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Sample records for rotation viscosity pinch

  1. Probing Rotational Viscosity in Synaptic Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Zeigler, Maxwell B.; Allen, Peter B.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2011-01-01

    The synaptic vesicle (SV) is a central organelle in neurotransmission, and previous studies have suggested that SV protein 2 (SV2) may be responsible for forming a gel-like matrix within the vesicle. Here we measured the steady-state rotational anisotropy of the fluorescent dye, Oregon Green, within individual SVs. By also measuring the fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green in SVs, we determined the mean rotational viscosity to be 16.49 ± 0.12 cP for wild-type (WT) empty mice vesicles (i.e., with no neurotransmitters), 11.21 ± 0.12 cP for empty vesicles from SV2 knock-out mice, and 11.40 ± 0.65 cP for WT mice vesicles loaded with the neurotransmitter glutamate (Glu). This measurement shows that SV2 is an important determinant of viscosity within the vesicle lumen, and that the viscosity decreases when the vesicles are filled with Glu. The viscosities of both empty SV2 knock-out vesicles and Glu-loaded WT vesicles were significantly different from that of empty WT SVs (p < 0.05). This measurement represents the smallest enclosed volume in which rotational viscosity has been measured thus far. PMID:21641331

  2. Rotating plasma disks in dense Z-pinch experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, M. J. E-mail: s.lebedev@imperial.ac.uk; Lebedev, S. V. E-mail: s.lebedev@imperial.ac.uk; Suttle, L.; Burdiak, G.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Hare, J.; Swadling, G.; Patankar, S.; Bocchi, M.; Chittenden, J. P.; Smith, R.; Hall, G. N.; Frank, A.; Blackman, E.; Drake, R. P.; Ciardi, A.

    2014-12-15

    We present data from the first z-pinch experiments aiming to simulate aspects of accretion disk physics in the laboratory. Using off axis ablation flows from a wire array z-pinch we demonstrate the formation of a hollow disk structure that rotates at 60 kms{sup −1} for 150 ns. By analysing the Thomson scattered spectrum we make estimates for the ion and electron temperatures as T{sub i} ∼ 60 eV and ZT{sub e} ∼ 150 to 200 eV.

  3. Shape of pinch and swell structures as a viscosity indicator: Application to lower crustal polyphase rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Robyn L.; Piazolo, Sandra; Daczko, Nathan R.

    2016-07-01

    Pinch and swell structures occur where a more competent layer in a weaker matrix is subjected to layer-parallel extension. In this contribution, we use numerical models to explore the use of pinch and swell structure shape symmetry and asymmetry as a determinant of relative viscosity between layers. Maximum asymmetry is attained when the matrix viscosity on one side is subtly weaker than the competent layer, while the other side is significantly weaker. Our numerical results are directly applied to asymmetrically developed pinch and swell structures in exposed lower continental crust. Here, shape geometries observed in a shear zone comprised of plagioclase-dominated, garnet-dominated and mixed amphibole-plagioclase-dominated bands, reveals that the plagioclase-dominated band is the most competent band and is marginally stronger (2×) and significantly stronger (10-40×) than the fine grained garnet-dominated and mixed amphibole-plagioclase-dominated band, respectively. Based on the experimentally determined viscosity of a plagioclase-dominated material and quantitative microstructural analysis, the viscosity range of the natural rock bands is 2.8 × 1015 to 1.1 × 1017 Pa s. Consequently, the assumption that the experimentally-derived plagioclase flow law is an appropriate proxy for the middle to lower continental crust may lead to a viscosity over-estimation by up to forty times.

  4. Pinch-off dynamics, extensional viscosity and relaxation time of dilute and ultradilute aqueous polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagioli, Madeleine; Dinic, Jelena; Jimenez, Leidy Nallely; Sharma, Vivek

    Free surface flows and drop formation processes present in printing, jetting, spraying, and coating involve the development of columnar necks that undergo spontaneous surface-tension driven instability, thinning, and pinch-off. Stream-wise velocity gradients that arise within the thinning neck create and extensional flow field, which induces micro-structural changes within complex fluids that contribute elastic stresses, changing the thinning and pinch-off dynamics. In this contribution, we use dripping-onto-substrate (DoS) extensional rheometry technique for visualization and analysis of the pinch-off dynamics of dilute and ultra-dilute aqueous polyethylene oxide (PEO) solutions. Using a range of molecular weights, we study the effect of both elasticity and finite extensibility. Both effective relaxation time and the transient extensional viscosity are found to be strongly concentration-dependent even for highly dilute solutions.

  5. Modeling the Parker instability in a rotating plasma screw pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalzov, I. V.; Brown, B. P.; Katz, N.; Forest, C. B.

    2012-02-01

    We analytically and numerically study the analogue of the Parker (magnetic buoyancy) instability in a uniformly rotating plasma screw pinch confined in a cylinder. Uniform plasma rotation is imposed to create a centrifugal acceleration, which mimics the gravity required for the classical Parker instability. The goal of this study is to determine how the Parker instability could be unambiguously identified in a weakly magnetized, rapidly rotating screw pinch, in which the rotation provides an effective gravity and a radially varying azimuthal field is controlled to give conditions for which the plasma is magnetically buoyant to inward motion. We show that an axial magnetic field is also required to circumvent conventional current driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities such as the sausage and kink modes that would obscure the Parker instability. These conditions can be realized in the Madison plasma Couette experiment (MPCX). Simulations are performed using the extended MHD code NIMROD for an isothermal compressible plasma model. Both linear and nonlinear regimes of the instability are studied, and the results obtained for the linear regime are compared with analytical results from a slab geometry. Based on this comparison, it is found that in a cylindrical pinch, the magnetic buoyancy mechanism dominates at relatively large Mach numbers (M > 5), while at low Mach numbers (M < 1), the instability is due to the curvature of magnetic field lines. At intermediate values of Mach number (1 < M < 5), the Coriolis force has a strong stabilizing effect on the plasma. A possible scenario for experimental demonstration of the Parker instability in MPCX is discussed.

  6. Bubble pinch-off in a rotating flow.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Raymond; Andersen, Anders; van der Meer, Devaraj; Bohr, Tomas

    2009-05-22

    We create air bubbles at the tip of a "bathtub vortex" which reaches to a finite depth. The bathtub vortex is formed by letting water drain through a small hole at the bottom of a rotating cylindrical container. The tip of the needlelike surface dip is unstable at high rotation rates and releases bubbles which are carried down by the flow. Using high-speed imaging we find that the minimal neck radius of the unstable tip decreases in time as a power law with an exponent close to 1/3. This exponent was found by Gordillo et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 194501 (2005)10.1103/PhysRevLett.95.194501] to govern gas flow driven pinch-off, and indeed we find that the volume oscillations of the tip creates a considerable air flow through the neck. We argue that the Bernoulli pressure reduction caused by this air flow can become sufficient to overcome the centrifugal forces and cause the final pinch-off. PMID:19519033

  7. Mixing of a passive scalar by the instability of a differentially rotating axial pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, A.; Gellert, M.; Rüdiger, G.

    2016-04-01

    The mean-field diffusion of passive scalars such as lithium, beryllium or temperature dispersals due to the magnetic Tayler instability of a rotating axial pinch is considered. Our study is carried out within a Taylor-Couette setup for two rotation laws: solid-body quasi-Kepler rotation. The minimum magnetic Prandtl number used is 0.05, and the molecular Schmidt number Sc of the fluid varies between 0.1 and 2. An effective diffusivity coefficient for the mixing is numerically measured by the decay of a prescribed concentration peak located between both cylinder walls. We find that only models with Sc exceeding 0.1 basically provide finite instability-induced diffusivity values. We also find that for quasi-Kepler rotation at a magnetic Mach number Mm ≃ 2, the flow transits from the slow-rotation regime to the fast-rotation regime that is dominated by the Taylor-Proudman theorem. For fixed Reynolds number, the relation between the normalized turbulent diffusivity and the Schmidt number of the fluid is always linear so that also a linear relation between the instability-induced diffusivity and the molecular viscosity results, just in the sense proposed by Schatzman (1977, A&A, 573, 80). The numerical value of the coefficient in this relation reaches a maximum at Mm ≃ 2 and decreases for larger Mm, implying that only toroidal magnetic fields on the order of 1 kG can exist in the solar tachocline.

  8. Ferrohydrodynamic evaluation of rotational viscosity and relaxation in certain ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rajesh

    2012-07-01

    A significant effect of aggregation dynamics for aqueous ferrofluid (AF) and kerosene based ferrofluid (KF) using magnetic field dependent capillary viscosity and magneto-optical relaxation measurements is studied. For better comparison parameters of AF and KF are kept similar. Ferrohydrodynamic equations of chain forming ferrofluids, dilute ferrofluids, and Brownian dynamic simulations are compared. It is observed that the rotational viscosity of AF is larger than that of KF due to field induced aggregates in it and strong dipolar interactions. It is also observed that at Ωτ ~ 0.04 both AF and KF viscosity becomes almost similar, suggesting similar behavior at that shear rate. The magneto-optical relaxation in AF exhibits nonexponential behavior when relaxed from higher magnetic field and follows irreversible thermodynamics, whereas for KF the relaxation is exponential and follows the effective field method. This discrepancy is explained based on aggregation dynamics of magnetic particles. Results are well described by the corresponding theoretical models. PMID:23005542

  9. Effect of temperature on rotational viscosity in magnetic nano fluids.

    PubMed

    Patel, R

    2012-10-01

    Flow behavior of magnetic nano fluids with simultaneous effect of magnetic field and temperature is important for its application for cooling devices such as transformer, loud speakers, electronic cooling and for its efficiency in targeted drug delivery and hyperthermia treatment. Using a specially designed horizontal capillary viscometer, temperature-sensitive and non-temperature-sensitive magnetic nano fluids are studied. In both these case the temperature-dependent rotational viscosity decreases, but follows a quite different mechanism. For temperature-sensitive magnetic nano fluids, the reduction in rotational viscosity is due to the temperature dependence of magnetization. Curie temperature ((T)(c)) and pyromagnetic coefficient are extracted from the study. A fluid with low T(c) and high pyromagnetic coefficient is useful for thermo-sensitive cooling devices and magnetic hyperthermia. For non-temperature-sensitive magnetic nano fluids, reduction in rotational viscosity is due to removal of physisorbed secondary surfactant on the particle because of thermal and frictional effects. This can be a good analogy for removal of drug from the magnetic particles in the case of targeted drug delivery. PMID:23096152

  10. Investigating plasma viscosity with fast framing photography in the ZaP-HD Flow Z-Pinch experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weed, Jonathan Robert

    The ZaP-HD Flow Z-Pinch experiment investigates the stabilizing effect of sheared axial flows while scaling toward a high-energy-density laboratory plasma (HEDLP > 100 GPa). Stabilizing flows may persist until viscous forces dissipate a sheared flow profile. Plasma viscosity is investigated by measuring scale lengths in turbulence intentionally introduced in the plasma flow. A boron nitride turbulence-tripping probe excites small scale length turbulence in the plasma, and fast framing optical cameras are used to study time-evolved turbulent structures and viscous dissipation. A Hadland Imacon 790 fast framing camera is modified for digital image capture, but features insufficient resolution to study turbulent structures. A Shimadzu HPV-X camera captures the evolution of turbulent structures with great spatial and temporal resolution, but is unable to resolve the anticipated Kolmogorov scale in ZaP-HD as predicted by a simplified pinch model.

  11. Measuring Lipid Membrane Viscosity Using Rotational and Translational Probe Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hormel, Tristan T.; Kurihara, Sarah Q.; Brennan, M. Kathleen; Wozniak, Matthew C.; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2014-05-01

    The two-dimensional fluidity of lipid bilayers enables the motion of membrane-bound macromolecules and is therefore crucial to biological function. Microrheological methods that measure fluid viscosity via the translational diffusion of tracer particles are challenging to apply and interpret for membranes, due to uncertainty about the local environment of the tracers. Here, we demonstrate a new technique in which determination of both the rotational and translational diffusion coefficients of membrane-linked particles enables quantification of viscosity, measurement of the effective radii of the tracers, and assessment of theoretical models of membrane hydrodynamics. Surprisingly, we find a wide distribution of effective tracer radii, presumably due to a variable number of lipids linked to each tracer particle. Furthermore, we show for the first time that a protein involved in generating membrane curvature, the vesicle trafficking protein Sar1p, dramatically increases membrane viscosity. Using the rheological method presented here, therefore, we are able to reveal a class of previously unknown couplings between protein activity and membrane mechanics.

  12. A Faraday rotation diagnostic for Z pinch experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, K. W.; Intrator, T. P.; Weber, T. E.; Yoo, C. B.; Klarenbeek, J.

    2012-10-01

    The MagLIF experiment is an approach to Magneto Inertial Fusion (MIF) that will compress a laser preheated magnetized plasma inside a small sub cm size beryllium capsule and the magnetic field inside. A good measurement of the compressed magnetic field will help us understand how the compression proceeds, and the time scale over which field diffuses out. We are working on a first step to the direct measurement of vacuum magnetic field (expected to be mostly Bz) compression time history, potentially space-resolved, without a plasma fill. A small magneto-active section of optical fiber can measure magnetic fields in the 1-1000 Tesla range. Directly measured vacuum Bz is an initial but important step towards validating the codes supporting MagLIF. The technology will use a Terbium doped optical fiber as a Faraday rotation medium. The optical path and hardware is simple, inexpensive, and small enough to fit inside a MagLIF capsule, and can be radiation hardened. Low noise, optically coupled magnetic field measurements will be possible for vacuum MagLIF shots.

  13. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF Z-PINCH EXPERIMENTS TO CREATE SUPERSONIC DIFFERENTIALLY ROTATING PLASMA FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Bocchi, M.; Ummels, B.; Chittenden, J. P.; Lebedev, S. V.; Frank, A.; Blackman, E. G.

    2013-04-10

    The physics of accretion disks is of fundamental importance for understanding of a wide variety of astrophysical sources that includes protostars, X-ray binaries, and active galactic nuclei. The interplay between hydrodynamic flows and magnetic fields and the potential for turbulence-producing instabilities is a topic of active research that would benefit from the support of dedicated experimental studies. Such efforts are in their infancy, but in an effort to push the enterprise forward we propose an experimental configuration which employs a modified cylindrical wire array Z-pinch to produce a rotating plasma flow relevant to accretion disks. We present three-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations which show how this approach can be implemented. In the simulations, a rotating plasma cylinder or ring is formed, with typical rotation velocity {approx}30 km s{sup -1}, Mach number {approx}4, and Reynolds number in excess of 10{sup 7}. The plasma is also differentially rotating. Implementation of different external magnetic field configurations is discussed. It is found that a modest uniform vertical field of 1 T can affect the dynamics of the system and could be used to study magnetic field entrainment and amplification through differential rotation. A dipolar field potentially relevant to the study of accretion columns is also considered.

  14. Rotation in a reversed field pinch with active feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconello, M.; Menmuir, S.; Brunsell, P. R.; Kuldkepp, M.

    2006-09-01

    Active feedback stabilization of multiple resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been successfully proven in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch. One of the features of plasma discharges operated with active feedback stabilization, in addition to the prolongation of the plasma discharge, is the sustainment of the plasma rotation. Sustained rotation is observed both for the internally resonant tearing modes (TMs) and the intrinsic impurity oxygen ions. Good quantitative agreement between the toroidal rotation velocities of both is found: the toroidal rotation is characterized by an acceleration phase followed, after one wall time, by a deceleration phase that is slower than in standard discharges. The TMs and the impurity ions rotate in the same poloidal direction with also similar velocities. Poloidal and toroidal velocities have comparable amplitudes and a simple model of their radial profile reproduces the main features of the helical angular phase velocity. RWMs feedback does not qualitatively change the TMs behaviour and typical phenomena such as the dynamo and the 'slinky' are still observed. The improved sustainment of the plasma and TMs rotation occurs also when feedback only acts on internally non-resonant RWMs. This may be due to an indirect positive effect, through non-linear coupling between TMs and RWMs, of feedback on the TMs or to a reduced plasma-wall interaction affecting the plasma flow rotation. Electromagnetic torque calculations show that with active feedback stabilization the TMs amplitude remains well below the locking threshold condition for a thick shell. Finally, it is suggested that active feedback stabilization of RWMs and current profile control techniques can be employed simultaneously thus improving both the plasma duration and its confinement properties.

  15. Evaluation of Lama glama semen viscosity with a cone-plate rotational viscometer.

    PubMed

    Casaretto, C; Martínez Sarrasague, M; Giuliano, S; Rubin de Celis, E; Gambarotta, M; Carretero, I; Miragaya, M

    2012-05-01

    Llama semen is highly viscous. This characteristic is usually evaluated subjectively by measuring the thread formed when carefully pippeting a sample of semen. The aims of this study were (i) to objectively determine and analyse llama semen viscosity, (ii) to compare semen viscosity between ejaculates of the same male as well as between different males, (iii) to study the correlation between viscosity and other semen characteristics and (iv) to evaluate the effect of collagenase on semen viscosity. Semen viscosity was evaluated using a cone-plate Brookfield rotational viscometer. A non Newtonian, pseudoplastic behaviour was observed in the 45 semen samples evaluated. Rheological parameters were determined obtaining the following results (mean ± SD): apparent viscosity at 11.5 s(-1): 46.71 ± 26.8 cpoise and at 115 s(-1): 12.61 ± 4.1 cpoise; structural viscosity (K) (dyne s cm(-2)): 2.18 ± 1.4 and coefficient of consistency (n): 0.45 ± 0.1. Statistical differences were found between different ejaculates of the same male for structural viscosity and apparent viscosity at 11.5 s(-1) (P < 0.01). Correlation was found only between coefficient of consistency (n) and sperm concentration (P < 0.01). Significant differences for coefficient of consistency (n) and viscosity at 115 s(-1) were found between samples incubated with and without collagenase (P < 0.05). PMID:21729143

  16. Wall-locking of kink modes in a line-tied screw pinch with a rotating wall

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Soldan, C.; Brookhart, M. I.; Hegna, C. C.; Forest, C. B.

    2012-05-15

    The effect of rotating conducting walls on mode-locking is studied in a line-tied, linear screw pinch experiment and then compared to a torque balance model which has been extended to include differential wall rotation. Wall rotation is predicted to asymmetrically affect the mode-unlocking threshold, with fast rotation eliminating the locking bifurcation. Static error fields are observed to lock the resistive wall mode (RWM) variant of the current driven kink instability by modifying the electromagnetic torque. Using locked modes, the stabilizing effect of wall rotation on the RWM is experimentally demonstrated by illustrating a reduction of the RWM growth rate and an extension of the RWM-stable operation window.

  17. Glacial isostatic adjustment and Earth rotation: Refined constraints on the viscosity of the deepest mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Peltier, W.R.; Jiang, X.

    1996-02-10

    This report explores the use of the present-day rate and direction of polar wander and the magnitude of the nontidal acceleration of the rate of planetary rotation of the earth to contrain the viscosity of the lower regions of the lower mantle.

  18. Resonance parallel viscosity in the banana regime in poloidally rotating tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C.; Hsu, C.T.; Dominguez, N. )

    1994-05-01

    Parallel viscosity in the banana regime in a poloidally ([bold E][times][bold B]) rotating tokamak plasma is calculated to include the effects of orbit squeezing and to allow the poloidal [bold E][times][bold B] Mach number [ital M][sub [ital p

  19. Time dependent parallel viscosity and relaxation rate of poloidal rotation in the banana regime

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.T.; Shaing, K.C.; Gormley, R. )

    1994-01-01

    Time dependent ion parallel viscous force in the banana regime with arbitrary inverse aspect ratio [epsilon] is calculated using the eigenfunction approach. The flux surface averaged viscosity is then used to study the relaxation process of the poloidal rotation which leads to oscillatory relaxation behavior. The relaxation rate [nu][sub [ital p

  20. GIA-related rotational variations for the Earth with low-viscosity D″ layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, Masao; Okuno, Jun'ichi

    2013-11-01

    We examine the rotational variations due to the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) process for the Earth with a low-viscosity D″ layer of 300 km thickness. The rate of change of degree-two harmonics of the Earth's geopotential, {dot J}_2, proportional to rate of change of the rotation, is not so sensitive to the D″ layer with viscosities smaller than 1020 Pa s, but the polar wander rate is significantly sensitive to its low viscosity. The difference is attributed to the physics of Liouville equation describing the rotational variations in the postglacial phase. The {dot J}_2 only depends on viscous relaxation of inertia elements for the surface mass redistribution in the glacial and deglacial phases (convolution for load Love number), referred to as `load term' here. On the other hand, the polar wander rate depends on the load term and also rotational potential perturbations for changing polar motion (convolution for tidal Love number), referred to as `tidal term' here. It is crucially important to note that the tidal term is excited even in the postglacial phase until the relaxation completes. These two terms respond to the GIA process by different sensitivities to the lower-mantle viscosity above the D″ layer (ηlm) and the viscosity of the D″ layer (ηD″). In fact, the ηlm-sensitivity of the polar wander rate is significantly different in the load and tidal terms, and that for the load term is identical to that for the {dot J}_2 as expected. Although the ηlm-sensitivity of the tidal term is essentially independent of the low viscosity of D″ layer, there is a significant difference in degree of ηlm-sensitivity in adopted viscosity models with no low-viscosity D″ layer and with low-viscosity D″ layer of (1-10) × 1018 Pa s. The difference is attributed to the ηD″-sensitivities of two fundamental relaxation modes due to the density jumps at the surface and the core-mantle boundary.

  1. Prediction of plasma rotation and neoclassical toroidal viscosity in KSTAR discharges based on plasma fluid formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Cheonho; Stacey, Weston

    2015-11-01

    Braginskii's flow rate of strain tensor formalism, as extended first to low collisional plasmas in axisymmetric circular toroidal flux surface geometry, then to elongated axisymmetric flux surface geometry, has recently been extended to 3-D non-axisymmetric toroidal flux surface geometry. In toroidally non-axisymmetric plasmas, the leading order neoclassical parallel viscosity terms in the flow rate of strain tensor do not vanish to cause flux surface averaged toroidal angular momentum damping and eventually slow down the plasma rotation. The formalism of Ref. 5 provides a means to systematically evaluate the ``neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV)'' in curvilinear plasma geometry based on the plasma fluid equations. As the first step of its application, a practical formalism for circular plasmas, given in the appendix of Ref. 5, will be applied to KSTAR discharges to predict the rotation and NTV, which can also be compared with actual rotation measurements to numerically validate the NTV damping effects.

  2. Probing viscosity of nanoliter droplets of butterfly saliva by magnetic rotational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarev, Alexander; Kaufman, Bethany; Gu, Yu; Andrukh, Taras; Adler, Peter H.; Kornev, Konstantin G.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic rotational spectroscopy was employed for rheological analysis of nanoliter droplets of butterfly saliva. Saliva viscosity of butterflies is 4-5 times greater than that of water and similar to that of 30%-40% sucrose solutions at 25 °C. Hence, viscosity stratification would not be expected when butterflies feed on nectar with 30%-40% sugar concentrations. We did not observe any viscoelastic effects or non-Newtonian behavior of saliva droplets. Thus, butterfly saliva is significantly different rheologically from that of humans, which demonstrates a viscoelastic behavior.

  3. Modeling and control of plasma rotation for NSTX using neoclassical toroidal viscosity and neutral beam injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goumiri, I. R.; Rowley, C. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Gates, D. A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Boyer, M. D.; Andre, R.; Kolemen, E.; Taira, K.

    2016-03-01

    A model-based feedback system is presented to control plasma rotation in a magnetically confined toroidal fusion device, to maintain plasma stability for long-pulse operation. This research uses experimental measurements from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and is aimed at controlling plasma rotation using two different types of actuation: momentum from injected neutral beams and neoclassical toroidal viscosity generated by three-dimensional applied magnetic fields. Based on the data-driven model obtained, a feedback controller is designed, and predictive simulations using the TRANSP plasma transport code show that the controller is able to attain desired plasma rotation profiles given practical constraints on the actuators and the available measurements of rotation.

  4. On the Viscosity-driven Secular Instability in Rotating Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, David; Lindblom, Lee

    1996-04-01

    Rapidly rotating stars may be subject to a secular instability driven by viscosity. The oscillation modes that are susceptible to this instability are studied here in models of rigidly rotating neutron stars based on the polytropic and on several more realistic equations of state. For the polytropic models we confirm the classical result: that sufficiently rapidly rotating stars with adiabatic index γ > 2.237 suffer from the viscous instability, while those with γ <2.237 do not. For the more realistic models we find no viscous instability in the 1.4 Msun models from any equation of state. In sufficiently massive and rapidly rotating models, however, we do find the viscous instability in stars constructed from some of the realistic equations of state.

  5. Faster in-plane switching and reduced rotational viscosity characteristics in a graphene-nematic suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Rajratan; Kinnamon, Daniel; Skaggs, Nicole; Womack, James

    2016-05-01

    The in-plane switching (IPS) for a nematic liquid crystal (LC) was found to be considerably faster when the LC was doped with dilute concentrations of monolayer graphene flakes. Additional studies revealed that the presence of graphene reduced the rotational viscosity of the LC, permitting the nematic director to respond quicker in IPS mode on turning the electric field on. The studies were carried out with several graphene concentrations in the LC, and the experimental results coherently suggest that there exists an optimal concentration of graphene, allowing a reduction in the IPS response time and rotational viscosity in the LC. Above this optimal graphene concentration, the rotational viscosity was found to increase, and consequently, the LC no longer switched faster in IPS mode. The presence of graphene suspension was also found to decrease the LC's pretilt angle significantly due to the π-π electron stacking between the LC molecules and graphene flakes. To understand the π-π stacking interaction, the anchoring mechanism of the LC on a CVD grown monolayer graphene film on copper substrate was studied by reflected crossed polarized microscopy. Optical microphotographs revealed that the LC alignment direction depended on monolayer graphene's hexagonal crystal structure and its orientation.

  6. Jeans instability of magnetized quantum plasma: Effect of viscosity, rotation and finite Larmor radius corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Shweta Sharma, Prerana; Chhajlani, R. K.

    2015-07-31

    The Jeans instability of self-gravitating quantum plasma is examined considering the effects of viscosity, finite Larmor radius (FLR) corrections and rotation. The analysis is done by normal mode analysis theory with the help of relevant linearized perturbation equations of the problem. The general dispersion relation is obtained using the quantum magneto hydrodynamic model. The modified condition of Jeans instability is obtained and the numerical calculations have been performed to show the effects of various parameters on the growth rate of Jeans instability.

  7. Rotating disk flow stability in electrochemical cells: Effect of viscosity stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontes, J.; Mangiavacchi, N.; Conceição, A. R.; Barcia, O. E.; Mattos, O. R.; Tribollet, B.

    2004-03-01

    This work is about the effect of viscosity stratification on the hydrodynamic instability of rotating disk flow, and whether or not it can take into account experimental observations of the lowering of critical Reynolds numbers in electrochemical systems, where a viscosity stratification is assumed to result from the gradients of chemical species existing in the convective boundary layer near the disk electrode. The analysis is for temporal stability of a class of von Kármán solutions: fully three-dimensional modes are considered and the neutral curves are therefore functions of not only the Reynolds number but also the wave frequency and the two wave numbers. Global minimization over wave numbers and also over the frequency gives the critical Reynolds number. The neutral curves exhibit a two-mode structure and the dependence of both modes on parameters is studied. It is shown that viscosity stratification leads to an increase in the range of parameters where perturbations are amplified and to a reduction of the critical Reynolds number, in a wide range of perturbation frequencies. The results support the hypothesis that the current oscillations may originate from a hydrodynamic instability.

  8. The effects of rotational flow, viscosity, thickness, and shape on transonic flutter dip phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Srivastava, Rakesh; Kaza, Krishna Rao V.

    1988-01-01

    The transonic flutter dip phenomena on thin airfoils, which are employed for propfan blades, is investigated using an integrated Euler/Navier-Stokes code and a two degrees of freedom typical section structural model. As a part of the code validation, the flutter characteristics of the NACA 64A010 airfoil are also investigated. In addition, the effects of artificial dissipation models, rotational flow, initial conditions, mean angle of attack, viscosity, airfoil thickness and shape on flutter are investigated. The results obtained with a Euler code for the NACA 64A010 airfoil are in reasonable agreement with published results obtained by using transonic small disturbance and Euler codes. The two artificial dissipation models, one based on the local pressure gradient scaled by a common factor and the other based on the local pressure gradient scaled by a spectral radius, predicted the same flutter speeds except in the recovery region for the case studied. The effects of rotational flow, initial conditions, mean angle of attack, and viscosity for the Reynold's number studied seem to be negligible or small on the minima of the flutter dip.

  9. Effects of turbulent viscosity on a rotating gas ring around a black hole: Results of numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, K.; Chang, H.-K.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present the time evolution of a rotationally axisymmetric gas ring around a non rotating black hole using two dimensional grid-based hydrodynamics simulations. We show the way in which angular momentum transport is included in simulations of non-selfgravitating accretion of matter towards a black hole. We use the Shakura-Sunyaev α viscosity prescription to estimate the turbulent viscosity for all major viscous stress tensors. We investigate how a gas ring which is initially assumed to rotate with Keplerian angular velocity is accreted onto a black hole and hence forms an accretion disc in the presence of turbulent viscosity. We show that a centrifugally pressure supported sub-Keplerian flow with shocks forms when the ring starts to disperse with inclusion of relatively small amount of viscosity. But, if the viscosity is above the critical value, the shock disappears altogether and the whole disc becomes Keplerian which is subsonic everywhere except in a region close to the horizon, where it supersonically enters to the black hole. We discovered a multiple valued Mach number solution and the corresponding density distributions that connect matter (a) from the initial Keplerian gas ring to a sub-Keplerian disc with shocks in presence of small amount of viscosity and (b) from the sub-Keplerian flow to a Keplerian disc in presence of huge amount of viscosity. We calculate the temporal variations of the magnitude of various time scales which ensure us about the stability of the flow.

  10. Formation of radiatively cooled, supersonically rotating, plasma flows in Z-pinch experiments: Towards the development of an experimental platform to study accretion disk physics in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, M. J.; Lebedev, S. V.; Hall, G. N.; Suttle, L.; Burdiak, G.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Hare, J.; Swadling, G.; Patankar, S.; Bocchi, M.; Chittenden, J. P.; Smith, R.; Frank, A.; Blackman, E.; Drake, R. P.; Ciardi, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present data from the first Z-pinch experiments aiming to simulate aspects of accretion disk physics in the laboratory. Using off axis ablation flows from a wire array z-pinch we demonstrate the formation of a supersonically (M ∼ 2) rotating hollow plasma cylinder of height ∼4 mm and radius 2 mm. Using a combination of diagnostics we measure the rotation speed (∼60 kms-1), electron density (1019 cm-3), ion temperature (Ti ∼ 60 eV) and the product of electron temperature and average ionisation (ZTe ∼ 150 to 200 eV). Using these parameters we calculate the Reynolds number for the plasma on the order 105 and magnetic Reynolds number as 10 - 100. The plasma flow is maintained for 150 ns, corresponding to one rotation period, which should allow for studying fast instabilities which develop on this time-scale.

  11. Time Evolution of a Rotating Gas Ring around a Black Hole in Presence of Viscosity and Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Kinsuk

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the flow dynamics of a rotating gas ring around a black hole in presence of turbulent viscosity and also cooling. We find that the matter of the initial gas ring starts to move inwards as the viscosity is enhanced. The so called centrifugal pressure supported sub-Keplerian flow with shocks forms in our simulation when the ring starts to disperse with inclusion of relatively small amount of viscosity. But, when the value of viscosity parameter is reasonably large, the accreting matter reaches up to marginally stable orbit which is close to the black hole and the whole disc becomes roughly Keplerian. The variation of shock's nature due to change of the magnitude of viscosity and also the variation of disc nature due the cooling processes may play an important role to study the temporal and spectral properties of the black hole candidates.

  12. Mantle viscosity, J2 and the nontidal acceleration of Earth rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peltier, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    Recent interpretations of laser ranging for the LAGEOS satellite have rather conclusively established that the observed acceleration in the node of its orbit is just that expected to exist as a residual effect of the last deglaciation event which ended about 6000 years ago. The nontidal acceleration of rotation would be rather different than that observed if there were any significant melting of high latitude continental ice masses currently ongoing. The sensitivity of the expected nontidal acceleration to variations of several elements of the radial viscoelastic structure of the planet is explored using a new normal mode method for the computation of viscoelastic relaxation spectra. These calculations establish that the most important sensitivity is to variations in the mantle viscosity profile. Although the predicted nontidal acceleration does depend upon lithospheric thickness and on the elastic component of the radial structure, the dependence on these components of the structure is much weaker than it is upon mantle viscosity. The observed J sub 2 is therefore a particularly useful determinant of radial variations in the latter parameter.

  13. Pinched Nerve

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Pinched Nerve Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Pinched Nerve? The term "pinched nerve" is a colloquial term ...

  14. Shear-thinning and constant viscosity predictions for rotating sphere flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garduño, Isaías E.; Tamaddon-Jahromi, Hamid R.; Webster, Michael F.

    2016-02-01

    The steady motion of a rotating sphere is analysed through two contrasting viscoelastic models, a constant viscosity (FENE-CR) model and a shear-thinning (LPTT) model. Giesekus (Rheol. Acta 9:30-38, 1970) presented an intriguing rotating viscoelastic flow, which to date has not been completely explained. In order to investigate this flow, sets of parameters have been explored to analyse the significant differences introduced with the proposed models, while the momentum-continuity-stress equations are solved through a hybrid finite-element/finite volume numerical scheme. Solutions are discussed for first, sphere angular velocity increase (\\varOmega), and second, through material velocity-scale increase (α). Numerical predictions for different solvent-ratios (β) show significant differences as the sphere angular velocity increases. It is demonstrated that an emerging equatorial anticlockwise vortex emerges in a specific range of \\varOmega. As such, this solution matches closely with the Giesekus experimental findings. Additionally, inside the emerging inertial vortex, a contrasting positive second normal stress-difference (N2 ( dot{γ} ) = τ_{rr} - τ_{θθ}) region is found compared against the negative N2-enveloping layer.

  15. Effects of Solvent Dielectric Constant and Viscosity on Two Rotational Relaxation Paths of Excited 9-(Dicyanovinyl) Julolidine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Songqiu; Han, Keli

    2016-07-14

    The understanding of the interplay between microenvironment and molecular rotors is helpful for designing and developing of molecular sensors of local physical properties. We present a study on the two rotational relaxation paths of excited 9-(dicyanovinyl) julolidine in several solvents. One rotational path (C-C single-bond rotation, τb) quickly leads to the formation of a twisted state. The other path (C═C double-bond rotation, τc) shows that the populations go back to the ground state directly via a conical intersection between the S1 and ground state. The increase in the solvent dielectric constant shows little effect on the τb lifetime for its small energy barrier (<0.01 eV), but τc lifetime is increased in larger dielectric constant solvents due to the larger energy gap at conical intersection. Both τb and τc are increased greatly with the increased solvent viscosity. τb is more sensitive to viscosity than τc may be due to its larger rotational moiety. PMID:26886050

  16. Modeling and control of plasma rotation for NSTX using Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity (NTV) and Neutral Beam Injection (NBI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goumiri, Imene; Rowley, Clarence; Sabbagh, Steven; Gates, David; Gerhardt, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    A model-based system to control plasma rotation in a magnetically confined toroidal fusion device is developed to maintain plasma stability for long pulse operation. This research uses experimental measurements from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and is aimed to control plasma rotation by using momentum from injected neutral beams and viscosity generated by three-dimensional applied magnetic fields as actuators. Based on the data driven model obtained, a feedback controller is designed to theoretically sustain the toroidal momentum of the plasma in a stable fashion and to achieve desired plasma rotation profiles. On going work includes extending this method to NSTX Upgrade which has more complete radial coverage of the neutral beams momentum sources which enable simultaneous control of plasma stored energy (Beta control).

  17. Application of the viscosity-expansion method to a rotating thin fluid disk bound by central gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Koichi

    2015-07-01

    The 2D rotation of a thin fluid disk with a porous sink around the center is studied within the Navier-Stokes and Euler equations. The viscosity (ν)-expansion method is applied to the viscous fluid bound to the central mass via gravity. The Navier-Stokes equations yield various types of rotation curve, including a flat one, depending on the choice of the pressure function that is not determined within the fluid dynamics. Stationary flow is achieved through the balance of the pressure gradient, gravity, and the centrifugal force. These features of the stationary flow survive in the inviscid limit. The stability of the inviscid flow is examined by the Euler equations for the perturbations. At large distances, the real part of eigenfrequencies (EFs) are dominantly positive and decreasing with distance for flat and rising rotation curves, meaning that the spiral pattern of the perturbations is trailing. One real increasing EF exists for the decaying rotation curve, for which the spiral pattern is leading. Complex frequencies always emerge when the disk has m-fold rotational symmetry with m≥ 2. The shape of the perturbed rotation curve has azimuthal as well as temporal dependences.

  18. Viscosity structure of Earth's mantle inferred from rotational variations due to GIA process and recent melting events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, Masao; Okuno, Jun'ichi; Lambeck, Kurt; Purcell, Anthony

    2015-08-01

    We examine the geodetically derived rotational variations for the rate of change of degree-two harmonics of Earth's geopotential, skew5dot J_2, and true polar wander, combining a recent melting model of glaciers and the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets taken from the IPCC 2013 Report (AR5) with two representative GIA ice models describing the last deglaciation, ICE5G and the ANU model developed at the Australian National University. Geodetically derived observations of skew4dot J_2 are characterized by temporal changes of -(3.7 ± 0.1) × 10-11 yr-1 for the period 1976-1990 and -(0.3 ± 0.1) × 10-11 yr-1 after ˜2000. The AR5 results make it possible to evaluate the recent melting of the major ice sheets and glaciers for three periods, 1900-1990, 1991-2001 and after 2002. The observed skew4dot J_2 and the component of skew4dot J_2 due to recent melting for different periods indicate a long-term change in skew4dot J_2-attributed to the Earth's response to the last glacial cycle-of -(6.0-6.5) × 10-11 yr-1, significantly different from the values adopted to infer the viscosity structure of the mantle in most previous studies. This is a main conclusion of this study. We next compare this estimate with the values of skew4dot J_2 predicted by GIA ice models to infer the viscosity structure of the mantle, and consequently obtain two permissible solutions for the lower mantle viscosity (ηlm), ˜1022 and (5-10) × 1022 Pa s, for both adopted ice models. These two solutions are largely insensitive to the lithospheric thickness and upper mantle viscosity as indicated by previous studies and relatively insensitive to the viscosity structure of the D″ layer. The ESL contributions from the Antarctic ice sheet since the last glacial maximum (LGM) for ICE5G and ANU are about 20 and 30 m, respectively, but glaciological reconstructions of the Antarctic LGM ice sheet have suggested that its ESL contribution may have been less than ˜10 m. The GIA-induced skew4dot J_2 for GIA

  19. Characteristics of Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity in NSTX and KSTAR for Rotation Control and the Evaluation of Plasma Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, S. A.; Berkery, J. W.; Park, Y. S.; Bell, R. E.; Gates, D. A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Goumiri, I.; Evans, T. E.; Ferraro, N.; Jeon, Y. M.; Ko, W.; Shaing, K. C.; Sun, Y.

    2014-10-01

    Three-dimensional magnetic fields producing non-resonant magnetic braking allow control of the plasma rotation profile, ωφ, in tokamaks. Experimental angular momentum alteration created by 3D field configurations with dominant n = 2 and n = 3 components in NSTX is compared to theoretical neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) torque density profiles, TNTV. Large radial variations of TNTV are typically found when flux surface displacements are computed using ideal MHD assumptions. In contrast, experimentally measured TNTV does not show strong torque localization. This may be explained by ion banana width orbit-averaging effects. A favorable characteristic for ωφ control clearly illustrated by KSTAR experiments is the lack of hysteresis of ωφ when altered by non-resonant NTV. Results from a model-based rotation controller designed using NBI and NTV from the applied 3D field as actuators are shown. The dependence of TNTV on δB2 significantly constrains the allowable field amplification in plasma response models when compared to experiment. Initial analysis shows that the single fluid model in the M3D-C1 resistive MHD code produces a flux surface-averaged δB consistent with the experimentally measured TNTV. Supported by US DOE Contracts DE-FG02-99ER54524 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  20. Modeling and control of plasma rotation and βn for NSTX-U using Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity and Neutral Beam Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goumiri, Imene; Rowley, Clarence; Sabbagh, Steven; Gates, David; Gerhardt, Stefan; Boyer, Mark

    2015-11-01

    A model-based system is presented allowing control of the plasma rotation profile in a magnetically confined toroidal fusion device to maintain plasma stability for long pulse operation. The analysis, using NSTX data and NSTX-U TRANSP simulations, is aimed at controlling plasma rotation using momentum from six injected neutral beams and neoclassical toroidal viscosity generated by three-dimensional applied magnetic fields as actuators. Based on the momentum diffusion and torque balance model obtained, a feedback controller is designed and predictive simulations using TRANSP will be presented. Robustness of the model and the rotation controller will be discussed.

  1. Effects of neoclassical toroidal viscosity induced by the intrinsic error fields and toroidal field ripple on the toroidal rotation in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. H.; Seol, J.; Ko, W. H.; Terzolo, L.; Aydemir, A. Y.; In, Y.; Ghim, Y.-c.; Lee, S. G.

    2016-08-01

    Effects of neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) induced by intrinsic error fields and toroidal field ripple on cocurrent toroidal rotation in H-mode tokamak plasmas are investigated. It is expected that large NTV torque can be localized at the edge region through the 1/ν-regime in the vicinity of E r ˜ 0 in the cocurrent rotating H-mode plasma. Numerical simulation on toroidal rotation demonstrates that the edge localized NTV torque determined by the intrinsic error fields and toroidal field ripples in the level of most tokamaks can damp the toroidal rotation velocity over the whole region while reducing the toroidal rotation pedestal which is clearly observed in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) tokamak. It is found that the NTV torque changes the toroidal rotation gradient in the pedestal region dramatically, but the toroidal rotation profile in the core region responds rigidly without a change in the gradient. On the other hand, it shows that the NTV torque induced by the intrinsic error fields and toroidal field ripple in the level of the KSTAR tokamak, which are expected to be smaller than most tokamaks by at least one order of magnitude, is negligible in determining the toroidal rotation velocity profile. Experimental observation on the toroidal rotation change by the externally applied nonaxisymmetric magnetic fields on KSTAR also suggests that NTV torque arising from nonaxisymmetric magnetic fields can damp the toroidal rotation over the whole region while diminishing the toroidal rotation pedestal.

  2. The effect of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots on the rotational viscosity and charge carrier concentration of a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbinin, D. P.; Konshina, E. A.; Solodkov, D. E.

    2015-08-01

    The addition of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) with a core diameter of 3.5 nm at a concentration of 10 wt % leads to a 2.5-fold increase in the dynamic rotational viscosity of a 5CB nematic liquid crystal (NLC). A comparison of the diffusion currents in NLC cells filled with pure 5CB and a suspension with QDs shows evidence of an increase in the concentration of charge carriers in the latter case.

  3. Eddy viscosity and flow properties of the solar wind: Co-rotating interaction regions, coronal-mass-ejection sheaths, and solar-wind/magnetosphere coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Borovsky, Joseph E.

    2006-05-15

    The coefficient of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) eddy viscosity of the turbulent solar wind is calculated to be {nu}{sub eddy}{approx_equal}1.3x10{sup 17} cm{sup 2}/s: this coefficient is appropriate for velocity shears with scale thicknesses larger than the {approx}10{sup 6} km correlation length of the solar-wind turbulence. The coefficient of MHD eddy viscosity is calculated again accounting for the action of smaller-scale turbulent eddies on smaller scale velocity shears in the solar wind. This eddy viscosity is quantitatively tested with spacecraft observations of shear flows in co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs) and in coronal-mass-ejection (CME) sheaths and ejecta. It is found that the large-scale ({approx}10{sup 7} km) shear of the CIR fractures into intense narrow ({approx}10{sup 5} km) slip zones between slabs of differently magnetized plasma. Similarly, it is found that the large-scale shear of CME sheaths also fracture into intense narrow slip zones between parcels of differently magnetized plasma. Using the solar-wind eddy-viscosity coefficient to calculate vorticity-diffusion time scales and comparing those time scales with the {approx}100-h age of the solar-wind plasma at 1 AU, it is found that the slip zones are much narrower than eddy-viscosity theory says they should be. Thus, our concept of MHD eddy viscosity fails testing. For the freestream turbulence effect in solar-wind magnetosphere coupling, the eddy-viscous force of the solar wind on the Earth's magnetosphere is rederived accounting for the action of turbulent eddies smaller than the correlation length, along with other corrections. The improved derivation of the solar-wind driver function for the turbulence effect fails to yield higher correlation coefficients between measurements of the solar-wind driver and measurements of the response of the Earth's magnetosphere.

  4. Hall viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, Nicholas

    2015-03-01

    Viscosity is a transport coefficient relating to transport of momentum, and usually thought of as the analog of friction that occurs in fluids and solids. More formally, it is the response of the stress to the gradients of the fluid velocity field, or to the rate of change of strain (derivatives of displacement from a reference state). In general, viscosity is described by a fourth-rank tensor. Invoking rotation invariance, it reduces to familiar shear and bulk viscosity parts, which describe dissipation, but it can also contain an antisymmetric part, analogous to the Hall conductivity part of the conductivity tensor. In two dimensions this part is a single number, the Hall viscosity. Symmetry of the system under time reversal (or, in two dimensions, reflections) forces it to vanish. In quantum fluids with a gap in the bulk energy spectrum and which lack both time reversal and reflection symmetries the Hall viscosity can be nonzero even at zero temperature. For integer quantum Hall states, it was first calculated by Avron, Seiler, and Zograf, using a Berry curvature approach, analogous to the Chern number for Hall conductivity. In 2008 this was extended by the present author to fractional quantum Hall states and to BCS states in two dimensions. I found that the general result is given by a simple formula ns / 2 , where n is the particle number density, and s is the ``orbital spin'' per particle. The spin s is also related to the shift S, which enters the relation between particle number and magnetic flux needed to put the ground state on a surface of non-trivial topology with introducing defect excitations, by S = 2 s ; the connection was made by Wen and Zee. The values of s and S are rational numbers, and are robust--unchanged under perturbations that do not cause the bulk energy gap to collapse--provided rotation as well as translation symmetry are maintained. Hall viscosity can be measured in principle, though a simple way to do so is lacking. It enters various

  5. RETRACTION: Unsteady flow and heat transfer of viscous incompressible fluid with temperature-dependent viscosity due to a rotating disc in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attia, H. A.

    2007-04-01

    It has come to the attention of the Institute of Physics that this article should not have been submitted for publication owing to its plagiarism of an earlier paper (Hossain A, Hossain M A and Wilson M 2001 Unsteady flow of viscous incompressible fluid with temperature-dependent viscosity due to a rotating disc in presence of transverse magnetic field and heat transfer Int. J. Therm. Sci. 40 11-20). Therefore this article has been retracted by the Institute of Physics and by the author, Hazem Ali Attia.

  6. Effects of edge-localized mode-induced neoclassical toroidal viscosity torque on the toroidal intrinsic rotation in the EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, H.; Xu, G. S.; Sun, Y.; Wan, B. N.; Yan, N.; Wang, H. Q.; Wang, F. D.; Naulin, V.

    2013-12-01

    Intrinsic rotation has been observed in lower hybrid current-driven (LHCD) H-mode plasmas with type-III edge-localized modes (ELMs) on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), and it is found that the edge toroidal rotation accelerated before the onset of the ELM burst. Magnetic perturbation analysis shows there is a perturbation amplitude growth below 30 kHz corresponding to the edge rotation acceleration. Using the filament model, the neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) code shows there is a co-current NTV torque at the edge, which may be responsible for the edge rotation acceleration. For maximum displacement ∼1 cm and toroidal mode number n=15, the calculated torque density is ∼0.44 N/m2, comparable with the average edge toroidal angular momentum change rate ∼1.24 N/m2. Here, the 1 cm maximum magnetic surface displacement estimated from the experimental observation corresponds to a maximum magnetic perturbation ∼ 10-3-10-2 T, in accordance with magnetic perturbation measurements during ELMs. By varying n from 10 to 20, the magnitude of the edge NTV torque density is mainly ∼0.1-1 N/m2. This significant co-current torque indicates that the NTV theory may be important in rotation problems during ELMs in H-mode plasmas. To better illuminate the problem, magnetic surface deformation obtained from other codes is desired for a more accurate calculation.

  7. Reversed-field pinch and screw pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Kito, M.; Yoshimura, H.

    1983-12-01

    The Electrotechnical Laboratory and the College of Science and Technology at Nihon University discuss the results, device parameters, and objectives of reversed-field pinch TPE-1R(M). This device is illustrated and tables are given of machine parameters, as well as plasma parameters and temperature and density scalings. Other reversed-field pinch (RFP) machines are discussed, and tables show the RFP devices of Japan and design parameters of TPE-2, a screw-pinch device with a noncircular cross section. The STP-3 screw-pinch device is also discussed.

  8. Strain localization in ductile rocks: A comparison of natural and simulated pinch-and-swell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Max; Berger, Alfons; Herwegh, Marco; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    We study pinch-and-swell structures in order to uncover the onset of strain localization and the change of deformation mechanisms in layered ductile rocks. To this end, boudinaged monomineralic veins embedded in an ultramylonitic matrix are analyzed quantitatively. The swells are built up by relatively undeformed original calcite grains, showing twinning and minor subgrain rotation recrystallization (SGR). Combined with progressive formation of high-angle misorientations between grains, indicative of SGR, severe grain size reduction defines the transition to the pinches. Accordingly, dynamically recrystallized grains have a strong crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO). Toward the necks, further grain size reduction, increasingly random misorientations, nucleation of new grains, and a loss of the CPO occur. We postulate that this microstructure marks the transition from dislocation to diffusion creep induced by strain localization. We confirm that the development of boudins is insensitive to original grain sizes and single-crystal orientations. In order to test these microstructural interpretations, a self-consistent numerical grain size evolution is implemented, based on thermo-mechanical principles, end-member flow laws and microphysical processes. Applying constant velocity and isothermal boundary conditions to a 3-layer finite element pure shear box, pinch-and-swell structures emerge out of the homogeneous layer through grain size softening at a critical state. Viscosity weakening due to elevated strain rates and dissipated heat from grain size reduction promotes strain rate weakening until a critical grain size is reached. At this point, a switch from dislocation to diffusion creep occurs. This state locks in at local steady states and is microstructurally expressed in pinches and swells, respectively. Thus, boudinage is identified as an energy attractor, identifying the high-energy steady state of an extending layered structure. We conclude from the

  9. Viscosity Measurement for Tellurium Melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bochuan; Li, Chao; Ban, Heng; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2006-01-01

    The viscosity of high temperature Te melt was measured using a new technique in which a rotating magnetic field was applied to the melt sealed in a suspended ampoule, and the torque exerted by rotating melt flow on the ampoule wall was measured. Governing equations for the coupled melt flow and ampoule torsional oscillation were solved, and the viscosity was extracted from the experimental data by numerical fitting. The computational result showed good agreement with experimental data. The melt velocity transient initiated by the rotating magnetic field reached a stable condition quickly, allowing the viscosity and electrical conductivity of the melt to be determined in a short period.

  10. Overview of results from the MST reversed field pinch experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarff, J. S.; Almagri, A. F.; Anderson, J. K.; Borchardt, M.; Carmody, D.; Caspary, K.; Chapman, B. E.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Duff, J.; Eilerman, S.; Falkowski, A.; Forest, C. B.; Goetz, J. A.; Holly, D. J.; Kim, J.-H.; King, J.; Ko, J.; Koliner, J.; Kumar, S.; Lee, J. D.; Liu, D.; Magee, R.; McCollam, K. J.; McGarry, M.; Mirnov, V. V.; Nornberg, M. D.; Nonn, P. D.; Oliva, S. P.; Parke, E.; Reusch, J. A.; Sauppe, J. P.; Seltzman, A.; Sovinec, C. R.; Stephens, H.; Stone, D.; Theucks, D.; Thomas, M.; Triana, J.; Terry, P. W.; Waksman, J.; Bergerson, W. F.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Lin, L.; Demers, D. R.; Fimognari, P.; Titus, J.; Auriemma, F.; Cappello, S.; Franz, P.; Innocente, P.; Lorenzini, R.; Martines, E.; Momo, B.; Piovesan, P.; Puiatti, M.; Spolaore, M.; Terranova, D.; Zanca, P.; Belykh, V.; Davydenko, V. I.; Deichuli, P.; Ivanov, A. A.; Polosatkin, S.; Stupishin, N. V.; Spong, D.; Craig, D.; Harvey, R. W.; Cianciosa, M.; Hanson, J. D.

    2013-10-01

    An overview of recent results from the MST programme on physics important for the advancement of the reversed field pinch (RFP) as well as for improved understanding of toroidal magnetic confinement more generally is reported. Evidence for the classical confinement of ions in the RFP is provided by analysis of impurity ions and energetic ions created by 1 MW neutral beam injection (NBI). The first appearance of energetic-particle-driven modes by NBI in a RFP plasma is described. MST plasmas robustly access the quasi-single-helicity state that has commonalities to the stellarator and ‘snake’ formation in tokamaks. In MST the dominant mode grows to 8% of the axisymmetric field strength, while the remaining modes are reduced. Predictive capability for tearing mode behaviour has been improved through nonlinear, 3D, resistive magnetohydrodynamic computation using the measured resistivity profile and Lundquist number, which reproduces the sawtooth cycle dynamics. Experimental evidence and computational analysis indicates two-fluid effects, e.g., Hall physics and gyro-viscosity, are needed to understand the coupling of parallel momentum transport and current profile relaxation. Large Reynolds and Maxwell stresses, plus separately measured kinetic stress, indicate an intricate momentum balance and a possible origin for MST's intrinsic plasma rotation. Gyrokinetic analysis indicates that micro-tearing modes can be unstable at high beta, with a critical gradient for the electron temperature that is larger than for tokamak plasmas by roughly the aspect ratio.

  11. CUSP-PINCH DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Watteau, J.P.H.

    1962-06-01

    An ion-electron plasma heating device of the pinch tube class is designed with novel means for counteracting the instabilities of an ordinary linear pinch discharge. A plasma-forming discharge is created between two spacedapart coaxial electiodes through a gas such as deuterium. A pair of spaced coaxial magnetic field coils encircle the discharge and carry opposing currents so that a magnetic field having a cuspate configuration is created around the plasma, the field being formed after the plasma has been established but before significant instability arises. Thus, containment time is increased and intensified heating is obtained. In addition to the pinch compression heating additional heating is obtained by high-frequency magnetic field modulation. (AEC)

  12. Hybrid X-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; Mishin, S. A.; Mingaleev, A. R.; Tilikin, I. N.; Knapp, P. F.; Cahill, A. D.; Hoyt, C. L.; Hammer, D. A.

    2012-05-15

    Results from experimental studies of a hybrid X-pinch with an initial configuration in the form of a high-current diode with conical tungsten electrodes spaced by 1-2 mm and connected to one another with 20- to 100-{mu}m-diameter wires are presented. The experiments were carried out at four facilities with a current amplitude from 200 to 1000 kA and front duration from 45 to 200 ns. It is shown that, in spite of their simpler configuration, hybrid X-pinches with a short rise time of the current pulse (50-100 ns) are highly competitive with standard X-pinches in the generated soft X-ray power and the formation of a single hot spot in them is much more stable, while hard X-ray emission is almost absent. The possibility of using hybrid X-pinches as soft X-ray sources for point projection X-ray imaging of plasma objects is considered.

  13. Turbulent Equipartition Theory of Toroidal Momentum Pinch

    SciTech Connect

    T.S. Hahm, P.H. Diamond, O.D. Gurcan, and G. Rewaldt

    2008-01-31

    The mode-independet part of magnetic curvature driven turbulent convective (TuroCo) pinch of the angular momentum density [Hahm et al., Phys. Plasmas 14,072302 (2007)] which was originally derived from the gyrokinetic equation, can be interpreted in terms of the turbulent equipartition (TEP) theory. It is shown that the previous results can be obtained from the local conservation of "magnetically weighted angular momentum density," nmi U|| R/B2, and its homogenization due to turbulent flows. It is also demonstrated that the magnetic curvature modification of the parallel acceleration in the nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in the laboratory frame, which was shown to be responsible for the TEP part of the TurCo pinch of angular momentum density in the previous work, is closely related to the Coriolis drift coupling to the perturbed electric field. In addition, the origin of the diffusive flux in the rotating frame is highlighted. Finally, it is illustratd that there should be a difference in scalings between the momentum pinch originated from inherently toroidal effects and that coming from other mechanisms which exist in a simpler geometry.

  14. Turbulent equipartition theory of toroidal momentum pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T. S.; Rewoldt, G.; Diamond, P. H.; Gurcan, O. D.

    2008-05-15

    The mode-independent part of the magnetic curvature driven turbulent convective (TurCo) pinch of the angular momentum density [Hahm et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 072302 (2007)], which was originally derived from the gyrokinetic equation, can be interpreted in terms of the turbulent equipartition (TEP) theory. It is shown that the previous results can be obtained from the local conservation of 'magnetically weighted angular momentum density', nm{sub i}U{sub parallel}R/B{sup 2}, and its homogenization due to turbulent flows. It is also demonstrated that the magnetic curvature modification of the parallel acceleration in the nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in the laboratory frame, which was shown to be responsible for the TEP part of the TurCo pinch of angular momentum density in the previous work, is closely related to the Coriolis drift coupling to the perturbed electric field. In addition, the origin of the diffusive flux in the rotating frame is highlighted. Finally, it is illustrated that there should be a difference in scalings between the momentum pinch originated from inherently toroidal effects and that coming from other mechanisms that exist in a simpler geometry.

  15. Z-Pinch Fusion Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miernik, Janie

    2011-01-01

    Fusion-based nuclear propulsion has the potential to enable fast interplanetary transportation. Shorter trips are better for humans in the harmful radiation environment of deep space. Nuclear propulsion and power plants can enable high Ispand payload mass fractions because they require less fuel mass. Fusion energy research has characterized the Z-Pinch dense plasma focus method. (1) Lightning is form of pinched plasma electrical discharge phenomena. (2) Wire array Z-Pinch experiments are commonly studied and nuclear power plant configurations have been proposed. (3) Used in the field of Nuclear Weapons Effects (NWE) testing in the defense industry, nuclear weapon x-rays are simulated through Z-Pinch phenomena.

  16. X-pinch. Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.

    2015-06-01

    Results of experimental studies of the X-pinch since its invention and implementation in 1982 at the Lebedev Physical Institute are presented. The review consists of two parts. The first part briefly outlines the history of creation and studies of X-pinches, describes the diagnostic techniques and devices developed during these studies, and presents the main results obtained in studying the physical processes occurring in the X-pinch. The second part is devoted to the results of detailed studies of the spatial, temporal, and spectral characteristics of the X-pinch hot spot—the region where the highest plasma parameters are achieved and which is a source of X-ray emission with extreme parameters. Some results of X-pinch simulations are also presented.

  17. X-pinch. Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Pikuz, S. A. Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.

    2015-06-15

    Results of experimental studies of the X-pinch since its invention and implementation in 1982 at the Lebedev Physical Institute are presented. The review consists of two parts. The first part briefly outlines the history of creation and studies of X-pinches, describes the diagnostic techniques and devices developed during these studies, and presents the main results obtained in studying the physical processes occurring in the X-pinch. The second part is devoted to the results of detailed studies of the spatial, temporal, and spectral characteristics of the X-pinch hot spot—the region where the highest plasma parameters are achieved and which is a source of X-ray emission with extreme parameters. Some results of X-pinch simulations are also presented.

  18. PINCHED PLASMA REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, J.A.; Suydam, R.; Tuck, J.L.

    1961-07-01

    BS>A plasma confining and heating reactor is described which has the form of a torus with a B/sub 2/ producing winding on the outside of the torus and a helical winding of insulated overlapping tunns on the inside of the torus. The inner helical winding performs the double function of shielding the plasma from the vitreous container and generating a second B/sub z/ field in the opposite direction to the first B/sub z/ field after the pinch is established.

