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Sample records for root ultraviolet b-sensing

  1. Synergistic effects of ultraviolet-B and methyl jasmonate on tanshinone biosynthesis in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong Hui; Zheng, Li Ping; Tian, Hao; Wang, Jian Wen

    2016-06-01

    Tanshinones are major bioactive diterpenoids of Salvia miltiorrhiza roots used for the treatment of cardiocerebral diseases. To develop effective elicitation and bioprocess strategies for the enhanced production of tanshinones, ultraviolet-B (UV-B) irradiation and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) elicitation were applied alone or in combination respectively in S. miltiorrhiza hairy root cultures. Our results showed 40-min UV-B irradiation at 40μW/cm(2) stimulated tanshinone production without any suppression of root growth, suggesting a new effective elicitor to S. miltiorrhiza hairy root cultures for tanshinone production. Moreover, the combined treatment of UV-B irradiation and MeJA exhibited synergistic effects on the expression levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (SmHMGR) and geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (SmGGPPS) genes in the tanshinone biosynthetic pathway. When hairy roots of 18-day-old cultures were exposed to the combined elicitation for 9days, the maximum production of tanshinone reached to 28.21mg/L, a 4.9-fold increase over the control. The combined elicitation of UV-B and MeJA was firstly used to stimulate the production of biologically important secondary metabolites in hairy root cultures. PMID:27043259

  2. Ultraviolet Radiation-Elicited Enhancement of Isoflavonoid Accumulation, Biosynthetic Gene Expression, and Antioxidant Activity in Astragalus membranaceus Hairy Root Cultures.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiao; Gai, Qing-Yan; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Gu, Cheng-Bo; Fu, Yu-Jie; Ma, Wei

    2015-09-23

    In this work, Astragalus membranaceus hairy root cultures (AMHRCs) were exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV-A, UV-B, and UV-C) for promoting isoflavonoid accumulation. The optimum enhancement for isoflavonoid production was achieved in 34-day-old AMHRCs elicited by 86.4 kJ/m(2) of UV-B. The resulting isoflavonoid yield was 533.54 ± 13.61 μg/g dry weight (DW), which was 2.29-fold higher relative to control (232.93 ± 3.08 μg/g DW). UV-B up-regulated the transcriptional expressions of all investigated genes involved in isoflavonoid biosynthetic pathway. PAL and C4H were found to be two potential key genes that controlled isoflavonoid biosynthesis. Moreover, a significant increase was noted in antioxidant activity of extracts from UV-B-elicited AMHRCs (IC50 values = 0.85 and 1.08 mg/mL) in comparison with control (1.38 and 1.71 mg/mL). Overall, this study offered a feasible elicitation strategy to enhance isoflavonoid accumulation in AMHRCs and also provided a basis for metabolic engineering of isoflavonoid biosynthesis in the future. PMID:26370303

  3. Simultaneous Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Flavonoids from Ultraviolet-B Radiation in Leaves and Roots of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi Using LC-UV-ESI-Q/TOF/MS.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wen-Ting; Fang, Min-Feng; Liu, Xiao; Yue, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi is one of the most widely used traditional Chinese herbal medicines. It has been used for anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antibacterial activities, and so forth. Long-term enhanced ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation caused more effect on leaves than on roots of the plant. Liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-UV-ESI-Q/TOF/MS) method was applied for simultaneous quantitative and qualitative analysis of flavonoids in leaves and roots of S. baicalensis by enhanced UV-B radiation. Both low-intensity radiation and high-intensity radiation were not significantly increaseing the contents of baicalin, wogonoside, and wogonin in roots. However different intensity of radiation has different effects on several flavonoids in leaves. Both low-intensity radiation and high-intensity radiation had no significant effect on contents of baicalin and tectoridin in leaves; the content of scutellarin was significantly decreased by low-intensity radiation; chrysin was detected in low-intensity radiation and high-intensity radiation, and chrysin content is the highest in low-intensity radiation, but chrysin was not detected in control group. Different changes of different flavonoids under enhanced UV-B radiation indicate that induction on flavonoids is selective by enhanced UV-B radiation. PMID:24757579

  4. Comparison of sealing ability of ProRoot MTA, RetroMTA, and Biodentine as furcation repair materials: An ultraviolet spectrophotometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sinkar, Roshan Chandrakant; Patil, Sanjay S; Jogad, Nitin P; Gade, Vandana J

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the sealing ability of ProRooT MTA, RetroMTA, and Biodentine as furcation repair materials using dye extraction leakage method. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five mandibular molars were randomly divided into four groups according to the material used for perforation repair. Group I — ProRoot MTA (10 samples), Group II — RetroMTA (10 samples), Group III — Biodentine (10 samples), and Group IV (Control) — left unrepaired (5 samples). All samples were subjected to orthograde and retrograde Methylene blue dye challenge followed by dye extraction with concentration 65% nitric acid. Samples were then analyzed using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer using 550 nm wave lengths. Statistical Analysis: One-way analysis of variance, Tukey-Kramer multiple comparisons test. Results: Biodentine showed least dye absorbance while RetroMTA showed highest dye absorbance values when compared with other repair materials. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it was observed that Biodentine showed better sealing ability when compared with other root repair materials. PMID:26752836

  5. Ultraviolet Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molde, Trevor

    1973-01-01

    Outlines the discovery and nature of ultraviolet light, discusses some applications for these wavelengths, and describes a number of experiments with ultraviolet radiation suitable for secondary school science classes. (JR)

  6. The inhibitory effect of a Platycodon root extract on ultraviolet B-induced pigmentation due to a decrease in Kit expression.

    PubMed

    Kasamatsu, Shinya; Hachiya, Akira; Shimotoyodome, Yoshie; Kameyama, Akiyo; Miyauchi, Yuki; Higuchi, Kazuhiko; Fujimori, Taketoshi; Ohuchi, Atsushi; Shibuya, Yusuke; Kitahara, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    The signaling of stem cell factor (SCF) through its receptor Kit is known to play an important role in regulating cutaneous melanogenesis. In the course of UVB-induced pigmentation, the expression of membrane-bound SCF by epidermal keratinocytes is upregulated at an early phase and subsequently activates neighboring melanocytes via their Kit receptors. In order to identify effective skin-lightening materials, we screened botanical extracts to determine their abilities to diminish Kit expression in melanocytes. A Platycodon root extract was consequently found to have a remarkable inhibitory activity on Kit expression. When the extract was applied to three-dimensional human skin substitutes in vitro and to human skin in vivo after UVB irradiation, their pigmentation was significantly reduced, confirming the substantial contribution of the suppression of SCF/Kit signaling to preventing or inhibiting melanin synthesis. These data demonstrate that a Platycodon root extract is a promising material for a skin-lightening product to improve pigmentation-related diseases. PMID:24799080

  7. Ultraviolet Extensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Side-by-Side Comparison Click on image for larger view

    This ultraviolet image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows the Southern Pinwheel galaxy, also know as Messier 83 or M83. It is located 15 million light-years away in the southern constellation Hydra.

    Ultraviolet light traces young populations of stars; in this image, young stars can be seen way beyond the main spiral disk of M83 up to 140,000 light-years from its center. Could life exist around one of these far-flung stars? Scientists say it's unlikely because the outlying regions of a galaxy are lacking in the metals required for planets to form.

    The image was taken at scheduled intervals between March 15 and May 20, 2007. It is one of the longest-exposure, or deepest, images ever taken of a nearby galaxy in ultraviolet light. Near-ultraviolet light (or longer-wavelength ultraviolet light) is colored yellow, and far-ultraviolet light is blue.

    What Lies Beyond the Edge of a Galaxy The side-by-side comparison shows the Southern Pinwheel galaxy, or M83, as seen in ultraviolet light (right) and at both ultraviolet and radio wavelengths (left). While the radio data highlight the galaxy's long, octopus-like arms stretching far beyond its main spiral disk (red), the ultraviolet data reveal clusters of baby stars (blue) within the extended arms.

    The ultraviolet image was taken by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer between March 15 and May 20, 2007, at scheduled intervals. Back in 2005, the telescope first photographed M83 over a shorter period of time. That picture was the first to reveal far-flung baby stars forming up to 63,000 light-years from the edge of the main spiral disk. This came as a surprise to astronomers because a galaxy's outer territory typically lacks high densities of star-forming materials.

    The newest picture of M83 from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer is shown at the right, and was taken over a longer period of

  8. Roots Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Barnabas

    1998-01-01

    Offers historical information about square roots. Presents three different methods--Hero's method, visual method, and remainder method--which can be used to teach the finding of square roots and one method for determining cube roots. (ASK)

  9. Square Root +

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederiksen, John G.

    1969-01-01

    A rational presentation of the so-called long division method for extracting the square root of a number. Diagrams are used to show relationship of this technique to the binomial theorem. Presentation exposes student to many facets of mathematics in addition to the mechanics of funding square root and cube root. Geometry, algebraic statements,…

  10. Root Hairs

    PubMed Central

    Grierson, Claire; Nielsen, Erik; Ketelaarc, Tijs; Schiefelbein, John

    2014-01-01

    Roots hairs are cylindrical extensions of root epidermal cells that are important for acquisition of nutrients, microbe interactions, and plant anchorage. The molecular mechanisms involved in the specification, differentiation, and physiology of root hairs in Arabidopsis are reviewed here. Root hair specification in Arabidopsis is determined by position-dependent signaling and molecular feedback loops causing differential accumulation of a WD-bHLH-Myb transcriptional complex. The initiation of root hairs is dependent on the RHD6 bHLH gene family and auxin to define the site of outgrowth. Root hair elongation relies on polarized cell expansion at the growing tip, which involves multiple integrated processes including cell secretion, endomembrane trafficking, cytoskeletal organization, and cell wall modifications. The study of root hair biology in Arabidopsis has provided a model cell type for insights into many aspects of plant development and cell biology. PMID:24982600

  11. Magnetic tunnel junctions for magnetic field sensor by using CoFeB sensing layer capped with MgO film

    SciTech Connect

    Takenaga, Takashi Tsuzaki, Yosuke; Yoshida, Chikako; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Hatada, Akiyoshi; Nakabayashi, Masaaki; Iba, Yoshihisa; Takahashi, Atsushi; Noshiro, Hideyuki; Tsunoda, Koji; Aoki, Masaki; Furukawa, Taisuke; Fukumoto, Hiroshi; Sugii, Toshihiro

    2014-05-07

    We evaluated MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) for magnetic field sensors with spin-valve-type structures in the CoFeB sensing layer capped by an MgO film in order to obtain both top and bottom interfaces of MgO/CoFeB exhibiting interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). Hysteresis of the CoFeB sensing layer in these MTJs annealed at 275 °C was suppressed at a thickness of the sensing layer below 1.2 nm by interfacial PMA. We confirmed that the CoFeB sensing layers capped with MgO suppress the thickness dependences of both the magnetoresistance ratio and the magnetic behaviors of the CoFeB sensing layer more than that of the MTJ with a Ta capping layer. MgO-based MTJs with MgO capping layers can improve the controllability of the characteristics for magnetic field sensors.

  12. Atmospheric ultraviolet remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, Robert E.

    Techniques and applications of the ultraviolet wavelength region are examined. The topics addressed include: radiometry, sensors, space operations, the earth's atmosphere, solar photoabsorption, photon cross sections, airglow, aurora, scattering and fluorescence, atmospheric ultraviolet backgrounds, radiance and transmission codes, ozone and lower atmospheric composition, upper atmospheric composition and density, global auroral imaging, and ionospheric electron density.

  13. Roots and Root Function: Introduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A number of current issues related to water management, ecohydrology, and climate change are giving impetus to new research aimed at understanding roots and their functioning. Current areas of research include: use of advanced imaging technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging to observe roots...

  14. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, M.E.; Bien, F.; Bernstein, L.S.

    1986-12-09

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined. 5 figs.

  15. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, Michael E.; Bien, Fritz; Bernstein, Lawrence S.

    1986-01-01

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined.

  16. Saponins from the roots of Platycodon grandiflorum suppress ultraviolet A-induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression via MAPKs and NF-κB/AP-1-dependent signaling in HaCaT cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Choi, Jae Ho; Han, Eun Hee; Kwon, Kwang-Il; Lee, Young Chun; Choi, Jun Min; Chung, Young Chul; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2011-12-01

    Saponins from the roots of Platycodon grandiflorum (CKS) have been shown to exhibit many pharmacological activities, including anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities and antioxidant effects. However, anti-skin photoaging effects of CKS have not yet been reported. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of CKS against UVA damage on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT). We then explored the inhibitory effects of CKS on UVA-induced MMP-1 and investigated the molecular mechanism underlying those effects. CKS increased the cell viability and inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in HaCaT cells exposed to UVA irradiation. Pre-treatment of HaCaT cells with CKS inhibited UVA-induced production of MMP-1 and MMP-9. In addition, CKS decreased UVA-induced expression of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6. Western blot analysis further revealed that CKS markedly suppressed the enhancement of collagen degradation in UVA-exposed HaCaT cells. CKS also suppressed UVA-induced activation of NF-κB or c-Jun and c-Fos, and the phosphorylation of MAPKs, which are upstream modulators of NF-κB and AP-1. PMID:22005258

  17. International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm, Karl-Heinz

    1992-01-01

    The observation, data reduction, and interpretation of ultraviolet spectra (obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer) of Herbig-Haro objects, stellar jets, and (in a few cases) reflection nebulae in star-forming regions is discussed. Intermediate results have been reported in the required semi-annual reports. The observations for this research were obtained in 23 (US1) IUE shifts. The spectra were taken in the low resolution mode with the large aperture. The following topics were investigated: (1) detection of UV spectra of high excitation Herbig-Haro (HH) objects, identification of emission lines, and a preliminary study of the energy distribution of the ultraviolet continuum; (2) details of the continuum energy distribution of these spectra and their possible interpretation; (3) the properties of the reddening (extinction) of HH objects; (4) the possible time variation of strong emission lines in high excitation HH objects; (5) the ultraviolet emission of low excitation HH objects, especially in the fluorescent lines of the H2 molecule; (6) the ultraviolet emission in the peculiar object HH24; (7) the spatial emission distribution of different lines and different parts of the continuum in different HH objects; and (8) some properties of reflection nebula, in the environment of Herbig-Haro objects. Each topic is discussed.

  18. Automated Root Tracking with "Root System Analyzer"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Jin, Meina; Ockert, Charlotte; Bol, Roland; Leitner, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Crucial factors for plant development are water and nutrient availability in soils. Thus, root architecture is a main aspect of plant productivity and needs to be accurately considered when describing root processes. Images of root architecture contain a huge amount of information, and image analysis helps to recover parameters describing certain root architectural and morphological traits. The majority of imaging systems for root systems are designed for two-dimensional images, such as RootReader2, GiA Roots, SmartRoot, EZ-Rhizo, and Growscreen, but most of them are semi-automated and involve mouse-clicks in each root by the user. "Root System Analyzer" is a new, fully automated approach for recovering root architectural parameters from two-dimensional images of root systems. Individual roots can still be corrected manually in a user interface if required. The algorithm starts with a sequence of segmented two-dimensional images showing the dynamic development of a root system. For each image, morphological operators are used for skeletonization. Based on this, a graph representation of the root system is created. A dynamic root architecture model helps to determine which edges of the graph belong to an individual root. The algorithm elongates each root at the root tip and simulates growth confined within the already existing graph representation. The increment of root elongation is calculated assuming constant growth. For each root, the algorithm finds all possible paths and elongates the root in the direction of the optimal path. In this way, each edge of the graph is assigned to one or more coherent roots. Image sequences of root systems are handled in such a way that the previous image is used as a starting point for the current image. The algorithm is implemented in a set of Matlab m-files. Output of Root System Analyzer is a data structure that includes for each root an identification number, the branching order, the time of emergence, the parent

  19. Root gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, P. H.

    1995-01-01

    When a plant root is reoriented within the gravity field, it responds by initiating a curvature which eventually results in vertical growth. Gravity sensing occurs primarily in the root tip. It may involve amyloplast sedimentation in the columella cells of the root cap, or the detection of forces exerted by the mass of the protoplast on opposite sides of its cell wall. Gravisensing activates a signal transduction cascade which results in the asymmetric redistribution of auxin and apoplastic Ca2+ across the root tip, with accumulation at the bottom side. The resulting lateral asymmetry in Ca2+ and auxin concentration is probably transmitted to the elongation zone where differential cellular elongation occurs until the tip resumes vertical growth. The Cholodny-Went theory proposes that gravity-induced auxin redistribution across a gravistimulated plant organ is responsible for the gravitropic response. However, recent data indicate that the gravity-induced reorientation is more complex, involving both auxin gradient-dependent and auxin gradient-independent events.

  20. Root canal

    MedlinePlus

    Endodontic therapy ... the root of a tooth. Generally, there is pain and swelling in the area. The infection can ... You may have some pain or soreness after the procedure. An over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drug, such as ibuprofen or naproxen, can help relieve ...

  1. New Standards for Ultraviolet Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, D. H.

    1971-01-01

    Guidelines covering safe levels for exposure to ultraviolet radiation in an occupational environment are reported. The guidelines clarify the spectral radiant exposure doses and relative spectral effectiveness of ultraviolet radiation required to elicit adverse biologic effects.

  2. Line Tunable Ultraviolet Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.; Barnes, Norman P.

    2004-01-01

    An ultraviolet laser is demonstrated using a dual wavelength Nd:YAG oscillator, sum frequency and second harmonic process. Synchronous pulses at 1.052 and 1.319 micrometers are amplified, mixed and subsequently doubled, producing pulses at 0.293 micrometers.

  3. Vacuum ultraviolet holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, G. C.; Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    We report the first demonstration of holographic techniques in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral region. Holograms were produced with coherent 1182-A radiation. The holograms were recorded in polymethyl methacrylate and examined with an electron microscope. A holographic grating with a fringe spacing of 386 A was produced and far-field Fraunhofer holograms of submicron particles were recorded.

  4. International Ultraviolet Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This report is the November 6, 1996 - October 9, 1997, IUE Final Report for the International Ultraviolet Explorer Final Archive contract. The ultimate objective of this contract is the completion of the archival reprocessing of all IUE data obtained at GSFC between 1978 and 1995.

  5. Vacuum ultraviolet holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, G. C.; Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    The authors report the first demonstration of holographic techniques in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral region. Holograms were produced with coherent 1182 A radiation. The holograms were recorded in polymethyl methacrylate and read out with an electron microscope. A holographic grating with a fringe spacing of 836 A was produced and far-field Fraunhofer holograms of sub-micron particles were recorded.

  6. Ultraviolet radiation changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Richard L.; Frederick, John E.; Ilyas, Mohammad; Filyushkin, V.; Wahner, Andreas; Stamnes, K.; Muthusubramanian, P.; Blumthaler, M.; Roy, Colin E.; Madronich, Sasha

    1991-01-01

    A major consequence of ozone depletion is an increase in solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation received at the Earth's surface. This chapter discusses advances that were made since the previous assessment (World Meteorological Organization (WMO)) to our understanding of UV radiation. The impacts of these changes in UV on the biosphere are not included, because they are discussed in the effects assessment.

  7. Psoriasis and ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Farber, E.M.; Nall, L. )

    1993-09-01

    Prevention and detection screening programs as a public health service in curtailing the ever-increasing incidence of all forms of skin cancer are reviewed. The effect of solar and artificial ultraviolet radiation on the general population and persons with psoriasis is examined. 54 refs.

  8. Pythium Root Rot (and Feeder Root Necrosis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pythium species cause a number of diseases on corn. Among the Pythium diseases, root rot presents the least conspicuous aboveground symptoms. Broadly defined, root rot also includes feeder root necrosis. At least 16 species of Pythium are known to cause root rot of corn. These include P. acanthicu...

  9. Ultraviolet phototherapy for pruritus.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Jennifer; Lim, Henry W

    2005-01-01

    Ultraviolet-based therapy has been used to treat various pruritic conditions including pruritus in chronic renal failure, atopic dermatitis, HIV, aquagenic pruritus and urticaria, solar, chronic, and idiopathic urticaria, urticaria pigmentosa, polycythemia vera, pruritic folliculitis of pregnancy, breast carcinoma skin infiltration, Hodgkin's lymphoma, chronic liver disease, and acquired perforating dermatosis, among others. Various mechanisms of action for phototherapy have been posited. Treatment limitations, side effects, and common dosing protocols are reviewed. PMID:16297008

  10. Research in extreme ultraviolet and far ultraviolet astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labov, S. E.

    1985-01-01

    Instruments designed to explore different aspects of far and extreme ultraviolet cosmic radiation were studied. The far ultraviolet imager (FUVI) was flown on the Aries sounding rocket. Its unique large format 75mm detector mapped out the far ultraviolet background radiation with a resolution of only a few arc minutes. Analysis of this data indicates to what extent the FUVI background is extra galactic in origin. A power spectrum of the spatial fluctuations will have direct consequences for galactic evolution.

  11. Detecting contaminants by ultraviolet photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neiswander, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    Relatively high ultraviolet absorptivity of most organics as compared to metal is suggested as basis for detecting traces of contamination. By photographing metal surface in ultraviolet light, contaminants that might otherwise interfere with adhesion of surface coatings, or with welding or brazing, could be detected and removed. Real time monitoring of cleaning process is also possible if ultraviolet sensitive television camera is used instead of photographic film.

  12. Compact ultraviolet laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, Brian Walter

    1997-09-01

    This dissertation presents theoretical analysis and experimental investigation of a compact ultraviolet laser, comprising an unstable resonator semiconductor (URSL) laser-pumped potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) periodically segmented waveguide (PSW) laser. A comprehensive survey of existing short wavelength visible and near ultraviolet laser technologies suitable for the development of compact ultraviolet lasers is presented. This survey establishes the suitability of a diode-pumped KTP PSW laser as an attractive approach for developing a compact ultraviolet laser. Requirements for an efficient diode-pumped KTP PSW laser are given, leading to the selection of a frequency-stabilized URSL and hydrothermal KTP PSWs as the component technologies to be developed and integrated. Since the design requirements for the URSL and KTP PSW are critically dependent on a thorough understanding of the spatial mode properties of KTP PSWs, analyses and modeling of the spatial mode properties of these devices is presented using effective index method (EIM) and beam propagation method (BPM) models. In addition, a new expression for the normalized conversion efficiency is presented which explicitly incorporates the dependence of this important parameter on the lateral variation of the refractive index and d coefficient. To assess the theoretical performance of an URSL-pumped KTP PSW, the BPM model was extended to incorporate second harmonic generation. This represents an important contribution to the development of numerical methods for modeling nonlinear waveguides, in general, and provides important information on the cooperative effects of diffraction and spatial mode beating on the SHG output from KTP PSWs. Extensive optical characterization of NUV SHG in hydrothermal KTP PSWs using an argon-ion laser-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser as the infrared laser pump source is presented. Spectral characterization, spatial mode characterization, and the temperature dependence of the QPM

  13. Ultraviolet-renormalon calculus

    SciTech Connect

    Vainshtein, A.I. Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk ); Zakharov, V.I. )

    1994-08-29

    We consider the status of the so-called ultraviolet (UV) renormalon which contributes to large order divergences of perturbative expansions in quantum chromodynamics. We argue that although the renormalon is associated with short distance dynamics, the class of renormalon graphs is not well defined and its overall weight is not controlled by theory. From this point of view there is not much difference from the case of Borel nonsummable singularities. Phenomenologically the UV renormalon is related to an effective four-fermion interaction originating within fundamental QCD.

  14. Ultraviolet atomic emission detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, W.; Peterson, N. C.; Bass, A. M.; Kurylo, M. J., III (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    A device and method are provided for performing qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis through the utilization of a vacuum UV chromatographic detector. The method involves the use of a carrier gas at low pressure. The gas carries a sample to a gas chromatograph column; the column output is directed to a microwave cavity. In this cavity, a low pressure microwave discharge produces fragmentation of the compounds present and generates intense atomic emissions in the vacuum ultraviolet. These emissions are isolated by a monochromator and measured by photometer to establish absolute concentration for the elements.

  15. Transparent ultraviolet photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xun; Shan, Chong-Xin; Lu, Ying-Jie; Xie, Xiu-Hua; Li, Bing-Hui; Wang, Shuang-Peng; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Shen, De-Zhen

    2016-02-15

    Photovoltaic cells have been fabricated from p-GaN/MgO/n-ZnO structures. The photovoltaic cells are transparent to visible light and can transform ultraviolet irradiation into electrical signals. The efficiency of the photovoltaic cells is 0.025% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions, while it can reach 0.46% under UV illumination. By connecting several such photovoltaic cells in a series, light-emitting devices can be lighting. The photovoltaic cells reported in this Letter may promise the applications in glass of buildings to prevent UV irradiation and produce power for household appliances in the future. PMID:26872163

  16. Investigation of ultraviolet interstellar extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, C.; Haramundanis, K. L.

    1973-01-01

    Results concerning interstellar extinction in the ultraviolet are reported. These results were initially obtained by using data from main-sequence stars and were extended to include supergiants and emission stars. The principal finding of the analysis of ultraviolet extinction is not only that it is wavelength dependent, but that if changes with galactic longitude in the U3 passband (lambda sub eff = 1621 A); it does not change significantly in the U2 passband (lambda sub eff = 2308 A). Where data are available in the U4 passband (lambda sub eff = 1537 A), they confirm the rapid rise of extinction in the ultraviolet found by other investigators. However, in all cases, emission stars must be used with great caution. It is important to realize that while extinction continues to rise toward shorter wavelengths in the ultraviolet, including the shortest ultraviolet wavelengths measured (1100 A), it no longer plays an important role in the X-ray region (50 A).

  17. Ultraviolet radiation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slemp, Wayne S.

    1989-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet testing was not developed which will provide highly accelerated (20 to 50X) exposures that correlate to flight test data. Additional studies are required to develop an exposure methodology which will assure that accelerated testing can be used for qualification of materials and coatings for long duration space flight. Some conclusions are listed: Solar UV radiation is present in all orbital environments; Solar UV does not change in flux with orbital altitude; UV radiation can degrade most coatings and polymeric films; Laboratory UV simulation methodology is needed for accelerated testing to 20 UV solar constants; Simulation of extreme UV (below 200 nm) is needed to evaluate requirements for EUV in solar simulation.

  18. Ultraviolet observations of comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Code, A. D.; Houck, T. E.; Lillie, C. F.

    1972-01-01

    The first observations of a comet in the vacuum ultraviolet were obtained on January 14, 1970, when OAO-2 recorded the spectrum of the bright comet Tago-Sato-Kosaka (1969g). The observations revealed, among other things, the predicted extensive hydrogen Lyman alpha halo. OAO-2 continued to collect spectrophotometric measurements of this comet throughout January of that year; a photograph of the nucleus in Lyman alpha revealed finer scale structures. In February of 1970, the bright comet Bennet (1969i) became favorable for space observations. On the basis of the OAO discovery, OGO-V made several measurements of comet Bennet with low spatial resolution photometers. Comet Enke was detected by OGO in January of 1971 at a large heliocentric distance from its Lyman alpha emission.

  19. ULTRAVIOLET PROTECTIVE COMPOUNDS AS A RESPONSE TO ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Life on Earth has evolved adaptations to many environmental stresses over the epochs. One consistent stress has been exposure to ultraviolet radiation. In response to UVR organisms have adapted myriad responses; behavioral, morphological and physiological. Behaviorally, some orga...

  20. Ultraviolet radiation induced discharge laser

    DOEpatents

    Gilson, Verle A.; Schriever, Richard L.; Shearer, James W.

    1978-01-01

    An ultraviolet radiation source associated with a suitable cathode-anode electrode structure, disposed in a gas-filled cavity of a high pressure pulsed laser, such as a transverse electric atmosphere (TEA) laser, to achieve free electron production in the gas by photoelectric interaction between ultraviolet radiation and the cathode prior to the gas-exciting cathode-to-anode electrical discharge, thereby providing volume ionization of the gas. The ultraviolet radiation is produced by a light source or by a spark discharge.

  1. Research in extreme ultraviolet and far ultraviolet astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    The Far Ultraviolet imager (FUVI) was flown on the Aries class sounding rocket 24.015, producing outstanding results. The diffuse extreme ultraviolet (EUV) background spectrometer which is under construction is described. It will be launched on the Black Brant sounding rocket flight number 27.086. Ongoing design studies of a high resolution spectrometer are discussed. This instrument incorporates a one meter normal incidence mirror and will be suitable for an advanced Spartan mission.

  2. 21 CFR 872.6350 - Ultraviolet detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultraviolet detector. 872.6350 Section 872.6350...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6350 Ultraviolet detector. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet detector is a device intended to provide a source of ultraviolet light which is...

  3. 21 CFR 872.6350 - Ultraviolet detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultraviolet detector. 872.6350 Section 872.6350...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6350 Ultraviolet detector. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet detector is a device intended to provide a source of ultraviolet light which is...

  4. 21 CFR 872.6350 - Ultraviolet detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultraviolet detector. 872.6350 Section 872.6350...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6350 Ultraviolet detector. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet detector is a device intended to provide a source of ultraviolet light which is...

  5. The Celescope catalog of ultraviolet observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Data obtained from approximately 7500 ultraviolet television pictures are used to compile a celescope catalog of ultraviolet observations. This catalog lists the magnitude as observed in each of celescope's four ultraviolet color bands, the standard deviations of the observed ultraviolet magnitudes, positions, identifications, and ground based magnitudes, colors, and spectral types for approximately 5000 stars.

  6. Ultraviolet-Induced Mirror Degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.; Hasegawa, T. T.; Cleland, E. L.

    1982-01-01

    Recent tests of second-surface mirrors show that ultraviolet radiation penetrates glass and metalized zone and impinges upon backing paint. According to report, many backing materials are degraded by ultraviolet radiation. Mirror corrosion is a serious problem in solar-energy collection systems. Effects of UV on polymeric materials have been studied, and in general, all are degraded by UV. Polymers most resistant to UV radiation are polyimides.

  7. Ultraviolet studies of Cepheids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1992-01-01

    We discuss whether with new evolutionary tracks we still have a problem fitting the Cepheids and their evolved companions on the appropriate evolutionary tracks. We find that with the Bertelli et al. tracks with convective overshoot by one pressure scale height the problem is essentially removed, though somewhat more mixing would give a better fit. By using the results of recent nonlinear hydrodynamic calculations, we find that we also have no problem matching the observed pulsation periods of the Cepheids with those expected from their new evolutionary masses, provided that Cepheids with periods less than 9 days are overtone pulsators. We investigate possible mass loss of Cepheids from UV studies of the companion spectrum of S Mus and from the ultraviolet spectra of the long period Cepheid l Carinae. For S Mus with a period of 9.6 days we derive an upper limit for the mass loss of M less than 10(exp -9) solar mass, if a standard velocity law is assumed for the wind. For l Carinae with a period of 35.5 days we find a probable mass loss of M is approximately 10(exp -5+/-2) solar mass.

  8. Higgs ultraviolet softening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brivio, I.; Éboli, O. J. P.; Gavela, M. B.; Gonzalez-García, M. C.; Merlo, L.; Rigolin, S.

    2014-12-01

    We analyze the leading effective operators which induce a quartic momentum dependence in the Higgs propagator, for a linear and for a non-linear realization of electroweak symmetry breaking. Their specific study is relevant for the understanding of the ultraviolet sensitivity to new physics. Two methods of analysis are applied, trading the Lagrangian coupling by: i) a "ghost" scalar, after the Lee-Wick procedure; ii) other effective operators via the equations of motion. The two paths are shown to lead to the same effective Lagrangian at first order in the operator coefficients. It follows a modification of the Higgs potential and of the fermionic couplings in the linear realization, while in the non-linear one anomalous quartic gauge couplings, Higgs-gauge couplings and gauge-fermion interactions are induced in addition. Finally, all LHC Higgs and other data presently available are used to constrain the operator coefficients; the future impact of pp → 4 leptons data via off-shell Higgs exchange and of vector boson fusion data is considered as well. For completeness, a summary of pure-gauge and gauge-Higgs signals exclusive to non-linear dynamics at leading-order is included.

  9. Extreme ultraviolet lithography machine

    DOEpatents

    Tichenor, Daniel A.; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Haney, Steven J.; Sweeney, Donald W.

    2000-01-01

    An extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) machine or system for producing integrated circuit (IC) components, such as transistors, formed on a substrate. The EUVL machine utilizes a laser plasma point source directed via an optical arrangement onto a mask or reticle which is reflected by a multiple mirror system onto the substrate or target. The EUVL machine operates in the 10-14 nm wavelength soft x-ray photon. Basically the EUV machine includes an evacuated source chamber, an evacuated main or project chamber interconnected by a transport tube arrangement, wherein a laser beam is directed into a plasma generator which produces an illumination beam which is directed by optics from the source chamber through the connecting tube, into the projection chamber, and onto the reticle or mask, from which a patterned beam is reflected by optics in a projection optics (PO) box mounted in the main or projection chamber onto the substrate. In one embodiment of a EUVL machine, nine optical components are utilized, with four of the optical components located in the PO box. The main or projection chamber includes vibration isolators for the PO box and a vibration isolator mounting for the substrate, with the main or projection chamber being mounted on a support structure and being isolated.

  10. Ultraviolet fluorescence monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Preppernau, B.L.; Aragon, B.P.

    1997-05-01

    A multispectral ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence imaging fluorometer and a pulsed molecular beam laser fluorometer were developed to detect volatile organic compounds of interest in environmental monitoring and drug interdiction applications. The UV fluorescence imaging fluorometer is a relatively simple instrument which uses multiple excitation wavelengths to measure the excitation/emission matrix for irradiated samples. Detection limits in the high part-per-million to low part-per-million range were measured for a number of volatile organic vapors in the atmosphere. Detection limits in the low part-per-million range were obtained using cryogenic cooling to pre-concentrate unknown samples before introducing them into the imaging fluorometer. A multivariate analysis algorithm was developed to analyze the excitation/emission matrix and used to determine the relative concentrations of species in computer synthesized mixtures containing up to five organic compounds. Analysis results demonstrated the utility of multispectral UV fluorescence in analytical measurements. A transportable UV fluorescence imaging fluorometer was used in two field tests. Field test results demonstrated that detection limits in the part-per-billion range were needed to reliably identify volatile organic compounds in realistic field test measurements. The molecular beam laser fluorometer, a more complex instrument with detection limits in the part-per-billion to part-per-trillion range, was therefore developed to satisfy detection sensitivity requirements for field test measurements. High-resolution spectroscopic measurements made with the molecular beam laser fluorometer demonstrated its utility in identifying volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere.

  11. Ultraviolet radiation and cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Rajesh Prasad; Sinha, Rajeshwar P; Moh, Sang Hyun; Lee, Taek Kyun; Kottuparambil, Sreejith; Kim, Youn-Jung; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Choi, Eun-Mi; Brown, Murray T; Häder, Donat-Peter; Han, Taejun

    2014-12-01

    Cyanobacteria are the dominant photosynthetic prokaryotes from an ecological, economical, or evolutionary perspective, and depend on solar energy to conduct their normal life processes. However, the marked increase in solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) caused by the continuous depletion of the stratospheric ozone shield has fueled serious concerns about the ecological consequences for all living organisms, including cyanobacteria. UV-B radiation can damage cellular DNA and several physiological and biochemical processes in cyanobacterial cells, either directly, through its interaction with certain biomolecules that absorb in the UV range, or indirectly, with the oxidative stress exerted by reactive oxygen species. However, cyanobacteria have a long history of survival on Earth, and they predate the existence of the present ozone shield. To withstand the detrimental effects of solar UVR, these prokaryotes have evolved several lines of defense and various tolerance mechanisms, including avoidance, antioxidant production, DNA repair, protein resynthesis, programmed cell death, and the synthesis of UV-absorbing/screening compounds, such as mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) and scytonemin. This study critically reviews the current information on the effects of UVR on several physiological and biochemical processes of cyanobacteria and the various tolerance mechanisms they have developed. Genomic insights into the biosynthesis of MAAs and scytonemin and recent advances in our understanding of the roles of exopolysaccharides and heat shock proteins in photoprotection are also discussed. PMID:25463663

  12. The SPARTAN Ultraviolet Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, L. D.; Esser, R.; Habbal, S. R.; Hassler, D. M.; Raymond, J. C.; Strachan, L.; van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Kohl, J. L.; Fineschi, S.

    1992-05-01

    An ultraviolet coronagraph (UVC) is being prepared for a series of orbital flights on NASA's Spartan 201 which is deployed and retrieved by Shuttle. The Spartan 201 payload consists of the UVC and a white light coronagraph developed by the High Altitude Observatory. Spartan is expected to provide 26 orbits of solar observations per flight. The first flight is scheduled for May 1993 and subsequent flights are planned to occur at each polar passage of Ulysses (1994 and 1995). The UVC measures the intensity and spectral line profile of resonantly scattered H I Ly-alpha and the intensities of O VI lambda 1032 and lambda 1037 at heliocentric heights between 1.3 and 3.5 solar radii. A description of the UVC instrument, its characteristics, and the observing program for the first flight will be presented. The initial scientific objective is to determine the random velocity distribution and bulk outflow velocity of coronal protons and the density and outflow velocity of O(5+) in polar coronal holes and adjoining high latitude streamers. This work is supported by NASA under Grant No. NAG5-613 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

  13. Light, Including Ultraviolet

    PubMed Central

    Maverakis, Emanual; Miyamura, Yoshinori; Bowen, Michael P.; Correa, Genevieve; Ono, Yoko; Goodarzi, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light is intricately linked to the functional status of the cutaneous immune system. In susceptible individuals, UV radiation can ignite pathogenic inflammatory pathways leading to allergy or autoimmunity. In others, this same UV radiation can be used as a phototherapy to suppress pathogenic cutaneous immune responses. These vastly different properties are a direct result of UV light’s ability to ionize molecules in the skin and thereby chemically alter them. Sometimes these UV-induced chemical reactions are essential, the formation of pre-vitamin D3 from 7-dehydrocholesterol, for example. In other instances they can be potentially detrimental. UV radiation can ionize a cell’s DNA causing adjacent pyrimidine bases to chemically bond to each other. To prevent malignant transformation, a cell may respond to this UV-induced DNA damage by undergoing apoptosis. Although this pathway prevents skin cancer it also has the potential of inducing or exacerbating autoreactive immune responses by exposing the cell’s nuclear antigens. Ultaviolet-induced chemical reactions can activate the immune system by a variety of other mechanisms as well. In response to UV irradiation keratinocytes secrete cytokines and chemokines, which activate and recruit leukocytes to the skin. In some individuals UV-induced chemical reactions can synthesize novel antigens resulting in a photoallergy. Alternatively, photosensitizing molecules can damage cells by initiating sunburn-like phototoxic reactions. Herein we review all types of UV-induced skin reactions, especially those involving the immune system. PMID:20018479

  14. Ultraviolet investigations for lunar missions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemphill, William R.; Fischer, William A.; Dornbach, J.E.

    1966-01-01

    Preliminary field tests of an active ultraviolet imaging system have shown that it is possible to produce linages of the terrain from distances as great as 75 feet by means of reflected ultraviolet light at wavelengths longer than 3300 A. Minerals that luminesce when exposed to ultraviolet energy have been detected from distances as great as 200 feet. With appropriate design modifications, it may be possible to utilize a similar system in detecting luminescing minerals from greater distances. Also, with a similar system and appropriate auxiliary equipment such as image intensifiers, it may be possible to discriminate between naturally occurring materials on the basis of reflected ultraviolet energy at wavelengths shorter than 3000 A. In this part of the spectrum image contrast for some rock types may exceed that from visible light. Information from these and related ultraviolet spectralanalysis studies may be useful in evaluating data obtained from passive ultraviolet systems in lunar orbit as well as from active systems on the lunar surface.

  15. Ultraviolet flare on Lambda Andromedae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baliunas, S. L.; Guinan, E. F.; Dupree, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    On November 5, 6, 1982, a luminous, flarelike brightening of the ultraviolet emissions was observed with IUE from the active RS CVn type star Lambda And during the phase of rotation period corresponding to maximum area coverage of the visible hemisphere by starspots and active regions. Enhancements during the flare in the ultraviolet emission lines as large as factors of several and in the ultraviolet continuum up to 80 percent persisted for over 5 hours. The bulk of the radiative output of the flare occurred in Mg II h and k and H I Ly-alpha. Because of the long duration and extreme luminosity of the event, the energy radiated by the flare alone is in excess of 10 to the 35th ergs just in the ultraviolet region. This is the most energetic stellar flare ever recorded in the ultraviolet. In addition, it is the first ultraviolet flare observed from a giant star. In comparison to the largest solar flares, the flare on Lambda And is at least three orders of magnitude more energetic in similar emission lines.

  16. Far Ultraviolet Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George; Rabin, Douglas M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) is studying a wide range of astronomical problems in the 905-1187 Angstrom wavelength region through the use of high resolution spectroscopy. The FUSE bandpass forms a nearly optimal complement to the spectral coverage provided by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), which extends down to approximately 1170 Angstroms. The photoionization threshold of atomic hydrogen (911 Angstroms) sets a natural short-wavelength limit for the FUV. FUSE was launched in June 1999 from Cape Canaveral, Florida, on a Delta II rocket into a 768 km circular orbit. Scientific observations started later that year. This spectral region is extremely rich in spectral diagnostics of astrophysical gases over a wide range of temperatures (100 K to over 10 million K). Important strong spectral lines in this wavelength range include those of neutral hydrogen, deuterium, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon (H I, D I, N I, O I, and Ar I), molecular hydrogen (H2), five-times ionized oxygen (O VI), and several ionization states of sulfur (S III - S VI). These elements are essential for understanding the origin and evolution of the chemical elements, the formation of stars and our Solar System, and the structure of galaxies, including our Milky Way. FUSE is one of NASA's Explorer missions and a cooperative project of NASA and the space agencies of Canada and France. These missions are smaller, more scientifically focused missions than the larger observatories, like Hubble and Chandra. FUSE was designed, built and operated for NASA by the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Johns Hopkins University. Hundreds of astronomers world-wide are using FUSE for a wide range of scientific research. Some of the important scientific discoveries from the first two years of the mission are described.

  17. Using Square Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, William Wynne

    1976-01-01

    This article describes techniques which enable the user of a comparatively simple calculator to perform calculations of cube roots, nth roots, trigonometric, and inverse trigonometric functions, logarithms, and exponentials. (DT)

  18. The Root Pressure Phenomenon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    Describes experiments demonstrating that root pressure in plants is probably controlled by a circadian rhythm (biological clock). Root pressure phenomenon plays significant part in water transport in contradiction with prevalent belief. (PS)

  19. Corky root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corky root rot (corchosis) was first reported in Argentina in 1985, but the disease was presumably present long before that. The disease occurs in most alfalfa-growing areas of Argentina but is more common in older stands. In space-planted alfalfa trials scored for root problems, corky root rot was ...

  20. WHY ROOTING FAILS.

    SciTech Connect

    CREUTZ,M.

    2007-07-30

    I explore the origins of the unphysical predictions from rooted staggered fermion algorithms. Before rooting, the exact chiral symmetry of staggered fermions is a flavored symmetry among the four 'tastes.' The rooting procedure averages over tastes of different chiralities. This averaging forbids the appearance of the correct 't Hooft vertex for the target theory.

  1. Armillaria root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    First described on grapevines in California in the 1880s, Armillaria root rot occurs in all major grape-growing regions of the state. The causal fungus, Armillaria mellea, infects woody grapevine roots and the base of the trunk (the root collar), resulting in a slow decline and eventual death of the...

  2. BLACK ROOT ROT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Black Root Rot Prepared by G. S. Abawi, Revised by L.E. Hanson Black root rot is caused by Thielaviopsis basicola (syn. Chalara elegans). The pathogen is widely distributed, can infect more than 130 plant species in 15 families, and causes severe black root rot diseases in ornamentals and crops suc...

  3. Future Directions in Ultraviolet Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George (Editor); Moos, Warren; VanSteenberg, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The 'Future Directions in Ultraviolet Spectroscopy' conference was inspired by the accomplishments of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) Mission. The FUSE mission was launched in June 1999 and spent over eight years exploring the far-ultraviolet universe, gathering over 64 million seconds of high-resolution spectral data on nearly 3000 astronomical targets. The goal of this conference was not only to celebrate the accomplishments of FUSE, but to look toward the future and understand the major scientific drivers for the ultraviolet capabilities of the next generation fo space observatories. Invited speakers presented discussions based on measurements made by FUSE and other ultraviolet instruments, assessed their connection with measurements made with other techniques and, where appropriate, discussed the implications of low-z measurements for high-z phenomena. In addition to the oral presentations, many participants presented poster papers. The breadth of these presentation made it clear that much good science is still in progress with FUSE data and that these result will continue to have relevance in many scientific areas.

  4. Harmful effects of ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-21

    Tanning for cosmetic purposes by sunbathing or by using artificial tanning devices is widespread. The hazards associated with exposure to ultraviolet radiation are of concern to the medical profession. Depending on the amount and form of the radiation, as well as on the skin type of the individual exposed, ultraviolet radiation causes erythema, sunburn, photodamage (photoaging), photocarcinogenesis, damage to the eyes, alteration of the immune system of the skin, and chemical hypersensitivity. Skin cancers most commonly produced by ultraviolet radiation are basal and squamous cell carcinomas. There also is much circumstantial evidence that the increase in the incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma during the past half century is related to increased sun exposure, but this has not been proved. Effective and cosmetically acceptable sunscreen preparations have been developed that can do much to prevent or reduce most harmful effects to ultraviolet radiation if they are applied properly and consistently. Other safety measures include (1) minimizing exposure to ultraviolet radiation, (2) being aware of reflective surfaces while in the sun, (3) wearing protective clothing, (4) avoiding use of artificial tanning devices, and (5) protecting infants and children.

  5. Ultraviolet-radiation-curable paints

    SciTech Connect

    Grosset, A M; Su, W F.A.; Vanderglas, E

    1981-09-30

    In product finishing lines, ultraviolet radiation curing of paints on prefabricated structures could be more energy efficient than curing by natural gas fired ovens, and could eliminate solvent emission. Diffuse ultraviolet light can cure paints on three dimensional metal parts. In the uv curing process, the spectral output of radiation sources must complement the absorption spectra of pigments and photoactive agents. Photosensitive compounds, such as thioxanthones, can photoinitiate unsaturated resins, such as acrylated polyurethanes, by a free radical mechanism. Newly developed cationic photoinitiators, such as sulfonium or iodonium salts (the so-called onium salts) of complex metal halide anions, can be used in polymerization of epoxy paints by ultraviolet light radiation. One-coat enamels, topcoats, and primers have been developed which can be photoinitiated to produce hard, adherent films. This process has been tested in a laboratory scale unit by spray coating these materials on three-dimensional objects and passing them through a tunnel containing uv lamps.

  6. Ultraviolet spectrophotometry of three LINERs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, R. W.; Keel, W. C.

    1986-01-01

    Three galaxies known to be LINERs were observed spectroscopically in the ultraviolet in an attempt to detect the presumed nonthermal continuum source thought to be the source of photoionization in the nuclei. NGC 4501 was found to be too faint for study with the IUE spectrographs, while NGC 5005 had an extended ultraviolet light profile. Comparison with the optical light profile of NGC 5005 indicates that the ultraviolet source is distributed spatially in the same manner as the optical starlight, probably indicating that the ultraviolet excess is due to a component of hot stars in the nucleus. These stars contribute detectable absorption features longward of 2500 A; together with optical data, the IUE spectra suggest a burst of star formation about 1 billion yr ago, with a lower rate continuing to produce a few OB stars. In NGC 4579, a point source contributing most of the ultraviolet excess is found that is much different than the optical light distribution. Furthermore, the ultraviolet to X-ray spectral index in NGC 4579 is 1.4, compatible with the UV to X-ray indices found for samples of Seyfert galaxies. This provides compelling evidence for the detection of the photoionizing continuum in NGC 4579 and draws the research fields of normal galaxies and active galactic nuclei closer together. The emission-line spectrum of NGC 4579 is compared with calculations from a photoionization code, CLOUDY, and several shock models. The photoionization code is found to give superior results, adding to the increasing weight of evidence that the LINER phenomenon is essentially a scaled-down version of the Seyfert phenomenon.

