl3∙6H2O; 7 mg/kg i.p. for 14 days: equivalent 0.78 mg/kg of elemental Al) and oxaliplatin (1 cycle of 3 mg/kg i.p. daily for 5 days, followed by 5 days of rest) synergistically induced cold allodynia as well as increased TRPAl mRNA and protein expression. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis showed a significant increase in aluminum concentrations in the DRG of mice treated with aluminum chloride and oxaliplatin compared to aluminum chloride alone. Similarly, in a mouse induced-tumor model, aluminum concentrations were increased in DRG tissue and tumor cells after oxaliplatin treatment. Taken together, these findings suggest that aluminum accumulation in the DRG may exacerbate neuropathic pain in oxaliplatin-treated mice. PMID:25928068

  14. Quantitative Analysis of Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Cultured on Microelectrode Arrays Based on Fluorescence Microscopy Image Processing.

    PubMed

    Mari, João Fernando; Saito, José Hiroki; Neves, Amanda Ferreira; Lotufo, Celina Monteiro da Cruz; Destro-Filho, João-Batista; Nicoletti, Maria do Carmo

    2015-12-01

    Microelectrode Arrays (MEA) are devices for long term electrophysiological recording of extracellular spontaneous or evocated activities on in vitro neuron culture. This work proposes and develops a framework for quantitative and morphological analysis of neuron cultures on MEAs, by processing their corresponding images, acquired by fluorescence microscopy. The neurons are segmented from the fluorescence channel images using a combination of segmentation by thresholding, watershed transform, and object classification. The positioning of microelectrodes is obtained from the transmitted light channel images using the circular Hough transform. The proposed method was applied to images of dissociated culture of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuronal cells. The morphological and topological quantitative analysis carried out produced information regarding the state of culture, such as population count, neuron-to-neuron and neuron-to-microelectrode distances, soma morphologies, neuron sizes, neuron and microelectrode spatial distributions. Most of the analysis of microscopy images taken from neuronal cultures on MEA only consider simple qualitative analysis. Also, the proposed framework aims to standardize the image processing and to compute quantitative useful measures for integrated image-signal studies and further computational simulations. As results show, the implemented microelectrode identification method is robust and so are the implemented neuron segmentation and classification one (with a correct segmentation rate up to 84%). The quantitative information retrieved by the method is highly relevant to assist the integrated signal-image study of recorded electrophysiological signals as well as the physical aspects of the neuron culture on MEA. Although the experiments deal with DRG cell images, cortical and hippocampal cell images could also be processed with small adjustments in the image processing parameter estimation. PMID:26510475

  15. An in vitro assay system for studying synapse formation between nociceptive dorsal root ganglion and dorsal horn neurons

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Donald J.; Choudhury, Papiya; MacDermott, Amy B.

    2010-01-01

    Synapses between nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and spinal cord dorsal horn neurons represent the first loci for transmission of painful stimuli. Our knowledge of the molecular organization and development of these synapses is sparse due, partly, to a lack of a reliable model system that reconstitutes synaptogenesis between these two neuronal populations. To address this issue, we have established an in vitro assay system consisting of separately purified DRG neurons and dorsal horn neurons on astrocyte micro-islands. Using immunocytochemistry, we have found that 97%, 93%, 98%, 96%, and 94% of DRG neurons on these microislands express markers often associated with nociceptive neurons including Substance P, TRPV1, calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP), TrKA, and peripherin, respectively. Triple labeling with these nociceptive-like markers, synaptic vesicle marker Vglut2 and using MAP2 as a dendritic marker revealed the presence of nociceptive-like markers at synaptic terminals. Using this immunocytochemical approach, we counted contact points as overlapping MAP2/Vglut2 puncta and showed that they increased with time in culture. Single and dual patch clamp recordings showed that overlapping Vglut2/MAP2 puncta observed after a few days in culture are likely to be functional synapses between DRG and dorsal horn neurons in our in vitro assay system. Taken together, these data suggest our co-culture microisland model system consists of mostly nociceptive-like DRG neurons that express presynaptic markers and form functional synapses with their dorsal horn partners. Thus, this model system may have direct application for studies on factors regulating development of nociceptive DRG/dorsal horn synapses. PMID:20385165

  16. Oxaliplatin-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy via TRPA1 Stimulation in Mice Dorsal Root Ganglion Is Correlated with Aluminum Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Kangsan; Kil, Eui-Joon; Lee, Minji; Auh, Chung-Kyun; Lee, Myung-Ah; Yeom, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Sukchan

    2015-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a platinum-based anticancer drug used to treat metastatic colorectal, breast, and lung cancers. While oxaliplatin kills cancer cells effectively, it exhibits several side effects of varying severity. Neuropathic pain is commonly experienced during treatment with oxaliplatin. Patients describe symptoms of paresthesias or dysesthesias that are triggered by cold (acute neuropathy), or as abnormal sensory or motor function (chronic neuropathy). In particular, we found that aluminum levels were relatively high in some cancer patients suffering from neuropathic pain based on clinical observations. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that aluminum accumulation in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the course of oxaliplatin treatment exacerbates neuropathic pain. In mice injected with oxaliplatin (three cycles of 3 mg/kg i.p. daily for 5 days, followed by 5 days of rest), we detected cold allodynia using the acetone test, but not heat hyperalgesia using a hot plate. However, co-treatment with aluminum chloride (AlCl3∙6H2O; 7 mg/kg i.p. for 14 days: equivalent 0.78 mg/kg of elemental Al) and oxaliplatin (1 cycle of 3 mg/kg i.p. daily for 5 days, followed by 5 days of rest) synergistically induced cold allodynia as well as increased TRPAl mRNA and protein expression. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis showed a significant increase in aluminum concentrations in the DRG of mice treated with aluminum chloride and oxaliplatin compared to aluminum chloride alone. Similarly, in a mouse induced-tumor model, aluminum concentrations were increased in DRG tissue and tumor cells after oxaliplatin treatment. Taken together, these findings suggest that aluminum accumulation in the DRG may exacerbate neuropathic pain in oxaliplatin-treated mice. PMID:25928068

  17. G(o) transduces GABAB-receptor modulation of N-type calcium channels in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Menon-Johansson, A S; Berrow, N; Dolphin, A C

    1993-11-01

    High-voltage-activated (HVA) calcium channel currents (IBa) were recorded from acutely replated cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. IBa was irreversibly inhibited by 56.9 +/- 2.7% by 1 microM omega-conotoxin-GVIA (omega-CTx-GVIA), whereas the 1,4-dihydropyridine antagonist nicardipine was ineffective. The selective gamma-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) agonist, (-)-baclofen (50 microM), inhibited the HVA IBa by 30.7 +/- 5.4%. Prior application of omega-CTx-GVIA completely occluded inhibition of the HVA IBa by (-)-baclofen, indicating that in this preparation (-)-baclofen inhibits N-type current. To investigate which G protein subtype was involved, cells were replated in the presence of anti-G protein antisera. Under these conditions the antibodies were shown to enter the cells through transient pores created during the replating procedure. Replating DRGs in the presence of anti-G(o) antiserum, raised against the C-terminal decapeptide of the G alpha o subunit, reduced (-)-baclofen inhibition of the HVA IBa, whereas replating DRGs in the presence of the anti-Gi antiserum did not. Using anti-G alpha o antisera (1:2000) and confocal laser microscopy, G alpha o localisation was investigated in both unreplated and replated neurons. G alpha o immunoreactivity was observed at the plasma membrane, neurites, attachment plaques and perinuclear region, and was particularly pronounced at points of cell-to-cell contact. The plasma membrane G alpha o immunoreactivity was completely blocked by preincubation with the immunising G alpha o undecapeptide (1 microgram.ml-1) for 1 h at 37 degrees C. A similar treatment also blocked recognition of G alpha o in brain membranes on immunoblots.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8309795

  18. Venom from the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, induces a calcium-dependent current in cultured dorsal root ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    de Plater, G M; Milburn, P J; Martin, R L

    2001-03-01

    The platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus), a uniquely Australian species, is one of the few living venomous mammals. Although envenomation of humans by many vertebrate and invertebrate species results in pain, this is often not the principal symptom of envenomation. However, platypus envenomation results in an immediate excruciating pain that develops into a very long-lasting hyperalgesia. We have previously shown that the venom contains a C-type natriuretic peptide that causes mast cell degranulation, and this probably contributes to the development of the painful response. Now we demonstrate that platypus venom has a potent action on putative nociceptors. Application of the venom to small to medium diameter dorsal root ganglion cells for 10 s resulted in an inward current lasting several minutes when the venom was diluted in buffer at pH 6.1 but not at pH 7.4. The venom itself has a pH of 6.3. The venom activated a current with a linear current-voltage relationship between -100 and -25 mV and with a reversal potential of -11 mV. Ion substitution experiments indicate that the current is a nonspecific cationic current. The response to the venom was blocked by the membrane-permeant Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor, thapsigargin, and by the tyrosine- and serine-kinase inhibitor, k252a. Thus the response appears to be dependent on calcium release from intracellular stores. The identity of the venom component(s) that is responsible for the responses we have described is yet to be determined but is probably not the C-type natriuretic peptide or the defensin-like peptides that are present in the venom. PMID:11248005

  19. Kv4 Channels Underlie the Subthreshold-Operating A-type K+-current in Nociceptive Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Phuket, Thanawath Ratanadilok Na; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    The dorsal root ganglion (DRG) contains heterogeneous populations of sensory neurons including primary nociceptive neurons and C-fibers implicated in pain signaling. Recent studies have demonstrated DRG hyperexcitability associated with downregulation of A-type K+ channels; however, the molecular correlate of the corresponding A-type K+ current (IA) has remained hypothetical. Kv4 channels may underlie the IA in DRG neurons. We combined electrophysiology, molecular biology (Whole-Tissue and Single-Cell RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry to investigate the molecular basis of the IA in acutely dissociated DRG neurons from 7- to 8-day-old rats. Whole-cell recordings demonstrate a robust tetraethylammonium-resistant (20 mM) and 4-aminopyridine-sensitive (5 mM) IA. Matching Kv4 channel properties, activation and inactivation of this IA occur in the subthreshold range of membrane potentials and the rate of recovery from inactivation is rapid and voltage-dependent. Among Kv4 transcripts, the DRG expresses significant levels of Kv4.1 and Kv4.3 mRNAs. Also, single small-medium diameter DRG neurons (∼30 μm) exhibit correlated frequent expression of mRNAs encoding Kv4.1 and Nav1.8, a known nociceptor marker. In contrast, the expressions of Kv1.4 and Kv4.2 mRNAs at the whole-tissue and single-cell levels are relatively low and infrequent. Kv4 protein expression in nociceptive DRG neurons was confirmed by immunohistochemistry, which demonstrates colocalization of Kv4.3 and Nav1.8, and negligible expression of Kv4.2. Furthermore, specific dominant-negative suppression and overexpression strategies confirmed the contribution of Kv4 channels to IA in DRG neurons. Contrasting the expression patterns of Kv4 channels in the central and peripheral nervous systems, we discuss possible functional roles of these channels in primary sensory neurons. PMID:19668710

  20. The effects of quinolones and NSAIDs upon GABA-evoked currents recorded from rat dorsal root ganglion neurones.

    PubMed

    Halliwell, R F; Davey, P G; Lambert, J J

    1991-02-01

    Recent animal studies have demonstrated a proconvulsant effect of certain quinolone and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug combinations. Radioligand binding experiments have indicated that these actions may be mediated by antagonism of the GABAA receptor. The present study has further investigated this hypothesis in a functional assay by examining the effects of the quinolones ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin alone and in combination with either fenbufen or biphenyl acetic acid (BPAA) upon GABA-evoked currents recorded from voltage-clamped rat dorsal root ganglion neurones (DRG) maintained in cell culture. GABA-evoked whole cell currents were weakly but dose-dependently (30 microM-1 mM) reduced in the presence of ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin. The IC50 for ciprofloxacin was 100 microM but greater than 1 mM for ofloxacin. Application of either fenbufen (100 microM) or BPAA (100 microM) alone produced little effect on the GABA-evoked currents. However, the inhibitory action of ciprofloxacin was enhanced in the presence of 100 microM fenbufen by approximately five-fold whereas the antagonism of GABA responses by ofloxacin was unaffected. In contrast, BPAA (100 microM) had a dramatic effect on the inhibitory actions of both antibiotics such that the IC50 for ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin was reduced to 0.03 and 0.3 microM respectively. The present results support earlier binding studies and extend them by demonstrating electrophysiologically a potent quinolone/NSAID drug interaction at the GABAA receptor. The mechanism(s) of this novel interaction remains to be determined. These results are commensurate with clinical observations of an increased risk of fits in patients prescribed certain quinolones together with certain NSAIDs. PMID:1647389

  1. Enhanced Expression of TREK-1 Is Related with Chronic Constriction Injury of Neuropathic Pain Mouse Model in Dorsal Root Ganglion.

    PubMed

    Han, Hyo Jo; Lee, Seung Wook; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Kim, Eun-Jin; Kwon, Byeonghun; Kang, Dawon; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Seo, Kwang-Suk

    2016-05-01

    Neuropathic pain is a complex state showing increased pain response with dysfunctional inhibitory neurotransmission. The TREK family, one of the two pore domain K⁺ (K2P) channel subgroups were focused among various mechanisms of neuropathic pain. These channels influence neuronal excitability and are thought to be related in mechano/thermosensation. However, only a little is known about the expression and role of TREK-1 and TREK-2, in neuropathic pain. It is performed to know whether TREK-1 and/ or 2 are positively related in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of a mouse neuropathic pain model, the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Following this purpose, Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analyses were performed using mouse DRG of CCI model and compared to the sham surgery group. Immunofluorescence staining of isolectin- B4 (IB4) and TREK were performed. Electrophysiological recordings of single channel currents were analyzed to obtain the information about the channel. Interactions with known TREK activators were tested to confirm the expression. While both TREK-1 and TREK-2 mRNA were significantly overexpressed in DRG of CCI mice, only TREK-1 showed significant increase (~9 fold) in western blot analysis. The TREK-1-like channel recorded in DRG neurons of the CCI mouse showed similar current-voltage relationship and conductance to TREK-1. It was easily activated by low pH solution (pH 6.3), negative pressure, and riluzole. Immunofluorescence images showed the expression of TREK-1 was stronger compared to TREK-2 on IB4 positive neurons. These results suggest that modulation of the TREK-1 channel may have beneficial analgesic effects in neuropathic pain patients. PMID:27133259

  2. Molecular and functional expression of cation-chloride cotransporters in dorsal root ganglion neurons during postnatal maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Shihong; Garzon-Muvdi, Tomás; Di Fulvio, Mauricio; Chen, Yanfang; Delpire, Eric; Alvarez, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    GABA depolarizes and excites central neurons during early development, becoming inhibitory and hyperpolarizing with maturation. This “developmental shift” occurs abruptly, reflecting a decrease in intracellular Cl− concentration ([Cl−]i) and a hyperpolarizing shift in Cl− equilibrium potential due to upregulation of the K+-Cl− cotransporter KCC2b, a neuron-specific Cl− extruder. In contrast, primary afferent neurons (PANs) are depolarized by GABA throughout adulthood because of expression of NKCC1, a Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter that accumulates Cl− above equilibrium. The GABAA-mediated depolarization of PANs determines presynaptic inhibition in the spinal cord, a key mechanism gating somatosensory information. Little is known about developmental changes in Cl− transporter expression and Cl− homeostasis in PANs. Whether NKCC1 is expressed in PANs of all phenotypes or is restricted to subpopulations (e.g., nociceptors) is debatable. Likewise, whether PANs express KCC2s is controversial. We investigated NKCC1 and K+-Cl− cotransporter expression in rat and mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons with molecular methods. Using fluorescence imaging microscopy, we measured [Cl−]i in acutely dissociated rat DRG neurons (P0–P21) loaded with N-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-6-methoxyquinolinium bromide and classified with phenotypic markers. DRG neurons of all sizes express two NKCC1 mRNAs, one full-length and a shorter splice variant lacking exon 21. Immunolabeling with validated antibodies revealed ubiquitous expression of NKCC1 in DRG neurons irrespective of postnatal age and phenotype. As maturation progresses [Cl−]i decreases gradually, persisting above equilibrium in >95% mature neurons. DRG neurons express mRNAs for KCC1, KCC3s, and KCC4, but not for KCC2s. Mechanisms underlying PANs' developmental changes in Cl− homeostasis are discussed and compared with those of central neurons. PMID:22457464

  3. Functional expression and axonal transport of α7 nAChRs by peptidergic nociceptors of rat dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed

    Shelukhina, Irina; Paddenberg, Renate; Kummer, Wolfgang; Tsetlin, Victor

    2015-07-01

    In recent pain studies on animal models, α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists demonstrated analgesic, anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, apparently acting through some peripheral receptors. Assuming possible involvement of α7 nAChRs on nociceptive sensory neurons, we investigated the morphological and neurochemical features of the α7 nAChR-expressing subpopulation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and their ability to transport α7 nAChR axonally. In addition, α7 receptor activity and its putative role in pain signal neurotransmitter release were studied. Medium-sized α7 nAChR-expressing neurons prevailed, although the range covered all cell sizes. These cells accounted for one-fifth of total medium and large DRG neurons and <5% of small ones. 83.2% of α7 nAChR-expressing DRG neurons were peptidergic nociceptors (CGRP-immunopositive), one half of which had non-myelinated C-fibers and the other half had myelinated Aδ- and likely Aα/β-fibers, whereas 15.2% were non-peptidergic C-fiber nociceptors binding isolectin B4. All non-peptidergic and a third of peptidergic α7 nAChR-bearing nociceptors expressed TRPV1, a capsaicin-sensitive noxious stimulus transducer. Nerve crush experiments demonstrated that CGRPergic DRG nociceptors axonally transported α7 nAChRs both to the spinal cord and periphery. α7 nAChRs in DRG neurons were functional as their specific agonist PNU282987 evoked calcium rise enhanced by α7-selective positive allosteric modulator PNU120596. However, α7 nAChRs do not modulate neurotransmitter CGRP and glutamate release from DRG neurons since nicotinic ligands affected neither their basal nor provoked levels, showing the necessity of further studies to elucidate the true role of α7 nAChRs in those neurons. PMID:24706047

  4. Shp-1 dephosphorylates TRPV1 in dorsal root ganglion neurons and alleviates CFA-induced inflammatory pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Tao; Xu, Ling-Chi; Yue, Lu-Peng; Liu, Feng-Yu; Cai, Jie; Liao, Fei-Fei; Kong, Jin-Ge; Xing, Guo-Gang; Yi, Ming; Wan, You

    2015-04-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors are expressed in nociceptive neurons of rat dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) and mediate inflammatory pain. Nonspecific inhibition of protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) increases the tyrosine phosphorylation of TRPV1 and sensitizes TRPV1. However, less is known about tyrosine phosphorylation's implication in inflammatory pain, compared with that of serine/threonine phosphorylation. Src homology 2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 1 (Shp-1) is a key phosphatase dephosphorylating TRPV1. In this study, we reported that Shp-1 colocalized with and bound to TRPV1 in nociceptive DRG neurons. Shp-1 inhibitors, including sodium stibogluconate and PTP inhibitor III, sensitized TRPV1 in cultured DRG neurons. In naive rats, intrathecal injection of Shp-1 inhibitors increased both TRPV1 and tyrosine-phosphorylated TRPV1 in DRGs and induced thermal hyperalgesia, which was abolished by pretreatment with TRPV1 antagonists capsazepine, BCTC, or AMG9810. Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain in rats significantly increased the expression of Shp-1, TRPV1, and tyrosine-phosphorylated TRPV1, as well as the colocalization of Shp-1 and TRPV1 in DRGs. Intrathecal injection of sodium stibogluconate aggravated CFA-induced inflammatory pain, whereas Shp-1 overexpression in DRG neurons alleviated it. These results suggested that Shp-1 dephosphorylated and inhibited TRPV1 in DRG neurons, contributing to maintain thermal nociceptive thresholds in normal rats, and as a compensatory mechanism, Shp-1 increased in DRGs of rats with CFA-induced inflammatory pain, which was involved in protecting against excessive thermal hyperalgesia. PMID:25790452

  5. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase-mediated Glycolytic Metabolic Shift in the Dorsal Root Ganglion Drives Painful Diabetic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Habibur; Jha, Mithilesh Kumar; Kim, Jong-Heon; Nam, Youngpyo; Lee, Maan Gee; Go, Younghoon; Harris, Robert A; Park, Dong Ho; Kook, Hyun; Lee, In-Kyu; Suk, Kyoungho

    2016-03-11

    The dorsal root ganglion (DRG) is a highly vulnerable site in diabetic neuropathy. Under diabetic conditions, the DRG is subjected to tissue ischemia or lower ambient oxygen tension that leads to aberrant metabolic functions. Metabolic dysfunctions have been documented to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of diverse pain hypersensitivities. However, the contribution of diabetes-induced metabolic dysfunctions in the DRG to the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy remains ill-explored. In this study, we report that pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDK2 and PDK4), key regulatory enzymes in glucose metabolism, mediate glycolytic metabolic shift in the DRG leading to painful diabetic neuropathy. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes substantially enhanced the expression and activity of the PDKs in the DRG, and the genetic ablation of Pdk2 and Pdk4 attenuated the hyperglycemia-induced pain hypersensitivity. Mechanistically, Pdk2/4 deficiency inhibited the diabetes-induced lactate surge, expression of pain-related ion channels, activation of satellite glial cells, and infiltration of macrophages in the DRG, in addition to reducing central sensitization and neuroinflammation hallmarks in the spinal cord, which probably accounts for the attenuated pain hypersensitivity. Pdk2/4-deficient mice were partly resistant to the diabetes-induced loss of peripheral nerve structure and function. Furthermore, in the experiments using DRG neuron cultures, lactic acid treatment enhanced the expression of the ion channels and compromised cell viability. Finally, the pharmacological inhibition of DRG PDKs or lactic acid production substantially attenuated diabetes-induced pain hypersensitivity. Taken together, PDK2/4 induction and the subsequent lactate surge induce the metabolic shift in the diabetic DRG, thereby contributing to the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy. PMID:26769971

  6. Enhanced Expression of TREK-1 Is Related with Chronic Constriction Injury of Neuropathic Pain Mouse Model in Dorsal Root Ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hyo Jo; Lee, Seung Wook; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Kim, Eun-Jin; Kwon, Byeonghun; Kang, Dawon; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Seo, Kwang-Suk

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a complex state showing increased pain response with dysfunctional inhibitory neurotransmission. The TREK family, one of the two pore domain K+ (K2P) channel subgroups were focused among various mechanisms of neuropathic pain. These channels influence neuronal excitability and are thought to be related in mechano/thermosensation. However, only a little is known about the expression and role of TREK-1 and TREK-2, in neuropathic pain. It is performed to know whether TREK-1 and/or 2 are positively related in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of a mouse neuropathic pain model, the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Following this purpose, Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analyses were performed using mouse DRG of CCI model and compared to the sham surgery group. Immunofluorescence staining of isolectin-B4 (IB4) and TREK were performed. Electrophysiological recordings of single channel currents were analyzed to obtain the information about the channel. Interactions with known TREK activators were tested to confirm the expression. While both TREK-1 and TREK-2 mRNA were significantly overexpressed in DRG of CCI mice, only TREK-1 showed significant increase (∼9 fold) in western blot analysis. The TREK-1-like channel recorded in DRG neurons of the CCI mouse showed similar current-voltage relationship and conductance to TREK-1. It was easily activated by low pH solution (pH 6.3), negative pressure, and riluzole. Immunofluorescence images showed the expression of TREK-1 was stronger compared to TREK-2 on IB4 positive neurons. These results suggest that modulation of the TREK-1 channel may have beneficial analgesic effects in neuropathic pain patients. PMID:27133259

  7. Role of oxidative stress in rabies virus infection of adult mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alan C; Kammouni, Wafa; Zherebitskaya, Elena; Fernyhough, Paul

    2010-05-01

    Rabies virus infection of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was studied in vitro with cultured adult mouse DRG neurons. Recent in vivo studies of transgenic mice that express the yellow fluorescent protein indicate that neuronal process degeneration, involving both dendrites and axons, occurs in mice infected with the challenge virus standard (CVS) strain of rabies virus by footpad inoculation. Because of the similarities of the morphological changes in experimental rabies and in diabetic neuropathy and other diseases, we hypothesize that neuronal process degeneration occurs as a result of oxidative stress. DRG neurons were cultured from adult ICR mice. Two days after plating, they were infected with CVS. Immunostaining was evaluated with CVS- and mock-infected cultures for neuron specific beta-tubulin, rabies virus antigen, and amino acid adducts of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) (marker of lipid peroxidation and hence oxidative stress). Neuronal viability (by trypan blue exclusion), terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) staining, and axonal growth were also assessed with the cultures. CVS infected 33 to 54% of cultured DRG neurons. Levels of neuronal viability and TUNEL staining were similar in CVS- and mock-infected DRG neurons. There were significantly more 4-HNE-labeled puncta at 2 and 3 days postinfection in CVS-infected cultures than in mock-infected cultures, and axonal outgrowth was reduced at these time points in CVS infection. Axonal swellings with 4-HNE-labeled puncta were also associated with aggregations of actively respiring mitochondria. We have found evidence that rabies virus infection in vitro causes axonal injury of DRG neurons through oxidative stress. Oxidative stress may be important in vivo in rabies and may explain previous observations of the degeneration of neuronal processes. PMID:20181692

  8. Membrane properties and electrogenesis in the distal axons of small dorsal root ganglion neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vasylyev, Dmytro V; Waxman, Stephen G

    2012-08-01

    Although it is generally thought that sensory transduction occurs at or close to peripheral nerve endings, with action potentials subsequently propagating along the axons of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons toward the central nervous system, the small diameter of nociceptive axons and their endings have made it difficult to estimate their membrane properties and electrogenic characteristics. Even the resting potentials of nociceptive axons are unknown. In this study, we developed the capability to record directly with patch-clamp electrodes from the small-diameter distal axons of DRG neurons in vitro. We showed using current-clamp recordings that 1) these sensory axons have a resting potential of -60.2 ± 1 mV; 2) both tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive (TTX-S) and TTX-resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) channels are present and available for activation at resting potential, at densities that can support action potential electrogenesis in these axons; 3) TTX-sensitive channels contribute to the amplification of small depolarizations that are subthreshold with respect to the action potential in these axons; 4) TTX-R channels can support the production of action potentials in these axons; and 5) these TTX-R channels can produce repetitive firing, even at depolarized membrane potentials where TTX-S channels are inactivated. Finally, using voltage-clamp recordings with an action potential as the command, we confirmed the presence of both TTX-S and TTX-R channels, which are activated sequentially during action potential in these axons. These results provide direct evidence for the presence of TTX-S and TTX-R Na(+) channels that are functionally available at resting potential and contribute to electrogenesis in small-diameter afferent axons. PMID:22572942

  9. Modulators of Calcium Influx Regulate Membrane Excitability in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lirk, Philipp; Poroli, Mark; Rigaud, Marcel; Fuchs, Andreas; Fillip, Patrick; Huang, Chun-Yuan; Ljubkovic, Marko; Sapunar, Damir; Hogan, Quinn

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic neuropathic pain resulting from neuronal damage remains difficult to treat, in part due to incomplete understanding of underlying cellular mechanisms. We have previously shown that inward Ca2+ flux (ICa) across the sensory neuron plasmalemma is decreased in a rodent model of chronic neuropathic pain, but the direct consequence of this loss of ICa on function of the sensory neuron has not been defined. We therefore examined the extent to which altered membrane properties after nerve injury, especially increased excitability that may contribute to chronic pain, are attributable to diminished Ca2+ entry. Methods Intracellular microelectrode measurements were obtained from A-type neurons of dorsal root ganglia excised from control rats and those with neuropathic pain behavior following spinal nerve ligation. Recording conditions were varied to suppress or promote ICa while biophysical parameters and excitability were determined. Results Both lowered external bath Ca2+ concentration and blockade of ICa with bath cadmium diminished the duration and area of the afterhyperpolarization (AHP), accompanied by decreased current threshold for action potential (AP) initiation and increased repetitive firing during sustained depolarization. Reciprocally, elevated bath Ca2+ increased the AHP and suppressed repetitive firing. Voltage sag during neuronal hyperpolarization, indicative of the cation-nonselective H-current, diminished with lowered bath Ca2+, cadmium application, or chelation of intracellular Ca2+. Additional recordings with selective blockers of ICa subtypes showed that N-, P/Q, L-, and R-type currents each contribute to generation of the AHP, and that blockade of any of these as well as the T-type current slows the AP upstroke, prolongs the AP duration, and (except for L-type current) decreases the current threshold for AP initiation. Conclusions Taken together, our findings show that suppression of ICa decreases the AHP, reduces the

  10. NSAIDs modulate GABA-activated currents via Ca2+-activated Cl− channels in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, LEI; LI, LI; MA, KE-TAO; WANG, YANG; LI, JING; SHI, WEN-YAN; ZHU, HE; ZHANG, ZHONG-SHUANG; SI, JUN-QIANG

    2016-01-01

    The ability of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to modulate γ-aminobutyrate (GABA)-activated currents via Ca2+-activated Cl− channels in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG), was examined in the present study. During the preparation of DRG neurons harvested from Sprague-Dawley rats, the whole-cell recording technique was used to record the effect of NSAIDs on GABA-activated inward currents, and the expression levels of the TMEM16A and TMEM16B subunits were revealed. In the event that DRG neurons were pre-incubated for 20 sec with niflumic acid (NFA) and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) prior to the administration of GABA, the GABA-induced inward currents were diminished markedly in the majority of neurons examined (96.3%). The inward currents induced by 100 µmol/l GABA were attenuated by (0±0.09%; neurons = 4), (5.32±3.51%; neurons = 6), (21.3±4.00%; neurons = 5), (33.8±5.20%; neurons = 17), (52.2±5.10%; neurons = 4) and (61.1±4.12%; neurons = 12) by 0.1, 1, 3, 10, 30 and 100 µmol/l NFA, respectively. The inward currents induced by 100 µmol/l GABA were attenuated by (13.8±6%; neurons = 6), (23.2±14.7%; neurons = 6) and (29.7±9.1%; neurons = 9) by 3, 10 and 30 µmol/l NPPB, respectively. NFA and NPPB dose-dependently inhibited GABA-activated currents with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 6.7 and 11 µmol/l, respectively. The inhibitory effect of 100 µmol/l NFA on the GABA-evoked inward current were also strongly inhibited by nitrendipine (NTDP; an L-type calcium channel blocker), 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid tetrakis (a highly selective calcium chelating reagent), caffeine (a widely available Ca2+ consuming drug) and calcium-free extracellular fluid, in a concentration-dependent manner. Immunofluorescent staining indicated that TMEM16A and TMEM16B expression was widely distributed in DRG neurons. The results suggest that NSAIDs may be able to regulate Ca2

  11. Dorsal root ganglion neurons innervating skeletal muscle respond to physiological combinations of protons, ATP, and lactate mediated by ASIC, P2X, and TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Light, Alan R; Hughen, Ronald W; Zhang, Jie; Rainier, Jon; Liu, Zhuqing; Lee, Jeewoo

    2008-09-01

    The adequate stimuli and molecular receptors for muscle metaboreceptors and nociceptors are still under investigation. We used calcium imaging of cultured primary sensory dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from C57Bl/6 mice to determine candidates for metabolites that could be the adequate stimuli and receptors that could detect these stimuli. Retrograde DiI labeling determined that some of these neurons innervated skeletal muscle. We found that combinations of protons, ATP, and lactate were much more effective than individually applied compounds for activating rapid calcium increases in muscle-innervating dorsal root ganglion neurons. Antagonists for P2X, ASIC, and TRPV1 receptors suggested that these three receptors act together to detect protons, ATP, and lactate when presented together in physiologically relevant concentrations. Two populations of muscle-innervating DRG neurons were found. One responded to low metabolite levels (likely nonnoxious) and used ASIC3, P2X5, and TRPV1 as molecular receptors to detect these metabolites. The other responded to high levels of metabolites (likely noxious) and used ASIC3, P2X4, and TRPV1 as their molecular receptors. We conclude that a combination of ASIC, P2X5 and/or P2X4, and TRPV1 are the molecular receptors used to detect metabolites by muscle-innervating sensory neurons. We further conclude that the adequate stimuli for muscle metaboreceptors and nociceptors are combinations of protons, ATP, and lactate. PMID:18509077

  12. Effect of TRPV4-p38 MAPK Pathway on Neuropathic Pain in Rats with Chronic Compression of the Dorsal Root Ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yu-Juan; Zhang, Xiao; Fan, Zhen-Zhen; Huai, Juan; Teng, Yong-Bo; Zhang, Yang; Yue, Shou-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships among TRPV4, p38, and neuropathic pain in a rat model of chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion. Mechanical allodynia appeared after CCD surgery, enhanced via the intrathecal injection of 4α-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (4α-PDD, an agonist of TRPV4) and anisomycin (an agonist of p38), but was suppressed by Ruthenium Red (RR, an inhibitor of TRPV4) and SB203580 (an inhibitor of p38). The protein expressions of p38 and P-p38 were upregulated by 4α-PDD and anisomycin injection but reduced by RR and SB203580. Moreover, TRPV4 was upregulated by 4α-PDD and SB203580 and downregulated by RR and anisomycin. In DRG tissues, the numbers of TRPV4- or p38-positive small neurons were significantly changed in CCD rats, increased by the agonists, and decreased by the inhibitors. The amplitudes of ectopic discharges were increased by 4α-PDD and anisomycin but decreased by RR and SB203580. Collectively, these results support the link between TRPV4 and p38 and their intermediary role for neuropathic pain in rats with chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion. PMID:27366753

  13. Neurite growth acceleration of adult Dorsal Root Ganglion neurons illuminated by low-level Light Emitting Diode light at 645 nm.

