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Sample records for rootworm diabrotica virgifera

  1. Historical and contemporary demography of United States populations of Western Corn Rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera; WCR) was sampled across much of its U.S. range for population genetic analyses. We assayed sequence variation at the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) locus and allelic variation at eleven microsatellite loci. ...

  2. Synthetic feeding stimulants enhance insecticide activity against western corn rootworm larvae, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In behavioral bioassays, the addition of a synthetic feeding stimulant blend improved the efficacy of the insecticide thiamethoxam against neonate western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, larvae. In 4-h bioassays, the concentration of thiamethoxam required for 50% mortality (LC...

  3. Quantitative trait locus mapping and functional genomics of an organophosphate resistance trait in the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, is an insect pest of corn, and population suppression with chemical insecticides is an important management tool. Traits conferring organophosphate insecticide resistance have increased in frequency among WCR populations, resulting in...

  4. Genetics of United States Populations of Western Corn Rootworm ( Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) and Implications for Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Corn Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera; WCR) were sampled from across much of their US range for population genetic analyses. We assayed allelic variation at microsatellite loci, including markers within a cadherin-like gene, a locus shown to be correlated with resistance to Bacillus...

  5. A NOVEL CADHERIN-LIKE GENE FROM WESTERN CORN ROOTWORM, DIABROTICA VIRGIFERA VIRGIFERA (COLEOPTERA: CHRYSOMELIDAE), LARVAL MIDGUT TISSUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A cadherin-like gene and its mRNA were cloned from western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera: Coleoptera), an economically important agricultural pest in North America and Europe. The full length cDNA (5371 bp in length) encodes an open reading frame for a 1688 amino ...

  6. Preliminary Mapping of the Western Corn Rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) Genome and Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) Interval Mapping for Growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preliminary investigations into the organization of the western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera; WCR) genome have resulted in low to moderate density gender-specific maps constructed from progeny of a backcrossed, short-diapause WCR family. Maps were based upon variation at microsatel...

  7. RNAi as a management tool for the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera.

    PubMed

    Fishilevich, Elane; Vélez, Ana M; Storer, Nicholas P; Li, Huarong; Bowling, Andrew J; Rangasamy, Murugesan; Worden, Sarah E; Narva, Kenneth E; Siegfried, Blair D

    2016-09-01

    The western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, is the most important pest of corn in the US Corn Belt. Economic estimates indicate that costs of control and yield loss associated with WCR damage exceed $US 1 billion annually. Historically, corn rootworm management has been extremely difficult because of its ability to evolve resistance to both chemical insecticides and cultural control practices. Since 2003, the only novel commercialized developments in rootworm management have been transgenic plants expressing Bt insecticidal proteins. Four transgenic insecticidal proteins are currently registered for rootworm management, and field resistance to proteins from the Cry3 family highlights the importance of developing traits with new modes of action. One of the newest approaches for controlling rootworm pests involves RNA interference (RNAi). This review describes the current understanding of the RNAi mechanisms in WCR and the use of this technology for WCR management. Further, the review addresses ecological risk assessment of RNAi and insect resistance management of RNAi for corn rootworm. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:27218412

  8. Entomopathogenic fungi in cornfields and their potential to manage larval western corn rootworm Diabrotica virgifera virgifera.

    PubMed

    Rudeen, Melissa L; Jaronski, Stefan T; Petzold-Maxwell, Jennifer L; Gassmann, Aaron J

    2013-11-01

    Entomopathogenic ascomycete fungi are ubiquitous in soil and on phylloplanes, and are important natural enemies of many soil-borne arthropods including larval western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, which is a major pest of corn. We measured the prevalence of Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae sensu lato in ten cornfields in Iowa, USA by baiting with larval insects. B. bassiana and M. anisopliae s.l. were present in 60% ± 6.3% and 55% ± 6.4% of soil samples, respectively. Subsequent laboratory bioassays found that some M. anisopliae s.l. strains collected from cornfields killed a greater proportion of D.v. virgifera larvae than a standard commercial strain. PMID:24120889

  9. Molecular Evolution of Glycoside Hydrolase Genes in the Western Corn Rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera)

    PubMed Central

    Eyun, Seong-il; Wang, Haichuan; Pauchet, Yannick; ffrench-Constant, Richard H.; Benson, Andrew K.; Valencia-Jiménez, Arnubio; Moriyama, Etsuko N.; Siegfried, Blair D.

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose is an important nutritional resource for a number of insect herbivores. Digestion of cellulose and other polysaccharides in plant-based diets requires several types of enzymes including a number of glycoside hydrolase (GH) families. In a previous study, we showed that a single GH45 gene is present in the midgut tissue of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). However, the presence of multiple enzymes was also suggested by the lack of a significant biological response when the expression of the gene was silenced by RNA interference. In order to clarify the repertoire of cellulose-degrading enzymes and related GH family proteins in D. v. virgifera, we performed next-generation sequencing and assembled transcriptomes from the tissue of three different developmental stages (eggs, neonates, and third instar larvae). Results of this study revealed the presence of seventy-eight genes that potentially encode GH enzymes belonging to eight families (GH45, GH48, GH28, GH16, GH31, GH27, GH5, and GH1). The numbers of GH45 and GH28 genes identified in D. v. virgifera are among the largest in insects where these genes have been identified. Three GH family genes (GH45, GH48, and GH28) are found almost exclusively in two coleopteran superfamilies (Chrysomeloidea and Curculionoidea) among insects, indicating the possibility of their acquisitions by horizontal gene transfer rather than simple vertical transmission from ancestral lineages of insects. Acquisition of GH genes by horizontal gene transfers and subsequent lineage-specific GH gene expansion appear to have played important roles for phytophagous beetles in specializing on particular groups of host plants and in the case of D. v. virgifera, its close association with maize. PMID:24718603

  10. Molecular evolution of glycoside hydrolase genes in the Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera).

    PubMed

    Eyun, Seong-il; Wang, Haichuan; Pauchet, Yannick; Ffrench-Constant, Richard H; Benson, Andrew K; Valencia-Jiménez, Arnubio; Moriyama, Etsuko N; Siegfried, Blair D

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose is an important nutritional resource for a number of insect herbivores. Digestion of cellulose and other polysaccharides in plant-based diets requires several types of enzymes including a number of glycoside hydrolase (GH) families. In a previous study, we showed that a single GH45 gene is present in the midgut tissue of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). However, the presence of multiple enzymes was also suggested by the lack of a significant biological response when the expression of the gene was silenced by RNA interference. In order to clarify the repertoire of cellulose-degrading enzymes and related GH family proteins in D. v. virgifera, we performed next-generation sequencing and assembled transcriptomes from the tissue of three different developmental stages (eggs, neonates, and third instar larvae). Results of this study revealed the presence of seventy-eight genes that potentially encode GH enzymes belonging to eight families (GH45, GH48, GH28, GH16, GH31, GH27, GH5, and GH1). The numbers of GH45 and GH28 genes identified in D. v. virgifera are among the largest in insects where these genes have been identified. Three GH family genes (GH45, GH48, and GH28) are found almost exclusively in two coleopteran superfamilies (Chrysomeloidea and Curculionoidea) among insects, indicating the possibility of their acquisitions by horizontal gene transfer rather than simple vertical transmission from ancestral lineages of insects. Acquisition of GH genes by horizontal gene transfers and subsequent lineage-specific GH gene expansion appear to have played important roles for phytophagous beetles in specializing on particular groups of host plants and in the case of D. v. virgifera, its close association with maize. PMID:24718603

  11. Validation of reference housekeeping genes for gene expression studies in western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera).

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Thaís Barros; Barros Rodrigues, Thaís; Khajuria, Chitvan; Wang, Haichuan; Matz, Natalie; Cunha Cardoso, Danielle; Valicente, Fernando Hercos; Zhou, Xuguo; Siegfried, Blair

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) is a powerful technique to investigate comparative gene expression. In general, normalization of results using a highly stable housekeeping gene (HKG) as an internal control is recommended and necessary. However, there are several reports suggesting that regulation of some HKGs is affected by different conditions. The western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is a serious pest of corn in the United States and Europe. The expression profile of target genes related to insecticide exposure, resistance, and RNA interference has become an important experimental technique for study of western corn rootworms; however, lack of information on reliable HKGs under different conditions makes the interpretation of qRT-PCR results difficult. In this study, four distinct algorithms (Genorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper and delta-CT) and five candidate HKGs to genes of reference (β-actin; GAPDH, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase; β-tubulin; RPS9, ribosomal protein S9; EF1a, elongation factor-1α) were evaluated to determine the most reliable HKG under different experimental conditions including exposure to dsRNA and Bt toxins and among different tissues and developmental stages. Although all the HKGs tested exhibited relatively stable expression among the different treatments, some differences were noted. Among the five candidate reference genes evaluated, β-actin exhibited highly stable expression among different life stages. RPS9 exhibited the most similar pattern of expression among dsRNA treatments, and both experiments indicated that EF1a was the second most stable gene. EF1a was also the most stable for Bt exposure and among different tissues. These results will enable researchers to use more accurate and reliable normalization of qRT-PCR data in WCR experiments. PMID:25356627

  12. Validation of Reference Housekeeping Genes for Gene Expression Studies in Western Corn Rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera)

    PubMed Central

    Barros Rodrigues, Thaís; Khajuria, Chitvan; Wang, Haichuan; Matz, Natalie; Cunha Cardoso, Danielle; Valicente, Fernando Hercos; Zhou, Xuguo; Siegfried, Blair

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) is a powerful technique to investigate comparative gene expression. In general, normalization of results using a highly stable housekeeping gene (HKG) as an internal control is recommended and necessary. However, there are several reports suggesting that regulation of some HKGs is affected by different conditions. The western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is a serious pest of corn in the United States and Europe. The expression profile of target genes related to insecticide exposure, resistance, and RNA interference has become an important experimental technique for study of western corn rootworms; however, lack of information on reliable HKGs under different conditions makes the interpretation of qRT-PCR results difficult. In this study, four distinct algorithms (Genorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper and delta-CT) and five candidate HKGs to genes of reference (β-actin; GAPDH, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase; β-tubulin; RPS9, ribosomal protein S9; EF1a, elongation factor-1α) were evaluated to determine the most reliable HKG under different experimental conditions including exposure to dsRNA and Bt toxins and among different tissues and developmental stages. Although all the HKGs tested exhibited relatively stable expression among the different treatments, some differences were noted. Among the five candidate reference genes evaluated, β-actin exhibited highly stable expression among different life stages. RPS9 exhibited the most similar pattern of expression among dsRNA treatments, and both experiments indicated that EF1a was the second most stable gene. EF1a was also the most stable for Bt exposure and among different tissues. These results will enable researchers to use more accurate and reliable normalization of qRT-PCR data in WCR experiments. PMID:25356627

  13. Broad-spectrum resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins by western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera).

    PubMed

    Jakka, Siva R K; Shrestha, Ram B; Gassmann, Aaron J

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of resistance and cross-resistance threaten the sustainability of genetically engineered crops that produce insecticidal toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is a serious pest of maize and has been managed with Bt maize since 2003. We conducted laboratory bioassays with maize hybrids producing Bt toxins Cry3Bb1, mCry3A, eCry3.1Ab, and Cry34/35Ab1, which represent all commercialized Bt toxins for management of western corn rootworm. We tested populations from fields where severe injury to Cry3Bb1 maize was observed, and populations that had never been exposed to Bt maize. Consistent with past studies, bioassays indicated that field populations were resistant to Cry3Bb1 maize and mCry3A maize, and that cross-resistance was present between these two types of Bt maize. Additionally, bioassays revealed resistance to eCry3.1Ab maize and cross-resistance among Cry3Bb1, mCry3A and eCry3.1Ab. However, no resistance or cross-resistance was detected for Cry34/35Ab1 maize. This broad-spectrum resistance illustrates the potential for insect pests to develop resistance rapidly to multiple Bt toxins when structural similarities are present among toxins, and raises concerns about the long-term durability of Bt crops for management of some insect pests. PMID:27297953

  14. Broad-spectrum resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins by western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera)

    PubMed Central

    Jakka, Siva R. K.; Shrestha, Ram B.; Gassmann, Aaron J.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of resistance and cross-resistance threaten the sustainability of genetically engineered crops that produce insecticidal toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is a serious pest of maize and has been managed with Bt maize since 2003. We conducted laboratory bioassays with maize hybrids producing Bt toxins Cry3Bb1, mCry3A, eCry3.1Ab, and Cry34/35Ab1, which represent all commercialized Bt toxins for management of western corn rootworm. We tested populations from fields where severe injury to Cry3Bb1 maize was observed, and populations that had never been exposed to Bt maize. Consistent with past studies, bioassays indicated that field populations were resistant to Cry3Bb1 maize and mCry3A maize, and that cross-resistance was present between these two types of Bt maize. Additionally, bioassays revealed resistance to eCry3.1Ab maize and cross-resistance among Cry3Bb1, mCry3A and eCry3.1Ab. However, no resistance or cross-resistance was detected for Cry34/35Ab1 maize. This broad-spectrum resistance illustrates the potential for insect pests to develop resistance rapidly to multiple Bt toxins when structural similarities are present among toxins, and raises concerns about the long-term durability of Bt crops for management of some insect pests. PMID:27297953

  15. Purification and kinetic analysis of acetylcholinesterase from western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Gao, J R; Rao, J V; Wilde, G E; Zhu, K Y

    1998-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE, EC 3.1.1.7) was purified from western corn rootworm (WCR, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) beetles by affinity chromatography. The purification factor reached over 20,000-fold with a specific activity of 169.5 mumol/min/mg and a yield of 23%. The Vmax values for hydrolyzing acetylthiocholine (ATC), acetyl-(beta-methyl) thiocholine (A beta MTC), propionylthiocholine (PTC), and S-butyrylthiocholine (BTC) were 184.8, 140.5, 150.2, and 18.8 mumol/min/mg, respectively, and K(m) values were 19.7, 18.5, 14.1, and 11.0 microM, respectively. The first three substrates showed significant inhibition to the AChE at higher concentrations, whereas BTC showed inhibition at the concentrations of 0.25-2 nM but activation at > 4 mM. AChE activity was almost completely inhibited by 1 microM eserine and BW284C15, respectively, but only 12% of AChE activity were inhibited by ethopropazine at the same concentration. These results suggested that the purified AChE from WCR was a typical insect AChE. Insecticides or their oxidative metabolites, chlorpyrifos-methyl oxon, carbofuran, carbaryl, malaoxon, and paraoxon, used in in vitro kinetic study exhibited high inhibition to AChE purified from WCR. However, chlorpyrifos-methyl oxon and carbofuran showed at least 36- and 4-fold, respectively, higher inhibitory potency than the remaining insecticides examined. Results from our in vitro inhibition of AChE agreed quite well with the previously published in vivo bioassay data. PMID:9880902

  16. Binary toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis active against the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte.

    PubMed

    Baum, James A; Chu, Chi-Rei; Rupar, Mark; Brown, Gregory R; Donovan, William P; Huesing, Joseph E; Ilagan, Oliver; Malvar, Thomas M; Pleau, Michael; Walters, Matthew; Vaughn, Ty

    2004-08-01

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is a significant pest of corn in the United States. The development of transgenic corn hybrids resistant to rootworm feeding damage depends on the identification of genes encoding insecticidal proteins toxic to rootworm larvae. In this study, a bioassay screen was used to identify several isolates of the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis active against rootworm. These bacterial isolates each produce distinct crystal proteins with approximate molecular masses of 13 to 15 kDa and 44 kDa. Insect bioassays demonstrated that both protein classes are required for insecticidal activity against this rootworm species. The genes encoding these proteins are organized in apparent operons and are associated with other genes encoding crystal proteins of unknown function. The antirootworm proteins produced by B. thuringiensis strains EG5899 and EG9444 closely resemble previously described crystal proteins of the Cry34A and Cry35A classes. The antirootworm proteins produced by strain EG4851, designated Cry34Ba1 and Cry35Ba1, represent a new binary toxin. Genes encoding these proteins could become an important component of a sustainable resistance management strategy against this insect pest. PMID:15294828

  17. Binary Toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis Active against the Western Corn Rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte

    PubMed Central

    Baum, James A.; Chu, Chi-Rei; Rupar, Mark; Brown, Gregory R.; Donovan, William P.; Huesing, Joseph E.; Ilagan, Oliver; Malvar, Thomas M.; Pleau, Michael; Walters, Matthew; Vaughn, Ty

    2004-01-01

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is a significant pest of corn in the United States. The development of transgenic corn hybrids resistant to rootworm feeding damage depends on the identification of genes encoding insecticidal proteins toxic to rootworm larvae. In this study, a bioassay screen was used to identify several isolates of the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis active against rootworm. These bacterial isolates each produce distinct crystal proteins with approximate molecular masses of 13 to 15 kDa and 44 kDa. Insect bioassays demonstrated that both protein classes are required for insecticidal activity against this rootworm species. The genes encoding these proteins are organized in apparent operons and are associated with other genes encoding crystal proteins of unknown function. The antirootworm proteins produced by B. thuringiensis strains EG5899 and EG9444 closely resemble previously described crystal proteins of the Cry34A and Cry35A classes. The antirootworm proteins produced by strain EG4851, designated Cry34Ba1 and Cry35Ba1, represent a new binary toxin. Genes encoding these proteins could become an important component of a sustainable resistance management strategy against this insect pest. PMID:15294828

  18. The western corn rootworm diabrotica Virgifera virgifera en route to Germany.

    PubMed

    Hummel, H E; Bertossa, M; Hein, D F; Wudtke, A; Urek, G; Modic, S; Ulrichs, Ch

    2005-01-01

    The western corn rootworm Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Col.:Chrysomelidae) (D.v.v.) is one of the most important maize pests in North America. Ever since its invasion into Europe and its detection near Belgrade airport by BACA in 1993 it quickly spread all over southeastern Europe and is now advancing towards central Europe. Up until summer 2004 considered free of D.v.v., Germany is, with the exception of its northern and northeastern borders, surrounded by countries with proven D.v.v. infestations. In addition to simultaneous spot introductions by airplanes, three main routes for terrestrial introduction into Germany are likely: 1. from south to north via Lombardy (Italy) through Switzerland to the State of Baden-Wuerttemberg in the southwest; 2. from south east to northwest via Croatia, Slovenia, Austria into the State of Bavaria; and 3. from Belgium and the Netherlands in southeasterly direction to the state of Northrhine-Westfalia. From these, progress of D.v.v. along route 1 is so far the most advanced. It follows the well established network of road and rail connections through Switzerland and underscores the active role mankind and its technology plays as an active distribution vector for D.v.v. Mandatory crop rotation in the Swiss Canton of Ticino did slow down but could not prevent the northbound advance of D.v.v. in 2004. Considering the recent discovery of D.v.vu near the South German border, its introduction into German territory is only a matter of time and may be ecologically unavoidable. In Slovenla, another relatively small southern transit state, the D.v.v. population density is still much lower than in Switzerland but with significantly increasing trend during 2004 and with special emphasis in its southeastern provinces. Considering its relatively short distance to southeastern Bavaria and the well developed transalpine rail, road and tunnel system, Slovenia as a transit state may provide another access route for D.v.v. of lesser but

  19. Quantitative trait locus mapping and functional genomics of an organophosphate resistance trait in the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera.

    PubMed

    Coates, B S; Alves, A P; Wang, H; Zhou, X; Nowatzki, T; Chen, H; Rangasamy, M; Robertson, H M; Whitfield, C W; Walden, K K; Kachman, S D; French, B W; Meinke, L J; Hawthorne, D; Abel, C A; Sappington, T W; Siegfried, B D; Miller, N J

    2016-02-01

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, is an insect pest of corn and population suppression with chemical insecticides is an important management tool. Traits conferring organophosphate insecticide resistance have increased in frequency amongst D. v. virgifera populations, resulting in the reduced efficacy in many corn-growing regions of the USA. We used comparative functional genomic and quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping approaches to investigate the genetic basis of D. v. virgifera resistance to the organophosphate methyl-parathion. RNA from adult methyl-parathion resistant and susceptible adults was hybridized to 8331 microarray probes. The results predicted that 11 transcripts were significantly up-regulated in resistant phenotypes, with the most significant (fold increases ≥ 2.43) being an α-esterase-like transcript. Differential expression was validated only for the α-esterase (ST020027A20C03), with 11- to 13-fold greater expression in methyl-parathion resistant adults (P < 0.05). Progeny with a segregating methyl-parathion resistance trait were obtained from a reciprocal backcross design. QTL analyses of high-throughput single nucleotide polymorphism genotype data predicted involvement of a single genome interval. These data suggest that a specific carboyxesterase may function in field-evolved corn rootworm resistance to organophosphates, even though direct linkage between the QTL and this locus could not be established. PMID:26566705

  20. Secondary contact and admixture between independently invading populations of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera in Europe.

    PubMed

    Bermond, Gérald; Ciosi, Marc; Lombaert, Eric; Blin, Aurélie; Boriani, Marco; Furlan, Lorenzo; Toepfer, Stefan; Guillemaud, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is one of the most destructive pests of corn in North America and is currently invading Europe. The two major invasive outbreaks of rootworm in Europe have occurred, in North-West Italy and in Central and South-Eastern Europe. These two outbreaks originated from independent introductions from North America. Secondary contact probably occurred in North Italy between these two outbreaks, in 2008. We used 13 microsatellite markers to conduct a population genetics study, to demonstrate that this geographic contact resulted in a zone of admixture in the Italian region of Veneto. We show that i) genetic variation is greater in the contact zone than in the parental outbreaks; ii) several signs of admixture were detected in some Venetian samples, in a bayesian analysis of the population structure and in an approximate bayesian computation analysis of historical scenarios and, finally, iii) allelic frequency clines were observed at microsatellite loci. The contact between the invasive outbreaks in North-West Italy and Central and South-Eastern Europe resulted in a zone of admixture, with particular characteristics. The evolutionary implications of the existence of a zone of admixture in Northern Italy and their possible impact on the invasion success of the western corn rootworm are discussed. PMID:23189184

  1. Assembly and annotation of full mitochondrial genomes for the corn rootworm species, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera and D. barberi (Insecta: Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), using Next Generation Sequence data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Complete mitochondrial genomes for two corn rootworm species, Diabrotica v. virgifera (16,747 bp) and D. barberi (16,632; Insecta: Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), were assembled from Illumina HiSeq2000 read data. Annotation indicated that the order and orientation of 13 protein coding genes (PCGs), and...

  2. Assembly and annotation of full mitochondrial genomes for the corn rootworm species, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera and Diabrotica barberi (Insecta: Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), using Next Generation Sequence data.

    PubMed

    Coates, Brad S

    2014-06-01

    Complete mitochondrial genomes for two corn rootworm species, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (16,747 bp) and Diabrotica barberi (16,632; Insecta: Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), were assembled from Illumina HiSeq2000 read data. Annotation indicated that the order and orientation of 13 protein coding genes (PCGs), and 22 tRNA and 2 rRNA sequences were in typical of insect mitochondrial genomes. Non-standard nad4 and cox3 stop codons were composed of single T nucleotides and likely completed by adenylation, and atypical TTT start codons was predicted for both D. v. virgifera and D. barberinad1 genes. The D. v. virgifera and D. barberi haplotypes showed 819 variable nucleotide positions within PCG regions (7.36% divergence), which suggest that speciation may have occurred ~3.68 million years ago assuming a linear rate of short-term substitution. Phylogenetic analyses of Coleopteran MtD genome show clustering based on family level, and may have the capacity to resolve the evolutionary history within this Order of insects. PMID:24657060

  3. Western corn rootworm Diabrotica v. virgifera in Europe: status, and options for future management.

    PubMed

    Hummel, H E; Deuker, A

    2009-01-01

    Diabrotica virgifero virgifera (Col.: Chrysomelidae) (western corn rootworm, WCR) unfortunately is now a firmly established European maize pest without indigenous natural enemies. Twenty years after its first introduction into Europe by traffic and trade, eradication is wishful thinking and not longer a viable option. Instead, European legislation calls for toxicological emergency measures on a case by case basis where and when new infestations occur either by new invasions from the native Americas or by introductions from other European countries. It is unclear at which point in time such treatment systems will break down because of development of resistant strains or by other complications of this seemingly unstable situation. Rather than proceeding as usual, sustainable biological, biotechnical and cultural methods should be practiced. Prominent among them are trapping and survey with attractants in conjunction with traditional crop rotation and phytosanitation. PMID:20218535

  4. Ultrastructural changes caused by Snf7 RNAi in larval enterocytes of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Le Conte).

    PubMed

    Koči, Juraj; Ramaseshadri, Parthasarathy; Bolognesi, Renata; Segers, Gerrit; Flannagan, Ronald; Park, Yoonseong

    2014-01-01

    The high sensitivity to oral RNA interference (RNAi) of western corn rootworm (WCR, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Le Conte) provides a novel tool for pest control. Previous studies have shown that RNAi of DvSnf7, an essential cellular component of endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT), caused deficiencies in protein de-ubiquitination and autophagy, leading to WCR death. Here we investigated the detailed mechanism leading to larval death by analyzing the ultrastructural changes in midgut enterocytes of WCR treated with double-stranded RNA (ds-DvSnf7). The progressive phases of pathological symptoms caused by DvSnf7-RNAi in enterocytes include: 1) the appearance of irregularly shaped macroautophagic complexes consisting of relatively large lysosomes and multi-lamellar bodies, indicative of failure in autolysosome formation; 2) cell sloughing and loss of apical microvilli, and eventually, 3) massive loss of cellular contents indicating loss of membrane integrity. These data suggest that the critical functions of Snf7 in insect midgut cells demonstrated by the ultrastructural changes in DvSnf7 larval enterocytes underlies the conserved essential function of the ESCRT pathway in autophagy and membrane stability in other organisms. PMID:24409288

  5. Identification of sensilla involved in taste mediation in adult western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte).

    PubMed

    Chyb, S; Eichenseer, H; Hollister, B; Mullin, C A; Frazier, J L

    1995-03-01

    A group of sensilla present on the maxillary galea of adult western corn rootworm,Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) beetles has been identified morphologically and physiologically to be involved in taste mediation. There are approximately 15 chemosensory hairs on each galea. Bilateral removal of these structures resulted in a significantly reduced consumption of a strongly phagostimulant triterpenoid, cucurbitacin B, and led to increased ingestion of a phagodeterrent alkaloid, strychnine. Electrophysiological responses obtained via tip-recording of galeal chemosensilla with submillimolar concentrations of host and nonhost plant compounds resulted in dose responses overlapping with the effective behavioral ranges. Cucurbitacin B was found to evoke chemosensory responses at levels as low as 0.1µM. Sinceγ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an agonist. (-)-β-hydrastine and strychnine are antagonists, and cucurbitacin B has been proposed to act at a separate modulatory site of classical synaptic GABA and glycine receptor-channel complexes, results reported here raise the possibility that there are peripheral chemosensory receptor sites that may resemble, functionally and structurally, synaptic receptor sites in the central nervous system. PMID:24234063

  6. Review on Resistance Breeding Options Targeting Western Corn Rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) in Europe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1. This review intends to present the part of the EU funded Project FP6, SSA: DIABR-ACT: Harmonise the strategies for fighting Diabrotica virgifera virgifera. Faculty of Agriculture in Osijek, Croatia, coordinated the part of the DIABR-ACT project concerning “resistance breeding” and reveal the lat...

  7. Monitoring western corn rootworm (Diabrotica v. virgifera) adults: situation in Romania 2008.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Hans E; Dinnesen, S; Nedelev, T; Grozea, I; Badea, A M; Ulrichs, Ch

    2009-01-01

    Romania is part of the southeast European expansion zone of the invasive rootworm species Diabrotica v. virgifera LeConte (Col.: Chrysomelidae) (WCR). The pest originated in North America and reached Belgrade airport with US foreign aid air shipments prior to 1992. Today, about 20 years after its introduction, WCR is a major maize pest which regionally causes economic damage to maize. However, it also can colonize secondary hosts which complicates IPM efforts. Basis for sound management is a reliable monitoring system. The easiest and cheapest way is to use Metcalf type monitoring traps for the mobile adults. Sex pheromones and plant kairomones for trapping are commercially available. Traps can be either bought or cheaply prepared. Metcalf traps with adhesive and lure cost about 15 cents per piece. So state-wide trapping is no longer a problem for less affluent countries. Results from two independent locations in 2008 report flight curves and attractively of secondary hosts like Sorghum spp. in relation to the principle host Zea mays. In addition, high capacity traps baited with pheromone are surprisingly effective, and, in combination with the chemically inert, absorptive silica powder AL 06, will be considered as future alternatives in cases where frequent monitoring is unfeasible and were a large holding capacity is indicated. PMID:20222584

  8. Behavior and Ecology of the Western Corn Rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1. Western corn rootworm beetles (WCR) are historic pests with a legacy of resistance and behavioral plasticity. Current patterns of behavior and nutritional ecology are important and relevant to the history and the future of rootworm management. The success of the most effective and environmenta...

  9. Western Corn Rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) Population Dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Much has been learned about the population dynamics of the western corn rootworm over the last half-century of intensive study, and this knowledge has helped humans manage this destructive pest of corn relatively successfully. However, this insect is something of a moving target when it comes to un...

  10. POLYMORPHIC MICROSATELLITE LOCI FROM NORTHERN AND MEXICAN CORN ROOTWORMS (INSECTA: COLEOPTERA: CHRYSOMELIDAE) AND CROSS-AMPLIFICATION WITH OTHER DIABROTICA SPP

    EPA Science Inventory

    The northern corn rootworm (Diabrotica barberi) and Mexican corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera zeae) are significant agricultural pests. For the northern corn rootworm, and to a lesser extent, the Mexican corn rootworm, high resolution molecular markers are needed. Here we pres...

  11. Antifeedant effects of proteinase inhibitors on feeding behaviors of adult western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera).