  7. Ultraviolet corona detection sensor study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, R. J.; MATHERN

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of detecting electrical corona discharge phenomena in a space simulation chamber via emission of ultraviolet light was evaluated. A corona simulator, with a hemispherically capped point to plane electrode geometry, was used to generate corona glows over a wide range of pressure, voltage, current, electrode gap length and electrode point radius. Several ultraviolet detectors, including a copper cathode gas discharge tube and a UV enhanced silicon photodiode detector, were evaluated in the course of the spectral intensity measurements. The performance of both silicon target vidicons and silicon intensified target vidicons was evaluated analytically using the data generated by the spectroradiometer scans and the performance data supplied by the manufacturers.

  8. [Relation between root structure and accumulation of anthraquinones of Morinda officinalis].

    PubMed

    Yao, Hui; Wu, Hong; Feng, Cheng Hao; Zhao, Sheng; Liang, She Jian

    2004-04-01

    The histological structures of the roots of Morinda officinalis How of different ages were observed, the distribution and accumulation of anthraquinones in the root were studied with the help of paraffin section, fluorescent microscope and ultraviolet spectrophotometer. The results indicated that the mature structures of the roots of M. officinalis were similar to those of common perennial herbs, and that the anthraquinones in the root of M. officinalis distributed in parenchymatous cells and the content of anthraquinones in the root gradually increased in number with age. Based on above mentioned investigation, we came to the conclusion that the root of M. officinalis should be collected after four years of growing and the top grade root should have well developed phloem and thin xylem. PMID:15259981

  9. Ultraviolet and Light Absorption Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargis, L. G.; Howell, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews developments in ultraviolet and light absorption spectrometry from December 1981 through November 1983, focusing on the chemistry involved in developing suitable reagents, absorbing systems, and methods of determination, and on physical aspects of the procedures. Includes lists of spectrophotometric methods for metals, non-metals, and…

  10. 21 CFR 872.6350 - Ultraviolet detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultraviolet detector. 872.6350 Section 872.6350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED.... An ultraviolet detector is a device intended to provide a source of ultraviolet light which is...

  11. 21 CFR 872.6350 - Ultraviolet detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultraviolet detector. 872.6350 Section 872.6350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED.... An ultraviolet detector is a device intended to provide a source of ultraviolet light which is...

  12. Root canal irrigants

    PubMed Central

    Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu

    2010-01-01

    Successful root canal therapy relies on the combination of proper instrumentation, irrigation, and obturation of the root canal. Of these three essential steps of root canal therapy, irrigation of the root canal is the most important determinant in the healing of the periapical tissues. The primary endodontic treatment goal must thus be to optimize root canal disinfection and to prevent reinfection. In this review of the literature, various irrigants and the interactions between irrigants are discussed. We performed a Medline search for English-language papers published untill July 2010. The keywords used were ‘root canal irrigants’ and ‘endodontic irrigants.’ The reference lists of each article were manually checked for additional articles of relevance. PMID:21217955

  13. Regulation of keratin expression by ultraviolet radiation: differential and specific effects of ultraviolet B and ultraviolet a exposure.

    PubMed

    Bernerd, F; Del Bino, S; Asselineau, D

    2001-12-01

    Skin, the most superficial tissue of our body, is the first target of environmental stimuli, among which is solar ultraviolet radiation. Very little is known about the regulation of keratin gene expression by ultraviolet radiation, however, although (i) it is well established that ultraviolet exposure is involved in skin cancers and photoaging and (ii) keratins represent the major epidermal proteins. The aim of this study was to analyze the regulation of human keratin gene expression under ultraviolet B (290-320 nm) or ultraviolet A (320-400 nm) irradiation using a panel of constructs comprising different human keratin promoters cloned upstream of a chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter gene and transfected into normal epidermal keratinocytes. By this approach, we demonstrated that ultraviolet B upregulated the transcription of keratin 19 gene and to a lesser extent the keratin 6, keratin 5, and keratin 14 genes. The DNA sequence responsible for keratin 19 induction was localized between -130 and +1. In contrast to ultraviolet B, ultraviolet A irradiation induced only an increase in keratin 17, showing a differential gene regulation between these two ultraviolet ranges. The induction of keratin 19 was confirmed by studying the endogenous protein in keratinocytes in classical cultures as well as in skin reconstructed in vitro and normal human skin. These data show for the first time that keratin gene expression is regulated by ultraviolet radiation at the transcriptional level with a specificity regarding the ultraviolet domain of solar light. PMID:11886503

  14. Indirect Ultraviolet-Reactivation of Phage λ

    PubMed Central

    George, Jacqueline; Devoret, Raymond; Radman, Miroslav

    1974-01-01

    When an F- recipient Escherichia coli K12 bacterium receives Hfr or F-lac+ DNA from an ultraviolet-irradiated donor, its capacity to promote DNA repair and mutagenesis of ultraviolet-damaged phage λ is substantially increased. We call this phenomenon indirect ultraviolet-reactivation, since its features are essentially the same as those of ultraviolet-reactivation; this repair process occurs in pyrimidine dimer excision-deficient strains and produces clear plaque mutations of the restored phage. Moreover, this process is similar to indirect ultraviolet-induction of prophage λ, since it is promoted by conjugation. However, contrarily to indirect induction, it is produced by Hfr donors and occurs in recipients restricting the incoming ultraviolet-damaged donor DNA. The occurrence of indirect ultraviolet-reactivation provides evidence for the existence in E. coli of an inducible error-prone mechanism for the repair of DNA. PMID:4589889

  15. The Roots of Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Yetta M.

    This review of research with children aged two to six on their reading, writing, and oral language development speaks of five roots of a tree of literate life that require nourishment in the soil of a written language environment. The roots discussed are the development of print awareness in situational contexts, the development of print awareness…

  16. Cylindrocarpon root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cylindrocarpon root rot of alfalfa has been found sporadically in Canada and the northern United States. The etiology of this disease is not fully understood, but the priority for research has not been high because of its infrequent occurrence. The infected area of the root initially has a water-soa...

  17. Irrational Square Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misiurewicz, Michal

    2013-01-01

    If students are presented the standard proof of irrationality of [square root]2, can they generalize it to a proof of the irrationality of "[square root]p", "p" a prime if, instead of considering divisibility by "p", they cling to the notions of even and odd used in the standard proof?

  18. Pythium Root Rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pythium root rot is a disease that is found in agricultural and nursery soils throughout the United States and Canada. It is caused by several Pythium species, and the symptoms are typified by leaf or needle chlorosis, stunting, root rot, and plant death. The disease is favored by wet soils, overc...

  19. Root-knot nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne species) can reduce crop yields worldwide, methods for their identification are often difficult to implement. This review summarizes the diagnostic morphological and molecular features for distinguishing the ten major previously described root-knot nematode ...

  20. Trees and Roots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lethonee A.

    Constructing a family history can be significant in helping persons understand and appreciate the root system that supports and sustains them. Oral history can be a valuable resource in family research as Alex Haley demonstrated in writing "Roots." The major difficulty of using oral tradition in tracing a family history is that family members with…

  1. Sugarbeet root aphid on postharvest root storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sugarbeet root aphid (SBRA), Pemphigus betae Doane, is a serious insect pest of sugarbeet in several North American sugarbeet production areas; however, it is rarely an economic pest in the Red River Valley (RRV). In 2012 and 2013, all RRV factory districts were impacted by SBRA outbreaks, and ...

  2. Method for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Felter, T. E.; Kubiak, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    A method of producing a patterned array of features, in particular, gate apertures, in the size range 0.4-0.05 .mu.m using projection lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A high energy laser beam is used to vaporize a target material in order to produce a plasma which in turn, produces extreme ultraviolet radiation of a characteristic wavelength of about 13 nm for lithographic applications. The radiation is transmitted by a series of reflective mirrors to a mask which bears the pattern to be printed. The demagnified focused mask pattern is, in turn, transmitted by means of appropriate optics and in a single exposure, to a substrate coated with photoresists designed to be transparent to EUV radiation and also satisfy conventional processing methods.

  3. Method for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Felter, T. E.; Kubiak, Glenn D.

    1999-01-01

    A method of producing a patterned array of features, in particular, gate apertures, in the size range 0.4-0.05 .mu.m using projection lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A high energy laser beam is used to vaporize a target material in order to produce a plasma which in turn, produces extreme ultraviolet radiation of a characteristic wavelength of about 13 nm for lithographic applications. The radiation is transmitted by a series of reflective mirrors to a mask which bears the pattern to be printed. The demagnified focused mask pattern is, in turn, transmitted by means of appropriate optics and in a single exposure, to a substrate coated with photoresists designed to be transparent to EUV radiation and also satisfy conventional processing methods.

  4. Interstellar extinction in the ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, R. C.; Savage, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    Interstellar extinction curves over the region 3600-1100 A for 17 stars are presented. The observations were made by the two Wisconsin spectrometers onboard the OAO-2 with spectral resolutions of 10 A and 20 A. The extinction curves generally show a pronounced maximum at 2175 plus or minus 25 A, a broad minimum in the region 1800-1350 A, and finally a rapid rise to the far ultraviolet. Large extinction variations from star to star are found, especially in the far ultraviolet; however, with only two possible exceptions in this sample, the wavelength at the maximum of the extinction bump is essentially constant. These data are combined with visual and infrared observations to display the extinction behavior over a range in wavelength of about a factor of 20.

  5. International Ultraviolet Explorer Observatory operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This volume contains the final report for the International Ultraviolet Explorer IUE Observatory Operations contract. The fundamental operational objective of the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) program is to translate competitively selected observing programs into IUE observations, to reduce these observations into meaningful scientific data, and then to present these data to the Guest Observer in a form amenable to the pursuit of scientific research. The IUE Observatory is the key to this objective since it is the central control and support facility for all science operations functions within the IUE Project. In carrying out the operation of this facility, a number of complex functions were provided beginning with telescope scheduling and operation, proceeding to data processing, and ending with data distribution and scientific data analysis. In support of these critical-path functions, a number of other significant activities were also provided, including scientific instrument calibration, systems analysis, and software support. Routine activities have been summarized briefly whenever possible.

  6. Root Nutrient Foraging1

    PubMed Central

    Giehl, Ricardo F.H.; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2014-01-01

    During a plant's lifecycle, the availability of nutrients in the soil is mostly heterogeneous in space and time. Plants are able to adapt to nutrient shortage or localized nutrient availability by altering their root system architecture to efficiently explore soil zones containing the limited nutrient. It has been shown that the deficiency of different nutrients induces root architectural and morphological changes that are, at least to some extent, nutrient specific. Here, we highlight what is known about the importance of individual root system components for nutrient acquisition and how developmental and physiological responses can be coupled to increase nutrient foraging by roots. In addition, we review prominent molecular mechanisms involved in altering the root system in response to local nutrient availability or to the plant's nutritional status. PMID:25082891

  7. The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welsh, Barry Y.

    1991-01-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) is a NASA astronomy mission which will operate in the 70-760A spectral band. The science payload consists of three grazing incidence scanning telescopes and an EUV spectrometer/deep survey instrument. An overview of the planned mission profile is given, and the instrumentation which comprises the science payload is discussed. The EUVE is scheduled for launch in late August 1991.

  8. Search for ultraviolet Shuttle glow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, P. D.; Feldman, P. D.; Henry, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    In January 1986, the Space Shuttle Columbia carried two ultraviolet experiments (UVX) in an attempt to observe very weak diffuse emission from various astronomical sources at wavelengths below 3200 A with moderate spectral resolution. The experiment attested to the feasibility of low cost astronomy from the Space Shuttle using Get Away Special canisters. Emissions from O2, O, and NO were detected and shown to be consistent with an atmospheric origin.

  9. Far-Ultraviolet Stellar Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, E. G.; Carruthers, G. R.

    1993-12-01

    During a shuttle flight in May, 1991, wide field images were obtained for 12 star fields with the NRL far-ultraviolet cameras. These cameras provide sensitivity bands with effective wavelengths of lambda eff = 1367 Angstroms and lambda eff = 1702 Angstroms. The properties of the resulting magnitude system will be described and compared with previous photometry from the OAO2, ANS and TD1 satellites. Results from several fields in the vicinity of the galactic center will be discussed.

  10. Ultraviolet-Resistant Bacterial Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Newcombe, David; LaDuc, Myron T.; Osman, Shariff R.

    2007-01-01

    A document summarizes a study in which it was found that spores of the SAFR-032 strain of Bacillus pumilus can survive doses of ultraviolet (UV) radiation, radiation, and hydrogen peroxide in proportions much greater than those of other bacteria. The study was part of a continuing effort to understand the survivability of bacteria under harsh conditions and develop means of sterilizing spacecraft to prevent biocontamination of Mars that could interfere with the search for life there.

  11. Ultraviolet observations of astronomical sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Joel A.

    1994-01-01

    The final report on 'Ultraviolet Observations of Astronomical Sources,' which ran for a total of three years, roughly between 1 July 1988 and 14 Feb. 1993 is presented. During the first year, I worked at Indiana University; since October, 1989, I have been at Tennessee State University. This grant has supported my studies of archival International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observations of zeta Aur binaries, cool stars that are paired with hot stars in binary systems. Such systems are important as a source of detailed knowledge about the structures of chromospheres and winds in cool giant and supergiant stars, since the hot star serves as a probe of many lines of sight through the cool supergiant star's outer atmosphere. By determining the physical conditions along many such lines of sight, a detailed two-dimensional map of the chromosphere and wind may be constructed. The grant grew out of my analysis of archival IUE observations of 31 Cyg in which I analyzed five epochs of an atmospheric eclipse that occurred in 1982. I fit the attenuation spectra of atmospheric eclipse throughout the ultraviolet (lambda(lambda)1175-1950 and lambda(lambda)2500-3100) with theoretically calculated spectra, thereby determining the physical properties of gas (mass column density of absorbers, temperature, and velocity spread) along each observed line of sight. A similar analysis for other such zeta Aur binaries was accomplished and theoretical models for the chromospheres of these stars based on my observations were constructed.

  12. Far ultraviolet astronomy using the FAUST telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, C. S.

    1981-01-01

    The Far Ultraviolet Space Telescope (FAUST) a compact, wide field-of-view, far ultraviolet instrument designed for astronomical observations of extended and point sources is discussed. The design and application of the instrument are described. The prime objective is to observe faint astronomical sources with sensitivities higher than previously available. Scientific programs will include: (1) a search for ultraviolet stars which are predicted to exist at the stage of evolution prior to the final death of a star; (2) observations of galaxies and quasars; and (3) joint programs with other Spacelab 1 experiments. The secondary objective is to verify the suitability of the Spacelab as a platform for far ultraviolet astronomy: data will be provided on the ultraviolet background levels due to astronomical, terrestrial, and spacecraft generated sources; the levels of contaminants which affect ultraviolet instruments; and the capability of the Orbiter for stable pointing at celestial sources for useful periods of time.

  13. Economic strategies of plant absorptive roots vary with root diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, D. L.; Wang, J. J.; Kardol, P.; Wu, H. F.; Zeng, H.; Deng, X. B.; Deng, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Plant roots typically vary along a dominant ecological axis, the root economics spectrum, depicting a tradeoff between resource acquisition and conservation. For absorptive roots, which are mainly responsible for resource acquisition, we hypothesized that root economic strategies differ with increasing root diameter. To test this hypothesis, we used seven plant species (a fern, a conifer, and five angiosperms from south China) for which we separated absorptive roots into two categories: thin roots (thickness of root cortex plus epidermis < 247 µm) and thick roots. For each category, we analyzed a range of root traits related to resource acquisition and conservation, including root tissue density, different carbon (C), and nitrogen (N) fractions (i.e., extractive, acid-soluble, and acid-insoluble fractions) as well as root anatomical traits. The results showed significant relationships among root traits indicating an acquisition-conservation tradeoff for thin absorptive roots while no such trait relationships were found for thick absorptive roots. Similar results were found when reanalyzing data of a previous study including 96 plant species. The contrasting economic strategies between thin and thick absorptive roots, as revealed here, may provide a new perspective on our understanding of the root economics spectrum.

  14. Quantitative measurements of root water uptake and root hydraulic conductivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Javaux, Mathieu; Meunier, Felicien; Couvreur, Valentin; Carminati, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    How is root water uptake distributed along the root system and what root properties control this distribution? Here we present a method to: 1) measure root water uptake and 2) inversely estimate the root hydraulic conductivities. The experimental method consists in using neutron radiography to trace deuterated water (D2O) in soil and roots. The method was applied to lupines grown aluminium containers filled with a sandy soil. When the lupines were 4 weeks old, D2O was locally injected in a selected soil regions and its transport was monitored in soil and roots using time-series neutron radiography. By image processing, we quantified the concentration of D2O in soil and roots. We simulated the transport of D2O into roots using a diffusion-convection numerical model. The diffusivity of the roots tissue was inversely estimated by simulating the transport of D2O into the roots during night. The convective fluxes (i.e. root water uptake) were inversely estimating by fitting the experiments during day, when plants were transpiring, and assuming that root diffusivity did not change. The results showed that root water uptake was not uniform along the roots. Water uptake was higher at the proximal parts of the lateral roots and it decreased by a factor of 10 towards the distal parts. We used the data of water fluxes to inversely estimate the profile of hydraulic conductivities along the roots of transpiring plants growing in soil. The water fluxes in the lupine roots were simulated using the Hydraulic Tree Model by Doussan et al. (1998). The fitting parameters to be adjusted were the radial and axial hydraulic conductivities of the roots. The results showed that by using the root architectural model of Doussan et al. (1998) and detailed information of water fluxes into different root segments we could estimate the profile of hydraulic conductivities along the roots. We also found that: 1) in a tap-rooted plant like lupine water is mostly taken up by lateral roots; (2) water

  15. Polymerizable ultraviolet stabilizers for outdoor use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogl, O.

    1982-01-01

    Polymeric materials that are stable enough to use outdoors without changes in excess of 20 years are investigated. Ultraviolet stabilizers or plastic materials were synthesized, polymerizable ultraviolet stabilizers, particularly of the 2(2-hydroxyphenyl)2H-benzotriazole family were prepared their polymerization, copolymerization and grafting onto other polymers were demonstrated, and ultraviolet stabilizing systems were devised. These materials were evaluated from the photophysical point of view.

  16. Ultraviolet light and hyperpigmentation in healing wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wiemer, D.R.; Spira, M.

    1983-10-01

    The concept of permanent hyperpigmentation in wounds following ultraviolet light exposure during the postoperative period has found a place in plastic surgical literature but has not been documented. This study evaluates the effect of ultraviolet light on healing wounds in paraplegics. It failed to confirm permanent alteration in pigmentation response to ultraviolet exposure and suggests that other factors are of greater importance in the development of hyperpigmentation in the healing wound.

  17. Roots in plant ecology.

    PubMed

    Cody, M L

    1986-09-01

    In 1727 the pioneer vegetation scientist Stephen Hales realized that I much that was of importance to his subject material took place below on ground. A good deal of descriptive work on plant roots and root systems was done in the subsequent two centuries; in crop plants especially, the gross morphology of root systems was well known by the early 20th century. These descriptive studies were extended to natural grasslands by Weaver and his associates and to deserts by Cannon by the second decade of this century, but since that time the study of subterranean growth form appears to have lapsed, as a recent review by Kummerow indicates. Nevertheless, growth form is an important aspect of plant ecology, and subterranean growth form is especially relevant to the study of vegetation in and areas (which is the main subject of this commentary). Moreover, there is a real need for more research to be directed towards understanding plant root systems in general. PMID:21227785

  18. Grass Rooting the System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Janice E.

    1976-01-01

    Suggests a taxonomy of the grass roots movement and gives a general descriptive over view of the 60 groups studied with respect to origin, constituency, size, funding, issues, and ideology. (Author/AM)

  19. Reading with Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Margaret I.

    1986-01-01

    Recommends a method of teaching Russian vocabulary that focuses on new words in context and on their structure: root, prefix, suffix, sound changes, and borrowings. Sources for teachers are given in the bibliography. (LMO)

  20. Combined ultraviolet studies of astronomical sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, A. K.; Baliunas, S. L.; Blair, W. P.; Hartmann, L. W.; Huchra, J. P.; Raymond, J. C.; Smith, G. H.; Sonderblom, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    Ultraviolet studies of various astronomical entities are reported. Among the specific phenomena examined were supernova remnants, dwarf novae, red giant stars, stellar winds, binary stars, and galaxies.

  1. Ultraviolet and thermally stable polymer compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, M. J.; Gloria, H. R.; Goldsberry, R. E.; Reinisch, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    Copolymers, produced from aromatic substituted aromatic azine-siloxane compositions, are thermally stable, solar ultraviolet light non-degradable by wavelengths shorter than those reaching earth surface.

  2. Dynamic ultraviolet sterilization of different implant types.

    PubMed

    Delgado, A A; Schaaf, N G

    1990-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of the dynamic ultraviolet sterilization process with various dental implants, stainless steel orthopedic cortical bone screws, and polysulfone polymer healing caps. These biomaterials were inoculated with the spores of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus stearothermophilus. They were then exposed to dynamic ultraviolet radiation in the chamber of a BUD Ultraviolet Device. Samples were incubated in trypticase soy broth at 37 degrees C and 56 degrees C, and they were subcultured onto an enriched agar medium. Results indicate that 16 seconds of dynamic ultraviolet radiation is effective in sterilizing these materials. This is significantly less time than other sterilization techniques presently used. PMID:2133336

  3. The phenomenology of rooting.

    PubMed

    Kerievsky, Bruce Stephen

    2010-09-01

    This paper examines the attractions of passionate involvement in wanting particular outcomes, which is popularly known as rooting. The author's lifelong personal experience is the source of his analysis, along with the insights provided by spiritual literature and especially the work of Dr. Thomas Hora, with whom the author studied for 30 years. The phrase "choiceless awareness," utilized by J. Krishnamurti, and attained via meditation, is seen as the means of transcending a rooting mode of being in the world. PMID:20165983

  4. Ultraviolet Radiation and Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, R.

    2003-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation from the sun produces ozone in the stratosphere and it participates in the destruction of ozone. Absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation by ozone is the primary heating mechanism leading to the maximum in temperature at the stratopause. Variations of solar ultraviolet radiation on both the 27-day solar rotation period and the 11-year solar cycle affect ozone by several mechanisms. The temperature and ozone in the upper stratosphere respond to solar uv variations as a coupled system. An increase in uv leads to an increase in the production of ozone through the photolysis of molecular oxygen. An increase in uv leads to an increase in temperature through the heating by ozone photolysis. The increase in temperature leads to a partially-offsetting decrease in ozone through temperature-dependent reaction rate coefficients. The ozone variation modulates the heating by ozone photolysis. The increase in ozone at solar maximum enhances the uv heating. The processes are understood and supported by long-term data sets. Variation in the upper stratospheric temperatures will lead to a change in the behavior of waves propagating upward from the troposphere. Changes in the pattern of wave dissipation will lead to acceleration or deceleration of the mean flow and changes in the residual or transport circulation. This mechanism could lead to the propagation of the solar cycle uv variation from the upper stratosphere downward to the lower stratosphere. This process is not well-understood and has been the subject of an increasing number of model studies. I will review the data analyses for solar cycle and their comparison to model results.

  5. Silicon Lightweight Mirrors (SLMS) for Ultraviolet and Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, W. A.; Keys, Andrew S. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Subtopic 01-S1.06 requires mirrors with a diameter of 0.5-2.4 meters, areal density less than 20 kg/sq m, a figure specification of 0.02-0.005 waves root mean square (rms) at 633 nanometers, a surface roughness 0.5-1 nanometers rms, and a midfrequency error of 1.0-2.5 nanometers rms for use in the infrared (IR) to extreme ultra violet (EUV) waveband. Schafer's Phase II objective is to use Silicon Lightweight Mirrors (SLMS), a novel, all-silicon, foam-core, lightweight mirror technology, to build three imaging mirrors for the Next Generation Space Telescope Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) Engineering Test Unit: M0 (a flat), M2 (a concave sphere) and M3R (an oblate spheroid). The surface figure error specification for the NIRCam imaging mirrors is 8 nanometers rms (0.013 waves rms at 633 nanometers), equivalent to that required for ultraviolet (UV) and EUV mirrors, and this figure must be maintained at the 35 K operational temperature of NGST. The surface roughness required is 30 A rms since NIRCam operates in the visible to infrared (VIS/IR) (0.65-5 microns). We will produce mounts for mirrors M2 and M3R using the complementary thermally matched C/SiC material demonstrated by Schafer under another NASA SBIR, NAS8-98137.

  6. Ultraviolet divergences and supersymmetric theories

    SciTech Connect

    Sagnotti, A.

    1984-09-01

    This article is closely related to the one by Ferrara in these same Proceedings. It deals with what is perhaps the most fascinating property of supersymmetric theories, their improved ultraviolet behavior. My aim here is to present a survey of the state of the art as of August, 1984, and a somewhat more detailed discussion of the breakdown of the superspace power-counting beyond N = 2 superfields. A method is also described for simplifying divergence calculations that uses the locality of subtracted Feynman integrals. 74 references.

  7. Microgap ultra-violet detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.; Bionta, Richard M.

    1994-01-01

    A microgap ultra-violet detector of photons with wavelengths less than 400 run (4000 Angstroms) which comprises an anode and a cathode separated by a gas-filled gap and having an electric field placed across the gap. Either the anode or the cathode is semi-transparent to UV light. Upon a UV photon striking the cathode an electron is expelled and accelerated across the gap by the electric field causing interactions with other electrons to create an electron avalanche which contacts the anode. The electron avalanche is detected and converted to an output pulse.

  8. Microgap ultra-violet detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Bionta, R.M.

    1994-09-20

    A microgap ultra-violet detector of photons with wavelengths less than 400 run (4,000 Angstroms) which comprises an anode and a cathode separated by a gas-filled gap and having an electric field placed across the gap is disclosed. Either the anode or the cathode is semi-transparent to UV light. Upon a UV photon striking the cathode an electron is expelled and accelerated across the gap by the electric field causing interactions with other electrons to create an electron avalanche which contacts the anode. The electron avalanche is detected and converted to an output pulse. 2 figs.

  9. JPL Fourier transform ultraviolet spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cageao, R. P.; Friedl, R. R.; Sander, Stanley P.; Yung, Y. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Fourier Transform Ultraviolet Spectrometer (FTUVS) is a new high resolution interferometric spectrometer for multiple-species detection in the UV, visible and near-IR. As an OH sensor, measurements can be carried out by remote sensing (limb emission and column absorption), or in-situ sensing (long-path absorption or laser-induced fluorescence). As a high resolution detector in a high repetition rate (greater than 10 kHz) LIF system, OH fluorescence can be discriminated against non-resonant background emission and laser scatter, permitting (0, 0) excitation.

  10. The far ultraviolet spectroscopic explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggess, A.

    1982-01-01

    The scientific objectives and performance characteristics of a new astronomy mission referred to as the far ultraviolet spectroscopic explorer, or FUSE are being defined by a team involving people experienced instrumental requirements that best meet the scientific needs. The team is intended to have a lifetime of about one year, ending with the submission of a report to NASA which could be used as the basis for an engineering design study. The principal objective of FUSE is to obtain astronomical spectra at wavelengths shorter than is possible with the Space Telescope.

  11. LYMAN - The far ultraviolet explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moos, Warren; Osantowski, John F.

    1989-01-01

    The LYMAN FUSE mission concept for far ultraviolet astronomy is presented. The wavelength window from 100 to 1200 A provides access to a wide range of important scientific problems in cosmology, galactic structure, stellar evolution, and planetary magnetospheres, which cannot be studied in any other way. The LYMAN FUSE Phase A study is examining in detail mission operations, instrumentation technology, the construction of the instrument module, and the interfaces between the Instrument Module and the Explorer Platform Mission. Most of the mission observing time will be allotted through a competitive Guest Observer program analogous to that in operation for the IUE.

  12. Plasmonic lens for ultraviolet wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Minoru; Tanimoto, Takuya; Inoue, Tsutomu; Aizawa, Kento

    2016-09-01

    A plasmonic lens (PL) is one of the promising photonic devices utilizing the surface plasmon wave. In this study, we have newly developed a PL with a 3.5 µm diameter for a wavelength of 375 nm (ultraviolet region). It is composed of multiple circular slit apertures milled in aluminum (Al) thin film. We have simulated the electric field distribution of the PL, and confirmed that a tightly focused beam spot of subwavelength size in the far-field region was attained. We have also measured the focusing characteristics of the PL using a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and compared them with the calculated results.

  13. A standard for ultraviolet radiation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, G. B.; Spicer, W. E.; Mckernan, P. C.; Pereskok, V. F.; Wanner, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    Photoemission diode standards for accurately measuring monochromatic ultraviolet light intensity (3000 A-1100 A) are described that are also blind to visible light. The standard uses an opaque photocathode of Cs2Te and is unique because of its combination of thinness (19 mm), high sensitivity, time stability, and uniformity of response. Design criteria, construction methods, and difficulties overcome in obtaining a stable, uniform, high yield photocathode responses are discussed. Cs2Te is discussed in terms of a model for high yield photoemitters.

  14. Ultraviolet spectrophotometry of degenerate stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstein, J. L.; Oke, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of one helium- and three hydrogen-atmosphere degenerates made with the International Ultraviolet Explorer are discussed. Fluxes in the UV give temperatures in good accordance with those determined from the ground and from the ANS satellite data. Profiles of the strong L-alpha absorption in two DA's fit predictions for the expected temperatures. Gravity determination is vitiated by their steep temperature dependence. If one accepts that theoretical predictions should be correct, corrections to the absolute IUE calibration derived are an upward shift of 3-5%, with irregular residuals attaining + or - 7%.

  15. Ultraviolet photometry of planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm, A. V.

    1972-01-01

    Nine of the planetary nebulae observed by the Wisconsin filter photometers are compared with 15 Monocerotis in the spectral region 1430-4250 A. The data are corrected for the degradation of the filters of stellar photometer number four with time. Comparisons with simple models indicate that most of the observed nebulae are subject to some interstellar extinction in the far ultraviolet. However, NGC 246 and NGC 1360 appear to be nearly unreddened. Thus far no unexpected features have been found in the observations.

  16. Modeling root reinforcement using root-failure Weibull survival function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, M.; Giadrossich, F.; Cohen, D.

    2013-03-01

    Root networks contribute to slope stability through complicated interactions that include mechanical compression and tension. Due to the spatial heterogeneity of root distribution and the dynamic of root turnover, the quantification of root reinforcement on steep slope is challenging and consequently the calculation of slope stability as well. Although the considerable advances in root reinforcement modeling, some important aspect remain neglected. In this study we address in particular to the role of root strength variability on the mechanical behaviors of a root bundle. Many factors may contribute to the variability of root mechanical properties even considering a single class of diameter. This work presents a new approach for quantifying root reinforcement that considers the variability of mechanical properties of each root diameter class. Using the data of laboratory tensile tests and field pullout tests, we calibrate the parameters of the Weibull survival function to implement the variability of root strength in a numerical model for the calculation of root reinforcement (RBMw). The results show that, for both laboratory and field datasets, the parameters of the Weibull distribution may be considered constant with the exponent equal to 2 and the normalized failure displacement equal to 1. Moreover, the results show that the variability of root strength in each root diameter class has a major influence on the behavior of a root bundle with important implications when considering different approaches in slope stability calculation. Sensitivity analysis shows that the calibration of the tensile force and the elasticity of the roots are the most important equations, as well as the root distribution. The new model allows the characterization of root reinforcement in terms of maximum pullout force, stiffness, and energy. Moreover, it simplifies the implementation of root reinforcement in slope stability models. The realistic quantification of root reinforcement for

  17. Reflection modeling in ultraviolet phototherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, David Robert; Robbins, Chris; Martin, Colin J.; Phanco, Graeme; Hare, Neil John O'

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Ultraviolet phototherapy is a widely used treatment which has exceptional success with a variety of skin conditions. Over-exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) can however be detrimental and cause side effects such as erythema, photokeratisis, and even skin cancer. Quantifying patient dose is therefore imperative to ensure biologically effective treatment while minimizing negative repercussions. A dose model for treatment would be valuable in achieving these ends. Methods: Prior work by the authors concentrated on modeling the output of the lamps used in treatment and it was found a line source model described the output from the sources to a high degree. In practice, these lamps are surrounded by reflective anodized aluminum in patient treatment cabins and this work extends the model to quantify specular reflections from these planes on patient dose. Results: The extension of the model to allow for reflected images in addition to tube output shows a remarkably good fit to the actual data measured. Conclusions: The reflection model yields impressive accuracy and is a good basis for full UVR cabin modeling.

  18. The International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Yoji

    The International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) was launched into a geosynchronous orbit on 26 January 1978. It is equipped with a 45-cm mirror and spectrographs operating in the far-ultraviolet (1150-2000 A) and the midultraviolet (1900-3200 A) wavelength regions. In a low-dispersion mode, the spectral resolution is some 6-7 A. In a high-dispersion echelle mode, the resolution is about 0.1 Aat the shortest wavelength and about 0.3 A at the longest. It is a collaborative program among NASA, ESA, and the British SERC. The IUE is operated in real time 16 hours a day from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center near Washington, D.C. and 8 hours daily from ESA's Villafranca ground station near Madrid, Spain. By the end of 1989, 1870 papers, using IUE observations, have been published in referred journals. During the same period, over 1700 different astronomers from all over the world used the IUE for their research.

  19. Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Narrow CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzycka, D.; Raymond, J. C.; Biesecker, D. A.; Li, J.; Ciaravella, A.

    2002-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are commonly described as new, discrete, bright features appearing in the field of view of a white light coronagraph and moving outward over a period of minutes to hours. Apparent angular widths of the CMEs cover a wide range, from few to 360°. The very narrow structures (narrower than ~15-20°) form only a small subset of all the observed CMEs and are usually referred to as rays, spikes, fans, etc. Recently, Gilbert et al. (2001, ApJ, 550, 1093) reported LASCO white light observations of 15 selected narrow CMEs. We extended the study and analyzed ultraviolet spectroscopy of narrow ejections, including several events listed by Gilbert et al. The data were obtained by the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS/SOHO). We present comparison of narrow and large CMEs and discuss the relation of the narrow CMEs to coronal jets and/or other narrow transient events. This work is supported by NASA under Grant NAG5-11420 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by the Italian Space Agency and by PRODEX (Swiss contribution).

  20. Rhodium Nanoparticles for Ultraviolet Plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Anne; Zhang, Xiao; Alcaraz de La Osa, Rodrigo; Sanz, Juan; Fernandez, Francisco; Moreno, Fernando; Finkelstein, Gleb; Liu, Jie; Everitt, Henry

    We introduce the non-oxidizing catalytic noble metal rhodium for ultraviolet (UV) plasmonics. 8 nm tripod-shaped planar Rh nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by a modified polyol reduction chemistry. They have a calculated local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) near 330 nm. To illustrate the UV plasmonic performance of Rh, p-aminothiophenol (PATP) was attached to the Rh NPs and enhanced Raman and fluorescence were observed upon UV illumination. The PATP Raman spectra produced by UV and visible excitation were respectively in and out of resonance with the Rh NP LSPR. This clearly revealed resonant spectral enhancement in the UV and accelerated photo-damage produced by intense local fields concentrated near the plasmonic Rh NPs. Simultaneously, surface enhanced fluorescence increased during 13 minutes of resonant UV illumination, providing direct evidence of charge transfer from the Rh NPs. The combined local field enhancement and charge transfer demonstrate essential steps toward plasmonically-enhanced ultraviolet photocatalysis. Due to its high chemical stability and strong plasmonic effect, Rh nanoparticles could find wide applications in UV plasmonics.

  1. Dose modeling in ultraviolet phototherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, David Robert; Robbins, Chris; O'Hare, Neil John

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Ultraviolet phototherapy is widely used in the treatment of numerous skin conditions. This treatment is well established and largely beneficial to patients on both physical and psychological levels; however, overexposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) can have detrimental effects, such as erythemal responses and ocular damage in addition to the potentially carcinogenic nature of UVR. For these reasons, it is essential to control and quantify the radiation dose incident upon the patient to ensure that it is both biologically effective and has the minimal possible impact on the surrounding unaffected tissue. Methods: To date, there has been little work on dose modeling, and the output of artificial UVR sources is an area where research has been recommended. This work characterizes these sources by formalizing an approach from first principles and experimentally examining this model. Results: An implementation of a line source model is found to give impressive accuracy and quantifies the output radiation well. Conclusions: This method could potentially serve as a basis for a full computational dose model for quantifying patient dose.

  2. Ultraviolet light and ocular diseases.

    PubMed

    Yam, Jason C S; Kwok, Alvin K H

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to review the association between ultraviolet (UV) light and ocular diseases. The data are sourced from the literature search of Medline up to Nov 2012, and the extracted data from original articles, review papers, and book chapters were reviewed. There is a strong evidence that ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure is associated with the formation of eyelid malignancies [basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)], photokeratitis, climatic droplet keratopathy (CDK), pterygium, and cortical cataract. However, the evidence of the association between UV exposure and development of pinguecula, nuclear and posterior subcapsular cataract, ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN), and ocular melanoma remained limited. There is insufficient evidence to determine whether age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is related to UV exposure. It is now suggested that AMD is probably related to visible radiation especially blue light, rather than UV exposure. From the results, it was concluded that eyelid malignancies (BCC and SCC), photokeratitis, CDK, pterygium, and cortical cataract are strongly associated with UVR exposure. Evidence of the association between UV exposure and development of pinguecula, nuclear and posterior subcapsular cataract, OSSN, and ocular melanoma remained limited. There is insufficient evidence to determine whether AMD is related to UV exposure. Simple behaviural changes, appropriate clothing, wearing hats, and UV blocking spectacles, sunglasses or contact lens are effective measures for UV protection. PMID:23722672

  3. The International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Yoji

    1990-01-01

    The International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) was launched into a geosynchronous orbit on 26 January 1978. It is equipped with a 45-cm mirror and spectrographs operating in the far-ultraviolet (1150-2000 A) and the midultraviolet (1900-3200 A) wavelength regions. In a low-dispersion mode, the spectral resolution is some 6-7 A. In a high-dispersion echelle mode, the resolution is about 0.1 Aat the shortest wavelength and about 0.3 A at the longest. It is a collaborative program among NASA, ESA, and the British SERC. The IUE is operated in real time 16 hours a day from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center near Washington, D.C. and 8 hours daily from ESA's Villafranca groundstation near Madrid, Spain. By the end of 1989, 1870 papers, using IUE observations, have been published in referred journals. During the same period, over 1700 different astronomers from all over the world used the IUE for their research.

  4. The "Green" Root Beer Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2010-01-01

    No, your students will not be drinking green root beer for St. Patrick's Day--this "green" root beer laboratory promotes environmental awareness in the science classroom, and provides a venue for some very sound science content! While many science classrooms incorporate root beer-brewing activities, the root beer lab presented in this article has…

  5. PBS Nanodots for Ultraviolet Radiation Nanosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekhtyar, Yu.; Romanova, M.; Anischenko, A.; Sudnikovich, A.; Polyaka, N.; Reisfeld, R.; Saraidarov, T.; Polyakov, B.

    PbS nanodots embedded in a zirconium oxide nanofilm were explored as possible ultraviolet (UV) sensors for nanodosimetry purposes. The nanodots were excited by ultraviolet photons to get emission of weak electrons. The emitted charge correlated to UV exposure indicates that PbS nanodots have potential for use as UV sensors for nanodosimetry.

  6. Ultraviolet light-an FDA approved technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ultraviolet Light (254 nm) is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved nonthermal intervention technology that can be used for decontamination of food and food contact surfaces. Ultraviolet light is a green technology that leaves no chemical residues. Results from our laboratory indicate that ex...

  7. Clear Film Protects Against Ultraviolet Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A.; Yavrouian, A.

    1983-01-01

    Acrylic film contains screeing agent filtering ultraviolet radiation up to 380 nanometers in wavelength but passes other components of Sunlight. Film used to protect such materials as rubber and plastics degraded by ultraviolet light. Used as protective cover on outdoor sheets or pipes made of such materials as polyethylene or polypropylene and on solar cells.

  8. Pen Ink as an Ultraviolet Dosimeter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, Nathan; Turner, Joanna; Parisi, Alfio; Spence, Jenny

    2008-01-01

    A technique for using highlighter ink as an ultraviolet dosimeter has been developed for use by secondary school students. The technique requires the students to measure the percentage of colour fading in ink drawn onto strips of paper that have been exposed to sunlight, which can be calibrated to measurements of the ultraviolet irradiance using…

  9. Near-ultraviolet laser diodes for brilliant ultraviolet fluorophore excitation.

    PubMed

    Telford, William G

    2015-12-01

    Although multiple lasers are now standard equipment on most modern flow cytometers, ultraviolet (UV) lasers (325-365 nm) remain an uncommon excitation source for cytometry. Nd:YVO4 frequency-tripled diode pumped solid-state lasers emitting at 355 nm are now the primary means of providing UV excitation on multilaser flow cytometers. Although a number of UV excited fluorochromes are available for flow cytometry, the cost of solid-state UV lasers remains prohibitively high, limiting their use to all but the most sophisticated multilaser instruments. The recent introduction of the brilliant ultraviolet (BUV) series of fluorochromes for cell surface marker detection and their importance in increasing the number of simultaneous parameters for high-dimensional analysis has increased the urgency of including UV sources in cytometer designs; however, these lasers remain expensive. Near-UV laser diodes (NUVLDs), a direct diode laser source emitting in the 370-380 nm range, have been previously validated for flow cytometric analysis of most UV-excited probes, including quantum nanocrystals, the Hoechst dyes, and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole. However, they remain a little-used laser source for cytometry, despite their significantly lower cost. In this study, the ability of NUVLDs to excite the BUV dyes was assessed, along with their compatibility with simultaneous brilliant violet (BV) labeling. A NUVLD emitting at 375 nm was found to excite most of the available BUV dyes at least as well as a UV 355 nm source. This slightly longer wavelength did produce some unwanted excitation of BV dyes, but at sufficiently low levels to require minimal additional compensation. NUVLDs are compact, relatively inexpensive lasers that have higher power levels than the newest generation of small 355 nm lasers. They can, therefore, make a useful, cost-effective substitute for traditional UV lasers in multicolor analysis involving the BUV and BV dyes. PMID:25930008

  10. Ultraviolet safety assessments of insect light traps.

    PubMed

    Sliney, David H; Gilbert, David W; Lyon, Terry

    2016-06-01

    Near-ultraviolet (UV-A: 315-400 nm), "black-light," electric lamps were invented in 1935 and ultraviolet insect light traps (ILTs) were introduced for use in agriculture around that time. Today ILTs are used indoors in several industries and in food-service as well as in outdoor settings. With recent interest in photobiological lamp safety, safety standards are being developed to test for potentially hazardous ultraviolet emissions. A variety of UV "Black-light" ILTs were measured at a range of distances to assess potential exposures. Realistic time-weighted human exposures are shown to be well below current guidelines for human exposure to ultraviolet radiation. These UV-A exposures would be far less than the typical UV-A exposure in the outdoor environment. Proposals are made for realistic ultraviolet safety standards for ILT products. PMID:27043058

  11. Ultraviolet safety assessments of insect light traps

    PubMed Central

    Sliney, David H.; Gilbert, David W.; Lyon, Terry

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Near-ultraviolet (UV-A: 315–400 nm), “black-light,” electric lamps were invented in 1935 and ultraviolet insect light traps (ILTs) were introduced for use in agriculture around that time. Today ILTs are used indoors in several industries and in food-service as well as in outdoor settings. With recent interest in photobiological lamp safety, safety standards are being developed to test for potentially hazardous ultraviolet emissions. A variety of UV “Black-light” ILTs were measured at a range of distances to assess potential exposures. Realistic time-weighted human exposures are shown to be well below current guidelines for human exposure to ultraviolet radiation. These UV-A exposures would be far less than the typical UV-A exposure in the outdoor environment. Proposals are made for realistic ultraviolet safety standards for ILT products. PMID:27043058

  12. The root economics spectrum: divergence of absorptive root strategies with root diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, D.; Wang, J.; Kardol, P.; Wu, H.; Zeng, H.; Deng, X.; Deng, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Plant roots usually vary along a dominant ecological axis, the root economics spectrum (RES), depicting a tradeoff between resource acquisition and conservation. For absorptive roots, which are mainly responsible for resource acquisition, we hypothesized that root strategies as predicted from the RES shift with increasing root diameter. To test this hypothesis, we used seven contrasting plant species for which we separated absorptive roots into two categories: thin roots (< 247 μm diameter) and thick roots. For each category, we analyzed a~range of root traits closely related to resource acquisition and conservation, including root tissue density, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) fractions as well as root anatomical traits. The results showed that trait relationships for thin absorptive roots followed the expectations from the RES while no clear trait relationships were found in support of the RES for thick absorptive roots. Our results suggest divergence of absorptive root strategies in relation to root diameter, which runs against a single economics spectrum for absorptive roots.

  13. Root architecture and root and tuber crop productivity.

    PubMed

    Villordon, Arthur Q; Ginzberg, Idit; Firon, Nurit

    2014-07-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that optimization of root architecture for resource capture is vital for enabling the next green revolution. Although cereals provide half of the calories consumed by humans, root and tuber crops are the second major source of carbohydrates globally. Yet, knowledge of root architecture in root and tuber species is limited. In this opinion article, we highlight what is known about the root system in root and tuber crops, and mark new research directions towards a better understanding of the relation between root architecture and yield. We believe that unraveling the role of root architecture in root and tuber crop productivity will improve global food security, especially in regions with marginal soil fertility and low-input agricultural systems. PMID:24630073

  14. The Ultraviolet Albedo of Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Melissa; Hendrix, A.

    2013-10-01

    A large set of ultraviolet images of Ganymede have been acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope over the last 15 years. These images have been used almost exclusively to study Ganymede’s stunning auroral emissions (Feldman et al. 2000; Eviatar et al. 2001; McGrath et al. 2004; Saur et al. 2011; McGrath et al. 2013), and even the most basic information about Ganymede’s UV albedo has yet to be gleaned from these data. We will present a first-cut analysis of both disk-averaged and spatially-resolved UV albedos of Ganymede, with focus on the spatially-resolved Lyman-alpha albedo, which has never been considered previously for this satellite. Ganymede's visibly bright regions are known to be rich in water ice, while the visibly dark regions seem to be more carbonaceous (Carlson et al., 1996). At Lyman-alpha, these two species should also have very different albedo values. References Carlson, R. and 39 co-authors, Near-infrared spectroscopy and spectral mapping of Jupiter and the Galilean satellites: Results from Galileo’s initial orbit, Science, 274, 385-388, 1996. Eviatar, A., D. F. Strobel, B. C. Wolven, P. D. Feldman, M. A. McGrath, and D. J. Williams, Excitation of the Ganymede ultraviolet aurora, Astrophys. J, 555, 1013-1019, 2001. Feldman, P. D., M. A. McGrath, D. F. Strobel, H. W. Moos, K. D. Retherford, and B. C. Wolven, HST/STIS imaging of ultraviolet aurora on Ganymede, Astrophys. J, 535, 1085-1090, 2000. McGrath M. A., Lellouch E., Strobel D. F., Feldman P. D., Johnson R. E., Satellite Atmospheres, Chapter 19 in Jupiter: The Planet, Satellites and Magnetosphere, ed. F. Bagenal, T. Dowling, W. McKinnon, Cambridge University Press, 2004. McGrath M. A., Jia, Xianzhe; Retherford, Kurt; Feldman, Paul D.; Strobel, Darrell F.; Saur, Joachim, Aurora on Ganymede, J. Geophys. Res., doi: 10.1002/jgra.50122, 2013. Saur, J., S. Duling, S., L. Roth, P. D. Feldman, D. F. Strobel, K. D. Retherford, M. A. McGrath, A. Wennmacher, American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting

  15. Detection of latent fingerprints by ultraviolet spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Xu, Xiaojing; Wang, Guiqiang

    2013-12-01

    Spectral imaging technology research is becoming more popular in the field of forensic science. Ultraviolet spectral imaging technology is an especial part of the full spectrum of imaging technology. This paper finished the experiment contents of the ultraviolet spectrum imaging method and image acquisition system based on ultraviolet spectral imaging technology. Ultraviolet spectral imaging experiments explores a wide variety of ultraviolet reflectance spectra of the object material curve and its ultraviolet spectrum of imaging modalities, can not only gives a reference for choosing ultraviolet wavelength to show the object surface potential traces of substances, but also gives important data for the ultraviolet spectrum of imaging technology development.

