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Sample records for rotating wave approximation

  1. Pulse design without the rotating-wave approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, S.; Li, Yi-Chao; Chen, Xi; Muga, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    We design realizable time-dependent semiclassical pulses to invert the population of a two-level system faster than adiabatically when the rotating-wave approximation cannot be applied. Different approaches, based on the counterdiabatic method or on invariants, may lead to singularities in the pulse functions. Ways to avoid or cancel the singularities are put forward when the pulse spans few oscillations. For many oscillations an alternative numerical minimization method is proposed and demonstrated.

  2. Quantum anti-Zeno effect without rotating wave approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Ai Qing; Sun, C. P.; Li Yong; Zheng Hang

    2010-04-15

    In this article, we systematically study the spontaneous decay phenomenon of a two-level system under the influences of both its environment and repetitive measurements. In order to clarify some well-established conclusions about the quantum Zeno effect (QZE) and the quantum anti-Zeno effect (QAZE), we do not use the rotating wave approximation (RWA) in obtaining an effective Hamiltonian. We examine various spectral distributions by making use of our present approach in comparison with other approaches. It is found that with respect to a bare excited state even without the RWA, the QAZE can still happen for some cases, for example, the interacting spectra of hydrogen. However, for a physical excited state, which is a renormalized dressed state of the atomic state, the QAZE disappears and only the QZE remains. These discoveries inevitably show a transition from the QZE to the QAZE as the measurement interval changes.

  3. Symmetric rotating-wave approximation for the generalized single-mode spin-boson system

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Victor V.; Scholes, Gregory D.; Brumer, Paul

    2011-10-15

    The single-mode spin-boson model exhibits behavior not included in the rotating-wave approximation (RWA) in the ultra and deep-strong coupling regimes, where counter-rotating contributions become important. We introduce a symmetric rotating-wave approximation that treats rotating and counter-rotating terms equally, preserves the invariances of the Hamiltonian with respect to its parameters, and reproduces several qualitative features of the spin-boson spectrum not present in the original rotating-wave approximation both off-resonance and at deep-strong coupling. The symmetric rotating-wave approximation allows for the treatment of certain ultra- and deep-strong coupling regimes with similar accuracy and mathematical simplicity as does the RWA in the weak-coupling regime. Additionally, we symmetrize the generalized form of the rotating-wave approximation to obtain the same qualitative correspondence with the addition of improved quantitative agreement with the exact numerical results. The method is readily extended to higher accuracy if needed. Finally, we introduce the two-photon parity operator for the two-photon Rabi Hamiltonian and obtain its generalized symmetric rotating-wave approximation. The existence of this operator reveals a parity symmetry similar to that in the Rabi Hamiltonian as well as another symmetry that is unique to the two-photon case, providing insight into the mathematical structure of the two-photon spectrum, significantly simplifying the numerics, and revealing some interesting dynamical properties.

  4. Analytical treatment of the continuous wave driving of a two-level atom without making the rotating wave approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Chris; Scully, Marlan O.

    2016-01-01

    In a straightforward manner, we utilize Floquet theory and adiabatic elimination to derive an analytic expression for a monochromatically driven two-level atom, without making the rotating wave approximation. We show that the counter-rotating terms dropped in the rotating wave approximation are responsible for three major effects. First an ac-Stark phase shift of the driven transition, second increased excited state population from far-detuned driving of the Lorentzian line, and third extra frequencies in the population dynamics that result in "wiggles." The analytic result agrees well with numerical simultations over a wide range of parameters.

  5. Dynamics of Jaynes-Cummings Model in the Absence of Rotating-Wave Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yun-Xia; Liu, Tao; Feng, Mang; Wang, Ke-Lin

    2007-05-01

    The Jaynes-Cummings model (JCM) is studied in the absence of the rotating-wave approximation (RWA) by a coherent-state expansion technique. In comparison with the previous paper in which the coherent-state expansion was performed only to the third order, we carry out in this paper a complete expansion to demonstrate exactly the dynamics of the JCM without the RWA. Our study gives a systematic method to solve the non-RWA problem, which would be useful in various physical systems, e.g., in a system with an ultracold trapped ion experiencing the running waves of lasers.

  6. Quantum speed limits in open systems: Non-Markovian dynamics without rotating-wave approximation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhe; Liu, Jing; Ma, Jian; Wang, Xiaoguang

    2015-01-01

    We derive an easily computable quantum speed limit (QSL) time bound for open systems whose initial states can be chosen as either pure or mixed states. Moreover, this QSL time is applicable to either Markovian or non-Markovian dynamics. By using of a hierarchy equation method, we numerically study the QSL time bound in a qubit system interacting with a single broadened cavity mode without rotating-wave, Born and Markovian approximation. By comparing with rotating-wave approximation (RWA) results, we show that the counter-rotating terms are helpful to increase evolution speed. The problem of non-Markovianity is also considered. We find that for non-RWA cases, increasing system-bath coupling can not always enhance the non-Markovianity, which is qualitatively different from the results with RWA. When considering the relation between QSL and non-Markovianity, we find that for small broadening widths of the cavity mode, non-Markovianity can increase the evolution speed in either RWA or non-RWA cases, while, for larger broadening widths, it is not true for non-RWA cases. PMID:25676589

  7. Atom-field entanglement in the Jaynes-Cummings model without rotating wave approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaee, M.; Batavani, M.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we present a structure for obtaining the exact eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the Jaynes-Cummings model (JCM) without the rotating wave approximation (RWA). We study the evolution of the system in the strong coupling region using the time evolution operator without RWA. The entanglement of the system without RWA is investigated using the Von Neumann entropy as an entanglement measure. It is interesting that in the weak coupling regime, the population of the atomic levels and Von Neumann entropy without RWA model shows a good agreement with the RWA whereas in strong coupling domain, the results of these two models are quite different.

  8. Cavity losses for the dissipative Jaynes Cummings Hamiltonian beyond rotating wave approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scala, M.; Militello, B.; Messina, A.; Maniscalco, S.; Piilo, J.; Suominen, K.-A.

    2007-11-01

    A microscopic derivation of the master equation for the Jaynes-Cummings model with cavity losses is given, taking into account the terms in the dissipator which vary with frequencies of the order of the vacuum Rabi frequency. Our approach allows us to single out physical contexts wherein the usual phenomenological dissipator turns out to be fully justified and constitutes an extension of our previous analysis (Scala et al 2007 Phys. Rev. A 75 013811), where a microscopic derivation was given in the framework of the rotating wave approximation.

  9. Coupling of exciton-polaritons in low-Q coupled microcavities beyond the rotating wave approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Rai, Prabin; Grezmak, John; Twieg, Robert J.; Singer, Kenneth D.

    2015-10-01

    We have demonstrated coupling between a pair of ultrastrong light-matter coupled microcavities composed of neat glassy organic dye films between metallic (silver) mirrors at room temperature. Based upon our modified coupled oscillator model, we have observed that the degeneracy between the Rabi splittings associated with the symmetric and antisymmetric cavity modes is broken by the higher-order antiresonant terms in the Hamiltonian associated with the breakdown of the rotating wave approximation in the ultrastrong coupling regime. These results are in quantitative agreement with both experiment and transfer matrix modeling. The component cavities are characterized by Q factors around 12 and display a large vacuum Rabi splitting around 1.12 eV between the upper and lower polariton branches, which is about 52 % of the excited state energy, thus indicating ultrastrong coupling in each individual cavity. This large splitting is due to the large oscillator strength of the neat dye glass. We have also observed large polariton-induced incidence-side asymmetry in reflection spectra in a coupled cavity pair with one cavity having no exciton.

  10. Fast control of semiconductor qubits beyond the rotating-wave approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang; Kestner, J. P.; Wang, Xin; Das Sarma, S.

    2016-07-01

    We present a theoretical study of single-qubit operations by oscillatory fields on various semiconductor platforms. We explicitly show how to perform faster gate operations by going beyond the universally used rotating-wave approximation (RWA) regime, while using only two sinusoidal pulses. We first show for specific published experiments how much error is currently incurred by implementing pulses designed using standard RWA. We then show that an even modest increase in gate speed would cause problems in using RWA for gate design in the singlet-triplet (ST) and resonant-exchange (RX) qubits. We discuss the extent to which analytically keeping higher orders in the perturbation theory would address the problem. More strikingly, we give a new prescription for gating with strong coupling far beyond the RWA regime. We perform numerical calculations for the phases and the durations of two consecutive pulses to realize the key Hadamard and π/8 gates with coupling strengths up to several times the qubit splitting. Working in this manifestly non-RWA regime, the gate operation speeds up by two to three orders of magnitude and nears the quantum speed limit without requiring complicated pulse shaping or optimal control sequences.

  11. Entanglement dynamics of two independent Jaynes-Cummings atoms without the rotating-wave approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qinghu; Yang Yuan; Liu Tao; Wang Kelin

    2010-11-15

    Entanglement evolution of two independent Jaynes-Cummings atoms without the rotating-wave approximation (RWA) is studied by a numerically exact approach. Previous results based on the RWA are essentially modified in the strong-coupling regime (g{>=}0.1), which has been reached in the recent experiments on the flux qubit coupled to the LC resonator. For the initial Bell state with anticorrelated spins, entanglement sudden death (ESD) is absent in the RWA but does appear in the present numerical calculation without the RWA. Aperiodic entanglement evolution in the strong-coupling regime is observed. The strong atom-cavity coupling facilitates the ESD. The sign of the detuning plays an essential role in the entanglement evolution for strong coupling, which is irrelevant in the RWA. Analytical results based on an unitary transformation are also given, which could not modify the RWA picture essentially. It is suggested that the activation of the photons may be the origin of ESD in this system.

  12. Fano-Agarwal couplings and non-rotating wave approximation in single-photon timed Dicke subradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Imran M.; Begzjav, Tuguldur

    2016-04-01

    Recently a new class of single-photon timed Dicke (TD) subradiant states has been introduced with possible applications in single-photon–based quantum information storage and on demand ultrafast retrieval (Scully M. O., Phys. Rev. Lett., 115 (2015) 243602). However, the influence of any kind of virtual processes on the decay of these new kind of subradiant states has been left as an open question. In the present paper, we focus on this problem in detail. In particular, we investigate how pure Fano-Agarwal couplings and other virtual processes arising from non-rotating wave approximation impact the decay of otherwise sub- and superradiant states. In addition to the overall virtual couplings among all TD states, we also focus on the dominant role played by the couplings between specific TD states.

  13. Parallel SVD updating using approximate rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetze, Juergen; Rieder, Peter; Nossek, J. A.

    1995-06-01

    In this paper a parallel implementation of the SVD-updating algorithm using approximate rotations is presented. In its original form the SVD-updating algorithm had numerical problems if no reorthogonalization steps were applied. Representing the orthogonalmatrix V (right singular vectors) using its parameterization in terms of the rotation angles of n(n - 1)/2 plane rotations these reorthogonalization steps can be avoided during the SVD-updating algorithm. This results in a SVD-updating algorithm where all computations (matrix vector multiplication, QRD-updating, Kogbetliantz's algorithm) are entirely based on the evaluation and application of orthogonal plane rotations. Therefore, in this form the SVD-updating algorithm is amenable to an implementation using CORDIC-based approximate rotations. Using CORDIC-based approximate rotations the n(n - 1)/2 rotations representing V (as well as all other rotations) are only computed to a certain approximation accuracy (in the basis arctan 2i). All necessary computations required during the SVD-updating algorithm (exclusively rotations) are executed with the same accuracy, i.e., only r << w (w: wordlength) elementary orthonormal (mu) rotations are used per plane rotation. Simulations show the efficiency of the implementation using CORDIC-based approximate rotations.

  14. Rotational waves in geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerus, Artyom; Vikulin, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The rotation model of a geoblock with intrinsic momentum was constructed by A.V. Vikulin and A.G. Ivanchin [9, 10] to describe seismicity within the Pacific Ocean margin. It is based on the idea of a rotational motion of geoblocks as the parts of the rotating body of the Earth that generates rotary deformation waves. The law of the block motion was derived in the form of the sine-Gordon equation (SG) [5, 9]; the dimensionless form of the equation is: δ2θ δ2θ δξ2 - δη2 = sinθ, (1) where θ = β/2, ξ = k0z and η = v0k0t are dimensionless coordinates, z - length of the chain of masses (blocks), t - time, β - turn angle, ν0 - representative velocity of the process, k0 - wave number. Another case analyzed was a chain of nonuniformly rotating blocks, with deviation of force moments from equilibrium positions μ, considering friction forces α along boundaries, which better matched a real-life seismic process. As a result, the authors obtained the law of motion for a block in a chain in the form of the modified SG equation [8]: δ2θ δ2θ δθ- δξ2 - δ η2 = sin θ+ α δη + μδ(ξ)sin θ (2)

  15. Finite-time Landau-Zener processes and counterdiabatic driving in open systems: Beyond Born, Markov, and rotating-wave approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhe; Zhou, Longwen; Xiao, Gaoyang; Poletti, Dario; Gong, Jiangbin

    2016-01-01

    We investigate Landau-Zener processes modeled by a two-level quantum system, with its finite bias energy varied in time and in the presence of a single broadened cavity mode at zero temperature. By applying the hierarchy equation method to the Landau-Zener problem, we computationally study the survival fidelity of adiabatic states without Born, Markov, rotating-wave, or other perturbative approximations. With this treatment it also becomes possible to investigate cases with very strong system-bath coupling. Different from a previous study of infinite-time Landau-Zener processes, the fidelity of the time-evolving state as compared with instantaneous adiabatic states shows nonmonotonic dependence on the system-bath coupling and on the sweep rate of the bias. We then consider the effect of applying a counterdiabatic driving field, which is found to be useful in improving the fidelity only for sufficiently short Landau-Zener processes. Numerically exact results show that different counterdiabatic driving fields can have very different robustness against environment effects. Lastly, using a case study, we discuss the possibility of introducing a dynamical decoupling field in order to eliminate the decoherence effect of the environment and, at the same time, to retain the positive role of a counterdiabatic field. Our work indicates that finite-time Landau-Zener processes with counterdiabatic driving offer a fruitful testbed to understand controlled adiabatic processes in open systems.

  16. Drift waves in rotating plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Liu, J.

    1983-09-01

    The stability of the electron drift wave is investigated in the presence of E x B plasma rotation typical of the central cell plasma in tandem mirrors. It is shown that a rotationally-driven drift wave may occur at low azimuthal mode numbers. Conditions for rotational instabilities are derived. Quasilinear formulas are given for the anomalous transport associated with the unstable fluctuations.

  17. Blast waves in rotating media.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossner, L. F.

    1972-01-01

    The model investigated involves a cylindrically symmetric blast wave generated by an infinitely long line explosion in a cold and homogeneous gas rotating rigidly in its self-gravitational field. It is found that within the context of rotation in a gravitational field a blast wave will not adopt the one-zone form familiar from similarity solutions but, rather, a two-zone form. The inner compression zone arises as a response to the presence of the restoring force, which drives a rarefaction wave into the outer compression zone.

  18. Constant Density Approximations for the Flow Behind Axisymmetric Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munson, Albert G.

    1961-01-01

    The incompressible rotational flow equations are used to obtain solutions for the flow behind axisymmetric shock waves with conic longitudinal sections. The nonlinear part of the term due to rotation is retained in the analysis. Numerical results for standoff distance and stagnation point velocity gradient are presented for the case in which the shock wave is a paraboloid, a sphere, or an oblate or prolate ellipsoid. A similarity parameter is proposed which correlates approximately the flow behind geometrically similar shock waves at different free-stream conditions.

  19. Wave-driven Rotation in Supersonically Rotating Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-15

    Supersonic rotation in mirrors may be produced by radio frequency waves. The waves produce coupled diffusion in ion kinetic and potential energy. A population inversion along the diffusion path then produces rotation. Waves may be designed to exploit a natural kinetic energy source or may provide the rotation energy on their own. Centrifugal traps for fusion and isotope separation may benefit from this wave-driven rotation.

  20. Slowly rotating scalar field wormholes: The second order approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kashargin, P. E.; Sushkov, S. V.

    2008-09-15

    We discuss rotating wormholes in general relativity with a scalar field with negative kinetic energy. To solve the problem, we use the assumption about slow rotation. The role of a small dimensionless parameter plays the ratio of the linear velocity of rotation of the wormhole's throat and the velocity of light. We construct the rotating wormhole solution in the second-order approximation with respect to the small parameter. The analysis shows that the asymptotical mass of the rotating wormhole is greater than that of the nonrotating one, and the null energy condition violation in the rotating wormhole spacetime is weaker than that in the nonrotating one.

  1. Dust waves in rotating planetary magnetospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Q.; Saleem, H.

    2005-10-31

    Low frequency electrostatic drift and acoustic waves are studied in rotating dusty plasmas. Linear dispersion relation is found. It is pointed out that rotation of the planet can introduce dust drift waves through Coriolis force in the planetary magnetospheres. This mode can couple with dust acoustic mode. Coriolis force effect may give rise to dipolar vortices in rotating dusty plasmas of planetary magnetospheres.

  2. Molecular collisions 21: Semiclassical approximation to atom-symmetric top rotational excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, D.; Curtiss, C. F.

    1973-01-01

    A distorted wave approximation to the T matrix for atom-symmetric top scattering was developed. The approximation is correct to first order in the part of the interaction potential responsible for transitions in the component of rotational angular momentum along the symmetry axis of the top. A semiclassical expression for this T matrix is derived by assuming large values of orbital and rotational angular momentum quantum numbers.

  3. Detecting Gravitational Waves using Pade Approximants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, E. K.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    1998-12-01

    We look at the use of Pade Approximants in defining a metric tensor for the inspiral waveform template manifold. By using this method we investigate the curvature of the template manifold and the number of templates needed to carry out a realistic search for a Gravitational Wave signal. By comparing this method with the normal use of Taylor Approximant waveforms we hope to show that (a) Pade Approximants are a superior method for calculating the inspiral waveform, and (b) the number of search templates needed, and hence computing power, is reduced.

  4. Wave-Driven Rotation In Centrifugal Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-03-28

    Centrifugal mirrors use supersonic rotation to provide axial confinement and enhanced stability. Usually the rotation is produced using electrodes, but these electrodes have limited the rotation to the Alfven critical ionization velocity, which is too slow to be useful for fusion. Instead, the rotation could be produced using radio frequency waves. A fixed azimuthal ripple is a simple and efficient wave that could produce rotation by harnessing alpha particle energy. This is an extension of the alpha channeling effect. The alpha particle power and efficiency in a simulated devices is sufficient to produce rotation without external energy input. By eliminating the need for electrodes, this opens new opportunities for centrifugal traps.

  5. Molecular collisions. 11: Semiclassical approximation to atom-symmetric top rotational excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, D.; Curtiss, C. F.

    1973-01-01

    In a paper of this series a distorted wave approximation to the T matrix for atom-symmetric top scattering was developed which is correct to first order in the part of the interaction potential responsible for transitions in the component of rotational angular momentum along the symmetry axis of the top. A semiclassical expression for this T matrix is derived by assuming large values of orbital and rotational angular momentum quantum numbers.

  6. Generalized stationary phase approximations for mountain waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, H.; Broutman, D.; Eckermann, S. D.

    2016-04-01

    Large altitude asymptotic approximations are derived for vertical displacements due to mountain waves generated by hydrostatic wind flow over arbitrary topography. This leads to new asymptotic analytic expressions for wave-induced vertical displacement for mountains with an elliptical Gaussian shape and with the major axis oriented at any angle relative to the background wind. The motivation is to understand local maxima in vertical displacement amplitude at a given height for elliptical mountains aligned at oblique angles to the wind direction, as identified in Eckermann et al. ["Effects of horizontal geometrical spreading on the parameterization of orographic gravity-wave drag. Part 1: Numerical transform solutions," J. Atmos. Sci. 72, 2330-2347 (2015)]. The standard stationary phase method reproduces one type of local amplitude maximum that migrates downwind with increasing altitude. Another type of local amplitude maximum stays close to the vertical axis over the center of the mountain, and a new generalized stationary phase method is developed to describe this other type of local amplitude maximum and the horizontal variation of wave-induced vertical displacement near the vertical axis of the mountain in the large altitude limit. The new generalized stationary phase method describes the asymptotic behavior of integrals where the asymptotic parameter is raised to two different powers (1/2 and 1) rather than just one power as in the standard stationary phase method. The vertical displacement formulas are initially derived assuming a uniform background wind but are extended to accommodate both vertical shear with a fixed wind direction and vertical variations in the buoyancy frequency.

  7. On the effects of permanent molecular dipole moments in two-photon molecular excitations: an analytic generalized rotating wave approximation treatment including both the direct permanent dipole and the virtual state excitation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meath, William J.; Jagatap, B. N.

    2011-10-01

    One of the purposes of this paper is to develop an analytical many-level generalized rotating wave approximation (GRWA), including the effects of permanent dipoles, for the excitation of many-level molecules through the simultaneous absorption of two photons. Included are expressions for the two-photon laser-molecule coupling C, and its two components Cd and Cv corresponding to the direct permanent dipole and the virtual state excitation mechanisms, respectively, and related observables such as the time-dependent populations of the initial and final states of the excitation process and resonance profiles. This GRWA treatment also includes an energy shift parameter ɛ, which causes shifts in the position of the resonance energy as the laser intensity increases. The effects of permanent dipoles are very different in Cv and ɛ versus Cd. These effects have been discussed previously for Cd using analytic two-level RWA approaches. The analytical results for Cv and ɛ obtained here are new as is their use in discussing the influence of permanent dipoles in the parts of the two-photon excitation process involving virtual states. In the absence of permanent dipoles Cd is zero whereas Cv and ɛ are not; they equal the corresponding perturbation theory results. The GRWA and perturbative results are related by Bessel function damping functions which, for dipolar molecules, damp out the divergence of the perturbative results as the laser intensity increases. Illustrative examples are given for a two-photon excitation involving a model chromophore which has a significant virtual state contribution through both the laser-molecule coupling and the energy shift parameter.

  8. Magnetized stratified rotating shear waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salhi, A.; Lehner, T.; Godeferd, F.; Cambon, C.

    2012-02-01

    We present a spectral linear analysis in terms of advected Fourier modes to describe the behavior of a fluid submitted to four constraints: shear (with rate S), rotation (with angular velocity Ω), stratification, and magnetic field within the linear spectral theory or the shearing box model in astrophysics. As a consequence of the fact that the base flow must be a solution of the Euler-Boussinesq equations, only radial and/or vertical density gradients can be taken into account. Ertel's theorem no longer is valid to show the conservation of potential vorticity, in the presence of the Lorentz force, but a similar theorem can be applied to a potential magnetic induction: The scalar product of the density gradient by the magnetic field is a Lagrangian invariant for an inviscid and nondiffusive fluid. The linear system with a minimal number of solenoidal components, two for both velocity and magnetic disturbance fields, is eventually expressed as a four-component inhomogeneous linear differential system in which the buoyancy scalar is a combination of solenoidal components (variables) and the (constant) potential magnetic induction. We study the stability of such a system for both an infinite streamwise wavelength (k1=0, axisymmetric disturbances) and a finite one (k1≠0, nonaxisymmetric disturbances). In the former case (k1=0), we recover and extend previous results characterizing the magnetorotational instability (MRI) for combined effects of radial and vertical magnetic fields and combined effects of radial and vertical density gradients. We derive an expression for the MRI growth rate in terms of the stratification strength, which indicates that purely radial stratification can inhibit the MRI instability, while purely vertical stratification cannot completely suppress the MRI instability. In the case of nonaxisymmetric disturbances (k1≠0), we only consider the effect of vertical stratification, and we use Levinson's theorem to demonstrate the stability of the

  9. Magnetized stratified rotating shear waves.

    PubMed

    Salhi, A; Lehner, T; Godeferd, F; Cambon, C

    2012-02-01

    We present a spectral linear analysis in terms of advected Fourier modes to describe the behavior of a fluid submitted to four constraints: shear (with rate S), rotation (with angular velocity Ω), stratification, and magnetic field within the linear spectral theory or the shearing box model in astrophysics. As a consequence of the fact that the base flow must be a solution of the Euler-Boussinesq equations, only radial and/or vertical density gradients can be taken into account. Ertel's theorem no longer is valid to show the conservation of potential vorticity, in the presence of the Lorentz force, but a similar theorem can be applied to a potential magnetic induction: The scalar product of the density gradient by the magnetic field is a Lagrangian invariant for an inviscid and nondiffusive fluid. The linear system with a minimal number of solenoidal components, two for both velocity and magnetic disturbance fields, is eventually expressed as a four-component inhomogeneous linear differential system in which the buoyancy scalar is a combination of solenoidal components (variables) and the (constant) potential magnetic induction. We study the stability of such a system for both an infinite streamwise wavelength (k(1) = 0, axisymmetric disturbances) and a finite one (k(1) ≠ 0, nonaxisymmetric disturbances). In the former case (k(1) = 0), we recover and extend previous results characterizing the magnetorotational instability (MRI) for combined effects of radial and vertical magnetic fields and combined effects of radial and vertical density gradients. We derive an expression for the MRI growth rate in terms of the stratification strength, which indicates that purely radial stratification can inhibit the MRI instability, while purely vertical stratification cannot completely suppress the MRI instability. In the case of nonaxisymmetric disturbances (k(1) ≠ 0), we only consider the effect of vertical stratification, and we use Levinson's theorem to demonstrate the

  10. Wave-particle Interactions In Rotating Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-01-11

    Wave-particle interactions in E×B rotating plasmas feature an unusual effect: particles are diffused by waves in both potential energy and kinetic energy. This wave-particle interaction generalizes the alpha channeling effect, in which radio frequency waves are used to remove alpha particles collisionlessly at low energy. In rotating plasmas, the alpha particles may be removed at low energy through the loss cone, and the energy lost may be transferred to the radial electric field. This eliminates the need for electrodes in the mirror throat, which have presented serious technical issues in past rotating plasma devices. A particularly simple way to achieve this effect is to use a high azimuthal mode number perturbation on the magnetic field. Rotation can also be sustained by waves in plasmas without a kinetic energy source. This type of wave has been considered for plasma centrifuges used for isotope separation. Energy may also be transferred from the electric field to particles or waves, which may be useful for ion heating and energy generation.

  11. Gravitational wave burst signal from core collapse of rotating stars

    SciTech Connect

    Dimmelmeier, Harald; Ott, Christian D.; Marek, Andreas; Janka, H.-Thomas

    2008-09-15

    We present results from detailed general relativistic simulations of stellar core collapse to a proto-neutron star, using two different microphysical nonzero-temperature nuclear equations of state as well as an approximate description of deleptonization during the collapse phase. Investigating a wide variety of rotation rates and profiles as well as masses of the progenitor stars and both equations of state, we confirm in this very general setup the recent finding that a generic gravitational wave burst signal is associated with core bounce, already known as type I in the literature. The previously suggested type II (or 'multiple-bounce') waveform morphology does not occur. Despite this reduction to a single waveform type, we demonstrate that it is still possible to constrain the progenitor and postbounce rotation based on a combination of the maximum signal amplitude and the peak frequency of the emitted gravitational wave burst. Our models include to sufficient accuracy the currently known necessary physics for the collapse and bounce phase of core-collapse supernovae, yielding accurate and reliable gravitational wave signal templates for gravitational wave data analysis. In addition, we assess the possibility of nonaxisymmetric instabilities in rotating nascent proto-neutron stars. We find strong evidence that in an iron core-collapse event the postbounce core cannot reach sufficiently rapid rotation to become subject to a classical bar-mode instability. However, many of our postbounce core models exhibit sufficiently rapid and differential rotation to become subject to the recently discovered dynamical instability at low rotation rates.

  12. Inertial modes of rigidly rotating neutron stars in Cowling approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kastaun, Wolfgang

    2008-06-15

    In this article, we investigate inertial modes of rigidly rotating neutron stars, i.e. modes for which the Coriolis force is dominant. This is done using the assumption of a fixed spacetime (Cowling approximation). We present frequencies and eigenfunctions for a sequence of stars with a polytropic equation of state, covering a broad range of rotation rates. The modes were obtained with a nonlinear general relativistic hydrodynamic evolution code. We further show that the eigenequations for the oscillation modes can be written in a particularly simple form for the case of arbitrary fast but rigid rotation. Using these equations, we investigate some general characteristics of inertial modes, which are then compared to the numerically obtained eigenfunctions. In particular, we derive a rough analytical estimate for the frequency as a function of the number of nodes of the eigenfunction, and find that a similar empirical relation matches the numerical results with unexpected accuracy. We investigate the slow rotation limit of the eigenequations, obtaining two different sets of equations describing pressure and inertial modes. For the numerical computations we only considered axisymmetric modes, while the analytic part also covers nonaxisymmetric modes. The eigenfunctions suggest that the classification of inertial modes by the quantum numbers of the leading term of a spherical harmonic decomposition is artificial in the sense that the largest term is not strongly dominant, even in the slow rotation limit. The reason for the different structure of pressure and inertial modes is that the Coriolis force remains important in the slow rotation limit only for inertial modes. Accordingly, the scalar eigenequation we obtain in that limit is spherically symmetric for pressure modes, but not for inertial modes.

  13. On Plasma Rotation Induced by Traveling Fast Alfvin Waves

    SciTech Connect

    F.W. Perkins; R.B. White; and V.S. Chan

    2001-08-09

    Absorption of fast Alfven waves by the minority fundamental ion-cyclotron resonance, coupled with finite banana width physics, generates torque distributions and ultimately rotational shear layers in the bulk plasma, even when the toroidal wavenumber k(subscript ''phi'') = n/R of the fast wave vanishes (n=0) and cyclotron absorption introduces no angular momentum nor canonical angular momentum [F.W. Perkins, R.B. White, P.T. Bonoli, and V.S. Chan, Phys. Plasmas 8 (2001) 2181]. The present work extends these results to travelling waves with non-zero n where heating directly introduces angular momentum. Since tokamak fast-wave antennas have approximately one wavelength per toroidal field coil, the toroidal mode number n lies in the range n = 10-20, independent of machine size. A zero-dimensional analysis shows that the rotation rate arising from direct torque is comparable to that of the rotational shear layer and has the same scaling. Nondimensional rotation profiles for n = (-10, 10) show modest changes from the n = 0 case in the expected direction. For a balanced antenna spectrum, the nondimensional rotational profile (averaged over n = -10, 10) lies quite close to the n = 0 profile.

