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Sample records for rotator cuff surgery

  1. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... cuff are common. They include tendinitis, bursitis, and injuries such as tears. Rotator cuff tendons can become ... cuff depends on age, health, how severe the injury is, and how long you've had the ...

  2. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the

  3. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  4. Rotator cuff problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... painting and carpentry Poor posture over many years Aging Rotator cuff tears TEARS Rotator cuff tears may ... joint x-ray ( arthrogram ), the doctor injects contrast material (dye) into the shoulder joint. Then an x- ...

  5. Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of open and arthroscopic rotator cuff repair [the UK Rotator Cuff Surgery (UKUFF) randomised trial].

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Andrew J; Cooper, Cushla D; Campbell, Marion K; Rees, Jonathan L; Moser, Jane; Beard, David J; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Gray, Alastair; Dawson, Jill; Murphy, Jacqueline; Bruhn, Hanne; Cooper, David; Ramsay, Craig R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Uncertainty exists regarding the best management of patients with degenerative tears of the rotator cuff. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of arthroscopic and open rotator cuff repair in patients aged ≥ 50 years with degenerative rotator cuff tendon tears. DESIGN Two parallel-group randomised controlled trial. SETTING Nineteen teaching and district general hospitals in the UK. PARTICIPANTS Patients (n = 273) aged ≥ 50 years with degenerative rotator cuff tendon tears. INTERVENTIONS Arthroscopic surgery and open rotator cuff repair, with surgeons using their usual and preferred method of arthroscopic or open repair. Follow-up was by telephone questionnaire at 2 and 8 weeks after surgery and by postal questionnaire at 8, 12 and 24 months after randomisation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) at 24 months was the primary outcome measure. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of the shoulder was made at 12 months after surgery to assess the integrity of the repair. RESULTS The mean OSS improved from 26.3 [standard deviation (SD) 8.2] at baseline to 41.7 (SD 7.9) at 24 months for arthroscopic surgery and from 25.0 (SD 8.0) at baseline to 41.5 (SD 7.9) at 24 months for open surgery. When effect sizes are shown for the intervention, a negative sign indicates that an open procedure is favoured. For the intention-to-treat analysis, there was no statistical difference between the groups, the difference in OSS score at 24 months was -0.76 [95% confidence interval (CI) -2.75 to 1.22; p = 0.452] and the CI excluded the predetermined clinically important difference in the OSS of 3 points. There was also no statistical difference when the groups were compared per protocol (difference in OSS score -0.46, 95% CI -5.30 to 4.39; p = 0.854). The questionnaire response rate was > 86%. At 8 months, 77% of participants reported that shoulder problems were much or slightly better, and at 24 months this increased to 85%. There were no significant differences in mean cost between the arthroscopic group and the open repair group for any of the component resource-use categories, nor for the total follow-up costs at 24 months. The overall treatment cost at 2 years was £2567 (SD £176) for arthroscopic surgery and £2699 (SD £149) for open surgery, according to intention-to-treat analysis. For the per-protocol analysis there was a significant difference in total initial procedure-related costs between the arthroscopic group and the open repair group, with arthroscopic repair being more costly by £371 (95% CI £135 to £607). Total quality-adjusted life-years accrued at 24 months averaged 1.34 (SD 0.05) in the arthroscopic repair group and 1.35 (SD 0.05) in the open repair group, a non-significant difference of 0.01 (95% CI -0.11 to 0.10). The rate of re-tear was not significantly different across the randomised groups (46.4% and 38.6% for arthroscopic and open surgery, respectively). The participants with tears that were impossible to repair had the lowest OSSs, the participants with re-tears had slightly higher OSSs and the participants with healed repairs had the most improved OSSs. These findings were the same when analysed per protocol. CONCLUSION In patients aged > 50 years with a degenerative rotator cuff tear there is no difference in clinical effectiveness or cost-effectiveness between open repair and arthroscopic repair at 2 years for the primary outcome (OSS) and all other prespecified secondary outcomes. Future work should explore new methods to improve tendon healing and reduce the high rate of re-tears observed in this trial. TRIAL REGISTRATION Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN97804283. FUNDING This project was funded by the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment programme and will be published in full in Health Technology Assessment; Vol. 19, No. 80. See the NIHR Journals Library website for further project information. PMID:26463717

  6. A randomised controlled trial comparing continuous supraclavicular and interscalene brachial plexus blockade for open rotator cuff surgery.

    PubMed

    Koh, W U; Kim, H J; Park, H S; Choi, W J; Yang, H S; Ro, Y J

    2016-06-01

    Continuous interscalene block is an approved modality for postoperative pain control, but it may cause hemidiaphragmatic paresis. In this study we aimed to determine whether continuous supraclavicular block would provide postoperative analgesia comparable to that of continuous interscalene block and reduce the incidence of hemidiaphragmatic paresis. Patients scheduled for open rotator cuff repair were randomly allocated to receive continuous interscalene (n = 38) or supraclavicular block (n = 37). Both participants and assessing clinicians were blinded to the group allocation. The primary endpoint was the mean pain intensity 24 h after the surgery. Postoperative mean (SD) pain scores at 24 h were similar in the supraclavicular and interscalene groups (2.57 (1.71) vs 2.84 (1.75) respectively; p = 0.478). The incidence of complete or partial hemidiaphragmatic paresis was lower in the supraclavicular group at 1 h after admission to the postanaesthetic care unit and 24 h after the surgery [25 (68%) vs 38 (100%); p = 0.001 and 14 (38%) vs 27 (71%) respectively; p = 0.008]. Continuous supraclavicular block provided comparable analgesia compared with interscalene block with a reduced incidence of complete or partial hemidiaphragmatic paresis for 24 h following surgery. PMID:26954669

  7. Proximal Biceps Tendon and Rotator Cuff Tears.

    PubMed

    Virk, Mandeep S; Cole, Brian J

    2016-01-01

    The long head of biceps tendon (LHBT) is frequently involved in rotator cuff tears and can cause anterior shoulder pain. Tendon hypertrophy, hourglass contracture, delamination, tears, and tendon instability in the bicipital groove are common macroscopic pathologic findings affecting the LHBT in the presence of rotator cuff tears. Failure to address LHBT disorders in the setting of rotator cuff tear can result in persistent shoulder pain and poor satisfaction after rotator cuff repair. Tenotomy or tenodesis of the LHBT are effective options for relieving pain arising from the LHBT in the setting of reparable and selected irreparable rotator cuff tears. PMID:26614474

  8. Prevalence of rotator cuff tears in operative proximal humerus fractures.

    PubMed

    Choo, Andrew; Sobol, Garret; Maltenfort, Mitchell; Getz, Charles; Abboud, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Proximal humerus fractures and rotator cuff tears have been shown to have increasing rates with advancing age, theoretically leading to significant overlap in the 2 pathologies. The goal of this study was to examine the prevalence, associated factors, and effect on treatment of rotator cuff tears in surgically treated proximal humerus fractures. A retrospective review was performed of all patients who had surgery for a proximal humerus fracture from January 2007 to June 2012 in the shoulder department of a large academic institution. Patient demographics, the presence and management of rotator cuff tears, and surgical factors were recorded. Regression analysis was performed to determine which factors were associated with rotator cuff tears. This study reviewed 349 fractures in 345 patients. Of these, 30 (8.6%) had concomitant rotator cuff tears. Those with a rotator cuff tear were older (average age, 68.7 vs 63.1 years), were more likely to have had a dislocation (40% vs 12.5%), and were more likely to have undergone subsequent arthroscopic repair or reverse total shoulder arthroplasty than those without a rotator cuff tear. Most (22 of 30) were treated with suture repair at the time of surgery, but 5 patients underwent reverse total shoulder arthroplasty based primarily on the intraoperative finding of a significant rotator cuff tear. A concomitant rotator cuff tear in association with a proximal humerus fracture is relatively common. Rotator cuff tears are associated with older patients and those with a fracture-dislocation. In rare cases, these cases may require the availability of a reverse shoulder prosthesis. PMID:25361372

  9. Rotator cuff and subacromial pathology.

    PubMed

    Yablon, Corrie M; Jacobson, Jon A

    2015-07-01

    Both MRI and ultrasound (US) demonstrate equivalent accuracy in the evaluation of the rotator cuff. Both modalities have their advantages, disadvantages, and pitfalls. Radiography is an important complementary modality in that it can demonstrate occult sources of shoulder pain. MRI is recommended for the evaluation of shoulder pain in patients < 40 years of age because labral pathology is frequently identified. However, in patients > 40 years, US should be the first-line modality because the incidence of rotator cuff pathology increases with age. US is useful to guide procedures such as subacromial injection and calcific tendinosis lavage. Radiologists should be knowledgeable of both MRI and US of the shoulder to tailor these examinations to the specific needs of their patients. PMID:26021584

  10. [Diagnosis and treatment of rotator cuff tears].

    PubMed

    van der Zwaal, Peer; Pekelharing, Janneke F; Thomassen, Bregje J W; Swen, Jan-Willem A; van Arkel, Ewoud R A

    2011-01-01

    A rotator cuff tear is a highly prevalent disorder, occurring in 25% of people over 60 years of age. In two thirds of patients the tear is small and asymptomatic. Acute, symptomatic cuff tears may occur in active sportsmen and women aged 30-50. There is often a considerable delay in diagnosis in this group, due to a lack of recognition by either the patient or the doctor. Recently identified risk factors for the development of cuff tear are nicotine abuse, hypercholesterolaemia, contralateral cuff tear and genetic predisposition. Conservative treatment can be very successful and consists of physical therapy and effective analgesics. Repeated steroid injections are harmful to the tendinous tissue and should be avoided. The aim of surgery is anatomical reinsertion of the ruptured tendon using an open or arthroscopic procedure. The arthroscopic procedure enables the surgeon to perform a more extensive evaluation and treatment of the joint. The arthroscopic procedure is technically more demanding than the open procedure, but seems to have a shorter rehabilitation period. PMID:21871139

  11. Ruptures of the rotator cuff.

    PubMed Central

    Ha'eri, G B

    1980-01-01

    Through the use of improved diagnostic techniques, including arthrography and arthroscopy, ruptures of the rotator cuff that previously might not have been recognized are now being identified more frequently. In most cases the symptoms are relatively mild and respond satisfactorily to rest and therapy. Occasionally, however, there is severe, persistent disability despite treatment. These ruptures require surgical repair. In such cases the data obtained from special investigations help the surgeon select the appropriate surgical approach and repair technique. An imaginative program of physiotherapy before and after the operation contributes greatly to a satisfactory result. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 PMID:7437980

  12. Partial Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Matthewson, Graeme; Beach, Cara J.; Nelson, Atiba A.; Woodmass, Jarret M.; Ono, Yohei; Boorman, Richard S.; Lo, Ian K. Y.; Thornton, Gail M.

    2015-01-01

    Partial thickness rotator cuff tears are a common cause of pain in the adult shoulder. Despite their high prevalence, the diagnosis and treatment of partial thickness rotator cuff tears remains controversial. While recent studies have helped to elucidate the anatomy and natural history of disease progression, the optimal treatment, both nonoperative and operative, is unclear. Although the advent of arthroscopy has improved the accuracy of the diagnosis of partial thickness rotator cuff tears, the number of surgical techniques used to repair these tears has also increased. While multiple repair techniques have been described, there is currently no significant clinical evidence supporting more complex surgical techniques over standard rotator cuff repair. Further research is required to determine the clinical indications for surgical and nonsurgical management, when formal rotator cuff repair is specifically indicated and when biologic adjunctive therapy may be utilized. PMID:26171251

  13. Clinical Examination of the Rotator Cuff

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nitin B.; Wilcox, Reginald; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Higgins, Laurence D.

    2013-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are the leading cause of shoulder pain and shoulder-related disability accounting for 4.5 million physician visits in the United States annually. A careful history and structured physical examination are often sufficient for diagnosing rotator cuff disorders. We are not aware of a clinical review article that presents a structured physical examination protocol of the rotator cuff for the interested clinician. To fill this void, we present a physical examination protocol developed on the basis of review of prior literature and our clinical experience from dedicated shoulder practices. Our protocol includes range of motion testing using a goniometer, strength testing using a dynamometer, and select special tests. Among the many tests for rotator cuff disorders that have been described, we chose ones that have been more thoroughly assessed for sensitivity and specificity. This protocol can be used to isolate the specific rotator cuff tendon involved. The protocol can be typically completed in 15 minutes. We also discuss the clinical implications and limitations of the physical examination maneuvers described in our protocol. This protocol is thorough yet time-efficient for a busy clinical practice. It is useful in diagnosis of rotator cuff tears, impingement syndrome, and biceps pathology. PMID:23332909

  14. Analysis of Direct Costs of Outpatient Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Narvy, Steven J; Ahluwalia, Avtar; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery is one of the most commonly performed orthopedic surgical procedures. We conducted a study to calculate the direct cost of arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tears confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-eight shoulders in 26 patients (mean age, 54.5 years) underwent primary rotator cuff repair by a single fellowship-trained arthroscopic surgeon in the outpatient surgery center of a major academic medical center. All patients had interscalene blocks placed while in the preoperative holding area. Direct costs of this cycle of care were calculated using the time-driven activity-based costing algorithm. Mean time in operating room was 148 minutes; mean time in recovery was 105 minutes. Calculated surgical cost for this process cycle was $5904.21. Among material costs, suture anchor costs were the main cost driver. Preoperative bloodwork was obtained in 23 cases, adding a mean cost of $111.04. Our findings provide important preliminary information regarding the direct economic costs of rotator cuff surgery and may be useful to hospitals and surgery centers negotiating procedural reimbursement for the increased cost of repairing complex tears. PMID:26761928

  15. Nonoperative treatment of rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, R H; Dunlop, R

    1995-12-01

    In this study, 33 patients with full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff were given a supervised nonoperative program of rotator strengthening exercises and then were seen at followup an average of 3.8 years later. Of the 14 patients who were dissatisfied with nonoperative care, 12 eventually had opted for surgery and 2 were dissatisfied with their status at followup. In attempting to identify patients who would benefit from nonoperative care, the authors were unable to show that individual parameters such as rotator strength, symptom duration, or functional impairment were useful to predict outcome. However, it was found that those who have an insurance claim or who experience significant sleep loss due to shoulder pain are unlikely to be satisfied with nonoperative treatment. Patient satisfaction with nonoperative treatment is best correlated with improved pain relief, the ability to carry a 10- to 15-pound suitcase at one's side, the ability to use the arm at shoulder level, and the ability to eat using a utensil. Objective variables such as rotator strength and active motion are not correlated with ultimate patient satisfaction. PMID:7497666

  16. Rotator cuff tears: An evidence based approach.

    PubMed

    Sambandam, Senthil Nathan; Khanna, Vishesh; Gul, Arif; Mounasamy, Varatharaj

    2015-12-18

    Lesions of the rotator cuff (RC) are a common occurrence affecting millions of people across all parts of the globe. RC tears are also rampantly prevalent with an age-dependent increase in numbers. Other associated factors include a history of trauma, limb dominance, contralateral shoulder, smoking-status, hypercholesterolemia, posture and occupational dispositions. The challenge lies in early diagnosis since a high proportion of patients are asymptomatic. Pain and decreasing shoulder power and function should alert the heedful practitioner in recognizing promptly the onset or aggravation of existing RC tears. Partial-thickness tears (PTT) can be bursal-sided or articular-sided tears. Over the course of time, PTT enlarge and propagate into full-thickness tears (FTT) and develop distinct chronic pathological changes due to muscle retraction, fatty infiltration and muscle atrophy. These lead to a reduction in tendon elasticity and viability. Eventually, the glenohumeral joint experiences a series of degenerative alterations - cuff tear arthropathy. To avert this, a vigilant clinician must utilize and corroborate clinical skill and radiological findings to identify tear progression. Modern radio-diagnostic means of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging provide excellent visualization of structural details and are crucial in determining further course of action for these patients. Physical therapy along with activity modifications, anti-inflammatory and analgesic medications form the pillars of nonoperative treatment. Elderly patients with minimal functional demands can be managed conservatively and reassessed at frequent intervals. Regular monitoring helps in isolating patients who require surgical interventions. Early surgery should be considered in younger, active and symptomatic, healthy patients. In addition to being cost-effective, this helps in providing a functional shoulder with a stable cuff. An easily reproducible technique of maximal strength and sturdiness should by chosen among the armamentarium of the shoulder surgeon. Grade 1 PTTs do well with debridement while more severe lesions mandate repair either by trans-tendon technique or repair following conversion into FTT. Early repair of repairable FTT can avoid appearance and progression of disability and weakness. The choice of surgery varies from surgeon-to-surgeon with arthroscopy taking the lead in the current scenario. The double-row repairs have an edge over the single-row technique in some patients especially those with massive tears. Stronger, cost-effective and improved functional scores can be obtained by the former. Both early and delayed postoperative rehabilitation programmes have led to comparable outcomes. Guarded results may be anticipated in patients in extremes of age, presence of comorbidities and severe tear patters. Overall, satisfactory results are obtained with timely diagnosis and execution of the appropriate treatment modality. PMID:26716086

  17. Rotator cuff tears: An evidence based approach

    PubMed Central

    Sambandam, Senthil Nathan; Khanna, Vishesh; Gul, Arif; Mounasamy, Varatharaj

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the rotator cuff (RC) are a common occurrence affecting millions of people across all parts of the globe. RC tears are also rampantly prevalent with an age-dependent increase in numbers. Other associated factors include a history of trauma, limb dominance, contralateral shoulder, smoking-status, hypercholesterolemia, posture and occupational dispositions. The challenge lies in early diagnosis since a high proportion of patients are asymptomatic. Pain and decreasing shoulder power and function should alert the heedful practitioner in recognizing promptly the onset or aggravation of existing RC tears. Partial-thickness tears (PTT) can be bursal-sided or articular-sided tears. Over the course of time, PTT enlarge and propagate into full-thickness tears (FTT) and develop distinct chronic pathological changes due to muscle retraction, fatty infiltration and muscle atrophy. These lead to a reduction in tendon elasticity and viability. Eventually, the glenohumeral joint experiences a series of degenerative alterations - cuff tear arthropathy. To avert this, a vigilant clinician must utilize and corroborate clinical skill and radiological findings to identify tear progression. Modern radio-diagnostic means of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging provide excellent visualization of structural details and are crucial in determining further course of action for these patients. Physical therapy along with activity modifications, anti-inflammatory and analgesic medications form the pillars of nonoperative treatment. Elderly patients with minimal functional demands can be managed conservatively and reassessed at frequent intervals. Regular monitoring helps in isolating patients who require surgical interventions. Early surgery should be considered in younger, active and symptomatic, healthy patients. In addition to being cost-effective, this helps in providing a functional shoulder with a stable cuff. An easily reproducible technique of maximal strength and sturdiness should by chosen among the armamentarium of the shoulder surgeon. Grade 1 PTTs do well with debridement while more severe lesions mandate repair either by trans-tendon technique or repair following conversion into FTT. Early repair of repairable FTT can avoid appearance and progression of disability and weakness. The choice of surgery varies from surgeon-to-surgeon with arthroscopy taking the lead in the current scenario. The double-row repairs have an edge over the single-row technique in some patients especially those with massive tears. Stronger, cost-effective and improved functional scores can be obtained by the former. Both early and delayed postoperative rehabilitation programmes have led to comparable outcomes. Guarded results may be anticipated in patients in extremes of age, presence of comorbidities and severe tear patters. Overall, satisfactory results are obtained with timely diagnosis and execution of the appropriate treatment modality. PMID:26716086

  18. Rotator cuff tear measurement by arthropneumotomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kilcoyne, R.F.; Matsen, F.A. III

    1983-02-01

    Five years of experience with a method of shoulder arthrography using upright tomography in cases of suspected or known rotator cuff tears has demonstrated its effectiveness. The value of the procedure lies in its ability to demonstrate the size of the cuff tear and the thickness of the remaining cuff tissue. This information provides the surgeon with a preoperative estimate of the difficulty of the repair and the prognosis for a good functional recovery. In 33 cases, there was good correlation between the upright thin-section tomogram findings and the surgical results. The tomograms provided better information about the size of the tear and the quality of the remaining cuff than did plain arthrograms.

  19. Rotator Cerclage Technique for Partial Rotator Cuff Ruptures

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt, Murat; Firat, Ahmet; Gursoy, Safa; Akkaya, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of partial rotator cuff tears is gradually increasing because of the advancements in imaging methods and arthroscopy techniques. One of the repair techniques is repair of the partial rotator cuff tear by conversion to a full-thickness tear. Another technique, the transtendon technique, has some practical challenges and risks. We attempted to develop a practical and easy technique with low morbidity to repair partial tears called the rotator cerclage technique. PMID:26900559

  20. Proteoglycans of human rotator cuff tendons.

    PubMed

    Berenson, M C; Blevins, F T; Plaas, A H; Vogel, K G

    1996-07-01

    Rotator cuff and biceps tendons that appeared grossly normal were procured from adult cadavers without a history of shoulder problems. These tendons were analyzed for the amount and type of glycosaminoglycan, type of proteoglycan, and histology. When compared with the distal/tensional region of biceps tendon, the glycosaminoglycan content of supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and subscapularis tendons was 2.5-fold higher and the glycosaminoglycan content of the proximal/compressed region of biceps tendon was 3-fold higher. The ratio of hyaluronic acid to chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate in all three cuff tendons was approximately 1. Rotator cuff tendons contained large proteoglycan similar to aggrecan, as demonstrated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel migration elution from Sepharose CL-4B, and content of both chondroitin sulfate and keratan sulfate chains. Both decorin and biglycan were also present, as demonstrated by migration in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and core protein immunoreactivity. In contrast decorin was the only proteoglycan prominent in distal/tensional regions of biceps tendon. Histological analysis showed layers of loosely organized alcian blue-stained material running between the longitudinal collagen fiber bundles. The proteoglycan content of rotator cuff tendons was similar to fibrocartilage in tendons that have been subjected to compressive loads in situ. This suggests that cells of normal adult rotator cuff tendons have adapted to loads distinct from pure tension. However, the histological organization did not resemble mature fibrocartilage. The increased amount of proteoglycan in rotator cuff tendons may serve to separate and lubricate collagen bundles as they move relative to each other during normal shoulder motion. PMID:8764859

  1. Muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration after an acute rotator cuff repair in a sheep model

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Tammy; Liu, Xuhui; Easley, Jeremiah T.; Ravishankar, Bharat; Puttlitz, Christian; Feeley, Brian T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Introduction rotator cuff tears (RCTs) are the most common tendon injury seen in orthopedic patients. Muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration of the muscle are crucial factors that dictate the outcome following rotator cuff surgery. Though less studied in humans, rotator cuff muscle fibrosis has been seen in animal models as well and may influence outcomes as well. The purpose of this study was to determine if the rotator cuff would develop muscle changes even in the setting of an acute repair in a sheep model. We hypothesized that fatty infiltration and fibrosis would be present even after an acute repair six months after initial surgery. Methods twelve female adult sheep underwent an acute rotator cuff tear and immediate repair on the right shoulder. The left shoulder served as a control and did not undergo a tear or a repair. Six months following acute rotator cuff repairs, sheep muscles were harvested to study atrophy, fatty infiltration, and fibrosis by histological analysis, western blotting, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results the repair group demonstrated an increase expression of muscle atrophy, fatty infiltration, and fibrosis related genes. Significantly increased adipocytes, muscle fatty infiltration, and collagen deposition was observed in rotator cuff muscles in the tendon repair group compared to the control group. Conclusions rotator cuff muscle undergoes degradation changes including fatty infiltration and fibrosis even after the tendons are repair immediately after rupture. Level of Evidence Basic Science Study. PMID:26261789

  2. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in elite rugby players

    PubMed Central

    Tambe, Amol; Badge, Ravi; Funk, Lennard

    2009-01-01

    Background Rugby is an increasingly popular collision sport. A wide spectrum of injuries can be sustained during training and match play. Rotator cuff injury is uncommon in contact sports and there is little published literature on the treatment of rotator cuff tears in rugby players. Aims We therefore reviewed the results and functional outcomes of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in elite rugby players. Materials and Methods Eleven professional rugby players underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair at our hospital over a 2-year period. We collected data on these patients from the operative records. The patients were recalled for outcome scoring and ultrasound scans. Results There were seven rugby league players and four rugby union players, including six internationals. Their mean age was 25.7 years. All had had a traumatic episode during match play and could not return to the game after the injury. The mean time to surgery was 5 weeks. The mean width of the cuff tear was 1.8 cm. All were full- thickness cuff tears. Associated injuries included two Bankart lesions, one bony Bankart lesion, one posterior labral tear, and two 360° labral tears. The biceps was involved in three cases. Two were debrided and a tenodesis was performed in one. Repair was with suture anchors. Following surgery, all patients underwent a supervised accelerated rehabilitation programme. The final follow-up was at 18 months (range: 6–31 months) post surgery. The Constant scores improved from 44 preoperatively to 99 at the last follow-up. The mean score at 3 months was 95. The Oxford shoulder score improved from 34 to 12, with the mean third month score being 18. The mean time taken to return to full match play at the preinjury level was 4.8 months. There were no complications in any of the patients and postoperative scans in nine patients confirmed that the repairs had healed. Conclusion We conclude that full-thickness rotator cuff tears in the contact athlete can be addressed successfully by arthroscopic repair, with a rapid return to preinjury status. PMID:20616950

  3. Regenerative Medicine in Rotator Cuff Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Randelli, Pietro; Ragone, Vincenza; Menon, Alessandra; Cabitza, Paolo; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Rotator cuff injuries are a common source of shoulder pathology and result in an important decrease in quality of patient life. Given the frequency of these injuries, as well as the relatively poor result of surgical intervention, it is not surprising that new and innovative strategies like tissue engineering have become more appealing. Tissue-engineering strategies involve the use of cells and/or bioactive factors to promote tendon regeneration via natural processes. The ability of numerous growth factors to affect tendon healing has been extensively analyzed in vitro and in animal models, showing promising results. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a whole blood fraction which contains several growth factors. Controlled clinical studies using different autologous PRP formulations have provided controversial results. However, favourable structural healing rates have been observed for surgical repair of small and medium rotator cuff tears. Cell-based approaches have also been suggested to enhance tendon healing. Bone marrow is a well known source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Recently, ex vivo human studies have isolated and cultured distinct populations of MSCs from rotator cuff tendons, long head of the biceps tendon, subacromial bursa, and glenohumeral synovia. Stem cells therapies represent a novel frontier in the management of rotator cuff disease that required further basic and clinical research. PMID:25184132

  4. Management of failed rotator cuff repair: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lädermann, Alexandre; Denard, Patrick J; Burkhart, Stephen S

    2016-01-01

    Importance Recurrent tear after rotator cuff repair (RCR) is common. Conservative, and open and arthroscopic revisions, have been advocated to treat these failures. Aim or objective The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the different options for managing recurrent rotator cuff tears. Evidence review A search was conducted of level I through 4 studies from January 2000 to October 2015, to identify studies reporting on failed RCR. 10 articles were identified. The overall quality of evidence was very low. Findings Mid-term to long-term follow-up of patients treated conservatively revealed acceptable results; a persistent defect is a well-tolerated condition that only occasionally requires subsequent surgery. Conservative treatment might be indicated in most patients, particularly in case of posterosuperior involvement and poor preoperative range of motion. Revision surgery might be indicated in a young patient with a repairable lesion, a 3 tendon tear, and in those with involvement of the subscapularis. Conclusions and relevance The current review indicates that arthroscopic revision RCR can lead to improvement in functional outcome despite a high retear rate. Further studies are needed to develop specific rehabilitation in the case of primary rotator cuff failure, to better understand the place of each treatment option, and, in case of repair, to optimise tendon healing. PMID:27134759

  5. I.S.Mu.L.T - Rotator Cuff Tears Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Francesco; Piccirilli, Eleonora; Bossa, Michela; Via, Alessio Giai; Colombo, Alessandra; Chillemi, Claudio; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Pellicciari, Leonardo; Franceschetti, Edoardo; Rugiero, Clelia; Scialdoni, Alessandro; Vittadini, Filippo; Brancaccio, Paola; Creta, Domenico; Buono, Angelo Del; Garofalo, Raffaele; Franceschi, Francesco; Frizziero, Antonio; Mahmoud, Asmaa; Merolla, Giovanni; Nicoletti, Simone; Spoliti, Marco; Osti, Leonardo; Padulo, Johnny; Portinaro, Nicola; Tajana, Gianfranco; Castagna, Alex; Foti, Calogero; Masiero, Stefano; Porcellini, Giuseppe; Tarantino, Umberto; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high level achieved in the field of shoulder surgery, a global consensus on rotator cuff tears management is lacking. This work is divided into two main sessions: in the first, we set questions about hot topics involved in the rotator cuff tears, from the etiopathogenesis to the surgical treatment. In the second, we answered these questions by mentioning Evidence Based Medicine. The aim of the present work is to provide easily accessible guidelines: they could be considered as recommendations for a good clinical practice developed through a process of systematic review of the literature and expert opinion, in order to improve the quality of care and rationalize the use of resources. PMID:26958532

  6. I.S.Mu.L.T - Rotator Cuff Tears Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Francesco; Piccirilli, Eleonora; Bossa, Michela; Via, Alessio Giai; Colombo, Alessandra; Chillemi, Claudio; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Pellicciari, Leonardo; Franceschetti, Edoardo; Rugiero, Clelia; Scialdoni, Alessandro; Vittadini, Filippo; Brancaccio, Paola; Creta, Domenico; Buono, Angelo Del; Garofalo, Raffaele; Franceschi, Francesco; Frizziero, Antonio; Mahmoud, Asmaa; Merolla, Giovanni; Nicoletti, Simone; Spoliti, Marco; Osti, Leonardo; Padulo, Johnny; Portinaro, Nicola; Tajana, Gianfranco; Castagna, Alex; Foti, Calogero; Masiero, Stefano; Porcellini, Giuseppe; Tarantino, Umberto; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high level achieved in the field of shoulder surgery, a global consensus on rotator cuff tears management is lacking. This work is divided into two main sessions: in the first, we set questions about hot topics involved in the rotator cuff tears, from the etiopathogenesis to the surgical treatment. In the second, we answered these questions by mentioning Evidence Based Medicine. The aim of the present work is to provide easily accessible guidelines: they could be considered as recommendations for a good clinical practice developed through a process of systematic review of the literature and expert opinion, in order to improve the quality of care and rationalize the use of resources. PMID:26958532

  7. Glenohumeral interposition of rotator cuff stumps: a rare complication of traumatic rotator cuff tear*

    PubMed Central

    Agnollitto, Paulo Moraes; Chu, Marcio Wen King; Lorenzato, Mario Muller; Zatiti, Salomão Chade Assan; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique

    2016-01-01

    The present report describes a case where typical findings of traumatic glenohumeral interposition of rotator cuff stumps were surgically confirmed. This condition is a rare complication of shoulder trauma. Generally, it occurs in high-energy trauma, frequently in association with glenohumeral joint dislocation. Radiography demonstrated increased joint space, internal rotation of the humerus and coracoid process fracture. In addition to the mentioned findings, magnetic resonance imaging showed massive rotator cuff tear with interposition of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus and subscapularis stumps within the glenohumeral joint. Surgical treatment was performed confirming the injury and the rotator cuff stumps interposition. It is important that radiologists and orthopedic surgeons become familiar with this entity which, because of its rarity, might be neglected in cases of shoulder trauma. PMID:26929462

  8. Glenohumeral interposition of rotator cuff stumps: a rare complication of traumatic rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Agnollitto, Paulo Moraes; Chu, Marcio Wen King; Lorenzato, Mario Muller; Zatiti, Salomão Chade Assan; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique

    2016-01-01

    The present report describes a case where typical findings of traumatic glenohumeral interposition of rotator cuff stumps were surgically confirmed. This condition is a rare complication of shoulder trauma. Generally, it occurs in high-energy trauma, frequently in association with glenohumeral joint dislocation. Radiography demonstrated increased joint space, internal rotation of the humerus and coracoid process fracture. In addition to the mentioned findings, magnetic resonance imaging showed massive rotator cuff tear with interposition of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus and subscapularis stumps within the glenohumeral joint. Surgical treatment was performed confirming the injury and the rotator cuff stumps interposition. It is important that radiologists and orthopedic surgeons become familiar with this entity which, because of its rarity, might be neglected in cases of shoulder trauma. PMID:26929462

  9. Evaluation of Internet Information About Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Kevin A; Codella, Stephen; Ciccotti, Michael G; Kane, Patrick W; Duncan, Ian C; Cohen, Steven B

    2016-01-01

    The content and quality of Internet websites are not governed or regulated. Therefore, patients who consult the Internet may receive outdated or incorrect medical information. Researchers have analyzed the quality of web information about various orthopedic surgeries, but no such analysis has been performed on websites covering rotator cuff repair. We conducted a study to evaluate and analyze rotator cuff repair information available to the general public through the Internet; to assess changes in the quality of information over time; to determine if sites sponsored by academic institutions offered higher-quality information; and to assess whether the readability of the material varied according to DISCERN scores. Two Internet searches were conducted, in 2011 and 2014. The 3 most commonly used search engines were used to search for rotator cuff repair. The first 50 websites from each search engine were evaluated for authorship and content. The DISCERN instrument was used to analyze the quality of each website's health information. The 2011 search revealed 21% of websites were associated with an academic institution, 38% were authored by a hospital or physician group, and 11.5% were industry-sponsored. The 2014 search revealed a similar distribution of contributors. The highest DISCERN scores were given to academic institution websites (51.6) and public education websites (49). There was no correlation between readability and DISCERN scores. Websites associated with academic institutions produced the highest-quality medical information. Over the past few years, authorship and content have changed little with respect to Internet information about rotator cuff repair. PMID:26991581

  10. The Burden of Craft in Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Where Have We Been and Where We Are Going.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Stephen S

    2015-08-01

    The rather turbulent history of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair went through stages of innovation, conflict, disruption, assimilation, and transformation that might be anticipated when a new and advanced technology (arthroscopic cuff repair) displaces an entrenched but outdated discipline (open cuff repair). The transition from open to arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has been a major paradigm shift that has greatly benefited patients. However, this technical evolution/revolution has also imposed a higher "burden of craft" on the practitioners of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Technological advancements in surgery demand that surgeons accept this burden of craft and master the advanced technology for the benefit of their patients. This article outlines the author's involvement in the development of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, and it also explores the surgeon's obligation to accept the burden of craft that is imposed by this discipline. PMID:26251931

  11. Biologically based strategies to augment rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Schaer, M.; Schober, M.; Berger, S.; Boileau, P.; Zumstein, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Lesions of the rotator cuff (RC) are among the most frequent tendon injuries. In spite of the developments in both open and arthroscopic surgery, RC repair still very often fails. In order to reduce the failure rate after surgery, several experimental in vitro and in vivo therapy methods have been developed for biological improvement of the reinsertion. This article provides an overview of the current evidence for augmentation of RC reconstruction with growth factors. Furthermore, potential future therapeutic approaches are discussed. We performed a comprehensive search of the PubMed database using various combinations of the keywords “tendon,” “rotator cuff,” “augmentation,” “growth factor,” “platelet-rich fibrin,” and “platelet-rich plasma” for publications up to 2011. Given the linguistic capabilities of the research team, we considered publications in English, German, French, and Spanish. We excluded literature reviews, case reports, and letters to the editor. PMID:22787334

  12. Calcific Tendinitis of the Rotator Cuff: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kachewar, Sushil G; Kulkarni, Devidas S

    2013-01-01

    Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff is a common disorder; its underlying mechanism still remains unknown. Although details of the clinical presentation(s) and pathological changes which are associated with calcific tendinitis are available, conservative management of this condition remains a topic of debate. About 90% of the patients can be treated non – operatively, but as some are resistant to conservative treatment; newer techniques or surgery should be indicated. Rheumatologists and radiologists have often described this shoulder abnormality, leading to its progressive differentiation from other painful shoulder syndromes. The conservative treatment includes the use of non – steroidal anti – inflammatory agents, roentegen therapy, physical modalities for controlling the pain and for preventing loss of joint mobility, local steroid injections, and open or arthroscopic surgeries. Results of non – operative treatments have also been satisfactory. These include heat, cold, range of motion and pendulum exercises, diathermy, short – wave, and radiation therapy. Rest, immobilization with a sling, and oral non – steroidal and steroid anti – inflammatory medications have also been mentioned. This review aimed at looking at calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff with a wide vision in the light of modern advances; while at the same time, not disregarding the past experiences. PMID:23998102

  13. Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff: a review.

    PubMed

    Kachewar, Sushil G; Kulkarni, Devidas S

    2013-07-01

    Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff is a common disorder; its underlying mechanism still remains unknown. Although details of the clinical presentation(s) and pathological changes which are associated with calcific tendinitis are available, conservative management of this condition remains a topic of debate. About 90% of the patients can be treated non - operatively, but as some are resistant to conservative treatment; newer techniques or surgery should be indicated. Rheumatologists and radiologists have often described this shoulder abnormality, leading to its progressive differentiation from other painful shoulder syndromes. The conservative treatment includes the use of non - steroidal anti - inflammatory agents, roentegen therapy, physical modalities for controlling the pain and for preventing loss of joint mobility, local steroid injections, and open or arthroscopic surgeries. Results of non - operative treatments have also been satisfactory. These include heat, cold, range of motion and pendulum exercises, diathermy, short - wave, and radiation therapy. Rest, immobilization with a sling, and oral non - steroidal and steroid anti - inflammatory medications have also been mentioned. This review aimed at looking at calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff with a wide vision in the light of modern advances; while at the same time, not disregarding the past experiences. PMID:23998102

  14. Rotator Cuff and Shoulder Conditioning Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cuff and Shoulder Conditioning Program Stretching Exercises 1. Pendulum_________________________________________________________________________ Repetitions Main muscles worked: Deltoids, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis ...

  15. Management of disorders of the rotator cuff: proceedings of the ISAKOS upper extremity committee consensus meeting.

    PubMed

    Arce, Guillermo; Bak, Klaus; Bain, Gregory; Calvo, Emilio; Ejnisman, Benno; Di Giacomo, Giovanni; Gutierrez, Vicente; Guttmann, Dan; Itoi, Eiji; Ben Kibler, W; Ludvigsen, Tom; Mazzocca, Augustus; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Savoie, Felix; Sugaya, Hiroyuki; Uribe, John; Vergara, Francisco; Willems, Jaap; Yoo, Yon Sik; McNeil, John W; Provencher, Matthew T

    2013-11-01

    The goal of this article is to consolidate the International Society of Arthroscopy, Knee Surgery & Orthopaedic Sports Medicine (ISAKOS) Upper Extremity Committee's (UEC's) current knowledge on rotator cuff disease and management, as well as highlight key unresolved issues. The rotator cuff is an anatomically complex structure important for providing glenohumeral function and stability as part of a closed chain system. Current consensus suggests rotator cuff injuries are most accurately diagnosed, at levels similar to diagnosis by magnetic resonance imaging, with a combination of cuff- and impingement-specific clinical tests. Updates in the understanding of acromion morphology, the insertional anatomy of the rotator cuff, and the role of suprascapular nerve release may require changes to current classification systems and surgical strategies. Although initial management focuses on nonoperative protocols, discussion continues on whether surgery for isolated impingement is clinically more beneficial than rehabilitation. However, clear indications have yet to be established for the use of single- versus double-row repair because evidence confirms neither is clinically efficacious than the other. Biceps tenodesis, however, in non-isolated cuff tears has proven more successful in addressing the etiology of shoulder pain and yields improved outcomes over tenotomy. Data reviewing the benefits of tendon transfers, shoulder prostheses, and mechanical scaffolds, as well as new research on the potential benefit of platelet-rich plasma, pluripotential stem cells, and gene therapies, will also be presented. PMID:24041864

  16. Imaging algorithms for evaluating suspected rotator cuff disease: Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound consensus conference statement.

    PubMed

    Nazarian, Levon N; Jacobson, Jon A; Benson, Carol B; Bancroft, Laura W; Bedi, Asheesh; McShane, John M; Miller, Theodore T; Parker, Laurence; Smith, Jay; Steinbach, Lynne S; Teefey, Sharlene A; Thiele, Ralf G; Tuite, Michael J; Wise, James N; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2013-05-01

    The Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound convened a panel of specialists from a variety of medical disciplines to reach a consensus about the recommended imaging evaluation of painful shoulders with clinically suspected rotator cuff disease. The panel met in Chicago, Ill, on October 18 and 19, 2011, and created this consensus statement regarding the roles of radiography, ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR arthrography. The consensus panel consisted of two co-moderators, a facilitator, a statistician and health care economist, and 10 physicians who have specialty expertise in shoulder pain evaluation and/or treatment. Of the 13 physicians on the panel, nine were radiologists who were chosen to represent a broad range of skill sets in diagnostic imaging, different practice types (private and academic), and different geographical regions of the United States. Five of the radiologists routinely performed musculoskeletal US as part of their practice and four did not. There was also one representative from each of the following clinical specialties: rheumatology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, orthopedic surgery, and nonoperative sports medicine. The goal of this conference was to construct several algorithms with which to guide the imaging evaluation of suspected rotator cuff disease in patients with a native rotator cuff, patients with a repaired rotator cuff, and patients who have undergone shoulder replacement. The panel hopes that these recommendations will lead to greater uniformity in rotator cuff imaging and more cost-effective care for patients suspected of having rotator cuff abnormality. PMID:23401583

  17. Management of Rotator Cuff and Impingement Injuries in the Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Gerald R.; Kelley, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To review current concepts of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of rotator cuff and impingement injuries in the athlete. Data Sources: The information we present was compiled from a review of classic and recently published material regarding rotator cuff and impingement injuries. These materials were identified through a search of a personal literature database compiled by the authors, as well as by selective searching of the MEDLINE. In addition, much of the information presented represents observations and opinions of the authors developed over 8 to 10 years of treating shoulder injuries in athletes. Data Synthesis: Biomechanics of the normal shoulder and pathophysiology of rotator cuff injuries in the athletic population are discussed, followed by a summary of the important diagnostic features of rotator cuff and impingement injuries. The principles of rehabilitation are extensively presented, along with indications and important technical aspects of selected surgical procedures. General principles and specific protocols of postoperative rehabilitation are also summarized. Conclusions/Recommendations: Rotator cuff and impingement injuries in the athletic population are multifactorial in etiology, exhibiting significant overlap with glenohumeral instability. Nonoperative treatment is successful in most athletic patients with rotator cuff and impingement injuries. When nonoperative treatment fails, arthroscopic surgical techniques such as rotator cuff repair and subacromial decompression may be successful in returning the athlete to competition. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 12.Figure 13. PMID:16558644

  18. Living with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear ‘bad days, bad nights’: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain. There is an absence of information about symptomatic rotator cuffs from the patients’ perspective; this limits the information clinicians can share with patients and the information that patients can access via sources such as the internet. This study describes the experiences of people with a symptomatic rotator cuff, their symptoms, the impact upon their daily lives and the coping strategies utilised by study participants. Methods An interpretive phenomenological analysis approach was used. 20 participants of the UKUFF trial (The United Kingdom Rotator Cuff Surgery Trial) agreed to participate in in-depth semi-structured interviews about their experiences about living with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear. Interviews were digitally recorded and fully transcribed. Field notes, memos and a reflexive diary were used. Data was coded in accordance with interpretive phenomenological analysis. Peer review, code-recode audits and constant comparison of data, codes and categories occurred throughout. Results The majority of patients described intense pain and severely disturbed sleep. Limited movement and reduced muscle strength were described by some participants. The predominantly adverse impact that a symptomatic rotator cuff tear had upon activities of daily living, leisure activities and occupation was described. The emotional and financial impact and impact upon caring roles were detailed. Coping strategies included attempting to carry on as normally as possible, accepting their condition, using their other arm, using analgesics, aids and adaptions. Conclusions Clinicians need to appreciate and understand the intensity and shocking nature of pain that may be experienced by participants with known rotator cuff tears and understand the detrimental impact tears can have upon all areas of patient’s lives. Clinicians also need to be aware of the potential emotional impact caused by cuff tears and to ensure that patients needing help for conditions such as depression are speedily identified and provided with support, explanation and appropriate treatment. PMID:25008095

  19. Rotator Cuff Damage: Reexamining the Causes and Treatments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Heyward L.

    1988-01-01

    Sports medicine specialists are beginning to reexamine the causes and treatments of rotator cuff problems, questioning the role of primary impingement in a deficient or torn cuff and trying new surgical procedures as alternatives to the traditional open acromioplasty. (Author/CB)

  20. Rotator Cuff Deficient Arthritis of the Glenohumeral Joint

    PubMed Central

    Macaulay, Alec A.; Greiwe, R. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Rotator cuff deficient arthritis of the glenohumeral joint, especially cuff tear arthropathy, has proved a challenging clinical entity for orthopaedic surgeons ever since Charles Neer originally detailed the problem in 1983. Understanding has improved regarding the pathophysiology and pathomechanics underlying cuff tear arthropathy. Surgical reconstruction options can lead to excellent outcomes for patients afflicted with these painful and functionally limited shoulders. Humeral hemiarthroplasty and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty have jumped to the forefront in the treatment of cuff tear arthropathy. As studies continue to look at the results of these procedures in cuff tear arthropathy, existing indications and treatment algorithms will be further refined. In this article the history and pathophysiology of cuff tear arthropathy are reviewed. Additionally, the clinical findings and results of surgical reconstruction are discussed. PMID:21119934

  1. Intense focused ultrasound stimulation of the rotator cuff: evaluation of the source of pain in rotator cuff tears and tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Gellhorn, Alfred C; Gillenwater, Cody; Mourad, Pierre D

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this preliminary study was to evaluate the ability of individual 0.1-s long pulses of intense focused ultrasound (iFU) emitted with a carrier frequency of 2 MHz to evoke diagnostic sensations when applied to patients whose shoulders have rotator cuff tears or tendinopathy. Patients were adults with painful shoulders and clinical and imaging findings consistent with rotator cuff disease. iFU stimulation of the shoulder was performed using B-mode ultrasound coupled with a focused ultrasound transducer that allowed image-guided delivery of precisely localized pulses of energy to different anatomic areas around the rotator cuff. The main outcome measure was iFU spatial average-temporal average intensity (I_SATA), and location required to elicit sensation. In control patients, iFU produced no sensation throughout the range of stimulation intensities (≤2000 W/cm(2) I_SATA). In patients with rotator cuff disease, iFU was able to induce sensation in the tendons of the rotator cuff, the subacromial bursa, and the subchondral bone in patients with chronic shoulder pain and rotator cuff disease, with an average ± standard deviation intensity equaling 680 ± 281 W/cm(2) I_SATA. This result suggests a primary role for these tissues in the pathogenesis of shoulder pain related to rotator cuff tendinopathy. PMID:26058842

  2. Current evidence for effectiveness of interventions to treat rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Huisstede, Bionka M A; Koes, Bart W; Gebremariam, Lukas; Keijsers, Ellen; Verhaar, Jan A N

    2011-06-01

    In this systematic review we assessed effectiveness of non-surgical and (post)surgical interventions for symptomatic rotator cuff tears (RotCuffTear). The Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, Cinahl, and Pedro were searched for relevant systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Two reviewers independently selected relevant studies, extracted data and assessed the methodological quality. Three Cochrane reviews (7 RCTs) and 14 RCTs were included (3 non-surgery, 10 surgery, 8 post-surgery). For small or medium RotCufftears, moderate evidence was found in favour of surgery versus physiotherapy in mid- and long-term. In surgery, tendon-to-bone fixation with one metal suture anchor loaded with double sutures (TB) was more effective (moderate evidence) than a side-to-side repair with permanent sutures (SS) in the mid- and long-term; limited evidence for effectiveness was found in favour of debridement versus anchor replacement and suture repair of the type II SLAP tear in the long-term. Further, no evidence was found in favour of any non-surgical, surgical or post-surgical intervention. In conclusion, although surgery seems to give better results compared to non-surgery and TB is more effective than SS in rotator cuff repair (RCR), it remains hard to draw firm evidence-based conclusions for effectiveness of non-surgical or (post)surgical interventions to treat RotCuffTears. More research is clearly needed. PMID:21146445

  3. Augmentation of Rotator Cuff Repair With Soft Tissue Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Thangarajah, Tanujan; Pendegrass, Catherine J.; Shahbazi, Shirin; Lambert, Simon; Alexander, Susan; Blunn, Gordon W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Tears of the rotator cuff are one of the most common tendon disorders. Treatment often includes surgical repair, but the rate of failure to gain or maintain healing has been reported to be as high as 94%. This has been substantially attributed to the inadequate capacity of tendon to heal once damaged, particularly to bone at the enthesis. A number of strategies have been developed to improve tendon-bone healing, tendon-tendon healing, and tendon regeneration. Scaffolds have received considerable attention for replacement, reconstruction, or reinforcement of tendon defects but may not possess situation-specific or durable mechanical and biological characteristics. Purpose To provide an overview of the biology of tendon-bone healing and the current scaffolds used to augment rotator cuff repairs. Study Design Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods A preliminary literature search of MEDLINE and Embase databases was performed using the terms rotator cuff scaffolds, rotator cuff augmentation, allografts for rotator cuff repair, xenografts for rotator cuff repair, and synthetic grafts for rotator cuff repair. Results The search identified 438 unique articles. Of these, 214 articles were irrelevant to the topic and were therefore excluded. This left a total of 224 studies that were suitable for analysis. Conclusion A number of novel biomaterials have been developed into biologically and mechanically favorable scaffolds. Few clinical trials have examined their effect on tendon-bone healing in well-designed, long-term follow-up studies with appropriate control groups. While there is still considerable work to be done before scaffolds are introduced into routine clinical practice, there does appear to be a clear indication for their use as an interpositional graft for large and massive retracted rotator cuff tears and when repairing a poor-quality degenerative tendon. PMID:26665095

  4. Improved apparatus for predictive diagnosis of rotator cuff disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, Anup; Hall, Brittany N.; Thigpen, Charles A.; Kwartowitz, David M.

    2014-03-01

    Rotator cuff disease impacts over 50% of the population over 60, with reports of incidence being as high as 90% within this population, causing pain and possible loss of function. The rotator cuff is composed of muscles and tendons that work in tandem to support the shoulder. Heavy use of these muscles can lead to rotator cuff tear, with the most common causes is age-related degeneration or sport injuries, both being a function of overuse. Tears ranges in severity from partial thickness tear to total rupture. Diagnostic techniques are based on physical assessment, detailed patient history, and medical imaging; primarily X-ray, MRI and ultrasonography are the chosen modalities for assessment. The final treatment technique and imaging modality; however, is chosen by the clinician is at their discretion. Ultrasound has been shown to have good accuracy for identification and measurement of full-thickness and partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. In this study, we report on the progress and improvement of our method of transduction and analysis of in situ measurement of rotator cuff biomechanics. We have improved the ability of the clinician to apply a uniform force to the underlying musculotendentious tissues while simultaneously obtaining the ultrasound image. This measurement protocol combined with region of interest (ROI) based image processing will help in developing a predictive diagnostic model for treatment of rotator cuff disease and help the clinicians choose the best treatment technique.

  5. Complicated acromioclavicular joint cyst with massive rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chul-Hyun

    2014-02-01

    An acromioclavicular (AC) joint cyst is an unusual presentation of full-thickness rotator cuff tears in patients with degenerative changes of the AC joint. It is important to understand the relationship between AC joint cysts and rotator cuff tears because there is a high recurrence rate if the cyst is treated without addressing the rotator cuff tear. Furthermore, recurrence or draining sinus caused by failure to treat the cyst may lead to infection. To our knowledge, there have been no reports of infected AC joint cyst as a serious complication. We present 2 cases involving an infected AC joint cyst with a massive rotator cuff tear caused by simple cyst excision. When patients have an AC joint cyst, physicians should consider the following points: (1) There is the possibility of an underlying rotator cuff tear, (2) Surgical treatment is indicated for a symptomatic cyst, (3) Aspiration and simple cyst excision are not recommended, because of the potential for postoperative complications such as recurrence, a draining sinus, and infection, and (4) Lateral clavicle resection should be performed if there is an irreparable rotator cuff tear. PMID:24551863

  6. EXERCISE REHABILITATION IN THE NON-OPERATIVE MANAGEMENT OF ROTATOR CUFF TEARS: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Peter; Ebert, Jay; Joss, Brendan; Bhabra, Gev; Ackland, Tim; Wang, Allan

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of rotator cuff tears increases with age, with full-thickness rotator cuff tears present in approximately 25% of individuals in their sixties, and more than 50% of those in their eighties. While surgery is considered an effective treatment, recurrent tears at the insertion site are common, especially with degenerative tears, which are frequent in the older population. More recently, there has been increasing interest in exercise rehabilitation and physical therapy as a means to manage partial and full thickness tears of the rotator cuff by addressing weakness and functional deficits. Recent studies have suggested that patients opting for physical therapy have demonstrated high satisfaction, an improvement in function, and success in avoiding surgery. When considering the increasing rate of shoulder surgery and the associated economic and social burden rotator cuff surgery places on both the patient and the health care system, non-surgical management such as physical therapy and exercise may, in selected cases, be a treatment alternative to surgical repair. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to provide an overview of rotator cuff pathology and pathogenesis, and to present an evidence-based case for the role of conservative rehabilitation in the management of rotator cuff injuries. Level of Evidence Level 5 PMID:27104061

  7. Progression from calcifying tendinitis to rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Masafumi; Higuchi, Fujio; Suzuki, Ritsu; Yamanaka, Kensuke

    2003-02-01

    This report documents the clinical, radiographic and histologic findings in a 46-year-old man with calcifying tendinitis in his left shoulder which progressed to rotator cuff tear. The patient had a 1-year history of repeated calcifying tendinitis before being referred to our hospital. On the initial visit, radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed calcium deposition localized in the supraspinatus tendon without apparent tear. Three months after the first visit, MRI revealed a partial-thickness rotator cuff tear at the site of calcium deposition. Surgical and histologic findings demonstrated that calcium deposition was the cause of cuff rupture. To our knowledge, based on a review of the English literature, this is the first case report in which the progression from calcifying tendinitis to rotator cuff tear has been serially observed. PMID:12589487

  8. Tendon transfer for irreparable rotator cuff tears: indications and surgical rationale

    PubMed Central

    Merolla, Giovanni; Chillemi, Claudio; Franceschini, Vincenzo; Cerciello, Simone; Ippolito, Giorgio; Paladini, Paolo; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: treatment of symptomatic irreparable rotator cuff tears is extremely challenging because, at present, there are no ideal solutions to this problem. Many patients respond favorably to nonsurgical treatment. However, when conservative measures fail to improve the patient’s pain and disability, surgery should be considered. Methods: different surgical techniques are available and the choice of the most appropriate procedure depends on the presenting symptoms, age of the patient, functional demand, medical comorbidities, joint stability and presence of arthritic changes. The transposition of the surrounding muscles to replace the rotator cuff function represents a viable option in the treatment of younger patients without glenohumeral osteoarthritis and with severe functional limitation. Purpose: aim of this study is to give an overview of the currently available evidence regarding tendon transfer procedures for irreparable rotator cuff tears. PMID:25767779

  9. Biceps Lesion Associated With Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ho Yeon; Kim, Jung Youn; Cho, Nam Su; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various tenodesis methods are being used for long head of the biceps tendon lesions. However, there is no consensus on the most appropriate surgical method. Hypothesis: There are significant differences in incidence of cosmetic deformity and persistent bicipital pain between open subpectoral and arthroscopic intracuff tenodesis groups. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: This study included 72 patients who underwent biceps tenodesis and rotator cuff repair between January 2009 and May 2014 and who were followed for at least 1 year. Open subpectoral tenodesis was performed in 39 patients (group A), and arthroscopic intracuff tenodesis was performed in 33 patients (group B). Results: In group A, the mean visual analog scale (VAS) score for pain during motion and mean University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and Constant scores significantly improved from 4.6, 18.6, and 64.5 preoperatively to 1.9, 30.5, and 86.5 at last follow-up, respectively (P < .001 for all). In group B, these scores significantly improved from 5.1, 17.6, and 62.9 preoperatively to 1.8, 31.5, and 85.9 at last follow-up, respectively (P < .001 for all). Popeye deformity was noted in 2 (5.2%) patients from group A and 5 (15.6%) patients from group B (P = .231). Additionally, persistent bicipital tenderness was noted in 1 (2.6%) patient from group A and 8 (24.2%) patients from group B (P = .012). Conclusion: Both open subpectoral tenodesis and arthroscopic intracuff tenodesis show good clinical outcomes for long head of the biceps tendon lesions. However, open subpectoral tenodesis may be more appropriate, considering the low incidence of Popeye deformity and tenderness. PMID:27231699

  10. Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff

    PubMed Central

    ElShewy, Mohamed Taha

    2016-01-01

    Calcific tendinitis within the rotator cuff tendon is a common shoulder disorder that should be differentiated from dystrophic calcification as the pathogenesis and natural history of both is totally different. Calcific tendinitis usually occurs in the fifth and sixth decades of life among sedentary workers. It is classified into formative and resorptive phases. The chronic formative phase results from transient hypoxia that is commonly associated with repeated microtrauma causing calcium deposition into the matrix vesicles within the chondrocytes forming bone foci that later coalesce. This phase may extend from 1 to 6 years, and is usually asymptomatic. The resorptive phase extends from 3 wk up to 6 mo with vascularization at the periphery of the calcium deposits causing macrophage and mononuclear giant cell infiltration, together with fibroblast formation leading to an aggressive inflammatory reaction with inflammatory cell accumulation, excessive edema and rise of the intra-tendineous pressure. This results in a severely painful shoulder. Radiological investigations confirm the diagnosis and suggest the phase of the condition and are used to follow its progression. Although routine conventional X-ray allows detection of the deposits, magnetic resonance imaging studies allow better evaluation of any coexisting pathology. Various methods of treatment have been suggested. The appropriate method should be individualized for each patient. Conservative treatment includes pain killers and physiotherapy, or “minimally invasive” techniques as needling or puncture and aspiration. It is almost always successful since the natural history of the condition ends with resorption of the deposits and complete relief of pain. Due to the intolerable pain of the acute and severely painful resorptive stage, the patient often demands any sort of operative intervention. In such case arthroscopic removal is the best option as complete removal of the deposits is unnecessary. PMID:26807357

  11. Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    ElShewy, Mohamed Taha

    2016-01-18

    Calcific tendinitis within the rotator cuff tendon is a common shoulder disorder that should be differentiated from dystrophic calcification as the pathogenesis and natural history of both is totally different. Calcific tendinitis usually occurs in the fifth and sixth decades of life among sedentary workers. It is classified into formative and resorptive phases. The chronic formative phase results from transient hypoxia that is commonly associated with repeated microtrauma causing calcium deposition into the matrix vesicles within the chondrocytes forming bone foci that later coalesce. This phase may extend from 1 to 6 years, and is usually asymptomatic. The resorptive phase extends from 3 wk up to 6 mo with vascularization at the periphery of the calcium deposits causing macrophage and mononuclear giant cell infiltration, together with fibroblast formation leading to an aggressive inflammatory reaction with inflammatory cell accumulation, excessive edema and rise of the intra-tendineous pressure. This results in a severely painful shoulder. Radiological investigations confirm the diagnosis and suggest the phase of the condition and are used to follow its progression. Although routine conventional X-ray allows detection of the deposits, magnetic resonance imaging studies allow better evaluation of any coexisting pathology. Various methods of treatment have been suggested. The appropriate method should be individualized for each patient. Conservative treatment includes pain killers and physiotherapy, or "minimally invasive" techniques as needling or puncture and aspiration. It is almost always successful since the natural history of the condition ends with resorption of the deposits and complete relief of pain. Due to the intolerable pain of the acute and severely painful resorptive stage, the patient often demands any sort of operative intervention. In such case arthroscopic removal is the best option as complete removal of the deposits is unnecessary. PMID:26807357

  12. Arthroscopic Transosseous Rotator Cuff Repair: Technical Note, Outcomes, and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Black, Eric M.; Lin, Albert; Srikumaran, Uma; Jain, Nitin; Freehill, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to review the authors’ initial experience with arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair. Thirty-one patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears underwent arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair over a 15-month period. Preoperatively, demographics and subjective scores were recorded. Postoperatively, pain levels, subjective shoulder values, satisfaction scores, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores, complications, and reoperations were noted with a minimum 2-year follow-up. The relationships between pre- and intraoperative variables and outcome scores were determined with univariate analysis. Average patient age was 56 years, and 23 patients (74%) were men. Twenty patients (65%) underwent primary rotator cuff repair, and 11 patients (35%) underwent revision repair. Average time to follow-up was 26 months. Average preoperative pain level and subjective shoulder value were 5.1 of 10 and 35%, respectively. Average postoperative scores included pain level of 0.9 of 10, subjective shoulder value of 84%, satisfaction score of 90.6 of 100, and ASES score of 86.3 of 100. There were 3 (9.7%) major and 2 (6%) minor complications. Patients undergoing revision rotator cuff repair had significantly worse outcomes (pain level, subjective shoulder value, ASES score; P<.05) compared with those undergoing primary repair, and cortical augmentation did not significantly affect outcome. Overall, outcomes after arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair are good, although patients undergoing revision repair do not have the same outcomes as those undergoing primary cuff repair. The procedure is not without complications (9.7% major, 6% minor complications). Cortical augmentation may be used to supplement fixation, although it does not necessarily affect outcomes. Patients without such augmentation may be at increased risk for suture cutout through the bone. PMID:25970360

  13. Biocompatibility of a polymer patch for rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Cole, Brian J; Gomoll, Andreas H; Yanke, Adam; Pylawka, Tamara; Lewis, Paul; Macgillivray, John D; Williams, James M

    2007-05-01

    Both mechanical and biological factors influence the high re-tear rate after rotator cuff repair. Mechanical factors have largely been addressed by the introduction of better implants and modification of suture configuration, but further improvements are needed to address the often poor tissue quality of the degenerated rotator cuff tendons. Current biological solutions provide only short-term reinforcement and have been associated with pseudo-infectious reactions. This pre-clinical animal study investigates the biological response to a novel polycarbonate polyurethane patch used for tissue augmentation in a rat rotator cuff repair model. Bilateral defects were created in the supraspinatus tendons of 12 Sprague Dawley rats. One side was repaired with a patch as a tissue augmentation device. The contralateral side acted as internal control without patch augmentation. After 6 weeks the tissues were harvested and underwent histologic and histomorphometric analyses. Histological evaluation demonstrated no inflammatory reaction; histomorphometry revealed tissue ingrowth of 79.9%. In conclusion, the polycarbonate polyurethane patch for tissue extension or augmentation in rotator cuff repair has demonstrated no inflammatory response and excellent tissue integration in a rat rotator cuff repair model. PMID:16964514

  14. Imaging Algorithms for Evaluating Suspected Rotator Cuff Disease: Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound Consensus Conference Statement

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Jon A.; Benson, Carol B.; Bancroft, Laura W.; Bedi, Asheesh; McShane, John M.; Miller, Theodore T.; Parker, Laurence; Smith, Jay; Steinbach, Lynne S.; Teefey, Sharlene A.; Thiele, Ralf G.; Tuite, Michael J.; Wise, James N.; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound convened a panel of specialists from a variety of medical disciplines to reach a consensus about the recommended imaging evaluation of painful shoulders with clinically suspected rotator cuff disease. The panel met in Chicago, Ill, on October 18 and 19, 2011, and created this consensus statement regarding the roles of radiography, ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR arthrography. The consensus panel consisted of two co-moderators, a facilitator, a statistician and health care economist, and 10 physicians who have specialty expertise in shoulder pain evaluation and/or treatment. Of the 13 physicians on the panel, nine were radiologists who were chosen to represent a broad range of skill sets in diagnostic imaging, different practice types (private and academic), and different geographical regions of the United States. Five of the radiologists routinely performed musculoskeletal US as part of their practice and four did not. There was also one representative from each of the following clinical specialties: rheumatology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, orthopedic surgery, and nonoperative sports medicine. The goal of this conference was to construct several algorithms with which to guide the imaging evaluation of suspected rotator cuff disease in patients with a native rotator cuff, patients with a repaired rotator cuff, and patients who have undergone shoulder replacement. The panel hopes that these recommendations will lead to greater uniformity in rotator cuff imaging and more cost-effective care for patients suspected of having rotator cuff abnormality. © RSNA, 2013 PMID:23401583

  15. [Rotator cuff avulsion fractures : Current concepts in the surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Pauly, S; Scheibel, M

    2016-02-01

    Rotator cuff avulsion fractures represent rare lesions in younger individuals and are caused by different trauma mechanisms. The present article outlines current concepts regarding diagnosis, indications, and surgical approaches to the treatment of greater and lesser tuberosity fractures, as discussed in the international literature. Modified arthroscopic double-row rotator cuff repair techniques allow for the anatomical reduction and retention of fragments and the treatment of concomitant intra-articular lesions at the same time. Moreover, the article provides practical hints on different surgical repair techniques, their respective limitations and results from the literature. PMID:26754657

  16. Degenerative rotator cuff tear in an elderly athlete: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Mohsen

    1999-01-01

    The incidence of rotator cuff tear increases with age. Degenerative rotator cuff tears are commonly seen in athletes above 40 years. These athletes are commonly involved in overhead activities. Repetitive microtrauma is a more important factor in rotator cuff degeneration than acute trauma. Conservative treatment is the mainstay treatment for these injuries. A case report of an elderly athlete who sailed competitively is presented. The clinical and radiographic presentations, management and rehabilitation of degenerative rotator cuff tears are discussed. ImagesFigure 1

  17. Glenoid loosening in total shoulder arthroplasty. Association with rotator cuff deficiency.

    PubMed

    Franklin, J L; Barrett, W P; Jackins, S E; Matsen, F A

    1988-01-01

    Seven cases of total shoulder arthroplasty exhibiting major glenoid radiolucent lines or actual translation of the glenoid component were evaluated to identify factors associated with glenoid loosening. The average time from arthroplasty was 30 months (range, 14-44 months). Six of the patients had severe, incompletely reconstructable rotator cuff tears present at the time of surgery, and one patient developed a cuff tear within 1 year of surgery. The amount of superior migration of the humeral component was closely correlated with the degree of glenoid loosening. With superior displacement of the humeral component, superior tipping of the glenoid component was observed: a "rocking horse" glenoid. For comparison, a contemporary group of 16 consecutive total shoulder arthroplasty patients with intact rotator cuffs were reviewed. The control group had no glenoid loosening an average of 5 years after operation. Upward riding of the prosthetic humeral head in patients with rotator cuff deficiency may contribute to loosening of the glenoid component in total shoulder arthroplasty. PMID:3361319

  18. Do Outcomes Differ after Rotator Cuff Repair for Patients Receiving Workers’ Compensation?

    PubMed Central

    Balyk, R.; Luciak-Corea, C.; Otto, D.; Baysal, D.