  16. Far ultraviolet nighttime ionospheric photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Liping; Peng, Ruyi; Shi, Entao; Peng, Jilong; Wang, Tianfang; Jiang, Fang; Jia, Nan; Li, Xiaoyin; Wang, Yongmei

    2015-01-01

    Far Ultraviolet Nighttime Ionopsheric Photometer (FNIP) is a newly-designed instrument for low earth orbit missions, observing the earth night airglow nadir at OI 135.6 nm emission produced by ionospheric O++e recombination and receiving the horizontal information on nighttime ionosphere with a spatial resolution of about 1.6∘×3.8∘. This simple, highly robust instrument excludes OI 130.4 nm emission and Herzberg oxygen bands with lower power and approximately achieves a sensitivity of about 400 counts/s/Rayleigh at 135.6 nm with stray light less than 2 %. Some tests of the instrument have been conducted and the results will be discussed in the end.

  17. Ultraviolet spectroscopy of cometary comae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Paul D.

    1991-01-01

    During the past decade, vacuum ultraviolet spectra of over 30 comets have been obtained with the IUE satellite observatory. With few exceptions, the spectra of these comets appear to be similar, with OH and H produced by the photodissociation of water being the dominant species and emissions of C, O, S, CS and CO2(+) usually present. Although signs of variabiity of many kinds in comet spectra appear, the evidence from the UV observations suggests that all comets have the same basic chemical composition and that observed differences are due to evolution and ageing processes. During the 1985-86 apparition of Comet Halley, spectra were also obtained by other spacecraft and by sounding rocket instruments, including a long-slit imaging spectrograph.

  18. Cloud effects on ultraviolet photoclimatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, A. E. S.; Spinhirne, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify for the needs of photobiology the influence of clouds upon the ultraviolet spectral irradiance reaching the ground. Towards this end, analytic formulas are developed which approximately characterize the influence of clouds upon total solar radiation. These may be used in conjunction with a solar pyranometer to assign an effective visual optical depth for the cloud cover. A formula is also developed which characterizes the influence of the optical depth of clouds upon the UV spectral irradiance in the 280-340 nm region. Thus total solar energy observations to assign cloud optical properties can be used to calculate the UV spectral irradiance at the ground in the presence of these clouds. As incidental by-products of this effort, convenient formulas are found for the direct and diffuse components of total solar energy.

  19. Ultraviolet, Visible, and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penner, Michael H.

    Spectroscopy in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) range is one of the most commonly encountered laboratory techniques in food analysis. Diverse examples, such as the quantification of macrocomponents (total carbohydrate by the phenol-sulfuric acid method), quantification of microcomponents, (thiamin by the thiochrome fluorometric procedure), estimates of rancidity (lipid oxidation status by the thiobarbituric acid test), and surveillance testing (enzyme-linked immunoassays), are presented in this text. In each of these cases, the analytical signal for which the assay is based is either the emission or absorption of radiation in the UV-Vis range. This signal may be inherent in the analyte, such as the absorbance of radiation in the visible range by pigments, or a result of a chemical reaction involving the analyte, such as the colorimetric copper-based Lowry method for the analysis of soluble protein.

  20. The Ultraviolet Albedo of Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGrath, Melissa; Hendrix, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    A large set of ultraviolet images of Ganymede have been acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope over the last 15 years. These images have been used almost exclusively to study Ganymede's stunning auroral emissions (Feldman et al. 2000; Eviatar et al. 2001; McGrath et al. 2004; Saur et al. 2011; McGrath et al. 2013), and even the most basic information about Ganymede's UV albedo has yet to be gleaned from these data. We will present a first-cut analysis of both disk-averaged and spatially-resolved UV albedos of Ganymede, with focus on the spatially-resolved Lyman-alpha albedo, which has never been considered previously for this satellite. Ganymede's visibly bright regions are known to be rich in water ice, while the visibly dark regions seem to be more carbonaceous (Carlson et al., 1996). At Lyman-alpha, these two species should also have very different albedo values.

  1. International ultraviolet explorer observatory operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains the Final Report for the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) Observatory Operations contract, NAS5-28787. The report summarizes the activities of the IUE Observatory over the 13-month period from November 1985 through November 1986 and is arranged in sections according to the functions specified in the Statement of Work (SOW) of the contract. In order to preserve numerical correspondence between the technical SOW elements specified by the contract and the sections of this report, project management activities (SOW element 0.0.) are reported here in Section 7, following the reports of technical SOW elements 1.0 through 6.0. Routine activities have been summarized briefly whenever possible; statistical compilations, reports, and more lengthy supplementary material are contained in the Appendices.

  2. Ultraviolet reflectance properties of asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, P. S.; Meadows, A. J.

    1985-05-01

    An analysis of the UV spectra of 28 asteroids obtained with the Internal Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite is presented. The spectra lie within the range 2100-3200 A. The results are examined in terms of both asteroid classification and of current ideas concerning the surface mineralogy of asteroids. For all the asteroids examined, UV reflectivity declines approximately linearly toward shorter wavelengths. In general, the same taxonomic groups are seen in the UV as in the visible and IR, although there is some evidence for asteroids with anomalous UV properties and for UV subclasses within the S class. No mineral absorption features are reported of strength similar to the strongest features in the visible and IR regions, but a number of shallow absorptions do occur and may provide valuable information on the surface composition of many asteroids.

  3. The ultraviolet astronomy mission: Columbus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R.

    1984-01-01

    An ultraviolet astronomy mission (Columbus) is described. It exploits the spectral region between 900 and 1200A, which is extremely rich in containing the Lyman lines of hydrogen and deuterium and the Lyman band of their molecules, together with the resonance lines of many important ions. High resolving power and high sensitivity provide a unique capability for studying the brightest members of neighboring galaxies, the HeI and HeII absorption systems in quasars out to a red shift of 2, and the halos of intervening galaxies. Complementary focal plane instruments are planned in order to allow observations to longer (2000A) and shorter (100A) wavelengths. This wide coverage embraces the resonance lines of all the cosmically abundant elements and a wide range of temperature zones up to 100 million K.

  4. Global Ultraviolet Imager (GUVI) investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Andrew B.

    1995-01-01

    This report covers the activities performed under NAS5-32572. The results of those activities are included in this Final Report. TIMED Science Objectives: (1) To determine the temperature, density, and wind structure of the MLTI (mixed layer thermal inertia), including the seasonal and latitudinal variations; and (2) To determine the relative importance of the various radiative, chemical, electrodynamical, and dynamical sources and sinks of energy for the thermal structure of the MLTI. GUVI Science Goals: (1) Determine the spatial and temporal variations of temperature and constituent densities in the lower thermosphere; and (2) Determine the importance of auroral energy sources and solar EUV (extreme ultraviolet) to the energy balance of the region.

  5. Ultraviolet characterization of integrating spheres.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Ping-Shine; Li, Zhigang; Arp, Uwe; Lykke, Keith R

    2007-08-01

    We have studied the performance of polytetrafluoroethylene integrating spheres in the ultraviolet (UV) region with wavelengths as short as 200 nm. Two techniques were used for this study; first, the spectral throughput of an integrating sphere irradiated by a deuterium lamp was analyzed by a monochromator. Second, a UV laser beam was directed into an integrating sphere, and spectrally dispersed laser induced fluorescence was studied. Significant absorption and fluorescence features were observed in the UV region and attributed to the contamination in the integrating sphere. We demonstrate that integrating spheres are easily contaminated by environmental pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons emitted from engine exhaust. Baking of the contaminated integrating sphere can reverse some but not all of the effects caused by contaminants. The implications for using integrating spheres for UV measurement are discussed. PMID:17676122

  6. Ultraviolet characterization of integrating spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Ping-Shine; Li, Zhigang; Arp, Uwe; Lykke, Keith R.

    2007-08-01

    We have studied the performance of polytetrafluoroethylene integrating spheres in the ultraviolet (UV) region with wavelengths as short as 200 nm. Two techniques were used for this study; first, the spectral throughput of an integrating sphere irradiated by a deuterium lamp was analyzed by a monochromator. Second, a UV laser beam was directed into an integrating sphere, and spectrally dispersed laser induced fluorescence was studied. Significant absorption and fluorescence features were observed in the UV region and attributed to the contamination in the integrating sphere. We demonstrate that integrating spheres are easily contaminated by environmental pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons emitted from engine exhaust. Baking of the contaminated integrating sphere can reverse some but not all of the effects caused by contaminants. The implications for using integrating spheres for UV measurement are discussed.

  7. Corona solar blind ultraviolet image detecting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Li-min; Tang, Wen-qing; Zhang, Yu

    2009-07-01

    Corona is one of important reasons of electrical energy loss in the electric power. According to incomplete statistics, corona loss electrical energy has achieved two thousands and fifty millions kW.h in our nation every year. Sometimes corona also can have some disturbance to radio and communication. Therefore to discover and examine corona promptly has the extremely vital significance for conserving energy and realizing high quality communication. Ultraviolet image detecting technology is a preferred corona detection method in electric power. It may realize all-weather reliable survey to corona. The solar blind ultraviolet signal discharged by corona is quite weak. Moreover the ultraviolet image quality has been affected seriously by the detection system noise. A corona solar blind ultraviolet image processing method is proposed in this paper. Ultraviolet image has so small target, low contrast image, district characteristic and real-time demand that it is processed by multi-scale ultraviolet morphology filter technology based on mathematics morphology in this paper. Results show that the method can stretch image contrast, enhance target and weaken noise. The algorithm is easy to deal in parallel and it can be realized easily by hardware. It will be accurately demarcated when the condition of device need to be absolutely measured. The paper proposes a kind of mathematics morphology algorithm. Solar blind ultraviolet image will be further processed according to temperature and humidity in order to remove the infection of corona discharge demarcation and solve correct demarcation question when equipment condition need to be absolutely measured.

  8. Stachbotrys Root Rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stachybotrys root rot is caused by Stachybotrys chartarum, a cellulytic saprophytic hyphomycete fungus. The pathogen produces mycotoxins including a host of immunosupressant compounds for human and is one of the causes of the "sick building syndrome." Although S. chartarum is rarely known as a plan...

  9. Violet root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus causing violet root rot, Helicobasidium brebissonii (anamorph Rhizoctonia crocorum), is widely distributed in Europe and North America but is rarely of much economic importance on alfalfa. The disease has also been reported in Australia, Argentina, and Iran. The disease is characterized b...

  10. "Roots": Medium and Message.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnamon, Keneth

    A national telephone survey indicated that audiences rated the television production of "Roots" positively in terms of the following: realistic portrayal of the people and the times; relevance for contemporary race relations; perceived emotional effect; and increased understanding of the psychology of black people. However, a comparison of the…

  11. Great Plains Roots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Jennifer

    2001-01-01

    Sandy White Hawk, Sicangu Lakota, was adopted by white missionaries as an infant and suffered child abuse. After 33 years, she found her birth family and formed First Nations Orphans Association, which uses songs and ceremonies to help adoptees return to their roots. Until the 1970s, federal agencies and welfare organizations facilitated removal…

  12. The Roots of Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montoya, Colleen, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This newsletter covers educational issues affecting schools in the Western Regional Educational Laboratory's 4-state region (Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah) and nationwide. The following articles appear in the Volume 4, Number 1 issue: (1) "The Roots of Reading"; (2) "Breaking the Code: Reading Literacy in K-3"; (3) "Improving Secondary…

  13. Fine root turnover: a story of root production and root phenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormack, M. L.; Adams, T. S.; Smithwick, E. A.; Eissenstat, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    Fine root turnover in terrestrial ecosystems partially controls carbon flow from plants into soils as well the amount of roots available for nutrient and water uptake. However, we have poor understanding of basic patterns and variability in fine root turnover. We address this shortfall through the use of a heuristic model and analysis of a multi-year minirhizotron dataset exploring the impacts of fine root phenology and production on fine root turnover rates across 12 temperate tree species in a common garden experiment. The heuristic model allowed us to calculate fine root turnover given different patterns of root production and different fine root lifespans. Using the model we found that patterns of phenology characterized by a single, concentrated peak resulted in slower calculated root turnover rates while broader and bi-modal production patterns resulted in faster turnover rates. For example, for roots with median lifespans of 91 days, estimates of root turnover increased from 1.5 yr-1 to 4.0 yr-1 between the pattern of concentrated root production and the pattern with root production spread equally throughout the year. Turnover rates observed in the common garden ranged from 0.75 yr-1 to 1.33 yr-1 and 0.93 yr-1 to 2.14 yr-1 when calculated as annual production divided by maximum standing root crop or average standing root crop, respectively. Turnover varied significantly across species and interannual variability in root production and turnover was high. Patterns of root phenology observed at the common garden included concentrated root production in late spring as well as several examples of bi-modal and broader patterns of root production with roots produced across spring, summer and fall. Overall, both phenology and total root production impacted estimates of root turnover, particularly for short-lived fine roots with median lifespans of less than one year. Our results suggest that better understanding fine root phenology and production will improve our

  14. STEREO's Extreme UltraViolet Imager (EUVI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    At a pixel resolution of 2048x2048, the STEREO EUVI instrument provides views of the Sun in ultraviolet light that rivals the full-disk views of SOHO/EIT. This image is through the 171 Angstrom (ultraviolet) filter which is characteristic of iron ions (missing eight and nine electrons) at 1 million degrees. There is a short data gap in the latter half of the movie that creates a freeze and then jump in the data view. This is a movie of the Sun in 171 Angstrom ultraviolet light. The time frame is late January, 2007

  15. Measurements of the diffuse ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, John D.; Craven, John D.; Frank, Louis A.

    1989-01-01

    The imaging instrumentation on the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite has been used to measure the intensity of the diffuse ultraviolet radiation on two great circles about the sky. It is found that the isotropic component of the diffuse ultraviolet radiation (possibly of extragalactic origin) has an intensity of 530 + or - 80 units (a unit is 1 photon per sq cm s A sr) at a wavelength of 150 nm. The Galactic component of the diffuse ultraviolet radiation has a dependence on Galactic latitude which requires strongly forward scattering particles if it is produced by dust above the Galactic plane.

  16. The Physiology of Adventitious Roots.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Bianka; Rasmussen, Amanda

    2016-02-01

    Adventitious roots are plant roots that form from any nonroot tissue and are produced both during normal development (crown roots on cereals and nodal roots on strawberry [Fragaria spp.]) and in response to stress conditions, such as flooding, nutrient deprivation, and wounding. They are important economically (for cuttings and food production), ecologically (environmental stress response), and for human existence (food production). To improve sustainable food production under environmentally extreme conditions, it is important to understand the adventitious root development of crops both in normal and stressed conditions. Therefore, understanding the regulation and physiology of adventitious root formation is critical for breeding programs. Recent work shows that different adventitious root types are regulated differently, and here, we propose clear definitions of these classes. We use three case studies to summarize the physiology of adventitious root development in response to flooding (case study 1), nutrient deficiency (case study 2), and wounding (case study 3). PMID:26697895

  17. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders is a device (including a fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation of the body to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders....

  18. 21 CFR 880.6500 - Medical ultraviolet air purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... to ultraviolet radiation. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet air purifier. 880.6500 Section... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6500 Medical ultraviolet air purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet...

  19. 21 CFR 880.6500 - Medical ultraviolet air purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... to ultraviolet radiation. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet air purifier. 880.6500 Section... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6500 Medical ultraviolet air purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet...

  20. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders is a device (including a fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation of the body to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders....

  1. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders is a device (including a fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation of the body to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders....

  2. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders is a device (including a fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation of the body to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders....

  3. 21 CFR 880.6500 - Medical ultraviolet air purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... to ultraviolet radiation. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet air purifier. 880.6500 Section... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6500 Medical ultraviolet air purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet...

  4. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders is a device (including a fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation of the body to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders....

  5. AUTOMATION OF AN ULTRAVIOLET-VISIBLE SPECTROMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is an overview of the functional description and major features of an automated ultraviolet-visible spectrometer system intended for environmental measurements application. As such, it defines functional specifications and requirements which are divided into the chlor...

  6. Inactivation of mitochondrial ATPase by ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, E.; Cuellar, A.

    1984-05-01

    The present work describes experiments that show that far-ultraviolet irradiation induce the inhibition of ATPase activity in both membrane-bound and soluble F1. It was also found that ultraviolet light promotes the release of tightly bound adenine nucleotides from F1-ATPase. Experiments carried out with submitochondrial particles indicate that succinate partially protects against these effects of ultraviolet light. Titration of sulfhydryl groups in both irradiated submitochondrial particles and soluble F1-ATPase indicates that a conformational change induced by photochemical modifications of amino acid residues appears involved in the inactivation of the enzyme. Finally, experiments are described which show that the tyrosine residue located in the active site of F1-ATPase is modified by ultraviolet irradiation.

  7. Solar ultraviolet radiation in a changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Craig E.; Zepp, Richard G.; Lucas, Robyn M.; Madronich, Sasha; Austin, Amy T.; Ballaré, Carlos L.; Norval, Mary; Sulzberger, Barbara; Bais, Alkiviadis F.; McKenzie, Richard L.; Robinson, Sharon A.; Häder, Donat-P.; Paul, Nigel D.; Bornman, Janet F.

    2014-06-01

    The projected large increases in damaging ultraviolet radiation as a result of global emissions of ozone-depleting substances have been forestalled by the success of the Montreal Protocol. New challenges are now arising in relation to climate change. We highlight the complex interactions between the drivers of climate change and those of stratospheric ozone depletion, and the positive and negative feedbacks among climate, ozone and ultraviolet radiation. These will result in both risks and benefits of exposure to ultraviolet radiation for the environment and human welfare. This Review synthesizes these new insights and their relevance in a world where changes in climate as well as in stratospheric ozone are altering exposure to ultraviolet radiation with largely unknown consequences for the biosphere.

  8. Astronomy and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, S.

    1994-01-01

    The extreme ultraviolet wave band (100 to 912 angstroms) was thought until recently to be useless to astronomy, primarily because the opacity of the interstellar medium would prevent observations at these wavelengths. However, the interstellar medium has been found to be markedly inhomogeneous in both density and ionization state and the sun is fortunately located in a region of low extreme ultraviolet opacity. The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer, launched in June 1992, has surveyed the sky in this wave band and has detected a wide variety of astronomical sources at considerable distances, including some extragalactic objects. Studies in the extreme ultraviolet band have already begun to increase our understanding of the contents of the universe.

  9. Hairy roots are more sensitive to auxin than normal roots

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wen Hui; Petit, Annik; Guern, Jean; Tempé, Jacques

    1988-01-01

    Responses to auxin of Lotus corniculatus root tips or protoplasts transformed by Agrobacterium rhizogenes strains 15834 and 8196 were compared to those of their normal counterparts. Three different types of experiments were performed, involving long-term, medium-term, or short-term responses to a synthetic auxin, 1-naphthaleneacetic acid. Root tip elongation, proton excretion by root tips, and transmembrane electrical potential difference of root protoplasts were measured as a function of exogenous auxin concentration. The sensitivity of hairy root tips or protoplasts to exogenous auxin was found to be 100-1000 times higher than that of untransformed material. PMID:16593928

  10. Hairy roots are more sensitive to auxin than normal roots.

    PubMed

    Shen, W H; Petit, A; Guern, J; Tempé, J

    1988-05-01

    Responses to auxin of Lotus corniculatus root tips or protoplasts transformed by Agrobacterium rhizogenes strains 15834 and 8196 were compared to those of their normal counterparts. Three different types of experiments were performed, involving long-term, medium-term, or short-term responses to a synthetic auxin, 1-naphthaleneacetic acid. Root tip elongation, proton excretion by root tips, and transmembrane electrical potential difference of root protoplasts were measured as a function of exogenous auxin concentration. The sensitivity of hairy root tips or protoplasts to exogenous auxin was found to be 100-1000 times higher than that of untransformed material. PMID:16593928

  11. Root canal retained restorations: 3. Root-face attachments.

    PubMed

    Dummer, P M; Edmunds, D H; Gidden, J R

    1990-10-01

    It has been common practice for many years to use retained roots to provide support and stability for partial or full dentures. The retention of such overdentures is greatly enhanced if the remaining roots are modified and restored with posts and root-face attachments. The final article in this series on root canal retained restorations classifies and describes some of the root-face attachments currently available, and also describes a number of prefabricated post systems with integral overdenture attachments. Guidelines for clinical and laboratory procedures are given. PMID:2097234

  12. Strigolactones Effects on Root Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltai, Hinanit

    2012-07-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) were defined as a new group of plant hormones that suppress lateral shoot branching. Our previous studies suggested SLs to be regulators of root development. SLs were shown to alter root architecture by regulating lateral root formation and to affect root hair elongation in Arabidopsis. Another important effect of SLs on root growth was shown to be associated with root directional growth. Supplementation of SLs to roots led to alterations in root directional growth, whereas associated mutants showed asymmetrical root growth, which was influenced by environmental factors. The regulation by SLs of root development was shown to be conducted via a cross talk of SLs with other plant hormones, including auxin. SLs were shown to regulate auxin transport, and to interfere with the activity of auxin-efflux carriers. Therefore, it might be that SLs are regulators of root directional growth as a result of their ability to regulated auxin transport. However, other evidences suggest a localized effect of SLs on cell division, which may not necessarily be associated with auxin efflux. These and other, recent hypothesis as to the SLs mode of action and the associated root perception and response to environmental factors will be discussed.

  13. Aquaporins and root water relations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water is one of the most critical resources limiting plant growth and crop productivity, and root water uptake is an important aspect of plant physiology governing plant water use and stress tolerance. Pathways of root water uptake are complex and are affected by root structure and physiological res...

  14. Ultraviolet Light and Skin Cancer in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Shannon C.; Bergfeld, Wilma F.

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers is increasing worldwide. Ultraviolet light exposure is the most important risk factor for cutaneous melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. Nonmelanoma skin cancer includes basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Constitutive skin color and genetic factors, as well as immunological factors, play a role in the development of skin cancer. Ultraviolet light also causes sunburn and photoaging damage to the skin. PMID:23015891

  15. Ultraviolet Behavior of N = 8 supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Lance J.; /SLAC

    2010-06-07

    In these lectures the author describes the remarkable ultraviolet behavior of N = 8 supergravity, which through four loops is no worse than that of N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory (a finite theory). I also explain the computational tools that allow multi-loop amplitudes to be evaluated in this theory - the KLT relations and the unitarity method - and sketch how ultraviolet divergences are extracted from the amplitudes.

  16. Ultraviolet Behavior of {N} = 8 Supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Lance J.

    2012-12-01

    In these lectures I describe the remarkable ultraviolet behavior of {N} = 8 supergravity, which through four loops is no worse than that of {N} = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory (a finite theory). I also explain the computational tools that allow multi-loop amplitudes to be evaluated in this theory - the KLT relations and the unitarity method - and sketch how ultraviolet divergences are extracted from the amplitudes.

  17. Ultraviolet stellar spectrophotometry from a balloon platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Y.; Wells, C.

    1974-01-01

    A 40 centimeter diameter aperture, balloon-borne telescope and ultraviolet spectrometer is described and selected scientific results are briefly reviewed. The general configuration of the 0.4 angstrom resolution instrument is shown and the utilization of servo-controlled secondary mirror, image dissector detector, and special mirror coatings are discussed. An outlook for astronomical research in the mid-ultraviolet from balloon-borne telescopes is presented together with future development plans for JSC's balloon-borne payload.

  18. Polarization measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.; West, E. A.; Noble, M.

    2005-08-01

    This paper will describe the Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) polarization testing of the Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph (SUMI) optics. SUMI is being develop for a sounding rocket payload to prove the feasibility of making magnetic field measurements in the transition region. This paper will cover the polarization properties of the VUV calibration polarizers, the instrumental polarization of the VUV chamber, SUMI's toroidal varied-line-space gratings and the SUMI polarimeter.

  19. Dust near luminous ultraviolet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes research activities related to the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) sky survey. About 745 luminous stars were examined for the presence of interstellar dust heated by a nearby star. The 'cirrus' discovered by IRAS is thermal radiation from interstellar dust at moderate and high galactic latitudes. The IRAS locates the dust which must (at some level) scatter ultraviolet starlight, although it was expected that thermal emission would be found around virtually every star, most stars shown no detectable emission. And the emission found is not uniform. It is not that the star is embedded in 'an interstellar medium', but rather what is found are discrete clouds that are heated by starlight. An exception is the dearth of clouds near the very hottest stars, implying that the very hottest stars play an active role with respect to destroying or substantially modifying the dust clouds over time. The other possibility is simply that the hottest stars are located in regions lacking in dust, which is counter-intuitive. A bibliography of related journal articles is attached.

  20. Masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinale, G; Goldsmith, J; Kearney, P A; Larson, C; Moore, C E; Prisbrey, S; Tong, W; Vernon, S P; Weber, F; Yan, P-Y

    1998-09-01

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), the technology specific requirements on the mask are a direct consequence of the utilization of radiation in the spectral region between 10 and 15 nm. At these wavelengths, all condensed materials are highly absorbing and efficient radiation transport mandates the use of all-reflective optical systems. Reflectivity is achieved with resonant, wavelength-matched multilayer (ML) coatings on all of the optical surfaces - including the mask. The EUV mask has a unique architecture - it consists of a substrate with a highly reflective ML coating (the mask blank) that is subsequently over-coated with a patterned absorber layer (the mask). Particulate contamination on the EUVL mask surface, errors in absorber definition and defects in the ML coating all have the potential to print in the lithographic process. While highly developed technologies exist for repair of the absorber layer, no viable strategy for the repair of ML coating defects has been identified. In this paper the state-of-the-art in ML deposition technology, optical inspection of EUVL mask blank defects and candidate absorber patterning approaches are reviewed.

  1. Ultraviolet radiation and skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Deevya L; Saladi, Rao N; Fox, Joshua L

    2010-09-01

    Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in fair-skinned populations in many parts of the world. The incidence, morbidity and mortality rates of skin cancers are increasing and, therefore, pose a significant public health concern. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the major etiologic agent in the development of skin cancers. UVR causes DNA damage and genetic mutations, which subsequently lead to skin cancer. A clearer understanding of UVR is crucial in the prevention of skin cancer. This article reviews UVR, its damaging effects on the skin and its relationship to UV immunosuppression and skin cancer. Several factors influence the amount of UVR reaching the earth's surface, including ozone depletion, UV light elevation, latitude, altitude, and weather conditions. The current treatment modalities utilizing UVR (i.e. phototherapy) can also predispose to skin cancers. Unnecessary exposure to the sun and artificial UVR (tanning lamps) are important personal attributable risks. This article aims to provide a comprehensive overview of skin cancer with an emphasis on carefully evaluated statistics, the epidemiology of UVR-induced skin cancers, incidence rates, risk factors, and preventative behaviors & strategies, including personal behavioral modifications and public educational initiatives. PMID:20883261

  2. Ultraviolet radiation cataract: dose dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderberg, Per G.; Loefgren, Stefan

    1994-07-01

    Current safety limits for cataract development after acute exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) are based on experiments analyzing experimental data with a quantal, effect-no effect, dose-response model. The present study showed that intensity of forward light scattering is better described with a continuous dose-response model. It was found that 3, 30 and 300 kJ/m2UVR300nm induces increased light scattering within 6 h. For all three doses the intensity of forward light scattering was constant after 6 h. The intensity of forward light scattering was proportional to the log dose of UVR300nm. There was a slight increase of the intensity of forward light scattering on the contralateral side in animals that received 300 kJ/m2. Altogether 72 Sprague-Dawley male rats were included. Half of the rats were exposed in vivo on one side to UVR300nm. The other half was kept as a control group, receiving the same treatment as exposed rats but without delivery of UVR300nm to the eye. Subgroups of the rats received either of the three doses. Rats were sacrificed at varying intervals after the exposure. The lenses were extracted and the forward light scattering was estimated. It is concluded that intensity of forward light scattering in the lens after exposure to UVR300nm should be described with a continuous dose-reponse model.

  3. Survey of ultraviolet shuttle glow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spear, K. A.; Uckler, G. J.; Tobiska, K.

    1985-01-01

    The University of Colorado Get Away Special (GAS) project utilizes the efforts of its students to place experiments on the shuttle. The objective of one experiment, the shuttle glow study, is to conduct a general survey of emissions in the ultraviolet near vehicle surfaces. An approximate wavelength range of 1900 to 3000 A will be scanned to observe predominant features. Special emphasis will be placed on studying the band structure of NO near 2000 A and the Mg+ line at 2800 A. The spectrometer, of Ebert-Faste 1/8-meter design, will perform the experiment during spacecraft night. It will be oriented such that the optical axis points to the cargo bay zenith. In order to direct the field-of-view of the instrument onto the shuttle vertical stabilizer (tail), a mirror assembly is employed. The mirror system has been designed to rotate through 7.5 degrees of arc using 10 positions resulting in a spatial resolution of 30 x 3 cm, with the larger dimension corresponding to the horizontal direction. Such a configuration can be attained from the forwardmost position in the cargo bay. Each spatial position will be subjected to a full spectral scan with a resolution on the order of 10 A.

  4. Human exposure to ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Diffey, B L

    1990-03-01

    Although the sun remains the main source of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure in humans, the advent of artificial UVR sources has increased the opportunity for both intentional and unintentional exposure. Intentional exposure is most often to tan the skin. People living in less sunny climates can now maintain a year-round tan by using sunbeds and solaria emitting principally UVA radiation. Another reason for intentional exposure to artificial UVR is treatment of skin diseases, notably psoriasis. Unintentional exposure is normally the result of occupation. Outdoor workers, such as farmers, receive three to four times the annual solar UV exposure of indoor workers. Workers in many industries, eg, photoprinting or hospital phototherapy departments, may be exposed to UVR from artificial sources. One group particularly at risk is electric arc welders, where inadvertent exposure is so common that the terms "arc eye" or "welders flash" are often used to describe photokeratitis. In addition to unavoidable exposure to natural UVR, the general public is exposed to low levels of UVR from sources such as fluorescent lamps used for indoor lighting and shops and restaurants where UVA lamps are often used in traps to attract flying insects. PMID:2203439

  5. Springback in root gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leopold, A. C.; Wettlaufer, S. H.

    1989-01-01

    Conditions under which a gravistimulus of Merit corn roots (Zea mays L.) is withdrawn result in a subsequent loss of gravitropic curvature, an effect which we refer to as springback.' This loss of curvature begins within 1 to 10 minutes after removal of the gravistimulus. It occurs regardless of the presence or absence of the root cap. It is insensitive to inhibitors of auxin transport (2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid, naphthylphthalamic [correction of naphthylphthalmaic] acid) or to added auxin (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid). Springback is prevented if a clinostat treatment is interjected to neutralize gravistimulation during germination, which suggests that the change in curvature is a response to a memory' effect carried over from a prior gravistimulation.

  6. Springback in root gravitropism.

    PubMed

    Leopold, A C; Wettlaufer, S H

    1989-01-01

    Conditions under which a gravistimulus of Merit corn roots (Zea mays L.) is withdrawn result in a subsequent loss of gravitropic curvature, an effect which we refer to as springback.' This loss of curvature begins within 1 to 10 minutes after removal of the gravistimulus. It occurs regardless of the presence or absence of the root cap. It is insensitive to inhibitors of auxin transport (2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid, naphthylphthalamic [correction of naphthylphthalmaic] acid) or to added auxin (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid). Springback is prevented if a clinostat treatment is interjected to neutralize gravistimulation during germination, which suggests that the change in curvature is a response to a memory' effect carried over from a prior gravistimulation. PMID:11537456

  7. Diagravitropism in corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leopold, A. C.; Wettlaufer, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    The diagravitropic behavior of Merit corn (Zea mays L.) roots grown in darkness provides an opportunity for comparison of two qualitatively different gravitropic systems. As with positive gravitropism, diagravitropism is shown to require the presence of the root cap, have a similar time course for the onset of curvature, and a similar presentation time. In contrast with positive gravitropism, diagravitropism appears to have a more limited requirement for calcium, for it is insensitive to the elution of calcium by EGTA and insensitive to the subsequent addition of a calcium/EGTA complex. These results are interpreted as indicating that whereas the same sensing system is shared by the two types of gravitropism, separate transductive systems are involved, one for diagravitropism, which is relatively independent of calcium, and one for positive gravitropism, which is markedly dependent on calcium.

  8. Control of Arabidopsis Root Development

    PubMed Central

    Petricka, Jalean J.; Winter, Cara M.; Benfey, Philip N.

    2013-01-01

    The Arabidopsis root has been the subject of intense research over the past decades. This research has led to significantly improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying root development. Key insights into the specification of individual cell types, cell patterning, growth and differentiation, branching of the primary root, and responses of the root to the environment have been achieved. Transcription factors and plant hormones play key regulatory roles. Recently, mechanisms involving protein movement and the oscillation of gene expression have also been uncovered. Root gene regulatory networks controlling root development have been reconstructed from genome-wide profiling experiments, revealing novel molecular connections and models. Future refinement of these models will lead to a more complete description of the complex molecular interactions that give rise to a simple growing root. PMID:22404466

  9. Ultraviolet resources over Northern Eurasia.

    PubMed

    Chubarova, Natalia; Zhdanova, Yekaterina

    2013-10-01

    We propose a new climatology of UV resources over Northern Eurasia, which includes the assessments of both detrimental (erythema) and positive (vitamin D synthesis) effects of ultraviolet radiation on human health. The UV resources are defined by using several classes and subclasses - UV deficiency, UV optimum, and UV excess - for 6 different skin types. To better quantifying the vitamin D irradiance threshold we accounted for an open body fraction S as a function of effective air temperature. The spatial and temporal distribution of UV resources was estimated by radiative transfer (RT) modeling (8 stream DISORT RT code) with 1×1° grid and monthly resolution. For this purpose special datasets of main input geophysical parameters (total ozone content, aerosol characteristics, surface UV albedo, UV cloud modification factor) have been created over the territory of Northern Eurasia. The new approaches were used to retrieve aerosol parameters and cloud modification factor in the UV spectral region. As a result, the UV resources were obtained for clear-sky and mean cloudy conditions for different skin types. We show that the distribution of UV deficiency, UV optimum and UV excess is regulated by various geophysical parameters (mainly, total ozone, cloudiness and open body fraction) and can significantly deviate from latitudinal dependence. We also show that the UV optimum conditions can be simultaneously observed for people with different skin types (for example, for 4-5 skin types at the same time in spring over Western Europe). These UV optimum conditions for different skin types occupy a much larger territory over Europe than that over Asia. PMID:23933245

  10. Modeling Ultraviolet Emissions Near Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linker, Jon A.

    2000-10-01

    In this report, we describe work awarded to Science Applications International Corporation, for the period 6/l/99 to 5/31/00. During this time period, we have investigated the interaction of Io, Jupiter's innermost Galilean satellite, with the Io plasma torus, and the role this interaction plays in producing ultraviolet (UV) emissions from neutral oxygen and sulfur. Io, the innermost of Jupiter's Galilean satellites, plays a unique role in the jovian magnetosphere. Neutral material that escapes from Io is ionized to form the lo torus, a dense, heavy-ion plasma that corotates with Jupiter and interacts with Io. Io supplies not only the torus, but is a major source of plasma for the entire magnetosphere. Ionization and charge-exchange of neutrals near lo strongly influences the plasma interaction, and Io's neutral atmosphere plays an important role in the generation of currents that couple Io to Jupiter. There have been no in situ measurements of the neutral density near Io, but remote observations of neutrals near lo have been performed for many years. Recent observations from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have shown detailed structure in UV emissions from neutral species near Io. Electron-impact of the neutrals by the Io torus plasma is the primary mechanism responsible for exciting these emissions. Previously, we have modeled the Io plasma environment using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, and we have shown that the interaction between Io and the plasma torus plays an important role in producing the morphology of the observed emissions. In the past year, we have extended these studies to use both UV observations and Galileo particle and field measurements to investigate the Io interaction.

  11. Earth, photographed in far-ultraviolet light with the ultraviolet camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Earth, photographed in far-ultraviolet light (1304 Angstrom) by Astronaut John W. Young, Apollo 16 commander, with the ultraviolet camera. The auroral belts 13 degrees either side of the magnetic equator can be seen crossing each other on the middle of the right side of the Earth.

  12. Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Asteroid(4) Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Bodewits, Dennis; Feaga, Lori M.; Landsman, Wayne; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Mutchler, Max J.; Russell, Christopher T.; McFadden, Lucy A.; Raymond, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    We report a comprehensive review of the UV-visible spectrum and rotational lightcurve of Vesta combining new observations by Hubble Space Telescope and Swift with archival International Ultraviolet Explorer observations. The geometric albedos of Vesta from 220 nm to 953 nm arc derived by carefully comparing these observations from various instruments at different times and observing geometries. Vesta has a rotationally averaged geometric albedo of 0.09 at 250 nm, 0.14 at 300 nm, 0.26 at 373 nm, 0.38 at 673 nm, and 0.30 at 950 nm. The linear spectral slope in the ultraviolet displays a sharp minimum ncar sub-Earth longitude of 20deg, and maximum in the eastern hemisphere. This is completely consistent with the distribution of the spectral slope in the visible wavelength. The uncertainty of the measurement in the ultraviolet is approx.20%, and in the visible wavelengths better than 10%. The amplitude of Vesta's rotational lightcurves is approx.10% throughout the range of wavelengths we observed, but is smaller at 950 nm (approx.6%) ncar the 1-micron mafic band center. Contrary to earlier reports, we found no evidence for any difference between the phasing of the ultraviolet and visible/ncar-infrared lightcurves with respect to sub-Earth longitude. Vesta's average spectrum between 220 and 950 nm can well be described by measured reflectance spectra of fine particle howardite-like materials of basaltic achondrite meteorites. Combining this with the in-phase behavior of the ultraviolet, visible. and ncar-infrared lightcurves, and the spectral slopes with respect to the rotational phase, we conclude that there is no global ultraviolet/visible reversal on Vesta. Consequently, this implies lack of global space weathering on Vesta. Keyword,: Asteroid Vesta; Spectrophotometry; Spectroscopy; Ultraviolet observations; Hubble Space Telescope observations

  13. The Roots of Beowulf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The first Beowulf Linux commodity cluster was constructed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in 1994 and its origins are a part of the folklore of high-end computing. In fact, the conditions within Goddard that brought the idea into being were shaped by rich historical roots, strategic pressures brought on by the ramp up of the Federal High-Performance Computing and Communications Program, growth of the open software movement, microprocessor performance trends, and the vision of key technologists. This multifaceted story is told here for the first time from the point of view of NASA project management.

  14. Philosophical Roots of Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovic, M.

    2008-10-01

    We shall consider the philosophical roots of cosmology in the earlier Greek philosophy. Our goal is to answer the question: Are earlier Greek theories of pure philosophical-mythological character, as often philosophers cited it, or they have scientific character. On the bases of methodological criteria, we shall contend that the latter is the case. In order to answer the question about contemporary situation of the relation philosophy-cosmology, we shall consider the next question: Is contemporary cosmology completely independent of philosophical conjectures? The answer demands consideration of methodological character about scientific status of contemporary cosmology. We also consider some aspects of the relation contemporary philosophy-cosmology.

  15. Matching roots to their environment

    PubMed Central

    White, Philip J.; George, Timothy S.; Gregory, Peter J.; Bengough, A. Glyn; Hallett, Paul D.; McKenzie, Blair M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Plants form the base of the terrestrial food chain and provide medicines, fuel, fibre and industrial materials to humans. Vascular land plants rely on their roots to acquire the water and mineral elements necessary for their survival in nature or their yield and nutritional quality in agriculture. Major biogeochemical fluxes of all elements occur through plant roots, and the roots of agricultural crops have a significant role to play in soil sustainability, carbon sequestration, reducing emissions of greenhouse gasses, and in preventing the eutrophication of water bodies associated with the application of mineral fertilizers. Scope This article provides the context for a Special Issue of Annals of Botany on ‘Matching Roots to Their Environment’. It first examines how land plants and their roots evolved, describes how the ecology of roots and their rhizospheres contributes to the acquisition of soil resources, and discusses the influence of plant roots on biogeochemical cycles. It then describes the role of roots in overcoming the constraints to crop production imposed by hostile or infertile soils, illustrates root phenotypes that improve the acquisition of mineral elements and water, and discusses high-throughput methods to screen for these traits in the laboratory, glasshouse and field. Finally, it considers whether knowledge of adaptations improving the acquisition of resources in natural environments can be used to develop root systems for sustainable agriculture in the future. PMID:23821619

  16. Ultraviolet radiation therapy and UVR dose models

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, David Robert

    2015-01-15

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been an effective treatment for a number of chronic skin disorders, and its ability to alleviate these conditions has been well documented. Although nonionizing, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is still damaging to deoxyribonucleic acid integrity, and has a number of unpleasant side effects ranging from erythema (sunburn) to carcinogenesis. As the conditions treated with this therapy tend to be chronic, exposures are repeated and can be high, increasing the lifetime probability of an adverse event or mutagenic effect. Despite the potential detrimental effects, quantitative ultraviolet dosimetry for phototherapy is an underdeveloped area and better dosimetry would allow clinicians to maximize biological effect whilst minimizing the repercussions of overexposure. This review gives a history and insight into the current state of UVR phototherapy, including an overview of biological effects of UVR, a discussion of UVR production, illness treated by this modality, cabin design and the clinical implementation of phototherapy, as well as clinical dose estimation techniques. Several dose models for ultraviolet phototherapy are also examined, and the need for an accurate computational dose estimation method in ultraviolet phototherapy is discussed.

  17. Ultraviolet Views of Enceladus, Tethys, and Dione

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. J.; Hendrix, A. R.

    2005-01-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has collected ultraviolet observations of many of Saturn's icy moons since Cassini's insertion into orbit around Saturn. We will report on results from Enceladus, Tethys and Dione, orbiting in the Saturn system at distances of 3.95, 4.88 and 6.26 Saturn radii, respectively. Icy satellite science objectives of the UVIS include investigations of surface age and evolution, surface composition and chemistry, and tenuous exospheres. We address these objectives by producing albedo maps, and reflection and emission spectra, and observing stellar occultations. UVIS has four channels: EUV: Extreme Ultraviolet (55 nm to 110 nm), FUV: Far Ultraviolet (110 to 190 nm), HSP: High Speed Photometer, and HDAC: Hydrogen-Deuterium Absorption Cell. The EUV and FUV spectrographs image onto a 2-dimensional detector, with 64 spatial rows by 1024 spectral columns. To-date we have focused primarily on the far ultraviolet data acquired with the low resolution slit width (4.8 angstrom spectral resolution). Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  18. [Health effects of ultraviolet radiation].

    PubMed

    Ohnaka, T

    1993-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) occurs from both natural and artificial sources. The main natural source is the sun. On the other hand, artificial UVR sources are widely used in industry and also used in hospitals, laboratories, etc. because of their germicidal properties. They are even used for cosmetic purposes. UVR can be classified into three regions according to its wavelength: as UVA (320-400nm), UVB (320-280nm) and UVC (280-200nm). The UVC has the greatest health effect on humans among the three. The sun radiates a wide range of spectrum of electromagnetic radiation including the UVR, however the radiation below 290 nm in wavelength does not reach the surface of the earth for effective absorption by the stratospheric ozone layer. As a result, UVR from a natural source consists of only UVA and a part of UVB. On the other hand, artificial UVR sources include UVC region and have serious effects on the human body, especially on the skin and eyes. The health effects of UVR on humans can be beneficial or detrimental, depending on the amount and form of UVR, as well as on the skin type of the individual exposed. It has been acknowledged that a long period of UVR deficiency may have harmful effects on the human body, such as the development of vitamin D deficiency and rickets in children due to a disturbance in the phosphorus and calcium metabolism. Appropriate measures to increase the amount of exposure to UVR, especially to UVB radiation by the use of sun bathing, the exposure to artificial UVR sources, etc. have shown to prevent disease states caused by UVR deficiency. The harmful effects of UVR consist of erythema, sunburn, photodamage (photoaging), photocarcinogenesis, damage to the eyes, alteration of the immune system of the skin, and chemical hypersensitivity. Skin cancer is commonly produced by UVR. In this review, various states of UV from solar radiation and the degree of exposure to UVR are introduced. The benefits and harmful health effects of

  19. Geophysical Imaging of Root Architecture and Root-soil Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Dafflon, B.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Roots play a critical role in controlling water and nutrient uptake, soil biogeochemical processes, as well as the physical anchorage for plants. While important processes, such as root hydraulic redistribution for optimal growth and survival have been recognized, representation of roots in climate models, e.g. its carbon storage, carbon resilience, root biomass, and role in regulating water and carbon fluxes across the rhizosphere and atmosphere interface is still challenging. Such a challenge is exacerbated because of the large variations of root architecture and function across species and locations due to both genetic and environmental controls and the lack of methods for quantifying root mass, distribution, dynamics and interaction with soils at field scales. The scale, complexity and the dynamic nature of plant roots call for minimally invasive methods capable of providing quantitative estimation of root architecture, dynamics over time and interactions with the soils. We present a study on root architecture and root-soil interactions using geophysical methods. Parameters and processes of interests include (1) moisture dynamics around root zone and its interaction with plant transpiration and environmental controls and (2) estimation of root structure and properties based on geophysical signals. Both pot and field scale studies were conducted. The pot scale experiments were conducted under controlled conditions and were monitored with cross-well electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), TDR moisture sensors and temperature probes. Pots with and without a tree were compared and the moisture conditions were controlled via a self regulated pumping system. Geophysical monitoring revealed interactions between roots and soils under dynamic soil moisture conditions and the role of roots in regulating the response of the soil system to changes of environmental conditions, e.g. drought and precipitation events. Field scale studies were conducted on natural trees using

  20. Perennial roots to immortality.

    PubMed

    Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2014-10-01

    Maximum lifespan greatly varies among species, and it is not strictly determined; it can change with species evolution. Clonal growth is a major factor governing maximum lifespan. In the plant kingdom, the maximum lifespans described for clonal and nonclonal plants vary by an order of magnitude, with 43,600 and 5,062 years for Lomatia tasmanica and Pinus longaeva, respectively. Nonclonal perennial plants (those plants exclusively using sexual reproduction) also present a huge diversity in maximum lifespans (from a few to thousands of years) and even more interestingly, contrasting differences in aging patterns. Some plants show a clear physiological deterioration with aging, whereas others do not. Indeed, some plants can even improve their physiological performance as they age (a phenomenon called negative senescence). This diversity in aging patterns responds to species-specific life history traits and mechanisms evolved by each species to adapt to its habitat. Particularities of roots in perennial plants, such as meristem indeterminacy, modular growth, stress resistance, and patterns of senescence, are crucial in establishing perenniality and understanding adaptation of perennial plants to their habitats. Here, the key role of roots for perennial plant longevity will be discussed, taking into account current knowledge and highlighting additional aspects that still require investigation. PMID:24563283

  1. Far ultraviolet excitation processes in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, P. D.; Opal, C. B.; Meier, R. R.; Nicolas, K. R.

    1976-01-01

    Recent observations of atomic oxygen and carbon in the far ultraviolet spectrum of comet Kohoutek have demonstrated the existence of these atomic species in the cometary coma. However, in order to identify the source of their origin, it is necessary to relate the observed ultraviolet flux to the atomic production rate. Analyses of observed OI wavelength 1304 and CI wavelength 1657 A multiplets have been carried out using high resolution solar spectra. Also examined is the possibility of observing ultraviolet fluorescence from molecules such as CO and H2, as well as resonance scattering either from atomic ions for which there are strong corresponding solar lines (CII) or from atoms for which there is an accidental wavelength coincidence (SI).

  2. GALEX 1st Light Near Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This image was taken on May 21 and 22 by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The image was made from data gathered during the missions 'first light' milestone, and shows celestial objects in the constellation Hercules. The objects shown represent those detected by the camera's near ultraviolet channel over a 5-minute period. The radial streaks at the edge of the image are due to stars reflecting from the near ultraviolet detector window.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer's first light images are dedicated to the crew of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The Hercules region was directly above Columbia when it made its last contact with NASA Mission Control on February 1, over the skies of Texas.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer launched on April 28 on a mission to map the celestial sky in the ultraviolet and determine the history of star formation in the universe over the last 10 billion years.