  14. Millimetre Wave with Rotational Orbital Angular Momentum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Ma, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) has been widely studied in fibre and short-range communications. The implementation of millimetre waves with OAM is expected to increase the communication capacity. Most experiments demonstrate the distinction of OAM modes by receiving all of the energy in the surface vertical to the radiation axis in space. However, the reception of OAM is difficult in free space due to the non-zero beam angle and divergence of energy. The reception of OAM in the space domain in a manner similar to that in optical fibres (i.e., receiving all of the energy rings vertical to the radiation axis) is impractical, especially for long-distance transmission. Here, we fabricate a prototype of the antenna and demonstrate that rather than in the space domain, the OAM can be well received in the time domain via a single antenna by rotating the OAM wave at the transmitter, i.e., the radio wave with rotational OAM. The phase and frequency measured in the experiment reveal that for different OAM modes, the received signals act as a commonly used orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in the time domain. This phase rotation has promising prospects for use in the practical reception of different OAMs of millimetre waves in long-distance transmission. PMID:27596746

  15. Millimetre Wave with Rotational Orbital Angular Momentum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Ma, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) has been widely studied in fibre and short-range communications. The implementation of millimetre waves with OAM is expected to increase the communication capacity. Most experiments demonstrate the distinction of OAM modes by receiving all of the energy in the surface vertical to the radiation axis in space. However, the reception of OAM is difficult in free space due to the non-zero beam angle and divergence of energy. The reception of OAM in the space domain in a manner similar to that in optical fibres (i.e., receiving all of the energy rings vertical to the radiation axis) is impractical, especially for long-distance transmission. Here, we fabricate a prototype of the antenna and demonstrate that rather than in the space domain, the OAM can be well received in the time domain via a single antenna by rotating the OAM wave at the transmitter, i.e., the radio wave with rotational OAM. The phase and frequency measured in the experiment reveal that for different OAM modes, the received signals act as a commonly used orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in the time domain. This phase rotation has promising prospects for use in the practical reception of different OAMs of millimetre waves in long-distance transmission. PMID:27596746

  16. Gravito-inertial waves in a differentially rotating spherical shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirouh, G. M.; Baruteau, C.; Rieutord, M.; Ballot, J.

    2016-08-01

    The gravito-inertial waves propagating over a shellular baroclinic flow inside a rotating spherical shell are analysed using the Boussinesq approximation. The wave properties are examined by computing paths of characteristics in the non-dissipative limit, and by solving the full dissipative eigenvalue problem using a high-resolution spectral method. Gravito-inertial waves are found to obey a mixed-type second-order operator and to be often focused around short-period attractors of characteristics or trapped in a wedge formed by turning surfaces and boundaries. We also find eigenmodes that show a weak dependence with respect to viscosity and heat diffusion just like truly regular modes. Some axisymmetric modes are found unstable and likely destabilized by baroclinic instabilities. Similarly, some non-axisymmetric modes that meet a critical layer (or corotation resonance) can turn unstable at sufficiently low diffusivities. In all cases, the instability is driven by the differential rotation. For many modes of the spectrum, neat power laws are found for the dependence of the damping rates with diffusion coefficients, but the theoretical explanation for the exponent values remains elusive in general. The eigenvalue spectrum turns out to be very rich and complex, which lets us suppose an even richer and more complex spectrum for rotating stars or planets that own a differential rotation driven by baroclinicity.

  17. A consistent collinear triad approximation for operational wave models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, J. E.; Smit, P. B.; Janssen, T. T.; Holthuijsen, L. H.

    2016-08-01

    In shallow water, the spectral evolution associated with energy transfers due to three-wave (or triad) interactions is important for the prediction of nearshore wave propagation and wave-driven dynamics. The numerical evaluation of these nonlinear interactions involves the evaluation of a weighted convolution integral in both frequency and directional space for each frequency-direction component in the wave field. For reasons of efficiency, operational wave models often rely on a so-called collinear approximation that assumes that energy is only exchanged between wave components travelling in the same direction (collinear propagation) to eliminate the directional convolution. In this work, we show that the collinear approximation as presently implemented in operational models is inconsistent. This causes energy transfers to become unbounded in the limit of unidirectional waves (narrow aperture), and results in the underestimation of energy transfers in short-crested wave conditions. We propose a modification to the collinear approximation to remove this inconsistency and to make it physically more realistic. Through comparison with laboratory observations and results from Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that the proposed modified collinear model is consistent, remains bounded, smoothly converges to the unidirectional limit, and is numerically more robust. Our results show that the modifications proposed here result in a consistent collinear approximation, which remains bounded and can provide an efficient approximation to model nonlinear triad effects in operational wave models.

  18. Scattering of electromagnetic wave by dielectric cylinder in eikonal approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syshchenko, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    The scattering of the plane electromagnetic wave on a spatially extended, fiber lake target is considered. The formula for the scattering cross section is obtained using the approximation analogous to eikonal one in quantum mechanics.

  19. Waves and vortices in rotating stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouquet, Annick; Herbert, Corentin; Marino, Raffaele; Rosenberg, Duane

    2015-04-01

    The interactions between vortices and waves is a long-standing problem in fluid turbulence. It can lead to a self-sustaining process that is dominant, for example in pipe flows, and to the prediction of large-scale coherent structures such as baroclinic jets in planetary atmospheres, and it can also be used as a control tool for the onset of turbulence. Similarly, the dynamics of the atmosphere and the ocean is dominated by complex interactions between nonlinear eddies and waves due to a combination of rotation and stratification (characterized respectively by frequencies f and N), as well as shear layers. The waves are faster at large scales, and this leads to a quasi-geostrophic quasi-linear regime in which there is a balance between pressure gradient and the Coriolis and gravity forces. The range of scales in these geophysical flows before dissipation prevails is such that other regimes can arise in which turbulence comes into play, with the eddy turn-over time becoming comparable to the wave period, and for which isotropy recovers for sufficiently high Reynolds numbers. One may decompose the flow-- observational, experimental or numerical, in terms of the normal modes that it supports, i.e. the inertia-gravity waves and the (slow, zero frequency) vortical modes carrying the potential vorticity, thanks to the existence of a small parameter, as for example the fluctuation around a mean flow or the ratio of the wave period to the eddy turn-over time. In this context an ensemble of data sets of rotating stratified turbulence will be analyzed, stemming from accurate direct numerical simulations of the Boussinesq equations at high resolution, up to 40963 grid points, using high-performance computing. These flows all support a constant-flux bi-directional cascade of energy towards both the large scales and the small scales. The parameter space includes the Reynolds number, the Prandtl number(s), and the Rossby and Froude numbers, and a universal response to a variety

  20. Experiments on nonlinear coastal shelf waves in a rotating annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Andrew; Dellar, Paul; Johnson, Ted

    2010-05-01

    In many coastal regions, the ocean depth increases very rapidly at a 'shelf break' running approximately parallel to the coastline. A shelf break marks the edge of the continental shelf, and separates the deep ocean from the relatively shallow near-coastal ocean. Shelf breaks play an important rôle in steering coastal currents, such as the Aghulas current which flows southwest along the eastern coast of Africa at speeds of up to 1 ms-1. To investigate the effect of shelf breaks in stabilising coastal currents, we have carried out laboratory experiments to generate nonlinear topographic Rossby waves that propagate along a shelf break in the presence of a mean current. Our experiments use an annular channel in a rotating cylindrical tank. We model the shelf break with a tank floor that undergoes a sharp drop at a certain radius Rh. The tank was filled with homogeneous fluid, and set rotating with constant angular velocity until the fluid inside rotated as a solid body. We then induced horizontal perturbations to the fluid, which caused Taylor columns to move inwards and outwards across the shelf. Conservation of potential vorticity forces these columns to acquire relative vorticity as they cross the shelf, which allows waves to propagate around the tank. These waves are known as topographic Rossby shelf waves. The large-scale flow around shelf breaks has been the subject of a series of theoretical investigations. These commonly approximate the sharp drop in the depth by a discontinuity, on the assumption that the horizontal length scale of the flow is much larger than the width of the shelf break. However, the fluid is still assumed to move in columns, as in shallow water theory, even as it crosses the shelf. Our present work aims to consolidate a theoretical model for nonlinear waves propagating along a depth discontinuity in the context of our laboratory experiments. We assume that rotational effects are dominant, and that fluid velocities are small compared with

  1. The Inhomogeneous Waves in a Rotating Piezoelectric Body

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Si

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis and numerical results of rotation, propagation angle, and attenuation angle upon the waves propagating in the piezoelectric body. Via considering the centripetal and Coriolis accelerations in the piezoelectric equations with respect to a rotating frame of reference, wave velocities and attenuations are derived and plotted graphically. It is demonstrated that rotation speed vector can affect wave velocities and make the piezoelectric body behaves as if it was damping. Besides, the effects of propagation angle and attenuation angle are presented. Critical point is found when rotation speed is equal to wave frequency, around which wave characteristics change drastically. PMID:24298219

  2. Revisiting the envelope approximation: Gravitational waves from bubble collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, David J.

    2016-06-01

    We study the envelope approximation and its applicability to first-order phase transitions in the early Universe. We demonstrate that the power laws seen in previous studies exist independently of the nucleation rate. We also compare the envelope approximation prediction to results from large-scale phase transition simulations. For phase transitions where the contribution to gravitational waves from scalar fields dominates over that from the coupled plasma of light particles, the envelope approximation is in agreement, giving a power spectrum of the same form and order of magnitude. In all other cases the form and amplitude of the gravitational wave power spectrum is markedly different and new techniques are required.

  3. Parabolic approximation method for fast magnetosonic wave propagation in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.K.; Perkins, F.W.; Hwang, D.Q.

    1985-07-01

    Fast magnetosonic wave propagation in a cylindrical tokamak model is studied using a parabolic approximation method in which poloidal variations of the wave field are considered weak in comparison to the radial variations. Diffraction effects, which are ignored by ray tracing mthods, are included self-consistently using the parabolic method since continuous representations for the wave electromagnetic fields are computed directly. Numerical results are presented which illustrate the cylindrical convergence of the launched waves into a diffraction-limited focal spot on the cyclotron absorption layer near the magnetic axis for a wide range of plasma confinement parameters.

  4. Gravitational wave asteroseismology with fast rotating neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gaertig, Erich; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2011-03-15

    We investigate damping and growth times of the quadrupolar f mode for rapidly rotating stars and a variety of different polytropic equations of state in the Cowling approximation. This is the first study of the damping/growth time of these types of oscillations for fast-rotating neutron stars in a relativistic treatment where the spacetime degrees of freedom of the perturbations are neglected. We use these frequencies and damping/growth times to create robust empirical formulae which can be used for gravitational-wave asteroseismology. The estimation of the damping/growth time is based on the quadrupole formula and our results agree very well with Newtonian ones in the appropriate limit.

  5. Various approximations made in augmented-plane-wave calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacalis, N. C.; Blathras, K.; Thomaides, P.; Papaconstantopoulos, D. A.

    1985-10-01

    The effects of various approximations used in performing augmented-plane-wave calculations were studied for elements of the fifth and sixth columns of the Periodic Table, namely V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, and W. Two kinds of approximations have been checked: (i) variation of the number of k points used to iterate to self-consistency, and (ii) approximations for the treatment of the core states. In addition a comparison between relativistic and nonrelativistic calculations is made, and an approximate method of calculating the spin-orbit splitting is given.

  6. Nuclear Rotations and the Born-Oppenheimer Approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Zettili, Nouredine

    2011-10-27

    We deal here with the application of the Nuclear Born Oppenheimer (NBO) method to the description of nuclear rotations. As an edifying illustration, we apply the NBO formalism to study the rotational motion of nuclei which are axially-symmetric and even, but whose shells are not closed. We focus, in particular, on the derivation of expressions for the rotational energy and for the moment of inertia. Additionally, we examine the connection between the NBO method and the self-consistent cranking (SCC) model. Finally, we compare the moment of inertia generated by the NBO method with the Thouless-Valantin formula and hence establish a connection between the NBO method and the large body of experimental data.

  7. Atmospheric planetary waves induced by solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krivolutsky, A. A.

    1989-01-01

    It is known that there are variations in the atmospheric processes with a period close to that of the rotation of the Sun (27 days). The variations are discovered in tropospheric processes, rainfalls, geopotential and in stratosphere. The main theoretical problem is the identification of the physical process by which these heterogeneous solar and meteorological phenomena are connected. Ivanovsky and Krivolutsky proposed that the periodic heating of the ozone layer by the short wave radiation would be the reason of excitation the 27-day oscillations. It was also assumed that excitement takes place in condition of resonance with an excited mode corresponding to the conditions present in the stratospheric circulations. The possibility is discussed of the resonant excitation and presentation is made of the data analysis results which support this idea.

  8. Approximate method for controlling solid elastic waves by transformation media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jin; Chang, Zheng; Hu, Gengkai

    2011-11-01

    By idealizing a general mapping as a series of local affine ones, we derive approximately transformed material parameters necessary to control solid elastic waves within classical elasticity theory. The transformed elastic moduli are symmetric, and can be used with Navier's equation to manipulate elastic waves. It is shown numerically that the method can provide a powerful tool to control elastic waves in solids in case of high frequency or small material gradient. Potential applications can be anticipated in nondestructive testing, structure impact protection, petroleum exploration, and seismology.

  9. Freely tunable broadband polarization rotator for terahertz waves.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ren-Hao; Zhou, Yu; Ren, Xiao-Ping; Peng, Ru-Wen; Jiang, Shang-Chi; Xu, Di-Hu; Xiong, Xiang; Huang, Xian-Rong; Wang, Mu

    2015-02-18

    A freely tunable polarization rotator for broadband terahertz waves is demonstrated using a three-rotating-layer metallic grating structure, which can conveniently rotate the polarization of a linearly polarized terahertz wave to any desired direction with nearly perfect conversion efficiency. This low-cost, high-efficiency, and freely tunable device has potential applications as material analysis, wireless communication, and THz imaging. PMID:25545177

  10. Impact of rotation on stochastic excitation of gravity and gravito-inertial waves in stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathis, S.; Neiner, C.; Tran Minh, N.

    2014-05-01

    Context. Gravity waves (or their signatures) are detected in stars thanks to helio- and asteroseismology, and they may play an important role in the evolution of stellar angular momentum. Moreover, a previous observational study of the CoRoT target HD 51452 demonstrated the potential strong impact of rotation on the stochastic excitation of gravito-inertial waves in stellar interiors. Aims: Our goal is to explore and unravel the action of rotation on the stochastic excitation of gravity and gravito-inertial waves in stars. Methods: The dynamics of gravito-inertial waves in stellar interiors in both radiation and in convection zones is described with a local non-traditional f-plane model. The coupling of these waves with convective turbulent flows, which leads to their stochastic excitation, is studied in this framework. Results: First, we find that in the super-inertial regime in which the wave frequency is twice as high as the rotation frequency (σ > 2Ω), the evanescence of gravito-inertial waves in convective regions decreases with decreasing wave frequency. Next, in the sub-inertial regime (σ < 2Ω), gravito-inertial waves become purely propagative inertial waves in convection zones. Simultaneously, turbulence in convective regions is modified by rotation. Indeed, the turbulent energy cascade towards small scales is slowed down, and in the case of rapid rotation, strongly anisotropic turbulent flows are obtained that can be understood as complex non-linear triadic interactions of propagative inertial waves. These different behaviours, due to the action of the Coriolis acceleration, strongly modify the wave coupling with turbulent flows. On one hand, turbulence weakly influenced by rotation is coupled with evanescent gravito-inertial waves. On the other hand, rapidly rotating turbulence is intrinsically and strongly coupled with sub-inertial waves. Finally, to study these mechanisms, the traditional approximation cannot be assumed because it does not properly

  11. Vortex wave interaction in a rotating stratified fluid: WKB simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulin, F. Y.; Flór, J.-B.

    2006-09-01

    In this paper we present ray-tracing results on the interaction of inertia gravity waves with the velocity field of a vortex in a rotating stratified fluid. We consider rays that interact with a Rankine-type vortex with a Gaussian vertical distribution of vertical vorticity. The rays are traced, solving the WKB equations in cylindrical coordinates for vortices with different aspect ratios. The interactions are governed by the value of Fr R/lambda where Fr is the vortex Froude number, R its radius, and lambda the incident wavelength. The Froude number is defined as Fr {=} U_{max}/(NR) with U_{max} the maximum azimuthal velocity and N the buoyancy frequency. When Fr R/lambda {>} 1, part of the incident wave field strongly decreases in wavelength while its energy is trapped. The vortex aspect ratio, H/R, determines which part of this incident wave field is trapped, and where its energy accumulates in the vortex. Increasing values of Fr R/lambda are shown to be associated with a narrowing of the trapping region and an increase of the energy amplification of trapped rays. In the inviscid approximation, the infinite energy amplification predicted for unidirectional flows is retrieved in the limit Fr R/lambda {->} infty. When viscous damping is taken into account, the maximal amplification of the wave energy becomes a function of Fr R/lambda and a Reynolds number, Re_{wave} {=} sqrt{U_L(2+U_H^2}/nu) k(2) , with U_L and U_H typical values of the shear in, respectively, the radial and vertical directions; the kinematic viscosity is nu, and the wavenumber k, for the incident waves. In a sequel paper, we compare WKB simulations with experimental results.

  12. Properties of rotational bands at the spin limit in A {approximately} 50, A {approximately} 65 and A {approximately} 110 nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Janzen, V.P.; Andrews, H.R.; Ball, G.C.

    1996-12-31

    There is now widespread evidence for the smooth termination of rotational bands in A {approx_equal} 110 nuclei at spins of 40-to-50{Dirac_h}s. The characteristics of these bands are compared to those of bands recently observed to high spin in {sup 64}Zn and {sup 48}Cr, studied with the 8{pi} {gamma}-ray spectrometer coupled to the Chalk River miniball charged-particle-detector array.

  13. Exact Faraday rotation in the cylindrical Einstein-Maxwell waves

    SciTech Connect

    Arafah, M.R.; Fakioglu, S.; Halilsoy, M. )

    1990-07-15

    We obtain the exact behavior of the cross-polarized cylindrical Einstein-Maxwell waves that generalizes the well-known Einstein-Rosen waves. In the presence of the second mode of polarization the outgoing waves interact with the incoming ones to exhibit an analogous effect of the Faraday rotation.

  14. Freely-tunable broadband polarization rotator for terahertz waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ru-Wen; Fan, Ren-Hao; Zhou, Yu; Jiang, Shang-Chi; Xiong, Xiang; Huang, Xian-Rong; Wang, Mu

    It is known that commercially-available terahertz (THz) emitters usually generate linearly polarized waves only along certain directions, but in practice, a polarization rotator that is capable of rotating the polarization of THz waves to any direction is particularly desirable and it will have various important applications. In this work, we demonstrate a freely tunable polarization rotator for broadband THz waves using a three-rotating-layer metallic grating structure, which can conveniently rotate the polarization of a linearly polarized THz wave to any desired direction with nearly perfect conversion efficiency. The device performance has been experimentally demonstrated by both THz transmission spectra and direct imaging. The polarization rotation originates from multi wave interference in the three-layer grating structure based on the scattering-matrix analysis. We can expect that this active broadband polarization rotator has wide applications in analytical chemistry, biology, communication technology, imaging, etc.. Reference: R. H. Fan, Y. Zhou, X. P. Ren, R. W. Peng, S. C. Jiang, D. H. Xu, X. Xiong, X. R. Huang, and Mu Wang, Advanced Materials 27,1201(2015). Freely-tunable broadband polarization rotator for terahertz waves.

  15. Anisotropic electromagnetic wave propagation modeling using parabolic approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brent, R. I.; Siegmann, W. L.; Jacobson, M. J.; Jacyna, G. M.

    1990-12-01

    A new method for the investigation of anisotropic electromagnetic wave propagation in the atmosphere is developed using parabolic approximations. Model equations for the electric field components are formulated which include the effects of both the inhomogeneous atmosphere and the static magnetic field of the earth. Application of parabolic-type approximations produces different systems of coupled parabolic equations. Each is valid for different relative magnitudes of components of the electric field. All admissible cases are then synthesized into one system which can be numerically examined, yielding solutions without a priori knowledge of electric field ratios. A specific example is presented and examined to understand static magnetic field effects on electromagnetic wave propagation. The influences of the earth's magnetic field are discussed and displayed in terms of electric components and the Poynting vector. Results demonstrate that the geomagnetic field can significantly influence HF atmospheric propagation.

  16. Emitting waves from heterogeneity by a rotating electric field.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ye-Hua; Lou, Qin; Chen, Jiang-Xing; Sun, Wei-Gang; Ma, Jun; Ying, He-Ping

    2013-09-01

    In a generic model of excitable media, we simulate wave emission from a heterogeneity (WEH) induced by an electric field. Based on the WEH effect, a rotating electric field is proposed to terminate existed spatiotemporal turbulence. Compared with the effects resulted by a periodic pulsed electric field, the rotating electric field displays several improvements, such as lower required intensity, emitting waves on smaller obstacles, and shorter suppression time. Furthermore, due to rotation of the electric field, it can automatically source waves from the boundary of an obstacle with small curvature. PMID:24089977

  17. Gravity Wave Emission by Spontaneous Imbalance of Baroclinic Waves in the Continuously Stratified Rotating Annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchert, Sebastian; Achatz, Ulrich; Rieper, Felix; Fruman, Mark

    2013-04-01

    We use a numerical model of the classic differentially heated rotating annulus experiment to study the spontaneous emission of gravity waves (GWs) from jet stream imbalances, which is a major source of these waves in the atmosphere for which no satisfactory parameterization exists. Atmospheric observations are the main tool for the testing and verification of theoretical concepts but have their limitations. Given their specific potential for yielding reproducible data and for studying process dependence on external system parameters, laboratory experiments are an invaluable complementary tool. Experiments with a rotating annulus exhibiting a jet modulated by large-scale waves due to baroclinic instability have already been used to study GWs: Williams et al (2008) observed spontaneously emitted interfacial GWs in a two-layer flow, and Jacoby et al (2011) detected GWs emitted from boundary-layer instabilities in a differentially heated rotating annulus. Employing a finite-volume code for the numerical simulation of a continuously stratified liquid in a differentially heated rotating annulus, we here investigate the GWs in a wide and shallow annulus with relatively large temperature difference between inner and outer cylinder walls. In this atmosphere-like regime where the Brunt-Vaisala frequency is larger than the inertial frequency, various analyses suggest a distinct gravity wave activity. To identify regions of GW emission we decompose the flow into the geostrophic and ageostrophic part through the inversion of the quasi-geostrophic potential vorticity (e.g. Verkley, 2009). The analysis of the geostrophic sources of the ageostrophic flow indicates that, in addition to boundary layer instabilities, spontaneous imbalance in the jet region acts as an important source mechanism. Jacoby, T. N. L., Read, P. L., Williams, P. D. and Young, R. M. B., 2011: Generation of inertia-gravity waves in the rotating thermal annulus by a localised boundary layer instability. Geophys

  18. An approximate solution for the free vibrations of rotating uniform cantilever beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    Approximate solutions are obtained for the uncoupled frequencies and modes of rotating uniform cantilever beams. The frequency approximations for flab bending, lead-lag bending, and torsion are simple expressions having errors of less than a few percent over the entire frequency range. These expressions provide a simple way of determining the relations between mass and stiffness parameters and the resultant frequencies and mode shapes of rotating uniform beams.

  19. Curvilinear parabolic approximation for surface wave transformation with wave current interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Fengyan; Kirby, James T.

    2005-04-01

    The direct coordinate transformation method, which only transforms independent variables and retains Cartesian dependent variables, may not be an appropriate method for the purpose of simplifying the curvilinear parabolic approximation of the vector form of the wave-current equation given by Kirby [Higher-order approximations in the parabolic equation method for water waves, J. Geophys. Res. 91 (1986) 933-952]. In this paper, the covariant-contravariant tensor method is used for the curvilinear parabolic approximation. We use the covariant components of the wave number vector and contravariant components of the current velocity vector so that the derivation of the curvilinear equation closely follows the higher-order approximation in rectangular Cartesian coordinates in Kirby [Higher-order approximations in the parabolic equation method for water waves, J. Geophys. Res. 91 (1986) 933-952]. The resulting curvilinear equation can be easily implemented using the existing model structure and numerical schemes adopted in the Cartesian parabolic wave model [J.T. Kirby, R.A. Dalrymple, F. Shi, Combined Refraction/Diffraction Model REF/DIF 1, Version 2.6. Documentation and User's Manual, Research Report, Center for Applied Coastal Research, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, 2004]. Several examples of wave simulations in curvilinear coordinate systems, including a case with wave-current interaction, are shown with comparisons to theoretical solutions or measurement data.

  20. The Submillimeter-wave Rotational Spectra of Interstellar Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbst, Eric; DeLucia, Frank C.; Butler, R. A. H.; Winnewisser, M.; Winnewisser, G.; Fuchs, U.; Groner, P.; Sastry, K. V. L. N.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss past and recent progress in our long-term laboratory program concerning the submillimeter-wave rotational spectroscopy of known and likely interstellar molecules, especially those associated with regions of high-mass star formation. Our program on the use of spectroscopy to study rotationally inelastic collisions of interstellar interest is also briefly mentioned.

  1. Alpha Channeling in Rotating Plasma with Stationary Waves

    SciTech Connect

    A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-15

    An extension of the alpha channeling effect to supersonically rotating mirrors shows that the rotation itself can be driven using alpha particle energy. Alpha channeling uses radiofrequency waves to remove alpha particles collisionlessly at low energy. We show that stationary magnetic fields with high nθ can be used for this purpose, and simulations show that a large fraction of the alpha energy can be converted to rotation energy.

  2. Comparison of gravitational wave detector network sky localization approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grover, K.; Fairhurst, S.; Farr, B. F.; Mandel, I.; Rodriguez, C.; Sidery, T.; Vecchio, A.

    2014-02-01

    Gravitational waves emitted during compact binary coalescences are a promising source for gravitational-wave detector networks. The accuracy with which the location of the source on the sky can be inferred from gravitational-wave data is a limiting factor for several potential scientific goals of gravitational-wave astronomy, including multimessenger observations. Various methods have been used to estimate the ability of a proposed network to localize sources. Here we compare two techniques for predicting the uncertainty of sky localization—timing triangulation and the Fisher information matrix approximations—with Bayesian inference on the full, coherent data set. We find that timing triangulation alone tends to overestimate the uncertainty in sky localization by a median factor of 4 for a set of signals from nonspinning compact object binaries ranging up to a total mass of 20M⊙, and the overestimation increases with the mass of the system. We find that average predictions can be brought to better agreement by the inclusion of phase consistency information in timing-triangulation techniques. However, even after corrections, these techniques can yield significantly different results to the full analysis on specific mock signals. Thus, while the approximate techniques may be useful in providing rapid, large scale estimates of network localization capability, the fully coherent Bayesian analysis gives more robust results for individual signals, particularly in the presence of detector noise.

  3. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Wave Functions for Rotating Molecule: Plot of Spherical Harmonics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagaoka, Shin-ichi; Teramae, Hiroyuki; Nagashima, Umpei

    2013-01-01

    At an early stage of learning quantum chemistry, undergraduate students usually encounter the concepts of the particle in a box, the harmonic oscillator, and then the particle on a sphere. Rotational levels of a diatomic molecule can be well approximated by the energy levels of the particle on a sphere. Wave functions for the particle in a…

  4. Rotation-induced nonlinear wavepackets in internal waves

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, A. J. Johnson, E. R.

    2014-05-15

    The long time effect of weak rotation on an internal solitary wave is the decay into inertia-gravity waves and the eventual formation of a localised wavepacket. Here this initial value problem is considered within the context of the Ostrovsky, or the rotation-modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV), equation and a numerical method for obtaining accurate wavepacket solutions is presented. The flow evolutions are described in the regimes of relatively-strong and relatively-weak rotational effects. When rotational effects are relatively strong a second-order soliton solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation accurately predicts the shape, and phase and group velocities of the numerically determined wavepackets. It is suggested that these solitons may form from a local Benjamin-Feir instability in the inertia-gravity wave-train radiated when a KdV solitary wave rapidly adjusts to the presence of strong rotation. When rotational effects are relatively weak the initial KdV solitary wave remains coherent longer, decaying only slowly due to weak radiation and modulational instability is no longer relevant. Wavepacket solutions in this regime appear to consist of a modulated KdV soliton wavetrain propagating on a slowly varying background of finite extent.

  5. A large-amplitude rotational wave in the Venusian ionosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedorov, A. O.; Vaisberg, O. L.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Galeev, A. A.; Intriligator, D. S.

    1991-01-01

    Results are reported of a preliminary analysis of a large-amplitude rotational wave in the Venusian ionosheath. The results are based on an analysis of the Pioneer Venus Orbiter plasma and magnetic field observations from six orbits in the first (1979) tail season. This wave appears to be the standing super-Alfvenic wing. It is located within the shocked plasma flow outside the boundary of the tail. The rotation of the magnetic field by about 90 deg across the wave occurs through several successive cycles making the wave similar to the group velocity wing consisting of phase velocity waves. The transition through the wave is accompanied by the vector change of the plasma velocity with the magnitude of the plasma velocity jump comparable to the vector jump of the Alfven velocity. The observed super-Alfvenic wing appears to originate upstream and closer to the planet, possibly near the upper boundary of the magnetic barrier on the dayside.

  6. Extreme-ultraviolet observations of global coronal wave rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Attrill, G. D. R.; Long, D. M.; Green, L. M.; Harra, L. K.; Van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.

    2014-11-20

    We present evidence of global coronal wave rotation in EUV data from SOHO/EIT, STEREO/EUVI, and SDO/AIA. The sense of rotation is found to be consistent with the helicity of the source region (clockwise for positive helicity, anticlockwise for negative helicity), with the source regions hosting sigmoidal structures. We also study two coronal wave events observed by SDO/AIA where no clear rotation (or sigmoid) is observed. The selected events show supporting evidence that they all originate with flux rope eruptions. We make comparisons across this set of observations (both with and without clear sigmoidal structures). On examining the magnetic configuration of the source regions, we find that the nonrotation events possess a quadrupolar magnetic configuration. The coronal waves that do show a rotation originate from bipolar source regions.

  7. Stochastic excitation of gravity waves in rapidly rotating massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathis, S.; Neiner, C.

    2015-01-01

    Stochastic gravity waves have been recently detected and characterised in stars thanks to space asteroseismology and they may play an important role in the evolution of stellar angular momentum. In this context, the observational study of the CoRoT hot Be star HD 51452 suggests a potentially strong impact of rotation on stochastic excitation of gravito-inertial waves in rapidly rotating stars. In this work, we present our results on the action of the Coriolis acceleration on stochastic wave excitation by turbulent convection. We study the change of efficiency of this mechanism as a function of the waves' Rossby number and we demonstrate that the excitation presents two different regimes for super-inertial and sub-inertial frequencies. Consequences for rapidly rotating early-type stars and the transport of angular momentum in their interiors are discussed.

  8. Fast computation of rotation-invariant image features by an approximate radial gradient transform.

    PubMed

    Takacs, Gabriel; Chandrasekhar, Vijay; Tsai, Sam S; Chen, David; Grzeszczuk, Radek; Girod, Bernd

    2013-08-01

    We present the radial gradient transform (RGT) and a fast approximation, the approximate RGT (ARGT). We analyze the effects of the approximation on gradient quantization and histogramming. The ARGT is incorporated into the rotation-invariant fast feature (RIFF) algorithm. We demonstrate that, using the ARGT, RIFF extracts features 16× faster than SURF while achieving a similar performance for image matching and retrieval. PMID:23204286

  9. Hopf Bifurcation from Rotating Waves and Patterns in Physical Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubitsky, M.; LeBlanc, V. G.; Melbourne, I.