    PubMed

    Burland, Marion; Paris, Lambert; Quintana, Patrice; Bec, Jean-Michel; Diouloufet, Lucie; Sar, Chamroeun; Boukhaddaoui, Hassan; Charlot, Benoit; Braga Silva, Jefferson; Chammas, Michel; Sieso, Victor; Valmier, Jean; Bardin, Fabrice

    2015-06-01

    The effect of a 645 nm Light Emitting Diode (LED) light irradiation on the neurite growth velocity of adult Dorsal Root Ganglion (DRG) neurons with peripheral axon injury 4-10 days before plating and without previous injury was investigated. The real amount of light reaching the neurons was calculated by taking into account the optical characteristics of the light source and of media in the light path. The knowledge of these parameters is essential to be able to compare results of the literature and a way to reduce inconsistencies. We found that 4 min irradiation of a mean irradiance of 11.3 mW/cm(2) (corresponding to an actual irradiance reaching the neurons of 83 mW/cm(2)) induced a 1.6-fold neurite growth acceleration on non-injured neurons and on axotomized neurons. Although the axotomized neurons were naturally already in a rapid regeneration process, an enhancement was found to occur while irradiating with the LED light, which may be promising for therapy applications. Dorsal Root Ganglion neurons (A) without previous injury and (B) subjected to a conditioning injury. PMID:25077453

  14. Expressing Constitutively Active Rheb in Adult Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Enhances the Integration of Sensory Axons that Regenerate Across a Chondroitinase-Treated Dorsal Root Entry Zone Following Dorsal Root Crush.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Klaw, Michelle C; Kholodilov, Nikolai; Burke, Robert E; Detloff, Megan R; Côté, Marie-Pascale; Tom, Veronica J

    2016-01-01

    While the peripheral branch of dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG) can successfully regenerate after injury, lesioned central branch axons fail to regrow across the dorsal root entry zone (DREZ), the interface between the dorsal root and the spinal cord. This lack of regeneration is due to the limited regenerative capacity of adult sensory axons and the growth-inhibitory environment at the DREZ, which is similar to that found in the glial scar after a central nervous system (CNS) injury. We hypothesized that transduction of adult DRG neurons using adeno-associated virus (AAV) to express a constitutively-active form of the GTPase Rheb (caRheb) will increase their intrinsic growth potential after a dorsal root crush. Additionally, we posited that if we combined that approach with digestion of upregulated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG) at the DREZ with chondroitinase ABC (ChABC), we would promote regeneration of sensory axons across the DREZ into the spinal cord. We first assessed if this strategy promotes neuritic growth in an in vitro model of the glial scar containing CSPG. ChABC allowed for some regeneration across the once potently inhibitory substrate. Combining ChABC treatment with expression of caRheb in DRG significantly improved this growth. We then determined if this combination strategy also enhanced regeneration through the DREZ after dorsal root crush in adult rats in vivo. After unilaterally crushing C4-T1 dorsal roots, we injected AAV5-caRheb or AAV5-GFP into the ipsilateral C5-C8 DRGs. ChABC or PBS was injected into the ipsilateral dorsal horn at C5-C8 to digest CSPG, for a total of four animal groups (caRheb + ChABC, caRheb + PBS, GFP + ChABC, GFP + PBS). Regeneration was rarely observed in PBS-treated animals, whereas short-distance regrowth across the DREZ was observed in ChABC-treated animals. No difference in axon number or length between the ChABC groups was observed, which may be related to intraganglionic inflammation induced by the

  15. Expressing Constitutively Active Rheb in Adult Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Enhances the Integration of Sensory Axons that Regenerate Across a Chondroitinase-Treated Dorsal Root Entry Zone Following Dorsal Root Crush

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; Klaw, Michelle C.; Kholodilov, Nikolai; Burke, Robert E.; Detloff, Megan R.; Côté, Marie-Pascale; Tom, Veronica J.

    2016-01-01

    While the peripheral branch of dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG) can successfully regenerate after injury, lesioned central branch axons fail to regrow across the dorsal root entry zone (DREZ), the interface between the dorsal root and the spinal cord. This lack of regeneration is due to the limited regenerative capacity of adult sensory axons and the growth-inhibitory environment at the DREZ, which is similar to that found in the glial scar after a central nervous system (CNS) injury. We hypothesized that transduction of adult DRG neurons using adeno-associated virus (AAV) to express a constitutively-active form of the GTPase Rheb (caRheb) will increase their intrinsic growth potential after a dorsal root crush. Additionally, we posited that if we combined that approach with digestion of upregulated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG) at the DREZ with chondroitinase ABC (ChABC), we would promote regeneration of sensory axons across the DREZ into the spinal cord. We first assessed if this strategy promotes neuritic growth in an in vitro model of the glial scar containing CSPG. ChABC allowed for some regeneration across the once potently inhibitory substrate. Combining ChABC treatment with expression of caRheb in DRG significantly improved this growth. We then determined if this combination strategy also enhanced regeneration through the DREZ after dorsal root crush in adult rats in vivo. After unilaterally crushing C4-T1 dorsal roots, we injected AAV5-caRheb or AAV5-GFP into the ipsilateral C5-C8 DRGs. ChABC or PBS was injected into the ipsilateral dorsal horn at C5-C8 to digest CSPG, for a total of four animal groups (caRheb + ChABC, caRheb + PBS, GFP + ChABC, GFP + PBS). Regeneration was rarely observed in PBS-treated animals, whereas short-distance regrowth across the DREZ was observed in ChABC-treated animals. No difference in axon number or length between the ChABC groups was observed, which may be related to intraganglionic inflammation induced by the

  16. An Unsorted Spike-Based Pattern Recognition Method for Real-Time Continuous Sensory Event Detection from Dorsal Root Ganglion Recording.

    PubMed

    Han, Sungmin; Chu, Jun-Uk; Kim, Hyungmin; Choi, Kuiwon; Park, Jong Woong; Youn, Inchan

    2016-06-01

    In functional neuromuscular stimulation systems, sensory information-based closed-loop control can be useful for restoring lost function in patients with hemiplegia or quadriplegia. The goal of this study was to detect sensory events from tactile afferent signals continuously in real time using a novel unsorted spike-based pattern recognition method. The tactile afferent signals were recorded with a 16-channel microelectrode in the dorsal root ganglion, and unsorted spike-based feature vectors were extracted as a novel combination of the time and time-frequency domain features. Principal component analysis was used to reduce the dimensionality of the feature vectors, and a multilayer perceptron classifier was used to detect sensory events. The proposed method showed good performance for classification accuracy, and the processing time delay of sensory event detection was less than 200 ms. These results indicated that the proposed method could be applicable for sensory feedback in closed-loop control systems. PMID:26672029

  17. Differential regulation of immune responses and macrophage/neuron interactions in the dorsal root ganglion in young and adult rats following nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Neuropathic pain is an apparently spontaneous experience triggered by abnormal physiology of the peripheral or central nervous system, which evolves with time. Neuropathic pain arising from peripheral nerve injury is characterized by a combination of spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia and allodynia. There is no evidence of this type of pain in human infants or rat pups; brachial plexus avulsion, which causes intense neuropathic pain in adults, is not painful when the injury is sustained at birth. Since infants are capable of nociception from before birth and display both acute and chronic inflammatory pain behaviour from an early neonatal age, it appears that the mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain are differentially regulated over a prolonged postnatal period. Results We have performed a microarray analysis of the rat L4/L5 dorsal root ganglia (DRG), 7 days post spared nerve injury, a model of neuropathic pain. Genes that are regulated in adult rats displaying neuropathic behaviour were compared to those regulated in young rats (10 days old) that did not show the same neuropathic behaviour. The results show a set of genes, differentially regulated in the adult DRG, that are principally involved in immune system modulation. A functional consequence of this different immune response to injury is that resident macrophages cluster around the large A sensory neuron bodies in the adult DRG seven days post injury, whereas the macrophages in young DRG remain scattered evenly throughout the ganglion, as in controls. Conclusions The results show, for the first time, a major difference in the neuroimmune response to nerve injury in the dorsal root ganglion of young and adult rats. Differential analysis reveals a new set of immune related genes in the ganglia, that are differentially regulated in adult neuropathic pain, and that are consistent with the selective activation of macrophages around adult, but not young large A sensory neurons post injury. These

  18. Neuronal and glial expression of inward rectifier potassium channel subunits Kir2.x in rat dorsal root ganglion and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yuzo; Yasaka, Toshiharu; Takano, Makoto; Ishihara, Keiko

    2016-03-23

    Inward rectifier K(+) channels of the Kir2.x subfamily play important roles in controlling the neuronal excitability. Although their cellular localization in the brain has been extensively studied, only a few studies have examined their expression in the spinal cord and peripheral nervous system. In this study, immunohistochemical analyses of Kir2.1, Kir2.2, and Kir2.3 expression were performed in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord using bright-field and confocal microscopy. In DRG, most ganglionic neurons expressed Kir2.1, Kir2.2 and Kir2.3, whereas satellite glial cells chiefly expressed Kir2.3. In the spinal cord, Kir2.1, Kir2.2 and Kir2.3 were all expressed highly in the gray matter of dorsal and ventral horns and moderately in the white matter also. Within the gray matter, the expression was especially high in the substantia gelatinosa (lamina II). Confocal images obtained using markers for neuronal cells, NeuN, and astrocytes, Sox9, showed expression of all three Kir2 subunits in both neuronal somata and astrocytes in lamina I-III of the dorsal horn and the lateral spinal nucleus of the dorsolateral funiculus. Immunoreactive signals other than those in neuronal and glial somata were abundant in lamina I and II, which probably located mainly in nerve fibers or nerve terminals. Colocalization of Kir2.1 and 2.3 and that of Kir2.2 and 2.3 were present in neuronal and glial somata. In the ventral horn, motor neurons and interneurons were also immunoreactive with the three Kir2 subunits. Our study suggests that Kir2 channels composed of Kir2.1-2.3 subunits are expressed in neuronal and glial cells in the DRG and spinal cord, contributing to sensory transduction and motor control. PMID:26854211

  19. L5 spinal nerve axotomy induces sensitization of cutaneous L4 Aβ-nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons in the rat in vivo.

    PubMed

    Djouhri, Laiche

    2016-06-15

    Partial nerve injury often leads to peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP), a major health problem that lacks effective drug treatment. PNP is characterized by ongoing/spontaneous pain, and hypersensitivity to noxious (hyperalgesia) and innocuous (allodynia) stimuli. Preclinical studies using the L5 spinal nerve ligation/axotomy (SNL/SNA) model of PNP suggest that this type of chronic pain results partly from sensitization of ipsilateral L4C-and Aδ-fiber nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, but whether L4 β-nociceptors, which constitute a substantial group of DRG neurons, also become sensitized remains unanswered. To address this issue, intracellular recordings from somata of cutaneous Aβ-nociceptors (classified according to their dorsal root conduction velocities (>6.5m/s), and physiologically based on their responses to noxious (but not innocuous) mechanical stimuli) were made from L4-DRGs in normal (control) rats and in rats seven days after L5 SNA in vivo. Compared with control, cutaneous L4 Aβ-nociceptive DRG neurons in SNA rats (that developed mechanical hypersensitivity) exhibited sensitization indicated by: a) decreased mean mechanical threshold (from 57.8±7.1 to 10.3±1.7mN), b) decreased mean dorsal root electrical threshold (from 11.4±0.7 to 4.3±0.4V), c) increased mean response to a suprathreshold mechanical stimulus (from 18.5±1.8 to 34±3.7spikes/sec) and d) an obvious, but non-significant, increase in the incidence of ongoing/spontaneous activity (from 3% to 18%). These findings suggest that cutaneous L4 Aβ-nociceptors also become sensitized after L5 SNA, and that sensitization of this subclass of A-fiber nociceptors may contribute both directly and indirectly to nerve injury-induced PNP. PMID:27173166

  20. The Venom of the Spider Selenocosmia Jiafu Contains Various Neurotoxins Acting on Voltage-Gated Ion Channels in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhaotun; Zhou, Xi; Chen, Jia; Tang, Cheng; Xiao, Zhen; Ying, Dazhong; Liu, Zhonghua; Liang, Songping

    2014-01-01

    Selenocosmia jiafu is a medium-sized theraphosid spider and an attractive source of venom, because it can be bred in captivity and it produces large amounts of venom. We performed reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) analyses and showed that S. jiafu venom contains hundreds of peptides with a predominant mass of 3000–4500 Da. Patch clamp analyses indicated that the venom could inhibit voltage-gated Na+, K+ and Ca2+ channels in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The venom exhibited inhibitory effects on tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na+ currents and T-type Ca2+ currents, suggesting the presence of antagonists to both channel types and providing a valuable tool for the investigation of these channels and for drug development. Intra-abdominal injection of the venom had severe toxic effects on cockroaches and caused death at higher concentrations. The LD50 was 84.24 μg/g of body weight in the cockroach. However, no visible symptoms or behavioral changes were detected after intraperitoneal injection of the venom into mice even at doses up to 10 mg/kg body weight. Our results provide a basis for further case-by-case investigations of peptide toxins from this venom. PMID:24603666

  1. 7, 8, 3′-Trihydroxyflavone Promotes Neurite Outgrowth and Protects Against Bupivacaine-Induced Neurotoxicity in Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Haohong; Luo, Xingjing

    2016-01-01

    Background 7, 8, 3′-trihydroxyflavone (THF) is a novel pro-neuronal small molecule that acts as a TrkB agonist. In this study, we examined the effect of THF on promoting neuronal growth and protecting anesthetics-induced neurotoxicity in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in vitro. Material/Methods Neonatal mouse DRG neurons were cultured in vitro and treated with various concentrations of THF. The effect of THF on neuronal growth was investigated by neurite outgrowth assay and Western blot. In addition, the protective effects of THF on bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity were investigated by apoptosis TUNEL assay, neurite outgrowth assay, and Western blot, respectively. Results THF promoted neurite outgrowth of DRG neurons in dose-dependent manner, with an EC50 concentration of 67.4 nM. Western blot analysis showed THF activated TrkB signaling pathway by inducing TrkB phosphorylation. THF also rescued bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity by reducing apoptosis and protecting neurite retraction in DRG neurons. Furthermore, the protection of THF in bupivacaine-injured neurotoxicity was directly associated with TrkB phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent manner in DRG neurons. Conclusions THF has pro-neuronal effect on DRG neurons by promoting neurite growth and protecting against bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity, likely through TrkB activation. PMID:27371503

  2. Caspase-2 Is Upregulated after Sciatic Nerve Transection and Its Inhibition Protects Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons from Apoptosis after Serum Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Vigneswara, Vasanthy; Berry, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Sciatic nerve (SN) transection-induced apoptosis of dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGN) is one factor determining the efficacy of peripheral axonal regeneration and the return of sensation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that caspase-2 (CASP2) orchestrates apoptosis of axotomised DRGN both in vivo and in vitro by disrupting the local neurotrophic supply to DRGN. We observed significantly elevated levels of cleaved CASP2 (C-CASP2), compared to cleaved caspase-3 (C-CASP3), within TUNEL+DRGN and DRG glia (satellite and Schwann cells) after SN transection. A serum withdrawal cell culture model, which induced 40% apoptotic death in DRGN and 60% in glia, was used to model DRGN loss after neurotrophic factor withdrawal. Elevated C-CASP2 and TUNEL were observed in both DRGN and DRG glia, with C-CASP2 localisation shifting from the cytosol to the nucleus, a required step for induction of direct CASP2-mediated apoptosis. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated downregulation of CASP2 protected 50% of DRGN from apoptosis after serum withdrawal, while downregulation of CASP3 had no effect on DRGN or DRG glia survival. We conclude that CASP2 orchestrates the death of SN-axotomised DRGN directly and also indirectly through loss of DRG glia and their local neurotrophic factor support. Accordingly, inhibiting CASP2 expression is a potential therapy for improving both the SN regeneration response and peripheral sensory recovery. PMID:23451279

  3. Radiotherapy Suppresses Bone Cancer Pain through Inhibiting Activation of cAMP Signaling in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion and Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guiqin; Dong, Yanbin; He, Xueming; Zhao, Ping; Yang, Aixing; Zhou, Rubing; Ma, Jianhua; Xie, Zhong; Song, Xue-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the major clinical approaches for treatment of bone cancer pain. Activation of cAMP-PKA signaling pathway plays important roles in bone cancer pain. Here, we examined the effects of radiotherapy on bone cancer pain and accompanying abnormal activation of cAMP-PKA signaling. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were used and received tumor cell implantation (TCI) in rat tibia (TCI cancer pain model). Some of the rats that previously received TCI treatment were treated with X-ray radiation (radiotherapy). Thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia were measured and used for evaluating level of pain caused by TCI treatment. PKA mRNA expression in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) was detected by RT-PCR. Concentrations of cAMP, IL-1β, and TNF-α as well as PKA activity in DRG and the spinal cord were measured by ELISA. The results showed that radiotherapy significantly suppressed TCI-induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. The level of PKA mRNA in DRG, cAMP concentration and PKA activity in DRG and in the spinal cord, and concentrations of IL-1β and TNF-α in the spinal cord were significantly reduced by radiotherapy. In addition, radiotherapy also reduced TCI-induced bone loss. These findings suggest that radiotherapy may suppress bone cancer pain through inhibition of activation of cAMP-PKA signaling pathway in DRG and the spinal cord. PMID:26989332

  4. Effects of 14 days of spaceflight and nine days of recovery on cell body size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishihara, A.; Ohira, Y.; Roy, R. R.; Nagaoka, S.; Sekiguchi, C.; Hinds, W. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    The cross-sectional areas and succinate dehydrogenase activities of L5 dorsal root ganglion neurons in rats were determined after 14 days of spaceflight and after nine days of recovery. The mean and distribution of the cross-sectional areas were similar to age-matched, ground-based controls for both the spaceflight and for the spaceflight plus recovery groups. The mean succinate dehydrogenase activity was significantly lower in spaceflight compared to aged-matched control rats, whereas the mean succinate dehydrogenase activity was similar in age-matched control and spaceflight plus recovery rats. The mean succinate dehydrogenase activity of neurons with cross-sectional areas between 1000 and 2000 microns2 was lower (between 7 and 10%) in both the spaceflight and the spaceflight plus recovery groups compared to the appropriate control groups. The reduction in the oxidative capacity of a subpopulation of sensory neurons having relatively large cross-sectional areas immediately following spaceflight and the sustained depression for nine days after returning to 1 g suggest that the 0 g environment induced significant alterations in proprioceptive function.

  5. Amitriptyline Activates TrkA to Aid Neuronal Growth and Attenuate Anesthesia-Induced Neurodegeneration in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaochun; Chen, Feng; Zheng, Ting; Huang, Fengyi; Chen, Jianghu; Tu, Wenshao

    2016-05-01

    Tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline (AM) has been shown to exert neurotrophic activity on neurons. We thus explored whether AM may aid the neuronal development and protect anesthesia-induced neuro-injury in young spinal cord dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons.The DRG explants were prepared from 1-day-old rats. The effect of AM on aiding DRG neural development was examined by immunohistochemistry at dose-dependent manner. AM-induced changes in gene and protein expressions, and also phosphorylation states of tyrosine kinases receptor A (TrkA) and B (TrkB) in DRG, were examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The effect of AM on attenuating lidocaine-induced DRG neurodegeneration was examined by immunohistochemistry, and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated TrkA/B down-regulation.Amitriptyline stimulated DRG neuronal development in dose-dependent manner, but exerted toxic effect at concentrations higher than 10 M. AM activated TrkA in DRG through phosphorylation, whereas it had little effect on TrkB-signaling pathway. AM reduced lidocaine-induced DRG neurodegeneration by regenerating neurites and growth cones. Moreover, the neuroprotection of AM on lidocaine-injured neurodegeneration was blocked by siRNA-mediated TrkA down-regulation, but not by TrkB down-regulation.Amitriptyline facilitated neuronal development and had protective effect on lidocaine-induced neurodegeneration, very likely through the activation of TrkA-signaling pathway in DRG. PMID:27149473

  6. Amitriptyline Activates TrkA to Aid Neuronal Growth and Attenuate Anesthesia-Induced Neurodegeneration in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaochun; Chen, Feng; Zheng, Ting; Huang, Fengyi; Chen, Jianghu; Tu, Wenshao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline (AM) has been shown to exert neurotrophic activity on neurons. We thus explored whether AM may aid the neuronal development and protect anesthesia-induced neuro-injury in young spinal cord dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The DRG explants were prepared from 1-day-old rats. The effect of AM on aiding DRG neural development was examined by immunohistochemistry at dose-dependent manner. AM-induced changes in gene and protein expressions, and also phosphorylation states of tyrosine kinases receptor A (TrkA) and B (TrkB) in DRG, were examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The effect of AM on attenuating lidocaine-induced DRG neurodegeneration was examined by immunohistochemistry, and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated TrkA/B down-regulation. Amitriptyline stimulated DRG neuronal development in dose-dependent manner, but exerted toxic effect at concentrations higher than 10 M. AM activated TrkA in DRG through phosphorylation, whereas it had little effect on TrkB-signaling pathway. AM reduced lidocaine-induced DRG neurodegeneration by regenerating neurites and growth cones. Moreover, the neuroprotection of AM on lidocaine-injured neurodegeneration was blocked by siRNA-mediated TrkA down-regulation, but not by TrkB down-regulation. Amitriptyline facilitated neuronal development and had protective effect on lidocaine-induced neurodegeneration, very likely through the activation of TrkA-signaling pathway in DRG. PMID:27149473

  7. Expression profile of vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT, SLC17A9) in subpopulations of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kentaro; Nomura, Yuka; Kawamori, Kanako; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Nagasawa, Kazuki

    2014-09-01

    ATP plays an important role in the signal transduction between sensory neurons and satellite cells in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs). In primary cultured DRG neurons, ATP is known to be stored in lysosomes via a vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT), and to be released into the intercellular space through exocytosis. DRGs consist of large-, medium- and small-sized neurons, which play different roles in sensory transmission, but there is no information on the expression profiles of VNUT in DRG subpopulations. Here, we obtained detailed expression profiles of VNUT in isolated rat DRG tissues. On immunohistochemical analysis, VNUT was found in DRG neurons, and was predominantly expressed by the small- and medium-sized DRG ones, as judged upon visual inspection, and this was compatible with the finding that the number of VNUT-positive DRG neurons in IB4-positive cells was greater than that in NF200-positive ones. These results suggest that VNUT play a role in ATP accumulation in DRG neurons, especially in small- and medium-sized ones, and might be involved in ATP-mediated nociceptive signaling in DRGs. PMID:25043192

  8. Axotomy of tributaries of the pelvic and pudendal nerves induces changes in the neurochemistry of mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons and the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Carly J; Tomasella, Eugenia; Malet, Mariana; Seroogy, Kim B; Hökfelt, Tomas; Villar, Marcelo J; Gebhart, G F; Brumovsky, Pablo R

    2016-05-01

    Using immunohistochemical techniques, we characterized changes in the expression of several neurochemical markers in lumbar 4-sacral 2 (L4-S2) dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron profiles (NPs) and the spinal cord of BALB/c mice after axotomy of the L6 and S1 spinal nerves, major tributaries of the pelvic (targeting pelvic visceral organs) and pudendal (targeting perineum and genitalia) nerves. Sham animals were included. Expression of cyclic AMP-dependent transcription factor 3 (ATF3), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT) types 1 and -2 was analysed seven days after injury. L6-S1 axotomy induced dramatic de novo expression of ATF3 in many L6-S1 DRG NPs, and parallel significant downregulations in the percentage of CGRP-, TRPV1-, TH- and VGLUT2-immunoreactive (IR) DRG NPs, as compared to their expression in uninjured DRGs (contralateral L6-S1-AXO; sham mice); VGLUT1 expression remained unaltered. Sham L6-S1 DRGs only showed a small ipsilateral increase in ATF3-IR NPs (other markers were unchanged). L6-S1-AXO induced de novo expression of ATF3 in several lumbosacral spinal cord motoneurons and parasympathetic preganglionic neurons; in sham mice the effect was limited to a few motoneurons. Finally, a moderate decrease in CGRP- and TRPV1-like-immunoreactivities was observed in the ipsilateral superficial dorsal horn neuropil. In conclusion, injury of a mixed visceral/non-visceral nerve leads to considerable neurochemical alterations in DRGs matched, to some extent, in the spinal cord. Changes in these and potentially other nociception-related molecules could contribute to pain due to injury of nerves in the abdominopelvic cavity. PMID:25749859

  9. Redox Imbalance in the Peripheral Mechanism Underlying the Mirror-Image Neuropathic Pain Due to Chronic Compression of Dorsal Root Ganglion.

