Sample records for rotator cuff surgery

  1. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  2. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    MedlinePLUS

    ... made of muscles and tendons. It helps your shoulder to move and stay stable. Problems with the rotator cuff are common. They include tendinitis, bursitis, and injuries such as tears. Rotator cuff tendons can become ...

  3. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Patient Education Institute

    This patient education program discusses rotator cuff injuries, their causes, symptoms, diagnosis, prevention, and options for their treatment including physiotherapy and surgery. This resource is a MedlinePlus Interactive Health Tutorial from the National Library of Medicine, designed and developed by the Patient Education Institute. NOTE: This tutorial requires a special Flash plug-in, version 4 or above. If you do not have Flash, you will be prompted to obtain a free download of the software before you start the tutorial. You will also need an Acrobat Reader, available as a free download, in order to view the Reference Summary.

  4. Efficacy of Different Rotator Cuff Repair Techniques.

    PubMed

    Gurnani, Navin; van Deurzen, Derek Friedrich Petrus; Flipsen, Mark; Raven, Eric Ernest Joseph; van den Bekerom, Michel Pieter Jozef

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this review article is to describe the currently used techniques for rotator cuff repair and after treatment. The literature was searched for the different surgical techniques and additional treatment including: [1] full arthroscopic and arthroscopic assisted rotator cuff repair, [2] acromioplasty as an additional treatment to rotator cuff repair, [3] the use of plasma rich platelets (PRP) after rotator cuff repair, [4] the single and double row fixation techniques, [5] long head of the biceps brachii tenotomy or tenodesis with rotator cuff repair, [6] scaffolds in rotator cuff surgery, and [7] early motion or immobilization after rotator cuff repair. The rationale, the results, and the scientific evidence were reported for the eligible procedures. PMID:26055023

  5. Physical and rehabilitation medicine (PRM) care pathways: "patients after rotator cuff tear surgery".

    PubMed

    Ribinik, P; Calmels, P; Barrois, B; Le Moine, F; Yelnik, A P

    2011-11-01

    This document is part of a series of documents designed by the French Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine Society (Sofmer) and the French Federation of PRM (Fedmer). These documents describe the needs for or a specific type of patients; PRM care objectives, human and material resources to be implemented, chronology as well as expected outcomes. "Care pathways in PRM" is a short document designed to enable the reader (physicians, decision-maker, administrator, lawyer or finance manager) to quickly apprehend the needs of these patients and the available therapeutic care structures for proper organization and pricing of these activities. Patients after rotator cuff tear surgery are classified into four care sequences and two clinical categories, taking into account personal and environmental factors that could influence patients' needs, in accordance with the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) (WHO). PMID:22018888

  6. [Ultrasound assessment of reconstructed rotator cuffs].

    PubMed

    Cammerer, U; Habermeyer, P; Plenk, A; Huber, R

    1992-12-01

    The evaluation of recurrent shoulder symptoms in patients who have had rotator cuff repair is a diagnostic challenge. Pain and limitation of motion may be caused by a recurrence of the rotator cuff tear. Arthrography is not considered to be helpful in postoperative cases, since it is false-positive in most of them. Pre-operative ultrasonography of the shoulder is regarded as a highly accurate diagnostic tool for rotator cuff tears. The diagnostic criteria used are: the continuity of the rotator cuff, its contour, its thickness and its echogenicity. Our study was aimed at determining which ultrasonographic criteria were significant for a retear. In addition, the "normal" postoperative sonographic appearance of the rotator cuff was established. Of 133 patients with a full thickness rotator cuff tear, 110 were evaluated 4-48 months (mean in 21 months) after surgery. A total of 85 cuffs were reconstructed, in 46 cases by direct suture, in 33 cases by suture to the major tubercle and in 6 cases by tendon transfer (Cofield technique). In 25 cases cuffs the could not be reconstructed. Subacromial decompression was performed routinely. The patients were evaluated clinically by range of movement, force and isometric and impingement tests. The subjective outcome was assessed by the algo-functional index of Patte. Ultrasonography was performed using a 7.5-MHz linear scanner. Each sonographic criterion was referred to the clinical and subjective findings. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the rotator cuffs that could not be reconstructed revealed non-visualization of the tendons. In 13 of the 85 patients in whom reconstruction of the cuff was possible a normal sonographic pattern was seen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1287844

  7. Cross-sectional analysis of baseline differences of candidates for rotator cuff surgery: a sex and gender perspective

    PubMed Central

    Razmjou, Helen; Davis, Aileen M; Jaglal, Susan B; Holtby, Richard; Richards, Robin R

    2009-01-01

    Background The word "sex" refers to biological differences between men and women. Gender refers to roles, behaviors, activities, and attributes that a given society considers appropriate for men and women. Traditionally, treatment decisions have been based on patient's sex without including the gender. Assessment of disability secondary to musculoskeletal problems would not be complete or accurate unless potentially relevant biological and non-biological aspects of being a man or woman are taken into consideration. The purposes of this study were to: 1) investigate the difference in pre-operative characteristics between men and women who were candidates for rotator cuff surgery; and, 2) assess the relationship between level of disability and factors that represent sex and factors that signify gender. Method This was a cross-sectional study. The primary outcome measure of disability was a disease-specific outcome measure, the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC) index, and independent variables were sex, age, hand dominance, shoulder side involvement, BMI, co-morbidity, medication use, work status, smoking habits, strength, range of motion, level of pathology, concurrent osteoarthritis, expectations for recovery, and participation restriction. Parametric, non-parametric, univariable, subgroup, and multivariable analyses were conducted. Results One hundred and seventy patients were included in the study. The mean age was 57 ± 11, 85 were females. Women reported higher levels of disability despite similar or lower levels of pathology. Scores of the WORC were strongly influenced by factors that represented "gender" such as participation restriction (F = 28.91, p < 0.0001) and expectations for improved activities of daily living (F = 5.80, p = 0.004). Painfree combined range of motion, which represented an interaction between "sex" and "gender" was also associated with disability after being adjusted for all other relevant baseline factors (F = 25.82, p < 0.0001). Conclusion Gender-related factors such as expectations and participation limitations have an independent impact on disability in men and women undergoing rotator cuff related surgery. PMID:19239706

  8. Rotator cuff and subacromial pathology.

    PubMed

    Yablon, Corrie M; Jacobson, Jon A

    2015-07-01

    Both MRI and ultrasound (US) demonstrate equivalent accuracy in the evaluation of the rotator cuff. Both modalities have their advantages, disadvantages, and pitfalls. Radiography is an important complementary modality in that it can demonstrate occult sources of shoulder pain. MRI is recommended for the evaluation of shoulder pain in patients??40 years, US should be the first-line modality because the incidence of rotator cuff pathology increases with age. US is useful to guide procedures such as subacromial injection and calcific tendinosis lavage. Radiologists should be knowledgeable of both MRI and US of the shoulder to tailor these examinations to the specific needs of their patients. PMID:26021584

  9. Biomechanical evaluation of rotator cuff fixation methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Paul France; Lonnie E. Paulos; Chris D. Harner; Chris B. Straight

    1989-01-01

    Initial fixation strength and failure mode for various rotator cuff reattachment techniques (variations of the McLaughlin technique) were evaluated. Repair methods included standard suture (control), reinforced suture [expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) patch and polydioxanone (PDS) tape augmentation] and stapling (nonarthroscopic and arthroscopic soft-tissue staples). The average strength of intact rotator cuff tissue (su praspinatus tendon) was also determined. The different rotator

  10. Partial Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Matthewson, Graeme; Beach, Cara J.; Nelson, Atiba A.; Woodmass, Jarret M.; Ono, Yohei; Boorman, Richard S.; Lo, Ian K. Y.; Thornton, Gail M.

    2015-01-01

    Partial thickness rotator cuff tears are a common cause of pain in the adult shoulder. Despite their high prevalence, the diagnosis and treatment of partial thickness rotator cuff tears remains controversial. While recent studies have helped to elucidate the anatomy and natural history of disease progression, the optimal treatment, both nonoperative and operative, is unclear. Although the advent of arthroscopy has improved the accuracy of the diagnosis of partial thickness rotator cuff tears, the number of surgical techniques used to repair these tears has also increased. While multiple repair techniques have been described, there is currently no significant clinical evidence supporting more complex surgical techniques over standard rotator cuff repair. Further research is required to determine the clinical indications for surgical and nonsurgical management, when formal rotator cuff repair is specifically indicated and when biologic adjunctive therapy may be utilized. PMID:26171251

  11. Understanding and preventing complications in repairing rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Papalia, Rocco; Del Buono, Angelo; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Repair of rotator cuff tears is a common procedure. Prior to approaching this surgery, it should be realized that each surgical step can lead to complications, including those related to positioning and anaesthesia. Stiffness, infection and failure of repair are the more frequent complications reported. PMID:21986055

  12. Rotator cuff injuries in adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jennifer M; Arkader, Alexandre; Wells, Lawrence M; Ganley, Theodore J

    2013-03-01

    The cause of rotator cuff injuries in the young athlete has been described as an overuse injury related to internal impingement. Abduction coupled with external rotation is believed to impinge on the rotator cuff, specifically the supraspinatus, and lead to undersurface tears that can progress to full-thickness tears. This impingement is believed to be worsened with increased range of motion and instability in overhead athletes. A retrospective review of seven patients diagnosed with rotator cuff injuries was performed to better understand this shoulder injury pattern. The type of sport played, a history of trauma, diagnosis, treatment method, and outcome were noted. Six patients were male and one was a female. Baseball was the primary sport for four patients, basketball for one, gymnastics for one, and wrestling for one. The following injury patterns were observed: two patients tore their subscapularis tendon, two sustained avulsion fractures of their lesser tuberosity, one tore his rotator interval, one tore his supraspinatus, and one avulsed his greater tuberosity. Only four patients recalled a specific traumatic event. Three patients were treated with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, three with miniopen repair, and one was treated with rehabilitation. Six of the seven patients returned to their preinjury level of sport after treatment. Rotator cuff tears are rare in the adolescent age group. The injury patterns suggest that acute trauma likely accounts for many rotator cuff tears and their equivalents in the young patient. Adolescents with rotator cuff tears reliably return to sports after treatment. The possibility of rotator cuff tears in skeletally immature athletes should be considered. The prognosis is very good once this injury is identified and treated. PMID:22668571

  13. Clinical Examination of the Rotator Cuff

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nitin B.; Wilcox, Reginald; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Higgins, Laurence D.

    2013-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are the leading cause of shoulder pain and shoulder-related disability accounting for 4.5 million physician visits in the United States annually. A careful history and structured physical examination are often sufficient for diagnosing rotator cuff disorders. We are not aware of a clinical review article that presents a structured physical examination protocol of the rotator cuff for the interested clinician. To fill this void, we present a physical examination protocol developed on the basis of review of prior literature and our clinical experience from dedicated shoulder practices. Our protocol includes range of motion testing using a goniometer, strength testing using a dynamometer, and select special tests. Among the many tests for rotator cuff disorders that have been described, we chose ones that have been more thoroughly assessed for sensitivity and specificity. This protocol can be used to isolate the specific rotator cuff tendon involved. The protocol can be typically completed in 15 minutes. We also discuss the clinical implications and limitations of the physical examination maneuvers described in our protocol. This protocol is thorough yet time-efficient for a busy clinical practice. It is useful in diagnosis of rotator cuff tears, impingement syndrome, and biceps pathology. PMID:23332909

  14. Rotator cuff tears in the throwing athlete.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Benjamin; Huttman, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Tears of the rotator cuff, both partial, and less commonly, full thickness, are relatively common in the throwing athlete. The rotator cuff is subjected to enormous stresses during repetitive overhead activity. The supraphysiological strains, especially when combined with pathology elsewhere in the kinetic chain, can lead to compromise of the cuff fabric, most commonly on the undersurface where tensile overload occurs. Exacerbation by a tight posterior capsular, anterior instability, and internal impingement render the cuff progressively compromised, with intrinsic shear stresses and undersurface fiber failure. Advances in imaging technology, including contrast magnetic resonance imaging, dynamic ultrasound, and arthroscopic visualization have enhanced our understanding of cuff pathology in this athletic population. Unfortunately, this has not yet translated into how to best approach these athletes to return them to their previous level of activity. Nonoperative management remains the mainstay for most throwers, with arthroscopic debridement an effective surgical option for those with refractory symptoms. Despite technological advances in cuff repair in the general population, comparable outcomes have not been achieved in high-level throwers. Widespread appreciation that securing the cuff operatively will likely end an athletes' throwing career has led to adopting a surgical approach that emphasizes debridement over repair for nearly all partial and full-thickness tears. Whether advances in surgical technique will ultimately permit definitive and lasting repairs that allow overhead throwers to return to their previous level of sports remains unknown at this time. PMID:24787724

  15. The Factors Affecting Pain Pattern after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Wan; Kim, Dong-Gyun

    2014-01-01

    Background We evaluated the factors that affect pain pattern after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Methods From June 2009 to October 2010, 210 patients underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair operations. Of them, 84 patients were enrolled as subjects of the present study. The evaluation of postoperative pain was conducted by visual analog scale (VAS) scores during postoperative outpatient interviews at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months. The factors that were thought to affect postoperative pain were evaluated by dividing into three categories: preoperative, operative, and postoperative. Results Pain after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery showed a strictly decreasing pain pattern. In single analysis and multiple regression tests for factors influencing the strictly decreasing pain pattern, initial VAS and pain onset were shown to be statistically significant factors (p = 0.012, 0.012, 0.044 and 0.028, respectively). With regard to the factors influencing lower than average intensity pain pattern for each period, the stiffness of internal rotation at 3 months postoperatively was shown to be a statistically significant factor in single and multiple regression tests (p = 0.017 and p = 0.004, respectively). Conclusions High initial VAS scores and the acute onset of pain affected the strictly decreasing postoperative pain pattern. Additionally, stiffness of internal rotation at postoperative 3 months affected the higher than average intensity pain pattern for each period after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. PMID:25436062

  16. Partial-thickness rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Matava, Matthew J; Purcell, Derek B; Rudzki, Jonas R

    2005-09-01

    Partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff have been diagnosed with increased frequency because of a heightened awareness of the condition by clinicians and improved diagnostic methods. Research into the causes, natural history, and optimal treatment of this condition lags behind that of full-thickness tears. However, despite the limitations in the existing literature, there has emerged a consensus among shoulder experts that partial-thickness rotator cuff tears should be aggressively treated in the active athlete because of the unfavorable natural history of these lesions and success of accepted surgical algorithms. This review will provide an overview of the theories regarding the origins of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears, discuss the relative accuracy of accepted diagnostic techniques, and summarize the indications and methods of operative repair with an emphasis on the results of various treatment approaches. PMID:16127127

  17. Biologically based strategies to augment rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Schaer, M.; Schober, M.; Berger, S.; Boileau, P.; Zumstein, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Lesions of the rotator cuff (RC) are among the most frequent tendon injuries. In spite of the developments in both open and arthroscopic surgery, RC repair still very often fails. In order to reduce the failure rate after surgery, several experimental in vitro and in vivo therapy methods have been developed for biological improvement of the reinsertion. This article provides an overview of the current evidence for augmentation of RC reconstruction with growth factors. Furthermore, potential future therapeutic approaches are discussed. We performed a comprehensive search of the PubMed database using various combinations of the keywords “tendon,” “rotator cuff,” “augmentation,” “growth factor,” “platelet-rich fibrin,” and “platelet-rich plasma” for publications up to 2011. Given the linguistic capabilities of the research team, we considered publications in English, German, French, and Spanish. We excluded literature reviews, case reports, and letters to the editor. PMID:22787334

  18. Morphology of the torn rotator cuff.

    PubMed Central

    Itoi, E; Hsu, H C; Carmichael, S W; Morrey, B F; An, K N

    1995-01-01

    The morphological characteristics of shoulders with torn rotator cuffs were determined using 41 embalmed specimens. The following parameters were measured in the supraspinatus (SSP), infraspinatus (ISP) and subscapularis (SSC) muscles: the length, thickness and width of the extramuscular tendon; the length of the intramuscular tendon; the length and width of a tear, if present, muscle fibre length; and muscle volume. The cross-sectional area (CSA) of the tendon was measured on the photographic image of slices of the tendon using an image analysis system, and the CSA of the muscle was calculated by dividing the muscle volume by muscle fibre length. The rotator cuff was intact in 11 shoulders. A partial-thickness tear of the cuff was present in 12 shoulders, a full-thickness tear of the SSP in 11 shoulders, and a full-thickness tear of more than 2 tendons in 7. Overall incidence of full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff was 44%, and that of partial-thickness tears 29%. With increase of tear size, the functional tendon length (extramuscular tendon length plus tear length) increased by a statistically significant amount in the SSP, ISP and SSC, whereas muscle fibre length decreased in SSP and ISP. It is concluded that the increased functional tendon length and decreased muscle fibre length are the main morphological changes that make the rotator cuff a physiologically abnormal unit. Surgical repair of the torn cuff would be expected to improve these anatomical changes and restore the kinetics of the glenohumeral joint.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 2 PMID:7649844

  19. Biological aspects of rotator cuff healing

    PubMed Central

    Wildemann, Britt; Klatte, Franka

    2011-01-01

    Summary Tendon tears of the rotator cuff show a high prevalence in today’s population. Patients suffer from permanent pain and disability, and surgical reconstruction may be the only possibility for abatement. The complex process of tendon-bone healing leads to mechanically inferior scar-tissue, which often results in retears or non-healing. In the current literature, factors such as patients age, sex and fatty muscle infiltration are highly correlated to the presence of rotator cuff tears and the incidence of retears. To improve the tendon tissue quality after surgical reconstructions biologically based strategies with use of growth factors arouse more and more interest in the last years. However, to optimize the treatment of rotator cuff tears the biological background of tears and retears must be investigated in more detail. This article will elucidate different aspects that have an impact on rotator cuff healing and give a brief insight in tendon/ligament cell culture and animal studies focusing on growth factor treatments. PMID:23738265

  20. Regenerative medicine in rotator cuff injuries.

    PubMed

    Randelli, Pietro; Randelli, Filippo; Ragone, Vincenza; Menon, Alessandra; D'Ambrosi, Riccardo; Cucchi, Davide; Cabitza, Paolo; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Rotator cuff injuries are a common source of shoulder pathology and result in an important decrease in quality of patient life. Given the frequency of these injuries, as well as the relatively poor result of surgical intervention, it is not surprising that new and innovative strategies like tissue engineering have become more appealing. Tissue-engineering strategies involve the use of cells and/or bioactive factors to promote tendon regeneration via natural processes. The ability of numerous growth factors to affect tendon healing has been extensively analyzed in vitro and in animal models, showing promising results. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a whole blood fraction which contains several growth factors. Controlled clinical studies using different autologous PRP formulations have provided controversial results. However, favourable structural healing rates have been observed for surgical repair of small and medium rotator cuff tears. Cell-based approaches have also been suggested to enhance tendon healing. Bone marrow is a well known source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Recently, ex vivo human studies have isolated and cultured distinct populations of MSCs from rotator cuff tendons, long head of the biceps tendon, subacromial bursa, and glenohumeral synovia. Stem cells therapies represent a novel frontier in the management of rotator cuff disease that required further basic and clinical research. PMID:25184132

  1. Partial-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Although the incidence of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCTs) was reported to be from 13% to 32% in cadaveric studies, the actual incidence is not yet known. The causes of PTRCTs can be explained by either extrinsic or intrinsic theories. Studies suggest that intrinsic degeneration within the rotator cuff is the principal factor in the pathogenesis of rotator cuff tears. Extrinsic causes include subacromial impingement, acute traumatic events, and repetitive microtrauma. However, acromially initiated rotator cuff pathology does not occur and extrinsic impingement does not cause pathology on the articular side of the tendon. An arthroscopic classification system has been developed based on the location and depth of the tear. These include the articular, bursal, and intratendinous areas. Both ultrasound and magnetic resonance image are reported with a high accuracy of 87%. Conservative treatment, such as subacromial or intra-articular injections and suprascapular nerve block with or without block of the articular branches of the circumflex nerve, should be considered prior to operative treatment for PTRCTs. PMID:21716613

  2. Regenerative Medicine in Rotator Cuff Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Randelli, Pietro; Ragone, Vincenza; Menon, Alessandra; Cabitza, Paolo; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Rotator cuff injuries are a common source of shoulder pathology and result in an important decrease in quality of patient life. Given the frequency of these injuries, as well as the relatively poor result of surgical intervention, it is not surprising that new and innovative strategies like tissue engineering have become more appealing. Tissue-engineering strategies involve the use of cells and/or bioactive factors to promote tendon regeneration via natural processes. The ability of numerous growth factors to affect tendon healing has been extensively analyzed in vitro and in animal models, showing promising results. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a whole blood fraction which contains several growth factors. Controlled clinical studies using different autologous PRP formulations have provided controversial results. However, favourable structural healing rates have been observed for surgical repair of small and medium rotator cuff tears. Cell-based approaches have also been suggested to enhance tendon healing. Bone marrow is a well known source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Recently, ex vivo human studies have isolated and cultured distinct populations of MSCs from rotator cuff tendons, long head of the biceps tendon, subacromial bursa, and glenohumeral synovia. Stem cells therapies represent a novel frontier in the management of rotator cuff disease that required further basic and clinical research. PMID:25184132

  3. Subacromial volume and rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Anthony; Avramis, Ioannis A; Argintar, Evan H; White, Eric R; Villacis, Diego C; Hatch III, George F Rick

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff pathology occurs commonly and its cause is likely multifocal in origin. The development and progression of rotator cuff injury, especially in relation to extrinsic shoulder compression, remain unclear. Traditionally, certain acromial morphologies have been thought to contribute to rotator cuff injury by physically decreasing the subacromial space. The relationship between subacromial space volume and rotator cuff tears (RCT) has, however, never been experimentally confirmed. In this study, we retrospectively compared a control patient population to patients with partial or complete RCTs in an attempt to quantify the relationship between subacromial volume and tear type. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively identified a total of 46 eligible patients who each had shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed from January to December of 2008. These patients were stratified into control, partial RCT, and full-thickness RCT groups. Subacromial volume was estimated for each patient by averaging five sequential MRI measurements of subacromial cross-sectional areas. These volumes were compared between control and experimental groups using the Student's t-test. Results: With the numbers available, there was no statistically significant difference in subacromial volume measured between: the control group and patients diagnosed partial RCT (P > 0.339), the control group and patients with complete RCTs (P > 0.431). Conclusion: We conclude that subacromial volumes cannot be reliably used to predict RCT type. PMID:26015629

  4. Anomalous biceps origin from the rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Patel, Vipul R

    2015-01-01

    Variations in the origin of the long head of biceps tendon (LHBT) have been described in literature; however, its clinical significance remains uncertain. We describe in this report, the history, physical examination and the arthroscopic findings in a patient who had an anomalous origin of the LHBT from the rotator cuff, resulting in restriction of range of motion. This anomalous origin of the long head of biceps tendon causing capsular contracture and restriction of movements leading to secondary internal impingement, has not been extensively reported in the literature. Shoulder arthroscopists should be aware that, although, an uncommon clinical condition, the aberrant congenital origin of the LHBT from the rotator cuff can rarely become pathologic in middle age and lead to shoulder dysfunction. In such cases, release of the anomalous band may be required, along with the treatment of other concomitant intraarticular pathologies in the glenohumeral joint. PMID:25593361

  5. Delivered growth factor therapy to improve healing after rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Emilie V; Silverio, Luz; Yao, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Background Degenerative rotator cuff tears are a significant cause of shoulder pain in the aging population. Rotator cuff repair surgery may be more successful when growth factors are delivered to the repair site. This study was designed to determine the cellular processes involved in normal bone-to-tendon healing and the current approaches used for biologic augmentation of rotator cuff repair. Methods This review focuses on animal studies of rotator cuff repair and early human trials. Results Regular bone-to-tendon healing forms a fibrous junction between tendon and bone that is markedly different from the original bone-to-tendon junction. Tendon augmentation with cellular components serves as scaffolding for endogenous fibroblastic cells and a possible source of growth factors and fibroblastic cells. Extracellular matrices provide a scaffold for incoming fibroblastic cells. However, research in extracellular matrices is not conclusive due to intermanufacturer variation and the lack of human subject research. Growth factors and platelet-rich plasma are established in other fields of research and show promise, but have not yet been rigorously tested in rotator cuff repair augmentation. Conclusions Rotator cuff repair can benefit from biologic augmentation. However, research in this field is still young and has not yet demonstrated that the benefits in healing rates are significant enough to merit regular clinical use. Randomized controlled trials will elucidate the use of biologic augmentation in rotator cuff repairs. PMID:24198519

  6. Symptomatic Progression of Asymptomatic Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Mall, Nathan A.; Kim, H. Mike; Keener, Jay D.; Steger-May, Karen; Teefey, Sharlene A.; Middleton, William D.; Stobbs, Georgia; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Background: The purposes of this study were to identify changes in tear dimensions, shoulder function, and glenohumeral kinematics when an asymptomatic rotator cuff tear becomes painful and to identify characteristics of individuals who develop pain compared with those who remain asymptomatic. Methods: A cohort of 195 subjects with an asymptomatic rotator cuff tear was prospectively monitored for pain development and examined annually for changes in various parameters such as tear size, fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff muscle, glenohumeral kinematics, and shoulder function. Forty-four subjects were found to have developed new pain, and the parameters before and after pain development were compared. The forty-four subjects were then compared with a group of fifty-five subjects who remained asymptomatic over a two-year period. Results: With pain development, the size of a full-thickness rotator cuff tear increased significantly, with 18% of the full-thickness tears showing an increase of >5 mm, and 40% of the partial-thickness tears had progressed to a full-thickness tear. In comparison with the assessments made before the onset of pain, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores for shoulder function were significantly decreased and all measures of shoulder range of motion were decreased except for external rotation at 90° of abduction. There was an increase in compensatory scapulothoracic motion in relation to the glenohumeral motion during early shoulder abduction with pain development. No significant changes were found in external rotation strength or muscular fatty degeneration. Compared with the subjects who remained asymptomatic, the subjects who developed pain were found to have significantly larger tears at the time of initial enrollment. Conclusions: Pain development in shoulders with an asymptomatic rotator cuff tear is associated with an increase in tear size. Larger tears are more likely to develop pain in the short term than are smaller tears. Further research is warranted to investigate the role of prophylactic treatment of asymptomatic shoulders to avoid the development of pain and loss of shoulder function. Level of Evidence: Prognostic Level III. See Instructions to Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:21084574

  7. Living with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear ‘bad days, bad nights’: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain. There is an absence of information about symptomatic rotator cuffs from the patients’ perspective; this limits the information clinicians can share with patients and the information that patients can access via sources such as the internet. This study describes the experiences of people with a symptomatic rotator cuff, their symptoms, the impact upon their daily lives and the coping strategies utilised by study participants. Methods An interpretive phenomenological analysis approach was used. 20 participants of the UKUFF trial (The United Kingdom Rotator Cuff Surgery Trial) agreed to participate in in-depth semi-structured interviews about their experiences about living with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear. Interviews were digitally recorded and fully transcribed. Field notes, memos and a reflexive diary were used. Data was coded in accordance with interpretive phenomenological analysis. Peer review, code-recode audits and constant comparison of data, codes and categories occurred throughout. Results The majority of patients described intense pain and severely disturbed sleep. Limited movement and reduced muscle strength were described by some participants. The predominantly adverse impact that a symptomatic rotator cuff tear had upon activities of daily living, leisure activities and occupation was described. The emotional and financial impact and impact upon caring roles were detailed. Coping strategies included attempting to carry on as normally as possible, accepting their condition, using their other arm, using analgesics, aids and adaptions. Conclusions Clinicians need to appreciate and understand the intensity and shocking nature of pain that may be experienced by participants with known rotator cuff tears and understand the detrimental impact tears can have upon all areas of patient’s lives. Clinicians also need to be aware of the potential emotional impact caused by cuff tears and to ensure that patients needing help for conditions such as depression are speedily identified and provided with support, explanation and appropriate treatment. PMID:25008095

  8. Rotator Cuff Deficient Arthritis of the Glenohumeral Joint

    PubMed Central

    Macaulay, Alec A.; Greiwe, R. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Rotator cuff deficient arthritis of the glenohumeral joint, especially cuff tear arthropathy, has proved a challenging clinical entity for orthopaedic surgeons ever since Charles Neer originally detailed the problem in 1983. Understanding has improved regarding the pathophysiology and pathomechanics underlying cuff tear arthropathy. Surgical reconstruction options can lead to excellent outcomes for patients afflicted with these painful and functionally limited shoulders. Humeral hemiarthroplasty and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty have jumped to the forefront in the treatment of cuff tear arthropathy. As studies continue to look at the results of these procedures in cuff tear arthropathy, existing indications and treatment algorithms will be further refined. In this article the history and pathophysiology of cuff tear arthropathy are reviewed. Additionally, the clinical findings and results of surgical reconstruction are discussed. PMID:21119934

  9. Dual-camera technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Tuttle, John R; Ramos, Paul; DaSilva, Manuel F

    2014-12-01

    An all-arthroscopic rotator cuff repair demands a high level of technical skill and is associated with a steep learning curve. It is well accepted that small rotator cuff tears or partial tears can be more difficult than large or even massive tears to repair. Part of the reason is the difficulty in visualizing the tear, as well as important surrounding structures, during repair. To improve visibility during the repair process, we have introduced a second arthroscopic camera. Two cameras allow the surgeon to observe the rotator cuff from both the articular and bursal sides. We find this technique has merit in small or partial-thickness rotator cuff tears; however, there may be other applications. PMID:25685668

  10. Dual-Camera Technique for Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Tuttle, John R.; Ramos, Paul; DaSilva, Manuel F.

    2014-01-01

    An all-arthroscopic rotator cuff repair demands a high level of technical skill and is associated with a steep learning curve. It is well accepted that small rotator cuff tears or partial tears can be more difficult than large or even massive tears to repair. Part of the reason is the difficulty in visualizing the tear, as well as important surrounding structures, during repair. To improve visibility during the repair process, we have introduced a second arthroscopic camera. Two cameras allow the surgeon to observe the rotator cuff from both the articular and bursal sides. We find this technique has merit in small or partial-thickness rotator cuff tears; however, there may be other applications. PMID:25685668

  11. Tendon transfer for irreparable rotator cuff tears: indications and surgical rationale

    PubMed Central

    Merolla, Giovanni; Chillemi, Claudio; Franceschini, Vincenzo; Cerciello, Simone; Ippolito, Giorgio; Paladini, Paolo; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: treatment of symptomatic irreparable rotator cuff tears is extremely challenging because, at present, there are no ideal solutions to this problem. Many patients respond favorably to nonsurgical treatment. However, when conservative measures fail to improve the patient’s pain and disability, surgery should be considered. Methods: different surgical techniques are available and the choice of the most appropriate procedure depends on the presenting symptoms, age of the patient, functional demand, medical comorbidities, joint stability and presence of arthritic changes. The transposition of the surrounding muscles to replace the rotator cuff function represents a viable option in the treatment of younger patients without glenohumeral osteoarthritis and with severe functional limitation. Purpose: aim of this study is to give an overview of the currently available evidence regarding tendon transfer procedures for irreparable rotator cuff tears. PMID:25767779

  12. Arthroscopic treatment options for irreparable rotator cuff tears of the shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Anley, Cameron M; Chan, Samuel KL; Snow, Martyn

    2014-01-01

    The management of patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears remains a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons with the final treatment option in many algorithms being either a reverse shoulder arthroplasty or a tendon transfer. The long term results of these procedures are however still widely debated, especially in younger patients. A variety of arthroscopic treatment options have been proposed for patients with an irreparable rotator cuff tear without the presence of arthritis of the glenohumeral joint. These include a simple debridement with or without a biceps tenotomy, partial rotator cuff repair with or without an interval slide, tuberplasty, graft interposition of the rotator cuff, suprascapular nerve ablation, superior capsule reconstruction and insertion of a biodegradable spacer (Inspace) to depress the humeral head. These options should be considered as part of the treatment algorithm in patients with an irreparable rotator cuff and could be used as either as an interim procedure, delaying the need for more invasive surgery in the physiologically young and active, or as potential definitive procedures in the medically unfit. The aim of this review is to highlight and summarise arthroscopic procedures and the results thereof currently utilised in the management of these challenging patients. PMID:25405083

  13. Revision reverse shoulder arthroplasty in failed shoulder arthroplasties for rotator cuff deficiency

    PubMed Central

    RANDELLI, PIETRO; RANDELLI, FILIPPO; COMPAGNONI, RICCARDO; CABITZA, PAOLO; RAGONE, VINCENZA; PULICI, LUCA; BANFI, GIUSEPPE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this systematic literature review is to report clinical outcomes of reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) used as a revision surgery following failure of the primary implant due to rotator cuff insufficiency. Methods a systematic review was performed using the following key words: revision, shoulder, rotator cuff deficiency, outcome assessment, treatment outcome, complications. Studies eligible for inclusion in the review were clinical trials investigating patients in whom a primary shoulder arthroplasty implant with an incompetent rotator cuff was replaced with a reverse shoulder prosthesis. Results nine articles were identified and further reviewed. The results refer to a total of 226 shoulders that were treated with RSA as revision surgery. The patients in the studies had a mean age ranging from 64 to 72 years and the longest follow-up was 3.8 years. Improvements in function and reduction of pain were shown by many studies, but the mean Constant score ranged from 44.2 to 56. High complication rates (of up to 62%) were recorded, and a mean reoperation rate of 27.5%. Conclusions RSA as revision surgery for patients with rotator cuff deficiency is a valid option, and often the only solution available, but it should be limited to elderly patients with poor function and severe pain. Level of evidence level IV, systematic review of level I–IV studies. PMID:26151037

  14. Massive Rotator Cuff Tear in an Adolescent Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Turman, Kimberly A.; Anderson, Mark W.; Miller, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Full-thickness rotator cuff tears in the young athlete are a rare injury. These injuries typically result from an acute traumatic event in a contact athlete, as opposed to overuse injuries more commonly seen in throwing athletes. Acute tears may be initially overlooked, with the symptoms attributed to other, more common causes, such as cuff contusion or brachial plexus neuropraxia (“stinger” or “burner”). If undiagnosed, the tear may progress to an irreparable state at the time of eventual diagnosis. Therefore, rotator cuff tear must be included in the differential for acute shoulder injuries in the young athlete. This article presents a case of an adolescent athlete with a traumatic, massive rotator cuff tear that was diagnosed and managed promptly with excellent outcome. PMID:23015923

  15. Location and Initiation of Degenerative Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H. Mike; Dahiya, Nirvikar; Teefey, Sharlene A.; Middleton, William D.; Stobbs, Georgia; Steger-May, Karen; Yamaguchi, Ken; Keener, Jay D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: It has been theorized that degenerative rotator cuff tears most commonly involve the supraspinatus tendon, initiating at the anterior portion of the supraspinatus insertion and propagating posteriorly. The purposes of this study were to determine the most common location of degenerative rotator cuff tears and to examine tear location patterns associated with various tear sizes. Methods: Ultrasonograms of 360 shoulders with either a full-thickness rotator cuff tear (272) or a partial-thickness rotator cuff tear (eighty-eight) were obtained to measure the width and length of the tear and the distance from the biceps tendon to the anterior margin of the tear. Tears were grouped on the basis of their size (anteroposterior width) and extent (partial or full-thickness). Each tear was represented numerically as a column of consecutive numbers representing the tear width and distance posterior to the biceps tendon. All tears were pooled to graphically represent the width and location of the tears within groups. Frequency histograms of the pooled data were generated, and the mode was determined for each histogram representing various tear groups. Results: The mean age (and standard deviation) of the 233 subjects (360 shoulders) was 64.7 ± 10.2 years. The mean width and length of the tears were 16.3 ± 12.1 mm and 17.0 ± 13.0 mm, respectively. The mean distance from the biceps tendon to the anterior tear margin was 7.8 ± 5.7 mm (range, 0 to 26 mm). Histograms of the various tear groups invariably showed the location of 15 to 16 mm posterior to the biceps tendon to be the most commonly torn location within the posterior cuff tendons. The histograms of small tears (a width of <10 mm) and partial-thickness tears showed similar distributions of tear locations, indicating that the region approximately 15 mm posterior to the biceps tendon may be where rotator cuff tears most commonly initiate. Conclusions: Degenerative rotator cuff tears most commonly involve a posterior location, near the junction of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus. The patterns of tear location across multiple tear sizes suggest that degenerative cuff tears may initiate in a region 13 to 17 mm posterior to the biceps tendon. Clinical Relevance: The findings of this study speak to the specific location of the most common type of rotator cuff lesions, degenerative rotator cuff tears. PMID:20439653

  16. Subacromial pain pump use is safe after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Busfield, Benjamin T.; Romero, Denise M.; Korshad, Daniel; Kharrazi, F. Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Background Intra-articular pain pumps with local anesthetics have been implicated as a potential cause of post-arthroscopic glenohumeral chondrolysis (PAGCL) of the shoulder. In short-term studies, subacromial pain pump use is effective and safe without association with PAGCL. Patients with full thickness rotator cuff tears may be at high risk of PAGCL given disruption of the tendinous integrity which may allow intra-articular infusion of local anesthetics. We hypothesized that subacromial pain pump use after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair would not result in PAGCL. Methods We analyzed a consecutive series of 34 patients treated with subacromial pain pump placement after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and subacromial decompression for full thickness rotator cuff tears. Thirty patients met inclusion criteria of greater than 12-month follow-up with an average age of 51 (28–68). All patients had the subacromial pain pumps placed under arthroscopic visualization and infused 0.25% bupivacaine without epinephrine at 2 cc/h for 48 h. All patients had clinical examinations and radiographic studies performed more than 1 year after surgery. Results Patients had an average rotator cuff size of 1.6 cm and fixation was performed with bioabsorbable suture anchors. All patients had at least 150° of abduction and forward flexion at latest follow-up without palpable crepitus and no patients had any evidence of joint space narrowing on post-operative radiographs. Conclusion Subacromial pain pump use after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is safe. Despite probable lack of a water-tight seal from repair, there were no cases of PAGCL. Level of evidence IV. PMID:25104887

  17. Impingement is not impingement: the case for calling it “Rotator Cuff Disease”

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Edward G.; Maffulli, Nicola; Del Buono, Angelo; Murrell, George A. C.; Garzon-Muvdi, Juan; Petersen, Steve A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Historically, many causes have been proposed for rotator cuff conditions. The most prevalent theory is that the rotator cuff tendons, especially the supraspinatus, make contact with the acromion and coracoacromial ligament, resulting in pain and eventual tearing of the tendon. However, more recent evidence suggests that this concept does not explain the changes in rotator cuff tendons with age. The role of acromioplasty and coracoacromial ligament release in the treatment of rotator cuff disease has become questioned. Evidence now suggests that tendinopathy associated with aging may be a predominant factor in the development of rotator cuff degeneration. We propose that the overwhelming evidence favors factors other than “impingement” as the major cause of rotator cuff disease and that a paradigm shift in the way the development of rotator cuff pathology is conceptualized allows for a more comprehensive approach to the care of the patient with rotator cuff disease. PMID:24367779

  18. Open versus Two Forms of Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Neal L.; Wu, Xiao; Tantau, Robyn; Silverstone, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    There have been technologic advances in the methods for repairing torn rotator cuffs. We compared the clinical and structural outcomes of three different forms of rotator cuff repair with up to 24 months’ followup. We wished to assess how surgical technique affected clinical outcomes and see how these correlated to repair integrity. Three cohorts of patients had repair of a symptomatic rotator cuff tear using (1) an open technique (n = 49); (2) arthroscopic knotted (n = 53); or (3) arthroscopic knotless (n = 57) by one surgeon. Standardized patient- and examiner-determined outcomes were obtained preoperatively and at 6 weeks, 3 and 6 months, and 2 years postoperatively. Ultrasound studies were performed with a validated protocol at 6 months and 2 years postsurgery. Clinical outcomes were similar with the exception that the arthroscopic groups had, on average, 20% better American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores than the open group at 6 months and 2 years. Retear correlated with tear size and operation time and occurred more frequently after open repair (39%) than after arthroscopic knotted (25%) and arthroscopic knotless (16%) repair. An intact cuff on ultrasound corresponded to better results for supraspinatus strength, patient outcomes, and rotator cuff functional ability. Level of Evidence: Level III, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19184264

  19. Arthroscopic vs mini-open rotator cuff repair. A quality of life impairment study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leonardo Osti; Rocco Papalia; Massimo Paganelli; Enzo Denaro; Nicola Maffulli

    2010-01-01

    We compared the clinical and quality of life related outcome of rotator cuff repair performed using either a mini-open or\\u000a an arthroscopic technique for rotator cuff tears of less than 3 cm. The records of 64 patients who underwent rotator cuff\\u000a repair between September 2003 and September 2005 were evaluated. Thirty-two patients underwent a mini-open rotator cuff repair,\\u000a and 32 patients

  20. Degenerative rotator cuff tear in an elderly athlete: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Mohsen

    1999-01-01

    The incidence of rotator cuff tear increases with age. Degenerative rotator cuff tears are commonly seen in athletes above 40 years. These athletes are commonly involved in overhead activities. Repetitive microtrauma is a more important factor in rotator cuff degeneration than acute trauma. Conservative treatment is the mainstay treatment for these injuries. A case report of an elderly athlete who sailed competitively is presented. The clinical and radiographic presentations, management and rehabilitation of degenerative rotator cuff tears are discussed. ImagesFigure 1

  1. Subacromial Spacer Placement for Protection of Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Szöllösy, Gregor; Rosso, Claudio; Fogerty, Simon; Petkin, Kalojan; Lafosse, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Rotator cuff repairs have a high failure rate proportional to the tear size. Various techniques have been described to improve the repair strength and failure rate. The described surgical technique uses a biodegradable subacromial balloon-shaped spacer (InSpace; OrthoSpace, Caesarea, Israel) that is implanted arthroscopically to protect our tendon repair. We describe the introduction technique and suggest some hints and tricks. The spacer is placed under direct vision in the subacromial space after the rotator cuff repair is finished. Correct placement is verified by moving the arm freely. The subacromial spacer may help to protect the rotator cuff repair by centering the humeral head and reducing friction between suture knots and the acromion. It may also help to flatten dog-ear formations. PMID:25473615

  2. Evaluation and nonsurgical management of rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Greis, Ari C; Derrington, Stephen M; McAuliffe, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    Rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy is a common finding that accounts for about 7% of patients with shoulder pain. There are numerous theories on the pathogenesis of rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy. The diagnosis is confirmed with radiography, MRI or ultrasound. There are numerous conservative treatment options available and most patients can be managed successfully without surgical intervention. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and multiple modalities are often used to manage pain and inflammation; physical therapy can help improve scapular mechanics and decrease dynamic impingement; ultrasound-guided needle aspiration and lavage techniques can provide long-term improvement in pain and function in these patients. PMID:25771323

  3. Preclinical Models for Translating Regenerative Medicine Therapies for Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Andrew Ryan; Iannotti, Joseph P.; McCarron, Jesse A.

    2010-01-01

    Despite improvements in the understanding of rotator cuff pathology and advances in surgical treatment options, repairs of chronic rotator cuff tears often re-tear or fail to heal after surgery. Hence, there is a critical need for new regenerative repair strategies that provide effective mechanical reinforcement of rotator cuff repair as well as stimulate and enhance the patient's intrinsic healing potential. This article will discuss and identify appropriate models for translating regenerative medicine therapies for rotator cuff repair. Animal models are an essential part of the research and development pathway; however, no one animal model reproduces all of the features of the human injury condition. The rat shoulder is considered the most appropriate model to investigate the initial safety, mechanism, and efficacy of biologic treatments aimed to enhance tendon-to-bone repair. Whereas large animal models are considered more appropriate to investigate the surgical methods, safety and efficacy of the mechanical—or combination biologic/mechanical—strategies are ultimately needed for treating human patients. The human cadaver shoulder model, performed using standard-of-care repair techniques, is considered the best for establishing the surgical techniques and mechanical efficacy of various repair strategies at time zero. While preclinical models provide a critical aspect of the translational pathway for engineered tissues, controlled clinical trials and postmarketing surveillance are also needed to define the efficacy, proper indications, and the method of application for each new regenerative medicine strategy. PMID:19663651

  4. Latissimus dorsi transfer for irreparable rotator cuff tears: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Irlenbusch, Ulrich; Bracht, Meike; Gansen, Heike-Kathrin; Lorenz, Ulrike; Thiel, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Latissimus dorsi transfer is indicated for isolated posterior superior defects of the rotator cuff. Additional lesions limit the success of the outcome, but they are relatively frequent in revision surgery. We analyzed their influence on the postoperative function in 52 patients with an irreparable tear of the rotator cuff (35 primary operations, 17 revision surgeries). We observed a continuous improvement in the Constant score from 36 to 69 points, also in ROM, strength, relief of pain and of different subjective parameters for the entire group in consecutive examinations at 11.1, 35.7 and 50.2 months. We found increased osteoarthritis (from 1.0 to 1.5 mm), as well as a decrease in the acromiohumeral distance (from 5.6 to 4.7 mm). In contrast, we detected a slight decrease in the values in the revision group and in the presence of an additional subscapularis lesion. PMID:18430594

  5. Intraarticular morphine and bupivacaine reduces postoperative pain after rotator cuff repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John E. Tetzlaff; John Brems; John Dilger

    2000-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To determine whether intraarticular injection of morphine, fentanyl, or sufentanil added to bupivacaine provided pain control after open rotator cuff repair. Methods: These data were collected as a prospective, randomized, blinded observer study. All patients received a standard interscalene anesthetic with 1.4% mepivacaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine. At the conclusion of surgery, they received an intraarticular injection after

  6. Functional evaluation of patient after arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tear

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rohit; Jadhav, Umesh

    2014-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff tear is a common problem either after trauma or after degenerative tear in old age group. Arthroscopic repair is the current concept of rotator cuff repair. Here, we are trying to evaluate the functional outcome after arthroscopic repair of full thickness rotator cuff tear (single row) in Indian population. Materials and methods Twenty five patients (14 males and 11 females) who underwent arthroscopic repair of full thickness rotator cuff tear at a single institution were included in the study. Postoperatively patient's shoulder was rated according to UCLA score, pain was graded according to the visual analog score. The range of motion was analysed and documented. Results The mean age of the patients were 50.48 years. The preoperative VAS score mode was 7 and post operative VAS was 1 (p value <0.001). The UCLA grading was good in 80% (n = 20), fair in 12% (n = 3), excellent in 8% (n = 2) and poor results were seen in none of the patients. The mean UCLA improved from a score of 15.84 to 30.28 with a p value <0.001. Mean postoperative forward flexion was 161.6°, mean abduction was 147.6° and mean external rotation was 45.4°. Conclusion Arthroscopic repair is a good procedure for full thickness rotator cuff tear with minimal complications. The newer double row repair claims to be biomechanically superior with faster healing rates without functional advantages, hence we used a single row repair considering the Indian population and the cost effectiveness of the surgery with good to excellent results. PMID:25983476

  7. Arthroscopic Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears Using Extracellular Matrix Graft

    PubMed Central

    Gilot, Gregory J.; Attia, Ahmed K.; Alvarez, Andres M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical technology, as well as generally good outcomes, repairs of full-thickness rotator cuff tears show a retear rate of 25% to 57% and may fail to provide full return of function. The repairs tend to fail at the suture-tendon junction, which is due to several factors, including tension at the repair site, quality of the tendon, and defective tissue repair. One strategy to augment repair of large to massive rotator cuff tears is the development of biological scaffold materials, composed of extracellular matrix (ECM). The goal is to strengthen and evenly distribute the mechanical load across the repair site, thus minimizing the rupture risk of the native tendon while providing the biological elements needed for healing. The promising results of ECM-derived materials and their commercial availability have increased their popularity among shoulder surgeons. In contrast to a traditional open or arthroscopically assisted mini-open approach, this completely arthroscopic technique offers the full advantages warranted by the use of a minimally invasive approach. This technical guide describes arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using an ECM graft technique. PMID:25276607

  8. Platelet-Rich Plasma Augmentation for Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff RepairA Randomized Controlled Trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roberto Castricini; Umile Giuseppe Longo; Massimo De Benedetto; Nicola Panfoli; Piergiorgio Pirani; Raul Zini; Nicola Maffulli; Vincenzo Denaro

    2011-01-01

    Background: After reinsertion on the humerus, the rotator cuff has limited ability to heal. Growth factor augmentation has been proposed to enhance healing in such procedure.Purpose: This study was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of growth factor augmentation during rotator cuff repair.Study Design: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1.Methods: Eighty-eight patients with a rotator cuff tear were

  9. Human dermal allograft for massive rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Kokkalis, Zinon T; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Scarlat, Marius; Christodoulou, Michael; Vottis, Christos; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Sotereanos, Dean G

    2014-12-01

    Previously published studies reported variable results using various suture techniques and reconstruction options for massive rotator cuff tears. Therefore, the current authors retrospectively studied 21 consecutive patients/shoulders with massive rotator cuff tears treated from January 2005 to October 2011 with a human dermal allograft through a mini-open approach. Mean patient age was 58 years (range, 33-72 years). Mean follow-up was 29 months (range, 18-52 months). Ten patients underwent revision repair for a failed rotator cuff repair. The authors measured the tendon gap (mean, 1.7 cm) and acromiohumeral interval (mean, 6.5 mm). They evaluated pain, shoulder range of motion (ROM) and function, patient satisfaction with the operation and outcome, and complications. At last follow-up, all patients experienced significant pain relief (P=.001) and improved ROM (P=.001) and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score (P=.001). Eighteen patients reported that they were satisfied or very satisfied and 3 reported that they were not satisfied with the operation and outcome. Comparison of outcomes between patients who underwent primary repair and those who underwent revision repair and between patients who had muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration grades 0 to II and those who had grades III to IV showed no statistically significant differences. A statistically significant correlation was observed between the size of the tendon gap and postoperative pain, ROM (except external rotation), and ASES score (P<.050). No significant correlation was observed between postoperative pain, ROM, and ASES score and the acromiohumeral interval (P>.050). Complications related to the dermal human allograft were not observed. PMID:25437086

  10. Classification of rotator cuff tendinopathy using high definition ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Hinsley, Hannah; Nicholls, Alex; Daines, Michael; Wallace, Gemma; Arden, Nigel; Carr, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: ultrasound is a valid cost effective tool in screening for rotator cuff pathology with high levels of accuracy in detecting full-thickness tears. To date there is no rotator cuff tendinopathy classification using ultrasound. The aims of this study are to define a valid high-definition ultrasound rotator cuff tendinopathy classification, which has discriminate validity between groups based upon anatomical principles. Methods: 464 women, aged 65–87, from an established general population cohort underwent bilateral shoulder ultrasound and musculoskeletal assessment. Sonographer accuracy was established in a separate study by comparing ultrasound findings to the gold standard intra-operative findings. Results: there were 510 normal tendons, 217 abnormal tendons, 77 partial tears, and 124 full-thickness tears. There was no statistical difference in age or the proportion with pain between the abnormal enthesis and partial tear groups, however both groups were statistically older (p<0.001) and had a greater proportion with pain (p<0.001 & p=0.050) than normal tendons. The full-thickness tears were statistically older than normal tendons (p<0.001), but not abnormal/partially torn tendons. The proportion with pain was significantly greater than both groups (p<0.001 & p=0.006). Symptomatic shoulders had a larger median tear size than asymptomatic shoulders (p=0.006). Using tear size as a predictor of pain likelihood, optimum sensitivity and specificity occurred when dividing tears into groups up to 2.5cm and >2.5cm, which corresponds with anatomical descriptions of the width of the supraspinatus tendon. Conclusion: the classification system is as follows: Normal Tendons; Abnormal enthesis/Partial-thickness tear; Single tendon full-thickness tears (0–2.5cm); Multi-tendon full-thickness tears (>2.5cm). PMID:25489559

  11. Arthroscopic According Subacromial Decompression: Results to the Degree of Rotator Cuff Tear

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James C. Esch; Leonard R. Ozerkis; Norman Kane; Nancy Lilliott

    Summary: We evaluated the results of arthroscopic subacromial decompres- sion according to the degree of rotator cuff tear in 71 patients, available for follow-up for at least 1 year (average 19 months). Of the patients with stage II disease, 82% were satisfied regardless of whether they had no rotator cuff tear (nine of 11) or had a partial tear (28

  12. Simultaneous rupture of bilateral quadriceps tendon and rotator cuff tear: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, H T

    2012-03-01

    This is a case report of a patient who sustained both a bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture and a complete rotator cuff tear. Overuse is a known risk factor for rotator cuff tears, but this case suggests that it can also be a risk factor for quadriceps tendon rupture. PMID:23155972

  13. REHABILITATION AFTER ARTHROSCOPIC ROTATOR CUFF REPAIR: CURRENT CONCEPTS REVIEW AND EVIDENCE-BASED GUIDELINES

    PubMed Central

    Westgard, Paul; Chandler, Zachary; Gaskill, Trevor R.; Kokmeyer, Dirk; Millett, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To provide an overview of the characteristics and timing of rotator cuff healing and provide an update on treatments used in rehabilitation of rotator cuff repairs. The authors' protocol of choice, used within a large sports medicine rehabilitation center, is presented and the rationale behind its implementation is discussed. Background: If initial nonsurgical treatment of a rotator cuff tear fails, surgical repair is often the next line of treatment. It is evident that a successful outcome after surgical rotator cuff repair is as much dependent on surgical technique as it is on rehabilitation. To this end, rehabilitation protocols have proven challenging to both the orthopaedic surgeon and the involved physical therapist. Instead of being based on scientific rationale, traditionally most rehabilitation protocols are solely based on clinical experience and expert opinion. Methods: A review of currently available literature on rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff tear repair on PUBMED / MEDLINE and EMBASE databases was performed to illustrate the available evidence behind various postoperative treatment modalities. Results: There is little high-level scientific evidence available to support or contest current postoperative rotator cuff rehabilitation protocols. Most existing protocols are based on clinical experience with modest incorporation of scientific data. Conclusion: Little scientific evidence is available to guide the timing of postsurgical rotator cuff rehabilitation. To this end, expert opinion and clinical experience remains a large facet of rehabilitation protocols. This review describes a rotator cuff rehabilitation protocol that incorporates currently available scientific literature guiding rehabilitation. PMID:22530194

  14. The use of the supraclavicular fossa portal in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William J. Ciccone; John W. Miles; Sang-Jin Cheon; Stephen Ash; James Esch; James Tasto

    2000-01-01

    Advances in arthroscopic technology allow rotator cuff repair through a minimally invasive approach. However, fixation of the rotator cuff tendon to suture anchors can be tedious and time consuming. The supraclavicular fossa portal allows improved access to the tear for passing suture. The authors describe the relevant anatomy, positioning, and surgical technique for use of the supraclavicular fossa portal to

  15. Delineation of diagnostic criteria and a rehabilitation program for rotator cuff injuries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank W. Jobe; Diane Radovich Moynes

    1982-01-01

    In the examination and rehabilitation of patients with shoulder injuries it is necessary to isolate the individ ual rotator cuff muscles as much as possible. We subscribe to the belief that, independent of the deltoid, the rotator cuff muscles can become fatigued, injured, or atrophied individually. Accordingly, we feel that these muscles must be considered separately during examination and rehabilitation.This

  16. Acromial impression fracture of the greater tuberosity with massive rotator cuff tear: this need not be a nightmare!

    PubMed Central

    Fahmy, Amr; Antonakopoulos, Nick; Khan, Amer

    2011-01-01

    An avulsion fracture of the greater tuberosity of the humerus with associated rotator cuff tear is rare. The authors describe the unusual case of a shoulder injury with an isolated, displaced greater tuberosity fracture associated with a massive rotator cuff tear. Due to the rotator cuff dysfunction, this patient presented with significant functional loss. PMID:22707607

  17. Rat rotator cuff muscle responds differently from hindlimb muscle to a combined tendon-nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael R; Ravishankar, Bharat; Laron, Dominique; Kim, Hubert T; Liu, Xuhui; Feeley, Brian T

    2015-07-01

    Rotator cuff tears (RCTs) are among the most common musculoskeletal injuries seen by orthopaedic surgeons. Clinically, massive cuff tears lead to unique pathophysiological changes in rotator cuff muscle, including atrophy, and massive fatty infiltration, which are rarely seen in other skeletal muscles. Studies in a rodent model for RCT have demonstrated that these histologic findings are accompanied by activation of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?) pathways following combined tendon-nerve injury. The purpose of this study was to compare the histologic and molecular features of rotator cuff muscle and gastrocnemius muscle-a major hindlimb muscle, following combined tendon-nerve injury. Six weeks after injury, the rat gastrocnemius did not exhibit notable fatty infiltration compared to the rotator cuff. Likewise, the adipogenic markers SREBP-1 and PPAR? as well as the TGF-? canonical pathway were upregulated in the rotator cuff, but not the gastrocnemius. Our study suggests that the rat rotator cuff and hindlimb muscles differ significantly in their response to a combined tendon-nerve injury. Clinically, these findings highlight the unique response of the rotator cuff to injury, and may begin to explain the poor outcomes of massive RCTs compared to other muscle-tendon injuries. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 33:1046-1053, 2015. PMID:25974842

  18. The frequency of subscapularis tears in arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs: A retrospective study comparing magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopic findings

    PubMed Central

    Garavaglia, Guido; Ufenast, Henri; Taverna, Ettore

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: With the advent of arthroscopic shoulder surgery the comprehension and description of rotator cuff tears have strongly evolved. Subscapularis tears are difficult to recognize and are underestimated. Our purpose is to report our observations concerning the relative frequency of subscapularis tears in patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and to compare the arthroscopic observations with the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. Materials and Methods: Retrospective cohort study including all patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was performed between March 2006 and March 2009 at our institution. Preoperative MRI findings, intraoperative arthroscopic findings, and details of surgical intervention were collected using medical charts. Results: We reviewed the medical charts of a total of 348 consecutive arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs. There were 311 supraspinatus tears (89%), 48 infraspinatus tears (14%), and 129 subscapularis tears (37%). MRI sensitivity and specificity were respectively 0.25 and 0.98 for subscapularis tendon tears, 0.67 and 1.0 for supraspinatus tears and 0.5 and 0.99 for infraspinatus tears. Conclusion: Subscapularis tears are frequent lesions and usually appear concomitantly with supra or infraspinatus lesions. We propose a classification of subscapularis tendon tears, based on our observations of the pathoanatomy of the tears. While concordance with MRI results are good for the supraspinatus, MRI often fails to diagnose the presence of subscapularis tears and infraspinatus tears PMID:22223958

  19. Complications associated with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Randelli, P; Spennacchio, P; Ragone, V; Arrigoni, P; Casella, A; Cabitza, P

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this literature review was to report complications associated with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (RCR). A computerized search of articles published between 200 and 2009 was performed using MEDLINE and PubMed. We included clinical studies (Level 1-4): (a) investigating patients with rotator cuff tears, managed by a completely arthroscopic RCR technique; (b) reported data about complications. Data about arthroscopic-assisted techniques were excluded. Articles that meet criteria inclusion were analytically examined. Complications were classified into general complications and specific complications related to arthroscopic RCR. We found 414 complications in 2,890 patients; most of them were specific complications related to arthroscopic RCR. Re-rupture was the most frequently encountered complication: re-tear rate ranged between 11.4 and 94%. Stiffness and hardware-related complications were observed in 74 and 12 patients, respectively. Eleven less common complications were also reported: 5 neurovascular, 3 septic, 2 thromboembolic events, and 1 anesthesiological complication. This review stated that arthroscopic RCR is a low-risk surgical procedure. Anatomical failure of the repair is the most common complication encountered in the literature. PMID:22205384

  20. A Comparison of Conventional Ultrasonography and Arthrosonography in the Assessment of Cuff Integrity after Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Won; Chun, Tong Jin; Bae, Kyoung Wan; Choy, Won Sik; Park, Hyeon Jong

    2014-01-01

    Background This study was designed to perform conventional ultrasonography, magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) and arthrosonography exams after rotator cuff repair to compare the results of conventional ultrasonography and arthrosonography with those of MRA as the gold standard. Methods We prospectively studied 42 consecutive patients (14 males, 28 females; average age, 59.4 years) who received arthroscopic rotator cuff repair due to full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus tendon from 2008 to 2010. The integrity assessment of the repaired rotator cuff was performed 6 months postoperatively using conventional ultrasonography, MRA, and arthrosonography. Results The diagnostic accuracy of the conventional ultrasonography compared to MRA was 78.6% and the McNemar test results were 0.016 in full-thickness tear and 0.077 in partial-thickness tear. The diagnostic accuracy of arthrosonography compared to MRA was 92.9% and the McNemar test results were 0.998 in full-thickness tear and 0.875 in partial-thickness tear. Conclusions It was found that the integrity assessment of the repaired rotator cuff by ultrasonography must be guarded against and that arthrosonography is an effective alternative method in the postoperative integrity assessment. Also, an arthrosonography seems to be a suitable modality to replace the conventional ultrasonography. PMID:25177461

  1. Return to driving after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: patient-reported safety and maneuverability.