    2000-02-01

    Hopf bifurcations from time periodic rotating waves to two frequency tori have been studied for a number of years by a variety of authors including Rand and Renardy. Rotating waves are solutions to partial differential equations where time evolution is the same as spatial rotation. Thus rotating waves can exist mathematically only in problems that have at least SO (2) symmetry. In this paper we study the effect on this Hopf bifurcation when the problem has more than SO (2) symmetry. These effects manifest themselves in physical space and not in phase space. We use as motivating examples the experiments of Gorman et al . on porous plug burner flames, of Swinney et al . on the Taylor-Couette system, and of a variety of people on meandering spiral waves in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. In our analysis we recover and complete Rand's classification of modulated wavy vortices in the Taylor-Couette system. It is both curious and intriguing that the spatial manifestations of the two frequency motions in each of these experiments is different, and it is these differences that we seek to explain. In particular, we give a mathematical explanation of the differences between the nonuniform rotation of cellular flames in Gorman's experiments and the meandering of spiral waves in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. Our approach is based on the center bundle construction of Krupa with compact group actions and its extension to noncompact group actions by Sandstede, Scheel, and Wulff.

  10. Wavelet approximation of correlated wave functions. II. Hyperbolic wavelets and adaptive approximation schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hongjun; Kolb, Dietmar; Flad, Heinz-Jurgen; Hackbusch, Wolfgang; Koprucki, Thomas

    2002-08-01

    We have studied various aspects concerning the use of hyperbolic wavelets and adaptive approximation schemes for wavelet expansions of correlated wave functions. In order to analyze the consequences of reduced regularity of the wave function at the electron-electron cusp, we first considered a realistic exactly solvable many-particle model in one dimension. Convergence rates of wavelet expansions, with respect to L2 and H1 norms and the energy, were established for this model. We compare the performance of hyperbolic wavelets and their extensions through adaptive refinement in the cusp region, to a fully adaptive treatment based on the energy contribution of individual wavelets. Although hyperbolic wavelets show an inferior convergence behavior, they can be easily refined in the cusp region yielding an optimal convergence rate for the energy. Preliminary results for the helium atom are presented, which demonstrate the transferability of our observations to more realistic systems. We propose a contraction scheme for wavelets in the cusp region, which reduces the number of degrees of freedom and yields a favorable cost to benefit ratio for the evaluation of matrix elements.

  11. Millimetre wave rotational spectrum of glycolic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisiel, Zbigniew; Pszczółkowski, Lech; Białkowska-Jaworska, Ewa; Charnley, Steven B.

    2016-03-01

    The pure rotational spectrum of glycolic acid, CH2OHCOOH, was studied in the region 115-318 GHz. For the most stable SSC conformer, transitions in all vibrational states up to 400 cm-1 have been measured and their analysis is reported. The data sets for the ground state, v21 = 1 , and v21 = 2 have been considerably extended. Immediately higher in vibrational energy are two triads of interacting vibrational states and their rotational transitions have been assigned and successfully fitted with coupled Hamiltonians accounting for Fermi and Coriolis resonances. The derived energy level spacings establish that the vibrational frequency of the ν21 mode is close to 100 cm-1. The existence of the less stable AAT conformer in the near 50 °C sample used in our experiment was also confirmed and additional transitions have been measured.

  12. Thermal Rossby waves in a rotating annulus. Their stability.

    PubMed

    Pino, D; Net, M; Sánchez, J; Mercader, I

    2001-05-01

    Nonlinear thermal convection in a fast rotating annulus about its axis, with slightly inclined ends, radial gravity and heating, is studied numerically for a fluid of Prandtl number sigma=0.7 and different values of the radius ratio and rotation rate. The properties of the rotating waves that appear after the Hopf bifurcation of the conductive state are analyzed. Near the critical Rayleigh number, different types of solutions with the same wave number coexist, and they are classified as a function of their connection with the two types of modes identified in the linear analysis for this Prandtl number. For different rotation rates, the stability of the primary solutions as a function of the radius ratio is also studied. The shape of the stability regions and the type of dominant disturbances that limit these regions are very sensitive to the proximity to the value of the radius ratio for which the type of dominant mode changes. PMID:11415011

  13. On the SPH Approximations in Modeling Water Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmidt, Kazimierz

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents an examination of approximation aspects of the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) in modeling the water wave phenomenon. Close attention is paid on consistency of the SPH formulation and its relation with a correction technique applied to improve the method accuracy. The considerations are confined to flow fields within finite domains with a free surface and fixed solid boundaries with free slip boundary conditions. In spite of a wide application of the SPH method in fluid mechanics, the appropriate modeling of the boundaries is still not clear. For solid straight line boundaries, a natural way is to use additional (virtual, ghost) particles outside the boundary and take into account mirror reflection of associated field variables. Such a method leads to good results, except for a vicinity of solid horizontal bottoms where, because of the SPH approximations in the description of pressure, a stratification of the fluid material particles may occur. In order to illustrate the last phenomenon, some numerical tests have been made. These numerical experiments show that the solid fluid bottom attracts the material particles and thus, to prevent these particles from penetration into the bottom, a mutual exchange of positions of real and ghost particles has been used in a computation procedure.

  14. Can the slow-rotation approximation be used in electromagnetic observations of black holes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayzenberg, Dimitry; Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolás

    2016-05-01

    Future electromagnetic observations of black holes (BHs) may allow us to test general relativity (GR) in the strong-field regime. Such tests, however, require knowledge of rotating BH solutions in modified gravity theories, a class of which does not admit the Kerr metric as a solution. Several rotating BH solutions in modified theories have only been found in the slow-rotation approximation (i.e. assuming the spin angular momentum is much smaller than the mass squared). We here investigate whether the systematic error due to the approximate nature of these BH metrics is small enough relative to the observational error to allow their use in electromagnetic observations to constrain deviations from GR. We address this by considering whether electromagnetic observables constructed from a slow-rotation approximation to the Kerr metric can fit observables constructed from the full Kerr metric with systematic errors smaller than current observational errors. We focus on BH shadow and continuum spectrum observations, as these are the least influenced by accretion disk physics, with current observational errors of about 10%. We find that the fractional systematic error introduced by using a second-order, slowly rotating Kerr metric is at most 2% for shadows created by BHs with dimensionless spins χ ≤slant 0.6. We also find that the systematic error introduced by using the slowly rotating Kerr metric as an exact metric when constructing continuum spectrum observables is negligible for BHs with dimensionless spins of χ ≲ 0.9. Our results suggest that the modified gravity solutions found in the slow-rotation approximation may be used to constrain realistic deviations from GR with continuum spectrum and BH shadow observations.

  15. Inertial wave beams and inertial wave modes in a rotating cylinder with time-modulated rotation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borcia, Ion D.; Ghasemi V., Abouzar; Harlander, Uwe

    2014-05-01

    Inertial gravity waves play an crucial role in atmospheres, oceans, and the fluid inside of planets and moons. In the atmosphere, the effect of rotation is neglected for small wavelength and the waves bear the character of internal gravity waves. For long waves, the hydrostatic assumption is made which in turn makes the atmosphere inelastic with respect to inertial motion. In contrast, in the Earth's interior, pure inertial waves are considered as an important fundamental part of the motion. Moreover, as the deep ocean is nearly homogeneous, there the inertial gravity waves bear the character of inertial waves. Excited at the oceans surface mainly due to weather systems the waves can propagate downward and influence the deep oceans motion. In the light of the aforesaid it is important to understand better fundamental inertial wave dynamics. We investigate inertial wave modes by experimental and numerical methods. Inertial modes are excited in a fluid filled rotating annulus by modulating the rotation rate of the outer cylinder and the upper and lower lids. This forcing leads to inertial wave beams emitted from the corner regions of the annulus due to periodic motions in the boundary layers (Klein et al., 2013). When the forcing frequency matches with the eigenfrequency of the rotating annulus the beam pattern amplitude is increasing, the beams broaden and mode structures can be observed (Borcia et al., 2013a). The eigenmodes are compared with analytical solutions of the corresponding inviscid problem (Borcia et al, 2013b). In particular for the pressure field a good agreement can be found. However, shear layers related to the excited wave beams are present for all frequencies. This becomes obvious in particular in the experimental visualizations that are done by using Kalliroscope particles, highlighting relative motion in the fluid. Comparing the eigenfrequencies we find that relative to the analytical frequencies, the experimental and numerical ones show a small

  16. Orientational invariance of the rotational transition probability in the sudden approximation. [atom-molecule collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Semiclassical collisions of an atom with a rigid-rotor molecule are examined in the sudden approximation. The rotational transition probability is shown to be invariant with respect to the choice of orientation for the molecular coordinate system; this fact contradicts recently reported results of a computer analysis. The present analysis may lead to an improved interpretation of recent molecular beam measurements.

  17. Inelastic scattering in atom-diatomic molecule collisions. I - Rotational transitions in the sudden approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The impact parameter method and the sudden approximation are applied to determine the total probability of inelastic rotational transitions arising from a collision of an atom and a homonuclear diatomic molecule at large impact parameters. An analytical approximation to this probability is found for conditions where the electron exchange or overlap forces dominate the scattering. An approximate upper bound to the range of impact parameters for which rotational scattering can be important is determined. In addition, an estimate of the total inelastic cross section is found at conditions for which a statistical model describes the scattering well. The results of this analysis are applied to Ar-O2 collisions and may be readily applied to other combinations of atoms and molecules.

  18. The flow field in a rotating detonation-wave engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kailasanath, Kazhikathra; Schwer, Douglas

    2011-11-01

    Rotating detonation-wave engines (RDE) are a form of continuous detonation-wave engine. They potentially provide further gains than an intermittent or pulsed detonation-wave engine (PDE). However, significantly less work has been on this concept when compared to the PDE. In this talk, we present the detailed flow field in an idealized RDE, primarily consisting of two concentric cylinders. A premixed detonable mixture is injected into the annulus between the two concentric cylinders. Once a detonation is initiated, it keeps travelling around in the annulus as long as there is fresh detonable mixture ahead of it. Hence, the injection process is critically important to the stability and performance of the RDE. Furthermore, we show that the flow field is quite complex consisting of multiple shock waves and the outflow is primarily axial, although the detonation-wave is travelling around circumferentially. Sponsored by the NRL 6.1 Computational Physics Task Area.

  19. Comparisons of characteristic timescales and approximate models for Brownian magnetic nanoparticle rotations

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Daniel B.; Weaver, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are promising tools for a host of therapeutic and diagnostic medical applications. The dynamics of rotating magnetic nanoparticles in applied magnetic fields depend strongly on the type and strength of the field applied. There are two possible rotation mechanisms and the decision for the dominant mechanism is often made by comparing the equilibrium relaxation times. This is a problem when particles are driven with high-amplitude fields because they are not necessarily at equilibrium at all. Instead, it is more appropriate to consider the “characteristic timescales” that arise in various applied fields. Approximate forms for the characteristic time of Brownian particle rotations do exist and we show agreement between several analytical and phenomenological-fit models to simulated data from a stochastic Langevin equation approach. We also compare several approximate models with solutions of the Fokker-Planck equation to determine their range of validity for general fields and relaxation times. The effective field model is an excellent approximation, while the linear response solution is only useful for very low fields and frequencies for realistic Brownian particle rotations. PMID:26130846

  20. Comparisons of characteristic timescales and approximate models for Brownian magnetic nanoparticle rotations

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Daniel B. Weaver, John B.

    2015-06-21

    Magnetic nanoparticles are promising tools for a host of therapeutic and diagnostic medical applications. The dynamics of rotating magnetic nanoparticles in applied magnetic fields depend strongly on the type and strength of the field applied. There are two possible rotation mechanisms and the decision for the dominant mechanism is often made by comparing the equilibrium relaxation times. This is a problem when particles are driven with high-amplitude fields because they are not necessarily at equilibrium at all. Instead, it is more appropriate to consider the “characteristic timescales” that arise in various applied fields. Approximate forms for the characteristic time of Brownian particle rotations do exist and we show agreement between several analytical and phenomenological-fit models to simulated data from a stochastic Langevin equation approach. We also compare several approximate models with solutions of the Fokker-Planck equation to determine their range of validity for general fields and relaxation times. The effective field model is an excellent approximation, while the linear response solution is only useful for very low fields and frequencies for realistic Brownian particle rotations.

  1. Flow patterns of rotating time-dependent Hartree-Fock wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosina, M.; Bouten, M.; Van Leuven, P.

    1982-12-01

    A soluble model (Elliott's model in two dimensions) is used to study how well flow patterns and features of rotational motion are represented by the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approximation. Due to the spreading of the wave packet in the exact Schrödinger time-evolution, the agreement is good only for phenomena which probe the current during a short time interval.

  2. Inertial waves and wave attractors in a rotating annulus with inner or outer cylinder libration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seelig, Torsten; Borcia, Ion D.; Klein, Marten; Ghasemi, Abozar; Will, Andreas; Egbers, Christoph; Schaller, Eberhard; Harlander, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    Inertial waves exist in rotating flows and are an ubiquitous phenomena in geophysical and astrophysical flows. Excitation mechanisms of inertial waves and wave attractors are the subject of recent publications [1, 2, 3]. Our research is focussed on the experimental and numerical study of inertial waves occuring in a homogeneous liquid confined between two coaxial co-rotating cylinders. The inner one has an inclined wall (frustum), in order to focus wave-energy [2]. Both cylinders rotate with mean angular velocity ?. Inertial waves are excited due to superimposed periodic oscillations with frequencies 0 ˜ ? ˜ 2? of (i) the inner or (ii) the outer cylinder together with the upper and lower lid of the cavity. The first results exhibit an agreement of wave reflection and attractor geometries between theory [2], numerical simulations and measurements. Further, we present similarities and differences between the cases of inner and outer cylinder libration. [1] Boisson, J., Lamriben, C., Maas, L.R.M., Cortet, P.P., Moisy, F.: Inertial waves and modes excited by the libration of a rotating cube. Physics of Fluids 24(076602), 1-18 (2012) [2] Borcia, I.D., Harlander, U.: Inertial waves in a rotating annulus with inclined inner cylinder: comparing the spectrum of wave attractor frequency bands and the eigenspectrum in the limit of zero inclination. Theor. Comput. Fluid Dyn. (2012). DOI 10.1007/s00162-012-0278-6 [3] Lopez, J.M., Marques, F.: Instabilities and inertial waves generated in a librating cylinder. Journal of Fluid Mechanics 687, 171-193. DOI 10.1017/jfm.2011.378

  3. Linear Vlasov theory in the shearing sheet approximation with application to the magneto-rotational instability

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, Tobias; Quataert, Eliot E-mail: eliot@berkeley.edu

    2014-09-01

    We derive the conductivity tensor for axisymmetric perturbations of a hot, collisionless, and charge-neutral plasma in the shearing sheet approximation. Our results generalize the well-known linear Vlasov theory for uniform plasmas to differentially rotating plasmas and can be used for wide range of kinetic stability calculations. We apply these results to the linear theory of the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) in collisionless plasmas. We show analytically and numerically how the general kinetic theory results derived here reduce in appropriate limits to previous results in the literature, including the low-frequency guiding center (or 'kinetic MHD') approximation, Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), and the gyro-viscous approximation. We revisit the cold plasma model of the MRI and show that, contrary to previous results, an initially unmagnetized collisionless plasma is linearly stable to axisymmetric perturbations in the cold plasma approximation. In addition to their application to astrophysical plasmas, our results provide a useful framework for assessing the linear stability of differentially rotating plasmas in laboratory experiments.

  4. Analysis of unsteady wave processes in a rotating channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosiliere, L. M.; Mawid, M.

    1993-01-01

    The impact of passage rotation on the gas dynamic wave processes is analyzed through a numerical simulation of ideal shock-tube flow in a closed rotating-channel. Initial conditions are prescribed by assuming homentropic solid-body rotation. Relevant parameters of the problem such as wheel Mach number, hub-to-tip radius ratio, length-to-tip radius ratio, diaphragm temperature ratio, and diaphragm pressure ratio are varied. The results suggest possible criteria for assessing the consequences of passage rotation on the wave processes, and they may therefore be applicable to pressure-exchange wave rotors. It is shown that for a fixed geometry and initial conditions, the contact interface acquires a distorted three-dimensional time-dependent orientation at non-zero wheel Mach numbers. At a fixed wheel Mach number, the level of distortion depends primarily on the density ratio across the interface as well as the hub-to-tip radius ratio. Rarefaction fronts, shocks, and contact interfaces are observed to propagate faster with increasing wheel Mach number.

  5. On the toroidal plasma rotations induced by lower hybrid waves

    SciTech Connect

    Guan Xiaoyin; Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Qin Hong; Liu Jian

    2013-02-15

    A theoretical model is developed to explain the plasma rotations induced by lower hybrid waves in Alcator C-Mod. In this model, torodial rotations are driven by the Lorentz force on the bulk-electron flow across flux surfaces, which is a response of the plasma to the resonant-electron flow across flux surfaces induced by the lower hybrid waves. The flow across flux surfaces of the resonant electrons and the bulk electrons are coupled through the radial electric field initiated by the resonant electrons, and the friction between ions and electrons transfers the toroidal momentum to ions from electrons. An improved quasilinear theory with gyrophase dependent distribution function is developed to calculate the perpendicular resonant-electron flow. Toroidal rotations are determined using a set of fluid equations for bulk electrons and ions, which are solved numerically by a finite-difference method. Numerical results agree well with the experimental observations in terms of flow profile and amplitude. The model explains the strong correlation between torodial flow and internal inductance observed experimentally, and predicts both counter-current and co-current flows, depending on the perpendicular wave vectors of the lower hybrid waves.

  6. On the Toroidal Plasma Rotations Induced by Lower Hybrid Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Xiaoyin; Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2012-11-14

    A theoretical model is developed to explain the plasma rotations induced by lower hybrid waves in Alcator C-Mod. In this model, torodial rotations are driven by the Lorentz force on the bulk electron flow across flux surfaces, which is a response of the plasma to the resonant-electron flow across flux surfaces induced by the lower hybrid waves. The flow across flux surfaces of the resonant electrons and the bulk electrons are coupled through the radial electric fi eld initiated by the resonant electrons, and the friction between ions and electrons transfers the toroidal momentum to ions from electrons. An improved quasilinear theory with gyrophase dependent distribution function is developed to calculate the perpendicular resonant-electron flow. Toroidal rotations are determined using a set of fluid equations for bulk electrons and ions, which are solved numerically by a fi nite- difference method. Numerical results agree well with the experimental observations in terms of flow pro file and amplitude. The model explains the strong correlation between torodial flow and internal inductance observed experimentally, and predicts both counter-current and co-current flows, depending on the perpendicular wave vectors of the lower hybrid waves. __________________________________________________

  7. Rotational excitation of symmetric top molecules by collisions with atoms. II - Infinite order sudden approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S.

    1979-01-01

    The infinite order sudden (IOS) approximation is extended to rotational excitation of symmetric tops by collisions with atoms. After development of a formalism for 'primitive' or 'one-ended' tops, proper parity-adapted linear combinations describing real rotors are considered and modifications needed for asymmetric rigid rotors are noted. The generalized spectroscopic relaxation cross sections are discussed. IOS calculations for NH3-He and H2CO-He are performed and compared with more accurate calculations, and the IOS approximation is found to provide a reasonably accurate description.

  8. Gravitational wave extraction in simulations of rotating stellar core collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Reisswig, C.; Ott, C. D.; Sperhake, U.; Schnetter, E.

    2011-03-15

    We perform simulations of general relativistic rotating stellar core collapse and compute the gravitational waves (GWs) emitted in the core-bounce phase of three representative models via multiple techniques. The simplest technique, the quadrupole formula (QF), estimates the GW content in the spacetime from the mass-quadrupole tensor only. It is strictly valid only in the weak-field and slow-motion approximation. For the first time, we apply GW extraction methods in core collapse that are fully curvature based and valid for strongly radiating and highly relativistic sources. These techniques are not restricted to weak-field and slow-motion assumptions. We employ three extraction methods computing (i) the Newman-Penrose (NP) scalar {Psi}{sub 4}, (ii) Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli-Moncrief master functions, and (iii) Cauchy-characteristic extraction (CCE) allowing for the extraction of GWs at future null infinity, where the spacetime is asymptotically flat and the GW content is unambiguously defined. The latter technique is the only one not suffering from residual gauge and finite-radius effects. All curvature-based methods suffer from strong nonlinear drifts. We employ the fixed-frequency integration technique as a high-pass waveform filter. Using the CCE results as a benchmark, we find that finite-radius NP extraction yields results that agree nearly perfectly in phase, but differ in amplitude by {approx}1%-7% at core bounce, depending on the model. Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli-Moncrief waveforms, while, in general, agreeing in phase, contain spurious high-frequency noise of comparable amplitudes to those of the relatively weak GWs emitted in core collapse. We also find remarkably good agreement of the waveforms obtained from the QF with those obtained from CCE. The results from QF agree very well in phase and systematically underpredict peak amplitudes by {approx}5%-11%, which is comparable to the NP results and is certainly within the uncertainties associated with core collapse

  9. Arc-Polarized, Nonlinear Alfven Waves and Rotational Discontinuities: Directions of Propogation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Ho, C. M.; Sakurai, R.; Arballo, J. K.; Riley, P.; Balogh, A.

    1996-01-01

    Large amplitude, noncompressive Alfven waves and rotational discontinuities are shown to be arc-polarized. The slowly rotating Alfven wave portion plus the fast rotating discontinuity comprise 360(deg) in phase rotation. The magnetic field vector perturbation lies in a plane. There are two (or more) possible interpretations to the observations.

  10. Neural rotational speed control for wave energy converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amundarain, M.; Alberdi, M.; Garrido, A. J.; Garrido, I.

    2011-02-01

    Among the benefits arising from an increasing use of renewable energy are: enhanced security of energy supply, stimulation of economic growth, job creation and protection of the environment. In this context, this study analyses the performance of an oscillating water column device for wave energy conversion in function of the stalling behaviour in Wells turbines, one of the most widely used turbines in wave energy plants. For this purpose, a model of neural rotational speed control system is presented, simulated and implemented. This scheme is employed to appropriately adapt the speed of the doubly-fed induction generator coupled to the turbine according to the pressure drop entry, so as to avoid the undesired stalling behaviour. It is demonstrated that the proposed neural rotational speed control design adequately matches the desired relationship between the slip of the doubly-fed induction generator and the pressure drop input, improving the power generated by the turbine generator module.

  11. Primordial gravitational waves measurements and anisotropies of CMB polarization rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Si-Yu; Xia, Jun-Qing; Li, Mingzhe; Li, Hong; Zhang, Xinmin

    2015-12-01

    Searching for the signal of primordial gravitational waves in the B-modes (BB) power spectrum is one of the key scientific aims of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiments. However, this could be easily contaminated by several foreground issues, such as the interstellar dust grains and the galactic cyclotron electrons. In this paper we study another mechanism, the cosmic birefringence, which can be introduced by a CPT-violating interaction between CMB photons and an external scalar field. Such kind of interaction could give rise to the rotation of the linear polarization state of CMB photons, and consequently induce the CMB BB power spectrum, which could mimic the signal of primordial gravitational waves at large scales. With the recently released polarization data of BICEP2 and the joint analysis data of BICEP2/Keck Array and Planck, we perform a global fitting analysis on constraining the tensor-to-scalar ratio r by considering the polarization rotation angle [ α (n ˆ)] which can be separated into a background isotropic part [ α bar ] and a small anisotropic part [ Δα (n ˆ)]. Since the data of BICEP2 and Keck Array experiments have already been corrected by using the "self-calibration" method, here we mainly focus on the effects from the anisotropies of CMB polarization rotation angle. We find that including Δα (n ˆ) in the analysis could slightly weaken the constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio r, when using current CMB polarization measurements. We also simulate the mock CMB data with the BICEP3-like sensitivity. Very interestingly, we find that if the effects of the anisotropic polarization rotation angle could not be taken into account properly in the analysis, the constraints on r will be dramatically biased. This implies that we need to break the degeneracy between the anisotropies of the CMB polarization rotation angle and the CMB primordial tensor perturbations, in order to measure the signal of primordial gravitational

  12. Comparison of techniques for approximating ocean bottom topography in a wave-refraction computer model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.

    1975-01-01

    A study of the effects of using different methods for approximating bottom topography in a wave-refraction computer model was conducted. Approximation techniques involving quadratic least squares, cubic least squares, and constrained bicubic polynomial interpolation were compared for computed wave patterns and parameters in the region of Saco Bay, Maine. Although substantial local differences can be attributed to use of the different approximation techniques, results indicated that overall computed wave patterns and parameter distributions were quite similar.

  13. Evolution of nonlinear ion-acoustic solitary wave propagation in rotating plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Das, G. C.; Nag, Apratim

    2006-08-15

    A simple unmagnetized plasma rotating around an axis at an angle {theta} with the propagation direction of the acoustic mode has been taken. The nonlinear wave mode has been derived as an equivalent Sagdeev potential equation. A special procedure, known as the tanh method, has been developed to study the nonlinear wave propagation in plasma dynamics. Further, under small amplitude approximation, the nonlinear plasma acoustic mode has been exploited to study the evolution of soliton propagation in the plasma. The main emphasis has been given to the interaction of Coriolis force on the changes of coherent structure of the soliton. The solitary wave solution finds the different nature of solitons called compressive and rarefactive solitons as well as its explosions or collapses along with soliton dynamics and these have been showing exciting observations in exhibiting a narrow wave packet with the generation of high electric pressure and the growth of high energy which, in turn, yields the phenomena of radiating soliton in dynamics.

  14. Analytical approximation of transit time scattering due to magnetosonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortnik, J.; Thorne, R. M.; Ni, B.; Li, J.

    2015-03-01

    Recent test particle simulations have shown that energetic electrons traveling through fast magnetosonic (MS) wave packets can experience an effect which is specifically associated with the tight equatorial confinement of these waves, known as transit time scattering. However, such test particle simulations can be computationally cumbersome and offer limited insight into the dominant physical processes controlling the wave-particle interactions, that is, in determining the effects of the various wave parameters and equatorial confinement on the particle scattering. In this paper, we show that such nonresonant effects can be effectively captured with a straightforward analytical treatment that is made possible with a set of reasonable, simplifying assumptions. It is shown that the effect of the wave confinement, which is not captured by the standard quasi-linear theory approach, acts in such a way as to broaden the range of particle energies and pitch angles that can effectively resonate with the wave. The resulting diffusion coefficients can be readily incorporated into global diffusion models in order to test the effects of transit time scattering on the dynamical evolution of radiation belt fluxes.

  15. Generation of Whistler Wave by a Rotating Magnetic Field Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavaev, A.; Papadopoulos, K.; Shao, X.; Sharma, A. S.; Gigliotti, A.; Gekelman, W.; Pribyl, P.; Vincena, S.

    2008-12-01

    The interaction of Rotating Magnetic Fields (RMF) with plasmas is a fundamental plasma physics problem with implications to fusion related Field-Reversed Configurations (FRC), space propulsion, astronaut protection from cosmic rays in long interstellar travel, control of the energetic population in the radiation belts and near zone processes in pulsar magnetospheres. In this paper we report recent experiments on the generation of whistler waves with a new type RMF-based antenna. The experiments were conducted on UCLA's Large Plasma Device (LAPD). The Rotating Magnetic Field (RMF) is created using poly-phased loop antennas. A number of parameter combinations, e.g. plasma density, background magnetic field, and driving current, were used. It was found that RMF created by a two phase-delayed loop antenna drives significant currents along the ambient magnetic field. The measured amplitude of induced wave field was proportional to the square-root of the plasma density. The spatial decay rate for the wave perturbation across the background magnetic field was found to scale with the plasma skin depth. A small amplitude second harmonic was also measured. The paper will also present analytic and simulation results that account for the experimental results; in particular, the scaling of the induced magnetic field as a function of the RMF and plasma parameters and the spatial decay rate of magnetic field. Applications of RMF as an efficient radiation source of plasma waves in space plasmas will be discussed. This work was sponsored by ONR MURI Grant 5-28828

  16. Piezoelectric tube rotation effect owing to surface acoustic wave excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryukov, Sergey V.; Sotnikov, Andrei; Schmidt, Hagen

    2016-03-01

    It is shown experimentally that a macroscopic cylindrical solid shaped like a piezoelectric tube can be rotated due to the excitation of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) with different amplitudes propagating in opposite directions along the solid's surface. A unidirectional SAW transducer covering the whole cylindrical surface has been used for ac voltage excitation of waves with unequal amplitudes in both directions. The pattern of such a transducer consists of a periodic comb structure with two electrodes of different width per period. An external torque is not applied to the tube and, from the outside, its movement looks like a motion under the action of an internal force. The observed mechanical response of the piezoelectric cylindrical tube to excitation of waves is due to an angular momentum of SAWs, the value of which has been directly calculated from experimental results.

  17. A wave model interpretation of the evolution of rotational discontinuities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Bernard J.; Cargill, Peter J.

    1993-01-01

    A hybrid numerical code is employed to trace the evolution of rotational discontinuities (RDs). An extensive parameter variation is carried out, with particular emphasis on beta, Ti/Te, theta sub B (the angle between the normal and total magnetic field), and the helicity of the RD. The RD structure is shown to have features in common with the evolution of both strongly modulated nonlinear wave packets and linear dispersive wave propagation in oblique magnetic fields. For small theta sub B, the RD disperses linearly, giving fast and Alfven waves upstream and downstream, respectively, and the familiar S-shaped hodograms. At larger theta sub B, nonlinearity becomes important and strong coupling to a compressional (sonic) component can occur in the main current layer. The results are applied to RDs observed in the solar wind and at the magnetopause.

  18. An approximate solution to the stress and deformation states of functionally graded rotating disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondhi, Lakshman; Sanyal, Shubhashis; Saha, Kashi Nath; Bhowmick, Shubhankar

    2016-07-01

    The present work employs variational principle to investigate the stress and deformation states and estimate the limit angular speed of functionally graded high-speed rotating annular disks of constant thickness. Assuming a series approximation following Galerkin's principle, the solution of the governing equation is obtained. In the present study, elasticity modulus and density of the disk material are taken as power function of radius with the gradient parameter ranging between 0.0 and 1.0. Results obtained from numerical solutions are validated with benchmark results and are found to be in good agreement. The results are reported in dimensional form and presented graphically. The results provide a substantial insight in understanding the behavior of FGM rotating disks with constant thickness and different gradient parameter. Furthermore, the stress and deformation state of the disk at constant angular speed and limit angular speed is investigated to explain the existence of optimum gradient parameters.