    PubMed

    Lv, H; Chen, H; Xu, J J; Jiang, Y S; Shen, Y J; Zhou, S Z; Xu, H; Xiong, Y C

    2016-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain, but few studies have examined the role of oxidative stress in the mirror-image neuropathic pain (MINP). The present study was to investigate the role of ROS in MINP caused by chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) (CCD) in a rat model. SD rats were randomly divided into sham group and CCD group. CCD was conducted to induce MINP. CCD rats were intraperitoneally injected with α-Phenyl-N-tert-butyl-nitrone (PBN) at 7 days after surgery. Paw withdrawal mechanical threshold (PWMT) was measured at -1, 1, 3, 5 and 7 days after surgery in sham group and CCD group, and at 8 time points after PBN injection. Rats were sacrificed at 3 and 7 days after surgery in sham group and CCD group and at 0.5 and 2 h after PBN injection, and the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities, as well as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malonaldehyde (MDA) contents were determined in the contralateral DRGs. Results showed bilateral PWMT reduced significantly in sham group and CCD group, but it returned to nearly normal level in sham group. MDA content, H2O2 content and SOD activity increased significantly, while catalase activity remained unchanged in CCD rats. PBN at 100 mg/kg significantly attenuated bilateral mechanical hyperalgesia accompanied by the improvement of oxidative stress in the contralateral DRGs. Our results demonstrate that ROS produced in the contralateral DRG are involved in the pathogenesis of CCD induced MINP, and ROS scavenger may be a promising drug for the therapy of MINP. PMID:26471165

  10. Role of nuclear factor-κB in oxidative stress associated with rabies virus infection of adult rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Kammouni, Wafa; Hasan, Leena; Saleh, Ali; Wood, Heidi; Fernyhough, Paul; Jackson, Alan C

    2012-08-01

    Recent studies in an experimental model of rabies showed major structural changes in the brain involving neuronal processes that are associated with severe clinical disease. Cultured adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons infected with the challenge virus standard-11 strain of rabies virus (CVS) showed axonal swellings and immunostaining for 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), indicating evidence of lipid peroxidation associated with oxidative stress and reduced axonal growth compared to that of mock-infected DRG neurons. We have evaluated whether nuclear factor (NF)-κB might act as a critical bridge linking CVS infection and oxidative stress. On Western immunoblotting, CVS infection induced expression of the NF-κB p50 subunit compared to that of mock infection. Ciliary neurotrophic factor, a potent activator of NF-κB, had no effect on mock-infected rat DRG neurons and reduced the number of 4-HNE-labeled puncta. SN50, a peptide inhibitor of NF-κB, and CVS infection had an additive effect in producing axonal swellings, indicating that NF-κB is neuroprotective. The fluorescent signal for subunit p50 was quantitatively evaluated in the nucleus and cytoplasm of mock- and CVS-infected rat DRG neurons. At 24 h postinfection (p.i.), there was a significant increase in the nucleus/cytoplasm ratio, indicating increased transcriptional activity of NF-κB, perhaps as a response to stress. At both 48 and 72 h p.i., there was significantly reduced nuclear localization of NF-κB. CVS infection may induce oxidative stress by inhibiting nuclear activation of NF-κB. A rabies virus protein may directly inhibit NF-κB activity. Further investigations are needed to gain a better understanding of the basic mechanisms involved in the oxidative damage associated with rabies virus infection. PMID:22623795

  11. Localization of the endocannabinoid-degrading enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase in rat dorsal root ganglion cells and its regulation after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Lever, Isobel J; Robinson, Michelle; Cibelli, Mario; Paule, Cleoper; Santha, Peter; Yee, Louis; Hunt, Stephen P; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Elphick, Maurice R; Nagy, Istvan; Rice, Andrew S C

    2009-03-25

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is a degradative enzyme for a group of endogenous signaling lipids that includes anandamide (AEA). AEA acts as an endocannabinoid and an endovanilloid by activating cannabinoid and vanilloid type 1 transient receptor potential (TRPV1) receptors, respectively, on dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons. Inhibition of FAAH activity increases AEA concentrations in nervous tissue and reduces sensory hypersensitivity in animal pain models. Using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and reverse transcription-PCR, we demonstrate the location of the FAAH in adult rat DRG, sciatic nerve, and spinal cord. In naive rats, FAAH immunoreactivity localized to the soma of 32.7 +/- 0.8% of neurons in L4 and L5 DRG. These were small-sized (mean soma area, 395.96 +/- 5.6 mum(2)) and predominantly colabeled with peripherin and isolectin B4 markers of unmyelinated C-fiber neurons; 68% colabeled with antibodies to TRPV1 (marker of nociceptive DRG neurons), and <2% colabeled with NF200 (marker of large myelinated neurons). FAAH-IR was also present in small, NF200-negative cultured rat DRG neurons. Incubation of these cultures with the FAAH inhibitor URB597 increased AEA-evoked cobalt uptake in a capsazepine-sensitive manner. After sciatic nerve axotomy, there was a rightward shift in the cell-size distribution of FAAH-immunoreactive (IR) DRG neurons ipsilateral to injury: FAAH immunoreactivity was detected in larger-sized cells that colabeled with NF200. An ipsilateral versus contralateral increase in both the size and proportion of FAAH-IR DRG occurred after spinal nerve transection injury but not after chronic inflammation of the rat hindpaw 2 d after injection of complete Freund's adjuvant. This study reveals the location of FAAH in neural tissue involved in peripheral nociceptive transmission. PMID:19321773

  12. Enhanced Excitability of Primary Sensory Neurons and Altered Gene Expression of Neuronal Ion Channels in Dorsal Root Ganglion in Paclitaxel-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haijun; Dougherty, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanism of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy after paclitaxel treatment is not well understood. Given the poor penetration of paclitaxel into central nervous system, peripheral nervous system is most at risk. Methods Intrinsic membrane properties of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were studied by intracellular recordings. Multiple-gene real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction array was used to investigate gene expression of DRG neuronal ion channels. Results Paclitaxel increased the incidence of spontaneous activity from 4.8% to 27.1% in large and from 0% to 33.3% in medium-sized neurons. Paclitaxel decreased the rheobase (nA) from 1.6 ± 0.1 to 0.8 ± 0.1 in large, from 1.5 ± 0.2 to 0.6 ± 0.1 in medium-sized, and from 1.6 ± 0.2 to 1.0 ± 0.1 in small neurons. After paclitaxel, other characteristics of membrane properties in each group remained the same except that Aδ neurons showed shorter action potential fall time (ms) (1.0 ± 0.2, n = 10 vs. 1.8 ± 0.3, n = 9, paclitaxel vs. vehicle). Meanwhile, real-time polymerase chain reaction array revealed an alteration in expression of some neuronal ion channel genes including upregulation of HCN1 (fold change 1.76 ± 0.06) and Nav1.7 (1.26 ± 0.02) and downregulation of Kir channels (Kir1.1, 0.73 ± 0.05, Kir3.4, 0.66 ± 0.06) in paclitaxel-treated animals. Conclusions The increased neuronal excitability and the changes in gene expression of some neuronal ion channels in DRG may provide insight into the molecular and cellular basis of paclitaxel neuropathy, which may lead to novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:24534904

  13. Changes in the expression of IL-6-Mediated MicroRNAs in the dorsal root ganglion under neuropathic pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Hori, Naosuke; Narita, Michiko; Yamashita, Akira; Horiuchi, Hiroshi; Hamada, Yusuke; Kondo, Takashige; Watanabe, Moe; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Kawata, Miho; Shibasaki, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Mitsuaki; Kuzumaki, Naoko; Inada, Eiichi; Ochiya, Takahiro; Iseki, Masako; Mori, Tomohisa; Narita, Minoru

    2016-08-01

    A multiplex analysis for profiling the expression of candidate microRNAs (miRNAs), which are small noncoding RNAs that function as key post-transcriptional regulators, may lead to a better understanding of the complex machinery of neuropathic pain. In the present study, we performed a miRNA array analysis using tissues of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG), a primary site for pain processing, obtained from mice with partial sciatic nerve ligation. Among 1135 total miRNAs, 26 miRNAs showed up-regulation (more than 2-fold change) and only 4 miRNAs showed down-regulation (less than 0.5-fold change) in the DRG of nerve-ligated mice. In a RT-qPCR assay, the levels of miR-21, miR-431, and miR-511-3p were significantly increased on the ipsilateral side of the DRG from 3 to 7 days after sciatic nerve ligation. These elevations were almost absent in IL-6 knockout mice. Furthermore, the expression level of miR-21, but not those of miR-431 or miR511-3p, was significantly increased in exosomes extracted from blood of nerve-ligated mice. These findings suggest that the increased expression of IL-6-regulated miR-21, miR-431, and miR-511-3p in the DRG and increased exosomal miR-21 extracted from blood after sciatic nerve ligation may play at least a partial role in neuropathic pain. Synapse 70:317-324, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990296

  14. Demethylation regulation of BDNF gene expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons is implicated in opioid-induced pain hypersensitivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Chao, Yu-Chieh; Xie, Fang; Li, Xueyang; Guo, Ruijuan; Yang, Ning; Zhang, Chen; Shi, Rong; Guan, Yun; Yue, Yun; Wang, Yun

    2016-07-01

    Repeated administration of morphine may result in opioid-induced hypersensitivity (OIH), which involves altered expression of numerous genes, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Yet, it remains unclear how BDNF expression is increased in DRG neurons after repeated morphine treatment. DNA methylation is an important mechanism of epigenetic control of gene expression. In the current study, we hypothesized that the demethylation regulation of certain BDNF gene promoters in DRG neurons may contribute to the development of OIH. Real-time RT-PCR was used to assess changes in the mRNA transcription levels of major BDNF exons including exon I, II, IV, VI, as well as total BDNF mRNA in DRGs from rats after repeated morphine administration. The levels of exon IV and total BDNF mRNA were significantly upregulated by repeated morphine administration, as compared to that in saline control group. Further, ELISA array and immunocytochemistry study revealed a robust upregulation of BDNF protein expression in DRG neurons after repeated morphine exposure. Correspondingly, the methylation levels of BDNF exon IV promoter showed a significant downregulation by morphine treatment. Importantly, intrathecal administration of a BDNF antibody, but not control IgG, significantly inhibited mechanical hypersensitivity that developed in rats after repeated morphine treatment. Conversely, intrathecal administration of an inhibitor of DNA methylation, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) markedly upregulated the BDNF protein expression in DRG neurons and enhanced the mechanical allodynia after repeated morphine exposure. Together, our findings suggest that demethylation regulation of BDNF gene promoter may be implicated in the development of OIH through epigenetic control of BDNF expression in DRG neurons. PMID:26970395

  15. Guidance of dorsal root ganglion neurites and Schwann cells by isolated Schwann cell topography on poly(dimethyl siloxane) conduits and films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. A.; Rementer, C. W.; Bruder, Jan M.; Hoffman-Kim, D.

    2011-08-01

    Biomimetic replicas of cellular topography have been utilized to direct neurite outgrowth. Here, we cultured postnatal rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) explants in the presence of Schwann cell (SC) topography to determine the influence of SC topography on neurite outgrowth. Four distinct poly(dimethyl siloxane) conduits were fabricated within which DRG explants were cultured. To determine the contribution of SC topographical features to neurite guidance, the extent of neurite outgrowth into unpatterned conduits, conduits with randomly oriented SC replicas, and conduits with SC replicas parallel or perpendicular to the conduit long axis was measured. Neurite directionality and outgrowth from DRG were also quantified on two-dimensional SC replicas with orientations corresponding to the four conduit conditions. Additionally, live SC migration and neurite extension from DRG on SC replicas were examined as a first step toward quantification of the interactions between live SC and navigating neurites on SC replicas. DRG neurite outgrowth and morphology within conduits and on two-dimensional SC replicas were directed by the underlying SC topographical features. Maximal neurite outgrowth and alignment to the underlying features were observed into parallel conduits and on parallel two-dimensional substrates, whereas the least extent of outgrowth was observed into perpendicular conduits and on perpendicular two-dimensional replica conditions. Additionally, neurites on perpendicular conditions turned to extend along the direction of underlying SC topography. Neurite outgrowth exceeded SC migration in the direction of the underlying anisotropic SC replica after two days in culture. This finding confirms the critical role that SC have in guiding neurite outgrowth and suggests that the mechanism of neurite alignment to SC replicas depends on direct contact with cellular topography. These results suggest that SC topographical replicas may be used to direct and optimize neurite

  16. Transient receptor potential canonical 3 (TRPC3) is required for IgG immune complex-induced excitation of the rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Lintao; Li, Yumei; Pan, Xinghua; Zhang, Pu; LaMotte, Robert H.; Ma, Chao

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain may accompany immune-related disorders with an elevated level of serum IgG immune complex (IgG-IC) but the underlying mechanisms are obscure. We previously demonstrated that IgG-IC directly excited a subpopulation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons through the neuronal Fc-gamma receptor I (FcγRI). This might be a mechanism linking IgG-IC to pain and hyperalgesia. The purpose of this study was to investigate the signaling pathways and transduction channels activated downstream of IgG-IC and FcγRI. In whole-cell recordings, IgG-IC induced a non-selective cation current (IIC) in the rat DRG neurons, carried by Ca2+ and Na+. The IIC was potentiated or attenuated by respectively lowering or increasing the intracellular Ca2+ buffering capacity, suggesting that this current was regulated by intracellular calcium. Single-cell RT-PCR revealed that transient receptor potential canonical 3 (TRPC3) mRNA was always coexpressed with FcγRI mRNA in the same DRG neuron. Moreover, ruthenium red (a general TRP channel blocker), BTP2 (a general TRPC channel inhibitor) or pyrazole-3 (a selective TRPC3 blocker), each potently inhibited the IIC. Specific knockdown of TRPC3 using small interfering RNA attenuated the IgG-IC-induced Ca2+ response and the IIC. Additionally, the IIC was blocked by the tyrosine kinase Syk inhibitor OXSI-2, the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor neomycin, or either the IP3 receptor antagonist 2-aminoethyldiphenylborinate or heparin. These results indicated that the activation of neuronal FcγRI triggers TRPC channels through the Syk-PLC-IP3 pathway, and that TRPC3 is a key molecular target for the excitatory effect of IgG-IC on DRG neurons. PMID:22787041

  17. Preferred recycling pathway by internalized PGE2 EP4 receptor following agonist stimulation in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons contributes to enhanced EP4 receptor sensitivity.

    PubMed

    St-Jacques, Bruno; Ma, Weiya

    2016-06-21

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a well-known pain mediator abundantly produced in injured tissues, sensitizes nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons (nociceptors) through its four EP receptors (EP1-4). Our prior study showed that PGE2 or EP4 agonist stimulates EP4 externalization and this event was not only suppressed by the inhibitor of anterograde export, but also by the recycling inhibitor (St-Jacques and Ma, 2013). These data suggest that EP4 recycling also contributes to agonist-enhanced EP4 surface abundance. In the current study, we tested this hypothesis using antibody-feeding-based internalization assay, recycling assay and FITC-PGE2 binding assay. We observed that selective EP4 agonist 1-hydroxy-PGE1 (1-OH-PGE1) or CAY10850 time- and concentration-dependently increased EP4 internalization in cultured DRG neuron. Internalized EP4 was predominantly localized in the early endosomes and recycling endosomes, but rarely in the late endosomes and lysosomes. These observations were confirmed by FITC-PGE2 binding assay. We further revealed that 1-OH-PGE1 or CAY10850 time- and concentration-dependently increased EP4 recycling. Double exposures to 1-OH-PGE1 induced a greater increase in calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release than a single exposure or vehicle exposure, an event blocked by pre-treatment with the recycling inhibitor monensin. Our data suggest that EP4 recycling contributes to agonist-induced cell surface abundance and consequently enhanced receptor sensitivity. Facilitating EP4 externalization and recycling is a novel mechanism underlying PGE2-induced nociceptor sensitization. PMID:27060485

  18. Efficient retrograde transport of adeno-associated virus type 8 to spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion after vector delivery in muscle.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui; Qiao, Chunping; Wang, Chi-Hsien; Li, Juan; Li, Jianbin; Yuan, Zhenhua; Zhang, Cheng; Xiao, Xiao

    2010-01-01

    The peripheral nervous system (PNS), including peripheral nerves and dorsal root ganglion (DRG), is involved in numerous neurological disorders, such as peripheral neuropathies (diabetic neuropathy, chronic pain, etc.) and demyelination diseases (multiple sclerosis, congenital muscular dystrophy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, etc.). Effective clinical interventions for those diseases are very limited. Gene therapy represents a novel therapeutic strategy for the PNS diseases, especially with simply and minimally invasive delivery methods. Previously, we have shown that adeno-associated virus type 8 (AAV8) can efficiently transduce muscles body wide by a simple intraperitoneal injection in neonatal mice. In this study, we investigated the capacity of AAV8 in transducing PNS in neonatal mice by intraperitoneal injection and also in adult mice by intramuscular injection. Efficient and long-term gene transfer was found in the white matter of the spinal cord, DRG neurons, and peripheral nerves in both groups, treated either as neonates or as adults, particularly neonates. In the adult mice injected with AAV8 in tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles in one of the hind legs, more neurons were transduced in the lower part of the spinal cord than in the upper part; the DRG neurons were transduced more on the vector-injected side than in the contralateral uninjected side. Few cells in the gray matter of the spinal cord were transduced regardless of the delivery methods and age of the mice. These results support the mechanism of vector retrograde transport and suggest that AAV8 crosses blood-nerve barrier poorly. Our finding should have important implications in gene therapy for peripheral neurological disorders. PMID:19719401

  19. Modulation of oxidative stress and Ca(2+) mobilization through TRPM2 channels in rat dorsal root ganglion neuron by Hypericum perforatum.

    PubMed

    Nazıroğlu, M; Çiğ, B; Özgül, C

    2014-03-28

    A main component of St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum, HP) is hyperforin which has antioxidant properties in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, due to its ability to modulate NADPH oxidase and protein kinase C. Recent reports indicate that oxidative stress through NADPH oxidase activates TRPM2 channels. HP may be a useful treatment for Ca(2+) entry and oxidative stress through modulation of TRPM2 channels in the DRG. We aimed to investigate the protective role of HP on Ca(2+) entry and oxidative stress through TRPM2 channels in DRG neurons of rats. The native rat DRG neurons were used in whole-cell patch-clamp, Fura-2 and antioxidant experiments. Appropriate, nontoxic concentrations and incubation times for HP were determined in the DRG neurons by assessing cell viability. The H2O2-induced TRPM2 currents were inhibited by 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate (2-APB) and N-(p-amylcinnamoyl)anthranilic acid (ACA). TRPM2 current densities and cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration in the neurons were also reduced by HP (2 and 24h). In Fura-2 experiments, cytosolic Ca(2+) mobilization was reduced by voltage-gated calcium channel blockers (verapamil+diltiazem, V+D) and HP. Glutathione peroxidase activity and GSH values in the DRG were high in HP, 2-APB and V+D groups although lipid peroxidation level was low in the groups. In conclusion, we observed a protective role for HP on Ca(2+) entry through a TRPM2 channel in the DRG neurons. Since over-production of oxidative stress and Ca(2+) entry are implicated in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain and neuronal inflammation, our findings may be relevant to the etiology and treatment of neuropathology in DRG neurons. PMID:24434769

  20. Comparison of dorsal root ganglion gene expression in rat models of traumatic and HIV-associated neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Maratou, Klio; Wallace, Victoria C.J.; Hasnie, Fauzia S.; Okuse, Kenji; Hosseini, Ramine; Jina, Nipurna; Blackbeard, Julie; Pheby, Timothy; Orengo, Christine; Dickenson, Anthony H.; McMahon, Stephen B.; Rice, Andrew S.C.

    2009-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms underlying peripheral neuropathic pain in the context of HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy, we measured gene expression in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of rats subjected to systemic treatment with the anti-retroviral agent, ddC (Zalcitabine) and concomitant delivery of HIV-gp120 to the rat sciatic nerve. L4 and L5 DRGs were collected at day 14 (time of peak behavioural change) and changes in gene expression were measured using Affymetrix whole genome rat arrays. Conventional analysis of this data set and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) was performed to discover biological processes altered in this model. Transcripts associated with G protein coupled receptor signalling and cell adhesion were enriched in the treated animals, while ribosomal proteins and proteasome pathways were associated with gene down-regulation. To identify genes that are directly relevant to neuropathic mechanical hypersensitivity, as opposed to epiphenomena associated with other aspects of the response to a sciatic nerve lesion, we compared the gp120 + ddC-evoked gene expression with that observed in a model of traumatic neuropathic pain (L5 spinal nerve transection), where hypersensitivity to a static mechanical stimulus is also observed. We identified 39 genes/expressed sequence tags that are differentially expressed in the same direction in both models. Most of these have not previously been implicated in mechanical hypersensitivity and may represent novel targets for therapeutic intervention. As an external control, the RNA expression of three genes was examined by RT-PCR, while the protein levels of two were studied using western blot analysis. PMID:18606552

  1. Activation of TRPC channels contributes to OA-NO2-induced responses in guinea-pig dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiulin; Beckel, Jonathan M; Daugherty, Stephanie L; Wang, Ting; Woodcock, Stephen R; Freeman, Bruce A; de Groat, William C

    2014-01-01

    Effects of nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2) on TRP channels were examined in guinea-pig dissociated dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons using calcium imaging and patch clamp techniques. OA-NO2 increased intracellular Ca2+ in 60–80% DRG neurons. 1-Oleoyl-2acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG), a TRPC agonist, elicited responses in 36% of OA-NO2-sensitive neurons while capsaicin (TRPV1 agonist) or allyl-isothiocyanate (AITC, TRPA1 agonist) elicited responses in only 16% and 10%, respectively, of these neurons. A TRPV1 antagonist (diarylpiperazine, 5 μm) in combination with a TRPA1 antagonist (HC-030031, 30 μm) did not change the amplitude of the Ca2+ transients or percentage of neurons responding to OA-NO2; however, a reducing agent DTT (50 mm) or La3+ (50 μm) completely abolished OA-NO2 responses. OA-NO2 also induced a transient inward current associated with a membrane depolarization followed by a prolonged outward current and hyperpolarization in 80% of neurons. The reversal potentials of inward and outward currents were approximately −20 mV and −60 mV, respectively. Inward current was reduced when extracellular Na+ was absent, but unchanged by niflumic acid (100 μm), a Cl− channel blocker. Outward current was abolished in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ or a combination of two Ca2+-activated K+ channel blockers (iberiotoxin, 100 nm and apamin, 1 μm). BTP2 (1 or 10 μm), a broad spectrum TRPC antagonist, or La3+ (50 μm) completely abolished OA-NO2 currents. RT-PCR performed on mRNA extracted from DRGs revealed the expression of all seven subtypes of TRPC channels. These results support the hypothesis that OA-NO2 activates TRPC channels other than the TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels already known to be targets in rat and mouse sensory neurons and challenge the prevailing view that electrophilic compounds act specifically on TRPA1 or TRPV1 channels. The modulation of sensory neuron excitability via actions on multiple TRP channels can contribute to the anti-inflammatory effect

  2. Pulsed radiofrequency treatment of the lumbar dorsal root ganglion in patients with chronic lumbar radicular pain: a randomized, placebo-controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Shanthanna, Harsha; Chan, Philip; McChesney, James; Thabane, Lehana; Paul, James

    2014-01-01

    Background No proof of efficacy, in the form of a randomized controlled trial (RCT), exists to support pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) treatment of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) for chronic lumbar radicular (CLR) pain. We determined the feasibility of a larger trial (primary objective), and also explored the efficacy of PRF in decreasing pain on a visual analog scale (VAS) and improving the Oswestry Disability Index. Methods This was a single-center, placebo-controlled, triple-blinded RCT. Patients were randomized to a placebo group (needle placement) or a treatment group (PRF at 42°C for 120 seconds to the DRG). Patients were followed up for 3 months post procedure. Outcomes with regard to pain, Oswestry Disability Index score, and side effects were analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis. Results Over 15 months, 350 potential patients were identified and 56 were assessed for eligibility. Fifteen of them did not meet the selection criteria. Of the 41 eligible patients, 32 (78%) were recruited. One patient opted out before intervention. Three patients were lost to follow-up at 3 months. Mean VAS differences were not significantly different at 4 weeks (−0.36, 95% confidence interval [CI], −2.29, 1.57) or at 3 months (−0.76, 95% CI, −3.14, 1.61). The difference in mean Oswestry Disability Index score was also not significantly different at 4 weeks (−2%, 95% CI, −14%, 10%) or 3 months (−7%, 95% CI, −21%, 6%). There were no major side effects. Six of 16 patients in the PRF group and three of 15 in the placebo group showed a >50% decrease in VAS score. Conclusion The recruitment rate was partially successful. At 3 months, the relative success of PRF-DRG was small. A large-scale trial to establish efficacy is not practically feasible considering the small effect size, which would necessitate recruitment of a challengingly large number of participants over a number of years. Until clear parameters for application of PRF are established, clinicians will need

  3. Diabetes enhances oxidative stress-induced TRPM2 channel activity and its control by N-acetylcysteine in rat dorsal root ganglion and brain.

    PubMed

    Sözbir, Ercan; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is a sulfhydryl donor antioxidant that contributes to the regeneration of glutathione (GSH) and also scavengers via a direct reaction with free oxygen radicals. Recently, we observed a modulatory role of NAC on GSH-depleted dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells in rats. NAC may have a protective role on oxidative stress and calcium influx through regulation of the TRPM2 channel in diabetic neurons. Therefore, we investigated the effects of NAC on DRG TRPM2 channel currents and brain oxidative stress in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Thirty-six rats divided into four groups: control, STZ, NAC and STZ + NAC. Diabetes was induced in the STZ and STZ + NAC groups by intraperitoneal STZ (65 mg/kg) administration. After the induction of diabetes, rats in the NAC and STZ + NAC groups received NAC (150 mg/kg) via gastric gavage. After 2 weeks, DRG neurons and the brain cortex were freshly isolated from rats. In whole-cell patch clamp experiments, TRPM2 currents in the DRG following diabetes induction with STZ were gated by H2O2. TRPM2 channel current densities in the DRG and lipid peroxidation levels in the DRG and brain were higher in the STZ groups than in controls; however, brain GSH, GSH peroxidase (GSH-Px), vitamin C and vitamin E concentrations and DRG GSH-Px activity were decreased by diabetes. STZ + H2O2-induced TRPM2 gating was totally inhibited by NAC and partially inhibited by N-(p-amylcinnamoyl) anthranilic acid (ACA) and 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate (2-APB). GSH-Px activity and lipid peroxidation levels were also attenuated by NAC treatment. In conclusion, we observed a modulatory role of NAC on oxidative stress and Ca(2+) entry through the TRPM2 channel in the diabetic DRG and brain. Since excessive oxidative stress and overload Ca(2+) entry are common features of neuropathic pain, our findings are relevant to the etiology and treatment of pain neuropathology in DRG neurons. PMID:26612073

  4. Neuroprotection induced by N-acetylcysteine against cytosolic glutathione depletion-induced Ca2+ influx in dorsal root ganglion neurons of mice: role of TRPV1 channels.

    PubMed

    Nazıroğlu, M; Ciğ, B; Ozgül, C

    2013-07-01

    Glutathione (GSH) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) are thiol-containing antioxidants, and also act through a direct reaction with free radicals. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is the principal transduction channel serving as a polymodal detector. Despite the importance of oxidative stress in pain sensitivity, its role in TRPV1 modulation is poorly understood. NAC may also have a regulator role on TRPV1 channel activity in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron. Therefore, we tested the effects of GSH and NAC on TRPV1 channel current, Ca(2+) influx, oxidative stress and caspase activity in the DRG of mice. DRG neurons were freshly isolated from mice and the neurons were incubated for 6 and 24h with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO). Pretreatment of cultured DRG neurons with NAC, results in a protection against oxidative damages. This neuroprotection is associated with the attenuation of a Ca(2+) influx triggered by oxidative agents such as H2O2, 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) and GSH depletion via BSO. Here, we demonstrate the contribution of cytosolic factors (related to thiol group depletion) on the activation of TRPV1 channels in this mechanism. TRPV1 channels are activated by various agents including capsaicin (CAP), the pungent component of hot chili peppers, and are blocked by capsazepine. An oxidative environment also increased CAP-evoked TRPV1 currents in the neurons. When NAC and GSH were included in the patch pipette as well as extracellularly in the chamber, TRPV1 channels were not activated by CAP and H2O2. TRPV1 inhibitors, 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate and N-(p-amylcinnamoyl)anthranilic acid strongly reduced BSO-induced oxidative toxicity and Ca(2+) influx, in a manner similar to pretreatment with NAC and GSH. Caspase-3 and -9 activities of all groups were not changed by the agonists or antagonists. In conclusion, in our experimental model, TRPV1 channels are involved in the oxidative stress-induced neuronal death, and negative modulation

  5. Hypericum perforatum Attenuates Spinal Cord Injury-Induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis in the Dorsal Root Ganglion of Rats: Involvement of TRPM2 and TRPV1 Channels.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Ümit Sinan; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Şenol, Nilgün; Ghazizadeh, Vahid

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative stress and cytosolic Ca(2+) overload have important roles on apoptosis in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons after spinal cord injury (SCI). Hypericum perforatum (HP) has an antioxidant property in the DRGs due to its ability to modulate NADPH oxidase and protein kinase C pathways. We aimed to investigate the protective property of HP on oxidative stress, apoptosis, and Ca(2+) entry through transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels in SCI-induced DRG neurons of rats. Rats were divided into four groups as control, HP, SCI, and SCI + HP. The HP groups received 30 mg/kg HP for three concessive days after SCI induction. The SCI-induced TRPM2 and TRPV1 currents and cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration were reduced by HP. The SCI-induced decrease in glutathione peroxidase and cell viability values were ameliorated by HP treatment, and the SCI-induced increase in apoptosis, caspase 3, caspase 9, cytosolic reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and mitochondrial membrane depolarization values in DRG of SCI group were overcome by HP treatment. In conclusion, we observed a protective role of HP on SCI-induced oxidative stress, apoptosis, and Ca(2+) entry through TRPM2 and TRPV1 in the DRG neurons. Our findings may be relevant to the etiology and treatment of SCI by HP. Graphical Abstract Possible molecular pathways of involvement of Hypericum perforatum (HP) on apoptosis, oxidative stress, and calcium accumulation through TRPM2 and TRPV1 channels in DRG neurons of SCI-induced rats. The TRPM2 channel is activated by ADP-ribose and oxidative stress through activation of ADP-ribose pyrophosphate although it was inhibited by N-(p-amylcinnamoyl) anthranilic acid (ACA) and 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate (2APB). The TRPV1 channel is activated by oxidative stress and capsaicin and it is blocked by capsazepine. Injury in the DRG can result in augmented ROS release, leading to Ca(2+) uptake through

  6. Increased expression of HCN2 channel protein in L4 dorsal root ganglion neurons following axotomy of L5- and inflammation of L4-spinal nerves in rats.