  19. X-pinch. Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    Results of experimental studies of the X-pinch since its invention and implementation in 1982 at the Lebedev Physical Institute are presented. The concept of the X-pinch arose in the course of innovative experiments on studying the generation of hot dense plasma in nanosecond Z-pinches. The main idea was to localize the region occupied by the plasma and stabilize the moment of its formation. This was achieved by using a load in the form of crossed wires. The resulting plasma object turned out to be so interesting that a new scientific direction appeared in plasma physics. At present, studies in this direction are being performed in many laboratories worldwide. The term X-pinch became conventional, and sections devoted to its study are always present at plasma conferences. X-pinch is not only a very interesting scientific object, but also a unique source of X-ray emission with extreme parameters. The use of X-pinches for point-projection X-ray radiography of high-energy-density objects provided many new experimental results. In some cases, the concepts of the processes occurring in matter upon fast energy deposition changed dramatically. The review consists of two parts. The first part briefly outlines the history of creation and studies of X-pinches, describes the diagnostic techniques and devices developed during these studies, and presents the main results obtained in studying the physical processes occurring in the X-pinch. The second part is devoted to the results of detailed studies of the X-pinch hot spot—the region where the highest plasma parameters are achieved and which is a source of X-ray emission with extreme parameters. Some results of X-pinch simulations are also presented.

  20. X-pinch. Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Pikuz, S. A. Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.

    2015-04-15

    Results of experimental studies of the X-pinch since its invention and implementation in 1982 at the Lebedev Physical Institute are presented. The concept of the X-pinch arose in the course of innovative experiments on studying the generation of hot dense plasma in nanosecond Z-pinches. The main idea was to localize the region occupied by the plasma and stabilize the moment of its formation. This was achieved by using a load in the form of crossed wires. The resulting plasma object turned out to be so interesting that a new scientific direction appeared in plasma physics. At present, studies in this direction are being performed in many laboratories worldwide. The term X-pinch became conventional, and sections devoted to its study are always present at plasma conferences. X-pinch is not only a very interesting scientific object, but also a unique source of X-ray emission with extreme parameters. The use of X-pinches for point-projection X-ray radiography of high-energy-density objects provided many new experimental results. In some cases, the concepts of the processes occurring in matter upon fast energy deposition changed dramatically. The review consists of two parts. The first part briefly outlines the history of creation and studies of X-pinches, describes the diagnostic techniques and devices developed during these studies, and presents the main results obtained in studying the physical processes occurring in the X-pinch. The second part is devoted to the results of detailed studies of the X-pinch hot spot—the region where the highest plasma parameters are achieved and which is a source of X-ray emission with extreme parameters. Some results of X-pinch simulations are also presented.

  1. MEMS fluid viscosity sensor.

    PubMed

    Ballato, Arthur

    2010-03-01

    Quartz shear resonators are employed widely as sensors to measure Newtonian viscosities of liquids. Perturbation of the electrical equivalent circuit parameters of the plate resonator by the fluid loading permits calculation of the mass density-shear viscosity product. Use of doubly rotated resonators does permit additional information to be obtained, but in no case can the viscosity and mass density values be separated. In these measurements, the resonator surface is exposed to a measurand bath whose extent greatly exceeds the penetration depth of the evanescent shear mode excited by the active element. Here we briefly review past techniques and current art, and sketch a proposal involving the interesting situation in which the separation between the resonator and a confining wall is less than the penetration depth of the fluid occupying the intervening region. To highlight the salient features of this novel case, the discussion is limited to the very idealized circumstance of a strictly 1-D problem, unencumbered by the vicissitudes inevitably encountered in practice. An appendix mentions some of these functional impedimenta and indicates how deviations from ideality might be approached in engineering embodiments. When the fluid confinement is of the order of the penetration depth, the resonator perturbation becomes a sensitive function of the separation, and it is found that viscosity and density may be separately and uniquely determined. Moreover, extreme miniaturization is a natural consequence because the penetration depth generally is on the order of micrometers for frequencies around 1 MHz at temperatures and pressures ordinarily encountered with gases and liquids. Micro-electro-mechanical (MEMS) versions of viscometers and associated types of fluid sensors are thereby enabled. PMID:20211786

  2. Dense-Pinch Photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, John F.; Lovberg, Ralph H.

    1988-05-01

    A promising approach to the generation of low-emittance e-beams for particle beam and FEL application employs a photoelectron cathode. IF such an e-beam source is to be viable at high power, a high-performance hard-UV illuminator is needed. Toward this end, experiments have been performed by illuminating a metal photocathode with the VUV radiation from a laser-guided gas-embedded high-density high-Z pinch. Such a VUV source is interesting because the plasma is created at high density and is optically thick. Thus, it is both a stable and an efficient radiator. Coupled with a copper photocathode it has generated a-beam current densities up to 60 A/sq-cm. The test device has been modified to utilize a pinch formed from a liquid jet in vacuum, rather than the laser-guided discharge in high-pressure gas. This is more suitable for rep-rate operation as it dispenses with the VUV-absorbing interposed gas, the channel-forming laser, and gas transport at high average power. A decane-jet device has been tested at 10 Hz with a peak pulse VUV power of 100 MW.

  3. Linking natural microstructures with numerical modeling of pinch-and-swell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Max; Berger, Alfons; Herwegh, Marco; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    For a variety of geological problems, the change from homogeneous to localized deformation and the establishment of steady-state conditions are equally important. Here, we show that pinch-and-swell structures are ideal candidates for the study of the switch in deformation style and mechanism during ductile creep. We present an interdisciplinary approach to the onset of pinch-and-swell structures and to the flow conditions during pre- to post-localization stages in ductile rocks. For this reason, naturally boudinaged calcite veins, embedded in a calc-mylonite, and their microfabrics were investigated quantitatively. Remnants of slightly deformed calcite hosts build up the swells, showing twinning and minor dislocation glide as crystal plastic deformation mechanisms which are accompanied by subgrain rotation recrystallization (SGR). Towards the pinches, we find a gradient of severe grain size reduction through progressive SGR, developing a characteristic dislocation creep crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO). Along this gradient, the finest recrystallized calcite grains appear randomly oriented, expressed by a "smearing-out" of the CPO and missing systematics of misorientation angles in the most extended areas. We interpret this microstructure as a switch from dislocation dominated creep to grain boundary sliding processes. Further, we show that the onset of boudinage is independent on both the original orientation and grain size of calcite hosts. We implemented these microstructural observations into a layered elasto-visco-plastic finite element framework, tracing variations in grain size (Peters et al., 2015). We base the microstructural evolution on thermo-mechanical-chemical principles and end-member flow laws (Herwegh et al., 2014). The simulated pinch-and-swell structures indicate that low strain rates in the swells favor dislocation creep, whereas accelerated rates provoke continuous grain size reduction allowing strain accommodation by diffusion creep

  4. Gas Bubble Pinch-off in Viscous and Inviscid Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taborek, P.

    2005-11-01

    We have used high-speed video to analyze pinch-off of nitrogen gas bubbles in fluids with a wide range of viscosity. If the external fluid is highly viscous (ηext>100 cP), the radius is proportional to the time before break, τ, and decreases smoothly to zero. If the external fluid has low viscosity (ηext<10 cP), the neck radius scales as &1/2circ; until an instability develops in the gas bubble which causes the neck to rupture and tear apart. Finally, if the viscosity of the external fluid is in an intermediate range, an elongated thread is formed which breaks apart into micron-sized bubbles. 100,000 frame-per-second videos will be presented which illustrate each of these flow regimes.

  5. Scaling and Instabilities in Bubble Pinch-Off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, J. C.; Waldrep, R.; Taborek, P.

    2005-05-01

    We have used a 100 000 frame-per-second video to analyze the pinch-off of nitrogen gas bubbles in fluids with a wide range of viscosity. If the external fluid is highly viscous (ηext>100 cP), the bubble neck radius is proportional to the time before break, τ, and decreases smoothly to zero. If the external fluid has low viscosity (ηext<10 cP), the radius scales as τ1/2 until an instability develops in the gas bubble, which causes the neck to rupture and tear apart. Finally, if the viscosity of the external fluid is in an intermediate range, an elongated thread is formed, which breaks apart into micron-sized bubbles.

  6. Nonlinear tearing mode interactions and mode locking in reversed field pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Hegna, C.C.

    1996-06-01

    The nonlinear interaction of a set of tearing instabilities and plasma flow is studied in a cylindrical plasma. An analytic theory of mode locking is developed which includes the effects of the localized electromagnetic torques, plasma inertia and cross-field viscosity. The calculation is specialized for the case of mode locking on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch. In MST plasmas, a set of m = 1 tearing instabilities become phase locked and form a toroidally localized, rotating magnetic disturbance. An evolution equation for the phase velocity of this magnetic disturbance is derived which accounts for two types of electromagnetic torques. The external torques describe the interaction of the tearing modes with static magnetic perturbations located outside the plasma region. The interior torques describe the nonlinear interaction of three tearing modes which satisfy a wave number resonance condition. For conditions typical of MST, the internal torques dominate the external torques, which suggest the nonlinear interaction of tearing instabilities play a prominent role in the momentum degradation and mode locking.

  7. Pinch technology improves olefin heat recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.

    1989-02-01

    Pyrolysis of naphthas or gas oils to provide ethylene and propylene for polymers is gaining in popularity in many countries. Pyrolysis takes place at the comparatively high temperatures of 800 to 850/sup 0/C. The very common solution of pyrolysis gas heat recovery in an ethylene unit is shown. Pinch technology allows finding the temperature point (the pinch) that divides the temperature scale in a process into two parts. If there is a pinch in a process (not every process has a pinch), heat from external sources must be supplied to the process at temperatures above the pinch, and must be taken from the system by cooling media at temperatures below the pinch only. If minimum consumption of energy for heating and cooling from external sources is desired, matching process streams across the pinch and adding heat to the system from external sources below the pinch temperature is not allowed.

  8. Viscous Heating At Stagnation In Z-Pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, M. G.

    2009-01-21

    The viscous heating associated with m = 0 MHD instabilities in the stagnated Z-pinch is developed further. It would appear that the larger numerical (Neumann) viscosity plus De Bar corrections in simulation codes to yield energy conservation might be another way of representing viscous heating, but in this case the viscosity is inserted to smooth shock discontinuities. However the viscous heating per unit volume appears to be independent of the coefficient of viscosity itself because the fastest growing MHD mode is itself determined by the viscous damping. Therefore it could be argued that, though the correct physics is not in the codes, the resulting heating is not sensitive to the fact that numerical viscosity instead is employed. In addition, by chance, the model of magnetic bubbles first introduced by Lovberg et al. and Riley et al., and later by Rudakov et al. to explain phenomenologically extra heating of the ions leads to the same heating rate as in Haines et al. For the stainless steel array in which T{sub i} was predicted and measured to be >200 KeV while T{sub e} = 3 KeV the ion viscous heating is dominant. However, for the low current experiment by Kroupp et al. in which the ion kinematic viscosity is much smaller than the resistive diffusivity there is resistive damping of MHD modes, and no ions viscous heating should be expected.

  9. Study of magnetic fields and current in the Z pinch at stagnation

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V. V.; Anderson, A. A.; Astanovitskiy, A. L.; Nalajala, V.; Dmitriev, O.; Papp, D.

    2015-09-15

    The structure of magnetic fields in wire-array Z pinches at stagnation was studied using a Faraday rotation diagnostic at the wavelength of 266 nm. The electron plasma density and the Faraday rotation angle in plasma were calculated from images of the three-channel polarimeter. The magnetic field was reconstructed with Abel transform, and the current was estimated using a simple model. Several shots with wire-array Z pinches at 0.5–1.5 MA were analyzed. The strength of the magnetic field measured in plasma of the stagnated pinch was in the range of 1–2 MG. The magnetic field and current profile in plasma near the neck on the pinch were reconstructed, and the size of the current-carrying plasma was estimated. It was found that current flowed in the large-size trailing plasma near the dense neck. Measurements of the magnetic field near the bulge on the pinch also showed current in trailing plasma. A distribution of current in the large-size trailing plasma can prevent the formation of multi-MG fields in the Z pinch.

  10. Bulk viscosity of multiparticle collision dynamics fluids.

    PubMed

    Theers, Mario; Winkler, Roland G

    2015-03-01

    We determine the viscosity parameters of the multiparticle collision dynamics (MPC) approach, a particle-based mesoscale hydrodynamic simulation method for fluids. We perform analytical calculations and verify our results by simulations. The stochastic rotation dynamics and the Andersen thermostat variant of MPC are considered, both with and without angular momentum conservation. As an important result, we find a nonzero bulk viscosity for every MPC version. The explicit calculation shows that the bulk viscosity is determined solely by the collisional interactions of MPC. PMID:25871248

  11. Dynamics of Pinch-Off in Immiscible Liquid/Liquid Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmire, E. K.; Webster, D. R.; Lowengrub, J. S.

    1997-11-01

    The behavior of glycerine/water jets flowing into a nearly immiscible ambient of Dow Corning 200 fluid is investigated using laser induced fluorescence flow visualization and particle image velocimetry. Clear images are obtained by matching the index of refraction in the glycerine/water solution with the index of refraction in the surrounding Dow Corning fluid. Jet Reynolds numbers are on the order of 100. The pinch-off of the jet column into droplets can be made repeatable by periodic forcing, and several pinch-off modes are examined. These modes are produced by varying the forcing frequency and amplitude, fluid viscosity ratio, and jet Reynolds number. The details of the pinch-off, including local variations in concentration near the transition location and the associated velocity fields will be discussed. The experimental results will be compared with numerical simulations that allow limited chemical mixing across the finite-thickness interface.

  12. What can asymmetry tell us? Investigation of asymmetric versus symmetric pinch and swell structures in nature and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Robyn; Piazolo, Sandra; Daczko, Nathan

    2015-04-01

    Pinch and swell structures occur from microscopic to landscape scales where a more competent layer in a weaker matrix is deformed by pure shear, often in rifting environments. The Anita Shear Zone (ASZ) in Fiordland, New Zealand has an example of landscape scale (1 km width) asymmetric pinch and swell structures developed in ultramafic rocks. Field work suggests that the asymmetry is a result of variations in the surrounding 'matrix' flow properties as the ultramafic band is surrounded to the east by an orthogneiss (Milford Orthogneiss) and to the west by a paragneiss (Thurso Paragneiss). In addition, there is a narrow and a much wider shear zone between the ultramafics and the orthogneiss and paragneiss, respectively. Detailed EBSD analysis of samples from a traverse across the pinch and swell structure indicate the ultramafics in the shear zone on the orthogneiss side have larger grain size than the ultramafics in the shear zone on the paragneiss side. Ultramafic samples from the highly strained paragneiss and orthogneiss shear zones show dislocation creep behaviour, and, on the paragneiss side, also significant deformation by grain boundary sliding. To test if asymmetry of pinch and swell structures can be used to derive the rheological properties of not only the pinch and swell lithologies, but also of the matrix, numerical simulations were performed. Numerical modelling of pure shear (extension) was undertaken with (I) initially three layers and then (II) five layers by adding soft high strain zones on both sides of the rheological hard layer. The matrix was given first symmetric, then asymmetric viscosity. Matrix viscosity was found to impact the formation of pinch and swell structures with the weaker layer causing increased tortuosity of the competent layer edge due to increased local differential stress. Results highlight that local, rheologically soft layers and the relative viscosity of matrix both impact significantly the shape and symmetry of developing

  13. Anisotropic eddy viscosity models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carati, D.; Cabot, W.

    1996-01-01

    A general discussion on the structure of the eddy viscosity tensor in anisotropic flows is presented. The systematic use of tensor symmetries and flow symmetries is shown to reduce drastically the number of independent parameters needed to describe the rank 4 eddy viscosity tensor. The possibility of using Onsager symmetries for simplifying further the eddy viscosity is discussed explicitly for the axisymmetric geometry.

  14. Reduction of viscosity in suspension of swimming bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Aranson, I. S.; Sokolov, A.; Chen, L.; Jin, Q.; Materials Science Division

    2009-09-29

    Measurements of the shear viscosity in suspensions of swimming Bacillus subtilis in free-standing liquid films have revealed that the viscosity can decrease by up to a factor of 7 compared to the viscosity of the same liquid without bacteria or with nonmotile bacteria. The reduction in viscosity is observed in two complementary experiments: one studying the decay of a large vortex induced by a moving probe and another measuring the viscous torque on a rotating magnetic particle immersed in the film. The viscosity depends on the concentration and swimming speed of the bacteria.

  15. Reduction of viscosity in suspension of swimming bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, A.; Aranson, I. S.; Materials Science Division; Illinois Inst. of Tech.

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of the shear viscosity in suspensions of swimming Bacillus subtilis in free-standing liquid films have revealed that the viscosity can decrease by up to a factor of 7 compared to the viscosity of the same liquid without bacteria or with nonmotile bacteria. The reduction in viscosity is observed in two complementary experiments: one studying the decay of a large vortex induced by a moving probe and another measuring the viscous torque on a rotating magnetic particle immersed in the film. The viscosity depends on the concentration and swimming speed of the bacteria.

  16. Development of novel techniques to study the magnetic field evolution in wire array Z-pinches and X pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, Wasif

    Understanding the magnetic field topology in wire-array Z-pinches is of great significance for their ultimate application to stockpile stewardship and inertial confinement fusion. We have developed and tested several novel techniques involving material-based sensors to measure magnetic fields as a function of space and time in high energy density plasmas on pulsed power machines. We first briefly introduce a technique that was used to measure a lower limit of the maximum magnetic field of a sub-microsecond duration pulse using magnetic reversal in CoPt thin films. The time-varying magnetic field was generated by an exploding wire array plasma called an X pinch produced on the 0.5 MA, 100 ns pulse duration, XP pulsed power generator. We then introduce a technique based on Faraday rotation that was used to measure magnetic fields in wire-array Z-pinches produced on the 1 MA, 100 ns rise time, COBRA pulsed power generator as well as on the XP generator. This technique measures magnetic fields as a function of space and time using Faraday rotation of a single longitudinal mode (SLM) laser through a magneto-optically active bulk waveguide, multicomponent terbium borate glass, placed adjacent to, or within, the wire array. We have measured fields > 10 T with 100 ns rise times outside of a wire-array Z-pinch for the entire duration (˜250 ns) of the current pulse and as much as ˜2 T inside a wire-array for ˜40 ns from the start of current. This is the first time that such rapidly varying and large fields have been measured using the terbium borate glass. The third method, also based on Faraday rotation of SLM laser light utilized an integrated optical fiber sensor (a fiber-sensor-fiber assembly) on the XP pulsed power generator that also yielded a measurement of the magnetic field of a wire-array Z-pinch for part of the current pulse. Finally, we repeated the third method by fabricating a "thin film waveguide" of terbium borate glass to increase the spatial resolution

  17. Pinch and swell structures: evidence for brittle-viscous behaviour in the middle crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, R.; Piazolo, S.; Daczko, N.

    2015-04-01

    The flow properties of middle to lower crustal rocks are commonly represented by viscous flow. However, examples of pinch and swell structures found in a mid-crustal high strain zone at St. Anne Point (Fiordland, New Zealand) suggest pinch and swell structures are initiated by brittle failure of the more competent layer in conjunction with material softening. On this basis we develop a flexible numerical model using brittle-viscous flow where Mohr-Coulomb failure is utilised to initiate pinch and swell structure development. Results show that pinch and swell structures develop in a competent layer in both Newtonian and non-Newtonian flow provided the competent layer has enough viscosity contrast and initially fails brittlely. The degree of material softening after initial failure is shown to impact pinch and swell characteristics with high rates of material softening causing the formation of thick necks between swells by limiting the successful localisation of strain. The flow regime and yielding characteristics of the matrix do not impact pinch and swell structure formation itself, so long as the matrix is less competent. To aid analysis of the structures and help derive the flow properties of rocks in the field, we define three stages of pinch and swell development and offer suggestions for measurements to be made in the field. Our study suggests that Mohr-Coulomb behaviour combined with viscous flow is an appropriate way to represent the heterogeneous rocks of the middle to lower crust. This type of mid-crustal rheological behaviour has significant influence on the localization of strain at all scales. For example, inclusion of Mohr-Coulomb brittle failure with viscous flow in just some mid-crustal layers within a crustal scale model will result in strain localisation throughout the whole crustal section allowing the development of through-going high strain structures from the upper crust into the middle and lower crust. This localization then has a significant

  18. Power of the pinch: pinch lower lid blepharoplasty.

    PubMed

    Kim, Elizabeth M; Bucky, Louis P

    2008-05-01

    Lower lid blepharoplasty is performed with great variation in technique. Conventional lower lid blepharoplasty with anterior fat removal via the orbital septum has a potential lower lid malposition rate of 15% to 20%. Lower lid malposition and the stigma of obvious lower lid surgery have led plastic surgeons to continue to change their approach to lower lid rejuvenation. In recent years, some surgeons have come to rely on alternative procedures like laser resurfacing alone or in conjunction with transconjunctival fat removal and canthopexy in an effort to avoid such complications. The pinch blepharoplasty technique removes redundant skin without undermining. This allows for more controlled wound healing, predictable recovery, and potential for simultaneous laser resurfacing. The combination of pinch blepharoplasty with transconjunctival fat removal leaves the middle lamella intact and reduces the chance of scleral show or ectropion. The purpose of this series is to demonstrate that pinch excision of redundant lower eyelid skin can be safely performed and that it can be used with laser resurfacing and/or transconjunctival fat removal for optimal treatment of the aging eye. A retrospective review of 46 consecutive patients who underwent pinch blepharoplasty, either in isolation or with other periorbital procedures was performed. Follow-up was at least 4 months (range of 4-24 months). In addition, we performed a prospective study of 25 consecutive patients to quantify the amount of skin removed and evaluate results and complications. An average of 8 mm of skin was resected (range of 4-12 mm) with the pinch blepharoplasty technique. Of these patients, 5.6% also underwent transconjunctival blepharoplasty, laser resurfacing, and/or fat grafting of the nasojugal groove. Despite the addition of simultaneous laser resurfacing, we did not see an increase in lower lid malposition. Three of the 71 patients had temporary scleral show that resolved with lower lid massage. In

  19. Z-Pinch Fusion for Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    SPIELMAN,RICK B.

    2000-01-01

    Z pinches, the oldest fusion concept, have recently been revisited in light of significant advances in the fields of plasma physics and pulsed power engineering. The possibility exists for z-pinch fusion to play a role in commercial energy applications. We report on work to develop z-pinch fusion concepts, the result of an extensive literature search, and the output for a congressionally-mandated workshop on fusion energy held in Snowmass, Co July 11-23,1999.

  20. High energy density Z-pinch plasmas using flow stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Shumlak, U. Golingo, R. P. Nelson, B. A. Bowers, C. A. Doty, S. A. Forbes, E. G. Hughes, M. C. Kim, B. Knecht, S. D. Lambert, K. K. Lowrie, W. Ross, M. P. Weed, J. R.

    2014-12-15

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch research project[1] at the University of Washington investigates the effect of sheared flows on MHD instabilities. Axially flowing Z-pinch plasmas are produced that are 100 cm long with a 1 cm radius. The plasma remains quiescent for many radial Alfvén times and axial flow times. The quiescent periods are characterized by low magnetic mode activity measured at several locations along the plasma column and by stationary visible plasma emission. Plasma evolution is modeled with high-resolution simulation codes – Mach2, WARPX, NIMROD, and HiFi. Plasma flow profiles are experimentally measured with a multi-chord ion Doppler spectrometer. A sheared flow profile is observed to be coincident with the quiescent period, and is consistent with classical plasma viscosity. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements: interferometry for density; spectroscopy for ion temperature, plasma flow, and density[2]; Thomson scattering for electron temperature; Zeeman splitting for internal magnetic field measurements[3]; and fast framing photography for global structure. Wall stabilization has been investigated computationally and experimentally by removing 70% of the surrounding conducting wall to demonstrate no change in stability behavior.[4] Experimental evidence suggests that the plasma lifetime is only limited by plasma supply and current waveform. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve high energy density plasmas,[5] which are large, easy to diagnose, and persist for extended durations. A new experiment, ZaP-HD, has been built to investigate this approach by separating the flow Z-pinch formation from the radial compression using a triaxial-electrode configuration. This innovation allows more detailed investigations of the sheared flow stabilizing effect, and it allows compression to much higher densities than previously achieved on ZaP by reducing the linear density and increasing the pinch current. Experimental results and

  1. High energy density Z-pinch plasmas using flow stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumlak, U.; Golingo, R. P.; Nelson, B. A.; Bowers, C. A.; Doty, S. A.; Forbes, E. G.; Hughes, M. C.; Kim, B.; Knecht, S. D.; Lambert, K. K.; Lowrie, W.; Ross, M. P.; Weed, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch research project[1] at the University of Washington investigates the effect of sheared flows on MHD instabilities. Axially flowing Z-pinch plasmas are produced that are 100 cm long with a 1 cm radius. The plasma remains quiescent for many radial Alfvén times and axial flow times. The quiescent periods are characterized by low magnetic mode activity measured at several locations along the plasma column and by stationary visible plasma emission. Plasma evolution is modeled with high-resolution simulation codes - Mach2, WARPX, NIMROD, and HiFi. Plasma flow profiles are experimentally measured with a multi-chord ion Doppler spectrometer. A sheared flow profile is observed to be coincident with the quiescent period, and is consistent with classical plasma viscosity. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements: interferometry for density; spectroscopy for ion temperature, plasma flow, and density[2]; Thomson scattering for electron temperature; Zeeman splitting for internal magnetic field measurements[3]; and fast framing photography for global structure. Wall stabilization has been investigated computationally and experimentally by removing 70% of the surrounding conducting wall to demonstrate no change in stability behavior.[4] Experimental evidence suggests that the plasma lifetime is only limited by plasma supply and current waveform. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve high energy density plasmas,[5] which are large, easy to diagnose, and persist for extended durations. A new experiment, ZaP-HD, has been built to investigate this approach by separating the flow Z-pinch formation from the radial compression using a triaxial-electrode configuration. This innovation allows more detailed investigations of the sheared flow stabilizing effect, and it allows compression to much higher densities than previously achieved on ZaP by reducing the linear density and increasing the pinch current. Experimental results and scaling

  2. Hall Viscosity II: Extracting Viscosity from Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Moshe; Bradlyn, Barry; Read, Nicholas

    2012-02-01

    When time reversal symmetry is broken, the viscosity tensor of a fluid can have non-dissipative components, similarly to the non-dissipative off-diagonal Hall conductivity. This ``Hall viscosity'' was recently shown to be half the particle density times the orbital angular momentum per particle. Its observation can thus help elucidate the nature of the more exotic quantum Hall states and related systems (e.g., p+ip superconductors). However, no concrete measurement scheme has hitherto been proposed. Motivated by this question we use linear response theory to derive a general relation between the viscosity tensor and the wave-vector dependent conductivity tensor for a Galilean-invariant quantum fluid. This relation enables one to extract the Hall viscosity, as well as other viscosity coefficients (shear and bulk) when relevant, from electromagnetic response measurements. We also discuss the connection between this result and a similar one recently derived by C. Hoyos and D. T. Son [arXiv:1109.2651].

  3. Nested X Pinches on the COBRA Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; McBride, R. D.; Knapp, P. F.; Wilhelm, H.; Hammer, D. A.; Sinars, D. B.

    2009-01-01

    Recent results of X pinch studies on the COBRA generator at Cornell University (peak current up to 1.2 MA and rise time of 100 ns) are presented. Using an initial configuration of wires before their twisting, similar to nested cylindrical wire arrays enables the assembly of a symmetric configuration at the X pinch crossing region. It also enables an investigation of multilayered X pinches. X pinches with different configurations, including with different materials in the inner and outer wire layers, were tested.

  4. Ulnar Nerve Tendon Transfers for Pinch.

    PubMed

    Cook, Shane; Gaston, R Glenn; Lourie, Gary M

    2016-08-01

    Power and tip pinch are an integral part of intrinsic hand function that can be significantly compromised with dysfunction of the ulnar nerve. Loss of power pinch is one component that can significantly affect an individual's ability to perform simple daily tasks. Tip pinch is less affected, as this task has significant contributions from the median nerve. To restore power pinch, the primary focus must be on restoring the action of the adductor pollicis primarily, and if indicated the first dorsal interosseous muscle and flexor pollicis brevis. PMID:27387080

  5. Nested X Pinches on the COBRA Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; McBride, R. D.; Knapp, P. F.; Wilhelm, H.; Hammer, D. A.; Sinars, D. B.

    2009-01-21

    Recent results of X pinch studies on the COBRA generator at Cornell University (peak current up to 1.2 MA and rise time of 100 ns) are presented. Using an initial configuration of wires before their twisting, similar to nested cylindrical wire arrays enables the assembly of a symmetric configuration at the X pinch crossing region. It also enables an investigation of multilayered X pinches. X pinches with different configurations, including with different materials in the inner and outer wire layers, were tested.

  6. Nonequilibrium viscosity of glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro, John C.; Allan, Douglas C.; Potuzak, Marcel

    2009-09-01

    Since glass is a nonequilibrium material, its properties depend on both composition and thermal history. While most prior studies have focused on equilibrium liquid viscosity, an accurate description of nonequilibrium viscosity is essential for understanding the low temperature dynamics of glass. Departure from equilibrium occurs as a glass-forming system is cooled through the glass transition range. The glass transition involves a continuous breakdown of ergodicity as the system gradually becomes trapped in a subset of the available configurational phase space. At very low temperatures a glass is perfectly nonergodic (or “isostructural”), and the viscosity is described well by an Arrhenius form. However, the behavior of viscosity during the glass transition range itself is not yet understood. In this paper, we address the problem of glass viscosity using the enthalpy landscape model of Mauro and Loucks [Phys. Rev. B 76, 174202 (2007)] for selenium, an elemental glass former. To study a wide range of thermal histories, we compute nonequilibrium viscosity with cooling rates from 10-12 to 1012K/s . Based on these detailed landscape calculations, we propose a simplified phenomenological model capturing the essential physics of glass viscosity. The phenomenological model incorporates an ergodicity parameter that accounts for the continuous breakdown of ergodicity at the glass transition. We show a direct relationship between the nonequilibrium viscosity parameters and the fragility of the supercooled liquid. The nonequilibrium viscosity model is validated against experimental measurements of Corning EAGLE XG™ glass. The measurements are performed using a specially designed beam-bending apparatus capable of accurate nonequilibrium viscosity measurements up to 1016Pas . Using a common set of parameters, the phenomenological model provides an accurate description of EAGLE XG™ viscosity over the full range of measured temperatures and fictive temperatures.

  7. The Imaging of Z-Pinches Using X-Pinch Backlighting

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, J.D.; Greenly, J.B.; Hammer, D.A.; McBride, R.D.; Pikuz, S.A.; Shelkovenko, T.A.

    2006-01-05

    Imaging using X-pinch backlighters has been implemented on the COBRA accelerator at Cornell University to study the early stages of wire-array Z-pinches. Two of four return-current posts in the wire-array load region are replaced by X pinches so that two images of one wire in an eight-wire z-pinch are obtained from different angles and at different times. High resolution images have been obtained that show the evolution of wire structure and instabilities. X-pinch wire diameter and other parameters were varied in order to shift the timing of the X pinches relative to the start of the z-pinch current pulse. It was found that XPBL wire diameter (mass per unit length) has the strongest influence on radiation timing.

  8. Viscosity of paraproteinemic sera.

    PubMed

    Tichý, M

    1996-01-01

    Viscosity was determined in a series of 1402 paraproteinemic sera. Viscosity was measured on an ultrasonic viscosimeter of domestic design and was expressed in relative units(ru). Increased viscosity over 2.1 ru was found in 288 sera, i.e. 20.5%. Clinical symptoms of the hyperviscosity syndrome were found in 44 cases (3%) with viscosity over 4.0 ru. Malignant monoclonal gammopathy as proved in all 44 cases. In 17 determinations with the presence of paraprotein IgM, the mean viscosity was 6.35% +/- 2.6 ru, and the mean paraprotein concentration was 41.12 +/- 11.26g/l. In 17 cases we found paraprotein IgG with a mean viscosity of 6.38 +/- 2.4 ru and a mean concentration of paraprotein was 63.66 +/- 14.52g/l. In 9 determinations with the presence of paraprotein IgA, the mean viscosity as 5.22 +/- 1.02 ru and the mean paraprotein concentration was 49.77 +/- 13.89g/1. In one case we found a double paraproteinemia of IgG-lambda + IgA-kappa (31.9 + 24.2g/l), with a viscosity of 10.5 ru. PMID:9106390

  9. Viscosity measuring using microcantilevers

    DOEpatents

    Oden, Patrick Ian

    2001-01-01

    A method for the measurement of the viscosity of a fluid uses a micromachined cantilever mounted on a moveable base. As the base is rastered while in contact with the fluid, the deflection of the cantilever is measured and the viscosity determined by comparison with standards.

  10. Viscosity and Solvation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses theories underlying the phenomena of solution viscosities, involving the Jones and Dole equation, B-coefficient determination, and flickering cluster model. Indicates that viscosity measurements provide a basis for the study of the structural effects of ions in aqueous solutions and are applicable in teaching high school chemistry. (CC)

  11. Pinch Experiments in a Table Top Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Pavez, Cristian; Moreno, Jose; Soto, Leopoldo; Tarifeno, Ariel

    2009-01-21

    The design and construction of a table top multipurpose capacitor bank of hundred of Joules and hundred of kiloAmperes conceived to be used in small scale Z-pinch experiments is reported. A recent result on a Z-pinch gas embedded discharge using hollow conical electrodes done in a similar table top generator is also presented.

  12. The high density Z-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, G. H.

    During the past few years techniques have been developed for producing pinches in solid deuterium. The conditions which exist in these plasmas are different from those produced earlier. The pinch is formed from a fiber of solid deuterium rather than from a low density gas, and the current is driven by a low impedance, high voltage pulse generator. Because of the high initial density, it is not necessary to compress the pinch to reach thermonuclear conditions, and the confinement time required for energy production is much shorter than for a gas. Results, which have been verified by experiments performed at higher current were quite surprising and encouraging. The pinch appeared to be stable for a time much longer than the Alfven radial transit time. It is argued that the pinch is not strictly stable, but it does not appear to disassemble in a catastrophic fashion. It appears that there may be a distinction between stability and confinement in the high density pinch. In the discussion below the status of the high density Z-pinch experiments at laboratories around the world is presented, and some of the calculational and experimental results described. Remarks are confined to recent work on the high density pinch.

  13. Numerical experiments on the theta pinch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volosevich, P. P.; Zukakishyili, G. G.

    1979-01-01

    Numerical calculation of theta pinch problems are presented. Physical processes in theta pinch systems are considered in a one dimensional, two temperature magnetohydrodynamic, approximation with allowance for end losses by longitudinal heat conductivity. The numerical calculations are compared with results of earlier experiments.

  14. Nested X Pinches on the COBRA Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, David; Shelkovenko, Tatiana; Pikuz, Sergei; McBride, Ryan; Knapp, Patrick; Wilhelm, Harold; Sinars, Daniel

    2008-11-01

    Recent results of X pinch studies on the COBRA generator at Cornell University (peak current up to 1.2 MA and rise time of 100 ns) are presented. Increasing of the pulser current requires the use of loads with higher mass per unit length. Such loads can be made by increasing the number of wires or the wire diameters, which leads to increasing the size and complexity of the wire crossing region. Using an initial configuration of wires (before their twisting), similar to nested arrays enables the assembly of a more-nearly symmetric configuration at the X pinch crossing region. It also enables an investigation of multilayered X pinches. We will present experimental results obtained from X pinches with different configurations, including X pinches with different materials in the inner and outer wire layers.

  15. Apparatus and method for measuring viscosity

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, R.J. Jr.

    1986-02-25

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method for measuring the viscosity of a fluid. This apparatus and method is particularly useful for the measurement of the viscosity of a liquid in a harsh environment characterized by high temperature and the presence of corrosive or deleterious gases and vapors which adversely affect conventional ball or roller bearings. The apparatus and method of the present invention employ one or more flexural or torsional bearings to suspend a bob capable of limited angular motion within a rotatable sleeve suspended from a stationary frame. 7 figs.

  16. Apparatus and method for measuring viscosity

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Jr., Robert J.

    1986-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method for measuring the viscosity of a fluid. This apparatus and method is particularly useful for the measurement of the viscosity of a liquid in a harsh environment characterized by high temperature and the presence of corrosive or deleterious gases and vapors which adversely affect conventional ball or roller bearings. The apparatus and method of the present invention employ one or more flexural or torsional bearings to suspend a bob capable of limited angular motion within a rotatable sleeve suspended from a stationary frame.

  17. Oral sensory discrimination of fluid viscosity.

    PubMed

    Smith, C H; Logemann, J A; Burghardt, W R; Carrell, T D; Zecker, S G

    1997-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the ability of normal young adult volunteers to sensorially identify Newtonian fluids of specified viscosities. Twenty subjects, 10 men and 10 women between the ages of 18 and 29 years participated. Seven stimuli, consisting of combinations of corn syrup and water, with viscosities ranging from 2 to 2,240 centipoise (cP) were prepared and characterized using a coaxial rotational viscometer. Subjects were presented with two anchor stimuli representing the extremes of the range of viscosities as a basis from which the experimental stimuli were judged. The seven experimental stimuli were randomly presented to each subject 10 times. The accuracy with which the subjects identified the viscosity of the fluid was significant at p < 0.01. The pattern of response was not significantly different across subjects nor gender. There were no differences in performance throughout the duration of the study. The repeat presentation of the anchor points did not significantly affect performance. Further research on oral perception of viscosity, and the processes that mediate changes in swallow physiology resulting from changes in viscosity is required. PMID:9071805

  18. The viscosity of short polyelectrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Dora; Cloitre, Michel; Leibler, Ludwik

    2014-03-21

    We consider the viscosity of solutions of highly charged short polyelectrolytes. Our system is a poly(styrene-maleic acid) copolymer solution (SMA) with various added salt concentrations in dilute and semidilute regimes. The SMA solutions show some particular features: (i) variations of the specific viscosity measured for different values of concentration and ionic strength can be rescaled on two universal curves when plotted as a function of the effective volume fraction; (ii) the reduced viscosity is proportional to the Debye length. In order to describe the viscosity of such a system we model the motion of the charged rods considering a simpler system: we replace each charged rod and its corresponding charge cloud by an effective neutral rod. This modified system is yet below the concentrated regime and, at most, steric interactions are left. In the semidilute regime, we model the rescaled rods moving under a mean field potential and obtain a dynamical equation for the orientational tensor, considered small, and the viscosity is derived from it. Within our mean field approach, the effects due to the rod Brownian motion and due to the potential cancel each other and the behavior of the viscosity is explained in terms of the effective volume fraction only. Our predictions are in good qualitative agreement with the experimental results over a wide range of parameters, and suggest a method for obtaining the rotational diffusion constant in the semidilute regime. PMID:24652236

  19. High-Temperature Viscosity of Commercial Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.

    2006-08-31

    Arrhenius models were developed for glass viscosity within the processing temperature of six types of commercial glasses: low-expansion-borosilicate glasses, E glasses, fiberglass wool glasses, TV panel glasses, container glasses, and float glasses. Both local models (for each of the six glass types) and a global model (for the composition region of commercial glasses, i.e., the six glass types taken together) are presented. The models are based on viscosity data previously obtained with rotating spindle viscometers within the temperature range between 900 C and 1550 C; the viscosity varied from 1 Pa?s to 750 Pa?s. First-order models were applied to relate Arrhenius coefficients to the mass fractions of 15 components: SiO2, TiO2, ZrO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, B2O3, MgO, CaO, SrO, BaO, PbO, ZnO, Li2O, Na2O, K2O. The R2 is 0.98 for the global model and ranges from .097 to 0.99 for the six local models. The models are recommended for glasses containing 42 to 84 mass% SiO2 to estimate viscosities or temperatures at a constant viscosity for melts within both the temperature range from 1100 C to 1550 C and viscosity range from 5 to 400 Pa?s.

  20. High-Temperature Viscosity Of Commercial Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R; See, Clem A; Lam, Oanh P; Minister, Kevin B

    2005-01-01

    Viscosity was measured for six types of commercial glasses: low-expansion-borosilicate glasses, E glasses, fiberglass wool glasses, TV panel glasses, container glasses, and float glasses. Viscosity data were obtained with rotating spindle viscometers within the temperature range between 900°C and 1550°C; the viscosity varied from 1 Pa∙s to 750 Pa∙s. Arrhenius coefficients were calculated for individual glasses and linear models were applied to relate them to the mass fractions of 11 major components (SiO2, CaO, Na2O, Al2O3, B2O3, BaO, SrO, K2O, MgO, PbO, and ZrO2) and 12 minor components (Fe2O3, ZnO, Li2O, TiO2, CeO2, F, Sb2O3, Cr2O3, As2O3, MnO2, SO3, and Co3O4). The models are recommended for glasses containing 42 to 84 mass% SiO2 to estimate viscosities or temperatures at a constant viscosity for melts within both the temperature range from 1100°C to 1550°C and viscosity range from 10 to 400 Pas.

  1. Pinch technology/process optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Improved process efficiency is of great importance to electric utilities and their industrial customers. It enhances company profitability, thereby fostering load retention and strategic load growth. Moreover, the technical means of achieving improved efficiency can significantly impact utility load shapes. By understanding the energy use patterns and options in an industrial facility, the utility and industrial user can work together to define mutually beneficial investment and operating decisions and to clarify how the decisions might be impacted by existing or alternative energy prices. Efforts to achieve such understanding are facilitated by using pinch technology, an innovative and highly effective methodology for systematically analyzing total industrial sites. This report documents a series of twelve industrial process optimization case studies. The studies were carried out using pinch technology. '' Each study was cosponsored by the industrial site's local electric utility. The twelve studies are follows: (1) pulp and paper, (2) refinery, (3) refinery, (4) yeast, (5) soups/sauces, (6) cellulose- acetate, (7) refinery, (8) chemicals, (9) gelatin-capsules, (10) refinery, (11) brewery, (12) cereal grains.

  2. Pinch-off of microfluidic droplets with oscillatory velocity of inner phase flow

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Pingan; Tang, Xin; Tian, Ye; Wang, Liqiu

    2016-01-01

    When one liquid is introduced into another immiscible one, it ultimately fragments due to hydrodynamic instability. In contrast to neck pinch-off without external actuation, the viscous two-fluid system subjected to an oscillatory flow demonstrates higher efficiency in breaking fluid threads. However, the underlying dynamics of this process is less well understood. Here we show that the neck-thinning rate is accelerated by the amplitude of oscillation. By simply evaluating the momentum transfer from external actuation, we derive a dimensionless pre-factor to quantify the accelerated pinch-off. Our data ascribes the acceleration to the non-negligible inner fluid inertia, which neutralizes the inner phase viscous stress that retards the pinch-off. Moreover, we characterize an equivalent neck-thinning behavior between an actuated system and its unactuated counterpart with decreased viscosity ratio. Finally, we demonstrate that oscillation is capable of modulating satellite droplet formation by shifting the pinch-off location. Our study would be useful for manipulating fluids at microscale by external forcing. PMID:27511300

  3. Pinch-off of microfluidic droplets with oscillatory velocity of inner phase flow.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pingan; Tang, Xin; Tian, Ye; Wang, Liqiu

    2016-01-01

    When one liquid is introduced into another immiscible one, it ultimately fragments due to hydrodynamic instability. In contrast to neck pinch-off without external actuation, the viscous two-fluid system subjected to an oscillatory flow demonstrates higher efficiency in breaking fluid threads. However, the underlying dynamics of this process is less well understood. Here we show that the neck-thinning rate is accelerated by the amplitude of oscillation. By simply evaluating the momentum transfer from external actuation, we derive a dimensionless pre-factor to quantify the accelerated pinch-off. Our data ascribes the acceleration to the non-negligible inner fluid inertia, which neutralizes the inner phase viscous stress that retards the pinch-off. Moreover, we characterize an equivalent neck-thinning behavior between an actuated system and its unactuated counterpart with decreased viscosity ratio. Finally, we demonstrate that oscillation is capable of modulating satellite droplet formation by shifting the pinch-off location. Our study would be useful for manipulating fluids at microscale by external forcing. PMID:27511300

  4. Counter-rotating accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyda, S.; Lovelace, R. V. E.; Ustyugova, G. V.; Romanova, M. M.; Koldoba, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Counter-rotating discs can arise from the accretion of a counter-rotating gas cloud on to the surface of an existing corotating disc or from the counter-rotating gas moving radially inwards to the outer edge of an existing disc. At the interface, the two components mix to produce gas or plasma with zero net angular momentum which tends to free-fall towards the disc centre. We discuss high-resolution axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations of viscous counter-rotating discs for the cases where the two components are vertically separated and radially separated. The viscosity is described by an isotropic α-viscosity including all terms in the viscous stress tensor. For the vertically separated components, a shear layer forms between them and the middle part of this layer free-falls to the disc centre. The accretion rates are increased by factors of ˜102-104 over that for a conventional disc rotating in one direction with the same viscosity. The vertical width of the shear layer and the accretion rate are strongly dependent on the viscosity and the mass fraction of the counter-rotating gas. In the case of radially separated components where the inner disc corotates and the outer disc rotates in the opposite direction, a gap between the two components opens and closes quasi-periodically. The accretion rates are ≳25 times larger than those for a disc rotating in one direction with the same viscosity.

  5. Study of micro-pinches in wire-array Z pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V. V.; Papp, D.; Anderson, A. A.; Talbot, B. R.; Astanovitskiy, A. L.; Nalajala, V.; Dmitriev, O.; Chittenden, J. P.; Niasse, N.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.

    2013-11-15

    Bright and hot areas with a high plasma density and temperature are observed in all kinds of Z pinches. We studied bright radiating spots produced by micro-pinches in cylindrical and planar wire-arrays at the 1 MA Zebra pulsed power generator using an x-ray streak camera synchronized with laser diagnostics, x-ray time-gated pinhole camera, and spectroscopy. Hot spots with extremely dense and relatively hot plasma arise during the collapse of the micro-pinches. These hot spots radiate a continuum spectrum with energy >2.5 keV. Typical micro-pinches in Al wire arrays generate x-ray bursts with durations of 0.4–1 ns in the soft x-ray range and 0.1–0.4 ns in the keV range. UV two-frame shadowgraphy shows spatial correlation of hot spots with the collapse and explosion of micro-pinches. Micro-pinches typically occur at the necks of the Z pinch, but can demonstrate a variety of parameters and different dynamics. An analysis of x-ray streak images shows that micro-pinches can generate >20% of the x-ray energy in some types of wire-array Z pinches.

  6. Study of micro-pinches in wire-array Z pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. V.; Papp, D.; Anderson, A. A.; Talbot, B. R.; Astanovitskiy, A. L.; Nalajala, V.; Dmitriev, O.; Chittenden, J. P.; Niasse, N.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.

    2013-11-01

    Bright and hot areas with a high plasma density and temperature are observed in all kinds of Z pinches. We studied bright radiating spots produced by micro-pinches in cylindrical and planar wire-arrays at the 1 MA Zebra pulsed power generator using an x-ray streak camera synchronized with laser diagnostics, x-ray time-gated pinhole camera, and spectroscopy. Hot spots with extremely dense and relatively hot plasma arise during the collapse of the micro-pinches. These hot spots radiate a continuum spectrum with energy >2.5 keV. Typical micro-pinches in Al wire arrays generate x-ray bursts with durations of 0.4-1 ns in the soft x-ray range and 0.1-0.4 ns in the keV range. UV two-frame shadowgraphy shows spatial correlation of hot spots with the collapse and explosion of micro-pinches. Micro-pinches typically occur at the necks of the Z pinch, but can demonstrate a variety of parameters and different dynamics. An analysis of x-ray streak images shows that micro-pinches can generate >20% of the x-ray energy in some types of wire-array Z pinches.

  7. Pinch and swell structures: evidence for strain localisation by brittle-viscous behaviour in the middle crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, R. L.; Piazolo, S.; Daczko, N. R.

    2015-09-01

    The flow properties of middle crustal rocks are commonly represented by viscous flow. Examples of pinch and swell structures found in a high strain zone at St. Anne Point (Fiordland, New Zealand) and Wongwibinda (N.S.W., Australia) suggest pinch and swell structures may be initiated by brittle failure of the more competent layer in conjunction with subsequent material softening. On this basis we develop a numerical model where Mohr-Coulomb constitutive strain localising behaviour is utilised to initiate pinch and swell structure development. Results show that pinch and swell structures develop in a competent layer in both Newtonian and non-Newtonian flow, provided the competent layer has sufficient viscosity contrast and can localise strain to form shear bands. The flow regime and strain localising characteristics of the surrounding country rock appear not to impact pinch and swell structure formation. The degree of material softening after the initial strain localising behaviour is shown to impact pinch and swell characteristics, while extensive material softening causes the formation of thick necks between swells by limiting the focused localisation of strain into shear bands. To aid analysis of the structures and help derive the flow properties of rocks in the field, we define three stages of pinch and swell development and offer suggestions for measurements to be made in the field. Our study suggests that Mohr-Coulomb strain localising behaviour combined with viscous flow is a viable alternative representation of the heterogeneous rheological behaviour of rocks seen in the middle crust. This type of mid-crustal rheological behaviour can have significant influence on the localisation of strain at all scales. For example, inclusion of Mohr-Coulomb strain localising behaviour with viscous flow in just some mid-crustal layers within a crustal-scale model can result in significant strain localisation, extending from the upper crust into the middle crust. This

  8. Axial X Pinch Backlighting on COBRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blesener, Isaac; Greenly, John; Pikuz, Sergey; Shelkovenko, Tatiania; Hammer, David; Kusse, Bruce

    2008-11-01

    X pinch backlighting is a useful imaging technique whereby two or more wires are crossed at a single point and driven with a high current (300-500 kA). At the crossing point, a micron-scale sub-nanosecond x-ray source is produced that acts as a point source and can be used for point-projection imaging. Axial x pinch backlighting is a new technique that allows an end-on image of Z pinches. New load geometry was developed at Cornell University to allow all standard diagnostics to be used on the same shot as the axial x pinch backlighting diagnostic. High density plasma features have been observed that correlate well with XUV self-emission images previously recorded on COBRA and simulation results from GORGON. Data and images will be presented illustrating the latest results from COBRA. Future applications include the possibility of shockwave imaging in the center of thing foil cylinders.

  9. Formation of a sheared flow Z pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golingo, R. P.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.

    2005-06-01

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch project is experimentally studying the effect of sheared flows on Z-pinch stability. It has been shown theoretically that when dVz/dr exceeds 0.1kVA the kink (m =1) mode is stabilized. [U. Shumlak and C. W. Hartman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 3285 (1995).] Z pinches with an embedded axial flow are formed in ZaP with a coaxial accelerator coupled with a 1m assembly region. Long-lived, quiescent Z pinches are generated throughout the first half cycle of the current. During the initial plasma acceleration phase, the axial motion of the current sheet is consistent with snowplow models. Magnetic probes in the assembly region measure the azimuthal modes of the magnetic field. The amplitude of the m =1 mode is proportional to the radial displacement of the Z-pinch plasma current. The magnetic mode levels show a quiescent period which is over 2000 times the growth time of a static Z pinch. The axial velocity is measured along 20 chords through the plasma and deconvolved to provide a radial profile. Using data from multiple pulses, the time evolution of the velocity profile is measured during formation, throughout the quiescent period, and into the transition to instability. The evolution shows that a sheared plasma flow develops as the Z pinch forms. Throughout the quiescent period, the flow shear is greater than the theoretically required threshold for stability. As the flow shear decreases, the magnetic mode fluctuations increase. The coaxial accelerator provides plasma throughout the quiescent period and may explain the evolution of the velocity profile and the sustainment of the flow Z pinch.

  10. The Physics of Fast Z Pinches

    SciTech Connect

    RYUTOV,D.D.; DERZON,MARK S.; MATZEN,M. KEITH

    1999-10-25

    The spectacular progress made during the last few years in reaching high energy densities in fast implosions of annular current sheaths (fast Z pinches) opens new possibilities for a broad spectrum of experiments, from x-ray generation to controlled thermonuclear fusion and astrophysics. Presently Z pinches are the most intense laboratory X ray sources (1.8 MJ in 5 ns from a volume 2 mm in diameter and 2 cm tall). Powers in excess of 200 TW have been obtained. This warrants summarizing the present knowledge of physics that governs the behavior of radiating current-carrying plasma in fast Z pinches. This survey covers essentially all aspects of the physics of fast Z pinches: initiation, instabilities of the early stage, magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the implosion phase, formation of a transient quasi-equilibrium near the stagnation point, and rebound. Considerable attention is paid to the analysis of hydrodynamic instabilities governing the implosion symmetry. Possible ways of mitigating these instabilities are discussed. Non-magnetohydrodynamic effects (anomalous resistivity, generation of particle beams, etc.) are summarized. Various applications of fast Z pinches are briefly described. Scaling laws governing development of more powerful Z pinches are presented. The survey contains 36 figures and more than 300 references.

  11. The physics of fast Z pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D.D.; Derzon, M.S.; Matzen, M.K.

    1998-07-01

    The spectacular progress made during the last few years in reaching high energy densities in fast implosions of annular current sheaths (fast Z pinches) opens new possibilities for a broad spectrum of experiments, from x-ray generation to controlled thermonuclear fusion and astrophysics. Presently Z pinches are the most intense laboratory X ray sources (1.8 MJ in 5 ns from a volume 2 mm in diameter and 2 cm tall). Powers in excess of 200 TW have been obtained. This warrants summarizes the present knowledge of physics that governs the behavior of radiating current-carrying plasma in fast Z-pinches. This survey covers essentially all aspects of the physics of fast Z pinches: initiation, instabilities of the early stage, magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the implosion phase, formation of a transient quasi-equilibrium near the stagnation point, and rebound. Considerable attention is paid to the analysis of hydrodynamic instabilities governing the implosion symmetry. Possible ways of mitigating these instabilities are discussed. Non-magnetohydrodynamic effects (anomalous resistivity, generation of particle beams, etc.) are summarized. Various applications of fast Z pinches are briefly described. Scaling laws governing development of more powerful Z pinches are presented. The survey contains 52 figures and nearly 300 references.

  12. Symmetric multilayer megampere X-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; McBride, R. D.; Knapp, P. F.; Wilhelm, G.; Sinars, D. B.; Hammer, D. A.; Orlov, N. Yu.

    2010-01-15

    Raising the power of X-ray emission from an X-pinch by increasing the pinch current to the megampere level requires the corresponding increase in the initial linear mass of the load. This can be achieved by increasing either the number of wires or their diameter. In both cases, special measures should be undertaken to prevent the formation of a complicated configuration with an uncontrolled spatial structure in the region of wire crossing, because such a structure breaks the symmetry of the neck formed in the crossing region, destabilizes plasma formation, and degrades X-ray generation. To improve the symmetry of the wire crossing region, X-pinch configurations with a regular multilayer arrangement of wires in this region were proposed and implemented. The results of experiments with various symmetric X-pinch configurations on the COBRA facility at currents of {approx}1MA are presented. It is shown that an X-pinch with a symmetric crossing region consisting of several layers of wires made of different materials can be successfully used in megampere facilities. The most efficient combinations of wires in symmetric multilayer X-pinches are found in which only one hot spot forms and that are characterized by a high and stable soft X-ray yield.

  13. Viscosity in Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, J. J.; Shu, F. H.; Cuzzi, J. N.

    1982-01-01

    The technique of estimating the viscosity in Saturn's rings from the damping rate of waves observed to be propagating within the rings is discussed. The wavetrains of attempts using spiral density waves as a diagnostic suffer significant complications that compromise the interpretations. A method that considers the damping of spiral bending waves was used to deduce a kinematic viscosity of 260 (+150, -100) sqcm/sec for the middle of the A ring where bending waves are excited by the 5:3 vertical resonance with Mimas. This value implies upper limits on the particle velocity dispersion and local ring thickness of 0.4 cm/sec and 30 m, respectively.

  14. ROTATING PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Boyer, K.; Hammel, J.E.; Longmire, C.L.; Nagle, D.E.; Ribe, F.L.; Tuck, J.L.

    1961-10-24

    ABS>A method and device are described for obtaining fusion reactions. The basic concept is that of using crossed electric and magnetic fields to induce a plasma rotation in which the ionized particles follow a circumferential drift orbit on wldch a cyclotron mode of motion is superimposed, the net result being a cycloidal motion about the axis of symmetry. The discharge tube has a radial electric field and a longitudinal magnetic field. Mirror machine geometry is utilized. The device avoids reliance on the pinch effect and its associated instability problems. (AEC)

  15. Viscosity of colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, E.G.D.; Schepper, I.M. de

    1995-12-31

    Simple expressions are given for the effective Newtonian viscosity as a function of concentration as well as for the effective visco-elastic response as a function of concentration and imposed frequency, of monodisperse neutral colloidal suspensions over the entire fluid range. The basic physical mechanisms underlying these formulae are discussed. The agreement with existing experiments is very good.

  16. In vivo analysis of trapeziometacarpal joint kinematics during pinch tasks.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Li-Chieh; Lin, Chien-Ju; Chen, Guan-Po; Jou, I-Ming; Wang, Chien-Kuo; Goryacheva, Irina G; Dosaev, Marat Z; Su, Fong-Chin

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated how the posture of the thumb while performing common pinch movements and the levels of pinch force applied by the thumb affect the arthrokinematics of the trapeziometacarpal joint in vivo. Fifteen subjects performed the pinch tasks at the distal phalange (DP), proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint, and metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint of the index finger with 0%, 50%, and 80% of maximal pinch forces by a single-axis load cell. 3D images of the thumb were obtained using the computed tomography. The results show that the reference points moved from the central region to the dorsal-radial region when changing from pinching the DP to the MP joint without pinching force being applied. Pinching with 80% of the maximum pinching force resulted in reference points being the closest to the volar-ulnar direction. Significant differences were seen between 0% and 50% of maximum pinch force, as well as between 0% and 80%, when pinching the MP joint in the distal-proximal direction. The effects of posture of the thumb and applied pinch force on the arthrokinematics of the joint were investigated with a 3D model of the trapeziometacarpal joint. Pinching with more than 50% of maximum pinch force might subject this joint to extreme displacement. PMID:24683540

  17. In Vivo Analysis of Trapeziometacarpal Joint Kinematics during Pinch Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guan-Po; Jou, I-Ming; Goryacheva, Irina G.; Dosaev, Marat Z.; Su, Fong-Chin

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated how the posture of the thumb while performing common pinch movements and the levels of pinch force applied by the thumb affect the arthrokinematics of the trapeziometacarpal joint in vivo. Fifteen subjects performed the pinch tasks at the distal phalange (DP), proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint, and metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint of the index finger with 0%, 50%, and 80% of maximal pinch forces by a single-axis load cell. 3D images of the thumb were obtained using the computed tomography. The results show that the reference points moved from the central region to the dorsal-radial region when changing from pinching the DP to the MP joint without pinching force being applied. Pinching with 80% of the maximum pinching force resulted in reference points being the closest to the volar-ulnar direction. Significant differences were seen between 0% and 50% of maximum pinch force, as well as between 0% and 80%, when pinching the MP joint in the distal-proximal direction. The effects of posture of the thumb and applied pinch force on the arthrokinematics of the joint were investigated with a 3D model of the trapeziometacarpal joint. Pinching with more than 50% of maximum pinch force might subject this joint to extreme displacement. PMID:24683540

  18. Radiative signatures of Z-pinch plasmas at UNR: from X-pinches to wire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.; Safronova, U. I.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Shrestha, I.; Osborne, G. C.; Weller, M. E.; Stafford, A.; Lorance, M.; Chuvatin, A. S.

    2014-08-01

    University-scale Z-pinch generators are able to produce High Energy Density (HED) plasmas in a broad range of plasma parameters under well-controlled and monitored experimental conditions suitable for radiation studies. The implosion of X-pinch and wire array loads at a 1 MA generator yields short (1-20 nsec) x-ray bursts from one or several bright plasma spots near the wire cross point (for X-pinches) or along and near Z-pinch axis (for wire arrays). Such X- and Z-pinch HED plasma with scales from a few µm to several mm in size emits radiation in a broad range of energies from 10 eV to 0.5 MeV and is subject of our studies during the last ten years. In particular, the substantial number of experiments with very different wire loads was performed on the 1 MA Zebra generator and analyzed: X-pinch, cylindrical, nested, and various types of the novel load, Planar Wire Arrays (PWA). Also, the experiments at an enhanced current of 1.5-1.7 MA on Zebra using Load Current Multiplier (LCM) were performed. This paper highlights radiative signatures of X-pinches and Single and Double PWAs which are illustrated using the new results with combined wire loads from two different materials.