  19. Asymptotic Stability of Planar Rarefaction Waves for the Relaxation Approximation of Conservation Laws in Several Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Tao

    1997-01-01

    This paper concerns the large time behavior toward planar rarefaction waves of solutions for the relaxation approximation of conservation laws in several dimensions. It is shown that a planar rarefaction wave is nonlinear stable in the sense that it is an asymptotic attractor for the relaxation approximation of conservation laws.

  20. Wave packet dynamics in the optimal superadiabatic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, V.; Goddard, B. D.; Manthe, U.

    2016-06-01

    We explain the concept of superadiabatic representations and show how in the context of electronically non-adiabatic transitions they lead to an explicit formula that can be used to predict transitions at avoided crossings. Based on this formula, we present a simple method for computing wave packet dynamics across avoided crossings. Only knowledge of the adiabatic potential energy surfaces near the avoided crossing is required for the computation. In particular, this means that no diabatization procedure is necessary, the adiabatic electronic energies can be computed on the fly, and they only need to be computed to higher accuracy when an avoided crossing is detected. We test the quality of our method on the paradigmatic example of photo-dissociation of NaI, finding very good agreement with results of exact wave packet calculations.

  1. Translation of waves along quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature two-dimensional local induction approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2015-09-01

    In a recent paper, we give a study of the purely rotational motion of general stationary states in the two-dimensional local induction approximation (2D-LIA) governing superfluid turbulence in the low-temperature limit [B. Svistunov, "Superfluid turbulence in the low-temperature limit," Phys. Rev. B 52, 3647 (1995)]. Such results demonstrated that variety of stationary configurations are possible from vortex filaments exhibiting purely rotational motion in addition to commonly discussed configurations such as helical or planar states. However, the filaments (or, more properly, waves along these filaments) can also exhibit translational motion along the axis of orientation. In contrast to the study on vortex configurations for purely rotational stationary states, the present paper considers non-stationary states which exhibit a combination of rotation and translational motions. These solutions can essentially be described as waves or disturbances which ride along straight vortex filament lines. As expected from our previous work, there are a number of types of structures that can be obtained under the 2D-LIA. We focus on non-stationary states, as stationary states exhibiting translation will essentially take the form of solutions studied in [R. A. Van Gorder, "General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation," Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014)], with the difference being translation along the reference axis, so that qualitative appearance of the solution geometry will be the same (even if there are quantitative differences). We discuss a wide variety of general properties of these non-stationary solutions and derive cases in which they reduce to known stationary states. We obtain various routes to Kelvin waves along vortex filaments and demonstrate that if the phase and amplitude of a disturbance both propagate with the same wave speed, then Kelvin waves will result. We also consider the self

  2. Translation of waves along quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature two-dimensional local induction approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2015-09-15

    In a recent paper, we give a study of the purely rotational motion of general stationary states in the two-dimensional local induction approximation (2D-LIA) governing superfluid turbulence in the low-temperature limit [B. Svistunov, “Superfluid turbulence in the low-temperature limit,” Phys. Rev. B 52, 3647 (1995)]. Such results demonstrated that variety of stationary configurations are possible from vortex filaments exhibiting purely rotational motion in addition to commonly discussed configurations such as helical or planar states. However, the filaments (or, more properly, waves along these filaments) can also exhibit translational motion along the axis of orientation. In contrast to the study on vortex configurations for purely rotational stationary states, the present paper considers non-stationary states which exhibit a combination of rotation and translational motions. These solutions can essentially be described as waves or disturbances which ride along straight vortex filament lines. As expected from our previous work, there are a number of types of structures that can be obtained under the 2D-LIA. We focus on non-stationary states, as stationary states exhibiting translation will essentially take the form of solutions studied in [R. A. Van Gorder, “General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation,” Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014)], with the difference being translation along the reference axis, so that qualitative appearance of the solution geometry will be the same (even if there are quantitative differences). We discuss a wide variety of general properties of these non-stationary solutions and derive cases in which they reduce to known stationary states. We obtain various routes to Kelvin waves along vortex filaments and demonstrate that if the phase and amplitude of a disturbance both propagate with the same wave speed, then Kelvin waves will result. We also consider the self

  3. Millimeter Wave Tunneling-Rotational Spectrum of Phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikova, L.; Daly, A. M.; Alonso, J. L.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.

    2013-06-01

    The millimeter wave spectra of phenol in the vibrational ground state and the first excited states of the bending and torsion vibrational modes have been studied in the frequency regions of 140 - 170 GHz and 280 - 360 GHz. The internal rotation of the hydroxyl group is responsible for the observed tunneling splitting into two substates (v_{t}, v_{b})^{+} and (v_{t}, v_{b})^{-} and more than 3500 distinct tunneling-rotational ^{b}R- and ^{b}Q-type transitions between them were measured and analyzed. Furthermore, accidental near degeneracies of the (+) and (-) energy levels were observed in case of the ground state and the v_{b} = 1 excited state and the analysis using a two-state effective Hamiltonian including tunneling-rotational Coriolis terms was performed. The spectroscopic constants for the first excited states of the bending and the torsion vibrational modes have been determined for the first time. The analysis of the microwave data provided very precise values of the spectroscopic constants necessary for the astrophysical search of phenol. We report a tentative detection for this molecule in the IRAM 30m line survey of Orion KL.

  4. The millimeter wave tunneling-rotational spectrum of phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesniková, L.; Daly, A. M.; Alonso, J. L.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.

    2013-07-01

    The millimeter wave spectra of phenol in the vibrational ground state and the first excited states of the bending and torsion vibrational modes have been studied in the frequency regions of 140-170 GHz and 280-360 GHz. The internal rotation of the hydroxyl group is responsible for the observed tunneling splitting into two substates (vt, vb)+ and (vt, vb)- and more than 3500 distinct tunneling-rotational bR- and bQ-type transitions between them were measured and analyzed. Furthermore, accidental near degeneracies of the (±) and (-) energy levels were observed in case of the ground state and the vb = 1 excited state and the analysis using a two-state effective Hamiltonian including tunneling-rotational Coriolis-like terms was performed. The analysis of the microwave data provided very precise values of the spectroscopic constants necessary for the astrophysical search of phenol. We report a tentative detection for this molecule in the IRAM 30m line survey of Orion KL.

  5. Lower Hybrid Wave Induced Rotation on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Ron; Podpaly, Yuri; Rice, John; Schmidt, Andrea

    2009-11-01

    Injection of RF power in the vicinity of the lower hybrid frequency has been observed to cause strong counter current rotation in Alcator C-Mod plasmas [1,2]. The spin-up rate is consistent with the rate at which momentum is injected by the LH waves, and also the rate at which fast electron momentum is transferred to the ions. A momentum diffusivity of ˜ 0.1 m^2/s is sufficient to account for the observed steady-state rotation. This value is also comparable with that derived from an analysis of rotation induced by RF mode conversion [3]. Radial force balance requires a radial electric field, suggesting a buildup of negative charge in the plasma core. This may be the result of an inward pinch of the LH produced fast electrons, as would be expected for resonant trapped particles. Analysis of the fast-electron-produced bremsstrahlung during LH power modulation experiments yields an inward pinch velocity of ˜ 1 m/s, consistent with the estimated trapped particle pinch velocity. [4pt] [1] A. Ince-Cushman, et.al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 102, 035002 (2009)[0pt] [2] J. E. Rice, et. al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 025004 (2009)[0pt] [3] Y. Lin, et.al., this meeting

  6. Phase mixed rotation magnetoconvection and Taylor's condition III. Wave trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewen, Susan A.; Soward, Andrew M.

    Nonlinear amplitude equations governing the radial modulation of quasi-geostrophic convective rolls, which occur in a rapidly rotating self-gravitating sphere permeated by a weak azimuthal magnetic field (small Elsasser number), were derived in Part I. Stationary and travelling pulse solutions were obtained in Part II. That analysis is extended here; wave train solutions are sought and their stability tested. Special features of the equations include: nonlinear diffusion and dispersion; also phase mixing, which leads to a lack of translational invariance of the system. In spite of the latter, the underlying structure of the wave trains sought is spatially periodic on a length L, but modulated by a time dependent Floquet exponent. Consequently, a Fourier representation is employed and the time evolution of the Fourier coefficients is determined numerically. It is shown that pulses confined to lengths l(< L) can be superimposed non-interactively to form wave trains. The numerical demonstration relies on establishing that the pseudo-energy based on the time averaged wave train amplitude coincides with the corresponding pulse energy E calculated in Part II. When l and L are comparable some pulse interaction can be inferred. Available numerical evidence suggests that wave trains, and by implication pulses, are unstable. The geophysical implications are discussed. All finite amplitude solutions pertain to the Ekman regime in which the modified Taylor's condition is satisfied by small magnetic field perturbations. Only in the infinite amplitude limit do the solutions determine true Taylor states. It is anticipated that following instability in the Ekman regime convection equilibrates in some large amplitude Taylor state, which is determined when additional ageostrophic effects are taken into account. Analysis of that state lies outside the range of validity of our amplitude equations.

  7. Exhaust Gas Emissions from a Rotating Detonation-wave Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kailasanath, Kazhikathra; Schwer, Douglas

    2015-11-01

    Rotating detonation-wave engines (RDE) are a form of continuous detonation-wave engines. They potentially provide further gains in performance than an intermittent or pulsed detonation-wave engine (PDE). The overall flow field in an idealized RDE, primarily consisting of two concentric cylinders, has been discussed in previous meetings. Because of the high pressures involved and the lack of adequate reaction mechanisms for this regime, previous simulations have typically used simplified chemistry models. However, understanding the exhaust species concentrations in propulsion devices is important for both performance considerations as well as estimating pollutant emissions. Progress towards addressing this need will be discussed in this talk. In this approach, an induction parameter model is used for simulating the detonation but a more detailed finite-chemistry model including NOx chemistry is used in the expansion flow region, where the pressures are lower and the uncertainties in the chemistry model are greatly reduced. Results show that overall radical concentrations in the exhaust flow are substantially lower than from earlier predictions with simplified models. The performance of a baseline hydrogen/air RDE increased from 4940 s to 5000 s with the expansion flow chemistry, due to recombination of radicals and more production of H2O, resulting in additional heat release. Work sponsored by the Office of Naval Research.

  8. Translational and rotational near-wall diffusion of spherical colloids studied by evanescent wave scattering.

    PubMed

    Lisicki, Maciej; Cichocki, Bogdan; Rogers, Simon A; Dhont, Jan K G; Lang, Peter R

    2014-06-28

    In this article we extend recent experimental developments [Rogers et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2012, 109, 098305] by providing a suitable theoretical framework for the derivation of exact expressions for the first cumulant (initial decay rate) of the correlation function measured in Evanescent Wave Dynamic Light Scattering (EWDLS) experiments. We focus on a dilute suspension of optically anisotropic spherical Brownian particles diffusing near a planar hard wall. In such a system, translational and rotational diffusion are hindered by hydrodynamic interactions with the boundary which reflects the flow incident upon it, affecting the motion of colloids. The validity of the approximation by the first cumulant for moderate times is assessed by juxtaposition to Brownian dynamics simulations, and compared with experimental results. The presented method for the analysis of experimental data allows the determination of penetration-depth-averaged rotational diffusion coefficients of spherical colloids at low density. PMID:24788942

  9. Gravity Wave Emission by Spontaneous Imbalance of Baroclinic Waves in the Continuously Stratified Rotating Annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchert, S.; Achatz, U.; Rieper, F.; Fruman, M. D.

    2012-04-01

    We use a numerical model of the classic differentially heated rotating annulus experiment to study the spontaneous emission of gravity waves (GWs) from jet stream imbalances, which is a major source of these waves in the atmosphere for which no satisfactory parameterization exists. Atmospheric observations are the main tool for the testing and verification of theoretical concepts but have their limitations. Given their specific potential for yielding reproducible data and for studying process dependence on external system parameters, laboratory experiments are an invaluable complementary tool. Experiments with a rotating annulus exhibiting a jet modulated by large-scale waves due to baroclinic instability have already been used to study GWs: Williams et al (2008) observed spontaneously emitted interfacial GWs in a two-layer flow, and Jacoby et al (2011) detected GWs emitted from boundary-layer instabilities in a differentially heated rotating annulus. Employing a new finite-volume code for the numerical simulation of a continuously stratified liquid in a differentially heated rotating annulus, we here investigate whether such an experiment might be useful for studies of spontaneous imbalance. A major problem was the identification of experimental parameters yielding an atmosphere-like regime where the Brunt-Vaisala frequency is larger than the inertial frequency, so that energy transport by the lowest-frequency waves is predominantly horizontal while high-frequency GWs transport energy vertically. We show that this is indeed the case for a wide and shallow annulus with relatively large temperature difference between the inner and outer cylinder walls. We also show that this set-up yields a conspicuous signal in the horizontal divergence field close to the meandering jet. Various analyses support the notion that this signal is predominantly due to GWs superposed on a geostrophic flow. Jacoby, T. N. L., Read, P. L., Williams, P. D. and Young, R. M. B., 2011

  10. The use of the plane wave fluid-structure interaction loading approximation in NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    The Plane Wave Approximation (PWA) is widely used in finite element analysis to implement the loading generated by an underwater shock wave. The method required to implement the PWA in NASTRAN is presented along with example problems. A theoretical background is provided and the limitations of the PWA are discussed.

  11. The millimeter-wave rotational spectrum of tertiary butyl isocyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisiel, Z.

    1992-02-01

    The millimeter-wave rotational spectrum of tertiary butyl isocyanide, (CH 3) 3CNC, was measured in the ground state and in the first excited state of the doubly degenerate CNC bending mode vβ. Accurate spectroscopic constants for both states have been determined from frequency measurements spanning the range 146-333 GHz. The results are compared with those for tertiary butyl cyanide, for which improved ground state sextic distortion constants are reported. The experimental quartic centrifugal distortion constants and the Coriolis coupling constant ξβ are well reproduced by a rudimentary force field calculation. Coriolis coupling constants for bending modes of linear segments attached to symmetric top C3 v molecules based on a tetrahedrally substituted carbon atom are compared and factors responsible for changes in their values are identified and discussed.

  12. Gravitational wave signatures from low-mode spiral instabilities in rapidly rotating supernova cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Takami; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei

    2014-02-01

    We study properties of gravitational waves (GWs) from the rotating core collapse of a 15M⊙ star by performing three-dimensional general-relativistic hydrodynamic simulations with an approximate neutrino transport. By parametrically changing the precollapse angular momentum, we focus on the effects of rotation on the GW signatures in the early postbounce evolution. Regarding three-flavor neutrino transport, we solve the energy-averaged set of radiation energy and momentum based on the Thorne's momentum formalism. In addition to the gravitational quadrupole radiation from matter motions, we take into account GWs from anisotropic neutrino emission. With these computations, our results present supporting evidence for the previous anticipation that nonaxisymmetric instabilities play an essential role in determining the postbounce GW signatures. During prompt convection, we find that the waveforms show narrow-band and highly quasiperiodic signals which persist until the end of simulations. We point out that such features reflect the growth of the one-armed spiral modes. The typical frequency of the quasiperiodic waveforms can be well explained by the propagating acoustic waves between the stalled shock and the rotating proto-neutron star surface, which suggests the appearance of the standing-accretion-shock instability. Although the GW signals exhibit strong variability between the two polarizations and different observer directions, they are within the detection limits of next-generation detectors such as KAGRA and Advanced LIGO, if the source with sufficient angular momentum is located in our Galaxy.

  13. Accuracy of the water column approximation in numerically simulating propagation of teleseismic PP waves and Rayleigh waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Ni, Sidao; Chu, Risheng; Yao, Huajian

    2016-06-01

    Numerical solvers of wave equations have been widely used to simulate global seismic waves including PP waves for modeling 410/660 km discontinuity and Rayleigh waves for imaging crustal structure. In order to avoid extra computation cost due to ocean water effects, these numerical solvers usually adopt water column approximation, whose accuracy depends on frequency and needs to be investigated quantitatively. In this paper, we describe a unified representation of accurate and approximate forms of the equivalent water column boundary condition as well as the free boundary condition. Then we derive an analytical form of the PP-wave reflection coefficient with the unified boundary condition, and quantify the effects of water column approximation on amplitude and phase shift of the PP waves. We also study the effects of water column approximation on phase velocity dispersion of the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave with a propagation matrix method. We find that with the water column approximation: (1) The error of PP amplitude and phase shift is less than 5% and 9 ° at periods greater than 25 s for most oceanic regions. But at periods of 15 s or less, PP is inaccurate up to 10% in amplitude and a few seconds in time shift for deep oceans. (2) The error in Rayleigh wave phase velocity is less than 1% at periods greater than 30 s in most oceanic regions, but the error is up to 2% for deep oceans at periods of 20 s or less. This study confirms that the water column approximation is only accurate at long periods and it needs to be improved at shorter periods.

  14. Accuracy of the water column approximation in numerically simulating propagation of teleseismic PP waves and Rayleigh waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Ni, Sidao; Chu, Risheng; Yao, Huajian

    2016-08-01

    Numerical solvers of wave equations have been widely used to simulate global seismic waves including PP waves for modelling 410/660 km discontinuity and Rayleigh waves for imaging crustal structure. In order to avoid extra computation cost due to ocean water effects, these numerical solvers usually adopt water column approximation, whose accuracy depends on frequency and needs to be investigated quantitatively. In this paper, we describe a unified representation of accurate and approximate forms of the equivalent water column boundary condition as well as the free boundary condition. Then we derive an analytical form of the PP-wave reflection coefficient with the unified boundary condition, and quantify the effects of water column approximation on amplitude and phase shift of the PP waves. We also study the effects of water column approximation on phase velocity dispersion of the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave with a propagation matrix method. We find that with the water column approximation: (1) The error of PP amplitude and phase shift is less than 5 per cent and 9° at periods greater than 25 s for most oceanic regions. But at periods of 15 s or less, PP is inaccurate up to 10 per cent in amplitude and a few seconds in time shift for deep oceans. (2) The error in Rayleigh wave phase velocity is less than 1 per cent at periods greater than 30 s in most oceanic regions, but the error is up to 2 per cent for deep oceans at periods of 20 s or less. This study confirms that the water column approximation is only accurate at long periods and it needs to be improved at shorter periods.

  15. Short-scale convection and long-scale deformationally unstable Rossby wave in a rotating fluid layer heated from below

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhomolov, Evgeniy

    1996-12-01

    A rotating fluid layer, heated from below, with a deformable upper and nondeformable lower stress free surfaces is considered in the Boussinesq approximation. The system of the differential equations that governs the long-scale Rossby waves and short-scale convection is obtained in the rapid-rotation approximation. Long-scale flows are unstable due to heating and deformation of the upper surface. The neutral stability curves for Rossby waves and convection are obtained for linearized version of the equations. In a slightly supercritical regime the amplitude equations for convection and Rossby waves are derived by the use of the method of multiscale expansions. The properties of the amplitude equations are discussed. The existence of the two weakly supercritical stationary convection regimes is shown by numerical integration of the equations in the rapid-rotation approximation. In one of them, the amplitude of short-scale convection is modulated due to long-scale deformation of the upper surface associated with the excitation of the Rossby wave. In the other regime, the presence of deformation gives rise to alternating regions with and without convection.

  16. Low-frequency internal waves in magnetized rotating stellar radiation zones. II. Angular momentum transport with a toroidal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathis, S.; de Brye, N.

    2012-04-01

    Context. With the progress of observational constraints on dynamical processes in stars, it becomes necessary to understand the angular momentum and the rotation profile history. In this context, internal waves constitute an efficient transport mechanism over long distances in stellar radiation zones. Indeed, they could be one of the mechanisms responsible for the quasi-flat rotation profile of the solar radiative region up to 0.2 R⊙. Aims: Angular momentum transport induced by internal waves depends on the properties of their excitation regions and of their dissipation during propagation. Then, the bottom of convective envelopes (the top of convective cores, respectively) are differentially rotating magnetic layers while radiation zones may host fossil magnetic fields. It is therefore necessary to understand the modification of internal wave mechanisms by both rotation and magnetic fields. Methods: We continue our previous work by proceeding step by step. We analytically built a complete formalism that treats the angular momentum transport by internal waves while taking into account both the Coriolis acceleration and the Lorentz force in a non-perturbative way for an axisymmetric toroidal field. We assumed a uniform Alfvén frequency and a weak differential rotation to isolate the transport properties as a function of the Rossby and Elsasser numbers. Results: We examined the different possible approximations to describe low-frequency internal waves modified by the Coriolis acceleration and the Lorentz force in a deep spherical shell. The complete structure of these waves, which become magneto-gravito-inertial waves, is given assuming the quasi-linear approximation first in the adiabatic case and then in the dissipative one. Vertical and equatorial trapping phenomena appear that favor retrograde waves. The efficiency of the induced transport as a function of the Rossby and Elsasser numbers is then obtained. Conclusions: A complete study of the transport of

  17. Approximate analytical time-domain Green's functions for the Caputo fractional wave equation.

    PubMed

    Kelly, James F; McGough, Robert J

    2016-08-01

    The Caputo fractional wave equation [Geophys. J. R. Astron. Soc. 13, 529-539 (1967)] models power-law attenuation and dispersion for both viscoelastic and ultrasound wave propagation. The Caputo model can be derived from an underlying fractional constitutive equation and is causal. In this study, an approximate analytical time-domain Green's function is derived for the Caputo equation in three dimensions (3D) for power law exponents greater than one. The Green's function consists of a shifted and scaled maximally skewed stable distribution multiplied by a spherical spreading factor 1/(4πR). The approximate one dimensional (1D) and two dimensional (2D) Green's functions are also computed in terms of stable distributions. Finally, this Green's function is decomposed into a loss component and a diffraction component, revealing that the Caputo wave equation may be approximated by a coupled lossless wave equation and a fractional diffusion equation. PMID:27586735

  18. The choice of optimal Discrete Interaction Approximation to the kinetic integral for ocean waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polnikov, V. G.

    A lot of discrete configurations for the four-wave nonlinear interaction processes have been calculated and tested by the method proposed earlier in the frame of the concept of Fast Discrete Interaction Approximation to the Hasselmann's kinetic integral (Polnikov and Farina, 2002). It was found that there are several simple configurations, which are more efficient than the one proposed originally in Hasselmann et al. (1985). Finally, the optimal multiple Discrete Interaction Approximation (DIA) to the kinetic integral for deep-water waves was found. Wave spectrum features have been intercompared for a number of different configurations of DIA, applied to a long-time solution of kinetic equation. On the basis of this intercomparison the better efficiency of the configurations proposed was confirmed. Certain recommendations were given for implementation of new approximations to the wave forecast practice.

  19. Periodic standing-wave approximation: Overview and three-dimensional scalar models

    SciTech Connect

    Andrade, Zeferino; Beetle, Christopher; Blinov, Alexey; Bromley, Benjamin; Burko, Lior M.; Cranor, Maria; Price, Richard H.; Owen, Robert

    2004-09-15

    The periodic standing-wave method for binary inspiral computes the exact numerical solution for periodic binary motion with standing gravitational waves, and uses it as an approximation to slow binary inspiral with outgoing waves. Important features of this method presented here are: (i) the mathematical nature of the 'mixed' partial differential equations to be solved (ii) the meaning of standing waves in the method (iii) computational difficulties, and (iv) the 'effective linearity' that ultimately justifies the approximation. The method is applied to three-dimensional nonlinear scalar model problems, and the numerical results are used to demonstrate extraction of the outgoing solution from the standing-wave solution, and the role of effective linearity.

  20. ANALYTIC APPROXIMATE SEISMOLOGY OF PROPAGATING MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Goossens, M.; Soler, R.; Arregui, I.

    2012-12-01

    Observations show that propagating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere. The technique of MHD seismology uses the wave observations combined with MHD wave theory to indirectly infer physical parameters of the solar atmospheric plasma and magnetic field. Here, we present an analytical seismological inversion scheme for propagating MHD waves. This scheme uses the observational information on wavelengths and damping lengths in a consistent manner, along with observed values of periods or phase velocities, and is based on approximate asymptotic expressions for the theoretical values of wavelengths and damping lengths. The applicability of the inversion scheme is discussed and an example is given.

  1. Dust Rotation Effects on DIA Surface Waves in a Semi-bounded Lorentzian Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myoung-Jae

    2008-09-07

    The dispersion relation for a dust ion-acoustic (DIA) surface wave is kinetically derived for the semi-bounded Lorentzian plasma containing elongated and rotating charged dust particles. The DIA surface wave frequency is found to be decreased as the dust rotational frequency increases.

  2. Rotation-vibrational states of H3+ and the adiabatic approximation.

    PubMed

    Alijah, Alexander; Hinze, Juergen

    2006-11-15

    We discuss recent progress in the calculation and identification of rotation-vibrational states of H3+ at intermediate energies up to 13,000 cm(-1). Our calculations are based on the potential energy surface of Cencek et al. which is of sub-microhartree accuracy. As this surface includes diagonal adiabatic and relativistic corrections to the fixed nuclei electronic energies, the remaining discrepancies between our calculated and experimental data should be due to the neglect of non-adiabatic coupling to excited electronic states in the calculations. To account for this, our calculated energy values were adjusted empirically by a simple correction formula. Based on our understanding of the adiabatic approximation, we suggest two new approaches to account for the off-diagonal adiabatic correction, which should work; however, they have not been tested yet for H3+. Theoretical predictions made for the above-barrier energy region of recent experimental interest are accurate to 0.35 cm(-1) or better. PMID:17015396

  3. Faraday rotation, band splitting, and one-way propagation of plasmon waves on a nanoparticle chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, N. A.; Stroud, D.

    2016-03-01

    We calculate the dispersion relations of plasmonic waves propagating along a chain of semiconducting or metallic nanoparticles in the presence of both a static magnetic field B and a liquid crystalline host. The dispersion relations are obtained using the quasistatic approximation and a dipole-dipole approximation to treat the interaction between surface plasmons on different nanoparticles. For plasmons propagating along a particle chain in a nematic liquid crystalline host with both B and the director parallel to the chain, we find a small, but finite, Faraday rotation angle. For B perpendicular to the chain, but director still parallel to the chain, the field couples the longitudinal and one of the two transverse plasmonic branches. This coupling is shown to split the two branches at the zero field crossing by an amount proportional to |B | . In a cholesteric liquid crystal host and an applied magnetic field parallel to the chain, the dispersion relations for left- and right-moving waves are found to be different. For some frequencies, the plasmonic wave propagates only in one of the two directions.

  4. The critical layer for gravity waves in sheared rotating stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, Christophe; Lott, Francois

    2012-11-01

    We re-examined the propagation of gravity waves through a critical layer surrounded by two inertial levels in the case of a constant vertically sheared flow. This problem involves a transition from balanced (where the quasi-geostrophic approximation applies) to sheared gravity waves. The three-dimensional disturbance is described analytically using both an exact solution and a WKB approximation valid for large Richardson numbers. In contradiction with past studies which show that there is finite reflection and did not analyse the transmission (Yamanaka and Tanaka, 1984), we find that reflection is extremely too small to be significant. The reasons that previous authors made incorrect evaluations are related to the fact that (i) the equations yielding to these results are extremely involved and (ii) the values of reflection and transmission coefficients are exponentially small or null, e.g. quite difficult to cross check numerically. Interestingly, these values are exactly like in the much simpler non-rotating case analysed by Booker and Bretherton (1966). Some practical implications for the problem of the emission of gravity waves by potential vorticity anomalies, analysed recently in Lott et al. (2013), are also discussed.

  5. Generation of magnetoacoustic zonal flows by Alfven waves in a rotating plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Lominadze, J. G.; Churikov, A. P.; Erokhin, N. N.; Tsypin, V. S.; Smolyakov, A. I.; Galvao, R. M. O.

    2007-08-15

    Analytical theory of nonlinear generation of magnetoacoustic zonal flows in a rotating plasma is developed. As the primary modes causing such a generation, a totality of the Alfven waves are considered, along with the kinetic, inertial, and rotational. It is shown that in all these cases of the Alfven waves the generation is possible if the double plasma rotation frequency exceeds the zonal flow frequency.

  6. A simple approximation for wave refraction - Application to the assessment of the nearshore wave directionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Ruiz, Alejandro; Solari, Sebastián; Ortega-Sánchez, Miguel; Losada, Miguel

    2015-12-01

    This work presents a simple and relatively quick methodology to obtain the nearshore wave angle. The method is especially valuable for curvilinear coasts where Snell's law may provide excessively inaccurate results. We defined a correction factor, K, that depends on the geometry of the coast and on the wave climate. The values of this coefficient were obtained minimizing the differences with a sophisticated numerical model. The limitations and performance of the methodology are further discussed. The procedure was applied to a beach in Southern Spain to analyze the influence of shoreline geometry on nearshore wave directionality. Offshore and nearshore distributions of wave period and directions were analyzed, and the results showed that the geometry of the coast played a crucial role in the directionality of the nearshore waves, which also plays an important role in hydrodynamics. The methodology presented here is able to analyze and quantify the importance of this directionality without a noticeable computational cost, even when a long time series of wave data are considered. Hence, this methodology constitutes a useful and efficient tool for practical applications in Coastal and Ocean Engineering, such as sedimentary, wave energy, and wave climate studies.

  7. AN EFFICIENT APPROXIMATION TO THE LIKELIHOOD FOR GRAVITATIONAL WAVE STOCHASTIC BACKGROUND DETECTION USING PULSAR TIMING DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J. A.; Siemens, X.; Van Haasteren, R.

    2013-05-20

    Direct detection of gravitational waves by pulsar timing arrays will become feasible over the next few years. In the low frequency regime (10{sup -7} Hz-10{sup -9} Hz), we expect that a superposition of gravitational waves from many sources will manifest itself as an isotropic stochastic gravitational wave background. Currently, a number of techniques exist to detect such a signal; however, many detection methods are computationally challenging. Here we introduce an approximation to the full likelihood function for a pulsar timing array that results in computational savings proportional to the square of the number of pulsars in the array. Through a series of simulations we show that the approximate likelihood function reproduces results obtained from the full likelihood function. We further show, both analytically and through simulations, that, on average, this approximate likelihood function gives unbiased parameter estimates for astrophysically realistic stochastic background amplitudes.

  8. Calculating Rotating Hydrodynamic and Magnetohydrodynamic Waves to Understand Magnetic Effects on Dynamical Tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xing

    2016-09-01

    To understand magnetic effects on dynamical tides, we study the rotating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow driven by harmonic forcing. The linear responses are analytically derived in a periodic box under the local WKB approximation. Both the kinetic and Ohmic dissipations at the resonant frequencies are calculated, and the various parameters are investigated. Although magnetic pressure may be negligible compared to thermal pressure, the magnetic field can be important for the first-order perturbation, e.g., dynamical tides. It is found that the magnetic field splits the resonant frequency, namely the rotating hydrodynamic flow has only one resonant frequency, but the rotating MHD flow has two, one positive and the other negative. In the weak field regime the dissipations are asymmetric around the two resonant frequencies and this asymmetry is more striking with a weaker magnetic field. It is also found that both the kinetic and Ohmic dissipations at the resonant frequencies are inversely proportional to the Ekman number and the square of the wavenumber. The dissipation at the resonant frequency on small scales is almost equal to the dissipation at the non-resonant frequencies, namely the resonance takes its effect on the dissipation at intermediate length scales. Moreover, the waves with phase propagation that is perpendicular to the magnetic field are much more damped. It is also interesting to find that the frequency-averaged dissipation is constant. This result suggests that in compact objects, magnetic effects on tidal dissipation should be considered.