  3. Photoresist composition for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Felter, T. E.; Kubiak, G. D.

    1999-01-01

    A method of producing a patterned array of features, in particular, gate apertures, in the size range 0.4-0.05 .mu.m using projection lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A high energy laser beam is used to vaporize a target material in order to produce a plasma which in turn, produces extreme ultraviolet radiation of a characteristic wavelength of about 13 nm for lithographic applications. The radiation is transmitted by a series of reflective mirrors to a mask which bears the pattern to be printed. The demagnified focused mask pattern is, in turn, transmitted by means of appropriate optics and in a single exposure, to a substrate coated with photoresists designed to be transparent to EUV radiation and also satisfy conventional processing methods. A photoresist composition for extreme ultraviolet radiation of boron carbide polymers, hydrochlorocarbons and mixtures thereof.

  4. Direct ultraviolet imaging and spectroscopy of betelgeuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupree, A. K.; Stefanik, R. P.

    2013-05-01

    Direct images of Betelgeuse were obtained over a span of 4 years with the Faint Object Camera on the Hubble Space Telescope. These images reveal the extended ultraviolet continuum emission (~2 times the optical diameter), the varying overall ultraviolet flux levels and a pattern of bright surface continuum features that change in position and appearance over several months or less. Concurrent photometry and radial velocity measures support the model of a pulsating star, first discovered in the ultraviolet from IUE. Spatially resolved HST spectroscopy reveals a larger extention in chromospheric emissions of Mg II as well as the rotation of the supergiant. Changing localized subsonic flows occur in the low chromosphere that can cover a substantial fraction of the stellar disk and may initiate the mass outflow.

  5. [Changes of root biomass, root surface area, and root length density in a Populus cathayana plantation].

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Liu, Guang-quan; Li, Hong-sheng

    2010-11-01

    By using soil core method, the biomass, surface area, and length density of roots < or =2 mm and 2-5 mm in diameter in a 50-year-old Populus cathayana plantation on the northern slope of Qinling Mountains were determined during growth season. Among the roots <5 mm in diameter, those < or =2 mm and 2-5 mm in diameter accounted for 77.8% and 22.2% of the total root biomass, respectively. The surface area and length density of the roots < or =2 mm in diameter accounted for more than 97% of the total, and those of the roots 2-5 mm in diameter only occupied less than 3%. The biomass, surface area, and root length density of roots < or =2 mm in diameter decreased with soil depth, while those of the roots 2-5 mm in diameter were the least in 20-30 cm soil layer. The biomass, surface area, and length density of roots < or =2 mm in diameter were significantly correlated with soil organic matter and available nitrogen, but no significant correlations were found for the roots 2-5 mm in diameter. PMID:21360997

  6. Transgene expression in regenerated roots.

    PubMed

    Malamy, Jocelyn

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTIONThis procedure, which uses a root transformation protocol, provides a rapid method for assessing gene expression in Arabidopsis roots. It is useful for testing promoter:reporter gene constructs, for expressing genes, the overexpression of which is lethal in whole plants, and for transforming the roots of plants that are recalcitrant to conventional transformation techniques. The protocol has been used successfully with Ws, No-0, and RLD ecotypes. PMID:21357026

  7. Ultraviolet O2 transmittance - AURIC implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, G. P.; Hall, L. A.; Minschwaner, K.; Yoshino, K.; Betchley, C.; Conant, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    A new spectrally precise approach to Schumann-Runge synthesis has been devised, employing nine (9) different spectral arrays containing polynomial coefficients. The coefficients were fit to calculated cross sections obtained from a detailed Schumann-Runge model that incorporates the most recent high resolution spectroscopic data for a temperature range between 130 and 500K. This large data base is being used to reexamine the existing parameterizations of UV transmission and photolysis. In addition, it is now possible to extend atmospheric radiance codes further into the ultraviolet. Initial implementation has been accomplished for the MODTRAN code as part of the eventual development of AURIC, the Atmospheric Ultraviolet Radiance Integrated Code.

  8. Ozone/Ultraviolet-Photo-Oxidation Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Ari Ben; Agthe, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental chemical-processing system destroys waste hydrazine in water by use of ozone in ultraviolet-photo-oxidation reactor. New process reduces concentrations of hydrazines and intermediate decomposition products in effluent liquid and gas to below limit of detectability. Liquid sprayed in reaction chamber past ultraviolet lamps, against flow of oxygen and ozone. Hydrazines and intermediate decomposition products oxidized to harmless substances. Effectiveness and speed of process depends on maintenance of circulating liquid at correct pH, determines lower limit of oxidation by ozone.

  9. Far and extreme ultraviolet astronomy with ORFEUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraemer, G.; Barnstedt, J.; Eberhard, N.; Grewing, M.; Gringel, W.; Haas, C.; Kaelble, A.; Kappelmann, N.; Petrik, J.; Appenzeller, I.

    1990-01-01

    ORFEUS (Orbiting and Retrievable Far and Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrometer) is a 1 m normal incidence telescope for spectroscopic investigations of cosmic sources in the far and extreme ultraviolet spectral range. The instrument will be integrated into the freeflyer platform ASTRO-SPAS. ORFEUS-SPAS is scheduled with STS ENDEAVOUR in September 1992. We describe the telescope with its two spectrometer and their capabilities i.e., spectral range, resolution and overall sensitivity. The main classes of objects to be observed with the instrument are discussed and two examples of simulated spectra for the white dwarf HZ43 and an O9-star in LMC are shown.

  10. Plasmonic enhancement of ultraviolet fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Xiaojin

    Plasmonics relates to the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and conduction electrons at metallic interfaces or in metallic nanostructures. Surface plasmons are collective electron oscillations at a metal surface, which can be manipulated by shape, texture and material composition. Plasmonic applications cover a broad spectrum from visible to near infrared, including biosensing, nanolithography, spectroscopy, optoelectronics, photovoltaics and so on. However, there remains a gap in this activity in the ultraviolet (UV, < 400 nm), where significant opportunity exists for both fundamental and application research. Motivating factors in the study of UV Plasmonics are the direct access to biomolecular resonances and native fluorescence, resonant Raman scattering interactions, and the potential for exerting control over photochemical reactions. This dissertation aims to fill in the gap of Plasmonics in the UV with efforts of design, fabrication and characterization of aluminium (Al) and magnesium (Mg) nanostructures for the application of label-free bimolecular detection via native UV fluorescence. The first contribution of this dissertation addresses the design of Al nanostructures in the context of UV fluorescence enhancement. A design method that combines analytical analysis with numerical simulation has been developed. Performance of three canonical plasmonic structures---the dipole antenna, bullseye nanoaperture and nanoaperture array---has been compared. The optimal geometrical parameters have been determined. A novel design of a compound bullseye structure has been proposed and numerically analyzed for the purpose of compensating for the large Stokes shift typical of UV fluorescence. Second, UV lifetime modification of diffusing molecules by Al nanoapertures has been experimentally demonstrated for the first time. Lifetime reductions of ~3.5x have been observed for the high quantum yield (QY) laser dye p-terphenyl in a 60 nm diameter aperture with 50

  11. Starbursts at space ultraviolet wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, Rosa M.

    2006-06-01

    Starbursts are systems with very high star formation rate per unit area. They are the preferred place where massive stars form; the main source of thermal and mechanical heating in the interstellar medium, and the factory where the heavy elements form. Thus, starbursts play an important role in the origin and evolution of galaxies. The similarities between the physical properties of local starbursts and high-z star-forming galaxies, highlight the cosmological relevance of starbursts. On the other hand, nearby starbursts are laboratories where to study violent star formation processes and their interaction with the interstellar and intergalactic media, in detail and deeply. Starbursts are bright at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, as they are in the far-infrared, due to the ‘picket-fence’ interstellar dust distribution. After the pioneering IUE program, high spatial and spectral resolution UV observations of local starburst galaxies, mainly taken with HST and FUSE, have made relevant contributions to the following issues: The determination of the initial mass function (IMF) in violent star forming systems in low and high metallicity environments, and in dense (e.g. in stellar clusters) and diffuse environments: A Salpeter IMF with high-mass stars constrains well the UV properties. The modes of star formation: Starburst clusters are an important mode of star formation. Super-stellar clusters have properties similar to globular clusters. The role of starbursts in AGN: Nuclear starbursts can dominate the UV light in Seyfert 2 galaxies, having bolometric luminosities similar to the estimated bolometric luminosities of the obscured AGN. The interaction between massive stars and the interstellar and intergalactic media: Outflows in cold, warm and coronal phases leave their imprints on the UV

  12. A Split-Root Technique for Measuring Root Water Potential

    PubMed Central

    Adeoye, Kingsley B.; Rawlins, Stephen L.

    1981-01-01

    Water encounters various resistances in moving along a path of decreasing potential energy from the soil through the plant to the atmosphere. The reported relative magnitudes of these pathway resistances vary widely and often these results are conflicting. One reason for such inconsistency is the difficulty in measuring the potential drop across various segments of the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. The measurement of water potentials at the soil-root interface and in the root xylem of a transpiring plant remains a challenging problem. In the divided root experiment reported here, the measured water potential of an enclosed, nonabsorbing branch of the root system of young corn (Bonanza) plants to infer the water potential of the remaining roots growing in soil was used. The selected root branch of the seedling was grown in a specially constructed Teflon test tube into which a screen-enclosed thermocouple psychrometer was inserted and sealed to monitor the root's water potential. The root and its surrounding atmosphere were assumed to be in vapor equilibrium. Images PMID:16661886

  13. [A case of appendicular supplementary root with external root resorption].

    PubMed

    González Bahillo, J; Martínez Insua, A; Varela Patiño, P; Rivas Lombardero, P; Paz Pumpido, F

    1991-01-01

    The case of a lateral maxillary incisor with a supplementary root fractured by external root resorption, is presented. The role played for the periodontal disease is shown in the clinical and radiographic achievements, and their implications in the pulpal disease. Endodontic therapy was performed and the diagnosis confirmed in the specimen histological research. PMID:1858059

  14. The roots of predictivism.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Eric Christian

    2014-03-01

    In The Paradox of Predictivism (2008, Cambridge University Press) I tried to demonstrate that there is an intimate relationship between predictivism (the thesis that novel predictions sometimes carry more weight than accommodations) and epistemic pluralism (the thesis that one important form of evidence in science is the judgments of other scientists). Here I respond to various published criticisms of some of the key points from Paradox from David Harker, Jarret Leplin, and Clark Glymour. Foci include my account of predictive novelty (endorsement novelty), the claim that predictivism has two roots, the prediction per se and predictive success, and my account of why Mendeleev's predictions carried special weight in confirming the Periodic Law of the Elements. PMID:24984449

  15. New roots for agriculture: exploiting the root phenome

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Jonathan P.; Brown, Kathleen M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in root biology are making it possible to genetically design root systems with enhanced soil exploration and resource capture. These cultivars would have substantial value for improving food security in developing nations, where yields are limited by drought and low soil fertility, and would enhance the sustainability of intensive agriculture. Many of the phenes controlling soil resource capture are related to root architecture. We propose that a better understanding of the root phenome is needed to effectively translate genetic advances into improved crop cultivars. Elementary, unique root phenes need to be identified. We need to understand the ‘fitness landscape’ for these phenes: how they affect crop performance in an array of environments and phenotypes. Finally, we need to develop methods to measure phene expression rapidly and economically without artefacts. These challenges, especially mapping the fitness landscape, are non-trivial, and may warrant new research and training modalities. PMID:22527403

  16. The Lunar Phase Curve in the Near Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrix, A. R.

    2002-01-01

    We present the ultraviolet phase curve of the Moon at two wavelengths, 215 and 237 nm, as measured by the Ultraviolet Spectrometer on board the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. Compensatory Root Water Uptake of Overlapping Root Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agee, E.; Ivanov, V. Y.; He, L.; Bisht, G.; Shahbaz, P.; Fatichi, S.; Gough, C. M.; Couvreur, V.; Matheny, A. M.; Bohrer, G.

    2015-12-01

    Land-surface models use simplified representations of root water uptake based on biomass distributions and empirical functions that constrain water uptake during unfavorable soil moisture conditions. These models fail to capture the observed hydraulic plasticity that allows plants to regulate root hydraulic conductivity and zones of active uptake based on local gradients. Recent developments in root water uptake modeling have sought to increase its mechanistic representation by bridging the gap between physically based microscopic models and computationally feasible macroscopic approaches. It remains to be demonstrated whether bulk parameterization of microscale characteristics (e.g., root system morphology and root conductivity) can improve process representation at the ecosystem scale. We employ the Couvreur method of microscopic uptake to yield macroscopic representation in a coupled soil-root model. Using a modified version of the PFLOTRAN model, which represents the 3-D physics of variably saturated soil, we model a one-hectare temperate forest stand under natural and synthetic climatic forcing. Our results show that as shallow soil layers dry, uptake at the tree and stand level shift to deeper soil layers, allowing the transpiration stream demanded by the atmosphere. We assess the potential capacity of the model to capture compensatory root water uptake. Further, the hydraulic plasticity of the root system is demonstrated by the quick response of uptake to rainfall pulses. These initial results indicate a promising direction for land surface models in which significant three-dimensional information from large root systems can be feasibly integrated into the forest scale simulations of root water uptake.

  18. Determinants and Polynomial Root Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Pillis, L. G.

    2005-01-01

    A little known property of determinants is developed in a manner accessible to beginning undergraduates in linear algebra. Using the language of matrix theory, a classical result by Sylvester that describes when two polynomials have a common root is recaptured. Among results concerning the structure of polynomial roots, polynomials with pairs of…

  19. Combined ultraviolet studies of astronomical sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, A. K.; Giampapa, M. S.; Huchra, J. P.; Noyes, R. W.; Hartmann, L. W.; Raymond, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    Ultraviolet studies of astronomical sources are discussed. Some studies utilized IVE data. Non-radiative shock at the edge of the Cygnses Loop, stellar flares, local interestellar medium, hot galaxies, stellar mass ejection, contact binaries, double quasars, and stellar chromosphere and coronae are discussed.

  20. Apollo 17 ultraviolet spectrometer experiment (S-169)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fastie, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    The scientific objectives of the ultraviolet spectrometer experiment are discussed, along with design and operational details, instrument preparation and performance, and scientific results. Information gained from the experiment is given concerning the lunar atmosphere and albedo, zodiacal light, astronomical observations, spacecraft environment, and the distribution of atomic hydrogen in the solar system and in the earth's atmosphere.

  1. Ultraviolet Viewing with a Television Camera.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisner, Thomas; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reports on a portable video color camera that is fully suited for seeing ultraviolet images and offers some expanded viewing possibilities. Discusses the basic technique, specialized viewing, and the instructional value of this system of viewing reflectance patterns of flowers and insects that are invisible to the unaided eye. (CW)

  2. The Copernicus ultraviolet spectral atlas of Sirius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogerson, John B., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A near-ultraviolet spectral atlas for the A1 V star Alpha CMa (Sirius) has been prepared from data taken by the Princeton spectrometer aboard the Copernicus satellite. The spectral region from 1649 to 3170 A has been scanned with a resolution of 0.1 A. The atlas is presented in graphs, and line identifications for the absorption features have been tabulated.

  3. Photodiode-Based, Passive Ultraviolet Dosimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Gray, Perry

    2004-01-01

    Simple, passive instruments have been developed for measuring the exposure of material specimens to vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation from the Sun. Each instrument contains a silicon photodiode and a coulometer. The photocharge generated in the photodiode is stored in the coulometer. The accumulated electric charge measured by use of the coulometer is assumed to be proportional to the cumulative dose of VUV radiation expressed in such convenient units as equivalent Sun hours (ESH) [defined as the number of hours of exposure to sunlight at normal incidence]. Intended originally for use aboard spacecraft, these instruments could also be adapted to such terrestrial uses as monitoring the curing of ultraviolet-curable epoxies. Each instrument includes a photodiode and a coulometer assembly mounted on an interface plate (see figure). The photodiode assembly includes an aluminum housing that holds the photodiode, a poly(tetrafluoroehylene) cosine receptor, and a narrow-band optical filter. The cosine receptor ensures that the angular response of the instrument approximates the ideal angular response (proportional to the cosine of the angle of incidence). The filter is chosen to pass the ultraviolet wavelength of interest in a specific experiment. The photodiode is electrically connected to the coulometer. The factor of proportionality between the charge stored in the coulometer and ultraviolet dosage (in units of ESH) is established, prior to use, in calibration experiments that involve the use of lamps and current sources traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

  4. Comet Kohoutek - Ultraviolet images and spectrograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opal, C. B.; Carruthers, G. R.; Prinz, D. K.; Meier, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    Emissions of atomic oxygen (1304 A), atomic carbon (1657 A), and atomic hydrogen (1216 A) from Comet Kohoutek were observed with ultraviolet cameras carried on a sounding rocket on Jan. 8, 1974. Analysis of the Lyman alpha halo at 1216 A gave an atomic hydrogen production rate of 4.5 x 10 to the 29th atoms per second.

  5. Biological effects of ultraviolet irradiation on bees

    SciTech Connect

    Es`kov, E.K.

    1995-09-01

    The influence of natural solar and artificial ultraviolet irradiation on developing bees was studied. Lethal exposures to irradiation at different stages of development were determined. The influence of irradiation on the variability of the morphometric features of bees was revealed. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Some Thoughts on Teaching about Ultraviolet Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thumm, Walter

    1975-01-01

    Describes the major obstacles in the study of ultraviolet radiation (UV). Presents the beneficial aspects of UV such as vitamin O production, sterilization, clinical treatment of diseases and wounds, and the marking of patients for radiotherapy. Warns of the dangers of UV exposure such as skin cancer and early aging. (GS)

  7. Ultraviolet Light: Some Considerations for Vision Stimulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowlton, Marie

    1986-01-01

    The article examines evidence of visual impairment caused by excessive amounts of ultraviolet (UV) light. Among considerations when using a source of UV light for vision stimulation are the position of the child and teacher, use of window glass filters or protective glasses, and careful recordkeeping of all UV stimulation. (Author/JW)[

  8. Ultraviolet imaging and spectroscopy of planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerard, Jean-Claude

    1994-01-01

    The main scientific results of the participation of the Institute of Astrophysics (Belgium) in the NASA's Pioneer Venus mission are reported on. The data were obtained with the Pioneer Orbiter's Ultraviolet Spectrometer (POUVS). The instrument provided a morphological study of the nitric oxide ultraviolet night glow. Information concerning the altitude of the airglow emitting layer was also collected and used to constrain models of turbulent transport on the night side of the planet. Models of the odd nitrogen thermospheric chemistry and transport were developed to analyze the observations and derive the properties of the global circulation of Venus' upper atmosphere. Images of the Jovian ultraviolet aurora were obtained. The morphology and the time variations of the HI Ly-alpha and H2 Lyman and Werner bands were acquired at different longitudes. The observed distribution was compared with the results of the spectrometric observations made with the Voyager and the International Ultraviolet Explorer missions. Images concerning the Io surface albedo and Saturn's disk and ring's reflectivity were also obtained.

  9. Solar ultraviolet radiation in a changing climate

    EPA Science Inventory

    The projected large increases in damaging ultraviolet radiation as a result of global emissions of ozone-depleting substances have been forestalled by the success of the Montreal Protocol. New challenges are now arising in relation to climate change. We highlight the complex inte...

  10. ULTRAVIOLET DISINFECTION STUDIES WITH CCL LISTED MICROORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resistance to ultraviolet (UV) disinfection is an essential aspect regarding all microbial groups listed on the CCL. The U.S. drinking water industry is interested in including UV light treatment as an amendment to conventional treatment for disinfecting water supplies. UV disi...

  11. Ultraviolet Stellar Astronomy - Skylab Experiment S019

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    This chart provides information about Skylab's Ultraviolet (UV) Stellar Astronomy experiment (SO19), a scientific airlock-based facility/experiment that would study UV spectra of early-type stars and galaxies. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  12. Ultraviolet Radiation: Human Exposure and Health Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenkate, Thomas D.

    1998-01-01

    Provides an overview of human exposure to ultraviolet radiation and associated health effects as well as risk estimates for acute and chronic conditions resulting from such exposure. Demonstrates substantial reductions in health risk that can be achieved through preventive actions. Also includes a risk assessment model for skin cancer. Contains 36…

  13. Ultraviolet transition probabilities in N II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David G.

    1993-01-01

    Oscillator strengths were calculated for the ultraviolet transition array 2p sup 2 - 2p3s in the N II spectrum. Results obtained confirm that the 748 A intercombination line is usually strong as predicted by Fawcett (1987). The results of theoretical weighted oscillator strengths are considered to be reliable.

  14. Atomic Oscillator Strengths in the Vacuum Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nave, Gillian; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Szabo, Csilla I.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed techniques to measure branching fractions in the vacuum ultraviolet using diffraction grating spectroscopy and phosphor image plates as detectors. These techniques have been used to measure branching fractions in Fe II that give prominent emission lines in astrophysical objects.

  15. Microwave-driven ultraviolet light sources

    DOEpatents

    Manos, Dennis M.; Diggs, Jessie; Ametepe, Joseph D.

    2002-01-29

    A microwave-driven ultraviolet (UV) light source is provided. The light source comprises an over-moded microwave cavity having at least one discharge bulb disposed within the microwave cavity. At least one magnetron probe is coupled directly to the microwave cavity.

  16. Ultraviolet protective eyewear for Wood's light use.

    PubMed

    Herro, Elise M; Cosan, Therese; Jacob, Sharon E

    2011-01-01

    When interpreting delayed patch test reads for children suspected of having contact dermatitis, we use the Wood's light to illuminate the highlighter outlines we made at the first read. Our pediatric patients wear single-use ultraviolet protective goggles to shield their retinas, because children have a propensity to attempt to look into the Wood's lamp. PMID:21615478

  17. 21 CFR 880.6710 - Medical ultraviolet water purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet water purifier. 880.6710... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6710 Medical ultraviolet water purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet water purifier is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to destroy bacteria in water...

  18. 21 CFR 880.6710 - Medical ultraviolet water purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet water purifier. 880.6710... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6710 Medical ultraviolet water purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet water purifier is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to destroy bacteria in water...

  19. 21 CFR 880.6710 - Medical ultraviolet water purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet water purifier. 880.6710... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6710 Medical ultraviolet water purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet water purifier is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to destroy bacteria in water...

  20. 40 CFR 1065.272 - Nondispersive ultraviolet analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nondispersive ultraviolet analyzer. 1065.272 Section 1065.272 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Nondispersive ultraviolet analyzer. (a) Application. You may use a nondispersive ultraviolet (NDUV) analyzer...

  1. 21 CFR 880.6710 - Medical ultraviolet water purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet water purifier. 880.6710... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6710 Medical ultraviolet water purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet water purifier is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to destroy bacteria in water...

  2. 21 CFR 880.6500 - Medical ultraviolet air purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet air purifier. 880.6500 Section... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6500 Medical ultraviolet air purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet air purifier is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to destroy bacteria in the air by...

  3. 21 CFR 880.6500 - Medical ultraviolet air purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet air purifier. 880.6500 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6500 Medical ultraviolet air purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet...

  4. 21 CFR 872.6070 - Ultraviolet activator for polymerization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ultraviolet radiation intended to polymerize (set) resinous dental pit and fissure sealants or restorative... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultraviolet activator for polymerization. 872.6070... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6070 Ultraviolet activator...

  5. 21 CFR 878.4635 - Ultraviolet lamp for tanning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation to tan the skin. See § 1040.20 of this chapter. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for tanning. 878.4635 Section 878...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4635 Ultraviolet lamp...

  6. 21 CFR 878.4635 - Ultraviolet lamp for tanning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation to tan the skin. See § 1040.20 of this chapter. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for tanning. 878.4635 Section 878...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4635 Ultraviolet lamp...

  7. 21 CFR 872.6070 - Ultraviolet activator for polymerization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ultraviolet radiation intended to polymerize (set) resinous dental pit and fissure sealants or restorative... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultraviolet activator for polymerization. 872.6070... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6070 Ultraviolet activator...

  8. 21 CFR 878.4635 - Ultraviolet lamp for tanning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation to tan the skin. See § 1040.20 of this chapter. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for tanning. 878.4635 Section 878...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4635 Ultraviolet lamp...

  9. 21 CFR 872.6070 - Ultraviolet activator for polymerization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ultraviolet radiation intended to polymerize (set) resinous dental pit and fissure sealants or restorative... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultraviolet activator for polymerization. 872.6070... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6070 Ultraviolet activator...

  10. 21 CFR 878.4635 - Ultraviolet lamp for tanning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation to tan the skin. See § 1040.20 of this chapter. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for tanning. 878.4635 Section 878...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4635 Ultraviolet lamp...

  11. 21 CFR 872.6070 - Ultraviolet activator for polymerization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ultraviolet radiation intended to polymerize (set) resinous dental pit and fissure sealants or restorative... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultraviolet activator for polymerization. 872.6070... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6070 Ultraviolet activator...

  12. 21 CFR 878.4635 - Ultraviolet lamp for tanning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation to tan the skin. See § 1040.20 of this chapter. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for tanning. 878.4635 Section 878...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4635 Ultraviolet lamp...

  13. 21 CFR 872.6070 - Ultraviolet activator for polymerization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ultraviolet radiation intended to polymerize (set) resinous dental pit and fissure sealants or restorative... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultraviolet activator for polymerization. 872.6070... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6070 Ultraviolet activator...

  14. 21 CFR 880.6710 - Medical ultraviolet water purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet water purifier. 880.6710... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6710 Medical ultraviolet water purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet water purifier is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to destroy bacteria in water...

  15. Cassava root membrane proteome reveals activities during storage root maturation.

    PubMed

    Naconsie, Maliwan; Lertpanyasampatha, Manassawe; Viboonjun, Unchera; Netrphan, Supatcharee; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Ogasawara, Naotake; Narangajavana, Jarunya

    2016-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is one of the most important crops of Thailand. Its storage roots are used as food, feed, starch production, and be the important source for biofuel and biodegradable plastic production. Despite the importance of cassava storage roots, little is known about the mechanisms involved in their formation. This present study has focused on comparison of the expression profiles of cassava root proteome at various developmental stages using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS. Based on an anatomical study using Toluidine Blue, the secondary growth was confirmed to be essential during the development of cassava storage root. To investigate biochemical processes occurring during storage root maturation, soluble and membrane proteins were isolated from storage roots harvested from 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month-old cassava plants. The proteins with differential expression pattern were analysed and identified to be associated with 8 functional groups: protein folding and degradation, energy, metabolism, secondary metabolism, stress response, transport facilitation, cytoskeleton, and unclassified function. The expression profiling of membrane proteins revealed the proteins involved in protein folding and degradation, energy, and cell structure were highly expressed during early stages of development. Integration of these data along with the information available in genome and transcriptome databases is critical to expand knowledge obtained solely from the field of proteomics. Possible role of identified proteins were discussed in relation with the activities during storage root maturation in cassava. PMID:26547558

  16. Gravisensing in roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perbal, G.

    1999-01-01

    The mode of gravisensing in higher plants is not yet elucidated. Although, it is generally accepted that the amyloplasts (statoliths) in the root cap cells (statocytes) are responsible for susception of gravity. However, the hypothesis that the whole protoplast acts as gravisusceptor cannot be dismissed. The nature of the sensor that is able to transduce and amplify the mechanical energy into a biochemical factor is even more controversial. Several cell structures could potentially serve as gravireceptors: the endoplasmic reticulum, the actin network, the plasma membrane, or the cytoskeleton associated with this membrane. The nature of the gravisusceptors and gravisensors is discussed by taking into account the characteristics of the gravitropic reaction with respect to the presentation time, the threshold acceleration, the reciprocity rule, the deviation from the sine rule, the movement of the amyloplasts, the pre-inversion effect, the response of starch free and intermediate mutants and the effects of cytochalasin treatment. From this analysis, it can be concluded that both the amyloplasts and the protoplast could be the gravisusceptors, the former being more efficient than the latter since they can focus pressure on limited areas. The receptor should be located in the plasma membrane and could be a stretch-activated ion channel.

  17. Summary of the Workshop on Ultraviolet Cosmic Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The relationship of the ultraviolet background radiation to the X-ray background is shown. The ultraviolet background, which is four orders of magnitude brighter than the x-ray background, is much less well determined. The relationship of the ultraviolet background to the EUV background and an excellent summary of the discordant ultraviolet observations at high galactic latitudes are given. A picture of the universe from the point of view of those who study ultraviolet background radiation, with emphasis on the various sources of noise that can affect the measurements is presented. The altitudes of various observing platforms are also indicated.

  18. Root development during soil genesis: effects of root-root interactions, mycorrhizae, and substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, A.; Zaharescu, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    A major driver of soil formation is the colonization and transformation of rock by plants and associated microbiota. In turn, substrate chemical composition can also influence the capacity for plant colonization and development. In order to better define these relationships, a mesocosm study was set up to analyze the effect mycorrhizal fungi, plant density and rock have on root development, and to determine the effect of root morphology on weathering and soil formation. We hypothesized that plant-plant and plant-fungi interactions have a stronger influence on root architecture and rock weathering than the substrate composition alone. Buffalo grass (Bouteloua dactyloides) was grown in a controlled environment in columns filled with either granular granite, schist, rhyolite or basalt. Each substrate was given two different treatments, including grass-microbes and grass-microbes-mycorrhizae and incubated for 120, 240, and 480 days. Columns were then extracted and analyzed for root morphology, fine fraction, and pore water major element content. Preliminary results showed that plants produced more biomass in rhyolite, followed by schist, basalt, and granite, indicating that substrate composition is an important driver of root development. In support of our hypothesis, mycorrhizae was a strong driver of root development by stimulating length growth, biomass production, and branching. However, average root length and branching also appeared to decrease in response to high plant density, though this trend was only present among roots with mycorrhizal fungi. Interestingly, fine fraction production was negatively correlated with average root thickness and volume. There is also slight evidence indicating that fine fraction production is more related to substrate composition than root morphology, though this data needs to be further analyzed. Our hope is that the results of this study can one day be applied to agricultural research in order to promote the production of crops

  19. Random root movements in weightlessness.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, A; Karlsson, C; Iversen, T H; Chapman, D K

    1996-02-01

    The dynamics of root growth was studied in weightlessness. In the absence of the gravitropic reference direction during weightlessness, root movements could be controlled by spontaneous growth processes, without any corrective growth induced by the gravitropic system. If truly random of nature, the bending behavior should follow so-called 'random walk' mathematics during weightlessness. Predictions from this hypothesis were critically tested. In a Spacelab ESA-experiment, denoted RANDOM and carried out during the IML-2 Shuttle flight in July 1994, the growth of garden cress (Lepidium sativum) roots was followed by time lapse photography at 1-h intervals. The growth pattern was recorded for about 20 h. Root growth was significantly smaller in weightlessness as compared to gravity (control) conditions. It was found that the roots performed spontaneous movements in weightlessness. The average direction of deviation of the plants consistently stayed equal to zero, despite these spontaneous movements. The average squared deviation increased linearly with time as predicted theoretically (but only for 8-10 h). Autocorrelation calculations showed that bendings of the roots, as determined from the 1-h photographs, were uncorrelated after about a 2-h interval. It is concluded that random processes play an important role in root growth. Predictions from a random walk hypothesis as to the growth dynamics could explain parts of the growth patterns recorded. This test of the hypothesis required microgravity conditions as provided for in a space experiment. PMID:11541141

  20. Nutritional regulation of root development.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Herrera, León Francisco; Shane, Michael W; López-Bucio, José

    2015-01-01

    Mineral nutrients such as nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and iron (Fe) are essential for plant growth, development, and reproduction. Adequate provision of nutrients via the root system impacts greatly on shoot biomass and plant productivity and is therefore of crucial importance for agriculture. Nutrients are taken up at the root surface in ionic form, which is mediated by specific transport proteins. Noteworthy, root tips are able to sense the local and internal concentrations of nutrients to adjust growth and developmental processes, and ultimately, to increase or decrease the exploratory capacity of the root system. Recently, important progress has been achieved in identifying the mechanisms of nutrient sensing in wild- and cultivated species, including Arabidopsis, bean, maize, rice, lupin as well as in members of the Proteaceae and Cyperaceae families, which develop highly sophisticated root clusters as adaptations to survive in soils with very low fertility. Major findings include identification of transporter proteins and transcription factors regulating nutrient sensing, miRNAs as mobile signals and peptides as repressors of lateral root development under heterogeneous nutrient supply. Understanding the roles played by N, P, and Fe in gene expression and biochemical characterization of proteins involved in root developmental responses to homogeneous or heterogeneous N and P sources has gained additional interest due to its potential for improving fertilizer acquisition efficiency in crops. PMID:25760021

  1. SR-71 Ship #1 - Ultraviolet Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    NASA's SR-71 streaks into the twilight on a night/science flight from the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Mounted in the nose of the SR-71 was an ultraviolet video camera aimed skyward to capture images of stars, asteroids and comets. The science portion of the flight is a project of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as test beds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. One early research project flown on one of Dryden's SR-71s consisted of a proposal for a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) of the California Institute of Technology, which operates under contract to NASA in much the way that NASA centers do. In March 1993, an upward-looking ultraviolet (UV) video camera placed in the SR-71's nosebay studied a variety of celestial objects in the ultraviolet light spectrum. The SR-71 was proposed as a test bed for the experiment because it is capable of flying at altitudes above 80,000 feet for an extended length of time. Observation of ultraviolet radiation is not possible from the Earth's surface because the atmosphere's ozone layer absorbs UV rays. Study of UV radiation is important because it is known to cause skin cancer with prolonged exposure. UV radiation is also valuable to study from an astronomical perspective. Satellite study of ultraviolet radiation is very expensive. As a result, the South West Research Institute (SWRI) in Texas developed the hypothesis of using a high-flying aircraft such as the SR-71 to conduct UV observations. The SR-71 is capable of flying above 90 percent of the Earth's atmosphere. The flight program was also designed to test the stability of the aircraft as a test bed for UV observation. A joint flight program was developed between the JPL and NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in 1994) in

  2. Hypocotyl adventitious root organogenesis differs from lateral root development

    PubMed Central

    Verstraeten, Inge; Schotte, Sébastien; Geelen, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Wound-induced adventitious root (AR) formation is a requirement for plant survival upon root damage inflicted by pathogen attack, but also during the regeneration of plant stem cuttings for clonal propagation of elite plant varieties. Yet, adventitious rooting also takes place without wounding. This happens for example in etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyls, in which AR initiate upon de-etiolation or in tomato seedlings, in which AR initiate upon flooding or high water availability. In the hypocotyl AR originate from a cell layer reminiscent to the pericycle in the primary root (PR) and the initiated AR share histological and developmental characteristics with lateral roots (LRs). In contrast to the PR however, the hypocotyl is a determinate structure with an established final number of cells. This points to differences between the induction of hypocotyl AR and LR on the PR, as the latter grows indeterminately. The induction of AR on the hypocotyl takes place in environmental conditions that differ from those that control LR formation. Hence, AR formation depends on differentially regulated gene products. Similarly to AR induction in stem cuttings, the capacity to induce hypocotyl AR is genotype-dependent and the plant growth regulator auxin is a key regulator controlling the rooting response. The hormones cytokinins, ethylene, jasmonic acid, and strigolactones in general reduce the root-inducing capacity. The involvement of this many regulators indicates that a tight control and fine-tuning of the initiation and emergence of AR exists. Recently, several genetic factors, specific to hypocotyl adventitious rooting in A. thaliana, have been uncovered. These factors reveal a dedicated signaling network that drives AR formation in the Arabidopsis hypocotyl. Here we provide an overview of the environmental and genetic factors controlling hypocotyl-born AR and we summarize how AR formation and the regulating factors of this organogenesis are distinct from LR

  3. IAA transport in corn roots includes the root cap

    SciTech Connect

    Hasenstein, K.H. )

    1989-04-01

    In earlier reports we concluded that auxin is the growth regulator that controls gravicurvature in roots and that the redistribution of auxin occurs within the root cap. Since other reports did not detect auxin in the root cap, we attempted to confirm the IAA does move through the cap. Agar blocks containing {sup 3}H-IAA were applied to the cut surface of 5 mm long apical segments of primary roots of corn (mo17xB73). After 30 to 120 min radioactivity (RA) of the cap and root tissue was determined. While segments suspended in water-saturated air accumulated very little RA in the cap, application of 0.5 {mu}1 of dist. water to the cap (=controls) increased RA of the cap dramatically. Application to the cap of 0.5 {mu}1 of sorbitol or the Ca{sup 2+} chelator EGTA reduced cap RA to 46% and 70% respectively compared to water, without affecting uptake. Control root segments gravireacted faster than non-treated or osmoticum or EGTA treated segments. The data indicate that both the degree of hydration and calcium control the amount of auxin moving through the cap.

  4. Towards a multidimensional root trait framework: a tree root review.

    PubMed

    Weemstra, Monique; Mommer, Liesje; Visser, Eric J W; van Ruijven, Jasper; Kuyper, Thomas W; Mohren, Godefridus M J; Sterck, Frank J

    2016-09-01

    Contents 1159 I. 1159 II. 1161 III. 1164 IV. 1166 1167 References 1167 SUMMARY: The search for a root economics spectrum (RES) has been sparked by recent interest in trait-based plant ecology. By analogy with the one-dimensional leaf economics spectrum (LES), fine-root traits are hypothesised to match leaf traits which are coordinated along one axis from resource acquisitive to conservative traits. However, our literature review and meta-level analysis reveal no consistent evidence of an RES mirroring an LES. Instead the RES appears to be multidimensional. We discuss three fundamental differences contributing to the discrepancy between these spectra. First, root traits are simultaneously constrained by various environmental drivers not necessarily related to resource uptake. Second, above- and belowground traits cannot be considered analogues, because they function differently and might not be related to resource uptake in a similar manner. Third, mycorrhizal interactions may offset selection for an RES. Understanding and explaining the belowground mechanisms and trade-offs that drive variation in root traits, resource acquisition and plant performance across species, thus requires a fundamentally different approach than applied aboveground. We therefore call for studies that can functionally incorporate the root traits involved in resource uptake, the complex soil environment and the various soil resource uptake mechanisms - particularly the mycorrhizal pathway - in a multidimensional root trait framework. PMID:27174359

  5. Root hairs improve root penetration, root-soil contact, and phosphorus acquisition in soils of different strength.

    PubMed

    Haling, Rebecca E; Brown, Lawrie K; Bengough, A Glyn; Young, Iain M; Hallett, Paul D; White, Philip J; George, Timothy S

    2013-09-01

    Root hairs are a key trait for improving the acquisition of phosphorus (P) by plants. However, it is not known whether root hairs provide significant advantage for plant growth under combined soil stresses, particularly under conditions that are known to restrict root hair initiation or elongation (e.g. compacted or high-strength soils). To investigate this, the root growth and P uptake of root hair genotypes of barley, Hordeum vulgare L. (i.e. genotypes with and without root hairs), were assessed under combinations of P deficiency and high soil strength. Genotypes with root hairs were found to have an advantage for root penetration into high-strength layers relative to root hairless genotypes. In P-deficient soils, despite a 20% reduction in root hair length under high-strength conditions, genotypes with root hairs were also found to have an advantage for P uptake. However, in fertilized soils, root hairs conferred an advantage for P uptake in low-strength soil but not in high-strength soil. Improved root-soil contact, coupled with an increased supply of P to the root, may decrease the value of root hairs for P acquisition in high-strength, high-P soils. Nevertheless, this work demonstrates that root hairs are a valuable trait for plant growth and nutrient acquisition under combined soil stresses. Selecting plants with superior root hair traits is important for improving P uptake efficiency and hence the sustainability of agricultural systems. PMID:23861547

  6. An Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph for JIMO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrix, A. R.; Esposito, L. W.; Pryor, W. R.; Stewart, A. I. F.; McClintock, W. E.; Hansen, C. J.

    2003-01-01

    It is vital to include an ultraviolet spectrograph as part of the JIMO payload to Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. Ultraviolet measurements are key for understanding the atmospheres, auroral activity and surfaces of these icy satellites, and a UV imaging spectrograph will also complement a visible camera and near-IR spectrometer, to achieve full wavelength coverage in remote sensing of the icy satellites. The UV instrument proposed for JIMO will be similar to that currently on board the Cassini spacecraft. The design draws on the experience of building UV spectrometers for Mariner, Pioneer, Galileo and Cassini. It will have three spectrographic channels that provide images and spectra of the atmosphere, aurorae and surface: An EUV channel (800-110 nm), an FUV channel (110 to 190 nm) range, and an NUV channel (180 to 350 nm).

  7. The Morphology of Nearby Ultraviolet Galaxy Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges-Kluck, Edmund J.; Bregman, Joel N.; Cafmeyer, Julian

    2016-04-01

    We have detected diffuse ultraviolet light around highly inclined galaxies within 100 Mpc, and around galaxies within 25 Mpc we can characterize its structure. The morphology of the diffuse light often corresponds to diffuse H-alpha and X-ray emission and is found above the central regions of galaxies as well as above regions with strong star formation. In some cases, brighter regions of diffuse ultraviolet light correspond to cold dust seen with Herschel. The most plausible explanation is that we are seeing extragalactic reflection nebulae, in which case the UV light traces the dust distribution and underlying star formation. The dust masses implied by the extragalactic flux are comparable to the dust in galaxy disks; if the dust-to-gas ratio is constant, then these galaxies expel about as much gas as they contain.

  8. SUMER: Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Axford, W. I.; Curdt, W.; Gabriel, A. H.; Grewing, M.; Huber, M. C. E.; Jordan, S. D.; Kuehne, M.; Lemaire, P.; Marsch, E.

    1992-01-01

    The experiment Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) is designed for the investigations of plasma flow characteristics, turbulence and wave motions, plasma densities and temperatures, structures and events associated with solar magnetic activity in the chromosphere, the transition zone and the corona. Specifically, SUMER will measure profiles and intensities of Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) lines emitted in the solar atmosphere ranging from the upper chromosphere to the lower corona; determine line broadenings, spectral positions and Doppler shifts with high accuracy, provide stigmatic images of selected areas of the Sun in the EUV with high spatial, temporal and spectral resolution and obtain full images of the Sun and the inner corona in selectable EUV lines, corresponding to a temperature from 10,000 to more than 1,800,000 K.

  9. LUT: A lunar-based ultraviolet telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Li; Ruan, Ping; Cai, Hongbo; Deng, Jinsong; Hu, Jingyao; Jiang, Xiaojun; Liu, Zhaohui; Qiu, Yulei; Wang, Jing; Wang, Shen; Yang, Jianfeng; Zhao, Fei; Wei, Jianyan

    2011-03-01

    The Lunar-based Ultraviolet Telescope (LUT) is a funded lunar-based ultraviolet telescope dedicated to continuously monitoring variable stars for as long as dozens of days and performing low Galactic latitude sky surveys. The slow and smooth spin of the Moon makes its step by step pointing strategy possible. A flat mirror mounted on a gimbal mount is configured to enlarge the sky coverage of the LUT. A Ritchey-Chrétien telescope with a Nasmyth focus configuration is adopted to reduce the total length of the system. A UV enhanced back illuminated AIMO CCD 47-20 chip together with the low noise electric design will minimize the instrumental influence on the system. The preliminary proposal for astrometric calibration and photometric calibration are also presented.

  10. GALEX 1st Light Far Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This image was taken May 21 and 22 by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The image was made from data gathered by the far ultraviolet channel of the spacecraft camera during the mission's 'first light' milestone. It shows about 400 celestial objects, appearing in blue, detected over a 3-minute, 20-second period in the constellation Hercules.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer's first light images are dedicated to the crew of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The Hercules region was directly above Columbia when it made its last contact with NASA Mission Control on February 1, over the skies of Texas.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer launched on April 28 on a mission to map the celestial sky in the ultraviolet and determine the history of star formation in the universe over the last 10 billion years.

  11. Contact lens disinfection by ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Dolman, P.J.; Dobrogowski, M.J. )

    1989-12-15

    A 253.7-nm ultraviolet light with an intensity of 1,100 microW/cm2 was tested for its germicidal activity against contact lenses and storage solutions contaminated with various corneal pathogens. The exposure time necessary to reduce a concentration of organisms from 10(6)/ml to less than 10/ml was 30 seconds for Staphylococcus aureus, 60 seconds for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and 84 seconds for Candida albicans. The time necessary to sterilize a suspension of 10(4)/ml Acanthamoeba polyphaga was less than three minutes with this technique. Four brands of soft contact lenses were exposed to ultraviolet light for over eight hours without changing their appearance, comfort, or refraction.

  12. Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE), phase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbrayer, Robert O.

    1994-01-01

    The Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE) is a 1-meter telescope for imaging from the lunar surface the ultraviolet spectrum between 1,000 and 3,500 angstroms. There have been several endorsements of the scientific value of a LUTE. In addition to the scientific value of LUTE, its educational value and the information it can provide on the design of operating hardware for long-term exposure in the lunar environment are important considerations. This report provides the results of the LUTE phase A activity begun at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in early 1992. It describes the objective of LUTE (science, engineering, and education), a feasible reference design concept that has evolved, and the subsystem trades that were accomplished during the phase A.

  13. Ultraviolet spectroscopy of planetary nebulae: Cosmological implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferland, Gary J.

    1990-01-01

    Optical spectrophotometry of PW Vulpeculae (Nova Vul 1984 no. 1) is combined with ultraviolet data to estimate electron temperatures, densities, and abundances in the ejecta of this slow classical nova. The reddening, distance, and evolution of the ultraviolet spectrum are also discussed. Abundances are nearly solar, with the exception of Nitrogen, which is substantially higher. Although Neon has been reported to be enhanced in several novae, it does not seem to be the case for PW Vul. Photoionization model calculations are presented of the ejecta that give a reasonable match of the observed emission spectrum. A strong featureless continuum shows that very hot, presumably shock heated, gas plays a major role in determining the energetics of this nova. Emission from this hot gas is responsible for the ionization of the nebular gas. A calculation of the masses of both the hot coronal gas and the cooler nebular gas shows that the former may account for most of the mass of the ejecta.

  14. A Far Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph for Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, G. R.

    1984-01-01

    The development of the Far Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (FUVIS) Shuttle sortie missions, is described. Objectives of the experiment are to obtain spatially-resolved far-ultraviolet spectra of extraterrestrial sources, including emission-line and reflection nebulae, diffuse background radiation, extragalactic objects, and comets. The use of fast focal ratio (f/1) Schmidt optics and an opaque CsI photocathode which affords high quantum efficiency in the far-UV provides the maximum possible diffuse source sensitivity. Measured emission line intensities of 5 Rayleighs (or continua of intensity 1 R/A) in 300 sec exposures are expected. The development includes a dedicated pointing platform and a low light level television camera for payload specialist use in target acquisition and guiding.

  15. Power and Roots by Recursion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aieta, Joseph F.

    1987-01-01

    This article illustrates how questions from elementary finance can serve as motivation for studying high order powers, roots, and exponential functions using Logo procedures. A second discussion addresses a relatively unknown algorithm for the trigonometric exponential and hyperbolic functions. (PK)

  16. Ultrasonic cleaning of root canals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaagen, Bram; Boutsioukis, Christos; Jiang, Lei-Meng; Macedo, Ricardo; van der Sluis, Luc; Versluis, Michel

    2011-11-01

    A crucial step during a dental root canal treatment is irrigation, where an antimicrobial fluid is injected into the root canal system to eradicate all bacteria. Agitation of the fluid using an ultrasonically vibrating miniature file has shown significant improvement in cleaning efficacy over conventional syringe irrigation. However, the physical mechanisms underlying the cleaning process, being acoustic streaming, cavitation or chemical activity, and combinations thereof, are not fully understood. High-speed imaging allows us to visualize the flow pattern and cavitation in a root canal model at microscopic scales, at timescales relevant to the cleaning processes (microseconds). MicroPIV measurements of the induced acoustic streaming are coupled to the oscillation characteristics of the file as simulated numerically and measured with a laser vibrometer. The results give new insight into the role of acoustic streaming and the importance of the confinement for the cleaning of root canals.

  17. Root Patterns in Heterogeneous Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dara, A.; Moradi, A. B.; Carminati, A.; Oswald, S. E.