    2008-01-01

    Comparisons of outcomes after rotator cuff repair between Worker’s Compensation Board (WCB) recipients and nonrecipients generally do not consider patient, injury, and shoulder characteristics. We compared preoperative differences between WCB recipients and nonrecipients and determined the impact on their 6-month postoperative outcome. We evaluated a prospective cohort of 141 patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears, 36 of whom (26%) were WCB recipients, preoperatively and 3 and 6 months after rotator cuff repair. Their mean age was 54.0 ± 10.4 years (standard deviation) and 102 (72%) patients were male. Shoulder range of motion, Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC) index, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons’ score were used to evaluate outcomes. We performed regression analyses to control for baseline differences in age, baseline scores, smoking status, symptom duration, injury type, and associated biceps disorder between WCB recipients and nonrecipients. WCB recipients were younger and more likely to smoke, have a traumatic injury, and undergo surgery within 6 months of injury. WCB recipients had lower recovery for all outcomes when these differences were not considered but when differences were accounted for, only 6-month WORC scores were lower in WCB recipients. Clinicians should consider preoperative characteristics before concluding WCB recipients experience less recovery after surgical repair. Level of Evidence: Level I, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18784971

  19. Anatomical Considerations of the Suprascapular Nerve in Rotator Cuff Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Tom, James A.; Shah, Mitesh P.; Lee, Dan J.; Cerynik, Douglas L.; Amin, Nirav H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. When using the double interval slide technique for arthroscopic repair of chronic large or massive rotator cuff tears, the posterior interval release is directed toward the scapular spine until the fat pad that protects the suprascapular nerve is reached. Injury to the suprascapular nerve can occur due to the nerve's proximity to the operative field. This study aimed to identify safe margins for avoiding injury to the suprascapular nerve. Materials and Methods. For 20 shoulders in ten cadavers, the distance was measured from the suprascapular notch to the glenoid rim, the articular margin of the rotator cuff footprint, and the lateral border of the acromion. Results. From the suprascapular notch, the suprascapular nerve coursed an average of 3.42 cm to the glenoid rim, 5.34 cm to the articular margin of the rotator cuff footprint, and 6.09 cm to the lateral border of the acromion. Conclusions. The results of this study define a safe zone, using anatomic landmarks, to help surgeons avoid iatrogenic injury to the suprascapular nerve when employing the double interval slide technique in arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff. PMID:24724030

  20. Functional evaluation of patient after arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tear

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rohit; Jadhav, Umesh

    2014-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff tear is a common problem either after trauma or after degenerative tear in old age group. Arthroscopic repair is the current concept of rotator cuff repair. Here, we are trying to evaluate the functional outcome after arthroscopic repair of full thickness rotator cuff tear (single row) in Indian population. Materials and methods Twenty five patients (14 males and 11 females) who underwent arthroscopic repair of full thickness rotator cuff tear at a single institution were included in the study. Postoperatively patient's shoulder was rated according to UCLA score, pain was graded according to the visual analog score. The range of motion was analysed and documented. Results The mean age of the patients were 50.48 years. The preoperative VAS score mode was 7 and post operative VAS was 1 (p value <0.001). The UCLA grading was good in 80% (n = 20), fair in 12% (n = 3), excellent in 8% (n = 2) and poor results were seen in none of the patients. The mean UCLA improved from a score of 15.84 to 30.28 with a p value <0.001. Mean postoperative forward flexion was 161.6°, mean abduction was 147.6° and mean external rotation was 45.4°. Conclusion Arthroscopic repair is a good procedure for full thickness rotator cuff tear with minimal complications. The newer double row repair claims to be biomechanically superior with faster healing rates without functional advantages, hence we used a single row repair considering the Indian population and the cost effectiveness of the surgery with good to excellent results. PMID:25983476

  1. Early rehabilitation affects functional outcomes and activities of daily living after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shimo, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuta; Tokiyoshi, Akinari; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The effect of early rehabilitation protocols after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is currently unknown. We examined short-term effects of early rehabilitation on functional outcomes and activities of daily living after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. [Subject and Methods] An 82-year-old male fell during a walk, resulting in a supraspinatus tear. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was performed using a single-row technique. He wore an abduction brace for 6 weeks after surgery. [Results] From day 1 after surgery, passive range of motion exercises, including forward flexion and internal and external rotation were performed twice per day. Starting at 6 weeks after surgery, active range of motion exercises and muscle strengthening exercises were introduced gradually. At 6 weeks after surgery, his active forward flexion was 150°, UCLA shoulder rating scale score was 34 points, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire disability/symptom score was 36 points. At 20 weeks after surgery, his active forward flexion was 120°, UCLA shoulder rating scale score was 34 points, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire disability/symptom score was 0 points. [Conclusion] These protocols are recommended to physical therapists during rehabilitation for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair to support rapid reintegration into activities of daily living. PMID:27064886

  2. Early rehabilitation affects functional outcomes and activities of daily living after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Shimo, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuta; Tokiyoshi, Akinari; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The effect of early rehabilitation protocols after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is currently unknown. We examined short-term effects of early rehabilitation on functional outcomes and activities of daily living after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. [Subject and Methods] An 82-year-old male fell during a walk, resulting in a supraspinatus tear. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was performed using a single-row technique. He wore an abduction brace for 6 weeks after surgery. [Results] From day 1 after surgery, passive range of motion exercises, including forward flexion and internal and external rotation were performed twice per day. Starting at 6 weeks after surgery, active range of motion exercises and muscle strengthening exercises were introduced gradually. At 6 weeks after surgery, his active forward flexion was 150°, UCLA shoulder rating scale score was 34 points, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire disability/symptom score was 36 points. At 20 weeks after surgery, his active forward flexion was 120°, UCLA shoulder rating scale score was 34 points, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire disability/symptom score was 0 points. [Conclusion] These protocols are recommended to physical therapists during rehabilitation for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair to support rapid reintegration into activities of daily living. PMID:27064886

  3. RESULTS OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF DENERATIVE ARTHROPATHY OF THE ROTATOR CUFF USING HEMIARTHROPLASTY- CTA®

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Rômulo Brasil; Ribeiro, Fabiano Rebouças; Tenor, Antonio Carlos; Filho, Cantidio Salvador Filardi; da Costa, Guilherme Barbieri Leme; Storti, Thiago Medeiros; da Costa Garcia, André; Lutfi, Hilton Vargas

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess results of CTA® partial shoulder arthroplasty for treatment of degenerative arthropathy of the rotator cuff. Methods: Between December 2006 and June 2009, 23 shoulders of 23 patients were submitted to CTA® type partial shoulder arthroplasty for treatment of arthropathy secondary to rotator cuff injury. Post-operative follow up time ranged from 6 to 35 months. Mean age was 74.1 years. Patients were predominantly female, representing 78.3% of cases. The right limb was affected in 18 patients. All patients had undergone at least 6 months of physiotherapy without improvement of the algetic picture, and being submitted to surgery by the same surgical team. None of the patients had history of surgery on the affected shoulder. The method elected for assessing patients during post-operative follow up was based on UCLA scoring criteria. Results: Improvement in pain was observed in all patients after arthroplasty. Mean UCLA pain score was 9.22 (ranging from 10 to 8). Mean function was 6 (10 to 2). Active frontal flexion was 2.39 (highest score 4 and lowest 0). Mean frontal flexion force was 4.09, maximum was 5 and minimum 3. Mean score on the UCLA was 26.52. 95% were satisfied with the surgery. Conclusion: CTA® type partial shoulder arthroplasty produced satisfactory results in the treatment of degenerative arthropathy of the rotator cuff and had a low rate of complications. PMID:27028431

  4. COMPREHENSIVE STRENGTH TRAINING PROGRAM FOR A RECREATIONAL SENIOR GOLFER 11-MONTHS AFTER A ROTATOR CUFF REPAIR

    PubMed Central

    Meira, Erik P.; En Gilpin, Hui; Brunette, Meredith

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Golf is a popular sport played by hundreds of thousands of individuals of all ages and of varying skill levels. An orthopedic or sports-related injury and/or surgery may limit an individual's sport participation, require him/her to complete a course of rehabilitation, and initiate (or resume) a sport-specific training program. Unlike the availability of evidence to guide postsurgical rehabilitation and sport-specific training of athletes from sports other than golf, there have only been two reports describing outcomes after surgery and for golfers. The purpose of this case report is to present a post-rehabilitation return to sport-training program for a recreational golfer 11-months after a rotator cuff repair. Case Description: The subject, a 67-year old female, injured her right shoulder requiring a rotator cuff repair 11-months prior to her participation in a golf fitness training program. The subject participated in six training sessions over seven week period consisting of general strengthening exercises (including exercises for the rotator cuff), exercises for the core, plyometrics, and power exercises. Outcomes: The subject made improvements in power and muscular endurance of the core. She was able to resume golf at the completion of the training program. Discussion: The subject was able to make functional improvements and return to golf after participation in a comprehensive strength program. Additional studies are necessary to improve program design for golfers who wish to return to sport after shoulder surgery. PMID:22163096

  5. EVALUATION OF THE RESULTS FROM REOPERATIONS ON PATIENTS WITH ROTATOR CUFF LESIONS

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Santos, Ruy Mesquita Maranhão; de Souza, Adriano; Estelles, José Renato Depari; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the results from open or arthroscopic surgical treatment on patients with symptomatic recurrence of rotator cuff injuries. Methods: Between December 1990 and July 2007, 30 patients were assessed and underwent reoperation performed by the Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Group of the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Fernandinho Simonsen Wing, Santa Casa de São Paulo, because of dehiscence of the rotator cuff suture. The study included patients with symptomatic recurrence of the injury and with at least 24 months of postoperative follow-up. Results: According to the UCLA evaluation criteria, 21 patients (70%) showed excellent or good outcomes; and nine patients (30%) showed fair or poor outcomes. Conclusion: Open or arthroscopic surgical treatment of recurrent rotator cuff injuries tended to present worse results than from the primary repair. In this study, we found that 70% of the results were excellent and good. The presence of extensive injuries in the reoperation tended to evolve with larger numbers of unsatisfactory results. In our study, we obtained better results from arthroscopic surgery than from open surgery.

  6. Midterm clinical outcomes following arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Flanagin, Brody A.; Garofalo, Raffaele; Lo, Eddie Y.; Feher, LeeAnne; Castagna, Alessandro; Qin, Huanying; Krishnan, Sumant G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Arthroscopic transosseous (TO) rotator cuff repair has recently emerged as a new option for surgical treatment of symptomatic rotator cuff tears. Limited data is available regarding outcomes using this technique. This study evaluated midterm clinical outcomes following a novel arthroscopic TO (anchorless) rotator cuff repair technique. Materials and Methods: A consecutive series of 107 patients and 109 shoulders underwent arthroscopic TO (anchorless) rotator cuff repair for a symptomatic full-thickness tear. Pre and postoperative range of motion (ROM) was compared at an average of 11.8 months. Postoperative outcome scores were obtained at an average of 38.0 months. Statistical analysis was performed to compare pre and postoperative ROM data. Univariate analysis was performed using Student's t-test to compare the effect of other clinical characteristics on final outcome. Results: Statistically significant improvements were noted in forward flexion, external rotation and internal rotation (P < 0.0001). Average postoperative subjective shoulder value was 93.7, simple shoulder test 11.6, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score 94.6. According to ASES scores, results for the 109 shoulders available for final follow-up were excellent in 95 (87.1%), good in 8 (7.3%), fair in 3 (2.8%), and poor in 3 (2.8%). There was no difference in ROM or outcome scores in patients who underwent a concomitant biceps procedure (tenodesis or tenotomy) compared with those who did not. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in outcome between patients who underwent either biceps tenodesis or tenotomy. Age, history of injury preceding the onset of pain, tear size, number of TO tunnels required to perform the repair, and presence of fatty infiltration did not correlate with postoperative ROM or subjective outcome measures at final follow-up. Two complications and four failures were noted. Conclusions: Arthroscopic TO rotator cuff repair technique leads to statistically significant midterm improvement in ROM and satisfactory midterm subjective outcome scores with low complication/failure rates in patients with average medium-sized rotator cuff tears with minimal fatty infiltration. Further work is required to evaluate radiographic healing rates with this technique and to compare outcomes following suture anchor repair. Level of Evidence: Level IV PMID:26980983

  7. Conservative management of rotator cuff tears: literature review and proposal for a prognostic. Prediction Score

    PubMed Central

    Merolla, Giovanni; Paladini, Paolo; Saporito, Marco; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Summary Rotator cuff tears are a common cause of pain and shoulder dysfunction. The prevalence of the rotator cuff tears increases with the age reaching the 80% in patients aged more than 80 year. Symptomatic shoulders usually are initially treated conservatively and then, in case of poor outcomes, with surgery. Different parameters are still used to decide between the conservative or surgical treatment in patients with rotator cuff tears. Aim of the current study is to characterize the various features used in decision making and to validate a “Prediction Score” that let us know which patients could have a good and stable outcome with non operative treatment. We enrolled 60 patients (mean age 52 years) with symptomatic rotator cuff tears who were assigned to conservative treatment and were evaluated at 6,9 and 12 months follow-up. We developed a score based on 18 clinical and radiographic parameters. 27 patients (“non conservative”) (45%) with a mean prediction score of 16.1 ± 1.7 interrupted the conservative treatment, while 33 patients (“conservative”) (55%) with an average prediction score of 11.3 ± 1.8 remained conservatively treated at last follow-up. The conservative patients were 14 years older than non conservative patients. According to the results of this study we identified a value of 13 points as a “cut-off” score to predict good results by conservative management of rotator cuff tear. These outcomes support the assumption that a predictive prognostic score may guarantee a rational approach in the management of subjects with RC tears, especially in elderly who continue to have the higher rate of recurrence and therefore could be well treated with standard conservative therapies. PMID:23738239

  8. EXTENSIVE ROTATOR CUFF INJURIES: AN EVALUATION OF ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OUTCOMES

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; Silva, Luciana Andrade; Eduardo, Cesar Moreira Mariz Pinto Rodrigo Tormin Ortiz; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    To assess the outcomes of the surgical treatment of extensive rotator cuff injuries through arthroscopy. Methods: Between June 1998 and October 2006, 61 patients with extensive rotator cuff injuries and submitted to surgical arthroscopy technique by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Santa Casa de Misericórdia Medical School were reassessed. The study included all patients with at least two tendons affected or with retraction at least on two tendons up to the glenoidal cavity edge and with at least 12 months of follow-up. Results: According to UCLA's evaluation criteria, 54 (89%) patients showed excellent or good outcomes; no fair outcome in none of the patients; and seven (11%) poor outcomes. A satisfaction rate of 92% was reported. Postoperative joint motion went from a mean lifting value of 93° to 141°, the mean lateral rotation went from 32° to 48° and the mean medial rotation went from L1 to T10. These differences were regarded as statistically significant. Conclusion: The arthroscopic repair of extensive rotator cuff injuries leads to satisfactory outcomes for most of the patients, with a high satisfaction degree.

  9. Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Using the Undersurface Technique

    PubMed Central

    Rubenis, Imants; Lam, Patrick H.; Murrell, George A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has traditionally been performed in the subacromial space from the bursal side of the tendon. The undersurface rotator cuff repair technique involves the arthroscope remaining in the glenohumeral joint, thus viewing the tendon from its undersurface during repair without a bursectomy or acromioplasty. Purpose: To compare the clinical and structural outcomes of undersurface rotator cuff repair with bursal-side repair. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data was conducted on 2 cohorts of patients who had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with knotless suture anchors configured in a single-row formation using inverted mattress–style sutures from either the bursal side (n = 100) or undersurface (n = 165) of the supraspinatus tendon. Data were collected preoperatively, intraoperatively, and at 1 week, 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 2 years postoperatively. At each time point, patients completed a modified L’Insalata questionnaire to assess patient-ranked pain scores and were clinically examined using standardized tests. Ultrasound examination was performed at 6 months and 2 years to assess the integrity of the repair. Results: At 2 years postoperatively, patients in both cohorts had significantly less pain and less difficulty with overhead activities compared with preoperative levels (P < .001). The type of repair performed (bursal or undersurface) did not affect the ability to perform overhead activities at 2 years. At 2 years, both groups also had similar retear rates (21% for bursal side, 23% for undersurface). The mean operative time for the arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was 32 minutes when performed from the bursal side and 20 minutes when performed from the undersurface (P < .001). Conclusion: Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, whether performed from the subacromial space or glenohumeral joint, resulted in decreased levels of pain and difficulty with overhead activities at 2 years. The major difference between the 2 techniques was operative time, with the undersurface technique being performed significantly faster than the bursal-side repair technique. PMID:26535375

  10. COMPARISON OF COMPLEMENTARY EXAMS IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF ROTATOR CUFF INJURIES

    PubMed Central

    El-Kouba, Gabriel; Andreas Huber, Thomas; Freitas, José Renato Wilke; Steglich, Valdir; Ayzemberg, Henrique; Santos, Adriano M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of simple radiography, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing rotator cuff injuries, comparing their findings with open or arthroscopic surgery findings. Methods: Protocols of the Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Service for patients undergoing surgical treatment for rotator cuff injuries diagnosed by means of radiography, ultrasound and/or MRI between 2002 and 2007 were evaluated. Based on the data gathered, we analyzed the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of these complementary examinations, compared with the findings during the surgical procedures. Results: This study included 147 patients with a mean age of 46.09 years. All the patients had undergone a radiography examination, 101 had undergone ultrasound examination and 72 had undergone MRI. We found sensitivity of 13.8%, specificity of 2.6% and accuracy of 30% with radiography; sensitivity of 57.6%, specificity of 29.6% and accuracy of 51.4% with ultrasound; and sensitivity of 86.6%, specificity of 22.2% and accuracy of 63.3% with MRI. Conclusion: Radiography was found to be a specific examination when the mirror sign was present. MRI and ultrasound were shown to be reliable methods with high accuracy for diagnosing rotator cuff injuries. PMID:27022589

  11. Shoulder muscle forces during driving: Sudden steering can load the rotator cuff beyond its repair limit

    PubMed Central

    Pandis, Petros; Prinold, Joe A.I.; Bull, Anthony M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Driving is one of the most common everyday tasks and the rotator cuff muscles are the primary shoulder stabilisers. Muscle forces during driving are not currently known, yet knowledge of these would influence important clinical advice such as return to activities after surgery. The aim of this study is to quantify shoulder and rotator cuff muscle forces during driving in different postures. Methods A musculoskeletal modelling approach is taken, using a modified driving simulator in combination with an upper limb musculoskeletal model (UK National Shoulder Model). Motion data and external force vectors were model inputs and upper limb muscle and joint forces were the outputs. Findings Comparisons of the predicted glenohumeral joint forces were compared to in vivo literature values, with good agreement demonstrated (61 SD 8% body weight mean peak compared to 60 SD 1% body weight mean peak). High muscle activation was predicted in the rotator cuff muscles; particularly supraspinatus (mean 55% of the maximum and up to 164 SD 27 N). This level of loading is up to 72% of mean failure strength for supraspinatus repairs, and could therefore be dangerous for some cases. Statistically significant and large differences are shown to exist in the joint and muscle forces for different driving positions as well as steering with one or both hands (up to 46% body weight glenohumeral joint force). Interpretation These conclusions should be a key consideration in rehabilitating the shoulder after surgery, preventing specific upper limb injuries and predicting return to driving recommendations. PMID:26139549

  12. Shoulder Impingement/Rotator Cuff Tendinitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone (humerus), your shoulder blade (scapula), and your collarbone (clavicle). Your arm is kept in your shoulder socket ... of surgery. These can include arthritis between the clavicle (collarbone) and the acromion (acromioclavicular arthritis), inflammation of ...

  13. Rotator Cuff Tears: Surgical Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... three repair methods the same for pain relief, strength improvement, and overall satisfaction. Open Repair A traditional ... physical therapy program will help you regain shoulder strength and motion. Immobilization A er surgery, therapy progresses ...

  14. Arthroscopic management of recalcitrant stiffness following rotator cuff repair: A retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Sanjeev; Mather, Richard C; Hsu, Andrew R; Ferry, Amon T; Romeo, Anthony A; Nicholson, Gregory P; Cole, Brian J; Verma, Nikhil N

    2013-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff repair surgery is one of the most commonly performed procedures in the world but limited literature exists for guidance of optimal management of post-operative arthrofibrosis following cuff repair. The purpose of this study is to report the results of arthroscopic capsular release, lysis of adhesions, manipulation under anesthesia, and aggressive physical therapy in patients with recalcitrant postoperative stiffness after rotator cuff repair. Materials and Methods: Twenty-nine patients who had recalcitrant arthrofibrosis following either an arthroscopic (62%), open (28%), or mini-open (10%) rotator cuff repair were included in study. The average age at the time of index cuff repair surgery was 49.8 years (range 24−70 years). Sixteen patients (55%) were involved in worker's compensation claims. The mean time from the date of index operation to lysis of adhesions was 9.7 months (range 4.2−36.2 months), and the mean time from lysis of adhesion to most recent follow-up 18.2 months (range 4.1−43.7 months). Post-operative evaluation was performed using American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Score (ASES), Visual Analog Score (VAS), Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE), and Simple Shoulder Test (SST) on 18 (62%), while range of motion (ROM), dynamometer strength testing, and Constant-Murley Scoring were performed on 13 (45%). Statistical analysis was performed using a Student's t-test. Results: Prior to arthroscopic lysis of adhesions, mean forward active elevation (FE) was 103.8°, (range 60-145° (SD 26.3) and external rotation at the side (ERS) was 25.3°, (range 5-70° SD 15.1°). Post-operatively, at the most recent follow-up, FE was significantly improved to 158.3°, (range 110−180° SD 22.3°), and ERS improved to 58.9°, (range 15−90° SD 18.6°) in both cases. Involvement in a worker's compensation claim resulted in a lower ASES, VAS, and SANE score, but there was no statistically significant difference in motion. Conclusion: Arthroscopic capsular release, lysis of adhesions, and manipulation under anesthesia is a safe, reliable method of treating persistent stiffness following rotator cuff repair. PMID:23682175

  15. Open Rotator Cuff Tear Repair Using Deltopectoral Approach

    PubMed Central

    Guity, Mohammad Reza; Eraghi, Amir Sobhani

    2015-01-01

    Background: The goal of this study was to evaluate the outcome of the open repair of rotator cuff tears via the deltopectoral approach in patients unable to afford arthroscopic repair costs. Methods: We evaluated 80 consecutive patients who were treated for full-thickness rotator cuff tears by open repair through the deltopectoral approach. There were 48 men and 32 women at a mean age of 60.1 years (range, 35-80 years). Preoperative and postoperative clinical assessments were performed with the Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, modified University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) score, and pain visual analog scale. Results: The mean follow-up period was 30.6 months (range, 18-48 months). At final follow-up visits, the ASES, Constant score, and modified UCLA score were found to have improved significantly from 33.56, 39.24, and 13.0 to 85.64, 81.46, and 32.2, respectively (P <0.01). Pain, as measured on a visual analog scale, was improved significantly (P <0.01). The mean time for recovering the full range of motion was 2.5 months. Postoperative pain at 48 hours and at 6 weeks was relatively low. There were no cases of intractable stiffness. Conclusion: The deltopectoral approach for open rotator cuff repair produced satisfactory results and reduces rate of shoulder stiffness and postoperative pain. PMID:26622080

  16. A randomised controlled feasibility study investigating the use of eccentric and concentric strengthening exercises in the treatment of rotator cuff tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To conduct a feasibility study to compare concentric and eccentric rotator cuff strengthening exercises for rotator cuff tendinopathy. Methods: A total of 11 patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy who were on the waiting list for arthroscopic subacromial decompression surgery were randomised to perform eccentric rotator cuff strengthening exercises, concentric strengthening exercises or no exercises. Patients were evaluated in terms of levels of pain and function using the Oxford Shoulder Score and a Visual Analogue Scale initially, at 4 weeks and at 8 weeks. Results: The study design was found to be acceptable to patients and achieved a high level of 86% compliance. The drop-out rate was 0%. Two patients performing eccentric strengthening exercises improved sufficiently to cancel their planned surgery. Conclusion: Further research in this area is recommended. The study design was feasible and power calculations have been conducted to aid future research planning. PMID:26770702

  17. Cross-sectional and longitudinal construct validity of two rotator cuff disease-specific outcome measures

    PubMed Central

    Razmjou, Helen; Bean, Andrea; van Osnabrugge, Varda; MacDermid, Joy C; Holtby, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Background Disease-specific Quality Of Life (QOL) measures are devised to assess the impact of a specific disease across a spectrum of important domains of life. The purpose of this study was to examine the cross-sectional and longitudinal construct validity (sensitivity to change) of two rotator cuff disease-specific measures, the Rotator Cuff-Quality Of Life (RC-QOL) and the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC) index, in relation to one another and to other joint and limb specific measures in the same population of the patients suffering from rotator cuff pathology. Methods Participants enrolled were consecutive patients who received physical therapy for management of impingement syndrome or received treatment following rotator cuff repair, acromioplasty or decompression surgeries. All subjects received physical therapy treatment and completed four outcome measures at 3 single points (initial, interim, and final). Cross-sectional convergent validity was assessed at each of the 3 time-points by correlating the WORC and RC-QOL's scores to each other and to two alternative scales; a joint-specific scale, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) standardized shoulder assessment form and a limb-specific measure, the Upper Extremity Functional Index (UEFI). Non-parametric statistics (Spearman's rho and Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney tests) examined the construct validity. The standardized response mean (SRM) was used to examine sensitivity to change. Results Forty-one participants entered the study and their scores were compared at 3 cross sectional single points. The correlation coefficients among the 4 measures varied from 0.60 to 0.91. Correlation between corresponding domains of the WORC and RC-QOL varied from 0.45 to 0.85. The known group validity was not significantly different among individual sub-scores and total scores. The final SRMs were (1.42), (1.43), (1.44), and (1.54) for the ASES, RCQOL, WORC, and UEFI respectively. Conclusion The WORC and RC-QOL exhibit similar cross-sectional convergent validity in patients suffering from rotator cuff pathology. The sensitivity to change was very close among all scores, with the UEFI having the highest sensitivity. Further research is needed to examine the extent to which each physical or emotional domain contributes to prognostic or therapeutic decision-making. PMID:16533405

  18. Disintegration of an absorbable rotator cuff anchor six weeks after implantation.

    PubMed

    Kelly, James D

    2005-04-01

    Rotator cuff failure by suture-bone or suture anchor pull-out, suture breakage, knot slippage, and tendon pull-out are well described. I report a case of early disintegration of a bioabsorbable suture anchor. A 77-year-old woman underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. On suspecting failure, the repair was repeated 40 days later. Arthroscopy revealed disintegration of the suture loop from the anchor. Open rotator cuff repair was then performed with transosseous suture and metallic anchors. PMID:15800531

  19. Rotator cuff injuries: current perspectives and trends for treatment and rehabilitation☆

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Fabio Antonio; Olawa, Paul Juma; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio; Ejnisman, Benno

    2015-01-01

    Objective To map out the approaches used by Brazilian orthopedists in treating complete tears of the rotator cuff. Methods A multiple-choice questionnaire was handed out to 232 orthopedists at the 45th Brazilian Congress of Orthopedics and Traumatology. Of these, 207 were returned but five were incomplete and were excluded. Thus, 202 questionnaires were used. Results Among the orthopedists who answered the questionnaires, around 60% were from the southeastern region and 46% were shoulder and elbow surgeons. There was a significant association (p < 0.05) between length of experience and number of rotator cuff repairs performed per year. There was also a significant association (p < 0.05) between shoulder specialty and the following variables: arthroscopic technique, use of anchors in a single-row configuration, mean time taken for an indication for surgery to be made in cases of traumatic and degenerative lesions, use of a specific protocol for postsurgical rehabilitation, return to sport and indication of irreparable injuries. Conclusions Brazilian shoulder surgeons have well-established approaches toward treating rotator cuff injuries. Most of these approaches differ significantly from those of other specialties. This shows the importance of placing value on training in preparing shoulder specialists in this country. PMID:27218075

  20. Augmented Fixation With Biodegradable Subacromial Spacer After Repair of Massive Rotator Cuff Tear

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt, Murat; Akkaya, Mustafa; Gursoy, Safa; Isik, Cetin

    2015-01-01

    Unsuccessful outcomes after repair of massive rotator cuff ruptures accompanied by muscle atrophy and fatty degeneration are frequently associated with inadequate management and secondary tears. We report the functional differences after rotator cuff rupture repair with a biodegradable spacer application. In these patients, rotator cuff rupture repair should provide coverage of the humeral head. Subsequently, acromioplasty should be performed to allow adequate space for the subacromial spacer. Thereafter measurement of the intra-articular space required for application of the biodegradable spacer is performed. Using this method can decrease the rate of tears by providing a safe subacromial space in cases of massive rotator cuff rupture. PMID:26697306

  1. All-Arthroscopic Patch Augmentation of a Massive Rotator Cuff Tear: Surgical Technique

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Peter N.; Frank, Rachel M.; Gupta, Anil K.; Yanke, Adam B.; Trenhaile, Scott W.; Romeo, Anthony A.; Bach, Bernard R.; Verma, Nikhil N.

    2013-01-01

    Surgical management of massive rotator cuff tears remains challenging, with failure rates ranging from 20% to 90%. Multiple different arthroscopic and open techniques have been described, but there is no current gold standard. Failure after rotator cuff repair is typically multifactorial; however, failure of tendon-footprint healing is often implicated. Patch augmentation has been described as a possible technique to augment the biology of rotator cuff repair in situations of compromised tendon quality and has shown promising short-term results. The purpose of this article is to describe our preferred surgical technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with patch augmentation. PMID:24400198

  2. Clinical and radiographic factors influencing the results of revision rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Hartzler, Robert U.; Sperling, John W.; Schleck, Cathy D.; Cofield, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Historically, results of open revision of rotator cuff repair have been mixed and often poor. We reviewed the outcomes of revision rotator cuff repair with a detailed analysis of clinical and radiographic risk factors in order to improve patient selection for this type of surgery. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six patients (37 shoulders) underwent first-time, open revision rotator cuff repair between 1995 and 2005. Average follow-up was 7.0 years (range 1-14.9 years). The tear size was small in 1 shoulder, medium in 8, large in 22 and massive in 6. Associations of 29 clinical and radiographic factors with the outcomes of pain, motion, and function were assessed. Results: Satisfactory outcome occurred in 22 shoulders (59%): An excellent result in 2, a good result in 7, and a fair result in 13. Unsatisfactory, poor results occurred in 15. Pain was substantially reduced in 25 (68%). Median pain scores decreased to five from a pre-operative eight (P = 0.002). Median motion did not change from pre-operative to post-operative. The chance of a satisfactory outcome and improved post-operative motion were associated with males, greater pre-operative motion, increased acromial humeral distance, the absence of glenohumeral arthritis, or a degenerative re-tear. Conclusions: Revision rotator cuff repair, although a safe operation, with a low re-operative rate, has very mixed overall results. By knowing the factors associated with success, surgeons can better counsel patients and with this increased knowledge, consider alternative treatment choices. PMID:23960361

  3. Effect of a Sleep Aid in Analgesia after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Chul-Hyun; Lee, Young-Kuk; Shin, Hong-Kwan; Hwang, Ilseon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects and safety of a sleep aid for postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Materials and Methods Seventy-eight patients were prospectively assigned to either the zolpidem group (multimodal analgesia+zolpidem; 39 patients) or the control group (multimodal analgesia; 39 patients). Self-rated pain levels were assessed twice a day using a visual analog scale (VAS). The need for additional rescue analgesic, duration of functional recovery, and adverse effects were assessed for the first 5 days after surgery. Results The mean number of times that additional rescue analgesic was required during 5 days after surgery was 2.1±2.0 in the zolpidem group and 3.3±2.8 in the control group, a significant difference. There were no significant differences between the two groups in mean VAS pain scores during the first 5 days after surgery, although the zolpidem group had lower VAS pain scores than the control group. Additionally, there were no significant differences in duration of functional recovery and adverse effects between the two groups. Conclusion The use of zolpidem for analgesia after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair provided a significant reduction in the need for rescue analgesic without increasing adverse effects. Nevertheless, mean VAS pain scores during the first 5 days after surgery did not differ between the zolpidem group and the control group. PMID:25837184

  4. PROSPECTIVE AND COMPARATIVE STUDY ON FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER OPEN AND ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OF ROTATOR CUFF TEARS

    PubMed Central

    de Castro Veado, Marco Antônio; Castilho, Rodrigo Simões; Maia, Philipe Eduardo Carvalho; Rodrigues, Alessandro Ulhôa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively assess the surgical results from patients undergoing repairs to rotator cuff injuries via open and arthroscopic procedures, with regard to functional and clinical features, and by means of ultrasound examinations, and to compare occurrences of renewed tearing. Methods: Sixty patients underwent operations performed by the same surgeon (29 via open surgery and 31 via arthroscopy), to repair complete rotator cuff tears. The procedures were performed at Hospital Governor Israel Pinheiro (HGIP) and Mater Dei Hospital in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, between August 2007 and February 2009. The patients were assessed functionally by means of the UCLA score before and after the operation, and magnetic resonance imaging was done before the operation. All the patients were reassessed at least 12 months after the operation, and an ultrasound examination was also performed at this time. Results: Out of the 29 patients who underwent open surgery, 27 (93.1%) presented good or excellent results, with a mean UCLA score of 32 after the operation. Their mean follow-up was 14 months. Three patients presented renewed tearing on ultrasound, of whom one remained asymptomatic. Out of the 31 patients who underwent arthroscopic procedures, 29 (93.5%) presented good or excellent results, with a mean UCLA score of 33 after the operation. Their mean follow-up was 19 months. Two patients presented renewed tearing, of whom one remained asymptomatic and one evolved with loosening of an anchor, with an unsatisfactory result. Conclusion: The repairs on rotator cuff injuries presented good results by means of both open surgery and arthroscopy, with similar functional results in the two groups and similar rates of renewed tearing. PMID:27027052

  5. Association between alcohol consumption and rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Passaretti, Daniele; Candela, Vittorio; Venditto, Teresa; Giannicola, Giuseppe; Gumina, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Background and purpose - Long-term alcohol intake is associated with various negative effects on capillary microcirculation and tissue perfusion. We hypothesized that alcohol consumption might be a risk factor for both the occurrence and the severity of rotator cuff tears (RCTs). Patients and methods - A case-control study was performed. We studied 249 consecutive patients (139 men and 110 women; mean age 64 (54-78) years) who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Tear size was determined intraoperatively. The control group had 356 subjects (186 men and 170 women; mean age 66 (58-82) years) with no RCT. All participants were questioned about their alcohol intake. Participants were divided into: (1) non-drinkers if they consumed less than 0.01 g of ethanol per day, and (2) moderate drinkers and (3) excessive drinkers if women (men) consumed > 24 g (36 g) per day for at least 2 years. Results - Total alcohol consumption, wine consumption, and duration of alcohol intake were higher in both men and women with RCT than in both men and women in the control group. Excessive alcohol consumption was found to be a risk factor for the occurrence of RCT in both sexes (men: OR = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.2-3.9; women: OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 0.94-4.1). Massive tears were associated with a higher intake of alcohol (especially wine) than smaller lesions. Interpretation - Long-term alcohol intake is a significant risk factor for the occurrence and severity of rotator cuff tear in both sexes. PMID:26610042

  6. Association between alcohol consumption and rotator cuff tear

    PubMed Central

    Passaretti, Daniele; Candela, Vittorio; Venditto, Teresa; Giannicola, Giuseppe; Gumina, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Long-term alcohol intake is associated with various negative effects on capillary microcirculation and tissue perfusion. We hypothesized that alcohol consumption might be a risk factor for both the occurrence and the severity of rotator cuff tears (RCTs). Patients and methods — A case-control study was performed. We studied 249 consecutive patients (139 men and 110 women; mean age 64 (54–78) years) who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Tear size was determined intraoperatively. The control group had 356 subjects (186 men and 170 women; mean age 66 (58–82) years) with no RCT. All participants were questioned about their alcohol intake. Participants were divided into: (1) non-drinkers if they consumed less than 0.01 g of ethanol per day, and (2) moderate drinkers and (3) excessive drinkers if women (men) consumed > 24 g (36 g) per day for at least 2 years. Results — Total alcohol consumption, wine consumption, and duration of alcohol intake were higher in both men and women with RCT than in both men and women in the control group. Excessive alcohol consumption was found to be a risk factor for the occurrence of RCT in both sexes (men: OR = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.2–3.9; women: OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 0.94–4.1). Massive tears were associated with a higher intake of alcohol (especially wine) than smaller lesions. Interpretation — Long-term alcohol intake is a significant risk factor for the occurrence and severity of rotator cuff tear in both sexes. PMID:26610042

  7. Classification of rotator cuff tendinopathy using high definition ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Hinsley, Hannah; Nicholls, Alex; Daines, Michael; Wallace, Gemma; Arden, Nigel; Carr, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: ultrasound is a valid cost effective tool in screening for rotator cuff pathology with high levels of accuracy in detecting full-thickness tears. To date there is no rotator cuff tendinopathy classification using ultrasound. The aims of this study are to define a valid high-definition ultrasound rotator cuff tendinopathy classification, which has discriminate validity between groups based upon anatomical principles. Methods: 464 women, aged 65–87, from an established general population cohort underwent bilateral shoulder ultrasound and musculoskeletal assessment. Sonographer accuracy was established in a separate study by comparing ultrasound findings to the gold standard intra-operative findings. Results: there were 510 normal tendons, 217 abnormal tendons, 77 partial tears, and 124 full-thickness tears. There was no statistical difference in age or the proportion with pain between the abnormal enthesis and partial tear groups, however both groups were statistically older (p<0.001) and had a greater proportion with pain (p<0.001 & p=0.050) than normal tendons. The full-thickness tears were statistically older than normal tendons (p<0.001), but not abnormal/partially torn tendons. The proportion with pain was significantly greater than both groups (p<0.001 & p=0.006). Symptomatic shoulders had a larger median tear size than asymptomatic shoulders (p=0.006). Using tear size as a predictor of pain likelihood, optimum sensitivity and specificity occurred when dividing tears into groups up to 2.5cm and >2.5cm, which corresponds with anatomical descriptions of the width of the supraspinatus tendon. Conclusion: the classification system is as follows: Normal Tendons; Abnormal enthesis/Partial-thickness tear; Single tendon full-thickness tears (0–2.5cm); Multi-tendon full-thickness tears (>2.5cm). PMID:25489559

  8. Magnetic resonance appearance of bioabsorbable anchor screws for double row arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs

    PubMed Central

    Pawaskar, Aditya C; Kekatpure, Aashay; Cho, Nam-Su; Rhee, Yong-Girl; Jeon, In-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the bioabsorbable, anchor related postoperative changes in rotator cuff surgery, which has become more popular recently. The purpose of the present study was to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to analyze the degradation of bioabsorbable anchors and to determine the incidences and characteristics of early postoperative reactions around the anchors and their mechanical failures. Materials and Methods: Postoperative MRIs of 200 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were retrospectively analyzed. The tissue reactions around the bioanchors included fluid accumulations around the anchor, granulation tissue formation and changes in the condition of the surrounding osseous structure. The condition of the bioanchor itself was also examined, including whether the bioanchor failed mechanically. In the case of mechanical failure, the location of the failure was noted. Serial MRIs of 18 patients were available for analysis. Results: The total number of medial row bioanchors was 124, while that of the lateral row was 338. A low signal intensity rim suggestive of sclerosis surrounded all lateral row bioanchors. Ninety three lateral row bioanchors (27%) showed a rim with signal intensity similar to or less than that of surrounding bone, which was granulation tissue or foreign body reaction (FBR). Similar signal intensity was seen around nine medial row bioanchors (7%). Fluid accumulation was seen around 4 lateral row bioanchors (1%) and around 14 medial row bioanchors (11%). Five lateral row bioanchors showed the breakage, while there was none in the medial row bioanchors. There were nine cases with a cuff re-tear (4.5%). There was no evidence of affection of glenohumeral articular surfaces or of osteolysis around any bioanchor. In serial MRI, there was no change in appearance of the bioanchors, but the granulation tissue or FBR around four bioanchors and the fluid around one bioanchor showed a decrease in successive MRI. Conclusion: This study highlights the normal and adverse reactions to Bioabsorbable anchors that surgeons can expect to see on MRI after rotator cuff repairs. PMID:26015604

  9. Predicting Rotator Cuff Tears Using Data Mining and Bayesian Likelihood Ratios

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hsueh-Yi; Huang, Chen-Yuan; Su, Chwen-Tzeng; Lin, Chen-Chiang

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Rotator cuff tear is a common cause of shoulder diseases. Correct diagnosis of rotator cuff tears can save patients from further invasive, costly and painful tests. This study used predictive data mining and Bayesian theory to improve the accuracy of diagnosing rotator cuff tears by clinical examination alone. Methods In this retrospective study, 169 patients who had a preliminary diagnosis of rotator cuff tear on the basis of clinical evaluation followed by confirmatory MRI between 2007 and 2011 were identified. MRI was used as a reference standard to classify rotator cuff tears. The predictor variable was the clinical assessment results, which consisted of 16 attributes. This study employed 2 data mining methods (ANN and the decision tree) and a statistical method (logistic regression) to classify the rotator cuff diagnosis into “tear” and “no tear” groups. Likelihood ratio and Bayesian theory were applied to estimate the probability of rotator cuff tears based on the results of the prediction models. Results Our proposed data mining procedures outperformed the classic statistical method. The correction rate, sensitivity, specificity and area under the ROC curve of predicting a rotator cuff tear were statistical better in the ANN and decision tree models compared to logistic regression. Based on likelihood ratios derived from our prediction models, Fagan's nomogram could be constructed to assess the probability of a patient who has a rotator cuff tear using a pretest probability and a prediction result (tear or no tear). Conclusions Our predictive data mining models, combined with likelihood ratios and Bayesian theory, appear to be good tools to classify rotator cuff tears as well as determine the probability of the presence of the disease to enhance diagnostic decision making for rotator cuff tears. PMID:24733553

  10. Contractile dysfunction of the shoulder (rotator cuff tendinopathy): an overview

    PubMed Central

    Littlewood, Chris

    2012-01-01

    It is now over a decade since the features defining a contractile dysfunction of the shoulder were first reported. Since this time, some progress has been made to better understand this mechanical syndrome. In response to these developments, this narrative review will explore current understanding in relation to pathology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of this syndrome with reference to literature specifically relating to contractile dysfunction but also literature relating to rotator cuff tendinopathy where necessary. The review not only identifies the strengths of the mechanical diagnosis and therapy approach with reference to a contractile dysfunction of the shoulder but also identifies where further progress needs to be made. PMID:24179329

  11. A modified Mason-Allen technique for rotator cuff repair using suture anchors.

    PubMed

    Scheibel, Markus Thomas; Habermeyer, Peter

    2003-03-01

    An adequate restoration of the muscle-tendon-bone unit is essential for a successful outcome after rotator cuff reconstruction. We describe a suture grasping technique for rotator cuff repair using suture anchors that can be performed either arthroscopically or during open rotator cuff refixation. The technique we use is a combination of a mattress and a single suture, thus representing the principles of a Mason-Allen suture technique. The modified Mason-Allen technique for suture anchor repair is easy to perform and provides excellent initial fixation strength allowing durable osteofibroblastic integration of the reinserted cuff. PMID:12627162

  12. REHABILITATION AFTER ARTHROSCOPIC ROTATOR CUFF REPAIR: CURRENT CONCEPTS REVIEW AND EVIDENCE-BASED GUIDELINES

    PubMed Central

    Westgard, Paul; Chandler, Zachary; Gaskill, Trevor R.; Kokmeyer, Dirk; Millett, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To provide an overview of the characteristics and timing of rotator cuff healing and provide an update on treatments used in rehabilitation of rotator cuff repairs. The authors' protocol of choice, used within a large sports medicine rehabilitation center, is presented and the rationale behind its implementation is discussed. Background: If initial nonsurgical treatment of a rotator cuff tear fails, surgical repair is often the next line of treatment. It is evident that a successful outcome after surgical rotator cuff repair is as much dependent on surgical technique as it is on rehabilitation. To this end, rehabilitation protocols have proven challenging to both the orthopaedic surgeon and the involved physical therapist. Instead of being based on scientific rationale, traditionally most rehabilitation protocols are solely based on clinical experience and expert opinion. Methods: A review of currently available literature on rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff tear repair on PUBMED / MEDLINE and EMBASE databases was performed to illustrate the available evidence behind various postoperative treatment modalities. Results: There is little high-level scientific evidence available to support or contest current postoperative rotator cuff rehabilitation protocols. Most existing protocols are based on clinical experience with modest incorporation of scientific data. Conclusion: Little scientific evidence is available to guide the timing of postsurgical rotator cuff rehabilitation. To this end, expert opinion and clinical experience remains a large facet of rehabilitation protocols. This review describes a rotator cuff rehabilitation protocol that incorporates currently available scientific literature guiding rehabilitation. PMID:22530194

  13. Evaluation of rotator cuff muscle strength in healthy individuals

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Paulo José Oliveira; Tomazini, José Elias

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the strength generated by the rotator muscles of the shoulder joint between the right upper limb and left upper limb among healthy individuals. METHODS: To evaluate the muscle strength of upper limbs from isometric contractions in the horizontal direction (rotation) an isometric dynamometer was used, equipped with transducers, signal conditioning, a data acquisition board, and finally, a computer. Study participants were 22 male military subjects, aged between 18 and 19 years old, body mass between 57.7 and 93.0 kg (71.8 ± 9.45 kg) and height between 1.67 and 1.90 m (1.75 ± 0.06 m), healthy and without clinical diseases or any type of orthopedic injury in the muscle skeletal system. RESULTS: The internal rotation in the right upper limb (RUL) was higher than the average strength of internal rotation in the left upper limb (LUL) (p = 0.723). The external rotation strength in RUL was lower than the average strength of external rotation in the LUL (p=0.788). No statistical difference was observed by comparing the strength values of all isometric strength tests. CONCLUSION: For the sample and methodology used to assess muscle strength, there was no statistical difference between the strength generated by the muscles of the rotator cuff of the right and left upper limbs. Experimental Study. PMID:26207091

  14. Factors affecting healing after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Abtahi, Amir M; Granger, Erin K; Tashjian, Robert Z

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff repair has been shown to have good long-term results. Unfortunately, a significant proportion of repairs still fail to heal. Many factors, both patient and surgeon related, can influence healing after repair. Older age, larger tear size, worse muscle quality, greater muscle-tendon unit retraction, smoking, osteoporosis, diabetes and hypercholesterolemia have all shown to negatively influence tendon healing. Surgeon related factors that can influence healing include repair construct-single vs double row, rehabilitation, and biologics including platelet rich plasma and mesenchymal stem cells. Double-row repairs are biomechanically stronger and have better healing rates compared with single-row repairs although clinical outcomes are equivalent between both constructs. Slower, less aggressive rehabilitation programs have demonstrated improved healing with no negative effect on final range of motion and are therefore recommended after repair of most full thickness tears. Additionally no definitive evidence supports the use of platelet rich plasma or mesenchymal stem cells regarding improvement of healing rates and clinical outcomes. Further research is needed to identify effective biologically directed augmentations that will improve healing rates and clinical outcomes after rotator cuff repair. PMID:25793161

  15. Prognostic factors for clinical outcomes after rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Pécora, José Otávio Reggi; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Assunção, Jorge Henrique; Gracitelli, Mauro Emílio Conforto; Martins, João Paulo Sobreiro; Ferreira, Arnaldo Amado

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify prognostic factors of postoperative functional outcomes. METHODS: Retrospective case series evaluating patients undergoing rotator cuff repair, analyzed by the UCLA score (pre and 12-month postoperative) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (preoperative). Patients' intrinsic variables related to the injury and intervention were evaluated. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to determine variables impact on postoperative functional assessment. RESULTS: 131 patients were included. The mean UCLA score increased from 13.17 ± 3.77 to 28.73 ± 6.09 (p<0,001). We obtained 65.7% of good and excellent results. Age (r= 0.232, p= 0.004) and reparability of posterosuperior injuries (r= 0.151, p= 0.043) correlated with the functional assessment at 12 months. After multivariate linear regression analysis, only age was associated (p = 0.008). CONCLUSIONS: The surgical treatment of rotator cuff tears lead to good and excellent results in 65.6% of patients. Age was an independent predictor factor with better clinical outcomes by UCLA score in older patients. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:26207092

  16. Labrum and rotator cuff injuries in the throwing athlete.

    PubMed

    Menge, Travis J; Byram, Ian R; Boykin, Robert E; Bushnell, Brandon D

    2015-02-01

    The large amount of force imparted across the shoulder during the act of throwing makes the glenohumeral joint highly susceptible to injury in the athlete performing overhead throwing motions. The bony incongruity of the shoulder enables greater range of motion than any other joint in the body, but it also results in significant strain on the surrounding soft tissues during the throwing motion. Throwers can present with acute injuries, but more commonly they suffer from chronic overuse conditions resulting from repetitive overload. Proper management requires early recognition with treatment directed toward the athlete's safe return to sports. Failure to institute an appropriate management strategy may result in significant complications, including prolonged disability, progression of symptoms, and further injury. We discuss the functional anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, evaluation, and treatment of common injuries of the glenoid labrum and rotator cuff in the overhead throwing athlete. PMID:25599876

  17. Platelets and plasma stimulate sheep rotator cuff tendon tenocytes when cultured in an extracellular matrix scaffold.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Brian A; Proffen, Benedikt L; Haslauer, Carla M; Murray, Martha M

    2016-04-01

    The addition of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to rotator cuff repair has not translated into improved outcomes after surgery. However, recent work stimulating ligament healing has demonstrated improved outcomes when PRP or whole blood is combined with an extracellular matrix carrier. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of three components of blood (plasma, platelets, and macrophages) on the in vitro activity of ovine rotator cuff cells cultured in an extracellular matrix environment. Tenocytes were obtained from six ovine infraspinatus tendons and cultured over 14 days in an extracellular matrix scaffold with the following additives: (1) plasma (PPP), (2) plasma and platelets (PAP), (3) plasma and macrophages (PPPM), (4) plasma, platelets and macrophages (PAPM), (5) phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and (6) PBS with macrophages (PBSM). Assays measuring cellular metabolism (AlamarBlue), proliferation (Quantitative DNA assay), synthesis of collagen and cytokines (SIRCOL, TNF-α and IL-10 ELISA, and MMP assay), and collagen gene expression (qPCR) were performed over the duration of the experiment, as well as histology at the conclusion. Plasma was found to stimulate cell attachment and spreading on the scaffold, as well as cellular proliferation. Platelets also stimulated cell proliferation, cellular metabolism, transition of cells to a myofibroblast phenotype, and contraction of the scaffolds. The addition of macrophages did not have any significant effect on the sheep rotator cuff cells in vitro. In vivo studies are needed to determine whether these changes in cellular function will translate into improved tendon healing. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:623-629, 2016. PMID:26419602

  18. Application of Pain Quantitative Analysis Device for Assessment of Postoperative Pain after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mifune, Yutaka; Inui, Atsuyuki; Nagura, Issei; Sakata, Ryosuke; Muto, Tomoyuki; Harada, Yoshifumi; Takase, Fumiaki; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Kokubu, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : The PainVision™ system was recently developed for quantitative pain assessment. Here, we used this system to evaluate the effect of plexus brachialis block on postoperative pain after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Methods : Fifty-five patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were included in this study. First 26 cases received no plexus brachialis block (control group), and the next 29 cases received the plexus brachialis block before surgery (block group). Patients completed the visual analog scale at 4, 8, 16, and 24 hours after surgery, and the intensity of postoperative pain was assessed with PainVision™ at 16 hours. The postoperative use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents was also recorded. Results : The pain intensity at 16 hours after surgery assessed by PainVision™ was significantly lower in the block group than in the control group (block, 252.0 ± 47.8, control, 489.0 ± 89.1, P < 0.05). However, there were no differences in the VAS values at 16 hours between the 2 groups (block, 4.3 ± 0.6, control, 5.7 ± 0.4, P = N.S.). The pain intensity and VAS at 16 hours after surgery were highly correlated (r = 0.59, P = 0.006 in the block group and r = 0.62, P = 0.003 in the control group). The effect size of the assessment by PainVision™ was bigger than that of VAS (r=0.31 in VAS and 0.51 in Pain vision). Conclusion : The PainVision™ system could be useful to evaluate postoperative pain because it enables the quantification and comparison of pain intensity independent of individual pain thresholds. PMID:26157522

  19. The global percutaneous shuttling technique tip for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Vopat, Bryan G; Murali, Jothi; Gowda, Ashok L; Kaback, Lee; Blaine, Theodore

    2014-04-22

    Most arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs utilize suture passing devices placed through arthroscopic cannulas. These devices are limited by the size of the passing device where the suture is passed through the tendon. An alternative technique has been used in the senior author's practice for the past ten years, where sutures are placed through the rotator cuff tendon using percutaneous passing devices. This technique, dubbed the global percutaneous shuttling technique of rotator cuff repair, affords the placement of sutures from nearly any angle and location in the shoulder, and has the potential advantage of larger suture bites through the tendon edge. These advantages may increase the area of tendon available to compress to the rotator cuff footprint and improve tendon healing and outcomes. The aim of this study is to describe the global percutaneous shuttling (GPS) technique and report our results using this method. The GPS technique can be used for any full thickness rotator cuff tear and is particularly useful for massive cuff tears with poor tissue quality. We recently followed up 22 patients with an average follow up of 32 months to validate its usefulness. American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores improved significantly from 37 preoperatively to 90 postoperatively (P<0.0001). This data supports the use of the GPS technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Further biomechanical studies are currently being performed to assess the improvements in tendon footprint area with this technique. PMID:25002932

  20. Healing rates for challenging rotator cuff tears utilizing an acellular human dermal reinforcement graft

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study presents a retrospective case series of the clinical and structural outcomes (1.5 T MRI) of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with acellular human dermal graft reinforcement performed by a single surgeon in patients with large, massive, and previously repaired rotator cuff tears. Materials and Methods: Fourteen patients with mean anterior to posterior tear size 3.87 ± 0.99 cm (median 4 cm, range 2.5–6 cm) were enrolled in the study and were evaluated for structural integrity using a high-field (1.5 T) MRI at an average of 16.8 months after surgery. The Constant-Murley scores, the Flexilevel Scale of Shoulder Function (Flex SF), scapular plane abduction, and strength were analyzed. Results: MRI results showed that the rotator cuff repair was intact in 85.7% (12/14) of the patients studied. Two patients had a Sugaya Type IV recurrent tear (2 of 14; 14.3%), which were both less than 1 cm. The Constant score increased from a preoperative mean of 49.72 (range 13–74) to a postoperative mean of 81.07 (range 45–92) (P value = 0.009). Flexilevel Scale of Shoulder Function (Flex SF) Score normalized to a 100-point scale improved from a preoperative mean of 53.69 to a postoperative mean of 79.71 (P value = 0.003). The Pain Score improved from a preoperative mean of 7.73 to a postoperative mean of 13.57 (P value = 0.008). Scapular plane abduction improved from a preoperative mean of 113.64° to a postoperative mean of 166.43° (P value = 0.010). The strength subset score improved from a preoperative mean of 1.73 kg to a postoperative mean of 7.52 kg (P value = 0.006). Conclusions: This study presents a safe and effective technique that may help improve the healing rates of large, massive, and revision rotator cuff tears with the use of an acellular human dermal allograft. This technique demonstrated favorable structural healing rates and statistically improved functional outcomes in the near term. Level of Evidence: 4. Retrospective case series. PMID:22787332

  1. Management of In-Season Concurrent Rotator Cuff Tear With Shoulder Instability in Professional Contact Football Athletes; Respect the Career Goals!

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Maike; Hoy, Gregory; Branson, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Professional sports injuries are usually all dealt with at one single operation to return the player to the sport after appropriate rehabilitation. We questioned the assumption that rotator cuff tears must be repaired concurrently with instability syndromes, and aimed to allow a professional rugby league player to achieve career goals by NOT correcting all pathology at one surgery. Case Presentation A professional rugby league player presented with acute shoulder instability on a setting of a chronic full thickness rotator cuff tear. We performed an “in season” arthroscopic stabilization on an elite rugby league player, leaving a previously diagnosed large full thickness rotator cuff tear untreated. This allowed aggressive rehabilitation and return to contact competition at 12 weeks post-surgery. The player achieved a long held career goal of winning a premiership ring before undertaking rotator cuff repair at the end of the season. Latest follow up at seven years (still at elite level) demonstrated an asymptomatic shoulder. Conclusions The assumption that all pathology found at surgical exploration requires correction to play at elite level is not universally correct. We postulate that whilst rotator cuff deficiency has severe long-term sequelae, it is shoulder instability alone that prevents high level contact sports participation. Career goal management is an important part of managing elite level athletes. We have demonstrated that by careful management of the specific pathology preventing participation can allow elite athletes to achieve career goals without compromising long-term health.

  2. Effectiveness of Physical Therapy in Treating Atraumatic Full Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears. A Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, John E.; Dunn, Warren R.; Sanders, Rosemary; An, Qi; Baumgarten, Keith M.; Bishop, Julie Y.; Brophy, Robert H.; Carey, James L.; Holloway, Brian G.; Jones, Grant L.; Ma, C. Benjamin; Marx, Robert G.; McCarty, Eric C.; Poddar, Sourav K.; Smith, Matthew V.; Spencer, Edwin E.; Vidal, Armando F.; Wolf, Brian R.; Wright, Rick W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the effectiveness of a specific non-operative physical therapy program in treating atraumatic full thickness rotator cuff tears using a multicenter prospective cohort study design. Methods Patients with atraumatic full thickness rotator cuff tears who consented to enroll provided data via questionnaire on demographics, symptom characteristics, co-morbidities, willingness to undergo surgery, and patient related outcome assessments (SF-12, ASES, WORC, SANE score, Shoulder Activity Scale). Physicians recorded physical examination and imaging data. Patients began a physical therapy program developed from a systematic review of the literature and returned for evaluation at 6 and 12 weeks. At those visits patients could chose one of three courses: 1.) Cured (no formal follow up scheduled), 2.) Improved (continue therapy with scheduled reassessment in 6 weeks), or 3.) No better (offered surgery). Patients were contacted by telephone at 1 and 2 years to determine if they had undergone surgery since their last visit. A Wilcoxon signed rank test with continuity correction was used to compare initial, 6 week, and 12 week outcome scores. Results The cohort consists of 452 patients. Patient reported outcomes improved significantly at 6 and 12 weeks. Patients elected to undergo surgery less than 25% of the time. Patients who decided to have surgery generally did so between 6 and 12 weeks, and few had surgery between 3 and 24 months. Conclusion Non-operative treatment using this physical therapy protocol is effective for treating atraumatic full thickness rotator cuff tears in approximately 75% of patients followed for two years. Level of evidence Level IV, Case Series, Treatment Study PMID:23540577

  3. Diagnostic accuracy of clinical examination features for identifying large rotator cuff tears in primary health care

    PubMed Central

    Cadogan, Angela; McNair, Peter; Laslett, Mark; Hing, Wayne; Taylor, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Rotator cuff tears are a common and disabling complaint. The early diagnosis of medium and large size rotator cuff tears can enhance the prognosis of the patient. The aim of this study was to identify clinical features with the strongest ability to accurately predict the presence of a medium, large or multitendon (MLM) rotator cuff tear in a primary care cohort. Methods: Participants were consecutively recruited from primary health care practices (n = 203). All participants underwent a standardized history and physical examination, followed by a standardized X-ray series and diagnostic ultrasound scan. Clinical features associated with the presence of a MLM rotator cuff tear were identified (P<0.200), a logistic multiple regression model was derived for identifying a MLM rotator cuff tear and thereafter diagnostic accuracy was calculated. Results: A MLM rotator cuff tear was identified in 24 participants (11.8%). Constant pain and a painful arc in abduction were the strongest predictors of a MLM tear (adjusted odds ratio 3.04 and 13.97 respectively). Combinations of ten history and physical examination variables demonstrated highest levels of sensitivity when five or fewer were positive [100%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.86–1.00; negative likelihood ratio: 0.00, 95% CI: 0.00–0.28], and highest specificity when eight or more were positive (0.91, 95% CI: 0.86–0.95; positive likelihood ratio 4.66, 95% CI: 2.34–8.74). Discussion: Combinations of patient history and physical examination findings were able to accurately detect the presence of a MLM rotator cuff tear. These findings may aid the primary care clinician in more efficient and accurate identification of rotator cuff tears that may require further investigation or orthopedic consultation. PMID:24421626

  4. Transosseous Physeal-Sparing Rotator Cuff Repair in an Adolescent Football Player.

    PubMed

    Alley, Maxwell C; Banerjee, Samik; Papaliodis, Dean; Tsitos, Konstantinos; Zanaros, George S

    2016-03-01

    Rotator cuff injuries in the pediatric and adolescent population are rare. These injuries are normally caused by an acute event or by repeated microtrauma as a result of poor mechanics during overhead sporting activities. Overall, these injuries account for fewer than 1% of all rotator cuff tears. Physeal injuries, tuberosity avulsions ("rotator cuff equivalents"), and proximal humeral fractures commonly occur in the pediatric population. Traumatic full-thickness rotator cuff ruptures that occur in this age group during contact sports are an extremely uncommon cause of shoulder pain. The rarity of this type of injury in the pediatric and adolescent population may be the result of the excellent tensile properties of rotator tendons in childhood that often resist mechanical forces better than the growth plate or the apophyses. This report describes a full-thickness rotator cuff tear and a posterior labral tear in a 12-year-old boy who had a direct injury to the shoulder while playing football. The authors' goal in reporting this case is to increase orthopedic surgeons' awareness of this type of injury. Early use of magnetic resonance imaging for persistent shoulder pain after direct injury during contact sports may avoid undue delay in diagnosis. This report also describes the mini-open transosseous extraphyseal technique of cuff repair and reviews the literature on this infrequent injury. Overall, excellent clinical outcomes and return to sports can be expected after surgical repair of torn and often retracted tendons. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(2):e353-e358.]. PMID:26840701

  5. [Controversies in the therapy of rotator cuff tears : Operative or nonoperative treatment, open or arthroscopic repair?].

    PubMed

    Lorbach, O

    2016-02-01

    Rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain that may lead to severe impairment of shoulder function with significant limitation of the quality of life. Furthermore, they are associated with high direct and indirect costs.Conservative therapy and various surgical procedures for rotator cuff repair are all possible treatment options. Therefore, the correct treatment for a symptomatic rotator cuff tear is important.The conservative therapy may be considered as an alternative treatment option for a symptomatic rotator cuff tear in patients with small or incomplete tears with no fatty atrophy or tendon retraction, with only slight pain, and in older patients with few functional demands. Surgical treatment is recommended after failed conservative treatment lasting 3-6 months, with the corresponding psychological strain. Moreover, surgical treatment should be considered as a primary treatment option for a symptomatic rotator cuff tear in young patients with high functional demands, patients with a high level of physical strain in their jobs, large tears, and tears where there is already significant muscle atrophy or tendon retraction.Arthroscopic treatment is considered to be the gold standard because of the better cosmetic results and treatment of concomitant pathological conditions, the lower levels of postoperative pain, the potentially lower risk of shoulder stiffness, and more focused adhesiolysis. However, arthroscopy does not improve clinical results. Because of the current financial situation, however, open rotator cuff repair is still a viable alternative. PMID:26694070

  6. Electromyographic assessment of muscle fatigue in massive rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, D H; Alizadehkhaiyat, O; Kemp, G J; Fisher, A C; Roebuck, M M; Frostick, S P

    2015-02-01

    Shoulder muscle fatigue has not been assessed in massive rotator cuff tear (MRCT). This study used EMG to measure fatigability of 13 shoulder muscles in 14 healthy controls and 11 patients with MRCT. A hand grip protocol was applied to minimise artifacts due to pain experience during measurement. The fatigue index (median frequency slope) was significantly non-zero (negative) for anterior, middle, and posterior parts of deltoid, supraspinatus and subscapularis muscles in the controls, and for anterior, middle, and posterior parts of deltoid, and pectoralis major in patients (p ≤ 0.001). Fatigue was significantly greater in patients compared to the controls for anterior and middle parts of deltoid and pectoralis major (p ≤ 0.001). A submaximal grip task provided a feasible way to assess shoulder muscle fatigue in MRCT patients, however with some limitations. The results suggest increased activation of deltoid is required to compensate for lost supraspinatus abduction torque. Increased pectoralis major fatigue in patients (adduction torque) likely reflected strategy to stabilise the humeral head against superior subluxing force of the deltoid. Considering physiotherapy as a primary or adjunct intervention for the management of MRCT, the findings of this study generate a base for future clinical studies aiming at the development of evidence-based protocols. PMID:25301260

  7. Assessment and characterization of in situ rotator cuff biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trent, Erika A.; Bailey, Lane; Mefleh, Fuad N.; Raikar, Vipul P.; Shanley, Ellen; Thigpen, Charles A.; Dean, Delphine; Kwartowitz, David M.

    2013-03-01

    Rotator cuff disease is a degenerative disorder that is a common, costly, and often debilitating, ranging in severity from partial thickness tear, which may cause pain, to total rupture, leading to loss in function. Currently, clinical diagnosis and determination of disease extent relies primarily on subjective assessment of pain, range of motion, and possibly X-ray or ultrasound images. The final treatment plan however is at the discretion of the clinician, who often bases their decision on personal experiences, and not quantitative standards. The use of ultrasound for the assessment of tissue biomechanics is established, such as in ultrasound elastography, where soft tissue biomechanics are measured. Few studies have investigated the use of ultrasound elastography in the characterization of musculoskeletal biomechanics. To assess tissue biomechanics we have developed a device, which measures the force applied to the underlying musculotendentious tissue while simultaneously obtaining the related ultrasound images. In this work, the musculotendinous region of the infraspinatus of twenty asymptomatic male organized baseball players was examined to access the variability in tissue properties within a single patient and across a normal population. Elastic moduli at percent strains less than 15 were significantly different than those above 15 percent strain within the normal population. No significant difference in tissue properties was demonstrated within a single patient. This analysis demonstrated elastic moduli are variable across individuals and incidence. Therefore threshold elastic moduli will likely be a function of variation in local-tissue moduli as opposed to a specific global value.

  8. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF CALCIFYING TENDINITIS OF THE ROTATOR CUFF

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Arnaldo Amado Ferreira; Trevizani, Cassio Silva; Benegas, Eduardo; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Gracitelli, Mauro Emílio Conforto; Bitar, Alexandre Carneiro; Neto, Francisco José dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical and radiographic results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of the rotator cuff in patients with calcifying tendinitis. Method: A retrospective study was conducted on twenty patients who underwent arthroscopic treatment for calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder between March 1999 and November 2005. Six patients were excluded due to loss of follow-up. The average follow-up period was 41.4 months. Eight patients (57%) were female and six (43%) were male. The right side was affected in 10 cases (71%) and the left in four cases (29%). Nine cases (64%) had calcification in the supraspinatus tendon, two (14%) in the infraspinatus tendon, and three (21%) in both tendons. Results: In all cases, resection of the calcium deposits was performed by means of a needle (Jelco® No. 14) in combination with curettage (mini-curette). Two shoulders (14%) underwent subacromial decompression, and one (7%) underwent excision of the distal clavicle. A tendon-tendon suture was performed in three shoulders (21%). None of the patients underwent tendon-bone reinsertion. The mean score obtained on the UCLA scale was 33 points (26-35), thus indicating that a majority of patients had good results. In the final radiographic evaluation, none of the patients showed signs of calcification. Conclusion: Arthroscopic treatment of calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder safely allows excision of the calcification, leading to good results in relation to shoulder pain and function. PMID:27022591

  9. Mechanical strength of repairs of the rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Gerber, C; Schneeberger, A G; Beck, M; Schlegel, U

    1994-05-01

    We have studied the mechanical properties of several current techniques of tendon-to-bone suture employed in rotator-cuff repair. Non-absorbable braided polyester and absorbable polyglactin and polyglycolic acid sutures best combined ultimate tensile strength and stiffness. Polyglyconate and polydioxanone sutures failed only at high loads, but elongated considerably under moderate loads. We then compared the mechanical properties of nine different techniques of tendon grasping, using 159 normal infraspinatus tendons from sheep. The most commonly used simple stitch was mechanically poor: repairs with two or four such stitches failed at 184 N and 208 N respectively. A new modification of the Mason-Allen suture technique improved the ultimate tensile strength to 359 N for two stitches. Finally, we studied the mechanical properties of several methods of anchorage to bone using typically osteoporotic specimens. Single and even double transosseous sutures and suture anchor fixation both failed at low tensile loads (about 140 N). The use of a 2 mm thick, plate-like augmentation device improved the failure strength to 329 N. The mechanical properties of many current repair techniques are poor and can be greatly improved by using good materials, an improved tendon-grasping suture, and augmentation at the bone attachment. PMID:8175836

  10. Rotator cuff tears after total shoulder arthroplasty in primary osteoarthritis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Levy, David M.; Abrams, Geoffrey D.; Harris, Joshua D.; Bach, Bernard R.; Nicholson, Gregory P.; Romeo, Anthony A.

    2016-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears have been reported to be uncommon following total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA). Postoperative rotator cuff tears can lead to pain, proximal humeral migration, and glenoid component loosening. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the incidence of post-TSA rotator cuff tears or dysfunction in osteoarthritic patients. A systematic review of multiple databases was performed using preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses guidelines. Levels I-IV evidence clinical studies of patients with primary osteoarthritis with a minimum 2-year follow-up were included. Fifteen studies with 1259 patients (1338 shoulders) were selected. Student's t-tests were used with a significant alpha value of 0.05. All patients demonstrated significant improvements in motion and validated clinical outcome scores (P < 0.001). Radiographic humeral head migration was the most commonly reported data point for extrapolation of rotator cuff integrity. After 6.6 ± 3.1 years, 29.9 ± 20.7% of shoulders demonstrated superior humeral head migration and 17.9 ± 14.3% migrated a distance more than 25% of the head. This was associated with an 11.3 ± 7.9% incidence of postoperative superior cuff tears. The incidence of radiographic anterior humeral head migration was 11.9 ± 15.9%, corresponding to a 3.0 ± 13.6% rate of subscapularis tears. We found an overall 1.2 ± 4.5% rate of reoperation for cuff injury. Nearly all studies reported indirect markers of rotator cuff dysfunction, such as radiographic humeral head migration and clinical exam findings. This systematic review suggests that rotator cuff dysfunction following TSA may be more common than previously reported. IV, systematic review of Levels I-IV studies.

  11. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank-Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 2: Rotator Cuff.

    PubMed

    Murray, Iain R; LaPrade, Robert F; Musahl, Volker; Geeslin, Andrew G; Zlotnicki, Jason P; Mann, Barton J; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2016-03-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common and result in considerable morbidity. Tears within the tendon substance or at its insertion into the humeral head represent a considerable clinical challenge because of the hostile local environment that precludes healing. Tears often progress without intervention, and current surgical treatments are inadequate. Although surgical implants, instrumentation, and techniques have improved, healing rates have not improved, and a high failure rate remains for large and massive rotator cuff tears. The use of biologic adjuvants that contribute to a regenerative microenvironment have great potential for improving healing rates and function after surgery. This article presents a review of current and emerging biologic approaches to augment rotator cuff tendon and muscle regeneration focusing on the scientific rationale, preclinical, and clinical evidence for efficacy, areas for future research, and current barriers to advancement and implementation. PMID:27099865

  12. OUTCOME OF ROTATOR CUFF REPAIR IN SNYDER TYPE Cl AND C2 LESIONS, CONSIDERING SMOKERS AND NONSMOKERS

    PubMed Central

    Júnior, Sérgio Correa Pinto; Luciano, Lessandro Gesser; Zotto, Crischiman Dal; Vieira, Felipe Fantozzi; Klassen, Ralf; Rodrigues, Airton; Neto, Francisco José dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the influence of smoking on the results from surgical repair of Snyder type C1 and C2 complete lesions of the rotator cuff. Methods: We evaluated 166 patients who had undergone surgical treatment for Snyder type C1 and C2 complete lesions of the rotator cuff, between June 2002 and December 2006. The inclusion criteria were a minimum follow-up period of 24 months and the absence of previous surgery on the affected shoulder. Patients with other associated injuries were excluded. We evaluated smoking and nonsmoking patients in accordance with the criteria of the World Health Organization (WHO). Female patients (119) predominated over male patients (47), and the mean age was 57 years (38 to 78). Out of the 166 patients evaluated, 21 were classified as smokers and 145 as nonsmokers. The final results were evaluated using the UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) criteria and statistical analysis was performed using the Epi Info® software. Results: According to the UCLA criteria, smokers had a final average of 32.6 points, while non-smokers had 33.8. Postoperative statistical analysis revealed a difference between the two groups, such that non-smoking patients had a better outcome. Conclusion: Smoking interferes with the final results from repairs of small and medium-sized lesions of the rotator cuff. PMID:27026963

  13. Elevated plasma levels of TIMP-1 in patients with rotator cuff tear

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Extracellular matrix remodeling is altered in rotator cuff tears, partly due to altered expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors. It is unclear whether this altered expression can be traced as changes in plasma protein levels. We measured the plasma levels of MMPs and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) in patients with rotator cuff tears and related changes in the pattern of MMP and TIMP levels to the extent of the rotator cuff tear. Methods Blood samples were collected from 17 patients, median age 61 (39–77) years, with sonographically verified rotator cuff tears (partial- or full-thickness). These were compared with 16 age- and sex-matched control individuals with sonographically intact rotator cuffs. Plasma levels of MMPs and TIMPs were measured simultaneously using Luminex technology and ELISA. Results The plasma levels of TIMP-1 were elevated in patients with rotator cuff tears, especially in those with full-thickness tears. The levels of TIMP-1, TIMP-3, and MMP-9 were higher in patients with full-thickness tears than in those with partial-thickness tears, but only the TIMP-1 levels were significantly different from those in the controls. Interpretation The observed elevation of TIMP-1 in plasma might reflect local pathological processes in or around the rotator cuff, or a genetic predisposition in these patients. That the levels of TIMP-1 and of certain MMPs were found to differ significantly between partial and full-thickness tears may reflect the extent of the lesion or different etiology and pathomechanisms. PMID:23043271

  14. Reusing Cadaveric Humeri for Fracture Testing After Testing Simulated Rotator Cuff Tendon Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Pitts, Todd C.; Knight, Alex N.; Burkhead, Wayne Z.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The financial cost of using human tissues in biomedical testing and surgical reconstruction is predicted to increase at a rate that is disproportionately greater than other materials used in biomechanical testing. Our first hypothesis is that cadaveric proximal humeri that had undergone monotonic failure testing of simulated rotator cuff repairs would not differ in ultimate fracture loads or in energy absorbed to fracture when compared to controls (i.e., bones without cuff repairs). Our second hypothesis is that there can be substantial cost savings if these cadaveric proximal humeri, with simulated cuff repairs, can be re-used for fracture testing. Results of fracture tests (conducted in a backwards fall configuration) and cost analysis support both hypotheses. Hence, the bones that had undergone monotonic failure tests of various rotator cuff repair techniques can be re-used in fracture tests because their load-carrying capacity is not significantly reduced. PMID:25371862

  15. Arthroscopic Management of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears in Major League Baseball Pitchers: The Lateralized Footprint Repair Technique.