  19. Axial x-ray backlighting of wire-array Z-pinches using X pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blesener, I. C.; Greenly, J. B.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Vishniakou, S.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.

    2009-12-01

    For the first time, a geometry has been developed to allow for an axial imaging system for wire-array Z-pinch experiments that produce high-resolution x-ray images. The new geometry required a significant redesign of the electrode hardware. Calibrated areal density measurements of the Z-pinch plasma including wire cores, coronal plasma, streaming plasma, and the precursor were obtained. The system used eight-wire molybdenum (Mo) X pinches in series with and directly below the Z-pinch axis to provide micron-scale x-rays sources for point-projection radiography. The images formed on the x-ray sensitive film had a 15 mm diameter field of view at the center height of the array and a magnification of about 7.5:1. Titanium (Ti) filters in front of the film transmitted radiation in the spectral range of 3-5 keV. For calibration, a separate film with the same thickness Ti filter was placed the same distance from the X pinch. This film had an unobstructed path that bypasses the Z-pinch but included step wedges for calibration of the Z-pinch plasma. The step wedges had thicknesses of tungsten (W) ranging from 0.015 to 1.1 μm to obtain areal density measurements of the W plasma from the wire-array. Images had subnanosecond temporal resolution and about 10 μm spatial resolution.

  20. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Shear thirning will cause a normally viscous fluid -- such as pie filling or whipped cream -- to deform and flow more readily under high shear conditions. In shear thinning, a pocket of fluid will deform and move one edge forward, as depicted here.

  1. Breakeven Fusion in Staged Z Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Hafiz; Ney, Paul; Rostoker, Norman; Wessel, Frank

    2008-03-01

    We are studying the prospect for breakeven thermonuclear fusion considering a Mega joule (MJ) class, 100 ns, impulse generator using a modified version of MACH2, a 2-1/2 D, radiation-code. The load is a cylindrical, xenon plasma shell that implodes radially onto a co-axial, deuterium-tritium plasma target. Optimized plasma density and pinch radius lead to a fusion-energy output that is many times the stored capacitor bank energy. In this ``Staged Z-pinch'' shock fronts form that preheat the DT plasma to several hundred eV, before adiabatic compression. During compression, the Xe liner becomes Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable while the DT target remains stable. Proper selection of the initial pinch radius and plasma density is crucial for optimum implosion efficiency.

  2. Pinch technology experience in plant retrofits

    SciTech Connect

    Kumana, J.D.; Spriggs, H.D.; Ashton, G.

    1987-01-01

    Pinch technology has been applied to retrofit of many plants employing a wide variety of technologies, including continuous and batch processes, and those involving solids processing. This paper reports the authors recent experience in identifying energy savings opportunities in an oil refinery, an ethylene plant, and a corn wet milling plant. The key findings are that: Pinch technology can be successfully applied to retrofits as well as new plant designs; the correct design for retrofits is not the same as that for new designs; pinch technology gives good results even in ''difficult'' processes employing the less common unit operations; and some commonly accepted practices (specifically in solids drying) are fundamentally wrong; multiple-effect drying based on a countercurrent humidity profile offers significant potential for energy savings.

  3. Two-dimensional structure and particle pinch in tokamak H mode.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Naohiro; Itoh, Kimitaka

    2005-05-20

    Two-dimensional structures of the electrostatic potential, density, and flow velocity near the edge of a tokamak plasma are investigated. The model includes the nonlinearity in bulk-ion viscosity and turbulence-driven shear viscosity. For the case with the strong radial electric field (H mode), a two-dimensional structure in a transport barrier is obtained, giving a poloidal shock with a solitary radial electric field profile. The inward particle pinch is induced from this poloidal asymmetric electric field, and increases as the radial electric field becomes stronger. The abrupt increase of this inward ion and electron flux at the onset of L- to H-mode transition explains the rapid establishment of the density pedestal, which is responsible for the observed spontaneous self-reorganization into an improved confinement regime. PMID:16090180

  4. Two-Dimensional Structure and Particle Pinch in Tokamak H Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, Naohiro; Itoh, Kimitaka

    2005-05-20

    Two-dimensional structures of the electrostatic potential, density, and flow velocity near the edge of a tokamak plasma are investigated. The model includes the nonlinearity in bulk-ion viscosity and turbulence-driven shear viscosity. For the case with the strong radial electric field (H mode), a two-dimensional structure in a transport barrier is obtained, giving a poloidal shock with a solitary radial electric field profile. The inward particle pinch is induced from this poloidal asymmetric electric field, and increases as the radial electric field becomes stronger. The abrupt increase of this inward ion and electron flux at the onset of L- to H-mode transition explains the rapid establishment of the density pedestal, which is responsible for the observed spontaneous self-reorganization into an improved confinement regime.

  5. Magnetic effect in viscosity of magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, H. A.; Gonzalez, E.; Restrepo, J.; Parra, C. A.; Ortiz, C.

    2016-02-01

    In this work the study of viscosity is presented for a magnetorheological fluid made from iron oxides micrometre, under an external magnetic field. The material was characterized by magnetic loops in a vibrating sample magnetometer and its crystal structure by X-ray diffraction. The results show that saturation magnetization and coercive field have dependence with the powder size. The material has different crystal structure which lattice parameters were determined by Rietveld refinement. The viscosity of the magnetorheological fluid was measured by a viscometer with rotational symmetry with and without external field. This result evidence a dependency on the size, percentage iron oxide and the applied magnetic field, it is due to the hydrodynamic volume of iron oxide interacts with the external magnetic field, increasing the flow resistance.

  6. Failure analysis of pinch-torsion tests as a thermal runaway risk evaluation method of Li-Ion Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yuzhi; Li, Dr. Tianlei; Ren, Prof. Fei; Gao, Yanfei; Wang, Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Recently a pinch-torsion test is developed for safety testing of Li-ion batteries (Ren et al., J. Power Source, 2013). It has been demonstrated that this test can generate small internal short-circuit spots in the separator in a controllable and repeatable manner. In the current research, the failure mechanism is examined by numerical simulations and comparisons to experimental observations. Finite element models are developed to evaluate the deformation of the separators under both pure pinch and pinch-torsion loading conditions. It is discovered that the addition of the torsion component significantly increased the maximum principal strain, which is believed to induce the internal short circuit. In addition, the applied load in the pinch-torsion test is significantly less than in the pure pinch test, thus dramatically improving the applicability of this method to ultra-thick batteries which otherwise require heavy load in excess of machine capability. It is further found that the separator failure is achieved in the early stage of torsion (within a few degree of rotation). Effect of coefficient of friction on the maximum principal strain is also examined.

  7. Fusion in a staged Z-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, F. J.; Rahman, H. U.; Ney, P.; Valenzuela, J.; Beg, F.; McKee, E.; Darling, T.

    2016-03-01

    This paper is dedicated to Norman Rostoker, our (FJW and HUR) mentor and long-term collaborator, who will always be remembered for the incredible inspiration that he has provided us. Norman's illustrious career dealt with a broad range of fundamental-physics problems and we were fortunate to have worked with him on many important topics: intense-charged-particle beams, field-reversed configurations, and Z-pinches. Rostoker 's group at the University of CA, Irvine was well known for having implemented many refinements to the Z-pinch, that make it more stable, scalable, and efficient, including the development of: the gas-puff Z-pinch [1], which provides for the use of an expanded range of pinch-load materials; the gas-mixture Z-pinch [2], which enhances the pinch stability and increases its radiation efficiency; e-beam pre-ionization [3], which enhances the uniformity of the initial-breakdown process in a gas pinch; magnetic-flux-compression [4, 5], which allows for the amplification of an axial-magnetic field Bz; the Z-θ pinch [6], which predicts fusion in a pinch-on-fiber configuration; the Staged Z-pinch (SZP) [7], which allows for the amplification of the pinch self-magnetic field, Bθ , in addition to a Bz, and leads to a stable implosion and high-gain fusion [8, 9, 10]. This paper describes the physical basis for a magneto-inertial compression in a liner-on-target SZP [11]. Initially a high-atomic-number liner implodes under the action of the J →×B → , Lorentz Force. As the implosion becomes super Alfvénic, magnetosonic waves form, transporting current and magnetic field through the liner toward the interface of the low-atomic-number target. The target implosion remains subsonic with its surface bounded by a stable-shock front. Shock waves that pass into the target provide a source of target plasma pre-heat. At peak compression the assembly is compressed by liner inertia, with flux compression producing an intense-magnetic field near the target

  8. Pinch technique: Theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binosi, Daniele; Papavassiliou, Joannis

    2009-08-01

    We review the theoretical foundations and the most important physical applications of the Pinch Technique (PT). This general method allows the construction of off-shell Green’s functions in non-Abelian gauge theories that are independent of the gauge-fixing parameter and satisfy ghost-free Ward identities. We first present the diagrammatic formulation of the technique in QCD, deriving, at one loop, the gauge independent gluon self-energy, quark-gluon vertex, and three-gluon vertex, together with their Abelian Ward identities. The generalization of the PT to theories with spontaneous symmetry breaking is carried out in detail, and the profound connection with the optical theorem and the dispersion relations are explained within the electroweak sector of the Standard Model. The equivalence between the PT and the Feynman gauge of the Background Field Method (BFM) is elaborated, and the crucial differences between the two methods are critically scrutinized. A variety of field theoretic techniques needed for the generalization of the PT to all orders are introduced, with particular emphasis on the Batalin-Vilkovisky quantization method and the general formalism of algebraic renormalization. The main conceptual and technical issues related to the extension of the technique beyond one loop are described, using the two-loop construction as a concrete example. Then the all-order generalization is thoroughly examined, making extensive use of the field theoretic machinery previously introduced; of central importance in this analysis is the demonstration that the PT-BFM correspondence persists to all orders in perturbation theory. The extension of the PT to the non-perturbative domain of the QCD Schwinger-Dyson equations is presented systematically, and the main advantages of the resulting self-consistent truncation scheme are discussed. A plethora of physical applications relying on the PT are finally reviewed, with special emphasis on the definition of gauge

  9. Multiwire X Pinches on the COBRA Pulsed Power Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; Pikuz, Sergey A.; Douglass, Jonathan D.; McBride, Ryan D.; Hammer, David A.

    2006-01-05

    The rebuilt COBRA pulsed power generator, which has a variable current pulse waveform and amplitude (90-150 ns rise time, 0.6 - 1 MA) has extended the range of current pulse parameters that can be used to study X pinches. X pinches with 2 to 12 wires with diameters from 25 to 75 {mu}m of several different wire materials (from Al to W) have been studied. The influence of different current shapes on X pinch plasma formation and pinch implosion dynamics has been studied using a set of diagnostics with spatial and/or temporal resolution. Multiwire X pinches were placed in the diode center and/or two four wire X pinches were places in one of four parallel return current circuits of the diode. Radiographic images of different test objects, wires in the array and the X pinches, themselves, were obtained with {mu}m scale spatial resolution.

  10. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The sample cell at the heart of CVX-2 will sit inside a thermostat providing three layers of insulation. The cell itself comprises a copper body that conducts heat efficiently and smoothes out thermal variations that that would destroy the xenon's uniformity. Inside the cell, the oscillating screen viscometer element is supported between two pairs of electrodes that deflect the screen and then measure screen motion.

  11. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2001 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The thermostat for CVX sits inside the white cylinder on a support structure that is placed inside a pressure canister. A similar canister holds the electronics and control systems. The CVX-2 arrangement is identical. The principal investigator is Dr. Robert F. Berg (not shown) of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD. This is a detail view of MSFC 0100143.

  12. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Because xenon near the critical point will collapse under its own weight, experiments on Earth (green line) are limited as they get closer (toward the left) to the critical point. CVX in the microgravity of space (red line) moved into unmeasured territory that scientists had not been able to reach.

  13. Critical exponent for viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.

    1990-01-01

    The critical exponent y characterizing the divergence of the viscosity for carbon dioxide and xenon has been measured. The values of y for both fluids fall within the range y = 0.041 + or - 0.001 and are consistent with the range y = 0.042 + or - 0.002 spanned by earlier data for four binary liquid mixtures. This agreement is the strongest evidence that pure fluids and binary liquids are in the same dynamic universality class; however, the results for y are inconsistent with the recent theoretical value of 0.032.

  14. General process improvements through pinch technology

    SciTech Connect

    Linnhoff, B.; Polley, G.T.; Sahdev, V.

    1988-06-01

    Over the last ten years pinch technology has emerged as somewhat of a ''maverick'' development in the process design and energy conservation scene. Running contrary to general trends by taking the computer out of the loop and putting the engineer back in control, it has been questioned by some and welcomed by others. Regardless of persuasion, however, critics and advocates alike have largely failed to notice that pinch technology is more than an energy conservation tool. This is probably because soon after the advent of pinch technology in the 1970s, the process design scene became dominated by the oil crisis. Energy savings became the primary task of process designers and, therefore, the primary focus of the technology. Application during this period typically demonstrated energy cost savings in the range of 20 to 50 percent and payback periods of one year or less. Only recently have the other benefits of the technology reemerged. While it is true that pinch technology is essentially a heat-flow-based technique it is also true that it can be used to address a very diverse range of objectives.

  15. Dynamics of hybrid X-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Shelkovenko, T. A.; Tilikin, I. N.; Ivanenkov, G. V.; Stepniewski, W.; Mingaleev, A. R.; Romanova, V. M.; Agafonov, A. V.; Cahill, A. D.; Hoyt, C. L.; Gourdain, P. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Pikuz, S. A.

    2015-01-15

    The dynamics of a new type of pinches—hybrid X-pinches (HXPs)—has been studied experimentally and numerically. The initial configuration of an HXP consists of a high-current diode with conical tungsten electrodes separated by a 1- to 3-mm-long gap and shunted with a 20- to 100-μm diameter wire. It was shown earlier that a hot spot (HS) with high plasma parameters also formed in the HXP, although its initial configuration is simpler than that of a standard X-pinch. Although details of the HXP dynamics still remain insufficiently studied, the main factors governing the HXP formation were investigated both experimentally and using magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The formation of a specific pressure profile in the electrode plasma after the wire explosion was investigated both experimentally and theoretically. It is shown that the effect of the pressure profile on the expanding wire plasma is similar for both standard X-pinches and HXPs, which allows one to assign them to the same class of loads of pulsed facilities. It is also established that the final stages of HS formation and the parameters of the HS plasma in standard X-pinches and HXPs are practically identical.

  16. Spectroscopic study in Z-pinch discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Garamoon, A.A.; Saudy, A.H.; Shark, W.

    1995-12-31

    The temporal variation of the emitted line intensity has been investigated, and thus an important information about the dynamic ionization stages in the Z-pinch discharge has been studied. Also the electron temperature Te, has been deduced by using a spectroscopic technique.

  17. The Pinch Pot Technique and Raku.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demery, Marie

    Since the 16th century, the small Japanese raku tea bowl has reflected the merged cultural influences of art, religion, and other countries on the art of Japanese pottery. Artistically, the bowl is a combination of ceramics (pinching) and sculpture (carving). The dictates of the Zen Buddhist tea masters determine its sculptural process and steps,…

  18. Magnetic pinch compression of silica glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, S. J.

    1974-01-01

    SiO2 glass has been irreversibly densified by pressures up to 250 kbar produced in a magnetic pinch apparatus. The threshold for significant densification was about 60 kbar. The recovered densities agree better with published shock wave results than with static results.

  19. Viscosity of Hydrous Rhyolitic Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Xu, Z.; Liu, Y.

    2002-12-01

    It is critical to understand and to be able to predict viscosity of hydrous silicate melts for understanding magma transport, bubble growth, volcanic eruptions, and magma fragmentation. We report new viscosity data for hydrous rhyolitic melt in the viscosity range of 109 to 1015 Pa s based on the kinetics of hydrous species reaction in the melt upon cooling (i.e., based on the equivalence between the glass transition temperature and the apparent equilibrium temperature). We also report viscosity data obtained from bubble growth experiments. Our data show that the viscosity model of Hess and Dingwell (1996) systematically overestimates the viscosity of hydrous rhyolitic melt at the high viscosity range by a factor of 2 to 4 (still within their stated 2σ uncertainty). Another problem with the model of Hess and Dingwell is that the functional dependence of viscosity on total H2O content cannot be extended to dry melt: as total H2O content decreases to zero, the viscosity would first increase, and then decrease to zero. A zero viscosity for a dry melt makes no sense. Hence we need a mixing law for hydrous melt viscosity that is extendible to dry melts. By examining the viscosity of rhyolitic melts containing 6 ppm to about 8.0 wt% total H2O (both our own data and literature data), we propose the following relation for the dependence of viscosity on total H2O content: 1/η = 1/η 1+(1/η 2-1/η 1)xn ≈ 1/η 1+xn/η 2 where η is viscosity and 1/η is fluidity, η 1 is the viscosity of the dry melt, x is the mole fraction of total dissolved H2O, n and η 2 are two fitting parameters, and η 2 can be identified to be the viscosity of the hypothetical melt consisting of pure H2O (η 2 cannot be directly measured since such a melt does not exist). The above equation appears to work well for the viscosity of hydrous rhyolitic melts. By fitting hydrous rhyolitic melt viscosity with the above equation, we find that rhyolitic melt viscosity vary by 1.2 orders of magnitude

  20. Development of viscosity sensor with long period fiber grating technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jyh-Dong; Wang, Jian-Neng; Chen, Shih-Huang; Wang, Juei-Mao

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of a viscosity sensing system using a simple and low-cost long-period fiber grating (LPFG) sensor. The LPFG sensor was extremely sensitive to the refractive index of the medium surrounding the cladding surface of the sensing grating, thus allowing it to be used as an ambient index sensor or chemical concentration indicator. Viscosity can be simply defined as resistance to flow of a liquid. We have measured asphalt binder, 100-190000 centistokes, in comparison with optical sensing results. The system sensing asphalt binders exhibited increase trend in the resonance wavelength shift when the refractive index of the medium changed. The prototype sensor consisted of a LPFG sensing component and a cone-shaped reservoir where gravitational force can cause asphalt binders flow through the capillary. Thus the measured time for a constant volume of asphalt binders can be converted into either absolute or kinematic viscosity. In addition, a rotational viscometer and a dynamic shear rheometer were also used to evaluate the viscosity of this liquid, the ratio between the applied shear stress and rate of shear, as well as the viscoelastic property including complex shear modulus and phase angle. The measured time could be converted into viscosity of asphalt binder based on calculation. This simple LPFG viscosity sensing system is hopefully expected to benefit the viscosity measurement for the field of civil, mechanical and aerospace engineering.

  1. Measurements of velocity shear and ion viscosity profile in a magnetohydrodynamic plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, L. A.; Intrator, T.; Sun, X.; Hendryx, J.; Wurden, G. A.; Furno, I.; Lapenta, G.

    2010-10-01

    Time-dependent, two-dimensional profiles of the axial flow velocity, density, electron temperature, and magnetic field components are measured at two axial locations in a screw pinch plasma column of the reconnection scaling experiment. The results show that the ion momentum flux for a given column radius is dissipated by the ion-ion Coulomb scattering viscosity due to a significant radial shear of the axial velocity. By comparing the terms of the magnetohydrodynamic momentum balance equation, radial profile of ion viscosity is determined. Chord-integrated ion temperature measurements performed at several radial locations using Doppler broadening spectroscopy show ion temperature of about 1 eV. Measured ion viscosity agrees within a factor of 2 with the classical Braginskii expectations.

  2. Measurements of velocity shear and ion viscosity profile in a magnetohydrodynamic plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, L. A.; Intrator, T.; Sun, X.; Hendryx, J.; Wurden, G. A.; Furno, I; Lapenta, G.

    2010-10-15

    Time-dependent, two-dimensional profiles of the axial flow velocity, density, electron temperature, and magnetic field components are measured at two axial locations in a screw pinch plasma column of the reconnection scaling experiment. The results show that the ion momentum flux for a given column radius is dissipated by the ion-ion Coulomb scattering viscosity due to a significant radial shear of the axial velocity. By comparing the terms of the magnetohydrodynamic momentum balance equation, radial profile of ion viscosity is determined. Chord-integrated ion temperature measurements performed at several radial locations using Doppler broadening spectroscopy show ion temperature of about 1 eV. Measured ion viscosity agrees within a factor of 2 with the classical Braginskii expectations.

  3. Viscosity of the earth's core.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gans, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation of the viscosity of the core at the boundary of the inner and outer core. It is assumed that this boundary is a melting transition and the viscosity limits of the Andrade (1934,1952) hypothesis (3.7 to 18.5 cp) are adopted. The corresponding kinematic viscosities are such that the precessional system explored by Malkus (1968) would be unstable. Whether it would be sufficiently unstable to overcome a severely subadiabatic temperature gradient cannot be determined.

  4. High-Frequency Shear Viscosity of Low-Viscosity Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaatze, U.; Behrends, R.

    2014-11-01

    A thickness shear quartz resonator technique is described to measure the shear viscosity of low-viscosity liquids in the frequency range from 6 MHz to 130 MHz. Examples of shear-viscosity spectra in that frequency range are presented to show that various molecular processes are accompanied by shear-viscosity relaxation. Among these processes are conformational variations of alkyl chains, with relaxation times of about 0.3 ns for -pentadecane and -hexadecane at 25 C. These variations can be well represented in terms of a torsional oscillator model. Also featured briefly are shear-viscosity relaxations associated with fluctuations of hydrogen-bonded clusters in alcohols, for which values between 0.3 ns (-hexanol) and 1.5 ns (-dodecanol) have been found at 25 C. In addition, the special suitability of high-frequency shear-viscosity spectroscopy to the study of critically demixing mixtures is demonstrated by some illustrative examples. Due to slowing, critical fluctuations do not contribute to the shear viscosity at sufficiently high frequencies of measurements so that the non-critical background viscosity of critical systems can be directly determined from high-frequency shear-viscosity spectroscopy. Relaxations in appear also in the shear-viscosity spectra with, for example, 2 ns for the critical triethylamine-water binary mixture at temperatures between 10 C and 18 C. Such relaxations noticeably influence the relaxation rate of order parameter fluctuations. They may be also the reason for the need of a special mesoscopic viscosity when mutual diffusion coefficients of critical polymer solutions are discussed in terms of mode-coupling theory.

  5. Polytropic scaling of a flow Z-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, M. C.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Golingo, R. P.; Claveau, E. L.; Doty, S. A.; Forbes, E. G.; Kim, B.; Ross, M. P.; Weed, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch project investigates the use of velocity shear to mitigate MHD instabilities. The ZaP-HD experiment produces 50 cm long pinches of varying radii. The power to the experiment is split between the plasma formation and acceleration process and the pinch assembly and compression process. Once the pinch is formed, low magnetic fluctuations indicate a quiescent, long-lived pinch. The split power supply allows more control of the pinch current than previous machine iterations, with a designed range from 50 to 150 kA. Radial force balance leads to the Bennett relation which indicates that as the pinch compresses due to increasing currents, the plasma pressure and/or linear density must change. Through ion spectroscopy and digital holographic interferometry coupled with magnetic measurements of the pinch current, the components of the Bennett relation can be fully measured. A scaling relation is then assumed to follow a polytrope as the pinch pressure, initially approximately 250 kPa, increases from an initially formed state to much higher values, approaching 100 MPa. A preliminary analysis of pinch scaling is shown corroborating with other diagnostics on the machine along with extrapolations to required currents for an HEDLP machine. This work is supported by grants from the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration.

  6. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of liquid xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Resembling a tiny bit of window screen, the oscillator at the heart of CVX-2 will vibrate between two pairs of paddle-like electrodes. The slight bend in the shape of the mesh has no effect on the data. What counts are the mesh's displacement in the xenon fluid and the rate at which the displacement dampens. The unit shown here is encased in a small test cell and capped with a sapphire windown to contain the xenon at high pressure.

  7. Viscosity measuring instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinstein, S. P. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for enabling the measurement of the viscosity of substances, especially those containing volatiles at elevated temperatures, with greater accuracy and at less cost than before. The apparatus includes a cylinder with a narrow exit opening at one end and a piston which closely slides within the cylinder to apply force against a sample in the cylinder to force the sample through the exit opening. In order to more rapidly heat a sample the ends of the cylinder and piston are tapered and the sample is correspondingly tapered, to provide a large surface to volume ratio. A corresponding coal sample is formed by compressing particles of coal under high pressure in a mold of appropriate shape.

  8. Methods of Viscosity Measurements in Sealed Ampoules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    1999-01-01

    Viscosity of semiconductor and metallic melts is usually measured by oscillating cup method. This method utilizes the melts contained in vacuum sealed silica ampoules, thus the problems related to volatility, contamination, and high temperature and pressure can be alleviated. In a typical design, the time required for a single measurement is of the order of one hour. In order to reduce this time to a minute range, a high resolution (0.05 arc.sec) angular detection system is implemented in our design of the viscometer. Furthermore, an electromagnet generating a rotational magnetic field (RMF) is incorporated into the apparatus. This magnetic field can be used to remotely and non intrusively measure the electrical conductivity of the melt. It can also be used to induce a well controlled rotational flow in the system. The transient behavior of this flow can potentially yield the viscosity of the fluid. Based on RMF implementation, two novel viscometry methods are proposed in this work: a) the transient torque method, b) the resonance method. A unified theoretical approach to the three methods (oscillating cup, transient torque, and resonance) is presented along with the initial test results of the constructed apparatus. Advantages of each of the method are discussed.

  9. Effective viscosity of magnetic nanofluids through capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Rajesh

    2012-02-01

    The simultaneous effect of magnetic field and temperature on the capillary viscosity of magnetic nanofluid is an important parameter for a new class of applications such as nanoduct flow, nanomotors, micro- and nanofluidic devices, for transformer cooling, magnetic targeted drug delivery, etc. The effective viscosity of a nanofluid is explained based on the rotation of the particles and the effect of torque on it due to an externally applied magnetic field. Two types of fluids are used here, temperature-sensitive and non-temperature-sensitive magnetic nanofluids. In both types of fluids, decrease in effective viscosity with temperature is observed, but in both cases the mechanism for the decrement is quite different. One is due to temperature dependence of the magnetic moment and the other is due to removal of the secondary surfactant. For temperature-sensitive magnetic nanofluids, a Curie temperature of ˜80 ∘C is extracted from this study. For non-temperature-sensitive magnetic nanofluids ˜65% of the secondary surfactant is removed for a change in temperature, ΔT = 40 ∘C. This is analogous with removal of a drug from magnetic particles for targeted drug delivery. Further, a linear dependence of effective viscosity with different capillary size and ξ (angle between magnetic field and flow direction, ξ∈[0,π/2]) is also observed. This linear dependence can also be a good approximation for the study of magnetic drug targeting, as in the human body the capillaries are of different sizes, and the externally applied magnetic field is not always parallel or perpendicular to the drug flow direction.

  10. Effective viscosity of magnetic nanofluids through capillaries.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rajesh

    2012-02-01

    The simultaneous effect of magnetic field and temperature on the capillary viscosity of magnetic nanofluid is an important parameter for a new class of applications such as nanoduct flow, nanomotors, micro- and nanofluidic devices, for transformer cooling, magnetic targeted drug delivery, etc. The effective viscosity of a nanofluid is explained based on the rotation of the particles and the effect of torque on it due to an externally applied magnetic field. Two types of fluids are used here, temperature-sensitive and non-temperature-sensitive magnetic nanofluids. In both types of fluids, decrease in effective viscosity with temperature is observed, but in both cases the mechanism for the decrement is quite different. One is due to temperature dependence of the magnetic moment and the other is due to removal of the secondary surfactant. For temperature-sensitive magnetic nanofluids, a Curie temperature of ~80 °C is extracted from this study. For non-temperature-sensitive magnetic nanofluids ~65% of the secondary surfactant is removed for a change in temperature, ΔT = 40 °C. This is analogous with removal of a drug from magnetic particles for targeted drug delivery. Further, a linear dependence of effective viscosity with different capillary size and ξ (angle between magnetic field and flow direction, ξε[0,π/2]) is also observed. This linear dependence can also be a good approximation for the study of magnetic drug targeting, as in the human body the capillaries are of different sizes, and the externally applied magnetic field is not always parallel or perpendicular to the drug flow direction. PMID:22463326

  11. Volatiles Which Increase Magma Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S.

    2015-12-01

    The standard model of an erupting volcano is one in which the viscosity of a decompressing magma increases as the volatiles leave the melt structure to form bubbles. It has now been observed that the addition of the "volatiles" P, Cl and F result in an increase in silicate melt viscosity. This observation would mean that the viscosity of selected degassing magmas would decrease rather than increase. Here we look at P, Cl and F as three volatiles which increase viscosity through different structural mechanisms. In all three cases the volatiles increase the viscosity of peralkaline composition melts, but appear to always decrease the viscosity of peraluminous melts. Phosphorus causes the melt to unmix into a Na-P rich phase and a Na-poor silicate phase. Thus as the network modifying Na (or Ca) are removed to the phosphorus-rich melt, the matrix melt viscosity increases. With increasing amounts of added phosphorus (at network modifying Na ~ P) the addition of further phosphorus causes a decrease in viscosity. The addition of chlorine to Fe-free aluminosilicate melts results in an increase in viscosity. NMR data on these glass indicates that the chlorine sits in salt-like structures surrounded by Na and/or Ca. Such structures would remove network-modifying atoms from the melt structure and thus result in an increase in viscosity. The NMR spectra of fluorine-bearing glasses shows that F takes up at least 5 different structural positions in peralkaline composition melts. Three of these positions should result in a decrease in viscosity due to the removal of bridging oxygens. Two of the structural positons of F, however, should result in an increase in viscosity as they require the removal of network-modifying atoms from the melt structure (with one of the structures being that observed for Cl). This would imply that increasing amounts of F might result in an increase in viscosity. This proposed increase in viscosity with increasing F has now been experimentally confirmed.

  12. Staged Z-pinch for Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, Frank; Rahman, Hafiz; Ney, Paul; Darling, Tim; McKee, Erik; Covington, Aaron; Beg, Farhat; Valenzuela, Julio; Narkis, Jeff; Presura, Radu

    2015-11-01

    The Staged Z-pinch (SZP) is configured as a plasma shell imploding onto an uniform, plasma fill (50:50 Deuterium:Tritium); the pinch is pre-magnetized, with an axial Bz field. Gas-puff experiments, at the University of California, Irvine, 1.25 MA, 1.25 μs, and 50 kJ, demonstrated that the implosion was stable, as primary (DD) and secondary (DT) neutrons were produced at peak compression. Subsequent analysis accounts for the stability and neutron yield, indicating that the SZP implosion is magneto-inertial, shock-driven, with magneto-sonic shocks in the liner and ordinary (sonic) shocks in the target. The shock waves preheat the target, as a stable, current-carrying, shock front forms at the interface. Near-term, the SZP team will test pinch loads on the 1 MA, 130 ns, 100 kJ University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada Terawatt, Zebra Facility. This paper details the context and our specific plans for the upcoming experiments, as well as our recent simulations predicting breakeven fusion on existing devices. Funded by the US Department of Energy, ARPA-E, Control Number 1184-1527.

  13. Conservative smoothing versus artificial viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, C.; Hicks, D.L.; Swegle, J.W.

    1994-08-01

    This report was stimulated by some recent investigations of S.P.H. (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method). Solid dynamics computations with S.P.H. show symptoms of instabilities which are not eliminated by artificial viscosities. Both analysis and experiment indicate that conservative smoothing eliminates the instabilities in S.P.H. computations which artificial viscosities cannot. Questions were raised as to whether conservative smoothing might smear solutions more than artificial viscosity. Conservative smoothing, properly used, can produce more accurate solutions than the von Neumann-Richtmyer-Landshoff artificial viscosity which has been the standard for many years. The authors illustrate this using the vNR scheme on a test problem with known exact solution involving a shock collision in an ideal gas. They show that the norms of the errors with conservative smoothing are significantly smaller than the norms of the errors with artificial viscosity.

  14. Anomalous - viscosity current drive

    DOEpatents

    Stix, Thomas H.; Ono, Masayuki

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus and method for maintaining a steady-state current in a toroidal magnetically confined plasma. An electric current is generated in an edge region at or near the outermost good magnetic surface of the toroidal plasma. The edge current is generated in a direction parallel to the flow of current in the main plasma and such that its current density is greater than the average density of the main plasma current. The current flow in the edge region is maintained in a direction parallel to the main current for a period of one or two of its characteristic decay times. Current from the edge region will penetrate radially into the plasma and augment the main plasma current through the mechanism of anomalous viscosity. In another aspect of the invention, current flow driven between a cathode and an anode is used to establish a start-up plasma current. The plasma-current channel is magnetically detached from the electrodes, leaving a plasma magnetically insulated from contact with any material obstructions including the cathode and anode.

  15. On the magnetic viscosity in Keplerian accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.

    1981-01-01

    The paper develops a model for the anomalous viscosity in accretion disks based on the hypothesis that the hydrodynamic turbulence within the disk takes the form of spatially localized magnetic flux cells. The local shear flow due to Keplerian differential rotation distorts the flux cell topology, converting shear flow energy into magnetic energy. In the radial diffusion approximation, the kinematic viscosity is estimated from the radial displacement and is shown to maximize at flux cell scale lengths for which the shear flow stopping and reconnection times are equal.

  16. ZBLAN Viscosity Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William

    2001-01-01

    The past year's contribution from Dr. Kaukler's experimental effort consists of these 5 parts: a) Construction and proof-of-concept testing of a novel shearing plate viscometer designed to produce small shear rates and operate at elevated temperatures; b) Preparing nonlinear polymeric materials to serve as standards of nonlinear Theological behavior; c) Measurements and evaluation of above materials for nonlinear rheometric behavior at room temperature using commercial spinning cone and plate viscometers available in the lab; d) Preparing specimens from various forms of pitch for quantitative comparative testing in a Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer, Thermal Mechanical Analyzer; and Archeological Analyzer; e) Arranging to have sets of pitch specimens tested using the various instruments listed above, from different manufacturers, to form a baseline of the viscosity variation with temperature using the different test modes offered by these instruments by compiling the data collected from the various test results. Our focus in this project is the shear thinning behavior of ZBLAN glass over a wide range of temperature. Experimentally, there are no standard techniques to perform such measurements on glasses, particularly at elevated temperatures. Literature reviews to date have shown that shear thinning in certain glasses appears to occur, but no data is available for ZBLAN glass. The best techniques to find shear thinning behavior require the application of very low rates of shear. In addition, because the onset of the thinning behavior occurs at an unknown elevated temperature, the instruments used in this study must provide controlled low rates of shear and do so for temperatures approaching 600 C. In this regard, a novel shearing parallel plate viscometer was designed and a prototype built and tested.

  17. Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement (FMVM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Astronaut Mike Fincke places droplets of honey onto the strings for the Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement (FMVM) investigation onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The FMVM experiment measures the time it takes for two individual highly viscous fluid droplets to coalesce or merge into one droplet. Different fluids and droplet size combinations were tested in the series of experiments. By using the microgravity environment, researchers can measure the viscosity or 'thickness' of fluids without the influence of containers and gravity using this new technique. Understanding viscosity could help scientists understand industrially important materials such as paints, emulsions, polymer melts and even foams used to produce pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic products.

  18. Critical Viscosity of Xenon investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Dr. Robert F. Berg (right), principal investigator and Dr. Micheal R. Moldover (left), co-investigator, for the Critical Viscosity of Xenon (CVX/CVX-2) experiment. They are with the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Although it does not easily combine with other chemicals, its viscosity at the critical point can be used as a model for a range of chemicals.

  19. Viscosity Depressants for Coal Liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalfayan, S. H.

    1983-01-01

    Proposed process modification incorporates viscosity depressants to prevent coal from solidifying during liquefaction. Depressants reduce amount of heat needed to liquefy coal. Possible depressants are metallic soaps, such as stearate, and amides, such as stearamide and dimer acid amides.

  20. A Experimental Study of the Dynamics of X-Pinch and Z-Pinch Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalantar, Daniel Husayn

    X-pinch experiments have been carried out using 12 to 100 μm diameter Al wires with peak currents of 330 to 380 kA. Two wires were placed between the output electrodes of a low inductance pulser so as to cross and touch at a single point, resulting in intense K-shell soft x-ray radiation from a sub-millimeter high temperature (300 to 700 eV) and density (2 times 10^{19} to 1 times 10^{21 } cm^{-3}) plasma at the cross point. Single wire z-pinch experiments were conducted for comparison. Additional x-pinch experiments were carried out using up to eight wires at peak currents from 280 kA to 1.0 MA. Intense soft x-ray emission from the cross region occurs in short bursts. Filtered GaAs:Cr photoconducting diodes and streaked x-ray pinhole images show individual bursts lasting <=1 ns. Time-integrated K-shell spectra obtained with a curved KAP crystal spectrograph were used to determine the electron temperature and density for individual bright spots. A sub-ns pulsed nitrogen laser was used for time -resolved schlieren and interferometry measurements of the unstable expansion of a coronal plasma that develops around the wires. The implosion and re-expansion of the corona at the x-pinch cross region was observed immediately prior to x-ray emission. Jets of plasma were ejected along the axis, as recorded in schlieren images and visible light frame images. Late in the pulse, gaps formed along the axis with electron density <=5 times 10^{17} cm^{-3}. Spectra indicated the presence of electron beams carrying the current in these gaps. Interferometry measurements provided the electron density profile late in the current pulse. Individual bursts of x-ray emission from one x -pinch were used to record a shadow of the dense core plasma at the initial wire position of a parallel x-pinch or z -pinch. This core expanded uniformly within the corona, surviving until it was disrupted by the implosion of the corona prior to soft x-ray emission. The Bennett relation is used to estimate

  1. Investigation on the pinch point position in heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Lisheng; Shi, Weixiu

    2016-06-01

    The pinch point is important for analyzing heat transfer in thermodynamic cycles. With the aim to reveal the importance of determining the accurate pinch point, the research on the pinch point position is carried out by theoretical method. The results show that the pinch point position depends on the parameters of the heat transfer fluids and the major fluid properties. In most cases, the pinch point locates at the bubble point for the evaporator and the dew point for the condenser. However, the pinch point shifts to the supercooled liquid state in the near critical conditions for the evaporator. Similarly, it shifts to the superheated vapor state with the condensing temperature approaching the critical temperature for the condenser. It even can shift to the working fluid entrance of the evaporator or the supercritical heater when the heat source fluid temperature is very high compared with the absorbing heat temperature. A wrong position for the pinch point may generate serious mistake. In brief, the pinch point should be founded by the iterative method in all conditions rather than taking for granted.

  2. Nonlocal Transport in the Reversed Field Pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Spizzo, G.; White, R. B.; Cappello, S.; Marrelli, L.

    2009-09-21

    Several heuristic models for nonlocal transport in plasmas have been developed, but they have had a limited possibility of detailed comparision with experimental data. Nonlocal aspects introduced by the existence of a known spectrum of relatively stable saturated tearing modes in a low current reversed field pinch offers a unique possibility for such a study. A numerical modelling of the magnetic structure and associated particle transport is carried out for the reversed-field pinch experiment at the Consorzio RFX, Padova, Italy. A reproduction of the tearing mode spectrum with a guiding center code1 reliably reproduces the observed soft X-ray tomography. Following particle trajectories in the stochastic magnetic field shows the transport across the unperturbed flux surfaces to be due to a spectrum of Levy flights, with the details of the spectrum position dependent. The resulting transport is subdiffusive, and cannot be described by Rechester-Rosenbluth diffusion, which depends on a random phase approximation. If one attempts to fit the local transport phenomenologically, the subdiffusion can be fit with a combination of diffusion and inward pinch2. It is found that whereas passing particles explore the stochastic field and hence participate in Levy flights, the trapped particles experience normal neoclassical diffusion. A two fluid nonlocal Montroll equation is used to model this transport, with a Levy flight defined as the motion of an ion during the period that the pitch has one sign. The necessary input to the Montroll equation consists of a time distribution for the Levy flights, given by the pitch angle scattering operator, and a distribution of the flight distances, determined numerically using a guiding center code. Results are compared to experiment. The relation of this formulation to fractional kinetics is also described.

  3. Parallel X pinches on the 1 MA COBRA pulser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Hoyt, C. L.; Greenly, J. B.; Wilhelm, H.; Hammer, D. A.

    2009-11-01

    Two standard and nested X pinches have been tested in parallel as the load on the 1MA, 100 ns risetime COBRA pulsed power generator at Cornell University. The spatial, temporal, and spectral parameters of the X pinches were studied using laser-based imaging, time gated XUV-sensitive cameras, a slit-step-wedge and pinhole cameras, X-ray spectroscopy and x-ray radiography. The latter includes testing a new method of point-projection quasi-monochromatic radiography. Electrical cross-talk of the X pinches was studied using very small B-dot probes placed in the space between X-pinches. The experiments show that the parallel nested x-pinches produce smaller, brighter and more stable x-ray source points than the standard configuration.

  4. Effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation on force of finger pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odagaki, Masato; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Hiwaki, Osamu

    2009-04-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is used to explore many aspects of brain function, and to treat neurological disorders. Cortical motor neuronal activation by TMS over the primary motor cortex (M1) produces efferent signals that pass through the corticospinal tracts. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) are observed in muscles innervated by the stimulated motor cortex. TMS can cause a silent period (SP) following MEP in voluntary electromyography (EMG). The present study examined the effects of TMS eliciting MEP and SP on the force of pinching using two fingers. Subjects pinched a wooden block with the thumb and index finger. TMS was applied to M1 during the pinch task. EMG of first dorsal interosseous muscles and pinch forces were measured. Force output increased after the TMS, and then oscillated. The results indicated that the motor control system to keep isotonic forces of the muscles participated in the finger pinch was disrupted by the TMS.

  5. What is a Reversed Field Pinch?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escande, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Short description * Usefulness of the RFP configuration for fusion science and dynamo physics * Attractivity of the RFP configuration for a reactor * Challenges ahead * Lawson criterion * Intuitive model of magnetic self-reversal * Intuitive description of the dynamo * Necessity of a helical deformation * MHD simulations * From single to multiple helicity * Single helicity * Multiple helicity * Quasi single helicity * Experimental results * Multiple helicity * Quasi single helicity * Upgrade of the RFX device * From double to single magnetic axis * Analytical description of the single helicity RFP * Helical Grad-Shafranov equation * Parallel Ohm's law * Pinch-stellarator equation * Single helicity ohmic RFP states * Calculation of the dynamo * Conclusion * Acknowledgments * References

  6. Structural Basis of Competition Between PINCH1 and PINCH2 for Binding to the Ankyrin Repeat Domain of Integrin-linked Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Chiswell, B.; Steigler, A; Razinia, Z; Nalibotski, E; Boggon, T; Calderwood, D

    2010-01-01

    Formation of a heterotrimeric IPP complex composed of integrin-linked kinase (ILK), the LIM domain protein PINCH, and parvin is important for signaling through integrin adhesion receptors. Mammals possess two PINCH genes that are expressed simultaneously in many tissues. PINCH1 and PINCH2 have overlapping functions and can compensate for one another in many settings; however, isoform-specific functions have been reported and it is proposed that association with a PINCH1- or PINCH2-containing IPP complex may provide a bifurcation point in integrin signaling promoting different cellular responses. Here we report that the LIM1 domains of PINCH1 and PINCH2 directly compete for the same binding site on the ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) of ILK. We determined the 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of the PINCH2 LIM1 domain complexed with the ARD of ILK, and show that disruption of this interface by point mutagenesis reduces binding in vitro and alters localization of PINCH2 in cells. These studies provide further evidence for the role of the PINCH LIM1 domain in association with ILK and highlight direct competition as one mechanism for regulating which PINCH isoform predominates in IPP complexes. Differential regulation of PINCH1 and PINCH2 expression may therefore provide a means for altering cellular integrin signaling pathways.

  7. Age-Related and Sex-Related Differences in Hand and Pinch Grip Strength in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puh, Urska

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to quantify age-related changes in hand grip strength and three types of pinch grip strength (key pinch, tip pinch, and palmar pinch) among male and female participants. The study included 199 healthy participants (100 females, 99 males) aged 20-79 years, who were divided into four age groups. The Baseline Hydraulic…

  8. Fusion Propulsion Z-Pinch Engine Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miernik, J.; Statham, G.; Fabisinski, L.; Maples, C. D.; Adams, R.; Polsgrove, T.; Fincher, S.; Cassibry, J.; Cortez, R.; Turner, M.; Percy, T.

    2011-01-01

    Fusion-based nuclear propulsion has the potential to enable fast interplanetary transportation. Due to the great distances between the planets of our solar system and the harmful radiation environment of interplanetary space, high specific impulse (Isp) propulsion in vehicles with high payload mass fractions must be developed to provide practical and safe vehicles for human spaceflight missions. The Z-Pinch dense plasma focus method is a Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) approach that may potentially lead to a small, low cost fusion reactor/engine assembly1. Recent advancements in experimental and theoretical understanding of this concept suggest favorable scaling of fusion power output yield 2. The magnetic field resulting from the large current compresses the plasma to fusion conditions, and this process can be pulsed over short timescales (10(exp -6 sec). This type of plasma formation is widely used in the field of Nuclear Weapons Effects testing in the defense industry, as well as in fusion energy research. A Decade Module 2 (DM2), approx.500 KJ pulsed-power is coming to the RSA Aerophysics Lab managed by UAHuntsville in January, 2012. A Z-Pinch propulsion concept was designed for a vehicle based on a previous fusion vehicle study called "Human Outer Planet Exploration" (HOPE), which used Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) 3 propulsion. The reference mission is the transport of crew and cargo to Mars and back, with a reusable vehicle.

  9. Rotating reactor studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Glyn O.

    1991-01-01

    Undesired gravitational effects such as convection or sedimentation in a fluid can sometimes be avoided or decreased by the use of a closed chamber uniformly rotated about a horizontal axis. In a previous study, the spiral orbits of a heavy or buoyant particle in a uniformly rotating fluid were determined. The particles move in circles, and spiral in or out under the combined effects of the centrifugal force and centrifugal buoyancy. A optimization problem for the rotation rate of a cylindrical reactor rotated about its axis and containing distributed particles was formulated and solved. Related studies in several areas are addressed. A computer program based on the analysis was upgraded by correcting some minor errors, adding a sophisticated screen-and-printer graphics capability and other output options, and by improving the automation. The design, performance, and analysis of a series of experiments with monodisperse polystyrene latex microspheres in water were supported to test the theory and its limitations. The theory was amply confirmed at high rotation rates. However, at low rotation rates (1 rpm or less) the assumption of uniform solid-body rotation of the fluid became invalid, and there were increasingly strong secondary motions driven by variations in the mean fluid density due to variations in the particle concentration. In these tests the increase in the mean fluid density due to the particles was of order 0.015 percent. To a first approximation, these flows are driven by the buoyancy in a thin crescent-shaped depleted layer on the descending side of the rotating reactor. This buoyancy distribution is balanced by viscosity near the walls, and by the Coriolis force in the interior. A full analysis is beyond the scope of this study. Secondary flows are likely to be stronger for buoyant particles, which spiral in towards the neutral point near the rotation axis under the influence of their centrifugal buoyancy. This is because the depleted layer is

  10. Viscosities of aqueous blended amines

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.H.; Li, M.H.

    1997-07-01

    Solutions of alkanolamines are an industrially important class of compounds used in the natural gas, oil refineries, petroleum chemical plants, and synthetic ammonia industries for the removal of acidic components like CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S from gas streams. The viscosities of aqueous mixtures of diethanolamine (DEA) + N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), DEA + 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP), and monoethanolamine (MEA) + 2-piperidineethanol (2-PE) were measured from 30 C to 80 C. A Redlich-Kister equation for the viscosity deviation was applied to represent the viscosity. On the basis of the available viscosity data for five ternary systems, MEA + MDEA + H{sub 2}O, MEA + AMP + H{sub 2}O, DEA + MDEA + H{sub 2}O, DEA + AMP + H{sub 2}O, and MEA + 2-PE + H{sub 2}O, a generalized set of binary parameters were determined. For the viscosity calculation of the systems tested, the overall average absolute percent deviation is about 1.0% for a total of 499 data points.

  11. Optimum pinch grips in the handling of dies.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, C; Freivalds, A

    2000-08-01

    Handling roller-press dies has caused numerous work-related musculoskeletal disorders in the leather industry. The dies are quite large (0.61 x 0.30 m), heavy (3.5 kg) and are difficult to handle because of the large pinch span requirements (up to 16 cm). The purpose of this study was to determine the optimum pinch span and optimum crossbar angulation to minimize die handling forces. Five-finger pulp-pinch forces were measured on five males and five females with a force-sensitive-resistor instrumented glove while handling a simulated adjustable die. Maximum pinch forces occurred at pinch spans between 1.27 and 3.81 cm, with average female strengths being 57% of average male pinch strengths. Minimum pinch forces to hold the die occurred at a 45 degrees angulation and increased linearly as the angle approached 90 degrees or the normal vertical orientation. The simplest solution to redesigning the dies is to: (1) decrease the distance between the braces to less than 4 cm and (2) slant the braces at 45 degrees. PMID:10975667

  12. Linear pinch driven by a moving compact torus

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, C.W.; Hammer, J.H.; Eddleman, J.L.

    1984-04-25

    In principle, a Z-pinch of sufficiently large aspect ratio can provide arbitrarily high magnetic field intensity for the confinement of plasma. In practice, however, achievable field intensities and timescales are limited by parasitic inductances, pulse driver power, current, voltage, and voltage standoff of nearby insulating surfaces or surrounding gas. Further, instabilities may dominate to prevent high fields (kink mode) or enhance them (sausage mode) but in a nonuniform and uncontrollable way. In this paper we discuss an approach to producing a high-field-intensity pinch using a moving compact torus. The moving torus can serve as a very high power driver and may be used to compress a pre-established pinch field, switch on an accelerating pinch field, or may itself be reconfigured to form an intense pinch. In any case, the high energy, high energy density, and high velocity possible with an accelerated compact torus can provide extremely high power to overcome, by a number of orders of magnitude, the limitations to pinch formation described earlier. In this paper we will consider in detail pinches formed by reconfiguration of the compact torus.

  13. Progress in Z-pinch inertial fusion energy.

    SciTech Connect

    Weed, John Woodruff

    2010-03-01

    The goal of z-pinch inertial fusion energy (IFE) is to extend the single-shot z-pinch inertial confinement fusion (ICF) results on Z to a repetitive-shot z-pinch power plant concept for the economical production of electricity. Z produces up to 1.8 MJ of x-rays at powers as high as 230 TW. Recent target experiments on Z have demonstrated capsule implosion convergence ratios of 14-21 with a double-pinch driven target, and DD neutron yields up to 8x10exp10 with a dynamic hohlraum target. For z-pinch IFE, a power plant concept is discussed that uses high-yield IFE targets (3 GJ) with a low rep-rate per chamber (0.1 Hz). The concept includes a repetitive driver at 0.1 Hz, a Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) to connect the driver to the target, high-yield targets, and a thick-liquid wall chamber. Recent funding by a U.S. Congressional initiative for $4M for FY04 is supporting research on RTLs, repetitive pulsed power drivers, shock mitigation, full RTL cycle planned experiments, high-yield IFE targets, and z-pinch power plant technologies. Recent results of research in all of these areas are discussed, and a Road Map for Z-Pinch IFE is presented.

  14. Analysis of the energetic parameters of a theta pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalcanti, G. H.; Farias, E. E.

    2009-12-15

    This work is devoted to study experimentally the performance of a theta pinch when the number of capacitors and turns of magnetic coil and the diameter of the glass tube are changed. To model the theta pinch a simple RLC circuit is used and the measurement of energy transmission from the bank of capacitors to the plasma is made using few experimental resources. In this work it was analyzed more than 2500 curves with a nonlinear procedure. Our results show that it is possible to design an optimized theta pinch making the appropriated choice of energetic parameters and therefore to reduce the stress of the system.

  15. Kinetic versus ideal magnetohydrodynamic modelling of the resistive wall mode in a reversed field pinch plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulec, M.; Ivanov, I. B.; Heyn, M. F.; Kernbichler, W.

    2012-03-01

    Resistive wall modes (RWMs) are studied within the kinetic model proposed by Heyn et al. [Nucl. Fusion 46, S159 (2006); Phys. Plasmas 18, 022501 (2011)], which accounts for Landau damping, transit-time magnetic pumping, and Coulomb collisions in cylindrical geometry. Results for the reversed field pinch plasma are compared to the magnetohydrodynamic results obtained by Guo et al., [Phys. Plasmas 6, 3868 (1999)]. Stabilization of the external kink mode by an ideal wall as well as stabilization of the resistive wall mode by toroidal plasma rotation is obtained. In contrast to MHD modelling, which predicts a stability window for the resistive wall position, kinetic modelling predicts a one sided window only, i.e., the resistive wall must be sufficiently close to plasma to achieve rotational stabilization of the mode but there is no lower limit on the wall position. Stabilizing rotation speeds are found somewhat smaller when compared to MHD results. In addition, for the present plasma configuration, the kinetic model predicts resistive wall mode stabilization only in one direction of toroidal rotation. In the opposite direction, a destabilizing effect is observed. This is in contrast to MHD where mode stabilization is symmetric with respect to the direction of the toroidal plasma rotation.

  16. Pinching solutions of slender cylindrical jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.; Orellana, Oscar

    1993-01-01

    Simplified equations for slender jets are derived for a circular jet of one fluid flowing into an ambient second fluid, the flow being confined in a circular tank. Inviscid flows are studied which include both surface tension effects and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. For slender jets a coupled nonlinear system of equations is found for the jet shape and the axial velocity jump across it. The equations can break down after a finite time and similarity solutions are constructed, and studied analytically and numerically. The break-ups found pertain to the jet pinching after a finite time, without violation of the slender jet ansatz. The system is conservative and admissible singular solutions are those which conserve the total energy, mass, and momentum. Such solutions are constructed analytically and numerically, and in the case of vortex sheets with no surface tension certain solutions are given in closed form.

  17. Plasma viscosity in spherical ICF implosion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vold, E.; Joglekar, A.; Ortega, M.; Moll, R.; Fenn, D.; Molvig, K.

    2016-05-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) hydrodynamic codes often ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates plasma viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. A Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport, and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation, is used to study differences between ICF implosions with and without plasma viscosity and to examine the role of artificial viscosity in a Lagrangian implosion simulation. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, fuel compression, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and this study suggests that artificial viscosity may provide an unphysical stability in implosion simulations.

  18. Viscosity in spherically symmetric accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Arnab K.

    2003-10-01

    The influence of viscosity on the flow behaviour in spherically symmetric accretion has been studied here. The governing equation chosen has been the Navier-Stokes equation. It has been found that at least for the transonic solution, viscosity acts as a mechanism that detracts from the effectiveness of gravity. This has been conjectured to set up a limiting scale of length for gravity to bring about accretion, and the physical interpretation of such a length scale has been compared with the conventional understanding of the so-called `accretion radius' for spherically symmetric accretion. For a perturbative presence of viscosity, it has also been pointed out that the critical points for inflows and outflows are not identical, which is a consequence of the fact that under the Navier-Stokes prescription, there is a breakdown of the invariance of the stationary inflow and outflow solutions - an invariance that holds good under inviscid conditions. For inflows, the critical point gets shifted deeper within the gravitational potential well. Finally, a linear stability analysis of the stationary inflow solutions, under the influence of a perturbation that is in the nature of a standing wave, has indicated that the presence of viscosity induces greater stability in the system than has been seen for the case of inviscid spherically symmetric inflows.

  19. Anomalous-viscosity current drive

    DOEpatents

    Stix, T.H.; Ono, M.

    1986-04-25

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for maintaining a steady-state current for magnetically confining the plasma in a toroidal magnetic confinement device using anomalous viscosity current drive. A second aspect of this invention relates to an apparatus and method for the start-up of a magnetically confined toroidal plasma.

  20. Hard X-rays from hybrid X pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Shelkovenko, T. A. Pikuz, S. A.; Hoyt, C. L.; Cahill, A. D.; Hammer, D. A.; Tilikin, I. N.; Mingaleev, A. R.; Agafonov, A. V.

    2014-12-15

    X pinches are well known to produce very small, dense plasma pinches (“hot spots”) that emit short bursts of 1.5–8 keV radiation. Hard X-ray radiation in the 8–100 keV range is also emitted, only a small portion of which is associated with the X-pinch hot spot. In hybrid X-pinches, the “long” X-ray pulse is terminated by fast closure of the gap between the two conical electrodes by rapidly expanding electrode plasmas. The temporal, spectral, and spatial properties of this higher energy radiation, 10 – 60 keV, have been studied. This radiation was used for point-projection imaging with magnification between 1.5 and 3, and spatial resolution less than100 micrometers was demonstrated.

  1. Rigid-drift magnetohydrodynamic equilibria for cylindrical screw pinches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, L.

    1979-01-01

    The rigid-drift equations of MHD equilibria in cylindrical geometry are solved analytically in terms of an infinite series of hypergeometric functions for the case where the pressure is proportional to the square of number density and the current density is arbitrarily pitched. Solutions are obtained for a pure Z pinch, a pure theta pinch, and a general screw pinch. It is found that the shapes of the pressure and magnetic-field profiles are completely determined by the model once two parameters are specified: the local plasma beta on the axis and a quantity related to the pitch of the current density. A set of profiles that resemble those observed experimentally in reversed-field pinches is presented. The results also indicate that hollow pressure profiles and reversed Bz profiles can occur either simultaneously or independently and that the pressure always falls to zero at a finite value of the radius.

  2. A Z-Pinch Driven Fusion Reactor Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derzon, Mark; Rochau, Gregory; Spielman, Rick; Slutz, Stephen; Rochau, G. E.; Peterson, R. R.; Peterson, P. F.

    1999-11-01

    Recent z-pinch target physics progress has encouraged us to consider how a power reactor could be configured based on a fast z-pinch driver. Initial cost estimates show that recyclable transmission lines (RTLs) are economically viable. Providing 'standoff' between the primary power supply and the target, which is what disposable RTLs provide, has historically been the main obstacle to the consideration of pinches as fusion drivers. We will be introducing basic reactor scaling in terms of shot rate, yield, tritium breeding and neutron flux, etc. This concept has advantages in that z-pinches provide a robust mechanical environment, as well as a chamber which does not require low-pressure pumping between shots and the wall lifetime is expected to be limited factors other than neutron damage. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. A model code for the radiative theta pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Saw, S. H.; Lee, P. C. K.; Akel, M.; Damideh, V.; Khattak, N. A. D.; Mongkolnavin, R.; Paosawatyanyong, B.

    2014-07-15

    A model for the theta pinch is presented with three modelled phases of radial inward shock phase, reflected shock phase, and a final pinch phase. The governing equations for the phases are derived incorporating thermodynamics and radiation and radiation-coupled dynamics in the pinch phase. A code is written incorporating correction for the effects of transit delay of small disturbing speeds and the effects of plasma self-absorption on the radiation. Two model parameters are incorporated into the model, the coupling coefficient f between the primary loop current and the induced plasma current and the mass swept up factor f{sub m}. These values are taken from experiments carried out in the Chulalongkorn theta pinch.

  4. Turbulent equipartition pinch of toroidal momentum in spherical torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahm, T. S.; Lee, J.; Wang, W. X.; Diamond, P. H.; Choi, G. J.; Na, D. H.; Na, Y. S.; Chung, K. J.; Hwang, Y. S.

    2014-12-01

    We present a new analytic expression for turbulent equipartition (TEP) pinch of toroidal angular momentum originating from magnetic field inhomogeneity of spherical torus (ST) plasmas. Starting from a conservative modern nonlinear gyrokinetic equation (Hahm et al 1988 Phys. Fluids 31 2670), we derive an expression for pinch to momentum diffusivity ratio without using a usual tokamak approximation of B ∝ 1/R which has been previously employed for TEP momentum pinch derivation in tokamaks (Hahm et al 2007 Phys. Plasmas 14 072302). Our new formula is evaluated for model equilibria of National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) (Ono et al 2001 Nucl. Fusion 41 1435) and Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST) (Chung et al 2013 Plasma Sci. Technol. 15 244) plasmas. Our result predicts stronger inward pinch for both cases, as compared to the prediction based on the tokamak formula.