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hak; Mullin, Christopher A

    2003-04-01

    Low-molecular-weight peptidyl proteinase inhibitors (PIs) including leupeptin, calpain inhibitor I, and calpeptin were found to be potent antifeedants for adult western corn rootworm (WCR) against the phagostimulation of cucurbitacin B (Cuc B) or a corn pollen extract (CPE). Leupeptin was the strongest (ED50 = 0.36 and 0.55 nmol/disk for Cuc B and CPE, respectively) among PIs tested with an antifeedant potency much stronger than the steroid progesterone (ED50 = 2.29 and 5.05 nmol/disk for Cuc B and CPE, respectively), but slightly less than the reference alkaloid, strychnine (ED50 = 0.17 and 0.37 nmol/disk for Cuc B and CPE, respectively). All active PIs contain a di- or tripeptidyl aldehyde moiety, indicating that PIs exert their antifeedant effects by covalent interaction with putative sulfhydryl (SH) groups on taste receptors as do these PIs with cysteine proteinases. However, opposite inhibition potency against Cuc B versus CPE by two thiol-group reducing agents, DTT and L-cysteine, and the results with other cysteine-modifying reagents obscure the net functional role of SH groups at WCR taste chemoreceptors. Surprisingly, the model phagostimulant for diabroticites, Cuc B, was more easily counteracted by these feeding deterrents than the stimulants present in CPE. Three-dimensional structure-antifeedant relationships for the PIs suggest that a novel taste chemoreception mechanism exists for these peptidyl aldehydes or that they fit partially into a strychnine binding pocket on protein chemoreceptors. Favorable economic benefit may be achieved if PIs are discovered to be useful in adult WCR control, since both pre- and postingestive sites would be targeted. PMID:12775144

  12. Knockdown of RNA Interference Pathway Genes in Western Corn Rootworms (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Le Conte) Demonstrates a Possible Mechanism of Resistance to Lethal dsRNA

    PubMed Central

    Vélez, Ana María; Khajuria, Chitvan; Wang, Haichuan; Narva, Kenneth E.; Siegfried, Blair D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is being developed as a potential tool for insect pest management. Increased understanding of the RNAi pathway in target insect pests will provide information to use this technology effectively and to inform decisions related to resistant management strategies for RNAi based traits. Dicer 2 (Dcr2), an endonuclease responsible for formation of small interfering RNA’s and Argonaute 2 (Ago2), an essential catalytic component of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) have both been associated with the RNAi pathway in a number of different insect species including the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). We identified both genes from a transcriptome library generated from different tissues and developmental stages of the western corn rootworm, an important target pest for transgenic plants expressing dsRNA targeting essential genes. The expression of these genes was suppressed by more than 90% after injecting gene specific dsRNA into adult rootworms. The injected beetles were then fed vATPase A dsRNA which has previously been demonstrated to cause mortality in western corn rootworm adults. The suppression of both RNAi pathway genes resulted in reduced mortality after subsequent exposure to lethal concentrations of vATPase A dsRNA as well as increased vATPase A expression relative to control treatments. Injections with dsRNA for a non-lethal target sequence (Laccase 2) did not affect mortality or expression caused by vATPase A dsRNA indicating that the results observed with Argo and Dicer dsRNA were not caused by simple competition among different dsRNA’s. These results confirm that both genes play an important role in the RNAi pathway for western corn rootworms and indicate that selection pressures that potentially affect the expression of these genes may provide a basis for future studies to understand potential mechanisms of resistance. PMID:27310918

  13. Use of chromatin remodeling ATPases as RNAi targets for parental control of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) and Neotropical brown stink bug (Euschistus heros).

    PubMed

    Fishilevich, Elane; Vélez, Ana M; Khajuria, Chitvan; Frey, Meghan L F; Hamm, Ronda L; Wang, Haichuan; Schulenberg, Greg A; Bowling, Andrew J; Pence, Heather E; Gandra, Premchand; Arora, Kanika; Storer, Nicholas P; Narva, Kenneth E; Siegfried, Blair D

    2016-04-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing mechanism that is present in animals and plants and is triggered by double stranded RNA (dsRNA) or small interfering RNA (siRNA), depending on the organism. In the western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), RNAi can be achieved by feeding rootworms dsRNA added to artificial diet or plant tissues transformed to express dsRNA. The effect of RNAi depends on the targeted gene function and can range from an absence of phenotypic response to readily apparent responses, including lethality. Furthermore, RNAi can directly affect individuals that consume dsRNA or the effect may be transferred to the next generation. Our previous work described the potential use of genes involved in embryonic development as a parental RNAi technology for the control of WCR. In this study, we describe the use of chromatin-remodeling ATPases as target genes to achieve parental gene silencing in two insect pests, a coleopteran, WCR, and a hemipteran, the Neotropical brown stink bug, Euschistus heros Fabricius (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae). Our results show that dsRNA targeting chromatin-remodeling ATPase transcripts, brahma, mi-2, and iswi strongly reduced the fecundity of the exposed females in both insect species. Additionally, knockdown of chd1 reduced the fecundity of E. heros. PMID:26873291

  14. cDNA cloning, biochemical characterization and inhibition by plant inhibitors of the alpha-amylases of the Western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera.

    PubMed

    Titarenko, E; Chrispeels, M J

    2000-10-01

    We report the characterization and cDNA cloning of two alpha-amylase isozymes from larvae of the Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte). Larvae raised on artificial media have very low levels of amylase activity, and much higher levels are found in larvae raised on maize seedlings. At pH 5.7, the optimum pH for enzyme activity, the alpha-amylases are substantially but not completely inhibited by amylase inhibitors from the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and from wheat (Triticum aestivum). Using the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we cloned two cDNAs with 83% amino acid identity that encode alpha-amylase-like polypeptides. Expression of one of the two cDNAs in insect cells with a baculovirus vector shows that this cDNA encodes an active amylase with a mobility that corresponds to that of one of the two isozymes present in larval extracts. The expressed enzyme is substantially inhibited by the same two inhibitors. We also show that expression in Arabidopsis of the cDNA that encodes the amylase inhibitor AI-1 of the common bean results in the accumulation of active inhibitor in the roots, and the results are discussed with reference to the possibility of using amylase inhibitors as a strategy to genetically engineer maize plants that are resistant to Western corn rootworm larvae. PMID:10899464

  15. Behavioral and electrophysiological dose-response relationships in adult western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) for host pollen amino acids.

    PubMed

    Hollister, Benedict; Mullin, Christopher A.

    1998-05-01

    A strong correlation is shown between taste cell inputs and phagostimulatory outputs with predominant dietary pollen amino acids for western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera. Behavioral and electrophysiological dose-response profiles in adult beetles are presented for five major free amino acids in host pollens. Differential responses were found with strongest phagostimulation and sensory response elicited by L-alanine and L-serine, followed in order by L-proline and beta-alanine. gamma-Aminobutyric acid gave the weakest and most sporadic response. ED(50) values for phagostimulation and chemosensory input were 28.3nmol/disk and 13mM, respectively, for L-alanine and 17nmol/disk and 11mM, respectively, for serine. Threshold values for the responses were approximately 1-2mM. These behavioral and chemosensory dose-response ranges correspond closely to levels of free amino acids present in host plant pollens. Use of these response values in development of a pollen chemosensory code for western corn rootworm feeding is discussed. PMID:12770166

  16. Genes, Gene Flow and Adaptation of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genetics of the western corn rootworm, D. v. virgifera, is a relatively new field of study. Nevertheless, rapid progress has been made in recent years and this trend seems likely to continue. Much of the earliest work on Diabrotica genetics was concerned with phylogenetics and molecular species ...

  17. Effects of refuges on the evolution of resistance to transgenic corn by western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte is a major pest of corn causing millions of dollars of economic loss annually through yield reductions and preventative management practices. Corn producing toxins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have been developed to help manage D. v. virgifera. Sinc...

  18. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of an endogenous endoglucanase belonging to GHF45 from the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Arnubio; Alves, Analiza P; Siegfried, Blair D

    2013-01-25

    A novel insect β-1,4-endoglucanase (DvvENGaseI) gene belonging to the glycoside hydrolase family (GHF) 45 was identified from the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera. The cDNA of the DvvENGaseI consisted of a 720 bp open reading frame encoding a 239 amino-acid protein. Analysis of the amino acid sequence revealed that DvvENGaseI exhibits 60% protein sequence identity when compared with an endoglucanase belonging to GHF45 from another beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata. Western blot analyses using a polyclonal antiserum developed from a partial peptide sequence revealed that DvvENGaseI expression coincided with body regions corresponding to the fore-, mid- and hindgut, although regions corresponding to the midgut and hindgut were the primary sites for DvvENGaseI expression. Functional analysis of the DvvENGaseI by RNA interference (RNAi) indicated that nearly complete knock-down of gene expression could be obtained by injection of dsRNA based on qRT-PCR and western blot analysis. However, suppression only resulted in slight developmental delays suggesting that this gene may be part of a larger system of cellulose degrading enzymes. PMID:23137634

  19. Physiological and cellular responses caused by RNAi- mediated suppression of Snf7 orthologue in western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) larvae.

    PubMed

    Ramaseshadri, Parthasarathy; Segers, Gerrit; Flannagan, Ronald; Wiggins, Elizabeth; Clinton, William; Ilagan, Oliver; McNulty, Brian; Clark, Thomas; Bolognesi, Renata

    2013-01-01

    Ingestion of double stranded RNA (dsRNA) has been previously demonstrated to be effective in triggering RNA interference (RNAi) in western corn rootworm (WCR, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte), providing potential novel opportunities for insect pest control. The putative Snf7 homolog of WCR (DvSnf7) has previously been shown to be an effective RNAi target for insect control, as DvSnf7 RNAi leads to lethality of WCR larvae. Snf7 functions as a part of the ESCRT (Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport) pathway which plays a crucial role in cellular housekeeping by internalization, transport, sorting and lysosomal degradation of transmembrane proteins. To understand the effects that lead to death of WCR larvae by DvSnf7 RNAi, we examined some of the distinct cellular processes associated with ESCRT functions such as de-ubiquitination of proteins and autophagy. Our data indicate that ubiquitinated proteins accumulate in DvSnf7 dsRNA-fed larval tissues and that the autophagy process seems to be impaired. These findings suggest that the malfunctioning of these cellular processes in both midgut and fat body tissues triggered by DvSnf7 RNAi were the main effects leading to the death of WCR. This study also illustrates that Snf7 is an essential gene in WCR and its functions are consistent with biological functions described for other eukaryotes. PMID:23349844

  20. Performance of a model for egg hatching of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, using measured and modelled soil temperatures as input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaafsma, A. W.; Fuentes, J. D.; Gillespie, T. J.; Whitfield, G. H.; Ellis, C. R.

    1993-03-01

    A model for egg hatching of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, was tested at several locations in Ontario, Canada, during the 1989 and 1990 seasons. The model required soil temperatures as input and was tested using measured and modelled data. Modelled soil temperatures at 5 and 10 cm depths were obtained from empirically and physically based models. The physically based model provided better estimates of soil temperatues, but both models slightly underestimated the temperatures. Predicted egg hatching, using measured and modelled soil temperature at 5 and 10 cm depths for all locations, compared reasonably well with the observations of egg hatching. When using modelled soil temperatures, the egg developmental model performed better using soil temperatures from the physically based model. However, both soil temperature models provided sufficiently accurate temperature values for use in the egg developmental model. Unlike the empirically based model, the physically based model was not site-specific and its application to larger areas appeared feasible.

  1. A plant defensive cystatin (soyacystatin) targets cathepsin L-like digestive cysteine proteinases (DvCALs) in the larval midgut of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera).

    PubMed

    Koiwa, H; Shade, R E; Zhu-Salzman, K; D'Urzo, M P; Murdock, L L; Bressan, R A; Hasegawa, P M

    2000-04-01

    Feeding bioassay results established that the soybean cysteine proteinase inhibitor N (soyacystatin N, scN) substantially inhibits growth and development of western corn rootworm (WCR), by attenuating digestive proteolysis [Zhao, Y. et al. (1996) Plant Physiol. 111, 1299-1306]. Recombinant scN was more inhibitory than the potent and broad specificity cysteine proteinase inhibitor E-64. WCR digestive proteolytic activity was separated by mildly denaturing SDS-PAGE into two fractions and in-gel assays confirmed that the proteinase activities of each were largely scN-sensitive. Since binding affinity to the target proteinase [Koiwa, H. et al. (1998) Plant J. 14, 371-380] governs the effectiveness of scN as a proteinase inhibitor and an insecticide, five peptides (28-33 kDa) were isolated from WCR gut extracts by scN affinity chromatographic separation. Analysis of the N-terminal sequence of these peptides revealed similarity to a cathepsin L-like cysteine proteinase (DvCAL1, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera cathepsin L) encoded by a WCR cDNA. Our results indicate that cathepsin L orthologs are pivotal digestive proteinases of WCR larvae, and are targets of plant defensive cystatins (phytocystatins), like scN. PMID:10760514

  2. Physiological and Cellular Responses Caused by RNAi- Mediated Suppression of Snf7 Orthologue in Western Corn Rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Ramaseshadri, Parthasarathy; Segers, Gerrit; Flannagan, Ronald; Wiggins, Elizabeth; Clinton, William; Ilagan, Oliver; McNulty, Brian; Clark, Thomas; Bolognesi, Renata

    2013-01-01

    Ingestion of double stranded RNA (dsRNA) has been previously demonstrated to be effective in triggering RNA interference (RNAi) in western corn rootworm (WCR, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte), providing potential novel opportunities for insect pest control. The putative Snf7 homolog of WCR (DvSnf7) has previously been shown to be an effective RNAi target for insect control, as DvSnf7 RNAi leads to lethality of WCR larvae. Snf7 functions as a part of the ESCRT (Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport) pathway which plays a crucial role in cellular housekeeping by internalization, transport, sorting and lysosomal degradation of transmembrane proteins. To understand the effects that lead to death of WCR larvae by DvSnf7 RNAi, we examined some of the distinct cellular processes associated with ESCRT functions such as de-ubiquitination of proteins and autophagy. Our data indicate that ubiquitinated proteins accumulate in DvSnf7 dsRNA-fed larval tissues and that the autophagy process seems to be impaired. These findings suggest that the malfunctioning of these cellular processes in both midgut and fat body tissues triggered by DvSnf7 RNAi were the main effects leading to the death of WCR. This study also illustrates that Snf7 is an essential gene in WCR and its functions are consistent with biological functions described for other eukaryotes. PMID:23349844

  3. Evidence of Field-Evolved Resistance to Bifenthrin in Western Corn Rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) Populations in Western Nebraska and Kansas.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Adriano E; Wang, Haichuan; Zukoff, Sarah N; Meinke, Lance J; French, B Wade; Siegfried, Blair D

    2015-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides have been used to control larvae or adults of the western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, a key pest of field corn in the United States. In response to reports of reduced efficacy of pyrethroids in WCR management programs in southwestern areas of Nebraska and Kansas the present research was designed to establish a baseline of susceptibility to the pyrethroid insecticide, bifenthrin, using susceptible laboratory populations and to compare this baseline with susceptibility of field populations. Concentration-response bioassays were performed to estimate the baseline susceptibility. From the baseline data, a diagnostic concentration (LC99) was determined and used to test adults of both laboratory and field populations. Larval susceptibility was also tested using both laboratory and field populations. Significant differences were recorded in adult and larval susceptibility among WCR field and laboratory populations. The highest LC50 for WCR adults was observed in populations from Keith 2 and Chase Counties, NE, with LC50s of 2.2 and 1.38 μg/vial, respectively, and Finney County 1, KS, with 1.43 μg/vial, as compared to a laboratory non-diapause population (0.24 μg/vial). For larvae, significant differences between WCR field and laboratory populations were also recorded. Significant differences in mortalities at the diagnostic bifenthrin concentration (LC99) were observed among WCR adult populations with western Corn Belt populations exhibiting lower susceptibility to bifenthrin, especially in southwestern Nebraska and southwestern Kansas. This study provides evidence that resistance to bifenthrin is evolving in field populations that have been exposed for multiple years to pyrethroid insecticides. Implications to sustainable rootworm management are discussed. PMID:26566127

  4. Evidence of Field-Evolved Resistance to Bifenthrin in Western Corn Rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) Populations in Western Nebraska and Kansas

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Adriano E.; Wang, Haichuan; Zukoff, Sarah N.; Meinke, Lance J.; French, B. Wade; Siegfried, Blair D.

    2015-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides have been used to control larvae or adults of the western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, a key pest of field corn in the United States. In response to reports of reduced efficacy of pyrethroids in WCR management programs in southwestern areas of Nebraska and Kansas the present research was designed to establish a baseline of susceptibility to the pyrethroid insecticide, bifenthrin, using susceptible laboratory populations and to compare this baseline with susceptibility of field populations. Concentration-response bioassays were performed to estimate the baseline susceptibility. From the baseline data, a diagnostic concentration (LC99) was determined and used to test adults of both laboratory and field populations. Larval susceptibility was also tested using both laboratory and field populations. Significant differences were recorded in adult and larval susceptibility among WCR field and laboratory populations. The highest LC50 for WCR adults was observed in populations from Keith 2 and Chase Counties, NE, with LC50s of 2.2 and 1.38 μg/vial, respectively, and Finney County 1, KS, with 1.43 μg/vial, as compared to a laboratory non-diapause population (0.24 μg/vial). For larvae, significant differences between WCR field and laboratory populations were also recorded. Significant differences in mortalities at the diagnostic bifenthrin concentration (LC99) were observed among WCR adult populations with western Corn Belt populations exhibiting lower susceptibility to bifenthrin, especially in southwestern Nebraska and southwestern Kansas. This study provides evidence that resistance to bifenthrin is evolving in field populations that have been exposed for multiple years to pyrethroid insecticides. Implications to sustainable rootworm management are discussed. PMID:26566127

  5. Semiochemical attractants ofDiabrotica undecimpunctata howardi barber, southern corn rootworm, andDiabrotica virgifera virgifera leconte, the western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Lampman, R L; Metcalf, R L; Andersen, J F

    1987-04-01

    During the summers of 1984 and 1985, a variety of structurally related benzenoid compounds was evaluated in sweet corn plots as attractants for adult southern corn rootworms (SCR), western com rootworms (WCR), and northern corn rootworms (NCR). Field response to the volatiles was measured by beetle counts on baited cylindrical sticky traps placed inside the corn plots at a height of l m above ground level. SCR adults were attracted late in the season (last week of August through September, 1984 and 1985) to numerous aromatic compounds, including phenylacetaldehyde, benzyl acetone, phenethyl alcohol, phenyl acetate, indole, veratrole, methyl eugenol, methyl isoeugenol, eugenol, and isoeugenol. Although many compounds attracted SCR adults late in the season, only veratrole, phenylacetaldehyde, and chavicol were significantly active in early and middle August 1985. WCR adults were attracted to a different group of compounds, namely estragole,trans-anethole, and indole. Estragole (4-methoxy-1-allylbenzene) was an effective WCR attractant from corn tasseling in early August 1985, until the end of the trapping period in late September and early October 1985. Indole andtrans-anethole (4-methoxy-1-propenylbenzene) were less effective attractants than estragole and were most active at the beginning and/or end of the corn season. Traps baited with 100 mg of estragole caught an average of 20 times more WCR adults than unbaited control traps, and the females outnumbered the males in the baited traps. Estragole dosage tests were conducted in three sweet corn plots on different dates in 1985 and the minimum effective dose ranged between 5 and 30 mg/trap. Field tests with structural analogs revealed the importance of the site of unsaturation in the allylic side chain of estragole and the effect of different ring substituents on WCR response. The phenylpropanoids, eugenol and isoeugenol, significantly attracted NCR adults, even though these beetles were in low abundance in the

  6. Parental RNA interference of genes involved in embryonic development of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte.

    PubMed

    Khajuria, Chitvan; Vélez, Ana M; Rangasamy, Murugesan; Wang, Haichuan; Fishilevich, Elane; Frey, Meghan L F; Carneiro, Newton Portilho; Gandra, Premchand; Narva, Kenneth E; Siegfried, Blair D

    2015-08-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is being developed as a potential tool for insect pest management and one of the most likely target pest species for transgenic plants that express double stranded RNA (dsRNA) is the western corn rootworm. Thus far, most genes proposed as targets for RNAi in rootworm cause lethality in the larval stage. In this study, we describe RNAi-mediated knockdown of two developmental genes, hunchback (hb) and brahma (brm), in the western corn rootworm delivered via dsRNA fed to adult females. dsRNA feeding caused a significant decrease in hb and brm transcripts in the adult females. Although total oviposition was not significantly affected, there was almost complete absence of hatching in the eggs collected from females exposed to dsRNA for either gene. These results confirm that RNAi is systemic in nature for western corn rootworms. These results also indicate that hunchback and brahma play important roles in rootworm embryonic development and could provide useful RNAi targets in adult rootworms to prevent crop injury by impacting the population of larval progeny of exposed adults. The ability to deliver dsRNA in a trans-generational manner by feeding to adult rootworms may offer an additional approach to utilizing RNAi for rootworm pest management. The potential to develop parental RNAi technology targeting progeny of adult rootworms in combination with Bt proteins or dsRNA lethal to larvae may increase opportunities to develop sustainable approaches to rootworm management involving RNAi technologies for rootworm control. PMID:26005118

  7. Characterization of the spectrum of insecticidal activity of a double-stranded RNA with targeted activity against Western Corn Rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte).

    PubMed

    Bachman, Pamela M; Bolognesi, Renata; Moar, William J; Mueller, Geoffrey M; Paradise, Mark S; Ramaseshadri, Parthasarathy; Tan, Jianguo; Uffman, Joshua P; Warren, Joanne; Wiggins, B Elizabeth; Levine, Steven L

    2013-12-01

    The sequence specificity of the endogenous RNA interference pathway allows targeted suppression of genes essential for insect survival and enables the development of durable and efficacious insecticidal products having a low likelihood to adversely impact non-target organisms. The spectrum of insecticidal activity of a 240 nucleotide (nt) dsRNA targeting the Snf7 ortholog in Western Corn Rootworm (WCR; Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) was characterized by selecting and testing insects based upon their phylogenetic relatedness to WCR. Insect species, representing 10 families and 4 Orders, were evaluated in subchronic or chronic diet bioassays that measured potential lethal and sublethal effects. When a specific species could not be tested in diet bioassays, the ortholog to the WCR Snf7 gene (DvSnf7) was cloned and corresponding dsRNAs were tested against WCR and Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata); model systems known to be sensitive to ingested dsRNA. Bioassay results demonstrate that the spectrum of activity for DvSnf7 is narrow and activity is only evident in a subset of beetles within the Galerucinae subfamily of Chrysomelidae (>90% identity with WCR Snf7 240 nt). This approach allowed for evaluating the relationship between minimum shared nt sequence length and activity. A shared sequence length of ≥ 21 nt was required for efficacy against WCR (containing 221 potential 21-nt matches) and all active orthologs contained at least three 21 nt matches. These results also suggest that WCR resistance to DvSnf7 dsRNA due to single nucleotide polymorphisms in the target sequence of 240 nt is highly unlikely. PMID:23748931

  8. Likelihood of multiple mating in Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Kang, Jungkoo; Krupke, Christian H

    2009-12-01

    We evaluated the mating ability of male western corn rootworms, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Leconte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), for 20 d after initial mating, using a series of laboratory experiments. Males mated an average of 2.24 times within 10 d after their first mating and averaged 0.15 matings between days 11 and 20 after their first mating. Because estimating the mating frequency in Bt/refuge cornfields is critical to developing robust and reliable models predicting Bt resistance development in this pest, we discuss how these laboratory findings may influence development and evaluation of current and future insect resistance management plans. PMID:20069837

  9. Genome Scan of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera for Genetic Variation Associated with Crop Rotation Tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop rotation has been a valuable technique for control of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, for almost a century. However, during the last two decades, crop rotation has ceased to be effective in an expanding area of the United States Corn Belt. This failure appears to be d...

  10. Distribution of genes and repetitive elements in the Diabrotica virgifera virgifera genome estimated using BAC sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feeding damage caused by the corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, is destructive to corn plants in North America and Europe where control remains challenging due to evolution of resistance traits that allow survival when exposed to chemical and transgenic toxins. Genome sequencing of an i...

  11. Containment of the western corn rootworm Diabrotica v.virgifera: continued successful management 2008 in southern Switzerland by monitoring and crop rotation.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Hans E; Bertossa, M

    2009-01-01

    Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Col.: Chrysomelidae), known as western corn rootworm (WCR) and endemic in North America, invaded Europe about two decades ago. Various unsuccessful attempts have been made to eradicate it from the Old World. Management with a variety of strategies is the option now remaining. WCR management in Southern Switzerland by a unique containment approach has been practiced successfully since 2003 using biotechnical means. Without any chemical pesticides or GMO input, the Swiss government mandated adherence to strict crop rotation. In addition to the economic benefits of this relatively simple approach, the environment was saved a considerable burden of pesticide applications. Other countries are invited to follow this example of sustainable pest management. PMID:20222583

  12. Characterizing the mechanism of action of double-stranded RNA activity against western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte).

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, Renata; Ramaseshadri, Parthasarathy; Anderson, Jerry; Bachman, Pamela; Clinton, William; Flannagan, Ronald; Ilagan, Oliver; Lawrence, Christina; Levine, Steven; Moar, William; Mueller, Geoffrey; Tan, Jianguo; Uffman, Joshua; Wiggins, Elizabeth; Heck, Gregory; Segers, Gerrit

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has previously been shown to be effective in western corn rootworm (WCR, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) larvae via oral delivery of synthetic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in an artificial diet bioassay, as well as by ingestion of transgenic corn plant tissues engineered to express dsRNA. Although the RNAi machinery components appear to be conserved in Coleopteran insects, the key steps in this process have not been reported for WCR. Here we characterized the sequence of events that result in mortality after ingestion of a dsRNA designed against WCR larvae. We selected the Snf7 ortholog (DvSnf7) as the target mRNA, which encodes an essential protein involved in intracellular trafficking. Our results showed that dsRNAs greater than or equal to approximately 60 base-pairs (bp) are required for biological activity in artificial diet bioassays. Additionally, 240 bp dsRNAs containing a single 21 bp match to the target sequence were also efficacious, whereas 21 bp short interfering (si) RNAs matching the target sequence were not. This result was further investigated in WCR midgut tissues: uptake of 240 bp dsRNA was evident in WCR midgut cells while a 21 bp siRNA was not, supporting the size-activity relationship established in diet bioassays. DvSnf7 suppression was observed in a time-dependent manner with suppression at the mRNA level preceding suppression at the protein level when a 240 bp dsRNA was fed to WCR larvae. DvSnf7 suppression was shown to spread to tissues beyond the midgut within 24 h after dsRNA ingestion. These events (dsRNA uptake, target mRNA and protein suppression, systemic spreading, growth inhibition and eventual mortality) comprise the overall mechanism of action by which DvSnf7 dsRNA affects WCR via oral delivery and provides insights as to how targeted dsRNAs in general are active against insects. PMID:23071820

  13. Characterizing the Mechanism of Action of Double-Stranded RNA Activity against Western Corn Rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte)

    PubMed Central

    Bolognesi, Renata; Ramaseshadri, Parthasarathy; Anderson, Jerry; Bachman, Pamela; Clinton, William; Flannagan, Ronald; Ilagan, Oliver; Lawrence, Christina; Levine, Steven; Moar, William; Mueller, Geoffrey; Tan, Jianguo; Uffman, Joshua; Wiggins, Elizabeth; Heck, Gregory; Segers, Gerrit

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has previously been shown to be effective in western corn rootworm (WCR, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) larvae via oral delivery of synthetic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in an artificial diet bioassay, as well as by ingestion of transgenic corn plant tissues engineered to express dsRNA. Although the RNAi machinery components appear to be conserved in Coleopteran insects, the key steps in this process have not been reported for WCR. Here we characterized the sequence of events that result in mortality after ingestion of a dsRNA designed against WCR larvae. We selected the Snf7 ortholog (DvSnf7) as the target mRNA, which encodes an essential protein involved in intracellular trafficking. Our results showed that dsRNAs greater than or equal to approximately 60 base-pairs (bp) are required for biological activity in artificial diet bioassays. Additionally, 240 bp dsRNAs containing a single 21 bp match to the target sequence were also efficacious, whereas 21 bp short interfering (si) RNAs matching the target sequence were not. This result was further investigated in WCR midgut tissues: uptake of 240 bp dsRNA was evident in WCR midgut cells while a 21 bp siRNA was not, supporting the size-activity relationship established in diet bioassays. DvSnf7 suppression was observed in a time-dependent manner with suppression at the mRNA level preceding suppression at the protein level when a 240 bp dsRNA was fed to WCR larvae. DvSnf7 suppression was shown to spread to tissues beyond the midgut within 24 h after dsRNA ingestion. These events (dsRNA uptake, target mRNA and protein suppression, systemic spreading, growth inhibition and eventual mortality) comprise the overall mechanism of action by which DvSnf7 dsRNA affects WCR via oral delivery and provides insights as to how targeted dsRNAs in general are active against insects. PMID:23071820

  14. Predator responses to novel haemolymph defences of Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera) larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many herbivorous arthropods use defensive chemistry to discourage predators from attacking. This chemistry relies on the ability of predators to rapidly learn to recognize and avoid offensive stimuli. Western corn rootworm (WCR) employs multifaceted chemical defences in its haemolymph, which may c...

  15. Novel Bacillus thuringiensis Binary Insecticidal Crystal Proteins Active on Western Corn Rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, R. Tracy; Stockhoff, Brian A.; Stamp, Lisa; Schnepf, H. Ernest; Schwab, George E.; Knuth, Mark; Russell, Josh; Cardineau, Guy A.; Narva, Kenneth E.