    PubMed

    Dines, Joshua S; Jones, Kristofer; Maher, Patrick; Altchek, David

    2016-01-01

    Clinical outcomes of surgical management of full-thickness rotator cuff tears in professional baseball players have been uniformly poor. We conducted a study to investigate return-to-play data and functional performance using a novel arthroscopic repair technique. We hypothesized that arthroscopic rotator cuff repair would result in a high rate of return to professional pitching and favorable functional outcomes. We identified 6 consecutive Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers who underwent surgical repair of full-thickness rotator cuff injuries using the lateralized footprint repair technique. At most recent follow-up, patients were evaluated to determine their ability to return to athletic activity. Functional outcomes were also assessed using player performance statistics. By mean follow-up of 66.7 months (range, 23.2-94.6 months), 5 (83%) of the 6 pitchers had returned to their preinjury level of competition for at least 1 full season. Despite the high rate of return to MLB play, few pitchers resumed pitching productivity at their preoperative level; mean number of innings pitched decreased from 1806.5 to 183.7. A slight performance reduction was also found in a comparison of preoperative and postoperative pitching statistics. Of note, the return rate was higher for players over age 30 years than for those under 30 years. Overhead athletes require a delicate balance of shoulder mobility and stability to meet functional demands. Anatomical adaptations at the glenohumeral joint should be considered when performing rotator cuff repair in these patients in order to preserve peak functional performance. This novel repair technique affords a high rate of return to MLB play, though elite overhead throwers should be counseled that pitching productivity might decrease after surgery. PMID:26991564

  16. High incidence of acute full-thickness rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Zidan, Fikri; Lunsjo, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Epidemiological studies of full-thickness rotator cuff tears (FTRCTs) have mainly investigated degenerative lesions. We estimated the population-based incidence of acute FTRCT using a new diagnostic model. Patients and methods During the period November 2010 through October 2012, we prospectively studied all patients aged 18–75 years with acute onset of pain after shoulder trauma, with limited active abduction, and with normal conventional radiographs. 259 consecutive patients met these inclusion criteria. The patients had a median age of 51 (18–75) years. 65% were males. The patients were divided into 3 groups according to the clinical findings: group I, suspected FTRCT; group II, other specific diagnoses; and group III, sprain. Semi-acute MRI was performed in all patients in group I and in patients in group III who did not recover functionally. Results We identified 60 patients with FTRCTs. The estimated annual incidence of MRI-verified acute FTRCT was 16 (95% CI: 11–23) per 105 inhabitants for the population aged 18–75 years and 25 (CI: 18–36) per 105 inhabitants for the population aged 40–75 years. The prevalence of acute FTRCT in the study group was 60/259 (23%, CI: 18–28). The tears were usually large and affected more than 1 tendon in 36 of these 60 patients. The subscapularis was involved in 38 of the 60 patients. Interpretation Acute FTRCTs are common shoulder injuries, especially in men. They are usually large and often involve the subscapularis tendon. PMID:25708526

  17. Correlations between biochemical markers in the synovial fluid and severity of rotator cuff disease.

    PubMed

    Tajana, M S; Murena, L; Valli, F; Passi, A; Grassi, F A

    2009-04-01

    The role of biochemical factors in the onset and natural history of rotator cuff disease is not fully understood, but it is generally recognised that they could induce tendon damage in association with mechanical and vascular factors. In this study, 5 biochemical parameters were analysed (total protein concentration, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 or gelatinase A, MMP-9 or gelatinase B, type I collagen telopeptides, hyaluronic acid) in the synovial fluid (SF) aspirated from the gleno-humeral joint of 29 patients undergoing surgical therapy for rotator cuff lesions. Four different groups of patients were identified according to the severity of the lesion: partial tear of the rotator cuff, full thickness tear involving 1 tendon and cuff tear arthropathy (CTA). The total SF protein concentration progressively increased with loss of integrity of the rotator cuff, reaching the highest levels in CTA. The absolute enzymatic activity of gelatinases was greater in full thickness tears than in partial tears, while it decreased in CTA. Conversely, the ratio between gelatinases and total protein content reached the highest level in partial tears and then progressively decreased. Collagen I telopeptides were significantly increased in full thickness tears and CTA, whereas the levels of hyaluronic acid decreased with worsening of rotator cuff disease. These findings support the hypothesis that gelatinases, which are involved in physiological tendon remodelling, intervene in the evolution of rotator cuff disease, too. Increased levels of type I collagen telopeptides give evidence that tendon tears are associated with an anatomic loss of tendon tissue and not with simple tendon retraction. PMID:19711169

  18. Is the Supraspinatus Muscle Atrophy Truly Irreversible after Surgical Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears?

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Seok Won; Kim, Sae Hoon; Tae, Suk-Kee; Yoon, Jong Pil; Choi, Jung-Ah

    2013-01-01

    Background Atrophy of rotator cuff muscles has been considered an irreversible phenomenon. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether atrophy is truly irreversible after rotator cuff repair. Methods We measured supraspinatus muscle atrophy of 191 patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative multidetector computed tomography images, taken at least 1 year after operation. The occupation ratio was calculated using Photoshop CS3 software. We compared the change between pre- and postoperative occupation ratios after modifying the preoperative occupation ratio. In addition, possible relationship between various clinical factors and the change of atrophy, and between the change of atrophy and cuff integrity after surgical repair were evaluated. Results The mean occupation ratio was significantly increased postoperatively from 0.44 ± 0.17 to 0.52 ± 0.17 (p < 0.001). Among 191 patients, 81 (42.4%) showed improvement of atrophy (more than a 10% increase in occupation ratio) and 33 (17.3%) worsening (more than a 10% decrease). Various clinical factors such as age tear size, or initial degree of atrophy did not affect the change of atrophy. However, the change of atrophy was related to repair integrity: cuff healing failure rate of 48.5% (16 of 33) in worsened atrophy; and 22.2% (18 of 81) in improved atrophy (p = 0.007). Conclusions The supraspinatus muscle atrophy as measured by occupation ratio could be improved postoperatively in case of successful cuff repair. PMID:23467404

  19. An epidemiological study of rotator cuff pathology using The Health Improvement Network database.

    PubMed

    White, J J E; Titchener, A G; Fakis, A; Tambe, A A; Hubbard, R B; Clark, D I

    2014-03-01

    Little is known about the incidence of rotator cuff pathology or its demographic associations in the general population. We undertook a large epidemiological study of rotator cuff pathology in the United Kingdom using The Health Improvement Network (THIN) database. The incidence of rotator cuff pathology was 87 per 100,000 person-years. It was more common in women than in men (90 cases per 100,000 person-years in women and 83 per 100,000 person-years in men; p < 0.001). The highest incidence of 198 per 100,000 person-years was found in those aged between 55 and 59 years. The regional distribution of incidence demonstrated an even spread across 13 UK health authorities except Wales, where the incidence was significantly higher (122 per 100,000 person-years; p < 0.001). The lowest socioeconomic group had the highest incidence (98 per 100,000 person-years). The incidence has risen fourfold since 1987 and as of 2006 shows no signs of plateauing. This study represents the largest general population study of rotator cuff pathology reported to date. The results obtained provide an enhanced appreciation of the epidemiology of rotator cuff pathology and may help to direct future upper limb orthopaedic services. PMID:24589790

  20. Clinical evidence in the treatment of rotator cuff tears with hyaluronic acid

    PubMed Central

    Osti, Leonardo; Buda, Matteo; Buono, Angelo Del; Osti, Raffaella; Massari, Leo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Purpose the aim of this quantitative review is to document potential benefit and adverse effects of hyaluronic acid (HA) injection into the shoulder with rotator cuff tears. Methods a systematic literature search was performed in english PubMed, Medline, Ovid, Google Scholar and Embase databases using the combined key words “hyaluronic acid”, “rotator cuff tear”, “hyaluronate”, “shoulder”, “viscosupplementation”, with no limit regarding the year of publication. Articles were included if they reported data on clinical and functional outcomes, complications in series of patients who had undergone HA injection for management of rotator cuff tears. Two Authors screened the selected articles for title, abstract and full text in accordance with predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. The papers were accurately analyzed focusing on objective rating scores reported. Results a total of 11 studies, prospective, 7 were randomized were included by full text. A total of 1102 patients were evaluated clinically after different HA injection compare with corticosteroid injection, physically therapies, saline solution injection and control groups. The use of HA in patients with rotator cuff tears improve VAS and functional score in all trials that we have analyzed. Conclusion intra-articular injection with HA is effective in reducing pain and improving function in shoulder with rotator cuff tears and without severe adverse reaction. Level of evidence Level I. PMID:26958534

  1. The response of tenocytes to commercial scaffolds used for rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Smith, R D; Carr, A; Dakin, S G; Snelling, S J; Yapp, C; Hakimi, O

    2016-01-01

    Surgical repairs of rotator cuff tears have high re-tear rates and many scaffolds have been developed to augment the repair. Understanding the interaction between patients' cells and scaffolds is important for improving scaffold performance and tendon healing. In this in vitro study, we investigated the response of patient-derived tenocytes to eight different scaffolds. Tested scaffolds included X-Repair, Poly-Tape, LARS Ligament, BioFiber (synthetic scaffolds), BioFiber-CM (biosynthetic scaffold), GraftJacket, Permacol, and Conexa (biological scaffolds). Cell attachment, proliferation, gene expression, and morphology were assessed. After one day, more cells attached to synthetic scaffolds with dense, fine and aligned fibres (X-Repair and Poly-Tape). Despite low initial cell attachment, the human dermal scaffold (GraftJacket) promoted the greatest proliferation of cells over 13 days. Expression of collagen types I and III were upregulated in cells grown on non-cross-linked porcine dermis (Conexa). Interestingly, the ratio of collagen I to collagen III mRNA was lower on all dermal scaffolds compared to synthetic and biosynthetic scaffolds. These findings demonstrate significant differences in the response of patient-derived tendon cells to scaffolds that are routinely used for rotator cuff surgery. Synthetic scaffolds promoted increased cell adhesion and a tendon-like cellular phenotype, while biological scaffolds promoted cell proliferation and expression of collagen genes. However, no single scaffold was superior. Our results may help understand the way that patients' cells interact with scaffolds and guide the development of new scaffolds in the future. PMID:26855160

  2. The response of tenocytes to commercial scaffolds used for rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Smith, R D; Carr, A; Dakin, S G; Snelling, S J; Yapp, C; Hakimi, O

    2016-01-01

    Surgical repairs of rotator cuff tears have high re-tear rates and many scaffolds have been developed to augment the repair. Understanding the interaction between patients' cells and scaffolds is important for improving scaffold performance and tendon healing. In this in vitro study, we investigated the response of patient-derived tenocytes to eight different scaffolds. Tested scaffolds included X-Repair, Poly-Tape, LARS Ligament, BioFiber (synthetic scaffolds), BioFiber-CM (biosynthetic scaffold), GraftJacket, Permacol, and Conexa (biological scaffolds). Cell attachment, proliferation, gene expression, and morphology were assessed. After one day, more cells attached to synthetic scaffolds with dense, fine and aligned fibres (X-Repair and Poly-Tape). Despite low initial cell attachment, the human dermal scaffold (GraftJacket) promoted the greatest proliferation of cells over 13 days. Expression of collagen types I and III were upregulated in cells grown on non-cross-linked porcine dermis (Conexa). Interestingly, the ratio of collagen I to collagen III mRNA was lower on all dermal scaffolds compared to synthetic and biosynthetic scaffolds. These findings demonstrate significant differences in the response of patient-derived tendon cells to scaffolds that are routinely used for rotator cuff surgery. Synthetic scaffolds promoted increased cell adhesion and a tendon-like cellular phenotype, while biological scaffolds promoted cell proliferation and expression of collagen genes. However, no single scaffold was superior. Our results may help understand the way that patients' cells interact with scaffolds and guide the development of new scaffolds in the future. PMID:26815643

  3. Correlation between Rotator Cuff Tears and Repeated Subacromial Steroid Injections: A Case-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, M; Singh, B; Nicolaou, N; Ravikumar, KJ

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Concern exists regarding potential damage to the rotator cuff from repeated corticosteroid injections into the subacromial space. PATIENTS AND METHODS In this retrospective, case-controlled study, 230 consecutive patients presenting to three orthopaedic units with subacromial impingement and investigated as an end-point with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the shoulder were divided into groups having received less than three or three or more subacromial injections of corticosteroids. RESULTS With no significant difference in age and sex distribution, analysis by MRI showed no significant difference between the two groups in the incidence of rotator cuff tear (P < 1.0). CONCLUSIONS This suggests that corticosteroid use in patients with subacromial impingement should not be considered a causative factor in rotator cuff tears. PMID:19409148

  4. Synovial Chondromatosis of the Subacromial Bursa Causing a Bursal-Sided Rotator Cuff Tear

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Julie A.; Garrigues, Grant E.

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is an uncommon condition, and involvement of the shoulder is even more rare. We report on a 39-year-old female who presented with symptoms, radiographic features, and intraoperative findings consistent with multiple subacromial loose bodies resulting in a partial-thickness, bursal-sided rotator cuff tear of the supraspinatus muscle. She was treated with an arthroscopic removal of loose bodies, complete excision of the subacromial/subdeltoid bursa, acromioplasty, and rotator cuff repair. To our knowledge, this is the first report of arthroscopic treatment for a bursal-sided, partial-thickness rotator cuff tear treated with greater than two-year clinical and radiographic follow-up. We utilized shoulder scores, preoperative and postoperative range of motion, and imaging to assess the results of treatment and surveillance for recurrence in our patient after two-year follow-up. PMID:25861500

  5. Epimuscular Fat in the Human Rotator Cuff Is a Novel Beige Depot

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Gretchen A.; Gibbons, Michael C.; Sato, Eugene; Lane, John G.; Ward, Samuel R.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic rotator cuff (RC) tears are a common and debilitating injury, characterized by dramatic expansion of adipose tissue, muscle atrophy, and limited functional recovery. The role of adipose expansion in RC pathology is unknown; however, given the identified paracrine/endocrine regulation by other adipose depots, it likely affects tissue function outside its boundaries. Therefore, we characterized the epimuscular (EM) fat depot of the human rotator cuff, defined its response to RC tears, and evaluated its influence on myogenesis in vitro. EM fat biopsies exhibited morphological and functional features of human beige fat compared with patient-matched s.c. biopsies, which appeared whiter. The transcriptional profile of EM fat and isolated EM adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) shifted as a function of the tear state; EM fat from intact cuffs had significantly elevated expression of the genes associated with uncoupled respiration, and the EM fat from torn cuffs had increased expression of beige-selective genes. EM ASC cocultures with human- and mouse-derived myogenic cells exhibited increased levels of myogenesis compared with s.c. cultures. Increased fusion and decreased proliferation of myogenic cells, rather than changes to the ASCs, were found to underlie this effect. Taken together, these data suggest that EM fat in the human rotator cuff is a novel beige adipose depot influenced by cuff state with therapeutic potential for promoting myogenesis in neighboring musculature. Significance Rotator cuff tears affect millions of people in the U.S.; however, current interventions are hindered by persistent muscle degeneration. This study identifies the therapeutic potential for muscle recovery in the epimuscular fat in the rotator cuff, previously considered a negative feature of the pathology, and finds that this fat is beige, rather than white. This is important for two reasons. First, the stem cells that were isolated from this beige fat are more myogenic than those from white fat, which have been the focus of stem cell-based therapies to date, suggesting epimuscular fat could be a better stem cell source to augment rotator cuff repair. Second, these beige stem cells promote myogenesis in neighboring cells in culture, suggesting the potential for this fat to be manipulated therapeutically to promote muscle recovery through secreted signals. PMID:25999520

  6. [Irreparable rotator cuff tears : Debridement, partial reconstruction, tendon transfer or reversed shoulder arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Patzer, Th; Hufeland, M; Krauspe, R

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic options for the treatment of irreparable rotator cuff tears are fluent, are dependent on the patients' claims and demands and on the grade of the ongoing cuff tear arthropathy.A partial rotator cuff reconstruction with sufficient tenolysis combined with interval slide techniques to restore the anterior and posterior force couple may be indicated if there is no fatty degeneration > grade 3 of the rotator cuff muscles in a well-centered joint. The margin convergence technique with side-by-side adaptation of the tendon limbs may reduce the load on the reconstructed tendons.The role of the suprascapular nerve, which can probably be constricted by the retracted rotator cuff, and its therapy has not been completely clarified. When distinct symptoms are present neurolysis may be reasonable.Tendon transfers can be indicated in a cooperative patient < 65 years with a higher grade of muscular atrophy but without degenerative changes > grade II according to Hamada with the loss of active external rotation but performable active flexion. For posterosuperior tears the latissimus dorsi or recently the teres major tendon transfer to the rotator cuff footprint may be appropriate. For nonreconstructable anterosuperior tears a partial transfer of the pectoralis major tendon is possible.Careful subacromial debridement combined with biceps tenotomy and a cautious or reversed decompression may reduce the pain temporarily without having an influence on active motion until with the loss of active elevation the indication for a reversed shoulder arthroplasty is reached.In the mean time, absorbable subacromial spacers may re-center the humeral head, but the effectiveness of this therapy on clinical outcome should be analyzed in further studies. PMID:26768144

  7. Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff: state of the art in diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Merolla, Giovanni; Singh, Sanjay; Paladini, Paolo; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    Calcific tendinitis is a painful shoulder disorder characterised by either single or multiple deposits in the rotator cuff tendon. Although the disease subsides spontaneously in most cases, a subpopulation of patients continue to complain of pain and shoulder dysfunction and the deposits do not show any signs of resolution. Although several treatment options have been proposed, clinical results are controversial and often the indication for a given therapy remains a matter of clinician choice. Herein, we report on the current state of the art in the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff. PMID:26163832

  8. Increased Upper Trapezius Muscle Stiffness in Overhead Athletes with Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Leong, Hio Teng; Hug, François; Fu, Siu Ngor

    2016-01-01

    Although excessive tension of the upper trapezius (UT) is thought to contribute to rotator cuff tendinopathy, no study examined UT tension in athletes with and without rotator cuff tendinopathy. Here we used UT shear modulus measured using ultrasound shear wave elastography as an index of muscle stiffness/tension. The aims of this study were twofold: 1) to determine whether the UT muscle shear modulus is altered in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy compared to asymptomatic athletes, and 2) to detect optimal cut-off points of UT shear modulus in identifying athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Forty-three male volleyball players (17 asymptomatic and 26 with rotator cuff tendinopathy, mean age = 22.9±3.5 years) participated in the study. UT shear modulus was quantified during active arm holding at 30° and 60° of shoulder abduction and passive arm positioning at 0°, 30° and 60° of shoulder abduction. During the active tasks, the UT shear modulus was higher in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy than the asymptomatic athletes (p = 0.002), regardless the arm position. During the passive tasks, athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy exhibited a higher UT shear modulus than asymptomatic athletes only at 0° of shoulder abduction (13.0±2.5 kPa vs 10.2±1.8 kPa, p = 0.001). When considering the active task, an optimal cut-off shear modulus of 12.0 kPa at 30° of shoulder abduction (sensitivity = 0.84, specificity = 0.57, AUC = 0.757, p = 0.008) and 9.5 kPa at 60° of shoulder abduction (sensitivity = 0.88, specificity = 0.67, AUC = 0.816, p = 0.002) was detected. When considering the passive task at 0° of shoulder abduction, a cut-off of 12.2 kPa was found (sensitivity = 0.73, AUC = 0.817, p = 0.001). Findings from the present study show that monitoring passive and active UT muscle shear modulus may provide important information for the prevention/rehabilitation of rotator cuff tendinopathy. PMID:27159276

  9. Increased Upper Trapezius Muscle Stiffness in Overhead Athletes with Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Hio Teng; Hug, François; Fu, Siu Ngor

    2016-01-01

    Although excessive tension of the upper trapezius (UT) is thought to contribute to rotator cuff tendinopathy, no study examined UT tension in athletes with and without rotator cuff tendinopathy. Here we used UT shear modulus measured using ultrasound shear wave elastography as an index of muscle stiffness/tension. The aims of this study were twofold: 1) to determine whether the UT muscle shear modulus is altered in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy compared to asymptomatic athletes, and 2) to detect optimal cut-off points of UT shear modulus in identifying athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Forty-three male volleyball players (17 asymptomatic and 26 with rotator cuff tendinopathy, mean age = 22.9±3.5 years) participated in the study. UT shear modulus was quantified during active arm holding at 30° and 60° of shoulder abduction and passive arm positioning at 0°, 30° and 60° of shoulder abduction. During the active tasks, the UT shear modulus was higher in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy than the asymptomatic athletes (p = 0.002), regardless the arm position. During the passive tasks, athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy exhibited a higher UT shear modulus than asymptomatic athletes only at 0° of shoulder abduction (13.0±2.5 kPa vs 10.2±1.8 kPa, p = 0.001). When considering the active task, an optimal cut-off shear modulus of 12.0 kPa at 30° of shoulder abduction (sensitivity = 0.84, specificity = 0.57, AUC = 0.757, p = 0.008) and 9.5 kPa at 60° of shoulder abduction (sensitivity = 0.88, specificity = 0.67, AUC = 0.816, p = 0.002) was detected. When considering the passive task at 0° of shoulder abduction, a cut-off of 12.2 kPa was found (sensitivity = 0.73, AUC = 0.817, p = 0.001). Findings from the present study show that monitoring passive and active UT muscle shear modulus may provide important information for the prevention/rehabilitation of rotator cuff tendinopathy. PMID:27159276

  10. The role of the peripheral and central nervous systems in rotator cuff disease.

    PubMed

    Bachasson, Damien; Singh, Anshuman; Shah, Sameer B; Lane, John G; Ward, Samuel R

    2015-08-01

    Rotator cuff (RC) disease is an extremely common condition associated with shoulder pain, reduced functional capacities, and impaired quality of life. It primarily involves alterations in tendon health and mechanical properties that can ultimately lead to tendon failure. RC tendon tears induce progressive muscle changes that have a negative impact on surgical reparability of the RC tendons and clinical outcomes. At the same time, a significant base of clinical data suggests a relatively weak relationship between RC integrity and clinical presentation, emphasizing the multifactorial aspects of RC disease. This review aims to summarize the potential contribution of peripheral, spinal, and supraspinal neural factors that may (1) exacerbate structural and functional muscle changes induced by tendon tear, (2) compromise the reversal of these changes during surgery and rehabilitation, (3) contribute to pain generation and persistence of pain, (4) impair shoulder function through reduced proprioception, kinematics, and muscle recruitment, and (5) help explain interindividual differences and response to treatment. Given the current clinical and scientific interest in peripheral nerve injury in the context of RC disease and surgery, we carefully reviewed this body of literature with a particular emphasis on suprascapular neuropathy that has generated a large number of studies in the past decade. Within this process, we highlight the gaps in current knowledge and suggest research avenues for scientists and clinicians. PMID:26189809

  11. Comparison of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in healthy patients over and under 65 years of age.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Papalia, Rocco; Del Buono, Angelo; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-12-01

    We compared the outcomes of arthroscopically repaired rotator cuff tears in 28 patients older than 65 years (the over 65 group: median age 70 years) with a control group of 28 patients younger than 65 years (the under 65 group: median age 57 years). The groups were similar in regard to sex distribution, surgical technique, and post-operative rehabilitation programmes, but different in age. After careful arthroscopic evaluation of the full-thickness rotator cuff tear, rotator cuff repair and biceps tenotomy were performed in all patients. Pre- and post-operatively, each patient was evaluated for range of motion, shoulder score (UCLA), and SF-36 self-administered questionnaire. Comparing pre- versus post-operative status at a minimum 24 months follow-up, forward elevation, internal and external rotation, modified UCLA rating system scores, and SF-36 scores improved significantly in both groups, with no significant difference between the groups. At the last follow-up, strength improved significantly in both groups, with non-significant intergroup difference. The Popeye sign was detected in 13/28 (46%) of the patients in the over 65 group and in 11/28 (39%) in the under 65 group (χ = 0.29) with non-significant difference between the two groups. In selected active patients older than 65, arthroscopic rotator cuff repair associated with biceps tenotomy (when necessary) can yield clinical and related quality of life outcomes similar to those of patients younger than 65 years. PMID:20182868

  12. Clinical Outcomes of Conservative Treatment and Arthroscopic Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears: A Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Hyung; Do, Hyun Kyung; Lee, Joong Hoon; Kim, Bo Ram; Noh, Jee Hyun; Choi, Soo Hyun; Chung, Sun Gun; Lee, Shi-Uk; Choi, Ji Eun; Kim, Seihee; Kim, Min Jee

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical outcomes following conservative treatment and arthroscopic repair in patients with a rotator cuff tear. Methods In this retrospective study, patients aged >50 years with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear were reviewed. The rotator cuff tendons were evaluated using ultrasonography, shoulder magnetic resonance imaging or MR arthrography, and the patients with either a high-grade partial-thickness or small-to-medium-sized (≤3 cm) full-thickness tear were included in this study. The primary outcome measures were a pain assessment score and range of motion (ROM) at 1-year follow-up. The secondary outcomes were the rate of tear progression or retear along with the rate of symptom aggravation after the treatments. Results A total of 357 patients were enrolled, including 183 patients that received conservative treatment and 174 patients who received an arthroscopic repair. The pain assessment score (p<0.001) and the ROM in forward flexion (p<0.001) were significantly improved in both groups. The ROM in internal rotation did not significantly change after conservative treatment and arthroscopic repair. The pain assessment score and ROM were not significantly different between the two groups. Retear was observed in 9.6% of patients who had an arthroscopic repair and tear progression was found in 6.7% of those who underwent conservative treatment. The proportion of aggravation for pain and ROM did not significantly differ between the two groups. Conclusion The effectiveness of conservative treatment is not inferior to arthroscopic repair for patients >50 years old with a less than medium-sized rotator cuff tear in a 1-year follow-up period. Further study is warranted to find the optimal combination of conservative treatment for a symptomatic rotator cuff tear. PMID:27152275

  13. Eccentric training as a new approach for rotator cuff tendinopathy: Review and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Paula R; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco; Salvini, Tania F

    2014-01-01

    Excessive mechanical loading is considered the major cause of rotator cuff tendinopathy. Although tendon problems are very common, they are not always easy to treat. Eccentric training has been proposed as an effective conservative treatment for the Achilles and patellar tendinopathies, but less evidence exists about its effectiveness for the rotator cuff tendinopathy. The mechanotransduction process associated with an adequate dose of mechanical load might explain the beneficial results of applying the eccentric training to the tendons. An adequate load increases healing and an inadequate (over or underuse) load can deteriorate the tendon structure. Different eccentric training protocols have been used in the few studies conducted for people with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Further, the effects of the eccentric training for rotator cuff tendinopathy were only evaluated on pain, function and strength. Future studies should assess the effects of the eccentric training also on shoulder kinematics and muscle activity. Individualization of the exercise prescription, comprehension and motivation of the patients, and the establishment of specific goals, practice and efforts should all be considered when prescribing the eccentric training. In conclusion, eccentric training should be used aiming improvement of the tendon degeneration, but more evidence is necessary to establish the adequate dose-response and to determine long-term follow-up effects. PMID:25405092

  14. A New Technique for Patch Augmentation of Rotator Cuff Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Mihara, Shuzou; Ono, Teruyasu; Inoue, Hirofumi; Kisimoto, Tetsurou

    2014-01-01

    Massive rotator cuff tears defying primary repair have been treated with debridement, arthroscopic subacromial decompression, partial repair, muscle-tendon transfer, and joint prosthesis, among other techniques. However, the treatment results have not been satisfactory compared with those of small- to medium-sized rotator cuff tears; each procedure has its merits and demerits, and currently, there is no single established method. For massive rotator cuff tears defying primary repair, the arthroscopic patch graft procedure has been reported as an effective surgical procedure, and this procedure is chosen as the first-line treatment in our department. In this procedure, suture anchors are generally used to fix the patch graft to the footprint on the side of the greater tuberosity. However, tendon-to-bone healing is frequently difficult to achieve, and bone-to-bone healing seems more advantageous for the repair of the rotator cuff attachment site. To improve the results of treatment, a new patch graft procedure was developed, in which the iliotibial ligament with bone was collected at Gerdy's tubercle and the bone was anchored to the footprint on the side of the greater tuberosity. With this procedure, excellent results were obtained, although only short-term results are available at present. The technique and its results so far are reported. PMID:25126505

  15. Single-Versus Double-Row Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair in Massive Tears

    PubMed Central

    Wang, EnZhi; Wang, Liang; Gao, Peng; Li, ZhongJi; Zhou, Xiao; Wang, SongGang

    2015-01-01

    Background It is a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons to treat massive rotator cuff tears. The optimal management of massive rotator cuff tears remains controversial. Therefore, the goal of this study was to compare arthroscopic single- versus double-row rotator cuff repair with a larger sample size. Material/Methods Of the subjects with massive rotator cuff tears, 146 were treated using single-row repair, and 102 were treated using double-row repair. Pre- and postoperative functional outcomes and radiographic images were collected. The clinical outcomes were evaluated for a minimum of 2 years. Results No significant differences were shown between the groups in terms of functional outcomes. Regarding the integrity of the tendon, a lower rate of post-treatment retear was observed in patients who underwent double-row repair compared with single-row repair. Conclusions The results suggest that double-row repair is relatively superior in shoulder ROM and the strength of tendon compared with single-row repair. Future studies involving more patients in better-designed randomized controlled trials will be required. PMID:26017641

  16. Symptoms of Pain Do Not Correlate with Rotator Cuff Tear Severity

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Warren R.; Kuhn, John E.; Sanders, Rosemary; An, Qi; Baumgarten, Keith M.; Bishop, Julie Y.; Brophy, Robert H.; Carey, James L.; Holloway, G. Brian; Jones, Grant L.; Ma, C. Benjamin; Marx, Robert G.; McCarty, Eric C.; Poddar, Sourav K.; Smith, Matthew V.; Spencer, Edwin E.; Vidal, Armando F.; Wolf, Brian R.; Wright, Rick W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: For many orthopaedic disorders, symptoms correlate with disease severity. The objective of this study was to determine if pain level is related to the severity of rotator cuff disorders. Methods: A cohort of 393 subjects with an atraumatic symptomatic full-thickness rotator-cuff tear treated with physical therapy was studied. Baseline pretreatment data were used to examine the relationship between the severity of rotator cuff disease and pain. Disease severity was determined by evaluating tear size, retraction, superior humeral head migration, and rotator cuff muscle atrophy. Pain was measured on the 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) in the patient-reported American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score. A linear multiple regression model was constructed with use of the continuous VAS score as the dependent variable and measures of rotator cuff tear severity and other nonanatomic patient factors as the independent variables. Forty-eight percent of the patients were female, and the median age was sixty-one years. The dominant shoulder was involved in 69% of the patients. The duration of symptoms was less than one month for 8% of the patients, one to three months for 22%, four to six months for 20%, seven to twelve months for 15%, and more than a year for 36%. The tear involved only the supraspinatus in 72% of the patients; the supraspinatus and infraspinatus, with or without the teres minor, in 21%; and only the subscapularis in 7%. Humeral head migration was noted in 16%. Tendon retraction was minimal in 48%, midhumeral in 34%, glenohumeral in 13%, and to the glenoid in 5%. The median baseline VAS pain score was 4.4. Results: Multivariable modeling, controlling for other baseline factors, identified increased comorbidities (p = 0.002), lower education level (p = 0.004), and race (p = 0.041) as the only significant factors associated with pain on presentation. No measure of rotator cuff tear severity correlated with pain (p > 0.25). Conclusions: Anatomic features defining the severity of atraumatic rotator cuff tears are not associated with the pain level. Factors associated with pain are comorbidities, lower education level, and race. Level of Evidence: Prognostic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:24875019

  17. T lymphocytes are not required for the development of fatty degeneration after rotator cuff tear

    PubMed Central

    Gumucio, J.; Flood, M.; Harning, J.; Phan, A.; Roche, S.; Lynch, E.; Bedi, A.; Mendias, C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Rotator cuff tears are among the most common and debilitating upper extremity injuries. Chronic cuff tears result in atrophy and an infiltration of fat into the muscle, a condition commonly referred to as ‘fatty degeneration’. While stem cell therapies hold promise for the treatment of cuff tears, a suitable immunodeficient animal model that could be used to study human or other xenograft-based therapies for the treatment of rotator cuff injuries had not previously been identified. Methods A full-thickness, massive supraspinatus and infraspinatus tear was induced in adult T-cell deficient rats. We hypothesised that, compared with controls, 28 days after inducing a tear we would observe a decrease in muscle force production, an accumulation of type IIB fibres, and an upregulation in the expression of genes involved with muscle atrophy, fibrosis and inflammation. Results Chronic cuff tears in nude rats resulted in a 30% to 40% decrease in muscle mass, a 23% reduction in production of muscle force, and an induction of genes that regulate atrophy, fibrosis, lipid accumulation, inflammation and macrophage recruitment. Marked large lipid droplet accumulation was also present. Conclusions The extent of degenerative changes in nude rats was similar to what was observed in T-cell competent rats. T cells may not play an important role in regulating muscle degeneration following chronic muscle unloading. The general similarities between nude and T-cell competent rats suggest the nude rat is likely an appropriate preclinical model for the study of xenografts that have the potential to enhance the treatment of chronically torn rotator cuff muscles. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:262–72. PMID:25185444

  18. Pulsed electromagnetic fields after rotator cuff repair: a randomized, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Buono, Angelo Del; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    The current study tested the hypothesis that the use of pulsed electromagnetic fields after rotator cuff repair is effective in the short term as an adjuvant treatment to reduce local inflammation, postoperative joint swelling, and recovery time, as well as to induce pain relief. Sixty-six patients who underwent shoulder arthroscopy for repair of small to medium rotator cuff tears were randomly divided into 2 groups with a block randomization procedure. Thirty-two patients underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and application of pulsed electromagnetic fields postoperatively; 34 patients underwent rotator cuff repair and placebo treatment (placebo group). All patients had the same postoperative rehabilitation protocol. At 3 months from the index procedure, visual analog scale, range of motion, and University of California at Los Angeles and Constant scores were significantly better in the pulsed electromagnetic fields group than in the placebo group (P<.05). Three patients in the pulsed electromagnetic fields group and 7 patients in the placebo group had mild to moderate capsulitis (P=.2). Severe capsulitis occurred in 1 patient in the pulsed electromagnetic fields group and 2 patients in the placebo group (P=.6). At the last follow-up (minimum, 2 years), clinical and functional outcomes were further improved in both groups, with no significant intergroup differences. Application of pulsed electromagnetic fields after rotator cuff repair is safe and reduces postoperative pain, analgesic use, and stiffness in the short term. At 2 years, no difference was seen in outcomes in patients who did or did not undergo treatment with pulsed electromagnetic fields. PMID:25760511

  19. Synthetic and degradable patches: an emerging solution for rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Hakimi, Osnat; Mouthuy, Pierre-Alexis; Carr, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The use of rotator cuff augmentation has increased dramatically over the last 10 years in response to the high rate of failure observed after non-augmented surgery. However, although augmentations have been shown to reduce shoulder pain, there is no consensus or clear guideline as to what is the safest or most efficacious material. Current augmentations, either available commercially or in development, can be classified into three categories: non-degradable structures, extra cellular matrix (ECM)-based patches and degradable synthetic scaffolds. Non-degradable structures have excellent mechanical properties, but can cause problems of infection and loss of integrity in the long-term. ECM-based patches usually demonstrate excellent biological properties in vitro, but studies have highlighted complications in vivo due to poor mechanical support and to infection or inflammation. Degradable synthetic scaffolds represent the new generation of implants. It is proposed that a combination of good mechanical properties, active promotion of biological healing, low infection risk and bio-absorption are the ideal characteristics of an augmentation material. Among the materials with these features, those processed by electrospinning have shown great promis. However, their clinical effectiveness has yet to be proven and well conducted clinical trials are urgently required. PMID:23837794

  20. Do Different Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors Impair Rotator Cuff Healing in a Rabbit Model?

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi; Li, Yue; Li, Feng-Long; Li, Xu; Zhuo, Hong-Wu; Jiang, Chun-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background: The effect of selective and non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors on tendon healing was variable. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the influence of non-selective COX inhibitor, ibuprofen and flurbiprofen axetil and selective COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib on the tendon healing process in a rabbit model. Methods: Ninety-six New Zealand rabbits were used as rotator cuff repair models. After surgery, they were divided randomly into four groups: Ibuprofen (10 mg·kg−1·d−1), celecoxib (8 mg·kg−1·d−1), flurbiprofen axetil (2 mg·kg−1·d−1), and control group (blank group). All drugs were provided for 7 days. Rabbits in each group were sacrificed at 3, 6, and 12 weeks after tendon repair. Tendon biomechanical load failure tests were performed. The percentage of type I collagen on the bone tendon insertion was calculated by Picric acid Sirius red staining and image analysis. All data were compared among the four groups at the same time point. All data in each group were also compared across the different time points. Qualitative histological evaluation of the bone tendon insertion was also performed among groups. Results: The load to failure increased significantly with time in each group. There were significantly lower failure loads in the celecoxib group than in the control group at 3 weeks (0.533 vs. 0.700, P = 0.002), 6 weeks (0.607 vs. 0.763, P = 0.01), and 12 weeks (0.660 vs. 0.803, P = 0.002), and significantly lower percentage of type I collagen at 3 weeks (11.5% vs. 27.6%, P = 0.001), 6 weeks (40.5% vs. 66.3%, P = 0.005), and 12 weeks (59.5% vs. 86.3%, P = 0.001). Flurbiprofen axetil showed significant differences at 3 weeks (failure load: 0.600 vs. 0.700, P = 0.024; percentage of type I collagen: 15.6% vs. 27.6%, P = 0.001), but no significant differences at 6 and 12 weeks comparing with control group, whereas the ibuprofen groups did not show any significant difference at each time point. Conclusions: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can delay tendon healing in the early stage after rotator cuff repair. Compared with nonselective COX inhibitors, selective COX-2 inhibitors significantly impact tendon healing. PMID:26315084

  1. Partial rotator cuff injury in athletes: bursal or articular?☆

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Cassiano Diniz; Cohen, Carina; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio; Monteiro, Gustavo Cará; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno

    2015-01-01

    A painful shoulder is a very common complaint among athletes, especially in the case of those in sports involving throwing. Partial lesions of the rotator cuff may be very painful and cause significant functional limitation to athletes’ sports practice. The incidence of partial lesions of the cuff is variable (13–37%). It is difficult to make the clinical and radiological diagnosis, and this condition should be borne in mind in the cases of all athletes who present symptoms of rotator cuff syndrome, including in patients who are diagnosed only with tendinopathy. Objective To evaluate the epidemiological behavior of partial lesions of the rotator cuff in both amateur and professional athletes in different types of sports. Methods We evaluated 720 medical files on athletes attended at the shoulder service of the Discipline of Sports Medicine at the Sports Traumatology Center, Federal University of São Paulo. The majority of them were men (65%). Among all the patients, 83 of them were diagnosed with partial lesions of the rotator cuff, by means of ultrasonography or magnetic resonance, or in some cases using both. We applied the binomial test to compare the proportions found. Result It was observed that intra-articular lesions predominated (67.6%) and that these occurred more frequently in athletes in sports involving throwing (66%). Bursal lesions occurred in 32.4% of the athletes, predominantly in those who did muscle building (75%). Conclusion Intra-articular lesions are more frequent than bursal lesions and they occur predominantly in athletes in sports involving throwing, while bursal lesions were more prevalent in athletes who did muscle building. PMID:26417568

  2. Treatment Options for Rotator Cuff Tears: A Guide for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... and repairs the tear with regular surgical instruments. Mini-open surgery: The surgeon uses an arthroscope for ... that: There is no difference between the open, mini-open, and arthroscopic types of surgery in the ...

  3. The MRI geyser sign: acromioclavicular joint cysts in the setting of a chronic rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Cooper, H John; Milillo, Ralph; Klein, Devon A; DiFelice, Gregory S

    2011-06-01

    We present the case of a 71-year-old man with a large acromioclavicular (AC) joint cyst successfully managed with surgical excision. AC joint cysts are soft tissue masses generally signifying underlying rotator cuff pathology. Traditionally, these cysts were identified with shoulder arthrography as a "geyser" of fluid escaping through the AC joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is today's preferred imaging modality; we describe the MRI equivalent of the "geyser sign," signifying synovial fluid escaping through the cuff defect, across the subacromial bursa, and decompressing superiorly through a degenerated AC joint. Surgical management is preferred for symptomatic cysts. Based on a review of limited retrospective case series, recommendations for management of these lesions are as follows. Repair of the rotator cuff is preferable whenever possible. In the case of an irreparable defect, good results can be achieved through excisional AC joint arthroplasty and resection of the cyst base. Aspiration of these cysts should not be attempted, due to the high recurrence rate and potential for a draining sinus. Hemiarthroplasty also may be effective in indirectly decompressing these cysts; but given the invasive nature of this procedure, it should be reserved for patients who are also symptomatic from cuff arthropathy. PMID:21869946

  4. Effect of highly purified capsaicin on articular cartilage and rotator cuff tendon healing: An in vivo rabbit study.

    PubMed

    Friel, Nicole A; McNickle, Allison G; DeFranco, Michael J; Wang, FanChia; Shewman, Elizabeth F; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J; Bach, Bernard R; Chubinskaya, Susan; Kramer, Susan M; Wang, Vincent M

    2015-12-01

    Highly purified capsaicin has emerged as a promising injectable compound capable of providing sustained pain relief following a single localized treatment during orthopedic surgical procedures. To further assess its reliability for clinical use, the potential effect of highly purified capsaicin on articular cartilage metabolism as well as tendon structure and function warrants clarification. In the current study, rabbits received unilateral supraspinatus transection and repair with a single 1 ml injection of capsaicin (R+C), PEG-only placebo (R+P), or saline (R+S) into the glenohumeral joint (GHJ). An additional group received 1 ml capsaicin onto an intact rotator cuff (I+C). At 18 weeks post-op, cartilage proteoglycan (PG) synthesis and content as well as cell viability were similar (p>0.05) across treatment groups. Biomechanical testing revealed no differences (p>0.05) among tendon repair treatment groups. Similarly, histologic features of both cartilage and repaired tendons showed minimal differences across groups. Hence, in this rabbit model, a single injection of highly purified capsaicin into the GHJ does not induce a deleterious response with regard to cartilage matrix metabolism and cell viability, or rotator cuff healing. These data provide further evidence supporting the use of injectable, highly purified capsaicin as a safe alternative for management of postoperative pain following GHJ surgery. PMID:26135547

  5. Rotator cuff muscle function and its relation to scapular morphology in apes.

    PubMed

    Larson, Susan G; Stern, Jack T

    2013-10-01

    It is widely held that many differences among primate species in scapular morphology can be functionally related to differing demands on the shoulder associated with particular locomotor habits. This perspective is largely based on broad scale studies, while more narrow comparisons of scapular form often fail to follow predictions based on inferred differences in shoulder function. For example, the ratio of supraspinous fossa/infraspinous fossa size in apes is commonly viewed as an indicator of the importance of overhead use of the forelimb, yet paradoxically, the African apes, the most terrestrial of the great apes, have higher scapular fossa ratios than the more suspensory orangutan. The recent discovery of several nearly complete early hominin scapular specimens, and their apparent morphological affinities to scapulae of orangutans and gorillas rather than chimpanzees, has led to renewed interest in the comparative analysis of human and extant ape scapular form. To facilitate the functional interpretation of differences in ape scapulae, particularly in regard to relative scapular fossa size, we used electromyography (EMG) to document the activity patterns in all four rotator cuff muscles in orangutans and gibbons, comparing the results with previously published data for chimpanzees. The EMG results indicate that the distinctive contributions of each cuff muscle to locomotion are the same in the three ape species, failing to support inferences of differences in rotator cuff function based on relative scapular fossa size comparisons. It is also shown that relative scapular fossa size is not in fact a good predictor of either the relative masses or cross-sectional areas of the rotator cuff muscles in apes, and relative fossa size gives a false impression of the importance of individual cuff muscles to locomotor differences among apes. A possible explanation for the disparity between fossa and muscle size relates to the underappreciated role of the scapular spine in structural reinforcement of the blade. PMID:23968682

  6. Convergent Validity of the Constant-Murley Outcome Measure in Patients with Rotator Cuff Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bean, Andrea; MacDermid, Joy C.; van Osnabrugge, Varda; Travers, Niki; Holtby, Richard

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Despite the popularity of the Constant-Murley score (CMS), a combined patient-report and objective (health professional administered) shoulder outcome measure, minimal information exists on its reliability or validity. The purpose of this study was to examine (1) internal consistency and convergent validity of the CMS and (2) the degree to which other shoulder measures explain variation in range of motion and strength components of the CMS. Methods: In this cross-sectional study of outcome measures, 45 patients undergoing conservative or surgical treatment for rotator cuff disease participated. Two disease-specific outcome measures, one shoulder-specific measure, and one upper extremity outcome measure were compared to the CMS. Results: Correlations between competing measures and relative total CMS were moderate (0.56 to 0.75). The American Shoulder & Elbow Score, the Upper Extremity Functional Index, the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index, and the Rotator Cuff Quality of Life index explained 38%, 28%, 26%, and 10% of variance of the objective component of the CMS respectively. Conclusions: The patient-report component of the CMS measures a multidimensional concept. The strength component had moderate correlations with isometric strength measures of the shoulder external rotators and abductors. The total CMS appears to measure a construct that is not totally captured by competing measures. The unexplained variance may be due, in part, to the lack of importance of the patient's physical impairment to symptoms or activity limitations as measured by other instruments. PMID:20145743

  7. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty for Management of Postinfectious Arthropathy With Rotator Cuff Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Morris, Brent J; Waggenspack, Wame N; Laughlin, Mitzi S; Elkousy, Hussein A; Gartsman, Gary M; Edwards, T Bradley

    2015-08-01

    Treatment of patients with rotator cuff deficiency and arthritis in the setting of a prior glenohumeral infection (postinfectious arthropathy) is complex, with little evidence to guide treatment. The current authors present their approach to management of these patients and clinical outcomes after reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA). All primary RSAs performed for postinfectious arthropathy and rotator cuff deficiency with native glenohumeral joints were identified in a prospective shoulder arthroplasty registry. Eight patients with a minimum of 2-year follow-up were included in the analysis. Clinical outcomes, including the Constant score, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, the Western Ontario Osteoarthritis Shoulder (WOOS) index, the Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) score, and range of motion measurements, were assessed preoperatively and at final follow-up. At an average follow-up of 4.4 years, no patient had a clinically detectable recurrence of infection. Significant improvements were noted in all outcome scores from preoperative evaluation to final follow-up after RSA, including Constant score (P=.003), ASES score (P<.001), WOOS index (P=.002), SANE score (P=.025), forward flexion (P<.001), abduction (P<.001), and external rotation (P=.020). Seven of 8 patients reported they were satisfied or very satisfied at final follow-up. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty can be performed in patients without significant medical comorbidities in the setting of postinfectious arthropathy and rotator cuff deficiency with a low risk of recurrence of infection. Significant clinical improvements were noted at short-term follow-up. PMID:26270757

  8. Arthroscopic Superior Capsular Reconstruction for Treatment of Massive Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Hirahara, Alan M.; Adams, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Massive irreparable rotator cuff tears have been troublesome entities to treat, especially in younger patients. Few good options exist, leaving most patients in recent years receiving a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty carries serious risks, a limited lifespan, and no other viable options should it fail. Recent biomechanical studies have shown that the superior capsule is critical to containing the glenohumeral joint reduced, allowing the larger muscles like the deltoid and pectoralis major to function properly. The superior capsular reconstruction is an anatomic reconstruction of the superior capsule to restore the normal restraint to superior translation that occurs with a deficient rotator cuff. The technique described in this article is an arthroscopic reconstruction of the superior capsule with dermal allograft. PMID:26870638

  9. Ultrasound vs. MRI in the assessment of rotator cuff structure prior to shoulder arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Christian Alexander; Weber, Marc-André; Neubecker, Clément; Bruckner, Thomas; Tanner, Michael; Zeifang, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims We compared the accuracy of US to 3 T Tesla MRI for the detection of rotator cuff and long biceps tendon pathologies before joint replacement. Methods 45 patients were prospectively included. Results For the supraspinatus tendon, the accuracy of US when using MRI as reference was 91.1%. For the infraspinatus tendon, the accuracy with MRI as reference was 84.4%. The subscapularis tendon was consistently assessed by US and MRI in 35/45 patients (accuracy 77.8%). For the long biceps tendon the accuracy was 86.7%. Conclusion US detection of rotator cuff and biceps tendon integrity is comparable to MRI and should be preferred in revision cases. PMID:25829757

  10. Effects of therapeutic ultrasound and exercise on pain, function, and isokinetic shoulder rotator strength of patients with rotator cuff disease

    PubMed Central

    Analan, Pınar Doruk; Leblebici, Berrin; Adam, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study was to evaluate the effects of therapeutic continuous ultrasound (US) on patients with rotator cuff disease. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-two patients were treated with a standard physiotherapy program consisting of a hot-pack, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), exercises, and US that was supervised by the same physiotherapist. The patients were randomly assigned to either a group that received true US (n=11) or one that received sham US (n=11). [Results] There were significant differences between the pre- and post-intervention UCLA Shoulder Rating Scale and Constant-Murley Shoulder Outcome scores, VAS, and external rotation (ER) peak torque 60°/second values for both the true and sham US groups. However, the between-group differences were not statistically significant. [Conclusion] In patients with rotator cuff disease, physiotherapy interventions effectively treat the pain, improve the clinical status, and increase the muscle strength of the shoulder ER at a low constant angular velocity, with functional improvement being seen immediately after treatment. However, at the end of the intervention, the US had yielded no additional efficacy to the physiotherapy treatment regimen of the patients with rotator cuff disease. PMID:26644656

  11. Long Head of the Biceps Pathology Combined with Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Ditsios, Konstantinos; Agathangelidis, Filon; Boutsiadis, Achilleas; Karataglis, Dimitrios; Papadopoulos, Pericles

    2012-01-01

    The long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) is an anatomic structure commonly involved in painful shoulder conditions as a result of trauma, degeneration, or overuse. Recent studies have pointed out the close correlation between LHBT lesions and rotator cuff (RCT) tears. Clinicians need to take into account the importance of the LHBT in the presence of other shoulder pathologies. This paper provides an up-to-date overview of recent publications on anatomy, pathophysiology, diagnosis, classification, and current treatment strategies. PMID:23209915

  12. Comparison of rotator cuff muscle architecture between humans and other selected vertebrate species.

    PubMed

    Mathewson, Margie A; Kwan, Alan; Eng, Carolyn M; Lieber, Richard L; Ward, Samuel R

    2014-01-15

    In this study, we compare rotator cuff muscle architecture of typically used animal models with that of humans and quantify the scaling relationships of these muscles across mammals. The four muscles that correspond to the human rotator cuff - supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis and teres minor - of 10 commonly studied animals were excised and subjected to a series of comparative measurements. When body mass among animals was regressed against physiological cross-sectional area, muscle mass and normalized fiber length, the confidence intervals suggested geometric scaling but did not exclude other scaling relationships. Based on the architectural difference index (ADI), a combined measure of fiber length-to-moment arm ratio, fiber length-to-muscle length ratio and the fraction of the total rotator cuff physiological cross-sectional area contributed by each muscle, chimpanzees were found to be the most similar to humans (ADI=2.15), followed closely by capuchins (ADI=2.16). Interestingly, of the eight non-primates studied, smaller mammals such as mice, rats and dogs were more similar to humans in architectural parameters compared with larger mammals such as sheep, pigs or cows. The force production versus velocity trade-off (indicated by fiber length-to-moment arm ratio) and the excursion ability (indicated by fiber length-to-muscle length ratio) of humans were also most similar to those of primates, followed by the small mammals. Overall, primates provide the best architectural representation of human muscle architecture. However, based on the muscle architectural parameters of non-primates, smaller rather than larger mammals may be better models for studying muscles related to the human rotator cuff. PMID:24072803

  13. Comparison of rotator cuff muscle architecture between humans and other selected vertebrate species

    PubMed Central

    Mathewson, Margie A.; Kwan, Alan; Eng, Carolyn M.; Lieber, Richard L.; Ward, Samuel R.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we compare rotator cuff muscle architecture of typically used animal models with that of humans and quantify the scaling relationships of these muscles across mammals. The four muscles that correspond to the human rotator cuff – supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis and teres minor – of 10 commonly studied animals were excised and subjected to a series of comparative measurements. When body mass among animals was regressed against physiological cross-sectional area, muscle mass and normalized fiber length, the confidence intervals suggested geometric scaling but did not exclude other scaling relationships. Based on the architectural difference index (ADI), a combined measure of fiber length-to-moment arm ratio, fiber length-to-muscle length ratio and the fraction of the total rotator cuff physiological cross-sectional area contributed by each muscle, chimpanzees were found to be the most similar to humans (ADI=2.15), followed closely by capuchins (ADI=2.16). Interestingly, of the eight non-primates studied, smaller mammals such as mice, rats and dogs were more similar to humans in architectural parameters compared with larger mammals such as sheep, pigs or cows. The force production versus velocity trade-off (indicated by fiber length-to-moment arm ratio) and the excursion ability (indicated by fiber length-to-muscle length ratio) of humans were also most similar to those of primates, followed by the small mammals. Overall, primates provide the best architectural representation of human muscle architecture. However, based on the muscle architectural parameters of non-primates, smaller rather than larger mammals may be better models for studying muscles related to the human rotator cuff. PMID:24072803

  14. A Canine Non-Weight-Bearing Model with Radial Neurectomy for Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiaoxi; Bao, Nirong; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.; Steinmann, Scott P.; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2015-01-01

    Background The major concern of using a large animal model to study rotator cuff repair is the high rate of repair retears. The purpose of this study was to test a non-weight-bearing (NWB) canine model for rotator cuff repair research. Methods First, in the in vitro study, 18 shoulders were randomized to 3 groups. 1) Full-width transections repaired with modified Mason-Allen sutures using 3-0 polyglactin suture, 2) Group 1 repaired using number 2 (#2) polyester braid and long-chain polyethylene suture, and 3) Partial-width transections leaving the superior 2 mm infraspinatus tendon intact without repair. In the in vivo study of 6 dogs, the infraspinatus tendon was partially transected as the same as the in vitro group 3. A radial neurectomy was performed to prevent weight bearing. The operated limb was slung in a custom-made jacket for 6 weeks. Results In the in vitro study, mean ultimate tensile load and stiffness in Group 2 were significantly higher than Group 1 and 3 (p<0.05). In the in vivo study, gross inspection and histology showed that the preserved superior 2-mm portion of the infraspinatus tendon remained intact with normal structure. Conclusions Based on the biomechanical and histological findings, this canine NWB model may be an appropriate and useful model for studies of rotator cuff repair. PMID:26107616

  15. Exercise Therapy for Total Tear of Rotator Cuff: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nejati, Parisa; Akbari, Faramarz

    2013-01-01

    Background Shoulder pain is one of the most common problems in ages older than 60 years of age. Rotator cuff pathology is the most common etiology of shoulder pain. Most of rotator cuff pathologies are treated conservatively in old ages and exercise therapy is not an accepted intervention for management of rotator cuff tear yet. Case presentation The case was a man of 53 years age with shoulder pain who had total tear of supraspinatus tendon and biceps tendinitis in the right shoulder. He had regularly gone swimming, mountain climbing and running in the last 10 years. The case was managed by exercise therapy for 3 months and physical modalities for 20 sessions. Shoulder pain and his function and right shoulder range of motion increased after 3 months. Para clinical findings did not change after treatment, though. The improvements continued 15 months after the beginning of the treatment. Conclusion Exercise therapy was very effective for improving pain and function in total tear of supraspinatus tendon and tendinitis of biceps. PMID:24868434

  16. In Vivo Measurement of Rotator Cuff Tear Tension: Medial Versus Lateral Footprint Position.

    PubMed

    Dierckman, Brian D; Wang, David W; Bahk, Michael S; Burns, Joseph P; Getelman, Mark H

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a study to evaluate in vivo tension applied to the rotator cuff tendon positioned at the medial versus lateral footprint during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. We evaluated 20 consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. During repair, a grasper was inserted through a lateral portal, and a digital weigh scale was attached. The tendon was grasped and translated to the medial footprint, and tension recorded. After a relaxation period, the tendon edge was translated to the lateral footprint, and tension recorded. Mean (SD) tension was 0.41 (0.33) pound when tendons were positioned at the medial footprint and 2.21 (1.20) pounds when they were positioned at the lateral footprint, representing a 5.4-fold difference (P < .0001). For smaller tears (≤20 mm anterior-posterior), 7.6 times less tension was applied to the tendons when pulled to the medial versus lateral footprint. For larger tears, 4.1 times less tension was applied to the tendons when pulled to the medial versus lateral footprint. This study demonstrated a significant, 5.4-fold increase in tension when the tendon edge was reduced to the lateral as opposed to the medial footprint in vivo. PMID:26991588

  17. Arthroscopic Lamina-Specific Double-Row Fixation for Large Delaminated Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Daisuke; Funakoshi, Noboru; Yamashita, Fumiharu

    2014-01-01

    Delamination is a commonly observed finding at the time of rotator cuff repair, but few studies have described the surgical techniques used for delaminated rotator cuff tears (RCTs) or their clinical outcomes. We developed a technique using a combination of a double row and an additional row, which we call lamina-specific double-row fixation, for large delaminated RCTs. The lamina-specific double-row technique is performed using an additional row (lamina-specific lateral row) of suture anchors placed between the typical medial and lateral rows of suture anchors. The technique is performed as follows: (1) medial-row sutures are passed through the inferior (articular-side) and superior (bursal-side) layers in a mattress fashion; (2) lamina-specific lateral-row simple sutures are passed through the inferior layer; and (3) lateral-row simple sutures are passed through the superior layer. We believe that this technique offers the following advantages: (1) creation of a larger area of contact between the inferior layer and the footprint, (2) higher initial fixation strength of the articular-side components of the repaired rotator cuff tendon, and (3) an adaptation between the superficial and inferior layers. This technique represents an alternative option in the operative treatment of large delaminated RCTs. PMID:25685671

  18. Biomechanical testing of a new knotless suture anchor compared with established anchors for rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Pietschmann, Matthias F; Froehlich, Valerie; Ficklscherer, Andreas; Wegener, Bernd; Jansson, Volkmar; Müller, Peter E

    2008-01-01

    Various suture anchors are available for rotator cuff repair. For arthroscopic application, a knotless anchor was developed to simplify the intra-operative handling. We compared the new knotless anchor (BIOKNOTLESStrade mark RC; DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA) with established absorbable and titanium suture anchors (UltraSorbtrade mark and Super Revo 5mmtrade mark; ConMed Linvatec, Utica, NY). Each anchor was tested on 6 human cadaveric shoulders. The anchors were inserted into the greater tuberosity. An incremental cyclic loading was performed. Ultimate failure loads, anchor displacement, and mode of failure were recorded. The anchor displacement of the BIOKNOTLESStrade mark RC (15.3 +/- 5.3 mm) after the first cycle with 75 N was significantly higher than with the two other anchors (Super Revo 2.1 +/- 1.6 mm, UltraSorb: 2.7 +/- 1.1 mm). There was no significant difference in the ultimate failure loads of the 3 anchors. Although the Bioknotlesstrade mark RC indicated comparable maximal pullout strength, it bares the risk of losing contact between the tendon-bone-interface due to a significantly higher system displacement. Therefore, gap formation between the bone and the soft tissue fixation jeopardizes the repair. Bioknotlesstrade mark RC should be used in the lateral row only when a double row technique for rotator cuff repair is performed, and is not appropriate for rotator cuff repair if used on its own. PMID:18396417

  19. Biologic augmentation in rotator cuff repair--should we do it, who should get it, and has it worked?

    PubMed

    McCormack, Richard A; Shreve, Mark; Strauss, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are a common pathologic entity, and rotator cuff repairs are a frequently performed procedure. Given the high rate of structural failure of repair, biological augmentation of repairs is increasingly important. Biological augmentation primarily enhances the healing response and secondarily provides a mechanical bridge for tension free repair. Understanding biology of tendons and tendon healing aids in determining an optimal environment for repair. The basic principles of rotator cuff repair are aimed at achieving high initial fixation strength of the repair, restoring the anatomic footprint of the cuff tendon, minimizing gap formation, and maintaining mechanical stability until biologic healing occurs. Methods of augmentation come in many different forms and can be categorized by cell type and mechanism of delivery. Cell types include individual growth factors, stem cells, or a combination of both. Vehicles range from in situ delivery, such as microfracture, direct injection, or scaffold materials that are biologic or synthetic. PMID:25150331

  20. [Use of cultured human autologous bone marrow stem cells in repair of a rotator cuff tear: preliminary results of a safety study].