  5. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This paper on titan plasma engineering contains papers on the following topics: reversed-field pinch as a fusion reactor; parametric systems studies; magnetics; burning-plasma simulations; plasma transient operations; current drive; and physics issues for compact RFP reactors.

  6. Timing of x-ray burst from X-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Shen; Zhang, Ran; Zhu, Xinlei; Zou, Xiaobing; Wang, Xinxin

    2015-06-15

    The x-ray burst timings of X-pinches, T{sub XB}, made using eight different wires for different current were measured. The results showed that a higher current makes a shorter T{sub XB} for a given X-pinch wire. In other words, T{sub XB} scales linearly with the line mass density for a given current. Based on the snow-plow model for Z-pinch plasma, it was derived that for a given X-pinch wire the integral of the current over time from zero to T{sub XB} is constant, i.e., ∫{sub 0}{sup T{sub X}{sub B}}i(t)⋅dt=const.. This theoretically derived relation was confirmed by our experiments.

  7. Extensional Relaxation Times and Pinch-off Dynamics of Dilute Polymer Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinic, Jelena; Zhang, Yiran; Jimenez, Leidy; Sharma, Vivek

    2015-11-01

    We show that visualization and analysis of capillary-driven thinning and pinch-off dynamics of the columnar neck in an asymmetric liquid bridge created by dripping-onto-substrate can be used for characterizing the extensional rheology of complex fluids. Using a particular example of dilute, aqueous PEO solutions, we show the measurement of both the extensional relaxation time and extensional viscosity of weakly elastic, polymeric complex fluids with low shear viscosity η< 20 mPa .s and relatively short relaxation time, λ <1 ms. Characterization of elastic effects and extensional relaxation times in these dilute solutions is beyond the range measurable in the standard geometries used in commercially available shear and extensional rheometers (including CaBER, capillary breakup extensional rheometer). As the radius of the neck that connects a sessile drop to a nozzle is detected optically, and the extensional response for viscoelastic fluids is characterized by analyzing their elastocapillary self-thinning, we refer to this technique as optically-detected elastocapillary self-thinning dripping-onto-substrate (ODES-DOS) extensional rheometry.

  8. Influence of toroidal rotation on resistive tearing modes in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W.

    2015-12-01

    Influence of toroidal equilibrium plasma rotation on m/n = 2/1 resistive tearing modes is studied numerically using a 3D toroidal MHD code (CLT). It is found that the toroidal rotation with or without shear can suppress the tearing instability and the Coriolis effect in the toroidal geometry plays a dominant role on the rotation induced stabilization. For a high viscosity plasma (τR/τV ≫ 1, where τR and τV represent resistive and viscous diffusion time, respectively), the effect of the rotation shear combined with the viscosity appears to be stabilizing. For a low viscosity plasmas (τR/τV ≪ 1), the rotation shear shows a destabilizing effect when the rotation is large.

  9. Influence of toroidal rotation on resistive tearing modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W.

    2015-12-15

    Influence of toroidal equilibrium plasma rotation on m/n = 2/1 resistive tearing modes is studied numerically using a 3D toroidal MHD code (CLT). It is found that the toroidal rotation with or without shear can suppress the tearing instability and the Coriolis effect in the toroidal geometry plays a dominant role on the rotation induced stabilization. For a high viscosity plasma (τ{sub R}/τ{sub V} ≫ 1, where τ{sub R} and τ{sub V} represent resistive and viscous diffusion time, respectively), the effect of the rotation shear combined with the viscosity appears to be stabilizing. For a low viscosity plasmas (τ{sub R}/τ{sub V} ≪ 1), the rotation shear shows a destabilizing effect when the rotation is large.

  10. Viscosity Relaxation in Molten HgZnTe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Kim, Yeong Woo; Baird, James K.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Rotating cup measurements of the viscosity of the pseudo-binary melt, HgZnTe have shown that the isothermal liquid with zinc mole fraction 0.16 requires tens of hours of equilibration time before a steady viscous state can be achieved. Over this relaxation period, the viscosity at 790 C increases by a factor of two, while the viscosity at 810 C increases by 40%. Noting that the Group VI elements tend to polymerize when molten, we suggest that the viscosity of the melt is enhanced by the slow formation of Te atom chains. To explain the build-up of linear Te n-mers, we propose a scheme, which contains formation reactions with second order kinetics that increase the molecular weight, and decomposition reactions with first order kinetics that inactivate the chains. The resulting rate equations can be solved for the time dependence of each molecular weight fraction. Using these molecular weight fractions, we calculate the time dependence of the average molecular weight. Using the standard semi-empirical relation between polymer average molecular weight and viscosity, we then calculate the viscosity relaxation curve. By curve fitting, we find that the data imply that the rate constant for n-mer formation is much smaller than the rate constant for n-mer deactivation, suggesting that Te atoms only weakly polymerize in molten HgZnTe. The steady state toward which the melt relaxes occurs as the rate of formation of an n-mer becomes exactly balanced by the sum of the rate for its deactivation and the rate for its polymerization to form an (n+1)-mer.

  11. Effective viscosity of non-gravitactic Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii microswimmer suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussler, Matthias; Rafaï, Salima; Peyla, Philippe; Wagner, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Active microswimmers are known to affect the macroscopic viscosity of suspensions in a more complex manner than passive particles. For puller-like microswimmers an increase in the viscosity has been observed. It has been suggested that the persistence of the orientation of the microswimmers hinders the rotation that is normally caused by the vorticity. It was previously shown that some sorts of algae are bottom-heavy swimmers, i.e., their centre of mass is not located in the centre of the body. In this way, the algae affect the vorticity of the flow when they are perpendicularly oriented to the axis of gravity. This orientation of gravity to vorticity is given in a rheometer that is equipped with a cone-plate geometry. Here we present measurements of the viscosity both in a cone-plate and a Taylor-Couette cell. The two set-ups yielded the same increase in viscosity although the axis of gravitation in the Taylor-Couette cell is parallel to the direction of vorticity. In a complementary experiment we tested the orientation of the direction of swimming through microscopic observation of single Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and could not identify a preferred orientation, i.e., our specific strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are not bottom-heavy swimmers. We thus conclude that bottom heaviness is not a prerequisite for the increase of viscosity and that the effect of gravity on the rheology of our strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is negligible. This finding reopens the question of whether the origin of persistence in the orientation of cells is actually responsible for the increased viscosity of the suspension.

  12. Regulation of dispersity and rheological properties of high-viscosity crudes

    SciTech Connect

    Nadirov, N.K.; Zhumasheva, K.S.; Burkitbaev, S.M.; Antoshkin, A.S.

    1988-03-01

    The degree of dispersity and the rheological properties of blended crudes from the Mangyshlak peninsula were studied. High-wax crudes from the Uzen' and Zhetybai fields and high-aromatic crudes from the Kalamkas and Karazhanbas fields were blended. The degree of dispersity was determined by laser correlation spectroscopy. Dynamic viscosity was determined under various shear stresses in a rotating viscometer. Variations of the ratios of components in the mixed crudes gave complex variations of viscosity. The transition from a highly aromatic crude to a waxy crude through a series of blends was accompanied by a change in the dynamic viscosity from monotonic to extremal.

  13. About plasma points' generation in Z-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Afonin, V. I.; Potapov, A. V.; Lazarchuk, V. P.; Murugov, V. M.; Senik, A. V.

    1997-05-05

    The streak tube study results (at visible and x-ray ranges) of dynamics of fast Z-pinch formed at explosion of metal wire in diode of high current generator are presented. Amplitude of current in the load reached {approx}180 kA at increase time {approx}50 ns. The results' analysis points to capability of controlling hot plasma points generation process in Z-pinch.

  14. Viscosity of deeply supercooled water and its coupling to molecular diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Dehaoui, Amine; Issenmann, Bruno; Caupin, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    The viscosity of a liquid measures its resistance to flow, with consequences for hydraulic machinery, locomotion of microorganisms, and flow of blood in vessels and sap in trees. Viscosity increases dramatically upon cooling, until dynamical arrest when a glassy state is reached. Water is a notoriously poor glassformer, and the supercooled liquid crystallizes easily, making the measurement of its viscosity a challenging task. Here we report viscosity of water supercooled close to the limit of homogeneous crystallization. Our values contradict earlier data. A single power law reproduces the 50-fold variation of viscosity up to the boiling point. Our results allow us to test the Stokes–Einstein and Stokes–Einstein–Debye relations that link viscosity, a macroscopic property, to the molecular translational and rotational diffusion, respectively. In molecular glassformers or liquid metals, the violation of the Stokes–Einstein relation signals the onset of spatially heterogeneous dynamics and collective motions. Although the viscosity of water strongly decouples from translational motion, a scaling with rotational motion remains, similar to canonical glassformers. PMID:26378128

  15. Viscosity of deeply supercooled water and its coupling to molecular diffusion.

    PubMed

    Dehaoui, Amine; Issenmann, Bruno; Caupin, Frédéric

    2015-09-29

    The viscosity of a liquid measures its resistance to flow, with consequences for hydraulic machinery, locomotion of microorganisms, and flow of blood in vessels and sap in trees. Viscosity increases dramatically upon cooling, until dynamical arrest when a glassy state is reached. Water is a notoriously poor glassformer, and the supercooled liquid crystallizes easily, making the measurement of its viscosity a challenging task. Here we report viscosity of water supercooled close to the limit of homogeneous crystallization. Our values contradict earlier data. A single power law reproduces the 50-fold variation of viscosity up to the boiling point. Our results allow us to test the Stokes-Einstein and Stokes-Einstein-Debye relations that link viscosity, a macroscopic property, to the molecular translational and rotational diffusion, respectively. In molecular glassformers or liquid metals, the violation of the Stokes-Einstein relation signals the onset of spatially heterogeneous dynamics and collective motions. Although the viscosity of water strongly decouples from translational motion, a scaling with rotational motion remains, similar to canonical glassformers. PMID:26378128

  16. Pinch-off Scaling Law of Soap Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, John; Ryu, Sangjin

    2014-11-01

    Three common interfacial phenomena that occur daily are liquid drops in gas, gas bubbles in liquid and thin-film bubbles. One aspect that has been studied for these phenomena is the formation or pinch-off of the drop/bubble from the liquid/gas threads. In contrast to the formation of liquid drops in gas and gas bubbles in liquid, thin-film bubble pinch-off has not been well documented. Having thin-film interfaces may alter the pinch-off process due to the limiting factor of the film thickness. We observed the pinch-off of one common thin-film bubble, soap bubbles, in order to characterize its pinch-off behavior. We achieved this by constructing an experimental model replicating the process of a human producing soap bubbles. Using high-speed videography and image processing, we determined that the minimal neck radius scaled with the time left till pinch-off, and that the scaling law exponent was 2/3, similar to that of liquid drops in gas.

  17. Rotating Bondi Accretion Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Myeong-Gu; Han, Du-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    The characteristics of accretion flow onto a black hole are determined by the physical condition of gas at large radius. When the gas has no angular momentum and is polytropic, the accretion flow becomes the classic Bondi flow. The mass accretion rate in such case is an eigenvalue and uniquely determined by the density and the temperature of the surrounding gas for a given black hole mass. When the gas has angular momentum above some critical value, the angular momentum of the gas should be removed by viscosity to reach the black hole horizon. We study, within the slim disk approximation, rotating polytropic accretion flow with alpha viscosity as an an extension of the Bondi flow. The characteristics of the accretion flow are now determined by the temperature, density, and angular momentum of the gas at the outer boundary. We explore the effects of the viscosity parameter and the outer boundary radius on the physical characteristic of the flow, especially on the mass accretion rate, and compare the result with previous works of Park (2009) and Narayan & Fabian (2011).

  18. Theoretical z -pinch scaling relations for thermonuclear-fusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Stygar, W A; Cuneo, M E; Vesey, R A; Ives, H C; Mazarakis, M G; Chandler, G A; Fehl, D L; Leeper, R J; Matzen, M K; McDaniel, D H; McGurn, J S; McKenney, J L; Muron, D J; Olson, C L; Porter, J L; Ramirez, J J; Seamen, J F; Speas, C S; Spielman, R B; Struve, K W; Torres, J A; Waisman, E M; Wagoner, T C; Gilliland, T L

    2005-08-01

    We have developed wire-array z -pinch scaling relations for plasma-physics and inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) experiments. The relations can be applied to the design of z -pinch accelerators for high-fusion-yield (approximately 0.4 GJ/shot) and inertial-fusion-energy (approximately 3 GJ/shot) research. We find that (delta(a)/delta(RT)) proportional (m/l)1/4 (Rgamma)(-1/2), where delta(a) is the imploding-sheath thickness of a wire-ablation-dominated pinch, delta(RT) is the sheath thickness of a Rayleigh-Taylor-dominated pinch, m is the total wire-array mass, l is the axial length of the array, R is the initial array radius, and gamma is a dimensionless functional of the shape of the current pulse that drives the pinch implosion. When the product Rgamma is held constant the sheath thickness is, at sufficiently large values of m/l, determined primarily by wire ablation. For an ablation-dominated pinch, we estimate that the peak radiated x-ray power P(r) proportional (I/tau(i))(3/2)Rlphigamma, where I is the peak pinch current, tau(i) is the pinch implosion time, and phi is a dimensionless functional of the current-pulse shape. This scaling relation is consistent with experiment when 13 MA < or = I < or = 20 MA, 93 ns < or = tau(i) < or = 169 ns, 10 mm < or = R < or = 20 mm, 10 mm < or = l < or = 20 mm, and 2.0 mg/cm < or = m/l < or = 7.3 mg/cm. Assuming an ablation-dominated pinch and that Rlphigamma is held constant, we find that the x-ray-power efficiency eta(x) congruent to P(r)/P(a) of a coupled pinch-accelerator system is proportional to (tau(i)P(r)(7/9 ))(-1), where P(a) is the peak accelerator power. The pinch current and accelerator power required to achieve a given value of P(r) are proportional to tau(i), and the requisite accelerator energy E(a) is proportional to tau2(i). These results suggest that the performance of an ablation-dominated pinch, and the efficiency of a coupled pinch-accelerator system, can be improved substantially by decreasing the

  19. Measuring membrane rigidity and viscosity: New methods, and new insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2014-03-01

    Lipid membranes are remarkable materials: flexible, two-dimensional fluids whose physical properties guide cellular function. Bending rigidity and viscosity are two of the key mechanical parameters that characterize membranes. Both, however, are challenging to measure. I describe improvements in experimental techniques to quantify the bending modulus and the two-dimensional viscosity of lipid membranes. First, I show that using selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM, also known as light sheet fluorescence microscopy) to image the thermal fluctuations of freely suspended giant lipid vesicles enables straightforward measurements of membrane rigidity, and also provides insights into changes in rigidity induced by cargo trafficking proteins. Second, I show that tracking both the rotational and translational diffusion of membrane-anchored tracer particles allows quantification of membrane viscosity, measurement of the effective radii of the tracers, and assessment of theoretical models of membrane hydrodynamics. Surprisingly, we find a wide distribution of effective tracer sizes, due presumably to a wide variety of couplings to the membrane. I also provide an example of protein-mediated changes in lipid viscosity.

  20. Z-Pinch Pulsed Plasma Propulsion Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polsgrove, Tara; Adams, Robert B.; Fabisinski, Leo; Fincher, Sharon; Maples, C. Dauphne; Miernik, Janie; Percy, Tom; Statham, Geoff; Turner, Matt; Cassibry, Jason; Cortez, Ross; Santarius, John

    2010-01-01

    Fusion-based propulsion can enable fast interplanetary transportation. Magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) is an approach which has been shown to potentially lead to a low cost, small reactor for fusion break even. The Z-Pinch/dense plasma focus method is an MIF concept in which a column of gas is compressed to thermonuclear conditions by an axial current (I approximates 100 MA). Recent advancements in experiments and the theoretical understanding of this concept suggest favorable scaling of fusion power output yield as I(sup 4). This document presents a conceptual design of a Z-Pinch fusion propulsion system and a vehicle for human exploration. The purpose of this study is to apply Z-Pinch fusion principles to the design of a propulsion system for an interplanetary spacecraft. This study took four steps in service of that objective; these steps are identified below. 1. Z-Pinch Modeling and Analysis: There is a wealth of literature characterizing Z-Pinch physics and existing Z-Pinch physics models. In order to be useful in engineering analysis, simplified Z-Pinch fusion thermodynamic models are required to give propulsion engineers the quantity of plasma, plasma temperature, rate of expansion, etc. The study team developed these models in this study. 2. Propulsion Modeling and Analysis: While the Z-Pinch models characterize the fusion process itself, propulsion models calculate the parameters that characterize the propulsion system (thrust, specific impulse, etc.) The study team developed a Z-Pinch propulsion model and used it to determine the best values for pulse rate, amount of propellant per pulse, and mixture ratio of the D-T and liner materials as well as the resulting thrust and specific impulse of the system. 3. Mission Analysis: Several potential missions were studied. Trajectory analysis using data from the propulsion model was used to determine the duration of the propulsion burns, the amount of propellant expended to complete each mission considered. 4

  1. Architecture of petawatt-class z-pinch accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stygar, W. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Headley, D. I.; Ives, H. C.; Leeper, R. J.; Mazarakis, M. G.; Olson, C. L.; Porter, J. L.; Wagoner, T. C.; Woodworth, J. R.

    2007-03-01

    We have developed an accelerator architecture that can serve as the basis of the design of petawatt-class z-pinch drivers. The architecture has been applied to the design of two z-pinch accelerators, each of which can be contained within a 104-m-diameter cylindrical tank. One accelerator is driven by slow (˜1μs) Marx generators, which are a mature technology but which necessitate significant pulse compression to achieve the short pulses (≪1μs) required to drive z pinches. The other is powered by linear transformer drivers (LTDs), which are less mature but produce much shorter pulses than conventional Marxes. Consequently, an LTD-driven accelerator promises to be (at a given pinch current and implosion time) more efficient and reliable. The Marx-driven accelerator produces a peak electrical power of 500 TW and includes the following components: (i) 300 Marx generators that comprise a total of 1.8×104 capacitors, store 98 MJ, and erect to 5 MV; (ii) 600 water-dielectric triplate intermediate-store transmission lines, which also serve as pulse-forming lines; (iii) 600 5-MV laser-triggered gas switches; (iv) three monolithic radial-transmission-line impedance transformers, with triplate geometries and exponential impedance profiles; (v) a 6-level 5.5-m-diameter 15-MV vacuum insulator stack; (vi) six magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines (MITLs); and (vii) a triple-post-hole vacuum convolute that adds the output currents of the six MITLs, and delivers the combined current to a z-pinch load. The accelerator delivers an effective peak current of 52 MA to a 10-mm-length z pinch that implodes in 95 ns, and 57 MA to a pinch that implodes in 120 ns. The LTD-driven accelerator includes monolithic radial transformers and a MITL system similar to those described above, but does not include intermediate-store transmission lines, multimegavolt gas switches, or a laser trigger system. Instead, this accelerator is driven by 210 LTD modules that include a total of 1

  2. Viscosity of the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hide, R.

    1972-01-01

    Estimates of the coefficient of kinematical viscosity nu of the earth's liquid metallic core that are given in the geophysical literature range from approximately 0.001 sq cm/s, the viscosity of molten iron at ordinary pressures, to approximately less than 10 to the 8th power sq cm/s, based on the observation that compressional waves traverse the core without suffering serious attenuation. Bumps on the core-mantle boundary with typical horizontal dimensions up to a few thousand km and vertical dimensions h of a few km would produce the topographic coupling between the core and mantle that is evidently implied by the observed decade variations in the length of the day (unless the coupling is due to the presence of rapidly fluctuating magnetic fields in the core).

  3. Magnetic Field Measurements in Wire-Array Z-Pinches using Magneto-Optically Active Waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Syed, Wasif; Blesener, Isaac; Hammer, David A.; Lipson, Michal

    2009-01-21

    Understanding the magnetic field topology in wire-array Z-pinches as a function of time is of great significance to understanding these high-energy density plasmas especially for their ultimate application to stockpile stewardship and inertial confinement fusion. We are developing techniques to measure magnetic fields as a function of space and time using Faraday rotation of a single longitudinal mode (SLM) laser through a magneto-optically active bulk waveguide (multicomponent terbium borate glass) placed adjacent to, or within, the wire array in 1 MA experiments. We have measured fields >10 T with 100 ns rise times outside of a wire-array for the entire duration of the current pulse and as much as {approx}2 T inside a wire-array for {approx}40 ns from the start of current. This is the first time that such rapidly varying and large fields have been measured using these materials. In a dense Z-pinch, these sensing devices may not survive for long but may provide the magnetic field at the position of the sensor that can be used to corroborate magnetic probes, with which we compare our results.

  4. Magnetic Field Measurements in Wire-Array Z-Pinches using Magneto-Optically Active Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, Wasif; Blesener, Isaac; Hammer, David A.; Lipson, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the magnetic field topology in wire-array Z-pinches as a function of time is of great significance to understanding these high-energy density plasmas especially for their ultimate application to stockpile stewardship and inertial confinement fusion. We are developing techniques to measure magnetic fields as a function of space and time using Faraday rotation of a single longitudinal mode (SLM) laser through a magneto-optically active bulk waveguide (multicomponent terbium borate glass) placed adjacent to, or within, the wire array in 1 MA experiments. We have measured fields >10 T with 100 ns rise times outside of a wire-array for the entire duration of the current pulse and as much as ˜2 T inside a wire-array for ˜40 ns from the start of current. This is the first time that such rapidly varying and large fields have been measured using these materials. In a dense Z-pinch, these sensing devices may not survive for long but may provide the magnetic field at the position of the sensor that can be used to corroborate magnetic probes, with which we compare our results.

  5. Viscosity-stabilized aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Wier, D. R.

    1981-01-27

    Thiourea functions as a solution viscosity stabilizer in aqueous compositions comprising thiourea, nonionic polymers such as polyalkylene oxides and anionic surfactants such as petroleum sulfonates. The aqueous compositions are useful in connection with fluid-drive oil recovery processes, processes for drilling, completing, or working over wells, or the like processes in which a thickened fluid is injected into or brought into contact with a subterranean earth formation.

  6. Spectroscopic studies on di-pophyrin rotor as micro-viscosity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, H.; Raut, S.; Kimbal, J.; Gryczynski, Z.; Dzyuba, S.; Balaz, M.

    2015-03-01

    In typical biological systems the fluid compartment makes up more than 70% percent of the system weight. A variety of mass and signal transportation as well as intermolecular interactions are often governed by viscosity. It is important to be able to measure/estimate viscosity and detect the changes in viscosity upon various stimulations. Understanding the influence of changes in viscosity is crucial and development of the molecular systems that sensitive to micro-viscosity is a goal of many researches. Molecular rotors have been considered the potential target since they present enhanced sensitivity to local viscosity that can strongly restrict molecular rotation. To understand the mechanics of rotor interaction with the environment we have been studied conjugated pophyrin-dimer rotor (DP) that emit in the near IR. Our goal is to investigate the photo physical properties such as absorption, transition moment orientation, emission and excitation, polarization anisotropy and fluorescence lifetime in various mediums of different viscosities from ethanol to poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) matrices. The results imply the influences of the medium's viscosity on the two distinct confirmations: planar and twisted conformations of DP. Linear dichroism from polarized absorption in PVA matrices shows various orientations of transition moments. Excitation anisotropy shows similar transition splitting between two conformations. Time resolved intensity decay at two different observations confirms the two different emission states and furthermore the communication between the two states in the form of energy transfer upon excitation.

  7. Viscosity Index Improvers and Thickeners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambaugh, R. L.; Kinker, B. G.

    The viscosity index of an oil or an oil formulation is an important physical parameter. Viscosity index improvers, VIIs, are comprised of five main classes of polymers: polymethylmethacrylates (PMAs), olefin copolymers (OCPs), hydrogenated poly(styrene-co-butadiene or isoprene) (HSD/SIP/HRIs), esterified polystyrene-co-maleic anhydride (SPEs) and a combination of PMA/OCP systems. The chemistry, manufacture, dispersancy and utility of each class are described. The comparative functions, properties, thickening ability, dispersancy and degradation of VIIs are discussed. Permanent and temporary shear thinning of VII-thickened formulations are described and compared. The end-use performance and choice of VI improvers is discussed in terms of low- and high-temperature viscosities, journal bearing oil film thickness, fuel economy, oil consumption, high-temperature pumping efficiency and deposit control. Discussion of future developments concludes that VI improvers will evolve to meet new challenges of increased thermal-oxidative degradation from increased engine operating temperatures, different base stocks of either synthetic base oils or vegetable oil-based, together with alcohol- or vegetable oil-based fuels. VI improvers must also evolve to deal with higher levels of fuel dilution and new types of sludge and also enhanced low-temperature requirements.

  8. Liquid Viscosities of Fluorinated Dialkylethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Noriaki; Kawamura, Mitsutaka; Sekiya, Akira; Ootake, Katsuto; Tamai, Ryoichi; Kurokawa, Yuji; Murata, Junji

    The liquid viscosities of thirteen fluorinated dialkylethers which are expected as promising candidates of CFC alternatives were measured at temperatures from 276 K to 328 K and atmospheric pressure. The fluorinated dialkylethers used in this study are 1-methoxy-1, 1, 2, 2- tetrafluoroethane; 1-difluoromethoxy- 1, 1 , 2 -trifluoroethane; 1-methoxy-1, 1 , 2 , 2 , 3 , 3 -hexafluoropropane; 1-methoxy-1-trifluoro-methyl-2, 2 , 2-trifluoroethane; 1-difluoro-methoxy-2, 2, 3, 3-tetrafluoropropane; 1-(2, 2, 2-trifruoroethoxy)-1, 1, 2, 2-tetrafluoroethane 1-difluoromethoxy-2, 2, 3, 3, 3-pentafluoropropane 1-methoxy-2, 2, 3, 3 -tetrafluoropropane; 1-methoxy-1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3-heptafluoropropane; 1-pentafluoroethoxy-1, 1, 2, 2-tetrafluoroethane; 2-trifluoromethoxy-1, 1, 1, 2-tetrafluorobutane; 1-proxy-nonafluorobutane; and 1-ethoxyundeca-fluoropentane. The liquid viscosities have been measured by the torsionally vibrating viscometer (YAMAICHI DENKI, F VM-80A) within an uncertainty of ±3%.The liquid viscosities of those compounds decrease exponentially with increase of temperature.

  9. Density and viscosity of lipids under pressure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a lack of data for the viscosity of lipids under pressure. The current report is a part of the effort to fill this gap. The viscosity, density, and elastohydrodynamic film thicknesses of vegetable oil (HOSuO) were investigated. Pressure–viscosity coefficients (PVC) of HOSuO at different tem...

  10. Rotational moulding.

    PubMed

    Crawford, R J; Kearns, M P

    2003-10-01

    Rotational moulding promises designers attractive economics and a low-pressure process. The benefits of rotational moulding are compared here with other manufacturing methods such as injection and blow moulding. PMID:14603714

  11. Rotating Vesta

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronomers combined 146 exposures taken by NASA's Hubble SpaceTelescope to make this 73-frame movie of the asteroid Vesta's rotation.Vesta completes a rotation every 5.34 hours.› Asteroid and...

  12. Continents and Earth's rotational stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, I.; Buffett, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    Continents strongly constrain the planform of the mantle convection/plate tectonic system. They impose long wavelength structure on surface velocities and tend to collect subduction zones around their margins . Additionally, they may affect the ability of the underlying mantle to effectively cool, which would create persistent temperature gradients between subcontinental and suboceanic mantle. These effects will change the moment of inertia of the planet and may control its rotational dynamics. Configurations of the continents have been implicated for both Earth's apparent Cenozoic rotational stability as well as its potential for large scale true polar wander deeper in its past. Here we present investigations into how continents can affect Earth's long term rotational stability. We have developed a version of the mantle convection code Aspect with a free outer surface, allowing for isostatically compensated continents and dynamic topography due to plumes and slabs. This allows us to self-consistently calculate moment of inertia anomalies in mantle convection models with surface continents and lateral viscosity variations. We explore different surface fractions of continental material as well as different mantle viscosity structures to identify when continents have a controlling influence. Finally, we discuss implications for Earth history, during which both continental mass and mantle viscosity may have changed significantly.

  13. Pinch Me - I'm Fusing!

    SciTech Connect

    DERZON,MARK S.

    2000-07-19

    The process of combining nuclei (the protons and neutrons inside an atomic nucleus) together with a release of kinetic energy is called fusion. This process powers the Sun, it contributes to the world stockpile of weapons of mass destruction and may one day generate safe, clean electrical power. Understanding the intricacies of fusion power, promised for 50 years, ,is sometimes difficult because there are a number of ways of doing it. There is hot fusion, cold fusion and con-fusion. Hot fusion is what powers suns through the conversion of mass energy to kinetic energy. Cold fusion generates con-fusion and nobody really knows what it is. Honestly - this is true. There does seem to be something going on here; I just don't know what. Apparently some experimenters get energy out of a process many call cold fission but no one seems to know what it is, or how to do it reliably. It is not getting much attention from the mainline physics community. Even so, no one is generating electrical power for you and me with either method. In this article 1 will point out some basic features of the mainstream approaches taken to hot fusion power, as well as describe why z pinches are worth pursuing as a driver for a power reactor and may one day generate electrical power for mankind.

  14. Velocity and rotation measurements in acoustically levitated droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Abhishek; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-10-01

    The velocity scale inside an acoustically levitated droplet depends on the levitator and liquid properties. Using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV), detailed velocity measurements have been made in a levitated droplet of different diameters and viscosity. The maximum velocity and rotation are normalized using frequency and amplitude of acoustic levitator, and droplet viscosity. The non-dimensional data are fitted for micrometer- and millimeter-sized droplets levitated in different levitators for different viscosity fluids. It is also shown that the rotational speed of nanosilica droplets at an advanced stage of vaporization compares well with that predicted by exponentially fitted parameters.

  15. Superparamagnetic nanoparticle-based viscosity test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kai; Liu, Jinming; Wang, Yi; Ye, Clark; Feng, Yinglong; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2015-08-01

    Hyperviscosity syndrome is triggered by high blood viscosity in the human body. This syndrome can result in retinopathy, vertigo, coma, and other unanticipated complications. Serum viscosity is one of the important factors affecting whole blood viscosity, which is regarded as an indicator of general health. In this letter, we propose and demonstrate a Brownian relaxation-based mixing frequency method to test human serum viscosity. This method uses excitatory and detection coils and Brownian relaxation-dominated superparamagnetic nanoparticles, which are sensitive to variables of the liquid environment such as viscosity and temperature. We collect the harmonic signals produced by magnetic nanoparticles and estimate the viscosity of unknown solutions by comparison to the calibration curves. An in vitro human serum viscosity test is performed in less than 1.5 min.

  16. The Dense Z-Pinch Programme at Imperial College

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, M. G.

    1994-03-01

    An extensive programme of research, both experimental and theoretical, into the stability and dynamics of Z-pinches has led to the funding of the DZP Project to study both radiative collapse of Z-pinch plasmas and pinches close to thermonuclear fusion conditions. The MAGPIE (Mega-Ampere Generator for Plasma Implosion Experiments) generator (2.4MV, 336kJ, 200ns) is now being commissioned ready for Z-pinch experiments commencing this summer. The design of the generator has been determined by the perceived requirements demanded by consideration of (a) fusion conditions with end losses to electrodes, (b) radiative collapse at currents well above the Pease-Braginskii limit, and (c) stability studies particularly under large ion Larmor radius conditions. As a result, and in contrast to other generators in the >1TW class this has a long pulse length (200ns) and a final line impedance of 1.25 ohm. The stability regimes together with theoretical and experimental results are reviewed in the framework of the I4a-N diagram. Our understanding (albeit incomplete) of other phenomena characteristic of Z-pinches, namely the formation of electron beams, dense spots of intense X-ray emission, ion beams and filaments will be summarised.

  17. Scaling of X pinches from 1 MA to 6 MA.

    SciTech Connect

    Bland, Simon Nicholas; McBride, Ryan D.; Wenger, David Franklin; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Chittenden, Jeremy Paul; Pikuz, Sergei A.; Harding, Eric; Jennings, Christopher A.; Ampleford, David J.; Yu, Edmund P.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; Hansen, Stephanie B.

    2010-09-01

    This final report for Project 117863 summarizes progress made toward understanding how X-pinch load designs scale to high currents. The X-pinch load geometry was conceived in 1982 as a method to study the formation and properties of bright x-ray spots in z-pinch plasmas. X-pinch plasmas driven by 0.2 MA currents were found to have source sizes of 1 micron, temperatures >1 keV, lifetimes of 10-100 ps, and densities >0.1 times solid density. These conditions are believed to result from the direct magnetic compression of matter. Physical models that capture the behavior of 0.2 MA X pinches predict more extreme parameters at currents >1 MA. This project developed load designs for up to 6 MA on the SATURN facility and attempted to measure the resulting plasma parameters. Source sizes of 5-8 microns were observed in some cases along with evidence for high temperatures (several keV) and short time durations (<500 ps).

  18. Theory and Simulation of A Novel Viscosity Measurement Method for High Temperature Semiconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bochuan; Li, Chao; Ban, Heng; Scripa, Rose; Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The properties of molten semiconductors are good indicators for material structure transformation and hysteresis under temperature variations. Viscosity, as one of the most important properties, is difficult to measure because of high temperature, high pressure, and vapor toxicity of melts. Recently, a novel method was developed by applying a rotating magnetic field to the melt sealed in a suspended quartz ampoule, and measuring the transient torque exerted by rotating melt flow on the ampoule wall. The method was designed to measure viscosity in short time period, which is essential for evaluating temperature hysteresis. This paper compares the theoretical prediction of melt flow and ampoule oscillation with the experimental data. A theoretical model was established and the coupled fluid flow and ampoule torsional vibration equations were solved numerically. The simulation results showed a good agreement with experimental data. The results also showed that both electrical conductivity and viscosity could be calculated by fitting the theoretical results to the experimental data. The transient velocity of the melt caused by the rotating magnetic field was found reach equilibrium in about half a minute, and the viscosity of melt could be calculated from the altitude of oscillation. This would allow the measurement of viscosity in a minute or so, in contrast to the existing oscillation cup method, which requires about an hour for one measurement.

  19. Effective Viscosity of Microswimmer Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafaï, Salima; Jibuti, Levan; Peyla, Philippe

    2010-03-01

    The measurement of a quantitative and macroscopic parameter to estimate the global motility of a large population of swimming biological cells is a challenge. Experiments on the rheology of active suspensions have been performed. Effective viscosity of sheared suspensions of live unicellular motile microalgae (Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii) is far greater than for suspensions containing the same volume fraction of dead cells. In addition, suspensions show shear thinning behavior. We relate these macroscopic measurements to the orientation of individual swimming cells under flow and discuss our results in the light of several existing models.

  20. Critical Viscosity of Xenon team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The thermostat for CVX sits inside the white cylinder on a support structure (at left) that is placed inside a pressure canister. A similar canister (right) holds the electronics and control systems. The CVX-2 arrangement is identical. The principal investigator is Dr. Robert F. Berg (left) of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD.

  1. Critical Viscosity of Xenon team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The thermostat for CVX sits inside the white cylinder on a support structure (at left) that is placed inside a pressure canister. A similar canister (right) holds the electronics and control systems. The CVX-2 arrangement is identical. The principal investigator is Dr. Robert F. Berg (not shown) of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD.

  2. A viscosity prescription for a self-gravitating accretion disc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, D. N. C.; Pringle, J. E.

    1987-01-01

    A model for treating the transfer of angular momentum within a gaseous differentially rotating disc subject to gravitational instability is discussed in terms of an effective kinematic viscosity. It is assumed that even when matter in the disc is subject to self-gravitation, the instability does not necessarily lead directly to condensation of parts of the disc into self-gravitating bodies. Conditions under which the present model permits a similarity solution are discussed, and it is shown that the general solution tends to the similarity solution at large times.

  3. Elements of Neoclassical Theory and Plasma Rotation in a Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolyakov, A.

    2015-12-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Quasineutrality condition * Diffusion in fully ionized magnetized plasma and automatic ambipolarity * Toroidal geometry and neoclassical diffusion * Diffusion and ambipolarity in toroidal plasmas * Ambipolarity and equilibrium poloidal rotation * Ambipolarity paradox and damping of poloidal rotation * Neoclassical plasma inertia * Oscillatory modes of poloidal plasma rotation * Dynamics of the toroidal momentum * Momentum diffusion in strongly collisional, short mean free path regime * Diffusion of toroidal momentum in the weak collision (banana) regime * Toroidal momentum diffusion and momentum damping from drift-kinetic theory and fluid moment equations * Comments on non-axisymmetric effects * Summary * Acknowledgments * Appendix: Trapped (banana) particles and collisionality regimes in a tokamak * Appendix: Hierarchy of moment equations * Appendix: Plasma viscosity tensor in the magnetic field: parallel viscosity, gyroviscosity, and perpendicular viscosity * Appendix: Closure relations for the flux surface averaged parallel viscosity in neoclassical (banana and plateau) regimes * References

  4. Approach to universality in axisymmetric bubble pinch-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekle, Stephan; Snoeijer, Jacco H.; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2009-09-01

    The pinch-off of an axisymmetric air bubble surrounded by an inviscid fluid is compared in four physical realizations: (i) cavity collapse in the wake of an impacting disk, (ii) gas bubbles injected through a small orifice, (iii) bubble rupture in a straining flow, and (iv) a bubble with an initially necked shape. Our boundary-integral simulations suggest that all systems eventually follow the universal behavior characterized by slowly varying exponents predicted by J. Eggers [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 094502 (2007)]. However, the time scale for the onset of this final regime is found to vary by orders of magnitude depending on the system in question. While for the impacting disk it is well in the millisecond range, for the gas injection needle universal behavior sets in only a few microseconds before pinch-off. These findings reconcile the different views expressed in recent literature about the universal nature of bubble pinch-off.

  5. First results from the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Prager, S.C.; Almagri, A.F.; Assadi, S.; Beckstead, J.A.; Dexter, R.N.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Chartas, G.; Hokin, S.A.; Lovell, T.W.; Rempel, T.D.; Sarff, J.S.; Shen, W.; Spragins, C.W.; Sprott, J.C. )

    1990-06-01

    The first period of physics operation of the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch ({ital Plasma} {ital Physics} {ital and} {ital Controlled} {ital Nuclear} {ital Fusion} {ital Research} 1988 (IAEA, Vienna, 1989), Vol 2, p. 757) has produced information on sawtooth oscillations, edge magnetic and electrostatic fluctuations, and equilibrium parameters at large plasma size. Sawtooth oscillations are prevalent at all values of pinch parameter and might constitute discrete dynamo events. Both electrostatic and magnetic fluctuations are of sufficient magnitude to be relevant to transport in the reversed field pinch. In the plasmas studied to date (up to a plasma current of 0.5 MA) the poloidal beta value is about 10% or greater.

  6. Resolving microstructures in Z pinches with intensity interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Apruzese, J. P.; Kroupp, E.; Maron, Y.; Giuliani, J. L.; Thornhill, J. W.

    2014-03-15

    Nearly 60 years ago, Hanbury Brown and Twiss [R. Hanbury Brown and R. Q. Twiss, Nature 178, 1046 (1956)] succeeded in measuring the 30 nrad angular diameter of Sirius using a new type of interferometry that exploited the interference of photons independently emitted from different regions of the stellar disk. Its basis was the measurement of intensity correlations as a function of detector spacing, with no beam splitting or preservation of phase information needed. Applied to Z pinches, X pinches, or laser-produced plasmas, this method could potentially provide spatial resolution under one micron. A quantitative analysis based on the work of Purcell [E. M. Purcell, Nature 178, 1449 (1956)] reveals that obtaining adequate statistics from x-ray interferometry of a Z-pinch microstructure would require using the highest-current generators available. However, using visible light interferometry would reduce the needed photon count and could enable its use on sub-MA machines.

  7. MHD Simulation of the Inverse Pinch Plasma Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Esaulov, A; Bauer, B; Lindemuth, I; Makhin, V; Presura, R; Ryutov, D

    2004-07-01

    A wall confined plasma in an inverse pinch configuration holds potential as a plasma target for Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) as well as the simple geometry to study wall-confined plasma. An experiment is planned to study the inverse pinch configuration using the Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF) at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). The dynamics of the discharge formation have been analyzed using analytic models and numerical methods. Strong heating occurs by thermalization of directed energy when an outward moving current sheet (the inverse pinch effect) collides with the outer wall of the experimental chamber. Two dimensional MHD simulations show Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov -like modes of instability, as expected because of the shock acceleration during plasma formation phase. The instabilities are not disruptive, but give rise to a mild level of turbulence. The conclusion from this work is that an interesting experiment relevant to wall confinement for MTF could be done using existing equipment at UNR.

  8. X-pinch dynamics: Neck formation and implosion

    SciTech Connect

    Oreshkin, V. I.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Artyomov, A. P.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Fedunin, A. V.; Rousskikh, A. G.; Zhigalin, A. S.

    2014-10-15

    We propose a model that describes the neck formation and implosion in an X-pinch. The process is simulated to go in two stages. The first stage is neck formation. This stage begins with an electrical explosion of the wires forming the X-pinch, and at the end of the stage, a micropinch (neck) is formed in the region where the wires are crossed. The second stage is neck implosion. The implosion is accompanied by outflow of matter from the neck region, resulting in the formation of a “hot spot”. Analytical estimates obtained in the study under consideration indicate that these stages are approximately equal in duration. Having analyzed the neck implosion dynamics, we have verified a scaling which makes it possible to explain the observed dependences of the time of occurrence of an x-ray pulse on the X-pinch current and mass.

  9. Suppression of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in Z-pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhigalin, A. S.; Rousskikh, A. G.; Baksht, R. B.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Oreshkin, V. I.

    2015-06-01

    Experiments on studying the stability of Z-pinch compression were carried out at a current of 450 kA with a build-up time of 450 ns. The plasma shell of the pinches was formed by evaporating the electrode material in the process of vacuum arc burning. The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities were suppressed using the regime of arc combustion on the surface of one of the electrodes in the high-voltage gap in which the pinch was positioned. As a result of free plasma discharge, the radial density distribution was formed such that the plasma concentration increased from the outer boundary to the shell axis. The experiments demonstrated that such an initial radial density distribution almost completely suppresses of the RT instability.

  10. Canards and curvature: nonsmooth approximation by pinching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desroches, M.; Jeffrey, M. R.

    2011-05-01

    In multiple time-scale (singularly perturbed) dynamical systems, canards are counterintuitive solutions that evolve along both attracting and repelling invariant manifolds. In two dimensions, canards result in periodic oscillations whose amplitude and period grow in a highly nonlinear way: they are slowly varying with respect to a control parameter, except for an exponentially small range of values where they grow extremely rapidly. This sudden growth, called a canard explosion, has been encountered in many applications ranging from chemistry to neuronal dynamics, aerospace engineering and ecology. Canards were initially studied using nonstandard analysis, and later the same results were proved by standard techniques such as matched asymptotics, invariant manifold theory and parameter blow-up. More recently, canard-like behaviour has been linked to surfaces of discontinuity in piecewise-smooth dynamical systems. This paper provides a new perspective on the canard phenomenon by showing that the nonstandard analysis of canard explosions can be recast into the framework of piecewise-smooth dynamical systems. An exponential coordinate scaling is applied to a singularly perturbed system of ordinary differential equations. The scaling acts as a lens that resolves dynamics across all time-scales. The changes of local curvature that are responsible for canard explosions are then analysed. Regions where different time-scales dominate are separated by hypersurfaces, and these are pinched together to obtain a piecewise-smooth system, in which curvature changes manifest as discontinuity-induced bifurcations. The method is used to classify canards in arbitrary dimensions, and to derive the parameter values over which canards form either small cycles (canards without head) or large cycles (canards with head).

  11. Scientific Objectives of the Critical Viscosity Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, R. F.; Moldover, M. R.

    1993-01-01

    In microgravity, the Critical Viscosity Experiment will measure the viscosity of xenon 15 times closer to the critical point than is possible on earth. The results are expected to include the first direct observation of the predicted power-law divergence of viscosity in a pure fluid and they will test calculations of the value of the exponent associated with the divergence. The results, when combined with Zeno's decay-rate data, will strengthen the test of mode coupling theory. Without microgravity viscosity data, the Zeno test will require an extrapolation of existing 1-g viscosity data by as much as factor of 100 in reduced temperature. By necessity, the extrapolation would use an incompletely verified theory of viscosity crossover. With the microgravity viscosity data, the reliance on crossover models will be negligible allowing a more reliable extrapolation. During the past year, new theoretical calculations for the viscosity exponent finally achieved consistency with the best experimental data for pure fluids. This report gives the justification for the proposed microgravity Critical Viscosity Experiment in this new context. This report also combines for the first time the best available light scattering data with our recent viscosity data to demonstrate the current status of tests of mode coupling theory.

  12. Viscosity profile and Quasi Periodic Oscillation frequency of few transient black hole candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Santanu; Debnath, Dipak; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Jana, Arghajit; Chatterjee, Debjit; Molla, Aslam Ali

    2016-07-01

    Matters enter into the potential well formed by the compact objects due to the transport of angular momentum by viscosity. We compute the amount of viscosity during the outburst time of the transient sources. In the progressive days as the viscosity increases inner edge of the Keplerian disc moves closer to the black holes. Thus the size of the Compton cloud reduces and the frequency of the Quasi Periodic Oscillations increases. We also compute the Compton cooling day by day, which is responsible for the movement of the shock both in rising and declining phases of the outburst. Our viscosity value rises/decays monotonically during the rising/declining phases of the outburst, well within the range proposed by magneto-rotational instability. For that we solve the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions and derive the condition of shock formation in presence of Compton cooling.

  13. Viscosity of ring polymer melts

    PubMed Central

    Pasquino, Rossana; Vasilakopoulos, Thodoris C.; Jeong, Youn Cheol; Lee, Hyojoon; Rogers, Simon; Sakellariou, George; Allgaier, Jürgen; Takano, Atsushi; Brás, Ana R.; Chang, Taihyun; Gooßen, Sebastian; Pyckhout-Hintzen, Wim; Wischnewski, Andreas; Hadjichristidis, Nikos; Richter, Dieter; Rubinstein, Michael; Vlassopoulos, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    We have measured the linear rheology of critically purified ring polyisoprenes, polystyrenes and polyethyleneoxides of different molar masses. The ratio of the zero-shear viscosities of linear polymer melts η0,linear to their ring counterparts η0,ring at isofrictional conditions is discussed as function of the number of entanglements Z. In the unentangled regime η0,linear/η0,ring is virtually constant, consistent with the earlier data, atomistic simulations, and the theoretical expectation η0,linear/η0,ring=2. In the entanglement regime, the Z-dependence of rings viscosity is much weaker than that of linear polymers, in qualitative agreement with predictions from scaling theory and simulations. The power-law extracted from the available experimental data in the rather limited range 1

  14. Measurement of Radiation Symmetry in Z-Pinch Driven Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, David L.

    2001-10-01

    The z-pinch driven hohlraum (ZPDH) is a promising approach to high yield inertial confinement fusion currently being characterized in experiments on the Sandia Z accelerator [1]. In this concept [2], x rays are produced by an axial z-pinch in a primary hohlraum at each end of a secondary hohlraum. A fusion capsule in the secondary is imploded by a symmetric x-ray flux distribution, effectively smoothed by wall reemission during transport to the capsule position. Capsule radiation symmetry, a critical issue in the design of such a system, is influenced by hohlraum geometry, wall motion and time-dependent albedo, as well as power balance and pinch timing between the two z-pinch x-ray sources. In initial symmetry studies on Z, we used solid low density burnthrough spheres to diagnose highly asymmetric, single-sided-drive hohlraum geometries. We then applied this technique to the more symmetric double z-pinch geometry [3]. As a result of design improvements, radiation flux symmetry in Z double-pinch wire array experiments now exceeds the measurement sensitivity of this self-backlit foam ball symmetry diagnostic (15% max-min flux asymmetry). To diagnose radiation symmetry at the 2 - 5% level attainable with our present ZPDH designs, we are using high-energy x rays produced by the recently-completed Z-Beamlet laser backlighter for point-projection imaging of thin-wall implosion and symmetry capsules. We will present the results of polar flux symmetry measuremets on Z for several ZPDH capsule geometries together with radiosity and radiation-hydrodynamics simulations for comparison. [1] M. E. Cuneo et al., Phys. Plasmas 8,2257(2001); [2] J. H. Hammer et al., Phys. Plasmas 6,2129(1999); [3] D. L. Hanson et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 45,360(2000).

  15. A formula for the Shakura-Sunyaev turbulent viscosity parameter. [for modeling of accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Goldman, I.; Hubickyj, O.

    1984-01-01

    A formula for the Shakura-Suniaev alpha parameter is proposed in terms of the growth rate of the unstable modes of the physical mechanisms that generates turbulence. Turbulent convection is discussed as a particular example. The effect of rotation on turbulent viscosity is considered, and some remarks are made on convective fluxes, disk stability, and other types of instabilities.

  16. Rotational diffusion of coumarins in aqueous DMSO.

    PubMed

    Inamdar, S R; Gayathri, B R; Mannekutla, J R

    2009-07-01

    The rotational dynamics of four structurally similar polar molecules viz., coumarin 440, coumarin 450, coumarin 466 and coumarin 151 has been studied in binary mixtures comprising of dimethyl sulphoxide and water at room temperature using the steady state fluorescence depolarization method and time correlated single photon counting technique. The binary mixtures are characterized by the fact that at a particular composition the viscosity (eta) of the solution reaches a maximum value that is higher than the viscosities of either of the two co-solvents. The dielectric properties of the solution change across the composition range and the qualitative features of the solvent relaxation dynamics in complex systems are known to differ from those in simple solutions. A hook type profile of rotational reorientation time (tau(r)) vs viscosity (eta) is obtained for all the solutes in dipolar aprotic mixture of dimethyl sulphoxide-water, with the rotational reorientation times being longer in organic solvent-rich zone, compared to the corresponding isoviscous point in water-rich zone due to strong hydrogen bonding. Fluorescence lifetimes as well as rotational reorientation times are sensitive to the composition of the binary solvent system under study than to the viscosity suggesting the importance of local structure. The results are discussed in the light of hydrodynamic and dielectric friction models. PMID:19184379

  17. Effective shear viscosity and dynamics of suspensions of micro-swimmers from small to moderate concentrations.

    PubMed

    Gyrya, V; Lipnikov, K; Aranson, I S; Berlyand, L

    2011-05-01

    Recently, there has been a number of experimental studies convincingly demonstrating that a suspension of self-propelled bacteria (microswimmers in general) may have an effective viscosity significantly smaller than the viscosity of the ambient fluid. This is in sharp contrast with suspensions of hard passive inclusions, whose presence always increases the viscosity. Here we present a 2D model for a suspension of microswimmers in a fluid and analyze it analytically in the dilute regime (no swimmer-swimmer interactions) and numerically using a Mimetic Finite Difference discretization. Our analysis shows that in the dilute regime (in the absence of rotational diffusion) the effective shear viscosity is not affected by self-propulsion. But at the moderate concentrations (due to swimmer-swimmer interactions) the effective viscosity decreases linearly as a function of the propulsion strength of the swimmers. These findings prove that (i) a physically observable decrease of viscosity for a suspension of self-propelled microswimmers can be explained purely by hydrodynamic interactions and (ii) self-propulsion and interaction of swimmers are both essential to the reduction of the effective shear viscosity. We also performed a number of numerical experiments analyzing the dynamics of swimmers resulting from pairwise interactions. The numerical results agree with the physically observed phenomena (e.g., attraction of swimmer to swimmer and swimmer to the wall). This is viewed as an additional validation of the model and the numerical scheme. PMID:20563812

  18. Effective shear viscosity and dynamics of suspensions of micro-swimmers from small to moderate concentrations.

    SciTech Connect

    Gyrya, V.; Lipnikov, K.; Aranson, I.; Berlyand, L.

    2011-05-01

    Recently, there has been a number of experimental studies convincingly demonstrating that a suspension of self-propelled bacteria (microswimmers in general) may have an effective viscosity significantly smaller than the viscosity of the ambient fluid. This is in sharp contrast with suspensions of hard passive inclusions, whose presence always increases the viscosity. Here we present a 2D model for a suspension of microswimmers in a fluid and analyze it analytically in the dilute regime (no swimmer-swimmer interactions) and numerically using a Mimetic Finite Difference discretization. Our analysis shows that in the dilute regime (in the absence of rotational diffusion) the effective shear viscosity is not affected by self-propulsion. But at the moderate concentrations (due to swimmer-swimmer interactions) the effective viscosity decreases linearly as a function of the propulsion strength of the swimmers. These findings prove that (i) a physically observable decrease of viscosity for a suspension of self-propelled microswimmers can be explained purely by hydrodynamic interactions and (ii) self-propulsion and interaction of swimmers are both essential to the reduction of the effective shear viscosity. We also performed a number of numerical experiments analyzing the dynamics of swimmers resulting from pairwise interactions. The numerical results agree with the physically observed phenomena (e.g., attraction of swimmer to swimmer and swimmer to the wall). This is viewed as an additional validation of the model and the numerical scheme.

  19. Polycrystalline diamond based detector for Z-pinch plasma diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Linyue; Zhao Jizhen; Chen Liang; Ouyang Xiaoping; Wang Lan

    2010-08-15

    A detector setup based on polycrystalline chemical-vapor-deposition diamond film is developed with great characteristics: low dark current (lower than 60 pA within 3 V/{mu}m), fast pulsed response time (rise time: 2-3 ns), flat spectral response (3-5 keV), easy acquisition, low cost, and relative large sensitive area. The characterizing data on Qiangguang-I accelerator show that this detector can satisfy the practical requirements in Z-pinch plasma diagnosis very well, which offers a promising prototype for the x-ray detection in Z-pinch diagnosis.

  20. Seeded perturbations in wire array Z-Pinches.

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Allen Conrad; Fedin, Dmitry; Kantsyrev, Victor Leonidovich; Wunsch, Scott Edward; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Lebedev, Sergey V.; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Ouart, Nicholas D.; LePell, Paul David; Safronova, Alla S.; Shrestha, I.; McKenney, John Lee; Ampleford, David J.; Rapley, J.; Bott, S. C.; Palmer, J. B. A.; Sotnikov, Vladimir Isaakovich; Bland, Simon Nicholas; Ivanov, Vladimir V.; Chittenden, Jeremy Paul; Jones, B.; Garasi, Christopher Joseph; Hall, Gareth Neville; Yilmaz, M. Faith; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Deeney, Christopher; Pokala, S.; Nalajala, V.

    2005-07-01

    Controlled seeding of perturbations is employed to study the evolution of wire array z-pinch implosion instabilities which strongly impact x-ray production when the 3D plasma stagnates on axis. Wires modulated in radius exhibit locally enhanced magnetic field and imploding bubble formation at discontinuities in wire radius due to the perturbed current path. Wires coated with localized spectroscopic dopants are used to track turbulent material flow. Experiments and MHD modeling offer insight into the behavior of z-pinch instabilities.

  1. A compact, coaxial shunt current diagnostic for X pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liangping; Zhang, Jinhai; Li, Mo; Zhang, Xinjun; Zhao, Chen; Zhang, Shaoguo

    2015-08-01

    A compact coaxial shunt was applied in X-pinches experiments on Qiangguang pulsed power generator. The coaxial shunt was designed to have a compact construction for smaller inductance and more, for conveniently assembling upon the X pinch load structure. The coaxial shunt is also a cheap current probe and was easily built by research groups. The shunt can monitor a 100 kA high current with a 100 ns rise time. The calibration results showed that the probe used in the experiments has a resistance of 3.2 mΩ with an uncertainty of 3%, and its response time to the step signal is less than 7 ns.

  2. {alpha} Heating in a Stagnated Z-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Appelbe, Brian; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2009-01-21

    A computational investigation of a scheme for magneto-inertial confinement fusion in a Z-pinch is carried out. In the scheme implosion of a deuterium-tritium fuel mass is preceded by formation of a hotspot containing warm, dense plasma on axis. The presence of the hotspot increases energy yield. Compression of the hotspot by the main fuel mass initiates thermonuclear burn. There is significant heating of the plasma by thermonuclear {alpha} particles which are confined by the strong magnetic field of the Z-pinch.

  3. ELECTROSTATIC MODE ASSOCIATED WITH PINCH VELOCITY IN RFPS

    SciTech Connect

    DELZANNO, GIAN LUCA; FINN, JOHN M.; CHACON, LUIS

    2007-02-08

    The existence of a new electrostatic instability is shown for RFP (reversed field pinch) equilibria. This mode arises due to the non-zero equilibrium radial flow (pinch flow). In RFP simulations with no-stress boundary conditions on the tangential velocity at the radial wall, this electrostatic mode is unstable and dominates the nonlinear dynamics, even in the presence of the MHD modes typically responsible for the reversal of the axial magnetic field at edge. Nonlinearly, this mode leads to two beams moving azimuthally towards each other, which eventually collide. The electrostatic mode can be controlled by using Dirichlet (no-slip) boundary conditions on the azimuthal velocity at the radial wall.

  4. Reversed field pinch current drive with oscillating helical fields

    SciTech Connect

    Farengo, Ricardo; Clemente, Roberto Antonio

    2006-04-15

    The use of oscillating helical magnetic fields to produce and sustain the toroidal and poloidal currents in a reversed field pinch (RFP) is investigated. A simple physical model that assumes fixed ions, massless electrons, and uniform density and resistivity is employed. Thermal effects are neglected in Ohm's law and helical coordinates are introduced to reduce the number of coupled nonlinear equations that must be advanced in time. The results show that it is possible to produce RFP-like magnetic field profiles with pinch parameters close to the experimental values. The efficiencies obtained for moderate resistivity, and the observed scaling, indicate that this could be a very attractive method for high temperature plasmas.

  5. On equilibrium parameters of a radiation-compression model pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Afonin, V.I.

    1994-12-31

    Up to date, the micropinch effect in high-current axially symmetric electric discharges was the subject of extensive theoretical and experimental research. The radiation compression mechanism proved to fit the experimental data better than any other model. It assumes the pinch equilibrium to occur when the surface radiation emission replaces the surface emission mode. The aim of the present work is to show that a quasi-stationary pinch state can exist in the case of an optically thin plasma as well. 8 figs.

  6. Lower Hybrid Wave Induced Rotation on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Ron; Podpaly, Yuri; Rice, John; Schmidt, Andrea

    2009-11-01

    Injection of RF power in the vicinity of the lower hybrid frequency has been observed to cause strong counter current rotation in Alcator C-Mod plasmas [1,2]. The spin-up rate is consistent with the rate at which momentum is injected by the LH waves, and also the rate at which fast electron momentum is transferred to the ions. A momentum diffusivity of ˜ 0.1 m^2/s is sufficient to account for the observed steady-state rotation. This value is also comparable with that derived from an analysis of rotation induced by RF mode conversion [3]. Radial force balance requires a radial electric field, suggesting a buildup of negative charge in the plasma core. This may be the result of an inward pinch of the LH produced fast electrons, as would be expected for resonant trapped particles. Analysis of the fast-electron-produced bremsstrahlung during LH power modulation experiments yields an inward pinch velocity of ˜ 1 m/s, consistent with the estimated trapped particle pinch velocity. [4pt] [1] A. Ince-Cushman, et.al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 102, 035002 (2009)[0pt] [2] J. E. Rice, et. al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 025004 (2009)[0pt] [3] Y. Lin, et.al., this meeting

  7. Viscosity dictates metabolic activity of Vibrio ruber

    PubMed Central

    Borić, Maja; Danevčič, Tjaša; Stopar, David

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about metabolic activity of bacteria, when viscosity of their environment changes. In this work, bacterial metabolic activity in media with viscosity ranging from 0.8 to 29.4 mPas was studied. Viscosities up to 2.4 mPas did not affect metabolic activity of Vibrio ruber. On the other hand, at 29.4 mPas respiration rate and total dehydrogenase activity increased 8 and 4-fold, respectively. The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) increased up to 13-fold at higher viscosities. However, intensified metabolic activity did not result in faster growth rate. Increased viscosity delayed the onset as well as the duration of biosynthesis of prodigiosin. As an adaptation to viscous environment V. ruber increased metabolic flux through the pentose phosphate pathway and reduced synthesis of a secondary metabolite. In addition, V. ruber was able to modify the viscosity of its environment. PMID:22826705

  8. Viscosity of Co-B melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olyanina, N. V.; Bel'tyukov, A. L.; Lad'yanov, V. I.