    2010-12-01

    Heterogeneous water availability is a typical characteristic of soils in which plant roots grow. Despite the intrinsic heterogeneity of soil-plant water relations, we know little about the ways how plants respond to local environmental quality. Furthermore, increasing use of soil amendments as partial water reservoirs in agriculture calls for a better understanding of plant response to soil heterogeneity. Neutron radiography is a non-invasive imaging that is highly sensitive to water and root distribution and that has high capability for monitoring spatial and temporal soil-plant water relations in heterogeneous systems. Maize plants were grown in 25 x 30 x 1 cm aluminum slabs filled with sandy soil. On the right side of the compartments a commercial water absorbent (Geohumus) was mixed with the soil. Geohumus was distributed with two patterns: mixed homogeneously with the soil, and arranged as 1-cm diameter aggregates (Fig. 1). Two irrigation treatments were applied: sufficient water irrigation and moderate water stress. Neutron radiography started 10 days after planting and has been performed twice a day for one week. At the end of the experiment, the containers were opened, the root were removed and dry root weight in different soil segments were measured. Neutron radiography showed root growth tendency towards Geohumus treated parts and preferential water uptake from Geohumus aggregates. Number and length of fine lateral roots were lower in treated areas compared to the non-treated zone and to control soil. Although corn plants showed an overall high proliferation towards the soil water sources, they decreased production of branches and fine root when water was more available near the main root parts. However there was 50% higher C allocation in roots grown in Geohumus compartments, as derived by the relative dry weight of root. The preferential C allocation in treated regions was higher when plants grew under water stress. We conclude that in addition to the

  18. Vacuum-ultraviolet laser uses superfluid helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    Vacuum ultra violet laser in wavelength around 0.800 microns is produced by using optical pumping to increase lifetimes of excited metastable molecules in super fluid helium. In method, super fluid helium is pumped electronically to produce excited HE2, and then pumped by circularly polarized 0.9096 - micron radiation to aline excited HE2 molecular spins. High power ultraviolet radiation has potential applications in molecular reaction studies, power transmission in space, and biomedical research.

  19. Cloud effects on middle ultraviolet global radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, J.; Chai, A.-T.; Mo, T.; Green, A. E. O.

    1977-01-01

    An Eppley radiometer and a Robertson-Berger sunburn meter are employed along with an all-sky camera setup to study cloud effects on middle ultraviolet global radiation at the ground level. Semiempirical equations to allow for cloud effects presented in previous work are compared with the experimental data. The study suggests a means of defining eigenvectors of cloud patterns and correlating them with the radiation at the ground level.

  20. Solar ultraviolet radiation: definitions and terminology.

    PubMed

    Matts, Paul J

    2006-01-01

    In the rapidly developing field of photobiology as it relates to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR), there is a need as never before to ensure that definitions and terminology are current, correct, and standard. This article provides a basic definition of UVR; a review of correct UVR radiometric symbols, units, and nomenclature; defines extraterrestrial and terrestrial solar UVR; and reviews the measurement of biologically effective dose of solar UVR in humans. PMID:16311162

  1. Polarization Measurements in the Vacuum Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, E. A.; Kobayashi, K.; Noble, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper will describe the VUV polarization testing of the NSSTC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph (SUMI) optics. SUMI is being developed for a sounding rocket payload to prove the feasibility of making magnetic field measurements in the transition region. This paper will cover the polarization properties of the VUV calibration polarizers, the instrumental polarization of the VUV chamber, SUMI's toroidal varied-line-space gratings and the SUMI polarimeter.

  2. Z-DNA: vacuum ultraviolet circular dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J.C.; Griffin, K.P.; Keck, P.C.; Takacs, P.Z.

    1981-08-01

    In concentrated salt or ethanolic solutions, the self-complementary copolymer poly(dG-dC)-poly(dG-dC) forms a left-handed double-helical structure that has been termed Z-DNA. The first evidence for this structure came from changes observed in the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum between 230 and 300 nm for low- and high-salt solutions. In 3 M NaCl, the CD spectrum is approximately inverted compared to the B-form spectrum observed in low salt solution. We measured the vacuum ultraviolet CD spectrum of poly(dG-dC)-poly(dG-dC) down to 180 nm under conditions in which the 230- to 300-nm spectrum is inverted. Below 200 nm, where the B form exhibits the large positive peak at 187 nm that is characteristic of right-handed double-helical DNAs, the Z form exhibits a large negative peak at 194 nm and a positive band below 186 nm. Therefore, the Z-form vacuum ultraviolet CD spectrum resembles an inverted and red-shifted B-form spectrum. The magnitudes of the differences observed between the B and Z forms in the CD spectrum below 200 nm are about 10 times greater than those observed between 230 and 300 nm. The vacuum ultraviolet CD spectrum of poly(dG-dC)-poly(dG-dC) is 3 M C/sub 2/O/sub 4/ also is inverted compared to the B-form spectrum; however, between 230 and 300 nm, it is nonconservative with a negative maximum at 290 nm and a weak positive CD signal above 300 nm, presumably reflecting differential light scattering and indicating the existence of molecular aggregates. Our results suggest that the vacuum ultraviolet CD spectrum is sensitive to the handedness of doublehelical DNA structures.

  3. Z-DNA Vacuum ultraviolet circular dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J.C.; Griffin, K.P.; Keck, P.C.; Takacs, P.Z.

    1981-08-01

    In concentrated salt or ethanolic solutions, the self-complementary copolymer poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC) forms a left-handed double-helical structure that has been termed ZDNA. The first evidence for this structure came from changes observed in the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum between 230 and 300 nm for low- and high-salt solutions (Pohl, F.M. and Jovin, T.M. (1972) J. Mol. Biol. 67, 675-696). In 3 M NaCl, the CD spectrum is approximately inverted compared to the B-form spectrum observed in low-salt solution. We measured the vacuum ultraviolet CD spectrum of poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC) down to 180 nm under conditions in which the 230 to 300 nm spectrum is inverted. Below 200 nm, where the B form exhibits the large positive peak at 187 nm that is characteristic of right-handed double-helical DNAs, the Z form exhibits a large negative peak at 194 nm and a positive band below 186 nm. Therefore, the Z-form vacuum ultraviolet CD spectrum resembles an inverted and red-shifted B-form spectrum. The magnitudes of the differences observed between the Band Z forms in the CD spectrum below 200 nm are about 10 times greater than those observed between 230 and 300 nm. The vacuum ultraviolet CD spectrum of poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC) in 3 M Cs/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ also is inverted compared to the B-form spectrum; however, between 230 and 300 nm, it is nonconservative with a negative maximum at 290 nm and a weak positive CD signal above 300 nm, presumably reflecting differential light scattering and indicating the existence of molecular aggregates. Our results suggest that the vacuum ultraviolet CD spectrum is sensitive to the handedness of double-helical DNA structures.

  4. The Copernicus ultraviolet spectral atlas Tau Scorpii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogerson, J. B., Jr.; Upson, W. L., II

    1977-01-01

    An ultraviolet spectral atlas was presented for the B0 V star, Tau Scorpii. It was scanned from 949 to 1560 A by the Princeton spectrometer aboard the Copernicus satellite. From 949 to 1420 A the observations have a nominal resolution of 0.05 A. At the longer wavelengths, the resolution was 0.1 A. The atlas was presented in both tables and graphs.

  5. The Copernicus ultraviolet spectral atlas of Vega

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogerson, John B., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A near-ultraviolet spectral atlas for the A0 V star Alpha Lyr (Vega) has been prepared from data taken by the Princeton spectrometer aboard the Copernicus satellite. The spectral region from 2000 to 3187 A has been scanned with a resolution of 0.1 A. The atlas is presented in graphs with a normalized continuum, and an identification table for the absorption features has been prepared.

  6. ANS ultraviolet observations of dwarf Cepheids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturch, C. R.; Wu, C.-C.

    1983-01-01

    Ultraviolet observations of three dwarf Cepheids (VZ Cnc, SX Phe, and AI Vel) are presented. The UV light curves are consistent with those in the visual region. When compared to standard stars, all three dwarf Cepheids exhibit flux deficiencies at the shortest observed wavelengths. The most extreme deficiencies appear for SX Phe; these may be related to the other properties previously noted for this star, including low metallicity, high space motion, and low luminosity.

  7. The ultraviolet spectrum of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. M.

    1972-01-01

    New observations of the Crab Nebula by OAO 2 stellar photometers are reported. Processed image data of the Crab give the logarithm of the integrated relative intensity per wavelength interval, corrected for sky background, and the rms error from 11 passbands in the ultraviolet range. The data are converted to logarithms of flux density per frequency interval and plotted on logarithmic scales with corrections for interstellar extinction.

  8. Rotational Variability in Ultraviolet Solar Spectral Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, M. A.; Richard, E. C.; Harder, J. W.; Thuillier, G. O.

    2011-12-01

    There are currently many observations and models of the Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) in the ultraviolet (UV). The models and the observations are often in agreement, but sometimes have significant differences. Using the decline of solar cycle 23 and the rise of solar cycle 24 as a test case, we will investigate the systematic differences between the short term SSI variation observed by satellite instruments and the predictions of proxy models.

  9. Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Science Operation Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, G. S.; Kronberg, F. A.; Meriwether, H. D.; Wong, L. S.; Grassi, C. L.

    1993-01-01

    The EUVE Science Operations Center (ESOC) is a satellite payload operations center for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer project, located on the Berkeley campus of the University of California. The ESOC has the primary responsibility for commanding the EUVE telescopes and monitoring their telemetry. The ESOC is one of a very few university-based satellite operations facilities operating with NASA. This article describes the history, operation, and advantages of the ESOC as an on-campus operations center.

  10. Large-Area Vacuum Ultraviolet Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, Shahid; Franz, David

    2012-01-01

    Pt/(n-doped GaN) Schottky-barrier diodes having active areas as large as 1 cm square have been designed and fabricated as prototypes of photodetectors for the vacuum ultraviolet portion (wavelengths approximately equal 200 nm) of the solar spectrum. In addition to having adequate sensitivity to photons in this wavelength range, these photodetectors are required to be insensitive to visible and infrared components of sunlight and to have relatively low levels of dark current.

  11. Ultraviolet spectra of R Coronae Borealis stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm, A. V.; Wu, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    An analysis of the International Ultraviolet Explorer spectra of the R CrB-type variables R CrB, RY Sgr, XX Cam, and MV Sgr suggests that: (1) it should be possible to construct useful models for the atmospheres of these hydrogen deficient, carbon rich stars if present standards of metallic line blanketing are used; and (2) the observed wavelength dependence of the circumstellar extinction is primarily due to circumstellar grains.

  12. Ultraviolet observations of solar fine structure.

    PubMed

    Dere, K P; Bartoe, J D; Brueckner, G E; Cook, J W; Socker, D G

    1987-11-27

    The High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph was flown on the Spacelab-2 shuttle mission to perform extended observations of the solar chromosphere and transition zone at high spatial and temporal resolution. Ultraviolet spectroheliograms show the temporal development of macrospicules at the solar limb. The C IV transition zone emission is produced in discrete emission elements that must be composed of exceedingly fine (less than 70 kilometers) subresolution structures. PMID:17744366

  13. Near ultraviolet photolysis of deuterated pyrrole.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Bríd; Devine, Adam L; Nix, Michael G D; Ashfold, Michael N R

    2006-08-01

    High resolution time-of-flight (TOF) measurements of the D atom fragments arising in the near ultraviolet (UV) photodissociation of deuterated pyrrole are reported. Structures evident in the measured TOF spectra are all interpretable in terms of N-D bond fission, and population of selected vibrational states of the pyrrolyl-d(4) co-fragment -- thereby clarifying previous uncertainties regarding the branching into different vibronic states of the pyrrolyl radical following UV excitation of pyrrole. PMID:16855723

  14. Root Caries in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Dick; Hyde, Susan

    2015-08-01

    Older adults are retaining an increasing number of natural teeth, and nearly half of all individuals aged 75 and older have experienced root caries. Root caries is a major cause of tooth loss in older adults, and tooth loss is the most significant negative impact on oral health-related quality of life for the elderly. The need for improved preventive efforts and treatment strategies for this population is acute. PMID:26357814

  15. The ultraviolet spectrum of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, K.; Gull, T. R.; Maran, S. P.; Stecher, T. P.; Fesen, R. A.; Parise, R. A.; Harvel, C. A.; Kafatos, M.; Trimble, V. L.

    1982-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectroscopy of the Crab Nebula done by the International Ultraviolet Explorer satellite is described, and an estimate of the carbon abundance is made, noting data reduction to remove spectral defects caused by radiation hits. The important C IV 1549, He II 1640, and semiforbidden C III 1908 emission line intensities were measured and upper limits placed on other ultraviolet features for the brightest filamentary region in the Nebula. The emission lines imply an average ionic abundance ratio n(C+2)/n(O+2) in the range from 0.4 to 1.5 in the observed gaseous condensations. The elemental abundance ratio of carbon to oxygen is probably in the same range. Analysis shows that there is no perceptible excess of carbon due to presupernova nucleosynthesis in the observed region. The large helium abundance, small carbon and oxygen abundances, and presence of a neutron star in the Crab Nebula suggest that the presupernova star had a mass close to eight solar masses.

  16. Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) observations of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, S. G.

    1993-01-01

    Ultraviolet images of several galaxies were obtained during the ASTRO-1 shuttle mission in December, 1990. The images have a FWHM angular resolution of approximately 3 arcsecond and are of circular fields approximately 40 arcminutes in diameter. Most galaxies were observed in at least two and sometimes as many as four broad bands. A very few fields were observed with narrower band filters. The most basic result of these observations is that most systems look dramatically different in the UV from their well-known optical appearances. Preliminary results of these studies will be presented. Information will be available on fields observed by the UTI during the ASTRO 1 mission; when that data becomes public it can be obtained from the NSSDC. The ASTRO observatory is expected to fly again in 1994 with approximately half of the observing time from that mission devoted to guest observers. The Ultraviolet Imaging telescope is extremely well suited for galaxy studies, and the UIT term is interested in encouraging a wide range of scientific studies by guest observers. Ultraviolet Imaging telescope is extremely well suited for galaxy studies, and the UIT team is interested in encouraging a wide range of scientific studies by guest observers.

  17. Fluoride coatings for vacuum ultraviolet reflection filters.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chun; Kong, Mingdong; Lin, Dawei; Li, Bincheng

    2015-12-10

    LaF3/MgF2 reflection filters with a high spectral-discrimination capacity of the atomic-oxygen lines at 130.4 and 135.6 nm, which were employed in vacuum ultraviolet imagers, were prepared by molybdenum-boat thermal evaporation. The optical properties of reflection filters were characterized by a high-precision vacuum ultraviolet spectrophotometer. The vulnerability of the filter's microstructures to environmental contamination and the recovery of the optical properties of the stored filter samples with ultraviolet ozone cleaning were experimentally demonstrated. For reflection filters with the optimized nonquarter-wave multilayer structures, the reflectance ratios R135.6 nm/R130.4 nm of 92.7 and 20.6 were achieved for 7° and 45° angles of incidence, respectively. On the contrary, R135.6 nm/R130.4 nm ratio of 12.4 was obtained for a reflection filter with a standard π-stack multilayer structure with H/L=1/4 at 7° AOI. PMID:26836877

  18. GALEX 1st Light Near Ultraviolet -50

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This image was taken May 21 and 22 by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The image was made from data gathered by the two channels of the spacecraft camera during the mission's 'first light' milestone. It shows about 50 celestial objects in the constellation Hercules. The reddish objects represent those detected by the camera's near ultraviolet channel over a 5-minute period, while bluish objects were detected over a 3-minute period by the camera's far ultraviolet channel. Deeper imaging may confirm the apparent existence in this field of galaxy pairs and triplets or individual star formation regions in single galaxies.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer's first light images are dedicated to the crew of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The Hercules region was directly above Columbia when it made its last contact with NASA Mission Control on February 1, over the skies of Texas.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer launched on April 28 on a mission to map the celestial sky in the ultraviolet and determine the history of star formation in the universe over the last 10 billion years.

  19. Future ultraviolet experiments, including FUSE/COLUMBUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggess, A.

    1984-01-01

    Several new facilities for ultraviolet astronomy are under construction or study for launch within the coming decade. These include the Hubble Space Telescope to be launched in 1986 with instruments for spectroscopy, imaging, and photopolarimetry in the ultraviolet; the ASTRO Spacelab payload, also to be launched in 1986 with a similar range of instrumentation; STARLAB, a combined Canadian, Australian and U.S. mission concentrating primarily on imagery; and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), which was renamed COLUMBUS. COLUMBUS is currently under study by NASA and ESA as a future joint mission for spectroscopic studies of astrophysical plasmas covering a temperature range from approximately 10 to the 3rd power to approximately 10 to the 7th power k. In order to achieve this objective, the optics should be optimized for wavelengths below 1200 Angstroms, with a total wavelength range from approximately 2000 to approximately 100 Angstroms. The operational concept will be based on experience with IUE, but changes in communications techniques since IUE was designed suggest some interesting new approaches to observing.

  20. Is N=8 Supergravity Ultraviolet Finite?

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Zvi; Dixon, Lance J.; Roiban, Radu

    2006-11-15

    Conventional wisdom holds that no four-dimensional gravity field theory can be ultraviolet finite. This understanding is based mainly on power counting. Recent studies confirm that one-loop N = 8 supergravity amplitudes satisfy the so-called 'no-triangle hypothesis', which states that triangle and bubble integrals cancel from these amplitudes. A consequence of this hypothesis is that for any number of external legs, at one loop N = 8 supergravity and N = 4 super-Yang-Mills have identical superficial degrees of ultraviolet behavior in D dimensions. We describe how the unitarity method allows us to promote these one-loop cancellations to higher loops, suggesting that previous power counts were too conservative. We discuss higher-loop evidence suggesting that N = 8 supergravity has the same degree of divergence as N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory and is ultraviolet finite in four dimensions. We comment on calculations needed to reinforce this proposal, which are feasible using the unitarity method.

  1. Effect of parameter choice in root water uptake models - the arrangement of root hydraulic properties within the root architecture affects dynamics and efficiency of root water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechmann, M.; Schneider, C.; Carminati, A.; Vetterlein, D.; Attinger, S.; Hildebrandt, A.

    2014-10-01

    Detailed three-dimensional models of root water uptake have become increasingly popular for investigating the process of root water uptake. However, they suffer from a lack of information on important parameters, particularly on the spatial distribution of root axial and radial conductivities, which vary greatly along a root system. In this paper we explore how the arrangement of those root hydraulic properties and branching within the root system affects modelled uptake dynamics, xylem water potential and the efficiency of root water uptake. We first apply a simple model to illustrate the mechanisms at the scale of single roots. By using two efficiency indices based on (i) the collar xylem potential ("effort") and (ii) the integral amount of unstressed root water uptake ("water yield"), we show that an optimal root length emerges, depending on the ratio between roots axial and radial conductivity. Young roots with high capacity for radial uptake are only efficient when they are short. Branching, in combination with mature transport roots, enables soil exploration and substantially increases active young root length at low collar potentials. Second, we investigate how this shapes uptake dynamics at the plant scale using a comprehensive three-dimensional root water uptake model. Plant-scale dynamics, such as the average uptake depth of entire root systems, were only minimally influenced by the hydraulic parameterization. However, other factors such as hydraulic redistribution, collar potential, internal redistribution patterns and instantaneous uptake depth depended strongly on the arrangement on the arrangement of root hydraulic properties. Root systems were most efficient when assembled of different root types, allowing for separation of root function in uptake (numerous short apical young roots) and transport (longer mature roots). Modelling results became similar when this heterogeneity was accounted for to some degree (i.e. if the root systems contained between

  2. Photoreactivation and ultraviolet-enhanced reactivation of ultraviolet-irradiated nuclear polyhedrosis virus by insect cells.

    PubMed

    Witt, D J

    1984-01-01

    The nuclear polyhedrosis virus (Baculovirus) of Galleria mellonella (Pryalidae: Lepidoptera) was used to investigate the capability of cultured insect cells to repair ultraviolet (UV) induced damage in the viral genome. When assayed by the formation of plaques in the cell line TN-368, the survival of the virus was found to decrease linearly with increased ultraviolet exposure. The infectious capacity of UV-irradiated virions was significantly restored after exposing the TN-368 monolayers to either photoreactivation conditions (white fluorescent and black light) or to UV-enhanced reactivation conditions (far ultraviolet radiation). Using both types of repair sequentially resulted in higher reactivation than when either was used alone. These results indicate that pyrimidine dimers are the major factor responsible for inactivation of this virus by UV radiation but that other photolesions not repairable by photoreactivation partially account for the inactivation of the virus. PMID:6365037

  3. An Evaluation of Root Phytochemicals Derived from Althea officinalis (Marshmallow) and Astragalus membranaceus as Potential Natural Components of UV Protecting Dermatological Formulations.

    PubMed

    Curnow, Alison; Owen, Sara J

    2016-01-01

    As lifetime exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation has risen, the deleterious effects have also become more apparent. Numerous sunscreen and skincare products have therefore been developed to help reduce the occurrence of sunburn, photoageing, and skin carcinogenesis. This has stimulated research into identifying new natural sources of effective skin protecting compounds. Alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) was employed to assess aqueous extracts derived from soil or hydroponically glasshouse-grown roots of Althea officinalis (Marshmallow) and Astragalus membranaceus, compared with commercial, field-grown roots. Hydroponically grown root extracts from both plant species were found to significantly reduce UVA-induced DNA damage in cultured human lung and skin fibroblasts, although initial Astragalus experimentation detected some genotoxic effects, indicating that Althea root extracts may be better suited as potential constituents of dermatological formulations. Glasshouse-grown soil and hydroponic Althea root extracts afforded lung fibroblasts with statistically significant protection against UVA irradiation for a greater period of time than the commercial field-grown roots. No significant reduction in DNA damage was observed when total ultraviolet irradiation (including UVB) was employed (data not shown), indicating that the extracted phytochemicals predominantly protected against indirect UVA-induced oxidative stress. Althea phytochemical root extracts may therefore be useful components in dermatological formulations. PMID:26953144

  4. An Evaluation of Root Phytochemicals Derived from Althea officinalis (Marshmallow) and Astragalus membranaceus as Potential Natural Components of UV Protecting Dermatological Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Curnow, Alison; Owen, Sara J.

    2016-01-01

    As lifetime exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation has risen, the deleterious effects have also become more apparent. Numerous sunscreen and skincare products have therefore been developed to help reduce the occurrence of sunburn, photoageing, and skin carcinogenesis. This has stimulated research into identifying new natural sources of effective skin protecting compounds. Alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) was employed to assess aqueous extracts derived from soil or hydroponically glasshouse-grown roots of Althea officinalis (Marshmallow) and Astragalus membranaceus, compared with commercial, field-grown roots. Hydroponically grown root extracts from both plant species were found to significantly reduce UVA-induced DNA damage in cultured human lung and skin fibroblasts, although initial Astragalus experimentation detected some genotoxic effects, indicating that Althea root extracts may be better suited as potential constituents of dermatological formulations. Glasshouse-grown soil and hydroponic Althea root extracts afforded lung fibroblasts with statistically significant protection against UVA irradiation for a greater period of time than the commercial field-grown roots. No significant reduction in DNA damage was observed when total ultraviolet irradiation (including UVB) was employed (data not shown), indicating that the extracted phytochemicals predominantly protected against indirect UVA-induced oxidative stress. Althea phytochemical root extracts may therefore be useful components in dermatological formulations. PMID:26953144

  5. Plant root-microbe communication in shaping root microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Lareen, Andrew; Burton, Frances; Schäfer, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    A growing body of research is highlighting the impacts root-associated microbial communities can have on plant health and development. These impacts can include changes in yield quantity and quality, timing of key developmental stages and tolerance of biotic and abiotic stresses. With such a range of effects it is clear that understanding the factors that contribute to a plant-beneficial root microbiome may prove advantageous. Increasing demands for food by a growing human population increases the importance and urgency of understanding how microbiomes may be exploited to increase crop yields and reduce losses caused by disease. In addition, climate change effects may require novel approaches to overcoming abiotic stresses such as drought and salinity as well as new emerging diseases. This review discusses current knowledge on the formation and maintenance of root-associated microbial communities and plant-microbe interactions with a particular emphasis on the effect of microbe-microbe interactions on the shape of microbial communities at the root surface. Further, we discuss the potential for root microbiome modification to benefit agriculture and food production. PMID:26729479

  6. Root anatomical phenes predict root penetration ability and biomechanical properties in maize (Zea Mays)

    PubMed Central

    Chimungu, Joseph G.; Loades, Kenneth W.; Lynch, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of roots to penetrate hard soil is important for crop productivity but specific root phenes contributing to this ability are poorly understood. Root penetrability and biomechanical properties are likely to vary in the root system dependent on anatomical structure. No information is available to date on the influence of root anatomical phenes on root penetrability and biomechanics. Root penetration ability was evaluated using a wax layer system. Root tensile and bending strength were evaluated in plant roots grown in the greenhouse and in the field. Root anatomical phenes were found to be better predictors of root penetrability than root diameter per se and associated with smaller distal cortical region cell size. Smaller outer cortical region cells play an important role in stabilizing the root against ovalization and reducing the risk of local buckling and collapse during penetration, thereby increasing root penetration of hard layers. The use of stele diameter was found to be a better predictor of root tensile strength than root diameter. Cortical thickness, cortical cell count, cortical cell wall area and distal cortical cell size were stronger predictors of root bend strength than root diameter. Our results indicate that root anatomical phenes are important predictors for root penetrability of high-strength layers and root biomechanical properties. PMID:25903914

  7. How Can Science Education Foster Students' Rooting?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Østergaard, Edvin

    2015-01-01

    The question of how to foster rooting in science education points towards a double challenge; efforts to "prevent" (further) uprooting and efforts to "promote" rooting/re-rooting. Wolff-Michael Roth's paper discusses the uprooting/rooting pair of concepts, students' feeling of alienation and loss of fundamental sense of the…

  8. The Special Sensor Ultraviolet Limb Imager (SSULI): An Ultraviolet Sensor of the Thermospheric and Ionospheric States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymond, K. F.; Thonnard, S. E.; Nicholas, A. C.; Budzien, S. A.; McCoy, R. P.

    2004-12-01

    We present a brief overview of the Special Sensor Ultraviolet Limb Imager (SSULI) ultraviolet remote sensor that is currently in operation aboard the Defense Meteorlogical Satellite Program's F-16 satellite. The satellite is an a sun-synchronous orbit at 0730 local time, at a 98° inclination, and a circular orbit at an altitude of ˜840 km. The instrument has been operating since mid-October 2003. We present an overview of the instrument's capabilities, its measurement goals, and some of the data that are being used for basic research.

  9. Ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy of the solar corona at the Naval Research Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Moses, J D; Ko, Y-K; Laming, J M; Provornikova, E A; Strachan, L; Beltran, S Tun

    2015-11-01

    We review the history of ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy with a specific focus on such activities at the Naval Research Laboratory and on studies of the extended solar corona and solar-wind source regions. We describe the problem of forecasting solar energetic particle events and discuss an observational technique designed to solve this problem by detecting supra-thermal seed particles as extended wings on spectral lines. Such seed particles are believed to be a necessary prerequisite for particle acceleration by heliospheric shock waves driven by a coronal mass ejection. PMID:26560611

  10. MES Buffer Affects Arabidopsis Root Apex Zonation and Root Growth by Suppressing Superoxide Generation in Root Apex

    PubMed Central

    Kagenishi, Tomoko; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František

    2016-01-01

    In plants, growth of roots and root hairs is regulated by the fine cellular control of pH and reactive oxygen species (ROS). MES, 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid as one of the Good’s buffers has broadly been used for buffering medium, and it is thought to suit for plant growth with the concentration at 0.1% (w/v) because the buffer capacity of MES ranging pH 5.5–7.0 (for Arabidopsis, pH 5.8). However, many reports have shown that, in nature, roots require different pH values on the surface of specific root apex zones, namely meristem, transition zone, and elongation zone. Despite the fact that roots always grow on a media containing buffer molecule, little is known about impact of MES on root growth. Here, we have checked the effects of different concentrations of MES buffer using growing roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results show that 1% of MES significantly inhibited root growth, the number of root hairs and length of meristem, whereas 0.1% promoted root growth and root apex area (region spanning from the root tip up to the transition zone). Furthermore, superoxide generation in root apex disappeared at 1% of MES. These results suggest that MES disturbs normal root morphogenesis by changing the ROS homeostasis in root apex. PMID:26925066

  11. MES Buffer Affects Arabidopsis Root Apex Zonation and Root Growth by Suppressing Superoxide Generation in Root Apex.

    PubMed

    Kagenishi, Tomoko; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František

    2016-01-01

    In plants, growth of roots and root hairs is regulated by the fine cellular control of pH and reactive oxygen species (ROS). MES, 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid as one of the Good's buffers has broadly been used for buffering medium, and it is thought to suit for plant growth with the concentration at 0.1% (w/v) because the buffer capacity of MES ranging pH 5.5-7.0 (for Arabidopsis, pH 5.8). However, many reports have shown that, in nature, roots require different pH values on the surface of specific root apex zones, namely meristem, transition zone, and elongation zone. Despite the fact that roots always grow on a media containing buffer molecule, little is known about impact of MES on root growth. Here, we have checked the effects of different concentrations of MES buffer using growing roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results show that 1% of MES significantly inhibited root growth, the number of root hairs and length of meristem, whereas 0.1% promoted root growth and root apex area (region spanning from the root tip up to the transition zone). Furthermore, superoxide generation in root apex disappeared at 1% of MES. These results suggest that MES disturbs normal root morphogenesis by changing the ROS homeostasis in root apex. PMID:26925066

  12. Five-color band ultraviolet photometry of fourteen close binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Y.; Mccluskey, G. E.; Wu, C.-C.

    1981-01-01

    Photometric observations obtained with the Astronomical Netherlands Satellite in five ultraviolet wavelength regions for 14 close binaries are presented. Strong excess far-ultraviolet flux is detected in four objects. The binaries TT Hya, RX Cas, and SX Cas exhibit a pronounced excess of far-ultraviolet flux, which is thought to be the result of mass transfer phenomena in these systems. Observations of the binary R Ara show very peculair variations; its far ultraviolet flux at 1550 A brightened by 0.4 mag between phases 0.7 and 0.8, while its near ultraviolet flux at 3300 A decreased by 0.5 mag over this same half-day interval. The A0 II-III component in the system RZ Sct is seen to dominate the ultraviolet spectrum.

  13. Effect of ultraviolet radiation on chlorophyll, carotenoid, protein and proline contents of some annual desert plants.

    PubMed

    Salama, Hediat M H; Al Watban, Ahlam A; Al-Fughom, Anoud T

    2011-01-01

    Investigation was carried out to find whether enhanced ultraviolet radiation influences the Malva parviflora L., Plantago major L., Rumex vesicarius L. and Sismbrium erysimoids Desf. of some annual desert plants. The seeds were grown in plastic pots equally filled with a pre-sieved normal sandy soil for 1 month. The planted pots from each species were randomly divided into equal groups (three groups). Plants of the first group exposed to white-light tubes (400-700 nm) 60 w and UV (365 nm) 8 w tubes. The second group was exposed to white-light tubes (400-700 nm) 60 w and UV (302 nm) 8 w tubes. The third group was exposed to white-light tubes (400-700 nm) 60 w and UV (254 nm) 8 w tubes, respectively, for six days. The results indicated that the chlorophyll contents were affected by enhanced UV radiation. The chlorophyll a, b, and total contents were decreased compared with the control values and reduced with the enhanced UV radiation, but the carotenoid was increased compared with the control and also reduced with the enhanced UV radiation. So, the contents of chlorophylls varied considerably. M. parviflora showed the highest constitutive levels of accumulated chlorophyll a, b, and total chlorophyll (0.463, 0.307 and 0.774 mg g(-1) f w) among the investigated plant species. P. major showed the lowest constitutive levels of the chloroplast pigments, 0.0036, 0.0038 and 0.0075 mg g(-1) f w for chlorophyll a, b, and total chlorophyll at UV-365 nm, respectively. The protein content was decreased significantly in both root and shoot systems compared with the control values but, it was increased with increasing wave lengths of UV-radiation of all tested plants. R. vesicarius showed the highest protein contents among the investigated plants; its content was 3.8 mg g(-1) f w at UV-365 nm in shoot system. On the other hand, decreasing ultraviolet wave length induced a highly significant increase in the level of proline in both root and shoot of all

  14. Root traits for infertile soils

    PubMed Central

    White, Philip J.; George, Timothy S.; Dupuy, Lionel X.; Karley, Alison J.; Valentine, Tracy A.; Wiesel, Lea; Wishart, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Crop production is often restricted by the availability of essential mineral elements. For example, the availability of N, P, K, and S limits low-input agriculture, the phytoavailability of Fe, Zn, and Cu limits crop production on alkaline and calcareous soils, and P, Mo, Mg, Ca, and K deficiencies, together with proton, Al and Mn toxicities, limit crop production on acid soils. Since essential mineral elements are acquired by the root system, the development of crop genotypes with root traits increasing their acquisition should increase yields on infertile soils. This paper examines root traits likely to improve the acquisition of these elements and observes that, although the efficient acquisition of a particular element requires a specific set of root traits, suites of traits can be identified that benefit the acquisition of a group of mineral elements. Elements can be divided into three Groups based on common trait requirements. Group 1 comprises N, S, K, B, and P. Group 2 comprises Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn, and Ni. Group 3 contains mineral elements that rarely affect crop production. It is argued that breeding for a limited number of distinct root ideotypes, addressing particular combinations of mineral imbalances, should be pursued. PMID:23781228

  15. Electrotropism of Maize Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Hideo; Evans, Michael L.

    1990-01-01

    We examined the kinetics of electrotropic curvature in solutions of low electrolyte concentration using primary roots of maize (Zea mays L., variety Merit). When submerged in oxygenated solution across which an electric field was applied, the roots curved rapidly and strongly toward the positive electrode (anode). The strength of the electrotropic response increased and the latent period decreased with increasing field strength. At a field strength of 7.5 volts per centimeter the latent period was 6.6 minutes and curvature reached 60 degrees in about 1 hour. For electric fields greater than 10 volts per centimeter the latent period was less than 1 minute. There was no response to electric fields less than 2.8 volts per centimeter. Both electrotropism and growth were inhibited when indoleacetic acid (10 micromolar) was included in the medium. The auxin transport inhibitor pyrenoylbenzoic acid strongly inhibited electrotropism without inhibiting growth. Electrotropism was enhanced by treatments that interfere with gravitropism, e.g. decapping the roots or pretreating them with ethyleneglycol-bis-[β-ethylether]-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid. Similarly, roots of agravitropic pea (Pisum sativum, variety Ageotropum) seedlings were more responsive to electrotropic stimulation than roots of normal (variety Alaska) seedlings. The data indicate that the early steps of gravitropism and electrotropism occur by independent mechanisms. However, the motor mechanisms of the two responses may have features in common since auxin and auxin transport inhibitors reduced both gravitropism and electrotropism. PMID:11537481

  16. Magnetophoretic Induction of Root Curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, Karl H.

    1997-01-01

    The last year of the grant period concerned the consolidation of previous experiments to ascertain that the theoretical premise apply not just to root but also to shoots. In addition, we verified that high gradient magnetic fields do not interfere with regular cellular activities. Previous results have established that: (1) intracellular magnetophoresis is possible; and (2) HGMF lead to root curvature. In order to investigate whether HGMF affect the assembly and/or organization of structural proteins, we examined the arrangement of microtubules in roots exposed to HGMF. The cytoskeletal investigations were performed with fomaldehyde-fixed, nonembedded tissue segments that were cut with a vibratome. Microtubules (MTs) were stained with rat anti-yeast tubulin (YOL 1/34) and DTAF-labeled antibody against rat IgG. Microfilaments (MFs) were visualized by incubation in rhodamine-labeled phalloidin. The distribution and arrangement of both components of the cytoskeleton were examined with a confocal microscope. Measurements of growth rates and graviresponse were done using a video-digitizer. Since HGMF repel diamagnetic substances including starch-filled amyloplasts and most The second aspect of the work includes studies of the effect of cytoskeletal inhibitors on MTs and MFs. The analysis of the effect of micotubular inhibitors on the auxin transport in roots showed that there is very little effect of MT-depolymerizing or stabilizing drugs on auxin transport. This is in line with observations that application of such drugs is not immediately affecting the graviresponsiveness of roots.

  17. Nitrosoguanidine and ultraviolet light mutagenesis in Eudorina elegans (chlorophyceae)

    SciTech Connect

    Toby, A.L.; Kemp, C.L.

    1980-06-01

    Reversion of an acetate requiring strain and the induction of sectored colonies are used to establish optimal conditions for nitrosoguanidine and ultraviolet light mutagenesis in Eudorina elegans Ehrenberg. Nitrosoguanidine is more effective in causing reversion of the acetate requiring strain and inducing auxotrophs. Morphogenetic mutants are more readily induced by ultraviolet light. The effectiveness of ultraviolet light as a mutagen is cell cycle dependent whereas the mutagenic action of nitrosoguanidine is not.

  18. Cosmic far ultraviolet background. [observations for intergalactic medium properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidsen, A.; Bowyer, S.; Lampton, M.

    1974-01-01

    The expected intensities of various possible components of the far ultraviolet background are discussed. It is concluded that existing results do not place interesting constraints on the density of the intergalactic medium (IGM). Current techniques and instrumentation for far ultraviolet astronomy are, however, sufficient to achieve vastly improved limits. New observations are required to determine whether the IGM can be detected in the far ultraviolet or whether the extragalactic component of the background is masked by radiation with a more local origin.

  19. Inhibition of Seagrass Photosynthesis by Ultraviolet-B Radiation 1

    PubMed Central

    Trocine, Robert P.; Rice, John D.; Wells, Gary N.

    1981-01-01

    Effects of ultraviolet-B radiation on the photosynthesis of seagrasses (Halophila engelmanni Aschers, Halodule wrightii Aschers, and Syringodium filiforme Kütz) were examined. The intrinsic tolerance of each seagrass to ultraviolet-B, the presence and effectiveness of photorepair mechanisms to ultraviolet-B-induced photosynthetic inhibition, and the role of epiphytic growth as a shield from ultraviolet-B were investigated. Halodule was found to possess the greatest photosynthetic tolerance for ultraviolet-B. Photosynthesis in Syringodium was slightly more sensitive to ultraviolet-B while Halophila showed relatively little photosynthetic tolerance. Evidence for a photorepair mechanism was found only in Halodule. This mechanism effectively attenuated photosynthetic inhibition induced by ultraviolet-B dose rates and dosages in excess of natural conditions. Syringodium appeared to rely primarily on a thick epidermal cell layer to reduce photosynthetic damage. Halophila seemed to have no morphological or photorepair capabilities to deal with ultraviolet-B. This species appeared to rely on epiphytic and detrital shielding and the shade provided by other seagrasses to reduce ultraviolet-B irradiation to tolerable levels. The presence of epiphytes on leaf surfaces was found to reduce the extent of photosynthetic inhibition from ultraviolet-B exposure in all species. Observations obtained in this study seem to suggest the possibility of anthocyanin and/or other flavonoid synthesis as an adaptation to long term ultraviolet-B irradiation by these species. In addition, Halophila appears to obtain an increased photosynthetic tolerance to ultraviolet-B as an indirect benefit of chloroplast clumping to avoid photo-oxidation by intense levels of photosynthetically active radiation. Images PMID:16661893

  20. Varying sensitivity of human skin fibroblasts to polychromatic ultraviolet light.

    PubMed

    Zamansky, G B

    1986-03-01

    The inactivation of normal and xeroderma pigmentosum cells has been compared following exposure to environmentally relevant wavelengths of ultraviolet light or to the more commonly investigated 254-nm ultraviolet light. The sensitivity of xeroderma pigmentosum cells to polychromatic long-wavelength ultraviolet light was greatly lower than that observed using 254-nm light. Such variations in the relative sensitivities of normal and xeroderma pigmentosum cells support the likelihood that the lesions which contribute to cellular alterations induced by solar wavelengths of ultraviolet light are different from those which predominate at 254 nm. PMID:3951456

  1. Mexoryl: a review of an ultraviolet a filter.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Gehaan; Evans, Gregory R D

    2007-09-15

    It is widely known that ultraviolet light causes skin damage and melanoma. Different wavelengths of ultraviolet light penetrate the skin at different depths, causing varying levels of damage. Higher wavelengths tend to penetrate deeper and, consequently, are thought to induce a myriad of skin conditions, thereby playing a significant role in the photoaging process. Sunscreens containing the ultraviolet A blocker Mexoryl are important in impeding ultraviolet A light, potentially reducing many of the characteristics of skin aging and preventing biochemical changes that can lead to nonmelanoma carcinoma. Until now, sunscreen products sold in the United States focused on blocking ultraviolet B light. Those that did provide ultraviolet A filtering contained physical blocks (zinc oxide or titanium dioxide) or the chemical block Parsol 1789 (avobenzone). These broad-spectrum sunscreens have limitations, such as degradation under ultraviolet exposure, that resulted in decreased effectiveness. Mexoryl, a novel ultraviolet A filter, provides efficient ultraviolet A coverage, better photostability, and enhanced water resistance. Sunscreens containing Mexoryl are widely used in Europe and Canada. It was not until July 24, 2006, that the U.S. Food and Drug Association approved the compound. PMID:17805138

  2. Descendant root volume varies as a function of root type: estimation of root biomass lost during uprooting in Pinus pinaster

    PubMed Central

    Danjon, Frédéric; Caplan, Joshua S.; Fortin, Mathieu; Meredieu, Céline

    2013-01-01

    Root systems of woody plants generally display a strong relationship between the cross-sectional area or cross-sectional diameter (CSD) of a root and the dry weight of biomass (DWd) or root volume (Vd) that has grown (i.e., is descendent) from a point. Specification of this relationship allows one to quantify root architectural patterns and estimate the amount of material lost when root systems are extracted from the soil. However, specifications of this relationship generally do not account for the fact that root systems are comprised of multiple types of roots. We assessed whether the relationship between CSD and Vd varies as a function of root type. Additionally, we sought to identify a more accurate and time-efficient method for estimating missing root volume than is currently available. We used a database that described the 3D root architecture of Pinus pinaster root systems (5, 12, or 19 years) from a stand in southwest France. We determined the relationship between CSD and Vd for 10,000 root segments from intact root branches. Models were specified that did and did not account for root type. The relationships were then applied to the diameters of 11,000 broken root ends to estimate the volume of missing roots. CSD was nearly linearly related to the square root of Vd, but the slope of the curve varied greatly as a function of root type. Sinkers and deep roots tapered rapidly, as they were limited by available soil depth. Distal shallow roots tapered gradually, as they were less limited spatially. We estimated that younger trees lost an average of 17% of root volume when excavated, while older trees lost 4%. Missing volumes were smallest in the central parts of root systems and largest in distal shallow roots. The slopes of the curves for each root type are synthetic parameters that account for differentiation due to genetics, soil properties, or mechanical stimuli. Accounting for this differentiation is critical to estimating root loss accurately. PMID

  3. The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope: The Final Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, William V.; Blair, William P.; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Romelfanger, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) was a 0.9 m telescope and moderate-resolution (Delta)lambda equals 3 A) far-ultraviolet (820-1850 Å) spectrograph that flew twice on the space shuttle, in 1990 December (Astro-1, STS-35) and 1995 March (Astro-2, STS-67). The resulting spectra were originally archived in a nonstandard format that lacked important descriptive metadata. To increase their utility, we have modified the original datareduction software to produce a new and more user-friendly data product, a time-tagged photon list similar in format to the Intermediate Data Files (IDFs) produced by the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer calibration pipeline. We have transferred all relevant pointing and instrument-status information from locally-archived science and engineering databases into new FITS header keywords for each data set. Using this new pipeline, we have reprocessed the entire HUT archive from both missions, producing a new set of calibrated spectral products in a modern FITS format that is fully compliant with Virtual Observatory requirements. For each exposure, we have generated quicklook plots of the fully-calibrated spectrum and associated pointing history information. Finally, we have retrieved from our archives HUT TV guider images, which provide information on aperture positioning relative to guide stars, and converted them into FITS-format image files. All of these new data products are available in the new HUT section of the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST), along with historical and reference documents from both missions. In this article, we document the improved data-processing steps applied to the data and show examples of the new data products.

  4. The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope: The Final Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, William V.; Blair, William P.; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Romelfanger, Mary L.

    2013-04-01

    The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) was a 0.9 m telescope and moderate-resolution (Δλ = 3 Å) far-ultraviolet (820-1850 Å) spectrograph that flew twice on the space shuttle, in 1990 December (Astro-1, STS-35) and 1995 March (Astro-2, STS-67). The resulting spectra were originally archived in a nonstandard format that lacked important descriptive metadata. To increase their utility, we have modified the original data-reduction software to produce a new and more user-friendly data product, a time-tagged photon list similar in format to the Intermediate Data Files (IDFs) produced by the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer calibration pipeline. We have transferred all relevant pointing and instrument-status information from locally-archived science and engineering databases into new FITS header keywords for each data set. Using this new pipeline, we have reprocessed the entire HUT archive from both missions, producing a new set of calibrated spectral products in a modern FITS format that is fully compliant with Virtual Observatory requirements. For each exposure, we have generated quick-look plots of the fully-calibrated spectrum and associated pointing history information. Finally, we have retrieved from our archives HUT TV guider images, which provide information on aperture positioning relative to guide stars, and converted them into FITS-format image files. All of these new data products are available in the new HUT section of the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST), along with historical and reference documents from both missions. In this article, we document the improved data-processing steps applied to the data and show examples of the new data products.

  5. Medically important solar ultraviolet A. Radiation measurements.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, M; Abdul Aziz, D; Tajuddin, M R

    1988-06-01

    Results from a 6-year study of solar ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation measurements at the equatorial location of Penang (5 degrees N) are presented. On clear days, the diurnal flux reaches a very high dosage of about 3.0 x 10(-2) KWHM-2 around midday. The average daily total flux is in the range of 1.6 x 10(-1) KWHM-2 and does not change much seasonally. The high 83% cloud cover only reduces the incoming flux to about half. The radiation flux represents a lower limit of the incident UVA radiation applicable to much of the equatorial/tropical region. PMID:3391727

  6. Experimental limits of the extreme ultraviolet background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wulf-Mathies, C.; Grewing, M.; Kraemer, G.; Schulz-Luepertz, E.; Kimble, R.; Bixler, J.; Bowyer, S.

    1983-01-01

    Photometric observations of the diffuse extreme ultraviolet background with two photometers having bandpasses of 750-940 A and 1040-1080 A are reported. The payload, which was flown aboard an ARIES sounding rocket in June 1982, is described, including the electron detectors, filters, and calibration. The operation of the probe during the experiment, including its motions, are described. The primary experiment involved spectroscopic observation of the hot white dwarf HZ43. The photometer count rate is shown and the measurements of the diffuse background are compared with theoretical predictions. Despite the lower limits obtained using a narrowband detector, the measurements are not sensitive enough to draw any relevant astrophysical conclusions.

  7. International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite mission analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, R. A.; Griffin, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The results are presented of the mission analysis performed by Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) in support of the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite. The launch window is open for three separate periods (for a total time of 7 months) during the year extending from July 20, 1977, to July 20, 1978. The synchronous orbit shadow constraint limits the launch window to approximately 88 minutes per day. Apogee boost motor fuel was computed to be 455 pounds (206 kilograms) and on-station weight was 931 pounds (422 kilograms). The target orbit is elliptical synchronous, with eccentricity 0.272 and 24 hour period.

  8. Biofouling control using ultrasonic and ultraviolet treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Panchal, C.B.; Takahashi, P.K.; Avery, W.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments were conducted at the Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii to determine the effectiveness of non-chemical techniques to control biofouling. The two techniques investigated were ultrasonic and ultraviolet. The colonization of microorganisms attracts higher order organisms; therefore, deactivation of microorganisms to prevent colony should reduce the fouling propensity. The major objective of the present investigation was to develop a biofouling model and analyze the experimental data to show the effects of reducing the microorganisms activation in the incoming water. The results show that reducing the microorganism activation in the incoming water increases the induction period of low fouling rate, but the growth is not affected.

  9. Ultraviolet femtosecond laser ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Imasaka, Totaro

    2008-01-01

    For this study, multiphoton ionization/mass spectrometry using an ultraviolet (UV) femtosecond laser was employed for the trace analysis of organic compounds. Some of the molecules, such as dioxins, contain several chlorine atoms and have short excited-state lifetimes due to a "heavy atom" effect. A UV femtosecond laser is, then, useful for efficient resonance excitation and subsequent ionization. A technique of multiphoton ionization using an extremely short laser pulse (e.g., <10 fs), referred to as "impulsive ionization," may have a potential for use in fragmentation-free ionization, thus providing information on molecular weight in mass spectrometry. PMID:18302290

  10. Ultraviolet Lasers Realized via Electrostatic Doping Method

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X. Y.; Shan, C. X.; Zhu, H.; Li, B. H.; Jiang, M. M.; Yu, S. F.; Shen, D. Z.