    PubMed

    Gholson, J Joseph; Lin, Albert; McGlaston, Timothy; DeAngelis, Joseph; Ramappa, Arun

    2015-01-01

    This survey investigated patients' return to driving after rotator cuff surgery, to determine whether pain, weakness, sling use, and narcotics correlate with self-assessed safety and maneuvering. Fifty-four patients (80.6% of those eligible) were surveyed 4 months after surgery. Return to driving ranged widely from same day to 4 months, with two not driving at 4 months; 12% reported narcotics use and 33% reported sling use. Drivers reporting weakness were more likely to feel unsafe (p = .02) and more likely to report difficulty maneuvering (p <.01). Drivers reporting pain were more likely to feel unsafe (p < .01) and more likely to report difficulty maneuvering their vehicle (p < .01). Patient-reported return to driving does not correspond to perceived safety; pain and weakness correspond with feeling unsafe and difficulty maneuvering. Although subjective, clinicians may find these self-assessments predictive when counseling patients on return to driving. PMID:25988695

  2. Tissue Engineering for Rotator Cuff Repair: An Evidence-Based Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Maffulli, Nicola; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Loppini, Mattia; Berton, Alessandra; Spiezia, Filippo; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to address the treatment of rotator cuff tears by applying tissue engineering approaches to improve tendon healing, specifically platelet rich plasma (PRP) augmentation, stem cells, and scaffolds. Our systematic search was performed using the combination of the following terms: “rotator cuff”, “shoulder”, “PRP”, “platelet rich plasma”, “stemcells”, “scaffold”, “growth factors”, and “tissue engineering”. No level I or II studies were found on the use of scaffolds and stem cells for rotator cuff repair. Three studies compared rotator cuff repair with or without PRP augmentation. All authors performed arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with different techniques of suture anchor fixation and different PRP augmentation. The three studies found no difference in clinical rating scales and functional outcomes between PRP and control groups. Only one study showed clinical statistically significant difference between the two groups at the 3-month follow up. Any statistically significant difference in the rates of tendon rerupture between the control group and the PRP group was found using the magnetic resonance imaging. The current literature on tissue engineering application for rotator cuff repair is scanty. Comparative studies included in this review suggest that PRP augmented repair of a rotator cuff does not yield improved functional and clinical outcome compared with non-augmented repair at a medium and long-term followup. PMID:25098365

  3. Application of Pain Quantitative Analysis Device for Assessment of Postoperative Pain after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mifune, Yutaka; Inui, Atsuyuki; Nagura, Issei; Sakata, Ryosuke; Muto, Tomoyuki; Harada, Yoshifumi; Takase, Fumiaki; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Kokubu, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : The PainVision™ system was recently developed for quantitative pain assessment. Here, we used this system to evaluate the effect of plexus brachialis block on postoperative pain after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Methods : Fifty-five patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were included in this study. First 26 cases received no plexus brachialis block (control group), and the next 29 cases received the plexus brachialis block before surgery (block group). Patients completed the visual analog scale at 4, 8, 16, and 24 hours after surgery, and the intensity of postoperative pain was assessed with PainVision™ at 16 hours. The postoperative use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents was also recorded. Results : The pain intensity at 16 hours after surgery assessed by PainVision™ was significantly lower in the block group than in the control group (block, 252.0 ± 47.8, control, 489.0 ± 89.1, P < 0.05). However, there were no differences in the VAS values at 16 hours between the 2 groups (block, 4.3 ± 0.6, control, 5.7 ± 0.4, P = N.S.). The pain intensity and VAS at 16 hours after surgery were highly correlated (r = 0.59, P = 0.006 in the block group and r = 0.62, P = 0.003 in the control group). The effect size of the assessment by PainVision™ was bigger than that of VAS (r=0.31 in VAS and 0.51 in Pain vision). Conclusion : The PainVision™ system could be useful to evaluate postoperative pain because it enables the quantification and comparison of pain intensity independent of individual pain thresholds.

  4. Shoulder Strength in Asymptomatic Individuals with Intact Compared with Torn Rotator Cuffs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H. Mike; Teefey, Sharlene A.; Zelig, Ari; Galatz, Leesa M.; Keener, Jay D.; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2009-01-01

    Background: Normative data are essential to the evaluation of shoulder function. The purposes of this study were to establish a normative database of isometric shoulder strength measured in asymptomatic individuals verified to have intact rotator cuffs and to determine the effect of asymptomatic rotator cuff tears on shoulder strength. Methods: Two hundred and thirty-seven volunteers with no shoulder pain or history of shoulder injury were screened with ultrasonography bilaterally for rotator cuff tears and then underwent isometric strength measurements for abduction in the scapular plane and external rotation. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of age, body habitus, hand dominance, and the presence of a rotator cuff tear on shoulder strength. Results: Of the 237 volunteers, forty-one were found to have a torn rotator cuff in at least one shoulder. The prevalence of rotator cuff tears was 0% for the subjects between forty and forty-nine years old; 10%, between fifty and fifty-nine years old; 20%, between sixty and sixty-nine years old; and 40.7% for those seventy years old or older. Both abduction strength and external rotation strength in the male subjects showed an age-dependent decrease, whereas only abduction strength showed an age-dependent decrease in the female subjects. In multiple regression analysis, age and weight were the most important predictors of abduction strength and external rotation strength, respectively. In the shoulders with a large-to-massive full-thickness rotator cuff tear, abduction strength was significantly decreased (p = 0.007). Additionally, the ratio of abduction strength to external rotation strength was significantly decreased in the shoulders with a large-to-massive full-thickness tear compared with the shoulders with an intact rotator cuff (p < 0.001). Conclusions: There is a high prevalence of rotator cuff tears in elderly asymptomatic individuals. Asymptomatic shoulders with a large-to-massive full-thickness rotator cuff tear have significantly decreased abduction strength. When there is a substantial decrease in abduction strength in relation to external rotation strength, the presence of an asymptomatic full-thickness tear should be suspected in that shoulder. Previous studies establishing normative values for isometric shoulder strength may have been skewed by the presence of asymptomatic rotator cuff tears in elderly subgroups. PMID:19181972

  5. Using the Boazul Cuff to Reduce Blood Loss in Varicose Vein Surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J Robinson; J Macierewicz; JD Beard

    2000-01-01

    Objective: this study was designed to assess if the use of a sterile exsanguination tourniquet (Boazul cuff) reduced blood loss from the groin and avulsion wounds during varicose vein surgery, (saphenofemoral disconnection, stripping to knee and multiple avulsions). Design: prospective, parallel cohort study. Materials: thirty-eight patients undergoing primary varicose vein surgery. Methods: the blood loss and number of avulsion wounds

  6. Following rotator cuff tears, the remaining (intact) tendons are mechanically altered

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Stephanie M.; Getz, Charles L.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2009-01-01

    Although presumed, damage in the remaining (intact) rotator cuff tendons in the presence of an isolated supraspinatus tendon tear or multiple tendon tear has not been well studied. This study utilized an animal model of multiple rotator cuff tendon tears to investigate alterations in the remaining (intact) tendon mechanical properties at 4 and 8 weeks post-injury. Twenty-four animals served as uninjured controls, while seventy-two were divided among the tendon detachment groups (supraspinatus tendon detachment, supraspinatus+infraspinatus tendon detachment, supraspinatus+subscapularis tendon detachment). We found the remaining (intact) rotator cuff tendons have decreased mechanical properties in the presence of rotator cuff tears. Remaining (intact) subscapularis and infraspinatus tendon cross-sectional area increased, while tendon modulus decreased after both one and two tendon tears. Additionally, the remaining (intact) tendon cross-sectional areas continued to increase with time post-injury. These alterations could potentially lead to further tendon damage and tear progression. PMID:19095175

  7. Does Platelet-Rich Plasma Accelerate Recovery After Rotator Cuff Repair? A Prospective Cohort Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris Hyunchul Jo; Ji Eun Kim; Kang Sup Yoon; Ji Ho Lee; Seung Baik Kang; Jae Hyup Lee; Hyuk Soo Han; Seung Hwan Rhee; Sue Shin

    2011-01-01

    Background: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been recently used to enhance and accelerate the healing of musculoskeletal injuries and diseases, but evidence is still lacking, especially on its effects after rotator cuff repair.Hypothesis: Platelet-rich plasma accelerates recovery after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in pain relief, functional outcome, overall satisfaction, and enhanced structural integrity of repaired tendon.Study Design: Cohort study; Level of

  8. Arthroscopic vs mini-open rotator cuff repair. A quality of life impairment study

    PubMed Central

    Osti, Leonardo; Papalia, Rocco; Paganelli, Massimo; Denaro, Enzo

    2009-01-01

    We compared the clinical and quality of life related outcome of rotator cuff repair performed using either a mini-open or an arthroscopic technique for rotator cuff tears of less than 3 cm. The records of 64 patients who underwent rotator cuff repair between September 2003 and September 2005 were evaluated. Thirty-two patients underwent a mini-open rotator cuff repair, and 32 patients underwent an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The mean follow-up period was 31 months in the mini-open group and 30.6 months in the arthroscopic group (P?>?0.05). The UCLA rating system, range of motion examination and the self-administered SF-36 used for postoperative evaluation showed a statistically significant improvement from the preoperative to the final score for both groups (P? 0.05). This study suggests that there is no difference in terms of subjective and objective outcomes between the two surgical procedures studied if patients have rotator cuff tears of less than 3 cm. PMID:19424692

  9. A new tear pattern of the rotator cuff and its treatment: Fosbury flop tears

    PubMed Central

    Lädermann, Alexandre; Denard, Patrick J.; Kolo, Frank C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this report is to describe a new full-thickness tear pattern of the posterosuperior rotator cuff with reversal healing. We describe the specific radiologic signs associated with this tear pattern and the arthroscopic rotator cuff repair technique. Materials and Methods: A prospective radiologic and clinical study collected all patients with a magnetic resonance imaging arthrogram that underwent an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair over a 1 year period. Results: Among 97 patients, five demonstrated a tear of the posterosuperior rotator cuff with reversal healing. Characteristic radiographic findings included a thicker tendon than normal, the presence of a stump and accumulation of liquid in the superior-medial part of the subacromial bursa, and adhesions between the supraspinatus tendon and the wall of the subacromial bursa. Conclusion: Avulsion of the posterosuperior rotator cuff with reversal healing on its bursal-side is a less common condition. This type of lesion and distinct radiographic signs that can be recognized to facilitate anatomic repair of the rotator cuff. Level of evidence: Level IV. PMID:25709239

  10. Is coracoacromial arch angle a predisposing factor for rotator cuff tears?

    PubMed Central

    Çay, Nurdan; Tosun, Özgür; I??k, Çetin; Ünal, Özlem; Kartal, Merve Gülbiz; Bozkurt, Murat

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of the present study was to investigate whether coracoacromial arch angle is a predisposing factor for rotator cuff tears. METHODS Shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations of 40 patients having shoulder arthroscopy due to rotator cuff tears and 28 patients with normal MRI findings were evaluated retrospectively. Acromio-humeral distance, coraco-humeral distance, the angle between the longitudinal axis of the coracoacromial ligament and longitudinal axis of the acromion (coracoacromial arch angle), and thickness of the coracoacromial ligament were measured. RESULTS In patients with rotator cuff pathology the mean coraco-humeral distance was 7.88±2.37 mm, the mean acromio-humeral distance was 7.89±2.09 mm, and the mean coracoacromial arch angle was 132.38°±6.52° compared to 11.67±1.86 mm, 11.15±1.84 mm, and 116.95°±7.66° in the control group, respectively (P < 0.001, for all). In regression analysis, all three parameters were found to be significant predictors of rotator cuff tears. The mean thickness of the coracoacromial ligament was not significantly different between the patient and control groups (0.95±0.30 mm vs. 1.00±0.33 mm, P > 0.05). CONCLUSION Acromio-humeral and coraco-humeral distances are narrower than normal limits in patients with rotator cuff tears. In addition, coracoacromial arch angle may be a predisposing factor for rotator cuff tears. PMID:25205023

  11. Post-operative rehabilitation after surgical repair of the rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Conti, Marco; Garofalo, Raffaele; Delle Rose, Giacomo; Massazza, Giuseppe; Vinci, Enzo; Randelli, Mario; Castagna, Alessandro

    2009-04-01

    Today advances in techniques and materials for rotator cuff surgery allow the repair of a large variety of types or extensions of cuff lesions in patients from a wide range of age groups who have different kinds of jobs and participate in different kinds of sports, and who have widely different expectations in terms of recovery of functions and pain relief. A large number of factors must be taken into account before implementing a rehabilitation protocol after rotator cuff surgery. These mainly include the technique (materials and procedure) used by the surgeon. Moreover, tissue quality, retraction, fatty infiltration and time from rupture are important biological factors while the patient's work or sport or daily activities after surgery and expectations of recovery must also be assessed. A rehabilitation protocol should also take into account the timing of biological healing of bone to tendon or tendon to tendon interface, depending on the type of rupture and repair. This timing should direct the therapist's choice of correct passive or assisted exercise and mobilisation manoeuvres and the teaching of correct active mobilisation movements the patient has to do. Following accepted knowledge about the time of biological tissue healing, surgical technique and focused rehabilitation exercise, a conceptual protocol in four phases could be applied, tailoring the protocol for each patient. It starts with sling rest with passive small self-assisted arm motion in phase one, to prevent post-op stiffness. In phase two passive mobilisation by the patient dry or in water, integrated with scapular mobilisation and stabiliser reinforcement, are done. Phase three consists of progressive active arm mobilisation dry or in water integrated with proprioceptive exercise and "core" stabilisation. In phase four full strength recovery integrated with the recovery of work or sports movements will complete the protocol. Because of the multi-factorial aspects of the problem, the best results can be obtained through a full transfer of information from the surgeon to the therapist to optimise timing and sizing of the individual rehabilitation protocol for each patient. PMID:19711171

  12. Electromyographic assessment of muscle fatigue in massive rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, D H; Alizadehkhaiyat, O; Kemp, G J; Fisher, A C; Roebuck, M M; Frostick, S P

    2015-02-01

    Shoulder muscle fatigue has not been assessed in massive rotator cuff tear (MRCT). This study used EMG to measure fatigability of 13 shoulder muscles in 14 healthy controls and 11 patients with MRCT. A hand grip protocol was applied to minimise artifacts due to pain experience during measurement. The fatigue index (median frequency slope) was significantly non-zero (negative) for anterior, middle, and posterior parts of deltoid, supraspinatus and subscapularis muscles in the controls, and for anterior, middle, and posterior parts of deltoid, and pectoralis major in patients (p ? 0.001). Fatigue was significantly greater in patients compared to the controls for anterior and middle parts of deltoid and pectoralis major (p ? 0.001). A submaximal grip task provided a feasible way to assess shoulder muscle fatigue in MRCT patients, however with some limitations. The results suggest increased activation of deltoid is required to compensate for lost supraspinatus abduction torque. Increased pectoralis major fatigue in patients (adduction torque) likely reflected strategy to stabilise the humeral head against superior subluxing force of the deltoid. Considering physiotherapy as a primary or adjunct intervention for the management of MRCT, the findings of this study generate a base for future clinical studies aiming at the development of evidence-based protocols. PMID:25301260

  13. Assessment and characterization of in situ rotator cuff biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trent, Erika A.; Bailey, Lane; Mefleh, Fuad N.; Raikar, Vipul P.; Shanley, Ellen; Thigpen, Charles A.; Dean, Delphine; Kwartowitz, David M.

    2013-03-01

    Rotator cuff disease is a degenerative disorder that is a common, costly, and often debilitating, ranging in severity from partial thickness tear, which may cause pain, to total rupture, leading to loss in function. Currently, clinical diagnosis and determination of disease extent relies primarily on subjective assessment of pain, range of motion, and possibly X-ray or ultrasound images. The final treatment plan however is at the discretion of the clinician, who often bases their decision on personal experiences, and not quantitative standards. The use of ultrasound for the assessment of tissue biomechanics is established, such as in ultrasound elastography, where soft tissue biomechanics are measured. Few studies have investigated the use of ultrasound elastography in the characterization of musculoskeletal biomechanics. To assess tissue biomechanics we have developed a device, which measures the force applied to the underlying musculotendentious tissue while simultaneously obtaining the related ultrasound images. In this work, the musculotendinous region of the infraspinatus of twenty asymptomatic male organized baseball players was examined to access the variability in tissue properties within a single patient and across a normal population. Elastic moduli at percent strains less than 15 were significantly different than those above 15 percent strain within the normal population. No significant difference in tissue properties was demonstrated within a single patient. This analysis demonstrated elastic moduli are variable across individuals and incidence. Therefore threshold elastic moduli will likely be a function of variation in local-tissue moduli as opposed to a specific global value.

  14. Is the Supraspinatus Muscle Atrophy Truly Irreversible after Surgical Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears?

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Seok Won; Kim, Sae Hoon; Tae, Suk-Kee; Yoon, Jong Pil; Choi, Jung-Ah

    2013-01-01

    Background Atrophy of rotator cuff muscles has been considered an irreversible phenomenon. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether atrophy is truly irreversible after rotator cuff repair. Methods We measured supraspinatus muscle atrophy of 191 patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative multidetector computed tomography images, taken at least 1 year after operation. The occupation ratio was calculated using Photoshop CS3 software. We compared the change between pre- and postoperative occupation ratios after modifying the preoperative occupation ratio. In addition, possible relationship between various clinical factors and the change of atrophy, and between the change of atrophy and cuff integrity after surgical repair were evaluated. Results The mean occupation ratio was significantly increased postoperatively from 0.44 ± 0.17 to 0.52 ± 0.17 (p < 0.001). Among 191 patients, 81 (42.4%) showed improvement of atrophy (more than a 10% increase in occupation ratio) and 33 (17.3%) worsening (more than a 10% decrease). Various clinical factors such as age tear size, or initial degree of atrophy did not affect the change of atrophy. However, the change of atrophy was related to repair integrity: cuff healing failure rate of 48.5% (16 of 33) in worsened atrophy; and 22.2% (18 of 81) in improved atrophy (p = 0.007). Conclusions The supraspinatus muscle atrophy as measured by occupation ratio could be improved postoperatively in case of successful cuff repair. PMID:23467404

  15. Correlation of acromial morphology with impingement syndrome and rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Indications for acromioplasty are based on clinical symptoms and are generally supported by typical changes in acromial morphology on standard radiographs. We evaluated 5 commonly used radiographic parameters of acromial morphology and assessed the association between different radiographic characteristics on the one hand and subacromial impingement or rotator cuff tears on the other. Patients and methods We measured acromial type (Bigliani), acromial slope (AS), acromial tilt (AT), lateral acromial angle (LAA), and acromion index (AI) on standard radiographs from 50 patients with full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears, 50 patients with subacromial impingement, and 50 controls without subacromial pathology. Results The acromial type according to Bigliani was not associated with any particular cuff lesion. A statistically significant difference between controls and impingement patients was found for AS. AT of controls was significantly smaller than that of impingement patients and cuff-tear patients. LAA of cuff-tear patients differed significantly from that of controls and impingement patients, but LAA of controls was not significantly different from that of impingement patients. Differences between impingement patients and cuff-tear patients were also significant. AI of controls was significantly lower than of impingement patients and of cuff-tear patients. A good correlation was found between acromial type and AS. Interpretation A low lateral acromial angle and a large lateral extension of the acromion were associated with a higher prevalence of impingement and rotator cuff tears. An extremely hooked anterior acromion with a slope of more than 43° and an LAA of less than 70° only occurred in patients with rotator cuff tears. PMID:23409811

  16. Clinical and Radiological Evaluation after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Using Suture Bridge Technique

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Won; Bae, Kyoung Wan; Choy, Won Sik

    2013-01-01

    Background We retrospectively assessed the clinical outcomes and investigated risk factors influencing retear after arthroscopic suture bridge repair technique for rotator cuff tear through clinical assessment and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA). Methods Between January 2008 and April 2011, sixty-two cases of full-thickness rotator cuff tear were treated with arthroscopic suture bridge repair technique and follow-up MRA were performed. The mean age was 56.1 years, and mean follow-up period was 27.4 months. Clinical and functional outcomes were assessed using range of motion, Korean shoulder score, Constant score, and UCLA score. Radiological outcome was evaluated with preoperative and follow-up MRA. Potential predictive factors that influenced cuff retear, such as age, gender, geometric patterns of tear, size of cuff tear, acromioplasty, fatty degeneration, atrophy of cuff muscle, retraction of supraspinatus, involved muscles of cuff and osteolysis around the suture anchor were evaluated. Results Thirty cases (48.4%) revealed retear on MRA. In univariable analysis, retear was significantly more frequent in over 60 years age group (62.5%) than under 60 years age group (39.5%; p = 0.043), and also in medium to large-sized tear than small-sized tear (p = 0.003). There was significant difference in geometric pattern of tear (p = 0.015). In multivariable analysis, only age (p = 0.036) and size of tear (p = 0.030) revealed a significant difference. The mean active range of motion for forward flexion, abduction, external rotation at the side and internal rotation at the side were significantly improved at follow-up (p < 0.05). The mean Korean shoulder score, Constant score, and UCLA score increased significantly at follow-up (p < 0.01). The range of motion, Korean shoulder score, Constant score, and UCLA score did not differ significantly between the groups with retear and intact repairs (p > 0.05). The locations of retear were insertion site in 10 cases (33.3%) and musculotendinous junction in 20 cases (66.7%; p = 0.006). Conclusions Suture bridge repair technique for rotator cuff tear showed improved clinical results. Cuff integrity after repair did not affect clinical results. Age of over 60 years and size of cuff tear larger than 1 cm were factors influencing rotator cuff retear after arthroscopic suture bridge repair technique. PMID:24340151

  17. Epidemiology of the rotator cuff tears: a new incidence related to thyroid disease

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Francesco; Osti, Leonardo; Padulo, Johnny; Maffulli, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: in the last years the incidence of rotator cuff tears increased and one main cause still waiting to be clarified. Receptors for thyroid hormones in rotator cuff tendons suggest possible effects on tendons metabolism and status. We undertook a retrospective, observational cohort study of 441 patients who underwent arthroscopic and mini-open repair for non traumatic degenerative rotator cuff tears. Methods: all the patients, predominantly females (63%), were interview to assess the relationship (frequency for class age “20 yrs” and factor analysis) between lesions of the rotator cuff with the following variables: gender, thyroid disease, smoker, taking medications for diabetes, hypertension or high cholesterol; presence of associated conditions (diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia). Results: thyroid disease is highly frequently (until 63% for 60<80 yrs) in females group independent to the age. Conversely, males showed a high frequency for smoker 37<62% until 80 yrs and 50% hypercholesterolemia over 80 yrs for the clinical variable studied. Conclusions: this is the first clinical report that shown a relationship between thyroid pathologies and non-traumatic rotator cuff tear as increased risk factors. PMID:25489548

  18. The role of the peripheral and central nervous systems in rotator cuff disease.

    PubMed

    Bachasson, Damien; Singh, Anshuman; Shah, Sameer B; Lane, John G; Ward, Samuel R

    2015-08-01

    Rotator cuff (RC) disease is an extremely common condition associated with shoulder pain, reduced functional capacities, and impaired quality of life. It primarily involves alterations in tendon health and mechanical properties that can ultimately lead to tendon failure. RC tendon tears induce progressive muscle changes that have a negative impact on surgical reparability of the RC tendons and clinical outcomes. At the same time, a significant base of clinical data suggests a relatively weak relationship between RC integrity and clinical presentation, emphasizing the multifactorial aspects of RC disease. This review aims to summarize the potential contribution of peripheral, spinal, and supraspinal neural factors that may (1) exacerbate structural and functional muscle changes induced by tendon tear, (2) compromise the reversal of these changes during surgery and rehabilitation, (3) contribute to pain generation and persistence of pain, (4) impair shoulder function through reduced proprioception, kinematics, and muscle recruitment, and (5) help explain interindividual differences and response to treatment. Given the current clinical and scientific interest in peripheral nerve injury in the context of RC disease and surgery, we carefully reviewed this body of literature with a particular emphasis on suprascapular neuropathy that has generated a large number of studies in the past decade. Within this process, we highlight the gaps in current knowledge and suggest research avenues for scientists and clinicians. PMID:26189809

  19. Fatal pulmonary embolism after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Durant, Thomas J.S.; Cote, Mark P.; Arciero, Robert A.; Mazzocca, Augustus D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: pulmonary embolism (PE) is a rare and serious complication of arthroscopic orthopaedic surgery. Currently there is great paucity in the literature regarding PE events following arthroscopic rotator cuff (ARCR) surgery. The purpose of this case series was to (1) report our known incidence rate of symptomatic PE following ARCR for a single surgeon and (2) describe five cases of pulmonary embolism following ARCR, detailing patient medical history and potential perioperative risk factors. Methods: the number of PE events were queried retrospectively from the institutional database with the ICD-9 code 415.1 within a 10 year time frame (2003–2013). Cases of PE identified by ICD-9 query were reviewed for type of procedure, postoperative day of event, and surgeon. Only patients with a confirmed diagnosis by computed tomography (CT) scan or post-mortem exam, were included in this study. Patient medical records belonging to affected patients were ordered and reviewed by a single investigator. Pre, intra, and postoperative information was obtained and summarized. Results: 5 cases of PE were identified, two of which were fatal. All events occurred in the perioperative period following ARCR. The 10 year incidence rate for PE following ARCR was 0.89%. Medical record review revealed significant risk factors for these patients when compared to current VTE prophylactic guidelines. Conclusions: our ten year incidence rate of PE following arthroscopic shoulder surgery and ARCR was 0.25 and 0.89% respectively. These rates were found to be considerably higher than reported rates of PE in the general population and following arthroscopic shoulder surgery. In addition, our methods failed to detect subclinical PE events, resulting in the likelihood of this value to be an underestimate of the true incidence. Medical record review revealed risk factors which would qualify patients for chemoprophylaxis under certain guidelines, however, the validity of available risk stratification methods continue to be a topic of debate. Level of Evidence: Level IV; case series. PMID:25332941

  20. Comparison of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in healthy patients over and under 65 years of age.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Papalia, Rocco; Del Buono, Angelo; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-12-01

    We compared the outcomes of arthroscopically repaired rotator cuff tears in 28 patients older than 65 years (the over 65 group: median age 70 years) with a control group of 28 patients younger than 65 years (the under 65 group: median age 57 years). The groups were similar in regard to sex distribution, surgical technique, and post-operative rehabilitation programmes, but different in age. After careful arthroscopic evaluation of the full-thickness rotator cuff tear, rotator cuff repair and biceps tenotomy were performed in all patients. Pre- and post-operatively, each patient was evaluated for range of motion, shoulder score (UCLA), and SF-36 self-administered questionnaire. Comparing pre- versus post-operative status at a minimum 24 months follow-up, forward elevation, internal and external rotation, modified UCLA rating system scores, and SF-36 scores improved significantly in both groups, with no significant difference between the groups. At the last follow-up, strength improved significantly in both groups, with non-significant intergroup difference. The Popeye sign was detected in 13/28 (46%) of the patients in the over 65 group and in 11/28 (39%) in the under 65 group (? = 0.29) with non-significant difference between the two groups. In selected active patients older than 65, arthroscopic rotator cuff repair associated with biceps tenotomy (when necessary) can yield clinical and related quality of life outcomes similar to those of patients younger than 65 years. PMID:20182868

  1. A New Technique for Patch Augmentation of Rotator Cuff Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Mihara, Shuzou; Ono, Teruyasu; Inoue, Hirofumi; Kisimoto, Tetsurou

    2014-01-01

    Massive rotator cuff tears defying primary repair have been treated with debridement, arthroscopic subacromial decompression, partial repair, muscle-tendon transfer, and joint prosthesis, among other techniques. However, the treatment results have not been satisfactory compared with those of small- to medium-sized rotator cuff tears; each procedure has its merits and demerits, and currently, there is no single established method. For massive rotator cuff tears defying primary repair, the arthroscopic patch graft procedure has been reported as an effective surgical procedure, and this procedure is chosen as the first-line treatment in our department. In this procedure, suture anchors are generally used to fix the patch graft to the footprint on the side of the greater tuberosity. However, tendon-to-bone healing is frequently difficult to achieve, and bone-to-bone healing seems more advantageous for the repair of the rotator cuff attachment site. To improve the results of treatment, a new patch graft procedure was developed, in which the iliotibial ligament with bone was collected at Gerdy's tubercle and the bone was anchored to the footprint on the side of the greater tuberosity. With this procedure, excellent results were obtained, although only short-term results are available at present. The technique and its results so far are reported. PMID:25126505

  2. A Multicenter Study of 210 Rotator Cuff Tears Treated by Arthroscopic Acromioplasty

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-François Kempf; Pascal Gleyze; François Bonnomet; Gilles Walch; Daniel Mole; André Frank; Philippe Beaufils; Christophe Levigne; Bruno Rio; André Jaffe

    1999-01-01

    Summary: We followed 210 cases of rotator cuff tears treated in four French centers by arthroscopic acromioplasty in 195 cases and by a tenotomy of the Long Head of Biceps (LHB) in 15 cases. All patients were evaluated by means of the Constant score (CS) and radiographic imaging. The mean age was 61 years and the mean follow-up period was

  3. Isokinetic torque imbalances in the rotator cuff of the elite water polo player

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William C. McMaster; Susan C. Long; Vincent J. Caiozzo

    1991-01-01

    The specific repetitive activity of water polo, like base ball pitching, emphasizes adduction and internal rota tion. This study used the Cybex II to evaluate the isokinetic strength of the rotator cuff in elite water polo players and in a group of control subjects. The water polo players were significantly stronger than the con trols. Of greater importance was the

  4. Novel Nanofiber-Based Scaffold for Rotator Cuff Repair and Augmentation

    E-print Network

    Lu, Helen H.

    and augmentation. To address this challenge, we have designed a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanofiber of human rotator cuff fibroblasts on aligned and unaligned PLGA nanofiber scaffolds. Additionally mechanical properties were maintained. These observations demonstrate the potential of the PLGA nanofiber

  5. Single-Versus Double-Row Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair in Massive Tears

    PubMed Central

    Wang, EnZhi; Wang, Liang; Gao, Peng; Li, ZhongJi; Zhou, Xiao; Wang, SongGang

    2015-01-01

    Background It is a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons to treat massive rotator cuff tears. The optimal management of massive rotator cuff tears remains controversial. Therefore, the goal of this study was to compare arthroscopic single- versus double-row rotator cuff repair with a larger sample size. Material/Methods Of the subjects with massive rotator cuff tears, 146 were treated using single-row repair, and 102 were treated using double-row repair. Pre- and postoperative functional outcomes and radiographic images were collected. The clinical outcomes were evaluated for a minimum of 2 years. Results No significant differences were shown between the groups in terms of functional outcomes. Regarding the integrity of the tendon, a lower rate of post-treatment retear was observed in patients who underwent double-row repair compared with single-row repair. Conclusions The results suggest that double-row repair is relatively superior in shoulder ROM and the strength of tendon compared with single-row repair. Future studies involving more patients in better-designed randomized controlled trials will be required. PMID:26017641

  6. Symptoms of Pain Do Not Correlate with Rotator Cuff Tear Severity

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Warren R.; Kuhn, John E.; Sanders, Rosemary; An, Qi; Baumgarten, Keith M.; Bishop, Julie Y.; Brophy, Robert H.; Carey, James L.; Holloway, G. Brian; Jones, Grant L.; Ma, C. Benjamin; Marx, Robert G.; McCarty, Eric C.; Poddar, Sourav K.; Smith, Matthew V.; Spencer, Edwin E.; Vidal, Armando F.; Wolf, Brian R.; Wright, Rick W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: For many orthopaedic disorders, symptoms correlate with disease severity. The objective of this study was to determine if pain level is related to the severity of rotator cuff disorders. Methods: A cohort of 393 subjects with an atraumatic symptomatic full-thickness rotator-cuff tear treated with physical therapy was studied. Baseline pretreatment data were used to examine the relationship between the severity of rotator cuff disease and pain. Disease severity was determined by evaluating tear size, retraction, superior humeral head migration, and rotator cuff muscle atrophy. Pain was measured on the 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) in the patient-reported American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score. A linear multiple regression model was constructed with use of the continuous VAS score as the dependent variable and measures of rotator cuff tear severity and other nonanatomic patient factors as the independent variables. Forty-eight percent of the patients were female, and the median age was sixty-one years. The dominant shoulder was involved in 69% of the patients. The duration of symptoms was less than one month for 8% of the patients, one to three months for 22%, four to six months for 20%, seven to twelve months for 15%, and more than a year for 36%. The tear involved only the supraspinatus in 72% of the patients; the supraspinatus and infraspinatus, with or without the teres minor, in 21%; and only the subscapularis in 7%. Humeral head migration was noted in 16%. Tendon retraction was minimal in 48%, midhumeral in 34%, glenohumeral in 13%, and to the glenoid in 5%. The median baseline VAS pain score was 4.4. Results: Multivariable modeling, controlling for other baseline factors, identified increased comorbidities (p = 0.002), lower education level (p = 0.004), and race (p = 0.041) as the only significant factors associated with pain on presentation. No measure of rotator cuff tear severity correlated with pain (p > 0.25). Conclusions: Anatomic features defining the severity of atraumatic rotator cuff tears are not associated with the pain level. Factors associated with pain are comorbidities, lower education level, and race. Level of Evidence: Prognostic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:24875019

  7. Pulsed electromagnetic fields after rotator cuff repair: a randomized, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Buono, Angelo Del; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    The current study tested the hypothesis that the use of pulsed electromagnetic fields after rotator cuff repair is effective in the short term as an adjuvant treatment to reduce local inflammation, postoperative joint swelling, and recovery time, as well as to induce pain relief. Sixty-six patients who underwent shoulder arthroscopy for repair of small to medium rotator cuff tears were randomly divided into 2 groups with a block randomization procedure. Thirty-two patients underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and application of pulsed electromagnetic fields postoperatively; 34 patients underwent rotator cuff repair and placebo treatment (placebo group). All patients had the same postoperative rehabilitation protocol. At 3 months from the index procedure, visual analog scale, range of motion, and University of California at Los Angeles and Constant scores were significantly better in the pulsed electromagnetic fields group than in the placebo group (P<.05). Three patients in the pulsed electromagnetic fields group and 7 patients in the placebo group had mild to moderate capsulitis (P=.2). Severe capsulitis occurred in 1 patient in the pulsed electromagnetic fields group and 2 patients in the placebo group (P=.6). At the last follow-up (minimum, 2 years), clinical and functional outcomes were further improved in both groups, with no significant intergroup differences. Application of pulsed electromagnetic fields after rotator cuff repair is safe and reduces postoperative pain, analgesic use, and stiffness in the short term. At 2 years, no difference was seen in outcomes in patients who did or did not undergo treatment with pulsed electromagnetic fields. PMID:25760511

  8. Biochemical markers in the synovial fluid of glenohumeral joints from patients with rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Y; Hamada, K; Nakajima, T; Fujikawa, K; Fukuda, H

    2001-07-01

    It is known that rotator cuff tears are sometimes accompanied by joint destruction. Our purpose was to elucidate the pathology with this condition. Thirty-two synovial fluid (SF) samples aspirated from the glenohumeral joints of patients with rotator cuff tears, including 7 with partial-thickness and 25 with full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff (10 massive and 15 isolated supraspinatus tendon (SSp) tears), were examined. Collagenase (MMP-1), stromelysin 1 (MMP-3), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) and carboxy-terminal type II procollagen peptide (pCOL Il-C) were measured in the SF using the respective sandwich enzyme immunoassays. Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) was also quantified with a cationic dye binding method using 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue. Levels of any molecules except pCOL II-C in the SF appeared to be higher in full-thickness tears than those in partial-thickness tears. Moreover, levels of MMP-1, MMP-3 and GAG in the SF were significantly higher in massive tears of the rotator cuff in comparison with those in isolated SSp tears. Such significance was not observed in the levels of TIMP-1 or pCOL II C in the SF. We examined the relation of those levels with operative findings or clinical parameters from full-thickness tears, and observed significant correlations of the tear size with the levels of MMP-1, MMP-3 and GAG in the SF. Although these marker molecules in SF do not always originate from cartilage, our results may indicate the potential for accelerated cartilage-degrading activity in the glenohumeral joint in massive tears of the rotator cuff. PMID:11518264

  9. Changes in endotracheal tube cuff pressure during laparoscopic surgery in head-up or head-down position

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The abdominal insufflation and surgical positioning in the laparoscopic surgery have been reported to result in an increase of airway pressure. However, associated effects on changes of endotracheal tube cuff pressure are not well established. Methods 70 patients undergoing elective laparoscopic colorectal tumor resection (head-down position, n?=?38) and laparoscopic cholecystecomy (head-up position, n?=?32) were enrolled and were compared to 15 patients undergoing elective open abdominal surgery. Changes of cuff and airway pressures before and after abdominal insufflation in supine position and after head-down or head-up positioning were analysed and compared. Results There was no significant cuff and airway pressure changes during the first fifteen minutes in open abdominal surgery. After insufflation, the cuff pressure increased from 26?±?3 to 32?±?6 and 27?±?3 to 33?±?5 cmH2O in patients receiving laparoscopic cholecystecomy and laparoscopic colorectal tumor resection respectively (both p?cuff pressure from 33?±?5 to 35?±?5 cmH2O (p?cuff pressure more than 10 cm H2O (18.8%). There was no significant correlation between increase of cuff pressure and either the patient's body mass index or the common range of intra-abdominal pressure (10-15 mmHg) used in laparoscopic surgery. Conclusions An increase of endotracheal tube cuff pressure may occur during laparoscopic surgery especially in the head-down position. PMID:25210501

  10. Rare coexistence of gouty and septic arthritis after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ichiseki, Toru; Ueda, Shusuke; Matsumoto, Tadami

    2015-01-01

    Coexistence of septic arthritis and gouty arthritis is rare. In particular, no reports have described the development of both gouty and septic arthritis after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. The patient was an 83-year-old man who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. He had a history of diabetes mellitus (HbA1c: 7.4%), but not of gout, and the GFR was decreased (GFR=46). During the postoperative course fever suddenly developed and joint fluid retention was found. Uric acid crystals were detected when the joint fluid was aspirated, after which when the culture results became available sepsis due to methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) was diagnosed. On the 2nd day after fever onset, lavage and debridement were performed under arthroscopy, with the subsequent course uneventful with no recurrence of the infection or gouty arthritis and no joint destruction. When uric acid crystals are found in aspirated joint fluid, gouty arthritis tends to be diagnosed, but like in the present case if infection also supervenes, joint destruction and a poor general state may result if appropriate intervention is not initiated swiftly. Accordingly, even if uric acid crystals are found, the possibility of coexistence of septic arthritis and gouty arthritis should be kept in mind.

  11. The MRI geyser sign: acromioclavicular joint cysts in the setting of a chronic rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Cooper, H John; Milillo, Ralph; Klein, Devon A; DiFelice, Gregory S

    2011-06-01

    We present the case of a 71-year-old man with a large acromioclavicular (AC) joint cyst successfully managed with surgical excision. AC joint cysts are soft tissue masses generally signifying underlying rotator cuff pathology. Traditionally, these cysts were identified with shoulder arthrography as a "geyser" of fluid escaping through the AC joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is today's preferred imaging modality; we describe the MRI equivalent of the "geyser sign," signifying synovial fluid escaping through the cuff defect, across the subacromial bursa, and decompressing superiorly through a degenerated AC joint. Surgical management is preferred for symptomatic cysts. Based on a review of limited retrospective case series, recommendations for management of these lesions are as follows. Repair of the rotator cuff is preferable whenever possible. In the case of an irreparable defect, good results can be achieved through excisional AC joint arthroplasty and resection of the cyst base. Aspiration of these cysts should not be attempted, due to the high recurrence rate and potential for a draining sinus. Hemiarthroplasty also may be effective in indirectly decompressing these cysts; but given the invasive nature of this procedure, it should be reserved for patients who are also symptomatic from cuff arthropathy. PMID:21869946

  12. How do massive immobile rotator cuff tears behave after arthroscopic interval slides? Comparison with mobile tears

    PubMed Central

    FOSSATI, CHIARA; ARRIGONI, PAOLO; RAGONE, VINCENZA; SPENNACCHIO, PIETRO; BANFI, GIUSEPPE; RANDELLI, FILIPPO; RANDELLI, PIETRO

    2014-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this study was to compare clinical outcomes of contracted immobile massive rotator cuff tears mobilised through an arthroscopic interval slide technique versus massive mobile cuff tears directly repaired without any mobilisation. Methods twenty-five patients who underwent arthroscopic repair for massive rotator cuff tears with a minimum of 18 months follow-up were included. The patients were retrospectively divided into two groups. In group 1, a single or double interval slide was performed to achieve adequate tendon mobilisation. In group 2 (control group), massive rotator cuff tears were arthroscopically repaired without any additional release. Patients were evaluated with validated outcomes scores: subjective and objective Constant score, a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain, and single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE). Results the two groups were comparable in terms of age, gender and involvement of the dominant arm. The mean follow-up duration was 31 months in group 1 and 28 months in group 2 (p = 0.4). The two groups showed no significant differences in SANE and VAS results (group 1: SANE 77%, VAS 1.3; group 2: SANE 88%, VAS 1.6), or in total Constant score (group 1: 66.5 ± 11; group 2: 75 ± 14; p = 0.1) and subjective Constant score (Group 1: 31 ± 5; group 2: 30.8 ± 7; p = 0.9). A significant difference was found for the objective Constant score, which was higher in the control group (group 1: 35.5 ± 7; group 2: 44 ± 8; p = 0.009). Conclusions Subjective clinical outcomes of arthroscopic repair with or without interval slides did not differ and were satisfactory. Objectively, immobile cuff tears showed inferior results. The use of interval slides might be considered a first step or an alternative to more invasive procedures for low demanding patients. Level of evidence Level III, retrospective comparative study. PMID:25606545

  13. Relationship of Radiographic Acromial Characteristics and Rotator Cuff Disease: A Prospective Investigation of Clinical, Radiographic, and Sonographic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Nady; Omid, Reza; Yamaguchi, Ken; Steger-May, Karen; Stobbs, Georgia; Keener, Jay D

    2013-01-01

    Background Many studies have attempted to correlate radiographic acromial characteristics with rotator cuff tears, but the results have not been conclusive. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between rotator cuff disease and development of symptoms with different radiographic acromial characteristics including shape, index, and presence of a spur. Materials and Methods The records of 216 patients enrolled in an ongoing prospective, longitudinal study investigating asymptomatic rotator cuff tears were reviewed. All patients underwent standardized radiographic evaluation, clinical evaluation, and shoulder ultrasonography at regularly scheduled surveillance visits. Three blinded observers reviewed all radiographs to determine the acromial morphology, presence and size of an acromial spur, and acromial index. These findings were analyzed to determine an association with the presence of a full-thickness rotator cuff tear. Results The three observers demonstrated poor agreement for acromial morphology, substantial agreement for the presence of an acromial spur, and excellent agreement for acromial index (kappa= 0.41, 0.65, and 0.86 respectively). The presence of an acromial spur was highly associated with the presence of a full-thickness rotator cuff tear (p=0.003) even after adjusting for age. No association was found between acromial index and rotator cuff disease (p=0.92). Conclusion The presence of an acromial spur is highly associated with the presence of a full-thickness rotator cuff tear in both the symptomatic and asymptomatic patient. The acromial morphology classification system is an unreliable method to assess the acromion. The acromial index shows no association with the presence of rotator cuff disease. PMID:22217644

  14. Rehabilitation following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a review of current literature.

    PubMed

    Ross, David; Maerz, Tristan; Lynch, Jamie; Norris, Sarah; Baker, Kevin; Anderson, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Physical rehabilitation following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has conventionally involved a 4- to 6-week period of immobilization; there are two schools of thought regarding activity level during this period. Some authors encourage early, more aggressive rehabilitation along with the use of a continuous passive motion device; others propose later, more conservative rehabilitation. Although some studies report trends in improved early range of motion, pain relief, and outcomes scores with aggressive rehabilitation following rotator cuff repair, no definitive consensus exists supporting a clinical difference resulting from rehabilitation timing in the early stages of healing. Rehabilitation timing does not affect outcomes after 6 to 12 months postoperatively. Given the lack of information regarding which patient groups benefit from aggressive rehabilitation, individualized patient care is warranted. PMID:24382874

  15. A Load-Sharing Rip-Stop Fixation Construct for Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Denard, Patrick J.; Burkhart, Stephen S.

    2012-01-01

    Despite advancements in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair techniques, achieving tendon-to-bone healing can be difficult in the setting of poor-quality tendon. Moreover, medial tendon tears or tears with lateral tendon loss may preclude standard techniques. Rip-stop suture configurations have been shown to improve load to failure compared with simple or mattress stitch patterns and may be particularly valuable in these settings. The purpose of this report is to describe a technical modification of a rip-stop rotator cuff repair that combines the advantages of a rip-stop suture (by providing resistance to tissue cutout) and a double row of load-sharing suture anchors (minimizing the load per anchor and therefore the load per suture within each anchor). PMID:23766972

  16. Biologic augmentation in rotator cuff repair--should we do it, who should get it, and has it worked?

    PubMed

    McCormack, Richard A; Shreve, Mark; Strauss, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are a common pathologic entity, and rotator cuff repairs are a frequently performed procedure. Given the high rate of structural failure of repair, biological augmentation of repairs is increasingly important. Biological augmentation primarily enhances the healing response and secondarily provides a mechanical bridge for tension free repair. Understanding biology of tendons and tendon healing aids in determining an optimal environment for repair. The basic principles of rotator cuff repair are aimed at achieving high initial fixation strength of the repair, restoring the anatomic footprint of the cuff tendon, minimizing gap formation, and maintaining mechanical stability until biologic healing occurs. Methods of augmentation come in many different forms and can be categorized by cell type and mechanism of delivery. Cell types include individual growth factors, stem cells, or a combination of both. Vehicles range from in situ delivery, such as microfracture, direct injection, or scaffold materials that are biologic or synthetic. PMID:25150331

  17. New perspectives in rotator cuff tendon regeneration: review of tissue engineered therapies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roberto Rotini; Milena Fini; Gianluca Giavaresi; Alessandro Marinelli; Enrico Guerra; Diego Antonioli; Alessandro Castagna; Roberto Giardino

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineering may play a major role in the treatment of rotator cuff tendon lesions through replacement of an injured\\u000a tendon segment. Tendons have very poor spontaneous regenerative capabilities, and despite intensive remodelling, complete\\u000a regeneration is never achieved and the strength of tendon and ligaments remains as much as 30% lower than normal even months\\u000a or years following an acute

  18. Comparison of rotator cuff muscle architecture between humans and other selected vertebrate species

    PubMed Central

    Mathewson, Margie A.; Kwan, Alan; Eng, Carolyn M.; Lieber, Richard L.; Ward, Samuel R.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we compare rotator cuff muscle architecture of typically used animal models with that of humans and quantify the scaling relationships of these muscles across mammals. The four muscles that correspond to the human rotator cuff – supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis and teres minor – of 10 commonly studied animals were excised and subjected to a series of comparative measurements. When body mass among animals was regressed against physiological cross-sectional area, muscle mass and normalized fiber length, the confidence intervals suggested geometric scaling but did not exclude other scaling relationships. Based on the architectural difference index (ADI), a combined measure of fiber length-to-moment arm ratio, fiber length-to-muscle length ratio and the fraction of the total rotator cuff physiological cross-sectional area contributed by each muscle, chimpanzees were found to be the most similar to humans (ADI=2.15), followed closely by capuchins (ADI=2.16). Interestingly, of the eight non-primates studied, smaller mammals such as mice, rats and dogs were more similar to humans in architectural parameters compared with larger mammals such as sheep, pigs or cows. The force production versus velocity trade-off (indicated by fiber length-to-moment arm ratio) and the excursion ability (indicated by fiber length-to-muscle length ratio) of humans were also most similar to those of primates, followed by the small mammals. Overall, primates provide the best architectural representation of human muscle architecture. However, based on the muscle architectural parameters of non-primates, smaller rather than larger mammals may be better models for studying muscles related to the human rotator cuff. PMID:24072803

  19. The Biomechanical and Histologic Effects of Platelet-Rich Plasma on Rat Rotator Cuff Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Jennifer; Evans, Douglas; Tonino, Pietro M.; Yong, Sherri; Callaci, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff tears are common injuries that are often treated with surgical repair. Because of the high concentration of growth factors within platelets, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has the potential to enhance healing in rotator cuff repairs. Hypothesis Platelet-rich plasma would alter the biomechanical and histologic properties of rotator cuff repair during an acute injury response. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Platelet-rich plasma was produced from inbred donor rats. A tendon-from-bone supraspinatus tear was created surgically and an immediate transosseous repair performed. The control group underwent repair only. The PRP group underwent a repair with PRP augmentation. Rats in each group were sacrificed at 7, 14, and 21 days. The surgically repaired tendons underwent biomechanical testing, including failure load, stiffness, failure strain, and stress relaxation characteristics. Histological analysis evaluated the cellular characteristics of the repair tissue. Results At 7- and 21-day periods, augmentation with PRP showed statistically significant effects on the biomechanical properties of the repaired rat supraspinatus tear, but failure load was not increased at the 7-, 14-, or 21-day periods (P = .688, .209, and .477, respectively). The control group had significantly higher stiffness at 21 days (P = .006). The control group had higher failure strain at 7 days (P = .02), whereas the PRP group had higher failure strain at 21 days (P = .008). Histologically, the PRP group showed increased fibroblastic response and vascular proliferation at each time point. At 21 days, the collagen fibers in the PRP group were oriented in a more linear fashion toward the tendon footprint. Conclusion In this controlled, rat model study, PRP altered the tissue properties of the supraspinatus tendon without affecting the construct’s failure load. Clinical Relevance The decreased tendon tissue stiffness acutely and failure to enhance tendon-to-bone healing of repairs should be considered before augmenting rotator cuff repairs with PRP. Further studies will be necessary to determine the role of PRP in clinical practice. PMID:22822177

  20. Long Head of the Biceps Pathology Combined with Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Ditsios, Konstantinos; Agathangelidis, Filon; Boutsiadis, Achilleas; Karataglis, Dimitrios; Papadopoulos, Pericles

    2012-01-01

    The long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) is an anatomic structure commonly involved in painful shoulder conditions as a result of trauma, degeneration, or overuse. Recent studies have pointed out the close correlation between LHBT lesions and rotator cuff (RCT) tears. Clinicians need to take into account the importance of the LHBT in the presence of other shoulder pathologies. This paper provides an up-to-date overview of recent publications on anatomy, pathophysiology, diagnosis, classification, and current treatment strategies. PMID:23209915

  1. Intraosseous foreign body granuloma in rotator cuff repair with bioabsorbable suture anchor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Nusselt; S. Freche; H.-M. Klinger; M. H. Baums

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradable implants lead to problems such as cyst formation, soft-tissue inflammation, loose implant fragments or local\\u000a osteolysis. This report represents the first published case of an intraosseous foreign body granuloma in the humeral head\\u000a after arthroscopic rotator cuff tear fixation with a poly-l-lactide (PLLA) suture anchor. A 48-year-old female patient presented with pain in her right shoulder. A refixation of

  2. Comparison of rotator cuff muscle architecture between humans and other selected vertebrate species.

    PubMed

    Mathewson, Margie A; Kwan, Alan; Eng, Carolyn M; Lieber, Richard L; Ward, Samuel R

    2014-01-15

    In this study, we compare rotator cuff muscle architecture of typically used animal models with that of humans and quantify the scaling relationships of these muscles across mammals. The four muscles that correspond to the human rotator cuff - supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis and teres minor - of 10 commonly studied animals were excised and subjected to a series of comparative measurements. When body mass among animals was regressed against physiological cross-sectional area, muscle mass and normalized fiber length, the confidence intervals suggested geometric scaling but did not exclude other scaling relationships. Based on the architectural difference index (ADI), a combined measure of fiber length-to-moment arm ratio, fiber length-to-muscle length ratio and the fraction of the total rotator cuff physiological cross-sectional area contributed by each muscle, chimpanzees were found to be the most similar to humans (ADI=2.15), followed closely by capuchins (ADI=2.16). Interestingly, of the eight non-primates studied, smaller mammals such as mice, rats and dogs were more similar to humans in architectural parameters compared with larger mammals such as sheep, pigs or cows. The force production versus velocity trade-off (indicated by fiber length-to-moment arm ratio) and the excursion ability (indicated by fiber length-to-muscle length ratio) of humans were also most similar to those of primates, followed by the small mammals. Overall, primates provide the best architectural representation of human muscle architecture. However, based on the muscle architectural parameters of non-primates, smaller rather than larger mammals may be better models for studying muscles related to the human rotator cuff. PMID:24072803

  3. A Canine Non-Weight-Bearing Model with Radial Neurectomy for Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiaoxi; Bao, Nirong; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.; Steinmann, Scott P.; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2015-01-01

    Background The major concern of using a large animal model to study rotator cuff repair is the high rate of repair retears. The purpose of this study was to test a non-weight-bearing (NWB) canine model for rotator cuff repair research. Methods First, in the in vitro study, 18 shoulders were randomized to 3 groups. 1) Full-width transections repaired with modified Mason-Allen sutures using 3-0 polyglactin suture, 2) Group 1 repaired using number 2 (#2) polyester braid and long-chain polyethylene suture, and 3) Partial-width transections leaving the superior 2 mm infraspinatus tendon intact without repair. In the in vivo study of 6 dogs, the infraspinatus tendon was partially transected as the same as the in vitro group 3. A radial neurectomy was performed to prevent weight bearing. The operated limb was slung in a custom-made jacket for 6 weeks. Results In the in vitro study, mean ultimate tensile load and stiffness in Group 2 were significantly higher than Group 1 and 3 (p<0.05). In the in vivo study, gross inspection and histology showed that the preserved superior 2-mm portion of the infraspinatus tendon remained intact with normal structure. Conclusions Based on the biomechanical and histological findings, this canine NWB model may be an appropriate and useful model for studies of rotator cuff repair. PMID:26107616

  4. Arthroscopic Lamina-Specific Double-Row Fixation for Large Delaminated Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Daisuke; Funakoshi, Noboru; Yamashita, Fumiharu

    2014-01-01

    Delamination is a commonly observed finding at the time of rotator cuff repair, but few studies have described the surgical techniques used for delaminated rotator cuff tears (RCTs) or their clinical outcomes. We developed a technique using a combination of a double row and an additional row, which we call lamina-specific double-row fixation, for large delaminated RCTs. The lamina-specific double-row technique is performed using an additional row (lamina-specific lateral row) of suture anchors placed between the typical medial and lateral rows of suture anchors. The technique is performed as follows: (1) medial-row sutures are passed through the inferior (articular-side) and superior (bursal-side) layers in a mattress fashion; (2) lamina-specific lateral-row simple sutures are passed through the inferior layer; and (3) lateral-row simple sutures are passed through the superior layer. We believe that this technique offers the following advantages: (1) creation of a larger area of contact between the inferior layer and the footprint, (2) higher initial fixation strength of the articular-side components of the repaired rotator cuff tendon, and (3) an adaptation between the superficial and inferior layers. This technique represents an alternative option in the operative treatment of large delaminated RCTs. PMID:25685671