    PubMed

    Smith, T; Al Otaibi, M; Sathish, J; Djouhri, L

    2015-06-01

    A hallmark of peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP) is chronic spontaneous pain and/or hypersensitivity to normally painful stimuli (hyperalgesia) or normally nonpainful stimuli (allodynia).This pain results partly from abnormal hyperexcitability of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We have previously shown, using a modified version of the lumbar 5 (L5)-spinal nerve ligation model of PNP (mSNA model involving L5-spinal nerve axotomy plus loose ligation of the lumbar 4 (L4)-spinal nerve with neuroinflammation-inducing chromic-gut), that L4 DRG neurons exhibit increased spontaneous activity, the key characteristic of neuronal hyperexcitability. The underlying ionic and molecular mechanisms of the hyperexcitability of L4 DRG neurons are incompletely understood, but could result from changes in expression and/or function of ion channels including hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, which are active near the neuron's resting membrane potential, and which produce an excitatory inward current that depolarizes the membrane potential toward the threshold of action potential generation. Therefore, in the present study we used the mSNA model to investigate whether: (a) expression of HCN1-HCN3 channels is altered in L4 DRG neurons which, in the mSNA model, are essential for transmission of the evoked pain, and which contribute to chronic spontaneous pain, and (b) local (intraplantar) blockade of these HCN channels, with a specific blocker, ZD7288, attenuates chronic spontaneous pain and/or evoked pain in mSNA rats. We found 7days after mSNA: (1) a significant increase in HCN2-immunoreactivity in small (<30μm) DRG neurons (predominantly IB4-negative neurons), and in the proportion of small neurons expressing HCN2 (putative nociceptors); (2) no significant change in HCN1- or HCN3-immunoreactivity in all cell types; and (3) attenuation, with ZD7288 (100μM intraplantar), of chronic spontaneous pain behavior (spontaneous foot lifting) and mechanical

  7. Expression and Regulation of Cav3.2 T-Type Calcium Channels during Inflammatory Hyperalgesia in Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masaya; Ueda, Takashi; Shibata, Yasuhiro; Kumamoto, Natsuko; Shimada, Shoichi; Ugawa, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    The Cav3.2 isoform of the T-type calcium channel is expressed in primary sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG), and these channels contribute to nociceptive and neuropathic pain in rats. However, there are conflicting reports on the roles of these channels in pain processing in rats and mice. In addition, the function of T-type channels in persistent inflammatory hyperalgesia is poorly understood. We performed behavioral and comprehensive histochemical analyses to characterize Cav3.2-expressing DRG neurons and examined the regulation of T-type channels in DRGs from C57BL/6 mice with carrageenan-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia. We show that approximately 20% of mouse DRG neurons express Cav3.2 mRNA and protein. The size of the majority of Cav3.2-positive DRG neurons (69 ± 8%) ranged from 300 to 700 μm2 in cross-sectional area and 20 to 30 μm in estimated diameter. These channels co-localized with either neurofilament-H (NF-H) or peripherin. The peripherin-positive cells also overlapped with neurons that were positive for isolectin B4 (IB4) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) but were distinct from transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-positive neurons during normal mouse states. In mice with carrageenan-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia, Cav3.2 channels, but not Cav3.1 or Cav3.3 channels, were upregulated in ipsilateral DRG neurons during the sub-acute phase. The increased Cav3.2 expression partially resulted from an increased number of Cav3.2-immunoreactive neurons; this increase in number was particularly significant for TRPV1-positive neurons. Finally, preceding and periodic intraplantar treatment with the T-type calcium channel blockers mibefradil and NNC 55-0396 markedly reduced and reversed mechanical hyperalgesia during the acute and sub-acute phases, respectively, in mice. These data suggest that Cav3.2 T-type channels participate in the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia, and this channel might play an even greater

  8. Infection of human fetal dorsal root ganglion glial cells with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 involves an entry mechanism independent of the CD4 T4A epitope.

    PubMed Central

    Kunsch, C; Hartle, H T; Wigdahl, B

    1989-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been implicated in the generation of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated neurological dysfunction, and it is believed that the presence of CD4 in the nervous system may be involved in the susceptibility of selected neural cell populations to HIV-1 infection. We previously demonstrated (B. Wigdahl, R. A. Guyton, and P. S. Sarin, Virology 159:440-445, 1987) that glial cells derived from human fetal dorsal root ganglion (DRG) are susceptible to HIV-1 infection and subsequently express at least a fraction of the virus genome. In contrast to HIV-1 infection of CD4+ lymphocytes, which can be blocked by treatment with monoclonal antibodies directed against the HIV-1-binding region of CD4 (T4A epitope), treatment of human fetal DRG glial cells with similar antibodies resulted in only a slight reduction in HIV-1-specific gag antigen expression. In addition, preincubation of the HIV-1 inoculum prior to infection with HIV-1-neutralizing antiserum did not reduce HIV-1 gag antigen expression in these cells. Furthermore, we were unable to detect the synthesis or accumulation of the CD4 molecule in neural cell populations derived from DRG. However, a protected CD4-specific RNA fragment was detected in RNA isolated from human fetal DRG and spinal cord tissue by an RNase protection assay with a CD4-specific antisense RNA probe. RNA blot hybridization analysis of total cellular RNA isolated from human fetal DRG and spinal cord demonstrated specific hybridization to an RNA species that comigrated with the mature 3.0-kilobase CD4 mRNA as well as two unique CD4 RNA species with relative molecular sizes of approximately 5.3 and 6.7 kilobases. Furthermore, all three CD4-related RNA species were polyadenylated when isolated from human fetal spinal cord tissue. These data suggest that HIV-1 infection of human fetal DRG glial cells may proceed via a mechanism of viral entry independent of the T4A epitope of CD4. Images PMID:2479771

  9. TRPV1-Mediated Neuropeptide Secretion and Depressor Effects: Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Ca2+ Release Receptors in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Wang, Hui; Galligan, James J.; Wang, Donna H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study tests the hypothesis that the transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1)-induced neuropeptide secretion and depressor response are mediated by, at least in part, activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated Ca2+ release receptors, leading to increased cytosolic Ca2+ in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Methods/Results Bolus injection of capsaicin (CAP, 10 or 50 μg/kg), a selective TRPV1 agonist, into anesthetized male Wistar rats caused dose-dependent decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP, P<0.05). CAP (50 μg/kg)-induced depressor effects and increases in plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) levels (-29±2 mmHg, 82.2±5.0 pg/ml, respectively) were abolished by a selective TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine (3 mg/kg CAPZ, -4±1 mmHg, 41.8±4.4 pg/ml, P<0.01), and attenuated by a selective ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonist, dantrolene (5 mg/kg, -12±1 mmHg, 57.2±2.6 pg/ml, P<0.01), but unaffected by an inhibitor of ER Ca2+-ATPase, thapsigargin (50 μg/kg TG, -30±1 mmHg, 73.8±2.3 pg/ml, P>0.05), or an antagonist of the inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R), 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (3 mg/kg 2-APB, -34±5 mmHg, 69.0±3.7 pg/ml, P>0.05). CGRP8-37 (1 mg/kg), a selective CGRP receptor antagonist, also blocked CAP-induced depressor effects. In contrast, dantrolene had no effect on CGRP (1 μg/kg)-induced depressor effects. In vitro, CAP (0.3 μM) increased intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and CGRP release from freshly isolated sensory neurons in DRG (P<0.01), which were blocked by CAPZ (10 μM) and attenuated by dantrolene but not TG or 2-APB. Conclusion Our results indicate that TRPV1 activation triggers RyR- but not IP3R-dependent Ca2+ release from ER in DRG neurons leading to increased CGRP release and consequent depressor effects. PMID:18806620

  10. Peripheral prostaglandin E2 prolongs the sensitization of nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons possibly by facilitating the synthesis and anterograde axonal trafficking of EP4 receptors.

    PubMed

    St-Jacques, Bruno; Ma, Weiya

    2014-11-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a well-known pain mediator enriched in inflamed tissues, plays a pivotal role in the genesis of chronic pain conditions such as inflammatory and neuropathic pain. PGE2-prolonged sensitization of nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons (nociceptors) may contribute to the transition from acute to chronic pain. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that facilitating synthesis and anterograde axonal trafficking of EP receptors contribute to PGE2-prolonged nociceptor sensitization. Intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of a stabilized PGE2 analog, 16,16 dimethyl PGE2 (dmPGE2), in a dose- and time-dependent manner, not only elicited primary tactile allodynia which lasted for 1d, but also prolonged tactile allodynia evoked by a subsequent i.pl. injection of dmPGE2 from 1d to 4d. Moreover, the duration of tactile allodynia was progressively prolonged following multiple sequential i.pl. injections of dmPGE2. Co-injection of the selective EP1 or EP4 receptor antagonist, the inhibitors of cAMP, PKA, PKC, PKCε or PLC as well as an interleukin-6 (IL-6) neutralizing antiserum differentially blocked primary tactile allodynia elicited by the 1st dmPGE2 and the prolonged tactile allodynia evoked by the 2nd dmPGE2, suggesting the involvement of these signaling events in dmPGE2-induced nociceptor activation and sensitization. Co-injection of a selective COX2 inhibitor or two EP4 antagonists prevented or shortened inflammagen-prolonged nociceptor sensitization. I.pl. injection of dmPGE2 or carrageenan time-dependently increased EP4 levels in L4-6 DRG neurons and peripheral nerves. EP4 was expressed in almost half of IB4-binding nociceptors of L4-6 DRG. Taken together, our data suggest that stimulating the synthesis and anterograde axonal trafficking to increase EP4 availability at the axonal terminals of nociceptors is likely a novel mechanism underlying PGE2-prolonged nociceptor

  11. Osthole, a herbal compound, alleviates nucleus pulposus-evoked nociceptive responses through the suppression of overexpression of acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) in rat dorsal root ganglion

    PubMed Central

    He, Qiu-Lan; Chen, Yuling; Qin, Jian; Mo, Sui-Lin; Wei, Ming; Zhang, Jin-Jun; Li, Mei-Na; Zou, Xue-Nong; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Chen, Xiao-Wu; Sun, Lai-Bao

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Osthole (Ost), a natural coumarin derivative, has been shown to inhibit many pro-inflammatory mediators and block voltage-gated Na+ channels. During inflammation, acidosis is an important pain inducer which activates nociceptors by gating depolarizing cationic channels, such as acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3). The aim of this study was to examine the effects of Ost on nucleus pulposus-evoked nociceptive responses and ASIC3 over-expression in the rat dorsal root ganglion, and to investigate the possible mechanism. Material/Methods Radicular pain was generated with application of nucleus pulposus (NP) to nerve root. Mechanical allodynia was evaluated using von Frey filaments with logarithmically incremental rigidity to calculate the 50% probability thresholds for mechanical paw withdrawal. ASIC3 protein expression in dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) was assessed with Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Membrane potential (MP) shift of DRG neurons induced by ASIC3-sensitive acid (pH6.5) was determined by DiBAC4 (3) fluorescence intensity (F.I.). Results The NP-evoked mechanical hyperalgesia model showed allodynia for 3 weeks, and ASIC3 expression was up-regulated in DRG neurons, reaching peak on Day 7. Epidural administration of Ost induced a remarkable and prolonged antinociceptive effect, accompanied by an inhibition of over-expressed ASIC3 protein and of abnormal shift of MP. Amiloride (Ami), an antagonist of ASIC3, strengthened the antinociceptive effect of Ost. Conclusions Up-regulation of ASIC3 expression may be associated with NP-evoked mechanical hyperalgesia. A single epidural injection of Ost decreased ASIC3 expression in DGR neurons and the pain in the NP-evoked mechanical hyperalgesia model. Osthole may be of great benefit for preventing chronic pain status often seen in lumbar disc herniation (LDH). PMID:22648244

  12. Accumulation of [3H]fucose-labelled glycoproteins in the Golgi apparatus of dorsal root ganglion neurons during inhibition of fast axonal transport caused by exposure of the ganglion to Co2+-containing or Ca2+-free medium.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, P A; Bennett, G

    1983-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies have established that Co2+-containing or Ca2+-free media interfere with the initiation of the fast axonal transport of proteins. The present study has used light- and electron-microscope radioautography to compare the distribution of [3H]fucose-labelled glycoproteins in neuronal cell bodies of control dorsal root ganglia and ganglia incubated for 16-17 h in Ca2+-free medium or in medium containing 0.18 mM Co2+. The radioautographic reaction in control cell bodies was diffusely scattered throughout the cytoplasm; grain counts revealed that 22% of the reaction was associated with elements of the Golgi apparatus and 78% was over other organelles and the remainder of the cytoplasm. In most experimental cell bodies, 78% of the silver grains were clustered over elements of the Golgi complex whereas other organelles and the remainder of the cytoplasm were comparatively much less labelled; structural alterations of the Golgi apparatus were also produced by the modified media. In parallel studies where the radioactivity in nerve trunks and ganglia was measured by liquid scintillation counting, it was found that the Ca2+-free medium and the Co2+-containing medium both reduced by approximately 80% the quantity of [3H]fucose-labelled glycoproteins which were carried by the fast axonal transport system; they did so without interfering with the incorporation of [3H]fucose into glycoproteins. The results indicate that in the presence of Co2+ or in the absence of Ca2+ the proteins which are destined for fast axonal transport accumulate at the Golgi apparatus of neuronal cell bodies. These results thus suggest that Ca2+ is required for proteins to leave the Golgi region in transit to the fast axonal transport system. PMID:6188994

  13. Expression patterns of T-type Cav3.2 channel and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor in dorsal root ganglion neurons of mice after sciatic nerve axotomy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Si-Fang; Yu, Xiao-Lu; Liu, Xiao-Ya; Wang, Bing; Li, Cheng-Hui; Sun, Yan-Gang; Liu, Xing-Jun

    2016-10-19

    Substantial evidence indicates that T-type Cav3.2 channel and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) contribute to pain hypersensitivity within primary sensory nerves. A recent study suggested that activation of IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) could increase Cav3.2 channel currents and further contribute to inflammatory pain sensitivity. However, the expression patterns of Cav3.2 and IGF-1R and their colocalization in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in chronic neuropathic pain condition remain unknown. In this study, we explored expression patterns of Cav3.2, IGF-1R and their colocalization, and whether phenotypic switch occurs in a subpopulation of Cav3.2 or IGF-1R neurons in mouse DRGs after sciatic nerve axotomy with immunofluorescence, real-time reverse transcription-PCR, and western blot assays. We found that expressions of Cav3.2 and IGF-1R, and their colocalization were not increased in DRGs of mice following axotomy. In addition, Cav3.2 or IGF-1R subpopulation neurons did not acquire significant switch in expression phenotype after sciatic nerve axotomy. Our findings argue for an upregulation of Cav3.2 and IGF-1R expression in lumbar DRGs post-sciatic nerve axotomy and provided an insight for understanding the functions of peripheral afferent Cav3.2 channel and IGF-1/IGF-1R signaling in chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:27571431

  14. Alterations of gene expression of sodium channels in dorsal root ganglion neurons of estrogen receptor knockout (ERKO) mice induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP).

    PubMed

    Ding, Haixia; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Jingli; Qian, Wenyi; Wang, Wenjuan; Wang, Jun; Gao, Rong; Xiao, Hang

    2012-08-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) mediate the neuroprotection of estrogens against MPTP-induced striatal dopamine (DA) depletion. Pain is an important and distressing symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD). Voltage-gated sodium channels in sensory neurons are involved in the development of neuropathic pain. In this study, MPTP caused changes in nociception and alterations of gene expression of voltage-gated sodium channels in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in ER knockout (ERKO) mice were investigated. We found that administration of MPTP (11 mg/kg) to WT mice led to an extensive depletion of DA and its two metabolites, αERKO mice were observed to be more susceptible to MPTP toxicity than βERKO or WT mice. In addition, we found that the mRNA levels of TTX-S and TTX-R sodium channel subtypes were differentially affected in MPTP-treated WT animals. The MPTP-induced up-regulation of Nav1.1 and Nav1.9, down-regulation of Nav1.6 in DRG neurons may be through ERβ, up-regulation of Nav1.7 and down-regulation of Nav1.8 are dependent on both ERα and ERβ. Therefore, the MPTP-induced alterations of gene expression of sodium channels in DRG neurons could be an important mechanism to affect excitability and nociceptive thresholds, and the ERs appear to play a role in nociception in PD. PMID:22371119

  15. Pulsed electromagnetic field enhances brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression through L-type voltage-gated calcium channel- and Erk-dependent signaling pathways in neonatal rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Yan, Xiaodong; Liu, Juanfang; Li, Ling; Hu, Xinghua; Sun, Honghui; Tian, Jing

    2014-09-01

    Although pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) exposure has been reported to promote neuronal differentiation, the mechanism is still unclear. Here, we aimed to examine the effects of PEMF exposure on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) mRNA expression and the correlation between the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and Bdnf mRNA expression in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGNs). Exposure to 50Hz and 1mT PEMF for 2h increased the level of [Ca(2+)]i and Bdnf mRNA expression, which was found to be mediated by increased [Ca(2+)]i from Ca(2+) influx through L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). However, calcium mobilization was not involved in the increased [Ca(2+)]i and BDNF expression, indicating that calcium influx was one of the key factors responding to PEMF exposure. Moreover, PD098059, an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) inhibitor, strongly inhibited PEMF-dependant Erk1/2 activation and BDNF expression, indicating that Erk activation is required for PEMF-induced upregulation of BDNF expression. These findings indicated that PEMF exposure increased BDNF expression in DRGNs by activating Ca(2+)- and Erk-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:24937769

  16. Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Progenitors Assist Functional Sensory Axon Regeneration after Dorsal Root Avulsion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hoeber, Jan; Trolle, Carl; Konig, Niclas; Du, Zhongwei; Gallo, Alessandro; Hermans, Emmanuel; Aldskogius, Hakan; Shortland, Peter; Zhang, Su-Chun; Deumens, Ronald; Kozlova, Elena N.

    2015-01-01

    Dorsal root avulsion results in permanent impairment of sensory functions due to disconnection between the peripheral and central nervous system. Improved strategies are therefore needed to reconnect injured sensory neurons with their spinal cord targets in order to achieve functional repair after brachial and lumbosacral plexus avulsion injuries. Here, we show that sensory functions can be restored in the adult mouse if avulsed sensory fibers are bridged with the spinal cord by human neural progenitor (hNP) transplants. Responses to peripheral mechanical sensory stimulation were significantly improved in transplanted animals. Transganglionic tracing showed host sensory axons only in the spinal cord dorsal horn of treated animals. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that sensory fibers had grown through the bridge and showed robust survival and differentiation of the transplants. Section of the repaired dorsal roots distal to the transplant completely abolished the behavioral improvement. This demonstrates that hNP transplants promote recovery of sensorimotor functions after dorsal root avulsion, and that these effects are mediated by spinal ingrowth of host sensory axons. These results provide a rationale for the development of novel stem cell-based strategies for functionally useful bridging of the peripheral and central nervous system. PMID:26053681

  17. Bilateral Thoracic Ganglion Cyst : A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kazanci, Burak; Tehli, Ozkan; Guclu, Bulent

    2013-01-01

    Ganglion cysts usually arise from the tissues around the facet joints. It is usually associated with degenerative cahanges in facet joints. Bilateral thoracic ganglion cysts are very rare and there is no previous case that located in bilateral intervertebral foramen compressing the L1 nerve root associated with severe radiculopathy. We report a 53 years old woman who presented with bilateral groin pain and severe numbness. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral cystic mass in the intervertebral foramen between 12th thoracal and 1st lumbar vertebrae. The cystic lesions were removed after bilateral exposure of Th12-L1 foramens. The result of hystopathology confirmed the diagnosis as ganglion cyst. The ganglion cyst may compromise lumbar dorsal ganglion when it located in the intervertebral foramen. The surgeon should keep this rare entity in their mind for differential diagnosis. PMID:23908708

  18. Semimembranosus ganglion cyst

    PubMed Central

    Kannadath, Bijun Sai; Soundamourthy, Sandosh; Subramanian, Aruna; Sinhasan, Sankappa P.; Bhat, Ramachandra V.

    2014-01-01

    Ganglion cysts are tumor-like lesions in the soft tissues, generated by mucoid degeneration of the joint capsule, tendon or tendon sheaths on the dorsum of hand, wrist and foot. However, an intratendinous origin for a ganglion cyst is extremely rare. During dissection of the popliteal fossa, a cyst of 2.5 cm×2 cm×0.5 cm was observed in the tendon of right semimembranosus, 3.5 cm above the insertion of the muscle. Contrast X-ray revealed the cyst as not communicating with the knee joint or any adjacent bursae. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of ganglion cyst. PMID:25276481

  19. Effects of serum immunoglobulins from patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) on depolarisation-induced calcium transients in isolated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Joanne M; Dharmalingam, Backialakshmi; Marsh, Stephen J; Thompson, Victoria; Goebel, Andreas; Brown, David A

    2016-03-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is thought to have an auto-immune component. One such target recently proposed from the effects of auto-immune IgGs on Ca(2+) transients in cardiac myocytes and cell lines is the α1-adrenoceptor. We have tested whether such IgGs exerted comparable effects on nociceptive sensory neurons isolated from rat dorsal root ganglia. Depolarisation-induced [Ca(2+)]i transients were generated by applying 30 mM KCl for 2 min and monitored by Fura-2 fluorescence imaging. No IgGs tested (including 3 from CRPS patients) had any significant effect on these [Ca(2+)]i transients. However, IgG from one CRPS patient consistently and significantly reduced the K(+)-induced response of cells that had been pre-incubated for 24h with a mixture of inflammatory mediators (1 μM histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, bradykinin and PGE2). Since this pre-incubation also appeared to induce a comparable inhibitory response to the α1-agonist phenylephrine, this is compatible with the α1-adrenoceptor as a target for CRPS auto-immunity. A mechanism whereby this might enhance pain is suggested. PMID:26708558

  20. Alterations of (/sup 3/H)actinomycin D binding to axotomized dorsal root ganglion cell nuclei: an autoradiographic method to detect changes in chromatin structure and RNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, M.R.

    1984-11-01

    An autoradiographic method was developed to quantify on a comparative basis the binding of (/sup 3/H)actinomycin D (Act D) to the cell nuclei of frozen, unfixed sections of spinal sensory ganglia in rats. After a crush lesion of the sciatic nerve, alterations of (/sup 3/H)Act D binding were found in L5 and L6 dorsal root ganglia which corresponded to changes in RNA synthesis observed in other studies. An increase in Act D binding was seen at 1 to 3 days postoperation, followed by a decrease at 5 to 7 days. By 9 to 11 days a second increase in binding occurred, followed by a decrease at 14 days. Contralateral ganglia exhibited an increase in Act D binding only at 5 days compared with unoperated controls. The timing of the response in axotomized ganglia differed with the distance of the lesion from the cell body. The observed patterns of Act D binding confirm that changes of chromatin structure are closely associated with the alterations of RNA and protein synthesis occurring after axon injury. The method may be useful as an indicator for alterations in RNA synthesis related to changes in chromatin structure in complex tissues.

  1. Neuro-fuzzy decoding of sensory information from ensembles of simultaneously recorded dorsal root ganglion neurons for functional electrical stimulation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigosa, J.; Weber, D. J.; Prochazka, A.; Stein, R. B.; Micera, S.

    2011-08-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is used to improve motor function after injury to the central nervous system. Some FES systems use artificial sensors to switch between finite control states. To optimize FES control of the complex behavior of the musculo-skeletal system in activities of daily life, it is highly desirable to implement feedback control. In theory, sensory neural signals could provide the required control signals. Recent studies have demonstrated the feasibility of deriving limb-state estimates from the firing rates of primary afferent neurons recorded in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). These studies used multiple linear regression (MLR) methods to generate estimates of limb position and velocity based on a weighted sum of firing rates in an ensemble of simultaneously recorded DRG neurons. The aim of this study was to test whether the use of a neuro-fuzzy (NF) algorithm (the generalized dynamic fuzzy neural networks (GD-FNN)) could improve the performance, robustness and ability to generalize from training to test sets compared to the MLR technique. NF and MLR decoding methods were applied to ensemble DRG recordings obtained during passive and active limb movements in anesthetized and freely moving cats. The GD-FNN model provided more accurate estimates of limb state and generalized better to novel movement patterns. Future efforts will focus on implementing these neural recording and decoding methods in real time to provide closed-loop control of FES using the information extracted from sensory neurons.

  2. Dorsal root ganglion-derived Schwann cells combined with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/chitosan conduits for the repair of sciatic nerve defects in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Qu, Wei; Wu, Yuxuan; Ma, Hao; Jiang, Huajun

    2014-01-01

    Schwann cells, nerve regeneration promoters in peripheral nerve tissue engineering, can be used to repair both the peripheral and central nervous systems. However, isolation and purification of Schwann cells are complicated by contamination with fibroblasts. Current reported measures are mainly limited by either high cost or complicated procedures with low cell yields or purity. In this study, we collected dorsal root ganglia from neonatal rats from which we obtained highly purified Schwann cells using serum-free melanocyte culture medium. The purity of Schwann cells (> 95%) using our method was higher than that using standard medium containing fetal bovine serum. The obtained Schwann cells were implanted into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/chitosan conduits to repair 10-mm sciatic nerve defects in rats. Results showed that axonal diameter and area were significantly increased and motor functions were obviously improved in the rat sciatic nerve tissue. Experimental findings suggest that serum-free melanocyte culture medium is conducive to purify Schwann cells and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/chitosan nerve conduits combined with Schwann cells contribute to restore sciatic nerve defects. PMID:25598778

  3. Immunohistological demonstration of CaV3.2 T-type voltage-gated calcium channel expression in soma of dorsal root ganglion neurons and peripheral axons of rat and mouse.