    2015-01-01

    P-type doping of wide-bandgap semiconductors has long been a challenging issue for the relatively large activation energy and strong compensation of acceptor states in these materials, which hinders their applications in ultraviolet (UV) optoelectronic devices drastically. Here we show that by employing electrostatic doping method, hole-dominant region can be formed in wide bandgap semiconductors, and UV lasing has been achieved through the external injection of electrons into the hole-dominant region, confirming the applicability of the p-type wide bandgap semiconductors realized via the electrostatic doping method in optoelectronic devices. PMID:26324054

  11. Rocket ultraviolet observations of Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.; Mccoy, Robert P.; Woods, Thomas N.; Feldman, Paul D.; Opal, Chet B.

    1987-01-01

    Ultraviolet observations of Comet Halley have been obtained in February and March, 1986 with two instrument payloads, one with the Faint Object Telescope and one with a direct imaging electrographic Schmidt camera and an objective grating spectrograph. The observations include spectroscopic imagery in the 1200-200 A wavelength range and imagery of the comet in hydrogen Lyman-alpha (1216 A) radiation. The present observations have been reduced to intensity contour plots in the different emission wavelengths, and production rates are given for the emitting species H, C, O, S, and CO.

  12. The Spartan-281 Far Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.; Heckathorn, Harry M.; Dufour, Reginald J.; Opal, Chet B.; Raymond, John C.

    1988-01-01

    The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory's Far Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (FUVIS), currently under development for flight as a Spartan shuttle payload, is designed to perform spectroscopy of diffuse sources in the FUV with very high sensitivity and moderate spatial and spectral resolution. Diffuse nebulae, the general galactic background radiation, and artificially induced radiation associated with the Space Shuttle vehicle are sources of particular interest. The FUVIS instrument will cover the wavelength range of 970-2000 A with selectable resolutions of 5 and 30 A. It is a slit imaging spectrograph having 3 arcmin spatial resolution along its 2.7 deg long slit.

  13. Ultraviolet light detection using an optical microcavity.

    PubMed

    Harker, Audrey; Mehrabani, Simin; Armani, Andrea M

    2013-09-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light exposure is connected to both physical and psychological diseases. As such, there is significant interest in developing sensors that can detect UV light in the mW/cm2 intensity range with a high signal-to-noise ratio. In this Letter, we demonstrate a UV sensor based on a silica integrated optical microcavity that has a linear operating response in both the forward and backward directions from 14 to 53 mW/cm2. The sensor response agrees with the developed predictive theory based on a thermodynamic model. Additionally, the signal-to-noise ratio is above 100 at physiologically relevant intensity levels. PMID:23988974

  14. Ultraviolet radiation, vitamin D and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Robyn M; Byrne, Scott N; Correale, Jorge; Ilschner, Susanne; Hart, Prue H

    2015-10-01

    There is compelling epidemiological evidence that the risk of developing multiple sclerosis is increased in association with low levels of sun exposure, possibly because this is associated with low vitamin D status. Recent work highlights both vitamin D and non-vitamin D effects on cellular immunity that suggests that higher levels of sun exposure and/or vitamin D status are beneficial for both MS risk and in ameliorating disease progression. Here we review this recent evidence, focusing on regulatory cells, dendritic cells, and chemokines and cytokines released from the skin following exposure to ultraviolet radiation. PMID:26477548

  15. Coherent sub-aperture ultraviolet imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, R. G.; Connally, W. J.; Avicola, K.; Monjo, D.; Olson, T.

    1989-09-01

    Laboratory targets have been imaged by a multi-sub-aperture, coherent receiver technique in which a common local oscillator illuminates the sub-aperture array to preserve both phase and intensity information. The target, receiver and range dimensions were chosen such that each sub-aperture was smaller than the speckle size. Various targets were illuminated by microsecond pulses from an e-beam pumped XeF power amplifier, which was seeded by a coherent ultraviolet beam generated with a frequency doubled visible dye laser. Data is presented showing comparisons between the coherent multi-sub-aperture approach and conventional, full aperture photography of the same traget(s).

  16. Ultraviolet and thermally stable polymer compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinisch, R. F.; Gloria, H. R.; Goldsberry, R. E.; Adamson, M. J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A class of polymers is provided, namely, poly(diarylsiloxy) arylazines. These polymers have a basic chemical composition which has the property of stabilizing the optical and physical properties of the polymer against the degradative effect of ultraviolet light and high temperatures. This stabilization occurs at wavelengths including those shorter than found on the surface of the earth and in the absence or presence of oxygen, making the polymers of the present invention useful for high performance coating applications in extraterrestrial space as well as similar applications in terrestrial service. The invention also provides aromatic azines which are useful in the preparation of polymers such as those of the present invention.

  17. Jupiter in blue, ultraviolet and near infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    These three images of Jupiter, taken through the narrow angle camera of NASA's Cassini spacecraft from a distance of 77.6 million kilometers (48.2 million miles) on October 8, reveal more than is apparent to the naked eye through a telescope.

    The image on the left was taken through the blue filter. The one in the middle was taken in the ultraviolet. The one on the right was taken in the near infrared.

    The blue-light filter is within the part of the electromagnetic spectrum detectable by the human eye. The appearance of Jupiter in this image is, consequently, very familiar. The Great Red Spot (below and to the right of center) and the planet's well-known banded cloud lanes are obvious. The brighter bands of clouds are called zones and are probably composed of ammonia ice particles. The darker bands are called belts and are made dark by particles of unknown composition intermixed with the ammonia ice.

    Jupiter's appearance changes dramatically in the ultraviolet and near infrared images. These images are near negatives of each other and illustrate the way in which observations in different wavelength regions can reveal different physical regimes on the planet.

    All gases scatter sunlight efficiently at short wavelengths; this is why the sky appears blue on Earth. The effect is even more pronounced in the ultraviolet. The gases in Jupiter's atmosphere, above the clouds, are no different. They scatter strongly in the ultraviolet, making the deep banded cloud layers invisible in the middle image. Only the very high altitude haze appears dark against the bright background. The contrast is reversed in the near infrared, where methane gas, abundant on Jupiter but not on Earth, is strongly absorbing and therefore appears dark. Again the deep clouds are invisible, but now the high altitude haze appears relatively bright against the dark background. High altitude haze is seen over the poles and the equator.

    The Great Red Spot, prominent in all images, is

  18. Ultraviolet and thermally stable polymer compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinisch, R. F.; Gloria, H. R.; Goldsberry, R. E.; Adamson, M. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A new class of polymers is provided, namely, poly (diarylsiloxy) arylazines. These novel polymers have a basic chemical composition which has the property of stabilizing the optical and physical properties of the polymer against the degradative effect of ultraviolet light and high temperatures. This stabilization occurs at wavelengths including those shorter than found on the surface of the earth and in the absence or presence of oxygen, making the polymers useful for high performance coating applications in extraterrestrial space as well as similar applications in terrestrial service. The invention also provides novel aromatic azines which are useful in the preparation of polymers such as those described.

  19. Imaging the magnetosphere in the extreme ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Y. T.

    1993-01-01

    A final report on research on magnetosphere imaging in the extreme ultraviolet is presented. The objectives of the research contract can be summarized in three related items: (1) investigate the feasibility of the EUV imaging concept by using Lockheed in-situ ion measurement data; (2) investigate the technical resources required to make scientific interpretations of such EUV images by end-to-end simulations of the imaging concept; and (3) construct and test the key element for EUV magnetosphere imaging, the multilayer mirror with normal-incidence reflectance designed for the selected solar resonance line.

  20. Ultraviolet radiation levels during the Antarctic spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, John E.; Snell, Hilary E.

    1988-01-01

    The decrease in atmospheric ozone over Antarctica during spring implies enhanced levels of ultraviolet (UV) radiation received at the earth's surface. Model calculations show that UV irradiances encountered during the occurrence of an Antarctic 'ozone hole' remain less than those typical of a summer solstice at low to middle latitudes. However, the low ozone amounts observed in October 1987 imply biologically effective irradiances for McMurdo Station, Antarctica, that are comparable to or greater than those for the same location at December solstice. Life indigenous to Antarctica thereby experiences a greatly extended period of summerlike UV radiation levels.

  1. Cosmic far-ultraviolet background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    It is demonstrated that interstellar dust grains forward-scatter far-ultraviolet radiation extremely strongly: the value of the Henyey-Greenstein scattering parameter g at 1425 A is shown to be at least 0.75; the actual value is very likely greater than 0.9. Also, observations of the Virgo cluster of galaxies sets a limit of tau greater than 2 x 10 to the 25th sec on the lifetime of 17-20 ev/C-squared heavy neutrinos, if such neutrinos are responsible for the gravitational binding of the cluster.

  2. Ultraviolet laser treatment of titanium surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balchev, Ivaylo; Minkovski, Nikolai; Dimitrov, Krasimir; Shipochka, Maria; Barbucha, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Interaction of a third harmonic of DPSS laser, wavelength 355 nm and pulse duration of 30 ns with titanium wafers was studied. It was investigated the structure of laser ablated titanium surface, depending on the laser beam scanning speed, and laser pulse frequency. The titanium surface modification was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and XPS (X- ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy). Nanosecond irradiation with ultraviolet light of Ti plate led to the formation of high porous granular structures consisting of agglomerated micro- and submicro- particles.

  3. Characteristics of ultraviolet scattering and turbulent channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Xu, Zhengyuan

    2013-08-01

    The nonline of sight (NLOS) ultraviolet (UV) scattering communication channel and atmospheric optical turbulent channel have been extensively but independently studied in the rich literature. However, the new characteristics of NLOS UV scattering and turbulent channels have not been comprehensively investigated. We propose a configurable framework, unifying the traditional line of sight turbulence theory and the Monte Carlo simulation framework for random scattering of photons. Results show that the scattering link geometry can significantly alter the received signal distribution. Irradiance fluctuations at the receiver may become much weaker due to the smoothing effect of impinging photons from different scattering paths, even though each scattering path undergoes strong turbulence. PMID:23903138

  4. Ultraviolet observations of LMC nova 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S.; Stryker, L. L.; Sonneborn, G.; Sparks, Warren M.; Sion, E. M.; Wagner, R. M.; Ferland, Gary; Gallagher, J. S.; Wade, R.; Williams, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    The IUE obtained ultraviolet spectra of a nova in an external galaxy. The spectral features do not seem unusual for a nova at maximum but it is hoped to be able to follow it for a long enough time to be able to study the high ionization lines that appear when the density drops to lower values (the nebular stage). A high dispersion spectrum was also obtained to assist in the line identification and to study the line of sight to the LMC 1 deg of arc away from SN 1987A.

  5. The Jovian stratosphere in the ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagener, R.; Caldwell, J.; Owen, T.; Kim, S.-J.; Encrenaz, T.

    1985-01-01

    Models of the spectral reflectivity at the center of the disk of Jupiter from 1450 to 3150 angstroms are presented. The reflectivity was computed from 30 low-dispersion IUE spectra taken during the 1978-1980 solar maximum. A vertically inhomogeneous radiative transfer program was used to compute model reflectivities of various stratospheric compositions for comparison. Ammonia and acetylene are well determined because they show narrow absorption bands in the ultraviolet. Possible compositions to improve the fit to the data below 1800 angstroms are suggested. The data are too noisy to detect possible CO Cameron band absorption near 2000 angstroms.

  6. Extreme ultraviolet photoionization of aldoses and ketoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Joong-Won; Dong, Feng; Grisham, Michael E.; Rocca, Jorge J.; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2011-04-01

    Gas phase monosaccharides (2-deoxyribose, ribose, arabinose, xylose, lyxose, glucose galactose, fructose, and tagatose), generated by laser desorption of solid sample pellets, are ionized with extreme ultraviolet photons (EUV, 46.9 nm, 26.44 eV). The resulting fragment ions are analyzed using a time of flight mass spectrometer. All aldoses yield identical fragment ions regardless of size, and ketoses, while also generating same ions as aldoses, yields additional features. Extensive fragmentation of the monosaccharides is the result the EUV photons ionizing various inner valence orbitals. The observed fragmentation patterns are not dependent upon hydrogen bonding structure or OH group orientation.

  7. Transparent conductive coatings in the far ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jongmin; Zukic, Muamer; Park, Jung HO; Wilson, Michele M.; Keffer, Charles E.; Torr, Douglas G.

    1993-01-01

    In certain cases a space-borne optical instrument with a dielectric window requires a transparent conductive coating deposited on the window to remove the electrostatic charge collected due to the bombardment of ionized particles. Semiconductor and metal films are studied for use as transparent conductive coatings for the front window of far ultraviolet camera. Cr is found to be the best coating material. The theoretical search for the semiconductor and metal coating materials and experimental results for ITO and Cr films are reported.

  8. Ultraviolet Spectra of Normal Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, Anne

    1997-01-01

    The data related to this grant on the Ultraviolet Spectra of Normal Spiral Galaxies have been entirely reduced and analyzed. It is incorporated into templates of Spiral galaxies used in the calculation of K corrections towards the understanding of high redshift galaxies. The main paper was published in the Astrophysical Journal, August 1996, Volume 467, page 38. The data was also used in another publication, The Spectral Energy Distribution of Normal Starburst and Active Galaxies, June 1997, preprint series No. 1158. Copies of both have been attached.

  9. ULTRAVIOLET PROTECTIVE PIGMENTS AND DNA DIMER INDUCTION AS RESPONSES TO ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Life on Earth has evolved adaptations to many environmental stresses over the epochs. One consistent stress has been exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The most basic effect of UV radiation on biological systems is damage to DNA. In response to UV radiation organisms have ad...

  10. Efficient hydraulic properties of root systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechmann, Marcel; Schneider, Christoph; Carminati, Andrea; Hildebrandt, Anke

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of ecosystem root water uptake (RWU) is paramount for parameterizing hydrological models. With the increase in computational power it is possible to calculate RWU explicitly up to the single plant scale using physical models. However, application of these models for increasing our understanding of ecosystem root water uptake is hindered by the deficit in knowledge about the detailed hydraulic parameter distribution within root systems. However, those physical models may help us to identify efficient parameterizations and to describe the influence of these hydraulic parameters on RWU profiles. In this research, we investigated the combined influence of root hydraulic parameters and different root topologies on shaping efficient root water uptake. First, we use a conceptual model of simple branching structures to understand the influence of branching location and transitions in root hydraulic properties on the RWU patterns in typical sub root structures. Second, we apply a physical model called "aRoot" to test our conclusions on complex root system architectures of single plants. aRoot calculates the distribution of xylem potential within arbitrary root geometries to satisfy a given water demand depending on the available water in the soil. Redistribution of water within the bulk soil is calculated using the Richards equation. We analyzed results using a measure of uptake efficiency, which describes the effort necessary for transpiration. Simulations with the conceptual model showed that total transpiration in sub root structures is independent of root hydraulic properties over a wide range of hydraulic parameters. On the other hand efficiency of root water uptake depends crucially on distribution hydraulic parameters in line with root topology. At the same time, these parameters shape strongly the distribution of RWU along the roots, and its evolution in time, thus leading to variable individual root water uptake profiles. Calculating

  11. Sensitivity of the "Root Bundle Model" to root mechanical properties and root distribution: Implication for shallow landslide stability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Massimiliano; Giadrossich, Filippo; Cohen, Denis

    2015-04-01

    Root reinforcement is recognized as an important factor for shallow landslides stability. Due to the complexity of root reinforcement mechanisms and the heterogeneity of the root-soil system, the estimation of parameters used in root reinforcement models is difficult, time consuming, and often highly uncertain. For practical applications, it is necessary to focus on the estimation of the most relevant parameters. The objective of the present contribution is to review the state of the art in the development of root reinforcement models and to discuss the sensitivity of the "Root Bundle Model" (RBM) when considering the variability of root mechanical properties and the heterogeneity of root distributions. The RBM is a strain-step loading fiber bundle model extended to include the mechanical and geometrical properties of roots. The model allows the calculation of the force-displacement behavior of a root bundle. In view of new results of field pullout tests performed on coarse roots of spruce (Picea abies) and considering a consistent dataset of root distribution of alpine tree species, we quantify the sensitivity of the RBM and the uncertainty associated with the most important input parameters. Preliminary results show that the extrapolation of force-diameter values from incomplete datasets (i.e., when only small roots are tested and values for coarse roots are extrapolated) may result in considerable errors. In particular, in the case of distributions with root diameters larger than 5 mm, root reinforcement tends to be dominated by coarse roots and their mechanical properties need to be quantified. In addition to the results of the model sensitivity, we present a possible best-practice method for the quantification of root reinforcement in view of its application to slope stability calculations and implementations in numerical models.

  12. FAINT NEAR-ULTRAVIOLET/FAR-ULTRAVIOLET STANDARDS FROM SWIFT/UVOT, GALEX, AND SDSS PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, Michael H.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Brown, Peter E-mail: hoversten@astro.psu.ed E-mail: brown@astro.psu.ed

    2010-12-10

    At present, the precision of deep ultraviolet photometry is somewhat limited by the dearth of faint ultraviolet standard stars. In an effort to improve this situation, we present a uniform catalog of 11 new faint (u {approx} 17) ultraviolet standard stars. High-precision photometry of these stars has been taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Galaxy Evolution Explorer archives and combined with new data from the Swift Ultraviolet Optical Telescope to provide precise photometric measures extending from the near-infrared to the far-ultraviolet. These stars were chosen because they are known to be hot (20, 000 < T{sub eff} < 50, 000 K) DA white dwarfs with published Sloan spectra that should be photometrically stable. This careful selection allows us to compare the combined photometry and Sloan spectroscopy to models of pure hydrogen atmospheres to both constrain the underlying properties of the white dwarfs and test the ability of white dwarf models to predict the photometric measures. We find that the photometry provides good constraints on white dwarf temperatures, which demonstrates the ability of Swift/UVOT to investigate the properties of hot luminous stars. We further find that the models reproduce the photometric measures in all 11 passbands to within their systematic uncertainties. Within the limits of our photometry, we find the standard stars to be photometrically stable. This success indicates that the models can be used to calibrate additional filters to our standard system, permitting easier comparison of photometry from heterogeneous sources. The largest source of uncertainty in the model fitting is the uncertainty in the foreground reddening curve, a problem that is especially acute in the UV.

  13. Root branching: mechanisms, robustness, and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Dastidar, Mouli Ghosh; Jouannet, Virginie; Maizel, Alexis

    2012-01-01

    Plants are sessile organisms that must efficiently exploit their habitat for water and nutrients. The degree of root branching impacts the efficiency of water uptake, acquisition of nutrients, and anchorage. The root system of plants is a dynamic structure whose architecture is determined by modulation of primary root growth and root branching. This plasticity relies on the continuous integration of environmental inputs and endogenous developmental programs controlling root branching. This review focuses on the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of lateral root distribution, initiation, and organogenesis with the main focus on the root system of Arabidopsis thaliana. We also examine the mechanisms linking environmental changes to the developmental pathways controlling root branching. Recent progress that emphasizes the parallels to the formation of root branches in other species is discussed. PMID:23801487

  14. New theories of root growth modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landl, Magdalena; Schnepf, Andrea; Vanderborght, Jan; Huber, Katrin; Javaux, Mathieu; Bengough, A. Glyn; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-04-01

    In dynamic root architecture models, root growth is represented by moving root tips whose line trajectory results in the creation of new root segments. Typically, the direction of root growth is calculated as the vector sum of various direction-affecting components. However, in our simulations this did not reproduce experimental observations of root growth in structured soil. We therefore developed a new approach to predict the root growth direction. In this approach we distinguish between, firstly, driving forces for root growth, i.e. the force exerted by the root which points in the direction of the previous root segment and gravitropism, and, secondly, the soil mechanical resistance to root growth or penetration resistance. The latter can be anisotropic, i.e. depending on the direction of growth, which leads to a difference between the direction of the driving force and the direction of the root tip movement. Anisotropy of penetration resistance can be caused either by microscale differences in soil structure or by macroscale features, including macropores. Anisotropy at the microscale is neglected in our model. To allow for this, we include a normally distributed random deflection angle α to the force which points in the direction of the previous root segment with zero mean and a standard deviation σ. The standard deviation σ is scaled, so that the deflection from the original root tip location does not depend on the spatial resolution of the root system model. Similarly to the water flow equation, the direction of the root tip movement corresponds to the water flux vector while the driving forces are related to the water potential gradient. The analogue of the hydraulic conductivity tensor is the root penetrability tensor. It is determined by the inverse of soil penetration resistance and describes the ease with which a root can penetrate the soil. By adapting the three dimensional soil and root water uptake model R-SWMS (Javaux et al., 2008) in this way

  15. The International Ultraviolet Explorer Data Analysis Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carini, M.; Thompson, R.; Arquilla, R.; Caplinger, J.; Taylor, L.

    1995-12-01

    The International Ultraviolet Explorer Regional Data Analysis Facility (RDAF) was established in 1981 to assist users in the analysis and interpretation of IUE data. In October 1992, the Colorado RDAF was closed, and the Goddard RDAF was renamed the International Ultraviolet Explorer Data Analysis Center (IUEDAC). Programs written using the Interactive Data Language (IDL), marketed by Research Systems Incorporated (RSI) allow users to reduce and analyze IUE spectral data processed through IUESIPS and NEWSIPS, display images, perform various database searches and convert IUE data sets into various formats. IUEDAC personnel support US Guest Observers with 19th episode IUE observing programs and are actively involved with LASP scientists working under a NASA ADP grant to reformat and distribute data from the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory 3 (Copernicus) mission. The IUEDAC staff also maintains several homepages on the World Wide Web. These pages provide WWW users access to both information and services provided by the IUEDAC. Users may also access the IUEDAC either by visiting the DAC in person or by remote logins via the internet.

  16. Orientation of migratory birds under ultraviolet light.

    PubMed

    Wiltschko, Roswitha; Munro, Ursula; Ford, Hugh; Stapput, Katrin; Thalau, Peter; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    In view of the finding that cryptochrome 1a, the putative receptor molecule for the avian magnetic compass, is restricted to the ultraviolet single cones in European Robins, we studied the orientation behaviour of robins and Australian Silvereyes under monochromatic ultraviolet (UV) light. At low intensity UV light of 0.3 mW/m(2), birds showed normal migratory orientation by their inclination compass, with the directional information originating in radical pair processes in the eye. At 2.8 mW/m(2), robins showed an axial preference in the east-west axis, whereas silvereyes preferred an easterly direction. At 5.7 mW/m(2), robins changed direction to a north-south axis. When UV light was combined with yellow light, robins showed easterly 'fixed direction' responses, which changed to disorientation when their upper beak was locally anaesthetised with xylocaine, indicating that they were controlled by the magnetite-based receptors in the beak. Orientation under UV light thus appears to be similar to that observed under blue, turquoise and green light, albeit the UV responses occur at lower light levels, probably because of the greater light sensitivity of the UV cones. The orientation under UV light and green light suggests that at least at the level of the retina, magnetoreception and vision are largely independent of each other. PMID:24718656

  17. The USDA Ultraviolet Radiation Monitoring Program.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, D. S.; Slusser, J. R.; Beaubien, A. F.; Gibson, J. H.

    1998-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Ultraviolet (UV) Radiation Monitoring Program has been measuring UV radiation since 1994. The initial network of 12 stations employed broadband meters to measure UVB irradiance and included ancillary measurements of temperature, humidity, and irradiance at seven wavelengths in the visible produced by a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR). Since that beginning the network has expanded to more than 20 stations and the broadband meters have been supplemented with a seven-wavelength Ultraviolet Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (UV-MFRSR). The network has been designed to include 30 stations, each with a full complement of instrumentation. Annual characterizations of the network's filter radiometers indicate that gradual shifts in instrument response are manageable but must be accounted for to achieve accurate and precise measurements of UV irradiance. The characterization and calibration of the filter instruments is discussed along with filter stability and instrument precision. Broadband instruments are shown to be quite stable and collocated instruments are shown to agree to within 2.3% for zenith angles less than 80° under all sky conditions. Preliminary investigations into the accuracy of the UV-MFRSR calibrated with the Langley method are presented and successful column ozone retrievals are demonstrated with the UV-MFRSR under clear skies.

  18. ULTRAVIOLET EXTINCTION AT HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect

    Peek, J. E. G.; Schiminovich, David

    2013-07-01

    In order to study the properties and effects of high Galactic latitude dust, we present an analysis of 373,303 galaxies selected from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer All-Sky Survey and Wide-field Infrared Explorer All-Sky Data Release. By examining the variation in aggregate ultraviolet colors and number density of these galaxies, we measure the extinction curve at high latitude. We additionally consider a population of spectroscopically selected galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to measure extinction in the optical. We find that dust at high latitude is neither quantitatively nor qualitatively consistent with standard reddening laws. Extinction in the FUV and NUV is {approx}10% and {approx}35% higher than expected, with significant variation across the sky. We find that no single R{sub V} parameter fits both the optical and ultraviolet extinction at high latitude, and that while both show detectable variation across the sky, these variations are not related. We propose that the overall trends we detect likely stem from an increase in very small silicate grains in the interstellar medium.

  19. The Ultraviolet Spectrograph on NASA's Juno Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstone, G. Randall; Persyn, Steven C.; Eterno, John S.; Walther, Brandon C.; Slater, David C.; Davis, Michael W.; Versteeg, Maarten H.; Persson, Kristian B.; Young, Michael K.; Dirks, Gregory J.; Sawka, Anthony O.; Tumlinson, Jessica; Sykes, Henry; Beshears, John; Rhoad, Cherie L.; Cravens, James P.; Winters, Gregory S.; Klar, Robert A.; Lockhart, Walter; Piepgrass, Benjamin M.; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Trantham, Bradley J.; Wilcox, Philip M.; Jackson, Matthew W.; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Vallerga, John V.; Raffanti, Rick; Martin, Adrian; Gérard, J.-C.; Grodent, Denis C.; Bonfond, Bertrand; Marquet, Benoit; Denis, François

    2014-03-01

    The ultraviolet spectrograph instrument on the Juno mission (Juno-UVS) is a long-slit imaging spectrograph designed to observe and characterize Jupiter's far-ultraviolet (FUV) auroral emissions. These observations will be coordinated and correlated with those from Juno's other remote sensing instruments and used to place in situ measurements made by Juno's particles and fields instruments into a global context, relating the local data with events occurring in more distant regions of Jupiter's magnetosphere. Juno-UVS is based on a series of imaging FUV spectrographs currently in flight—the two Alice instruments on the Rosetta and New Horizons missions, and the Lyman Alpha Mapping Project on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter mission. However, Juno-UVS has several important modifications, including (1) a scan mirror (for targeting specific auroral features), (2) extensive shielding (for mitigation of electronics and data quality degradation by energetic particles), and (3) a cross delay line microchannel plate detector (for both faster photon counting and improved spatial resolution). This paper describes the science objectives, design, and initial performance of the Juno-UVS.

  20. Ultraviolet and infrared correlation studies in Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Lakshmi S.; Sujatha, N. V.; Narayanankutty, K.

    We have studied the variation of diffuse ultraviolet (UV) radiation in the northern part of the Orion constellation using a set of eight areas of the GALEX All-Sky Imaging Survey in the far and near UV. Different components of diffuse UV radiation, like dust scattered emission and H2 fluorescence, were quantified and separated after removing the point sources and the foreground emission in each of the fields. Then the dependence of the individual UV components on the infrared 100 μ m dust emission was studied. We did not find any positive correlation between the diffuse-UV and IR-100 micron intensities, probably due to the high optical depth of the region or the entire dust column not contributing to the diffuse UV radiation. However, in the far UV we noticed the presence of an excess emission in addition to the dust scattered radiation, which is clearly absent in the near UV. This excess emission, identified as the H2 fluorescence, is produced by the Trapezium stars in the surrounding molecular clouds. We also compare our results with those of previous studies in the region, based on Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) observations.

  1. Ultraviolet through infrared imager performance testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzetta, Jason A.; Scopatz, Stephen D.

    2009-09-01

    The objective of any imaging system is to optimize the amount of pertinent information collected from a scene. Whether it is used for artistic reproduction, scientific research, or camouflage detection, a camera has the same ultimate requirement. In the era of broadband, multi-spectral, hyperspectral, and fused sensor systems, both spectral and spatial data continue to play battling roles in determining which is dominant in how well an imaging system meets its definitive objective. Typically sensor testing requires hardware and software exclusively designed for the spectral region of interest. Thus an imaging system with ultraviolet through infrared imaging capabilities could require three or more separate test benches for sensor characterization. Obviously this not only increases the complexity, and subsequently the cost of testing, but also more importantly tends to produce discontinuous results. This paper will outline the hardware and software developed by the authors that employ identical test methods and shared optics to complete infrared, visible, and ultraviolet sensor performance analysis. Challenges encompassing multiple emitting source switching, splitting, and combining will be addressed along with new single fused type source designs. Decisions related to specifying optics and targets of sufficient quality and construction to provide coverage of the full spectral region will be discussed along with sample performance specifications and data. Test methodology controlled by a single automated software suite will be summarized including modulation transfer function, signal to noise ratio, uniformity, focus, distortion, intrascene dynamic range, and sensitivity. Selected examples of results obtained by this test set will be presented.

  2. Ultraviolet emissions in the planetary atmospheres.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shematovich, V. I.

    2008-12-01

    Actual state and perspectives of the observations of the plan- etary atmospheres in the ultraviolet range of wavelengths are discussed. The main features of the planetary aeronomy for terrestrial planets, giant planets and exoplanets-transits are given. The following hot problems of the plane- tary astronomy in the UV wavelength range are discussed: (i) UV observations of hot coronas of the terrestrial planets; (ii) formation and morphology of the rarefied H2O-, O2 - and O-dominant atmospheres of the icy satellites in the gi- ant planet systems; (iii) formation and evolution of the neutral gas clouds in the giant planet systems; (iv) studies of the extended hydrogen coronae of the transit-exoplanets formed due to the stellar UV and plasma wind forcing. The mathematical models such as the Monte Carlo model for the electron, proton, and heavy-ion precipitation into the planetary atmospheres are also discussed. Such models are currently used to calculate the excitation rates of the atmo- spheric UV emissions and will be used for the interpretation of the expected UV observations of the planetary atmospheres with the space observatory World Space Observatory - Ultraviolet (WSO-UV) [1, 2].

  3. Multifunctional Deployment Hinges Rigidified by Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.; Simburger, Edward J.; Matusmoto, James; Giants, Thomas W.; Garcia, Alexander; Perry, Alan; Rawal, Suraj; Marshall, Craig; Lin, John Kun Hung; Day, Jonathan Robert; Scarborough, Stephen Emerson

    2005-01-01

    Multifunctional hinges have been developed for deploying and electrically connecting panels comprising planar arrays of thin-film solar photovoltaic cells. In the original intended application of these hinges, the panels would be facets of a 32-sided (and approximately spherical) polyhedral microsatellite (see figure), denoted a PowerSphere, that would be delivered to orbit in a compact folded configuration, then deployed by expansion of gas in inflation bladders. Once deployment was complete, the hinges would be rigidified to provide structural connections that would hold the panels in their assigned relative positions without backlash. Such hinges could also be used on Earth for electrically connecting and structurally supporting solar panels that are similarly shipped in compact form and deployed at their destinations. As shown in section A-A in the figure, a hinge of this type is partly integrated with an inflation bladder and partly integrated with the frame of a solar panel. During assembly of the hinge, strip extensions from a flexible circuit harness on the bladder are connected to corresponding thin-film conductors on the solar panel by use of laser welding and wrap-around contacts. The main structural component of the hinge is a layer of glass fiber impregnated with an ultraviolet-curable resin. After deployment, exposure to ultraviolet light from the Sun cures the resin, thereby rigidifying the hinge.

  4. The measurement of solar ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Roy, C R; Gies, H P; Lugg, D J; Toomey, S; Tomlinson, D W

    1998-11-01

    High skin cancer rates, stratospheric ozone depletion and increased public interest and concern have resulted in a strong demand for solar ultraviolet radiation measurements and information. The Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) has been involved since the mid-1980s in the measurement of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) using spectroradiometers (SRM) and a network of broadband detectors at 18 sites in Australia and Antarctica and in Singapore through a collaborative agreement with the Singapore Institute of Science and Forensic Medicine. Measurement locations range from equatorial (Singapore, 1.3 degrees N) through tropical (Darwin, 12.4 degrees S) to polar (Mawson, 67.6 degrees S) and as a result there are many difficulties associated with maintenance and calibration of the network detectors, and transfer of data to ensure an accurate and reliable data collection. Calibration procedures for the various detectors involve the comparison with simultaneous spectral measurements using a portable SRM incorporating a double monochromator, calibrated against traceable standard lamps. Laboratory measurements of cosine response and responsivity are also made. Detectors are intercompared at the Yallambie site for a number of months before installation at another location. As an additional check on the calibrations, computer models of solar UVR at the earth's surface for days with clear sky and known ozone are compared with the UV radiometer measurements. PMID:9920423

  5. Root growth, secondary root formation and root gravitropism in carotenoid-deficient seedlings of Zea mays L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Y. K.; Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of ABA on root growth, secondary-root formation and root gravitropism in seedlings of Zea mays was investigated by using Fluridone-treated seedlings and a viviparous mutant, both of which lack carotenoids and ABA. Primary roots of seedlings grown in the presence of Fluridone grew significantly slower than those of control (i.e. untreated) roots. Elongation of Fluridone-treated roots was inhibited significantly by the exogenous application of 1 mM ABA. Exogenous application of 1 micromole and 1 nmole ABA had either no effect or only a slight stimulatory effect on root elongation, depending on the method of application. The absence of ABA in Fluridone-treated plants was not an important factor in secondary-root formation in seedlings less than 9-10 d old. However, ABA may suppress secondary-root formation in older seedlings, since 11-d-old control seedlings had significantly fewer secondary roots than Fluridone-treated seedlings. Roots of Fluridone-treated and control seedlings were graviresponsive. Similar data were obtained for vp-9 mutants of Z. mays, which are phenotypically identical to Fluridone-treated seedlings. These results indicate that ABA is necessary for neither secondary-root formation nor for positive gravitropism by primary roots.

  6. Four cuspal maxillary second premolar with single root and three root canals: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Parul; Nikhil, Vineeta; Goyal, Ayush; Singh, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    Traditional configuration of maxillary second premolars has been described to have two cusps, one root and one or two root canals. The endodontic literature reports considerable anatomic aberrations in the root canal morphology of maxillary second premolar but the literature available on the variation in cuspal anatomy and its relationship to the root canal anatomy is sparse. The purpose of this clinical report was to describe the root and root canal configuration of a maxillary second premolar with four cusps. PMID:27563190

  7. Four cuspal maxillary second premolar with single root and three root canals: Case report.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Parul; Nikhil, Vineeta; Goyal, Ayush; Singh, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    Traditional configuration of maxillary second premolars has been described to have two cusps, one root and one or two root canals. The endodontic literature reports considerable anatomic aberrations in the root canal morphology of maxillary second premolar but the literature available on the variation in cuspal anatomy and its relationship to the root canal anatomy is sparse. The purpose of this clinical report was to describe the root and root canal configuration of a maxillary second premolar with four cusps. PMID:27563190

  8. White Light Coronograph (WLC) and Ultra-Violet Coronal Spectrometer (UVCS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The white light coronagraph (WLC) and ultraviolet coronal spectrometer (UVCS) together reveal the corona and the roots of the solar wind from 1.5 to 6 solar radii from Sun center. The WLC measures the plasma density and spatial structure of the corona and coronal mass ejections at a resolution of about 20 arcseconds. The UVCS, in combination with the WLC, measures the temperature and radial outflow speed of the coronal plasma. These instruments will detect mass ejections from active regions and high speed solar wind streams from coronal holes a few days before the source regions rotate onto the face of the Sun, thus giving a week or more of advanced warning for disturbed geomagnetic conditions at Earth.

  9. Brown Root Rot of Alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This bulletin describes the disease of alfalfa called brown root rot (BRR) including: the disease symptoms, the fungal pathogen and its biology, its distribution, and disease management. Since the 1920s, BRR has been regarded as an important disease of forage legumes, including alfalfa, in northern ...

  10. Dry root rot of chickpea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dry root rot of chickpea is a serious disease under dry hot summer conditions, particularly in the semi-arid tropics of Ethiopia, and in central and southern India. It usually occurs at reproductive stages of the plant. Symptoms include drooping of petioles and leaflets of the tips, but not the low...

  11. Rhizoctonia root rot of lentil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia root rot is a soilborne disease of lentil caused by the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, and is favored by cool (11-19 C or 52 - 66 F) and wet soil conditions. The disease starts as reddish or dark brown lesions on lentil plants near the soil line, and develops into sunken lesions an...

  12. [Root arthrosis of the thumb].

    PubMed

    Hautefeuille, P; Duquesnoy, B

    1991-12-15

    Root arthrosis of the thumb results from a degenerative lesion of the trapezometacarpal joint. It is particularly frequent in menopausal women. The often prolonged pain it produces sometimes raises therapeutic problems. Treatment is always medical at first, but when it fails several surgical operations will ensure permanent painlessness. PMID:1808686

  13. Disease notes - Bacterial root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial root rot initiated by lactic acid bacteria, particularly Leuconostoc, occurs every year in Idaho sugarbeet fields. Hot fall weather seems to make the problem worse. Although Leuconostoc initiates the rot, other bacteria and yeast frequently invade the tissue as well. The acetic acid bac...

  14. Cutting the Roots of Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koziey, Paul W.

    1996-01-01

    Violence is rooted in obedience to authority and in comparisons--foundations of our institutions of parenting and schooling. Obedience brings reward and punishment, comparison perpetuates a cycle of competition and conflict. Television violence is especially harmful because children easily understand visual images. The Reality Research approach to…

  15. Excising the Root from STEM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lock, Roger

    2009-01-01

    There are a number of well-intentioned STEM initiatives, some designed to improve the recruitment and retention of science teachers. Sometimes it appears that the initiators are remote from direct contact with the "grass roots" issues that feed the "stem" on which the blossoms of young enthusiastic recruits to the science teaching profession are…

  16. Molecular regulatory mechanism of tooth root development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao-Feng; Chai, Yang

    2012-01-01

    The root is crucial for the physiological function of the tooth, and a healthy root allows an artificial crown to function as required clinically. Tooth crown development has been studied intensively during the last few decades, but root development remains not well understood. Here we review the root development processes, including cell fate determination, induction of odontoblast and cementoblast differentiation, interaction of root epithelium and mesenchyme, and other molecular mechanisms. This review summarizes our current understanding of the signaling cascades and mechanisms involved in root development. It also sets the stage for de novo tooth regeneration. PMID:23222990

  17. Characterizing pathways by which gravitropic effectors could move from the root cap to the root of primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; McClelen, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    Plasmodesmata linking the root cap and root in primary roots Zea mays are restricted to approx. 400 protodermal cells bordering approx. 110000 microns2 of the calyptrogen of the root cap. This area is less than 10% of the cross-sectional area of the root-tip at the cap junction. Therefore, gravitropic effectors moving from the root cap to the root can move symplastically only through a relatively small area in the centre of the root. Decapped roots are non-responsive to gravity. However, decapped roots whose caps are replaced immediately after decapping are strongly graviresponsive. Thus, gravicurvature occurs only when the root cap contacts the root, and symplastic continuity between the cap and root is not required for gravicurvature. Completely removing mucilage from the root tip renders the root non-responsive to gravity. Taken together, these data suggest that gravitropic effectors move apoplastically through mucilage from the cap to the root.

  18. Investigation of VEGGIE Root Mat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbiah, Arun M.

    2013-01-01

    VEGGIE is a plant growth facility that utilizes the phenomenon of capillary action as its primary watering system. A cloth made of Meta Aramid fiber, known as Nomex is used to wick water up from a reservoir to the bottom of the plants roots. This root mat system is intended to be low maintenance with no moving parts and requires minimal crew interface time. Unfortunately, the water wicking rates are inconsistent throughout the plant life cycle, thus causing plants to die. Over-wicking of water occurs toward the beginning of the cycle, while under-wicking occurs toward the middle. This inconsistency of wicking has become a major issue, drastically inhibiting plant growth. The primary objective is to determine the root cause of the inconsistent wicking through experimental testing. Suspect causes for the capillary water column to break include: a vacuum effect due to a negative pressure gradient in the water reservoir, contamination of material due to minerals in water and back wash from plant fertilizer, induced air bubbles while using syringe refill method, and material limitations of Nomex's ability to absorb and retain water. Experimental testing will be conducted to systematically determine the cause of under and over-wicking. Pressure gages will be used to determine pressure drop during the course of the plant life cycle and during the water refill process. A debubbler device will be connected to a root mat in order to equalize pressure inside the reservoir. Moisture and evaporation tests will simultaneously be implemented to observe moisture content and wicking rates over the course of a plant cycle. Water retention tests will be performed using strips of Nomex to determine materials wicking rates, porosity, and absorptivity. Through these experimental tests, we will have a better understanding of material properties of Nomex, as well as determine the root cause of water column breakage. With consistent test results, a forward plan can be achieved to resolve

  19. Scanning X-Ray Or Extreme-Ultraviolet Monochromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Wavelength of peak transmission of proposed high-throughput, narrow-band-pass x-ray or extreme-ultraviolet monochromator continuously adjustable. Essential filtering and reflecting components designed according to principles described in "Compact X-Ray and Extreme-Ultraviolet Monochromator" (MFS-28499). However, angle of incidence varied to change wavelength of Bragg reflection.

  20. OZONE AND ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION DISINFECTION FOR SMALL COMMUNITY WATER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone and ultraviolet radiation were used as alternatives to chlorine for disinfection in several small existing community water systems. Both ozone and ultraviolet light were found to be inferior to chlorination from the standpoint of operation and maintenance requirements and m...

  1. Geomagnetic Tail Lab (GEOTAIL) Diffuse Ultraviolet Experiment (DUVE) Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    At Launch Complex 17 Pad A, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) workers are installing the payload fairing around the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) mated to a Delta II rocket. The EUVE spacecraft is designed to study the extreme ultraviolet portion of the spectrum.

  2. View from... CLEO 2011: Ultraviolet goes solid-state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pile, David

    2011-07-01

    Semiconductor light-emitting diodes may soon replace mercury lamps as the ultraviolet source of choice in a wide range of applications. Researchers around the world are now racing to increase the efficiency and output power of such ultraviolet solid-state devices.

  3. Observations of the Ultraviolet Spectra of Carbon White Dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    Strong ultraviolet carbon lines were detected in additional white DC (continuous visual spectra) dwarfs using the IUE. These lines are not seen in the ultraviolet spectrum of the cool DC star Stein 2051 B. The bright DA white dwarf LB 3303 has a strong unidentified absorption near lambda 1400.

  4. Mechanisms of Melanoma Promotion by Ultraviolet Radiation.

    PubMed

    Rünger, Thomas M

    2016-09-01

    The mutagenic properties of ultraviolet radiation drive the initiation of melanoma. Induction of matrix metalloproteinases in melanoma cells by longwave UVA radiation, possibly via a Warburg-like effect, promotes melanoma invasiveness. This is one of several mechanisms by which ultraviolet radiation also promotes further growth of previously established melanomas. PMID:27542295

  5. Ultraviolet lasers. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    Reports cited from the international literature describe various aspects of ultraviolet lasers including laser output, far ultraviolet radiation, electron pumping, optical pumping, and laser materials. Gas lasers, pulsed lasers, dye lasers, CO2 lasers, xenon fluoride lasers, and transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) lasers are considered. This updated bibliography contains 283 citations, 66 of which are new additions to the previous edition.

  6. Ultraviolet laser beam monitor using radiation responsive crystals

    DOEpatents

    McCann, Michael P.; Chen, Chung H.

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus and method for monitoring an ultraviolet laser beam includes disposing in the path of an ultraviolet laser beam a substantially transparent crystal that will produce a color pattern in response to ultraviolet radiation. The crystal is exposed to the ultraviolet laser beam and a color pattern is produced within the crystal corresponding to the laser beam intensity distribution therein. The crystal is then exposed to visible light, and the color pattern is observed by means of the visible light to determine the characteristics of the laser beam that passed through crystal. In this manner, a perpendicular cross sectional intensity profile and a longitudinal intensity profile of the ultraviolet laser beam may be determined. The observation of the color pattern may be made with forward or back scattered light and may be made with the naked eye or with optical systems such as microscopes and television cameras.

  7. Visible and ultraviolet reflectance characteristics of arctic homeotherms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, P. S.; Lavigne, D. M.

    1981-12-01

    Reflectance characteristics of the epidermal coverings (hair, feathers) of several white birds and mammals were examined in the visible and ultraviolet regions of the solar spectrum. Non-white phases of the same species, and other non-white animals were examined for comparison. As expected, non-white animals exhibited lower reflectance values than white animals in the visible spectrum. Most species examined demonstrated reduced reflectance in the ultraviolet, reaching minimum values between 290 and 310 nm. In white animals, significant differences were found in the reflectance of UV-A (320 400 nm) and UV-B (280 320 nm) radiation. This accounts for the apparent differences in ultraviolet reflectance among various arctic mammals detected previously with ultraviolet photography. Reflectance patterns in the visible and ultraviolet were not obviously correlated with phylogenetic relationship, nor with the gross structure of hair or feathers.

  8. Control of root system architecture by DEEPER ROOTING 1 increases rice yield under drought conditions.

    PubMed

    Uga, Yusaku; Sugimoto, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Satoshi; Rane, Jagadish; Ishitani, Manabu; Hara, Naho; Kitomi, Yuka; Inukai, Yoshiaki; Ono, Kazuko; Kanno, Noriko; Inoue, Haruhiko; Takehisa, Hinako; Motoyama, Ritsuko; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Wu, Jianzhong; Matsumoto, Takashi; Takai, Toshiyuki; Okuno, Kazutoshi; Yano, Masahiro

    2013-09-01

    The genetic improvement of drought resistance is essential for stable and adequate crop production in drought-prone areas. Here we demonstrate that alteration of root system architecture improves drought avoidance through the cloning and characterization of DEEPER ROOTING 1 (DRO1), a rice quantitative trait locus controlling root growth angle. DRO1 is negatively regulated by auxin and is involved in cell elongation in the root tip that causes asymmetric root growth and downward bending of the root in response to gravity. Higher expression of DRO1 increases the root growth angle, whereby roots grow in a more downward direction. Introducing DRO1 into a shallow-rooting rice cultivar by backcrossing enabled the resulting line to avoid drought by increasing deep rooting, which maintained high yield performance under drought conditions relative to the recipient cultivar. Our experiments suggest that control of root system architecture will contribute to drought avoidance in crops. PMID:23913002

  9. Nicotiana Roots Recruit Rare Rhizosphere Taxa as Major Root-Inhabiting Microbes.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Muhammad; Law, Audrey D; Moe, Luke A

    2016-02-01

    Root-associated microbes have a profound impact on plant health, yet little is known about the distribution of root-associated microbes among different root morphologies or between rhizosphere and root environments. We explore these issues here with two commercial varieties of burley tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing from rhizosphere soil, as well as from primary, secondary, and fine roots. While rhizosphere soils exhibited a fairly rich and even distribution, root samples were dominated by Proteobacteria. A comparison of abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) between rhizosphere and root samples indicated that Nicotiana roots select for rare taxa (predominantly Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Acidobacteria) from their corresponding rhizosphere environments. The majority of root-inhabiting OTUs (~80 %) exhibited habitat generalism across the different root morphological habitats, although habitat specialists were noted. These results suggest a specific process whereby roots select rare taxa from a larger community. PMID:26391804

  10. The role of strigolactones in root development

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Huwei; Tao, Jinyuan; Gu, Pengyuan; Xu, Guohua; Zhang, Yali

    2016-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) and their derivatives were recently defined as novel phytohormones that orchestrate shoot and root growth. Levels of SLs, which are produced mainly by plant roots, increase under low nitrogen and phosphate levels to regulate plant responses. Here, we summarize recent work on SL biology by describing their role in the regulation of root development and hormonal crosstalk during root deve-lopment. SLs promote the elongation of seminal/primary roots and adventitious roots (ARs) and they repress lateral root formation. In addition, auxin signaling acts downstream of SLs. AR formation is positively or negatively regulated by SLs depending largely on the plant species and experimental conditions. The relationship between SLs and auxin during AR formation appears to be complex. Most notably, this hormonal response is a key adaption that radically alters rice root architecture in response to nitrogen- and phosphate-deficient conditions. PMID:26515106

  11. Environmental Control of Root System Biology.

    PubMed

    Rellán-Álvarez, Rubén; Lobet, Guillaume; Dinneny, José R

    2016-04-29

    The plant root system traverses one of the most complex environments on earth. Understanding how roots support plant life on land requires knowing how soil properties affect the availability of nutrients and water and how roots manipulate the soil environment to optimize acquisition of these resources. Imaging of roots in soil allows the integrated analysis and modeling of environmental interactions occurring at micro- to macroscales. Advances in phenotyping of root systems is driving innovation in cross-platform-compatible methods for data analysis. Root systems acclimate to the environment through architectural changes that act at the root-type level as well as through tissue-specific changes that affect the metabolic needs of the root and the efficiency of nutrient uptake. A molecular understanding of the signaling mechanisms that guide local and systemic signaling is providing insight into the regulatory logic of environmental responses and has identified points where crosstalk between pathways occurs. PMID:26905656

  12. Laser dentistry: A new application of excimer laser in root canal therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pini, R.; Salimbeni, R.; Vannini, M.; Barone, R.; Clauser, C.

