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Sample records for rotameric transitions insights

  1. A phenylalanine rotameric switch for signal-state control in bacterial chemoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Davi R.; Yang, Chen; Ames, Peter; Baudry, Jerome; Parkinson, John S.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial chemoreceptors are widely used as a model system for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of transmembrane signaling and have provided a detailed understanding of how ligand binding by the receptor modulates the activity of its associated kinase CheA. However, the mechanisms by which conformational signals move between signaling elements within a receptor dimer and how they control kinase activity remain unknown. Here, using long molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the kinase-activating cytoplasmic tip of the chemoreceptor fluctuates between two stable conformations in a signal-dependent manner. A highly conserved residue, Phe396, appears to serve as the conformational switch, because flipping of the stacked aromatic rings of an interacting F396-F396' pair in the receptor homodimer takes place concomitantly with the signal-related conformational changes. We suggest that interacting aromatic residues, which are common stabilizers of protein tertiary structure, might serve as rotameric molecular switches in other biological processes as well. PMID:24335957

  2. Theoretical Insights from Facile Microsecond Simulation of the Glass Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Jui-Hsiang; Patra, Tarak; Simmons, David

    Despite more than half a century of research, the fundamental nature of the glass transition remains one of the major open questions in polymer science and condensed matter physics. Molecular dynamics simulations have provided key insights into this problem, but their ability to firmly establish the underlying nature of glass formation have been limited by the extreme computational difficulty of directly probing the deeply supercooled regime most relevant to this process. Here we describe a new protocol for simulation of the glass transition enabling facile access to in-equilibrium segmental relaxation times approaching and exceeding one microsecond - well into the deeply supercooled regime of most glass-forming liquids. Coupled with a well-validated strategy for extrapolation to experimental timescales, this approach provides vastly improved prediction of experimental glass transition temperatures. Here we combine data acquired through this protocol for the deeply supercooled regime of polymeric, inorganic, organic, and metallic glass formers to robustly test several theories of glass formation and identify microscopic phenomenological features shared across all classes of glass-forming liquid in the deeply supercooled regime. We acknowledge the W. M. Keck Foundation for financial support of this research.

  3. Effect of thienyl groups on the photoisomerization and rotamerism of symmetric and asymmetric diaryl-ethenes and diaryl-butadienes.

    PubMed

    Bartocci, Giampiero; Galiazzo, Guido; Ginocchietti, Gabriella; Mazzucato, Ugo; Spalletti, Anna

    2004-09-01

    Five symmetric (bis-substituted) and asymmetric (mono-substituted) analogues of E-stilbene and EE-1,4-diphenylbutadiene, where one or both the side aryls are 2'-thienyl or 3'-thienyl groups, have been studied by stationary and pulsed fluorimetric techniques, laser flash photolysis, conventional photochemical methods and theoretical calculations. The results obtained for these compounds and the comparison with those previously reported for three other compounds of the same series, allowed the effects of the position of the heteroatom and of the extension of the olefin chain on the excited state relaxation properties to be understood. The presence of one or two thienyl groups and their positional isomerism affect the spectral behaviour, the relaxation properties (radiative/reactive competition), the photoisomerization mechanism (singlet/triplet) and the ground state rotamerism. For the dienes containing the 3'-thienyl substituent(s), two rotamers were evidenced whose radiative and photochemical properties were obtained by selective excitation. PMID:15346189

  4. Complete NMR assignments of bioactive rotameric (3 → 8) biflavonoids from the bark of Garcinia hombroniana.

    PubMed

    Jamila, Nargis; Khairuddean, Melati; Khan, Sadiq Noor; Khan, Naeem

    2014-07-01

    The genus Garcinia is reported to possess antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, hepatoprotective and anti-HIV activities. Garcinia hombroniana in Malaysia is used to treat itching and as a protective medicine after child birth. This study was aimed to isolate the chemical constituents from the bark of G. hombroniana and explore their possible pharmacological potential. Ethyl acetate extract afforded one new (1) and six (2-7) known 3 → 8 rotameric biflavonoids. Their structures were elucidated by UV, IR and NMR (1D and 2D) spectroscopy together with electron ionization/ESI mass spectrometric techniques and were identified as (2R, 3S) volkensiflavone-7-O-rhamnopyranoside (1), volkensiflavone (2), 4″-O-methyl-volkensiflavone (3), volkensiflavone-7-O-glucopyranoside (4), morelloflavone (5), 3″-O-methyl-morelloflavone (6) and morelloflavone-7-O-glucopyranoside (7). The absolute configuration of compound 1 was assigned by circular dichroism spectroscopy as 2R, 3S. The coexistence of conformers of isolated biflavonoids in solution at 25 °C in different solvents was confirmed by variable temperature NMR studies. At room temperature (25 °C), compounds 1-7 exhibited duplicate NMR signals, while at elevated temperature (90 °C), a single set of signals was obtained. Compound 5 showed significant in vitro antioxidant activities against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and 2,2'-azino-bis-3-ethyl benzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid radicals. The antibacterial studies showed that compounds 5 and 6 are the most active against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli. Compounds 3 and 6 also showed moderate antituberculosis activity against H38 Rv. Based on the research findings, G. hombroniana could be concluded as a rich source of flavanone-flavone (3 → 8) biflavonoids that exhibit rotameric behaviour at room temperature and display significant antioxidant and antibacterial activities. PMID:24700704

  5. New Insights of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yadi; Zhou, Binhua P.

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key step during embryonic morphogenesis, heart development, chronic degenerative fibrosis, and cancer metastasis. Several distinct traits have been conveyed by EMT, including cell motility, invasiveness, resistance to apoptosis, and some properties of stem cells. Many signal pathways have contributed to the induction of EMT, such as transforming growth factor-β, Wnt, Hedgehog, Notch, and nuclear factor κB. Over the last few years, increasing evidence has shown that EMT plays an essential role in tumor progression and metastasis. Understanding the molecular mechanism of EMT has a great effect in unraveling the metastatic cascade and may lead to novel interventions for metastatic disease. PMID:18604456

  6. New Insights into the Transition From Magmatic to Tectonic Rifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, R. W.; Buck, W. R.; Qin, R.

    2008-12-01

    Magma plays a major role in the development of many rifts and continental margins. This is particularly clear for some of the more recent continental rifts including the Afro-Arabian Rift System and the breakup of South America from Africa. We are interested in how magma, injected as dikes, may lead to weakening of the lithosphere so that rifting can proceed even if the supply of magma wanes. We use a hybrid numerical model to simulate the effect of dike injection on continental lithopsheric rifting. We have developed a numerical diking simulation where the key diking parameters controlling the input of magma are the magma chamber size, minimum diking interval, and maximum tectonic force. The model includes a 2D finite difference code (FLAC) for tracking long- term stress build-up and strain in a viscoelastic-plactic model lithosphere. A boundary element code is used to simulate the effect of short-duration dike intrusion events that are specified to occur periodically at the center of the model region. The stresses from the finite difference code are applied to the boundary element code to calculate how much a dike opens as a function of depth. If a dike is generated, basaltic-density magma is "injected" into the finite difference model based on the distribution of dike opening obtained from the boundary element code. Diking thermally weakens the lithosphere and changes the lithospheric density structure, both weakening the lithosphere and reduce the force difference needed to continue extension. Varying the diking interval and magma chamber size, changes the rates magma input and lithospheric weakening. The maximum tectonic force effects the rate of magma injection, total magmatic extension, and hence, the timing of the transition from magmatic to tectonic extension. With normal lithospheric thicknesses and thermal structure, this transition may require as little as 3-5 km of magmatic extension before the onset of tectonic rifting.

  7. Photophysical and theoretical studies of photoisomerism and rotamerism of trans-styrylphenanthrenes

    SciTech Connect

    Bartocci, G.; Masetti, F.; Mazzucato, U.; Spalletti, A.; Baraldi, I.; Momicchioli, F.

    1987-08-27

    The photophysical and photochemical properties and the ground-state conformational equilibrium of trans-n-styrylphenanthrene (n-StPh, with n = 1, 2, 3, 4, 9) have been studied in inert solvents. The kinetic parameters of the competitive radiative and reactive decay processes have been obtained. A detailed analysis of the fluorimetric behavior as a function of the excitation wavelength and temperature has allowed the distinct decay parameters and the ground-state energy difference of the two rotamers of trans-3-StPh to be obtained. Parallel theoretical calculations of the potential energy curves for the internal rotation of the phenanthryl group in the ground state, of the energies and oscillator strengths of the lowest transitions, and of the activation energies for trans ..-->.. cis isomerization in the ground and lowest excited singlet states have been carried out with a modified (CS) INDO method. The results of the experimental and theoretical studies are in satisfactory agreement and provide a general description of the photophysical and photochemical behavior of this class of compounds.

  8. The Role of CH···O Coulombic Interactions in Determining Rotameric Conformations of Phenyl Substituted 1,3-Dioxanes and Tetrahydropyrans.

    PubMed

    Wiberg, Kenneth B; Lambert, Kyle M; Bailey, William F

    2015-08-21

    The rotameric conformations of the phenyl ring in both the axial and the equatorial conformers of phenyl substituted 1,3-dioxanes and tetrahydropyrans are compared with those of the corresponding phenylcyclohexanes at the MP2/6-311+G* level. The compounds with an axial phenyl commonly adopt a conformation in which the plane of the aromatic ring is perpendicular to the benzylic C-H bond. However, axial 5-phenyl-1,3-dioxane adopts a "parallel" conformation that allows an ortho hydrogen to be proximate to the two ring oxygens, leading to attractive CH···O interactions. Stabilizing Coulombic interactions of this sort are found with many of the oxygen-containing six-membered rings that were investigated. PMID:26182246

  9. Motivations for enterprise system adoption in transition economies: insights from Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, Piotr; Weistroffer, Heinz Roland

    2016-06-01

    Enterprise system (ES) adoption can bring many benefits, but may also put tremendous strain on an organisation or business, sometimes with disastrous outcomes. The specific motivations and expectations that lead to ES adoption may impact the success or failure of these endeavours, and understanding these motivations may be useful in predicting the success of ES projects. Most of the published research on ES adoption motivation has been in the context of highly developed countries. The social, cultural, economic and political conditions in developing, emerging and transition economies make for a different business environment, and insights obtained from developed countries may not always transfer to these settings. This study seeks to identify and help understand the motivations for ES adoption specifically in transition economies, as these economies play a significant role in the global market, but have not been receiving adequate research attention. Drawing on the experience of 129 ES adopters in Poland, a transition economy, this study categorises motivations into coherent groups of issues and evaluates the influence of discovered motivations on ES adoption success. Further, motivations revealed by this study are compared with motivations reported by prior research conducted in developed countries.

  10. Insights into the Microbial and Viral Dynamics of a Coastal Downwelling-Upwelling Transition.

    PubMed

    Gregoracci, Gustavo Bueno; Soares, Ana Carolina Dos Santos; Miranda, Milene Dias; Coutinho, Ricardo; Thompson, Fabiano L

    2015-01-01

    Although previous studies have described opposing states in upwelling regions, i.e., the rise of cold nutrient-rich waters and prevalence of surface warm nutrient-poor waters, few have addressed the transition from one state to the other. This study aimed to describe the microbial and viral structure during this transition and was able to obtain the taxonomic and metabolic compositions as well as physical-chemical data. This integrated approach allowed for a better understanding of the dynamics of the downwelling upwelling transition, suggesting that a wealth of metabolic processes and ecological interactions are occurring in the minute fractions of the plankton (femto, pico, nano). These processes and interactions included evidence of microbial predominance during downwelling (with nitrogen recycling and aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis), different viral predation pressures over primary production in different states (cyanobacteria vs eukaryotes), and a predominance of diatoms and selected bacterial and archaeal groups during upwelling (with the occurrence of a wealth of nitrogen metabolism involving ammonia). Thus, the results provided insights into which microbes, viruses and microbial-mediated processes are probably important in the functioning of upwelling systems. PMID:26327119

  11. Insight into structural phase transitions from the decoupled anharmonic mode approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Donat J.; Passerone, Daniele

    2016-08-01

    We develop a formalism (decoupled anharmonic mode approximation, DAMA) that allows calculation of the vibrational free energy using density functional theory even for materials which exhibit negative curvature of the potential energy surface with respect to atomic displacements. We investigate vibrational modes beyond the harmonic approximation and approximate the potential energy surface with the superposition of the accurate potential along each normal mode. We show that the free energy can stabilize crystal structures at finite temperatures which appear dynamically unstable at T  =  0. The DAMA formalism is computationally fast because it avoids statistical sampling through molecular dynamics calculations, and is in principle completely ab initio. It is free of statistical uncertainties and independent of model parameters, but can give insight into the mechanism of a structural phase transition. We apply the formalism to the perovskite cryolite, and investigate the temperature-driven phase transition from the P21/n to the Immm space group. We calculate a phase transition temperature between 710 and 950 K, in fair agreement with the experimental value of 885 K. This can be related to the underestimation of the interaction of the vibrational states. We also calculate the main axes of the thermal ellipsoid and can explain the experimentally observed increase of its volume for the fluorine by 200–300% throughout the phase transition. Our calculations suggest the appearance of tunneling states in the high temperature phase. The convergence of the vibrational DOS and of the critical temperature with respect of reciprocal space sampling is investigated using the polarizable-ion model.

  12. Insight into structural phase transitions from the decoupled anharmonic mode approximation.

    PubMed

    Adams, Donat J; Passerone, Daniele

    2016-08-01

    We develop a formalism (decoupled anharmonic mode approximation, DAMA) that allows calculation of the vibrational free energy using density functional theory even for materials which exhibit negative curvature of the potential energy surface with respect to atomic displacements. We investigate vibrational modes beyond the harmonic approximation and approximate the potential energy surface with the superposition of the accurate potential along each normal mode. We show that the free energy can stabilize crystal structures at finite temperatures which appear dynamically unstable at T  =  0. The DAMA formalism is computationally fast because it avoids statistical sampling through molecular dynamics calculations, and is in principle completely ab initio. It is free of statistical uncertainties and independent of model parameters, but can give insight into the mechanism of a structural phase transition. We apply the formalism to the perovskite cryolite, and investigate the temperature-driven phase transition from the P21/n to the Immm space group. We calculate a phase transition temperature between 710 and 950 K, in fair agreement with the experimental value of 885 K. This can be related to the underestimation of the interaction of the vibrational states. We also calculate the main axes of the thermal ellipsoid and can explain the experimentally observed increase of its volume for the fluorine by 200-300% throughout the phase transition. Our calculations suggest the appearance of tunneling states in the high temperature phase. The convergence of the vibrational DOS and of the critical temperature with respect of reciprocal space sampling is investigated using the polarizable-ion model. PMID:27269514

  13. The Fourth Grade Experience: Insights toward the Transition to Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Kelly A.

    2005-01-01

    The transition from elementary to middle school can be an exciting as well as scary time for young adolescents. The stress of this transition can be decreased by incorporating transition programs that address student needs and concerns. This qualitative research study was designed to gain an overall sense of fourth grade in order to better…

  14. Structural insights into the cubic-hexagonal phase transition kinetics of monoolein modulated by sucrose solutions

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Caleb W.; Strango, Zachariah I.; Dell, Zachary R.; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Harper, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Using DSC (differential scanning calorimetry), we measure the kinetics of the cubic-HII phase transition of monoolein in bulk sucrose solutions. We find that the transition temperature is dramatically lowered, with each 1 mol/kg of sucrose concentration dropping the transition by 20 °C. The kinetics of this transition also slow greatly with increasing sucrose concentration. For low sucrose concentrations, the kinetics are asymmetric, with the cooling (HII-cubic) transition taking twice as long as the heating (cubic-HII) transition. This asymmetry in transition times is reduced for higher sucrose concentrations. The cooling transition (cubic-HII) exhibits Avrami exponents in the range of 2 to 2.5 and the heating transition shows Avrami exponents ranging from 1 to 3. A classical Avrami interpretation would be that these processes occur via a one or two dimensional pathway with variable nucleation rates. A non-classical perspective would suggest that these exponents reflect the time dependence of pore formation (cooling) and destruction (heating). New density measurements of monoolein show that the currently accepted value is about 5% too low; this has substantial implications for electron density modeling. Structural calculations indicate that the head group area and lipid length in the cubic-HII transition shrink by about 12 % and 4 % respectively; this reduction is practically the same as that seen in a lipid with a very different molecular structure (rac-di-12:0 β-GlcDAG) that makes the same transition. Thermodynamic considerations suggest there is a hydration shell about one water molecule thick in front of the lipid head groups in both the cubic and HII phases. PMID:25758637

  15. Structural insights into the cubic-hexagonal phase transition kinetics of monoolein modulated by sucrose solutions.

    PubMed

    Reese, Caleb W; Strango, Zachariah I; Dell, Zachary R; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Harper, Paul E

    2015-04-14

    Using DSC (differential scanning calorimetry), we measure the kinetics of the cubic-HII phase transition of monoolein in bulk sucrose solutions. We find that the transition temperature is dramatically lowered, with each 1 mol kg(-1) of sucrose concentration dropping the transition by 20 °C. The kinetics of this transition also slow greatly with increasing sucrose concentration. For low sucrose concentrations, the kinetics are asymmetric, with the cooling (HII-cubic) transition taking twice as long as the heating (cubic-HII) transition. This asymmetry in transition times is reduced for higher sucrose concentrations. The cooling transition exhibits Avrami exponents in the range of 2 to 2.5 and the heating transition shows Avrami exponents ranging from 1 to 3. A classical Avrami interpretation would be that these processes occur via a one or two dimensional pathway with variable nucleation rates. A non-classical perspective would suggest that these exponents reflect the time dependence of pore formation (cooling) and destruction (heating). New density measurements of monoolein show that the currently accepted value is about 5% too low; this has substantial implications for electron density modeling. Structural calculations indicate that the head group area and lipid length in the cubic-HII transition shrink by about 12% and 4% respectively; this reduction is practically the same as that seen in a lipid with a very different molecular structure (rac-di-12:0 β-GlcDAG) that makes the same transition. Thermodynamic considerations suggest there is a hydration shell about one water molecule thick in front of the lipid head groups in both the cubic and HII phases. PMID:25758637

  16. Safety threats and opportunities to improve interfacility care transitions: insights from patients and family members

    PubMed Central

    Jeffs, Lianne; Kitto, Simon; Merkley, Jane; Lyons, Renee F; Bell, Chaim M

    2012-01-01

    Aim To explore patients’ and family members’ perspectives on how safety threats are detected and managed across care transitions and strategies that improve care transitions from acute care hospitals to complex continuing care and rehabilitation health care organizations. Background Poorly executed care transitions can result in additional health care spending due to adverse outcomes and delays as patients wait to transfer from acute care to facilities providing different levels of care. Patients and their families play an integral role in ensuring they receive safe care, as they are the one constant in care transitions processes. However, patients’ and family members’ perspectives on how safety threats are detected and managed across care transitions from health care facility to health care facility remain poorly understood. Methods This qualitative study used semistructured interviews with patients (15) and family members (seven) who were transferred from an acute care hospital to a complex continuing care/rehabilitation care facility. Data were analyzed using a directed content analytical approach. Results Our results revealed three key overarching themes in the perceptions: lacking information, getting “funneled through” too soon, and difficulty adjusting to the shift from total care to almost self-care. Several patients and families described their expectations and experiences associated with their interfacility care transitions as being uninformed about their transfer or that transfer happened too early. In addition, study participants identified the need for having a coordinated approach to care transitions that engages patients and family members. Conclusion Study findings provide patients’ and family members’ perspectives on key safety threats and how to improve care transitions. Of particular importance is the need for patients and family members to play a more active role in their care transition planning and self-care management. PMID

  17. Interpretation and nonuniqueness of CTRW transition distributions: Insights from an alternative solute transport formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Scott K.; Berkowitz, Brian

    2014-12-01

    The continuous time random walk (CTRW) has both an elegant mathematical theory and a successful record at modeling solute transport in the subsurface. However, there are some interpretation ambiguities relating to the relationship between the discrete CTRW transition distributions and the underlying continuous movement of solute that have not been addressed in existing literature. These include the exact definition of "transition", and the extent to which transition probability distributions are unique/quantifiable from data. Here, we present some theoretical results which address these uncertainties in systems with an advective bias. Simultaneously, we present an alternative, reduced parameter CTRW formulation for general advective transport in heterogeneous porous media, which models early- and late-time transport by use of random transition times between sparse, imaginary planes normal to flow. We show that even in the context of this reduced-parameter formulation there is nonuniqueness in the definitions of both transition lengths and waiting time distributions, and that neither may be uniquely determined from experimental data. For practical use of this formulation, we suggest Pareto transition time distributions, leading to a two-degree-of-freedom modeling approach. We then demonstrate the power of this approach in fitting two sets of existing experimental data. While the primary focus is the presentation of new results, the discussion is designed to be pedagogical and to provide a good entry point into practical modeling of solute transport with the CTRW.

  18. New Insight into the Solar System’s Transition Disk Phase Provided by the Metal-rich Carbonaceous Chondrite Isheyevo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Melissa A.; Garvie, Laurence A. J.; Knauth, L. Paul

    2015-03-01

    Many aspects of planet formation are controlled by the amount of gas remaining in the natal protoplanetary disks (PPDs). Infrared observations show that PPDs undergo a transition stage at several megayears, during which gas densities are reduced. Our Solar System would have experienced such a stage. However, there is currently no data that provides insight into this crucial time in our PPD’s evolution. We show that the Isheyevo meteorite contains the first definitive evidence for a transition disk stage in our Solar System. Isheyevo belongs to a class of metal-rich meteorites whose components have been dated at almost 5 Myr after formation of Ca, Al-rich inclusions, and exhibits unique sedimentary layers that imply formation through gentle sedimentation. We show that such layering can occur via the gentle sweep-up of material found in the impact plume resulting from the collision of two planetesimals. Such sweep-up requires gas densities consistent with observed transition disks (10-12-10-11 g cm-3). As such, Isheyevo presents the first evidence of our own transition disk and provides new constraints on the evolution of our solar nebula.

  19. Electronic structure of carbon dioxide under pressure and insights into the molecular-to-nonmolecular transition.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Sean R; Jarrige, Ignace; Wu, Min; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Tse, John S; Mi, Zhongying; Kaci, Linada; Jiang, Jian-Zhong; Cai, Yong Q

    2013-11-12

    Knowledge of the high-pressure behavior of carbon dioxide (CO2), an important planetary material found in Venus, Earth, and Mars, is vital to the study of the evolution and dynamics of the planetary interiors as well as to the fundamental understanding of the C-O bonding and interaction between the molecules. Recent studies have revealed a number of crystalline polymorphs (CO2-I to -VII) and an amorphous phase under high pressure-temperature conditions. Nevertheless, the reported phase stability field and transition pressures at room temperature are poorly defined, especially for the amorphous phase. Here we shed light on the successive pressure-induced local structural changes and the molecular-to-nonmolecular transition of CO2 at room temperature by performing an in situ study of the local electronic structure using X-ray Raman scattering, aided by first-principle exciton calculations. We show that the transition from CO2-I to CO2-III was initiated at around 7.4 GPa, and completed at about 17 GPa. The present study also shows that at ~37 GPa, molecular CO2 starts to polymerize to an extended structure with fourfold coordinated carbon and minor CO3 and CO-like species. The observed pressure is more than 10 GPa below previously reported. The disappearance of the minority species at 63(± 3) GPa suggests that a previously unknown phase transition within the nonmolecular phase of CO2 has occurred. PMID:24167283

  20. Coordinated encoding between cell types in the retina: insights from the theory of phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpee, Tatyana

    2015-03-01

    In this talk I will describe how the emergence of some types of neurons in the brain can be quantitatively described by the theory of transitions between different phases of matter. The two key parameters that control the separation of neurons into subclasses are the mean and standard deviation of noise levels among neurons in the population. The mean noise level plays the role of temperature in the classic theory of phase transitions, whereas the standard deviation is equivalent to pressure, in the case of liquid-gas transitions, or to magnetic field for magnetic transitions. Our results account for properties of two recently discovered types of salamander OFF retinal ganglion cells, as well as the absence of multiple types of ON cells. We further show that, across visual stimulus contrasts, retinal circuits continued to operate near the critical point whose quantitative characteristics matched those expected near a liquid-gas critical point and described by the nearest-neighbor Ising model in three dimensions. Because the retina needs to operate under changing stimulus conditions, the observed parameters of cell types corresponded to metastable states in the region between the spinodal line and the line describing maximally informative solutions. Such properties of neural circuits can maximize information transmission in a given environment while retaining the ability to quickly adapt to a new environment. NSF CAREER award 1254123 and NIH R01EY019493

  1. Student Transition from Primary to Lower Secondary School in Cambodia: Narrative Insights into Complex Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, D. Brent, Jr.; Zimmermann, Thomas; Sitha, Chhinh; Williams, James H.; Kitamura, Yuto

    2014-01-01

    This article has three purposes. First, it presents findings from a study of student retention and dropout in Cambodia, as pupils transition from primary to lower secondary school. Second, it aims to understand from an in-depth, emic perspective the dynamics of this process and the challenges that individual families and their students face around…

  2. Insight into insulator-to-metal transition of sulfur-doped silicon by DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zong-Yan; Yang, Pei-Zhi

    2014-09-01

    Using density functional theory calculations, the mechanism of insulator-to-metal transition of S-doped Si has been systematically investigated. The calculated crystal structure indicates that the gentle lattice distortion is caused by sulfur doping, and this doping effect is gradually weakened with the increase of sulfur concentration. Two distinct impurity energy levels in the band gap are induced by sulfur doping, and their position and width are linearly varying along with the increase of sulfur concentration. Owing to the overlap and dispersion of these impurity energy levels, the insulator-to-metal transition occurs at the sulfur concentration of 2.095 × 10(20) cm(-3), which is consistent with the experimental measurement. Moreover, the defect states related with sulfur doping show delocalization features and are more outstanding at the higher sulfur concentration. The calculated results suggest that S-hyperdoped Si is a suitable candidate for intermediate band solar cells. PMID:25019287

  3. Recent insights into instability and transition to turbulence in open-flow systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morkovin, Mark V.

    1988-01-01

    Roads to turbulence in open-flow shear layers are interpreted as sequences of often competing instabilities. These correspond to primary and higher order restructurings of vorticity distributions which culminate in convected spatial disorder (with some spatial coherence on the scale of the shear layer) traditionally called turbulence. Attempts are made to interpret these phenomena in terms of concepts of convective and global instabilities on one hand, and of chaos and strange attractors on the other. The first is fruitful, and together with a review of mechanisms of receptivity provides a unifying approach to understanding and estimating transition to turbulence. In contrast, current evidence indicates that concepts of chaos are unlikely to help in predicting transition in open-flow systems. Furthermore, a distinction should apparently be made between temporal chaos and the convected spatial disorder of turbulence past Reynolds numbers where boundary layers and separated shear layers are formed.

  4. Decreased Temperate but not Polar Fish Productivity Across the Eocene-Oligocene Transition: Insights from Ichthyoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zill, M.; Sibert, E. C.; Norris, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT, 38-28 Ma) was a period of global cooling and increased nutrient delivery to the ocean. It is associated with the onset of permanent ice sheet on Antarctica, and the beginning of a highly productive polar ecosystem, dominated by diatoms and favoring short, efficient food chains. In a highly efficient, large phytoplankton-dominated ecosystem, we would expect to see higher abundances of consumers, as fewer trophic steps means more carbon available to upper trophic level groups. Here we use the accumulation rate of ichthyoliths (fish teeth and dermal scales) to measure the relative export production of fish through this time period of changing climate. Records from the South Atlantic gyre (DSDP Site 522) the South Pacific Gyre (DSDP Site 596) and the Southern Ocean (DSDP Site 689) show a 50% reduction in ichthyolith accumulation rate in the vicinity the Eocene Oligocene boundary. However, this drop in fish production occurs just after the E/O in the Atlantic, 4 million years before the E/O in the Pacific and 6 million years prior to the E/O in the Southern Ocean. Since the EOT is generally associated with an increase in productivity and diatom blooms in the Southern Ocean and tropical Pacific, we would expect that the abundance of fish would increase across the transition. Our results are surprisingly the inverse of this expectation, and suggest that the transition from greenhouse to icehouse did not produce increase in forage fish or even a response of any kind during the climatological transition into the icehouse world. Indeed, it seems that ichthyolith accumulation rate and primary productivity are not perfectly linked, and it may be that ichthyolith accumulation is responding more to another factor, such as ocean temperature or prey availability that is not linked to the increased diatom production during the EOT.

  5. Insight into the microscopic structure of an AdS black hole from a thermodynamical phase transition.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shao-Wen; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2015-09-11

    Comparing with an ordinary thermodynamic system, we investigate the possible microscopic structure of a charged anti-de Sitter black hole completely from the thermodynamic viewpoint. The number density of the black hole molecules is introduced to measure the microscopic degrees of freedom of the black hole. We found that the number density suffers a sudden change accompanied by a latent heat when the black hole system crosses the small-large black hole coexistence curve, while when the system passes the critical point, it encounters a second-order phase transition with a vanishing latent heat due to the continuous change of the number density. Moreover, the thermodynamic scalar curvature suggests that there is a weak attractive interaction between two black hole molecules. These phenomena might cast new insight into the underlying microscopic structure of a charged anti-de Sitter black hole. PMID:26406818

  6. Insights into the water mean transit time in a high-elevation tropical ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera, Giovanny M.; Segura, Catalina; Vaché, Kellie B.; Windhorst, David; Breuer, Lutz; Crespo, Patricio

    2016-07-01

    This study focuses on the investigation of the mean transit time (MTT) of water and its spatial variability in a tropical high-elevation ecosystem (wet Andean páramo). The study site is the Zhurucay River Ecohydrological Observatory (7.53 km2) located in southern Ecuador. A lumped parameter model considering five transit time distribution (TTD) functions was used to estimate MTTs under steady-state conditions (i.e., baseflow MTT). We used a unique data set of the δ18O isotopic composition of rainfall and streamflow water samples collected for 3 years (May 2011 to May 2014) in a nested monitoring system of streams. Linear regression between MTT and landscape (soil and vegetation cover, geology, and topography) and hydrometric (runoff coefficient and specific discharge rates) variables was used to explore controls on MTT variability, as well as mean electrical conductivity (MEC) as a possible proxy for MTT. Results revealed that the exponential TTD function best describes the hydrology of the site, indicating a relatively simple transition from rainfall water to the streams through the organic horizon of the wet páramo soils. MTT of the streams is relatively short (0.15-0.73 years, 53-264 days). Regression analysis revealed a negative correlation between the catchment's average slope and MTT (R2 = 0.78, p < 0.05). MTT showed no significant correlation with hydrometric variables, whereas MEC increases with MTT (R2 = 0.89, p < 0.001). Overall, we conclude that (1) baseflow MTT confirms that the hydrology of the ecosystem is dominated by shallow subsurface flow; (2) the interplay between the high storage capacity of the wet páramo soils and the slope of the catchments provides the ecosystem with high regulation capacity; and (3) MEC is an efficient predictor of MTT variability in this system of catchments with relatively homogeneous geology.

  7. Exploring sustainability transitions in households: insights from real-life experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baedeker, Carolin; Buhl, Johannes; Greiff, Kathrin; Hasselkuß, Marco; Liedtke, Christa; Lukas, Melanie

    2016-04-01

    Societal transformation towards sustainable consumption and production, especially in urban areas, is a key challenge. The design and implementation of sustainable product service systems (PSS) might be the initial point, in which private households play a major role. The Sustainable LivingLab research infrastructure was developed as an experimental setting for investigating consumption and production patterns in private households, especially to explore socio-technical innovations which are helpful to guide sustainability transitions. The suggested presentation describes results of several real-life experiments conducted in German households, e.g. the project SusLabNRW (North-Rhine Westphalia as part of the European SusLabNWE-Project), the EnerTransRuhr project as well as the PATHWAYS project that explore patterns of action, time use, social practices and the related resource use in private households. The presentation gives an overview of the employed methods and analysed data (qualitative interviews, social network analysis, survey on household activities and inventories and a sustainability assessment (resource profiles - MIPS household analysis). Households' resource consumption was calculated in all fields of activity to analyse social practices' impact. The presentation illustrates how aggregated data can inform scenario analysis and concludes with an outlook onto transition pathways at household level and socio-technical innovations in the fields of housing, nutrition and mobility.

  8. The peptide-receptive transition state of MHC-1 molecules: Insight from structure and molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson H.; Mage, M.; Dolan, M.; Wang, R.; Boyd, L.; Revilleza, M.; Natarajan, K.; Myers, N.; Hansen, T.; Margulies, D.

    2012-05-01

    MHC class I (MHC-I) proteins of the adaptive immune system require antigenic peptides for maintenance of mature conformation and immune function via specific recognition by MHC-I-restricted CD8(+) T lymphocytes. New MHC-I molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum are held by chaperones in a peptide-receptive (PR) transition state pending release by tightly binding peptides. In this study, we show, by crystallographic, docking, and molecular dynamics methods, dramatic movement of a hinged unit containing a conserved 3(10) helix that flips from an exposed 'open' position in the PR transition state to a 'closed' position with buried hydrophobic side chains in the peptide-loaded mature molecule. Crystallography of hinged unit residues 46-53 of murine H-2L(d) MHC-I H chain, complexed with mAb 64-3-7, demonstrates solvent exposure of these residues in the PR conformation. Docking and molecular dynamics predict how this segment moves to help form the A and B pockets crucial for the tight peptide binding needed for stability of the mature peptide-loaded conformation, chaperone dissociation, and Ag presentation.

  9. Interaction of carbon monoxide with transition metals: evolutionary insights into drug target discovery.

    PubMed

    Foresti, Roberta; Motterlini, Roberto

    2010-12-01

    The perception that carbon monoxide (CO) is poisonous and life-threatening for mammalian organisms stems from its intrinsic propensity to bind iron in hemoglobin, a reaction that ultimately leads to impaired oxygen delivery to tissues. From evolutionary and chemical perspectives, however, CO is one of the most essential molecules in the formation of biological components and its interaction with transition metals is at the origin of primordial cell signaling. Not surprisingly, mammals have gradually evolved systems to finely control the synthesis and the sensing of this gaseous molecule. Cells are indeed continuously exposed to small quantities of CO produced endogenously during the degradation of heme by constitutive and inducible heme oxygenase enzymes. We have gradually learnt that heme oxygenase-derived carbon monoxide (CO) serves as a ubiquitous signaling mediator which could be exploited for therapeutic purposes. The development of transition metal carbonyls as prototypic carbon monoxide-releasing molecules (CO-RMs) represents a novel stratagem for a safer delivery of CO-based pharmaceuticals in the treatment of various pathological disorders. This review will look back at evolution to analyze and argue that a dynamic interaction of CO with specific intracellular metal centers is the common denominator for the diversified beneficial effects mediated by this gaseous molecule. PMID:20704543

  10. Insights into the structural nature of the transition state in the Kir channel gating pathway.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Philip W; Bollepalli, Murali K; Rapedius, Markus; Nematian-Ardestani, Ehsan; Shang, Lijun; Sansom, Mark Sp; Tucker, Stephen J; Baukrowitz, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In a previous study we identified an extensive gating network within the inwardly rectifying Kir1.1 (ROMK) channel by combining systematic scanning mutagenesis and functional analysis with structural models of the channel in the closed, pre-open and open states. This extensive network appeared to stabilize the open and pre-open states, but the network fragmented upon channel closure. In this study we have analyzed the gating kinetics of different mutations within key parts of this gating network. These results suggest that the structure of the transition state (TS), which connects the pre-open and closed states of the channel, more closely resembles the structure of the pre-open state. Furthermore, the G-loop, which occurs at the center of this extensive gating network, appears to become unstructured in the TS because mutations within this region have a 'catalytic' effect upon the channel gating kinetics. PMID:25483285

  11. Insights into the structural nature of the transition state in the Kir channel gating pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Philip W; Bollepalli, Murali K; Rapedius, Markus; Nematian-Ardestani, Ehsan; Shang, Lijun; Sansom, Mark SP; Tucker, Stephen J; Baukrowitz, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In a previous study we identified an extensive gating network within the inwardly rectifying Kir1.1 (ROMK) channel by combining systematic scanning mutagenesis and functional analysis with structural models of the channel in the closed, pre-open and open states. This extensive network appeared to stabilize the open and pre-open states, but the network fragmented upon channel closure. In this study we have analyzed the gating kinetics of different mutations within key parts of this gating network. These results suggest that the structure of the transition state (TS), which connects the pre-open and closed states of the channel, more closely resembles the structure of the pre-open state. Furthermore, the G-loop, which occurs at the center of this extensive gating network, appears to become unstructured in the TS because mutations within this region have a ‘catalytic’ effect upon the channel gating kinetics. PMID:25483285

  12. Photoluminescence of deep defects involving transition metals in silicon -- New insights from highly enriched 28Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steger, Michael

    The fundamental properties of deep luminescence centres in Si associated with transition metals such as Cu, Ag, Au, and Pt have been studied for decades, both as markers for these deleterious contaminants, as well as for the possibility of efficient Si-based light emission. Due to the high diffusivity and solubility of these metals, these are among the most ubiquitous luminescence centres observed in Si, and have thus served as testbeds for elucidating the physics of isoelectronic bound excitons and for testing ab-initio calculations of defect properties. While these deep isoelectronic bound exciton centres have been studied extensively with many different methods, the actual composition of most centres could not be determined with certainty. Only the recent availability of high quality, highly enriched 28Si made it possible to advance the knowledge of the constituents of these complexes. The greatly improved spectral resolution resulting from the elimination of inhomogeneous isotope broadening in isotopically enriched 28Si enabled the extension of the established technique of observing isotope shifts to the measurement of isotopic fingerprints. These isotopic fingerprints reveal not only the presence of a specific element, but also the number of atoms of that element involved in the formation of a given luminescence centre. This technique has revealed that the detailed constituents of all of the centres previously studied had been identified incorrectly. In this work, the results of ultra-high resolution photoluminescence studies of these centres in specially prepared 28Si samples are discussed. In addition, new centres were discovered revealing the existence of several different families of impurity complexes containing either four or five atoms chosen from Li, Cu, Ag, Au, and Pt. The constituents of all these centres have been determined, together with no-phonon transition energies, no-phonon isotope shifts, local vibrational mode energies, and the isotope

  13. New insights into the transport processes controlling the sulfate-methane-transition-zone near methane vents

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, Nabil; Garziglia, Sébastien; Ruffine, Livio

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, several studies have raised concerns about the possible interactions between methane hydrate decomposition and external change. To carry out such an investigation, it is essential to characterize the baseline dynamics of gas hydrate systems related to natural geological and sedimentary processes. This is usually treated through the analysis of sulfate-reduction coupled to anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Here, we model sulfate reduction coupled with AOM as a two-dimensional (2D) problem including, advective and diffusive transport. This is applied to a case study from a deep-water site off Nigeria’s coast where lateral methane advection through turbidite layers was suspected. We show by analyzing the acquired data in combination with computational modeling that a two-dimensional approach is able to accurately describe the recent past dynamics of such a complex natural system. Our results show that the sulfate-methane-transition-zone (SMTZ) is not a vertical barrier for dissolved sulfate and methane. We also show that such a modeling is able to assess short timescale variations in the order of decades to centuries. PMID:27230887

  14. New insights into the transport processes controlling the sulfate-methane-transition-zone near methane vents.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Nabil; Garziglia, Sébastien; Ruffine, Livio

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, several studies have raised concerns about the possible interactions between methane hydrate decomposition and external change. To carry out such an investigation, it is essential to characterize the baseline dynamics of gas hydrate systems related to natural geological and sedimentary processes. This is usually treated through the analysis of sulfate-reduction coupled to anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Here, we model sulfate reduction coupled with AOM as a two-dimensional (2D) problem including, advective and diffusive transport. This is applied to a case study from a deep-water site off Nigeria's coast where lateral methane advection through turbidite layers was suspected. We show by analyzing the acquired data in combination with computational modeling that a two-dimensional approach is able to accurately describe the recent past dynamics of such a complex natural system. Our results show that the sulfate-methane-transition-zone (SMTZ) is not a vertical barrier for dissolved sulfate and methane. We also show that such a modeling is able to assess short timescale variations in the order of decades to centuries. PMID:27230887

  15. New insights into the transport processes controlling the sulfate-methane-transition-zone near methane vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, Nabil; Garziglia, Sébastien; Ruffine, Livio

    2016-05-01

    Over the past years, several studies have raised concerns about the possible interactions between methane hydrate decomposition and external change. To carry out such an investigation, it is essential to characterize the baseline dynamics of gas hydrate systems related to natural geological and sedimentary processes. This is usually treated through the analysis of sulfate-reduction coupled to anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Here, we model sulfate reduction coupled with AOM as a two-dimensional (2D) problem including, advective and diffusive transport. This is applied to a case study from a deep-water site off Nigeria’s coast where lateral methane advection through turbidite layers was suspected. We show by analyzing the acquired data in combination with computational modeling that a two-dimensional approach is able to accurately describe the recent past dynamics of such a complex natural system. Our results show that the sulfate-methane-transition-zone (SMTZ) is not a vertical barrier for dissolved sulfate and methane. We also show that such a modeling is able to assess short timescale variations in the order of decades to centuries.

  16. Molecular dynamics insight to phase transition in n-alkanes with carbon nanofillers

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, Monisha; Vaish, Rahul

    2015-05-15

    The present work aims to investigate the phase transition, dispersion and diffusion behavior of nanocomposites of carbon nanotube (CNT) and straight chain alkanes. These materials are potential candidates for organic phase change materials(PCMs) and have attracted flurry of research recently. Accurate experimental evaluation of the mass, thermal and transport properties of such composites is both difficult as well as economically taxing. Additionally it is crucial to understand the factors that results in modification or enhancement of their characteristic at atomic or molecular level. Classical molecular dynamics approach has been extended to elucidate the same. Bulk atomistic models have been generated and subjected to rigorous multistage equilibration. To reaffirm the approach, both canonical and constant-temperature, constant- pressure ensembles were employed to simulate the models under consideration. Explicit determination of kinetic, potential, non-bond and total energy assisted in understanding the enhanced thermal and transport property of the nanocomposites from molecular point of view. Crucial parameters including mean square displacement and simulated self diffusion coefficient precisely define the balance of the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic interactions. Radial distribution function also reflected the density variation, strength and mobility of the nanocomposites. It is expected that CNT functionalization could improve the dispersion within n-alkane matrix. This would further ameliorate the mass and thermal properties of the composite. Additionally, the determined density was in good agreement with experimental data. Thus, molecular dynamics can be utilized as a high throughput technique for theoretical investigation of nanocomposites PCMs.

  17. Molecular dynamics insight to phase transition in n-alkanes with carbon nanofillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Monisha; Vaish, Rahul

    2015-05-01

    The present work aims to investigate the phase transition, dispersion and diffusion behavior of nanocomposites of carbon nanotube (CNT) and straight chain alkanes. These materials are potential candidates for organic phase change materials(PCMs) and have attracted flurry of research recently. Accurate experimental evaluation of the mass, thermal and transport properties of such composites is both difficult as well as economically taxing. Additionally it is crucial to understand the factors that results in modification or enhancement of their characteristic at atomic or molecular level. Classical molecular dynamics approach has been extended to elucidate the same. Bulk atomistic models have been generated and subjected to rigorous multistage equilibration. To reaffirm the approach, both canonical and constant-temperature, constant- pressure ensembles were employed to simulate the models under consideration. Explicit determination of kinetic, potential, non-bond and total energy assisted in understanding the enhanced thermal and transport property of the nanocomposites from molecular point of view. Crucial parameters including mean square displacement and simulated self diffusion coefficient precisely define the balance of the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic interactions. Radial distribution function also reflected the density variation, strength and mobility of the nanocomposites. It is expected that CNT functionalization could improve the dispersion within n-alkane matrix. This would further ameliorate the mass and thermal properties of the composite. Additionally, the determined density was in good agreement with experimental data. Thus, molecular dynamics can be utilized as a high throughput technique for theoretical investigation of nanocomposites PCMs.

  18. Along-axis transition between narrow and wide rifts: Insights from 3D numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koptev, Alexander; Calais, Eric; Burov, Evgueni; Leroy, Sylvie; Gerya, Taras

    2016-04-01

    Based on performed high-resolution rheologically consistent three-dimensional thermo-mechanical numerical models, we show that there is a significant difference in the influence of the rheological profile on rifting style in the case of dominant active (plume-activated) rifting compared to dominant passive (far-field tectonic stresses) rifting. Narrow rifting, conventionally attributed to cold strong lithosphere in passive rifting mode, may develop in weak hot ultra-stretched lithosphere during active rifting, after plume impingement on a tectonically pre-stressed lithosphere. In that case, initially ultra-wide small-amplitude rift patterns focus, in a few Myr, in large-scale faults that form a narrow rift. Also, wide rifting may develop during ultra-slow spreading of strong lithosphere, and "switch" to the narrow rifting upon plume impingement. For further understanding the mechanisms behind the interactions between the mantle plume and far-field stresses in case of realistic horizontally heterogeneous lithosphere, we have tested our models on the case of the central East African Rift system (EARS). The EARS south of the Ethiopian Rift Valley bifurcates in two branches (eastern, magma-rich and western, magma-poor) surrounding the strong Tanzanian craton. Broad zones of low seismic velocity observed throughout the upper mantle beneath the central part of the EARS are consistent with the spreading of a deep mantle plume. The extensional features and topographic expression of the Eastern rift varies significantly north-southward: in northern Kenya the area of deformation is very wide (some 150-250 km in E-W direction), to the south the rift narrows to 60-70 km, yet further to the south this localized deformation widens again. Here we investigate this transition between localized and wide rifting using thermo-mechanical numerical modeling that couples, in a dynamic sense, the rise of the upper mantle material with the deformation of the African lithosphere below the

  19. Increased Alpha (8-12 Hz) Activity during Slow Wave Sleep as a Marker for the Transition from Implicit Knowledge to Explicit Insight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yordanova, Juliana; Kolev, Vasil; Wagner, Ullrich; Born, Jan; Verleger, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The number reduction task (NRT) allows us to study the transition from implicit knowledge of hidden task regularities to explicit insight into these regularities. To identify sleep-associated neurophysiological indicators of this restructuring of knowledge representations, we measured frequency-specific power of EEG while participants slept during…

  20. Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This theme issue on transitions for individuals with disabilities contains nine papers discussing transition programs and issues. "Transition Issues for the 1990s," by Michael J. Ward and William D. Halloran, discusses self-determination, school responsibility for transition, continued educational engagement of at-risk students, and service…

  1. New Mechanistic Insights on the Selectivity of Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Organic Reactions: The Role of Computational Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinhao; Chung, Lung Wa; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2016-06-21

    With new advances in theoretical methods and increased computational power, applications of computational chemistry are becoming practical and routine in many fields of chemistry. In organic chemistry, computational chemistry plays an indispensable role in elucidating reaction mechanisms and the origins of various selectivities, such as chemo-, regio-, and stereoselectivities. Consequently, mechanistic understanding improves synthesis and assists in the rational design of new catalysts. In this Account, we present some of our recent works to illustrate how computational chemistry provides new mechanistic insights for improvement of the selectivities of several organic reactions. These examples include not only explanations for the existing experimental observations, but also predictions which were subsequently verified experimentally. This Account consists of three sections discuss three different kinds of selectivities. The first section discusses the regio- and stereoselectivities of hydrosilylations of alkynes, mainly catalyzed by [Cp*Ru(MeCN)3](+) or [CpRu(MeCN)3](+). Calculations suggest a new mechanism that involves a key ruthenacyclopropene intermediate. This mechanism not only explains the unusual Markovnikov regio-selectivity and anti-addition stereoselectivity observed by Trost and co-workers, but also motivated further experimental investigations. New intriguing experimental observations and further theoretical studies led to an extension of the reaction mechanism. The second section includes three cases of meta-selective C-H activation of aryl compounds. In the case of Cu-catalyzed selective meta-C-H activation of aniline, a new mechanism that involves a Cu(III)-Ar-mediated Heck-like transition state, in which the Ar group acts as an electrophile, was proposed. This mechanism predicted a higher reactivity for more electron-deficient Ar groups, which was supported by experiments. For two template-mediated, meta-selective C-H bond activations catalyzed by

  2. Laser Flash Photolysis Generation of High-Valent Transition Metal-Oxo Species: Insights from Kinetic Studies in Real Time

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Newcomb, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Conspectus High-valent transition metal-oxo species are active oxidizing species in many metal-catalyzed oxidation reactions in both Nature and the laboratory. In homogeneous catalytic oxidations, a transition metal catalyst is oxidized to a metal-oxo species by a sacrificial oxidant, and the activated transition metal-oxo intermediate oxidizes substrates. Mechanistic studies of these oxidizing species can provide insights for understanding commercially important catalytic oxidations and the oxidants in cytochrome P450 enzymes. In many cases, however, the transition metal oxidants are so reactive that they do not accumulate to detectable levels in mixing experiments, which have millisecond mixing times, and successful generation and direct spectroscopic characterization of these highly reactive transients remain a considerable challenge. Our strategy for understanding homogeneous catalysis intermediates employs photochemical generation of the transients with spectroscopic detection on time-scales as short as nanoseconds and direct kinetic studies of their reactions with substrates by laser flash photolysis (LFP) methods. This Account describes studies of high-valent manganese- and iron-oxo intermediates. Irradiation of porphyrin-manganese(III) nitrates and chlorates or corrole-manganese(IV) chlorates resulted in homolytic cleavage of the O-X bonds in the ligands, whereas irradiation of porphyrin-manganese(III) perchlorates resulted in heterolytic cleavage of O-Cl bonds to give porphyrin-manganese(V)-oxo cations. Similar reactions of corrole- and porphyrin-iron(IV) complexes gave highly reactive transients that were tentatively identified as macrocyclic ligand-iron(V)-oxo species. Kinetic studies demonstrated high reactivity of the manganese(V)-oxo species, and even higher reactivities of the putative iron(V)-oxo transients. For example, second-order rate constants for oxidations of cis-cyclooctene at room temperature were 6 × 103 M−1 s−1 for a corrole

  3. Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, David; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes four articles: "Career Aspirations" (Field); "Making the Transition to a New Curriculum" (Baker, Householder); "How about a 'Work to School' Transition?" (Glasberg); and "Technological Improvisation: Bringing CNC to Woodworking" (Charles, McDuffie). (SK)

  4. Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Sandy, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This "feature issue" focuses on transition from school to adult life for persons with disabilities. Included are "success stories," brief program descriptions, and a list of resources. Individual articles include the following titles and authors: "Transition: An Energizing Concept" (Paul Bates); "Transition Issues for the 1990s" (William Halloran…

  5. Insights into the Effects of Zinc Doping on Structural Phase Transition of P2-Type Sodium Nickel Manganese Oxide Cathodes for High-Energy Sodium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuehang; Xu, Gui-Liang; Zhong, Guiming; Gong, Zhengliang; McDonald, Matthew J; Zheng, Shiyao; Fu, Riqiang; Chen, Zonghai; Amine, Khalil; Yang, Yong

    2016-08-31

    P2-type sodium nickel manganese oxide-based cathode materials with higher energy densities are prime candidates for applications in rechargeable sodium ion batteries. A systematic study combining in situ high energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD), ex situ X-ray absorption fine spectroscopy (XAFS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SS-NMR) techniques was carried out to gain a deep insight into the structural evolution of P2-Na0.66Ni0.33-xZnxMn0.67O2 (x = 0, 0.07) during cycling. In situ HEXRD and ex situ TEM measurements indicate that an irreversible phase transition occurs upon sodium insertion-extraction of Na0.66Ni0.33Mn0.67O2. Zinc doping of this system results in a high structural reversibility. XAFS measurements indicate that both materials are almost completely dependent on the Ni(4+)/Ni(3+)/Ni(2+) redox couple to provide charge/discharge capacity. SS-NMR measurements indicate that both reversible and irreversible migration of transition metal ions into the sodium layer occurs in the material at the fully charged state. The irreversible migration of transition metal ions triggers a structural distortion, leading to the observed capacity and voltage fading. Our results allow a new understanding of the importance of improving the stability of transition metal layers. PMID:27494351

  6. Synaptic plasticity modulates autonomous transitions between waking and sleep states: Insights from a Morris-Lecar model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciszak, Marzena; Bellesi, Michele

    2011-12-01

    The transitions between waking and sleep states are characterized by considerable changes in neuronal firing. During waking, neurons fire tonically at irregular intervals and a desynchronized activity is observed at the electroencephalogram. This activity becomes synchronized with slow wave sleep onset when neurons start to oscillate between periods of firing (up-states) and periods of silence (down-states). Recently, it has been proposed that the connections between neurons undergo potentiation during waking, whereas they weaken during slow wave sleep. Here, we propose a dynamical model to describe basic features of the autonomous transitions between such states. We consider a network of coupled neurons in which the strength of the interactions is modulated by synaptic long term potentiation and depression, according to the spike time-dependent plasticity rule (STDP). The model shows that the enhancement of synaptic strength between neurons occurring in waking increases the propensity of the network to synchronize and, conversely, desynchronization appears when the strength of the connections become weaker. Both transitions appear spontaneously, but the transition from sleep to waking required a slight modification of the STDP rule with the introduction of a mechanism which becomes active during sleep and changes the proportion between potentiation and depression in accordance with biological data. At the neuron level, transitions from desynchronization to synchronization and vice versa can be described as a bifurcation between two different states, whose dynamical regime is modulated by synaptic strengths, thus suggesting that transition from a state to an another can be determined by quantitative differences between potentiation and depression.

  7. Transition metal doping of Mg2FeH6--a DFT insight into synthesis and electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Batalović, Katarina; Radaković, Jana; Belošević-Čavor, Jelena; Koteski, Vasil

    2014-06-28

    Mg2FeH6 is a promising hydrogen storage material with one of the highest volumetric hydrogen density among the known hydrogen storage materials. However, its complicated synthesis and high temperature of hydrogen desorption limit wider applications. In this paper we study the influence of transition metal (Ni, Co, Mn) doping on the structural, electronic and hydrogen sorption properties of Mg2FeH6, using first-principles density functional theory calculations. The thermodynamics of three different synthesis routes is addressed, and all of the mentioned transition metals are found to destabilize Mg2FeH6. In addition, a detailed study of electronic structure properties, including densities of states (DOS) and charge transfer analysis (AIM), reveals that the doping with Ni, Mn and Co leads to the reduction of the direct band gap of Mg2FeH6. PMID:24825440

  8. Insights into the nature of the transition zone from physically constrained inversion of long-period seismic data

    PubMed Central

    Cammarano, Fabio; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Imposing a thermal and compositional significance to the outcome of the inversion of seismic data facilitates their interpretation. Using long-period seismic waveforms and an inversion approach that includes constraints from mineral physics, we find that lateral variations of temperature can explain a large part of the data in the upper mantle. The additional compositional signature of cratons emerges in the global model as well. Above 300 km, we obtain seismic geotherms that span the range of expected temperatures in various tectonic regions. Absolute velocities and gradients with depth are well constrained by the seismic data throughout the upper mantle, except near discontinuities. The seismic data are consistent with a slower transition zone and an overall faster shallow upper mantle, which is not compatible with a homogenous dry pyrolite composition. A gradual enrichment with depth in a garnet-rich component helps to reduce the observed discrepancies. A hydrated transition zone would help to lower the velocities in the transition zone, but it does not explain the seismic structure above it. PMID:17483461

  9. Insights into the nature of the transition zone from physically constrained inversion of long-period seismic data.

    PubMed

    Cammarano, Fabio; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2007-05-29

    Imposing a thermal and compositional significance to the outcome of the inversion of seismic data facilitates their interpretation. Using long-period seismic waveforms and an inversion approach that includes constraints from mineral physics, we find that lateral variations of temperature can explain a large part of the data in the upper mantle. The additional compositional signature of cratons emerges in the global model as well. Above 300 km, we obtain seismic geotherms that span the range of expected temperatures in various tectonic regions. Absolute velocities and gradients with depth are well constrained by the seismic data throughout the upper mantle, except near discontinuities. The seismic data are consistent with a slower transition zone and an overall faster shallow upper mantle, which is not compatible with a homogenous dry pyrolite composition. A gradual enrichment with depth in a garnet-rich component helps to reduce the observed discrepancies. A hydrated transition zone would help to lower the velocities in the transition zone, but it does not explain the seismic structure above it. PMID:17483461

  10. Transitional Evolution of the Geomagnetic Field Recorded in Long Volcanic Sequences: Insights From Icelandic and Hawaiian Lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, J. K.; Herrero-Bervera, E.; Valet, J.

    2007-12-01

    We have studied the short-term evolution of the geomagnetic field recorded by long volcanic sequences in Iceland and Hawaii. The eastern Icelandic sequences correspond to 45 and 49 individual lava flows sampled and range in age from 12.9 to 10.21 Ma as reported by Watkins and Walker [Watkins and Walker, 1977. Am J. Sci. 277, 513-584] and are labeled as profiles C and D. Also sampled were long volcanic sequences in the Waianae, Koolau (island of O"ahu) and Mauna Loa (Big Island of Hawaii) volcanoes. We have studied in detail the directional characteristics of three successive reversals, the Gilbert-Gauss, the Lower and the Upper Mammoth reversals recorded by the Waianae lavas. These results confirm that large oscillations of directions precede or follow the reversals, which shows waveforms typical of paleosecular variation with their amplitude being considerably amplified by the decrease of the dipole. There is no apparent preferred location for the virtual geomagnetic poles (VGP). In addition to the directional analyses, determinations of absolute paleointensity were attempted on more than 540 samples, which document the field variations surrounding the Lower Mammoth transition. A period of a weak field dominated before the reversal; then the transition was initiated by a transit from normal to reverse polarity followed by a short restoration of field intensity in reverse polarity. A second episode of a very weak field was accompanied by a return to positive inclinations before reaching the reverse polarity. The very strong and apparent rapid recovery of the dipole following completion of the reversal culminated at a value of 16 x 1022 Am2 similar to field intensities reported for the other detailed volcanic records of reversals studied so far. The asymmetry between the pre- and the post-reversal phases appears as a dominant characteristic and indicates the importance of field regeneration to initiate a new stable polarity interval. In addition we have obtained

  11. Transitions in eruption style at Merapi Volcano (Java, Indonesia); insights from satellite thermal infrared images and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, B. B.; Clarke, A. B.; Vanderkluysen, L.; De'Michieli Vitturi, M.