    2016-02-01

    The temperature and concentration dependences of the kinematic viscosity of Co-B melts with a boron content up to 50 at % are studied by torsional vibrations. The viscosity polytherms are satisfactorily described by the Arrhenius equation. An increase in the viscosity with an increase in the boron content from 15 to 36 at % is observed in the concentration dependence of the viscosity. The viscosity of the melt is almost independent of the boron content in concentration ranges of 0-15 and 36-50 at %. The concentration dependence of the melt viscosity of the system is calculated using various equations. The best coincidence with the experimental data is obtained for the calculation using the Kaptay equation.

  9. Saybolt universal viscosity converted to kinematic

    SciTech Connect

    Anaya, C.; Bermudez, O.

    1987-09-21

    This article describes a program for personal and handheld computers, written in Basic, which has been developed for the conversion of Saybolt universal viscosity in Saybolt Universal Seconds (SSU or SUS) to kinematic viscosity in centistokes (cSt), at any selected temperature. It was developed using the mathematical relationship presented in the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard D2161-82. In the standard, an equation is presented to convert kinematic viscosity to Saybolt universal viscosity, but nothing is presented to convert from Saybolt to kinematic because it is necessary to find the roots of a nonexplicit function. There are several numerical methods that can be used to determine the roots of the nonexplicit function, and therefore, convert Saybolt universal viscosity to kinematic viscosity. In the program, the first iteration of the second-order Newton-Raphson method is followed by the Wegstein method as a convergence accelerator.

  10. Compositional dependence of lower crustal viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinevar, William J.; Behn, Mark D.; Hirth, Greg

    2015-10-01

    We calculate the viscosity structure of the lower continental crust as a function of its bulk composition using multiphase mixing theory. We use the Gibbs free-energy minimization routine Perple_X to calculate mineral assemblages for different crustal compositions under pressure and temperature conditions appropriate for the lower continental crust. The effective aggregate viscosities are then calculated using a rheologic mixing model and flow laws for the major crust-forming minerals. We investigate the viscosity of two lower crustal compositions: (i) basaltic (53 wt % SiO2) and (ii) andesitic (64 wt % SiO2). The andesitic model predicts aggregate viscosities similar to feldspar and approximately 1 order of magnitude greater than that of wet quartz. The viscosity range calculated for the andesitic crustal composition (particularly when hydrous phases are stable) is most similar to independent estimates of lower crust viscosity in actively deforming regions based on postglacial isostatic rebound, postseismic relaxation, and paleolake shoreline deflection.

  11. Interinstrument reliability of the Jamar electronic dynamometer and pinch gauge compared with the Jamar hydraulic dynamometer and B&L Engineering mechanical pinch gauge.

    PubMed

    King, Theodore I

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study sought to determine interinstrument reliability of the Jamar electronic dynamometer and pinch gauge compared with the commonly used Jamar hydraulic dynamometer and B&L Engineering mechanical pinch gauge. METHOD. Twenty men and 20 women were tested for grip strength with the two different dynamometers, and 17 men and 25 women were tested for lateral pinch strength with the two different pinch gauges. RESULTS. Grip strength measurements were approximately 10% higher with the hydraulic dynamometer, and lateral pinch strength measurements were approximately 18% higher with the mechanical pinch gauge. Paired t tests and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used for statistical analyses. The two-tailed p value was <.0001, and the ICC indicated poor to moderate reliability. CONCLUSION. When retesting patients, it is recommended that occupational therapists use the same instrument to measure hand strength because interinstrument reliability may be lacking. PMID:23791323

  12. Transient Torque Method: A Fast and Nonintrusive Technique to Simultaneously Determine Viscosity and Electrical Conductivity of Semiconducting and Metallic Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.; Ban, H.; Lin, B.; Scripa, R. N.; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Zhu, S.

    2004-01-01

    A transient torque method was developed to rapidly and simultaneously determine the viscosity and electrical conductivity of liquid metals and molten semiconductors. The experimental setup of the transient torque method is similar to that of the oscillation cup method. The melt sample is sealed inside a fused silica ampoule, and the ampoule is suspended by a long quartz fiber to form a torsional oscillation system. A rotating magnetic field is used to induce a rotating flow in the conductive melt, which causes the ampoule to rotate around its vertical axis. A sensitive angular detector is used to measure the deflection angle of the ampoule. Based on the transient behavior of the deflection angle as the rotating magnetic field is applied, the electrical conductivity and viscosity of the melt can be obtained simultaneously by numerically fitting the data to a set of governing equations. The transient torque viscometer was applied successfully to measure the viscosity and electrical conductivity of high purity mercury at 53.4 C. The results were in excellent agreement with published data. The method is nonintrusive; capable of rapid measurement of the viscosity of toxic, high vapor pressure melts at elevated temperatures. In addition, the transient torque viscometer can also be operated as an oscillation cup viscometer to measure just the viscosity of the melt or as a rotating magnetic field method to determine the electrical conductivity of a melt or a solid if desired.

  13. Raynaud's disease: reduced hand blood flows with normal blood viscosity.

    PubMed

    McGrath, M A; Peek, R; Penny, R

    1978-04-01

    Hand blood flows and the blood and plasma viscosities were measured in patients with Raynaud's disease in an attempt to identify the mechanism of the episodic vascular insufficiency. Using venous occlusion plethysmography the following observations were made: (1) the hand blood flows were significantly less than in normals at 32 degrees, 27 degrees and 20 degrees C; (2) the percentage decrease in flow with cooling was greater in normals and (3) cooling of one hand from 32 degrees to 27 degrees C caused an abnormal decrease in flow through the contralateral hand. Using a rotational viscometer the blood and plasma viscosities were found to be normal at both high and low shear rates. The percentage increase in the blood viscosity with cooling from 35 degrees to 25 degrees was also normal. These studies demonstrate an increased constrictive response of the cutaneous vasculature of the hand to both local and reflex stimulation, and exclude a rheological abnormality, under conditions similar to those of the present study. PMID:277163

  14. Acoustic streaming flows and sample rotation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Eugene

    1998-11-01

    Levitated drops in a gas can be driven into rotation by altering their surrounding convective environment. When these drops are placed in an acoustic resonant chamber, the symmetry characteristics of the steady streaming flows in the vicinity of the drops determine the rotational motion of the freely suspended fluid particles. Using ultrasonic standing waves around 22 kHz and millimeter-size electrostatically levitated drops, we have investigated the correlation between the convective flow characteristics and their rotational behavior. The results show that accurate control of the drop rotation axis and rate can be obtained by carefully modifying the symmetry characteristics of the chamber, and that the dominant mechanism for rotation drive is the drag exerted by the air flow over the drop surface. In addition, we found that the rotational acceleration depends on the drop viscosity, suggesting that this torque is initially strongly influenced by differential flows within the drop itself. [Work sponsored by NASA].

  15. Holographic viscosity of fundamental matter.

    PubMed

    Mateos, David; Myers, Robert C; Thomson, Rowan M

    2007-03-01

    A holographic dual of a finite-temperature SU(Nc) gauge theory with a small number of flavors Nfviscosity to entropy ratio in these theories saturates the conjectured universal bound eta/s> or =1/4pi. Given the known results for the entropy density, the contribution of the fundamental matter eta fund is therefore enhanced at strong 't Hooft coupling lambda; for example, eta fund approximately lambda NcNfT3 in four dimensions. Other transport coefficients are analogously enhanced. These results hold with or without a baryon number chemical potential. PMID:17358523

  16. Rotating Wavepackets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Any free-particle wavepacket solution of Schrodinger's equation can be converted by differentiations to wavepackets rotating about the original direction of motion. The angular momentum component along the motion associated with this rotation is an integral multiple of [h-bar]. It is an "intrinsic" angular momentum: independent of origin and…

  17. Viscosity modification of high-oleic sunflower oil with polymeric additives for the design of new biolubricant formulations.

    PubMed

    Quinchia, L A; Delgado, M A; Valencia, C; Franco, J M; Gallegos, C

    2009-03-15

    Although most common lubricants contain mineral or synthetic oils as basestocks, new environmental regulations are demanding environmentally friendly lubricants. In this sense, vegetable oils represent promising alternatives to mineral-based lubricants because of their high biodegradability, good lubricity, and low volatility. However, their poor thermooxidative stability and the small range of viscosity represent a clear disadvantage to be used as suitable biolubricants. The main objective of this work was to develop new environmentally friendly lubricant formulations with improved kinematic viscosity values and viscosity thermal susceptibility. With this aim, a high-oleic sunflower oil (HOSO) was blended with polymeric additives, such as ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) and styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) copolymers, at different concentrations (0.5-5% w/w). Dynamic viscosity and density measurements were performed in a rotational rheometer and capillary densimeter, respectively, in a temperature range between 25 and 120 degrees C. An Arrhenius-like equation fits the evolution of viscosity with temperature fairly well. Both EVA and SBS copolymers may be satisfactorily used as additives to increase the viscosity of HOSO, thus improving the low viscosity values of this oil. HOSO viscosity increases with polymer concentration. Specifically, EVA/HOSO blends exhibit higher viscosity values, which are needed for applications such as lubrication of bearings and four-stroke engines. On the other hand, viscositythermal susceptibility of HOSO samples increases with EVA or SBS concentration. PMID:19368214

  18. X-rays from a microsecond X-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Appartaim, R. K.

    2013-08-28

    The characteristics of x-rays emitted by X-pinches driven by discharging a current of ∼320 kA with a quarter period of 1 μs in crossed 25 μm wires have been investigated. The x-ray emissions are studied using filtered silicon photodiodes, diamond radiation detectors, and pinhole cameras. The results show that predominantly x-rays from the microsecond X-pinch tend to be emitted in two distinct sets of bursts. The first is predominantly “soft,” i.e., with photon energy hν < 5 keV, followed by a second set of bursts beginning up to 100 ns following the initial bursts, and usually consisting of higher photon energies. Our results show, however, that the x-ray emissions do not contain a significant component with hν > 10 keV as might be expected from electron beam activity within the plasma or from the X-pinch diode. High-resolution images obtained with the observed x-rays suggest a well-defined small source of soft x-rays that demonstrates the potential of the microsecond X-pinch.

  19. Comment on Turbulent Equipartition Theory of Toroidal Momentum Pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T. S.; Diamond, P. H.; Gurcan, O. D.; Rewoldt, G.

    2009-03-12

    This response demonstrates that the comment by Peeters et al. contains an incorrect and misleading interpretation of our paper [Hahm et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 055902 (2008)] regarding the density gradient dependence of momentum pinch and the turbulent equipartition (TEP) theory.

  20. The Concept of the Pinch Helicon Magnetoplasma Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Celso

    2015-11-01

    A new concept of a high efficient electrodeless magnetoplasma-based electric thruster using a helicon plasma submitted to a pinch effect is proposed. This concept is intended to have high thrust for a short period, while reducing the plasma-wall contact. This proposal is highly suitable for rocket devices for faster satellites' orbital correction, a feasible way to lead manned missions into deep space, and for a more compact plasma sources for plasma materials for fusion studies. The pinch effect is created by a set of poloidal field coils placed around the insulating cylinder where the helical antenna is mounted. A pulsed current creates the pinch effect, which immediately insulates the plasma to the wall, thus reducing the perpendicular particle and energy losses. As a consequence, the axial flux, thus the thrust, should be increased because of particle balance. This may require an additional magnetic field produced by a single coil placed at the back of the helicon antenna (the gas entrance) to be acted during the pinch phase, leading to an unbalanced magnetic mirror-type configuration, therefore a net flux outwards. The combination with the double helicon structure may also maximize the efficiency. If everything is synchronized, there will be no gas or energy wasted, and the wall heat will be minimal, thus reducing the problems of material fatigue and failures, and making feasible the use of conventional materials.

  1. Z-pinch experiments on Saturn at 30 TW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spielman, R. B.; Dukart, R. J.; Hanson, D. L.; Hammel, B. A.; Hsing, W. W.; Matzen, M. K.; Porter, J. L.

    1989-12-01

    We have recently completed the first gas-puff Z-pinch experiments on Saturn (32 TW, 1.4 MJ, 1.9 MV, 40-ns FWHM, and 0.11 Ω). These experiments used the most powerful driver to date for fast Z-pinch experiments. Saturn, a 36 module accelerator, uses a double post-hole vacuum convolute to deliver the total machine current to the load. The 10-nH Saturn Z-pinch diode is capable of delivering a peak current of 10.5 MA. We diagnosed the current using segmented Rogowski coils at the insulator, resistive shunts in the vacuum transmission lines, and B-dot loops and piezoelectric pressure gauges near the load. On most shots electrical losses in the vacuum convolute were minimal with nearly complete current delivery to the Z-pinch load. We have conducted experiments with deuterium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon gas puffs. A maximum total radiation yield of 505+/-25 kJ was obtained with xenon. The peak keV x-ray yields were 100+/-5 kJ for neon L-shell radiation, 30+/-4 kJ for krypton l-shell radiation, and 39+/-4 kJ for argon K-shell radiation.

  2. Z-pinch experiments on Saturn at 30 TW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spielman, R. B.; Dukart, R. J.; Hanson, D. L.; Hammel, B. A.; Hsing, W. W.; Matzen, M. K.; Porter, J. L.

    We have recently completed the first gas-puff z-pinch on Saturn (32 TW, 1.4 MJ, 1.9 MV, 40-ns FWHM, and 0.11 ohm). These experiments used the most powerful driver to date for fast z-pinch experiments. Saturn, a 36 module accelerator, uses a double post-hole vacuum convolute to deliver the total machine current to the load. The 10-nH Saturn z-pinch diode is capable of delivering a peak current of 10.5 MA. We diagnosed the current using segmented Rogowski coils at the insulator, resistive shunts in the vacuum transmission lines, and B-dot loops and piezoelectric pressure gauges near the load. On most shots electrical losses in the vacuum convolute were minimal with nearly complete current delivery to the z-pinch load. We have conducted experiments with deuterium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon gas puffs. A maximum total radiation yield of 505 + or - 25 kJ was obtained with xenon. The peak keV X-ray yields were 100 + or - 5 kJ for neon K-shell radiation, 30 + or - 4 kJ for krypton L-shell radiation, and 39 + or - 4 kJ for argon K-shell radiation.

  3. MHD simulation studies of z-pinch shear flow stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraschiv, I.; Bauer, B. S.; Sotnikov, V. I.; Makhin, V.; Siemon, R. E.

    2003-10-01

    The development of the m=0 instability in a z-pinch in the presence of sheared plasma flows is investigated with the aid of a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation code (MHRDR). The linear growth rates are compared to the results obtained by solving the ideal MHD linearized equations [1] and to the results obtained using a 3D hybrid simulation code [2]. The instability development is followed into the nonlinear regime where its growth and saturation are examined. [1] V.I. Sotnikov, I. Paraschiv, V. Makhin, B.S. Bauer, J.-N. Leboeuf, and J.M. Dawson, "Linear analysis of sheared flow stabilization of global magnetohydrodynamic instabilities based on the Hall fluid mode", Phys. Plasmas 9, 913 (2002). [2] V.I. Sotnikov, V. Makhin, B.S. Bauer, P. Hellinger, P. Travnicek, V. Fiala, J.-N. Leboeuf, "Hybrid Simulations of Current-Carrying Instabilities in Z-pinch Plasmas with Sheared Axial Flow", AIP Conference Proceedings, Volume 651, Dense Z-Pinches: 5th International Conference on Dense Z-Pinches, edited by J. Davis et al., page 396, June 2002.

  4. Pinch-off Dynamics of Non-Newtonian Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, F. M.; Gutman, S. R.; Taborek, P.

    2010-11-01

    The pinch-off dynamics of a variety of shear-thinning fluids (foams, concentrated emulsions, and slurries) were studied using high speed videography. The pinch was characterized by the variation of the minimum neck radius rmin as a function of the time to pinch t, with rmin prop to t^α. The rheology of shear thinning fluids can be characterized by an exponent τ = k γ^n, with n < 1. We found that for a variety of shear-thinning fluids including mayonnaise and acrylic paint, rmin scales with t to a power α equal to the flow index for the particular fluid. The flow index was measured using a TA instruments AR-G2 rheometer. The flow index for acrylic paint was 0.440 +/- 0.014 and rmin scales with t to the 0.41 +/- 0.03; for mayonnaise the flow index was 0.355 +/- 0.014; and rmin scales with t to the 0.35+/- 0.02. To study the transition from conventional Newtonian pinch, we systematically varied the concentration of a water-Xanthan gum mixture.

  5. Stabilization in the ZaP Flow Z-Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumlak, U.; Blakely, J. M.; Chan, B.-J.; Golingo, R. P.; Knecht, S. D.; Nelson, B. A.; Oberto, R. J.; Sybouts, M. R.; Vogman, G. V.; Den Hartog, D. J.

    2009-06-01

    The ZaP flow Z-pinch experiment at the University of Washington investigates the innovative plasma confinement concept of using sheared flows to stabilize an otherwise unstable configuration. The ZaP experiment generates an axially flowing Z-pinch that is 1 m long with a 1 cm radius with a coaxial accelerator coupled to a pinch assembly chamber. Magnetic probes measure the fluctuation levels of the azimuthal modes m = 1, 2, and 3. After assembly, the plasma is magnetically confined for an extended quiescent period where the mode activity is significantly reduced. Experimental measurements show a sheared flow profile that is coincident with the low magnetic fluctuations during the quiescent period. Recent experimental modifications produce more energetic Z-pinch plasmas that exhibit the same general behavior. The plasma equilibrium is characterized with a suite of diagnostics that measure the plasma density, magnetic field, ion and electron temperatures, in addition to plasma flow. The equilibrium is shown to satisfy radial force balance.

  6. Pinch technique and the Batalin-Vilkovisky formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binosi, Daniele; Papavassiliou, Joannis

    2002-07-01

    In this paper we take the first step towards a nondiagrammatic formulation of the pinch technique. In particular we proceed into a systematic identification of the parts of the one-loop and two-loop Feynman diagrams that are exchanged during the pinching process in terms of unphysical ghost Green's functions; the latter appear in the standard Slavnov-Taylor identity satisfied by the tree-level and one-loop three-gluon vertex. This identification allows for the consistent generalization of the intrinsic pinch technique to two loops, through the collective treatment of entire sets of diagrams, instead of the laborious algebraic manipulation of individual graphs, and sets up the stage for the generalization of the method to all orders. We show that the task of comparing the effective Green's functions obtained by the pinch technique with those computed in the background field method Feynman gauge is significantly facilitated when employing the powerful quantization framework of Batalin and Vilkovisky. This formalism allows for the derivation of a set of useful nonlinear identities, which express the background field method Green's functions in terms of the conventional (quantum) ones and auxiliary Green's functions involving the background source and the gluonic antifield; these latter Green's functions are subsequently related by means of a Schwinger-Dyson type of equation to the ghost Green's functions appearing in the aforementioned Slavnov-Taylor identity.

  7. Advances in reversed field pinch theory and computation

    SciTech Connect

    Schnack, D.D.; Ho, Y.L.; Carreras, B.A.; Sidikman, K.; Craddock, G.G.; Mattor, N.; Nebel, R.A.; Prager, S.C.; Terry, P.W.; Zita, E.J.

    1992-12-31

    Advances in theory and computations related to the reversed field pinch (RFP) are presented. These are: (1) the effect of the dynamo on thermal transport; (2) a theory of ion heating due to dynamo fluctuations; (3) studies of active and passive feedback schemes for controlling dynamo fluctuations; and (4) an analytic model for coupled g-mode and rippling turbulence in the RFP edge.

  8. Computation of turbulent rotating channel flow with an algebraic Reynolds stress model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warfield, M. J.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1986-01-01

    An Algebraic Reynolds Stress Model has been implemented to modify the Kolmogorov-Prandtl eddy viscosity relation to produce an anisotropic turbulence model. The eddy viscosity relation becomes a function of the local turbulent production to dissipation ratio and local turbulence/rotation parameters. The model is used to predict fully-developed rotating channel flow over a diverse range of rotation numbers. In addition, predictions are obtained for a developing channel flow with high rotation. The predictions are compared with the experimental data available. Good predictions are achieved for mean velocity and wall shear stress over most of the rotation speeds tested. There is some prediction breakdown at high rotation (rotation number greater than .10) where the effects of the rotation on turbulence become quite complex. At high rotation and low Reynolds number, the laminarization on the trailing side represents a complex effect of rotation which is difficult to predict with the described models.

  9. From viscosity and surface tension to marangoni flow in melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shouyi; Zhang, Ling; Jahanshahi, Sharif

    2003-10-01

    This article covers some of our recent work on slag viscosity, the surface tension of liquid Cu-O alloys, and the relative role of Marangoni and bulk flow on refractory wear in iron-silicate slags. A viscosity model developed for slags containing SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, CaO, MgO, MnO, FeO, PbO, NiO, Cu2O, ZnO, CoO, and TiO2 is capable of representing the effects of temperature, silica, and network-modifier cations within a wide range of temperatures and compositions. It forms a useful part of a computational package for multiphase-equilibrium (MPE) calculations and for predicting slag viscosities. The models are well applicable to a range of industrial slags (blast furnace, new iron making, base-metal and Platinum Group Metals (PGM) smelting, and coal-ash slags). The package has also some capability of predicting the viscosity of slags containing suspended solids. The surface tension of liquid copper-oxygen alloys has also been analyzed. The adsorption behavior of oxygen in liquid copper is well represented by the combined Langmuir-Gibbs isotherm. According to the rate data for silica-rod dissolution in liquid iron-silicate slags at 1573 K, the preferential attack at the slag line diminishes as the linear velocity of flow at the surface of the rotating silica rod reaches 9 to 16 cm/s. A tentative analysis gives the critical condition, that relates the critical Reynolds (Re) and Marangoni (Ma) number by the equation Re*2=0.13 Ma*.

  10. An Empirical Viscosity Model for Coal Slags

    SciTech Connect

    Matyas, Josef; Cooley, Scott K.; Sundaram, S. K.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Edmondson, Autumn B.; Arrigoni, Benjamin M.

    2008-10-25

    Slags of low viscosity readily penetrate the refractory lining in slagging gasifiers, causing rapid and severe corrosion called spalling. In addition, a low-viscosity slag that flows down the gasifier wall forms a relatively thin layer of slag on the refractory surface, allowing the corrosive gases in the gasifier to participate in the chemical reactions between the refractory and the slag. In contrast, a slag viscosity of <25 Pa•s at 1400°C is necessary to minimize the possibility of plugging the slag tap. There is a need to predict and optimize slag viscosity so slagging gasifiers can operate continuously at temperatures ranging from 1300 to 1650°C. The approach adopted in this work was to statistically design and prepare simulated slags, measure the viscosity as a function of temperature, and develop a model to predict slag viscosity based on slag composition and temperature. Statistical design software was used to select compositions from a candidate set of all possible vertices that will optimally represent the composition space for 10 main components. A total of 21 slag compositions were generated, including 5 actual coal slag compositions. The Arrhenius equation was applied to measured viscosity versus temperature data of tested slags, and the Arrhenius coefficients (A and B in ln(vis) = A + B/T) were expressed as linear functions of the slag composition. The viscosity model was validated using 1) data splitting approach, and 2) viscosity/temperature data of selected slag compositions from the literature that were formulated and melted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The capability of the model to predict the viscosity of coal slags was compared with the model developed by Browning et al. because this model can predict the viscosity of slags from coal ash better than the most commonly used empirical models found in the literature.

  11. Digit mechanics in relation to endpoint compliance during precision pinch

    PubMed Central

    Nataraj, Raviraj; Audu, Musa L.; Li, Zong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the mechanics of the thumb and index finger in relation to compliant endpoint forces during precision pinch. The objective was to gain insight into how individuals modulate motor output at the digit endpoints and joints according to compliance-related sensory feedback across the digits. Thirteen able-bodied subjects performed precision pinch upon elastic resistance bands of a customized apparatus instrumented with six degree-of-freedom load-cells. Compliance levels were discretely adjusted according to the number of bands connected. Subjects were provided visual feedback to control the rate of force application. Fifteen repetitions of low-to-moderate force (<20 N) pinches were analyzed at each of five compliance levels, during which force and motion data were collected. Joint angles and moments normalized by pinch force magnitude were computed. Second-order polynomials were used to characterize joint mechanics as a function of compliance. The joint degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) at the finger showed greater dependence on compliance for angular position while the thumb joint DOFs demonstrated greater dependence for normalized joint moment. The digits also adjusted coordination of their endpoint forces according to compliance. Overall, the finger may be altering its position to increase load to the joints of the thumb with changing compliance. These findings describe naturally emergent changes in digit mechanics for compliant precision pinch, which involves motor execution in response to endpoint sensory feedback. Identifying and understanding these motor patterns may provide theoretical basis for restoring and rehabilitating sensorimotor pathologies of the hand. PMID:25596633

  12. Hysteretic pinching of human secondary osteons subjected to torsion.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, Maria-Grazia; Di Comite, Mariasevera; Mitov, Plamen; Kabo, John Michael

    2007-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of bone tissue's ultra- and micro- structure is fundamental to assessment of macroscopic bone mechanics. This paper explores the ultra-structural characteristics of human femoral tissue responsible for energy absorption of secondary osteons under mechanical loading. A novel mathematical interpretation of single osteon mechanics elucidates the behavior of the collagen-apatite interface. Fully calcified single osteon specimens were mechanically tested quasi-statically under cyclic torsional loading about their longitudinal axis. On each hysteretic diagram, all cycles after the initial monotonic cycle appear pinched and share two points. Stiffness degradation and pinching degradation were investigated on the torque versus deflection-angle-per-unit-length diagrams as the number of cycles increases, in relation to the appearance of osteons in cross-section under circularly polarized light microscopy. Material science's Bauschinger effect, originally defined for metals and later extended to structures reinforced with metal bars, is adapted to describe pinching. Material science's prying effect, defined as amplification of eccentric tensile load through lever action, is employed to explain pinching. The presence of the two points shared by all complete cycles is analyzed in terms of the mathematical fixed point theorem. The results allow formulation of the following conjectures: (1) the prying of carbonated apatite crystallites at the interface with the 40 nm long bands of non-calcified collagen fibrils causes pinching; (2) the prying effect increases with the increasing percentage of collagen-apatite elements that form a larger angle with the osteon axis; and (3) micro-cracks increase more in number than in length as the number of cycles increases. PMID:17399724

  13. Monitoring viscosity in asphalt binders using an ultrasonic guided wave approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haser, Alexandra N.; McGovern, Megan E.; Behnia, Behzad; Buttlar, William; Reis, Henrique

    2015-03-01

    A pulse-echo ultrasonic guided wave approach capable of monitoring the viscosity of asphalt binders as function of temperature is presented. The method consists of sending a torsional wave from one end of a cylindrical steel rod embedded in asphalt binder and receiving the reflected signals. Experiments were performed on several binders of different performance grades, at temperatures ranging from 25 to 1800C. First, the viscosity of the binders was measured using a rotational viscometer in accordance with ASTM standards. The change in signal strength of the end-of-waveguide reflection of the guided wave was also monitored for the same binders over the same range of temperatures. It was observed that the values obtained using the guided wave approach correlates well with the viscosity values obtained using the rotational viscometer. The method also appears capable of monitoring changes in viscosity due to aging of the binders. The method has the advantage of having no moving parts, which makes it attractive for the development of a system that is capable of monitoring viscosity in asphalt binders in the asphalt industry. Industrial applications examples are briefly summarized.

  14. Supergranulation rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schou, Jesper; Beck, John G.

    2001-01-01

    Simple convection models estimate the depth of supergranulation at approximately 15,000 km which suggests that supergranules should rotate at the rate of the plasma in the outer 2% of the Sun by radius. Previous measurements (Snodgrass & Ulrich, 1990; Beck & Schou, 2000) found that supergranules rotate significantly faster than this, with a size-dependent rotation rate. We expand on previous work and show that the torsional oscillation signal seen in the supergranules tracks that obtained for normal modes. We also find that the amplitudes and lifetimes of the supergranulation are size dependent.

  15. Surface dilatational viscosity of Langmuir monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Juan; Vogel, Michael; Hirsa, Amir

    2003-11-01

    With increased interest in microfluidic systems, interfacial phenomena is receiving more attention. As the length scales of fluid problems decrease, the surface to volume ratio increases and the coupling between interfacial flow and bulk flow becomes increasingly dominated by effects due to intrinsic surface viscosities (shear and dilatational), in comparison to elastic effects (due to surface tension gradients). The surface shear viscosity is well-characterized, as cm-scale laboratory experiments are able to isolate its effects from other interfacial processes (e.g., in the deep-channel viscometer). The same is not true for the dilatational viscosity, because it acts in the direction of surface tension gradients. Their relative strength scale with the capillary number, and for cm-scale laboratory flows, surface tension effects tend to dominate. In microfluidic scale flows, the scaling favors viscosity. We have devised an experimental apparatus which is capable of isolating and enhancing the effects of dilatational viscosity at the cm scales by driving the interface harmonically in time, while keeping the interface flat. In this talk, we shall present both the theory for how this works as well as experimental measurements of surface velocity from which we deduce the dilatational viscosity of several monolayers on the air-water interface over a substantial range of surface concentrations. Anomalous behavior over some range of concentration, which superficially indicates negative viscosity, maybe explained in terms of compositional effects due to large spatial and temporal variations in concentration and corresponding viscosity.

  16. Low shear viscosity due to Anderson localization

    SciTech Connect

    Giannakis, Ioannis; Hou Defu; Ren Haicang; Li Jiarong

    2008-01-15

    We study the Anderson localization effect on the shear viscosity in a system with random medium by Kubo formula. We show that this effect can suppress nonperturbatively the shear viscosity and other transport coefficients. The possible relevancy of such a suppression to the near perfect fluid behavior of the quark-gluon plasma created in heavy-ion collisions is discussed.

  17. Reducing blood viscosity with magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, R.; Huang, K.

    2011-07-01

    Blood viscosity is a major factor in heart disease. When blood viscosity increases, it damages blood vessels and increases the risk of heart attacks. Currently, the only method of treatment is to take drugs such as aspirin, which has, however, several unwanted side effects. Here we report our finding that blood viscosity can be reduced with magnetic fields of 1 T or above in the blood flow direction. One magnetic field pulse of 1.3 T lasting ˜1 min can reduce the blood viscosity by 20%-30%. After the exposure, in the absence of magnetic field, the blood viscosity slowly moves up, but takes a couple of hours to return to the original value. The process is repeatable. Reapplying the magnetic field reduces the blood viscosity again. By selecting the magnetic field strength and duration, we can keep the blood viscosity within the normal range. In addition, such viscosity reduction does not affect the red blood cells’ normal function. This technology has much potential for physical therapy.

  18. Plasma viscosity in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, A J; Jones, S C; Juby, L D; Axon, A T

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the relation of plasma viscosity to disease activity in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: Crohn's disease (n = 60) and ulcerative colitis (n = 71) were diagnosed on the basis of typical histological or radiological features. Active Crohn's disease was defined as a Crohn's disease activity index of 150 or over. Active ulcerative colitis was defined as a liquid stool passed three times a day or more with blood. Blood samples were assessed for haemoglobin concentration, total white cell count, platelets, plasma viscosity, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, serum albumin, and C-reactive protein. RESULTS: Plasma viscosity was higher in those with active Crohn's disease compared with those with inactive Crohn's disease or active ulcerative colitis. Plasma viscosity correlated significantly with erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and platelet count in patients with Crohn's disease. In ulcerative colitis plasma viscosity correlated only with serum C-reactive protein. Plasma viscosity showed a low sensitivity for detecting active Crohn's disease, with 48% of those with active disease having a plasma viscosity within the laboratory reference range. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma viscosity is related to disease activity in Crohn's disease, but is insufficiently sensitive for it to replace erythrocyte sedimentation rate as a measure of the acute phase response in Crohn's disease. PMID:1740516

  19. Formation of a pinched electron beam and an intense x-ray source in radial foil rod-pinch diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    Low-impedance rod-pinch diode experiments were performed on the MIG generator at Institute of High Current Electronics using an aluminum foil placed between concentric electrodes of a rod-pinch diode. The J × B force accelerates the foil plasma in the axial and radial directions. After the foil plasma is pushed beyond the tip of the rod, a vacuum gap and a pinched electron beam form. The anode and cathode plasmas expansion and the following plasmas sweeping up by the J × B force can result in repetitive gap formations and closures, which are evident in the several successive intense x-ray pulses. A 0.7-mm-size point-like x-ray source was realized using a 1-mm-diameter tungsten rod, tapered to a point over the last 10 mm. The results of experiments show that the foil-shorted rod-pinch diode configuration has the potential to form low-impedance diodes, to shorten x-ray pulse duration and to realize submillimeter spot-size x-ray sources.

  20. Research on pinching characteristics of electron beams emitted from different cathode surfaces of a rod-pinch diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Qiu, Aici; Zhang, Zhong; Zhang, Pengfei; Wang, Zhiguo; Yang, Hailiang

    2010-07-01

    The particle-in-cell code UNIPIC is used to simulate the working process of a rod-pinch diode and investigate the pinching characteristics of electron beams emitted from different cathode surfaces. The simulation results indicate that the electron beam emitted from the upstream surface pinches better than from other surfaces when all the three surfaces emit electrons. The charge-density deposition on the anode surface peaks at the rod tip while the deposited charge density is approximately uniform over the first 15 mm of the rod before rapidly increasing over the last 3 mm, indicating a large axial extent of electron deposition. For the case of single-surface emission, the pinching quality of the electron beam emitted from the downstream surface is better than those from other surfaces. The charge-density deposition peaks at the rod tip and decreases rapidly off the tip. Based on the relationship of Larmor radius, beam's self-magnetic field, and the spatial current distribution, the above simulation results are analyzed theoretically. The experiments are performed on the inductive voltage adder to examine the simulations. By comparing the axial distribution of the radiation on the anode rod measured with the pinhole camera and the on-axis forward x-ray dose measured with the LiF thermoluminescent detectors, the simulation results are verified. The electron emission suppression method and the impedance change for each case are investigated or discussed in this paper.

  1. Viscosity of Common Seed and Vegetable Oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wes Fountain, C.; Jennings, Jeanne; McKie, Cheryl K.; Oakman, Patrice; Fetterolf, Monty L.

    1997-02-01

    Viscosity experiments using Ostwald-type gravity flow viscometers are not new to the physical chemistry laboratory. Several physical chemistry laboratory texts (1 - 3) contain at least one experiment studying polymer solutions or other well-defined systems. Several recently published articles (4 - 8) indicated the continued interest in using viscosity measurements in the teaching lab to illustrate molecular interpretation of bulk phenomena. Most of these discussions and teaching experiments are designed around an extensive theory of viscous flow and models of molecular shape that allow a full data interpretation to be attempted. This approach to viscosity experiments may not be appropriate for all teaching situations (e.g., high schools, general chemistry labs, and nonmajor physical chemistry labs). A viscosity experiment is presented here that is designed around common seed and vegetable oils. With the importance of viscosity to foodstuffs (9) and the importance of fatty acids to nutrition (10), an experiment using these common, recognizable oils has broad appeal.

  2. Optical fiber-based fluorescent viscosity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidekker, Mark A.; Akers, Walter J.; Fischer, Derek; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A.

    2006-09-01

    Molecular rotors are a unique group of viscosity-sensitive fluorescent probes. Several recent studies have shown their applicability as nonmechanical fluid viscosity sensors, particularly in biofluids containing proteins. To date, molecular rotors have had to be dissolved in the fluid for the measurement to be taken. We now show that molecular rotors may be covalently bound to a fiber-optic tip without loss of viscosity sensitivity. The optical fiber itself may be used as a light guide for emission light (external illumination of the tip) as well as for both emission and excitation light. Covalently bound molecular rotors exhibit a viscosity-dependent intensity increase similar to molecular rotors in solution. An optical fiber-based fluorescent viscosity sensor may be used in real-time measurement applications ranging from biomedical applications to the food industry.

  3. Plasma viscosity elevations with simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, D. G.; Convertino, V. A.; Goldwater, D.; Ferguson, E. W.; Schoomaker, E. B.

    1986-01-01

    A hypothesis correlating an increase in blood viscosity during bed rest to a decrease in aerobic capacity during simulated weightlessness is tested. Eight human subjects were studied on the sixth day of bed rest during two consecutive 10-d bed rest periods separated by a 14-d recovery interval designed to simulate the flight-layover schedule of Shuttle astronauts. Plasma viscosity and volume were measured, together with maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max). An increase in hematocrit, plasma protein, and fibrinogen concentrations was found, contributing to an elevation in plasma viscosity. VO2max decreased significantly in the first, but not the second bed rest cycle, and though many individuals exhibited a decrease in plasma volume and aerobic capacity coupled with elevated plasma viscosity, correlations between these variables were lacking. It is concluded that the decrease in VO2max observed following simulated weightlessness cannot be attributed to alterations in muscle blood flow resulting from increased blood viscosity.

  4. Solar rotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziembowski, W.

    Sunspot observations made by Johannes Hevelius in 1642 - 1644 are the first ones providing significant information about the solar differential rotation. In modern astronomy the determination of the rotation rate is done in a routine way by measuring positions of various structures on the solar surface as well as by studying the Doppler shifts of spectral lines. In recent years a progress in helioseismology enabled determination of the rotation rate in the layers inaccessible for direct observations. There are still uncertainties concerning, especially, the temporal variations of the rotation rate and its behaviour in the radiative interior. We are far from understanding the observations. Theoretical works have not yet resulted in a satisfactory model for the angular momentum transport in the convective zone.

  5. Rotational aerophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, N. H.; Tarnopolsky, A. Z.; Lai, J. C. S.

    2002-03-01

    Free rotational aerophones such as the bullroarer, which consists of a wooden slat whirled around on the end of a string, and which emits a loud pulsating roar, have been used in many ancient and traditional societies for ceremonial purposes. This article presents an experimental and theoretical investigation of this instrument. The aerodynamics of rotational behavior is elucidated, and relates slat rotation frequency to slat width and velocity through the air. Analysis shows that sound production is due to generation of an oscillating-rotating dipole across the slat, the role of the vortices shed by the slat being relatively minor. Apparent discrepancies between the behavior of a bullroarer slat and a slat mounted on an axle in a wind tunnel are shown to be due to viscous friction in the bearings of the wind-tunnel experiment.

  6. Effect of Viscosity Measurement Method to Simulate High Pressure Die Casting of Thin-Wall AlSi10MnMg Alloy Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, B. W.; Li, L. X.; Liu, X.; Zhang, L. Q.; Xu, R.

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, a rotating cylinder viscometer (RCV) was adopted to measure the viscosity of AlSi10MnMg aluminum alloy. The results show that the measured viscosity is much higher than previously reported viscosity of aluminum alloys measured by oscillation vessel viscometer. The viscosity measured by RCV was introduced into the simulation of the filling progress of high pressure die casting (HPDC) for thin-walled castings of aluminum alloy (TWCA). The simulated results match well with the experimental results indicating that the RCV is the most appropriate to use for simulations of HPDC for TWCA.

  7. Eruptive viscosity and volcano morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posin, Seth B.; Greeley, Ronald

    1988-01-01

    Terrestrial central volcanoes formed predominantly from lava flows were classified as shields, stratovolcanoes, and domes. Shield volcanoes tend to be large in areal extent, have convex slopes, and are characterized by their resemblance to inverted hellenic war shields. Stratovolcanoes have concave slopes, whereas domes are smaller and have gentle convex slopes near the vent that increase near the perimeter. In addition to these differences in morphology, several other variations were observed. The most important is composition: shield volcanoes tend to be basaltic, stratovolcanoes tend to be andesitic, and domes tend to be dacitic. However, important exceptions include Fuji, Pico, Mayon, Izalco, and Fuego which have stratovolcano morphologies but are composed of basaltic lavas. Similarly, Ribkwo is a Kenyan shield volcano composed of trachyte and Suswa and Kilombe are shields composed of phonolite. These exceptions indicate that eruptive conditions, rather than composition, may be the primary factors that determine volcano morphology. The objective of this study is to determine the relationships, if any, between eruptive conditions (viscosity, erupted volume, and effusion rate) and effusive volcano morphology. Moreover, it is the goal of this study to incorporate these relationships into a model to predict the eruptive conditions of extraterrestrial (Martian) volcanoes based on their morphology.

  8. Advanced feedback control methods in EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Yadikin, D.; Brunsell, P. R.; Paccagnella, R.

    2006-07-15

    Previous experiments in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch device have shown the possibility of suppression of multiple resistive wall modes (RWM). A feedback system has been installed in EXTRAP T2R having 100% coverage of the toroidal surface by the active coil array. Predictions based on theory and the previous experimental results show that the number of active coils should be sufficient for independent stabilization of all unstable RWMs in the EXTRAP T2R. Experiments using different feedback schemes are performed, comparing the intelligent shell, the fake rotating shell, and the mode control with complex feedback gains. Stabilization of all unstable RWMs throughout the discharge duration of t{sub d}{approx_equal}10{tau}{sub w} is seen using the intelligent shell feedback scheme. Mode rotation and the control of selected Fourier harmonics is obtained simultaneously using the mode control scheme with complex gains. Different sensor signals are studied. A feedback system with toroidal magnetic field sensors could have an advantage of lower feedback gain needed for the RWM suppression compared to the system with radial magnetic field sensors. In this study, RWM suppression is demonstrated, using also the toroidal field component as a sensor signal in the feedback system.

  9. Advanced feedback control methods in EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadikin, D.; Brunsell, P. R.; Paccagnella, R.

    2006-07-01

    Previous experiments in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch device have shown the possibility of suppression of multiple resistive wall modes (RWM). A feedback system has been installed in EXTRAP T2R having 100% coverage of the toroidal surface by the active coil array. Predictions based on theory and the previous experimental results show that the number of active coils should be sufficient for independent stabilization of all unstable RWMs in the EXTRAP T2R. Experiments using different feedback schemes are performed, comparing the intelligent shell, the fake rotating shell, and the mode control with complex feedback gains. Stabilization of all unstable RWMs throughout the discharge duration of td≈10τw is seen using the intelligent shell feedback scheme. Mode rotation and the control of selected Fourier harmonics is obtained simultaneously using the mode control scheme with complex gains. Different sensor signals are studied. A feedback system with toroidal magnetic field sensors could have an advantage of lower feedback gain needed for the RWM suppression compared to the system with radial magnetic field sensors. In this study, RWM suppression is demonstrated, using also the toroidal field component as a sensor signal in the feedback system.

  10. The linear model and experimentally observed resonant field amplification in tokamaks and reversed field pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Pustovitov, V. D.

    2011-01-15

    A review is given of the experimentally observed effects related to the resonant field amplification (RFA) and the Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) instability in tokamaks and reversed field pinches (RFPs). This includes the feedback rotation of RWM in RFX-mod RFP, dependence of the RWM growth rate on the plasma-wall separation observed in JT-60U, appearance of the slowly growing RWM precursors in JT-60U and similar phenomena in other devices. The experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions based on the model comprising the Maxwell equations, Ohm's law for the conducting wall, the boundary conditions and assumption of linear plasma response to the external magnetic perturbations. The model describes the plasma reaction to the error field as essentially depending on two factors: the plasma proximity to the RWM stability threshold and the natural rotation frequency of the plasma mode. The linear response means that these characteristics are determined by the plasma equilibrium parameters only. It is shown that the mentioned effects in different devices under different conditions can be described on a common basis with only assumption that the plasma behaves as a linear system. To extend the range of the model validation, some predictions are derived with proposals for experimental studies of the RFA dynamics.

  11. Computation of shear viscosity of colloidal suspensions by SRD-MD

    SciTech Connect

    Laganapan, A. M. K.; Videcoq, A. Bienia, M.; Ala-Nissila, T.; Bochicchio, D.; Ferrando, R.

    2015-04-14

    The behaviour of sheared colloidal suspensions with full hydrodynamic interactions (HIs) is numerically studied. To this end, we use the hybrid stochastic rotation dynamics-molecular dynamics (SRD-MD) method. The shear viscosity of colloidal suspensions is computed for different volume fractions, both for dilute and concentrated cases. We verify that HIs help in the collisions and the streaming of colloidal particles, thereby increasing the overall shear viscosity of the suspension. Our results show a good agreement with known experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies. This work demonstrates the ability of SRD-MD to successfully simulate transport coefficients that require correct modelling of HIs.

  12. A three-dimensional model for the effective viscosity of bacterial suspensions.

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, B. M.; Sokolov, A.; Aranson, I. S.; Berlyand, L.; Karpeev, D. A.; Pennsylvania State Univ.; Illinois Inst. of Tech.

    2009-01-01

    We derive the effective viscosity of dilute suspensions of swimming bacteria from the microscopic details of the interaction of an elongated body with the background flow. An individual bacterium propels itself forward by rotating its flagella and reorients itself randomly by tumbling. Due to the bacterium's asymmetric shape, interactions with a prescribed generic (such as planar shear or straining) background flow cause the bacteria to preferentially align in directions in which self-propulsion produces a significant reduction in the effective viscosity, in agreement with recent experiments on suspensions of Bacillus subtilis.

  13. Thermal conductivity and viscosity measurements of ethylene glycol-based Al2O3 nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The dispersion and stability of nanofluids obtained by dispersing Al2O3 nanoparticles in ethylene glycol have been analyzed at several concentrations up to 25% in mass fraction. The thermal conductivity and viscosity were experimentally determined at temperatures ranging from 283.15 K to 323.15 K using an apparatus based on the hot-wire method and a rotational viscometer, respectively. It has been found that both thermal conductivity and viscosity increase with the concentration of nanoparticles, whereas when the temperature increases the viscosity diminishes and the thermal conductivity rises. Measured enhancements on thermal conductivity (up to 19%) compare well with literature values when available. New viscosity experimental data yield values more than twice larger than the base fluid. The influence of particle size on viscosity has been also studied, finding large differences that must be taken into account for any practical application. These experimental results were compared with some theoretical models, as those of Maxwell-Hamilton and Crosser for thermal conductivity and Krieger and Dougherty for viscosity. PMID:21711737

  14. The focal adhesion protein PINCH-1 associates with EPLIN at integrin adhesion sites

    PubMed Central

    Karaköse, Esra; Geiger, Tamar; Flynn, Kevin; Lorenz-Baath, Katrin; Zent, Roy; Mann, Matthias; Fässler, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT PINCH-1 is a LIM-only domain protein that forms a ternary complex with integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and parvin (to form the IPP complex) downstream of integrins. Here, we demonstrate that PINCH-1 (also known as Lims1) gene ablation in the epidermis of mice caused epidermal detachment from the basement membrane, epidermal hyperthickening and progressive hair loss. PINCH-1-deficient keratinocytes also displayed profound adhesion, spreading and migration defects in vitro that were substantially more severe than those of ILK-deficient keratinocytes indicating that PINCH-1 also exerts functions in an ILK-independent manner. By isolating the PINCH-1 interactome, the LIM-domain-containing and actin-binding protein epithelial protein lost in neoplasm (EPLIN, also known as LIMA1) was identified as a new PINCH-1-associated protein. EPLIN localized, in a PINCH-1-dependent manner, to integrin adhesion sites of keratinocytes in vivo and in vitro and its depletion severely attenuated keratinocyte spreading and migration on collagen and fibronectin without affecting PINCH-1 levels in focal adhesions. Given that the low PINCH-1 levels in ILK-deficient keratinocytes were sufficient to recruit EPLIN to integrin adhesions, our findings suggest that PINCH-1 regulates integrin-mediated adhesion of keratinocytes through the interactions with ILK as well as EPLIN. PMID:25609703

  15. Calculations of rotational flows using stream function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M.; Yam, C.; Tang, K.; Dwyer, H.

    1989-01-01

    The stream function equation is solved for steady two-dimensional (and axisymmetric) rotational flows. Both finite differences and finite volumes discretization techniques are studied, using generalized body fitted coordinates and unstructured staggered grids, respectively. For inviscid transonic flows, a new artificial viscosity scheme which does not produce any artificial vorticity is introduced, for the stability of the mixed flow calculations and for capturing shocks. The solution of Euler equations, in primitive variables, are also considered. The effects of the artificial viscosity and numerical boundary conditions on the total enthalpy and the vorticity distributions are demonstrated.

  16. Electrically rotating suspended films of polar liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirsavar, R.; Amjadi, A.; Tonddast-Navaei, A.; Ejtehadi, M. R.

    2011-02-01

    Controlled rotation of a suspended soap water film, simply generated by applying an electric field, has been reported recently. The film rotates when the applied electric field exceeds a certain threshold. In this study, we investigate the phenomenon in films made of a number of other liquids with various physical and chemical properties. Our measurements show that the intrinsic electrical dipole moments of the liquid molecules seems to be vital for the corresponding film rotation. All the investigated rotating liquids have a molecular electric dipole moment of above 1 Debye, while weakly polar liquids do not rotate. However, the liquids investigated here cover a wide range of physical parameters (e.g. viscosity, density, conductivity, etc.). So far, no significant correlation has been observed between the electric field thresholds and macroscopic properties of the liquids.

  17. Viscosity of concentrated solutions and of human erythrocyte cytoplasm determined from NMR measurement of molecular correlation times. The dependence of viscosity on cell volume.

    PubMed

    Endre, Z H; Kuchel, P W

    1986-08-01

    Metabolically active human erythrocytes were incubated with [alpha-13C]glycine which led to the specific enrichment of intracellular glutathione. The cells were then studied using 13C-NMR in which the longitudinal relaxation times (T1) and nuclear Overhauser enhancements of the free glycine and glutathione were measured. The T1 values of labelled glycine were also determined in various-concentration solutions of bovine serum albumin and glycerol and also of the natural abundance 13C of glycerol in glycerol solutions. From the T1 estimates the rotational correlation time (tau r) was calculated using a formula based on a model of an isotropic spherical rotor or that of a symmetrical ellipsoidal rotor; for glycine the differences in estimates of tau r obtained using the two models were not significant. From the correlation times and by use of the Stokes-Einstein equations viscosity and translational diffusion coefficients were calculated; thus comment can be made on the likelihood of diffusion control of certain enzyme-catalysed reactions in the erythrocyte. Bulk viscosities of the erythrocyte cytoplasm and the above-mentioned solutions were measured using Ostwald capillary viscometry. Large differences existed between the latter viscosity estimates and those based upon NMR-T1 measurements. We derived an equation from the theory of the viscosity of concentrated solutions which contains two phenomenological interaction parameters, a 'shape' factor and a 'volume' factor; it was fitted to data relating to the concentration dependence of viscosity measured by both methods. We showed, by using the equation and interaction-parameter estimates for a particular probe molecule in a particular solution, that it was possible to correlate NMR viscosity and bulk viscosity; in other words, given an estimate of the bulk viscosity, it was possible to calculate the NMR 'micro' viscosity or vice versa. However, the values of the interaction parameters depend upon the relative sizes of

  18. An Inertial-Fusion Z-Pinch Power Plant Concept

    SciTech Connect

    DERZON,MARK S.; ROCHAU,GARY E.; DEGROOT,J.; OLSON,CRAIG L.; PETERSON,P.; PETERSON,R.R.; SLUTZ,STEPHEN A.; ZAMORA,ANTONIO J.

    2000-12-15

    With the promising new results of fast z-pinch technology developed at Sandia National Laboratories, we are investigating using z-pinch driven high-yield Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) as a fusion power plant energy source. These investigations have led to a novel fusion system concept based on an attempt to separate many of the difficult fusion engineering issues and a strict reliance on existing technology, or a reasonable extrapolation of existing technology, wherever possible. In this paper, we describe the main components of such a system with a focus on the fusion chamber dynamics. The concept works with all of the electrically-coupled ICF proposed fusion designs. It is proposed that a z-pinch driven ICF power system can be feasibly operated at high yields (1 to 30 GJ) with a relatively low pulse rate (0.01-0.1 Hz). To deliver the required current from the rep-rated pulse power driver to the z-pinch diode, a Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) and the integrated target hardware are fabricated, vacuum pumped, and aligned prior to loading for each power pulse. In this z-pinch driven system, no laser or ion beams propagate in the chamber such that the portion of the chamber outside the RTL does not need to be under vacuum. Additionally, by utilizing a graded-density solid lithium or fluorine/lithium/beryllium eutectic (FLiBe) blanket between the source and the first-wall the system can breed its own fuel absorb a large majority of the fusion energy released from each capsule and shield the first-wall from a damaging neutron flux. This neutron shielding significantly reduces the neutron energy fluence at the first-wall such that radiation damage should be minimal and will not limit the first-wall lifetime. Assuming a 4 m radius, 8 m tall cylindrical chamber design with an 80 cm thick spherical FLiBe blanket, our calculations suggest that a 20 cm thick 6061-T6 Al chamber wall will reach the equivalent uranium ore radioactivity level within 100 years after a 30

  19. Viscosity measurement techniques in Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boromand, Arman; Jamali, Safa; Maia, Joao M.

    2015-11-01

    In this study two main groups of viscosity measurement techniques are used to measure the viscosity of a simple fluid using Dissipative Particle Dynamics, DPD. In the first method, a microscopic definition of the pressure tensor is used in equilibrium and out of equilibrium to measure the zero-shear viscosity and shear viscosity, respectively. In the second method, a periodic Poiseuille flow and start-up transient shear flow is used and the shear viscosity is obtained from the velocity profiles by a numerical fitting procedure. Using the standard Lees-Edward boundary condition for DPD will result in incorrect velocity profiles at high values of the dissipative parameter. Although this issue was partially addressed in Chatterjee (2007), in this work we present further modifications (Lagrangian approach) to the original LE boundary condition (Eulerian approach) that will fix the deviation from the desired shear rate at high values of the dissipative parameter and decrease the noise to signal ratios in stress measurement while increases the accessible low shear rate window. Also, the thermostat effect of the dissipative and random forces is coupled to the dynamic response of the system and affects the transport properties like the viscosity and diffusion coefficient. We investigated thoroughly the dependency of viscosity measured by both Eulerian and Lagrangian methodologies, as well as numerical fitting procedures and found that all the methods are in quantitative agreement.

  20. MODELING OF DIFFERENTIAL ROTATION IN RAPIDLY ROTATING SOLAR-TYPE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Hotta, H.; Yokoyama, T.

    2011-10-10

    We investigate differential rotation in rapidly rotating solar-type stars by means of an axisymmetric mean field model that was previously applied to the Sun. This allows us to calculate the latitudinal entropy gradient with a reasonable physical basis. Our conclusions are as follows. (1) Differential rotation approaches the Taylor-Proudman state when stellar rotation is faster than solar rotation. (2) Entropy gradient generated by the attached subadiabatic layer beneath the convection zone becomes relatively small with a large stellar angular velocity. (3) Turbulent viscosity and turbulent angular momentum transport determine the spatial difference of angular velocity {Delta}{Omega}. (4) The results of our mean field model can explain observations of stellar differential rotation.

  1. Dynamical influences on the moment of inertia tensor from lateral viscosity variations inferred from seismic tomographic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Shuxia; Yuen, David A.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the influences of lateral variations of viscosity on the moment of inertia tensor from viscous flows due to the density anomalies in the mantle inferred from seismic tomographic models. The scaling relations between the density and the seismic anomalies is taken as either a constant or a function increasing with depth in accord with the recent high-pressure experimental studies. The viscosity is taken as an exponential function of the 3D density anomaly. In models with an isoviscous background, the effects on the perturbed moment of inertia tensor from the lateral viscosity variations are smaller than those due to variations in the radial viscosity profiles. In mantle models with a background viscosity increasing with depth, the influences of the lateral viscosity variations are significant. The most striking feature in the latter case is that the two off-diagonal elements delta I(sub xz) and delta I(sub yz) in the inertia tensor exhibit greatest sensitivity to lateral variations of the viscosity. While the other elements of the inertia change by only about a few tens of percent in the range of lateral viscosity contrast considered (less than 300), delta I(sub xz) and delta I(sub yz) can vary up to 40 times even with a change in sign, depending on the radial viscosity stratification and the location of the strongest lateral variations. The increase in the velocity-density scaling relation with depth can reduce the influences of the lateral viscosity variations, but it does not change the overall sensitive nature of delta I(sub xz) and delta I(sub yz). This study demonstrates clearly that the lateral viscosity variations, especially in the upper mantle, must be considered in the determination of long-term polar wander, since the variations in the delta I(sub xz) and delta I(sub yz) terms are directly responsible for exciting rotational movements.

  2. Viscosity of multicomponent partially ionized gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armaly, B. F.; Sutton, K.

    1980-07-01

    An approximate method is proposed for predicting the viscosity of partially ionized gas mixtures. This technique expresses the viscosity of a mixture in terms of the viscosities of the individual pure components, is simple in form, and does not require large computer run times or storage. Thus, the technique is suitable for use with complex flowfields and heat-transfer calculations. Results for gas mixtures which are representative of the atmospheres of Jupiter, Earth, and Venus, are presented and it is shown that the results compare favorably with detailed kinetic-theory analyses.

  3. Viscoseal performance with rarefied-gas sealant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milligan, M. W.

    1971-01-01

    A fundamental study of viscoseals having a rarefied gas as the sealant has been conducted. Both experimental and analytical investigations are reported. Three different analytical models have been formulated and are described in detail. An experimental investigation has been conducted on multiple grooved two-inch diameter viscoseals over a wide range of gas densities and shaft speeds up to 30,000 rpm. Comparisons are presented between actual viscoseal performance and the theoretical predictions for both sealing coefficient and net leakage parameters as functions of the degree of gas rarefication. Recommendations are presented for the use of the analytical models.

  4. Viscosity of high-temperature iodine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Steve H.; Kunc, Joseph A.

    1991-01-01

    The viscosity coefficient of iodine in the temperature range 500 - 3000 K is calculated. Because of the low dissociation energy of the I2 molecules, the dissociation degree of the gas increases quickly with temperature, and I + I2 and I + I collisions must be taken into account in calculation of viscosity at temperatures greater than 1000 deg. Several possible channels for atom-atom interaction are considered, and the resulting collision integrals are averaged over all the important channels. It is also shown that the rigid-sphere model is inaccurate in predictions of the viscosity.

  5. Free Volume in Membranes: Viscosity or Tension?

    PubMed Central

    Markin, V. S.; Sachs, F.

    2016-01-01

    Many papers have used fluorescent probe diffusion to infer membrane viscosity but the measurement is actually an assay of the free volume of the membrane. The free volume is also related to the membrane tension. Thus, changes in probe mobility refer equally well to changes in membrane tension. In complicated structures like cell membranes, it appears more intuitive to consider variations in free volume as referring to the effect of domains structures and interactions with the cytoskeleton than changes in viscosity since tension is a state variable and viscosity is not.

  6. Viscoseal performance with rarefied-gas sealant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milligan, M. W.

    1973-01-01

    A fundamental study of viscoseals having a rarefied gas as the sealant was conducted. Both experimental and analytical investigations are reported. Three different analytical models were formulated and are described in detail. An experimental investigation was conducted on multiple grooved two-inch diameter viscoseals over a wide range of gas densities and shaft speeds up to 30,000 rpm. Comparisons are presented between actual viscoseal performance and the theoretical predictions for both sealing coefficient and net leakage parameters as functions of the degree of gas rarefication. Recommendations are presented for the use of the analytical models.

  7. Bulk viscosity of a pion gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Egang; Moore, Guy D.

    2011-04-01

    We compute the bulk viscosity of a gas of pions at temperatures below the QCD crossover temperature, for the physical value of mπ, to lowest order in chiral perturbation theory. Bulk viscosity is controlled by number-changing processes which become exponentially slow at low temperatures when the pions become exponentially dilute, leading to an exponentially large bulk viscosity ζ~(F08/mπ5)exp(2mπ/T), where F0≃93MeV is the pion decay constant.

  8. Shear viscosity in the postquasistatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Peralta, C.; Rosales, L.; Rodriguez-Mueller, B.; Barreto, W.