  5. Diagnostic Performance and Reliability of Ultrasonography for Fatty Degeneration of the Rotator Cuff Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Lindley B.; Teefey, Sharlene A.; Middleton, William D.; Dahiya, Nirvikar; Steger-May, Karen; Kim, H. Mike; Wessell, Daniel; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diagnostic evaluation of rotator cuff muscle quality is important to determine indications for potential operative repair. Ultrasonography has developed into an accepted and useful tool for evaluating rotator cuff tendon tears; however, its use for evaluating rotator muscle quality has not been well established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic performance and observer reliability of ultrasonography in grading fatty degeneration of the posterior and superior rotator cuff muscles. Methods: The supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and teres minor muscles were prospectively evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography in eighty patients with shoulder pain. The degree of fatty degeneration on MRI was graded by four independent raters on the basis of the modified Goutallier grading system. Ultrasonographic evaluation of fatty degeneration was performed by one of three radiologists with use of a three-point scale. The two scoring systems were compared to determine the diagnostic performance of ultrasonography. The interobserver and intraobserver reliability of MRI grading by the four raters were determined. The interobserver reliability of ultrasonography among the three radiologists was determined in a separate group of thirty study subjects. The weighted Cohen kappa, percentage agreement, sensitivity, and specificity were calculated. Results: The accuracy of ultrasonography for the detection of fatty degeneration, as assessed on the basis of the percentage agreement with MRI, was 92.5% for the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles and 87.5% for the teres minor. The sensitivity was 84.6% for the supraspinatus, 95.6% for the infraspinatus, and 87.5% for the teres minor. The specificity was 96.3% for the supraspinatus, 91.2% for the infraspinatus, and 87.5% for the teres minor. The agreement between MRI and ultrasonography was substantial for the supraspinatus and infraspinatus (kappa = 0.78 and 0.71, respectively) and moderate for the teres minor (kappa = 0.47). The interobserver reliability for MRI was substantial for the supraspinatus and infraspinatus (kappa = 0.76 and 0.77, respectively) and moderate for the teres minor (kappa = 0.59). For ultrasonography, the interobserver reliability was substantial for all three muscles (kappa = 0.71 for the supraspinatus, 0.65 for the infraspinatus, and 0.72 for the teres minor). Conclusions: The diagnostic performance of ultrasonography in identifying and grading fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff muscles was comparable with that of MRI. Ultrasonography can be used as the primary diagnostic imaging modality for fatty changes in rotator cuff muscles. Level of Evidence: Diagnostic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:22717835

  6. Mini-Open Suture Bridge Repair with Porcine Dermal Patch Augmentation for Massive Rotator Cuff Tear: Surgical Technique and Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Moon; Lee, Young-Kuk; Shin, Hong-Kwan

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to describe the mini-open suture bridge technique with porcine dermal patch augmentation for massive rotator cuff tear and to assess preliminary clinical and radiological results. Methods Five patients with massive rotator cuff tear for which it was not possible to restore the anatomical footprint underwent mini-open suture bridge repair using a porcine dermal patch. The patients' average age was 53.4 years (range, 45 to 57 years), and the average duration of follow-up was 20.6 months (range, 14 to 26 months). Patients were evaluated with preoperative and postoperative outcome measures, including a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) score, and the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score. The structural integrity of repaired rotator cuffs was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging 6 months postoperatively. Results The average VAS pain score, UCLA score, and ASES score improved from 6.8, 15.4, and 39.4 preoperatively to 0.8, 31.2, and 86.4 postoperatively (p = 0.041, 0.042, and 0.043, respectively). Magnetic resonance images obtained at an average of 8 months after surgery showed that four patients had intact repair integrity with graft incorporation. One patient had a re-tear with partial healing but still had a satisfactory clinical outcome. There was no intraoperative or postoperative complication in any patient. Conclusions Mini-open suture bridge repair with porcine dermal patch augmentation can be an option in young patients with high physical demands and massive rotator cuff tears for which it is not possible to restore the anatomical footprint. PMID:25177460

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Rotator Cuff Tears in Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Freygant, Magdalena; Dziurzy?ska-Bia?ek, Ewa; Guz, Wies?aw; Samojedny, Antoni; Go?ofit, Andrzej; Kostkiewicz, Agnieszka; Terpin, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Shoulder joint is a common site of musculoskeletal pain caused, among other things, by rotator cuff tears due to narrowing of subacromial space, acute trauma or chronic shoulder overload. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent modality for imaging of soft tissues of the shoulder joint considering a possibility of multiplanar image acquisition and non-invasive nature of the study. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of partial and complete rotator cuff tears in magnetic resonance images of patients with shoulder impingement syndrome and to review the literature on the causes and classification of rotator cuff tears. Material/Methods We retrospectively analyzed the results of 137 shoulder MRI examinations performed in 57 women and 72 men in Magnetic Resonance facility of the Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging at the St. Jadwiga the Queen Regional Hospital No. 2 in Rzeszow between June 2010 and February 2013. Examinations were performed using Philips Achieva 1.5T device, including spin echo and gradient echo sequences with T1-, T2- and PD-weighted as well as fat saturation sequences in transverse, frontal and sagittal oblique planes. Patients were referred from hospital wards as well as from outpatient clinics of the subcarpathian province. Results The most frequently reported injuries included partial supraspinatus tendon tear and complete tearing most commonly involved the supraspinatus muscle tendon. The smallest group comprised patients with complete tear of subscapularis muscle tendon. Among 137 patients in the study population, 129 patients suffered from shoulder pain, including 57 patients who reported a history of trauma. There was 44% women and 56% men in a group of patients with shoulder pain. Posttraumatic shoulder pain was predominantly reported by men, while women comprised a larger group of patients with shoulder pain not preceded by injury. Conclusions Rotator cuff injury is a very common pathology in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. Isolated supraspinatus tendon injury or complete tearing is most frequent, rather than in conjunction with injuries to other rotator cuff tendons. We did not observe isolated complete tears of infraspinatus and subscapular muscle tendons. PMID:25374626

  8. Botulinum toxin is detrimental to repair of a chronic rotator cuff tear in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Gilotra, Mohit; Nguyen, Thao; Christian, Matthew; Davis, Derik; Henn, R Frank; Hasan, Syed Ashfaq

    2015-08-01

    Re-tear continues to be a problem after rotator cuff repair. Intramuscular botulinum toxin (Botox) injection can help optimize tension at the repair site to promote healing but could have an adverse effect on the degenerated muscle in a chronic tear. We hypothesized that Botox injection would improve repair characteristics without adverse effect on the muscle in a chronic rotator cuff tear model. The supraspinatus tendon of both shoulders in 14 rabbits underwent delayed repair 12 weeks after transection. One shoulder was treated with intramuscular Botox injection and the other with a saline control injection. Six weeks after repair, outcomes were based on biomechanics, histology, and magnetic resonance imaging. Botox-treated repairs were significantly weaker (2.64?N) than control repairs (5.51?N, p?=?0.03). Eighty percent of Botox-treated repairs and 40% of control repairs healed with some partial defect. Fatty infiltration of the supraspinatus was present in all shoulders (Goutallier Grade 3 or 4) but was increased in the setting of Botox. This study provides additional support for the rabbit supraspinatus model of chronic cuff tear, showing consistent fatty infiltration. Contrary to our hypothesis, Botox had a negative effect on repair strength and might increase fatty infiltration. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 33:1152-1157, 2015. PMID:25626677

  9. Biological augmentation of rotator cuff repair using bFGF-loaded electrospun poly(lactide-co-glycolide) fibrous membranes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Song; Zhao, Jingwen; Dong, Shikui; Huangfu, Xiaoqiao; Li, Bin; Yang, Huilin; Zhao, Jinzhong; Cui, Wenguo

    2014-01-01

    Clinically, rotator cuff tear (RCT) is among the most common shoulder pathologies. Despite significant advances in surgical techniques, the re-tear rate after rotator cuff (RC) repair remains high. Insufficient healing capacity is likely the main factor for reconstruction failure. This study reports on a basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-loaded electrospun poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) fibrous membrane for repairing RCT. Implantable biodegradable bFGF–PLGA fibrous membranes were successfully fabricated using emulsion electrospinning technology and then characterized and evaluated with in vitro and in vivo cell proliferation assays and repairs of rat chronic RCTs. Emulsion electrospinning fabricated ultrafine fibers with a core-sheath structure which secured the bioactivity of bFGF in a sustained manner for 3 weeks. Histological observations showed that electrospun fibrous membranes have excellent biocompatibility and biodegradability. At 2, 4, and 8 weeks after in vivo RCT repair surgery, electrospun fibrous membranes significantly increased the area of glycosaminoglycan staining at the tendon–bone interface compared with the control group, and bFGF–PLGA significantly improved collagen organization, as measured by birefringence under polarized light at the healing enthesis compared with the control and PLGA groups. Biomechanical testing showed that the electrospun fibrous membrane groups had a greater ultimate load-to-failure and stiffness than the control group at 4 and 8 weeks. The bFGF–PLGA membranes had the highest ultimate load-to-failure, stiffness, and stress of the healing enthesis, and their superiority compared to PLGA alone was significant. These results demonstrated that electrospun fibrous membranes aid in cell attachment and proliferation, as well as accelerating tendon–bone remodeling, and bFGF-loaded PLGA fibrous membranes have a more pronounced effect on tendon–bone healing. Therefore, augmentation using bFGF–PLGA electrospun fibrous membranes is a promising treatment for RCT. PMID:24868155

  10. Rotator cuff healing after continuous subacromial bupivacaine infusion: an in vivo rabbit study

    PubMed Central

    FRIEL, NICOLE A.; WANG, VINCENT M.; SLABAUGH, MARK A.; WANG, FANCHIA; CHUBINSKAYA, SUSAN; COLE, BRIAN J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of continuous subacromial bupivacaine infusion on supraspinatus muscle and rotator cuff tendon healing via gross, biomechanical, and histologic analyses. Methods Thirty-three New Zealand White rabbits underwent unilateral supraspinatus transection and rotator cuff repair (RCR). Rabbits were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: (1)RCR only, (2)RCR with continuous saline infusion for 48 hours, or (3)RCR with continuous 0.25% bupivacaine with epinephrine (1:200,000) infusion for 48 hours. Rabbits were sacrificed at either 2 (for histologic assessment) or 8 weeks post-operatively (for biomechanical and histologic assessment). Results Tensile testing showed significantly higher load to failure in intact tendons compared to repaired tendons (p<0.01); however, no statistical differences were detected among RCR only, RCR Saline, and RCR Bupivacaine groups. Histologically, the enthesis of repaired tendons showed increased cellularity and disorganized collagen fibers compared to intact tendons, with no differences between treatment groups. Muscle histology demonstrated scattered degenerative muscle fibers at 2 weeks in both RCR Saline and RCR Bupivacaine, but no degeneration was noted at 8 weeks. Conclusions The healing supraspinatus tendons exposed to bupivacaine infusion showed similar histologic and biomechanical characteristics compared to untreated and saline infused RCR groups. Muscle histology showed fiber damage at 2 weeks for both the saline and bupivacaine treated groups, with no apparent disruption at 8 weeks, suggesting a recovery process. Therefore, subacromial bupivacaine infusion in this rabbit rotator cuff model does not appear to impair muscle or tendon following acute injury and repair. Level Of Evidence Basic science study PMID:22818894

  11. Decreased loading following rotator cuff tears leads to improved biceps tendon properties in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Peltz, Cathryn D.; Hsu, Jason E.; Zgonis, Miltiadis H.; Trasolini, Nicholas A.; Glaser, David L.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of biceps tendon changes following rotator cuff tears. We hypothesized that increased loading on the biceps tendon following rotator cuff tears will result in further detrimental changes while decreased loading will result in increased organization and more normal tendon composition. Additionally, we hypothesized that changes with altered loading will begin at the proximal insertion into bone and progress along the tendon length at later time points. Materials and methods Supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendon detachments in rats were followed by various loading protocols at various time points. Regional changes in cellularity, cell shape, collagen organization, and matrix proteins of the long head of the biceps tendon were determined by histologic measures and immunohistochemistry. Results Increased loading following detachments resulted in more disorganized collagen after only 1 week and compositional changes by 4 weeks. By 8 weeks, decreased loading resulted in increased organization, decreased cellularity, more elongated cell shape and more normal tendon composition. Organizational changes with increased loading began in the intra-articular space and progressed along the tendon length with time. Conclusions Combined with previous findings of decreased mechanics with increased loading, these results indicate increased compressive loading away from the proximal insertion into bone as a mechanism for biceps tendon pathology in the presence of rotator cuff tears. The striking improvements with decreased loading further support increased loading as a mechanism for biceps tendon pathology as removal of this load led to improvements in tendon histology, organization and composition. Level of evidence Basic Science Study PMID:21393021

  12. The conceptually equivalent Dutch version of the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC)©

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The WORC is a quality of life questionnaire designed for patients with disorders of the rotator cuff, originally developed in English. The purpose of this study was to cross-culturally adapt the WORC for use in the Dutch population and to evaluate reliability, agreement and floor and ceiling effects of this Dutch version in a population of patients with rotator cuff disease. Methods Reliability was tested by measuring the Cronbach’s alpha for internal consistency and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for test-retest reliability. Agreement was measured using the Standard Error of Measurement (SEMagreement); and the smallest detectable change (SDC) was calculated based on the SEM. Pearson Correlations Coefficients were used to comparing the WORC with the RAND-36, the Constant Score and 11-point shoulder hindrance scale. Results Fifty-seven patients entered into this study of whom 50 were available for test-retest validation. The internal consistency of the Dutch WORC tested by Cronbach’s alpha was 0.95 for the total questionnaire. The ICC for the WORC is 0.91 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.85-0.95. Standard Error of Measurement was 6.0 points with a Smallest Detectable Change of 16.7 points on a 0-100 scale. Pearson Correlations Coefficients showed a significant positive correlation between the Dutch WORC and Constant Score (r?=?0.60) and a strong reversed correlation with the shoulder hindrance scale (r?=?-0.75). Conclusion The Dutch WORC seems to be a reliable health-related quality of life questionnaire for patients with rotator cuff disorders. Trial registration NCT01532492. PMID:24359231

  13. Double-needle ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment of rotator cuff calcific tendinitis: tips & tricks.

    PubMed

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Viganò, Sara; Martini, Chiara; Aliprandi, Alberto; Randelli, Pietro; Serafini, Giovanni; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Rotator cuff calcific tendinitis is a very common disease and may result in a very painful shoulder. Aetiology of this disease is still poorly understood. When symptoms are mild, this disease may be treated conservatively. Several treatment options have been proposed. Among them, ultrasound-guided procedures have been recently described. All procedures use one or two needles to inject a fluid, to dissolve calcium and to aspirate it. In the present article, we review some tips and tricks that may be useful to improve performance of an ultrasound-guided double-needle procedure. PMID:22710923

  14. Septic bursitis after ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment of rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Randelli, Filippo; Sdao, Silvana; Sardanelli, Francesco; Randelli, Pietro

    2014-08-01

    Calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff is a common condition. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous aspiration is one of several options to treat this condition. The main advantages of this procedure are short duration, good outcome, and low cost. Furthermore, only minor complications have been reported in the literature, namely, vagal reactions during the procedure and mild postprocedural pain. We report the first case of septic bursitis after ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment of calcific tendinopathy. Although this is generally considered a very safe procedure, a risk of infection should be taken into account. PMID:24486157

  15. Rotator Cuff Fatigue and Glenohumeral Kinematics in Participants Without Shoulder Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Teyhen, Deydre S; Miller, Joseph M; Middag, Tansy R; Kane, Edward J

    2008-01-01

    Context: Researchers have established that superior migration of the humeral head increases after fatigue of the rotator cuff muscles. In these studies, the investigators used imaging techniques to assess migration of the humeral head during statically held shoulder positions. Their results may not represent the amount of superior humeral head migration that occurs during dynamic arm elevation. Objective: To investigate the effect of rotator cuff fatigue on humeral head migration during dynamic concentric arm elevation (arm at the side [approximately 0°] to 135°) in healthy individuals and to determine the test-retest reliability of digital fluoroscopic video for assessing glenohumeral migration. Design: Test-retest cohort study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty men (age ?=? 27.7 ± 3.6 years, mass ?=? 81.5 ± 11.8 kg) without shoulder disorders participated in this study. Intervention(s): Three digital fluoroscopic videos (2 prefatigue and 1 postfatigue) of arm elevation were collected at 30 Hz. The 2 prefatigue arm elevation trials were used to assess test-retest reliability with the arm at the side and at 45°, 90°, and 135° of elevation. The prefatigue and postfatigue digital fluoroscopic videos were used to assess the effects of rotator cuff fatigue on glenohumeral migration. All measurements were taken in the right shoulder. Main Outcome Measure(s): The dependent measure was glenohumeral migration (in millimeters). We calculated the intraclass correlation coefficient and standard error of the measurement to assess the test-retest reliability. A 2 × 4 repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to assess the effects of fatigue on arm elevation at the 4 shoulder positions. Results: The test-retest reliability ranged from good to excellent (.77 to .92). Superior migration of the humeral head increased postfatigue (P < .001), regardless of angle. Conclusions: Digital fluoroscopic video assessment of shoulder kinematics provides a reliable tool for studying kinematics during arm elevation. Furthermore, superior migration of the humeral head during arm elevation increases with rotator cuff fatigue in individuals without shoulder dysfunction. PMID:18668167

  16. All-Suture Transosseous Repair for Rotator Cuff Tear Fixation Using Medial Calcar Fixation.

    PubMed

    Aramberri-Gutiérrez, Mikel; Martínez-Menduiña, Amaia; Valencia-Mora, María; Boyle, Simon

    2015-04-01

    We describe an all-suture transosseous repair technique used in the management of rotator cuff tears by means of an all-suture anchor secured on the intra-articular side of the humeral calcar. The technique uses an anterior cruciate ligament guide to ensure accurate positioning of the tunnels, avoiding the articular cartilage and minimizing risk to the neurovascular structures. The distal end of the guide is inserted through a rotator interval portal and passed down to the axillary pouch. The proximal end of the guide is approximated to the greater tuberosity at the cuff footprint, and a complete transosseous tunnel is created with a 2.4-mm drill. An all-suture implant is inserted through this tunnel down to the calcar, and its deployment is visualized under arthroscopy. Gentle traction is applied to the anchor, resulting in a 4-mm concertina of the suture anchor that rests opposed to the medial cortex. The major advantage of this technique is the fixation strength gained from the biomechanically superior cortical bone of the calcar. Furthermore, this method permits greater preservation of bone surface area at the level of the footprint for a larger tendon-to-bone healing surface. This technique also provides an excellent alternative in revision situations. PMID:26052495

  17. All-Suture Transosseous Repair for Rotator Cuff Tear Fixation Using Medial Calcar Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Aramberri-Gutiérrez, Mikel; Martínez-Menduiña, Amaia; Valencia-Mora, María; Boyle, Simon

    2015-01-01

    We describe an all-suture transosseous repair technique used in the management of rotator cuff tears by means of an all-suture anchor secured on the intra-articular side of the humeral calcar. The technique uses an anterior cruciate ligament guide to ensure accurate positioning of the tunnels, avoiding the articular cartilage and minimizing risk to the neurovascular structures. The distal end of the guide is inserted through a rotator interval portal and passed down to the axillary pouch. The proximal end of the guide is approximated to the greater tuberosity at the cuff footprint, and a complete transosseous tunnel is created with a 2.4-mm drill. An all-suture implant is inserted through this tunnel down to the calcar, and its deployment is visualized under arthroscopy. Gentle traction is applied to the anchor, resulting in a 4-mm concertina of the suture anchor that rests opposed to the medial cortex. The major advantage of this technique is the fixation strength gained from the biomechanically superior cortical bone of the calcar. Furthermore, this method permits greater preservation of bone surface area at the level of the footprint for a larger tendon-to-bone healing surface. This technique also provides an excellent alternative in revision situations. PMID:26052495

  18. Stem cell therapy in the management of shoulder rotator cuff disorders.

    PubMed

    Mora, Maria Valencia; Ibán, Miguel A Ruiz; Heredia, Jorge Díaz; Laakso, Raul Barco; Cuéllar, Ricardo; Arranz, Mariano García

    2015-05-26

    Rotator cuff tears are frequent shoulder problems that are usually dealt with surgical repair. Despite improved surgical techniques, the tendon-to-bone healing rate is unsatisfactory due to difficulties in restoring the delicate transitional tissue between bone and tendon. It is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms that determine this failure. The study of the molecular environment during embryogenesis and during normal healing after injury is key in devising strategies to get a successful repair. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) can differentiate into different mesodermal tissues and have a strong paracrine, anti-inflammatory, immunoregulatory and angiogenic potential. Stem cell therapy is thus a potentially effective therapy to enhance rotator cuff healing. Promising results have been reported with the use of autologous MSC of different origins in animal studies: they have shown to have better healing properties, increasing the amount of fibrocartilage formation and improving the orientation of fibrocartilage fibers with less immunologic response and reduced lymphocyte infiltration. All these changes lead to an increase in biomechanical strength. However, animal research is still inconclusive and more experimental studies are needed before human application. Future directions include expanded stem cell therapy in combination with growth factors or different scaffolds as well as new stem cell types and gene therapy. PMID:26029341

  19. Greater Tuberosity Osteotomy and Teres Minor Transfer for Irreparable Superior Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Brian R; Bries, Andrew D; Nepola, James V

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mid- to long- term objective, subjective and radiographic results of patients who underwent anterior-superior transfer of remaining infraspinatus tendon and teres minor tendon for irreparable superior rotator cuff tears. thirteen patients were identified who underwent infraspinatus tendon transfer to a more superior position on the humeral head between January 1, 1990 and december 31, 2001. nine shoulders in eight patients were available for clinical examination, radiographs and questionnaire follow-up at an average of 83.5 ± 31.4 months. radiographic examination revealed 1 fibrous union and 6 united tuberosity osteotomies. Samilson-Prieto grading of radiographs revealed 4 shoulders with mild, and 4 shoulders with moderate, OA. Seven of the patients were satisfied with their shoulder. there were two poor outcomes. Local antero-superior teres minor and residual infraspinatus transfer provides a viable option for irreparable rotator cuff defects. Mid- to long-term satisfactory outcome was achieved in 7 out of 9 shoulders. PMID:17907433

  20. Antioxidant's cytoprotective effects on rotator cuff tenofibroblasts exposed to aminoamide local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ra Jeong; Hah, Young-Sool; Kang, Jae-Ran; Park, Hyung Bin

    2015-07-01

    Local anesthetics (LA) are among the drugs most frequently used for musculoskeletal problems, in procedures ranging from diagnosis to postoperative pain control. The cytotoxicity of LA is an emerging area of concern. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cyanidin, an antioxidant, exerts cytoprotective effects against tenofibroblast death induced by LA. Primary cultured human rotator cuff tenofibroblasts were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of these LA: Ropivacaine (0.075%), Bupivacaine (0.05%), and Lidocaine (0.2%). The effects of cyanidin (100??g/ml) on the cytotoxicity induced by these LA were investigated. Cell viability, ROS production, caspase-3/7 activity, and expressions of phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), phospho-p38, phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and cleaved PARP-1 were evaluated. Exposure to LA significantly induced cell death (p?rotator cuff tenofibroblasts. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 33:1001-1007, 2015. PMID:25639557

  1. Rotator Cuff Metastases: A Report of Two Cases with Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Soker, Gokhan; Soker, Eda; Gulek, Bozkurt; Acikalin, Arbil; Asut, Elife; Kaya, Omer; Dilek, Okan; Yilmaz, Cengiz

    2014-01-01

    Context: Distant metastases of primary malignancies to the skeletal muscle tissue are a very rare event. Distant metastases that affect the rotator cuff are even rarer, and only a few of cases have been reported so far. Case Report: The present article reports two cases that presented to our hospital with the complaint of shoulder pain and had a soft tissue mass affecting the muscles of the rotator cuff and invading the neighboring bone compartments. One of the patients developed mucoepidermoid cancer metastasis of the submandibular gland, and the other was found to have a malignant epithelial tumor metastasized from the lower lobe of the right lung, whose primary origin could not be diagnosed until the imaging examinations were employed. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging findings are presented in this paper. Conclusion: Metastases to the muscle tissues could be misdiagnosed as primary sarcomas. Because the therapy regiments and prognoses are fairly different for these two entities, the possibility of a metastasis to the muscle tissue must be considered as a differential diagnosis for case of painful soft tissue mass. Ultrasound is very useful in detection of the lesion and acts as a very important tool during guidance for biopsy. Magnetic resonance imaging, however, is a very valuable asset in the evaluation of the borders of the soft tissue mass and its invasive effect on the bony tissues. Particularly when the features such as lobulated contours, peripheral edema, and intratumoral necrosis exist, the possibility of metastases must be considered. PMID:25599056

  2. Stem cell therapy in the management of shoulder rotator cuff disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Maria Valencia; Ibán, Miguel A Ruiz; Heredia, Jorge Díaz; Laakso, Raul Barco; Cuéllar, Ricardo; Arranz, Mariano García

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are frequent shoulder problems that are usually dealt with surgical repair. Despite improved surgical techniques, the tendon-to-bone healing rate is unsatisfactory due to difficulties in restoring the delicate transitional tissue between bone and tendon. It is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms that determine this failure. The study of the molecular environment during embryogenesis and during normal healing after injury is key in devising strategies to get a successful repair. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) can differentiate into different mesodermal tissues and have a strong paracrine, anti-inflammatory, immunoregulatory and angiogenic potential. Stem cell therapy is thus a potentially effective therapy to enhance rotator cuff healing. Promising results have been reported with the use of autologous MSC of different origins in animal studies: they have shown to have better healing properties, increasing the amount of fibrocartilage formation and improving the orientation of fibrocartilage fibers with less immunologic response and reduced lymphocyte infiltration. All these changes lead to an increase in biomechanical strength. However, animal research is still inconclusive and more experimental studies are needed before human application. Future directions include expanded stem cell therapy in combination with growth factors or different scaffolds as well as new stem cell types and gene therapy. PMID:26029341

  3. Expression of bioactive bone morphogenetic proteins in the subacromial bursa of patients with chronic degeneration of the rotator cuff

    PubMed Central

    Neuwirth, Jana; Fuhrmann, Renée AE; Veit, Amanda; Aurich, Matthias; Stonâns, Ilmars; Trommer, Tilo; Hortschansky, Peter; Chubinskaya, Susanna; Mollenhauer, Juergen A

    2006-01-01

    Degeneration of the rotator cuff is often associated with inflammation of the subacromial bursa and focal mineralization of the supraspinatus tendon. Portions of the supraspinatus tendon distant from the insertion site could transform into fibrous cartilage, causing rotator-cuff tears owing to mechanical instability. Indirect evidence is presented to link this pathology to ectopic production and secretion of bioactive bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) from sites within the subacromial bursa. Surgically removed specimens of subacromial bursa tissue from patients with chronic tears of the rotator cuff were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-PCR. Bioactive BMP was detected in bursa extracts by a bioassay based on induction of alkaline phosphatase in the osteogenic/myogenic cell line C2C12. Topical and differential expression of BMP-2/4 and BMP-7 mRNA and protein was found in bursa tissue. The bioassay of C2C12 cells revealed amounts of active BMP high enough to induce osteogenic cell types, and blocking BMP with specific antibodies or soluble BMP receptors Alk-3 and Alk-6 abolished the inductive properties of the extract. Sufficient information was gathered to explain how ectopic expression of BMP might induce tissue transformation into ectopic bone/cartilage and, therefore, promote structural degeneration of the rotator cuff. Early surgical removal of the subacromial bursa might present an option to interrupt disease progression. PMID:16719933

  4. Rotator Cuff Repair in Upper Extremity Ambulators! Andrew Zganjar, 1Steven Grindel MD, 1Dara Mickschl PA-C!

    E-print Network

    , canes, walkers and wheelchairs place upper extremity ambulators at increased risk of re-injury due or female patients with shoulder impingement or rotator cuff tear who rely on AWDs for mobility. 2, preoperative and postoperative clinical shoulder measurements and operative findings. Clinical Shoulder

  5. Infusion Methods for Continuous Interscalene Brachial Plexus Block for Postoperative Pain Control after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Gyeong Jo; Yoon, Ji Uk; Kim, Eun Jung; Baek, Seung Hoon; Ri, Hyun Su

    2015-01-01

    Background Infusion methods during regional analgesia using perineural catheters may influence the quality of postoperative analgesia. This study was conducted to compare the effects of combined or bolus-only infusion of 0.2% ropivacaine on the postoperative analgesia in interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB) with perineural catheterization. Methods Patients scheduled for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were divided into two groups, one that would receive a combined infusion (group C, n = 32), and one that would receive intermittent infusion (group I, n = 32). A perineural catheter was inserted into the interscalene brachial plexus (ISBP) using ultrasound (US) and nerve stimulation, and 10 ml of 0.2% ropivacaine was administered. After the operation, group C received a continuous infusion of 4 ml/h, and a 4 ml bolus with a lockout interval of 60 min. Group I received only a 4 ml bolus, and the lockout interval was 30 min. Postoperative pain by the numeric rating scale (NRS) and the forearm muscle tone by the manual muscle test (MMT) were checked and evaluated at the following timepoints: preoperative, and postoperative 1, 4, 12, 24, 36, and 48 h. Supplemental opioid requirements, total consumed dose of local anesthetic, and adverse effects were compared between the two groups. Results Sixty-four patients completed the study and the postoperative values such as operation time, time to discharge, and operation site were comparable. There were no differences in NRS scores and supplemental opioid requirements between the two groups. The MMT scores of group I at 4 and 12 h after surgery were significantly higher than those of group C (P < 0.05). The total consumed dose of local anesthetic was significantly lower in group I than in group C (P < 0.05). The adverse effects were not different between the groups. Conclusions The bolus-only administration of 0.2% ropivacaine provided a similar analgesic effect with a lower total volume of local anesthetic and decreased motor weakness compared to combined infusion. Therefore, bolus-only administration is an effective postoperative analgesic method in ISBPB with perineural catheterization after rotator cuff repair.

  6. Extracting Information about the Rotator Cuff from Magnetic Resonance Images Using Deterministic and Random Techniques

    PubMed Central

    De Los Ríos, F. A.; Paluszny, M.

    2015-01-01

    We consider some methods to extract information about the rotator cuff based on magnetic resonance images; the study aims to define an alternative method of display that might facilitate the detection of partial tears in the supraspinatus tendon. Specifically, we are going to use families of ellipsoidal triangular patches to cover the humerus head near the affected area. These patches are going to be textured and displayed with the information of the magnetic resonance images using the trilinear interpolation technique. For the generation of points to texture each patch, we propose a new method that guarantees the uniform distribution of its points using a random statistical method. Its computational cost, defined as the average computing time to generate a fixed number of points, is significantly lower as compared with deterministic and other standard statistical techniques. PMID:25650281

  7. Medium term results of reverse total shoulder replacement in patients with rotator cuff arthropathy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. K. Sayana; G. Kakarala; S. Bandi; C. Wynn-Jones

    2009-01-01

    Background  The Delta III total shoulder replacement is a reversed, semi-constrained prosthesis and is recommended for the management\\u000a of rotator cuff arthropathy.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  We performed a retrospective mid-term review of the Delta shoulder replacements performed during 2000–2005 with a minimum\\u000a 18-month follow-up. We recorded the pre-operative and post-operative constant scores.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  The Constant’s score improved from a pre-operative mean of 14.8 (95% CI

  8. Effective ways of restoring muscular imbalances of the rotator cuff muscle group: a comparative study of various training methods

    PubMed Central

    Malliou, P; Giannakopoulos, K; Beneka, A; Gioftsidou, A; Godolias, G

    2004-01-01

    Background: Many studies have compared different training methods for improving muscular performance, but more investigations need to be directed to the restoration of muscular imbalances. Objective: To determine the most effective training for altering strength ratios in the shoulder rotator cuff. Methods: Forty eight physical education students were randomly assigned to four groups (12 per group): (a) experimental group who carried out multijoint dynamic resistance training for shoulder internal and external rotation movement (pull ups or lat pull downs, overhead press, reverse pull ups, push ups) (MJDR group); (b) experimental group who exercised the same muscle group using dumbbells weighing 2 kg (isolated group); (c) experimental group who followed an isokinetic strengthening programme for the rotator cuff muscle group (isokinetic group); (d) control group who had no strength training. Testing was performed in the supine position with the glenohumeral joint in 90° of abduction in the coronal plane, with a range of motion of 0–90° of external rotation and 0–65° of internal rotation at angular velocities of 60, 120, and 180°/s. The test procedure was performed before and after the exercise period of six weeks. Results: One way analysis of variance found no differences between the groups for the initial tests. Analysis of variance with repeated measures showed that the strength ratios in all the experimental groups had altered after the exercise period, with the isokinetic group showing the most significant improvement. Conclusions: Isokinetic strengthening is the most effective method of altering strength ratios of the rotator cuff muscle. PMID:15562178

  9. Maintaining endotracheal tube cuff pressure at 20 mm Hg to prevent dysphagia after anterior cervical spine surgery; protocol of a double-blind randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In anterior cervical spine surgery a retractor is obligatory to approach the spine. Previous studies showed an increase of endotracheal tube cuff pressure after placement of a retractor. It is known that high endotracheal tube cuff pressure increases the incidence of postoperative dysphagia, hoarseness, and sore throat. However, until now no evidence supports the fact whether adjusting the endotracheal tube cuff pressure during anterior cervical spine surgery will prevent this comorbidity. We present the design of a randomized controlled trial to determine whether adjusting endotracheal tube cuff pressure after placement of a retractor during anterior cervical spine surgery will prevent postoperative dysphagia. Methods/design 177 patients (aged 18–90 years) scheduled for anterior cervical spine surgery on 1 or more levels will be included. After intubation, endotracheal tube cuff pressure is manually inflated to 20 mm Hg in all patients. Patients will be randomized into two groups. In the control group endotracheal tube cuff pressure is not adjusted after retractor placement. In the intervention group endotracheal tube cuff pressure after retractor placement is maintained at 20 mm Hg and air is withdrawn when cuff pressure exceeds 20 mm Hg. Endotracheal tube cuff pressure is measured after intubation, before and after placement and removal of the retractor. Again air is inflated if cuff pressure sets below 20 mmHg after removal of the retractor. The primary outcome measure is postoperative dysphagia. Other outcome measures are postoperative hoarseness, postoperative sore throat, degree of dysphagia, length of hospital stay, and pneumonia. The study is a single centre double blind randomized trial in which patients and research nurses will be kept blinded for the allocated treatment during the follow-up period of 2 months. Discussion Postoperative dysphagia occurs frequently after anterior cervical spine surgery. This may be related to high endotracheal tube cuff pressure. Whether adaptation and maintaining the pressure after placement of the retractor will decrease the incidence of dysphagia, has to be determined by this trial. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR) 3542: http://www.trialregister.nl. PMID:24067111

  10. ProSeal™ laryngeal mask airway cuff pressure changes with and without use of nitrous oxide during laparoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Bimla; Gupta, Rajat; Sehgal, Raminder; Koul, Archna; Sood, Jayashree

    2013-01-01

    Background: The ProSeal™ laryngeal mask (PLMA) is increasingly being used as an airway device for laparoscopic surgery. Its silicone cuff allows diffusion of nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide and other gases with resultant rise in its intracuff pressure during anesthesia. The present study was designed to investigate the intracuff pressure changes during anesthesia with and without nitrous oxide in patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery lasting up to two hours. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 2 and 3, undergoing general anesthesia with muscle paralysis, were randomized into two groups of 50 patients each to receive an anesthetic gas mixture containing either oxygen and nitrous oxide (group N) or oxygen and air (group A). Following insertion of an appropriate size PLMA, its cuff was inflated with air to an intracuff pressure of 45 mm Hg. The cuff pressure was measured every 10 minutes for the entire course of anesthesia. The position of the device was also assessed fiberoptically and postoperative airway complications were recorded. Results: The maximum intracuff pressure recorded in group N was 103 ± 4.7 mm Hg vs. 45.5 ± 1.5 mm Hg in group A. The percentage rise in cuff pressure every 10 minutes was also highly significant (P < 0.001) being maximum in first 10 min in group N. The incidence of postoperative airway complications was comparable between the two groups. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrate that the intracuff pressure of the PLMA increases progressively over time when the breathing gas mixture contains nitrous oxide. PMID:23493234

  11. Effects of 8 Weeks’ Specific Physical Training on the Rotator Cuff Muscle Strength and Technique of Javelin Throwers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeyoung; Lee, Youngsun; Shin, Insik; Kim, Kitae; Moon, Jeheon

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] For maximum efficiency and to prevent injury during javelin throwing, it is critical to maintain muscle balance and coordination of the rotator cuff and the glenohumeral joint. In this study, we investigated the change in the rotator cuff muscle strength, throw distance and technique of javelin throwers after they had performed a specific physical training that combined elements of weight training, function movement screen training, and core training. [Subjects] Ten javelin throwers participated in this study: six university athletes in the experimental group and four national-level athletes in the control group. [Methods] The experimental group performed 8 weeks of the specific physical training. To evaluate the effects of the training, measurements were performed before and after the training for the experimental group. Measurements comprised anthropometry, isokinetic muscle strength measurements, the function movement screen test, and movement analysis. [Results] After the specific physical training, the function movement screen score and external and internal rotator muscle strength showed statistically significant increases. Among kinematic factors, only pull distance showed improvement after training. [Conclusion] Eight weeks of specific physical training for dynamic stabilizer muscles enhanced the rotator cuff muscle strength, core stability, throw distance, and flexibility of javelin throwers. These results suggest that specific physical training can be useful for preventing shoulder injuries and improving the performance for javelin throwers. PMID:25364111

  12. Effects of 8 weeks' specific physical training on the rotator cuff muscle strength and technique of javelin throwers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeyoung; Lee, Youngsun; Shin, Insik; Kim, Kitae; Moon, Jeheon

    2014-10-01

    [Purpose] For maximum efficiency and to prevent injury during javelin throwing, it is critical to maintain muscle balance and coordination of the rotator cuff and the glenohumeral joint. In this study, we investigated the change in the rotator cuff muscle strength, throw distance and technique of javelin throwers after they had performed a specific physical training that combined elements of weight training, function movement screen training, and core training. [Subjects] Ten javelin throwers participated in this study: six university athletes in the experimental group and four national-level athletes in the control group. [Methods] The experimental group performed 8 weeks of the specific physical training. To evaluate the effects of the training, measurements were performed before and after the training for the experimental group. Measurements comprised anthropometry, isokinetic muscle strength measurements, the function movement screen test, and movement analysis. [Results] After the specific physical training, the function movement screen score and external and internal rotator muscle strength showed statistically significant increases. Among kinematic factors, only pull distance showed improvement after training. [Conclusion] Eight weeks of specific physical training for dynamic stabilizer muscles enhanced the rotator cuff muscle strength, core stability, throw distance, and flexibility of javelin throwers. These results suggest that specific physical training can be useful for preventing shoulder injuries and improving the performance for javelin throwers. PMID:25364111

  13. Evaluation of an exercise concept focusing on eccentric strength training of the rotator cuff for patients with subacromial impingement syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susanne Bernhardsson; Ingrid Hultenheim Klintberg; Gunilla Kjellby Wendt

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect on pain intensity and function of an exercise concept focusing on specific eccentric strength training of the rotator cuff in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome.Design: Single-subject research design with baseline and treatment phases (AB design).Setting: Home-based training programme supervised and supported by visits to physiotherapy clinic.Subjects: Ten patients, mean (SD) age 54 (8.6) years, symptom

  14. Skeletal muscle fibrosis and stiffness increase after rotator cuff tendon injury and neuromuscular compromise in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Sato, Eugene J; Killian, Megan L; Choi, Anthony J; Lin, Evie; Esparza, Mary C; Galatz, Leesa M; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Ward, Samuel R

    2014-09-01

    Rotator cuff tears can cause irreversible changes (e.g., fibrosis) to the structure and function of the injured muscle(s). Fibrosis leads to increased muscle stiffness resulting in increased tension at the rotator cuff repair site. This tension influences repairability and healing potential in the clinical setting. However, the micro- and meso-scale structural and molecular sources of these whole-muscle mechanical changes are poorly understood. Here, single muscle fiber and fiber bundle passive mechanical testing was performed on rat supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles with experimentally induced massive rotator cuff tears (Tenotomy) as well as massive tears with chemical denervation (Tenotomy + BTX) at 8 and 16 weeks post-injury. Titin molecular weight, collagen content, and myosin heavy chain profiles were measured and correlated with mechanical variables. Single fiber stiffness was not different between controls and experimental groups. However, fiber bundle stiffness was significantly increased at 8 weeks in the Tenotomy + BTX group compared to Tenotomy or control groups. Many of the changes were resolved by 16 weeks. Only fiber bundle passive mechanics was weakly correlated with collagen content. These data suggest that tendon injury with concomitant neuromuscular compromise results in extra-cellular matrix production and increases in stiffness of the muscle, potentially complicating subsequent attempts for surgical repair. PMID:24838823

  15. Medial Versus Lateral Supraspinatus Tendon Properties: Implications for Double-Row Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Vincent M.; Wang, FanChia; McNickle, Allison G.; Friel, Nicole A.; Yanke, Adam B.; Chubinskaya, Susan; Romeo, Anthony A.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Cole, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff repair re-tear rates range from 25-90% necessitating methods to improve repair strength. While numerous laboratory studies have compared single to double row fixation properties, little is known regarding regional (i.e., medial versus lateral) suture retention properties in both intact and torn tendons. Hypothesis A torn supraspinatus tendon will have reduced suture retention properties on the lateral aspect of the tendon compared to the more medial musculotendinous junction. Study Design Controlled Laboratory Study Methods Human supraspinatus tendons (torn and intact) were randomly assigned for suture retention mechanical testing, ultrastructural collagen fibril analysis, or histology following suture pullout testing. For biomechanical evaluation, sutures were placed either at the musculotendinous junction (medial) or 10 mm from the free margin (lateral), and tendons were elongated to failure. Collagen fibril assessments were performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results Intact tendons showed no regional differences with respect to suture retention properties. In contrast, among torn tendons the medial region exhibited significantly higher stiffness and work values relative to the lateral region. For the lateral region, work to 10 mm displacement (1592±261 N-mm) and maximum load (265±44 N) for intact tendons were significantly higher (p<0.05) than those of torn tendons (1086±388 N-mm and 177±71 N, respectively). For medial suture placement, maximum load, stiffness and work of intact and torn tendons were similar (p>0.05). Regression analyses for the intact and torn groups revealed generally low correlations between donor age and the three biomechanical indices. For both intact and torn tendons, the mean fibril diameter and area density were greater in the medial region relative to the lateral (p?0.05). In the lateral tendon, but not the medial region, torn specimens showed a significantly lower fibril area fraction (48.3±3.8%) than intact specimens (56.7±3.6%, p<0.05). Conclusions Superior pullout resistance of medial placed sutures may provide a strain shielding effect for the lateral row following double row repair. Larger diameter collagen fibrils as well as greater fibril area fraction in the medial supraspinatus tendon may provide greater resistance to suture migration. Clinical Relevance While clinical factors such as musculotendinous integrity warrant strong consideration for surgical decision making, the present ultrastructural and biomechanical results appear to provide a scientific rationale for double-row rotator cuff repair where sutures are placed more medial at the muscle tendon junction. PMID:20929937

  16. Correlations of isokinetic measurements with tendon healing following open repair of rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Circi, Esra; Akgun, Rahmi Can; Tarhan, Nefise Cagla; Cetin, Nuri; Akpinar, Sercan; Tuncay, Ismail Cengiz

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation of tendon integrity following open cuff repairs with functional and isokinetic strength measurements. Twenty-six shoulders of 25 patients were included in this study. At the final follow-up, 14 repairs (53.8%) were intact and 12 repairs (46.2%) had failed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Mean UCLA score at latest follow-up was 28.5 and mean Constant score was 80.3. Constant scores were found to be significantly low for the failed group. Age was found to be significantly related to failed repair. Fatty infiltration stage in the failed repair group was significantly high, and a strong positive correlation for both groups existed pre and postoperatively. When both groups were compared, the failed group was found to have significantly low measurements at extension and internal rotation. Despite high failure rates, functional results were satisfactory. Increased age and fatty infiltration stage decrease success. PMID:19533125

  17. Role of Serum Fibrinogen Levels in Patients with Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Petrillo, Stefano; Berton, Alessandra; Spiezia, Filippo; Loppini, Mattia; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Although rotator cuff (RC) tendinopathy is a frequent pathology of the shoulder, the real understanding of its aetiopathogenesis is still unclear. Several studies showed that RC tendinopathy is more frequent in patients with hyperglycemia, diabetes, obesity, or metabolic syndrome. This paper aims to evaluate the serum concentration of fibrinogen in patients with RC tears. Metabolic disorders have been related to high concentration of serum fibrinogen and the activity of fibrinogen has been proven to be crucial in the development of microvascular damage. Thus, it may produce progression of RC degeneration by reducing the vascular supply of tendons. We report the results of a cross-sectional frequency-matched case-control study comparing the serum concentration of fibrinogen of patients with RC tears with that of a control group of patients without history of RC tears who underwent arthroscopic meniscectomy. We choose to enrol in the control group patients with pathology of the lower limb with a likely mechanic, not metabolic, cause, different from tendon pathology. We found no statistically significant differences in serum concentration of fibrinogen when comparing patients with RC tears and patients who underwent arthroscopic meniscectomy (P = 0.5). Further studies are necessary to clarify the role of fibrinogen in RC disease. PMID:24817887

  18. The results of arthroscopic versus mini-open repair for rotator cuff tears at mid-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Pearsall, Albert W; Ibrahim, Khalid A; Madanagopal, Sudhakar G

    2007-01-01

    Background To prospectively evaluate patients who underwent a "mini-open" repair versus a completely arthroscopic technique for small to large size rotator cuff tears. Methods Fifty-two patients underwent "mini-open" or all arthroscopic repair of a full thickness tear of the rotator cuff. Patients who complained of shoulder pain and/or weakness and who had failed a minimum of 6 weeks of physical therapy and had at least one sub-acromial injection were surgical candidates. Pre and post-operative clinical evaluations included the following: 1) demographics; 2) Simple Shoulder Test (SST); 3) University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) rating scale; 4) visual analog pain assessment (VAS); and 5) pre-op SF12 assessment. Descriptive analysis was performed for patient demographics and for all variables. Pre and post outcome scores, range of motion and pain scale were compared using paired t-tests. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to evaluate any effect between dependent and independent variables. Significance was set at p is less than or equal to 0.05. Results There were 31 females and 21 males. The average follow-up was 50.6 months (27 – 84 months). The average age was similar between the two groups [arthroscopic x = 55 years/mini-open x = 58 years, p = 0.7]. Twenty-seven patients underwent arthroscopic repair and 25 underwent repair with a mini-open incision. The average rotator cuff tear size was 3.1 cm (range: 1–5 centimeters). There was no significant difference in tear size between the two groups (arthroscopic group = 2.9 cm/mini-open group = 3.2 cm, p = 0.3). Overall, there was a significant improvement from pre-operative status in shoulder pain, shoulder function as measured on the Simple Shoulder test and UCLA Shoulder Form. Visual analog pain improved, on average, 4.4 points and the most recent Short Shoulder Form and UCLA scores were 8 and 26 respectively. Both active and passive glenohumeral joint range of motion improved significantly from pre-operatively. Conclusion Based upon the number available, we found no statistical difference in outcome between the two groups, indicating that either procedure is efficacious in the treatment of small and medium size rotator cuff tears. Level of Evidence Type III PMID:18053153

  19. A prospective multi-site registry study of a specific protocol of autologous bone marrow concentrate for the treatment of shoulder rotator cuff tears and osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Centeno, Christopher J; Al-Sayegh, Hasan; Bashir, Jamil; Goodyear, Shaun; Freeman, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Shoulder pain is a common musculoskeletal complaint in the general population. Bone marrow concentrate (BMC) injections offer promising potential as a minimally invasive approach for treatment of shoulder pain in degenerative disease. In this study, we investigated the clinical outcomes of the BMC injections for treatment of shoulder pain and disability due to osteoarthritis (OA) and rotator cuff tears in a treatment registry population. Methods A total of 115 shoulders in 102 patients were treated with autologous BMC injections for symptomatic OA at the glenohumeral joint and/or rotator cuff tears. Data were collected for factors potentially influencing outcome, including age, sex, body mass index, and the type of condition treated (ie, OA or rotator cuff tear). Clinical outcomes were assessed serially over time using the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand score (DASH), the numeric pain scale (NPS), and a subjective improvement rating scale. Baseline scores were compared to the most recent outcome scores at the time of the analysis and adjusted for demographic differences. We reported comparisons of pre- and post-treatment scores, the differences between osteoarthritis and rotator cuff groups, and the predictive effects on the clinical outcomes. Results At the most current follow-up assessment after treatment, the average DASH score decreased (improved) from 36.1 to 17.1 (P<0.001) and the average numeric pain scale value decreased (improved) from 4.3 to 2.4 (P<0.001). These changes were associated with an average subjective improvement of 48.8%. No differences were observed between outcomes among the shoulders treated for OA versus rotator cuff tears, nor did age, sex, or body mass index influence pain or functional outcomes. There were no significant treatment-related adverse events reported. Discussion We observed preliminarily encouraging results following BMC injections for shoulder OA and rotator cuff tears. These results serve as basis for the design of an adequately powered randomized controlled trial.

  20. The geyser sign and torn rotator cuff: clinical significance and pathomechanics.

    PubMed

    Craig, E V

    1984-12-01

    The geyser radiographic sign on shoulder arthrogram is characterized by leakage of dye from the glenohumeral joint into the subdeltoid bursa. The dye outlines the acromioclavicular joint. It is usually an indication of a full-thickness cuff tear of long duration. The clinical occurrence and pathomechanics of this finding indicate that repair is generally difficult. PMID:6499313

  1. Muscle biopsy investigations on neuromuscular insufficiency of the rotator cuff: a contribution to the functional impingement of the shoulder joint.

    PubMed

    Irlenbusch, Ulrich; Gansen, Heike-Kathrin

    2003-01-01

    The possibility that functional impingement results from muscular imbalance has been discussed. This study investigates whether disturbance of muscular coordination is reflected in a shift in the balance of fast-twitch and slow-twitch fibers, as fast-twitch fibers enable a rapid reaction or contraction and slow-twitch fibers enable slow contractions and sustained performance. The supraspinatus and deltoid muscles in 37 patients with a supraspinatus syndrome and partial or complete rupture of the rotator cuff underwent biopsy. All three groups of patients showed a reduction in size, increased variability, and change in the frequency distribution of fiber cross sections. The fast-twitch fibers were especially affected. These findings were confirmed objectively by morphometric measurements. It might be concluded from the changes mentioned above that disturbance in coordination of the musculature can cause a functional impingement. We term this neuromuscular insufficiency of the rotator cuff. The mechanical factors relating to subacromial impingement may only have a role in promoting its manifestation by restricting the compensatory range of the joint. PMID:14564260

  2. All-arthroscopic versus mini-open repair of small or moderate-sized rotator cuff tears: A protocol for a randomized trial [NCT00128076

    PubMed Central

    MacDermid, Joy C; Holtby, Richard; Razmjou, Helen; Bryant, Dianne

    2006-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff tears are the most common source of shoulder pain and disability. Only poor quality studies have compared mini-open to arthroscopic repair, leaving surgeons with inadequate evidence to support optimal, minimally-invasive repair. Methods/Design This randomized, multi-centre, national trial will determine whether an arthroscopic or mini-open repair provides better quality of life for patients with small or moderate-sized rotator cuff tears. A national consensus meeting of investigators in the Joint Orthopaedic Initiative for National Trials of the Shoulder (JOINTS Canada) identified this question as the top priority for shoulder surgeons across Canada. The primary outcome measure is a valid quality-of-life scale (Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC)) that addresses 5 domains of health affected by rotator cuff disease. Secondary outcomes will assess rotator cuff functionality (ROM, strength, Constant score), secondary dimensions of health (general health status (SF-12) and work limitations), and repair integrity (MRI). Outcomes are measured at baseline, at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months post-operatively by blinded research assistants and musculoskeletal radiologists. Patients (n = 250) with small or medium-sized cuff tears identified by clinical examination and MRI who meet eligibility criteria will be recruited. This sample size will provide 80% power to statistically detect a clinically important difference of 20% in WORC scores between procedures after controlling for baseline WORC score (? = 0.05). A central methods centre will manage randomization, data management, and monitoring under supervision of experienced epidemiologists. Surgeons will participate in either conventional or expertise-based designs according to defined criteria to avoid biases from differential surgeon expertise. Mini-open or all-arthroscopic repair procedures will be performed according to a standardized protocol. Central Adjudication (of cases), Trial Oversight and Safety Committees will monitor trial conduct. We will use an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), where the baseline WORC score is used as a covariate, to compare the quality of life (WORC score) at 2 years post-operatively. As a secondary analysis, we will conduct the same statistical test but will include age and tear size as covariates with the baseline score. Enrollment will require 2 years and follow-up an additional 2 years. The trial will commence when funding is in place. Discussion These results will have immediate impact on the practice behaviors of practicing surgeons and surgical trainees at JOINTS centres across Canada. JOINTS Canada is actively engaged in knowledge exchange and will publish and present findings internationally to facilitate wider application. This trial will establish definitive evidence on this question at an international level. PMID:16529658

  3. All-Arthroscopic versus Mini-Open Repair of Small to Large Sized Rotator Cuff Tears: A Meta-Analysis of Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Cai, Zhengdong; Li, Guodong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare clinical outcomes of patients with full-thickness small to large sized tears undergoing all-arthroscopic versus mini-open rotator cuff repair. Method A literature search for electronic databases and references for eligible studies was conducted through Medline, Embase and Cochrane library between 1969 and 2013. Results A total of 12 comparative studies (n?=?770 patients) were included. Pooled results showed: there were no differences in function outcome, pain scores, retear rate or the incidence of adhesive capsulitis between all arthroscopic and mini-open repair groups. Conclusions There were no differences in outcomes between the arthroscopic and mini-open rotator cuff repair techniques, they should be considered alternative treatment options. Level of Evidence Level IV, Meta analysis. PMID:24728326

  4. Ultrasound-Guided Myofascial Trigger Point Injection Into Brachialis Muscle for Rotator Cuff Disease Patients With Upper Arm Pain: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Mi Ri; Chang, Won Hyuk; Choi, Hyo Seon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy of trigger point injection into brachialis muscle for rotator cuff disease patients with upper arm pain. Methods A prospective, randomized, and single-blinded clinical pilot trial was performed at university rehabilitation hospital. Twenty-one patients clinically diagnosed with rotator cuff disease suspected of having brachialis myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) were randomly allocated into two groups. Effect of ultrasound (US)-guided trigger point injection (n=11) and oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) (n=10) was compared by visual analog scale (VAS). Results US-guided trigger point injection of brachialis muscle resulted in excellent outcome compared to the oral NSAID group. Mean VAS scores decreased significantly after 2 weeks of treatment compared to the baseline in both groups (7.3 vs. 4.5 in the injection group and 7.4 vs. 5.9 in the oral group). The decrease of the VAS score caused by injection (?VAS=-2.8) was significantly larger than caused by oral NSAID (?VAS=-1.5) (p<0.05). Conclusion In patients with rotator cuff disease, US-guided trigger point injection of the brachialis muscle is safe and effective for both diagnosis and treatment when the cause of pain is suspected to be originated from the muscle. PMID:25379497

  5. Rotator cuff repair augmentation using a novel polycarbonate polyurethane patch: preliminary results at 12 months’ follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Encalada-Diaz, Ivan; Cole, Brian J.; MacGillivray, John D.; Ruiz-Suarez, Michell; Kercher, James S.; Friel, Nicole A.; Valero-Gonzalez, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Background Preventing anatomic failure after rotator cuff repair (RCR) remains a challenge. Augmentation with a surgical mesh may permanently reinforce the repair and decrease failure rates. The purpose of this study is to assess the postoperative outcomes of open RCR augmented with a novel reticulated polycarbonate polyurethane patch. Materials and methods Ten patients with supraspinatus tendon tears underwent open RCR augmented with a polycarbonate polyurethane patch secured in a 6-point fixation construct placed over the repaired tendon. Patients were evaluated with preoperative and postoperative outcome measures, including the Simple Shoulder Test, visual analog pain scale, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons shoulder score, Cumulative Activities of Daily Living score, and University of California, Los Angeles shoulder scale, as well as range of motion. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging was used to evaluate repair status. Results Patients showed significant improvements in visual analog pain scale, Simple Shoulder Test, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons shoulder scores at both 6 and 12 months postoperatively (P <.05 and P < .01, respectively). The University of California, Los Angeles postoperative score was good to excellent in 7 patients at 6 months and in 8 patients at 12 months. Range of motion in forward flexion, abduction, internal rotation, and external rotation was significantly improved at both 6 and 12 months postoperatively (P < .05 and P < .01, respectively). Magnetic resonance imaging at 12 months showed healing in 90%; one patient had a definitive persistent tear. We found no adverse events associated with the patch, including the absence of fibrosis, mechanical symptoms, or visible subacromial adhesions. Discussion The polycarbonate polyurethane patch was designed to support tissue in growth and enhance healing as shown by preclinical animal studies. Clinically, the patch is well tolerated and shows promising efficacy, with a 10% retear rate at the 12-month time point. Level of evidence Level IV, Case Series, Treatment Study. PMID:21106404

  6. Are Platelet-Rich Products Necessary during the Arthroscopic Repair of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Ge, Heng’an; Zhou, Jiaojiao; Cheng, Biao

    2013-01-01

    Background Platelet-rich products (PRP) are widely used for rotator cuff tears. However, whether platelet-rich products produce superior clinical or radiological outcomes is controversial. This study aims to use meta-analysis to compare clinical and radiological outcomes between groups with or without platelet-rich products. Methods The Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane library databases were searched for relevant studies published before April 20, 2013. Studies were selected that clearly reported a comparison between the use or not of platelet-rich products. The Constant, ASES, UCLA, and SST scale systems and the rotator cuff retear rate were evaluated. The weighted mean differences and relative risks were calculated using a fixed-effects model. Results Seven studies were enrolled in this meta-analysis. No significant differences were found for the Constant scale (0.73, 95% CI, ?1.82 to 3.27, P?=?0.58), ASES scale (?2.89, 95% CI, ?6.31 to 0.53, P?=?0.1), UCLA scale (?0.79, 95% CI, ?2.20 to 0.63, P?=?0.28), SST scale (0.34, 95% CI, ?0.01 to 0.69, P?=?0.05), and the overall rotator cuff retear rate (0.71, 95% CI, 0.48 to 1.05, P?=?0.08). Subgroup analysis according to the initial tear size showed a lower retear rate in small- and medium-sized tears (0.33, 95% CI, 0.12 to 0.91, P?=?0.03) after platelet-rich product application but no difference for large- and massive-sized tears (0.86, 95% CI, 0.60 to 1.23, P?=?0.42). Conclusion In conclusion, the meta-analysis suggests that the platelet-rich products have no benefits on the overall clinical outcomes and retear rate for the arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears. However, a decrease occurred in the rate of retears among patients treated with PRP for small- and medium-sized rotator cuff tears but not for large- and massive-sized tears. Level of Evidence Level II PMID:23874991

  7. Do Matrix Metalloproteases and Tissue Inhibitors of Metalloproteases in Tenocytes of the Rotator Cuff Differ with Varying Donor Characteristics?