    2012-12-01

    Merapi is a 2968 m high volcano located in the Central Java Province of Indonesia and one of the country's most active volcanoes. Episodes of andesitic dome growth are periodically interrupted by explosive eruptions, which have caused at least 429 fatalities in the last 20 years alone. We use thermal infrared (TIR) images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) and Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instruments to measure heat flux at Merapi Volcano over the time period from 2006-2010. We also estimate effusion rates at the vent from the heat flux values using the method of Harris and Ripepe (2007, Geophys. Res. Let. 34). Our data set includes over 500 MODIS images and over 40 ASTER scenes that allow us to observe trends in heat flux at the vent over time. We produce a 5-year record of heat flux at Merapi that includes a typical Merapi-style, dome-building effusive eruption in 2006 and the explosive VEI 3-4 eruption of 2010. We are able to confirm the accuracy of heat flux measurements and effusion rate estimates from TIR data by comparison with a limited number of ground observations from the 2006 and 2010 eruptions. Our observations capture transitions in activity at Merapi from inactive to active and from effusive to explosive as well as the time scales over which these transitions occur. We use a numerical approach to model magma ascent in the volcanic conduit in order to understand factors that may have led to significant changes in eruption rate and style over this period. We constrain relevant model input and output parameters using previous petrologic, seismic, and geodetic studies of the Merapi system, and vary several critical parameters over reasonable ranges as documented in the literature. Results suggest that chamber pressure and some combination of total volatile content and rate of open-system degassing are the primary parameters controlling the observed transitions in eruption rate and style.

  12. Glaciation and erosion of Eastern Greenland at the Eocene-Oligocene transition: Insights from low-temperature thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Thomas; Steer, Philippe; Gallagher, Kerry; Szulc, Adam; Whittam, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Climate cooling through the Late Cenozoic was important in the evolution of glaciated mountain ranges. While the onset of accelerated Cenozoic exhumation is generally associated with the Quaternary at mid-latitudes, coincident with the local onset of glaciation, some high-latitude passive margins may have experienced earlier glaciation starting at 30-38 Ma or even 45 Ma. To address this issue, we use a set of new AFT data from 16 sub-vertical profiles sampled along the fjords of the central Eastern Greenland margin between 68° and 76° N, combined with new apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He (AHe) data from selected profiles. To infer thermal histories and exhumation from these profiles, we use the software QTQt. The modeling results show a major phase of exhumation in the East Greenland margin between 68° and 76° N starting at 30±5 Ma. The spatial distribution of the exhumation shows that normal faulting on East Greenland margin had no resolvable influence on exhumation related to the cooling phase. However, the timing is coincident with the dramatic worldwide fall of surface temperature at the Eocene-Oligocene transition. We therefore suggest that a transition from an Eocene fluvial to an Oligocene glacial-dominated landscape triggered a period of enhanced erosion. We infer from the thermal histories that around 2.7±1.9 km of erosion occurred close to the coast since the Eocene-Oligocene transition. This amount of erosion is consistent with the incision of the fjords and with the effective removal of 2.3±1.5 km of basalt thickness, deduced by the thermal modeling of a heating phase at 55±5 Ma. This phase of erosion is most strongly evidenced near the coast, suggesting either that continental ice extent was limited to the coastal areas or that erosion was less efficient outside these areas, leading to no obvious signal in thermochronometric data further north. Overall, this study provides the first onshore evidence of the onset of continental ice in East Greenland margin

  13. New insights into the nature of the asymmetrical flow of shear-thinning polymer solutions in transitional pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Chaofan; Poole, Robert; Dennis, David

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies of shear-thinning fluids in pipe flow discovered that, although the time-averaged velocity profile was axisymmetric when the flow was laminar or fully turbulent, contrary to expectations it was asymmetric in the laminar-turbulent transition regime. The general consensus of these previous experiments was that the location of the peak velocity remained at a fixed point in space. We present new experimental data which demonstrates that this is in fact not the case. The experiment was performed using an aqueous solution of Xanthan Gum (0.15 wt%), a shear-thinning polymer solution. Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV) was used to measure the 3C velocity vectors over the entire circular cross-section of the pipe, 220 pipe diameters downstream of the inlet. The exhibition of significant departures from axisymmetry in transitional flows of shear-thinning fluids was observed and in addition it was discovered that the asymmetric flow pattern is not stationary, although the peak velocity does preferentially arise at certain azimuthal locations. The ensemble average of all the SPIV data results in the recovery of the velocity profile measured using laser Doppler velocimetry in previous studies: still asymmetric but to a lesser extent than the instantaneous flow.

  14. New insights into the transition pathway from nonspecific to specific complex of DNA with Escherichia coli integration host factor.

    PubMed

    Vivas, Paula; Kuznetsov, Serguei V; Ansari, Anjum

    2008-05-15

    To elucidate the nature of the transition-state ensemble along the reaction pathway from a nonspecific protein-DNA complex to the specific complex, we have carried out measurements of DNA bending/unbending dynamics on a cognate DNA substrate in complex with integration host factor (IHF), an architectural protein from E. coli that bends its cognate site by approximately 180 degrees . We use a laser temperature jump to perturb the IHF-DNA complex and monitor the relaxation kinetics with time-resolved FRET measurements on DNA substrates end-labeled with a FRET pair. Previously, we showed that spontaneous bending/kinking of DNA, from thermal disruption of base-pairing/-stacking interactions, may be the rate-limiting step in the formation of the specific complex (Kuznetsov, S. V.; Sugimura, S.; Vivas, P.; Crothers, D. M.; Ansari, A. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2006, 103, 18515). Here, we probe the effect of varying [KCl], which affects the stability of the complex, on this rate-limiting step. We find that below approximately 250 mM KCl, the observed relaxation kinetics are from the unimolecular bending/unbending of DNA, and the relaxation rate kr is independent of [KCl]. Above approximately 300 mM KCl, dissociation of the IHF-DNA complex becomes significant, and the observed relaxation process includes contributions from the association/dissociation step, with kr decreasing with increasing [KCl]. The DNA bending step occurs with a positive activation enthalpy, despite the large negative enthalpy change reported for the specific IHF-DNA complex (Holbrook, J. A.; Tsodikov, O. V.; Saecker, R. M.; Record, M. T., Jr. J. Mol. Biol. 2001, 310, 379). Our conclusion from these studies is that in the uphill climb to the transition state, the DNA is kinked, but with no release of ions, as indicated by the salt-independent behavior of k(r) at low [KCl]. Any release of ions in the unimolecular process, together with conformational changes in the protein-DNA complex that facilitate

  15. Coupled textural and compositional characterization of basaltic scoria: Insights into the transition from Strombolian to fire fountain activity at Mount Etna, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polacci, Margherita; Corsaro, Rosa Anna; Andronico, Daniele

    2006-03-01

    Strombolian and fire fountain activities represent a common expression of explosive basaltic eruptions. However, the transition between these two eruptive styles and their source mechanisms are still debated. We use textural and compositional studies to characterize pyroclastic material from both the Strombolian and Hawaiian-style fire fountain phases of the January June 2000 Etna activity. We find that basaltic scoria presents distinctive textural and compositional features that reflect different modes of magma vesiculation and crystallization in the two eruptive regimes. Overall, magma that forms Strombolian scoria is far more crystallized, less vesicular, and more evolved, indicating strong volatile depletion and longer residence time before being erupted. Fire fountain scoria indicates a fast-rising magma with evidence of moderate syneruptive volatile exsolution. The new textural and compositional data set is integrated with previous volcanological and geophysical investigations to provide further insights into the dynamics of fire fountains, and to frame the transition from Strombolian explosions to fire fountain activity into a model that may apply to future eruptions at Mount Etna as well as other active basaltic volcanoes.

  16. On the Mechanism(s) of Membrane Permeability Transition in Liver Mitochondria of Lamprey, Lampetra fluviatilis L.: Insights from Cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Belyaeva, Elena A.; Emelyanova, Larisa V.; Korotkov, Sergey M.; Brailovskaya, Irina V.; Savina, Margarita V.

    2014-01-01

    Previously we have shown that opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in its low conductance state is the case in hepatocytes of the Baltic lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis L.) during reversible metabolic depression taking place in the period of its prespawning migration when the exogenous feeding is switched off. The depression is observed in the last year of the lamprey life cycle and is conditioned by reversible mitochondrial dysfunction (mitochondrial uncoupling in winter and coupling in spring). To further elucidate the mechanism(s) of induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in the lamprey liver, we used Cd2+ and Ca2+ plus Pi as the pore inducers. We found that Ca2+ plus Pi induced the high-amplitude swelling of the isolated “winter” mitochondria both in isotonic sucrose and ammonium nitrate medium while both low and high Cd2+ did not produce the mitochondrial swelling in these media. Low Cd2+ enhanced the inhibition of basal respiration rate of the “winter” mitochondria energized by NAD-dependent substrates whereas the same concentrations of the heavy metal evoked its partial stimulation on FAD-dependent substrates. The above changes produced by Cd2+ or Ca2+ plus Pi in the “winter” mitochondria were only weakly (if so) sensitive to cyclosporine A (a potent pharmacological desensitizer of the nonselective pore) added alone and they were not sensitive to dithiothreitol (a dithiol reducing agent). Under monitoring of the transmembrane potential of the “spring” lamprey liver mitochondria, we revealed that Cd2+ produced its decrease on both types of the respiratory substrates used that was strongly hampered by cyclosporine A, and the membrane potential was partially restored by dithiothreitol. The effects of different membrane permeability modulators on the lamprey liver mitochondria function and the seasonal changes in their action are discussed. PMID:24995321

  17. On the mechanism(s) of membrane permeability transition in liver mitochondria of lamprey, Lampetra fluviatilis L.: insights from cadmium.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, Elena A; Emelyanova, Larisa V; Korotkov, Sergey M; Brailovskaya, Irina V; Savina, Margarita V

    2014-01-01

    Previously we have shown that opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in its low conductance state is the case in hepatocytes of the Baltic lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis L.) during reversible metabolic depression taking place in the period of its prespawning migration when the exogenous feeding is switched off. The depression is observed in the last year of the lamprey life cycle and is conditioned by reversible mitochondrial dysfunction (mitochondrial uncoupling in winter and coupling in spring). To further elucidate the mechanism(s) of induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in the lamprey liver, we used Cd(2+) and Ca(2+) plus Pi as the pore inducers. We found that Ca(2+) plus Pi induced the high-amplitude swelling of the isolated "winter" mitochondria both in isotonic sucrose and ammonium nitrate medium while both low and high Cd(2+) did not produce the mitochondrial swelling in these media. Low Cd(2+) enhanced the inhibition of basal respiration rate of the "winter" mitochondria energized by NAD-dependent substrates whereas the same concentrations of the heavy metal evoked its partial stimulation on FAD-dependent substrates. The above changes produced by Cd(2+) or Ca(2+) plus Pi in the "winter" mitochondria were only weakly (if so) sensitive to cyclosporine A (a potent pharmacological desensitizer of the nonselective pore) added alone and they were not sensitive to dithiothreitol (a dithiol reducing agent). Under monitoring of the transmembrane potential of the "spring" lamprey liver mitochondria, we revealed that Cd(2+) produced its decrease on both types of the respiratory substrates used that was strongly hampered by cyclosporine A, and the membrane potential was partially restored by dithiothreitol. The effects of different membrane permeability modulators on the lamprey liver mitochondria function and the seasonal changes in their action are discussed. PMID:24995321

  18. Reactions of oxygen-containing molecules on transition metal carbides: Surface science insight into potential applications in catalysis and electrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stottlemyer, Alan L.; Kelly, Thomas G.; Meng, Qinghe; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2012-09-01

    Historically the interest in the catalytic properties of transition metal carbides (TMC) has been inspired by their "Pt-like" properties in the transformation reactions of hydrocarbon molecules. Recent studies, however, have revealed that the reaction pathways of oxygen-containing molecules are significantly different between TMCs and Pt-group metals. Nonetheless, TMCs demonstrate intriguing catalytic properties toward oxygen-containing molecules, either as the catalyst or as the catalytically active substrate to support metal catalysts, in several important catalytic and electrocatalytic applications, including water electrolysis, alcohol electrooxidation, biomass conversion, and water gas shift reactions. In the current review we provide a summary of theoretical and experimental studies of the interaction of TMC surfaces with oxygen-containing molecules, including both inorganic (O2, H2O, CO and CO2) and organic (alcohols, aldehydes, acids and esters) molecules. We will discuss the general trends in the reaction pathways, as well as future research opportunities in surface science studies that would facilitate the utilization of TMCs as catalysts and electrocatalysts.

  19. Reactions of oxygen-containing molecules on transition metal carbides: Surface science insight into potential applications in catalysis and electrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stottlemyer, Alan L.; Kelly, Thomas G.; Meng, Qinghe; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2012-09-01

    Historically the interest in the catalytic properties of transition metal carbides (TMC) has been inspired by their “Pt-like” properties in the transformation reactions of hydrocarbon molecules. Recent studies, however, have revealed that the reaction pathways of oxygen-containing molecules are significantly different between TMCs and Pt-group metals. Nonetheless, TMCs demonstrate intriguing catalytic properties toward oxygen-containing molecules, either as the catalyst or as the catalytically active substrate to support metal catalysts, in several important catalytic and electrocatalytic applications, including water electrolysis, alcohol electrooxidation, biomass conversion, and water gas shift reactions. In the current review we provide a summary of theoretical and experimental studies of the interaction of TMC surfaces with oxygen-containing molecules, including both inorganic (O2, H2O, CO and CO2) and organic (alcohols, aldehydes, acids and esters) molecules. We will discuss the general trends in the reaction pathways, as well as future research opportunities in surface science studies that would facilitate the utilization of TMCs as catalysts and electrocatalysts.

  20. Experimental insights into flow impingement in cerebral aneurysm by stereoscopic particle image velocimetry: transition from a laminar regime

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Takanobu; Sato, Ayaka; Shinke, Manabu; Takahashi, Sara; Tobe, Yasutaka; Takao, Hiroyuki; Murayama, Yuichi; Umezu, Mitsuo

    2013-01-01

    This study experimentally investigated the instability of flow impingement in a cerebral aneurysm, which was speculated to promote the degradation of aneurysmal wall. A patient-specific, full-scale and elastic-wall replica of cerebral artery was fabricated from transparent silicone rubber. The geometry of the aneurysm corresponded to that found at 9 days before rupture. The flow in a replica was analysed by quantitative flow visualization (stereoscopic particle image velocimetry) in a three-dimensional, high-resolution and time-resolved manner. The mid-systolic and late-diastolic flows with a Reynolds number of 450 and 230 were compared. The temporal and spatial variations of near-wall velocity at flow impingement delineated its inherent instability at a low Reynolds number. Wall shear stress (WSS) at that site exhibited a combination of temporal fluctuation and spatial divergence. The frequency range of fluctuation was found to exceed significantly that of the heart rate. The high-frequency-fluctuating WSS appeared only during mid-systole and disappeared during late diastole. These results suggested that the flow impingement induced a transition from a laminar regime. This study demonstrated that the hydrodynamic instability of shear layer could not be neglected even at a low Reynolds number. No assumption was found to justify treating the aneurysmal haemodynamics as a fully viscous laminar flow. PMID:23427094

  1. Unravelling the deep fluid composition in the Taupo Volcanic Zone: insight into the magmatic-hydrothermal transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambefort, I. S.; Lewis, B.; Boseley, C.; Begue, F.; Rae, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Ngatamariki Geothermal Field represents the only location in the Taupo Volcanic Zone where geothermal well drilling has intercepted intrusive rocks with a high temperature alteration halo. Thus it presents the perfect opportunity to study the magmatic-hydrothermal transition in the TVZ by characterising the nature of the deep magmatic fluids inferred to be linked to the geothermal heat source. In addition to the calc-alkaline Ngatamariki diorite (encountered in a 1985 drillhole; Wood, 1986), recent (2012) geothermal drilling encountered a quartz-phyric tonalite. After emplacement, these intrusions cooled, degassed, and produced a high temperature alteration halo, associated with intense quartz-illite/muscovite-pyrite alteration and pervasive quartz replacement of the overlying tuff-breccia. This alteration zone contains abundant high temperature quartz veins, similar to quartz veining stockwork characteristic of Porphyry Cu (±Au-Mo) systems. The recently encountered quartz-phyric tonalite contains common phenocrysts of quartz and pseudomorphs of plagioclase and minor ferromagnesian minerals (predominantly amphiboles) in a medium-grained, magnetite-bearing felsic groundmass. Quartz phenocrysts are generally rounded and embayed quartz eyes (≤1 cm diam.), or skeletal crystals. SEM-CL imaging was used to map the crystallisation history of the phenocrystic quartz in the tonalite and the quartz veins cross-cutting the diorite and overlying pyroclastic rocks. The quartz eyes show a complex growth history with zones of dissolution and recrystallisation. Skeletal quartz crystals also have complex zoning and are outlined by myrmekitic textures and/or dendritic overgrowths with the groundmass (granophyric textures). These features form in granites due to undercooling during shallow magmatic emplacement and are often associated with the exsolution of a volatile phase. Cathodoluminescence indicates that the edges of the quartz veins are lined by euhedral crystals

  2. Sedimentary provenance insights to East Antarctic ice sheet oscillations and growth during the mid-Miocene Climate Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, E. L.; van de Flierdt, T.; Williams, T.; Hemming, S. R.; Cook, C.; Passchier, S.

    2012-12-01

    A major step in the evolution of the East Antarctic ice sheet (EAIS) occurred ~ 14 Ma during the Mid-Miocene Climate Transition (MMCT), a period with a global climatic shift that had a profound effect on many components of the Earth system, including terrestrial biota, ocean circulation, both ocean and terrestrial temperatures, sea-level, and ice volume. Of particular interest during this transition is the variability in the extent of the EAIS at its marine-grounded margins. Despite inferences on the total amount of ice growth on Antarctica as a whole, little is known of the temporal and spatial evolution of the East Antarctic ice expansion at this time. Here we apply isotopic provenance studies in order to determine the source of glacially derived sediments deposited ca. 14.7 to 12.6 Ma off the coast of East Antarctica at IODP Site U1356. A total of 672 hornblendes grains from 40 samples were analyzed for their 40Ar/39Ar ages, showing a dominant and unvarying age population of 1400 -1550 Ma for all of the samples. Neodymium (Nd) isotope measurements on the terrigenous <63 μm sediment fraction in contrast show a large range of 8 epsilon units (-8.4 to -16.4). We interpret our results to indicate a greatly retreated EAIS in the Wilkes subglacial basin prior to and during the MMCT. Observed Ar ages are best explained by an ice sheet that sat along the extension of the Mertz Shear Zone, at the western edge of the Wilkes Basin. Three distinct excursions to more radiogenic Nd isotope values require significant input from a more radiogenic source, such as the Ferrar Group, which consists of the Ferrar Doloerite, Kirkpatrick Basalt and Dufek Gabbro, and has epsilon Nd values of approximately -5. The Ferrar Group outcrops extensively along the spine of the Transantarctic Mountains, and geophysical surveys (Ferraccioli et al., 2009, Tectonophysics) indicate that Ferrar dolerite intrudes Beacon Sandstone in areas within the Wilkes subglacial basin. Given the decoupling in

  3. Quantification of active mitochondrial permeability transition pores using GNX-4975 inhibitor titrations provides insights into molecular identity.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Andrew P; Halestrap, Andrew P

    2016-05-01

    Inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) by the novel inhibitor GNX-4975 was characterized. Titration of MPTP activity in de-energized rat liver mitochondria allowed determination of the number of GNX-4975-binding sites and their dissociation constant (Ki). Binding sites increased in number when MPTP opening was activated by increasing [Ca(2+)], phenylarsine oxide (PAO) or KSCN, and decreased when MPTP opening was inhibited with bongkrekic acid (BKA) or ADP. Values ranged between 9 and 50 pmol/mg of mitochondrial protein, but the Ki remained unchanged at ∼1.8 nM when the inhibitor was added before Ca(2+) However, when GNX-4975 was added after Ca(2+) it was much less potent with a Ki of ∼140 nM. These data imply that a protein conformational change is required to form the MPTP complex and generate the GNX-4975-binding site. Occupation of the latter with GNX-4975 prevents the Ca(2+) binding that triggers pore opening. We also demonstrated that GNX-4975 stabilizes an interaction between the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT), held in its 'c' conformation with carboxyatractyloside (CAT), and the phosphate carrier (PiC) bound to immobilized PAO. No components of the F1Fo-ATP synthase bound significantly to immobilized PAO. Our data are consistent with our previous proposal that the MPTP may form at an interface between the PiC and ANT (or other similar mitochondrial carrier proteins) when they adopt novel conformations induced by factors that sensitize the MPTP to [Ca(2+)]. We propose that GNX-4975 binds to this interface preventing a calcium-triggered event that opens the interface into a pore. PMID:26920024

  4. Quantification of active mitochondrial permeability transition pores using GNX-4975 inhibitor titrations provides insights into molecular identity

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Andrew P.; Halestrap, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) by the novel inhibitor GNX-4975 was characterized. Titration of MPTP activity in de-energized rat liver mitochondria allowed determination of the number of GNX-4975-binding sites and their dissociation constant (Ki). Binding sites increased in number when MPTP opening was activated by increasing [Ca2+], phenylarsine oxide (PAO) or KSCN, and decreased when MPTP opening was inhibited with bongkrekic acid (BKA) or ADP. Values ranged between 9 and 50 pmol/mg of mitochondrial protein, but the Ki remained unchanged at ∼1.8 nM when the inhibitor was added before Ca2+. However, when GNX-4975 was added after Ca2+ it was much less potent with a Ki of ∼140 nM. These data imply that a protein conformational change is required to form the MPTP complex and generate the GNX-4975-binding site. Occupation of the latter with GNX-4975 prevents the Ca2+ binding that triggers pore opening. We also demonstrated that GNX-4975 stabilizes an interaction between the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT), held in its ‘c’ conformation with carboxyatractyloside (CAT), and the phosphate carrier (PiC) bound to immobilized PAO. No components of the F1Fo-ATP synthase bound significantly to immobilized PAO. Our data are consistent with our previous proposal that the MPTP may form at an interface between the PiC and ANT (or other similar mitochondrial carrier proteins) when they adopt novel conformations induced by factors that sensitize the MPTP to [Ca2+]. We propose that GNX-4975 binds to this interface preventing a calcium-triggered event that opens the interface into a pore. PMID:26920024

  5. From Resilience to Vulnerability: Mechanistic Insights into the Effects of Stress on Transitions in Critical Period Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Bridget L.; Graham, Bronwyn M.; Li, Stella; Richardson, Rick

    2013-01-01

    While early experiences are proposed to be important for the emergence of anxiety and other mental health problems, there is little empirical research examining the impact of such experiences on the development of emotional learning. Of the research that has been performed in this area, however, a complex picture has emerged in which the maturation of emotion circuits is influenced by the early experiences of the animal. For example, under typical laboratory rearing conditions infant rats rapidly forget learned fear associations (infantile amnesia) and express a form of extinction learning which is relapse-resistant (i.e., extinction in infant rats may be due to fear erasure). In contrast, adult rats exhibit very long-lasting memories of past learned fear associations, and express a form of extinction learning that is relapse-prone (i.e., the fear returns in a number of situations). However, when rats are reared under stressful conditions then they exhibit adult-like fear retention and extinction behaviors at an earlier stage of development (i.e., good retention of learned fear and relapse-prone extinction learning). In other words, under typical rearing conditions infant rats appear to be protected from exhibiting anxiety whereas after adverse rearing fear learning appears to make those infants more vulnerable to the later development of anxiety. While the effects of different experiences on infant rats’ fear retention and extinction are becoming better documented, the mechanisms which mediate the early transition seen following stress remain unclear. Here we suggest that rearing stress may lead to an early maturation of the molecular and cellular signals shown to be involved in the closure of critical period plasticity in sensory modalities (e.g., maturation of GABAergic neurons, development of perineuronal nets), and speculate that these signals could be manipulated in adulthood to reopen infant forms of emotional learning (i.e., those that favor resilience

  6. The Impact of the Demographic Transition on Dengue in Thailand: Insights from a Statistical Analysis and Mathematical Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Derek A. T.; Iamsirithaworn, Sopon; Lessler, Justin T.; McDermott, Aidan; Prasanthong, Rungnapa; Nisalak, Ananda; Jarman, Richard G.; Burke, Donald S.; Gibbons, Robert V.

    2009-01-01

    decreased by half, we find that the critical vaccination fraction has not changed significantly, declining from an average of 85% to 80%. Clinical guidelines should consider the impact of continued increases in the age of dengue cases in Thailand. Countries in the region lagging behind Thailand in the demographic transition may experience the same increase as their population ages. The impact of demographic changes on the force of infection has been hypothesized for other diseases, but, to our knowledge, this is the first observation of this phenomenon. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:19721696

  7. Isotopic insights into sources of acid driving weathering across a mountain-floodplain transition in the Amazon headwaters of Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, M. A.; Clark, K.; Paris, G.; Adkins, J. F.; West, A.

    2012-12-01

    The carbon budget associated with mineral weathering depends on the extent to which weathering is driven by strong acids (e.g., H2SO4, HNO3) as opposed to weak acids derived from atmospheric CO2 (e.g., H2CO3, organic acids). It has remained difficult to accurately partition acid sources associated with carbonate and silicate weathering, presenting an obstacle to quantifying weathering drawdown of CO2. Moreover, little is known about how acid sources change along material pathways from mountains, where rocks are eroded, producing reactive carbonate and silicate minerals, but also sulfides that generate H2SO4, and floodplains, where the resulting sediment is transported, deposited, and chemically reworked. Such mountain-floodplain transitions are increasingly recognized as important weathering reactors, making it important to quantify any associated variation in acid sources. In this study, these questions are addressed using the dissolved major element geochemistry, the carbon isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13C DIC), and the sulfur isotopic composition of dissolved sulfate (δ34S) of rivers draining the Peruvian Andes and Madre de Dios floodplain. The dissolved major element geochemistry of the Andean headwater catchments suggests inputs of sulfuric acid (from the oxidation of sulfide minerals) but is also consistent with the weathering of sulfate minerals. The δ13C DIC values of river water samples from the Andean catchments provide key constraints and range from -18 to -5 ‰, which is consistent with the mixing of DIC derived from the weathering of silicates by respired CO2 and from the weathering of carbonates by either atmospheric CO2 or sulfuric acid. In order to distinguish between the two possible carbonate weathering agents, we calculated the fraction of carbonate-derived DIC both using an isotope mass balance model and a mineral mass balance model. These results were compared assuming either pure sulfuric acid or atmospheric CO2

  8. Insight into the structural and biological relevance of the T/R transition of the N-terminus of the B-chain in human insulin.

    PubMed

    Kosinová, Lucie; Veverka, Václav; Novotná, Pavlína; Collinsová, Michaela; Urbanová, Marie; Moody, Nicholas R; Turkenburg, Johan P; Jiráček, Jiří; Brzozowski, Andrzej M; Žáková, Lenka

    2014-06-01

    The N-terminus of the B-chain of insulin may adopt two alternative conformations designated as the T- and R-states. Despite the recent structural insight into insulin-insulin receptor (IR) complexes, the physiological relevance of the T/R transition is still unclear. Hence, this study focused on the rational design, synthesis, and characterization of human insulin analogues structurally locked in expected R- or T-states. Sites B3, B5, and B8, capable of affecting the conformation of the N-terminus of the B-chain, were subjects of rational substitutions with amino acids with specific allowed and disallowed dihedral φ and ψ main-chain angles. α-Aminoisobutyric acid was systematically incorporated into positions B3, B5, and B8 for stabilization of the R-state, and N-methylalanine and d-proline amino acids were introduced at position B8 for stabilization of the T-state. IR affinities of the analogues were compared and correlated with their T/R transition ability and analyzed against their crystal and nuclear magnetic resonance structures. Our data revealed that (i) the T-like state is indeed important for the folding efficiency of (pro)insulin, (ii) the R-state is most probably incompatible with an active form of insulin, (iii) the R-state cannot be induced or stabilized by a single substitution at a specific site, and (iv) the B1-B8 segment is capable of folding into a variety of low-affinity T-like states. Therefore, we conclude that the active conformation of the N-terminus of the B-chain must be different from the "classical" T-state and that a substantial flexibility of the B1-B8 segment, where GlyB8 plays a key role, is a crucial prerequisite for an efficient insulin-IR interaction. PMID:24819248

  9. Insight into the Structural and Biological Relevance of the T/R Transition of the N-Terminus of the B-Chain in Human Insulin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The N-terminus of the B-chain of insulin may adopt two alternative conformations designated as the T- and R-states. Despite the recent structural insight into insulin–insulin receptor (IR) complexes, the physiological relevance of the T/R transition is still unclear. Hence, this study focused on the rational design, synthesis, and characterization of human insulin analogues structurally locked in expected R- or T-states. Sites B3, B5, and B8, capable of affecting the conformation of the N-terminus of the B-chain, were subjects of rational substitutions with amino acids with specific allowed and disallowed dihedral φ and ψ main-chain angles. α-Aminoisobutyric acid was systematically incorporated into positions B3, B5, and B8 for stabilization of the R-state, and N-methylalanine and d-proline amino acids were introduced at position B8 for stabilization of the T-state. IR affinities of the analogues were compared and correlated with their T/R transition ability and analyzed against their crystal and nuclear magnetic resonance structures. Our data revealed that (i) the T-like state is indeed important for the folding efficiency of (pro)insulin, (ii) the R-state is most probably incompatible with an active form of insulin, (iii) the R-state cannot be induced or stabilized by a single substitution at a specific site, and (iv) the B1–B8 segment is capable of folding into a variety of low-affinity T-like states. Therefore, we conclude that the active conformation of the N-terminus of the B-chain must be different from the “classical” T-state and that a substantial flexibility of the B1–B8 segment, where GlyB8 plays a key role, is a crucial prerequisite for an efficient insulin–IR interaction. PMID:24819248

  10. A new insight into the isotropic-nematic phase transition in lyotropic solutions of semiflexible polymers: density-functional theory tested by molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Egorov, Sergei A; Milchev, Andrey; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2016-06-14

    Semiflexible polymers in solution are studied for a wide range of both contour length L and persistence length lp as a function of monomer concentration under good solvent conditions. Both density-functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods are used, and a very good agreement between both techniques is observed for rather stiff polymers. Evidence for a new mechanism of order parameter fluctuations in the nematic phase is presented, namely collective deformations of bundles of wormlike chains twisted around each other, and the typical wavelengths and amplitudes of these modes are estimated. These long wavelength fluctuations cause a reduction of the order parameter in comparison with the DFT prediction. It is also found that DFT becomes unreliable for rather flexible polymers in predicting that the transition from the isotropic (I)-phase to the nematic (N)-phase still exists at very high monomer concentrations (which in reality does not occur). However, under conditions when DFT is accurate, it provides reliable predictions also for the width of the I-N two-phase coexistence region, which are difficult to obtain from MD in spite of the use of very large systems (up to 500 000 monomers) by means of graphics processing units (GPU). For short and not very stiff chains, a pre-transitional chain stretching is found in the isotropic phase near the I-N-transition, not predicted by theories. A comparison with theoretical predictions by Khokhlov-Semenov, Odijk, and Chen reveals that the scaled transition densities are not simply functions of L/lp only, as these theories predict, but depend on d/lp (where d is the chain diameter) as well. Chain properties in the nematically ordered phase are compared to those of chains confined in tubes, and the deflection length concept is tested. Eventually, some consequences for the interpretation of experiments are spelled out. PMID:27249320

  11. Failure and frictional sliding envelopes in three-dimensional stress space: Insights from Distinct Element Method (DEM) models and implications for the brittle-ductile transition of rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöpfer, Martin; Childs, Conrad; Manzocchi, Tom

    2013-04-01

    Rocks deformed at low confining pressure are brittle, meaning that after peak stress the strength decreases to a residual value determined by frictional sliding. The difference between the peak and residual value is the stress drop. At high confining pressure, however, no stress drop occurs. The transition pressure at which no loss in strength occurs is a possible definition of the brittle-ductile transition. The Distinct Element Method (DEM) is used to illustrate how this type of brittle-ductile transition emerges from a simple model in which rock is idealised as an assemblage of cemented spherical unbreakable grains. These bonded particle models are subjected to loading under constant mean stress and stress ratio conditions using distortional periodic space, which eliminates possible boundary effects arising from the usage of rigid loading platens. Systematic variation of both mean stress and stress ratio allowed determination of the complete three dimensional yield, peak stress and residual strength envelopes. The models suggest that the brittle-ductile transition is a mean stress and stress ratio dependent space curve, which cannot be adequately described by commonly used failure criteria (e.g., Mohr-Coulomb, Drucker-Prager). The model peak strength data exhibit an intermediate principal stress dependency which is, at least qualitatively, similar to that observed for natural rocks deformed under polyaxial laboratory conditions. Comparison of failure envelopes determined for bonded particle models with and without bond shear failure suggests that the non-linear pressure dependence of strength (concave failure envelopes) is, at high mean stress, the result of microscopic shear failure, a result consistent with earlier two-dimensional numerical multiple-crack simulations [D. A. Lockner & T. R. Madden, JGR, Vol. 96, No. B12, 1991]. Our results may have implications for a wide range of geophysical research areas, including the strength of the crust, the seismogenic

  12. Novel Insights Into The Mode of Inhibition of Class A SHV-1 Beta-Lactamases Revealed by Boronic Acid Transition State Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    W Ke; J Sampson; C Ori; F Prati; S Drawz; C Bethel; R Bonomo; F van den Akker

    2011-12-31

    Boronic acid transition state inhibitors (BATSIs) are potent class A and C {beta}-lactamase inactivators and are of particular interest due to their reversible nature mimicking the transition state. Here, we present structural and kinetic data describing the inhibition of the SHV-1 {beta}-lactamase, a clinically important enzyme found in Klebsiella pneumoniae, by BATSI compounds possessing the R1 side chains of ceftazidime and cefoperazone and designed variants of the latter, compounds 1 and 2. The ceftazidime and cefoperazone BATSI compounds inhibit the SHV-1 {beta}-lactamase with micromolar affinity that is considerably weaker than their inhibition of other {beta}-lactamases. The solved crystal structures of these two BATSIs in complex with SHV-1 reveal a possible reason for SHV-1's relative resistance to inhibition, as the BATSIs adopt a deacylation transition state conformation compared to the usual acylation transition state conformation when complexed to other {beta}-lactamases. Active-site comparison suggests that these conformational differences might be attributed to a subtle shift of residue A237 in SHV-1. The ceftazidime BATSI structure revealed that the carboxyl-dimethyl moiety is positioned in SHV-1's carboxyl binding pocket. In contrast, the cefoperazone BATSI has its R1 group pointing away from the active site such that its phenol moiety moves residue Y105 from the active site via end-on stacking interactions. To work toward improving the affinity of the cefoperazone BATSI, we synthesized two variants in which either one or two extra carbons were added to the phenol linker. Both variants yielded improved affinity against SHV-1, possibly as a consequence of releasing the strain of its interaction with the unusual Y105 conformation.

  13. The Continent-Ocean Transition in the Mid-Norwegian Margin: Insight From Seismic Data and the Onshore Caledonian Analogue in the Seve Nappe Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmalak, Mansour M.; Planke, Sverre; Andersen, Torgeir B.; Faleide, Jan Inge; Corfu, Fernando; Tegner, Christian; Myklebust, Reidun

    2015-04-01

    The continental breakup and initial seafloor spreading in the NE Atlantic was accompanied by widespread intrusive and extrusive magmatism and the formation of conjugate volcanic passive margins. These margins are characterized by the presence of seaward dipping reflectors (SDR), an intense network of mafic sheet intrusions of the continental crust and adjacent sedimentary basins and a high-velocity lower crustal body. Nevertheless many issues remain unclear regarding the structure of volcanic passive margins; in particular the transitional crust located beneath the SDR.New and reprocessed seismic reflection data on the Mid-Norwegian margin allow a better sub-basalt imaging of the transitional crust located beneath the SDR. Different high-amplitude reflections with abrupt termination and saucer shaped geometries are identified and interpreted as sill intrusions. Other near vertical and inclined reflections are interpreted as dykes or dyke swarms. We have mapped the extent of the dyke reflections along the volcanic margin. The mapping suggests that the dykes represent the main feeder system for the SDR. The identification of saucer shaped sills implies the presence of sediments in the transitional zone beneath the volcanic sequences. Onshore exposures of Precambrian basement of the eroded volcanic margin in East Greenland show that, locally, the transitional crust is highly intruded by dykes and intrusive complexes with an increasing intensity of the plumbing and dilatation of the continental crust ocean-ward. Another well exposed analogue for a continent-ocean transitional crust is located within the Seve Nappe Complex (SNC) of the Scandinavian Caledonides. The best-preserved parts of SNC in the Pårte, Sarek, Kebnekaise, Abisko, and Indre Troms mountains are composed mainly of meta-sandstones and shales (now hornfelses) truncated typically by mafic dykes. At Sarek and Pårte, the dykes intrude the sedimentary rocks of the Favoritkammen Group, with a dyke density up

  14. Seismicity triggered by the olivine-spinel transition: new insights from combined XRD and acoustic emission monitoring during deformation experiments in Mg2GeO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubnel, A.; Hilairet, N.; Brunet, F.; Gasc, J.; Cordier, P.; Wang, Y.; Green, H. W.

    2012-04-01

    Polycrystalline Mg2GeO4-olivine has been deformed (strain rates from 2.10-4/s to 10-5/s) in the deformation-DIA in 13-BM-D at GSECARS (Advanced Photon Source) at ca. 2 GPa confining pressure for temperatures between 973 and 1573 K (i.e., in the Mg2GeO4-ringwoodite field). Stress, advancement of transformation, and strain were measured in-situ using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and imaging, and acoustic emissions (AE) were recorded simultaneously. When differential stress is applied (ca. 1- to 2 GPa) and temperature is increased, the very beginning of the transformation to the ringwoodite structure (as evidenced by in situ XRD) is accompanied by AE bursts which locate within the sample. At high strain rates (>10-4/s) and low temperatures (800-900 degrees C), the number of AEs is comparable, if not larger, to that observed during the cold compression of quartz grains. The largest events always occur at a temperature slightly below that of appearance of the ringwoodite-structure phase on the XRD images patterns. This suggests that AEs are generated while the transition is still nucleation controlled (pseudo-martensitic stage). During stress-relaxation periods, the rate of AE triggering decreases, but does not completely vanish. Importantly, we still observed very large AEs at strain rates as low as approx. 10-5/ s, while at these early stages of the transformation, the samples did not show any macroscopic rheological weakening. Focal mechanism analysis of the largest AEs showed that they are all of shear type, some being even pure double couple. They radiate about the same amount of energy as typically recorded during fast crack propagation in amorphous glass material. Microstructural analysis (SEM, EBSD and TEM) highlights the presence of thin transformation bands, with plausible evidence of shear (grain distortion and grain size reduction). These bands are made of incoherent spinel and olivine nano-grains which run across germanium-olivine grain boundaries. These bands

  15. Seismicity triggered by the olivine-spinel transition: new insights from combined XRD and acoustic emission monitoring during deformation experiments in Mg2GeO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubnel, A. J.; Hilairet, N.; Brunet, F.; Héripré, E.; Cordier, P.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Polycrystalline Mg2GeO4-olivine has been deformed (strain rates from 2.10-4/s to 10-5/s) in the deformation-DIA in 13-BM-D at GSECARS (Advanced Photon Source) at ca. 2 GPa confining pressure for temperatures between 973 and 1573 K (i.e., in the Mg2GeO4-ringwoodite field). Stress, advancement of transformation, and strain were measured in-situ using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and imaging, and acoustic emissions (AE) were recorded simultaneously. When differential stress is applied (ca. 1- to 2 GPa) and temperature is increased, the very beginning of the transformation to the ringwoodite structure (as evidenced by in situ XRD) is accompanied by AE bursts which locate within the sample. At high strain rates (>10-4/s) and low temperatures (800-900 degrees C), the number of AEs is comparable, if not larger, to that observed during the cold compression of quartz grains. The largest events always occur at a temperature slightly below that of appearance of the ringwoodite-structure phase on the XRD images patterns. This suggests that AEs are generated while the transition is still nucleation controlled (pseudo-martensitic stage). During stress-relaxation periods, the rate of AE triggering decreases, but does not completely vanish. Importantly, we still observed very large AEs at strain rates as low as approx. 10-5/ s, while at these early stages of the transformation, the samples did not show any macroscopic rheological weakening. Focal mechanism analysis of the largest AEs showed that they are all of shear type, some being even pure double couple. They radiate about the same amount of energy as typically recorded during fast crack propagation in amorphous glass material. Microstructural analysis (SEM, EBSD and TEM) highlights the presence of thin transformation bands, with plausible evidence of shear (grain distortion and grain size reduction). These bands are made of incoherent spinel and olivine nano-grains which run across germanium-olivine grain boundaries. These bands

  16. Insights into the kinematic Cenozoic evolution of the Basin and Range-Colorado Plateau transition from coincident seismic refraction and reflection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, J.; Parsons, T.

    1994-01-01

    Estimates of surface extension in the southern Basin and Range province and transition into the Colorado Plateau range from a few percent to several hundred percent locally, yet the crustal thickness varies perhaps only 10-15km across these provinces. Within the southern Basin and Range and the metamorphic core complex belt, extremely extended crust is directly juxtaposed against equally thick (or thinner) crust that underwent far milder extension. Unless preextension crustal thickness varied dramatically over a short distance, the crust must have maintained its thickness during extrusion, through mechanisms that involve crustal flow and magmatism. A 300km-long profile of seismic refraction and coincident vertical-incidence reflection data are employed to investigate the geophysical signature of these processes from the extended southern Basin and Range province to the unextended Colorado Plateau. -from Author

  17. Seismicity triggered by the olivine-spinel transition: New insights from combined XRD and acoustic emission monitoring during deformation experiments in Mg2GeO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubnel, A. J.; Hilairet, N.; Gasc, J.; Héripré, E.; Brunet, F.; Wang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Polycrystalline Mg2GeO4-olivine has been deformed (strain rates from 2.10-4/s to 10-5/s) in the deformation-DIA in 13-BM-D at GSECARS (Advanced Photon Source) at ca. 2 GPa confining pressure for temperatures between 973 and 1573 K (i.e., in the Mg2GeO4-ringwoodite field). Stress, advancement of transformation, and strain were measured in-situ using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and imaging, and acoustic emissions (AE) full waveforms were recorded simultaneously. When differential stress is applied (ca. 1- to 2 GPa) and temperature is increased, the very beginning of the transformation to the ringwoodite structure (as evidenced by in situ XRD) is accompanied by AE bursts which locate within the sample. At high strain rates (>10-4/s) and low temperatures (800-900 degrees C), the number of AEs is comparable, if not larger, to that observed during the cold compression of quartz grains. The largest events always occur at a temperature slightly below that of appearance of the ringwoodite-structure phase on the XRD images patterns. This suggests that AEs are generated while the transition is still nucleation controlled (pseudo-martensitic stage). During stress-relaxation periods, the rate of AE triggering decreases, but does not completely vanish. The AE production rate increases again as soon as deformation is started again. Importantly, we still observed very large AEs at strain rates as low as approx. 10-5/ s. At these early stages of the transformation, the samples did not show any macroscopic rheological weakening. Focal mechanism analysis of the largest AEs showed that they are all of shear type, some being even pure double couple. They radiate about the same amount of energy as typically recorded during fast crack propagation in amorphous glass material. This suggests that they cannot only originate from the martensitic nucleation of oriented spinel-lamellae within a single germanium olivine crystal. Preliminary microstructural analysis (SEM and EBSD) highlights the

  18. Insights into the smooth-to-rough transitioning in Mycobacterium bolletii unravels a functional Tyr residue conserved in all mycobacterial MmpL family members.

    PubMed

    Bernut, Audrey; Viljoen, Albertus; Dupont, Christian; Sapriel, Guillaume; Blaise, Mickaël; Bouchier, Christiane; Brosch, Roland; de Chastellier, Chantal; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Kremer, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    In mycobacteria, MmpL proteins represent key components that participate in the biosynthesis of the complex cell envelope. Whole genome analysis of a spontaneous rough morphotype variant of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii identified a conserved tyrosine that is crucial for the function of MmpL family proteins. Isogenic smooth (S) and rough (R) variants differed by a single mutation linked to a Y842H substitution in MmpL4a. This mutation caused a deficiency in glycopeptidolipid production/transport in the R variant and a gain in the capacity to produce cords in vitro. In zebrafish, increased virulence of the M. bolletii R variant over the parental S strain was found, involving massive production of serpentine cords, abscess formation and rapid larval death. Importantly, this finding allowed us to demonstrate an essential role of Tyr842 in several different MmpL proteins, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis MmpL3. Structural homology models of MmpL4a and MmpL3 identified two additional critical residues located in the transmembrane regions TM10 and TM4 that are facing each other. We propose that these central residues are part of the proton-motive force that supplies the energy for substrate transport. Hence, we provide important insights into mechanistic/structural aspects of MmpL proteins as lipid transporters and virulence determinants in mycobacteria. PMID:26585558

  19. Continental hyperextension, mantle exhumation and thin oceanic crust at the continent-ocean transition, West Iberia: new insights from wide-angle seismic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davy, Richard; Minshull, Tim; Bayrakci, Gaye; Bull, Jon; Klaeschen, Dirk; Papenberg, Cord; Reston, Timothy; Sawyer, Dale; Zelt, Colin

    2016-04-01

    Anomalously thin oceanic crust and expanses of exhumed and serpentinised mantle material at magma-poor rift margins are now a globally observed phenomena that characterizes the seaward limit of the continent-ocean transition. Hyperextension of continental crust at the Deep Galicia rifted margin in the North Atlantic has been accommodated by the rotation of continental fault blocks, which are underlain by the S-reflector, an interpreted detachment fault, along which exhumed and serpentinized mantle peridotite is observed. West of these features, the enigmatic Peridotite Ridge has been suggested to delimit the seaward extent of the continent-ocean transition. An outstanding question at this margin is where oceanic crust begins, with little existing data to constrain this boundary and a lack of clear seafloor spreading magnetic anomalies. Here we present results from a 160-km-long wide-angle seismic profile (WE-1). Forward modelling and travel time tomography models of the crustal compressional velocity structure reveal highly thinned and rotated crustal blocks overlying the S-reflector, which correlates with the 6.0 - 7.0 kms‑1 velocity contours, corresponding to peridotite serpentinization of 60 - 30 %, respectively. West of the Peridotite Ridge we observe a basement layer which is 2.8 - 3.5 km thick in which velocities increase smoothly and rapidly from ˜4.6 kms‑1 to 7.3 - 7.6 kms‑1,with an average velocity gradient of 1.00 s‑1. Below this, velocities slowly increase toward typical mantle velocities. Such a downward increase into mantle velocities is interpreted as decreasing serpentinization of mantle material with depth. However, sparse Moho reflections indicate the onset of an anomalously thin oceanic crust, which increases in thickness from ˜0.5 km to ˜1.5 km over a distance of 35 km, seaward.

  20. The coupled δ 13C-radiocarbon systematics of three Late Glacial/early Holocene speleothems; insights into soil and cave processes at climatic transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudzka, D.; McDermott, F.; Baldini, L. M.; Fleitmann, D.; Moreno, A.; Stoll, H.

    2011-08-01

    The coupled δ 13C-radiocarbon systematics of three European stalagmites deposited during the Late Glacial and early Holocene were investigated to understand better how the carbon isotope systematics of speleothems respond to climate transitions. The emphasis is on understanding how speleothems may record climate-driven changes in the proportions of biogenic (soil carbon) and limestone bedrock derived carbon. At two of the three sites, the combined δ 13C and 14C data argue against greater inputs of limestone carbon as the sole cause of the observed shift to higher δ 13C during the cold Younger Dryas. In these stalagmites (GAR-01 from La Garma cave, N. Spain and So-1 from Sofular cave, Turkey), the combined changes in δ 13C and initial 14C activities suggest enhanced decomposition of old stored, more recalcitrant, soil carbon at the onset of the warmer early Holocene. Alternative explanations involving gradual temporal changes between open- and closed-system behaviour during the Late Glacial are difficult to reconcile with observed changes in speleothem δ 13C and the growth rates. In contrast, a stalagmite from Pindal cave (N. Spain) indicates an abrupt change in carbon inputs linked to local hydrological and disequilibrium isotope fractionation effects, rather than climate change. For the first time, it is shown that while the initial 14C activities of all three stalagmites broadly follow the contemporaneous atmospheric 14C trends (the Younger Dryas atmospheric 14C anomaly can be clearly discerned), subtle changes in speleothem initial 14C activities are linked to climate-driven changes in soil carbon turnover at a climate transition.

  1. Phylogenetic analyses of gazelles reveal repeated transitions of key ecological traits and provide novel insights into the origin of the genus Gazella.

    PubMed

    Lerp, Hannes; Klaus, Sebastian; Allgöwer, Stefanie; Wronski, Torsten; Pfenninger, Markus; Plath, Martin

    2016-05-01

    African bovids are a famous example of a taxonomic group in which the correlated evolution of body size, feeding mode, gregariousness, and social organization in relation to the preferred habitat type has been investigated. A continuum has been described ranging from small-bodied, sedentary, solitary or socially monogamous, forest- or bush-dwelling, browsing species that seek shelter from predation in dense vegetation, to large-bodied, migratory, highly gregarious, grazing taxa inhabiting open savannahs and relying on flight or group-defense behaviors when facing predators. Here, we examined a geographically widespread clade within the Bovidae (the genus Gazella) that shows minimal interspecific variation in body size and asked if we could still uncover correlated changes of key ecological and behavioral traits during repeated transitions from open-land to mountain-dwelling. Our study used a multi-locus phylogeny (based on sequence variation of Cytb and six nuclear intron markers) of all extant members of the genus Gazella to infer evolutionary patterns of key ecological and behavioral traits and to estimate ancestral character states using Bayesian inference. At the base of the Gazella-phylogeny, open plains were inferred as the most likely habitat type, and three independent transitions toward mountain-dwelling were uncovered. Those shifts coincided with shifts from migratory to sedentary lifestyles. Character estimation for group size was largely congruent with movement patterns in that species forming large groups tended to be migratory, while small group size was correlated with a sedentary lifestyle. Evolutionary patterns of two other conspicuous traits (twinning ability vs. exclusive singleton births and hornless vs. horned females) did not follow this trend in the Gazella-phylogeny. Furthermore, we inferred the genus Gazella to have emerged in the Late Miocene to Pliocene (10-3Mya), and estimating ancestral ranges based on a Dispersal

  2. Magmatism and metamorphism at the sheeted dyke-gabbro transition zone: new insight from beerbachite from ODP/IODP Hole 1256D and Oman ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Python, Marie; Abily, Bénédicte; France, Lydéric

    2014-05-01

    During IODP Expedition 335, two-pyroxenes bearing granulites (beerbachites) were extensively recovered as drilling cuttings at the gabbro-sheeted dyke transition zone of ODP Hole 1256D (East Pacific Rise, 6°44.163'N, 91°56.061'W). This lithology results from high-temperature metamorphism of previously hydrothermally altered diabases, basalts and/or gabbros; the heat source likely stems from the melt lens located at the top of the magmatic chambers imaged along present-day fast-spreading ridges. This lithology, associated with gabbroic bodies, characterises the transition zone between the sheeted dyke complex and the uppermost gabbroic section and represents the interface between magmatic and hydrothermal convecting systems in an oceanic crust formed at fast-spreading ridges. Samples acquired during IODP Exp. 335 show a particularly high degree of recrystallisation and are characterised by the absence of hydrous phases like amphibole, suggesting very high-T metamorphism. The Beerbachites mineral chemical characteristics are rather homogeneous compared to gabbros or dolerite from the sheeted dyke but pyroxenes Mg#, Ti, Al and Cr contents as well as the anorthite content of plagioclase are closer to gabbro than dolerite. This similarity may be explained by two hypothesis: either beerbachites in Hole 1256D are metamorphosed gabbros, or they underwent a melt-rock reaction process with the gabbros parental magma and were re-equilibrated at high temperature until their mineral composition become similar to that of gabbros. The gabbro-sheeted dyke transition zone in the Oman ophiolite is also outlined by the presence of high grade metamorphic rocks. Fine grained granulites and amphibolites that may be derived from the transformation of altered sheeted dyke diabases are in direct contact with fresh gabbroic and troctolitic bodies which are themselves cross-cut by dolerite dykes. The observation of textures show that high-T recrystallisation occurred in the fine grained

  3. Major softening at brittle-ductile transition due to interplay between chemical and deformation processes: An insight from evolution of shear bands in the South Armorican Shear Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukovská, Zita; Jeřábek, Petr; Morales, Luiz F. G.

    2016-02-01

    The formation of S-C/C' fabrics in the South Armorican Shear Zone has been evaluated by detailed microstructural study where the focus was given to initiation and early evolution of the C/C' fabric shear bands. Our observations suggest that the S-C/C' fabrics formed at distinct temperature conditions indicating >550°C for the S fabric and 300-350°C at 100-400 MPa for the C/C' fabric shear bands. The evolving microstructure within shear bands documents switches in deformation mechanisms related to positive feedbacks between deformation and chemical processes and imposes mechanical constraints on the evolution of the brittle-ductile transition in the continental transform fault domains. Three stages of shear band evolution have been identified. Stage I corresponds to initiation of shear bands via formation of microcracks with possible yielding differential stress of up to 250 MPa. Stage II is associated with subgrain rotation recrystallization and dislocation creep of quartz and coeval dissolution-precipitation creep of microcline. Recrystallized quartz grains show continual increase in size and decrease in stress and strain rates from 94 MPa to 17-26 MPa and 1.8 × 10-1 s-1-9 × 10-17 s-1 associated with deformation partitioning into weaker microcline layer and shear band widening. The quartz mechanical data allowed us to set some constrains for coeval dissolution-precipitation of microcline which at our estimated pressure-temperature conditions suggests creep at 17-26 MPa differential stress and 1.8 × 10-15 s-1 strain rate. Stage III is characterized by localized slip along white mica bands accommodated by dislocation creep at strain rate 1.8 × 10-14 s-1 and stress 5.75 MPa. Our mechanical data point to dynamic evolution of the studied brittle-ductile transition characterized by major weakening to strengths >10 MPa. Such nonsteady state evolution may be common in crustal shear zones especially when phase transformations are involved.

  4. Distribution of transition times in a stochastic model of excitable cell: Insights into the cell-intrinsic mechanisms of randomness in neuronal interspike intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Requena-Carrión, Jesús; Requena-Carrión, Víctor J.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we develop an analytical approach to studying random patterns of activity in excitable cells. Our analytical approach uses a two-state stochastic model of excitable system based on the electrophysiological properties of refractoriness and restitution, which characterize cell recovery after excitation. By applying the notion of probability density flux, we derive the distributions of transition times between states and the distribution of interspike interval (ISI) durations for a constant applied stimulus. The derived ISI distribution is unimodal and, provided that the time spent in the excited state is constant, can be approximated by a Rayleigh peak followed by an exponential tail. We then explore the role of the model parameters in determining the shape of the derived distributions and the ISI coefficient of variation. Finally, we use our analytical results to study simulation results from the stochastic Morris-Lecar neuron and from a three-state extension of the proposed stochastic model, which is capable of reproducing multimodal ISI histograms.

  5. Correlation-induced metal-insulator transitions in d0 magnetic superlattices based on alkaline-earth monoxides: Insights from ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yi-Lin; Dong, Shengjie; Zhou, Baozeng; Zhao, Hui; Wu, Ping

    2015-06-01

    Using first-principles density functional theory calculations, we have investigated the electronic structure and magnetic properties of four superlattices (MO)1/(MX)1 (001) (M=Ca and Sr; X=N and C). Our results show that compared with standard GGA approach, the GGA plus effective Ueff scheme can correct electronic structure and magnetic properties in some extent. With enhancing electronic correlation, for (CaO)1/(CaN)1, (SrO)1/(SrN)1, and (SrO)1/(SrC)1, the bands across Fermi level are divided into two parts and the shape of isotropic spherical spin atmosphere becomes anisotropic dumbbell-like with specific orientation, accompanying metal-insulator transitions. For (CaO)1/(CaC)1, the states just smearing with the Fermi level shift to lower energy region below Fermi level, indicating the transformation from a nearly half metal to an actual half metal occurs. The different behavior of (CaO)1/(CaC)1 compared with three other compounds may be caused by the larger ionization energy of calcium than that of strontium and the smaller electronegativity of carbon than that of nitrogen.