  9. Self-consistent internal structure of a rotating gaseous planet and its comparison with an approximation by oblate spheroidal equidensity surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Dali; Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald

    2015-12-01

    In an important paper, Roberts (1963b) studied the hydrostatic equilibrium of an isolated, self-gravitating, rapidly rotating polytropic gaseous body based on a controversial assumption/approximation that all (outer and internal) equidensity surfaces are in the shape of oblate spheroids whose eccentricities are a function of the equatorial radius and whose axes of symmetry are parallel to the rotation axis. We compute the three-dimensional, finite-element, fully self-consistent, continuous solution for a rapidly rotating polytropic gaseous body with Jupiter-like parameters without making any prior assumptions about its outer shape and internal structure. Upon partially relaxing the Roberts' approximation by assuming that only the outer equidensity surface is in the shape of an oblate spheroid, we also compute a finite-element solution with the same parameters without making any prior assumptions about its internal structure. It is found that all equidensity surfaces of the fully self-consistent solution differ only slightly from the oblate spheroidal shape. It is also found that the characteristic difference between the fully self-consistent solution and the outer-spheroidal-shape solution is insignificantly small. Our results suggest that the Roberts' assumption of spheroidal equidensity surfaces represents a reasonably accurate approximation for rotating polytropic gaseous bodies with Jupiter-like parameters. The numerical accuracy of our finite-element solution is checked by an exact analytic solution based on the Green's function using the spheroidal wave function. The three different solutions in non-spherical geometries - the fully self-consistent numerical solution, the numerical solution with the outer spheroidal shape and the exact analytical solution - can also serve as a useful benchmark for other solutions based on different numerical methods.

  10. The Detectability of Millimeter-wave Molecular Rotational Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liszt, Harvey S.; Pety, Jerome

    2016-06-01

    Elaborating on a formalism that was first expressed some 40 years ago, we consider the brightness of low-lying millimeter-wave rotational lines of strongly polar molecules at the threshold of detectability. We derive a simple expression relating the brightness to the line-of-sight integral of the product of the total gas and molecular number densities and a suitably defined temperature-dependent excitation rate into the upper level of the transition. Detectability of a line is contingent only on the ability of a molecule to channel enough of the ambient thermal energy into the line, and the excitation can be computed in bulk by summing over rates without solving the multi-level rate equations, or computing optical depths and excitation temperatures. Results for {{HCO}}+, HNC, and CS are compared with escape-probability solutions of the rate equations using closed-form expressions for the expected range of validity of our ansatz, with the result that gas number densities as high as {10}4 {{{cm}}}-3 or optical depths as high as 100 can be accommodated in some cases. For densities below a well-defined upper bound, the range of validity of the discussion can be cast as an upper bound on the line brightness which is 0.3 K for the J = 1–0 lines and 0.8–1.7 K for the J = 2–1 lines of these species. The discussion casts new light on the interpretation of line brightnesses under conditions of weak excitation, simplifies derivation of physical parameters, and eliminates the need to construct grids of numerical solutions of the rate equations.

  11. Experimental observation of steady inertial wave turbulence in deep rotating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarom, Ehud; Sharon, Eran

    2015-11-01

    We present experimental evidence of inertial wave turbulence in deep rotating fluid. Experiments were performed in a rotating cylindrical water tank, where previous work showed statistics similar to 2D turbulence (specifically an inverse energy cascade). Using Fourier analysis of high resolution data in both space (3D) and time we show that most of the energy of a steady state flow is contained around the inertial wave dispersion relation. The nonlinear interaction between the waves is manifested by the widening of the time spectrum around the dispersion relation. We show that as the Rossby number increases so does the spectrum width, with a strong dependence on wave number. Our results suggest that in some parameters range, rotating turbulence velocity field can be represented as a field of interacting waves (wave turbulence). Such formalism may provide a better understanding of the flow statistics. This work was supported by the Israel Science Foundation, Grant No. 81/12.

  12. Dispersion relation for small amplitude sound waves in rotating newtonian fluids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marín-Antuña, José; Hernández-Rodríguez, Arezky; Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar

    1996-11-01

    For a rotating newtonian fluid (which is viscous and compressible), the linearized Navier-Stokes equation, the continuity equation and the equation for isoentropic process are simultaneosly considered to obtain an equation for pressure waves. This equation is solved to get the dispersion law for such waves. In the dispersion law an adimensional parameter τ is used, which is given by the relation between the characteristic damping wave time and the period of the fluid rotation. The limit of a viscous compressible static fluid is obtained. The numerical results of the dispersion relation are given for different values of the angle between the direction of the wave propagation and the rotation axis and for the values of τ. The existence of gaps and of a typical wave guide effect are reported. The dispersion relation of the modes are given for the real and the imaginary parts of the wave vector.

  13. Polynomial scaling approximations and dynamic correlation corrections to doubly occupied configuration interaction wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Raemdonck, Mario; Alcoba, Diego R.; Poelmans, Ward; De Baerdemacker, Stijn; Torre, Alicia; Lain, Luis; Massaccesi, Gustavo E.; Van Neck, Dimitri; Bultinck, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    A class of polynomial scaling methods that approximate Doubly Occupied Configuration Interaction (DOCI) wave functions and improve the description of dynamic correlation is introduced. The accuracy of the resulting wave functions is analysed by comparing energies and studying the overlap between the newly developed methods and full configuration interaction wave functions, showing that a low energy does not necessarily entail a good approximation of the exact wave function. Due to the dependence of DOCI wave functions on the single-particle basis chosen, several orbital optimisation algorithms are introduced. An energy-based algorithm using the simulated annealing method is used as a benchmark. As a computationally more affordable alternative, a seniority number minimising algorithm is developed and compared to the energy based one revealing that the seniority minimising orbital set performs well. Given a well-chosen orbital basis, it is shown that the newly developed DOCI based wave functions are especially suitable for the computationally efficient description of static correlation and to lesser extent dynamic correlation.

  14. One-way approximation for the simulation of weak shock wave propagation in atmospheric flows.

    PubMed

    Gallin, Louis-Jonardan; Rénier, Mathieu; Gaudard, Eric; Farges, Thomas; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François

    2014-05-01

    A numerical scheme is developed to simulate the propagation of weak acoustic shock waves in the atmosphere with no absorption. It generalizes the method previously developed for a heterogeneous medium [Dagrau, Rénier, Marchiano, and Coulouvrat, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 130, 20-32 (2011)] to the case of a moving medium. It is based on an approximate scalar wave equation for potential, rewritten in a moving time frame, and separated into three parts: (i) the linear wave equation in a homogeneous and quiescent medium, (ii) the effects of atmospheric winds and of density and speed of sound heterogeneities, and (iii) nonlinearities. Each effect is then solved separately by an adapted method: angular spectrum for the wave equation, finite differences for the flow and heterogeneity corrections, and analytical method in time domain for nonlinearities. To keep a one-way formulation, only forward propagating waves are kept in the angular spectrum part, while a wide-angle parabolic approximation is performed on the correction terms. The numerical process is validated in the case of guided modal propagation with a shear flow. It is then applied to the case of blast wave propagation within a boundary layer flow over a flat and rigid ground. PMID:24815240

  15. Polynomial scaling approximations and dynamic correlation corrections to doubly occupied configuration interaction wave functions.

    PubMed

    Van Raemdonck, Mario; Alcoba, Diego R; Poelmans, Ward; De Baerdemacker, Stijn; Torre, Alicia; Lain, Luis; Massaccesi, Gustavo E; Van Neck, Dimitri; Bultinck, Patrick

    2015-09-14

    A class of polynomial scaling methods that approximate Doubly Occupied Configuration Interaction (DOCI) wave functions and improve the description of dynamic correlation is introduced. The accuracy of the resulting wave functions is analysed by comparing energies and studying the overlap between the newly developed methods and full configuration interaction wave functions, showing that a low energy does not necessarily entail a good approximation of the exact wave function. Due to the dependence of DOCI wave functions on the single-particle basis chosen, several orbital optimisation algorithms are introduced. An energy-based algorithm using the simulated annealing method is used as a benchmark. As a computationally more affordable alternative, a seniority number minimising algorithm is developed and compared to the energy based one revealing that the seniority minimising orbital set performs well. Given a well-chosen orbital basis, it is shown that the newly developed DOCI based wave functions are especially suitable for the computationally efficient description of static correlation and to lesser extent dynamic correlation. PMID:26374017

  16. Localized waves supported by the rotating waveguide array.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao; Ye, Fangwei; Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Vysloukh, Victor A; Chen, Xianfeng

    2016-09-01

    We show that truncated rotating square waveguide arrays support new types of localized modes that exist even in the linear case, in complete contrast to localized excitations in nonrotating arrays requiring nonlinearity for their existence and forming above the energy flow threshold. These new modes appear either around an array center, since the rotation leads to the emergence of the effective attractive potential with a minimum at the rotation axis, or in the array corners, in which case localization occurs due to competition between the centrifugal force and total internal reflection at the interface of the truncated array. The degree of localization of the central and corner modes mediated by the rotation increases with the rotation frequency. The stable rotating soliton families bifurcating from linear modes are analyzed in both focusing and defocusing media. PMID:27607984

  17. Effective medium approximation for effective propagation constant calculation in a dense random medium. [electromagnetic wave scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, P. Y.; Fung, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    The effective medium approximation (EMA) formalism developed for scalar wave calculations in solid state physics is generalized to electromagnetic wave scattering in a dense random medium. Results are applied to compute the effective propagation constant in a dense medium involving discrete spherical scatterers. When compared with a common quasicrystalline approximation (QCA), it is found that EMA accounts for backward scattering and the effect of correlation among three scatterers which are not available in QCA. It is also found that there is not much difference in the calculated normalized phase velocity between the use of these two approximations. However, there is a significant difference in the computed effective loss tangent in a nonabsorptive random medium. The computed effective loss tangent using EMA and measurements from a snow medium are compared, showing good agreement.

  18. Gravity jitter effected slosh waves and the stability of a rotating bubble under microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Lee, C. C.; Leslie, F. W.

    1991-01-01

    The instability of liquid and gas interface can be induced by the pressure of longitudinal and lateral accelerations, vehicle vibration, and rotational fields of spacecraft in a microgravity environment. Characteristics of slosh waves excited by the restoring force field of gravity jitters have been investigated. Results show that lower frequency gravity jitters excite slosh wave with higher ratio of maximum amplitude to wave length than that of the slosh waves generated by the higher frequency gravity jitters.

  19. Estimation of aquifer dimensions from passive seismic signals with approximate wave propagation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lähivaara, Timo; Ward, Nicholas F. Dudley; Huttunen, Tomi; Koponen, Janne; Kaipio, Jari P.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, it has been proposed that spontaneous seismic activity could be used in the estimation of hydrological parameters of aquifers such as permeability and storage. Approximate wave propagation models such as ray tracing, which are commonly used in hydrological parameter estimation with active sources and backscattering geometry, are not feasible with passive seismological imaging. With respect to full wave propagation models, the most accurate known model for aquifers is the poroelastic model while bedrock is usually modelled as an elastic medium. Using a poroelastic model in the forward model can be a computationally impractical choice. In this paper, we carry out a feasibility study in which we attempt to estimate the aquifer depth and water table using a highly approximate elastic model also for the aquifer. We adopt the Bayesian approximation error approach in which a statistical model is constructed for the errors that are induced by using model approximations such as sparse meshing and simplified physical models. We consider the problem in a simple two-dimensional geometry and show that straightforward adoption of approximate models leads to inconsistent parameter estimates, that is, the true parameters have essentially vanishing posterior density. On the other hand, using the Bayesian approximation error approach, the parameter estimates are consistent.

  20. Equation of State Dependence of Gravitational Waves from Rapidly Rotating Core-Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richers, Sherwood; Ott, Christian D.; Abdikamalov, Ernazar

    2016-03-01

    We carry out axisymmetric simulations of rotating core-collapse, exploring over 92 precollapse rotational configurations and 18 different finite-temperature microphysical equations of state (EOS) using the general-relativistic hydrodynamical code CoCoNuT. Our focus is on gravitational wave (GW) emission. We find that the GW wave signature depends systematically on the rotation rate of the inner core at bounce and the compactness of the protoneutron star (PNS), set by the EOS and rotation. The GW signal from core bounce is almost independent of the EOS. However, the frequency of the post-bounce ring down signal from the fundamental quadrupole oscillation mode of the PNS is dependent on both rotation and the EOS, increasing with rotation rate and compactness. We will discuss the origin of the EOS-dependent f-mode frequency variation and its potential observability with Advanced LIGO.

  1. Geometric phases of the Faraday rotation of electromagnetic waves in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jian; Qin Hong

    2012-10-15

    Geometric phases of circularly polarized electromagnetic waves in nonuniform magnetized plasmas is studied theoretically. The variation of the propagation direction of circularly polarized waves results in a geometric phase, which also contributes to the Faraday rotation, in addition to the standard dynamical phase. The origin and properties of the geometric phase are investigated. The influence of the geometric phase to plasma diagnostics using the Faraday rotation is discussed as an application of the theory.

  2. Geometric Phase Of The Faraday Rotation Of Electromagnetic Waves In Magnetized Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jian Liu and Hong Qin

    2011-11-07

    The geometric phase of circularly polarized electromagnetic waves in nonuniform magnetized plasmas is studied theoretically. The variation of the propagation direction of circularly polarized waves results in a geometric phase, which also contributes to the Faraday rotation, in addition to the standard dynamical phase. The origin and properties of the geometric phase is investigated. The in uence of the geometric phase to plasma diagnostics using Faraday rotation is also discussed as an application of the theory.

  3. Rotational manipulation of single cells and organisms using acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Daniel; Ozcelik, Adem; Bojanala, Nagagireesh; Nama, Nitesh; Upadhyay, Awani; Chen, Yuchao; Hanna-Rose, Wendy; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-01-01

    The precise rotational manipulation of single cells or organisms is invaluable to many applications in biology, chemistry, physics and medicine. In this article, we describe an acoustic-based, on-chip manipulation method that can rotate single microparticles, cells and organisms. To achieve this, we trapped microbubbles within predefined sidewall microcavities inside a microchannel. In an acoustic field, trapped microbubbles were driven into oscillatory motion generating steady microvortices which were utilized to precisely rotate colloids, cells and entire organisms (that is, C. elegans). We have tested the capabilities of our method by analysing reproductive system pathologies and nervous system morphology in C. elegans. Using our device, we revealed the underlying abnormal cell fusion causing defective vulval morphology in mutant worms. Our acoustofluidic rotational manipulation (ARM) technique is an easy-to-use, compact, and biocompatible method, permitting rotation regardless of optical, magnetic or electrical properties of the sample under investigation. PMID:27004764

  4. Rotational manipulation of single cells and organisms using acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Daniel; Ozcelik, Adem; Bojanala, Nagagireesh; Nama, Nitesh; Upadhyay, Awani; Chen, Yuchao; Hanna-Rose, Wendy; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-01-01

    The precise rotational manipulation of single cells or organisms is invaluable to many applications in biology, chemistry, physics and medicine. In this article, we describe an acoustic-based, on-chip manipulation method that can rotate single microparticles, cells and organisms. To achieve this, we trapped microbubbles within predefined sidewall microcavities inside a microchannel. In an acoustic field, trapped microbubbles were driven into oscillatory motion generating steady microvortices which were utilized to precisely rotate colloids, cells and entire organisms (that is, C. elegans). We have tested the capabilities of our method by analysing reproductive system pathologies and nervous system morphology in C. elegans. Using our device, we revealed the underlying abnormal cell fusion causing defective vulval morphology in mutant worms. Our acoustofluidic rotational manipulation (ARM) technique is an easy-to-use, compact, and biocompatible method, permitting rotation regardless of optical, magnetic or electrical properties of the sample under investigation. PMID:27004764

  5. Effect on plasma rotation of lower hybrid (LH) waves in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. P.; Barnes, M.; Parker, R. R.; Rice, J. E.; Parra, F. I.; Bonoli, P. T.; Reinke, M. L.

    2014-02-12

    The injection of LH waves for current drive into a tokamak changes the ion toroidal rotation. In Alcator C-Mod, the direction of the steady state rotation change due to LH waves depends on the plasma current and the density. The change in rotation can be estimated by balancing the external torque of lower hybrid waves with the turbulent radial transport of the momentum. For high plasma current, the turbulent pinch and diffusion of the injected counter-current momentum are sufficient to explain the rotation change. However, for low plasma current, the change in the the intrinsic momentum transport (residual stress) for a non-rotating state is required to explain the co-current rotation change. Accordingly, we investigate the intrinsic momentum transport for the non-rotating state when diamagnetic flow and ExB flow cancel each other. The change in the intrinsic momentum transport due to lower hybrid waves is significant when the plasma current is low, which may explain the rotation reversal for low plasma current. The effect of changed q (safety factor) profile by lower hybrid on the intrinsic momentum transport is estimated by gyrokinetics.

  6. Condensate wave function and elementary excitations of bosonic polar molecules: Beyond the first Born approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chao-Chun; Wang, Daw-Wei; Wu, Wen-Chin

    2010-04-01

    We investigate the condensate wave function and elementary excitations of strongly interacting bosonic polar molecules in a harmonic trap, treating the scattering amplitude beyond the standard first Born approximation (FBA). By using an appropriate trial wave function in the variational method, effects of the leading-order correction beyond the FBA have been investigated and shown to be significantly enhanced when the system is close to the phase boundary of collapse. How such a leading-order effect of going beyond the FBA can be observed in a realistic experiment is also discussed.

  7. Approximate entropy analysis of short-term HFECG based on wave mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Xinbao; Xu, Yinlin; Wang, Jun; Ma, Xiaofei

    2005-02-01

    An improved approximate entropy (ApEn) algorithm based on wave mode is proposed by analyzing and modifying ApEn, so that the irregular analysis can be applied to analyze the short-term series, which contain a great deal of detailed information and fluctuate slowly but in a wide range, such as high-frequency electrocardiogram (HFECG). By analyzing the complexity of HFECG, a conclusion can be drawn that ApEn algorithm based on wave mode can obviously distinguish heart diseases from the healthy group. Therefore, it is of significance for diagnosing myocardial infarction in time.

  8. The breakdown of the anelastic approximation in rotating compressible convection: implications for astrophysical systems

    PubMed Central

    Calkins, Michael A.; Julien, Keith; Marti, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The linear theory for rotating compressible convection in a plane layer geometry is presented for the astrophysically relevant case of low Prandtl number gases. When the rotation rate of the system is large, the flow remains geostrophically balanced for all stratification levels investigated and the classical (i.e. incompressible) asymptotic scaling laws for the critical parameters are recovered. For sufficiently small Prandtl numbers, increasing stratification tends to further destabilize the fluid layer, decrease the critical wavenumber and increase the oscillation frequency of the convective instability. In combination, these effects increase the relative magnitude of the time derivative of the density perturbation contained in the conservation of mass equation to non-negligible levels; the resulting convective instabilities occur in the form of compressional quasi-geostrophic oscillations. We find that the anelastic equations, which neglect this term, cannot capture these instabilities and possess spuriously growing eigenmodes in the rapidly rotating, low Prandtl number regime. It is shown that the Mach number for rapidly rotating compressible convection is intrinsically small for all background states, regardless of the departure from adiabaticity. PMID:25792951

  9. A WKB approximation of elastic waves travelling on a shell of revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsbøl, J. O.; Sorokin, S. V.; Peake, N.

    2016-08-01

    This paper is concerned with the elastic waveguide properties of an infinite pipe with circular cross section whose radius varies slowly along its length. The equations governing the elastodynamics of such shells are derived analytically, approximated asymptotically in the limit of slow axial variation, and solved by means of the WKB-method (Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin). From the derived solution the dispersion relation, modal coefficients, and wave amplification at each location along the structure are extracted, allowing identification of which types of waves are able to propagate along the structure at a given frequency. A key feature in the formulation of the model and the solution is that the radius and its variation are not specified in advance. Two characteristic examples of shells of revolution are presented to illustrate some general features of the waveguide properties, demonstrating how the evolution of the waves depends on the axial variation of the shell radius. It is explained how local resonances can be excited by the travelling waves and how strong amplifications of displacement can be produced. Specifically, for the axial/breathing wave it is shown that a local resonance is excited at the location where the frequency of the travelling wave and the radius of the shell exactly match the ring-frequency.

  10. Electromagnetic waves propagation nearby rotating gravitating astrophysical object with atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladyshev, V. O.; Tereshin, A. A.; Fomin, I. V.; Chelnokov, M. B.; Kauts, V. L.; Gladysheva, T. M.; Bazleva, D. D.

    The aim of the article to explore the effects of gravitational lensing and attraction of electromagnetic radiation in the description of the propagation of radiation nearby the atmospheres of rotating astrophysical objects.

  11. Effects of different wave free surface approximations on the response of a TLP in deep water

    SciTech Connect

    Mekha, B.B.; Johnson, C.P.; Roesset, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper is based on work conducted at the Offshore Technology Research Center to investigate the relative importance of different types of nonlinearities on the dynamic response of tension leg platforms. A time domain solution using Morison`s equation with several modifications and allowing to include or neglect various sources of nonlinearities was implemented and used in the dynamic analysis. This paper focuses on the non-linear effect of evaluating the wave forces up to the free surface using different approximate methods. A TLP hull model with time varying tendon forces is subjected to regular and irregular waves with and without current. The effects on calculating the wave kinematics up to the mean water level or up to the actual free surface, making use of various extrapolation or stretching techniques are then discussed.

  12. Black-hole quasinormal resonances: Wave analysis versus a geometric-optics approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2009-09-01

    It has long been known that null unstable geodesics are related to the characteristic modes of black holes—the so-called quasinormal resonances. The basic idea is to interpret the free oscillations of a black hole in the eikonal limit in terms of null particles trapped at the unstable circular orbit and slowly leaking out. The real part of the complex quasinormal resonances is related to the angular velocity at the unstable null geodesic. The imaginary part of the resonances is related to the instability time scale (or the inverse Lyapunov exponent) of the orbit. While this geometric-optics description of the black-hole quasinormal resonances in terms of perturbed null rays is very appealing and intuitive, it is still highly important to verify the validity of this approach by directly analyzing the Teukolsky wave equation which governs the dynamics of perturbation waves in the black-hole spacetime. This is the main goal of the present paper. We first use the geometric-optics technique of perturbing a bundle of unstable null rays to calculate the resonances of near-extremal Kerr black holes in the eikonal approximation. We then directly solve the Teukolsky wave equation (supplemented by the appropriate physical boundary conditions) and show that the resultant quasinormal spectrum obtained directly from the wave analysis is in accord with the spectrum obtained from the geometric-optics approximation of perturbed null rays.

  13. Spectral analysis of approximations of Dirichlet-Neumann operators and nonlocal shallow water wave models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas-Magaña, Rosa; Panayotaros, Panayotis

    2015-11-01

    We study the problem of wave propagation in a long-wave asymptotic regime over variable bottom of an ideal irrotational fluid in the framework of the Hamiltonian formulation in which the non-local Dirichlet-Neumann (DtN) operator appears explicitly in the Hamiltonian. We propose a non-local Hamiltonian model for bidirectional wave propagation in shallow water that involves pseudodifferential operators that approximate the DtN operator for variable depth. These models generalize the Boussinesq system as they include the exact dispersion relation in the case of constant depth. We present results for the normal modes and eigenfrequencies of the linearized problem. We see that variable topography introduces effects such as steepening of normal modes with increasing variation of depth, as well as amplitude modulation of the normal modes in certain wavelength ranges. Numerical integration shows that the constant depth nonlocal Boussinesq model with quadratic nonlinearity can capture the evolution obtained with higher order approximations of the DtN operator. In the case of variable depth we observe certain oscillations in width of the crest and also some interesting textures in the evolution of wave crests during the passage from obstacles.

  14. Approximation to cutoffs of higher modes of Rayleigh waves for a layered earth model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, Y.; Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.

    2009-01-01

    A cutoff defines the long-period termination of a Rayleigh-wave higher mode and, therefore is a key characteristic of higher mode energy relationship to several material properties of the subsurface. Cutoffs have been used to estimate the shear-wave velocity of an underlying half space of a layered earth model. In this study, we describe a method that replaces the multilayer earth model with a single surface layer overlying the half-space model, accomplished by harmonic averaging of velocities and arithmetic averaging of densities. Using numerical comparisons with theoretical models validates the single-layer approximation. Accuracy of this single-layer approximation is best defined by values of the calculated error in the frequency and phase velocity estimate at a cutoff. Our proposed method is intuitively explained using ray theory. Numerical results indicate that a cutoffs frequency is controlled by the averaged elastic properties within the passing depth of Rayleigh waves and the shear-wave velocity of the underlying half space. ?? Birkh??user Verlag, Basel 2009.

  15. Finite Larmor Radius approximation for waves propagation in cylindrical plasma configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeotti, Laura; Ceccherini, Francesco; Brambilla, Marco; Barnes, Daniel C.; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2011-10-01

    We present an analytical derivation in cylindrical geometry of the Finite Larmor Radius approximation for the wave equations in the cyclotron frequency range and show a set of numerical results obtained with a new extended version of the code FELICE, which allows for arbitrary profiles of field, densities and temperatures. Obtaining a cylindrical FLR approximation is of great relevance for studying the wave propagation in plasma configurations like FRC's and theta-pinches in particular. The generic configuration we consider can be divided in the radial direction in two regions, i.e, a ``plasma region'' and a ``vacuum region''. In the former the wave propagation is computed numerically from the FRL approximation found, in the latter instead a general analytical solution has been calculated and implemented in the code. A detailed description on how to ensure both the overall causality of the propagation process and the correct matching conditions for the antenna surface and the vacuum/plasma surface is shown as well.

  16. Observation of Co and Counter Rotation Produced by Lower Hybrid Waves in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, R. R.; Podpaly, Y.; Lee, J.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J. E.; Bonoli, P. T.; Meneghini, O.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wallace, G. M.; Wilson, J. R.

    2011-12-23

    Lower hybrid waves launched uni-directionally into tokamak plasmas impart momentum to the electrons. This momentum can be transferred to the ions, leading to substantial counter current rotation. Observations of LH-induced counter rotation have been previously reported [1], and the initial rate of increase has been found to be consistent with the calculated rate of wave momentum injection [2]. However, in recent experiments in Alcator C-Mod it has been found that application of LH waves to relatively low current (I{sub p}{approx}0.4-0.6 MA) plasmas can result in a co-current change of rotation, which implies a different mechanism than that described above. This appears to be linked to the so-called intrinsic rotation commonly observed in Alcator C-Mod and other tokamaks [3]. In addition to the change in direction at low current, some dependence on the magnetic configuration (USL vs. LSN) has been observed.

  17. Energy transfer by inertial waves during the buildup of turbulence in a rotating system.

    PubMed

    Kolvin, Itamar; Cohen, Kobi; Vardi, Yuval; Sharon, Eran

    2009-01-01

    We study the transition from fluid at rest to turbulence in a rotating tank. The energy is transported by inertial wave packets through the fluid volume. These high amplitude waves propagate at velocities consistent with those calculated from linearized theory [H. P. Greenspan, (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England, 1968)]. A "front" in the temporal evolution of the energy power spectrum indicates a time scale for energy transport at the linear wave speed. Nonlinear energy transfer between modes is governed by a different, longer, time scale. The observed mechanisms can lead to significant differences between rotating and two-dimensional turbulent flows. PMID:19257200

  18. Influence of differential rotation on the detectability of gravitational waves from the r-mode instability

    SciTech Connect

    Sa, Paulo M.; Tome, Brigitte

    2006-08-15

    Recently, it was shown that differential rotation is an unavoidable feature of nonlinear r-modes. We investigate the influence of this differential rotation on the detectability of gravitational waves emitted by a newly born, hot, rapidly-rotating neutron star, as it spins down due to the r-mode instability. We conclude that gravitational radiation may be detected by the advanced laser interferometer detector LIGO if the amount of differential rotation at the time the r-mode instability becomes active is not very high.

  19. Explicit approximations to estimate the perturbative diffusivity in the presence of convectivity and damping. III. Cylindrical approximations for heat waves traveling inwards

    SciTech Connect

    Berkel, M. van; Tamura, N.; Ida, K.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Zwart, H. J.; Inagaki, S.; Baar, M. R. de

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, a number of new explicit approximations are introduced to estimate the perturbative diffusivity (χ), convectivity (V), and damping (τ) in cylindrical geometry. For this purpose, the harmonic components of heat waves induced by localized deposition of modulated power are used. The approximations are based on the heat equation in cylindrical geometry using the symmetry (Neumann) boundary condition at the plasma center. This means that the approximations derived here should be used only to estimate transport coefficients between the plasma center and the off-axis perturbative source. If the effect of cylindrical geometry is small, it is also possible to use semi-infinite domain approximations presented in Part I and Part II of this series. A number of new approximations are derived in this part, Part III, based upon continued fractions of the modified Bessel function of the first kind and the confluent hypergeometric function of the first kind. These approximations together with the approximations based on semi-infinite domains are compared for heat waves traveling towards the center. The relative error for the different derived approximations is presented for different values of the frequency, transport coefficients, and dimensionless radius. Moreover, it is shown how combinations of different explicit formulas can be used to estimate the transport coefficients over a large parameter range for cases without convection and damping, cases with damping only, and cases with convection and damping. The relative error between the approximation and its underlying model is below 2% for the case, where only diffusivity and damping are considered. If also convectivity is considered, the diffusivity can be estimated well in a large region, but there is also a large region in which no suitable approximation is found. This paper is the third part (Part III) of a series of three papers. In Part I, the semi-infinite slab approximations have been treated. In Part II

  20. Hybrid simulations of rotational discontinuities. [Alfven wave propagation in astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, C. C.; Cargill, P. J.

    1991-01-01

    1D hybrid simulations of rotational discontinuities (RDs) are presented. When the angle between the discontinuity normal and the magnetic field (theta-BN) is 30 deg, the RD broadens into a quasi-steady state of width 60-80 c/omega-i. The hodogram has a characteristic S-shape. When theta-BN = 60 deg, the RD is much narrower (10 c/omega-i). For right handed rotations, the results are similar to theta-BN = 30 deg. For left handed rotations, the RD does not evolve much from its initial conditions and the S-shape in the hodogram is much less visible. The results can be understood in terms of matching a fast mode wavelike structure upstream of the RD with an intermediate mode one downstream.