    PubMed Central

    Klatte-Schulz, Franka; Aleyt, Thomas; Pauly, Stephan; Geißler, Sven; Gerhardt, Christian; Scheibel, Markus; Wildemann, Britt

    2015-01-01

    An imbalance between matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteases (TIMPs) may have a negative impact on the healing of rotator cuff tears. The aim of the project was to assess a possible relationship between clinical and radiographic characteristics of patients such as the age, sex, as well as the degenerative status of the tendon and the MMPs and TIMPs in their tenocyte-like cells (TLCs). TLCs were isolated from ruptured supraspinatus tendons and quantitative Real-Time PCR and ELISA was performed to analyze the expression and secretion of MMPs and TIMPs. In the present study, MMPs, mostly gelatinases and collagenases such as MMP-2, -9 and -13 showed an increased expression and protein secretion in TLCs of donors with higher age or degenerative status of the tendon. Furthermore, the expression and secretion of TIMP-1, -2 and -3 was enhanced with age, muscle fatty infiltration and tear size. The interaction between MMPs and TIMPs is a complex process, since TIMPs are not only inhibitors, but also activators of MMPs. This study shows that MMPs and TIMPs might play an important role in degenerative tendon pathologies. PMID:26068238

  8. The accuracy of “subacromial grind test” in diagnosis of supraspinatus rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Sawalha, Seif; Fischer, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to assess the accuracy of a simple clinical test (subacromial grind test) in diagnosing supraspinatus tendon tears. Patients and Methods: The test is considered positive if palpable crepitus or grinding is detected on passive internal and external rotation of the shoulder while abducted in the scapular plane. Data were collected prospectively on 47 patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy, and the results of the test and arthroscopy compared. Results: During arthroscopy, 17 patients had full thickness (FT) tears of supraspinatus tendon and 10 had partial thickness tears. For any supraspinatus tear, the sensitivity of the test was 63%, specificity 95%, positive predictive value 94%, negative predictive value 66% and overall accuracy 79%. For FT tears, the sensitivity was 82%, specificity 87%, positive predictive value 78%, negative predictive value 90% and overall accuracy 85%. Conclusion: We found that this is a useful single test for diagnosing FT supraspinatus tears. Level of Evidence: Level IV diagnostic study. PMID:25937713

  9. Delaminated tears of the rotator cuff: prevalence, characteristics, and diagnostic accuracy using indirect MR arthrography.

    PubMed

    Choo, Hye Jung; Lee, Sun Joo; Kim, Jung-Han; Kim, Dong Wook; Park, Young-Mi; Kim, Ok Hwa; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, radiologic characteristics, and accuracy of diagnosing delaminated tears at the supraspinatus tendon-infraspinatus tendon (SST-IST) on indirect MR arthrography. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Of 531 consecutive shoulders that underwent indirect MR arthrography, 231 shoulders with tears at the SST-IST were included. On the MR images, delaminated tears at the SST-IST, defined as intratendinous horizontal splitting between the articular and bursal layers of the SST-IST with or without different degrees of retraction between the two layers, were identified and classified into six types. Other radiologic findings of the SST-IST, such as the presence of intramuscular cysts, were evaluated. We used video records of 127 arthroscopic surgeries to determine the diagnostic accuracy of indirect MRI for the detection of the delaminated tears at the SST-IST. RESULTS. On MRI, 56% (129/231) of shoulders with SST-IST tears had delaminated tears. Articular-delaminated full-thickness tears (n = 58) and articular-delaminated partial-thickness tears (n = 64) were the most common types. Approximately 82% (36/44) of articular-delaminated full-thickness tears occurring at the SST were combined with articular-delaminated partial-thickness tears at the IST. SST-IST footprint tears and intramuscular cysts were significantly more common in the shoulders with delaminated tears. The sensitivity and specificity of indirect MR arthrography for detection of delaminated tears were 92% and 94%, respectively. CONCLUSION. On indirect MR arthrography, approximately half of the shoulders with SST-IST tears had delaminated tears. The diagnostic accuracy of indirect MR arthrography for detection of delaminated tears was high. PMID:25615759

  10. Radial extracorporeal shock-wave therapy in patients with chronic rotator cuff tendinitis: a prospective randomised double-blind placebo-controlled multicentre trial.

    PubMed

    Kolk, A; Yang, K G Auw; Tamminga, R; van der Hoeven, H

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of radial extracorporeal shock-wave therapy (rESWT) on patients with chronic tendinitis of the rotator cuff. This was a randomised controlled trial in which 82 patients (mean age 47 years (24 to 67)) with chronic tendinitis diagnosed clinically were randomly allocated to a treatment group who received low-dose rESWT (three sessions at an interval 10 to 14 days, 2000 pulses, 0.11 mJ/mm(2), 8 Hz) or to a placebo group, with a follow-up of six months. The patients and the treating orthopaedic surgeon, who were both blinded to the treatment, evaluated the results. A total of 44 patients were allocated to the rESWT group and 38 patients to the placebo group. A visual analogue scale (VAS) score for pain, a Constant-Murley (CMS) score and a simple shoulder test (SST) score significantly improved in both groups at three and six months compared with baseline (all p ? 0.012). The mean VAS was similar in both groups at three (p = 0.43) and six months (p = 0.262). Also, the mean CMS and SST scores were similar in both groups at six months (p = 0.815 and p = 0.834, respectively). It would thus seem that low-dose rESWT does not reduce pain or improve function in patients chronic rotator cuff tendinitis compared with placebo treatment. PMID:24151273

  11. Open Rotator Cuff Surgery in Swiss Elite Rock Climbers (P31)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hans-Peter Bircher; Christoph Thür; Andreas Schweizer

    Rock and indoor climbing has become a very popular sport. For moving in a vertical or even overhanging wall an intact shoulder\\u000a function is mandatory beside a good grasp function.Hand and particular finger injuries in climbing are well described in the\\u000a literature. Almost no report is avaible about shoulder injuries in climbers. In our retrospective case study 21 shoulders\\u000a in

  12. Open Rotator Cuff Surgery in Swiss Elite Rock Climbers (P31)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hans-Peter Bircher; Christoph Thür; Andreas Schweizer

    Rock and indoor climbing has become a very popular sport. For moving in a vertical or even overhanging wall an intact shoulder\\u000a function is mandatory beside a good grasp function. Hand and particular finger injuries in climbing are well described in\\u000a the literature. Almost no report is avaible about shoulder injuries in climbers. In our retrospective case study 21 shoulders

  13. Rotator cuff exercises

    MedlinePLUS

    ... activities, including your shoulder joint and your shoulder blade Observe your spine and posture as you stand ... band Isometric shoulder exercises Wall push-ups Shoulder blade (scapular) retraction - no tubing Shoulder blade (scapular) retraction - ...

  14. Rotator Cuff Repair

    MedlinePLUS

    ... DOCTORS HOSPITAL CENTER FOR ORTHOPEDICS AND SPORTS MEDICINE CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA June 18, 2008 00:00:00 ... Good afternoon and welcome to Doctors Hospital in Coral Gables, Florida. I'm Dr. John Zvijac, sports ...

  15. Rotator cuff problems

    MedlinePLUS

    ... when a tear does not completely sever the attachments to the bone. A complete, full thickness tear ... the affected shoulder. You may have weakness and loss of motion when raising the arm above your ...

  16. Rotator Cuff Exercises

    MedlinePLUS

    ... left arm out at shoulder level with your elbow bent to 90° and your hand down. Keep your elbow bent, and slowly raise your left hand. Stop ... your left arm at your side with your elbow bent to 90° and the forearm resting against ...

  17. Rotator cuff repair

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to move. The tendons can be torn from overuse or injury. You will likely receive general anesthesia ... You are active and use your shoulder for sports or work. You have weakness and are unable ...

  18. Effect of Platelet-Rich Plasma and Bioactive Glass Powder for the Improvement of Rotator Cuff Tendon-to-Bone Healing in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yang; Dong, Yu; Chen, Shiyi; Li, Yunxia

    2014-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that a platelet-rich plasma (PRP) plus bioactive glass (BG) mixture could shorten the tendon-bone healing process in rotator cuff tendon repair, thirty mature male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups, Control, PRP, and PRP + BG. All groups underwent a surgical procedure to establish a rotator cuff tendon healing model. Mechanical examinations and histological assays were taken to verify the adhesion of the tendon-bone. Real-time PCR was adopted to analyze Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 (BMP-2). The maximum load-to-failure value in mechanical examinations was significantly higher in the PRP + BG group than that in the control group after six weeks (Control 38.73 ± 8.58, PRP 54.49 ± 8.72, PRP + BG 79.15 ± 7.62, p < 0.001), but it was not significantly different at 12 weeks (PRP 74.27 ± 7.74, PRP + BG 82.57 ± 6.63, p = 0.145). In histological assays, H&E (hematoxylin-eosin) staining showed that the interface between the tendon-bone integration was much sturdier in the PRP + BG group compared to the other two groups at each time point, and more ordered arranged tendon fibers can be seen at 12 weeks. At six weeks, the mRNA expression levels of BMP-2 in the PRP + BG group were higher than those in the other groups (PRP + BG 0.65 ± 0.11, PRP 2.284 ± 0.07, Control 0.12 ± 0.05, p < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in the mRNA expression levels of BMP-2 among the three groups at 12 weeks (p = 0.922, 0.067, 0.056). BMP-2 levels in PRP and PRP+BG groups were significantly lower at 12 weeks compared to six weeks (p = 0.006, <0.001).We found that the PRP + BG mixture could enhance tendon-bone healing in rotator cuff tendon repair. PMID:25464384

  19. The central nervous system--an additional consideration in 'rotator cuff tendinopathy' and a potential basis for understanding response to loaded therapeutic exercise.

    PubMed

    Littlewood, Chris; Malliaras, Peter; Bateman, Marcus; Stace, Richmond; May, Stephen; Walters, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Tendinopathy is a term used to describe a painful tendon disorder but despite being a well-recognised clinical presentation, a definitive understanding of the pathoaetiology of rotator cuff tendinopathy remains elusive. Current explanatory models, which relate to peripherally driven nocioceptive mechanisms secondary to structural abnormality, or failed healing, appear inadequate on their own in the context of current literature. In light of these limitations this paper presents an extension to current models that incorporates the integral role of the central nervous system in the pain experience. The role of the central nervous system (CNS) is described and justified along with a potential rationale to explain the favourable response to loaded therapeutic exercises demonstrated by previous studies. This additional consideration has the potential to offer a useful way to explain pain to patients, for clinicians to prescribe appropriate therapeutic management strategies and for researchers to advance knowledge in relation to this clinically challenging problem. PMID:23932100

  20. Motion of the shoulder complex in individuals with isolated acromioclavicular osteoarthritis and associated with rotator cuff dysfunction: part 2 - muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Catarina de Oliveira; Michener, Lori Ann; Ribeiro, Ivana Leão; Reiff, Rodrigo Bezerra de Menezes; Camargo, Paula Rezende; Salvini, Tania Fátima

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to compare muscle activity in individuals with isolated acromioclavicular osteoarthritis (ACO), ACO associated with rotator cuff disease (ACO+RCD), and controls. Seventy-four participants (23 isolated ACO, 25 ACO+RCD, 26 controls) took part in this study. Disability was assessed with the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire. Muscle activity of the upper trapezius (UT), lower trapezius (LT), serratus anterior (SA), and anterior deltoid (AD) was collected during arm elevation in the sagittal and scapular planes. Pain during motion was assessed with the numerical pain rating scale. Analysis of the DASH, pain and kinematics were reported in part 1 of this study. For each muscle, separate 2-way linear mixed-model ANOVAs were performed to compare groups. ACO+RCD group had more UT and AD activity than the the isolated ACO and control other groups, more AD activity than the isolated ACO group during the ascending phase, and more AD activity than the ACO and control groups during the descending phase in both planes. Isolated ACO group had less SA activity than the control group only in the sagittal plane. Alterations in shoulder muscle activity are present in individuals with isolated ACO and with ACO+RCD and should be considered in rehabilitation. PMID:24928470

  1. Full thickness tears: retaining the cuff.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Rizzello, Giacomo; Panascì, Manlio; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2011-12-01

    Repair of rotator cuff tears is technically challenging. Full thickness rotator cuff tears have no potential for spontaneous healing, no reliable tendons substitutes are available, and their management is only partially understood. Many factors seem to contribute to the final outcome, and considerable variations in the decision-making process exist. For these reasons, decisions are often taken on the basis of surgeon's clinical experience. Accurate and prompt diagnosis is fundamental to guide correct management, and the tear pattern should be carefully evaluated to planning the most appropriate repair. PMID:22089291

  2. Rotator cuff - self-care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... when one of the tendons is torn from overuse or injury ... It is best to avoid playing sports until you have no pain during rest or activity. Also, when examined by your doctor or physical therapist, you should have: Full ...

  3. Vaginal Cuff Dehiscence in Robotic-Assisted Total Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kashani, Shabnam; Gallo, Taryn; Sargent, Anita; ElSahwi, Karim; Silasi, Dan-Arin

    2012-01-01

    Study Objective: The aim of this study was to estimate the cumulative incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence in robotic-assisted total hysterectomies in our patients and to provide recommendations to decrease the incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence. Methods: This was an observational case series, Canadian Task Force Classification II-3 conducted at an academic and community teaching hospital. A total of 654 patients underwent robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy for both malignant and benign reasons from September 1, 2006 to March 1, 2011 performed by a single surgeon. The da Vinci Surgical System was used for robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy. Results: There were 3 cases of vaginal cuff dehiscence among 654 robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomies, making our cumulative incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence 0.4%. The mean time between the procedures and vaginal cuff dehiscence was 44.3 d (6.3 wk). All patients were followed up twice after surgery, at 3 to 4 wk and 12 to 16 wk. Conclusion: In our study, the incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence after robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy compares favorably to that of total abdominal and vaginal hysterectomy. Our study suggests that the incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence is more likely related to the technique of colpotomy and vaginal cuff suturing than to robotic-assisted total hysterectomy per se. With proper technique and patient education, our vaginal dehiscence rate has been 0.4%, which is 2.5 to 10 times less than the previously reported vaginal cuff dehiscence rate in the literature. PMID:23484559

  4. International rotations during residency: spine deformity surgery in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Alan H

    2013-05-01

    International elective rotations are becoming increasingly common in residency training programs. These experiences offer a tremendous opportunity to help patients in medically underserved nations, and can enhance training by exposing participants to pathology not often encountered in developed countries. Additionally, there is emerging evidence that international training exposure develops a broader appreciation of cultural diversity in patient care, offers personal and professional development, and teaches residents to use limited resources more efficiently, giving them a unique perspective on the ordering of tests and delivery of care when they return. This paper highlights the author's experience on a volunteer trip to Ghana that was focused on treating pediatric spinal deformity, and reviews notable international medical volunteers, and highlights the evidence supporting the benefits of international residency rotations. PMID:23641456

  5. Triangle Tilt Surgery: Effect on Coracohumeral Distance and External Rotation of the Glenohumeral Joint

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rahul K.; Mahmooduddin, Faiz

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Shoulder muscle imbalances and bone deformities that develop secondary to obstetric brachial plexus injury have been extensively studied. Less emphasis has focused on coracohumeral distance, a small value potentially being linked to impaired shoulder external rotation. The purpose of this study is to analyze coracohumeral distances and shoulder external rotation in obstetric brachial plexus injury patients before and after triangle tilt surgery. Methods: Twenty patients with deformities secondary to obstetric brachial plexus injury were included. Coracohumeral distances were measured on computed tomographic images. Clinical functioning was evaluated through video recordings by using a modified Mallet scale. Paired Student t tests were used to determine statistical significance of anatomic and functional parameters, pre- and postoperatively. Results: Coracohumeral distance (P < .0006), total Mallet score (P < .0001), supination angle (P < .0001), and individual Mallet scores for all external rotation parameters including hand-to-mouth (P < .0001), supination (P = .0010), external rotation (P < .0001), hand-to-neck (P < .0001), and hand-to-spine (P = .0064) were significantly higher postoperatively than preoperatively for affected shoulders. Hand-to-mouth angles were significantly lower postoperatively than preoperatively (P < .0001). Coracohumeral distance in unaffected shoulders remained unchanged. Conclusions: Triangle tilt surgery significantly improves coracohumeral distance and clinical functioning in obstetric brachial plexus injury patients. Coracohumeral distance plays a key role in shoulder external rotation. Increasing coracohumeral distance significantly improves all external rotation parameters and total Mallet scores. The triangle tilt surgery relieves excessive tightness of the anterior stabilizing complex, widens coracohumeral distance, and improves external rotation of shoulder. PMID:21119773

  6. The impact of rotator cuff deficiency on structure, mechanical properties, and gene expression profiles of the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT): Implications for management of the LHBT during primary shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kurdziel, Michael D; Moravek, James E; Wiater, Brett P; Davidson, Abigail; Seta, Joseph; Maerz, Tristan; Baker, Kevin C; Wiater, J Michael

    2015-08-01

    The long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) occupies a unique proximal intra-articular and distal extra-articular position within the human shoulder. In the presence of a rotator cuff (RC) tear, the LHBT is recruited into an accelerated role undergoing potential mechanical and biochemical degeneration. Intra-articular sections of the LHBT were harvested during primary shoulder arthroplasty from patients with an intact or deficient RC. LHBTs were stained (H&E, Alcian Blue) and subjected to histologic analysis using the semiquantitative Bonar scale and measurement of collagen orientation. LHBTs (n?=?12 per group) were also subjected to gene-expression analyses via an RT(2) -PCR Profiler Array quantifying 84 genes associated with cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. LHBTs (n?=?18 per group) were biomechanically tested with both stress-relaxation and load-to-failure protocols and subsequently modeled with the Quasilinear Viscoelastic (QLV) and Structural-Based Elastic (SBE) models. While no histologic differences were observed, significant differences in mechanical testing, and viscoelastic modeling parameters were found. PCR arrays identified five genes that were differentially expressed between RC-intact and RC-deficient LHBT groups. LHBTs display signs of pathology regardless of RC status in the arthroplasty population, which may be secondary to both glenohumeral joint arthritis and the additional mechanical role of the LHBT in this population. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 33:1158-1164, 2015. PMID:25877256

  7. Pneumomediastinum after arthroscopic shoulder surgery -A case report-

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hae-Kyoung; Ko, Eun-Sung; Kim, Jee-Young; Park, Jung-Min; Kim, Jae-Yun

    2013-01-01

    An 86-year-old female with a history of right rotator cuff injury was admitted for arthroscopic shoulder surgery under general anesthesia. There were no remarkable immediate postoperative complications. However, while recovering in the general ward, she developed dyspnea with hypoxia. She was immediately treated with oxygen, and antibiotics after pneumomediastinum was confirmed on both chest x-ray and chest computed tomography. Subcutaneous emphysema on either face or neck followed by arthroscopic shoulder surgery was common, but pneumomediastinum with hypoxia is a rare but extremely dangerous complication. Thus we would like to report our case and its pathology, the diagnosis, the treatment and prevention, with literature review. PMID:23646251

  8. Rolling cuff flexible bellows

    DOEpatents

    Lambert, Donald R. (Livermore, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A flexible connector apparatus used to join two stiff non-deformable members, such as piping. The apparatus is provided with one or more flexible sections or assemblies each utilizing a bellows of a rolling cuff type connected between two ridge members, with the bellows being supported by a back-up ring, such that only the curved end sections of the bellows are unsupported. Thus, the bellows can be considered as being of a tube-shaped configuration and thus have high pressure resistance. The components of the flexible apparatus are sealed or welded one to another such that it is fluid tight.

  9. Efficacy of Various Analgesics on Shoulder Function and Rotator Cuff Tendon-to-Bone Healing in a Rat (Rattus norvegicus) Model

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Adam C; Tucker, Jennica J; Yannascoli, Sarah M; Dunkman, Andrew A; Thomas, Stephen J; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2014-01-01

    Although relief of postoperative pain is an imperative aspect of animal welfare, analgesics that do not interfere with the scientific goals of the study must be used. Here we compared the efficacy of different analgesic agents by using an established rat model of supraspinatus tendon healing and a novel gait-analysis system. We hypothesized that different analgesic agents would all provide pain relief in this model but would cause differences in tendon-to-bone healing and gait parameters. Buprenorphine, ibuprofen, tramadol–gabapentin, and acetaminophen were compared with a no-analgesia control group. Gait measures (stride length and vertical force) on the operative forelimb differed between the control group and both the buprenorphine (2 and 4 d postsurgery) and ibuprofen (2 d postsurgery) groups. Step length was different in the control group as compared with the tramadol–gabapentin (2 d after surgery), buprenorphine (2 and 4 d after surgery), and ibuprofen (2 d after surgery) groups. Regarding tendon-to-bone healing, the ibuprofen group showed less stiffness at the insertion site; no other differences in tendon-to-bone healing were detected. In summary, the analgesics evaluated were associated with differences in both animal gait and tendon-to-bone healing. This information will be useful for improving the management of postsurgical pain without adversely affecting tissue healing. Given its ability to improve gait without impeding healing, we recommend use of buprenorphine for postsurgical pain management in rats. In addition, our gait-analysis system can be used to evaluate new analgesics. PMID:24602546

  10. Surgery Videos: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Injuries and Disorders Total Ankle Replacement (Doctors Hospital, Coral Gables, FL, 11/27/2012) Back Pain Lumbar ... 09/19/2007) Rotator Cuff Repair (Doctors Hospital, Coral Gables, FL, 6/18/2008) Shoulder Arthroscopy (St. ...

  11. Two cases of post-coital vaginal cuff dehiscence with small bowel evisceration after robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, My-Linh T.; Kapoor, Monica; Pradhan, Tana S.; Pua, Tarah L.; Tedjarati, Sean S.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Vaginal cuff dehiscence following robotic surgery is uncommon. Published reports of vaginal cuff dehiscence following robotic surgery are increasing, but the true incidence is unknown. PRESENTATION OF CASE Case 1. A 45 year old female had sexual intercourse and presented with a vaginal cuff dehiscence complicated by small bowel evisceration 4 months after RA-TLH. Case 2. A 44 year old female had sexual intercourse and presented with a vaginal cuff dehiscence with small bowel evisceration 6 weeks after RA-TLH. DISCUSSION We discuss the rate of vaginal cuff dehiscence by mode of hysterectomy, surgical and non-surgical risk factors that may contribute to vaginal cuff dehiscence, and proposed preventative methods at the time of RA-TLH to reduce this complication. CONCLUSION Vaginal cuff dehiscence with associated evisceration of intraabdominal contents is a potentially severe complication of hysterectomy. We recommend counseling patients who undergo RA-TLH to abstain from vaginal intercourse for a minimum of 8–12 weeks. PMID:23708306

  12. COMMUNITY CUFF: MANUALLYPOWERED BLOOD PRESSURE CUFF FOR SUBSAHARAN AFRICA

    E-print Network

    McGaughey, Alan

    Bons Full cuff design Rigid elbow piece Manual pumping Output Electronics + casing Ashley Brienza usability while minimizing cost. With automaDc deflaDon, intuiDve visual cues, a rigid elbow worker. Novel design · Rigid elbow piece and SBR forearm sleeve to keep arm at 45 degrees

  13. Mechanical environment associated with rotator cuff tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zong-Ping Luo; Horng-Chaung Hsu; John J. Grabowski; Bernard F. Morrey; Kai-Nan An

    1998-01-01

    A simplified 2-dimensional finite element model was used to investigate the stress environment in the supraspinatus tendon. The extrafibrillar matrix and collagen fiber were modeled with fiber-reinforced composite elements. The stress was evaluated at humeroscapular elevation angles of 0°, 30°, and 60°. Two acromion conditions were simulated. In the first set of conditions there was no subacromial impingement. In the

  14. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870...Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section 868.5750...Devices § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section 868.5750...Devices § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section 868.5750...Devices § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section 868.5750...Devices § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an...

  19. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870...Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has...

  20. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870...Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has...

  1. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870...Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section 868.5750...Devices § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an...

  3. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870...Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has...

  4. Logic-controlled occlusive cuff system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. T.; Hoffler, G. W. (inventors); Hursta, W. N.

    1981-01-01

    An occlusive cuff system comprises a pressure cuff and a source of regulated compressed gas feeding the cuff through an electrically operated fill valve. An electrically operated vent valve vents the cuff to the ambient pressure. The fill valve is normally closed and the vent valve is normally open. In response to an external start signal, a logic network opens the fill valve and closes the vent valve, thereby starting the pressurization cycle and a timer. A pressure transducer continuously monitors the pressure in the cuff. When the transducer's output equals a selected reference voltage, a comparator causes the logic network to close the fill valve. The timer, after a selected time delay, opens the vent valve to the ambient pressure, thereby ending the pressurization cycle.

  5. Rolling-cuff flexible bellows

    DOEpatents

    Lambert, D.R.

    1982-09-27

    A flexible connector apparatus used to join two stiff non-deformable members, such as piping, is described. The apparatus is provided with one or more flexible sections or assemblies each utilizing a bellows of a rolling cuff type connected between two ridge members, with the bellows being supported by a back-up ring, such that only the curved end sections of the bellows are unsupported. Thus, the bellows can be considered as being of a tube-shaped configuration and thus have high pressure resistance. The components of the flexible apparatus are sealed or welded one to another such that it is fluid tight.

  6. Robotic-Assisted Laparoscopic Nephroureterectomy and Bladder Cuff Excision

    PubMed Central

    Ozdemir, A. T.; Asil, E.; Balbay, M. D.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Our aim was to show that bladder cuff excision and distal ureterectomy can be safely performed by using the LigaSure device during robotic-assisted laparoscopic nephroureterectomy. Methods: A 60-year-old man presented with gross hematuria. He was diagnosed with upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) on the left side and was scheduled for robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery. Without changing the patient's position, sealing with the LigaSure atlas for bladder cuff excision and distal ureterectomy was performed. Results: The operating time was 140 minutes from the initial incision to skin closure of all incisions. The estimated blood loss during the surgery was 120mL. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The Foley drain was removed on day 3 after normal cystographic findings, and the patient was discharged from the hospital on the fourth postoperative day. Conclusion: Robot-assisted nephroureterectomy with distal ureterectomy in the same position using a LigaSure device is a safe alternative for upper tract transitional cell carcinoma. PMID:23477188

  7. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section 868.5800 Food and Drugs...DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A...

  8. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section 868.5800 Food and Drugs...DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section 868.5800 Food and Drugs...DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section 868.5800 Food and Drugs...DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A...

  11. Prehospital endotracheal intubation; need for routine cuff pressure measurement?

    PubMed

    Peters, Joost H; Hoogerwerf, Nico

    2013-10-01

    In endotracheal intubation, a secured airway includes an insufflated cuff distal to the vocal cords. High cuff pressures may lead to major complications occurring after a short period of time. Cuff pressures are not routinely checked after intubation in the prehospital setting, dealing with a vulnerable group of patients. We reviewed cuff pressures after intubation by Helicopter Emergency Medical Services and paramedics noted in a dispatch database. Initial cuff pressures are almost all too high, needing adjustment to be in the safe zone. Dutch paramedics lack manometers and, therefore, only few paramedic intubations are followed by cuff pressure measurements. We recommend cuff pressure measurements after all (prehospital) intubations and, therefore, all ambulances need to be equipped with cuff manometers. PMID:23100319

  12. Hypopharyngeal Wall Exposure within the Surgical Field : The Role of Axial Rotation of the Thyroid Cartilage during Anterior Cervical Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byung Kwan; Cho, Won Ho; Choi, Chang Hwa; Song, Geun Sung; Kim, Choongrak

    2010-01-01

    Objective Esophageal/hypopharyngeal injury can be a disastrous complication of anterior cervical surgery. The amount of hypopharyngeal wall exposure within the surgical field has not been studied. The objective of this study is to evaluate the chance of hypopharyngeal wall exposure by measuring the amount of axial rotation of the thyroid cartilage (ARTC) and posterior projection of the hypopharynx (PPH). Methods The study was prospectively designed using intraoperative ultrasonography. We measured the amount of ARTC in 27 cases. The amount of posterior projection of the hypopharynx (PPH) also was measured on pre-operative CT and compared at three different levels; the superior border of the thyroid cartilage (SBTC), cricoarytenoid joint and tip of inferior horn of the thyroid cartilage (TIHTC). The presence of air density was also checked on the same levels. Results The angle of ARTC ranged from -6.9° to 29.7°, with no statistical difference between the upper and lower cervical group. The amount of PPH was increased caudally. Air densities were observed in 26 cases at the SBTC, but none at the TIHTC. Conclusion Within the confines of the thyroid cartilage, surgeons are required to pay more attention to the status of hypopharynx/esophagus near the inferior horn of the thyroid cartilage. The hypopharynx/esophagus at the TIHTC is more likely to be exposed than at the upper and middle part of the thyroid cartilage, which may increase the risk of injury by pressure. Surgeons should be aware of the fact that the visceral component at C6-T1 surgeries also rotates as much as when the thyroid cartilage is engaged with a retractor. The esophagus at lower cervical levels warrants more careful retraction because it is not protected by the thyroid cartilage. PMID:21286476

  13. External Rotator Sparing with Posterior Acetabular Fracture Surgery: Does It Change Outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Ceylan, Halil; Inanir, Murat; Sarlak, Ahmet Y.

    2014-01-01

    This study analyses the results of the treatment with external rotator sparing approach in acetabular fractures to determine whether muscle sparing has a positive impact on functional outcome. 20 patients with a mean age of 45.9 years (range: 26–64) that had been treated for displaced acetabular fractures were included in this series. Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment (SMFA) questionnaire and hip muscle strength measurement were done at the 24-month of follow-up period. The radiographic results at the final followup were excellent in 9 hips (45%), good in 6 hips (30%), fair in 4 hips (20%), and poor in one hip (5%) according to the criteria developed by Matta. The average SMFA score for all of the patients was 18.3 (range: 0–55.4). The mean dysfunctional and bother indexes were 17.2 and 20.6, respectively. The overall muscle strength deficit was 11.8%. The greatest loss of strength was in internal rotation. In patients with better postoperative reduction quality of acetabular fracture, peak torque, and maximum work of hip flexion, extension and also internal rotation maximum work deficit were significantly lower (P < 0.05). Accurate initial reduction and longer postoperative muscle strengthening exercise programs seem critical to decrease postoperative hip muscle weakness after acetabular fractures. PMID:25110590

  14. Control device for prosthetic urinary sphincter cuff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinicke, Robert H. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A device for controlling flow of fluid to and from a resilient inflatable cuff implanted about the urethra to control flow of urine therethrough. The device comprises a flexible bulb reservoir and a control unit that includes a manually operated valve that opens automatically when the bulb is squeezed to force fluid into the cuff for closing the urethra. The control unit also includes a movable valve seat member having a relatively large area exposed to pressure of fluid in a chamber that is connected to the cuff and which moves to a position in which the valve member is unseated by an abutment when fluid pressure in the chamber exceeds a predetermined value to thereby relieve excess fluid pressure in the cuff. The arrangement is such that the valve element is held closed against the seat member by the full differential in fluid pressures acting on both sides of the valve element until the seat member is moved away from the valve element to thus insure positive closing of the valve element until the seat member is moved out of engagement with the valve element by excess pressure differential.

  15. Rotationally actuated prosthetic helping hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E. (inventor); Belcher, Jewell G., Jr. (inventor); Carden, James R. (inventor); West, Thomas W. (inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A prosthetic device has been developed for below-the-elbow amputees. The device consists of a cuff, a stem, a housing, two hook-like fingers, an elastic band for holding the fingers together, and a brace. The fingers are pivotally mounted on a housing that is secured to the amputee's upper arm with the brace. The stem, which also contains a cam, is rotationally mounted within the housing and is secured to the cuff, which fits over the amputee's stump. By rotating the cammed stem between the fingers with the lower arm, the amputee can open and close the fingers.

  16. Transverse versus longitudinal tripolar configuration for selective stimulation with multipolar cuff electrodes.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Thomas N; Kurstjens, G A Mathijs; Struijk, Johannes J

    2011-04-01

    The ability to stimulate subareas of a nerve selectively is highly desirable, since it has the potential of simplifying surgery to implanting one cuff on a large nerve instead of many cuffs on smaller nerves or muscles, or alternatively can improve function where surgical access to the smaller nerves is limited. In this paper, stimulation was performed with a four-channel multipolar cuff electrode implanted on the sciatic nerve of nine rabbits to compare the extensively researched longitudinal tripolar configuration with the transverse tripolar configuration, which has received less interest. The performance of these configurations was evaluated in terms of selectivity in recruitment of the three branches of the sciatic nerve. The results showed that the transverse configuration was able to selectively activate the sciatic nerve branches to a functionally relevant level in more cases than the longitudinal configuration (20/27 versus 11/27 branches) and overall achieved a higher mean selectivity [0.79 ± 0.13 versus 0.61 ± 0.09 (mean ± standard deviation)]. The transverse configuration was most successful at recruiting the small cutaneous and medium-sized peroneal branches, and less successful at recruiting the large tibial nerve. PMID:21421427

  17. INJURIES OF THE MUSCULOTENDINOUS CUFF OF THE SHOULDER

    PubMed Central

    Blanche, Donald W.

    1953-01-01

    Injuries of the musculotendinous cuff are frequent and often cause long periods of disability. The cuff is subject to progressive degenerative changes which are visible microscopically in most persons past 30 years of age, and visible grossly in those past 40. The cuff ruptures through areas of degeneration. A great majority of patients recover good shoulder function under conservative treatment. Operation is not urgent. Accurate diagnosis of a complete tear of the cuff cannot be made until the acute phase of injury has passed, and delay in operating does not decrease chances of good results. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:13059640

  18. Sphygmomanometer cuffs: a potential source of infection!

    PubMed

    Zargaran, David; Hardwick, Sarah; Adel, Reeja; Hill, George; Stubbins, Daniel; Salmasi, Abdul Majeed

    2015-02-01

    We evaluated the potential pathogenic hazard of sphygmomanometer blood pressure cuffs (BPCs) in a hospital setting. Prospectively, the presence of bacterial organisms on 120 BPCs in 14 medical wards and outpatient clinics in a district general hospital in London was assessed. Swabs taken from the inner aspect of the cuffs were cultured using standard microbiological techniques. Bacterial organisms were found in 85% (102) of the 120 BPCs assessed. The highest rates of contamination were found in the outpatients department (90%). There were differences in the most common bacterial species isolated between the samples obtained from the outpatient clinics and the wards, with coagulase-negative Staphylococcus and diphtheroids being the most prevalent species in the wards and outpatient clinics, respectively. These findings highlight the necessity to eliminate this potential risk of infection. PMID:24569512

  19. Vaginal Cuff Dehiscence: Risk Factors and Associated Morbidities

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs Weizman, Noga; Einarsson, Jon I.; Wang, Karen C.; Vitonis, Allison F.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To evaluate whether the route and surgical technique by which hysterectomy is performed influence the incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of total hysterectomy cases performed at Brigham and Woman's Hospital or Faulkner Hospital during 2009 through 2011. Results: During the study period, 2382 total hysterectomies were performed; 23 of these (0.96%) were diagnosed with cuff dehiscence, and 4 women had recurrent dehiscence. Both laparoscopic (odds ratio, 23.4; P = .007) and robotic (odds ratio, 73; P = .0006) hysterectomies were associated with increased odds of cuff dehiscence in a multivariate regression analysis. The type of energy used during colpotomy, mode of closure (hand sewn, laparoscopic suturing, or suturing assisted by a device), and suture material did not differ significantly between groups; however, continuous suturing of the cuff was a protective factor (odds ratio, 0.24; P = .03). Women with dehiscence had more extensive procedures, as well as an increased incidence of additional major postoperative complications (17.4% vs 3%, P = .004). Conclusion: The rate of cuff dehiscence in our cohort correlates with the current literature. This study suggests that the risk of dehiscence is influenced mainly by the scope and complexity of the surgical procedure. It seems that different colpotomy techniques do not influence the rate of cuff dehiscence; however, continuous suturing of the cuff may be superior to interrupted suturing. PMID:25901104

  20. Comprehensive Approach to Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Options and Techniques

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... portal that I use for visualization and for instrumentation, which is a direct lateral portal. I place ... put an anterior cannula in that allows me instrumentation and orients me because the largest blood vessels ...

  1. Magnitude of Interfractional Vaginal Cuff Movement: Implications for External Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Daniel J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Michaletz-Lorenz, Martha [Department of Education and Training, Elekta, Maryland Heights, MO (United States); Goddu, S. Murty [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Grigsby, Perry W., E-mail: pgrigsby@wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify the extent of interfractional vaginal cuff movement in patients receiving postoperative irradiation for cervical or endometrial cancer in the absence of bowel/bladder instruction. Methods and Materials: Eleven consecutive patients with cervical or endometrial cancer underwent placement of three gold seed fiducial markers in the vaginal cuff apex as part of standard of care before simulation. Patients subsequently underwent external irradiation and brachytherapy treatment based on institutional guidelines. Daily megavoltage CT imaging was performed during each external radiation treatment fraction. The daily positions of the vaginal apex fiducial markers were subsequently compared with the original position of the fiducial markers on the simulation CT. Composite dose-volume histograms were also created by summing daily target positions. Results: The average ({+-} standard deviation) vaginal cuff movement throughout daily pelvic external radiotherapy when referenced to the simulation position was 16.2 {+-} 8.3 mm. The maximum vaginal cuff movement for any patient during treatment was 34.5 mm. In the axial plane the mean vaginal cuff movement was 12.9 {+-} 6.7 mm. The maximum vaginal cuff axial movement was 30.7 mm. In the craniocaudal axis the mean movement was 10.3 {+-} 7.6 mm, with a maximum movement of 27.0 mm. Probability of cuff excursion outside of the clinical target volume steadily dropped as margin size increased (53%, 26%, 4.2%, and 1.4% for 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 cm, respectively.) However, rectal and bladder doses steadily increased with larger margin sizes. Conclusions: The magnitude of vaginal cuff movement is highly patient specific and can impact target coverage in patients without bowel/bladder instructions at simulation. The use of vaginal cuff fiducials can help identify patients at risk for target volume excursion.

  2. Effect of tear size, corticosteroids and subacromial decompression surgery on the hierarchical structural properties of torn supraspinatus tendons

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, J. M. R.; Murphy, R. J.; Chaudhury, S.; Czernuszka, J. T.; Carr, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The effects of disease progression and common tendinopathy treatments on the tissue characteristics of human rotator cuff tendons have not previously been evaluated in detail owing to a lack of suitable sampling techniques. This study evaluated the structural characteristics of torn human supraspinatus tendons across the full disease spectrum, and the short-term effects of subacromial corticosteroid injections (SCIs) and subacromial decompression (SAD) surgery on these structural characteristics. Methods Samples were collected inter-operatively from supraspinatus tendons containing small, medium, large and massive full thickness tears (n = 33). Using a novel minimally invasive biopsy technique, paired samples were also collected from supraspinatus tendons containing partial thickness tears either before and seven weeks after subacromial SCI (n = 11), or before and seven weeks after SAD surgery (n = 14). Macroscopically normal subscapularis tendons of older patients (n = 5, mean age = 74.6 years) and supraspinatus tendons of younger patients (n = 16, mean age = 23.3) served as controls. Ultra- and micro-structural characteristics were assessed using atomic force microscopy and polarised light microscopy respectively. Results Significant structural differences existed between torn and control groups. Differences were identifiable early in the disease spectrum, and increased with increasing tear size. Neither SCI nor SAD surgery altered the structural properties of partially torn tendons seven weeks after treatment. Conclusions These findings may suggest the need for early clinical intervention strategies for torn rotator cuff tendons in order to prevent further degeneration of the tissue as tear size increases. Further work is required to establish the long-term abilities of SCI and SAD to prevent, and even reverse, such degeneration. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:252–61. PMID:25106417

  3. Profile soft-seal cuff, a new endotracheal tube, effectively inhibits an increase in the cuff pressure through high compliance rather than low diffusion of nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Karasawa, F; Mori, T; Okuda, T; Satoh, T

    2001-01-01

    We assessed the nitrous oxide (N(2)O) gas-barrier properties of a new endotracheal tube cuff, the Profile Soft-Seal Cuff (PSSC) (Sims Portex, Kent, UK). The tracheas of randomly selected patients were intubated with the Trachelon (Terumo, Tokyo, Japan), Profile Cuff (PC) (Sims Portex), or PSSC (n = 15 for each) endotracheal tube. Cuffs were inflated with air, and intracuff pressure was measured during anesthesia with 67% N(2)O. The concentration of N(2)O in cuffs was measured at the end of anesthesia. Postoperative sore throat was assessed. The volume-pressure relationship and thickness of the cuff were also measured. Cuff pressure, which increased gradually during anesthesia, was significantly less in the PSSC and PC groups than in the Trachelon group. The PSSC had smaller pressure than the PC 120 min after the start of anesthesia (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the N(2)O concentration in cuffs among the groups, although the PSSC had the thinnest cuff with the highest compliance. The incidence of postoperative sore throat in the Trachelon group was significantly higher than in the other two groups. In summary, the PSSC effectively inhibits an increase in cuff pressure during anesthesia with N(2)O. The underlying mechanism is probably the higher compliance of the thinner cuff, rather than a reduction in N(2)O diffusion into the cuff. PMID:11133616

  4. Direct navigation on 3D rotational x-ray data acquired with a mobile propeller C-arm: accuracy and application in functional endoscopic sinus surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Kraats, Everine B.; Carelsen, Bart; Fokkens, Wytske J.; Boon, Sjirk N.; Noordhoek, Niels; Niessen, Wiro J.; van Walsum, Theo

    2005-12-01

    Recently, three-dimensional (3D) rotational x-ray imaging has been combined with navigation technology, enabling direct 3D navigation for minimally invasive image guided interventions. In this study, phantom experiments are used to determine the accuracy of such a navigation set-up for a mobile C-arm with propeller motion. After calibration of the C-arm system, the accuracy is evaluated by pinpointing divots on a special-purpose phantom with known geometry. This evaluation is performed both with and without C-arm motion in between calibration and registration for navigation. The variation caused by each of the individual transformations in the calibration and registration process is also studied. The feasibility of direct navigation on 3D rotational x-ray images for functional endoscopic sinus surgery has been evaluated in a cadaver navigation experiment. Navigation accuracy was approximately 1.0 mm, which is sufficient for functional endoscopic sinus surgery. C-arm motion in between calibration and registration slightly degraded the registration accuracy by approximately 0.3 mm. Standard deviations of each of the transformations were in the range 0.15-0.31 mm. In the cadaver experiment, the navigation images were considered in good correspondence with the endoscopic images by an experienced ENT surgeon. Availability of 3D localization information provided by the navigation system was considered valuable by the ENT surgeon.

  5. Development of a rotational cell-seeding system for tubularized extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffolds in vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Callanan, A; Davis, N F; McGloughlin, T M; Walsh, M T

    2014-05-01

    Tubularized porcine extracellular matrices (ECMs) are under investigation as adjuvant scaffolds for endovascular aneurismal repair (EVAR). Limitations with tubularized ECMs in this setting include difficulties in achieving a confluent endothelium on the scaffold's luminal surface prior to in vivo implantation. In this in vitro study a rotational "cell-seeding rig" (RCR) was constructed to assess the potential for endothelialization of tubular ECM constructs. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were cultured onto the luminal surfaces of tubular porcine urinary bladder matrix (UBM) scaffolds and rotated in the RCR at experimental rotational speeds. Results showed that endothelial attachment occurred at a rotation speed of six revolutions per hour. HAECs continued to proliferate after the initial attachment period of 24 h and formed a confluent endothelial monolayer after 14 days of growth. Our results demonstrate that RCRs facilitate attachment of HAECs in vitro at a speed of six revolutions per hour. The endothelialization technique presented in the current study may be important for advancing tissue-engineering approaches to address some of the current limitations in endovascular treatments of abdominal aortic aneurysms. PMID:24155222

  6. Descriptive Report of Shoulder Range of Motion and Rotational Strength Six and 12 Weeks Following Arthroscopic Superior Labral Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sueyoshi, Tetsuro; Winters, Matthew; Zeman, David

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To measure short-term post surgery glenohumeral internal and external rotation strength, shoulder range of motion (ROM), and subjective self-report ratings following arthroscopic superior labral (SLAP) repair. Background Physical therapists provide rehabilitation for patients following arthroscopic repair of the superior labrum. Little research has been published regarding the short-term results of this procedure while the patient is typically under the direct care of the physical therapist. Methods Charts from 39 patients (7 females and 32 males) with a mean age of 43.4±14.9 years following SLAP repair were reviewed. All patients underwent rehabilitation by the same therapist using a standardized protocol and were operated on and referred by the same orthopaedic surgeon. Retrospective chart review was performed to obtain descriptive profiles of shoulder ROM at 6 and 12 weeks post surgery and isokinetically documented internal and external rotation strength 12 weeks post surgery. Results At 12 weeks post-surgery, involved shoulder flexion, abduction, and external rotation active ROM values were 2-6 degrees greater than the contralateral, non-involved extremity. Isokinetic internal and external rotation strength deficits of 7-11% were found as compared to the uninjured extremity. Patients completed the self-report section of the Modified American Shoulder Elbow Surgeons Rating Scale and scored a mean of 37/45 points. Conclusion The results of this study provide objective data for both glenohumeral joint ROM and rotator cuff strength following superior labral repair at time points during which the patient is under the direct care of the physical therapist. These results show a nearly complete return of active ROM and muscular strength following repair of the superior labrum and post-operative physical therapy. PMID:21509132

  7. Leakage of fluid around endotracheal tube cuffs: a cadaver study

    PubMed Central

    Lucius, Ralph; Ewald, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the leakage of liquid past the cuffs of tracheal tubes in fresh frozen human heads. Methods Six truncated fresh frozen heads were used and intubated with 8.0 mm endotracheal tubes. The intracuff pressures tested were 30 and 100 cmH2O. Subsequently, 20 ml of each of two oral antiseptic rinses (0.2% chlorhexidine and octenidine [octenidol®, Schülke & Mayr GmbH, Norderstedt, Germany]) was applied for thirty seconds in the mouth. During the trial, leakage of the cuffs was examined. Results The sealing between the tracheal cuff and tracheal wall was leakage-proof for all tested intracuff pressures and all tested antiseptic rinses. However, approximately 5.6 ml and 1.8 ml leaked into the esophagus and remained as a cuff-puddle, respectively. Conclusions The sealing between an endotracheal tube cuff with an intracuff pressure of 30 cmH2O and the tracheal wall is leakage-proof during oral care with antiseptic rinsing. An increase of intracuff pressure to 100 cmH2O does not appear to be required. PMID:24363847

  8. Effects of Wing-Cuff on NACA 23015 Aerodynamic Performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, S. M. A.; Belhenniche, M.; Madani Fouatih, O.; Imine, B.

    2014-03-01

    The main subject of this work is the numerical study control of flow separation on a NACA 23015 airfoil by using wing cuff. This last is a leading edge modification done to the wing. The modification consists of a slight extension of the chord on the outboard section of the wings. Different numerical cases are considered for the baseline and modified airfoil NACA 23015 according at different angle of incidence. The turbulence is modeled by two equations k-epsilon model. The results of this numerical investigation showed several benefits of the wing cuff compared with a conventional airfoil and an agreement is observed between the experimental data and the present study. The most intriguing result of this research is the capability for wing cuff to perform short take-offs and landings.

  9. Perivascular fluid cuffs decrease lung compliance by increasing tissue resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Kevin; Alvarez, Diego F.; King, Judy A.; Stevens, Troy

    2010-01-01

    Objective Lung inflammation causes perivascular fluid cuffs to form around extra-alveolar blood vessels; however, the physiologic consequences of such cuffs remain poorly understood. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that perivascular fluid cuffs, without concomitant alveolar edema, are sufficient to decrease lung compliance. Design Prospective, randomized, controlled study. Setting Research laboratory. Subjects One hundred twenty male CD40 rats. Interventions To test this hypothesis, the plant alkaloid thapsigargin was used to activate store-operated calcium entry and increase cytosolic calcium in endothelium. Thapsigargin was infused into a central venous catheter of intact, sedated, and mechanically ventilated rats. Measurements Static and dynamic lung mechanics and hemodynamics were measured continuously. Main Results Thapsigargin produced perivascular fluid cuffs along extra-alveolar vessels but did not cause alveolar flooding or blood gas abnormalities. Lung compliance dose-dependently decreased after thapsigargin infusion, attributable to an increase in tissue resistance that was attributed to increased tissue damping and tissue elastance. Airway resistance was not changed. Neither central venous pressure nor left ventricular end diastolic pressure was altered by thapsigargin. Heart rate did not change, although thapsigargin decreased pressure over time sufficient to reduce cardiac output by 50%. Infusion of the type 4 phosphodiesterase inhibitor, rolipram, prevented thapsigargin from inducing perivascular cuffs and decreasing lung compliance. Rolipram also normalized pressure over time and corrected the deficit in cardiac output. Conclusions Our findings resolve for the first time that perivascular cuff formation negatively impacts mechanical coupling between the bronchovascular bundle and the lung parenchyma, decreasing lung compliance without impacting central venous pressure. PMID:20400904

  10. Variables affecting leakage past endotracheal tube cuffs: a bench study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Renée Pitts; Daniel Fisher; Demet Sulemanji; Joseph Kratohvil; Yandong Jiang; Robert Kacmarek

    2010-01-01

    Purpose  Leakage of oral secretions past endotracheal tubes (ETT) has been implicated in ventilator associated pneumonia. The aim of\\u000a this bench study was to compare the ability of current generation ETT cuffs to prevent fluid leakage and to determine the\\u000a specific mechanical ventilator settings that affect movement of fluid across an inflated ETT cuff.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Using a 2.3-cm internal diameter (ID) tracheal

  11. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...tracheostomy tube. The cuff is used to prevent the patient's aspiration of substances, such as blood or vomit, or to provide a means for positive-pressure ventilation of the patient. This device is made of either stainless steel or plastic....

  12. Use of A Neonatal Blood Pressure Cuff to Monitor Blood Pressure In The Adult Finger – Comparison With A Standard Adult Arm Cuff

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sohail Q Khan; Joanna M. Wardlaw; Richard Davenport; Jim Slattery; Stephanie Lewis

    1998-01-01

    Background. There are few suitable methods for monitoring blood pressure continously (or intermittently) for research in adult stroke patients, who are ill but do not justify invasive intensive care monitoring. Method. We tested a neonatal arm blood pressure in adults by placing it on the forefinger (“finger cuff”). We compared the repeatability of the finger cuff with blood pressure measured

  13. Computerized cuff pressure algometry: A new method to assess deep-tissue hypersensitivity in fibromyalgia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anders Jespersen; Lene Dreyer; Sally Kendall; Thomas Graven-Nielsen; Lars Arendt-Nielsen; Henning Bliddal; Bente Danneskiold-Samsoe

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of computerized cuff pressure algometry (CPA) in fibromyalgia (FM) and to correlate deep-tissue sensitivity assessed by CPA with other disease markers of FM. Forty-eight women with FM and 16 healthy age-matched women were included. A computer-controlled, pneumatic tourniquet cuff was placed over the gastrocnemius muscle. The cuff was inflated, and

  14. Evaluation of risk factors of vaginal cuff dehiscence after hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung Ji; Kim, Seongmin; Bae, Hyo Sook; Lee, Jae Kwan; Lee, Nak Woo

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate risk factors of vaginal cuff dehiscence or evisceration according to the type of operation. Methods Medical records of 604 women who underwent hysterectomies at Korea University Anam Hospital between June 2007 and June 2011 were reviewed. They were allocated to six groups. The six types of hysterectomies included robotic hysterectomy (n = 7), robotic radical hysterectomy and node dissection (RRHND, n = 9), total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH, n = 274), laparoscopy assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH, n = 238), laparoscopic radical hysterectomy and node dissection (n = 11), and abdominal radical hysterectomy (ARH, n = 63). The characteristics and outcomes of each groups were compared. Results There was no difference in the characteristics of patients between 6 groups. In total of 604 hysterectomies, 3 evisceration (0.49%) and 21 dehiscences (3.47%) occurred. Evisceration were found in RRHND (1/9, 11.1%), TLH (1/276, 0.36%), and ARH (1/63, 1.56%). Dehiscences occurred in TLH (15/274, 5.42%), LAVH (4/238, 1.68%), and ARH (2/63, 3.17%). In 169 cases of TLH with intra-corporeal continuous suture, 1 evisceration and 4 dehiscences occurred, whereas 11 dehiscences occurred in 105 TLH cases with vaginal continuous locking suture (2.96% vs. 10.47%, P = 0.02). Conclusion The incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscenceand eviscerationwas significantly higher in TLH than LAVH. The intra-corporeal cuff suture was superior to the vaginal suture to prevent the vaginal cuff complications in TLH. PMID:24678487

  15. The relevance of the moment arm of shoulder muscles with respect to axial rotation of the glenohumeral joint in four positions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David K Kuechle; Stephen R Newman; Eiji Itoi; Glen L Niebur; Bernard F Morrey; Kai-Nan An

    2000-01-01

    Objective. This study was undertaken to determine the efficiency of the shoulder girdle muscles during axial humeral rotation based on measurements of the moment arms.Design. The instantaneous muscle moment arms of 10 shoulder muscles, including the three portions of the deltoid, the rotator cuff muscles, teres major, and the thoracohumeral muscle group, were measured during four specified glenohumeral rotations.Background. Axial

  16. Cardiac and vascular adaptation to 0g with and without thigh cuffs (Antares 14 and Altair 21 day Mir spaceflights)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ph. Arbeille; G. Fomina; F. Achaibou; J. Pottier; A. Kotovskaya

    1995-01-01

    Cardiovascular Actaptation was evaluated on 2 astronauts: one wearing thigh cuffs from flight day 1 to 8 (14d flight), the second without cuffs (21d flight). Ultrasound investigations were performed at rest and during LBNP. Results: Without thigh cuffs the cardiovascular Actaptation consists in (1) the development of a hypovolemia with an increase of the heart rate and the cardiac output,

  17. Cuff-less and Noninvasive Measurements of Arterial Blood Pressure by Pulse Transit Time

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. C. Y. Poon; Y. T. Zhang

    2005-01-01

    The current blood pressure (BP) measurement devices are mostly built on the principle of auscultation, oscillometry or tonometry, all of which use an inflatable cuff to occlude or unload the artery. The need of a cuff in these devices limits the further reduction in size and power consumption, and restricts the frequency and ease of their usage. Therefore, this study

  18. A Profile of Glenohumeral Internal and External Rotation Motion in the Uninjured High School Baseball Pitcher, Part II: Strength

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Wendy J.; Kaplan, Kevin M.; ElAttrache, Neal S.; Jobe, Frank W.; Morrey, Bernard F.; Kaufman, Kenton R.