  6. Feeding behaviour in a ‘basal’ tortoise provides insights on the transitional feeding mode at the dawn of modern land turtle evolution

    PubMed Central

    Tzankov, Nikolay; Werneburg, Ingmar; Heiss, Egon

    2015-01-01

    Almost all extant testudinids are highly associated with terrestrial habitats and the few tortoises with high affinity to aquatic environments are found within the genus Manouria. Manouria belongs to a clade which forms a sister taxon to all remaining tortoises and is suitable as a model for studying evolutionary transitions within modern turtles. We analysed the feeding behaviour of Manouria emys and due to its phylogenetic position, we hypothesise that the species might have retained some ancestral features associated with an aquatic lifestyle. We tested whether M. emys is able to feed both in aquatic and terrestrial environments. In fact, M. emys repetitively tried to reach submerged food items in water, but always failed to grasp them—no suction feeding mechanism was applied. When feeding on land, M. emys showed another peculiar behaviour; it grasped food items by its jaws—a behaviour typical for aquatic or semiaquatic turtles—and not by the tongue as generally accepted as the typical feeding mode in all tortoises studied so far. In M. emys, the hyolingual complex remained retracted during all food uptake sequences, but the food transport was entirely lingual based. The kinematical profiles significantly differed from those described for other tortoises and from those proposed from the general models on the function of the feeding systems in lower tetrapods. We conclude that the feeding behaviour of M. emys might reflect a remnant of the primordial condition expected in the aquatic ancestor of the tortoises. PMID:26339550

  7. AP-1-mediated chromatin looping regulates ZEB2 transcription: new insights into TNFα-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yichun; Shiue, Chiou-Nan; Zhu, Jian; Zhuang, Ting; Jonsson, Philip; Wright, Anthony P H; Zhao, Chunyan; Dahlman-Wright, Karin

    2015-04-10

    The molecular determinants of malignant cell behaviour in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) are poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that regulators of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) are potential therapeutic targets for TNBC. In this study, we demonstrate that the inflammatory cytokine TNFα induces EMT in TNBC cells via activation of AP-1 signaling and subsequently induces expression of the EMT regulator ZEB2. We also show that TNFα activates both the PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK pathways, which act upstream of AP-1. We further investigated in detail AP-1 regulation of ZEB2 expression. We show that two ZEB2 transcripts derived from distinct promoters are both expressed in breast cancer cell lines and breast tumor samples. Using the chromosome conformation capture assay, we demonstrate that AP-1, when activated by TNFα, binds to a site in promoter 1b of the ZEB2 gene where it regulates the expression of both promoter 1b and 1a, the latter via mediating long range chromatin interactions. Overall, this work provides a plausible mechanism for inflammation-induced metastatic potential in TNBC, involving a novel regulatory mechanism governing ZEB2 isoform expression. PMID:25762639

  8. Secular change in ambient upper-mantle temperature and the transition from Archean to Proterozoic tectonics: Insights from the rock record and phase equilibria modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael; Johnson, Tim; VanTongeren, Jill

    2013-04-01

    There are differences between Archean and post-Archean crust that may be related to Earth's thermal evolution and mechanism of heat loss. The Archean continental crust is dominated by grey gneisses and plutonic complexes of the tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) suite whereas volcano-sedimentary greenstone belts form only a minor component. The temporal record of apparent thermal gradients retrieved from crustal rocks provides information about secular change in thermal regimes and tectonics. Paleoarchean-Mesoarchean crust generally registers low-to-moderate-P-moderate-to-high-T metamorphic conditions, implying high but uniform apparent thermal gradients of 850-1350°C/GPa; ultrahigh P-T conditions are generally not recorded. This record is inconsistent with one-sided subduction, which generates an asymmetric thermal structure that is registered in the crust as two types of metamorphism with contrasting apparent thermal gradients. In the Mesoarchean-Neoarchean, the sporadic appearance of two types of metamorphism with contrasting apparent thermal gradients—eclogite-high pressure granulite metamorphism with apparent thermal gradients of 350-750°C/GPa and granulite-ultrahigh temperature metamorphism with apparent thermal gradients of 750-1500°C/GPa—marks a transition to one-sided subduction and plate tectonics as the dominant geodynamic regime. Although the thermal structure of the mantle in the Archean is poorly constrained, petrological data and thermal evolution models suggest ambient upper-mantle potential temperatures (Tp) in the Archean were significantly hotter than the present day. Ambient upper-mantle temperature affects the tectonic regime and style of orogenesis. Results of 2-d numerical experiments show that one-sided subduction is stabilized by stronger lithosphere consequent upon reduced melt flux from underlying asthenospheric mantle as Tp declined to <200°C warmer than present-day by the end of the Archean. Furthermore, higher ambient Tp

  9. Structure and Mechanism of Dimer-Monomer Transition of a Plant Poly(A)-Binding Protein upon RNA Interaction: Insights into Its Poly(A) Tail Assembly.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Mariane Noronha; Sforça, Mauricio Luis; Soprano, Adriana Santos; Lee, Jack; Souza, Tatiana de Arruda Campos Brasil de; Cassago, Alexandre; Portugal, Rodrigo Villares; Zeri, Ana Carolina de Mattos; Murakami, Mario Tyago; Sadanandom, Ari; Oliveira, Paulo Sergio Lopes de; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2015-07-31

    Poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs) play crucial roles in mRNA biogenesis, stability, transport and translational control in most eukaryotic cells. Although animal PABPs are well-studied proteins, the biological role, three-dimensional structure and RNA-binding mode of plant PABPs remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we report the structural features and RNA-binding mode of a Citrus sinensis PABP (CsPABPN1). CsPABPN1 has a domain architecture of nuclear PABPs (PABPNs) with a single RNA recognition motif (RRM) flanked by an acidic N-terminus and a GRPF-rich C-terminus. The RRM domain of CsPABPN1 displays virtually the same three-dimensional structure and poly(A)-binding mode of animal PABPNs. However, while the CsPABPN1 RRM domain specifically binds poly(A), the full-length protein also binds poly(U). CsPABPN1 localizes to the nucleus of plant cells and undergoes a dimer-monomer transition upon poly(A) interaction. We show that poly(A) binding by CsPABPN1 begins with the recognition of the RNA-binding sites RNP1 and RNP2, followed by interactions with residues of the β2 strands, which stabilize the dimer, thus leading to dimer dissociation. Like human PABPN1, CsPABPN1 also seems to form filaments in the presence of poly(A). Based on these data, we propose a structural model in which contiguous CsPABPN1 RRM monomers wrap around the RNA molecule creating a superhelical structure that could not only shield the poly(A) tail but also serve as a scaffold for the assembly of additional mRNA processing factors. PMID:26013164

  10. Coupled pyrite concentration and sulfur isotopic insight into the paleo sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) in the northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qi; Wang, Jiasheng; Taladay, Katie; Lu, Hongfeng; Hu, Gaowei; Sun, Fei; Lin, Rongxiao

    2016-01-01

    The sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) is an important diagenetic redox boundary within marine sediments where the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), coupled with bacterial sulfate reduction, can promote sulfur isotopic enrichments in several solid phase minerals including pyrite (FeS2). Authigenic pyrite can form in concentrated abundances within the SMTZ and as such, can be used as a proxy to identify paleo-SMTZs. This study uses enrichments in 34S and anomalously high abundances of authigenic pyrites in 287 samples from the northern South China Sea (SCS) to determine the paleo-SMTZ. The pyrite samples were collected from sediment cores acquired at three sites, each of which are known to be located in natural gas hydrate-bearing regions. We assess the relative abundances of authigenic pyrites, the types of pyrite morphologies recovered in the cored sediments, and the sulfur isotopic values of recovered pyrite samples using two methods: (1) handpicked sample analysis using a binocular microscope, and (2) the chromium reduction method. Our results show that pyrite concentrations and sulfur isotopic compositions exhibit synchronous fluctuations, particularly from 6.8 m below seafloor (mbsf) to 8.4 mbsf at all three study sites. There is a significant increase in the occurrence of rod-like pyrite morphology within this key interval. We define the position of the paleo-SMTZ by the presence of anomalously high accumulations of pyrites at greater than 5.0 wt.% using the handpicking method or greater than 0.5 wt.% via the chromium reduction method, along with positive Δδ34S excursions greater than 10.0‰ VCDT. We discovered a regional paleo-SMTZ that is shallower than the modern SMTZ, suggesting a previous period of elevated methane flux from depth, possibly related to widespread gas hydrate dissociation.

  11. Continental hyperextension, mantle exhumation, and thin oceanic crust at the continent-ocean transition, West Iberia: New insights from wide-angle seismic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davy, R. G.; Minshull, T. A.; Bayrakci, G.; Bull, J. M.; Klaeschen, D.; Papenberg, C.; Reston, T. J.; Sawyer, D. S.; Zelt, C. A.

    2016-05-01

    Hyperextension of continental crust at the Deep Galicia rifted margin in the North Atlantic has been accommodated by the rotation of continental fault blocks, which are underlain by the S reflector, an interpreted detachment fault, along which exhumed and serpentinized mantle peridotite is observed. West of these features, the enigmatic Peridotite Ridge has been inferred to delimit the western extent of the continent-ocean transition. An outstanding question at this margin is where oceanic crust begins, with little existing data to constrain this boundary and a lack of clear seafloor spreading magnetic anomalies. Here we present results from a 160 km long wide-angle seismic profile (Western Extension 1). Travel time tomography models of the crustal compressional velocity structure reveal highly thinned and rotated crustal blocks separated from the underlying mantle by the S reflector. The S reflector correlates with the 6.0-7.0 km s-1 velocity contours, corresponding to peridotite serpentinization of 60-30%, respectively. West of the Peridotite Ridge, shallow and sparse Moho reflections indicate the earliest formation of an anomalously thin oceanic crustal layer, which increases in thickness from ~0.5 km at ~20 km west of the Peridotite Ridge to ~1.5 km, 35 km further west. P wave velocities increase smoothly and rapidly below top basement, to a depth of 2.8-3.5 km, with an average velocity gradient of 1.0 s-1. Below this, velocities slowly increase toward typical mantle velocities. Such a downward increase into mantle velocities is interpreted as decreasing serpentinization of mantle rock with depth.

  12. Science insights.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Kazuyuki

    2015-06-01

    "Below is an essay by Prof. Tanabe originally written in Japanese. It gives an insight to Prof. Tanabe's inquiring mind and his approach to science. He also seek, as always, to inspire and nudge the young to scientific discovery". PMID:25463310

  13. Insights on STEM Careers

    SciTech Connect

    Wendelberger, Joanne Roth

    2014-11-05

    This presentation will provide career advice for individuals seeking to go beyond just having a job to building a successful career in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Careful planning can be used to turn a job into a springboard for professional advancement and personal satisfaction. Topics to be addressed include setting priorities, understanding career ladders, making tough choices, overcoming stereotypes and assumptions by others, networking, developing a professional identify, and balancing a career with family and other personal responsibilities. Insights on the transition from individual technical work to leadership will also be provided. The author will draw upon experiences gained in academic, industrial, and government laboratory settings, as well as extensive professional service and community involvement.

  14. An allolactose trapped at the lacZ β-galactosidase active site with its galactosyl moiety in a (4)H3 conformation provides insights into the formation, conformation, and stabilization of the transition state.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Robert W; Huber, Reuben E

    2015-12-01

    When lactose was incubated with G794A-β-galactosidase (a variant with a "closed" active site loop that binds transition state analogs well) an allolactose was trapped with its Gal moiety in a (4)H3 conformation, similar to the oxocarbenium ion-like conformation expected of the transition state. The numerous interactions formed between the (4)H3 structure and β-galactosidase indicate that this structure is representative of the transition state. This conformation is also very similar to that of d-galactono-1,5-lactone, a good transition state analog. Evidence indicates that substrates take up the (4)H3 conformation during migration from the shallow to the deep mode. Steric forces utilizing His418 and other residues are important for positioning the O1 leaving group into a quasi-axial position. An electrostatic interaction between the O5 of the distorted Gal and Tyr503 as well as C-H-π bonds with Trp568 are also significant. Computational studies of the energy of sugar ring distortion show that the β-galactosidase reaction itinerary is driven by energetic considerations in utilization of a (4)H3 transition state with a novel (4)C1-(4)H3-(4)C1 conformation itinerary. To our knowledge, this is the first X-ray crystallographic structural demonstration that the transition state of a natural substrate of a glycosidase has a (4)H3 conformation. PMID:26291713

  15. Transition Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Statfeld, Jenna L.

    2011-01-01

    Post-school transition is the movement of a child with disabilities from school to activities that occur after the completion of school. This paper provides information about: (1) post-school transition; (2) transition plan; (3) transition services; (4) transition planning; (5) vocational rehabilitation services; (6) services that are available…

  16. Network Observability Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Jianhui; Motter, Adilson E.

    2012-12-01

    In the modeling, monitoring, and control of complex networks, a fundamental problem concerns the comprehensive determination of the state of the system from limited measurements. Using power grids as example networks, we show that this problem leads to a new type of percolation transition, here termed a network observability transition, which we solve analytically for the configuration model. We also demonstrate a dual role of the network’s community structure, which both facilitates optimal measurement placement and renders the networks substantially more sensitive to “observability attacks.” Aside from their immediate implications for the development of smart grids, these results provide insights into decentralized biological, social, and technological networks.

  17. Kohler's Insight Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windholtz, George

    1985-01-01

    Psychology textbooks frequently present Wolfgang Kohler's two-stick experiment with chimpanzees as having demonstrated insight in learning. Studies that replicated Kohler's work support his findings but not his interpretation in terms of insightful solution. The uncritical inclusion of Kohler's insight interpretation in texts is not warranted in…

  18. Proofs that Develop Insight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Keith

    2010-01-01

    Many mathematics educators have noted that mathematicians do not only read proofs to gain conviction but also to obtain insight. The goal of this article is to discuss what this insight is from mathematicians' perspective. Based on interviews with nine research-active mathematicians, two sources of insight are discussed. The first is reading a…

  19. Late Pleistocene to Holocene river terrace deformation within the Little Salmon Fault Zone: insights to tectonic transition from Cascadia Subduction to San Andreas transform stress regimes, Van Duzen river, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicovich, S.; Hemphill-Haley, M. A.; Leroy, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    The southern Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ) of northwestern California exhibits northeast-directed contraction, transitioning to north-northwest directed translation within the broad San Andreas fault (SAF) transform margin to the south. The Little Salmon fault (LSF) is one of the southern-most, active thrust faults within the onshore fold and thrust belt of the CSZ, and lies proximal to the transition from compressional to dextral stress across the Mendocino Triple Junction. Thus, it is an ideal location to characterize strain associated with this complex region of transitional stress regimes. High precision topographic data (LiDAR) enabled detailed mapping of geomorphic features that would otherwise be obscured by dense vegetation of the area. A northwest trending lineament, sub-parallel and south of the main splay of the LSF is observed on LiDAR imagery. The lineament exhibits potential up-to-the-northeast offset and traverses several Van Duzen river terrace risers and treads that range from Pleistocene to potentially Holocene in age. A shallow, exploratory trench was hand-excavated across the lineament. The shallow, roughly 1.5 m-deep, 16 m-long trench exposed imbricated gravels that dip into the base of the trench in the upper end. Coring within the lower end of the trench mapped the southern extent of the gravels. The architecture of the unconsolidated, clast-supported gravel deposit displays a diffuse up-to-the-northeast step. More obvious offset may be expressed at lower depths and/or in mediums with more confining stress. The linear map expression of the lineament across relatively steep terrain suggests that the fault may be relatively steeply dipping. Conjugate deformation shear bands within Neogene bedrock nearby along the Van Duzen river provide additional information about the state of stress within this area of transition.

  20. Insight in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Látalová, Klára

    2012-09-01

    Although there has been interest in insight in bipolar disorder, research has not been as developed as in schizophrenia. The Medline, Embase, and PsychInfo data bases were searched. The key words used in the search were "bipolar", "mania", "manic", "awareness", and "insight". Books, editorials, letters, and reports on pediatric subjects were excluded. Abstracts or full texts were screened for relevance. Better insight is associated with better adherence to treatment and better outcomes. Impairments of executive functions and memory, as well as higher severity of psychotic symptoms, are associated with impairments of insight. Insight is more impaired during an illness episode than during remission, in mixed than in pure manic episodes, in bipolar II than in bipolar I patients, in pure mania than in bipolar or unipolar depression. Psychosocial treatments improve insight and outcomes. There is a need for integration of quantitative assessment methods and their introduction into research and clinical practice. PMID:22101737

  1. Mechanistic Insights into C-H Oxidations by Ruthenium(III)-Pterin Complexes: Impact of Basicity of the Pterin Ligand and Electron Acceptability of the Metal Center on the Transition States.

    PubMed

    Mitome, Hiroumi; Ishizuka, Tomoya; Kotani, Hiroaki; Shiota, Yoshihito; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Kojima, Takahiko

    2016-08-01

    A ruthenium(II) complex, [Ru(dmdmp)Cl(MeBPA)] (2) (Hdmdmp = N,N-dimethyl-6,7-dimethylpterin, MeBPA = N-methyl-N,N-bis(pyridylmethyl)amine), having a pterin derivative as a proton-accepting ligand, was synthesized and characterized. Complex 2 shows higher basicity than that of a previously reported Ru(II)-pterin complex, [Ru(dmdmp) (TPA)](+) (1) (TPA = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine). On the other hand, 1e(-)-oxidized species of 1 (1OX) exhibits higher electron-acceptability than that of 1e(-)-oxidized 2 (2OX). Bond dissociation enthalpies (BDE) of the two Ru(II) complexes having Hdmdmp as a ligand in proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) to generate 1OX and 2OX were calculated to be 85 kcal mol(-1) for 1OX and 78 kcal mol(-1) for 2OX. The BDE values are large enough to perform H atom transfer from C-H bonds of organic molecules to the 1e(-)-oxidized complexes through PCET. The second-order rate constants (k) of PCET oxidation reactions were determined for 1OX and 2OX. The logarithms of normalized k values were proportional to the BDE values of C-H bonds of the substrates with slopes of -0.27 for 1OX and -0.44 for 2OX. The difference between 1OX and 2OX in the slopes suggests that the transition states in PCET oxidations of substrates by the two complexes bear different polarization, as reflection of difference in the electron acceptability and basicity of 1OX and 2OX. The more basic 2OX attracts a proton from a C-H bond via a more polarized transition state than that of 1OX; on the contrary, the more electron-deficient 1OX forms less polarized transition states in PCET oxidation reactions of C-H bonds. PMID:27403587

  2. Oedipus and insight.

    PubMed

    Michels, R

    1986-10-01

    Insight is a core concept in psychoanalytic theory. The Oedipus myth has been a central metaphor in the evolution of psychoanalytic theory, particularly the psychoanalytic theory of development. Similarly, Sophocles' drama, its relation to the myth, and its repeated reinterpretation throughout the ages provide a valuable metaphor for our understanding of the role of insight in psychoanalysis and in development. We may have underestimated the importance of insight in normal development while oversimplifying its significance as an agent of therapeutic change. PMID:3797556

  3. In Search of Insight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Craig A.; Simon, Herbert A.

    1990-01-01

    Attaining the insight needed to solve the Mutilated Checkerboard problem, which requires discovery of an effective problem representation (EPR), is described. Performance on insight problems can be predicted from the availability of generators and constraints in the search for an EPR. Data for 23 undergraduates were analyzed. (TJH)

  4. Native Speaker Insight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broughton, Geoffrey

    1978-01-01

    Defines the concept of native speaker insight and suggests that, for the purpose of teaching English as a second language, the goal should not be native speaker insight (NSI) but NS Type 1, a reduced, adequate and attainable goal for foreign learners. (CFM)

  5. Structural perspective of ARHI mediated inhibition of STAT3 signaling: an insight into the inactive to active transition of ARHI and its interaction with STAT3 and importinβ.

    PubMed

    Muthu, Kannan; Panneerselvam, Manivel; Topno, Nishith Saurav; Jayaraman, Manikandan; Ramadas, Krishna

    2015-04-01

    ARHI, a putative tumor suppressor protein with unique 32 amino acid extension in the N-terminal region, differs from oncogenes Ras and Rap, negatively regulates STAT3 signaling and inhibits the migration of ovarian cancer cells. ARHI associates directly with STAT3, also forms complex with importinβ, and prevents formation of RanGTPase-importinβ complex, which is essential for transporting STAT3 into the nucleus. Hence, the structural aspects pertaining to ARHI mediated inhibition of STAT3 translocation can provide hints on the regulation of STAT3 signaling mechanism. Accordingly, in the present study, the structure of ARHI was predicted and its transition from inactive to active state studied using MD simulations and free energy landscape analysis. The transition of ARHI is marked by the movement of switch I region towards γ-phosphate of GTP, in addition, the hydrophobic interaction between N-terminal helix and switch II region of ARHI accounts for its low intrinsic GTPase activity. Further, the protein-protein interaction studies reveal that the residues of N-terminal helix, effector domain, P-loop and G box motif of ARHI actively form polar and non-polar interaction with NTD of STAT3 and make them compact thereby rendering STAT3 inaccessible for Ran-importinβ mediated translocation. On the other hand, ARHI competes with RanGTPase and interacts with importinβ via basic-acidic patch interaction, which leads to inhibition of STAT3 translocation. The interacting residues involved for this structural mechanism would be instrumental in designing inhibitors for STAT3, which mimics ARHI thereby leading to the suppression of cancer cell growth. PMID:25499977

  6. Examining hydrogen transitions.

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, S. E.; Energy Systems

    2007-03-01

    This report describes the results of an effort to identify key analytic issues associated with modeling a transition to hydrogen as a fuel for light duty vehicles, and using insights gained from this effort to suggest ways to improve ongoing modeling efforts. The study reported on here examined multiple hydrogen scenarios reported in the literature, identified modeling issues associated with those scenario analyses, and examined three DOE-sponsored hydrogen transition models in the context of those modeling issues. The three hydrogen transition models are HyTrans (contractor: Oak Ridge National Laboratory), MARKAL/DOE* (Brookhaven National Laboratory), and NEMS-H2 (OnLocation, Inc). The goals of these models are (1) to help DOE improve its R&D effort by identifying key technology and other roadblocks to a transition and testing its technical program goals to determine whether they are likely to lead to the market success of hydrogen technologies, (2) to evaluate alternative policies to promote a transition, and (3) to estimate the costs and benefits of alternative pathways to hydrogen development.

  7. Insights on semiconductor-metal transition in indium-doped zinc oxide from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saw, K. G.; Aznan, N. M.; Yam, F. K.; Ng, S. S.; Pung, S. Y.

    2016-07-01

    ZnO thin films doped with various amounts of In impurities were prepared by magnetron sputtering at a substrate temperature of 150°C. The shift in optical bandgap of the In-doped ZnO films is studied as a function of carrier concentration. Nominally doped ZnO films exhibit an increase in the measured optical band gap known as the Burstein-Moss effect. Dominant band gap narrowing is observed with increased doping. XPS and TOFSIMS analyses confirm that In is incorporated in the ZnO material. The In 3d peaks show that no metallic In is present as a result of heavy doping. The XRD phase analysis shows a preferential c-axis growth but a shift of the ZnO (002) peak to lower 2-theta values with increasing FWHM as the carrier concentration increases indicates the decline in the quality of crystallinity. An elongation of the c lattice constant is also observed and is likely to be caused by intersitital In as the amount of In dopants increases. The incorporation of In induces a semiconductor-metal transition between the carrier concentrations of 3.58 - 5.61×1019 cm-3 and structural changes in the ZnO host material.

  8. Dynamics of a Quantum Phase Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Wojciech H.; Dorner, Uwe; Zoller, Peter

    2005-09-02

    We present two approaches to the dynamics of a quench-induced phase transition in the quantum Ising model. One follows the standard treatment of thermodynamic second order phase transitions but applies it to the quantum phase transitions. The other approach is quantum, and uses Landau-Zener formula for transition probabilities in avoided level crossings. We show that predictions of the two approaches of how the density of defects scales with the quench rate are compatible, and discuss the ensuing insights into the dynamics of quantum phase transitions.

  9. Tectonic transition from Late Carboniferous subduction to Early Permian post-collisional extension in the Eastern Tianshan, NW China: Insights from geochronology and geochemistry of mafic-intermediate intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoran; Zhao, Guochun; Eizenhöfer, Paul R.; Sun, Min; Han, Yigui; Hou, Wenzhu; Liu, Dongxing; Wang, Bo; Liu, Qian; Xu, Bing; Zhu, Chloe Yanlin

    2016-07-01

    a tectonic transition from oceanic subduction to post-collisional extension during Late Carboniferous to Early Permian time, probably triggered by the closure of the Junggar Ocean and subsequent arc-continent collision between the Central Tianshan and Junggar terranes that gave rise to the final assembly of the Eastern Tianshan.

  10. Dreaming and insight

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Christopher L.; Ruby, Perrine M.; Malinowski, Josie E.; Bennett, Paul D.; Blagrove, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses claims that dreams can be a source of personal insight. Whereas there has been anecdotal backing for such claims, there is now tangential support from findings of the facilitative effect of sleep on cognitive insight, and of REM sleep in particular on emotional memory consolidation. Furthermore, the presence in dreams of metaphorical representations of waking life indicates the possibility of novel insight as an emergent feature of such metaphorical mappings. In order to assess whether personal insight can occur as a result of the consideration of dream content, 11 dream group discussion sessions were conducted which followed the Ullman Dream Appreciation technique, one session for each of 11 participants (10 females, 1 male; mean age = 19.2 years). Self-ratings of deepened self-perception and personal gains from participation in the group sessions showed that the Ullman technique is an effective procedure for establishing connections between dream content and recent waking life experiences, although wake life sources were found for only 14% of dream report text. The mean Exploration-Insight score on the Gains from Dream Interpretation questionnaire was very high and comparable to outcomes from the well-established Hill (1996) therapist-led dream interpretation method. This score was associated between-subjects with pre-group positive Attitude Toward Dreams (ATD). The need to distinguish “aha” experiences as a result of discovering a waking life source for part of a dream, from “aha” experiences of personal insight as a result of considering dream content, is discussed. Difficulties are described in designing a control condition to which the dream report condition can be compared. PMID:24550849

  11. Dreaming and insight.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Christopher L; Ruby, Perrine M; Malinowski, Josie E; Bennett, Paul D; Blagrove, Mark T

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses claims that dreams can be a source of personal insight. Whereas there has been anecdotal backing for such claims, there is now tangential support from findings of the facilitative effect of sleep on cognitive insight, and of REM sleep in particular on emotional memory consolidation. Furthermore, the presence in dreams of metaphorical representations of waking life indicates the possibility of novel insight as an emergent feature of such metaphorical mappings. In order to assess whether personal insight can occur as a result of the consideration of dream content, 11 dream group discussion sessions were conducted which followed the Ullman Dream Appreciation technique, one session for each of 11 participants (10 females, 1 male; mean age = 19.2 years). Self-ratings of deepened self-perception and personal gains from participation in the group sessions showed that the Ullman technique is an effective procedure for establishing connections between dream content and recent waking life experiences, although wake life sources were found for only 14% of dream report text. The mean Exploration-Insight score on the Gains from Dream Interpretation questionnaire was very high and comparable to outcomes from the well-established Hill (1996) therapist-led dream interpretation method. This score was associated between-subjects with pre-group positive Attitude Toward Dreams (ATD). The need to distinguish "aha" experiences as a result of discovering a waking life source for part of a dream, from "aha" experiences of personal insight as a result of considering dream content, is discussed. Difficulties are described in designing a control condition to which the dream report condition can be compared. PMID:24550849

  12. William Crabtree's Venus transit observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollerstrom, Nicholas

    2005-04-01

    The close collaboration between the two North-country astronomers Jeremiah Horrocks and William Crabtree gave them special insight into the new astronomy published by the recently-deceased Kepler, whereby Horrocks became the only person to apprehend that the Rudolphine tables were in fact predicting a Venus transit in 1639. This paper focuses especially upon William Crabtree's role and contribution. A comparison is made with an earlier, unsuccessful endeavour by these two concerning a possible transit of Mercury. Much of the record of their work was lost during the civil war. Finally, thanks to Christiaan Huygens, Horrock's manuscript was published by Johannes Hevelius in Danzig, in 1662.

  13. Changing Schools: Insights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Policy and Planning (ED), Washington, DC.

    Over 1,000 communities in 45 states, territories, and the District of Columbia, are mobilized under the AMERICA 2000 banner to reach the 6 National Education Goals. This collection of papers, written by those who have wrestled with the process of school reform, offers useful insights to communities as they begin their process of transforming…

  14. Implementation of Insight Responsibilities in Process Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Deborah M.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes an approach for evaluating flight readiness (COFR) and contractor performance evaluation (award fee) as part of the insight role of NASA Process Engineering at Kennedy Space Center. Several evaluation methods are presented, including systems engineering evaluations and use of systems performance data. The transition from an oversight function to the insight function is described. The types of analytical tools appropriate for achieving the flight readiness and contractor performance evaluation goals are described and examples are provided. Special emphasis is placed upon short and small run statistical quality control techniques. Training requirements for system engineers are delineated. The approach described herein would be equally appropriate in other directorates at Kennedy Space Center.

  15. Death: 'nothing' gives insight.

    PubMed

    Ettema, Eric J

    2013-08-01

    According to a widely accepted belief, we cannot know our own death--death means 'nothing' to us. At first sight, the meaning of 'nothing' just implies the negation or absence of 'something'. Death then simply refers to the negation or absence of life. As a consequence, however, death has no meaning of itself. This leads to an ontological paradox in which death is both acknowledged and denied: death is … nothing. In this article, I investigate whether insight into the ontological paradox of the nothingness of death can contribute to a good end-of-life. By analysing Aquinas', Heidegger's and Derrida's understanding of death as nothingness, I explore how giving meaning to death on different ontological levels connects to, and at the same time provides resistance against, the harsh reality of death. By doing so, I intend to demonstrate that insight into the nothingness of death can count as a framework for a meaningful dealing with death. PMID:23054426

  16. Update on INSIGHTS Development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Listed; Eric Burgett

    2011-09-01

    INSIGHTS is a transformational separate effects testing capability to perform in situ irradiation studies and characterization of the microscale behavior of nuclear fuel materials under a wide variety of in-pile conditions. Separate effects testing including growth, irradiation, and monitoring of these materials, and encompasses the full science based approach for fuels development from the nanoscale to the mesoscale behavior of the sample material and other defects driven by the modeling and simulation efforts of INL.

  17. Metric transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This report describes NASA's metric transition in terms of seven major program elements. Six are technical areas involving research, technology development, and operations; they are managed by specific Program Offices at NASA Headquarters. The final program element, Institutional Management, covers both NASA-wide functional management under control of NASA Headquarters and metric capability development at the individual NASA Field Installations. This area addresses issues common to all NASA program elements, including: Federal, state, and local coordination; standards; private industry initiatives; public-awareness initiatives; and employee training. The concluding section identifies current barriers and impediments to metric transition; NASA has no specific recommendations for consideration by the Congress.

  18. The politics of insight

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Carola; Cristofori, Irene; Grafman, Jordan; Beeman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed that liberals and conservatives differ in cognitive style. Liberals are more flexible, and tolerant of complexity and novelty, whereas conservatives are more rigid, are more resistant to change, and prefer clear answers. We administered a set of compound remote associate problems, a task extensively used to differentiate problem-solving styles (via insight or analysis). Using this task, several researches have proven that self-reports, which differentiate between insight and analytic problem-solving, are reliable and are associated with two different neural circuits. In our research we found that participants self-identifying with distinct political orientations demonstrated differences in problem-solving strategy. Liberals solved significantly more problems via insight instead of in a step-by-step analytic fashion. Our findings extend previous observations that self-identified political orientations reflect differences in cognitive styles. More specifically, we show that type of political orientation is associated with problem-solving strategy. The data converge with previous neurobehavioural and cognitive studies indicating a link between cognitive style and the psychological mechanisms that mediate political beliefs. PMID:26810954

  19. The politics of insight.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Carola; Cristofori, Irene; Grafman, Jordan; Beeman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed that liberals and conservatives differ in cognitive style. Liberals are more flexible, and tolerant of complexity and novelty, whereas conservatives are more rigid, are more resistant to change, and prefer clear answers. We administered a set of compound remote associate problems, a task extensively used to differentiate problem-solving styles (via insight or analysis). Using this task, several researches have proven that self-reports, which differentiate between insight and analytic problem-solving, are reliable and are associated with two different neural circuits. In our research we found that participants self-identifying with distinct political orientations demonstrated differences in problem-solving strategy. Liberals solved significantly more problems via insight instead of in a step-by-step analytic fashion. Our findings extend previous observations that self-identified political orientations reflect differences in cognitive styles. More specifically, we show that type of political orientation is associated with problem-solving strategy. The data converge with previous neurobehavioural and cognitive studies indicating a link between cognitive style and the psychological mechanisms that mediate political beliefs. PMID:26810954

  20. Resolving Conformational and Rotameric Exchange in Spin-Labeled Proteins Using Saturation Recovery EPR

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Michael D.; Hideg, Kálmán

    2010-01-01

    The function of many proteins involves equilibria between conformational substates, and to elucidate mechanisms of function it is essential to have experimental tools to detect the presence of conformational substates and to determine the time scale of exchange between them. Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) has the potential to serve this purpose. In proteins containing a nitroxide side chain (R1), multicomponent electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra can arise either from equilibria involving different conformational substates or rotamers of R1. To employ SDSL to uniquely identify conformational equilibria, it is thus essential to distinguish between these origins of multicomponent spectra. Here we show that this is possible based on the time scale for exchange of the nitroxide between distinct environments that give rise to multicomponent EPR spectra; rotamer exchange for R1 lies in the ≈0.1–1 μs range, while conformational exchange is at least an order of magnitude slower. The time scales of exchange events are determined by saturation recovery EPR, and in favorable cases, the exchange rate constants between substates with lifetimes of approximately 1–70 μs can be estimated by the approach. PMID:20157634

  1. [Humanitarian transition].

    PubMed

    Mattei, Jean-François; Troit, Virginie

    2016-02-01

    In two centuries, modern humanitarian action has experienced several fractures often linked to crises. Although its professionalism and intervention force remain indisputable, it faces, since the 2000s, a new context that limits its ability to act and confronts it with new dilemmas, even though it must deal with needs for aid of unprecedented scale. These difficulties reveal a humanitarian transition period that was not anticipated. This transition period reflects the change from a dominant paradigm of North-South solidarity of Western origin to a much more complex model. This article provides a summary of the current mutations that are dominated by the States' assertion of sovereignty. Among the possible solutions, it argues for an ethical approach and a better integration of the research carried out in the Global South, prerequisites for building a true partnership and placing the victims at the heart of the operations which involve them. PMID:26936180

  2. Eliminating Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallick, Barb; Lee, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Adults often find themselves transitioning from one activity to another in a short time span. Most of the time, they do not feel they have a lot of control over their schedules, but wish that they could carve out extended time to relax and focus on one project. Picture a group of children in the block area who have spent 15 or 20 minutes building…

  3. Modeling for Insights

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Gretchen Matthern

    2007-04-01

    System Dynamics is a computer-aided approach to evaluating the interrelationships of different components and activities within complex systems. Recently, System Dynamics models have been developed in areas such as policy design, biological and medical modeling, energy and the environmental analysis, and in various other areas in the natural and social sciences. The real power of System Dynamic modeling is gaining insights into total system behavior as time, and system parameters are adjusted and the effects are visualized in real time. System Dynamic models allow decision makers and stakeholders to explore long-term behavior and performance of complex systems, especially in the context of dynamic processes and changing scenarios without having to wait decades to obtain field data or risk failure if a poor management or design approach is used. The Idaho National Laboratory recently has been developing a System Dynamic model of the US Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The model is intended to be used to identify and understand interactions throughout the entire nuclear fuel cycle and suggest sustainable development strategies. This paper describes the basic framework of the current model and presents examples of useful insights gained from the model thus far with respect to sustainable development of nuclear power.

  4. Adaptation to Transition: Implications for Working with Cult Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Beth; Bradley, Loretta J.

    1998-01-01

    Notes that because individuals experiencing transitions seem to be particularly susceptible to cult membership, developing insight and resources to cope with transition must be an integral part of strategies to prevent cult membership. Discusses interventions focusing on treatment of former cult members are . (Author/MKA)

  5. Osho - Insights on sex.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Anil Kumar Mysore

    2013-01-01

    Sex is a mysterious phenomenon, which has puzzled even great sages. Human beings have researched and mastered the biology of sex. But that is not all. Sex needs to be understood from the spiritual perspective too. The vision of Osho is an enlightening experience in this regard. Out of the thousands of lectures, five lectures on sex made Osho most notorious. Born into a Jain family of Madhya Pradesh, Rajneesh, who later wanted himself to be called Osho, is a great master. He has spoken volumes on a wide range of topics ranging from sex to super-consciousness. His contributions in the area of sex are based on the principles of "Tantra" which has its origin from Buddhism. This article focuses on his life and insights on sex, which if understood properly, can be a stepping stone for enlightenment. PMID:23858266

  6. Osho - Insights on sex

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Anil Kumar Mysore

    2013-01-01

    Sex is a mysterious phenomenon, which has puzzled even great sages. Human beings have researched and mastered the biology of sex. But that is not all. Sex needs to be understood from the spiritual perspective too. The vision of Osho is an enlightening experience in this regard. Out of the thousands of lectures, five lectures on sex made Osho most notorious. Born into a Jain family of Madhya Pradesh, Rajneesh, who later wanted himself to be called Osho, is a great master. He has spoken volumes on a wide range of topics ranging from sex to super-consciousness. His contributions in the area of sex are based on the principles of “Tantra” which has its origin from Buddhism. This article focuses on his life and insights on sex, which if understood properly, can be a stepping stone for enlightenment. PMID:23858266

  7. Dynamo Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, M. K.; Yadav, R.; Chandra, M.; Paul, S.; Wahi, P.

    2010-11-23

    In this article we review the experimental and numerical results related to the dynamo transitions. Recent experiments of Von Karman Sodium (VKS) exhibit various dynamo states including constant, time-periodic, and chaotic magnetic fields. Similarly pseudospectral simulations of dynamo show constant, time-periodic, quasiperiodic, and chaotic magnetic field configurations. One of the windows for the magnetic Prandtl number of unity shows period doubling route to chaos. Quasiperiodic route to chaos has been reported for the Prandtl number of 0.5. The dynamo simulations also reveal coexisting multiple attractors that were obtained for different initial conditions.

  8. Effect of adduct formation with molecular nitrogen on the measured collisional cross sections of transition metal-1,10-phenanthroline complexes in traveling wave ion-mobility spectrometry: N2 is not always an "inert" buffer gas.

    PubMed

    Rijs, Nicole J; Weiske, Thomas; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2015-10-01

    The number of separations and analyses of molecular species using traveling wave ion-mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (TWIMS-MS) is increasing, including those extending the technique to analytes containing metal atoms. A critical aspect of such applications of TWIMS-MS is the validity of the collisional cross sections (CCSs) measured and whether they can be accurately calibrated against other ion-mobility spectrometry (IMS) techniques. Many metal containing species have potential reactivity toward molecular nitrogen, which is present in high concentration in the typical Synapt-G2 TWIMS cell. Here, we analyze the effect of nitrogen on the drift time of a series of cationic 1,10-phenanthroline complexes of the late transition metals, [(phen)M](+), (M = Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, Au, Zn, Cd, and Hg) in order to understand potential deviations from expected drift time behaviors. These metal complexes were chosen for their metal open-coordination site and lack of rotameric species. The target species were generated via electrospray ionization (ESI), analyzed using TWIMS in N2 drift gas, and the observed drift time trends compared. Theoretically derived CCSs for all species (via both the projection approximation and trajectory method) were also compared. The results show that, indeed, for metal containing species in this size regime, reaction with molecular nitrogen has a dramatic effect on measured drift times and must not be ignored when comparing and interpreting TWIMS arrival time distributions. Density-functional theory (DFT) calculations are employed to analyze the periodic differences due to the metal's interaction with nitrogen (and background water) in detail. PMID:26378338

  9. Searching for Insight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynden-Bell, Donald

    2010-09-01

    Is space-time only brought into being by its energy content? The jury is still out, but other questions that have been with me for much of my life—giant black holes in galactic nuclei, the formation of the Galaxy, the connection between first-order phase transitions and negative specific heats, the cause of the large-scale flow of galaxies relative to the cosmic microwave background—have all received reasonable answers. I have found great fun in understanding the dynamical mechanisms underlying such phenomena as magnetohydrodynamic jets, relativistic disks, and the bars, spirals, and chemical evolution of galaxies. The great challenges for future astronomers will be the exploration of the 96% of the Universe now believed to be neither atomic nor baryonic but perhaps partially leptonic. However, most advances do not come via frontal attack but from “bread-and-butter” investigations in related areas where observation is possible today!

  10. Grigor Narekatsi's astronomical insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poghosyan, Samvel

    2015-07-01

    What stand out in the solid system of Gr. Narekatsi's naturalistic views are his astronomical insights on the material nature of light, its high speed and the Sun being composed of "material air". Especially surprising and fascinating are his views on stars and their clusters. What astronomers, including great Armenian academician V. Ambartsumian (scattering of stellar associations), would understand and prove with much difficulty thousand years later, Narekatsi predicted in the 10th century: "Stars appear and disappear untimely", "You who gather and scatter the speechless constellations, like a flock of sheep". Gr. Narekatsti's reformative views were manifested in all the spheres of the 10th century social life; he is a reformer of church life, great language constructor, innovator in literature and music, freethinker in philosophy and science. His ideology is the reflection of the 10th century Armenian Renaissance. During the 9th-10th centuries, great masses of Armenians, forced to migrate to the Balkans, took with them and spread reformative ideas. The forefather of the western science, which originated in the period of Reformation, is considered to be the great philosopher Nicholas of Cusa. The study of Gr. Narekatsti's logic and naturalistic views enables us to claim that Gr. Narekatsti is the great grandfather of European science.

  11. Quantifying macromolecular conformational transition pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyler, Sean; Kumar, Avishek; Thorpe, Michael; Beckstein, Oliver

    2015-03-01

    Diverse classes of proteins function through large-scale conformational changes that are challenging for computer simulations. A range of fast path-sampling techniques have been used to generate transitions, but it has been difficult to compare paths from (and assess the relative strengths of) different methods. We introduce a comprehensive method (pathway similarity analysis, PSA) for quantitatively characterizing and comparing macromolecular pathways. The Hausdorff and Fréchet metrics (known from computational geometry) are used to quantify the degree of similarity between polygonal curves in configuration space. A strength of PSA is its use of the full information available from the 3 N-dimensional configuration space trajectory without requiring additional specific knowledge about the system. We compare a sample of eleven different methods for the closed-to-open transitions of the apo enzyme adenylate kinase (AdK) and also apply PSA to an ensemble of 400 AdK trajectories produced by dynamic importance sampling MD and the Geometrical Pathways algorithm. We discuss the method's potential to enhance our understanding of transition path sampling methods, validate them, and help guide future research toward deeper physical insights into conformational transitions.

  12. Understanding age-based transition needs: Perspectives from adolescents and adults with congenital heart disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to explore the transition process in congenital heart disease (CHD) care through the perceived needs and concerns of adolescents (pretransition) and the experiential insight from adults (post-transition), in order to inform future transition initiatives and information ...

  13. Kindergarten Transition in a Small Rural School: From Planning to Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Amy

    2008-01-01

    This article offers an insight into the process of Kindergarten transition at Callan Public School, a small school in rural NSW. The transition programme at Callan Public School was recently developed and had its inaugural implementation in 2007. A case study analysis revealed that the transition programme experienced clear stages of development,…

  14. Claudin 1 in Breast Cancer: New Insights

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bowen; Moodie, Amanda; Blanchard, Anne A. A.; Leygue, Etienne; Myal, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Claudin 1 is a small transmembrane protein responsible for maintaining the barrier function that exists between epithelial cells. A tight junction protein that regulates the paracellular transport of small ions across adjacent cells, claudin 1 maintains cellular polarity and plays a major role in cell-cell communication and epithelial cell homeostasis. Long considered to be a putative tumor suppressor in human breast cancer, new studies suggest a role much more complex. While most invasive breast cancers exhibit a down regulation or absence of claudin 1, some aggressive subtypes that exhibit high claudin 1 levels have now been described. Furthermore, a causal role for claudin 1 in breast cancer progression has recently been demonstrated in some breast cancer cell lines. In this review we highlight new insights into the role of claudin 1 in breast cancer, including its involvement in collective migration and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). PMID:26633531

  15. Claudin 1 in Breast Cancer: New Insights.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bowen; Moodie, Amanda; Blanchard, Anne A A; Leygue, Etienne; Myal, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Claudin 1 is a small transmembrane protein responsible for maintaining the barrier function that exists between epithelial cells. A tight junction protein that regulates the paracellular transport of small ions across adjacent cells, claudin 1 maintains cellular polarity and plays a major role in cell-cell communication and epithelial cell homeostasis. Long considered to be a putative tumor suppressor in human breast cancer, new studies suggest a role much more complex. While most invasive breast cancers exhibit a down regulation or absence of claudin 1, some aggressive subtypes that exhibit high claudin 1 levels have now been described. Furthermore, a causal role for claudin 1 in breast cancer progression has recently been demonstrated in some breast cancer cell lines. In this review we highlight new insights into the role of claudin 1 in breast cancer, including its involvement in collective migration and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). PMID:26633531

  16. Insights on galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, James Steven

    1999-12-01

    Recent advances in theoretical modeling coupled with a wealth of new observational data, provide a unique opportunity for gaining insight into process of galaxy formation. I present results which test and develop current theories. The analysis utilizes state of the art theoretical modeling and makes predictions aimed at comparisons with some of the latest and upcoming observational data sets. In part I, I discuss an analysis of the structure and properties of dark matter halos (believed to govern the dynamical evolution of galaxies). The results make use of very high-resolution N-body simulations, and are derived from a new hierarchical halo finder, designed especially for these projects and to complement advancements in simulation technology. I present information on the dark matter halo substructure, density profiles, angular momentum structure, and collision rates. In part II, I discuss some aspects of galaxy formation theory in light of new observational data. The discussion includes an investigation of the nature of high-redshift galaxies, the local velocity function of galaxies, and the use of gamma ray telescopes to probe the extra-galactic background light-the latter analysis is done in the context of semi-analytic modeling of galaxy formation. The most important conclusions of this thesis are as follows. (1)Dark matter halos at high redshift are much less concentrated than previously believed. implying that quiescently star-forming galaxies at high redshift are larger and dimmer than expected. (2)The observed bright. abundant. and highly clustered high- redshift (Lyman-break) galaxies are likely starbursts driven by collisions between relatively small galaxies at z ~ 3. And (3)there is a real possibility of using the growing advances in γ-ray astronomy to probe many poorly constrained processes of galaxy formation, including the stellar initial mass function and the star formation history of the universe.

  17. Recent Neurobiological Insights into the Concept of Insight in Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Mythri, Starlin Vijay; Sanjay, Y

    2016-01-01

    The concept of insight in psychosis has been an interesting area in clinical psychiatry for well over a century with a surge in research interest over the past 25 years. Moreover, the past 5 years have been particularly fruitful in deciphering its neurobiological underpinnings. This article presents the development of the concept of insight in psychosis and reviews the current neurobiological research findings in this area. PMID:27335512

  18. Transitions: A Personal Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Ann Stace

    1995-01-01

    Distinguishes between unchosen transitions (children maturing and leaving, parents aging, companies downsizing) and chosen ones (moving, divorce, marriage, career changes). Describes the steps one goes through: uneasiness, renewed energy, complaining, exploration, partial transition, and the completed transition. (JOW)

  19. Insight and analysis problem solving in microbes to machines.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kevin B

    2015-11-01

    A key feature for obtaining solutions to difficult problems, insight is oftentimes vaguely regarded as a special discontinuous intellectual process and/or a cognitive restructuring of problem representation or goal approach. However, this nearly century-old state of art devised by the Gestalt tradition to explain the non-analytical or non-trial-and-error, goal-seeking aptitude of primate mentality tends to neglect problem-solving capabilities of lower animal phyla, Kingdoms other than Animalia, and advancing smart computational technologies built from biological, artificial, and composite media. Attempting to provide an inclusive, precise definition of insight, two major criteria of insight, discontinuous processing and problem restructuring, are here reframed using terminology and statistical mechanical properties of computational complexity classes. Discontinuous processing becomes abrupt state transitions in algorithmic/heuristic outcomes or in types of algorithms/heuristics executed by agents using classical and/or quantum computational models. And problem restructuring becomes combinatorial reorganization of resources, problem-type substitution, and/or exchange of computational models. With insight bounded by computational complexity, humans, ciliated protozoa, and complex technological networks, for example, show insight when restructuring time requirements, combinatorial complexity, and problem type to solve polynomial and nondeterministic polynomial decision problems. Similar effects are expected from other problem types, supporting the idea that insight might be an epiphenomenon of analytical problem solving and consequently a larger information processing framework. Thus, this computational complexity definition of insight improves the power, external and internal validity, and reliability of operational parameters with which to classify, investigate, and produce the phenomenon for computational agents ranging from microbes to man-made devices. PMID

  20. PyTransit: Transit light curve modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parviainen, Hannu

    2015-05-01

    PyTransit implements optimized versions of the Giménez and Mandel & Agol transit models for exoplanet transit light-curves. The two models are implemented natively in Fortran with OpenMP parallelization, and are accessed by an object-oriented python interface. PyTransit facilitates the analysis of photometric time series of exoplanet transits consisting of hundreds of thousands of data points, and of multipassband transit light curves from spectrophotometric observations. It offers efficient model evaluation for multicolour observations and transmission spectroscopy, built-in supersampling to account for extended exposure times, and routines to calculate the projected planet-to-star distance for circular and eccentric orbits, transit durations, and more.

  1. Understanding Insight in the Context of Q

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coghlan, David

    2012-01-01

    In Revans' learning formula, L = P + Q, Q represents "questioning insight", by which Revans means that insight comes out of the process of questioning programmed knowledge (P) in the light of experience. We typically focus on the content of an insight rather than on the act of insight. Drawing primarily on the work of Bernard Lonergan this paper…

  2. Shedding light on insight: Priming bright ideas

    PubMed Central

    Slepian, Michael L.; Weisbuch, Max; Rutchick, Abraham M.; Newman, Leonard S.; Ambady, Nalini

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has characterized insight as the product of internal processes, and has thus investigated the cognitive and motivational processes that immediately precede it. In this research, however, we investigate whether insight can be catalyzed by a cultural artifact, an external object imbued with learned meaning. Specifically, we exposed participants to an illuminating lightbulb – an iconic image of insight – prior to or during insight problem-solving. Across four studies, exposing participants to an illuminating lightbulb primed concepts associated with achieving an insight, and enhanced insight problem-solving in three different domains (spatial, verbal, and mathematical), but did not enhance general (non-insight) problem-solving. PMID:20652087

  3. Transition from Pediatric to Adult Health Care in Patients with Chronic Illnesses: An Integrative Review.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jennifer; Slobodov, Gennady

    2015-01-01

    A systematic review of the literature was performed to identify barriers, themes, or additional insight specific to the transitional care processes from a pediatric to an adult health care setting for patients with spina bifida. PMID:26630779

  4. On transition rates in surface hopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartín, J. M.; Romaniello, P.; Stella, L.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Suraud, E.

    2012-12-01

    Trajectory surface hopping (TSH) is one of the most widely used quantum-classical algorithms for nonadiabatic molecular dynamics. Despite its empirical effectiveness and popularity, a rigorous derivation of TSH as the classical limit of a combined quantum electron-nuclear dynamics is still missing. In this work, we aim to elucidate the theoretical basis for the widely used hopping rules. Naturally, we concentrate thereby on the formal aspects of the TSH. Using a Gaussian wave packet limit, we derive the transition rates governing the hopping process at a simple avoided level crossing. In this derivation, which gives insight into the physics underlying the hopping process, some essential features of the standard TSH algorithm are retrieved, namely (i) non-zero electronic transition rate ("hopping probability") at avoided crossings; (ii) rescaling of the nuclear velocities to conserve total energy; (iii) electronic transition rates linear in the nonadiabatic coupling vectors. The well-known Landau-Zener model is then used for illustration.

  5. Disabled Readers: Insight, Assessment, Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Diane J., Ed.

    Focusing on helping teachers to understand and help children who have reading disabilities, the 13 papers in this volume were prepared by practitioners at various levels from public school, community, and university settings. The papers included in part one offer insights into the concomitant aspects of reading difficulties. Specific topics…

  6. Psychology of Sport. Issues & Insights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, A. Craig, Ed.

    This book is designed to provide instructors and students in sport psychology courses with a learning instrument that combines the continuity of a textbook with the range of opinion, in-depth treatment of selected issues, and insight into research methods of a book of readings. The subject is divided into four topical categories. Under the heading…

  7. New Insights about Letter Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty Stahl, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    The acquisition of alphabetic knowledge (letter names, letter sounds, and letter forms) is an important predictor of later literacy achievement. This article describes research findings that provide new insights about how children learn the alphabetic principle and the implications for effective and efficient instruction of the alphabet. Teachers…

  8. Understanding intercultural transitions of medical students

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Nasser; Fisher, Ros

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this research was to explore the transition of medical students to an international branch campus of a medical university established in Bahrain. Methods In order to gain insights into this transition, we explored two culturally diverse systems of learning of the university and the local schools in Bahrain, using Communities of Practice as a lens for understanding transitions. Focus groups were conducted with secondary school teachers and first year medical students. Additionally, semi-structured interviews were conducted with university lecturers.   Results The findings suggest that, while Communities of Practice have been influential in contextualising transitions to university, this model does not seem to help us to fully understand intercultural transitions to the case-study university. Conclusions The research emphasises that more attention should be given to learner individual agency within this theory as a framework for understanding transitions. It also challenges approaches within medical education that attempt to standardise systems of learning through acquisition of established practices. PMID:25725207

  9. Giving Voice to Student and Alumnae Opposition during the Transition to Coeducation by a College for Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Rebecca Jean Grandstaff

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation provides insight into students' and alumnae's experiences during the transition and legal proceedings as their former college for women transitioned to coeducation. Previous research on the transition of single-sex colleges to coeducation has primarily examined the process from an organizational perspective. This study focuses on…

  10. Dynamic statistical models of biological cognition: insights from communications theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Rodrick

    2014-10-01

    Maturana's cognitive perspective on the living state, Dretske's insight on how information theory constrains cognition, the Atlan/Cohen cognitive paradigm, and models of intelligence without representation, permit construction of a spectrum of dynamic necessary conditions statistical models of signal transduction, regulation, and metabolism at and across the many scales and levels of organisation of an organism and its context. Nonequilibrium critical phenomena analogous to physical phase transitions, driven by crosstalk, will be ubiquitous, representing not only signal switching, but the recruitment of underlying cognitive modules into tunable dynamic coalitions that address changing patterns of need and opportunity at all scales and levels of organisation. The models proposed here, while certainly providing much conceptual insight, should be most useful in the analysis of empirical data, much as are fitted regression equations.

  11. Gas turbine combustor transition

    DOEpatents

    Coslow, Billy Joe; Whidden, Graydon Lane

    1999-01-01

    A method of converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit.

  12. Gas turbine combustor transition

    DOEpatents

    Coslow, B.J.; Whidden, G.L.

    1999-05-25

    A method is described for converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit. 7 figs.

  13. Insights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogner, Donna, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two methods to teach radioactive decay to secondary students with wide ranging abilities. Activities are designed to follow classroom discussions of atomic structure, transmutation, half life, and nuclear decay. Includes "The Tasmanian Empire: A Radioactive Dating Activity" and an exercise to teach concepts of half life without using…

  14. Insights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogner, Donna, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an approach to solving oxidation-reduction reactions. The advantage of this procedure for both acidic and basic equations is stressed and emphasizes the electrical nature of redox equations. (KR)

  15. Graduating into Start-up: Exploring the Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nabi, Ghulam; Holden, Rick; Walmsley, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of the exploratory research discussed in this paper was to generate insights into the complexity of the career-making processes involved in the transition from being a student to starting up a business. Using story-telling interviews, data were collected from fifteen graduates based in the Yorkshire region of the UK. Qualitative…

  16. Conceptualizing Transitions to Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyn, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of theories of the transition to young adulthood. It sets out the argument for conceptual renewal and discusses some implications of new patterns of transition for adult education.

  17. The Managerial Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kneeland, Steven J.

    1980-01-01

    Having identified the problem of managerial transition in a previous article (CE 510 277), the author outlines a strategy for change which includes performance appraisal, definition of the management structure, and counselling for the individual in transition. (SK)

  18. Insights into Parochial School Leadership from a New Generation of Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benscoter, Andy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to gather insights from current parochial school administrators who experience the day-to-day operations and expectations of the position. The role of the parochial principal has transitioned over the past decades to be a position requiring a variety of skills and abilities. Data collection occurred…

  19. Glass transition(s) of ionomers

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    Ionomers are predominantly nonpolar polymers that contain a small amount of bonded salt groups. Microphase separation of ion-rich microdomains occurs as a consequence of the thermodynamic incompatibility of the salt groups and the polymer matrix and associative interactions between salt groups. Associations of the salt groups usually increase the glass transition of the continuous matrix phase, presumably as a consequence of the inhibition of chain mobility that accompanies physical crosslinking. The central question raised in this paper is whether the dispersed ion-rich microphase exhibits a glass transition. Although no glass transition for the microphase is detected by calorimetry, a dynamic mechanical relaxation is commonly observed above the T{sub g} of the matrix phase. This transition has some of the attributes of a glass transition, but it is not clear what is the actual relaxation process that is measured. This paper discusses the effect of the ionic groups on the matrix glass transition, the origin of the high-temperature dynamic mechanical transition, and the effects of the addition of plasticizers on the T{sub g} of the matrix and the higher temperature mechanical relaxation.

  20. Phase Transition to Bundles of Flexible Supramolecular Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, B. A. H.; Bolhuis, P. G.; Fasolino, A.

    2008-05-01

    We report Monte Carlo simulations of the self-assembly of supramolecular polymers based on a model of patchy particles. We find a first-order phase transition, characterized by hysteresis and nucleation, toward a solid bundle of polymers, of length much greater than the average gas phase length. We argue that the bundling transition is the supramolecular equivalent of the sublimation transition, which results from a weak chain-chain interaction. We provide a qualitative equation of state that gives physical insight beyond the specific values of the parameters used in our simulations.