    2010-05-15

    We apply the postquasistatic approximation, an iterative method for the evolution of self-gravitating spheres of matter, to study the evolution of anisotropic nonadiabatic radiating and dissipative distributions in general relativity. Dissipation is described by viscosity and free-streaming radiation, assuming an equation of state to model anisotropy induced by the shear viscosity. We match the interior solution, in noncomoving coordinates, with the Vaidya exterior solution. Two simple models are presented, based on the Schwarzschild and Tolman VI solutions, in the nonadiabatic and adiabatic limit. In both cases, the eventual collapse or expansion of the distribution is mainly controlled by the anisotropy induced by the viscosity.

  9. Viscosity studies of water based magnetite nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anu, K.; Hemalatha, J.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetite nanofluids of various concentrations have been synthesized through co-precipitation method. The structural and topographical studies made with the X-Ray Diffractometer and Atomic Force Microscope are presented in this paper. The density and viscosity studies for the ferrofluids of various concentrations have been made at room temperature. The experimental viscosities are compared with theoretical values obtained from Einstein, Batchelor and Wang models. An attempt to modify the Rosensweig model is made and the modified Rosensweig equation is reported. In addition, new empirical correlation is also proposed for predicting viscosity of ferrofluid at various concentrations.

  10. MiRNA let-7g regulates skeletal myoblast motility via Pinch-2.

    PubMed

    Boudoukha, S; Rivera Vargas, T; Dang, I; Kropp, J; Cuvellier, S; Gautreau, A; Polesskaya, A

    2014-05-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression by RNA-binding proteins and by small non-coding RNAs plays an important role in cell biology. Our previous results show that in murine skeletal myoblasts, the expression of Pinch-2, a focal adhesion remodeling factor that regulates cell motility, is repressed by an RNA-binding protein IMP-2/Igf2bp2. We now show that the expression of Pinch-2 is also regulated by the miRNA let-7g. Let-7g and IMP-2 repress Pinch-2 expression independently of each other. A knock-down of let-7g leads to an increase in Pinch-2 expression, and to a decrease of cell motility, which can be reversed by a simultaneous knock-down of Pinch-2. We conclude that let-7g controls the motility of mouse myoblasts in cell culture by post-transcriptionally regulating the expression of Pinch-2. PMID:24613920

  11. Transport and Measurements of High-Current Electron Beams from X pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agafonov, Alexey V.; Mingaleev, Albert R.; Romanova, Vera M.; Tarakanov, Vladimir P.; Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; Pikuz, Sergey A.; Blesener, Isaac C.; Kusse, Bruce R.; Hammer, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Generation of electron beams is an unavoidable property of X-pinches and other pulsed-power-driven pinches of different geometry. Some issues concerning high-current electron beam transport from the X pinch to the diagnostic system and measurements of the beam current by Faraday cups with different geometry's are discussed. Of particular interest is the partially neutralized nature of the beam propagating from the X-pinch to a diagnostic system. Two scenarios of electron beam propagation from X-pinch to Faraday cup are analyzed by means of computer simulation using the PIC-code KARAT. The first is longitudinal neutralization by ions extracted from plasma at an output window of the X-pinch diode; the second is the beam transport through a plasma background between the diode and a diagnostic system.

  12. Transport and Measurements of High-Current Electron Beams from X pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Agafonov, Alexey V.; Mingaleev, Albert R.; Romanova, Vera M.; Tarakanov, Vladimir P.; Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; Pikuz, Sergey A.; Blesener, Isaac C.; Kusse, Bruce R.; Hammer, David A.

    2009-01-21

    Generation of electron beams is an unavoidable property of X-pinches and other pulsed-power-driven pinches of different geometry. Some issues concerning high-current electron beam transport from the X pinch to the diagnostic system and measurements of the beam current by Faraday cups with different geometry's are discussed. Of particular interest is the partially neutralized nature of the beam propagating from the X-pinch to a diagnostic system. Two scenarios of electron beam propagation from X-pinch to Faraday cup are analyzed by means of computer simulation using the PIC-code KARAT. The first is longitudinal neutralization by ions extracted from plasma at an output window of the X-pinch diode; the second is the beam transport through a plasma background between the diode and a diagnostic system.

  13. Kinetic simulation of neutron production in a deuterium z-pinch.

    SciTech Connect

    Mostrom, C.; Stygar, William A.; Thoma, Carsten; Welch, Dale Robert; Clark, R. E.; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Rose, David V.

    2010-11-01

    We have found computationally that, at sufficiently high currents, half of the neutrons produced by a deuterium z pinch are thermonuclear in origin. Early experiments below 1-MA current found that essentially all of the neutrons produced by a deuterium pinch are not thermonuclear, but are initiated by an instability that creates beam-target neutrons. Many subsequent authors have supported this result while others have claimed that pinch neutrons are thermonuclear. To resolve this issue, we have conducted fully kinetic, collisional, and electromagnetic simulations of the complete time evolution of a deuterium pinch. We find that at 1-MA pinch currents, most of the neutrons are, indeed, beam-target in origin. At much higher current, half of the neutrons are thermonuclear and half are beam-target driven by instabilities that produce a power law fall off in the ion energy distribution function at large energy. The implications for fusion energy production with such pinches are discussed.

  14. Light detonation wave in a cylindrical Z-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusupaliev, U.; Sysoev, N. N.; Shuteev, S. A.; Elenskii, V. G.

    2015-09-01

    A secondary compression wave previously observed by other researchers in a cylindrical Z-pinch has been identified in this work as a light detonation wave. It appears on the inner surface of a discharge chamber under the action of the intense ultraviolet radiation from a plasma pinch at the stage of its maximum compression. The condition of the light detonation wave has been determined experimentally. The dependence of its Mach number on a generalized dimensionless variable has been determined taking into account the conservation laws for the light detonation wave including the pressure of the gas, expenses on the formation of the surface plasma, and the energy of ionization of the gas involved in the wave. An analogy with the laser-supported detonation wave created by intense laser radiation has been revealed. The indicated dependence is within the error of measurement in agreement with the experimental data for light detonation waves created by both methods.

  15. Simplified scaling model for the THETA-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, K. J.; Thomson, D. B.

    1982-02-01

    A simple ID scaling model for the fast THETA-pinch was developed and written as a code that would be flexible, inexpensive in computer time, and readily available for use with the Los Alamos explosive-driven high-magnetic-field program. The simplified model uses three successive separate stages: (1) a snowplow-like radial implosion, (2) an idealized resistive annihilation of reverse bias field, and (3) an adiabatic compression stage of a BETA = 1 plasma for which ideal pressure balance is assumed to hold. The code uses one adjustable fitting constant whose value was first determined by comparison with results from the Los Alamos Scylla III, Scyllacita, and Scylla IA THETA-pinches.

  16. Terahertz pinch harmonics enabled by single nano rods.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeong-Ryeol; Bahk, Young-Mi; Choe, Jong Ho; Han, Sanghoon; Choi, Seong Soo; Ahn, Kwang Jun; Park, Namkyoo; Park, Q-Han; Kim, Dai-Sik

    2011-11-21

    A pinch harmonic (or guitar harmonic) is a musical note produced by lightly pressing the thumb of the picking hand upon the string immediately after it is picked [J. Chem. Educ. 84, 1287 (2007)]. This technique turns off the fundamental and all overtones except those with a node at that location. Here we present a terahertz analogue of pinch harmonics, whereby a metallic nano rod placed at a harmonic node on a terahertz nanoresonator suppresses the fundamental mode, making the higher harmonics dominant. Strikingly, a skin depth-wide nano rod placed at the mid-point turns off all resonances. Our work demonstrates that terahertz electromagnetic waves can be tailored by nanoparticles strategically positioned, paving important path towards terahertz switching and detection applications. PMID:22109504

  17. Tungsten Z-Pinch Long Implosions on the Saturn Generator

    SciTech Connect

    DOUGLAS,MELISSA R.; DEENEY,CHRISTOPHER; SPIELMAN,RICK B.; COVERDALE,CHRISTINE A.; RODERICK,N.F.; HAINES,M.G.

    1999-11-05

    Recent success on the Saturn and Z accelerators at Sandia National Laboratories have demonstrated the ability to scale z-pinch parameters to increasingly larger current pulsed power facilities. Next generation machines will require even larger currents (>20 MA), placing further demands on pulsed power technology. To this end, experiments have been carried out on Saturn operating in a long pulse mode, investigating the potential of lower voltages and longer implosion times while still maintaining pinch fidelity. High wire number, 25 mm diameter tungsten arrays were imploded with implosion times ranging from 130 to 240 ns. The results were comparable to those observed in the Saturn short pulse mode, with risetimes on the order of 4.5 to 6.5 ns. Experimental data will be presented, along with two dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations used to explain and reproduce the experiment.

  18. Modeling Z-Pinch implosions in two dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.; Bowers, R.; Brownell, J.

    1997-12-31

    Ideally, simulations of Z-Pinch implosions should provide useful information about important physics processes underlying observed experimental results and provide design capabilities for future experiments. With this goal the authors have developed a methodology for simulating hollow Z-Pinches in two dimensions and applied it to experiments conducted on the Pegasus I and Pegasus II capacitor banks, the Procyon explosion generator system, and the Saturn and PBFA-Z accelerators. In comparisons with experimental results the simulations have reproduced important features of the current drive, spectrum, radiation pulse shape, peak power and total radiated energy. Comparison of the instability development in the simulations with visible light framing camera photos has shown a close correlation with the observed instability wavelengths and amplitudes. Using this methodology the authors are analyzing recent Saturn and PBFA-Z experiments and applying the 2-D modeling in developing applications such as the dynamic hohlraum.

  19. High gain fusion in a Staged Z-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ney, Paul; Rahman, Hafiz; Wessel, Frank; Presura, Radu

    2013-10-01

    The implosion of a Staged Z-pinch is simulated for the Sandia National Laboratories, ZR accelerator. The pinch is comprised of a silver (Ag) plasma shell, 3-mm outer radius, 0.01-cm thick, imploding onto a uniform fill (target) of deuterium-tritium (DT); the Z-R parameters are: 130 ns, 27 MA, 22 MJ; the 2-1/2 D, radiation-MHD code is MACH2. Magnetosonic shock waves generated during implosion propagate at different speeds in the liner and target, producing a shock front at the interface, and a conduction channel ahead of the liner. The interface remains stable even as the outer-surface of the liner is RT unstable. At peak compression target plasma hot spots trigger ignition with a fusion yield of 200 MJ and a net-energy gain approaching 10. The stability remains robust and the gain is unaffected for perturbations ranging from 2-5%.

  20. Optimization of Capsule Symmetry in Z-Pinch Driven Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesey, R. A.; Cuneo, M.; Hanson, D.; Porter, J.; Mehlhorn, T.; Ruggles, L.; Simpson, W.; Vargas, M.; Hammer, J.; Landen, O.

    1999-11-01

    The uniformity of the radiation flux incident on the capsule is a critical issue for indirect drive fusion using the z-pinch driven hohlraum high-yield concept(J.H. Hammer et al., Phys. Plas. 6), 2129 (1999).. Experiments on the Z accelerator at Sandia have demonstrated the ability to diagnose the uniformity of the flux striking a foam ball (surrogate capsule)(P.A. Amendt et al., Phys. Plas. 4), 1862 (1997); S.G. Glendinning et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 536 (1999).. These single-sided drive experiments have been modeled using radiosity and radiation-hydrodynamics codes, yielding agreement with the measured ablation rate vs. angle on the foam ball. Flux uniformity at the 1-2% level needed for high-convergence capsule implosions requires a 2-sided drive (top and bottom z-pinch) configuration. Constrained optimization methods have identified hohlraum geometries with improved symmetry.

  1. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  2. Rotation Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In aircraft turbine engine research, certain investigations require extremely precise measurement of the position of a rotating part, such as the rotor, a disc-like part of the engine's compressor which revolves around a shaft at extremely high speeds. For example, in studies of airflow velocity within a compressor, researchers need to know-for data correlation the instantaneous position of a given spot on the rotor each time a velocity measurement is made. Earlier methods of measuring rotor shaft angle required a physical connection to the shaft, which limited the velocity of the rotating object.

  3. Density peaking and turbulent pinch in DIII-D discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada-Mila, C.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.

    2006-07-15

    A study of density peaking and particle flow in low confinement (L-mode) DIII-D discharges [G. R. McKee, C. C. Petty, R. E. Waltz et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1235 (2001)], using global gyrokinetic simulations, is presented. It is found that under experimental conditions, in particular when realistic collisionality is included, a turbulent pinch driven by electron temperature and density gradients can occur.

  4. Sausage mode of a pinched charged particle beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.

    1981-02-10

    The axisymmetric oscillations of a self-pinched charged particle beam are analyzed using a dispersion relation derived from a 3/2 dimensional model. This calculation includes the effects of rounded profiles, finite conductivity, a steady return current, and phase mix damping among particle orbits. However, only the lowest order radial mode of distortion is treated, and this is done in an approximate fashion.

  5. Cu spectroscopy from a z-pinch plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Arati; Clark, Robert W.; Ouart, Nicholas D.; Giuliani, John L.

    2014-11-01

    Recent improvements in diagnostic techniques at the Sandia Laboratories Z accelerator have facilitated the production of very detailed x-ray spectral data in the range of 1-20 keV. The high energy density plasma produced in a z-pinch is inherently in non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE). We therefore employ a NLTE collisional equilibrium model in a 1D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics code to simulate the dynamics of the pinch and to generate synthetic emission spectra. We will discuss the effects on radiation spectra and the yields of using simplifying assumptions in the atomic model and/or the radiation transport. X-ray emission from moderately high atomic number plasmas such as Fe and Cu wire array implosions often include substantial 2p-1s K-α radiation. In a z-pinch plasma, K-shell vacancies can be produced by e-beams, hot electrons at the tail of a Maxwellian and also by photopumping from energetic photons emitted near the pinch axis. In the Z-1975 Cu wire implosion, K-α lines from various ionization stages of Cu as well as from minor constituents including Ni, Fe and Cr are observed. We have calculated K-α production within a full simulation of a Cu implosion, including contributions from energetic electrons and photons. Photo-pumped K-α emission can be distinguished from that produced by e-beams; K-shell vacancies will be produced near the axis for a beam, and near the outer edge of the plasma for energetic photons. Spectroscopic modeling of these K-α lines as well as K- and L-shell emission from valence electrons can provide quantitative diagnostics of plasma parameters. This methodology can also be used to investigate K-α emission from other laboratory experiments such as EBIT and astrophysical plasmas.

  6. Characteristics of switching plasma in an inverse-pinch switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ja H.; Choi, Sang H.; Venable, Demetrius D.; Han, Kwang S.; Nam, Sang H.

    1993-01-01

    Characteristics of the plasma that switches on tens of giga volt-ampere in an inverse-pinch plasma switch (INPIStron) have been made. Through optical and spectroscopic diagnostics of the current carrying plasma, the current density, the motion of current paths, dominant ionic species have been determined in order to access their effects on circuit parameters and material erosion. Also the optimum operational condition of the plasma-puff triggering method required for azimuthally uniform conduction in the INPIStron has been determined.

  7. Necessary stability condition for field-reversed theta pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, J. R.

    1981-03-01

    Toroidal systems of arbitrary cross section without toroidal magnetic field are analyzed via the double adiabatic fluid equations. Such systems are shown to be unstable if there exists one closed field line on which the average of kapparB/sup 2/ is positive, where kappa is the curvature. A similar criterion is derived for linear systems and is applied to a noncircular z-pinch.

  8. Quasi-steady operation of reversed field pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Nebel, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    A three fluid, Lagrangian mesh, transport and stability code (RFPBRN) has been developed and applied to the Reversed Field Pinch reactor concept. Using a circular cylinder, quasi-static approximation, RFPBRN follows the time evolution of the temperature, density, and magnetic field profiles for the RFP while simultaneously monitoring ideal MHD stability. Local stability is monitored for Suydam modes while global stability is monitored using a Rayleigh-Ritz expansion of the energy principle.

  9. A microfluidic device for simultaneous measurement of viscosity and flow rate of blood in a complex fluidic network

    PubMed Central

    Jun Kang, Yang; Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Blood viscosity has been considered as one of important biophysical parameters for effectively monitoring variations in physiological and pathological conditions of circulatory disorders. Standard previous methods make it difficult to evaluate variations of blood viscosity under cardiopulmonary bypass procedures or hemodialysis. In this study, we proposed a unique microfluidic device for simultaneously measuring viscosity and flow rate of whole blood circulating in a complex fluidic network including a rat, a reservoir, a pinch valve, and a peristaltic pump. To demonstrate the proposed method, a twin-shaped microfluidic device, which is composed of two half-circular chambers, two side channels with multiple indicating channels, and one bridge channel, was carefully designed. Based on the microfluidic device, three sequential flow controls were applied to identify viscosity and flow rate of blood, with label-free and sensorless detection. The half-circular chamber was employed to achieve mechanical membrane compliance for flow stabilization in the microfluidic device. To quantify the effect of flow stabilization on flow fluctuations, a formula of pulsation index (PI) was analytically derived using a discrete fluidic circuit model. Using the PI formula, the time constant contributed by the half-circular chamber is estimated to be 8 s. Furthermore, flow fluctuations resulting from the peristaltic pumps are completely removed, especially under periodic flow conditions within short periods (T < 10 s). For performance demonstrations, the proposed method was applied to evaluate blood viscosity with respect to varying flow rate conditions [(a) known blood flow rate via a syringe pump, (b) unknown blood flow rate via a peristaltic pump]. As a result, the flow rate and viscosity of blood can be simultaneously measured with satisfactory accuracy. In addition, the proposed method was successfully applied to identify the viscosity of rat blood, which circulates in a

  10. In-flight surface tension and viscosity measurements of inkjet printed droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staat, Hendrik; van der Bos, Arjan; van den Berg, Marc; Reinten, Hans; Wijshoff, Herman; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-11-01

    In modern drop-on-demand inkjet printing, the jetted liquid is a mixture of solvents, pigments and surfactants. In order to predict the droplet formation process, it is of importance to know the liquid properties. Surface tension is not constant at the timescale of droplet formation for a liquid that contains surfactants, making it non-trivial to determine the surface tension of the ink directly. Therefore we developed a technique to measure the surface tension of liquids during inkjet printing. We use high speed imaging to record the shape oscillation of a microdroplet within the first few hundred microseconds after droplet pinch-off. The frequency of oscillation depends on the surface tension, so by determining this frequency, we can measure the surface tension. The decay of oscillation amplitude is set by the viscosity, so we can also determine the viscosity with this technique. We use this technique to study the effect of surfactants on the surface tension of ink during the inkjet printing process.

  11. Shear viscosity in magnetized neutron star crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofengeim, D. D.; Yakovlev, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    The electron shear viscosity due to Coulomb scattering of degenerate electrons by atomic nuclei throughout a magnetized neutron star crust is calculated. The theory is based on the shear viscosity coefficient calculated neglecting magnetic fields but taking into account gaseous, liquid and solid states of atomic nuclei, multiphonon scattering processes, and finite sizes of the nuclei albeit neglecting the effects of electron band structure. The effects of strong magnetic fields are included in the relaxation time approximation with the effective electron relaxation time taken from the field-free theory. The viscosity in a magnetized matter is described by five shear viscosity coefficients. They are calculated and their dependence on the magnetic field and other parameters of dense matter is analyzed. Possible applications and open problems are outlined.

  12. Viscosity of Sheared Helical filament Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartucci, Matthew; Urbach, Jeff; Blair, Dan; Schwenger, Walter

    The viscosity of suspensions can be dramatically affected by high aspect ratio particles. Understanding these systems provides insight into key biological functions and can be manipulated for many technological applications. In this talk, the viscosity as a function of shear rate of suspensions of helical filaments is compared to that of suspensions of straight rod-like filaments. Our goal is to determine the impact of filament geometry on low volume fraction colloidal suspensions in order to identify strategies for altering viscosity with minimal volume fraction. In this research, the detached flagella of the bacteria Salmonella Typhimurium are used as a model system of helical filaments and compared to mutated straight flagella of the Salmonella. We compare rheological measurements of the suspension viscosity in response to shear flow and use a combination of the rheology and fluorescence microscopy to identify the microstructural changes responsible for the observed rheological response.

  13. Sludge based Bacillus thuringiensis biopesticides: viscosity impacts.

    PubMed

    Brar, S K; Verma, M; Tyagi, R D; Valéro, J R; Surampalli, R Y

    2005-08-01

    Viscosity studies were performed on raw, pre-treated (sterilised and thermal alkaline hydrolysed or both types of treatment) and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) fermented sludges at different solids concentration (10-40 g/L) for production of biopesticides. Correlations were established among rheological parameter (viscosity), solids (total and dissolved) concentration and entomotoxicity (Tx) of Bt fermented sludges. Exponential and power laws were preferentially followed by hydrolysed fermented compared to raw fermented sludge. Soluble chemical oxygen demand variation corroborated with increase in dissolved solids concentration on pre-treatments, contributing to changes in viscosity. Moreover, Tx was higher for hydrolysed fermented sludge in comparison to raw fermented sludge owing to increased availability of nutrients and lower viscosity that improved oxygen transfer. The shake flask results were reproducible in fermenter. This study will have major impact on selecting fermentation, harvesting and formulation techniques of Bt fermented sludges for biopesticide production. PMID:15979118

  14. Second coefficient of viscosity in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, Robert L.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Zheng, Zhonquan

    1991-01-01

    Acoustic attenuation measurements in air were analyzed in order to estimate the second coefficient of viscosity. Data over a temperature range of 11 C to 50 C and at relative humidities between 6 percent and 91 percent were used. This analysis showed that the second coefficient of viscosity varied between 1900 and 20,000 times larger than the dynamic or first coefficient of viscosity over the temperature and humidity range of the data. In addition, the data showed that the molecular relaxation effects, which are responsible for the magnitude of the second coefficient of viscosity, place severe limits on the use of time-independent, thermodynamic equations of state. Compressible flows containing large streamwise velocity gradients, like shock waves, which cause significant changes in particle properties to occur during time intervals shorter than hundredths of seconds, must be modeled using dynamic equations of state. The dynamic model approach is described briefly.

  15. Hydrophilicity and the viscosity of interfacial water.

    PubMed

    Goertz, Matthew P; Houston, J E; Zhu, X-Y

    2007-05-01

    We measure the viscosity of nanometer-thick water films at the interface with an amorphous silica surface. We obtain viscosity values from three different measurements: friction force in a water meniscus formed between an oxide-terminated W tip and the silica surface under ambient conditions; similar measurements for these interfaces under water; and the repulsive "drainage" force as the two surfaces approach at various speeds in water. In all three cases, we obtain effective viscosities that are approximately 10(6) times greater than that of bulk water for nanometer-scale interfacial separations. This enhanced viscosity is not observed when we degrade the hydrophilicity of the surface by terminating it with -H or -CH3. In view of recent results from other interfaces, we conclude that the criterion for the formation of a viscous interphase is the degree of hydrophilicity of the interfacial pair. PMID:17408290

  16. Quartz resonator fluid density and viscosity monitor

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Stephen J.; Wiczer, James J.; Cernosek, Richard W.; Frye, Gregory C.; Gebert, Charles T.; Casaus, Leonard; Mitchell, Mary A.

    1998-01-01

    A pair of thickness-shear mode resonators, one smooth and one with a textured surface, allows fluid density and viscosity to be independently resolved. A textured surface, either randomly rough or regularly patterned, leads to trapping of liquid at the device surface. The synchronous motion of this trapped liquid with the oscillating device surface allows the device to weigh the liquid; this leads to an additional response that depends on liquid density. This additional response enables a pair of devices, one smooth and one textured, to independently resolve liquid density and viscosity; the difference in responses determines the density while the smooth device determines the density-viscosity product, and thus, the pair determines both density and viscosity.

  17. Measurement of DWPF glass viscosity - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J.R.

    2000-02-17

    This report details the results of a scoping study funded by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for the measurement of melt viscosities for simulated glasses representative of Macrobatch 2 (Tank 42/51 feed).

  18. Diagnostics for Z-pinch implosion experiments on PTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, X. D. Huang, X. B. Zhou, S. T. Zhang, S. Q. Dan, J. K. Li, J. Cai, H. C. Wang, K. L. Ouyang, K. Xu, Q. Duan, S. C. Chen, G. H. Wang, M. Feng, S. P. Yang, L. B. Xie, W. P. Deng, J. J.

    2014-12-15

    The preliminary experiments of wire array implosion were performed on PTS, a 10 MA z-pinch driver with a 70 ns rise time. A set of diagnostics have been developed and fielded on PTS to study pinch physics and implosion dynamics of wire array. Radiated power measurement for soft x-rays was performed by multichannel filtered x-ray diode array, and flat spectral responses x-ray diode detector. Total x-ray yield was measured by a calibrated, unfiltered nickel bolometer which was also used to obtain pinch power. Multiple time-gated pinhole cameras were used to produce spatial-resolved images of x-ray self-emission from plasmas. Two time-integrated pinhole cameras were used respectively with 20-μm Be filter and with multilayer mirrors to record images produced by >1-keV and 277±5 eV self-emission. An optical streak camera was used to produce radial implosion trajectories, and an x-ray streak camera paired with a horizontal slit was used to record a continuous time-history of emission with one-dimensional spatial resolution. A frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) was used to produce four frame laser shadowgraph images with 6 ns time interval. We will briefly describe each of these diagnostics and present some typical results from them.

  19. Fluid Closure, Theory, Relations to Particle Pinches, Fluid Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, Jan; Zagorodny, Anatoly

    2011-10-03

    The fluid closure in a toroidal plasma is discussed. In particular the relation to particle and temperature pinches is considered. Implications for the radial growth of transport coefficients are given. A particularly significant effect of dissipative kinetic resonances is that they reduce particle pinches. This is shown both for a gyrofluid and a quasilinear kinetic model. In particular the fact that the ITG and Trapped electron modes are resonant modes and that the effect of dissipative kinetic resonanses is ignorable for impurities but not for main ions shows that the closure aspect in a fluid description and strongly nonlinear effects in a kinetic description are instrumental for a proper description of particle pinches. We assume here that only the ITG mode due to main ions is unstable. The ITG mode due to impurities would, of course, be sensitive to the resonance with impurities. This also addresses the question of sources in the Fokker-Planck equation. The point is that we need only to worry about resonant sources for the wave dynamics, since RF heating with phase velocity or NBI heating with beam velocity far from the drift waves will appear only as ideal heat sources. The difference in phase velocity between drift waves and RF waves is much larger than the difference in thermal velocity of main ions and typical impurity ions.

  20. Dynamics of conical wire array Z-pinch implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Ampleford, D. J.; Lebedev, S. V.; Bland, S. N.; Bott, S. C.; Chittenden, J. P.; Jennings, C. A.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Ivanov, V. V.; Fedin, D. A.; Laca, P. J.; Yilmaz, M. F.; Nalajala, V.; Shrestha, I.; Williamson, K.; Osborne, G.; Haboub, A.; Ciardi, A.

    2007-10-15

    A modification of the wire array Z pinch, the conical wire array, has applications to the understanding of wire array implosions and potentially to pulse shaping relevant to inertial confinement fusion. Results are presented from imploding conical wire array experiments performed on university scale 1 MA generators--the MAGPIE generator (1 MA, 240 ns) at Imperial College London [I. H. Mitchell et al., Rev. Sci Instrum. 67, 1533 (1996)] and the Nevada Terawatt Facility's Zebra generator (1 MA, 100 ns) at the University of Nevada, Reno [B. Bauer et al., in Dense Z-Pinches, edited by N. Pereira, J. Davis, and P. Pulsifer (AIP, New York, 1997), Vol. 409, p. 153]. This paper will discuss the implosion dynamics of conical wire arrays. Data indicate that mass ablation from the wires in this complex system can be reproduced with a rocket model with fixed ablation velocity. Modulations in the ablated plasma are present, the wavelength of which is invariant to a threefold variation in magnetic field strength. The axial variation in the array leads to a zippered precursor column formation. An initial implosion of a magnetic bubble near the cathode is followed by the implosion zippering upwards. Spectroscopic data demonstrating a variation of plasma parameters (e.g., electron temperature) along the Z-pinch axis is discussed, and experimental data are compared to magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

  1. Effects of EVA spacesuit glove on grasping and pinching tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appendino, Silvia; Battezzato, Alessandro; Chen Chen, Fai; Favetto, Alain; Mousavi, Mehdi; Pescarmona, Francesco

    2014-03-01

    The human hand has a wide range of degrees of freedom, allowing a great variety of movements, and is also one of the most sensitive parts of the human body. Due to these characteristics, it is the most important tool for astronauts to perform extravehicular activities (EVA). However, astronauts must wear mandatory EVA equipment to be protected from the harsh conditions in space and this strongly reduces hand performance, in particular as regards dexterity, tactile perception, mobility and fatigue. Several studies have been conducted to determine the influence of the EVA glove on manual capabilities, both in the past and more recently. This study presents experimental data regarding the performance decline occurring in terms of force and fatigue in the execution of grasping and pinching tasks when wearing an EVA glove, in pressurized and unpressurized conditions, compared with barehanded potential. Results show that wearing the unpressurized EVA glove hinders grip and lateral pinch performances, dropping exerted forces to about 50-70%, while it barely affects two- and three-finger pinch performances. On the other hand, wearing the pressurized glove worsens performances in all cases, reducing forces to about 10-30% of barehanded potential. The results are presented and compared with the previous literature.

  2. Hybrid X Pinches at 1.2 MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; Pikuz, Sergey A.; Cahill, Adam D.; Hoyt, Cad L.; Hammer, David A.; Tilikin, Ivan N.; Mishin, Sergey N.; Mingaleev, Albert R.

    2012-10-01

    A hybrid X-pinch (HXP) configuration consisting of solid conical electrodes connected by a wire as a central load has been tested on four different generators with currents varying from 200 kA to 1.2 MA and risetimes ranging from 50 ns to 170 ns. It was possible to optimize the wire material, length and diameter so that most of these HXPs generated an intense single burst of soft x-rays with energy yield comparable with that produced by standard X pinches. This configuration is useful primarily for pulsers with MA current level and was suggested to simplify standard wire X-pinch configurations with many wires. Wires as well as hollow and filled tubes made of Al, Ni and polyethylene were tested as a load on the COBRA pulser (1.2 MA, 100 ns rise time). The filled tubes expand the range of materials that can be studied under extreme conditions. Electron beams generation in HXPs has also been studied.

  3. Influence of melt viscosity of basaltic and andesitic composition on seismic attenuation in partially molten gabbronorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, Fabrice R.; Neuville, Daniel R.; Ildefonse, Benoit; Mainprice, David

    2008-04-01

    The characteristic frequencies at which two different melt-related attenuation mechanisms occur in partially molten gabbronorite are computed as a function of aspect ratios of the melt-filled cracks, and the melt viscosity. The computations were done for basaltic and andesitic melts. The melt viscosity is constrained by (i) laboratory measurements performed in the range 10 8-10 14 Pa s with a creep apparatus and in the range 10 -1 to 10 5 Pa s with a rotational Couette viscometer, and (ii) modeling of viscosity at high temperatures. The results of the characteristic frequency calculations suggest that melt squirt flow is a viable attenuation mechanism at seismic frequencies for aspect ratio of melt inclusions in the range 10 -3 to 10 -2 for the andesite, and 10 -4 to 10 -3 for the two basalts.

  4. Radial electric field generated by resonant trapped electron pinch with radio frequency injection in a tokamak plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Zhe; Fisch, N. J.; Qin Hong

    2011-08-15

    Radial electric fields in tokamaks can be generated by charge accumulation due to a resonant trapped electron pinch effect. The radial field can then drive a toroidal flow. This resonant pinch effect was evaluated for the current-drive scheme that diffused electrons in the direction parallel to the toroidal field. It was found that, for typical tokamak parameters, to generate a radial electric field on the order of 100 kV/m, an rf power density on the order of kW/m{sup 3} is required. This power, absorbed by trapped electrons, is a small fraction of rf power density for current drive which is absorbed by passing electrons. However, according to the Landau resonant mechanism, the fraction of the momentum to trapped electrons decays exponentially with the square of the parallel phase velocity of the wave; therefore, the power absorbed at lower resonant velocities is the key. On the other hand, the redistribution of the current profile, due to rf current, decreases the local poloidal field and may reduce the particle transport significantly. It can relax the requirement of momentum deposited to trapped electrons, and, at the same time, contribute to explain the strongly correlation between the rotation and the driven current observed in experiments.

  5. Eddy viscosity measurements in a rectangular jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swan, David H.; Morrison, Gerald L.

    1988-01-01

    The flow field of a rectangular jet with a 2:1 aspect ratio was studied at a Reynolds number of 100,000 (Mach number 0.09) using three-dimensional laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Velocity gradients, Reynolds stress tensor components, and scalar eddy viscosities are presented for the major and minor axis planes of the jet. The eddy viscosity model was found to be applicable only in the direction of maximum mean velocity gradient.

  6. The Rheological Properties of Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) Gels from Rotational Viscometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Glenn A.; Bella, Malika; Salzmann, Christoph G.

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was developed to follow the gelation of a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) solution upon addition of borax by using rotational viscometry. The rheological properties of the gel were examined, measuring the dependence of viscosity and shear stress on the shear rate. Time-dependent studies were also conducted in which the viscosity of…

  7. Developing models for simulation of pinched-beam dynamics in heavy ion fusion. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, J.K.; Mark, J.W.K.; Sharp, W.M.; Yu, S.S.

    1984-02-22

    For heavy-ion fusion energy applications, Mark and Yu have derived hydrodynamic models for numerical simulation of energetic pinched-beams including self-pinches and external-current pinches. These pinched-beams are applicable to beam propagation in fusion chambers and to the US High Temperature Experiment. The closure of the Mark-Yu model is obtained with adiabatic assumptions mathematically analogous to those of Chew, Goldberger, and Low for MHD. Features of this hydrodynamic beam model are compared with a kinetic treatment.

  8. Use of spherically bent crystals to diagnose wire array z pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Shelkovenko, T.A.; Pikuz, S.A.; Hammer, D.A.; Ampleford, D.J.; Bland, S.N.; Bott, S.C.; Chittenden, J.P.; Lebedev, S.V.

    2004-10-01

    Spherically bent mica and quartz crystals have provided time-integrated spectra and monochromatic images in self-radiation of wire array z-pinch implosions on the MAGPIE generator (1 MA, 240 ns) at Imperial College. Diagnostics based on spherically bent crystals offer higher efficiencies than those based on flat or convex dispersion elements, allowing positioning far from the pinch with good debris shielding. A mica crystal spectrometer produced an image of the pinch in each emission line with about 100 {mu}m axial resolution. Combining the results of monochromatic imaging and spectra confirmed the presence of bright spots, probably generated by energetic electrons inside the pinch.

  9. A Simple BODIPY-Based Viscosity Probe for Imaging of Cellular Viscosity in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Dongdong; Teoh, Chai Lean; Gao, Nengyue; Xu, Qing-Hua; Chang, Young-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular viscosity is a fundamental physical parameter that indicates the functioning of cells. In this work, we developed a simple boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY)-based probe, BTV, for cellular mitochondria viscosity imaging by coupling a simple BODIPY rotor with a mitochondria-targeting unit. The BTV exhibited a significant fluorescence intensity enhancement of more than 100-fold as the solvent viscosity increased. Also, the probe showed a direct linear relationship between the fluorescence lifetime and the media viscosity, which makes it possible to trace the change of the medium viscosity. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that BTV could achieve practical applicability in the monitoring of mitochondrial viscosity changes in live cells through fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). PMID:27589762

  10. Electromagnetic analysis of arbitrarily shaped pinched carpets

    SciTech Connect

    Dupont, Guillaume; Guenneau, Sebastien; Enoch, Stefan

    2010-09-15

    We derive the expressions for the anisotropic heterogeneous tensors of permittivity and permeability associated with two-dimensional and three-dimensional carpets of an arbitrary shape. In the former case, we map a segment onto smooth curves whereas in the latter case we map an arbitrary region of the plane onto smooth surfaces. Importantly, these carpets display no singularity of the permeability and permeability tensor components. Moreover, a reduced set of parameters leads to nonmagnetic two-dimensional carpets in p polarization (i.e., for a magnetic field orthogonal to the plane containing the carpet). Such an arbitrarily shaped carpet is shown to work over a finite bandwidth when it is approximated by a checkerboard with 190 homogeneous cells of piecewise constant anisotropic permittivity. We finally perform some finite element computations in the full vector three-dimensional case for a plane wave in normal incidence and a Gaussian beam in oblique incidence. The latter requires perfectly matched layers set in a rotated coordinate axis which exemplifies the role played by geometric transforms in computational electromagnetism.

  11. A phenomenological treatment of rotating turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, YE

    1995-01-01

    The strong similarity between the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and initially isotropic turbulence subject to rotation is noted. We then apply the MHD phenomenologies of Kraichnan and Matthaeus & Zhou to rotating turbulence. When the turbulence is subject to a strong rotation, the energy spectrum is found to scale as E(k) = C(sub Omega)(Omega(sub epsilon))(sup 1/2)k(sup -2), where Omega is the rotation rate, k is the wavenumber, and epsilon is the dissipation rate. This spectral form is consistent with a recent letter by Zeman. However, here the constant C(sub Omega) is found to be related to the Kolmogorov constant and is estimated in the range 1.22 - 1.87 for the typical values of the latter constant. A 'rule' that relates spectral transfer times to the eddy turnover time and the time scale for decay of the triple correlations is deduced. A hypothesis for the triple correlation decay rate leads to the spectral law which varies between the '-5/3' (without rotation) and '-2' laws (with strong rotation). For intermediate rotation rates, the spectrum varies according to the value of a dimensionless parameter that measures the strength of the rotation wavenumber k(sub Omega) = (Omega(sup 3)/epsiolon)(sup 1/2) relative to the wavenumber k. An eddy viscosity is derived with an explicit dependence on the rotation rate.

  12. Viscosity of peridotite liquid up to 13 GPa: Implications for magma ocean viscosities [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebske, Christian; Schmickler, Bettina; Terasaki, Hidenori; Poe, Brent T.; Suzuki, Akio; Funakoshi, Ken-ichi; Ando, Ryota; Rubie, David C.

    2005-12-01

    The viscosity of synthetic peridotite liquid has been investigated at high pressures using in-situ falling sphere viscometry by combining a multi-anvil technique with synchrotron radiation. We used a newly designed capsule containing a small recessed reservoir outside of the hot spot of the heater, in which a viscosity marker sphere is embedded in a forsterite + enstatite mixture having a higher solidus temperature than the peridotite. This experimental setup prevents spheres from falling before a stable temperature above the liquidus is established and thus avoids difficulties in evaluating viscosities from velocities of spheres falling through a partially molten sample. Experiments have been performed between 2.8 and 13 GPa at temperatures ranging from 2043 to 2523 K. Measured viscosities range from 0.019 (± 0.004) to 0.13 (± 0.02) Pa s. At constant temperature, viscosity increases with increasing pressure up to ˜ 8.5 GPa but then decreases between ˜ 8.5 and 13 GPa. The change in the pressure dependence of viscosity is likely associated with structural changes of the liquid that occur upon compression. By combining our results with recently published 0.1 MPa peridotite liquid viscosities [D.B. Dingwell, C. Courtial, D. Giordano, A. Nichols, Viscosity of peridotite liquid, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 226 (2004) 127-138.], the experimental data can be described by a non-Arrhenian, empirical Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman equation, which has been modified by adding a term to account for the observed pressure dependence of viscosity. This equation reproduces measured viscosities to within 0.08 log 10-units on average. We use this model to calculate viscosities of a peridotitic magma ocean along a liquid adiabat to a depth of ˜ 400 km and discuss possible effects on viscosity at greater pressures and temperatures than experimentally investigated.

  13. Technique for Determining the Viscosity and Electrical Conductivity of Semiconducting Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.; Scripa, R. N.; Ban, H.; Lin, B.; Su, C. H.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Feth, S.; Zhu, S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel apparatus for determining the viscosity and electrical conductivity of semiconducting liquids has been developed at NASA/MSFC. The apparatus is based on the transient torque technique and utilizes a 125 micrometer diameter quartz fiber as a torsion wire and a sensitive angular detector to measure the deflection angle of the crucible containing the liquid. A rotating flow is induced in the semiconducting melt by the application of a rotating magnetic field and measurement of the magnitude and transient behavior of the induced deflection angle allows the simultaneous determination of the viscosity and electrical conductivity of the melt. Measurements at room temperature and up to 900 C were made on high purity melts.

  14. Dissipative shocks in multicomponent magneto rotating Lorentzian plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, S.; Akhtar, N.; Hasnain, H.

    2015-11-01

    Nonlinear ion acoustic shocks in homogenous multicomponent electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) dissipative magneto rotating plasmas are studied. Dissipation in the plasma system is included via kinematic viscosity of ions. The electrons and positrons are Lorentzian and following kappa distribution function. Reductive perturbation technique is applied to derive Korteweg de Vries Burgers (KdVB) equation. The effects of variation of positron density, positron spectral index, temperature ratio of kappa distributed electrons to kappa distributed positrons, ion kinematic viscosity and rotational frequency effects are discussed in the context of pulsar magnetosphere.

  15. Instability and new phases of higher-dimensional rotating black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Dias, Oscar J. C.; Monteiro, Ricardo; Santos, Jorge E.; Figueras, Pau; Emparan, Roberto

    2009-12-01

    It has been conjectured that higher-dimensional rotating black holes become unstable at a sufficiently large value of the rotation, and that new black holes with pinched horizons appear at the threshold of the instability. We search numerically and find the stationary axisymmetric perturbations of Myers-Perry black holes with a single spin that mark the onset of the instability and the appearance of the new black hole phases. We also find new ultraspinning Gregory-Laflamme instabilities of rotating black strings and branes.

  16. Viscosity of Xenon Examined in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.

    1999-01-01

    Why does water flow faster than honey? The short answer, that honey has a greater viscosity, merely rephrases the question. The fundamental answer is that viscosity originates in the interactions between a fluid s molecules. These interactions are so complicated that, except for low-density gases, the viscosity of a fluid cannot be accurately predicted. Progress in understanding viscosity has been made by studying moderately dense gases and, more recently, fluids near the critical point. Modern theories predict a universal behavior for all pure fluids near the liquid-vapor critical point, and they relate the increase in viscosity to spontaneous fluctuations in density near this point. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon (CVX) experiment tested these theories with unprecedented precision when it flew aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-85) in August 1997. Near the critical point, xenon is a billion times more compressible than water, yet it has about the same density. Because the fluid is so "soft," it collapses under its own weight when exposed to the force of Earth s gravity - much like a very soft spring. Because the CVX experiment is conducted in microgravity, it achieves a very uniform fluid density even very close to the critical point. At the heart of the CVX experiment is a novel viscometer built around a small nickel screen. An oscillating electric field forces the screen to oscillate between pairs of electrodes. Viscosity, which dampens the oscillations, can be calculated by measuring the screen motion and the force applied to the screen. So that the fluid s delicate state near the critical point will not be disrupted, the screen oscillations are set to be both slow and small.

  17. On the similarity of variable viscosity flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voivenel, L.; Danaila, L.; Varea, E.; Renou, B.; Cazalens, M.

    2016-08-01

    Turbulent mixing is ubiquitous in both nature and industrial applications. Most of them concern different fluids, therefore with variable physical properties (density and/or viscosity). The focus here is on variable viscosity flows and mixing, involving density-matched fluids. The issue is whether or not these flows may be self-similar, or self-preserving. The importance of this question stands on the predictability of these flows; self-similar dynamical systems are easier tractable from an analytical viewpoint. More specifically, self-similar analysis is applied to the scale-by-scale energy transport equations, which represent the transport of energy at each scale and each point of the flow. Scale-by-scale energy budget equations are developed for inhomogeneous and anisotropic flows, in which the viscosity varies as a result of heterogeneous mixture or temperature variations. Additional terms are highlighted, accounting for the viscosity gradients, or fluctuations. These terms are present at both small and large scales, thus rectifying the common belief that viscosity is a small-scale quantity. Scale-by-scale energy budget equations are then adapted for the particular case of a round jet evolving in a more viscous host fluid. It is further shown that the condition of self-preservation is not necessarily satisfied in variable-viscosity jets. Indeed, the jet momentum conservation, as well as the constancy of the Reynolds number in the central region of the jet, cannot be satisfied simultaneously. This points to the necessity of considering less stringent conditions (with respect to classical, single-fluid jets) when analytically tackling these flows and reinforces the idea that viscosity variations must be accounted for when modelling these flows.

  18. Estimating Heavy Oil Viscosity from Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasheghani Farahani, Fereidoon

    Heavy oils are viscoelastic material; therefore, their shear properties influence the seismic response and should not be ignored. Heavy oil viscosity, among other parameters, controls the attenuation of seismic waves which is measured in terms of quality factor Q. BISQ, a poroviscoelastic model that couples the effects of simultaneous Biot and squirt flow mechanisms, is used to relate Q to the fluid viscosity. The variation of quality factor with respect to fluid viscosity, as predicted by BISQ, matches the laboratory measurements. Quality factor is a measurable seismic attribute. Higher frequency data are more favourable for Q estimation. Crosswell seismic data from a heavy oil reservoir is used for estimating Q. Travel time tomography followed by attenuation tomography yields the quality factor. The resultingQ tomogram can be converted into the viscosity tomogram if the remaining reservoir parameters are known. Such parameters are populated for the zone of interest using the geostatistical methods from the available log and core data at borehole locations. Existing BISQ equations can only take one fluid phase into account. However, the porous reservoir rock is saturated with bitumen and water. A slightly modified version of the BISQ relations is used in order to accommodate the presence of a second fluid phase. The estimated viscosity tomogram shows ambiguity because for every given quality factor, more than one viscosity value can be calculated. Despite the ambiguity, the methodology introduced in this study demonstrates that seismic data have the potential to be used for estimation of fluid viscosity in heavy oil reservoirs, although further research is needed to improve the workflow.

  19. Transient Torque Technique for Viscosity and Electrical Conductivity Determination of Semiconducting Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.; Scripa, R. N.; Ban, H.; Lin, B.; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Feth, S.; Zhu, S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel apparatus based on transient torque technique is constructed in MSFC/NASA. The apparatus uses a 125um diameter quartz fiber as torsion wire. A high sensitive angular detector is implemented to measure the deflection angle of the crucible containing the liquid. A rotating magnetic field (RMF) is used to induce a rotating flow of a conducting or semiconducting melts. By measuring the magnitude and transient behavior of the induced deflection angle, the electrical conductivity and viscosity of the melt can be measured simultaneously. High purity elements namely Hg, Ga, Zn and Te are tested at room temperature and high temperature up to 900 C.

  20. Ultrasonic viscosity measurement using the shear-wave reflection coefficient with a novel signal processing technique.

    PubMed

    Franco, Ediguer E; Adamowski, Julio C; Buiochi, Flávio

    2010-05-01

    Real-time viscosity measurement remains a necessity for highly automated industry. To resolve this problem, many studies have been carried out using an ultrasonic shear wave reflectance method. This method is based on the determination of the complex reflection coefficient's magnitude and phase at the solid-liquid interface. Although magnitude is a stable quantity and its measurement is relatively simple and precise, phase measurement is a difficult task because of strong temperature dependence. A simplified method that uses only the magnitude of the reflection coefficient and that is valid under the Newtonian regimen has been proposed by some authors, but the obtained viscosity values do not match conventional viscometry measurements. In this work, a mode conversion measurement cell was used to measure glycerin viscosity as a function of temperature (15 to 25 degrees C) and corn syrup-water mixtures as a function of concentration (70 to 100 wt% of corn syrup). Tests were carried out at 1 MHz. A novel signal processing technique that calculates the reflection coefficient magnitude in a frequency band, instead of a single frequency, was studied. The effects of the bandwidth on magnitude and viscosity were analyzed and the results were compared with the values predicted by the Newtonian liquid model. The frequency band technique improved the magnitude results. The obtained viscosity values came close to those measured by the rotational viscometer with percentage errors up to 14%, whereas errors up to 96% were found for the single frequency method. PMID:20442023

  1. Ultraspinning instability of rotating black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Dias, Oscar J. C.; Figueras, Pau; Monteiro, Ricardo; Santos, Jorge E.

    2010-11-15

    Rapidly rotating Myers-Perry black holes in d{>=}6 dimensions were conjectured to be unstable by Emparan and Myers. In a previous publication, we found numerically the onset of the axisymmetric ultraspinning instability in the singly spinning Myers-Perry black hole in d=7, 8, 9. This threshold also signals a bifurcation to new branches of axisymmetric solutions with pinched horizons that are conjectured to connect to the black ring, black Saturn and other families in the phase diagram of stationary solutions. We firmly establish that this instability is also present in d=6 and in d=10, 11. The boundary conditions of the perturbations are discussed in detail for the first time, and we prove that they preserve the angular velocity and temperature of the original Myers-Perry black hole. This property is fundamental to establishing a thermodynamic necessary condition for the existence of this instability in general rotating backgrounds. We also prove a previous claim that the ultraspinning modes cannot be pure gauge modes. Finally we find new ultraspinning Gregory-Laflamme instabilities of rotating black strings and branes that appear exactly at the critical rotation predicted by the aforementioned thermodynamic criterium. The latter is a refinement of the Gubser-Mitra conjecture.

  2. Viscosity, relaxation time, and dynamics within a model asphalt of larger molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Derek D.; Greenfield, Michael L.

    2014-01-21

    The dynamics properties of a new “next generation” model asphalt system that represents SHRP AAA-1 asphalt using larger molecules than past models is studied using molecular simulation. The system contains 72 molecules distributed over 12 molecule types that range from nonpolar branched alkanes to polar resins and asphaltenes. Molecular weights range from 290 to 890 g/mol. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations conducted at six temperatures from 298.15 to 533.15 K provide a wealth of correlation data. The modified Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts equation was regressed to reorientation time correlation functions and extrapolated to calculate average rotational relaxation times for individual molecules. The rotational relaxation rate of molecules decreased significantly with increasing size and decreasing temperature. Translational self-diffusion coefficients followed an Arrhenius dependence. Similar activation energies of ∼42 kJ/mol were found for all 12 molecules in the model system, while diffusion prefactors spanned an order of magnitude. Viscosities calculated directly at 533.15 K and estimated at lower temperatures using the Debye-Stokes-Einstein relationship were consistent with experimental data for asphalts. The product of diffusion coefficient and rotational relaxation time showed only small changes with temperature above 358.15 K, indicating rotation and translation that couple self-consistently with viscosity. At lower temperatures, rotation slowed more than diffusion.

  3. Viscosity of Campi Flregrei (Italy) magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misiti, Valeria; Vetere, Francesco; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Behrens, Harald; Mangiacapra, Annarita; Freda, Carmela

    2010-05-01

    Viscosity is an important factor governing both intrusive and volcanic processes. The most important parameters governing silicate melts viscosity are bulk composition of melt and temperature. Pressure has only minor effect at crustal depths, whereas crystals and bubbles have significant influence. Among compositional parameters, the water content is critical above all in terms of rheological behaviour of melts and explosive style of an eruption. Consequently, without an appropriate knowledge of magma viscosity depending on the amount of dissolved volatiles, it is not possible to model the processes (i.e., magma ascent, fragmentation, and dispersion) required to predict realistic volcanic scenarios and thus forecast volcanic hazards. The Campi Flegrei are a large volcanic complex (~150 km2) located west of the city of Naples, Italy, that has been the site of volcanic activity for more than 60 ka and represents a potential volcanic hazard owing to the large local population. In the frame of a INGV-DPC (Department of Civil Protection) project devoted to design a multidisciplinary system for short-term volcano hazard evaluation, we performed viscosity measurements, under dry and hydrous conditions, of primitive melt compositions representative of two Campi Flegrei eruptions (Minopoli-shoshonite and Fondo Riccio-latite). Viscosity of the two melts have been investigated in the high temperature/low viscosity range at atmospheric pressure in dry samples and at 0.5 GPa in runs having water content from nominally anhydrous to about 3 wt%. Data in the low temperature/high viscosity range were obtained near the glass transition temperature at atmospheric pressure on samples whose water contents vary from 0.3 up to 2.43 wt%. The combination of high- and low-viscosity data permits a general description of the viscosity as a function of temperature and water content using a modified Tamman-Vogel-Fulcher equation. logν = a+ --b--+ --d--×exp(g × w-) (T - c) (T - e) T (1) where

  4. Measurement of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and viscosity of TiO{sub 2}-water nanofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Duangthongsuk, Weerapun; Wongwises, Somchai

    2009-04-15

    Nanofluid is an innovative heat transfer fluid with superior potential for enhancing the heat transfer performance of conventional fluids. Many attempts have been made to investigate its thermal conductivity and viscosity, which are important thermophysical properties. No definitive agreements have emerged, however, about these properties. This article reports the thermal conductivity and dynamic viscosity of nanofluids experimentally. TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles dispersed in water with volume concentration of 0.2-2 vol.% are used in the present study. A transient hot-wire apparatus is used for measuring the thermal conductivity of nanofluids whereas the Bohlin rotational rheometer (Malvern Instrument) is used to measure the viscosity of nanofluids. The data are collected for temperatures ranging from 15 C to 35 C. The results show that the measured viscosity and thermal conductivity of nanofluids increased as the particle concentrations increased and are higher than the values of the base liquids. Furthermore, thermal conductivity of nanofluids increased with increasing nanofluid temperatures and, conversely, the viscosity of nanofluids decreased with increasing temperature of nanofluids. Moreover, the measured thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluids are quite different from the predicted values from the existing correlations and the data reported by other researchers. Finally, new thermophysical correlations are proposed for predicting the thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluids. (author)

  5. Viscosity Measurement Using Drop Coalescence in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.; Ethridge, Edwin C.; Maxwell, Daniel; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present in here validation studies of a new method for application in microgravity environment which measures the viscosity of highly viscous undercooled liquids using drop coalescence. The method has the advantage of avoiding heterogeneous nucleation at container walls caused by crystallization of undercooled liquids during processing. Homogeneous nucleation can also be avoided due to the rapidity of the measurement using this method. The technique relies on measurements from experiments conducted in near zero gravity environment as well as highly accurate analytical formulation for the coalescence process. The viscosity of the liquid is determined by allowing the computed free surface shape relaxation time to be adjusted in response to the measured free surface velocity for two coalescing drops. Results are presented from two sets of validation experiments for the method which were conducted on board aircraft flying parabolic trajectories. In these tests the viscosity of a highly viscous liquid, namely glycerin, was determined at different temperatures using the drop coalescence method described in here. The experiments measured the free surface velocity of two glycerin drops coalescing under the action of surface tension alone in low gravity environment using high speed photography. The liquid viscosity was determined by adjusting the computed free surface velocity values to the measured experimental data. The results of these experiments were found to agree reasonably well with the known viscosity for the test liquid used.

  6. Entropy viscosity method applied to Euler equations

    SciTech Connect

    Delchini, M. O.; Ragusa, J. C.; Berry, R. A.

    2013-07-01

    The entropy viscosity method [4] has been successfully applied to hyperbolic systems of equations such as Burgers equation and Euler equations. The method consists in adding dissipative terms to the governing equations, where a viscosity coefficient modulates the amount of dissipation. The entropy viscosity method has been applied to the 1-D Euler equations with variable area using a continuous finite element discretization in the MOOSE framework and our results show that it has the ability to efficiently smooth out oscillations and accurately resolve shocks. Two equations of state are considered: Ideal Gas and Stiffened Gas Equations Of State. Results are provided for a second-order time implicit schemes (BDF2). Some typical Riemann problems are run with the entropy viscosity method to demonstrate some of its features. Then, a 1-D convergent-divergent nozzle is considered with open boundary conditions. The correct steady-state is reached for the liquid and gas phases with a time implicit scheme. The entropy viscosity method correctly behaves in every problem run. For each test problem, results are shown for both equations of state considered here. (authors)

  7. Viscosity of confined inhomogeneous nonequilibrium fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junfang; Todd, B. D.; Travis, Karl P.

    2004-12-01

    We use the nonlocal linear hydrodynamic constitutive model, proposed by Evans and Morriss [Statistical Mechanics of Nonequilibrium Liquids (Academic, London, 1990)], for computing an effective spatially dependent shear viscosity of inhomogeneous nonequilibrium fluids. The model is applied to a simple atomic fluid undergoing planar Poiseuille flow in a confined channel of several atomic diameters width. We compare the spatially dependent viscosity with a local generalization of Newton's law of viscosity and the Navier-Stokes viscosity, both of which are known to suffer extreme inaccuracies for highly inhomogeneous systems. The nonlocal constitutive model calculates effective position dependent viscosities that are free from the notorious singularities experienced by applying the commonly used local constitutive model. It is simple, general, and has widespread applicability in nanofluidics where experimental measurement of position dependent transport coefficients is currently inaccessible. In principle the method can be used to predict approximate flow profiles of any arbitrary inhomogeneous system. We demonstrate this by predicting the flow profile for a simple fluid undergoing planar Couette flow in a confined channel of several atomic diameters width.

  8. Predicting slag viscosity from coal ash composition

    SciTech Connect

    Laumb, J.; Benson, S.A.; Katrinak, K.A.; Schwalbe, R.; McCollor, D.P.

    1999-07-01

    Management of slag flow from cyclone-fired utility boilers requires accurate prediction of viscosity. Cyclones tend to build up slag when the cyclone combustion temperature is less than the temperature required to melt and tap the ash from the coal being fired. Cyclone-fired boilers designed for lignite are equipped with predry systems, which remove 6-9% of the moisture from the coal. Cyclones tend to slag when the as-received heating value of the fuel is less than 6350 Btu/lb and T250 (temperature where viscosity equals 250 poise) is greater than 2350 F. The T250 value, as well as the rest of the viscosity-temperature relationship, can be predicted using models based on coal ash composition. The focus of this work is to evaluate several models in terms of their agreement with measured viscosities. Viscosity measurements were made for ten samples, including nine lignite coals and one lignite-derived slag. Model performance is related to the SiO{sub 2}, CaO, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} contents of the slag. The Sage and McIlroy and Kalmanovitch models worked best for high SiO{sub 2} and low Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} fuels. The Senior model worked best when Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} content was moderate to high.

  9. Viscosity of confined inhomogeneous nonequilibrium fluids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junfang; Todd, B D; Travis, Karl P

    2004-12-01

    We use the nonlocal linear hydrodynamic constitutive model, proposed by Evans and Morriss [Statistical Mechanics of Nonequilibrium Liquids (Academic, London, 1990)], for computing an effective spatially dependent shear viscosity of inhomogeneous nonequilibrium fluids. The model is applied to a simple atomic fluid undergoing planar Poiseuille flow in a confined channel of several atomic diameters width. We compare the spatially dependent viscosity with a local generalization of Newton's law of viscosity and the Navier-Stokes viscosity, both of which are known to suffer extreme inaccuracies for highly inhomogeneous systems. The nonlocal constitutive model calculates effective position dependent viscosities that are free from the notorious singularities experienced by applying the commonly used local constitutive model. It is simple, general, and has widespread applicability in nanofluidics where experimental measurement of position dependent transport coefficients is currently inaccessible. In principle the method can be used to predict approximate flow profiles of any arbitrary inhomogeneous system. We demonstrate this by predicting the flow profile for a simple fluid undergoing planar Couette flow in a confined channel of several atomic diameters width. PMID:15549963

  10. Effect of viscosity on learned satiation.

    PubMed

    Mars, M; Hogenkamp, P S; Gosses, A M; Stafleu, A; De Graaf, C

    2009-08-01

    A higher viscosity of a food leads to a longer orosensory stimulation. This may facilitate the learned association between sensory signals and metabolic consequences. In the current study we investigated the effect of viscosity on learned satiation. In two intervention groups a low viscosity (LV) yogurt (n=24) and a high viscosity (HV) yogurt (n=22) was offered ad libitum for breakfast. In a learning period of 4 weeks, subjects consumed ad libitum a novel flavoured high energy density (HED) yogurt (150 kcal/100 g) or low energy density (LED) yogurt (50 kcal/100 g), with 10 exposures to each yogurt on alternate days. Over the repeated exposures, an interaction effect of exposure timeenergyviscosity on intake was seen (F(1,771)=4.12; p=0.04). In the HV intervention group a borderline significant interaction between exposure and energy density was observed (F(1,369)=3.61; p=0.06); after 10 exposures, the LED yogurt resulted in a 46+/-16 g higher intake compared with the HED yogurt. In the LV group, no significant interaction between exposure and energy density was seen (F(1,401)=1.04; p=0.31); after 10 exposures intake difference between the LED and HED yogurts was only 1.5+/-15 g. These results suggest that a higher viscosity facilitates learned satiation. PMID:19394350

  11. Feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes in a reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Brunsell, P.R.; Yadikin, D.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Liu, Y.Q.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J.R.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.