    2011-01-01

    Context: A database describing the range of normal rotator cuff strength values in uninjured high school pitchers has not been established. Chronologic factors that contribute to adaptations in strength also have not been established. Objectives: To establish a normative profile of rotator cuff strength in uninjured high school baseball pitchers and to determine whether bilateral differences in rotator cuff strength are normal findings in this age group. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Baseball playing field. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 165 uninjured male high school baseball pitchers (age = 16 ± 1 years, height = 1.8 ± 0.1 m, mass = 76.8 ± 10.1 kg, pitching experience = 7 ± 2 years). Main Outcome Measure(s): Isometric rotator cuff strength was measured bilaterally with a handheld dynamometer. We calculated side-to-side differences in strength (external rotation [ER], internal rotation [IR], and the ratio of ER:IR at 90° of abduction), differences in strength by age, and the influence of chronologic factors (participant age, years of pitching experience) on limb strength. Results: Side-to-side differences in strength were found for ER, IR, and ER:IR ratio at 90° of abduction. Age at the time of testing was a significant but weak predictor of both ER strength (R2 = 0.032, P = .02) and the ER:IR ratio (R2 = 0.051, P = .004) at 90° of abduction. Conclusions: We established a normative profile of rotator cuff strength for the uninjured high school baseball pitcher that might be used to assist clinicians and researchers in the interpretation of muscle strength performance in this population. These data further suggested that dominant-limb adaptations in rotator cuff strength are a normal finding in this age group and did not demonstrate that these adaptations were a consequence of the age at the time of testing or the number of years of pitching experience. PMID:21669099

  19. Reliability of forced internal rotation and active internal rotation to assess lateral instability of the biceps pulley

    PubMed Central

    ARRIGONI, PAOLO; ROSE, GIACOMO DELLE; D’AMBROSI, RICCARDO; ROTUNDO, GIORGIO; CAMPAGNA, VINCENZO; PIRANI, PIERGIORGIO; PANASCÌ, MANLIO; PETRICCIOLI, DARIO; BERTONE, CELESTE; GRASSO, ANDREA; LATTE, CARMINE; COSTA, ALBERTO; VIOLA, GINO; DE GIORGI, SILVANA; PANELLA, ANTONELLO; PADUA, ROBERTO; BECCARINI, ALESSANDRO; SALCHER, BARBARA; OLIVIERI, MATTEO; MUGNAINI, MARCO; PANNONE, ANTONELLO; CEOLDO, CHIARA; LONGO, UMILE GIUSEPPE; DENARO, VINCENZO; CERCIELLO, SIMONE; PANNI, ALFREDO SCHIAVONE; AVANZI, PAOLO; ZORZI, CLAUDIO; RAGONE, VINCENZA; CASTAGNA, ALESSANDRO; RANDELLI, PIETRO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between positive painful forced internal rotation (FIR) and lateral pulley instability in the presence of a pre-diagnosed posterosuperior cuff tear. The same investigation was conducted for painful active internal rotation (AIR). Methods a multicenter prospective study was conducted in a series of patients scheduled to undergo arthroscopic posterosuperior cuff repair. Pain was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (DASH) was administered. The VAS score at rest, DASH score, and presence/absence of pain on FIR and AIR were recorded and their relationships with lesions of the lateral pulley, cuff tear patterns and shape of lesions were analyzed. Results the study population consisted of 115 patients (mean age: 55.1 years) recruited from 12 centers. The dominant arm was affected in 72 cases (62.6%). The average anteroposterior extension of the lesion was 1.61 cm. The mean preoperative VAS and DASH scores were 6.1 and 41.8, respectively. FIR and AIR were positive in 94 (81.7%) and 85 (73.9%) cases, respectively. The lateral pulley was compromised in 50 cases (43.4%). Cuff tears were partial articular in 35 patients (30.4%), complete in 61 (53%), and partial bursal in 19 (16.5%). No statistical correlation between positive FIR or AIR and lateral pulley lesions was detected. Positive FIR and AIR were statistically associated with complete lesions. Negative FIR was associated with the presence of partial articular tears. Conclusions painful FIR in the presence of a postero-superior cuff tear does not indicate lateral pulley instability. When a cuff tear is suspected, positive FIR and AIR are suggestive of full-thickness tear patterns while a negative FIR suggests a partial articular lesion. Level of evidence: level I, validating cohort study with good reference standards. PMID:26151035

  20. Detection of endobronchial intubation by monitoring the CO2 level above the endotracheal cuff.

    PubMed

    Efrati, Shai; Deutsch, Israel; Weksler, Nathan; Gurman, Gabriel M

    2015-02-01

    Early detection of accidental endobronchial intubation (EBI) is still an unsolved problem in anesthesia and critical care daily practice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of monitoring above cuff CO2 to detect EBI (the working hypothesis was that the origin of CO2 is from the unventilated, but still perfused, lung). Six goats were intubated under general anesthesia and the ETT positioning was verified by a flexible bronchoscope. The AnapnoGuard system, already successfully used to detect air leak around the ETT cuff, was used for continuous monitoring of above-the-cuff CO2 level. When the ETT distal tip was located in the trachea, with an average cuff pressure of 15 mmHg, absence of CO2 above the cuff was observed. The ETT was then deliberately advanced into one of the main bronchi under flexible bronchoscopic vision. In all six cases the immediate presence of CO2 above the cuff was identified. Further automatic inflation of the cuff, up to a level of 27 mmHg, did not affect the above-the-cuff measured CO2 level. Withdrawal of the ETT and repositioning of its distal tip in mid-trachea caused the disappearance of CO2 above the cuff in a maximum of 3 min, confirming the absence of air leak and the correct positioning of the ETT. Our results suggest that measurement of the above-the-cuff CO2 level could offer a reliable, on-line solution for early identification of accidental EBI. Further studies are planned to validate the efficacy of the method in a clinical setup. PMID:24870932

  1. Intraoperative evaluation of the spiral nerve cuff electrode on the femoral nerve trunk

    PubMed Central

    Polasek, K H; Schiefer, M A; Pinault, G C J; Triolo, R J; Tyler, D J

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of the Case Western Reserve University spiral nerve cuff electrode on the femoral nerve trunk was performed intraoperatively in four subjects undergoing femoral-popliteal bypass surgery. The threshold, nerve size and selective activation capabilities of the electrode were examined. The activation thresholds for the first muscle to be recruited were 6.3, 9, 10.6, and 37.4 nC with pulse amplitudes ranging from 0.3 to 1 mA. The femoral nerve was found to have an elliptical cross-section with a major axis average length of 9 mm (8–12 mm) and a minor axis length of 1.5 mm. In all four subjects selective activation of the sartorius was obtained. In two subjects, the rectus femoris could also be selectively activated and in one subject the vastus medialis was selectively activated. Each electrode had four independent contacts that were evaluated separately. Small air bubbles were formed in the space over some contacts, preventing stimulation. This occurred in one contact in each electrode, leaving three effective stimulation channels. This issue has been corrected for future studies. PMID:19901448

  2. Evaluation of tracheal cuff pressure variation in spontaneously breathing patients

    PubMed Central

    Plotnikow, Gustavo A; Roux, Nicolas; Feld, Viviana; Gogniat, Emiliano; Villalba, Dario; Ribero, Noelia Vairo; Sartore, Marisa; Bosso, Mauro; Quiroga, Corina; Leiva, Valeria; Scrigna, Mariana; Puchulu, Facundo; Distéfano, Eduardo; Scapellato, Jose Luis; Intile, Dante; Planells, Fernando; Noval, Diego; Buñirigo, Pablo; Jofré, Ricardo; Nielsen, Ernesto Díaz

    2013-01-01

    Background: Most of the studies referring cuff tubes’ issues were conducted on intubated patients. Not much is known about the cuff pressure performance in chronically tracheostomized patients disconnected from mechanical ventilation. Objective: To evaluate cuff pressure (CP) variation in tracheostomized, spontaneously breathing patients in a weaning rehabilitation center. Materials and Methods: Experimental setup to test instruments in vitro, in which the gauge (TRACOE) performance at different pressure levels was evaluated in six tracheostomy tubes, and a clinical setupin which CP variation over 24 h, every 4 h, and for 6 days was measured in 35 chronically tracheostomized clinically stable, patients who had been disconnected from mechanical ventilation for at least 72 h. The following data were recorded: Tube brand, type, and size; date of the tube placed; the patient's body position; the position of the head; axillary temperature; pulse and respiration rates; blood pressure; and pulse oximetry. Results: In vitro difference between the initial pressure (IP) and measured pressure (MP) was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The difference between the IP and MP was significant when selecting for various tube brands (P < 0.05). In the clinical set-up, 207 measurements were performed and the CP was >30 cm H2O in 6.28% of the recordings, 20-30 cm H2O in 42.0% of the recordings, and <20 cm H2O in 51.69% of the recordings. Conclusion: The systematic CP measurement in chronically tracheostomized, spontaneously breathing patients showed high variability, which was independent of tube brand, size, type, or time of placement. Consequently, measurements should be made more frequently. PMID:24459624

  3. Suprascapular nerve block as a method of preemptive pain control in shoulder surgery.

    PubMed

    Jerosch, J; Saad, M; Greig, M; Filler, T

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of suprascapular nerve block (SSNB) in shoulder surgery. The study group consisted of 260 patients, which were subjected to shoulder operations. The patients were divided into two equal groups: group I with nerve block compared to a control group II without a nerve block. The mean age of the patients in group I was 56.2 +/- 6.86 years and that in group II was 54.5 +/- 7.06 years. The female to male ratio was 71:59 in group I and was 69:61 in group II. Surgical procedures were arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, arthroscopic subacromial decompression, arthroscopic acromioclavicular resection, arthroscopic removal of calcific tendonitis, arthroscopic reconstruction of instability, arthroscopic capsular release and shoulder replacement. In all cases the pain was documented by the visual analogue scale (VAS) preoperative, at the first, the second as well as at the third day after surgery. In order to evaluate the amount of fluid, which is needed for infiltration of the area of the supraspinatus fossa, we injected different amount of local anesthetic in combination with contrast dye in five patients. In this study to document the fluid distribution, after injecting with different milliliters, 10 ml is proved to be more than enough to have sufficient local anesthetic to block the SSN. Pre-operatively the mean VAS was comparable between both groups. We documented a significant difference in favour of SSNB from day 1 to day 3 after surgery. No specific complications due to this nerve block procedure were found in any patient post-operatively. PMID:18369594

  4. [Usefulness of tracheal tube with N2O gas-barrier cuff].

    PubMed

    Umezono, Y; Fujita, A; Toi, T; Sakio, H

    1999-11-01

    We evaluated three different tracheal tubes, Portex Profile Soft-Seal Cuff (PSSC), Portex Profile Cuff (PC) and Mallincrodt Lo-Contour (LC), when they are used in the artificial trachea and in anesthetized patients. When a cuff was inflated in the artificial trachea, PSSC with a cuff of high N2O gas-barrier property, and PC could achieve air-tight sealing with a smaller amount of injected air, compared with LC. This finding suggests that the inflated cuff-shape and cuff-fold formation are important to block the airway leakage with small volume of air. Either of three tubes was used randomly in thirty adult patients for general anesthesia using nitrous oxide 65%. Intracuff pressures were increased significantly with the passage of time. In PSSC group, however, intracuff pressure was 25 +/- 6 mmHg (mean +/- SD) at two hours, and in other two groups it was between 32 and 48 mmHg. The use of a tracheal tube with gas-barrier cuff is recommended to prevent a high tracheal wall pressure. PMID:10586564

  5. Vaginal cuff closure at abdominal hysterectomy: comparing sutures with absorbable staples.

    PubMed

    Stovall, T G; Summitt, R L; Lipscomb, G H; Ling, F W

    1991-09-01

    To compare two methods of vaginal cuff closure during abdominal hysterectomy, 60 patients were randomized to one of two cuff-closure methods. The vaginal cuff was closed with three interrupted 0-Dexon sutures in 30 and with absorbable staples in 30. Both groups were similar with respect to age, gravidity, parity, preoperative indication, hemoglobin, and hematocrit. The operative technique and quantity of irrigation used was standardized. Operative blood loss was calculated by the weight method and an unactivated, medium flat Jackson-Pratt drain was left in place for collecting postoperative cuff cultures at 24 and 48 hours. The mean operative times in the suture group (97.4 minutes) and staple group (93.4 minutes) were not significantly different (P greater than .05). Cuff-closure time was more rapid (P = .0001) in the staple group (5.8 minutes) than in the suture group (9.3 minutes). Intraoperative cultures were positive in eight of 30 suture patients (26.7%) and eight of 30 staple patients (26.7%). Postoperative cultures at either 24 or 48 hours were positive in four women (13.3%) in the suture group and six (20%) in the staple group. Febrile morbidity occurred in six (20%) in each group. Three staple and two suture subjects developed a vaginal cuff abscess or hematoma, one of whom was readmitted to the hospital for intravenous antibiotics and draining of the vaginal cuff abscess. The presence of a positive vaginal cuff culture did not predict clinical outcome. Based on these observations and the increased cost of the stapling device, we conclude that there is no significant clinical advantage of surgical staples over traditional sutures for vaginal cuff closure at abdominal hysterectomy. PMID:1876376

  6. Cosmetic Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... risks of cosmetic surgery? top People who have cosmetic surgery face many of the same risks as anyone having surgery. These include: Infection Not healing well Damage to nerves Bleeding Not being happy with the results Risks ...

  7. Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... significant defects or problems. But what about having cosmetic surgery just to change your appearance? Is it a ... are right and wrong reasons to have surgery. Cosmetic surgery is unlikely to change your life. Most board- ...

  8. Control of tracheal cuff pressure: a pilot study using a pneumatic device

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexandre Duguet; Leda D’Amico; Giuseppina Biondi; Hélène Prodanovic; Jésus Gonzalez-Bermejo; Thomas Similowski

    2007-01-01

    Objective  To evaluate the efficacy of a simple mechanical device to maintain constant endotracheal cuff pressure (Pcuff) during mechanical\\u000a ventilation (large encased inflatable cuff connected to the endotracheal cuff and receiving constant pressure from a heavy\\u000a mass attached to an articulated arm).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Design and setting  Single-center, prospective, randomized, crossover, pilot study in a medical intensive care unit.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Patients and participants  Nine consecutive mechanically ventilated patients (age

  9. Rotational thromboelastometry and multiple electrode platelet aggregometry in four patients with abnormal routine coagulation studies before removal of epidural catheters after major surgery: a case series and research study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Routine coagulation tests have a low predictability for perioperative bleeding complications, and spinal hematoma after removal of epidural catheters is very infrequent. Thromboelastometry and point-of-care platelet aggregometry may improve hemostatic monitoring but have not been studied in the context of safety around epidural removal. Methods Twenty patients who received an epidural catheter for major thoracoabdominal and abdominal surgery were included prospectively. In addition to routine coagulation tests, rotational thromboelastometry and multiple electrode platelet aggregometry were carried out. Results A coagulation deficit was suggested by routine coagulation tests on the intended day of epidural catheter removal in four out of 20 patients. Prothrombin time-international normalized ratio was elevated to 1.5 in one patient (normal range: 0.9 to 1.2) while rotational thromboelastometry and multiple electrode platelet aggregometry parameters were within normal limits. Activated partial thromboplastin time was elevated to 47 to 50 seconds in the remaining three patients (normal range 28 to 45 seconds). Rotational thromboelastometry showed that one of the patients’ results was due to heparin effect: the clotting time with the HEPTEM® activator was 154 seconds as compared to 261 seconds with INTEM. The three remaining patients with prolonged routine coagulation test results had all received over 1L of hydroxyethyl starch (Venofundin®) and thrombosis prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin (enoxaparin). Rotational thromboelastometry and multiple electrode platelet aggregometrygave normal or hypercoagulative signals in most patients. Conclusions This case series is new in that it examines rotational thromboelastometry and multiple electrode platelet aggregometry postoperatively in the context of epidural analgesia and shows that they may be clinically useful. These methods should be validated before they can be used for standard patient care. PMID:24377397

  10. } Surgery 7 weeks } Medicine 7 weeks

    E-print Network

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    #12;} Surgery 7 weeks } Medicine 7 weeks } Pediatrics 7 weeks } OB-GYN 7 weeks } Psychiatry 7 weeks;} Medicine, Surgery, Pediatrics 8 weeks } OB-GYN, Family Med, Psychiatry 6 weeks } Elective block 6 weeks;} Educational and LCME concerns } Student wish for longer Medicine and Surgery rotations } National norms

  11. [Isokinetic evaluation of external rotators and abductors of the shoulder before and after arthroscopic decompression of suprascapular nerve due to its neuropathy--preliminary report].

    PubMed

    Fabi?, Jaros?aw

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents results of objective isokinetic evaluation of shoulder abductors and external rotators peak torque in 4 cases (2 women and 2 men) suffering from suprascapular nerve neuropathy (SNN). The mean age of patients was 25 years. The clinical diagnosis of SSN involvement was confirmed by electromyographic study in all cases. The radiological, sonographic and additionally magnetic resonas (2 cases operated on) examinations proved the absence of bone and soft tissues pathologies (ganglion and rotator cuff). The arthroscopic decompression of SSN was done in 2 cases. Isokinetic evaluation (180 degrees/s) disclosed weakness of shoulder abductors and external rotators in all cases and decrease of side to side difference of their peak torque 6 months after surgery. The patients operated on refused control EMG evaluation since they experience complete pain relief and improvement of function. There were no complications. Arthroscopic suprascapular nerve decompression can be done safely and effectively in properly selected cases. The isokinetics offers objective pre and postoperative evaluation of muscles involved by SNN. PMID:18078284

  12. Once daily nisoldipine in hypertension: cuff and ambulatory intra-arterial blood pressure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Brigden; M. Heber; M. Caruana; A. Lahiri; E. B. Raftery

    1989-01-01

    Cuff blood pressure data has suggested that the calcium channel antagonist nisoldipine has full twenty four hour efficacy. To test this, 24 h ambulatory intra-arterial blood pressure monitoring was performed on 18 untreated hypertensive subjects (12 men, 6 women) (cuff blood pressure >150\\/95 mm Hg) before and after chronic treatment with 10–20 mg oral nisoldipine taken daily at 08.00 h.

  13. Recovery of neural activity from nerve cuff electrodes.

    PubMed

    Wodlinger, B; Durand, D M

    2011-01-01

    The ability to recover signals from the peripheral nerves would provide natural and physiological signals for controlling artificial limbs and neural prosthetic devices. Current cuff electrode systems can provide multiple channels but the signals have low signal to noise ratio and are difficult to recover. Previous work has shown that beamforming algorithms provide a method to extract such signals from peripheral nerve activiy [1]. This paper describes in-silico and in vivo experiments done to validate that method in a more realistic case. A modified beam forming algorithm capable of significantly decrease cross talk between channels is described and the results of the a 16-channel Flat Interface Nerve Electrode used to recover signals from the sciatic nerve in rabbit while the distal tibial and peroneal branches were stimulated The beamforming spatial filters were able to distinguish which branch was being stimulated, and in many cases how strongly, over a large range of stimulation intensities. PMID:22255375

  14. Endotracheal tube cuff ignited by electrocautery during tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Le Clair, J; Gartner, S; Halma, G

    1990-08-01

    A 64-year old female requiring prolonged ventilatory support was scheduled for an elective tracheostomy. Anesthesia consisted of surgical infiltration of 1% lidocaine and supplemental isoflurane. The patient was mechanically ventilated with an FIO2 of 1.0. An incision was made over the third and fourth tracheal rings. Opening the trachea with electrocautery resulted in a large leak around the endotracheal tube. The cuff was visualized through the tracheal incision and noted to be deflated. A small bleeder was coagulated on the tracheal ring. At this point, a flash fire occurred rising about one-inch high through the tracheal incision. The surgeon immediately covered the site with his hand. The anesthetist promptly disconnected the anesthesia circuit and removed the endotracheal tube. The surgeon inserted the tracheostomy tube and ventilation resumed. The fire lasted approximately 1-2 seconds. Dexamethasone 10 mg was administered intravenously. End-tidal CO2 and oxygen saturation levels were unchanged. The endotracheal tube was inspected. Approximately one-third to one-half of the cuff was charred. Proper management of an endotracheal tube fire includes stopping ventilation, disconnecting the oxygen source, removing the endotracheal tube, diagnosing injury, administering short-term steroids, administering antibiotics if indicated, providing ventilation and medical support as necessary and monitoring the patient for at least 24 hours. Extreme caution is necessary when using electrocautery in close proximity to an endotracheal tube. If electrocautery is used in close proximity to an endotracheal tube, an FIO2 of 0.3 or less with helium should be used. PMID:2399778

  15. A simple method to control tracheal cuff pressure in anaesthesia and in air evacuation.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, I; Watanabe, K; Hayashida, S; Kanno, M; Sato, T

    1999-10-01

    The pressure within latex balloons remains constant despite the balloons being inflated to more than 40 times their initial volume. We used this property to enable improved tracheal cuff pressure control. A latex balloon with an initial volume of 5 ml was connected via a vinyl duct attached with a roller clamp and three-way stopcock to a standard tracheal tube cuff. The 5 ml latex balloon was then inflated with 250 ml of air. The pressure within the tracheal tube cuff was monitored throughout anaesthesia with the inflated latex balloon acting as a pressure controller. Throat symptoms were recorded on the first four postoperative days. The controller kept the tracheal tube cuff pressures constant, and reduced the incidence of postoperative throat symptoms. Variations in cuff pressures with and without the controller were investigated in an altitude chamber to simulate flight. In the altitude chamber, cuff pressure reached over 200 cmH2O at 10 000 feet without the controller, whereas such variations were practically eliminated when the controller was used. PMID:10540063

  16. Orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Gehrig, Laura M B

    2011-09-01

    Orthopedic surgery is a specialty of surgery dedicated to the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases and injuries of the musculoskeletal system in all age groups. Careers in orthopedic surgery span the spectrum from general orthopedics to those of subspecialty expertise in orthopedic trauma, hand, pediatrics, total joint, foot and ankle, sports medicine, and oncology to name a few. PMID:21871990

  17. Eyelid Surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Neoh; A. Eckstein

    2010-01-01

    Eyelid lengthening with or without blepharoplasty (dermatochalasis correction) is usually the final step of surgical rehabilitation. A pleasing outcome after orbital decompression and squint surgery, if indicated, is very much dependent on correcting any remaining lid deformity satisfactorily. This is often more challenging than the preceding surgery. The most common indication for lid surgery is upper lid retraction with poor

  18. The effect of pilot balloon design on estimation of safe tracheal tube cuff pressure.

    PubMed

    Janossy, K M; Pullen, J; Young, D; Bell, G

    2010-08-01

    We studied the effect of pilot balloon design on the ability of experienced anaesthetists to assess and inflate tracheal tube cuffs to safe pressures. A model trachea was designed, incorporating a degree of compliance and an air leak, to evaluate six different pilot balloons grafted onto identical tracheal tubes. Pilot balloons were inflated to one of four pressures and anaesthetists were asked to estimate whether the pressure was acceptable, too low or too high. Anaesthetists were then asked to inflate the cuff of each tube. Overall, 103 (42.9%) of anaesthetists' assessments of tracheal tube cuff pressures were correct (33% correct would be expected by chance, p = 0.002). Pressures generated by anaesthetists inflating tracheal tube cuffs were very variable. Median (IQR [range]) pressures for each pilot balloon ranged from 29 (17-43 [9-56]) cmH(2)O to 74 (49-114 [4-140]) cmH(2)O (p < 0.001). The design of the pilot balloon significantly affects anaesthetists' ability to inflate tracheal tube cuffs to safe pressures. PMID:20573148

  19. Fabrication and performance analysis of a DEA cuff designed for dry-suit applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, S.; Camacho Mattos, A.; Barbazza, A.; Soleimani, M.; Boscariol, P.; Menon, C.

    2013-03-01

    A method for manufacturing a cylindrical dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) is presented. The cylindrical DEA can be used in fabricating the cuff area of dry-suits where the garment is very tight and wearing the suit is difficult. When electrically actuated, the DEA expands radially and the suit can be worn more comfortably. In order to study the performance of the DEA, a customized testing setup was designed, and silicone-made cuff samples with different material stiffnesses were tested. Analytical and FEM modeling were considered to evaluate the experimental output. The results revealed that although the stiffness of the DEA material has a direct relationship with the radial constrictive pressure caused by mechanically stretching the DEA, it has a minor effect on the actuation pressure. It was also found that stacking multiple layers of the DEA to fabricate a laminated structure enabled the attainment of a desired variation of pressure required for the implementation of an electrically tunable cuff.

  20. Arterial pressure: agreement between a brachial cuff-based device and radial tonometry

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chloe M.; Korolkova, Olga; Davies, Justin E.; Parker, Kim H.; Siggers, Jennifer H.; March, Katherine; Tillin, Therese; Chaturvedi, Nish; Hughes, Alun D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Aortic (central) blood pressure (BP) differs from brachial BP and may be a superior predictor of cardiovascular events. However, its measurement is currently restricted to research settings, owing to a moderate level of operator dependency. We tested a new noninvasive device in a large UK cohort. The device estimates central BP using measurements obtained with an upper arm cuff inflated to suprasystolic pressure. We compared these estimates with those obtained using radial tonometry as well as with invasively acquired measurements of aortic BP in a limited number of individuals. Methods: Consecutive cuff-based and tonometry-based estimates of the pressure waveform and the central BP were obtained from 1107 individuals (70?±?6 years). Short-term and long-term reproducibility studies were performed on 28 individuals. Simultaneous cuff-based and invasively measured pressure traces were acquired and compared in an additional six individuals (65?±?20 years). Results: Central systolic BP, as estimated by the cuff-based device, was found to be highly reproducible (coefficient of variation 4 and 8% for short and long-term reproducibility, respectively) and was comparable to that estimated by tonometry (average difference 3?±?6?mmHg, intraclass correlation coefficient?=?0.91). The cuff-based pressure waveforms were similar to those acquired invasively (cross-correlation coefficient 0.93), and the difference in the estimated central systolic BP was ?5?±?8?mmHg (P?=?0.2). Conclusion: Cuff-based devices show promise to simplify the measurement of central BP, whilst maintaining a similar fidelity to tonometry. This could lead to improved adoption of estimates of central BP in clinical practice. PMID:24379000

  1. Bipolar Posterior Deltoid Transfer for Massive Rotator Cuff Tears: A Report on 2 Patients

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary: A transfer of the posterior deltoid innervated by the posterior branch of the axillary nerve and vascularized by the posterior circumflex humeral artery is described for irreparable tears of the supra- and infraspinatus muscle tendons. Functionally useful abduction and flexion were restored in 2 patients. PMID:26090280

  2. Biomechanical evaluation of four different transosseous-equivalent\\/suture bridge rotator cuff repairs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Maguire; Jerome Goldberg; Desmond Bokor; Nicky Bertollo; Matthew Henry Pelletier; Wade Harper; William R. Walsh

    Purpose  Evaluate the biomechanical behavior of four variants of the transosseous-equivalent\\/suture bridge (TOE\\/SB) repair.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Four suture bridge (SB) constructs were created using 24 sheep infraspinatus tendon-humerus constructs (n = 6 per technique). The groups were (1) Knotted Standard Suture Bridge (Standard SB)—suture bridge with two medial mattress\\u000a stitches, (2) Knotted Double Suture Bridge (Double SB)—four medial mattress stitches, (3) Untied Suture Bridge with

  3. Endoscopic Versus Open Approach of Bladder Cuff and Distal Ureter in the Management of Upper Urinary Tract Transitional Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yapanoglu, Turgut; Kocaturk, Huseyin; Polat, Ozkan; Demirel, Azam; Okyar, Guray

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Nephroureterectomy with the removal of the ipsilateral ureteral orifice and bladder cuff en bloc remains the gold standard treatment for upper urinary tract urothelial cancer. The distal ureter can be removed with the open surgical technique or endoscopic approach. We compared the outcomes of the endoscopic approach with those of conventional open surgery on the distal ureter. Materials and Methods: We collected data from the charts of 30 patients who underwent radical nephroureterectomy at our clinic from January 1997 to January 2007 for upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma. The patients were divided into two groups according to procedure performed on the distal ureter. Group I (n:12) was comprised of patients who underwent an open surgical procedure, and group II (n:18), was comprised of patients who underwent an endoscopic approach. Both groups were compared in terms of operative time, blood loss, transurethral catheter duration and duration of hospital stay. Results: Patient age and tumor location showed no significant differences between the two groups. The operative time was significantly longer in group I than group II (181 versus 128 minutes; p<0.05). On the other hand, the estimated blood loss, transurethral catheter duration and duration of hospital stay were significantly lower in group II (205 mL versus 435 mL, 5 versus 8.5 days and 5.6 versus 9.2 days, respectively; p <0.05). Conclusion: The results of our study show that the endoscopic approach is less invasive than open surgery on the distal ureter. This procedure can easily be performed in the management of upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma. PMID:25610045

  4. Tennis elbow surgery - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    ... surgery - discharge; Lateral tendinosis surgery - discharge; Lateral tennis elbow surgery - discharge ... had surgery to repair a tendon in your elbow . The surgeon made a cut (incision) over the ...

  5. Feasibility of cuff-free measurement of systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michela Masè; Walter Mattei; Roberta Cucino; Luca Faes; Giandomenico Nollo

    2011-01-01

    We validated a prototype cuff-free device for noninvasive estimation of blood pressure (BP). The system assumed a linear relation between BP values and the inverse of arterial blood pulse transit time, measured as time interval between the R wave on the electrocardiograph and the onset of the peripheral pulse wave on a finger plethysmogram. Thirty-three healthy subjects were analyzed at

  6. Fate of the proximal aortic cuff: Implications for endovascular aneurysm repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karl A. Illig; Richard M. Green; Kenneth Ouriel; Patrick Riggs; Stephen Bartos; James A. DeWeese

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Long-term success of endoluminally placed grafts for exclusion of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) relies on secure fixation at the proximal and distal cuffs and, as such, assumes that the fixation sites will not dilate over time. Data regarding this issue, however, are not yet available. This study was performed to evaluate the region of the proximal anastomosis in patients

  7. On the identification of sensory information from mixed nerves by using single-channel cuff electrodes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stanisa Raspopovic; Jacopo Carpaneto; Esther Udina; Xavier Navarro; Silvestro Micera

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several groups have shown that the performance of motor neuroprostheses can be significantly improved by detecting specific sensory events related to the ongoing motor task (e.g., the slippage of an object during grasping). Algorithms have been developed to achieve this goal by processing electroneurographic (ENG) afferent signals recorded by using single-channel cuff electrodes. However, no efforts have been made

  8. Visual sensations produced by optic nerve stimulation using an implanted self-sizing spiral cuff electrode

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Claude Veraart; Christian Raftopoulos; J. Thomas Mortimer; Jean Delbeke; Delphine Pins; Géraldine Michaux; Annick Vanlierde; Simone Parrini; Marie-Chantal Wanet-Defalque

    1998-01-01

    A blind volunteer with retinitis pigmentosa was chronically implanted with a self-sizing spiral cuff electrode around an optic nerve. Electrical stimuli applied to the nerve produced localized visual sensations that were broadly distributed throughout the visual field and could be varied by changing the stimulating conditions. These results demonstrate the potential for constructing a visual prosthesis, based on electrical stimulation

  9. Selectivity of multiple-contact nerve cuff electrodes: a simulation analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adam Q. Choi; James K. Cavanaugh; Dominique M. Durand

    2001-01-01

    Advances in functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) have increased the need for nerve cuff designs that can control multiple motor functions through selective stimulation of selected populations of axons. This selectivity has proved to be difficult to achieve. Recent experiments suggest that it is possible to slowly reshape peripheral nerve without affecting its physiological function. Using computer simulations the authors have

  10. Intraoperative Evaluation of the Spiral Nerve Cuff Electrode for a Standing Neuroprosthesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katharine H. Polasek; Matthew A. Schiefer; Gilles C. Pinault; Ronald J. Triolo; Dustin J. Tyler

    2007-01-01

    Evaluation of the spiral nerve cuff electrode on the proximal femoral nerve for a standing neuroprosthesis was performed intraoperatively in 4 subjects. The mean stimulation threshold was 17.7 plusmn 12 nC, similar to stimulation thresholds in upper extremity nerves. The femoral nerve was found to have an oblong cross section with an average width of 9 mm and height of

  11. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... find out more. Dental and Soft Tissue Surgery Dental and Soft Tissue Surgery Oral and facial surgeons ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, ...

  12. Mohs Surgery

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... contact Share | Mohs Surgery A A A Mohs Learning Series Mohs for Melanoma Ninety percent of nonmelanoma ... Cell Carcinoma (BCC) Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) Mohs Learning Series Insight from Dr. Sherrif Ibrahim Why Isn’ ...

  13. Mastoid surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. G. Joshi

    1950-01-01

    Summary  562 cases of mastoiditis admitted to the King Edward VII Memorial Hospital in the last 12 years have been reviewed. Though\\u000a the incidence of mastoiditis has been lowered and there are reports of recoveries of cases of acute mastoiditis now and then\\u000a with sulpha and penicillin therapy, the place of surgery in mastoiditis is unchanged. These drugs supplement surgery but

  14. [Robotic surgery].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Portillo, Mucio; Valenzuela-Salazar, Carlos; Quiroz-Guadarrama, César David; Pachecho-Gahbler, Carlos; Rojano-Rodríguez, Martín

    2014-12-01

    Medicine has experienced greater scientific and technological advances in the last 50 years than in the rest of human history. The article describes relevant events, revises concepts and advantages and clinical applications, summarizes published clinical results, and presents some personal reflections without giving dogmatic conclusions about robotic surgery. The Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) defines robotic surgery as a surgical procedure using technology to aid the interaction between surgeon and patient. The objective of the surgical robot is to correct human deficiencies and improve surgical skills. The capacity of repeating tasks with precision and reproducibility has been the base of the robot´s success. Robotic technology offers objective and measurable advantages: -?Improving maneuverability and physical capacity during surgery. -?Correcting bad postural habits and tremor. -?Allowing depth perception (3D images). -?Magnifying strength and movement limits. -?Offering a platform for sensors, cameras, and instruments. Endoscopic surgery transformed conceptually the way of practicing surgery. Nevertheless in the last decade, robotic assisted surgery has become the next paradigm of our era. PMID:25643879

  15. DEHN SURGERY 1. Introduction

    E-print Network

    Hachimori, Masahiro

    DEHN SURGERY 1. Introduction Dehn surgery hyperbolic knot exceptional surgery (§2) link Dehn surgery (§3) 2. Exceptional surgery and boundary slopes hyperbolic knot exceptional surgery ? S3 ( S3 homotopy S3 ) Dehn surgery K S3 knot E(K) = S3 -intN(K) exterior prim- itive class H1(E(K); Z) ( ) m K

  16. [Presbyopia surgery].

    PubMed

    Gatinel, Damien

    2008-05-31

    Presbyopia surgery is a compensation option which aims at creating an increased depth of field. Monovision preserves a good close-vision quality for myopes. Multifocality is well tolerated by hyperopes if it is compatible with good far-vision quality. Conductive keratoplasty and Lasik multifocal ablation patterns are newly emerging methods. Monovision and multifocality can be applied to surgery by using corneal or intraocular implantation techniques. Multifocal intraocular lenses (IOLs) are growing in popularity among patients and surgeons, and opened the way to refractive lens exchange. Still they are not used routinely in cataract surgery, for reasons probably connected to the frequently observed reduction in contrast sensitivity. Accommodative IOL provides new method to compensate accommodation of presbyopes. Indications depend on preoperative ametropia, patient age and visual needs. PMID:18652400

  17. Bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    2014-08-26

    Essential facts: Type 2 diabetes is linked closely to obesity. Bariatric surgery can lead to dramatic improvements in the management of the condition, according to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). There are two main types of bariatric surgery. A gastric band procedure uses a band to reduce the size of the stomach so a smaller amount of food is required to make the patient feel full. A gastric bypass is where the digestive system is re-routed past most of the stomach so less food is digested. PMID:25138853

  18. Acne Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dilworth, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    Acne surgery consists of comedone extraction of non-inflamed lesions, triamcinolone acetate injections of some inflamed lesions, and extraction of milia. Prevention is a very important part of comedone treatment, especially avoidance of picking, moisturizers and harsh soaps. Instruments are also very important: even the finest may be too thick and may have to be filed down. Acne surgery is only an adjunct of good medical therapy. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7 PMID:21283373

  19. How Important is the Recommended Slow Cuff Pressure Deflation Rate for Blood Pressure Measurement?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dingchang Zheng; John N. Amoore; Stephan Mieke; Alan Murray

    Cuff pressure deflation rate influences blood pressure (BP) measurement. However, there is little quantitative clinical evidence\\u000a on its effect. Oscillometric pulses recorded from 75 subjects at the recommended deflation rate of 2–3 mmHg per second were\\u000a analyzed. Some pulses were removed to realize six faster rates (2–7 times faster than the original). Systolic, diastolic,\\u000a and mean arterial blood pressures (SBP, DBP,

  20. Cuff-Less Estimation of Blood Pressure Using Pulse Transit Time and Pre-ejection Period

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sujay Deb; Chinmayee Nanda; D. Goswami; J. Mukhopadhyay; S. Chakrabarti

    2007-01-01

    Non-invasive and cuff-less measurement of arterial blood pressure (BP) is desirable for continuous patient monitoring. Among the various possible techniques pulse transit time (PTT) based approach for estimation of BP is the most promising one. But change in BP is reflected both in PTT and pre-ejection period (PEP). We propose to measure PTT using multiple PPG and PPG-ECG combination recorded

  1. On the identification of sensory information from mixed nerves by using single-channel cuff electrodes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Several groups have shown that the performance of motor neuroprostheses can be significantly improved by detecting specific sensory events related to the ongoing motor task (e.g., the slippage of an object during grasping). Algorithms have been developed to achieve this goal by processing electroneurographic (ENG) afferent signals recorded by using single-channel cuff electrodes. However, no efforts have been made so far to understand the number and type of detectable sensory events that can be differentiated from whole nerve recordings using this approach. Methods To this aim, ENG afferent signals, evoked by different sensory stimuli were recorded using single-channel cuff electrodes placed around the sciatic nerve of anesthetized rats. The ENG signals were digitally processed and several features were extracted and used as inputs for the classification. The work was performed on integral datasets, without eliminating any noisy parts, in order to be as close as possible to real application. Results The results obtained showed that single-channel cuff electrodes are able to provide information on two to three different afferent (proprioceptive, mechanical and nociceptive) stimuli, with reasonably good discrimination ability. The classification performances are affected by the SNR of the signal, which in turn is related to the diameter of the fibers encoding a particular type of neurophysiological stimulus. Conclusions Our findings indicate that signals of acceptable SNR and corresponding to different physiological modalities (e.g. mediated by different types of nerve fibers) may be distinguished. PMID:20423488

  2. Laparoscopic Transvesical Resection of an En Bloc Bladder Cuff and Distal Ureter during Nephroureterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Giannakopoulos, Stilianos; Toufas, George; Dimitriadis, Charalampos; Giannopoulos, Stavros; Kalaitzis, Christos; Bantis, Athanasios; Patris, Emmanuel; Touloupidis, Stavros

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The most appropriate technique for excising the distal ureter and bladder cuff during laparoscopic nephroureterectomy is still debated. We report our experience with a pure laparoscopic transvesical method that duplicates the long-standing open transvesical approach. Materials and Methods. Seven men and three women diagnosed with upper tract transitional cell carcinoma were treated with this procedure. Three intravesical ports were inserted, and pneumovesicum was established at 12?mmHg. Transvesical laparoscopic circumferential detachment of the bladder cuff and en bloc mobilization of the last centimeters of the distal ureter were performed, followed by the closure of the bladder defect. Subsequently, a nephrectomy was performed either laparoscopically or using an open flank approach. Results. The median age was 68.5 years. The procedure was completed uneventfully in all cases. The median operating time for distal ureter excision was 82.5 minutes (range 55–120). No complications directly related to the pneumovesicum method were recorded. The median follow-up period was 31 months (range 12–55). During the follow-up period, two patients (20%) died from the disease, and a bladder tumor developed in three cases (30%). Conclusion. The laparoscopic transvesical resection of the en bloc bladder cuff and distal ureter is a reliable, effective, and oncologically safe technique, at least in the midterm. PMID:23049475

  3. Intraoperative atelectasis due to endotracheal tube cuff herniation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Moazeni Bitgani, Mohammad; Madineh, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff herniation is a rare, and often difficult to diagnose, cause of bronchial obstruction. We present a case of outside cuff herniation of an endotracheal tube that caused pulmonary right lung atelectasis. A 29-year-old man ,a case of car accident with multiple fractures, was admitted to the emergency ward and transferred to the operating room(OR) for open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of all fractures .The procedures were done under general anesthesia (G/A). The past medical history of the patient did not indicate any problem. Anesthesia was induced with thiopental, atracurium and then maintained by propofol and remifentanyl infusions and 100% O2 via orally inserted ETT. The patient was positioned in left lateral decubitus position for operation. Two hours after induction of anesthesia, the oxygen saturation level dropped to 85 % and the breath sounds in the right side of the chest were weakened. The chest x-ray images showed right lung atelectasis especially in the upper lobe. The problem was disappeared after removal of the ETT. In this case, we observed that an ETT cuff herniation can be a cause of airway obstruction. If there is a decreased unilateral breath sounds, we recommend replacement or repositioning of ETT. PMID:23165818

  4. Bariatric Surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Schweitzer; A. Lidor; T. Magnuson

    2006-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently the only effective long-term treatment of morbid obesity and its related co-morbidities. Gastric bypass, adjustable gastric banding, and duodenal switch with biliopancreatic diversion are the three most common operations performed in the United States to induce sustained weight loss. Patient selection is important since compliance postoperatively leads to a successful outcome in over 80% of patients.

  5. After Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or accidental injury. Some people have a greater risk of complications because of other medical conditions. Your surgeon can tell you how you might feel and what you will be able to do - or not do - the first few days, weeks, or months after surgery. Some other questions to ask are How long ...

  6. Arthroscopic Surgery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Arthroscopic surgery (or microsurgery) is a significant breakthrough in treating knee injuries. Its applications range from basic diagnosis to arthroscopic menisectomy, although its use in some procedures is still highly controversial. Many surgeons perform the diagnostic procedure, but follow this with the conventional surgical approach.…

  7. Abdominal wall surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Abdominal wall surgery is surgery that improves the appearance of flabby, stretched-out abdominal (belly) muscles and skin. It ... tummy tuck" to more complicated, extensive surgery. Abdominal wall surgery is not the same as liposuction, which ...

  8. [Robotic surgery].

    PubMed

    Sándor, József; Haidegger, Tamás; Kormos, Katalin; Ferencz, Andrea; Csukás, Domokos; Bráth, Endre; Szabó, Györgyi; Wéber, György

    2013-10-01

    Due to the fast spread of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, surgical procedures have been changed essentially. The new techniques applied for both abdominal and thoracic procedures provided the possibility for minimally invasive access with all its advantages. Robots - originally developed for industrial applications - were retrofitted for laparoscopic procedures. The currently prevailing robot-assisted surgery is ergonomically more advantageous for the surgeon, as well as for the patient through the more precise preparative activity thanks to the regained 3D vision. The gradual decrease of costs of robotic surgical systems and development of new generations of minimally invasive devices may lead to substantial changes in routine surgical procedures. PMID:24144815

  9. Drinking Citrus Fruit Juice Inhibits Vascular Remodeling in Cuff-Induced Vascular Injury Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Arika; Asayama, Rie; Mogi, Masaki; Nakaoka, Hirotomo; Kan-no, Harumi; Tsukuda, Kana; Chisaka, Toshiyuki; Wang, Xiao-Li; Bai, Hui-Yu; Shan, Bao-Shuai; Kukida, Masayoshi; Iwanami, Jun; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2015-01-01

    Citrus fruits are thought to have inhibitory effects on oxidative stress, thereby attenuating the onset and progression of cancer and cardiovascular disease; however, there are few reports assessing their effect on vascular remodeling. Here, we investigated the effect of drinking the juice of two different citrus fruits on vascular neointima formation using a cuff-induced vascular injury mouse model. Male C57BL6 mice were divided into five groups as follows: 1) Control (water) (C), 2) 10% Citrus unshiu (CU) juice (CU10), 3) 40% CU juice (CU40), 4) 10% Citrus iyo (CI) juice (CI10), and 5) 40% CI juice (CI40). After drinking them for 2 weeks from 8 weeks of age, cuff injury was induced by polyethylene cuff placement around the femoral artery. Neointima formation was significantly attenuated in CU40, CI10 and CI40 compared with C; however, no remarkable preventive effect was observed in CU10. The increases in levels of various inflammatory markers including cytokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1?, and tumor necrosis factor-? in response to vascular injury did not differ significantly between C, CU10 and CI10. The increases in cell proliferation and superoxide anion production were markedly attenuated in CI10, but not in CU10 compared with C. The increase in phosphorylated ERK expression was markedly attenuated both in CU10 and CI10 without significant difference between CU10 and CI10. Accumulation of immune cells did not differ between CU10 and CI10. These results indicate that drinking citrus fruit juice attenuates vascular remodeling partly via a reduction of oxidative stress. Interestingly, the preventive efficacy on neointima formation was stronger in CI than in CU at least in part due to more prominent inhibitory effects on oxidative stress by CI. PMID:25692290

  10. Electrochemical performance of platinum electrodes within the multi-electrode spiral nerve cuff.

    PubMed

    Rozman, Janez; Pe?lin, Polona; Mehle, Andraž; Šala, Martin

    2014-09-01

    In this study, the electrochemical performance of platinum electrodes within a multi-electrode spiral cuff to be used for selective nerve stimulation was investigated. The original cuff, simplified into a half-cuff, contained a single row of nine electrodes (0.5 × 2 mm) at a distance of 2 mm from its inner surface. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the electrochemical reactions at the electrode-electrolyte interface, to define a potential window within which the electrode could be safely used in selective nerve stimulation, to calculate the charge injection capacity and cathodal charge storage capacity. Voltage transients retrieved during excitation with quasitrapezoidal biphasic current pulses, tested by selective nerve stimulation of the isolated porcine left cervical vagus nerve segment, were used to determine the maximum polarization across the electrode-electrolyte interface and to calculate cathodic charge injection capacity of the electrode. The results show that the most negative and most positive potentials across the electrode-electrolyte interface reached -0.54 and 0.59 V; these did not exceed the safe potential limits for water electrolysis. Furthermore, the time integral of the cathodic current by cyclic voltammetry measured over the potential range of water electrolysis, actually representing the cathodal charge storage capacity, was approximately -4 mC cm(-2). The charge injection capacity, representing the maximum charge density injected in a current stimulation pulse, using only reversible processes, however, was around 75 µC cm(-2). In conclusion, both, the tested stimulation pulse and electrode are suitable for efficient and safe selective nerve stimulation. PMID:24938675

  11. Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure Assessment: Education May Improve but not Guarantee the Safety of Palpation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Seyed Siamdoust, Seyed Alireza; Mohseni, Masood; Memarian, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Background: Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure (ETCP) should be kept in the range of 20 - 30 cm H2O. Earlier studies suggested that ETCP assessment by palpation of pilot balloon results in overinflation or underinflation and subsequent complications such as tracheal wall damage and aspiration. Objectives: The current study aimed to evaluate the effect of an in vitro educational program on the ability of anesthesia personnel to inflate Endotracheal Tube Cuffs (ETT) within safe pressure limits. Patients and Methods: The survey included two series of blinded ETCP measurements in intubated patients before and two weeks after an in vitro educational intervention. The in vitro educational program included two separate trials. The anesthesia personnel were asked to inflate an ETT cuff inserted in a tracheal model using their usual inflation technique. In the same session, six ETTs at different pressure levels were examined by the participants and their estimation of ETCP was recorded. After the in vitro assessment, the participants were informed about the actual pressure of the in vitro ETCPs and were allowed to train their fingers by in vitro pilot balloon palpation with validated manometer measurements. Results: The mean ETCP after the in vitro survey was significantly lower than the mean ETCP before the intervention (45 ± 13 vs. 51 ± 15 cm H2O, P = 0.002). The rate of measurements within the safe pressure limits significantly improved after the in vitro education (24.2% vs. 39.7%, P = 0.002). Conclusions: Implementing educational programs with the introduction of estimation techniques besides the use of manometer as a standard intraoperative monitoring will improve the safety of the practice.

  12. Design, fabrication and evaluation of a conforming circumpolar peripheral nerve cuff electrode for acute experimental use

    PubMed Central

    Foldes, Emily L.; Ackermann, D. Michael; Bhadra, Niloy; Kilgore, Kevin L.; Bhadra, Narendra

    2011-01-01

    Nerve cuff electrodes are a principle tool of basic and applied electro-neurophysiology studies and are championed for their ability to achieve good nerve recruitment with low thresholds. We describe the design and method of fabrication for a novel circumpolar peripheral nerve electrode for acute experimental use. This cylindrical cuff-style electrode provides approximately 270 degrees of radial electrode contact with a nerve for each of an arbitrary number of contacts, has a profile that allows for simple placement and removal in an acute nerve preparation, and is designed for adjustment of the cylindrical diameter to ensure a close fit on the nerve. For each electrode, the electrical contacts were cut from 25 µm platinum foil as an array so as to maintain their positions relative to each other within the cuff. Lead wires were welded to each intended contact. The structure was then molded in silicone elastomer, after which the individual contacts were electrically isolated. The final electrode was curved into a cylindrical shape with an inner diameter corresponding to that of the intended target nerve. The positions of these contacts were well maintained during the molding and shaping process and failure rates during fabrication due to contact displacements were very low. Established electrochemical measurements were made on one electrode to confirm expected behavior for a platinum electrode and to measure the electrode impedance to applied voltages at different frequencies. These electrodes have been successfully used for nerve stimulation, recording, and conduction block in a number of different acute animal experiments by several investigators. PMID:21187115

  13. DEHN SURGERY SIDDHARTHA GADGIL

    E-print Network

    Gadgil, Siddhartha

    DEHN SURGERY SIDDHARTHA GADGIL Contents 1. Introduction 1 2. Co-ordinates for surgery 1 3. Some algebraic topology 2 4. The theorem of Lickorish and Wallace 3 5. Surgeries and Cobordisms 4 6. The Kirby Calculus 5 7. Constructing knots using surgery 5 8. Surgeries about knots 5 References 6 1. Introduction

  14. Preparing for Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Preparing for Surgery If you are preparing for surgery, there are some critical steps you can take to help ensure the ... eat or drink anything after midnight before your surgery. Under some circumstances, your physician anesthesiologist may give ...

  15. Cosmetic breast surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Cosmetic breast surgery is done at an outpatient surgery clinic or in a hospital. Most women receive general anesthesia ... with a plastic surgeon if you are considering cosmetic breast surgery. Discuss how you expect to look and feel ...

  16. Rééducation des ruptures de coiffe de l’épaule opérées : prise en charge en hospitalisation en internat ou en hospitalisation de jour (à propos de 76 observations)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C Delbrouck; M Dauty; D Huguet; C Dubois

    2003-01-01

    Objective. – To define criteria of orientation in day-hospitalized or in-patient after shoulder rotator cuff surgery.Method. – Population of 71 patients (53.2 years ±7) (76 shoulders) operated for rotator cuff tear by the same surgeon, then treated by physical therapy either in day-hospitalization or in-patient. Weekly, evaluation until the second month after surgery by setting as criteria: pain, passive and

  17. Development of adaptive pneumatic tourniquet systems based on minimal inflation pressure for upper limb surgeries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pneumatic tourniquets are medical devices that occlude blood flow to distal part of extremities and are commonly used in upper limb surgeries to provide a dry, clean and bloodless field. To decrease pressure-related injuries and potential risk of complications subjected to the high inflation pressure of pneumatic tourniquet, minimal inflation pressures are recommended. Methods A new occlusion pressure mathematical model for the upper limb was established based on the correlation analysis between several possible influencing parameters and the minimal pneumatic tourniquet pressure at which the peripheral pulse disappeared was recorded using a digital plethysmograph. A prototype of an adaptive pneumatic tourniquet which automatically varies the pressure in the tourniquet cuff according to the above prediction model was developed for the upper limb which used the lowest possible inflation pressure to achieve occlusion. The prototype comprises a blood pressure monitoring module, an inflatable tourniquet cuff, and a pressure relief mechanism to maintain an optimal cuff inflation pressure. Simulation experiments were conducted to verify the function and stability of the designed adaptive pneumatic tourniquet and clinical experiments using volunteers were undertaken to evaluate the performance of the prototype design in achieving adequate haemostasis in the upper limb. Results Results demonstrated that the mean arterial occlusion pressure was 152.3?±?16.7 mmHg, obviously below the 250 to 300 mmHg previously recommended (J Bone Joint Surg Br 68:625-628, 1986 and Arthroscopy 11:307–311, 1995). Conclusions In conclusion, this adaptive method and apparatus which can provide minimal inflation pressure may be a clinically practical alternative for upper limb surgery performed with pneumatic tourniquets. PMID:24053348

  18. The Effect of Arthroscopic Rotator Interval Closure on Glenohumeral Volume.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Brent A; Rosenzweig, Seth D; Sheppard, Evan D; Jennings, Jonathan K; Thompson, Kevin J

    2015-06-01

    The role of rotator interval in shoulder pathology and the effect of its closure are not well understood. In addition, the effect of rotator interval closure on intra-articular glenohumeral volume (GHV) remains unknown. We conducted a study to quantify the GHV reduction obtained with an arthroscopic rotator interval closure and to determine whether medial and lateral interval closures resulted in different degrees of volume reduction. We dissected 8 fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders (mean age, 64.4 years) to the level of the rotator cuff. Volumetric measurements were taken before and after medial and lateral rotator interval closure incorporating the superior glenohumeral ligament and the upper portion of the subscapularis. Arthroscopic closure of the rotator interval with 2 sutures reduced GHV by a mean of 45%. More volume reduction resulted with use of a single lateral interval closure stitch than with use of a single medial stitch (35% vs 24%; P < .02). Arthroscopic rotator interval closure with 2 plication stitches is a powerful tool in reducing intracapsular volume of the shoulder and may be a useful adjunct in restoring glenohumeral stability. If a single plication stitch is preferred, a lateral stitch (vs a medial stitch) can be used for a significantly larger reduction in shoulder volume. PMID:26047004

  19. Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Loss Surgery: Stacie's Story (Video) Weight and Diabetes Metabolic Syndrome Healthy Eating Preparing Your Child for Surgery Body ... Mass Index (BMI) Staying at a Healthy Weight Metabolic Syndrome How Can I Lose Weight Safely? When Being ...

  20. Numerical validation of a suprasystolic brachial cuff-based method for estimating aortic pressure.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fuyou

    2014-01-01

    Central aortic pressures are better predictors of cardiovascular events than peripheral pressures. However, central aortic blood pressures cannot be measured noninvasively; for this reason, estimating aortic pressures from noninvasive measurements of peripheral pressures has been the subject of numerous studies. In the present study, a novel method was proposed to noninvasively estimate aortic pressures from the oscillometric wave of a suprasystolic brachial cuff. The errors of estimation were evaluated in relation to various cardiovascular properties using an integrated cardiovascular-cuff model. Obtained results demonstrated that the estimation errors are affected mainly by aortic stiffness. The estimation errors for aortic systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, pulse pressure and wave shape under the assumed cardiovascular conditions were 5.84 ± 1.58 mmHg, -0.28 ± 0.41 mmHg, 6.12 ± 1.42 mmHg and 1.72 ± 0.57 mmHg, respectively, all of which fell within the error ranges established by existing devices. Since the method is easy to be automated and bases the estimation fully on patient-specific information, its clinical application is promising, although further clinical studies are awaited to validate the method in vivo. PMID:24211996

  1. Cuff leak test and laryngeal survey for predicting post-extubation stridor

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anit B; Ani, Chizobam; Feeney, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Evidence for the predictive value of the cuff leak test (CLT) for post-extubation stridor (PES) is conflicting. We evaluated the association and accuracy of CLT alone or combined with other laryngeal parameters with PES. Methods: Fifty-one mechanically ventilated adult patients in a medical-surgical intensive care unit were tested prior to extubation using; CLT, laryngeal ultrasound and indirect laryngoscopy. Biometric, laryngeal and endotracheal tube (ETT) parameters were recorded. Results: PES incidence was 4%. CLT demonstrated ‘no leak’ in 20% of patients. Laryngeal oedema was present in 10% of the patients on indirect laryngoscopy, and 71% of the patients had a Grades 1-3 indirect laryngoscopic view. Mean air column width on laryngeal ultrasound was 0.66 ± 0.15 cm (cuff deflated), mean ratio of ETT to laryngeal diameter was 0.48 ± 0.07, and the calculated CLT and laryngeal survey composite was 0.86 ± 1.25 (range 0-5). CLT and the CLT and Laryngeal survey composite measure were not associated with or predict PES. Age, sex, peri-extubation steroid use, intubation duration and body mass index were not associated with PES. Conclusion: Even including ultrasonographic and indirect laryngoscopic examination of the airway, no single aspect of the CLT or combination with laryngeal parameters accurately predicts PES. PMID:25788742

  2. Model-based analysis and design of nerve cuff electrodes for restoring bladder function by selective stimulation of the pudendal nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Alexander R.; Grill, Warren M.

    2013-06-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve (PN) is being developed as a means to restore bladder function in persons with spinal cord injury. A single nerve cuff electrode placed on the proximal PN trunk may enable selective stimulation of distinct fascicles to maintain continence or evoke micturition. The objective of this study was to design a nerve cuff that enabled selective stimulation of the PN. Approach. We evaluated the performance of both flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) cuff and round cuff designs, with a range of FINE cuff heights and number of contacts, as well as multiple contact orientations. This analysis was performed using a computational model, in which the nerve and fascicle cross-sectional positions from five human PN trunks were systematically reshaped within the nerve cuff. These cross-sections were used to create finite element models, with electric potentials calculated and applied to a cable model of a myelinated axon to evaluate stimulation selectivity for different PN targets. Subsequently, the model was coupled to a genetic algorithm (GA) to identify solutions that used multiple contact activation to maximize selectivity and minimize total stimulation voltage. Main results. Simulations did not identify any significant differences in selectivity between FINE and round cuffs, although the latter required smaller stimulation voltages for target activation due to preserved localization of targeted fascicle groups. Further, it was found that a ten contact nerve cuff generated sufficient selectivity for all PN targets, with the degree of selectivity dependent on the relative position of the target within the nerve. The GA identified solutions that increased fitness by 0.7-45.5% over single contact activation by decreasing stimulation of non-targeted fascicles. Significance. This study suggests that using an optimal nerve cuff design and multiple contact activation could enable selective stimulation of the human PN trunk for restoration of bladder function.