  1. Transition in Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The concept of a large disturbance bypass mechanism for the initiation of transition is reviewed and studied. This mechanism, or some manifestation thereof, is suspected to be at work in the boundary layers present in a turbine flow passage. Discussion is presented on four relevant subtopics: (1) the effect of upstream disturbances and wakes on transition; (2) transition prediction models, code development, and verification; (3) transition and turbulence measurement techniques; and (4) the hydrodynamic condition of low Reynolds number boundary layers.

  2. Transitivity of Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regenwetter, Michel; Dana, Jason; Davis-Stober, Clintin P.

    2011-01-01

    Transitivity of preferences is a fundamental principle shared by most major contemporary rational, prescriptive, and descriptive models of decision making. To have transitive preferences, a person, group, or society that prefers choice option "x" to "y" and "y" to "z" must prefer "x" to "z". Any claim of empirical violations of transitivity by…

  3. Transition: Terms and Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Ed

    This paper provides explanations and case examples of some terms and concepts related to transition of students with disabilities under 1997 amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Explanations and examples focus on the concepts of "statement of transition service needs" and "statement of needed transition services". The…

  4. "I Take Engineering with Me": Epistemological Transitions across an Engineering Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winberg, Christine; Winberg, Simon; Jacobs, Cecilia; Garraway, James; Engel-Hills, Penelope

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study epistemological transitions across an intended engineering curriculum and recommend strategies to assist students in attaining the increasingly complex concepts and insights that are necessary for transition to advanced levels of study. We draw on Legitimation Code Theory [Maton, Karl. 2014, "Knowledge and Knowers:…

  5. Quantifying the Qualitative: Measuring the Insight Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarman, Matthew S.

    2014-01-01

    No scales currently exist that measure variability in the insight experience. Two scales were created to measure two factors hypothesized to be key drivers of the insight experience: insight radicality (i.e., perceived deviation between previous and new problem representations) and restructuring experience (i.e., the subjective experience of the…

  6. Solid-solid phase transitions via melting in metals.

    PubMed

    Pogatscher, S; Leutenegger, D; Schawe, J E K; Uggowitzer, P J; Löffler, J F

    2016-01-01

    Observing solid-solid phase transitions in-situ with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution is a great challenge, and is often only possible via computer simulations or in model systems. Recently, a study of polymeric colloidal particles, where the particles mimic atoms, revealed an intermediate liquid state in the transition from one solid to another. While not yet observed there, this finding suggests that such phenomena may also occur in metals and alloys. Here we present experimental evidence for a solid-solid transition via the formation of a metastable liquid in a 'real' atomic system. We observe this transition in a bulk glass-forming metallic system in-situ using fast differential scanning calorimetry. We investigate the corresponding transformation kinetics and discuss the underlying thermodynamics. The mechanism is likely to be a feature of many metallic glasses and metals in general, and may provide further insight into phase transition theory. PMID:27103085

  7. Solid–solid phase transitions via melting in metals

    PubMed Central

    Pogatscher, S.; Leutenegger, D.; Schawe, J. E. K.; Uggowitzer, P. J.; Löffler, J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Observing solid–solid phase transitions in-situ with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution is a great challenge, and is often only possible via computer simulations or in model systems. Recently, a study of polymeric colloidal particles, where the particles mimic atoms, revealed an intermediate liquid state in the transition from one solid to another. While not yet observed there, this finding suggests that such phenomena may also occur in metals and alloys. Here we present experimental evidence for a solid–solid transition via the formation of a metastable liquid in a ‘real' atomic system. We observe this transition in a bulk glass-forming metallic system in-situ using fast differential scanning calorimetry. We investigate the corresponding transformation kinetics and discuss the underlying thermodynamics. The mechanism is likely to be a feature of many metallic glasses and metals in general, and may provide further insight into phase transition theory. PMID:27103085

  8. The INSIGHT SEIS VBB Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillier, S.; De Raucourt, S.; Lognonne, P. H.; Banerdt, B.; Mimoun, D.; Giardini, D.; Christensen, U. R.; Pike, W. T.; Zweifel, P.; Mance, D.; Bierwirth, M.; Laudet, P.; Perez, R.; Kerjean, L.; Hurst, K. J.; Mocquet, A.; Garcia, R. F.

    2012-12-01

    The SEIS experiment is the primary payload of the Interior Structure investigation using Seismology and Heat Transport (INSIGHT) Mission Proposal, submitted to NASA in the frame of the 2010 Discovery program, and selected for a competitive phase A study, together with two other projects. The objective of the INSIGHT SEIS experiment is the determination of the deep internal structure of Mars. In particular, geophysical parameters of first importance, such as the state (liquid/solid) and size of the core, structure of the mantle, shape of discontinuities, thickness of the crust will be determined by the experiment. It will measure seismic activity in a very broad band of signal, from the tidal frequencies (0.05 mHz) up to the short period frequencies (50 Hz), to address the widest range of scientific questions, from the state of the core to the meteoritic impact and quake rates. The instrument integrates a Very Broad Band (VBB) 3 axis seismometer, completed by another trihedron of MEMS short period seismometers, environmental sensors for pressure, wind and temperature, The sensors will be deployed on the Martian ground by a robotic arm from a Phoenix-type lander platform and protected by a wind and thermal shield. The sensor assembly, which contains all seismic sensors, the leveling system, as well as house-keeping and temperature measurements, will be deployed on the soil in order to allow the best possible mechanical coupling with the ground motion. The wind and thermal shield, the sensors' specific containers (vacuum sphere for VBBs) and a passive thermal compensation system will achieve a very high protection of the VBB against temperature and pressure variations, allowing the sensor to operate in the rough Martian thermal environment while reaching a deection threshold below 10-9 ms-2 Hz-1/2 in the VBB bandwidth. A dedicated electronics will manage the overall experiment and ultra-low noise, space qualified 24 bits A/D converters will perform the acquisition

  9. Theoretical insights into interprofessional education.

    PubMed

    Hean, Sarah; Craddock, Deborah; Hammick, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    This article argues for the need for theory in the practice of interprofessional education. It highlights the range of theories available to interprofessional educators and promotes the practical application of these to interprofessional learning and teaching. It summarises the AMEE Guides in Medical Education publication entitled Theoretical Insights into Interprofessional Education: AMEE Guide No. 62, where the practical application of three theories, social capital, social constructivism and a sociological perspective of interprofessional education are discussed in-depth through the lens of a case study. The key conclusions of these discussions are presented in this article. PMID:22288995

  10. Approaching the Distinction between Intuition and Insight

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhonglu; Lei, Yi; Li, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Intuition and insight share similar cognitive and neural basis. Though, there are still some essential differences between the two. Here in this short review, we discriminated between intuition, and insight in two aspects. First, intuition, and insight are toward different aspects of information processing. Whereas intuition involves judgment about “yes or no,” insight is related to “what” is the solution. Second, tacit knowledge play different roles in between intuition and insight. On the one hand, tacit knowledge is conducive to intuitive judgment. On the other hand, tacit knowledge may first impede but later facilitate insight occurrence. Furthermore, we share theoretical, and methodological views on how to access the distinction between intuition and insight. PMID:27555833

  11. Approaching the Distinction between Intuition and Insight.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhonglu; Lei, Yi; Li, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Intuition and insight share similar cognitive and neural basis. Though, there are still some essential differences between the two. Here in this short review, we discriminated between intuition, and insight in two aspects. First, intuition, and insight are toward different aspects of information processing. Whereas intuition involves judgment about "yes or no," insight is related to "what" is the solution. Second, tacit knowledge play different roles in between intuition and insight. On the one hand, tacit knowledge is conducive to intuitive judgment. On the other hand, tacit knowledge may first impede but later facilitate insight occurrence. Furthermore, we share theoretical, and methodological views on how to access the distinction between intuition and insight. PMID:27555833

  12. The Many Worlds of Transition Research.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narasimha, R.

    2007-01-01

    The transition from laminar to turbulent flow in a boundary layer is a complex phenomenon that may take different routes, each involving distinct stages governed by different, often not-yet unraveled dynamical principles. There are, surprisingly, questions concerning virtually every stage in the process, beginning with receptivity to external disturbances, the linear stability of spatially developing flows, different possible nonlinear end games, the formation and propagation of turbulent spots and the emergence of fully developed turbulent flow. There seems no doubt that the flow has to be seen as a forced, nonlinear spatio-temporal system, but the system is so complex that to extract simple insights is still very difficult.

  13. GOES-R: Satellite Insight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, Austin J.; Leon, Nancy J.; Novati, Alexander; Lincoln, Laura K.; Fisher, Diane K.

    2012-01-01

    GOES-R: Satellite Insight seeks to bring awareness of the GOES-R (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite -- R Series) satellite currently in development to an audience of all ages on the emerging medium of mobile games. The iPhone app (Satellite Insight) was created for the GOES-R Program. The app describes in simple terms the types of data products that can be produced from GOES-R measurements. The game is easy to learn, yet challenging for all audiences. It includes educational content and a path to further information about GOESR, its technology, and the benefits of the data it collects. The game features action-puzzle game play in which the player must prevent an overflow of data by matching falling blocks that represent different types of GOES-R data. The game adds more different types of data blocks over time, as long as the player can prevent a data overflow condition. Points are awarded for matches, and players can compete with themselves to beat their highest score.

  14. Gravitationally induced quantum transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we calculate the probability for resonantly inducing transitions in quantum states due to time-dependent gravitational perturbations. Contrary to common wisdom, the probability of inducing transitions is not infinitesimally small. We consider a system of ultracold neutrons, which are organized according to the energy levels of the Schrödinger equation in the presence of the Earth's gravitational field. Transitions between energy levels are induced by an oscillating driving force of frequency ω . The driving force is created by oscillating a macroscopic mass in the neighborhood of the system of neutrons. The neutron lifetime is approximately 880 sec while the probability of transitions increases as t2. Hence, the optimal strategy is to drive the system for two lifetimes. The transition amplitude then is of the order of 1.06 ×10-5, and hence with a million ultracold neutrons, one should be able to observe transitions.

  15. Moons over Jupiter: transits and shadow transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, J. H.; et al.

    2003-06-01

    There is no more beautiful illustration of orbital motions than the movements of Jupiter's satellites. Every six years, their movements are most strikingly displayed, when the jovian system is presented edge-on to Earth. This means that there is a higher frequency of multiple transits over the face of the planet, as all the moons transit across the equatorial zone, whereas in other years Ganymede and Callisto transit near the poles or not at all. Also, for a few months, the satellites pass in front of each other, displaying mutual eclipses and occultations. In 2002/2003 we have been able to observe a fine series of these multiple and mutual events. On the cover, and on these pages, are some of the highest-resolution images received.

  16. Transitions: The Evolution of Linguistic Replicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Simon

    Maynard Smith and Szathmáry (1995) propose a series of major transitions in the evolutionary history of life. Their work provides a rich framework for thinking about replication. They identified the importance of language in this light, but language is a new system of replication in more than one sense: it is both an enabler of cultural replicators with unlimited heredity, and also a new kind of evolutionary system itself. Iterated learning is the process of linguistic transmission, and it drives both language change and the transitions to qualitatively new kinds of linguistic system. By seeing language as an evolutionary system, the biggest payoff we get may be the ability to take biologists' insights into the evolution of life and apply them to the evolution of language.

  17. Elasticity and Inverse Temperature Transition in Elastin

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perticaroli, Stefania; Ehlers, Georg; Jalarvo, Niina; Katsaras, John; Nickels, Jonathan D.

    2015-09-22

    Structurally, elastin is protein and biomaterial that provides elasticity and resilience to a range of tissues. This work provides insights into the elastic properties of elastin and its peculiar inverse temperature transition (ITT). These features are dependent on hydration of elastin and are driven by a similar mechanism of hydrophobic collapse to an entropically favorable state. Moreover, when using neutron scattering, we quantify the changes in the geometry of molecular motions above and below the transition temperature, showing a reduction in the displacement of water-induced motions upon hydrophobic collapse at the ITT. Finally, we measured the collective vibrations of elastinmore » gels as a function of elongation, revealing no changes in the spectral features associated with local rigidity and secondary structure, in agreement with the entropic origin of elasticity.« less

  18. Elasticity and Inverse Temperature Transition in Elastin

    SciTech Connect

    Perticaroli, Stefania; Ehlers, Georg; Jalarvo, Niina; Katsaras, John; Nickels, Jonathan D.

    2015-09-22

    Structurally, elastin is protein and biomaterial that provides elasticity and resilience to a range of tissues. This work provides insights into the elastic properties of elastin and its peculiar inverse temperature transition (ITT). These features are dependent on hydration of elastin and are driven by a similar mechanism of hydrophobic collapse to an entropically favorable state. Moreover, when using neutron scattering, we quantify the changes in the geometry of molecular motions above and below the transition temperature, showing a reduction in the displacement of water-induced motions upon hydrophobic collapse at the ITT. Finally, we measured the collective vibrations of elastin gels as a function of elongation, revealing no changes in the spectral features associated with local rigidity and secondary structure, in agreement with the entropic origin of elasticity.

  19. Elasticity and Inverse Temperature Transition in Elastin.

    PubMed

    Perticaroli, Stefania; Ehlers, Georg; Jalarvo, Niina; Katsaras, John; Nickels, Jonathan D

    2015-10-15

    Elastin is a structural protein and biomaterial that provides elasticity and resilience to a range of tissues. This work provides insights into the elastic properties of elastin and its peculiar inverse temperature transition (ITT). These features are dependent on hydration of elastin and are driven by a similar mechanism of hydrophobic collapse to an entropically favorable state. Using neutron scattering, we quantify the changes in the geometry of molecular motions above and below the transition temperature, showing a reduction in the displacement of water-induced motions upon hydrophobic collapse at the ITT. We also measured the collective vibrations of elastin gels as a function of elongation, revealing no changes in the spectral features associated with local rigidity and secondary structure, in agreement with the entropic origin of elasticity. PMID:26722771

  20. Rotamerism-driven large magnitude host-guest binding change in a crown ether derivatized pyridinium-phenolate series.

    PubMed

    Ay, Emel; Hobeika, Nelly; Chaumeil, Hélène; Tschamber, Théophile; Jin, Ming; Versace, Davy-Louis; Malval, Jean-Pierre

    2016-03-17

    Two TICTOID-based pyridinium-phenolates bearing a crown ether macrocycle have been designed for the complexation of a potassium cation. The nucleophilicity of the intraannular phenolate -O(-) function can be strongly modulated by biaryl twisting. Such a structure/electronic transduction effect gives rise to a host-guest binding change by more than two orders of magnitude. PMID:26948128

  1. Dynamical Transition in polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yunfen; Markelz, Andrea

    2008-03-01

    Two of the possible causes for the so called dynamical transition (the rapid increase in flexibility for biomolecules at ˜ 200 K) are: thermally activated side chain diffusive motions with hydration dependent activation energies; or a glass transition in the biological water directly adjacent to the biomolecule. If the transition is strictly due to side chain activation, it should not depend on protein structure. Previously we demonstrated that the dynamical transition remains after tertiary structure was removed using THz time domain dielectric spectroscopy (0.2 -2.0 THz, 0.5-5ps). Here measurements on polyalanine as a function of chain length show that the dynamical transition does not occur for peptide length shorter than 5. However, the transition is observed for 5 mer and higher. Structural and simulation studies indicate that the 5 mer transiently occupies structured forms [1,2]. These results suggest that A) the dynamical transition is not due to thermally activated side chain motion and B) secondary structure is necessary for the dynamical transition. Secondary structure possibly induces sufficient ordering in the adjacent water to result in a fragile to strong glass transition resulting in increased protein flexibility [3]. [1] KAH Wildman et al. Solid State Nucl. Magn. Reson. 24 (2003) 94-109. [2] Yuguang Mu,et al. Proteins 58, (2005) 45-52. [3] S.H. Chen et al. PNAS (2006) 9012--9016.

  2. Photoinduced phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Bennemann, K H

    2011-02-23

    Optically induced ultrafast electronic excitations with sufficiently long lifetimes may cause strong effects on phase transitions like structural and nonmetal→metal ones and on supercooling, supersaturation, etc. Examples are the transitions diamond→graphite, graphite→graphene, non-metal→metal, solid→liquid and vapor→liquid, solid. Photoinduced formation of graphene and water condensation of saturated or supersaturated vapor due to increased bonding amongst water molecules are of particular interest. These nonequilibrium transitions are an ultrafast response, on a few hundred fs time scale, to the fast low to large energy electronic excitations. The energy of the photons is converted into electronic energy via electronic excitations changing the cohesive energy. This changes the chemical potential controlling the phase transition. In view of the advances in laser optics photon induced transitions are expected to become an active area in nonequilibrium physics and phase transition dynamics. Conservation laws like energy or angular momentum conservation control the time during which the transitions occur. Since the photon induced effects result from weakening or strengthening of the bonding between the atoms or molecules transitions like solid/liquid, etc can be shifted in both directions. Photoinduced transitions will be discussed from a unified point of view. PMID:21411879

  3. When higher working memory capacity hinders insight.

    PubMed

    DeCaro, Marci S; Van Stockum, Charles A; Wieth, Mareike B

    2016-01-01

    Higher working memory capacity (WMC) improves performance on a range of cognitive and academic tasks. However, a greater ability to control attention sometimes leads individuals with higher WMC to persist in using complex, attention-demanding approaches that are suboptimal for a given task. We examined whether higher WMC would hinder insight problem solving, which is thought to rely on associative processes that operate largely outside of close attentional control. In addition, we examined whether characteristics of the insight problems influence whether this negative relationship will be revealed. In Experiment 1, participants completed matchstick arithmetic problems, which require a similar initial problem representation for all problems. Higher WMC was associated with less accurate insight problem solving. In Experiment 2, participants completed insight word problems, which require substantially different representations for each problem. Higher WMC was again negatively associated with insight, but only after statistically controlling for shared variance between insight and incremental problem-solving accuracy. These findings suggest that WMC may benefit performance on fundamental processes common to both incremental and insight problem solving (e.g., initial problem representation), but hinder performance on the processes that are unique to insight (e.g., solution and restructuring). By considering the WMC of the individual, and the nature of the insight task, we may better understand the process of insight and how to best support it. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26120772

  4. An Observational Perspective of Transitional Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espaillat, C.; Muzerolle, J.; Najita, J.; Andrews, S.; Zhu, Z.; Calvet, N.; Kraus, S.; Hashimoto, J.; Kraus, A.; D'Alessio, P.

    Transitional disks are objects whose inner disk regions have undergone substantial clearing. The Spitzer Space Telescope produced detailed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of transitional disks that allowed us to infer their radial dust disk structure in some detail, revealing the diversity of this class of disks. The growing sample of transitional disks also opened up the possibility of demographic studies, which provided unique insights. There now exist (sub)millimeter and infrared images that confirm the presence of large clearings of dust in transitional disks. In addition, protoplanet candidates have been detected within some of these clearings. Transitional disks are thought to be a strong link to planet formation around young stars and are a key area to study if further progress is to be made on understanding the initial stages of planet formation. Here we provide a review and synthesis of transitional disk observations to date with the aim of providing timely direction to the field, which is about to undergo its next burst of growth as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) reaches its full potential. We discuss what we have learned about transitional disks from SEDs, color-color diagrams, and imaging in the (sub)millimeter and infrared. We note the limitations of these techniques, particularly with respect to the sizes of the clearings currently detectable, and highlight the need for pairing broadband SEDs with multi-wavelength images to paint a more detailed picture of transitional disk structure. We review the gas in transitional disks, keeping in mind that future observations with ALMA will give us unprecedented access to gas in disks, and also observed infrared variability pointing to variable transitional disk structure, which may have implications for disks in general. We then distill the observations into constraints for the main disk-clearing mechanisms proposed to date (i.e., photoevaporation, grain growth, and companions) and

  5. New geochemical insights into volcanic degassing.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Marie

    2008-12-28

    Magma degassing plays a fundamental role in controlling the style of volcanic eruptions. Whether a volcanic eruption is explosive, or effusive, is of crucial importance to approximately 500 million people living in the shadow of hazardous volcanoes worldwide. Studies of how gases exsolve and separate from magma prior to and during eruptions have been given new impetus by the emergence of more accurate and automated methods to measure volatile species both as volcanic gases and dissolved in the glasses of erupted products. The composition of volcanic gases is dependent on a number of factors, the most important being magma composition and the depth of gas-melt segregation prior to eruption; this latter parameter has proved difficult to constrain in the past, yet is arguably the most critical for controlling eruptive style. Spectroscopic techniques operating in the infrared have proved to be of great value in measuring the composition of gases at high temporal resolution. Such methods, when used in tandem with microanalytical geochemical investigations of erupted products, are leading to better constraints on the depth at which gases are generated and separated from magma. A number of recent studies have focused on transitions between explosive and effusive activity and have led to a better understanding of gas-melt segregation at basaltic volcanoes. Other studies have focused on degassing during intermediate and silicic eruptions. Important new results include the recognition of fluxing by deep-derived gases, which buffer the amount of dissolved volatiles in the melt at shallow depths, and the observation of gas flow up permeable conduit wall shear zones, which may be the primary mechanism for gas loss at the cusp of the most explosive and unpredictable volcanic eruptions. In this paper, I review current and future directions in the field of geochemical studies of volcanic degassing processes and illustrate how the new insights are beginning to change the way in

  6. Transition to Old Age (Transition to Retirement).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Simon

    Several conceptualizations and definitions of retirement have been proposed. One of them--the three-stage transition process--can be illustrated from studies in Israel: (1) leaving the old role; (2) going through the act of formal separation; and (3) adjusting to the new situation and role. Today's higher rate of survival into later years means…

  7. Novel percolation transitions and coupled catastrophes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, Raissa

    Collections of interdependent networks are at the core of modern society, spanning physical, biological and social systems. Simple mathematical models of the structure and function of networks can provide important insights into real-world systems, enhancing our ability to steer and control them. Here our focus is on abrupt changes in networks, due both to phase transitions and to jumping between bi-stable equilibria. We begin with an overview of novel classes of percolation phase transitions that result from repeated, small interventions intended to delay the transition. These new phenomena allow us to extend percolation approaches to modular networks, Brownian motion, and cluster growth dynamics. We then focus on abrupt transitions due to a system jumping between bi-stable equilibria, modeled as a cusp catastrophe in nonlinear dynamics. We show that when systems that each undergo a cusp catastrophe interact, we can observe a new phenomena of catastrophe-hopping leading to non-local cascading failures. Here an intermediate system facilitates the propagation of a sudden change or collapse, and we show that catastrophe hopping is consistent with the outbreak of protests observed during the Arab Spring of 2011.

  8. New Insights into Ovarian Function

    PubMed Central

    Pangas, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Infertility adversely affects many couples worldwide. Conversely, the exponential increase in world population threatens our planet and its resources. Therefore, a greater understanding of the fundamental cellular and molecular events that control the size of the primordial follicle pool and follicular development is of utmost importance to develop improved in vitro fertilization as well as to design novel approaches to regulate fertility. In this review we attempt to highlight some new advances in basic research of the mammalian ovary that have occurred in recent years focusing primarily on mouse models that have contributed to our understanding of ovarian follicle formation, development, and ovulation. We hope that these new insights into ovarian function will trigger more research and translation to clinically relevant problems. PMID:20839083

  9. Transitions in Spousal Caregiving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Lynda C.; Zdaniuk, Bozena; Schulz, Richard; Jackson, Sharon; Hirsch, Calvin

    2003-01-01

    Describes transitions over 5 years among community-dwelling elderly spouses into and within caregiving roles and associated health outcomes. The trajectory of health outcomes associated with caregiving was generally downward. Those who transitioned to heavy caregiving had more symptoms of depression, and poorer self-reported health and health…

  10. Good Transitions = Great Starts!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Our Children: The National PTA Magazine, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The smooth transition of outgoing and incoming board members and officers is of vital importance and can determine the PTA's success for years to come. The transition process is the responsibility of both incoming and outgoing officers and board members. It gives closure to those leaving their positions and allows those coming in to be properly…

  11. Children and Transition Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Betty Ruth

    Daily transitions in early childhood centers and classrooms include periods when children are completing one activity, preparing to begin a new activity, and moving from place to place in a room or building. Transition activities involve teaching techniques that prepare learners to listen, relax, sit down, move between locations or activities, and…

  12. Matter in transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Lara B.; Gray, James; Raghuram, Nikhil; Taylor, Washington

    2016-04-01

    We explore a novel type of transition in certain 6D and 4D quantum field theories, in which the matter content of the theory changes while the gauge group and other parts of the spectrum remain invariant. Such transitions can occur, for example, for SU(6) and SU(7) gauge groups, where matter fields in a three-index antisymmetric representation and the fundamental representation are exchanged in the transition for matter in the two-index antisymmetric representation. These matter transitions are realized by passing through superconformal theories at the transition point. We explore these transitions in dual F-theory and heterotic descriptions, where a number of novel features arise. For example, in the heterotic description the relevant 6D SU(7) theories are described by bundles on K3 surfaces where the geometry of the K3 is constrained in addition to the bundle structure. On the F-theory side, non-standard representations such as the three-index antisymmetric representation of SU( N) require Weierstrass models that cannot be realized from the standard SU( N) Tate form. We also briefly describe some other situations, with groups such as Sp(3), SO(12), and SU(3), where analogous matter transitions can occur between different representations. For SU(3), in particular, we find a matter transition between adjoint matter and matter in the symmetric representation, giving an explicit Weierstrass model for the F-theory description of the symmetric representation that complements another recent analogous construction.

  13. Transitioning between Clerkship Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltys, Stephen M.; Pary, Robert J.; Robinson, Stephen W.; Markwell, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors report on succession-planning for mid-level academic positions. Method: The authors describe the process of succession-planning between clerkship directors and the smooth transition resulting in one case. Results: Gradually transitioning allowed a new faculty person to assume the clerkship-director position with minimal…

  14. Researching Student Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voorhees, Richard A.; Smith, Gregory P.; Luan, Jing

    2006-01-01

    This article sketches a research agenda for the further study of community college student transitions. Specific techniques are depicted as are potential data sources that can be used to pursue that agenda. The role of student tracking systems in transition research is discussed as well as the applicability of national surveys to the study of…

  15. Transitions and Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilfeld, Ellen M., Ed.; Hanssen, Elizabeth, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    If children are to benefit from a healthy, supportive early childhood experience, it is important to strengthen transitions between early childhood experiences in educational and care settings and the more formal educational system. This issue of Coordinator's Notebook focuses on strengthening linkages and transitions between home, preschool, and…

  16. Boundary layer transition studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1995-01-01

    A small-scale wind tunnel previously used for turbulent boundary layer experiments was modified for two sets of boundary layer transition studies. The first study concerns a laminar separation/turbulent reattachment. The pressure gradient and unit Reynolds number are the same as the fully turbulent flow of Spalart and Watmuff. Without the trip wire, a laminar layer asymptotes to a Falkner & Skan similarity solution in the FPG. Application of the APG causes the layer to separate and a highly turbulent and approximately 2D mean flow reattachment occurs downstream. In an effort to gain some physical insight into the flow processes a small impulsive disturbance was introduced at the C(sub p) minimum. The facility is totally automated and phase-averaged data are measured on a point-by-point basis using unprecedently large grids. The evolution of the disturbance has been tracked all the way into the reattachment region and beyond into the fully turbulent boundary layer. At first, the amplitude decays exponentially with streamwise distance in the APG region, where the layer remains attached, i.e. the layer is viscously stable. After separation, the rate of decay slows, and a point of minimum amplitude is reached where the contours of the wave packet exhibit dispersive characteristics. From this point, exponential growth of the amplitude of the disturbance is observed in the detached shear layer, i.e. the dominant instability mechanism is inviscid. A group of large-scale 3D vortex loops emerges in the vicinity of the reattachment. Remarkably, the second loop retains its identify far downstream in the turbulent boundary layer. The results provide a level of detail usually associated with CFD. Substantial modifications were made to the facility for the second study concerning disturbances generated by Suction Holes for laminar flow Control (LFC). The test section incorporates suction through interchangeable porous test surfaces. Detailed studies have been made using isolated

  17. QM/MM Analysis of Transition States and Transition State Analogues in Metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Roston, D; Cui, Q

    2016-01-01

    Enzymology is approaching an era where many problems can benefit from computational studies. While ample challenges remain in quantitatively predicting behavior for many enzyme systems, the insights that often come from computations are an important asset for the enzymology community. Here we provide a primer for enzymologists on the types of calculations that are most useful for mechanistic problems in enzymology. In particular, we emphasize the integration of models that range from small active-site motifs to fully solvated enzyme systems for cross-validation and dissection of specific contributions from the enzyme environment. We then use a case study of the enzyme alkaline phosphatase to illustrate specific application of the methods. The case study involves examination of the binding modes of putative transition state analogues (tungstate and vanadate) to the enzyme. The computations predict covalent binding of these ions to the enzymatic nucleophile and that they adopt the trigonal bipyramidal geometry of the expected transition state. By comparing these structures with transition states found through free energy simulations, we assess the degree to which the transition state analogues mimic the true transition states. Technical issues worth treating with care as well as several remaining challenges to quantitative analysis of metalloenzymes are also highlighted during the discussion. PMID:27498640

  18. Transition to university: the role played by emotion.

    PubMed

    McMillan, W

    2013-08-01

    Students experience transition to university as challenging. Recent studies implicate emotion in university success. This article reports on a pilot study to examine the extent to which school to university transition is experienced as emotional. Understanding the role of emotion in this transition can inform mechanisms for student support. This qualitative study used focus group interviews to elicit insider accounts of transition. The pilot cohort consisted of a tutorial group of twenty-eight students from within the class of one hundred and eight-first-year students at one Faculty of Dentistry in South Africa. Three focus group interviews were conducted. Issues identified in the literature as significant were used to analyse the data. Eleven descriptive tags related to transition and associated with emotion were identified from the data. These were clustered into four themes - 'academic challenges', 'friends and family', 'outside constraints' and 'identity'. Findings suggest that emotions are a natural part of the experience of transition. Drawing on insights of students' emotional needs, it is suggested that students in transition need a roadmap and a guide. A framework, to be used as a roadmap, is suggested. Peer mentoring is discussed as a mechanism for mediating the framework and thus for supporting students in the transition. PMID:23815694

  19. A Posteriori Transit Probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Daniel J.; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2013-08-01

    Given the radial velocity (RV) detection of an unseen companion, it is often of interest to estimate the probability that the companion also transits the primary star. Typically, one assumes a uniform distribution for the cosine of the inclination angle i of the companion's orbit. This yields the familiar estimate for the prior transit probability of ~Rlowast/a, given the primary radius Rlowast and orbital semimajor axis a, and assuming small companions and a circular orbit. However, the posterior transit probability depends not only on the prior probability distribution of i but also on the prior probability distribution of the companion mass Mc, given a measurement of the product of the two (the minimum mass Mc sin i) from an RV signal. In general, the posterior can be larger or smaller than the prior transit probability. We derive analytic expressions for the posterior transit probability assuming a power-law form for the distribution of true masses, dΓ/dMcvpropMcα, for integer values -3 <= α <= 3. We show that for low transit probabilities, these probabilities reduce to a constant multiplicative factor fα of the corresponding prior transit probability, where fα in general depends on α and an assumed upper limit on the true mass. The prior and posterior probabilities are equal for α = -1. The posterior transit probability is ~1.5 times larger than the prior for α = -3 and is ~4/π times larger for α = -2, but is less than the prior for α>=0, and can be arbitrarily small for α > 1. We also calculate the posterior transit probability in different mass regimes for two physically-motivated mass distributions of companions around Sun-like stars. We find that for Jupiter-mass planets, the posterior transit probability is roughly equal to the prior probability, whereas the posterior is likely higher for Super-Earths and Neptunes (10 M⊕ - 30 M⊕) and Super-Jupiters (3 MJup - 10 MJup), owing to the predicted steep rise in the mass function toward smaller

  20. A Density-Independent Flocking Transition in Confluent Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czajkowski, Michael; Bi, Dapeng; Manning, M. Lisa; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    Some of us recently demonstrated a density-independent solid-liquid transition in confluent tissues controlled by cell motility and a cell shape parameter measuring the interplay of cortical tension and cell-cell adhesion. An important insight of this work is that the rigidity and dynamics of cell layers depends sensitively on cell shape. To explore the influence of cell shape on collective states, we have constructed continuum equations that couple a scalar field describing cell-shape anisotropy to cell polarization. The model displays a density independent transition to a polarized state of elongated cells driven by a cellular ``shape-index'' parameter. We map out the phase diagram using linear stability analysis and numerical solution of the nonlinear hydrodynamic equations. The proposed transition constitutes a density-independent flocking transition. We acknowledge support from The Simons Foundation and NSF-DGE-1068780.

  1. Extrasolar Planetary Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Andrew Collier

    An extrasolar planet will transit the visible hemisphere of its host star if its orbital plane lies sufficiently close to the observer's line of sight. The resulting periodic dips in stellar flux reveal key system parameters, including the density of the host star and, if radial-velocity observations are available, the surface gravitational acceleration of the planet. In this chapter I present the essential methodology for modelling the time-dependent flux variation during a transit, and its use in determining the posterior probability distribution for the physical parameters of the system. Large-scale searches for transiting systems are an efficient way of discovering planets whose bulk densities, and hence compositions, can be accessed if their masses can also be determined. I present algorithms for detrending large ensembles of light curves, for searching for transit-like signals among them. I also discuss methods for identifying diluted stellar eclipsing binaries mimicking planetary transit signals, and validation of transit candidates too faint for radial-velocity follow-up. I review the use of time-resolved spectrophotometry and high-resolution spectroscopy during transits to identify the molecular constituents of exoplanetary atmospheres.

  2. Predictability of critical transitions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaozhu; Kuehn, Christian; Hallerberg, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Critical transitions in multistable systems have been discussed as models for a variety of phenomena ranging from the extinctions of species to socioeconomic changes and climate transitions between ice ages and warm ages. From bifurcation theory we can expect certain critical transitions to be preceded by a decreased recovery from external perturbations. The consequences of this critical slowing down have been observed as an increase in variance and autocorrelation prior to the transition. However, especially in the presence of noise, it is not clear whether these changes in observation variables are statistically relevant such that they could be used as indicators for critical transitions. In this contribution we investigate the predictability of critical transitions in conceptual models. We study the quadratic integrate-and-fire model and the van der Pol model under the influence of external noise. We focus especially on the statistical analysis of the success of predictions and the overall predictability of the system. The performance of different indicator variables turns out to be dependent on the specific model under study and the conditions of accessing it. Furthermore, we study the influence of the magnitude of transitions on the predictive performance. PMID:26651760

  3. Predictability of critical transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaozhu; Kuehn, Christian; Hallerberg, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Critical transitions in multistable systems have been discussed as models for a variety of phenomena ranging from the extinctions of species to socioeconomic changes and climate transitions between ice ages and warm ages. From bifurcation theory we can expect certain critical transitions to be preceded by a decreased recovery from external perturbations. The consequences of this critical slowing down have been observed as an increase in variance and autocorrelation prior to the transition. However, especially in the presence of noise, it is not clear whether these changes in observation variables are statistically relevant such that they could be used as indicators for critical transitions. In this contribution we investigate the predictability of critical transitions in conceptual models. We study the quadratic integrate-and-fire model and the van der Pol model under the influence of external noise. We focus especially on the statistical analysis of the success of predictions and the overall predictability of the system. The performance of different indicator variables turns out to be dependent on the specific model under study and the conditions of accessing it. Furthermore, we study the influence of the magnitude of transitions on the predictive performance.

  4. First insights into disassembled "evapotranspiration"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chormański, Jarosław; Kleniewska, Małgorzata; Berezowski, Tomasz; Szporak-Wasilewska, Sylwia; Okruszko, Tomasz; Szatyłowicz, Jan; Batelaan, Okke

    2015-04-01

    In this work we present an initial data analysis obtained from a complex tool for measuring water fluxes in wetland ecosystems. The tool was designed to quantify processes related to interception storage on plants leafs. The measurements are conducted by combining readings from various instruments, including: eddy covariance tower (EC), field spectrometer, SapFlow system, rain gauges above and under canopy, soil moisture probes and other. The idea of this set-up is to provide continuous measurement of overall water flux from the ecosystem (EC tower), intercepted water volume and timing (field spectrometers), through-fall (rain gauges above and under canopy), transpiration (SapFlow), evaporation and soil moisture (soil moisture probes). Disassembling the water flux to the above components allows giving more insight to the interception related processes and differentiates them fromthe total evapotranspiration. The measurements are conducted in the Upper Biebrza Basin (NE Poland). The study area is part of the valley and is covered by peat soils (mainly peat moss with the exception of areas near the river) and receives no inundations waters of the Biebrza. The plant community of Agrostietum-Carici caninae has a dominant share here creating an up to 0.6 km wide belt along the river. The area is covered also by Caricion lasiocarpae as well as meadows and pastures Molinio-Arrhenatheretea, Phragmitetum communis. Sedges form a hummock pattern characteristic for the sedge communities in natural river valleys with wetland vegetation. The main result of the measurement set-up will be the analyzed characteristics and dynamics of interception storage for sedge ecosystems and a developed methodology for interception monitoring by use spectral reflectance technique. This will give a new insight to processes of evapotranspiration in wetlands and its component transpiration, evaporation from interception and evaporation from soil. Moreover, other important results of this project

  5. Holographic magnetic phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Lifschytz, Gilad; Lippert, Matthew

    2009-09-15

    We study four-dimensional interacting fermions in a strong magnetic field, using the holographic Sakai-Sugimoto model of intersecting D4- and D8-branes in the deconfined, chiral-symmetric parallel phase. We find that as the magnetic field is varied, while staying in the parallel phase, the fermions exhibit a first-order phase transition in which their magnetization jumps discontinuously. Properties of this transition are consistent with a picture in which some of the fermions jump to the lowest Landau level. Similarities to known magnetic phase transitions are discussed.

  6. Insight Into Neurocognitive Dysfunction in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Medalia, Alice; Thysen, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Insight into psychotic symptoms is typically poor in schizophrenia; however, it is not known whether insight into neurocognitive impairment is similarly impaired. Most people with schizophrenia experience cognitive dysfunction, and the deficits in attention, memory, and critical thinking have been associated with poor functional outcome. As new treatments are developed for the cognitive impairments, it will be important to know whether patients will be receptive to yet another therapy. Insight is an important factor in treatment compliance and treatment outcome; however, it is not known if patients have insight into their cognitive dysfunction. In order to assess insight into neuro cognitive dysfunction, 75 subjects were administered the Measure of Insight into Cognition–Clinician Rated, a newly created measure based on the Scale to Access the Unawareness of Mental Disorder, that assesses insight into cognitive impairment. Subjects were also administered the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia and Independent Living Scale–Problem Solving to objectively assess neuropsychological status and problem-solving skills needed for independent living. Results demonstrated that virtually all subjects had cognitive impairment, yet insight into their neuro cognitive symptoms was limited. This finding has potential implications for treatment programs seeking to improve cognitive functioning in schizophrenia PMID:18199632

  7. Mining Login Data for Actionable Student Insight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agnihotri, Lalitha; Aghababyan, Ani; Mojarad, Shirin; Riedesel, Mark; Essa, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    Student login data is a key resource for gaining insight into their learning experience. However, the scale and the complexity of this data necessitate a thorough exploration to identify potential actionable insights, thus rendering it less valuable compared to student achievement data. To compensate for the underestimation of login data…

  8. Working wonders? investigating insight with magic tricks.

    PubMed

    Danek, Amory H; Fraps, Thomas; von Müller, Albrecht; Grothe, Benedikt; Ollinger, Michael

    2014-02-01

    We propose a new approach to differentiate between insight and noninsight problem solving, by introducing magic tricks as problem solving domain. We argue that magic tricks are ideally suited to investigate representational change, the key mechanism that yields sudden insight into the solution of a problem, because in order to gain insight into the magicians' secret method, observers must overcome implicit constraints and thus change their problem representation. In Experiment 1, 50 participants were exposed to 34 different magic tricks, asking them to find out how the trick was accomplished. Upon solving a trick, participants indicated if they had reached the solution either with or without insight. Insight was reported in 41.1% of solutions. The new task domain revealed differences in solution accuracy, time course and solution confidence with insight solutions being more likely to be true, reached earlier, and obtaining higher confidence ratings. In Experiment 2, we explored which role self-imposed constraints actually play in magic tricks. 62 participants were presented with 12 magic tricks. One group received verbal cues, providing solution relevant information without giving the solution away. The control group received no informative cue. Experiment 2 showed that participants' constraints were suggestible to verbal cues, resulting in higher solution rates. Thus, magic tricks provide more detailed information about the differences between insightful and noninsightful problem solving, and the underlying mechanisms that are necessary to have an insight. PMID:24300080

  9. Functional Insights from Structural Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Forouhar,F.; Kuzin, A.; Seetharaman, J.; Lee, I.; Zhou, W.; Abashidze, M.; Chen, Y.; Montelione, G.; Tong, L.; et al

    2007-01-01

    Structural genomics efforts have produced structural information, either directly or by modeling, for thousands of proteins over the past few years. While many of these proteins have known functions, a large percentage of them have not been characterized at the functional level. The structural information has provided valuable functional insights on some of these proteins, through careful structural analyses, serendipity, and structure-guided functional screening. Some of the success stories based on structures solved at the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (NESG) are reported here. These include a novel methyl salicylate esterase with important role in plant innate immunity, a novel RNA methyltransferase (H. influenzae yggJ (HI0303)), a novel spermidine/spermine N-acetyltransferase (B. subtilis PaiA), a novel methyltransferase or AdoMet binding protein (A. fulgidus AF{_}0241), an ATP:cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase (B. subtilis YvqK), a novel carboxysome pore (E. coli EutN), a proline racemase homolog with a disrupted active site (B. melitensis BME11586), an FMN-dependent enzyme (S. pneumoniae SP{_}1951), and a 12-stranded {beta}-barrel with a novel fold (V. parahaemolyticus VPA1032).

  10. Iron and cancer: recent insights.

    PubMed

    Manz, David H; Blanchette, Nicole L; Paul, Bibbin T; Torti, Frank M; Torti, Suzy V

    2016-03-01

    Iron is an essential dietary element. However, the ability of iron to cycle between oxidized and reduced forms also renders it capable of contributing to free radical formation, which can have deleterious effects, including promutagenic effects that can potentiate tumor formation. Dysregulation of iron metabolism can increase cancer risk and promote tumor growth. Cancer cells exhibit an enhanced dependence on iron relative to their normal counterparts, a phenomenon we have termed iron addiction. Work conducted in the past few years has revealed new cellular processes and mechanisms that deepen our understanding of the link between iron and cancer. Control of iron efflux through the combined action of ferroportin, an iron efflux pump, and its regulator hepcidin appears to play an important role in tumorigenesis. Ferroptosis is a form of iron-dependent cell death involving the production of reactive oxygen species. Specific mechanisms involved in ferroptosis, including depletion of glutathione and inhibition of glutathione peroxidase 4, have been uncovered. Ferritinophagy is a newly identified mechanism for degradation of the iron storage protein ferritin. Perturbations of mechanisms that control transcripts encoding proteins that regulate iron have been observed in cancer cells, including differences in miRNA, methylation, and acetylation. These new insights may ultimately provide new therapeutic opportunities for treating cancer. PMID:26890363

  11. Structural Insight into Proteorhodopsin Oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Katherine M.; Voska, Jeda; Kinnebrew, Maia; Pavlova, Anna; Junk, Matthias J.N.; Han, Songi

    2013-01-01

    Oligomerization has important functional implications for many membrane proteins. However, obtaining structural insight into oligomeric assemblies is challenging, as they are large and resist crystallization. We focus on proteorhodopsin (PR), a protein with seven transmembrane α-helices that was found to assemble to hexamers in densely packed lipid membrane, or detergent-solubilized environments. Yet, the structural organization and the subunit interface of these PR oligomers were unknown. We used site-directed spin-labeling together with electron spin-resonance lineshape and Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization analysis to construct a model for the specific orientation of PR subunits within the hexameric complex. We found intersubunit distances to average 16 Å between neighboring 55 residues and that residues 177 are >20 Å apart from each other. These distance constraints show that PR has a defined and radial orientation within a hexamer, with the 55-site of the A-B loop facing the hexamer core and the 177-site of the E-F loop facing the hexamer exterior. Dynamic nuclear polarization measurements of the local solvent dynamics complement the electron spin-resonance-based distance analysis, by resolving whether protein surfaces at positions 55, 58, and 177 are exposed to solvent, or covered by protein-protein or protein-detergent contacts. PMID:23442869

  12. Electronic Transitions in f-electron Metals at High Pressures:

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C; Maddox, B; Lazicki, A; Iota, V; Klepeis, J P; McMahan, A

    2007-02-08

    This study was to investigate unusual phase transitions driven by electron correlation effects that occur in many f-band transition metals and are often accompanied by large volume changes: {approx}20% at the {delta}-{alpha} transition in Pu and 5-15% for analogous transitions in Ce, Pr, and Gd. The exact nature of these transitions has not been well understood, including the short-range correlation effects themselves, their relation to long-range crystalline order, the possible existence of remnants of the transitions in the liquid, the role of magnetic moments and order, the critical behavior, and dynamics of the transitions, among other issues. Many of these questions represent forefront physics challenges central to Stockpile materials and are also important in understanding the high-pressure behavior of other f- and d-band transition metal compounds including 3d-magnetic transition monoxide (TMO, TM=Mn, Fe, Co, Ni). The overarching goal of this study was, therefore, to understand the relationships between crystal structure and electronic structure of transition metals at high pressures, by using the nation's brightest third-generation synchrotron x-ray at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Significant progresses have been made, including new discoveries of the Mott transition in MnO at 105 GPa and Kondo-like 4f-electron dehybridization and new developments of high-pressure resonance inelastic x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray emission spectroscopy. These scientific discoveries and technology developments provide new insights and enabling tools to understand scientific challenges in stockpile materials. The project has broader impacts in training two SEGRF graduate students and developing an university collaboration (funded through SSAAP).

  13. Circadian Insights into Motivated Behavior.

    PubMed

    Antle, Michael C; Silver, Rae

    2016-01-01

    For an organism to be successful in an evolutionary sense, it and its offspring must survive. Such survival depends on satisfying a number of needs that are driven by motivated behaviors, such as eating, sleeping, and mating. An individual can usually only pursue one motivated behavior at a time. The circadian system provides temporal structure to the organism's 24 hour day, partitioning specific behaviors to particular times of the day. The circadian system also allows anticipation of opportunities to engage in motivated behaviors that occur at predictable times of the day. Such anticipation enhances fitness by ensuring that the organism is physiologically ready to make use of a time-limited resource as soon as it becomes available. This could include activation of the sympathetic nervous system to transition from sleep to wake, or to engage in mating, or to activate of the parasympathetic nervous system to facilitate transitions to sleep, or to prepare the body to digest a meal. In addition to enabling temporal partitioning of motivated behaviors, the circadian system may also regulate the amplitude of the drive state motivating the behavior. For example, the circadian clock modulates not only when it is time to eat, but also how hungry we are. In this chapter we explore the physiology of our circadian clock and its involvement in a number of motivated behaviors such as sleeping, eating, exercise, sexual behavior, and maternal behavior. We also examine ways in which dysfunction of circadian timing can contribute to disease states, particularly in psychiatric conditions that include adherent motivational states. PMID:26419240

  14. Communication: The cluster vapor to cluster solid transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweatman, Martin B.; Lue, Leo

    2016-05-01

    Until now, depletion induced transitions have been the hallmark of multicomponent systems only. Monte Carlo simulations reveal a depletion-induced phase transition from cluster vapor to cluster solid in a one-component fluid with competing short range and long range interactions. This confirms a prediction made by earlier theoretical work. Analysis of renormalized cluster-cluster and cluster-vapor interactions suggests that a cluster liquid is also expected within a very narrow range of model parameters. These insights could help identify the mechanisms of clustering in experiments and assist the design of colloidal structures through engineered self-assembly.

  15. Parity-violating electric-dipole transitions in helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiller, J.; Sucher, J.; Bhatia, A. K.; Feinberg, G.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines parity-violating electric-dipole transitions in He in order to gain insight into the reliability of approximate calculations which are carried out for transitions in many-electron atoms. The contributions of the nearest-lying states are computed with a variety of wave functions, including very simple product wave functions, Hartree-Fock functions and Hylleraas-type wave functions with up to 84 parameters. It is found that values of the matrix elements of the parity-violating interaction can differ considerably from the values obtained from the good wave functions, even when these simple wave functions give accurate values for the matrix elements in question

  16. Overview of EMF 22 U.S. Transition Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Fawcett, Allen A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; De La Chesnaye, Francisco; Reilly, J. M.; Weyant, John

    2010-01-01

    The Energy Modeling Forum 22 study included a set of U.S. transition scenarios designed to bracket a range of potential U.S. climate policy goals. Models from the six teams that participated in this part of the study include models that have been prominently involved in analyzing proposed U.S. climate legislation, as well as models that have been involved in the Climate Change Science Program and other parts of this EMF 22 study. This paper presents an overview of the results from the U.S. transition scenarios, and provides insights into the comparison of results from the participating models.

  17. Geomagnetic polarity transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Ronald T.; McFadden, Phillip L.

    1999-05-01

    The top of Earth's liquid outer core is nearly 2900 km beneath Earth's surface, so we will never be able to observe it directly. This hot, dense, molten iron-rich body is continuously in motion and is the source of Earth's magnetic field. One of the most dynamic manifestations at Earth's surface of this fluid body is, perhaps, a reversal of the geomagnetic field. Unfortunately, the most recent polarity transition occurred at about 780 ka, so we have never observed a transition directly. It seems that a polarity transition spans many human lifetimes, so no human will ever witness the phenomenon in its entirety. Thus we are left with the tantalizing prospect that paleomagnetic records of polarity transitions may betray some of the secrets of the deep Earth. Certainly, if there are systematics in the reversal process and they can be documented, then this will reveal substantial information about the nature of the lowermost mantle and of the outer core. Despite their slowness on a human timescale, polarity transitions occur almost instantaneously on a geological timescale. This rapidity, together with limitations in the paleomagnetic recording process, prohibits a comprehensive description of any reversal transition both now and into the foreseeable future, which limits the questions that may at this stage be sensibly asked. The natural model for the geomagnetic field is a set of spherical harmonic components, and we are not able to obtain a reliable model for even the first few harmonic terms during a transition. Nevertheless, it is possible, in principle, to make statements about the harmonic character of a geomagnetic polarity transition without having a rigorous spherical harmonic description of one. For example, harmonic descriptions of recent geomagnetic polarity transitions that are purely zonal can be ruled out (a zonal harmonic does not change along a line of latitude). Gleaning information about transitions has proven to be difficult, but it does seem

  18. Alternative fuel transit buses

    SciTech Connect

    Motta, R.; Norton, P.; Kelly, K.

    1996-10-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory; this project was funded by DOE. One of NREL`s missions is to objectively evaluate the performance, emissions, and operating costs of alternative fuel vehicles so fleet managers can make informed decisions when purchasing them. Alternative fuels have made greater inroads into the transit bus market than into any other. Each year, the American Public Transit Association (APTA) surveys its members on their inventory and buying plans. The latest APTA data show that about 4% of the 50,000 transit buses in its survey run on an alternative fuel. Furthermore, 1 in 5 of the new transit buses that members have on order are alternative fuel buses. This program was designed to comprehensively and objectively evaluate the alternative fuels in use in the industry.

  19. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified. PMID:25666075

  20. The Heliosphere in Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, Justin

    2015-04-01

    The heliosphere consists of the connective tissue of particles, fields and photons that mediate our interaction with the Sun and with interstellar space. Exploration of the heliosphere yields clues to the nature of environments we cannot reach ourselves, illuminating the composition of the solar interior, or the acceleration of cosmic rays in the galaxy. The heliosphere is also a laboratory for us to understand the fundamental physics of magnetized plasma, from heating and instabilities to coupling with neutral gas and dust. This talk will review some of the most exciting recent results in the heliosphere with a focus on transitions: what we can learn by exploring transitions within the heliosphere, how the heliosphere is responding to the long term transition in solar activity, and how our very view of the heliosphere is in transition with upcoming missions such as Solar Probe Plus, Solar Orbiter and IMAP.

  1. Magellan in transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doody, Dave

    1993-01-01

    Aerobraking Magellan would provide the possibility of obtaining gravity field data for Venus all the way to the poles. Attempts to accomplish aerobraking, which began on May 25, 1993 in the Magellan Transition Experiment, are discussed.

  2. Oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    de Azevedo, Cristina G.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

    2002-01-18

    Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes, namely those of fulvalene, tercyclopentadienyl, quatercyclopentadienyl, and pentacyclopentadienyl(cyclopentadienyl) are the subject of this account. Thermal-, photo-, and redox chemistries of homo- and heteropolynuclear complexes are described.

  3. Transit Timing Variations

    NASA Video Gallery

    The animation shows the difference between planet transit timing of single and multiple planet system. In tightly packed planetary systems, the gravitational pull of the planets among themselves ca...

  4. High-pressure structural phase transition in MnWO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Fuertes, J.; Friedrich, A.; Gomis, O.; Errandonea, D.; Morgenroth, W.; Sans, J. A.; Santamaría-Pérez, D.

    2015-03-01

    The pressure-induced phase transition of the multiferroic manganese tungstate MnWO4 is studied on single crystals using synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. We observe the monoclinic P 2 /c to triclinic P 1 ¯ phase transition at 20.1 GPa and get insight on the phase transition mechanism from the appearance of tilted triclinic domains. Selective Raman spectroscopy experiments with single crystals have shown that the onset of the phase transition occurs 5 GPa below the previously reported pressure obtained from experiments performed with powder samples.

  5. Perceived Admiration and Transition to Parenthood for Black and White Married Couples

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Lance T.; Orbuch, Terri L.; Brown, Edna

    2014-01-01

    Perceived admiration was examined in this study as a mediator of marital quality and transition to parenthood among Black American and White American couples. Both positive and negative dimensions of marital quality were assessed for husbands (N = 148) and wives (N = 155) during their first and third years of marriage in a large-scale survey. Findings revealed that transitioning Black American husbands reported lower marital tension than transitioning White American husbands. Perceived admiration mediated the link between transition to parenthood and marital wellbeing for wives, and between transition to parenthood and marital tension for husbands. Results suggest that perceived admiration plays a critical role in understanding the transition to parenthood, regardless of race. Insights are offered for practitioners who provide relationship or parental counseling and education to couples during the transition to parenthood. PMID:25309110

  6. Stability, transition and turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    A glimpse is provided of the research program in stability, transition and turbulence based on numerical simulations. This program includes both the so-called abrupt and the restrained transition processes. Attention is confined to the prototype problems of channel flow and the parallel boundary layer in the former category and the Taylor-Couette flow in the latter category. It covers both incompressible flows and supersonic flows. Some representative results are presented.

  7. Stability, transition and turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    A glimpse is provided of the research program in stability, transition, and turbulence based on numerical simulations. This program includes both the so-called abrupt and the restrained transition processes. Attention is confined to the prototype problems of channel flow and the parallel boundary layer in the former category and the Taylor-Couette flow in the latter category. It covers both incompressible flows and supersonic flows. Some representative results are presented.

  8. Matter in transition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anderson, Lara B.; Gray, James; Raghuram, Nikhil; Taylor, Washington

    2016-04-13

    In this study, we explore a novel type of transition in certain 6D and 4D quantum field theories, in which the matter content of the theory changes while the gauge group and other parts of the spectrum remain invariant. Such transitions can occur, for example, for SU(6) and SU(7) gauge groups, where matter fields in a three-index antisymmetric representation and the fundamental representation are exchanged in the transition for matter in the two-index antisymmetric representation. These matter transitions are realized by passing through superconformal theories at the transition point. We explore these transitions in dual F-theory and heterotic descriptions, wheremore » a number of novel features arise. For example, in the heterotic description the relevant 6D SU(7) theories are described by bundles on K3 surfaces where the geometry of the K3 is constrained in addition to the bundle structure. On the F-theory side, non-standard representations such as the three-index antisymmetric representation of SU(N) require Weierstrass models that cannot be realized from the standard SU(N) Tate form. We also briefly describe some other situations, with groups such as Sp(3), SO(12), and SU(3), where analogous matter transitions can occur between different representations. For SU(3), in particular, we find a matter transition between adjoint matter and matter in the symmetric representation, giving an explicit Weierstrass model for the F-theory description of the symmetric representation that complements another recent analogous construction.« less

  9. Strong dependence of fluorescence quenching on the transition metal in layered transition metal dichalcogenide nanoflakes for nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Loo, Adeline Huiling; Bonanni, Alessandra; Pumera, Martin

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, the application of transition metal dichalcogenides for the development of biosensors has been receiving widespread attention from researchers, as demonstrated by the surge in studies present in the field. While different transition metal dichalcogenide materials have been employed for the fabrication of fluorescent biosensors with superior performance, no research has been conducted to draw comparisons across materials containing different transition metals. Herein, the performance of MoS2 and WS2 nanoflakes for the fluorescence detection of nucleic acids is assessed. It is discovered that, at the optimal amount, MoS2 and WS2 nanoflakes exhibit a similar degree of fluorescence quenching, at 75% and 71% respectively. However, MoS2 nanoflakes have better performance in the areas of detection range and selectivity than WS2 nanoflakes. The detection range achieved with MoS2 nanoflakes is 9.60-366 nM while 13.3-143 nM with WS2 nanoflakes. In the context of selectivity, MoS2 nanoflakes display a signal difference of 97.8% between complementary and non-complementary DNA targets, whereas WS2 nanoflakes only exhibit 44.3%. Such research is highly beneficial as it delivers vital insights on how the performance of a fluorescent biosensor can be affected by the transition metal present. Furthermore, these insights can assist in the selection of suitable transition metal dichalcogenide materials for utilization in biosensor development. PMID:27241269

  10. Mode Transitions in Hall Effect Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekerak, Michael J.; Longmier, Benjamin W.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Brown, Daniel L.; Hofer, Richard R.; Polk, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Mode transitions have been commonly observed in Hall Effect Thruster (HET) operation where a small change in a thruster operating parameter such as discharge voltage, magnetic field or mass flow rate causes the thruster discharge current mean value and oscillation amplitude to increase significantly. Mode transitions in a 6-kW-class HET called the H6 are induced by varying the magnetic field intensity while holding all other operating parameters constant and measurements are acquired with ion saturation probes and ultra-fast imaging. Global and local oscillation modes are identified. In the global mode, the entire discharge channel oscillates in unison and azimuthal perturbations (spokes) are either absent or negligible. Downstream azimuthally spaced probes show no signal delay between each other and are very well correlated to the discharge current signal. In the local mode, signals from the azimuthally spaced probes exhibit a clear delay indicating the passage of "spokes" and are not well correlated to the discharge current. These spokes are localized oscillations propagating in the ExB direction that are typically 10-20% of the mean value. In contrast, the oscillations in the global mode can be 100% of the mean value. The transition between global and local modes occurs at higher relative magnetic field strengths for higher mass flow rates or higher discharge voltages. The thrust is constant through mode transition but the thrust-to-power decreased by 25% due to increasing discharge current. The plume shows significant differences between modes with the global mode significantly brighter in the channel and the near-field plasma plume as well as exhibiting a luminous spike on thruster centerline. Mode transitions provide valuable insight to thruster operation and suggest improved methods for thruster performance characterization.