    2002-01-01

    A new family of insecticidal crystal proteins was discovered by screening sporulated Bacillus thuringiensis cultures for oral activity against western corn rootworm (WCR) larvae. B. thuringiensis isolates PS80JJ1, PS149B1, and PS167H2 have WCR insecticidal activity attributable to parasporal inclusion bodies containing proteins with molecular masses of ca. 14 and 44 kDa. The genes encoding these polypeptides reside in apparent operons, and the 14-kDa protein open reading frame (ORF) precedes the 44-kDa protein ORF. Mutagenesis of either gene in the apparent operons dramatically reduced insecticidal activity of the corresponding recombinant B. thuringiensis strain. Bioassays performed with separately expressed, biochemically purified 14- and 44-kDa polypeptides also demonstrated that both proteins are required for WCR mortality. Sequence comparisons with other known B. thuringiensis insecticidal proteins failed to reveal homology with previously described Cry, Cyt, or Vip proteins. However, there is evidence that the 44-kDa polypeptide and the 41.9- and 51.4-kDa binary dipteran insecticidal proteins from Bacillus sphaericus are evolutionarily related. The 14- and 44-kDa polypeptides from isolates PS80JJ1, PS149B1, and PS167H2 have been designated Cry34Aa1, Cry34Ab1, and Cry34Ac1, respectively, and the 44-kDa polypeptides from these isolates have been designated Cry35Aa1, Cry35Ab1, and Cry35Ac1, respectively. PMID:11872461

  16. Novel Bacillus thuringiensis binary insecticidal crystal proteins active on western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte.

    PubMed

    Ellis, R Tracy; Stockhoff, Brian A; Stamp, Lisa; Schnepf, H Ernest; Schwab, George E; Knuth, Mark; Russell, Josh; Cardineau, Guy A; Narva, Kenneth E

    2002-03-01

    A new family of insecticidal crystal proteins was discovered by screening sporulated Bacillus thuringiensis cultures for oral activity against western corn rootworm (WCR) larvae. B. thuringiensis isolates PS80JJ1, PS149B1, and PS167H2 have WCR insecticidal activity attributable to parasporal inclusion bodies containing proteins with molecular masses of ca. 14 and 44 kDa. The genes encoding these polypeptides reside in apparent operons, and the 14-kDa protein open reading frame (ORF) precedes the 44-kDa protein ORF. Mutagenesis of either gene in the apparent operons dramatically reduced insecticidal activity of the corresponding recombinant B. thuringiensis strain. Bioassays performed with separately expressed, biochemically purified 14- and 44-kDa polypeptides also demonstrated that both proteins are required for WCR mortality. Sequence comparisons with other known B. thuringiensis insecticidal proteins failed to reveal homology with previously described Cry, Cyt, or Vip proteins. However, there is evidence that the 44-kDa polypeptide and the 41.9- and 51.4-kDa binary dipteran insecticidal proteins from Bacillus sphaericus are evolutionarily related. The 14- and 44-kDa polypeptides from isolates PS80JJ1, PS149B1, and PS167H2 have been designated Cry34Aa1, Cry34Ab1, and Cry34Ac1, respectively, and the 44-kDa polypeptides from these isolates have been designated Cry35Aa1, Cry35Ab1, and Cry35Ac1, respectively. PMID:11872461

  17. Diabrotica virgifera virgifera on South-Northern expansion drive?

    PubMed

    Hummel, H E; Wagner, L; Bertossa, M; Deuker, A; Leithold, G

    2012-01-01

    As Wudtke and colleagues predicted and Hummel and colleagues later confirmed, the Western corn rootworm Diabrotica v. virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) (WCR) had shown the ability to expand northward from South and Eastern into Central Europe. Decades earlier WCR had done the same in North America. Yet, European entomologists erroneously assumed they would be somehow magically protected from such aggressive moves of WCR. Meanwhile we know better: Southern Germany is infested, and also many East European countries are victims of these Northern and also Eastern advances. In Germany, neither speed nor extent of such advances is well defined. Jumping advances similar to earlier spreading episodes may be the rule, but they are not well predictable. In this report, we argue for a persistent northbound trend of WCR. PMID:23885424

  18. A monitoring trap for Diabrotica virgifera virgifera and D. barberi adults lured with a poisoned cucurbitacin bait.

    PubMed

    Shaw, J T; Hummel, H E

    2003-01-01

    A trap is described that uses as a simple natural ingredient a cucurbitacin mixture to capture and carbaryl insecticide to kill northern and western corn rootworm beetles (Diabrotica barberi Smith and Lawrence, and Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (D.v.v.), respectively). The trap is consistent in numbers of beetles captured per trap per day, and it should be useful in integrated pest management programs to monitor the population density of rootworm beetles in corn fields. Captures between 1981 and 1983 in Illinois showed that western corn rootworm adults that disperse into first-year cornfields were predominantly females. These traps are being utilized today (2003) by many researchers in the New World desiring to know more about rootworm beetle movement and activities. Entomologists in the Old World confronted with the alien invasive pest D.v.v. should profit likewise from increased knowledge and availability of these traps for Diabrotica management. PMID:15149093

  19. Characterisation of cysteine proteinases responsible for digestive proteolysis in guts of larval western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera) by expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Bown, David P; Wilkinson, Hillary S; Jongsma, Maarten A; Gatehouse, John A

    2004-04-01

    Cysteine proteinases are the major class of enzymes responsible for digestive proteolysis in western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera), a serious pest of maize. A larval gut extract hydrolysed typical cathepsin substrates, such as Z-phe-arg-AMC and Z-arg-arg-AMC, and hydrolysis was inhibited by Z-phe-tyr-DMK, specific for cathepsin L. A cDNA library representing larval gut tissue mRNA contained cysteine proteinase-encoding clones at high frequency. Sequence analysis of 11 cysteine proteinase cDNAs showed that 9 encoded cathepsin L-like enzymes, and 2 encoded cathepsin B-like enzymes. Three enzymes (two cathepsin L-like, DvRS5 and DvRS30, and one cathepsin B-like, DvRS40) were expressed as recombinant proteins in culture supernatants of the yeast Pichia pastoris. The cathepsin L-like enzymes were active proteinases, whereas the cathepsin B-like enzyme was inactive until treated with bovine trypsin. The amino acid residue in the S2 binding pocket, the major determinant of substrate specificity in cathepsin cysteine proteinases, predicted that the two cathepsin L-like enzymes, DvRS5 and DvRS30, should differ in substrate specificity, with the latter resembling cathepsin B in hydrolysing substrates with a positively charged residue at P2. This prediction was confirmed; DvRS5 only hydrolysed Z-phe-arg-AMC and not Z-arg-arg-AMC, whereas DvRS30 hydrolysed both substrates. The enzymes showed similar proteolytic activity towards peptide substrates. PMID:15041015

  20. Adult activity and oviposition of corn rootworms, Diabrotica spp. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), in Miscanthus, corn, and switchgrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of the biomass crop Miscanthus (Miscanthus × giganteus Greef and Deuter ex Hodkinson and Renvoize) to support larval development for both United States (U.S.) and European populations of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, suggests an avenue for potential i...

  1. Role of a gamma-aminobutryic acid (GABA) receptor mutation in the evolution and spread of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera resistance to cyclodiene insecticides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An alanine to serine amino acid substitution within the Rdl subunit of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor confers resistance to cyclodiene insecticides in many species. The corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, is a damaging pest of cultivated corn that was partially controlled by ...

  2. Neonate larvae of the specialist herbivore Diabrotica virgifera virgifera do not exploit the defensive volatile (E)-ß-caryophyllene to assist in locating maize roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The behavior of the neonate larvae of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (western corn rootworm, WCR) was assessed in presence of maize root constitutively emitting (E)-ß-caryophylene (EßC). This root volatile has been shown to attract both second instar WCR and insect-killing nematodes, offerin...

  3. Evaluation of potential fitness costs associated with eCry3.1Ab resistance in Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both an eCry3.1Ab resistant and paired control western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera colony were tested for adult longevity, egg oviposition, egg viability, and larval development in order to evaluate the potential fitness costs associated with eCry3.1Ab resistance in the western cor...

  4. Expression and induction of three family 4 cytochrome P450 (CYP4)* genes identified from insecticide-resistant and susceptible western corn rootworms, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera.

    PubMed

    Scharf, M E; Parimi, S; Meinke, L J; Chandler, L D; Siegfried, B D

    2001-04-01

    We have previously determined that cytochrome P450-based oxidation is involved in resistance to the insecticides methyl parathion and carbaryl in geographically distinct Nebraska western corn rootworm populations. Three new family 4 cytochrome P450 (CYP4) gene fragments (CYP4AJ1, CYP4G18 and CYP4AK1) were cloned and sequenced from insecticide-resistant and -susceptible western corn rootworms. Insecticide bioassays indicated the resistant population employed in this study was significantly resistant to the insecticides methyl parathion and carbaryl. CYP4AJ1 and CYP4G18 were cloned from both genomic PCR and RT-PCR products, although only CYP4AJ1 contains an intronic region. Alignments of inferred amino acid sequences with other homologous insect CYP4 genes indicates a high degree of similarity. Northern analysis concurrently employing mixed probes representing each of the three rootworm CYP4 fragments identified increased mRNA transcript signals (i) in resistant rootworms and (ii) following induction by the P450 inducer pentamethyl benzene. These results support our previous documentation of P450-based insecticide resistance and suggest increased CYP4 transcript abundance can serve as a molecular resistance-associated marker. PMID:11422509

  5. Increased Expression of a cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase in Rotation-Adapted Western Corn Rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new ‘variant’ behavior in Western Corn Rootworm (WCR) has resulted in egg-laying into non-cornfields, compared to ‘normal’ deposition of eggs in cornfields, allowing these insects to circumvent crop rotation. No morphological or genetic characteristics have been defined to differentiate between th...

  6. Evidence of field-evolved resistance to bifenthrin in western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) populations in western Nebraska and Kansas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used to control larvae or adult western corn rootworm, a key pest of corn in the United States. In response to reports of reduced efficacy of pyrethroids in WCR management programs in southwestern areas of Nebraska and Kansas the present research was designed to es...

  7. Natural enemies in control of invasive species Diabrotica virgifera Virgifera from maize crops.

    PubMed

    Grozea, Ioana; Carabet, Alin; Chirita, Ramona; Badea, Ana Maria

    2008-01-01

    The invasive Diabrotico virgifera virgifera Le Conte (western corn rootworm) species has become a very important pest of maize growing areas from Europe. Incidence of this pest in Europe and Romania attract the specialist's attention and European organisms regarding substantial changes which save the yield. Current trends in control regard the using natural enemies' because non-pollutants effects. In this way it follows protection of useful scale from agroecosystems and their exploitation in control of invasive population. It were take the soil and surface samples for establish the presence of control biological agents. The maximum appearance period of invasive species (July, August) is very important in establishing the analogy with appearance of predator's species. From natural enemies of Diabrotica virgifera can be notice follow species: Speira diademata, Argiope bruennichi, Theridion impressum (Arachnida: Araneae), Coccinella sp., Pseudophomus rufipes (Insecta: Coleoptera). The spider species Argiope bruennichi (Araneae: Araneidae) and Theridion impressum (Araneae: Theriidae) are able to diminish significantly population of adults, especially in appearance of maize silk. The aim of the theme we approach is to find solutions to the issues created by invasive species Diabrotica virgifera virgifera using an ecological alternative of the chemical methods, as an-polluting biological methods. In a period when easily apply to chemical substances we consider that is absolutely necessary the introduction of these biological methods. PMID:19226790

  8. Distribution and antifeedant associations of sesquiterpene lactones in cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) on western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte).

    PubMed

    Chou, J C; Mullin, C A

    1993-07-01

    Seven antifeedant sesquiterpene lactones (STLs), 4,5-dihydroniveusin A, argophyllin B, argophyllin A, 15-hydroxy-3-dehydrodesoxytifruticin, niveusin B, 1,2-anhydridoniveusin A, and an unidentified epoxide, in cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) have been quantified by a highperformance thin-layer chromatography and UV-reflectance scanning densitometry analysis. Age-related expression of STL content in sunflower reveals a heretofore undescribed pattern in which nonpolar STLs such as 15-hydroxy-3-dehydrodesoxytifruticin predominate up to an age of three weeks, but are subsequently displaced by polar STLs, especially argophyllin A, through later foliar stages and anthesis. This leaf pattern of STL ontogeny is maintained in three widely differentH. annuus cultivars (Giant Gray Stripe, Royal Hybrid 2141, Hybrid 7111), which in turn had similar total contents of STLs. Antifeedant activity for western corn rootworm was positively correlated with STL content, particularly with argophyllin A and its isomer argophyllin B, in respective tissue extracts. Enhanced amounts of highly antifeedant argophyllins, especially in newly grown leaf and floral tissues yielding sunflower progeny, strongly suggest that these epoxy-STLs are a chemical defense against insect herbivory. PMID:24249174

  9. Impact of cysteine proteinase inhibition in midgut fluid and oral secretion on fecundity and pollen consumption of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera).

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hak; Mullin, Christopher A

    2003-03-01

    Cysteine proteinases predominate in the midgut fluid (MF) and oral secretion (OS) of adult western corn rootworm (WCR) based on their mild acidic pH optima (pH 6.0), enhanced activities after treatment with thiol reducing agents, and inhibition by selective cysteine proteinase inhibitors (PIs). Four cysteine PIs including E-64, calpeptin, calpain inhibitor II, and leupeptin (also a serine PI) strongly inhibited azocaseinolytic activity in a dose-dependent manner in both the MF and OS. The most significant effect on adult female WCR of cysteine PI consumption with corn pollen was the reduction in fecundity, but female survival was not apparently affected. Mean fresh weights for all PI-fed females were also lower than control groups. All PI-fed groups [E-64, calpain inhibitor I (Cal I) and leupeptin] had a significantly lower daily egg production than respective corn pollen-fed controls. E-64 was more potent than leupeptin and Cal I on inhibiting fecundity, which correlates with their relative anti-proteinase potency in vitro. E-64, Cal I, and leupeptin at 1.5-2 nmol/beetle/day reduced fecundity down to 25-45% of control values. Reduced egg production by PI-fed beetles results from a combination of the direct inhibition of protein digestion and a post-ingestive negative feedback mechanism, which reduces food intake. The supplement of ten essential amino acids into the E-64-treated pollen enhanced up to 3.7-fold the number of eggs laid compared to the E-64-fed group without these amino acids, suggesting that egg production is dependent on the supply of essential amino acids from corn pollen proteolysis. PMID:12587142

  10. Tolerance of eCry3.1Ab in reciprocal cross offspring of eCry3.1Ab-selected and control colonies of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two reciprocal cross colonies were created by separating virgin western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, males and females from both a selected laboratory colony that was being reared on eCry3.1Ab-expressing corn (Zea mays L.) and a control colony reared on its near isoline. F...

  11. Distribution of Genes and Repetitive Elements in the Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Genome Estimated Using BAC Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Coates, Brad S.; Alves, Analiza P.; Wang, Haichuan; Walden, Kimberly K. O.; French, B. Wade; Miller, Nicholas J.; Abel, Craig A.; Robertson, Hugh M.; Sappington, Thomas W.; Siegfried, Blair D.

    2012-01-01

    Feeding damage caused by the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, is destructive to corn plants in North America and Europe where control remains challenging due to evolution of resistance to chemical and transgenic toxins. A BAC library, DvvBAC1, containing 109,486 clones with 104 ± 34.5 kb inserts was created, which has an ~4.56X genome coverage based upon a 2.58 Gb (2.80 pg) flow cytometry-estimated haploid genome size. Paired end sequencing of 1037 BAC inserts produced 1.17 Mb of data (~0.05% genome coverage) and indicated ~9.4 and 16.0% of reads encode, respectively, endogenous genes and transposable elements (TEs). Sequencing genes within BAC full inserts demonstrated that TE densities are high within intergenic and intron regions and contribute to the increased gene size. Comparison of homologous genome regions cloned within different BAC clones indicated that TE movement may cause haplotype variation within the inbred strain. The data presented here indicate that the D. virgifera virgifera genome is large in size and contains a high proportion of repetitive sequence. These BAC sequencing methods that are applicable for characterization of genomes prior to sequencing may likely be valuable resources for genome annotation as well as scaffolding. PMID:22919272

  12. Distribution of genes and repetitive elements in the Diabrotica virgifera virgifera genome estimated using BAC sequencing.

    PubMed

    Coates, Brad S; Alves, Analiza P; Wang, Haichuan; Walden, Kimberly K O; French, B Wade; Miller, Nicholas J; Abel, Craig A; Robertson, Hugh M; Sappington, Thomas W; Siegfried, Blair D

    2012-01-01

    Feeding damage caused by the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, is destructive to corn plants in North America and Europe where control remains challenging due to evolution of resistance to chemical and transgenic toxins. A BAC library, DvvBAC1, containing 109,486 clones with 104 ± 34.5 kb inserts was created, which has an ~4.56X genome coverage based upon a 2.58 Gb (2.80 pg) flow cytometry-estimated haploid genome size. Paired end sequencing of 1037 BAC inserts produced 1.17 Mb of data (~0.05% genome coverage) and indicated ~9.4 and 16.0% of reads encode, respectively, endogenous genes and transposable elements (TEs). Sequencing genes within BAC full inserts demonstrated that TE densities are high within intergenic and intron regions and contribute to the increased gene size. Comparison of homologous genome regions cloned within different BAC clones indicated that TE movement may cause haplotype variation within the inbred strain. The data presented here indicate that the D. virgifera virgifera genome is large in size and contains a high proportion of repetitive sequence. These BAC sequencing methods that are applicable for characterization of genomes prior to sequencing may likely be valuable resources for genome annotation as well as scaffolding. PMID:22919272

  13. Response ofDiabrotica virgifera virgifera, D. v. Zeae, andD. porracea to stereoisomers of 8-methyl-2-decyl propanoate.

    PubMed

    Guss, P L; Sonnet, P E; Carney, R L; Branson, T F; Tumlinson, J H

    1984-07-01

    The four stereoisomers of 8-methyl-2-decyl propanoate were tested in the United States and Mexico for attractiveness toDiabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, the western corn rootworm,D. v. zeae Krysan and Smith, the Mexican corn rootworm, andD. porracea Harold. Males ofD. v. virgifera andD. v. zeae responded strongly to the (2R,8R)-isomer and secondarily to (2S,8R), whileD. ponacea responded exclusively to the (2S,8R)-isomer. The (2S,8S)- and (2R,8S)-isomers were inactive in all tests. Synergism or inhibition was not detected when various mixtures of the isomers were tested withD. v. virgifera. These phenomena were not tested withD. v. zeae andD. ponacea. PMID:24318854

  14. Resistance evolution to the first generation of genetically modified Diabrotica-active Bt-maize events by western corn rootworm: management and monitoring considerations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera; WCR) is a major coleopteran maize pest in North America and the EU, and has traditionally been managed through crop rotation and broad-spectrum soil insecticides. Genetically modified (GM) Bt-maize offers an additional means of control against W...

  15. The Glycolytic Enzymes Activity in the Midgut of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) adult and their Seasonal Changes

    PubMed Central

    Guzik, Joanna; Nakonieczny, Mirosław; Tarnawska, Monika; Bereś, Paweł K.; Drzewiecki, Sławomir; Migula, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) is an important pest of maize. The diet of the D. virgifera imago is rich in starch and other polysaccharides present in cereals such as maize. Therefore, knowledge about enzymes involved in digestion of such specific food of this pest seems to be important. The paper shows, for the first time, the activities of main glycolytic enzymes in the midgut of D. virgifera imago: endoglycosidases (α-amylase, cellulase, chitinase, licheninase, laminarinase); exoglycosidases (α- and β-glucosidases, α- and β-galactosidases) and disaccharidases (maltase, isomaltase, sucrase, trehalase, lactase, and cellobiase). Activities of α-amylase, α-glucosidase, and maltase were the highest among assayed endoglycosidases, exoglycosidases, and disaccharidases, respectively. This indicates that in the midgut of D. virgifera imago α-amylase, α-glucosidase and maltase are important enzymes in starch hydrolysis and products of its digestion. These results lead to conclusion that inhibition of most active glycolytic enzymes of D. virgifera imago may be another promising method for chemical control of this pest of maize.

  16. Proliferation and copy number variation of BEL-like long terminal repeat retrotransposons within the Diabrotica virgifera virgifera genome.

    PubMed

    Coates, Brad S; Fraser, Lisa M; French, B Wade; Sappington, Thomas W

    2014-01-25

    The proliferation of retrotransposons within a genome can contribute to increased size and affect the function of eukaryotic genes. BEL/Pao-like long-terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons were annotated from the highly adaptable insect species Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, the Western corn rootworm, using survey sequences from bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) inserts and contigs derived from a low coverage next-generation genome sequence assembly. Eleven unique D. v. virgifera BEL elements were identified that contained full-length gag-pol coding sequences, whereas 88 different partial coding regions were characterized from partially assembled elements. Estimated genome copy number for full and partial BEL-like elements ranged from ~8 to 1582 among individual contigs using a normalized depth of coverage (DOC) among Illumina HiSeq reads (total genome copy number ~8821). BEL element copy number was correlated among different D. v. virgifera populations (R2=0.9846), but individual element numbers varied ≤ 1.68-fold and the total number varied by ~527 copies. These data indicate that BEL element proliferation likely contributed to a large genome size, and suggest that differences in copy number are a source of genetic variability among D. v. virgifera. PMID:24498652

  17. Proliferation and copy number variation of BEL-like long terminal repeat retrotransposons within the Diabrotica virgifera virgifera genome.

    PubMed

    Coates, Brad S; Fraser, Lisa M; French, B Wade; Sappington, Thomas W

    2013-10-25

    The proliferation of retrotransposons within a genome can contribute to increased size and affect the function of eukaryotic genes. BEL/Pao-like long-terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons were annotated from the highly adaptable insect species Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, the western corn rootworm, using survey sequences from bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) inserts and contigs derived from a low coverage next-generation genome sequence assembly. Eleven unique D. v. virgifera BEL elements were identified that contained full-length gag-pol coding sequences, whereas 88 different partial coding regions were characterized from partially assembled elements. Estimated genome copy number for full and partial BEL-like elements ranged from ~8 to 1,582 among individual contigs using a normalized depth of coverage (DOC) among Illumina HiSeq reads (total genome copy number ~8,821). BEL element copy number was correlated among different D. v. virgifera populations (R(2)=0.9846), but individual element numbers varied≤1.68-fold and the total number varied by ~527 copies. These data indicate that BEL element proliferation likely contributed to a large genome size, and suggest that differences in copy number are a source of genetic variability among D. v. virgifera. PMID:24513336

  18. A Multifaceted Hemolymph Defense Against Predation in Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Defensive chemistry mitigates the strength of trophic interactions between an herbivore and its diverse assemblage of predators. Diabrotica virgifera virgifera is a chrysomelid beetle whose subterranean larvae are a notorious pest of maize production, although they succumb a number of generalist pre...

  19. Abundance and distribution of western and northern corn rootworm (Diabrotica spp.) and prevalence of rotation resistance in eastern Iowa.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, Mike W; Gassmann, Aaron J

    2013-02-01

    The western corn rootworm Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and the northern corn rootworm Diabrotica barberi Smith & Lawrence (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) are major pests of corn (Zea mays L.). Historically, crop rotation has been an effective management strategy, but both species have adapted to crop rotation in the Midwest. For both species in eastern Iowa, we measured abundance and prevalence of rotation resistance using sticky traps and emergence cages in fields of corn and soybean (Glycine max L.). Based on currently available data, we calculated the economic thresholds for these pests at two Diabrotica spp. per trap per day in cornfields and 1.5 D. v. virgifera per trap per day in soybean fields. The economic injury level of rotation-resistant D. barberi was determined to be 3.5 adult insects per emergence cage per year. Peak abundance of rootworm adults in cornfields was below economic thresholds in the majority of fields sampled, suggesting that management of rootworm larvae in continuous cornfields may not always be necessary. Rotation-resistant D. barberi was found throughout eastern Iowa using emergence cages in first-year cornfields, however, the abundance was below levels expected to impose economic injury in 14 of 17 fields evaluated. The presence of rotation-resistant D. v. virgifera, as measured by the occurrence of this insect in soybean fields, occurred only in northeastern Iowa and was also below the economic threshold. These data suggests that crop rotation remains a viable pest management strategy in eastern Iowa. PMID:23448029

  20. No clear effect of admixture between two European invading outbreaks of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera in natura.

    PubMed

    Bermond, Gérald; Cavigliasso, Fanny; Mallez, Sophie; Spencer, Joseph; Guillemaud, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we challenged the hypothesis that admixture may have had a positive impact in the context of the European invasion of the western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, LeConte. This beetle was introduced in Europe from the USA several times since the 1980's. The multiple introductions of this major pest of cultivated corn led to the formation of two major outbreaks in North Western (NW) Italy and in Central and South Eastern (CSE) Europe that eventually merged into a secondary contact zone where insects from both outbreaks interbreed. We collected about 600 insects from this contact zone and genotyped them using 13 microsatellite markers. Three types of information were obtained from the collected individuals: (i) their survival under starvation; (ii) their admixed status, determined through a Bayesian method of genetic clustering and (iii) their mating probability, studied via the detection, isolation and genotyping of sperm in female spermathecae. Twenty six % and 12% of the individuals were assigned to the NW Italy or the CSE Europe parental types, respectively, and 23% and 39% to the F1 and backcross hybrid types, respectively. Globally, our results do not reveal any significant impact of the admixed status on the mating probability and on the choice of mating partners. However the admixed status had a sex- and sampling site-dependent effect on survival in adults under starvation. In addition sex had an effect on survival, with mortality hazard about 3 times larger in males than in females. The consequences of these findings for the evolution of the admixture zone of northern Italy are discussed. PMID:25170837

  1. No Clear Effect of Admixture between Two European Invading Outbreaks of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera in Natura

    PubMed Central

    Bermond, Gérald; Cavigliasso, Fanny; Mallez, Sophie; Spencer, Joseph; Guillemaud, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we challenged the hypothesis that admixture may have had a positive impact in the context of the European invasion of the western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, LeConte. This beetle was introduced in Europe from the USA several times since the 1980’s. The multiple introductions of this major pest of cultivated corn led to the formation of two major outbreaks in North Western (NW) Italy and in Central and South Eastern (CSE) Europe that eventually merged into a secondary contact zone where insects from both outbreaks interbreed. We collected about 600 insects from this contact zone and genotyped them using 13 microsatellite markers. Three types of information were obtained from the collected individuals: (i) their survival under starvation; (ii) their admixed status, determined through a Bayesian method of genetic clustering and (iii) their mating probability, studied via the detection, isolation and genotyping of sperm in female spermathecae. Twenty six % and 12% of the individuals were assigned to the NW Italy or the CSE Europe parental types, respectively, and 23% and 39% to the F1 and backcross hybrid types, respectively. Globally, our results do not reveal any significant impact of the admixed status on the mating probability and on the choice of mating partners. However the admixed status had a sex- and sampling site-dependent effect on survival in adults under starvation. In addition sex had an effect on survival, with mortality hazard about 3 times larger in males than in females. The consequences of these findings for the evolution of the admixture zone of northern Italy are discussed. PMID:25170837

  2. Baseline Susceptibility of Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) to Clothianidin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, neonate susceptibility to clothianidin, a highly effective contact and systemic neonicotinoid insecticide, was determined from both laboratory and field collected populations. Neonates were exposed to filter paper treated with increasing...

  3. Spatial Distribution and Areawide Management of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte in South Dakota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diabrotica v. virgifera is an economically important pest of maize in the U.S. Corn Belt. The areawide management program was conducted from 1997 – 2001 in five states. The location in South Dakota encompassed 41.4 km2 and was dominated by corn and soybean fields. An IPM approach was used to suppres...

  4. Response of larvae of invasive maize pest Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) to carbon/nitrogen ratio and phytosterol content of European maize varieties.

    PubMed

    Moeser, J; Vidal, S

    2004-08-01

    We studied the performance of larvae of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Chrysomelidae, Galerucinae) on 17 different maize, Zea mays L., varieties from six European countries. Food conversion efficiency studies were performed using a newly established method. The growth of D. v. virgifera (western corn rootworm) larvae and the amount of ingested food was measured and the food conversion efficiency was calculated. In addition, we analyzed the carbon/nitrogen ratio and the phytosterol content of the different varieties. Significant differences between the maize varieties with regard to larval weight gain, amount of ingested food, and food conversion efficiency were encountered. The efficiency of D. v. virgifera in converting root biomass into insect biomass was positively related to the amount of nitrogen in the plant tissue. Furthermore the root phytosterol content influenced the larval weight gain and the amount of ingested food. It was possible to group the varieties into suitable and unsuitable cultivars with regard to D. v. virgifera larval performance on the basis of the phytosterol content. Our results provide the first evidence of the high variability among European maize varieties with respect to D. v. virgifera nutrition. The use of less suitable maize varieties is discussed with respect to integrated pest management strategies. PMID:15384346

  5. Generalist-feeding subterranean mites as potential biological control agents of immature corn rootworms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Predatory mites are important components of subterranean food webs and may help regulate densities of agricultural pests, including western corn rootworms (Chrysomelidae: Diabrotica virgifera virgifera). Implementing conservation and/or classical biocontrol tactics could enhance densities of special...

  6. A novel Bacillus thuringiensis (PS149B1) containing a Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 binary toxin specific for the western corn rootworm Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte forms ion channels in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Masson, Luke; Schwab, George; Mazza, Alberto; Brousseau, Roland; Potvin, Lena; Schwartz, Jean-Louis

    2004-09-28

    The binary Bacillus thuringiensis PS149B1 insecticidal crystal (Cry) protein is comprised of two components, Cry34Ab1, a 14-kDa protein, and Cry35Ab1, a 44-kDa protein, the combination of which forms a novel binary toxin active on western corn rootworm larvae. The permeabilizing behavior of the native binary toxin and its two individual components expressed as recombinant proteins was studied using calcein efflux determination in liposomes and by ion channel activity measurements in planar lipid bilayers (PLBs). Data obtained with solubilized native PS149B1 binary protein revealed it to be a pore-forming toxin that can permeabilize liposomes and form ion channels ( approximately 300-900 pS) in PLBs at pH 5.5 but not pH 9.0. The 14-kDa component of the toxin also formed ion channels ( approximately 15-300 pS) at pH 5.5 but did not insert easily in PLBs. While the 44-kDa moiety did seldomly form resolvable ion channels ( approximately 15-750 pS) in PLBs, it did destabilize the membranes. It showed pH-dependent truncation to a stable 40-kDa protein. The purified 40-kDa truncated product formed channels ( approximately 10-450 pS) in PLBs at pH 5.5. At that same pH, while a 3:1 molar mixture (14:44 kDa) of the individual components of the toxin induced channel activity that resembled that of the 14-kDa component alone, the 3:1 molar mixture of the 14-kDa component and 40-kDa truncated product induced channel activity ( approximately 20-800 pS) similar to that of PS149B1 in planar lipid bilayers. We conclude that the overall membrane permeabilization process of Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 is a result of ion channel formation. PMID:15379574

  7. Within and Between Field Movement of Diabrotica barberi and D. virgifera virgifera in the South Dakota Areawide Management Site

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dispersal is a way insects search for food, shelter, mates, oviposition sites, etc., and can ultimately result in gene flow among populations. We investigated the within and between field movement of Diabrotica barberi Smith and Lawrence and D. virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)...

