Sample records for rotator cuff surgery

  1. Management of complications after rotator cuff surgery.

    PubMed

    Parada, Stephen A; Dilisio, Matthew F; Kennedy, Colin D

    2015-03-01

    Rotator cuff repair (RCR) is a common procedure performed by orthopedic surgeons via arthroscopic, open, or mini-open techniques. While this surgery is considered to be of low morbidity, several potential complications can arise either intraoperatively or during the postoperative time period. Some of these complications are related to the surgical approach (arthroscopic or open), while others are patient dependent. Many of these complications can be managed through nonoperative means; however, early recognition and timely treatment is essential in limiting the long-term sequela and improving patient outcome. There are several different ways to classify complications after RCR repair: timing, severity, preventability, whether or not the pathology is intra- or extra-articular, and the type of treatment necessary. It is essential that the surgeon is cognizant of the etiology contributing to the failed RCR surgery in order to provide timely and proper management. PMID:25532916

  2. Rotator cuff exercises

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is irritation and swelling of these tendons A rotator cuff tear, which occurs when one of the tendons is ... 17. O'Brien MJ, Leggin BG, Williams GR. Rotator cuff tendinopathies and tears: surgery and therapy. In: Skirven TM, Osterman AL, ...

  3. Mode of failure for rotator cuff repair with suture anchors identified at revision surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig A. Cummins; George A. C. Murrell

    2003-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction. After surgical repair, there is a significant re-tear rate (25%-90%). The aim of this study was to determine the primary mode of mechanical failure for rotator cuffs repaired with suture anchors at the time of revision rotator cuff repair. We prospectively followed 342 consecutive torn rotator cuffs, repaired

  4. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  5. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cuff are common. They include tendinitis, bursitis, and injuries such as tears. Rotator cuff tendons can become ... cuff depends on age, health, how severe the injury is, and how long you've had the ...

  6. Rotator cuff repair - series (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Surgery to repair a torn rotator cuff is usually very successful at relieving pain in the shoulder. The procedure is less predictable at returning strength to the shoulder. Recovery time often depends on the extent of the tear.

  7. Rotator cuff repair

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Three common techniques are used to repair a rotator cuff tear: During open repair, surgical incision is made and ... when: You have a large or a complete rotator cuff tear. A tear was caused by a recent injury. ...

  8. Rotator cuff problems

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a normally smooth layer) lining these tendons. A rotator cuff tear occurs when one of the tendons is torn ... carpentry Poor posture over many years Aging TEARS Rotator cuff tears may occur in two ways: A sudden, acute ...

  9. Rotator Cuff Tears: Prospective Comparisonof MR Imaging with Arthrography,Sonography,and Surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Lawrence; David Karasick; Alfred B. Kurtz; Donald G. Mitchell; Matthew D. Rifkin; Cynthia L. Miller; David W. Levy; John M. Fenlin; Arthur R. Bartolozzi

    Thirty-eight patients with suspected rotator cuff tears were examined at 1.5 T by using a loop-gap resonator surface coil. The MR findings were compared prospectively in a blinded fashion with the results from double-contrast arthrography in all 38 patients, high-resolution sonography in 23 patients, and surgery in 16 patients. In the total group of 38 patients, MR imaging detected 22

  10. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Patient Education Institute

    This patient education program discusses rotator cuff injuries, their causes, symptoms, diagnosis, prevention, and options for their treatment including physiotherapy and surgery. This resource is a MedlinePlus Interactive Health Tutorial from the National Library of Medicine, designed and developed by the Patient Education Institute. NOTE: This tutorial requires a special Flash plug-in, version 4 or above. If you do not have Flash, you will be prompted to obtain a free download of the software before you start the tutorial. You will also need an Acrobat Reader, available as a free download, in order to view the Reference Summary.

  11. Risk factors for readmission and revision surgery following rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Seth L; Lyman, Stephen; Koulouvaris, Panagiotis; Willis, Andrew; Marx, Robert G

    2008-03-01

    Risk factors for revision surgery and hospitalization following rotator cuff repair (RCR) have not been clearly identified. We hypothesized patient factors and surgeon and hospital volume independently contribute to the risk of readmission within 90 days and revision RCR within one year. Using the SPARCS database, we included patients undergoing primary RCR in New York State between 1997 and 2002. These patients were tracked for readmission within 90 days and revision RCR within 1 year. A generalized estimating equation was developed to determine whether patient factors, surgeon volume, or hospital volume were independent risk factors for the above outcome measures. The total annual number of RCR increased from 6,656 in 1997 to 10,128 in 2002. Ambulatory cases increased from 57% to 82% during this time period. Independent risk factors for readmission within 90 days included increasing age and increased number of comorbidities. Independent risk factors for revision RCR included increasing age, increased comorbidity, and lower surgeon volume. Hospital volume had a minimal effect on either outcome measure. The shift toward out-patient surgery mirrors the shift from open to arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The finding that surgeon volume is a predictor of revision RCR reflects the findings in other orthopaedic procedures. PMID:18264848