  11. Signal Transduction in Histidine Kinases: Insights from New Structures

    PubMed Central

    Bhate, Manasi P.; Molnar, Kathleen S.; Goulian, Mark; DeGrado, William F.

    2015-01-01

    Histidine kinases (HKs) are major players in bacterial signaling. There has been an explosion of new HK crystal structures in the last five years. We globally analyze the structures of HKs to yield insights into the mechanisms by which signals are transmitted to and across protein structures in this family. We interpret known enzymological data in the context of new structural data to show how asymmetry across the dimer interface is a key feature of signal transduction in HKs, and discuss how different HK domains undergo asymmetric-to-symmetric transitions during signal transduction and catalysis. A thermodynamic framework for signaling that encompasses these various properties is presented and the consequences of weak thermodynamic coupling are discussed. The synthesis of observations from enzymology, structural biology, protein engineering and thermodynamics paves the way for a deeper molecular understanding of histidine kinase signal transduction. PMID:25982528

  12. Fick's Insights on Liquid Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2004-10-07

    In 1855, Adolph Fick published ''On Liquid Diffusion'', mathematically treating salt movements in liquids as a diffusion process, analogous to heat diffusion. Less recognized is the fact that Fick also provided a detailed account of the implications of salt diffusion to transport through membranes. A careful look at Fick (1855) shows that his conceptualization of molecular diffusion was more comprehensive than could be captured with the mathematical methods available to him, and therefore his expression, referred to as Fick's Law, dealt only with salt flux. He viewed salt diffusion in liquids as a binary process, with salt moving in one way and water moving in the other. Fick's analysis of the consequences of such a binary process operating in a hydrophilic pore in a membrane offers insights that are relevant to earth systems. This paper draws attention to Fick's rationale, and its implications to hydrogeological systems. Fick (1829-1901; Figure 1), a gifted scientist, published the first book on medical physics (Fick, 1858), discussing the application of optics, solid mechanics, gas diffusion, and heat budget to biological systems. Fick's paper is divisible into two parts. The first describes his experimental verification of the applicability of Fourier's equation to liquid diffusion. The second is a detailed discussion of diffusion through a membrane. Although Fick's Law specifically quantifies solute flux, Fick visualized a simultaneous movement of water and stated, ''It is evident that a volume of water equal to that of the salt passes simultaneously out of the upper stratum into the lower.'' (Fick, 1855, p.30). Fick drew upon Fourier's model purely by analogy. He assumed that concentration gradient impelled salt movement, without inquiring why concentration gradient should constitute a driving force. As for water movement, he stated intuitively, ''a force of suction comes into play on each side of the membrane, proportional to the difference of concentration

  13. Bioanalytical insights into mediator lipidomics.

    PubMed

    Kasuga, Kie; Suga, Takahiro; Mano, Nariyasu

    2015-09-10

    The importance of lipids in health and disease has been widely acknowledged. Lipids are well known to undergo enzymatic and/or non-enzymatic conversions to lipid mediators (LMs), which demonstrate potent actions in various biological events, such as the regulation of cellular signaling pathways and the promotion and resolution of inflammation. LMs activate G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to exert various functions. Monitoring these mediators in disease is essential to uncover the mechanisms of pathogenesis for many diseases, such as asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, and cancer. Along with technical developments in mass spectrometry, highly sensitive and multiplexed analyses of LMs in the human periphery and other tissues have become available. These advancements enable the temporal and spatial profiling of LMs; therefore, the findings obtained from LM profiling are expected to decode pathology. As trace amounts of LMs can exert functions, the development of a highly sensitive, accurate, and robust analytical method is necessary. Although not mandatory, mediator lipidomics validation is becoming popular and remains challenging. Because LMs already exist in biological matrices, evaluations of the matrix effect and extraction efficiencies are important issues. Thus, more careful analyses are required. In this review, we focus on mediator lipidomics, including polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, and LMs derived from PUFAs, such as eicosanoids, lipoxins and resolvins. In addition to the recent progress in human mediator lipidomics, bioanalytical insights derived from this field (i.e., effective sample preparation from biological matrices and evaluation of the matrix effect) are described herein. PMID:25769667

  14. Rare insights into cancer biology.

    PubMed

    Adam, J; Yang, M; Soga, T; Pollard, P J

    2014-05-15

    Cancer-associated mutations have been identified in the metabolic genes succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), fumarate hydratase (FH) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH), advancing and challenging our understanding of cellular function and disease mechanisms and providing direct links between dysregulated metabolism and cancer. Some striking parallels exist in the cellular consequences of the genetic mutations within this triad of cancer syndromes, including accumulation of oncometabolites and competitive inhibition of 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases, particularly, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylases, JmjC domain-containing histone demethylases (part of the JMJD family) and the ten-eleven translocation (TET) family of 5methyl cytosine (5mC) DNA hydroxylases. These lead to activation of HIF-dependent oncogenic pathways and inhibition of histone and DNA demethylation. Mutations in FH, resulting in loss of enzyme activity, predispose affected individuals to a rare cancer, hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC), characterised by benign smooth muscle cutaneous and uterine tumours (leiomyomata) and an aggressive form of collecting duct and type 2 papillary renal cancer. Interestingly, loss of FH activity results in the accumulation of high levels of fumarate that can lead to the non-enzymatic modification of cysteine residues in multiple proteins (succination) and in some cases to their disrupted function. Here we consider that the study of rare diseases such as HLRCC, combining analyses of human tumours and cell lines with in vitro and in vivo murine models has provided novel insights into cancer biology associated with dysregulated metabolism and represents a useful paradigm for cancer research. PMID:23812428

  15. General trends of dihedral conformational transitions in a globular protein.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome; Smith, Jeremy C; McCammon, J Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Dihedral conformational transitions are analyzed systematically in a model globular protein, cytochrome P450cam, to examine their structural and chemical dependences through combined conventional molecular dynamics (cMD), accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) and adaptive biasing force (ABF) simulations. The aMD simulations are performed at two acceleration levels, using dihedral and dual boost, respectively. In comparison with cMD, aMD samples protein dihedral transitions approximately two times faster on average using dihedral boost, and ∼ 3.5 times faster using dual boost. In the protein backbone, significantly higher dihedral transition rates are observed in the bend, coil, and turn flexible regions, followed by the β bridge and β sheet, and then the helices. Moreover, protein side chains of greater length exhibit higher transition rates on average in the aMD-enhanced sampling. Side chains of the same length (particularly Nχ = 2) exhibit decreasing transition rates with residues when going from hydrophobic to polar, then charged and aromatic chemical types. The reduction of dihedral transition rates is found to be correlated with increasing energy barriers as identified through ABF free energy calculations. These general trends of dihedral conformational transitions provide important insights into the hierarchical dynamics and complex free energy landscapes of functional proteins. PMID:26799251

  16. The Work of Cultural Transition: An Emerging Model

    PubMed Central

    Ryba, Tatiana V.; Stambulova, Natalia B.; Ronkainen, Noora J.

    2016-01-01

    In today’s uncertain, fluid job market, transnational mobility has intensified. Though the concept of cultural transition is increasingly used in sport and career research, insight into the processes of how individuals produce their own development through work and relationships in shifting cultural patterns of meaning remains limited. The transnational industry of sports, in which athletes’ psychological adjustment to cultural transitions has implications for both performance and meaningful life, serves as a backdrop for this article. This study applied the life story method to interviews with 15 professional and semi-professional athletes, focusing particularly on the cultural transition aspect of their transnational athletic careers. The aims of the study were to identify the developmental tasks of cultural transitions and strategies/mechanisms through which cultural transitions were enacted. Three underlying mechanisms of the transition process that assisted athletic career adaptability were social repositioning, negotiation of cultural practices, and meaning reconstruction. Based on the data analyses, a temporal model of cultural transition is proposed. The results of this research provide professionals working in the fields of career counseling and migrant support with a content framework for enhancing migrant workers’ adaptabilities and psychological wellbeing. PMID:27047436

  17. The Work of Cultural Transition: An Emerging Model.

    PubMed

    Ryba, Tatiana V; Stambulova, Natalia B; Ronkainen, Noora J

    2016-01-01

    In today's uncertain, fluid job market, transnational mobility has intensified. Though the concept of cultural transition is increasingly used in sport and career research, insight into the processes of how individuals produce their own development through work and relationships in shifting cultural patterns of meaning remains limited. The transnational industry of sports, in which athletes' psychological adjustment to cultural transitions has implications for both performance and meaningful life, serves as a backdrop for this article. This study applied the life story method to interviews with 15 professional and semi-professional athletes, focusing particularly on the cultural transition aspect of their transnational athletic careers. The aims of the study were to identify the developmental tasks of cultural transitions and strategies/mechanisms through which cultural transitions were enacted. Three underlying mechanisms of the transition process that assisted athletic career adaptability were social repositioning, negotiation of cultural practices, and meaning reconstruction. Based on the data analyses, a temporal model of cultural transition is proposed. The results of this research provide professionals working in the fields of career counseling and migrant support with a content framework for enhancing migrant workers' adaptabilities and psychological wellbeing. PMID:27047436

  18. Using ontologies to study cell transitions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding, modelling and influencing the transition between different states of cells, be it reprogramming of somatic cells to pluripotency or trans-differentiation between cells, is a hot topic in current biomedical and cell-biological research. Nevertheless, the large body of published knowledge in this area is underused, as most results are only represented in natural language, impeding their finding, comparison, aggregation, and usage. Scientific understanding of the complex molecular mechanisms underlying cell transitions could be improved by making essential pieces of knowledge available in a formal (and thus computable) manner. Results We describe the outline of two ontologies for cell phenotypes and for cellular mechanisms which together enable the representation of data curated from the literature or obtained by bioinformatics analyses and thus for building a knowledge base on mechanisms involved in cellular reprogramming. In particular, we discuss how comprehensive ontologies of cell phenotypes and of changes in mechanisms can be designed using the entity-quality (EQ) model. Conclusions We show that the principles for building cellular ontologies published in this work allow deeper insights into the relations between the continuants (cell phenotypes) and the occurrents (cell mechanism changes) involved in cellular reprogramming, although implementation remains for future work. Further, our design principles lead to ontologies that allow the meaningful application of similarity searches in the spaces of cell phenotypes and of mechanisms, and, especially, of changes of mechanisms during cellular transitions. PMID:24103098

  19. Radiative Transitions in Charmonium from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; David Richards

    2006-01-17

    Radiative transitions between charmonium states offer an insight into the internal structure of heavy-quark bound states within QCD. We compute, for the first time within lattice QCD, the transition form-factors of various multipolarities between the lightest few charmonium states. In addition, we compute the experimentally unobservable, but physically interesting vector form-factors of the {eta}{sub c}, J/{psi} and {chi}{sub c0}. To this end we apply an ambitious combination of lattice techniques, computing three-point functions with heavy domain wall fermions on an anisotropic lattice within the quenched approximation. With an anisotropy {xi} = 3 at a{sub s} {approx} 0.1 fm we find a reasonable gross spectrum and a hyperfine splitting {approx}90 MeV, which compares favorably with other improved actions. In general, after extrapolation of lattice data at non-zero Q{sup 2} to the photopoint, our results agree within errors with all well measured experimental values. Furthermore, results are compared with the expectations of simple quark models where we find that many features are in agreement; beyond this we propose the possibility of constraining such models using our extracted values of physically unobservable quantities such as the J/{psi} quadrupole moment. We conclude that our methods are successful and propose to apply them to the problem of radiative transitions involving hybrid mesons, with the eventual goal of predicting hybrid meson photoproduction rates at the GlueX experiment.

  20. On transition rates in surface hopping.

    PubMed

    Escartín, J M; Romaniello, P; Stella, L; Reinhard, P-G; Suraud, E

    2012-12-21

    Trajectory surface hopping (TSH) is one of the most widely used quantum-classical algorithms for nonadiabatic molecular dynamics. Despite its empirical effectiveness and popularity, a rigorous derivation of TSH as the classical limit of a combined quantum electron-nuclear dynamics is still missing. In this work, we aim to elucidate the theoretical basis for the widely used hopping rules. Naturally, we concentrate thereby on the formal aspects of the TSH. Using a Gaussian wave packet limit, we derive the transition rates governing the hopping process at a simple avoided level crossing. In this derivation, which gives insight into the physics underlying the hopping process, some essential features of the standard TSH algorithm are retrieved, namely (i) non-zero electronic transition rate ("hopping probability") at avoided crossings; (ii) rescaling of the nuclear velocities to conserve total energy; (iii) electronic transition rates linear in the nonadiabatic coupling vectors. The well-known Landau-Zener model is then used for illustration. PMID:23267477

  1. Evolutionary paths in starbursting transition dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellenbusch, Kate Erika

    2008-10-01

    In this thesis we present an observational optical study of a subgroup of dwarf galaxies which have characteristics of a possible evolutionary transition between actively star-forming systems and inactive dwarf galaxies. The goal of this thesis is to assess the transition nature of these systems and gain insight into their evolutionary histories. Data for the investigation consist primarily of broad-band and narrow-band Ha images taken with the WIYN 0.9m telescope. We find that these galaxies contain central starbursts embedded in older, smooth, elliptical outer stellar envelopes. They also have small HI contents and apparently lack sufficient amounts of ISM to sustain high star formation rates over a significant cosmic timescale; gas exhaustion timescales are < 1 Gyr. We also find these objects have surprisingly high HII region oxygen abundances with values near solar. This suggests the starburst came from internal gas that was previously enriched and that a significant fraction of the synthesized metals are retained. Additionally, these systems are located in loose groups and are not currently interacting with any nearby galaxies. Thus their origins are not immediately clear. We explore possible evolutionary histories for such starburst "transition" dwarf galaxies based on this puzzling set of characteristics and results from moderately deep optical imaging. We consider mechanisms where the starbursts are tied either to interactions with other galaxies or to the state of the interstellar medium.

  2. Venus Transit 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, L. A.; Odenwald, S. F.

    2002-09-01

    December 6th, 1882 was the last transit of the planet Venus across the disk of the sun. It was heralded as an event of immense interest and importance to the astronomical community as well as the public at large. There have been only six such occurrences since Galileo first trained his telescope on the heavens in 1609 and on Venus in 1610 where he concluded that Venus had phases like the moon and appeared to get larger and smaller over time. Many historians consider this the final nail in the coffin of the Ptolemaic, Earth centered solar system. In addition, each transit has provided unique opportunities for discovery such as measurement and refinement of the astronomical unit, calculation of longitudes on the earth, and detection of Venus' atmosphere. The NASA Sun Earth Connection Education Forum in partnership with the Solar System Exploration Forum, DPS, and a number of NASA space missions is developing plans for an international education program centered around the June 8, 2004 Venus transit. The transit will be visible in its entirety from Europe and partially from the East Coast of the United States. We will use a series of robotic observatories including the Telescopes In Education network distributed in latitude to provide observations of the transit that will allow middle and high school students to calculate the A.U. through application of parallax. We will also use Venus transit as a probe of episodes in American history (e.g. 1769: revolutionary era, 1882: post civil war era, and 2004: modern era). Museums and planetariums in the US and Europe will offer real time viewing of the transit and conduct educational programs through professional development seminars, public lectures, and planetarium shows. We are interested in soliciting advice from the research community to coordinate professional research interests with this program.

  3. Starch phosphorylation: insights and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mahlow, Sebastian; Orzechowski, Sławomir; Fettke, Joerg

    2016-07-01

    During starch metabolism, the phosphorylation of glucosyl residues of starch, to be more precise of amylopectin, is a repeatedly observed process. This phosphorylation is mediated by dikinases, the glucan, water dikinase (GWD) and the phosphoglucan, water dikinase (PWD). The starch-related dikinases utilize ATP as dual phosphate donor transferring the terminal γ-phosphate group to water and the β-phosphate group selectively to either C6 position or C3 position of a glucosyl residue within amylopectin. By the collaborative action of both enzymes, the initiation of a transition of α-glucans from highly ordered, water-insoluble state to a less order state is realized and thus the initial process of starch degradation. Consequently, mutants lacking either GWD or PWD reveal a starch excess phenotype as well as growth retardation. In this review, we focus on the increased knowledge collected over the last years related to enzymatic properties, the precise definition of the substrates, the physiological implications, and discuss ongoing questions. PMID:27147464

  4. RTGs on Transit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dassoulas, John; McNutt, Ralph L.

    2007-01-01

    Transit, the US Navy's Navigation Satellite System was conceived at the Applied Physics Laboratory in 1957 by observing the Doppler shift while tracking Sputnik I. As spacecraft development proceeded there was concern about the ability of batteries to maintain the hermetic seal over a 5-year operational life requirement; therefore, alternate energy sources were investigated. The radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) concept was pursued and resulted in the launch of SNAP 3s, providing partial power on both Transit 4A and 4B. SNAP 9s provided full power on three Transit 5BNs. All launches occurred in the early 1960s. When the U.S. conducted the high altitude nuclear test from Johnson Island, several spacecraft were lost due to artificial enhancement of charged particles in the Earth's magnetosphere resulting in rapid degradation of solar cell power production. This led to the decision to have both an RTG and Solar cell/battery design for Transit power systems; hence, a new RTG design, with a separable heat source and radiative coupling to the thermoelectric elements, was flown on TRIAD. This pioneering effort provided the impetus for future RTGs on interplanetary spacecraft. This paper describes the origin and purpose of the Transit program and provides details on the five satellites in that program that were powered by the first American RTGs used in space. The rationale and some of the challenges inherent in that use are also described.

  5. Transition and laminar instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    The linear stability theory was applied to the problem of boundary layer transition in incompressible flow. The theory was put into a form suitable for three-dimensional boundary layers; both the temporal and spatial theories were examined; and a generalized Gaster relation for three-dimensional boundary layers was derived. Numerical examples include the stability characteristics of Falkner-Skan boundary layers, the accuracy of the two-dimensional Gaster relation for these boundary layers, and the magnitude and direction of the group velocity for oblique waves in the Blasius boundary layer. Available experiments which bear on the validity of stability theory and its relation to transition are reviewed and the stability theory is applied to transition prediction. The amplitude method is described in which the wide band disturbance amplitude in the boundary layer is estimated from stability theory and an interaction relation for the initial amplitude density of the most unstable frequency.

  6. Electroweak Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Gregory Wayne

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles, and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, _ {T}, is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially sensitive function of T. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase T so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal extensions of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field. Semi-classical reasoning suggests that, when a particle receives a contribution to its mass from the vacuum expectation value of a scalar, under certain conditions, the ground state of particle number one contains a 'dimple' or shallow scalar field condensate around the particle. We argue that this is not the case. A careful analysis, taking into account quantum mechanics, shows that the semi-classical approximation is a poor one. We find that there are no energetically favored one-particle dimple solutions for perturbative couplings.

  7. Electroweak phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-09-16

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T} is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T}. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T} so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field.

  8. Electroweak phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-09-16

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T} is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T}. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T} so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field.

  9. Recent Insights into the Neurobiology of Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Marci R.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is associated with various psychopathologies, and elevated impulsivity is typically disadvantageous. This manuscript reviews recent investigations into the neurobiology of impulsivity using human imaging techniques and animal models. Both human imaging and preclinical pharmacological manipulations have yielded important insights into the neurobiological underpinnings of impulsivity. A more thorough understanding of the complex neurobiology underlying aspects of impulsivity may provide insight into new treatment options that target elevated impulsivity and psychopathologies such as addictions. PMID:25431750

  10. [Transition in diabetology].

    PubMed

    Hauschild, M; Elowe-Gruau, E; Dwyer, A; Aquarone, M-P; Unal, S; Jornayvaz, F R; Perrenoud, L; Gastaldi, G; Castellsague, M; Dirlewanger, M; Schwitzgebel, V M

    2015-02-18

    For patients with type I diabetes, transition from pediatric to adult care is a challenge due to complex treatment requirements and the physical, psychological and social changes of adolescence. Members of the care team must recognize that while these emerging adults need to develop self-management skills, this may conflict at times with the developmentally appropriate desire for increasing autonomy. The role of nursing in coordinating a successful transition is critical for maintaining continuity of patient-centered care that responds to the specific needs of these young adults. PMID:25915986

  11. UTM: Universal Transit Modeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeg, Hans J.

    2014-12-01

    The Universal Transit Modeller (UTM) is a light-curve simulator for all kinds of transiting or eclipsing configurations between arbitrary numbers of several types of objects, which may be stars, planets, planetary moons, and planetary rings. A separate fitting program, UFIT (Universal Fitter) is part of the UTM distribution and may be used to derive best fits to light-curves for any set of continuously variable parameters. UTM/UFIT is written in IDL code and its source is released in the public domain under the GNU General Public License.

  12. Insight and theory of mind in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Rowena; Fish, Scott; Granholm, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Theory of mind (ToM) impairment is common in individuals with schizophrenia and is associated with poor social functioning. Poor insight has also been linked to poor outcome in schizophrenia. Social developmental research has shown representations of self (insight) and representations of others (ToM) are related. In schizophrenia, contradictory reports of associations between insight and ToM have emerged, possibly due to a failure to account for neurocognitive impairments and symptoms associated with both mentalization constructs. This study investigated the relationships between ToM (intentions of others on the Hinting task) and clinical and cognitive insight, while accounting for shared variance with neurocognitive impairment and symptom severity in 193 individuals with schizophrenia. Clinical, but not cognitive, insight was associated with ToM. A unique association between Awareness of Mental Illness and Hinting Task performance was found, independent of shared variance with neurocognition and symptoms. Importantly, ToM was found to mediate Awareness of Mental Illness and neurocognition. Results suggested treatments targeting mentalization abilities that contribute to representations of self and others may improve insight deficits associated with poor outcome in schizophrenia. PMID:25467703

  13. Insight and theory of mind in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ng, Rowena; Fish, Scott; Granholm, Eric

    2015-01-30

    Theory of mind (ToM) impairment is common in individuals with schizophrenia and is associated with poor social functioning. Poor insight has also been linked to poor outcome in schizophrenia. Social developmental research has shown representations of self (insight) and representations of others (ToM) are related. In schizophrenia, contradictory reports of associations between insight and ToM have emerged, possibly due to a failure to account for neurocognitive impairments and symptoms associated with both mentalization constructs. This study investigated the relationships between ToM (intentions of others on the Hinting Task) and clinical and cognitive insight, while accounting for shared variance with neurocognitive impairment and symptom severity in 193 individuals with schizophrenia. Clinical, but not cognitive, insight was associated with ToM. A unique association between Awareness of Mental Illness and Hinting Task performance was found, independent of shared variance with neurocognition and symptoms. Importantly, ToM was found to mediate Awareness of Mental Illness and neurocognition. Results suggested that treatments targeting mentalization abilities that contribute to representations of self and others may improve insight deficits associated with poor outcome in schizophrenia. PMID:25467703

  14. Structural insights and functional implications of inter-individual variability in β2-adrenergic receptor

    PubMed Central

    Tandale, Aditi; Joshi, Manali; Sengupta, Durba

    2016-01-01

    The human β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family and due to its central role in bronchodilation, is an important drug target. The inter-individual variability in β2AR has been implicated in disease susceptibility and differential drug response. In this work, we identified nine potentially deleterious non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) using a consensus approach. The deleterious nsSNPs were found to cluster near the ligand binding site and towards the G-protein binding site. To assess their molecular level effects, we built structural models of these receptors and performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Most notably, in the Phe290Ser variant we observed the rotameric flip of Trp2866.48, a putative activation switch that has not been reported in β2AR thus far. In contrast, the variant Met82Lys was found to be the most detrimental to epinephrine binding. Additionally, a few of the nsSNPs were seen to cause perturbations to the lipid bilayer, while a few lead to differences at the G-protein coupling site. We are thus able to classify the variants as ranging from activating to damaging, prioritising them for experimental studies. PMID:27075228

  15. Statistical analysis of coherent structures in transitional pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Tobias M.; Eckhardt, Bruno; Vollmer, Jürgen

    2007-06-01

    Numerical and experimental studies of transitional pipe flow have shown the prevalence of coherent flow structures that are dominated by downstream vortices. They attract special attention because they contribute predominantly to the increase of the Reynolds stresses in turbulent flow. In the present study we introduce a convenient detector for these coherent states, calculate the fraction of time the structures appear in the flow, and present a Markov model for the transition between the structures. The fraction of states that show vortical structures exceeds 24% for a Reynolds number of about Re=2200 , and it decreases to about 20% for Re=2500 . The Markov model for the transition between these states is in good agreement with the observed fraction of states, and in reasonable agreement with the prediction for their persistence. It provides insight into dominant qualitative changes of the flow when increasing the Reynolds number.

  16. Dynamics of Sleep Stage Transitions in Health and Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishi, Akifumi; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Natelson, Benjamin H.; Togo, Fumiharu; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2007-07-01

    Sleep dynamics emerges from complex interactions between neuronal populations in many brain regions. Annotated sleep stages from electroencephalography (EEG) recordings could potentially provide a non-invasive way to obtain valuable insights into the mechanisms of these interactions, and ultimately into the very nature of sleep regulation. However, to date, sleep stage analysis has been restricted, only very recently expanding the scope of the traditional descriptive statistics to more dynamical concepts of the duration of and transitions between vigilance states and temporal evaluation of transition probabilities among different stages. Physiological and/or pathological implications of the dynamics of sleep stage transitions have, to date, not been investigated. Here, we study detailed duration and transition statistics among sleep stages in healthy humans and patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, known to be associated with disturbed sleep. We find that the durations of waking and non-REM sleep, in particular deep sleep (Stages III and IV), during the nighttime, follow a power-law probability distribution function, while REM sleep durations follow an exponential function, suggestive of complex underlying mechanisms governing the onset of light sleep. We also find a substantial number of REM to non-REM transitions in humans, while this transition is reported to be virtually non-existent in rats. Interestingly, the probability of this REM to non-REM transition is significantly lower in the patients than in controls, resulting in a significantly greater REM to awake, together with Stage I to awake, transition probability. This might potentially account for the reported poor sleep quality in the patients because the normal continuation of sleep after either the lightest or REM sleep is disrupted. We conclude that the dynamical transition analysis of sleep stages is useful for elucidating yet-to-be-determined human sleep regulation mechanisms with a

  17. Tips for Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellems, Ryan O.; Morningstar, Mary E.

    2010-01-01

    The Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA) states that transition planning should begin at the earliest age appropriate and no later than age 16. IDEA requires schools to make collaborative efforts to provide students access to an array of postschool activities including integrated employment, postsecondary…

  18. Nursing Role Transition Preceptorship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batory, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    The preceptorship clinical experience in a practical nursing (PN) program at a Midwestern community college is considered crucial to the PN students' transition from novice nurse to professional nurse. However, no research has been available to determine whether the preceptorship clinical accomplishes its purpose. A case study was conducted to…

  19. A Transiting Jupiter Analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipping, D. M.; Torres, G.; Henze, C.; Teachey, A.; Isaacson, H.; Petigura, E.; Marcy, G. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Chen, J.; Bryson, S. T.; Sandford, E.

    2016-04-01

    Decadal-long radial velocity surveys have recently started to discover analogs to the most influential planet of our solar system, Jupiter. Detecting and characterizing these worlds is expected to shape our understanding of our uniqueness in the cosmos. Despite the great successes of recent transit surveys, Jupiter analogs represent a terra incognita, owing to the strong intrinsic bias of this method against long orbital periods. We here report on the first validated transiting Jupiter analog, Kepler-167e (KOI-490.02), discovered using Kepler archival photometry orbiting the K4-dwarf KIC-3239945. With a radius of (0.91+/- 0.02) {R}{{J}}, a low orbital eccentricity ({0.06}-0.04+0.10), and an equilibrium temperature of (131+/- 3) K, Kepler-167e bears many of the basic hallmarks of Jupiter. Kepler-167e is accompanied by three Super-Earths on compact orbits, which we also validate, leaving a large cavity of transiting worlds around the habitable-zone. With two transits and continuous photometric coverage, we are able to uniquely and precisely measure the orbital period of this post snow-line planet (1071.2323 ± 0.0006d), paving the way for follow-up of this K = 11.8 mag target.

  20. Youth Policy in Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timpane, Michael; And Others

    A study team was commissioned to critically review three independent reports on youth and schooling: "Youth: Transition to Adulthood"; "The Education of Adolescents"; and "The Reform of Secondary Education." The study team examined the reports in light of the most recent available social science evidence. The three reports, presenting similar…

  1. Transition at hypersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morkovin, Mark V.

    1987-01-01

    Certain conjectures on the physics of instabilities in high-speed flows are discussed and the state of knowledge of hypersonic transition summarized. The case is made for an unpressured systematic research program in this area consisting of controlled microscopic experiments, theory, and numerical simulations.

  2. A Survey Transition Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, William; McAllister, Alex M.

    2012-01-01

    Successful outcomes for a "Transition Course in Mathematics" have resulted from two unique design features. The first is to run the course as a "survey course" in mathematics, introducing sophomore-level students to a broad set of mathematical fields. In this single mathematics course, undergraduates benefit from an introduction of proof…

  3. Variational transition state theory

    SciTech Connect

    Truhlar, D.G.

    1993-12-01

    This research program involves the development of variational transition state theory (VTST) and semiclassical tunneling methods for the calculation of gas-phase reaction rates and selected applications. The applications are selected for their fundamental interest and/or their relevance to combustion.

  4. Immigration and Adult Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumbaut, Ruben G.; Komaie, Golnaz

    2010-01-01

    Almost 30 percent of the more than 68 million young adults aged eighteen to thirty-four in the United States today are either foreign born or of foreign parentage. As these newcomers make their transitions to adulthood, say Ruben Rumbaut and Golnaz Komaie, they differ significantly not only from one another but also from their native-parentage…

  5. String mediated phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, ED; Haws, D.; Rivers, R.; Holbraad, S.

    1988-01-01

    It is demonstrated from first principles how the existence of string-like structures can cause a system to undergo a phase transition. In particular, the role of topologically stable cosmic string in the restoration of spontaneously broken symmetries is emphasized. How the thermodynamic properties of strings alter when stiffness and nearest neighbor string-string interactions are included is discussed.

  6. Families in Transition .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Michael L., Ed.; Gumaer, James, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Focuses on disrupted families and the role of the school counselor in helping children adjust. Describes characteristics of healthy families, and discusses the transition to the blended family, effects of divorce groups on children's classroom behavior, counseling children in stepfamilies, single-parent families, and parenting strengths of single…

  7. Singing Smoothes Classroom Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Sarah E.

    2012-01-01

    Just as humming a merry tune helped Snow White and her furry animal friends to quickly clean a filthy cottage in the movie "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (Disney & Cottrell, 1937), singing can be an effective way to help keep young children fully engaged during classroom transitions. The purposes of this article are to: (1) consider why…

  8. Learning for Life Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varmecky, Jane Hyde

    2012-01-01

    Many adults return to formal learning situations to pursue lifelong learning goals because their lives are in transition from dealing with real-life problems such as divorce and re-marriage. The purpose of this study was to describe what couples learned that contributed to the success of their subsequent marriages and how they learned it. The…

  9. Pure electronic metal-insulator transition at the interface of complex oxides

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, D.; Liu, Jian; Freeland, J. W.; Middey, S.; Kareev, M.; Kwon, Jihwan; Zuo, J. M.; Chuang, Yi-De; Kim, J. W.; Ryan, P. J.; Chakhalian, J.

    2016-01-01

    In complex materials observed electronic phases and transitions between them often involve coupling between many degrees of freedom whose entanglement convolutes understanding of the instigating mechanism. Metal-insulator transitions are one such problem where coupling to the structural, orbital, charge, and magnetic order parameters frequently obscures the underlying physics. Here, we demonstrate a way to unravel this conundrum by heterostructuring a prototypical multi-ordered complex oxide NdNiO3 in ultra thin geometry, which preserves the metal-to-insulator transition and bulk-like magnetic order parameter, but entirely suppresses the symmetry lowering and long-range charge order parameter. These findings illustrate the utility of heterointerfaces as a powerful method for removing competing order parameters to gain greater insight into the nature of the transition, here revealing that the magnetic order generates the transition independently, leading to an exceptionally rare purely electronic metal-insulator transition with no symmetry change. PMID:27324948

  10. Pure electronic metal-insulator transition at the interface of complex oxides.

    PubMed

    Meyers, D; Liu, Jian; Freeland, J W; Middey, S; Kareev, M; Kwon, Jihwan; Zuo, J M; Chuang, Yi-De; Kim, J W; Ryan, P J; Chakhalian, J

    2016-01-01

    In complex materials observed electronic phases and transitions between them often involve coupling between many degrees of freedom whose entanglement convolutes understanding of the instigating mechanism. Metal-insulator transitions are one such problem where coupling to the structural, orbital, charge, and magnetic order parameters frequently obscures the underlying physics. Here, we demonstrate a way to unravel this conundrum by heterostructuring a prototypical multi-ordered complex oxide NdNiO3 in ultra thin geometry, which preserves the metal-to-insulator transition and bulk-like magnetic order parameter, but entirely suppresses the symmetry lowering and long-range charge order parameter. These findings illustrate the utility of heterointerfaces as a powerful method for removing competing order parameters to gain greater insight into the nature of the transition, here revealing that the magnetic order generates the transition independently, leading to an exceptionally rare purely electronic metal-insulator transition with no symmetry change. PMID:27324948

  11. Pure electronic metal-insulator transition at the interface of complex oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, D.; Liu, Jian; Freeland, J. W.; Middey, S.; Kareev, M.; Kwon, Jihwan; Zuo, J. M.; Chuang, Yi-De; Kim, J. W.; Ryan, P. J.; Chakhalian, J.

    2016-06-01

    In complex materials observed electronic phases and transitions between them often involve coupling between many degrees of freedom whose entanglement convolutes understanding of the instigating mechanism. Metal-insulator transitions are one such problem where coupling to the structural, orbital, charge, and magnetic order parameters frequently obscures the underlying physics. Here, we demonstrate a way to unravel this conundrum by heterostructuring a prototypical multi-ordered complex oxide NdNiO3 in ultra thin geometry, which preserves the metal-to-insulator transition and bulk-like magnetic order parameter, but entirely suppresses the symmetry lowering and long-range charge order parameter. These findings illustrate the utility of heterointerfaces as a powerful method for removing competing order parameters to gain greater insight into the nature of the transition, here revealing that the magnetic order generates the transition independently, leading to an exceptionally rare purely electronic metal-insulator transition with no symmetry change.

  12. Transition to management -- A personal perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.L.

    1998-02-01

    This paper explores one woman`s journey through her recent promotion into management, and will identify key factors that helped prepare and position her to be ready to exercise leadership through a formal management role. It discusses assessment of qualifications and skills, acquisition of needed skills, the influence of luck and timing, and the use of mentors and delegation as survival skills to get through the transition period and become fully functional as a manager. It also includes insights into sensitive issues such as how to relate to former peers, how to gain credibility as the junior member of the management team, and how to juggle family responsibilities with increased time commitments at work. It emphasizes the importance of acknowledging the help the authors receive in reaching their own career goals and offering the same kind of help and support to those in the early stages of their careers.

  13. Main-group elements as transition metals.

    PubMed

    Power, Philip P

    2010-01-14

    The last quarter of the twentieth century and the beginning decade of the twenty-first witnessed spectacular discoveries in the chemistry of the heavier main-group elements. The new compounds that were synthesized highlighted the fundamental differences between their electronic properties and those of the lighter elements to a degree that was not previously apparent. This has led to new structural and bonding insights as well as a gradually increasing realization that the chemistry of the heavier main-group elements more resembles that of transition-metal complexes than that of their lighter main-group congeners. The similarity is underlined by recent work, which has shown that many of the new compounds react with small molecules such as H(2), NH(3), C(2)H(4) or CO under mild conditions and display potential for applications in catalysis. PMID:20075912

  14. Nonuniversal scaling of the magnetocaloric effect as an insight into spin-lattice interactions in manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Anders; Nielsen, Kaspar K.; Bez, Henrique N.; Bahl, Christian R. H.

    2016-08-01

    We measure the magnetocaloric effect of the manganite series La0.67Ca0.33 -xSrxMnO3 by determining the isothermal entropy change upon magnetization, using variable-field calorimetry. The results demonstrate that the field dependence of the magnetocaloric effect close to the critical temperature is not given uniquely by the critical exponents of the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic phase transition, i.e., the scaling is nonuniversal. A theoretical description based on the Bean-Rodbell model and taking into account compositional inhomogeneities is shown to be able to account for the observed field dependence. In this way the determination of the nonuniversal field dependence of the magnetocaloric effect close to a phase transition can be used as a method to gain insight into the strength of the spin-lattice interactions of magnetic materials. The approach is shown also to be applicable to first-order transitions.

  15. FIVE KEPLER TARGET STARS THAT SHOW MULTIPLE TRANSITING EXOPLANET CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Haas, Michael J.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Koch, David; Lissauer, Jack J.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Fressin, Francois; Holman, Matthew J.; Latham, David W.; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; Ford, Eric B.; Moorhead, Althea V.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Howell, Steve B.; Isaacson, Howard

    2010-12-10

    We present and discuss five candidate exoplanetary systems identified with the Kepler spacecraft. These five systems show transits from multiple exoplanet candidates. Should these objects prove to be planetary in nature, then these five systems open new opportunities for the field of exoplanets and provide new insights into the formation and dynamical evolution of planetary systems. We discuss the methods used to identify multiple transiting objects from the Kepler photometry as well as the false-positive rejection methods that have been applied to these data. One system shows transits from three distinct objects while the remaining four systems show transits from two objects. Three systems have planet candidates that are near mean motion commensurabilities-two near 2:1 and one just outside 5:2. We discuss the implications that multi-transiting systems have on the distribution of orbital inclinations in planetary systems, and hence their dynamical histories, as well as their likely masses and chemical compositions. A Monte Carlo study indicates that, with additional data, most of these systems should exhibit detectable transit timing variations (TTVs) due to gravitational interactions, though none are apparent in these data. We also discuss new challenges that arise in TTV analyses due to the presence of more than two planets in a system.

  16. Transit of Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Laurance R.

    1998-01-01

    During the past five years we have pursued the detection of extrasolar planets by the photometric transit method, i.e. the detection of a planet by watching for a drop in the brightness of the light as it crosses in front of a star. The planetary orbit must cross the line-of-sight and so most systems will not be lined up for such a transit to ever occur. However, we have looked at eclipsing binary systems which are already edge-on. Such systems must be very small in size as this makes the differential light change due to a transit much greater for a given planet size (the brightness difference will be proportional to the area of the transiting planet to the disc area of the star). Also, the planet forming region should be closer to the star as small stars are generally less luminous (that is, if the same thermal regime for planet formation applies as in the solar system). This led to studies of the habitable zone around other stars, as well. Finally, we discovered that our data could be used to detect giant planets without transits as we had been carefully timing the eclipses of the stars (using a GPS antenna for time) and this will drift by being offset by any giant planets orbiting around the system, as well. The best summary of our work may be to just summarize the 21 refereed papers produced during the time of this grant. This will be done is chronological order and in each section separately.

  17. Transitioning from Idiopathic to Explainable Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Albert J

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis lacks an identifiable cause, and its diagnosis requires the exclusion of etiologically defined diseases that resemble it. Insights into its pathogenesis are moving autoimmune hepatitis from an idiopathic to explainable disease, and the goal of this review is to describe the insights that are hastening this transition. Two types of autoimmune hepatitis are justified by serological markers, but they also have distinctive genetic associations (DRB1 and DQB1 genes) and autoantigens. DRB1 alleles are the principal susceptibility factors in white adults, and a six amino acid sequence encoded in the antigen-binding groove of class II molecules of the major histocompatibility complex can influence the selection of autoantigens. Polymorphisms, including variants of SH2B3 and CARD10 genes, may affect immune reactivity and disease severity. The cytochrome mono-oxygenase, CYP2D6, is the autoantigen associated with type 2 autoimmune hepatitis, and it shares homologies with multiple viruses that might promote self-intolerance by molecular mimicry. Chemokines, especially CXCL9 and CXCL10, orchestrate the migration of effector cells to sites of injury and are associated with disease severity. Cells of the innate and adaptive immune responses promote tissue damage, and possible deficiencies in the number and function of regulatory T cells may facilitate the injurious process. Receptor-mediated apoptosis is the principal mechanism of hepatocyte loss, and cell-mediated and antibody-dependent mechanisms of cytotoxicity also contribute. Insights that explain autoimmune hepatitis will allow triggering exogenous antigens to be characterized, risk management to be improved, prognostic indices to be refined, and site-specific therapeutic interventions to emerge. PMID:25999246

  18. Trajectory description of the quantum-classical transition for wave packet interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chia-Chun

    2016-08-01

    The quantum-classical transition for wave packet interference is investigated using a hydrodynamic description. A nonlinear quantum-classical transition equation is obtained by introducing a degree of quantumness ranging from zero to one into the classical time-dependent Schrödinger equation. This equation provides a continuous description for the transition process of physical systems from purely quantum to purely classical regimes. In this study, the transition trajectory formalism is developed to provide a hydrodynamic description for the quantum-classical transition. The flow momentum of transition trajectories is defined by the gradient of the action function in the transition wave function and these trajectories follow the main features of the evolving probability density. Then, the transition trajectory formalism is employed to analyze the quantum-classical transition of wave packet interference. For the collision-like wave packet interference where the propagation velocity is faster than the spreading speed of the wave packet, the interference process remains collision-like for all the degree of quantumness. However, the interference features demonstrated by transition trajectories gradually disappear when the degree of quantumness approaches zero. For the diffraction-like wave packet interference, the interference process changes continuously from a diffraction-like to collision-like case when the degree of quantumness gradually decreases. This study provides an insightful trajectory interpretation for the quantum-classical transition of wave packet interference.

  19. The Mongolia experience: transitioning within transition.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Richard G

    2009-12-01

    Although Mongolia has a long and distinguished history, as a new and emerging democracy it is experiencing the pains of transition-one that is moving the country from its pastoral and nomadic past into the 21st century. Confounded by its previous dependence on socialist Soviet Russia, the concept of a market economy seems opportunistic for some, while for those living within the traditional lifestyle of the herdsman in the countryside it is confusing and threatening to family structure and values. Adolescents and young adults are caught at the interface-not only of their own development, but by the disparities between tradition and Western values, new technology, and freedoms granted by the emerging democracy, and by the civic practice of democracy itself. Conceptually the new belongs to the young, and yet limited health and educational resources are available to modulate and focus both threats and opportunities. Using the analogy of the spirit banner of the warrior, it is the young as the warriors of the 21st century who have the energy and investment in the future that will be needed to shepherd this change. Both personal and public health, within the context of development, the psychobiological model, and the political and social ecology will be strong determinants of success. It is a parallel investment in both youth and the ideals they represent that will ensure success for the new Mongolia. PMID:20653216

  20. Alternative fuel transit buses: The Pierce Transit Success Story

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The Pierce transit program for operating mass transit buses on compressed natural gas (CNG) is described. Cost, reliability, fuel efficiency, emission of combustion products, and future trends are discussed.

  1. InSight Planetary Protection Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benardini, James; La Duc, Myron; Willis, Jason

    The NASA Discovery Program’s next mission, Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSIght), consists of a single spacecraft that will be launched aboard an Atlas V 401 rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base (Space Launch Complex 3E) during the March 2016 timeframe. The overarching mission goal is to illuminate the fundamentals of formation and evolution of terrestrial planets by investigating the interior structure and processes of Mars. The flight system consists of a heritage cruise stage, aeroshell (heatshield and backshell), and Lander from the 2008 Phoenix mission. Included in the lander payload are various cameras, a seismometer, an auxiliary sensor suite to measure wind, temperature, and pressure, and a mole to penetrate the regolith (<5 meters) and assess the subsurface geothermal gradient of Mars. Being a Mars lander mission without life detection instruments, InSight has been designated a PP Category Iva mission. As such, planetary protection bioburden requirements apply which require microbial reduction procedures and biological burden reporting. The InSight project is current with required PP documentation, having completed an approved Planetary Protection Plan, Subsidiary PP Plans, and a PP Implementation Plan. The InSight mission’s early planetary protection campaign has commenced, coinciding with the fabrication and assembly of payload and flight system hardware and the baseline analysis of existing flight spares. A report on the status of InSight PP activities will be provided.

  2. Food Choices and Consequences for the Nutritional Status: Insights into Nutrition Transition in an Hospital Community

    PubMed Central

    Piple, Jitendra; Gora, Ranjeet; Purbiya, Pragati; Puliyel, Ashish; Chugh, Parul; Bahl, Pinky; Puliyel, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although economic development is generally accompanied by improvements in the overall nutritional status of the country’s population the ‘nutritional transition’ often involves a shift to high energy diets and less exercise with negative consequences. This pilot study was done to examine if education of parents operates at the household level to influence dietary choices and the nutritional status of children in a small community of hospital workers. Material and Methods 3 groups of persons with varying skill and education levels participated. Weighed food logs were used in all households to calculate ‘adult equivalent’ per-capita-consumption. Nutrients were calculated using nutrients calculator software. BMI was used to classify children as underweight, normal weight and overweight. Results 128 individuals participated from 30 families included 47 children. 10 children (21%) were underweight, 29 (62%) were normal and 8 (17%) were overweight. Energy consumption was highest in families with overweight children 2692 +/-502 compared to 2259 +/-359 in families with normal weight and 2031+/-354 in the family of underweight children. These differences were statistically significant. 42% underweight children belonged to Class 1 at the lowest skill level and there were no overweight children in this group. Most of the overweight children belonged to Class 2. In Class 3 there were no underweight children and the majority was normal weight children. Conclusion Underweight children came from the poorer households. Per capita intake of the family as a whole correlated well with BMI in the children. There was increased obesity in middle income families belonging to Class 2—probably in families who move up the scale from deprivation. Nutritional status in children correlated mostly with maternal education status. PMID:26559817

  3. Unique insights into the intestinal absorption, transit, and subsequent biodistribution of polymer-derived microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Reineke, Joshua J.; Cho, Daniel Y.; Dingle, Yu-Ting; Morello, A. Peter; Jacob, Jules; Thanos, Christopher G.; Mathiowitz, Edith

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric microspheres (MSs) have received attention for their potential to improve the delivery of drugs with poor oral bioavailability. Although MSs can be absorbed into the absorptive epithelium of the small intestine, little is known about the physiologic mechanisms that are responsible for their cellular trafficking. In these experiments, nonbiodegradable polystyrene MSs (diameter range: 500 nm to 5 µm) were delivered locally to the jejunum or ileum or by oral administration to young male rats. Following administration, MSs were taken up rapidly (≤5 min) by the small intestine and were detected by transmission electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Gel permeation chromatography confirmed that polymer was present in all tissue samples, including the brain. These results confirm that MSs (diameter range: 500 nm to 5 µm) were absorbed by the small intestine and distributed throughout the rat. After delivering MSs to the jejunum or ileum, high concentrations of polystyrene were detected in the liver, kidneys, and lungs. The pharmacologic inhibitors chlorpromazine, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and cytochalasin D caused a reduction in the total number of MSs absorbed in the jejunum and ileum, demonstrating that nonphagocytic processes (including endocytosis) direct the uptake of MSs in the small intestine. These results challenge the convention that phagocytic cells such as the microfold cells solely facilitate MS absorption in the small intestine. PMID:23922388

  4. Migration and the epidemiological transition: insights from the Agincourt sub-district of northeast South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Collinson, Mark A.; White, Michael J.; Bocquier, Philippe; McGarvey, Stephen T.; Afolabi, Sulaimon A.; Clark, Samuel J.; Kahn, Kathleen; Tollman, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Migration and urbanization are central to sustainable development and health, but data on temporal trends in defined populations are scarce. Healthy men and women migrate because opportunities for employment and betterment are not equally distributed geographically. The disruption can result in unhealthy exposures and environments and income returns for the origin household. Objectives The objectives of the paper are to describe the patterns, levels, and trends of temporary migration in rural northeast South Africa; the mortality trends by cause category over the period 2000–2011; and the associations between temporary migration and mortality by broad cause of death categories. Method Longitudinal, Agincourt Health and Demographic Surveillance System data are used in a continuous, survival time, competing-risk model. Findings In rural, northeast South Africa, temporary migration, which involves migrants relocating mainly for work purposes and remaining linked to the rural household, is more important than age and sex in explaining variations in mortality, whatever the cause. In this setting, the changing relationship between temporary migration and communicable disease mortality is primarily affected by reduced exposure of the migrant to unhealthy conditions. The study suggests that the changing relationship between temporary migration and non-communicable disease mortality is mainly affected by increased livelihood benefits of longer duration migration. Conclusion Since temporary migration is not associated with communicable diseases only, public health policies should account for population mobility whatever the targeted health risk. There is a need to strengthen the rural health care system, because migrants tend to return to the rural households when they need health care. PMID:24848656

  5. MICROSCOPIC DYNAMICS AT THE GLASS TRANSITION: INSIGHTS FROM SOFT COLLOIDAL DISPERSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Romeo, G.; Imperiali, L.; Acierno, D.; Nieves, A. F.; Weitz, D. A.

    2008-08-28

    We investigate the microscopic dynamics of compressible colloidal particles as function of concentration through dynamic light scattering and confocal microscopy experiments. In analogy with hard sphere (HS) colloidal systems, we find that the particles display liquid, supercooled liquid or glassy dynamics, depending on volume fraction. In the present case, however caging effects are observed for particle volume fractions higher than one, i.e. when the particles are compressed. We find that heterogeneous dynamics, described by a non Gaussian distribution of the displacements, play a major role in the supercooled liquid in proximity of the relaxation time.

  6. Spin symmetry transitions make DNA strands separate. New insight into the mechanism of transcription.

    PubMed

    Tulub, Alexander A; Stefanov, Vassily E

    2015-01-01

    The DFT:B3LYP (6-31G** basis set) method, including the hyperfine and spin-orbit couplings (HFC and SOC, respectively), is used to study the separation of two complementary trinucleotide sequences, (dC-dG-dA)-(dG-dC-dT), upon the action of two Mg(2+) cofactors (a simplified model). The computations reveal a crossing of the singlet (S) potential energy surface by the triplet (T) surface at two distinct points. Within the crossing region the T curve lies below the S curve. Adhering to the concept of the minimal energy path, one can assume that the T path is more favorable compared to that of the S path. The T path is not simple; it consists of two, T+ and T-, curves initially separated by the HFC and SOC. On reaching the second crossing point, both curves merge into the T0 state, which facilitates the T → S transfer. Totally, the process of the two trinucleotide separation (the first step of transcription) appears as the S → T → S symmetry conversion. PMID:26656910

  7. On the Pedagogical Insight of Mathematicians: "Interaction" and "Transition from the Concrete to the Abstract"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannone, Paola; Nardi, Elena

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we draw on a 16-month study funded by the Learning and Teaching Support Network in the UK and entitled "Mathematicians as Educational Co-Researchers." The study's aims were two-fold. Primarily we intended to explore mathematicians' reflections on issues identified in the literature as highly topical in the area of teaching and…

  8. Transition Planning: A Team Effort. NICHCY Transition Summary, TS10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Mary Kate

    This summary on transition planning provides ideas and information on how students, families, school personnel, service providers, and others can work together to help students with a disability make a smooth transition after leaving high school. It focuses on creative transition planning and services that use all the resources that exist in…

  9. Models for transition clinics.

    PubMed

    Carrizosa, Jaime; An, Isabelle; Appleton, Richard; Camfield, Peter; Von Moers, Arpad

    2014-08-01

    Transition is a purposeful, planned process that addresses the medical, psychosocial, educational, and vocational needs of adolescents and young adults with chronic medical conditions, as they advance from a pediatric and family-centered to an adult, individual focused health care provider. This article describes some of the models for transition clinics or services for epilepsy in five countries (Canada, France, Colombia, Germany, and the United Kingdom). These models include joint adult and pediatric clinics, algorithm-driven service, and a check list system in the context of pediatric care. Evaluation of these models is limited, and it is not possible to choose an optimal program. The attitude and motivation of health care providers may be the most important elements. PMID:25209087

  10. Collapse transition in proteins.

    PubMed

    Ziv, Guy; Thirumalai, D; Haran, Gilad

    2009-01-01

    The coil-globule transition, a tenet of the physics of polymers, has been identified in recent years as an important unresolved aspect of the initial stages of the folding of proteins. We describe the basics of the collapse transition, starting with homopolymers and continuing with proteins. Studies of denatured-state collapse under equilibrium are then presented. An emphasis is placed on single-molecule fluorescence experiments, which are particularly useful for measuring properties of the denatured state even under conditions of coexistence with the folded state. Attempts to understand the dynamics of collapse, both theoretically and experimentally, are then described. Only an upper limit for the rate of collapse has been obtained so far. Improvements in experimental and theoretical methodology are likely to continue to push our understanding of the importance of the denatured-state thermodynamics and dynamics for protein folding in the coming years. PMID:19081910

  11. High speed transition prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasperas, Gediminis

    1993-01-01

    The main objective of this work period was to develop, maintain and exercise state-of-the-art methods for transition prediction in supersonic flow fields. Basic state and stability codes, acquired during the last work period, were exercised and applied to calculate the properties of various flowfields. The development of a code for the prediction of transition location using a currently novel method (the PSE or Parabolized Stability Equation method), initiated during the last work period and continued during the present work period, was cancelled at mid-year for budgetary reasons. Other activities during this period included the presentation of a paper at the APS meeting in Tallahassee, Florida entitled 'Stability of Two-Dimensional Compressible Boundary Layers', as well as the initiation of a paper co-authored with H. Reed of the Arizona State University entitled 'Stability of Boundary Layers'.

  12. Transitions: exploring the frontier.

    PubMed

    Corless, Inge B

    End-of-life experiences go by various terms, including near-death experiences (NDEs), death bed visions, death bed phenomena, death bed coincidences, and nearing death awareness. Death bed escorts is the term applied to the vision of deceased family members or friends who inform the dying person that they will be accompanied in the transition from life. In this article, I examine the subject of NDEs and death bed escorts, starting with the rich body of work provided by Robert and Beatrice Kastenbaum. A subject of some interest to Robert Kastenbaum, he explored this frontier in his many writings on dying, death, and bereavement. Ever the pioneer and having made the ultimate transition, he may yet be exploring new frontiers. PMID:25351590

  13. Emergence and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikkema, Arnold

    2006-05-01

    Phase transitions are well defined in physics through concepts such as spontaneous symmetry breaking, order parameter, entropy, and critical exponents. But emergence --- also exhibiting whole-part relations (such as top-down influence), unpredictability, and insensitivity to microscopic detail --- is a loosely-defined concept being used in many disciplines, particularly in psychology, biology, philosophy, as well as in physics[1,2]. I will review the concepts of emergence as used in the various fields and consider the extent to which the methods of phase transitions can clarify the usefulness of the concept of emergence both within the discipline of physics and beyond.1. Robert B. Laughlin, A Different Universe: Reinventing Physics from the Bottom Down (New York: Basic Books, 2005). 2. George F.R. Ellis, ``Physics and the Real World'', Physics Today, vol. 58, no. 7 (July 2005) pp. 49-54.

  14. Molecular insights into intracellular RNA localization

    PubMed Central

    Blower, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Localization of mRNAs to specific destinations within a cell or an embryo is important for local control of protein expression. mRNA localization is well-known to function in very large and polarized cells such as neurons, and to facilitate embryonic patterning during early development. However, recent genome-wide studies have revealed that mRNA localization is more widely utilized than previously thought to control gene expression. Not only can transcripts be localized asymmetrically within the cytoplasm, they are often also localized to symmetrically-distributed organelles. Recent genetic, cytological, and biochemical studies have begun to provide molecular insight into how cells select RNAs for transport, move them to specific destinations, and control their translation. This review will summarize recent insights into the mechanisms and function of RNA localization with a specific emphasis on molecular insights into each step in the mRNA localization process. PMID:23351709

  15. Radiative Transitions in Charmonium

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; David Richards

    2005-10-01

    The form factors for the radiative transitions between charmonium mesons are investigated. We employ an anisotropic lattice using a Wilson gauge action, and domain-wall fermion action. We extrapolate the form factors to Q{sup 2} = 0, corresponding to a real photon, using quark-model-inspired functions. Finally, comparison is made with photocouplings extracted from the measured radiative widths, where known. Our preliminary results find photocouplings commensurate with these experimentally extracted values.