  8. Spatial clustering of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera and Agriotes ustulatus in small-scale maize fields without topographic relief drift

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soil living larvae of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and Agriotes ustulatus Schaller (Elateridae) can cause economic damage to maize roots. This study investigated the spatial clustering of both pests in four small-scale maize fields in southern Hungary, wher...

  9. Within and Between Field Dispersal of Diabrotica barberi and D. virgifera virgifera in the South Dakota Areawide Management Site

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dispersal is a means by which organisms search for food, shelter, mates, oviposition sites, etc., and can ultimately result in gene flow among populations. We investigated the within and between field movement of Diabrotica barberi Smith and Lawrence and D. virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: C...

  10. Proliferation and copy number variation of BEL-like long terminal repeat retrotransposons within the Diabrotica virgifera virgifera genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The proliferation of retrotransposons within a genome can contribute to increased sizes and affect the function of eukaryotic genes. BEL/Pao-like long-terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons were annotated from the highly adaptable insect species Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, the western corn root...

  11. MULTIPLE STRAIN WOLBACHIA INFECTION OF NORTHERN CORN ROOTWORM (DIABROTICA BARBERI)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Northern corn rootworm (Diabrotica barberi)(NCR) populations in the USA are infected with at least 3 strains of the endosymbiont, Wolbachia. NCR from central Illinois appears to be singly infected with a strain wBar2. NCR from eastern Illinois to Pennsylvania appear to harbor at least 2 differen...

  12. Comparative Performance of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) and Microsatellite Markers for the Detection of Population Differentiation in Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified from contiguous sequences assembled from Diabrotica virgifera virgifera midgut expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP)-based assays confirmed variation at 20 biallel...

  13. Effects of the Training Dataset Characteristics on the Performance of Nine Species Distribution Models: Application to Diabrotica virgifera virgifera

    PubMed Central

    Dupin, Maxime; Reynaud, Philippe; Jarošík, Vojtěch; Baker, Richard; Brunel, Sarah; Eyre, Dominic; Pergl, Jan; Makowski, David

    2011-01-01

    Many distribution models developed to predict the presence/absence of invasive alien species need to be fitted to a training dataset before practical use. The training dataset is characterized by the number of recorded presences/absences and by their geographical locations. The aim of this paper is to study the effect of the training dataset characteristics on model performance and to compare the relative importance of three factors influencing model predictive capability; size of training dataset, stage of the biological invasion, and choice of input variables. Nine models were assessed for their ability to predict the distribution of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, a major pest of corn in North America that has recently invaded Europe. Twenty-six training datasets of various sizes (from 10 to 428 presence records) corresponding to two different stages of invasion (1955 and 1980) and three sets of input bioclimatic variables (19 variables, six variables selected using information on insect biology, and three linear combinations of 19 variables derived from Principal Component Analysis) were considered. The models were fitted to each training dataset in turn and their performance was assessed using independent data from North America and Europe. The models were ranked according to the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve and the likelihood ratio. Model performance was highly sensitive to the geographical area used for calibration; most of the models performed poorly when fitted to a restricted area corresponding to an early stage of the invasion. Our results also showed that Principal Component Analysis was useful in reducing the number of model input variables for the models that performed poorly with 19 input variables. DOMAIN, Environmental Distance, MAXENT, and Envelope Score were the most accurate models but all the models tested in this study led to a substantial rate of mis-classification. PMID:21701579

  14. Evaluation of Potential Fitness Costs Associated With eCry3.1Ab Resistance in Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Geisert, Ryan W; Hibbard, Bruce E

    2016-08-01

    Both an eCry3.1Ab-selected and paired control western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, colony were tested for adult longevity, egg oviposition, egg viability, and larval development in order to evaluate the potential fitness costs associated with eCry3.1Ab resistance. Adult longevity experiments were conducted by pairing virgin males and females together in plastic boxes supplied with food, water, and ovipositional medium and observed for survival time. Eggs were also collected from the ovipositional medium once a week to determine average egg oviposition and egg viability. Larval development time experiments were conducted by infesting seedling assays with 25 neonate larvae and recording larval recovery after several days. Adult longevity, average egg oviposition, and larval development time results indicated a lack of fitness costs associated with eCry3.1Ab resistance in the western corn rootworm. Results of egg viability indicated a fitness advantage for the eCry3.1Ab-selected colony with a significantly higher egg hatch than the control. PMID:27151470

  15. Role of a γ-aminobutryic acid (GABA) receptor mutation in the evolution and spread of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera resistance to cyclodiene insecticides.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Coates, B S; Chen, H; Sappington, T W; Guillemaud, T; Siegfried, B D

    2013-10-01

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, is a damaging pest of cultivated corn that was controlled by applications of cyclodiene insecticides from the late 1940s until resistance evolved ∼10 years later. Range expansion from the western plains into eastern USA coincides with resistance development. An alanine to serine amino acid substitution within the Rdl subunit of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor confers resistance to cyclodiene insecticides in many species. We found that the non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) G/T at the GABA receptor cDNA position 838 (G/T(838)) of D. v. virgifera resulted in the alanine to serine change, and the codominant SNP allele T(838) was genetically linked to survival of beetles in aldrin bioassays. A phenotypic gradient of decreasing susceptibility from west to east was correlated with higher frequencies of the resistance-conferring T(838) allele in the eastern-most populations. This pattern exists in opposition to perceived selective pressures since the more eastern and most resistant populations probably experienced reduced exposure. The reasons for the observed distribution are uncertain, but historical records of the range expansion combined with the distribution of susceptible and resistant phenotypes and genotypes provide an opportunity to better understand factors affecting the species' range expansion. PMID:23841833

  16. Effects of a potato cysteine proteinase inhibitor on midgut proteolytic enzyme activity and growth of the southern corn rootworm, Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Fabrick, J; Behnke, C; Czapla, T; Bala, K; Rao, A G; Kramer, K J; Reeck, G R

    2002-04-01

    The major proteinase activity in extracts of larval midguts from the southern corn rootworm (SCR), Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi, was identified as a cysteine proteinase that prefers substrates containing an arginine residue in the P1 position. Gelatin-zymogram analysis of the midgut proteinases indicated that the artificial diet-fed SCR, corn root-fed SCR, and root-fed western corn rootworms (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) possess a single major proteinase with an apparent molecular mass of 25kDa and several minor proteinases. Similar proteinase activity pH profiles were exhibited by root-fed and diet-fed rootworms with the optimal activity being slightly acidic. Rootworm larvae reared on corn roots exhibited significantly less caseinolytic activity than those reared on the artificial diet. Midgut proteolytic activity from SCR was most sensitive to inhibition by inhibitors of cysteine proteinases. Furthermore, rootworm proteinase activity was particularly sensitive to inhibition by a commercial protein preparation from potato tubers (PIN-II). One of the proteins, potato cysteine proteinase inhibitor-10', PCPI-10', obtained from PIN-II by ion-exchange chromatography, was the major source of inhibitory activity against rootworm proteinase activity. PCPI-10' and E-64 were of comparable potency as inhibitors of southern corn rootworm proteinase activity (IC(50) =31 and 35nM, respectively) and substantially more effective than chicken egg white cystatin (IC(50) =121nM). Incorporation of PCPI-10' into the diet of SCR larvae in feeding trials resulted in a significant increase in mortality and growth inhibition. We suggest that expression of inhibitors such as PCPI-10' by transgenic corn plants in the field is a potentially attractive method of host plant resistance to these Diabrotica species. PMID:11886775

  17. Evidence of resistance to Cry34/35Ab1 corn by western corn rootworm: root injury in the field and larval survival in plant-based bioassays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is a serious pest of corn in the United States and recent management of western corn rootworm has included planting of Bt corn. Beginning in 2009, western corn rootworm populations with resistance to Cry3Bb1 c...

  18. Parasitism of Northern Corn Rootworms (Chrysomelidae: Diabrotica barberi) by Celatoria diabroticae (Tachinidae) in South Dakota: New Geographic Record

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn rootworms (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) are devastating pests of maize (Zea mays L.). Recently, there has been increased interest in biological control of rootworms, and one group of parasitoids under investigation for their potential as natural enemies of Diabrotica spp. are Celatoria (Diptera: ...

  19. Isolation of transcripts from Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte responsive to the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Cry3Bb1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crystal (Cry) proteins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have been widely used as a method of insect pest management for several decades. In recent years, a transgenic corn expressing the Cry3Bb1 toxin has been successfully used for protection against corn rootworm larvae (Genus Diabrotica). ...

  20. Basic biology and small-scale rearing of Celatoria compressa(Diptera: Tachinidae), a parasitoid of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, F; Toepfer, S; Kuhlmann, U

    2003-12-01

    The tachinid Celatoria compressa Wulp has been evaluated as a candidate biological control agent for the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgiferaLeConte, in Europe, where it is an invasive alien pest of maize. Special emphasis has been placed on understanding aspects of the parasitoid basic biology and on developing a rearing technique for a small-scale production of C. compressapuparia. The age of C. compressa adults was found to be the most crucial factor in achieving mating. Only newly emerged, 1-h-old females, mated successfully with 2- to 5-day-old males, achieving a success rate of 74%. After mating, a prelarviposition period of 4 days occurred. The 5-day-old C. compressa females inserted their eggs containing fully-developed first instars directly into adults of D. v. virgifera. Total larval and pupal developmental time, including a pre-larviposition period of 4 days, was 29 days under quarantine laboratory conditions (25 degrees C daytime, 15 degrees C at night, L:D 14:10, 50% +/- 10% r.h). Females of C. compressa were capable of producing on average 30 puparia throughout a female's mean larviposition period of 15 days. A large number of host attacks by C. compressa were unsuccessful, resulting in a mean larviposition success rate of 24% per female. Parasitoid females appear to have difficulties inserting the egg through the intersegmental sutures or membranes around leg openings of the host adults. Although the small-scale rearing technique of C. compressa presented is both time and labour intensive, C. compressa has been reared successfully for at least 20 successive generations without shifting the 1 male : 1 female sex ratio using a non-diapause strain of D. v. virgifera. PMID:14704104

  1. Development and characterization of MIR604 resistance in a western corn rootworm population (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    mCry3A is one of only four proteins licensed for commercial use in Diabrotica control. Utilizing a colony of western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, selected for resistance to mCry3A, we evaluated how mCry3A resistance was inherited and whether fitness costs were associated wi...

  2. Antixenosis in maize reduces feeding by western corn rootworm larvae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The first known example of a naturally-occurring maize genotype with behavioral resistance to western corn rootworm larval feeding was discovered in tests with SUM2162. Behavioral responses of neonate western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) larvae were evaluated in laboratory...

  3. Screening for corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) resistance to transgenic Bt corn in North Dakota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Western (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, and northern corn rootworms (NCR), D. barberi Smith & Lawrence, are major economic pests of corn in much of the U.S. Corn Belt. Western corn rootworm resistance to transgenic corn expressing Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) endotoxins has been confi...

  4. Maize Phenology Affects Establishment, Damage, and Development of the Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera:Chrysomelidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of maize (Zea mays L.) phenology on establishment and adult emergence of the western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) as well as plant damage to maize was evaluated in the greenhouse and in field trials in 2001 and 2002. Although neonate western corn rootworm larva...

  5. The effect of western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and water deficit on maize performance under controlled conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of greenhouse experiments using three infestation levels of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, under well-watered, moderately dry, and very dry soil moisture levels were conducted to quantify the interaction of western corn rootworm and soil water deficit on ...

  6. Effect of transgenic corn hybrids and a soil insecticide on corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) beetle emergence in North Dakota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Northern, Diabrotica barberi Smith & Lawrence, and western corn rootworms, D. virgifera virgifera LeConte, are economic pests of corn, Zea mays L. (Poaceae) in North Dakota. Many area corn growers rely on transgenic Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) corn hybrids to manage corn rootworms. Our objective was...

  7. Time of planting and choice of maize hybrids in controlling WCR (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Le Conte) in Serbia and Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Baca, F; Videnovic, Z; Erski, P; Stankovic, R; Dobrikovic, Danica

    2003-01-01

    increased from 16.0 to 63.9%. To successfully decrease the size and intensity of attacks of the Diabrotica v. virgifera population under conditions of applying insecticides or not, it is necessary to use maize hybrids of the earliest possible maturity group and to plant the seed on the earliest date possible in the first year of growing maize, if maize is to be followed by maize in the next year. PMID:15149095

  8. Corn volatiles as attractants for northern and western corn rootworm beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae:Diabrotica spp.).

    PubMed

    Hammack, L

    1996-07-01

    Synthetic corn volatiles and selected analogs were tested in commercial corn fields for attractiveness to feral northern (NCR,Diabrotica barberi) and western corn rootworm beetles (WCR,D. virgifera virgifera). Two new attractants, geranylacetone and α-terpineol, were identified among corn terpenes and compared at four stages in crop development with the phenylpropanoid standards cinnamyl alcohol and 4-methoxy-cinnamaldehyde, with each component at 30 mg/trap. Dose-response relationships (0.1-100 mg/trap) and efficacy of two-component blends (30 mg/component) were also examined. More beetles were captured on traps baited with (+)- than (-)-α-terpineol, but the difference was statistically significant only for WCR. Captures with geranylacetone or (+)-α-terpineol were directly proportional to the logarithm of the attractant dose. WCR females were attracted to as little as 0.1 mg of either compound. WCR males required ≥ 1.0 mg of (+)-α-terpineol and were not attracted to geranylacetone at any dose. NCR required ≥0.3 mg of either attractant and showed less marked response differences between the sexes than did WCR. Geranylacetone and cinnamyl alcohol were equally effective attractants, whereas (+)-α-terpineol was significantly less attractive to WCR but more attractive to NCR than was 4-methoxycinnamaldehyde. Corn terpenes and phenylpropanoid standards produced similar seasonal response patterns in that captures tended to rise in each case as the season progressed, except during silking when no compound was attractive. Mixing corn terpenes or phenylpropanoid standards synergized responses of WCR females, but (+)-α-terpineol suppressed attraction of NCR females to geranylacetone. PMID:24226082

  9. Selection for Resistance to the Cry3Bb1 Protein in a Genetically Diverse Population of Non-diapausing Western Corn Rootworm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) is an economically important pest of maize in North America. In 2003, the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency approved the commercial use of Monsanto’s Bt maize expressing the Cry3Bb1 protein, which is toxic to pest Diabrotica beetles. How...

  10. RNAi induced knockdown of a cadherin-like protein (EF531715) does not affect toxicity of Cry34/35Ab1 or Cry3Aa to Diabrotica virgifera virgifera larvae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Tan, Sek Yee; Rangasamy, Murugesan; Wang, Haichuan; Vélez, Ana María; Hasler, James; McCaskill, David; Xu, Tao; Chen, Hong; Jurzenski, Jessica; Kelker, Matthew; Xu, Xiaoping; Narva, Kenneth; Siegfried, Blair D

    2016-08-01

    The western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is an important maize pest throughout most of the U.S. Corn Belt. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal proteins including modified Cry3Aa and Cry34/35Ab1 have been expressed in transgenic maize to protect against WCR feeding damage. To date, there is limited information regarding the WCR midgut target sites for these proteins. In this study, we examined whether a cadherin-like gene from Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (DvvCad; GenBank accession # EF531715) associated with WCR larval midgut tissue is necessary for Cry3Aa or Cry34/35Ab1 toxicity. Experiments were designed to examine the sensitivity of WCR to trypsin activated Cry3Aa and Cry34/35Ab1 after oral feeding of the DvvCad dsRNA to knockdown gene expression. Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed that DvvCad mRNA transcript levels were reduced in larvae treated with cadherin dsRNA. Relative cadherin expression by immunoblot analysis and nano-liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS) of WCR neonate brush border membrane vesicle (BBMV) preparations exposed to DvvCad dsRNA confirmed reduced cadherin expression when compared to BBMV from untreated larvae. However, the larval mortality and growth inhibition of WCR neonates exposed to cadherin dsRNA for two days followed by feeding exposure to either Cry3Aa or Cry34/35Ab1 for four days was not significantly different to that observed in insects exposed to either Cry3Aa or Cry34/35Ab1 alone. In combination, these results suggest that cadherin is unlikely to be involved in the toxicity of Cry3Aa or Cry34/35Ab1 to WCR. PMID:27334721

  11. Identification of a female-produced sex pheromone of the western corn rootworm.

    PubMed

    Guss, P L; Tumlinson, J H; Sonnet, P E; Proveaux, A T

    1982-02-01

    A sex pheromone has been isolated and identified from virgin females of the western corn rootworm (WCR),Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte. The synthesized compound, racemic 8-methyl-2-decanol propanoate, was equal in attraction to the natural pheromone when tested in the field as a trap bait against three taxa ofDiabrotica known to respond to pheromone extracts from female WCR. Five taxa (D. virgifera virgifera; D. virgifera zeae Krysan and Smith, Mexican corn rootworm;D. longicornis barberi Smith and Lawrence, northern corn rootworm;D. longicornis longicornis (Say); andD. porracea Harold) were attracted to traps baited with 8-methyl-2-decanol propanoate. The response of male northern corn rootworms (NCR) in the field peaked at a relatively low concentration of 8-methyl-2-decanol propanoate and then was severely reduced at the higher concentrations tested. Conversely, the response of male WCR in the field continued to increase up to the highest dose tested. PMID:24414965

  12. Wolbachia MLST marker diversity from multiply infected northern corn rootworm (Diabrotica barberi) populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The northern corn rootworm (NCR, Diabrotica barberi) in eastern and central North America exhibits at least three distinct populations with respect to Wolbachia infection: uninfected; singly infected; multiply infected. The infected states are associated with different mtDNA haplotypes and reduced m...

  13. Northern corn rootworm (Diabrotica barberi) populations infected by at least 5 Wolbachia strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wolbachia infections are present in northern corn rootworm (Diabrotica barberi) populations from east of the Mississippi River. The boundary between infected and uninfected populations is in central Illinois. DNA sequencing of Wolbachia ftsZ and wsp segments indicates that east central Illinois popu...

  14. Impact of corn variety on potential predators of larval corn rootworms (Coleoptera: Diabrotica spp.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn rootworms (Coleoptera: Diabrotica spp.) are serious pests of maize around the world. Larvae feed on corn roots, which reduces uptake of water and nutrients and lowers plant yield. Current control practices rely on soil insecticides or genetically modified corn varieties. Although some researche...

  15. Density-Dependent and Density-Independent Mortality of the Western Corn Rootworm: Impact on Dose Calculations of Rootworm-Resistant Bt Corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The percent of viable eggs of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, which survived to the adult stage was evaluated for the effect of egg density in 2005 and 2007 in Central Missouri. In 2005, each plot was 2.44 m × 3.05 m and contained 64 maize, Zea mays L., plants. I...

  16. Examining cuphea as a potential host for western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae): larval development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In previous crop rotation research, adult emergence traps placed in plots planted to Cuphea PSR-23 (a selected cross of C. viscossisma and C. lanceolata) caught high numbers of adult western corn rootworms, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, suggesting that larvae may have completed development...

  17. Increased Survival of Western Corn Rootworm on Transgenic Corn Within Three Generations of Onplant Greenhouse Selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agricultural industry has adopted a high dose/refuge strategy as a means of delaying the onset of insect resistance to transgenic crops. Recently, Bt corn products developed for control of western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, have been introduced with less than high-dose...

  18. Developing genomics tools for the western corn rootworm - Progress and promise

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cooperative efforts among a number of interested scientists and institutions in the U.S. and Europe are being undertaken to expand genomics resources for the western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera). Such resources include development of hundreds of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP...

  19. A core set of microsatellite markers for Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) population genetics studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interest in the ecological and population genetics of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, has grown rapidly in the last few years in North America and Europe. This interest is a result of a number of converging issues related to increasing difficult...

  20. Monogalactosyldiacylglycerols as host recognition cues for western corn rootworm larvae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) was identified as a host recognition cue for larvae of the western corn rootworm Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte. An active glycolipid fraction obtained from an extract of germinating maize roots was isolated with thin layer chromatography using a bioassay-...

  1. Fitness costs of resistance to Cry3Bb1 maize by Western Corn Rootworm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crops producing toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are widely planted to manage insect pests, including western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a significant pest of maize. The evolution of resistance would diminish the ef...

  2. Mortality impact of MON863 transgenic maize roots on western corn rootworm larvae in the field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mortality of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) larvae due to feeding on MON863 transgenic maize (Zea mays L.) expressing the Cry3Bb1 protein relative to survivorship on maize with the same genetic background without the gene (isoline maize) was evaluated at three Missour...

  3. Adaptation and Invasiveness of Western Corn Rootworm: Intensifying Research on a Worsening Pest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is an established insect pest of maize (Zea mays L.) in North America. The rotation of maize with another crop, principally soybeans, Glycine max (L.), was the primary management strategy utilized by North American producers and rema...

  4. Toxic and behavioral effects of free fatty acids on western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feeding behavior, feeding intensity and staying behavior of neonate western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) larvae were evaluated in response to synthetic feeding stimulant blends. All of the treatments contained a 3-sugar blend (glucose:fructose:sucrose, 30:4:4 mg per ml) an...

  5. Susceptibility of Nebraska Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) Populations to Bt Corn Events

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic plants have been widely adopted by growers to manage the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, in field corn. Because of reduced efficacy in some Nebraska fields after repeated use of Cry3Bb1 expressing hybrids, single plant bioassays were conducted in 2012 and 20...

  6. Field-based assessment of resistance to Bt Corn by Western Corn Rootworm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is a serious pest of corn and is managed with Bt corn that produce insecticidal toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Beginning in 2009, severe injury to Bt corn producing Cry3Bb1 was observed in some cornfields ...

  7. Dynamic precision phenotyping reveals mechanism of crop tolerance to herbivory by the western corn rootworm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (LeConte) is a major pest of maize, Zea mays L. Over the years, this pest has repeatedly shown its resilience and adaptability not only to traditional crop management strategies including chemical pesticides and crop rotation, but also to de...

  8. LARVAL SAMPLING AND INSTAR DETERMINATION IN FIELD POPULATIONS OF NORTHERN AND WESTERN CORN ROOTWORM (COLEOPTERA: CHRYSOMELIDAE).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Head capsule width was measured for northern (Diabrotica barberi Smith & Lawrence) and western corn rootworm (D. virgifera virgifera LeConte) larvae recovered primarily from maize root systems but also from large soil cores each centered around a root system. Larvae for measurement derived from fie...

  9. Localized Search Cues in Corn Roots for Western Corn Rootworm Larvae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host-recognition cues that elicit a unique “tight-turning” behavior by larvae of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, were extracted from living corn roots with acetone. In behavioral bioassays, an acetone extract of corn roots had activity in the tight-turning bioassa...

  10. Genetic Diversity in Laboratory Colonies of Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) including a Nondiapause Colony

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laboratory-reared western corn rootworms, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, from colonies maintained at the North Central Agricultural Research Laboratory (NCARL) in Brookings, SD, are used extensively by many researchers in studies of the biology, ecology, behavior, and genetics of this major insect ...

  11. Methyl anthranilate as a repellent for western corn rootworm larvae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl anthranilate was identified as the active compound in extracts of maize roots that were shown to be repellent to neonate western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) larvae. A bioassay-driven approach was used to isolate the active material from diethyl ether extracts of r...

  12. The Nutritive Value of Dying Maize and Setaria Faberi Roots for Western Corn Rootworm Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The timing that senescing root tissues of Setaria faberi R.A.W. Herrm. and maize, Zea mays L., no longer support growth and development of neonate and 2nd instar western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, larvae was evaluated under greenhouse conditions. Three separate experimen...

  13. Environmental and Genotypic Effects for Western Corn Rootworm Tolerance Traits in American and European Maize Trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) (WCR) is the most destructive pest of maize in North America currently causing considerable economic losses also in Central and Southeast Europe. Developing and releasing of commercial hybrids with higher level of native (host-plant)...

  14. Adaptation by western corn rootworm to Bt corn: characterizing inheritance, fitness costs, and feeding preference

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, we used a laboratory-selected, Bt-resistant strain of western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Le Conte, to characterize inheritance of resistance, feeding behavior, and fitness costs associated with resistance to maize producing the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin Cry3...

  15. Selection for Cry3Bb1 resistance in a genetically diverse population of nondiapausing Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five short-diapause laboratory lines of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) were selected for resistance to MON863, a variety of corn genetically modified with the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) transgene that expresses the Cry3Bb1 endotoxin. Three of the selecte...

  16. Greenhouse-selected resistance to Cry3Bb1-producing corn in three western corn rootworm populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic corn producing the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin Cry3Bb1 has been useful for controlling western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, one of the most economically important crop pests in the United States. However, rapid evolution of resistance by this beetle to Bt c...

  17. Selection for resistance to mCry3A-expressing transgenic corn in western corn rootworm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the development of resistance to mCry3A, a laboratory colony of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, was established from field survivors of mCry3A-expressing (MIR604) corn. Feral adults emerging from MIR604 (selected) and isoline (control) field plots w...

  18. Conventional Screening Overlooks Resistance Sources: Rootworm Damage of Diverse Inbred Lines and Their B73 Hybrids is Unrelated

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The western corn rootworm (WCR; Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) is a major pest of maize in the USA and Europe, and is likely to increase in importance as the trend towards continuous corn favors larger WCR populations. Although current transgenic approaches are effective, native resistance...

  19. crw1- A novel maize mutant highly susceptible to foliar damage by the Western corn rootworm beetle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Leconte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is the most destructive insect pest of corn (Zea mays L) in the United States. The adult WCR beetles derive their nourishment from multiple sources including corn pollen and silks as well as the pollen o...

  20. Isolation and characterization of host recognition cues in corn roots for larvae of the western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Behavioral bioassays were used to isolate compounds from germinating corn roots that elicit a host recognition response (tight-turning behavior) by neonate larvae of the western corn rootworm Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte. When a behaviorally-active extract of germinating corn roots was sep...

  1. The effects of a winter cover crop on Diabrotica Virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) populations and beneficial arthropod communities in no-till maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of an autumn-planted, spring-killed, grass cover crop (Elymus trachycaulus [Link] Gould ex Shinners) on populations of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte and its predator community were evaluated in South Dakota maize fields over two seasons. Abundance, size, and sex ratio of D. virg...

  2. Carbon isotope ratios document that the elytra of western corn rootworm reflects adult versus larval feeding and later instar larvae prefer Bt corn to alternate hosts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is a major pest of maize, Zea mays L., worldwide. While exploring conventional approaches to management and more recently bioengineering, extended research has been conducted on ways to manage its root-feeding larvae. The nee...

  3. Selection for resistance to the Cry3Bb1 protein in a genetically diverse population of non-diapausing Western Corn Rootworm

    EPA Science Inventory

    The western corn rootworm (WCR, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) is a serious economic pest of corn, and historically has evolved resistance to many chemical insecticides when used to manage their populations. In 2003 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved for com...

  4. Effect of MIR604 transgenic maize at different stages of development on western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in a central missouri field environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The establishment and survival of western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, was evaluated on transgenic Bt maize, Zea mays L., expressing the mCry3A protein (MIR604) and non-Bt maize with the same genetic background (isoline maize) at different stages of development in 2007 and ...

  5. Mortality of western corn rootworm larvae on MIR604 transgenic maize roots: field survivorship has no impact on survivorship of F1 progeny on MIR604

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mortality of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) larvae due to MIR604 transgenic corn (Zea mays L.) expressing the modified Cry3A (mCry3A) protein relative to survivorship on corn with the same genetic background without the gene (isoline corn) was evaluated at three Misso...

  6. The Impact of MON863 Transgenic Roots is Equivalent on Western Corn Rootworm Larvae for a Wide Range of Maize Phenologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of maize (Zea mays L.) phenology on establishment, damage, and adult emergence of the western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) to MON863 transgenic maize expressing the Cry3Bb1 protein and its isoline was evaluated in field trials in 2002 and 2003. As expected, pla...

  7. Development of resistance to eCry3.1Ab-expressing transgenic maize in a laboratory-selected population of western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory colony of western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, was selected for resistance to transgenic maize expressing the eCry3.1ab protein. The selected colony was developed by rearing larvae on non-elite, non-commercial Bt maize expressing the eCry3.1Ab protein. After ...

  8. Selection for Cry3Bb1 resistance in a genetically diverse population of non-diapausing western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five short-diapause laboratory lines of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) were selected for resistance to MON863, a variety of corn genetically modified with the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) transgene that expresses the Cry3Bb1 d-endotoxin. Three of the selected lines were develo...

  9. Larval mortality and development for rotation-resistant and rotation-susceptible populations of the western corn rootworm on Bt corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is one of the most economically important insect pests threatening the production of corn, Zea mays (L.), in the United States. Throughout its history, this insect has displayed considerable adaptability by overcoming a variety of pe...

  10. Introduction of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera into the Old World and its consequences: a recently acquired invasive alien pest species on Zea mays from North America.