    PubMed

    Havlas, V; Kotaška, J; Koníček, P; Trč, T; Konrádová, Š; Kočí, Z; Syková, E

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Rotator cuff tears are one of the most frequent shoulder disorders which are often associated with pain and interfere with proper arm function. In order to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of using cultured human autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) applied to the suture site during arthroscopic repair of a rotator cuff tear, a prospective clinical study was designed and started recently at the authors' department. Its primary goal was to evaluate the safety of using cultured human MSCs, the secondary goal then was to study a therapeutic effect of their application. Preliminary results of the study on a limited number of patients are presented here. MATERIAL AND METHODS Ten patients who met the indication criteria for arthroscopic repair of a rotator cuff tear were included in the study. In addition, they also had to meet inclusion and lack exclusion criteria. According to the protocol, their bone marrow was harvested at 3 to 4 weeks before surgery. Subsequently, an arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff tear was performed and an suspension of cultured MSCs was applied to the suture site at the end of the procedure. The isolation of MSCs from bone marrow and their cultivation was carried out by the company Bioinova, Ltd. The patients were followed up at 6 weeks and 3 and 6 months post-operatively. Their clinical assessment included physical examination of the shoulder, pain intensity evaluation according to the visual analogue scale (VAS), and subjective questionnaires for Constant and University of California (UCLA) scores. All patients underwent MRI examination at 6 post-operative months to evaluate the quality of rotator cuff reconstruction. The findings were compared with the pre-operative results. RESULTS A final evaluation was made in eight patients of 10. Two patients were excluded from the study because their exclusion criteria were fulfilled. The evaluated patients showed significantly better clinical outcomes as early as 6 weeks after surgery; also all pre-operative scores were improved at 3 and 6 months. The average values at 6 months post-operatively were: 0 points for the VAS score, 32 for the UCLA score and 84 for the Constant score. The MRI findings at 6 months after surgery showed fully healed and well-integrated tissue of the rotator cuff tendon attachment in all eight patients. No adverse effects of therapy were recorded during the follow-up period. DISCUSSION The use of autologous stem cells and growth factors in the treatment of tendons, muscles and cartilage is currently the topic of many experimental studies on animal models. Its utilisation in human clinical trials has been reported only marginally; the relevant studies have so far used only suspensions of non-cultured mononuclear cells. Our study, although on a smallsize patient group, provides evidence that human cultured autologous MSCs can safely be used for tissue repair in the indications mentioned above. CONCLUSIONS Our preliminary short-term results show that using human cultured autologous MSCs in the treatment of rotator cuff tears is safe. However, further research is needed, particularly with regard to the effectiveness of the method. Key words: rotator cuff tear, arthroscopic repair, mesenchymal stem cells, tendon, cell therapy. PMID:26317295

  1. Clinical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Results of Arthroscopic Repair of Intratendinous Partial-thickness Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jian; Cui, Guo-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Background: Partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCTs) are being diagnosed more often because of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Compared with articular and bursal side tears, there have been few studies about evaluating the clinical and structural outcomes after intratendinous tear repair. Methods: From 2008 to 2012, 33 consecutive patients with intratendinous PTRCTs underwent arthroscopic repair. All of them were retrospectively evaluated. The University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) and constant scores were evaluated before operation and at the final follow-up. Postoperative cuff integrity was determined using MRI according to Sugaya's classification. Results: At the 2-year follow-up, the average UCLA score increased from 16.7 ± 1.9 to 32.5 ± 3.5, and the constant score increased from 66.2 ± 10.5 to 92.4 ± 6.9 (P < 0.001). Twenty seven patients received follow-up MRI examinations at an average of 15.2 months after surgery. Of these 27 patients, 22 (81.5%) had a healed tendon, and five patients had partial tears. There was no association between functional and anatomic results. Conclusions: For intratendinous PTRCT, clinical outcomes and tendon healing showed good results at a minimum 2-year after arthroscopic repair. PMID:26021507

  2. Intraosseous foreign body granuloma in rotator cuff repair with bioabsorbable suture anchor.

    PubMed

    Nusselt, T; Freche, S; Klinger, H-M; Baums, M H

    2010-08-01

    Biodegradable implants lead to problems such as cyst formation, soft-tissue inflammation, loose implant fragments or local osteolysis. This report represents the first published case of an intraosseous foreign body granuloma in the humeral head after arthroscopic rotator cuff tear fixation with a poly-L: -lactide (PLLA) suture anchor. A 48-year-old female patient presented with pain in her right shoulder. A refixation of her right supraspinatus tendon with a biodegradable suture anchor was performed 11 months ago at an external hospital. Laboratory tests showed normal values for C-reactive protein, leukocytes and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. No signs of infection or instability were noted. The visual analogue scale (VAS) was 8, the simple shoulder test (SST) was 4 and the American shoulder and elbow surgeons score (ASES) was 44. Plain radiographs showed high lucency in the area of the tuberculum majus. MRI showed an intra- and extraosseous mass surrounded by fluid in this area. Surgical care involved arthroscopic debridement and removal of the suture anchor. Histological examination revealed a foreign body granuloma. At the 18-month follow-up the patient was nearly pain-free. The VAS was 2, SST was 10 and ASES was 88. Foreign body granulomas are a well known but rarely described complication that arises after the use of biodegradable suture anchors in shoulder surgery. Every patient presenting with shoulder pain after usage of a biodegradable fixation material should be evaluated closely. Orthopaedic surgeons should be aware of the possibility of delayed foreign body reactions, especially after using PLLA anchors. PMID:20526849

  3. Diagnosis of Calcific Tendonitis of the Rotator Cuff by Using Susceptibility-weighted MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Nörenberg, Dominik; Ebersberger, Hans U; Walter, Thula; Ockert, Ben; Knobloch, Gesine; Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd; Makowski, Marcus R

    2016-02-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic performance of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) and standard shoulder joint magnetic resonance (MR) sequences in comparison to that of conventional radiography for the identification of calcifications in the rotator cuff in patients with calcific tendonitis. Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved this prospective study. Written informed consent was obtained from all subjects. Fifty-four patients clinically suspected of having calcific tendonitis of the rotator cuff were included. On radiographs (the standard of reference), 27 patients had positive calcification findings, and 27 did not. Standard MR sequences and SWI, including magnitude and phase imaging, were performed. The diameter of calcifications was measured to assess intermodality correlations. Sensitivity, specificity, and intra- and interobserver agreement were calculated. Phantom measurements were performed to assess the detection limit of SWI. Results Fifty-six calcifications were detected with radiography in 27 patients. Most (55 calcifications, 98%) could be identified as calcifications by using SWI. Standard T1- and T2-weighted sequences were used to identify 33 calcifications (59%). SWI yielded a sensitivity of 98% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.943, 1) and specificity of 96% (95% CI: 0.886, 1) for the identification of calcifications when compared with radiography. Standard rotator cuff MR sequences yielded a sensitivity of 59% (95% CI: 0.422, 0.758) and specificity of 67% (95% CI: 0.493, 0.847). Diameter measurements demonstrated a high correlation between SWI and radiography (R(2) = 0.90), with overestimation of lesion diameter at SWI (mean ± standard deviation for SWI, 7.6 mm ± 5.4; for radiography, 5.3 mm ± 5.1). SWI yielded higher interobserver agreement (R(2) = 0.99, P < .001; 95% CI: 0.989, 0.996) compared with standard MR sequences (R(2) = 0.67, P = .62; 95% CI: 0.703, 0.899). In phantom experiments, SWI and computed tomography were used to identify small calcifications that were missed at radiography. Conclusion SWI enables the reliable detection of calcifications in the rotator cuff in patients with calcific tendonitis by using conventional radiography as a reference and offers better sensitivity and specificity than standard rotator cuff MR sequences. (©) RSNA, 2015 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26347995

  4. Effects of humeral head compression taping on the isokinetic strength of the shoulder external rotator muscle in patients with rotator cuff tendinitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moon-Hwan; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of humeral head compression taping (HHCT) on the strength of the shoulder external rotator muscle in patients with rotator cuff tendinitis. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty patients with rotator cuff tendinitis were recruited. The shoulder external rotator strength was measured using a Biodex isokinetic dynamometer system. A paired t-test was performed to evaluate within-group differences in the strength of the shoulder external rotator muscle. [Results] Significantly higher shoulder external rotator peak torque and peak torque per body weight were found in the HHCT condition than in the no-taping condition. [Conclusion] HHCT may effectively increase the shoulder external rotator muscle strength in patients with rotator cuff tendinitis. PMID:25642053

  5. Tendon degeneration and chronic shoulder pain: changes in the collagen composition of the human rotator cuff tendons in rotator cuff tendinitis.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, G P; Harrall, R L; Constant, C R; Chard, M D; Cawston, T E; Hazleman, B L

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To analyse the collagen composition of normal adult human supraspinatus tendon and to compare with: (1) a flexor tendon (the common biceps tendon) which is rarely involved in any degenerative pathology; (2) degenerate tendons from patients with chronic rotator cuff tendinitis. METHODS--Total collagen content, collagen solubility and collagen type were investigated by hydroxyproline analysis, acetic acid and pepsin digestion, cyanogen bromide peptide analysis, SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. RESULTS--The collagen content of the normal cadaver supraspinatus tendons (n = 60) was 96.3 micrograms HYPRO/mg dry weight (range 79.3-113.3) and there was no significant change across the age range 11 to 95 years. There was no significant difference from the common biceps tendon [93.3 (13.5) micrograms HYPRO/mg dry weight, n = 24]. Although extremely insoluble in both acetic acid and pepsin, much of the collagen was soluble after cyanogen bromide digestion [mean 47.9% (29.8)]. Seventeen per cent (10/60) of the 'normal' cadaver supraspinatus tendon sample contained more than 5% type III collagen, although none of the common biceps tendons had significant amounts. Degenerate supraspinatus and subscapularis tendons had a reduced collagen content [83.8 (13.9) micrograms/mg dry weight and 76.9 (16.8) micrograms/mg dry wt respectively) and were more soluble in acetic acid, pepsin and cyanogen bromide (p < 0.001). Eighty two per cent (14/17) of supraspinatus tendons and 100% (8/8) of subscapularis tendons from patients with tendinitis contained more than 5% type III collagen. CONCLUSIONS--The changes in collagen composition in rotator cuff tendinitis are consistent with new matrix synthesis, tissue remodelling and wound healing, in an attempt to repair the tendon defect, even in old and degenerate tendons. An increase in type III collagen in some 'normal' cadaver supraspinatus tendons is evidence that changes in collagen synthesis and turnover may precede tendon rupture. These changes may be the result of repeated minor injury and microscopic fibre damage or a consequence of local factors such as reduced vascular perfusion, tissue hypoxia, altered mechanical forces and the influence of cytokines. These collagenous changes may accumulate with age and substantially weaken the tendon structure, predisposing the tendon to rotator cuff tendinitis and eventual tendon rupture. Images PMID:8037494

  6. Evaluation of functional results from shoulders after arthroscopic repair of complete rotator cuff tears associated with traumatic anterior dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; Freitas, José Márcio Alves; de Oliveira França, Flávio; Santos, Flávio Márcio Lago; de Simoni, Leandro Furtado; Godinho, Pedro Couto

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical outcome of arthroscopic rotator cuff fixation and, when present, simultaneous repair of the Bankart lesion caused by traumatic dislocation; and to assess whether the size of the rotator cuff injury caused by traumatic dislocation has any influence on the postoperative clinical outcomes. Methods Thirty-three patients with traumatic shoulder dislocation and complete rotator cuff injury, with at least two years of follow up, were retrospectively evaluated. For analysis purposes, the patients were divided into groups: presence of fixed Bankart lesion or absence of this lesion, and rotator cuff lesions smaller than 3.0 cm (group A) or greater than or equal to 3.0 cm (group B). All the patients underwent arthroscopic repair of the lesions and were evaluated postoperatively by means of the UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) score and strength measurements. Results The group with Bankart lesion repair had a postoperative UCLA score of 33.96, while the score of the group without Bankart lesion was 33.7, without statistical significance (p = 0.743). Group A had a postoperative UCLA score of 34.35 and group B, 33.15, without statistical significance (p = 0.416). Conclusion The functional outcomes of the patients who only presented complete rotator cuff tearing after traumatic shoulder dislocation, which underwent arthroscopic repair, were similar to the outcomes of those who presented an associated with a Bankart lesion that was corrected simultaneously with the rotator cuff injury. The extent of the original rotator cuff injury did not alter the functional results in the postoperative evaluation. PMID:27069884

  7. The Duration of Symptoms does not correlate with Rotator Cuff Tear Severity or Other Patient Related Features. A Cross Sectional Study of Patients with Atraumatic, Full Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Unruh, Kenneth P; Kuhn, John E.; Sanders, Rosemary; An, Qi; Baumgarten, Keith M.; Bishop, Julie Y.; Brophy, Robert H.; Carey, James L.; Holloway, Brian G.; Jones, Grant L.; Ma, Benjamin C.; Marx, Robert G.; McCarty, Eric C.; Poddar, Souray K.; Smith, Matthew V.; Spencer, Edwin E.; Vidal, Armando F.; Wolf, Brian R.; Wright, Rick W.; Dunn, Warren R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this cross-sectional study is to determine if the duration of symptoms influences the features seen in patients with atraumatic full thickness rotator cuff tears. Our hypothesis is that increasing duration of symptoms will correlate with more advanced findings of rotator cuff tear severity on MRI, worse shoulder outcome scores, more pain, decreased range of motion, and less strength. Methods 450 patients with full thickness rotator cuff tears were enrolled in a prospective cohort study to assess the effectiveness of nonoperative treatment and factors predictive of success. Duration of patient symptoms were divided into four groups: ≤3 months, 4–6 months, 7–12 months, and >12 months. Data collected at patient entry into the study included: 1.) Demographic data, 2.) History and physical exam data, 3.) Radiographic imaging data, and 4.) Validated patient reported measures of shoulder status. Statistical analysis included a univariate analysis with Kruskal-Wallis test and Pearson tests to identify statistically significant differences in these features for different durations of symptoms Results Longer duration of symptoms does not correlate with more severe rotator cuff disease. Duration of symptoms was not related to weakness; limited range of motion; tear size; fatty atrophy; or validated patient reported outcome measures. Conclusions There is only a weak relationship between the duration of symptoms and features associated with rotator cuff disease. Level of Evidence Level III, Cross Sectional Study PMID:24411924

  8. The lateral Jobe test: A more reliable method of diagnosing rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Gillooly, John Joseph; Chidambaram, Ramiah; Mok, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The most reliable clinical investigations to diagnose rotator cuff tears reported in the literature is a triad of weakness on resisted external rotation, pain on impingement, and weakness on supraspinatus testing, or a combination of two of the above in a patient over 60 years of age. We present a simple new clinical test “The lateral Jobe Test” and compare it to these combined tests. The lateral Jobe test is performed with the patient’s shoulder abducted 90° in the coronal plane and internally rotated so that with the elbows flexed 90° the fingers point inferiorly and thumbs medially. A positive test is pain or weakness on resisting an inferiorly directed force applied to the distal arms or an inability to perform the test. Materials and Methods: A consecutive series of 175 patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy were reviewed prospectively and examined by two independent orthopedic surgeons blinded to the diagnosis. The results of the clinical tests were validated against arthroscopic findings. Results: The lateral Jobe test had a significantly higher sensitivity (81 vs. 58%) than the combined tests. The specificity of both was similar at 89 and 88%, respectively. Conslusion: The lateral Jobe test is a simple single test which can help in the clinical diagnosis of rotator cuff tears. Level of Evidence: Level IIb PMID:21072147

  9. Treatment options for irreparable postero-superior cuff tears in young patients

    PubMed Central

    Galasso, Olimpio; Familiari, Filippo; Gasparini, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears (RCTs) occur more commonly with advanced age, with most rotator cuff abnormalities in patients less than 30 years old being painful tendinoses or partial-thickness RCTs. Irreparable postero-superior cuff tears has been reported as frequent as 7% to 10% in the general population, and the incidence of irreparable RCTs in young patients is still unknown. Several surgical procedures have been proposed for young patients with irreparable postero-superior RCTs, such as rotator cuff debridement, partial rotator cuff repair, biceps tenotomy/tenodesis, rotator cuff grafting, latissimus dorsi tendon transfer, and reverse shoulder arthroplasty. After being thoroughly investigated in open surgery, arthroscopic techniques for latissimus dorsi tendon transfer have been recently described. They have been shown to be an adequate option to open surgery for managing irreparable postero-superior RCTs refractory to conservative management. PMID:26601058

  10. Mid-term results of arthroscopic subacromial decompression in patients with or without partial thickness rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Ahmed S.; Dwyer, Amitabh J.; Chambler, Andrew F. W.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate mid-term outcome in patients who underwent arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD) for shoulder impingement syndrome with intact and partially torn rotator cuffs. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 consecutive patients (83 shoulders) who underwent ASD for impingement syndrome between 2003 and 2006 were analyzed. Mean age was 57.1 years. Patients’ self-reported Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) for pain was collected prospectively and was used as an instrument to measure surgical outcome. Results: The mean initial and final OSS for patients with an intact rotator cuff was 26.1 and 40.3, respectively, at a mean follow up of 71.9 months (nearly 7 years). The mean initial and final OSS for patients with a partially torn articular sided tear was 22.6 and 41.9, respectively, at mean follow up of 70.7 months. Both groups showed significant sustained improvement (P < 0.0001). The mean improvement of OSS following ASD was statistically greater (P < 0.03) for partially torn rotator cuff group (19.3 points) as compared to those with normal rotator cuff (14.2 points). Conclusion: Patients with dual pathology (partial rotator cuff tear and impingement) appreciated a significantly greater improvement following ASD compared to those with impingement alone. Both groups of patients had a similar final outcome at a mid-term follow up. Level of Evidence: IV, retrospective study on consecutive series of patients. PMID:23204763

  11. Effect of subacromial sodium hyaluronate injection on rotator cuff disease: A double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Moghtaderi, Alireza; Sajadiyeh, Sepideh; Khosrawi, Saeid; Dehghan, Farnaz; Bateni, Vahid

    2013-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff disease is a common cause of shoulder pain. There are studies about the effectiveness of sodium hyaluronate injection on shoulder and knee pain, but few studies demonstrating the efficacy of sodium hyaluronate ultrasonography guided injection for rotator cuff disease. This study evaluates effectiveness of ultrasonography guided subacromial sodium hyaluronate injection in patients with impingment syndrome without rotator cuff complete tear. Materials and Methods: This prospective, double-blind, placebo controlled clinical trial study was performed among 40 patients with subacromial impingement syndrome without complete tear of rotator cuff. Patients randomly injected ultrasonography guided in 2 groups: Case group by 20 mg of sodium hyaluronate (Fermathron™) and control group by 0.9% normal saline. Both groups received 3 weekly injections. The pain score (100 mm visual analogue score [VAS]) was evaluated before first injection and one week after each injection. The constant score was evaluated before first and 12 week after last injection. Data was analyzed statistically by Independent t-test. Results: In both groups mean VAS has decreased, but more significantly in case group (P < 0.001). Mean constant score was significantly higher in case group 12 weeks after last injection (P < 0.001). The constant score improved 12 weeks after the last injection in both groups with a significantly better result in case group (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Subacromial injections of sodium hyaluronate are effective in treating rotator cuff disease without complete tears. PMID:24524035

  12. Evaluation of the results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of rotator cuff injuries in patients aged 65 years and over☆

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; Santos, Pedro Doenux; Checchia, Sergio Luiz; Cohen, Carina; Giora, Taís Stedile Busin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of rotator cuff injuries in patients aged 65 years and over. Methods Between 1998 and 2009, 168 patients underwent operations. Five cases were excluded. The remaining 163 patients were stratified according to their age group: 65–69 years (49.1%), 70–74 (26.4%) and 75 years and over (24.5%). Their mean age was 71 years (range: 65–83). There were 63 male patients (38.7%). The mean length of time with pain, from the onset of symptoms to the surgery, was 23 months (range: 2 days to 240 months). Sixty-two patients (38%) reported histories of trauma and 26 (16%) reported that their pain worsened through exertion. Results From the UCLA criteria, 80.4% of the results were excellent, 16% good, 1.8% fair and 1.8% poor. Complications occurred in 11%. The final clinical result did not show any correlation with age progression, injury size or tendons affected. However, there was a significant association (p < 0.001) between the presence of trauma and larger injuries. The length of time between the onset of symptoms and the surgical procedure had a significant relationship (p < 0.027) with the postoperative results: the longer this time was, the worse the results were. Conclusion Arthroscopic treatment of rotator cuff injuries in patients aged 65 years and over presented excellent and good results in 96.4% of the cases, according to the UCLA assessment, with a low complication rate. Advanced age did not show any influence on the postoperative clinical evolution, but the earlier the surgical treatment was instituted, the better the results were. PMID:26229935

  13. PLATELET-RICH PLASMA IN ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIRS OF COMPLETE TEARS OF THE ROTATOR CUFF

    PubMed Central

    Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Gracitelli, Mauro Emilio Conforto; Sunada, Edwin Eiji; Benegas, Eduardo; de Santis Prada, Flavia; Neto, Raul Bolliger; Rodrigues, Marcelo Bordalo; Neto, Arnaldo Amado Ferreira; de Camargo, Olavo Pires

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate shoulder functional results and the retear rate of arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff augmented with platelet-rich plasma (PRP).Methods: Prospective case series with single-row arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff augmented with PRP. Only cases of isolated supraspinatus tears with retraction of less than 3 cm were included in this series. The PRP used was obtained by apheresis. It was applied on liquid consistency in its activated form, with the addition of autologous thrombin. Patients were evaluated after 12 months of the surgical procedure. The Constant-Murley, UCLA and VAS scales were used, and the retear rate was assessed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results: Fourteen patients were evaluated (14 shoulders). The mean Constant-Murley score was 45.64 ± 12.29 before the operation and evolved to 80.78 ± 13.22 after the operation (p < 0.001). The UCLA score increased from 13.78 ± 5.66 to 31.43 ± 3.9 (p < 0.001). The patients’ pain level decreased from a median of 7.5 (p25% = 6, p75% = 8) to 0.5 (p25% = 0, p75% = 3) (p = 0.0013) according to the VAS score. None of the patients presented complete retear. Three patients (21.4%) showed partial retear, without transfixation. Only one patient developed complications (adhesive capsulitis). Conclusion: Patients submitted to arthroscopic rotator cuff repair augmented with PRP showed significant functional improvement and none of them had complete retearing. PMID:27047894

  14. Deltoid muscle shape analysis with magnetic resonance imaging in patients with chronic rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It seems appropriate to assume, that for a full and strong global shoulder function a normally innervated and active deltoid muscle is indispensable. We set out to analyse the size and shape of the deltoid muscle on MR-arthrographies, and analyse its influence on shoulder function and its adaption (i.e. atrophy) for reduced shoulder function. Methods The fatty infiltration (Goutallier stages), atrophy (tangent sign) and selective myotendinous retraction of the rotator cuff, as well as the thickness and the area of seven anatomically defined segments of the deltoid muscle were measured on MR-arthrographies and correlated with shoulder function (i.e. active abduction). Included were 116 patients, suffering of a rotator cuff tear with shoulder mobility ranging from pseudoparalysis to free mobility. Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to determine the distribution of the data before either Spearman or Pearson correlation and a multiple regression was applied to reveal the correlations. Results Our developed method for measuring deltoid area and thickness showed to be reproducible with excellent interobserver correlations (r = 0.814–0.982). The analysis of influencing factors on active abduction revealed a weak influence of the amount of SSP tendon (r = −0.25; p < 0.01) and muscle retraction (r = −0.27; p < 0.01) as well as the stage of fatty muscle infiltration (GFDI: r = −0.36; p < 0.01). Unexpectedly however, we were unable to detect a relation of the deltoid muscle shape with the degree of active glenohumeral abduction. Furthermore, long-standing rotator cuff tears did not appear to influence the deltoid shape, i.e. did not lead to muscle atrophy. Conclusions Our data support that in chronic rotator cuff tears, there seems to be no disadvantage to exhausting conservative treatment and to delay implantation of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, as the shape of deltoid muscle seems only to be influenced by natural aging, but to be independent of reduced shoulder motion. PMID:23957805

  15. Double-needle ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment of rotator cuff calcific tendinitis: tips & tricks.

    PubMed

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Viganò, Sara; Martini, Chiara; Aliprandi, Alberto; Randelli, Pietro; Serafini, Giovanni; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Rotator cuff calcific tendinitis is a very common disease and may result in a very painful shoulder. Aetiology of this disease is still poorly understood. When symptoms are mild, this disease may be treated conservatively. Several treatment options have been proposed. Among them, ultrasound-guided procedures have been recently described. All procedures use one or two needles to inject a fluid, to dissolve calcium and to aspirate it. In the present article, we review some tips and tricks that may be useful to improve performance of an ultrasound-guided double-needle procedure. PMID:22710923

  16. Assessment of function in patients with rotator cuff tears: Functional test versus self-reported questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Basar, Selda; Citaker, Seyit; Kanatli, Ulunay; Ozturk, Burak Yagmur; Kilickap, Sadettin; Kafa, Nihan K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The rotator cuff tears (RCT) are a well-known cause of shoulder pain and loss of upper extremity function. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the upper extremity function using two different methods in patients with RCT and to determine the parameters that influence the upper extremity function. Materials and Methods: A sample of 38 patients (27-76 years; 10 men and 28 women) who were diagnosed with a chronic full-thickness RCT, confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was studied. Upper extremity function was determined using Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC) and 9 Hole Peg Test (9PEG). Other assessments included active range of motion (ROM), muscle strength, shoulder pain, and scapular dyskinesis. Results: There was a weak association between WORC scores and 9PEG. A statistically significant, negative relationship was found between 9PEG and ROM in supination, as well as muscle strength of shoulder extensors, adductors, internal and external rotators. Conclusions: In addition to the weak association between WORC and 9PEG, the difference between the parameters related to each method suggests that they should not be used interchangeably to determine the upper extremity function. We recommend the utilization of 9PEG instead of WORC in assessing the upper extremity function in the setting of loss of muscle strength. Level of Evidence: Level IV, Therapeutic study. PMID:25538429

  17. RADIOGRAPHIC STUDY ON THE ACROMION INDEX AND ITS RELATIONSHIP WITH ROTATOR CUFF TEARS

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; Da Silva, Luciana Andrade; Menegassi Martel, Éder; Debom, Leandro Gervazoni; Andrade, Manoel Loyola; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the lateral projection of the acromion and rotator cuff tears (RCTs) in the Brazilian population. Methods: The lateral projection of the acromion was measured using anteroposterior radiographs of the shoulders, carried out with the glenoid cavity in absolute profile and the humeral head in the neutral position or with internal rotation. The acromion index (AI) was defined as the ratio between the distance from the plane of the glenoid cavity to the lateral edge of the acromion and the distance from the plane of the glenoid cavity to the lateral edge of the humeral head. This index was measured in 83 patients (mean age of 54 years) with RCTs and compared with a group of 28 individuals (mean age of 48 years) without RCTs. The presence or absence of RCTs was determined by means of magnetic resonance imaging. Results: The mean AI was 0.7194 for the patients with RCTs and 0.6677 for the individuals without RCTs, in the Brazilian population. This difference was statistically significant, with P < 0.001. Conclusion: A relationship can be established between AI and rotator cuff tears in the Brazilian population.

  18. Towards the development of a novel experimental shoulder simulator with rotating scapula and individually controlled muscle forces simulating the rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Daniel; Tomas, Daniel; Gossweiler, Lukas; Siegl, Walter; Osterhoff, Georg; Heinlein, Bernd

    2014-03-01

    A preclinical analysis of novel implants used in shoulder surgery requires biomechanical testing conditions close to physiology. Existing shoulder experiments may only partially apply multiple cycles to simulate postoperative, repetitive loading tasks. The aim of the present study was therefore the development of an experimental shoulder simulator with rotating scapula able to perform multiple humeral movement cycles by simulating individual muscles attached to the rotator cuff. A free-hanging, metallic humerus pivoted in a polyethylene glenoid is activated by tension forces of linear electroactuators to simulate muscles of the deltoideus (DELT), supraspinatus (SSP), infraspinatus/teres minor and subscapularis. The abductors DELT and SSP apply forces with a ratio of 3:1 up to an abduction angle of 85°. The rotating scapular part driven by a rotative electro actuator provides one-third to the overall arm abduction. Resulting joint forces and moments are measured by a 6-axis load cell. A linear increase in the DELT and SSP motors is shown up to a maximum of 150 and 50 N for the DELT and SSP, respectively. The force vector in the glenoid resulted in 253 N at the maximum abduction. The present investigation shows the contribution of individual muscle forces attached to the moving humerus to perform active abduction in order to reproducibly test shoulder implants. PMID:24170552

  19. EVALUATION OF THE RESULTS FROM ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR ON ROTATOR CUFF INJURIES AMONG PATIENTS UNDER 50 YEARS OF AGE

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Santos, Ruy Mesquita Maranhão; de Souza, Adriano; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of rotator cuff injuries among patients under 50 years of age. Methods: Sixty-three patients with rotator cuff injuries who underwent arthroscopic surgical treatment performed by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, in the Fernandinho Simonsen wing of Santa Casa Medical School, São Paulo, between August 1998 and December 2007, were reassessed. The study included all patients with rotator cuff injuries who were under 50 years of age and had been followed up postoperatively for at least 24 months. Results: According to the UCLA evaluation criteria, 59 patients (92%) showed excellent and good results; five (8%) showed fair results; and none showed poor results. The postoperative evaluation showed that the mean range of motion was 145° for elevation, 47° for lateral rotation and T10 for medial rotation. Unsatisfactory results were associated with prolonged duration of the injury, with a statistically significant relationship. Conclusion: Arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries in young patients produces excellent or good results for most patients.

  20. The Effect of Platelet-rich Fibrin Matrix on Rotator Cuff Healing in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Hasan, S; Weinberg, M; Khatib, O; Jazrawi, L; Strauss, E J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine if the application of platelet-rich fibrin matrix could improve regeneration of the tendon-bone insertion site in a rat rotator cuff repair model. 25 Lewis syngeneic rats underwent bilateral tenotomy and repair of the supraspinatus tendon. 10 separate rats were used for PRFM harvest. All left (control) shoulders underwent transosseous rotator cuff repair, while all right (treatment) shoulders were repaired similarly with PRFM augmentation. 9 rats were sacrificed at 2-weeks and ten at 4-weeks for biomechanical testing. 3 separate rats were sacrificed at 2-weeks and 4-weeks each for histologic analysis of the insertion site. At 2 weeks, the experimental group repairs were significantly stronger in ultimate load to failure (P=0.01), stress (P=0.03), and stiffness (P=0.03). Differences in biomechanical testing were not found between the groups at 4 weeks. Histological analysis revealed less collagen organization and cartilage formation at the insertion site in the experimental group. Semiquantitative histologic analysis confirmed our qualitative assessment of the specimens. PRFM does not recapitulate the native enthesis, but rather induces an exuberant and disordered healing response that is characterized by fibrovascular scar tissue. PMID:26509369

  1. All-Suture Transosseous Repair for Rotator Cuff Tear Fixation Using Medial Calcar Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Aramberri-Gutiérrez, Mikel; Martínez-Menduiña, Amaia; Valencia-Mora, María; Boyle, Simon

    2015-01-01

    We describe an all-suture transosseous repair technique used in the management of rotator cuff tears by means of an all-suture anchor secured on the intra-articular side of the humeral calcar. The technique uses an anterior cruciate ligament guide to ensure accurate positioning of the tunnels, avoiding the articular cartilage and minimizing risk to the neurovascular structures. The distal end of the guide is inserted through a rotator interval portal and passed down to the axillary pouch. The proximal end of the guide is approximated to the greater tuberosity at the cuff footprint, and a complete transosseous tunnel is created with a 2.4-mm drill. An all-suture implant is inserted through this tunnel down to the calcar, and its deployment is visualized under arthroscopy. Gentle traction is applied to the anchor, resulting in a 4-mm concertina of the suture anchor that rests opposed to the medial cortex. The major advantage of this technique is the fixation strength gained from the biomechanically superior cortical bone of the calcar. Furthermore, this method permits greater preservation of bone surface area at the level of the footprint for a larger tendon-to-bone healing surface. This technique also provides an excellent alternative in revision situations. PMID:26052495

  2. Stem cell therapy in the management of shoulder rotator cuff disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Maria Valencia; Ibán, Miguel A Ruiz; Heredia, Jorge Díaz; Laakso, Raul Barco; Cuéllar, Ricardo; Arranz, Mariano García

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are frequent shoulder problems that are usually dealt with surgical repair. Despite improved surgical techniques, the tendon-to-bone healing rate is unsatisfactory due to difficulties in restoring the delicate transitional tissue between bone and tendon. It is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms that determine this failure. The study of the molecular environment during embryogenesis and during normal healing after injury is key in devising strategies to get a successful repair. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) can differentiate into different mesodermal tissues and have a strong paracrine, anti-inflammatory, immunoregulatory and angiogenic potential. Stem cell therapy is thus a potentially effective therapy to enhance rotator cuff healing. Promising results have been reported with the use of autologous MSC of different origins in animal studies: they have shown to have better healing properties, increasing the amount of fibrocartilage formation and improving the orientation of fibrocartilage fibers with less immunologic response and reduced lymphocyte infiltration. All these changes lead to an increase in biomechanical strength. However, animal research is still inconclusive and more experimental studies are needed before human application. Future directions include expanded stem cell therapy in combination with growth factors or different scaffolds as well as new stem cell types and gene therapy. PMID:26029341

  3. Shoulder muscle activation and coordination in patients with a massive rotator cuff tear: an electromyographic study.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, David H; Alizadehkhaiyat, Omid; Kemp, Graham J; Fisher, Anthony C; Roebuck, Margaret M; Frostick, Simon P

    2012-07-01

    Adaptive muscle activation strategies following a massive rotator cuff tear (MRCT) are inadequately understood, and the relationship among muscles during everyday activities has not been considered. Thirteen healthy subjects comprised the control group, and 11 subjects with a MRCT the patient group. Upper limb function was assessed using the Functional Impairment test-hand, neck, shoulder, and arm (FIT-HaNSA). Electromyography (EMG) was recorded from 13 shoulder muscles, comprising five muscle groups, during a shelf-lifting task. Mean FIT-HaNSA scores were significantly lower in MRCT patients (p≤0.001), reflecting a severe functional deficit. In MRCT patients, EMG signal amplitude was significantly higher for the biceps brachii-brachioradialis (p < 0.001), upper trapezius-serratus anterior (p= 0.025), muscle groups and for the latissimus dorsi (p = 0.010), and teres major (p=0.007) muscles. No significant differences in the correlation among muscle groups were identified, pointing to an unchanged neuromuscular strategy following a tear. In MRCT patients, a reorganization of muscle activation strategy along the upper limb kinetic chain is aimed at reducing demand on the glenohumeral joint. Increased activation of the latissimus dorsi and teres major muscles is an attempt to compensate for the deficient rotator cuff. Re-education towards an alternate neuromuscular control strategy appears necessary to restore function. PMID:22213234

  4. A novel double-row rotator cuff repair exceeds strengths of conventional repairs.

    PubMed

    Burkhead, Wayne Z; Skedros, John G; O'Rourke, Peter J; Pierce, William A; Pitts, Todd C

    2007-08-01

    Double-row rotator cuff repairs are becoming popular because of their ability to improve initial ultimate failure load for full-thickness rotator cuff tears, especially in middle-aged to elderly patients. We hypothesized a quasi-double-row repair using a combination of transosseous sutures, anchors, and double knots (TOAK technique) would exceed the clinically relevant 250-N load threshold and the initial mean ultimate failure loads of anchor-only and transosseous suture-only fixation. In simulated full-thickness supraspinatus tears in cadavers (mean age, 62 years; range, 50-77 years), failure loads of two repair techniques were compared with a TOAK repair using sutures and bioabsorbable anchors. Radiographic densitometry was conducted on all humeral heads. Testing was performed at 6 mm per minute in 18 bones in the following three groups (n = 6 per group): (1) transosseous suture-only with weave-type stitch and single-knot fixation; (2) anchor-only with horizontal mattress stitch and single-knot fixation; and (3) TOAK. The mean ultimate failure load was 238 N for the transosseous suture-only group and 215 N for the anchor-only group. Although the bones had lower density, TOAK specimens failed at 55% to 67% higher loads (mean, 404 N) than the other groups. These data support further evaluation of the TOAK technique for full-thickness supraspinatus tears in middle-aged to elderly patients. PMID:17452913

  5. Stem cell therapy in the management of shoulder rotator cuff disorders.

    PubMed

    Valencia Mora, Maria; Ruiz Ibn, Miguel A; Daz Heredia, Jorge; Barco Laakso, Raul; Cullar, Ricardo; Garca Arranz, Mariano

    2015-05-26

    Rotator cuff tears are frequent shoulder problems that are usually dealt with surgical repair. Despite improved surgical techniques, the tendon-to-bone healing rate is unsatisfactory due to difficulties in restoring the delicate transitional tissue between bone and tendon. It is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms that determine this failure. The study of the molecular environment during embryogenesis and during normal healing after injury is key in devising strategies to get a successful repair. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) can differentiate into different mesodermal tissues and have a strong paracrine, anti-inflammatory, immunoregulatory and angiogenic potential. Stem cell therapy is thus a potentially effective therapy to enhance rotator cuff healing. Promising results have been reported with the use of autologous MSC of different origins in animal studies: they have shown to have better healing properties, increasing the amount of fibrocartilage formation and improving the orientation of fibrocartilage fibers with less immunologic response and reduced lymphocyte infiltration. All these changes lead to an increase in biomechanical strength. However, animal research is still inconclusive and more experimental studies are needed before human application. Future directions include expanded stem cell therapy in combination with growth factors or different scaffolds as well as new stem cell types and gene therapy. PMID:26029341

  6. The Effect of Corticosteroid on Collagen Expression in Injured Rotator Cuff Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Anthony S.; Callaci, John J.; Juknelis, Dainius; Marra, Guido; Tonino, Pietro; Freedman, Kevin B.; Wezeman, Frederick H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Subacromial corticosteroid injections are commonly used in the nonoperative management of rotator cuff disease. The effects of corticosteroid injection on injured rotator cuff tendons have not been studied. Our aims were to characterize the acute response of rotator cuff tendons to injury through the analysis of the type-III to type-I collagen expression ratio, a tendon injury marker, and to examine the effects of corticosteroid on this response. Methods Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to four groups: control, tendon injury, steroid treatment, and tendon injury and steroid treatment. Six rats served as sham controls. Unilateral tendon injuries were created with full-thickness defects across 50% of the total width of the infraspinatus tendon, 5 mm from its humeral insertion. Steroid treatment with a single dose of methylprednisolone (0.6 mg/kg), equivalent to that given to humans, was injected into the subacromial space under direct visualization. Steroid treatment followed the creation of an injury in the rats in the injury and steroid treatment group. At one, three, and five weeks after the injury, the total RNA isolated from tendons was quantified with real-time polymerase chain reaction with use of primers for type-I and type-III collagen and ribosomal 18s RNA. Results The type-III to type-I collagen expression ratio remained at baseline at all time-points in the control and sham groups. At one week, the type-III to type-I collagen expression ratio increased more than fourfold above the control level in the tendon injury group (p = 0.017) and the tendon injury and steroid treatment group (p = 0.003). The ratio remained greater than twofold above the control at three weeks in both groups (p = 0.003 and p = 0.037) and returned to baseline at five weeks. Interestingly, the group that had steroid treatment only showed an increase of >4.5-fold (p = 0.001) in the type-III to type-I collagen expression ratio, without structural injury to the tendon. This ratio returned to baseline levels by three weeks. Conclusions A single dose of corticosteroid does not alter the acute phase response of an injured rotator cuff tendon in the rat. However, the same steroid dose in uninjured tendons initiates a short-term response equivalent to that of structural injury. Clinical Relevance These findings suggest that while a single corticosteroid dose may have no long-term effects on tendon collagen gene expression, collagen composition may be acutely altered by the injection. Therapy and activity recommendations following subacromial corticosteroid exposure should be made with the awareness of possible compromised rotator cuff tendon properties. PMID:16757768

  7. Vaginal Treatment of Vaginal Cuff Dehiscence with Visceral Loop Prolapse: A New Challenge in Reparative Vaginal Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Di Naro, Edoardo; Schonauer, Luca Maria; Loverro, Maria Teresa; Indellicati, Beatrice; Barnaba, Mario; Loverro, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Vaginal cuff dehiscence is a rare, but potentially morbid, complication of total hysterectomy and refers to separation of the vaginal cuff closure. The term vaginal cuff dehiscence is frequently interchanged with the terms of cuff separation or cuff rupture. All denote the separation of a vaginal incision that was previously closed at time of total hysterectomy. After dehiscence of the vaginal cuff, abdominal or pelvic contents may prolapse through the vaginal opening. Bowel evisceration, outside the vulvar introitus, can lead to serious sequelae, including peritonitis, bowel injury and necrosis, or sepsis. Therefore, although prompt surgical and medical intervention is required to replace prolapsed structures, the main problem remains the reconstruction of vaginal vault. In case of recent hysterectomy, vaginal reparation only requires the approximation of vaginal walls, including their fascia, while if dehiscence occurs after a long time from hysterectomy, the adequate suspension of the vaginal vault has to be taken into consideration. In this report we describe the case of a postmenopausal patient, undergoing surgical emergency because of the evisceration of an intestinal loop through a dehiscence of vaginal vault, after numerous reconstructive vaginal surgeries for vaginal prolapse. This paper analyzes clinical circumstances, risk factors, comorbidity, and clinical and surgical management of this complication. PMID:25525534

  8. PARot – assessing platelet-rich plasma plus arthroscopic subacromial decompression in the treatment of rotator cuff tendinopathy: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous platelet concentrate. It is prepared by separating the platelet fraction of whole blood from patients and mixing it with an agent to activate the platelets. In a clinical setting, PRP may be reapplied to the patient to improve and hasten the healing of tissue. The therapeutic effect is based on the presence of growth factors stored in the platelets. Current evidence in orthopedics shows that PRP applications can be used to accelerate bone and soft tissue regeneration following tendon injuries and arthroplasty. Outcomes include decreased inflammation, reduced blood loss and post-treatment pain relief. Recent shoulder research indicates there is poor vascularization present in the area around tendinopathies and this possibly prevents full healing capacity post surgery (Am J Sports Med36(6):1171–1178, 2008). Although it is becoming popular in other areas of orthopedics there is little evidence regarding the use of PRP for shoulder pathologies. The application of PRP may help to revascularize the area and consequently promote tendon healing. Such evidence highlights an opportunity to explore the efficacy of PRP use during arthroscopic shoulder surgery for rotator cuff pathologies. Methods/Design PARot is a single center, blinded superiority-type randomized controlled trial assessing the clinical outcomes of PRP applications in patients who undergo shoulder surgery for rotator cuff disease. Patients will be randomized to one of the following treatment groups: arthroscopic subacromial decompression surgery or arthroscopic subacromial decompression surgery with application of PRP. The study will run for 3 years and aims to randomize 40 patients. Recruitment will be for 24 months with final follow-up at 1 year post surgery. The third year will also involve collation and analysis of the data. This study will be funded through the NIHR Biomedical Research Unit at the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN10464365 PMID:23758981

  9. Systematic Review of All-Arthroscopic Versus Mini-Open Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rongzhong; Wang, Sanrong; Wang, Yule; Qin, Xiaoxia; Sun, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare outcomes in patients with rotator cuff tears undergoing all-arthroscopic versus mini-open rotator cuff repair. A systematic review and meta-analysis of outcomes of all-arthroscopic repair versus mini-open repair in patients with rotator cuff repair was conducted. Studies meeting the inclusion criteria were screened and included from systematic literature search for electronic databases including Medline, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL, and CINAHL library was conducted from 1969 and 2015. A total of 18 comparative studies including 4 randomized clinical trials (RCTs) were included. Pooled results indicate that there was no difference in the functional outcomes, range of motion, visual analog scale (VAS) score, and short-form 36 (SF-36) subscales. However, Constant-Murley functional score was found to be significantly better in patients with mini-open repair. However, the results of the review should be interpreted with caution due to small size and small number of studies contributing to analysis in some of the outcomes. All-arthroscopic and mini-open repair surgical techniques for the management of rotator cuff repair are associated with similar outcomes and can be used interchangeably based on the patient and rotator tear characteristics. PMID:26947557

  10. Systematic Review of All-Arthroscopic Versus Mini-Open Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rongzhong; Wang, Sanrong; Wang, Yule; Qin, Xiaoxia; Sun, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare outcomes in patients with rotator cuff tears undergoing all-arthroscopic versus mini-open rotator cuff repair. A systematic review and meta-analysis of outcomes of all-arthroscopic repair versus mini-open repair in patients with rotator cuff repair was conducted. Studies meeting the inclusion criteria were screened and included from systematic literature search for electronic databases including Medline, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL, and CINAHL library was conducted from 1969 and 2015. A total of 18 comparative studies including 4 randomized clinical trials (RCTs) were included. Pooled results indicate that there was no difference in the functional outcomes, range of motion, visual analog scale (VAS) score, and short-form 36 (SF-36) subscales. However, Constant-Murley functional score was found to be significantly better in patients with mini-open repair. However, the results of the review should be interpreted with caution due to small size and small number of studies contributing to analysis in some of the outcomes. All-arthroscopic and mini-open repair surgical techniques for the management of rotator cuff repair are associated with similar outcomes and can be used interchangeably based on the patient and rotator tear characteristics. PMID:26947557

  11. Quantitative Assessment of Fat Infiltration in the Rotator Cuff Muscles using water-fat MRI

    PubMed Central

    Nardo, Lorenzo; Karampinos, Dimitrios C.; Lansdown, Drew A.; Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Lee, Sonia; Maroldi, Roberto; Ma, C. Benjamin; Link, Thomas M.; Krug, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate a chemical shift-based fat quantification technique in the rotator cuff muscles in comparison with the semi-quantitative Goutallier fat infiltration classification (GC) and to assess their relationship with clinical parameters. Materials and Methods The shoulders of 57 patients were imaged using a 3T MR scanner. The rotator cuff muscles were assessed for fat infiltration using GC by two radiologists and an orthopedic surgeon. Sequences included oblique-sagittal T1-, T2- and proton density-weighted fast spin echo, and six-echo gradient echo. The iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation (IDEAL) was used to measure fat fraction. Pain and range of motion of the shoulder were recorded. Results Fat fraction values were significantly correlated with GC grades (p< 0.0001, kappa>0.9) showing consistent increase with GC grades (grade=0, 0%–5.59%; grade=1, 1.1%–9.70%; grade=2, 6.44%–14.86%; grade=3, 15.25%–17.77%; grade=4, 19.85%–29.63%). A significant correlation between fat infiltration of the subscapularis muscle quantified with IDEAL versus a) deficit in internal rotation (Spearman Rank Correlation Coefficient=0.39, 95% CI 0.13–0.60, p<0.01) and b) pain (Spearman Rank Correlation coefficient=0.313, 95% CI 0.049–0.536, p=0.02) was found but was not seen between the clinical parameters and GC grades. Additionally, only quantitative fat infiltration measures of the supraspinatus muscle were significantly correlated with a deficit in abduction (Spearman Rank Correlation Coefficient=0.45, 95% CI 0.20–0.60, p<0.01). Conclusion We concluded that an accurate and highly reproducible fat quantification in the rotator cuff muscles using water-fat MRI techniques is possible and significantly correlates with shoulder pain and range of motion. PMID:24115490

  12. Are the good functional results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff injuries maintained over the long term?☆

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz; Yonamine, Alexandre Maris

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether the good and excellent functional results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears are maintained over the long term. Methods From the sample of the study conducted by our group in 2006, in which we evaluated the functional results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears, 35 patients were reassessed, 8 years after the first evaluation. The inclusion criteria were that these patients with massive rotator cuff tears operated by means of an arthroscopic technique, who participated in the previous study and achieved good or excellent outcomes according to the UCLA criteria. Patients whose results were not good or excellent in the first evaluation according to the UCLA criteria were excluded. Results Among the 35 patients reassessed, 91% of them continued to present good and excellent results (40% excellent and 51% good), while 3% presented fair results and 6% poor results. The time interval between the first and second evaluations was 8 years and the minimum length of follow-up since the immediate postoperative period was 9 years (range: 9–17 years), with an average of 11.4 years. Conclusion The good and excellent results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears were mostly maintained (91%), with the same level of function and satisfaction, even though 8 years had passed since the first assessment, with a follow-up period averaging 11.4 years. PMID:26962491

  13. Expression of bioactive bone morphogenetic proteins in the subacromial bursa of patients with chronic degeneration of the rotator cuff

    PubMed Central

    Neuwirth, Jana; Fuhrmann, Renée AE; Veit, Amanda; Aurich, Matthias; Stonâns, Ilmars; Trommer, Tilo; Hortschansky, Peter; Chubinskaya, Susanna; Mollenhauer, Juergen A

    2006-01-01

    Degeneration of the rotator cuff is often associated with inflammation of the subacromial bursa and focal mineralization of the supraspinatus tendon. Portions of the supraspinatus tendon distant from the insertion site could transform into fibrous cartilage, causing rotator-cuff tears owing to mechanical instability. Indirect evidence is presented to link this pathology to ectopic production and secretion of bioactive bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) from sites within the subacromial bursa. Surgically removed specimens of subacromial bursa tissue from patients with chronic tears of the rotator cuff were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-PCR. Bioactive BMP was detected in bursa extracts by a bioassay based on induction of alkaline phosphatase in the osteogenic/myogenic cell line C2C12. Topical and differential expression of BMP-2/4 and BMP-7 mRNA and protein was found in bursa tissue. The bioassay of C2C12 cells revealed amounts of active BMP high enough to induce osteogenic cell types, and blocking BMP with specific antibodies or soluble BMP receptors Alk-3 and Alk-6 abolished the inductive properties of the extract. Sufficient information was gathered to explain how ectopic expression of BMP might induce tissue transformation into ectopic bone/cartilage and, therefore, promote structural degeneration of the rotator cuff. Early surgical removal of the subacromial bursa might present an option to interrupt disease progression. PMID:16719933

  14. Effect of Bone Mineral Density on Rotator Cuff Tear: An Osteoporotic Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaobin; Giambini, Hugo; Ben-Abraham, Ephraim; An, Kai-Nan; Nassr, Ahmad; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2015-01-01

    Introduction An increased bone mineral density (BMD) in the proximity to tendon insertion can improve rotator cuff repair and healing. However, how a decrease of BMD in the humeral head affects the biomechanical properties of the rotator cuff tendon is still unclear. Previous studies have demonstrated ovariectomy in animals to lead to osteoporosis and decreased BMD, and Teriparatide (PTH) administration to improve BMD and strength of bone. This study aimed to explore the correlation between humeral head BMD and infraspinatus (ISP) tendon insertion strength, and if an increase in bone quantity of the humeral head can improve the strength of the rotator cuff. Materials and Methods Eighteen New England white rabbits were divided into the 3 groups: Control, Ovariectomy-Saline (OVX-Saline), and Ovariectomy-PTH (OVX-PTH). The OVX-Saline group and the OVX-PTH were administered daily saline and Teriparatide injections for 8 weeks starting at 17 weeks of OVX. BMD of the humeral head was measured, the ISP tendon failure load was tested and the failure stress was calculated. One specimen from each group was used for histological analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to derive equations for the BMD and failure stress. Results Significant differences were observed in the measured humeral head BMD of the Control and OVX-PTH groups compared to the OVX-Saline group (P = 0.0004 and P = 0.0024, respectively). No significant difference was found in failure stress among the three groups, but an expected trend with the control group and OVX-PTH group presenting higher failure strength compared to the OVX-Saline group. BMD at the humeral head showed a positive linear correlation with stress (r2 = 0.54). Histology results showed the superiority in OVX-PTH group ISP enthesis compared to the OVX-Saline group. Conclusion Bone loss of the humeral head leads to decreased tendon/bone insertion strength of the infraspinatus tendon enthesis. Teriparatide administration can increase bone density of the humeral head and may improve the mechanical properties of the infraspinatus tendon enthesis. PMID:26466092

  15. The diagnostic value of the combination of patient characteristics, history, and clinical shoulder tests for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tear

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is unknown which combination of patient information and clinical tests might be optimal for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears. This study aimed to determine the diagnostic value of nine individual clinical tests for evaluating rotator cuff tear and to develop a prediction model for diagnosing rotator cuff tear. Methods This prospective cohort study included 169 patients with shoulder complaints. Patients who reported a previous shoulder dislocation were excluded from the analysis (N = 69). One experienced clinician conducted 25 clinical tests of which 9 are specifically designed to diagnose rotator cuff pathology (empty can, Neer, Hawkins-Kenney, drop arm, lift-off test, painful arc, external rotation lag sign, drop sign, infraspinatus muscle strength test). The final diagnosis, based on magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA), was determined by consensus between the clinician and a radiologist, who were blinded to patient information. A prediction model was developed by logistic regression analysis. Results and discussion In this cohort, 38 patients were diagnosed with rotator cuff tears. The individual overall accuracy of the rotator cuff clinical tests was 61%–75%. After backward selection, the model determined that the most important predictors of rotator cuff tears were higher age and a positive Neer test. This internally validated prediction model had good discriminative ability (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) = 0.73). Conclusion Our results showed that individual clinical shoulder tests had moderate diagnostic value for diagnosing rotator cuff tear. Our prediction model showed improved diagnostic value. However, the prediction value is still relatively low, supporting a low threshold for additional diagnostic tests for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears. Level of evidence Study of diagnostic test: level I. PMID:25099359

  16. Proteomics Perspectives in Rotator Cuff Research: A Systematic Review of Gene Expression and Protein Composition in Human Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sejersen, Maria Hee Jung; Frost, Poul; Hansen, Torben Bæk; Deutch, Søren Rasmussen; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff

    2015-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff tendinopathy including tears is a cause of significant morbidity. The molecular pathogenesis of the disorder is largely unknown. This review aimed to present an overview of the literature on gene expression and protein composition in human rotator cuff tendinopathy and other tendinopathies, and to evaluate perspectives of proteomics – the comprehensive study of protein composition - in tendon research. Materials and Methods We conducted a systematic search of the literature published between 1 January 1990 and 18 December 2012 in PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. We included studies on objectively quantified differential gene expression and/or protein composition in human rotator cuff tendinopathy and other tendinopathies as compared to control tissue. Results We identified 2199 studies, of which 54 were included; 25 studies focussed on rotator cuff or biceps tendinopathy. Most of the included studies quantified prespecified mRNA molecules and proteins using polymerase chain reactions and immunoassays, respectively. There was a tendency towards an increase of collagen I (11 of 15 studies) and III (13 of 14), metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 (6 of 12), -9 (7 of 7), -13 (4 of 7), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 (4 of 7), and vascular endothelial growth factor (4 of 7), and a decrease in MMP-3 (10 of 12). Fourteen proteomics studies of tendon tissues/cells failed inclusion, mostly because they were conducted in animals or in vitro. Conclusions Based on methods, which only allowed simultaneous quantification of a limited number of prespecified mRNA molecules or proteins, several proteins appeared to be differentially expressed/represented in rotator cuff tendinopathy and other tendinopathies. No proteomics studies fulfilled our inclusion criteria, although proteomics technologies may be a way to identify protein profiles (including non-prespecified proteins) that characterise specific tendon disorders or stages of tendinopathy. Thus, our results suggested an untapped potential for proteomics in tendon research. PMID:25879758

  17. Proximal humerus osteolysis after revision rotator cuff repair with bioabsorbable suture anchors.

    PubMed

    Park, Andrew Y; Hatch, Joshua D

    2011-03-01

    Biodegradable anchors were designed to provide secure fixation while allowing for later resorption and replacement by host tissue. First-generation implants degraded relatively rapidly and caused foreign-body reactions, synovitis, fragmentation, and osteolysis. Newer implants have similar complications. It is not known if the primary cause of the osteolysis is biological (precipitated by breakdown products of the polymer) or mechanical (caused by initial loss of implant stability). Case reports have described glenoid osteolysis around biodegradable suture anchor placement for shoulder stabilization, but up until now, to our knowledge, only 1 case of proximal humerus osteolysis has been reported for these implants. Here we describe a semicrystalline, poly-L-lactic acid bioabsorbable suture anchor failure after revision rotator cuff repair with subsequent humeral tuberosity osteolysis. PMID:21720602

  18. Intra-articular changes precede extra-articular changes in the biceps tendon following rotator cuff tears in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Peltz, Cathryn D.; Hsu, Jason E.; Zgonis, Miltiadis H.; Trasolini, Nicholas A.; Glaser, David L.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Biceps tendon pathology is common with rotator cuff tears. The mechanisms for biceps changes, and therefore its optimal treatment, are unknown. Our objective was to determine the effect of rotator cuff tears on regional biceps tendon pathology. We hypothesized that histological and compositional changes would appear before organizational changes, both would appear before mechanical changes, and changes would begin at the tendon’s insertion site. Methods Sixty-five Sprague-Dawley rats received either detachment of supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons or sham surgery. Rats were sacrificed at 1, 4 or 8 weeks for regional measurements of histological, compositional, organizational (1, 4 and 8 weeks) or mechanical properties (4 and 8 weeks only). Results One week following tendon detachments, decreased organization and more rounded cell shape were found in the intra-articular space of the biceps tendon. Aggrecan expression was increased along the entire length of the tendon while all other compositional changes were at the tendon’s proximal insertion into bone only. With time, this disorganization and more rounded cell shape extended the length of the tendon. Organizational and cell shape changes also preceded detrimental mechanical changes, as decreased modulus in the intra-articular space was found after 8 weeks. Conclusions Results support a degenerative component to pathology in the biceps tendon. Additionally, changes resembling a tendon exposed to compressive loading occurring first in the intra-articular space indicate that the biceps tendon plays an increased role as a load bearing structure against the humeral head in the presence of rotator cuff tears. PMID:21816629

  19. Results of reconstruction of massive irreparable rotator cuff tears using a fascia lata allograft

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrios, Varvitsiotis; Athanasios, Papaspiliopoulos; Eleni, Antipa; Xenofon, Papacharalampous; George, Flevarakis; John, Feroussis

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the advances in surgical treatment options, massive rotator cuff (r-c) tears still represent a challenge for orthopedic surgeons. This study assesses the effectiveness of fascia lata allograft in reconstruction of massive and irreparable r-c tear and to evaluate the healing and functional outcomes. Materials and Methods: 68 patients (38 men, 30 women, mean age 64.9 years) with massive or irreparable r-c tears were treated with placement of fascia lata allograft to fill the defect between February 2006 and February 2010. At 43 months followup they were evaluated clinically using the constant score, preoperatively and postoperatively. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound were used postoperatively, to assess the integrity of the allograft at the repair site. Postoperatively, standard rehabilitation protocol was followed with gradual restoration. Results: Postoperative constant score increased from 32.5 preoperatively to 88.7 postoperatively. The most important was the pain relief from 2.4 preoperatively to 14.1 postoperatively and range of motion. The results of the MRI were not reliable, but the ultrasound was satisfactory. Finally, there was no infection or rejection of the graft in any of the patients. Conclusions: Despite advances in surgical methods, there is still not a universally accepted treatment for massive and irreparable rotator cuff tears, because the standard methods have dubious results, with excessive retear rates and poor outcomes, necessitating the need for new repair strategies. We documented significant clinical improvement using fascia lata allograft in the repair of massive irreparable r-c tear, acting as scaffold to bridge the defect, enhancing the healing at the repair site. PMID:26015630

  20. Clinical outcomes of arthroscopic single and double row repair in full thickness rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jong-Hun; Shafi, Mohamed; Kim, Weon-Yoo; Kim, Young-Yul

    2010-01-01

    Background: There has been a recent interest in the double row repair method for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair following favourable biomechanical results reported by some studies. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical results of arthroscopic single row and double row repair methods in the full-thickness rotator cuff tears. Materials and Methods: 22 patients of arthroscopic single row repair (group I) and 25 patients who underwent double row repair (group II) from March 2003 to March 2005 were retrospectively evaluated and compared for the clinical outcomes. The mean age was 58 years and 56 years respectively for group I and II. The average follow-up in the two groups was 24 months. The evaluation was done by using the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) rating scale and the shoulder index of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES). Results: In Group I, the mean ASES score increased from 30.48 to 87.40 and the mean ASES score increased from 32.00 to 91.45 in the Group II. The mean UCLA score increased from the preoperative 12.23 to 30.82 in Group I and from 12.20 to 32.40 in Group II. Each method has shown no statistical clinical differences between two methods, but based on the sub scores of UCLA score, the double row repair method yields better results for the strength, and it gives more satisfaction to the patients than the single row repair method. Conclusions: Comparing the two methods, double row repair group showed better clinical results in recovering strength and gave more satisfaction to the patients but no statistical clinical difference was found between 2 methods. PMID:20697485

  1. Infusion Methods for Continuous Interscalene Brachial Plexus Block for Postoperative Pain Control after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Gyeong Jo; Yoon, Ji Uk; Kim, Eun Jung; Baek, Seung Hoon; Ri, Hyun Su

    2015-01-01

    Background Infusion methods during regional analgesia using perineural catheters may influence the quality of postoperative analgesia. This study was conducted to compare the effects of combined or bolus-only infusion of 0.2% ropivacaine on the postoperative analgesia in interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB) with perineural catheterization. Methods Patients scheduled for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were divided into two groups, one that would receive a combined infusion (group C, n = 32), and one that would receive intermittent infusion (group I, n = 32). A perineural catheter was inserted into the interscalene brachial plexus (ISBP) using ultrasound (US) and nerve stimulation, and 10 ml of 0.2% ropivacaine was administered. After the operation, group C received a continuous infusion of 4 ml/h, and a 4 ml bolus with a lockout interval of 60 min. Group I received only a 4 ml bolus, and the lockout interval was 30 min. Postoperative pain by the numeric rating scale (NRS) and the forearm muscle tone by the manual muscle test (MMT) were checked and evaluated at the following timepoints: preoperative, and postoperative 1, 4, 12, 24, 36, and 48 h. Supplemental opioid requirements, total consumed dose of local anesthetic, and adverse effects were compared between the two groups. Results Sixty-four patients completed the study and the postoperative values such as operation time, time to discharge, and operation site were comparable. There were no differences in NRS scores and supplemental opioid requirements between the two groups. The MMT scores of group I at 4 and 12 h after surgery were significantly higher than those of group C (P < 0.05). The total consumed dose of local anesthetic was significantly lower in group I than in group C (P < 0.05). The adverse effects were not different between the groups. Conclusions The bolus-only administration of 0.2% ropivacaine provided a similar analgesic effect with a lower total volume of local anesthetic and decreased motor weakness compared to combined infusion. Therefore, bolus-only administration is an effective postoperative analgesic method in ISBPB with perineural catheterization after rotator cuff repair. PMID:26175882

  2. Effects of 8 Weeks’ Specific Physical Training on the Rotator Cuff Muscle Strength and Technique of Javelin Throwers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeyoung; Lee, Youngsun; Shin, Insik; Kim, Kitae; Moon, Jeheon

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] For maximum efficiency and to prevent injury during javelin throwing, it is critical to maintain muscle balance and coordination of the rotator cuff and the glenohumeral joint. In this study, we investigated the change in the rotator cuff muscle strength, throw distance and technique of javelin throwers after they had performed a specific physical training that combined elements of weight training, function movement screen training, and core training. [Subjects] Ten javelin throwers participated in this study: six university athletes in the experimental group and four national-level athletes in the control group. [Methods] The experimental group performed 8 weeks of the specific physical training. To evaluate the effects of the training, measurements were performed before and after the training for the experimental group. Measurements comprised anthropometry, isokinetic muscle strength measurements, the function movement screen test, and movement analysis. [Results] After the specific physical training, the function movement screen score and external and internal rotator muscle strength showed statistically significant increases. Among kinematic factors, only pull distance showed improvement after training. [Conclusion] Eight weeks of specific physical training for dynamic stabilizer muscles enhanced the rotator cuff muscle strength, core stability, throw distance, and flexibility of javelin throwers. These results suggest that specific physical training can be useful for preventing shoulder injuries and improving the performance for javelin throwers. PMID:25364111

  3. FUNCTIONAL EVALUATION OF PATIENTS WHO HAVE UNDERGONE ARTHROSCOPIC DEBRIDEMENT TO TREAT MASSIVE AND IRREPARABLE TEARS OF THE ROTATOR CUFF

    PubMed Central

    Veado, Marco Antônio de Castro; Rodrigues, Alessandro Ulhôa

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the results from patients who underwent arthroscopic debridement of extensive irreparable rotator cuff injuries. Methods: 27 patients were operated between 2003 and 2007, and 22 of them were evaluated. The surgical procedure consisted of arthroscopic debridement of the stumps of the tendons involved, bursectomy, removal of acromial osteophytes and, possibly, biceps tenotomy and tuberoplasty. Results: All the patients showed involvement of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons at the preoperative stage. In the postoperative evaluation, 14 patients had a complete teres minor muscle, and three had partial tears of the subscapularis tendon. There was an improvement in the UCLA criteria, from 15 preoperatively to 31 postoperatively. There was no improvement in muscle strength, but there was a reduction in the pain. Conclusion: Arthroscopic debridement is a recommended procedure for elderly patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears, good range of motion and low functional demand, when the main objective is to diminish pain. PMID:27022590

  4. Comparative analysis on arthroscopic sutures of large and extensive rotator cuff injuries in relation to the degree of osteopenia☆

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Alexandre; Atti, Vinícius; Agostini, Daniel Cecconi; Valin, Márcio Rangel; de Almeida, Nayvaldo Couto; Agostini, Ana Paula

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the results from arthroscopic suturing of large and extensive rotator cuff injuries, according to the patient's degree of osteopenia. Method 138 patients who underwent arthroscopic suturing of large and extensive rotator cuff injuries between 2003 and 2011 were analyzed. Those operated from October 2008 onwards formed a prospective cohort, while the remainder formed a retrospective cohort. Also from October 2008 onwards, bone densitometry evaluation was requested at the time of the surgical treatment. For the patients operated before this date, densitometry examinations performed up to two years before or after the surgical treatment were investigated. The patients were divided into three groups. Those with osteoporosis formed group 1 (n = 16); those with osteopenia, group 2 (n = 33); and normal individuals, group 3 (n = 55). Results In analyzing the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) scores of group 3 and comparing them with group 2, no statistically significant difference was seen (p = 0.070). Analysis on group 3 in comparison with group 1 showed a statistically significant difference (p = 0.027). Conclusion The results from arthroscopic suturing of large and extensive rotator cuff injuries seem to be influenced by the patient's bone mineral density, as assessed using bone densitometry. PMID:26229899

  5. Retrospective study of sonographic findings in bone involvement associated with rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy: preliminary results of a case series*

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H.; Gregio-Junior, Everaldo; Lorenzato, Mario Muller

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study was aimed at investigating bone involvement secondary to rotator cuff calcific tendonitis at ultrasonography. Materials and Methods Retrospective study of a case series. The authors reviewed shoulder ultrasonography reports of 141 patients diagnosed with rotator cuff calcific tendonitis, collected from the computer-based data records of their institution over a four-year period. Imaging findings were retrospectively and consensually analyzed by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists looking for bone involvement associated with calcific tendonitis. Only the cases confirmed by computed tomography were considered for descriptive analysis. Results Sonographic findings of calcific tendinopathy with bone involvement were observed in 7/141 (~ 5%) patients (mean age, 50.9 years; age range, 42-58 years; 42% female). Cortical bone erosion adjacent to tendon calcification was the most common finding, observed in 7/7 cases. Signs of intraosseous migration were found in 3/7 cases, and subcortical cysts in 2/7 cases. The findings were confirmed by computed tomography. Calcifications associated with bone abnormalities showed no acoustic shadowing at ultrasonography, favoring the hypothesis of resorption phase of the disease. Conclusion Preliminary results of the present study suggest that ultrasonography can identify bone abnormalities secondary to rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy, particularly the presence of cortical bone erosion. PMID:26811551

  6. Comparison of the Tendon Damage Caused by Four Different Anchor Systems Used in Transtendon Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing-Song; Liu, Sen; Zhang, Qiuyang; Xue, Yun; Ge, Dongxia; O'Brien, Michael J.; Savoie, Felix H.; You, Zongbing

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. The objective of this study was to compare the damage to the rotator cuff tendons caused by four different anchor systems. Methods. 20 cadaveric human shoulder joints were used for transtendon insertion of four anchor systems. The Healix Peek, Fastin RC, Bio-Corkscrew Suture, and Healix Transtend anchors were inserted through the tendons using standard transtendon procedures. The areas of tendon damage were measured. Results. The areas of tendon damage (mean ± standard deviation, n = 7) were 29.1 ± 4.3 mm2 for the Healix Peek anchor, 20.4 ± 2.3 mm2 for the Fastin RC anchor, 23.4 ± 1.2 mm2 for the Bio-Corkscrew Suture anchor, 13.7 ± 3.2 mm2 for the Healix Transtend anchor inserted directly, and 9.1 ± 2.1 mm2 for the Healix Transtend anchor inserted through the Percannula system (P < 0.001 or P < 0.001, compared to other anchors). Conclusions. In a cadaver transtendon rotator cuff repair model, smaller anchors caused less damage to the tendon tissues. The Healix Transtend implant system caused the least damage to the tendon tissues. Our findings suggest that smaller anchors should be considered when performing transtendon procedures to repair partial rotator cuff tears. PMID:22811923

  7. A systematic review of the histological and molecular changes in rotator cuff disease

    PubMed Central

    Dean, B. J. F.; Franklin, S. L.; Carr, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The pathogenesis of rotator cuff disease (RCD) is complex and not fully understood. This systematic review set out to summarise the histological and molecular changes that occur throughout the spectrum of RCD. Methods We conducted a systematic review of the scientific literature with specific inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results A total of 101 studies met the inclusion criteria: 92 studies used human subjects exclusively, seven used animal overuse models, and the remaining two studies involved both humans and an animal overuse model. A total of 58 studies analysed supraspinatus tendon exclusively, 16 analysed subacromial bursal tissue exclusively, while the other studies analysed other tissue or varying combinations of tissue types including joint fluid and muscle. The molecular biomarkers that were altered in RCD included matrix substances, growth factors, enzymes and other proteins including certain neuropeptides. Conclusions The pathogenesis of RCD is being slowly unravelled as a result of the significant recent advances in molecular medicine. Future research aimed at further unlocking these key molecular processes will be pivotal in developing new surgical interventions both in terms of the diagnosis and treatment of RCD. PMID:23610686

  8. Role of Serum Fibrinogen Levels in Patients with Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Petrillo, Stefano; Berton, Alessandra; Spiezia, Filippo; Loppini, Mattia; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Although rotator cuff (RC) tendinopathy is a frequent pathology of the shoulder, the real understanding of its aetiopathogenesis is still unclear. Several studies showed that RC tendinopathy is more frequent in patients with hyperglycemia, diabetes, obesity, or metabolic syndrome. This paper aims to evaluate the serum concentration of fibrinogen in patients with RC tears. Metabolic disorders have been related to high concentration of serum fibrinogen and the activity of fibrinogen has been proven to be crucial in the development of microvascular damage. Thus, it may produce progression of RC degeneration by reducing the vascular supply of tendons. We report the results of a cross-sectional frequency-matched case-control study comparing the serum concentration of fibrinogen of patients with RC tears with that of a control group of patients without history of RC tears who underwent arthroscopic meniscectomy. We choose to enrol in the control group patients with pathology of the lower limb with a likely mechanic, not metabolic, cause, different from tendon pathology. We found no statistically significant differences in serum concentration of fibrinogen when comparing patients with RC tears and patients who underwent arthroscopic meniscectomy (P = 0.5). Further studies are necessary to clarify the role of fibrinogen in RC disease. PMID:24817887

  9. ESRRB polymorphisms are associated with comorbidity of temporomandibular disorders and rotator cuff disease.

    PubMed

    Bonato, L L; Quinelato, V; Pinheiro, A daR; Amaral, M V G; de Souza, F N; Lobo, J C; Aguiar, D P; Augusto, L M M; Vieira, A R; Salles, J I; Cossich, V R A; Guimarães, J A M; de Gouvêa, C V D; Granjeiro, J M; Casado, P L

    2016-03-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are associated with comorbidity. Shoulder pain is among the symptoms associated with TMD. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between TMD and rotator cuff disease (RCD) and related genetic aspects. All subjects underwent orofacial and shoulder examinations. The control group comprised 30 subjects with no pain. Affected subjects were divided into three groups: RCD (TMD-free, n=16), TMD (RCD-free, n=13), and TMD/RCD (patients with both RCD and TMD, n=49). A total of eight single nucleotide polymorphisms in the ESRRB gene were investigated. A chemiluminescent immunoassay was used to measure estradiol levels. Surface electromyography recorded head and cervical muscle activity. The χ(2) test and Student t-test/Mann-Whitney test were used to assess the significance of nominal and continuous variables. A P-value of <0.05 was considered significant. TMD subjects were seven times more susceptible to RCD than controls. The rs1676303 TT (P=0.02) and rs6574293 GG (P=0.04) genotypes were associated with RCD and TMD, respectively. TMD/RCD subjects showed associations with rs4903399 (P=0.02), rs10132091 (P=0.02), and CTTCTTAG/CCTCTCAG (P=0.01) haplotypes and lower muscle activity. Estradiol levels were similar among groups. This study supports TMD as a risk factor for RCD. ESRRB haplotypes and low muscle activity are common biomechanical characteristics in subjects with both diseases. PMID:26584852

  10. Radial extracorporeal shock-wave therapy in rotator cuff calcific tendinosis

    PubMed Central

    Mangone, Giuseppe; Veliaj, Altin; Postiglione, Marco; Viliani, Tamara; Pasquetti, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of Radial Extracorporeal Shock-wave Therapy (RESWT) compared with High Power LASER Therapy (HPLT) for the treatment of patients with Rotator Cuff Calcific Tendinosis (RCCT). RCCT is widely diffused, it is painful and invalidating. It is an important public health problem with social and economic implications. The most common therapeutic approach is a physiotherapic one. Both HPLT and RESWT give positive results. There is a debate on which is to be preferred. Therefore there is need to obtain scientific evidence to support either case. An observational study was carried out in the period between October 2008 and September 2009 in our outpatient clinic with 62 patients, divided into 3 groups: group A 36 patients treated only with RESWT, group B 26 patients treated only with HPLT and group C 16 patients with only short term improvement with HPLT retreated with RESWT. Patients were evaluated with Constant-Murley scale before and after treatment (immediately, 1 month and 3 months) for mean constant score, pain and range of movement. Data were examined statistically with SPSS. Criteria for inclusion and exclusion were defined. Patients treated with HPLT have shown good clinical results but have returned to original syndrome 1 month after treatment. RESWT has given improvement after treatment extended in time (3 months) in terms of pain and recover of functionality with a limited number of applications. The evidence collected indicates that RESWT is the method of choice. PMID:22460011

  11. The rotator cuff muscles have a direction specific recruitment pattern during shoulder flexion and extension exercises.

    PubMed

    Wattanaprakornkul, Duangjai; Cathers, Ian; Halaki, Mark; Ginn, Karen A

    2011-09-01

    A recent study has shown that posterior rotator cuff (RC) muscles are recruited at significantly higher levels than the anterior RC during shoulder flexion. It was proposed that the mechanism whereby the posterior RC muscles were providing shoulder stability during flexion was to counterbalance potential anterior humeral head translation caused by flexion torque producing muscles. This hypothesis implies that anterior RC activity should be higher than posterior RC activity during extension to prevent posterior humeral head translation. As the normal recruitment pattern of the RC during extension has not been established, the purpose of this study was to examine this hypothesis by comparing shoulder muscle activation levels and recruitment patterns during flexion and extension exercises. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded from 9 shoulder muscles in 15 volunteers. Flexion and extension exercises were performed in prone at 20%, 50%, and 70% of each participant's maximal load. A repeated measures ANOVA was used to determine differences between exercises, muscles and loads, while Pearson's correlation analysis was used to relate mean EMG patterns. During extension subscapularis and latissimus dorsi were activated at higher levels than during flexion; during flexion, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, deltoid, trapezius, and serratus anterior were more highly activated than during extension. In addition, the pattern of activity in each muscle did not vary with load. These results support the hypothesis that during flexion and extension the RC muscles are recruited in a direction specific manner to prevent potential antero-posterior humeral head translation caused by torque producing muscles. PMID:21333595

  12. In vitro and finite element analysis of a novel rotator cuff fixation technique.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, Tadanao; Suenaga, Naoki; Sano, Hirotaka; Oizumi, Naomi; Minami, Akio

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the biomechanic strength and stress dispersion at the repair site of surface-holding repair techniques for rotator cuff repair compared to the double-row technique. Eighteen bovine infraspinatus tendons were repaired using 3 different repair techniques: double-row repair, surface-holding repair with transosseous sutures, and surface-holding repair with knotless anchors. Biomechanical testing and two-dimensional finite element analysis were performed. The surface-holding repair with transosseous sutures provided 87.9% more stiffness than the double-row repair. The number of tendon-suture site failures of the surface-holding repair with transosseous sutures was smaller than the other 2 techniques. The finite element analysis showed that the surface-holding repair model had a more dispersing stress pattern compared to a double-row repair model. It suggests that these repair techniques can prevent high stress concentration compared to the double-row repair. PMID:18823800

  13. Atrophy, inducible satellite cell activation, and possible denervation of supraspinatus muscle in injured human rotator-cuff muscle.