  16. Transition Region Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brekke, P.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Ultraviolet emission lines emitted from the SOLAR TRANSITION REGION are often shifted from their expected rest wavelengths. Shifts of spectral lines are due to the so-called DOPPLER EFFECT, where the source of emission is moving either away from or towards the observer, causing a change in the apparent wavelength. The shifted emission lines are most often interpreted as a flow of plasma along ...

  17. Kondo-Anderson transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettemann, S.; Mucciolo, E. R.; Varga, I.; Slevin, K.

    2012-03-01

    Dilute magnetic impurities in a disordered Fermi liquid are considered close to the Anderson metal-insulator transition (AMIT). Critical power-law correlations between electron wave functions at different energies in the vicinity of the AMIT result in the formation of pseudogaps of the local density of states. Magnetic impurities can remain unscreened at such sites. We determine the density of the resulting free magnetic moments in the zero-temperature limit. While it is finite on the insulating side of the AMIT, it vanishes at the AMIT, and decays with a power law as function of the distance to the AMIT. Since the fluctuating spins of these free magnetic moments break the time-reversal symmetry of the conduction electrons, we find a shift of the AMIT, and the appearance of a semimetal phase. The distribution function of the Kondo temperature TK is derived at the AMIT, in the metallic phase, and in the insulator phase. This allows us to find the quantum phase diagram in an external magnetic field B and at finite temperature T. We calculate the resulting magnetic susceptibility, the specific heat, and the spin relaxation rate as a function of temperature. We find a phase diagram with finite-temperature transitions among insulator, critical semimetal, and metal phases. These new types of phase transitions are caused by the interplay between Kondo screening and Anderson localization, with the latter being shifted by the appearance of the temperature-dependent spin-flip scattering rate. Accordingly, we name them Kondo-Anderson transitions.

  18. Stimulated coherent transition radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hung-chi Lihn

    1996-03-01

    Coherent radiation emitted from a relativistic electron bunch consists of wavelengths longer than or comparable to the bunch length. The intensity of this radiation out-numbers that of its incoherent counterpart, which extends to wavelengths shorter than the bunch length, by a factor equal to the number of electrons in the bunch. In typical accelerators, this factor is about 8 to 11 orders of magnitude. The spectrum of the coherent radiation is determined by the Fourier transform of the electron bunch distribution and, therefore, contains information of the bunch distribution. Coherent transition radiation emitted from subpicosecond electron bunches at the Stanford SUNSHINE facility is observed in the far-infrared regime through a room-temperature pyroelectric bolometer and characterized through the electron bunch-length study. To measure the bunch length, a new frequency-resolved subpicosecond bunch-length measuring system is developed. This system uses a far-infrared Michelson interferometer to measure the spectrum of coherent transition radiation through optical autocorrelation with resolution far better than existing time-resolved methods. Hence, the radiation spectrum and the bunch length are deduced from the autocorrelation measurement. To study the stimulation of coherent transition radiation, a special cavity named BRAICER is invented. Far-infrared light pulses of coherent transition radiation emitted from electron bunches are delayed and circulated in the cavity to coincide with subsequent incoming electron bunches. This coincidence of light pulses with electron bunches enables the light to do work on electrons, and thus stimulates more radiated energy. The possibilities of extending the bunch-length measuring system to measure the three-dimensional bunch distribution and making the BRAICER cavity a broadband, high-intensity, coherent, far-infrared light source are also discussed.

  19. Practice Makes Perfect? University Students' Response to a First-Year Transition Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browning, Catherine; Sheffield, Suzanne Le-May

    2008-01-01

    This paper shares new insights on the first-year university student transition experience. Our research focuses on students' practice of academic skills developed in a "Foundations for Learning" course, from their own perspective, after they completed the course. Once they had an opportunity to practice what they learned in subsequent…

  20. Passages: Rafting the Green River as an Analogy to the Mid-Life Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isenhart, Myra W.

    To help adults develop an awareness of midlife issues, to encourage personal acceptance of the transition, and to introduce appropriate coping skills, a speech communication course was designed that relied on river trip activities to develop insights about this passage. The vehicle for the seminar was a four-day raft trip down the Green River,…

  1. Factors Affecting Students' Information Literacy as They Transition from High School to College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varlejs, Jana; Stec, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    Despite the considerable attention paid to the need to increase the information literacy of high school students in preparation for the transition to college, poor research skills still seem to be the norm. To gain insight into the problem, library instruction environments of nineteen high schools were explored. The schools were selected based on…

  2. Agile in Large-Scale Development Workshop: Coaching, Transitioning and Practicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Thomas; Larsson, Andreas

    Agile in large-scale and complex development presents its own set of problems, both how to practice, transition and coaching. This workshop aims at bringing persons interested in this topic together to share tools, techniques and insights. The workshop will follow the increasingly popular “lightning talk + open space” format.

  3. NASA metric transition plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NASA science publications have used the metric system of measurement since 1970. Although NASA has maintained a metric use policy since 1979, practical constraints have restricted actual use of metric units. In 1988, an amendment to the Metric Conversion Act of 1975 required the Federal Government to adopt the metric system except where impractical. In response to Public Law 100-418 and Executive Order 12770, NASA revised its metric use policy and developed this Metric Transition Plan. NASA's goal is to use the metric system for program development and functional support activities to the greatest practical extent by the end of 1995. The introduction of the metric system into new flight programs will determine the pace of the metric transition. Transition of institutional capabilities and support functions will be phased to enable use of the metric system in flight program development and operations. Externally oriented elements of this plan will introduce and actively support use of the metric system in education, public information, and small business programs. The plan also establishes a procedure for evaluating and approving waivers and exceptions to the required use of the metric system for new programs. Coordination with other Federal agencies and departments (through the Interagency Council on Metric Policy) and industry (directly and through professional societies and interest groups) will identify sources of external support and minimize duplication of effort.

  4. NASA metric transition plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA science publications have used the metric system of measurement since 1970. Although NASA has maintained a metric use policy since 1979, practical constraints have restricted actual use of metric units. In 1988, an amendment to the Metric Conversion Act of 1975 required the Federal Government to adopt the metric system except where impractical. In response to Public Law 100-418 and Executive Order 12770, NASA revised its metric use policy and developed this Metric Transition Plan. NASA's goal is to use the metric system for program development and functional support activities to the greatest practical extent by the end of 1995. The introduction of the metric system into new flight programs will determine the pace of the metric transition. Transition of institutional capabilities and support functions will be phased to enable use of the metric system in flight program development and operations. Externally oriented elements of this plan will introduce and actively support use of the metric system in education, public information, and small business programs. The plan also establishes a procedure for evaluating and approving waivers and exceptions to the required use of the metric system for new programs. Coordination with other Federal agencies and departments (through the Interagency Council on Metric Policy) and industry (directly and through professional societies and interest groups) will identify sources of external support and minimize duplication of effort.

  5. Transition mixing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, R.; White, C.

    1986-01-01

    A computer model capable of analyzing the flow field in the transition liner of small gas turbine engines is developed. A FORTRAN code has been assembled from existing codes and physical submodels and used to predict the flow in several test geometries which contain characteristics similar to transition liners, and for which experimental data was available. Comparisons between the predictions and measurements indicate that the code produces qualitative results but that the turbulence models, both K-E and algebraic Reynolds Stress, underestimate the cross-stream diffusion. The code has also been used to perform a numerical experiment to examine the effect of a variety of parameters on the mixing process in transition liners. Comparisons illustrate that geometries with significant curvature show a drift of the jet trajectory toward the convex wall and weaker wake region vortices and decreased penetration for jets located on the convex wall of the liner, when compared to jets located on concave walls. Also shown were the approximate equivalency of angled slots and round holes and a technique by which jet mixing correlations developed for rectangular channels can be used for can geometries.

  6. The Myths of Mass Transit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Catherine G.

    1982-01-01

    Criticizes eight commonly held notions about the value of mass transit systems in public transportation programs. Alternative approaches for improving the quality and quantity of urban transit systems are discussed. (AM)

  7. Youths Transitioning as Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, C. Amelia

    2014-01-01

    This chapter considers how transitions to adulthood have been historically represented and presents alternative ways of thinking about transitions to adulthood through the context of adult basic education programs.

  8. Phase transitions analogy for cavity flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Petru; Kaufman, Miron

    The fluid flow in cavity type systems, in which one of the walls is moving while the others are stationary, is analyzed using computational modeling, under the assumption of no-slip boundary conditions. By iteratively adapting the mesh used, we are able to map with high spatial resolution the complex flow structures that form at the two types of corners of the cavity, i.e. (i) corners defined by stationary walls, and (ii) corners defined by a stationary and the moving wall, respectively. For the structures that form in the vicinity of the fixed points defined by the corners, we observe that the flow magnitudes and spatial distributions follow scaling laws similar with critical phenomena. In particular, the behavior at the first type of corner is analogous to a to a first-order transition (discontinuity) point, while the behavior at the second one is analogous to a thermodynamic critical point (second-order transition). These results provide a unique insight into the solution to Navier-Stokes equations for cavity flows.

  9. Novel insights into mitotic chromosome condensation

    PubMed Central

    Piskadlo, Ewa; Oliveira, Raquel A.

    2016-01-01

    The fidelity of mitosis is essential for life, and successful completion of this process relies on drastic changes in chromosome organization at the onset of nuclear division. The mechanisms that govern chromosome compaction at every cell division cycle are still far from full comprehension, yet recent studies provide novel insights into this problem, challenging classical views on mitotic chromosome assembly. Here, we briefly introduce various models for chromosome assembly and known factors involved in the condensation process (e.g. condensin complexes and topoisomerase II). We will then focus on a few selected studies that have recently brought novel insights into the mysterious way chromosomes are condensed during nuclear division. PMID:27508072

  10. The transition to agricultural sustainability

    PubMed Central

    Ruttan, Vernon W.

    1999-01-01

    The transition to sustainable growth in agricultural production during the 21st century will take place within the context of a transition to a stable population and a possible transition to a stable level of material consumption. If the world fails to successfully navigate a transition to sustainable growth in agricultural production, the failure will be due more to a failure in the area of institutional innovation than to resource and environmental constraints. PMID:10339524

  11. Visual Analytics Technology Transition Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Scholtz, Jean; Cook, Kristin A.; Whiting, Mark A.; Lemon, Douglas K.; Greenblatt, Howard

    2009-09-23

    The authors provide a description of the transition process for visual analytic tools and contrast this with the transition process for more traditional software tools. This paper takes this into account and describes a user-oriented approach to technology transition including a discussion of key factors that should be considered and adapted to each situation. The progress made in transitioning visual analytic tools in the past five years is described and the challenges that remain are enumerated.

  12. Reconstructing Transition Knowledge in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Chen-chen

    2012-01-01

    Taking a post-colonial stand and using school to work transition as an example, the author re-examines the special education discourses in Taiwan and attempts to construct alternate understandings of transition from sociological and cultural perspectives. A review of past transition literature and a survey of the educational background of the…

  13. Slow Transit Constipation.

    PubMed

    Wald, Arnold

    2002-08-01

    The diagnosis of slow transit functional constipation is based upon diagnostic testing of patients with idiopathic constipation who responded poorly to conservative measures such as fiber supplements, fluids, and stimulant laxatives. These tests include barium enema or colonoscopy, colonic transit of radio-opaque markers, anorectal manometry, and expulsion of a water-filled balloon. Plain abdominal films can identify megacolon, which can be further characterized by barium or gastrografin studies. Colonic transit of radio-opaque markers identifies patients with slow transit with stasis of markers in the proximal colon. However, anorectal function should be characterized to exclude outlet dysfunction, which may coexist with colonic inertia. Because slow colonic transit is defined by studies during which patients consume a high-fiber diet, fiber supplements are generally not effective, nor are osmotic laxatives that consist of unabsorbed sugars. Stimulant laxatives are considered first-line therapy, although studies often show a diminished colonic motor response to such agents. There is no evidence to suggest that chronic use of such laxatives is harmful if they are used two to three times per week. Polyethylene glycol with or without electrolytes may be useful in a minority of patients, often combined with misoprostol. I prefer to start with misoprostol 200 mg every other morning and increase to tolerance or efficacy. I see no advantage in prescribing misoprostol on a TID or QID basis or even daily because it increases cramping unnecessarily. This drug is not acceptable in young women who wish to become pregnant. An alternative may be colchicine, which is reported to be effective when given as 0.6 mg TID. Long-term efficacy has not been studied. Finally, biofeedback is a risk-free approach that has been reported as effective in approximately 60% of patients with slow transit constipation in the absence of outlet dysfunction. Although difficult to understand

  14. Ultrafast photophysics of transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Chergui, Majed

    2015-03-17

    The properties of transition metal complexes are interesting not only for their potential applications in solar energy conversion, OLEDs, molecular electronics, biology, photochemistry, etc. but also for their fascinating photophysical properties that call for a rethinking of fundamental concepts. With the advent of ultrafast spectroscopy over 25 years ago and, more particularly, with improvements in the past 10-15 years, a new area of study was opened that has led to insightful observations of the intramolecular relaxation processes such as internal conversion (IC), intersystem crossing (ISC), and intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR). Indeed, ultrafast optical spectroscopic tools, such as fluorescence up-conversion, show that in many cases, intramolecular relaxation processes can be extremely fast and even shorter than time scales of vibrations. In addition, more and more examples are appearing showing that ultrafast ISC rates do not scale with the magnitude of the metal spin-orbit coupling constant, that is, that there is no heavy-atom effect on ultrafast time scales. It appears that the structural dynamics of the system and the density of states play a crucial role therein. While optical spectroscopy delivers an insightful picture of electronic relaxation processes involving valence orbitals, the photophysics of metal complexes involves excitations that may be centered on the metal (called metal-centered or MC) or the ligand (called ligand-centered or LC) or involve a transition from one to the other or vice versa (called MLCT or LMCT). These excitations call for an element-specific probe of the photophysics, which is achieved by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this case, transitions from core orbitals to valence orbitals or higher allow probing the electronic structure changes induced by the optical excitation of the valence orbitals, while also delivering information about the geometrical rearrangement of the neighbor atoms around the atom of

  15. Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) Fuel Cell Transit Buses: Preliminary Evaluation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2007-03-01

    This report provides an evaluation of three prototype fuel cell-powered transit buses operating at AC Transit in Oakland, California, and six baseline diesel buses similar in design to the fuel cell buses.

  16. Gaining Insights into Children's Geometric Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Nancy K.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how research on children's geometric thinking was used in conjunction with the picture book "The Greedy Triangle" to gain valuable insights into children's prior geometric knowledge of polygons. Exercises focused on the names, visual appearance, and properties of polygons, as well as real-world connections for each, are…

  17. Gaining Algorithmic Insight through Simplifying Constraints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginat, David

    2002-01-01

    Discusses algorithmic problem solving in computer science education, particularly algorithmic insight, and focuses on the relevance and effectiveness of the heuristic simplifying constraints which involves simplification of a given problem to a problem in which constraints are imposed on the input data. Presents three examples involving…

  18. Insights into Our Understandings of Large Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastberg, Signe E.; Walker, Vicki

    2008-01-01

    This article explores prospective teachers' understandings of one million to gain insights into the development of adult understanding of large numbers. Themes in the prospective teachers' work included number associated with a quantity of objects, number as an abstraction, and additive and multiplicative approaches. The authors suggest that the…

  19. Insight into an Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birch, Jen

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author shares some insights on the characteristics of a person with Asperger's syndrome, a condition on the higher-functioning end of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Born in 1955, the author was raised in rural South Auckland. As a baby, she propelled herself around the floor on her stomach, using her limbs as flippers,…

  20. Developmental Social Cognitive Neuroscience: Insights from Deafness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corina, David; Singleton, Jenny

    2009-01-01

    The condition of deafness presents a developmental context that provides insight into the biological, cultural, and linguistic factors underlying the development of neural systems that impact social cognition. Studies of visual attention, behavioral regulation, language development, and face and human action perception are discussed. Visually…

  1. Gestures and Insight in Advanced Mathematical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Caroline; Thomas, Michael O. J.; Dreyfus, Tommy

    2011-01-01

    What role do gestures play in advanced mathematical thinking? We argue that the role of gestures goes beyond merely communicating thought and supporting understanding--in some cases, gestures can help generate new mathematical insights. Gestures feature prominently in a case study of two participants working on a sequence of calculus activities.…

  2. Innovative Leadership: Insights from a Learning Technologist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Professor Ricardo Torres Kompen is a leading proponent for, and researcher in, personal learning environments (PLEs). During his interview, Torres Kompen clarified his research on PLEs, particularly the digital toolbox within PLEs. He elaborated on experiences with implementing PLE initiatives, personal insights on using social media and Web 2.0…

  3. InSight Planetary Protection Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benardini, James; Vaishampayan, Parag; Chen, Fei; Kazarians, Gayane; Willis, Jason; Witte, Joe; Hendrickson, Ryan

    2016-07-01

    The InSight Project is a Discovery mission that consists of a single spacecraft with an overarching mission goal of illuminating the fundamentals of formation and evolution of terrestrial planets by investigating the interior structure and processes of Mars. The flight system is comprised of a 2008 Phoenix mission heritage cruise stage, aeroshell (heatshield and backshell), and lander. The lander payload contains cameras, a seismometer, a mole to penetrate the regolith (≤5 meters) to measure the geothermal gradient of Mars, and an auxiliary payload sensor suite to measure wind, temperature, and pressure. As a Mars lander mission without life detection instruments, the InSight mission has been designated PP Category IVa. Therefore, planetary protection bioburden requirements are applicable to this mission and require microbial reduction procedures and biological burden reports. Due to primary payload technical issues, InSight's 2016 launch has been delayed by NASA. The mission is currently under a re-planning phase. InSight has completed an approved Planetary Protection Plan, Subsidiary PP Plans, PP Implementation Documentation, and ~50% of the PPO verification biological assays. The flight system and additional payloads were assembled and being readied for launch at the launch site at the time of the project stand-down and has since been secured for storage. The status of the PP activities will be reported.

  4. Vitamin D and Adipogenesis: New Molecular Insights

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The focus of the current review is to highlight some new insights into the molecular mechanism by which vitamin D, a potentially nutritionally modulated factor, influences adipogenesis. Recent studies, predominantly using the mouse 3T3-L1 pre-adipocyte cell culture model, have shown that the role of...

  5. Development and Testing of "Math Insight" Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zucker, Andrew A.

    2006-01-01

    Computers running appropriate software hold great promise for teaching and learning mathematics. To this end, SRI International developed an integrated, computer-based problem solving environment called "Math Insight" that included interactive tools, such as a spreadsheet and dynamic geometric sketches, and professionally produced videos used to…

  6. Insights on the College, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowdle, Michael A.; Silverman, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    This document contains the 2000-2001 issues of Mt. San Antonio College's (Mt. SAC's) "Insights on the College." The first issue, "Mt. SAC Progress Report on Partnership for Excellence Goals," is a report on the self-assessment of the Partnership for Excellence (PFE) program conducted by Mt. SAC. The PFE program addresses the goal of the community…

  7. University Student Employment: Insights Gained under Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Ding

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the perilous state of Chinese university graduates in seeking jobs. This pressure has given people many valuable insights, enabling them to look at the problems among university students and the direction of higher education development from a new perspective. To overcome this problem, the State Council held a…

  8. Cognitive Psychology--An Educational Insight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muirhead, Brent

    2007-01-01

    Cognitive psychology offers relevant insights into improving the teaching and learning process. The author has selected ten questions from a graduate class in cognition and learning taken at The Teachers College, Columbia University. The questions will be used to examine the most effective ways to learn and recall information.

  9. Factorising a Quadratic Expression with Geometric Insights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joarder, Anwar H.

    2015-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for factorising a quadratic expression to facilitate instruction and learning. It appeals to elementary geometry which may provide better insights to some students or teachers. There have been many methods for factorising a quadratic expression described in school text books. However, students often seem to struggle with…

  10. Corticotropin-releasing hormone: Mediator of vertebrate life stage transitions?

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yugo; Grommen, Sylvia V H; De Groef, Bert

    2016-03-01

    Hormones, particularly thyroid hormones and corticosteroids, play critical roles in vertebrate life stage transitions such as amphibian metamorphosis, hatching in precocial birds, and smoltification in salmonids. Since they synergistically regulate several metabolic and developmental processes that accompany vertebrate life stage transitions, the existence of extensive cross-communication between the adrenal/interrenal and thyroidal axes is not surprising. Synergies of corticosteroids and thyroid hormones are based on effects at the level of tissue hormone sensitivity and gene regulation. In addition, in representative nonmammalian vertebrates, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) stimulates hypophyseal thyrotropin secretion, and thus functions as a common regulator of both the adrenal/interrenal and thyroidal axes to release corticosteroids and thyroid hormones. The dual function of CRH has been speculated to control or affect the timing of vertebrate life history transitions across taxa. After a brief overview of recent insights in the molecular mechanisms behind the synergic actions of thyroid hormones and corticosteroids during life stage transitions, this review examines the evidence for a possible role of CRH in controlling vertebrate life stage transitions. PMID:26874222

  11. Race to the Top: Transiting Brown Dwarfs and Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beatty, Thomas G.

    2015-12-01

    There are currently twelve known transiting brown dwarfs, nine of which orbit single main-sequence stars. These systems give us one of the only ways in which we may directly measure the masses and radii brown dwarfs, which in turn provides strong constraints on theoretical models of brown dwarf interiors and atmospheres. In addition, the transiting brown dwarfs allow us to forge a link between our understanding of transiting hot Jupiters, and our understanding of the field brown dwarf population. Comparing the two gives us a unique avenue to explore the role and interaction of surface gravity and stellar irradiation in the atmospheres of sub-stellar objects. It also allows us to leverage the detailed spectroscopic information we have for field brown dwarfs to interpret the broadband colors of hot Jupiters. This provides us with insight into the L/T transition in brown dwarfs, and the atmospheric chemistry changes that occur in hot Jupiter atmospheres as they cool. I will discuss recent observational results, with a particular focus on the transiting brown dwarf KELT-1b, and suggest how more of these important systems may be discovered in the future.

  12. Five Kepler target stars that show multiple transiting exoplanet candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Fressin, Francois; Ford, Eric B.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; /UC, Santa Cruz, Phys. Dept. /NASA, Ames

    2010-06-01

    We present and discuss five candidate exoplanetary systems identified with the Kepler spacecraft. These five systems show transits from multiple exoplanet candidates. Should these objects prove to be planetary in nature, then these five systems open new opportunities for the field of exoplanets and provide new insights into the formation and dynamical evolution of planetary systems. We discuss the methods used to identify multiple transiting objects from the Kepler photometry as well as the false-positive rejection methods that have been applied to these data. One system shows transits from three distinct objects while the remaining four systems show transits from two objects. Three systems have planet candidates that are near mean motion commensurabilities - two near 2:1 and one just outside 5:2. We discuss the implications that multitransiting systems have on the distribution of orbital inclinations in planetary systems, and hence their dynamical histories; as well as their likely masses and chemical compositions. A Monte Carlo study indicates that, with additional data, most of these systems should exhibit detectable transit timing variations (TTV) due to gravitational interactions - though none are apparent in these data. We also discuss new challenges that arise in TTV analyses due to the presence of more than two planets in a system.

  13. A crystallographic approach to structural transitions in icosahedral viruses.

    PubMed

    Indelicato, Giuliana; Cermelli, Paolo; Salthouse, David G; Racca, Simone; Zanzotto, Giovanni; Twarock, Reidun

    2012-04-01

    Viruses with icosahedral capsids, which form the largest class of all viruses and contain a number of important human pathogens, can be modelled via suitable icosahedrally invariant finite subsets of icosahedral 3D quasicrystals. We combine concepts from the theory of 3D quasicrystals, and from the theory of structural phase transformations in crystalline solids, to give a framework for the study of the structural transitions occurring in icosahedral viral capsids during maturation or infection. As 3D quasicrystals are in a one-to-one correspondence with suitable subsets of 6D icosahedral Bravais lattices, we study systematically the 6D-analogs of the classical Bain deformations in 3D, characterized by minimal symmetry loss at intermediate configurations, and use this information to infer putative viral-capsid transition paths in 3D via the cut-and-project method used for the construction of quasicrystals. We apply our approach to the Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle virus (CCMV) and show that the putative transition path between the experimentally observed initial and final CCMV structures is most likely to preserve one threefold axis. Our procedure suggests a general method for the investigation and prediction of symmetry constraints on the capsids of icosahedral viruses during structural transitions, and thus provides insights into the mechanisms underlying structural transitions of these pathogens. PMID:21611828

  14. Dimensional reduction transition

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, E.

    1984-11-01

    In this conference on phase transitions in the early Universe the author discusses the transition from more than four space-time dimensions to four effective space-time dimensions; the dimensional reduction transition. The basic assumption is that the true dimensionality of space-time is more than four, and that at present the extra dimensions are compact and too small to be observable. The origin of the observed gauge symmetries from symmetries of a compact space has been proposed as a possible approach for the unification of particle physics and gravity. The common assumption in all models with extra dimensions is that the unseen dimensions are compactified to a very small size, usually taken to be of the order of the Planck length. To probe the structure of the extra dimensions would require energies of the Planck mass E = m/sub pl/ = 1.2 x 10/sup 19/GeV, and the early Universe may be the only source of such energies. The author will assume for initial conditions that all spatial dimensions are small, and that initially the Universe had N = 3 + D spatial dimensions. When the temperature fell below T = R/sub D//sup -1/, where R/sub D/ is the physical size of the compact extra dimensions, the space-time dimensionality of the Universe underwent a reduction to effectively a 4 space-time dimensional Universe, and dynamical effects of the extra dimensions became unimportant. In this paper I will discuss three possible consequences of this cosmological dimensional reduction; entropy production (inflation), magnetic monopole production, and stable, massive particle production. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

  16. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2010-01-08

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

  17. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-29

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

  18. Global transition in health.

    PubMed

    Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Meyrowitsch, Dan W

    2007-02-01

    "Tempora mutantur et nos in illis" King Lothar I remarked by year 900 AD. What exactly changed in us over time, i.e. how patterns of the epidemiological transition in populations locally and globally might appear, was described by Omran in 1971 [1]. The effect of transition on health and diseases in populations was demonstrated by Frenkl et al in 1991 [2]. And which major public health problems following each other, and why, was underscored by LaPorte in 1995 [3]. In 2000, leaders of the world society decided to identify a range of common goals, the Millennium Development Goals (MDG), to be reached by year 2015. Many of the MDG are directly or indirectly related with the major health problems, particularly those hitting the poorest: lack of clean drinking water, unhealthy environment, high maternal mortality due to lack of care for the pregnant, and lack of control of major communicable, often fatal diseases like child diseases, malaria, HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis. It is remarkable that the specific chronic diseases of major public health relevance are in fact not mentioned in the MDG, even if these diseases increasingly are hitting populations in low- and middle-income societies, i.e. developing countries. The world community seems to prioritize the diseases that are most visible, and most often linked with poverty, namely the infectious diseases mentioned above, which together kill about 17 million people annually, often in combination with malnutrition, and the 0.6 million deaths related to birth and pregnancy. With the exception of HIV/AIDS, which also hit richer societies, these diseases of poverty have been under-prioritized regarding research as well. However, at the turn of the Millennium, the burden of "Western" non-communicable diseases was increasing fast in developing countries. And by 2025, the burden of non-communicable diseases is expected to have doubled globally, with half of the burden on developing countries. Therefore it may be rewarding to look

  19. Electromagnetic transitions in hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    The object of this review is to survey observations of electromagnetic transitions in hypernuclei and to point out contributions of these observations to an understanding of the effective two-body hyperon-nucleon forces in the nucleus. The discussion concentrates on lambda-hyperon nucleon potentials. Future plans for high resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy using Ge diode detectors is discussed, especially regarding the window of utility of such devices. Expected improvements in beam facilities are also reviewed. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab. (DWL)

  20. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    2009-08-21

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

  1. A translational evaluation of transitions.

    PubMed

    Jessel, Joshua; Hanley, Gregory P; Ghaemmaghami, Mahshid

    2016-06-01

    Transitions with nonhuman animals are typically framed as inescapable changes in signaled reinforcement schedules that result in a pause in responding unique to switches from rich to lean schedules. Pausing is considered to be a function of the aversive qualities of the contrasting reinforcement schedules. Transitions are typically framed in applied research as physical changes in location that evoke problem behavior maintained by the escape of an aversive event or resumption of a preferred event. We attempted to extend the basic framing of transitions to behaviors and contexts of social significance and evaluate a novel treatment for the problem of dawdling by 3 boys who had been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder during rich-to-lean transitions. Dawdling during physical transitions was most readily observed when transitioning to lean contexts in Experiment 1. We then shortened transition duration in Experiment 2 by programming unsignaled and probabilistic rich reinforcement in the upcoming context. PMID:26916573

  2. Insight, distress and coping styles in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Michael; Peters, Emmanuelle; Fannon, Dominic; Anilkumar, Anantha P.P.; Aasen, Ingrid; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Kumari, Veena

    2007-01-01

    Background The stigma and negative societal views attached to schizophrenia can make the diagnosis distressing. There is evidence that poor insight into symptoms of the disorder and need for treatment may reflect the use of denial as a coping style. However, the relationships between insight and other coping styles have seldom been investigated. Method We examined the associations between insight, distress and a number of coping styles in 65 outpatients with schizophrenia (final n = 57) in a cross-sectional study. Results We found that (i) awareness of symptoms and problems correlated with greater distress, (ii) ‘preference for positive reinterpretation and growth’ coping style correlated with lower distress and with lower symptom awareness (re-labelling), (iii) ‘preference for mental disengagement’ coping style correlated with greater distress and lower awareness of problems, and (iv) ‘social support-seeking’ coping style correlated with greater awareness of illness, but not distress. No relationship occurred between the use of ‘denial’ as a coping style and insight or distress. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that awareness of illness and related problems is associated with greater distress in schizophrenia. However, this investigation has not supported a simple psychological denial explanation for this relationship, as complex relationships emerged between different dimensions of insight and coping styles. The negative association between ‘positive reinterpretation and growth’ and distress suggests that adopting this style may lead to re-labelling symptoms in a less distressing way. Avoidant and isolating styles of coping both appear unhelpful. Psychological interventions should aim to promote more active coping such as discussing a mental health problem with others. PMID:17561377

  3. [Insight into illness and compliance in schizophrenic disorders].

    PubMed

    Zsolt, Juhász Levente; György, Bartkó

    2006-01-01

    Poor insight into illness is a characteristic and common phenomenon in schizophrenic disorders. Lack of insight may lead to poor clinical outcome, thus, research focused on this phenomenon could help develop effective treatment strategies. The relationship between compliance with treatment and insight is complex and it may be influenced mostly by specific components of insight. The aim of the present study was to review the current definitions of insight, the tools and questionnaires used for its measurement, as well as the relationship between insight and psychopathological symptoms. Three theoretical models developed for the explanation of impaired insight are described; the Psychological Defence Model, the Cognitive Deficit Model, and the Neuropsychological Deficit Model. The neurocognitive bases of impaired insight is given special attention in this article. Administration of second generation antipsychotics and psychosocial interventions (psychoeducation with problem solving procedures and motivating techniques) can improve insight, and enhance compliance with treatment, thus, optimizing long-term therapeutic outcome for schizophrenia patients. PMID:17438658

  4. Analysis Insights, August 2015: Sustainable Transportation; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    NREL Analysis Insights mines our body of analysis work to synthesize topical insights and key findings. In this issue, we examine transportation systems, alternative fuels, and implications of increasing electrification of transit. Moving people and goods from point A to B has never been easier, but our current transportation systems also take a toll on our environment. Transportation currently accounts for 71% of total U.S. petroleum use and 33% of the nation’s total carbon emissions. With new technology, can we make our transportation system cleaner and more cost effective? NREL is applying its analytical expertise and imagination to do just that. Solutions start with systems thinking. Connecting the dots between physical components - vehicles, fueling stations, and highways - and institutional components - traffic laws, regulations, and vehicle standards - helps illuminate solutions that address the needs of the transportation system's many stakeholders.

  5. Structural and Mechanistic Insights into C-P Bond Hydrolysis by Phosphonoacetate Hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Vinayak; Borisova, Svetlana A.; Metcalf, William W.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.; Nair, Satish K.

    2011-12-22

    Bacteria have evolved pathways to metabolize phosphonates as a nutrient source for phosphorus. In Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021, 2-aminoethylphosphonate is catabolized to phosphonoacetate, which is converted to acetate and inorganic phosphate by phosphonoacetate hydrolase (PhnA). Here we present detailed biochemical and structural characterization of PhnA that provides insights into the mechanism of C-P bond cleavage. The 1.35 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure reveals a catalytic core similar to those of alkaline phosphatases and nucleotide pyrophosphatases but with notable differences, such as a longer metal-metal distance. Detailed structure-guided analysis of active site residues and four additional cocrystal structures with phosphonoacetate substrate, acetate, phosphonoformate inhibitor, and a covalently bound transition state mimic provide insight into active site features that may facilitate cleavage of the C-P bond. These studies expand upon the array of reactions that can be catalyzed by enzymes of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily.

  6. Plasma inverse transition acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    2001-06-18

    It can be proved fundamentally from the reciprocity theorem with which the electromagnetism is endowed that corresponding to each spontaneous process of radiation by a charged particle there is an inverse process which defines a unique acceleration mechanism, from Cherenkov radiation to inverse Cherenkov acceleration (ICA) [1], from Smith-Purcell radiation to inverse Smith-Purcell acceleration (ISPA) [2], and from undulator radiation to inverse undulator acceleration (IUA) [3]. There is no exception. Yet, for nearly 30 years after each of the aforementioned inverse processes has been clarified for laser acceleration, inverse transition acceleration (ITA), despite speculation [4], has remained the least understood, and above all, no practical implementation of ITA has been found, until now. Unlike all its counterparts in which phase synchronism is established one way or the other such that a particle can continuously gain energy from an acceleration wave, the ITA to be discussed here, termed plasma inverse transition acceleration (PITA), operates under fundamentally different principle. As a result, the discovery of PITA has been delayed for decades, waiting for a conceptual breakthrough in accelerator physics: the principle of alternating gradient acceleration [5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]. In fact, PITA was invented [7, 8] as one of several realizations of the new principle.

  7. Planet Demographics from Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    From the demographics of planets detected by the Kepler mission, we have learned that there exists approximately one planet per star for planets larger than Earth orbiting inside of 1 AU. We have also learned the relative occurrence of these planets as a function of their orbital periods, sizes, and host star masses and metallicities. In this talk I will review the key statistical findings that the planet size distribution peaks in the range 1-3 times Earth-size, the orbital period distribution is characterized by a power-law cut off at short periods, small planets are more prevalent around small stars, and that approximately 20% of Sun-like stars hosts a planet 1-2 times Earth-size in a habitable zone. Looking forward, I will describe analysis of photometry from the K2 mission that is yielding initial planet discoveries and offering the opportunity to measure planet occurrence in widely separated regions of the galaxy. Finally, I will also discuss recent techniques to discover transiting planets in space-based photometry and to infer planet population properties from the ensemble of detected and non-detected transit signals.

  8. Transitions in viscous withdrawal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wendy W.

    2008-11-01

    A process analogous to flow-focusing occurs in extended and stably stratified layers of immiscible, viscous liquids. In viscous withdrawal, an axisymmetric converging flow is imposed in the upper layer. When the upper layer flow is weak, the interface forms a hump. No liquid from the lower layer is entrained. When the upper layer flow is strong, liquid from the lower layer is entrained and the interface becomes a spout. Here I summarize recent results on the fundamental mechanisms controlling these regimes. For selective withdrawal, a clear picture has emerged, with good agreement between theory, simulation and experiment. The regime ends when the viscous stress exerted by the upper layer flow overcomes surface tension, creating a saddle-node bifurcation in the hump solution. Less is understood about viscous entrainment. A long-wavelength model including only local information is degenerate, possessing many solutions for the same withdrawal condition. Including information about the global geometry removes this degeneracy but also makes the surprising prediction that global geometry can change the nature of the transition. First-order, weakly first-order or continuous transitions are all possible. How these results relate to the variety of experimental phenomena, such as stable, micron-sized spouts, intricate patterns of hysteresis and multiple stable spout states under the same condition, is at present unclear. (Includes material from joint works with Blanchette, Cohen, Kleine Berkenbusch, and Schmidt.)

  9. 309 Building transition plan

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, C.E.

    1994-08-31

    The preparation for decontamination and decommissioning (transition) of the 309 Building is projected to be completed by the end of the fiscal year (FY) 1998. The major stabilization and decontamination efforts include the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR), fuel storage and transfer pits, Transfer Waste (TW) tanks and the Ion Exchange Vaults. In addition to stabilizing contaminated areas, equipment, components, records, waste products, etc., will be dispositioned. All nonessential systems, i.e., heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), electrical, monitoring, fluids, etc., will be shut down and drained/de-energized. This will allow securing of the process, laboratory, and office areas of the facility. After that, the facility will be operated at a level commensurate with its surveillance needs while awaiting D&D. The implementation costs for FY 1995 through FY 1998 for the transition activities are estimated to be $1,070K, $2,115K, $2,939K, and $4,762K, respectively. Costs include an assumed company overhead of 20% and a 30% out year contingency.

  10. Transition Probabilities of the Rare Earth Neutral Lanthanum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Andria; Lawler, James E.; Den Hartog, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    In continuation of a long-standing project to measure transition probabilities for rare earth elements, La i is currently being studied. Transition probabilities of the rare earths and other elements are determined in order to assist astronomers in making stellar spectroscopy more quantitative. Atomic spectroscopy is a key tool for astronomers as it provides nearly all the details about the physics and chemistry of the universe outside of our solar system. Rare earth elements tend to have complex electronic structure due to their open 4f, 5d, 6s, and 6p shells. This leads to a rich spectrum throughout the ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared, making them very accessible elements for study in stellar photospheric spectra. A transition probability is the probability per unit time for a transition to occur between an upper level and a lower level. The process for measuring transition probabilities is by using the well-established technique of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence to measure the radiative lifetimes for each upper level. This is then combined with branching fractions measured using a 1m high-resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometer. Radiative lifetimes for ~70 upper levels of neutral La along with their associated branching fractions will be reported, resulting in the determination of several hundred new transition probabilities. These transition probabilities will assist astronomers in analyzing the chemical compositions of older, cooler stars which give insight into the origins of the chemical elements.This work supported by by NSF grant AST-1211055 (JEL & EDH) and by the NSF REU program (AJP).

  11. The "Insight Paradox" in Schizophrenia: Magnitude, Moderators and Mediators of the Association Between Insight and Depression.

    PubMed

    Belvederi Murri, Martino; Amore, Mario; Calcagno, Pietro; Respino, Matteo; Marozzi, Valentina; Masotti, Mattia; Bugliani, Michele; Innamorati, Marco; Pompili, Maurizio; Galderisi, Silvana; Maj, Mario

    2016-09-01

    The so-called "insight paradox" posits that among patients with schizophrenia higher levels of insight are associated with increased levels of depression. Although different studies examined this issue, only few took in account potential confounders or factors that could influence this association. In a sample of clinically stable patients with schizophrenia, insight and depression were evaluated using the Scale to assess Unawareness of Mental Disorder and the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia. Other rating scales were used to assess the severity of psychotic symptoms, extrapyramidal symptoms, hopelessness, internalized stigma, self-esteem, and service engagement. Regression models were used to estimate the magnitude of the association between insight and depression while accounting for the role of confounders. Putative psychological and sociodemographic factors that could act as mediators and moderators were examined using the PROCESS macro. By accounting for the role of confounding factors, the strength of the association between insight into symptoms and depression increased from 13% to 25% explained covariance. Patients with lower socioeconomic status (F = 8.5, P = .04), more severe illness (F = 4.8, P = .03) and lower levels of service engagement (F = 4.7, P = .03) displayed the strongest association between insight and depression. Lastly, hopelessness, internalized stigma and perceived discrimination acted as significant mediators. The relationship between insight and depression should be considered a well established phenomenon among patients with schizophrenia: it seems stronger than previously reported especially among patients with lower socioeconomic status, severe illness and poor engagement with services. These findings may have relevant implications for the promotion of insight among patients with schizophrenia. PMID:27069064

  12. Making Mudstones: insights into material behavior through resedimentation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flemings, P. B.; Reece, J.; Adams, A. L.; Germaine, J. T.

    2012-12-01

    We explore how composition controls permeability, stiffness, and fabric in 'resedimented' mudstones. We mix slurries of natural mudstone (e.g. Boston Blue Clay and Gulf of Mexico Mudstone) with other components (e.g. silt) and we subject them to uniaxial compression to effective stresses up to 40 MPa. We show that increasing the silt fraction in mudstones results in a transition from a single porosity to a dual porosity structure. This dual porosity structure results from the development of large pore throat pathways associated with silt-to-silt contacts in the mixture. We describe how fabric evolves with increased effective stress due to increasing alignment of platy materials that rotate during uniaxial compression. We illustrate how pore throats evolve from approximately circular to elongate and how this results in the development of permeability anisotropy from isotropic at low effective stresses to anisotropic (Kh/Kv >2) at 40 MPa. Finally, we show how stiffness increases during compression. As compression proceeds, increasing grain-to-grain contact increases the stiffness. With the resedimentation approach, the effects of sample variability and sample disturbance are removed and the fundamental material behavior of mudstones is illuminated. The results can be used to simulate the evolution of mudstone properties during burial and the associated flow that must occur. More broadly, the results provide insight into the material properties of mudstones given particular burial histories that allow us to predict their flow behavior, and their sealing capacity.

  13. Microemulsion: new insights into the ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Rahul Rama; Verma, Anurag; Ghosh, Amitava

    2013-01-01

    Delivery of drugs into eyes using conventional drug delivery systems, such as solutions, is a considerable challenge to the treatment of ocular diseases. Drug loss from the ocular surface by lachrymal fluid secretion, lachrymal fluid-eye barriers, and blood-ocular barriers are main obstacles. A number of ophthalmic drug delivery carriers have been made to improve the bioavailability and to prolong the residence time of drugs applied topically onto the eye. The potential use of microemulsions as an ocular drug delivery carrier offers several favorable pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical properties such as their excellent thermodynamic stability, phase transition to liquid-crystal state, very low surface tension, and small droplet size, which may result in improved ocular drug retention, extended duration of action, high ocular absorption, and permeation of loaded drugs. Further, both lipophilic and hydrophilic characteristics are present in microemulsions, so that the loaded drugs can diffuse passively as well get significantly partitioned in the variable lipophilic-hydrophilic corneal barrier. This review will provide an insight into previous studies on microemulsions for ocular delivery of drugs using various nonionic surfactants, cosurfactants, and associated irritation potential on the ocular surface. The reported in vivo experiments have shown a delayed effect of drug incorporated in microemulsion and an increase in the corneal permeation of the drug. PMID:23936681

  14. Mechanistic insights into the mode of action of anticandidal sesamol.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Moiz A; Fatima, Zeeshan; Hameed, Saif

    2016-09-01

    Previously we have deciphered the antifungal effect of sesamol (Ses), a phenolic compound obtained from sesame oil, against human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. To gain deeper insights into the possible mechanisms involved, transcription profiling was done in presence of Ses which revealed various targets through which Ses was barricading the growth of C. albicans. We observed that Ses perturbs membrane integrity confirming our previous observations and displayed disrupted plasma membrane ATPase activity. We further investigated that Ses leads to inhibited morphological transition, biofilm formation and epithelial cell adhesion which are significant virulence attributes required for pathogenesis. Interestingly, Ses also causes amendment in iron homeostasis as revealed by hypersensitivity under iron deprivation, ferroxidase assay to estimate iron levels and concomitant upregulation of FTR2, a high affinity iron transporter. Finally we assessed that Ses causes defect in mitochondrial functioning and DNA repair mechanism. Together, being source of consumable natural product, further studies on Ses are warranted so that it can be exploited as effective antifungal agent. PMID:27392701

  15. New Insights into Stellar Astrophysics from High-Precision Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, David R.

    2013-01-01

    The rich harvest of information on the occurrence and nature of planets around solar-type stars is why Kepler was built, but equally profound from this mission are the insights and quantitative physical studies of stars. The Kepler sample is dominated by the ~100,000 stars that are like the Sun, yet the Kepler field includes examples of nearly every stellar type. Kepler's exquisite photometry - continuously over an extended time - has enabled the detection of new phenomena and has provided critical tests of stellar models. In this brief review I will summarize some of the exciting new findings that Kepler has made possible, including: Stellar surface granulation in late-type stars; Evidence for rapid rotation of the cores of some evolved stars; Flares on G, K and M stars; Precise ages for older solar-type stars; Evidence for "mixed" modes in evolved stars that couple p-modes to interior g-modes; Stellar differential rotation; Detection of stellar activity cycles from asteroseismology; Mixing processes in stars; Detailed studies of eclipsing binaries; A comparison of the Sun to similar stars; Pulsating stars; Stellar surface features revealed by planet transits.

  16. Molecular and isotopic insights into methane oxidation in Lake Kivu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zigah, P. K.; Wehrli, B.; Schubert, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Lake Kivu is a meromictic lake in the East African Rift Valley, located between the Republic of Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo. The hypolimnion is permanently stratified and contain an unusually high amount of dissolved methane (CH4; ~ 60 km3) and carbon dioxide (CO2; ~300 km3) at standard temperature and pressure. While microbial-mediated methane oxidation is an important sink of methane in the lake, little is known about the distribution of microbes involved in the methane oxidation. To provide insights into methanotrophy in the lake, we analyzed depth profile of CH4, δ13C-CH4 and δ13C-DIC, δ13C-POC and the biomarkers of methanotrophic archaea and bacteria and their stable carbon isotopic composition from suspended particulate matter isolated from the lake water column. Our preliminary data show enhanced methane oxidation in oxic-anoxic transition zone in the water column. Depth distribution of diagnostic methanotrophic archaeal biomarkers such as archaeol and hydroxyarchaeol suggest archaea might be involved in anaerobic methane oxidation. Phospholipid fatty acids and diplopterol distribution and carbon isotopic signatures indicate bacteria-mediated anaerobic (and aerobic) methane oxidation in the lake.

  17. Insights into high temperature tensional fracturing in silicic magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Oliver; Lavallée, Yan; De Angelis, Silvio; Hornby, Adrian

    2015-04-01

    During dome-forming eruptions, the rapid transition from effusive to explosive activity is a direct consequence of strain localisation in magma. A deformation mechanism map of magma subjected to strain localisation will help develop accurate numerical models, which, coupled to an understanding of the mechanics driving the monitored geophysical signals precursor to failure, will enhance eruption forecasts. Here we present our work where seismic data is combined with experimental work to give insights into high temperature tensional fracturing in magma. The seismic data is derived from multiple recent dome-forming eruptions including Unzen (Japan), Volcán de Colima (Mexico) and Mt. St. Helens (USA). For the analysis we implemented various methods to study temporal variations in seismicity, such as: automatic event detection, statistical analysis of time-series, waveform correlation, and singular value decomposition. Preliminary results have highlighted various processes during dome formation such as: sub-weekly cycles, clusters during spine extrusion, and variations in precursors to dome extrusion. In our experiments, samples from the above volcanoes were placed under tensional conditions at high temperatures and acoustic emissions were recorded. The data is analysed and compared to the natural seismic data so that constraints may be placed on the conditions of the natural seismogenic sources. Using a combination of field and experimental data promises a greater understanding of the processes affecting the rise of magma during an eruption. This will help with the challenge of forecasting and hazard mitigation during dome-forming eruptions worldwide.

  18. New insight into neurodegeneration: the role of proteomics.

    PubMed

    Pal, Ramavati; Alves, Guido; Larsen, Jan Petter; Møller, Simon Geir

    2014-06-01

    Recent advances within the field of proteomics, including both upstream and downstream protocols, have fuelled a transition from simple protein identification to functional analysis. A battery of proteomics approaches is now being employed for the analysis of protein expression levels, the monitoring of cellular activities and for gaining an increased understanding into biochemical pathways. Combined, these approaches are changing the way we study disease by allowing accurate and targeted, large scale protein analysis, which will provide invaluable insight into disease pathogenesis. Neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), prion disease, and other diseases that affect the neuromuscular system, are a leading cause of disability in the aging population. There are no effective intervention strategies for these disorders and diagnosis is challenging as it relies primarily on clinical symptomatic features, which often overlap at early stages of disease. There is, therefore, an urgent need to develop reliable biomarkers to improve early and specific diagnosis, to track disease progression, to measure molecular responses towards treatment regimes and ultimately devise new therapeutic strategies. To accomplish this, a better understanding of disease mechanisms is needed. In this review we summarize recent advances in the field of proteomics applicable to neurodegenerative disorders, and how these advances are fueling our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of these complex disorders. PMID:24323427

  19. Fluorescence spectroscopy of rhodopsins: insights and approaches.

    PubMed

    Alexiev, Ulrike; Farrens, David L

    2014-05-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy has become an established tool at the interface of biology, chemistry and physics because of its exquisite sensitivity and recent technical advancements. However, rhodopsin proteins present the fluorescence spectroscopist with a unique set of challenges and opportunities due to the presence of the light-sensitive retinal chromophore. This review briefly summarizes some approaches that have successfully met these challenges and the novel insights they have yielded about rhodopsin structure and function. We start with a brief overview of fluorescence fundamentals and experimental methodologies, followed by more specific discussions of technical challenges rhodopsin proteins present to fluorescence studies. Finally, we end by discussing some of the unique insights that have been gained specifically about visual rhodopsin and its interactions with affiliate proteins through the use of fluorescence spectroscopy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Retinal Proteins - You can teach an old dog new tricks. PMID:24183695

  20. Fluorescence spectroscopy of rhodopsins: Insights and approaches

    PubMed Central

    Alexiev, Ulrike; Farrens, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy has become an established tool at the interface of biology, chemistry and physics because of its exquisite sensitivity and recent technical advancements. However, rhodopsin proteins present the fluorescence spectroscopist with a unique set of challenges and opportunities due to the presence of the light-sensitive retinal chromophore. This review briefly summarizes some approaches that have successfully met these challenges and the novel insights they have yielded about rhodopsin structure and function. We start with a brief overview of fluorescence fundamentals and experimental methodologies, followed by more specific discussions of technical challenges rhodopsin proteins present to fluorescence studies. Finally, we end by discussing some of the unique insights that have been gained specifically about visual rhodopsin and its interactions with affiliate proteins through the use of fluorescence spectroscopy. PMID:24183695

  1. Insights from Human/Mouse genome comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-03-30

    Large-scale public genomic sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of vertebrate sequence data poised to provide insights into mammalian biology. These include deep genomic sequence coverage of human, mouse, rat, zebrafish, and two pufferfish (Fugu rubripes and Tetraodon nigroviridis) (Aparicio et al. 2002; Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001; Waterston et al. 2002). In addition, a high-priority has been placed on determining the genomic sequence of chimpanzee, dog, cow, frog, and chicken (Boguski 2002). While only recently available, whole genome sequence data have provided the unique opportunity to globally compare complete genome contents. Furthermore, the shared evolutionary ancestry of vertebrate species has allowed the development of comparative genomic approaches to identify ancient conserved sequences with functionality. Accordingly, this review focuses on the initial comparison of available mammalian genomes and describes various insights derived from such analysis.

  2. Partnership Transitions and Maternal Parenting

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Audrey N.; Cooper, Carey E.; McLanahan, Sara; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2011-01-01

    We use data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 1,975) to examine the association between mothers’ partnership changes and parenting behavior during the first five years of their children’s lives. We compare coresidential with dating transitions, and recent with more distal transitions. We also examine interactions between transitions and race/ethnicity, maternal education and family structure at birth. Findings indicate that both coresidential and dating transitions were associated with higher levels of maternal stress and harsh parenting; recent transitions had stronger associations than distal transitions. Maternal education significantly moderates these associations, with less educated mothers responding more negatively to instability in terms of maternal stress, and more educated mothers responding more negatively in terms of literacy activities. PMID:21423848

  3. Distinguishing 6 Population Subgroups by Timing and Characteristics of the Menopausal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaobi; Harlow, Siobán D.; Elliott, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in women’s menstrual bleeding patterns precede the onset of menopause. In this paper, the authors identify population subgroups based on menstrual characteristics of the menopausal transition experience. Using the TREMIN data set (1943–1979), the authors apply a Bayesian change-point model with 8 parameters for each woman that summarize change in menstrual bleeding patterns during the menopausal transition. The authors then use estimates from this model to classify menstrual patterns into subgroups using a K-medoids algorithm. They identify 6 subgroups of women whose transition experience can be distinguished by age at onset, variability of the menstrual cycle, and duration of the early transition. These results suggest that for most women, mean and variance change points are well aligned with proposed bleeding markers of the menopausal transition, but for some women they are not clearly associated. Increasing understanding of population differences in the transition experience may lead to new insights into ovarian aging. Because of age inclusion criteria, most longitudinal studies of the menopausal transition probably include only a subset of the 6 subgroups of women identified in this paper, suggesting a potential bias in the understanding of both the menopausal transition and the linkage between the transition and chronic disease. PMID:22138039

  4. Phases and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitterman, Moshe

    2014-09-01

    In discussing phase transitions, the first thing that we have to do is to define a phase. This is a concept from thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, where a phase is defined as a homogeneous system. As a simple example, let us consider instant coffee. This consists of coffee powder dissolved in water, and after stirring it we have a homogeneous mixture, i.e., a single phase. If we add to a cup of coffee a spoonful of sugar and stir it well, we still have a single phase -- sweet coffee. However, if we add ten spoonfuls of sugar, then the contents of the cup will no longer be homogeneous, but rather a mixture of two homogeneous systems or phases, sweet liquid coffee on top and coffee-flavored wet sugar at the bottom...

  5. Nonadiabatic transition path sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, M. C.; Corcelli, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    Fewest-switches surface hopping (FSSH) is combined with transition path sampling (TPS) to produce a new method called nonadiabatic path sampling (NAPS). The NAPS method is validated on a model electron transfer system coupled to a Langevin bath. Numerically exact rate constants are computed using the reactive flux (RF) method over a broad range of solvent frictions that span from the energy diffusion (low friction) regime to the spatial diffusion (high friction) regime. The NAPS method is shown to quantitatively reproduce the RF benchmark rate constants over the full range of solvent friction. Integrating FSSH within the TPS framework expands the applicability of both approaches and creates a new method that will be helpful in determining detailed mechanisms for nonadiabatic reactions in the condensed-phase.

  6. Hybrid Electric Transit Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterna, Larry A.

    1997-01-01

    A government, industry, and university cooperative is developing an advanced hybrid electric city transit bus. Goals of this effort include doubling the fuel economy compared to current buses and reducing emissions to one-tenth of current EPA standards. Unique aspects of the vehicle's power system include the use of ultra-capacitors as an energy storage system, and a planned natural gas fueled turbogenerator developed from a small jet engine. Power from both the generator and energy storage system is provided to a variable speed electric motor attached to the rear axle. At over 15000 kg gross weight, this is the largest vehicle of its kind ever built using ultra-capacitor energy storage. This paper describes the overall power system architecture, the evolution of the control strategy, and its performance over industry standard drive cycles.

  7. Maritime in transit care.

    PubMed

    Bott, G; Barnard, J; Prior, K

    2015-01-01

    Operation GRITROCK saw the first operational deployment of the Maritime In Transit Care team from the Role 2 (Enhanced) (R2(E)) Medical Treatment Facility, which is able to provide Damage Control Surgery and the limited holding of patients, situated on board RFA ARGUS. Whilst the Medical Emergency Response Team demonstrated the capability of advanced military Pre-Hospital Emergency Care (PHEC) on Op HERRICK, the need to provide a similar high level of care on contingency operations was recognised. Op GRITROCK allowed for the continued exploration of a maritime capability from an established R2(E) platform whilst providing medical evacuation capability for a significant population at risk distributed over a large Joint Operation Area. Although the patient load during the operation was low, key lessons were learnt and opportunities identified to further develop the newly recognised sub-speciality of PHEC, both medically and logistically, and these will be discussed in this article. PMID:26867404

  8. Probiotics in transition.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Fergus; Dinan, Timothy G; Ross, Paul; Hill, Colin

    2012-11-01

    Despite the hyperbole often linked with a popular research field, the scientific rationale for probiotics is sound. The probiotic concept is not new but is undergoing transition as knowledge of the gut microbiota in health and disease becomes translated to the clinic. Operationally, a probiotic represents a mimic of and/or supplement to the normal gut microbiota. Much confusion has arisen among consumers because of media misportrayals of probiotics as all being the same. However, with clarification of the molecular basis of host-microbe interactions, the selection criteria for probiotics and the delineation of their distinct mechanisms of action are improving. Most probiotics are from the genus Lactobacillus or Bifidobacterium; this is likely to change and diversify. Similarly, the development of new therapeutic strategies, such as the development of phagebiotics, psychobiotics, and genetically modified pharmabiotics, is poised to become a therapeutic reality. PMID:23010563

  9. Nonadiabatic transition path sampling.

    PubMed

    Sherman, M C; Corcelli, S A

    2016-07-21

    Fewest-switches surface hopping (FSSH) is combined with transition path sampling (TPS) to produce a new method called nonadiabatic path sampling (NAPS). The NAPS method is validated on a model electron transfer system coupled to a Langevin bath. Numerically exact rate constants are computed using the reactive flux (RF) method over a broad range of solvent frictions that span from the energy diffusion (low friction) regime to the spatial diffusion (high friction) regime. The NAPS method is shown to quantitatively reproduce the RF benchmark rate constants over the full range of solvent friction. Integrating FSSH within the TPS framework expands the applicability of both approaches and creates a new method that will be helpful in determining detailed mechanisms for nonadiabatic reactions in the condensed-phase. PMID:27448877

  10. Exploring Insight: Focus on Shifts of Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palatnik, Alik; Koichu, Boris

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents and analyses a sequence of events that preceded an insight solution to a challenging problem in the context of numerical sequences. A three­week long solution process by a pair of ninth­-grade students is analysed by means of the theory of shifts of attention. The goal for this article is to reveal the potential of this theory…

  11. Aspects of Transition in Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, H. P.

    2007-01-01

    This talk provides a description of several types of transition encountered in turbomachines. It is based largely on personal experience of the detection of transition in turbomachines. Examples are taken from axial compressors, axial turbines and radial turbines. The illustrations are concerned with transition in steady and unsteady boundary layers that develop under the influence of two-dimensional and three-dimensional flow fields.