  1. The effect of nonlinear traveling waves on rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauregui-Correa, Juan Carlos

    2013-08-01

    The effect of the housing stiffness on nonlinear traveling waves is presented in this work. It was found that the housing controls the synchronization of nonlinear elements and it allows nonlinear waves to travel through the structure. This phenomenon was observed in a gearbox with a soft housing, and the phenomenon was reproduced with a lump-mass dynamic model. The model included a pair of gears, the rolling bearings and the housing. The model considered all the nonlinear effects. Numerical and experimental results were analyzed with a time-frequency method using the Morlet wavelet function. A compound effect was observed when the nonlinear waves travel between the gears and the bearings: the waves increased the dynamic load amplitude and add another periodic load.

  2. Absorption of inertia-gravity waves in vertically sheared rotating stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, C.; Lott, F.

    2012-12-01

    It is well established that gravity waves have a substantial role on the large-scale atmospheric circulation, particularly in the middle atmosphere. In the present work, we re-examine the reflection and transmission of gravity waves through a critical layer surrounded by two inertial levels for the case of a constant vertically sheared flow. In this configuration, the vertical structure of the disturbance can be described as quasi-geostrophic from the critical layer up to the inertial levels, at which the Doppler-shifted frequency is equal to the Coriolis parameter. Near and beyond these levels, the balanced approximations do not apply and there is a transition from the quasi-geostrophic solution to propagating gravity waves. The three-dimensional disturbance solution is obtained analytically using both an exact method, in terms of hypergeometric functions, and a WKB approximation valid for large Richardson numbers; the latter includes an exponentially small term which captures the radiation feedback in the region between the inertial levels. We first focused on the homogeneous part of the disturbance equations, under the assumption of an unbounded domain. In contrast with past studies which show that there is a finite reflection and did not analyze the transmission (Yamanaka and Tanaka, 1984), we find that the reflection coefficient is too small to be significant and that the transmission coefficient is exactly like in the much simpler non-rotating case analyzed by Booker and Bretherton (1966). Our theoretical predictions are found to be in very good agreement with those obtained by numerically integrating the complete hydrostatic-Boussinesq equations with a small Rayleigh damping. The discrepancies between our results and those in Yamanaka and Tanaka (1984) are related to the fact that the solutions are given in term of multivalued functions and the values of the reflection and transmission coefficients are exponentially small, e.g. quite difficult to cross check

  3. Wave Propagation in a Rotating Transversely Isotropic Two-Temperature Generalized Thermoelastic Medium Without Dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Baljeet

    2016-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with the propagation of plane waves in a rotating, transversely isotropic, two-temperature generalized thermoelastic solid half-space without energy dissipation. The governing equations are solved to show the existence of three plane waves in the x-z plane. The reflection of these plane waves from a thermally insulated free surface is also studied to obtain a system of three non-homogeneous equations in reflection coefficients of the reflected waves. The speeds and reflection coefficients are computed for a particular model of the half-space. The speeds and reflection coefficients of plane waves are shown graphically to observe the effects of anisotropy, two temperatures and rotation.

  4. Proposal for determining the energy content of gravitational waves by using approximate symmetries of differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Ibrar; Qadir, Asghar; Mahomed, F. M.

    2009-06-15

    Since gravitational wave spacetimes are time-varying vacuum solutions of Einstein's field equations, there is no unambiguous means to define their energy content. However, Weber and Wheeler had demonstrated that they do impart energy to test particles. There have been various proposals to define the energy content, but they have not met with great success. Here we propose a definition using 'slightly broken' Noether symmetries. We check whether this definition is physically acceptable. The procedure adopted is to appeal to 'approximate symmetries' as defined in Lie analysis and use them in the limit of the exact symmetry holding. A problem is noted with the use of the proposal for plane-fronted gravitational waves. To attain a better understanding of the implications of this proposal we also use an artificially constructed time-varying nonvacuum metric and evaluate its Weyl and stress-energy tensors so as to obtain the gravitational and matter components separately and compare them with the energy content obtained by our proposal. The procedure is also used for cylindrical gravitational wave solutions. The usefulness of the definition is demonstrated by the fact that it leads to a result on whether gravitational waves suffer self-damping.

  5. Study of Rotating-Wave Electromagnetic Modes for Applications in Space Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazco, J. E.

    2016-08-01

    Rotating waves are circularly polarized electromagnetic wave fields that behave like traveling waves but have discrete resonant frequencies of standing waves. In JPL's Communications Ground Systems Section (333), we are making use of this peculiar type of electromagnetic modes to develop a new generation of devices and instruments for direct applications in space exploration. In this article, we present a straightforward analysis about the phase velocity of these wave modes. A derivation is presented for the azimuthal phase velocity of transverse magnetic rotating modes inside cylindrical cavity resonators. Computer simulations and experimental measurements are also presented that corroborate the theory developed. It is shown that the phase velocity of rotating waves inside cavity resonators increases with radial position within the cavity and decreases when employing higher-order operating modes. The exotic features of rotating modes, once better understood, have the potential to enable the implementation of a plethora of new devices that range from amplifiers and frequency multipliers to electron accelerators and ion thrusters.

  6. Electron-impact excitation of carbon and silicon in the distorted-wave approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindzola, M. S.; Bhatia, A. K.; Temkin, A.

    1977-01-01

    The 3P to 1D electron-impact excitation cross section within the ground configuration of both neutral carbon and silicon is calculated in the distorted-wave approximation of the two-state Hartree-Fock coupled equations. An essential element of the present treatment is that orthogonality to core orbitals is not assumed in deriving equations for the scattering orbitals. A local adiabatic polarization potential is also added to the distorted-wave equations. Both elements are necessary in getting good agreement with close-coupling results for carbon to low impacting energies. The agreement is sufficiently good that predictions for silicon should be accurate to within a factor of 2.

  7. Fluctuations of spherical waves in a turbulent atmosphere: effect of the axisymmetric approximation in computational methods.

    PubMed

    Salomons, E M

    2000-10-01

    The validity of the axisymmetric parabolic-equation (PE) method for line-of-sight sound propagation in a turbulent atmosphere is investigated. The axisymmetric PE method is a finite-difference method for solving a 2D parabolic wave equation, which follows from the 3D wave equation by the assumption of axial symmetry around the vertical axis through the source. It is found that this axisymmetric approximation has a considerable spurious effect on the fluctuations of the sound field. This is concluded from analytical expressions for the log-amplitude and phase variances, derived both for isotropic turbulence and for axisymmetric turbulence. The expressions for axisymmetric turbulence are compared with the results of numerical computations with the PE method. PMID:11051480

  8. Approximate analytical calculation of the mach configuration of steady shock waves in a plane constricting channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, A. E.; Fomin, V. M.

    1998-05-01

    An approximate analytical model for calculation of the parameters of a steady gas flow inside a plane constricting channel formed by two symmetrically positioned wedges is suggested. A Mach configuration of shock waves (triple point) is formed in the channel when the wedge angles are larger than some critical value. The flow calculation in a constricting channel reduces to the solution of the iterative problem for a system of nonlinear algebraic equations. The configurations of shock waves, the slipstream, and the sonic line are described by the proposed model of a gas flow. A comparison of the results obtained using this model allows a fairly accurate calculation of the Mach stem and the length of the subsonic-flow region.

  9. Quantum Lattice Fluctuations in the Charge Density Wave State beyond the Adiabatic Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shida, Keisuke; Watanabe, Yuko; Gomi, Hiroki; Takahashi, Akira; Tomita, Norikazu

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a tractable numerical method in which large-amplitude quantum lattice fluctuations can be described beyond the adiabatic approximation using the coherent state representation of phonons. A many-body wave function is constructed by the superposition of direct products of non-orthogonal Slater determinants for electrons and coherent states of phonons. Both orbitals in all the Slater determinants and the amplitudes of all the coherent states are simultaneously optimized. We apply the method to the one-dimensional Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model with the on-site and nearest-neighbor-site Coulomb interactions. It is shown the lattice fluctuations in doped charge density wave (CDW) systems are described by the translational and vibrational motion of lattice solitons. Such lattice solitons induce bond alternation in the doped CDW system while the lattice becomes equidistant in the half-filled CDW system.

  10. Modelling vibrational-rotational interactions in intensities of v2 band of H2O by Pade approximants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, O. V.; Voitsekhovskaya, O. K.

    2014-11-01

    A semiempirical model in the form of Pade approximants, describing vibrational-rotational (VR) interactions in intensities of VR-lines of v2 water vapor (H2O) band, was developed. The corresponding to the C2v molecular symmetry group matrix elements, involved in the expansion of the transformed dipole moment, was applied to the derivation. The treatment of experimental intensities of v2 H2O band for transitions with ΔK = +/-1 and ΔK = +/-3 by means of obtained model results in decreasing the root mean square deviation (RMS) about two times (2.82 % instead of 6.20 %) in comparison to the traditional scheme.

  11. On plasma rotation induced by waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Xiaoyin; Dodin, I. Y.; Fisch, N. J.; Qin, Hong; Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 ; Liu, Jian

    2013-10-15

    The momentum conservation for resonant wave-particle interactions, now proven rigorously and for general settings, is applied to explain in simple terms how tokamak plasma is spun up by the wave momentum perpendicular to the dc magnetic field. The perpendicular momentum is passed through resonant particles to the dc field and, giving rise to the radial electric field, is accumulated as a Poynting flux; the bulk plasma is then accelerated up to the electric drift velocity proportional to that flux, independently of collisions. The presence of this collisionless acceleration mechanism permits varying the ratio of the average kinetic momentum absorbed by the resonant-particle and bulk distributions depending on the orientation of the wave vector. Both toroidal and poloidal forces are calculated, and a fluid model is presented that yields the plasma velocity at equilibrium.

  12. Pilot-wave hydrodynamics in a rotating frame: Exotic orbits

    SciTech Connect

    Oza, Anand U.; Harris, Daniel M.; Rosales, Rodolfo R.; Bush, John W. M.; Wind-Willassen, Øistein

    2014-08-15

    We present the results of a numerical investigation of droplets walking on a rotating vibrating fluid bath. The drop's trajectory is described by an integro-differential equation, which is simulated numerically in various parameter regimes. As the forcing acceleration is progressively increased, stable circular orbits give way to wobbling orbits, which are succeeded in turn by instabilities of the orbital center characterized by steady drifting then discrete leaping. In the limit of large vibrational forcing, the walker's trajectory becomes chaotic, but its statistical behavior reflects the influence of the unstable orbital solutions. The study results in a complete regime diagram that summarizes the dependence of the walker's behavior on the system parameters. Our predictions compare favorably to the experimental observations of Harris and Bush [“Droplets walking in a rotating frame: from quantized orbits to multimodal statistics,” J. Fluid Mech. 739, 444–464 (2014)].

  13. Rotation of weakly collisional plasmas in tokamaks, operated with Alfv{acute e}n waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tsypin, V.S.; Elfimov, A.G.; de Azevedo, C.A.; de Assis, A.S.

    1996-12-01

    The effect of the kinetic Alfv{acute e}n waves on weakly collisional plasma rotation in tokamaks has been studied for the plateau and banana regimes. The quasistationary rotation velocities and radial electric field have been found. The estimation of these quantities for the Phaedrus-T tokamak [S. Wukitch {ital et} {ital al}., Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 77}, 294 (1996)] and for the Joint European Torus (JET) [A. Fasoli {ital et} {ital al}., Nucl. Fusion, {bold 36}, 258 (1996)] has been presented. It is shown that the kinetic Alfv{acute e}n waves, which are needed for current drive, change weakly the quasistationary rotation velocities and radial electric field, as found from the experimental data of these tokamaks. In conditions with increased rf power, the plasma rotation and radial electric field can essentially grow up. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Single-scatter vector-wave scattering from surfaces with infinite slopes using the Kirchhoff approximation.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Neil C

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents a new formulation of the 3D Kirchhoff approximation that allows calculation of the scattering of vector waves from 2D rough surfaces containing structures with infinite slopes. This type of surface has applications, for example, in remote sensing and in testing or imaging of printed circuits. Some preliminary calculations for rectangular-shaped grooves in a plane are presented for the 2D surface method and are compared with the equivalent 1D surface calculations for the Kirchhoff and integral equation methods. Good agreement is found between the methods. PMID:18677363

  15. Instabilities and waves on a columnar vortex in a strongly stratified and rotating fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Junho; Billant, Paul

    2013-08-01

    This paper investigates the effect of the background rotation on the radiative instability of a columnar Rankine vortex in a strongly stratified fluid. We show that a cyclonic background rotation strongly stabilizes the radiative instability. The modes become neutral when the Rossby number Ro is below a critical value which depends on the azimuthal wavenumber of the wave. In the limit of small Rossby number, there exist fast neutral waves that are not captured by the quasi-geostrophic theory. In the presence of anticyclonic background rotation, the centrifugal instability dominates the radiative instability only when -400 ≲ Ro < -1. The numerical stability analysis is completed by asymptotic analyses for large wavenumbers which explain the properties and mechanisms of the waves and the instabilities. The stability of a continuous smoothed Rankine vortex is also investigated. The most amplified azimuthal wavenumber is then finite instead of infinite for the Rankine vortex.

  16. Statistical physics approach to dendritic computation: The excitable-wave mean-field approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollo, Leonardo L.; Kinouchi, Osame; Copelli, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    We analytically study the input-output properties of a neuron whose active dendritic tree, modeled as a Cayley tree of excitable elements, is subjected to Poisson stimulus. Both single-site and two-site mean-field approximations incorrectly predict a nonequilibrium phase transition which is not allowed in the model. We propose an excitable-wave mean-field approximation which shows good agreement with previously published simulation results [Gollo , PLoS Comput. Biol.NERNET1553-734X10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000402 5, e1000402 (2009)] and accounts for finite-size effects. We also discuss the relevance of our results to experiments in neuroscience, emphasizing the role of active dendrites in the enhancement of dynamic range and in gain control modulation.

  17. Concurrent measurement of linear and circular birefringence using rotating-wave-plate Stokes polarimeter.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jing-Fung

    2008-09-01

    A novel technique is presented for obtaining concurrent measurements of the linear and circular birefringence properties of an optical sample by using a rotating-wave-plate Stokes polarimeter to extract the 2x2 central elements of the corresponding Mueller matrix via two linearly polarized probe lights. For a compound sample comprising a half-wave plate in series with a quarter-wave plate, the measured values of the principal angle and retardance of the quarter-wave plate are found to have average normalized errors of 0.56% and 1.16%, respectively, while the measured value of the rotation angle of the half-wave plate has an error of just 0.39%. When analyzing glucose solutions with concentrations ranging from 0-1.2 g/dl positioned in front of a half-wave plate, the average normalized errors in the principal axis angle and retardance measurements of the half-wave plate are 0.69% and 2.65%, respectively, while the error in the rotation angle measurements of the glucose solutions is 2.13%. The correlation coefficient between the measured rotation angle and the concentration of the glucose solution is determined to be 0.99985, while the standard deviation is just 0.0022 deg. Overall the experimental results demonstrate the ability of the proposed system to obtain highly accurate measurements of the linear and circular birefringence properties of an optical sample and to decouple the relationship between the principal axis angle and the rotation angle. PMID:18758522

  18. The transverse and rotational motions of magnetohydrodynamic kink waves in the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Goossens, M.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Soler, R.; Terradas, J.; Verth, G.

    2014-06-10

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink waves have now been observed to be ubiquitous throughout the solar atmosphere. With modern instruments, they have now been detected in the chromosphere, interface region, and corona. The key purpose of this paper is to show that kink waves do not only involve purely transverse motions of solar magnetic flux tubes, but the velocity field is a spatially and temporally varying sum of both transverse and rotational motion. Taking this fact into account is particularly important for the accurate interpretation of varying Doppler velocity profiles across oscillating structures such as spicules. It has now been shown that, as well as bulk transverse motions, spicules have omnipresent rotational motions. Here we emphasize that caution should be used before interpreting the particular MHD wave mode/s responsible for these rotational motions. The rotational motions are not necessarily signatures of the classic axisymmetric torsional Alfvén wave alone, because kink motion itself can also contribute substantially to varying Doppler velocity profiles observed across these structures. In this paper, the displacement field of the kink wave is demonstrated to be a sum of its transverse and rotational components, both for a flux tube with a discontinuous density profile at its boundary, and one with a more realistic density continuum between the internal and external plasma. Furthermore, the Doppler velocity profile of the kink wave is forward modeled to demonstrate that, depending on the line of sight, it can either be quite distinct or very similar to that expected from a torsional Alfvén wave.

  19. Plane waves at or near grazing incidence in the parabolic approximation. [acoustic equations of motion for sound fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaninch, G. L.; Myers, M. K.

    1980-01-01

    The parabolic approximation for the acoustic equations of motion is applied to the study of the sound field generated by a plane wave at or near grazing incidence to a finite impedance boundary. It is shown how this approximation accounts for effects neglected in the usual plane wave reflection analysis which, at grazing incidence, erroneously predicts complete cancellation of the incident field by the reflected field. Examples are presented which illustrate that the solution obtained by the parabolic approximation contains several of the physical phenomena known to occur in wave propagation near an absorbing boundary.

  20. Hamiltonian structure for rotational capillary waves in stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Calin Iulian

    2016-07-01

    We show that the governing equations of two-dimensional water waves driven by surface tension propagating over two-layered stratified flows admit a Hamiltonian formulation. Moreover, the underlying flows that we consider here, have piecewise constant distribution of vorticity, the jump in vorticity being located along the interface separating the fluid of bigger density at the bottom from the lighter fluid adjacent to the free surface.

  1. The Mm-Wave Rotational Spectrum of Glycolic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisiel, Zbigniew; Pszczółkowski, Lech; Białkowska-Jaworska, Ewa; Charnley, Steven B.

    2014-06-01

    Glycolic acid, HOCH_2COOH is the simplest α-hydroxy acid. It is as yet undetected in the interstellar medium, but is known to be present in carbonaceous meteorites and in residues from UV-photolysed interstellar ice analogue mixtures. Prior rotational spectroscopy has been carried out up to 40 GHz for the main, SSC conformer, Presently we report the analysis of the rotational spectrum of glycolic acid on the basis of broadband measurements performed up to 318 GHz, and updated spectroscopic constants for the ground state and the first two excited states of the low-frequency ν21 torsional mode. We have used the AABS package to assign multiple further excited vibrational states of the SSC conformer. In particular, we have been able to assign the highly perturbed triad of ν14, ν20 and 3ν21 states. The triad has been fitted down to experimental accuracy with a coupled fit, which allowed us to pin down the hitherto elusive frequency of the ν21 mode. The experimental results make an interesting comparison with those of anharmonic force field calculations. We have also been able to extend the measurements for the AAT conformer. C.E.Blom, A.Bauder, Chem. Phys. Lett., 82, 492 (1981), J. Am. Chem. Soc., 104, 2993 (1982). H.Hasegawa, O.Ohashi, I.Yamaguchi, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 82, 205 (1982). P.D.Godfrey, F.M.Rodgers, R.D.Brown, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 119, 2232 (1997).

  2. Numerical analysis of volume holograms with spherical reference wave based on Born approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, S.; Yamamoto, M.

    2013-05-01

    Holographic Data Storage (HDS) is one of the next generation storage technologies that can actualize high data capacity and high data transfer rate. Since information is recorded 3-dimensionally in a thick medium, data capacity of the HDS is not constrained by diffraction limit. However, behavior of wavefront in an inhomogeneous thick medium is highly complex, and it is hard to handle propagation of wavefront in the medium analytically. Therefore, we establish a numerical technique for analysis of volume holograms. The proposed technique is based on the scalar diffraction theory, which is described as the volume integral equation. By applying Born approximation and angular spectrum method to the volume integral equation, the technique can be applicable for various problems. We analyze characteristics of the volume hologram with spherical reference wave, and confirm effectiveness of the proposed technique. Compared to conventional techniques such as coupled wave analysis, beam propagation method, and finite-difference time domain method, the proposed technique has application potentiality for various problems, and it is easy to implement. In this study, we show effectiveness of the proposed technique by applying to analysis of the volume hologram with spherical reference wave. It can be expected that the proposed technique may become a tool for design of HDS systems.

  3. Anomalous incident-angle and elliptical-polarization rotation of an elastically refracted P-wave

    PubMed Central

    Fa, Lin; Fa, Yuxiao; Zhang, Yandong; Ding, Pengfei; Gong, Jiamin; Li, Guohui; Li, Lijun; Tang, Shaojie; Zhao, Meishan

    2015-01-01

    We report a newly discovered anomalous incident-angle of an elastically refracted P-wave, arising from a P-wave impinging on an interface between two VTI media with strong anisotropy. This anomalous incident-angle is found to be located in the post-critical incident-angle region corresponding to a refracted P-wave. Invoking Snell’s law for a refracted P-wave provides two distinctive solutions before and after the anomalous incident-angle. For an inhomogeneously refracted and elliptically polarized P-wave at the anomalous incident-angle, its rotational direction experiences an acute variation, from left-hand elliptical to right-hand elliptical polarization. The new findings provide us an enhanced understanding of acoustical-wave scattering and lead potentially to widespread and novel applications. PMID:26244284

  4. Computational resources to filter gravitational wave data with P-approximant templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Edward K.

    2002-08-01

    The prior knowledge of the gravitational waveform from compact binary systems makes matched filtering an attractive detection strategy. This detection method involves the filtering of the detector output with a set of theoretical waveforms or templates. One of the most important factors in this strategy is knowing how many templates are needed in order to reduce the loss of possible signals. In this study, we calculate the number of templates and computational power needed for a one-step search for gravitational waves from inspiralling binary systems. We build on previous works by first expanding the post-Newtonian waveforms to 2.5-PN order and second, for the first time, calculating the number of templates needed when using P-approximant waveforms. The analysis is carried out for the four main first-generation interferometers, LIGO, GEO600, VIRGO and TAMA. As well as template number, we also calculate the computational cost of generating banks of templates for filtering GW data. We carry out the calculations for two initial conditions. In the first case we assume a minimum individual mass of 1 Msolar and in the second, we assume a minimum individual mass of 5 Msolar. We find that, in general, we need more P-approximant templates to carry out a search than if we use standard PN templates. This increase varies according to the order of PN-approximation, but can be as high as a factor of 3 and is explained by the smaller span of the P-approximant templates as we go to higher masses. The promising outcome is that for 2-PN templates, the increase is small and is outweighed by the known robustness of the 2-PN P-approximant templates.

  5. Toward improving global attenuation models: Interpreting surface-wave amplitudes with approximate theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, C. A.; Hjorleifsdottir, V.; Ekstrom, G.

    2011-12-01

    Surface-wave amplitudes provide the primary constraint on upper-mantle anelastic structure and are also sensitive to small-scale elastic structure through focusing effects. However, the use of amplitudes for seismic imaging presents several challenges. One, amplitudes are affected not only by propagation through anelastic and elastic heterogeneity but also by uncertainty in the source excitation, local receiver structure, and instrument response. Two, accounting for focusing and defocusing effects, which is important if amplitudes are to be used to study anelasticity, depends considerably on the chosen theoretical treatment. Three, multiple scattering of seismic energy by elastic heterogeneity can be mapped into attenuation, especially at high frequencies. With the objective of improving our ability to image mantle seismic attenuation using real amplitude observations, we investigate how approximations in the theoretical treatment of wave excitation and propagation influence the interpretation of amplitudes. We use a spectral-element wave-propagation solver (SPECFEM3D_GLOBE) to generate accurate seismograms for global Earth models containing one-dimensional attenuation structure and three-dimensional variations in seismic velocity. The seismograms are calculated for 42 realistically distributed earthquakes. Fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave amplitudes in the period range 50--200 seconds are measured using the approach of Ekström et al. (1997), for which PREM is the assumed Earth model. We show that using the appropriate local seismic structure at the source and receiver instead of PREM has a non-negligible effect on the amplitudes and improves their interpretation. The amplitudes due to focusing and defocusing effects are predicted for great-circle ray theory, exact ray theory (JWKB theory), and finite-frequency theory. We assess the ability of each theory to predict amplitudes that agree with those measured from the SPECFEM synthetics for an Earth model that

  6. Quantum metrology with rotating matter waves in different geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Dunningham, J. A.; Cooper, J. J.; Hallwood, D. W.

    2012-09-01

    A promising practical application of entanglement is metrology, where quantum states can be used to make measurements beyond the shot noise limit. Here we consider how metrology schemes could be realised using atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) trapped in different potentials. In particular, we show that if a trapped BEC is rotated at just the right frequency, it can undergo a quantum phase transition characterised by large-scale entanglement spreading across the system. This simple process of stirring can generate interesting quantum states such as macroscopic superpositions of all the atoms flowing in opposite directions around a ring-shaped potential. We consider different trapping potentials and show how this leads to different entangled states. In particular, we find that by reducing the dimensionality of the system to one or two dimensions, it is possible to generate entangled states that are remarkably robust to the loss of atoms and so are ideally suited to precision measurement schemes.

  7. Response to "Comment on `General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation'"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2014-11-01

    In R. A. Van Gorder, "General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation," Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014) I discussed properties of generalized vortex filaments exhibiting purely rotational motion under the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation. Such solutions are stationary in terms of translational motion. In the Comment [N. Hietala, "Comment on `General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation' [Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014)]," Phys. Fluids 26, 119101 (2014)], the author criticizes my paper for not including translational motion (although it was clearly stated that the filament motion was assumed rotational). As it turns out, if one is interested in studying the geometric structure of solutions (which was the point of my paper), one obtains the needed qualitative results on the structure of such solutions by studying the purely rotational case. Nevertheless, in this Response I shall discuss the vortex filaments that have both rotational and translational motions. I then briefly discuss why one might want to study such generalized rotating filament solutions, in contrast to simple the standard helical or planar examples (which are really special cases). I also discuss how one can study the time evolution of filaments which exhibit more complicated dynamics than pure translation and rotation. Doing this, one can study non-stationary solutions which initially appear purely rotational and gradually display other dynamics as the filaments evolve.

  8. Rotational study of the CH4-CO complex: Millimeter-wave measurements and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Surin, L A; Tarabukin, I V; Panfilov, V A; Schlemmer, S; Kalugina, Y N; Faure, A; Rist, C; van der Avoird, A

    2015-10-21

    The rotational spectrum of the van der Waals complex CH4-CO has been measured with the intracavity OROTRON jet spectrometer in the frequency range of 110-145 GHz. Newly observed and assigned transitions belong to the K = 2-1 subband correlating with the rotationless jCH4 = 0 ground state and the K = 2-1 and K = 0-1 subbands correlating with the jCH4 = 2 excited state of free methane. The (approximate) quantum number K is the projection of the total angular momentum J on the intermolecular axis. The new data were analyzed together with the known millimeter-wave and microwave transitions in order to determine the molecular parameters of the CH4-CO complex. Accompanying ab initio calculations of the intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) of CH4-CO have been carried out at the explicitly correlated coupled cluster level of theory with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)-F12a] and an augmented correlation-consistent triple zeta (aVTZ) basis set. The global minimum of the five-dimensional PES corresponds to an approximately T-shaped structure with the CH4 face closest to the CO subunit and binding energy De = 177.82 cm(-1). The bound rovibrational levels of the CH4-CO complex were calculated for total angular momentum J = 0-6 on this intermolecular potential surface and compared with the experimental results. The calculated dissociation energies D0 are 91.32, 94.46, and 104.21 cm(-1) for A (jCH4 = 0), F (jCH4 = 1), and E (jCH4 = 2) nuclear spin modifications of CH4-CO, respectively. PMID:26493903

  9. Nonlinear stability of overcompresive shock waves in a rotationally invariant system of viscous conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freistühler, Heinrich; Liu, Tai-Ping

    1993-04-01

    This paper proves that certain non-classical shock waves in a rotationally invariant system of viscous conservation laws posses nonlinear large-time stability against sufficiently small perturbations. The result applies to small intermediate magnetohydrodynamic shocks in the presence of dissipation.

  10. Continuation and stability of convective modulated rotating waves in spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, F.; Net, M.; Sánchez, J.

    2016-01-01

    Modulated rotating waves (MRW), bifurcated from the thermal-Rossby waves that arise at the onset of convection of a fluid contained in a rotating spherical shell, and their stability, are studied. For this purpose, Newton-Krylov continuation techniques are applied. Nonslip boundary conditions, an Ekman number E =10-4 , and a low Prandtl number fluid Pr=0.1 in a moderately thick shell of radius ratio η =0.35 , differentially heated, are considered. The MRW are obtained as periodic orbits by rewriting the equations of motion in the rotating frame of reference where the rotating waves become steady states. Newton-Krylov continuation allows us to obtain unstable MRW that cannot be found by using only time integrations, and identify regions of multistability. For instance, unstable MRW without any azimuthal symmetry have been computed. It is shown how they become stable in a small Rayleigh-number interval, in which two branches of traveling waves are also stable. The study of the stability of the MRW helps to locate and classify the large sequence of bifurcations, which takes place in the range analyzed. In particular, tertiary Hopf bifurcations giving rise to three-frequency stable solutions are accurately determined.

  11. Continuation and stability of convective modulated rotating waves in spherical shells.

    PubMed

    Garcia, F; Net, M; Sánchez, J

    2016-01-01

    Modulated rotating waves (MRW), bifurcated from the thermal-Rossby waves that arise at the onset of convection of a fluid contained in a rotating spherical shell, and their stability, are studied. For this purpose, Newton-Krylov continuation techniques are applied. Nonslip boundary conditions, an Ekman number E=10^{-4}, and a low Prandtl number fluid Pr=0.1 in a moderately thick shell of radius ratio η=0.35, differentially heated, are considered. The MRW are obtained as periodic orbits by rewriting the equations of motion in the rotating frame of reference where the rotating waves become steady states. Newton-Krylov continuation allows us to obtain unstable MRW that cannot be found by using only time integrations, and identify regions of multistability. For instance, unstable MRW without any azimuthal symmetry have been computed. It is shown how they become stable in a small Rayleigh-number interval, in which two branches of traveling waves are also stable. The study of the stability of the MRW helps to locate and classify the large sequence of bifurcations, which takes place in the range analyzed. In particular, tertiary Hopf bifurcations giving rise to three-frequency stable solutions are accurately determined. PMID:26871166

  12. Energetic Particles and Upstream Waves at Co-rotating Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Edward J.; Zhou, Xiaoyan

    2010-03-01

    We report a study of energetic ion acceleration at shocks bounding co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs). Archived data obtained by Ulysses magnetic field, solar wind and energetic particle investigations at low latitude CIRs have been assembled and analyzed. The statistical relations between various properties of 22 Forward shocks, energetic particles and upstream heliospheric magnetic field fluctuations are presented. No statistically significant correlations are found between the shock compression ratio, r, or the particle intensity, jp, or the energetic particle spectral index, s, and the shock normal-upstream field angle, θBn. Furthermore, a theoretical relation between the particle spectral index and shock compression is not consistent with the observed values of s and r. The particle intensities are poorly correlated with the power in upstream heliospheric magnetic field fluctuations contrary to our preliminary study of fewer shocks. We conclude that many of the expectations of Diffusive Shock Theory are not supported by this data set but it is too early to decide whether some key measurement is missing or the theory needs reconsideration.