    PubMed

    Rose, K E; Lunardi, N; Boscolo, A; Dong, X; Erisir, A; Jevtovic-Todorovic, V; Todorovic, S M

    2013-10-10

    Previous behavioral studies have revealed that CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels support peripheral nociceptive transmission and electrophysiological studies have established the presence of T-currents in putative nociceptive sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglion (DRG). To date, however, the localization pattern of this key nociceptive channel in the soma and peripheral axons of these cells has not been demonstrated due to lack of isoform-selective anti-CaV3.2 antibodies. In the present study a new polyclonal CaV3.2 antibody is used to localize CaV3.2 expression in rodent DRG neurons using different staining techniques including confocal and electron microscopy (EM). Confocal microscopy of both acutely dissociated cells and short-term cultures demonstrated strong immunofluorescence of anti-CaV3.2 antibody that was largely confined to smaller diameter DRG neurons where it co-localized with established immuno-markers of unmyelinated nociceptors, such as, CGRP, IB4 and peripherin. In contrast, a smaller proportion of these CaV3.2-labeled DRG cells also co-expressed neurofilament 200 (NF200), a marker of myelinated sensory neurons. In the rat sciatic nerve preparation, confocal microscopy demonstrated anti-CaV3.2 immunofluorescence which was co-localized with both peripherin and NF200. Further, EM revealed immuno-gold labeling of CaV3.2 preferentially in association with unmyelinated sensory fibers from mouse sciatic nerve. Finally, we demonstrated the expression of CaV3.2 channels in peripheral nerve endings of mouse hindpaw skin as shown by co-localization with Mrgpd-GFP-positive fibers. The CaV3.2 expression within the soma and peripheral axons of nociceptive sensory neurons further demonstrates the importance of this channel in peripheral pain transmission. PMID:23867767

  4. Stromal Cell-Derived Factor 1 Increases Tetrodotoxin-Resistant Sodium Currents Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons via Different Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Fang; Li, Yang; Fu, Qiang; Fan, Yong-Yan; Zhu, Chao; Liu, Yan-Hong; Mi, Wei-Dong

    2016-07-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1)/chemokine CXC motif ligand 12 (CXCL12), a chemokine that is upregulated in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) during chronic pain models, has recently been found to play a central role in pain hypersensitivity. The purpose of present study is to investigate the functional impact of SDF-1 and its receptor, chemokine CXC motif receptor 4 (CXCR4), on two TTXR sodium channels in rat DRG using electrophysiological techniques. Preincubation with SDF-1 caused a concentration-dependent increase of Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 currents amplitudes in acutely isolated small diameter DRG neurons in short-term culture. As to Nav1.9, changes in current density and kinetic properties of Nav1.9 current evoked by SDF-1(50 ng/ml) was eliminated by CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002. The increase in Nav1.9 current was also blocked by pertussis toxin (PTX) but not cholera toxin (CTX), showing involvement of Gi/o but not Gs subunits. As to Nav1.8, inhibitors (AMD3100, PTX, CTX, LY294002) used in present study didn't inhibit the increased amplitude of Nav1.8 current and shifted activation curve of Nav1.8 in a hyperpolarizing direction in the presence of SDF-1 (50 ng/ml). In conclusion, our data demonstrated that SDF-1 may excite primary nociceptive sensory neurons by acting on the biophysical properties of Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 currents but via different mechanisms. PMID:27038931

  5. The PDZ domain protein PICK1 and the sodium channel BNaC1 interact and localize at mechanosensory terminals of dorsal root ganglion neurons and dendrites of central neurons.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Anne; Garcia-Anoveros, Jaime; Corey, David P

    2002-02-15

    Members of the BNaC/ASIC family of ion channels have been implicated in mechanotransduction and nociception mediated by dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. These ion channels are also expressed in the CNS. We identified the PDZ domain protein PICK1 as an interactor of BNaC1(ASIC2) in a yeast two-hybrid screen. We show by two-hybrid assays, glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays, and coimmunoprecipitations that the BNaC1-PICK1 interaction is specific, and that coexpression of both proteins leads to their clustering in intracellular compartments. The interaction between BNaC1 and PICK1 requires the PDZ domain of PICK1 and the last four amino acids of BNaC1. BNaC1 is similar to two other BNaC/ASIC family members, BNaC2 (ASIC1) and ASIC4, at its extreme C terminus, and we show that PICK1 also interacts with BNaC2. We found that PICK1, like BNaC1 and BNaC2, is expressed by DRG neurons and, like the BNaC1alpha isoform, is present at their peripheral mechanosensory endings. Both PICK1 and BNaC1alpha are also coexpressed by some pyramidal neurons of the cortex, by pyramidal neurons of the CA3 region of hippocampus, and by cerebellar Purkinje neurons, localizing to their dendrites and cell bodies. Therefore, PICK1 interacts with BNaC/ASIC channels and may regulate their subcellular distribution or function in both peripheral and central neurons. PMID:11739374

  6. Activation of the cAMP-PKA signaling pathway in rat dorsal root ganglion and spinal cord contributes toward induction and maintenance of bone cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Gui-Qin; Liu, Su; He, Duan-Duan; Liu, Yue-Peng; Song, Xue-Jun

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the role of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-protein kinase A (cAMP-PKA) signaling in the development of bone cancer pain in rats. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (N=48) were divided randomly into four groups: sham (n=8), tumor cell implantation (TCI) (n=16), TCI+saline (n=8), and TCI+PKA inhibitor (n=16). Bone cancer-induced pain behaviors - thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia - were tested at postoperative days -3, -1, 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 14. A PKA inhibitor, Rp-cAMPS (1 mmol/l/20 μl), was injected intrathecally on postoperative days 3, 4, and 5 (early phase) or 7, 8, and 9 postoperative days (late phase). The expression of PKA mRNA in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was detected by reverse transcription-PCR. The concentration of cAMP and activity of PKA in DRG and spinal cord were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. TCI treatment induced significant pain behaviors, manifested as thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Spinal administration of the PKA inhibitor Rp-cAMPS during the early phase and late phase significantly delayed or reversed, respectively, TCI-induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. TCI treatment also led to obvious tumor growth and bone destruction. The level of PKA mRNA in the DRG, as well as the concentration of cAMP and the activity of PKA, in both the DRG and spinal cord were significantly increased after TCI treatment (P<0.01). We conclude that the inhibition of the cAMP-PKA signaling pathway may reduce bone cancer pain. PMID:24978483

  7. Localization of the NBMPR-sensitive equilibrative nucleoside transporter, ENT1, in the rat dorsal root ganglion and lumbar spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Governo, Ricardo J M; Deuchars, Jim; Baldwin, Stephen A; King, Anne E

    2005-10-19

    ENT1 is an equilibrative nucleoside transporter that enables trans-membrane bi-directional diffusion of biologically active purines such as adenosine. In spinal cord dorsal horn and in sensory afferent neurons, adenosine acts as a neuromodulator with complex pro- and anti-nociceptive actions. Although uptake and release mechanisms for adenosine are believed to exist in both the dorsal horn and sensory afferent neurons, the expression profile of specific nucleoside transporter subtypes such as ENT1 is not established. In this study, immunoblot analysis with specific ENT1 antibodies (anti-rENT1(227-290) or anti-hENT1(227-290)) was used to reveal the expression of ENT1 protein in tissue homogenates of either adult rat dorsal horn or dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Immunoperoxidase labeling with ENT1 antibodies produced specific staining in dorsal horn which was concentrated over superficial laminae, especially the substantia gelatinosa (lamina II). Immunofluorescence double-labeling revealed a punctate pattern for ENT1 closely associated, in some instances, with cell bodies of either neurons (confirmed with NeuN) or glia (confirmed with CNPase). Electron microscopy analysis of ENT1 expression in lamina II indicated its presence within pre- and post-synaptic elements, although a number of other structures, including myelinated and unmyelinated, axons were also labeled. In sensory ganglia, ENT1 was localized to a high proportion of cell bodies of all sizes that co-expressed substance P, IB4 or NF, although ENT1 was most highly expressed in the peptidergic population. These data provide the first detailed account of the expression and cellular distribution of ENT1 in rat dorsal horn and sensory ganglia. The functional significance of ENT1 expression with regard to the homeostatic regulation of adenosine at synapses remains to be established. PMID:16226730

  8. Long-term non-invasive interrogation of human dorsal root ganglion neuronal cultures on an integrated microfluidic multielectrode array platform.

    PubMed

    Enright, H A; Felix, S H; Fischer, N O; Mukerjee, E V; Soscia, D; Mcnerney, M; Kulp, K; Zhang, J; Page, G; Miller, P; Ghetti, A; Wheeler, E K; Pannu, S

    2016-09-21

    Scientific studies in drug development and toxicology rely heavily on animal models, which often inaccurately predict the true response for human exposure. This may lead to unanticipated adverse effects or misidentified risks that result in, for example, drug candidate elimination. The utilization of human cells and tissues for in vitro physiological platforms has become a growing area of interest to bridge this gap and to more accurately predict human responses to drugs and toxins. The effects of new drugs and toxins on the peripheral nervous system are often investigated with neurons isolated from dorsal root ganglia (DRG), typically with one-time measurement techniques such as patch clamping. Here, we report the use of our multi-electrode array (MEA) platform for long-term noninvasive assessment of human DRG cell health and function. In this study, we acquired simultaneous optical and electrophysiological measurements from primary human DRG neurons upon chemical stimulation repeatedly through day in vitro (DIV) 23. Distinct chemical signatures were noted for the cellular responses evoked by each chemical stimulus. Additionally, the cell viability and function of the human DRG neurons were consistent through DIV 23. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on long-term measurements of the cell health and function of human DRG neurons on a MEA platform. Future generations will include higher electrode numbers in customized arrangements as well as integration with different tissue types on a single device. This platform will provide a valuable testing tool for both rodent and human cells, enabling a more comprehensive risk assessment for drug candidates and toxicants. PMID:27351032

  9. Ultrastructural Visualization of Individual Tegument Protein Dissociation during Entry of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 into Human and Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Anupriya; Boadle, Ross A.; Kelly, Barbara J.; Diefenbach, Russell J.; Alam, Waafiqa; Cunningham, Anthony L.

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) enters neurons primarily by fusion of the viral envelope with the host cell plasma membrane, leading to the release of the capsid into the cytosol. The capsid travels via microtubule-mediated retrograde transport to the nuclear membrane, where the viral DNA is released for replication in the nucleus. In the present study, the composition and kinetics of incoming HSV-1 capsids during entry and retrograde transport in axons of human fetal and dissociated rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons were examined by wide-field deconvolution microscopy and transmission immunoelectron microscopy (TIEM). We show that HSV-1 tegument proteins, including VP16, VP22, most pUL37, and some pUL36, dissociated from the incoming virions. The inner tegument proteins, including pUL36 and some pUL37, remained associated with the capsid during virus entry and transit to the nucleus in the neuronal cell body. By TIEM, a progressive loss of tegument proteins, including VP16, VP22, most pUL37, and some pUL36, was observed, with most of the tegument dissociating at the plasma membrane of the axons and the neuronal cell body. Further dissociation occurred within the axons and the cytosol as the capsids moved to the nucleus, resulting in the release of free tegument proteins, especially VP16, VP22, pUL37, and some pUL36, into the cytosol. This study elucidates ultrastructurally the composition of HSV-1 capsids that encounter the microtubules in the core of human axons and the complement of free tegument proteins released into the cytosol during virus entry. PMID:22457528

  10. A Ganglion Cyst in the Second Lumbar Intervertebral Foramen

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon Hyuk; Kim, Min Su; Chang, Chul Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Ganglion cysts usually arise from the tendon sheaths and tissues around the joints. It is usually associated with degenerative arthritic changes in older people. Ganglion cyst in the spine is rare and there is no previous report on case that located in the intervertebral foramen and compressed dorsal root ganglion associated severe radiculopathy. A 29-year-old woman presented with severe left thigh pain and dysesthesia for a month. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a dumbbell like mass in the intervertebral foramen between second and third lumbar vertebrae on the left side. The lesion was removed after exposure of the L2-L3 intervertebral foramen. The histological examination showed fragmented cystic wall-like structure composed of fibromyxoid tissue but there was no lining epithelium. A ganglion cyst may compromise lumbar dorsal root ganglion when it located in the intervertebral foramen. Although it is very rare location, ganglion cyst should be included in the differential diagnosis for intervertebral foraminal mass lesions. PMID:21607185

  11. Treatment of Ganglion Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Fung, B.; Lung, C. P.

    2013-01-01

    Ganglion cysts are soft tissue swellings occurring most commonly in the hand or wrist. Apart from swelling, most cysts are asymptomatic. Other symptoms include pain, weakness, or paraesthesia. The two main concerns patients have are the cosmetic appearance of the cysts and the fear of future malignant growth. It has been shown that 58% of cysts will resolve spontaneously over time. Treatment can be either conservative or through surgical excision. This review concluded that nonsurgical treatment is largely ineffective in treating ganglion cysts. However, it advised to patients who do not surgical treatment but would like symptomatic relief. Compared to surgery, which has a lower recurrence rate but have a higher complication rate with longer recovery period. It has been shown that surgical interventions do not provide better symptomatic relief compared to conservative treatment. If symptomatic relief is the patient's primary concern, a conservative approach is preferred, whilst surgical intervention will decrease the likelihood of recurrence. PMID:24967120

  12. Embryonic development of the Drosophila brain. II. Pattern of glial cells.

    PubMed

    Hartenstein, V; Nassif, C; Lekven, A

    1998-12-01

    Glial cells in Drosophila and other insects are organized in an outer layer that envelops the surface of the central and peripheral nervous system (subperineurial glia, peripheral glia), a middle layer associated with neuronal somata in the cortex (cell body glia), and an inner layer surrounding the neuropile (longitudinal glia, midline glia, nerve root glia). In the ventral nerve cord, most glial cells are formed by a relatively small number of neuro-glioblasts; subsequently, glial cell precursors migrate and spread out widely to reach their final destination. By using a glia-specific marker (antibody against the Repo protein) we have reconstructed the pattern of glial cell precursors at successive developmental stages, focusing on the glia of the supraesophageal ganglion and subesophageal ganglion which are not described in previous studies. Digitized images of consecutive optical sections were used to generate 3-D models that show the spatial pattern of glial cell precursors in relationship to the neuropile, brain surface, and peripheral nerves. Similar to their spatial organization in the ventral nerve cord, glial cells of the brain populate the brain nerves and outer surface, cortical cell body layer, and cortex-neuropile interface. Neuropile-associated glial cells arise from a cluster located at the base of the supraesophageal ganglion; from this position, they migrate dorsally along the developing axon tracts and by late embryonic stages form a sheath around all neuropile compartments, including the supraesophageal commissure. Surface and cell body glial cells derive from several discrete foci, notably two large clusters at the deuterocerebrum/protocerebrum boundary and the posterior protocerebrum. From these foci, glial cells then fan out to envelop the surface of the supraesophageal ganglion. PMID:9831044

  13. Development of anomalous rectification (Ih) and of a tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium current in embryonic quail neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Schlichter, R; Bader, C R; Bernheim, L

    1991-01-01

    1. The developmental expression of an inwardly rectifying current activated by membrane hyperpolarization (Ih) and of a tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant Na+ current (INa(TR)) was studied using freshly dissociated ganglionic quail neurones of various embryonic ages. This work was carried out on parasympathetic (ciliary) and sensory (trigeminal and dorsal root) ganglion neurones with the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique. 2. In sensory and parasympathetic neurones, Ih was activated at potentials more negative than -60 mV and displayed strong inward rectification. No sign of time- or voltage-dependent inactivation was apparent. Ih was carried by both Na+ and K+ ions and was selectively and reversibly blocked by extracellular Cs+. 3. During the development of sensory neurones, Ih was observed for the first time between embryonic day 10 (E10) and E11 and the percentage of neurones expressing the current increased subsequently, reaching a plateau level of about 80% at E14. In the parasympathetic neurones of the ciliary ganglion, Ih was already detected at E10 and the percentage of neurones possessing the current increased until E16, a stage at which all neurones were found to express Ih. 4. In the presence of TTX (1 microM), an inward Na+ current, INa(TR), was recorded in sensory neurones after E12. This current was activated at potentials more depolarized than -30 mV and its amplitude was maximal at +5 mV. INa(TR) showed time- and voltage-dependent inactivation. Half-maximal steady-state inactivation was observed at -40 mV. 5. INa(TR) was observed for the first time after E12 in sensory neurones and the percentage of neurones with INa(TR) increased until E14. Thereafter, 80% of the neurones had the current. In contrast, INa(TR) was never observed in the parasympathetic neurones of the ciliary ganglion during embryonic development. 6. Our results with parasympathetic and sensory neurones suggest that the expression of INa(TR) is linked to the phenotype

  14. Cortical basal ganglionic degeneration.

    PubMed

    Scarmeas, N; Chin, S S; Marder, K

    2001-10-01

    In this case study, we describe the symptoms, neuropsychological testing, and brain pathology of a retired mason's assistant with cortical basal ganglionic degeneration (CBGD). CBGD is an extremely rare neurodegenerative disease that is categorized under both Parkinsonian syndromes and frontal lobe dementias. It affects men and women nearly equally, and the age of onset is usually in the sixth decade of life. CBGD is characterized by Parkinson's-like motor symptoms and by deficits of movement and cognition, indicating focal brain pathology. Neuronal cell loss is ultimately responsible for the neurological symptoms. PMID:14602941

  15. Ganglion Cell Regeneration Following Whole-Retina Destruction in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Sherpa, Tshering; Fimbel, Shane M.; Mallory, Dianne E.; Maaswinkel, Hans; Spritzer, Scott D.; Sand, Jordan A.; Li, L.; Hyde, David R.; Stenkamp, Deborah L.

    2008-01-01

    The retinas of adult teleost fish can regenerate neurons following injury. The current study provides the first documentation of functional whole retina regeneration in the zebrafish, Danio rerio, following intraocular injection of the cytotoxin, ouabain. Loss and replacement of laminated retinal tissue was monitored by analysis of cell death and cell proliferation, and by analysis of retina-specific gene expression patterns. The spatiotemporal process of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) regeneration was followed through the use of selective markers, and was found to largely recapitulate the spatiotemporal process of embryonic ganglion cell neurogenesis, over a more protracted time frame. However, the re-expression of some ganglion cell markers was not observed. The growth and pathfinding of ganglion cell axons was evaluated by measurement of the optic nerve head (ONH), and the restoration of normal ONH size was found to correspond to the time of recovery of two visually-mediated behaviors. However, some abnormalities were noted, including overproduction of RGCs, and progressive and excessive growth of the ONH at longer recovery times. This model system for whole-retina regeneration has provided an informative view of the regenerative process. PMID:18000816

  16. Retinal ganglion cell axons regenerate in the presence of intact sensory fibres.

    PubMed

    King, Carolyn; Bartlett, Carole; Sauvé, Yves; Lund, Ray; Dunlop, Sarah; Beazley, Lyn

    2006-02-01

    A novel allograft paradigm was used to test whether adult mammalian central axons regenerate within a peripheral nerve environment containing intact sensory axons. Retinal ganglion cell axon regeneration was compared following anastomosis of dorsal root ganglia grafts or conventional peripheral nerve grafts to the adult rat optic nerve. Dorsal root ganglia grafts comprised intact sensory and degenerate motor axons, whereas conventional grafts comprised both degenerating sensory and motor axons. Retinal ganglion cell axons were traced after 2 months. Dorsal root ganglia survived with their axons persisting throughout the graft. Comparable numbers of retinal ganglion cells regenerated axons into both dorsal root ganglia (1053+/-223) and conventional grafts (1323+/-881; P>0.05). The results indicate that an intact sensory environment supports central axon regeneration. PMID:16407770

  17. Symptomatic Elbow Ganglion Causing Pronator Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rockwell, W. Bradford

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Descriptions of ganglion cysts date back to 400 BC. Ganglions causing peripheral nerve compression have been described most notably at the wrist. Ganglion compression of the median nerve at the elbow is rare. We report a case of a palmar elbow ganglion causing median nerve compression and the clinical presentation of pronator syndrome. After removal of the ganglion and median nerve decompression, the patient’s symptoms fully resolved. PMID:25289303

  18. The 'ventral organs' of Pycnogonida (Arthropoda) are neurogenic niches of late embryonic and post-embryonic nervous system development.

    PubMed

    Brenneis, Georg; Scholtz, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Early neurogenesis in arthropods has been in the focus of numerous studies, its cellular basis, spatio-temporal dynamics and underlying genetic network being by now comparably well characterized for representatives of chelicerates, myriapods, hexapods and crustaceans. By contrast, neurogenesis during late embryonic and/or post-embryonic development has received less attention, especially in myriapods and chelicerates. Here, we apply (i) immunolabeling, (ii) histology and (iii) scanning electron microscopy to study post-embryonic ventral nerve cord development in Pseudopallene sp., a representative of the sea spiders (Pycnogonida), the presumable sister group of the remaining chelicerates. During early post-embryonic development, large neural stem cells give rise to additional ganglion cell material in segmentally paired invaginations in the ventral ectoderm. These ectodermal cell regions - traditionally designated as 'ventral organs' - detach from the surface into the interior and persist as apical cell clusters on the ventral ganglion side. Each cluster is a post-embryonic neurogenic niche that features a tiny central cavity and initially still houses larger neural stem cells. The cluster stays connected to the underlying ganglionic somata cortex via an anterior and a posterior cell stream. Cell proliferation remains restricted to the cluster and streams, and migration of newly produced cells along the streams seems to account for increasing ganglion cell numbers in the cortex. The pycnogonid cluster-stream-systems show striking similarities to the life-long neurogenic system of decapod crustaceans, and due to their close vicinity to glomerulus-like neuropils, we consider their possible involvement in post-embryonic (perhaps even adult) replenishment of olfactory neurons - as in decapods. An instance of a potentially similar post-embryonic/adult neurogenic system in the arthropod outgroup Onychophora is discussed. Additionally, we document two transient posterior

  19. Spontaneous Discharge Patterns in Cochlear Spiral Ganglion Cells Prior to the Onset of Hearing in Cats

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Timothy A.; Leake, Patricia A.; Snyder, Russell L.; Stakhovskaya, Olga; Bonham, Ben

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneous neural activity has been recorded in the auditory nerve of cats as early as 2 days postnatal (P2 ), yet individual auditory neurons do not respond to ambient sound levels below 90–100 dB SPL until about P10. Significant refinement of the central projections from the spiral ganglion to the cochlear nucleus occurs during this neonatal period. This refinement may be dependent on peripheral spontaneous discharge activity. We recorded from single spiral ganglion cells in kittens aged P3 to P9. The spiral ganglion was accessed via the round window through the spiral lamina. A total of 112 ganglion cells were isolated for study in 9 animals. Spike rates in neonates were very low, ranging from 0.06 to 56 sp/s with a mean of 3.09 +/− 8.24 sp/s. Ganglion cells in neonatal kittens exhibited remarkable repetitive spontaneous bursting discharge patterns. The unusual patterns were evident in the large mean interval coefficient of variation (CVi = 2.9 +/−1.6) and burst index of 5.2 +/− 3.5 across ganglion cells. Spontaneous bursting patterns in these neonatal mammals were similar to those reported for cochlear ganglion cells of the embryonic chicken suggesting this may be a general phenomenon that is common across animal classes. Rhythmic spontaneous discharge of retinal ganglion cells has been shown to be important in the development of central retinotopic projections and normal binocular vision (Shatz, 1996, Proc Natl Acad Sci 93). Bursting rhythms in cochlear ganglion cells may play a similar role in the auditory system during pre-hearing periods. PMID:17686914

  20. Differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into Medial Ganglionic Eminence vs. Caudal Ganglionic Eminence cells.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sandra; Kim, Tae-Gon; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Chung, Sangmi

    2016-05-15

    Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) represent an opportunity to study human development in vitro, to model diseases in a dish, to screen drugs as well as to provide an unlimited and ethically unimpeded source of therapeutic cells. Cortical GABAergic interneurons, which are generated from Medial Ganglionic Eminence (MGE) cells and Caudal Ganglionic Eminence (CGE) cells during embryonic development, regulate cortical neural networks by providing inhibitory inputs. Their malfunction, resulting in failure to intricately regulate neural circuit balance, has been implicated in brain diseases, such as schizophrenia, autism and epilepsy. In this study, using combinatorial and temporal modulation of developmentally relevant dorsoventral and rostrocaudal signaling pathways, we efficiently generated MGE cells vs. CGE cells from human PSCs, which predominantly generate Parvalbumin-expressing or Somatostatin-expressing interneurons vs. Calretinin-expressing interneurons, respectively. Efficient generation of specific differentiated progenies of hPSCs as shown in this study will be a pivotal step to realize the full potential of hPSCs for regenerative medicine, developmental studies, disease modeling, bioassay, and drug screening. PMID:26364591

  1. Correlation in the Discharges of Neighboring Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells During Prenatal Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffei, Lamberto; Galli-Resta, Lucia

    1990-04-01

    The spontaneous discharges of neighboring retinal ganglion cells were recorded simultaneously in anesthetized prenatal rats between embryonic days 18 and 21. We report here that in the majority of cases the firings of neighboring retinal ganglion cells are strongly correlated during prenatal life. Correlation in the discharges of neighboring cells during development has long been suggested as a way to consolidate synaptic connections with a target cell onto which they converge, a model first proposed by Hebb. Correlation in the activities of neighboring neurons in the retina could be the basis of developmental processes such as refinement of retinotopic maps in the brain and segregation of the inputs from the two eyes.

  2. Re-induction of the cell cycle in the Arabidopsis post-embryonic root meristem is ABA-insensitive, GA-dependent and repressed by KRP6

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwland, Jeroen; Stamm, Petra; Wen, Bo; Randall, Ricardo S.; Murray, James A. H.; Bassel, George W.

    2016-01-01

    Seeding establishment following seed germination requires activation of the root meristem for primary root growth. We investigated the hormonal and genetic regulation of root meristem activation during Arabidopsis seed germination. In optimal conditions, radicle cell divisions occur only after the completion of germination and require de novo GA synthesis. When the completion of germination is blocked by ABA, radicle elongation and cell divisions occurred in these non-germinating seeds. Conversely under GA-limiting conditions, ABA-insensitive mutants complete germination in the absence of radicle meristem activation and growth. Radicle meristem activation and extension can therefore occur independently of completion of the developmental transition of germination. The cell cycle regulator KRP6 partially represses GA-dependent activation of the cell cycle. Germination of krp6 mutant seeds occurs more rapidly, is slightly insensitive to ABA in dose-response assays, but also hypersensitive to the GA synthesis inhibitor PAC. These conflicting phenotypes suggest the cell cycle uncouples GA and ABA responses in germinating Arabidopsis seeds, and that KRP6 acts downstream of GA to inhibit mitotic cell cycle activation during germination. PMID:27021201

  3. Retinal ganglion cells are autonomous circadian oscillators synthesizing N-acetylserotonin during the day.

    PubMed

    Garbarino-Pico, Eduardo; Carpentieri, Agata R; Contin, Maria A; Sarmiento, María I Keller; Brocco, Marcela A; Panzetta, Pedro; Rosenstein, Ruth E; Caputto, Beatriz L; Guido, Mario E

    2004-12-01

    Retinal ganglion cells send visual and circadian information to the brain regarding the environmental light-dark cycles. We investigated the capability of retinal ganglion cells of synthesizing melatonin, a highly reliable circadian marker that regulates retinal physiology, as well as the capacity of these cells to function as autonomous circadian oscillators. Chick retinal ganglion cells presented higher levels of melatonin assessed by radioimmunoassay during both the subjective day in constant darkness and the light phase of a light-dark cycle. Similar changes were observed in mRNA levels and activity of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase, a key enzyme in melatonin biosynthesis, with the highest levels of both parameters during the subjective day. These daily variations were preceded by the elevation of cyclic-AMP content, the second messenger involved in the regulation of melatonin biosynthesis. Moreover, cultures of immunopurified retinal ganglion cells at embryonic day 8 synchronized by medium exchange synthesized a [3H]melatonin-like indole from [3H]tryptophan. This [3H]indole was rapidly released to the culture medium and exhibited a daily variation, with levels peaking 8 h after synchronization, which declined a few hours later. Cultures of embryonic retinal ganglion cells also showed self-sustained daily rhythms in arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase mRNA expression during at least three cycles with a period near 24 h. These rhythms were also observed after the application of glutamate. The results demonstrate that chick retinal ganglion cells may function as autonomous circadian oscillators synthesizing a melatonin-like indole during the day. PMID:15448149

  4. Embryonic hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Golub, Rachel; Cumano, Ana

    2013-12-01

    Blood cells are continually produced from a pool of progenitors that derive from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). In vertebrates, the hematopoietic system develops from two distinct waves or generation of precursors. The first wave occurs in the yolk sac, in mammals or equivalent embryonic structure, and produces nucleated primitive erythrocytes that provide the embryo with the first oxygen transporter and are, therefore, essential for the viability of the embryo. The yolk sac also produces myeloid cells that migrate to the central nervous system and to the skin to form the microglia and skin specific macrophages, the Langerhans cells. The second wave occurs in the dorsal aorta and produces multipotential hematopoietic progenitors. These cells are generated once in the lifetime from mesoderm derivatives closely related to endothelial cells, during a short period of embryonic development. Newly generated cells do not reconstitute the hematopoietic compartment of conventional recipients; therefore, they are designated as immature or pre-HSCs. They undergo maturation into adult HSCs in the aorta or in the fetal liver accompanied by the expression of MHC class I, CD45, CD150, Sca-1 and the absence of CD48. Differentiation of HSCs first occurs in the fetal liver, giving rise to mature blood cells. HSCs also expand in the fetal liver, and in a short time period (four days in the mouse embryo), they increase over 40-fold. HSCs and progenitor cells exit the fetal liver and colonize the spleen, where differentiation to the myeloid lineage and particular lymphoid subsets is favored. PMID:24041595

  5. Connecting the eye to the brain: the molecular basis of ganglion cell axon guidance

    PubMed Central

    Oster, S F; Sretavan, D W

    2003-01-01

    In the past several years, a great deal has been learnt about the molecular basis through which specific neural pathways in the visual system are established during embryonic development. This review provides a framework for understanding the principles of retinal ganglion cell axon guidance, and introduces some of the families of axon guidance molecules involved. In addition, the potential relevance of retinal axon guidance to human visual developmental disorders, and to retinal axon regeneration, is discussed. PMID:12714414

  6. Preparation of embryonic retinal explants to study CNS neurite growth.

    PubMed

    Hanea, Sonia T; Shanmugalingam, Ushananthini; Fournier, Alyson E; Smith, Patrice D

    2016-05-01

    This protocol outlines the preparation of embryonic mouse retinal explants, which provides an effective technique to analyze neurite outgrowth in central nervous system (CNS) neurons. This validated ex vivo system, which displays limited neuronal death, is highly reproducible and particularly amenable to manipulation. Our previously published studies involving embryonic chick or adult mouse retinal explants were instrumental in the preparation of this protocol; aspects of these previous techniques were combined, adopted and optimized. This protocol thus permits more efficient analysis of neurite growth. Briefly, the retina is dissected from the embryonic mouse eye using precise techniques that take into account the small size of the embryonic eye. The approach applied ensures that the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer faces the adhesion substrate on coated cover slips. Neurite growth is clear, well-delineated and readily quantifiable. These retinal explants can therefore be used to examine the neurite growth effects elicited by potential therapeutic agents. PMID:27072342

  7. The ‘Ventral Organs’ of Pycnogonida (Arthropoda) Are Neurogenic Niches of Late Embryonic and Post-Embryonic Nervous System Development

    PubMed Central

    Brenneis, Georg; Scholtz, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Early neurogenesis in arthropods has been in the focus of numerous studies, its cellular basis, spatio-temporal dynamics and underlying genetic network being by now comparably well characterized for representatives of chelicerates, myriapods, hexapods and crustaceans. By contrast, neurogenesis during late embryonic and/or post-embryonic development has received less attention, especially in myriapods and chelicerates. Here, we apply (i) immunolabeling, (ii) histology and (iii) scanning electron microscopy to study post-embryonic ventral nerve cord development in Pseudopallene sp., a representative of the sea spiders (Pycnogonida), the presumable sister group of the remaining chelicerates. During early post-embryonic development, large neural stem cells give rise to additional ganglion cell material in segmentally paired invaginations in the ventral ectoderm. These ectodermal cell regions – traditionally designated as ‘ventral organs’ – detach from the surface into the interior and persist as apical cell clusters on the ventral ganglion side. Each cluster is a post-embryonic neurogenic niche that features a tiny central cavity and initially still houses larger neural stem cells. The cluster stays connected to the underlying ganglionic somata cortex via an anterior and a posterior cell stream. Cell proliferation remains restricted to the cluster and streams, and migration of newly produced cells along the streams seems to account for increasing ganglion cell numbers in the cortex. The pycnogonid cluster-stream-systems show striking similarities to the life-long neurogenic system of decapod crustaceans, and due to their close vicinity to glomerulus-like neuropils, we consider their possible involvement in post-embryonic (perhaps even adult) replenishment of olfactory neurons – as in decapods. An instance of a potentially similar post-embryonic/adult neurogenic system in the arthropod outgroup Onychophora is discussed. Additionally, we document two transient

  8. Intraneural ganglion cyst on the external popliteal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Rendon, Diego; Pescador, David; Cano, Carlos; Blanco, Juan

    2014-01-01

    There are many causes for the paralysis of the external sciatic popliteal nerve , such as the intraneural ganglion cyst. In this case, we evaluate a 52-year-old woman with no relevant personal record, who was admitted with paresis of the right foot of 4 months of evolution associated with alterations in the sensitivity that rose up to the posterolateral region of the leg. The diagnosis was based on MR and cyst decompression and disconnection of the articular branch. Given the low incidence of these lesions, their origin is still subject to controversy. The most widely accepted theory is the unifying articular theory described by Spinner in the year 2003. Intraneural ganglion cysts must be included in the differential diagnosis of progressive paralysis of the sciatic nerve, lesions of the nerve root at L5 and nerve sheath tumours that start at the lateral compartment of the knee. The treatment of a fibular intraneural ganglion cyst must be surgical and the operation must be performed as soon as possible. PMID:24891476

  9. Proximal Sciatic Nerve Intraneural Ganglion Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Karin R.; Wilson, Dianne; Boland, Michael; Fee, Dominic B.