    2005-09-15

    An array of saddle coils having N{sub c}=16 equally spaced positions along the toroidal direction has been installed for feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsaker, M. Cecconello et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)]. Using feedback, multiple nonresonant RWMs are simultaneously suppressed for three to four wall times. Feedback stabilization of RWMs results in a significant prolongation of the discharge duration. This is linked to a better sustainment of the plasma and tearing mode toroidal rotation with feedback. Due to the limited number of coils in the toroidal direction, pairs of modes with toroidal mode numbers n,n{sup '} that fulfill the condition |n-n{sup '}|=N{sub c} are coupled by the feedback action from the discrete coil array. With only one unstable mode in a pair of coupled modes, the suppression of the unstable mode is successful. If two modes are unstable in a coupled pair, two possibilities exist: partial suppression of both modes or, alternatively, complete stabilization of one target mode while the other is left unstable.

  12. High-energy electron acceleration in the gas-puff Z-pinch plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Takasugi, Keiichi; Miyazaki, Takanori; Nishio, Mineyuki

    2014-12-15

    The characteristics of hard x-ray generation were examined in the gas-puff z-pinch experiment. The experiment on reversing the voltage was conducted. In both of the positive and negative discharges, the x-ray was generated only from the anode surface, so it was considered that the electrons were accelerated by the induced electromagnetic force at the pinch time.

  13. Universal pinch off of rods by capillarity-driven surface diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, H.; Miksis, M.J.; Voorhees, P.W.; Davis, S.H.

    1998-06-05

    Interfacial energy is a central factor in setting the morphology of phases and in determining the stability of equilibrium morphologies. here the authors examine the morphological evolution of a rod via capillary-driven surface diffusion as it both approaches and departs the topological singularity of pinch off. During the final stages of pinching the neck radius approaches zero, and self-similar solutions are sought. The authors have derived local similarity solutions for the axisymmetric pinch off of rods when the morphological evolution is by capillarity-driven surface diffusion. These local solutions describe the approach to and departure from the topological singularity where a rod pinches into two separate bodies. During pinching, the self-similar surface profile far away from the neck approaches two opposing cones with a unique half-cone angle of 46.04{degree}. It is thus likely that all rods must pinch off with this cone angle. This assertion is supported by several numerical simulations. After pinch off, the smoothening of the cone tip is again self-similar. The results obtained here for rods also apply to the pinch off of cylindrical pore channels.

  14. Measuring pad-pad pinch strength in a non-human primate: Macaca fascicularis.

    PubMed

    Banks, Jacob J; Lavender, Steven A; Buford, John A; Sommerich, Carolyn M

    2007-12-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to establish a methodology for determining and perhaps predicting (via regression analysis of anthropometric measures) Macaca fascicularis isometric pinch strength for a specific task. The larger purpose of this work was to properly scale a pinching task for the monkeys in order to study dose-response relationships in a non-human primate model for carpal tunnel syndrome. Three female and one male macaque (n=4) of varying size and age were trained to perform a left-handed pad-pad pinch. The task required 60 degrees of wrist flexion at a static pinching distance of 3 cm between the thumb and fingers. Subjects were trained for a period of 20-weeks. After that time, an analysis of performance gradients found that they had each reached a plateau in their force output. Pinch strength for the four animals ranged from 29.4 to 59.8 N. Regression analysis revealed that body mass (kg) and wrist circumference (cm) were both predictive of pinch strength, exhibiting adjusted R(2) values of 0.93 (p=0.024) and 0.96 (p=0.015), respectively. Thus, the results suggest that maximal pinch strength could be acceptably estimated in future subjects using either the wrist circumference or the body mass measures, as both were strong predictors of pad-pad pinch strength. PMID:17035044

  15. Generation of ultra-high magnetic fields by a degenerate, snow-plow pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, C. W.; Eddleman, J. L.; Gee, M.; Harte, J. A.; Zimmerman, G. B.

    1992-12-01

    We discuss 1-D and 2-D LASNEX calculations of a snow-plow pinch in Xenon. The pinch is driven by inductively stored energy, switched by a compact-torus, fast-opening switch, with performance characteristics calculated by the TRACII, 2-D, MHD code. The 10-cm initial radius, 1 cm long Xe pinch, is driven by 50 MA current thatis switched on in 100 ns. The pinch uniquely undergoes radiative collapse during the snow-plow phase, conforming to the original description of the 'snow-plow', to form a high-density, high-kinetic energy Xe shell which dynamically converges to a pinch equilibrium with degenerate electron pressure, high-density high-magnetic field. The described pinch configuration, calculated in 1-D, is expected to be unstable to R-T, sausage, and kink instabilities. A small initial B(sub zo) field (approximately 100 G) is calculated to be compressed to B(sub z) approximately = B (sub theta) at the final, degenerate, pinch equilibrium, thus stabilizing sausage instability. A larger initial B(sub z) field (approximately 10 kG) is calculated to be compressed by the radiatively collapsing plasma in the snow-plow to B(sub z) approximately = B (sub theta) to stabilize R-T instability during the snow-plow phase. Finally, the kink instability (if it occurs) is expected, as observed, to leave intact the tightly pinched plasma column.

  16. One atmosphere viscosity measurements of MORBs from ODP Leg 206, Hole 1256D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Nakamura, H.; Ishibashi, H.

    2009-12-01

    We carried out viscosity measurements of MORBs from ODP Leg 206, Hole 1256D at one atmosphere both in hyperliquidus and subliquidus conditions. Three samples examined are #1 (core 39R1), #2(core 27R19) and #3 (core 3R4). They are typical MORBs but have different Mg/(Mg+Fe) ratios of 0.60, 0.48, and 0.42. Viscosity measurements were carried out mostly after the method of Sato (2005, J. Mineral. Petrol. Sci),. The oxygen fugacity of the furnace was controlled by mixed gas of CO2:H2(400/20ml/min), at FMQ buffer conditions. Rotational viscometer was connected to a ceramic rod of 6 mm diameter, the end of which immersed in the sample crucible 30 mm inner diameter and 60 mm high. The system is calibrated with standard viscosity oils for different depths. The samples were initially melted at ca. 50 C higher temperature than liquidus, and kept for 3 days before viscometry and sampling. After the viscometry and sampling, the furnace temperature was decreased by 5 to 30 C, and kept for 1-3 days before another viscometry and sampling. These steps are repeated until the high viscosity of the melt precluded the measurements. The quenched samples were analayzed for phase chemistry and textural features. Sample #1 crystallized plagioclase and olivine at 1215 C, followed by augite at 1205 C. Total crystal content increased to 29 vol% at 1185 C. Sample #2 crystallized plagioclase and pigeonite at 1175 C, followed by olivine and augite at 1165 C. Total crystal content increased up to 25 vol% at 1152 C. Sample #3 crystallized plagioclase, pigeonite and olivine at 1155 C. Total crystal content increased up to 25 vol% at 1133 C. Bulk viscosity increased from 46 to 74 Pa s at hyperliquidus temperatures of 1240 to 1210 C, whereas it increased up to 2908 Pa s in subliquidus temperatures of 1185 C in the sample #1. In the sample #2, bulk viscosity also increased slowly from 42 Pa s at 1232 C to 79 Pa s at 1172 C, then increased much rapidly to 3422 Pa s at 1152 C. Similarly, the sample #3

  17. Viscosity jump in Earth's mid-mantle.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Maxwell L; Lekić, Vedran; Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina

    2015-12-11

    The viscosity structure of Earth's deep mantle affects the thermal evolution of Earth, the ascent of mantle plumes, settling of subducted oceanic lithosphere, and the mixing of compositional heterogeneities in the mantle. Based on a reanalysis of the long-wavelength nonhydrostatic geoid, we infer viscous layering of the mantle using a method that allows us to avoid a priori assumptions about its variation with depth. We detect an increase in viscosity at 800- to 1200-kilometers depth, far greater than the depth of the mineral phase transformations that define the mantle transition zone. The viscosity increase is coincident in depth with regions where seismic tomography has imaged slab stagnation, plume deflection, and changes in large-scale structure and offers a simple explanation of these phenomena. PMID:26659053

  18. Diffusion, Viscosity and Crystal Growth in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myerson, Allan S.

    1996-01-01

    The diffusivity of TriGlycine Sulfate (TGS), Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate (KDP), Ammonium Dihydrogen Phosphate (ADF) and other compounds of interest to microgravity crystal growth, in supersaturated solutions as a function of solution concentration, 'age' and 'history was studied experimentally. The factors that affect the growth of crystals from water solutions in microgravity have been examined. Three non-linear optical materials have been studied, potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP), ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) and triglycine sulfate (TGC). The diffusion coefficient and viscosity of supersaturated water solutions were measured. Also theoretical model of diffusivity and viscosity in a metastable state, model of crystal growth from solution including non-linear time dependent diffusivity and viscosity effect and computer simulation of the crystal growth process which allows simulation of the microgravity crystal growth were developed.

  19. Polyfunctional dispersants for controlling viscosity of phyllosilicates

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.

    2006-07-25

    This invention provides phyllosilicates and polyfunctional dispersants which can be manipulated to selectively control the viscosity of phyllosilicate slurries. The polyfunctional dispersants used in the present invention, which include at least three functional groups, increase the dispersion and exfoliation of phyllosilicates in polymers and, when used in conjunction with phyllosilicate slurries, significantly reduce the viscosity of slurries having high concentrations of phyllosilicates. The functional groups of the polyfunctional dispersants are capable of associating with multivalent metal cations and low molecular weight organic polymers, which can be manipulated to substantially increase or decrease the viscosity of the slurry in a concentration dependent manner. The polyfunctional dispersants of the present invention can also impart desirable properties on the phyllosilicate dispersions including corrosion inhibition and enhanced exfoliation of the phyllosilicate platelets.

  20. Cosmological two-fluid bulk viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Horn, L. J.; Salvati, G. A. Q.

    2016-04-01

    A simple two-fluid model of cosmological bulk viscosity, in which small deviations from thermal equilibrium account for the viscous bulk pressure, is substantiated by kinetic theory. Some peculiar issues regarding its relation to the radiative fluid model are discussed. The microphysical picture underlying the viscous dissipation is made precise. We also consider a reactive `cross' viscosity associated with deviations from detailed balance, which includes the so-called creation pressure of the cosmological fluid. For collisional interactions between the fluid components, the reactive viscous pressure is not an independent mechanism for entropy production. Entropy from cross effects may be generated through an effective isentropic particle source. In both instances new results are obtained for the reactive viscosity, and applied to a representative case of non-equilibrium decay.

  1. Increased blood viscosity in diabetic proliferative retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Lowe, G D; Ghafour, I M; Belch, J J; Forbes, C D; Foulds, W S; MacCuish, A C

    1986-02-01

    Blood rheology and haemostasis were assessed in 18 diabetics with proliferative retinopathy and in 18 diabetics without proliferative retinopathy, matched for age, sex, smoking habit and type, duration and treatment of diabetes. Proliferative retinopathy was associated with significantly higher levels of blood viscosity at high and low shear rates, which were related to higher levels of plasma viscosity and fibrinogen. Blood urea, glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin and white cell count were also significantly higher, whereas haematocrit, red cell deformability and several other haematological and biochemical variables did not differ significantly in the 2 groups. In view of these findings, and of our recent demonstration that increased blood viscosity also exists in those patients with retinal vein occlusion who develop a similar proliferative retinopathy, we suggest that hyperviscosity may contribute to retinal ischaemia and hence proliferative retinopathy. PMID:3698481

  2. Z-Pinch fusion-based nuclear propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miernik, J.; Statham, G.; Fabisinski, L.; Maples, C. D.; Adams, R.; Polsgrove, T.; Fincher, S.; Cassibry, J.; Cortez, R.; Turner, M.; Percy, T.

    2013-02-01

    Fusion-based nuclear propulsion has the potential to enable fast interplanetary transportation. Due to the great distances between the planets of our solar system and the harmful radiation environment of interplanetary space, high specific impulse (Isp) propulsion in vehicles with high payload mass fractions must be developed to provide practical and safe vehicles for human space flight missions. The Z-Pinch dense plasma focus method is a Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) approach that may potentially lead to a small, low cost fusion reactor/engine assembly [1]. Recent advancements in experimental and theoretical understanding of this concept suggest favorable scaling of fusion power output yield [2]. The magnetic field resulting from the large current compresses the plasma to fusion conditions, and this process can be pulsed over short timescales (10-6 s). This type of plasma formation is widely used in the field of Nuclear Weapons Effects testing in the defense industry, as well as in fusion energy research. A Z-Pinch propulsion concept was designed for a vehicle based on a previous fusion vehicle study called "Human Outer Planet Exploration" (HOPE), which used Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) [3] propulsion. The reference mission is the transport of crew and cargo to Mars and back, with a reusable vehicle. The analysis of the Z-Pinch MIF propulsion system concludes that a 40-fold increase of Isp over chemical propulsion is predicted. An Isp of 19,436 s and thrust of 3812 N s/pulse, along with nearly doubling the predicted payload mass fraction, warrants further development of enabling technologies.

  3. Liner Compression of a MAGO / Inverse-Pinch Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Siemon, R E; Atchison, W L; Awe, T; Bauer, B S; Buyko, A M; Chernyshev, V K; Cowan, T E; Degnan, J H; Faehl, R J; Fuelling, S; Garanin, S F; Goodrich, T; Ivanovsky, A V; Lindemuth, I R; Makhin, V; Mokhov, V N; Reinovsky, R E; Ryutov, D D; Scudder, D W; Taylor, T; Yakubov, V B

    2005-05-18

    In the ''metal liner'' approach to Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), a preheated magnetized plasma target is compressed to thermonuclear temperature and high density by externally driving the implosion of a flux conserving metal enclosure, or liner, which contains the plasma target. As in inertial confinement fusion, the principle fusion fuel heating mechanism is pdV work by the imploding enclosure, called a pusher in ICF. One possible MTF target, the hard-core diffuse z pinch, has been studied in MAGO experiments at VNIIEF, and is one possible target being considered for experiments on the Atlas pulsed power facility. Numerical MHD simulations show two intriguing and helpful features of the diffuse z pinch with respect to compressional heating. First, in two-dimensional simulations the m=0 interchange modes, arising from an unstable pressure profile, result in turbulent motions and self-organization into a stable pressure profile. The turbulence also gives rise to convective thermal transport, but the level of turbulence saturates at a finite level, and simulations show substantial heating during liner compression despite the turbulence. The second helpful feature is that pressure profile evolution during compression tends towards improved stability rather than instability when analyzed according to the Kadomtsev criteria. A liner experiment is planned for Atlas to study compression of magnetic flux without plasma as a first step. The Atlas geometry is compatible with a diffuse z pinch, and simulations of possible future experiments show that keV temperatures and useful neutron production for diagnostic purposes should be possible if a suitable plasma injector is added to the Atlas facility.

  4. Computational modeling of wall-supported dense Z-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehey, P.; Gerwin, R.A.; Kirkpatrick, R.

    1997-11-01

    In our previous computational modeling of deuterium-fiber-initiated Z-pinches intended for ohmic self-heating to fusion conditions, instability-driven expansion caused densities to drop far below those desired for fusion applications; such behavior has been observed on experiments such as Los Alamos` HDZP-II. A new application for deuterium-fiber-initiated Z-pinches is Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), in which a preheated and magnetized target plasma is hydrodynamically compressed, by a separately driven liner, to fusion conditions. Although the conditions necessary for suitable target plasma--density O(10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}), temperature O(100 eV), magnetic field O(100 kG)--are less extreme than those required for the previous ohmically heated fusion scheme, the plasma must remain magnetically insulated and clean long enough to be compressed by the imploding liner to fusion conditions, e.g., several microseconds. A fiber-initiated Z-pinch in a 2-cm-radius, 2-cm long conducting liner has been built at Los Alamos to investigate its suitability as an MTF target plasma. Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic modeling of this experiment shows early instability similar to that seen on HDZP-II; however, when plasma finds support and stabilization at the outer radial wall, a relatively stable profile forms and persists. Comparison of experimental results and computations, and computational inclusion of additional experimental details is being done. Analytic and computational investigation is also being done on possible instability-driven cooling of the plasma by Benard-like convective cells adjacent to the cold wall.

  5. Theta-Pinch Thruster for Piloted Deep Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPointe, Mike R.; Reddy, Dhanireddy (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A new high-power propulsion concept that combines a rapidly pulsed theta-pinch discharge with upstream particle reflection by a magnetic mirror was evaluated under a Phase 1 grant awarded through the NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts. Analytic and numerical models were developed to predict the performance of a theta-pinch thruster operated over a wide range of initial gas pressures and discharge periods. The models indicate that a 1 m radius, 10 m long thruster operated with hydrogen propellant could provide impulse-bits ranging from 1 N-s to 330 N-s with specific impulse values of 7,500 s to 2,500 s, respectively. A pulsed magnetic field strength of 2 T is required to compress and heat the preionized hydrogen over a 10(exp -3) second discharge period, with about 60% of the heated plasma exiting the chamber each period to produce thrust. The unoptimized thruster efficiency is low, peaking at approximately 16% for an initial hydrogen chamber pressure of 100 Torr. The specific impulse and impulse-bit at this operating condition are 3,500 s and 90 N-s, respectively, and the required discharge energy is approximately 9x10(exp 6) J. For a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, the engine would produce an average thrust of 900 N at 3,500 s specific impulse. Combined with the electrodeless nature of the device, these performance parameters indicate that theta-pinch thrusters could provide unique, long-life propulsion systems for piloted deep space mission applications.

  6. Viscosity Meaurement Technique for Metal Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ban, Heng; Kennedy, Rory

    2015-02-09

    Metallic fuels have exceptional transient behavior, excellent thermal conductivity, and a more straightforward reprocessing path, which does not separate out pure plutonium from the process stream. Fabrication of fuel containing minor actinides and rare earth (RE) elements for irradiation tests, for instance, U-20Pu-3Am-2Np-1.0RE-15Zr samples at the Idaho National Laboratory, is generally done by melt casting in an inert atmosphere. For the design of a casting system and further scale up development, computational modeling of the casting process is needed to provide information on melt flow and solidification for process optimization. Therefore, there is a need for melt viscosity data, the most important melt property that controls the melt flow. The goal of the project was to develop a measurement technique that uses fully sealed melt sample with no Americium vapor loss to determine the viscosity of metallic melts and at temperatures relevant to the casting process. The specific objectives of the project were to: develop mathematical models to establish the principle of the measurement method, design and build a viscosity measurement prototype system based on the established principle, and calibrate the system and quantify the uncertainty range. The result of the project indicates that the oscillation cup technique is applicable for melt viscosity measurement. Detailed mathematical models of innovative sample ampoule designs were developed to not only determine melt viscosity, but also melt density under certain designs. Measurement uncertainties were analyzed and quantified. The result of this project can be used as the initial step toward the eventual goal of establishing a viscosity measurement system for radioactive melts.

  7. Viscosity properties of sodium borophosphate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Gaylord, S.; Tincher, B.; Petit, L. Richardson, K.

    2009-05-06

    The viscosity behavior of (1 - x)NaPO{sub 3}-xNa{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} glasses (x = 0.05-0.20) have been measured as a function of temperature using beam-bending and parallel-plate viscometry. The viscosity was found to shift to higher temperatures with increasing sodium borate content. The kinetic fragility parameter, m, estimated from the viscosity curve, decreases from 52 to 33 when x increases from 0.05 to 0.20 indicating that the glass network transforms from fragile to strong with the addition of Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}. The decrease in fragility with increasing x is due to the progressive depolymerization of the phosphate network by the preferred four-coordinated boron atoms present in the low alkali borate glasses. As confirmed by Raman spectroscopy increasing alkali borate leads to enhanced B-O-P linkages realized with the accompanying transition from solely four-coordinated boron (in BO{sub 4} units) to mixed BO{sub 4}/BO{sub 3} structures. The glass viscosity characteristics of the investigated glasses were compared to those of P-SF67 and N-FK5 commercial glasses from SCHOTT. We showed that the dependence of the viscosity of P-SF67 was similar to the investigated glasses due to similar phosphate network organization confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, whereas N-FK5 exhibited a very different viscosity curve and fragility parameter due to its highly coordinated silicate network.

  8. Bubble pinch-off and scaling during liquid drop impact on liquid pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Bahni; Biswas, Gautam; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2012-08-01

    Simulations are performed to show entrapment of air bubble accompanied by high speed upward and downward water jets when a water drop impacts a pool of water surface. A new bubble entrapment zone characterised by small bubble pinch-off and long thick jet is found. Depending on the bubble and jet behaviour, the bubble entrapment zone is subdivided into three sub-regimes. The entrapped bubble size and jet height depends on the crater shape and its maximum depth. During the bubble formation, bubble neck develops an almost singular shape as it pinches off. The final pinch-off shape and the power law governing the pinching, rneck ∝ A(t0 - t)αvaries with the Weber number. Weber dependence of the function describing the radius of the bubble during the pinch-off only affects the coefficient A and not the power exponent α.

  9. Dynamo and anomalous transport in the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Prager, S.C.

    1998-08-01

    The reversed field pinch is an effective tool to study the macroscopic consequences of magnetic fluctuations, such as the dynamo effect and anomalous transport. Several explanations exist for the dynamo (the self-generation of plasma current)--the MHD dynamo, the kinetic dynamo, and the diamagnetic dynamo. There is some experimental evidence for each, particularly from measurements of ion velocity and electron pressure fluctuations. Magnetic fluctuations are known to produce energy and particle flux in the RFP core. Current profile control is able to decrease fluctuation-induced transport by a factor of five. Improved confinement regimes are also obtained at deep reversal and, possibly, with flow shear.

  10. Neoclassical Transport in the Helical Reversed-Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobbin, M.; Spizzo, G.; Marrelli, L.; White, R. B.

    2010-11-01

    Test particle evaluation of the diffusion coefficient in a fusion plasma in the reversed-field pinch (RFP) configuration shows distinct similarities with stellarators when the plasma spontaneously evolves towards a helical shape. The almost total absence of superbanana particles at the levels of helical deformation seen in experiment (Bh/B=10%) causes transport to be proportional to collision frequency (at low collisions). This fact excludes the possibility that the minimum conceivable transport could be inversely proportional to collision frequency, which is typical of unoptimized stellarators. This result strengthens the perspectives of the helical RFP as a fusion configuration.

  11. The effect of toroidicity on reversed field pinch dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Jorge A.; Bos, Wouter J. T.; Schneider, Kai; Montgomery, David C.

    2014-09-01

    The influence of the curvature of the imposed magnetic field on reversed field pinch dynamics is investigated by comparing the flow of a magnetofluid in a torus with aspect ratio 1.83, with the flow in a periodic cylinder. It is found that an axisymmetric toroidal mode is always present in the toroidal, but absent in the cylindrical configuration. In particular, in contrast to the cylinder, the toroidal case presents a double poloidal recirculation cell with a shear localized at the plasma edge. Quasi-single-helicity states are found to be more persistent in toroidal than in periodic cylinder geometry.

  12. OPTIMIZATION STUDY FOR FILL STEM MANUFACTURINGAND PINCH WELD PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P; Karl Arnold, K

    2006-09-06

    A statistically designed experiment was conducted as part of a six sigma project for Fill Stem Manufacturing and Pinch Weld Processing. This multi-year/multi-site project has successfully completed a screening study and used those results as inputs to this optimization study. Eleven welds were made using fairly tight current and cycle range. The welds demonstrate increased burst strength, longer closure length, more net displacement, and improved bond rating with increased current. However, excessive melting remains a concern from a processing viewpoint and may cause adverse metallurgical interactions. Therefore, the highest current levels specified cannot be utilized. A Validation Study is proposed for the Defense Programs Inert Facility.

  13. Ionization dynamics of a single wire z-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Mark Darren

    This thesis explored the ionization dynamics of a single wire z-pinch. Experiments were conducted on fine wires of aluminum, copper, silver, and tungsten ranging in diameter from 7.5--50mum with lengths of 2.5cm. These wires were subjected to a pulsed current of ˜2kA, 500ns half-cycle from a spark-gap triggered, negatively-charged capacitor bank discharge. The results of this thesis are divided into three parts which cover the entire dynamic evolution of the wires during the first ˜500ns of the current pulse. The first part examined surface impurity evolution and its contribution to the voltage collapse and initial plasma formation. It was discovered that hydrocarbon impurities contribute significantly to the initial plasma formation, for all wires studied, and that high ionization states of carbon (CIII and CIV) are present at the point of the voltage collapse. The second portion of the thesis dealt with laser imaging and the observation of instability growth at the core/corona boundary of expanding z-pinch wire plasmas. From the increased sensitivity of the resonant XeCl excimer laser diagnostics, it was determined that, for aluminum wires, these instabilities were consistent with a hydrodynamic Rayleigh-Taylor instability of a decelerating plasma plume front. The third portion of the thesis focused on potential seeding mechanisms for instability growth in single wire z-pinches and their relevance to wire array experiments. It was observed in copper wires that do pre-heating of wires caused surface alterations due to recrystallization. It was also discovered, during the course of these studies, that electrical current pulses on the timescale of the experimental pulse (500ns half-cycle) could also alter the surface structure of copper wires and lead to coronal instabilities. Finally, preliminary investigations into the possibility of crystal/grain growth behavior in tungsten wires is given, along with the idea of using potassium doped tungsten wires as a means

  14. TPE-1R (M) reversed field pinch experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, T.; Hirano, Y.; Maejima, Y.; Ogawa, K.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the engineering aspects of the design, tests, and performances of the toroidal device TPE-1RM with which plasma physics researches on ''Reversed Field Pinch''configurations are carried out and this is an intermediate scale like HBTX-1A, ZT-40M, and ETA-BETA II. In TPE-1RM experiments are being performed in order to obtain an optimum reversed field configurations for MHD stability. The main description in this report is devoted to the metal vacuum vessel and specially contrived electrical circuit for field programming control techniques. The experiments with this device have been successful both from the technical and physcial points of view.

  15. Infinitesimal structure of inverse pinch effect cylindrical MHD shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Baty, Roy S; Stanescu, Dan; Tucker, Don H

    2008-01-01

    Nonstandard analysis is used to derive the relationships between the jump functions for density, pressure, velocity and magnetic field within a diverging cylindrical magnetohydrodynamic shock caused by the inverse pinch effect. The shock is assumed to have infinitesimal thickness. The obtained relationships allow explicit numerical constructions of the shock structure once the variation in one variable, here chosen to be the density, is specified. The shapes thus constructed offer additional insight into the physics of such shock waves from a perspective which would be extremely difficult to investigate experimentally.

  16. Dynamical processes in the reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Caramana, E.; Cayton, T.; Dagazian, R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents a review of recent theoretical work on the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A wide variety of topics are discussed. These include: nonlinear, two-dimensional, helical, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of current-driven modes; a statistical model of plasma turbulence in the RFP; analytic and numerical calculations of resistive ballooning modes in toroidal geometry; work on coherent m = 0 excitations observed in the ZT-40M device; finite Larmor radius effects on the tearing mode; destabilization of MHD modes by kinetic effects; and, possible plasma heating by means of magnetoacoustic oscillations.

  17. Axisymmetric bubble pinch-off at high Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Gordillo, J M; Sevilla, A; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, J; Martínez-Bazán, C

    2005-11-01

    Analytical considerations and potential-flow numerical simulations of the pinch-off of bubbles at high Reynolds numbers reveal that the bubble minimum radius, rn, decreases as tau proportional to r2n sqrt[1lnr2n], where tau is the time to break up, when the local shape of the bubble near the singularity is symmetric. However, if the gas convective terms in the momentum equation become of the order of those of the liquid, the bubble shape is no longer symmetric and the evolution of the neck changes to a rn proportional to tau1/3 power law. These findings are verified experimentally. PMID:16383983

  18. Stability of a diffuse linear pinch with axial boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Einaudi, G.; Van Hoven, G.

    1981-01-01

    A formulation of the stability behavior of a finite-length pinch is presented. A general initial perturbation is expressed as a uniformly convergent sum over a complete discrete k set. A variational calculation is then performed, based on the energy principle, in which the end-boundary conditions appear as constraints. The requisite Lagrange multipliers mutually couple the elemental periodic excitations. The resulting extended form of delta-W still admits a proper second-variation treatment so that the minimization and stability considerations of Newcomb remain applicable. Comparison theorems are discussed as is the relevance of this end-effect model to the stability of solar coronal loops.

  19. Anode-plasma expansion in pinch-reflex diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Colombant, D.G.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1983-10-24

    Anode-plasma expansion in pinch-reflex diodes is investigated with use of a one-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model. Early in time, the plasma undergoes thermal expansion and its front is slowed down as a result of j x B. After the current has reached its maximum and for small radius where j and B are larger, j x B may accelerate the bulk of the anode plasma to large velocities. Good qualitative agreement is obtained with observations of the time dependence of the plasma velocity as well as its radial profile. The maximum expansion velocities reach tens of centimeters per microsecond.

  20. Slim accretion discs with different viscosity prescriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szuszkiewicz, Ewa

    1990-05-01

    The variability of X-ray sources powered by accretion may be connected to thermal instabilities in the innermost parts of slim disks. The time-scales of variability predicted by the theory with the standard alpha-viscosity prescription agree with those observed in a wide range of sources. The amplitudes (3-4 orders of magnitude in luiminosity) are correctly predicted for X-ray transient sources, but in general are too big for quasars, Seyferts, galactic blackhole candidates and LMXBs. It is shown that a slight modification of the viscosity prescription can offer a much better agreement with observations.

  1. Thermal relics in cosmology with bulk viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, A.; Lambiase, G.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we discuss some consequences of cosmological models in which the primordial cosmic matter is described by a relativistic imperfect fluid. The latter takes into account the dissipative effects (bulk viscosity) arising from different cooling rates of the fluid components in the expanding Universe. We discuss, in particular, the effects of the bulk viscosity on Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and on the thermal relic abundance of particles, looking at recent results of PAMELA experiment. The latter has determined an anomalous excess of positron events, which cannot be explained by conventional cosmology and particle physics.

  2. Measuring Viscosities of Gases at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Mall, Gerald H.; Hoshang, Chegini

    1987-01-01

    Variant of general capillary method for measuring viscosities of unknown gases based on use of thermal mass-flowmeter section for direct measurement of pressure drops. In technique, flowmeter serves dual role, providing data for determining volume flow rates and serving as well-characterized capillary-tube section for measurement of differential pressures across it. New method simple, sensitive, and adaptable for absolute or relative viscosity measurements of low-pressure gases. Suited for very complex hydrocarbon mixtures where limitations of classical theory and compositional errors make theoretical calculations less reliable.

  3. Rare Gas Viscosities: A Learning Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, Arthur M.

    2002-02-01

    The viscosities, h, of the rare gases and SF6 are determined in a physical chemistry laboratory experiment using the evacuation method, which is based on Poiseuille's equation. Students become aware that h does not vary monotonically with row number (or atomic mass) and confirm this behavior on the basis of the kinetic theory expression for h. They find that the collision diameters of the gases, s, which are obtained from h values, increase monotonically with molar mass, as expected. Students can show that values of s obtained from gas viscosities agree reasonably well with ab initio calculations of atomic (molecular) diameters using Gaussian 98W.

  4. Viscosity of a nanoconfined liquid during compression

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Shah H.; Kramkowski, Edward L.; Ochs, Peter J.; Wilson, David M.; Hoffmann, Peter M.

    2014-01-13

    The viscous behavior of liquids under nanoconfinement is not well understood. Using a small-amplitude atomic force microscope, we found bulk-like viscosity in a nanoconfined, weakly interacting liquid. A further decrease in viscosity was observed at confinement sizes of a just few molecular layers. Overlaid over the continuum viscous behavior, we measured non-continuum stiffness and damping oscillations. The average stiffness of the confined liquid was found to scale linearly with the size of the confining tip, while the damping scales with the radius of curvature of the tip end.

  5. Shear viscosity coefficient of liquid lanthanides

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, H. P. Thakor, P. B. Prajapati, A. V.; Sonvane, Y. A.

    2015-05-15

    Present paper deals with the computation of shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides. The effective pair potential v(r) is calculated through our newly constructed model potential. The Pair distribution function g(r) is calculated from PYHS reference system. To see the influence of local field correction function, Hartree (H), Tailor (T) and Sarkar et al (S) local field correction function are used. Present results are compared with available experimental as well as theoretical data. Lastly, we found that our newly constructed model potential successfully explains the shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides.

  6. Shock capturing by the spectral viscosity method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadmor, Eitan

    1989-01-01

    A main disadvantage of using spectral methods for nonlinear conservation laws lies in the formation of Gibbs phenomenon, once spontaneous shock discontinuities appear in the solution. The global nature of spectral methods than pollutes the unstable Gibbs oscillations overall the computational domain, and the lack of entropy dissipation prevents convergences in these cases. The Spectral Viscosity method, which is based on high frequency dependent vanishing viscosity regularization of the classical spectral methods is discussed. It is shown that this method enforces the convergence of nonlinear spectral approximations without sacrificing their overall spectral accuracy.

  7. Gravimetric capillary method for kinematic viscosity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Iwan, J.; Alexander, D.; Jin, Wei-Qing

    1992-01-01

    A novel version of the capillary method for viscosity measurements of liquids is presented. Viscosity data can be deduced in a straightforward way from mass transfer data obtained by differential weighing during the gravity-induced flow of the liquid between two cylindrical chambers. Tests of this technique with water, carbon tetrachloride, and ethanol suggest that this arrangement provides an accuracy of about +/- 1 percent. The technique facilitates operation under sealed, isothermal conditions and, thus can readily be applied to reactive and/or high vapor pressure liquids.

  8. Wave Speeds, Riemann Solvers and Artificial Viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, W.J.

    1999-07-18

    A common perspective on the numerical solution of the equation Euler equations for shock physics is examined. The common viewpoint is based upon the selection of nonlinear wavespeeds upon which the dissipation (implicit or explicit) is founded. This perspective shows commonality between Riemann solver based method (i.e. Godunov-type) and artificial viscosity (i.e. von Neumann-Richtmyer). As an example we derive an improved nonlinear viscous stabilization of a Richtmyer-Lax-Wendroff method. Additionally, we will define a form of classical artificial viscosity based upon the HLL Riemann solver.

  9. Suppression of the n=2 rotational instability in field-reversed configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Alan L.; Slough, J.; Harding, Dennis G.

    1983-06-01

    Compact toroid plasmas formed in field-reversed theta pinches are generally destroyed after 30-50 μsec by a rotating n=2 instability. In the reported experiment, instability is controlled, and the plasma destruction is avoided in the TRX-1 theta pinch through the application of octopole magnetic fields. The decay times for loss of poloidal flux and particles are unaffected by the octopole fields. These decay times are about 100 μsec based on inferences from interferometry and excluded flux measurements. The weak, rotating elliptical disturbance (controlled n=2 mode) also made possible a novel determination of the density profile near the separatrix using single-chord interferometry. The local density gradient scale length in this region is found to be about one ion gyrodiameter.

  10. The importance of EBIT data for Z-pinch plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, A S; Kantsyrev, V L; Neill, P; Safronova, U I; Fedin, D A; Ouart, N D; Yilmaz, M F; Osborne, G; Shrestha, I; Williamson, K; Hoppe, T; Harris, C; Beiersdorfer, P; Hansen, S

    2007-04-04

    The results from the last six years of x-ray spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry of high energy density Z-pinch plasmas complemented by experiments with the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are presented. The two topics discussed are the development of M-shell x-ray W spectroscopic diagnostics and K-shell Ti spectropolarimetry of Z-pinch plasmas. The main focus is on radiation from a specific load configuration called an 'X-pinch'. X-pinches are excellent sources for testing new spectral diagnostics and for atomic modelling because of the high density and temperature of the pinch plasmas, which scale from a few {micro}m to several mm in size. They offer a variety of load configurations, which differ in wire connections, number of wires, and wire materials. In this work the study of X-pinches with tungsten wires combined with wires from other, lower-Z materials is reported. Utilizing data produced with the LLNL EBIT at different energies of the electron beam the theoretical prediction of line positions and intensity of M-shell W spectra were tested and calibrated. Polarization-sensitive X-pinch experiments at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) provide experimental evidence for the existence of strong electron beams in Ti and Mo X-pinch plasmas and motivate the development of x-ray spectropolarimetry of Z-pinch plasmas. This diagnostic is based on the measurement of spectra recorded simultaneously by two spectrometers with different sensitivity to the linear polarization of the observed lines and compared with theoretical models of polarization-dependent spectra. Polarization-dependent K-shell spectra from Ti X-pinches are presented and compared with model calculations and with spectra generated by a quasi-Maxwellian electron beam at the LLNL EBIT-II electron beam ion trap.

  11. Shear-rate-dependent viscosities of nematic and disc-like particles perfectly aligned in arbitrary relative directions to the shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Hyearn-Maw

    2016-07-01

    The shear-rate-dependent viscosity coefficients of hard ellipsoids are derived for arbitrary relative orientations to the shear flow geometry. Each of the nine components of the coefficients scaled by the Newtonian shear viscosity agrees with the previous result for the viscosity in the zero-shear-rate limit. Among the components, the shear viscosity is graphically displayed for nematic ellipsoids with an axis ratio greater than 1 and for disc-like ellipsoids with an axis ratio less than 1 over the whole range of relative orientations of the axis of ellipsoid to the plane shear layer. As the primary axis of the ellipsoid rotates from the x-axis to the y-axis in the x-y plane, the shear viscosity increases or decreases for nematic or disc-like ellipsolids, respectively.

  12. Spiders Tune Glue Viscosity to Maximize Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Zhang, Ci; Diaz, Candido; Opell, Brent D; Blackledge, Todd A; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-11-24

    Adhesion in humid conditions is a fundamental challenge to both natural and synthetic adhesives. Yet, glue from most spider species becomes stickier as humidity increases. We find the adhesion of spider glue, from five diverse spider species, maximizes at very different humidities that matches their foraging habitats. By using high-speed imaging and spreading power law, we find that the glue viscosity varies over 5 orders of magnitude with humidity for each species, yet the viscosity at maximal adhesion for each species is nearly identical, 10(5)-10(6) cP. Many natural systems take advantage of viscosity to improve functional response, but spider glue's humidity responsiveness is a novel adaptation that makes the glue stickiest in each species' preferred habitat. This tuning is achieved by a combination of proteins and hygroscopic organic salts that determines water uptake in the glue. We therefore anticipate that manipulation of polymer-salts interaction to control viscosity can provide a simple mechanism to design humidity responsive smart adhesives. PMID:26513350

  13. Commensurability Effects in Viscosity of Nanoconfined Water.

    PubMed

    Neek-Amal, Mehdi; Peeters, Francois M; Grigorieva, Irina V; Geim, Andre K

    2016-03-22

    The rate of water flow through hydrophobic nanocapillaries is greatly enhanced as compared to that expected from macroscopic hydrodynamics. This phenomenon is usually described in terms of a relatively large slip length, which is in turn defined by such microscopic properties as the friction between water and capillary surfaces and the viscosity of water. We show that the viscosity of water and, therefore, its flow rate are profoundly affected by the layered structure of confined water if the capillary size becomes less than 2 nm. To this end, we study the structure and dynamics of water confined between two parallel graphene layers using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the shear viscosity is not only greatly enhanced for subnanometer capillaries, but also exhibits large oscillations that originate from commensurability between the capillary size and the size of water molecules. Such oscillating behavior of viscosity and, consequently, the slip length should be taken into account in designing and studying graphene-based and similar membranes for desalination and filtration. PMID:26882095

  14. Pressure-viscosity coefficient of biobased lubricants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Film thickness is an important tribological property that is dependent on the combined effect of lubricant properties, material property of friction surfaces, and the operating conditions of the tribological process. Pressure-viscosity coefficient (PVC) is one of the lubricant properties that influe...

  15. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-05-15

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a “heat flux viscosity,” is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  16. Electron perpendicular viscosity in Braginskii's equations

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, S. K.; Chan, V. S.

    2013-07-15

    The viscosity coefficient of the electron perpendicular stress tensor in Braginskii's theory is corrected by the addition of a term of the same order of magnitude, through the inclusion of a term beyond pitch angle scattering in the mass-ratio expansion of the electron-ion collision operator.

  17. Viscosity Measurement using Drop Coalescence in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.; Ethridge, Edwin; Maxwell, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    We present in here details of a new method, using drop coalescence, for application in microgravity environment for determining the viscosity of highly viscous undercooled liquids. The method has the advantage of eliminating heterogeneous nucleation at container walls caused by crystallization of undercooled liquids during processing. Also, due to the rapidity of the measurement, homogeneous nucleation would be avoided. The technique relies on both a highly accurate solution to the Navier-Stokes equations as well as on data gathered from experiments conducted in near zero gravity environment. The liquid viscosity is determined by allowing the computed free surface shape relaxation time to be adjusted in response to the measured free surface velocity of two coalescing drops. Results are presented from two validation experiments of the method which were conducted recently on board the NASA KC-135 aircraft. In these tests the viscosity of a highly viscous liquid, such as glycerine at different temperatures, was determined to reasonable accuracy using the liquid coalescence method. The experiments measured the free surface velocity of two glycerine drops coalescing under the action of surface tension alone in low gravity environment using high speed photography. The free surface velocity was then compared with the computed values obtained from different viscosity values. The results of these experiments were found to agree reasonably well with the calculated values.

  18. Viscosity of endodontic irrigants: Influence of temperature

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Claudio; Ceci, Matteo; Beltrami, Riccardo; Colombo, Marco; Dagna, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to assess the influence of temperature on the viscosity of different endodontic irrigants. Materials and Methods: The measurements of viscosity of 3% hydrogen peroxide, 0.9% sodium chloride, aqueous solution of 0.2% chlorhexidine (CHX) and 0.2% cetrimide, 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) at different temperatures (22°C, 30°C, 40°C, 50°C and 60°C) were obtained using Mohr balance and Ostwald viscometer. The Shapiro-Wilk test and Mann-Whitney U-tests were used for the statistical analysis. (α = 0.05). Results: No significant differences were recorded at each temperature among 3% hydrogen peroxide, 0.9% sodium chloride and aqueous solution of 0.2% CHX and 0.2% cetrimide. 5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA showed the higher values. Viscosity statistically decreased with increasing temperature. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, 5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA are significantly viscous at room temperature and their viscosity reduces with elevating temperature. PMID:26604955

  19. Viscosity in a lepton-photon universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husdal, Lars

    2016-08-01

    We look at viscosity production in a universe consisting purely of leptons and photons. This is quite close to what the universe actually look like when the temperature was between 10^{10} K and 10^{12} K (1-100 MeV). By taking the strong force and the hadronic particles out of the equation, we can examine how the viscous forces behave with all the 12 leptons present. By this we study how shear- and (more interestingly) bulk viscosity is affected during periods with particle annihilation. We use the theory given by Hoogeveen et al. from 1986, replicate their 9-particle results and expanded it to include the muon and tau particles as well. This will impact the bulk viscosity immensely for high temperatures. We will show that during the beginning of the lepton era, when the temperature is around 100 MeV, the bulk viscosity will be roughly 100 million times larger with muons included in the model compared to a model without.

  20. Pressure viscosity coefficient of vegetable oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The elastohydrodynamic (EHD) pressure viscosity coefficient (PVC) of ten vegetable oils from commodity and new crops, and two petroleum-based oils, polyalphaolefin (PAO) and hexadecane, were investigated. PVC was measured using three different methods: the So and Klaus (S-K) procedure from oil visco...

  1. Sensor for Viscosity and Shear Strength Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, J.; Moore, J.E. Jr.; Ebadian, M.A.; Jones, W.K.

    1998-10-20

    Measurement of the physical properties (viscosity and density) of waste slurries is critical in evaluating transport parameters to ensure turbulent flow through transport pipes. The environment for measurement and sensor exposure is extremely harsh; therefore, reliability and ruggedness are critical in the sensor design. The work for this project will be performed in three phases. The first phase, carried out in FY96, involved (1) an evaluation of acoustic and other methods for viscosity measurement; (2) measurement of the parameters of slurries over the range of percent solids found in tanks and transport systems; (3) a comparison of physical properties (e.g., viscosity and density) to percent solids found composition; and (4) the design of a prototype sensor. The second phase (FY97) will involve the fabrication of a prototype hybrid sensor to measure the viscosity and mechanical properties of slurries in remote, high-radiation environments. Two different viscometer designs are being investigated in this study: a magnetostrictive pulse wave guide viscometer; an oscillating cylinder viscometer. In FY97, the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU), which has printed circuit, thick film, thin film, and co-fired ceramic fabrication capability, will fabricate five probes for demonstration after technology selection and evaluation.

  2. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-05-01

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a "heat flux viscosity," is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  3. Study of gas-puff Z-pinches on COBRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, N.; Rosenberg, E. W.; Gourdain, P. A.; de Grouchy, P. W. L.; Kusse, B. R.; Hammer, D. A.; Bell, K. S.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Potter, W. M.; Atoyan, L.; Cahill, A. D.; Evans, M.; Greenly, J. B.; Hoyt, C. L.; Pikuz, S. A.; Schrafel, P. C.; Kroupp, E.; Fisher, A.; Maron, Y.

    2014-11-01

    Gas-puff Z-pinch experiments were conducted on the 1 MA, 200 ns pulse duration Cornell Beam Research Accelerator (COBRA) pulsed power generator in order to achieve an understanding of the dynamics and instability development in the imploding and stagnating plasma. The triple-nozzle gas-puff valve, pre-ionizer, and load hardware are described. Specific diagnostics for the gas-puff experiments, including a Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence system for measuring the radial neutral density profiles along with a Laser Shearing Interferometer and Laser Wavefront Analyzer for electron density measurements, are also described. The results of a series of experiments using two annular argon (Ar) and/or neon (Ne) gas shells (puff-on-puff) with or without an on- (or near-) axis wire are presented. For all of these experiments, plenum pressures were adjusted to hold the radial mass density profile as similar as possible. Initial implosion stability studies were performed using various combinations of the heavier (Ar) and lighter (Ne) gasses. Implosions with Ne in the outer shell and Ar in the inner were more stable than the opposite arrangement. Current waveforms can be adjusted on COBRA and it was found that the particular shape of the 200 ns current pulse affected on the duration and diameter of the stagnated pinched column and the x-ray yield.

  4. D-D fusion experiments using fast z pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Spielman, R.B.; Baldwin, G.T.; Cooper, G.

    1994-04-01

    The development of high current (I > 10 MA) drivers provides us with a new tool for the study of neutron-producing plasmas in the thermal regime. The imploded deuterium mass (or collisionality) increases as I{sup 2} and the ability of the driver to heat the plasma to relevant fusion temperatures improves as the power of the driver increases. Additionally, fast (< 100 ns) implosions are more stable to the usual MHD instabilities that plagued the traditional slower implosions. We describe experiments in which deuterium gas puffs or CD{sub 2} fiber arrays were imploded in a fast z-pinch configuration on Sandia`s Saturn facility generating up to 3 {times} 10{sup 12} D-D neutrons. These experiments were designed to explore the physics of neutron-generating plasmas in a z-pinch geometry. Specifically, we intended to produce neutrons from a nearly thermal plasma where the electrons and ions have a nearly Maxwellian distribution. This is to be clearly differentiated from the more usual D-D beam-target neutrons generated in many dense plasma focus (DPF) devices.

  5. D-D fusion experiments using fast Z pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Spielman, R.B.; Baldwin, G.T.; Cooper, G.

    1998-03-01

    The development of high current (I > 10 MA) drivers provides the authors with a new tool for the study of neutron-producing plasmas in the thermal regime. The imploded deuterium mass (or collisionality) increases as I{sup 2} and the ability of the driver to heat the plasma to relevant fusion temperatures improves as the power of the driver increases. Additionally, fast (<100 ns) implosions are more stable to the usual MHD instabilities that plagued the traditional slower implosions. The authors describe experiments in which deuterium gas puffs or CD{sub 2} fiber arrays were imploded in a fast z-pinch configuration on Sandia`s Saturn facility generating up to 3 {times} 10{sup 12} D-D neutrons. These experiments were designed to explore the physics of neutron-generating plasmas in a z-pinch geometry. Specifically, the authors intended to produce neutrons from a nearly thermal plasma where the electrons and ions have a nearly Maxwellian distribution. This is to be clearly differentiated from the more usual D-D beam-target neutrons generated in many dense plasma focus (DPF) devices.

  6. Ion Acceleration by Magnetic Pinch Instabilities- Powerful Neutron Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Anna; Li, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Since the 1950s pinch discharges with deuterium gas have been known to produce large neutron bursts. During these early quests for laboratory fusion it was initially believed that the heat produced in the pinch led to sufficently high temperatures that these neutrons resulted from thermonuclear (TN) burn. However, a series of careful measurements led by Stirling Colgate was carried out to show that these neutrons did not result form TN burn. Rather, they resulted from an m = 0 sausage mode instability that accelerated the ions, causing beam-target interactions. Today, this same mechanism is used in dense plasma focus machines to generate intense neutron pulses for neutron activation experiments. One such experiment, to test the citicality of aging plutonium, is currently being planned at the Nevada Test Site. Helping to characterize the neutrons from the dense palsma focus to be used in this large experiment was the last applied physics project that Stirling work on. In this talk we will summarize the physics issues involved both in the original discovery in the 1950s and in today's experiments.

  7. Driven, steady-state RFP computations. [reversed field pinch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlburg, J. P.; Montgomery, D.; Doolen, G. D.; Turner, L.

    1988-01-01

    The pseudospectral three-dimensional MHD code of Dahlburg et al. (1986 and 1987) is used to compute the dynamical behavior of a channel of magnetofluid carrying an axial current and magnetic flux. This situation contains the essential MHD behavior of the reversed-field pinch (RFP). An externally imposed electric field is applied to an initially current-free magnetofluid and drives currents that rise and eventually fluctuate about values corresponding to pinch ratios Theta of about 1.3, 2.2, and 4.5. A period of violent turbulence leads to an approximately force-free core, surrounded by an active MHD boundary layer that is not force-free. A steady state is reached that can apparently be sustained indefinitely (for several hundred Alfven transit times or longer). The turbulence level and time variability in the steady state increase with increasing Theta. The average toroidal magnetic field at the wall reverses for Theta = 2.2 and 4.5, but not for Theta = 1.3. Negative toroidal current filaments are observed. The Lundquist numbers are of the order of a few hundred.

  8. Study of gas-puff Z-pinches on COBRA

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, N.; Rosenberg, E. W.; Gourdain, P. A.; Grouchy, P. W. L. de; Kusse, B. R.; Hammer, D. A.; Bell, K. S.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Potter, W. M.; Atoyan, L.; Cahill, A. D.; Evans, M.; Greenly, J. B.; Hoyt, C. L.; Pikuz, S. A.; Schrafel, P. C.; Kroupp, E.; Fisher, A.; Maron, Y.

    2014-11-15

    Gas-puff Z-pinch experiments were conducted on the 1 MA, 200 ns pulse duration Cornell Beam Research Accelerator (COBRA) pulsed power generator in order to achieve an understanding of the dynamics and instability development in the imploding and stagnating plasma. The triple-nozzle gas-puff valve, pre-ionizer, and load hardware are described. Specific diagnostics for the gas-puff experiments, including a Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence system for measuring the radial neutral density profiles along with a Laser Shearing Interferometer and Laser Wavefront Analyzer for electron density measurements, are also described. The results of a series of experiments using two annular argon (Ar) and/or neon (Ne) gas shells (puff-on-puff) with or without an on- (or near-) axis wire are presented. For all of these experiments, plenum pressures were adjusted to hold the radial mass density profile as similar as possible. Initial implosion stability studies were performed using various combinations of the heavier (Ar) and lighter (Ne) gasses. Implosions with Ne in the outer shell and Ar in the inner were more stable than the opposite arrangement. Current waveforms can be adjusted on COBRA and it was found that the particular shape of the 200 ns current pulse affected on the duration and diameter of the stagnated pinched column and the x-ray yield.

  9. Z-Pinch Driven Isentropic Compression for Inertial Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Asay, J.R.; Hall, C.A.; Holland, K.G.; Slutz, S.A.; Spielman, R.B.; Stygar, W.A.

    1999-02-01

    The achievement of high gain with inertial fusion requires the compression of hydrogen isotopes to high density and temperatures. High densities can be achieved most efficiently by isentropic compression. This requires relatively slow pressure pulses on the order of 10-20 nanoseconds; however, the pressure profile must have the appropriate time. We present 1-D numerical simulations that indicate such a pressure profile can be generated by using pulsed power driven z pinches. Although high compression is calculated, the initial temperature is too low for ignition. Ignition could be achieved by heating a small portion of this compressed fuel with a short (-10 ps) high power laser pulse as previously described. Our 1-D calculations indicate that the existing Z-accelerator could provide the driving current (-20 MA) necessary to compress fuel to roughly 1500 times solid density. At this density the required laser energy is approximately 10 kJ. Multidimensional effects such as the Rayleigh-Taylor were not addressed in this brief numerical study. These effects will undoubtedly lower fuel compression for a given chive current. Therefore it is necessary to perform z-pinch driven compression experiments. Finally, we present preliminary experimental data from the Z-accelerator indicating that current can be efficiently delivered to appropriately small loads (- 5 mm radius) and that VISAR can be used measure high pressure during isentropic compression.

  10. Increasing Z-pinch vacuum hohlraum capsule coupling efficiency.

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, Debbie; Vesey, Roger Alan; Cochrane, Kyle Robert; Nikroo, A.; Bennett, Guy R.; Schroen, Diana Grace; Ruggles, Laurence E.; Porter, John L.; Streit, Jon; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Cuneo, Michael Edward

    2004-11-01

    Symmetric capsule implosions in the double-ended vacuum hohlraum (DEH) on Z have demonstrated convergence ratios of 14-21 for 2.15-mm plastic ablator capsules absorbing 5-7 kJ of x-rays, based on backlit images of the compressed ablator remaining at peak convergence [1]. Experiments with DD-filled 3.3-mm diameter capsules designed to absorb 14 kJ of x-rays have begun as an integrated test of drive temperature and symmetry, complementary to thin-shell symmetry diagnostic capsules. These capsule implosions are characterized by excellent control of symmetry (< 3% time-integrated), but low hohlraum efficiency (< 2%). Possible methods to increase the capsule absorbed energy in the DEH include mixed-component hohlraums, large diameter foam ablator capsules, transmissive shine shields between the z-pinch and capsule, higher spoke electrode x-ray transmission, a double-sided power feed, and smaller initial radius z-pinch wire arrays. Simulations will explore the potential for each of these modifications to increase the capsule coupling efficiency for near-term experiments on Z and ZR.

  11. Self-pinched transport of an intense proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ottinger, P. F.; Young, F. C.; Stephanakis, S. J.; Rose, D. V.; Neri, J. M.; Weber, B. V.; Myers, M. C.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Mosher, D.; Olson, C. L.

    2000-01-01

    Ion beam self-pinched transport (SPT) experiments have been carried out using a 1.1-MeV, 100-kA proton beam. A Rutherford scattering diagnostic and a LiF nuclear activation diagnostic measured the number of protons within a 5 cm radius at 50 cm into the transport region that was filled with low-pressure helium. Time-integrated signals from both diagnostics indicate self-pinching of the ion beam in a helium pressure window between 35 and 80 mTorr. Signals from these two diagnostics are consistent with ballistic transport at pressures above and below this SPT pressure window. Interferometric measurements of electron densities during beam injection into vacuum are consistent with ballistic transport with co-moving electrons. Interferometric measurements for beam injection into helium show that the electron density increases quadratically with pressure through the SPT window and roughly linearly with pressure above the SPT window. The ionization fraction of the helium plateaus at about 1.5% for pressures above 80 mTorr. In the SPT window, the electron density is 3 to 20 times the beam density. Numerical simulations of these beam transport experiments produce results that are in qualitative agreement with the experimental measurements. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  12. Analytical and phenomenological studies of rotating turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahalov, Alex; Zhou, YE

    1995-01-01

    A framework, which combines mathematical analysis, closure theory, and phenomenological treatment, is developed to study the spectral transfer process and reduction of dimensionality in turbulent flows that are subject to rotation. First, we outline a mathematical procedure that is particularly appropriate for problems with two disparate time scales. The approach which is based on the Green's method leads to the Poincare velocity variables and the Poincare transformation when applied to rotating turbulence. The effects of the rotation are now reflected in the modifications to the convolution of a nonlinear term. The Poincare transformed equations are used to obtain a time-dependent analog of the Taylor-Proudman theorem valid in the asymptotic limit when the non-dimensional parameter mu is identical to Omega(t) approaches infinity (Omega is the rotation rate and t is the time). The 'split' of the energy transfer in both direct and inverse directions is established. Secondly, we apply the Eddy-Damped-Quasinormal-Markovian (EDQNM) closure to the Poincare transformed Euler/Navier-Stokes equations. This closure leads to expressions for the spectral energy transfer. In particular, an unique triple velocity decorrelation time is derived with an explicit dependence on the rotation rate. This provides an important input for applying the phenomenological treatment of Zhou. In order to characterize the relative strength of rotation, another non-dimensional number, a spectral Rossby number, which is defined as the ratio of rotation and turbulence time scales, is introduced. Finally, the energy spectrum and the spectral eddy viscosity are deduced.

  13. Rotational Viscometers--A Subject for Student Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2010-01-01

    Three variants of the rotational viscometer employing a dc motor are considered. The viscometers are highly suitable for liquids of high viscosity, such as glycerol or oils (that is, for [eta] in the range 10-1000 mPa s). The set-ups are very simple and can serve as a first step to designing devices that are more complicated. Experimentation with…

  14. Reference Correlation for the Viscosity of Ethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eckhard; Span, Roland; Herrmann, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    A new representation of the viscosity for the fluid phase of ethane includes a zero-density correlation and a contribution for the critical enhancement, initially both developed separately, but based on experimental data. The higher-density contributions are correlated as a function of the reduced density δ = ρ/ρc and of the reciprocal reduced temperature τ = Tc/T (ρc—critical density and Tc—critical temperature). The final formulation contains 14 coefficients obtained using a state-of-the-art linear optimization algorithm. The evaluation and choice of the selected primary data sets is reviewed, in particular with respect to the assessment used in earlier viscosity correlations. The new viscosity surface correlation makes use of the reference equation of state for the thermodynamic properties of ethane by Bücker and Wagner [J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 35, 205 (2006)] and is valid in the fluid region from the melting line to temperatures of 675 K and pressures of 100 MPa. The viscosity in the limit of zero density is described with an expanded uncertainty of 0.5% (coverage factor k = 2) for temperatures 290 < T/K < 625, increasing to 1.0% at temperatures down to 212 K. The uncertainty of the correlated values is 1.5% in the range 290 < T/K < 430 at pressures up to 30 MPa on the basis of recent measurements judged to be very reliable as well as 4.0% and 6.0% in further regions. The uncertainty in the near-critical region (1.001 < 1/τ < 1.010 and 0.8 < δ < 1.2) increases with decreasing temperature up to 3.0% considering the available reliable data. Tables of the viscosity calculated from the correlation are listed in an appendix for the single-phase region, for the vapor-liquid phase boundary, and for the near-critical region.