  13. Phase velocity and attenuation predictions of waves in cancellous bone using an iterative effective medium approximation.

    PubMed

    Potsika, Vassiliki T; Protopappas, Vasilios C; Vavva, Maria G; Polyzos, Demosthenes; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2013-01-01

    The quantitative determination of wave dispersion and attenuation in bone is an open research area as the factors responsible for ultrasound absorption and scattering in composite biological tissues have not been completely explained. In this study, we use the iterative effective medium approximation (IEMA) proposed in [1] so as to calculate phase velocity and attenuation in media with properties similar to those of cancellous bones. Calculations are performed for a frequency range of 0.4-0.8 MHz and for different inclusions' volume concentrations and sizes. Our numerical results are compared with previous experimental findings so as to assess the effectiveness of IEMA. It was made clear that attenuation and phase velocity estimations could provide supplementary information for cancellous bone characterization. PMID:24111396

  14. Nonlinear Solver Approaches for the Diffusive Wave Approximation to the Shallow Water Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, N.; Knepley, M.

    2015-12-01

    The diffusive wave approximation to the shallow water equations (DSW) is a doubly-degenerate, nonlinear, parabolic partial differential equation used to model overland flows. Despite its challenges, the DSW equation has been extensively used to model the overland flow component of various integrated surface/subsurface models. The equation's complications become increasingly problematic when ponding occurs, a feature which becomes pervasive when solving on large domains with realistic terrain. In this talk I discuss the various forms and regularizations of the DSW equation and highlight their effect on the solvability of the nonlinear system. In addition to this analysis, I present results of a numerical study which tests the applicability of a class of composable nonlinear algebraic solvers recently added to the Portable, Extensible, Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc).

  15. General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2014-06-15

    In his study of superfluid turbulence in the low-temperature limit, Svistunov [“Superfluid turbulence in the low-temperature limit,” Phys. Rev. B 52, 3647 (1995)] derived a Hamiltonian equation for the self-induced motion of a vortex filament. Under the local induction approximation (LIA), the Svistunov formulation is equivalent to a nonlinear dispersive partial differential equation. In this paper, we consider a family of rotating vortex filament solutions for the LIA reduction of the Svistunov formulation, which we refer to as the 2D LIA (since it permits a potential formulation in terms of two of the three Cartesian coordinates). This class of solutions holds the well-known Hasimoto-type planar vortex filament [H. Hasimoto, “Motion of a vortex filament and its relation to elastica,” J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 31, 293 (1971)] as one reduction and helical solutions as another. More generally, we obtain solutions which are periodic in the space variable. A systematic analytical study of the behavior of such solutions is carried out. In the case where vortex filaments have small deviations from the axis of rotation, closed analytical forms of the filament solutions are given. A variety of numerical simulations are provided to demonstrate the wide range of rotating filament behaviors possible. Doing so, we are able to determine a number of vortex filament structures not previously studied. We find that the solution structure progresses from planar to helical, and then to more intricate and complex filament structures, possibly indicating the onset of superfluid turbulence.

  16. Application of the semiclassical perturbation (SCP) approximation to diffraction and rotationally inelastic scattering of atoms and molecules from surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, L.M.; Miller, W.H.

    1983-02-15

    The semiclassical perturbation (SCP) approximation of Miller and Smith (Phys. Rev. A 17, 17 (1978)) is applied to the scattering of atoms and molecules from crystal surfaces. Specifically, diffraction of He from LiF, and diffraction and rotationally inelastic scattering of H/sub 2/ from LiF are treated, and the SCP model is seen to agree well with earlier coupled-channel and quantum sudden calculations. These tests of the SCP model are all for ''soft'' interaction potentials, e.g., of the Lennard-Jones Devonshire variety, but it is also shown that the model behaves correctly in the limit of an impulsive hard-wall potential function. The SCP picture thus appears to have a wide range of validity for describing the dynamics of gas-surface collisions.

  17. Circular Polarizations of Gravitational Waves from Core-Collapse Supernovae: A Clear Indication of Rapid Rotation.

    PubMed

    Hayama, Kazuhiro; Kuroda, Takami; Nakamura, Ko; Yamada, Shoichi

    2016-04-15

    We propose to employ the circular polarization of gravitational waves emitted by core-collapse supernovae as an unequivocal indication of rapid rotation deep in their cores just prior to collapse. It has been demonstrated by three dimensional simulations that nonaxisymmetric accretion flows may develop spontaneously via hydrodynamical instabilities in the postbounce cores. It is not surprising, then, that the gravitational waves emitted by such fluid motions are circularly polarized. We show, in this Letter, that a network of the second generation detectors of gravitational waves worldwide may be able to detect such polarizations up to the opposite side of the Galaxy as long as the rotation period of the core is shorter than a few seconds prior to collapse. PMID:27127951

  18. Circular Polarizations of Gravitational Waves from Core-Collapse Supernovae: A Clear Indication of Rapid Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayama, Kazuhiro; Kuroda, Takami; Nakamura, Ko; Yamada, Shoichi

    2016-04-01

    We propose to employ the circular polarization of gravitational waves emitted by core-collapse supernovae as an unequivocal indication of rapid rotation deep in their cores just prior to collapse. It has been demonstrated by three dimensional simulations that nonaxisymmetric accretion flows may develop spontaneously via hydrodynamical instabilities in the postbounce cores. It is not surprising, then, that the gravitational waves emitted by such fluid motions are circularly polarized. We show, in this Letter, that a network of the second generation detectors of gravitational waves worldwide may be able to detect such polarizations up to the opposite side of the Galaxy as long as the rotation period of the core is shorter than a few seconds prior to collapse.

  19. On strongly interacting internal waves in a rotating ocean and coupled Ostrovsky equations.

    PubMed

    Alias, A; Grimshaw, R H J; Khusnutdinova, K R

    2013-06-01

    In the weakly nonlinear limit, oceanic internal solitary waves for a single linear long wave mode are described by the KdV equation, extended to the Ostrovsky equation in the presence of background rotation. In this paper we consider the scenario when two different linear long wave modes have nearly coincident phase speeds and show that the appropriate model is a system of two coupled Ostrovsky equations. These are systematically derived for a density-stratified ocean. Some preliminary numerical simulations are reported which show that, in the generic case, initial solitary-like waves are destroyed and replaced by two coupled nonlinear wave packets, being the counterpart of the same phenomenon in the single Ostrovsky equation. PMID:23822486

  20. Analytic approximation to nonlinear hydroelastic waves traveling in a thin elastic plate floating on a fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Lu, DongQiang

    2013-11-01

    An analytic approximation method known as the homotopy analysis method (HAM) is applied to study the nonlinear hydroelastic progressive waves traveling in an infinite elastic plate such as an ice sheet or a very large floating structure (VLFS) on the surface of deep water. A convergent analytical series solution for the plate deflection is derived by choosing the optimal convergencecontrol parameter. Based on the analytical solution the effects of different parameters are considered. We find that the plate deflection becomes lower with an increasing Young's modulus of the plate. The displacement tends to be flattened at the crest and be sharpened at the trough as the thickness of the plate increases, and the larger density of the plate also causes analogous results. Furthermore, it is shown that the hydroelastic response of the plate is greatly affected by the high-amplitude incident wave. The results obtained can help enrich our understanding of the nonlinear hydroelastic response of an ice sheet or a VLFS on the water surface.

  1. Relativistic description of inclusive quasielastic proton-nucleus scattering with relativistic distorted-wave impulse approximation and random-phase approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Niekerk, D. D. van; Ventel, B. I. S. van der; Titus, N. P.; Hillhouse, G. C.

    2011-04-15

    We present a fully relativistic model for polarized inclusive quasielastic proton-nucleus scattering that includes relativistic distorted waves for the projectile and ejectile (RDWIA), as well as the relativistic random-phase approximation (RPA) applied to the target nucleus. Using a standard relativistic impulse approximation treatment of quasielastic scattering and a two-body Scalar, Pseudoscalar, Vector, Axial vector, Tensor (SPVAT) form of the current operator, it is shown how the behavior of the projectile/ejectile and target can be decoupled. Distortion effects are included via a full partial-wave expansion of the relativistic wave functions. Target correlations are included via the relativistic RPA applied to mean-field theory in quantum hadrodynamics. A number of novel analytical and numerical techniques are employed to aid in this highly nontrivial calculation. A baseline plane-wave calculation is performed for the reaction {sup 40}Ca(p-vector,p-vector{sup '}) at an energy of 500 MeV and an angle {theta}{sub c.m.}=40 deg. Here it is found that the effect of isoscalar correlations is a quenching of the cross section that is expected to become more pronounced at lower energies or for higher-density targets. A RDWIA calculation shows additional reduction and if isoscalar target correlations are included this effect is enhanced.

  2. A new model for algebraic Rossby solitary waves in rotation fluid and its solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yao-Deng; Yang, Hong-Wei; Gao, Yu-Fang; Yin, Bao-Shu; Feng, Xing-Ru

    2015-09-01

    A generalized Boussinesq equation that includes the dissipation effect is derived to describe a kind of algebraic Rossby solitary waves in a rotating fluid by employing perturbation expansions and stretching transformations of time and space. Using this equation, the conservation laws of algebraic Rossby solitary waves are discussed. It is found that the mass, the momentum, the energy, and the velocity of center of gravity of the algebraic solitary waves are conserved in the propagation process. Finally, the analytical solution of the equation is generated. Based on the analytical solution, the properties of the algebraic solitary waves and the dissipation effect are discussed. The results point out that, similar to classic solitary waves, the dissipation can cause the amplitude and the speed of solitary waves to decrease; however, unlike classic solitary waves, the algebraic solitary waves can split during propagation and the decrease of the detuning parameter can accelerate the occurrence of the solitary waves fission phenomenon. Project supported by the Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Marine Ecology and Environment and Disaster Prevention and Mitigation Project, China (Grant No. 2012010), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 41205082 and 41476019), the Special Funds for Theoretical Physics of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11447205), and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD), China.

  3. Exact solutions of regular approximate relativistic wave equations for hydrogen-like atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, R.; van Lenthe, E.; Baerends, E. J.; Snijders, J. G.

    1994-07-01

    Apart from relativistic effects originating from high kinetic energy of an electron in a flat potential, which are treated in first order by the Pauli Hamiltonian, there are relativistic effects even for low-energy electrons if they move in a strong Coulomb potential. The latter effects can be accurately treated already in the zeroth order of an expansion of the Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation, if the expansion is carefully chosen to be nondivergent for r→0 even for Coulomb potentials, as shown by Van Lenthe et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 99, 4597 (1993)] (cf. also Heully et al. [J. Phys. B 19, 2799 (1986)] and Chang et al. [Phys. Scr. 34, 394 (1986)]). In the present paper, it is shown that the solutions of the zeroth order of this two-component regular approximate (ZORA) equation for hydrogen-like atoms are simply scaled solutions of the large component of the Dirac wave function for this problem. The eigenvalues are related in a similar way. As a consequence, it is proven that under some restrictions, the ZORA Hamiltonian is bounded from below for Coulomb-like potentials. Also, an exact result for the first order regular approximate Hamiltonian is given. The method can also be used to obtain exact results for regular approximations of scalar relativistic equations, like the Klein-Gordon equation. The balance between relativistic effects originating from the Coulombic singularity in the potential (typically core penetrating s and p valence electrons in atoms and molecules) and from high kinetic energy (important for high-energy electrons in a flat potential and also for core-avoiding high angular momentum (d, f, and g states in atoms) are discussed.

  4. Partial Antisymmetry and Approximate Primitive Wave Functions for Interacting Electronic Groups.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergenz, Robert Allan

    The partial antisymmetry (PA) theorem of W. H. Adams (Chem. Phys. Letters, 68, 511 (1979)) shows that if one can determine an N-electron eigenfunction of a certain non-linear operator, then one can use the eigenfunction, without using full antisymmetry (FA), to calculate an eigenvalue of the Schrodinger Hamiltonian for the system. The operator neither depends on nor commutes with the antisymmetrizer, but involves partial antisymmetrizers. This work provides an initial numerical test of a new approach to calculating approximate interatomic interaction energies based on the PA theorem. Interaction energies were calculated for X ^1Sigma^{+}_ {rm g} Ne_2, Li_2 and Na_2, X^1Sigma^{+} LiNa, X^2Sigma^{+} _{rm g} Li_2 ^{+}, x ^7Sigma ^{+}_{rm u} N_2, x ^3Sigma ^{+}_{rm u} Li_2 and Na_2, x ^3Sigma^{+} LiNa and ionic and covalent configurations of X ^1Sigma^{+} LiF, all at several internuclear distances. Spin-coupled products of single determinants approximated the atomic wave functions, and accurate HF atomic bases were used. Three methods were used: the conventional method based on FA, the PA approach, and a method based on a hybrid set of assumptions. Results were compared with accurate potential curves from the literature. In nine cases of the eleven, including both bonding and repulsive interactions, the PA approximation gave results that were better or roughly the same as those using FA. In these cases there is thus no penalty exacted for the use of PA, though it is shown to be easier to use.

  5. Do inertial wave interactions control the rate of energy dissipation of rotating turbulence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortet, Pierre-Philippe; Campagne, Antoine; Machicoane, Nathanael; Gallet, Basile; Moisy, Frederic

    2015-11-01

    The scaling law of the energy dissipation rate, ɛ ~U3 / L (with U and L the characteristic velocity and lengthscale), is one of the most robust features of fully developed turbulence. How this scaling is affected by a background rotation is still a controversial issue with importance for geo and astrophysical flows. At asymptotically small Rossby numbers Ro = U / ΩL , i.e. in the weakly nonlinear limit, wave-turbulence arguments suggest that ɛ should be reduced by a factor Ro . Such scaling has however never been evidenced directly, neither experimentally nor numerically. We report here direct measurements of the injected power, and therefore of ɛ, in an experiment where a propeller is rotating at a constant rate in a large volume of fluid rotating at Ω. In co-rotation, we find a transition between the wave-turbulence scaling at small Ro and the classical Kolmogorov law at large Ro . The transition between these two regimes is characterized from experiments varying the propeller and tank dimensions. In counter-rotation, the scenario is much richer with the observation of an additional peak of dissipation, similar to the one found in Taylor-Couette experiments.

  6. Internal wave breather propagation under the influence of the Earth rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talipova, Tatiana; Rouvinskaya, Ekaterina; Kurkina, Oxana

    2015-04-01

    The internal wave breather propagation under the influence of the Earth rotation is studied in the frames of the asymptotic model based on the Gardner equation as well as the fully nonlinear Euler equations. It is obtained that the amplitude and shape of short breathers depend on the Earth rotation very weakly but the wide breathers change the amplitude and shape sufficiently. This effect is studied in the model situation adapted to the Baltic Sea hydrological conditions. The rate of the breather amplitude damping upon the even bottom is shown.

  7. Numerical approximation of the Schrödinger equation with the electromagnetic field by the Hagedorn wave packets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhennan

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we approximate the semi-classical Schrödinger equation in the presence of electromagnetic field by the Hagedorn wave packets approach. By operator splitting, the Hamiltonian is divided into the modified part and the residual part. The modified Hamiltonian, which is the main new idea of this paper, is chosen by the fact that Hagedorn wave packets are localized both in space and momentum so that a crucial correction term is added to the truncated Hamiltonian, and is treated by evolving the parameters associated with the Hagedorn wave packets. The residual part is treated by a Galerkin approximation. We prove that, with the modified Hamiltonian only, the Hagedorn wave packets dynamics give the asymptotic solution with error O(ε{sup 1/2}), where ε is the scaled Planck constant. We also prove that, the Galerkin approximation for the residual Hamiltonian can reduce the approximation error to O(ε{sup k/2}), where k depends on the number of Hagedorn wave packets added to the dynamics. This approach is easy to implement, and can be naturally extended to the multidimensional cases. Unlike the high order Gaussian beam method, in which the non-constant cut-off function is necessary and some extra error is introduced, the Hagedorn wave packets approach gives a practical way to improve accuracy even when ε is not very small.

  8. Uniform asymptotic approximations for transient waves due to an initial disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Per A.; Schäffer, Hemming A.; Fuhrman, David R.; Toledo, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we first present a semianalytical method for the evolution of linear fully dispersive transient waves generated by an initial surface displacement and propagating over a constant depth. The procedure starts from Fourier and Hankel transforms and involves a combination of the method of stationary phase, the method of uniform asymptotic approximations and various Airy integral formulations. Second, we develop efficient convolution techniques expressed as single and double summations over the source area. These formulations are flexible, extremely fast, and highly accurate even for the dispersive tail of the transient waves. To verify the accuracy of the embedded dispersion properties, we consider test cases with sharp-edged disturbances in 1-D and 2-D. Furthermore, we consider the case of a relatively blunt Gaussian disturbance in 2-D. In all cases, the agreement between the convolution results and simulations with a high-order Boussinesq model is outstanding. Finally, we make an attempt to extend the convolution methods to geophysical tsunami problems taking into account, e.g., uneven bottom effects. Unfortunately, refraction/diffraction effects cannot easily be incorporated, so instead we focus on the incorporation of linear shoaling and its effect on travel time and temporal evolution of the surface elevation. The procedure is tested on data from the 2011 Japan tsunami. Convolution results are likewise compared to model simulations based on the nonlinear shallow water equations and both are compared with field observations from 10 deep water DART buoys. The near-field results are generally satisfactory, while the far-field results leave much to be desired.

  9. Interplay of Waves and Eddies and Energy Exchange in Rotating Stratified Geophysical Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouquet, A.; Marino, R.; Rosenberg, D. L.; Herbert, C.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the distribution of energy between wave and vortical modes as a function of scale in high resolution direct numerical simulations of rotating stratified Boussinesq flows with a unit aspect ratio, varying the dimensionless parameters in regimes in which wave turbulence prevails. The shift in scale from a vortex-dominated to a wave-dominated dynamics, characterized each by their Fourier spectra, is quantified by the wavenumber KR at which they cross. We examine the dependency of KR with parameters characteristics of the intrinsic dynamics of the flow such as Reynolds, Froude and Rossby numbers, and their combinations. Features of the energy exchange between potential and kinetic energy related to the interplay of wave modes and vortical modes are also explored and results recast in the context of geophysical flows.

  10. Annihilation and creation of rotating waves by a local light pulse in a protoplasmic droplet of the Physarum plasmodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Seiji; Ueda, Tetsuo

    2010-06-01

    Pattern dynamics plays a fundamental role in biological functions from cell to organ in living systems, and the appearance of rotating waves can lead to pathological situations. Basic dynamics of rotating waves of contraction-relaxation activity under local perturbation is studied in a newly developed protoplasmic droplet of the Physarum plasmodium. A light pulse is applied by irradiating circularly a quarter of the droplet showing a single rotating wave. The oscillation pattern changes abruptly only when the irradiation is applied at a part of the droplet near the maximal contraction. The abrupt changes are as follows: the rotating wave disappears or is displaced when the irradiation area is very close to the center of the rotating wave, while new rotating waves are created when the irradiation area is far from the center of the rotating wave. These results support the hypothesis that the phase response curve has a discontinuous change (type 0 resetting) from delay to advance around the maximal contraction. The significance of the results is discussed in relation to “vulnerability” in excitable media and biological systems in general.

  11. Rotating matter-wave beam splitters and consequences for atom gyrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Antoine, Charles

    2007-09-15

    The effect of a rotation on a matter-wave-laser beam splitter is studied and modeled. This modeling is shown to give important nontrivial corrections to the Sagnac phase shift of matter-wave gyrometers when the duration of the laser action cannot be neglected with respect to the propagation time between beam splitters. This result is illustrated on a Mach-Zehnder atom gyrometer (rate gyroscope) with running laser beam splitters. A quasiclassical description of the interferometer arms inside the beam splitters is proposed to interpret the corrected Sagnac phase shift in terms of an effective interferometer area.

  12. Rotating black holes in a draining bathtub: Superradiant scattering of gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richartz, Maurício; Prain, Angus; Liberati, Stefano; Weinfurtner, Silke

    2015-06-01

    In a draining rotating fluid flow background, surface perturbations behave as a scalar field on a rotating effective black hole spacetime. We propose a new model for the background flow which takes into account the varying depth of the water. Numerical integration of the associated Klein-Gordon equation using accessible experimental parameters shows that gravity waves in an appropriate frequency range are amplified through the mechanism of superradiance. Our numerical results suggest that the observation of this phenomenon in a common fluid mechanical system is within experimental reach. Unlike the case of wave scattering around Kerr black holes, which depends only on one dimensionless background parameter (the ratio a /M between the specific angular momentum and the mass of the black hole), our system depends on two dimensionless background parameters, namely the normalized angular velocity and surface gravity at the effective black hole horizon.

  13. Pilot-wave dynamics in a rotating frame: on the emergence of orbital quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oza, Anand; Harris, Daniel; Rosales, Rodolfo; Bush, John

    2013-11-01

    We present the results of a theoretical investigation of droplets walking on a rotating vibrating fluid bath. The droplet's trajectory is described in terms of an integro-differential equation that incorporates the influence of its propulsive wave force. Predictions for the dependence of the orbital radius on the bath's rotation rate compare favorably with experimental data and capture the progression from continuous to quantized orbits as the vibrational acceleration is increased. The orbital quantization is rationalized by assessing the stability of the orbital solutions, and may be understood as resulting directly from the dynamic constraint imposed on the drop by its monochromatic guiding wave. The stability analysis also predicts the existence of wobbling orbital states reported in recent experiments, and the virtual absence of stable orbits in the limit of large vibrational forcing. The authors acknowledge the generous financial support of the NSF through Grant CBET-0966452.

  14. Chiral vortical wave and induced flavor charge transport in a rotating quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yin; Huang, Xu-Guang; Liao, Jinfeng

    2015-10-01

    We show the existence of a new gapless collective excitation in a rotating fluid system with chiral fermions, named the chiral vortical wave (CVW). The CVW has its microscopic origin at the quantum anomaly and macroscopically arises from interplay between vector and axial charge fluctuations induced by vortical effects. The wave equation is obtained both from hydrodynamic current equations and from chiral kinetic theory, and its solutions show nontrivial CVW-induced charge transport from different initial conditions. Using the rotating quark-gluon plasma in heavy ion collisions as a concrete example, we show the formation of an induced flavor quadrupole in quark-gluon plasma and estimate the elliptic flow splitting effect for Λ baryons that may be experimentally measured.

  15. Distorted-wave born approximation calculations for turbulence scattering in an upward-refracting atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Kenneth E.; Di, Xiao; Wang, Lintao

    1990-01-01

    Weiner and Keast observed that in an upward-refracting atmosphere, the relative sound pressure level versus range follows a characteristic 'step' function. The observed step function has recently been predicted qualitatively and quantitatively by including the effects of small-scale turbulence in a parabolic equation (PE) calculation. (Gilbert et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 87, 2428-2437 (1990)). The PE results to single-scattering calculations based on the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) are compared. The purpose is to obtain a better understanding of the physical mechanisms that produce the step-function. The PE calculations and DWBA calculations are compared to each other and to the data of Weiner and Keast for upwind propagation (strong upward refraction) and crosswind propagation (weak upward refraction) at frequencies of 424 Hz and 848 Hz. The DWBA calculations, which include only single scattering from turbulence, agree with the PE calculations and with the data in all cases except for upwind propagation at 848 Hz. Consequently, it appears that in all cases except one, the observed step function can be understood in terms of single scattering from an upward-refracted 'skywave' into the refractive shadow zone. For upwind propagation at 848 Hz, the DWBA calculation gives levels in the shadow zone that are much below both the PE and the data.

  16. Real-time observation of dynamics in rotational molecular wave packets by use of air-laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Bin; Chu, Wei; Li, Guihua; Yao, Jinping; Zhang, Haisu; Ni, Jielei; Jing, Chenrui; Xie, Hongqiang; Cheng, Ya

    2014-04-01

    Molecular rotational spectroscopy based on a strong-field-ionization-induced nitrogen laser is employed to investigate the time evolution of the rotational wave packet composed by a coherent superposition of quantum rotational states created in a field-free molecular alignment. We show that this technique uniquely allows real-time observation of the ultrafast dynamics of the molecular rotational wave packet. Our analysis also shows that there exist two channels of generation of the nitrogen laser, shedding light on the population inversion mechanism behind the air laser generated by intense femtosecond laser pulses.

  17. Toroidal rotation of multiple species of ions in tokamak plasma driven by lower-hybrid-waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo Yang; Wang Shaojie; Pan Chengkang

    2012-10-15

    A numerical simulation is carried out to investigate the toroidal rotation of multiple species of ions and the radial electric field in a tokamak plasma driven by the lower-hybrid-wave (LHW). The theoretical model is based on the neoclassical transport theory associated with the anomalous transport model. Three species of ions (primary ion and two species of impurity ions) are taken into consideration. The predicted toroidal velocity of the trace impurities during the LHW injection agrees reasonably well with the experimental observation. It is shown that the toroidal rotation velocities of the trace impurity ions and the primary ions are close, therefore the trace impurity ions are representative of the primary ions in the toroidal rotation driven by the LHW.

  18. Gravity jitters excited slosh waves in rotating propellant tank under microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Lee, C. C.; Leslie, Fred W.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of fluids, in particular the effect of surface tension on partially-filled rotating fluids (cryogenic liquid helium and helium vapor) in a full-scale Gravity Probe-B Spacecraft propellant tank without probe imposed by various frequencies of gravity jitters have been investigated. Results disclose the conditions for the excitation of large amplitude slosh waves which shall be avoided in the design of cryogenic liquid propellant system.

  19. Non-linear evolution of tidally forced inertial waves in rotating fluid bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favier, B.; Barker, A. J.; Baruteau, C.; Ogilvie, G. I.

    2014-03-01

    We perform one of the first studies into the non-linear evolution of tidally excited inertial waves in a uniformly rotating fluid body, exploring a simplified model of the fluid envelope of a planet (or the convective envelope of a solar-type star) subject to the gravitational tidal perturbations of an orbiting companion. Our model contains a perfectly rigid spherical core, which is surrounded by an envelope of incompressible uniform density fluid. The corresponding linear problem was studied in previous papers which this work extends into the non-linear regime, at moderate Ekman numbers (the ratio of viscous to Coriolis accelerations). By performing high-resolution numerical simulations, using a combination of pseudo-spectral and spectral element methods, we investigate the effects of non-linearities, which lead to time-dependence of the flow and the corresponding dissipation rate. Angular momentum is deposited non-uniformly, leading to the generation of significant differential rotation in the initially uniformly rotating fluid, i.e. the body does not evolve towards synchronism as a simple solid body rotator. This differential rotation modifies the properties of tidally excited inertial waves, changes the dissipative properties of the flow and eventually becomes unstable to a secondary shear instability provided that the Ekman number is sufficiently small. Our main result is that the inclusion of non-linearities eventually modifies the flow and the resulting dissipation from what linear calculations would predict, which has important implications for tidal dissipation in fluid bodies. We finally discuss some limitations of our simplified model, and propose avenues for future research to better understand the tidal evolution of rotating planets and stars.

  20. Bayesian reconstruction of gravitational wave burst signals from simulations of rotating stellar core collapse and bounce

    SciTech Connect

    Roever, Christian; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Christensen, Nelson; Dimmelmeier, Harald; Heng, Ik Siong; Meyer, Renate

    2009-11-15

    Presented in this paper is a technique that we propose for extracting the physical parameters of a rotating stellar core collapse from the observation of the associated gravitational wave signal from the collapse and core bounce. Data from interferometric gravitational wave detectors can be used to provide information on the mass of the progenitor model, precollapse rotation, and the nuclear equation of state. We use waveform libraries provided by the latest numerical simulations of rotating stellar core collapse models in general relativity, and from them create an orthogonal set of eigenvectors using principal component analysis. Bayesian inference techniques are then used to reconstruct the associated gravitational wave signal that is assumed to be detected by an interferometric detector. Posterior probability distribution functions are derived for the amplitudes of the principal component analysis eigenvectors, and the pulse arrival time. We show how the reconstructed signal and the principal component analysis eigenvector amplitude estimates may provide information on the physical parameters associated with the core collapse event.

  1. Effect of rotation and imperfection on reflection and transmission of plane waves in anisotropic generalized thermoelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajneesh; Singh, Manjeet

    2009-07-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the propagation of plane waves at an imperfectly bonded interface of two orthotropic generalized thermoelastic rotating half-spaces with different elastic and thermal properties. The thermoelastic theory with one relaxation time developed by Lord and Shulman [A generalized dynamical theory of thermoelasticity, J. Mech. Phys. Solids 15 (1967) 299-309] is used to study the problem. The reflection and transmission coefficients of Quasi Longitudinal (QL-) wave, Quasi Thermal (T-mode) wave and Quasi Transverse (QT-) wave have been derived. The effect of rotation has been studied on the velocities of different waves. Some special cases of boundaries i.e. normal stiffness, transverse stiffness, thermal contact conductance, slip boundary and welded contact boundary have been deduced from an imperfect one. Impact of different boundaries has been studied graphically. It is observed that thermal properties, rotation and imperfect boundary have significant effect on the propagation of waves.

  2. Effect of the pair-structure factor of a particulate medium on scalar wave scattering in the first Born approximation.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Serkan; Korotkova, Olga

    2009-06-15

    Using scattering matrices and the angular spectrum representation of waves, we develop the analytical theory of scattering of random scalar waves from random collections of particles, valid under the first Born approximation. We demonstrate that in the calculation of far-field statistics, such as the spectral density and the spectral degree of coherence, the knowledge of the pair-structure factor of the collection is crucial. We illustrate our analytical approach by considering a numerical example involving scattering of two partially correlated plane waves from a random distribution of spheres. PMID:19529695

  3. Generation of plasma rotation in a tokamak by ion-cyclotron absorption of fast Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    F.W. Perkins; R.B. White; P. Bonoli

    2000-06-13

    Control of rotation in tokamak plasmas provides a method for suppressing fine-scale turbulent transport by velocity shear and for stabilizing large-scale magnetohydrodynamic instabilities via a close-fitting conducting shell. The experimental discovery of rotation in a plasma heated by the fast-wave minority ion cyclotron process is important both as a potential control method for a fusion reactor and as a fundamental issue, because rotation arises even though this heating process introduces negligible angular momentum. This paper proposes and evaluates a mechanism which resolves this apparent conflict. First, it is assumed that angular momentum transport in a tokamak is governed by a diffusion equation with a no-slip boundary condition at the plasma surface and with a torque-density source that is a function of radius. When the torque density source consists of two separated regions of positive and negative torque density, a non-zero central rotation velocity results, even when the total angular momentum input vanishes. Secondly, the authors show that localized ion-cyclotron heating can generate regions of positive and negative torque density and consequently central plasma rotation.