    PubMed

    Gigliotti, Deanna; Leiter, Jeff R S; Macek, Bryce; Davidson, Michael J; MacDonald, Peter B; Anderson, Judy E

    2015-09-15

    The high frequency of poor outcome and chronic pain after surgical repair of shoulder rotator-cuff injury (RCI) prompted this study to explore the potential to amplify muscle regeneration using nitric oxide (NO)-based treatment. After preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), biopsies of supraspinatus and ipsilateral deltoid (as a control) were collected during reparative surgery for RCI. Muscle fiber diameter, the pattern of neuromuscular junctions observed with alpha-bungarotoxin staining, and the γ:ε subunit ratio of acetylcholine receptors in Western blots were examined in tandem with experiments to determine the in vitro responsiveness of muscle satellite cells to activation (indicated by uptake of bromodeoxyuridine, BrdU) by the NO-donor drug, isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN). Consistent with MRI findings of supraspinatus atrophy (reduced occupation ratio and tangent sign), fiber diameter was lower in supraspinatus than in deltoid. ISDN induced a significant increase over baseline (up to 1.8-fold), in the proportion of BrdU+ (activated) Pax7+ satellite cells in supraspinatus, but not in deltoid, after 40 h in culture. The novel application of denervation indices revealed a trend for supraspinatus muscle to have a higher γ:ε subunit ratio than deltoid (P = 0.13); this ratio inversely with both occupancy ratio (P < 0.05) and the proportion of clusters at neuromuscular junctions (P = 0.05). Results implicate possible supraspinatus denervation in RCI and suggest NO-donor treatment has potential to promote growth in atrophic supraspinatus muscle after RCI and improve functional outcome. PMID:26135801

  14. Evidence for an Environmental and Inherited Predisposition Contributing to the Risk for Global Tendinopathies or Compression Neuropathies in Patients With Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Tashjian, Robert Z.; Farnham, James M.; Granger, Erin K.; Teerlink, Craig C.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff tearing has been found to be clinically associated with other tendinopathies and compression neuropathies; a significant excess of these phenotypes has been seen in patients with rotator cuff tears. It is unclear if the association is secondary to environmental or genetic influences. Purpose: To examine population-based data for comorbid association of rotator cuff tearing and tendinopathies and compression neuropathies and to determine whether the association extends to relatives of patients with rotator cuff tears, which could suggest a genetic contribution. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: The Utah Population Database (UPDB) contains health and genealogical data on over 2 million Utah residents. Current Procedural Terminology, Fourth Revision, codes (CPT 4) and International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes (ICD-9) entered in patient records were used to identify patients with rotator cuff tearing and with comorbid tendinopathies and compression neuropathies. We tested the hypothesis of excess familial clustering of these other phenotypes with rotator cuff tearing using a well-established method (estimation of relative risks) in the overall study group of rotator cuff patients (N = 1889). Results: Significantly elevated risk for elbow, hand/wrist, foot/ankle, knee, and hip tendinopathies, as well as for all tendinopathies and compression neuropathies, was observed in rotator cuff tear cases themselves (P < 2.8e–13), in their spouses (P < .02), and in their first-degree relatives (P < 5.5e–4). A significant excess of elbow (P = .01), foot/ankle (P = .04), and all tendinopathies (P = 3.1e–3) was also observed in second-degree relatives, and a significant excess of compression neuropathies (P = .03) was observed in third-degree relatives. Conclusion: The current study shows strong evidence of familial clustering of rotator cuff tearing with other tendinopathies and with compression neuropathy. Observed increased risks in spouses and first-degree relatives supports shared environmental risk factors for rotator cuff tearing, most tendinopathies, and compression neuropathies. Increased risks to third-degree relatives for compression neuropathy suggest an association of these phenotypes that may have a shared genetic etiology. PMID:27115018

  15. ProSeal™ laryngeal mask airway cuff pressure changes with and without use of nitrous oxide during laparoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Bimla; Gupta, Rajat; Sehgal, Raminder; Koul, Archna; Sood, Jayashree

    2013-01-01

    Background: The ProSeal™ laryngeal mask (PLMA) is increasingly being used as an airway device for laparoscopic surgery. Its silicone cuff allows diffusion of nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide and other gases with resultant rise in its intracuff pressure during anesthesia. The present study was designed to investigate the intracuff pressure changes during anesthesia with and without nitrous oxide in patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery lasting up to two hours. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 2 and 3, undergoing general anesthesia with muscle paralysis, were randomized into two groups of 50 patients each to receive an anesthetic gas mixture containing either oxygen and nitrous oxide (group N) or oxygen and air (group A). Following insertion of an appropriate size PLMA, its cuff was inflated with air to an intracuff pressure of 45 mm Hg. The cuff pressure was measured every 10 minutes for the entire course of anesthesia. The position of the device was also assessed fiberoptically and postoperative airway complications were recorded. Results: The maximum intracuff pressure recorded in group N was 103 ± 4.7 mm Hg vs. 45.5 ± 1.5 mm Hg in group A. The percentage rise in cuff pressure every 10 minutes was also highly significant (P < 0.001) being maximum in first 10 min in group N. The incidence of postoperative airway complications was comparable between the two groups. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrate that the intracuff pressure of the PLMA increases progressively over time when the breathing gas mixture contains nitrous oxide. PMID:23493234

  16. Maintaining endotracheal tube cuff pressure at 20 mm Hg to prevent dysphagia after anterior cervical spine surgery; protocol of a double-blind randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In anterior cervical spine surgery a retractor is obligatory to approach the spine. Previous studies showed an increase of endotracheal tube cuff pressure after placement of a retractor. It is known that high endotracheal tube cuff pressure increases the incidence of postoperative dysphagia, hoarseness, and sore throat. However, until now no evidence supports the fact whether adjusting the endotracheal tube cuff pressure during anterior cervical spine surgery will prevent this comorbidity. We present the design of a randomized controlled trial to determine whether adjusting endotracheal tube cuff pressure after placement of a retractor during anterior cervical spine surgery will prevent postoperative dysphagia. Methods/design 177 patients (aged 18–90 years) scheduled for anterior cervical spine surgery on 1 or more levels will be included. After intubation, endotracheal tube cuff pressure is manually inflated to 20 mm Hg in all patients. Patients will be randomized into two groups. In the control group endotracheal tube cuff pressure is not adjusted after retractor placement. In the intervention group endotracheal tube cuff pressure after retractor placement is maintained at 20 mm Hg and air is withdrawn when cuff pressure exceeds 20 mm Hg. Endotracheal tube cuff pressure is measured after intubation, before and after placement and removal of the retractor. Again air is inflated if cuff pressure sets below 20 mmHg after removal of the retractor. The primary outcome measure is postoperative dysphagia. Other outcome measures are postoperative hoarseness, postoperative sore throat, degree of dysphagia, length of hospital stay, and pneumonia. The study is a single centre double blind randomized trial in which patients and research nurses will be kept blinded for the allocated treatment during the follow-up period of 2 months. Discussion Postoperative dysphagia occurs frequently after anterior cervical spine surgery. This may be related to high endotracheal tube cuff pressure. Whether adaptation and maintaining the pressure after placement of the retractor will decrease the incidence of dysphagia, has to be determined by this trial. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR) 3542: http://www.trialregister.nl. PMID:24067111

  17. A Spectral Analysis of Rotator Cuff Musculature Electromyographic Activity: Surface and Indwelling

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, Daniel P.; Vanadurongwan, Bavornrat; Lenhoff, Mark W.; Cordasco, Frank A.; Chehab, Eric L.; Adler, Ronald S.; Henn, R. Frank; Hillstrom, Howard J.

    2010-01-01

    Electromyography (EMG) of the shoulder girdle is commonly performed; however, EMG spectral properties of shoulder muscles have not been clearly defined. The purpose of this study was to determine the maximum power frequency, Nyquist rate, and minimum sampling rate for indwelling and surface EMG of the normal shoulder girdle musculature. EMG signals were recorded using indwelling electrodes for the rotator cuff muscles and surface electrodes for ten additional shoulder muscles in ten healthy volunteers. A fast Fourier transform was performed on the raw EMG signal collected during maximal isometric contractions to derive the power spectral density. The 95% power frequency was calculated during the ramp and plateau subphase of each contraction. Data were analyzed with analysis of variance (ANOVA) and paired t tests. Indwelling EMG signals had more than twice the frequency content of surface EMG signals (p?

  18. Rotator cuff arthropathy: what functional results can be expected from reverse arthroplasty?☆

    PubMed Central

    Fávaro, Rodrigo Caldonazzo; Abdulahad, Michel; Filho, Salim Mussi; Valério, Rafael; Superti, Mauro José

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the functional results from reverse arthroplasty and its complications and relationships with types of injury. Methods Twenty-seven shoulders (26 women and one man) were treated. The patients were assessed using the UCLA functional scale. The implant used was the Delta Xtend Depuy® model. The injuries were classified using the Seebauer method for the degree of arthroplasty and the Nerot method for notching. Result The mean age was 77.4 years (range: 67–89) and the follow-up was 25.8 months (range: 6–51). The preoperative UCLA score was 10.1 (range: 6–15) and the postoperative UCLA score was 29.8 (range: 22–35), which was a statistically significant improvement (p < 0.001). According to the Seebauer classification, five patients were 1B, 19 were 2A and three were 2B. Fifteen cases presented complications (55.5%) and notching was the commonest of these, occurring in 14 patients (nine with grade 1 and five with grade 2), but this did not cause instability in any of them. Only one patient (3.7%) had a major complication, consisting of dislocation in the immediate postoperative period. Two patients (7.4%) said that they would undergo the procedure again. One patient (3.7%) underwent a revision procedure. Conclusion Reverse arthroplasty was shown to be an excellent option for treating patients with rotator cuff arthropathy, with a low rate of major complications. Notching was a frequent complication, but in the majority of the cases, it did not present clinical repercussions. PMID:26535197

  19. Leukocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF) for long-term delivery of growth factor in rotator cuff repair: review, preliminary results and future directions.

    PubMed

    Zumstein, Matthias A; Berger, Simon; Schober, Martin; Boileau, Pascal; Nyffeler, Richard W; Horn, Michael; Dahinden, Clemens A

    2012-06-01

    Surgical repair of the rotator cuff repair is one of the most common procedures in orthopedic surgery. Despite it being the focus of much research, the physiological tendon-bone insertion is not recreated following repair and there is an anatomic non-healing rate of up to 94%. During the healing phase, several growth factors are upregulated that induce cellular proliferation and matrix deposition. Subsequently, this provisional matrix is replaced by the definitive matrix. Leukocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF) contain growth factors and has a stable dense fibrin matrix. Therefore, use of LPRF in rotator cuff repair is theoretically attractive. The aim of the present study was to determine 1) the optimal protocol to achieve the highest leukocyte content; 2) whether L-PRF releases growth factors in a sustained manner over 28 days; 3) whether standard/gelatinous or dry/compressed matrix preparation methods result in higher growth factor concentrations. 1) The standard L-PRF centrifugation protocol with 400 x g showed the highest concentration of platelets and leukocytes. 2) The L-PRF clots cultured in medium showed a continuous slow release with an increase in the absolute release of growth factors TGF-β1, VEGF and MPO in the first 7 days, and for IGF1, PDGF-AB and platelet activity (PF4=CXCL4) in the first 8 hours, followed by a decrease to close to zero at 28 days. Significantly higher levels of growth factor were expressed relative to the control values of normal blood at each culture time point. 3) Except for MPO and the TGFβ-1, there was always a tendency towards higher release of growth factors (i.e., CXCL4, IGF-1, PDGF-AB, and VEGF) in the standard/gelatinous- compared to the dry/compressed group. L-PRF in its optimal standard/gelatinous-type matrix can store and deliver locally specific healing growth factors for up to 28 days and may be a useful adjunct in rotator cuff repair. PMID:21740372

  20. Patch-Augmented Latissimus Dorsi Transfer and Open Reduction–Internal Fixation of Unstable Os Acromiale for Irreparable Massive Posterosuperior Rotator Cuff Tear

    PubMed Central

    Petri, Maximilian; Greenspoon, Joshua A.; Bhatia, Sanjeev; Millett, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Latissimus dorsi transfer is a reasonable treatment option for massive posterosuperior rotator cuff tears that can substantially improve chronically painful and dysfunctional shoulders. This report and accompanying video describe the treatment of an active 43-year-old man with severe pain and weakness in the right shoulder after 3 failed rotator cuff repairs. Preoperative imaging showed a massive posterosuperior rotator cuff tear retracted to the glenoid as well as a hypermobile os acromiale likely causing dynamic impingement and recurrent rotator cuff tears. After diagnostic arthroscopy, the latissimus tendon is harvested and augmented with a 3-mm human acellular dermal patch (ArthroFlex; Arthrex, Naples, FL). The native rotator cuff tissue is repaired as much as possible, and the latissimus tendon is passed underneath the deltoid and posterior to the teres minor. The patch-augmented tendon is then integrated into a double-row SpeedBridge repair of eight 4.75-mm BioComposite SwiveLock anchors (Arthrex). The bony surface of the os acromiale is prepared and then fixed to the acromion with 2 cannulated partially threaded screws and additional tension-band wiring. Postoperative rehabilitation initially focuses on early passive range of motion, followed by active and active-assisted motion and a biofeedback program starting at 6 weeks postoperatively. PMID:26697309

  1. Patch-Augmented Latissimus Dorsi Transfer and Open Reduction-Internal Fixation of Unstable Os Acromiale for Irreparable Massive Posterosuperior Rotator Cuff Tear.

    PubMed

    Petri, Maximilian; Greenspoon, Joshua A; Bhatia, Sanjeev; Millett, Peter J

    2015-10-01

    Latissimus dorsi transfer is a reasonable treatment option for massive posterosuperior rotator cuff tears that can substantially improve chronically painful and dysfunctional shoulders. This report and accompanying video describe the treatment of an active 43-year-old man with severe pain and weakness in the right shoulder after 3 failed rotator cuff repairs. Preoperative imaging showed a massive posterosuperior rotator cuff tear retracted to the glenoid as well as a hypermobile os acromiale likely causing dynamic impingement and recurrent rotator cuff tears. After diagnostic arthroscopy, the latissimus tendon is harvested and augmented with a 3-mm human acellular dermal patch (ArthroFlex; Arthrex, Naples, FL). The native rotator cuff tissue is repaired as much as possible, and the latissimus tendon is passed underneath the deltoid and posterior to the teres minor. The patch-augmented tendon is then integrated into a double-row SpeedBridge repair of eight 4.75-mm BioComposite SwiveLock anchors (Arthrex). The bony surface of the os acromiale is prepared and then fixed to the acromion with 2 cannulated partially threaded screws and additional tension-band wiring. Postoperative rehabilitation initially focuses on early passive range of motion, followed by active and active-assisted motion and a biofeedback program starting at 6 weeks postoperatively. PMID:26697309

  2. A Comparison of Whole-Body Vibration and Resistance Training on Total Work in the Rotator Cuff

    PubMed Central

    Hand, Jason; Verscheure, Susan; Osternig, Louis

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Context: Whole-body vibration machines are a relatively new technology being implemented in the athletic setting. Numerous authors have examined the proposed physiologic mechanisms of vibration therapy and performance outcomes. Changes have mainly been observed in the lower extremity after individual exercises, with minimal attention to the upper extremity and resistance training programs. Objective: To examine the effects of a novel vibration intervention directed at the upper extremity as a precursor to a supervised, multijoint dynamic resistance training program. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: National Collegiate Athletic Association Division IA institution. Patients or Other Participants: Thirteen female student-athletes were divided into the following 2 treatment groups: (1) whole-body vibration and resistance training or (2) resistance training only. Intervention(s): Participants in the vibration and resistance training group used an experimental vibration protocol of 2 60 seconds at 4 mm and 50 Hz, in a modified push-up position, 3 times per week for 10 weeks, just before their supervised resistance training session. Main Outcome Measure(s): Isokinetic total work measurements of the rotator cuff were collected at baseline and at week 5 and week 10. Results: No differences were found between the treatment groups (P > .05). However, rotator cuff output across time increased in both groups (P < .05). Conclusions: Although findings did not differ between the groups, the use of whole-body vibration as a precursor to multijoint exercises warrants further investigation because of the current lack of literature on the topic. Our results indicate that indirectly strengthening the rotator cuff using a multijoint dynamic resistance training program is possible. PMID:19771284

  3. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS ON THE RESULT FOR ARTHROSCOPIC ROTATOR CUFF SUTURE BETWEEN SMOKING AND NON-SMOKING PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Alexandre; Valin, Márcio Rangel; Zampieri, Rodrigo; Almeida, Nayvaldo Couto de; Roveda, Gilberto; Agostini, Ana Paula

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To comparatively analyze the results from arthroscopic rotator cuff suture between smoking and non-smoking patients. Methods: A group of 286 patients who underwent arthroscopic suturing of primary rotator cuff injuries between June 12, 2002, and May 14, 2008, was analyzed. The patients included in the study were evaluated using the UCLA scale, with a minimum follow-up of 12 months and average of 56.52 months. The variables studied were age, sex, side operated, dominance, profile of cigarette use and UCLA index. Results: This study evaluated a total of 205 patients. Mean age (p = 0.289) and sex (p = 0.124) were analyzed statistically between the smoking and non-smoking patients and the two groups were considered to be similar. The average UCLA score for the non-smoking patients (143) was 34 (32 to 35). The average UCLA score for the smoking patients (51) was 33 (29 to 35). There was no statistically significant difference in UCLA score (p = 0.123) between the smoking and non-smoking patients. For the purposes of statistical analysis, we grouped the small and medium tears (107) and compared these with the large and extensive tears (80), between smokers and non-smokers. There was no statistically significant difference using the Mann-Whitney test regarding the small and medium tears (p = 818). There was a statistically significant difference using the Mann-Whitney test regarding the large and extended tears, between the smoking and non-smoking patients, such that the non-smokers showed better UCLA scores (p = 0.038). Conclusion: The results from arthroscopic suturing of large and extensive rotator cuff injuries are inferior among smoking patients. PMID:27027006

  4. The results of arthroscopic versus mini-open repair for rotator cuff tears at mid-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Pearsall, Albert W; Ibrahim, Khalid A; Madanagopal, Sudhakar G

    2007-01-01

    Background To prospectively evaluate patients who underwent a "mini-open" repair versus a completely arthroscopic technique for small to large size rotator cuff tears. Methods Fifty-two patients underwent "mini-open" or all arthroscopic repair of a full thickness tear of the rotator cuff. Patients who complained of shoulder pain and/or weakness and who had failed a minimum of 6 weeks of physical therapy and had at least one sub-acromial injection were surgical candidates. Pre and post-operative clinical evaluations included the following: 1) demographics; 2) Simple Shoulder Test (SST); 3) University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) rating scale; 4) visual analog pain assessment (VAS); and 5) pre-op SF12 assessment. Descriptive analysis was performed for patient demographics and for all variables. Pre and post outcome scores, range of motion and pain scale were compared using paired t-tests. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to evaluate any effect between dependent and independent variables. Significance was set at p is less than or equal to 0.05. Results There were 31 females and 21 males. The average follow-up was 50.6 months (27 – 84 months). The average age was similar between the two groups [arthroscopic x = 55 years/mini-open x = 58 years, p = 0.7]. Twenty-seven patients underwent arthroscopic repair and 25 underwent repair with a mini-open incision. The average rotator cuff tear size was 3.1 cm (range: 1–5 centimeters). There was no significant difference in tear size between the two groups (arthroscopic group = 2.9 cm/mini-open group = 3.2 cm, p = 0.3). Overall, there was a significant improvement from pre-operative status in shoulder pain, shoulder function as measured on the Simple Shoulder test and UCLA Shoulder Form. Visual analog pain improved, on average, 4.4 points and the most recent Short Shoulder Form and UCLA scores were 8 and 26 respectively. Both active and passive glenohumeral joint range of motion improved significantly from pre-operatively. Conclusion Based upon the number available, we found no statistical difference in outcome between the two groups, indicating that either procedure is efficacious in the treatment of small and medium size rotator cuff tears. Level of Evidence Type III PMID:18053153

  5. Initial fixation and cyclic loading stability of knotless suture anchors for rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Brown, Barrett S; Cooper, Andrew D; McIff, Terence E; Key, Vincent H; Toby, E Bruce

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the resistance to gapping and the mode of failure for 2 knotless suture anchor systems used for rotator cuff repair compared with the performance of a conventional titanium anchor system. Eight matched pairs of fresh-frozen humeri were dissected free of all soft tissues and scanned to measure bone mineral density (BMD). The suture anchor systems tested were the TwinFix 5.0 Titanium (Smith & Nephew, Andover, MA), Bioknotless RC (DePuy Mitek, Norwood, MA), and Magnum (Opus Medical, San Juan Capistrano, CA), and each was inserted into each humerus. Cyclic, tensile loading was applied through the suture loop for 5000 cycles, or until failure, by using a servohydraulic testing machine. Gapping distances, defined as increasing elongation of the bone/anchor/suture system, were continuously measured. Total cycles to failure and mechanism of failure were documented. Mean initial (first cycle) and final (last cycle) gapping distances were 3.81 mm and 5.36 mm for the TwinFix 5.0, 4.02 mm and 5.34 mm for the Bioknotless RC, and 3.56 mm and 4.98 mm for the Magnum anchors. No significant difference was detected among mean gap openings (P > .05). However, the Bioknotless RC had more early failures (5) than the other 2 implants (1 each), approaching significance (P = .07). Trials of the Bioknotless RC that did not fail early were found to have significantly less gap opening than the other 2 systems for both initial (1.89 mm vs 3.82 mm for the TwinFix 5.0 and 3.56 mm for the Magnum) and final (2.00 mm vs 4.68 mm for the TwinFix 5.0 and 4.24 mm for the Magnum) gap opening. BMD was a significant predictor of initial (P = .029) and final (P = .008) gap opening, whereas the site of anchor insertion was a significant predictor of final displacement. The Opus Magnum was comparable with a conventional suture anchor, but the Mitek Bioknotless RC showed a trend toward early failure. Biomechanical analysis of knotless suture anchor systems can demonstrate trends among implants in an experimental setting. Knowledge of these trends could influence implant selection. PMID:18036851

  6. Identification of suitable reference genes for gene expression studies in tendons from patients with rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio; Cohen, Carina; Loyola, Leonor Casilla; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Smith, Marília Cardoso; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moises

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tear is one of the most common causes of shoulder dysfunction. Gene expression analysis may be a useful tool for understanding tendon tears and the failure of cuff healing, and reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) has become an effective method for such studies. However, this technique requires the use of suitable reference genes for data normalization. Here, we evaluate the suitability of six reference genes (18S, ACTB, B2M, GAPDH, HPRT1 and TBP) using samples from the rotator cuff tendons of 28 individuals with tendon tears (3 tendons regions) and 8 controls (2 tendon regions); for the tear patients, we evaluated ruptured and non-ruptured tendon samples. The stability of the candidate reference genes was determined using the NormFinder, geNorm, BestKeeper and DataAssist software packages. Overall, HPRT1 was the best single reference gene, and HPRT1+TBP composed the best pair and HPRT1+TBP+ACTB composed the best trio of reference genes from the analysis of different groups, including the simultaneous analysis of all tissue samples. To identify the optimal combination of reference genes, we evaluated the expression of COL1A1 and COL3A1, and no obvious differences were observed when using 2, 3 or 4 reference genes for most of the analyses. However, COL3A1 expression differed between ruptured and non-ruptured (posterior superior region) tendons of patients only when normalized by HPRT1+TBP+B2M and HPRT1+TBP. On the other hand, the comparison between these two groups using the best trio of reference genes (HPRT1+TBP+ACTB) and 4 reference genes did not revealed a significant difference in COL3A1 expression. Consequently, the use of suitable reference genes for a reliable gene expression evaluation by RT-qPCR should consider the type of tendon samples investigated. HPRT1+TBP+ACTB seems to be the best combination of reference genes for the analysis of involving different tendon samples of individuals with rotator cuff tears. PMID:25768100

  7. Identification of Suitable Reference Genes for Gene Expression Studies in Tendons from Patients with Rotator Cuff Tear

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio; Cohen, Carina; Loyola, Leonor Casilla; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Smith, Marília Cardoso; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moises

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tear is one of the most common causes of shoulder dysfunction. Gene expression analysis may be a useful tool for understanding tendon tears and the failure of cuff healing, and reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) has become an effective method for such studies. However, this technique requires the use of suitable reference genes for data normalization. Here, we evaluate the suitability of six reference genes (18S, ACTB, B2M, GAPDH, HPRT1 and TBP) using samples from the rotator cuff tendons of 28 individuals with tendon tears (3 tendons regions) and 8 controls (2 tendon regions); for the tear patients, we evaluated ruptured and non-ruptured tendon samples. The stability of the candidate reference genes was determined using the NormFinder, geNorm, BestKeeper and DataAssist software packages. Overall, HPRT1 was the best single reference gene, and HPRT1+TBP composed the best pair and HPRT1+TBP+ACTB composed the best trio of reference genes from the analysis of different groups, including the simultaneous analysis of all tissue samples. To identify the optimal combination of reference genes, we evaluated the expression of COL1A1 and COL3A1, and no obvious differences were observed when using 2, 3 or 4 reference genes for most of the analyses. However, COL3A1 expression differed between ruptured and non-ruptured (posterior superior region) tendons of patients only when normalized by HPRT1+TBP+B2M and HPRT1+TBP. On the other hand, the comparison between these two groups using the best trio of reference genes (HPRT1+TBP+ACTB) and 4 reference genes did not revealed a significant difference in COL3A1 expression. Consequently, the use of suitable reference genes for a reliable gene expression evaluation by RT-qPCR should consider the type of tendon samples investigated. HPRT1+TBP+ACTB seems to be the best combination of reference genes for the analysis of involving different tendon samples of individuals with rotator cuff tears. PMID:25768100

  8. The geyser sign and torn rotator cuff: clinical significance and pathomechanics.

    PubMed

    Craig, E V

    1984-12-01

    The geyser radiographic sign on shoulder arthrogram is characterized by leakage of dye from the glenohumeral joint into the subdeltoid bursa. The dye outlines the acromioclavicular joint. It is usually an indication of a full-thickness cuff tear of long duration. The clinical occurrence and pathomechanics of this finding indicate that repair is generally difficult. PMID:6499313

  9. A prospective multi-site registry study of a specific protocol of autologous bone marrow concentrate for the treatment of shoulder rotator cuff tears and osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Centeno, Christopher J; Al-Sayegh, Hasan; Bashir, Jamil; Goodyear, Shaun; Freeman, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Shoulder pain is a common musculoskeletal complaint in the general population. Bone marrow concentrate (BMC) injections offer promising potential as a minimally invasive approach for treatment of shoulder pain in degenerative disease. In this study, we investigated the clinical outcomes of the BMC injections for treatment of shoulder pain and disability due to osteoarthritis (OA) and rotator cuff tears in a treatment registry population. Methods A total of 115 shoulders in 102 patients were treated with autologous BMC injections for symptomatic OA at the glenohumeral joint and/or rotator cuff tears. Data were collected for factors potentially influencing outcome, including age, sex, body mass index, and the type of condition treated (ie, OA or rotator cuff tear). Clinical outcomes were assessed serially over time using the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand score (DASH), the numeric pain scale (NPS), and a subjective improvement rating scale. Baseline scores were compared to the most recent outcome scores at the time of the analysis and adjusted for demographic differences. We reported comparisons of pre- and post-treatment scores, the differences between osteoarthritis and rotator cuff groups, and the predictive effects on the clinical outcomes. Results At the most current follow-up assessment after treatment, the average DASH score decreased (improved) from 36.1 to 17.1 (P<0.001) and the average numeric pain scale value decreased (improved) from 4.3 to 2.4 (P<0.001). These changes were associated with an average subjective improvement of 48.8%. No differences were observed between outcomes among the shoulders treated for OA versus rotator cuff tears, nor did age, sex, or body mass index influence pain or functional outcomes. There were no significant treatment-related adverse events reported. Discussion We observed preliminarily encouraging results following BMC injections for shoulder OA and rotator cuff tears. These results serve as basis for the design of an adequately powered randomized controlled trial. PMID:26089699

  10. Cathepsins in Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy: Identification in Human Chronic Tears and Temporal Induction in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Seto, Song P; Parks, Akia N; Qiu, Yongzhi; Soslowsky, Louis J; Karas, Spero; Platt, Manu O; Temenoff, Johnna S

    2015-09-01

    While overuse of the supraspinatus tendon is a leading factor in rotator cuff injury, the underlying biochemical changes have not been fully elucidated. In this study, torn human rotator cuff (supraspinatus) tendon tissue was analyzed for the presence of active cathepsin proteases with multiplex cysteine cathepsin zymography. In addition, an overuse injury to supraspinatus tendons was induced through downhill running in an established rat model. Histological analysis demonstrated that structural damage occurred by 8 weeks of overuse compared to control rats in the region of tendon insertion into bone. In both 4- and 8-week overuse groups, via zymography, there was approximately a 180% increase in cathepsin L activity at the insertion region compared to the controls, while no difference was found in the midsubstance area. Additionally, an over 400% increase in cathepsin K activity was observed for the insertion region of the 4-week overused tendons. More cathepsin K and L immunostaining was observed at the insertion region of the overuse groups compared to controls. These results provide important information on a yet unexplored mechanism for tendon degeneration that may operate alone or in conjunction with other proteases to contribute to chronic tendinopathy. PMID:25558848

  11. Architectural and Biochemical Adaptations in Skeletal Muscle and Bone Following Rotator Cuff Injury in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Eugene J.; Killian, Megan L.; Choi, Anthony J.; Lin, Evie; Choo, Alexander D.; Rodriguez-Soto, Ana E.; Lim, Chanteak T.; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Galatz, Leesa M.; Ward, Samuel R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Injury to the rotator cuff can cause irreversible changes to the structure and function of the associated muscles and bones. The temporal progression and pathomechanisms associated with these adaptations are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the time course of structural muscle and osseous changes in a rat model of a massive rotator cuff tear. Methods: Supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscle architecture and biochemistry and humeral and scapular morphological parameters were measured three days, eight weeks, and sixteen weeks after dual tenotomy with and without chemical paralysis via botulinum toxin A (BTX). Results: Muscle mass and physiological cross-sectional area increased over time in the age-matched control animals, decreased over time in the tenotomy+BTX group, and remained nearly the same in the tenotomy-alone group. Tenotomy+BTX led to increased extracellular collagen in the muscle. Changes in scapular bone morphology were observed in both experimental groups, consistent with reductions in load transmission across the joint. Conclusions: These data suggest that tenotomy alone interferes with normal age-related muscle growth. The addition of chemical paralysis yielded profound structural changes to the muscle and bone, potentially leading to impaired muscle function, increased muscle stiffness, and decreased bone strength. Clinical Relevance: Structural musculoskeletal changes occur after tendon injury, and these changes are severely exacerbated with the addition of neuromuscular compromise. PMID:25834081

  12. Kinesiology Tape Compared to NSAIDS in the Treatment of Rotator Cuff Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Devereaux, Moira; Velanoski, Kinny Quan; Pennings, Amanda; ElMaraghy, Amr

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine if kinesiology tape is as effective as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) when used as an adjunctive therapy to exercise at reducing pain and improving function in patients with rotator cuff impingement. Methods: A prospective, single-blind, randomized control trial was conducted. One hundred patients (average age: 48 ± 12.3, 61 males, 39 females) with a diagnosis of subacromial impingement syndrome were recruited and randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: taping and exercise (n=33), NSAIDs and exercise (n=29), or exercise only (n=38). All patients completed a two-week (four sessions) exercise program guided by a registered physiotherapist. The physiotherapist applied the kinesiology tape to the patients in the taping and exercise group who wore the tape full time for an average of 3.5 days. Patients were assessed pre and post treatment by a research assistant who was blinded to each patient’s assigned treatment group. Patients were provided with a usage diary to record their compliance with the treatment protocol. Shoulder pain and function were assessed using a Numeric Pain Rating Scale, the Simple Shoulder Test (SST), and the Constant Score. Results: A significant improvement in pain with arm elevation, SST, and Constant Scores was observed in all the groups: taping and exercise group (1.2±2.5, 1.6±2.2, 7.8±8.1, respectively; p<0.05), NSAIDs and exercise group (2.1±2.4, 1.5±2.7, 11.0±11.7; respectively; p<0.05), and the exercise only group (1.3±2.6, 1.4±2.2, 6.3±10.9, respectively; p<0.05). A significant improvement in activities of daily living and functional arm level was observed in the taping and exercise group (0.8±1.2, 1.6±2.2 respectively; p<0.05) and the NSAIDS and exercise group (1.0±1.6, 0.8±2.0 respectively; p<0.05). Between-group differences were not statistically significant. Although all treatment groups showed a slight trend toward increased strength, the results were not significant. Patients were more compliant with the kinesiology tape (100%) than the NSAIDS treatment regime (84%). 88.5% of participants reported on average less than 2/10 discomfort with the tape. Conclusion: Kinesiology tape is as effective as NSAIDs as an adjuvant therapy to exercise at reducing shoulder pain and improving function in patients with subacromial impingement. Patients demonstrated increased compliance with the addition of kinesiology tape to an exercise program as compared to NSAIDS. Kinesiology tape appears to be well-tolerated and may prove to be a safer alternative to NSAIDs in the conservative treatment of shoulder impingement pain and dysfunction.

  13. Low-dose CT imaging of radio-opaque markers for assessing human rotator cuff repair: accuracy, repeatability and the effect of arm position.

    PubMed

    Derwin, K A; Milks, R A; Davidson, I; Iannotti, J P; McCarron, J A; Bey, M J

    2012-02-01

    Previous studies have used radiostereometric analysis (RSA) to assess the integrity and mechanical properties of repaired tendons and ligament grafts. A conceptually similar approach is to use CT imaging to measure the 3D position and distance between implanted markers. The purpose of this study was to quantify the accuracy and repeatability of measuring the position and distance between metallic markers placed in the rotator cuff using low-dose CT imaging. We also investigated the effect of repeated or variable positions of the arm on position and distance measures. Six human patients had undergone rotator cuff repair and placement of tantalum beads in the rotator cuff at least one year prior to participating in this study. On a single day each patient underwent nine low-dose CT scans in seven unique arm positions. CT scans were analyzed to assess bias, precision and RMS error of the measurement technique. The effect of repeated or variable positions of the arm on the 3D position of the beads and the distance between these beads and suture anchors in the humeral head were also assessed. Results showed the CT imaging method is accurate and repeatable to within 0.7 mm. Further, measures of bead position and anchor-to-bead distance are influenced by arm position and location of the bead within the rotator cuff. Beads located in the posterior rotator cuff moved medially as much as 20 mm in abduction or external rotation. When clinically relevant CT arm positions such as the hand on umbilicus or at side were repeated, bead position varied less than 4 mm in any anatomic direction and anchor-to-bead distance varied +2.8 to -1.6 mm (RMS 1.3 mm). We conclude that a range of ± 3 mm is a conservative estimate of the uncertainty in anchor-to-bead distance for patients repeatedly scanned in clinically-relevant arm positions. PMID:22169153

  14. Effect of mechanical stimulation on bone marrow stromal cell-seeded tendon slice constructs: a potential engineered tendon patch for rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ting-Wu; Sun, Yu-Long; Thoreson, Andrew R; Steinmann, Scott P; Amadio, Peter C; An, Kai-Nan; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2015-05-01

    Cell-based tissue engineered tendons have potential to improve clinical outcomes following rotator cuff repair, especially in large or massive rotator cuff tears, which pose a great clinical challenge. The aim of this study was to develop a method of constructing a functional engineered tendon patch for rotator cuff repair with cyclic mechanical stimulation. Decellularized tendon slices (DTSs) were seeded with BMSCs and subjected to cyclic stretching for 1, 3, or 7 days. The mechanical properties, morphologic characteristics and tendon-related gene expression of the constructs were investigated. Viable BMSCs were observed on the DTS after 7 days. BMSCs penetrated into the DTSs and formed dense cell sheets after 7 days of mechanical stretching. Gene expression of type I collagen, decorin, and tenomodulin significantly increased in cyclically stretched BMSC-DTS constructs compared with the unstrained control group (P < 0.05). The ultimate tensile strength and stiffness of the cyclically stretched tendon constructs were similar to the unstrained control group (P > 0.05). In conclusion, mechanical stimulation of BMSC-DTS constructs upregulated expression of tendon-related proteins, promoted cell tenogenic differentiation, facilitated cell infiltration and formation of cell sheets, and retained mechanical properties. The patch could be used as a graft to enhance the surgical repair of rotator cuff tears. PMID:25770996

  15. Preliminary investigation of a biological augmentation of rotator cuff repairs using a collagen implant: a 2-year MRI follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Bokor, Desmond John; Sonnabend, David; Deady, Luke; Cass, Ben; Young, Allan; Van Kampen, Craig; Arnoczky, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background the inability to restore the normal tendon footprint and limit strains on the repair site are thought to contribute to re-tearing following rotator cuff repair. The purpose of this study was to use a collagen implant to augment rotator cuff repairs through the restoration of the native tendon footprint and the induction of new tissue to decrease overall tendon strain. Methods repairs of full-thickness rotator cuff lesions in 9 adult patients were augmented with a novel collagen implant placed over the bursal surface of the repair. Tendon thickness and footprint anatomy were evaluated using MRI at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Clinical results were assessed using standard outcome metrics. Mean follow-up for all patients was 25.8 months. Results the implant induced significant new tissue formation in all patients by 3 months. This tissue matured over time and became indistinguishable from the underlying tendon. At 24 months all repairs remained intact and normal footprint anatomy of the tendon was restored in all patients. All clinical scores improved significantly over time. Conclusion the ability of a collagen implant to induce new host tissue formation and restore the normal footprint anatomy may represent a significant advancement in the biological augmentation and ultimate durability of rotator cuff repairs. PMID:26605186

  16. Tendon of the long head of the biceps originating from the rotator cuff – An uncommon anatomical variation: case report☆

    PubMed Central

    Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Esteves, Leonardo Roure; Figueiredo, Eduardo; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Ejnisman, Benno

    2015-01-01

    Anatomical variations at the origin of the biceps tendon have been described by several authors, but occurrences of an origin in the supraspinatus are rare. It is unclear whether this variation might contribute toward pathological conditions of the shoulder. Our objective here was to describe a case of an anatomical variation in the origin of the tendon of the long head of the biceps. The clinical information, preoperative images and arthroscopic images relating to a patient with an aberrant origin of the long head of the biceps, which was observed during shoulder arthroscopy, were reviewed. In this case study, the origin of the biceps was found in the rotator cuff, without any origin from the supraglenoid tubercle or upper labrum. This variant did not seem to contribute toward the pathological condition of the shoulder, and standard treatment for the concomitant condition was sufficient for treating it. PMID:26962493

  17. The effects of a rotator cuff tear on activities of daily living in older adults: A kinematic analysis.

    PubMed

    Vidt, Meghan E; Santago, Anthony C; Marsh, Anthony P; Hegedus, Eric J; Tuohy, Christopher J; Poehling, Gary G; Freehill, Michael T; Miller, Michael E; Saul, Katherine R

    2016-02-29

    Rotator cuff tears (RCT) in older individuals may compound age-associated physiological changes and impact their ability to perform daily functional tasks. Our objective was to quantify thoracohumeral kinematics for functional tasks in 18 older adults (mean age=63.3±2.2), and compare findings from nine with a RCT to nine matched controls. Motion capture was used to record kinematics for 7 tasks (axilla wash, forward reach, functional pull, hair comb, perineal care, upward reach to 90°, upward reach to 105°) spanning the upper limb workspace. Maximum and minimum joint angles and motion excursion for the three thoracohumeral degrees of freedom (elevation plane, elevation, axial rotation) were identified for each task and compared between groups. The RCT group used greater minimum elevation angles for axilla wash and functional pull (p≤0.0124) and a smaller motion excursion for functional pull (p=0.0032) compared to the control group. The RCT group also used a more internally rotated maximum axial rotation angle than controls for functional reach, functional pull, hair comb, and upward reach to 105° (p≤0.0494). The most differences between groups were observed for axial rotation, with the RCT group using greater internal rotation to complete functional tasks, and significant differences between groups were identified for all three thoracohumeral degrees of freedom for functional pull. We conclude that older adults with RCT used more internal rotation to perform functional tasks than controls. The kinematic differences identified in this study may have consequences for progression of shoulder damage and further functional impairment in older adults with RCT. PMID:26879327

  18. Treatment of the calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff by ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle lavage. Two years prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Del Castillo-González, Federico; Ramos-Álvarez, Juan José; Rodríguez-Fabián, Guillermo; González-Pérez, José; Calderón-Montero, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Summary Purpose: to evaluate the short and long term effectiveness of ultrasonography (US)-guided percutaneous needle lavage in calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff. To study the evolution of the size of calcifications and pain in the two years after treatment. Methods: a 2 year longitudinal prospective study is carried out after applying the UGPL technique on a number of patients diagnosed with calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff. Clinical, ultrasound and radiology follow-up controls were performed, 3 months, 6 months, one year and two years after the treatment. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was used to assess the pain. The degree and point of pain is selected on a 10cm line, arranged horizontally or vertically. The “0” represents no pain and “10” represents worst pain. The population studied was made up of 121 patients that required our service as a result of suffering from a painful shoulder. Results: the pain (VAS) and the size of the calcification significantly decreased with the application of the technique (p< 0,001 in both cases) and regardless of the sex (p: 0.384 for pain and p: 0.578 for the size of the calcification). This occurred from the first check-up (3 months) and was maintained for two year. Conclusion: we consider this technique to be a valid alternative as a first-choice treatment of calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. The intervention is simple, cost-effective, does not require hospitalization, involves no complications, rehabilitation treatment is not required and it shows very few side effects without sequelae, significantly reducing the size of the calcification and pain in the majority of patients. PMID:25767776

  19. Treatment of the calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff by ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle lavage. Two years prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-González, Federico Del; Ramos-Álvarez, Juan José; Rodríguez-Fabián, Guillermo; González-Pérez, José; Calderón-Montero, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: to evaluate the short and long term effectiveness of ultrasonography (US)-guided percutaneous needle lavage in calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff. To study the evolution of the size of calcifications and pain in the two years after treatment. Methods: study design: A 2 year longitudinal prospective study is carried out after applying the UGPL technique on a number of patients diagnosed with calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff. Clinical, ultrasound and radiology follow-up controls were performed, 3 months, 6 months, one year and two years after the treatment. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was used to assess the pain. The degree and point of pain is selected on a 10 cm line, arranged horizontally or vertically. The “0” represents no pain and “10” represents worst pain. The population studied was made up of 121 patients that required our service as a result of suffering from a painful shoulder. Results: the pain (VAS) and the size of the calcification significantly decreased with the application of the technique (p< 0,001 in both cases) and regardless of the sex (p: 0.384 for pain and p: 0.578 for the size of the calcification). This occurred from the first check-up (3 months) and was maintained for two year. Conclusions: we consider this technique to be a valid alternative as a first-choice treatment of calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. The intervention is simple, cost-effective, does not require hospitalization, involves no complications, rehabilitation treatment is not required and it shows very few side effects without sequelae, significantly reducing the size of the calcification and pain in the majority of patients. PMID:25332939

  20. Evidence for effectiveness of Extracorporal Shock-Wave Therapy (ESWT) to treat calcific and non-calcific rotator cuff tendinosis--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Huisstede, Bionka M A; Gebremariam, Lukas; van der Sande, Renske; Hay, Elaine M; Koes, Bart W

    2011-10-01

    Extracorporeal shock-wave therapy (ESWT) is suggested as a treatment alternative for calcific and non-calcific rotator cuff tendinosis (RC-tendinosis), which may decrease the need for surgery. In this study we assessed the evidence for effectiveness of ESWT for these disorders. The Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, Pedro, and Cinahl were searched for relevant systematic reviews and RCTs. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality. Seventeen RCTs (11 calcific, 6 non-calcific) were included. For calcific RC-tendinosis, strong evidence was found for effectiveness in favour of high-ESWT versus low-ESWT in short-term. Moderate evidence was found in favour of high-ESWT versus placebo in short-, mid- and long-term and versus low-ESWT in mid- and long-term. Moreover, high-ESWT was more effective (moderate evidence) with focus on calcific deposit versus focus on tuberculum major in short- and long-term. RSWT was more effective (moderate evidence) than placebo in mid-term. For non-calcific RC-tendinosis, no strong or moderate evidence was found in favour of low-, mid- or high-ESWT versus placebo, each other, or other treatments. This review shows that only high-ESWT is effective for treating calcific RC-tendinosis. No evidence was found for the effectiveness of ESWT to treat non-calcific RC-tendinosis. PMID:21396877

  1. Ultrasound-Guided Myofascial Trigger Point Injection Into Brachialis Muscle for Rotator Cuff Disease Patients With Upper Arm Pain: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Mi Ri; Chang, Won Hyuk; Choi, Hyo Seon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy of trigger point injection into brachialis muscle for rotator cuff disease patients with upper arm pain. Methods A prospective, randomized, and single-blinded clinical pilot trial was performed at university rehabilitation hospital. Twenty-one patients clinically diagnosed with rotator cuff disease suspected of having brachialis myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) were randomly allocated into two groups. Effect of ultrasound (US)-guided trigger point injection (n=11) and oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) (n=10) was compared by visual analog scale (VAS). Results US-guided trigger point injection of brachialis muscle resulted in excellent outcome compared to the oral NSAID group. Mean VAS scores decreased significantly after 2 weeks of treatment compared to the baseline in both groups (7.3 vs. 4.5 in the injection group and 7.4 vs. 5.9 in the oral group). The decrease of the VAS score caused by injection (ДVAS=-2.8) was significantly larger than caused by oral NSAID (ДVAS=-1.5) (p<0.05). Conclusion In patients with rotator cuff disease, US-guided trigger point injection of the brachialis muscle is safe and effective for both diagnosis and treatment when the cause of pain is suspected to be originated from the muscle. PMID:25379497

  2. Calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder: arthroscopic needling versus complete calcium removal and rotator cuff repair. A prospective comparative study

    PubMed Central

    CASTAGNA, ALESSANDRO; DE GIORGI, SILVANA; GAROFALO, RAFFAELE; CONTI, MARCO; TAFURI, SILVIO; MORETTI, BIAGIO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the aim of the present study was to verify the differences in the clinical outcomes of two arthroscopic techniques used to treat calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder: needling versus complete removal of the calcium deposit and tendon repair. Methods from September 2010 to September 2012, 40 patients with calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff were arthroscopically treated by the same surgeon using one of the two following techniques: needling (Group 1) and complete removal of the calcium deposit and tendon repair with suture anchors (Group 2). Both groups followed the same rehabilitation program. The two groups were compared at 6 and 12 months of follow-up for the presence of residual calcifications and for the following clinical outcomes: Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Evaluation Form (ASES) shoulder score, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder rating scale, Simple Shoulder Test (SST) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Results all the clinical scores (Constant, ASES, UCLA, SST and VAS scores) improved significantly between baseline and postoperative follow-up, both at 6 and at 12 months. No differences at final follow-up were found between the two groups. Conclusions both the techniques were effective in solving the symptoms of calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder. Clinical scores improved in both groups. Residual calcifications were found in only a few cases and were always less than 10 mm. Level of evidence Level II, prospective comparative study. PMID:26904521

  3. TENOTOMY WITH OR WITHOUT TENODESIS OF THE LONG HEAD OF THE BICEPS USING REPAIR OF THE ROTATOR CUFF

    PubMed Central

    Ikemoto, Roberto Yukio; Pileggi, Paulo Eduardo; Murachovsky, Joel; Nascimento, Luís Gustavo Prata; Serpone, Rogerio Bueno; Strose, Eric; Oliveira, Luiz Henrique Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the functional results among patients undergoing tenotomy with or without tenodesis of the long head of the biceps associated with arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries, with a minimum two-year follow-up. Method: This was a retrospective non-randomized trial with evidence level III, in which the medical files of 77 patients with lesions of the long head of the biceps were reviewed and clinically reassessed. Among these, 55 patients underwent tenotomy without tenodesis and 22 underwent tenotomy with tenodesis, with outpatient follow-up for at least two years. The age, dominant side, operated side, lesion size using the Gartsman classification, pre and postoperative range of motion, presence or absence of the Popeye sign, pain in the bicipital groove and assessments using the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) score and the elbow strength index. Results: The mean UCLA score of the sample went from 16.92 (range: 8 to 25) to 31.45 (range: 13 to 35) (p < 0.001). Comparison of the pre and postoperative UCLA scores in the two groups showed that the difference in the group with tenotomy and tenodesis was 15.95 and in the group with tenotomy alone, 14.62 (p = 0.023). However, there was no statistical significance in comparing the groups regarding pain in the bicipital groove, Popeye sign or elbow strength index. Conclusion: This study showed that the difference in UCLA scores was statistically significant. The group with tenotomy and tenodesis of the long head of the biceps presented better functional results. PMID:27047893

  4. Randomised clinical trial comparing the effects of acupuncture and a newly designed placebo needle in rotator cuff tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Kleinhenz, J; Streitberger, K; Windeler, J; Gssbacher, A; Mavridis, G; Martin, E

    1999-11-01

    Acupuncture has gained increasing attention in the treatment of chronic pain. The lack of a satisfying placebo method has made it impossible to show whether needling is an important part of the method or whether the improvement felt by the patient is due to the therapeutic setting and psychological phenomena. Also, the effectiveness of acupuncture has not been demonstrated sufficiently. We treated 52 sportsmen with rotator cuff tendinitis in a randomised single-blind clinical trial using a new placebo-needle as control. Patients were treated for 4 weeks. The primary endpoint of the trial was the change in the modified Constant-Murley-score from the baseline. Assessment of the treatment outcome was made by experienced orthopaedists not informed of the treatment allocation. Acupuncture with penetration of the skin was shown to be more effective than a similar therapeutic setting with placebo needling in the treatment of pain. The acupuncture-group improved 19.2 Constant-Murley-score points (SD 16.1, range from -13 to 50), the control-group improved 8.37 points (SD 14.56, range from -20 to 41), (P=0.014; C.I. 2.3;19.4). This study showed that needling is an important part of the acupuncture effect in the treatment of chronic shoulder pain in athletes. No conclusions can be derived from this study concerning the importance of choosing points and the rules of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Using the new placebo method as control for other ailments could improve the evidence of specific acupuncture effects beyond pain treatment. PMID:10534595

  5. High-resolution ultrasound of rotator cuff and biceps reflection pulley in non-elite junior tennis players: anatomical study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tennis is believed to be potentially harmful for the shoulder, therefore the purpose of this study is to evaluate the anatomy of the rotator cuff and the coraco-humeral ligament (CHL) in a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players with high-resolution ultrasound (US). Methods From August 2009 to September 2010 n = 90 a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players (mean age ± standard deviation: 15 ± 3) and a control group of age- and sex- matched subjects were included. Shoulder assessment with a customized standardized protocol was performed. Body mass index, dominant arm, years of practice, weekly hours of training, racket weight, grip (Eastern, Western and semi-Western), kind of strings were recorded. Results Abnormalities were found at ultrasound in 14/90 (15%) players. Two players had supraspinatus tendinosis, two had subacromial impingement and ten had subacromial bursitis. CHL thickness resulted comparable in the dominant and non-dominant arms (11.3 ± 4.4 mm vs. 13 ± 4.2, p > 0.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that no association was present among CHL thickness and the variables evaluated. In the control group, abnormalities were found at ultrasound in 6/60 (10%) subjects (sub-acromial bursitis). No statistically significant differences between players and control group were found (p = 0.71). Conclusion In a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players only minor shoulder abnormalities were found. PMID:25034864

  6. Ultrasound evaluation of the distal migration of the long head of biceps tendon following tenotomy in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of tears of the rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Karataglis, D; Papadopoulos, P; Boutsiadis, A; Fotiadou, A; Ditsios, K; Hatzokos, I; Christodoulou, A

    2012-11-01

    This study evaluates the position of the long head of biceps tendon using ultrasound following simple tenotomy, in patients with arthroscopically repaired rotator cuff tears. In total, 52 patients with a mean age of 60.7 years (45 to 75) underwent arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff and simple tenotomy of the long head of biceps tendon. At two years post-operatively, ultrasound revealed that the tendon was inside the bicipital groove in 43 patients (82.7%) and outside in nine (17.3%); in six of these it was lying just outside the groove and in the remaining three (5.8%) it was in a remote position with a positive Popeye Sign. A dynamic ultrasound scan revealed that the tenotomised tendons had adhered to the surrounding tissues (autotenodesis).The initial condition of the tendon influenced its final position (p < 0.0005). The presence of a Popeye sign was statistically influenced by the pre-operative co-existence of supraspinatus and subscapularis tears (p < 0.0001). It appears that the natural history of the tenotomised long head of biceps tendon is to tenodese itself inside or just outside the bicipital groove, while its pre-operative condition and coexistent subscapularis tears play a significant role in the occurrence of a Popeye sign. PMID:23109635

  7. Rotator Cuff Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... healing to bone takes a minimum of six weeks, but if you keep somebody immobilized for that ... hit ground strokes fairly early, within 10-12 weeks. However, when it comes to the overhead activities, ...

  8. Rotator cuff repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... suture anchors can be made of metal or material that dissolves over time, and do not need ... for help. Smoking can slow wound and bone healing. Tell your ... on when to arrive at the hospital. Be sure to arrive on time.

  9. Rotator Cuff Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... left arm out at shoulder level with your elbow bent to 90° and your hand down. Keep your elbow bent, and slowly raise your left hand. Stop ... your left arm at your side with your elbow bent to 90° and the forearm resting against ...

  10. Rotator cuff exercises

    MedlinePlus

    Shoulder exercises ... A key part in your recovery is doing exercises to make the muscles and tendons in your ... for everyday tasks or sports activities Before doing exercises at home, ask your doctor or physical therapist ...

  11. Rotator Cuff Tears

    MedlinePlus

    ... not intended to serve as medical advice. Anyone seeking specific orthopaedic advice or assistance should consult his ... not intended to serve as medical advice. Anyone seeking specific orthopaedic advice or assistance should consult his ...

  12. [Stress fracture of the scapular spine associated with rotator cuff dysfunction: Report of 3 cases and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    García-Coiradas, J; Lópiz, Y; Marco, F

    2014-01-01

    Scapular spine stress fractures have been scarcely reported in the literature. Their pathomechanics, clinical course and treatment are not well established. We review 3 cases in 2 patients that were associated with cuff dysfunction. On follow-up, none of these fractures progressed to healing. Two of them needed osteosynthesis and bone grafting, and the third one became a painless non-union. The authors propose the combination of 3 factors as a reason for this lesion: a functionally impaired cuff, a greater activation of the muscles with origin and insertion in the spine-acromion and a fragile bone. As we believe that these fractures are unstable, and non-union would be expected, their surgical management is recommended. PMID:24821480

  13. Editorial Commentary: Results of Biplanar Fluoroscopy With 3-Dimensional Analysis in Patients With Rotator Cuff Tears Challenge the Concept of Superior Translation of the Humeral Head and Must Be Interpreted With Caution.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Kinematic analysis of patients with rotator cuff tears shows unexpected inferior, rather than superior, translation of the humeral head. This paradox challenges conventional thought, but limitations addressed by the authors temper the results and leave the question open for future study. PMID:26945951

  14. Effect of Platelet-Rich Plasma and Bioactive Glass Powder for the Improvement of Rotator Cuff Tendon-to-Bone Healing in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yang; Dong, Yu; Chen, Shiyi; Li, Yunxia

    2014-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that a platelet-rich plasma (PRP) plus bioactive glass (BG) mixture could shorten the tendon-bone healing process in rotator cuff tendon repair, thirty mature male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups, Control, PRP, and PRP + BG. All groups underwent a surgical procedure to establish a rotator cuff tendon healing model. Mechanical examinations and histological assays were taken to verify the adhesion of the tendon-bone. Real-time PCR was adopted to analyze Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 (BMP-2). The maximum load-to-failure value in mechanical examinations was significantly higher in the PRP + BG group than that in the control group after six weeks (Control 38.73 ± 8.58, PRP 54.49 ± 8.72, PRP + BG 79.15 ± 7.62, p < 0.001), but it was not significantly different at 12 weeks (PRP 74.27 ± 7.74, PRP + BG 82.57 ± 6.63, p = 0.145). In histological assays, H&E (hematoxylin-eosin) staining showed that the interface between the tendon-bone integration was much sturdier in the PRP + BG group compared to the other two groups at each time point, and more ordered arranged tendon fibers can be seen at 12 weeks. At six weeks, the mRNA expression levels of BMP-2 in the PRP + BG group were higher than those in the other groups (PRP + BG 0.65 ± 0.11, PRP 2.284 ± 0.07, Control 0.12 ± 0.05, p < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in the mRNA expression levels of BMP-2 among the three groups at 12 weeks (p = 0.922, 0.067, 0.056). BMP-2 levels in PRP and PRP+BG groups were significantly lower at 12 weeks compared to six weeks (p = 0.006, <0.001).We found that the PRP + BG mixture could enhance tendon-bone healing in rotator cuff tendon repair. PMID:25464384

  15. EVALUATION OF ANATOMICAL INTEGRITY USING ULTRASOUND EXAMINATION, AND FUNCTIONAL INTEGRITY USING THE CONSTANT & MURLEY SCORE, OF THE ROTATOR CUFF FOLLOWING ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; França, Flavio de Oliveira; Alves, Freitas José Marcio; Watanabe, Fábio Nagato; Nobre, Leonardo Oliveira; De Almeida Neto, Manoel Augusto; Mendes Da Silva, Marcos André

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the functional and anatomical results from surgical treatment via arthroscopy in cases of complete rupture of the rotator cuff, using ultrasound images and the Constant and Murley functional index to investigate the correlation between them. Methods: 100 patients (110 shoulders) were evaluated. The mean follow-up was 48.8 ± 33.28 months (12 to 141 months). The mean age was 60.25 ± 10.09 (36 to 81 years). Rupture of the supraspinal tendon alone occurred in 85 cases (77%), and in association with the infraspinatus in 20 cases (18%) and subscapularis in four shoulders (4%). An association of supraspinatus, infraspinatus and subscapularis lesions was found in one shoulder (1%). The lesions were classified according to DeOrio and Cofield scores as small/medium in 85 shoulders (77%) and large/extensive in 25 (23%). The clinical results were assessed in accordance with the Constant and Murley criteria. The ultrasound results relate to reports issued by different radiologists. Statistical analysis was carried out using the chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, Student's t test, Pearson's correlation, Kruskal-Wallis correlation and logistic regression (significance: p < 0.05). Results: The mean Constant evaluation was 85.3 ± 10.06 in the normal shoulders and 83.96 ± 8.67 in the operated shoulders (p = 0.224). Excellent and good results were found in 74 shoulders (67%), satisfactory and moderate results in 32 (29%) and poor results in four (4%). The ultrasound evaluation showed 38 shoulders with re-rupture (35%) and absence of rupture in 71 (65%). Among the 74 shoulders (67%) with excellent/good results, 22 (30%) presented re-rupture in the ultrasound report (p = 0.294). Among the four shoulders (4%) with poor results, two (50%) presented reports of intact tendons (p = 0.294). Conclusion: There was no statistically valid correlation between the ultrasound diagnosis and the clinical evaluation of results among the patients who underwent arthroscopic repair to treat full tear lesions of the rotator cuff. The clinical results from the complete rotator cuff repairs via arthroscopy presented a high level of functional recovery (Constant 83.96), compared with the contralateral shoulder. The postoperative ultrasound reports presented a high percentage of re-rupture (35%). Postoperative strength was greater among the patients aged under 60 years (p = 0.002) and in cases of lesions less than or equal to 3 cm (p = 0.003).

  16. Magnetic resonance visualization of surgical classification of rotator cuff tear: comparison with three-dimensional shoulder magnetic resonance arthrography at 3.0 T.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Han; Kim, Ah Hyun; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2014-01-01

    The purpose was to evaluate the diagnostic feasibility of magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) for surgical classification of rotator cuff tear (RCT). Two-dimensional (2D)/three-dimensional (3D) MRAs of 45 patients who underwent and subsequent arthroscopy were evaluated. Full-thickness tears of supraspinatus-infraspinatus tendon were classified based on surgical categories: crescentic, U-shaped, and L-shaped. Signal-to-noise ratios showed no significant difference (P>.05); however contrast-to-noise ratios were significantly higher on 2D MRA (P=.02). Diagnoses of RCTs using 3D MRA were similar to diagnoses using 2D MRA, but had a shorter imaging time. MR visualization for surgical classification was feasible. However, diagnosis of L-shaped tears was limited. PMID:25108667

  17. Tracheal tube cuff pressure. Clinical use of the Cardiff Cuff Controller.

    PubMed

    Willis, B A; Latto, I P; Dyson, A

    1988-04-01

    Seventy-one adult patients (31 male, 40 female) who presented for surgery underwent orotracheal intubation with Portex Blue Line standard cuff disposable tubes (9-mm for males, 8-mm for females). The tracheal tube cuff was inflated by a trained assistant using a syringe and the initial cuff pressure measured; the minimum cuff pressure required to prevent respiratory gas leakage was also measured and the cuff pressure maintained above this pressure throughout the operation by means of the Cardiff Cuff Controller. Initial cuff pressure values averaged 11.9 kPa for males and 13.5 kPa for females compared with minimum cuff pressure values of 5.2 and 1.2 kPa, respectively. The differences between initial and minimum pressures were statistically highly significant (p much less than 0.001). It is concluded that the present method of inflation may lead to gross overinflation of tracheal tube cuffs and that cuff pressure monitoring may be performed simply by means of an electropneumatic controller. The difference in minimum cuff pressure between males and females suggests that the difference in tracheal size between the sexes is greater than the 9-mm to 8-mm difference in tracheal tube size. PMID:3377155

  18. Measurement of migration of soft tissue by modified Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA): validation of a new technique to monitor rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Cashman, P M M; Baring, T; Reilly, P; Emery, R J H; Amis, A A

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a technique to use Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) to measure migration of soft-tissue structures after rotator cuff repair. RSA stereo films were obtained; images were analysed using a semi-automatic software program allowing 3D viewing of results. RSA imaging experiments were performed to validate the technique, using a glass phantom with implanted RSA beads and an animal model with steel sutures as RSA markers which were moved known distances. Repeated measurements allowed assessment of inter- and intra-observer variability at a maximum of 1.06 mm. RSA analysis of the phantom showed a variation up to 0.22 mm for static and 0.28 mm for dynamic studies. The ovine tissue specimen demonstrated that using steel sutures as RSA markers in soft tissue is feasible, although less accurate than when measuring bone motion. This novel application of RSA to measure soft tissue migration is practicable and can be extended to in vivo studies. PMID:20143960

  19. Imaging of the shoulder after surgery.

    PubMed

    McMenamin, Drew; Koulouris, George; Morrison, William B

    2008-10-01

    Postoperative imaging of the shoulder is challenging. This article reviews the radiologic evaluation following surgery for subacromial impingment, rotator cuff lesions and glenohumeral instability, including the common surgical procedures, the expected postoperative findings and potential complications. A specific emphasis is made on magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:18457932

  20. Does a land-based compensatory strength-training programme influences the rotator cuff balance of young competitive swimmers?

    PubMed

    Batalha, Nuno; Raimundo, Armando; Tomas-Carus, Pablo; Paulo, João; Simão, Roberto; Silva, António J

    2015-11-01

    During the repeated execution of the swimming strokes, the shoulder adductor and internal rotator muscles have a tendency to become proportionally stronger when compared to their antagonist group. This can lead to muscle imbalances. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a compensatory training programme on the strength and balance of shoulder rotator muscles in young swimmers. A randomized controlled trial design was used. Forty male swimmers took part in the study and were randomly divided into two groups: an experimental group (n = 20) and a training group (n = 20). A control group (n = 16) of young sedentary male students was also evaluated. The experimental group subjects participated in a 16-week shoulder-strength programme with Thera-Band(®) elastic bands; the training group was restricted to aquatic training. Peak torque of shoulder internal rotator and external rotator (ER) was measured at baseline and after 16 weeks. Concentric action at 1.04 rad s(-1) (3 reps) and 3.14 rad s(-1) (20 reps) was measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. The strength-training programme led to an improvement of the ER strength and shoulder rotator balance in the experimental group (data from both shoulders at 1.04 rad s(-1)). Moreover, concentric action at 3.14 rad s(-1) presented significant differences only for the dominant shoulder. Findings suggest that the prescribed shoulder-strengthening exercises could be a useful training option for young competitive swimmers. They can produce an increase in absolute strength values and greater muscle balance in shoulder rotators. PMID:26332051

  1. Tissue anchor use in arthroscopic glenohumeral surgery.

    PubMed

    Diduch, David R; Scanelli, John; Tompkins, Marc; Milewski, Matthew D; Carson, Eric; Ma, Shen-Ying Richard

    2012-07-01

    Arthroscopic surgery has become the mainstay of treatment of several common glenohumeral pathologies such as tears of the rotator cuff and labrum. Arthroscopic rotator cuff and labral repair provide outcomes comparable to those achieved with traditional open techniques, with the benefits of smaller incisions and less soft-tissue disruption. Development and improvement of tissue anchors and arthroscopic instrumentation has been integral to the increased popularity of arthroscopic glenohumeral repairs. Current anchors can be categorized by design and material composition. Awareness of the advantages and limitations of these implants may influence anchor selection. PMID:22751165

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography, MRI and MR arthrography in the characterisation of rotator cuff disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Jean-Sébastien; Braën, Caroline; Leblond, Jean; Desmeules, François; Dionne, Clermont E; MacDermid, Joy C; Bureau, Nathalie J; Frémont, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background Different diagnostic imaging modalities, such as ultrasonography (US), MRI, MR arthrography (MRA) are commonly used for the characterisation of rotator cuff (RC) disorders. Since the most recent systematic reviews on medical imaging, multiple diagnostic studies have been published, most using more advanced technological characteristics. The first objective was to perform a meta-analysis on the diagnostic accuracy of medical imaging for characterisation of RC disorders. Since US is used at the point of care in environments such as sports medicine, a secondary analysis assessed accuracy by radiologists and non-radiologists. Methods A systematic search in three databases was conducted. Two raters performed data extraction and evaluation of risk of bias independently, and agreement was achieved by consensus. Hierarchical summary receiver-operating characteristic package was used to calculate pooled estimates of included diagnostic studies. Results Diagnostic accuracy of US, MRI and MRA in the characterisation of full-thickness RC tears was high with overall estimates of sensitivity and specificity over 0.90. As for partial RC tears and tendinopathy, overall estimates of specificity were also high (>0.90), while sensitivity was lower (0.67–0.83). Diagnostic accuracy of US was similar whether a trained radiologist, sonographer or orthopaedist performed it. Conclusions Our results show the diagnostic accuracy of US, MRI and MRA in the characterisation of full-thickness RC tears. Since full thickness tear constitutes a key consideration for surgical repair, this is an important characteristic when selecting an imaging modality for RC disorder. When considering accuracy, cost, and safety, US is the best option. PMID:25677796

  3. Endobronchial cuff pressures.

    PubMed

    Cobley, M; Kidd, J F; Willis, B A; Vaughan, R S

    1993-05-01

    In 20 adult patients (18 male) who presented for thoracotomy, the trachea was intubated using Mallinckrodt disposable double-lumen tubes (18 large and two medium). The endobronchial cuff was inflated by a trained operating department assistant using an air-filled syringe. The volume of air and the initial endobronchial cuff pressure were measured. The minimum cuff pressure required to prevent respiratory gas leakage from the isolated lung was measured also and maintained using the Cardiff Cuff Controller. Mean initial cuff pressure was 69.3 (SEM 6.0) mm Hg, whereas the mean minimum cuff pressure was 29.5 (4.0) mm Hg (P < 0.0001). The results suggest that the method described of inflating the endobronchial cuff may lead to overinflation and subsequent excessive pressure on the endobronchial wall. PMID:8318334

  4. Influence of corticoids on healing of the rotator cuff of rats – biomechanical study☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Dau, Leonardo; Abagge, Marcelo; Fruehling, Vagner Messias; Sola Junior, Wilson; Lavrador, José Marcos; da Cunha, Luiz Antônio Munhoz

    2014-01-01

    Objective to compare healing strength of the infraspinatus tendon of rats with corticoid inoculation, regarding maximum tension, maximum force and rupture force, after injury and experimental repair. Methods a total of 60 Wistar rats were subjected to tenotomy of the infraspinatus tendon, which was then sutured. Before the surgery, they were divided into a control group (C) inoculated with serum and a study group (S) inoculated with corticoids over the tendon. After repair, the rats were sacrificed in groups of 10 individuals in the control group and 10 in the study group at the times of one week (C1 and S1), three weeks (C3 and S3) and five weeks (C5 and S5). The rats were dissected, separating out the infraspinatus tendon with the humerus. The study specimens were subjected to a traction test, with evaluation of the maximum tension (kgf/cm2), maximum force (kgf) and rupture force (kgf), comparing the study group with the respective control groups. Results among the rats sacrificed one week after the procedure, we observed greater maximum tension in group C1 than in group S1. The variables of maximum force (kgf) and rupture force did not differ statistically between the groups investigated. In the same way, among the rats sacrificed three weeks after the procedure, group C3 only showed greater maximum tension than group S3 (p = 0.007), and the other variables did not present differences. Among the rats sacrificed five weeks after the procedure (C5 and S5), none of the parameters studied presented statistical differences. Conclusion we concluded that corticoid diminished the resistance to maximum tension in the groups sacrificed one and three weeks after the procedure, in comparison with the respective control groups. The other parameters did not show differences between the study and control groups. PMID:26229831

  5. Loose cuff hypertension.

    PubMed

    Taleyarkhan, Pervin R; Geddes, Leslie A; Kemeny, Andre E; Vitter, Jillian S

    2009-09-01

    In this study, an analysis of the effects of cuff looseness on mean blood pressure readings was performed. Using a standard adult blood pressure cuff, pressure readings were taken on each arm at a cuff looseness of 0, 2, 4, and 6 cm beyond patient arm circumference. The cuff was then switched to the opposite arm and the procedure repeated. Blood pressure readings taken from the left arm with the cuff at an appropriately snug fit served as the reference. Increasing cuff looseness simulates the possibly incorrect blood pressure cuff placement by health care workers in the clinical setting. Data from 24 subjects support the claims that mean blood pressure increases with respect to increasing cuff looseness. It was shown that measurements taken on left and right arms will result in significantly different blood pressure readings (p < 0.001). It is therefore crucial to properly place the cuff at a snug fit on the patient's arm for each measurement procedure, to prevent false readings. Lack of consistent cuff size and snugness procedures can lead to misdiagnosis of hypertension, acute patient discomfort, and inconvenient costs to the patient and health care provider. PMID:19662531

  6. Rotator cuff - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your positions and posture during the day and night can also help relieve some of your shoulder pain: When you sleep, lie either on the side that is not in pain or on your back. Resting your painful shoulder on a couple of ...