  3. Effect of different cuff widths on the motor nerve conduction of the median nerve: an experimental study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Parul Mittal; Shweta Shenoy; Jaspal S Sandhu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A bloodless operative field is considered mandatory for most surgical procedures on the upper and lower extremity. This is accomplished by using either an Esmarch bandage or a pneumatic tourniquet, but a number of complications are associated with both. Nerve palsy is one of the most frequently encountered complications of this procedure. Wider cuffs have been found to cause

  4. Indirect systolic and mean blood pressure determination by a new tail cuff method in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Ikeda; Y. Nara; Y. YAMORII

    1991-01-01

    Summary A new tail cuff method for determining systolic and mean blood pressure in rats was developed based on photoelectric detection of tail arterial blood flow and pulsatile volume oscillation. Indirect systolic and mean blood pressure measured by this method correlated well with direct systolic and mean blood pressures recorded by a transducer and polygraph after carotid artery cannulation in

  5. Radioimmunoguided surgery.

    PubMed

    Veroux, G; Nicosia, A S; Veroux, P; Cardillo, P; Veroux, M; Amodeo, C

    1999-01-01

    Although clinical staging of neoplastic diseases has long remained the only approach to prognosis and treatment, parameters for stage determination, such as tumor size (T) and lymph-node involvement (N), do not always provide effective indication of optimal treatment. Molecular medicine has also provided useful indications as to an alternative and/or integration to clinical staging. Despite the numerous possibilities afforded by pre-operative staging techniques, failures in defining the real spread of neoplasias into surrounding structures have remained a very important diagnostic problem. The labeling of monoclonal antibodies binding with neoplastic target cells by way of radioactive isotopes introduced the techniques known as immunoscintigraphy and SPECT, which then evolved into radioimmunoguided surgery. Fourty patients suffering from colorectal cancer whose age ranged between 42-82 years were singled out for this study. Before undergoing surgery, they were administered pancoloscopy and macrobiopsies, AP-LL chest x-rays, hepatobiliary ECT, echoendoscopy, abdomen and pelvis CT with nephrostographic phase, and total body bone scintigraphy. They were treated with 125I-B72.3 and 125I-FO23C5 (5% and 95% of patients, respectively). Thyrosuppression was achieved by Lugol solution (15 drops x 3/die) from the 6th day before infusion and until the day of surgical operation. Radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS) has also been tested on staging and second-look of ovarian tumors. Five years after surgical operation the survival rate of Dukes A patients (15%) was confirmed to amount to 100%, whereas for Dukes B patients (50%) having undergone RIGS-guided exeresis on single unrecognized metastases (2 patients) and on unrecognized n+ (5 patients) the survival rate was found to be 85% after 5 years; 2 patients deceased due to relapse; 1 patient deceased due to e.p.a. Finally, for Dukes C patients; (35%) having undergone RIGS-guided exeresis on unrecognized liver micrometastases (1 patient), on single isolated metastases (2 patients) and in the occurrence of multicentric lymph-node positivity (9 patients), the survival rate after 5 years was found to amount to 64%; 5 patients deceased due to relapse. Out of 19 patients without pre-operative evidence of ovarian tumor as opposed to just 1 patient suspected of pelvic recurrence, after intra-operative surgical radicalization (45%), 1 patient was diagnosed fibrosis (suspicious lesion on CT) and 1 other patient peritoneal MTS (negative CT) by means of RIGS. RIGS has made it possible: to localize primary and/or metastatic lesions; to determine tumor-free margins, loco-regional disease spread; to differentiate suspicious foci on inspection and palpation (biotopic sampling); to detect invisible and impalpable tumor foci (occult sites); to verify radical exeresis; to evaluate lymphatic drainage stations; to enable guided exeresis of liver metastases. PMID:10626169

  6. Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To conduct an evidence-based analysis of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery. Background Obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) of at last 30 kg/m2.1 Morbid obesity is defined as a BMI of at least 40 kg/m2 or at least 35 kg/m2 with comorbid conditions. Comorbid conditions associated with obesity include diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemias, obstructive sleep apnea, weight-related arthropathies, and stress urinary incontinence. It is also associated with depression, and cancers of the breast, uterus, prostate, and colon, and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Obesity is also associated with higher all-cause mortality at any age, even after adjusting for potential confounding factors like smoking. A person with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 has about a 50% higher risk of dying than does someone with a healthy BMI. The risk more than doubles at a BMI of 35 kg/m2. An expert estimated that about 160,000 people are morbidly obese in Ontario. In the United States, the prevalence of morbid obesity is 4.7% (1999–2000). In Ontario, the 2004 Chief Medical Officer of Health Report said that in 2003, almost one-half of Ontario adults were overweight (BMI 25–29.9 kg/m2) or obese (BMI ? 30 kg/m2). About 57% of Ontario men and 42% of Ontario women were overweight or obese. The proportion of the population that was overweight or obese increased gradually from 44% in 1990 to 49% in 2000, and it appears to have stabilized at 49% in 2003. The report also noted that the tendency to be overweight and obese increases with age up to 64 years. BMI should be used cautiously for people aged 65 years and older, because the “normal” range may begin at slightly above 18.5 kg/m2 and extend into the “overweight” range. The Chief Medical Officer of Health cautioned that these data may underestimate the true extent of the problem, because they were based on self reports, and people tend to over-report their height and under-report their weight. The actual number of Ontario adults who are overweight or obese may be higher. Diet, exercise, and behavioural therapy are used to help people lose weight. The goals of behavioural therapy are to identify, monitor, and alter behaviour that does not help weight loss. Techniques include self-monitoring of eating habits and physical activity, stress management, stimulus control, problem solving, cognitive restructuring, contingency management, and identifying and using social support. Relapse, when people resume old, unhealthy behaviour and then regain the weight, can be problematic. Drugs (including gastrointestinal lipase inhibitors, serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, and appetite suppressants) may be used if behavioural interventions fail. However, estimates of efficacy may be confounded by high rates of noncompliance, in part owing to the side effects of the drugs. In addition, the drugs have not been approved for indefinite use, despite the chronic nature of obesity. The Technology Morbidly obese people may be eligible for bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery for morbid obesity is considered an intervention of last resort for patients who have attempted first-line forms of medical management, such as diet, increased physical activity, behavioural modification, and drugs. There are various bariatric surgical procedures and several different variations for each of these procedures. The surgical interventions can be divided into 2 general types: malabsorptive (bypassing parts of the gastrointestinal tract to limit the absorption of food), and restrictive (decreasing the size of the stomach so that the patient is satiated with less food). All of these may be performed as either open surgery or laparoscopically. An example of a malabsorptive technique is Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Examples of restrictive techniques are vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG) and adjustable gastric banding (AGB). The Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP) Schedule of Benefits for Physician Services includ

  7. Rotating Wavepackets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Any free-particle wavepacket solution of Schrodinger's equation can be converted by differentiations to wavepackets rotating about the original direction of motion. The angular momentum component along the motion associated with this rotation is an integral multiple of [h-bar]. It is an "intrinsic" angular momentum: independent of origin and…

  8. Safety and reliability of the sealing cuff pressure of the Microcuff pediatric tracheal tube for prevention of post-extubation morbidity in children: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Metwalli, Roshdi Roshdi; Sadek, Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of sealing pressure as an inflation technique of the Microcuff pediatric tracheal cuffed tube. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 children were enrolled in this study. After induction of anesthesia and intubation with Microcuff pediatric tracheal tube, patients were randomly assigned, to one of the three groups. Control group (n = 20) the cuff was inflated to a cuff pressure of 20 cm H2O; sealing group (n = 20) the cuff was inflated to prevent the air leak at peak airway pressure of 20 cm H2O and the finger group (n = 20) the cuff was inflated to a suitable pressure using the finger estimation. Tracheal leak, incidence and severity of post-extubation cough, stridor, sore throat and hoarseness were recorded. Results: The cuff pressure as well as the volume of air to fill the cuff was significantly low in the sealing group when compared with the control group (P < 0.001); however, their values were significantly high in the finger group compared with both the control and the sealing group (P < 0.001). The incidence and severity of sore throat were significantly high in the finger group compared with both the control and the sealing group (P = 0.0009 and P = 0.0026). Three patients in the control group developed air leak around the endotracheal tube cuff. The incidence and severity of other complications were similar in the three groups. Conclusion: In pediatric N2O, free general anesthesia using Microcuff pediatric tracheal tub, sealing cuff pressure is safer than finger palpation technique regarding post-extubation morbidities and more reliable than recommended safe pressure in prevention of the air leak. PMID:25422605

  9. Randomised clinical trial comparing the effects of acupuncture and a newly designed placebo needle in rotator cuff tendinitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julia Kleinhenz; Konrad Streitberger; Jürgen Windeler; Albert Güßbacher; Georg Mavridis; Eike Martin

    1999-01-01

    Acupuncture has gained increasing attention in the treatment of chronic pain. The lack of a satisfying placebo method has made it impossible to show whether needling is an important part of the method or whether the improvement felt by the patient is due to the therapeutic setting and psychological phenomena. Also, the effectiveness of acupuncture has not been demonstrated sufficiently.

  10. Rotator interval.

    PubMed

    Woertler, Klaus

    2015-07-01

    The rotator interval is an anatomically complex region of the shoulder joint that is difficult to evaluate on clinical examination and by imaging. Abnormalities of its components may contribute to instability, shoulder stiffness, and pain and are challenging to diagnose and treat. This article gives an overview of the anatomy, MR anatomy, and normal variants of the rotator interval, together with basic technical aspects of MR imaging of this area. Pathologic conditions of the rotator interval capsule, the long head of biceps tendon, and the pulley system are reviewed and illustrated with several clinical examples. PMID:26021585

  11. ROTATION DESCRIPTIONS AND ACTIVITIES -201.00 PHARMACY PRACTICE RESIDENCY

    E-print Network

    Martin, Gail

    Surgery 2) Three-four 6-week elective medicine rotations · General Medicine · Cardiology · Critical Care Pharmaceutical Care: 1) Cardiology 2) Critical Care 3) General Medicine 4) General Surgery 5) Infectious Diseases. CARDIOLOGY - 201.47 Intensive Cardiac Care and Ward Cardiology Preceptors: Jaekyu Shin, Pharm.D., MS, BCPS

  12. Single-site robotic surgery in gynecologic cancer: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ha-Na; Lee, Yoo-Young; Choi, Chel Hun; Lee, Jeong-Won; Bae, Duk-Soo; Kim, Byoung-Gie

    2015-01-01

    Objective To discuss the feasibility of single-site robotic surgery for benign gynecologic tumors and early stage gynecologic cancers. Methods In this single institution, prospective analysis, we analyzed six patients who had undergone single-site robotic surgery between December 2013 and August 2014. Surgery was performed using the da Vinci Si Surgical System. Patient characteristics and surgical outcomes were analyzed. Results Single-site robotic surgery was performed successfully in all six cases. The median patient age was 48 years, and the median body mass index was 25.5 kg/m2 (range, 22 to 33 kg/m2). The median total operative time was 211 minutes, and the median duration of intracorporeal vaginal cuff suturing was 32 minutes (range, 22 to 47 minutes). The median duration of pelvic lymph node dissection was 31 minutes on one side and 27 minutes on the other side. Patients' postoperative courses were uneventful. The median postoperative hospital stay was 4 days. No postoperative complications occurred. Conclusion When used to treat benign gynecologic tumors and early stage gynecologic cancers, the single-site da Vinci robotic surgery is feasible, safe, and produces favorable surgical outcomes. PMID:25609162

  13. Thrombosis of the external jugular vein: a rare complication of a proximal humerus fracture treated with collar and cuff immobilisation.

    PubMed

    Gale, Michael; Craxford, Simon; Taylor, Leia; Montgomery, Helen; Pickering, Simon

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of an 87-year-old woman who developed a thrombosis of her external jugular vein after sustaining a proximal humerus fracture managed nonoperatively with a collar and cuff. At review in fracture clinic she was found to have an enlarged external jugular vein which was subsequently found to be thrombosed. Her collar and cuff had been applied very tightly and it was felt by the ENT team to be the cause of the thrombosis of her external jugular vein. She was fully anticoagulated with warfarin after subsequently developing a deep vein thrombosis in the subclavian and axillary veins. She made a full recovery following anticoagulation. In this case, we review the potential causes of this rare and underdiagnosed condition, as well as the usual investigations and treatments. We also review the common complications of this fracture and the alternative treatment options available. PMID:25247102

  14. Thrombosis of the External Jugular Vein: A Rare Complication of a Proximal Humerus Fracture Treated with Collar and Cuff Immobilisation

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Helen; Pickering, Simon

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of an 87-year-old woman who developed a thrombosis of her external jugular vein after sustaining a proximal humerus fracture managed nonoperatively with a collar and cuff. At review in fracture clinic she was found to have an enlarged external jugular vein which was subsequently found to be thrombosed. Her collar and cuff had been applied very tightly and it was felt by the ENT team to be the cause of the thrombosis of her external jugular vein. She was fully anticoagulated with warfarin after subsequently developing a deep vein thrombosis in the subclavian and axillary veins. She made a full recovery following anticoagulation. In this case, we review the potential causes of this rare and underdiagnosed condition, as well as the usual investigations and treatments. We also review the common complications of this fracture and the alternative treatment options available. PMID:25247102

  15. Changes of Achilles Midportion Tendon Microcirculation After Repetitive Simultaneous Cryotherapy and Compression Using a Cryo\\/Cuff

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karsten Knobloch; Ruth Grasemann; Michael Jagodzinski; Martinus Richter; Johannes Zeichen; Christian Krettek

    2006-01-01

    Background: Cryotherapy and compression have been shown to decrease pain and improve function. The dosage and timing of these options remain unclear.Purpose: To examine the effects of a standardized compression and cryotherapy device (Cryo\\/Cuff) on midportion Achilles tendon microcirculation during intermittent administration.Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study.Methods: Twenty-six subjects were included (13 men and 13 women; age, 32.3 ± 12 years;

  16. Septoplasty and Turbinate Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... may be asked to use saline sprays or irrigations after your surgery. Please check with your surgeon ... may be asked to use saline sprays or irrigations after your surgery. Please check with your surgeon ...

  17. Complications of TMJ surgery.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, David; Puig, Leann

    2015-02-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) surgery can be divided into 3 types of surgery: Arthroscopy, arthroplasty, and total joint replacement. The complications associated with these procedures increase with complexity. They all include injury to adjacent structures, infections, and bleeding problems. PMID:25483447

  18. Diabetic Vitrectomy Surgery

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Magwire, who is a registered nurse and certified diabetes educator. 00:01:06 MELISSA MAGWIRE, RN, CDE: ... questions you may have during the surgery about diabetes or the surgery. You can e-mail these ...

  19. Robotic liver surgery.

    PubMed

    Leung, Universe; Fong, Yuman

    2014-10-01

    Robotic surgery is an evolving technology that has been successfully applied to a number of surgical specialties, but its use in liver surgery has so far been limited. In this review article we discuss the challenges of minimally invasive liver surgery, the pros and cons of robotics, the evolution of medical robots, and the potentials in applying this technology to liver surgery. The current data in the literature are also presented. PMID:25392840

  20. Effect of the thigh-cuffs on the carotid artery diameter jugular vein section and facial skin edema: HDT study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roumy, Jerome; Diridillou, Stephane; Herault, Stephane; Fomina, Galina; Alferova, Irina; Arbeille, Philippe

    2001-08-01

    Objective: To evaluate the distal arterial, venous and skin changes in a group using thigh cuffs during daytime and in a control group. Method: Cardiac, arterial, venous parameters were measured by echography and Doppler. Skin thickness was measured by high frequency echography. Results & discussion: Head down position induced plasma volume reduction, increased cerebral resistance, reduced lower limb resistance. The jugular vein increased whereas the femoral and popliteal veins decreased. All these changes were already observed in previous HDT. Common carotid diameter decreased, Front head skin thickness increased and Tibial skin thickness decreased. Eight hours with thigh cuffs increased the cardiac and carotid sizes which is in agreement with the plasma volume increase. Conversely they reduced the cerebral vascular resistance, jugular section and front head edema which may explain the sensation of comfort reported by the subjects. At the lower limb level the thigh cuffs restored the skin thickness to pre-HDT level but enlarged markedly the femoral and popliteal veins. HR, BP, CO, TPR did not change.

  1. CARDIAC COUNTERCLOCKWISE ROTATION IS A RISK FACTOR FOR HIGH-DOSE IRRADIATION TO THE LEFT ANTERIOR DESCENDING CORONARY ARTERY IN PATIENTS WITH LEFT-SIDED BREAST CANCER WHO RECEIVING ADJUVANT RADIOTHERAPY AFTER BREAST-CONSERVING SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    TANAKA, HIDEKAZU; HAYASHI, SHINYA; HOSHI, HIROAKI

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Patients irradiated for left-sided breast cancer have higher incidence of cardiovascular disease than those receiving irradiation for right-sided breast cancer. Most abnormalities were in the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery territory. We analyzed the relationships between preoperative examination results and irradiation dose to the LAD artery in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Seventy-one patients receiving breast radiotherapy were analyzed. The heart may rotate around longitudinal axis, showing either clockwise or counterclockwise rotation (CCWR). On electrocardiography, the transition zone (TZ) was judged in precordial leads. CCWR was considered to be present if TZ was at or to the right of V3. The prescribed dose was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. The maximum (Dmax) and mean (Dmean) doses to the LAD artery and the volumes of the LAD artery receiving at least 20 Gy, 30 Gy and 40 Gy (V20Gy, V30Gy and V40Gy, respectively) were significantly higher in CCWR than in the non-CCWR patients. On multivariate analysis, TZ was significantly associated with Dmax, Dmean, V20Gy, V30Gy, and V40Gy. CCWR is a risk factor for high-dose irradiation to the LAD artery. Electrocardiography is useful for evaluating the cardiovascular risk of high-dose irradiation to the LAD artery. PMID:25741035

  2. Simulation of Endoscopic Surgery

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Simulation of Endoscopic Surgery Nicholas AYACHE 1 - Stéphane COTIN 1 - Hervé DELINGETTE 1 Jean of therapy. This is particularly true for video-surgery, where the use of video-images during, in order to rehearse a difficult surgical procedure. In the future, we believe that surgery simulators

  3. Pediatric Surgery Gallengangatresie

    E-print Network

    Manstein, Dietmar J.

    1 Pediatric Surgery Gallengangatresie: eine seltene Erkrankung fällt durch die Maschen eines Versorgungsnetzes C. Petersen, B. M. Ure Pediatric Surgery Warum machen wir so viel Wirbel um eine seltene Surgery Die Gallengangatresie ist ein Problem! Seltene Erkrankung: ca. 1: 18.000 In Deutschland ca. 40

  4. Wrong site surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. García-Germán Vázquez; J. Sanz-Martín; F. Canillas del Rey; J. Sanjurjo-Navarro

    2009-01-01

    The term “wrong site surgery” refers to surgery carried out on the wrong side, in the wrong anatomical area or in the wrong patient. It can also indicate that the surgical procedure employed was not the one intended. In spite of being a rather neglected topic, wrong site surgery is a fairly usual complication in a surgeon's professional life -

  5. Pediatric heart surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... There are many kinds of heart defects. Some are minor, and others are more serious. Defects can occur inside the heart or in the large blood vessels ...

  6. Current status of rotational atherectomy.

    PubMed

    Tomey, Matthew I; Kini, Annapoorna S; Sharma, Samin K

    2014-04-01

    Rotational atherectomy facilitates percutaneous coronary intervention for complex de novo lesions with severe calcification. A strategy of routine rotational atherectomy has not, however, conferred reduction in restenosis or major adverse cardiac events. As it is technically demanding, rotational atherectomy is also uncommon. At this 25-year anniversary since the introduction of rotational atherectomy, we sought to review the current state-of-the-art in rotational atherectomy technique, safety, and efficacy data in the modern era of drug-eluting stents, strategies to prevent and manage complications, including slow-flow/no-reflow and burr entrapment, and appropriate use in the context of the broader evolution in the management of stable ischemic heart disease. Fundamental elements of optimal technique include use of a single burr with burr-to-artery ratio of 0.5 to 0.6-rotational speed of 140,000 to 150,000 rpm, gradual burr advancement using a pecking motion, short ablation runs of 15 to 20 s, and avoidance of decelerations >5,000 rpm. Combined with meticulous technique, optimal antiplatelet therapy, vasodilators, flush solution, and provisional use of atropine, temporary pacing, vasopressors, and mechanical support may prevent slow-flow/no-reflow, which in contemporary series is reported in 0.0% to 2.6% of cases. On the basis of the results of recent large clinical trials, a subset of patients with complex coronary artery disease previously assigned to rotational atherectomy may be directed instead to medical therapy alone or bypass surgery. For patients with de novo severely calcified lesions for which rotational atherectomy remains appropriate, referral centers of excellence are required. PMID:24630879

  7. Rotating Phasors

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sharp, Cory

    This interactive phasor page allows you to control the values of a rotating phasor and see a visualization of each change that is done. You can control: one, pos/neg, two, beats, delta, sawtooth, square, triangle, time, zoom, plus you can put into five different values: Frequency (rel, HZ, mHZ), Amplitude (raw, rel), and Phases (Deg, Rad, unitrad).

  8. Rotating Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambru?, Victor E.; Winstanley, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the rigidly rotating quantum thermal distribution of fermions in flat space-time. We find that thermal states diverge on the speed of light surface. We remove the divergences by enclosing the system inside a cylindrical boundary and investigate thermal expectation values and the Casimir effect for two sets of boundary conditions.

  9. Improved Measurement of Blood Pressure by Extraction of Characteristic Features from the Cuff Oscillometric Waveform.

    PubMed

    Lim, Pooi Khoon; Ng, Siew-Cheok; Jassim, Wissam A; Redmond, Stephen J; Zilany, Mohammad; Avolio, Alberto; Lim, Einly; Tan, Maw Pin; Lovell, Nigel H

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel approach to improve the estimation of systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) from oscillometric waveform data using variable characteristic ratios between SBP and DBP with mean arterial pressure (MAP). This was verified in 25 healthy subjects, aged 28 ± 5 years. The multiple linear regression (MLR) and support vector regression (SVR) models were used to examine the relationship between the SBP and the DBP ratio with ten features extracted from the oscillometric waveform envelope (OWE). An automatic algorithm based on relative changes in the cuff pressure and neighbouring oscillometric pulses was proposed to remove outlier points caused by movement artifacts. Substantial reduction in the mean and standard deviation of the blood pressure estimation errors were obtained upon artifact removal. Using the sequential forward floating selection (SFFS) approach, we were able to achieve a significant reduction in the mean and standard deviation of differences between the estimated SBP values and the reference scoring (MLR: mean ± SD = -0.3 ± 5.8 mmHg; SVR and -0.6 ± 5.4 mmHg) with only two features, i.e., Ratio2 and Area3, as compared to the conventional maximum amplitude algorithm (MAA) method (mean ± SD = -1.6 ± 8.6 mmHg). Comparing the performance of both MLR and SVR models, our results showed that the MLR model was able to achieve comparable performance to that of the SVR model despite its simplicity. PMID:26087370

  10. General surgery career resource.

    PubMed

    Parsee, Ana M; Ross, Sharona B; Gantt, Nancy L; Kichler, Kandace; Hollands, Celeste

    2013-11-01

    General surgery residency training can lead to a rewarding career in general surgery and serve as the foundation for careers in several surgical subspecialties. It offers broad-based training with exposure to the cognitive and technical aspects of several surgical specialties and prepares graduating residents for a wide range of career paths. This career development resource discusses the training aspects of general surgery. PMID:24157351

  11. Hyperoxaluria and Bariatric Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asplin, John R.

    2007-04-01

    Bariatric surgery as a means to treat obesity is becoming increasingly common in the United States. An early form of bariatric surgery, the jejunoileal bypass, had to be abandoned in 1980 due to numerous complications, including hyperoxaluria and kidney stones. Current bariatric procedures have not been systematically evaluated to determine if they cause hyperoxaluria. Presented here are data showing that hyperoxaluria is the major metabolic abnormality in patients with bariatric surgery who form kidney stones. Further studies are needed to assess the prevalence of hyperoxaluria in all patients with bariatric surgery.

  12. Anesthesia for colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Baldini, Gabriele; Fawcett, William J

    2015-03-01

    Anesthesiologists play a pivotal role in facilitating recovery of patients undergoing colorectal surgery, as many Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) elements are under their direct control. Successful implementation of ERAS programs requires that anesthesiologists become more involved in perioperative care and more aware of the impact of anesthetic techniques on surgical outcomes and recovery. Key to achieving success is strict adherence to the principle of aggregation of marginal gains. This article reviews anesthetic and analgesic care of patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery in the context of an ERAS program, and also discusses anesthesia considerations for emergency colorectal surgery. PMID:25701931

  13. Single-point but not tonic cuff pressure pain sensitivity is associated with level of physical fitness - a study of non-athletic healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Lemming, Dag; Börsbo, Björn; Sjörs, Anna; Lind, Eva-Britt; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Gerdle, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is often used for pain rehabilitation but the link between physical activity level and pain sensitivity is still not fully understood. Pressure pain sensitivity to cuff algometry and conditioned pain modulation (CPM) were evaluated in highly active men (n=22), normally active men (n=26), highly active women (n=27) and normally active women (n=23) based on the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire. Cuff pressure pain sensitivity was assessed at the arm and lower leg. The subjects scored the pain intensity on an electronic Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) during ten minutes with 25 kPa constant cuff pressure and two minutes with zero pressure. The maximal VAS score and area under the VAS-curve were extracted. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were recorded by manual pressure algometry on the ipsilateral tibialis anterior muscle before, during and after the tonic arm stimulation. Tonic cuff stimulation of the arm and leg resulted in higher VAS peak scores in women compared with men (p<0.04). In all groups the PPTs were reduced during and after the cuff stimulation compared with baseline (p=0.001). PPT were higher in men compared with women (p=0.03) and higher in highly physical active compared with normal active (p=0.048). Besides the well-known gender difference in pressure pain sensitivity this study demonstrates that a high physical fitness degree in non-athletic subjects is associated with increased pressure pain thresholds but does not affect cuff pressure pain sensitivity in healthy people. PMID:25933412

  14. Single-Point but Not Tonic Cuff Pressure Pain Sensitivity Is Associated with Level of Physical Fitness – A Study of Non-Athletic Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Lemming, Dag; Börsbo, Björn; Sjörs, Anna; Lind, Eva-Britt; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Gerdle, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is often used for pain rehabilitation but the link between physical activity level and pain sensitivity is still not fully understood. Pressure pain sensitivity to cuff algometry and conditioned pain modulation (CPM) were evaluated in highly active men (n=22), normally active men (n=26), highly active women (n=27) and normally active women (n=23) based on the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire. Cuff pressure pain sensitivity was assessed at the arm and lower leg. The subjects scored the pain intensity on an electronic Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) during ten minutes with 25 kPa constant cuff pressure and two minutes with zero pressure. The maximal VAS score and area under the VAS-curve were extracted. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were recorded by manual pressure algometry on the ipsilateral tibialis anterior muscle before, during and after the tonic arm stimulation. Tonic cuff stimulation of the arm and leg resulted in higher VAS peak scores in women compared with men (p<0.04). In all groups the PPTs were reduced during and after the cuff stimulation compared with baseline (p=0.001). PPT were higher in men compared with women (p=0.03) and higher in highly physical active compared with normal active (p=0.048). Besides the well-known gender difference in pressure pain sensitivity this study demonstrates that a high physical fitness degree in non-athletic subjects is associated with increased pressure pain thresholds but does not affect cuff pressure pain sensitivity in healthy people. PMID:25933412

  15. Ultrasound Guided Surgery: Multimodal Visualization and

    E-print Network

    , particularly the Departments of Neurosurgery, Vascular Surgery, and Laparoscopic Surgery. My supervisors have: Geirmund Unsgård, Neurosurgery, Hans Olav Myhre, Vascular Surgery and Ronald Mårvik, Laparoscopic Surgery

  16. Adult Reconstructive Surgery Foot and Ankle Surgery Hand, Upper Extremity and Microvascular Surgery Oncology Orthopaedic Research Pediatric Surgery Spine Surgery Sports Medicine

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Adult Reconstructive Surgery Foot and Ankle Surgery Hand, Upper Extremity and Microvascular Surgery Oncology Orthopaedic Research Pediatric Surgery Spine Surgery Sports Medicine Trauma and Post______________________________: This letter is to welcome you to the University of California, Davis Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

  17. Adult Reconstructive Surgery Foot and Ankle Surgery Hand, Upper Extremity and Microvascular Surgery Oncology Orthopaedic Research Pediatric Surgery Spine Surgery Sports Medicine

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Adult Reconstructive Surgery Foot and Ankle Surgery Hand, Upper Extremity and Microvascular Surgery Oncology Orthopaedic Research Pediatric Surgery Spine Surgery Sports Medicine Trauma and Post OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 4860 Y Street, Suite 3800 Sacramento, CA 95817 P: 916

  18. Adult Reconstructive Surgery Foot and Ankle Surgery Hand, Upper Extremity and Microvascular Surgery Oncology Orthopaedic Research Pediatric Surgery Spine Surgery Sports Medicine

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Adult Reconstructive Surgery Foot and Ankle Surgery Hand, Upper Extremity and Microvascular Surgery Oncology Orthopaedic Research Pediatric Surgery Spine Surgery Sports Medicine Trauma and Post Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 4860 Y Street, 1700 Sacramento, CA 95817 P: 916.734.2700 F: 916

  19. A portable Halbach magnet that can be opened and closed without force: The NMR-CUFF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windt, Carel W.; Soltner, Helmut; Dusschoten, Dagmar van; Blümler, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Portable equipment for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is becoming increasingly attractive for use in a variety of applications. One of the main scientific challenges in making NMR portable is the design of light-weight magnets that possess a strong and homogeneous field. Existing NMR magnets can provide such magnetic fields, but only for small samples or in small regions, or are rather heavy. Here we show a simple yet elegant concept for a Halbach-type permanent magnet ring, which can be opened and closed with minimal mechanical force. An analytical solution for an ideal Halbach magnet shows that the magnetic forces cancel if the structure is opened at an angle of 35.3° relative to its poles. A first prototype weighed only 3.1 kg, and provided a flux density of 0.57 T with a homogeneity better than 200 ppm over a spherical volume of 5 mm in diameter without shimming. The force needed to close it was found to be about 20 N. As a demonstration, intact plants were imaged and water (xylem) flow measured. Magnets of this type (NMR-CUFF = Cut-open, Uniform, Force Free) are ideal for portable use and are eminently suited to investigate small or slender objects that are part of a larger or immobile whole, such as branches on a tree, growing fruit on a plant, or non-metallic tubing in industrial installations. This new concept in permanent-magnet design enables the construction of openable, yet strong and homogeneous magnets, which aside from use in NMR or MRI could also be of interest for applications in accelerators, motors, or magnetic bearings.

  20. [Future of surgery].

    PubMed

    Idezuki, Y

    2000-03-01

    Most current surgical techniques were developed in the 20th century, especially during the past 50 years. Open heart surgery, vascular surgery, neonatal surgery, organ transplantation and artificial organs, microsurgery, intravenous hyperalimentation, and, more recently, endoscopic surgery emerged during the past five decades. Many of the dreams of surgeons in the past have now been realized. These advances in surgery were made possible by the development of new technologies and instrumentation, but most importantly were initiated by the pioneering spirit of surgeons. This will continue on in the next century, since history shows that classical or conventional treatment modalities are constantly changing and being replaced by new ones based on new ideas and technologies. In this age of molecular biology, gene therapy, computer science, and the Internet, the pace of change in medicine and surgery will accelerate. Systems for training and communications, and even medical ethics, will inevitably change. We may not be able to predict precisely the future changes in surgery and surgeons, but we must be prepared for them and steer the future of surgery for the benefit of patients. PMID:10773985

  1. Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Malcolm M. DeCamp; Robert J. McKenna; Claude C. Deschamps; Mark J. Krasna

    2008-01-01

    The objective of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) is the safe, effective, and durable palliation of dyspnea in appropriately se- lected patients with moderate to severe emphysema. Appropriate patient selection and preoperative preparation are prerequisites for successful LVRS. An effective LVRS program requires participation by and communication between experts from pulmonary medicine, thoracic surgery, thoracic anesthesiology, critical care medicine, rehabilitation

  2. Refractive surgery survey 2001

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kerry D Solomon; Mike P Holzer; Helga P Sandoval; Luis G Vargas; Liliana Werner; David T Vroman; Terrance J Kasper; David J Apple

    2002-01-01

    In February 2001, a questionnaire on the practice of refractive surgery was sent worldwide to all 8196 members of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery; 1511 responses (18.4%) were received. Although laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) was the most common refractive procedure reported, phakic intraocular lenses, clear lens extraction, and photorefractive keratectomy were also widespread. Nineteen percent of

  3. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is breast cancer treated? Surgery for breast cancer Radiation therapy for breast cancer Chemotherapy for breast cancer Hormone therapy for breast ... Topic How is breast cancer treated? Next Topic Radiation therapy for breast cancer Surgery for breast cancer Most women with breast ...

  4. Rotating Motion

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Wolfgang Christian

    In these problems, two people ride on a merry-go-round (radius fixed at 10 m..it's big!). One rider tosses a ball toward the other. The period of motion can be varied as can the initial velocity of the ball, relative to rider. One of the problems is to select the initial velocity of the ball so that it passes through center of the merry-go-round. Another is for the rider who throws the ball to catch it him/herself after exactly half a rotation.

  5. Bariatric Surgery for Severe Obesity

    MedlinePLUS

    ... resources ??. Alternate Language URL Bariatric Surgery for Severe Obesity Page Content Bariatric Surgery for Adults Bariatric Surgery ... especially if they have a disease linked to obesity. Severe obesity is a chronic condition that is ...

  6. The Educational Value of Community Preceptorships in Surgery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rambo, William M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A comparison of the experiences of 683 surgery students taking preceptorships in community hospitals and 696 taking only university-based rotations found no significant differences in individual characteristics, academic performance, choice of specialty for the first postgraduate year, or program director evaluations. The preceptorships were…

  7. Quantitative analysis of microdebriders used in endoscopic sinus surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Berrylin J. Ferguson; Paul A. DiBiase; Frank D'Amico

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a standardized in vitro model for evaluating efficacy of the microdebriders and to assess whether differences in efficacy exist among available microdebriders. Microdebriders combine suction of tissue with amputation by a hollow rotating cutter. Several models are available, and they are increasingly popular in endoscopic sinus surgery. Materials and Methods: Seven microdebriders were tested by using a

  8. Endoscopic surgery: ideal for endocrine surgery?

    PubMed

    Marescaux, J; Mutter, D; Vix, M; Leroy, J

    1999-08-01

    The laparoscopic approach of endocrine tumors is recent, the first reported resection of an adrenal gland in 1992. It represents a revolution in endocrine surgery equivalent to that observed in general surgery after the first cholecystectomy was performed in 1987. This new approach needs evaluation in terms of feasibility, indications, safety, and surgical procedure to define its potential advantages. The surgical technique and operative approaches of laparoscopic adrenalectomies are at the present time well defined and mostly accepted. Pancreatic approaches and resections, thyroidectomies, and parathyroidectomies are more confidential and performed only by rare teams. Nevertheless, the development of this technique is ineluctable. The spread of this technique, partly due to the increased quality of the technologies available, especially cameras, encounter a major brake that limits its generalization: If general surgeons commonly perform laparoscopy in their daily practice, they treat few patients presenting endocrine disorders. On the other hand, endocrine surgeons to whom many patients are referred do not have regular videoscopic practice. Endocrine surgery benefit few patients for these reasons. An analysis of the present state of the art allows us to imagine the evolution and future of videoscopic endocrine surgery. PMID:10415209

  9. Stability and selectivity of a chronic, multi-contact cuff electrode for sensory stimulation in human amputees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Daniel W.; Schiefer, Matthew A.; Keith, Michael W.; Anderson, J. Robert; Tyler, Dustin J.

    2015-04-01

    Objective. Stability and selectivity are important when restoring long-term, functional sensory feedback in individuals with limb-loss. Our objective is to demonstrate a chronic, clinical neural stimulation system for providing selective sensory response in two upper-limb amputees. Approach. Multi-contact cuff electrodes were implanted in the median, ulnar, and radial nerves of the upper-limb. Main results. Nerve stimulation produced a selective sensory response on 19 of 20 contacts and 16 of 16 contacts in subjects 1 and 2, respectively. Stimulation elicited multiple, distinct percept areas on the phantom and residual limb. Consistent threshold, impedance, and percept areas have demonstrated that the neural interface is stable for the duration of this on-going, chronic study. Significance. We have achieved selective nerve response from multi-contact cuff electrodes by demonstrating characteristic percept areas and thresholds for each contact. Selective sensory response remains consistent in two upper-limb amputees for 1 and 2 years, the longest multi-contact sensory feedback system to date. Our approach demonstrates selectivity and stability can be achieved through an extraneural interface, which can provide sensory feedback to amputees.

  10. Design and characterization of an intracavitary ultrasound hyperthermia applicator for recurrent or residual lesions in the vaginal cuff.

    PubMed

    Lee, R J; Suh, H

    2003-01-01

    For evaluating the feasibility of treating recurrent lesions in the vaginal cuff by hyperthermia, a 2-element ultrasound applicator was designed, constructed and characterized. A half-cylindrical transducer (d=1 cm, length=1 cm) was used to construct the 2-element ultrasound applicator. Each element of this applicator was operated at 1.5 MHz and characterized by measuring transducer efficiency and acoustic power distribution. Thermocouple probes were used to measure the temperature rise in the phantom. The element sizes used in this study were selected to be comparable to a high dose rate brachytherapy colpostat applicator. Each element was powered separately to achieve a desired temperature pattern in a target. The acoustic output power as a function of applied electric power of elements 1 and 2 were linear over this 1-40 W range and efficiencies were 32.2 +/- 3.4% and 46.2 +/- 0.8%, respectively. The temperature measurements in the phantom showed that a 6 degrees C temperature rise was achieved 2 cm from the applicator surface. As a conclusion, the ability of the ultrasound colpostat applicator to be used for hyperthermia was demonstrated by measuring acoustic output power, ultrasound field distribution and temperature rise in the phantom. Based on the characteristics of this applicator, it has the potential to be useful for inducing hyperthermia to the vaginal cuff in the clinic. PMID:12944170

  11. [Surgery for thoracic tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Kilani, T; Boudaya, M S; Zribi, H; Ouerghi, S; Marghli, A; Mestiri, T; Mezni, F

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is mainly a medical disease. Surgery has been the unique therapeutic tool for a long time before the advent of specific antituberculous drugs, and the role of surgery was then confined to the treatment of the sequelae of tuberculosis and their complications. The resurgence of tuberculosis and the emergence of multidrug-resistant TB combined to immunosuppressed patients represent a new challenge for tuberculosis surgery. Surgery may be indicated for a diagnostic purpose in patients with pulmonary, pleural, mediastinal or thoracic wall involvement, or with a therapeutic purpose (drainage, resection, residual cavity obliteration). Modern imaging techniques and the advent of video-assisted thoracic surgery allowed a new approach of this pathology; the majority of diagnostic interventions and selected cases requiring lung resection can be performed through a mini-invasive approach. Patients proposed for aggressive surgery may be treated with the best results thanks to a good evaluation of the thoracic lesions, of the patients' nutritional, infectious and general status combined with a good coordination between the specialized medical team for an optimal preparation to surgery. PMID:24894967

  12. Predicting outcomes of rectus femoris transfer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Reinbolt, Jeffrey A.; Fox, Melanie D.; Schwartz, Michael H.; Delp, Scott L.

    2009-01-01

    Rectus femoris transfer surgery is a common treatment for stiff knee gait in children with cerebral palsy. Unfortunately, the improvement in knee motion after surgery is inconsistent. There is great interest in understanding the causes of stiff knee gait and determining predictors of improved knee motion after surgery. This study demonstrates that it is possible to predict whether or not a patient’s knee motion will improve following rectus femoris transfer surgery with greater than 80% accuracy. A predictive model was developed that requires only a few preoperative gait analysis measurements, already collected as a routine part of treatment planning. Our examination of 62 patients before and after rectus femoris transfer revealed that a combination of hip power, knee power, and knee flexion velocity at toe-off correctly predicted postoperative outcome for 80% of cases. With the addition of two more preoperative measurements, hip flexion and internal rotation, prediction accuracy increased to nearly 88%. Other combinations preoperative gait analysis measurements also predicted outcomes with high accuracy. These results provide insight into factors related to positive outcomes and suggest that predictive models provide a valuable tool for determining indications for rectus femoris transfer. PMID:19411175

  13. Rotating Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues currently being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  14. Postoperative pharyngolaryngeal adverse events with laryngeal mask airway (LMA Supreme) in laparoscopic surgical procedures with cuff pressure limiting 25?cmH?O: prospective, blind, and randomised study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Joo-Eun; Oh, Chung-Sik; Choi, Jae Won; Son, Il Soon; Kim, Seong-Hyop

    2014-01-01

    To reduce the incidence of postoperative pharyngolaryngeal adverse events, laryngeal mask airway (LMA) manufacturers recommend maximum cuff pressures not exceeding 60?cmH?O. We performed a prospective randomised study, comparing efficacy and adverse events among patients undergoing laparoscopic surgical procedures who were allocated randomly into low (limiting 25?cmH?O, L group) and high (at 60?cmH?O, H group) LMA cuff pressure groups with LMA Supreme. Postoperative pharyngolaryngeal adverse events were evaluated at discharge from postanaesthetic care unit (PACU) (postoperative day 1, POD 1) and 24 hours after discharge from PACU (postoperative day 2, POD 2). All patients were well tolerated with LMA without ventilation failure. Before pneumoperitoneum, cuff volume and pressure and oropharyngeal leak pressure (OLP) showed significant differences. Postoperative sore throat at POD 2 (3 versus 12 patients) and postoperative dysphagia at POD 1 and POD 2 (0 versus 4 patients at POD 1; 0 versus 4 patients at POD 2) were significantly lower in L group, compared with H group. In conclusion, LMA with cuff pressure limiting 25?cmH?O allowed both efficacy of airway management and lower incidence of postoperative adverse events in laparoscopic surgical procedures. This clinical trial is registered with KCT0000334. PMID:24778598

  15. Non-invasive measurement of pulse pressure variation and systolic pressure variation using a finger cuff corresponds with intra-arterial measurement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Lansdorp; D. Ouweneel; A. de Keijzer; J. G. van der Hoeven; J. Lemson; P. Pickkers

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulse pressure variation (PPV) and systolic pressure variation (SPV) are reliable predictors of fluid responsiveness in patients undergoing controlled mechanical ventilation. Currently, PPV and SPV are measured invasively and it is unknown if an arterial pressure (AP) signal obtained with a finger cuff can be used as an alternative. The aim of this study was to validate PPV and

  16. Teaching plastic surgery from different perspectives.

    PubMed

    Cable, Christian; Chong, Tae; Pratt, Daniel D

    2012-06-01

    Just as everyone has a different learning style, teachers too approach the task from different perspectives. There are five basic teaching perspectives or styles: transmission, apprenticeship, developmental, nurturing, and social justice. The acronym BIAS is useful to describe the beliefs, intentions, assessments, and strategies associated with each perspective. The authors present a hypothetical 1-week rotation in plastic and reconstructive surgery in which a student encounters instructors who embody the five basic teaching perspectives. By presenting these perspectives, the authors introduce valuable teaching techniques that can benefit all those charged with the education of learners along the spectrum from premedical to continuing education venues. Educational objectives include the following: (1) explain and illustrate different approaches to effective teaching in plastic surgery; (2) introduce readers to the Teaching Perspectives Inventory as a means of determining their primary teaching style; and (3) argue for a "plurality of the good" in teaching. PMID:22634660

  17. A new dimension in endo surgery: Micro endo surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pecora, Gabriele Edoardo; Pecora, Camilla Nicole

    2015-01-01

    There is an immense difference between tradizional Endodontic Surgery and Micro-Endo Surgery. Microsurgical techniques made possible and accessible results,that were unimaginable before. Under microscopic control,the operative techniques reached continous changes,allowing a better precision and quality standards. The dramatic evolution from Endo Surgery to Micro-Endo Surgery has enlarged the horizon of therapeutic options. Illumination and magnification through the Microscope has fundamentally and radically changed the way endo surgery can be performed. PMID:25657519

  18. Anti-reflux surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Mark IV) fundoplication; Toupet fundoplication; Thal fundoplication; Hiatal hernia repair; Endoluminal fundoplication ... surgery, your surgeon will: First repair the hiatal hernia, if present. This involves tightening the opening in ...

  19. Periodontal Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the teeth and to recreate a normal appearance. Periodontal Disease Periodontal disease is diagnosed when gingival or gum ... changes and extending to periodontal plastic surgery. Treating Periodontal Disease Periodontal disease does not always respond to conservative ...

  20. Heart bypass surgery - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    ... surgery. The twisting involved in turning the steering wheel may pull on your incision. Ask your provider ... You have problems taking any of your heart medicines. Your weight goes up by more than 2 ...

  1. Plastic Surgery for Teenagers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for referrals to ASPS Member Surgeons and to learn more about cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery. The ... publication and is subject to change as scientific knowledge and technology advances and as practice patterns evolve. ...

  2. Validation of On-Orbit Methodology for the Assessment of Cardiac Function and Changes in the Circulating Volume Using "Braslet-M" Occlusion Cuffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, D. R.; Sargsyan, A. E.; Garcia, K. M.; Ebert, D.; Feiveson, A. H.; Alferova, I. V.; Dulchavsky, S. A.; Matveev, V. P.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Duncan, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The transition to microgravity eliminates the hydrostatic gradients in the vascular system. The resulting fluid redistribution commonly manifests as facial edema, engorgement of the external neck veins, nasal congestion, and headache. This experiment examined the responses to modified Valsalva and Mueller maneuvers as measured by cardiac and vascular ultrasound in a baseline microgravity steady state, and under the influence of thigh occlusion cuffs (Braslet cuffs). METHODS: Nine International Space Station crewmember subjects (Expeditions 16 - 20) were examined in 15 experiment sessions 101 46 days after launch (mean SD; 33 - 185). 27 cardiac and vascular parameters were obtained under three respiratory conditions (baseline, Valsalva, and Mueller) before and after tightening of the Braslet cuffs for a total of 162 data points per session. The quality of cardiac and vascular ultrasound examinations was assured through remote monitoring and guidance by Investigators from the NASA Telescience Center in Houston, TX, USA. RESULTS: Fourteen of the 81 measured conditions were significantly different with Braslet application and were apparently related to cardiac preload reduction or increase in the venous volume sequestered in the lower extremity. These changes represented 10 of the 27 parameters measured. In secondary analysis, 7 of the 27 parameters were found to respond differently to respiratory maneuvers depending on the presence or absence of thigh compression, with a total of 11 differences. CONCLUSIONS: Acute application of Braslet occlusion cuffs causes lower extremity fluid sequestration and exerts proportionate measurable effects on cardiac performance in microgravity. Ultrasound techniques measuring the hemodynamic effects of thigh cuffs in combination with respiratory maneuvers may serve as an effective tool in determining the volume status of a cardiac or hemodynamically compromised patient in microgravity.

  3. Postoperative Instructions Following Facial Surgery

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Postoperative Instructions Following Facial Surgery 1. Your surgery will be performed in the Surgery Center on the 4th floor of the Center for Health and Healing (CHH) at Oregon Health & Sciences University. The procedure is done under anesthesia administered by an anesthesiologist. After surgery, you

  4. Department of Surgery Reunion Gala

    E-print Network

    Haykin, Simon

    Department of Surgery Reunion Gala Report A celebration of over 40 years of the Department of Surgery October25th&26th2013 #12;October25th2013:Wine&Cheese Surgery Reunion Gala Weekend: Wine & Cheese On Friday October 25, 2013 the Surgery Reunion Gala weekend kicked off with a wine and cheese event

  5. 2013 PLASTIC SURGERY VISITING PROFESSOR

    E-print Network

    Shoubridge, Eric

    2013 PLASTIC SURGERY VISITING PROFESSOR Dr. Mutaz B. Habal June 6, 2013 McGill University Division of Plastic Surgery 2013 PLASTIC SURGERY VISITING PROFESSOR Special thanks to our sponsors: Representative Surgery MUHC McGill University Campagne Les meilleurs soins pour la vie The Best Care for Life Campaign

  6. Cosmetic Eyelid and Facial Surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guy J. Ben Simon; John D. McCann

    2008-01-01

    The goal of cosmetic surgery is to reverse anatomical changes that occur in the face with aging. It is a rapidly growing subdiscipline of ophthalmic plastic surgery and includes forehead, eyelid, mid-face, lower face, and neck surgery, most performed by ophthalmic plastic surgeons. The current article reviews updates in cosmetic eyelid and facial surgery, including minimally invasive techniques such as

  7. Sexual dysfunction after pelvic surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C Zippe; K Nandipati; A Agarwal; R Raina

    2006-01-01

    Pelvic surgeries are among the most common causes of organic sexual dysfunction in men and women. The impact of nerve-sparing surgery on potency has been well documented in radical prostatectomy. However, its impact on potency needs to be evaluated in other pelvic surgeries. Sexual dysfunction is highly prevalent even after multiple technical advances in the field of oncological surgeries. The

  8. Endoscopic pituitary surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paolo Cappabianca; Luigi Maria Cavallo; Oreste de Divitiis; Domenico Solari; Felice Esposito; Annamaria Colao

    2008-01-01

    Pituitary surgery is a continuous evolving speciality of the neurosurgeons’ armamentarium, which requires precise anatomical\\u000a knowledge, technical skills and integrated appreciation of the pituitary pathophysiology. What we consider “pure” endoscopic\\u000a transsphenoidal surgery is a procedure performed through the nose and the sphenoid bone, with the endoscope alone throughout\\u000a the whole approach to visualize the surgical target area and without the

  9. Vet Med & Surgery Staff 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    1971 Major Subject: Veterinary Medicine and Surgery THE EFFECTS OF NECLOFENAMIC ACID ON OSTEOARTHRITIS IN THE HORSE A Thesis by FLOYD LITTLETON GUNN Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Co ittee ead of Department ember Nember..., Texas; 1945-1966. Assistant Professor; Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, Texas A&N University; 1966-present. The typist for this thesis was Mrs. Ed Thielemann. gg$&3 ...

  10. Photobiomodulation in laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Rong, Dong-Liang; Huang, Jin; Deng, Xiao-Yuan; Liu, Song-Hao

    2006-01-01

    Laser surgery provides good exposure with clear operating fields and satisfactory preliminary functional results. In contrast to conventional excision, it was found that matrix metalloproteinases and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases -1 mRNA expression is higher, myofibroblasts appeared and disappeared slower in laser excision wounds. It has been suggested that the better anatomical and functional results achieved following laser cordectomy may be explained by the fact that such procedures result in better, more rapid healing processes to recover vocal cord for early glottic tumors and better. In this paper, the role of photobiomodulation in laser surgery will be discussed by the cultured monolayer normal human skin fibroblast model of the photobiomodulation of marginal irradiation of high intensity laser beam, the photobiomodulation related to the irradiated tissue, the biological information model of photobiomodulation and the animal models of laser surgery. Although high intensity laser beam is so intense that it destroys the irradiated cells or tissue, its marginal irradiation intensity is so low that there is photobiomodulation on non-damage cells to modulate the regeneration of partly damaged tissue so that the surgery of laser of different parameters results in different post-surgical recovery. It was concluded that photobiomodulation might play an important role in the long-term effects of laser surgery, which might be used to design laser surgery.

  11. Robotic surgery in gynecology.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rooma; Sanjay, Madhumati; Rupa, B; Kumari, Samita

    2015-01-01

    FDA approved Da Vinci Surgical System in 2005 for gynecological surgery. It has been rapidly adopted and it has already assumed an important position at various centers where this is available. It comprises of three components: A surgeon's console, a patient-side cart with four robotic arms and a high-definition three-dimensional (3D) vision system. In this review we have discussed various robotic-assisted laparoscopic benign gynecological procedures like myomectomy, hysterectomy, endometriosis, tubal anastomosis and sacrocolpopexy. A PubMed search was done and relevant published studies were reviewed. Surgeries that can have future applications are also mentioned. At present most studies do not give significant advantage over conventional laparoscopic surgery in benign gynecological disease. However robotics do give an edge in more complex surgeries. The conversion rate to open surgery is lesser with robotic assistance when compared to laparoscopy. For myomectomy surgery, Endo wrist movement of robotic instrument allows better and precise suturing than conventional straight stick laparoscopy. The robotic platform is a logical step forward to laparoscopy and if cost considerations are addressed may become popular among gynecological surgeons world over. PMID:25598600

  12. Robotic Surgery for Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jandee; Chung, Woong Youn

    2013-01-01

    Robotic surgery is an innovation in thyroid surgery that may compensate for the drawbacks of conventional endoscopic surgery. A surgical robot provides strong advantages, including three-dimensional imaging, motion scaling, tremor elimination, and additional degrees of freedom. We review here recent adaptations, experience and applications of robotics in thyroid surgery. Robotic thyroid surgeries include thyroid lobectomy, total thyroidectomy, central compartment neck dissection, and radical neck dissection for benign and malignant thyroid diseases. Most of the current literature consists of case series of robotic thyroidectomies. Recent retrospective and prospective analyses have evaluated the safety and oncologic efficacy of robotic surgery for thyroid cancer. Although robotic thyroid surgery is often associated with longer operation times than conventional open surgery, robotic techniques have shown similar or superior levels of surgical completeness and safety compared with conventional open or endoscopic surgery. Compared to open thyroidectomy, robotic thyroidectomy has been associated with several quality-of-life benefits, including excellent cosmetic results, reduced neck pain and sensory changes, and decreased voice and swallowing discomfort after surgery. For surgeons, robotic surgery has improved ergonomics and has a shorter learning curve than open or endoscopic surgery. The advantages of robotic thyroid surgery over conventional surgery suggest that robotic thyroidectomy with or without neck dissection may become the preferred surgical option for thyroid diseases. Robotic thyroid surgery will likely continue to develop as more endocrine and head-and-neck surgeons are trained and more patients seek this newly developed surgical option. PMID:24783046

  13. The pitcher's mound: a late sequela of posterior type II SLAP lesions.

    PubMed

    Pearce, C E; Burkhart, S S

    2000-03-01

    Three patients with long-standing disabling shoulder pain underwent arthroscopic examination. Two of the 3 had preoperative magnetic resonance imaging scans showing complete rotator cuff tears confirmed at surgery. The third patient was found to have a partial-thickness bursal surface cuff tear. In addition, each patient was found to have a quite prominent posterior superior glenoid osteophyte located beneath an unstable type II SLAP lesion. PMID:10705336

  14. Laparoscopic renal surgery.

    PubMed

    Sountoulides, P G; Kaufmann, O G; Kaplan, A G; Louie, M K; McDougall, E M; Clayman, R V

    2009-08-01

    Renal surgery, radical nephrectomy in particular, was historically the first application of laparoscopic techniques in urology. Since then, laparoscopy has been constantly evolving to claim its position in the surgical armamentarium of the urologist for the treatment of both malignant and benign diseases of the kidney and upper urinary tract. Over the years of increasing surgical experience and exposure, along with the evolution in the techniques and instruments used, laparoscopy has emerged as an equally effective and even more attractive alternative to open surgery for certain indications. The currently available load of literature is able to prove beyond any doubt the oncologic efficacy and minimal morbidity of laparoscopy for the treatment of renal masses in the form of radical or partial laparoscopic nephrectomy and nephroureterectomy. On the other hand, one can claim that laparoscopy is not far from replacing open surgery for the management of benign conditions such as ureteropelvic junction obstruction and donor nephrectomy. This review on laparoscopic renal surgery will discuss the major applications, indications, techniques and outcomes of laparoscopy in the contemporary management of benign and malignant renal diseases while focusing on its benefits and drawbacks compared to open surgery. PMID:19648858

  15. [Experiences with shorter surgery].

    PubMed

    Rückert, K; Nahrstedt, U

    2001-05-01

    Through the introduction of new computer-based forms of organisation, the hospital stay for both general and visceral surgery has been significantly reduced. A short stay ward with 15 beds and a dedicated functional unit was established in 1994 where approximately 1,000 operations take place each year with a 2.3 day average hospital stay. At this center laparoscopic cholecystectomy, laparoscopic herniorrhaphy, arthroscopy and perforating vein surgery are performed on ASA-I- and ASA-II-patients. Experience indicates that patients satisfaction has dramatically increased. This is due to a shorter waiting period, a guaranteed operation in accordance with the time scheduled, a comfortable hotel-like-atmosphere and minimal hospital stay without an increase of the perioperative risk. In this way hospitals can maximize their profits using special payment arrangements (all-inclusive prices). Even after introduction of the new DRG-systems short stay surgery will be attractive considering economic aspects. PMID:11396242

  16. Cosmetic Facial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Peter A.

    1987-01-01

    Canadians have committed themselves to a healthier lifestyle, and many are seeking to look as well as they feel. For patients with realistic expectations, modern techniques of cosmetic facial surgery can enhance appearance and be of psychological benefit. Today most procedures can be done under local anesthesia on an out-patient basis. Facial contour defects can be improved by means of procedures such as rhinoplasty, mentoplasty, otoplasty and malarplasty. Facial rejuvenation surgery to decrease the signs of aging includes the forehead lift, eyebrow and eyelid lift, rhytidectomy, liposuction and chemical peeling. Newer controversial trends in cosmetic facial surgery include collagen implantation and fat transfer for contour defects, and eyelid tattooing. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:21263984

  17. Open surgery simulation.

    PubMed

    Bielser, Daniel; Gross, Markus H

    2002-01-01

    The design of simulators for surgical training and planning poses a great number of technical challenges. Therefore the focus of systems and algorithms was mostly on the more restricted minimal invasive surgery. This paper tackles the more general problem of open surgery and presents efficient solutions to several of the main difficulties. In addition to an improved collision detection scheme for computing interactions with even heavily moving tissue, a hierarchical system for the haptic rendering has been realized in order to reach the best performance of haptic feedback. A flexible way of modeling complex surgical tools out of simple basic components is proposed. In order to achieve a realistic and at the same time fast relaxation of the tissue, the approach of explicit finite elements has been substantially improved. We are able to demonstrate realistic simulations of interactive open surgery scenarios. PMID:15458060

  18. [Refractive surgery: techniques and reliability].

    PubMed

    Zanen, A

    2003-09-01

    Refractive surgery modifies anatomic properties of the eye, in order to improve vision without the recourse to optical devices. It includes corneal surgery (radial keratotomy, excimer laser keratectomy), intraocular surgery (artificial lens implantation) and scleral surgery. The level of satisfaction of the patients who have benefit from this surgery is usually high, but is related to the selection of the subjects, which depends on the motivation and also on the default to be corrected. Despite the continuous progress of that surgery, it is not devoid of risks and complications. PMID:14606294

  19. Stellar Evolution with Rotation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Meynet; A. Maeder

    2006-01-01

    Abstract. Grids of models for rotating stars are constructed in the range of 9 to 120 M,at solar metallicity. The following effects of rotation are included: shellular rotation, new struc- ture equations for non?conservative case, surface distortions, increase of mass loss with rotation, meridional circulation and interaction with horizontal turbulence, shear instability and cou- pling with thermal effects, advection and

  20. Thermal comfort during surgery 

    E-print Network

    Manning, David Harold

    1978-01-01

    Lewis, D. G. and A. Nackenzie. Cooling During Major Vascular Surgery. British Journal of Anesthesioioqnf, August 1972, 44(8), 859-864. Nackenzie, A. Hazards in the Operating Theatre, Environmental Control. Royal ~tulle e of 3~enon of Ella d. R als, ko...THERMAL COMFORT DURING SURGERY A Thesis by DAVID HAROLD MANNING Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Industrial...