    PubMed

    Hummel, H E

    2003-01-01

    Diabrotica v. virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), (in short D.v.v.), with common name western corn rootworm, is endemic to the New World. Originating in the regions from South America to Mexico where it was in biological equilibrium with its natural enemies, predators and pathogens, it moved north with its food plants. Probably due to human agricultural farm practices with preference for monoculture of maize, the insect found open niches for expanding to the midwestern US where LeConte first described the species in Nebraska in 1867. Cyclodiene insecticide resistance, discovered in 1961, accelerated its spread and movement across the Great Plaines to the Atlantic Coast where it arrived around 1980. D.v.v. is a costly adversary to maize, to cucurbit, and, because of recent hostshifts, a threat to soybean production. Booming air travel and shipments of goods by air provided opportunities for D.v.v., without its natural enemies, to invade Europe where the insect was first described by F. Baca in 1993 near Belgrade airport (Baca 1993, Camprag & Baca 1995). From this focal point, D.v.v. expanded its range in all directions. Ten years later, in 2002, most of southeastern Europe has D.v.v. populations, some of them reaching economic damage levels such as those in Serbia, Croatia, and Hungary. New spot infestations in Northern Italy (Veneto, Lombardy, Piemonte) and in the Ticino region of Southern Switzerland, but also in Austria, Slovakia, Czechia, the Ukraine, even France, signal the final arrival of D.v.v. in Central Europe. The Alps, formerlyconsidered a natural barrier, might be circumvented or trespassed via air and road traffic. Model calculations by Baufeld and Enzian (2003) show that climatic and survival conditions are favorable for D.v.v. in all of Central Europe. Yet, in spite of well known annual losses of one billion dollars in the US, an effective and sustainable European strategy for keeping D.v.v. in check is still missing. PMID:15149091

  11. A Western Corn Rootworm Cadherin-like Protein is not Involved in the Binding and Toxicity of Cry34/35Ab1 and Cry3Aa Bacillus Thuringiensis Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The western corn rootworm (WCR) Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte is an important insect pest of corn. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal proteins Cry3Aa (as mCry3A) and Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 have been expressed in transgenic corn and are used to control the insect in the U.S. To date, there ...

  12. Resistance evolution to the first generation of genetically modified Diabrotica-active Bt-maize events by western corn rootworm: management and monitoring considerations.

    PubMed

    Devos, Yann; Meihls, Lisa N; Kiss, József; Hibbard, Bruce E

    2013-04-01

    Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera; WCR) is a major coleopteran maize pest in North America and the EU, and has traditionally been managed through crop rotation and broad-spectrum soil insecticides. Genetically modified Bt-maize offers an additional management tool for WCR and has been valuable in reducing insecticide use and increasing farm income. A concern is that the widespread, repeated, and exclusive deployment of the same Bt-maize transformation event will result in the rapid evolution of resistance in WCR. This publication explores the potential of WCR to evolve resistance to plant-produced Bt-toxins from the first generation of Diabrotica-active Bt-maize events (MON 863 and MON 88017, DAS-59122-7 and MIR604), and whether currently implemented risk management strategies to delay and monitor resistance evolution are appropriate. In twelve of the twelve artificial selection experiments reported, resistant WCR populations were yielded rapidly. Field-selected resistance of WCR to Cry3Bb1 is documented in some US maize growing areas, where an increasing number of cases of unexpected damage of WCR larvae to Bt-maize MON 88017 has been reported. Currently implemented insect resistance management measures for Bt-crops usually rely on the high dose/refuge (HDR) strategy. Evidence (including laboratory, greenhouse and field data) indicates that several conditions contributing to the success of the HDR strategy may not be met for the first generation of Bt-maize events and WCR: (1) the Bt-toxins are expressed heterogeneously at a low-to-moderate dose in roots; (2) resistance alleles may be present at a higher frequency than initially assumed; (3) WCR may mate in a non-random manner; (4) resistance traits could have non-recessive inheritance; and (5) fitness costs may not necessarily be associated with resistance evolution. However, caution must be exercised when extrapolating laboratory and greenhouse results to field conditions. Model predictions

  13. Parasitism of Western Corn Rootworm Larvae and Pupae by Steinernema carpocapsae.

    PubMed

    Jackson, J J; Brooks, M A

    1995-03-01

    Virulence and development of the insect-parasitic nematode, Steinernema carpocapsae (Weiser) (Mexican strain), were evaluated for the immature stages of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte. Third instar rootworm larvae were five times more susceptible to nematode infection than second instar larvae and 75 times more susceptible than first instar larvae and pupae, based on laboratory bioassays. Rootworm eggs were not susceptible. Nematode development was observed in all susceptible rootworm stages, but a complete life cycle was observed only in second and third instar larvae and pupae. Nematode size was affected by rootworm stage; the smallest infective-stage nematodes were recovered from second instar rootworm larvae. Results of this study suggest that S. carpocapsae should be applied when second and third instar rootworm larvae are predominant in the field. PMID:19277256

  14. Root herbivory: molecular analysis of the maize transcriptome upon infestation by Southern corn rootworm, Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While many studies have characterized the transcriptome of plants attacked by herbivorous insect pests, few have undertaken an examination of the genes affected by root pests. We have subjected maize seedlings to infestation by southern corn rootworm (SCR) Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi and usin...

  15. Sequences of Wolbachia wsp genes reveal multiple infection of individual northern corn rootworms (Diabrotica barberi) by several Wolbachia strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Northern corn rootworm (Diabrotica barberi)(NCR) populations in the USA are infected with at least 4 strains of the endosymbiont, Wolbachia. NCR from eastern Illinois to Pennsylvania appear to harbor at least 4 different strains designated wBar1, wBar3, wBar4, and wBar5. NCR from central Illinois ...

  16. Wolbachia wsp gene hypervariable region specific PCR primers detect multiple strain infections in northern corn rootworm (Diabrotica barberi)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The northern corn rootworm (Diabrotica barberi)(Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in eastern and central North America exhibits at least three distinct populations with respect to Wolbachia infection: uninfected; singly-infected; multi-infected. The infected states are associated with different mtDNA haplo...

  17. Insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis protect corn from corn rootworms.

    PubMed

    Moellenbeck, D J; Peters, M L; Bing, J W; Rouse, J R; Higgins, L S; Sims, L; Nevshemal, T; Marshall, L; Ellis, R T; Bystrak, P G; Lang, B A; Stewart, J L; Kouba, K; Sondag, V; Gustafson, V; Nour, K; Xu, D; Swenson, J; Zhang, J; Czapla, T; Schwab, G; Jayne, S; Stockhoff, B A; Narva, K; Schnepf, H E; Stelman, S J; Poutre, C; Koziel, M; Duck, N

    2001-07-01

    Field tests of corn co-expressing two new delta-endotoxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have demonstrated protection from root damage by western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte). The level of protection exceeds that provided by chemical insecticides. In the bacterium, these proteins form crystals during the sporulation phase of the growth cycle, are encoded by a single operon, and have molecular masses of 14 kDa and 44 kDa. Corn rootworm larvae fed on corn roots expressing the proteins showed histopathological symptoms in the midgut epithelium. PMID:11433280

  18. Impact of the Bt corn proteins Cry34/35Ab1 and Cry3Bb1, alone or pyramided, on western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) beetle emergence in the field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is a major pest of corn, Zea mays L. This study compared the effect of the Bt proteins Cry34/35Ab1, Cry3Bb1, singly expressed, and Cry3Bb1 plus Cry34/35Ab1 in a pyramid, with a near-isoline control, on D. virgifera adult emergence in fie...

  19. Distribution of MCA-coated grits in maize fields after high wheel tractor application for disrupting orientation of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte.

    PubMed

    Wennemann, Ludger; Hummel, Hans E

    2002-01-01

    High wheel tractor applications of 4-methoxycinnamaldehyde (MCA)-coated corn granules ('grits') were conducted in Ruski Krstur (Serbia) in summer 2001 in a 5 ha corn field. Grits are a by-product after corn is harvested and separated from the cob and used as a carrier medium to disseminate MCA into the corn field. MCA is a kairomone mimic derived form Cucurbita maxima (Duchesne) used to disrupt orientation of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte towards different MCA and pheromone baited traps. The ultimate goal is to investigate the use of MCA as a mating disruptant. MCA was dissolved in an organic solvent and mixed in a cement machine with the grits. Grits were applied at rates of 17.39, 17.1 and 12.45 kg/ha on July 4th, July 19th and August 3rd. Before the impact of MCA as a disruptant can be addressed, the distribution patterns of MCA coated grits have to be thoroughly investigated. They were evaluated by counting girts deposited in 16 or 20 plastic dishes of 30-cm diameter positioned along 2 rows through the field directly after the grit application by tractor. Additionally, grits deposited on corn plant surface such as leaves, leaf axils and corn cobs were counted. Total number of grits collected in plastic dishes revealed even application rates at the first and second application but not on the third application date. Number of grits collected on plant surfaces were significantly different from each other regarding each application date. Altogether, grit distribution in the dishes as well as on the plant surface was variable. However, distribution patterns achieved so far hold promise to disseminate MCA coated grits into corn fields for orientation disruption or mating disruption of D. virgifera virgifera. PMID:12696417

  20. Protein profiling and tps23 induction in different maize lines in response to methyl jasmonate treatment and Diabrotica virgifera infestation.

    PubMed

    Capra, Emanuele; Colombi, Cinzia; De Poli, Pamela; Nocito, Fabio Francesco; Cocucci, Maurizio; Vecchietti, Alberto; Marocco, Adriano; Stile, Maria Rosaria; Rossini, Laura

    2015-03-01

    Plant responses to herbivore insects involve direct and indirect defense with the production of signal molecules including jasmonic acid (JA) and its derivatives (e.g. methyl jasmonate, MeJA). In maize (Zea mays), root feeding by Diabrotica virgifera larvae activates an indirect defense mechanism, through enthomopathogenic nematodes that are recruited after Terpene Synthase 23 (tps23) upregulation and (E)-β-caryophyllene root emission. In order to gain insight into the correlation between JA signaling and response to Diabrotica attack, we analyzed tps23 expression and protein profiles in maize roots in response to MeJA treatment and insect infestation. Similar to herbivore feeding, MeJA treatment was found to increase tps23 transcript accumulation, with consistent variations for both treatments in maize lines differing in (E)-β-caryophyllene production. Analysis of root protein profiles showed specific alterations leading to the identification of three proteins that were induced by MeJA treatment. We focused on a peroxidase-like protein (Px-like) showing that the corresponding transcripts accumulated in all tested lines. Results show that exogenous application of MeJA upregulates tps23 expression and specifically alters protein patterns in maize roots. Parallel effects on tps23 transcript accumulation were observed upon hormone exposure and insect infestation in different maize lines. In contrast, Px-like transcript profiling showed differences between treatments. These results support the possible involvement of MeJA in mediating the upregulation of tps23 in response to Diabrotica attack. PMID:25506768

  1. Isolation of transcripts from Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte responsive to the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Cry3Bb1

    EPA Science Inventory

    Crystal proteins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have been widely used as a method of insect pest management for several decades. In recent years, a transgenic corn expressing the Cry3Bb1 toxin has been successfully used for protection against corn rootworm larvae (Genus...

  2. Influence of western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) larval injury on yield of different types of maize.

    PubMed

    Urías-López, M A; Meinke, L J

    2001-02-01

    Two field experiments were conducted in 1995-1996 to determine if there are common yield responses among maize hybrids to larval western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte injury. Three yellow dent hybrids, five white food grade dent hybrids, and a popcorn hybrid were included in the study. The minimum level of rootworm injury as measured by root damage ratings (3.2-4.2) that significantly reduced yield was similar across the hybrids included in the study. However, the pattern of yield response to different rootworm injury levels varied among hybrids. This suggests that maize hybrids may inherently differ in their ability to tolerate rootworm injury and partition biomass in response to injury and other stresses. The complex interaction among hybrid, level of injury, and other stresses suggests that a common western corn rootworm injury-yield relationship may not exist within maize. PMID:11233098

  3. Evolution of diabroticite rootworm beetle (Chrysomelidae) receptors for Cucurbita blossom volatiles.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, R L; Lampman, R L

    1991-03-01

    The diabroticite rootworm beetles coevolved with plants of the family Cucurbitaceae as demonstrated by their feeding dependence on the tetracyclic triterpenoid cucurbitacins. These beetles also exhibit strong attraction to phenylpropanoid volatile components of Cucurbita blossoms. A mixture of 1,2,4-trimethoxybenzene, indole, and (E)-cinnamaldehyde, all blossom components, is highly attractive to the several species of diabroticite cucumber beetles and corn rootworms and is considered a simplified Cucurbita blossom kairomone odor. The evolutionary divergence in antennal receptor complementarity is best understood by comparing the species-specific responses of several Diabrotica to structural analogues of (E)-cinnamaldehyde, the major attractant for Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi. Cinnamyl alcohol is a strong attractant for Diabrotica barberi, and 4-methoxycinnamaldehyde is an exceptional attractant for Diabrotica virgifera. The very closely related species D. barberi and Diabrotica cristata are most strongly attracted to 4-methoxyphenethanol, which is unattractive to the other species studied. PMID:11607158

  4. Evolution of diabroticite rootworm beetle (Chrysomelidae) receptors for Cucurbita blossom volatiles.

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, R L; Lampman, R L

    1991-01-01

    The diabroticite rootworm beetles coevolved with plants of the family Cucurbitaceae as demonstrated by their feeding dependence on the tetracyclic triterpenoid cucurbitacins. These beetles also exhibit strong attraction to phenylpropanoid volatile components of Cucurbita blossoms. A mixture of 1,2,4-trimethoxybenzene, indole, and (E)-cinnamaldehyde, all blossom components, is highly attractive to the several species of diabroticite cucumber beetles and corn rootworms and is considered a simplified Cucurbita blossom kairomone odor. The evolutionary divergence in antennal receptor complementarity is best understood by comparing the species-specific responses of several Diabrotica to structural analogues of (E)-cinnamaldehyde, the major attractant for Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi. Cinnamyl alcohol is a strong attractant for Diabrotica barberi, and 4-methoxycinnamaldehyde is an exceptional attractant for Diabrotica virgifera. The very closely related species D. barberi and Diabrotica cristata are most strongly attracted to 4-methoxyphenethanol, which is unattractive to the other species studied. PMID:11607158

  5. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction method for differentiating western and northern corn rootworm larvae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Roehrdanz, Richard L

    2003-06-01

    Western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, and northern corn rootworm, D. barberi Smith and Lawrence, are sympatric species and serious pests of corn cultivation in North America. Comparison of nucleotide sequence of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I and II was used to design polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers that discriminate immature stages of the two species based on differences in amplicon size. Multiplex PCR can be used to give a positive test for each species in a single amplification reaction. This provides a method to identify field caught larvae and facilitates investigations of larval interaction and competition between the species. PMID:12852603

  6. Transgenic approaches to western corn rootworm control.

    PubMed

    Narva, Kenneth E; Siegfried, Blair D; Storer, Nicholas P

    2013-01-01

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) is a significant corn pest throughout the United States corn belt. Rootworm larvae feed on corn roots causing yield losses and control expenditures that are estimated to exceed US$1 billion annually. Traditional management practices to control rootworms such as chemical insecticides or crop rotation have suffered reduced effectiveness due to the development of physiological and behavioral resistance. Transgenic maize expressing insecticidal proteins are very successful in protecting against rootworm damage and preserving corn yield potential. However, the high rate of grower adoption and early reliance on hybrids expressing a single mode of action and low-dose traits threatens the durability of commercialized transgenic rootworm technology for rootworm control. A summary of current transgenic approaches for rootworm control and the corresponding insect resistance management practices is included. An overview of potential new modes of action based on insecticidal proteins, and especially RNAi targeting mRNA coding for essential insect proteins is provided. PMID:23604211

  7. A promising biotechnical approach to pest management of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera in Illinois maize fields under kairomonal shielding with the new MSD technique.

    PubMed

    Hummel, H E; Shaw, J T; Hein, D F

    2005-01-01

    Environmentally compatible and sustainable plant protection requires novel approaches to pest management characterized by minimal emphasis on toxicants. Classical toxicants traditionally dominated economic entomology for half a century. But worldwide problems with environmental pollution and with increasing resistance levels in all major pesticide classes and in many key insect species including Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (D.v.v.) strongly advocate a rethinking and a change in management paradigms used. Soft, minimally invasive, biological, biotechnical and cultural approaches should replace hard pesticides which are in favor up to now. Fortunately, pheromones, kairomones, plant attractants, better traps, new plant varieties and cultural methods like crop rotation, in short more sophisticated methods are now available as pressure for finding and exploring novel strategies increases. Facing this situation, a new biotechnical approach of population reduction of D.v.v., called "MSD" technique, is introduced. MSD is characterized as an approach combining mass trapping, shielding and deflecting of adult insects along an invisible odor barrier of synthetic kairomone which diminishes the flux of insects across a high capacity trap line baited with kairomone, thus reducing both the population fluctuation and number and its reproductive success within the shielded area. In the case of D.v.v. in Zea mays fields, effects realized by the MSD technique have been measured simultaneously by a number of independent criteria during the summers of 2003 and 2004 at 2 different locations in Illinois maize fields of up to one half hectare size. Results observed are statistically significant and cannot be explained by mass trapping alone. There is also an additional shielding and deflection, in short "diversion" effect whose basic sensory and behavioral mechanisms call for future exploration. PMID:16628896

  8. The Effect of Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and Water Deficit on Maize Performance Under Controlled Conditions.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, M A B; Sharp, R E; Oliver, M J; Finke, D L; Ellersieck, M R; Hibbard, B E

    2016-04-01

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is the most important insect of maize, Zea mays L., but knowledge of its interaction with water deficit on maize production is lacking. A series of greenhouse experiments using three infestation levels of the western corn rootworm, D. virgifera virgifera, under well-watered, moderately dry, and very dry soil moisture levels were conducted to quantify the interaction of western corn rootworm and soil water deficit on B73×Mo17 maize growth and physiology. Three separate experiments were conducted. Soil moisture regimes were initiated 30 d postplanting for experiments using neonate and second-instar larvae and 30 d postinfestation in the experiment using eggs. In the neonate and second-instar experiments, there were no significant differences among western corn rootworm levels in their effects on leaf water potential, shoot dry weight, and root dry weight. The interaction of western corn rootworm and soil moisture significantly impacted the larval recovery in the neonate experiment, but no other significant interactions were documented between soil moisture levels and rootworm infestation levels. Overall, the results indicate that under the conditions of these experiments, the effect of water deficit was much greater on plants than the effect of western corn rootworm and that the interactions between water deficit and western corn rootworm levels minimally affected the measured parameters of plant performance. PMID:26896532

  9. Identification of a female-produced sex pheromone from the southern corn rootworm,Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi Barber.

    PubMed

    Guss, P L; Tumlinson, J H; Sonnet, P E; McLaughlin, J R

    1983-09-01

    A sex pheromone has been isolated and identified from virgin females of the southern corn rootworm (SCR),Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi Barber. The synthesized compound, 10-methyl-2-tridecanone was shown to be attractive to males of the SCR, and also to males ofD. u. undecimpunctata Mannerheim, the western spotted cucumber beetle (WSCB), and ofD. u. duodecimnotata in Mexico. Males of both the SCR and the WSCB strongly preferred theR over theS enantiomer. The resolved enantiomers were not tested againstD. u. duodecimnotata. PMID:24407866

  10. Interactions among Bt maize, entomopathogens, and rootworm species (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in the field: effects on survival, yield, and root injury.

    PubMed

    Petzold-Maxwell, Jennifer L; Jaronski, Stefan T; Clifton, Eric H; Dunbar, Mike W; Jackson, Mark A; Gassmann, Aaron J

    2013-04-01

    A 2 yr field study was conducted to determine how a blend of entomopathogens interacted with Bt maize to affect mortality of Diabrotica spp. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), root injury to maize (Zea maize L.) and yield. The blend of entomopathogens included two entomopathogenic nematodes, Steinernema carpocapsae Weiser and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora Poinar, and one entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium brunneum (Metschnikoff) Sorokin. Bt maize (event DAS59122-7, which produces Bt toxin Cry34/35Ab1) decreased root injury and survival of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) and northern corn rootworm (Diabrotica barberi Smith & Lawrence) but did not affect yield. During year 1 of the study, when rootworm abundance was high, entomopathogens in combination with Bt maize led to a significant reduction in root injury. In year 2 of the study, when rootworm abundance was lower, entomopathogens significantly decreased injury to non-Bt maize roots, but had no effect on Bt maize roots. Yield was significantly increased by the addition of entomopathogens to the soil. Entomopathogens did not decrease survival of corn rootworm species. The results suggest that soil-borne entomopathogens can complement Bt maize by protecting roots from feeding injury from corn rootworm when pest abundance is high, and can decrease root injury to non-Bt maize when rootworm abundance is low. In addition, this study also showed that the addition of entomopathogens to soil contributed to an overall increase in yield. PMID:23786047

  11. MITOCHONDRIAL DNA AND ITS1 DIFFERENTIATION IN GEOGRAPHICAL POPULATIONS OF NORTHERN CORN ROOTWORM, DIABROTICA BARBERI (COLEOPTERA: CHRYSOMELIDAE): IDENTIFICATION OF DISTINCT GENETIC POPULATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic variation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the nuclear ribosomal spacer, ITS1, in local and dispersed geographical populations of northern corn rootworm, Diabrotica barberi Smith and Lawrence was examined. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was use...

  12. Tracking the Extent of Multi-Strain Infection of Individual Northern Corn Rootworms (Diabrotica barberi) Using Specific Primers for Different wsp Hypervariable Regions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The northern corn rootworm (Diabrotica barberi) in eastern and central North America exhibits at least three distinct populations with respect to Wolbachia infection: uninfected; singly-infected; multi-infected. The infected states are associated with different mtDNA haplotypes and reduced mt variab...

  13. MITOCHONDRIAL DNA AND ITS1 DIFFERENTIATION IN GEOGRAPHICAL POPULATIONS OF NORTHERN CORN ROOTWORM, DIABROTICA BARBERI (COLEOPTERA: CHRYSOMELIDAE): IDENTIFICATION OF DISTINCT GENETIC POPULATIONS [SEE ABSTRACT FOR ACCESSION NOS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic variation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the nuclear ribosomal spacer, ITS1, in local and dispersed geographical populations of northern corn rootworm, Diabrotica barberi Smith and Lawrence was examined. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was use...

  14. Effects of different growing systems and fertiliser rates on attractiveness of maize crop to beetles of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte and larvae dammage.

    PubMed

    Baca, F; Jovanovic, Z; Veskovic, M; Kaitovic, Z

    2003-01-01

    Monitoring of plant lodging, yield reaction due to root injures caused by western corn rootworm larvae (WCR) (Diabroticia virgifera virgifera Le Conte) and adults abundance with yellow Multigard and Pherocone AM and pheromone Csalomon traps, were performed in three field trials. First one with 4 variants of maize growing system; maize continuous cropping, two crop rotation (wheat-maize, soybean-maize) and three crop rotation (wheat-soybean-maize), set up in 1985. Second one with 54 variants, both conducted in Zemun Polje. A large scale trial with three rates of NPK mineral fertilizers; (NPK 0 kg/ha, 170 kg/ha and 270 kg/ha with two type of N applied in side dressing (N 0 kg/ha, 50 kg/ha and 80 kg/ha) was set up in Crepaja in 1997, 1998 and 1999. Each variant of fertilizers had two combinations; one treated with insecticide and another one untreated check. Feeding on root system of WCR larvae, in the variants with insecticide application, resulted in plant lodging that ranged in average from 2.1% in 1997, to 61.6% in 1999, while in variant without insecticide application, root damage resulted in plant lodging from 19.5% in 1997, to 56.6% in 1999. Increasing of the nitrogen rates in the variants without application of insecticide tended to raise the percentage of plant lodging Yield reaction on nitrogen application was positive in 1997, first year and 1998, second year of maize monoculture, while in 1999 was negative. Larval injury affected maize yield in the higher extend in extremely dry year 2000, when yield index was 0.37 comparing 2.86 t/ha in maize monoculture to 7.66 t/ha in three crop rotation, 0.54 (2.86: 5.28 maize monoculture: wheat-maize) and 0.55 (2.86: 5.22 maize monoculture: soybean-maize). Adult abundance monitored with yellow sticky and pheromone traps indicate that maize in three crop rotation has the smallest attraction to the migratory WCR beetles. The choice of three crop rotation seems to be the most promising choice for maize growing, which

  15. RNA interference as a method for target-site screening in the Western Corn Rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA interference (RNAi) is one of the most powerful and extraordinarily-specific means by which to silence genes. The ability of RNAi to silence genes makes it possible to ascertain function from genomic data, thereby making it an excellent choice for target-site screening. To test the efficacy of...

  16. Lipid, polyamide, and flavonol phagostimulants for adult western corn rootworm from sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) pollen.

    PubMed

    Lin, S; Mullin, C A

    1999-03-01

    Adult Diabroticites including western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, consume pollen of corn, squash, sunflower, and other species. Short-chain neutral amino acids in methanol-water extracts of pollen have been previously identified in our laboratory as strong phagostimulants for Diabrotica. Bioassay-driven fractionation was used to characterize the interacting lipid and midpolarity phagostimulants for adult WCR in Giant Gray Stripe sunflower, Helianthus annuus L., pollen. Lipids rich in omega3-linolenic acid including triglycerides, free fatty acids, phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidic acids, and phosphatidylcholines were highly phagostimulatory. Other important phagostimulatory components included a hydroxycinnamic acid-polyamine amide, N(1),N(5),N(10)-tri[(E)-p-coumaroyl]spermidine, and a flavonol, quercetin beta-3-O-glucoside. The structural characteristics of these phagoactive compounds and their role in the pollinivory specialization of rootworm beetles are discussed. PMID:10552441

  17. Behavioral responses of western corn rootworm larvae to volatile semiochemicals from corn seedlings.

    PubMed

    Hibbard, B E; Bjostad, L B

    1988-06-01

    Corn seedling volatiles collected cryogenically are highly attractive to western corn rootworm larvae,Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), in a laboratory bioassay. Carbon dioxide is known as an attractant for western corn rootworm larvae, and the amount of carbon dioxide in the cryogenic collections was measured with an infrared gas analyzer. In a choice test between a source containing carbon dioxide alone and a source containing corn seedling volatiles with an equal amount of carbon dioxide (verified by infrared gas analysis), western corn rootworm larvae chose the corn volatile source significantly more often than the side with carbon dioxide alone. This indicates that carbon dioxide is only one of the volatiles from corn seedlings that is behaviorally important and that other compounds of behavioral importance are present as well. PMID:24276403

  18. Diagnostic assays based on esterase-mediated resistance mechanisms in western corn rootworms (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuguo; Scharf, Michael E; Parimi, Srinivas; Meinke, Lance J; Wright, Robert J; Chandler, Laurence D; Siegfried, Blair D

    2002-12-01

    Resistance to methyl-parathion among Nebraska western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, populations is associated with increased hydrolytic metabolism of an organophosphate insecticide substrate. An electrophoretic method to identify resistant individuals based on the staining intensity of esterase isozymes on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels was developed. Three groups of esterases (I, II, and III) were visible on the gels, but only group II esterase isozymes were intensified in resistant populations. A total of 26 and 31 field populations of western corn rootworms from Nebraska (in 1998 and 1999, respectively) were assessed with nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) assays and diagnostic concentration bioassays. Significant correlations were observed between the two diagnostic assays. Group II esterase isozymes provide a reliable biochemical marker for detection of methyl-parathion resistance in individual western corn rootworms and a tool for monitoring the frequency of resistant individuals in field populations. PMID:12539840

  19. Effects of Pyramided Bt Corn and Blended Refuges on Western Corn Rootworm and Northern Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Keweshan, Ryan S; Head, Graham P; Gassmann, Aaron J

    2015-04-01

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, and the northern corn rootworm, Diabrotica barberi Smith & Lawrence (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), are major pests of corn (Zea mays L). Several transgenic corn events producing insecticidal toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) kill corn rootworm larvae and reduce injury to corn roots. However, planting of Bt corn imposes selection on rootworm populations to evolve Bt resistance. The refuge strategy and pyramiding of multiple Bt toxins can delay resistance to Bt crops. In this study, we assessed the impact of four treatments--1) non-Bt corn, 2) Cry3Bb1 corn, 3) corn pyramided with Cry3Bb1 and Cry34/35Ab1, and 4) pyramided corn with a blended refuge--on survival, time of adult emergence, and size of western and northern corn rootworm. All treatments with Bt corn led to significant reductions in the number of adults that emerged per plot. However, at one location, we identified Cry3Bb1-resistant western corn rootworm. In some cases Bt treatments reduced size of adults and delayed time of adult emergence, with effects most pronounced for pyramided corn. For both species, the number of adults that emerged from pyramided corn with a blended refuge was significantly lower than expected, based solely on emergence from pure stands of pyramided corn and non-Bt corn. The results of this study indicate that pyramided corn with a blended refuge substantially reduces survival of both western and northern corn rootworm, and as such, should be a useful tool within the context of a broader integrated pest management strategy. PMID:26470183

  20. Ovarian development and ovipositional preference of the western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) variant in east central Illinois.

    PubMed

    Rondon, Silvia I; Gray, Michael E

    2004-04-01

    The rotation of maize, Zea mays L., and soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., has been the traditional cultural tactic to manage the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, in the Corn Belt. The reduced effectiveness of this rotation as a pest management tool in east central Illinois, northern Indiana, and southern Michigan can be explained by the shift in the ovipositional behavior of the new variant of western corn rootworm. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of maize, soybean, oat, Avena sativa L., stubble, and alfalfa, Medicago sativa L., on the ovarian development and ovipositional preferences of the variant western corn rootworm. Field research was conducted near Urbana, IL, during 1998-2000. Gravid females were present throughout the season in all crops, and due to the prolonged period in which western corn rootworm females can lay eggs, none of the crops were immune from oviposition. Results indicated that the western corn rootworm variant oviposits in maize, soybean, oat stubble, and alfalfa In 1998 and 1999, maize was the preferred oviposition site among crops; however, in 2000, maize, soybean, and oat stubble treatments had similar densities of western corn rootworm eggs. Lack of oviposition preference of the western corn rootworm variant demonstrated in this experiment represents a reasonable explanation of why the effectiveness of the rotation strategy to control western corn rootworm has diminished. PMID:15154460

  1. Screening Maize Germplasm for Resistance to Western and Northern Corn Rootworms (Chrysomelidae: Diabrotica spp.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn rootworms (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) are devastating pests of maize (Zea mays L.), with a subterranean larval stage that consumes root tissue. To lessen reliance on soil insecticides and provide alternatives for genetically modified maize hybrids, researchers have developed novel maize germpla...