  7. Saline-filled cuffs help prevent laser-induced polyvinylchloride endotracheal tube fires.

    PubMed

    Sosis, M B; Dillon, F X

    1991-02-01

    To determine whether the filling of tracheal tube cuffs with saline would decrease their combustibility during laser surgery, 20 polyvinylchloride tracheal tubes were studied. The cuffed end of each tracheal tube was inserted into the neck of an empty flask, and the tube and flask were flushed with oxygen for 5 min before cuff inflation. Ten tracheal tubes had their cuffs inflated with air, and 10 were inflated with saline. A Lasersonics LS880 CO2 laser, set to 5 W for five of each of the two types of filled cuffs and to 40 W for the other pair of five tubes, was fired continuously at the cuffs for up to 1 min. No combustion occurred at the 5-W setting. The times to cuff perforation when the laser was set at 5 W were (mean +/- SD) 1.00 +/- 0.83 and 4.21 +/- 3.91 s for the air- and saline-filled cuffs, respectively, a difference that was not statistically significant. The time to deflation of the saline-filled cuff (104.6 +/- 67.5 s) was, however, significantly longer than that of the air-filled cuff (2.59 +/- 1.97 s). When the tracheal tube cuffs were exposed to 40-W laser radiation, the cuff and adjacent tube shaft ignited in all cases when the cuffs were inflated with air, but only in one of five cases when the cuffs were filled with saline (P less than 0.05). The filling of tracheal tube cuffs with saline provides simple, moderately effective partial protection of the cuff of endotracheal tubes during CO2 laser airway surgery. PMID:1985502

  8. Obtaining Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Approval for International Rotations During Plastic Surgery Residency Training.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Donald R

    2015-06-01

    Global medicine and international rotations are becoming increasingly popular and relevant in training the next generation of Plastic Surgeons. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the American Board of Medical Specialties have started to address the issues that will ensure our residents are protected as well as ensuring that they gain a valuable educational experience. The principles and the process for getting an International Rotation approved by the Plastic Surgery Residency Review Committee are outlined in this article. PMID:26080131

  9. Triangle Tilt Surgery: Effect on Coracohumeral Distance and External Rotation of the Glenohumeral Joint

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rahul K.; Mahmooduddin, Faiz

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Shoulder muscle imbalances and bone deformities that develop secondary to obstetric brachial plexus injury have been extensively studied. Less emphasis has focused on coracohumeral distance, a small value potentially being linked to impaired shoulder external rotation. The purpose of this study is to analyze coracohumeral distances and shoulder external rotation in obstetric brachial plexus injury patients before and after triangle tilt surgery. Methods: Twenty patients with deformities secondary to obstetric brachial plexus injury were included. Coracohumeral distances were measured on computed tomographic images. Clinical functioning was evaluated through video recordings by using a modified Mallet scale. Paired Student t tests were used to determine statistical significance of anatomic and functional parameters, pre- and postoperatively. Results: Coracohumeral distance (P < .0006), total Mallet score (P < .0001), supination angle (P < .0001), and individual Mallet scores for all external rotation parameters including hand-to-mouth (P < .0001), supination (P = .0010), external rotation (P < .0001), hand-to-neck (P < .0001), and hand-to-spine (P = .0064) were significantly higher postoperatively than preoperatively for affected shoulders. Hand-to-mouth angles were significantly lower postoperatively than preoperatively (P < .0001). Coracohumeral distance in unaffected shoulders remained unchanged. Conclusions: Triangle tilt surgery significantly improves coracohumeral distance and clinical functioning in obstetric brachial plexus injury patients. Coracohumeral distance plays a key role in shoulder external rotation. Increasing coracohumeral distance significantly improves all external rotation parameters and total Mallet scores. The triangle tilt surgery relieves excessive tightness of the anterior stabilizing complex, widens coracohumeral distance, and improves external rotation of shoulder. PMID:21119773

  10. Vaginal Cuff Dehiscence in Robotic-Assisted Total Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kashani, Shabnam; Gallo, Taryn; Sargent, Anita; ElSahwi, Karim; Silasi, Dan-Arin

    2012-01-01

    Study Objective: The aim of this study was to estimate the cumulative incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence in robotic-assisted total hysterectomies in our patients and to provide recommendations to decrease the incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence. Methods: This was an observational case series, Canadian Task Force Classification II-3 conducted at an academic and community teaching hospital. A total of 654 patients underwent robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy for both malignant and benign reasons from September 1, 2006 to March 1, 2011 performed by a single surgeon. The da Vinci Surgical System was used for robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy. Results: There were 3 cases of vaginal cuff dehiscence among 654 robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomies, making our cumulative incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence 0.4%. The mean time between the procedures and vaginal cuff dehiscence was 44.3 d (6.3 wk). All patients were followed up twice after surgery, at 3 to 4 wk and 12 to 16 wk. Conclusion: In our study, the incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence after robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy compares favorably to that of total abdominal and vaginal hysterectomy. Our study suggests that the incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence is more likely related to the technique of colpotomy and vaginal cuff suturing than to robotic-assisted total hysterectomy per se. With proper technique and patient education, our vaginal dehiscence rate has been 0.4%, which is 2.5 to 10 times less than the previously reported vaginal cuff dehiscence rate in the literature. PMID:23484559

  11. [Complications related to implants in arthroscopic shoulder surgery].

    PubMed

    Lorbach, O; Wilmes, P; Brogard, P; Seil, R

    2008-11-01

    With the increase in shoulder arthroscopies are increased complications related to shoulder implants frequently used for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and shoulder stabilisation. The biggest problem is malpositioning of the suture anchor, which might lead to persistent pain, serious cartilage damage, decreased range of motion, and failure of the reconstruction, resulting in revision surgery. Especially in osteoporotic bone, it is important to choose an implant that provides sufficient mechanical strength. Other possible complications are related to the sutures of the anchor. Suture damage or accidental removal of the sutures from the anchor could leave them useless in situ. Tangling of the sutures, especially in massive reconstructions of the rotator cuff, can lead the surgeon to switch to an open technique. Compared with metal implants, bioabsorbable implants have advantages concerning possible revision surgery. However, implant costs, anchor hole enlargement, and possible higher failure rates compared with metallic implants should be considered. A rare but serious complication is allergic reaction to the implant. PMID:18813907

  12. Efficacy of Various Analgesics on Shoulder Function and Rotator Cuff Tendon-to-Bone Healing in a Rat (Rattus norvegicus) Model

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Adam C; Tucker, Jennica J; Yannascoli, Sarah M; Dunkman, Andrew A; Thomas, Stephen J; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2014-01-01

    Although relief of postoperative pain is an imperative aspect of animal welfare, analgesics that do not interfere with the scientific goals of the study must be used. Here we compared the efficacy of different analgesic agents by using an established rat model of supraspinatus tendon healing and a novel gait-analysis system. We hypothesized that different analgesic agents would all provide pain relief in this model but would cause differences in tendon-to-bone healing and gait parameters. Buprenorphine, ibuprofen, tramadol–gabapentin, and acetaminophen were compared with a no-analgesia control group. Gait measures (stride length and vertical force) on the operative forelimb differed between the control group and both the buprenorphine (2 and 4 d postsurgery) and ibuprofen (2 d postsurgery) groups. Step length was different in the control group as compared with the tramadol–gabapentin (2 d after surgery), buprenorphine (2 and 4 d after surgery), and ibuprofen (2 d after surgery) groups. Regarding tendon-to-bone healing, the ibuprofen group showed less stiffness at the insertion site; no other differences in tendon-to-bone healing were detected. In summary, the analgesics evaluated were associated with differences in both animal gait and tendon-to-bone healing. This information will be useful for improving the management of postsurgical pain without adversely affecting tissue healing. Given its ability to improve gait without impeding healing, we recommend use of buprenorphine for postsurgical pain management in rats. In addition, our gait-analysis system can be used to evaluate new analgesics. PMID:24602546

  13. Tracheal Stenosis and Cuff Pressure: Comparison of Minimal Occlusive Volume and Palpation Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Totonchi, Ziae; Jalili, Fatemeh; Hashemian, Seyed Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tracheal stenosis, which has received more emphasis recently, is a common post intubation complication and may develop due to different reasons. One important reason is the endotracheal tube cuff pressure. Therefore, this study sought to examine the accuracy of diagnostic test for palpation and minimal occlusive volume techniques to measure the endotracheal tube cuff pressure. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, the accuracy of diagnostic tests for palpation and minimal occlusive volume techniques to measure the endotracheal tube cuff pressure was assessed in 101 patients aged over 18 years who had undergone open heart surgery and post-surgical mechanical ventilation in the ICU. Results: In the palpation technique, the cuff pressure of 27 patients (26.7%) was reported to be out of the permissible range and for the rest of them (74 patients, 73.3%) it was within the permissible range. Then, the cuff pressure was checked by the standard method using a manometer and after comparing the results it was found that the cuff pressure of 92 patients (91.1%) was not in the permissible range and only nine patients (8.9%) had a cuff pressure within the permissible range (20–30 cm H2O). In minimal occlusive volume method compared with the standard method, 22 patients (21.7%) had cuff pressure within the permissible range of 20–30 cm H2O, and 79 of them (78.2%) had cuff pressure out of the permissible range and higher than the upper limit. Conclusion: This study recommends that the best way to measure the endotracheal tube cuff pressure is to use a cuff manometer, and when it is not available, the minimal occlusive volume would be a better alternative compared to the palpation technique to keep the cuff pressure within a proper range to avoid tracheotomy complications such as tracheal stenosis.

  14. Comparison of Pressure Changes by Head and Neck Position between High-Volume Low-Pressure and Taper-Shaped Cuffs: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Mihara, Ryosuke; Imagawa, Kentaro; Hattori, Kazuo; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    The present study compared changes in cuff pressure by head and neck position between high-volume low-pressure (HVLP) and taper-shaped (taper) cuffs in a prospective randomized clinical trial. Methods. Forty patients were intubated using tracheal tubes with either HVLP (n = 20; HVLP group) or taper-shaped (n = 20; Taper group) cuffs. Initial cuff pressure was adjusted to 15, 20, or 25 cmH2O in the neutral position. Cuff pressure was evaluated after changing the head and neck positions to flexion, extension, and rotation. Results. Cuff pressure significantly increased with flexion in both HVLP and Taper groups at all initial cuff pressures. It significantly increased with extension in the HVLP group, but not in the Taper group. Cuff pressure did not significantly differ with rotation in either group and was significantly smaller in the Taper group during flexion and extension than in the HVLP group, regardless of initial cuff pressure. Conclusion. Cuff pressure changes with head and neck flexion and extension were smaller in the Taper group than in the HVLP group. Our results highlight the potential for taper cuffs to prevent excessive cuff pressure increases with positional changes in the head and neck. This trial is registered with UMIN000016119. PMID:26509152

  15. Special report: Occlusive cuff controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    A mechanical occlusive cuff controller suitable for blood flow experiments in space shuttle flights is described. The device requires 115 volt ac power and a pressurized gas source. Two occluding cuff pressures (30 and 50 mmHg) are selectable by a switch on the front panel. A screw driver adjustment allows accurate cuff pressurization levels for under or oversized limbs. Two pressurization cycles (20 second and 2 minutes) can be selected by a front panel switch. Adjustment of the timing cycles is also available through the front panel. A pushbutton hand switch allows remote start of the cuff inflation cycle. A stop/reset switch permits early termination of the cycle and disabling of the controller to prevent inadvertent reactivation. Pressure in the cuff is monitored by a differential aneroid barometer. In addition, an electrocardiogram trigger circuit permits the initiation of the pressurization cycle by an externally supplied ECG cycle.

  16. Femtosecond laser combined with non-chopping rotation phacoemulsification technique for soft-nucleus cataract surgery: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Lin, Haotian; Chen, Wan; Zhang, Bo; Xiang, Wu; Li, Jing; Chen, Weirong; Liu, Yizhi

    2016-01-01

    Soft-lens cataract surgeries are becoming increasingly common for cataract surgeons and chopping the soft nucleus using conventional techniques is problematic. We introduced a femtosecond laser combined with a non-chopping rotation phacoemulsification technique for soft-nucleus cataract surgery and evaluated the safety and efficacy of using this technique. Sixty-six patients with soft-nucleus cataracts ranging from grade 1~3 were divided into 3 groups based on nuclear staging. Those groups were further divided into three subgroups: femtosecond laser pretreatment combined with a non-chopping rotation phacoemulsification technique (subgroup 1), conventional manual cataract surgery with a non-chopping rotation technique (subgroup 2) and conventional manual cataract surgery with a quick-chop technique (subgroup 3).Patients were followed up at 1, 7, and 30 days after surgery. There was an 84.6% and a 63.34% reduction in ultrasound time and cumulative dissipated energy, respectively, between the subgroup 1 and the subgroup 3; and this was associated with a 36.1% and 29.7% reduction in endothelial cell loss and aqueous flare. There were no adverse events at the follow-up times. With its reduced ultrasound energy, endothelial cell loss and aqueous flare, the femtosecond laser pretreatment combined with a non-chopping rotation technique was more efficient than conventional manual cataract surgery for soft-nucleus cataracts. PMID:26728573

  17. Femtosecond laser combined with non-chopping rotation phacoemulsification technique for soft-nucleus cataract surgery: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Lin, Haotian; Chen, Wan; Zhang, Bo; Xiang, Wu; Li, Jing; Chen, Weirong; Liu, Yizhi

    2016-01-01

    Soft-lens cataract surgeries are becoming increasingly common for cataract surgeons and chopping the soft nucleus using conventional techniques is problematic. We introduced a femtosecond laser combined with a non-chopping rotation phacoemulsification technique for soft-nucleus cataract surgery and evaluated the safety and efficacy of using this technique. Sixty-six patients with soft-nucleus cataracts ranging from grade 1~3 were divided into 3 groups based on nuclear staging. Those groups were further divided into three subgroups: femtosecond laser pretreatment combined with a non-chopping rotation phacoemulsification technique (subgroup 1), conventional manual cataract surgery with a non-chopping rotation technique (subgroup 2) and conventional manual cataract surgery with a quick-chop technique (subgroup 3).Patients were followed up at 1, 7, and 30 days after surgery. There was an 84.6% and a 63.34% reduction in ultrasound time and cumulative dissipated energy, respectively, between the subgroup 1 and the subgroup 3; and this was associated with a 36.1% and 29.7% reduction in endothelial cell loss and aqueous flare. There were no adverse events at the follow-up times. With its reduced ultrasound energy, endothelial cell loss and aqueous flare, the femtosecond laser pretreatment combined with a non-chopping rotation technique was more efficient than conventional manual cataract surgery for soft-nucleus cataracts. PMID:26728573

  18. Posterior Pharyngeal Airway in Clockwise Rotation of Maxillomandibular Complex Using Surgery-first Orthognathic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young Jin; Lee, Chang-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Background: Because obstructive sleep apnea is known to be an important preexisting factor causing chronic disease, many investigations have been done recently. There have been few reports regarding the posterior pharyngeal airway after clockwise rotation of maxillomandibular complex. Because the 2-jaw surgery in class III patients could cause obstructive sleep apnea or snoring, we investigated the posterior pharyngeal airway change of the clockwise maxillomandibular complex in the surgery-first orthognathic approach for the correction of class III dentofacial deformities. Methods: A cephalometric evaluation of 35 patients with skeletal class III deformity was performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Three measurements of the posterior pharyngeal airway space (nasopharynx, oropharynx, and hypopharynx) and hyoid bone positions (the distance from palatal plane to hyoid bone and the distance from mandibular plane to the hyoid bone) were evaluated and correlated with the skeletal movement of the jaws using imaging software (V-Ceph, Osstem, Seoul, Korea). Results: The preoperative airway space turned out to be enlarged in class III dentofacial deformities compared with those of normal persons. The preoperative P1, P2, and P3 in our cohort were increased and posterior nasal spine to hyoid bone and mandibular plane to hyoid bone were decreased compared with those of normal person’s data because the cohort consists of prognathic patients where the mandible is located in forward position. After 6 months, most values were nearly normal. Conclusion: Orthognathic surgery based on clockwise rotation of maxillomandibular complex did not cause severe posterior airway space changes at 6 months postoperation. PMID:26495198

  19. Rotational thromboelastometry-guided blood product management in major spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Naik, Bhiken I; Pajewski, Thomas N; Bogdonoff, David I; Zuo, Zhiyi; Clark, Pamela; Terkawi, Abdullah S; Durieux, Marcel E; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Nemergut, Edward C

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT Major spinal surgery in adult patients is often associated with significant intraoperative blood loss. Rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) is a functional viscoelastometric method for real-time hemostasis testing. In this study, the authors sought to characterize the coagulation abnormalities encountered in spine surgery and determine whether a ROTEM-guided, protocol-based approach to transfusion reduced blood loss and blood product use and cost. METHODS A hospital database was used to identify patients who had undergone adult deformity correction spine surgery with ROTEM-guided therapy. All patients who received ROTEM-guided therapy (ROTEM group) were matched with historical cohorts whose coagulation status had not been evaluated with ROTEM but who were treated using a conventional clinical and point-of-care laboratory approach to transfusion (Conventional group). Both groups were subdivided into 2 groups based on whether they had received intraoperative tranexamic acid (TXA), the only coagulation-modifying medication administered intraoperatively during the study period. In the ROTEM group, 26 patients received TXA (ROTEM-TXA group) and 24 did not (ROTEM-nonTXA group). Demographic, surgical, laboratory, and perioperative transfusion data were recorded. Data were analyzed by rank permutation test, adapted for the 1:2 ROTEM-to-Conventional matching structure, with p < 0.05 considered significant. RESULTS Comparison of the 2 groups in which TXA was used showed significantly less fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) use in the ROTEM-TXA group than in the Conventional-TXA group (median 0 units [range 0-4 units] vs 2.5 units [range 0-13 units], p < 0.0002) but significantly more cryoprecipitate use (median 1 unit [range 0-4 units] in the ROTEM-TXA group vs 0 units [range 0-2 units] in the Conventional-TXA group, p < 0.05), with a nonsignificant reduction in blood loss (median 2.6 L [range 0.9-5.4 L] in the ROTEM-TXA group vs 2.9 L [0.7-7.0 L] in the Conventional-TXA group, p = 0.21). In the 2 groups in which TXA was not used, the ROTEM-nonTXA group showed significantly less blood loss than the Conventional-nonTXA group (median 1 L [range 0.2-6.0 L] vs 1.5 L [range 1.0-4.5 L], p = 0.0005), with a trend toward less transfusion of packed red blood cells (pRBC) (median 0 units [range 0-4 units] vs 1 unit [range 0-9 units], p = 0.09]. Cryoprecipitate use was increased and FFP use decreased in response to ROTEM analysis identifying hypofibrinogenemia as a major contributor to ongoing coagulopathy. CONCLUSIONS In major spine surgery, ROTEM-guided transfusion allows for standardization of transfusion practices and early identification and treatment of hypofibrinogenemia. Hypofibrinogenemia is an important cause of the coagulopathy encountered during these procedures and aggressive management of this complication is associated with less intraoperative blood loss, reduced transfusion requirements, and decreased transfusion-related cost. PMID:26053893

  20. Delayed Presentation of Vaginal Cuff Dehiscence after Robotic Hysterectomy for Gynecologic Cancer: A Case Series and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Pamela A.; Gressel, Gregory M.; Goldberg, Gary L.; Kuo, Dennis Yi-Shin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Vaginal cuff dehiscence after hysterectomy has varying incidence according to surgical approach, with highest rates associated with laparoscopic surgery. Comparative data on timing of diagnosis describe a wide range of clinical presentation from weeks to years after hysterectomy. Limited reports have focused specifically on delayed presentation of vaginal cuff dehiscence. Cases. All cases of vaginal cuff dehiscence at our institution between 2005 and 2015 were collectively reviewed and three cases were identified of women who presented with cuff dehiscence greater than 180 days from index surgery. Diagnosis occurred at 342 to 461 days after operation. One patient presented with abdominal pain, a second case presented with vaginal discharge, and the third case lacked clinical symptoms altogether. Prior to diagnosis, one case received chemotherapy and external beam radiation for Stage IB1 cervical cancer and another case received external beam radiation alone for Stage II endometrioid adenocarcinoma. All cuffs were repaired vaginally with interrupted, early absorbable suture. Conclusion. Robotic total laparoscopic hysterectomy may be associated with increased risk of vaginal cuff dehiscence. Further studies are needed to determine risk factors and patient characteristics associated with delayed presentation of vaginal cuff dehiscence in robotic total hysterectomy as well as all surgical approaches. PMID:27110413

  1. Rotational Strength and Flexibility of the Knee Following Pes Anserinus Transplant Surgery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanke, Daniel J.

    1978-01-01

    Results of this study indicate that there is no significant difference in degrees of rotation or rotational strength of the knee joint between surgical and nonsurgical limbs of rehabilitated subjects. (MM)

  2. Bleeding risk assessment using whole blood impedance aggregometry and rotational thromboelastometry in patients following cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Petricevic, Mate; Biocina, Bojan; Milicic, Davor; Konosic, Sanja; Svetina, Lucija; Leki?, Ante; Zdilar, Boris; Burcar, Ivan; Milosevic, Milan; Brahimaj, Rifat; Samardzic, Jure; Gasparovic, Hrvoje

    2013-11-01

    Excessive bleeding after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is risk factor for adverse outcomes after elective cardiac surgery (ECS). Differentiating between patients who bleed due to surgical issues and those whose excessive chest tube output (CTO) is due to coagulopathy, remains challenging. Bedside suitable tests to identify hemostatic disturbances and predict excessive bleeding are desirable. The study sought to evaluate prediction of excessive bleeding after ECS using two bedside suitable devices for platelet function and viscoelastic blood clot properties assessment. We enrolled 148 patients (105 male and 43 female) undergoing ECS in a prospective observational study. Patients were characterized as bleeders if their 24 h CTO exceeded the 75th percentile of distribution. Multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA, with ASPI, ADP and the TRAP test) and rotational thromboelastometry (TEM, with ExTEM, HepTEM and FibTEM test), were performed at three time points: preoperatively (T1), during CPB (T2), and after protamine administration (T3). The primary endpoint was CTO and the secondary endpoint was administration of blood products, 30-day and 1 year mortality. The best predictors of increased bleeding tendency were the tests performed after protamine administration (T3). At T3, patients characterized as bleeders had significantly lower MEA ASPI (median, 14 vs. 27 AUC, p = 0.004) and ADP test values (median, 22 vs. 41 AUC, p = 0.002) as well as TEM values expressed in maximum clot firmness after 30 min (MCF 30) for ExTEM (53 vs. 56 mm, p = 0.005), HepTEM (48 vs. 52 mm, p = 0.003) and FibTEM (8 vs. 11 mm, p < 0.001) test. 24 h CTO inversely correlated with both the MEA (ASPI test: r = -0.236, p = 0.004; ADP test: r = -0.299, p < 0.001), and TEM MCF 30 (ExTEM: r = -0.295, p < 0.001; HepTEM: -0.329, p < 0.001; FibTEM: -0.377, p < 0.001) test values. Our study showed that MEA and TEM are useful methods for prediction of excessive bleeding after ECS. In order to prevent excessive postoperative CTO, hemostatic interventions with timely and targeted blood component therapy according to MEA and TEM results should be considered. PMID:23341179

  3. An electropneumatic instrument for measuring and controlling the pressures in the cuffs of tracheal tubes: 'the Cardiff Cuff Controller'.

    PubMed

    Morris, J V; Latto, I P

    1985-01-01

    An instrument has been developed for measuring and controlling the pressures in the cuffs of tracheal tubes. It was devised to protect the trachea from high cuff pressure and to prevent aspiration past the cuff. PMID:4045989

  4. Does Laparoscopic Hysterectomy Increase the Risk of Vaginal Cuff Dehiscence? An Analysis of Outcomes from Multiple Academic Centers and a Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Mikhail, Emad; Cain, Mary Ashley; Shah, Madhvi; Solnik, M Jonathon; Sobolewski, Craig J; Hart, Stuart

    2015-11-01

    Vaginal cuff dehiscence represents a serious, but infrequent complication after hysterectomy, with a reported increased incidence following a laparoscopic approach. Various risk factors have been proposed including laparoscopically placed suture, surgical experience, use of electrosurgery, surgical indication, and obesity. Technical aspects of the procedure itself have also been questioned such as the variable use of monopolar electrosurgery during colpotomy and the suture type or number of layers chosen to reapproximate the vaginal cuff. Nothwithstanding the tendency for cuff dehiscence to occur following laparoscopic approach, there remains a paucity of high-quality data that supports or refutes this finding or clearly defines the mechanism(s) by which this event occurs allowing for the proposal of objective guidelines for reducing risk. Various techniques have been proposed to decrease the risk of vaginal cuff dehiscence during endoscopic hysterectomy, including use of monopolar current on cutting mode, achievement of cuff hemostasis with sutures rather than electrocoagulation, use of a two-layer cuff closure with polydioxanone suture, and use of bidirectional barbed suture for cuff closure. The authors experience at three university-based minimally invasive gynecologic surgery programs showed a low rate of vaginal cuff dehiscence in their own practices. Large randomized controlled trials are needed to truly determine whether there is a difference in vaginal cuff dehiscence between surgical modalities for hysterectomy as well as to determine the true risk factors. PMID:26680391

  5. Cuff width alters the amplitude envelope of wrist cuff pressure pulse waveforms.

    PubMed

    Jilek, Jiri; Stork, Milan

    2010-07-01

    The accuracy of noninvasive blood pressure (BP) measurement with any method is affected by cuff width. Measurement with a too narrow cuff overestimates BP and measurement with a too wide cuff underestimates BP. Automatic wrist cuff BP monitors use permanently attached narrow cuffs with bladders about 6 cm wide. Such narrow cuffs should result in under-cuffing for wrist circumferences larger than 15 cm. The objective of this qualitative study was to show that a narrow wrist cuff results in increased BP values when a cuff pulse amplitude ratio algorithm is used. According to the algorithm used in this study, systolic pressure (SBP) corresponds to the point of 50% of maximal amplitude; for diastolic pressure (DBP) the ratio is 70%. Data were acquired from 12 volunteers in the sitting position. The mean wrist circumference was 18 cm. The acquired cuff pulse data were used to compute SBP, mean pressure (MAP) and DBP. The mean values for a 6 cm cuff were SBP = 144 mmHg, MAP = 104 mmHg and DBP = 88 mmHg. The values for a 10 cm cuff were SBP = 128 mmHg, MAP = 93 mmHg and DBP = 78 mmHg. The reference BP values were SBP = 132 mmHg, MAP = 96 mmHg and DBP = 80 mmHg. All narrow (6 cm) cuff BP values were higher than wide (10 cm) cuff or reference BP values. The results indicate that wider wrist cuffs may be desirable for more accurate and reliable BP measurement with wrist monitors. PMID:20505218

  6. Anatomical knowledge retention in third-year medical students prior to obstetrics and gynecology and surgery rotations.

    PubMed

    Jurjus, Rosalyn A; Lee, Juliet; Ahle, Samantha; Brown, Kirsten M; Butera, Gisela; Goldman, Ellen F; Krapf, Jill M

    2014-01-01

    Surgical anatomy is taught early in medical school training. The literature shows that many physicians, especially surgical specialists, think that anatomical knowledge of medical students is inadequate and nesting of anatomical sciences later in the clinical curriculum may be necessary. Quantitative data concerning this perception of an anatomical knowledge deficit are lacking, as are specifics as to what content should be reinforced. This study identifies baseline areas of strength and weakness in the surgical anatomy knowledge of medical students entering surgical rotations. Third-year medical students completed a 20-25-question test at the beginning of the General Surgery and Obstetrics and Gynecology rotations. Knowledge of inguinal anatomy (45.3%), orientation in abdominal cavity (38.8%), colon (27.7%), and esophageal varices (12.8%) was poor. The numbers in parentheses are the percentage of questions answered correctly per topic. In comparing those scores to matched test items from this cohort as first-year students in the anatomy course, the drop in retention overall was very significant (P = 0.009) from 86.9 to 51.5%. Students also scored lower in questions relating to pelvic organs (46.7%), urogenital development (54.0%), pulmonary development (17.8%), and pregnancy (17.8%). These data showed that indeed, knowledge of surgical anatomy is poor for medical students entering surgical clerkships. These data collected will be utilized to create interactive learning modules, aimed at improving clinically relevant anatomical knowledge retention. These modules, which will be available to students during their inpatient surgical rotations, connect basic anatomy principles to clinical cases, with the ultimate goal of closing the anatomical knowledge gap. PMID:24591485

  7. Cuff width increases the serum biochemical markers of tourniquet-induced skeletal muscle ischemia in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Chalidis, Byron E; Kalivas, Efstathios; Parziali, Marina; Christodoulou, Anastasios G; Dimitriou, Christos G

    2012-08-01

    Tourniquet application is a widely accepted adjuvant technique in extremity surgery. The purpose of this prospective, randomized trial was to evaluate the effect of cuff width on skeletal muscle ischemia-reperfusion injury. A 2- or 4-cm wide curved tourniquet cuff was applied around the midthigh of 36 New Zealand White rabbits and inflated to a pressure of 200 or 400 mm Hg for 2 hours: group A=2 cm to 200 mm Hg; group B=2 cm to 400 mm Hg; group C=4 cm to 200 mm Hg; group D=4 cm to 400 mm Hg. Blood levels of potassium, lactic acid, urea, lactic dehydrogenase, and creatinine phosphokinase MM isoenzyme (CPK-MM) were measured as basic indicators for limb ischemia before tourniquet inflation and 1, 5, and 30 minutes after cuff release.Potassium values did not differ among the 4 groups. Lactic acid and urea concentrations were always higher in the 400 mm Hg groups (B and D) (P<.001). However, cuff width did not affect their levels (P>.16). Lactic dehydrogenase and CPK-MM values were also greater in the 400 mm Hg groups at all times (P<.001). Further subgroup analysis of 200 mm Hg pressure groups showed higher lactic dehydrogenase (P<.02) but not CPK-MM (P>.9) concentrations in group C than in group A during the 30-minute period. At 400 mm Hg, lactic dehydrogenase and CPK-MM values were higher in group D compared with group B only 30 minutes after cuff deflation (P<.001). Broad tourniquets are associated with significantly greater and prolonged elevation of serum biochemical markers of inducible skeletal muscle ischemia-reperfusion injury compared with narrow ones. This difference is more prominent when a wide cuff is inflated to a high pressure. PMID:22868613

  8. [Surgery].

    PubMed

    Roulin, D; Hbner, M; Demartines, N

    2013-01-16

    In 2012, an innovative approach for staged in situ liver transection was proposed that could allow for even more aggressive major hepatectomies. Otherwise, after 25 years, laparoscopy became "traditional" and other minimally invasive techniques continue to be developed but their indications deserve further investigation. Less aggressive treatment in non-complicated diverticulitis becomes more popular, and even antibiotic treatment has been challenged by a randomized study. In colorectal oncology, local resection or observation only seems to become a valuable approach in selected patients with complete response after neo adjuvant chemoradiation. Finally, enhanced recovery pathways (ERAS) have been validated and is increasingly accepted for colorectal surgery and ERAS principles are successfully applied in other surgical fields. PMID:23409643

  9. Handcrafted cuff manometers do not accurately measure endotracheal tube cuff pressure

    PubMed Central

    Annoni, Raquel; de Almeida, Antonio Evanir

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the agreement between two handcrafted devices and a cuff-specific manometer. Methods The agreement between two handcrafted devices adapted to measure tracheal tube cuff pressure and a cuff-specific manometer was tested on 79 subjects. The cuff pressure was measured with a commercial manometer and with two handcrafted devices (HD) assembled with aneroid sphygmomanometers (HD1 and HD2). The data were compared using Wilcoxon and Spearman tests, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and limit-of-agreement analysis. Results Cuff pressures assessed with handcrafted devices were significantly different from commercial device measurements (pressures were higher when measured with HD1 and lower with HD2). The ICCs between the commercial device and HD1 and HD2 were excellent (ICC = 0.8 p < 0.001) and good (ICC = 0.66, p < 0.001), respectively. However, the Bland- Altman plots showed wide limits of agreement between HD1 and HD2 and the commercial device. Conclusion The handcrafted manometers do not provide accurate cuff pressure measurements when compared to a cuff-specific device and should not be used to replace the commercial cuff manometers in mechanically ventilated patients. PMID:26376160

  10. Rotationally actuated prosthetic helping hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G., Jr. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor); West, Thomas W. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A prosthetic device has been developed for below-the-elbow amputees. The device consists of a cuff, a stem, a housing, two hook-like fingers, an elastic band for holding the fingers together, and a brace. The fingers are pivotally mounted on a housing that is secured to the amputee's upper arm with the brace. The stem, which also contains a cam, is rotationally mounted within the housing and is secured to the cuff, which fits over the amputee's stump. By rotating the cammed stem between the fingers with the lower arm, the amputee can open and close the fingers.

  11. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  12. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  13. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  14. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  18. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870.1120...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has an inflatable bladder in an...

  19. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870.1120...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has an inflatable bladder in an...

  20. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870.1120...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has an inflatable bladder in an...

  1. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870.1120...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has an inflatable bladder in an...

  2. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870.1120...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has an inflatable bladder in an...

  3. FATTY MUSCLE INFILTRATION IN CUFF TEAR: PRE AND POST OPERATIVE EVALUATION BY MRI

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; Sella, Guilherme do Val; Miranda, Eduardo Régis de Alencar Bona; Zampieri, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the fatty infiltration and atrophy of the supraespinatus in the pre- and postoperative of a rotator cuff lesion (RCL), by MRI. Methods: Ten patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears who had undergone surgical arthroscopic rotator cuff repair between September and December 2011 were included. This is a prospective study, with analysis and comparison of fatty infiltration and atrophy of the supraespinatus. The occupation ratio was measured using the magic selection tool in Adobe Photoshop CS3(r) on T1 oblique sagittal Y-view MRI. Through Photoshop, the proportion occupied by the muscle belly regarding its fossae was calculated. Results: There was a statistically significant increase in the muscle ratio (p=0.013) comparing images pre and postoperative, analyzed by the Wilcoxon T test. Conclusion: The proportion of the supraspinal muscle above the pit increases in the immediate postoperative period, probably due to the traction exerted on the tendon at the time of repair. Level of Evidence II, Cohort Study.

  4. An in vitro comparison of tracheostomy tube cuffs

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Seamus; Haury, Frances; Jew, Korinne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Shiley Flexible adult tracheostomy tube with TaperGuard cuff has been designed through its geometry, materials, diameter, and wall thickness to minimize micro-aspiration of fluids past the cuff and to provide an effective air seal in the trachea while also minimizing the risk of excessive contact pressure on the tracheal mucosa. The cuff also has a deflated profile that may allow for easier insertion through the stoma site. This unique design is known as the TaperGuard cuff. The purpose of the observational, in vitro study reported here was to compare the TaperGuard taper-shaped cuff to a conventional high-volume low-pressure cylindrical-shaped cuff (Shiley Disposable Inner Cannula Tracheostomy Tube [DCT]) with respect to applied tracheal wall pressure, air and fluid sealing efficacy, and insertion force. Methods Three sizes of tracheostomy tubes with the two cuff types were placed in appropriately sized tracheal models and lateral wall pressure was measured via pressure-sensing elements on the inner surface. Fluid sealing performance was assessed by inflating the cuffs within the tracheal models (25 cmH2O), instilling water above the cuff, and measuring fluid leakage past the cuff. To measure air leak, tubes were attached to a test lung and ventilator, and leak was calculated by subtracting the average exhaled tidal volume from the average delivered tidal volume. A tensile test machine was used to measure insertion force for each tube with the cuff deflated to simulate clinical insertion through a stoma site. Results The average pressure exerted on the lateral wall of the model trachea was lower for the taper-shaped cuff than for the cylindrical cuff under all test conditions (P<0.05). The taper-shaped cuff also demonstrated a more even, lower pressure distribution along the lateral wall of the model trachea. The average air and fluid seal performance with the taper-shaped cuff was significantly improved, when compared to the cylindrical-shaped cuff, for each tube size tested (P<0.05). The insertion force for the taper-shaped cuff was ~40% less than that for the cylindrical-shaped cuff. Conclusion In a model trachea, the Shiley Flexible Adult tracheostomy tube with TaperGuard cuff, when compared to the Shiley Disposable Inner Cannula Tracheostomy tube with cylindrical cuff, exerted a lower average lateral wall pressure and a more evenly distributed pressure. In addition, it provided more effective fluid and air seals and required less force to insert. PMID:25960679

  5. Control device for prosthetic urinary sphincter cuff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinicke, Robert H. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A device for controlling flow of fluid to and from a resilient inflatable cuff implanted about the urethra to control flow of urine therethrough. The device comprises a flexible bulb reservoir and a control unit that includes a manually operated valve that opens automatically when the bulb is squeezed to force fluid into the cuff for closing the urethra. The control unit also includes a movable valve seat member having a relatively large area exposed to pressure of fluid in a chamber that is connected to the cuff and which moves to a position in which the valve member is unseated by an abutment when fluid pressure in the chamber exceeds a predetermined value to thereby relieve excess fluid pressure in the cuff. The arrangement is such that the valve element is held closed against the seat member by the full differential in fluid pressures acting on both sides of the valve element until the seat member is moved away from the valve element to thus insure positive closing of the valve element until the seat member is moved out of engagement with the valve element by excess pressure differential.

  6. Application of Minimum Effective Cuff Inflating Volume for Laryngeal Mask Airway and its Impact on Postoperative Pharyngeal Complications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing-Bing; Yan, Jie; Zhou, Hong-Gang; Hao, Jing; Liu, Ai-Jia; Ma, Zheng-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background: High intracuff pressure can cause severe pharyngeal complications including sore throat or hoarseness after laryngeal mask airway (LMA) removal postoperatively. Though the application of minimum effective cuff inflating volume is suggested to maintain airway sealing and adequacy of ventilation for patients receiving general anesthesia with LMA at lower level of the intracuff pressure, it is currently not a standard care in most of the anesthetic departments. In this study, the minimum effective cuff inflating volume was determined for classic LMA Well Lead™ (Well Lead Medical Co., Ltd., China) and its impact on postoperative pharyngeal complications was also explored. Methods: Patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status (I–III) undergoing the short-duration urological surgery were recruited in this trial. First, the minimum effective cuff inflating volume was determined for size 4 or 5 LMA Well LeadTM in the study 1. Immediately following placement and confirmation of ideal LMA position, the cuff was inflated with 5, 7, 10 ml of air and up to 30 ml at 5 ml increment. The intracuff pressure, oropharyngeal leak pressure (OLP), and inspiratory peak airway pressure under positive pressure ventilation at the corresponding cuff volume as indicated above were recorded. Second, the enrolled patients were randomly allocated into minimum effective cuff inflating volume group (MC) and routine care (RC) group in the study 2. The minimum effective cuff inflating volume was applied and maintained in MC group, whereas the cuff volume was inflated with half of the maximum cuff inflating volume recommended by manufacturer in RC group throughout the surgical procedure and stay in postanesthesia care unit prior to LMA removal. The incidence of pharyngeal complications at 0, 2, 24, and 48 h after removal of LMA and other intra-operative adverse events were also documented. Results: The intracuff pressure varied with the cuff inflating volume in a positive linear correlation manner (Y = 11.68X − 42.1, r2 = 0.9191) under the range of 5–30 ml for size 4 LMA. In similar with size 4 LMA, the data were also showed the linear relationship between the intracuff pressure and the cuff inflating volume (Y = 7.39X − 10.9, r2 = 0.8855) for size 5 LMA. The minimal effective cuff inflating volume for size 4 or 5 LMA was 7–9 ml in combination of considering OLP needed to maintain airway sealing during intermittently positive pressure ventilation. The intracuff pressure in MC group was lower compared with RC group (63.0 ± 3.7 vs. 126.4 ± 24.0 cmH2O for size 4 LMA; 55.6 ± 2.4 vs. 138.5± 26.8 cmH2O for size 5 LMA; P < 0.0001). The incidence of pharyngeal adverse events was lower in MC group versus the RC group at 2, 24 h after LMA removal. Conclusions: The relationship between the cuff inflating volume and the intracuff pressure for size 4 or 5 LMA Well Lead™ is in a linear correlation manner at the range of 5–30 ml. The minimal cuff inflating volume is adequate for satisfactory airway sealing and consequently associated with lower incidence of postoperative pharyngeal complications for LMA Well Lead.™ PMID:26415792

  7. Rotator Cuff Tendinitis and Tear (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... millimeters. J Shoulder Elbow Surg 2003; 12:110. Green S, Buchbinder R, Hetrick S. Physiotherapy interventions for shoulder pain. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2003; :CD004258. Buchbinder R, Green S, Youd JM. Corticosteroid injections for shoulder pain. Cochrane ...

  8. On cuff imbalance and tripolar ENG amplifier configurations.

    PubMed

    Triantis, Iasonas F; Demosthenous, Andreas; Donaldson, Nick

    2005-02-01

    Electroneurogram (ENG) recording techniques benefit from the use of tripolar cuffs because they assist in reducing interference from sources outside the cuff. However, in practice the performance of ENG amplifier configurations, such as the quasi-tripole and the true-tripole, has been widely reported to be degraded due to the departure of the tripolar cuff from ideal behavior. This paper establishes the presence of cuff imbalance and investigates its relationship to cuff asymmetry, cuff end-effects and interference source proximity. The paper also presents a comparison of the aforementioned amplifier configurations with a new alternative, termed the adaptive-tripole, developed to automatically compensate for cuff imbalance. The output signal-to-interference ratio of the three amplifier configurations were compared in vivo for two interference signals (stimulus artifact and M-wave) superimposed on compound action potentials. The experiments showed (for the first time) that the two interference signals result in different cuff imbalance values. Nevertheless, even with two distinct cuff imbalances present, the adaptive-tripole performed better than the other two systems in 61.9% of the trials. PMID:15709669

  9. Mucosal cuff length to penile length ratio may affect the risk of premature ejaculation in circumcised males.

    PubMed

    Yuruk, E; Temiz, M Z; Colakerol, A; Muslumanoglu, A Y

    2016-03-01

    Data regarding the relation between premature ejaculation (PE) and post-circumcision mucosal cuff length are controversial. The aim of this study is to analyze the relation between post-circumcision mucosal cuff length/penile length ratio (MCR) and PE. After exclusion of patients with erectile dysfunction, penile deformity, history of penile surgery and severe lower urinary tract symptoms, 49 circumcised men with PE were included. The control group is constituted of 50 healthy volunteers with normal ejaculatory function. Self-estimated intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) and premature ejaculation profile (PEP) measures of all subjects were recorded, and the MCRs of patients and controls were compared. The mean age of PE patients and controls was 35.82±7.73 (range 23-54) and 38.78±13.42 (range 19-71) years, respectively (P=0.183). Although mucosal cuff length was not associated with either self-estimated IELT (r=-0.185, P=0.067) or PEP (r=-0.098, P=0.336), there was a negative correlation between MCR and self-estimated IELT (r=-0.205, P=0.0001) and PEP measures (r=-0.308, P=0.002). The length of the mucosal cuff after circumcision may have an impact on ejaculatory function. Surgeons should avoid leaving excessive amount of mucosa during circumcision. PMID:26700215

  10. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section 868.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy...

  11. Intrafraction Prostate Translations and Rotations During Hypofractionated Robotic Radiation Surgery: Dosimetric Impact of Correction Strategies and Margins

    SciTech Connect

    Water, Steven van de; Valli, Lorella; Aluwini, Shafak; Lanconelli, Nico; Heijmen, Ben; Hoogeman, Mischa

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric impact of intrafraction prostate motion and the effect of robot correction strategies for hypofractionated CyberKnife treatments with a simultaneously integrated boost. Methods and Materials: A total of 548 real-time prostate motion tracks from 17 patients were available for dosimetric simulations of CyberKnife treatments, in which various correction strategies were included. Fixed time intervals between imaging/correction (15, 60, 180, and 360 seconds) were simulated, as well as adaptive timing (ie, the time interval reduced from 60 to 15 seconds in case prostate motion exceeded 3 mm or 2° in consecutive images). The simulated extent of robot corrections was also varied: no corrections, translational corrections only, and translational corrections combined with rotational corrections up to 5°, 10°, and perfect rotational correction. The correction strategies were evaluated for treatment plans with a 0-mm or 3-mm margin around the clinical target volume (CTV). We recorded CTV coverage (V{sub 100%}) and dose-volume parameters of the peripheral zone (boost), rectum, bladder, and urethra. Results: Planned dose parameters were increasingly preserved with larger extents of robot corrections. A time interval between corrections of 60 to 180 seconds provided optimal preservation of CTV coverage. To achieve 98% CTV coverage in 98% of the treatments, translational and rotational corrections up to 10° were required for the 0-mm margin plans, whereas translational and rotational corrections up to 5° were required for the 3-mm margin plans. Rectum and bladder were spared considerably better in the 0-mm margin plans. Adaptive timing did not improve delivered dose. Conclusions: Intrafraction prostate motion substantially affected the delivered dose but was compensated for effectively by robot corrections using a time interval of 60 to 180 seconds. A 0-mm margin required larger extents of additional rotational corrections than a 3-mm margin but resulted in lower doses to rectum and bladder.

  12. Magnitude of Interfractional Vaginal Cuff Movement: Implications for External Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Daniel J.; Michaletz-Lorenz, Martha; Goddu, S. Murty; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify the extent of interfractional vaginal cuff movement in patients receiving postoperative irradiation for cervical or endometrial cancer in the absence of bowel/bladder instruction. Methods and Materials: Eleven consecutive patients with cervical or endometrial cancer underwent placement of three gold seed fiducial markers in the vaginal cuff apex as part of standard of care before simulation. Patients subsequently underwent external irradiation and brachytherapy treatment based on institutional guidelines. Daily megavoltage CT imaging was performed during each external radiation treatment fraction. The daily positions of the vaginal apex fiducial markers were subsequently compared with the original position of the fiducial markers on the simulation CT. Composite dose-volume histograms were also created by summing daily target positions. Results: The average ({+-} standard deviation) vaginal cuff movement throughout daily pelvic external radiotherapy when referenced to the simulation position was 16.2 {+-} 8.3 mm. The maximum vaginal cuff movement for any patient during treatment was 34.5 mm. In the axial plane the mean vaginal cuff movement was 12.9 {+-} 6.7 mm. The maximum vaginal cuff axial movement was 30.7 mm. In the craniocaudal axis the mean movement was 10.3 {+-} 7.6 mm, with a maximum movement of 27.0 mm. Probability of cuff excursion outside of the clinical target volume steadily dropped as margin size increased (53%, 26%, 4.2%, and 1.4% for 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 cm, respectively.) However, rectal and bladder doses steadily increased with larger margin sizes. Conclusions: The magnitude of vaginal cuff movement is highly patient specific and can impact target coverage in patients without bowel/bladder instructions at simulation. The use of vaginal cuff fiducials can help identify patients at risk for target volume excursion.

  13. Tracheomegaly Secondary to Tracheotomy Tube Cuff in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Yoon, Tae Mi; Lee, Joon Kyoo; Lim, Sang Chul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tracheomegaly has not been reported in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Herein, the authors report a case of tracheomegaly secondary to tracheotomy tube cuff in a patient with ALS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an ALS patient with tracheomegaly and of tracheomegaly being associated with tracheotomy tube cuff and home tracheotomy mechanical ventilator. The clinician should consider the possibility of tracheomegaly in the differential diagnosis, if a patient with ALS develops repeat air leakage around the tracheotomy tube or rupture of tracheotomy tube cuff. PMID:26496301

  14. Damage to the cuff of EMG tube at endotracheal intubation by using a lightwand -A case report-

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Sook; Park, Keun-Suk; Kang, Mae-Hwa

    2010-01-01

    Electromyogpraphic endotracheal tube (EMG tube) is a new device used to monitor recurrent laryngeal nerve integrity during thyroid surgery. The EMG tube has 2 pairs of electrodes on the surface of silicon-based tube reached to inner space of tube cuff. We experienced an unusual endotracheal tube-related problem from the distinct structural feature of the EMG tube. In this case, we intubated a patient who had difficult airway with the EMG tube using a lightwand. After successful endotracheal intubation, we could not expand the pilot balloon and ventilate the patient effectively. We removed the EMG tube and found that one of electrodes of the EMG tube is bended and made a right angle with the long axis of the tube, and perforated the tube cuff. So we report this case to make anesthesia providers aware that much more attention is needed to use EMG tube during endotracheal intubation. PMID:21286432

  15. Continuous real time endotracheal tube cuff pressure waveform.

    PubMed

    Ganigara, Anuradha; Ramavakoda, Chandrika Y

    2014-08-01

    Endotracheal tube cuff pressure monitoring is one of the standard degrees of care afforded to anesthetized patients in the operative theater. Traditional pressure transducer when used to monitor cuff pressure provides real time continuous sine wave pressure waveform which has not been described in literature so far. This unique waveform needs to be further processed and evaluated to check its utility in airway pressure monitoring. PMID:24838549

  16. Return to Sport Following Shoulder Surgery in the Elite Pitcher

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Joshua D.; Frank, Jonathan M.; Jordan, Mark A.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Romeo, Anthony A.; Gupta, Anil K.; Abrams, Geoffrey D.; McCormick, Frank M.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2013-01-01

    Context: The ability to return to elite pitching, performance, and clinical outcomes of shoulder surgery in elite baseball pitchers are not definitively established. Objective: To determine (1) the rate of return to sport (RTS) in elite pitchers following shoulder surgery, (2) postoperative clinical outcomes upon RTS, and (3) performance upon RTS and to compare RTS rates in different types of shoulder surgery. Data Sources: Using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines and checklist, Medline, SciVerse Scopus, SportDiscus, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched. Study Selection: Levels I-IV evidence were eligible for inclusion if performance-based (eg, RTS) and/or clinical outcome–based reporting of outcomes were reported following surgical treatment of shoulder pathology in elite pitchers (major or minor league or collegiate). Data Extraction: Subject, shoulder, and pre- and postoperative performance-based variables of interest were extracted. All shoulder surgery types were potentially inclusive (eg, open, arthroscopic, rotator cuff, labrum, biceps, acromioclavicular joint, fracture). Study methodological quality was analyzed using the Modified Coleman Methodology Score (MCMS). Results: Six studies were analyzed (287 elite male pitchers [mean age, 27 years] who underwent shoulder surgery, with 99% on the dominant, throwing shoulder). MCMS was 38 (poor). Most pitchers were professional, with a mean career length of 6.58 years and postoperative clinical follow-up of 3.62 years. In 5 of 6 studies, multiple diagnoses were addressed concomitantly at surgery. Rate of RTS was 68% at mean 12 months following surgery. Twenty-two percent of Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers never RTS in MLB. Overall performance did improve following surgery; however, this did not improve to pre-injury levels. Conclusion: In this systematic review, the rate of return to elite baseball pitching following surgery was established. Performance tended to decrease prior to surgery and gradually improve postoperatively, though not reaching pre-injury levels of pitching. Level of Evidence: IV (systematic review of studies level I-IV evidence), therapeutic. PMID:24459557

  17. Leakage of fluid around endotracheal tube cuffs: a cadaver study

    PubMed Central

    Lucius, Ralph; Ewald, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the leakage of liquid past the cuffs of tracheal tubes in fresh frozen human heads. Methods Six truncated fresh frozen heads were used and intubated with 8.0 mm endotracheal tubes. The intracuff pressures tested were 30 and 100 cmH2O. Subsequently, 20 ml of each of two oral antiseptic rinses (0.2% chlorhexidine and octenidine [octenidol®, Schülke & Mayr GmbH, Norderstedt, Germany]) was applied for thirty seconds in the mouth. During the trial, leakage of the cuffs was examined. Results The sealing between the tracheal cuff and tracheal wall was leakage-proof for all tested intracuff pressures and all tested antiseptic rinses. However, approximately 5.6 ml and 1.8 ml leaked into the esophagus and remained as a cuff-puddle, respectively. Conclusions The sealing between an endotracheal tube cuff with an intracuff pressure of 30 cmH2O and the tracheal wall is leakage-proof during oral care with antiseptic rinsing. An increase of intracuff pressure to 100 cmH2O does not appear to be required. PMID:24363847

  18. Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgery in Female Professional Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Young, Simon W.; Safran, Marc R.; Dakic, Jodie; Nguyen, Michael L.; Stroia, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Recent publications have highlighted the relatively poor outcome of other overhead athletes, particularly baseball players, with regard to return to sports at the same or higher level after shoulder surgery. However, true assessment of their ability when returning to sport is not as clear. Further, ability to return to other overhead sports has not been reported. Our objective was to assess outcome and time to return to previous level of function following shoulder surgery in professional tennis players. Methods: The records of all female tennis players on the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) professional circuit between January 2008 and June 2010 were reviewed to identify players who underwent shoulder surgery on their dominant (serving) shoulder. Details of the surgery including date, procedures performed, and complications were recorded. The primary outcomes were ability and time to return to professional play, and if they were able to return to their previous level of function, as determined by singles ranking. Pre and post-operative singles rankings were used to determine rate and completeness of return to preoperative function. Their highest ranking pre-injury, post operatively, and the time to return to pre-injury ranking were evaluated. Results: During the study period eight professional women tennis players from the WTA underwent shoulder surgery on their dominant arm. All surgery was performed arthroscopically, 7 out of 8 players had more than one procedure performed during the surgery. In total, 3 players underwent debridement of a partial rotator cuff tear and 2 players underwent repair of a complete supraspinatus tear. Three players had an anterior labral repair or reconstruction for anterior instability, and one player underwent repair of a SLAP lesion. Two players underwent neurolysis of a suprascapular nerve, and three players in total underwent a subacromial decompression. All players (100%) returned to professional play. The mean time to return to play was 6.7 months after surgery. However, only 25% (2 out of 8) players had achieved their pre-injury singles rank or better by 18 months post operatively. In total, three players returned to their pre-injury singles ranking, with their peak singles ranking being attained at a mean of 2.5 years post operatively. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that in professional female tennis players, a high return to play rate following arthroscopic shoulder surgery is also associated with a prolonged and often incomplete return to previous level of performance. Thus, counselling the patient to this fact is important to manage their expectations.

  19. Tracheal tube cuff inflation guided by pressure volume loop closure associated with lower postoperative cuff-related complications: Prospective, randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Almarakbi, Waleed A.; Kaki, Abdullah M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The main function of an endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff is to prevent aspiration. High cuff pressure is usually associated with postoperative complications. We tried to compare cuff inflation guided by pressure volume loop closure (PV-L) with those by just to seal technique (JS) and assess the postoperative incidence of sore throat, cough and hoarseness. Materials and Methods: In a prospective, randomized clinical trial, 100 patients’ tracheas were intubated. In the first group (n = 50), ETT cuff inflation was guided by PV-L, while in the second group (n. = 50) the ETT cuff was inflated using the JS technique. Intracuff pressures and volumes were measured. The incidence of postoperative cuff-related complications was reported. Results: Demographic data and durations of intubation were comparable between the groups. The use of PV-L was associated with a lesser amount of intracuff air [4.05 (3.7-4.5) vs 5 (4.8-5.5), P < 0.001] and lower cuff pressure than those in the JS group [18.25 (18-19) vs 33 (32-35), P ≤ 0.001]. The incidence of postextubation cuff-related complications was significantly less frequent among the PV-L group patients as compared with the JS group patients (P ≤ 0.009), except for hoarseness of voice, which was less frequent among the PV-L group, but not statistically significant (P ≤ 0.065). Multiple regression models for prediction of intra-cuff pressure after intubation and before extubation revealed a statistically significant association with the technique used for cuff inflation (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: The study confirms that PV-L-guided ETT cuff inflation is an effective way to seal the airway and associates with a lower ETT cuff pressure and lower incidence of cuff-related complications. PMID:25191181

  20. Subcutaneous emphysema: a complication of surgery and anesthesia.

    PubMed Central

    Stoykewych, A. A.; Curran, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    Subcutaneous emphysema is an iatrogenic complication by which air is introduced into the tissues either during or immediately after surgery. A case is presented that demonstrates the complication, following the removal of third molars, believed to be due to violation of the maxillary sinus, an underinflated cuff of a nasotracheal tube, and coughing on extubation. Images Figure 1 PMID:8507023

  1. AB178. Holmium laser resection of the distal ureter and bladder cuff during radical nephroureterectomy for patients with pelvis or ureteral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Yongchao

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the feasibility of transurethral resection for the distal ureter and bladder cuff in radical nephroureterectomy for the treatment of upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma (UUT-UC). Methods A total of 76 patients with renal pelvic carcinoma or upper tract urothelial carcinoma during July 2003 to December 2011 were retrospective analyzed. All patients were divided into two groups according to doctor’s suggestion and their wishes. Thirty-six patients of them received excision of the distal ureter and bladder cuff by transurethral Holmium laser (cystoscopy group) combined with open nephroureterectomy, and 40 patients of them underwent open surgery (open surgery group).The operation time, postoperative activity time, and postoperative hospital stay in the two groups were compared. Results All operations were completed successfully in both groups. Compared with Open Surgery Group, the operation time [(177.2±36.9) vs. (229.6±28.1) min, t=−7.004, P=0.000], postoperative activity time [(2.7±0.7) vs. (4.1±1.0) d, t=−6.802, P=0.000] and hospital stay [(6.9±1.0) vs. (8.6±1.5) d, t=−5.448, P=0.000] of cystoscopy group were shorter. No recurrence or metastasis was observed from a follow-up of 6–120 months (median=32 months) in the two groups. Conclusions Transurethral surgery is superior to traditional open surgery in trauma degree and postoperative recovery time. Transurethral Holmium laser resection of the distal ureter and bladder cuff is a minimally invasive and safety technique in the nephroureterectomy for the treatment of UTUC.

  2. Dose-Response Evaluation of Braslet-M Occlusion Cuffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebert, Douglas; Garcia, Kathleen; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Ham, David; Hamilton, Douglas; Dulchavsky, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Braslet-M is a set of special elasticized thigh cuffs used by the Russian space agency to reduce the effects of the head-ward fluid shift during early adaptation to microgravity by sequestering fluid in the lower extremities. Currently, no imaging modalities are used in the calibration of the device, and the pressure required to produce a predictable physiological response is unknown. This investigation intends to relate the pressure exerted by the cuffs to the extent of fluid redistribution and commensurate physiological effects. Materials and Methods: Ten healthy subjects with standardized fluid intake participated in the study. Data collection included femoral and internal jugular vein imaging in two orthogonal planes, pulsed Doppler of cervical and femoral vessels and middle cerebral artery, optic nerve imaging, and echocardiography. Braslet-M cuff pressure was monitored at the skin interface using pre-calibrated pressure sensors. Using 6 and 30 head-down tilt in two separate sessions, the effect of Braslet-M was assessed while incrementally tightening the cuffs. Cuffs were then simultaneously released to document the resulting hemodynamic change. Results: Preliminary analysis shows correlation between physical pressure exerted by the Braslet-M device and several parameters such as jugular and femoral vein cross-sections, resistivity of the lower extremity vascular bed, and others. A number of parameters reflect blood redistribution and will be used to determine the therapeutic range of the device and to prevent unsafe application. Conclusion: Braslet-M exerts a physical effect that can be measured and correlated with many changes in central and peripheral hemodynamics. Analysis of the full data set will be required to make definitive recommendations regarding the range of safe therapeutic application. Objective data and subjective responses suggest that a safer and equally effective use of Braslet can be achieved when compared with the current non-imaging calibration techniques.

  3. Robotic surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Robot-assisted surgery; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery; Laparoscopic surgery with robotic assistance ... Robotic surgery is similar to laparoscopic surgery. It can be performed through smaller cuts than open surgery. ...

  4. Thyroid Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ways to Donate American Thyroid Association » Thyroid Surgery Thyroid Surgery Thyroid operations are advised for patients who ... Thyroid Nodules Thyroid Surgery Thyroid and Weight Thyroiditis Thyroid Surgery Resources Thyroid Surgery Brochure PDF Thyroid Surgery ...

  5. Comparison of prophylactic effects of polyurethane cylindrical or tapered cuff and polyvinyl chloride cuff endotracheal tubes on ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodpoor, Ata; Peyrovi-far, Ali; Hamishehkar, Hadi; Bakhtyiari, Zhaleh; Mirinezhad, Mir Mousa; Hamidi, Masoud; Golzari, Samad Eslam Jamal

    2013-01-01

    Because microaspiration of contaminated supraglottic secretions past the endotracheal tube cuff is considered to be central in the pathogenesis of pneumonia, improved design of tracheal tubes with new cuff material and shape have reduced the size and number of folds, which together with the addition of suction ports above the cuff to drain pooled subglottic secretions leads to reduced aspiration of oropharyngeal secretions. So we conducted a study to compare the prophylactic effects of polyurethane-cylindrical or tapered cuff and polyvinyl chloride cuff endotracheal tubes (ETT) on ventilator-associated pneumonia. This randomized clinical trial was carried out in a 12 bed surgical intensive care unit. 96 patients expected to require mechanical ventilation more than 96 hours were randomly allocated to one of three following groups: Polyvinyl chloride cuff (PCV) ETT, Polyurethane (PU) cylindrical Sealguard ETT and PU Taperguard ETT. Cuff pressure monitored every three hours 3 days in all patients. Mean cuff pressure didn't have significant difference between three groups during 72 hours. Pneumonia was seen in 11 patients (34%) in group PVC, 8 (25%) in Sealguard and 7 (21%) in Taperguard group. Changes in mean cuff pressure between Sealguard and PVC tubes and also between Taperguard and PVC tubes did not show any significant difference. There was no significant difference in overinflation between three groups. The use of ETT with PU material results in reducing ventilator-associated pneumonia compared to ETT with PVC cuff. In PU tubes Taperguard has less incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia compared to Sealguard tubes. PMID:23945890

  6. Mini-Bentall Procedure: The "French Cuff" Technique.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tristan D

    2016-02-01

    This article describes how I perform a minimally invasive aortic root replacement, also known as the Mini-Bentall procedure. In particular, it highlights the details on how to perform the "French Cuff" technique to ensure an absolute proximal annular hemostasis. Six consecutive patients underwent the Mini-Bentall procedure using the "French Cuff" technique. Five patients did not have any transfusion and one patient had two pooled platelets. Five patients were extubated on table in the operating room and one patient was extubated 12 hours after the procedure. All patients were discharged home within 7 days after the procedure without any surgical complications. PMID:26777944

  7. Comparative effects of cuff size and tightness of fit on accuracy of blood pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    Banner, T E; Gravenstein, J S

    1991-10-01

    To determine the effect of snugness of cuff wrap on the accuracy of blood pressure (BP) measurements, we performed two studies on 6 healthy volunteers. In both studies, control values were obtained from the right upper arm with cuffs of appropriate size and snug fit. Study 1 had two phases. In the first, cuffs of appropriate size were wrapped snugly around the upper left arm of seated subjects. The effects of two other degrees of cuff snugness on the measurement of BP were evaluated by placing a filled 250-mL intravenous fluid bag between the cuff and arm over the triceps, measuring BP, then draining the same bag of half its contents and then all of its contents without rewrapping the cuff ("loose," "very loose" fit), each time measuring BP. The second phase of study 1 was identical in procedure, except that the cuffs used on the left arm were one size too small. In study 2, the experimental cuffs were placed just above the right ankle. To alter the signal-to-noise ratio, BP was raised or lowered: the standing position elevated mean BP by an average of 90 mm Hg, and elevation of the legs decreased mean BP by an average of 43 mm Hg. In study 1, we found that appropriately sized cuffs, whether wrapped tightly or loosely, gave correct BP readings. Cuffs snugly wrapped, but too small for the subject, gave high BP readings, on the average by approximately 10 mm Hg. Loose wrapping of small cuffs gave variable results in individual subjects that exaggerated systolic BP from 2 to 80 mm Hg. In study 2, elevating the legs or standing decreased or increased BP consistently. Loose wrapping of appropriately sized cuffs around the ankles of the subjects had no additional significant effect on BP. PMID:1744670

  8. Cosmetic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Looking and feeling your best Cosmetic surgery Cosmetic surgery Teens might have cosmetic surgery for a number ... my body? What are the risks of cosmetic surgery? top People who have cosmetic surgery face many ...

  9. Rotational thromboelastometry and multiple electrode platelet aggregometry in four patients with abnormal routine coagulation studies before removal of epidural catheters after major surgery: a case series and research study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Routine coagulation tests have a low predictability for perioperative bleeding complications, and spinal hematoma after removal of epidural catheters is very infrequent. Thromboelastometry and point-of-care platelet aggregometry may improve hemostatic monitoring but have not been studied in the context of safety around epidural removal. Methods Twenty patients who received an epidural catheter for major thoracoabdominal and abdominal surgery were included prospectively. In addition to routine coagulation tests, rotational thromboelastometry and multiple electrode platelet aggregometry were carried out. Results A coagulation deficit was suggested by routine coagulation tests on the intended day of epidural catheter removal in four out of 20 patients. Prothrombin time-international normalized ratio was elevated to 1.5 in one patient (normal range: 0.9 to 1.2) while rotational thromboelastometry and multiple electrode platelet aggregometry parameters were within normal limits. Activated partial thromboplastin time was elevated to 47 to 50 seconds in the remaining three patients (normal range 28 to 45 seconds). Rotational thromboelastometry showed that one of the patients’ results was due to heparin effect: the clotting time with the HEPTEM® activator was 154 seconds as compared to 261 seconds with INTEM. The three remaining patients with prolonged routine coagulation test results had all received over 1L of hydroxyethyl starch (Venofundin®) and thrombosis prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin (enoxaparin). Rotational thromboelastometry and multiple electrode platelet aggregometrygave normal or hypercoagulative signals in most patients. Conclusions This case series is new in that it examines rotational thromboelastometry and multiple electrode platelet aggregometry postoperatively in the context of epidural analgesia and shows that they may be clinically useful. These methods should be validated before they can be used for standard patient care. PMID:24377397

  10. Assessment of musculoskeletal pain sensitivity and temporal summation by cuff pressure algometry: a reliability study.

    PubMed

    Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Finocchietti, Sara; Handberg, Gitte; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-11-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain is linked with sensitization, and standardized methods for assessment are needed. This study investigated (1) the test-retest reliability of computer-controlled cuff-pressure algometry (pain thresholds and temporal pain summation) on the arm and leg and (2) conditioned pain modulation (CPM) assessed by cuff algometry. The influences of age and gender were evaluated. On 2 different days, cuff pain threshold (cPPT), cuff pain tolerance (cPTT), and temporal summation of pain (TSP) by visual analog scale scores to 10 repeated cuff stimulations at cPTT intensity, as well as pressure pain threshold with handheld pressure algometry, were assessed in 136 healthy subjects. In one session, cuff pain sensitivity was also assessed before and after cold pressor-induced CPM. Good-to-excellent intraclass correlations (0.60-0.90) were demonstrated for manual and cuff algometry, and no systematic bias between sessions was found for cPPT, cPTT, and TSP on the leg and for cPTT and TSP on the arm. Cuff pressure pain threshold and cPTT were higher in men compared with women (P < 0.05). Middle-aged subjects had higher pressure pain threshold, but lower cPPT and cPTT, compared with younger subjects (P < 0.05). Temporal summation of pain was increased in women compared with men (P < 0.05). Cuff algometry was sensitive to CPM demonstrated as increased cPPT and cPTT and reduced TSP (P < 0.05). Reliability and sensitivity of computer-controlled cuff algometry for pain assessment is comparable with manual pressure algometry and constitutes a user-independent method for assessment of pain. Difference in age-related pain sensitivity between manual and cuff algometry should be further investigated. PMID:26172551

  11. Evaluation of an Intervention to Maintain Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure Within Therapeutic Range

    PubMed Central

    Sole, Mary Lou; Su, Xiaogang; Talbert, Steve; Penoyer, Daleen Aragon; Kalita, Samar; Jimenez, Edgar; Ludy, Jeffery E.; Bennett, Melody

    2012-01-01

    Background Endotracheal tube cuff pressure must be kept within an optimal range that ensures ventilation and prevents aspiration while maintaining tracheal perfusion. Objectives To test the effect of an intervention (adding or removing air) on the proportion of time that cuff pressure was between 20 and 30 cm H2O and to evaluate changes in cuff pressure over time. Methods A repeated-measure crossover design was used to study 32 orally intubated patients receiving mechanical ventilation for two 12-hour shifts (randomized control and intervention conditions). Continuous cuff pressure monitoring was initiated, and the pressure was adjusted to a minimum of 22 cm H2O. Caregivers were blinded to cuff pressure data, and usual care was provided during the control condition. During the intervention condition, cuff pressure alarm or clinical triggers guided the intervention. Results Most patients were men (mean age, 61.6 years). During the control condition, 51.7% of cuff pressure values were out of range compared with 11.1% during the intervention condition (P < .001). During the intervention, a mean of 8 adjustments were required, mostly to add air to the endotracheal tube cuff (mean 0.28 [SD, 0.13] mL). During the control condition, cuff pressure decreased over time (P < .001). Conclusions The intervention was effective in maintaining cuff pressure within an optimal range, and cuff pressure decreased over time without intervention. The effect of the intervention on outcomes such as ventilator-associated pneumonia and tracheal damage requires further study. PMID:21362715

  12. Heart Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart with a healthy heart from a donor Traditional heart surgery, often called open-heart surgery, is ... off-pump, or beating heart, surgery. It's like traditional open-heart surgery because the chest bone is ...

  13. Lung surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lung tissue removal; Pneumonectomy; Lobectomy; Lung biopsy; Thoracoscopy; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery; VATS ... do surgery on your lungs are thoracotomy and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Lung surgery using a ...

  14. Cataract Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ...

  15. Intraoperative evaluation of the spiral nerve cuff electrode on the femoral nerve trunk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polasek, K. H.; Schiefer, M. A.; Pinault, G. C. J.; Triolo, R. J.; Tyler, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    Evaluation of the Case Western Reserve University spiral nerve cuff electrode on the femoral nerve trunk was performed intraoperatively in four subjects undergoing femoral-popliteal bypass surgery. The threshold, nerve size and selective activation capabilities of the electrode were examined. The activation thresholds for the first muscle to be recruited were 6.3, 9, 10.6, and 37.4 nC with pulse amplitudes ranging from 0.3 to 1 mA. The femoral nerve was found to have an elliptical cross-section with a major axis average length of 9 mm (8-12 mm) and a minor axis length of 1.5 mm. In all four subjects selective activation of the sartorius was obtained. In two subjects, the rectus femoris could also be selectively activated and in one subject the vastus medialis was selectively activated. Each electrode had four independent contacts that were evaluated separately. Small air bubbles were formed in the space over some contacts, preventing stimulation. This occurred in one contact in each electrode, leaving three effective stimulation channels. This issue has been corrected for future studies.