  12. Collective and individual migration following the epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Ian Y.; Javaid, Sarah; Wong, Elisabeth A.; Perk, Sinem; Haber, Daniel A.; Toner, Mehmet; Irimia, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    During cancer progression, malignant cells in the tumour invade surrounding tissues. This transformation of adherent cells to a motile phenotype has been associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here, we show that EMT-activated cells migrate through micropillar arrays as a collectively advancing front that scatters individual cells. Individual cells with few neighbours dispersed with fast, straight trajectories, whereas cells that encountered many neighbours migrated collectively with epithelial biomarkers. We modelled these emergent dynamics using a physical analogy to phase transitions during binary-mixture solidification, and validated it using drug perturbations, which revealed that individually migrating cells exhibit diminished chemosensitivity. Our measurements also indicate a degree of phenotypic plasticity as cells interconvert between individual and collective migration. The study of multicellular behaviours with single-cell resolution should enable further quantitative insights into heterogeneous tumour invasion.

  13. Exciton complexes in low dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thilagam, A.

    2014-08-01

    We examine the excitonic properties of layered configurations of low dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (LTMDCs) using the fractional dimensional space approach. The binding energies of the exciton, trion, and biexciton in LTMDCs of varying layers are analyzed, and linked to the dimensionality parameter α, which provides insight into critical electro-optical properties (relative oscillator strength, absorption spectrum, exciton-exciton interaction) of the material systems. The usefulness of α is highlighted by its independence of the physical mechanisms underlying the confinement effects of geometrical structures. Our estimates of the binding energies of exciton complexes for the monolayer configuration of transition metal dichalcogenides suggest a non-collinear structure for the trion and a positronium-molecule-like square structure for the biexciton.

  14. Exciton complexes in low dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Thilagam, A.

    2014-08-07

    We examine the excitonic properties of layered configurations of low dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (LTMDCs) using the fractional dimensional space approach. The binding energies of the exciton, trion, and biexciton in LTMDCs of varying layers are analyzed, and linked to the dimensionality parameter α, which provides insight into critical electro-optical properties (relative oscillator strength, absorption spectrum, exciton-exciton interaction) of the material systems. The usefulness of α is highlighted by its independence of the physical mechanisms underlying the confinement effects of geometrical structures. Our estimates of the binding energies of exciton complexes for the monolayer configuration of transition metal dichalcogenides suggest a non-collinear structure for the trion and a positronium-molecule-like square structure for the biexciton.

  15. The structural flexibility of the preferredoxin transit peptide.

    PubMed

    Wienk, H L; Czisch, M; de Kruijff, B

    1999-06-25

    In order to obtain insight into the structural flexibility of chloroplast targeting sequences, the Silene pratensis preferredoxin transit peptide was studied by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In water, the peptide is unstructured, with a minor propensity towards helix formation from Val-9 to Ser-12 and from Gly-30 to Ser-40. In 50% (v/v) trifluoroethanol, structurally independent N- and C-terminal helices are stabilized. The N-terminal helix appears to be amphipathic, with hydrophobic and hydroxylated amino acids on opposite sides. The C-terminal helix comprises amino acids Met-29-Gly-50 and is destabilized at Gly-39. No ordered tertiary structure was observed. The results are discussed in terms of protein import into chloroplasts, in which the possible interactions between the transit peptide and lipids are emphasized. PMID:10405168

  16. Graphical representation for thermal equilibrium when transition temperatures are present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We propose the use of graphics in order to get a quick insight of the thermal equilibrium of two bodies, when a transition temperature is present in the interval between both initial temperatures. We have found two convenient variables in order to represent the mathematical condition for the partial or complete transition of each component. In mixing hot water and cold ice, the proposed graphical representation exhibits straight lines separating four regions corresponding to different equilibrium states, going from one containing just ice up to the other containing just water, and two states in between with increased ice or increased water. This graphical representation helps to avoid typical student errors in learning elementary physics.

  17. Quantum information-geometry of dissipative quantum phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Banchi, Leonardo; Giorda, Paolo; Zanardi, Paolo

    2014-02-01

    A general framework for analyzing the recently discovered phase transitions in the steady state of dissipation-driven open quantum systems is still lacking. To fill this gap, we extend the so-called fidelity approach to quantum phase transitions to open systems whose steady state is a Gaussian fermionic state. We endow the manifold of correlation matrices of steady states with a metric tensor g measuring the distinguishability distance between solutions corresponding to a different set of control parameters. The phase diagram can then be mapped out in terms of the scaling behavior of g and connections with the Liouvillean gap and the model correlation functions unveiled. We argue that the fidelity approach, thanks to its differential-geometric and information-theoretic nature, provides insights into dissipative quantum critical phenomena as well as a general and powerful strategy to explore them. PMID:25353417

  18. Understanding the glass transition in GeSbTe materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyna, Glenn

    2010-03-01

    Moore's law demands the continual reduction in size of the components of computers. One future direction for memory technology involves the use of phase change materials which can be switched by pulsed electrically heating from a conducting crystalline phase to an insulating amorphous phase. These materials are typically alloys of Germanium, Antimony and Tellurium (GST). In order to form multi-state bits, it is necessary to arrest the glass transition via varying annealing time such that differences in resistivity can be measured based. As might be expected, this process is hinder by ``creep'' of the glass towards higher resistance states after the quench is halted. In this lecture, simulation studies are employed to study the glass transition from the crystalline state and discern the mechanism for the gap opening. The nature of mid gaps states found from the simulated quenches gives insight into the mechanism of the creep and suggests ways in which the phenomena can be arrested.

  19. The physical origins of transit time measurements for rapid, single cell mechanotyping.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Kendra D; Scott, Michael B; Bruce, Samuel L; Gopinath, Ajay B; Bikos, Dimitri; Mason, Thomas G; Kim, Jin Woong; Choi, Hong Sung; Rowat, Amy C

    2016-08-16

    The mechanical phenotype or 'mechanotype' of cells is emerging as a potential biomarker for cell types ranging from pluripotent stem cells to cancer cells. Using a microfluidic device, cell mechanotype can be rapidly analyzed by measuring the time required for cells to deform as they flow through constricted channels. While cells typically exhibit deformation timescales, or transit times, on the order of milliseconds to tens of seconds, transit times can span several orders of magnitude and vary from day to day within a population of single cells; this makes it challenging to characterize different cell samples based on transit time data. Here we investigate how variability in transit time measurements depends on both experimental factors and heterogeneity in physical properties across a population of single cells. We find that simultaneous transit events that occur across neighboring constrictions can alter transit time, but only significantly when more than 65% of channels in the parallel array are occluded. Variability in transit time measurements is also affected by the age of the device following plasma treatment, which could be attributed to changes in channel surface properties. We additionally investigate the role of variability in cell physical properties. Transit time depends on cell size; by binning transit time data for cells of similar diameters, we reduce measurement variability by 20%. To gain further insight into the effects of cell-to-cell differences in physical properties, we fabricate a panel of gel particles and oil droplets with tunable mechanical properties. We demonstrate that particles with homogeneous composition exhibit a marked reduction in transit time variability, suggesting that the width of transit time distributions reflects the degree of heterogeneity in subcellular structure and mechanical properties within a cell population. Our results also provide fundamental insight into the physical underpinnings of transit measurements

  20. Insightful problem solving in an Asian elephant.

    PubMed

    Foerder, Preston; Galloway, Marie; Barthel, Tony; Moore, Donald E; Reiss, Diana

    2011-01-01

    The "aha" moment or the sudden arrival of the solution to a problem is a common human experience. Spontaneous problem solving without evident trial and error behavior in humans and other animals has been referred to as insight. Surprisingly, elephants, thought to be highly intelligent, have failed to exhibit insightful problem solving in previous cognitive studies. We tested whether three Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) would use sticks or other objects to obtain food items placed out-of-reach and overhead. Without prior trial and error behavior, a 7-year-old male Asian elephant showed spontaneous problem solving by moving a large plastic cube, on which he then stood, to acquire the food. In further testing he showed behavioral flexibility, using this technique to reach other items and retrieving the cube from various locations to use as a tool to acquire food. In the cube's absence, he generalized this tool utilization technique to other objects and, when given smaller objects, stacked them in an attempt to reach the food. The elephant's overall behavior was consistent with the definition of insightful problem solving. Previous failures to demonstrate this ability in elephants may have resulted not from a lack of cognitive ability but from the presentation of tasks requiring trunk-held sticks as potential tools, thereby interfering with the trunk's use as a sensory organ to locate the targeted food. PMID:21876741

  1. 2016 Mars Insight Mission Design and Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abilleira, Fernando; Frauenholz, Ray; Fujii, Ken; Wallace, Mark; You, Tung-Han

    2014-01-01

    Scheduled for a launch in the 2016 Earth to Mars opportunity, the Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy, and Heat Transport (InSight) Mission will arrive to Mars in late September 2016 with the primary objective of placing a science lander on the surface of the Red Planet followed by the deployment of two science instruments to investigate the fundamental processes of terrestrial planet formation and evolution. In order to achieve a successful landing, the InSight Project has selected a launch/arrival strategy that satisfies the following key and driving requirements: (1) Deliver a total launch mass of 727 kg, (2) target a nominal landing site with a cumulative Delta V99 less than 30 m/s, and (3) approach EDL with a V-infinity upper limit of 3.941 km/s and (4) an entry flight-path angle (EFPA) of -12.5 +/- 0.26 deg, 3-sigma; the InSight trajectories have been designed such that they (5) provide UHF-band communications via Direct-To-Earth and MRO from Entry through landing plus 60 s, (6) with injection aimpoints biased away from Mars such that the probability of the launch vehicle upper stage impacting Mars is less than 1.0 X 10(exp 4) for fifty years after launch, and (7) non-nominal impact probabilities due to failure during the Cruise phase less than 1.0 X 10(exp 2).

  2. Electronic transitions of scandium monophosphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Na; Ng, K. F.; Cheung, A. S.-C.

    2015-08-01

    The electronic transition spectrum of scandium monophosphide (ScP) molecule in the visible region between 480 and 575 nm has been recorded using laser ablation/reaction free jet expansion and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Nine vibrational bands belonging to two electronic transition systems, namely the [19.0]1Σ+ - X1Σ+ transition, and [19.8]3Σ+ - a3Σ+ transition, have been identified and rotationally analysed. A least squares fit of the measured lines yielded molecular constants for the singlet and the triplet electronic states. Theoretical calculation results have been used to assist the assignment of the observed electronic states.

  3. Primordial equation of state transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravind, Aditya; Lorshbough, Dustin; Paban, Sonia

    2016-06-01

    We revisit the physics of transitions from a general equation of state parameter to the final stage of slow-roll inflation. We show that it is unlikely for the modes comprising the cosmic microwave background to contain imprints from a preinflationary equation of state transition and still be consistent with observations. We accomplish this by considering observational consistency bounds on the amplitude of excitations resulting from such a transition. As a result, the physics which initially led to inflation likely cannot be probed with observations of the cosmic microwave background. Furthermore, we show that it is unlikely that equation of state transitions may explain the observed low multipole power suppression anomaly.

  4. Quantum phase transition in space

    SciTech Connect

    Damski, Bogdan; Zurek, Wojciech H

    2008-01-01

    A quantum phase transition between the symmetric (polar) phase and the phase with broken symmetry can be induced in a ferromagnetic spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate in space (rather than in time). We consider such a phase transition and show that the transition region in the vicinity of the critical point exhibits scalings that reflect a compromise between the rate at which the transition is imposed (i.e., the gradient of the control parameter) and the scaling of the divergent healing length in the critical region. Our results suggest a method for the direct measurement of the scaling exponent {nu}.

  5. A new interpretation of the Besnus transition in monoclinic pyrrhotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Non-stoichiometric monoclinic 4C pyrrhotite (ideal formula: Fe7S8) is a major magnetic remanence carrier in the Earth's crust and in extraterrestrial materials. Because of its low-temperature magnetic transition around 30 K also known as Besnus transition, this mineral phase is easily detectable in natural samples. Considering the rock magnetic literature, an intrinsic origin of the Besnus transition similar to that of the Verwey transition has generally been assumed. Although the physical properties of pyrrhotite have intensively been studied, the mechanism behind the pronounced change in magnetization at the low-temperature transition is still debated. To address this question we performed magnetization experiments on a natural pyrrhotite crystal (Fe6.6S8) that consists of an epitaxial intergrowth of a commensurate 4C and an incommensurate 5C* superstructure that are different in their defect structure (1,2). The occurrence of two monoclinic superstructures detected by X-ray diffractometry is magnetically confirmed by symmetric inflection points in hysteresis measurements above the transition at about 30 K. The disappearance of the inflection points and the associated change of the hysteresis parameters indicate that the two superstructures become strongly coupled to form a unitary magnetic anisotropy system at the transition. From this it follows that the Besnus transition in monoclinic pyrrhotite is an extrinsic magnetic phenomenon with respect to the 4C superstructure and therefore the physics behind it is in fact different from that of the well-known Verwey transition. Finally, this novel interpretation explains the rock magnetic data for the low-temperature transition that has been reported for monoclinic pyrrhotite. It will also provide deeper understanding of magnetism in monoclinic pyrrhotite, which in turn will enable a more profound insight to the magnetization properties of the Earth's crust. 1.) Charilaou, M., Kind, J., Koulialias, D., Weidler, P

  6. Evaluating outpatient transition clinics: a mixed-methods study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Sattoe, Jane N T; Peeters, Mariëlle A C; Hilberink, Sander R; Ista, Erwin; van Staa, AnneLoes

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To support young people in their transition to adulthood and transfer to adult care, a number of interventions have been developed. One particularly important intervention is the transition clinic (TC), where paediatric and adult providers collaborate. TCs are often advocated as best practices in transition care for young people with chronic conditions, but little is known about TC models and effects. The proposed study aims to gain insight into the added value of a TC compared with usual care (without a TC). Methods and analysis We propose a mixed-methods study with a retrospective controlled design consisting of semistructured interviews among healthcare professionals, observations of consultations with young people, chart reviews of young people transferred 2–4 years prior to data collection and questionnaires among the young people included in the chart reviews. Qualitative data will be analysed through thematic analysis and results will provide insights into structures and daily routines of TCs, and experienced barriers and facilitators in transitional care. Quantitatively, within-group differences on clinical outcomes and healthcare use will be studied over the four measurement moments. Subsequently, comparisons will be made between intervention and control groups on all outcomes at all measurement moments. Primary outcomes are ‘no-show after transfer’ (process outcome) and ‘experiences and satisfaction with the transfer’ (patient-reported outcome). Secondary outcomes consider clinical outcomes, healthcare usage, self-management outcomes and perceived quality of care. Ethics The Medical Ethical Committee of the Erasmus Medical Centre approved the study protocol (MEC-2014-246). Dissemination Study results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals and conferences. The study started in September 2014 and will continue until December 2016. The same study design will be used in a national study in 20 diabetes settings (2016

  7. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Preliminary Evaluation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2008-10-01

    This report provides preliminary results from a National Renewable Energy Laboratory evaluation of a protoptye fuel cell transit bus operating at Connecticut Transit in Hartford. Included are descriptions of the planned fuel cell bus demonstration and equipment; early results and agency experience are also provided.

  8. Transition Assessment: Using Gap Analysis to Enhance Effective Transition Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenthal, Alison B.; Bassett, Diane S.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been an increased emphasis on transition planning for students with exceptional needs. This is in part the result of the mandates contained in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004. This increased emphasis has revealed a number of shortcomings with how transition planning is done…

  9. Correlates of Insight among Youth with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewin, Adam B.; Bergman, R. Lindsey; Peris, Tara S.; Chang, Susanna; McCracken, James T.; Piacentini, John

    2010-01-01

    Background: Individuals with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) may lack insight into the irrational nature of their symptoms. Among adults with OCD, poor insight has been linked to greater symptom severity, increased likelihood of comorbid symptoms, lower adaptive functioning, and worse treatment outcomes. Parallel work regarding insight among…

  10. Phase transitions in disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrahsheh, Fawaz Y.

    Disorder can have a wide variety of consequences for the physics of phase transitions. Some transitions remain unchanged in the presence of disorder while others are completely destroyed. In this thesis we study the effects of disorder on several classical and quantum phase transitions in condensed matter systems. After a brief introduction, we study the ferromagnetic phase transition in a randomly layered Heisenberg magnet using large-scale Monte-Carlo simulations. Our results provide numerical evidence for the exotic infinite-randomness scenario. We study classical and quantum smeared phase transitions in substitutional alloys A1-xBx. Our results show that the disorder completely destroys the phase transition with a pronounced tail of the ordered phase developing for all compositions x < 1. In addition, we find that short-ranged disorder correlations can have a dramatic effect on the transition. Moreover, we show an experimental realization of the composition-tuned ferromagnetic-to-paramagnetic quantum phase transition in Sr1-xCa xRuO3. We investigate the effects of disorder on first-order quantum phase transitions on the example of the N-color quantum Ashkin-Teller model. By means of a strong disorder renormalization group, we demonstrate that disorder rounds the first-order transition to a continuous one for both weak and strong coupling between the colors. Finally, we investigate the superfluid-insulator quantum phase transition of one-dimensional bosons with off-diagonal disorder by means of large-scale Monte-Carlo simulations. Beyond a critical disorder strength, we find nonuniversal, disorder dependent critical behavior.

  11. Quantum Phase Transitions of Antiferromagnets and the Cuprate Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachdev, Subir

    I begin with a proposed global phase diagram of the cuprate superconductors as a function of carrier concentration, magnetic field, and temperature, and highlight its connection to numerous recent experiments. The phase diagram is then used as a point of departure for a pedagogical review of various quantum phases and phase transitions of insulators, superconductors, and metals. The bond operator method is used to describe the transition of dimerized antiferromagnetic insulators between magnetically ordered states and spin-gap states. The Schwinger boson method is applied to frustrated square lattice antiferromagnets: phase diagrams containing collinear and spirally ordered magnetic states, Z_2 spin liquids, and valence bond solids are presented, and described by an effective gauge theory of spinons. Insights from these theories of insulators are then applied to a variety of symmetry breaking transitions in d-wave superconductors. The latter systems also contain fermionic quasiparticles with a massless Dirac spectrum, and their influence on the order parameter fluctuations and quantum criticality is carefully discussed. I conclude with an introduction to strong coupling problems associated with symmetry breaking transitions in two-dimensional metals, where the order parameter fluctuations couple to a gapless line of fermionic excitations along the Fermi surface.

  12. Rural Agricultural Change and Fertility Transition in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Prem; Ghimire, Dirgha

    2013-06-01

    Using longitudinal panel data from the Western Chitwan Valley of Nepal, this study investigates the impact of the use of modern farm technologies on fertility transition-specifically, the number of births in a farm household. Previous explanations for the slow pace of fertility transition in rural agricultural settings often argued that the demand for farm labor is the primary driver of high fertility. If this argument holds true, the use of modern farm technologies that are designed to carry out labor-intensive farm activities ought to substitute for farm labor and discourage births in farm families. However, little empirical evidence is available on the potential influence of the use of modern farm technologies on the fertility transition. To fill this gap, the panel data examined in this study provides an unusual opportunity to test this long standing, but unexplored, argument. The results demonstrate that the use of modern farm technologies, particularly the use of a tractor and other modern farm implements, reduce subsequent births in farm households. This offers important insight for understanding the fertility transition in Nepal, a setting that is experiencing high population growth and rapidly changing farming practices. PMID:23729867

  13. Detection by Transit Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Jenkins, Jon M.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A periodic sequence of planetary transits provides a valid detection of an orbiting planet and provides the relative size of the planet and its orbital period. Ancillary measurements of the stellar spectrum and the variations of the star's radial velocity or position combined with stellar models allow the absolute size of the planet and its mass to be obtained. The results of this approach have already shown that the planet orbiting HD209458 has only 70% of the mass of Jupiter, but is nearly 50% larger in radius. Based on models of planetary structure, these results imply that the planet must have spent most of its lifetime so close to the star that it has not been able to cool and contract as have the giant planets in our Solar System. Thus its density is much less than Jupiter and Saturn and is actually less than that of water; i.e., about 0.4 gr/cu cm. If more sensitive measurements of the light curve of stars with closely orbiting planets can be made that provide the varying amplitude of the light reflected by the planet at various phases in its orbit, then characteristics of the planetary atmosphere can be obtained. Potentially, these data can identify major molecular species present in the atmosphere and tell us if clouds are present and yield the phase function of the aerosols. Although such detail cannot be obtained for Earth-size planets because their signal amplitudes are too small, it is possible to get data critical to the determination of the structure of extrasolar planetary systems. In particular, the size distributions and their orbital distributions can be measured by the transit photometry missions now in development. The COROT mission should be able to find large terrestrial planets in short-period orbits while the more ambitious Kepler and Eddington missions should be able to detect planets even smaller than the Earth and at orbital distances that place them in the habitable zone of their stars.

  14. Adult Transition Program without Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moberg, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Best practices in adult transition special education for moderate to severe students suggest student-centered planning that maximizes independence in adult life. Based on the above sources, school districts and governing boards would best serve moderate to severe transition special education students with increasing integration into the community…

  15. ESTIMATION OF AGE TRANSITION PROBABILITIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ZINTER, JUDITH R.

    THIS NOTE DESCRIBES THE PROCEDURES USED IN DETERMINING DYNAMOD II AGE TRANSITION MATRICES. A SEPARATE MATRIX FOR EACH SEX-RACE GROUP IS DEVELOPED. THESE MATRICES WILL BE USED AS AN AID IN ESTIMATING THE TRANSITION PROBABILITIES IN THE LARGER DYNAMOD II MATRIX RELATING AGE TO OCCUPATIONAL CATEGORIES. THREE STEPS WERE USED IN THE PROCEDURE--(1)…

  16. Phase Transitions for Suspension Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iommi, Godofredo; Jordan, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    This paper is devoted to studying the thermodynamic formalism for suspension flows defined over countable alphabets. We are mostly interested in the regularity properties of the pressure function. We establish conditions for the pressure function to be real analytic or to exhibit a phase transition. We also construct an example of a potential for which the pressure has countably many phase transitions.

  17. Transition Programs: Bridging the Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peavey, Kay

    This document shares the collective wisdom and experience of professionals who have successfully guided the transition of hundreds of youths and adults from New York's correctional institutions back into the community. The first section begins with an overview of the New York State Education Department's transition program model to move…

  18. Partnership Transitions and Maternal Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Audrey N.; Cooper, Carey E.; McLanahan, Sara; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2010-01-01

    We use data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 1,975) to examine the association between mothers' partnership changes and parenting behavior during the first 5 years of their children's lives. We compare coresidential with dating transitions and recent with more distal transitions. We also examine interactions between…

  19. Transition Planning for Foster Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geenen, Sarah J.; Powers, Laurie E.

    2006-01-01

    The study evaluated the IEPs/Individualized Transition Plans of 45 students who were in special education and foster care, and compared them to the plans of 45 students who were in special education only. Results indicate that the transition plans of foster youth with disabilities were poor in quality, both in absolute terms and in comparison to…

  20. Developmental Transitions in Male Sexuality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Robert; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The article defines and elaborates on eight transitions in male sexuality, the first being the gender identity transition, and the last being the male climacteric. It discusses society's lack of support. Originally presented at the American Sociological Association Session on the Male Role in Society, New York City, 1976. (LPG)

  1. Nonadiabatic transitions and gauge structure

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K. ); Rice, S.A. )

    1994-04-01

    We examine the role of fictitious gauge structure in nonadiabatic transitions for transport in open paths. Local features of the gauge potential modify the nature of the intersection of the adiabatic energy surfaces and thereby affect crucially the Landau-Zener formula for a single-passage transition rate.

  2. Rural Transition Strategies That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Phebe

    Successful rural transition strategies which assist disabled rural secondary students in the transition from school to employment and community integration are described. Effective programs and specific strategies touch on such topic areas as job/career exploration, on-site job exploration, career planning, prevocational training, transition…

  3. Understanding brachiation: insight from a collisional perspective.

    PubMed

    Usherwood, James R; Bertram, John E A

    2003-05-01

    Gibbons are able to brachiate effectively through the forest canopy with a suspended swinging motion via contact with handholds. The swing phase is unlikely to be a cause of significant energy loss as pendulums are able to oscillate with only gradual mechanical energy dissipation. We consider the energetics associated with the transition of either a swing (during continuous-contact brachiation) or a ballistic flight (ricochetal brachiation) to a subsequent swing. In both styles of brachiation, kinematic data suggest that a gibbon overshoots the path that would allow a smooth transition into the swing phase. The sudden change in velocity due to such an overshoot is associated with a collision. Assuming neither the handhold nor the gibbon stores elastic strain energy, the energetic consequences of such overshoots can be calculated. We suggest two reasons for overshooting smooth transition trajectories: in the case of continuous contact brachiation, excess mechanical energy can be maintained with a high amplitude swing, and an overshoot during ricochetal brachiation produces a safety margin. The degree of energy loss with the transition to the swing phase is dependent both on the alignment of the pre- and post-transition paths, and on the kinetic energy at that instant. Active mechanisms reduce the effects of overshoots in both brachiation gaits. During continuous-contact brachiation, the path of the centre of mass can be controlled actively by flexion both of the trailing arm and the legs. During ricochetal brachiation, the length between the hand and the centre of mass (determining the subsequent swing path) can be controlled throughout the flight phase with leg flexion/extension. In addition, the elongated arms characteristic of gibbons improves the geometry of a collision for a given overshoot, and so may be viewed as a morphological adaptation reducing the energetic losses caused by overshooting for safety. PMID:12682095

  4. Sampling diffusive transition paths

    SciTech Connect

    F. Miller III, Thomas; Predescu, Cristian

    2006-10-12

    We address the problem of sampling double-ended diffusive paths. The ensemble of paths is expressed using a symmetric version of the Onsager-Machlup formula, which only requires evaluation of the force field and which, upon direct time discretization, gives rise to a symmetric integrator that is accurate to second order. Efficiently sampling this ensemble requires avoiding the well-known stiffness problem associated with sampling infinitesimal Brownian increments of the path, as well as a different type of stiffness associated with sampling the coarse features of long paths. The fine-features sampling stiffness is eliminated with the use of the fast sampling algorithm (FSA), and the coarse-feature sampling stiffness is avoided by introducing the sliding and sampling (S&S) algorithm. A key feature of the S&S algorithm is that it enables massively parallel computers to sample diffusive trajectories that are long in time. We use the algorithm to sample the transition path ensemble for the structural interconversion of the 38-atom Lennard-Jones cluster at low temperature.

  5. Sampling diffusive transition paths.

    PubMed

    Miller, Thomas F; Predescu, Cristian

    2007-04-14

    The authors address the problem of sampling double-ended diffusive paths. The ensemble of paths is expressed using a symmetric version of the Onsager-Machlup formula, which only requires evaluation of the force field and which, upon direct time discretization, gives rise to a symmetric integrator that is accurate to second order. Efficiently sampling this ensemble requires avoiding the well-known stiffness problem associated with the sampling of infinitesimal Brownian increments of the path, as well as a different type of stiffness associated with the sampling of the coarse features of long paths. The fine-feature sampling stiffness is eliminated with the use of the fast sampling algorithm, and the coarse-feature sampling stiffness is avoided by introducing the sliding and sampling (S&S) algorithm. A key feature of the S&S algorithm is that it enables massively parallel computers to sample diffusive trajectories that are long in time. The authors use the algorithm to sample the transition path ensemble for the structural interconversion of the 38-atom Lennard-Jones cluster at low temperature. PMID:17444696

  6. Third-person Diagnostic Interview on the Cognitive Insight Level of Psychotic Patients with an Insight at the Denial Level

    PubMed Central

    Mehdizadeh, Mahsa; Rezaei, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: According to the previous findings, the third-person technique improved the clinical insight of psychotic patients, therefore the present study aims to examine the effect of a third-person interview compared to a first-person interview on the level of cognitive insight of psychotic patients with an insight at the denial level. Materials and Methods: In this study, using interviews and questionnaires, a total number of 44 patients of Razi Psychiatric Educational and Treatment Center with an insight at the denial level being assessed using diagnostic interviews were divided randomly into two groups. Then, the two groups of patients' cognitive insights were evaluated using Beck Cognitive Insight Scale. Results: The findings indicated that in psychotic patients with an insight at the denial level, the third-person technique of interview compared to the first-person had little effect on the improvement of overall cognitive insight and its components, including self-reflection and self-assurance; however, this effect was not strong enough to make a significant difference between the two groups of patients. Conclusion: According to the study findings, we can conclude that the third-person interview compared to the first-person interview has no effect on the improvement of the cognitive insight of psychotic patients with an insight at the denial level. This finding is consistent with the previous studies indicating that although the theory of mind has some correlations with the clinical insight of patients, it has no effect on their cognitive insight. PMID:27335517

  7. Theory of antiferroelectric phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolédano, Pierre; Guennou, Mael

    2016-07-01

    At variance with structural ferroic phase transitions which give rise to macroscopic tensors coupled to macroscopic fields, criteria defining antiferroelectric (AFE) phase transitions are still under discussion due to the absence of specific symmetry properties characterizing their existence. They are recognized by the proximity of a ferroelectric (FE) phase induced under applied electric field, with a double hysteresis loop relating the induced polarization to the electric field and a typical anomaly of the dielectric permittivity. Here, we show that there exist indeed symmetry criteria defining AFE transitions. They relate the local symmetry of the polar crystallographic sites emerging at an AFE phase transition with the macroscopic symmetry of the AFE phase. The dielectric properties of AFE transitions are deduced from a Landau theoretical model in which ferroelectric and ferrielectric phases are shown to stabilize as the result of specific symmetry-allowed couplings of the AFE order parameter with the field-induced polarization.

  8. Gel transitions in colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergenholtz, J.; Fuchs, M.

    1999-12-01

    The idealized mode-coupling theory (MCT) is applied to colloidal systems interacting via short-range attractive interactions of Yukawa form. At low temperatures, MCT predicts a slowing down of the local dynamics and ergodicity-breaking transitions. The non-ergodicity transitions share many features with the colloidal gel transition, and are proposed to be the source of gelation in colloidal systems. Previous calculations of the phase diagram are complemented with additional data for shorter ranges of the attractive interaction, showing that the path of the non-ergodicity transition line is then unimpeded by the gas-liquid critical curve at low temperatures. Particular attention is given to the critical non-ergodicity parameters; this is motivated by recent experimental measurements. An asymptotic model is developed, valid for dilute systems of spheres interacting via strong short-range attractions, and is shown to capture all aspects of the low-temperature MCT non-ergodicity transitions.

  9. INSIGHT AGONISTES: A READING OF SOPHOCLES'S OEDIPUS THE KING.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Eugene J

    2015-07-01

    In this reading of Sophocles's Oedipus the King, the author suggests that insight can be thought of as the main protagonist of the tragedy. He personifies this depiction of insight, calling it Insight Agonistes, as if it were the sole conflicted character on the stage, albeit masquerading at times as several other characters, including gods, sphinxes, and oracles. This psychoanalytic reading of the text lends itself to an analogy between psychoanalytic process and Sophocles's tragic hero. The author views insight as always transgressing against, always at war with a conservative, societal, or intrapsychic chorus of structured elements. A clinical vignette is presented to illustrate this view of insight. PMID:26198605

  10. Assessing transitional phenomena with the transitional object memory probe.

    PubMed

    Fowler, C; Hilsenroth, M J; Handler, L

    1998-01-01

    Winnicott's concept of transitional relatedness has captured the interest of psychoanalysts because it provides an understanding of the dialectical process occurring between inner and outer reality, and by extension, between analyst and analysand. Clinical observations related to transitional phenomena have led the authors to develop a projective early memory probe that assesses transitional phenomena. The transitional object early memory probe was tested both for its empirical validity and for its clinical utility in psychodynamic psychotherapy. Construct validity was assessed by comparing memory scores to the Rorschach Transitional Object Scale, as well as to therapist ratings of patient behaviors. Results demonstrated moderate correlations between early memory scores and Rorschach scale scores. Equally important was the finding that early memory scores were significantly correlated with therapist ratings of key behavioral patterns in therapy. A case vignette highlights the clinical application of the transitional object probe in assessing the capacity for transitional relatedness. In this case, the data gleaned from the patient's memories provided the therapist with a sharper focus on their role in the patient's growing capacity for more vital and creative contact with reality. PMID:9810109

  11. Mechanistic insights into transient severe mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jackson J; Syed, Faisal F; Killu, Ammar M; Boilson, Barry A; Nishimura, Rick A; Pislaru, Sorin V

    2015-09-01

    Acute mitral regurgitation (AMR), a known complication of acute coronary syndromes, is usually associated with posterior papillary muscle dysfunction/rupture. In severe cases, management of AMR requires surgical intervention. Reversible severe AMR in patients in the absence of left ventricular systolic dysfunction and coronary artery stenosis may result from processes which cause transient subendocardial ischemia, such as intermittent episodes of hypotension or coronary artery vasospasm. We present two cases of reversible transient AMR due to subendocardial and/or endocardial ischemia, both of which offer insight into the mechanism of transient severe AMR. PMID:26982531

  12. The new insights into cadmium sensing

    PubMed Central

    Chmielowska-Bąk, Jagna; Gzyl, Jarosław; Rucińska-Sobkowiak, Renata; Arasimowicz-Jelonek, Magdalena; Deckert, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is non-essential heavy metal, which in excess, exhibits deleterious effects to the most of the organisms. Mobilization of defense mechanisms against this toxic agent requires rapid activation of signaling pathways. The article presents recent advances in the research concerning cadmium signal transduction in plants. New insights into the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), plant growth regulators, and Cd-induced protein modifications are reviewed. Moreover, the role of recently recognized Cd-associated signal elements, including micro RNAs and several cis- and trans-acting elements is discussed. PMID:24917871

  13. Structural insights into microtubule doublet interactions inaxonemes

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, Kenneth H.; Sui, Haixin

    2007-06-06

    Coordinated sliding of microtubule doublets, driven by dynein motors, produces periodic beating of the axoneme. Recent structural studies of the axoneme have used cryo-electron tomography to reveal new details of the interactions among some of the multitude of proteins that form the axoneme and regulate its movement. Connections among the several sets of dyneins, in particular, suggest ways in which their actions may be coordinated. Study of the molecular architecture of isolated doublets has provided a structural basis for understanding the doublet's mechanical properties that are related to the bending of the axoneme, and has also offered insight into its potential role in the mechanism of dynein activity regulation.

  14. Gene regulation in amphioxus: An insight from transgenic studies in amphioxus and vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kozmikova, Iryna; Kozmik, Zbynek

    2015-12-01

    Cephalochordates, commonly known as amphioxus or lancelets, are the most basal subphylum of chordates. Cephalochordates are thus key to understanding the origin of vertebrates and molecular mechanisms underlying vertebrate evolution. The evolution of developmental control mechanisms during invertebrate-to-vertebrate transition involved not only gene duplication events, but also specific changes in spatial and temporal expression of many genes. To get insight into the spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression during invertebrate-to-vertebrate transition, functional studies of amphioxus gene regulatory elements are highly warranted. Here, we review transgenic studies performed in amphioxus and vertebrates using promoters and enhancers derived from the genome of Branchiostoma floridae. We describe the current methods of transgenesis in amphioxus, provide evidence of Tol2 transposon-generated transgenic embryos of Branchiostoma lanceolatum and discuss possible future directions. We envision that comparative transgenic analysis of gene regulatory sequences in the context of amphioxus and vertebrate embryos will likely provide an important mechanistic insight into the evolution of vertebrate body plan. PMID:26094865

  15. Premorbid Personality and Insight in First-Episode Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Maria S.; Garcia-Jalon, Elena; Gilleen, James K.; David, Anthony S.; Peralta MD, Victor; Cuesta, Manuel J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Insight in psychosis and schizophrenia is considered a complex biopsychosocial phenomenon. Premorbid personality is regarded by some authors as part of the substrate to many psychiatric phenomena, but it is not clear if this applies to insight. Aim: To examine longitudinal relationships between personality traits and insight dimensions in first-episode psychosis. Methods: One hundred consecutive antipsychotic-naïve first-episode nonaffective psychotic patients admitted to hospital were included in the study. Eighty-one patients completed at 1 month a premorbid personality evaluation, plus baseline, and 6-month insight assessments. We used the Assessment and Documentation of Psychopathology inventory for assessing insight dimensions (not feeling ill, lack of insight, and refusal of treatment) and the Personality Assessment Schedule for ascertaining 5 dimensions of premorbid personality (schizoid, passive-dependent, anancastic, sociopathic, and schizotypy). Results: At baseline, personality dimensions did not show any association with insight dimensions, with the exception of schizotypy traits. At 6 months, schizoid and sociopathic personality showed a significant association with not feeling ill (r = .30, P ≤ .007; r = .27, P = .01) and lack of insight (r = .36, P = .001; r = .41, P < .001), respectively. When we calculated insight change, schizoid and sociopathic personality had moderate correlation with the lack of insight dimension (r = −.34, P = .002; r = .38, P < .001, respectively). After applying partial correlations for potential confounders and Bonferroni correction, the associations remained significant. Moreover, using a regression model, sociopathic and schizoid personality significantly predicted lack of insight at 6 months and change from baseline to the 6 months assessment. Conclusions: Sociopathic and schizoid personality dimensions were not only significantly associated with lack of insight at 6 months but also predicted change on

  16. Selenophene transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    White, C.J.

    1994-07-27

    This research shows that selenophene transition metal complexes have a chemistry that is similar to their thiophene analogs. Selenophene coordination has been demonstrated and confirmed by molecular structure in both the {eta}{sup 5}- and the {eta}{sup 1}(Se)-coordination modes. The reaction chemistry of selenophene complexes closely resembles that of the analogous thiophene complexes. One major difference, however, is that selenophene is a better donor ligand than thiophene making the selenophene complexes more stable than the corresponding thiophene complexes. The {sup 77}Se NMR chemical shift values for selenophene complexes fall within distinct regions primarily depending on the coordination mode of the selenophene ligand. In the final paper, the C-H bond activation of {eta}{sup 1}(S)-bound thiophenes, {eta}{sup 1}(S)-benzothiophene and {eta}{sup 1}(Se)-bound selenophenes has been demonstrated. The deprotonation and rearrangement of the {eta}{sup 1}(E)-bound ligand to the carbon bound L-yl complex readily occurs in the presence of base. Reprotonation with a strong acid gives a carbene complex that is unreactive towards nucleophilic attack at the carbene carbon and is stable towards exposure to air. The molecular structure of [Cp(NO)(PPh{sub 3})Re(2-benzothioenylcarbene)]O{sub 3}SCF{sub 3} was determined and contains a Re-C bond with substantial double bond character. Methyl substitution for the thienylcarbene or selenylcarbene gives a carbene that rearranges thermally to give back the {eta}{sup 1}(E)-bound complex. Based on these model reactions, a new mechanism for the H/D exchange of thiophene over the hydrodesulfurization catalyst has been proposed.

  17. Interference term between the spin and orbital contributions to M1 transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Fayache, M. S.; Zamick, L.; Sharon, Y. Y.; Durga Devi, Y.

    2000-02-01

    We study the cross-correlation between the spin and orbital parts of magnetic dipole transitions M1 in both isoscalar and isovector channels. In particular, we closely examine certain cases of isovector transitions where {sigma}B(M1) is very close to {sigma}B(M1){sub {sigma}}+{sigma}B(M1){sub l}, implying a cancellation of the summed interference terms. We gain some insight into this problem by considering special cases approaching the SU(4) limit, and by examining the behavior of single-particle transitions at the beginning and towards the end of the s-d shell. For isoscalar transitions there is always destructive interference between the spin and orbital amplitudes. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  18. Identifying the challenging factors in the transition from colleges of engineering to employment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baytiyeh, Hoda; Naja, Mohamad

    2012-03-01

    The transition from university to a career in engineering is a challenging process. This study examined the perceptions of engineering graduates regarding the difficulties they encountered in their transition from the university to the workplace. Lebanese practising engineers (n=217), living around the world, were surveyed to identify their current employment situations and their attitudes toward their academic preparation. Factor analysis revealed three main challenges facing engineering graduates: communication; responsibility; self-confidence. Seventeen interviews were conducted to gather information on ways to facilitate this transition. Comments reflected the need for better collaboration between engineering schools and engineering firms. The results will provide insight for engineering colleges, faculty members and administrators into the challenges faced by graduates and their aspirations for a smoother transition into employment.

  19. 22 CFR 41.71 - Transit aliens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Transit aliens. 41.71 Section 41.71 Foreign... NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Transit Aliens § 41.71 Transit aliens. (a) Transit aliens—general. An alien is classifiable as a nonimmigrant transit alien under INA 101(a) (15) (C) if the consular officer is...

  20. 22 CFR 41.71 - Transit aliens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Transit aliens. 41.71 Section 41.71 Foreign... NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Transit Aliens § 41.71 Transit aliens. (a) Transit aliens—general. An alien is classifiable as a nonimmigrant transit alien under INA 101(a) (15) (C) if the consular officer is...

  1. 22 CFR 41.71 - Transit aliens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transit aliens. 41.71 Section 41.71 Foreign... NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Transit Aliens § 41.71 Transit aliens. (a) Transit aliens—general. An alien is classifiable as a nonimmigrant transit alien under INA 101(a) (15) (C) if the consular officer is...

  2. 22 CFR 41.71 - Transit aliens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Transit aliens. 41.71 Section 41.71 Foreign... NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Transit Aliens § 41.71 Transit aliens. (a) Transit aliens—general. An alien is classifiable as a nonimmigrant transit alien under INA 101(a) (15) (C) if the consular officer is...

  3. 22 CFR 41.71 - Transit aliens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Transit aliens. 41.71 Section 41.71 Foreign... NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Transit Aliens § 41.71 Transit aliens. (a) Transit aliens—general. An alien is classifiable as a nonimmigrant transit alien under INA 101(a) (15) (C) if the consular officer is...

  4. 20 CFR 627.901 - Transition period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transition period. 627.901 Section 627.901... PROGRAMS UNDER TITLES I, II, AND III OF THE ACT Transition Provisions § 627.901 Transition period. The transition period ended June 30, 1993 unless otherwise stated. The intent of the transition period is...

  5. Welcome to College? Developing a Richer Understanding of the Transition Process for Adult First Year Students Using Reflective Written Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risquez, Angelica; Moore, Sarah; Morley, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the process of adjustment among adult learners by focusing on their own perceptions as they make the transition to higher education in an Irish setting, in order to gain a richer understanding about early university experience. The analysis of the journal-based reflections confirms existing insights about the complexity of…

  6. Major evolutionary transitions in individuality

    PubMed Central

    West, Stuart A.; Fisher, Roberta M.; Gardner, Andy; Kiers, E. Toby

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of life on earth has been driven by a small number of major evolutionary transitions. These transitions have been characterized by individuals that could previously replicate independently, cooperating to form a new, more complex life form. For example, archaea and eubacteria formed eukaryotic cells, and cells formed multicellular organisms. However, not all cooperative groups are en route to major transitions. How can we explain why major evolutionary transitions have or haven’t taken place on different branches of the tree of life? We break down major transitions into two steps: the formation of a cooperative group and the transformation of that group into an integrated entity. We show how these steps require cooperation, division of labor, communication, mutual dependence, and negligible within-group conflict. We find that certain ecological conditions and the ways in which groups form have played recurrent roles in driving multiple transitions. In contrast, we find that other factors have played relatively minor roles at many key points, such as within-group kin discrimination and mechanisms to actively repress competition. More generally, by identifying the small number of factors that have driven major transitions, we provide a simpler and more unified description of how life on earth has evolved. PMID:25964342

  7. The Visibility of Earth Transits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellano, Timothy P.; Doyle, Laurance; McIntosh, Dawn; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The recent photometric detection of planetary transits of the solar-like star HD 209458 at a distance of 47 parsecs suggest that transits can reveal the presence of Jupiter-size planetary companions in the solar neighborhood. Recent space-based transit searches have achieved photometric precision within an order of magnitude of that required to detect the much smaller transit signal of an earth-size planet across a solar-size star. Laboratory experiments in the presence of realistic noise sources have shown that CCDs can achieve photometric precision adequate to detect the 9.6 E-5 dimming of the Sun due to a transit of the Earth. Space-based solar irradiance monitoring has shown that the intrinsic variability of the Sun would not preclude such a detection. Transits of the Sun by the Earth would be detectable by observers that reside within a narrow band of sky positions near the ecliptic plane, if the observers possess current Earth epoch levels of technology and astronomical expertise. A catalog of solar-like stars that satisfy the geometric condition for Earth transit visibility are presented.

  8. The Visibility of Earth Transits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellano, Tim; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The recent detection of planetary transits of the solar-like star HD 209458 at a distance of 47 parsecs suggest that transits can reveal the presence of Jupiter-size planetary companions in the solar neighborhood. Recent space-based transit searches have achieved photometric precision within an order of magnitude of that required to detect the much smaller transit signal of an earth-size planet around a solar-size star. Laboratory experiments in the presence of realistic noise sources have shown that CCDs can achieve photometric precision adequate to detect the 9.6 E-5 dimming, of the Sun due to a transit of the Earth. Space-based solar irradiance monitoring has shown that the intrinsic variability of the Sun would not preclude such a detection. Transits of the Sun by the Earth would be detectable by observers that reside within a narrow band of sky positions near the ecliptic plane, if the observers possess current Earth epoch levels of technology and astronomical expertise. A catalog of candidate target stars, their properties, and simulations of the photometric Earth transit signal detectability at each target is presented.

  9. The Use of Social Media for Navigating the Transitions into and through the First Year of College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaccaro, Annemarie; Adams, Sue K.; Kisler, Tiffani S.; Newman, Barbara M.

    2015-01-01

    Although the use of technology is at an all-time high among college students, research about how social media facilitates the transition to college is limited. This paper presents findings from two qualitative studies about the role of social media in fostering a sense of belonging. Narratives from 66 students offer insight into the distinct…

  10. Electronic Transitions of Yttrium Monophosphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Allan S. C.; Li, Biu Wa; Chan, MAN-CHOR

    2015-06-01

    Electronic transition spectrum of the yttrium monophosphide (YP) molecule in the visible region between 715 nm and 880 nm has been recorded using laser ablation/reaction free-jet expansion and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The YP molecule was produced by reacting laser - ablated yttrium atoms with PH3 seeded in argon. Thirteen vibrational bands were analyzed and five electronic transition systems have identified, namely the [12.2] Ω = 3 - X3 Π_2 transition, [13.3] Ω = 3 - X3 Π_2 transition, [13.4] Ω = 3 - X3 Π_2 transition, [13.5] Ω = 3 - X3 Π_2 transition, and [13.4] Ω = 2 - X3 Π_2 transition. Least squares fits of the measured rotational lines yielded molecular constants for the ground and excited states. The ground state symmetry and the bond length r_0 of the YP molecule have been determined to be a X3 Π_2 state and 2.4413 Å respectively in this work. A molecular orbital energy level diagram has been used to help the assignment of the observed electronic states. This work represents the first experimental investigation of the spectrum of the YP molecule.

  11. Crossing Over: The Lived Experiences of Clinical Laboratory Science Education Teachers as They Transition from Traditional to Online Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veldkamp, Ruth B.

    2013-01-01

    A phenomenological study was undertaken to understand and describe the nature and meaning of the live experiences of faculty transition from traditional to teaching online clinical laboratory science courses. In order to gain insight into the lived experiences of faculty, in-depth interviews were conducted with 10 faculty members. The task of the…

  12. Major evolutionary transitions in individuality.

    PubMed

    West, Stuart A; Fisher, Roberta M; Gardner, Andy; Kiers, E Toby

    2015-08-18

    The evolution of life on earth has been driven by a small number of major evolutionary transitions. These transitions have been characterized by individuals that could previously replicate independently, cooperating to form a new, more complex life form. For example, archaea and eubacteria formed eukaryotic cells, and cells formed multicellular organisms. However, not all cooperative groups are en route to major transitions. How can we explain why major evolutionary transitions have or haven't taken place on different branches of the tree of life? We break down major transitions into two steps: the formation of a cooperative group and the transformation of that group into an integrated entity. We show how these steps require cooperation, division of labor, communication, mutual dependence, and negligible within-group conflict. We find that certain ecological conditions and the ways in which groups form have played recurrent roles in driving multiple transitions. In contrast, we find that other factors have played relatively minor roles at many key points, such as within-group kin discrimination and mechanisms to actively repress competition. More generally, by identifying the small number of factors that have driven major transitions, we provide a simpler and more unified description of how life on earth has evolved. PMID:25964342

  13. Applying insights from repository safety assessments.

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, Peter N.

    2010-03-01

    Despite decades of international consensus that deep geological disposal is the best option for permanent management of long-lived high-level radioactive wastes, no repositories for used nuclear fuel or high-level waste are in operation. Detailed long-term safety assessments have been completed worldwide for a wide range of repository designs and disposal concepts, however, and valuable insights from these assessments are available to inform future decisions about managing radioactive wastes. Qualitative comparisons among the existing safety assessments for disposal concepts in clay, granite, salt, and unsaturated volcanic tuff show how different geologic settings can be matched with appropriate engineered barrier systems to provide a high degree of confidence in the long-term safety of geologic disposal. Review of individual assessments provides insights regarding the release pathways and radionuclides that are most likely to contribute to estimated doses to humans in the far future for different disposal concepts, and can help focus research and development programs to improve management and disposal technologies. Lessons learned from existing safety assessments may be particularly relevant for informing decisions during the process of selecting potential repository sites.

  14. Insights to regenerate materials: learning from nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Aznar, J. M.; Valero, C.; Gómez-Benito, M. J.; Javierre, E.

    2016-08-01

    Self-healing materials, both biological and engineered, integrate the ability to repair themselves and recover their functionality using the resources inherently available to them. Although significant advances have been made, in recent years, for the design of different concepts of self-healing materials, this work aims to provide some insights into how living materials are able to regenerate or heal when a fracture or injury occurs. The main sensors that regulate this adaptive and regenerative behavior are the cells. These are able to sense the mechanical alterations in their surroundings and regulate their activity in order to remove dead tissue and/or create new tissue. Therefore, understanding how cells are able to regenerate tissues under complex and multiphysics conditions can define the biomimetics guidelines to heal through inert or traditional engineering materials. In this work, we present a combination of experiments and different kinds of multiscale and multiphysics models in order to understand how mechanics regulate some mechanisms at cell and tissue level. This combination of results aims to gain insight into the development of novel strategies for self-healing materials, mimicking the behavior induced by cells and biological tissues.

  15. Insights into chloroplast biogenesis and development.

    PubMed

    Pogson, Barry J; Ganguly, Diep; Albrecht-Borth, Verónica

    2015-09-01

    In recent years many advances have been made to obtain insight into chloroplast biogenesis and development. In plants several plastids types exist such as the proplastid (which is the progenitor of all plastids), leucoplasts (group of colourless plastids important for storage including elaioplasts (lipids), amyloplasts (starch) or proteinoplasts (proteins)), chromoplasts (yellow to orange-coloured due to carotenoids, in flowers or in old leaves as gerontoplasts), and the green chloroplasts. Chloroplasts are indispensable for plant development; not only by performing photosynthesis and thus rendering the plant photoautotrophic, but also for biochemical processes (which in some instances can also take place in other plastids types), such as the synthesis of pigments, lipids, and plant hormones and sensing environmental stimuli. Although we understand many aspects of these processes there are gaps in our understanding of the establishment of functional chloroplasts and their regulation. Why is that so? Even though chloroplast function is comparable in all plants and most of the algae, ferns and moss, detailed analyses have revealed many differences, specifically with respect to its biogenesis. As an update to our prior review on the genetic analysis of chloroplast biogenesis and development [1] herein we will focus on recent advances in Angiosperms (monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants) that provide novel insights and highlight the challenges and prospects for unravelling the regulation of chloroplast biogenesis specifically during the establishment of the young plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast Biogenesis. PMID:25667967

  16. Promoting screening mammography: insight or uptake?

    PubMed

    Keen, John D

    2010-01-01

    The US Preventive Services Task Force has emphasized individualized decision-making regarding participation in screening mammography for women ages 40 to 49. Positive public opinion regarding screening mammography is understandable given that screening advocates have heavily promoted the slogan "early detection saves lives" while ignoring screening harms. The goal of mammography screening advocates is to increase screening participation or uptake. The purpose of this paper is to promote physician and patient insight by presenting the age-related benefit and harms of screening. At age 50, routine screening saves approximately 1 woman per 1000 over 10 years. The life-saving proportion of screen-detected cancers is 5%, which means mammograms must detect 21 cancers to save one life. Almost half of screen-detected cancers represent pseudo-disease and would never become symptomatic yet alone lethal during a woman's lifetime. Consequently, 40- and 50-year-old women are 10 times more likely to experience overdiagnosis and overtreatment than to have their lives saved. Analysis of events and outcomes per single screening round for women ages 40 to 49 show that approximately 9600 screening mammograms, 960 diagnostic exams, and 90 to 140 biopsies are required to save one life. Given the substantial harms of screening, advocates should refocus their priority from promoting uptake to promoting insight. PMID:21057074

  17. Risk Insights Gained from Fire Incidents

    SciTech Connect

    Kazarians, Mardy; Nowlen, Steven P.

    1999-06-10

    There now exist close to 20 years of history in the application of Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for the analysis of fire risk at nuclear power plants. The current methods are based on various assumptions regarding fire phenomena, the impact of fire on equipment and operator response, and the overall progression of a fire event from initiation through final resolution. Over this same time period, a number of significant fire incidents have occurred at nuclear power plants around the world. Insights gained from US experience have been used in US studies as the statistical basis for establishing fire initiation frequencies both as a function of the plant area and the initiating fire source.To a lesser extent, the fire experience has also been used to assess the general severity and duration of fires. However, aside from these statistical analyses, the incidents have rarely been scrutinized in detail to verify the underlying assumptions of fire PRAs. This paper discusses an effort, under which a set of fire incidents are being reviewed in order to gain insights directly relevant to the methods, data, and assumptions that form the basis for current fire PRAs. The paper focuses on the objectives of the effort, the specific fire events being reviews methodology, and anticipated follow-on activities.

  18. Magnetic TRAnsition Region Probe (MTRAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Davis, John; Hathaway, David; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    MTRAP (Magnetic Transition Region Probe) will reveal the fine-scale physical processes in the Sun's magnetic transition region, the complex layer from the upper photosphere to the upper chromosphere/lower transition region. In the magnetic transition region plasma forces and magnetic forces are of comparable strength, which results in complex interplay of the two, which interplay governs the coupling of the convectively-driven deeper layers to the magnetically-driven upper transition region and inner corona. The fine-scale magnetic structure, processes, and events in the magnetic transition region are key to the genesis of the Sun's entire hot, dynamic outer atmosphere and to the initiation of large eruptive events. MTRAP will be a single spacecraft in Sun-synchronous Earth orbit. Because MTRAP will probe and measure the 3-D structure and dynamics of the magnetic field and plasma in the chromosphere and transition region with unprecedented resolution, the required telescope size and telemetry rates dictate that MTRAP be in Earth orbit, not in deep space. The observations will feature visible and infrared maps of vector magnetic and velocity fields in the magnetic transition region and photosphere. These will have large field of view (greater than 100,000 km), high resolution (greater than 100 km), and high sensitivity (greater than 30 G in transverse field). These observations of the lower atmosphere will be complemented by UV maps of the structure, velocity, and magnetic field (including the full vector field if technically feasible) higher up, in the upper chromosphere and lower transition region. MTRAP will also have an EUV imaging spectrograph observing coronal structure and dynamics in the same field of view with comparable resolution. Specific phenomena to be analyzed include spicules, bright points, jets, the base of plumes, and the triggering of eruptive flares and coronal mass ejections. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  19. Fluctuation driven electroweak phase transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Kolb, Edward W.

    1991-01-01

    We examine the dynamics of the electroweak phase transition in the early Universe. For Higgs masses in the range 46 less than or = M sub H less than or = 150 GeV and top quark masses less than 200 GeV, regions of symmetric and asymmetric vacuum coexist to below the critical temperature, with thermal equilibrium between the two phases maintained by fluctuations of both phases. We propose that the transition to the asymmetric vacuum is completed by percolation of these subcritical fluctuations. Our results are relevant to scenarios of baryogenesis that invoke a weakly first-order phase transition at the electroweak scale.

  20. Linear-time transitive orientation

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, R.M.; Spinrad, J.P.

    1997-06-01

    The transitive orientation problem is the problem of assigning a direction to each edge of a graph so that the resulting digraph is transitive. A graph is a comparability graph if such an assignment is possible. We describe an O(n + m) algorithm for the transitive orientation problem, where n and m are the number of vertices and edges of the graph; full details are given in. This gives linear time bounds for maximum clique and minimum vertex coloring on comparability graphs, recognition of two-dimensional partial orders, permutation graphs, cointerval graphs, and triangulated comparability graphs, and other combinatorial problems on comparability graphs and their complements.

  1. Holographic approach to phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, Sebastian; Garcia-Garcia, Antonio M.; Rodriguez-Gomez, Diego

    2010-02-15

    We provide a description of phase transitions at finite temperature in strongly coupled field theories using holography. For this purpose, we introduce a general class of gravity duals to superconducting theories that exhibit various types of phase transitions (first or second order with both mean and non-mean field behavior) as parameters in their Lagrangian are changed. Moreover the size and strength of the conductivity coherence peak can also be controlled. Our results suggest that certain parameters in the gravitational dual control the interactions responsible for binding the condensate and the magnitude of its fluctuations close to the transition.