  15. Rotating Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues currently being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  16. The analytical model for vortex ring pinch-off process based on the energy extremum principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yang; Liu, Hong; Qin, Suyang; Wang, Fuxin

    2015-11-01

    The discovery of vortex ring pinch-off is greatly helpful for us to understand the mechanism of optimal vortex formation, which further implies the optimal biological propulsion for animals. The vortex ring pinch-off implies its limiting formation and is dominated by the energy extremum principle. However, it is found that vortex ring pinch-off is a continuous process rather than a transient timescale. Therefore, we are wondering that how to identify the onset and end of pinch-off process. Based on the Kelvin-Benjamin variational principle, a dimensionless energy number is adopted to characterize the energy evolution of vortex rings. The vortex ring flow fields are obtained by DPIV with the piston-cylinder setup, and their geometric structures are identified using its Lagrangian coherent structures. The results show that the dimensionless energy numbers with the steady translating vortex rings share a critical value. It is then demonstrated that the dimensionless energy number dominates the onset and the end of pinch-off process. Besides, the onset and end of pinch-off can also be identified using LCSs. Additionally, based on the dimensionless energy number or LCSs, the corresponding vortex ring formation times(L/D) for the onset or the end of pinch-off are consistent.

  17. An Investigation of X-Pinch Dynamics by X-Ray Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Adam; Hoyt, Cad; Pikuz, Sergei; Shelkovenko, Tania; Hammer, David

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies of plasma pinches, such as x-pinches or hybrid pinches, have thoroughly characterized the radiating hot spot formed at the center of the plasma in terms of size, temperature, and density. However, much of the plasma volume surrounding the hot spot has remained relatively unstudied. We propose that a study of the surrounding plasmacanbe accomplished by means of absorption spectroscopy in spite of the high brightness of the x-pinch hot spot. Such an experiment has been designedforthe XP pulser at Cornell University. The XP pulser, which is capable of delivering 500 kA of current in 100 ns, is used to drive an x-pinch as a source of continuum radiation. This radiation is dispersed by an astigmatic mica crystal before interacting with another x-pinch serving as the objectplasma. The astigmatism of the crystal allows focusing to occur both at the sample location as well as at the detector for increased luminosity. To date, the experimental design for the study of plasma in an aluminum x-pinch has been completed. The object plasmaunder study willbe Al 5056, an Al alloy containing 5% Mg. The H-like and He-like resonance andsatellite linesin the spectrum from the Mgwill be used as the basis for plasma diagnosis. Preliminary results from this experiment will be presented.

  18. Development of a Z-pinch-driven ICF hohlraum concept on Z

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, M.E.; Porter, J.L. Jr.; Vesey, R.A.

    1999-07-01

    Recent development of high power z-pinches (> 150 MW) on the Z driver has permitted the study of high-temperature, radiation-driven hohlraums. Three complementary, Z-pinch source-hohlraum-ICF capsule configurations are being developed to harness the x-ray output of these Z-pinch's. These are the dynamic-hohlraum, static-wall hohlraum, and Z-pinch-driven hohlraum concepts. Each has different potential strengths and concerns. In this paper, the authors report on the first experiments with the Z-pinch-driven hohlraum (ZPDH) concept. A high-yield ICF capsule design for this concept appears feasible, when driven by z-pinches from a 60 MA-class driver. Initial experiments characterize the behavior of the spoke array on Z-pinch performance and x-ray transmission, and the uniformity of radiation flux incident on a foam capsule in the secondary, for a single-sided drive. Measurements of x-ray wall re-emission power and spectrum, radiation temperatures, spoke-plasma location, and drive uniformity will be presented and compared with 0-D energetics, 2-D Lasnex rad-hydro, and 3-D radiosity calculations of energy transport and drive uniformity.

  19. Subcritical excitation of the current-driven Tayler instability by super-rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüdiger, G.; Schultz, M.; Gellert, M.; Stefani, F.

    2016-01-01

    It is known that in a hydrodynamic Taylor-Couette system, uniform rotation or a rotation law with positive shear ("super-rotation") is linearly stable. It is also known that a conducting fluid under the presence of a sufficiently strong axial electric-current becomes unstable against nonaxisymmetric disturbances. It is thus suggestive that a cylindrical pinch formed by a homogeneous axial electric-current is stabilized by rotation laws with dΩ/dR ≥ 0. For magnetic Prandtl number Pm ≠ 1 and for slow rotation, however, rigid rotation and super-rotation support the instability by lowering the critical Hartmann numbers. This double-diffusive instability of super-rotation even exists for toroidal magnetic fields with rather arbitrary radial profiles, the current-free profile Bϕ ∝ 1/R included. The sign of the azimuthal drift of the nonaxisymmetric hydromagnetic instability pattern strongly depends on the magnetic Prandtl number. The pattern counterrotates with the flow for Pm ≪ 1 and it corotates for Pm ≫ 1 while for rotation laws with negative shear, the instability pattern migrates in the direction of the basic rotation for all Pm. An axial electric-current of minimal 3.6 kA flowing inside or outside the inner cylinder suffices to realize the double-diffusive instability for super-rotation in experiments using liquid sodium as the conducting fluid between the rotating cylinders. The limit is 11 kA if a gallium alloy is used.

  20. Numerical studies of thermal convection with temperature- and pressure-dependent viscosity at extreme viscosity contrasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaleque, Tania S.; Fowler, A. C.; Howell, P. D.; Vynnycky, M.

    2015-07-01

    Motivated by convection of planetary mantles, we consider a mathematical model for Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a basally heated layer of a fluid whose viscosity depends strongly on temperature and pressure, defined in an Arrhenius form. The model is solved numerically for extremely large viscosity variations across a unit aspect ratio cell, and steady solutions for temperature, isotherms, and streamlines are obtained. To improve the efficiency of numerical computation, we introduce a modified viscosity law with a low temperature cutoff. We demonstrate that this simplification results in markedly improved numerical convergence without compromising accuracy. Continued numerical experiments suggest that narrow cells are preferred at extreme viscosity contrasts, and this conclusion is supported by a linear stability analysis.

  1. Soft x-ray tomography system for the toroidal pinch experiment-RX reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Koguchi, H.; Shimada, T.; Asai, T.; Yagi, Y.; Hirano, Y.; Sakakita, H.

    2004-10-01

    A soft x-ray (SXR) measurement system for tomography analysis on a reversed-field pinch machine. torodial pinch experiment, RX [TPE-RX, R/a=1.72/0.45 m, I{sub p}<1 MA (designed)], is presented. The soft x-ray imaging system consists of two surface barrier detector (SBD) arrays that are vertical and horizontal. Thirteen SBDs are installed on the vertical ports and used for the measurement along vertical lines of sight. Eleven SBDs are installed on the horizontal port and used for the measurement along a fan-shaped line of sight. These detectors have 15-{mu}m-thick Be foil with sensitivity in the soft x-ray range. This system is installed in order to study the structure of the SXR emission from the plasma core and to know the relation between global performance and magnetohydrodynamics dynamics. This system has been used under several operating conditions in addition to those of standard operation. The first results of these experiments are reported.

  2. Soft x-ray tomography system for the toroidal pinch experiment-RX reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koguchi, H.; Shimada, T.; Asai, T.; Yagi, Y.; Hirano, Y.; Sakakita, H.

    2004-10-01

    A soft x-ray (SXR) measurement system for tomography analysis on a reversed-field pinch machine. torodial pinch experiment, RX [TPE-RX, R/a=1.72/0.45 m, Ip<1 MA (designed)], is presented. The soft x-ray imaging system consists of two surface barrier detector (SBD) arrays that are vertical and horizontal. Thirteen SBDs are installed on the vertical ports and used for the measurement along vertical lines of sight. Eleven SBDs are installed on the horizontal port and used for the measurement along a fan-shaped line of sight. These detectors have 15-μm-thick Be foil with sensitivity in the soft x-ray range. This system is installed in order to study the structure of the SXR emission from the plasma core and to know the relation between global performance and magnetohydrodynamics dynamics. This system has been used under several operating conditions in addition to those of standard operation. The first results of these experiments are reported.

  3. Polar Radiation-Flux Symmetry Measurements in Z-Pinch-Driven Hohlraums with Symmetric Double-Pinch Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, D. L.; Vesey, R. A.; Cuneo Porter, M. E., Jr.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruggles, L. E.; Simpson, W. W.; Seamen, H.; Primm, P.; Torres, J.; McGurn, J.; Gilliland, T. L.; Reynolds, P.; Hebron, D. E.; Dropinski, S. C.; Schroen-Carey, D. G.; Hammer, J. H.; Landen, O.; Koch, J.

    2000-10-01

    We are currently exploring symmetry requirements of the z-pinch-driven hohlraum concept [1] for high-yield inertial confinement fusion. In experiments on the Z accelerator, the burnthrough of a low-density self-backlit foam ball has been used to diagnose the large time-dependent flux asymmetry of several single-sided-drive hohlraum geometries [2]. We are currently applying this technique to study polar radiation flux symmetry in a symmetric double z-pinch geometry. Wire arrays on opposite ends of the hohlraum, connected in series to a single current drive of 18 MA, implode and stagnate on axis, efficiently radiating about 100 TW of x rays which heat the secondary to 75 eV. Comparisons with 3-D radiosity and 2-D rad-hydro models of hohlraum symmetry performance will be presented. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. 1 J. H. Hammer et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 2129 (1999). 2 D. L. Hanson et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 44, 40 (1999).

  4. Shape anisotropy induces rotations in optically trapped red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambardekar, Kapil; Dharmadhikari, Jayashree A.; Dharmadhikari, Aditya K.; Yamada, Toshihoro; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Kono, Hirohiko; Fujimura, Yuichi; Sharma, Shobhona; Mathur, Deepak

    2010-07-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical study is carried out to probe the rotational behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) in a single beam optical trap. We induce shape changes in RBCs by altering the properties of the suspension medium in which live cells float. We find that certain shape anisotropies result in the rotation of optically trapped cells. Indeed, even normal (healthy) RBCs can be made to rotate using linearly polarized trapping light by altering the osmotic stress the cells are subjected to. Hyperosmotic stress is found to induce shape anisotropies. We also probe the effect of the medium's viscosity on cell rotation. The observed rotations are modeled using a Langevin-type equation of motion that takes into account frictional forces that are generated as RBCs rotate in the medium. We observe good correlation between our measured data and calculated results.

  5. Measurement and calculation of the viscosity of metals—a review of the current status and developing trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, J.; Gröbner, J.; Hort, N.; Kainer, K. U.; Schmid-Fetzer, R.

    2014-06-01

    Viscosity is an important rheological property of metals in casting because it controls the rate of transport of liquid metals, which may lead to casting defects such as hot tearing and porosity. The measurement methods and numerical models of the viscosity of liquid and semi-solid state metals that have been published to date are reviewed in this paper. Most experimental measurements have been performed with rotational and oscillatory viscometers, which offer advantages at low viscosities in particular. Besides these two traditional methods for measuring viscosities, a couple of studies also introduced the technique of isothermal compression for alloys in the semi-solid state, and even an optical basicity method for the viscosity of slags. As to numerical models, most published results show that the viscosity of liquid and semi-solid state metals can be described by the Arrhenius, Andrade, Kaptay or Budai-Bemkő-Kaptay equations. In addition, there are some alternative models, such as the power model and the isothermal stress-strain model.

  6. Viscous effects in rapidly rotating stars with application to white-dwarf models. I, II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durisen, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    A general approximate numerical technique is proposed for constructing evolutionary sequences of rapidly rotating axisymmetric barytropic equilibrium configurations, with allowance for angular momentum transfer by a nonconstant isotropic viscosity. The principal physical assumption involved is the constancy of the angular momentum per unit mass on cylinders about the axis of rotation. Rapidly rotating nonmagnetic white-dwarf models with a zero-temperature degenerate-electron equation of state are considered as a particular application. The viscosity used in the analysis is that of the degenerate electrons.

  7. Immobilization of soluble protein complexes in MAS solid-state NMR: Sedimentation versus viscosity.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Riddhiman; Mainz, Andi; Busi, Baptiste; Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Kranz, Maximilian; Hofmann, Thomas; Reif, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, MAS solid-state NMR has emerged as a technique for the investigation of soluble protein complexes. It was found that high molecular weight complexes do not need to be crystallized in order to obtain an immobilized sample for solid-state NMR investigations. Sedimentation induced by sample rotation impairs rotational diffusion of proteins and enables efficient dipolar coupling based cross polarization transfers. In addition, viscosity contributes to the immobilization of the molecules in the sample. Natural Deep Eutectic Solvents (NADES) have very high viscosities, and can replace water in living organisms. We observe a considerable amount of cross polarization transfers for NADES solvents, even though their molecular weight is too low to yield significant sedimentation. We discuss how viscosity and sedimentation both affect the quality of the obtained experimental spectra. The FROSTY/sedNMR approach holds the potential to study large protein complexes, which are otherwise not amenable for a structural characterization using NMR. We show that using this method, backbone assignments of the symmetric proteasome activator complex (1.1MDa), and high quality correlation spectra of non-symmetric protein complexes such as the prokaryotic ribosome 50S large subunit binding to trigger factor (1.4MDa) are obtained. PMID:27017576

  8. Surface shear viscosity of a lung surfactant: Newtonian to non-Newtonian transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoughi, Amir; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2011-11-01

    DPPC molecule is the most prevalent constituent of lung surfactant, and understanding its behavior as a monolayer may lead to better simulations of respiration. At low surface pressures (i.e. large surface tensions, corresponding to area per molecule of about 50 angstrom squared, or greater), DPPC behaves as a purely viscous film with surface shear viscosity that is Reynolds number independent. Transition to a non-Newtonian regime occurs at large surface pressures. At the small scales associated with the liquid lining of the alveoli, the relative effects of surface viscosities can be comparable to that of surface tension. Here, we examine the interfacial hydrodynamics by isolating the effects of the surface shear viscosity. DPPC monolayer is spread from a concentrated solution at the air/water interface in a deep channel viscometer, consisting of an annular region between two stationary cylinders and a rotating floor. The interfacial velocity is measured non-invasively (without any seeding particles) using Brewster angle microscopy with short laser pulses. The departure from Newtonian behavior is quantified by comparisons to numerical simulations of Navier-Stokes with a BoussinesqâScriven surface model and various surface shear viscosities.

  9. Oral glucose retention, saliva viscosity and flow rate in 5-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Negoro, M; Nakagaki, H; Tsuboi, S; Adachi, K; Hanaki, M; Tanaka, D; Takami, Y; Nakano, T; Kuwahara, M; Thuy, T T

    2000-11-01

    There are significant differences of glucose retention in site-specificity and individuals. Sixty-two 5-year-old nursery schoolchildren participated in this study on the relation between the viscosity of saliva and flow rate and glucose retention. Each child was instructed to rinse his/her mouth with a glucose solution (0.5 M, 5 ml) and then to spit out. Three minutes after rinsing, glucose retention was determined. Resting saliva was collected by a natural outflow method, then the flow rate was determined. A rotational viscometer was used to determine the viscosity. Glucose retention and flow rate were correlated at the left maxillary primary molars, and glucose retention and viscosity were correlated at the maxillary central primary incisors. It was concluded that glucose retention after glucose mouth rinsing was site-specific, and that glucose retention and the index of decayed, missing and filled primary teeth (dmft) were slightly correlated with the salivary viscosity and flow rate. PMID:11000387

  10. Fully kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of a deuterium gas puff z pinch.

    PubMed

    Welch, D R; Rose, D V; Clark, R E; Mostrom, C B; Stygar, W A; Leeper, R J

    2009-12-18

    We present the first fully kinetic, collisional, and electromagnetic simulations of the complete time evolution of a deuterium gas puff z pinch. Recent experiments with 15-MA current pinches have suggested that the dominant neutron-production mechanism is thermonuclear. We observe distinct differences between the kinetic and magnetohydrodynamic simulations in the pinch evolution with the kinetic simulations producing both thermonuclear and beam-target neutrons. The kinetic approach demonstrated in this Letter represents a viable alternative for performing future plasma physics calculations. PMID:20366259

  11. X-ray imaging measurements of capsule implosions driven by a Z-pinch dynamic hohlraum.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J E; Chandler, G A; Slutz, S A; Bennett, G R; Cooper, G; Lash, J S; Lazier, S; Lemke, R; Nash, T J; Nielsen, D S; Moore, T C; Ruiz, C L; Schroen, D G; Smelser, R; Torres, J; Vesey, R A

    2002-08-26

    The radiation and shock generated by impact of an annular tungsten Z-pinch plasma on a 10-mm diam 5-mg/cc CH(2) foam are diagnosed with x-ray imaging and power measurements. The radiative shock was virtually unaffected by Z-pinch plasma instabilities. The 5-ns-duration approximately 135-eV radiation field imploded a 2.1-mm-diam CH capsule. The measured radiation temperature, shock radius, and capsule radius agreed well with computer simulations, indicating understanding of the main features of a Z-pinch dynamic-hohlraum-driven capsule implosion. PMID:12190409

  12. The Study of a Fibre Z-Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klir, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    This thesis presents the results of fibre Z-pinch experiments carried out on the Z-150 device at the CTU in Prague. The generator that was used to drive the experiments consisted of one capacitor of 3e-6 F capacitance. In the case of 20 kV charging voltage, the current was peaking at 80 kA with a 850 ns quarter period. The Z-pinch was formed from carbon fibres of 15 micrometer diameter and 1 cm length. The discharge was observed by a large number of diagnostic tools. This comprehensive set of diagnostics enabled us to describe the gross dynamics of the Z-pinch. It was found out that after the breakdown a low density coronal plasma was formed while the fibre diameter remained almost unchanged. This low density corona was carrying almost all the current of the order of 10 kA. When the current had built up, the implosion of the corona onto the central fibre occurred. The implosion velocity approached the value of 2e5 m/s. When the imploded corona had reached the fibre, the dip in dI/dt, voltage peak up to 10 kV, and XUV pulse of a 10-30 ns width were observed. XUV radiation was emitted from several bright spots which corresponded to the interaction of m=0 instability necks with the dense core. The electron temperature and density were approximately 80 eV and 10e25 per cubic meter, respectively. Although the presence of a fibre did not significantly suppress MHD instabilities, they were not disruptive. After the fibre ablation, i.e. after 500 ns, material evaporated from electrodes started to play a dominant role. The observed plasma column seemed to be MHD unstable and when m=0 instabilities had developed, X-ray pulses were emitted from several hot spots, particularly near the anode. At that time the voltage peak of up to 30 kV was detected.

  13. Rotational reorientation dynamics at high pressures: rhodamine 6G in ethanol from 1 bar to 6 kbar

    SciTech Connect

    Philips, L.A.; Webb, S.P.; Yeh, S.W.; Clark, J.H.

    1985-01-03

    Picosecond, time-resolved fluorescence depolarization spectroscopy has been used to measure the rotational reorientation time (tau/sub or/) of electronically excited rhodamine 6G. When the dependence of tau/sub or/ on solvent viscosity for a series of linear alcohols is compared with that for ethanol as a function of pressure over the range from 1 bar to 6 kbar, substantially different rotational reorientation dynamics are found for identical macroscopic viscosities. 31 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  14. Low temperature viscosity in elongated ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarcón, T.; Pérez-Madrid, A.; Rubí, J. M.

    1997-12-01

    We have studied the relaxation and transport properties of a ferrofluid in an elongational flow. These properties are influenced by the bistable nature of the potential energy. Bistability comes from the irrotational character of the flow together with the symmetry of the dipoles. Additionally, the presence of a constant magnetic field destroys the symmetry of the potential energy magnetizing the system. We have shown that at a moderate temperature, compared to the height of the energy barrier, the viscosity decreases with respect to the value it would have if the potential were stable. This phenomenon is known as the "negative viscosity" effect. Thermal motion induces jumps of the magnetic moment between the two stable states of the system leading to the aforementioned lowered dissipation effect.

  15. Viscosity of nitrogen near the critical point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, R. S.; Sengers, J. V.

    1978-01-01

    The formulation of a quantitative description of the critical enhancement in the shear viscosity of fluids near the gas-liquid critical point is considered. The critical point is a point of marginal thermodynamic stability. In the vicinity of the critical point, large-scale density fluctuations are present in the fluid. The critical enhancement of the transport properties is related to the correlation length. The correlation length is related to the compressibility, thus providing consistency between the equations for the transport properties and the equation of state in the critical region. The critical region parameters for nitrogen are presented in a table. It is found that the critical viscosity enhancement observed by Zozulya and Blagoi (1974) for nitrogen is consistent with current theoretical predictions

  16. Prediction of viscosity of dense fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royal, Damian D.; Vesovic, Velisa; Trusler, J. P. Martin; Wakeham, William. A.

    The Vesovic-Wakeham (VW) method of predicting the viscosity of dense fluid mixtures has been improved by implementing new mixing rules based on the rigid sphere formalism. The proposed mixing rules are based on both Lebowitz's solution of the Percus-Yevick equation and on the Carnahan-Starling equation. The predictions of the modified VW method have been compared with experimental viscosity data for a number of diverse fluid mixtures: natural gas, hexane + hheptane, hexane + octane, cyclopentane + toluene, and a ternary mixture of hydrofluorocarbons (R32 + R125 + R134a). The results indicate that the proposed improvements make possible the extension of the original VW method to liquid mixtures and to mixtures containing polar species, while retaining its original accuracy.

  17. Predicting human blood viscosity in silico.

    PubMed

    Fedosov, Dmitry A; Pan, Wenxiao; Caswell, Bruce; Gompper, Gerhard; Karniadakis, George E

    2011-07-19

    The viscosity of blood has long been used as an indicator in the understanding and treatment of disease, and the advent of modern viscometers allows its measurement with ever-improving clinical convenience. However, these advances have not been matched by theoretical developments that can yield a quantitative understanding of blood's microrheology and its possible connection to relevant biomolecules (e.g., fibrinogen). Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics and two different red blood cell models, we accurately predict the dependence of blood viscosity on shear rate and hematocrit. We explicitly represent cell-cell interactions and identify the types and sizes of reversible rouleaux structures that yield a tremendous increase of blood viscosity at low shear rates. We also present the first quantitative estimates of the magnitude of adhesive forces between red cells. In addition, our simulations support the hypothesis, previously deduced from experiments, of yield stress as an indicator of cell aggregation. This non-Newtonian behavior is analyzed and related to the suspension's microstructure, deformation, and dynamics of single red blood cells. The most complex cell dynamics occurs in the intermediate shear rate regime, where individual cells experience severe deformation and transient folded conformations. The generality of these cell models together with single-cell measurements points to the future prediction of blood-viscosity anomalies and the corresponding microstructures associated with various diseases (e.g., malaria, AIDS, and diabetes mellitus). The models can easily be adapted to tune the properties of a much wider class of complex fluids including capsule and vesicle suspensions. PMID:21730178

  18. Pinch me - I'm fusing! Fusion Power - what is it? What is a z pinch? And why are z-pinches a promising fusion power technology?

    SciTech Connect

    DERZON,MARK S.

    2000-03-01

    The process of combining nuclei (the protons and neutrons inside an atomic nucleus) together with a release of kinetic energy is called fusion. This process powers the Sun, it contributes to the world stockpile of weapons of mass destruction and may one day generate safe, clean electrical power. Understanding the intricacies of fusion power, promised for 50 years, is sometimes difficult because there are a number of ways of doing it. There is hot fusion, cold fusion and con-fusion. Hot fusion is what powers suns through the conversion of mass energy to kinetic energy. Cold fusion generates con-fusion and nobody really knows what it is. Even so, no one is generating electrical power for you and me with either method. In this article the author points out some basic features of the mainstream approaches taken to hot fusion power, as well as describe why z pinches are worth pursuing as a driver for a power reactor and how it may one day generate electrical power for mankind.

  19. Gyrokinetic studies of microinstabilities in the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Carmody, D.; Pueschel, M. J.; Terry, P. W.

    2013-05-15

    An analytic equilibrium, the Toroidal Bessel Function Model, is used in conjunction with the gyrokinetic code GYRO to investigate the nature of microinstabilities in a reversed field pinch plasma. The effect of the normalized electron plasma pressure β on the characteristics of the microinstabilities is studied. At a β of 4.5%, a transition between an ion temperature gradient (ITG) and a microtearing mode is observed. Suppression of the ITG mode occurs as in the tokamak, through coupling to shear Alfvén waves, with a critical β for stability higher than its tokamak equivalent due to a shorter parallel connection length. A steep dependence of the microtearing growth rate on the temperature gradient suggests high profile stiffness. There is evidence for a collisionless microtearing mode. The properties of this mode are investigated, and it is found that electron curvature drift plays an important role in the instability.

  20. Nonlinear Trapped Electron Mode Pinch in Strong Turbulence Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, David; Terry, P. W.

    2006-10-01

    Recent work has shown that there is an inward flux component in collisionless trapped electron mode turbulence produced by a nonlinear cross phase^2. The result was obtained for a weak turbulence regime, consistent with near threshold conditions. We extend this work to the strong turbulence regime, applying asymptotic analysis to the nonlinear frequency expressions generated from self-consistent statistical closure theory. We first check to see if there is a consistent strong turbulence regime for the previously considered threshold ordering^2, and examine the properties and scalings of the inward flux components. We then examine other orderings that are further above the instability threshold. The orderings will be compared with experimental profiles to determine likely regimes and nonlinear pinch properties. ^2P.W. Terry and R. Gatto, Phys. Plasmas 13, 062309 (2006).

  1. Pinch-induced behavioral inhibition ('clipnosis') in domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Pozza, Megan E; Stella, Judi L; Chappuis-Gagnon, Anne-Claire; Wagner, Susan O; Buffington, C A Tony

    2008-02-01

    Research has documented immobilization of rodents, rabbits, guinea pigs and dogs by mechanical means, typically using neck clips or inversion ('animal hypnosis'). In contrast, only a few studies of mechanical immobilization of cats are available, although some success has been reported in the literature. Domestic cats may be effectively immobilized by clips placed along the animal's dorsum. We use the term 'pinch-induced behavioral inhibition' (PIBI) for this behavior because it describes both the method and the response, while avoiding the more anthropomorphic term 'hypnosis'. We investigated the effectiveness of PIBI and its neurological and habituation effects in healthy cats and cats with idiopathic cystitis (IC). Although not all cats were susceptible to PIBI and effectiveness varied among individuals, PIBI was useful for gentle restraint in most cats. PMID:18222719

  2. Reversed Field Pinch Dynamics in Toroidal and Cylindrical Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Jorge A.; Bos, Wouter J. T.; Schneider, Kai; Montgomery, David C.

    2014-10-01

    The effect of the curvature of the imposed magnetic field on Reversed Field Pinch dynamics is investigated by comparing the flow of a magnetofluid in a torus with aspect ratio 1.83, with the flow in a periodic cylinder. It is found that an axisymmetric toroidal mode is always present in the toroidal, but absent in the cylindrical configuration. In particular, in contrast to the cylinder, the toroidal case presents a double poloidal recirculation cell with a shear localized at the plasma edge. Quasi-single-helicity states are found to be more persistent in toroidal than in periodic cylinder geometry. This work was supported by the contract SiCoMHD (ANR-Blanc 2011-045), computing time was supplied by IDRIS, project 22206.

  3. Experimental astrophysics with high power lasers and Z pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A; Drake, R P; Ryutov, D D

    2004-12-10

    With the advent of high energy density (HED) experimental facilities, such as high-energy lasers and fast Z-pinch, pulsed-power facilities, mm-scale quantities of matter can be placed in extreme states of density, temperature, and/or velocity. This has enabled the emergence of a new class of experimental science, HED laboratory astrophysics, wherein the properties of matter and the processes that occur under extreme astrophysical conditions can be examined in the laboratory. Areas particularly suitable to this class of experimental astrophysics include the study of opacities relevant to stellar interiors; equations of state relevant to planetary interiors; strong shock driven nonlinear hydrodynamics and radiative dynamics, relevant to supernova explosions and subsequent evolution; protostellar jets and high Mach-number flows; radiatively driven molecular clouds and nonlinear photoevaporation front dynamics; and photoionized plasmas relevant to accretion disks around compact objects, such as black holes and neutron stars.

  4. Dense plasma in Z-pinches and the plasma focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, M. G.

    1981-04-01

    Studies of the plasma focus, which after its three-dimensional compression closely resembles a Z-pinch, have shown that an electron temperature of 1 keV can be achieved in a narrow filament. Of great interest is the very high neutron yield, up to one trillion neutrons per discharge, which greatly exceeds that of any other fusion device. The origin of the neutrons is still a matter for research, as under different conditions there is evidence of intense electron and ion beams, instabilities, turbulence, and filamentations. All of these phenomena seem to be closely correlated to the neutron production which may not be thermonuclear in origin at all. An investigation is conducted of the physical processes that could be playing an important role in this case. A simplified interpretation of the phenomena could be that at a high line density the plasma focus is violently MHD unstable, but can form reconnecting bubbles.

  5. Instability Control in a Staged Z-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    WESSEL, Frank J

    2011-04-22

    A \\Staged Z-Pinch is a fusion-energy concept in which stored-electric energy is first converted into plasma-liner-kinetic energy, and then transferred to a coaxialtarget plasma [H. U. Rahman, F. J. Wessel, and N. Rostoker, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, p. 714(1996)]. Proper choice of the liner and target materials, and their initial radii and mass densities, leads to dynamic stabilization, current amplification, and shock heating of the target. Simulations suggest that this configuration has merit as a alternative inertial-confinement-fusion concept, and may provide an energy release exceeding thermonuclear break-even, if tested on one of many newer pulsed power systems, for example those located at Sandia National Laboratories.

  6. Design for megavolt inverse-pinch plasma switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ja H.; Choi, Sang H.; Song, Kyo D.

    1989-06-01

    To meet the requirements for the output switch of an ultra-high-power (greater than 30 GW) pulser, an upgrading design for an inverse-pinch plasma switch (INPIS) is considered. The hold-off voltage of 1 MV is met by adopting multistage rim-fire electrodes and using SF6 as the dielectric gas of the switch. The inductance and capacitance of the switch, which are restricted by the short rise-time (less than 0.1 microsec) requirement, were met by adjusting the dimensions of the coaxial electrodes of the switch. The input/output transmission lines attached to the switch will be immersed in oil to meet the high voltage insulation and impedance-matching requirements. Since the forwarding current is relatively low with respect to the switch capability, the lifetime of the switch is expected to exceed the requirement of 10,000 shots.

  7. Lower hybrid accessibility in a large, hot reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Dziubek, R.A.; Harvey, R.W.; Hokin, S.A.; Uchimoto, E.

    1995-11-01

    Accessibility and damping of the slow wave in a reversed field pinch (RFP) plasma is investigated theoretically, using projected Reversed Field Experiment (RFX) plasma parameters. By numerically solving the hot plasma dispersion relation, regions of propagation are found and the possibility of mode conversion is analyzed. If the parallel index of refraction of the wave is chosen judiciously at the edge of the plasma, the slow wave is accessible to a target region located just inside the reversal surface without mode conversion. Landau damping is also optimized in this region. A representative fast electron population is then added in order to determine its effect on accessibility and damping. The presence of these electrons, whose parameters were estimated by extrapolation of Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) data, does not affect the accessibility of the wave. However, the initial phase velocity of the wave needs to be increased somewhat in order to maintain optimal damping in the target zone.

  8. Anomalous transport theory for the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P.W.; Hegna, C.C; Sovinec, C.R.

    1996-09-01

    Physically motivated transport models with predictive capabilities and significance beyond the reversed field pinch (RFP) are presented. It is shown that the ambipolar constrained electron heat loss observed in MST can be quantitatively modeled by taking account of the clumping in parallel streaming electrons and the resultant self-consistent interaction with collective modes; that the discrete dynamo process is a relaxation oscillation whose dependence on the tearing instability and profile relaxation physics leads to amplitude and period scaling predictions consistent with experiment; that the Lundquist number scaling in relaxed plasmas driven by magnetic turbulence has a weak S{sup {minus}1/4} scaling; and that radial E{times}B shear flow can lead to large reductions in the edge particle flux with little change in the heat flux, as observed in the RFP and tokamak. 24 refs.

  9. Axial laser heating of three meter theta pinch plasma columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, A. L.; Lowenthal, D. D.

    1980-10-01

    A 3-m long plasma column formed and confined by a fast rising solenoidal field was irradiated from one end by a powerful pulsed CO2 laser. It was found that beam trapping density minima could be maintained for the length of the laser pulse if the plasma diameter exceeded about 1.5 cm. The erosion of the density minimum was governed by classical diffusion processes. Three meter long plasmas in 2.6 cm bore plasma tubes could be fairly uniformly heated by 3.0 kJ of CO2 laser irradiation. Best results were obtained when heating began before or during the theta pinch implosion phase and the plasma fill pressure exceeded 1.0 torr H2. Plasma line energies of about 1 kJ/m could be obtained in a magnetic field rising to 6 T in 4.7 microseconds.

  10. Thrust Stand Measurements of the Conical Theta Pinch FARAD Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-01-01

    It is found that the impulse of a pulsed inductive plasma thruster utilizing preionization is maximized for a particular ratio of the stored energy in the capacitor to the injected propellant mass. The fact that the impulse depends on the ratio of the initial stored energy to injected propellant mass agrees with previous current sheet studies, supporting the idea that a Townsend-like breakdown process strongly influences current sheet formation, and in turn, current sheet formation strongly affects the operational efficiency of the device. The optimum in half cone angle of the inductive coil can be explained in terms of a balance between the direct axial acceleration and the radial pinching contribution to thrust. From the trends in these data we conclude that operation at the correct ratio of capacitor energy to propellant mass is essential for efficient operation of pulsed inductive plasma thrusters employing a preionized propellant.

  11. Conceptual Design of a Z-Pinch Fusion Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Robert; Polsgrove, Tara; Fincher, Sharon; Fabinski, Leo; Maples, Charlotte; Miernik, Janie; Stratham, Geoffrey; Cassibry, Jason; Cortez, Ross; Turner, Matthew; Santarius, John; Percy, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a project that aims to develop a conceptual design for a Z-pinch thruster, that could be applied to develop advanced thruster designs which promise high thrust/high specific impulse propulsion. Overviews shows the concept of the design, which use annular nozzles with deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel and a Lithium mixture as a cathode, Charts show the engine performance as a function of linear mass, nozzle performance (i.e., plasma segment trajectories), and mission analysis for possible Mars and Jupiter missions using this concept for propulsion. Slides show views of the concepts for the vehicle configuration, thrust coil configuration, the power management system, the structural analysis of the magnetic nozzle, the thermal management system, and the avionics suite,

  12. RELAP-7 Numerical Stabilization: Entropy Viscosity Method

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Berry; M. O. Delchini; J. Ragusa

    2014-06-01

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on the INL's modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical integration methods, and physical models. The end result will be a reactor systems analysis capability that retains and improves upon RELAP5's capability and extends the analysis capability for all reactor system simulation scenarios. RELAP-7 utilizes a single phase and a novel seven-equation two-phase flow models as described in the RELAP-7 Theory Manual (INL/EXT-14-31366). The basic equation systems are hyperbolic, which generally require some type of stabilization (or artificial viscosity) to capture nonlinear discontinuities and to suppress advection-caused oscillations. This report documents one of the available options for this stabilization in RELAP-7 -- a new and novel approach known as the entropy viscosity method. Because the code is an ongoing development effort in which the physical sub models, numerics, and coding are evolving, so too must the specific details of the entropy viscosity stabilization method. Here the fundamentals of the method in their current state are presented.

  13. Hydrodynamics and viscosity in the Rindler spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eling, Christopher; Chirco, Goffredo; Liberati, Stefano

    2012-07-01

    In the past year it has been shown that one can construct an approximate (d + 2) dimensional solution of the vacuum Einstein equations dual to a (d + 1) dimensional fluid satisfying the Navier-Stokes equations. The construction proceeds by perturbing the flat Rindler metric, subject to the boundary conditions of a non-singular causal horizon in the interior and a fixed induced metric on a given timelike surface r = rc in the bulk. We review this fluid-Rindler correspondence and show that the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio of the fluid on r = rc takes the universal value 1/4π both in Einstein gravity and in a wide class of higher curvature generalizations. Since the precise holographic duality for this spacetime is unknown, we propose a microscopic explanation for this viscosity based on the peculiar properties of quantum entanglement. Using a novel holographic Kubo formula in terms of a two-point function of the stress tensor of matter fields in the bulk, we calculate a shear viscosity and find that the ratio with respect to the entanglement entropy density is exactly 1/4π in four dimensions.

  14. Vapor-phase viscosity of phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, E.; Neumann, A.-K.

    1993-07-01

    New measurements of the vapor-phase viscosity of phenol were performed from 437 up to 624 K and for densities between 0.006 and 0.023 mol · L-1 in an all-quartz oscillating-disk viscometer with small gaps. Thus, including our own measurements reported earlier, experimental data are available in the temperature range between 376 and 639 K and in the density range from 0.001 up to 0.023 mol · L-1. The data were evaluated with a density series for the viscosity in which only a linear density contribution is included. The values of the second viscosity virial coefficient obtained for phenol as well as for benzene, toluene, and p-xylene were compared with results of the Rainwater-Friend theory and of the modified Enskog theory on the basis of the Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential. The agreement is reasonable, when the potential parameter ratios determined by Bich and Vogel are used. The influence of bound dimers seems to be already taken into account in the three-monomer contribution according to Hoffman and Curtiss.

  15. Turbulent viscosity in natural surf zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, F.; Ruessink, B. G.

    2012-12-01

    Waves breaking in the shallow surf zone near the shoreline inject turbulence into the water column that may reach the bed to suspend sediment. Breaking-wave turbulence in the surf zone is, however, poorly understood, which is one of the reasons why many process-based coastal-evolution models predict coastal change during severe storms inadequately. Here, we use data collected in two natural surf zones to derive a new parameterization for the stability function Cμ that determines the magnitude of the eddy viscosity νt in two-equation turbulent-viscosity models, νt = Cμk2/ε, where k is turbulent kinetic energy and ε is the turbulence dissipation rate. In both data sets, the ratio of turbulence production to dissipation is small (≈0.15), while vertical turbulence diffusion is significant. This differs from assumptions underlying existing Cμ parameterizations, which we show to severely overpredict observed Cμ for most conditions. Additionally, we rewrite our new Cμ parameterization into a formulation that accurately reproduces our Reynolds-stress based estimates of turbulence production. This formulation is linear with strain, consistent with earlier theoritical work for large strain rates. Also, it does not depend on ε and can, therefore, also be applied in one-equation turbulent-viscosity models. We anticipate our work to improve turbulence modeling in natural surf zones and to eventually lead to more reliable predictions of coastal evolution in response to severe storms.

  16. Observation of Cocurrent Toroidal Rotation in the EAST Tokamak with Lower-Hybrid Current Drive

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Yuejiang; Xu Guosheng; Wang Fudi; Wang Mao; Fu Jia; Li Yingying; Zhang Wei; Zhang Wei; Chang Jiafeng; Lv Bo; Qian Jinping; Shan Jiafang; Liu Fukun; Ding Siye; Wan Baonian; Lee, Sang-Gon; Bitter, Manfred; Hill, Kenneth

    2011-06-10

    Lower-hybrid waves have been shown to induce a cocurrent change in toroidal rotation of up to 40 km/s in the L-mode plasma core region and 20 km/s in the edge of the EAST tokamak. This modification of toroidal rotation develops on different time scales. For the edge, the time scale is no more than 100 ms, but for the core the time scale is around 1 s. A simple model based on turbulent equipartition and thermoelectric pinch predicts the experimental results.

  17. Observation of cocurrent toroidal rotation in the EAST tokamak with lower-hybrid current drive.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yuejiang; Xu, Guosheng; Wang, Fudi; Wang, Mao; Fu, Jia; Li, Yingying; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Chang, Jiafeng; Lv, Bo; Qian, Jinping; Shan, Jiafang; Liu, Fukun; Ding, Siye; Wan, Baonian; Lee, Sang-Gon; Bitter, Manfred; Hill, Kenneth

    2011-06-10

    Lower-hybrid waves have been shown to induce a cocurrent change in toroidal rotation of up to 40  km/s in the L-mode plasma core region and 20  km/s in the edge of the EAST tokamak. This modification of toroidal rotation develops on different time scales. For the edge, the time scale is no more than 100 ms, but for the core the time scale is around 1 s. A simple model based on turbulent equipartition and thermoelectric pinch predicts the experimental results. PMID:21770511

  18. Local viscoelasticity of living cells measured by rotational magnetic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Berret, J-F

    2016-01-01

    When submitted to a magnetic field, micron-size wires with superparamagnetic properties behave as embedded rheometers and represent interesting sensors for microrheology. Here we use rotational magnetic spectroscopy to measure the shear viscosity of the cytoplasm of living cells. We address the question of whether the cytoplasm is a viscoelastic liquid or an elastic gel. The main result of the study is the observation of a rotational instability between a synchronous and an asynchronous regime of rotation, found for murine fibroblasts and human cancer cells. For wires of susceptibility 3.6, the transition occurs in the range 0.01-1 rad s(-1). The determination of the shear viscosity (10-100 Pa s) and elastic modulus (5-20 Pa) confirms the viscoelastic character of the cytoplasm. In contrast to earlier studies, it is concluded that the interior of living cells can be described as a viscoelastic liquid, and not as an elastic gel. PMID:26729062

  19. Local viscoelasticity of living cells measured by rotational magnetic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berret, J.-F.

    2016-01-01

    When submitted to a magnetic field, micron-size wires with superparamagnetic properties behave as embedded rheometers and represent interesting sensors for microrheology. Here we use rotational magnetic spectroscopy to measure the shear viscosity of the cytoplasm of living cells. We address the question of whether the cytoplasm is a viscoelastic liquid or an elastic gel. The main result of the study is the observation of a rotational instability between a synchronous and an asynchronous regime of rotation, found for murine fibroblasts and human cancer cells. For wires of susceptibility 3.6, the transition occurs in the range 0.01-1 rad s-1. The determination of the shear viscosity (10-100 Pa s) and elastic modulus (5-20 Pa) confirms the viscoelastic character of the cytoplasm. In contrast to earlier studies, it is concluded that the interior of living cells can be described as a viscoelastic liquid, and not as an elastic gel.

  20. Instability heating of solid-fiber Z pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, R.A. Jr.

    1994-02-01

    The Los Alamos High Density Z Pinch-II (HDZP-II) facility is used to study the dynamics of z-pinch plasmas generated from solid fibers of deuterated polyethylene CD{sub 2} with a range in radii of 3--60 {mu}m. HDZP-II is a pulsed-power generator that delivers a current that rises to 700 kA in 100 ns through an inductive load. A multiframe circular schlieren records the evolution of the shape and size of the plasma on seven images taken at 10-ns intervals. These circular-schlieren images show very strong m=0 instability at the onset of current and a rapid radial expansion of the plasma. No higher-order instabilities are observed. An interferometer is used to infer the electron density and electron line density, giving a measure of the fraction of plasma contained within the outline of the circular-schlieren image at one time during the multiframe sequence. A three-channel x-ray crystal-reflection spectrometer provides the time-resolved, spatially-averaged electron temperature. The magnitude of the x-ray emission at these energies also gives qualitative information about the electron temperature and density at late times. A lower bound on the ion temperature is inferred from the particle pressure needed to balance the magnetic field pressure. The ion temperature rose above that of the electrons, strongly suggesting an additional heating term that puts energy directly into the ions. An ion heating term is proposed to explain the observed rapid radial expansion and elevated ion temperatures. This heating term is based on the assumption that the observed m=0 instabilities reconnect, enclosing magnetic flux which degenerates into turbulence in the plasma. A 0-D simulation is developed to investigate the relevance of different physical models to the data presented.

  1. An analysis of HS6-5-2 steel viscosity in the semi-solid state

    SciTech Connect

    Solek, Krzysztof; Korolczuk-Hejnak, Marta; Slezak, Wojciech; Karbowniczek, Miroslaw

    2011-05-04

    The main objective of this study was an analysis of the rheological properties of selected steel alloy in the semi-solid state. A knowledge of the rheological properties of material is crucial for the numerical modeling of the shaping technology. Semi-solid processing of metal alloys, also known as thixoforming processes, is an innovative method which has many advantages in comparison with classical metal forming and foundry processes. The most significant achievement of this particular study is the application of a viscometer which was specially designed for material tests executed at extremely high temperatures, such as the measurement of liquid or semi-liquid steel viscosity. This paper presents the results of a rheological analysis of HS6-5-2 (PN SW7M) tool steel. It was performed using a rotational viscometer with a stationary external cup. The results were used for the development of mathematical models of the apparent viscosity.

  2. Measurement of the microscopic viscosities of microfluids with a dynamic optical tweezers system

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuquan; Wu, Xiaojing; Wang, Yijia; Zhu, Siwei; Gao, Bruce Z; Yuan, X-C

    2016-01-01

    Viscosity coefficients of microfluids—Newtonian and non-Newtonian—were explored through the rotational motion of a particle trapped by optical tweezers in a microflute. Unlike conventional methods based on viscometers, our microfluidic system employs samples of less than 30 µl to complete a measurement. Viscosity coefficients of ethanol and fetal bovine serum, as typical examples of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids, were obtained experimentally, and found to be in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. Additionally, a practical application to a DNA solution with incremental ethidium bromide content was employed and the results are consistent with clinical data, indicating that our system provides a potentially important complementary tool for use in such biological and medical applications. PMID:27087769

  3. Rotational dissipation and the Miesowicz coefficients.

    PubMed

    Simões, M; Yamaguti, K; Palangana, A J

    2009-12-01

    In this work, we will study the relative contribution of each of the two dissipative channels of the Eriksen, Leslie, and Parodi (ELP) approach to the observed values of the Miesowicz viscosity coefficients of the nematic liquid crystals. According to the fundamental equation of the liquid crystal's viscosity dissipative process, TS=-integral d3r(sigma)ijA(ij)+hxN , there are two channels by which the nematic viscous dissipation can occur: or it occurs by means of a shear flow configuration, where A(ij) is the characterizing term, or it occurs by means of a rotational configuration, where N is the characterizing term (these parameters will be defined in the paper). It will be also shown that this relative contribution can be measured by a simple relationship connecting the Miesowicz coefficients, which exhibits a quasitemperature independent behavior, suggesting that it is nearly constant through the entire domain of the nematic phase. PMID:20365179

  4. Reference Correlation for the Viscosity of Ethane

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Eckhard; Span, Roland; Herrmann, Sebastian

    2015-12-15

    A new representation of the viscosity for the fluid phase of ethane includes a zero-density correlation and a contribution for the critical enhancement, initially both developed separately, but based on experimental data. The higher-density contributions are correlated as a function of the reduced density δ = ρ/ρ{sub c} and of the reciprocal reduced temperature τ = T{sub c}/T (ρ{sub c}—critical density and T{sub c}—critical temperature). The final formulation contains 14 coefficients obtained using a state-of-the-art linear optimization algorithm. The evaluation and choice of the selected primary data sets is reviewed, in particular with respect to the assessment used in earlier viscosity correlations. The new viscosity surface correlation makes use of the reference equation of state for the thermodynamic properties of ethane by Bücker and Wagner [J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 35, 205 (2006)] and is valid in the fluid region from the melting line to temperatures of 675 K and pressures of 100 MPa. The viscosity in the limit of zero density is described with an expanded uncertainty of 0.5% (coverage factor k = 2) for temperatures 290 < T/K < 625, increasing to 1.0% at temperatures down to 212 K. The uncertainty of the correlated values is 1.5% in the range 290 < T/K < 430 at pressures up to 30 MPa on the basis of recent measurements judged to be very reliable as well as 4.0% and 6.0% in further regions. The uncertainty in the near-critical region (1.001 < 1/τ < 1.010 and 0.8 < δ < 1.2) increases with decreasing temperature up to 3.0% considering the available reliable data. Tables of the viscosity calculated from the correlation are listed in an appendix for the single-phase region, for the vapor–liquid phase boundary, and for the near-critical region.

  5. Beam heated linear theta-pinch device for producing hot plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Bohachevsky, Ihor O.

    1981-01-01

    A device for producing hot plasmas comprising a single turn theta-pinch coil, a fast discharge capacitor bank connected to the coil, a fuel element disposed along the center axis of the coil, a predetermined gas disposed within the theta-pinch coil, and a high power photon, electron or ion beam generator concentrically aligned to the theta-pinch coil. Discharge of the capacitor bank generates a cylindrical plasma sheath within the theta-pinch coil which heats the outer layer of the fuel element to form a fuel element plasma layer. The beam deposits energy in either the cylindrical plasma sheath or the fuel element plasma layer to assist the implosion of the fuel element to produce a hot plasma.

  6. Method for plasma formation for extreme ultraviolet lithography-theta pinch

    DOEpatents

    Hassanein, Ahmed; Konkashbaev, Isak; Rice, Bryan

    2007-02-20

    A device and method for generating extremely short-wave ultraviolet electromagnetic wave, utilizing a theta pinch plasma generator to produce electromagnetic radiation in the range of 10 to 20 nm. The device comprises an axially aligned open-ended pinch chamber defining a plasma zone adapted to contain a plasma generating gas within the plasma zone; a means for generating a magnetic field radially outward of the open-ended pinch chamber to produce a discharge plasma from the plasma generating gas, thereby producing a electromagnetic wave in the extreme ultraviolet range; a collecting means in optical communication with the pinch chamber to collect the electromagnetic radiation; and focusing means in optical communication with the collecting means to concentrate the electromagnetic radiation.

  7. X-Pinch And Its Applications In X-ray Radiograph

    SciTech Connect

    Zou Xiaobing; Wang Xinxin; Liu Rui; Zhao Tong; Zeng Naigong; Zhao Yongchao; Du Yanqiang

    2009-07-07

    An X-pinch device and the related diagnostics of x-ray emission from X-pinch were briefly described. The time-resolved x-ray measurements with photoconducting diodes show that the x-ray pulse usually consists of two subnanosecond peaks with a time interval of about 0.5 ns. Being consistent with these two peaks of the x-ray pulse, two point x-ray sources of size ranging from 100 mum to 5 mum and depending on cut-off x-ray photon energy were usually observed on the pinhole pictures. The x-pinch was used as x-ray source for backlighting of the electrical explosion of single wire and the evolution of X-pinch, and for phase-contrast imaging of soft biological objects such as a small shrimp and a mosquito.

  8. Precision pinch performance in patients with sensory deficits of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Yen, Wei-Jang; Kuo, Yao-Lung; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Chen, Shu-Min; Kuan, Ta-Shen; Hsu, Hsiu-Yun

    2014-01-01

    To investigate how sensory symptoms impact the motor control of hands, in this study we examined the differences in conventional sensibility assessments and pinch force control in the pinch-holding-up activity (PHUA) test between carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients and healthy controls. CTS patients (n = 82) with 122 affected hands and an equal number of control subjects were recruited to participate in the threshold, discrimination, and PHUA tests. The patients showed significantly poorer hand sensibility and lower efficiency of force adjustment in the PHUA test as compared with the control subjects. Baseline pinch strength and the percentage of maximal pinch strength for the PHUA were significantly higher for the subgroup of sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) of <16 μV than for the subgroup of SNAP of 16 μV. Using a PHUA perspective to analyze the efficiency of force-adjustment could assist the clinical detection of sensory nerve dysfunction. PMID:24496877

  9. Transition from Beam-Target to Thermonuclear Fusion in High-Current Deuterium Z -Pinch Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offermann, Dustin T.; Welch, Dale R.; Rose, Dave V.; Thoma, Carsten; Clark, Robert E.; Mostrom, Chris B.; Schmidt, Andrea E. W.; Link, Anthony J.

    2016-05-01

    Fusion yields from dense, Z -pinch plasmas are known to scale with the drive current, which is favorable for many potential applications. Decades of experimental studies, however, show an unexplained drop in yield for currents above a few mega-ampere (MA). In this work, simulations of DD Z -Pinch plasmas have been performed in 1D and 2D for a constant pinch time and initial radius using the code Lsp, and observations of a shift in scaling are presented. The results show that yields below 3 MA are enhanced relative to pure thermonuclear scaling by beamlike particles accelerated in the Rayleigh-Taylor induced electric fields, while yields above 3 MA are reduced because of energy lost by the instability and the inability of the beamlike ions to enter the pinch region.

  10. Rotator Cuff Tears

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctors because of a rotator cuff problem. A torn rotator cuff will weaken your shoulder. This means ... or more of the rotator cuff tendons is torn, the tendon no longer fully attaches to the ...

  11. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... others can be very painful. Treatment for a torn rotator cuff depends on age, health, how severe ... is, and how long you've had the torn rotator cuff. Treatment for torn rotator cuff includes: ...

  12. Rotator cuff problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... days, such as in painting and carpentry Poor posture over many years Aging Rotator cuff tears TEARS ... also help prevent rotator cuff problems. Practice good posture to keep your rotator cuff tendons and muscles ...

  13. Electron thermal transport within magnetic islands in the reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, H. D.; Reusch, J. A.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Hegna, C. C.

    2010-05-15

    Tearing mode induced magnetic islands have a significant impact on the thermal characteristics of magnetically confined plasmas such as those in the reversed-field pinch (RFP). New Thomson scattering diagnostic capability on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) RFP has enabled measurement of the thermal transport characteristics of islands. Electron temperature (T{sub e}) profiles can now be acquired at 25 kHz, sufficient to measure the effect of an island on the profile as the island rotates by the measurement point. In standard MST plasmas with a spectrum of unstable tearing modes, remnant islands are present in the core between sawtoothlike reconnection events. Associated with these island remnants is flattening of the T{sub e} profile inside the island separatricies. This flattening is characteristic of rapid parallel heat conduction along helical magnetic field lines. In striking contrast, a temperature gradient within an m=1, n=5 island is observed in these same plasmas just after a sawtooth event when the m=1, n=5 mode may briefly come into resonance near the magnetic axis. This suggests local heating and relatively good confinement within the island. Local power balance calculations suggest reduced thermal transport within this island relative to the confinement properties of standard MST discharges between reconnection events. The magnetic field and island structure is modeled with three-dimensional nonlinear resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations (DEBS code) with Lundquist numbers matching those in MST during standard discharges. During improved confinement plasmas with reduced tearing mode activity, temperature fluctuations correlated with magnetic signals are small with characteristic fluctuation amplitudes of order T-tilde{sub e}/T{sub e}approx2%.

  14. Fast ion confinement and stability in a neutral beam injected reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J. K.; Almagri, A. F.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Eilerman, S.; Forest, C. B.; Koliner, J. J.; Mirnov, V. V.; Morton, L. A.; Nornberg, M. D.; Parke, E.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S.; Waksman, J.; Belykh, V.; Davydenko, V. I.; Ivanov, A. A.; Polosatkin, S. V.; Tsidulko, Y. A.; Lin, L.; Liu, D.; and others

    2013-05-15

    The behavior of energetic ions is fundamentally important in the study of fusion plasmas. While well-studied in tokamak, spherical torus, and stellarator plasmas, relatively little is known in reversed field pinch plasmas about the dynamics of fast ions and the effects they cause as a large population. These studies are now underway in the Madison Symmetric Torus with an intense 25 keV, 1 MW hydrogen neutral beam injector (NBI). Measurements of the time-resolved fast ion distribution via a high energy neutral particle analyzer, as well as beam-target neutron flux (when NBI fuel is doped with 3–5% D{sub 2}) both demonstrate that at low concentration the fast ion population is consistent with classical slowing of the fast ions, negligible cross-field transport, and charge exchange as the dominant ion loss mechanism. A significant population of fast ions develops; simulations predict a super-Alfvénic ion density of up to 25% of the electron density with both a significant velocity space gradient and a sharp radial density gradient. There are several effects on the background plasma including enhanced toroidal rotation, electron heating, and an altered current density profile. The abundant fast particles affect the plasma stability. Fast ions at the island of the core-most resonant tearing mode have a stabilizing effect, and up to 60% reduction in the magnetic fluctuation amplitude is observed during NBI. The sharp reduction in amplitude, however, has little effect on the underlying magnetic island structure. Simultaneously, beam driven instabilities are observed as repetitive ∼50 μs bursts which coincide with fast particle redistribution; data indicate a saturated core fast ion density well below purely classical predictions.

  15. Optimized Minimal Inductance Transmission Line Configuration for Z-Pinch Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O

    2003-10-16

    Successful dynamic Z-pinch experiments generally require good current delivery to the target load. Power flow losses through highly inductive transmission line configurations reduce the current available to the load. In this Brief Report, a variational calculus technique is used to determine the transmission line configuration that produces the least possible inductance and therefore the best possible current delivery for Z-pinch experiments.

  16. Sheath broadening in imploding z-pinches due to large-bandwidth Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, J.H.; Eddleman, J.L.; Tabak, M.; Toor, A.; Zimmerman, G.B.; De Groot, J.S.

    1996-06-04

    The magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability has been predicted and observed to cause breakup of the plasma sheath in imploding Z-pinches. In this work we show that for the type of density profile encountered in strongly radiating pinches, instability at very short wavelengths grows to the non-linear stage and seeds progressively longer wavelengths. The result is a self-similar broadening of the sheath as found for mix layers in fluid RT unstable systems.

  17. Use of the Pegasus Z pinch machine to study inertial instabilities in aluminum: a preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, E.; Egan, P.; Winer, K.; Stokes, J.; Fulton, R.D.; King, N.S.P.; Morgan, D.V.; Obst, A.W.; Oro, D.W.

    1997-06-13

    We have designed a target to probe the use of the Pegasus Z-Pinch machine to image inertial instabilities that develop on cylindrical- convergent material interfaces. The Z-pinch is tailored so that the target, soft Al 1100-O, remains solid; instabilities and inertial effects are seeded by wire inclusions of different densities. We present here the first images and preliminary results from this experiment.

  18. Twist viscosities and flow alignment of biaxial nematic liquid crystal phases of a soft ellipsoid-string fluid studied by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Sarman, Sten; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2012-09-14

    We have calculated the twist viscosity and the alignment angle between the director and the stream lines in shear flow of a liquid crystal model system, which forms biaxial nematic liquid crystals, as functions of the density, from the Green-Kubo relations by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation and by a nonequilibrium molecular dynamics algorithm, where a torque conjugate to the director angular velocity is applied to rotate the director. The model system consists of a soft ellipsoid-string fluid where the ellipsoids interact according a repulsive version of the Gay-Berne potential. Four different length-to-width-to-breadth ratios have been studied. On compression, this system forms discotic or calamitic uniaxial nematic phases depending on the dimensions of the molecules, and on further compression a biaxial nematic phase is formed. In the uniaxial nematic phase there is one twist viscosity and one alignment angle. In the biaxial nematic phase there are three twist viscosities and three alignment angles corresponding to the rotation around the various directors and the different alignments of the directors relative to the stream lines, respectively. It is found that the smallest twist viscosity arises by rotation around the director formed by the long axes, the second smallest one arises by rotation around the director formed by the normals of the broadsides, and the largest one by rotation around the remaining director. The first twist viscosity is rather independent of the density whereas the last two ones increase strongly with density. One finds that there is one stable director alignment relative to the streamlines, namely where the director formed by the long axes is almost parallel to the stream lines and where the director formed by the normals of the broadsides is almost parallel to the shear plane. The relative magnitudes of the components of the twist viscosities span a fairly wide interval so this model should be useful for parameterisation

  19. Numerical modeling of the Parker instability in a rotating plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalzov, Ivan; Brown, Ben; Katz, Noam; Forest, Cary

    2011-10-01

    We study numerically the analogue of the Parker (magnetic buoyancy) instability in a rotating plasma screw pinch confined in a bounded cylinder. The goal of the study is to show the possibility of reaching the Parker instability for the plasma parameters achievable in the Madison Plasma Couette Experiment (MPCX). Simulations are performed using the extended magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code NIMROD for an isothermal compressible plasma model. Both linear and nonlinear regimes of the instability are studied, and the obtained results are compared with analytic results for a slab geometry. It is shown that the effect of plasma rotation in a cylindrical geometry is two-fold: first, centrifugal acceleration acts as analogue of gravity and provides the equilibrium density stratification; second, the presence of Coriolis force results in increase of critical gradient of magnetic field required for the onset of instability.

  20. Shear dependence of field-induced contributions to the viscosity of magnetic fluids at low shear rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odenbach, S.; Störk, H.

    1998-03-01

    Viscoelastic properties of ferrofluids are an upcoming field of scientific interest, since the magnetic control of the related fluid behavior would give rise to new applications as well as for new possibilities in basic research concerning viscoelasticity. We have constructed a specialized rheometer for the investigation of fluids under the influence of magnetic fields, to examine such effects in stable suspensions of magnetic particles. In particular we will report the change of field-induced increase of viscosity due to variation of the shear rate applied to the fluid. The results show that the available theoretical approach, namely the concept of rotational viscosity, is not valid for the description of the field-induced increase of viscosity in concentrated fluids at low shear rates.