  2. Diabrotica collicola (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)a new species of leaf beetle from Argentina Discussion and key to some similar species of the Diabrotica virgifera group

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The new species Diabrotica collicola Cabrera & Cabrera Walsh is described and illustrated based on specimens collected from Balcozna, Catamarca Province (Argentina). A full description is provided and includes morphological characters of the mouthparts, hind wing venation, binding patch, metendoster...

  3. Comparison of adult corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) sampling methods.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, R J; Wilde, G E; Shufran, R A; Milliken, G A

    2002-02-01

    Studies were conducted in Kansas corn and soybean fields during 1997 to compare various sampling methods, traps, and trap components for capturing three species of adult corn rootworms: western (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Leconte), southern (D. undecimpunctata howardi Barber), and northern (D. barberi Smith & Lawrence). Lure constituents affected the species of beetle attracted to the trap. Traps with a lure containing 4-methoxycinnamaldehyde attracted more western corn rootworms, those with a lure containing eugenol were more attractive to northern corn rootworms, and those containing trans-cinnamaldehyde were most attractive to southern corn rootworms. Multigard sticky traps caught more beetles than did Pherocon AM sticky traps. In corn, a newly designed lure trap caught more beetles than did sticky traps on most occasions. Also, lure-baited sticky traps caught more beetles than did nonbaited sticky traps. Varying the color of the lure trap bottom did not affect the number caught. In soybeans, the new lure traps captured more beetles than did the nonbaited Multigard or Pherocon AM sticky traps. Results of this study suggest the new lure trap may provide a more accurate assessment of corn rootworm populations than traditional monitoring techniques and may be more esthetically pleasing to growers and consultants. PMID:11942770

  4. Post-establishment movement of western corn rootworm larvae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in Central Missouri corn.

    PubMed

    Hibbard, Bruce E; Duran, Daniel P; Ellersieck, Mark R; Ellsbury, Michael M

    2003-06-01

    If registered, transgenic corn, Zea mays L., with corn rootworm resistance will offer a viable alternative to insecticides for managing Diabrotica spp. corn rootworms. Resistance management to maintain susceptibility is in the interest of growers, the Environmental Protection Agency, and industry, but little is known about many aspects of corn rootworm biology required for an effective resistance management program. The extent of larval movement by the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, that occurs from plant-to-plant or row-to-row after initial establishment was evaluated in 1998 and 1999 in a Central Missouri cornfield. Post-establishment movement by western corn rootworm larvae was clearly documented in two of four treatment combinations in 1999 where larvae moved up to three plants down the row and across a 0.46-m row. Larvae did not significantly cross a 0.91-m row after initial host establishment in 1998 or 1999, whether or not the soil had been compacted by a tractor and planter. In the current experiment, western corn rootworm larvae moved from highly damaged, infested plants to nearby plants with little to no previous root damage. Our data do not provide significant insight into how larvae might disperse after initial establishment when all plants in an area are heavily damaged or when only moderate damage occurs on an infested plant. A similar situation might also occur if a seed mixture of transgenic and isoline plants were used and if transgenic plants with rootworm resistance are not repellent to corn rootworm larvae. PMID:12852594

  5. A spatially explicit model simulating western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) adaptation to insect-resistant maize.

    PubMed

    Storer, Nicholas P

    2003-10-01

    A stochastic spatially explicit computer model is described that simulates the adaptation by western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, to rootworm-resistance traits in maize. The model reflects the ecology of the rootworm in much of the corn belt of the United States. It includes functions for crop development, egg and larval mortality, adult emergence, mating, egg laying, mortality and dispersal, and alternative methods of rootworm control, to simulate the population dynamics of the rootworm. Adaptation to the resistance trait is assumed to be controlled by a monogenic diallelic locus, whereby the allele for adaptation varies from incompletely recessive to incompletely dominant, depending on the efficacy of the resistance trait. The model was used to compare the rate at which the adaptation allele spread through the population under different nonresistant maize refuge deployment scenarios, and under different levels of crop resistance. For a given refuge size, the model indicated that placing the nonresistant refuge in a block within a rootworm-resistant field would be likely to delay rootworm adaptation rather longer than planting the refuge in separate fields in varying locations. If a portion of the refuge were to be planted in the same fields or in-field blocks each year, rootworm adaptation would be delayed substantially. Rootworm adaptation rates are also predicted to be greatly affected by the level of crop resistance, because of the expectation of dependence of functional dominance on dose. If the dose of the insecticidal protein in the maize is sufficiently high to kill >90% of heterozygotes and approximately 100% of susceptible homozygotes, the trait is predicted to be much more durable than if the dose is lower. A partial sensitivity analysis showed that parameters relating to adult dispersal affected the rate of pest adaptation. Partial validation of the model was achieved by comparing output of the model with field data on

  6. Susceptibility of Nebraska Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) Populations to Bt Corn Events.

    PubMed

    Wangila, David S; Gassmann, Aaron J; Petzold-Maxwell, Jennifer L; French, B Wade; Meinke, Lance J

    2015-04-01

    Transgenic plants have been widely adopted by growers to manage the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, in field corn. Because of reduced efficacy in some Nebraska fields after repeated use of Cry3Bb1-expressing hybrids, single plant bioassays were conducted in 2012 and 2013 to characterize the susceptibility of western corn rootworm populations to the rootworm-active proteins Cry3Bb1, mCry3A, and Cry34/35Ab1. Results demonstrate that there are heritable differences in susceptibility of Nebraska western corn rootworm populations to rootworm-active Bt traits. Proportional survival and corrected survival data coupled with field histories collectively support the conclusion that a level of field resistance to Cry3Bb1 has evolved in some Nebraska populations in response to selection pressure and that cross-resistance exists between Cry3Bb1 and mCry3A. There was no apparent cross-resistance between Cry34/35Ab1 and either Cry3Bb1 or mCry3A. The potential implications of these results on current and future corn rootworm management strategies are discussed. PMID:26470186

  7. Delaying corn rootworm resistance to Bt corn.

    PubMed

    Tabashnik, Bruce E; Gould, Fred

    2012-06-01

    Transgenic crops producing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins for insect control have been successful, but their efficacy is reduced when pests evolve resistance. To delay pest resistance to Bt crops, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has required refuges of host plants that do not produce Bt toxins to promote survival of susceptible pests. Such refuges are expected to be most effective if the Bt plants deliver a dose of toxin high enough to kill nearly all hybrid progeny produced by matings between resistant and susceptible pests. In 2003, the EPA first registered corn, Zea mays L., producing a Bt toxin (Cry3Bb1) that kills western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, one of the most economically important crop pests in the United States. The EPA requires minimum refuges of 20% for Cry3Bb1 corn and 5% for corn producing two Bt toxins active against corn rootworms. We conclude that the current refuge requirements are not adequate, because Bt corn hybrids active against corn rootworms do not meet the high-dose standard, and western corn rootworm has rapidly evolved resistance to Cry3Bb1 corn in the laboratory, greenhouse, and field. Accordingly, we recommend increasing the minimum refuge for Bt corn targeting corn rootworms to 50% for plants producing one toxin active against these pests and to 20% for plants producing two toxins active against these pests. Increasing the minimum refuge percentage can help to delay pest resistance, encourage integrated pest management, and promote more sustainable crop protection. PMID:22812111

  8. Attraction of Heterorhabditis sp. toward synthetic (E)-beta-cariophyllene, a plant SOS signal emitted by maize on feeding by larvae of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera.

    PubMed

    Anbesse, S; Ehlers, R U

    2010-01-01

    Most plants, when damaged by herbivore insects, synthesize and release various chemicals as indirect defence mechanism that attract parasitic or predatory insects that are natural enemies of the herbivores. When attacked by Western Corn Rootworms, the roots of many maize plant varieties emit (E)-beta-caryophyllene that attracts the neighbouring entomopathogenic nematodes to kill the feeding pest. Through plant genetics and biotechnology it was possible to manipulate this volatile compound in order to increase the effectiveness of entomopathogenic nematodes in reducing the damage of the pest. In order to further use this strategy to improve the effectiveness of Heterorhabditis bacteriophora by selective breeding, we invesa tigated the applicability of the strategy in different standard laboratory bioassays using three different sand and agar plate assays. The synthetic form of (E)-beta-caryophyllene and H. megidis (the strain, which in previous investigation, showed significant attraction to caryophyllene) were used in the study. In all bioassays no significant difference was observed in attraction of nematodes between the caryophyllene treatments and the controls. The results contradict results of previous investigations done by other investigators (Rasmann et al., 2005). Future investigations for the genetic improvement of the host finding ability of entomopathogenic nematodes can therefore not target attraction to caryophyllene. PMID:21539265

  9. Characterization of bacteria isolated from maize roots: emphasis on Serratia and infestation with corn rootworms (Chrysomelidae: Diabrotica)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Larval corn rootworms (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) are soil-dwelling insect pests that frequently cause economic damage to maize (Zea mays L.) by consuming root tissues, thus lowering grain yield. Little is known about interactions between rootworms and soil bacteria, including potential impacts of m...

  10. Effect of Seed Blends and Soil-Insecticide on Western and Northern Corn Rootworm Emergence from mCry3A+eCry3.1Ab Bt Maize.

    PubMed

    Frank, Daniel L; Kurtz, Ryan; Tinsley, Nicholas A; Gassmann, Aaron J; Meinke, Lance J; Moellenbeck, Daniel; Gray, Michael E; Bledsoe, Larry W; Krupke, Christian H; Estes, Ronald E; Weber, Patrick; Hibbard, Bruce E

    2015-06-01

    Seed blends containing various ratios of transgenic Bt maize (Zea mays L.) expressing the mCry3A+eCry3.1Ab proteins and non-Bt maize (near-isoline maize) were deployed alone and in combination with a soil applied pyrethroid insecticide (Force CS) to evaluate the emergence of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, in a total of nine field environments across the Midwestern United States in 2010 and 2011. Northern corn rootworm, Diabrotica barberi Smith & Lawrence emergence was also evaluated in four of these environments. Both western and northern corn rootworm beetle emergence from all Bt treatments was significantly reduced when compared with beetle emergence from near-isoline treatments. Averaged across all environments, western corn rootworm beetle emergence from 95:5, 90:10, and 80:20 seed blend ratios of mCry3A+eCry3.1Ab: near-isoline were 2.6-, 4.2-, and 6.7-fold greater than that from the 100:0 ratio treatment. Northern corn rootworm emergence from the same seed blend treatments resulted in 2.8-, 3.2-, and 4.2-fold more beetles than from the 100:0 treatment. The addition of Force CS (tefluthrin) significantly reduced western corn rootworm beetle emergence for each of the three treatments to which it was applied. Force CS also significantly delayed the number of days to 50% beetle emergence in western corn rootworms. Time to 50% beetle emergence in the 100% mCry3A+eCry3.1Ab treatment with Force CS was delayed 13.7 d when compared with western corn rootworm beetle emergence on near-isoline corn. These data are discussed in terms of rootworm resistance management. PMID:26470254

  11. Identification of a volatile attractant for Diabrotica and Acalymma spp. from blossoms of Cucurbita maxima duchesne.

    PubMed

    Andersen, J F; Metcalf, R L

    1986-03-01

    Fractionation of headspace volatiles from Cucurbita maxima blossoms by high-performance liquid chromatography resulted in the isolation of a single component which was highly active in an electroantennogram bioassay on Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi antennae. This compound was identified as indole by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Field-trapping bioassays were conducted which indicated that indole is a potent attractant of the western corn rootworm,D. virgifera virgifera, and the striped cucumber beetle,Acalymma vittatum. The southern corn rootworm,D. u. howardi, did not respond, despite its strong EAG response. The sex ratio ofD. v. virgifera found in indole-baited traps varied seasonally. Males were trapped in abundance in late July and later September, 1983, while females were more abundant August and early September. The effectiveness of indole as aD. v. virgifera attractant also varied seasonally. A prolonged period of depressed trap catches occurred in early August 1983, during the silking and tasseling period of the corn in the field where trapping was carried out. PMID:24306908

  12. Effect of Bt maize and soil insecticides on yield, injury, and rootworm survival: implications for resistance management.

    PubMed

    Petzold-Maxwell, Jennifer L; Meinke, Lance J; Gray, Michael E; Estes, Ronald E; Gassmann, Aaron J

    2013-10-01

    A 2-yr field experiment was conducted to determine the effects on Diabrotica spp. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) of an insecticidal seed treatment (Poncho 1250, (AI)/clothianidin) and a granular insecticide (Aztec 2.1G, (AI)/tebupirimphos and cyfluthrin) alone and in combination with maize producing the insectidical toxin Cry3Bb1 derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Yields for Bt maize plots were significantly greater than for non-Bt maize; however, insecticides did not significantly affect yield. Insecticides significantly decreased root injury in non-Bt maize plots, but there were no significant differences in root injury between Bt maize with or without either insecticide. Maize producing the Bt toxin Cry3Bb1 and the soil-applied insecticide Aztec significantly decreased survival of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte), while only Bt maize significantly decreased survival of the northern corn rootworm (Diabrotica barberi Smith & Lawrence). For both species, Bt maize and each of the insecticides delayed emergence. In the absence of density-dependent mortality, Bt maize imposed 71 and 80% reduction in survival on the western corn rootworm and the northern corn rootworm, respectively. The data from this study do not support combining insecticide with Bt maize because the addition of insecticide did not increase yield or reduce root injury for Bt maize, and the level of rootworm mortality achieved with conventional insecticide was likely too low to delay the evolution of Bt resistance. In addition, delays in emergence from Bt maize combined with insecticides could promote assortative mating among Bt-selected individuals, which may hasten resistance evolution. PMID:24224233

  13. Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) Larval Movement in eCry3.1Ab+mCry3A Seed Blend Scenarios.

    PubMed

    Zukoff, Sarah N; Zukoff, Anthony L; Geisert, Ryan W; Hibbard, Bruce E

    2016-08-01

    Corn fields planted with plant-incorporated Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins must have a portion of the field planted with non-Bt, isoline, plants that serve as a refuge for susceptible insects. In the Corn Belt, refuge seeds are now blended in the bag with Bt seeds for corn hybrids containing two or more toxins targeted toward the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte. Syngenta's corn hybrid, Agrisure Duracade, containing the eCry3.1Ab (event 5307) and mCry3a (event MIR604) rootworm-targeted toxins were registered as a seed blend in 2014. Western corn rootworm larval movement between the refuge plants and the Duracade plants was assessed to determine western corn rootworm survival and amount of root damage on these plants when planted in all possible seed blend scenarios. In this study, western corn rootworm larvae moved between isoline and Bt plants and adult survival was greater on Bt plants if movement from a neighboring infested isoline plant had occurred. However, root damage to these Bt plants did not reach economic levels. The low numbers of western corn rootworm larvae that did move from an infested Bt plant to an isoline plant could potentially select for resistance if they survived to adulthood. PMID:27190042

  14. Diabrotica egg separation from soil: an efficient and fast procedure for monitoring egg stages of corn rootworm populations.

    PubMed

    Shaw, J T; Hummel, H E

    2003-01-01

    Maize growers repeatedly are confronted with the need to make predictions and decisions about which of their fields are likely to develop corn rootworm populations above the economic threshold and are in need of treatment. One of the best parameters that can help as a basis for these decisions are corn rootworm egg counts in the soil. The Western corn rootworms have one generation each year. Females oviposit eggs in the soil in corn fields from late July through early September. These eggs overwinter in the soil and almost all hatch the following June. An apparatus is described that utilizes water, MgSO4 solution and differing screen sieves for extracting the rootworm eggs from the soil samples collected from the field after deciding on an acceptable sampling procedure. Samples may be a composite of subsamples or a number of individual samples taken at various locations in a field. The Illinois machine and the final separation of eggs, using flotation in 2 molar MgSO4 solution, are highly efficient, and recoveries of 97% of rootworm eggs manually placed in samples of soil have repeatedly been achieved. Thus, this would be a useful tool in integrated pest management programs that monitor the density of corn rootworm eggs in corn fields. PMID:15149094

  15. MOLECULAR PHYLOGENETIC RELATIONSHIPS AMONG DIABROTICA SPECIES (ACCESSION NO. AF195196)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn rootworms of the genus Diabrotica (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) are the most serious pest of corn in midwestern United States. Despite their economic importance, phylogenetic relationships within the genus remain unclear. Phylogenetic analysis of five Diabrotica was undertaken using DNA sequences...

  16. Field-Evolved Resistance to Bt Maize by Western Corn Rootworm

    PubMed Central

    Gassmann, Aaron J.; Petzold-Maxwell, Jennifer L.; Keweshan, Ryan S.; Dunbar, Mike W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Crops engineered to produce insecticidal toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are planted on millions of hectares annually, reducing the use of conventional insecticides and suppressing pests. However, the evolution of resistance could cut short these benefits. A primary pest targeted by Bt maize in the United States is the western corn rootworm Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). Methodology/Principal Findings We report that fields identified by farmers as having severe rootworm feeding injury to Bt maize contained populations of western corn rootworm that displayed significantly higher survival on Cry3Bb1 maize in laboratory bioassays than did western corn rootworm from fields not associated with such feeding injury. In all cases, fields experiencing severe rootworm feeding contained Cry3Bb1 maize. Interviews with farmers indicated that Cry3Bb1 maize had been grown in those fields for at least three consecutive years. There was a significant positive correlation between the number of years Cry3Bb1 maize had been grown in a field and the survival of rootworm populations on Cry3Bb1 maize in bioassays. However, there was no significant correlation among populations for survival on Cry34/35Ab1 maize and Cry3Bb1 maize, suggesting a lack of cross resistance between these Bt toxins. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report of field-evolved resistance to a Bt toxin by the western corn rootworm and by any species of Coleoptera. Insufficient planting of refuges and non-recessive inheritance of resistance may have contributed to resistance. These results suggest that improvements in resistance management and a more integrated approach to the use of Bt crops may be necessary. PMID:21829470

  17. Interaction of insecticides, entomopathogenic nematodes, and larvae of the western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Nishimatsu, T; Jackson, J J

    1998-04-01

    Chemical insecticides and entomopathogenic nematodes have been independently used to suppress corn rootworm damage in maize. We report on the mortality response of larvae of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, to the combined treatment with 1 of 3 insecticides (terbufos, fonofos, and tefluthrin) and the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae Weiser (Mexican strain). Corn rootworm mortality with combinations of the insecticides terbufos or fonofos and S. carpocapsae was typically additive for the 2 agents. Evidence of antagonism between these agents was sometimes observed. The combination of tefluthrin with S. carpocapsae frequently resulted in a synergistic response and a 24% average increase in expected mortality. The influence of the tefluthrin appears to be isolated to an effect on the rootworm larvae. Synergism also was observed when tefluthrin was combined with the nematode Heterorhabditis bacteriophora Poinar (Lewiston strain). The combined use of tefluthrin with an entomopathogenic nematode may offer an integrated approach to increase the efficacy of entomopathogenic nematodes for insect control. PMID:9589627

  18. Field capture of northern and western corn rootworm beetles relative to attractant structure and volatility.

    PubMed

    Hammack, Leslie; Petroski, Richard J

    2004-09-01

    We used field assays to study attraction of feral northern and western corn rootworm beetles (Diabrotica barberi and D. virgifera virgifera) to a series of mostly nitrogenous and benzenoid synthetic compounds allied with host plant and floral aromas. Vaporization rates were obtained for most field-tested compounds and selected additional lures under both ideal and field-representative, but constant, conditions. Although many test compounds showed at least trace activity for one or both species, methyl benzoate and some of its derivatives, notably methyl anthranilate and methyl 4-methoxybenzoate, merited emphasis as effective new lures for females. Structural alteration of methyl benzoate had consistently negative effects on northern corn rootworm captures despite variable effects on release rate, whereas western corn rootworm was more strongly attracted to methyl anthranilate and methyl 4-methoxybenzoate than to the considerably more volatile parent compound. Phenylacetaldoxime was attractive to females of both species, but no more so than syn-benzaldoxime, included as reference. Release rate was disproportionately low for benzaldoxime, as well as other nitrogenous lures, under field compared with ideal conditions. The attractiveness of salicylaldoxime to northern corn rootworm, despite its low field release rate, and the unattractiveness of methyl salicylate, having a methyl ester in place of the oxime group, similarly highlighted importance of the oxime moiety for reactivity of this species. PMID:15586676

  19. Field-evolved resistance to Bt maize by western corn rootworm: predictions from the laboratory and effects in the field.

    PubMed

    Gassmann, Aaron J

    2012-07-01

    Crops engineered to produce insecticidal toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) provide an effective management tool for many key insect pests. However, pest species have repeatedly demonstrated their ability to adapt to management practices. Results from laboratory selection experiments illustrate the capacity of pest species to evolve Bt resistance. Furthermore, resistance has been documented to Bt sprays in the field and greenhouse, and more recently, by some pests to Bt crops in the field. In 2009, fields were discovered in Iowa (USA) with populations of western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, that had evolved resistance to maize that produces the Bt toxin Cry3Bb1. Fields with resistant insects in 2009 had been planted to Cry3Bb1 maize for at least three consecutive years and as many as 6years. Computer simulation models predicted that the western corn rootworm might evolve resistance to Bt maize in as few as 3years. Laboratory and field data for interactions between western corn rootworm and Bt maize indicate that currently commercialized products are not high-dose events, which increases the risk of resistance evolution because non-recessive resistance traits may enhance survival on Bt maize. Furthermore, genetic analysis of laboratory strains of western corn rootworm has found non-recessive inheritance of resistance. Field studies conducted in two fields identified as harboring Cry3Bb1-resistant western corn rootworm found that survival of western corn rootworm did not differ between Cry3Bb1 maize and non-Bt maize and that root injury to Cry3Bb1 maize was higher than injury to other types of Bt maize or to maize roots protected with a soil insecticide. These first cases of field-evolved resistance to Bt maize by western corn rootworm provide an early warning and point to the need to apply better integrated pest management practices when using Bt maize to manage western corn rootworm. PMID:22537837

  20. The role of Wolbachia bacteria in reproductive incompatibilities and hybrid zones of Diabrotica beetles and Gryllus crickets.

    PubMed

    Giordano, R; Jackson, J J; Robertson, H M

    1997-10-14

    A rickettsial bacterium in the genus Wolbachia is the cause of a unidirectional reproductive incompatibility observed between two major beetle pests of maize, the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, and the Mexican corn rootworm, D. v. zeae. These subspecies are allopatric except for two known regions of sympatry in Texas and Mexico. We demonstrate that populations of D. v. virgifera, with the exception of two populations in southern Arizona, are infected with a strain of Wolbachia. Populations of D. v. zeae are not infected. Treatment of D. v. virgifera with tetracycline eliminated the Wolbachia and removed the reproductive incompatibility. Similar patterns of reproductive incompatibility exist among taxa of the cricket genus Gryllus. Gryllus assimilis, G. integer, G. ovisopis, G. pennsylvanicus, and G. rubens are infected with Wolbachia whereas G. firmus is usually not. Populations of G. rubens and G. ovisopis carry the same Wolbachia strain, which is distinct from that of G. integer. G. pennsylvanicus is infected with two Wolbachia strains, that found in G. rubens and one unique to G. pennsylvanicus. Moreover, a proportion of G. pennsylvanicus individuals harbors both strains. Wolbachia may have influenced speciation in some members of the genus Gryllus by affecting the degree of hybridization between species. Given that Wolbachia infections are relatively common in insects, it is likely that other insect hybrid zones may be influenced by infections with Wolbachia. PMID:9326628

  1. The role of Wolbachia bacteria in reproductive incompatibilities and hybrid zones of Diabrotica beetles and Gryllus crickets

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Rosanna; Jackson, Jan J.; Robertson, Hugh M.

    1997-01-01

    A rickettsial bacterium in the genus Wolbachia is the cause of a unidirectional reproductive incompatibility observed between two major beetle pests of maize, the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, and the Mexican corn rootworm, D. v. zeae. These subspecies are allopatric except for two known regions of sympatry in Texas and Mexico. We demonstrate that populations of D. v. virgifera, with the exception of two populations in southern Arizona, are infected with a strain of Wolbachia. Populations of D. v. zeae are not infected. Treatment of D. v. virgifera with tetracycline eliminated the Wolbachia and removed the reproductive incompatibility. Similar patterns of reproductive incompatibility exist among taxa of the cricket genus Gryllus. Gryllus assimilis, G. integer, G. ovisopis, G. pennsylvanicus, and G. rubens are infected with Wolbachia whereas G. firmus is usually not. Populations of G. rubens and G. ovisopis carry the same Wolbachia strain, which is distinct from that of G. integer. G. pennsylvanicus is infected with two Wolbachia strains, that found in G. rubens and one unique to G. pennsylvanicus. Moreover, a proportion of G. pennsylvanicus individuals harbors both strains. Wolbachia may have influenced speciation in some members of the genus Gryllus by affecting the degree of hybridization between species. Given that Wolbachia infections are relatively common in insects, it is likely that other insect hybrid zones may be influenced by infections with Wolbachia. PMID:9326628

  2. SEXUAL DIMORPHISM OF BASITARSI IN DIABROTICA AND CEROTOMA SPP. (COLEOPTERA: CHRYSOMELIDAE)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sexual dimorphism in basitarsal pad morphology is described for prothoracic and mesothoracic legs of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, Diabrotica barberi Smith and Lawrence, and Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi Barber and for prothoracic legs of Cerotoma trifucata (Forster). On the indicate...

  3. Adaptation by western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) to Bt maize: inheritance, fitness costs, and feeding preference.

    PubMed

    Petzold-Maxwell, Jennifer L; Cibils-Stewart, Ximena; French, B Wade; Gassmann, Aaron J

    2012-08-01

    We examined inheritance of resistance, feeding behavior, and fitness costs for a laboratory-selected strain of western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), with resistance to maize (Zea maize L.) producing the Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bt) toxin Cry3Bb1. The resistant strain developed faster and had increased survival on Bt maize relative to a susceptible strain. Results from reciprocal crosses of the resistant and susceptible strains indicated that inheritance of resistance was nonrecessive. No fitness costs were associated with resistance alleles in the presence of two entomopathogenic nematode species, Steinernema carpocapsae Weiser and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora Poinar. Larval feeding studies indicated that the susceptible and resistant strains did not differ in preference for Bt and non-Bt root tissue in choice assays. PMID:22928323

  4. TWO DIFFERENT WOLBACHIA TYPES CREATE A BREEDING BARRIER BETWEEN POPULATIONS OF NORTHERN CORN ROOTWORM (DIABROTICA BARBERI) IN ILLINOIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wolbachia sp. are endosymbiotic bacteria that are widespread in Arthropods and are often associated with reproductive incompatibilities between infected and uninfected individuals. 16S rDNA primers detected Wolbachia in northern corn rootworms (NCR) from the eastern portion of their range with a W...

  5. Predicting western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) larval injury to rotated corn with Pherocon AM traps in soybeans.

    PubMed

    O'Neal, M E; Gray, M E; Ratcliffe, S; Steffey, K L

    2001-02-01

    Crop rotation for portions of east central Illinois and northern Indiana no longer adequately protects corn (Zea mays L.) roots from western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte. Seventeen growers in east central Illinois monitored western corn rootworm adults in soybean (Glycine max L.) fields with unbaited Pherocon AM traps during 1996 and 1997. In the following years (1997 and 1998), growers left untreated strips (no insecticide applied) when these fields were planted with corn. Damage to rotated corn by rootworms was more severe in untreated than in treated strips of rotated corn, ranging from minor root scarring to a full node of roots pruned. Densities of western corn rootworms in soybean fields from 1996 were significantly correlated with root injury to rotated corn the following season. Adult densities from 1997 were not significantly correlated with root injury in 1998, due to heavy precipitation throughout the spring of 1998 and extensive larval mortality. Twenty-eight additional growers volunteered in 1998 to monitor rootworm adults in soybean fields with Pherocon AM traps based on recommendations that resulted from our research efforts in 1996 and 1997. In 1999, these 28 fields were rotated to corn, and rootworm larval injury was measured in untreated strips. Based on 1996-1997 and 1998-1999 data, a regression analysis revealed that 27% of the variation in root injury to rotated corn could be explained by adult density in soybeans the previous season. We propose a sampling plan for soybean fields and a threshold for predicting western corn rootworm larval injury to rotated corn. PMID:11233140

  6. Evidence of Resistance to Cry34/35Ab1 Corn by Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae): Root Injury in the Field and Larval Survival in Plant-Based Bioassays.