  2. Nonradiative transition dynamics in alexandrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayen, S. K.; Wang, W. B.; Petricevic, V.; Alfano, R. R.

    1986-01-01

    The first direct picosecond time-resolved measurement of the nonradiative transition dynamics between the excited 4T2 pump band and the metastable 2E storage level of the trivalent chromium ion in alexandrite is reported. The nonradiative relaxation times of 17 ps for intra-4T2 vibrational transitions, and 27 ps for 4T2-2E electronic transition are obtained. The thermal repopulation rate of the 4T2 state from the metastable 2E level is of the order 3.5 x 10 to the 9th per s.

  3. Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatley, Peter J.; Pollacco, Don L.; Queloz, Didier; Rauer, Heike; Watson, Christopher A.; West, Richard G.; Chazelas, Bruno; Louden, Tom M.; Bannister, Nigel; Bento, Joao; Burleigh, Matthew; Cabrera, Juan; Eigmüller, Philipp; Erikson, Anders; Genolet, Ludovic; Goad, Michael; Grange, Andrew; Jordán, Andrés; Lawrie, Katherine; McCormac, James; Neveu, Marion; Walker, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS) is a new ground-based survey for transiting exoplanets. Our primary goal is to find the first statistically-significant sample of Neptunes and super-Earths that are bright enough for radial velocity confirmation. By measuring precise masses and radii we will constrain the bulk composition and internal structure of planets that span the transition between the gas giants and terrestrial planets. Our brightest exoplanets will also be suitable for atmospheric characterisation with large facilities such as the VLT, JWST and the E-ELT. NGTS construction began in June 2013, and the survey is due to commence in 2014.

  4. Transition to turbulence in pipe flow as a phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Mukund; Hof, Björn

    2015-11-01

    In pipe flow, turbulence first arises in the form of localized turbulent patches called puffs. The flow undergoes a transition to sustained turbulence via spatio-temporal intermittency, with puffs splitting, decaying and merging in the background laminar flow. However, the due to mean advection of the puffs and the long timescales involved (~107 advective time units), it is not possible to study the transition in typical laboratory set-ups. So far, it has only been possible to indirectly estimate the critical point for the transition. Here, we exploit the stochastic memoryless nature of the puff decay and splitting processes to construct a pipe flow set-up, that is periodic in a statistical sense. It then becomes possible to study the flow for sufficiently long times and characterize the transition in detail. We present measurements of the turbulent fraction as a function of Reynolds number which in turn allows a direct estimate of the critical point. We present evidence that the transition has features of a phase transition of second order.

  5. Student voluntarism in transition.

    PubMed

    Garcia, S A; Clark, C; Walfish, S

    1979-01-01

    The university student volunteer as a social change agent is in a period of transition. There is no returning to the idealism and activism of the 1960s if this and future generations of students continue to see self-preservation and individual advancement as their only viable option here in America. In view of the changing nature of today's students, the conventional definitions of volunteers, such as Shultz's (1972) altruist, average, and pseudo-volunteer, must be reconsidered. Does the acceptance of minimal pay or demand for academic credit preclude one's being a true altruist? Further, is altruism a necessary or sufficient condition of voluntarism? While we must attempt to answer these questions, the purpose here was to suggest viable first steps in reviving and enhancing student voluntarism. Some of the most salient points are: (1) Student volunteers provide critically needed services to the community, (2) Students are increasingly demanding tangible personal and educational gains for services through voluntarism, (3) Faculty support is vital to student voluntarism and they should be encouraged to actively design their classes to integrate classroom theory and practice through volunteering, and (4) The community agencies served should be active participants in the faculty, student, agency triad, and not merely passive recipients of services. The future of student voluntarism must be viewed in the larger context of changes occurring in the society-at-large, such as cynicism, mistrust of authority figures and leaders, and a move away from altruism and toward symbiosis and/or individualism. There is widespread disillusionment with "band-aid" approaches to solving enormous social problems, i.e., trying to help the few while some of society's most fundamental structures guarantee the perpetuation of poverty, crime, and general anomie. The rekindling of the ideology of cooperative altruism will take ingenuity and tireless effort. Meanwhile, if community psychology

  6. Quantum criticality at the Anderson transition: A typical medium theory perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudian, Samiyeh; Tang, Shao; Dobrosavljević, Vladimir

    2015-10-01

    We present a complete analytical and numerical solution of the typical medium theory (TMT) for the Anderson metal-insulator transition. This approach self-consistently calculates the typical amplitude of the electronic wave functions, thus representing the conceptually simplest order-parameter theory for the Anderson transition. We identify all possible universality classes for the critical behavior, which can be found within such a mean-field approach. This provides insights into how interaction-induced renormalizations of the disorder potential may produce qualitative modifications of the critical behavior. We also formulate a simplified description of the leading critical behavior, thus obtaining an effective Landau theory for Anderson localization.

  7. The role of correlations on oxygen orbitals in late transition-metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Bayo; Dang, Hung T.; Gull, Emanuel; Millis, Andrew J.

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the effect on transition-metal oxide physics of including interactions on the oxygen sites as well as on the transition-metal site using a generalization of the single-site Dynamical Mean Field method. On-site repulsive and Hund's interactions in the full Slater-Kanamori form are treated using a numerically exact continuous-time quantum Monte-Carlo solver. We determine the metal-insulator and magnetic phase diagrams as a function of charge-transfer tendency and interaction strengths. The results are compared directly to models with no oxygen correlations, yielding insights about the role of oxygen-specific correlations.

  8. Influence of a heated leading edge on boundary layer growth, stability, and transition

    SciTech Connect

    Landrum, D.B.; Macha, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a combined theoretical and experimental study of the influence of a heated leading edge on the growth, stability, and transition of a two-dimensional boundary layer. The findings are directly applicable to aircraft wings and nacelles that use surface heating for anti-icing protection. The potential effects of the non-adiabatic condition are particularly important for laminar-flow sections where even small perturbations can result in significantly degraded aerodynamic performance. The results of the study give new insight to the fundamental coupling between streamwise pressure gradient and surface heat flux in laminar and transitional boundary layers.

  9. Influence of a heated leading edge on boundary layer growth, stability, and transition

    SciTech Connect

    Landrum, D.B.; Macha, J.M.

    1987-06-01

    This paper presents the results of a combined theoretical and experimental study of the influence of a heated leading edge on the growth, stability, and transition of a two-dimensional boundary layer. The findings are directly applicable to aircraft wings and nacelles that use surface heating for anti-icing protection. The potential effects of the non-adiabatic condition are particularly important for laminar-flow sections where even small perturbations can result in significantly degraded aerodynamic performance. The results of the study give new insight to the fundamental coupling between streamwise pressure gradient and surface heat flux in laminar and transitional boundary layers. 13 references.

  10. Structure stabilities and transitions in polyhedral metal nanocrystals: An atomic-bond-relaxation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ai; Zhu, Ziming; He, Yan; Ouyang, Gang

    2012-04-01

    We present an atomic-bond-relaxation (ABR) method to illustrate a deeper insight on structure stabilities and transitions of metal nanocrystals with polyhedral structure based on the thermodynamic consideration. It has been found that the end effects in polyhedral nanocrystals induced by the atoms located at edges, side facets, and vertexes play the dominant roles for their structure performances. The theoretical predictions are well consistent with the experimental measurements and simulations, which suggest the ABR model can be an effective method to understand solid-solid phase transition of polyhedral metal nanocrystals.

  11. Genomic insights into the evolutionary origin of Myxozoa within Cnidaria.

    PubMed

    Chang, E Sally; Neuhof, Moran; Rubinstein, Nimrod D; Diamant, Arik; Philippe, Hervé; Huchon, Dorothée; Cartwright, Paulyn

    2015-12-01

    The Myxozoa comprise over 2,000 species of microscopic obligate parasites that use both invertebrate and vertebrate hosts as part of their life cycle. Although the evolutionary origin of myxozoans has been elusive, a close relationship with cnidarians, a group that includes corals, sea anemones, jellyfish, and hydroids, is supported by some phylogenetic studies and the observation that the distinctive myxozoan structure, the polar capsule, is remarkably similar to the stinging structures (nematocysts) in cnidarians. To gain insight into the extreme evolutionary transition from a free-living cnidarian to a microscopic endoparasite, we analyzed genomic and transcriptomic assemblies from two distantly related myxozoan species, Kudoa iwatai and Myxobolus cerebralis, and compared these to the transcriptome and genome of the less reduced cnidarian parasite, Polypodium hydriforme. A phylogenomic analysis, using for the first time to our knowledge, a taxonomic sampling that represents the breadth of myxozoan diversity, including four newly generated myxozoan assemblies, confirms that myxozoans are cnidarians and are a sister taxon to P. hydriforme. Estimations of genome size reveal that myxozoans have one of the smallest reported animal genomes. Gene enrichment analyses show depletion of expressed genes in categories related to development, cell differentiation, and cell-cell communication. In addition, a search for candidate genes indicates that myxozoans lack key elements of signaling pathways and transcriptional factors important for multicellular development. Our results suggest that the degeneration of the myxozoan body plan from a free-living cnidarian to a microscopic parasitic cnidarian was accompanied by extreme reduction in genome size and gene content. PMID:26627241

  12. Interior of Mars from InSight geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehant, V.; Folkner, W.; Asmar, S.; Rivoldini, A.; Van Hoolst, T.; Banerdt, B.

    2012-04-01

    Within the INSIGHT mission, the radioscience experiment aims at obtaining the rotation and interior structure of Mars. It is called for that reason RISE (Rotation and Interior Structure Experiment). It does not uses an instrument stricto sensus but uses the spacecraft X-band communication system. The parameters that will be determined from the rotation and orientation observation (i.e. from length-of-day variations, precession (long-term changes in the rotational orientation), and nutations (periodic changes in the rotational orientation)) are the angular momentum of the atmosphere, the moments of inertia of the whole planet and of the core. This will allow to constrain the interior models of Mars. The Doppler effect on the radio signal is related to the variations of the rotation and orientation of the planet Mars. When measured for a time longer than the seasonal timescale, the observation can provide values for the moments of inertia. The mean moment of inertia is a strong constraint on the core size and density, core temperature and mantle mineralogy. The size of the core has major consequences for internal structure and planetary evolution. For example, a large core makes a perovskite-bearing lower mantle impossible, due to insufficient pressure at the base of the mantle. The endothermic phase transition spinel-perovskite has a strong effect on mantle convection. The size and composition of the core are also important in the history of the magnetic dynamo, which in turn has important consequences for the retention of the atmosphere and the possible habitability of the surface early in Mars' history.

  13. Molecular insight into conformational transmission of human P-glycoprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shan-Yan; Liu, Fu-Feng; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2013-12-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a kind of ATP-binding cassette transporter, can export candidates through a channel at the two transmembrane domains (TMDs) across the cell membranes using the energy released from ATP hydrolysis at the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). Considerable evidence has indicated that human P-gp undergoes large-scale conformational changes to export a wide variety of anti-cancer drugs out of the cancer cells. However, molecular mechanism of the conformational transmission of human P-gp from the NBDs to the TMDs is still unclear. Herein, targeted molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore the atomic detail of the conformational transmission of human P-gp. It is confirmed that the conformational transition from the inward- to outward-facing is initiated by the movement of the NBDs. It is found that the two NBDs move both on the two directions (x and y). The movement on the x direction leads to the closure of the NBDs, while the movement on the y direction adjusts the conformations of the NBDs to form the correct ATP binding pockets. Six key segments (KSs) protruding from the TMDs to interact with the NBDs are identified. The relative movement of the KSs along the y axis driven by the NBDs can be transmitted through α-helices to the rest of the TMDs, rendering the TMDs to open towards periplasm in the outward-facing conformation. Twenty eight key residue pairs are identified to participate in the interaction network that contributes to the conformational transmission from the NBDs to the TMDs of human P-gp. In addition, 9 key residues in each NBD are also identified. The studies have thus provided clear insight into the conformational transmission from the NBDs to the TMDs in human P-gp.

  14. Molecular insight into conformational transmission of human P-glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Shan-Yan; Liu, Fu-Feng E-mail: ysun@tju.edu.cn; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan E-mail: ysun@tju.edu.cn

    2013-12-14

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a kind of ATP-binding cassette transporter, can export candidates through a channel at the two transmembrane domains (TMDs) across the cell membranes using the energy released from ATP hydrolysis at the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). Considerable evidence has indicated that human P-gp undergoes large-scale conformational changes to export a wide variety of anti-cancer drugs out of the cancer cells. However, molecular mechanism of the conformational transmission of human P-gp from the NBDs to the TMDs is still unclear. Herein, targeted molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore the atomic detail of the conformational transmission of human P-gp. It is confirmed that the conformational transition from the inward- to outward-facing is initiated by the movement of the NBDs. It is found that the two NBDs move both on the two directions (x and y). The movement on the x direction leads to the closure of the NBDs, while the movement on the y direction adjusts the conformations of the NBDs to form the correct ATP binding pockets. Six key segments (KSs) protruding from the TMDs to interact with the NBDs are identified. The relative movement of the KSs along the y axis driven by the NBDs can be transmitted through α-helices to the rest of the TMDs, rendering the TMDs to open towards periplasm in the outward-facing conformation. Twenty eight key residue pairs are identified to participate in the interaction network that contributes to the conformational transmission from the NBDs to the TMDs of human P-gp. In addition, 9 key residues in each NBD are also identified. The studies have thus provided clear insight into the conformational transmission from the NBDs to the TMDs in human P-gp.

  15. Genomic insights into the evolutionary origin of Myxozoa within Cnidaria

    PubMed Central

    Chang, E. Sally; Neuhof, Moran; Rubinstein, Nimrod D.; Diamant, Arik; Philippe, Hervé; Huchon, Dorothée; Cartwright, Paulyn

    2015-01-01

    The Myxozoa comprise over 2,000 species of microscopic obligate parasites that use both invertebrate and vertebrate hosts as part of their life cycle. Although the evolutionary origin of myxozoans has been elusive, a close relationship with cnidarians, a group that includes corals, sea anemones, jellyfish, and hydroids, is supported by some phylogenetic studies and the observation that the distinctive myxozoan structure, the polar capsule, is remarkably similar to the stinging structures (nematocysts) in cnidarians. To gain insight into the extreme evolutionary transition from a free-living cnidarian to a microscopic endoparasite, we analyzed genomic and transcriptomic assemblies from two distantly related myxozoan species, Kudoa iwatai and Myxobolus cerebralis, and compared these to the transcriptome and genome of the less reduced cnidarian parasite, Polypodium hydriforme. A phylogenomic analysis, using for the first time to our knowledge, a taxonomic sampling that represents the breadth of myxozoan diversity, including four newly generated myxozoan assemblies, confirms that myxozoans are cnidarians and are a sister taxon to P. hydriforme. Estimations of genome size reveal that myxozoans have one of the smallest reported animal genomes. Gene enrichment analyses show depletion of expressed genes in categories related to development, cell differentiation, and cell–cell communication. In addition, a search for candidate genes indicates that myxozoans lack key elements of signaling pathways and transcriptional factors important for multicellular development. Our results suggest that the degeneration of the myxozoan body plan from a free-living cnidarian to a microscopic parasitic cnidarian was accompanied by extreme reduction in genome size and gene content. PMID:26627241

  16. Plasmids and Rickettsial Evolution: Insight from Rickettsia felis

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Joseph J.; Beier, Magda S.; Rahman, M. Sayeedur; Ammerman, Nicole C.; Shallom, Joshua M.; Purkayastha, Anjan; Sobral, Bruno S.; Azad, Abdu F.

    2007-01-01

    Background The genome sequence of Rickettsia felis revealed a number of rickettsial genetic anomalies that likely contribute not only to a large genome size relative to other rickettsiae, but also to phenotypic oddities that have confounded the categorization of R. felis as either typhus group (TG) or spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae. Most intriguing was the first report from rickettsiae of a conjugative plasmid (pRF) that contains 68 putative open reading frames, several of which are predicted to encode proteins with high similarity to conjugative machinery in other plasmid-containing bacteria. Methodology/Principal Findings Using phylogeny estimation, we determined the mode of inheritance of pRF genes relative to conserved rickettsial chromosomal genes. Phylogenies of chromosomal genes were in agreement with other published rickettsial trees. However, phylogenies including pRF genes yielded different topologies and suggest a close relationship between pRF and ancestral group (AG) rickettsiae, including the recently completed genome of R. bellii str. RML369-C. This relatedness is further supported by the distribution of pRF genes across other rickettsiae, as 10 pRF genes (or inactive derivatives) also occur in AG (but not SFG) rickettsiae, with five of these genes characteristic of typical plasmids. Detailed characterization of pRF genes resulted in two novel findings: the identification of oriV and replication termination regions, and the likelihood that a second proposed plasmid, pRFδ, is an artifact of the original genome assembly. Conclusion/Significance Altogether, we propose a new rickettsial classification scheme with the addition of a fourth lineage, transitional group (TRG) rickettsiae, that is unique from TG and SFG rickettsiae and harbors genes from possible exchanges with AG rickettsiae via conjugation. We offer insight into the evolution of a plastic plasmid system in rickettsiae, including the role plasmids may have played in the acquirement of

  17. Parity nonconservation in atomic Zeeman transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Angstmann, E. J.; Dinh, T. H.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2005-11-15

    We discuss the possibility of measuring nuclear anapole moments in atomic Zeeman transitions and perform the necessary calculations. Advantages of using Zeeman transitions include variable transition frequencies and the possibility of enhancement of parity nonconservation effects.

  18. Differential Scanning Fluorimetry provides high throughput data on silk protein transitions.

    PubMed Central

    Vollrath, Fritz; Hawkins, Nick; Porter, David; Holland, Chris; Boulet-Audet, Maxime

    2014-01-01

    Here we present a set of measurements using Differential Scanning Fluorimetry (DSF) as an inexpensive, high throughput screening method to investigate the folding of silk protein molecules as they abandon their first native melt conformation, dehydrate and denature into their final solid filament conformation. Our first data and analyses comparing silks from spiders, mulberry and wild silkworms as well as reconstituted ‘silk' fibroin show that DSF can provide valuable insights into details of silk denaturation processes that might be active during spinning. We conclude that this technique and technology offers a powerful and novel tool to analyse silk protein transitions in detail by allowing many changes to the silk solutions to be tested rapidly with microliter scale sample sizes. Such transition mechanisms will lead to important generic insights into the folding patterns not only of silks but also of other fibrous protein (bio)polymers. PMID:25004800

  19. Differential Scanning Fluorimetry provides high throughput data on silk protein transitions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollrath, Fritz; Hawkins, Nick; Porter, David; Holland, Chris; Boulet-Audet, Maxime

    2014-07-01

    Here we present a set of measurements using Differential Scanning Fluorimetry (DSF) as an inexpensive, high throughput screening method to investigate the folding of silk protein molecules as they abandon their first native melt conformation, dehydrate and denature into their final solid filament conformation. Our first data and analyses comparing silks from spiders, mulberry and wild silkworms as well as reconstituted `silk' fibroin show that DSF can provide valuable insights into details of silk denaturation processes that might be active during spinning. We conclude that this technique and technology offers a powerful and novel tool to analyse silk protein transitions in detail by allowing many changes to the silk solutions to be tested rapidly with microliter scale sample sizes. Such transition mechanisms will lead to important generic insights into the folding patterns not only of silks but also of other fibrous protein (bio)polymers.

  20. 'I am a mother': young women's negotiation of femininity and risk in the transition to adulthood.

    PubMed

    Graham, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    In studies of sexual risk behaviour among youth, the role of dominant conceptions of masculinity and femininity has received increasing attention. However, where research has sought to explore femininity, it has predominantly focused on adolescent girls. This paper departs from previous research by offering insights into how young women negotiate their femininity as they transition from adolescence to adulthood and encounter changing social contexts. Drawing on data from ethnographic enquiry, it argues that as young women transition out of school and into emerging adulthood, their options for negotiating different types of femininity become constrained, with consequences for engagement in sexual risk behaviours. This may to some extent explain why in some South African contexts older young women are more vulnerable to HIV infection than adolescent girls. The paper offer insights into future prospects for youth development programming seeking to reduce young women's vulnerability to risk. PMID:26413859

  1. Hadron-Quark Phase Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Cavagnoli, Rafael; Menezes, Debora P.; Providencia, Constanca

    2009-06-03

    In the present work we study the hadron-quarkphase transition with boson condensation by investigating the binodal surface and extending it to finite temperature in order to mimic the QCD phase diagram.

  2. ISS Update: Transit of Venus

    NASA Video Gallery

    ISS Update commentator Brandi Dean interviews Mario Runco, NASA astronaut, about Venus's transit across the sun on June 5, 2012. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Johnson and include the hashtag #...

  3. Transition probabilities of Br II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bengtson, R. D.; Miller, M. H.

    1976-01-01

    Absolute transition probabilities of the three most prominent visible Br II lines are measured in emission. Results compare well with Coulomb approximations and with line strengths extrapolated from trends in homologous atoms.

  4. Moved by a Rapid Transit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueter, C.

    2013-04-01

    Enticing by virtue of its predictability, historical utility, and spectacle, the transit of Venus is a niche event among astronomical phenomena. Though the value of a transit for scientific purposes is now diminished, the brief appearance of Venus silhouetted against the background of the Sun in 2004 moved the artistic community to celebrate the rare alignment. Artists of all ages combined old traditions with fresh technology to create a 21st-century tapestry of music, sculpture, paintings, glasswork, quilts, sky shows, and digital imagery. A full catalog of transit-related art generated over the centuries would feature the sampling of entries presented here and at the Moved by a Rapid Transit website.

  5. Career Transitions for Faculty Members committed to Undergraduate Neuroscience Education

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, Gary L.

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights some of the critical issues that were discussed during a breakout session on career transitions at the 2014 Faculty for Undergraduate Neuroscience (FUN) Workshop at Ithaca College on Undergraduate Neuroscience Education: Challenges and Solutions in Creating and Sustaining Programs. Topics included: (1) transitioning from graduate school or a postdoc position to an assistant professor position; (2) preparing for promotion and tenure decisions; (3) balancing teaching, research, and service during a career in academics; (4) exploring alternative career options, including moving to another institution, taking on an administrative position, and working in industry; and (5) deciding when and how to retire. Much of the discussion focused on special challenges that women and minorities face in the academic environment. Participants offered valuable insights and suggestions for helping new faculty members prepare for reappointment, promotion, and tenure decisions, including utilizing networking connections within FUN for letters of support and collaborative opportunities. These networking opportunities were also valued by participants who were in rather unique positions, such as transitioning from a purely administrative role back to a regular faculty position or handling the extra burden of being a chair or program director with essentially the same research and grant-writing expectations of a regular faculty member. The session proved to be enlightening for most participants and though several questions and concerns remained unanswered, several ideas and insights were shared by the participants and a sense of empathy for the unique circumstances many of the participants were experiencing provided an atmosphere of comradery and support that often emanates from these FUN workshop sessions. PMID:26240524

  6. Career Transitions for Faculty Members committed to Undergraduate Neuroscience Education.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, Gary L

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights some of the critical issues that were discussed during a breakout session on career transitions at the 2014 Faculty for Undergraduate Neuroscience (FUN) Workshop at Ithaca College on Undergraduate Neuroscience Education: Challenges and Solutions in Creating and Sustaining Programs. Topics included: (1) transitioning from graduate school or a postdoc position to an assistant professor position; (2) preparing for promotion and tenure decisions; (3) balancing teaching, research, and service during a career in academics; (4) exploring alternative career options, including moving to another institution, taking on an administrative position, and working in industry; and (5) deciding when and how to retire. Much of the discussion focused on special challenges that women and minorities face in the academic environment. Participants offered valuable insights and suggestions for helping new faculty members prepare for reappointment, promotion, and tenure decisions, including utilizing networking connections within FUN for letters of support and collaborative opportunities. These networking opportunities were also valued by participants who were in rather unique positions, such as transitioning from a purely administrative role back to a regular faculty position or handling the extra burden of being a chair or program director with essentially the same research and grant-writing expectations of a regular faculty member. The session proved to be enlightening for most participants and though several questions and concerns remained unanswered, several ideas and insights were shared by the participants and a sense of empathy for the unique circumstances many of the participants were experiencing provided an atmosphere of comradery and support that often emanates from these FUN workshop sessions. PMID:26240524

  7. Clinicians’ views on improving inter-organizational care transitions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with complex health conditions frequently require care from multiple providers and are particularly vulnerable to poorly executed transitions from one healthcare setting to another. Poorly executed care transitions can result in negative patient outcomes (e.g. medication errors, delays in treatment) and increased healthcare spending due to re-hospitalization or emergency room visits by patients. Little is known about care transitions from acute care to complex continuing care and rehabilitation settings. Thus, a qualitative study was undertaken to explore clinicians’ perceptions of strategies aimed at improving patient care transitions from acute care hospitals to complex continuing care and rehabilitation healthcare organizations. Methods A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was conducted with clinicians employed at two selected healthcare facilities: an acute care hospital and a complex continuing care/rehabilitation organization, respectively. Analysis of the transcripts involved the creation of a coding schema using the content analyses outlined by Ryan and Bernard. In total, 31 interviews were conducted with clinicians at the participating study sites. Results Three themes emerged from the data to delineate what study participants described as strategies to ensure quality inter-organizational transitions of patients transferred from acute care to the complex continuing care and rehabilitation hospital. These themes are: 1) communicating more effectively; 2) being vigilant around the patients’ readiness for transfer and care needs; and 3) documenting more accurately and completely in the patient transfer record. Conclusion Our study provides insights from the perspectives of multiple clinicians that have important implications for health care leaders and clinicians in their efforts to enhance inter-organizational care transitions. Of particular importance is the need to have a collective and collaborative approach amongst

  8. Bypass transition to turbulence and research Desiderata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morkovin, M. V.

    1985-01-01

    Bypass transitions are seldom mentioned in texts or meetings on instability and transition to wall turbulence. The nature of a number of bypass transitions is illustrated by example. Until this characteristics is truly understood predicting transition on the basis of theory or statistically inadequate correlations (as they all are) entails risks that should be considered in justifying any design involving transition. A historical overview of bypass transition identified on blunt bodies is given.

  9. Universal Keplerian state transition matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepperd, S. W.

    1985-01-01

    A completely general method for computing the Keplerian state transition matrix in terms of Goodyear's universal variables is presented. This includes a new scheme for solving Kepler's problem which is a necessary first step to computing the transition matrix. The Kepler problem is solved in terms of a new independent variable requiring the evaluation of only one transcendental function. Furthermore, this transcendental function may be conveniently evaluated by means of a Gaussian continued fraction.

  10. The major synthetic evolutionary transitions.

    PubMed

    Solé, Ricard

    2016-08-19

    Evolution is marked by well-defined events involving profound innovations that are known as 'major evolutionary transitions'. They involve the integration of autonomous elements into a new, higher-level organization whereby the former isolated units interact in novel ways, losing their original autonomy. All major transitions, which include the origin of life, cells, multicellular systems, societies or language (among other examples), took place millions of years ago. Are these transitions unique, rare events? Have they instead universal traits that make them almost inevitable when the right pieces are in place? Are there general laws of evolutionary innovation? In order to approach this problem under a novel perspective, we argue that a parallel class of evolutionary transitions can be explored involving the use of artificial evolutionary experiments where alternative paths to innovation can be explored. These 'synthetic' transitions include, for example, the artificial evolution of multicellular systems or the emergence of language in evolved communicating robots. These alternative scenarios could help us to understand the underlying laws that predate the rise of major innovations and the possibility for general laws of evolved complexity. Several key examples and theoretical approaches are summarized and future challenges are outlined.This article is part of the themed issue 'The major synthetic evolutionary transitions'. PMID:27431528

  11. Gauge theory of glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasin, Mikhail

    2011-05-01

    A new analytical approach for the description of the glass transition in a frustrated system is suggested. The theory is based on the non-equilibrium dynamics technique, and takes into account the interaction of the local order field with the massive gauge field, which describes frustration-induced plastic deformation. The glass transition is regarded as a phase transition interrupted because of the premature critical slowing-down of one of the degrees of freedom caused by the frustrations. It is shown that freezing of the system appears when the correlation length and relaxation time of the gauge field diverge. The Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann relation for the transition kinetics and the critical exponent for the nonlinear susceptibility, 2.5\\lesssim \\gamma \\leq 3 , are derived in the framework of the suggested approach. An expression for the temperature dependence of the heat capacity near to the glass transition is derived. This dependence is qualitatively in good agreement with experimental data. The presented theory reproduces the characteristic form of the langphiphirangt correlation function dependence on time, and explains the boson peak appearance on this curve. In addition, the function of the glass transition temperature value with cooling rate is derived; this dependence fully conforms with known experimental data.

  12. Transitions in turbulent rotating convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaei, Hadi; Alards, Kim; Kunnen, Rudie; Toschi, Federico; Clercx, Herman; Fluid Dynamics Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to explore the flow transition from one state to the other in rotating Rayleigh-Bènard convection using Lagrangian acceleration statistics. 3D particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV) is employed in a water-filled cylindrical tank of equal height and diameter. The measurements are performed at the center and close to the top plate at a Rayleigh number Ra = 1.28e9 and Prandtl number Pr = 6.7 for different rotation rates. In parallel, direct numerical simulation (DNS) has been performed to provide detailed information on the boundary layers. We report the acceleration pdfs for different rotation rates and show how the transition from weakly to strongly rotating Rayleigh-Bènard affects the acceleration pdfs in the bulk and boundary layers. We observe that the shapes of the acceleration PDFs as well as the isotropy in the cell center are largely unaffected while crossing the transition point. However, acceleration pdfs at the top show a clear change at the transition point. Using acceleration pdfs and DNS data, we show that the transition between turbulent states is actually a boundary layer transition between Prandtl-Blasius type (typical of non-rotating convection) and Ekman type.

  13. Planetary transits and stellar variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aigrain, Suzanne

    2005-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the detection of extrasolar planets via the transit method, and more specifically addresses issues relevant to the preparation of upcoming space missions such as CoRoT, Kepler, Eddington, aiming to detect terrestrial planets. The automated detection of transits in tens of thousands of noisy light curves is a challenging task because of the brief, shallow and rare nature of the sought-after signal. I developed a Bayesian transit detection algorithm and tested it through Monte Carlo simulations. This led to a number of improvements to the algorithm, resulting in a maximum likelihood box-fitting approach that is simpler and, for detection purposes, more effective. I also developed an empirical model of the intrinsic micro-variability of the parent stars, which constitutes one of the main performance limitations for space-based transit searches, and used this model to optimise variability filters. These tools were used to identify optimal regions of the stellar parameter space to be targeted by missions such as CoRoT and Eddington, through Monte Carlo simulations and participation in the first CoRoT blind transit detection exercise. Recently, the same tools have been used to analyse ground-based data from the University of New South Wales planet search project, leading to the identification of several potential transiting planet candidates.

  14. Unstable supercritical discontinuous percolation transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Cheng, Xueqi; Zheng, Zhiming; Chung, Ning Ning; D'Souza, Raissa M.; Nagler, Jan

    2013-10-01

    The location and nature of the percolation transition in random networks is a subject of intense interest. Recently, a series of graph evolution processes have been introduced that lead to discontinuous percolation transitions where the addition of a single edge causes the size of the largest component to exhibit a significant macroscopic jump in the thermodynamic limit. These processes can have additional exotic behaviors, such as displaying a “Devil's staircase” of discrete jumps in the supercritical regime. Here we investigate whether the location of the largest jump coincides with the percolation threshold for a range of processes, such as Erdős-Rényipercolation, percolation via edge competition and via growth by overtaking. We find that the largest jump asymptotically occurs at the percolation transition for Erdős-Rényiand other processes exhibiting global continuity, including models exhibiting an “explosive” transition. However, for percolation processes exhibiting genuine discontinuities, the behavior is substantially richer. In percolation models where the order parameter exhibits a staircase, the largest discontinuity generically does not coincide with the percolation transition. For the generalized Bohman-Frieze-Wormald model, it depends on the model parameter. Distinct parameter regimes well in the supercritical regime feature unstable discontinuous transitions—a novel and unexpected phenomenon in percolation. We thus demonstrate that seemingly and genuinely discontinuous percolation transitions can involve a rich behavior in supercriticality, a regime that has been largely ignored in percolation.

  15. Modelling the transitional boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narasimha, R.

    1990-01-01

    Recent developments in the modelling of the transition zone in the boundary layer are reviewed (the zone being defined as extending from the station where intermittency begins to depart from zero to that where it is nearly unity). The value of using a new non-dimensional spot formation rate parameter, and the importance of allowing for so-called subtransitions within the transition zone, are both stressed. Models do reasonably well in constant pressure 2-dimensional flows, but in the presence of strong pressure gradients further improvements are needed. The linear combination approach works surprisingly well in most cases, but would not be so successful in situations where a purely laminar boundary layer would separate but a transitional one would not. Intermittency-weighted eddy viscosity methods do not predict peak surface parameters well without the introduction of an overshooting transition function whose connection with the spot theory of transition is obscure. Suggestions are made for further work that now appears necessary for developing improved models of the transition zone.

  16. Insights into enzymatic halogenation from computational studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senn, Hans

    2014-11-01

    The halogenases are a group of enzymes that have only come to the fore over the last ten years thanks to the discovery and characterization of several of novel representatives. They have re-vealed the fascinating variety of distinct chemical mechanisms that nature utilizes to activate and introduce halogens into organic substrates. Computational studies using a range of approaches have already elucidated many details of the mechanisms of these enzymes, often in synergistic combination with experiment. This Review summarizes the main insights gained from these stud-ies. It also seeks to identify open questions that are amenable to computational investigations. The studies discussed herein also serve to illustrate some of the limitations of the current computa-tional approaches and the challenges encountered in computational mechanistic enzymology.

  17. New Sociotechnical Insights in Interaction Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelnour-Nocera, José; Mørch, Anders I.

    New challenges are facing interaction design. On one hand because of advances in technology - pervasive, ubiquitous, multimodal and adaptive computing - are changing the nature of interaction. On the other, web 2.0, massive multiplayer games and collaboration software extends the boundaries of HCI to deal with interaction in settings of remote communication and collaboration. The aim of this workshop is to provide a forum for HCI practitioners and researchers interested in knowledge from the social sciences to discuss how sociotechnical insights can be used to inform interaction design, and more generally how social science methods and theories can help to enrich the conceptual framework of systems development and participatory design. Position papers submissions are invited to address key aspects of current research and practical case studies.

  18. New Biological Insights from Better Structure Models.

    PubMed

    Touw, Wouter G; Joosten, Robbie P; Vriend, Gert

    2016-03-27

    Structure validation is a key component of all steps in the structure determination process, from structure building, refinement, deposition, and evaluation all the way to post-deposition optimisation of structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) by re-refinement and re-building. Today, many aspects of protein structures are understood better than 10years ago, and combined with improved software and more computing power, the automated PDB_REDO procedure can significantly improve about 85% of all X-ray structures ever deposited in the PDB. We review structure validation, structure improvement, and a series of validation resources and facilities that give access to improved PDB files and to reports on the quality of the original and the improved structures. Post-deposition optimisation generally leads to improved protein structures and a series of examples will illustrate how that, in turn, leads to improved or even novel biological insights. PMID:26869101

  19. Structural insights into eukaryotic aquaporin regulation.

    PubMed

    Törnroth-Horsefield, Susanna; Hedfalk, Kristina; Fischer, Gerhard; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin; Neutze, Richard

    2010-06-18

    Aquaporin-mediated water transport across cellular membranes is an ancient, ubiquitous mechanism within cell biology. This family of integral membrane proteins includes both water selective pores (aquaporins) and transport facilitators of other small molecules such as glycerol and urea (aquaglyceroporins). Eukaryotic aquaporins are frequently regulated post-translationally by gating, whereby the rate of flux through the channel is controlled, or by trafficking, whereby aquaporins are shuttled from intracellular storage sites to the plasma membrane. A number of high-resolution X-ray structures of eukaryotic aquaporins have recently been reported and the new structural insights into gating and trafficking that emerged from these studies are described. Basic structural themes reoccur, illustrating how the problem of regulation in diverse biological contexts builds upon a limited set of possible solutions. PMID:20416297

  20. Insights into conifer giga-genomes.

    PubMed

    De La Torre, Amanda R; Birol, Inanc; Bousquet, Jean; Ingvarsson, Pär K; Jansson, Stefan; Jones, Steven J M; Keeling, Christopher I; MacKay, John; Nilsson, Ove; Ritland, Kermit; Street, Nathaniel; Yanchuk, Alvin; Zerbe, Philipp; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2014-12-01

    Insights from sequenced genomes of major land plant lineages have advanced research in almost every aspect of plant biology. Until recently, however, assembled genome sequences of gymnosperms have been missing from this picture. Conifers of the pine family (Pinaceae) are a group of gymnosperms that dominate large parts of the world's forests. Despite their ecological and economic importance, conifers seemed long out of reach for complete genome sequencing, due in part to their enormous genome size (20-30 Gb) and the highly repetitive nature of their genomes. Technological advances in genome sequencing and assembly enabled the recent publication of three conifer genomes: white spruce (Picea glauca), Norway spruce (Picea abies), and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda). These genome sequences revealed distinctive features compared with other plant genomes and may represent a window into the past of seed plant genomes. This Update highlights recent advances, remaining challenges, and opportunities in light of the publication of the first conifer and gymnosperm genomes. PMID:25349325

  1. Insights into the evolution of lanthipeptide biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yi; Zhang, Qi; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2013-01-01

    Lanthipeptides are a group of posttranslationally modified peptide natural products that contain multiple thioether crosslinks. These crosslinks are formed by dehydration of Ser/Thr residues followed by addition of the thiols of Cys residues to the resulting dehydroamino acids. At least four different pathways to these polycyclic natural products have evolved, reflecting the high efficiency and evolvability of a posttranslational modification route to generate conformationally constrained peptides. The wealth of genomic information that has been made available in recent years has started to provide insights into how these remarkable pathways and their posttranslational modification machineries may have evolved. In this review, we discuss a model for the evolution of the lanthipeptide biosynthetic enzymes that has recently been developed based on the currently available data. PMID:24038659

  2. Understanding Spatial Genome Organization: Methods and Insights

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, Vijay; Shendure, Jay; Duan, Zhijun

    2016-01-01

    The manner by which eukaryotic genomes are packaged into nuclei while maintaining crucial nuclear functions remains one of the fundamental mysteries in biology. Over the last ten years, we have witnessed rapid advances in both microscopic and nucleic acid-based approaches to map genome architecture, and the application of these approaches to the dissection of higher-order chromosomal structures has yielded much new information. It is becoming increasingly clear, for example, that interphase chromosomes form stable, multilevel hierarchical structures. Among them, self-associating domains like so-called topologically associating domains (TADs) appear to be building blocks for large-scale genomic organization. This review describes features of these broadly-defined hierarchical structures, insights into the mechanisms underlying their formation, our current understanding of how interactions in the nuclear space are linked to gene regulation, and important future directions for the field. PMID:26876719

  3. Insights into enzymatic halogenation from computational studies

    PubMed Central

    Senn, Hans M.

    2014-01-01

    The halogenases are a group of enzymes that have only come to the fore over the last 10 years thanks to the discovery and characterization of several novel representatives. They have revealed the fascinating variety of distinct chemical mechanisms that nature utilizes to activate halogens and introduce them into organic substrates. Computational studies using a range of approaches have already elucidated many details of the mechanisms of these enzymes, often in synergistic combination with experiment. This Review summarizes the main insights gained from these studies. It also seeks to identify open questions that are amenable to computational investigations. The studies discussed herein serve to illustrate some of the limitations of the current computational approaches and the challenges encountered in computational mechanistic enzymology. PMID:25426489

  4. Insights into Mechanisms of Chronic Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Diack, Abigail B.; Alibhai, James D.; Barron, Rona; Bradford, Barry; Piccardo, Pedro; Manson, Jean C.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and prion diseases are characterised by the accumulation of abnormal conformers of a host encoded protein in the central nervous system. The process leading to neurodegeneration is still poorly defined and thus development of early intervention strategies is challenging. Unique amongst these diseases are Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs) or prion diseases, which have the ability to transmit between individuals. The infectious nature of these diseases has permitted in vivo and in vitro modelling of the time course of the disease process in a highly reproducible manner, thus early events can be defined. Recent evidence has demonstrated that the cell-to-cell spread of protein aggregates by a “prion-like mechanism” is common among the protein misfolding diseases. Thus, the TSE models may provide insights into disease mechanisms and testable hypotheses for disease intervention, applicable to a number of these chronic neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26771599

  5. Insights into the Specificity of Lysine Acetyltransferases*

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Alex C.; Taylor, Keenan C.; Rank, Katherine C.; Rayment, Ivan; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.

    2014-01-01

    Reversible lysine acetylation by protein acetyltransferases is a conserved regulatory mechanism that controls diverse cellular pathways. Gcn5-related N-acetyltransferases (GNATs), named after their founding member, are found in all domains of life. GNATs are known for their role as histone acetyltransferases, but non-histone bacterial protein acetytransferases have been identified. Only structures of GNAT complexes with short histone peptide substrates are available in databases. Given the biological importance of this modification and the abundance of lysine in polypeptides, how specificity is attained for larger protein substrates is central to understanding acetyl-lysine-regulated networks. Here we report the structure of a GNAT in complex with a globular protein substrate solved to 1.9 Å. GNAT binds the protein substrate with extensive surface interactions distinct from those reported for GNAT-peptide complexes. Our data reveal determinants needed for the recognition of a protein substrate and provide insight into the specificity of GNATs. PMID:25381442

  6. Advanced clinical insights & practice: ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Benner, Randall W; Zavarella, Matthew S

    2008-03-01

    This issue sees the debut of a new series of continuing education articles. The series, Advanced Clinical Insights & Practice, is designed to provide continuing education to an ever-expanding realm of paramedicine that needs more of it: the critical care transport paramedic. Secondly, and equally important, are the benefits that can be reaped by other certification levels reading this feature. For EMT-Basics and Intermediates, it will provide a great enhancement to your core knowledge, although most of the interventions discussed will be beyond your traditional scope. For paramedics, it will augment both your pathophysiological understanding and clinical assessment/management skills of diseases and injuries discussed. Ultimately though, it is hoped that anyone who reads these articles will become a better clinician. The next article will appear in the July issue. PMID:18814637

  7. Insights into software development in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Lorraine M.

    1992-01-01

    The interdependence of the U.S.-Japanese economies makes it imperative that we in the United States understand how business and technology developments take place in Japan. We can gain insight into these developments in software engineering by studying the context in which Japanese software is developed, the practices that are used, the problems encountered, the setting surrounding these problems, and the resolution of these problems. Context includes the technological and sociological characteristics of the software development environment, the software processes applied, personnel involved in the development process, and the corporate and social culture surrounding the development. Presented in this paper is a summary of results of a study that addresses these issues. Data for this study was collected during a three month visit to Japan where the author interviewed 20 software managers representing nine companies involved in developing software in Japan. These data are compared to similar data from the United States in which 12 managers from five companies were interviewed.

  8. Aha! experiences leave a mark: facilitated recall of insight solutions.

    PubMed

    Danek, Amory H; Fraps, Thomas; von Müller, Albrecht; Grothe, Benedikt; Ollinger, Michael

    2013-09-01

    The present study investigates a possible memory advantage for solutions that were reached through insightful problem solving. We hypothesized that insight solutions (with Aha! experience) would be remembered better than noninsight solutions (without Aha! experience). 34 video clips of magic tricks were presented to 50 participants as a novel problem-solving task, asking them to find out how the trick was achieved. Upon discovering the solution, participants had to indicate whether they had experienced insight during the solving process. After a delay of 14 days, a recall of solutions was conducted. Overall, 55 % of previously solved tricks were recalled correctly. Comparing insight and noninsight solutions, 64.4 % of all insight solutions were recalled correctly, whereas only 52.4 % of all noninsight solutions were recalled correctly. We interpret this finding as a facilitating effect of previous insight experiences on the recall of solutions. PMID:23007629

  9. Intertwining Risk Insights and Design Decisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornford, Steven L.; Feather, Martin S.; Jenkins, J. Steven

    2006-01-01

    The state of systems engineering is such that a form of early and continued use of risk assessments is conducted (as evidenced by NASA's adoption and use of the 'Continuous Risk Management' paradigm developed by SEI). ... However, these practices fall short of theideal: (1) Integration between risk assessment techniques and other systems engineering tools is weak. (2) Risk assessment techniques and the insights they yield are only informally coupled to design decisions. (3) Individual riskassessment techniques lack the mix of breadth, fidelity and agility required to span the gamut of the design space. In this paper we present an approach that addresses these shortcomings. The hallmark of our approach is a simple representation comprising objectives (what the system is to do), risks (whose occurrence would detract from attainment of objectives) and activities (a.k.a. 'mitigations') that, if performed, will decrease those risks. These are linked to indicate by how much a risk would detract from attainment of an objective, and by how much an activity would reduce a risk. The simplicity of our representational framework gives it the breadth to encompass the gamut of the design space concerns, the agility to be utilized in even the earliest phases of designs, and the capability to connect to system engineering models and higher-fidelity risk tools. It is through this integration that we address the shortcomings listed above, and so achieve the intertwining between risk insights and design decisions needed to guide systems engineering towards superior final designs while avoiding costly rework to achieve them. The paper will use an example, constructed to be representative of space mission design, to illustrate our approach.

  10. Transition boiling heat transfer and the film transition regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramilison, J. M.; Lienhard, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    The Berenson (1960) flat-plate transition-boiling experiment has been recreated with a reduced thermal resistance in the heater, and an improved access to those portions of the transition boiling regime that have a steep negative slope. Tests have been made in Freon-113, acetone, benzene, and n-pentane boiling on horizontal flat copper heaters that have been mirror-polished, 'roughened', or teflon-coated. The resulting data reproduce and clarify certain features observed by Berenson: the modest surface finish dependence of boiling burnout, and the influence of surface chemistry on both the minimum heat flux and the mode of transition boiling, for example. A rational scheme of correlation yields a prediction of the heat flux in what Witte and Lienhard (1982) previously identified as the 'film-transition boiling' region. It is also shown how to calculate the heat flux at the boundary between the pure-film, and the film-transition, boiling regimes, as a function of the advancing contact angle.

  11. The transition experience to pre-school for six families with children with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Podvey, Mara Cohen; Hinojosa, Jim; Koenig, Kristie

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to gain an understanding of how families receiving related therapy services experience the transition from early intervention to pre-school special education. Participants were six families with a child who received early intervention services and became eligible for pre-school special education services. Data was collected using in-depth interviews over 3 months. Grounded theory lead to theoretical insights and supported the development of three themes and a metatheme. 'Transition is scary', describes the families' feelings about the transition itself and their own perspectives of how their families fared. 'Therapy is central to progress, but not to transition', reflects how therapy remained central to their children's progress, but did not help families acclimate to the pre-school environment. 'Communication is key to comfort', expresses the importance of communication with all relevant parties. The metatheme 'The Outsiders' describes how the transition represents a significant status change for the family in terms of their involvement in their children's education, but also highlights the ways in which families continue to meet the needs of their children outside of the pre-school milieu. Findings suggest that families perceive the transition as difficult despite the presence of policies designed to make it easier for them. A deeper examination of policy and its influence on everyday practice related to the transition must occur to help reconcile the reasons for this difference. PMID:20652866

  12. A brain mechanism for facilitation of insight by positive affect.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Karuna; Kounios, John; Parrish, Todd B; Jung-Beeman, Mark

    2009-03-01

    Previous research has shown that people solve insight or creative problems better when in a positive mood (assessed or induced), although the precise mechanisms and neural substrates of this facilitation remain unclear. We assessed mood and personality variables in 79 participants before they attempted to solve problems that can be solved by either an insight or an analytic strategy. Participants higher in positive mood solved more problems, and specifically more with insight, compared with participants lower in positive mood. fMRI was performed on 27 of the participants while they solved problems. Positive mood (and to a lesser extent and in the opposite direction, anxiety) was associated with changes in brain activity during a preparatory interval preceding each solved problem; modulation of preparatory activity in several areas biased people to solve either with insight or analytically. Analyses examined whether (a) positive mood modulated activity in brain areas showing responsivity during preparation; (b) positive mood modulated activity in areas showing stronger activity for insight than noninsight trials either during preparation or solution; and (c) insight effects occurred in areas that showed mood-related effects during preparation. Across three analyses, the ACC showed sensitivity to both mood and insight, demonstrating that positive mood alters preparatory activity in ACC, biasing participants to engage in processing conducive to insight solving. This result suggests that positive mood enhances insight, at least in part, by modulating attention and cognitive control mechanisms via ACC, perhaps enhancing sensitivity to detect non-prepotent solution candidates. PMID:18578603

  13. INSIGHT AND SELF-STIGMA IN PATIENTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA.

    PubMed

    Vidović, Domagoj; Brecić, Petrana; Vilibić, Maja; Jukić, Vlado

    2016-03-01

    Poor insight and high level of self-stigma are often present among patients with schizophrenia and are related to poorer treatment adherence, poorer social function and rehabilitation, aggressive behavior, higher level of depression, social anxiety, lower quality of life and self-esteem. Reports on a relationship between insight and stigma are controversial. We examined the relationship of the level of insight and self-stigma in a sample of 149 patients with schizophrenia. Insight was measured with the Scale to assess Unawareness of Mental Disorder and self-stigma with the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness. Results showed 88.6% of the patients to have high or moderate insight, with a mean value of 2.73. General insight showed the highest level (2.58) and insight in positive symptoms the lowest level (2.9). The self-stigma score in general was 2.13, with stereotype endorsement being lowest (1.98). According to study results, 77.1% of patients felt minimal or low self-stigma across all subscales, except for stigma resistance subscale. Statistically significant correlation was found between insight and four subscales of self-stigma, while no correlation was found for the stigma resistance subscale only. These results imply the need of individually tailored antistigma and insight promoting programs for patients with schizophrenia. PMID:27333714

  14. Rural Agricultural Change and Fertility Transition in Nepal*

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Prem; Ghimire, Dirgha

    2013-01-01

    Using longitudinal panel data from the Western Chitwan Valley of Nepal, this study investigates the impact of the use of modern farm technologies on fertility transition—specifically, the number of births in a farm household. Previous explanations for the slow pace of fertility transition in rural agricultural settings often argued that the demand for farm labor is the primary driver of high fertility. If this argument holds true, the use of modern farm technologies that are designed to carry out labor-intensive farm activities ought to substitute for farm labor and discourage births in farm families. However, little empirical evidence is available on the potential influence of the use of modern farm technologies on the fertility transition. To fill this gap, the panel data examined in this study provides an unusual opportunity to test this long standing, but unexplored, argument. The results demonstrate that the use of modern farm technologies, particularly the use of a tractor and other modern farm implements, reduce subsequent births in farm households. This offers important insight for understanding the fertility transition in Nepal, a setting that is experiencing high population growth and rapidly changing farming practices. PMID:23729867

  15. A multinomial choice model approach for dynamic driver vision transitions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Hsuan; Wong, Jinn-Tsai

    2015-01-01

    Exploring the continual process of drivers allocating their attention under varying conditions could be vital for preventing motor vehicle crashes. This study aims to model visual behaviors and to estimate the effects of various contributing factors on driver's vision transitions. A visual attention allocation framework, based on certain contributing attributes related to driving tasks and environmental conditions, has been developed. The associated logit type models for determining driver choices for focal points were successfully formulated and estimated by using naturalistic glance data from the 100-car event database. The results offer insights into driver visual behavior and patterns of visual attention allocation. The three focal points that drivers most frequently rely on and glance at are the forward, left and rear view mirror. The sample drivers were less likely to demonstrate troublesome transition patterns, particularly in mentally demanding situations. Additionally, instead of shifting vision directly between two non-forward focal points, the sample drivers frequently had an intermediate forward glance. Thus, seemingly unrelated paths could be grouped into explanatory patterns of driver attention allocation. Finally, in addition to the vision-transition patterns, the potential pitfalls of such patterns and possible countermeasures to improving safety are illustrated, focusing on situations when drivers are distracted, traveling at high speeds and approaching intersections. PMID:25463950

  16. Simulating Exoplanet Transit and Eclipse Observations with JWST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Tom

    2011-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be a nearly ideal machine for acquiring the transmission and emission spectra of transiting exoplanets over its large wavelength range 0.7 - 28 microns. The NIRSpec, NIRCam, nTFI, and MIRI instruments will have spectroscopic capabilities that span spectral resolutions from 20 - 3000 and can cover up to 2 - 3 octaves in wavelength simultaneously. This will allow observing multiple molecular features at once, facilitating the separation of atmospheric temperature and abundance effects on spectra. Many transiting planets will also be able to be observed with both transmission and eclipse spectroscopy, providing further insights and constraints on planetary thermal structures and energy transport. Simulated JWST spectra of planets ranging from mini-Neptunes to gas giants will be presented. These simulations include planets ranging from mini-Neptunes to gas giants will be presented. These simulations include current best estimates of actual instrument throughput, resolution, spectral range, systematic noise, and random noise terms. They show that JWST will be able to determine the atmospheric parameters of a wide variety of planets, often when observing only one or a few transit or eclipse event sequences. The thermal emissions of rocky super-Earths will also be quickly detectable via mid-IR eclipse observations if such planets are found around nearby M star hosts beforehand.

  17. Bridging analytical approaches for low-carbon transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geels, Frank W.; Berkhout, Frans; van Vuuren, Detlef P.

    2016-06-01

    Low-carbon transitions are long-term multi-faceted processes. Although integrated assessment models have many strengths for analysing such transitions, their mathematical representation requires a simplification of the causes, dynamics and scope of such societal transformations. We suggest that integrated assessment model-based analysis should be complemented with insights from socio-technical transition analysis and practice-based action research. We discuss the underlying assumptions, strengths and weaknesses of these three analytical approaches. We argue that full integration of these approaches is not feasible, because of foundational differences in philosophies of science and ontological assumptions. Instead, we suggest that bridging, based on sequential and interactive articulation of different approaches, may generate a more comprehensive and useful chain of assessments to support policy formation and action. We also show how these approaches address knowledge needs of different policymakers (international, national and local), relate to different dimensions of policy processes and speak to different policy-relevant criteria such as cost-effectiveness, socio-political feasibility, social acceptance and legitimacy, and flexibility. A more differentiated set of analytical approaches thus enables a more differentiated approach to climate policy making.

  18. Transition to turbulence in Taylor-Couette ferrofluidic flow

    PubMed Central

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    It is known that in classical fluids turbulence typically occurs at high Reynolds numbers. But can turbulence occur at low Reynolds numbers? Here we investigate the transition to turbulence in the classic Taylor-Couette system in which the rotating fluids are manufactured ferrofluids with magnetized nanoparticles embedded in liquid carriers. We find that, in the presence of a magnetic field transverse to the symmetry axis of the system, turbulence can occur at Reynolds numbers that are at least one order of magnitude smaller than those in conventional fluids. This is established by extensive computational ferrohydrodynamics through a detailed investigation of transitions in the flow structure, and characterization of behaviors of physical quantities such as the energy, the wave number, and the angular momentum through the bifurcations. A finding is that, as the magnetic field is increased, onset of turbulence can be determined accurately and reliably. Our results imply that experimental investigation of turbulence may be feasible by using ferrofluids. Our study of transition to and evolution of turbulence in the Taylor-Couette ferrofluidic flow system provides insights into the challenging problem of turbulence control. PMID:26065572

  19. Transition to turbulence in Taylor-Couette ferrofluidic flow.

    PubMed

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    It is known that in classical fluids turbulence typically occurs at high Reynolds numbers. But can turbulence occur at low Reynolds numbers? Here we investigate the transition to turbulence in the classic Taylor-Couette system in which the rotating fluids are manufactured ferrofluids with magnetized nanoparticles embedded in liquid carriers. We find that, in the presence of a magnetic field transverse to the symmetry axis of the system, turbulence can occur at Reynolds numbers that are at least one order of magnitude smaller than those in conventional fluids. This is established by extensive computational ferrohydrodynamics through a detailed investigation of transitions in the flow structure, and characterization of behaviors of physical quantities such as the energy, the wave number, and the angular momentum through the bifurcations. A finding is that, as the magnetic field is increased, onset of turbulence can be determined accurately and reliably. Our results imply that experimental investigation of turbulence may be feasible by using ferrofluids. Our study of transition to and evolution of turbulence in the Taylor-Couette ferrofluidic flow system provides insights into the challenging problem of turbulence control. PMID:26065572

  20. Pseudopotentials for quantum Monte Carlo calculations of transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogel, Jaron; Santana, Juan; Kent, Paul; Reboredo, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of transition metal oxides are partially limited by the availability of high quality pseudopotentials that are both accurate in QMC and compatible with major electronic structure codes, e.g. by not being overly hard in the standard planewave basis. Following insight gained from recent GW calculations, a set of neon core pseudopotentials with small cutoff radii have been created for the early transition metal elements Sc to Zn within the local density approximation of DFT. The pseudopotentials have been tested for energy consistency within QMC by calculating the first through fourth ionization potentials of the isolated transition metal (TM) atoms and the binding curve of each TM-O dimer. The vast majority of the ionization potentials fall within 0.3 eV of the experimental values, with exceptions occurring mainly for atoms with multiple unpaired d electrons where multireference effects are the strongest. The equilibrium bond lengths of the dimers are within 1% of experimental values and the binding energy errors are typically less than 0.3 eV. Given the uniform treatment of the core, the larger deviations occasionally observed may primarily reflect the limitations of a Slater-Jastrow trial wavefunction. This work is supported by the Materials Sciences & Engineering Division of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. DOE. Research by PRCK was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.