  16. Arthroscopic fixation with a minimally invasive axillary approach for latissimus dorsi transfer using an endobutton in massive and irreparable postero-superior cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Yariv; Grimberg, Jean; Valenti, Philippe; Chechik, Ofir; Drexler, Michael; Kany, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopically assisted latissimus dorsi transfer is a viable option for treatment of patients in their 50s to 70s, without arthritis of the glenohumeral joint, who suffer from massive rotator cuff tears that are not amendable to primary repair due to fatty changes in the muscle tissue, or that have failed previous repair attempts. This procedure offers immediate and dramatic pain relief and is not as technically demanding as one might think. Understanding and respecting the principles of tendon transfer is a key to the success of this procedure. PMID:23960367

  17. Concomitant Correction of a Soft-Tissue Fenestration with Keratinised Tissue Augmentation By Using A Rotated Double-Pedicle Flap During Second-Stage Implant Surgery- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Aileni Amarender; Kumar, P. Anoop; Sailaja, Sistla; Chakravarthy, Yshs

    2015-01-01

    Soft tissue deficiencies and defects around dental implants have been observed frequently. Soft-tissue defects after implant procedures originate from the process of modelling of periimplant mucosa and often cause aesthetic disharmony, food debris accumulation and soft tissue shrinkage. Periimplant mucogingival surgery focuses on creating an optimum band of keratinized tissue resulting in soft tissue architecture similar to the gingiva around natural teeth. A 23-year-old male reported to the Department of Periodontology with a complaint of gum soreness, foul smell and food accumulation at a site where a 3.75 x 11.5mm implant was placed previously. On clinical examination, fenestration of tissue above the cover screw was observed and there appeared to be a keratinized tissue of 1mm surrounding the implant. The case was managed by use of a rotated double-pedicle flap during second-stage implant surgery to correct the soft-tissue fenestration defect and to obtain a keratinized periimplant soft tissue. A periosteal bed was prepared by giving a horizontal incision at the mucogingival junction to a depth of 4 mm. Two split-thickness keratinized pedicles were dissected from the mesial and distal interproximal tissues near the implant. After rotation, both the pedicles were sutured to each other mid-buccally and the pedicles were rigidly immobilized with sutures. At 1 month, there was a 3mm band of stable and firm keratinized tissue over the underlying tissues. The procedure resulted in an aesthetic improvement due to enhanced soft tissue architecture and optimum integration between the peri-implant soft tissue and the final prosthesis. PMID:26816998

  18. Post-operative pulmonary complications after non-cardiothoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kelkar, Kalpana Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Post-operative pulmonary complications (PPCs) occur in 5–10% of patients undergoing non-thoracic surgery and in 22% of high risk patients. PPCs are broadly defined as conditions affecting the respiratory tract that can adversely influence clinical course of the patient after surgery. Prior risk stratification, risk reduction strategies, performing short duration and/or minimally invasive surgery and use of anaesthetic technique of combined regional with general anaesthesia can reduce the incidence of PPCs. Atelectasis is the main cause of PPCs. Atelectasis can be prevented or treated by adequate analgesia, incentive spirometry (IS), deep breathing exercises, continuous positive airway pressure, mobilisation of secretions and early ambulation. Pre-operative treatment of IS is more effective. The main reason for post-operative pneumonia is aspiration along the channels formed by longitudinal folds in the high volume, low pressure polyvinyl chloride cuffs of the endotracheal tubes. Use of tapered cuff, polyurethane cuffs and selective rather than the routine use of nasogastric tube can decrease chances of aspiration. Acute lung injury is the most serious PPC which may prove fatal. PMID:26556919

  19. Post-operative pulmonary complications after non-cardiothoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Kelkar, Kalpana Vinod

    2015-09-01

    Post-operative pulmonary complications (PPCs) occur in 5-10% of patients undergoing non-thoracic surgery and in 22% of high risk patients. PPCs are broadly defined as conditions affecting the respiratory tract that can adversely influence clinical course of the patient after surgery. Prior risk stratification, risk reduction strategies, performing short duration and/or minimally invasive surgery and use of anaesthetic technique of combined regional with general anaesthesia can reduce the incidence of PPCs. Atelectasis is the main cause of PPCs. Atelectasis can be prevented or treated by adequate analgesia, incentive spirometry (IS), deep breathing exercises, continuous positive airway pressure, mobilisation of secretions and early ambulation. Pre-operative treatment of IS is more effective. The main reason for post-operative pneumonia is aspiration along the channels formed by longitudinal folds in the high volume, low pressure polyvinyl chloride cuffs of the endotracheal tubes. Use of tapered cuff, polyurethane cuffs and selective rather than the routine use of nasogastric tube can decrease chances of aspiration. Acute lung injury is the most serious PPC which may prove fatal. PMID:26556919

  20. Comparison of fluid leakage across endotracheal tube cuffs using a three-dimensional printed model of the human trachea.

    PubMed

    Kimijima, Tomohiko; Edanaga, Mitsutaka; Yamakage, Michiaki

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare fluid leakage across endotracheal tube cuffs using a three-dimensional (3D)-printed human tracheal model that anatomically simulates the human trachea. We made two models based on computed tomography data of the neck and chest. Using a Mallinckrodt Hi-Lo™ (HL), ThinCuff(®) (TC), and Mallinckrodt TaperGuard™ (TG), we sequentially measured the amount of fluid leakage across each endotracheal tube cuff after applying saline or viscous liquid above the cuff. The TG allowed significantly less leakage than the HL and TC with both saline and the viscous liquid. Our study, using a 3D-printed tracheal model, indicated that a conical-shaped endotracheal tube cuff significantly reduces fluid leakage across the cuff compared with conventional cylindrical-shaped cuffs made of polyurethane or polyvinylchloride, contrary to the results of a previous study using a solid cylindrical structure. PMID:26816263

  1. Cuff electrodes for very small diameter nerves -- prototyping and first recordings in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ordonez, Juan S; Pikov, Victor; Wiggins, Harvey; Patten, Craig; Stieglitz, Thomas; Rickert, J; Schuettler, Martin

    2014-01-01

    A fabrication method for cuff electrodes to interface small nerves was developed. Medical grade silicone rubber conforms the body of the cuff and insulation of the wires, platinum was used as metal for the embedded wiring and contacts. Planar electrode arrays where fabricated using a picosecond laser and then positioned into a carrying tube to provide the third dimension with the desired inner diameter (Ø 0.3-0.5 mm). The post preparation of the cuffs after structuring allows the fabrication of a stable self-closing flap that insulates the opening slit of the cuff without the need of extra sutures. Basic for the success of the cuff is the laser-based local thinning of both the silicone rubber and the metal at defined sections. This is critical to permit the PDMS' body to dominate the mechanical properties. Finite element modeling was applied to optimize the displacement ability of the cuff, leading to design capable of withstanding multiple implantation procedures without wire damage. Furthermore, the contact's surface was roughened by laser patterning to increase the charge injection capacity of Pt to 285 μC/cm(2) measured by voltage transient detection during pulse testing. The cuff electrodes were placed on a small sympathetic nerve of an adult female Sprague-Dawley rat for recording of spontaneous and evoked neural activity in vivo. PMID:25571569

  2. Cuff overinflation and endotracheal tube obstruction: case report and experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Initiated by a clinical case of critical endotracheal tube (ETT) obstruction, we aimed to determine factors that potentially contribute to the development of endotracheal tube obstruction by its inflated cuff. Prehospital climate and storage conditions were simulated. Methods Five different disposable ETTs (6.0, 7.0, and 8.0 mm inner diameter) were exposed to ambient outside temperature for 13 months. In addition, every second of these tubes was mechanically stressed by clamping its cuffed end between the covers of a metal emergency case for 10 min. Then, all tubes were heated up to normal body temperature, placed within the cock of a syringe, followed by stepwise inflation of their cuffs to pressures of 3 kPa and ≥12 kPa, respectively. The inner lumen of the ETT was checked with the naked eye for any obstruction caused by the external cuff pressure. Results Neither in tubes that were exposed to ambient temperature (range: -12°C to +44°C) nor in those that were also clamped, visible obstruction by inflated cuffs was detected at any of the two cuff pressure levels. Conclusions We could not demonstrate a critical obstruction of an ETT by its inflated cuff, neither when the cuff was over-inflated to a pressure of 12 kPa or higher, nor in ETTs that had been exposed to unfavorable storage conditions and significant mechanical stress. PMID:20377858

  3. Tracheomegaly Secondary to Tracheotomy Tube Cuff in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Yoon, Tae Mi; Lee, Joon Kyoo; Lim, Sang Chul

    2015-10-01

    Tracheomegaly has not been reported in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Herein, the authors report a case of tracheomegaly secondary to tracheotomy tube cuff in a patient with ALS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an ALS patient with tracheomegaly and of tracheomegaly being associated with tracheotomy tube cuff and home tracheotomy mechanical ventilator.The clinician should consider the possibility of tracheomegaly in the differential diagnosis, if a patient with ALS develops repeat air leakage around the tracheotomy tube or rupture of tracheotomy tube cuff. PMID:26496301

  4. [A new metal tube for laser surgery of the laryngotracheal region].

    PubMed

    Heine, P

    1989-08-01

    Various measures have been taken to minimize laser-specific hazards during laryngotracheal microsurgery with CO2-laser equipment. Endorsing Norton's view that only a metal tube ensures complete safety during laser surgery, we tested the "Laser-Flex", a new endotracheal tube (ETT) of high-grade stainless steel. This reconstructed, flexible, gas-tight ETT was designed to avoid perforation and even ignition of the tube with consecutive inhalation of combustion products known to be very strong lung irritants. The dull surface of the spiral ETT prevents damage to the surrounding mucosa by diverging the laser beam. The flexibility and greater stability compared with PVC- or silicone armored tubes makes intubation possible without a guide even under difficult conditions. A small PVC-tube with two high-volume-low-pressure cuffs is attached to the distal end of the metal ETT. The cuffs are filled via different inlets clearly distinguished by color as well as by the inscriptions "proximal" and "distal". Both inlet lines float inside the metal tube, thus being protected from accidental laser beams. The cuffs are filled with saline solution. In case of inflammation and destruction of the proximal cuff, the discharged solution will extinguish the flame and also protect the distal cuff, ensuring normal ventilation. Thus none of the laser operations had to be interrupted during our test period if accidentally perforation of the proximal cuff occurred. The high price of the "Laser-Flex" should not be a reason to abstain from using this tube. In view of the higher margin of patient safety, this tube might be used even from an economic point of view. In our tests we reused each tube five to eight times, thus lowering the costs with each reuse. Checks following sterilization after each use did not show any dysfunction of the cuffs or valves. PMID:2782601

  5. The correlation between body mass index, limb circumferences and blood pressure cuff fit in bariatric surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, R; Alyamani, O; Viswanath, A; Bonney, I

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between body mass index (BMI) and upper and lower arm as well as lower leg circumferences and the frequency of correct blood pressure (BP) cuff fit. We explored recommendations for the most likely BP cuff size and location for the three BMI categories. Materials and Methods: Following IRB approval we retrospectively analyzed a research database of bariatric surgical patients with a BMI of ≥40 kg/m2. Data included patients’ characteristics, upper and lower arm as well as lower leg circumferences. Patients were divided into three groups based on BMI (kg/m2, Group I: <45, Group II: 45-55, and Group III: >55). Appropriate cuff fit using a standard or large adult BP cuff (CRITIKON®, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin, USA) on the upper and lower arm, and lower leg was determined. We analyzed the percent proportion of proper cuff fit for cuff sizes and locations between groups using appropriate nonparametric testing. Results: Limb circumference correlated significantly with BMI (P = 0.01), and the upper arm correlated most closely (r = 0.76). A standard adult BP cuff on the lower arm fit properly in >90% and >80% and in Groups I and II, respectively. A large cuff on the lower arm was appropriate in 87% of Group III. In two participants, a large cuff fit properly on the lower leg. Discussion: Limb circumference significantly correlated with BMI. Recommendations for proper cuff fit in different BMI categories can be made.

  6. Condensation of humidified air in the inflation line of a polyurethane cuff precludes correct continuous pressure monitoring during mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Spapen, Herbert; Moeyersons, Walter; Stiers, Wim; Desmet, Geert; Suys, Emiel

    2014-12-01

    Within continuously controlled limits of cuff pressure, an endotracheal tube cuff made of polyurethane (PU) prevents secretion inflow better than a conventional polyvinylchloride cuff. However, the temperature difference between ventilator gas and the air inside a PU cuff produces condensation droplets that accumulate in the cuff inflation canal. We investigated whether condensation influenced continuous cuff pressure monitoring. A PU-cuffed tube was placed into an artificial trachea and connected to a ventilator and test lung. An additional line was inserted at the distal cuff end to directly measure pressure inside the cuff. Methylene blue instillation via the inflation line mimicked condensation. Inspiratory (Pinsp) and expiratory (Pexp) pressures were continuously recorded. Six consecutive experiments were performed comparing pressures at baseline (T0) and at 24 h (T24). Shortly after dye instillation, pressures recorded at the inflation canal became permanently fixed at 25 cmH2O. In contrast, pressures measured directly in the cuff progressively decreased (mean Pinsp 30 3 vs. 20 2 cmH2O and mean Pexp 25 0 vs. 12 2 cmH2O, T0 vs. T24, both P < 0.05). Thus, condensation in the inflation line of a PU-cuffed tube renders continuous cuff pressure monitoring unreliable, thereby increasing the risk for microaspiration. PMID:24854520

  7. Outpatient Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Policymakers | Members | Patients | News Media Anesthesia 101 Patient Safety Stories Resources About Home » Patients » Preparing For Surgery » Types of Surgery » Outpatient Surgery Share this Page Preparing For ...

  8. Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Plastic Surgery KidsHealth > For Teens > Plastic Surgery Print A A ... her forehead lightened with a laser? What Is Plastic Surgery? Just because the name includes the word "plastic" ...

  9. Fascicle-selective multi-contact cuff electrode.

    PubMed

    Rossel, Olivier; Soulier, Fabien; Coulombe, Jonathan; Bernard, Serge; Cathébras, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Neural recording is one of the main issues to be addressed in order to allow closed-loop functional electrical stimulation systems. Because each fascicle in nerves carry specific information, new sensors providing high spatial selectivity are required for chronic implantable devices. This work aims at evaluating the feasibility of a new device using a highly spatial-selective multi-contact cuff electrode. The proposed electrode configuration is evaluated based on simulations using a model of a nerve comprising multiple fascicles. Study of the electrode selectivity is done and compared with a state-of-the-art electrode designed for the same purpose and shows that activity of two fascicles separated by as little as 1 mm can be distinguished. Implementation challenges and perspectives for such electrodes are also discussed. PMID:22254969

  10. Tripolar-cuff deviation from ideal model: assessment by bioelectric field simulations and saline-bath experiments.

    PubMed

    Triantis, Iasonas F; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2008-06-01

    Ideally, interference in neural measurements due to signals from nearby muscles can be completely eliminated with the use of tripolar cuffs, in combination with appropriate amplifier configurations, such as the quasi-tripole (QT) and the true-tripole (TT). The operation of these amplifiers, is based on the theoretical property of the nerve cuff to produce a linear relationship of potential versus distance along its length, internally, when external potentials appear between its ends. Thus, in principle, electroneurogram (ENG) recordings from an ideal tripolar cuff would be free from electromyogram (EMG) interference generated by nearby muscles. However, in practice the cuff exhibits non-ideal behaviour leading to "cuff imbalance". The main focus of this paper is to investigate the causes of cuff imbalance, to demonstrate that it should be incorporated as a main parameter in the theoretical ENG-recording cuff electrode model. In addition to cuff asymmetry and tissue growth, the proximity of the interference source to the cuff is shown to result in cuff imbalance. The influence of proximity imbalance on the performance of the QT and TT amplifiers is also considered. Proximity imbalance is studied using bioelectric field simulations and saline-bath experiments. Variation is observed with both distance (40 mm and 70 mm was examined) and orientation (0-180 degrees), with the latter causing a more severe effect especially when the source dipole and the cuff are vertical to each other. The simulations and measurements are in close agreement. Tissue growth imbalance and asymmetry imbalance are also investigated in vitro. Finally, the signal-to-interference ratio (SIR; ENG/EMG) of the QT and TT amplifiers is examined in the presence of cuff imbalance. It is shown that proximity imbalance results in their SIR to peak only at certain cuff orientation values. This important finding offers an insight as to why in practice ENG recordings using these amplifiers have been widely reported to be degraded by EMG interference. PMID:17689281

  11. Endotracheal tube cuff ignited by electrocautery during tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Le Clair, J; Gartner, S; Halma, G

    1990-08-01

    A 64-year old female requiring prolonged ventilatory support was scheduled for an elective tracheostomy. Anesthesia consisted of surgical infiltration of 1% lidocaine and supplemental isoflurane. The patient was mechanically ventilated with an FIO2 of 1.0. An incision was made over the third and fourth tracheal rings. Opening the trachea with electrocautery resulted in a large leak around the endotracheal tube. The cuff was visualized through the tracheal incision and noted to be deflated. A small bleeder was coagulated on the tracheal ring. At this point, a flash fire occurred rising about one-inch high through the tracheal incision. The surgeon immediately covered the site with his hand. The anesthetist promptly disconnected the anesthesia circuit and removed the endotracheal tube. The surgeon inserted the tracheostomy tube and ventilation resumed. The fire lasted approximately 1-2 seconds. Dexamethasone 10 mg was administered intravenously. End-tidal CO2 and oxygen saturation levels were unchanged. The endotracheal tube was inspected. Approximately one-third to one-half of the cuff was charred. Proper management of an endotracheal tube fire includes stopping ventilation, disconnecting the oxygen source, removing the endotracheal tube, diagnosing injury, administering short-term steroids, administering antibiotics if indicated, providing ventilation and medical support as necessary and monitoring the patient for at least 24 hours. Extreme caution is necessary when using electrocautery in close proximity to an endotracheal tube. If electrocautery is used in close proximity to an endotracheal tube, an FIO2 of 0.3 or less with helium should be used. PMID:2399778

  12. Cuff leakage, not paravalvular leakage, in the Carpentier Edwards PERIMOUNT Magna Ease aortic bioprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Shigehiko; Cho, Tomoki; Izubuchi, Ryo; Masuda, Munetaka

    2015-12-01

    Though the Carpentier Edwards PERIMOUNT Magna Ease valve is a bioprosthesis with documented excellent haemodynamics and easy implantability, this valve has a gap between the cobalt-chromium-nickel alloy stent and silicone sewing ring. This gap, which is widest just below each of the three commissural struts, lacks silicone and leaves the two-layer polytetrafluoroethylene fabric unsupported and unprotected. If the needle of a valve suture is placed in this structurally weak area of the sewing ring, the resultant fabric tear may result in a true cuff leakage, not the usual paravalvular leakage. We describe this pitfall in the context of a recent operation to alert surgeons everywhere that suture placement too close to the stent (missing the silicone sewing ring) can result in postoperative cuff leakage. We need to be very careful to include the silicone ring in each stitch to prevent injury to the valve cuff of this prosthesis and to avoid cuff leakage. PMID:26337338

  13. A miniaturized cuff electrode for electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves in the freely moving rat.

    PubMed

    Jellema, T; Teepen, J L

    1995-01-01

    A bipolar cuff electrode for electrical stimulation of small diameter peripheral nerves is described. The cuff is made of a highly flexible rubber-impression material, and the electrode assembly is suited for chronic implantation. Its manual construction is easy and reliable, utilizing only simple tools. The cuff completely envelopes nerves of varying diameter and requires a minimal amount of manipulations of the nerve, thereby reducing the chance of surgical trauma. The snug envelope prevents the nerve from drying, and minimizes shunting between the two leads by extracellular fluids. Small outer dimensions were achieved: 1.4 x 1.1 x 2.3 mm (width x height x length) when used with nerves of 1 mm diameter, which minimizes pressure and damage to surrounding tissues. Morphometric analysis of nerves enclosed in cuffs for 28-30 h revealed a small decrease in the number of large-diameter fibers. Stimulation thresholds remained, however, constant throughout the experiments. PMID:7633905

  14. In vitro evaluation of a nitinol based vein cuff for external valvuloplasty.

    PubMed

    Hiebl, B; Jung, F; Schossig, M; Scharnagl, N; Richau, K; Niehues, S

    2010-01-01

    This study shows first in vitro tests of a nitinol based vein cuff developed for external valvuloplasty. In contrary to currently existing vein cuffs the tested model enables minimal invasive implantation and also maintains its round pre-shaped profile at body temperature (37 degrees C). The examination of the cuff surface structure by scanning electron microscopy, profilometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy after sterilization with ethylene oxide and before cyto-compatibility testing revealed a nearly smooth surface (mean square roughness Rq 66 +/- 33 nm) which was primarily composed of nickel, oxygen, titanium, carbon and silicon where nickel was the least fraction (Ni: 0.7%, Ti: 1.7%, Si: 15.8%, O: 29.5%, C: 52.3%) of the surface elements. Si and C are supposed to be contaminations caused by a final cuff polishing with silicon carbide at the end of the manufacturing process. To evaluate cyto-compatibility initial cell adherence and cell activity were assessed. The results showed good initial cell adherence of L929 fibroblast-like cells on the cuff surface already after 24 h. The results also revealed no inhibitory effects on the activity of these cells (MTS test) later on. The test setup developed to analyse functionality in a dynamic mode was shown to be suited at blood pressures up to 300 mmHg. The cuff successfully limited dilation of varicose veins (Vena saphena magna) at physiological blood pressures (< 120 mmHg) and also in cases of hypertonia (300 mmHg) to the diameter determined by the cuff (4.0 mm) over thecomplete testing period. This indicates that the clasp based cuff closure mechanism is suited to close the cuff under variable physiological and pathological blood pressure conditions. The cuff structure only allowed minimal adaptation on the inhomogenously dilating vein profile in the both peripheral cuff modules. Both peripheral modules followed the vessel dilation in correlation to the applied pressure. At pressures within the physiological range cuff also maintained the pre-shaped round profile in the central and peripheral modules during the pressure increase and the consecutive cuff expansion. The study showed that the first nitinol based vein cuff for external valvuloplasty was processed well enough by electropolishing and sterilization to allow culturing of L929 fibroblast-like cells on the cuff surface as a test of general biocompatibility. The cuff also proved to limit dilation of varicose veins at physiological and pathological blood pressures in vitro. Further tests with primary cells from the venous wall will follow to test the specific biocompatibility before tests in vivo can be envisaged. PMID:20675918

  15. Experimental determination of compound action potential direction and propagation velocity from multi-electrode nerve cuffs.

    PubMed

    Rieger, R; Taylor, J; Comi, E; Donaldson, N; Russold, M; Mahony, C M O; McLaughlin, J A; McAdams, E; Demosthenous, A; Jarvis, J C

    2004-07-01

    Information extracted from whole-nerve electroneurograms, recorded using electrode cuffs, can provide signals to neuroprostheses. However, the amount of information that can be extracted from a single tripole is limited. This communication demonstrates how previously unavailable information about the direction of action potential propagation and velocity can be obtained using a multi-electrode cuff and that the arrangement acts as a velocity-selective filter. Results from in vitro experiments on frog nerves are presented. PMID:15234689

  16. Rotator Cuff Tear Degeneration and Cell Apoptosis in Smokers vs Nonsmokers

    PubMed Central

    Lundgreen, Kirsten; Lian, Øystein Bjerkestrand; Scott, Alex; Nassab, Paulina; Fearon, Angela; Engebretsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of smoking on supraspinatus tendon degeneration, including cellular alterations, proliferation, and apoptosis of tendon cells. Methods Supraspinatus tendon samples of 10 smokers and 15 nonsmokers with full-thickness tears were compared, focusing on the severity of tendon histopathology including apoptosis (programmed cell death), cellularity, and proliferation. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess the density of apoptotic cells and proliferation. The extent of tendon degeneration was classified according to a revised version of the Bonar tendon histopathology score. Results The smokers were younger (P = .01). The symptom duration among smokers was longer (P < .05). The supraspinatus tendons from the smokers presented significantly more advanced degenerative changes (Bonar score, 13.5 [interquartile range, 1.4] v 9 [interquartile range, 3]; P < .001). The smokers’ tendons showed increased density of apoptotic cells (0.108 [SE, 0.038] v 0.0107 [SE, 0.007]; P = .024) accompanied by reduced tenocyte density (P = .019) and upregulation of proliferative activity (P < .0001). Conclusions Smoking is associated with worsened supraspinatus tendon histopathology and increased apoptosis. Clinical Relevance Pronounced degenerative changes, reduced tendon cellularity, and increased apoptosis may indicate reduced tendon healing capacity in smokers. PMID:24863404

  17. Loss of rotator cuff tendon-to-bone interface pressure after reattachment using a suture anchor.

    PubMed

    Brassart, Nicolas; Sanghavi, Sanjay; Hansen, Ulrich N; Emery, Roger J; Amis, Andrew A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the tendon-to-bone interface pressure, contact area, and force after reattaching a tendon to bone by use of a suture and suture anchor. Repairs were made in 8 ovine shoulders in vitro, by use of 3 suture types in each: Ethibond, polydioxanone, or Orthocord. A Tekscan pressure sensor was placed between the tendon and bone and monitored for 1 hour after the repair. The principal finding was a significant loss of approximately 60% of the contact parameters immediately after the suture was tied, followed by further significant loss over the next hour to a mean of only 14% of the initial readings. We concluded that pressure measurement systems that only record the initial maximum pressure would yield overly optimistic results for the actual repair pressure after the repair is completed. The Tekscan system, however, allowed us to monitor pressure reductions that occurred both during and after the repair. PMID:18504147

  18. Bipolar Posterior Deltoid Transfer for Massive Rotator Cuff Tears: A Report on 2 Patients

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary: A transfer of the posterior deltoid innervated by the posterior branch of the axillary nerve and vascularized by the posterior circumflex humeral artery is described for irreparable tears of the supra- and infraspinatus muscle tendons. Functionally useful abduction and flexion were restored in 2 patients. PMID:26090280

  19. [Current and known aspects of the arterial supply of the rotator cuff].

    PubMed

    Hermann, B; Steiner, D

    1989-01-01

    The basic arterial supply of the shoulder is well known, some details for example the supply of the m. supraspinatus are not studied yet. Preparation of shoulder-specimens after injection of silicone-caoutchouc are done to examine the vascular system. The arterial supply of the shoulder is described as a system of four rings. The results are discussed in combination with the literature. PMID:2508361

  20. Pelvic Surgical Site Infections in Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lachiewicz, Mark P.; Moulton, Laura J.; Jaiyeoba, Oluwatosin

    2015-01-01

    The development of surgical site infection (SSI) remains the most common complication of gynecologic surgical procedures and results in significant patient morbidity. Gynecologic procedures pose a unique challenge in that potential pathogenic microorganisms from the skin or vagina and endocervix may migrate to operative sites and can result in vaginal cuff cellulitis, pelvic cellulitis, and pelvic abscesses. Multiple host and surgical risk factors have been identified as risks that increase infectious sequelae after pelvic surgery. This paper will review these risk factors as many are modifiable and care should be taken to address such factors in order to decrease the chance of infection. We will also review the definitions, microbiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of pelvic SSIs after gynecologic surgery. PMID:25788822

  1. Clinical effects of thigh cuffs during a 7-day 6° head-down bed rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavy-Le Traon, Anne; Maillet, Alain; Vasseur Clausen, Pascale; Custaud, Marc-Antoine; Alferova, Irina; Gharib, Claude; Fortrat, Jacques-Olivier

    2001-08-01

    Thigh cuffs are used by Russian cosmonauts to limit the fluid shift induced by space flight. A ground simulation using the head-down bed rest (HDBR) model was performed to assess the effects of thigh cuffs on clinical tolerance and orthostatic adaptation. 8 male healthy volunteers (32.4±1.9 years) participated twice in a 7-day HDBR — one time with thigh cuffs (worm daily from 9 am to 7 pm) (TC) and one time without (WTC). Orthostatic tolerance was assessed by a 10 minute stand test and by a LBNP test (5 min at -15, -30, -45 mmHg) before (BDC-1) and at the end of the HDBR period (R+1). Plasma volume was measured before and at the end of HDBR by the Evans blue dye dilution technique. Thigh cuffs limits headache due to fluid shift, as well as the loss in plasma volume (TC: -5.85±0.95%; WTC: -9.09±0.82%, p<0.05). The mean duration of the stand test (R+1) did not differ in the two group (TC 7.1±1.3 min; WTC 7.0±1.0 min). The increase in HR and decrease in diastolic blood pressure were slightly but significantly larger without thigh cuffs. Duration of the LBNP tests did not differ with thigh cuffs. Thigh cuffs limit the symptoms due to fluid shift and the loss in plasma volume. They partly reduced the increase in HR during orthostatic stress but had no effect on duration of orthostatic stress tests.

  2. Comparative study between benzydamine hydrochloride gel, lidocaine 5% gel and lidocaine 10% spray on endotracheal tube cuff as regards postoperative sore throat.

    PubMed

    Mekhemar, Nashwa Abdallah; El-Agwany, Ahmed Samy; Radi, Wafaa Kamel; El-Hady, Sherif Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative sore throat is a common complication after endotracheal intubation. After tracheal intubation, the incidence of sore throat varies from 14.4% to 50%. The aim of the study was to compare between benzydamine hydrochloride gel, lidocaine 5% gel and lidocaine 10% spray on the endotracheal tube cuff as regards postoperative sore throat. The present study was carried out on 124 patients admitted to Alexandria university hospitals for lumbar fixation surgery requiring general anesthesia. Patients were randomly allocated into 4 groups. Benzydamine hydrochloride gel, 5% lidocaine hydrochloride gel, 10% lidocaine hydrochloride spray, or normal saline were applied on endotracheal tube cuffs before endotracheal intubation. The patients were examined for sore throat (none, mild, moderate, or severe) at 0, 1, 6, 12, and 24h after extubation. The results were collected, analyzed and presented in table and figure. The highest incidence of postoperative sore throat occurred at 6h after extubation in all groups. There was a significantly lower incidence of postoperative sore throat in the benzydamine group than 5% lidocaine gel, 10% lidocaine spray, and normal saline groups. The benzydamine group had significantly decreased severity of postoperative sore throat compared with the 10% lidocaine, 5% lidocaine, and normal saline groups at observation time point. Compared with the 5% lidocaine the 10% lidocaine group had significantly increased incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat after extubation. Compared with normal saline the 10% lidocaine group had increased incidence of postoperative sore throat. There were no significant differences among groups in local or systemic side effects. So in conclusion, benzydamine hydrochloride gel on the endotracheal tube cuff is a simple and effective method to reduce the incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat. Application of 10% lidocaine spray should be avoided because of worsening of postoperative sore throat where incidence increased but not the severity in relation to 5% lidocaine gel. Applying 5% lidocaine on the endotracheal tube cuff does not prevent postoperative sore throat but its application is better than lidocaine 10% spray or saline. PMID:27108819

  3. [Comparative study between benzydamine hydrochloride gel, lidocaine 5% gel and lidocaine 10% spray on endotracheal tube cuff as regards postoperative sore throat].

    PubMed

    Mekhemar, Nashwa Abdallah; El-Agwany, Ahmed Samy; Radi, Wafaa Kamel; El-Hady, Sherif Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative sore throat is a common complication after endotracheal intubation. After tracheal intubation, the incidence of sore throat varies from 14.4% to 50%. The aim of the study was to compare between benzydamine hydrochloride gel, lidocaine 5% gel and lidocaine 10% spray on the endotracheal tube cuff as regards postoperative sore throat. The present study was carried out on 124 patients admitted to Alexandria university hospitals for lumbar fixation surgery requiring general anesthesia. Patients were randomly allocated into 4 groups. Benzydamine hydrochloride gel, 5% lidocaine hydrochloride gel, 10% lidocaine hydrochloride spray, or normal saline were applied on endotracheal tube cuffs before endotracheal intubation. The patients were examined for sore throat (none, mild, moderate, or severe) at 0, 1, 6, 12, and 24h after extubation. The results were collected, analyzed and presented in table and figure. The highest incidence of postoperative sore throat occurred at 6h after extubation in all groups. There was a significantly lower incidence of postoperative sore throat in the benzydamine group than 5% lidocaine gel, 10% lidocaine spray, and normal saline groups. The benzydamine group had significantly decreased severity of postoperative sore throat compared with the 10% lidocaine, 5% lidocaine, and normal saline groups at observation time point. Compared with the 5% lidocaine the 10% lidocaine group had significantly increased incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat after extubation. Compared with normal saline the 10% lidocaine group had increased incidence of postoperative sore throat. There were no significant differences among groups in local or systemic side effects. So in conclusion, benzydamine hydrochloride gel on the endotracheal tube cuff is a simple and effective method to reduce the incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat. Application of 10% lidocaine spray should be avoided because of worsening of postoperative sore throat where incidence increased but not the severity in relation to 5% lidocaine gel. Applying 5% lidocaine on the endotracheal tube cuff does not prevent postoperative sore throat but its application is better than lidocaine 10% spray or saline. PMID:26993406

  4. Case Report of Multiple Tracheostomy Revisions due to Persistent, Recurrent Cuff Leak

    PubMed Central

    Azimi-Bolourian, Jian P.; Hanna, Issa A.; Williams, George W.

    2015-01-01

    This case is a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who was unable to be separated from mechanical ventilator support and required a tracheostomy. The patient underwent an initial open tracheostomy utilizing flexible fiberoptic tracheoscopy (FFT) in the operating room (OR). Subsequently, he developed recurrent leaks in the tracheal tube cuff requiring multiple trips back to the operating room. The recurrent cuff leak occurred following each tube placement until the etiology of the leak was discovered during the fourth procedure. In the fourth procedure, the wound was explored more extensively, and it was found that there was a sharp, calcified, aberrant fragment of a tracheal cartilage ring protruding into the tracheal lumen, which was damaging the cuff of each tube. This fragment was not visible by multiple FFTs, nor was it visible in the wound by the surgeons until wider exploration of the wound occurred. The cartilage fragment was ultimately excised and the patient had no further cuff leaks. Aberrant tracheal cartilage should be on the differential diagnosis for cuff leaks subsequent to surgical tracheostomy (ST) or percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT). PMID:26240762

  5. Adolescent hypertension identified with correct cuff and its cardiovascular and gestational problems after 29 years

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Sandra Regina Ramos; Arcuri, Edna Apparecida Moura; Isabella, Adriana Paula Jordão; Arcuri, Silvia Maria; Santos, Jair Lício Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Objective to identify, in 2011, rates of hypertension, cardiovascular and gestational problems in subjects presenting high blood pressure in 1982, when correct cuff size was used, according to the American Heart Association Arm Circumference/Cuff Width ratio of 0.40. Methods high blood pressure was defined in 2011 as systolic = 115 mmHg and diastolic = 80mmHg, resulting in 20 subjects between 39 and 43 years old. (Risk Group). They were compared to 20 subjects from the original sample with lower blood pressure values (Control group). Results the rates of hypertension, cardiovascular and gestational problems were significantly higher (Fisher: p=0.02) in the Risk Group, with one case of cardiovascular death. Our findings arouse speculations about whether, if a proper cuff had been used in clinical practice, the complications and death could have been avoided. Conclusions data suggest compliance with the use of cuff width corresponding to 40% of arm circumference, despite polemics concerning cuff availability and difficulties of using many sizes. PMID:24553697

  6. Noise and selectivity of velocity-selective multi-electrode nerve cuffs.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, N; Rieger, R; Schuettler, M; Taylor, J

    2008-10-01

    Using a multi-electrode nerve-signal recording cuff and a method of signal processing described previously, activity in axons with different propagation velocities can be distinguished, and the relative amplitude of the small-fibre signals increased. This paper is, largely, an analysis of the selectivity and noise of this system though impedance measurements from an actual cuff are included. The signal processor includes narrow band-pass filters. It is shown that the selectivity and noise both increase with the centre frequencies of these filters. A convenient approach is to make the filter frequencies inversely related to the artificial time delays so that the filter 'Q's are approximately constant and the noise densities are equal for all velocity filters. Numerical calculations, using formulae for this system and for the conventional tripole, based on a fixed cuff size and tissue resistivity, find the number of action potentials per second that must pass through the cuff so that the signal power equals the noise power. For slow fibres (20 m/s), the rate is 14 times lower for the multi-electrode cuff than the tripole, a significant advantage for recording from these fibres. PMID:18696136

  7. Blood flow restriction: effects of cuff type on fatigue and perceptual responses to resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Loenneke, J P; Thiebaud, R S; Fahs, C A; Rossow, L M; Abe, T; Bemben, M G

    2014-06-01

    Blood flow restriction (BFR) combined with low load resistance training has been shown to result in muscle hypertrophy similar to that observed with higher loads. However, not all studies have found BFR efficacious, possibly due to methodological differences. It is presently unclear whether there are differences between cuffs of similar size (5 cm) but different material (nylon vs. elastic). The purpose was to determine if there are differences in repetitions to fatigue and perceptual ratings of exertion (RPE) and discomfort between narrow elastic and narrow nylon cuffs. Sixteen males and females completed three sets of BFR knee extension exercise in a randomized cross-over design using either elastic or nylon restrictive cuffs applied at the proximal thigh. There were no differences in repetitions to fatigue (marker of blood flow) or perceptual ratings between narrow elastic and narrow nylon cuffs. This data suggests that either elastic or nylon cuffs of the same width should cause similar degrees of BFR at the same pressure during resistance exercise. PMID:24901077

  8. Possibilities offered by implantable miniaturized cuff-electrodes for insect neurophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Hartbauer, Manfred; Krger, Thilo B.; Stieglitz, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in microsystems technology led to a miniaturization of cuff-electrodes, which suggests these electrodes not just for long-term neuronal recordings in mammalians, but also in medium-sized insects. In this study we investigated the possibilities offered by cuff-electrodes for neuroethology using insects as a model organism. The implantation in the neck of a tropical bushcricket resulted in high quality extracellular nerve recordings of different units responding to various acoustic, vibratory, optical and mechanical stimuli. In addition, multi-unit nerve activity related to leg movements was recorded in insects walking on a trackball. A drawback of bi-polar nerve recordings obtained during tethered flight was overlay of nerve activity with large amplitude muscle potentials. Interestingly, cuff-electrode recordings were robust to withstand walking and flight activity so that good quality nerve recordings were possible even three days after electrode implantation. Recording multi-unit nerve activity in intact insects required an elaborate spike sorting algorithm in order to discriminate neuronal units responding to external stimuli from background activity. In future, a combination of miniaturized cuff-electrodes and light-weight amplifiers equipped with a wireless transmitter will allow the investigation of neuronal processes underlying natural behavior in freely moving insects. By this means cuff-electrodes may contribute to the development of realistic neuronal models simulating neuronal processes underlying natural insect behavior, such like mate choice and predator avoidance. PMID:23576843

  9. Strabismus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... figures 2 and 3]. What is an adjustable suture? Strabismus surgery involves sewing the eye muscle to ... of the muscle. Standard strabismus surgery (no adjustable suture) utilizes a permanent knot. Adjustable suture technique utilizes ...

  10. Turbinate surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Turbinectomy; Turbinoplasty; Turbinate reduction; Nasal airway surgery ... There are several types of turbinate surgery: Turbinectomy: All or part of the lower turbinate is taken out. This can be done in several different ways, but sometimes a ...

  11. After Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... side effects. There is usually some pain with surgery. There may also be swelling and soreness around ... the first few days, weeks, or months after surgery. Some other questions to ask are How long ...

  12. Cosmetic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... should be certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery. How many years has the doctor performed this ... of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS)/ The American Board of Plastic Surgery (ABPS) – All of the surgeons listed through this ...

  13. Effect of long-term implanted nerve cuff electrodes on the electrophysiological properties of human sensory nerves.

    PubMed

    Slot, P J; Selmar, P; Rasmussen, A; Sinkjaer, T

    1997-03-01

    During a long-term implantation (307 days) of a tripolar split cuff electrode around the palmar digital nerve to the radial side of the left index finger, branching off the median nerve in a medullary lesioned C6 patient, the physiological state of the nerve was intensively monitored. The resulting sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) amplitude was recorded, using both near-nerve electrodes and the implanted cuff electrode. The SNAP amplitude declined within 10 days to approximately 50% of the first SNAP cuff amplitude measured on Day 2 after implantation and recovered to the initial amplitude within 3 months. The SNAP amplitude measurements made with near-nerve electrodes were consistent with the cuff results; the SNAP conduction velocity (CV) recorded by the near-nerve electrodes and the cuff electrode was constant during the whole implantation period. This is in agreement with the results from two other patients: one with a cuff implanted around the sural nerve, and the other with a cuff implanted around a branch of the tibial nerve. These results and animals studies show that the cuff electrode is an electrically stable neural-electrical transducer. PMID:9148706

  14. 76 FR 10578 - Cuffs Run Pumped Storage, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Cuffs Run Pumped Storage, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions To Intervene, and Competing Applications On November 18, 2010, Cuffs Run Pumped Storage,...

  15. Improving time to continence after robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy: augmentation of the total anatomic reconstruction technique by adding dynamic detrusor cuff trigonoplasty and suprapubic tube placement.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Ashutosh K; Ali, Adnan; Ghareeb, George; Ludwig, Wesley; Metgud, Sheela; Theckumparampil, Nithin; Takenaka, Atsushi; Chugtai, Bilal; Shrivastava, Abhishek; Kaplan, Steve A; Leung, Robert; Paryani, Rahul; Grushow, Siobhan; Durand, Matthieu; Peyser, Alexandra; Chopra, Sameer; Harneja, Niyati; Lee, Richard K; Herman, Michael; Robinson, Brian; Shevchuck, Maria M

    2012-12-01

    After robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy, total anatomic reconstruction (TR) with the additions of a circumapical urethral dissection, a dynamic detrusor cuff trigonoplasty, and placement of a suprapubic catheter was performed in 49 patients from June to July 2012. Continence at 6 weeks after catheter removal was assessed for an initial group of 23 patients, and also at 2 weeks in an additional 26 patients who most recently had undergone surgery. Follow-up appointments and telephone interviews were used to assess pad use and continence. Of the initial 23 patients receiving the modified TR, 60.9% had 0 pad use at 6 weeks. By 2 weeks, 65.4% of the most recent 26 patients operated on achieved continence with 0-1 pad use. Preservation and reconstruction of the pelvic floor and supporting bladder structures leads to an earlier return of continence. These key steps need to be validated and confirmed in larger and randomized trials. PMID:23230868

  16. Fabrication and characterization of stimulus nerve cuff electrode with highly roughened surface for chronic implant.

    PubMed

    Yi Jae Lee; Kang-Il Song; Ji Yoon Kang; Soo Hyun Lee

    2015-08-01

    Nerve cuff electrodes for peripheral nerve prostheses are required chronically implanted electrodes which simultaneously stimulate and record nerve activity. It is inevitable challenge to investigate electrode material with low interfacial impedance and enhanced charge transfer capacity. In this study, stimulus nerve cuff electrodes on polyimide with Pt, conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), black Pt, and IrOx were fabricated and characterized. The electrochemical properties were investigated using cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and voltage transient measurements. From th experimental results, stimulus nerve cuff electrodes with black Pt showed the highest charge delivery capacity (80 times higher than Pt), charge injection capacity (6 times higher than Pt), and lowest interfacial impedance (3.8 times lower than Pt). PMID:26737026

  17. Improving the shape and compliance characteristics of a high-volume, low-pressure cuff improves tracheal seal.

    PubMed

    Young, P J; Blunt, M C

    1999-12-01

    A prototype design of a compliant latex, high-volume, low-pressure cuffed tracheal tube cuff (CHVLP) was compared with the Mallinckrodt Hi-Lo, Sheridan preformed and Portex Profile high-volume, low-pressure (HVLP) cuffed tracheal tubes for leakage of dye placed above the cuff in a benchtop mechanical ventilation model and in five isolated pig tracheas. There was no leakage in the ventilation model or in the pig tracheas with the prototype CHVLP. There was rapid leakage in the ventilation model and in all the pig tracheas for the Mallinckrodt Hi-Lo, the Sheridan preformed and the Portex Profile cuffs. This benchtop study suggests that improved HVLP cuff compliance characteristics may be beneficial in the prevention of leakage of fluid to the lungs known to occur with HVLP cuffs. PMID:10700788

  18. Arterial pressure: agreement between a brachial cuff-based device and radial tonometry

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chloe M.; Korolkova, Olga; Davies, Justin E.; Parker, Kim H.; Siggers, Jennifer H.; March, Katherine; Tillin, Therese; Chaturvedi, Nish; Hughes, Alun D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Aortic (central) blood pressure (BP) differs from brachial BP and may be a superior predictor of cardiovascular events. However, its measurement is currently restricted to research settings, owing to a moderate level of operator dependency. We tested a new noninvasive device in a large UK cohort. The device estimates central BP using measurements obtained with an upper arm cuff inflated to suprasystolic pressure. We compared these estimates with those obtained using radial tonometry as well as with invasively acquired measurements of aortic BP in a limited number of individuals. Methods: Consecutive cuff-based and tonometry-based estimates of the pressure waveform and the central BP were obtained from 1107 individuals (70??6 years). Short-term and long-term reproducibility studies were performed on 28 individuals. Simultaneous cuff-based and invasively measured pressure traces were acquired and compared in an additional six individuals (65??20 years). Results: Central systolic BP, as estimated by the cuff-based device, was found to be highly reproducible (coefficient of variation 4 and 8% for short and long-term reproducibility, respectively) and was comparable to that estimated by tonometry (average difference 3??6?mmHg, intraclass correlation coefficient?=?0.91). The cuff-based pressure waveforms were similar to those acquired invasively (cross-correlation coefficient 0.93), and the difference in the estimated central systolic BP was ?5??8?mmHg (P?=?0.2). Conclusion: Cuff-based devices show promise to simplify the measurement of central BP, whilst maintaining a similar fidelity to tonometry. This could lead to improved adoption of estimates of central BP in clinical practice. PMID:24379000

  19. Multiple-electrode nerve cuffs for low-velocity and velocity-selective neural recording.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J; Donaldson, N; Winter, J

    2004-09-01

    In the paper, a method using multiple-electrode nerve cuffs is presented that enables electroneurographic signals (ENG) to be recorded selectively by action potential velocity. The theory uses a one-dimensional model of the electrodes in the cuff. Using this model, the transfer function for a single tripole is derived, and it is shown that more than one tripole signal can be recorded from within a cuff. When many tripole signals are available and are temporally aligned by artificial delays and summed, there is a significant increase in the amplitude of the recorded action potential, depending on the cuff length and the action potential velocity, with the greatest gain occurring for low velocities. For example, a cuff was considered that was constrained by surgical considerations to 30 mm between the end electrodes. For action potentials with a velocity of 120 m s(-1), it was shown that, as the number of tripoles increased from one, the peak energy spectral density of the recorded output increased by a factor of about 1.6 with three tripoles, whereas, for 20 m s(-1), the increase was about 19, with ten tripoles. The time delays and summation act as a velocity-selective filter. With consideration of the energy spectral densities at frequencies where these are maximum (to give the best signal-to-noise ratio), the tuning curves are presented for these velocity-selective filters and show that useful velocity resolution is possible using this method. For a 30 mm cuff with nine tripoles, it is demonstrated that it is possible to resolve at least five distinct velocity bands in the range 20-120m s(-1). PMID:15503964

  20. An improved configuration for the reduction of EMG in electrode cuff recordings: a theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Rahal, M; Winter, J; Taylor, J; Donaldson, N

    2000-09-01

    A theoretical investigation of different electroneurogram recording techniques using electrode cuffs is presented. A new screened tripole arrangement is proposed with a higher inherent signal to interference ratio than the true tripole, which also allows the nulling of the residual electromyogram signal. The reduction in interference is small because the electrode impedance is large compared to the source resistance. PMID:11008430

  1. Achieving a Safe Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure in the Prehospital Setting: Is It Time to Revise the Standard Cuff Inflation Practice?

    PubMed

    Carhart, Elliot; Stuck, Logan H; Salzman, Joshua G

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported unsafe endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff pressures (CP) in the prehospital environment. The purpose of this study was to identify an optimal cuff inflation volume (CIV) to achieve a safe CP (20-30 cmH2O). This observational study utilized 30 recently harvested ovine tracheae, which were warmed from refrigeration in a water bath at 85°F prior to testing. Each trachea was intubated with five different ETT sizes (6.0-8.0 mm), and each size tube was tested with six cuff inflation volumes (5-10 cc). The order of ETT size for each trachea and CIV for each size ETT was randomly pre-assigned. Data were descriptively summarized and categorized before mixed-effects logistic regression was used to determine optimal CIV. Only 113 CP measurements (12.6%, N = 900) were within the optimal range (M = 54.75 cmH2O, SD = 38.52), all of which resulted from a CIV 6 or 7 cc (61% and 39%, respectively). CIVs of 5 cc (n = 150) resulted in underinflation (<20 cmH2O) in all instances, while CIVs of 8, 9, or 10 cc (n = 150 each) resulted in overinflation (>30 cmH2O) in all instances, regardless of ETT size. The odds of achieving a safe CP were greater with CIV of 6 cc for tube sizes 6.0 (OR = 15.9, 95% CI = 3.85-65.58, p < 0.01) and 6.5 mm (OR = 3.16, 95% CI = 1.06-9.39, p = 0.039); however, there was no significant difference in the odds of achieving a safe CP between CIV of 6 and 7 cc for tube sizes 7.0, 7.5, or 8.0 mm. Neither trachea circumference (M = 7.11cm, SD = 0.40), nor tissue temperature (M = 81.32°F, SD = 0.93) were found to be significant predictors of CP (p = 0.20 and 0.81, respectively). Our study showed a high frequency of CP measurements outside of the desired norms. The CIV range of 6-7 cc resulted in the highest likelihood of achieving the desired cuff pressure range, while cuffs inflated with 8-10 cc resulted in dangerously high CPs in all instances. In the absence of a more ideal solution, the results of this study suggest that narrowing the recommended CIV from 5-10 cc to 6-7 cc might be a reasonable target for any tube size. PMID:26383171

  2. Tennis elbow surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery - discharge; Lateral tendinosis surgery - discharge; Lateral tennis elbow surgery - discharge ... had surgery to repair a tendon in your elbow . The surgeon made a cut (incision) over the ...

  3. Maze Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... patients may also receive a pacemaker during the surgery. Recovery Time You can expect to stay in the hospital for 5 to 7 days or longer, including at least 1 to 2 days in the ... control any fluid buildup after surgery. You may also need to take aspirin for ...

  4. Measurement of brachial artery endothelial function using a standard blood pressure cuff.

    PubMed

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Tison, Geoffrey H; Alley, Hugh F; Budinger, Thomas F; Owens, Christopher D; Olgin, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    The integrity of endothelial function in major arteries (EFMA) is a powerful independent predictor of heart attack and stroke. Existing ultrasound-based non-invasive assessment methods are technically challenging and suitable only for laboratory settings. EFMA, like blood pressure (BP), is both acutely and chronically affected by factors such as lifestyle and medication. Consequently, laboratory-based measurements cannot fully gauge the effects of medical interventions on EFMA. EFMA and BP have, arguably, comparable (but complementary) value in the assessment of cardiovascular health. Widespread deployment of EFMA assessment is thus a desirable clinical goal. To this end, we propose a device based on modifying the measurement protocol of a standard electronic sphygmomanometer. The protocol involves inflating the cuff to sub-diastolic levels to enable recording of the pulse waveform before and after vasodilatory stimulus. The mechanical unloading of the arterial wall provided by the cuff amplifies the distension that occurs with each pulse, which is measured as a pressure variation in the cuff. We show that the height of the rising edge of each pulse is proportional to the change in lumen area between diastole and systole. This allows the effect of vasodilatory stimuli on the artery to be measured with high sensitivity. We compare the proposed cuff flow-mediated dilation (cFMD) method to ultrasound flow-mediated dilation (uFMD). We find significant correlation (r = 0.55, p = 0.003, N = 27) between cFMD- and uFMD-based metrics obtained when the release of a 5 min cuff occlusion is employed to induce endothelial stimulus via reactive hyperemia. cFMD is approximately proportional to the square of uFMD, representing a typical increase in sensitivity to vasodilation of 300-600%. This study illustrates the potential for an individual to conveniently measure his/her EFMA by using a low-cost reprogrammed home sphygmomanometer. PMID:26393958

  5. Unnecessary surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Leape, L L

    1989-01-01

    The extent of unnecessary surgery has been the object of considerable speculation and occasional wild accusation in recent years. Most evidence of the existence of unnecessary surgery, such as information from studies of geographic variations and the results of second surgical opinion programs, is circumstantial. However, results from the few studies that have measured unnecessary surgery directly indicate that for some highly controversial operations the fraction that are unwarranted could be as high as 30 percent. Most unnecessary surgery results from physician uncertainty about the effectiveness of an operation. Elimination of this uncertainty requires more efficient production and dissemination of scientific information about clinical effectiveness. In the absence of adequate data from scientific studies, the use of a consensus of expert opinion, disseminated by means of comprehensive practice guidelines, offers the best opportunity to identify and eliminate unnecessary surgery. PMID:2668237

  6. Refractive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kellum, Keith

    2000-01-01

    The concept of surgically altering the eye to correct refractive errors has been considered for hundreds of years, but only in the past 60 years has interest grown considerably due to the development of modern refractive surgery techniques such as astigmatic keratotomies to correct astigmatism induced by cataract surgery and future technologies currently being investigated. Modern refractive surgery is more involved than setting the correct parameters on the laser. Patient selection and examination, proper technique, and postoperative follow-up for potential complications are essential for a successful refractive procedure. Critical evaluation of new techniques is vital to avoid the pitfall of overly exuberant enthusiasm for new and unproven methods of refractive surgery. Kellum K. Refractive surgery. The Ochsner Journal 2000; 2:164-167. PMID:21765686

  7. Rotating Wavepackets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Any free-particle wavepacket solution of Schrodinger's equation can be converted by differentiations to wavepackets rotating about the original direction of motion. The angular momentum component along the motion associated with this rotation is an integral multiple of [h-bar]. It is an "intrinsic" angular momentum: independent of origin and

  8. Rotating Wavepackets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Any free-particle wavepacket solution of Schrodinger's equation can be converted by differentiations to wavepackets rotating about the original direction of motion. The angular momentum component along the motion associated with this rotation is an integral multiple of [h-bar]. It is an "intrinsic" angular momentum: independent of origin and…

  9. The extracellular potential of a myelinated nerve fiber in an unbounded medium and in nerve cuff models.

    PubMed Central

    Struijk, J J

    1997-01-01

    A model is presented for the calculation of single myelinated fiber action potentials in an unbounded homogeneous medium and in nerve cuff electrodes. The model consists of a fiber model, used to calculate the action currents at the nodes of Ranvier, and a cylindrically symmetrical volume conductor model in which the fiber's nodes are represented as point current sources. The extracellular action potentials were shown to remain unchanged if the fiber diameter and the volume conductor geometry are scaled by the same factor (principle of corresponding states), both in an unbounded homogeneous medium and in an inhomogeneous volume conductor. The influence of several cuff electrode parameters, among others, cuff length and cuff diameter, were studied, and the results were compared, where possible, with theoretical and experimental results as reported in the literature. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:9168022

  10. Brain surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  11. Supergranulation rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schou, Jesper; Beck, John G.

    2001-01-01

    Simple convection models estimate the depth of supergranulation at approximately 15,000 km which suggests that supergranules should rotate at the rate of the plasma in the outer 2% of the Sun by radius. Previous measurements (Snodgrass & Ulrich, 1990; Beck & Schou, 2000) found that supergranules rotate significantly faster than this, with a size-dependent rotation rate. We expand on previous work and show that the torsional oscillation signal seen in the supergranules tracks that obtained for normal modes. We also find that the amplitudes and lifetimes of the supergranulation are size dependent.

  12. Bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Karmali, Shahzeer; Stoklossa, Carlene Johnson; Sharma, Arya; Stadnyk, Janet; Christiansen, Sandra; Cottreau, Danielle; Birch, Daniel W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To review the management of bariatric surgical patients. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched, as well as PubMed US National Library, from January 1950 to December 2009. Evidence was levels I, II, and III. MAIN MESSAGE Bariatric surgery should be considered for obese patients at high risk of morbidity and mortality who have not achieved adequate weight loss with lifestyle and medical management and who are suffering from the complications of obesity. Bariatric surgery can result in substantial weight loss, resolution of comorbid conditions, and improved quality of life. The patient’s weight-loss history; his or her personal accountability, responsibility, and comprehension; and the acceptable level of risk must be taken into account. Complications include technical failure, bleeding, abdominal pain, nausea or vomiting, excess loose skin, bowel obstruction, ulcers, and anastomotic stricture. Lifelong monitoring by a multidisciplinary team is essential. CONCLUSION Limited long-term success of behavioural and pharmacologic therapies in severe obesity has led to renewed interest in bariatric surgery. Success with bariatric surgery is more likely when multidisciplinary care providers, in conjunction with primary care providers, assess, treat, monitor, and evaluate patients before and after surgery. Family physicians will play a critical role in counseling patients about bariatric surgery and will need to develop skills in managing these patients in the long-term. PMID:20841586

  13. Could "safe practice" be compromising safe practice? Should anesthetists have to deflate the cuff of the endotracheal tube before extubation?

    PubMed

    Priebe, Hans J

    2016-02-01

    Deflation of the cuff of the endotracheal tube (ETT) before tracheal extubation is considered mandatory and safe practice. However, there are potential shortcomings associated with this practice (e.g., aspiration around the uncuffed ETT, loss of positive airway pressure, difficulty in generating an effective cough at the time of extubation). By contrast, keeping the cuff inflated during extubation will minimize the risk of tracheal aspiration around the ETT, and it will reliably allow maintenance of positive airway pressure until extubation, effective lung recruitment before extubation, and generation of an effective cough during extubation. All of these factors might reduce the overall risk of immediate postextubation and postoperative respiratory and pulmonary complications. Mandatory monitoring of cuff pressure ensures a remaining rather small, highly compressible cuff volume around the ETT which is unlikely to carry per se the risk of producing laryngeal trauma. In my view, as the overall advantages of not deflating the cuff before extubation outweigh the disadvantages, anesthetists should not have to deflate the cuff of the ETT before extubation. Ultimately, only a randomized controlled trial will be able to assess the effect of such practice on patient outcome. PMID:26126979

  14. Tennis elbow surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Lateral epicondylitis - surgery; Lateral tendinosis - surgery; Lateral tennis elbow - surgery ... Surgery to repair tennis elbow is usually an outpatient surgery. This means you will not stay in the hospital overnight. You will be given medicine ( ...

  15. Rotational Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockett, Keith

    1988-01-01

    Demonstrates several objects rolling down a slope to explain the energy transition among potential energy, translational kinetic energy, and rotational kinetic energy. Contains a problem from Galileo's rolling ball experiment. (YP)

  16. Solar rotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziembowski, W.

    Sunspot observations made by Johannes Hevelius in 1642 - 1644 are the first ones providing significant information about the solar differential rotation. In modern astronomy the determination of the rotation rate is done in a routine way by measuring positions of various structures on the solar surface as well as by studying the Doppler shifts of spectral lines. In recent years a progress in helioseismology enabled determination of the rotation rate in the layers inaccessible for direct observations. There are still uncertainties concerning, especially, the temporal variations of the rotation rate and its behaviour in the radiative interior. We are far from understanding the observations. Theoretical works have not yet resulted in a satisfactory model for the angular momentum transport in the convective zone.

  17. Effect of Alpine ski boot cuff release on knee joint force during the backward fall.

    PubMed

    Benoit, D L; Lamontagne, M; Greaves, C; Liti, A; Cerulli, G

    2005-01-01

    The modern rigid alpine ski boot has been associated with an increase in severe knee joint injuries. A new design that allows the rear portion of the upper cuff of the boot (rear spoiler) to open when a posterior directed force is applied to it (similar to when a skier falls back on the ski) is investigated. Motion analysis was combined with kinetic measures to estimate the shear and compressive forces at the knee joint using a link-segment model while subjects fell backward to provoke ski boot cuff release. The rear spoiler opening was found to reduce anterior cruciate ligament directed shear force while increasing compressive force at the joint. We conclude that both compressive force and reduced anterior cruciate directed shear force have been associated with protective mechanisms at the knee joint. This occurred over a very brief period of time, however, and the influence this may have on knee injury prevention is discussed. PMID:16440506

  18. A device for emulating cuff recordings of action potentials propagating along peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Robert; Schuettler, Martin; Chuang, Sheng-Chih

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes a device that emulates propagation of action potentials along a peripheral nerve, suitable for reproducible testing of bio-potential recording systems using nerve cuff electrodes. The system is a microcontroller-based stand-alone instrument which uses established nerve and electrode models to represent neural activity of real nerves recorded with a nerve cuff interface, taking into consideration electrode impedance, voltages picked up by the electrodes, and action potential propagation characteristics. The system emulates different scenarios including compound action potentials with selectable propagation velocities and naturally occurring nerve traffic from different velocity fiber populations. Measured results from a prototype implementation are reported and compared with in vitro recordings from Xenopus Laevis frog sciatic nerve, demonstrating that the electrophysiological setting is represented to a satisfactory degree, useful for the development, optimization and characterization of future recording systems. PMID:24760928

  19. Multielectrode nerve cuff stimulation of the median nerve produces selective movements in a raccoon animal model.

    PubMed

    Walter, J S; Griffith, P; Sweeney, J; Scarpine, V; Bidnar, M; McLane, J; Robinson, C

    1997-04-01

    In this study, an electrode system consisting of twelve small platinum dot electrodes imbedded in a spiral silicone rubber insulating cuff was used to investigate the feasibility of selective (regional) stimulation of the median nerves of the raccoon. Acute experiments in four raccoons consisted of functional responses observations, isometric force recordings from tendon attachments and postmortem fascicular mapping. Functional responses (elbow, wrist and/or digit flexion, pronation and/or thumb abduction) to selective stimulation were noted as dependent upon cuff electrode configuration (longitudinal tripole with and without field steering, as well as a transverse bipolar arrangement) and current level (threshold, 1/2 maximal, maximal). Muscle force recruitment curves (force as a function of stimulus amplitude) were plotted for flexor digitorum superficialis, flexor digitorum profundus, flexor carpi radialis, palmaris longus and pronator teres of three raccoons. Fascicular maps at the level of the nerve cuff were created indicating the approximate position of innervation to each of the aforementioned muscles, as well as other innervation such as paw fascicles, sensory fascicles, and elbow innervation (such as coracobrachialis). The greatest selectivity was observed at or near threshold current levels. In all four raccoons studied, a threshold electrode choice and stimulation strategy could be identified enabling selective production of either digit flexion, wrist flexion and/or digit and wrist flexion. It was possible to elicit a selective pronation response at threshold in three of the four animals. Selective elbow flexion at threshold could be produced in all four experiments. With stronger currents, additional movements were usually induced. The raccoon therefore appears to be a suitable, if challenging, animal model for further development of not only nerve cuff electrode approaches but perhaps other stimulation electrode technologies prior to human neuroprosthetic studies. PMID:9144615

  20. Selective control of muscle activation with a multipolar nerve cuff electrode.

    PubMed

    Veraart, C; Grill, W M; Mortimer, J T

    1993-07-01

    Acute experiments were performed on adult cats to study selective activation of medial gastrocnemius, soleus, tibialis anterior, and extensor digitorum longus with a cuff electrode. A spiral nerve cuff containing twelve "dot" electrodes was implanted around the sciatic nerve and evoked muscle twitch forces were recorded in six experiments. Spatially isolated "dot" electrodes in four geometries: monopolar, longitudinal tripolar, tripolar with four common anodes, and two parallel tripoles, were combined with transverse field steering current(s) from an anode(s) located 180 degrees around from the cathode(s) to activate different regions of the nerve trunk. To quantify the degree of selectivity, a selectivity index was defined as the ratio of the force in one muscle to the force in all four muscles in response to a particular stimulus. The selectivity index was used to construct recruitment curves for a muscle with the optimal degree of selectivity. Physiological responses were correlated with the anatomical structure of the sciatic nerve by identifying the nerve fascicles innervating the four muscles, and by determining the relative positions of the electrodes and the nerve fascicles. The results indicated that the use of transverse field steering current improved selectivity. We also found that tripoles with individual dot anodes were more selective than tripoles with four common dot anodes. Stimulation with two parallel tripoles was effective in activating selectively fascicles that could not be activated selectively with only a single tripole. The multipolar cuff proved an effective method to control selectively and progressively the force in muscles innervated by fascicles that were well defined at the level of the cuff. PMID:8244425

  1. Nail surgery.

    PubMed

    Haneke, Eckart

    2013-01-01

    Nail surgery is a special branch of hand and dermatologic surgery. It is not widely performed, and many physicians do not feel at ease to perform it. The objective of this contribution is to give a short overview of the most important surgical procedures in clinical practice. References from the literature and the author's own experiences are condensed to describe what a dermatologic practitioner with knowledge of the nail and some surgical skills can perform. Nail surgery is a precise technique that requires careful administration and attention to details. Proper patient preparation starts with a patient history to identify potential contraindications and to prevent unnecessary complications. The author recommends isopropyl alcohol scrub and chlorhexidine for disinfection and ropivacaine 1% for anesthesia. The technique used for anesthesia depends on the type of surgery. Surgical procedures are described for diagnostic biopsies, nail avulsion in general, onychogryposis, paronychia treatment, hematomas and bone fracture due to trauma, removal of subungual foreign bodies, ingrowing nails, pincer nails, warts, ungual fibrokeratomas, digital myxoid pseudocyst, subungual exostoses, and various tumors. If performed correctly with adequate skills, nail surgery will lead to functionally and aesthetically satisfying results in the majority of instances. PMID:24079580

  2. Optimal care and design of the tracheal cuff in the critically ill patient

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of non-invasive ventilation and high-flow nasal-oxygen therapy, intubation is still performed in a large proportion of critically ill patients. The aim of this narrative review is to discuss recent data on long-term intubation-related complications, such as microaspiration, and tracheal ischemic lesions. These complications are common in critically ill patients, and are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Recent data suggest beneficial effects of tapered cuffed tracheal tubes in reducing aspiration. However, clinical data are needed in critically ill patients to confirm this hypothesis. Polyurethane-cuffed tracheal tubes and continuous control of cuff pressure could be beneficial in preventing microaspiration and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). However, large multicenter studies are needed before recommending their routine use. Cuff pressure should be maintained between 20 and 30 cmH2O to prevent intubation-related complications. Tracheal ischemia could be prevented by manual or continuous control of cuff pressure. PMID:24572178

  3. A nerve cuff technique for selective excitation of peripheral nerve trunk regions.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, J D; Ksienski, D A; Mortimer, J T

    1990-07-01

    Numerical modeling and experimental testing of a nerve cuff technique for selective stimulation of superficial peripheral nerve trunk regions is presented. Two basic electrode configurations ("snug" cuff monopolar and tripolar longitudinally aligned dots) have been considered. In addition, the feasibility of "steering" excitation into superficial nerve trunk regions using subthreshold levels of current flow from an electrode dot located on the opposite side of the nerve has been tested. Modeling objectives were to solve for the electric field that would be generated within a representative nerve trunk by each electrode configuration; and to use a simple nerve cable model to predict the effectiveness of each configuration in producing localized excitation. In three acute experiments on cat sciatic nerve the objective was to characterize the effectiveness of each electrode configuration in selectively activating only the medial gastrocnemius muscle. Modeling and experimentation both suggest that longitudinally aligned tripolar dot electrodes on the surface of a nerve trunk, and bounded by a layer of insulation (such as a nerve cuff), will restrict excitation to superficial nerve trunk regions more successfully than will monopolar dot electrodes. Excitation "steering" will improve the spatial selectivity of both monopolar and tripolar electrode configurations. PMID:2394459

  4. Fascicular selectivity in transverse stimulation with a nerve cuff electrode: a theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Deurloo, Kirsten E I; Holsheimer, Jan; Bergveld, Piet

    2003-10-01

    The performance of cathode-anode configurations in a cuff electrode to stimulate a single fascicle in a nerve trunk has been investigated theoretically. A three-dimensional volume conductor model of a nerve trunk with four fascicles in a cuff electrode and a model of myelinated nerve fiber stimulation were used to calculate the recruitment of 15 m fibers in each fascicle. The effect of a monopole, a transverse bipole (anode opposite the cathode), and a narrow transverse tripole (guarded cathode) in selectively stimulating 15 m fibers in each fascicle has been quantified and presented as recruitment curves. It is predicted that selective fascicle stimulation is advanced most by stimulation with a bipole in a plane perpendicular to the axis of the nerve trunk. Monopoles and conventional longitudinal tripoles perform less well, as does a longitudinal tripole with an additional "steering" anode. Apart from transverse bipolar stimulation an additional anode may be used to maximally fit the area of excitation to the topography of the fascicle to be recruited. As compared to monopolar and longitudinal tripolar stimulation, the slope of the recruitment curves in transverse bipolar stimulation is reduced considerably, thus allowing improved fine tuning of nerve (and thus force) recruitment. Another advantage of this method is a minimal number of cable connections to the cuff electrode. The cost of the improved selectivity is an increased stimulation current. PMID:22151073

  5. Novel Cuff Design to Facilitate Anastomosis of Small Vessels During Cervical Heterotopic Heart Transplantation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fensterer, Tathyana F; Miller, Cynthia J; Perez-Abadia, Gustavo; Maldonado, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Cervical heterotopic heart transplantation in rodents is a useful tool for studying transplantation immunology. However, end-to-end anastomosis of small-diameter vessels by using standard microsurgical technique is technically difficult and can require prolonged graft ischemia. A novel cuff system was designed from polyethylene tubing to allow anastomosis of vessels with internal luminal diameters of 0.3 to 0.9 mm. Key features include a spring-like adjustable lumen to facilitate vessel eversion, a barb to hold vessel ends in place after eversion, and a handling system that allows easy manipulation and stabilization of cuffs by a single operator. After a training period, a single operator performed a series of 8 transplants in which the mean warm ischemic time of grafts was 8.5 ± 2.9 min. Here we provide a detailed description of how to construct and perform end-to-end vessel anastomosis by using our novel cuff system. The discussion of the technique is supplemented with tips learned during the process of developing a reliable experimental model. PMID:25296016

  6. Association of Oversized Tracheal Tubes and Cuff Overinsufflation With Postintubation Tracheal Ruptures

    PubMed Central

    Sudhoff, Tobias H.; Seidl, Rainer O.; Estel, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Postintubation tracheal ruptures (PTR) are rare but cause severe complications. Our objective was to investigate the tracheal pattern of injury resulting from cuff inflation of the tracheal tube, to study the two main factors responsible for PTR (cuff overinsufflation and inapplicable tube sizes), and to explain the context, why small women are particularly susceptible to PTR. Methods Experimental study performed on 28 fresh human laryngotracheal specimens (16 males, 12 females) within 24 hours post autopsy. Artificial ventilation was simulated by using an underwater construction and a standard tracheal tube. Tube sizes were selected according to our previously published nomogram. Tracheal lesions were detected visually and tracheal diameters measured. The influence of body size, sex difference and appropriate tube size were investigated according to patient height. Results In all 28 cases, the typical tracheal lesion pattern was a longitudinal median rupture of the posterior trachea. Appropriate tube sizes according to body size caused PTR with significantly higher cuff pressure when compared with oversized tubes. An increased risk of PTR was found in shorter patients, when oversized tubes were used. Sex difference did not have any significant influence. Conclusion This experimental model provides information about tracheal patterns in PTR for the first time. The model confirms by experiment the observations of case series in PTR patients, and therefore emphasizes the importance of correct tube size selection according to patient height. This minimizes the risk of PTR, especially in shorter patients, who have an increased risk of PTR when oversized tubes are used. PMID:26622963

  7. Laparoscopic Transvesical Resection of an En Bloc Bladder Cuff and Distal Ureter during Nephroureterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Giannakopoulos, Stilianos; Toufas, George; Dimitriadis, Charalampos; Giannopoulos, Stavros; Kalaitzis, Christos; Bantis, Athanasios; Patris, Emmanuel; Touloupidis, Stavros

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The most appropriate technique for excising the distal ureter and bladder cuff during laparoscopic nephroureterectomy is still debated. We report our experience with a pure laparoscopic transvesical method that duplicates the long-standing open transvesical approach. Materials and Methods. Seven men and three women diagnosed with upper tract transitional cell carcinoma were treated with this procedure. Three intravesical ports were inserted, and pneumovesicum was established at 12 mmHg. Transvesical laparoscopic circumferential detachment of the bladder cuff and en bloc mobilization of the last centimeters of the distal ureter were performed, followed by the closure of the bladder defect. Subsequently, a nephrectomy was performed either laparoscopically or using an open flank approach. Results. The median age was 68.5 years. The procedure was completed uneventfully in all cases. The median operating time for distal ureter excision was 82.5 minutes (range 55–120). No complications directly related to the pneumovesicum method were recorded. The median follow-up period was 31 months (range 12–55). During the follow-up period, two patients (20%) died from the disease, and a bladder tumor developed in three cases (30%). Conclusion. The laparoscopic transvesical resection of the en bloc bladder cuff and distal ureter is a reliable, effective, and oncologically safe technique, at least in the midterm. PMID:23049475

  8. The Effect of Arthroscopic Rotator Interval Closure on Glenohumeral Volume.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Brent A; Rosenzweig, Seth D; Sheppard, Evan D; Jennings, Jonathan K; Thompson, Kevin J

    2015-06-01

    The role of rotator interval in shoulder pathology and the effect of its closure are not well understood. In addition, the effect of rotator interval closure on intra-articular glenohumeral volume (GHV) remains unknown. We conducted a study to quantify the GHV reduction obtained with an arthroscopic rotator interval closure and to determine whether medial and lateral interval closures resulted in different degrees of volume reduction. We dissected 8 fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders (mean age, 64.4 years) to the level of the rotator cuff. Volumetric measurements were taken before and after medial and lateral rotator interval closure incorporating the superior glenohumeral ligament and the upper portion of the subscapularis. Arthroscopic closure of the rotator interval with 2 sutures reduced GHV by a mean of 45%. More volume reduction resulted with use of a single lateral interval closure stitch than with use of a single medial stitch (35% vs 24%; P < .02). Arthroscopic rotator interval closure with 2 plication stitches is a powerful tool in reducing intracapsular volume of the shoulder and may be a useful adjunct in restoring glenohumeral stability. If a single plication stitch is preferred, a lateral stitch (vs a medial stitch) can be used for a significantly larger reduction in shoulder volume. PMID:26047004

  9. [Metabolic surgery].