  12. Biologic augmentation of rotator cuff repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott R. Montgomery; Frank A. Petrigliano; Seth C. Gamradt

    Rotator cuff repair is a common orthopedic procedure. Despite advances in surgical technique, the rotator cuff tendons often\\u000a fail to heal after surgery. In recent years, a number of biologic strategies have been developed and tested to augment healing\\u000a after rotator cuff repair. These strategies include allograft, extracellular matrices (ECMs), platelet rich plasma (PRP),\\u000a growth factors, stem cells, and gene

  13. Apoptosis in rotator cuff tendonopathy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jun Yuan; George A. C. Murrell; Ai-Qun Wei; Min-Xia Wang

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of apoptosis (programmed cell death) in the pathogenesis of rotator cuff disorders. The edges of torn supraspinatus rotator cuff tendons were collected from patients with rotator cuff tear (n=25). Samples of the intra-articular portion of subscapularis tendons were collected from patients without rotator cuff tear as control (n=6). To minimize

  14. Postoperative subcoracoid impingement syndrome in patients with rotator cuff tear

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naoki Suenaga; Akio Minami; Kiyoshi Kaneda

    2000-01-01

    Impingement of the tendinous rotator cuff on the coracoid process (subcoracoid impingement syndrome) has rarely been reported as a cause of pain after surgery for rotator cuff tear. We evaluated clinical features, surgical results, and histopathology findings of resected coracoid processes in patients with subcoracoid impingement syndrome after anterior acromioplasty and management of rotator cuff tear. Pain at the anterior

  15. Cross-sectional analysis of baseline differences of candidates for rotator cuff surgery: a sex and gender perspective

    PubMed Central

    Razmjou, Helen; Davis, Aileen M; Jaglal, Susan B; Holtby, Richard; Richards, Robin R

    2009-01-01

    Background The word "sex" refers to biological differences between men and women. Gender refers to roles, behaviors, activities, and attributes that a given society considers appropriate for men and women. Traditionally, treatment decisions have been based on patient's sex without including the gender. Assessment of disability secondary to musculoskeletal problems would not be complete or accurate unless potentially relevant biological and non-biological aspects of being a man or woman are taken into consideration. The purposes of this study were to: 1) investigate the difference in pre-operative characteristics between men and women who were candidates for rotator cuff surgery; and, 2) assess the relationship between level of disability and factors that represent sex and factors that signify gender. Method This was a cross-sectional study. The primary outcome measure of disability was a disease-specific outcome measure, the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC) index, and independent variables were sex, age, hand dominance, shoulder side involvement, BMI, co-morbidity, medication use, work status, smoking habits, strength, range of motion, level of pathology, concurrent osteoarthritis, expectations for recovery, and participation restriction. Parametric, non-parametric, univariable, subgroup, and multivariable analyses were conducted. Results One hundred and seventy patients were included in the study. The mean age was 57 ± 11, 85 were females. Women reported higher levels of disability despite similar or lower levels of pathology. Scores of the WORC were strongly influenced by factors that represented "gender" such as participation restriction (F = 28.91, p < 0.0001) and expectations for improved activities of daily living (F = 5.80, p = 0.004). Painfree combined range of motion, which represented an interaction between "sex" and "gender" was also associated with disability after being adjusted for all other relevant baseline factors (F = 25.82, p < 0.0001). Conclusion Gender-related factors such as expectations and participation limitations have an independent impact on disability in men and women undergoing rotator cuff related surgery. PMID:19239706

  16. Biomechanical analysis of bursal-sided partial thickness rotator cuff tears

    E-print Network

    Makhsous, Mohsen

    Biomechanical analysis of bursal-sided partial thickness rotator cuff tears Scott Yang, BSa , Hyung of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Keywords: Rotator cuff; rotator cuff tear; supraspinatus abductor of the arm, and is most commonly torn in partial thickness rotator cuff tears.8 Partial thickness

  17. The behavior of rotator cuff tendon cells in three-dimensional culture

    E-print Network

    Gill, Harmeet (Harmeet Kaur)

    2007-01-01

    The rotator cuff is composed of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subcapularis, and teres minor tendons. Rotator cuff injuries are common athletic and occupational injuries that surgery cannot fully repair. Therefore tendon ...

  18. Rotator Cuff Repair

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CUFF REPAIR DOCTORS HOSPITAL CENTER FOR ORTHOPEDICS AND SPORTS MEDICINE CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA June 18, 2008 00:00: ... Coral Gables, Florida. I'm Dr. John Zvijac, sports medicine and shoulder surgeon here at Doctors Hospital, and ...