    2009-01-01

    Intraneural ganglion cysts are nonneoplastic, mucinous cysts within the epineurium of peripheral nerves which usually involve the peroneal nerve at the knee. A 37-year-old female presented with progressive left buttock and posterior thigh pain. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a sciatic nerve mass at the sacral notch which was subsequently revealed to be an intraneural ganglion cyst. An intraneural ganglion cyst confined to the proximal sciatic nerve has only been reported once prior to 2009. PMID:20069041

  10. Ligamentous Hyperlaxity and Dorsal Wrist Ganglions

    PubMed Central

    McKeon, Kathleen E.; London, Daniel A.; Osei, Daniel A.; Gelberman, Richard H.; Goldfarb, Charles A.; Boyer, Martin I.; Calfee, Ryan P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine if symptomatic dorsal wrist ganglions are associated with generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity. Methods Ninety-six patients (61 females) presenting to hand surgeons for a symptomatic dorsal wrist ganglions were prospectively enrolled in this case-control investigation. Beighton scores were calculated to quantify generalized ligamentous laxity in each patient, and a scaphoid shift test (scapholunate capsuloligamentous laxity evaluation) was performed. A positive scaphoid shift test was defined by both pain and a palpable clunk. Ninety-six individuals without ganglions were then enrolled to form an age and sex frequency-matched control cohort. The control group was similarly assessed for Beighton score and scaphoid shift test. Binary logistic regression was performed to assess the association of ganglions with generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity (Beighton score ≥4) while accounting for effects of age and sex. Results Patients with symptomatic dorsal wrist ganglions demonstrated significantly increased rates of generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity. Among those with ganglions, 27 of 96 (28%) patients exhibited generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity, compared to 12 of the 96 (13%) age and sex-matched individuals in the control group. Patients with symptomatic dorsal wrist ganglions were also significantly more likely to demonstrate localized scapholunate hyperlaxity with a positive scaphoid shift test (25% positive scaphoid shift test with ganglions vs 1% in controls). In logistic modeling, patients with dorsal wrist ganglions had 2.9 (95% CI 1.3-6.2) times greater odds of generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity compared to patients without a dorsal wrist ganglion after accounting for patient age and sex. Discussion Symptomatic dorsal wrist ganglions were associated with both generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity and a positive scaphoid shift test. Although an association between wrist ganglions and ligamentous hyperlaxity does not prove causation, the

  11. New Treatments for Spinal Nerve Root Avulsion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Carlstedt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Further progress in the treatment of the longitudinal spinal cord injury has been made. In an inverted translational study, it has been demonstrated that return of sensory function can be achieved by bypassing the avulsed dorsal root ganglion neurons. Dendritic growth from spinal cord sensory neurons could replace dorsal root ganglion axons and re-establish a reflex arch. Another research avenue has led to the development of adjuvant therapy for regeneration following dorsal root to spinal cord implantation in root avulsion injury. A small, lipophilic molecule that can be given orally acts on the retinoic acid receptor system as an agonist. Upregulation of dorsal root ganglion regenerative ability and organization of glia reaction to injury were demonstrated in treated animals. The dual effect of this substance may open new avenues for the treatment of root avulsion and spinal cord injuries. PMID:27602018

  12. New Treatments for Spinal Nerve Root Avulsion Injury.

    PubMed

    Carlstedt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Further progress in the treatment of the longitudinal spinal cord injury has been made. In an inverted translational study, it has been demonstrated that return of sensory function can be achieved by bypassing the avulsed dorsal root ganglion neurons. Dendritic growth from spinal cord sensory neurons could replace dorsal root ganglion axons and re-establish a reflex arch. Another research avenue has led to the development of adjuvant therapy for regeneration following dorsal root to spinal cord implantation in root avulsion injury. A small, lipophilic molecule that can be given orally acts on the retinoic acid receptor system as an agonist. Upregulation of dorsal root ganglion regenerative ability and organization of glia reaction to injury were demonstrated in treated animals. The dual effect of this substance may open new avenues for the treatment of root avulsion and spinal cord injuries. PMID:27602018

  13. Ganglions of the proximal interphalangeal joint.

    PubMed

    Cheng, C A; Rockwell, W B

    1999-08-01

    Ganglion cysts-the most common hand tumors-usually affect women in their twenties and thirties. The cause of these cysts is unknown, although trauma has been postulated as an inciting factor. Ganglions occur most commonly at the dorsal and palmar wrist. However, ganglions of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint are rare. Four patients with PIP joint ganglions were recently treated at our institution. Three received aspiration and one received operative therapy, all with good results. All four patients were older than 65 years. PMID:10470671

  14. Selective regulation of 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid oxido-reductase expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons: a possible mechanism to cope with peripheral nerve injury-induced chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Patte-Mensah, Christine; Meyer, Laurence; Schaeffer, Véronique; Mensah-Nyagan, Ayikoe G

    2010-09-01

    The enzyme 3alpha-hydroxysteroid oxido-reductase (3alpha-HSOR) catalyzes the synthesis and bioavailability of 3alpha,5alpha-neurosteroids as allopregnanolone (3alpha,5alpha-THP) which activates GABA(A) receptors and blocks T-type calcium channels involved in pain mechanisms. Here, we used a multidisciplinary approach to demonstrate that 3alpha-HSOR is a cellular target the modulation of which in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) may contribute to suppress pain resulting from peripheral nerve injury. Immunohistochemistry and confocal microscope analyses showed 3alpha-HSOR-immunostaining in naive rat DRG sensory neurons and glial cells. Pulse-chase, high performance liquid chromatography and Flo/One characterization of neurosteroids demonstrated 3alpha,5alpha-THP production in DRG. Behavioral methods allowed identification of pain symptoms (thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia and/or allodynia) in rats subjected to sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI). Reverse transcription and real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that 3alpha-HSOR mRNA concentration in CCI-rat ipsilateral DRG, 5-fold higher than in contralateral DRG, was also 4- to 6-fold elevated than that in sham-operated or naive rat DRG. Consistently, Western blotting confirmed increased 3alpha-HSOR protein levels in CCI-rat ipsilateral DRG and double immunolabeling showed that 3alpha-HSOR overexpression occurred in DRG neurons but not in glia. Functional plasticity of 3alpha-HSOR leading to increased 3alpha,5alpha-THP production was evidenced in CCI-rat DRG. Interestingly, behavioral and molecular time-course investigations revealed that 3alpha-HSOR gene upregulation was correlated to pain symptom development. Most importantly, in vivo knockdown of 3alpha-HSOR expression in healthy rat DRG using 6-carboxyfluorescein-3alpha-HSOR-siRNA exacerbated thermal and mechanical pain perceptions. This paper is the first to show that siRNA-induced knockdown of a key neurosteroid-synthesizing enzyme directly

  15. Adult human nasal mesenchymal-like stem cells restore cochlear spiral ganglion neurons after experimental lesion.

    PubMed

    Bas, Esperanza; Van De Water, Thomas R; Lumbreras, Vicente; Rajguru, Suhrud; Goss, Garrett; Hare, Joshua M; Goldstein, Bradley J

    2014-03-01

    A loss of sensory hair cells or spiral ganglion neurons from the inner ear causes deafness, affecting millions of people. Currently, there is no effective therapy to repair the inner ear sensory structures in humans. Cochlear implantation can restore input, but only if auditory neurons remain intact. Efforts to develop stem cell-based treatments for deafness have demonstrated progress, most notably utilizing embryonic-derived cells. In an effort to bypass limitations of embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells that may impede the translation to clinical applications, we sought to utilize an alternative cell source. Here, we show that adult human mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs) obtained from nasal tissue can repair spiral ganglion loss in experimentally lesioned cochlear cultures from neonatal rats. Stem cells engraft into gentamicin-lesioned organotypic cultures and orchestrate the restoration of the spiral ganglion neuronal population, involving both direct neuronal differentiation and secondary effects on endogenous cells. As a physiologic assay, nasal MSC-derived cells engrafted into lesioned spiral ganglia demonstrate responses to infrared laser stimulus that are consistent with those typical of excitable cells. The addition of a pharmacologic activator of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway concurrent with stem cell treatment promoted robust neuronal differentiation. The availability of an effective adult autologous cell source for inner ear tissue repair should contribute to efforts to translate cell-based strategies to the clinic. PMID:24172073

  16. Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Do, Michael Tri Hoang; Yau, King-Wai

    2010-10-01

    Life on earth is subject to alternating cycles of day and night imposed by the rotation of the earth. Consequently, living things have evolved photodetective systems to synchronize their physiology and behavior with the external light-dark cycle. This form of photodetection is unlike the familiar "image vision," in that the basic information is light or darkness over time, independent of spatial patterns. "Nonimage" vision is probably far more ancient than image vision and is widespread in living species. For mammals, it has long been assumed that the photoreceptors for nonimage vision are also the textbook rods and cones. However, recent years have witnessed the discovery of a small population of retinal ganglion cells in the mammalian eye that express a unique visual pigment called melanopsin. These ganglion cells are intrinsically photosensitive and drive a variety of nonimage visual functions. In addition to being photoreceptors themselves, they also constitute the major conduit for rod and cone signals to the brain for nonimage visual functions such as circadian photoentrainment and the pupillary light reflex. Here we review what is known about these novel mammalian photoreceptors. PMID:20959623

  17. Cellular localization of dopamine D2 receptor messenger RNA in the rat trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Peterfreund, R A; Kosofsky, B E; Fink, J S

    1995-12-01

    The actions of dopamine are mediated by specific, high-affinity, G protein-coupled receptors. Multiple subtypes of dopamine receptors have been characterized, including the D2 subtype (D2R). Cells within the dorsal root and petrosal ganglia of the rat express D2R messenger RNA (mRNA) consistent with D2R expression by primary sensory neurons. We hypothesized that neurons of the trigeminal ganglion express D2R mRNA. Total cellular RNA from rat trigeminal ganglia was analyzed on Northern blots under high stringency conditions. Hybridization of trigeminal ganglion RNA resulted in a signal which comigrated with striatal, pituitary, and hypothalamic D2R mRNA. To determine the distribution of D2R expressing cells in the trigeminal ganglion, cryostat sections were analyzed by in situ hybridization followed by emulsion autoradiography. We identified a population of clustered cells labeled with dense grain concentrations over their cytoplasms. These findings demonstrate the expression of D2 dopamine receptor mRNA in discrete subpopulations of neurons in the rat trigeminal ganglion. Our observations suggest that drugs active at dopamine receptors of the D2 subtype are potential modulators of sensory activity of neurons whose cell bodies reside in the trigeminal ganglion. D2 dopamine receptors may thus have a role in clinical pain syndromes involving the head and neck. PMID:7486101

  18. Dorsal wrist ganglion: Current review of literature.

    PubMed

    Meena, Sanjay; Gupta, Ajay

    2014-06-01

    Ganglion cyst is the most common soft tissue tumour of hand. Sixty to seventy percent of ganglion cysts are found in the dorsal aspect of the wrist. They may affect any age group; however they are more common in the twenties to forties. Its origin and pathogenesis remains enigmatic. Non-surgical treatment is unreliable with a high recurrence rates. Open surgical excision leads to unsightly scar and poor outcome. Arthroscopy excision has shown very promising result with very low recurrence rate. We reviewed the current literature available on dorsal wrist ganglion. PMID:25983472

  19. Intramuscular Ganglion of the Quadriceps Femoris

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeung Jin; Chae, Soo Uk; Kim, Jong Yun; Jo, Hyang Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Ganglion cysts are common lesions that are most often found around the joints of the hands and feet. Ganglia around the distal femur usually occur within the synovial membrane or tendon sheath, but rarely within muscles. Several cases of intramuscular ganglions in the hand and wrist have been reported, but a ganglion cyst in the quadriceps muscle has rarely been addressed in studies. In this report, we present a 17-year-old patient with a painful movable mass in the intramuscular area of the quadriceps femoris that was diagnosed by ultrasound and treated by excision and biopsy. PMID:23508475

  20. Dorsal wrist ganglion: Current review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Sanjay; Gupta, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Ganglion cyst is the most common soft tissue tumour of hand. Sixty to seventy percent of ganglion cysts are found in the dorsal aspect of the wrist. They may affect any age group; however they are more common in the twenties to forties. Its origin and pathogenesis remains enigmatic. Non-surgical treatment is unreliable with a high recurrence rates. Open surgical excision leads to unsightly scar and poor outcome. Arthroscopy excision has shown very promising result with very low recurrence rate. We reviewed the current literature available on dorsal wrist ganglion. PMID:25983472

  1. [Intrinsically Photosensitive Retinal Ganglion Cells].

    PubMed

    Skorkovská, K; Skorkovská, Š

    2015-06-01

    Recently discovered intrinsically photosensitive melanopsin-containing retinal ganglion cells contribute to circadian photoentrainment and pupillary constriction; recent works have also brought new evidence for their accessory role in the visual system in humans. Pupil light reaction driven by individual photoreceptors can be isolated by means of the so called chromatic pupillography. The use of chromatic stimuli to elicit different pupillary responses may become an objective clinical pupil test in the detection of retinal diseases and in assessing new therapeutic approaches particularly in hereditary retinal degenerations like retinitis pigmentosa. In advanced stages of disease, the pupil light reaction is even more sensitive than standard electroretinography for detecting residual levels of photoreceptor activity. This review summarizes current knowledge on intrinsically photosensitive retinal cells and highlights its possible implications for clinical practice. PMID:26201360

  2. Semaphorin 3A and neurotrophins: a balance between apoptosis and survival signaling in embryonic DRG neurons.

    PubMed

    Ben-Zvi, Ayal; Yagil, Zohar; Hagalili, Yamit; Klein, Hagit; Lerman, Omer; Behar, Oded

    2006-01-01

    Large numbers of neurons are eliminated by apoptosis during nervous system development. For instance, in the mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG), the highest incidence of cell death occurs between embryonic days 12 and 14 (E12-E14). While the cause of cell death and its biological significance in the nervous system is not entirely understood, it is generally believed that limiting quantities of neurotrophins are responsible for neuronal death. Between E12 and E14, developing DRG neurons pass through tissues expressing high levels of axonal guidance molecules such as Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) while navigating to their targets. Here, we demonstrate that Sema3A acts as a death-inducing molecule in neurotrophin-3 (NT-3)-, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)- and nerve growth factor (NGF)-dependent E12 and E13 cultured DRG neurons. We show that Sema3A most probably induces cell death through activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/c-Jun signaling pathway, and that this cell death is blocked by a moderate increase in NGF concentration. Interestingly, increasing concentrations of other neurotrophic factors, such as NT-3 or BDNF, do not elicit similar effects. Our data suggest that the number of DRG neurons is determined by a fine balance between neurotrophins and Semaphorin 3A, and not only by neurotrophin levels. PMID:16336628

  3. Molecular biology of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, M; Zhou, H; Nathans, J

    1996-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells are the output neurons that encode and transmit information from the eye to the brain. Their diverse physiologic and anatomic properties have been intensively studied and appear to account well for a number of psychophysical phenomena such as lateral inhibition and chromatic opponency. In this paper, we summarize our current view of retinal ganglion cell properties and pose a number of questions regarding underlying molecular mechanisms. As an example of one approach to understanding molecular mechanisms, we describe recent work on several POU domain transcription factors that are expressed in subsets of retinal ganglion cells and that appear to be involved in ganglion cell development. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8570601

  4. Infraspinatus paralysis due to spinoglenoid notch ganglion.

    PubMed

    Skirving, A P; Kozak, T K; Davis, S J

    1994-07-01

    We describe five patients, seen since 1984, with posterior shoulder pain and isolated wasting and weakness of the infraspinatus. In four of these a ganglion in the spinoglenoid notch was demonstrated by MRI and in one recent case ultrasound scans were positive. Three patients have been treated by operation, but there was recurrence in one after five years. In each confirmed case, the ganglion straddled the base of the spine of the scapula, extending into both supraspinatus and infraspinatus fossae. The nerve was either compressed against the spine or stretched over the posterior aspect of the ganglion. Adequate surgical exposure is essential to preserve the nerve to the infraspinatus and to allow complete removal of the ganglion. This is difficult because of the location and thin-walled nature of the cysts. PMID:8027146

  5. Ganglions of the hand and wrist.

    PubMed

    Young, L; Bartell, T; Logan, S E

    1988-06-01

    The ganglion is the most common soft tissue tumor of the hand and wrist, originating from the joint capsule or tendon sheath. Accurate diagnosis and proper treatment of these entities require a thorough knowledge of the anatomy of the wrist and hand as well as of the ganglion itself. Definitive therapy is based on total surgical removal of the cyst and its connections to the joint or tendon sheath. PMID:3287641

  6. Changes in ganglion cells during retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Saha, Susmita; Greferath, Ursula; Vessey, Kirstan A; Grayden, David B; Burkitt, Anthony N; Fletcher, Erica L

    2016-08-01

    Inherited retinal degeneration such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is associated with photoreceptor loss and concomitant morphological and functional changes in the inner retina. It is not known whether these changes are associated with changes in the density and distribution of synaptic inputs to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). We quantified changes in ganglion cell density in rd1 and age-matched C57BL/6J-(wildtype, WT) mice using the immunocytochemical marker, RBPMS. Our data revealed that following complete loss of photoreceptors, (∼3months of age), there was a reduction in ganglion cell density in the peripheral retina. We next examined changes in synaptic inputs to A type ganglion cells by performing double labeling experiments in mice with the ganglion cell reporter lines, rd1-Thy1 and age-matched wildtype-Thy1. Ribbon synapses were identified by co-labelling with CtBP2 (RIBEYE) and conventional synapses with the clustering molecule, gephyrin. ON RGCs showed a significant reduction in RIBEYE-immunoreactive synapse density while OFF RGCs showed a significant reduction in the gephyrin-immmunoreactive synapse density. Distribution patterns of both synaptic markers across the dendritic trees of RGCs were unchanged. The change in synaptic inputs to RGCs was associated with a reduction in the number of immunolabeled rod bipolar and ON cone bipolar cells. These results suggest that functional changes reported in ganglion cells during retinal degeneration could be attributed to loss of synaptic inputs. PMID:27132232

  7. Anterior Displacement of the Geniculate Ganglion.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Tomoyasu; Orita, Yorihisa; Nishizaki, Kazunori

    2016-04-01

    We present the case of a 34-year-old Japanese woman with cholesteatoma of the middle ear. During the operation, this patient showed an unusual position of the geniculate ganglion. We reviewed the computed tomography (CT) images targeting the ear of the present case after the operation. We found that the shortest ranges from the ampullated end of the superior semicircular canal to the geniculate ganglion fossa were 5.1 mm on both sides. We did not find any cases with obvious dislocation of the geniculate ganglion among the 67 cases for which we had performed tympanoplasty. Displacement of the geniculate ganglion is either extremely rare or typically unnoticed because this abnormality is asymptomatic. We speculated that the unusual position of the geniculate ganglion was due to an incomplete development of the tympanic tegmen. When surgical treatment such as decompression of the facial nerve or tympanoplasty is performed, close attention should always be paid to the anatomy of the facial nerve from the labyrinthine segment to the geniculate ganglion. In the present case, although connective tissues existed around the anterior epitympanic recess, we left this lesion to avoid iatrogenic facial palsy. PMID:27340996

  8. Relationship between dorsal ganglion cysts of the wrist and intraosseous ganglion cysts of the carpal bones.

    PubMed

    Van den Dungen, Sophie; Marchesi, Simona; Ezzedine, Rabih; Bindou, David; Lorea, Patrick

    2005-10-01

    Soft tissue ganglion cysts are the most common benign tumours of the wrist; their pathogenesis remains controversial. We prospectively screened the radiographic appearance of the wrists of 51 patients presenting to a single surgeon with dorsal wrist ganglions during a one-year period. Postero-anterior and lateral radiographs were systematically performed looking for possible associated intraosseous ganglion cysts. There were 51 dorsal soft tissue ganglion cysts in 51 patients. We detected 29 associated intraosseous ganglia in 24 patients (47%): 16 ganglia in the lunate bone (55%), 5 in the capitate bone, 7 in the scaphoid and 1 in the trapezoid. Mean size of the intraosseous ganglia was 3 mm (range, 2 to 5 mm). This high prevalence of intraosseous ganglia in association with soft tissue ganglia has to our knowledge never been reported previously. A common aetiology for these two types of ganglion cysts may explain this high association rate. PMID:16305077

  9. Evaluation of the percentage of ganglion cells in the ganglion cell layer of the rodent retina

    PubMed Central

    Schlamp, Cassandra L.; Montgomery, Angela D.; Mac Nair, Caitlin E.; Schuart, Claudia; Willmer, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Retinal ganglion cells comprise a percentage of the neurons actually residing in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) of the rodent retina. This estimate is useful to extrapolate ganglion cell loss in models of optic nerve disease, but the values reported in the literature are highly variable depending on the methods used to obtain them. Methods We tested three retrograde labeling methods and two immunostaining methods to calculate ganglion cell number in the mouse retina (C57BL/6). Additionally, a double-stain retrograde staining method was used to label rats (Long-Evans). The number of total neurons was estimated using a nuclear stain and selecting for nuclei that met specific criteria. Cholinergic amacrine cells were identified using transgenic mice expressing Tomato fluorescent protein. Total neurons and total ganglion cell numbers were measured in microscopic fields of 104 µm2 to determine the percentage of neurons comprising ganglion cells in each field. Results Historical estimates of the percentage of ganglion cells in the mouse GCL range from 36.1% to 67.5% depending on the method used. Experimentally, retrograde labeling methods yielded a combined estimate of 50.3% in mice. A retrograde method also yielded a value of 50.21% for rat retinas. Immunolabeling estimates were higher at 64.8%. Immunolabeling may introduce overestimates, however, with non-specific labeling effects, or ectopic expression of antigens in neurons other than ganglion cells. Conclusions Since immunolabeling methods may overestimate ganglion cell numbers, we conclude that 50%, which is consistently derived from retrograde labeling methods, is a reliable estimate of the ganglion cells in the neuronal population of the GCL. PMID:23825918

  10. Ectopic ganglion in cauda equina: case report.

    PubMed

    Conner, Andrew K; Fung, Kar-Ming; Peterson, Jo Elle G; Glenn, Chad A; Martin, Michael D

    2016-06-01

    Macroscopic ectopic or heterotopic ganglionic tissue within the cauda equina is a very rare pathological finding and is usually associated with spinal dysraphism. However, it may mimic genuine neoplasms of the cauda equina. The authors describe a 29-year-old woman with a history of back pain, right leg pain, and urinary incontinence in whom imaging demonstrated an enhancing mass located in the cauda equina at the L1-2 interspace. The patient subsequently underwent biopsy and was found to have a focus of ectopic ganglionic tissue that was 1.3 cm in greatest dimension. To the authors' knowledge, ectopic or heterotopic ganglionic tissue within the cauda equina in a patient without evidence of spinal dysraphism has never been reported. This patient presented with imaging and clinical findings suggestive of a neoplasm, and an open biopsy proved the lesion to be ectopic ganglionic tissue. The authors suggest that ectopic ganglionic tissue be added to the list of differential diagnoses of a space-occupying lesion arising from the cauda equina. PMID:26871650

  11. Compression Neuropathy of the Radial Nerve Due to Ganglion Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Lifchez, Scott D.; Dzwierzynski, William W.

    2008-01-01

    Ganglions of the upper extremity are common. Radial nerve dysfunction, particularly radial sensory dysfunction, is a rare finding in association with a ganglion. We present our experience with two such ganglia and a review of the literature. PMID:18780092

  12. Intraneural ganglion cyst of the tibial nerve.

    PubMed

    Adn, M; Hamlat, A; Morandi, X; Guegan, Y

    2006-08-01

    Intraneural ganglion cyst of the tibial nerve is very rare. To date, only 5 cases of this entity in the popliteal fossa have been reported. We report a new case and review the previously reported cases. A 40-year-old man experienced a mild vague pain in the medial half of his right foot for 3 years. Magnetic resonance imaging scan demonstrated a soft-tissue mass along the right tibial nerve. At surgery, an intraneural ganglion cyst was evacuated. After 12 months, the patient was pain-free with no signs of recurrence. Trauma might be a contributing factor to the development of intraneural ganglion cysts. Application of microsurgical techniques is encouraged. PMID:16775659

  13. Retinoic acid influences neuronal migration from the ganglionic eminence to the cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, James E.; Goodman, Timothy; McCarthy, Deirdre M.; Duester, Gregg; Bhide, Pradeep G.; Dräger, Ursula C.; McCaffery, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The ganglionic eminence contributes cells to several forebrain structures including the cerebral cortex, for which it provides GABAergic interneurons. Migration of neuronal precursors from the retinoic-acid rich embryonic ganglionic eminence to the cerebral cortex is known to be regulated by several factors, but retinoic acid has not been previously implicated. We found retinoic acid to potently inhibit cell migration in slice preparations of embryonic mouse forebrains, which was reversed by an antagonist of the dopamine-D2 receptor, whose gene is transcriptionally regulated by retinoic acid. Histonedeacetylase inhibitors, which amplify nuclear receptor-mediated transcription, potentiated the inhibitory effect of retinoic acid. Surprisingly, when retinoic acid signalling was completely blocked with a pan-retinoic acid receptor antagonist, this also decreased cell migration into the cortex, implying that a minimal level of endogenous retinoic acid is necessary for tangential migration. Given these opposing effects of retinoic acid in vitro, the in vivo contribution of retinoic acid to migration was tested by counting GABAergic interneurons in cortices of adult mice with experimental reductions in retinoic acid signalling: a range of perturbations resulted in significant reductions in the numerical density of some GABAergic interneuron subpopulations. These observations suggest functions of retinoic acid in interneuron diversity and organization of cortical excitatory–inhibitory balance. PMID:21895658

  14. [Ganglion cysts of the hand and wrist].