    PubMed

    Jurowich, C; Germer, C T; Seyfried, F; Thalheimer, A

    2012-06-01

    The prevalence of obesity and diabetes mellitus type 2 is constantly rising worldwide and is one of the most threatening global health and health economic problems. Whereas bariatric surgery is well established in the treatment of morbid obesity, the surgical treatment options for type 2 diabetes mellitus alone are still under discussion (metabolic surgery). Bariatric procedures differ considering weight loss and influencing associated comorbidities. Detailed knowledge of available surgical treatment options for morbid obesity, the risks and requirements of laparoscopic skills, effectiveness and, as far as already known, mechanisms of action are crucial for appropriate implementation. PMID:22695815

  10. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  11. Carotid artery surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  12. Preprosthetic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ephros, Hillel; Klein, Robert; Sallustio, Anthony

    2015-08-01

    Preprosthetic oral and maxillofacial surgery has changed dramatically over the last 3 decades. Surgical preparation for dentures has been displaced by site development for implants. Nonetheless, there is still a role to play for several preprosthetic procedures. In this article, historical context is provided, enduring concepts are reviewed, and procedures that remain relevant are described and discussed. PMID:26231818

  13. Cosmetic surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    The psychotherapeutic nature of cosmetic surgery is emphasised by outlining the range of symptoms from which patients suffer and by explaining the sequence of psychological reactions which cause them. The principles which govern the selection of patients are defined. A brief account of each of the main cosmetic operations is given together with notes on their limitations and risks. PMID:2589786

  14. Arthroscopic Surgery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Arthroscopic surgery (or microsurgery) is a significant breakthrough in treating knee injuries. Its applications range from basic diagnosis to arthroscopic menisectomy, although its use in some procedures is still highly controversial. Many surgeons perform the diagnostic procedure, but follow this with the conventional surgical approach.…

  15. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  16. Rhabdomyosarcoma: Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... on an arm or leg. Some types of surgery might need to be done by special surgeons. For example, removing tumors in the head and neck area may require surgical teams with ENT (ear, nose, and throat) surgeons, plastic surgeons, maxillofacial surgeons, and neurosurgeons. If a tumor is large ...

  17. Fetal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Laberge, Jean-Martin

    1986-01-01

    Fetal surgery has come of age. For decades experimental fetal surgery proved essential in studying normal fetal physiology and development, and pathophysiology of congenital defects. Clinical fetal surgery started in the 1960s with intrauterine transfusions. In the 1970s, the advent of ultrasonography revolutionized fetal diagnosis and created a therapeutic vacuum. Fetal treatment, medical and surgical, is slowly trying to fill the gap. Most defects detected are best treated after birth, some requiring a modification in the time, mode and place of delivery for optimal obstetrical and neonatal care. Surgical intervention in utero should be considered for malformations that cause progressive damage to the fetus, leading to death or severe morbidity; that can be corrected or palliated in utero with a reasonable expectation of normal postnatal development; that cannot wait to be corrected after birth, even considering pre-term delivery; that are not accompanied by chromosomal or other major anomalies. At present, congenital hydronephrosis is the most common indication for fetal surgery, followed by obstructive hydrocephalus. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia also fulfills the criteria, but its correction poses more problems, and no clinical attempts have been reported so far. In the future many other malformations or diseases may become best treated in utero. The ethical and moral issues are complex and need to be discussed as clinical and experimental progress is made. PMID:21267309

  18. Cardiac and Vascular Responses to Thigh Cuffs and Respiratory Maneuvers on Crewmembers of the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Douglas; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Garcia, Kathleen; Ebert, Douglas; Whitson, Peggy A.; Feiveson, Alan; Alferova, Irina V.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Matveev, Vladimir P.; Bogomolov, Valery V.; Duncan, J. Michael

    2011-01-01

    The transition to microgravity eliminates the hydrostatic gradients in the vascular system. The resulting fluid redistribution commonly manifests as facial edema, engorgement of the external neck veins, and a decrease in leg diameter. This experiment examined the responses to modified Valsalva and Mueller maneuvers measured by cardiac and vascular ultrasound (ECHO) in a baseline steady state and during preload reduction introduced with thigh occlusion cuffs used as a counter-measure device (Braslet cuffs) measured by cardiac and vascular ultrasound examinations. Methods: Nine International Space Station crewmember subjects (Expeditions 16 - 20) were examined in 15 experiment sessions 101 +/- 46.days after launch (mean +/- SD; 33 - 185). Twenty Seven cardiac and vascular parameters were obtained with/without respiratory maneuvers before and after tightening of the Braslet cuffs. Results: Non-physicians performed diagnostic-quality cardiac and vascular ultrasound examinations using remote guidance. Three of 27 combinations of maneuvers and Braslet or Braslet alone were identified as being significant changed when compared to baseline. Eleven of 81 differences between combinations of Mueller, Valsalva or baseline were significant and related to cardiac preload reduction or increase in lower extremity venous volume. Conclusions: Acute application of Braslet occlusion cuffs causes lower extremity fluid sequestration and exerts commensurate measurable effects on cardiac performance in microgravity. Ultrasound techniques to measure the hemodynamic effects of thigh cuffs in combination with respiratory maneuvers may serve as an invaluable tool in determining the volume status of the cardiac patient at the 'microgravity bedside'.

  19. Local perivascular delivery of anti-restenotic agents from a drug-eluting poly(epsilon-caprolactone) stent cuff.

    PubMed

    Pires, Nuno M M; van der Hoeven, Barend L; de Vries, Margreet R; Havekes, Louis M; van Vlijmen, Bart J; Hennink, Wim E; Quax, Paul H A; Jukema, J Wouter

    2005-09-01

    The introduction of drug-eluting stents (DES) to prevent in-stent restenosis is one of the major advances in interventional cardiology. Currently many types of DES are under evaluation for effectiveness and safety, a time-consuming and difficult procedure in humans. An animal model that allows rapid evaluation of the present and upcoming therapeutic approaches to prevent in-stent restenosis is most valuable and still lacking. Here, a perivascular cuff to induce restenosis was constructed of a poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) formulation suitable for the controlled delivery of drugs. Placing the PCL cuff around the femoral artery, in vivo, resulted in reproducible restenosis-like lesions containing predominantly smooth muscle-actin positive cells. Loading the cuff with the anti-restenotic compounds paclitaxel and rapamycin resulted, in vitro, in a sustained and dose-dependent release for at least 3 weeks. Paclitaxel- and rapamycin-eluting PCL cuffs placed around the femoral artery of mice in vivo significantly reduced intimal thickening by 76 +/- 2% and 75 +/- 6%, respectively, at 21 days. Perivascular sustained release of both anti-restenotic agents is restricted to the cuffed vessel segment with no systemic adverse effects or effect on cuffed contralateral femoral arteries. Drug-eluting PCL cuffs provide an easy and rapid tool to evaluate anti-restenotic agents to be used in combination with the DES strategies. PMID:15814137

  20. An MRI-based leg model used to simulate biomechanical phenomena during cuff algometry: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Manafi-Khanian, Bahram; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Cuff pressure stimulation is applicable for assessing deep-tissue pain sensitivity by exciting a variety of deep-tissue nociceptors. In this study, the relative transfer of biomechanical stresses and strains from the cuff via the skin to the muscle and the somatic tissue layers around bones were investigated. Cuff pressure was applied on the lower leg at three different stimulation intensities (mild pressure to pain). Three-dimensional finite element models including bones and three different layers of deep tissues were developed based on magnetic resonance images (MRI). The skin indentation maps at mild pressure, pain threshold, and intense painful stimulations were extracted from MRI and applied to the model. The mean stress under the cuff position around tibia was 4.6, 4.9 and around fibula 14.8, 16.4 times greater than mean stress of muscle surface in the same section at pain threshold and intense painful stimulations, respectively. At the same stimulation intensities, the mean strains around tibia were 36.4, 42.3 % and around fibula 32.9, 35.0 %, respectively, of mean strain on the muscle surface. Assuming strain as the ideal stimulus for nociceptors the results suggest that cuff algometry is less capable to challenge the nociceptors of tissues around bones as compared to more superficially located muscles. PMID:25916888

  1. Nerve cuff recordings of muscle afferent activity from tibial and peroneal nerves in rabbit during passive ankle motion.

    PubMed

    Riso, R R; Mosallaie, F K; Jensen, W; Sinkjaer, T

    2000-06-01

    Activity from muscle afferents regarding ankle kinesthesia was recorded using cuff electrodes in a rabbit preparation in which tactile input from the foot was eliminated. The purpose was to determine if such activity can provide information useful in controlling functional electrical stimulation (FES) systems that restore mobility in spinal injured man. The rabbit's ankle was passively flexed and extended while the activity of the tibial and peroneal nerves was recorded. Responses to trapezoidal stimulus profiles were investigated for excursions from 10 degrees to 60 degrees using velocities from 5 degrees/s to 30 degrees/s and different initial ankle positions. The recorded signals mainly reflect activity from primary and secondary muscle afferents. Dorsiflexion stretched the ankle extensors and produced velocity dependent activity in the tibial nerve, and this diminished to a tonic level during the stimulus plateau. The peroneal nerve was silent during dorsiflexion, but was activated by stretch of the peroneal muscles during ankle extension. The responses of the two nerves behaved in a reciprocal manner, but exhibited considerable hysteresis, since motion that relaxed the stretch to the driving muscle produced an immediate cessation of the prior stretch induced activity. A noted difference between the tibial and peroneal nerve responses is that the range of joint position change that activated the flexor afferents was greater then for the extensor afferents. Ankle rotation at higher velocities increased the dynamic stretch evoked responses during the stimulus ramp but showed no effect on the tonic activity during the stimulus plateau. Prestretching the muscles by altering the initial position increased the response to the ramp movement, however, for the peroneal nerve, when the prestretch brought the flexor muscles near to their maximal lengths, the response to additional stretch provided by the ramp movement was diminished. The results indicate that the whole nerve recorded muscle afferent activity may be useful for control of FES assisted standing, because it can indicate the direction of rotation of the passively moved ankle joint, along with coarse information regarding the rate of movement and static joint position. PMID:10896197

  2. Lung Carcinoid Tumor: Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... for lung carcinoid tumor symptoms Surgery to treat lung carcinoid tumors Surgery is the main treatment for ... often be cured by surgery alone. Types of lung surgery Different operations can be used to treat ( ...

  3. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) Surgery for breast cancer Most women with breast cancer have some type ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  4. Scoliosis surgery - child

    MedlinePlus

    Spinal curvature surgery - child; Kyphoscoliosis surgery - child; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery - child; VATS - child ... Before surgery, your child will receive general anesthesia. This will make ... and unable to feel pain during the operation. During ...

  5. Preparing for Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Preparing for Surgery Home For Patients Search FAQs Preparing for Surgery ... Surgery FAQ080, August 2011 PDF Format Preparing for Surgery Gynecologic Problems What is the difference between outpatient ...

  6. Ear Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Plastic Surgery Ear Plastic Surgery Patient Health Information News media ... weight earrings. Does Insurance Pay for Cosmetic Ear Surgery? Insurance usually does not cover surgery solely for ...

  7. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... treated? Next Topic Radiation therapy for breast cancer Surgery for breast cancer Most women with breast cancer ... common types of breast cancer surgery. Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) This type of surgery removes only a ...

  8. Plastic Surgery for Teenagers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery for Teenagers Plastic Surgery For Teenagers Briefing Paper Teenagers who want to have plastic surgery usually ... 669-678. Share Related Links Plastic Surgery Briefing Papers Find Your Surgeon Please enter a search Menu ...

  9. What Is Refractive Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ...

  10. LASIK - Laser Eye Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ...

  11. Alternative Refractive Surgery Procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ...

  12. Bloodless surgery in geriatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Guarino, Salvatore; Di Matteo, Filippo; Sorrenti, Salvatore; Greco, Roberto; Nardi, Matteo; Favoriti, Pasqualino; De Antoni, Enrico; Filippini, Angelo; Catania, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    In bloodless surgery a series of measures has to be implemented to reduce the perioperative need for transfusion of whole blood or its components. Jehovah's Witness are the most representative group of patients opting for bloodless surgery as their faith follows strict believes that prohibits receiving blood. Geriatric patients requiring bloodless surgery are even more delicate and represent a challenge for surgeons. The physiological response of the over 65 year population to decreased hemoglobin level is slower and less effective than in young and adult patients. Herby we describe the perioperative protocol implemented in our surgical Department offered to geriatric Jehovah's Witness patients. Preoperative optimization of the patients is the key step in the preparation period. Intraoperative anesthetic and surgical measures are also required along with a strict postoperative follow-up. From our experience, bloodless surgery is feasible in the geriatric population as long as it is performed in specialized centers where a multidisciplinary team is prepared to specifically manage this scenario. Rigorous patients selection and preparation are mandatory. PMID:25183638

  13. [Tumor surgery].

    PubMed

    Hausamen, J E

    2000-05-01

    Surgery is still the primary therapeutic approach in treatment of tumors in the head and neck area, dating back to the early nineteenth century. More than 150 years ago, hemimaxillectomies and mandibular resections as well as hemiglossectomies were already performed by leading surgeons. The block principle we are now following dates back to Crile, who also established the principle of cervical lymph node dissection. Ablative oncologic surgery has always been closely linked with plastic and reconstructive surgery, rendering radical surgical interventions possible without disfiguring patients. The development of facial reconstructive surgery proceeded in stages, in the first instance as secondary reconstruction using tube pedicled flaps. The change to the concept of primary reconstruction occurred via arterialized skin flaps and myocutaneous flaps to the widely accepted and performed free tissue transfer. Free bone grafting, inaugurated earlier and still representing the majority of bone grafting, has been supplemented for certain reconstructive purposes by free vascularized bone transfer from various donor sites. Although the five-year-survival rate of carcinoma of the oral cavity has remained unchanged in the past 30 years, distinctive improvements in tumor surgery can be recorded. This is primarily based on improved diagnostics such as modern imaging techniques and the refinement of surgical techniques. The DOSAK has worked out distinctive guidelines for effective ablative oncologic surgery. Surgical approaches offering wide exposure and carrying low morbidity play a decisive role in radical resections. For this reason, midfacial degloving offers an essential improvement for the resection of midface tumors, especially from an aesthetic point of view. Tumors situated deep behind the viscerocranium at the skull base can be clearly exposed either through a lateral approach following a temporary osteotomy of the mandibular ramus or a transmandibular, transmaxillar, or transfacial approach with minimal morbidity. Concerning the concept of neck dissection, radical techniques are more and more abandoned in favor of a more conservative procedure. Actual inquiries concerning present surgical procedures as to the surgical strategy in "N(o)-neck" or marginal and segmental resection in mandibular adherent carcinomas demand scientific clarification. PMID:10938654

  14. Spine surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... discharge; Microdecompression - discharge; Laminotomy - discharge; Disk removal - discharge; Spine surgery - diskectomy - discharge; Intervertebral foramina - discharge; Spine surgery - foraminotomy - ...

  15. Continuous endotracheal tube cuff pressure control system protects against ventilator-associated pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The use of a system for continuous control of endotracheal tube cuff pressure reduced the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in one randomized controlled trial (RCT) with 112 patients but not in another RCT with 142 patients. In several guidelines on the prevention of VAP, the use of a system for continuous or intermittent control of endotracheal cuff pressure is not reviewed. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of VAP in a large sample of patients (n = 284) treated with either continuous or intermittent control of endotracheal tube cuff pressure. Methods We performed a prospective observational study of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation during more than 48 hours in an intensive care unit (ICU) using either continuous or intermittent endotracheal tube cuff pressure control. Multivariate logistic regression analysis (MLRA) and Cox proportional hazard regression analysis were used to predict VAP. The magnitude of the effect was expressed as odds ratio (OR) or hazard ratio (HR), respectively, and 95% confidence interval (CI). Results We found a lower incidence of VAP with the continuous (n = 150) than with the intermittent (n = 134) pressure control system (22.0% versus 11.2%; p = 0.02). MLRA showed that the continuous pressure control system (OR = 0.45; 95% CI = 0.22-0.89; p = 0.02) and the use of an endotracheal tube incorporating a lumen for subglottic secretion drainage (SSD) (OR = 0.39; 95% CI = 0.19-0.84; p = 0.02) were protective factors against VAP. Cox regression analysis showed that the continuous pressure control system (HR = 0.45; 95% CI = 0.24-0.84; p = 0.01) and the use of an endotracheal tube incorporating a lumen for SSD (HR = 0.29; 95% CI = 0.15-0.56; p < 0.001) were protective factors against VAP. However, the interaction between type of endotracheal cuff pressure control system (continuous or intermittent) and endotracheal tube (with or without SSD) was not statistically significant in MLRA (OR = 0.41; 95% CI = 0.07-2.37; p = 0.32) or in Cox analysis (HR = 0.35; 95% CI = 0.06-1.84; p = 0.21). Conclusions The use of a continuous endotracheal cuff pressure control system and/or an endotracheal tube with a lumen for SSD could help to prevent VAP in patients requiring more than 48 hours of mechanical ventilation. PMID:24751286

  16. Difficulty with cuff deflation of reinforced tracheal tube caused by inflation line occlusion with silk thread ligation and fixation.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Sayoko; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Imai, Eriko; Kawamata, Mikito

    2015-01-01

    A reinforced tracheal tube, ligated with silk threads, was inserted into a tracheostomy orifice and fixed to the skin. The cuff inflation line of the reinforced tracheal tube became occluded. Reinforced 'armoured' tracheal tubes have a spiral of wire embedded into the wall of the tube to give strength and flexibility, and may be sharply bent without compromising the tube lumen. The tracheal cuff attached to the tube is inflated by injecting air through a narrow-diameter tube welded to the outside of the tracheal tube. When a reinforced tracheal tube is ligated and fixed with silk threads, it should be confirmed whether the tracheal tube cuff can be deflated and inflated after fixation. Moreover, because occlusion can be eliminated by removing all silk threads used to ligate a tracheal tube, they should be removed before extubation. PMID:25743860

  17. Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure Assessment: Education May Improve but not Guarantee the Safety of Palpation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Seyed Siamdoust, Seyed Alireza; Mohseni, Masood; Memarian, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Background: Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure (ETCP) should be kept in the range of 20 - 30 cm H2O. Earlier studies suggested that ETCP assessment by palpation of pilot balloon results in overinflation or underinflation and subsequent complications such as tracheal wall damage and aspiration. Objectives: The current study aimed to evaluate the effect of an in vitro educational program on the ability of anesthesia personnel to inflate Endotracheal Tube Cuffs (ETT) within safe pressure limits. Patients and Methods: The survey included two series of blinded ETCP measurements in intubated patients before and two weeks after an in vitro educational intervention. The in vitro educational program included two separate trials. The anesthesia personnel were asked to inflate an ETT cuff inserted in a tracheal model using their usual inflation technique. In the same session, six ETTs at different pressure levels were examined by the participants and their estimation of ETCP was recorded. After the in vitro assessment, the participants were informed about the actual pressure of the in vitro ETCPs and were allowed to train their fingers by in vitro pilot balloon palpation with validated manometer measurements. Results: The mean ETCP after the in vitro survey was significantly lower than the mean ETCP before the intervention (45 ± 13 vs. 51 ± 15 cm H2O, P = 0.002). The rate of measurements within the safe pressure limits significantly improved after the in vitro education (24.2% vs. 39.7%, P = 0.002). Conclusions: Implementing educational programs with the introduction of estimation techniques besides the use of manometer as a standard intraoperative monitoring will improve the safety of the practice. PMID:26161313

  18. Design, fabrication and evaluation of a conforming circumpolar peripheral nerve cuff electrode for acute experimental use

    PubMed Central

    Foldes, Emily L.; Ackermann, D. Michael; Bhadra, Niloy; Kilgore, Kevin L.; Bhadra, Narendra

    2011-01-01

    Nerve cuff electrodes are a principle tool of basic and applied electro-neurophysiology studies and are championed for their ability to achieve good nerve recruitment with low thresholds. We describe the design and method of fabrication for a novel circumpolar peripheral nerve electrode for acute experimental use. This cylindrical cuff-style electrode provides approximately 270 degrees of radial electrode contact with a nerve for each of an arbitrary number of contacts, has a profile that allows for simple placement and removal in an acute nerve preparation, and is designed for adjustment of the cylindrical diameter to ensure a close fit on the nerve. For each electrode, the electrical contacts were cut from 25 µm platinum foil as an array so as to maintain their positions relative to each other within the cuff. Lead wires were welded to each intended contact. The structure was then molded in silicone elastomer, after which the individual contacts were electrically isolated. The final electrode was curved into a cylindrical shape with an inner diameter corresponding to that of the intended target nerve. The positions of these contacts were well maintained during the molding and shaping process and failure rates during fabrication due to contact displacements were very low. Established electrochemical measurements were made on one electrode to confirm expected behavior for a platinum electrode and to measure the electrode impedance to applied voltages at different frequencies. These electrodes have been successfully used for nerve stimulation, recording, and conduction block in a number of different acute animal experiments by several investigators. PMID:21187115

  19. Robot-Assisted Minimally Invasive Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery Operation

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Most people rotate through and they do fine. Robotic surgery requires a little bit of expertise and ... physician assistant is [Aaron Murstoka]. Head nurse of robotics is [Sara Harrick]. And the rest of these ...

  20. An Irrigation Suction System Using a Pressurized Fluid High-Flow Pump System in Comparison with a Standard Cuff Pressure System: Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Murai, Yasuo; Matano, Fumihiro; Toda, Shigeki; Kobayashi, Shiro; Morita, Akio

    2016-05-01

    Objective In neurosurgical operations, such as clipping of ruptured cerebral aneurysms, irrigation of the operative field is a basic and extremely important surgical technique. Various irrigation-suction (IS) systems have been marketed for irrigation of operative fields in neurosurgery. However, with these devices, we often must increase the cuff pressure to maintain fluid power and change the fluid bag relatively frequently. We report the usefulness of pressurized irrigation fluid with the Niagara high-flow irrigation system (NI). Method Using both the NI system and an IS, we altered pressure and duration to investigate differences in flow rate. Results There was no change in flow rate 80 minutes after pressurization of the NI system, and flow rates decreased slightly. Additionally, flow rates using NI were sensitive to changes in pressure. Conclusion This system has reduced the workload of assisting nurses and surgeons during surgery. Thus we consider the technique to be very useful for neurosurgical operations that require delicate procedures. PMID:25915502

  1. Application of layered poly (L-lactic acid) cell free scaffold in a rabbit rotator cuff defect model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the application of a layered cell free poly (L-lactic acid) (PLLA) scaffold to regenerate an infraspinatus tendon defect in a rabbit model. We hypothesized that PLLA scaffold without cultivated cells would lead to regeneration of tissue with mechanical properties similar to reattached infraspinatus without tendon defects. Methods Layered PLLA fabric with a smooth surface on one side and a pile-finished surface on the other side was used. Novel form of layered PLLA scaffold was created by superimposing 2 PLLA fabrics. Defects of the infraspinatus tendon were created in 32 rabbits and the PLLA scaffolds were transplanted, four rabbits were used as normal control. Contralateral infraspinatus tendons were reattached to humeral head without scaffold implantation. Histological and mechanical evaluations were performed at 4, 8, and 16 weeks after operation. Results At 4 weeks postoperatively, cell migration was observed in the interstice of the PLLA fibers. Regenerated tissue was directly connected to the bone composed mainly of type III collagen, at 16 weeks postoperatively. The ultimate failure load increased in a time-dependent manner and no statistical difference was seen between normal infraspinatus tendon and scaffold group at 8 and 16 weeks postoperatively. There were no differences between scaffold group and reattach group at each time of point. The stiffness did not improve significantly in both groups. Conclusions A novel form of layered PLLA scaffold has the potential to induce cell migration into the scaffold and to bridge the tendon defect with mechanical properties similar to reattached infraspinatus tendon model. PMID:22136125

  2. Rotating melter

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.

    1985-06-11

    A horizontally disposed helical coil is positioned around and in communication with a hollow horizontal shaft extending lengthwise of a tank having oppositely disposed inlet and outlet ports. Hot oil is directed into the hollow shaft and circulated through the helical coil and a device rotates the hollow shaft and helical coil so that pieces of solidified coal tar or a similar material introduced through the inlet port of the tank and directed into the helical coil are simultaneously melted, agitated, and conveyed thereby toward the outlet port.

  3. Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To conduct an evidence-based analysis of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery. Background Obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) of at last 30 kg/m2.1 Morbid obesity is defined as a BMI of at least 40 kg/m2 or at least 35 kg/m2 with comorbid conditions. Comorbid conditions associated with obesity include diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemias, obstructive sleep apnea, weight-related arthropathies, and stress urinary incontinence. It is also associated with depression, and cancers of the breast, uterus, prostate, and colon, and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Obesity is also associated with higher all-cause mortality at any age, even after adjusting for potential confounding factors like smoking. A person with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 has about a 50% higher risk of dying than does someone with a healthy BMI. The risk more than doubles at a BMI of 35 kg/m2. An expert estimated that about 160,000 people are morbidly obese in Ontario. In the United States, the prevalence of morbid obesity is 4.7% (1999–2000). In Ontario, the 2004 Chief Medical Officer of Health Report said that in 2003, almost one-half of Ontario adults were overweight (BMI 25–29.9 kg/m2) or obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2). About 57% of Ontario men and 42% of Ontario women were overweight or obese. The proportion of the population that was overweight or obese increased gradually from 44% in 1990 to 49% in 2000, and it appears to have stabilized at 49% in 2003. The report also noted that the tendency to be overweight and obese increases with age up to 64 years. BMI should be used cautiously for people aged 65 years and older, because the “normal” range may begin at slightly above 18.5 kg/m2 and extend into the “overweight” range. The Chief Medical Officer of Health cautioned that these data may underestimate the true extent of the problem, because they were based on self reports, and people tend to over-report their height and under-report their weight. The actual number of Ontario adults who are overweight or obese may be higher. Diet, exercise, and behavioural therapy are used to help people lose weight. The goals of behavioural therapy are to identify, monitor, and alter behaviour that does not help weight loss. Techniques include self-monitoring of eating habits and physical activity, stress management, stimulus control, problem solving, cognitive restructuring, contingency management, and identifying and using social support. Relapse, when people resume old, unhealthy behaviour and then regain the weight, can be problematic. Drugs (including gastrointestinal lipase inhibitors, serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, and appetite suppressants) may be used if behavioural interventions fail. However, estimates of efficacy may be confounded by high rates of noncompliance, in part owing to the side effects of the drugs. In addition, the drugs have not been approved for indefinite use, despite the chronic nature of obesity. The Technology Morbidly obese people may be eligible for bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery for morbid obesity is considered an intervention of last resort for patients who have attempted first-line forms of medical management, such as diet, increased physical activity, behavioural modification, and drugs. There are various bariatric surgical procedures and several different variations for each of these procedures. The surgical interventions can be divided into 2 general types: malabsorptive (bypassing parts of the gastrointestinal tract to limit the absorption of food), and restrictive (decreasing the size of the stomach so that the patient is satiated with less food). All of these may be performed as either open surgery or laparoscopically. An example of a malabsorptive technique is Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Examples of restrictive techniques are vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG) and adjustable gastric banding (AGB). The Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP) Schedule of Benefits for Physician Services includes fee code “S120 gastric bypass or partition, for morbid obesity” as an insured service. The term gastric bypass is a general term that encompasses a variety of surgical methods, all of which involve reconfiguring the digestive system. The term gastric bypass does not include AGB. The number of gastric bypass procedures funded and done in Ontario, and funded as actual out-of-country approvals,2 is shown below. Number of Gastric Bypass Procedures by Fiscal Year: Ontario and Actual Out-of-Country (OOC) Approvals Data from Provider Services, MOHLTC Courtesy of Provider Services, Ministry of Health and Long Term Care Review Strategy The Medical Advisory Secretariat reviewed the literature to assess the effectiveness, safety, and cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery to treat morbid obesity. It used its standard search strategy to retrieve international health technology assessments and English-language journal articles from selected databases. The interventions of interest were bariatric surgery and, for the controls, either optimal conventional management or another type of bariatric procedure. The outcomes of interest were improvement in comorbid conditions (e.g., diabetes, hypertension); short- and long-term weight loss; quality of life; adverse effects; and economic analysis data. The databases yielded 15 international health technology assessments or systematic reviews on bariatric surgery. Subsequently, the Medical Advisory Secretariat searched MEDLINE and EMBASE from April 2004 to December 2004, after the search cut-off date of April, 2004, for the most recent systematic reviews on bariatric surgery. Ten studies met the inclusion criteria. One of those 10 was the Swedish Obese Subjects study, which started as a registry and intervention study, and then published findings on people who had been enrolled for at least 2 years or at least 10 years. In addition to the literature review of economic analysis data, the Medical Advisory Secretariat also did an Ontario-based economic analysis. Summary of Findings Bariatric surgery generally is effective for sustained weight loss of about 16% for people with BMIs of at least 40 kg/m2 or at least 35 kg/m2 with comorbid conditions (including diabetes, high lipid levels, and hypertension). It also is effective at resolving the associated comorbid conditions. This conclusion is largely based on level 3a evidence from the prospectively designed Swedish Obese Subjects study, which recently published 10-year outcomes for patients who had bariatric surgery compared with patients who received nonsurgical treatment. (1) Regarding specific procedures, there is evidence that malabsorptive techniques are better than other banding techniques for weight loss and resolution of comorbid illnesses. However, there are no published prospective, long-term, direct comparisons of these techniques available. Surgery for morbid obesity is considered an intervention of last resort for patients who have attempted first-line forms of medical management, such as diet, increased physical activity, behavioural modification, and drugs. In the absence of direct comparisons of active nonsurgical intervention via caloric restriction with bariatric techniques, the following observations are made: A recent systematic review examining the efficacy of major commercial and organized self-help weight loss programs in the United States concluded that the evidence to support the use of such programs was suboptimal, except for one trial on Weight Watchers. Furthermore, the programs were associated with high costs, attrition rates, and probability of regaining at least 50% of the lost weight in 1 to 2 years. (2) A recent randomized controlled trial reported 1-year outcomes comparing weight loss and metabolic changes in severely obese patients assigned to either a low-carbohydrate diet or a conventional weight loss diet. At 1 year, weight loss was similar for patients in each group (mean, 2–5 kg). There was a favourable effect on triglyceride levels and glycemic control in the low-carbohydrate diet group. (3) A decision-analysis model showed bariatric surgery results in increased life expectancy in morbidly obese patients when compared to diet and exercise. (4) A cost-effectiveness model showed bariatric surgery is cost-effective relative to nonsurgical management. (5) Extrapolating from 2003 data from the United States, Ontario would likely need to do 3,500 bariatric surgeries per year. It currently does 508 per year, including out-of-country surgeries. PMID:23074460

  4. Nerve stimulation with a multi-contact cuff electrode: validation of model predictions.

    PubMed

    Deurloo, K E; Holsheimer, J; Bergveld, P

    2000-10-01

    The recruitment characteristics of muscle selective nerve stimulation by a multi-contact nerve cuff electrode, as predicted by computer modeling, have been investigated in acute experiments on rabbits. A nerve cuff containing five or six dot electrodes was placed around the sciatic nerve in five rabbits. M-waves were recorded with wire electrodes from the lateral gastrocnemius, soleus, tibialis anterior, and extensor digitorum longus muscles. The muscle recruitment performances of three contact configurations (monopole, transverse bipole, transverse tripole) were compared. The selectivity was quantified by the recruitment of two muscles (one extensor and one flexor) in response to a particular stimulus. The results showed that only in a few cases, transverse bi- and tripolar stimulation provided a better selectivity than monopolar stimulation. Neither of the two extensors, nor of the two flexors could be stimulated separately. In accordance with the results of the modeling studies, bi- and tripolar stimulation required higher stimulus currents than monopolar stimulation, whereas maximum recruitment and slopes of recruitment curves were lower. The rabbit sciatic nerve appears to be a less suitable preparation for reproducible selectivity experiments, due to the variability in the number and size of the fascicles and their position in this nerve. PMID:11094386

  5. Selection of muscle and nerve-cuff electrodes for neuroprostheses using customizable musculoskeletal model.

    PubMed

    Blana, Dimitra; Hincapie, Juan G; Chadwick, Edward K; Kirsch, Robert F

    2013-01-01

    Neuroprosthetic systems based on functional electrical stimulation aim to restore motor function to individuals with paralysis following spinal cord injury. Identifying the optimal electrode set for the neuroprosthesis is complicated because it depends on the characteristics of the individual (such as injury level), the force capacities of the muscles, the movements the system aims to restore, and the hardware limitations (number and type of electrodes available). An electrode-selection method has been developed that uses a customized musculoskeletal model. Candidate electrode sets are created based on desired functional outcomes and the hard ware limitations of the proposed system. Inverse-dynamic simulations are performed to determine the proportion of target movements that can be accomplished with each set; the set that allows the most movements to be performed is chosen as the optimal set. The technique is demonstrated here for a system recently developed by our research group to restore whole-arm movement to individuals with high-level tetraplegia. The optimal set included selective nerve-cuff electrodes for the radial and musculocutaneous nerves; single-channel cuffs for the axillary, suprascapular, upper subscapular, and long-thoracic nerves; and muscle-based electrodes for the remaining channels. The importance of functional goals, hardware limitations, muscle and nerve anatomy, and surgical feasibility are highlighted. PMID:23881765

  6. Cuff leak test and laryngeal survey for predicting post-extubation stridor

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anit B; Ani, Chizobam; Feeney, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Evidence for the predictive value of the cuff leak test (CLT) for post-extubation stridor (PES) is conflicting. We evaluated the association and accuracy of CLT alone or combined with other laryngeal parameters with PES. Methods: Fifty-one mechanically ventilated adult patients in a medical-surgical intensive care unit were tested prior to extubation using; CLT, laryngeal ultrasound and indirect laryngoscopy. Biometric, laryngeal and endotracheal tube (ETT) parameters were recorded. Results: PES incidence was 4%. CLT demonstrated ‘no leak’ in 20% of patients. Laryngeal oedema was present in 10% of the patients on indirect laryngoscopy, and 71% of the patients had a Grades 1-3 indirect laryngoscopic view. Mean air column width on laryngeal ultrasound was 0.66 ± 0.15 cm (cuff deflated), mean ratio of ETT to laryngeal diameter was 0.48 ± 0.07, and the calculated CLT and laryngeal survey composite was 0.86 ± 1.25 (range 0-5). CLT and the CLT and Laryngeal survey composite measure were not associated with or predict PES. Age, sex, peri-extubation steroid use, intubation duration and body mass index were not associated with PES. Conclusion: Even including ultrasonographic and indirect laryngoscopic examination of the airway, no single aspect of the CLT or combination with laryngeal parameters accurately predicts PES. PMID:25788742

  7. Rotating Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues currently being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  8. Chronic stability and selectivity of four-contact spiral nerve-cuff electrodes in stimulating the human femoral nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, L. E.; Tyler, D. J.; Anderson, J. S.; Triolo, R. J.

    2009-08-01

    This study describes the stability and selectivity of four-contact spiral nerve-cuff electrodes implanted bilaterally on distal branches of the femoral nerves of a human volunteer with spinal cord injury as part of a neuroprosthesis for standing and transfers. Stimulation charge threshold, the minimum charge required to elicit a visible muscle contraction, was consistent and low (mean threshold charge at 63 weeks post-implantation: 23.3 ± 8.5 nC) for all nerve-cuff electrode contacts over 63 weeks after implantation, indicating a stable interface with the peripheral nervous system. The ability of individual nerve-cuff electrode contacts to selectively stimulate separate components of the femoral nerve to activate individual heads of the quadriceps was assessed with fine-wire intramuscular electromyography while measuring isometric twitch knee extension moment. Six of eight electrode contacts could selectively activate one head of the quadriceps while selectively excluding others to produce maximum twitch responses of between 3.8 and 8.1 N m. The relationship between isometric twitch and tetanic knee extension moment was quantified, and selective twitch muscle responses scaled to between 15 and 35 N m in tetanic response to pulse trains with similar stimulation parameters. These results suggest that this nerve-cuff electrode can be an effective and chronically stable tool for selectively stimulating distal nerve branches in the lower extremities for neuroprosthetic applications.

  9. Evaluation of the role of pin fixation versus collar and cuff immobilisation in supracondylar fractures of the humerus in children.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, J G; El Abed, K; Soffe, K; Kearns, S; Mulcahy, D; Condon, F; Moore, D; Dowling, F; Fogarty, E

    2000-04-01

    Long term results of children with supracondylar humeral fractures treated with manipulation and strapping and manipulation followed by pin fixation were evaluated. Forty patients were regarded as Gartland type II injuries. 33 of these were treated with closed reduction and collar and cuff immobilisation and 7 with closed reduction and percutaneous pinning. Two cases of cubitus varus were reported one from each treatment modality. Forty-four patients were included as Gartland type III injuries. Of these 14 were treated with closed reduction and collar and cuff immobilisation, 25 with closed reduction and percutaneous pinning and five with open reduction and pinning. There were two cases of cubitus varus and one case of cubitus valgus following pin fixation. In addition one case of extension lag and one significant ulnar nerve neurapraxia was recorded following pin fixation. One case of cubitus varus was seen following manipulation and collar and cuff treatment. There was no statistical difference between either treatment modality in terms of predicting a better outcome (p0.05). We conclude that pin fixation has no advantages over simple immobilisation in certain Gartland II and III type injuries. Although pin fixation is beneficial in unstable injuries collar and cuff immobilisation continues to have an important role in the treatment of stable supracondylar fractures. PMID:10704580

  10. Continuous and Noninvasive Recording of Cardiovascular Parameters with the Finapres Finger Cuff Enhances Undergraduate Student Understanding of Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Yvonne; Choate, Julia

    2012-01-01

    The Finapres finger cuff recording system provides continuous calculations of beat-to-beat variations in cardiac output (CO), total peripheral resistance, heart rate (HR), and blood pressure (BP). This system is unique in that it allows experimental subjects to immediately, continuously, and noninvasively visualize changes in CO at rest and during

  11. Continuous and Noninvasive Recording of Cardiovascular Parameters with the Finapres Finger Cuff Enhances Undergraduate Student Understanding of Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Yvonne; Choate, Julia

    2012-01-01

    The Finapres finger cuff recording system provides continuous calculations of beat-to-beat variations in cardiac output (CO), total peripheral resistance, heart rate (HR), and blood pressure (BP). This system is unique in that it allows experimental subjects to immediately, continuously, and noninvasively visualize changes in CO at rest and during…

  12. Chronic stability and selectivity of four-contact spiral nerve-cuff electrodes in stimulating the human femoral nerve

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, L E; Tyler, D J; Anderson, J S; Triolo, R J

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the stability and selectivity of four-contact spiral nerve-cuff electrodes implanted bilaterally on distal branches of the femoral nerves of a human volunteer with spinal cord injury as part of a neuroprosthesis for standing and transfers. Stimulation charge threshold, the minimum charge required to elicit a visible muscle contraction, was consistent and low (mean threshold charge at 63 weeks post-implantation: 23.3 ± 8.5 nC) for all nerve-cuff electrode contacts over 63 weeks after implantation, indicating a stable interface with the peripheral nervous system. The ability of individual nerve-cuff electrode contacts to selectively stimulate separate components of the femoral nerve to activate individual heads of the quadriceps was assessed with fine-wire intramuscular electromyography while measuring isometric twitch knee extension moment. Six of eight electrode contacts could selectively activate one head of the quadriceps while selectively excluding others to produce maximum twitch responses of between 3.8 and 8.1 Nm. The relationship between isometric twitch and tetanic knee extension moment was quantified, and selective twitch muscle responses scaled to between 15 and 35 Nm in tetanic response to pulse trains with similar stimulation parameters. These results suggest that this nerve-cuff electrode can be an effective and chronically stable tool for selectively stimulating distal nerve branches in the lower extremities for neuroprosthetic applications. PMID:19602729

  13. Robotic Surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Automated Endoscopic System for Optimal Positioning, or AESOP, was developed by Computer Motion, Inc. under a SBIR contract from the Jet Propulsion Lab. AESOP is a robotic endoscopic positioning system used to control the motion of a camera during endoscopic surgery. The camera, which is mounted at the end of a robotic arm, previously had to be held in place by the surgical staff. With AESOP the robotic arm can make more precise and consistent movements. AESOP is also voice controlled by the surgeon. It is hoped that this technology can be used in space repair missions which require precision beyond human dexterity. A new generation of the same technology entitled the ZEUS Robotic Surgical System can make endoscopic procedures even more successful. ZEUS allows the surgeon control various instruments in its robotic arms, allowing for the precision the procedure requires.

  14. Burn surgery.

    PubMed

    Tenenhaus, Mayer; Rennekampff, Hans Oliver

    2007-10-01

    The challenges posed by thermal injury often are daunting emotionally and physically for the survivor, family, and staff. Morbidity and mortality have improved with advances in emergent and multidisciplinary care; the establishment of dedicated burn centers; and increased education, prevention, and experience. The role of surgery in the treatment of these complex injury patterns continues to evolve, incorporating refined concepts of tissue preservation, wound bed preparation, and early attention to functional and esthetic parameters. Societal reintegration, psychosocial support, and new pain control strategies have dramatically improved the quality of life for our patients during and after the acute course of care. With improved survivability and a changing demographic, fundamental reconstructive surgical principles have found increased applicability and are instituted at the time of admission whenever possible. PMID:17967624

  15. Shoulder arthroscopy

    MedlinePlus

    SLAP repair; SLAP lesion; Acromioplasty; Bankart repair; Bankart lesion; Shoulder repair; Shoulder surgery; Rotator cuff repair ... tissues include the cartilage, bones, tendons, and ligaments. Repairs any damaged tissues. To do this, your surgeon ...

  16. Model-based analysis and design of nerve cuff electrodes for restoring bladder function by selective stimulation of the pudendal nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Alexander R.; Grill, Warren M.

    2013-06-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve (PN) is being developed as a means to restore bladder function in persons with spinal cord injury. A single nerve cuff electrode placed on the proximal PN trunk may enable selective stimulation of distinct fascicles to maintain continence or evoke micturition. The objective of this study was to design a nerve cuff that enabled selective stimulation of the PN. Approach. We evaluated the performance of both flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) cuff and round cuff designs, with a range of FINE cuff heights and number of contacts, as well as multiple contact orientations. This analysis was performed using a computational model, in which the nerve and fascicle cross-sectional positions from five human PN trunks were systematically reshaped within the nerve cuff. These cross-sections were used to create finite element models, with electric potentials calculated and applied to a cable model of a myelinated axon to evaluate stimulation selectivity for different PN targets. Subsequently, the model was coupled to a genetic algorithm (GA) to identify solutions that used multiple contact activation to maximize selectivity and minimize total stimulation voltage. Main results. Simulations did not identify any significant differences in selectivity between FINE and round cuffs, although the latter required smaller stimulation voltages for target activation due to preserved localization of targeted fascicle groups. Further, it was found that a ten contact nerve cuff generated sufficient selectivity for all PN targets, with the degree of selectivity dependent on the relative position of the target within the nerve. The GA identified solutions that increased fitness by 0.7-45.5% over single contact activation by decreasing stimulation of non-targeted fascicles. Significance. This study suggests that using an optimal nerve cuff design and multiple contact activation could enable selective stimulation of the human PN trunk for restoration of bladder function.

  17. Model-based analysis and design of nerve cuff electrodes for restoring bladder function by selective stimulation of the pudendal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Alexander R; Grill, Warren M

    2013-01-01

    Objective Electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve (PN) is being developed as a means to restore bladder function in persons with spinal cord injury. A single nerve cuff electrode placed on the proximal PN trunk may enable selective stimulation of distinct fascicles to maintain continence or evoke micturition. The objective of this study was to design a nerve cuff that enabled selective stimulation of the PN. Approach We evaluated the performance of both flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) cuff and round cuff designs, with a range of FINE cuff heights and number of contacts, as well as multiple contact orientations. This analysis was performed using a computational model, in which the nerve and fascicle cross-sectional positions from five human PN trunks were systematically reshaped within the nerve cuff. These cross-sections were used to create finite element models, with electric potentials calculated and applied to a cable model of a myelinated axon to evaluate stimulation selectivity for different PN targets. Subsequently, the model was coupled to a genetic algorithm (GA) to identify solutions that used multiple contact activation to maximize selectivity and minimize total stimulation voltage. Main results Simulations did not identify any significant differences in selectivity between FINE and round cuffs, although the latter required smaller stimulation voltages for target activation due to preserved localization of targeted fascicle groups. Further, it was found that a 10 contact nerve cuff generated sufficient selectivity for all PN targets, with the degree of selectivity dependent on the relative position of the target within the nerve. The GA identified solutions that increased fitness by 0.7–45.5% over single contact activation by decreasing stimulation of non-targeted fascicles. Significance This study suggests that using an optimal nerve cuff design and multiple contact activation could enable selective stimulation of the human PN trunk for restoration of bladder function. PMID:23594706

  18. Electromyography of 3 Scapular Muscles: A Comparative Analysis of The Cuff Link Device and a Standard Push-Up

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, W Steven; Campbell, Brian M; Swartz, Erik E; Armstrong, Charles W

    2008-01-01

    Context: The Cuff Link is a closed kinetic chain rehabilitation apparatus for the upper extremity. Limited research has established its effectiveness to elicit muscle activation of the scapular muscles. Objective: To determine if scapular muscle activation differs in response to 2 upper extremity closed kinetic chain exercises: Cuff Link and standard push-up. Design: A single-group, repeated-measures design. Setting: Controlled laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-eight healthy individuals (13 women: age  =  19.69 ± 1.55 years, height  =  167.44 ± 9.52 cm, mass  =  61.00 ± 8.79 kg; 15 men: age  =  22.00 ± 3.91 years, height  =  181.44 ± 6.60 cm, mass  =  82.36 ± 13.23 kg) with no history of shoulder or low back injury volunteered to participate in this study. Intervention(s): Participants performed 10 trials of complete revolutions on the Cuff Link and 10 full–weight-bearing push-ups. We controlled trial velocity and randomized order. Trunk and shoulder positions were normalized to the participant's height. Using surface electromyography, we recorded muscle activity of the serratus anterior, middle trapezius, and lower trapezius. Rectified and smoothed electromyography data for the serratus anterior, middle trapezius, and lower trapezius were normalized as a percentage of the maximal voluntary isometric contractions (%MVIC). Main Outcome Measure(s): Mean muscle activity of the serratus anterior, middle trapezius, and lower trapezius. We used paired-samples t tests to analyze the mean data for each condition. The α level was adjusted to .016 to avoid a type I error. Results: Middle trapezius %MVIC was greater during push-ups (27.01 ± 20.40%) than during use of the Cuff Link (11.49 ± 9.46%) (P  =  .001). Lower trapezius %MVIC was greater during push-ups (36.07 ± 18.99%) than during use of the Cuff Link (16.29 ± 8.64%) (P  =  .001). There was no difference in %MVIC for the serratus anterior between conditions. Conclusions: The push-up demonstrated greater middle trapezius and lower trapezius activation levels compared with the Cuff Link. However, the push-up had a high participant failure rate. Because serratus anterior activation levels were similar, the Cuff Link may be an appropriate alternative for individuals lacking the upper body strength to perform a push-up. PMID:18833308

  19. [Minimally invasive surgery and robotic surgery: surgery 4.0?].

    PubMed

    Feußner, H; Wilhelm, D

    2016-03-01

    Surgery can only maintain its role in a highly competitive environment if results are continuously improved, accompanied by further reduction of the interventional trauma for patients and with justifiable costs. Significant impulse to achieve this goal was expected from minimally invasive surgery and, in particular, robotic surgery; however, a real breakthrough has not yet been achieved. Accordingly, the new strategic approach of cognitive surgery is required to optimize the provision of surgical treatment. A full scale integration of all modules utilized in the operating room (OR) into a comprehensive network and the development of systems with technical cognition are needed to upgrade the current technical environment passively controlled by the surgeon into an active collaborative support system (surgery 4.0). Only then can the true potential of minimally invasive surgery and robotic surgery be exploited. PMID:26801753

  20. Gallbladder Cancer: Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... or organs to which cancer has spread Possible risks and side effects The risks and side effects of surgery depend on how ... health before the surgery. All surgery carries some risk, including the possibility of bleeding, blood clots, infections, ...

  1. Joint Replacement Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trial Journal Articles Arthritis July 2014 Joint Replacement Surgery: Health Information Basics for You and Your Family What Is Joint Replacement Surgery? Joint replacement surgery is removing a damaged joint ...

  2. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... t help, you may need coronary artery bypass surgery. The surgery creates a new path for blood to flow ... more than one bypass. The results of the surgery usually are excellent. Many people remain symptom-free ...

  3. Laser surgery - skin

    MedlinePlus

    Surgery using a laser ... used is directly related to the type of surgery being performed and the color of the tissue ... Laser surgery can be used to: Close small blood vessels to reduce blood loss Remove warts , moles , sunspots, and ...

  4. Types of Heart Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart surgery that is becoming more common is robotic-assisted surgery. For this surgery, a surgeon uses a computer to control surgical tools on thin robotic arms. The tools are inserted through small incisions ...

  5. Surgery For Stomach Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... then be put directly into the tube. Possible complications and side effects of surgery Surgery for stomach cancer is difficult and can have complications. These can include bleeding from the surgery, blood ...

  6. Arteries Stiffen With Age, but Can Retain an Ability to Become More Elastic With Applied External Cuff Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chengyu; Zheng, Dingchang; Murray, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract It is accepted that arterial compliance decreases with age, with changes in the arterial pulse shape measured at the periphery. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between arterial transmural pressure changes and changes in peripheral finger pulse shape characteristics for both older and younger subjects. Finger photoplethysmographic pulses were recorded noninvasively from the right index fingers of 100 healthy normotensive subjects. Their median age was 43 years (range 20–71 years) allowing two distinct age groups to be compared (older group ≥45 and younger group < 45 years). Arterial transmural pressures on the whole right arm were reduced with a 50 cm long cuff inflated to 10, 20, 30, and 40 mmHg. Pulse maximum amplitude and rise time were calculated for each age group, and for each cuff pressure level. Gradual and significant decreases in both pulse maximum amplitude and rise time were found with increasing cuff pressure for both age groups. With an external cuff pressure of 40 mmHg, there was an average maximum amplitude and rise time decrease of 27.1% (P < 0.001) and 7.5% (P < 0.001) respectively. The changes in the older group were significantly greater than those in the younger group for maximum amplitude (30.3% vs 24.4%, P = 0.006), but not for rise time (8.0% vs 6.7%, P = 0.23). Our results show that arterial compliance of the arm artery increases with reduced transmural pressure for both older and younger groups, and demonstrate that the aged arm artery can become more elastic with applied external cuff pressure. PMID:26469929

  7. Effects of cuff inflation and deflation on pulse transit time measured from ECG and multi-wavelength PPG.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Li, Yao; Ding, Xiao-Rong; Dai, Wen-Xuan; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-08-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT), which refers to the time it takes a pulse wave to travel between two arterial sites is a promising index for cuff-less blood pressure (BP) estimation, as well as non-invasive assessment of arterial functions. However, it has not been investigated whether PTTs measured from ECG and different wavelength PPG are equally affected by the arterial status. Furthermore, comparison between the changes of different PTTs can provide enlightenment on the hardware implementation of the PTT-based BP estimation method. This work mainly studied the changes of PTTs calculated from electrocardiogram (ECG) and multi-wavelength photoplethysmogram (PPG) after exerting cuff pressure on the upper arm. A four-channel PPG acquisition system was developed to collect the multi-wavelength PPG signals of red, yellow, green and blue light at the fingertip simultaneously. Ten subjects participated in the experiment and their PTTs measured from different PPG and ECG signals before and after exerting cuff pressure were compared. This study found that within one minute after the four-minute cuff inflation and deflation process, the PTT measured from ECG and yellow PPG experienced a significant increase (p<;0.05) while the PTT from ECG and blue PPG had no statistical difference (p>0.9) compared with that before exerting cuff pressure. This indicates that PTTs calculated from different wavelength PPG have different recoverability from smooth muscle relaxation. Another interesting finding is that the PTT calculated from ECG and yellow PPG had a strong correlation (|r|>0.7) with the time difference between yellow PPG and other PPG signals, which implies the potential of the time difference between yellow PPG and other PPGs as a complementary to PTT-based model for blood pressure estimation. PMID:26737652

  8. Cosmetic Plastic Surgery Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    2014 Cosmetic Plastic Surgery Statistics Cosmetic Procedure Trends 2014 Plastic Surgery Statistics Report Please credit the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF PLASTIC SURGEONS when citing statistical data or using ...

  9. Radiographic assessment of scapular rotational tilt in chronic shoulder impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Endo, K; Ikata, T; Katoh, S; Takeda, Y

    2001-01-01

    This study presents an objective evaluation of both scapular upward and axial rotational tilts in shoulder impingement syndrome, using a scapular spine line defined on antero-posterior (AP) radiographs of the shoulder as the referential line. Twenty-seven patients with unilateral shoulder motion pain, who were diagnosed as having chronic shoulder impingement syndrome, were enrolled in the study. Scapular upward and axial rotational tilts were compared between the affected and contralateral shoulders. AP radiographs were obtained at shoulder abduction angles of 0 degrees, 45 degrees, and 90 degrees, and the X-ray films were digitized by computer. The upward and axial rotational tilts of the scapula were then evaluated on the digital images. In shoulder impingement syndrome, both upward and axial external rotations of the scapula were impaired at the painful arc angle of abduction. This tended to be more apparent for the axial rotation of the scapula than for the upward rotation. These reductions in scapular rotations reduce available clearance for the rotator cuff and humeral greater tuberosity as the shoulder is abducted. PMID:11289583

  10. Assessment of central haemomodynamics from a brachial cuff in a community setting

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Large artery stiffening and wave reflections are independent predictors of adverse events. To date, their assessment has been limited to specialised techniques and settings. A new, more practical method allowing assessment of central blood pressure from waveforms recorded using a conventional automated oscillometric monitor has recently been validated in laboratory settings. However, the feasibility of this method in a community based setting has not been assessed. Methods One-off peripheral and central haemodynamic (systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) and pulse pressure) and wave reflection parameters (augmentation pressure (AP) and index, AIx) were obtained from 1,903 volunteers in an Austrian community setting using a transfer-function like method (ARCSolver algorithm) and from waveforms recorded with a regular oscillometric cuff. We assessed these parameters for known differences and associations according to gender and age deciles from <30 years to >80 years in the whole population and a subset with a systolic BP < 140 mmHg. Results We obtained 1,793 measures of peripheral and central BP, PP and augmentation parameters. Age and gender associations with central haemodynamic and augmentation parameters reflected those previously established from reference standard non-invasive techniques under specialised settings. Findings were the same for patients with a systolic BP below 140 mmHg (i.e. normotensive). Lower values for AIx in the current study are possibly due to differences in sampling rates, detection frequency and/or averaging procedures and to lower numbers of volunteers in younger age groups. Conclusion A novel transfer-function like algorithm, using brachial cuff-based waveform recordings, provides robust and feasible estimates of central systolic pressure and augmentation in community-based settings. PMID:22734820

  11. Fibre-selective recording from the peripheral nerves of frogs using a multi-electrode cuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuettler, Martin; Donaldson, Nick; Seetohul, Vipin; Taylor, John

    2013-06-01

    Objective. We investigate the ability of the method of velocity selective recording (VSR) to determine the fibre types that contribute to a compound action potential (CAP) propagating along a peripheral nerve. Real-time identification of the active fibre types by determining the direction of action potential propagation (afferent or efferent) and velocity might allow future neural prostheses to make better use of biological sensor signals and provide a new and simple tool for use in fundamental neuroscience. Approach. Fibre activity was recorded from explanted Xenopus Laevis frog sciatic nerve using a single multi-electrode cuff that records whole nerve activity with 11 equidistant ring-shaped electrodes. The recorded signals were amplified, delayed against each other with variable delay times, added and band-pass filtered. Finally, the resulting amplitudes were measured. Main Result. Our experiments showed that electrically evoked frog CAP was dominated by two fibre populations, propagating at around 20 and 40 m/s, respectively. The velocity selectivity, i.e. the ability of the system to discriminate between individual populations was increased by applying band-pass filtering. The method extracted an entire velocity spectrum from a 10 ms CAP recording sample in real time. Significance. Unlike the techniques introduced in the 1970s and subsequently, VSR requires only a single nerve cuff and does not require averaging to provide velocity spectral information. This makes it potentially suitable for the generation of highly-selective real-time control-signals for future neural prostheses. In our study, electrically evoked CAPs were analysed and it remains to be proven whether the method can reliably classify physiological nerve traffic. The work presented here was carried out at the laboratories of the Implanted Devices Group, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, UK.

  12. [Evolution on rotation manipulation].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi

    2013-07-01

    Through review of ancient literature, the developing history of rotation manipulation is traced, various rotation manipulation techniques in different historical periods are analyzed, and evolution process of rotation manipulation is also summarized. It is found that uni-direction rotation was mainly adopted before the establishment of the Republic of China (1911). Influenced by Japanese technique, back and fro rotation took place of the uni-direction rotation, and became the mainstay of the rotation manipulations. However, it is held that the uni-direction rotation has stronger stimulative effects as well as soft tissue relaxation effect, which can be applied for treatment of various diseases. PMID:24032195

  13. Advanced Nail Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Haneke, Eckart

    2011-01-01

    Six techniques not yet widely known or used in the dermatologic surgery of the nails are briefly described. Small-to-medium-sized tumours of the proximal nail fold (PNF) can be excised and the defect repaired with advancement or rotation flaps. A superficial biopsy technique of the matrix for the diagnosis of longitudinal brown streaks in the nail, which allows rapid histological diagnosis of the melanocyte focus to be performed, is described here. Because the excision is very shallow and leaves the morphogenetic connective tissue of the matrix intact, the defect heals without scarring. Laterally positioned nail tumours can be excised in the manner of a wide lateral longitudinal nail biopsy. The defect repair is performed with a bipedicled flap from the lateral aspect of the distal phalanx. Malignant tumours of the nail organ often require its complete ablation. These defects can be covered by a full-thickness skin graft, reversed dermal graft, or cross-finger flap. The surgical correction of a split nail is often difficult. The cicatricial tissue of the matrix and PNF have to be excised and the re-attachment of these wounds prevented. The matrix defect has to be excised and sutured or covered with a free matrix graft taken either from the neighbouring area or from the big toe nail. PMID:22279381

  14. Empirical quantification of internal and external rotation muscular co-activation ratios in healthy shoulders.

    PubMed

    Brookham, Rebecca L; Dickerson, Clark R

    2014-03-01

    Biomechanical models used to estimate joint loads often predict that antagonistic muscles are inactive or underestimate their contributions [3, 5]. This can result in systematic underestimation of muscle force predictions and joint contact forces. To test the feasibility of employing an empirical co-activation ratio to improve shoulder muscle force modeling estimates, it was purposed to define the co-activation relationship between humeral internal and external rotator muscles in young healthy adults. Electromyography was recorded from rotator cuff and shoulder musculature of 20 adults. Participants performed 54 submaximal voluntary force exertions of humeral internal and external rotation at various humeral abduction and rotation postures. Empirical co-activation relationships for aggregates of humeral internal and external rotators (non-weighted and PCSA-weighted versions) were well characterized by regression models (r (2) = 0.62-0.70) during internal rotation exertions, but only moderately well (r (2) = 0.35-0.42) during external rotation exertions. Humeral abduction and intensity were important predictors in both exertion types. There was no or minimal improvement in r (2) using PCSA-weighted CIs, suggesting low utility. Quantification and implementation of shoulder co-activation into biomechanical models may improve muscle force and joint load estimates, which could assist in more reliable injury risk and tissue load predictions. PMID:23765130

  15. Critical care education in general surgery residencies.

    PubMed

    Meyer, A A; Fakhry, S M; Sheldon, G F

    1989-08-01

    Surgical critical care (SCC) was recently identified as an essential component of general surgery by the American Board of Surgery (ABS). Previous studies have found limited attention to critical care education in general surgery programs. This survey was developed to determine the changes in critical care education, following the emphasis by the ABS. The survey determined the format for SCC education, the time and resources committed, and the views of the program directors toward SCC. Program directors of all 296 approved general surgery residencies were surveyed, with a 79% response. Most program directors (91%) agree that SCC is an essential component of general surgery, and 72% believe a separate intensive care unit (ICU) rotation should be used in SCC education. Education in SCC was provided by a separate ICU service in 110 (47%) of the programs. The remaining 53% used care of patients in the ICU during traditional services as their educational experience. The average ICU rotation for surgery residents was 9 weeks and usually occurred in the second year of training. In 97% of the 110 programs with an ICU service, lectures and conferences were conducted regularly. Seventeen programs sponsored critical care fellowships, and 25 additional programs were considering them. Ninety percent of surgical ICU services had faculty that consisted exclusively of surgeons or surgeons and other specialists. Only 53% of surgeons attending on an ICU service had a reduction in their other responsibilities. Despite overwhelming agreement that critical care is an essential component of general surgery, less than half of the training programs have an ICU service to coordinate resident education in SCC. If surgeons are to continue to provide total care to their patients, there needs to be increased commitment to SCC education. PMID:2763037

  16. How do stars rotate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woehl, H.

    1982-08-01

    Theories of stellar rotation are discussed. The discovery of sunspots and their use in determining rotation rates is explained along with use of spectroscopy, in particular the Doppler effect, in determining rates, and the differential rotation of the sun is discussed with some mathematics. The most important theories of differential solar rotation are presented: differential viscosity in the convection zone, interaction of convective cells with rotating gas, and the influence of the Coriolis force. The relationship of stellar rotational velocity to spectral type is shown and explained, and methods of determining stellar rotation are discussed, including relating variations in stellar activity to variations in starspot spectra, and analyzing spectral profiles with Fourier transforms.

  17. Glenohumeral Rotational Motion and Strength and Baseball Pitching Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Wendy J.; Kaufman, Kenton R.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Addressing loss of shoulder range of motion and rotator cuff weakness in injury-prevention programs might be an effective strategy for preventing throwing arm injuries in baseball pitchers. However, the influence of these clinical measures on pitching biomechanics is unclear. Objective: To evaluate the relationships among clinical measures of shoulder rotational motion and strength and 3-dimensional pitching biomechanics and to evaluate the presence of coupling between the shoulder and the elbow during pitching to provide insight into the influence of clinical shoulder characteristics on elbow biomechanics. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Biomechanics laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 27 uninjured male high school baseball pitchers (age  =  16 ± 1.1 years, height  =  183 ± 7 cm, mass  =  83 ± 12 kg). Main Outcome Measure(s): Clinical measures included shoulder internal- and external-rotation range of motion and peak isometric internal- and external-rotator strength. Three-dimensional upper extremity biomechanics were assessed as participants threw from an indoor pitching mound to a target at regulation distance. Linear regressions were used to assess the influence of clinical measures on the peak shoulder internal and external rotation moments and the peak elbow-adduction moment. Results: We found a positive relationship between clinically measured internal-rotator strength and shoulder external-rotation moment (R2  =  0.181, P  =  .04) during pitching. We also noted an inverse relationship between clinically measured external-rotation motion and the elbow-adduction moment (R2  =  0.160, P  =  .04) and shoulder internal-rotation moment (R2  =  0.250, P  =  .008) during pitching. We found a positive relationship between peak shoulder internal-rotation moment and the peak elbow-adduction moment (R2  =  0.815, P < .001) during pitching. Conclusions: This study provides insight into the effects of shoulder strength and motion on pitching biomechanics and how these clinical measures might contribute to throwing arm injuries in the baseball pitcher. A relationship also was identified between peak shoulder and elbow moments in the throwing arm during pitching, providing biomechanical support for addressing clinical shoulder characteristics as a potential strategy for preventing elbow injury. PMID:22892405

  18. American Board of Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Board of Surgery is an independent, nonprofit organization founded in 1937 to provide board certification to individuals who have met a defined standard of education, training and knowledge in the field of surgery. 1617 John F. ...

  19. Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... followed by a long recovery period. With recent advances in technology, including the nasal endoscope, sinus surgery ... nose, tear duct blockage, and others. Additionally, recent advances in endoscopic sinus surgery allow your sinus surgeon ...

  20. Ear surgery - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in an outpatient surgical facility, or in a hospital. The surgery is performed while the patient is awake but ... covered with a bulky, moderate pressure dressing following surgery. ... the hospital on the same day, or shortly thereafter. Within ...

  1. Complications of Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... further intracranial surgeries. Impaired sense of taste or smell : The sense of smell usually improves after the procedure because airflow is ... in their voice after sinus surgery. Impairment of smell or taste: (see above) Infection: The most common ...

  2. Refractive corneal surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... You will be less dependent on glasses or contact lenses after the surgery. Sometimes, you will no longer ... tears. Check with your doctor. Do NOT wear contact lenses on the eye that had surgery, even if ...

  3. Heart bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... having coronary bypass surgery include: Infection, including chest wound infection, which is more likely to happen if you are obese, have diabetes, or have already had this surgery Heart attack ...

  4. Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Higdon KK. Reduction mammoplasty. In: Neligan PC, ed. Plastic Surgery . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2013:chap 8. ... Gabriel A. Breast augmentation. In: Neligan PC, ed. Plastic Surgery . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2013:chap 2.

  5. Weight Loss Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Weight loss surgery helps people with extreme obesity to lose weight. It may be an option if you cannot lose weight ... obesity. There are different types of weight loss surgery. They often limit the amount of food you ...

  6. Cosmetic ear surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Otoplasty; Ear pinning; Ear surgery - cosmetic; Ear reshaping; Pinnaplasty ... Cosmetic ear surgery may be done in the surgeon's office, an outpatient clinic, or a hospital. It can be performed under ...

  7. Hip fracture surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... neck fracture repair; Trochanteric fracture repair; Hip pinning surgery; Osteoarthritis-hip ... You may receive general anesthesia before this surgery. This means ... spinal anesthesia. With this kind of anesthesia, medicine is ...

  8. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... best performed by a trained surgeon with specialized education and training. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, ...

  9. Concerns about cosmetic surgery.

    PubMed

    De Sousa, Avinash

    2007-01-01

    This article looks at some ethical challenges in cosmetic surgery. Enhancement versus therapy, risks, patient autonomy, beneficence and informed consent are issues that need to be considered when