    PubMed

    Gassmann, Aaron J; Shrestha, Ram B; Jakka, Siva R K; Dunbar, Mike W; Clifton, Eric H; Paolino, Aubrey R; Ingber, David A; French, B Wade; Masloski, Kenneth E; Dounda, John W; St Clair, Coy R

    2016-08-01

    Western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is a serious pest of corn in the United States, and recent management of western corn rootworm has included planting of Bt corn. Beginning in 2009, western corn rootworm populations with resistance to Cry3Bb1 corn and mCry3A corn were found in Iowa and elsewhere. To date, western corn rootworm populations have remained susceptible to corn producing Bt toxin Cry34/35Ab1. In this study, we used single-plant bioassays to test field populations of western corn rootworm for resistance to Cry34/35Ab1 corn, Cry3Bb1 corn, and mCry3A corn. Bioassays included nine rootworm populations collected from fields where severe injury to Bt corn had been observed and six control populations that had never been exposed to Bt corn. We found incomplete resistance to Cry34/35Ab1 corn among field populations collected from fields where severe injury to corn producing Cry34/35Ab1, either singly or as a pyramid, had been observed. Additionally, resistance to Cry3Bb1 corn and mCry3A corn was found among the majority of populations tested. These first cases of resistance to Cry34/35Ab1 corn, and the presence of resistance to multiple Bt toxins by western corn rootworm, highlight the potential vulnerability of Bt corn to the evolution of resistance by western corn rootworm. The use of more diversified management practices, in addition to insect resistance management, likely will be essential to sustain the viability of Bt corn for management of western corn rootworm. PMID:27329619

  7. Long-chain free fatty acids: Semiochemicals for host location by western corn rootworm larvae.

    PubMed

    Hibbard, B E; Bernklau, E J; Bjostad, L B

    1994-12-01

    A bioassay-driven sequential fractionation scheme was used to isolate fractions of a crude dichloromethane maize seedling extract behaviorally active to larvae of the western corn rootworm,Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte. (Z,Z)-9,12-Octadecadienoic (linoleic) acid, (Z)-9-octadecenoic (oleic) acid, and octadecanoic (stearic) acid were identified from a purified fraction of maize extract that was attractive to western corn rootworm larvae in choice tests with equal levels of carbon dioxide on both sides of the choice. When synthetic linoleic, oleic, and stearic acids were tested together in the amounts and proportions found in the attractive fraction (1000, 800, and 300 ng of linoleic, oleic, and stearic acids, respectively), significantly more western corn rootworm larvae were found on the side with synthetic free fatty acids plus carbon dioxide than on the side with carbon dioxide alone. Results of the choice-test bioassays were not significantly different when the synthetic blend of free fatty acids was substituted for the purified maize fraction. Neither the purified extract nor the synthetic blend was behaviorally active in preliminary single-choice experiments without carbon dioxide. Linoleic, oleic, and stearic acids were also tested individually in the choice test bioassay with carbon dioxide on both sides of the choice to determine a dose-response curve. Linoleic and oleic acid each had one dose that was significantly attractive in conjunction with carbon dioxide on both sides of the choice, but stearic acid was not active in the doses tested. PMID:24241996

  8. In-field labeling of western corn rootworm adults (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) with rubidium.

    PubMed

    Nowatzki, Timothy M; Niimi, Bradly; Warren, Kelli J; Putnam, Sean; Meinke, Lance J; Gosselin, David C; Harvey, F Edwin; Hunt, Thomas E; Siegfried, Blair D

    2003-12-01

    Field and laboratory studies were conducted in 2000 and 2001 to determine the feasibility of mass marking western corn rootworm adults, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, with RbCl in the field. Results showed that application of rubidium (Rb) in solution to both the soil (1 g Rb/plant) and whorl (1 g Rb/plant) of corn plants was optimal for labeling western corn rootworm adults during larval development. Development of larvae on Rb-enriched corn with this technique did not significantly influence adult dry weight or survival. Rb was also highly mobile in the plant. Application of Rb to both the soil and the whorl resulted in median Rb concentrations in the roots (5,860 ppm) that were 150-fold greater than concentrations in untreated roots (38 ppm) 5 wk after treatment. Additionally, at least 90% of the beetles that emerged during the first 3 wk were labeled above the baseline Rb concentration (5 ppm dry weight) determined from untreated beetles. Because emergence was 72% complete at this time, a significant proportion of the population had been labeled. Results from laboratory experiments showed that labeled beetles remained distinguishable from unlabeled beetles for up to 4 d postemergence. The ability to efficiently label large numbers of beetles under field conditions and for a defined period with virtually no disruption of the population provides an unparalleled opportunity to conduct mark-recapture experiments for quantifying the short-range, intrafield movement of adult corn rootworms. PMID:14977112

  9. Independent Action between DvSnf7 RNA and Cry3Bb1 Protein in Southern Corn Rootworm, Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi and Colorado Potato Beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Steven L.; Tan, Jianguo; Mueller, Geoffrey M.; Bachman, Pamela M.; Jensen, Peter D.; Uffman, Joshua P.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, corn rootworm (CRW)-resistant maize events producing two or more CRW-active Bt proteins have been commercialized to enhance efficacy against the target pest(s) by providing multiple modes of action (MoA). The maize hybrid MON 87411 has been developed that produces the CRW-active Cry3Bb1 Bt protein (hereafter Cry3Bb1) and expresses a RNAi-mediated MoA that also targets CRW. As part of an environmental risk assessment for MON 87411, the potential for an interaction between the CRW-active DvSnf7 RNA (hereafter DvSnf7) and Cry3Bb1 was assessed in 12-day diet incorporation bioassays with the southern corn rootworm (SCR, Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi). The potential for an interaction between DvSnf7 and Cry3Bb1 was evaluated with two established experimental approaches. The first approach evaluated each substance alone and in combination over three different response levels. For all three response levels, observed responses were shown to be additive and not significantly different from predicted responses under the assumption of independent action. The second approach evaluated the potential for a fixed sub-lethal concentration of Cry3Bb1 to decrease the median lethal concentration (LC50) of DvSnf7 and vice-versa. With this approach, the LC50 value of DvSnf7 was not altered by a sub-lethal concentration of Cry3Bb1 and vice-versa. In addition, the potential for an interaction between the Cry3Bb1 and DvSnf7 was tested with Colorado potato beetle (CPB, Leptinotarsa decemlineata), which is sensitive to Cry3Bb1 but not DvSnf7. CPB assays also demonstrated that DvSnf7 does not alter the activity of Cry3Bb1. The results from this study provide multiple lines of evidence that DvSnf7 and Cry3Bb1 produced in MON 87411 have independent action. PMID:25734482

  10. Independent action between DvSnf7 RNA and Cry3Bb1 protein in southern corn rootworm, Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi and Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata.

    PubMed

    Levine, Steven L; Tan, Jianguo; Mueller, Geoffrey M; Bachman, Pamela M; Jensen, Peter D; Uffman, Joshua P

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, corn rootworm (CRW)-resistant maize events producing two or more CRW-active Bt proteins have been commercialized to enhance efficacy against the target pest(s) by providing multiple modes of action (MoA). The maize hybrid MON 87411 has been developed that produces the CRW-active Cry3Bb1 Bt protein (hereafter Cry3Bb1) and expresses a RNAi-mediated MoA that also targets CRW. As part of an environmental risk assessment for MON 87411, the potential for an interaction between the CRW-active DvSnf7 RNA (hereafter DvSnf7) and Cry3Bb1 was assessed in 12-day diet incorporation bioassays with the southern corn rootworm (SCR, Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi). The potential for an interaction between DvSnf7 and Cry3Bb1 was evaluated with two established experimental approaches. The first approach evaluated each substance alone and in combination over three different response levels. For all three response levels, observed responses were shown to be additive and not significantly different from predicted responses under the assumption of independent action. The second approach evaluated the potential for a fixed sub-lethal concentration of Cry3Bb1 to decrease the median lethal concentration (LC50) of DvSnf7 and vice-versa. With this approach, the LC50 value of DvSnf7 was not altered by a sub-lethal concentration of Cry3Bb1 and vice-versa. In addition, the potential for an interaction between the Cry3Bb1 and DvSnf7 was tested with Colorado potato beetle (CPB, Leptinotarsa decemlineata), which is sensitive to Cry3Bb1 but not DvSnf7. CPB assays also demonstrated that DvSnf7 does not alter the activity of Cry3Bb1. The results from this study provide multiple lines of evidence that DvSnf7 and Cry3Bb1 produced in MON 87411 have independent action. PMID:25734482

  11. Captures of western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) adults with Pherocon AM and vial traps in four crops in east central Illinois.

    PubMed

    Rondon, Silvia I; Gray, Michael E

    2003-06-01

    It is hypothesized that the long-term rotation of maize (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glycine max L.) in east central Illinois has caused a significant change in the ovipositional behavior of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte. Since the mid 1990s in east central Illinois, western corn rootworm adults have been observed feeding on soybean foliage and also now use soybean fields as egg laying sites. This behavioral adaptation has greatly decreased the effectiveness of rotation as a pest management tactic. By using Pherocon AM and vial traps, we evaluated the influence of maize, soybean, oat stubble (Avena sativa L.), and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) on male and female adult western corn rootworm densities from April 1998 through September 2000 near Urbana, IL. Our results indicated that western corn rootworm adults are common inhabitants of maize, soybean, oat stubble, and alfalfa. Trapping efforts with both Pherocon AM (attractive) and vial traps (passive) revealed that initial densities of both male and female western corn rootworm adults were greater in maize. Soon after emergence, densities of females began to decline within maize and increase in other crops (soybean, oat stubble, and alfalfa). Results from this experiment support the hypothesis that variant western corn rootworm females in east central Illinois are colonizing crops other than maize at densities of potential economic importance. Those producers who choose to rotate maize with soybean or alfalfa may remain at risk to economic larval injury to maize roots. Potentially, oat stubble also may support levels of western corn rootworm females resulting in sufficient oviposition to cause economic losses to rotated maize the following season. PMID:12852611

  12. Genetic monitoring of western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) populations on a microgeographic scale.

    PubMed

    Ivkosic, S A; Gorman, J; Lemic, D; Mikac, K M

    2014-06-01

    Microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA genetic monitoring of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, was undertaken in Croatia and Serbia from 1996 to 2011 and in the United States in 2011. The seven U.S. populations displayed the greatest allelic diversity. In Europe, the highest number of alleles was found in Rugvica, Croatia, and Surčin, Serbia, the two sites closest to international airports. The highest number of mitochondrial (mt) DNA haplotypes was recorded from Croatia in 1996. From 2009 to 2011, haplotype diversity declined, and Croatia and Serbia had a single fixed haplotype. U.S. continuous maize locations had one haplotype, while three haplotypes were found at crop-rotated locations. Minimal temporal genetic differentiation was found within and between populations in Europe and the United States. Bayesian cluster analysis identified two genetic clusters that grouped western corn rootworm from Croatia and Serbia separately from U.S. populations; however, these clusters were not neat, and numerous U.S. individuals had both European and U.S. ancestry, suggesting bidirectional gene flow. Bottlenecks were identified within most Croatian populations sampled in 1996, only two populations in 2009, and in all populations in 2011. Bottlenecks were not identified from Serbia from 1996 to 2011 or from the United States in 2011. As suspected Serbia was identified as the geographic source of western corn rootworm in Croatia. The temporal genetic monitoring undertaken allowed a deeper understanding of the population genetics of western corn rootworm in Croatia, neighboring Serbia, and its geographic source in the United States. The data obtained can be used to inform western corn rootworm pest management strategies in Croatia and Europe. PMID:24690224

  13. Western corn rootworm and Bt maize: challenges of pest resistance in the field.

    PubMed

    Gassmann, Aaron J; Petzold-Maxwell, Jennifer L; Keweshan, Ryan S; Dunbar, Mike W

    2012-01-01

    Crops genetically engineered to produce insecticidal toxins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) manage many key insect pests while reducing the use of conventional insecticides. One of the primary pests targeted by Bt maize in the United States is the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte. Beginning in 2009, populations of western corn rootworm were identified in Iowa, USA that imposed severe root injury to Cry3Bb1 maize. Subsequent laboratory bioassays revealed that these populations were resistant to Cry3Bb1 maize, with survival on Cry3Bb1 maize that was three times higher than populations not associated with such injury. Here we report the results of research that began in 2010 when western corn rootworm were sampled from 14 fields in Iowa, half of which had root injury to Cry3Bb1 maize of greater than 1 node. Of these samples, sufficient eggs were collected to conduct bioassays on seven populations. Laboratory bioassays revealed that these 2010 populations had survival on Cry3Bb1 maize that was 11 times higher and significantly greater than that of control populations, which were brought into the laboratory prior to the commercialization of Bt maize for control of corn rootworm. Additionally, the developmental delays observed for control populations on Cry3Bb1 maize were greatly diminished for 2010 populations. All 2010 populations evaluated in bioassays came from fields with a history of continuous maize production and between 3 and 7 y of Cry3Bb1 maize cultivation. Resistance to Cry34/35Ab1 maize was not detected and there was no correlation between survival on Cry3Bb1 maize and Cry34/35Ab1 maize, suggesting a lack of cross resistance between these Bt toxins. Effectively dealing with the challenge of field-evolved resistance to Bt maize by western corn rootworm will require better adherence to the principles of integrated pest management. PMID:22688688

  14. Larval sampling and instar determination in field populations of northern and western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Hammack, Leslie; Ellsbury, Michael M; Roehrdanz, Richard L; Pikul, Joseph L

    2003-08-01

    Abundance and head capsule width were measured for northern (Diabrotica barberi Smith & Lawrence) and western corn rootworm (D. virgifera virgifera LeConte) larvae recovered primarily from maize root systems but also from large soil cores each centered around a root system. Larvae for measurement derived from field populations under infestation and rotation regimes that allowed most specimens to be assigned to species. A frequency distribution of head capsule widths indicated three separate peaks for western corn rootworm, presumably representing frequency of the three larval instars, with no larvae measuring 280 or 420 microm in the valleys between peaks. Multiple normal curves fit to similar but partially overlapping peaks generated by northern corn rootworm suggested that division of first to second and second to third instar can best be made for this species at 267 and 406 microm, respectively (270 and 410 when measurements are made to the nearest 20 microm). These results implied that instar of individuals from mixed northern and western corn rootworm populations can be accurately judged from head capsule width without having to determine species. The relative abundance of western corn rootworm instars was similar in root systems removed from the center of 19-cm diameter x 19-cm deep soil cores and in soil cores from which the root systems were removed. Furthermore, the number of larvae from root systems correlated significantly with that from the surrounding soil. These results indicated that the former and much more convenient sampling unit can be used to estimate population developmental stage and possibly density, at least early in the season when these tests were done and young larvae predominated. PMID:14503586

  15. Inheritance and Fitness Costs of Resistance to Cry3Bb1 Corn by Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Ingber, David A; Gassmann, Aaron J

    2015-10-01

    Transgenic crops that produce insecticidal toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are widely planted to manage pest insects. One of the primary pests targeted by Bt corn in the United States is western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). Cry3Bb1 corn for management of western corn rootworm was commercialized in 2003, and beginning in 2009, populations of western corn rootworm with field-evolved resistance to Cry3Bb1 corn were found in Iowa. Here we quantify the magnitude, inheritance, and fitness costs of resistance to Cry3Bb1 corn in two strains (Hopkinton and Cresco) derived from field populations that evolved resistance to Cry3Bb1 corn. For Hopkinton, we found evidence for complete resistance to Cry3Bb1 corn and nonrecessive inheritance. Additionally, no fitness costs of Cry3Bb1 resistance were detected for Hopkinton. For Cresco, resistance was incomplete and recessive, and we detected fitness costs affecting developmental rate, survival to adulthood, and fecundity. These results suggest that variation may exist among field populations in both the inheritance and accompanying fitness costs of resistance. To the extent that field populations exhibit nonrecessive inheritance and a lack of fitness cost, this will favor more rapid evolution of resistance than would be expected when resistance is functionally recessive and is accompanied by fitness costs. PMID:26453731

  16. Carbon isotope ratios document that the elytra of western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) reflects adult versus larval feeding and later instar larvae prefer Bt corn to alternate hosts.

    PubMed

    Hiltpold, Ivan; Adamczyk, John J; Higdon, Matthew L; Clark, Thomas L; Ellersieck, Mark R; Hibbard, Bruce E

    2014-06-01

    In much of the Corn Belt and parts of Europe, the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is the most important insect pest of maize. The need for additional basic knowledge of this pest has been highlighted while developing resistance management plans for insecticidal genetically modified crops. This study evaluated the possibility of tracking feeding habits of western corn rootworm larvae using stable carbon isotope signatures. Plants accumulate different ratios of (13)C:(12)C isotopes, usually expressed as δ(13)C, according to whether they use the C3 or C4 photosynthetic pathway. Herbivore biomass is expected to reflect the δ(13)C of the food they eat. For the current experiment, western corn rootworm larvae were grown on different species of plants exhibiting different δ(13)C values. The δ(13)C values were then measured in elytra of emerged beetles. When beetles were unfed, biomass reflected larval feeding. When beetles were fed for 31 d postemergence, δ(13)C values of elytra almost exclusively reflected adult feeding. These results suggest the use of caution in the interpretation of δ(13)C data aiming to document larval diet history when adult feeding history is unknown. The technique was also used to evaluate western corn rootworm larval choice between alternate hosts and maize with and without genetically modified (Bt) traits aimed at their control. Propensity for feeding on alternate hosts versus maize was biased toward feeding on maize regardless whether the maize had Bt or not, suggesting western corn rootworm larvae were not repelled by Bt. These data will be helpful for regulators in interpreting western corn rootworm feeding data on Bt maize. PMID:24874160

  17. Monogalactosyldiacylglycerols as Host Recognition Cues for Western Corn Rootworm Larvae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Bernklau, E J; Hibbard, B E; Dick, D L; Rithner, C D; Bjostad, L B

    2015-04-01

    Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) was identified as a host recognition cue for larvae of the western corn rootworm Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte. An active glycolipid fraction obtained from an extract of germinating maize roots was isolated with thin layer chromatography using a bioassay-driven approach. When analyzed with LC-MS (positive ion scanning), the assay-active spot was found to contain four different MGDG species: 18:3-18:3 (1,2-dilinolenoyl), 18:2-18:3 (1-linoleoyl, 2-linolenoyl), 18:2-18:2 (1,2-dilinoleoyl), and 18:2-16:0 (1-linoleoyl, 2-palmitoyl). A polar fraction was also needed for activity. When combined with a polar fraction containing a blend of sugars (glucose:fructose:sucrose:myoinositol), the isolated MGDG elicited a unique tight-turning behavior by neonate western corn rootworm larvae that is indicative of host recognition. In behavioral bioassays where disks treated with the active blend were exposed to successive sets of rootworm larvae, the activity of MGDG increased over four exposures, suggesting that larvae may be responding to compounds produced after enzymatic breakdown of MGDG. In subsequent tests with synthetic blends composed of theoretical MGDG-breakdown products, larval responses to four synthetic blends were not significantly different (P<0.5) than the response to isolated MGDG. GC-MS analysis showed modest increases in the amounts of the 16:0, 18:0, and 18:3 free fatty acids released from MGDG after a 30-min exposure to rootworm larvae, which is consistent with the enzymatic breakdown hypothesis. PMID:26470164

  18. Western corn rootworm larval movement in SmartStax seed blend scenarios.

    PubMed

    Zukoff, Sarah N; Bailey, Wayne C; Ellersieck, Mark R; Hibbard, Bruce E

    2012-08-01

    Insect resistance management (IRM) can extend the lifetime of management options, but depends on extensive knowledge of the biology of the pest species involved for an optimal plan. Recently, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registered seed blends refuge for two of the transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) corn products targeting the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte. Larval movement between Bt and isoline plants can be detrimental to resistance management for high dose Bt products because the larger larvae can be more tolerant of the Bt toxins. We assessed movement of western corn rootworm larvae among four spatial arrangements of SmartStax corn (expressing both the Cry34/35Ab1 and Cry3Bb1 proteins) and isoline plants by infesting specific plants with wild type western corn rootworm eggs. Significantly fewer western corn rootworm larvae, on average, were recovered from infested SmartStax plants than infested isoline plants, and the SmartStax plants were significantly less damaged than corresponding isoline plants. However, when two infested isoline plants surrounded a SmartStax plant, a significant number of larvae moved onto the SmartStax plant late in the season. These larvae caused significant damage both years and produced significantly more beetles than any other plant configuration in the study (including isoline plants) in the first year of the study. This plant configuration would occur rarely in a 5% seed blend refuge and may produce beetles of a susceptible genotype because much of their initial larval development was on isoline plants. Results are discussed in terms of their potential effects on resistance management. PMID:22928304

  19. Early Detection and Mitigation of Resistance to Bt Maize by Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Andow, David A; Pueppke, Steven G; Schaafsma, Arthur W; Gassmann, Aaron J; Sappington, Thomas W; Meinke, Lance J; Mitchell, Paul D; Hurley, Terrance M; Hellmich, Richard L; Porter, R Pat

    2016-02-01

    Transgenic Bt maize that produces less than a high-dose has been widely adopted and presents considerable insect resistance management (IRM) challenges. Western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, has rapidly evolved resistance to Bt maize in the field, leading to local loss of efficacy for some corn rootworm Bt maize events. Documenting and responding to this resistance has been complicated by a lack of rapid diagnostic bioassays and by regulatory triggers that hinder timely and effective management responses. These failures are of great concern to the scientific and agricultural community. Specific challenges posed by western corn rootworm resistance to Bt maize, and more general concerns around Bt crops that produce less than a high-dose of Bt toxin, have caused uncertainty around current IRM protocols. More than 15 years of experience with IRM has shown that high-dose and refuge-based IRM is not applicable to Bt crops that produce less than a high-dose. Adaptive IRM approaches and pro-active, integrated IRM-pest management strategies are needed and should be in place before release of new technologies that produce less than a high-dose. We suggest changes in IRM strategies to preserve the utility of corn rootworm Bt maize by 1) targeting local resistance management earlier in the sequence of responses to resistance and 2) developing area-wide criteria to address widespread economic losses. We also favor consideration of policies and programs to counteract economic forces that are contributing to rapid resistance evolution. PMID:26362989

  20. Geographic information systems in corn rootworm management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn rootworms (Diabrotica spp. Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) are serious pests of corn (Zea mays) in the United States and Europe. Control measures for corn rootworms (CRW) were historically based upon chemical pesticides and crop rotation. Pesticide use created environmental and economic concerns. In...

  1. Susceptibility of northern corn rootworm Diabrotica barberi Smith & Lawrence (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) to mCry3A and eCry3.1Ab Bacillus thuringiensis proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Susceptibility of the northern corn rootworm (NCR), to mCry3A and eCry3.1Ab proteins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) was determined using a diet bioassay. Northern corn rootworm neonates were exposed to different concentrations of mCry3A and eCry3.1Ab, incorporated into artificial diet. Lar...

  2. Susceptibility of Northern Corn Rootworm Diabrotica barberi Smith (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) to mCry3A and eCry3.1Ab Bacillus thuringiensis proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Susceptibility of the northern corn rootworm (NCR), to mCry3A and eCry3.1Ab proteins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) was determined using a diet bioassay. Northern corn rootworm neonates were exposed to different concentrations of mCry3A and eCry3.1Ab, incorporated into artificial diet. Lar...

  3. The Temporal and Spatial Invasion Genetics of the Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in Southern Europe.

    PubMed

    Lemic, Darija; Mikac, Katarina M; Ivkosic, Stephanie A; Bažok, Renata

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the genetics of the western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte in southern Europe during the introduction (1996-2001) and establishment/spread (2002-2011) phases of its invasion. The Diabrotica microsatellite core-set was used to perform traditional population genetics analyses. Our results indicated that during the introduction phase genetic diversity and population genetic structure were lower overall as compared to the establishment/spread phase. Unusually high genetic differentiation was found between the Italy and southern Europe comparisons, including high differentiation between Italian populations separated by a short distance during the establishment/spread phase. STRUCTURE analysis revealed two genetic clusters during the introduction phase and two genetic clusters during the establishment/spread phase. However, bottlenecked populations were only detected during the invasion phase. A small but significant isolation by distance effect was noted in both phases. Serbia was the geographic source of WCR to Croatia and Hungary in the introduction phase, while the United States of America was the possible source of WCR to Italy in 2001. These introductory populations were the subsequent source of individuals sampled during the establishment/spread phase. Repeated introductions and admixture events in southern Europe may have resulted in genetically diverse WCR populations that have attained 83% of all known alleles worldwide. PMID:26406466

  4. The Temporal and Spatial Invasion Genetics of the Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in Southern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Lemic, Darija; Mikac, Katarina M.; Ivkosic, Stephanie A.; Bažok, Renata

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the genetics of the western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte in southern Europe during the introduction (1996–2001) and establishment/spread (2002–2011) phases of its invasion. The Diabrotica microsatellite core-set was used to perform traditional population genetics analyses. Our results indicated that during the introduction phase genetic diversity and population genetic structure were lower overall as compared to the establishment/spread phase. Unusually high genetic differentiation was found between the Italy and southern Europe comparisons, including high differentiation between Italian populations separated by a short distance during the establishment/spread phase. STRUCTURE analysis revealed two genetic clusters during the introduction phase and two genetic clusters during the establishment/spread phase. However, bottlenecked populations were only detected during the invasion phase. A small but significant isolation by distance effect was noted in both phases. Serbia was the geographic source of WCR to Croatia and Hungary in the introduction phase, while the United States of America was the possible source of WCR to Italy in 2001. These introductory populations were the subsequent source of individuals sampled during the establishment/spread phase. Repeated introductions and admixture events in southern Europe may have resulted in genetically diverse WCR populations that have attained 83% of all known alleles worldwide. PMID:26406466

  5. 6-Methoxy-2-benzoxazolinone: A semiochemical for host location by western corn rootworm larvae.

    PubMed

    Bjostad, L B; Hibbard, B E

    1992-07-01

    A bioassay-driven sequential fractionation scheme was used to isolate all portions of a crude dichloromethane corn seedling extract behaviorally active to larvae of the western corn rootworm,Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte. 6-Methoxy-2-benzoxazolinone (MBOA) was identified as one of the most important components of an attractive crude corn extract. MBOA was found on or in the intact root tissues by injecting an extract of undamaged roots onto an HPLC immediately after extraction. MBOA was demonstrated to be volatile and functions as a semiochemical in conjunction with carbon dioxide in host location by western corn rootworm larvae, which are oligophagous on the roots of maize and several other species of grasses. Because MBOA occurs almost exclusively in maize and other grasses, it offers a simple way for the larvae to distinguish possible hosts from non-hosts. MBOA has previously been reported as a chemical defense against other insect species. This is the first report in grasses of a secondary compound that is toxic or a deterrent to nonadapted insect herbivores but that is used as a semiochemical in host location by a specialist insect species. PMID:24254139

  6. Modeling the dynamics of adaptation to transgenic corn by western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Onstad, D W; Guse, C A; Spencer, J L; Levine, E; Gray, M E

    2001-04-01

    A simulation model of the population dynamics and genetics of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, was created for a landscape of corn, soybean, and other crops. Although the model was created to study a 2-locus problem for beetles having genes for resistance to both crop rotation and transgenic corn, during this first phase of the project, the model was simulated to evaluate only resistance management plans for transgenic corn. Allele expression in the rootworm and toxin dose in the corn plant were the two most important factors affecting resistance development. A dominant resistance allele allowed quick evolution of resistance to transgenic corn, whereas a recessive allele delayed resistance >99 yr. With high dosages of toxin and additive expression, the time required to reach 3% resistance allele frequency ranged from 13 to >99 yr. With additive expression, lower dosages permitted the resistant allele frequency to reach 3% in 2-9 yr with refuges occupying 5-30% of the land. The results were sensitive to delays in emergence by susceptible adults and configuration of the refuge (row strips versus blocks). PMID:11332850

  7. Genetic variation in geographical populations of western and Mexican corn rootworm.

    PubMed

    Szalanski, A L; Roehrdanz, R L; Taylor, D B; Chandler, L

    1999-11-01

    Genetic variation in the nuclear rDNA ITS1 region of western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (WCR), and Mexican corn rootworm, D. v. zeae (MCR) was studied. Two sites were detected which differentiated WCR and MCR in the 642-base sequence. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of the first internal transcribed spacer region (ITS1) sequence revealed no variation within or among the twelve WCR and two MCR populations. PCR-RFLP of 75% of the mitochondrial DNA genome detected one significant polymorphic site out of the approximately 190 restriction sizes observed in WCR. The polymorphism did not differentiate geographical populations of WCR and is not diagnostic for the subspecies. The low levels of variation observed in WCR suggests either high levels of gene flow or a recent geographical expansion from a relatively small base. Gene flow would facilitate the rapid spread of traits that could compromise control programmes, such as insecticide resistance or behavioural modifications. The minimal genetic differentiation between WCR and MCR raises questions about the evolutionary history of these subspecies and how the distinct phenotypes are maintained. PMID:10620046

  8. Responses of northern and western corn rootworms to semiochemical attractants in corn fields.

    PubMed

    Lance, D R

    1988-04-01

    Small plots (18 × 18 m) were treated with grids of cotton wicks that contained semiochemicals for adultDiabrotica barberi Smith and Lawrence, the northern corn rootworm (NCR). In plots treated with eugenol (350 g/hectare), NCR were attracted to point sources of the compound, but there were no significant changes in numbers of either NCR orD. virgifera virgifera LeConte, the western corn rootworm (WCR), found on plants in the plots. In plots treated with 12.5 mg/hectare of 8R-methyl-2R-decyl propanoate (2R,8R-MDP, the apparent female-produced sex pheromone of NCR and WCR), males of both species were attracted to point sources, but beetles did not congregate within treated plots. With racemic 2,8-MDP at 1.0 g/hectare, male WCR were attracted into plots, but NCR of both sexes were strongly repelled. In a separate study, capture of beetles at pheromone-baited traps declined when the surrounding area contained wicks that emitted racemic 2,8-MDP. In treated plots, male WCR were relatively inefficient at finding pheromone sources. With NCR, emigration from plots could account totally for the observed 3- to 10-fold reduction in catch at 0.01-1.0 g/hectare. PMID:24276203

  9. Methyl Anthranilate as a Repellent for Western Corn Rootworm Larvae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Bernklau, E J; Hibbard, B E; Norton, A P; Bjostad, L B

    2016-08-01

    Methyl anthranilate was identified as the active compound in extracts of maize (Zea mays L.) roots that were shown to be repellent to neonate western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) larvae. A bioassay-driven approach was used to isolate the active material from diethyl ether extracts of roots from germinating maize seeds. Separation of the extract on a Florisil column yielded an active fraction of 90:10 hexane:diethyl ether. Analysis with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry identified two compounds in the active fraction: indole (2,3-benzopyrrole) and methyl anthranilate (methyl 2-aminobenzoate). When tested in behavioral bioassays, methyl anthranilate elicited a significant (P < 0.05) repellent response at doses of 1, 10, and 100 µg. In subsequent single-choice bioassays, 1, 10, and 100 µg of methyl anthranilate prevented larvae from approaching 10 mmol/mol concentrations of carbon dioxide, which is normally highly attractive to the larvae. Indole, the other compound identified from the active fraction, did not elicit a behavioral response by the larvae. Methyl anthranilate has potential for development as a management tool for western corn rootworm larvae and may be best suited for use in a push-pull control strategy. PMID:27122493

  10. Impact of the Bt Corn Proteins Cry34/35Ab1 and Cry3Bb1, Alone or Pyramided, on Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) Beetle Emergence in the Field.