    PubMed

    Sarig, Oren; Hass, Avraham; Oron, Amir

    2013-10-01

    Ganglion cysts are considered the most common tumor of the wrist and hand. They are most common between the second and fourth decades of life. The most common anatomical location is the dorsal wrist. This article includes a general review of these cysts including symptoms, pathology and methods of diagnosis, as well as a review of these cysts in specific anatomic locations. The article also includes an updated review of the literature comparing open surgery vs. arthroscopic treatment. The authors believe that arthroscopic surgery of ganglion cysts will gain an important role in the treatment of these cysts. PMID:24450035

  15. Current treatment of ganglion of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Ho, P C; Griffiths, J; Lo, W N; Yen, C H; Hung, L K

    2001-07-01

    Ganglion of the wrist is one of the the most common lesions of the hand. The cause of pain in an occult dorsal wrist ganglion has been linked to compression of the posterior interosseous nerve at the wrist. A case is presented in this paper and the pathoanatomy discussed. Ultrasound-guided aspiration after hyaluronidase instillation provided a useful alternative to surgery with a high success rate. Arthroscopic decompression for dorsal and palmar wrist ganglia offered the patient the benefit of smaller surgical scars and a high success rate. A description of the surgical techniques, pathoanatomy, and early results of the authors and a review of the literature is presented. PMID:11677666

  16. Ganglions of the hand and wrist.

    PubMed

    Thornburg, L E

    1999-01-01

    Ganglions of the hand and wrist are common benign lesions. They most frequently arise adjacent to joints and tendons, but may also be intratendinous or intraosseous. Treatment options include observation, aspiration, and surgical excision. Observation is acceptable in most instances. Indications for more aggressive treatment include pain, interference with activity, nerve compression, and imminent ulceration (in the case of some mucous cysts). The recurrence rate after puncture and aspiration is greater than 50% for cysts in most locations, but is less than 30% for cysts in the flexor tendon sheath. Surgical excision is effective, with a recurrence rate of only 5% if care is taken to completely excise the stalk of the cyst along with a small portion of joint capsule. Surgical treatment of occult ganglions is successful with accurate assessment of the source of the pain. Arthroscopic treatment of dorsal wrist ganglions is still experimental, but early results are encouraging. Ganglion surgery requires a formal operative environment and careful technique in order to minimize injury to adjacent structures and minimize the likelihood of recurrence. PMID:10434077

  17. Ultrasound-guided stellate ganglion block: safety and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Narouze, Samer

    2014-06-01

    Cervical sympathetic and stellate ganglion blocks (SGB) provide a valuable diagnostic and therapeutic benefit to sympathetically maintained pain syndromes in the head, neck, and upper extremity. With the ongoing efforts to improve the safety of the procedure, the techniques for SGB have evolved over time, from the use of the standard blind technique, to fluoroscopy, and recently to the ultrasound (US)-guided approach. Over the past few years, there has been a growing interest in the ultrasound-guided technique and the many advantages that it might offer. Fluoroscopy is a reliable method for identifying bony surfaces, which facilitates identifying the C6 and C7 transverse processes. However, this is only a surrogate marker for the cervical sympathetic trunk. The ideal placement of the needle tip should be anterolateral to the longus colli muscle, deep to the prevertebral fascia (to avoid spread along the carotid sheath) but superficial to the fascia investing the longus colli muscle (to avoid injecting into the muscle substance). Identifying the correct fascial plane can be achieved with ultrasound guidance, thus facilitating the caudal spread of the injectate to reach the stellate ganglion at C7-T1 level, even if the needle is placed at C6 level. This allows for a more effective and precise sympathetic block with the use of a small injectate volume. Ultrasound-guided SGB may also improve the safety of the procedure by direct visualization of vascular structures (inferior thyroidal, cervical, vertebral, and carotid arteries) and soft tissue structures (thyroid, esophagus, and nerve roots). Accordingly, the risk of vascular and soft tissue injury may be minimized. PMID:24760493

  18. Differentiation patterns of mouse embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells into neurons.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mai; Kamishibahara, Yu; Kitazawa, Ayako; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Shimizu, Norio

    2016-05-01

    Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have the ability to differentiate in vitro into various cell lineages including neurons. The differentiation of these cells into neurons has potential applications in regenerative medicine. Previously, we reported that a chick dorsal root ganglion (DRG)-conditioned medium (CM) promoted the differentiation of mouse ES and iPS cells into neurons. Here, we used real-time PCR to investigate the differentiation patterns of ES and iPS cells into neurons when DRG-CM was added. DRG-CM promoted the expression levels of βIII-tubulin gene (a marker of postmitotic neurons) in ES and iPS cells. ES cells differentiated into neurons faster than iPS cells, and the maximum peaks of gene expression involved in motor, sensory, and dopaminergic neurons were different. Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitors could be very valuable at numerous stages in the production and use of stem cells in basic research and eventual cell-based therapies. Thus, we investigated whether the addition of a ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 and DRG-CM on the basis of the differentiation patterns promotes the neuronal differentiation of ES cells. When the ROCK inhibitor was added to the culture medium at the initial stages of cultivation, it stimulated the neuronal differentiation of ES cells more strongly than that stimulated by DRG-CM. Moreover, the combination of the ROCK inhibitor and DRG-CM promoted the neuronal differentiation of ES cells when the ROCK inhibitor was added to the culture medium at day 3. The ROCK inhibitor may be useful for promoting neuronal differentiation of ES cells. PMID:25354731

  19. Telocytes of the human adult trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Mugurel Constantin; Cretoiu, Dragos; Vrapciu, Alexandra Diana; Hostiuc, Sorin; Dermengiu, Dan; Manoiu, Vasile Sorin; Cretoiu, Sanda Maria; Mirancea, Nicolae

    2016-06-01

    Telocytes (TCs) are typically defined as cells with telopodes by their ultrastructural features. Their presence was reported in various organs, however little is known about their presence in human trigeminal ganglion. To address this issue, samples of trigeminal ganglia were tested by immunocytochemistry for CD34 and examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We found that TCs are CD34 positive and form networks within the ganglion in close vicinity to microvessels and nerve fibers around the neuronal-glial units (NGUs). TEM examination confirmed the existence of spindle-shaped and bipolar TCs with one or two telopodes measuring between 15 to 53 μm. We propose that TCs are cells with stemness capacity which might contribute in regeneration and repair processes by: modulation of the stem cell activity or by acting as progenitors of other cells present in the normal tissue. In addition, further studies are needed to establish if they might influence the neuronal circuits. PMID:27147447

  20. From connected pathway flow to ganglion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rücker, M.; Berg, S.; Armstrong, R. T.; Georgiadis, A.; Ott, H.; Schwing, A.; Neiteler, R.; Brussee, N.; Makurat, A.; Leu, L.; Wolf, M.; Khan, F.; Enzmann, F.; Kersten, M.

    2015-05-01

    During imbibition, initially connected oil is displaced until it is trapped as immobile clusters. While initial and final states have been well described before, here we image the dynamic transient process in a sandstone rock using fast synchrotron-based X-ray computed microtomography. Wetting film swelling and subsequent snap off, at unusually high saturation, decreases nonwetting phase connectivity, which leads to nonwetting phase fragmentation into mobile ganglia, i.e., ganglion dynamics regime. We find that in addition to pressure-driven connected pathway flow, mass transfer in the oil phase also occurs by a sequence of correlated breakup and coalescence processes. For example, meniscus oscillations caused by snap-off events trigger coalescence of adjacent clusters. The ganglion dynamics occurs at the length scale of oil clusters and thus represents an intermediate flow regime between pore and Darcy scale that is so far dismissed in most upscaling attempts.

  1. Ganglion cysts in a juvenile dog.

    PubMed

    Cho, K O; Park, N Y; Kang, M I; Umemura, K; Itakura, C

    2000-07-01

    Ganglion cysts were diagnosed in a 4-month-old male Afghan Hound. Grossly, the subcutaneous ovoid cysts around the caudal right elbow joint and left ischiatic tuberosity had abundant mucinous fluid and internal folding. The lesions recurred twice around the elbow joint after surgical removal. Neither cyst communicated with the joint cavity. Histologically, the cyst wall consisted of inner myxomatous and outer immature connective tissue. Some parts of the cyst wall had various stages of myxoid metaplasia of collagen tissue leading to new cyst formation. Ultrastructural study revealed that cells in the myxoid metaplastic lesion had well-developed cytoplasmic secretory elements, including abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and many smooth-walled vesicles. These ganglion cysts apparently resulted from the metaplasia of fibroblasts to secreting cells. PMID:10896396

  2. Ganglion cysts and carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kerrigan, J J; Bertoni, J M; Jaeger, S H

    1988-09-01

    We review 12 cases of ganglion cyst with carpal tunnel syndrome in 11 patients seen at the Hand Rehabilitation Center. Mean age was 42 years (range, 28 to 60 years). One half of the cysts were associated with direct trauma, usually with wrist hyperextension. Symptoms usually developed after the appearance or sudden growth of the cyst. Motor conduction or distal sensory latency was abnormal in seven of eight studied cases. Tinel's sign on tapping the cyst may be pathognomonic for this syndrome. Cyst removal and incision of the flexor retinaculum relieved the symptoms in 11 cases. The other case had total resolution after spontaneous cyst rupture. This syndrome is successfully treated with cyst decompression with release of the carpal canal and has an excellent prognosis. To our knowledge this represents the largest operative series of carpal tunnel syndrome and ganglion cyst. PMID:3241055

  3. Learning LM Specificity for Ganglion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Unsupervised learning models have been proposed based on experience (Ahumada and Mulligan, 1990;Wachtler, Doi, Lee and Sejnowski, 2007) that allow the cortex to develop units with LM specific color opponent receptive fields like the blob cells reported by Hubel and Wiesel on the basis of visual experience. These models used ganglion cells with LM indiscriminate wiring as inputs to the learning mechanism, which was presumed to occur at the cortical level.

  4. Simultaneous bilateral ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate ligaments

    PubMed Central

    Demircay, Emre; Ofluoglu, Demet; Ozel, Omer; Oztop, Pinar

    2015-01-01

    Intra-articular ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are rare, and bilateral ganglion cysts are even rarer. These cysts may cause intermittent or chronic nonspecific knee discomfort. Although three cases of bilateral ganglion cysts have been reported in the literature, the knees were not simultaneously affected in those cases. Herein, we report the case of a 56-year-old woman who presented with simultaneous bilateral ganglion cysts of the ACL that were symptomatic. She was successfully treated with arthroscopic resection and debridement. We also present a brief review of the literature, highlighting the aetiology, diagnosis and management of ganglion cysts of the ACL. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of simultaneous bilateral intra-articular ganglion cysts of the ACL. PMID:25917477

  5. Simultaneous bilateral ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    Demircay, Emre; Ofluoglu, Demet; Ozel, Omer; Oztop, Pinar

    2015-04-01

    Intra-articular ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are rare, and bilateral ganglion cysts are even rarer. These cysts may cause intermittent or chronic nonspecific knee discomfort. Although three cases of bilateral ganglion cysts have been reported in the literature, the knees were not simultaneously affected in those cases. Herein, we report the case of a 56-year-old woman who presented with simultaneous bilateral ganglion cysts of the ACL that were symptomatic. She was successfully treated with arthroscopic resection and debridement. We also present a brief review of the literature, highlighting the aetiology, diagnosis and management of ganglion cysts of the ACL. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of simultaneous bilateral intra-articular ganglion cysts of the ACL. PMID:25917477

  6. Roots Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Barnabas

    1998-01-01

    Offers historical information about square roots. Presents three different methods--Hero's method, visual method, and remainder method--which can be used to teach the finding of square roots and one method for determining cube roots. (ASK)

  7. Morphologic pattern of the intrinsic ganglionated nerve plexus in the mouse heart

    PubMed Central

    Rysevaite, Kristina; Saburkina, Inga; Pauziene, Neringa; Noujaim, Sami; Jalife, José; Pauza, Dainius H.

    2011-01-01

    Summary BACKGROUND Both normal and genetically modified mice are excellent models to investigate molecular mechanisms of arrhythmogenic cardiac diseases that may associate with an imbalance between the sympathetic and the parasympathetic nervous input to the heart. OBJECTIVE We sought to: (1) determine the structural organization of the mouse cardiac neural plexus; (2) identify extrinsic neural sources and their relationship with the cardiac plexus; and (3) reveal any anatomical differences in the cardiac plexus between mouse and other species. METHODS Cardiac nerve structures were visualized employing histochemical staining for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) on whole heart and thorax-dissected preparations derived from 25 mice. To confirm reliability of staining parasympathetic and sympathetic neural components in the mouse heart we applied a histochemical method for AChE and imunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and/or choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) on whole mounts preparations from 6 mice. RESULTS The double immunohistochemical labeling of TH and ChAT on AChE positive neural elements in mouse whole mounts demonstrated equal staining of nerves and ganglia for AChE that were positive for both TH and ChAT. The extrinsic cardiac nerves access the mouse heart at the right (RCV) and left (LCV) cranial veins and interblend within the ganglionated nerve plexus of the heart hilum that is persistently localized on the heart base. Nerves and bundles of nerve fibers extend epicardially from this plexus to atria and ventricles by left dorsal, dorsal right atrial, right ventral, and ventral left atrial routes or subplexuses. The RCV received extrinsic nerves mainly originated from the right cervicothoracic ganglion and a branch of the right vagus nerve, while the LCV was supplied by extrinsic nerves from the left cervicothoracic ganglion and the left vagus nerve. The majority of intrinsic cardiac ganglia were localized on the heart base at the roots of pulmonary

  8. Transcriptomic and anatomical complexity of primary, seminal, and crown roots highlight root type-specific functional diversity in maize (Zea mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Huanhuan; Lu, Xin; Opitz, Nina; Marcon, Caroline; Paschold, Anja; Lithio, Andrew; Nettleton, Dan; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Maize develops a complex root system composed of embryonic and post-embryonic roots. Spatio-temporal differences in the formation of these root types imply specific functions during maize development. A comparative transcriptomic study of embryonic primary and seminal, and post-embryonic crown roots of the maize inbred line B73 by RNA sequencing along with anatomical studies were conducted early in development. Seminal roots displayed unique anatomical features, whereas the organization of primary and crown roots was similar. For instance, seminal roots displayed fewer cortical cell files and their stele contained more meta-xylem vessels. Global expression profiling revealed diverse patterns of gene activity across all root types and highlighted the unique transcriptome of seminal roots. While functions in cell remodeling and cell wall formation were prominent in primary and crown roots, stress-related genes and transcriptional regulators were over-represented in seminal roots, suggesting functional specialization of the different root types. Dynamic expression of lignin biosynthesis genes and histochemical staining suggested diversification of cell wall lignification among the three root types. Our findings highlight a cost-efficient anatomical structure and a unique expression profile of seminal roots of the maize inbred line B73 different from primary and crown roots. PMID:26628518

  9. Cytoarchitectonic study of the trigeminal ganglion in humans

    PubMed Central

    KRASTEV, DIMO STOYANOV; APOSTOLOV, ALEXANDER

    2013-01-01

    The trigeminal ganglion (TG), a cluster of pseudounipolar neurons, is located in the trigeminal impression of the temporal pyramid. It is covered by a sheath of the dura mater and arachnoid and is near the rear end of the cavernous sinus. The peripheral processes of the pseudounipolar cells are involved in the formation of the first and second branch and the sensory part of the third branch of the fifth cranial nerve, and the central ones form the sensory root of the nerve, which penetrates at the level of the middle cerebellar peduncle, aside from the pons, and terminate in the sensory nuclei of the trigeminal complex. We found that the primary sensory neurons involved in sensory innervation of the orofacial complex are a diverse group. Although they possess the general structure of pseudounipolar neurons, there are significant differences among them, seen in varying intensities of staining. Based on our investigations we classified the neurons into 7 groups, i.e. large, subdivided into light and dark, medium, also light and dark, and small light and dark, and, moreover, neurons with an irregular shape of their perikarya. Further research by applying various immunohistochemical methods will clarify whether differences in the morphological patterns of the neurons are associated with differences in the neurochemical composition of various neuronal types. PMID:26527926

  10. Concerted Signaling by Retinal Ganglion Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Markus; Lagnado, Leon; Baylor, Denis A.

    1995-11-01

    To analyze the rules that govern communication between eye and brain, visual responses were recorded from an intact salamander retina. Parallel observation of many retinal ganglion cells with a microelectrode array showed that nearby neurons often fired synchronously, with spike delays of less than 10 milliseconds. The frequency of such synchronous spikes exceeded the correlation expected from a shared visual stimulus up to 20-fold. Synchronous firing persisted under a variety of visual stimuli and accounted for the majority of action potentials recorded. Analysis of receptive fields showed that concerted spikes encoded information not carried by individual cells; they may represent symbols in a multineuronal code for vision.

  11. Symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cyst of the patellar tendon.

    PubMed

    Jose, Jean; O'Donnell, Kevin; Lesniak, Bryson

    2011-02-01

    Ganglion cysts have been previously described throughout the body, most commonly about the wrist, hand, knee, ankle, and feet. When symptomatic, they may interfere with joint mechanics, resulting in snapping, catching, and locking. Intratendinous ganglion cysts lack a synovial epithelial lining and are thought to develop from the mucoid degeneration of connective tissue caused by chronic irritation, chronic repetitive injury, and chronic ischemia. On magnetic resonance imaging, ganglion cysts originating from tendons, ligaments, tendon sheaths, menisci, or joint capsules appear as well-defined lobulated masses that follow simple or complex fluid signal intensity on all pulse sequences, with enhancing walls and internal septations on post-contrast images. There may be appreciable degeneration and partial tearing of the structure of origin, particularly if associated with tendons. On ultrasonography, they present as hypoechoic masses, with internal septations and lobulations of varying sizes, without significant vascularity on power or color Doppler sampling. A thin fluid neck extending from the structure of origin (tail sign), when present, is a reliable sign of a ganglion cyst. This article describes a sonographically guided technique to treat symptomatic ganglion cysts within the patellar tendon. Complete evacuation of the ganglion cyst, with disappearance of the tail sign, is considered the determining factor for a successful procedure. A similar technique can be used for the treatment of other symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cysts elsewhere in the body. To our knowledge, symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cysts within the patellar tendon and their treatment have not been previously reported. PMID:21323277

  12. The successful arthroscopic treatment of suprascapular intraneural ganglion cysts.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Nikhil K; Spinner, Robert J; Smith, Jay; Howe, Benjamin M; Amrami, Kimberly K; Iannotti, Joseph P; Dahm, Diane L

    2015-09-01

    OBJECT High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can distinguish between intraneural ganglion cysts and paralabral (extraneural) cysts at the glenohumeral joint. Suprascapular intraneural ganglion cysts share the same pathomechanism as their paralabral counterparts, emanating from a tear in the glenoid labrum. The authors present 2 cases to demonstrate that the identification and arthroscopic repair of labral tears form the cornerstone of treatment for intraneural ganglion cysts of the suprascapular nerve. METHODS Two patients with suprascapular intraneural ganglion cysts were identified: 1 was recognized and treated prospectively, and the other, previously reported as a paralabral cyst, was identified retrospectively through the reinter-pretation of high-resolution MR images. RESULTS Both patients achieved full functional recovery and had complete radiological involution of the intraneural ganglion cysts at the 3-month and 12-month follow-ups, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Previous reports of suprascapular intraneural ganglion cysts described treatment by an open approach to decompress the cysts and resect the articular nerve branch to the glenohumeral joint. The 2 cases in this report demonstrate that intraneural ganglion cysts, similar to paralabral cysts, can be treated with arthroscopic repair of the glenoid labrum without resection of the articular branch. This approach minimizes surgical morbidity and directly addresses the primary etiology of intraneural and extraneural ganglion cysts. PMID:26323813

  13. Gravity and embryonic development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    The relationship between the developing embryo (both plant and animal) and a gravitational field has long been contemplated. The difficulty in designing critical experiments on the surface of the earth because of its background of 1 g, has been an obstacle to a resolution of the problem. Biological responses to gravity (particularly in plants) are obvious in many cases; however, the influence of gravity as an environmental input to the developing embryo is not as obvious and has proven to be extremely difficult to define. In spite of this, over the years numerous attempts have been made using a variety of embryonic materials to come to grips with the role of gravity in development. Three research tools are available: the centrifuge, the clinostat, and the orbiting spacecraft. Experimental results are now available from all three sources. Some tenuous conclusions are drawn, and an attempt at a unifying theory of gravitational influence on embryonic development is made.

  14. Therapeutic Approach of Wrist Ganglion Using Electroacupuncture: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung Min; Lee, Sung Hoon; Jung, A Young; Nam, Doo Hyoun; Cheon, Ji Hwan

    2014-01-01

    A ganglion cyst is a relatively common benign tumor on the wrist. Conservative and surgical approaches have been used for its treatment. Various conservative treatment methods have been suggested such as reassurance, aspiration, sclerosant injection, and direct compression. But, there is no acceptable treatment of choice yet because each suggested method has a relatively high recurrence rate. We want to report two cases in which the size of the wrist ganglion was decreased by using electroacupuncture. One patient presented with a chronic ganglion for six years and the other patient presented with a recently occurred acute ganglion. We applied electroacupuncture for 20 minutes once a week for eight weeks to both of them. Afterwards, the size of the wrist ganglion diminished in the follow-up sonography and the accompanying pain was also relieved. Herein we report both cases along with a review of the relevant literature. PMID:25024969

  15. The retinal ganglion cell classes of New World primates.

    PubMed

    Yamada, E S; Silveira, L C; Gomes, F L; Lee, B B

    1996-12-01

    In the primate retina there are distinct ganglion cell classes, exhibiting particular morphologies and central projections, each responsible for conveying particular types of visual information to the brain. The chief retinal inputs to the cortex arise from specific ganglion cell classes, M-ganglion cells, responsible for carrying the luminance signal, and P-ganglion cells, that convey the red-green color opponent signal, as well as high contrast luminance signal. There are other ganglion cell classes, such as small-field bistratified cells, exhibiting dendrites that stratify at two different levels in the inner plexiform layer, which convey the blue-yellow color opponent signal. Most published data concerning primate retinal ganglion cell anatomy and physiology have been obtained from Old World species. Studies on New World monkeys have recently become of interest since they differ from the Old World monkeys with respect to the color vision inheritance pattern. On reviewing retinal ganglion cell layer organization in New World monkeys, it seems that there are more similarities than differences in relation to the Old World monkeys. Diurnal genera of New World monkeys exhibit a well-developed fovea centralis and ganglion cell density peak, as well as peripheral density values which are in the range reported for Old World monkeys and human. Moreover, all the major ganglion cell classes identified in Old World monkeys are also present in New World primates. Up to now, no obvious anatomical differences between dichromats and trichromats have been reported. The only genus that is significantly different from the others is the Aotus. It exhibits lower ganglion cell density in the central retina, and apparently lacks the small-field bistratified cells. PMID:9394516

  16. Square Root +

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederiksen, John G.

    1969-01-01

    A rational presentation of the so-called long division method for extracting the square root of a number. Diagrams are used to show relationship of this technique to the binomial theorem. Presentation exposes student to many facets of mathematics in addition to the mechanics of funding square root and cube root. Geometry, algebraic statements,…

  17. Tendoscopic Excision of an Intratendinous Ganglion in the Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Endo, Jun; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Sasho, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Intratendinous ganglion cysts are rare lesions of unknown etiology that originate within a tendon. We report the case of a 34-year-old female with an intratendinous ganglion in the plantar portion of the flexor hallucis longus tendon. The intratendinous ganglion recurred after ultrasound-guided needle aspiration. Tendoscopic excision of the intratendinous ganglion cyst achieved a satisfactorily result without recurrence. PMID:25456345

  18. Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the auricle in a child.

    PubMed

    Crozier, Emily; Rihani, Jordan; Koral, Korgun; Cope-Yokoyama, Sandy; Rakheja, Dinesh; Ulualp, Seckin O

    2012-12-01

    We describe the diagnosis and management of a child with embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the auricle and emphasize both clinical and radiological findings of this rare condition. A nine-year-old boy presented for evaluation of a slowly enlarging left auricle mass. The mass was nodular, violaceous, semi-translucent, and hyperpigmented with an overlying pseudo-vesicular plaque. The mass appeared to involve the left cavum concha, root of the helix, superior aspect of the external auditory canal, the tragus and extend to a deep preauricular component. MR imaging documented a lobulated soft tissue mass surrounding the external auditory canal with superficial involvement of the pinna. Incisional biopsy of the mass suggested embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. The tumor was completely removed by total auriculectomy and lateral temporal bone resection. The final diagnosis was embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. Although rare, otolaryngologists, pediatricians, and radiologists need to consider rhabdomyosarcoma in the differential diagnosis of auricle mass in children. PMID:23279030

  19. Multielectrode array recordings reveal physiological diversity of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells in the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Tanja; Ziegler, Christiane; Blau, Axel

    2008-05-01

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) play important roles in non-image forming photoreception and participate in the regulation of the circadian rhythm and the pupillary light reflex. The aim of the present work was to characterize the light response of ipRGCs at two developmental stages of the embryonic chick. The electrophysiological study was based on comparative multielectrode array recordings from acute retinal slices. To ensure that light was the only source of excitation, intercellular activity modulation by gap junctions and chemical synapses was inhibited by carbenoxolone and bafilomycin A1, respectively. Action potentials evoked by blue light were detected as early as day 13 of embryonic development, which is notably earlier than the completion of the maturation process of functional rods and cones. Three different response types were distinguished by their response latency and sensitivity to different illumination intensities. At this point it is not clear whether these types just represent different maturation stages or have different morphologies and functions with respect to the non-image forming visual system and circadian entrainment. PMID:18377877

  20. Selectivity for multiple stimulus features in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Fairhall, Adrienne L; Burlingame, C Andrew; Narasimhan, Ramesh; Harris, Robert A; Puchalla, Jason L; Berry, Michael J

    2006-11-01

    Under normal viewing conditions, retinal ganglion cells transmit to the brain an encoded version of the visual world. The retina parcels the visual scene into an array of spatiotemporal features, and each ganglion cell conveys information about a small set of these features. We study the temporal features represented by salamander retinal ganglion cells by stimulating with dynamic spatially uniform flicker and recording responses using a multi-electrode array. While standard reverse correlation methods determine a single stimulus feature--the spike-triggered average--multiple features can be relevant to spike generation. We apply covariance analysis to determine the set of features to which each ganglion cell is sensitive. Using this approach, we found that salamander ganglion cells represent a rich vocabulary of different features of a temporally modulated visual stimulus. Individual ganglion cells were sensitive to at least two and sometimes as many as six features in the stimulus. While a fraction of the cells can be described by a filter-and-fire cascade model, many cells have feature selectivity that has not previously been reported. These reverse models were able to account for 80-100% of the information encoded by ganglion cells. PMID:16914609

  1. Methylene blue-enhanced arthroscopic resection of dorsal wrist ganglions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Joo; Sawyer, Gregory A; Dasilva, Manuel F

    2011-12-01

    The ganglion is the most common soft tissue mass of the hand and wrist. Over the past 10 to 15 years, there has been a growing interest in arthroscopic treatment of dorsal wrist ganglions. Proposed advantages of arthroscopy include greater motion (particularly wrist flexion), improved cosmesis, and potential to identify/treat other intra-articular pathology. Despite the documented clinical success of arthroscopic ganglion excision, limitations include inconsistent identification of the ganglion stalk. Our described technique offers a means by which to improve visualization of the ganglion stalk intra-articularly to produce a more effective and efficient arthroscopic ganglion excision. During the procedure, a small volume of methylene blue solution is injected into the cyst. Its communication with the joint is apparent arthroscopically, thus identifying the location of the stalk. With the ability to precisely identify the ganglion stalk using an injection of methylene blue, the surgeon can direct the arthroscopic debridement toward the appropriate pathologic tissue. Unnecessary debridement of uninvolved tissue can be avoided with the technique. This also allows for optimal portal placement and, in particular, indicates whether a midcarpal portal should be employed. This should result in fewer recurrences, decreased operative time, and less iatrogenic injury. PMID:22105637

  2. Magnesium and Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Komiya, Yuko; Su, Li-Ting; Chen, Hsiang-Chin; Habas, Raymond; Runnels, Loren W.