    1989-01-01

    We report the first study of the application of excimer lasers in dentistry for the treatment of dental root canals. High-energy ultraviolet (UV) radiation emitted by an XeCl excimer laser (308 nm) and delivered through suitable optical fibers can be used to remove residual organic tissue from the canals. To this aim, UV ablation thresholds of dental tissues have been measured, showing a preferential etching of infiltrated dentin in respect to healthy dentin, at laser fluences of 0.5-1.5 J/cm{sup 2}. This technique has been tested on extracted tooth samples, simulating a clinical procedure. Fibers of decreasing core diameters have been used to treat different sections of the root canal down to its apical portion, resulting in an effective, easy, and fast cleaning action. Possible advantages of excimer laser clinical applications in respect to usual procedures are also discussed.

  13. Rhizosphere biophysics and root water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carminati, Andrea; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Ahmed, Mutez A.; Passioura, John

    2016-04-01

    The flow of water into the roots and the (putative) presence of a large resistance at the root-soil interface have attracted the attention of plant and soil scientists for decades. Such resistance has been attributed to a partial contact between roots and soil, large gradients in soil matric potential around the roots, or accumulation of solutes at the root surface creating a negative osmotic potential. Our hypothesis is that roots are capable of altering the biophysical properties of the soil around the roots, the rhizosphere, facilitating root water uptake in dry soils. In particular, we expect that root hairs and mucilage optimally connect the roots to the soil maintaining the hydraulic continuity across the rhizosphere. Using a pressure chamber apparatus we measured the relation between transpiration rate and the water potential difference between soil and leaf xylem during drying cycles in barley mutants with and without root hairs. The samples were grown in well structured soils. At low soil moistures and high transpiration rates, large drops in water potential developed around the roots. These drops in water potential recovered very slowly, even after transpiration was severely decreased. The drops in water potential were much bigger in barley mutants without root hairs. These mutants failed to sustain high transpiration rates in dry conditions. To explain the nature of such drops in water potential across the rhizosphere we performed high resolution neutron tomography of the rhizosphere of the barleys with and without root hairs growing in the same soil described above. The tomograms suggested that the hydraulic contact between the soil structures was the highest resistance for the water flow in dry conditions. The tomograms also indicate that root hairs and mucilage improved the hydraulic contact between roots and soil structures. At high transpiration rates and low water contents, roots extracted water from the rhizosphere, while the bulk soil, due its

  14. Condenser for ring-field deep ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N.; Nugent, Keith A.

    2002-01-01

    A condenser for use with a ring-field deep ultraviolet or extreme ultraviolet lithography system. A condenser includes a ripple-plate mirror which is illuminated by a collimated or converging beam at grazing incidence. The ripple plate comprises a flat or curved plate mirror into which is formed a series of channels along an axis of the mirror to produce a series of concave surfaces in an undulating pattern. Light incident along the channels of the mirror is reflected onto a series of cones. The distribution of slopes on the ripple plate leads to a distribution of angles of reflection of the incident beam. This distribution has the form of an arc, with the extremes of the arc given by the greatest slope in the ripple plate. An imaging mirror focuses this distribution to a ring-field arc at the mask plane.

  15. Condenser for ring-field deep-ultraviolet and extreme-ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N.; Nugent, Keith A.

    2001-01-01

    A condenser for use with a ring-field deep ultraviolet or extreme ultraviolet lithography system. A condenser includes a ripple-plate mirror which is illuminated by a collimated beam at grazing incidence. The ripple plate comprises a plate mirror into which is formed a series of channels along an axis of the mirror to produce a series of concave surfaces in an undulating pattern. Light incident along the channels of the mirror is reflected onto a series of cones. The distribution of slopes on the ripple plate leads to a distribution of angles of reflection of the incident beam. This distribution has the form of an arc, with the extremes of the arc given by the greatest slope in the ripple plate. An imaging mirror focuses this distribution to a ring-field arc at the mask plane.

  16. High intensity vacuum ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet production by noncollinear mixing in laser vaporized media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todt, Michael A.; Albert, Daniel R.; Davis, H. Floyd

    2016-06-01

    A method is described for generating intense pulsed vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) laser radiation by resonance enhanced four-wave mixing of commercial pulsed nanosecond lasers in laser vaporized mercury under windowless conditions. By employing noncollinear mixing of the input beams, the need of dispersive elements such as gratings for separating the VUV/XUV from the residual UV and visible beams is eliminated. A number of schemes are described, facilitating access to the 9.9-14.6 eV range. A simple and convenient scheme for generating wavelengths of 125 nm, 112 nm, and 104 nm (10 eV, 11 eV, and 12 eV) using two dye lasers without the need for dye changes is described.

  17. Ultraviolet spectropolarimetry of the Be star PP Carinae with the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, K. S.; Meade, M. R.; Nordsieck, K. H.; Anderson, C. M.; Babler, B. L.; Clayton, G. C.; Code, A. D.; Magalhaes, A. M.; Schulte-Ladbeck, R. E.; Taylor, M.

    1993-01-01

    We present the first ultraviolet spectropolarimetric observations of the Be star PP Car, obtained with the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment (WUPPE) aboard the Astro 1 mission. Usable polarization data were obtained from 1400 to 2330 A, along with a good spectrum from 1400 to 3200 A. These data show a lower polarization shortward of the Balmer jump than had been predicted by standard models, and a broad UV polarization dip around 1900 A is seen. These results are in agreement with those found from the WUPPE observations of two other Be stars, Xi Tau and Pi Aqr, which were published earlier. All these observations are an important probe of the Be circumstellar envelopes and demonstrate the need for the inclusion of metal-line effects in circumstellar disk models of Be star UV polarization.

  18. Single-rooted primary first mandibular molar

    PubMed Central

    Haridoss, SelvaKumar; Swaminathan, Kavitha; Rajendran, Vijayakumar; Rajendran, Bharathan

    2014-01-01

    Morphological variations like single-rooted molar in primary dentition are scarce. Understanding the root canal anatomy and variations is necessary for successful root canal therapy. The purpose of the present article is to report successful endodontic treatment of primary left mandibular first molar with an abnormal morphology of a single root. This case report highlights the importance of knowledge and its applications in the management of anomalous anatomic variants which play a crucial role in the success of endodontic treatment. PMID:25150245

  19. Absolute sensitivity calibration of extreme ultraviolet photoresists

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Juanita; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Aquila, Andrew; George, Simi; Niakoula, Dimitra

    2008-05-16

    One of the major challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography remains simultaneously achieving resist sensitivity, line-edge roughness, and resolution requirement. Sensitivity is of particular concern owing to its direct impact on source power requirements. Most current EUV exposure tools have been calibrated against a resist standard with the actual calibration of the standard resist dating back to EUV exposures at Sandia National Laboratories in the mid 1990s. Here they report on an independent sensitivity calibration of two baseline resists from the SEMATECH Berkeley MET tool performed at the Advanced Light Source Calibrations and Standards beamline. The results show the baseline resists to be approximately 1.9 times faster than previously thought based on calibration against the long standing resist standard.

  20. Improved aluminum coatings for the ultraviolet

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.F.; LaDelfe, P.; Ochoa, E.

    1981-01-01

    Highly reflective aluminum coatings or aluminum coatings with dielectric overcoats are frequently used in the ultraviolet. The reflectance values published by Hass and his group are generally accepted for this uv region. We have produced evaporated aluminum coatings for a wide range of deposition conditions and none of our coatings exhibit the Hass reflectance characteristics. The reflectance of our coatings appear to be independent of the evaporation pressure and deposition time or rate. Our coatings do not have the characteristic decrease in reflectance with decreasing wavelength. Our main attention has been focused on the origin of a reflectance dip for each of our coatings near 300 nm. This dip has apparently not been reported before and does not appear to be due to adsorbed layers on the film or due to trapped impurities within the film.

  1. Ultraviolet Absorption by Secondary Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madronich, S.; Lee-Taylor, J. M.; Hodzic, A.; Aumont, B.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are typically formed in the atmosphere by the condensation of a myriad of intermediates from the photo-oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Many of these partly oxidized molecules have functional groups (chromophores) that absorb at the ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths available in the troposphere (λ ≳ 290 nm). We used the explicit chemical model GECKO-A (Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics for Organics in the Atmosphere) to estimate UV absorption cross sections for the gaseous and particulate components of SOA from different precursors (biogenic and anthropogenic) and formed in different environments (low and high NOx, day and night). Model predictions are evaluated with laboratory and field measurements of SOA UV optical properties (esp. mass absorption coefficients and single scattering albedo), and implications are presented for surface UV radiation trends, urban actinic flux modification, and SOA lifetimes.

  2. ZnO-Based Ultraviolet Photodetectors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kewei; Sakurai, Makoto; Aono, Masakazu

    2010-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) photodetection has drawn a great deal of attention in recent years due to a wide range of civil and military applications. Because of its wide band gap, low cost, strong radiation hardness and high chemical stability, ZnO are regarded as one of the most promising candidates for UV photodetectors. Additionally, doping in ZnO with Mg elements can adjust the bandgap largely and make it feasible to prepare UV photodetectors with different cut-off wavelengths. ZnO-based photoconductors, Schottky photodiodes, metal–semiconductor–metal photodiodes and p–n junction photodetectors have been developed. In this work, it mainly focuses on the ZnO and ZnMgO films photodetectors. We analyze the performance of ZnO-based photodetectors, discussing recent achievements, and comparing the characteristics of the various photodetector structures developed to date. PMID:22163675

  3. SUMER: Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Axford, W. I.; Curdt, W.; Gabriel, A. H.; Grewing, M.; Huber, M. C. E.; Jordan, M. C. E.; Lemaire, P.; Marsch, E.; Poland, A. I.

    1988-01-01

    The SUMER (solar ultraviolet measurements of emitted radiation) experiment is described. It will study flows, turbulent motions, waves, temperatures and densities of the plasma in the upper atmosphere of the Sun. Structures and events associated with solar magnetic activity will be observed on various spatial and temporal scales. This will contribute to the understanding of coronal heating processes and the solar wind expansion. The instrument will take images of the Sun in EUV (extreme ultra violet) light with high resolution in space, wavelength and time. The spatial resolution and spectral resolving power of the instrument are described. Spectral shifts can be determined with subpixel accuracy. The wavelength range extends from 500 to 1600 angstroms. The integration time can be as short as one second. Line profiles, shifts and broadenings are studied. Ratios of temperature and density sensitive EUV emission lines are established.

  4. Vacuum Ultraviolet Photoionization of Complex Chemical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostko, Oleg; Bandyopadhyay, Biswajit; Ahmed, Musahid

    2016-05-01

    Tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation coupled to mass spectrometry is applied to the study of complex chemical systems. The identification of novel reactive intermediates and radicals is revealed in flame, pulsed photolysis, and pyrolysis reactors, leading to the elucidation of spectroscopy, reaction mechanisms, and kinetics. Mass-resolved threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence measurements provide unprecedented access to vibrationally resolved spectra of free radicals present in high-temperature reactors. Photoionization measurements in water clusters, nucleic acid base dimers, and their complexes with water provide signatures of proton transfer in hydrogen-bonded and π-stacked systems. Experimental and theoretical methods to track ion-molecule reactions and fragmentation pathways in intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen-bonded systems in sugars and alcohols are described. Photoionization of laser-ablated molecules, clusters, and their reaction products inform thermodynamics and spectroscopy that are relevant to astrochemistry and catalysis. New directions in coupling VUV radiation to interrogate complex chemical systems are discussed.

  5. Atomic emission in the ultraviolet nightglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, W. E.; Siskind, D. E.

    1989-01-01

    An observation of the ultraviolet nightglow between 2670 A and 3040 A was conducted over White Sands Missile Range on October 22, 1984, at 0020 hours LST during the Orionids meteor shower. A 1/4-meter UV spectrometer operating at 3.5 A resolution viewed the earth's limb at tangent heights between 90 km and 110 km for 120 seconds. By inverting the observed limb intensities, a total zenith intensity of 1.4 kR is inferred for the Herzberg I system. Excess emission above the Herzberg I (7,3) band at 2852 A is identified as the Mg I resonance line. The intensity ratio of the Herzberg I band system to the 2972 A line from O(1S) was less than that predicted from the accepted O(1S) branching ratio and acceptable ratios of Herzberg I to 5577 A emissions. Arguments supporting the identification of the Herzberg III band system are also advanced.

  6. Overview of the Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Edward A.; Porter, Jason G.; Davis, John M.; Gary, G. A.; Spann, James F., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Traditional magnetographs measure the solar magnetic field at the visible "surface" of the Sun, the photosphere. The Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) is a design study for an instrument to measure the solar magnetic field higher in the atmosphere, in the upper chromosphere and in the transition region at the base of the corona. The magnetic pressure at these levels is much stronger than the gas pressure (in contrast to the situation at the photosphere), and so the field is much more dynamic. Observations in this region will significantly improve our understanding of the physical processes driving flares and heating in the Sun's upper atmosphere. The instrument will incorporate new technologies to achieve the polarization efficiencies required to isolate the magnetic lines (Civ at 155nm and MgII at 280nm) to be observed in the UV. We describe the scientific goals, the SUMI baseline design and the optical components that are being developed for a sounding rocket program.

  7. Femtosecond transparency in the extreme ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarana, Michal; Greene, Chris H.

    2012-06-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency-like behavior in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) is studied theoretically, including the effect of intense 800nm laser dressing of He 2s2p(^1P^o) and 2p^2(^2S^e) autoionizing states. We present an ab initio solution of the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation in an LS-coupling configuration interaction basis set. The method enables a rigorous treatment of optical field ionization of these coupled autoionizing states into the N = 2 continuum in addition to N = 1. Our calculated transient absorption spectra show the formation of the Autler-Townes doublet in the presence of the dressing laser field. The presented results are in encouraging agreement with experiment [1]. [4pt] [1] Z.H. Loh, C.H. Greene, and S. R. Leone, Chem. Phys. 350, 7 (2008)

  8. Ultraviolet radiation as an ant repellent

    SciTech Connect

    Thorvilson, H.G.; Russell, S.A.; Green, B.; Gransberg, D.

    1996-12-31

    In an effort to repel red imported fire ants (RIFA) from electrical devices, such as transformers, ultraviolet (UV) light was tested. Initial tests determined if RIFA`s tolerate a UV-irradiated environment when given a choice between UV-irradiated and non-irradiated. All replications in this test indicated that RIFA`s are intolerant of UV-irradiation and sought to escape it. RIFA`s moved to shaded environments and transported their brood out its well. A second test sought to determine if long-term UV-irradiation of the entire colonies cause increased RIFA mortality. Queenright colonies were exposed to UV irradiation of 254nm constantly for 115 days and colonies had a higher mortality rate than did a control colony. RIFA`s attempted to escape UV light and had increased rate when exposed to UV (254nm), but a practical application of this technique may be detrimental to insulation on electrical wiring.

  9. Near ultraviolet spectrograph for balloon platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreejith, A. G.; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    2015-06-01

    Small and compact scientific payloads may be easily designed constructed and own on high altitude balloons. Despite the fact that large orbital observatories provide accurate observations and statistical studies of remote and/or faint space sources, small telescopes on board balloons or rockets are still attractive because of their low cost and rapid response time. We describe here a near ultraviolet (NUV) spectrograph designed to be own on a high{altitude balloon platform. Our basic optical design is a modified Czerny-Turner system using off the shelf optics. We compare different methods of aberration corrections in such a system. We intend the system to be portable and scalable to different telescopes. The use of reflecting optics reduces the transmission loss in UV. We plan on using an image intensified CMOS sensor operating in photon counting mode as the detector of choice.

  10. Ultraviolet Spectra of Globular Clusters in Andromeda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, R. C.

    1999-05-01

    As part of a NASA-funded effort with Ben Dorman of Goddard Space Flight Center, I am engaged in calculating spectra from first principles of solar-type stars of a wide range of metallicity. This paper reports on an extension of this work funded by the Hubble Space Telescope archival program, the derivation of fundamental parameters for several globular clusters in Andromeda (M31). Properties of the underlying stellar population are derived by matching archival HST spectra with composite spectra constructed by weighted coaddition of the calculated spectra for stars of appropriate spectral types. Armed with these ab initio calculations, this work explores the degeneracy in age and metallicity in the ultraviolet, and the affect of unknowns such as the relative abundance of light elements versus iron and the possible presence of blue stragglers or blue horizontal branch stars.

  11. The development of solar ultraviolet observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan-Ni; Zhang, Chun-Min

    2011-11-01

    Mankind has been eager to know the variation of the atmospheric change processes in which the sun play a most important role, So research the Sun activity is a hot point. Observe and analyze its ultraviolet(UV) spectra is a valid way to know the Sun activity, solar UV radiation flux and upper atmospheric absorption of UV is representative of the sun activity. The solar UV emission lines are generally optically thin, so the detection aroused great attention. This paper provide an overview of the past two decades advances instrumentation for solar UV observation. Emphasis is given to the great mission such as OSO 8(Orbiting Solar Observatory 8), SOHO(Solar and Heliospheric Observatory), TRACE(Transition Region and Coronal Explorer), SDO(Solar Dynamics Observatory) and KuaFu, especially to their UV instrumentation and scientific objective, some outlook is proposed.

  12. Controlled doping of graphene using ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Zhengtang; Pinto, Nicholas J.; Davila, Yarely; Charlie Johnson, A. T.

    2012-06-18

    The electronic properties of graphene are tunable via doping, making it attractive in low dimensional organic electronics. Common methods of doping graphene, however, adversely affect charge mobility and degrade device performance. We demonstrate a facile shadow mask technique of defining electrodes on graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) thereby eliminating the use of detrimental chemicals needed in the corresponding lithographic process. Further, we report on the controlled, effective, and reversible doping of graphene via ultraviolet (UV) irradiation with minimal impact on charge mobility. The change in charge concentration saturates at {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} and the quantum yield is {approx}10{sup -5} e/photon upon initial UV exposure. This simple and controlled strategy opens the possibility of doping wafer-size CVD graphene for diverse applications.

  13. Ni/TiO2 Ultraviolet Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamadzade Lajvardi, Mehdi; Jahangiri, Mojtaba

    2016-03-01

    The fabrication technology of solid-state photon detectors based on semiconductors other than silicon is yet to mature, but their recent progress opens new possibilities. Such devices are especially attractive for ultraviolet radiation level measurements because semiconductor materials with band gaps larger than 3.0 eV can be used as “visible-blind” detectors, the operation of which do not require using visible light filters. Here, fabrication and characterization of a UV detector based on nickel/titanium dioxide Schottky junction is reported. The operation of the device is described based on the photoelectric mechanism taking place in the carrier- depleted oxide adjacent to the Ni layer. Simplicity of fabrication, cost-effectiveness and fast response are the positive features of the device. These features of the device are compared with those of the previously reported Ag/TiO2 UV detectors.

  14. The Coronal Ultraviolet Berkeley Spectrometer (CUBS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Brett C.; Cotton, Daniel M.; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    1992-01-01

    We describe an instrument package to remotely measure thermospheric, exospheric, and plasmaspheric structure and composition. This instrument was flown aboard the second test flight of the Black Brant XII sounding rocket on December 5, 1989, which attained an apogee of 1460 km. The experiment package consisted of a spectrophotometer to measure He I 584 A, O II 834 A, O I 989 A, hydrogen Lyman beta (1025 A), hydrogen Lyman alpha (1216 A), and O I 1304 A transitions, and a photometer to measure the He II 304 A emission. The optical design of the spectrophotometer was identical to that of the Berkeley Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Airglow Rocket Spectrometer payload, flown on September 30, 1988 aboard the maiden flight of the Black Brant XII rocket. We present the initial data analysis and describe directions we will go toward the completion of our study.

  15. Disruption of cytoplasmic microtubules by ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zamansky, G.B.; Perrino, B.A.; Chou, I.N. )

    1991-07-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of cultured human skin fibroblasts causes the disassembly of their microtubules. Using indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, we have now investigated whether damage to the microtubule precursor pool may contribute to the disruption of microtubules. Exposure to polychromatic UV radiation inhibits the reassembly of microtubules during cellular recovery from cold treatment. In addition, the ability of taxol to promote microtubule polymerization and bundling is inhibited in UV-irradiated cells. However, UV irradiation of taxol-pretreated cells or in situ detergent-extracted microtubules fails to disrupt the microtubule network. These data suggest that damage to dimeric tubulin, or another soluble factor(s) required for polymerization, contributes to the disassembly of microtubules in UV-irradiated human skin fibroblasts.

  16. Ultraviolet spectra and chromospheres of R stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, J. A.; Johnson, H. R.; Obrien, G. T.; Baumert, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Long-wavelength IUE spectra of 13 normal R stars and two hydrogen-deficient R0 supergiants were obtained. Early R stars are noted to have line spectra and levels of flux in the ultraviolet characteristic of G5-K2 III stars, whereas late R stars were observed to have colors and line spectra similar to late K and M stars, but with greatly enhanced strength of low-lying multiplets of neutral metals. Hydrogen-deficient carbon stars show readily apparent differences from the normal early R stars, reflecting their luminosity and somewhat higher temperatures. The lines of neutral metals in these stars are weakened, while those of ionized metals are strengthened.

  17. Combined ultraviolet studies of astronomical source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupress, A. K.; Baliunas, S. L.; Blair, W. P.; Hartmann, L. W.; Huchra, J. P.; Raymond, J. C.; Smith, G. H.; Soderblom, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    As part of its Ultraviolet Studies of Astronomical Sources the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for the period 1 Feb. 1985 to 31 July 1985 observed the following: the Cygnus Loop; oxygen-rich supernova remnants in 1E0102-72; the Large Magellanic Cloud supernova remnants; P Cygni profiles in dwarf novae; soft X-ray photoionization of interstellar gas; spectral variations in AM Her stars; the mass of Feige 24; atmospheric inhomogeneities in Lambda Andromedae and FF Aquarii; photometric and spectroscopic observation of Capella; Alpha Orionis; metal deficient giant stars; M 67 giants; high-velocity winds from giant stars; accretion disk parameters in cataclysmic variables; chromospheric emission of late-type dwarfs in visual binaries; chromospheres and transient regions of stars in the Ursa Major group; and low-metallicity blue galaxies.

  18. The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer - Overview and calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welsh, Barry Y.; Vallerga, John V.; Jelinsky, Pat; Vedder, Peter W.; Bowyer, Stuart

    1990-01-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) is a NASA-funded astronomy mission that will operate in the 70 to 760 A band. The science payload, which has been designed and built by the Space Sciences Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley, consists of three grazing incidence scanning telescopes and an EUV spectrometer/deep survey instrument. This paper gives details of the planned mission profile and an overview of the instrumentation that the science payload comprises. Topics such as the thermal design, contamination control, and details of the electronics system are discussed. Finally, the results of the calibration of the various subsystems that make up the EUVE instrumentation are reviewed, and the calibration plan for the integrated EUVE instruments is discussed.

  19. Ultraviolet radiation and health: friend and foe.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Robyn M; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise

    While excessive exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is a significant cause of disease burden in Australia and the Western Pacific region, there are well documented beneficial as well as adverse effects of UVR exposure. Ambient UVR levels do not translate directly to personal UVR dose and thus to biological effect - each person's sun-exposure behaviour and pigmentation also play a role. Exposure in childhood may be more important than exposure in adulthood for both beneficial and adverse effects. Stratospheric ozone depletion increases ambient UVR in the UVB wavelength, possibly the most important wavelength for both beneficial and deleterious health effects. There is ongoing research examining the effects of UVR exposure on immune function, including an examination of the possible role of lack of UVR exposure in the aetiology of multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes mellitus. PMID:12463975

  20. Extreme-Ultraviolet Observations of Nine Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seon, Kwang-Il; Edelstein, Jerry

    1998-05-01

    We report the observation of nine pulsars using the Lexan (100 Å) band of the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer scanning telescopes. The observations, none of which resulted in positive detections, are used to derive limits to the temperature of surface thermal radiation from the objects. We compare the temperature limits with predictions from neutron star cooling models. The N_H I toward our targets limits our ability to establish rigorous limits needed to discriminate among the models. We also derive a limit to heating by magnetic monopole flux-catalyzed nucleon decay for the very old pulsar PSR J1455-3330, which is similar to the limit derived for PSR B1929+10 and 3 orders of magnitude larger than the limit for PSR J0437-4715.

  1. International ultraviolet explorer solar array power degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, J. H., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The characteristic electrical performance of each International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) solar array panel is evaluated as a function of several prevailing variables (namely, solar illumination, array temperature and solar cell radiation damage). Based on degradation in the current-voltage characteristics of the array due to solar cell damage accumulated over time by space charged particle radiations, the available IUE solar array power is determined for life goals up to 10 years. Best and worst case calculations are normalized to actual IUE flight data (available solar array power versus observatory position) to accurately predict the future IUE solar array output. It is shown that the IUE solar array can continue to produce more power than is required at most observatory positions for at least 5 more years.

  2. Phototoxicity in an ultraviolet ink manufacturing plant.

    PubMed

    Linnell, Joshua D; Amani-Taleshi, Darius; Korentager, Richard; Dougherty, William R

    2012-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) dyes are used as inks in garment printing. Hypersensitivity reactions to these compounds have been reported in the literature. The authors report a case of reaction to UV ink in a patient already on corticosteroid therapy. The patient's clinical course was reviewed along with images of wounds that subsequently developed. The affected areas were debrided and covered with Vaseline gauze and silver impregnated dressings. Epithelium was salvaged in many areas, and regrowth occurred over several weeks in regions of deeper injury. The concurrent use of steroids and the rapidity of the onset of symptoms were not characteristic of hypersensitivity dermatitis, which has previously been reported. The cause of the wounds was likely phototoxicity from radical subtypes in the ink that catalyze the reaction when exposed to UV light. PMID:22665133

  3. Avian ultraviolet/violet cones as magnetoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Bischof, Hans-Joachim; Nießner, Christine; Peichl, Leo; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    In a recent paper, we described the localization of cryptochrome 1a in the retina of domestic chickens, Gallus gallus, and European robins, Erithacus rubecula: Cryptochrome 1a was found exclusively along the membranes of the disks in the outer segments of the ultraviolet/violet single cones. Cryptochrome has been suggested to act as receptor molecule for the avian magnetic compass, which would mean that the UV/V cones have a double function: they mediate vision in the short-wavelength range and, at the same time, magnetic directional information. This has important implications and raises a number of questions, in particular, how the two types of input are separated. Here, we point out several possibilities how this could be achieved.  PMID:22446535

  4. Modeling extreme ultraviolet suppression of electrostatic analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Gershman, Daniel J.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2010-04-15

    In addition to analyzing energy-per-charge ratios of incident ions, electrostatic analyzers (ESAs) for spaceborne time-of-flight mass spectrometers must also protect detectors from extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons from the Sun. The required suppression rate often exceeds 1:10{sup 7} and is generally established in tests upon instrument design and integration. This paper describes a novel technique to model the EUV suppression of ESAs using photon ray tracing integrated into SIMION, the most commonly used ion optics design software for such instruments. The paper compares simulation results with measurements taken from the ESA of the Mass instrument flying onboard the Wind spacecraft. This novel technique enables an active inclusion of EUV suppression requirements in the ESA design process. Furthermore, the simulation results also motivate design rules for such instruments.

  5. Application of MIMO technology in ultraviolet communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Gang; Tang, Yi; Ni, Guoqiang; Huang, Heqing; Zhang, Xuan

    2013-12-01

    Affected by atmospheric turbulence and multipath transmission, inter-symbol interference (ISI) is generated, and communication speed is limited in the channel of non-line-of-sight ultraviolet (NLOS UV) communication. Thus, MIMO space division multiplexing (MIMO-SDM) technology has a significant effect to reduce co-channel interference, fading and improve the transmission rate. Combined with characteristics of UV channel and noise, model of UV communication MIMO channel and channel capacity is developed, and the application of SDM technology based on vertical bell laboratories layered space-time coding (V-BLAST) is investigated. Also bit error rate (BER) performances with zero-forcing (ZF), minimum mean square error (MMSE) detection algorithm are obtained. Simulation results show that the capacity of UV communication MIMO channel is related to the number of transmit and received antennas , and channel SNR. And the BER performance with MMSE detection algorithm is better than ZF detection algorithm.

  6. Vacuum Ultraviolet Photoionization of Complex Chemical Systems.

    PubMed

    Kostko, Oleg; Bandyopadhyay, Biswajit; Ahmed, Musahid

    2016-05-27

    Tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation coupled to mass spectrometry is applied to the study of complex chemical systems. The identification of novel reactive intermediates and radicals is revealed in flame, pulsed photolysis, and pyrolysis reactors, leading to the elucidation of spectroscopy, reaction mechanisms, and kinetics. Mass-resolved threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence measurements provide unprecedented access to vibrationally resolved spectra of free radicals present in high-temperature reactors. Photoionization measurements in water clusters, nucleic acid base dimers, and their complexes with water provide signatures of proton transfer in hydrogen-bonded and π-stacked systems. Experimental and theoretical methods to track ion-molecule reactions and fragmentation pathways in intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen-bonded systems in sugars and alcohols are described. Photoionization of laser-ablated molecules, clusters, and their reaction products inform thermodynamics and spectroscopy that are relevant to astrochemistry and catalysis. New directions in coupling VUV radiation to interrogate complex chemical systems are discussed. PMID:26980311

  7. The ubiquity of avian ultraviolet plumage reflectance.

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Muir D; Lanyon, Scott M

    2003-01-01

    Although several bird species have been shown to reflect ultraviolet (UV) light from their plumages, the incidence of UV reflectance, and therefore the potential for UV or UV-enhanced signals, across the avian tree of life is not known. In this study, we collected reflectance data from the plumages of 312 bird species representing 142 families. Our results demonstrate that all avian families possess plumages that reflect significant amounts of UV light. The ubiquity of UV reflectance indicates that all studies of avian behaviour, ecology and evolution involving plumage coloration would benefit from consideration of plumage reflectance in the UV portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Additionally, we demonstrate the existence of cryptic UV plumage patches and cryptic dimorphism among birds. PMID:12965000

  8. The Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation: Polarization Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, E. A.; Porter, J. G.; Davis, J. M.; Gary, G. A.; Kobayashi, K.; Noble, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper will describe the objectives of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) and the optical components that have been developed to meet those objectives. A sounding rocket payload is being developed to test the feasibility of magnetic field measurements in the Sun s transition region. This paper will review the scientific measurements that will be made by the SUMI sounding rocket program, and the optics have been optimized for simultaneous measurements of two magnetic lines formed in the transition region (CIV at 1550 A and MgII at 2800 A). Finally, this paper will concentrate on the polarization properties of the SUM1 polarimeter and toroidal varied-line-space gratings.

  9. Phototherapy cabinet for ultraviolet radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, S.N.; Frost, P.

    1981-08-01

    A newly designed cabinet can be used for the treatment of psoriasis with fluorescent ultraviolet (UV) lamps. the new design provides more uniform distribution of UV radiation in both the horizontal and vertical axes, and several safety features have been added. The distribution and uniformity of UV output in this and in a previously described cabinet are compared. The UV output at the vertical center of the older UV light cabinet was six times greater than that at either the top or bottom, while the design of the present cabinet provides uniform UV radiation except for a slight increase at head height and at the level of the lower legs compared with the middle third of the cabinet. The variation in output of the older cabinet may, in part, explain the commonly encountered difficulty in the phototherapy of psoriasis of the scalp and lower extremities.

  10. Reaction Mechanism of Extreme Ultraviolet Resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriumi, Minoru; Kaneyama, Koji; Itani, Toshiro

    2008-06-01

    Molecular resist of polyphenol was evaluated as an extreme-ultraviolet resist compared with a polymer resist of poly(tert-butoxycarbonylhydroxystyrene). X-ray reflectometry was used to determine the resist-film density and measurement accuracy was improved. The molecular resist shows higher sensitivity of 3 mJ/cm2 than the polymer resist of 4 mJ/cm2. The deprotection mechanism was approximated by simple reaction equations and Fourier-transform infrared spectra was interpreted to give the products of a quantum yield and a deprotection rate constant as 9.7×10-8 and 8.1×10-8 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 for molecular and polymer resists. The higher sensitivity of the molecular resist is due to the larger efficiency of the reaction mechanism.

  11. Root proliferation in decaying roots and old root channels: A nutrient conservation mechanism in oligotrophic mangrove forests?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, K.L.

    2001-01-01

    1. In oligotrophic habitats, proliferation of roots in nutrient-rich microsites may contribute to overall nutrient conservation by plants. Peat-based soils on mangrove islands in Belize are characterized by the presence of decaying roots and numerous old root channels (0.1-3.5 cm diameter) that become filled with living and highly branched roots of Rhizophora mangle and Avicennia germinans. The objectives of this study were to quantify the proliferation of roots in these microsites and to determine what causes this response. 2. Channels formed by the refractory remains of mangrove roots accounted for only 1-2% of total soil volume, but the proportion of roots found within channels varied from 9 to 24% of total live mass. Successive generations of roots growing inside increasingly smaller root channels were also found. 3. When artificial channels constructed of PVC pipe were buried in the peat for 2 years, those filled with nutrient-rich organic matter had six times more roots than empty or sand-filled channels, indicating a response to greater nutrient availability rather than to greater space or less impedance to root growth. 4. Root proliferation inside decaying roots may improve recovery of nutrients released from decomposing tissues before they can be leached or immobilized in this intertidal environment. Greatest root proliferation in channels occurred in interior forest zones characterized by greater soil waterlogging, which suggests that this may be a strategy for nutrient capture that minimizes oxygen losses from the whole root system. 5. Improved efficiency of nutrient acquisition at the individual plant level has implications for nutrient economy at the ecosystem level and may explain, in part, how mangroves persist and grow in nutrient-poor environments.

  12. An Extreme Flux Vacuum Ultraviolet/Ultraviolet Beamline For The Measurement Of Biological Circular Dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, D.T.; Vasanthi, N.; Shaw, D.; Brown, A.; Todd, B.; Grant, A.F.; Flaherty, J.V.; Mullacrane, I.D.; Miller, M.J.; Bowler, M.A.; Jones, G.R.; Mythen, C.

    2004-05-12

    A new extreme flux vacuum ultraviolet bending magnet beamline (CD12) has been commission at the SRS, Daresbury. The beamline has met all of its designed performance parameters and these are detailed. The clear advantages of SRCD over CD undertaken on conventional instruments are discussed and examples of its capabilities in terms of measurement precision and enhanced signal-to-noise for both steady-state CD and time-resolved CD are given.

  13. Ultraviolet spectral synthesis of HD 72660

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golriz, S. S.; Landstreet, J. D.

    2016-03-01

    The study of chemical abundances in stellar atmosphere provides a useful tool to investigate the formation and evolution history of stars. The optical wavelength range has been used almost exclusively in the past to determine the elemental abundance in A-type stars. We use high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ultraviolet spectra obtained from the STIS/NUV-MAMA instrument on board Hubble Space Telescope. The spectra available cover the wavelength ranges 1630 Å-1901 Å and 2130 Å-2887 Å. The main challenge to carrying out abundance analysis in the ultraviolet is the extreme level of line blending. Abundance analysis using single isolated spectral lines is almost completely impossible; it is necessary to model spectral windows using spectrum synthesis with fairly complete line-lists. We have used the LTE spectrum synthesis code ZEEMAN to model the UV spectrum of HD 72660, adjusting abundances for a best match for elements with 6 ≤ Z≤ 82 for which lines are present in the Vinna Atomic Line Database line-list. Abundances or upper limits are derived for 32 elements. We find that except a few, our derived abundances are slightly higher than solar values. We estimate upper limits for abundances of eleven elements and abundance values of 12 elements which have not been detected in the optical. The high abundances that we find for some heavy elements may point to radiative levitation. The presence of lanthanides plus our results, suggest the reclassification of HD 72660 as a transition object between an HgMn star and an Am star.

  14. The Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer for SOHO (UVCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, J. L.; Noci, G.

    1992-05-01

    The purpose of the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) is to provide information about the behavior, in the extended corona, of the primary particles (protons and electrons) and several minor ions (O(5+) , Mg(9+) , Si(11+) , and Fe(11+) ). Spectroscopic diagnostic techniques will be used to determine random velocity distributions, densities, and bulk outflow velocities for these particles. The resulting empirical description of the extended corona can be used to address a broad range of scientific questions regarding the nature of the solar corona and the generation of the solar wind. The instrument consists of an externally and internally occulted telescope assembly and a spectrometer assembly. It has three channels whose purposes are the following: 1) VUV spectroscopy and absolute radiometry in the 1130 to 1361 Angstroms wavelength range with spectral resolution up to 9800 and spatial resolution elements of 7" or larger, 2) EUV spectroscopy and absolute radiometry in the 937 to 1127 Angstroms (first order) and 469 to 655 Angstroms (second order) wavelength ranges with spectral resolution up to 12000 and the same spatial resolution as the VUV channel, and 3) White light polarimetry with a wavelength band pass of 4500 -- 6000 Angstroms and a single 14" by 14" spatial resolution element. MAMA detectors provide simultaneous ultraviolet observations of a 40' long strip (parallel to a limb tangent) of the corona. Mirror and instrument motions allow this instantaneous field-of-view to scan out to heliocentric heights of 10 Rsun and onto the solar disk. This work is supported by NASA under contract NAS5-31250 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

  15. Forecasting solar extreme and far ultraviolet irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henney, C. J.; Hock, R. A.; Schooley, A. K.; Toussaint, W. A.; White, S. M.; Arge, C. N.

    2015-03-01

    A new method is presented to forecast the solar irradiance of selected wavelength ranges within the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and far ultraviolet (FUV) bands. The technique is similar to a method recently published by Henney et al. (2012) to predict solar 10.7 cm (2.8 GHz) radio flux, abbreviated F10.7, utilizing advanced predictions of the global solar magnetic field generated by a flux transport model. In this and the previous study, we find good correlation between the absolute value of the observed photospheric magnetic field and selected EUV/FUV spectral bands. By evolving solar magnetic maps forward 1 to 7 days with a flux transport model, estimations of the Earth side solar magnetic field distribution are generated and used to forecast irradiance. For example, Pearson correlation coefficient values of 0.99, 0.99, and 0.98 are found for 1 day, 3 day, and 7 day predictions, respectively, of the EUV band from 29 to 32 nm. In the FUV, for example, the 160 to 165 nm spectral band, correlation values of 0.98, 0.97, and 0.96 are found for 1 day, 3 day, and 7 day predictions, respectively. In the previous study, the observed F10.7 signal is found to correlate well with strong magnetic field (i.e., sunspot) regions. Here we find that solar EUV and FUV signals are significantly correlated with the weaker magnetic fields associated with plage regions, suggesting that solar magnetic indices may provide an improved indicator (relative to the widely used F10.7 signal) of EUV and FUV nonflaring irradiance variability as input to ionospheric and thermospheric models.

  16. Far Ultraviolet Imaging from the Image Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. B.; Heetderks, H.; Frey, H. U.; Lampton, M.; Geller, S. P.; Stock, J. M.; Abiad, R.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Tremsin, A. S.; Habraken, S.

    2000-01-01

    Direct imaging of the magnetosphere by the IMAGE spacecraft will be supplemented by observation of the global aurora. The IMAGE satellite instrument complement includes three Far Ultraviolet (FUV) instruments. The Wideband Imaging Camera (WIC) will provide broad band ultraviolet images of the aurora for maximum spatial and temporal resolution by imaging the LBH N2 bands of the aurora. The Spectrographic Imager (SI), a novel form of monochromatic imager, will image the aurora, filtered by wavelength. The proton-induced component of the aurora will be imaged separately by measuring the Doppler-shifted Lyman-a. Finally, the GEO instrument will observe the distribution of the geocoronal emission to obtain the neutral background density source for charge exchange in the magnetosphere. The FUV instrument complement looks radially outward from the rotating IMAGE satellite and, therefore, it spends only a short time observing the aurora and the Earth during each spin. To maximize photon collection efficiency and use efficiently the short time available for exposures the FUV auroral imagers WIC and SI both have wide fields of view and take data continuously as the auroral region proceeds through the field of view. To minimize data volume, the set of multiple images are electronically co-added by suitably shifting each image to compensate for the spacecraft rotation. In order to minimize resolution loss, the images have to be distort ion-corrected in real time. The distortion correction is accomplished using high speed look up tables that are pre-generated by least square fitting to polynomial functions by the on-orbit processor. The instruments were calibrated individually while on stationary platforms, mostly in vacuum chambers. Extensive ground-based testing was performed with visible and near UV simulators mounted on a rotating platform to emulate their performance on a rotating spacecraft.

  17. EFFECTS OF OZONE ON ROOT PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone alters root growth and root processes by first reducing photosynthesis and altering foliar metabolic pathways. The alteration in foliar metabolism is reflected in lowered carbohydrate levels in the roots. This can reduce key metabolic processes such as mineral uptake and sy...

  18. Cultivar selection for sugarbeet root rot resistance.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal and bacterial root rots in sugar beet caused by Rhizoctonia solani (Rs) and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum (Lm) can lead to root yield losses greater than 50%. To reduce the impact of these root rots on sucrose loss in the field, storage, and factories, studies were conducted t...

  19. Effect of scapling on root respiration rate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scalping improves root quality at harvest since impurities such as potassium, sodium, amino nitrogen and invert sugars that hinder sugarbeet processing are concentrated in the upper root crown. The effect of scalping on root storage properties, however, is less clear. A small study was conducted t...

  20. [Root caries--scanning electron microscopic observations].

    PubMed

    Heinrich, R; Hornová, J; Kneist, S; Künzel, W

    1990-01-01

    Sound and carious root surfaces of 24 extracted human teeth with extensive periodontal attachment loss were examined by SEM. The microflora covering the radicular surfaces was a complex flora consisting of filamentous and fusiform bacteria, short and long rods. Cocci and coccoid bacteria were observed on root surfaces. Bacterial invasion in the exposed peripheral root dentin was delayed by sclerotic dentin. PMID:2150459

  1. Nonthermal combined ultraviolet and vacuum-ultraviolet curing process for organosilicate dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H.; Guo, X.; Pei, D.; Li, W.; Blatz, J.; Hsu, K.; Benjamin, D.; Lin, Y.-H.; Fung, H.-S.; Chen, C.-C.; Nishi, Y.; Shohet, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Porous SiCOH films are of great interest in semiconductor fabrication due to their low-dielectric constant properties. Post-deposition treatments using ultraviolet (UV) light on organosilicate thin films are required to decompose labile pore generators (porogens) and to ensure optimum network formation to improve the electrical and mechanical properties of low-k dielectrics. The goal of this work is to choose the best vacuum-ultraviolet photon energy in conjunction with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons without the need for heating the dielectric to identify those wavelengths that will have the most beneficial effect on improving the dielectric properties and minimizing damage. VUV irradiation between 8.3 and 8.9 eV was found to increase the hardness and elastic modulus of low-k dielectrics at room temperature. Combined with UV exposures of 6.2 eV, it was found that this "UV/VUV curing" process is improved compared with current UV curing. We show that UV/VUV curing can overcome drawbacks of UV curing and improve the properties of dielectrics more efficiently without the need for high-temperature heating of the dielectric.

  2. International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) ultraviolet spectral atlas of selected astronomical objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Chi-Chao; Reichert, Gail A.; Ake, Thomas B.; Boggess, Albert; Holm, Albert V.; Imhoff, Catherine L.; Kondo, Yoji; Mead, Jaylee M.; Shore, Steven N.

    1992-01-01

    The IUE Ultraviolet Spectral Atlas of Selected Astronomical Objects (or 'the Atlas'), is based on the data that were available in the IUE archive in 1986, and is intended to be a quick reference for the ultraviolet spectra of many categories of astronomical objects. It shows reflected sunlight from the Moon, planets, and asteroids, and also shows emission from comets. Comprehensive compilations of UV spectra for main sequence, subgiant, giant, bright giant, and supergiant stars are published elsewhere. This Atlas contains the spectra for objects occupying other areas of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram: pre-main sequence stars, chemically peculiar stars, pulsating variables, subluminous stars, and Wolf-Rayet stars. This Atlas also presents phenomena such as the chromospheric and transition region emissions from late-type stars; composite spectra of stars, gas streams, accretion disks and gas envelopes of binary systems; the behavior of gas ejecta shortly after the outburst of novac and supernovac; and the H II regions, planetary nebulae, and supernova remnants. Population 2 stars, globular clusters, and luminous stars in the Magellanic Clouds, M31, and M33, are also included in this publication. Finally, the Atlas gives the ultraviolet spectra of galaxies of different Hubble types and of active galaxies.

  3. Springback in Root Gravitropism 1

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, A. Carl; Wettlaufer, Scott H.

    1989-01-01

    Conditions under which a gravistimulus of Merit corn roots (Zea mays L.) is withdrawn result in a subsequent loss of gravitropic curvature, an effect which we refer to as `springback.' This loss of curvature begins within 1 to 10 minutes after removal of the gravistimulus. It occurs regardless of the presence or absence of the root cap. It is insensitive to inhibitors of auxin transport (2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid, naphthylphthalmaic acid) or to added auxin (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid). Springback is prevented if a clinostat treatment is interjected to neutralize gravistimulation during germination, which suggests that the change in curvature is a response to a `memory' effect carried over from a prior gravistimulation. PMID:11537456

  4. The rhizosphere revisited: root microbiomics

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, Peter A. H. M.; Berendsen, Roeland L.; Doornbos, Rogier F.; Wintermans, Paul C. A.; Pieterse, Corné M. J.

    2013-01-01

    The rhizosphere was defined over 100 years ago as the zone around the root where microorganisms and processes important for plant growth and health are located. Recent studies show that the diversity of microorganisms associated with the root system is enormous. This rhizosphere microbiome extends the functional repertoire of the plant beyond imagination. The rhizosphere microbiome of Arabidopsis thaliana is currently being studied for the obvious reason that it allows the use of the extensive toolbox that comes with this model plant. Deciphering plant traits that drive selection and activities of the microbiome is now a major challenge in which Arabidopsis will undoubtedly be a major research object. Here we review recent microbiome studies and discuss future research directions and applicability of the generated knowledge. PMID:23755059

  5. Phene Synergism between Root Hair Length and Basal Root Growth Angle for Phosphorus Acquisition1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Miguel, Magalhaes Amade

    2015-01-01

    Shallow basal root growth angle (BRGA) increases phosphorus acquisition efficiency by enhancing topsoil foraging because in most soils, phosphorus is concentrated in the topsoil. Root hair length and density (RHL/D) increase phosphorus acquisition by expanding the soil volume subject to phosphorus depletion through diffusion. We hypothesized that shallow BRGA and large RHL/D are synergetic for phosphorus acquisition, meaning that their combined effect is greater than the sum of their individual effects. To evaluate this hypothesis, phosphorus acquisition in the field in Mozambique was compared among recombinant inbred lines of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) having four distinct root phenotypes: long root hairs and shallow basal roots, long root hairs and deep basal roots, short root hairs and shallow basal roots, and short root hairs and deep basal roots. The results revealed substantial synergism between BRGA and RHL/D. Compared with short-haired, deep-rooted phenotypes, long root hairs increased shoot biomass under phosphorus stress by 89%, while shallow roots increased shoot biomass by 58%. Genotypes with both long root hairs and shallow roots had 298% greater biomass accumulation than short-haired, deep-rooted phenotypes. Therefore, the utility of shallow basal roots and long root hairs for phosphorus acquisition in combination is twice as large as their additive effects. We conclude that the anatomical phene of long, dense root hairs and the architectural phene of shallower basal root growth are synergetic for phosphorus acquisition. Phene synergism may be common in plant biology and can have substantial importance for plant fitness, as shown here. PMID:25699587

  6. Modeling root reinforcement using a root-failure Weibull survival function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, M.; Giadrossich, F.; Cohen, D.