  4. Toroidal rotation and radial electric field driven by the lower-hybrid-wave in a tokamak fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shaojie

    2011-10-15

    A theoretical model is proposed to interpret the counter-current rotation driven by the lower-hybrid-wave observed in the tokamak lower-hybrid-wave parallel current drive experiments. It is found that ions absorb the toroidal momentum indirectly from the wave through collisional friction with the resonant electrons that directly take the momentum from the wave through Landau resonance. This momentum coupling pumps out the ions to produce a negative radial electric field and makes the plasma rotate in the counter-current direction.

  5. Correction of the near threshold behavior of electron collisional excitation cross-sections in the plane-wave Born approximation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kilcrease, D. P.; Brookes, S.

    2013-08-19

    The modeling of NLTE plasmas requires the solution of population rate equations to determine the populations of the various atomic levels relevant to a particular problem. The equations require many cross sections for excitation, de-excitation, ionization and recombination. Additionally, a simple and computational fast way to calculate electron collisional excitation cross-sections for ions is by using the plane-wave Born approximation. This is essentially a high-energy approximation and the cross section suffers from the unphysical problem of going to zero near threshold. Various remedies for this problem have been employed with varying degrees of success. We present a correction procedure formore » the Born cross-sections that employs the Elwert–Sommerfeld factor to correct for the use of plane waves instead of Coulomb waves in an attempt to produce a cross-section similar to that from using the more time consuming Coulomb Born approximation. We compare this new approximation with other, often employed correction procedures. Furthermore, we also look at some further modifications to our Born Elwert procedure and its combination with Y.K. Kim's correction of the Coulomb Born approximation for singly charged ions that more accurately approximate convergent close coupling calculations.« less

  6. Correction of the near threshold behavior of electron collisional excitation cross-sections in the plane-wave Born approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kilcrease, D. P.; Brookes, S.

    2013-08-19

    The modeling of NLTE plasmas requires the solution of population rate equations to determine the populations of the various atomic levels relevant to a particular problem. The equations require many cross sections for excitation, de-excitation, ionization and recombination. Additionally, a simple and computational fast way to calculate electron collisional excitation cross-sections for ions is by using the plane-wave Born approximation. This is essentially a high-energy approximation and the cross section suffers from the unphysical problem of going to zero near threshold. Various remedies for this problem have been employed with varying degrees of success. We present a correction procedure for the Born cross-sections that employs the Elwert–Sommerfeld factor to correct for the use of plane waves instead of Coulomb waves in an attempt to produce a cross-section similar to that from using the more time consuming Coulomb Born approximation. We compare this new approximation with other, often employed correction procedures. Furthermore, we also look at some further modifications to our Born Elwert procedure and its combination with Y.K. Kim's correction of the Coulomb Born approximation for singly charged ions that more accurately approximate convergent close coupling calculations.

  7. Educing the emission mechanism of internal gravity waves in the differentially heat rotating annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, Joran; Hien, Steffen; Achatz, Ulrich; Borchert, Sebastian; Fruman, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the lifecycle of gravity waves is fundamental to a good comprehension of the dynamics of the atmosphere. In this lifecycle, the emission mechanisms may be the most elusive. Indeed, while the emission of gravity waves by orography or convection is well understood, the so-called spontaneous emission is still a quite open topic of investigation [1]. This type of emission usually occur very near jet-front systems in the troposphere. In this abstract, we announce our numerical study of the question. Model systems of the atmosphere which can be easily simulated or built in a laboratory have always been an important part of the study of atmospheric dynamics, alongside global simulations, in situ measurements and theory. In the case of the study of the spontaneous emission of gravity waves near jet-front systems, the differentially heated rotating annulus set up has been proposed and extensively used. It comprises of an annular tank containing water: the inner cylinder is kept at a cold temperature while the outer cylinder is kept at a warm temperature. The whole system is rotating. Provided the values of the control parameters (temperature, rotation rate, gap between the cylinders, height of water) are well chosen, the resulting flow mimics the troposphere at midlatitudes: it has a jet stream, and a baroclinic lifecycle develops on top of it. A very reasonable ratio of Brunt-Väisälä frequency over rotation rate of the system can be obtained, so as to be as close to the atmosphere as possible. Recent experiments as well as earlier numerical simulations in our research group have shown that gravity waves are indeed emitted in this set up, in particular near the jet front system of the baroclinic wave [2]. After a first experimental stage of characterising the emitted wavepacket, we focused our work on testing hypotheses on the gravity wave emission mechanism: we have tested and validated the hypothesis of spontaneous imbalance generated by the flow in

  8. Transfer induced by core excitation within an extended distorted-wave Born approximation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Ramos, M.; Moro, A. M.; Gómez-Camacho, J.; Thompson, I. J.

    2015-07-01

    Background: Dynamic core-excitation effects have been found to be of importance in breakup reactions and may be of relevance when obtaining spectroscopic information from transfer reactions. Purpose: In this paper we extend the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) formalism in order to allow for noncentral components in the core-core term appearing in the transition operator, which allows for dynamic core-excitation effects. Then we study these effects by applying the formalism to different (d ,p ) reactions. Methods: The expression of the nonlocal kernels required for the evaluation of the DWBA amplitudes has been extended so as to include noncentral parts in the core-core interaction. The DWBA scattering amplitude is then obtained by solving the corresponding inhomogeneous equation, with the new computed kernels, and the usual outgoing boundary conditions. A new DWBA code has been developed for this purpose. Results: For 10Be(d ,p ) 11Be , core-excitation effects are found to be almost negligible (<3 %) . The importance of this effect has been found to depend to a large extent on the excitation energy of the core. This has been confirmed in the 30Ne(d ,p ) 31Ne case, for which the excitation energy of the first 2+ state is 0.8 MeV, and the effect of core excitation increases to ≈10 % . Conclusions: We find dynamic core-excitation effects in transfer reactions to have small contributions to cross sections, in general. However, they should not be neglected, since they may modify the spectroscopic information obtained from these reactions and may become of importance in reactions with nuclei with a core with high deformation and low excitation energy.

  9. Direct observation of nonlinear coupling in wave turbulence at the surface of water and relevance of approximate resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubourg, Quentin; Mordant, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    energy cascade is clearly observed consistently with previous measurements. A large amount of data permits us to use higher order statistical tools to investigate directly the resonant interactions. We observe a strong presence of triadic interactions in our system, confirming the foundations of the weak wave turbulence theory. A significant part of these interactions are non-local and enable coupling between capillary and gravity waves. We also emphasize the role of approximate resonances that are made possible by the nonlinear spectral widening. The quasi-resonances increase significantly the number of wave interactions and in particular open the possibility of observing 3-wave coupling among gravity waves although 3-wave exact resonances are prohibited. These effects are being currently investigated in a larger size experiment using a 13m in diameter wave flume. Our observation raise the question of the importance of these approximate resonances of gravity waves in energy transfers both in the theory and in the ocean.

  10. Wave generation by fracture initiation and propagation in geomaterials with internal rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esin, Maxim; Pasternak, Elena; Dyskin, Arcady; Xu, Yuan

    2016-04-01

    Crack or fracture initiation and propagation in geomaterials are sources of waves and is important in both stability and fracture (e.g. hydraulic fracture) monitoring. Many geomaterials consist of particles or other constituents capable of rotating with respect to each other, either due to the absence of the binder phase (fragmented materials) or due to extensive damage of the cement between the constituents inflicted by previous loading. In investigating the wave generated in fracturing it is important to distinguish between the cases when the fracture is instantaneously initiated to its full length or propagates from a smaller initial crack. We show by direct physical experiments and discrete element modelling of 2D arrangements of unbonded disks that under compressive load fractures are initiated instantaneously as a result of the material instability and localisation. Such fractures generate waves as a single impulse impact. When the fractures propagate, they produce a sequence of impulses associated with the propagation steps. This manifests itself as acoustic (microseismic) emission whose temporal pattern contains the information of the fracture geometry, such as fractal dimension of the fracture. The description of this process requires formulating criteria of crack growth capable of taking into account the internal rotations. We developed an analytical solution based on the Cosserat continuum where each point of body has three translational and three rotational degrees of freedom. When the Cosserat characteristic lengths are comparable with the grain sizes, the simplified equations of small-scale Cosserat continuum can be used. We established that the order of singularity of the main asymptotic term for moment stress is higher than the order of singularity for conventional stress. Therefore, the mutual rotation of particles and related bending and/or twisting of the bonds between the particles represent an unconventional mechanism of crack propagation.

  11. Multivariate statistical data analysis methods for detecting baroclinic wave interactions in the thermally driven rotating annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Larcher, Thomas; Harlander, Uwe; Alexandrov, Kiril; Wang, Yongtai

    2010-05-01

    Experiments on baroclinic wave instabilities in a rotating cylindrical gap have been long performed, e.g., to unhide regular waves of different zonal wave number, to better understand the transition to the quasi-chaotic regime, and to reveal the underlying dynamical processes of complex wave flows. We present the application of appropriate multivariate data analysis methods on time series data sets acquired by the use of non-intrusive measurement techniques of a quite different nature. While the high accurate Laser-Doppler-Velocimetry (LDV ) is used for measurements of the radial velocity component at equidistant azimuthal positions, a high sensitive thermographic camera measures the surface temperature field. The measurements are performed at particular parameter points, where our former studies show that kinds of complex wave patterns occur [1, 2]. Obviously, the temperature data set has much more information content as the velocity data set due to the particular measurement techniques. Both sets of time series data are analyzed by using multivariate statistical techniques. While the LDV data sets are studied by applying the Multi-Channel Singular Spectrum Analysis (M - SSA), the temperature data sets are analyzed by applying the Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOF ). Our goal is (a) to verify the results yielded with the analysis of the velocity data and (b) to compare the data analysis methods. Therefor, the temperature data are processed in a way to become comparable to the LDV data, i.e. reducing the size of the data set in such a manner that the temperature measurements would imaginary be performed at equidistant azimuthal positions only. This approach initially results in a great loss of information. But applying the M - SSA to the reduced temperature data sets enable us to compare the methods. [1] Th. von Larcher and C. Egbers, Experiments on transitions of baroclinic waves in a differentially heated rotating annulus, Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics

  12. Modified dust ion-acoustic surface waves in a semi-bounded magnetized plasma containing the rotating dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2016-05-01

    The dispersion relation for modified dust ion-acoustic surface waves in the magnetized dusty plasma containing the rotating dust grains is derived, and the effects of magnetic field configuration on the resonant growth rate are investigated. We present the results that the resonant growth rates of the wave would increase with the ratio of ion plasma frequency to cyclotron frequency as well as with the increase of wave number for the case of perpendicular magnetic field configuration when the ion plasma frequency is greater than the dust rotation frequency. For the parallel magnetic field configuration, we find that the instability occurs only for some limited ranges of the wave number and the ratio of ion plasma frequency to cyclotron frequency. The resonant growth rate is found to decrease with the increase of the wave number. The influence of dust rotational frequency on the instability is also discussed.

  13. Stability of steady rotational water-waves of finite amplitude on arbitrary shear currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seez, William; Abid, Malek; Kharif, Christian

    2016-04-01

    A versatile solver for the two-dimensional Euler equations with an unknown free-surface has been developed. This code offers the possibility to calculate two-dimensional, steady rotational water-waves of finite amplitude on an arbitrary shear current. Written in PYTHON the code incorporates both pseudo-spectral and finite-difference methods in the discretisation of the equations and thus allows the user to capture waves with large steepnesses. As such it has been possible to establish that, in a counter-flowing situation, the existence of wave solutions is not guaranteed and depends on a pair of parameters representing mass flux and vorticity. This result was predicted, for linear solutions, by Constantin. Furthermore, experimental comparisons, both with and without vorticity, have proven the precision of this code. Finally, waves propagating on top of highly realistic shear currents (exponential profiles under the surface) have been calculated following current profiles such as those used by Nwogu. In addition, a stability analysis routine has been developed to study the stability regimes of base waves calculated with the two-dimensional code. This linear stability analysis is based on three dimensional perturbations of the steady situation which lead to a generalised eigenvalue problem. Common instabilities of the first and second class have been detected, while a third class of wave-instability appears due to the presence of strong vorticity. {1} Adrian Constantin and Walter Strauss. {Exact steady periodic water waves with vorticity}. Communications on Pure and Applied Mathematics, 57(4):481-527, April 2004. Okey G. Nwogu. {Interaction of finite-amplitude waves with vertically sheared current fields}. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 627:179, May 2009.

  14. Monitoring Rotational Components of Seismic Waves with a Ring Laser Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gakundi, Jackson; Dunn, Robert

    2015-04-01

    It has been known for decades that seismic waves can introduce rotation in the surface of the Earth. There are historic records of tombstones in Japan being rotated after large earthquakes. Until fairly recently, the primary way to detect ground rotation from earthquakes was with an array of several seismographs. The development of large ring laser interferometers has provided a way for a single instrument to make extremely sensitive measurements of ground motion. In this poster, a diagram of a large ring laser will be presented. For comparison, seismograms recorded with a ring laser and a collocated standard seismograph will be presented. A major thrust of this research is the detection and analysis of seismic responses from directional drilling sites in Arkansas and Oklahoma. There are suggestions that the injection of pressurized water used to fracture gas bearing shale may cause small earthquakes. The Arkansas Oil and Gas Commission ordered the closing of certain waste water disposal wells in North Central Arkansas. Apparently, these wells injected waste water into a previously unknown fault causing it to slip. An attempt is being made to determine if the seismic wave patterns from earthquakes generated near directional drilling sites differ from those generated miles away.

  15. Survey of Coherent Approximately 1 Hz Waves in Mercury's Inner Magnetosphere from MESSENGER Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boardsen, Scott A.; Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C.

    2012-01-01

    We summarize observations by the MESSENGER spacecraft of highly coherent waves at frequencies between 0.4 and 5 Hz in Mercury's inner magnetosphere. This survey covers the time period from 24 March to 25 September 2011, or 2.1 Mercury years. These waves typically exhibit banded harmonic structure that drifts in frequency as the spacecraft traverses the magnetic equator. The waves are seen at all magnetic local times, but their observed rate of occurrence is much less on the dayside, at least in part the result of MESSENGER's orbit. On the nightside, on average, wave power is maximum near the equator and decreases with increasing magnetic latitude, consistent with an equatorial source. When the spacecraft traverses the plasma sheet during its equatorial crossings, wave power is a factor of 2 larger than for equatorial crossings that do not cross the plasma sheet. The waves are highly transverse at large magnetic latitudes but are more compressional near the equator. However, at the equator the transverse component of these waves increases relative to the compressional component as the degree of polarization decreases. Also, there is a substantial minority of events that are transverse at all magnetic latitudes, including the equator. A few of these latter events could be interpreted as ion cyclotron waves. In general, the waves tend to be strongly linear and characterized by values of the ellipticity less than 0.3 and wave-normal angles peaked near 90 deg. Their maxima in wave power at the equator coupled with their narrow-band character suggests that these waves might be generated locally in loss cone plasma characterized by high values of the ratio beta of plasma pressure to magnetic pressure. Presumably both electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves and electromagnetic ion Bernstein waves can be generated by ion loss cone distributions. If proton beta decreases with increasing magnetic latitude along a field line, then electromagnetic ion Bernstein waves are predicted

  16. Forced generation of solitary waves in a rotating fluid and their stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Wooyoung

    The primary objective of this graduate research is to study forced generation of solitary waves in a rotating fluid and their stability properties. For axisymmetric flow of a non-uniformly rotating fluid within a long cylindrical tube, an analysis is presented to predict the periodic generation of upstream-advancing vortex solitons by axisymmetric disturbance steadily moving with a transcritical velocity as a forcing agent. The phenomenon is simulated using the forced Korteweg-de Vries (fKdV) equation to model the amplitude function of the Stokes stream function for describing this family of rotating flows of an inviscid and incompressible fluid. The numerical results for the weakly nonlinear and weakly dispersive wave motion show that a sequence of well-defined axisymmetrical recirculating eddies is periodically produced and emitted to radiate upstream of the disturbance, soon becoming permanent in the form as a procession of vortex solitons, which we call vortons. Two primary flows, the Rankine vortex and the Burgers vortex, are adopted to exhibit in detail the process of producing the upstream vortons by the critical motion of a slender body moving along the central axis, with the Burgers vortex being found the more effective of the two in the generation of vortons. To investigate the evolution of free or forced waves within a tube of non-uniform radius, a new forced KdV equation is derived which models the variable geometry with variable coefficients. A set of section-mean conservation laws is derived specially for this class of rotational tube flows of an inviscid and incompressible fluid, in both differential and integral forms. A new aspect of stability theory is analyzed for possible instabilities of the axisymmetric solitary waves subject to non-axisymmetric disturbances. The present linear analysis based on the model equation involving the bending mode shows that the axisymmetric solitary wave is neutrally stable with respect to small bending mode

  17. A high-order time-parallel scheme for solving wave propagation problems via the direct construction of an approximate time-evolution operator

    SciTech Connect

    Haut, T. S.; Babb, T.; Martinsson, P. G.; Wingate, B. A.

    2015-06-16

    Our manuscript demonstrates a technique for efficiently solving the classical wave equation, the shallow water equations, and, more generally, equations of the form ∂u/∂t=Lu∂u/∂t=Lu, where LL is a skew-Hermitian differential operator. The idea is to explicitly construct an approximation to the time-evolution operator exp(τL)exp(τL) for a relatively large time-step ττ. Recently developed techniques for approximating oscillatory scalar functions by rational functions, and accelerated algorithms for computing functions of discretized differential operators are exploited. Principal advantages of the proposed method include: stability even for large time-steps, the possibility to parallelize in time over many characteristic wavelengths and large speed-ups over existing methods in situations where simulation over long times are required. Numerical examples involving the 2D rotating shallow water equations and the 2D wave equation in an inhomogenous medium are presented, and the method is compared to the 4th order Runge–Kutta (RK4) method and to the use of Chebyshev polynomials. The new method achieved high accuracy over long-time intervals, and with speeds that are orders of magnitude faster than both RK4 and the use of Chebyshev polynomials.

  18. A high-order time-parallel scheme for solving wave propagation problems via the direct construction of an approximate time-evolution operator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Haut, T. S.; Babb, T.; Martinsson, P. G.; Wingate, B. A.

    2015-06-16

    Our manuscript demonstrates a technique for efficiently solving the classical wave equation, the shallow water equations, and, more generally, equations of the form ∂u/∂t=Lu∂u/∂t=Lu, where LL is a skew-Hermitian differential operator. The idea is to explicitly construct an approximation to the time-evolution operator exp(τL)exp(τL) for a relatively large time-step ττ. Recently developed techniques for approximating oscillatory scalar functions by rational functions, and accelerated algorithms for computing functions of discretized differential operators are exploited. Principal advantages of the proposed method include: stability even for large time-steps, the possibility to parallelize in time over many characteristic wavelengths and large speed-ups over existingmore » methods in situations where simulation over long times are required. Numerical examples involving the 2D rotating shallow water equations and the 2D wave equation in an inhomogenous medium are presented, and the method is compared to the 4th order Runge–Kutta (RK4) method and to the use of Chebyshev polynomials. The new method achieved high accuracy over long-time intervals, and with speeds that are orders of magnitude faster than both RK4 and the use of Chebyshev polynomials.« less

  19. An Exact Solution for Geophysical Edge Waves in the {β}-Plane Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu-Kruse, Delia

    2015-12-01

    By taking into account the {β}-plane effects, we provide an exact nonlinear solution to the geophysical edge-wave problem within the Lagrangian framework. This solution describes trapped waves propagating eastward or westward along a sloping beach with the shoreline parallel to the Equator.

  20. Three-dimensional structures of equatorial waves and the resulting super-rotation in the atmosphere of a tidally locked hot Jupiter

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Shang-Min; Gu, Pin-Gao; Dobbs-Dixon, Ian

    2014-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) equatorial trapped waves excited by stellar isolation and the resulting equatorial super-rotating jet in a vertical stratified atmosphere of a tidally locked hot Jupiter are investigated. Taking the hot Jupiter HD 189733b as a fiducial example, we analytically solve linear equations subject to stationary stellar heating with a uniform zonal-mean flow included. We also extract wave information in the final equilibrium state of the atmosphere from our radiative hydrodynamical simulation for HD 189733b. Our analytic wave solutions are able to qualitatively explain the 3D simulation results. Apart from previous wave studies, investigating the vertical structure of waves allows us to explore new wave features such as the wavefronts tilts related to the Rossby-wave resonance as well as dispersive equatorial waves. We also attempt to apply our linear wave analysis to explain some numerical features associated with the equatorial jet development seen in the general circulation model by Showman and Polvani. During the spin-up phase of the equatorial jet, the acceleration of the jet can be in principle boosted by the Rossby-wave resonance. However, we also find that as the jet speed increases, the Rossby-wave structure shifts eastward, while the Kelvin-wave structure remains approximately stationary, leading to the decline of the acceleration rate. Our analytic model of jet evolution implies that there exists only one stable equilibrium state of the atmosphere, possibly implying that the final state of the atmosphere is independent of initial conditions in the linear regime. Limitations of our linear model and future improvements are also discussed.

  1. Three-dimensional Structures of Equatorial Waves and the Resulting Super-rotation in the Atmosphere of a Tidally Locked Hot Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shang-Min; Dobbs-Dixon, Ian; Gu, Pin-Gao

    2014-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) equatorial trapped waves excited by stellar isolation and the resulting equatorial super-rotating jet in a vertical stratified atmosphere of a tidally locked hot Jupiter are investigated. Taking the hot Jupiter HD 189733b as a fiducial example, we analytically solve linear equations subject to stationary stellar heating with a uniform zonal-mean flow included. We also extract wave information in the final equilibrium state of the atmosphere from our radiative hydrodynamical simulation for HD 189733b. Our analytic wave solutions are able to qualitatively explain the 3D simulation results. Apart from previous wave studies, investigating the vertical structure of waves allows us to explore new wave features such as the wavefronts tilts related to the Rossby-wave resonance as well as dispersive equatorial waves. We also attempt to apply our linear wave analysis to explain some numerical features associated with the equatorial jet development seen in the general circulation model by Showman and Polvani. During the spin-up phase of the equatorial jet, the acceleration of the jet can be in principle boosted by the Rossby-wave resonance. However, we also find that as the jet speed increases, the Rossby-wave structure shifts eastward, while the Kelvin-wave structure remains approximately stationary, leading to the decline of the acceleration rate. Our analytic model of jet evolution implies that there exists only one stable equilibrium state of the atmosphere, possibly implying that the final state of the atmosphere is independent of initial conditions in the linear regime. Limitations of our linear model and future improvements are also discussed.

  2. Pitch Angle Scattering of Energetic Particles by Waves Generated from a Rotating Magnetic Field Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, X.; Karavaev, A. V.; Sharma, A. S.; Papadopoulos, K.; Gumerov, N.; Gigliotti, A. F.; Gekelman, W. N.

    2009-12-01

    Injection of whistler waves into Earth's inner radiation belt to enhance precipitation of energetic electrons has been an active research area, and is referred to as RB Remediation (RBR). Most mechanisms of pitch angle scattering of energetic particles are based on gyro-resonant wave-particle interaction. Recent experiments and simulations show that Rotating Magnetic Field (RMF) antennas in plasmas can be efficient radiation sources of MHD and whistler waves. In experiments conducted in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA, poly-phased current loops drove the RMF antenna. These experiments, as well as simulations show that 75-85% of the radiation generated by the RMF antenna is in guided propagation. The whistler and MHD waves have non-local magnetic field gradients in the transverse direction and these provide ways to break the adiabatic invariants of electrons and precipitate them via a non-resonant scattering. In this paper simulations of non-resonant pitch angle scattering of energetic particles by waves generated by RMF sources are presented. Three-dimensional EMHD simulations are used to model whistlers and the resultant 3D electromagnetic fields are used in particle tracing codes to study pitch angle scattering. The simulations are carried out for a wide range of magnetic fields produced by RMF sources, including fields much larger than the ambient magnetic field in space plasma environments. This work was sponsored by ONR MURI Grant 5-28828

  3. Full-dimensional quantum wave packet study of rotationally inelastic transitions in H2+H2 collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying Lin, Shi; Guo, Hua

    2002-09-01

    We report full-dimensional accurate quantum dynamical calculations of the rotationally inelastic collision: para-H2(ν1=0,j1)=0+para- H2(ν2=0,j2)=0→para- H2(ν1=0,j1)'+para- H2(ν2=0,j2)', using a wave packet approach based on the Chebyshev polynomial expansion of Green's operator. The six-dimensional Hamiltonian within the coupled-states approximation is discretized in a mixed grid/basis representation and its action is computed in appropriate representations facilitated by a series of one-dimensional pseudo-spectral transformations. Both the parity and diatomic exchange symmetry are adapted. The S-matrix elements for the rotational transitions are obtained at all energies by the Fourier transform of Chebyshev correlation functions and used to compute transition probabilities, differential and integral cross sections, and state-resolved thermal rate constants. Results are compared for two recently proposed ab initio based potential energy surfaces and with previous quantum results.

  4. Cooper Pairs with Broken Parity and Spin-Rotational Symmetries in d-Wave Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebed, A. G.

    2006-01-01

    Paramagnetic effects are shown to result in the appearance of a triplet component of order parameter in a vortex phase of a d-wave superconductor in the absence of impurities. This component, which breaks parity and spin-rotational symmetries of Cooper pairs, is expected to be of the order of unity in a number of modern superconductors such as organic, high Tc, and some others. A generic phase diagram of such type-IV superconductors, which are singlet ones at H=0 and in the Meissner phase, and characterized by singlet-triplet mixed Copper pairs Δs+iΔt with broken symmetries in a vortex phase, is discussed.

  5. On the linear approximation of gravity wave saturation in the mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, W. C.; Schoeberl, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Lindzen's model of gravity wave breaking is shown to be inconsistent with the process of convective adjustment and associated turbulent outbreak. The K-theory turbulent diffusion model used by Lindzen implies a spatially uniform turbulent field which is not in agreement with the fact that gravity wave saturation and the associated convection produce turbulence only in restricted zones. The Lindzen model may be corrected to some extent by taking the turbulent Prandtl number for a diffusion acting on the wave itself to be very large. The eddy diffusion coefficients computed by Lindzen then become a factor of 2 larger and eddy transports of heat and constituents by wave fields vanish to first order.

  6. Magnetic field effect on waves in a centrifuged layer of a rotating conducting viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueva, N. V.; Sandalov, V. M.; Tkach, M. E.; Soldatov, I. N.

    2015-05-01

    This paper considers wave processes in a centrifuged layer of an incompressible viscous conducting fluid in an axial magnetic field in the cavity of a rapidly rotating infinite cylinder with insulating walls. Inertial modes (solutions of the linearized boundary-value problem of magnetohydrodynamics) are represented as a superposition of helical fields. Expressions for the vorticity parameters of the helical flows forming the inertial mode at a small Stewart number are given. Dispersion curves of inertial waves are constructed, and the influence of the magnetic field on the flow field is analyzed. The critical frequencies at which the lowest (surface) mode arises are determined. The spatial and temporal stability of the modes are investigated.

  7. Shear flow driven drift waves and the counter-rotating vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Q.; Saleem, H.; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2005-10-01

    It is shown that the drift waves can become unstable due to the shear flow produced by externally applied electric field. The modified Rayleigh instability condition is obtained which is applicable to both electron-ion and electron-positron-ion plasmas. It is proposed that the shear flow driven drift waves can be responsible for large amplitude electrostatic fluctuations in tokamak edges. In the nonlinear regime the stationary structures may appear in electron-positron-ion plasmas as well as electron-ion plasmas. A particular form of the shear flow can give rise to counter-rotating dipole vortices and vortex chains. The speed and amplitude of the structures are affected by the presence of positrons in the electron ion plasma. The relevance of this investigation to laboratory and astrophysical plasmas is pointed out.

  8. Nonlinear Stability of Strong Planar Rarefaction Waves for the Relaxation Approximation of Conservation Laws in Several Space Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Huijiang

    2000-04-01

    In this paper, we show that a strong planar rarefaction wave is nonlinear stable, namely it is an attractor for the relaxation approximation of the scalar conservation laws in several space dimensions. Compared with former results obtained by T. P. Liu (1987, Comm. Math. Phys.108, 153-175) and T. Luo (1997, J. Differential Equations133, 255-279), our main novelty lies in the fact that the planar rarefaction waves do not need to be small, and in the one-dimensional case, the initial disturbance can also be chosen arbitrarily large.

  9. CORONAL FARADAY ROTATION FLUCTUATIONS AND A WAVE/TURBULENCE-DRIVEN MODEL OF THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Hollweg, Joseph V.; Cranmer, Steven R.; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. E-mail: scranmer@cfa.harvard.ed

    2010-10-20

    Some recent models for coronal heating and the origin of the solar wind postulate that the source of energy and momentum consists of Alfven waves of solar origin dissipating via MHD turbulence. We use one of these models to predict the level of Faraday rotation fluctuations (FRFs) that should be imposed on radio signals passing through the corona. This model has the virtue of specifying the correlation length of the turbulence, knowledge of which is essential for calculating the FRFs; previous comparisons of observed FRFs with models suffered from the fact that the correlation length had to be guessed. We compare the predictions with measurements of FRFs obtained by the Helios radio experiment during occultations in 1975 through 1977, close to solar minimum. We show that only a small fraction of the FRFs are produced by density fluctuations; the bulk of the FRFs must be produced by coronal magnetic field fluctuations. The observed FRFs have periods of hours, suggesting that they are related to Alfven waves which are observed in situ by spacecraft throughout the solar wind; other evidence also suggests that the FRFs are due to coronal Alfven waves. We choose a model field line in an equatorial streamer which has background electron concentrations that match those inferred from the Helios occultation data. The predicted FRFs are found to agree very well with the Helios data. If the FRFs are in fact produced by Alfven waves with the assumed correlation length, our analysis leads us to conclude that wave-turbulence models should continue to be pursued with vigor. But since we cannot prove that the FRFs are produced by Alfven waves, we state the more conservative conclusion, still subject to the correctness of the assumed correlation length, that the corona contains long-period magnetic fluctuations with sufficient energy to heat the corona and drive the solar wind.

  10. Transformation cloaking and radial approximations for flexural waves in elastic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, M.; Colquitt, D. J.; Jones, I. S.; Movchan, A. B.; Movchan, N. V.

    2014-09-01

    It is known that design of elastic cloaks is much more challenging than that of acoustic cloaks, cloaks of electromagnetic waves or scalar problems of anti-plane shear. In this paper, we address fully the fourth-order problem and develop a model of a broadband invisibility cloak for channelling flexural waves in thin plates around finite inclusions. We also discuss an option to employ efficiently an elastic pre-stress and body forces to achieve such a result. An asymptotic derivation provides a rigorous link between the model in question and elastic wave propagation in thin solids. This is discussed in detail to show connection with non-symmetric formulations in vector elasticity studied in earlier work.