    2014-01-01

    Important for energy metabolism, neurotransmission, bone stability, and other cellular functions, Mg2+ has well-established and undisputedly critical roles in adult tissues. Its contributions to early embryonic development are less clearly understood. For decades it has been known that gestational Mg2+ deficiency in rodents produces teratogenic effects. More recent studies have linked deficiency in this vital cation to birth defects in humans, including spina bifida, a neural fold closure defect in humans that occurs at an average rate of 1 per 1000 pregnancies. The first suggestion that Mg2+ may be playing a more specific role in early development arose from studies of the TRPM7 and TRPM6 ion channels. TRPM7 and TRPM6 are divalent-selective ion channels in possession of their own kinase domains that have been implicated in the control of Mg2+ homeostasis in vertebrates. Disruption of the functions of these ion channels in mice as well as in frogs interferes with gastrulation, a pivotal process during early embryonic development that executes the emergence of the body plan and closure of the neural tube. Surprisingly, gastrulation defects produced by depletion of TRPM7 can be prevented by Mg2+ supplementation, indicating an essential role for Mg2+ in gastrulation and neural fold closure. The aim of this review is to summarize the data emerging from molecular genetic, biochemical and electrophysiological studies of TRPM6 and TRPM7 and provide a model of how Mg2+, through these unique channel-kinases, may be impacting early embryonic development. PMID:24721994

  3. Cometin is a novel neurotrophic factor that promotes neurite outgrowth and neuroblast migration in vitro and supports survival of spiral ganglion neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Jesper Roland; Fransson, Anette; Fjord-Larsen, Lone; Thompson, Lachlan H; Houchins, Jeffrey P; Andrade, Nuno; Torp, Malene; Kalkkinen, Nisse; Andersson, Elisabet; Lindvall, Olle; Ulfendahl, Mats; Brunak, Søren; Johansen, Teit E; Wahlberg, Lars U

    2012-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors are secreted proteins responsible for migration, growth and survival of neurons during development, and for maintenance and plasticity of adult neurons. Here we present a novel secreted protein named Cometin which together with Meteorin defines a new evolutionary conserved protein family. During early mouse development, Cometin is found exclusively in the floor plate and from E13.5 also in dorsal root ganglions and inner ear but apparently not in the adult nervous system. In vitro, Cometin promotes neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglion cells which can be blocked by inhibition of the Janus or MEK kinases. In this assay, additive effects of Cometin and Meteorin are observed indicating separate receptors. Furthermore, Cometin supports migration of neuroblasts from subventricular zone explants to the same extend as stromal cell derived factor 1a. Given the neurotrophic properties in vitro, combined with the restricted inner ear expression during development, we further investigated Cometin in relation to deafness. In neomycin deafened guinea pigs, two weeks intracochlear infusion of recombinant Cometin supports spiral ganglion neuron survival and function. In contrast to the control group receiving artificial perilymph, Cometin treated animals retain normal electrically-evoked brainstem response which is maintained several weeks after treatment cessation. Neuroprotection is also evident from stereological analysis of the spiral ganglion. Altogether, these studies show that Cometin is a potent new neurotrophic factor with therapeutic potential. PMID:21985865

  4. Dual ACL Ganglion Cysts: Significance of Detailed Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Amit; Nag, H. L.; Meena, Sanjay; Lohiya, Ramprakash; Agarwal, Abhinav

    2014-01-01

    Intra-articular ganglion cysts of the knee joint are rare and most frequently are an incidental finding on MRI and arthroscopy. Most of the previous studies have reported a single ganglion cyst in the knee. There have been previous reports of more than one cyst in the same knee but not in the same structure within the knee. We are reporting a case of dual ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) ganglion cysts one of which was missed on radiological examination but later detected during arthroscopy. To the best of our knowledge, no such case has been reported in the indexed English literature till date. PMID:25400962

  5. Ulnar Nerve Compression in Guyon's Canal by Ganglion Cyst.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Kyung-Woo; Kim, Min-Su; Chang, Chul-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Ho

    2011-02-01

    Compression of the ulnar nerve in Guyon's canal can result from repeated blunt trauma, fracture of the hamate's hook, and arterial thrombosis or aneurysm. In addition, conditions such as ganglia, rheumatoid arthritis and ulnar artery disease can rapidly compress the ulnar nerve in Guyon's canal. A ganglion cyst can acutely protrude or grow, which also might compress the ulnar nerve. So, clinicians should consider a ganglion cyst in Guyon's canal as a possible underlying cause of ulnar nerve compression in patients with a sudden decrease in hand strength. We believe that early decompression with removal of the ganglion is very important to promote complete recovery. PMID:21519507

  6. Ulnar Nerve Compression in Guyon's Canal by Ganglion Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Kyung-Woo; Kim, Min-Su; Chang, Chul-Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Compression of the ulnar nerve in Guyon's canal can result from repeated blunt trauma, fracture of the hamate's hook, and arterial thrombosis or aneurysm. In addition, conditions such as ganglia, rheumatoid arthritis and ulnar artery disease can rapidly compress the ulnar nerve in Guyon's canal. A ganglion cyst can acutely protrude or grow, which also might compress the ulnar nerve. So, clinicians should consider a ganglion cyst in Guyon's canal as a possible underlying cause of ulnar nerve compression in patients with a sudden decrease in hand strength. We believe that early decompression with removal of the ganglion is very important to promote complete recovery. PMID:21519507

  7. Prox1 Regulates the Subtype-Specific Development of Caudal Ganglionic Eminence-Derived GABAergic Cortical Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Young, Allison; Petros, Timothy; Karayannis, Theofanis; McKenzie Chang, Melissa; Lavado, Alfonso; Iwano, Tomohiko; Nakajima, Miho; Taniguchi, Hiroki; Huang, Z. Josh; Heintz, Nathaniel; Oliver, Guillermo; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Machold, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Neurogliaform (RELN+) and bipolar (VIP+) GABAergic interneurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex provide critical inhibition locally within the superficial layers. While these subtypes are known to originate from the embryonic caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE), the specific genetic programs that direct their positioning, maturation, and integration into the cortical network have not been elucidated. Here, we report that in mice expression of the transcription factor Prox1 is selectively maintained in postmitotic CGE-derived cortical interneuron precursors and that loss of Prox1 impairs the integration of these cells into superficial layers. Moreover, Prox1 differentially regulates the postnatal maturation of each specific subtype originating from the CGE (RELN, Calb2/VIP, and VIP). Interestingly, Prox1 promotes the maturation of CGE-derived interneuron subtypes through intrinsic differentiation programs that operate in tandem with extrinsically driven neuronal activity-dependent pathways. Thus Prox1 represents the first identified transcription factor specifically required for the embryonic and postnatal acquisition of CGE-derived cortical interneuron properties. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Despite the recognition that 30% of GABAergic cortical interneurons originate from the caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE), to date, a specific transcriptional program that selectively regulates the development of these populations has not yet been identified. Moreover, while CGE-derived interneurons display unique patterns of tangential and radial migration and preferentially populate the superficial layers of the cortex, identification of a molecular program that controls these events is lacking. Here, we demonstrate that the homeodomain transcription factor Prox1 is expressed in postmitotic CGE-derived cortical interneuron precursors and is maintained into adulthood. We found that Prox1 function is differentially required during both embryonic and postnatal stages of development to

  8. Root Hairs

    PubMed Central

    Grierson, Claire; Nielsen, Erik; Ketelaarc, Tijs; Schiefelbein, John

    2014-01-01

    Roots hairs are cylindrical extensions of root epidermal cells that are important for acquisition of nutrients, microbe interactions, and plant anchorage. The molecular mechanisms involved in the specification, differentiation, and physiology of root hairs in Arabidopsis are reviewed here. Root hair specification in Arabidopsis is determined by position-dependent signaling and molecular feedback loops causing differential accumulation of a WD-bHLH-Myb transcriptional complex. The initiation of root hairs is dependent on the RHD6 bHLH gene family and auxin to define the site of outgrowth. Root hair elongation relies on polarized cell expansion at the growing tip, which involves multiple integrated processes including cell secretion, endomembrane trafficking, cytoskeletal organization, and cell wall modifications. The study of root hair biology in Arabidopsis has provided a model cell type for insights into many aspects of plant development and cell biology. PMID:24982600

  9. Degeneration and regeneration of ganglion cell axons.

    PubMed

    Weise, J; Ankerhold, R; Bähr, M

    2000-01-15

    The retino-tectal system has been used to study developmental aspects of axon growth, synapse formation and the establishment of a precise topographic order as well as degeneration and regeneration of adult retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons after axonal lesion. This paper reviews some novel findings that provide new insights into the mechanisms of developmental RGC axon growth, pathfinding, and target formation. It also focuses on the cellular and molecular cascades that underlie RGC degeneration following an axonal lesion and on some therapeutic strategies to enhance survival of axotomized RGCs in vivo. In addition, this review deals with problems related to the induction of regeneration after axonal lesion in the adult CNS using the retino-tectal system as model. Different therapeutic approaches to promote RGC regeneration and requirements for specific target formation of regenerating RGCs in vitro and in vivo are discussed. PMID:10649506

  10. Microcirculation of human fetal posterior root ganglia: a scanning electron microscopic study of corrosion casts.

    PubMed

    Gorczyca, J; Skawina, A; Litwin, J A; Miodoński, A J

    1998-02-01

    The vasculature of lumbar posterior root ganglia was investigated in human fetuses aged 17-24 weeks; using the corrosion casting technique and scanning electron microscopy. The arterial supply consisted of one main artery and occasional arterioles entering the ganglion at its pole and running axially, while the venous drainage was located at the periphery of the ganglion, thus indicating a centrifugal pattern of blood flow. The dense capillary network of the ganglion showed the roughly parallel course of the vessels in the central zone and an irregular arrangement in the peripheral zone where capillaries formed "nests", probably surrounding individual perikaryons of ganglionic cells. The capillaries had a sinusoidal character with numerous dilatations about twice the normal capillary size, as well as occasional larger vascular spaces resulting from capillary interconnections and suggesting the intussusceptive type of angiogenesis. PMID:9488902

  11. Hmx1 is required for the normal development of somatosensory neurons in the geniculate ganglion.

    PubMed

    Quina, Lely A; Tempest, Lynne; Hsu, Yun-Wei A; Cox, Timothy C; Turner, Eric E

    2012-05-01

    Hmx1 is a variant homeodomain transcription factor expressed in the developing sensory nervous system, retina, and craniofacial mesenchyme. Recently, mutations at the Hmx1 locus have been linked to craniofacial defects in humans, rats, and mice, but its role in nervous system development is largely unknown. Here we show that Hmx1 is expressed in a subset of sensory neurons in the cranial and dorsal root ganglia which does not correspond to any specific sensory modality. Sensory neurons in the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia of Hmx1dm/dm mouse embryos have no detectable Hmx1 protein, yet they undergo neurogenesis and express sensory subtype markers normally, demonstrating that Hmx1 is not globally required for the specification of sensory neurons from neural crest precursors. Loss of Hmx1 expression has no obvious effect on the early development of the trigeminal (V), superior (IX/X), or dorsal root ganglia neurons in which it is expressed, but results in marked defects in the geniculate (VII) ganglion. Hmx1dm/dm mouse embryos possess only a vestigial posterior auricular nerve, and general somatosensory neurons in the geniculate ganglion are greatly reduced by mid-gestation. Although Hmx1 is expressed in geniculate neurons prior to cell cycle exit, it does not appear to be required for neurogenesis, and the loss of geniculate neurons is likely to be the result of increased cell death. Fate mapping of neural crest-derived tissues indicates that Hmx1-expressing somatosensory neurons at different axial levels may be derived from either the neural crest or the neurogenic placodes. PMID:22586713

  12. Ganglion cyst of the posterior cruciate ligament in a child.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Shamsi Abdul; Sujir, Premjit; Naik, Monappa A; Rao, Sharath K

    2012-04-01

    Ganglion cysts are more commonly associated with the anterior cruciate ligament than the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A literature review showed that all reported cases of ganglion cysts to date involved adults. We report a rare case of ganglion cyst in the PCL of a four-year-old boy, and discuss its aetiology, clinical presentation, imaging features and management. Ganglion cysts of the PCL may be confused with meniscal cysts arising from tears of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Hence, the posterior horn of the medial meniscus has to be carefully evaluated to rule out a tear. MR imaging is the method of choice to confirm diagnosis, and arthroscopic resection is a safe treatment modality even in children. PMID:22511069

  13. Volar wrist ganglion excision through the flexor carpi radialis sheath.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Gregory A; DaSilva, Manuel F; Akelman, Edward

    2012-09-01

    Volar wrist ganglions are much less frequent than their dorsal counterparts but provide much more surgical trepidation due to their proximity to the radial artery. With the majority arising from the radiocarpal joint, we have found that entering the flexor carpi radialis sheath and accessing the ganglion through the floor of the sheath allows for a relatively safe excision of these benign hand tumors. PMID:22913995

  14. Embryonic MGE Precursor Cells Grafted into Adult Rat Striatum Integrate and Ameliorate Motor Symptoms in 6-OHDA-Lesioned Rats

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica; Noctor, Stephen C.; Espinosa, Ana; Ariza, Jeanelle; Parker, Philip; Orasji, Samantha; Daadi, Marcel M.; Bankiewicz, Krystof; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Kriegstein, Arnold R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY We investigated a strategy to ameliorate the motor symptoms of rats that received 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions, a rodent model of Parkinson’s disease, through transplantation of embryonic medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) cells into the striatum. During brain development, embryonic MGE cells migrate into the striatum and neocortex where they mature into GABAergic interneurons and play a key role in establishing the balance between excitation and inhibition. Unlike most other embryonic neurons, MGE cells retain the capacity for migration and integration when transplanted into the postnatal and adult brain. We performed MGE cell transplantation into the basal ganglia of control and 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Transplanted MGE cells survived, differentiated into GABA+ neurons, integrated into host circuitry, and modifed motor behavior in both lesioned and control rats. Our data suggest that MGE cell transplantation into the striatum is a promising approach to investigate the potential benefits of remodeling basal ganglia circuitry in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:20207227

  15. Topography of ganglion cell production in the cat's retina

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, C.; Polley, E.H.

    1985-03-01

    The ganglion cells of the cat's retina form several classes distinguishable in terms of soma size, axon diameter, dendritic morphology, physiological properties, and central connections. Labeling with (/sup 3/H)thymidine shows that the ganglion cells which survive in the adult are produced as several temporally shifted, overlapping waves: medium-sized cells are produced before large cells, whereas the smallest ganglion cells are produced throughout the period of ganglion cell generation. Large cells and medium-sized cells show the same distinctive pattern of production, forming rough spirals around the area centralis. The oldest cells tend to lie superior and nasal to the area centralis, whereas cells in the inferior nasal retina and inferior temporal retina are, in general, progressively younger. Within each retinal quadrant, cells nearer the area centralis tend to be older than cells in the periphery, but there is substantial overlap. The retinal raphe divides the superior temporal quadrant into two zones with different patterns of cell addition. Superior temporal retina near the vertical meridian adds cells only slightly later than superior nasal retina, whereas superior temporal retina near the horizontal meridian adds cells very late, contemporaneously with inferior temporal retina. The broader wave of production of smaller ganglion cells seems to follow this same spiral pattern at its beginning and end. The presence of the area centralis as a nodal point about which ganglion cell production in the retinal quadrants pivots suggests that the area centralis is already an important retinal landmark even at the earliest stages of retinal development.

  16. Directional summation in non-direction selective retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Syed Y; Hamade, Khaldoun C; Yang, Ellen J; Nawy, Scott; Smith, Robert G; Pettit, Diana L

    2013-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells receive inputs from multiple bipolar cells which must be integrated before a decision to fire is made. Theoretical studies have provided clues about how this integration is accomplished but have not directly determined the rules regulating summation of closely timed inputs along single or multiple dendrites. Here we have examined dendritic summation of multiple inputs along On ganglion cell dendrites in whole mount rat retina. We activated inputs at targeted locations by uncaging glutamate sequentially to generate apparent motion along On ganglion cell dendrites in whole mount retina. Summation was directional and dependent13 on input sequence. Input moving away from the soma (centrifugal) resulted in supralinear summation, while activation sequences moving toward the soma (centripetal) were linear. Enhanced summation for centrifugal activation was robust as it was also observed in cultured retinal ganglion cells. This directional summation was dependent on hyperpolarization activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels as blockade with ZD7288 eliminated directionality. A computational model confirms that activation of HCN channels can override a preference for centripetal summation expected from cell anatomy. This type of direction selectivity could play a role in coding movement similar to the axial selectivity seen in locust ganglion cells which detect looming stimuli. More generally, these results suggest that non-directional retinal ganglion cells can discriminate between input sequences independent of the retina network. PMID:23516351

  17. Directional Summation in Non-direction Selective Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Syed Y.; Hamade, Khaldoun C.; Yang, Ellen J.; Nawy, Scott; Smith, Robert G.; Pettit, Diana L.

    2013-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells receive inputs from multiple bipolar cells which must be integrated before a decision to fire is made. Theoretical studies have provided clues about how this integration is accomplished but have not directly determined the rules regulating summation of closely timed inputs along single or multiple dendrites. Here we have examined dendritic summation of multiple inputs along On ganglion cell dendrites in whole mount rat retina. We activated inputs at targeted locations by uncaging glutamate sequentially to generate apparent motion along On ganglion cell dendrites in whole mount retina. Summation was directional and dependent13 on input sequence. Input moving away from the soma (centrifugal) resulted in supralinear summation, while activation sequences moving toward the soma (centripetal) were linear. Enhanced summation for centrifugal activation was robust as it was also observed in cultured retinal ganglion cells. This directional summation was dependent on hyperpolarization activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels as blockade with ZD7288 eliminated directionality. A computational model confirms that activation of HCN channels can override a preference for centripetal summation expected from cell anatomy. This type of direction selectivity could play a role in coding movement similar to the axial selectivity seen in locust ganglion cells which detect looming stimuli. More generally, these results suggest that non-directional retinal ganglion cells can discriminate between input sequences independent of the retina network. PMID:23516351

  18. Grasses suppress shoot-borne roots to conserve water during drought

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many important crops are members of the Poaceae family, and develop fibrous root systems characterized by a high-degree of root initiation from the basal nodes of the shoot, termed the crown. While this post-embryonic shoot-borne root system represents the major conduit for water uptake, little is k...

  19. Subparaneurial ganglion cysts of the fibular and tibial nerves: A new variant of intraneural ganglion cysts.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Nikhil K; Desy, Nicholas M; Howe, B Matthew; Amrami, Kimberly K; Spinner, Robert J

    2016-05-01

    Over the last decade, the mechanism of formation of intraneural ganglion cysts has been established through a meticulous review of clinical findings and correlation with patterns produced on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Pathognomonic imaging patterns distinguish these rare lesions from the more common extraneural variants in almost all cases. In this report, we present a new pattern of cyst occurrence in the subparaneurial compartment of the nerve and provide potential anatomic explanations for its pathogenesis. Using an anatomic framework of connective tissue compartments of the nerve, we reviewed 63 (56 fibular and seven tibial) intraneural ganglion cysts in the knee region evaluated at our institution and all reports with MRI in the world's literature for evidence of cyst occurrence in the subparaneurial compartment. We identified six cases (five in the common fibular nerve and one in the tibial nerve) at our institution that had MR evidence of cyst in the subparaneurial compartment with a new complex lobulated pattern. All cases had articular branch connections to the superior tibiofibular joint, which at operation were resected along with the joints. Follow-up revealed complete recovery in all instances and no clinical or radiological signs of recurrence. Three cases out of 80 in the literature exhibited the new complex lobulated MRI pattern. We present a new pattern of intraneural ganglion cyst occurrence in a potential space that surrounds peripheral nerves- the subparaneurial compartment. We believe that the unifying articular theory applies to the pathogenesis and management of these rare variants. Clin. Anat. 29:530-537, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26599204

  20. Selective sparing of later-born ganglion cells after neonatal transection of the infraorbital nerve.

    PubMed

    White, F A; Chiaia, N L; McCann, P; Enfiejian, H L; MacDonald, G J; Bennett-Clarke, C A; Rhoades, R W

    1993-05-01

    A combination of [3H]thymidine labelling and retrograde tracing with either horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or true blue (TB) was used to determine whether V primary afferent neurons born on different embryonic (E) days were differentially susceptible to neonatal transection of the infraorbital nerve (ION). In one experiment, rat fetuses were exposed to [3H]thymidine on E-8.5, 9.5, 10.5, 11.5, 12.5, 13.5, 14.5, or 15.5, the left infraorbital nerve (ION) was transected on the day of birth, and both the regenerate and intact IONs were labelled with HRP when the animals reached adulthood. The percentage of HRP labelled cells that were also heavily labelled by [3H]thymidine was calculated for both the intact ganglion and that ipsilateral to the damaged nerve for each animal. A consistently higher percentage of double labelled cells on the lesioned rather than on the intact side for a given E-day was taken as an indication that cells born on the day in question had an increased probability of survival relative to the entire population of V ganglion cells that contributed axons to the ION. Cells born late in gestation on E-12.5 through 14.5 were significantly more likely than early born (E-9.5 through 11.5) cells to survive neonatal axotomy. In a second experiment, fetuses were exposed to [3H]thymidine on either E-9.5, E-10.5, or E-14.5, the vibrissa pads on both sides of the face were injected with TB within 6 hours of birth, and the ION was transected 6-8 hours later.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8509500

  1. Polymodal Sensory Integration in Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Križaj, David

    2016-01-01

    An animal's ability to perceive the external world is conditioned by its capacity to extract and encode specific features of the visual image. The output of the vertebrate retina is not a simple representation of the 2D visual map generated by photon absorptions in the photoreceptor layer. Rather, spatial, temporal, direction selectivity and color "dimensions" of the original image are distributed in the form of parallel output channels mediated by distinct retinal ganglion cell (RGC) populations. We propose that visual information transmitted to the brain includes additional, light-independent, inputs that reflect the functional states of the retina, anterior eye and the body. These may include the local ion microenvironment, glial metabolism and systemic parameters such as intraocular pressure, temperature and immune activation which act on ion channels that are intrinsic to RGCs. We particularly focus on light-independent mechanical inputs that are associated with physical impact, cell swelling and intraocular pressure as excessive mechanical stimuli lead to the counterintuitive experience of "pressure phosphenes" and/or debilitating blinding disease such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. We point at recently discovered retinal mechanosensitive ion channels as examples through which molecular physiology brings together Greek phenomenology, modern neuroscience and medicine. Thus, RGC output represents a unified picture of the embodied context within which vision takes place. PMID:26427477

  2. Sphenopalatine Ganglion Stimulation in Neurovascular Headaches.

    PubMed

    Schoenen, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The interest for the sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) in neurovascular headaches dates back to 1908 when Sluder presented his work on the role of the SPG in 'nasal headaches', which are now part of the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias and cluster headache (ICHD-III-beta). Since then various interventions with blocking or lesional properties have targeted the SPG (transnasal injection of lidocaine and other agents, alcohol or steroid injections, radiofrequency lesions, or even ganglionectomy); success rates vary, but benefit is usually transient. Here we briefly review some anatomophysiological characteristics of the SPG and hypotheses about its pathophysiological role in neurovascular headaches before describing recent therapeutic results obtained with electrical stimulation of the SPG. Based on results of a prospective randomized controlled study, SPG stimulation appears to be an effective treatment option for patients with chronic cluster headaches; efficacy data indicate that acute electrical stimulation of the SPG provides significant attack pain relief and in many cases pain freedom compared to sham stimulation. Moreover, in some patients SPG stimulation has been associated with a significant and clinically meaningful reduction in cluster headache attack frequency; this preventive effect of SPG stimulation warrants further investigation. For migraine attacks, the outcome of a proof-of-concept study using a temporary electrode implanted in the pterygopalatine fossa was less encouraging; however, an ongoing multicenter trial is evaluating the efficacy of long-term SPG stimulation against sham stimulation for acute and preventive treatment in patients with frequent migraine. PMID:26394372

  3. Human pelvic extramural ganglion cells: a semiquantitative and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Imai, Kanoko; Furuya, Kenichi; Kawada, Michihiro; Kinugasa, Yusuke; Omote, Kiichi; Namiki, Akiyoshi; Uchiyama, Eiichi; Murakami, Gen

    2006-12-01

    In pelvic surgery, much attention is paid to nerve bundles but not to ganglion cells. Using serial section histology of 14 postmortem-treated hemipelvis (eight males, six females; mean, 79 years old), we examined the population number, distribution, and tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactivity (TH-IR; suggesting sympathetic neurons) of extramural pelvic ganglion cells. All pelvic ganglion cells were uniformly sized (25-30 microm) contrasting with small intramural rectal neurons. Abundant ganglion cells (30,000-140,000 unilaterally) existed not only along the pelvic viscera except for the rectum, but also along the hypogastric nerve, pelvic splanchnic nerve, pelvic plexus, and associated branches excluding those within the mesorectum. The intrapelvic ganglion cells outside the sympathetic trunk did not form macroscopically identifiable ganglia, but made small clusters (0.1-2.0 mm of maximum diameter) or were diffusely scattered within nerve bundles. More than half of these cells appeared TH-IR positive, although the positive/negative proportion differed between nerves and specimens. Greater numbers of ganglion cells were found in dorsosuperior sites (e.g., around the seminal vesicle) rather than in ventroinferior sites (e.g., along the urethra) in males, and vice versa in females. However, in total cell numbers, interindividual variations were evident rather than intergender difference. Due to significant interindividual variations in cell number, differences are likely to exist between patients in "resistance" to surgical stresses. We hypothesized that pelvic ganglion cells are liable to be damaged due to drying along the surgical margin, hypoxia in venous bleeding, pressure from surgical retractors, extension stress with taping and excess traction and/or direct injury with electrical scalpels. PMID:17033734

  4. Roots and Root Function: Introduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A number of current issues related to water management, ecohydrology, and climate change are giving impetus to new research aimed at understanding roots and their functioning. Current areas of research include: use of advanced imaging technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging to observe roots...

  5. Systems approaches to study root architecture dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta, Candela; Wabnik, Krzysztof; Benková, Eva

    2013-01-01

    The plant root system is essential for providing anchorage to the soil, supplying minerals and water, and synthesizing metabolites. It is a dynamic organ modulated by external cues such as environmental signals, water and nutrients availability, salinity and others. Lateral roots (LRs) are initiated from the primary root post-embryonically, after which they progress through discrete developmental stages which can be independently controlled, providing a high level of plasticity during root system formation. Within this review, main contributions are presented, from the classical forward genetic screens to the more recent high-throughput approaches, combined with computer model predictions, dissecting how LRs and thereby root system architecture is established and developed. PMID:24421783

  6. Topography, syntopy and morphology of the human otic ganglion: a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Senger, Miriam; Stoffels, Hans-Jürgen; Angelov, Doychin N

    2014-09-01

    The human otic ganglion (OG) is not readily accessible during ordinary anatomical teaching courses because of insufficient time and severe difficulties encountered in dissection. Accordingly, most anatomical descriptions of its location, relation to neighbouring structures, size and shape are supported only by drawings, but not by photographs. The aim of this study has been to present the OG with associated roots and branches in dissected anatomic specimens. Following cumbersome dissection and precise photo-documentation, a detailed analysis of location, syntopy and morphology was performed. We carried out this study in 21 infratemporal fossae of 18 cadavers and were able to identify the OG, the mandibular-, the inferior alveolar- and the lingual nerve in all of them. We found no significant variation regarding the location of the GO in the infratemporal fossa and its syntopy to the adjacent structures. An OG resembling the classic description was found only in 90.50% of the cases. All 3 roots (parasympathetic, sympathetic and sensory) could be identified only in 82.3% of the specimens. The established presence of ganglionic branches varied from 0% (communicating rami to the meningeal branch of the mandibular nerve, to the greater petrosal nerve and to the lingual nerve) to 90% (r. communicans to n. canalis pterygoideus). We conclude that precise knowledge of this enormous variety might be very helpful not only to students of medicine and dentistry during anatomical dissection courses, but also to head and neck surgeons, ear-nose-throat specialists and neurosurgeons when treating pathology of pre- and postganglionic fibres. PMID:24973995

  7. Imunoreactivity of zinc transporter 7 (ZNT7) in mouse dorsal root ganglia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the present study, we showed for the first time the localization of ZNT7 immunoreactivity in the mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) by means of immunohistochemistry and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Our results revealed that ZNT7 immunoreactivity was abundantly expressed in the nerve cells of...

  8. Regulation of proliferation and histone acetylation in embryonic neural precursors by CREB/CREM signaling

    PubMed Central

    Parlato, Rosanna; Mandl, Claudia; Hölzl-Wenig, Gabriele; Liss, Birgit; Tucker, Kerry L; Ciccolini, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor CREB (cAMP-response element binding protein) regulates differentiation, migration, survival and activity-dependent gene expression in the developing and mature nervous system. However, its specific role in the proliferation of embryonic neural progenitors is still not completely understood. Here we investigated how CREB regulates proliferation of mouse embryonic neural progenitors by a conditional mutant lacking Creb gene in neural progenitors. In parallel, we explored possible compensatory effects by the genetic ablation of another member of the same gene family, the cAMP-responsive element modulator (Crem). We show that CREB loss differentially impaired the proliferation, clonogenic potential and self-renewal of precursors derived from the ganglionic eminence (GE), in comparison to those derived from the cortex. This phenotype was associated with a specific reduction of histone acetylation in the GE of CREB mutant mice, and this reduction was rescued in vivo by inhibition of histone deacetylation. These observations indicate that the impaired proliferation could be caused by a reduced acetyltransferase activity in Creb conditional knock-out mice. These findings support a crucial role of CREB in controlling embryonic neurogenesis and propose a novel mechanism by which CREB regulates embryonic neural development.

  9. Ganglion and “Dendrite” Populations in EAS Ears

    PubMed Central

    Rask-Andersen, Helge; Liu, Wei; Linthicum, Fred H

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims EAS technique combines electric and acoustic stimulation in the same ear and utilizes both low frequency acoustic hearing and electric stimulation of preserved neurons. We present data of ganglion cell and dendrite populations in ears from normal individuals and those suffered from adult-onset hereditary progressive hearing loss with various residual low tone hearing. Some of these were potential candidates for EAS surgery. The data may give us information about the neuro-anatomic situation in EAS ears. Methods Dendrites and ganglion cells were calculated and audio-cytocochleograms constructed. The temporal bones were from the collection at the House Ear Institute in Los Angeles, USA. Normal human anatomy, based on surgical specimens, is presented. Results IHCs and OHCs, supporting cells, ganglion cells and dendrites were preserved in the apical region. In the mid-frequency region, around 1 kHz, the OC with inner and outer hair cells were often conserved while in the lower basal turn, representing frequencies above 3 kHz, OC was atrophic and replaced by thin cells. Despite loss of hair cells and lamina fibers ganglion cells were present even after 28 years duration of deafness. Conclusions Conditions with profound SNHL with preserved low tone hearing may have several causes and the pathology may vary accordingly. In our patients with progressive adult-onset SNHL (amalgamated into “presbyacusis”) neurons were conserved even after long duration of deafness. These spiral ganglion cells may be excellent targets for electric stimulation using EAS technique. PMID:19955718

  10. Imaging of retinal ganglion cells in glaucoma: pitfalls and challenges.

    PubMed

    Werkmeister, R M; Cherecheanu, A Popa; Garhofer, G; Schmidl, D; Schmetterer, L

    2013-08-01

    Imaging has gained a key role in modern glaucoma management. Traditionally, interest was directed toward the appearance of the optic nerve head and the retinal nerve fiber layer. With the improvement of the resolution of optical coherence tomography, the ganglion cell complex has also become routinely accessible in the clinic. Further advances have been made in understanding the structure-function relationship in glaucoma. Nevertheless, direct imaging of the retinal ganglion cells in glaucoma would be advantageous. With the currently used techniques, this goal cannot be achieved, because the transversal resolution is limited by aberrations of the eye. The use of adaptive optics has significantly improved transversal resolution, and the imaging of several cell types including cones and astrocytes has become possible. Imaging of retinal ganglion cells, however, still remains a problem, because of the transparency of these cells. However, the visualization of retinal ganglion cells and their dendrites has been achieved in animal models. Furthermore, attempts have been made to visualize the apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells in vivo. Implementation of these techniques in clinical practice will probably improve glaucoma care and facilitate the development of neuroprotective strategies. PMID:23512142