  1. [Breast cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Delpech, Yann; Barranger, Emmanuel

    2013-12-01

    The surgery for breast cancer is frequently the first step in a multi-disciplinary care. It allows for local control, but also to establish crucial prognostic factor indicating potential adjuvant therapy. The current trend s towards de-escalation of surgical treatment for reducing the functional and aesthetic morbidity. At the local level, this de-escalation has been made possible by performing most often breast conservative surgery because of the development of oncoplastic techniques, but also because of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. At the axillary level, the reduction of morbidity has been made possible by the advent of the sentinel node biopsy which is more and more indicated year after year. PMID:24579336

  2. Complications in periorbital surgery.

    PubMed

    Terella, Adam M; Wang, Tom D; Kim, Michael M

    2013-02-01

    Comprehensive rejuvenation of the periorbital region commonly involves management of the brow, as well as the upper and lower eyelids. Browlifting, upper and lower blepharoplasty, fat transfer, and neuromodulators are frequently utilized with excellent results. However, surgery in this region can be fraught with potential complications ranging from a poor cosmetic outcome to orbital hematoma and vision loss. Although avoidance of complications is preferred, it is incumbent on the surgeon to have a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology, prevention, and management of these complications. The authors examine the more common complications of periorbital surgery. PMID:23426754

  3. A Review of Comparison of Complications of Vaginal Hysterectomy with and without Concomitant Surgery for SUI: A 5 Years' Experience at a Tertiary Care Hospital of Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Mohsin Rizvi, Raheela; Akhtar, Munnazza; Zuberi, Nadeem Faiyaz

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The study was performed to review the complications of surgery for POP with or without surgery for SUI. This included the need for second procedure two years after the primary surgery. Study Design. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional comparative study at the Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan. International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) was used to identify women who underwent vaginal hysterectomy with anterior/posterior repair alone and those with concomitant tension-free vaginal tape surgery for urodynamic stress incontinence. Results. The 28 cases of VH/repair combined with TVT were compared for complications with 430 cases of VH with repair alone. The basic characteristics like age, BMI, and degree of prolapse showed no statistical difference among two groups. The main comorbidities in both groups were hypertension, diabetes, and bronchial asthma. We observed no significant differences in intraoperative and postoperative complications except for cuff abscess, need for medical intervention, and readmission following discharge from hospital, which were higher in cases with vaginal hysterectomy with concomitant TVT. Conclusions. Vaginal hysterectomy is an efficient treatment for uterovaginal prolapse with a swift recovery, short length of hospital stay, and rare serious complications. The addition of surgery for USI does not appear to increase the morbidity. PMID:24454388

  4. [Robotic surgery in gynecology].

    PubMed

    Hibner, Micha?; Marianowski, Piotr; Szymusik, Iwona; Wielgós, Miros?aw

    2012-12-01

    Introduction of robotic surgery in the first decade of the 21 century was one of the biggest breakthroughs in surgery since the introduction of anesthesia. For the first time in history the surgeon was placed remotely from the patient and was able to operate with the device that has more degrees of freedom than human hand. Initially developed for the US Military in order to allow surgeons to be removed from the battlefield, surgical robots quickly made a leap to the mainstream medicine. One of the first surgical uses for the robot was cardiac surgery but it is urology and prostate surgery that gave it a widespread popularity Gynecologic surgeons caught on very quickly and it is estimated that 31% of hysterectomies done in the United States in 2012 will be done robotically. With over half a million hysterectomies done each year in the US alone, gynecologic surgery is one of the main driving forces behind the growth of robotic surgery Other applications in gynecology include myomectomy oophorectomy and ovarian cystectomy resection of endometriosis and lymphadenectomy Advantages of the surgical robot are clearly seen in myomectomy The wrist motion allows for better more precise suturing than conventional "straight stick" laparoscopy The strength of the arms allow for better pulling of the suture and the third arm for holding the suture on tension. Other advantage of the robot is scaling of the movements when big movement on the outside translates to very fine movement on the inside. This enables much more precise surgery and may be important in the procedures like tubal anastomosis and implantation of the ureter Three-dimensional vision provides excellent depth of field perception. It is important for surgeons who are switching from open surgeries and preliminary evidence shows that it may allow for better identification of lesions like endometriosis. Another big advantage of robotics is that the surgeon sits comfortably with his/her arms and head supported. This results in much less fatigue and therefore increases precision and potentially may decrease the number of medical errors. The eyes of the surgeon are directed at where the hands should be, which is more natural, allows for a more natural body position and mimics open surgery Robot also enables better teaching, especially when two consoles are used. The surgeon and the student may be either sharing the instruments with two consoles or switching between one another. In a situation where the student operates, the surgeon can use the telestation to teach. Robotic simulator attached to one of the consoles allows students to practice after hours. In summary surgical robot is a great tool, especially in gynecology but also in urology cardiac surgery general surgery and laryngology The device will evolve and most likely with time will eliminate laparoscopy PMID:23488297

  5. Spines, backbones and orthopedic surgery. Spines, backbones and orthopedic surgery.

    E-print Network

    1/ 17 Spines, backbones and orthopedic surgery. Spines, backbones and orthopedic surgery. Simon;2/ 17 Spines, backbones and orthopedic surgery. Motivation #12;2/ 17 Spines, backbones and orthopedic motion with a near critical drift towards an absorbing barrier at the origin. #12;3/ 17 Spines, backbones

  6. Improvement of the knee center of rotation during walking after opening wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyungsoo; Feng, Jun; Nha, Kyung Wook; Park, Won Man; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2015-06-01

    Accurate measurement of the center of rotation of the knee joint is indispensable for prediction of joint kinematics and kinetics in musculoskeletal models. However, no study has yet identified the knee center of rotations during several daily activities before and after high tibial osteotomy surgery, which is one surgical option for treating knee osteoarthritis. In this study, an estimation method for determining the knee joint center of rotation was developed by applying the optimal common shape technique and symmetrical axis of rotation approach techniques to motion-capture data and validated for typical activities (walking, squatting, climbing up stairs, walking down stairs) of 10 normal subjects. The locations of knee joint center of rotations for injured and contralateral knees of eight subjects with osteoarthritis, both before and after high tibial osteotomy surgery, were then calculated during walking. It was shown that high tibial osteotomy surgery improved the knee joint center of rotation since the center of rotations for the injured knee after high tibial osteotomy surgery were significantly closer to those of the normal healthy population. The difference between the injured and contralateral knees was also generally reduced after surgery, demonstrating increased symmetry. These results indicate that symmetry in both knees can be recovered in many cases after high tibial osteotomy surgery. Moreover, the recovery of center of rotation in the injured knee was prior to that of symmetry. This study has the potential to provide fundamental information that can be applied to understand abnormal kinematics in patients, diagnose knee joint disease, and design a novel implants for knee joint surgeries. PMID:25963385

  7. Anaesthesia for robotic gynaecological surgery.

    PubMed

    Gupta, K; Mehta, Y; Sarin Jolly, A; Khanna, S

    2012-07-01

    Robotic surgery is gaining widespread popularity due to advantages such as reduced blood loss, reduced postoperative pain, shorter hospital stay and better visualisation of fine structures. Robots are being used in urological, cardiac, thoracic, orthopaedic, gynaecological and general surgery. Robotic surgery received US Food and Drug Administration approval for use in gynaecological surgery in 2005. The various gynaecological robotic operations being performed are myomectomy, total and supracervical hysterectomy, ovarian cystectomy, sacral colpopexy, tubal reanastomosis, lymph node dissection, surgery of retroperitoneal ectopic pregnancy, Moskowitz procedure and endometriosis surgery. The anaesthetic considerations include difficult access to the patient intraoperatively, steep Trendelenburg position, long surgical duration and the impact of pneumoperitoneum. We highlight the complications encountered in these surgeries and methods to prevent these complications. Robotic gynaecological surgery can be safely performed after considering the physiological effects of the steep Trendelenburg position and of pneumoperitoneum. The benefits of the surgical procedure should be weighed against the risks in patients with underlying cardiorespiratory problems. PMID:22813488

  8. What Happens After Heart Surgery?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... doctors. This is where patients go after open-heart surgery or a heart attack. You’re watched around ... for several days, depending on the type of heart surgery and the time you need to recover. Then ...

  9. TECHNIQUES IN ASEPTIC RODENT SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Hoogstraten-Miller, Shelley L.; Brown, Patricia A.

    2008-01-01

    Performing aseptic survival surgery in rodents can be challenging. This unit describes some basic principles to assist clinicians, researchers, and technicians in becoming proficient in performing aseptic rodent surgery. PMID:18729061

  10. Advances in surgery. Volume 17

    SciTech Connect

    Shires, G.T.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the advancements made in surgery. The topics discussed are: Diagnostic uses of computerized tomography of abdomen; kidney surgery advancements, evaluation and management of pheochromocytomas; trauma of spleen and liver and microsurgery applications.

  11. Cataract Surgery in Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Murthy, Somashiela; Ganesh, Sudha K.; Phaik, Chee Soon; Sangwan, Virender; Biswas, Jyotimai

    2012-01-01

    Cataract surgery in uveitic eyes is often challenging and can result in intraoperative and postoperative complications. Most uveitic patients enjoy good vision despite potentially sight-threatening complications, including cataract development. In those patients who develop cataracts, successful surgery stems from educated patient selection, careful surgical technique, and aggressive preoperative and postoperative control of inflammation. With improved understanding of the disease processes, pre- and perioperative control of inflammation, modern surgical techniques, availability of biocompatible intraocular lens material and design, surgical experience in performing complicated cataract surgeries, and efficient management of postoperative complications have led to much better outcome. Preoperative factors include proper patient selection and counseling and preoperative control of inflammation. Meticulous and careful cataract surgery in uveitic cataract is essential in optimizing the postoperative outcome. Management of postoperative complications, especially inflammation and glaucoma, earlier rather than later, has also contributed to improved outcomes. This manuscript is review of the existing literature and highlights the management pearls in tackling complicated cataract based on medline search of literature and experience of the authors. PMID:22518338

  12. Refractive Surgery Survey 2001.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Kerry D; Holzer, Mike P; Sandoval, Helga P; Vargas, Luis G; Werner, Liliana; Vroman, David T; Kasper, Terrance J; Apple, David J

    2002-02-01

    In February 2001, a questionnaire on the practice of refractive surgery was sent worldwide to all 8196 members of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery; 1511 responses (18.4%) were received. Although laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) was the most common refractive procedure reported, phakic intraocular lenses, clear lens extraction, and photorefractive keratectomy were also widespread. Nineteen percent of the respondents said they had had refractive surgery, and that group reported performing significantly more procedures than those who had not had a refractive procedure (P < .0001). The most common complication of LASIK was dry eyes, occurring in more than half of the cases in one fourth of the practices; however, only 30% of surgeons said they perform a Schirmer test before surgery. High-volume surgeons reported seeing fewer cases of flap striae (P = .002) and slipped flaps (P = .02) than low-volume surgeons. Seventy-seven percent said that wavefront LASIK ablation will increase the quality of vision and of those already performing wavefront ablation, 92% stated they believe it will improve outcomes. PMID:11821220

  13. IVF after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Doblado, Manuel A.; Lewkowksi, Beth M.; Odem, Randall R.; Jungheim, Emily S.

    2010-01-01

    Little data exist regarding in vitro fertilization in women who have undergone bariatric surgery. Our experience with five patients suggests IVF is a safe and effective fertility treatment for these women although special considerations should be made including the type of bariatric procedure the patient underwent and relating this knowledge to symptoms the patient may experience during their IVF cycle. PMID:20667406

  14. Pathways in general surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nick Carty

    Surgery is an ideal fi eld for the application of care pathways. There is typically a single evaluation and diagnostic episode followed by a defi ned treatment. Where follow-up is required, this usually has a predictable schedule. In contrast, many other medical specialities are concerned with the treatment of diseases, which, by their nature, are less easily defi ned. This

  15. Cataract surgery in uveitis.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Murthy, Somashiela; Ganesh, Sudha K; Phaik, Chee Soon; Sangwan, Virender; Biswas, Jyotimai

    2012-01-01

    Cataract surgery in uveitic eyes is often challenging and can result in intraoperative and postoperative complications. Most uveitic patients enjoy good vision despite potentially sight-threatening complications, including cataract development. In those patients who develop cataracts, successful surgery stems from educated patient selection, careful surgical technique, and aggressive preoperative and postoperative control of inflammation. With improved understanding of the disease processes, pre- and perioperative control of inflammation, modern surgical techniques, availability of biocompatible intraocular lens material and design, surgical experience in performing complicated cataract surgeries, and efficient management of postoperative complications have led to much better outcome. Preoperative factors include proper patient selection and counseling and preoperative control of inflammation. Meticulous and careful cataract surgery in uveitic cataract is essential in optimizing the postoperative outcome. Management of postoperative complications, especially inflammation and glaucoma, earlier rather than later, has also contributed to improved outcomes. This manuscript is review of the existing literature and highlights the management pearls in tackling complicated cataract based on medline search of literature and experience of the authors. PMID:22518338

  16. Emergence of Refractive Surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter J. McDonnell

    major story of the last 2 decades of the 20th century has been the emergence of re- fractive surgery. Initially extremely controversial, with modest predictability and de- batable safety and long-term stability,1 surgical modification of corneal curvature has come to be well accepted by the profession and the public. The number of these pro- cedures that will be performed in

  17. Stereotactic Surgery of Erythromelalgia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward I. Kandel

    1990-01-01

    Erythromelalgia is a very rare vascular disease affecting children and is accompanied by severe burning pain in the extremities. The disease is practically incurable. There are no recommendations in the literature concerning the possibility of managing the disease by stereotactic surgery. We operated on 3 children with severe pain due to erythromelalgia. The stereotactic destruction of VPL and CM was

  18. Ovary Surgery Codes

    Cancer.gov

    Ovary C569 (Except for M9727, 9733, 9741-9742, 9764-9809, 9832, 9840-9931, 9945-9946, 9950-9967, 9975-9992) Codes 00 None; no surgery of primary site; autopsy ONLY 17 Local tumor destruction, NOS No specimen sent to pathology from surgical event

  19. Testis Surgery Codes

    Cancer.gov

    Testis C620–C 629 (Except for M9727, 9733, 9741-9742, 9764-9809, 9832, 9840-9931, 9945-9946, 9950-9967, 9975-9992) Codes 00 None; no surgery of primary site; autopsy ONLY 12 Local tumor destruction, NOS No specimen sent to pathology from surgical

  20. Utility of aortic cuffs in converting initially ineligible patients due to unfavorable neck anatomy into successful candidates for endovascular aortic aneurysm repair: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Awan, Omer; Garcia, Mark; Awan, Yousaf; Gakhal, Mandip; Kim, Moonjohn; Iliescu, Bogdan; Siegel, Eliot

    2010-01-01

    Endovascular repair of the abdominal aortic aneurysm has been established as a successful alternative to open surgical repair, provided that the criteria necessary for such an approach are fulfilled. Anatomic criteria include suitable diameter, length, and angle of the aneurysm proximal neck. We present three cases in which patients were initially ineligible for endovascular repair because of unfavorable neck anatomy but in whom the use of aortic cuffs allowed for successful endograft placement and aneurysm exclusion. PMID:22470712

  1. College of Medicine SUR Surgery

    E-print Network

    MacAdam, Keith

    College of Medicine SUR Surgery KEY: # = new course * = course changed = course dropped University of Kentucky 2013-2014 Undergraduate Bulletin 1 SUR 815 FIRST-YEAR ELECTIVE, SURGERY. (1-3) With the advice by the Department of Surgery. The intent is to provide the student an opportunity for exploration and study

  2. Psychiatric aspects of bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Yung-Chieh; Huang, Chih-Kuan; Tai, Chi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Bariatric surgery has been consistently shown to be effective in long-term marked weight loss and in bringing significant improvement to medical comorbidities such as metabolic syndrome. Empirical data suggest a high prevalence of psychiatric disorders among bariatric surgery candidates. In this review, we focus on the studies published recently with a high impact on our understanding of the role of psychiatry in bariatric surgery. Recent findings This article reviews the specific psychopathologies before surgery, changes in psychopathologies after surgery, suicide risk related to bariatric surgery, factors associated with weight loss, and recommendations for presurgical and postsurgical assessment and management. Research indicates a decrease in certain psychiatric symptoms after weight loss with bariatric surgery. However, the risk of suicide and unsuccessful weight loss in some bariatric surgery patients make monitoring following surgery as important as careful assessment and management before surgery. Specific considerations for youth and older populations and future potential research foci are discussed. Summary Recent publications suggest new directions for psychiatric evaluation and interventions for bariatric surgery patients. Future research on outcomes of specific populations, effectiveness of psychopharmacotherapy, and underlying pathophysiology are warranted for the advancement of treating bariatric surgery patients. PMID:25036421

  3. Mechatronics Interface for Computer Assisted Prostate Surgery Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altamirano del Monte, Felipe; Padilla Castañeda, Miguel A.; Arámbula Cosío, Fernando

    2006-09-01

    In this work is presented the development of a mechatronics device to simulate the interaction of the surgeon with the surgical instrument (resectoscope) used during a Transurethral Resection of the Prostate (TURP). Our mechatronics interface is part of a computer assisted system for training in TURP, which is based on a 3D graphics model of the prostate which can be deformed and resected interactively by the user. The mechatronics interface, is the device that the urology residents will manipulate to simulate the movements performed during surgery. Our current prototype has five degrees of freedom, which are enough to have a realistic simulation of the surgery movements. Two of these degrees of freedom are linear, to determinate the linear displacement of the resecting loop and the other three are rotational to determinate three directions and amounts of rotation.

  4. Corneoplastique™: Art of vision surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gulani, Arun C

    2014-01-01

    Corneoplastique incorporates the entire spectrum of Vision corrective surgery including Lasik, premium cataract surgery, corneal surgery, ocular surface surgery and the full range of anterior segment surgery itself in manipulating the optics of every eye towards unaided emmetropia to define each and every eye surgeon as a “Vision Corrective Surgeon”. This concept of approaching each case individually and designing vision therewith enables surgeons to correct not only virgin eyes but also approach complex cases and complications with the goal of 20/20 vision. Armed with this holistic approach, eye surgeons can use minimally invasive, aesthetically pleasing and visually focused surgery in single or staged process aiming for each patient's Best Vision Potential (BVP) raising eye surgery itself then to an Art! PMID:24492495

  5. [Cytoreductive surgery and immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Samsoniia, M D; Lesnovskaia, E E; Kandelaki, M A

    2007-06-01

    The aim of the article was to treat Pliss lymphosarcoma by means of Cytoreductive surgery to improve patient outcomes by taking into consideration the dynamics of Blood Auto-Proteolytic Activity (BAPA). In rats suffering from tumour proves to be obvious that higher the BAPA, more intensive is the process of invasive growth of tumour. Therefore, the performance of cytoreductive surgery is more reasonable when BAPA is at its minimal level, i. e. either at the early stage of tumour, though this may sound as a paradox. Removal of the tumour at the maximal level of BAPA will favour rapid development of a recurrent tumour. This can be explained by the fact that the remained cells tend to be more serious threat when BAPA level appears to be high. PMID:17660610

  6. Lateral Skull Base Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Manolidis, Spiros; Jackson, C. Gary; Von Doersten, Peter G.; Pappas, Dennis; Glasscock, Michael E.

    1997-01-01

    Lateral skull base surgery has remained the surgical frontier of new developments in the treatment of lesions heretofore difficult to access. Examination of surgical results stimulates technical innovation and provides an intervention risk-benefit ratio assessment for particular lesions useful in management planning. With this in mind, we report the updated collective experience with lateral skull base surgery at the Otology Group over the past 20 years. Two hundred ninety-eight patients underwent surgical intervention for lateral skull base lesions. In 81 patients these lesions were malignant; in 217, benign. Of the benign lesions, 165 were glomus tumors: 139 glomus jugulare, 19 glomus vagale, and 7 glomus tympanicum. The remainder comprised 21 menigniomas, 14 neuromas, two neurofibromas, and a small group of much rarer entities. The philosophy of surgical approach, results, and follow-up are discussed. PMID:17171022

  7. Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Senior, Brent A

    2008-01-01

    Endoscopic skull base surgery has undergone rapid advancement in the past decade moving from pituitary surgery to suprasellar lesions and now to a myriad of lesions extending from the cribriform plate to C2 and laterally out to the infratemporal fossa and petrous apex. Evolution of several technological advances as well as advances in understanding of endoscopic anatomy and the development of surgical techniques both in resection and reconstruction have fostered this capability. Management of benign disease via endoscopic methods is largely accepted now but more data is needed before the controversy on the role of endoscopic management of malignant disease is decided. Continued advances in surgical technique, navigation systems, endoscopic imaging technology, and robotics assure continued brisk evolution in this expanding field. PMID:19434274

  8. Surgery in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Hamberger, B

    1998-03-01

    Sweden has 9 university and regional hospitals and about 75 county hospitals. These hospitals are funded by counties that directly tax their inhabitants. In addition, the university hospitals use state money for education and research. The private sector performing major surgical procedures is small but slowly increasing. Reorganizations and closings of smaller hospitals are continually occurring, and various organizational models are being tested. Surgical care for inpatients is free for Swedish citizens; however, there is a small fee for outpatient care (US $10-$20 per visit). Education in surgery is changing rapidly with the introduction of new methods. Clinical research closely connected to basic sciences will be of profound importance for future development. The present article is confined mainly to general surgery in Sweden, but it also covers some general aspects of medicine in Sweden. PMID:9517748

  9. Telemetric Blood Pressure Assessment in Angiotensin II-Infused ApoE-/- Mice: 28 Day Natural History and Comparison to Tail-Cuff Measurements.

    PubMed

    Haggerty, Christopher M; Mattingly, Andrea C; Gong, Ming C; Su, Wen; Daugherty, Alan; Fornwalt, Brandon K

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a disease of the aortic wall, which can progress to catastrophic rupture. Assessment of mechanical characteristics of AAA, such as aortic distensibility, may provide important insights to help identify at-risk patients and understand disease progression. While the majority of studies on this topic have focused on retrospective patient data, recent studies have used mouse models of AAA to prospectively evaluate the evolution of aortic mechanics. Quantification of aortic distensibility requires accurate measurement of arterial blood pressure, particularly pulse pressure, which is challenging to perform accurately in murine models. We hypothesized that volume/pressure tail-cuff measurements of arterial pulse pressure in anesthetized mice would have sufficient accuracy to enable calculations of aortic distensibility with minimal error. Telemetry devices and osmotic mini-pumps filled with saline or angiotensin-II were surgically implanted in male apolipoprotein-E deficient (ApoE-/-) mice. Blood pressure in the aortic arch was measured continuously via telemetry. In addition, simultaneous blood pressure measurements with a volume/pressure tail-cuff system were performed under anesthesia at specific intervals to assess agreement between techniques. Compared to controls, mice infused with angiotensin-II had an overall statistically significant increase in systolic pressure, with no overall difference in pulse pressure; however, pulse pressure did increase significantly with time. Systolic measurements agreed well between telemetry and tail-cuff (coefficient of variation = 10%), but agreement of pulse pressure was weak (20%). In fact, group-averaged pulse pressure from telemetry was a better predictor of a subject's pulse pressure on a given day than a simultaneous tail-cuff measurement. Furthermore, these approximations introduced acceptable errors (15.1 ± 12.8%) into the calculation of aortic distensibility. Contrary to our hypothesis, we conclude that tail-cuff measures of arterial pulse pressure have limited accuracy. Future studies of aneurysm mechanics using the ApoE-/-/angiotensin-II model would be better in assuming pulse pressure profiles consistent with our telemetry findings instead of attempting to measure pulse pressure in individual mice. PMID:26086817

  10. Telemetric Blood Pressure Assessment in Angiotensin II-Infused ApoE-/- Mice: 28 Day Natural History and Comparison to Tail-Cuff Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Christopher M.; Mattingly, Andrea C.; Gong, Ming C.; Su, Wen; Daugherty, Alan; Fornwalt, Brandon K.

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a disease of the aortic wall, which can progress to catastrophic rupture. Assessment of mechanical characteristics of AAA, such as aortic distensibility, may provide important insights to help identify at-risk patients and understand disease progression. While the majority of studies on this topic have focused on retrospective patient data, recent studies have used mouse models of AAA to prospectively evaluate the evolution of aortic mechanics. Quantification of aortic distensibility requires accurate measurement of arterial blood pressure, particularly pulse pressure, which is challenging to perform accurately in murine models. We hypothesized that volume/pressure tail-cuff measurements of arterial pulse pressure in anesthetized mice would have sufficient accuracy to enable calculations of aortic distensibility with minimal error. Telemetry devices and osmotic mini-pumps filled with saline or angiotensin-II were surgically implanted in male apolipoprotein-E deficient (ApoE-/-) mice. Blood pressure in the aortic arch was measured continuously via telemetry. In addition, simultaneous blood pressure measurements with a volume/pressure tail-cuff system were performed under anesthesia at specific intervals to assess agreement between techniques. Compared to controls, mice infused with angiotensin-II had an overall statistically significant increase in systolic pressure, with no overall difference in pulse pressure; however, pulse pressure did increase significantly with time. Systolic measurements agreed well between telemetry and tail-cuff (coefficient of variation = 10%), but agreement of pulse pressure was weak (20%). In fact, group-averaged pulse pressure from telemetry was a better predictor of a subject’s pulse pressure on a given day than a simultaneous tail-cuff measurement. Furthermore, these approximations introduced acceptable errors (15.1 ± 12.8%) into the calculation of aortic distensibility. Contrary to our hypothesis, we conclude that tail-cuff measures of arterial pulse pressure have limited accuracy. Future studies of aneurysm mechanics using the ApoE-/-/angiotensin-II model would be better in assuming pulse pressure profiles consistent with our telemetry findings instead of attempting to measure pulse pressure in individual mice. PMID:26086817

  11. Computer Assisted Orthognathic Surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benoit Mollard; Stéphane Lavallée; Georges Bettega

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a surgical simulator for orthognathic surgery based on the integration of dental models and 3D cephalometry.\\u000a The objective of dental models integration is to make coherent informations gathered from different sources (occlusal analysis\\u000a and CT scan), and for that purpose, a system using a 3D optical localizer is used. The 3D Cephalometry analysis is used for\\u000a the

  12. Laparoscopy in General Surgery

    PubMed Central

    O'Regan, Patrick J.; Anderson, Dawn L.

    1992-01-01

    After a period of rather slow initial acceptance by general surgeons, laparoscopy and video endoscopic surgery have suddenly burst on to the surgical scene. Almost overnight many of the surgical procedures once requiring a large incision are now being performed through small punctures. This article describes some of the more common procedures and discusses the merits and difficulties associated with these innovations. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:21221367

  13. Delirium After Cardiac Surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James L. Rudolph

    \\u000a Delirium is an acute change in cognitive functioning, characterized by inattention and associated with disorganized thinking\\u000a or altered level of consciousness, which preferentially affects the older patients (Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental\\u000a disorders, fourth edition, text revision. Washington: American Psychiatric Association; 2000). After cardiac surgery, the\\u000a incidence of delirium has been reported between 2 and 73%, depending on the

  14. Complications of Sling Surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suzette E. Sutherland

    \\u000a Until recently, abdominal Burch colposuspension was considered the gold standard for the surgical treatment of stress urinary\\u000a incontinence (SUI) (1,2). However, the introduction of vaginal sling surgery has been met with great enthusiasm because of comparable efficacy, but\\u000a with lower surgical morbidity (3). With the advent of minimally invasive, tension-free, midurethral vaginal slings (4), colposuspension has been replaced as the

  15. Power Harvesting from Rotation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicone, Carmen; Feng, Z. C.

    2008-01-01

    We show the impossibility of harvesting power from rotational motions by devices attached to the rotating object. The presentation is suitable for students who have studied Lagrangian mechanics. (Contains 2 figures.)

  16. Rural pediatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Don K

    2015-03-01

    Published outcome studies support regionalization of pediatric surgery, in which all children suspected of having surgical disease are transferred to a specialty center. Transfer to specialty centers, however, is an expensive approach to quality, both in direct costs of hospitalization and the expense incurred by families. A related question is the role of well-trained rural surgeons in an adequately resourced facility in the surgical care of infants and children. Local community facilities provide measurably equivalent results for straightforward emergencies in older children such as appendicitis. With education, training, and support such as telemedicine consultation, rural surgeons and hospitals may be able to care for many more children such as single-system trauma and other cases for which they have training such as pyloric stenosis. They can recognize surgical disease at earlier stages and initiate appropriate treatment before transfer so that patients are in better shape for surgery when they arrive for definitive care. Rural and community facilities would be linked in a pediatric surgery system that covers the spectrum of pediatric surgical conditions for a geographical region. PMID:25760196

  17. Shaft-Rotation Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, Richard L.

    1990-01-01

    Signal-processing subsystem generates signal indicative of rotation of shaft from output of accelerometer mounted on housing of bearing supporting shaft. Output of subsystem binary signal at frequency of rotation of shaft. Part of assembly of electronic equipment measuring vibrations in rotating machinery. Accelerometer mounted in such way sensitive to vibrations of shaft perpendicular to axis. Output of accelerometer includes noise and components of vibration at frequencies higher than rotational frequency of shaft.

  18. ROTATION-VIBRATION TETRAHEDRAL

    E-print Network

    Sadovskií, Dmitrií

    ANALYSIS OF ROTATION-VIBRATION RELATIVE EQUILIBRIA ON THE EXAMPLE OF A TETRAHEDRAL FOUR ATOM (RE) of a nonrigid molecule which vibrates about a well de#12;ned equilibrium con#12;guration and rotates as a whole. Our analysis uni#12;es the theory of rotational and vibrational RE. We rely

  19. Transformations: Rotation (NLVM)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-01-01

    This Java applet enables learners to explore the rotation transformation both informally and within a coordinate system. Students select and compose shapes and manipulate the center and angle of rotation to see the effect on a rotated image. Links to instructions, activities and teacher/parent information are included.

  20. Effect of Resistance Training Maintaining the Joint Angle-torque Profile Using a Haptic-based Machine on Shoulder Internal and External Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeonghun; Lee, Kunwoo; Moon, Jeheon; Koo, Dohoon; Park, Jaewoo; Kim, Kyengnam; Hong, Daehie; Shin, Inshik

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to present an individualized resistance training method to enable exercise while maintaining an exercise load that is set according to an individual’s joint angle-torque using a haptic-based resistance training machine. [Methods] Five participants (machine group) performed individualized shoulder internal and external rotation training with a haptic resistance training machine, while another five participants performed general dumbbell-based shoulder internal and external rotation training for eight weeks. Internal and external rotation powers of subjects were measured using an isokinetic machine before and after training. [Results] The average powers of both shoulder internal and external rotation has been improved after training (25.72%, 13.62%). The improvement in power of external rotation in the machine group was significantly higher than that in the control group. [Conclusion] This study proposes a haptic-based individualized rotator cuff muscle training method. The training protocol maintaining the joint angle-torque profile showed better improvement of shoulder internal/external rotation than dumbbell training. PMID:24764626

  1. Effect of Resistance Training Maintaining the Joint Angle-torque Profile Using a Haptic-based Machine on Shoulder Internal and External Rotation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeonghun; Lee, Kunwoo; Moon, Jeheon; Koo, Dohoon; Park, Jaewoo; Kim, Kyengnam; Hong, Daehie; Shin, Inshik

    2014-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to present an individualized resistance training method to enable exercise while maintaining an exercise load that is set according to an individual's joint angle-torque using a haptic-based resistance training machine. [Methods] Five participants (machine group) performed individualized shoulder internal and external rotation training with a haptic resistance training machine, while another five participants performed general dumbbell-based shoulder internal and external rotation training for eight weeks. Internal and external rotation powers of subjects were measured using an isokinetic machine before and after training. [Results] The average powers of both shoulder internal and external rotation has been improved after training (25.72%, 13.62%). The improvement in power of external rotation in the machine group was significantly higher than that in the control group. [Conclusion] This study proposes a haptic-based individualized rotator cuff muscle training method. The training protocol maintaining the joint angle-torque profile showed better improvement of shoulder internal/external rotation than dumbbell training. PMID:24764626

  2. Antifibrinolytics in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Dhir, Achal

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac surgery exerts a significant strain on the blood bank services and is a model example in which a multi-modal blood-conservation strategy is recommended. Significant bleeding during cardiac surgery, enough to cause re-exploration and/or blood transfusion, increases morbidity and mortality. Hyper-fibrinolysis is one of the important contributors to increased bleeding. This knowledge has led to the use of anti-fibrinolytic agents especially in procedures performed under cardiopulmonary bypass. Nothing has been more controversial in recent times than the aprotinin controversy. Since the withdrawal of aprotinin from the world market, the choice of antifibrinolytic agents has been limited to lysine analogues either tranexamic acid (TA) or epsilon amino caproic acid (EACA). While proponents of aprotinin still argue against its non-availability. Health Canada has approved its use, albeit under very strict regulations. Antifibrinolytic agents are not without side effects and act like double-edged swords, the stronger the anti-fibrinolytic activity, the more serious the side effects. Aprotinin is the strongest in reducing blood loss, blood transfusion, and possibly, return to the operating room after cardiac surgery. EACA is the least effective, while TA is somewhere in between. Additionally, aprotinin has been implicated in increased mortality and maximum side effects. TA has been shown to increase seizure activity, whereas, EACA seems to have the least side effects. Apparently, these agents do not differentiate between pathological and physiological fibrinolysis and prevent all forms of fibrinolysis leading to possible thrombotic side effects. It would seem prudent to select the right agent knowing its risk-benefit profile for a given patient, under the given circumstances. PMID:23545866

  3. Suture anchor fixation strength with or without augmentation in osteopenic and severely osteoporotic bones in rotator cuff repair: a biomechanical study on polyurethane foam model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to compare the results of various types of anchor applications with or without augmentation in both osteopenic and severely osteoporotic bone models. Methods Two different types of suture anchors were tested in severely osteoporotic (SOP) and osteopenic polyurethane (PU) foam blocks using an established protocol. An Instron machine applied static loading parallel to the axis of insertion until failure, and the mean anchor failure strengths were calculated. The mode of failure (anchor pullout, suture tear) was recorded. The anchors tested included the Corkscrew® (CS) (Arthrex Inc., Naples, FL, USA) (without augmentation, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-augmented, and bioabsorbable tricalcium phosphate (TCP) cement-augmented) and Corkscrew® FT II (CS FT II) 5.5 mm (without augmentation as used routinely). Results The mean failure loads for both SOP and osteopenic PU foam blocks, respectively, were as follows: CS, 16.2 and 212.4 N; CS with TCP, 75.2 and 396 N; CS with PMMA, 101.2 and 528.8 N; CS FT II, 13.8 and 339.8 N. Conclusions Augmentation of CS with TCP or PMMA would be essential to SOP bones. In the osteopenic bone model, although anchor fixation augmented with PMMA is the best fixation method, CS augmented with TCP cement or CS FT II without any need for augmentation may also be used as an alternative. PMID:25148925

  4. Complications in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Niebuhr, H; Nahrstedt, U; Hollmann, S; Rückert, K

    1995-01-01

    Over the last few years, laparoscopic surgery has gained widespread acceptance in surgical practice. The indications range has expanded extraordinarily in that time. Some of the practiced procedures are already considered the gold standard, while others are still on the way there. The fascinating technique and results notwithstanding, a number of risks, mistakes, and complications are possible in both the initial and the advanced states. We present our experience from 2118 laparoscopic operations performed between February 1991 to March 1995, focusing on the intraoperative complications (Tables 1, 2). PMID:21400429

  5. National Epilepsy Surgery Support Activity

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, K.; Rathore, Chaturbhuj; Rao, Malla Bhaskara

    2014-01-01

    While there are over one million people with drug-resistant epilepsy in India, today, there are only a handful of centers equipped to undertake presurgical evaluation and epilepsy surgery. The only solution to overcome this large surgical treatment gap is to establish comprehensive epilepsy care centers across the country that are capable of evaluating and selecting the patients for epilepsy surgery with the locally available technology and in a cost-effective manner. The National Epilepsy Surgery Support Activity (NESSA) aims to provide proper guidance and support in establishing epilepsy surgery programs across India and in neighboring resource-poor countries, and in sustaining them. PMID:24791081

  6. Bassett healthcare rural surgery experience.

    PubMed

    Borgstrom, David C; Heneghan, Steven J

    2009-12-01

    The surgical training at Bassett is naturally broader than in many university settings, with a survey showing that nearly 70% of graduates who practice general surgery remain in a rurally designated area. Rural surgery experience falls into 3 categories: undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate. The general surgery training program has no competing fellowships or subspecialty residencies; residents get significant experience with endoscopy; ear, nose, and throat; plastic and hand surgery; and obstetrics and gynecology. The rural setting lifestyle is valued by the students, residents, and fellows alike. It provides an ideal setting for recognizing the specific nuances of small-town American life, with a high-quality education and surgical experience. PMID:19944814

  7. Standing male equine urogenital surgery.

    PubMed

    Adams, Aric; Hendrickson, Dean A

    2014-04-01

    The advantages of performing standing male urogenital surgeries are numerous when compared with performing the same surgery in the anesthetized animal. Some traditional standing male urogenital surgeries, such as castrations, may be faster and cheaper to perform. Laparoscopic standing male urogenital surgeries may allow for improved visualization of the surgical field, decreased hemorrhage, and decreased morbidity and convalescence. Limitations of standing procedures may include increased danger to the surgeon because of fractious behavior of the patient, and increased expense and training associated with instrumentation for specialized procedures such as laparoscopy. PMID:24680211

  8. Cylindrical rotating triboelectric nanogenerator.

    PubMed

    Bai, Peng; Zhu, Guang; Liu, Ying; Chen, Jun; Jing, Qingshen; Yang, Weiqing; Ma, Jusheng; Zhang, Gong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-07-23

    We demonstrate a cylindrical rotating triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) based on sliding electrification for harvesting mechanical energy from rotational motion. The rotating TENG is based on a core-shell structure that is made of distinctly different triboelectric materials with alternative strip structures on the surface. The charge transfer is strengthened with the formation of polymer nanoparticles on surfaces. During coaxial rotation, a contact-induced electrification and the relative sliding between the contact surfaces of the core and the shell result in an "in-plane" lateral polarization, which drives the flow of electrons in the external load. A power density of 36.9 W/m(2) (short-circuit current of 90 ?A and open-circuit voltage of 410 V) has been achieved by a rotating TENG with 8 strip units at a linear rotational velocity of 1.33 m/s (a rotation rate of 1000 r/min). The output can be further enhanced by integrating more strip units and/or applying larger linear rotational velocity. This rotating TENG can be used as a direct power source to drive small electronics, such as LED bulbs. This study proves the possibility to harvest mechanical energy by TENGs from rotational motion, demonstrating its potential for harvesting the flow energy of air or water for applications such as self-powered environmental sensors and wildlife tracking devices. PMID:23799926

  9. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT RESIDENTS GENERAL SURGERY RESIDENTS

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    Davenport, Michael Urology 1 2362 Esquivel, Micaela General Surgery 1 2608 Jopling, Jeffrey General Surgery, Harsha Urology 2 2301 Pridgen, Brian Plastic Surgery 2 2302 Read, Blake General Surgery 2 2303 Rustad 2 2310 Stauffer, Craig Urology 2 2312 Della Valle, Jessica General Surgery Prelim 1 2399 Hyun, Jeong

  10. Frontal skull base surgery combined with endonasal endoscopic sinus surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Motohiro Morioka; Jun-ichiro Hamada; Shigetoshi Yano; Yutaka Kai; Norihisa Ogata; Eiji Yumoto; Yukitaka Ushio; Jun-ichi Kuratsu

    2005-01-01

    BackgroundPostoperative infection remains a serious complication after radical resection of anterior skull base lesions because intracranial, nasal, and paranasal cavities are opened during surgery. To prevent complications from postoperative infection, we combined endonasal endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) with the frontal transbasal approach in patients with skull base lesions.

  11. Robotic surgery: urologic implications.

    PubMed

    Moran, Michael E

    2003-11-01

    Current medical robots have nothing in common with the anthropomorphic robots in science fiction classics. They are in fact, manipulators, working on a master-slave principle. Robots can be defined as "automatically controlled multitask manipulators, which are freely programmable in three or more spaces." The success of robots in surgery is based on their precision, lack of fatigue, and speed of action. This review describes the theory, advantages, disadvantages, and clinical utilization of mechanical and robotic arm systems to replace the second assistant and provide camera direction and stability during laparoscopic surgery. The Robotrac system (Aesculap, Burlingame, CA), the First Assistant (Leonard Medical Inc, Huntingdon Valley, PA), AESOP (Computer Motion, Goleta, CA), ZEUS (Computer Motion), and the da Vinci (Intuitive Surgical, Mountain View, CA) system are reviewed, as are simple mechanical-assist systems such as Omnitract (Minnesota Scientific, St. Paul, MN), Iron Intern (Automated Medical Products Corp., New York, NY), the Bookwalter retraction system (Codman , Somerville, NJ), the Surgassistant trade mark (Solos Endoscopy, Irvine, CA), the Trocar Sleeve Stabilizer (Richard Wolf Medical Instruments Corp., Rosemont, IL), and the Endoholder (Codman, Somerville, NJ). PMID:14642026

  12. [Modern surgery of cataracts].

    PubMed

    Izák, M

    1990-03-01

    Surgery of cataract has a history of almost 250 years. The first 150 years were in the sign of extracapsular extracion. The subsequent 70 years were devoted to the development and improvement of the technique of intracapsular extraction and the last more than 20 years are a return to extracapsular extraction. This is due in particular to the development of microsurgery. "Modern surgery of cataract" is thus extracapsular extraction at a microsurgical level, in indicated cases associated also with implantation of an intraocular lens. The author analyzes recent aspects of indication for operation, preoperative examination techniques, preoperative preparation of the patient, anaesthesia, the operation proper, correction of aphakia, and postoperative care. In the author's opinion the future of microsurgery of cataract will involve improvement and wider use of phakoemulsification and laser systems as well as new models and materials for artificial lenses. It is no longer an unreal dream to make through a minimal paracentesis a microincision of the capsule, remove the nucleus and mass intracapsularity and replace them by injection of a transparent, artificial gel. PMID:2334988

  13. Adolescent bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Daniel S; Fallon, Sara C; Brandt, Mary L

    2012-08-01

    Pediatric obesity has increased from a relatively uncommon problem to one of the most important public health problems facing children today. Typical "adult" diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, have become increasingly prevalent in the pediatric population. The earlier presentation of these comorbidities will have a significant impact for the future because this population of children will require more medical resources at an earlier age and will have a significantly decreased life expectancy. The significant morbidity of obesity in the pediatric population has led to consideration of more aggressive treatment protocols for obesity in children, including the introduction of surgical management at an earlier age. Surgery for obesity in adolescents has particular risks and benefits that must be accounted for when considering this approach. The unique psychological and emotional needs of adolescent patients make the patient selection process and perioperative management substantially different from those of adult patients. Initial outcomes of bariatric surgery in adolescents are comparable to those seen in adults in the short term. However, the long-term effects of these procedures on the adolescent population are not known. This review discusses the epidemiology of pediatric obesity, the indications for operative therapy in adolescent patients, the common surgical procedures used for weight loss, the reported outcomes of these procedures, and the importance of multidisciplinary management for this unique patient population. PMID:22869408

  14. [Micronutrients in bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Amaya García, M J; Vilchez López, F J; Campos Martín, C; Sánchez Vera, P; Pereira Cunill, J L

    2012-01-01

    The morbid obesity is a chronic disease with increasing prevalence and that associates an important morbility and mortality. The bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment to secure a weight reduction maintained in the time and a diminution in the rates of complications associated to the obesity. The overweight and the obesity are risk factors for the deficit of several micronutrients like vitamins B1, B6, C, folic acid and D, minerals like the iron and trace elements like zinc, generally by dietetic deficit. In spite of it, at the moment a consensus don't exist about the monitoring of micronutrients in the preoperative one, although it seems reasonable in view of his considerable prevalence. The bariatric surgery can bring about deficit of micronutrients or to intensify previous deficiencies, as much by limitation of the ingestion like by the maldigestión and malabsorption in the malabsortives techniques, being the parallel risk to the ponderal loss. It is precise to monitor of by life the different micronutrients, mainly after the malabsortives surgical techniques. The use of a polivitamínic complex of systematic form is recommended and in the cases in which he is insufficient, it will be precise to use specific suplementación. PMID:22732956

  15. [Ethics in aesthetic surgery].

    PubMed

    de Fontaine, S

    2013-09-01

    The use of aesthetic medicine and surgery is increasingly popular, and becomes a true phenomenon of society. Many women and men are asking for such treatments. A large proportion of the population carry the idea that this branch of medicine is a true consumer product. The acts of aesthetic medicine and surgery are not without consequences. They produce important changes in the human body, and carry risks of complications that must be taken into account. The overrated media interest of this subject produce commercial drifts that act against the general health of the patients. The invasive acts of medical aesthetics must be placed in a precise legal and ethical framework to protect the patients. A project of a new Belgian law is on the way, awaiting for publication in "Le Moniteur": this law (proposed by Senator Dominique Tilmans) clarifies the competences required for performing non-surgical aesthetic treatments and specific aesthetic invasive treatments. Other projects of law are being studied, and will concern publicity, information of the public, and rules of private clinics where aesthetic invasive acts are performed. Recent international news have shown, with the PIP breast prosthesis scandal, that surveillance of the medical aesthetic field is mandatory. To provide a better protection of patients, the legislator has decided legislate over the subject. PMID:24195242

  16. Fibronectin and craniofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M; AlShomer, Feras; Alqahtani, Abdullah; Alhadlg, Ahmad

    2014-12-01

    Fibronectin is an essential component of the extracellular matrix. The role of fibronectin in craniofacial surgery has not been previously reviewed. Fibronectin mediates bone differentiation and development of the skull. Studies have shown that normal development of the skull requires a specific pattern of expression around the epithelial-mesenchymal interface of the neurocranium. Fibronectin is also essential in mediating the migration of neural crest cells to form the facial skeleton. The calvaria of patients with Apert and Crouzon syndromes have an abnormally elevated collagen level. However, fibronectin levels are elevated in the former syndrome and decreased in the latter syndrome. The significance of this requires further research. Fibronectin gene expression is increased in port wine-derived fibroblasts in patients with Sturge-Weber syndrome. Normal palatogenesis also requires a specific pattern of expression of fibronectin around the maxillary process as well as the roof of the stomodeum, and several studies have linked the development of cleft lip/palate to an imbalance of fibronectin content of the extracellular matrix. Fibronectin mediates cell-to-cell attachment during repair of calvarial defects; hence, fibronectin has been used as a carrier for bone morphogenetic proteins to treat calvarial defects. Finally, fibronectin is now an essential component in stem cell technology related to craniofacial surgery. PMID:24322634

  17. Bariatric metabolic surgery.

    PubMed

    Scopinaro, N

    2014-08-01

    According to the WHO, the worldwide prevalence of obesity body mass index (BMI) 30 kg/m² nearly doubled between 1980 and 2008, with 10% of men and 14% of women and a total of more than half a billion adults (aged >20 years old) being classed as obese. At least 2.8 million people die each year worldwide as a result of being overweight or obese, usually from the inevitable related comorbidities. It has been reported that approximately 65% of the worlds population inhabits countries where overweight and obesity are responsible for higher mortality than underweight. The recently published Interdisciplinary European Guidelines on Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery note that despite the WHO stating that excess weight is considered the fifth leading risk for deaths worldwide, it has not yet been possible to successfully curb the obesity epidemic. Moreover, severe obesity (BMI>35 kg/m²) represents a rapidly growing segment of the epidemic in which the negative effects on health and disability are especially marked. Excess weight drastically elevates a persons risk of developing a number of non-communicable diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension, stroke, dyslipidaemia, sleep apnoea, cancer, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, and other serious comorbidities. The WHO emphasises that 44% of type 2 diabetes mellitus, 23% of ischaemic heart disease and around 741% of certain cancers are attributable to overweight and obesity. In the majority of European countries, overweight and obesity are responsible for about 80% of cases of type 2 diabetes, 35% of cases of ischaemic heart disease and 55% of cases of hypertensive disease among adults. Additionally, a range of debilitating conditions such as osteoarthritis, respiratory difficulties, gallbladder disease, infertility, and psychosocial problems, among others, which lead to reduced life expectancy, quality of life and disability, are extremely costly in terms of both absence from work and use of health resources. Noteworthy, the lifespan of severely obese individuals is decreased by an estimated 5-20 years depending on gender, age, and race. Weight loss and maintenance are the obvious aims of bariatric surgery. The ideal bariatric operation should be easy and quick to perform, with minimal perioperative and long-term complications. It should result in excellent weight loss and indefinite weight maintenance in the vast majority of operated patients, necessitating minimal follow-up care, and be equally suitable for all patients, independent of individual characteristics such as compliance, age, and different degrees of overweight. It is immediately apparent that such a surgical procedure does not exist, and therefore we must carefully evaluate all the different features and characteristics of each operation and of each patient to try to select the procedure that provides the greatest probability of long-term success for a particular patient, with the best cost/benefit ratio. Bariatric surgery has proven to be the most effective mode of treatment for morbidly obese patients, with recent long-term studies providing evidence of a substantial reduction of mortality in bariatric surgery patients, as well as a decreased risk of developing new health-related comorbidities. Furthermore, a reduction in the use of healthcare services and therefore a reduction in direct healthcare costs was also observed. Bariatric surgery is an established and integral part of the comprehensive management of morbidly obese patients. PMID:25230385

  18. Comparison of the LMA Supreme vs the i-gel in paralysed patients undergoing gynaecological laparoscopic surgery with controlled ventilation.

    PubMed

    Teoh, W H L; Lee, K M; Suhitharan, T; Yahaya, Z; Teo, M M; Sia, A T H

    2010-12-01

    We compared the efficacy of the inflatable cuff of the LMA Supreme against the non-inflatable i-gel cuff in providing an adequate seal for laparoscopic surgery in the Trendelenburg position in 100 female patients. There was no difference in our primary outcome, oropharyngeal leak pressure, between the LMA Supreme and the i-gel (mean (SD) 26.4 (5.1) vs 25.0 (5.7) cmH(2) O, respectively; p = 0.18). Forty-seven (94%) LMA Supremes and 48 (96%) i-gels were successfully inserted on the first attempt, with similar ease, and comparable times to the first capnograph trace (mean (SD) 14.3 (4.7) s for the LMA Supreme vs 15.4 (8.2) s for the i-gel; p = 0.4). Gastric tube insertion was easier and achieved more quickly with the LMA Supreme vs the i-gel (9.0 (2.5) s vs 15.1 (7.3) s, respectively; p < 0.001). After creation of the pneumoperitoneum, there was a smaller difference between expired and inspired tidal volumes with the LMA Supreme (21.5 (15.2) ml) than with the i-gel (31.2 (23.5) ml; p = 0.009). There was blood on removal of two LMA Supremes and one i-gel. Four patients in the LMA Supreme group and one patient in the i-gel group experienced mild postoperative sore throat. PMID:20958278

  19. Resident away rotations allow adaptive neurosurgical training.

    PubMed

    Gephart, Melanie Hayden; Derstine, Pamela; Oyesiku, Nelson M; Grady, M Sean; Burchiel, Kim; Batjer, H Hunt; Popp, A John; Barbaro, Nicholas M

    2015-04-01

    Subspecialization of physicians and regional centers concentrate the volume of certain rare cases into fewer hospitals. Consequently, the primary institution of a neurological surgery training program may not have sufficient case volume to meet the current Residency Review Committee case minimum requirements in some areas. To ensure the competency of graduating residents through a comprehensive neurosurgical education, programs may need for residents to travel to outside institutions for exposure to cases that are either less common or more regionally focused. We sought to evaluate off-site rotations to better understand the changing demographics and needs of resident education. This would also allow prospective monitoring of modifications to the neurosurgery training landscape. We completed a survey of neurosurgery program directors and query of data from the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education to characterize the current use of away rotations in neurosurgical education of residents. We found that 20% of programs have mandatory away rotations, most commonly for exposure to pediatric, functional, peripheral nerve, or trauma cases. Most of these rotations are done during postgraduate year 3 to 6, lasting 1 to 15 months. Twenty-six programs have 2 to 3 participating sites and 41 have 4 to 6 sites distinct from the host program. Programs frequently offset potential financial harm to residents rotating at a distant site by support of housing and transportation costs. As medical systems experience fluctuating treatment paradigms and demographics, over time, more residency programs may adapt to meet the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education case minimum requirements through the implementation of away rotations. PMID:25635889

  20. Laparoscopic nephroureterectomy with transvesical single-port distal ureter and bladder cuff dissection: points of technique and initial surgical outcomes with five patients

    PubMed Central

    Markuszewski, Marcin; K??cz, Jakub; Sieczkowski, Marcin; Po?om, Wojciech; Piaskowski, Wojciech; Krajka, Kazimierz; Matuszewski, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Although a variety of techniques have been used to manage the distal ureter during laparoscopic radical nephroureterectomy (LNU), a consensus has not yet been established. Recently, some authors have used a single-port transvesical approach to excise the distal ureter and bladder cuff following LNU. The aim of the study was to present our initial experience in „en bloc” dissection of the distal ureter and bladder cuff during LNU, using a transvesical single-port approach (T-LESS) and standard laparoscopic instruments. From April to October 2012, 5 patients aged 45 to 73 years with upper urinary tract urothelial tumors were subjected to LNU/T-LESS. After a standard LNU was performed, a TriPort+® device was introduced into the bladder and the pneumovesicum was established. A bladder cuff with a distal ureter was dissected and put in the paravesical tissue. The bladder wall defect was closed with the V-loc® 3/0 suture. The LNU was then completed in the flank position. All procedures were completed successfully. No significant blood loss or complications were observed. The mean operative time was 250 min (range: 200–370) for a total procedure and 59 min (range: 42–80) for the T-LESS stage. The postoperative hospital stay was 5.2 days (range: 4–9). Pathologic examination revealed no positive margin in any of the cases. The LNU/T-LESS approach is an efficient and safe procedure. A well-visualized dissection of the distal ureter, closing the defect of the bladder, the use of standard laparoscopic instruments and a good cosmesis are advantages of the method. PMID:25097698

  1. Rotational spectrum of trifluoroacetone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luca Evangelisti; Laura B. Favero; Assimo Maris; Sonia Melandri; Alicia Vega-Toribio; Alberto Lesarri; Walther Caminati

    2010-01-01

    The rotational spectra of 5 isotopologues of 1,1,1-trifluoroacetone have been assigned using pulsed-jet Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy. All rotational transitions appear as doublets, due to the internal rotation of the methyl group. Analysis of the tunneling splittings using both the principal axis method (PAM) and the combined axis method (CAM) methods allows to determine accurately the height of the threefold barrier

  2. Telemedicine, virtual reality, and surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormack, Percival D.; Charles, Steve

    1994-01-01

    Two types of synthetic experience are covered: virtual reality (VR) and surgery, and telemedicine. The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: geometric models; physiological sensors; surgical applications; virtual cadaver; VR surgical simulation; telesurgery; VR Surgical Trainer; abdominal surgery pilot study; advanced abdominal simulator; examples of telemedicine; and telemedicine spacebridge.

  3. Virtual reality orthopedic surgery simulator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ming-Dar Tsai; Ming-Shium Hsieh; Shyan-Bin Jou

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a highly interactive virtual reality orthopedic surgery simulator. The simulator allows surgeons to use various surgical instruments to operate on virtual rigid anatomic structures, such bones, prostheses and bone grafts, to simulate every procedure on the rigid structures for complex orthopedic surgeries, including arthroplasty, corrective or open osteotomy, open reduction of fractures and amputation. A comparative study

  4. Using your shoulder after replacement surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Joint replacement surgery - using your shoulder; Shoulder replacement surgery - after ... You have had shoulder replacement surgery to replace the bones of your shoulder joint with artificial parts. The parts include a stem made of ...

  5. Patient Safety: Guide to Safe Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Gallery Do Your Homework Dangers of Plastic Surgery Tourism Patient and Consumer Information Patients of Courage Patient ... on Breast Implants The Dangers of Plastic Surgery Tourism Plastic Surgery Glossary Menu Cosmetic Reconstructive Articles & Videos ...

  6. [Thoracoscopic surgery of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Naruke, T

    1995-02-01

    Thoracoscopic surgery is a dream that was realized by the remarkable progress achieved in the video equipment system and the development of advanced surgical tools, in particular the endoscopic stapler. The main reasons for the rapid and wide introduction of thoracoscopic surgery are that patient injury is much less than with the traditional chest operation, there is no need for blood transfusion, the physical and mental loads on the patient are much less, and recovery from surgery is much faster. When performed by a skilled surgeon, it is a safe surgical operation, and this surgical technique may become applicable to about one-half of thoracic surgery. The application of robotics and the use of artificial satellites in the sector of thoracoscopic surgery may be possible in the future. PMID:7857090

  7. Ethical challenges in fetal surgery.

    PubMed

    Smajdor, Anna

    2011-02-01

    Fetal surgery has been practised for some decades now. However, it remains a highly complex area, both medically and ethically. This paper shows how the routine use of ultrasound has been a catalyst for fetal surgery, in creating new needs and new incentives for intervention. Some of the needs met by fetal surgery are those of parents and clinicians who experience stress while waiting for the birth of a fetus with known anomalies. The paper suggests that the role of technology and visualisation techniques in creating and meeting such new needs is ethically problematic. It then addresses the idea that fetal surgery should be restricted to interventions that are life-saving for the fetus, arguing that this restriction is unduly paternalistic. Fetal surgery poses challenges for an autonomy-based system of ethics. However, it is risky to circumvent these challenges by restricting the choices open to pregnant women, even when these choices appear excessively altruistic. PMID:21071567

  8. Virtual Open Heart Surgery

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    How does open heart surgery work? Without taking the time to get a formal medical degree, it can be quite hard to find out first-hand. Fortunately, this site from the Australian Broadcasting Company (ABC) takes you inside a virtual operating room to try your hand at performing this procedure. Visitors can look over the interactive Menu to first learn about the anatomy of this region of the body. It's a good place to start and users can proceed to look through the ten (simplified) steps to performing such a complicated operation. Along the way, visitors are given the opportunity to learn about the science behind each step and it's all quite fascinating. It's a great resource for budding scientists, medical professionals, and those who are generally curious about the human body.

  9. [Surgery for chylothorax].