    PubMed

    Hitchon, A J; Smith, J L; French, B W; Schaafsma, A W

    2015-08-01

    Western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is a major pest of corn, Zea mays L. The effect of the Bt proteins Cry34/35Ab1 and Cry3Bb1, alone or pyramided in corn hybrids on D. v. virgifera adult emergence was evaluated in field experiments for 3 yr. Experiments were infested artificially with 2,500 viable D. v. virgifera eggs per row meter of corn. The reduction in beetle emergence compared with non-Bt controls, from Cry34/35Ab1, Cry3Bb1, and the pyramided hybrids ranged from 64.3 to 97.4%, 91.1 to 95.2%, and 98.1 to 99.6%, respectively. The sex ratio of emerged beetles was usually female-biased from the Cry3Bb1 and pyramided treatments, but not from Cry34/35Ab1 treatment alone. Emergence from all Bt hybrids was delayed compared with the control, with the delay longest from the pyramided hybrid. In 2013, three egg infestation levels were tested, with density-dependent mortality observed at 1,250 viable eggs per row meter. The effect of Bt proteins on the emergence timing and sex ratio of D. v. virgifera may impact the suitability of resistance management plans, specifically the effectiveness of the refuge strategy. Susceptible males emerging from refuge might not be synchronized to mate with potentially resistant females emerging later from Bt corn hybrids. PMID:26470344

  11. Historical and contemporary population genetics of the invasive western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Lemic, D; Mikac, K M; Bažok, R

    2013-08-01

    Classical population genetic analyses were used to investigate populations of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, in Croatia in 1996 and 2009. The number of alleles was low in both 1996 and 2009; however, more alleles were found in the putative populations surveyed in 2009. Croatia had only 51% of the alleles recorded from the United States and 69% from Europe. However, 10 private (unique) alleles were found in Croatia, which were not found previously in Europe. Most populations were out of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, although no linkage disequilibrium was found. Low to no genetic differentiation was found between population pairwise comparisons in 1996, with a greater level of differentiation found between populations sampled in 2009. Using the program STRUCTURE, a single genetic cluster was found for populations sampled in 1996 and 2009. However, two genetic clusters were detected when the 1996 and 2009 data were combined, indicating significant temporal differentiation. Isolation by distance pattern of gene flow characterized populations sampled in 2009 only when the most distant population of Ogulin (the head of the expansion front) was included in the analysis. When Ogluin was excluded from the 2009 analysis no isolation by distance pattern was found. The possible impact that control practices have had on the population genetics of D. v. virgifera in Croatia from 1996 to 2009 are discussed in light of the temporal genetics differences found. PMID:23905746

  12. Effect of soybean varieties on survival and fecundity of western corn rootworm.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, Mike W; Gassmann, Aaron J

    2012-04-01

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is a major pest of corn (Zea mays L.) in North America and has evolved resistance to crop rotation by ovipositing in alternate crops such as soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]. Through experiments with plants grown in the greenhouse and the field, we tested whether soybeans with resistance to the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae), affected survival, fecundity, and consumption of soybean for D. v. virgifera. Soybean varieties tested included those types resistant to A. glycines (Rag1 and rag1/rag3) and a susceptible near isoline of the Rag1 variety. Females were provided with a diet of corn tissue for 4 d after which they were fed a diet of tissue from one of three soybean varieties for 4 d, starved for 4 d, or fed corn tissue. When fed greenhouse grown plants, strains differed significantly in survival and consumption, but consumption did not differ by variety of soybean. Diet treatment only affected fecundity; individuals fed corn continuously had greater fecundity than those individuals fed soybeans. In the experiment with plants grown in the field, leaf consumption differed among strains and individuals fed corn continuously had greater fecundity than the other treatments. Soybean varieties with Rag1 and rag1/rag3 resistance to A. glycines did not appear to affect the fitness of D. v. virgifera. Thus, planting of these A. glycines-resistant soybean varieties should not directly affect the spread of rotation-resistant D. v. virgifera. PMID:22606835

  13. Effects of entomopathogens on mortality of western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and fitness costs of resistance to Cry3Bb1 maize.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Amanda M; French, B Wade; Jaronski, Stefan T; Gassmann, Aaron J

    2014-02-01

    Fitness costs can delay pest resistance to crops that produce insecticidal toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), and past research has found that entomopathogens impose fitness costs of Bt resistance. In addition, entomopathogens can be used for integrated pest management by providing biological control of pests. The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is a major pest of maize and is currently managed by planting of Bt maize. We tested whether entomopathogenic nematodes and fungi increased mortality of western corn rootworm and whether these entomopathogens increased fitness costs of resistance to Cry3Bb1 maize. We exposed western corn rootworm larvae to two species of nematodes, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora Poinar (Rhabditida: Heterorhabditidae) and Steinernemafeltiae Filipjev (Rhabditida: Steinernematidae), and to two species of fungi, Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin (Hypocreales: Cordycipitaceae) (strain GHA) and Metarhizium brunneum (Metschnikoff) Sorokin (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) (strain F52) in two assay types, namely, seedling mat and small cup. Larval mortality increased with the concentration of H. bacteriophora and S. feltiae in the small cup assay, and with the exception of S. feltiae and B. bassiana in the seedling mat assay, mortality from entomopathogens was significantly greater than zero for the remaining entomopathogens in both assays. However, no fitness costs were observed in either assay type for any entomopathogen. Increased mortality of western corn rootworm larvae caused by these entomopathogens supports their potential use in biological control; however, the lack of fitness costs suggests that entomopathogens will not delay the evolution of Bt resistance in western corn rootworm. PMID:24665720

  14. Impact of western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) on sweet corn and evaluation of insecticidal and cultural control options.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, M P; Kirkwyland, J J; Gardner, J

    2000-06-01

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is an important pest of corn, Zea mays L., causing yield losses from root damage, plant lodging, and silk feeding. Because little is known about its impact on sweet corn, we conducted research to evaluate the combined effects of insecticide, planting date, and cultivar on root damage, plant lodging, and yield in central New York sweet corn. We also examined the influence of planting date and cultivar on the emergence of adult western corn rootworms. The research was conducted in 1994 and again in 1995 by using a split-split plot experimental design with insecticide as main plot, planting date as subplot, and cultivar as sub-subplot. The effect of cultivar on beetle emergence was not significant. Root damage was not correlated with adult emergence in 1994 but was positively correlated in 1995. In 1994, there was no interaction of the main factors, and all factors had a significant impact on root damage. In 1995 there was an interaction of insecticide and planting date, and of cultivar and planting date. Generally, root damage was reduced by insecticide and later planting. Plant lodging was affected by the interaction of insecticide and planting date, and the interaction of cultivar and planting date, for both years of the study. As with root damage, lodging was reduced with insecticide treatment and later planting but also was dependent on cultivar. In 1994 and especially in 1995, silk clipping by adult western corn rootworms precluded much inference about how yield was influenced by larval feeding damage on roots. The number of emerging western corn rootworm adults was lower and later in later plantings. PMID:10902334

  15. Insecticidal activity of monoterpenoids to western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), twospotted spider mite (Acari: Tetranychidae), and house fly (Diptera: Muscidae).

    PubMed

    Lee, S; Tsao, R; Peterson, C; Coats, J R

    1997-08-01

    Acute toxicities of 34 naturally occurring monoterpenoids were evaluated against 3 important arthropod pest species; the larva of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte; the adult of the twospotted spider mite. Tetranychus urticae Koch; and the adult house fly. Musca domestica L. Potential larvicidal or acaricidal activities of each monoterpenoid were determined by topical application, leaf-dip method, soil bioassay, and greenhouse pot tests. Phytotoxicity was also tested on a corn plant. Citronellic acid and thymol were the most topically toxic against the house fly, and citronellol and thujone were the most effective on the western corn rootworm. Most of the monoterpenoids were lethal to the twospotted spider mite at high concentrations; carvomenthenol and terpinen-4-ol were especially effective. A wide range of monoterpenoids showed some larvicidal activity against the western corn rootworm in the soil bioassay. Perillaldehyde, the most toxic (LC50 = 3 micrograms/g) in soil, was only 1/3 as toxic as carbofuran, a commercial soil insecticide (LC50 = 1 microgram/g). Selected monoterpenoids also effectively protected corn roots from attack by the western corn rootworm larvae under greenhouse conditions. alpha-Terpineol was the best monoterpenoid in the greenhouse pot test. The acute toxicity of monoterpenoids was low relative to conventional insecticides. Some monoterpenoids were phytotoxic to corn roots and leaves. l-Carvone was the most phytotoxic, whereas pulegone was the safest. The results with thymyl ethyl ether, one of the synthetic derivatives of thymol, showed a potential of derivatization to reduce monoterpenoid phytotoxicity. PMID:9260540

  16. Evidence of evolving carbaryl resistance in western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in areawide-managed cornfields in north central Kansas.

    PubMed

    Zhu, K Y; Wilde, G E; Higgins, R A; Sloderbeck, P E; Buschman, L L; Shufran, R A; Whitworth, R J; Starkey, S R; He, F

    2001-08-01

    Susceptibility of adult populations of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, to carbaryl was determined by a survey in 1996 before the implementation of an areawide management program near Scandia in north central Kansas. Subsequently, the susceptibility of western corn rootworm adults to carbaryl has been monitored throughout the program from 1997 to 2000 in both control and managed areas. In 1996, adults were highly susceptible to carbaryl with a mean LC50 value of 0.64 microg/vial. This value was comparable to those for adults collected from other regions within Kansas. However, adult susceptibility to carbaryl decreased rapidly within the managed area, where the cucurbitacin- carbaryl-based bait SLAM has been used as the primary tool to control adults in this project since 1997. In 1999, adults collected from the managed area were 9- and 20-fold less susceptible to carbaryl at the LC50 and LC90 levels, respectively, than those evaluated in 1996. In contrast, adults collected from the control area were only 2- and 3-fold less susceptible to carbaryl at the LC50 and LC90 levels, respectively, than adults evaluated in 1996. Although field adult populations of western corn rootworm were relatively low in 2000, evaluations showed trends similar to those in 1999 regarding their carbaryl susceptibility in the managed and control areas. These results provide evidence that western corn rootworm has been evolving carbaryl resistance rapidly in response to the use of SLAM in areawide-managed cornfields near Scandia. PMID:11561854

  17. crw1 - A Novel Maize Mutant Highly Susceptible to Foliar Damage by the Western Corn Rootworm Beetle

    PubMed Central

    Venkata, Bala Puchakayala; Lauter, Nick; Li, Xu; Chapple, Clint; Krupke, Christian; Johal, Gurmukh; Moose, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is the most destructive insect pest of corn (Zea mays L.) in the United States. The adult WCR beetles derive their nourishment from multiple sources including corn pollen and silks as well as the pollen of alternate hosts. Conversely, the corn foliage is largely neglected as a food source by WCR beetles, leading to a perception of a passive interaction between the two. We report here a novel recessive mutation of corn that was identified and named after its foliar susceptibility to corn rootworm beetles (crw1). The crw1 mutant under field conditions was exceptionally susceptible to foliar damage by WCR beetles in an age-specific manner. It exhibits pleiotropic defects on cell wall biochemistry, morphology of leaf epidermal cells and lower structural integrity via differential accumulation of cell wall bound phenolic acids. These findings indicate that crw1 is perturbed in a pathway that was not previously ascribed to WCR susceptibility, as well as implying the presence of an active mechanism(s) deterring WCR beetles from devouring corn foliage. The discovery and characterization of this mutant provides a unique opportunity for genetic analysis of interactions between maize and adult WCR beetles and identify new strategies to control the spread and invasion of this destructive pest. PMID:23951124

  18. crw1--A novel maize mutant highly susceptible to foliar damage by the western corn rootworm beetle.

    PubMed

    Venkata, Bala Puchakayala; Lauter, Nick; Li, Xu; Chapple, Clint; Krupke, Christian; Johal, Gurmukh; Moose, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is the most destructive insect pest of corn (Zea mays L.) in the United States. The adult WCR beetles derive their nourishment from multiple sources including corn pollen and silks as well as the pollen of alternate hosts. Conversely, the corn foliage is largely neglected as a food source by WCR beetles, leading to a perception of a passive interaction between the two. We report here a novel recessive mutation of corn that was identified and named after its foliar susceptibility to corn rootworm beetles (crw1). The crw1 mutant under field conditions was exceptionally susceptible to foliar damage by WCR beetles in an age-specific manner. It exhibits pleiotropic defects on cell wall biochemistry, morphology of leaf epidermal cells and lower structural integrity via differential accumulation of cell wall bound phenolic acids. These findings indicate that crw1 is perturbed in a pathway that was not previously ascribed to WCR susceptibility, as well as implying the presence of an active mechanism(s) deterring WCR beetles from devouring corn foliage. The discovery and characterization of this mutant provides a unique opportunity for genetic analysis of interactions between maize and adult WCR beetles and identify new strategies to control the spread and invasion of this destructive pest. PMID:23951124

  19. Soil application of an encapsulated CO2 source and its potential for management of western corn rootworm larvae.

    PubMed

    Schumann, M; Patel, A; Vidal, S

    2014-02-01

    Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) larvae use carbon dioxide (CO2) to locate the roots of their hosts. This study investigated whether an encapsulated CO2 source (CO2-emitting capsules) is able to outcompete CO2 gradients established by corn root respiration in the soil. Furthermore, the following two management options with the capsules were tested in semifield experiments (0.5- to 1-m2 greenhouse plots): the disruption of host location and an "attract-and-kill" strategy in which larvae were lured to a soil insecticide (Tefluthrin) between the corn rows. The attract-and-kill strategy was compared with an application of Tefluthrin in the corn rows (conventional treatment) at 33 and 18% of the standard field application rate. Application of the CO2-emitting capsules 30 cm from the plant base increased CO2 levels near the application point for up to 20 d with a peak at day 10. Both the disruption of host location and an attract-and-kill strategy caused a slight but nonsignificant reduction in larval densities. The disruption of host location caused a 17% reduction in larval densities, whereas an attract-and-kill strategy with Tefluthrin added at 33 and 18% of the standard application rate caused a 24 and 27% reduction in larval densities, respectively. As presently formulated, the CO2-emitting capsules, either with or without insecticide, do not provide adequate control of western corn rootworm. PMID:24665706

  20. Mating Success, Longevity, and Fertility of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Chrysomelidae: Coleoptera) in Relation to Body Size and Cry3Bb1-Resistant and Cry3Bb1-Susceptible Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    French, Bryan Wade; Hammack, Leslie; Tallamy, Douglas W.

    2015-01-01

    Insect resistance to population control methodologies is a widespread problem. The development of effective resistance management programs is often dependent on detailed knowledge regarding the biology of individual species and changes in that biology associated with resistance evolution. This study examined the reproductive behavior and biology of western corn rootworm beetles of known body size from lines resistant and susceptible to the Cry3Bb1 protein toxin expressed in transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis maize. In crosses between, and within, the resistant and susceptible genotypes, no differences occurred in mating frequency, copulation duration, courtship duration, or fertility; however, females mated with resistant males showed reduced longevity. Body size did not vary with genotype. Larger males and females were not more likely to mate than smaller males and females, but larger females laid more eggs. Moderately strong, positive correlation occurred between the body sizes of successfully mated males and females; however, weak correlation also existed for pairs that did not mate. Our study provided only limited evidence for fitness costs associated with the Cry3Bb1-resistant genotype that might reduce the persistence in populations of the resistant genotype but provided additional evidence for size-based, assortative mating, which could favor the persistence of resistant genotypes affecting body size. PMID:26569315

  1. Mating Success, Longevity, and Fertility of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Chrysomelidae: Coleoptera) in Relation to Body Size and Cry3Bb1-Resistant and Cry3Bb1-Susceptible Genotypes.

    PubMed

    French, Bryan Wade; Hammack, Leslie; Tallamy, Douglas W

    2015-01-01

    Insect resistance to population control methodologies is a widespread problem. The development of effective resistance management programs is often dependent on detailed knowledge regarding the biology of individual species and changes in that biology associated with resistance evolution. This study examined the reproductive behavior and biology of western corn rootworm beetles of known body size from lines resistant and susceptible to the Cry3Bb1 protein toxin expressed in transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis maize. In crosses between, and within, the resistant and susceptible genotypes, no differences occurred in mating frequency, copulation duration, courtship duration, or fertility; however, females mated with resistant males showed reduced longevity. Body size did not vary with genotype. Larger males and females were not more likely to mate than smaller males and females, but larger females laid more eggs. Moderately strong, positive correlation occurred between the body sizes of successfully mated males and females; however, weak correlation also existed for pairs that did not mate. Our study provided only limited evidence for fitness costs associated with the Cry3Bb1-resistant genotype that might reduce the persistence in populations of the resistant genotype but provided additional evidence for size-based, assortative mating, which could favor the persistence of resistant genotypes affecting body size. PMID:26569315

  2. Evaluation of conventional resistance to European corn borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) and western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in experimental maize lines developed from a backcross breeding program.

    PubMed

    Abel, C A; Berhow, M A; Wilson, R L; Binder, B F; Hibbard, B E

    2000-12-01

    Plant resistance is a promising control method for the two most damaging insect pests of maize, Zea mays L.: the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner), and the western corn rootworm Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte. Fifteen experimental lines of maize, derived from a backcross breeding program designed to introgress resistance to European corn borer from Peruvian maize into two U.S. Corn Belt adapted inbred lines, were evaluated for resistance to European corn borer and western corn rootwonrm. The experimental lines were in the second generation of backcrossing. All experimental lines were resistant to leaf blade feeding by European corn borer. These lines had low levels of 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one, a chemical commonly associated with leaf blade feeding resistance, indicating that this was not the mechanism of resistance to leaf blade feeding in these lines. Eleven experimental lines were resistant to leaf sheath and collar feeding by European corn borer. Useful sources of European corn borer ovipositional nonpreference and root feeding resistance to western corn rootworm were not identified. Some of the lines evaluated in this study may provide useful sources of resistance to both leaf blade and leaf sheath and collar feeding by European corn borer. PMID:11142317

  3. Expression and characterization of a recombinant endoglucanase from western corn rootworm, in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Valencia Jiménez, Arnubio; Wang, Haichuan; Siegfried, Blair D

    2014-01-01

    The endoglucanase cDNA, Dvv-ENGase I, from western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte was expressed using the GS115 methylotrophic strain of Pichia pastoris. The Dvv-ENGase I gene was cloned into the integrative plasmid pPICZαA under the control of AOX1, which is a methanol-inducible promoter. Positive clones were selected for their ability to produce the recombinant endoglucanase upon continuous methanol induction. The secreted recombinant insect endoglucanase Dvv-ENGase I has an apparent molecular mass of 29 kDa. The recombinant endo-1,4-β-glucanase (ENGase) was able to digest the substrates: hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC), carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), and Whatman No. 1 filter paper. A higher accumulation of reducing sugar was evident when the P. pastoris expression medium contained HEC (1%) instead of CMC (1%). An enzymatic activity band was detected after performing electrophoretic separation under nondenaturing conditions. The biological activity of the recombinant Dvv-ENGase I was influenced by the presence of protease inhibitors in the culture medium. PMID:25434035

  4. Gut bacteria facilitate adaptation to crop rotation in the western corn rootworm.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chia-Ching; Spencer, Joseph L; Curzi, Matías J; Zavala, Jorge A; Seufferheld, Manfredo J

    2013-07-16

    Insects are constantly adapting to human-driven landscape changes; however, the roles of their gut microbiota in these processes remain largely unknown. The western corn rootworm (WCR, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) is a major corn pest that has been controlled via annual rotation between corn (Zea mays) and nonhost soybean (Glycine max) in the United States. This practice selected for a "rotation-resistant" variant (RR-WCR) with reduced ovipositional fidelity to cornfields. When in soybean fields, RR-WCRs also exhibit an elevated tolerance of antiherbivory defenses (i.e., cysteine protease inhibitors) expressed in soybean foliage. Here we show that gut bacterial microbiota is an important factor facilitating this corn specialist's (WCR's) physiological adaptation to brief soybean herbivory. Comparisons of gut microbiota between RR- and wild-type WCR (WT-WCR) revealed concomitant shifts in bacterial community structure with host adaptation to soybean diets. Antibiotic suppression of gut bacteria significantly reduced RR-WCR tolerance of soybean herbivory to the level of WT-WCR, whereas WT-WCR were unaffected. Our findings demonstrate that gut bacteria help to facilitate rapid adaptation of insects in managed ecosystems. PMID:23798396

  5. Inheritance of methyl-parathion resistance in Nebraska western corn rootworm populations (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Parimi, Srinivas; Scharf, Michael E; Meinke, Lance J; Chandler, Laurence D; Siegfried, Blair D

    2003-02-01

    Field populations of western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, were collected from three different sites (York Co., Phelps Co., and Saunders Co.) in Nebraska during 1996. Adult bioassays of these three populations were conducted with different concentrations of methyl-parathion and at a diagnostic concentration (1.0 microg/ml) to determine resistance levels among these populations. Self and reciprocal crosses were made between the two resistant and one susceptible laboratory-reared populations. Dose-responses and dominance ratios calculated for the four reciprocal crosses indicated that resistance was incompletely dominant in both strains, although in one of the strains there was an indication of sex linkage. However, evaluation of native polyacrylamide gels stained for nonspecific esterases and nonspecific esterase activity of parents and F1 progeny of the crosses suggested that esterase inheritance was completely dominant and autosomal. The results of this study were inconclusive with regard to the precise nature of inheritance, because the bioassays and esterase assays could not discriminate between heterozygotes and homozygotes. However, they do provide insight into the potential for developing simple diagnostic assays to assess resistance frequencies. Based on the inheritance studies described in this investigation, we can begin to generate information on specific genetic factors that dictate the evolutionary divergence of discrete resistant populations and facilitate modeling efforts designed to approximate the movement of genes for resistance among populations. PMID:12650355

  6. Wing shape and size of the western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) is related to sex and resistance to soybean-maize crop rotation.

    PubMed

    Mikac, K M; Douglas, J; Spencer, J L

    2013-08-01

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is a major pest of maize in the United States and more recently, Europe. Understanding the dispersal dynamics of this species will provide crucial information for its management. This study used geometric morphometric analysis of hind wing venation based on 13 landmarks in 223 specimens from nine locations in Illinois, Nebraska, Iowa, and Missouri, to assess whether wing shape and size differed between rotated and continuously grown maize where crop rotation-resistant and susceptible individuals are found, respectively. Before assessing differences between rotation-resistant and susceptible individuals, sexual dimorphism was investigated. No significant difference in wing (centroid) size was found between males and females; however, females had significantly different shaped (more elongated) wings compared with males. Wing shape and (centroid) size were significantly larger among individuals from rotated maize where crop-rotation resistance was reported; however, cross-validation of these results revealed that collection site resistance status was an only better than average predictor of shape in males and females. This study provides preliminary evidence of wing shape and size differences in D. v. virgifera from rotated versus continuous maize. Further study is needed to confirm whether wing shape and size can be used to track the movement of rotation-resistant individuals and populations as a means to better inform management strategies. PMID:24020261

  7. Identification and quantification of hydroxamic acids in maize seedling root tissue and impact on western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) larval development.

    PubMed

    Davis, C S; Ni, X; Quisenberry, S S; Foster, J E

    2000-06-01

    Hydroxamic acid content was analyzed in the root tissue of four maize, Zea mays L., lines using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and related to western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, larval development and survivorship. Maize lines evaluated included Mp710 (PI 596627), MpSWCB-4, (PI 550498), Sc213 (PI 548792), and Dk580 (DeKalb commercial hybrid). Maize plants from each line were grown in test tubes containing a transparent agarose gel medium in a growth chamber. After 8 d of growth, root tissue of each line was harvested and hydroxamic acid content analyzed using HPLC. Three hydroxamic acids, 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one (DIMBOA), 6-methoxybenzoxazolinone (MBOA), and 2,4-dihydroxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one (DIBOA), were identified in the maize roots tested. DIMBOA concentration was quantified and ranged from 246.37 +/- 70.53 micrograms to 91.84 +/- 49.82 micrograms DIMBOA per gram of root tissue. No significant difference was found among lines in D. v. virgifera larval development and survivorship. PMID:10902360

  8. Single and blended maize volatiles as attractants for diabroticite corn rootworm beetles.

    PubMed

    Hammack, L

    2001-07-01

    Synthetic maize volatiles and analogs dispensed singly and blended were tested for attractiveness to western (WCR, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) and northern corn rootworm beetles (NCR, D. barberi) in maize fields. Newly identified attractants included syn-benzaldoxime, especially for NCR, and beta-caryophyllene for WCR females. (+/-)-Linalool was more effective than was (-)-linalool. Myrcene, (+)-beta-pinene, and (-)-beta-pinene were unattractive. Adding methyl salicylate to (+/-)-linalool, (+)-alpha-terpineol, or beta-ionone appeared to synergistically increase capture of WCR females, but dispensing the terpenes in binary blends did not. Dose-response data for methyl salicylate, (+/-)-linalool, and a blend of both compounds confirmed the synergy. beta-Caryophyllene, but not (-)-alpha-pinene, added to the latter blend produced a further synergistic increase in WCR female capture that did not vary with sesquiterpene dose from 1.0 to 100 mg. Indole addition to the same blend caused an increase in WCR female captures indicative of synergy, assuming that each did not individually lure different segments of the WCR female population. The green leaf volatiles (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate and (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol were unattractive alone and had no influence on efficacy of traps baited with 3.3 mg each of (+/-)-linalool, methyl salicylate, and beta-caryophyllene. The latter mixture captured about half as many WCR females as did 10 mg of 4-methoxycinnamaldehyde, a potent WCR attractant standard. Substituting beta-ionone for (+/-)-linalool yielded a ternary blend that captured more beetles than did the aldehyde and was unaffected by aldehyde addition. Olive oil, which has been used to sustain attractant volatilization, did not affect captures. The results show that the blending of maize volatiles has thepotential to greatly improve efficacy of lures having promising applications in corn rootworm population management. PMID:11504034

  9. Evaluation of corn hybrids expressing Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 and Cry3BbL against the western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Prasifka, P L; Rule, D M; Storer, N P; Nolting, S P; Hendrix, W H

    2013-04-01

    Studies were conducted across nine U.S. states, over 5 yr, to characterize the efficacy of transgenic corn (Zea mays L.) hybrids producing insecticidal proteins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) for control of western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Le Conte. Hybrids tested had the same genetic background, contained one of two single events (DAS-59122-7 expressing Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 or MON 88017 expressing Cry3Bb1) or a pyramid consisting of both rootworm-active events (SmartStax traits) and were compared with a non-Bt near isoline. Frequency analyses of root feeding data showed that hybrids containing both events sustained less root damage (0-3 node injury scale) than hybrids containing either event alone. The levels of root protection provided by MON 88017 and DAS-59122-7 were not different from each other. Efficacy was also evaluated based on consistency of protection, based on the proportion of plants with root ratings of either < or = 0.25 or < 1.00 on the node injury scale. The combination of two modes of action in SmartStax provided greater product consistency over a single mode of action at the 0.25 level and all hybrids producing Bt proteins provided equally high consistency at the 1.00 level. Overall these data show single and multiple mode of action hybrids provided high, consistent protection over the past 5 yr across the trial geography; however, pyramiding the rootworm Bt events provided greater and more consistent root protection. These findings also support that pyramided traits like SmartStax (Cry3Bb1 + Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1) remain a viable strategy for delaying resistance to either trait. PMID:23786070

  10. Larval susceptibility of an insecticide-resistant western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) population to soil insecticides: laboratory bioassays, assays of detoxification enzymes, and field performance.

    PubMed

    Wright, R J; Scharf, M E; Meinke, L J; Zhou, X; Siegfried, B D; Chandler, L D

    2000-02-01

    Soil insecticides were evaluated in laboratory and field studies against larvae of an insecticide resistant population (Phelps County, NE) of western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte. Insecticide toxicity was evaluated by topical application of technical insecticides to 3rd instars from Saunders County, NE (susceptible) and Phelps County populations. Resistance ratios (LD50 Phelps County/LD50 Saunders County) for the insecticides methyl parathion, tefluthrin, carbofuran, terbufos, and chlorpyrifos were 28.0, 9.3, 8.7, 2.6 and 1.3, respectively. Biochemical investigation of suspected enzymatic resistance mechanisms in 3rd instars identified significant elevation of esterase activity (alpha and beta naphthyl acetate hydrolysis [3.8- and 3.9-fold]). Examination of 3rd instar esterases by native PAGE identified increased intensity of several isoenzymes in the resistant population. Assays of cytochrome P450 activity (4-CNMA demethylation and aldrin epoxidation) did not identify elevated activity in resistant 3rd instars. Granular soil insecticides were applied at planting to corn, Zea mays L., in replicated field trials in 1997 and 1998 at the same Phelps County site as the source of resistant rootworms for the laboratory studies. In 1997, planting time applications of Counter 20CR, Counter 15 G (terbufos), and Lorsban 15 G (chlorpyrifos) resulted in the lowest root injury ratings (1-6 Iowa scale); 2.50, 2.55, 2.65, respectively (untreated check root rating of 4.55). In 1998, all insecticides performed similarly against a lower rootworm density (untreated check root rating of 3.72). These studies suggest that resistance previously documented in adults also is present in 3rd instars, esterases are possibly involved as resistance mechanisms, and resistance to methyl parathion in adults is also evident in larvae, but does not confer cross-resistance in larvae to all organophosphate insecticides. PMID:14658504