    2013-11-01

    Root networks contribute to slope stability through complex interactions with soil that include mechanical compression and tension. Due to the spatial heterogeneity of root distribution and the dynamics of root turnover, the quantification of root reinforcement on steep slopes is challenging and consequently the calculation of slope stability also. Although considerable progress has been made, some important aspects of root mechanics remain neglected. In this study we address specifically the role of root-strength variability on the mechanical behavior of a root bundle. Many factors contribute to the variability of root mechanical properties even within a single class of diameter. This work presents a new approach for quantifying root reinforcement that considers the variability of mechanical properties of each root diameter class. Using the data of laboratory tensile tests and field pullout tests, we calibrate the parameters of the Weibull survival function to implement the variability of root strength in a numerical model for the calculation of root reinforcement (RBMw). The results show that, for both laboratory and field data sets, the parameters of the Weibull distribution may be considered constant with the exponent equal to 2 and the normalized failure displacement equal to 1. Moreover, the results show that the variability of root strength in each root diameter class has a major influence on the behavior of a root bundle with important implications when considering different approaches in slope stability calculation. Sensitivity analysis shows that the calibration of the equations of the tensile force, the elasticity of the roots, and the root distribution are the most important steps. The new model allows the characterization of root reinforcement in terms of maximum pullout force, stiffness, and energy. Moreover, it simplifies the implementation of root reinforcement in slope stability models. The realistic quantification of root reinforcement for tensile

  7. Root-cubing and general root-powering methods for finding the zeros of polynomials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bareiss, E. H.

    1969-01-01

    Mathematical analysis technique generalizes a root squaring and root cubing method into a general root powering method. The introduction of partitioned polynomials into this general root powering method simplifies the coding of the polynomial transformations into input data suitable for processing by computer. The method includes analytic functions.

  8. Application of glutathione to roots selectively inhibits cadmium transport from roots to shoots in oilseed rape

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Shin-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione is a tripeptide involved in various aspects of plant metabolism. This study investigated the effects of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) applied to specific organs (source leaves, sink leaves, and roots) on cadmium (Cd) distribution and behaviour in the roots of oilseed rape plants (Brassica napus) cultured hydroponically. The translocation ratio of Cd from roots to shoots was significantly lower in plants that had root treatment of GSH than in control plants. GSH applied to roots reduced the Cd concentration in the symplast sap of root cells and inhibited root-to-shoot Cd translocation via xylem vessels significantly. GSH applied to roots also activated Cd efflux from root cells to the hydroponic solution. Inhibition of root-to-shoot translocation of Cd was visualized, and the activation of Cd efflux from root cells was also shown by using a positron-emitting tracer imaging system (PETIS). This study investigated a similar inhibitory effect on root-to-shoot translocation of Cd by the oxidized form of glutathione, GSSG. Inhibition of Cd accumulation by GSH was abolished by a low-temperature treatment. Root cells of plants exposed to GSH in the root zone had less Cd available for xylem loading by actively excluding Cd from the roots. Consequently, root-to-shoot translocation of Cd was suppressed and Cd accumulation in the shoot decreased. PMID:23364937

  9. Estimate of fine root production including the impact of decomposed roots in a Bornean tropical rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Ayumi; Khoon Koh, Lip; Kume, Tomonori; Makita, Naoki; Matsumoto, Kazuho; Ohashi, Mizue

    2016-04-01

    Considerable carbon is allocated belowground and used for respiration and production of roots. It is reported that approximately 40 % of GPP is allocated belowground in a Bornean tropical rainforest, which is much higher than those in Neotropical rainforests. This may be caused by high root production in this forest. Ingrowth core is a popular method for estimating fine root production, but recent study by Osawa et al. (2012) showed potential underestimates of this method because of the lack of consideration of the impact of decomposed roots. It is important to estimate fine root production with consideration for the decomposed roots, especially in tropics where decomposition rate is higher than other regions. Therefore, objective of this study is to estimate fine root production with consideration of decomposed roots using ingrowth cores and root litter-bag in the tropical rainforest. The study was conducted in Lambir Hills National Park in Borneo. Ingrowth cores and litter bags for fine roots were buried in March 2013. Eighteen ingrowth cores and 27 litter bags were collected in May, September 2013, March 2014 and March 2015, respectively. Fine root production was comparable to aboveground biomass increment and litterfall amount, and accounted only 10% of GPP in this study site, suggesting most of the carbon allocated to belowground might be used for other purposes. Fine root production was comparable to those in Neotropics. Decomposed roots accounted for 18% of fine root production. This result suggests that no consideration of decomposed fine roots may cause underestimate of fine root production.

  10. Far-ultraviolet stellar photometry: Fields in Sagittarius and Scorpius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Edward G.; Carruthers, George R.

    1995-02-01

    Far-ultraviolet photometry for 741 objects in a field in Sagittarius centered near M8 and 541 objects in a field centered near sigma Scorpii is presented. These data were extracted from electographic images obtained with two cameras during a shuttle flight in 1991 April/May. The cameras provided band passes with lambdaeff = 1375 A and lambdaeff = 1781 A. Synthetic colors show that these bands are sensitive to effective temperature for hot stars. Our measurements were placed on a quantitative far-ultraviolet magnitude scale by convolving the spectra of stars observed by IUE with our cameras' spectral response functions. Fifty-eight percent of the ultraviolet objects were identified with visible stars using the SIMBAD database while another 40% of the objects are blends of early type stars too close together to separate with our resolution. Our photometry is compared with that from the TD-1, OAO 2, and ANS satellites and the S201 (Apollo 16) far-ultraviolet camera and found to agree at the level of a few tenths of a magnitude. Unlike previous studies, almost half of the identified visual counterparts to the ultraviolet objects are early B stars. A plot of distance modulus against ultraviolet color excess reveals a significant population of stars with strong ultraviolet excess.

  11. The pattern of secondary root formation in curving roots of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortin, M. C.; Pierce, F. J.; Poff, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    A gravitational stimulus was used to induce the curvature of the main root of Arabidopsis thaliana. The number of secondary roots increased on the convex side and decreased on the concave side of any curved main root axes in comparison with straight roots used as the control. The same phenomenon was observed with the curved main roots of plants grown on a clinostat and of mutant plants exhibiting random root orientation. The data suggest that the pattern of lateral root formation is associated with curvature but is independent of the environmental stimuli used to induce curvature.

  12. Outdoor ultraviolet polychromatic action spectra for growth responses of Bellis perennis and Cynosurus cristatus.

    PubMed

    Cooley, N M; Truscott, H M; Holmes, M G; Attridge, T H

    2000-12-01

    Polychromatic ultraviolet (UV) action spectra for various growth responses of the dicotyledon Bellis perennis L. (daisy) and the grass Cynosurus cristatus L. (crested dog's-tail) have been measured. The plants were grown in the natural environment and ambient daylight was supplemented with five different UV irradiances centred at eight different wavelengths (313, 318, 320, 322, 339, 348, 356 and 377 nm). Destructive growth analysis was performed on B. perennis and C. cristatus after 300 and 122 days respectively. Dose response curves were created to construct action spectra for individual responses. Different spectral responses were observed in these two plant types. B. perennis exhibited a substantial action maximum at 313 nm for the inhibition of aerial, root and total dry weight; a similar action maximum at 313 nm for the inhibition of leaf expansion was observed. Longer wavelengths were relatively ineffective on these growth parameters, with the exception of a small but statistically significant (P < 0.05) response to 320 nm radiation. By contrast, C. cristatus showed negligible response to 313 nm radiation, for inhibition of aerial, root and total dry weight but substantial responses to longer wavelengths, especially at 339 and 348 nm. These action spectra add weight to suggestions in the literature that UV-A has a role to play in responses in this region of the spectrum. The possible implications of these observations are discussed. PMID:11332892

  13. Stellar Ultraviolet Rocket Research Program. [faint object spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A 1/4 meter ultraviolet spectrometer, developed to measure the ultraviolet flux from several standard type stars was flown successfully on Aerobee rockets. The ultraviolet flux from alpha Lyr, eta U Ma, zeta Oph, delta Ori, alpha CMa, beta CMa, and alpha Leo were measured. These values agreed with the OAO data obtained by Code in the 1200 to 3400 A region to + or - 9%. The design and calibration of a faint object spectrometer for observing stars and nebula with a 3 A resolution and a 3% accuracy in a 60 second observation are discussed.

  14. Tuning the work function of graphene by ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yow-Jon; Zeng, Jian-Jhou

    2013-05-06

    Graphene layers grown by chemical vapor deposition were, respectively, irradiated for 0, 20, 40, and 60 min by an ultraviolet light source in order to experimentally study the change in the work function of graphene. The dependences of the work function and carrier concentration upon ultraviolet irradiation have been found. It is shown that ultraviolet irradiation may lead to oxygen desorption, thus reducing the hole density and work function of graphene. Based on the well-known expression for the Fermi energy of Dirac fermions, the Fermi velocity of graphene was extracted to be about 5.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} m/s.

  15. Biological applications of ultraviolet free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J.C.

    1997-10-01

    This review examines the possibilities for biological research using the three ultraviolet free-electron lasers that are nearing operational status in the US. The projected operating characteristics of major interest in biological research of the free-electron lasers at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, and Duke University are presented. Experimental applications in the areas of far- and vacuum ultraviolet photophysics and photochemistry, structural biology, environmental photobiology, and medical research are discussed and the prospects for advances in these areas, based upon the characteristics of the new ultraviolet free-electron lasers, are evaluated.

  16. Far-ultraviolet imagery of the Barnard Loop Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, G. R.; Opal, C. B.

    1977-01-01

    An electrographic Schmidt camera carried on a sounding rocket has yielded far-ultraviolet (1050-2000 A and 1230-2000 A) images of the Barnard Loop Nebula and of the general background in the Orion region due to scattering of ultraviolet starlight by interstellar dust particles. The total intensity in the Barnard Loop region agrees well with OAO-2 measurements, but the discrete Loop structure contributes only some 15% of the total. The measurements are consistent with a relatively high albedo for the dust grains in the far-ultraviolet.

  17. Rotational Raman scattering (Ring effect) in satellite backscatter ultraviolet measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebula, Richard P.; Joiner, Joanna; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Hilsenrath, Ernest; McPeters, Richard D.; Park, Hongwoo

    1995-07-01

    A detailed radiative transfer calculation has been carried out to estimate the effects of rotational Raman scattering (RRS) on satellite measurements of backscattered ultraviolet radiation. Raman-scattered light is shifted in frequency from the incident light, which causes filling in of solar Fraunhofer lines in the observed backscattered spectrum (also known as the Ring effect). The magnitude of the rotational Raman scattering filling in is a function of wavelength, solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, surface pressure, and instrument spectral resolution. The filling in predicted by our model is found to be in agreement with observations from the Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Radiometer and the Nimbus-7 Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Radiometer.

  18. Investigation of the diffuse ultraviolet background with DE data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, John D.

    1988-01-01

    The imaging instrumentation on the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite is used to measure the intensity of the diffused ultraviolet radiation on two great circles about the sky. It was found that the extragalactic component of the diffuse ultraviolet radiation has an intensity of 530 + or - 15 units (a unit is one photon/(sq cm s A sr) at a wavelength of 150 nm. The galactic component of the diffuse ultraviolet radiation has a dependence on galactic latitude which requires strongly forward scattering particles if it is produced by dust above the galactic plane.

  19. Optimal root arrangement of cereal crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Yeonsu; Park, Keunhwan; Kim, Ho-Young

    2015-11-01

    The plant root absorbs water from the soil and supplies it to the rest part of the plant. It consists of a number of root fibers, through whose surfaces water uptake occurs. There is an intriguing observation that for most of cereal crops such as maize and wheat, the volume density of root in the soil declines exponentially as a function of depth. To understand this empirical finding, we construct a theoretical model of root water uptake, where mass transfer into root surface is modeled just as heat flux around a fin. Agreement between the theoretically predicted optimal root distribution in vertical direction and biological data supports the hypothesis that the plant root has evolved to achieve the optimal water uptake in competition with neighbors. This study has practical implication in the agricultural industry as well as optimal design of water transport networks in both micro- and macroscales. Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea.

  20. Inhibitory effects of Enteromorpha linza polysaccharide on micronucleus of Allium sativum root cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongshan; Wang, Xiaomei; Li, Jingfen; Liu, Chongbin; Zhang, Quanbin

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the antimutagenic function of the polysaccharide from Enteromorpha linza with the micronucleus test of Allium sativum root cells induced by sulfur dioxide and ultraviolet was studied. The concentration-effect relation of the two inducers was firstly evaluated. The results showed that an increase of genotoxicity damage was demonstrated and micronuclei frequency induced by sulfur dioxide and ultraviolet displayed dose dependent increases. All the doses of polysaccharide did affect the micronuclei frequency formation compared with the negative control. And also, the significant increase in inhibition rate of micronuclei frequency was observed with the increase of the dose of polysaccharide. It was showed maximum inhibition of micronuclei frequency cells (71.74% and 66.70%) at a concentration of 200g/mL in three experiments. The low molecular weight polysaccharide showed higher inhibition rate than raw polysaccharide at the higher concentration (50g/mL) in the absence of sulfur dioxide and ultraviolet. It was confirmed to be a good mutant inhibitor. PMID:26927934

  1. Real-time ultraviolet and column ozone from multichannel ultraviolet radiometers deployed in the National Science Foundation's ultraviolet monitoring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, Germar; Booth, Charles R.; Ehramjian, James C.

    2005-04-01

    Multichannel moderate-bandwidth ground-based ultraviolet (GUV) filter radiometers have recently been installed at several sites of the U.S. National Science Foundation's UV monitoring network where they complement high-resolution solar UV-100 (SUV-100) spectroradiometers. The five GUV channels are characterized for their spectral response and calibrated against SUV systems as well as irradiance standard lamps. Results indicate that accurate spectral characterization of GUV channels in the UV-B is crucial for obtaining high-quality UV measurements, in particular if instruments are calibrated with standard lamps. Using an inversion algorithm suggested by Dahlback (1996), total column ozone and approximately 30 different UV integrals and dose rates are routinely calculated from GUV measurements. For UV-A irradiance, GUV and SUV data agree to within +/-5% for solar zenith angles (SZAs) up to 90 deg. A similarly good agreement can be achieved for the UV index if solar measurements are restricted to SZAs smaller than 78 deg. The agreement for data products that are dominated by wavelengths in the UV-B is generally worse, but can be substantially improved if GUV instruments are equipped with an additional channel at 313 nm. GUV total column ozone values agree on average to within +/-5% with observations from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) on board the earth probe satellite. GUV data products are disseminated via the website www.biospherical.com/NSF in near real time.

  2. Chemical stress by different agents affects the melatonin content of barley roots.

    PubMed

    Arnao, Marino B; Hernández-Ruiz, Josefa

    2009-04-01

    The presence of melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) in plants has been clearly demonstrated. However, while this indoleamine has been intensively studied in animals, especially in mammals, the same is not true in the case of plants, where one of the most interesting aspects is its possible role as antioxidative molecule in physiological processes. Some data reflect the possible protective role that melatonin may exert in some stress situations such as ultraviolet (UV)-radiation, induced senescence and copper stress. The present work was designed to establish how the melatonin content changes in plants as a result of chemically induced stress. For this, barley plants were exposed in different treatments to the chemical-stress agents: sodium chloride, zinc sulphate or hydrogen peroxide. After different times, the content of melatonin in treated roots and control roots were determined using liquid chromatography (LC) with time-of-flight/mass spectrometry and LC with fluorescence detection for identification and quantification, respectively. The data show that the melatonin content in roots increased due to stress, reaching up to six times the melatonin content of control roots. Induction was time dependent, while hydrogen peroxide (10 mm) and zinc sulphate (1 mm) were the most effective inducers. The capacity of roots to absorb melatonin from soil was also studied. The data establish, for first time, that the chemical-stress agents assayed can induce the biosynthesis of melatonin in barley roots and produce a significant increase in their melatonin content. Such an increase in melatonin probably plays an important antioxidative role in the defense against chemically induced stress and other abiotic/biotic stresses. PMID:19196434

  3. Extreme ultraviolet spectral irradiance measurements since 1946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidtke, G.

    2015-03-01

    In the physics of the upper atmosphere the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation plays a dominant role controlling most of the thermospheric/ionospheric (T/I) processes. Since this part of the solar spectrum is absorbed in the thermosphere, platforms to measure the EUV fluxes became only available with the development of rockets reaching altitude levels exceeding 80 km. With the availability of V2 rockets used in space research, recording of EUV spectra started in 1946 using photographic films. The development of pointing devices to accurately orient the spectrographs toward the sun initiated intense activities in solar-terrestrial research. The application of photoelectric recording technology enabled the scientists placing EUV spectrometers aboard satellites observing qualitatively strong variability of the solar EUV irradiance on short-, medium-, and long-term scales. However, as more measurements were performed more radiometric EUV data diverged due to the inherent degradation of the EUV instruments with time. Also, continuous recording of the EUV energy input to the T/I system was not achieved. It is only at the end of the last century that there was progress made in solving the serious problem of degradation enabling to monitore solar EUV fluxes with sufficient radiometric accuracy. The data sets available allow composing the data available to the first set of EUV data covering a period of 11 years for the first time. Based on the sophisticated instrumentation verified in space, future EUV measurements of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) are promising accuracy levels of about 5% and less. With added low-cost equipment, real-time measurements will allow providing data needed in ionospheric modeling, e.g., for correcting propagation delays of navigation signals from space to earth. Adding EUV airglow and auroral emission monitoring by airglow cameras, the impact of space weather on the terrestrial T/I system can be studied with a spectral terrestrial

  4. The Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Legacy of HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope has been a spectacularly successful platform for spectroscopy in the diagnostic-rich far-ultraviolet (FUV: 120-170 nm) and near-ultraviolet (NUV: 170-310 nm) regions. HST has hosted four generations of UV instruments, beginning with Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) and Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) in the original 1990 payload, followed by Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) in 1997, and more recently Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) as part of Servicing Mission 4 in 2009. The latter two instruments have contributed by far the lion's share of HST's spectroscopic archive: STIS, because of its longevity (thirteen years in operation so far, although with a hiatus between 2004-2009); and COS because of its high sensitivity, which allows efficient observations, and thus many more targets in a typical GO program. STIS benefits from a compact echelle design, and the sharp stable imaging of HST, to provide high-resolution (3-7 km s-1) spectra of bright objects, including stars, nebulae, quasars, novae, and so forth. COS achieves astounding sensitivity in the FUV by a sophisticated design that compensates for the spherical abberation of HST's primary mirror, disperses the target's light, and focuses the spectral image all with just a single optical element. While the spectral resolution of COS (about 18 km s-1) is not as high as that of STIS, it is adequate for diverse investigations, including faint broad-lined AGN at the edge of the Universe, hot stars in nearby galaxies, and magnetically active planet-hosting red dwarfs in the solar neighborhood. Thanks in part to the "UV Initiative" in recent HST proposal cycles, there have been several large efforts involving both STIS and COS, to assemble important spectral collections, including full UV atlases of representative hot and cool stars at high resolution with STIS; long time series of archetype AGN ("reverberation mapping") with COS; and hundreds of sightlines to distant

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF RELATIVE SENSITIVITY OF AMPHIBIANS TO ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Different studies have demonstrated that solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation can adversely affect survival and development of embryonic and larval amphibians. However, because of among-laboratory variations in exposure profiles (artificial vs. natural sunlight; natural sunlight at d...

  6. HYDRAULIC STUDIES AND CLEANING EVALUATIONS OF ULTRAVIOLET DISINFECTION UNITS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Various types of operating ultraviolet disinfection reactor designs were evaluated for hydraulic characteristics and cleaning requirements. The fluorocarbon polymer tube designs promote plug-flow behavior because of their relatively high length-to-diameter ratio. Hydraulic evalua...

  7. Photosynthetic carbon reduction by seagrasses exposed to ultraviolet A radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The seagrasses Halophila engelmannii, Halodule wrightii, and Syringodium filiforme were examined for their intrinsic sensitivity to ultraviolet-A-UV-A and ultraviolet-B-UV-B radiation. The effect of UV-A on photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) was also determined. Ultraviolet-A and ultraviolet-B were studied with emphasis on the greater respective environmental consequence in terms of seagrass distribution and abundance. Results indicate that an intrinsic sensitivity to UV-A alone is apparent only in Halophila, while net photosynthesis in Halodule and Syringodium seems unaffected by the level of UV-A provided. The sensitivity of Halophila to UV-A in the absense of (PAR) indicates that the photosynthetic reaction does not need to be in operation for damage to occur. Other significant results are reported.

  8. Measurements of Radiating Flow Fields in the Vacuum Ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikh, U. A.; Jacobs, C.; Laux, C. O.; Morgan, R. G.; McIntyre, T. J.

    The vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region of the radiation spectrum spans from 100 nm to 200 nm and is responsible for 30-50 % of the radiative heat flux during peak heating for a lunar return trajectory [1].

  9. Vacuum ultraviolet laser induced fluorescence on a Si atomic beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brian, T. R.; Lawler, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    A broadly applicable vacuum ultraviolet experiment is described for measuring radiative lifetimes of neutral and singly-ionized atoms in a beam environment to 5-percent accuracy using laser induced fluorescence. First results for neutral Si are reported.

  10. Complex refractive index of Martian dust - Mariner 9 ultraviolet observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, K.; Ajello, J. M.; Hord, C. W.; Egan, W. G.

    1976-01-01

    Mariner 9 ultraviolet spectrometer observations of the 1971 dust clouds obscuring the surface of Mars have been analyzed by matching the observed dust phase function with Mie scattering calculations for size distributions of homogeneous and isotropic material. Preliminary results indicate an effective particle radius of not less than 0.2. The real component of the index of refraction is not less than 1.8 at both 268 and 305 nm; corresponding values for the imagery component are 0.02 and 0.01. These values are consistent with those found by Mead (1970) for the visible and near-visible wavelengths. The refractive index and the absorption coefficient increase rapidly with decreasing wavelength in going from the visible to the ultraviolet, indicating the presence of an ultraviolet absorption band which may shield organisms from ultraviolet irradiation.

  11. Good Afternoon, Sunshine! Protecting Children from Ultraviolet Rays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Certo, Delaine

    1996-01-01

    Notes caregivers' responsibility to protect children from too much exposure to ultraviolet radiation and the potential for melanoma. Provides suggestions on how to prevent children from sunburn and skin cancer, including the proper way to apply sunscreen. (MOK)

  12. A Comparison of Optical Detectors for the Visible and Ultraviolet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, William E. L.

    1989-01-01

    Presents data for instructors on the current state of ultraviolet-visible detector technology and gives sources of further information. Described are the mechanisms and characteristics of photomultiplier tubes and array detectors. Lists 15 references. (YP)

  13. Determination of the Solar Ultraviolet Transmission in Tree Shade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parisi, Alfio V.; Kimlin, Michael G.

    1999-01-01

    Presents an activity in which the amount of solar ultraviolet radiation in tree shade is measured at different times of the day and compared with changes in illumination levels and temperature. (Author/WRM)

  14. Ultraviolet Radiation Induction of Mutation in Penicillium Claviforme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New, June; Jolley, Ray

    1986-01-01

    Cites reasons why Penicillium claviforme is an exceptionally good species for ultraviolet induced mutation experiments. Provides a set of laboratory instructions for teachers and students. Includes a discussion section. (ML)

  15. Light shield and cooling apparatus. [high intensity ultraviolet lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, T. G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A light shield and cooling apparatus was developed for a high intensity ultraviolet lamp including water and high pressure air for cooling and additional apparatus for shielding the light and suppressing the high pressure air noise.

  16. Polymer filters for ultraviolet-excited integrated fluorescence sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandin, Marc; Abshire, Pamela; Smela, Elisabeth

    2012-09-01

    Optical filters for blocking ultraviolet (UV) light were fabricated by doping various polymer hosts with a UV absorbing chromophore. The polymers were polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a silicone elastomer frequently used in microfluidics, SU-8, a photopatternable epoxy, and Humiseal 1B66, an acrylic coating used for moisture protection of integrated circuits. The chromophore was 2-(2‧-hydroxy-5‧-methylphenyl) benzotriazole (BTA), which has a high extinction coefficient between 300 nm and 400 nm. We demonstrate filters 5 µm thick that exhibit high ultraviolet rejection (nearly -40 dB at 342 nm) yet pass visible light (near 0 dB above 400 nm), making them ideal for ultraviolet-excited fluorescence sensing within microsystems. The absorbance of the BTA depended on the host polymer. These filters are promising for integrated fluorescence spectroscopy in bioanalytical platforms because they can be patterned by dry etching, molding or exposure to ultraviolet light.

  17. General complex polynomial root solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skowron, J.; Gould, A.

    2012-12-01

    This general complex polynomial root solver, implemented in Fortran and further optimized for binary microlenses, uses a new algorithm to solve polynomial equations and is 1.6-3 times faster than the ZROOTS subroutine that is commercially available from Numerical Recipes, depending on application. The largest improvement, when compared to naive solvers, comes from a fail-safe procedure that permits skipping the majority of the calculations in the great majority of cases, without risking catastrophic failure in the few cases that these are actually required.

  18. Xanthones from Garcinia propinqua Roots.

    PubMed

    Meesakul, Pornphimol; Pansanit, Acharavadee; Maneerat, Wisanu; Sripisut, Tawanun; Ritthiwigrom, Thunwadee; Machana, Theeraphan; Cheenpracha, Sarot; Laphookhieo, Surat

    2016-01-01

    Phytochemical investigation of Garcinia propinqua roots led to the isolation and identification of a new xanthone, doitunggarcinone D (1), together with 15 known compounds (2-16). Their structures were elucidated by intensive analysis of spectroscopic data. Compounds 3, 6, 7, 14, 15 and 16 exhibited strong antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis TISTR 088 with MIC values in the range of 1-4 µg/mL. Compounds 3, 7, 10 and 14 also showed good antibacterial activity against B. cereus TISTR 688 with MIC values ranging from 4-8 µg/mL. PMID:26996028

  19. Observations of the far ultraviolet airflow by the Ultraviolet Limb Imaging experiment on STS-39

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budzien, S. A.; Feldman, P. D.; Conway, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Limb Imaging (UVLIM) experiment flew on STS-39 in the spring of 1991 to observe the Earth's thermospheric airglow and included a far ultraviolet (1080-1800 A) spectrometer. We present first results from this spectrometer, including a spectroscopic analysis at 6-A resolution of H, O, N, and N2 dayglow emissions and modeling of the observed limb-scan profiles of dayglow emissions. The observed N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) emission reflects a vibrational population distribution in the a(1 Pi)(sub g) state that differs significantly from those predicted for direct electron excitation and excitation with cascade from the a('1 Sigma)(sub u)(-) and w(1 Delta)(sub u) states. The vibrational population distribution and LBH brightness suggest a total cascade rate 45% that of direct excitation, in contrast to laboratory measurements. For the first time, pronounced limb brightening is observed in both the N I lambda 1200 limb emission profiles, as expected for emissions excited by N2 dissociation which produces kinetically fast N fragments; however, optically thick components of these features are also observed. Preliminary modeling of the OI lambda 1356, HI lambda 1216, and OI lambda 1304 and OI lambda 1641 emissions agrees to within roughly 10% of the observed limb-scan profiles, but the models underestimate the N2 LBH profiles by a factor of 1.4-1.6, consistent with the inferred cascade effect. Other findings include: an OI lambda 1152/lambda 1356 intensity ratio that is inconsistent with the large cascade contribution to OI lambda 1356 from np 5P states required by laboratory and nightglow observations; nightglow observations of the tropical ultraviolet arcs exhibit a wide range of OI lambda 1356/lambda 1304 intensity ratios and illustrate the complicated observing geometry and radiative transfer effects that must be modeled; and we find a 3-sigma upper limit of 8.5 R to the total LBH vehicle glow emission.

  20. Morphometric data of canine sacral nerve roots with reference to electrical sacral root stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rijkhoff, N J; Koldewijn, E L; d'Hollosy, W; Debruyne, F M; Wijkstra, H

    1996-01-01

    Experiments to investigate restoration of lower urinary tract control by electrical stimulation of the sacral nerve roots are mostly performed on dogs, yet little morphometric data (such as canine root and fiber diameter distributions) are available. The aim of this study was to acquire morphometric data of the intradural canine sacral dorsal and ventral roots (S1-S3). Cross-sections of sacral roots of two beagle dogs were analyzed using a light microscope and image processing software. The cross-sectional area of each root was measured. The diameters of the fibers and the axons in the cross-sections of the S2 and S3 roots were measured and used to construct nerve fiber diameter frequency distribution histograms. The results show a unimodal diameter distribution for the dorsal roots and a bimodal distribution for the ventral roots. In addition the average ratio g of the axon diameter to fiber diameter was calculated for each root. PMID:8732990

  1. Root canal treatment of a maxillary first premolar with three roots

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Josey; Devadathan, Aravindan; Syriac, Gibi; Shamini, Sai

    2015-01-01

    Successful root canal treatment needs a thorough knowledge of both internal and external anatomy of a tooth. Variations in root canal anatomy constitute an impressive challenge to the successful completion of endodontic treatment. Undetected extra roots and canals are a major reason for failed root canal treatment. Three separate roots in a maxillary first premolar have a very low incidence of 0.5–6%. Three rooted premolars are anatomically similar to molars and are sometimes called “small molars or radiculous molars.” This article explains the diagnosis and endodontic management of a three rooted maxillary premolar with separate canals in each root highlighting that statistics may indicate a low incidence of abnormal variations in root canal morphology of a tooth, but aberrant anatomy is a possibility in any tooth. Hence, modern diagnostics like cone beam computed tomography, and endodontic operating microscope may have to be used more for predictable endodontic treatment. PMID:26538958

  2. Inhibition of auxin movement from the shoot into the root inhibits lateral root development in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, R. C.; Brady, S. R.; Muday, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    In roots two distinct polar movements of auxin have been reported that may control different developmental and growth events. To test the hypothesis that auxin derived from the shoot and transported toward the root controls lateral root development, the two polarities of auxin transport were uncoupled in Arabidopsis. Local application of the auxin-transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) at the root-shoot junction decreased the number and density of lateral roots and reduced the free indoleacetic acid (IAA) levels in the root and [3H]IAA transport into the root. Application of NPA to the basal half of or at several positions along the root only reduced lateral root density in regions that were in contact with NPA or in regions apical to the site of application. Lateral root development was restored by application of IAA apical to NPA application. Lateral root development in Arabidopsis roots was also inhibited by excision of the shoot or dark growth and this inhibition was reversible by IAA. Together, these results are consistent with auxin transport from the shoot into the root controlling lateral root development.

  3. Foraging strategies in trees of different root morphology: the role of root lifespan.

    PubMed

    Adams, Thomas S; McCormack, M Luke; Eissenstat, David M

    2013-09-01

    Resource exploitation of patches is influenced not simply by the rate of root production in the patches but also by the lifespan of the roots inhabiting the patches. We examined the effect of sustained localized nitrogen (N) fertilization on root lifespan in four tree species that varied widely in root morphology and presumed foraging strategy. The study was conducted in a 12-year-old common garden in central Pennsylvania using a combination of data from minirhizotron and root in-growth cores. The two fine-root tree species, Acer negundo L. and Populus tremuloides Michx., exhibited significant increases in root lifespan with local N fertilization; no significant responses were observed in the two coarse-root tree species, Sassafras albidum Nutt. and Liriodendron tulipifera L. Across species, coarse-root tree species had longer median root lifespan than fine-root tree species. Localized N fertilization did not significantly increase the N concentration or the respiration of the roots growing in the N-rich patch. Our results suggest that some plant species appear to regulate the lifespan of different portions of their root system to improve resource acquisition while other species do not. Our results are discussed in the context of different strategies of foraging of nutrient patches in species of different root morphology. PMID:24128849

  4. PATTERNS IN SOIL FERTILITY AND ROOT HERBIVORY INTERACT TO INFLUENCE FINE-ROOT DYNAMICS.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Glen, N.; Jones, Robert, H.

    2006-03-01

    Fine-scale soil nutrient enrichment typically stimulates root growth, but it may also increase root herbivory, resulting in trade-offs for plant species and potentially influencing carbon cycling patterns. We used root ingrowth cores to investigate the effects of microsite fertility and root herbivory on root biomass in an aggrading upland forest in the coastal plain of South Carolina, USA. Treatments were randomly assigned to cores from a factorial combination of fertilizer and insecticide. Soil, soil fauna, and roots were removed from the cores at the end of the experiment (8–9 mo), and roots were separated at harvest into three diameter classes. Each diameter class responded differently to fertilizer and insecticide treatments. The finest roots (,1.0 mm diameter), which comprised well over half of all root biomass, were the only ones to respond significantly to both treatments, increasing when fertilizer and when insecticide were added (each P , 0.0001), with maximum biomass found where the treatments were combined (interaction term significant, P , 0.001). These results suggest that root-feeding insects have a strong influence on root standing crop with stronger herbivore impacts on finer roots and within more fertile microsites. Thus, increased vulnerability to root herbivory is a potentially significant cost of root foraging in nutrient-rich patches.

  5. Extreme ultraviolet transmission of a synthetic diamond thin film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, John V.; Gibson, J. L.; Knowles, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements are presented of a thin film of synthetic diamond at various wavelengths in the extreme ultraviolet. The synthetic diamond combines the transmission properties of carbon with the strength, density, and ruggedness of a natural diamond. The Extreme Ultraviolet Transmission (EUV) of a film of the synthetic diamond has shown the existence of a thin surface layer of silicon, probably in the form of silicon carbide, which is not a contaminant layer.

  6. Novel Ultraviolet Light Absorbing Polymers For Optical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doddi, Namassivaya; Yamada, Akira; Dunks, Gary B.

    1988-07-01

    Ultraviolet light absorbing monomers have been developed that can be copolymerized with acrylates. The composition of the resultant stable copolymers can be adjusted to totally block the transmission of light below about 430 nm. Fabrication of lenses from the materials is accomplished by lathe cutting and injection molding procedures. These ultraviolet light absorbing materials are non-mutagenic and non-toxic and are currently being used in intraocular lenses.

  7. Prediction of skin cancer occurrence by ultraviolet solar index

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Miguel; Rojas, Elisa; Calaf, Gloria M.

    2012-01-01

    An increase in the amount of solar ultraviolet light that reaches the Earth is considered to be responsible for the worldwide increase in skin cancer. It has been reported that exposure to excessive levels of solar ultraviolet light has multiple effects, which can be harmful to humans. Experimental ultraviolet light measurements were obtained in several locations in Chile between 2006 and 2009 using wide-band solar light Biometer YES, calibrated according to World Meteorological Organization (WMO) criteria and integrated into the National Meteorological Center of Chile ultraviolet network (DMC). The aim of this study was to determine skin cancer rates in relation to experimental data accumulated during one year of studying the solar ultraviolet index in Chile, in order to explain the possible effect of radiation on skin cancer. The rate of skin cancer per 100,000 persons was considered in Arica, Santiago, Concepción and Valdivia and extrapolated to other cities. Results of the present study showed that the incidence of skin cancer was markedly correlated with accumulative ultraviolet radiation, and rates of skin cancer could be extrapolated to other locations in Chile. There is a steady increase in the rate of skin cancer in cities located nearest to the equator (low latitude) that receive greater accumulated solar ultraviolet radiation, due to the accumulative effects of this type of radiation on the skin. It can be concluded that Arica is a city at sea level that receives higher levels of ultraviolet solar radiation than other locations, which may explain the higher prevalence of skin cancer in the population of this location, compared with other cities in Chile. PMID:22741013

  8. Engineering support for an ultraviolet imager for the ISTP mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, Douglas G.

    1991-01-01

    Design and development activities were carried out for the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) to be flown on the Polar Spacecraft of the INternational Solar Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Mission. The following tasks were performed: (1) design and fabrication of prototype/engineering model of the UVI imager; (2) preliminary design review; (3) vacuum ultraviolet filter design; (4) auroral energy deposition code; (5) model of LBH vehicle glow; (6) laboratory measurement program of collision cross-sections; and (7) support of ISTP meetings.

  9. Correlation of Far Ultraviolet Lunar Albedo with Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddox, Will; Spann, James F.; Germany, Glynn

    2004-01-01

    We present a correlative analysis between the variability of the lunar albedo in the far ultraviolet wavelength range (130- 190 nm) and various solar activity indices for a two-week period. We also report lunar albedo measurements in four separate wavelength ranges, corresponding to four filters on the Polar Ultraviolet Imager. To our knowledge this is the first reported long term measurements of the lunar albedo in this wavelength range.

  10. Ultraviolet (UV) From Quasars - Skylab Student Experiment ED-23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This chart describes the Skylab student experiment Ultraviolet (UV) from Quasars, proposed by John C. Hamilton of Aiea, Hawaii. This experiment utilized Skylab's Ultraviolet Stellar Astronomy equipment to photograph quasars in the UV spectrum and compare those images to existing radio and visible data. In March 1972 NASA and the National Science Teachers Association selected 25 experiment proposals for flight on Skylab. Science advisors from the Marshall Space Flight Center aided and assisted the students in developing the proposals for flight on Skylab.

  11. Optical design of solar blind ultraviolet warning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Quanyong; Xu, Chunyun; Dong, Jianing

    2012-11-01

    Ultraviolet warning technology is one of the important methods for missile warning. "Solar blind region" provides a very effective way to detect the target for missile approaching alarm. In order to find the target by detecting the ultraviolet radiation of missile efflux plasma, ultraviolet optical system design of large field of view and large relative aperture is the key for the technology of ultraviolet detection. From the academic point of view, the structure parameters are determined for 2048×2048 ultraviolet CCD detector according to the requirements of ultraviolet warning system. The refractive ultraviolet warning optical system is designed for 0.24μm ~0.28μm wave band with ZEMAX optical design software. The focal length is 41mm, the field of view is 46°and the relative aperture is 1:3.5. In order to ensure the detected energy, aspherical and binary surface are adopted to reduce the aberration and spot size of the system. Within the 0.8 field of view RMS of spot diagram is less than 13μm. It is smaller than the pixel size 13.5μm of ultraviolet CCD. The energy concentration is more than 80%. This optical system has long focal length and large relative aperture that meet the energy requirements of warning system. Large field of view can satisfy the range of searching targets. The spot diagram RMS of each field of view is so small that can meet the requirement of image quality. In addition, the system is composed of six lenses. The structure of it is simple, the volume is small and the application is very convenient.

  12. Regeneration of imprint molds using vacuum ultraviolet light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, Masashi; Yamaguchi, Masanori; Yabu, Shintaro

    2011-04-01

    Etching characteristics of various resins by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, λ=172 nm) light have been examined under conditions of exposure time, substrate temperature, radiation distance and ambient oxygen concentration. The VUV light have used to clean the imprinted molds which are contaminated by organic substances such as ultraviolet-resins through many times of imprinting processes, and it has revealed that the VUV light has effectively regenerated the contaminated molds manufactured by quartz, silicon-carbide and nickel.

  13. Absolute dosimetry for extreme-ultraviolet lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Kurt W.; Campiotti, Richard H.

    2000-06-01

    The accurate measurement of an exposure dose reaching the wafer on an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithographic system has been a technical challenge directly applicable to the evaluation of candidate EUV resist materials and calculating lithography system throughputs. We have developed a dose monitoring sensor system that can directly measure EUV intensities at the wafer plane of a prototype EUV lithographic system. This sensor system, located on the wafer stage adjacent to the electrostatic chuck used to grip wafers, operates by translating the sensor into the aerial image, typically illuminating an 'open' (unpatterned) area on the reticle. The absolute signal strength can be related to energy density at the wafer, and thus used to determine resist sensitivity, and the signal as a function of position can be used to determine illumination uniformity at the wafer plane. Spectral filtering to enhance the detection of 13.4 nm radiation was incorporated into the sensor. Other critical design parameters include the packaging and amplification technologies required to place this device into the space and vacuum constraints of a EUV lithography environment. We describe two approaches used to determine the absolute calibration of this sensor. The first conventional approach requires separate characterization of each element of the sensor. A second novel approach uses x-ray emission from a mildly radioactive iron source to calibrate the absolute response of the entire sensor system (detector and electronics) in a single measurement.

  14. An atlas of ultraviolet P Cygni profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, Theodore P.; Lamers, Henny J. G. L. M.; Lindholm, Douglas M.; Odell, Andrew P.

    1994-01-01

    We have selected spectra of 232 stars from the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) archives for inclusion in an atlas intended for various uses but tailored especially for the study of stellar winds. The atlas covers the range in spectral types from O3 to F8. The full atlas covers the reduced and normalized high resolution spectra from the IUE long- and short-wavelength spectrographs. Here we discuss the selection of the stars and the data reduction, and we present in velocity units the profiles of lines formed in the stellar winds. The selected lines cover a wide range of ionizations, allowing a comparison of the profiles from different ions in the wind of each star and a comparison of the different wind lines as a function spectral type and luminosity. We also present the basic data on the program stars to facilitate study of the dependence of wind features on stellar parameters such as luminosity, temperature, escape velocity, and v sin i. We provide an overview of the characteristic behavior of the wind lines in the H-R diagram. The complete spectra are available in digital form through the NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS). We offer a description of the electronic database that is available through the ADS and guidelines for obtaining access to that database.

  15. Ultraviolet spectroscopy of R Coronae Borealis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm, A. V.; Doherty, L. R.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of the hydrogen-deficient supergiant R CrB were obtained with the IUE over an interval of 54 days in order to study the nature of this star's irregular, small-amplitude variations in light. By chance, the series of observations coincided with a dip in the light intermediate between the normal fluctuations and the deep declines associated with the formation of an obscuring dust cloud. High-resolution spectra have been used to search for radial velocity variations, while low-resolution spectra yield ultraviolet light curves down to 1810 A. Both types of spectra have been analyzed for indications of temperature changes. It is found that a combination of photospheric temperature variation and variable extinction is necessary to account for the details of the observations. A simple, ad hoc, periodic model is presented in which the amount of obscuring dust varies in proportion to the drop in temperature, but at a later time, reproduces the wavelength dependence of both the amplitudes and phase shifts of the light curves. The radial velocities are consistent with pulsation being responsible for the temperature variation.

  16. Coherence techniques at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chang

    2002-10-01

    The renaissance of Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray (SXR) optics in recent years is mainly driven by the desire of printing and observing ever smaller features, as in lithography and microscopy. This attribute is complemented by the unique opportunity for element specific identification presented by the large number of atomic resonances, essentially for all materials in this range of photon energies. Together, these have driven the need for new short-wavelength radiation sources (e.g. third generation synchrotron radiation facilities), and novel optical components, that in turn permit new research in areas that have not yet been fully explored. This dissertation is directed towards advancing this new field by contributing to the characterization of spatial coherence properties of undulator radiation and, for the first time, introducing Fourier optical elements to this short-wavelength spectral region. The first experiment in this dissertation uses the Thompson-Wolf two-pinhole method to characterize the spatial coherence properties of the undulator radiation at Beamline 12 of the Advanced Light Source. High spatial coherence EUV radiation is demonstrated with appropriate spatial filtering. The effects of small vertical source size and beamline apertures are observed. The difference in the measured horizontal and vertical coherence profile evokes further theoretical studies on coherence propagation of an EUV undulator beamline. A numerical simulation based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle is performed.

  17. Ultraviolet Radiation in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, M., Hanslmeier, A.

    UV radiation is an important part in the electromagnetic spectrum since the energy of the photons is great enough to produce important chemical reactions in the atmospheres of planets and satellites of our Solar System, thereby affecting the transmission of this radiation to the ground and its physical properties. Scientists have used different techniques (balloons and rockets) to access to the information contained in this radiation, but the pioneering of this new frontier has not been free of dangers. The Sun is our main source of UV radiation and its description occupies the first two chapters of the book. The Earth is the only known location where life exists in a planetary system and therefore where the interaction of living organism with UV radiation can be tested through different epochs and on distinct species. The development of the human technology has affected the natural shield of ozone that protects complex lifeforms against damaging UV irradiation. The formation of the ozone hole and its consequences are described, together with the possible contribution of UV radiation to recent climate changes. Finally, we will discuss the the potential role of ultraviolet light in the development of life on bodies such as Mars, Europa and Titan. The Solar System is not isolated; other external sources can contribute to the enhancement of the UV radiation in our environment. The influence of such events as nearby supernovae and gamma-ray bursts are described, together with the consequences to terrestrial life from such events.

  18. Coral Skeletons Defend against Ultraviolet Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Reef, Ruth; Kaniewska, Paulina; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove

    2009-01-01

    Background Many coral reef organisms are photosynthetic or have evolved in tight symbiosis with photosynthetic symbionts. As such, the tissues of reef organisms are often exposed to intense solar radiation in clear tropical waters and have adapted to trap and harness photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). High levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) associated with sunlight, however, represent a potential problem in terms of tissue damage. Methodology/Principal Findings By measuring UVR and PAR reflectance from intact and ground bare coral skeletons we show that the property of calcium carbonate skeletons to absorb downwelling UVR to a significant extent, while reflecting PAR back to the overlying tissue, has biological advantages. We placed cnidarians on top of bare skeletons and a UVR reflective substrate and showed that under ambient UVR levels, UVR transmitted through the tissues of cnidarians placed on top of bare skeletons were four times lower compared to their counterparts placed on a UVR reflective white substrate. In accordance with the lower levels of UVR measured in cnidarians on top of coral skeletons, a similar drop in UVR damage to their DNA was detected. The skeletons emitted absorbed UVR as yellow fluorescence, which allows for safe dissipation of the otherwise harmful radiation. Conclusions/Significance Our study presents a novel defensive role for coral skeletons and reveals that the strong UVR absorbance by the skeleton can contribute to the ability of corals, and potentially other calcifiers, to thrive under UVR levels that are detrimental to most marine life. PMID:19946361

  19. Far Ultraviolet Remote Sensing: Challenges and Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxton, L. J.

    2004-12-01

    The far ultraviolet is commonly taken to be that spectral range from 115 nm to 185 nm. This definition reflects the practical nature and origin of the measurement technique. The short wavelength cut-off is defined by the transmittance cut-off of window materials (about 115 nm). The long wavelength end of the region is defined by the desire to exclude the orders-of-magnitude brighter signal at around 195 nm, which, happily, coincides with the fall-off in CsI photocathode efficiency at around 185 nm. The FUV allows us to probe the atmosphere down to about 130 km (as low as 80 km in H Lyman alpha). In this paper I will discuss what we have learned by using a novel imager, GUVI, on TIMED to study the ionosphere-thermosphere (IT) system, how we see the IT coupled to geospace and the solar input, and what we can learn from a future FUV system. In particular, I want to stress that FUV remote sensing is an important COMPONENT of a complete system for exploring the connections between the Sun, geospace, and the IT system. To that end, I will briefly discuss how those data need to be integrated into a virtual observatory that will enable new investigations into the near-Earth environment.

  20. Sources and measurement of ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Diffey, Brian L

    2002-09-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is part of the electromagnetic spectrum. The biological effects of UV radiation vary enormously with wavelength and for this reason the UV spectrum is further subdivided into three regions: UVA, UVB, and UVC. Quantities of UV radiation are expressed using radiometric terminology. A particularly important term in clinical photobiology is the standard erythema dose (SED), which is a measure of the erythemal effectiveness of a UV exposure. UV radiation is produced either by heating a body to an incandescent temperature, as is the case with solar UV, or by passing an electric current through a gas, usually vaporized mercury. The latter process is the mechanism whereby UV radiation is produced artificially. Both the quality (spectrum) and quantity (intensity) of terrestrial UV radiation vary with factors including the elevation of the sun above the horizon and absorption and scattering by molecules in the atmosphere, notably ozone, and by clouds. For many experimental studies in photobiology it is simply not practicable to use natural sunlight and so artificial sources of UV radiation designed to simulate the UV component of sunlight are employed; these are based on either optically filtered xenon arc lamps or fluorescent lamps. The complete way to characterize an UV source is by spectroradiometry, although for most practical purposes a detector optically filtered to respond to a limited portion of the UV spectrum normally suffices. PMID:12231182