    PubMed

    Riquet, M; Badia, A

    2004-04-01

    Chyle is lymph fluid of intestinal origin containing fat digestion products. Chylothorax is produced by leaks from the thoracic duct or from one of its collaterals subsequent to valve incompetence. These leaks may be due to trauma (post-surgical chylothorax, the most frequent) or to spontaneous rupture of a lymph vessel distended by chyle reflux, the thoracic duct itself being pathological. When the thoracic duct is interrupted (obstruction, agenesis), chylothorax may occur from leakage due to reflux within substitution collateral pathways diverting the flow of chyle into the venoux confluents of the neck. Medical treatment is always attempted first: evacuation of chylothorax by drainage and fat-free diet or parenteral nutrition. Recently, treatment with octreotide has been found to be beneficial. Surgery consists in thoracic duct ligation or suture of leaking collaterals. In difficult cases, when the chyle leakage cannot be identified, pleurodesis is the only option. PMID:15133447

  10. Cosmetic breast surgery.

    PubMed

    Field, D A; Miller, S

    1992-02-01

    Appropriate follow-up care, including early postoperative serial mammography, is essential for women receiving cosmetic breast surgery. Common procedures include augmentation or reduction mammoplasty and breast reconstruction following mastectomy for cancer. Postoperative complications include infection, poor wound healing and pain. Hypertrophic scar formation, which may disrupt the normal breast contour, may be reduced by gentle and frequent massage of the scar. Avoiding sun exposure and using sun screens may prevent hyperpigmentation of the scar. Reduction mammoplasty is associated with sensory loss, which is occasionally permanent. Special complications associated with augmentation mammoplasty include diffusion of silicone through the implant and unfavorable breast appearance secondary to capsular contracture. Capsular contracture may be prevented by regular implant exercises. Preoperative and early postoperative serial mammograms are essential to differentiate surgical from malignant changes. PMID:1739055

  11. Excimer laser refractive surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Manche, E E; Carr, J D; Haw, W W; Hersh, P S

    1998-01-01

    Excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy and excimer laser in situ keratomileusis are relatively new treatment modalities that can be used to correct refractive errors of the eye. They are most commonly used to correct myopia (nearsightedness) but can also be used to correct hyperopia (farsightedness) and astigmatism. The excimer laser alters the refractive state of the eye by removing tissue from the anterior cornea through a process known as photoablative decomposition. This process uses ultraviolet energy from the excimer laser to disrupt chemical bonds in the cornea without causing any thermal damage to surrounding tissue. The modified anterior corneal surface enables light to be focused on the retina, thereby reducing or eliminating the dependence on glasses and contact lenses. We discuss in detail all aspects of excimer laser refractive surgery--techniques, indications and contraindications, clinical outcomes, and complications. PMID:9682628

  12. Endoscopic pituitary surgery.

    PubMed

    Cappabianca, Paolo; Cavallo, Luigi Maria; de Divitiis, Oreste; Solari, Domenico; Esposito, Felice; Colao, Annamaria

    2008-01-01

    Pituitary surgery is a continuous evolving speciality of the neurosurgeons' armamentarium, which requires precise anatomical knowledge, technical skills and integrated appreciation of the pituitary pathophysiology. What we consider "pure" endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery is a procedure performed through the nose and the sphenoid bone, with the endoscope alone throughout the whole approach to visualize the surgical target area and without the use of any transsphenoidal retractor. It offers some advantages due to the endoscope itself: a superior close-up view of the relevant anatomy and an enlarged working angle are provided with an increased panoramic vision inside the surgical area. Concerning results in terms of mass removal, relief of clinical symptoms, cure of the underlying disease and complication rate, they are, at least, similar to those reported in the major microsurgical series, but patient compliance is by far better. Furthermore transsphenoidal endoscopy brings advantages to the patient (less nasal traumatism, no nasal packing, less post-op pain and usually quick recovery), to the surgeon (wider and closer view of the surgical target area, increase of the scientific activity as from the peer-reviewed literature on the topic in the last 10 years, smoothing of interdisciplinary cooperation), to the institution (shorter post-op hospital stay, increase of the case load). Besides, further progress and technological advance are expected from the close cooperation between different technologies and industries. Continuing works in such field of "minimalism" will offer further possibilities to provide the surgeon with even more effectiveness and safety, and, on the other hand, the patient with improvement of results. PMID:18286374

  13. Ambulatory surgery centers and outpatient urologic surgery among Medicare beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Suskind, Anne M.; Dunn, Rodney L.; Zhang, Yun; Hollingsworth, John M.; Hollenbeck, Brent K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine the effect of an ambulatory surgery center (ASC) opening in a healthcare market on utilization and quality of outpatient urologic surgery. Methods Retrospective cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries undergoing outpatient urologic surgery from 2001 to 2010. Markets were classified into three groups based on ASC status (i.e., those with ASCs, those without ASCs, and those where ASCs were introduced). Multiple propensity score methods adjusted for differences between markets and general linear mixed models determined the effect of ASC opening on utilization and quality, defined by mortality and hospital admission within 30 days of the index procedure. Results During the study period, 195 ASCs opened in markets previously without one. Rates of hospital based urologic surgery in markets where ASCs were introduced declined from 221 to 214 procedures per 10,000 beneficiaries in the 4 years after baseline. In contrast, rates in the other two market types increased over the same period (p < 0.001). Rates of outpatient urologic surgery overall (i.e., in the hospital and ASC) demonstrated similar growth across market types during same period (p = 0.56). The introduction of an ASC into a market was not associated with increases in hospital admission or mortality (p’s > 0.5). Conclusions The introduction of an ASC into a healthcare market lowered rates of outpatient urologic surgery performed in the more expensive hospital setting. This redistribution was not associated with declines in quality or with greater growth in overall outpatient surgery use. PMID:24976220

  14. Single incision laparoscopic surgery in general surgery: a review

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, N; Nicholson, J

    2011-01-01

    Single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) is a rapidly developing field that may represent the future of laparoscopic surgery. The major advantage of SILS over standard laparoscopic surgery is in cosmesis, with surgery becoming essentially scarless if the incision is hidden within the umbilicus. Only one incision is required so the risk of potential complications like port site hernias, haematomas and wound infection is reduced. The trade-off for this is a technically more challenging procedure with different underlying principles to that of traditional laparoscopic surgery. A wide variety of new equipment has been developed to support SILS and the range of procedures that are amenable to the technique is increasing. To date most of the published data relating to SILS are in the form of case series, with the first large randomised controlled trials due to be completed by the end of 2012. The existing evidence suggests that SILS is similar to standard laparoscopic surgery in terms of complication rates, completion rates and post-operative pain scores. However, the duration of SILS is longer than equivalent laparoscopic procedures. This article discusses SILS with regard to its applications in general surgery and reviews the evidence currently available. PMID:21929912

  15. Remote Ischemic Preconditioning in Children Undergoing Cardiac Surgery With Cardiopulmonary Bypass: A Single?Center Double?Blinded Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    McCrindle, Brian W.; Clarizia, Nadia A.; Khaikin, Svetlana; Holtby, Helen M.; Manlhiot, Cedric; Schwartz, Steven M.; Caldarone, Christopher A.; Coles, John G.; Van Arsdell, Glen S.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Redington, Andrew N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) harnesses an innate defensive mechanism that protects against inflammatory activation and ischemia?reperfusion injury, known sequelae of cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. We sought to determine the impact of RIPC on clinical outcomes and physiological markers related to ischemia?reperfusion injury and inflammatory activation after cardiac surgery in children. Methods and Results Overall, 299 children (aged neonate to 17 years) were randomized to receive an RIPC stimulus (inflation of a blood pressure cuff on the left thigh to 15 mm Hg above systolic for four 5?minute intervals) versus a blinded sham stimulus during induction with a standardized anesthesia protocol. Primary outcome was duration of postoperative hospital stay, with serial clinical and laboratory measurements for the first 48 postoperative hours and clinical follow?up to discharge. There were no significant baseline differences between RIPC (n=148) and sham (n=151). There were no in?hospital deaths. No significant difference in length of postoperative hospital stay was noted (sham 5.4 versus RIPC 5.6 days; difference +0.2; adjusted P=0.91), with the 95% confidence interval (?0.7 to +0.9) excluding a prespecified minimal clinically significant differences of 1 or 1.5 days. There were few significant differences in other clinical outcomes or values at time points or trends in physiological markers. Benefit was not observed in specific subgroups when explored through interactions with categories of age, sex, surgery type, Aristotle score, or first versus second half of recruitment. Adverse events were similar (sham 5%, RIPC 6%; P=0.68). Conclusions RIPC is not associated with important improvements in clinical outcomes and physiological markers after cardiac surgery in children. Clinical Trial Registration URL: clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00650507. PMID:25074698

  16. OSAS Surgery and Postoperative Discomfort: Phase I Surgery versus Phase II Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Giulio; Pelo, Sandro; Foresta, Enrico; Boniello, Roberto; Romandini, Mario; Cervelli, Daniele; Azzuni, Camillo; Marianetti, Tito Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. This study aims to investigate the reasons that discourage the patients affected by OSAS to undergo orthognathic surgery and compares the postoperative discomfort of phase I (soft tissue surgery) and phase II (orthognathic surgery) procedures for treatment of OSAS. Material and Methods. A pool of 46 patients affected by OSAS was divided into two groups: “surgery patients” who accepted surgical treatments of their condition and “no surgery patients” who refused surgical procedures. The “surgery patients” group was further subdivided into two arms: patients who accepted phase I procedures (IP) and those who accepted phase II (IIP). To better understand the motivations behind the refusal of II phase procedures, we asked the patients belonging to both the IP group and “no surgery” group to indicate the main reason that influenced their decision to avoid II phase procedures. We also monitored and compared five parameters of postoperative discomfort: pain, painkiller assumption, length of hospitalization, foreign body sensation, and diet assumption following IP and IIP procedures. Results. The main reason to avoid IIP procedures was the concern of a more severe postoperative discomfort. Comparison of the postoperative discomfort following IP versus IIP procedures showed that the former scored worse in 4 out of 5 parameters analyzed. Conclusion. IIP procedures produce less postoperative discomfort. IIP procedures, namely, orthognathic surgery, should be the first choice intervention in patients affected by OSAS and dentoskeletal malformation. PMID:25695081

  17. Mental Rotation Explanation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    One of the most popular tasks used in measuring individual differences in spatial ability is a mental rotation task introduced by Shepard and Metzler (1971). This page provides information about use of a spatial ability task to illustrate the prinicple of mental rotation.

  18. Visualizing quaternion rotation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John C. Hart; George K. Francis; Louis H. Kauffman

    1994-01-01

    Quaternions play a vital role in the representation of rotations in computer graphics, primarily for animation and user interfaces. Unfortunately, quaternion rotation is often left as an advanced topic in computer graphics education due to difficulties in portraying the four-dimensional space of the quaternions. One tool for overcoming these obstacles is the quaternion demonstrator, a physical visual aid consisting primarily

  19. Optics of Rotating Systems

    E-print Network

    Bahram Mashhoon

    2009-06-03

    Electrodynamics of rotating systems is expected to exhibit novel nonlocal features that come about when acceleration-induced nonlocality is introduced into the special relativity theory in conformity with the Bohr-Rosenfeld principle. The implications of nonlocality for the amplitude and frequency of electromagnetic radiation received by uniformly rotating observers are investigated.

  20. Rotation of `Dust Devils'

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Durward

    1931-01-01

    THE direction of rotation of `dust devils' has been noted in Lower Egypt and Iraq during the past four years, and the reports received in this office indicate that in about 50 per cent of cases the direction of rotation is clockwise, and in the other 50 per cent anticlockwise. This seems a surprising result, because if a `dust devils'

  1. Rotatable seal assembly. [Patent application; rotating targets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. M. Logan; J. L. Garibaldi

    1980-01-01

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on

  2. Axial rotation in NGC 2287

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Levato; B. Garcia

    1984-01-01

    Axial and rotational velocities of the members of the open cluster NGC 2287 are measured. The average rotation of the cluster is compared with the average rotation of field stars of the same types; it is found that NGC 2287 rotates at a slower rate than field stars. This result is discussed in terms of the correlation among the rotation,

  3. Double Line Image Rotation.

    PubMed

    Ashtari, Amir Hossein; Nordin, Md Jan; Kahaki, Seyed Mostafa Mousavi

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes a fast algorithm for rotating images while preserving their quality. The new approach rotates images based on vertical or horizontal lines in the original image and their rotated equation in the target image. The proposed method is a one-pass method that determines a based-line equation in the target image and extracts all corresponding pixels on the base-line. Floating-point multiplications are performed to calculate the base-line in the target image, and other line coordinates are calculated using integer addition or subtraction and logical justifications from the base-line pixel coordinates in the target image. To avoid a heterogeneous distance between rotated pixels in the target image, each line rotates to two adjacent lines. The proposed method yields good performance in terms of speed and quality according to the results of an analysis of the computation speed and accuracy. PMID:26054069

  4. Postoperative Pharyngolaryngeal Adverse Events with Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA Supreme) in Laparoscopic Surgical Procedures with Cuff Pressure Limiting 25?cmH2O: Prospective, Blind, and Randomised Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Joo-Eun; Choi, Jae Won; Son, Il Soon

    2014-01-01

    To reduce the incidence of postoperative pharyngolaryngeal adverse events, laryngeal mask airway (LMA) manufacturers recommend maximum cuff pressures not exceeding 60?cmH2O. We performed a prospective randomised study, comparing efficacy and adverse events among patients undergoing laparoscopic surgical procedures who were allocated randomly into low (limiting 25?cmH2O, L group) and high (at 60?cmH2O, H group) LMA cuff pressure groups with LMA Supreme. Postoperative pharyngolaryngeal adverse events were evaluated at discharge from postanaesthetic care unit (PACU) (postoperative day 1, POD 1) and 24 hours after discharge from PACU (postoperative day 2, POD 2). All patients were well tolerated with LMA without ventilation failure. Before pneumoperitoneum, cuff volume and pressure and oropharyngeal leak pressure (OLP) showed significant differences. Postoperative sore throat at POD 2 (3 versus 12 patients) and postoperative dysphagia at POD 1 and POD 2 (0 versus 4 patients at POD 1; 0 versus 4 patients at POD 2) were significantly lower in L group, compared with H group. In conclusion, LMA with cuff pressure limiting 25?cmH2O allowed both efficacy of airway management and lower incidence of postoperative adverse events in laparoscopic surgical procedures. This clinical trial is registered with KCT0000334. PMID:24778598

  5. Surgery for Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ackermans, Linda; Kuhn, Jens; Neuner, Irene; Temel, Yasin; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle

    2013-01-01

    Tourette syndrome is a chronic neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by motor and vocal tics. In the majority of cases, tics are associated by behavioral disorders such as obsessive-compulsive behavior. First symptoms typically appear in early childhood. Mostly symptoms disappear when adulthood is reached. Treatment options consist of behavioral therapy and medication. In refractory cases, surgery may be an option. In the past, several attempts have been made to treat therapy-refractory patients through neurosurgical ablative procedures. In 1999, deep brain stimulation was introduced as a novel treatment option for patients with intractable Tourette syndrome. Up until now, five brain areas have been used or suggested as potential target areas for deep brain stimulation in Tourette syndrome. In the majority of the published cases, there is a clear effect on tics but most studies consist of only a limited number of patients. A strict patient selection is absolutely mandatory. There is a need for double-blinded multicenter trials with inclusion of more patients. PMID:22722039

  6. Fluorescence Imaging in Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Orosco, Ryan K.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Nguyen, Quyen T.

    2013-01-01

    Although the modern surgical era is highlighted by multiple technological advances and innovations, one area that has remained constant is the dependence of the surgeon's vision on white-light reflectance. This renders different body tissues in a limited palette of various shades of pink and red, thereby limiting the visual contrast available to the operating surgeon. Healthy tissue, anatomic variations, and diseased states are seen as slight discolorations relative to each other and differences are inherently limited in dynamic range. In the upcoming years, surgery will undergo a paradigm shift with the use of targeted fluorescence imaging probes aimed at augmenting the surgical armamentarium by expanding the “visible” spectrum available to surgeons. Such fluorescent “smart probes” will provide real-time, intraoperative, pseudo-color, high-contrast delineation of both normal and pathologic tissues. Fluorescent surgical molecular guidance promises another major leap forward to improve patient safety and clinical outcomes, and to reduce overall healthcare costs. This review provides an overview of current and future surgical applications of fluorescence imaging in diseased and nondiseased tissues and focus on the innovative fields of image processing and instrumentation. PMID:23335674

  7. Antifibrinolytics in liver surgery

    PubMed Central

    Makwana, Jalpa; Paranjape, Saloni; Goswami, Jyotsna

    2010-01-01

    Hyperfibrinolysis, a known complication of liver surgery and orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), plays a significant role in blood loss. This fact justifies the use of antifibrinolytic drugs during these procedures. Two groups of drug namely lysine analogues [epsilon aminocaproic acid (EACA) and tranexamic acid (TA)] and serine-protease-inhibitors (aprotinin) are frequently used for this purpose. But uniform data or guidelines on the type of antifibrinolytic drugs to be used, their indications and correct dose, is still insufficient. Antifibrinolytics behave like a double-edged sword. On one hand, there are benefits of less transfusion requirements but on the other hand there is potential complication like thromboembolism, which has been reported in several studies. We performed a systematic search in PubMed and Cochrane Library, and we included studies wherein antifibrinolytic drugs (EACA, TA, or aprotinin) were compared with each other or with controls/placebo. We analysed factors like intraoperative red blood cell and fresh frozen plasma requirements, the perioperative incidence of hepatic artery thrombosis, venous thromboembolic events and mortality. Among the three drugs, EACA is least studied. Use of extensively studied drug like aprotinin has been restricted because of its side effects. Haemostatic effect of aprotinin and tranexamic acid has been comparable. However, proper patient selection and individualized treatment for each of them is required. Purpose of this review is to study various clinical trials on antifibrinolytic drugs and address the related issues like benefits claimed and associated potential complications. PMID:21224964

  8. [Complications in thyroid surgery].

    PubMed

    Lombardi, C P; Raffaelli, M; De Crea, C; Traini, E; Oragano, L; Sollazzi, L; Bellantone, R

    2007-10-01

    Thyroidectomy is one of the most frequently performed surgical procedure worldwide, even if the risks of lethal postoperative complications prevented its evolution and diffusion until the beginning of the XX century. At that time, T. Kocher described his meticulous technique, reporting excellent results in terms of mortality and morbidity. At present, mortality for this procedure approaches 0% and overall complication rate is less than 3%. Nonetheless, major complications of thyroidectomy (i.e. compressive hematoma, recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy and hypoparathyroidism) are still fearful complications and account for a significant percentage of medico-legal claims. Patients volume and surgical skill play an important role in reducing the risk of complications. Accurate knowledge of anatomy and pathophysiology, complications incidence and pathogenesis and a careful surgical performance are essential. In this review, post-thyroidectomy complications basing on literature analysis and personal experience are described. The main anatomical, technical and pathophysiological factors that help preventing post-thyroidectomy complications are analyzed, taking into proper account new technologies and the minimally invasive surgical procedures that influenced thyroid surgery during the last decade. PMID:17947950

  9. Rotating reactor studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Glyn O.

    1991-01-01

    Undesired gravitational effects such as convection or sedimentation in a fluid can sometimes be avoided or decreased by the use of a closed chamber uniformly rotated about a horizontal axis. In a previous study, the spiral orbits of a heavy or buoyant particle in a uniformly rotating fluid were determined. The particles move in circles, and spiral in or out under the combined effects of the centrifugal force and centrifugal buoyancy. A optimization problem for the rotation rate of a cylindrical reactor rotated about its axis and containing distributed particles was formulated and solved. Related studies in several areas are addressed. A computer program based on the analysis was upgraded by correcting some minor errors, adding a sophisticated screen-and-printer graphics capability and other output options, and by improving the automation. The design, performance, and analysis of a series of experiments with monodisperse polystyrene latex microspheres in water were supported to test the theory and its limitations. The theory was amply confirmed at high rotation rates. However, at low rotation rates (1 rpm or less) the assumption of uniform solid-body rotation of the fluid became invalid, and there were increasingly strong secondary motions driven by variations in the mean fluid density due to variations in the particle concentration. In these tests the increase in the mean fluid density due to the particles was of order 0.015 percent. To a first approximation, these flows are driven by the buoyancy in a thin crescent-shaped depleted layer on the descending side of the rotating reactor. This buoyancy distribution is balanced by viscosity near the walls, and by the Coriolis force in the interior. A full analysis is beyond the scope of this study. Secondary flows are likely to be stronger for buoyant particles, which spiral in towards the neutral point near the rotation axis under the influence of their centrifugal buoyancy. This is because the depleted layer is thicker and extends all the way around the reactor.

  10. Training Surgical Residents for a Career in Academic Global Surgery: A Novel Training Model.

    PubMed

    Swain, JaBaris D; Matousek, Alexi C; Scott, John W; Cooper, Zara; Smink, Douglas S; Bolman, Ralph Morton; Finlayson, Samuel R G; Zinner, Michael J; Riviello, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Academic global surgery is a nascent field focused on improving surgical care in resource-poor settings through a broad-based scholarship agenda. Although there is increasing momentum to expand training opportunities in low-resource settings among academic surgical programs, most focus solely on establishing short-term elective rotations rather than fostering research or career development. Given the complex nature of surgical care delivery and programmatic capacity building in the resource-poor settings, many challenges remain before global surgery is accepted as an academic discipline and an established career path. Brigham and Women's Hospital has established a specialized global surgery track within the general surgery residency program to develop academic leaders in this growing area of need and opportunity. Here we describe our experience with the design and development of the program followed by practical applications and lessons learned from our early experiences. PMID:25911458

  11. JAMA Patient Page: Robotic Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Surgery Robotic surgerymay sound a little too high-tech for comfort, but rest assured, the accurate term ... A surgeon performs your procedure using very high-tech equipment. Originally designed for use on battlefields, today ...

  12. Image-Guided Brain Surgery

    Cancer.gov

    Once the surgery is underway, taking new MRI images of the patient's brain allows the surgeon to check his or her progress, see if the position of anything has changed, and look for remaining pieces of the tumor.

  13. Value of Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kocher, Mininder S

    2015-01-01

    Value has become the buzzword of contemporaneous health care reform. Value is defined as outcomes relative to costs. Orthopaedic surgery has come under increasing scrutiny due to high procedural costs. However, orthopaedic surgery may actually be a great value given the benefits of treatment. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) Value Project team was tasked to develop a model for assessing the benefits of orthopaedic surgery including indirect costs related to productivity and health-related quality of life. This model was applied to 5 orthopaedic conditions demonstrating robust societal and economic value. In all cost-effectiveness models, younger patients demonstrated greater cost-effectiveness given increased lifespan and productivity. This has tremendous implications within the field of pediatric orthopedic surgery. Pediatric orthopaedics may be the best value in medicine! PMID:26049310

  14. Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePLUS

    Minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass; MIDCAB; Robot assisted coronary artery bypass; RACAB; Keyhole heart surgery ... The surgeon will then find and prepare an artery on your chest wall to attach to your ...

  15. The effect of changing the sequence of cuff inflation and device fixation with the LMA-Supreme® on device position, ventilatory complications, and airway morbidity: a clinical and fiberscopic study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The conventional sequence when using supraglottic airway devices is insertion, cuff inflation and fixation. Our hypothesis was that a tighter fit of the cuff and tip could be achieved with a consequently lower incidence of air leak, better separation of gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts and less airway morbidity if the device were first affixed and the cuff then inflated. Methods Our clinical review board approved the study (public registry number DRKS00003174). An LMA Supreme® was inserted into 184 patients undergoing lower limb arthroscopy in propofol-remifentanil anaesthesia who were randomly assigned to either the control (inflation then fixation; n?=?92) or study group (fixation then inflation; n?=?92). The cuff was inflated to 60 cmH2O. The patients’ lungs were ventilated in pressure-controlled mode with 5 cmH2O PEEP, Pmax to give 6 ml kg-1 tidal volume, and respiratory rate adjusted to end-tidal CO2 of 4.8 and 5.6 kPa. Correct cuff and tip position were determined by leak detection, capnometry trace, oropharyngeal leak pressure, suprasternal notch test, and lube-tube test. Bowl and cuff position and the presence of glottic narrowing were assessed by fiberscopic examination. Postoperative dysphagia, hoarseness and sore throat were assessed with a questionnaire. Ventilatory impairment was defined as a tidal volume?cuff inflation and device fixation does not affect device position, oropharyngeal leak pressures or separation of gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts. It reduces the incidence of glottic narrowing with impaired ventilation and also perioperative airway morbidity. PMID:24387685

  16. SURGICAL SCIENTIST PROGRAM Department of Surgery

    E-print Network

    Barthelat, Francois

    SURGICAL SCIENTIST PROGRAM Department of Surgery McGill University The purpose of the Surgical Scientist Program of the Department of Surgery is to develop surgical scientists who will be the future leaders in academic surgery both at McGill and in other university Departments of Surgery. Application

  17. The Dehn Surgery Problem Marc Lackenby

    E-print Network

    Lackenby, Marc

    The Dehn Surgery Problem Marc Lackenby 19 June 2012 #12;Dehn surgery This is a method for building 3-manifolds: #12;Dehn surgery This is a method for building 3-manifolds: Start with a knot or link K in 3-sphere. #12;Dehn surgery This is a method for building 3-manifolds: Start with a knot or link K

  18. MEDICAL COLLEGE OF WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY

    E-print Network

    MEDICAL COLLEGE OF WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY CASE CONFERENCE SCHEDULE CONVENER TITLE SCHEDULE LOCATION Cardiothoracic Surgery Multidisciplinary Thoracic Tumor Conference Thursdays at 7:00am Froedtert Cancer Center Conference Room J Cardiothoracic Surgery Cardiothoracic Surgery M&M Conference Wednesdays

  19. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT RESIDENTS GENERAL SURGERY RESIDENTS

    E-print Network

    Bogyo, Matthew

    Chang, Timothy Urology 1 2228 Dallas, Kai Urology 1 2389 Itoga, Nathan Vascular Surgery 1 2708 Marshall, Clement General Surgery 2 2428 Massoudi, Rustin Urology 2 2429 Mittermiller, Paul Plastic Surgery 2 2430 2422 Sue, Gloria Plastic Surgery 2 2625 Sun, Andrew Urology 2 2626 Sussman, Eric Neurosurgery 2 2269

  20. Laparoscopic Surgery for Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Stocchi, Luca

    2010-01-01

    Laparoscopic techniques have become increasingly used in the treatment of ulcerative colitis: in experienced hands, they are safe and feasible. Recovery advantages have not been consistently demonstrated and functional results have been comparable to open surgery. Other possible benefits and costs issues have also been inconsistent. Further investigation on the role of laparoscopic surgery for ulcerative colitis with larger populations and longer follow-up with a focus on recovery parameters, quality of life, and costs are needed. PMID:22131895

  1. Rhabdomyolysis after Laparoscopic Bariatric Surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philippe Mognol; Stéphane Vignes; Denis Chosidow; Jean-Pierre Marmuse

    2004-01-01

    Background: Postoperative rhabdomyolysis is an uncommon event. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of rhabdomyolysis\\u000a following laparoscopic obesity surgery. Methods: Rhabdomyolysis was studied prospectively. Over a 6-month period, 66 consecutive\\u000a patients underwent bariatric surgery (gastric banding (n=50) and gastric bypass (n=16)). All patients underwent laparoscopic\\u000a procedures. A range of blood tests, including serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK)

  2. Cataract surgery in ancient Egypt.

    PubMed

    Blomstedt, Patric

    2014-03-01

    Ophthalmology was one of the most important specialties in Egyptian medicine, and more specialists are known in this field than in any other. This specialization seems, however, to have been of a purely noninvasive nature. Even though it has been claimed that cataract surgery was performed in pharaonic Egypt, careful analysis of the sources does not support the claim. No example of cataract surgery or of any other invasive ophthalmologic procedure can be found in the original sources. PMID:24485861

  3. An update on thyroid surgery.

    PubMed

    Gimm, O; Brauckhoff, M; Thanh, P N; Sekulla, C; Dralle, H

    2002-08-01

    Surgery has been the treatment of choice for many disorders of the thyroid gland, both benign and malignant, for many decades. However, surgery has not been invariable but has continued to change in accordance with research results. In benign cases, surgery has generally evolved to be as organ preserving as possible. In several instances, however, a more radical extent of resection seems justified in order to ensure that the risk of recurrence is as low as possible. For instance, total thyroidectomy may be beneficial in patients with endemic multinodular goitre or young patients with Graves' disease and accompanying cold nodules or high levels of autoantibodies. Several tools, e.g. magnifying glasses, bipolar coagulation forceps and neuromonitoring, are available to identify and preserve the recurrent laryngeal nerve and the parathyroid glands, hence keeping the morbidity at a low level. Most recently, minimally invasive surgery has been successfully used in treating both benign and malignant disorders of the thyroid gland. In the case of malignant disorders, minimally invasive surgery may become an attractive alternative to open surgery if a limited surgical extent is justified, e.g. in patients with micro-PTC (papillary thyroid carcinoma, diameter less than 1 cm). Whether a limited surgical approach is also justified in other cases, e.g. in any patient with intrathyroidal PTC or patients with micro-FTC (follicular thyroid carcinoma), remains to be shown and is the subject of ongoing investigations. One of the most intriguing recent discoveries is the identification of genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with hereditary medullary thyroid carcinoma. In these patients, the timing and extent of surgery may depend not only on the patient's age and serum levels of the tumour marker calcitonin but also on the specific germline RET proto-oncogene mutation. Surgery will certainly continue to play an important role in the treatment of thyroid diseases and may be increasingly based on individual findings instead of general recommendations. PMID:12192544

  4. Rotational relaxation of hydrogen halides

    SciTech Connect

    Koura, K.

    1980-03-15

    The comment of Levine on the rotational relaxation of hydrogen halides are answered. In particular the information theoretic predictions for the rotational transitions rate constant are considered. (AIP)

  5. Rotatable seal assembly. [Patent application; rotating targets

    DOEpatents

    Logan, C.M.; Garibaldi, J.L.

    1980-11-12

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

  6. Error analysis in laparoscopic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantert, Walter A.; Tendick, Frank; Bhoyrul, Sunil; Tyrrell, Dana; Fujino, Yukio; Rangel, Shawn; Patti, Marco G.; Way, Lawrence W.

    1998-06-01

    Iatrogenic complications in laparoscopic surgery, as in any field, stem from human error. In recent years, cognitive psychologists have developed theories for understanding and analyzing human error, and the application of these principles has decreased error rates in the aviation and nuclear power industries. The purpose of this study was to apply error analysis to laparoscopic surgery and evaluate its potential for preventing complications. Our approach is based on James Reason's framework using a classification of errors according to three performance levels: at the skill- based performance level, slips are caused by attention failures, and lapses result form memory failures. Rule-based mistakes constitute the second level. Knowledge-based mistakes occur at the highest performance level and are caused by shortcomings in conscious processing. These errors committed by the performer 'at the sharp end' occur in typical situations which often times are brought about by already built-in latent system failures. We present a series of case studies in laparoscopic surgery in which errors are classified and the influence of intrinsic failures and extrinsic system flaws are evaluated. Most serious technical errors in lap surgery stem from a rule-based or knowledge- based mistake triggered by cognitive underspecification due to incomplete or illusory visual input information. Error analysis in laparoscopic surgery should be able to improve human performance, and it should detect and help eliminate system flaws. Complication rates in laparoscopic surgery due to technical errors can thus be considerably reduced.

  7. Mental Rotation Experiment

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the entry page for the Mental Rotation Experiment. This experiment presents 16 different pairs of three dimensional objects. Users judge whether the objects are the same or different. Responses are timed.

  8. Synchronous Rotation of Moon

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The representation is an animation of the moon's orbit around the Earth. This animation and accompanying text explain that the same side of the moon always faces Earth because of the moon's rotation. The animation begins with a demonstration of how the moon would appear if it did not rotate on its axis, and shows that all sides would be visible from Earth at some point in that orbit. The animation then shows the synchronous rotation of the moon and explains this rotation is the reason for our only seeing one side of the moon. The sun is shown at the right side of the diagram and the Earth and moon are shown with an illuminated side facing the sun and a dark side facing away from the sun. Colored "craters" on opposite sides of the moon are used as reference points for the animation.

  9. The Earth's rotation problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumberg, V. A.; Ivanova, T. V.

    2008-09-01

    The aim of the present paper is to find the trigonometric solution of the equations of the Earth's rotation around its centre of mass in the form of polynomial trigonometric series (Poisson series) without secular and mixed therms. For that the techniques of the General Planetary Theory (GPT) ( Brumberg, 1995) and the Poisson Series Processor (PSP) (Ivanova, 1995) are used. The GPT allows to reduce the equations of the translatory motion of the major planets and the Moon and the equations of the Earth's rotation in Euler parameters to the secular system describing the evolution of the planetary and lunar orbits (independent of the Earth's rotation) and the evolution of the Earth's rotation (depending on the planetary and lunar evolution).

  10. Simultaneous multiwavelength laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolbarsht, Myron L.

    1994-08-01

    The coagulative effect of the conventional CO2 surgical laser at 10.6 micrometers is usually sufficient for homeostasis during surgery, but at laser wavelengths approaching 3 micrometers , the absorption depth is very shallow, and all the laser/tissue interaction is very close to the surface. Where ablation of surface tissues must be combined with a more penetrating laser action for coagulation or tissue bonding, auxiliary wavelengths are required. Significant penetration into the remaining unablated tissue is needed for coagulation of large blood vessels, as well as for generalized control of bleeding or seeping, or for more gentle, but even, heating of the cut surfaces of blood vessels, nerves, and other tissues as part of tissue anastomosis or bonding procedures. Also, large volumes of tissue are often removed as rapidly as possible; this needs deep penetration of the energy over a wide area. All of these effects call for wavelengths well away from the water absorption peak near 3 micrometers . Both ZrF4 and sapphire optical fibers are sufficiently transparent in the visible and IR regions of the spectrum to pass an ablative wavelength near 3 micrometers , coagulative and tissue bonding wavelengths in the shorter IR, and another auxiliary beam in the visible to serve as a marker which will remain in precise optical alignment with the active and invisible IR beams. The control of the relative proportions of the various active wavelengths will allow selection of the precise surgical effect to be obtained, ranging from pure ablation to coagulation only or tissue bonding alone with all combinations in between. The concept of the multiwavelength laser delivery system will certainly be popular in the future whenever such instrumentation becomes sufficiently available for its utility to be widely recognized.

  11. Limb salvage surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kadam, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    The threat of lower limb loss is seen commonly in severe crush injury, cancer ablation, diabetes, peripheral vascular disease and neuropathy. The primary goal of limb salvage is to restore and maintain stability and ambulation. Reconstructive strategies differ in each condition such as: Meticulous debridement and early coverage in trauma, replacing lost functional units in cancer ablation, improving vascularity in ischaemic leg and providing stable walking surface for trophic ulcer. The decision to salvage the critically injured limb is multifactorial and should be individualised along with laid down definitive indications. Early cover remains the standard of care, delayed wound coverage not necessarily affect the final outcome. Limb salvage is more cost-effective than amputations in a long run. Limb salvage is the choice of procedure over amputation in 95% of limb sarcoma without affecting the survival. Compound flaps with different tissue components, skeletal reconstruction; tendon transfer/reconstruction helps to restore function. Adjuvant radiation alters tissue characters and calls for modification in reconstructive plan. Neuropathic ulcers are wide and deep often complicated by osteomyelitis. Free flap reconstruction aids in faster healing and provides superior surface for offloading. Diabetic wounds are primarily due to neuropathy and leads to six-fold increase in ulcerations. Control of infections, aggressive debridement and vascular cover are the mainstay of management. Endovascular procedures are gaining importance and have reduced extent of surgery and increased amputation free survival period. Though the standard approach remains utilising best option in the reconstruction ladder, the recent trend shows running down the ladder of reconstruction with newer reliable local flaps and negative wound pressure therapy. PMID:24501463

  12. Patient Safety in Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Makary, Martin A.; Sexton, J Bryan; Freischlag, Julie A.; Millman, E Anne; Pryor, David; Holzmueller, Christine; Pronovost, Peter J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Improving patient safety is an increasing priority for surgeons and hospitals since sentinel events can be catastrophic for patients, caregivers, and institutions. Patient safety initiatives aimed at creating a safe operating room (OR) culture are increasingly being adopted, but a reliable means of measuring their impact on front-line providers does not exist. Methods: We developed a surgery-specific safety questionnaire (SAQ) and administered it to 2769 eligible caregivers at 60 hospitals. Survey questions included the appropriateness of handling medical errors, knowledge of reporting systems, and perceptions of safety in the operating room. MANOVA and ANOVA were performed to compare safety results by hospital and by an individual's position in the OR using a composite score. Multilevel confirmatory factor analysis was performed to validate the structure of the scale at the operating room level of analysis. Results: The overall response rate was 77.1% (2135 of 2769), with a range of 57% to 100%. Factor analysis of the survey items demonstrated high face validity and internal consistency (? = 0.76). The safety climate scale was robust and internally consistent overall and across positions. Scores varied widely by hospital [MANOVA omnibus F (59, 1910) = 3.85, P < 0.001], but not position [ANOVA F (4, 1910) = 1.64, P = 0.16], surgeon (mean = 73.91), technician (mean = 70.26), anesthesiologist (mean = 71.57), CRNA (mean = 71.03), and nurse (mean = 70.40). The percent of respondents reporting good safety climate in each hospital ranged from 16.3% to 100%. Conclusions: Safety climate in surgical departments can be validly measured and varies widely among hospitals, providing the opportunity to benchmark performance. Scores on the SAQ can serve to evaluate interventions to improve patient safety. PMID:16632997

  13. Rotational vertebral artery syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah Marti; Stefan Hegemann; Hans-Christian von Büdingen; Ralf W. Baumgartner; Dominik Straumann

    2008-01-01

    Whether the rotational vertebral artery syndrome (RVAS), consisting of attacks of vertigo, nystagmus and tinnitus elicited\\u000a by head-rotation induced compression of the dominant vertebral artery (VA), reflects ischemic dysfunction of uni- or bilateral\\u000a peripheral or central vestibular structures, is still debated. We report on a patient with bilateral high-grade carotid stenoses,\\u000a in whom rightward headrotation led to RVAS symptoms including

  14. Faraday rotation in graphene

    E-print Network

    I. V. Fialkovsky; D. V. Vassilevich

    2012-11-29

    We study magneto--optical properties of monolayer graphene by means of quantum field theory methods in the framework of the Dirac model. We reveal a good agreement between the Dirac model and a recent experiment on giant Faraday rotation in cyclotron resonance. We also predict other regimes when the effects are well pronounced. The general dependence of the Faraday rotation and absorption on various parameters of samples is revealed both for suspended and epitaxial graphene.

  15. Rotational rate sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Steven L. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A rate sensor for angular/rotational acceleration includes a housing defining a fluid cavity essentially completely filled with an electrolyte fluid. Within the housing, such as a toroid, ions in the fluid are swept during movement from an excitation electrode toward one of two output electrodes to provide a signal for directional rotation. One or more ground electrodes within the housing serve to neutralize ions, thus preventing any effect at the other output electrode.

  16. Translational and rotational relaxation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katsuhisa Koura

    1976-01-01

    The translational relaxation and the translational nonequilibrium effects on the rotational relaxation are studied by solving the semiclassical Boltzmann equation with Monte Carlo simulation in the HCl-H2 system, where HCl formed in the exothermic reaction H+Cl2-->HCl+Cl with nonequilibrium rotational and translational distributions with an excess translational energy is dispersed in the heat bath of H2. A simple hard sphere model

  17. Electromagnetic rotational actuation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Alexander Lee

    2010-08-01

    There are many applications that need a meso-scale rotational actuator. These applications have been left by the wayside because of the lack of actuation at this scale. Sandia National Laboratories has many unique fabrication technologies that could be used to create an electromagnetic actuator at this scale. There are also many designs to be explored. In this internship exploration of the designs and fabrications technologies to find an inexpensive design that can be used for prototyping the electromagnetic rotational actuator.

  18. Recovering rotations in aeroelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrem, R.; Beckert, A.; Wendland, H.

    2007-08-01

    We present a new scheme for loose coupling in fluid structure-interaction problems as they typically appear in the context of aircraft design. This coupling scheme is based upon generalized multivariate scattered data interpolation and is tailored for small structural models, which bear in addition to deformations also rotational information. In contrast to classical coupling schemes, we also employ this rotational information to build a more accurate reconstruction.

  19. Instability in Rotating Machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings contain 45 papers on a wide range of subjects including flow generated instabilities in fluid flow machines, cracked shaft detection, case histories of instability phenomena in compressors, turbines, and pumps, vibration control in turbomachinery (including antiswirl techniques), and the simulation and estimation of destabilizing forces in rotating machines. The symposium was held to serve as an update on the understanding and control of rotating machinery instability problems.

  20. [Liver surgery after the millennium].

    PubMed

    Jakab, Ferenc

    2006-12-24

    Since 1906 according to the invitation of the Hungarian Surgical Society mainly surgeons have had the honour to give the János Balassa memorial lecture. In accordance with the traditions the first part of the lecture is a commemoration at János Balassa and the second part deals with the work of the invited lecturer. This year the 84th memorial lecture was held. The speaker besides reviewing János Balassa's biographical data pointed out his outstanding characteristics. Balassa was not only the founder of the first surgical school but a prominent intellectual leader in his age. He summarised the two basic conceptions of his oeuvre in the lecture that he held after being appointed to the leader of the surgical department; to raise surgery from the level of bunglers and barbers to the up-to-date surgical standards. His other statement is valid even today: surgery is equivalent with internal medicine among the clinical sciences but he did not intended to split them up. In the second part of the lecture the speaker presented his own work in hepatic surgery. He highlighted the present concerns of the history of hepatic surgery. He summarised separately the change of approaches in the indications of primary and secondary hepatic tumours. He determined the R0 resection as the basic factor of hepatic surgery. In his lecture he reported the alterations and expectations of surgery in hepatocellular carcinoma and metastatic hepatic tumours. He pointed out the increasing radicality in this field. He reviewed the new surgical techniques that give better results. He emphasised the importance of bloodless surgery in his own experience with Baron knack and different hepatic parenchyma separating techniques. He mentioned the role of oncology in connection with hepatic surgery, especially the results of molecular biology. In his lecture it stood out that he holds the long-term survival the most important result of hepatic surgery but he mentioned several other prognostic factors. Finally he gave an overview about the potential future of hepatic surgery. PMID:17378163

  1. Bariatric Surgery in Hypothalamic Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Nathan C.; Rose, Susan R.; Inge, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    Craniopharyngiomas (CP) are epithelial neoplasms generally found in the area of the pituitary and hypothalamus. Despite benign histology, these tumors and/or their treatment often result in significant, debilitating disorders of endocrine, neurological, behavioral, and metabolic systems. Severe obesity is observed in a high percentage of patients with CP resulting in significant comorbidities and negatively impacting quality of life. Obesity occurs as a result of hypothalamic damage and disruption of normal homeostatic mechanisms regulating energy balance. Such pathological weight gain, termed hypothalamic obesity (HyOb), is often severe and refractory to therapy. Unfortunately, neither lifestyle intervention nor pharmacotherapy has proven effective in the treatment of HyOb. Given the limited choices and poor results of these treatments, several groups have examined bariatric surgery as a treatment alternative for patients with CP–HyOb. While a large body of evidence exists supporting the use of bariatric surgery in the treatment of exogenous obesity and its comorbidities, its role in the treatment of HyOb has yet to be defined. To date, the existing literature on bariatric surgery in CP–HyOb is largely limited to case reports and series with short term follow-up. Here we review the current reports on the use of bariatric surgery in the treatment of CP–HyOb. We also compare these results to those reported for other populations of HyOb, including Prader–Willi Syndrome, Bardet–Biedl syndrome, and hypothalamic melanocortin signaling defects. While initial reports of bariatric surgery in CP–HyOb are promising, their limited scope makes it difficult to draw any substantial conclusions as to the long term safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery in CP–HyOb. There continues to be a need for more robust, controlled, prospective studies with long term follow-up in order to better define the role of bariatric surgery in the treatment of HyOb. PMID:22649412

  2. Recent advances in urologic laparoscopic surgeries: laparoendoscopic single-site surgery, natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery, robotics and navigation.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Tadashi

    2013-05-01

    Laparoscopic surgery was developed at the end of the 1980s and has been utilized in almost all urologic surgical procedures. It offers the benefits of less invasiveness and earlier recovery than open surgery. The introduction of laparoendoscopic single-site surgery has offered reduced pain and improved cosmetic satisfaction to patients. Scarless nephrectomy has been realized with transvaginal natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery in women. The development of surgical robots has decreased the technical difficulty of complicated procedures, shortened the learning curve, and improved perioperative outcomes relative to laparoscopic surgery. Surgical navigation using real-time sonography, augmented reality, fluorescence, or radioisotope images will improve the quality of these surgeries. PMID:23601994

  3. Applications of robotics in surgery.

    PubMed

    Panait, L; Doarn, C R; Merrell, R C

    2002-01-01

    The end of the 20th century brought an increased use of computerized technology in medicine and surgery. The development of robotic surgical systems opened new approaches in general and cardiac surgery. Two leading robotic companies, Computer Motion, Inc. and Intuitive Surgical, Inc. have developed the Zeus and Da Vinci respectively, as very effective tools for surgeons to use. Both of them consist of a surgeon console, located far from the operating table, and three robotic arms, which reproduce inside the patient's body the movements performed by the surgeon at the console. The advantages of robotic surgery over laparoscopy and open surgery include: better eye-hand coordination, tremor filtration, steadiness of camera, 3-D vision, motion scale, more degrees of freedom for instruments etc. Of course, there are also some disadvantages, like the lack of tactile feedback, long time of set up, long learning curve, high cost etc. However, the advantages seem to overcome the disadvantages and more and more operations are conducted using robots. The impact of robotics in surgery is therefore very promising and in the future it will probably open even more new ways in the surgical practice and education both in Romania and across the globe. PMID:12731212

  4. Training in robotic surgery: simulators, surgery, and credentialing.

    PubMed

    Bahler, Clinton D; Sundaram, Chandru P

    2014-11-01

    The use of robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery has increased rapidly and with it, the need to better define a structured curriculum and credentialing process. Numerous efforts have been made by surgical societies to define the requisite skills for robotic surgeons, but individual institutions have the responsibility for granting privileges. Recently, efforts have focused on creating a standardized curriculum with competency-based assessments. A competency-based approach offers a better hope of honoring the principle of "above all, do no harm" and obtaining continued acceptance of new operative technologies such as robot-assisted surgery. PMID:25306169

  5. Axial rotation in NGC 2287

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levato, H.; Garcia, B.

    Axial and rotational velocities of the members of the open cluster NGC 2287 are measured. The average rotation of the cluster is compared with the average rotation of field stars of the same types; it is found that NGC 2287 rotates at a slower rate than field stars. This result is discussed in terms of the correlation among the rotation, binarity, and peculiarity among members of open clusters.

  6. Lattice QCD in rotating frames.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Arata; Hirono, Yuji

    2013-08-23

    We formulate lattice QCD in rotating frames to study the physics of QCD matter under rotation. We construct the lattice QCD action with the rotational metric and apply it to the Monte Carlo simulation. As the first application, we calculate the angular momenta of gluons and quarks in the rotating QCD vacuum. This new framework is useful to analyze various rotation-related phenomena in QCD. PMID:24010426

  7. Oncoplastic breast surgery: current strategies

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Merisa; Peled, Anne Warren

    2015-01-01

    The surgical management of breast cancer has dramatically evolved over the past 20 years, with oncoplastic surgery gaining increased popularity. This field of breast surgery allows for complete resection of tumor, preservation of normal parenchyma tissue, and the use of local or regional tissue for immediate breast reconstruction at the time of partial mastectomy. These techniques extend the options for breast conservation surgery, improve aesthetic outcomes, have high patient satisfaction and result in better control of tumor margins. This article will detail the approach to evaluating and treating patients undergoing oncoplastic reconstruction. Different oncoplastic approaches will be described and applied to an oncoplastic reconstructive algorithm. Surgical complications, oncologic outcomes and aesthetic outcomes are reviewed. PMID:26005647

  8. Radioguided surgery in Meckel's diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Ayala, S; Andrés, A; Rambalde, E F; Deus, J; Cáncer, L; Tardin, L; Banzo, J; Prats, E

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the case of a patient with intermittent episodes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding and suspected Meckel's diverticulum, whose presence was confirmed by (99m)Tc-pertechnetate scintigraphy. A previous exploratory laparotomy had been performed without finding the diverticulum. In spite of years of medical treatment, the patient presented a new episode of lower gastrointestinal bleeding with normal colonoscopy. A new (99m)Tc-pertechnetate scintigraphy (including SPECT/CT) was performed and allowed the anatomical location of a Meckel's diverticulum and enabled its removal by laparoscopic radioguided surgery. The introduction of SPECT/CT in the scintigraphic diagnostic protocol in Meckel's diverticulum increases diagnostic safety and improves lesion location. Furthermore, it favors the performance of radioguided surgery and facilitates the lesion resection, particularly when the patient has suffered previous abdominal surgery, with a more conservative procedure, reducing the morbidity associated with the surgical procedure. PMID:24560596

  9. Surgery applications of virtual reality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    Virtual reality is a computer-generated technology which allows information to be displayed in a simulated, bus lifelike, environment. In this simulated 'world', users can move and interact as if they were actually a part of that world. This new technology will be useful in many different fields, including the field of surgery. Virtual reality systems can be used to teach surgical anatomy, diagnose surgical problems, plan operations, simulate and perform surgical procedures (telesurgery), and predict the outcomes of surgery. The authors of this paper describe the basic components of a virtual reality surgical system. These components include: the virtual world, the virtual tools, the anatomical model, the software platform, the host computer, the interface, and the head-coupled display. In the chapter they also review the progress towards using virtual reality for surgical training, planning, telesurgery, and predicting outcomes. Finally, the authors present a training system being developed for the practice of new procedures in abdominal surgery.

  10. Telescopic laryngeal and pharyngeal surgery.

    PubMed

    Richtsmeier, W J; Scher, R L

    1997-12-01

    Surgery of the hypopharynx and larynx has traditionally been performed with either direct, unaided vision or the operating microscope. We proposed to extend the surgical capability provided by angled Hopkins telescopes to the larynx and hypopharynx. Forty-eight cases in which rigid telescopes were employed primarily for intervention were reviewed. We found significant advantages of the telescopic system when performing procedures on surfaces that were not 90 degrees from the observer, such as the walls of the hypopharynx, the petiole of the epiglottis, the ventricle, and the posterior commissure. Both 30 degree and 70 degree telescopes were found useful, but required complementary instruments. The potassium titanyl phosphate laser's flexible fiber provided a distinct advantage in resecting lesions that presented on vertical surfaces. Telescopes also permitted the use of large instruments designed for intraperitoneal and intrathoracic surgery that blocked the view of the operating microscope. Telescopic pharyngeal and laryngeal visualization allowed surgical procedures complementary to more traditional forms of endoscopic surgery. PMID:9415594

  11. Use of Piezosurgery for internal auditory canal drilling in acoustic neuroma surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juergen Grauvogel; Christian Scheiwe; Jan Kaminsky

    Background  Piezosurgery is based on microvibrations generated by the piezoelectrical effect and has a selective bone-cutting ability\\u000a with preservation of soft tissue. This study examined the applicability of Piezosurgery compared to rotating drills (RD) for\\u000a internal auditory canal (IAC) opening in acoustic neuroma (AN) surgery.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  Piezosurgery was used in eight patients for IAC drilling in AN surgery. After exposition

  12. Double cheek-cervical rotation flap for repair of facial defects.

    PubMed

    Lim, R Y; Strickland, S A; Lim, J W

    1993-01-01

    Repair of extensive facial defects due to cancer surgery or trauma is a challenge to restore form, function, and facade. This article studies the advantages of using the double cheek-cervical rotation flap for immediate reconstruction of 10 patients with huge facial defects. PMID:8421911

  13. Rotating Aperture System

    SciTech Connect

    Rusnak, Brian; Hall, James M.; Shen, Stewart; Wood, Richard L.

    2005-01-18

    A rotating aperture system includes a low-pressure vacuum pumping stage with apertures for passage of a deuterium beam. A stator assembly includes holes for passage of the beam. The rotor assembly includes a shaft connected to a deuterium gas cell or a crossflow venturi that has a single aperture on each side that together align with holes every rotation. The rotating apertures are synchronized with the firing of the deuterium beam such that the beam fires through a clear aperture and passes into the Xe gas beam stop. Portions of the rotor are lapped into the stator to improve the sealing surfaces, to prevent rapid escape of the deuterium gas from the gas cell.

  14. Rotations about nonorthogonal axes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davenport, P. B.

    1973-01-01

    Given a desired three-axis reorientation, it is well known that there are, in general, twelve possible sequences of three successive rotations about orthogonal axes which will perform the reorientation. The present paper determines whether the maneuver can or cannot be accomplished with three successive rotations aobut arbitrary (not necessarily orthogonal) axes. This result is then employed to derive conditions on the axes which insure that every rotation may be so generated. The associated angles of all the possible three-legged slews are exhibited by a closed analytical procedure which requires no assumptions concerning the degree of nonorthogonality nor any approximations. The classical orthogonal case (Euler angles) is then an immediate consequence as a special case of the generalized solution.

  15. Accuracy of the ankle-brachial index using the SCVL®, an arm and ankle automated device with synchronized cuffs, in a population with increased cardiovascular risk

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, David; Rodriguez-Carranza, Sandra; Laroche, Patrick; Bruckert, Eric; Giral, Philippe; Girerd, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the accuracy of the ankle brachial index (ABI) measured with the SCVL® (“screening cardiovascular lab”; GenNov, Paris, France), an automated device with synchronized arm and ankle cuffs with an automatic ABI calculation. Methods Patients were consecutively included in a cardiovascular prevention unit if they presented with at least two cardiovascular risk factors. ABI measurements were made using the SCVL, following a synchronized assessment of brachial and ankle systolic pressure. These values were compared to the ABI obtained with the usual Doppler-assisted method. Results We included 157 patients. Mean age was 59.1 years, 56.8% had hypertension, 22.3% had diabetes mellitus, and 17.6% were current smokers. An abnormal ABI was observed in 17.2% with the SCVL and in 16.2% with the Doppler. The prevalence rates of an abnormal ABI by patient measured with each device, ie, 15.7% (confidence interval [CI] 0.95: [11.8; 20.4]) or 14.3% (CI 0.95: [10.7; 18.9]), did not differ. The coefficient of variation of Doppler and SCVL measures was 15.8% and 15.1%, respectively. The regression line between the two measurement methods was statistically significant. The value-to-value comparison also shows a difference of mean equal to 0.010 (CI 0.95: [?0.272; 0.291]) (r = ?0.055). Reproducibility of ABI measurements with the SCVL showed a difference of mean equal to 0.009 (CI 0.95: [?0.203; 0.222]), without heteroscedasticity (r = ?0.003). Conclusion The SCVL is a fast and easy to use automated oscillometric device for the determination of ABI. The use of this two-synchronized-cuff device correlates well with the gold standard Doppler ultrasound method and is reproducible. The SCVL may ease the screening for peripheral arterial disease in routine medical practice. PMID:22566745

  16. Piezolelectric surgery in dentistry: a review.

    PubMed

    Carini, F; Saggese, V; Porcaro, G; Baldoni, M

    2014-01-01

    In the last ten years was observed a significant increase of publications about piezoelectric bone surgery. The purpose of this review was to define the state of art and to realize a comparison between piezoelectric devices and manual or rotating traditional techniques, analyzing advantages and disadvantages from a clinical and histological point of view for various dental procedures. The literature review has been carried out using medical databases on line: MEDLINE and COCHRANE LIBRARY. The authors selected 37 publications about dental field and consistent with inclusion criteria established. From the clinical point of view, the analysis of selected publications concerning procedures such as maxillary sinus lift, alveolar ridge expansion, samples of autologous bone, etc, showed surgical trauma reduction, especially towards to soft and nervous tissues, surgical mini-invasiveness, cut precision and selectivity and speed of learning guaranteed by piezoelectric devices compared to traditional ones. Histologically, however, the study of biology and postintervention bone tissue healing showed a lower loss of bone with piezoelectric instruments than with conventional devices, as well as a better healing quality by reducing patient's postsurgery morbidity. The use of piezoelectric devices seems thus to simplify different sinus lift surgical procedures and to allow greater predictability, although some studies reveal that there are not substantial differences in comparison of long-term results between conventional and piezoelectric instruments and also criticize their increase in operation time. PMID:24487947

  17. Current trends in hand surgery.

    PubMed

    Kalliainen, Loree K

    2012-06-01

    Hand surgery became an established subspecialty between World Wars I and II. Prior to this time, hand injuries were cared for by various specialists-neurosurgeons, plastic surgeons, orthopedic surgeons, and general surgeons-each of whom would focus on their particular tissue within the hand. With the nearly 90,000 hand injuries sustained during World War II, military hospitals were created to deal solely with hand injuries, and hand specialists began to treat the hand as a single functional organ. This article briefly reviews the origin of the field and discusses current trends in hand surgery. PMID:22866498

  18. Anesthetic considerations for robotic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Recently, demand for minimally invasive surgery has increased greatly. As a result, robot-assisted techniques have gained in popularity, because they overcome several of the shortcomings of conventional laparoscopic techniques. However, robotic surgery may require innovations with regard to patient positioning and the overall arrangement of operative equipment and personnel, which may go against the conservative nature of anesthesia care. Anesthesiologists should become familiar with these changes by learning the basic features of robotic surgical systems to offer better anesthetic care and promote patient safety. PMID:24567806

  19. Percutaneous Surgery of the Forefoot.

    PubMed

    Redfern, David; Vernois, Joel; Legré, Barbara Piclet

    2015-07-01

    This article describes some of the common techniques used in percutaneous surgery of the forefoot. Techniques such as minimally invasive chevron Akin osteotomy for correction of hallux valgus, first metatarsophalangeal joint cheilectomy, distal minimally invasive metatarsal osteotomies, bunionette correction, and hammertoe correction are described. This article is an introduction to this rapidly developing area of foot and ankle surgery. Less invasive techniques are continually being developed across the whole spectrum of surgical specialties. The surgical ethos of minimizing soft-tissue disruption in the process of achieving surgical objectives remains at the center of this evolution. PMID:26117570

  20. Academic colorectal surgery job search.

    PubMed

    Kalady, Matthew F

    2014-06-01

    The field of academic colorectal surgery encompasses a vast array of possibilities. Clinical care accompanied by research, teaching, innovation, and/or administration provides the foundation for what is considered an academic career. For those choosing academic colorectal surgery, the process of finding and selecting a first job can provoke much angst. This article describes some strategies to approach the academic colorectal job search and provides insight into deciding a career focus, exploring relevant positions, weighing specific factors, and negotiating your first offer. PMID:25067918