  19. Shoulder function after surgical repair of rotator cuff tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Kronberg; P Wahlström; L-Å Broström

    1997-01-01

    Shoulder function was assessed in 37 patients with a mean age of 57 years after acromioplasty and repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears were performed. The cuff tears were closed without transfer of other muscles or use of synthetic materials. At review 2 years after surgery 32 patients had significant pain relief and improved shoulder function. Range of motion, muscle

  20. Rotator Cuff Tears

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2013 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Rotator Cu? Tears A rotator cu? tear is a common cause of pain and disability ... Surgeons. Cause There are two main causes of rotator cu? tears: injury and degeneration. Acute Tear If you fall ...

  1. Prospective Evaluation of the Effect of Rotator Cuff Integrity on the Outcome of Open Rotator Cuff Repairs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven Klepps; Julie Bishop; Jason Lin; Oren Cahlon; Alyssa Strauss; Patrick Hayes; Evan L. Flatow

    2004-01-01

    Background: Open rotator cuff repairs have led to excellent clinical results; however, several studies have linked postoperative structural integrity to patient outcomes. The purpose of this study is to prospectively assess postoperative cuff integrity after open rotator cuff repair and assess its relationship to clinical outcome.Hypothesis: Preoperative rotator cuff tear size and postoperative rotator cuff integrity are important factors in

  2. Diagnosis and treatment of anterosuperior rotator cuff tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jon J. P. Warner; Laurence Higgins; I. M. Parsons; Paul Dowdy

    2001-01-01

    Nineteen of 407 patients who underwent rotator cuff repair surgery over a 6-year period were found to have a tear of the subscapularis in combination with the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons. Nine of these patients had an unsuccessful prior surgery, which failed to recognize the extent of the subscapularis component. Surgical repair of the subscapularis tendon required a deltopectoral approach,

  3. Advances in biology and mechanics of rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Lorbach, Olaf; Baums, Mike H; Kostuj, Tanja; Pauly, Stephan; Scheibel, Markus; Carr, Andrew; Zargar, Nasim; Saccomanno, Maristella F; Milano, Giuseppe

    2015-02-01

    High initial fixation strength, mechanical stability and biological healing of the tendon-to-bone interface are the main goals after rotator cuff repair surgery. Advances in the understanding of rotator cuff biology and biomechanics as well as improvements in surgical techniques have led to the development of new strategies that may allow a tendon-to-bone interface healing process, rather than the formation of a fibrovascular scar tissue. Although single-row repair remains the most cost-effective technique to address a rotator cuff tear, some biological intervention has been recently introduced to improve tissue healing and clinical outcome of rotator cuff repair. Animal models are critical to ensure safety and efficacy of new treatment strategies; however, although rat shoulders as well as sheep and goats are considered the most appropriate models for studying rotator cuff pathology, no one of them can fully reproduce the human condition. Emerging therapies involve growth factors, stem cells and tissue engineering. Experimental application of growth factors and platelet-rich plasma demonstrated promising results, but has not yet been transferred into standardized clinical practice. Although preclinical animal studies showed promising results on the efficacy of enhanced biological approaches, application of these techniques in human rotator cuff repairs is still very limited. Randomized controlled clinical trials and post-marketing surveillance are needed to clearly prove the clinical efficacy and define proper indications for the use of combined biological approaches. The following review article outlines the state of the art of rotator cuff repair and the use of growth factors, scaffolds and stem cells therapy, providing future directions to improve tendon healing after rotator cuff repair. Level of evidence Expert opinion, Level V. PMID:25573661

  4. Current biomechanical concepts for rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Lee, Thay Q

    2013-06-01

    For the past few decades, the repair of rotator cuff tears has evolved significantly with advances in arthroscopy techniques, suture anchors and instrumentation. From the biomechanical perspective, the focus in arthroscopic repair has been on increasing fixation strength and restoration of the footprint contact characteristics to provide early rehabilitation and improve healing. To accomplish these objectives, various repair strategies and construct configurations have been developed for rotator cuff repair with the understanding that many factors contribute to the structural integrity of the repaired construct. These include repaired rotator cuff tendon-footprint motion, increased tendon-footprint contact area and pressure, and tissue quality of tendon and bone. In addition, the healing response may be compromised by intrinsic factors such as decreased vascularity, hypoxia, and fibrocartilaginous changes or aforementioned extrinsic compression factors. Furthermore, it is well documented that torn rotator cuff muscles have a tendency to atrophy and become subject to fatty infiltration which may affect the longevity of the repair. Despite all the aforementioned factors, initial fixation strength is an essential consideration in optimizing rotator cuff repair. Therefore, numerous biomechanical studies have focused on elucidating the strongest devices, knots, and repair configurations to improve contact characteristics for rotator cuff repair. In this review, the biomechanical concepts behind current rotator cuff repair techniques will be reviewed and discussed. PMID:23730471

  5. Rotator cuff tear —Relationship between clinical and anatomopathological findings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Gschwend; D. Ivoševi?-Radovanovi?; D. Patte

    1987-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears (RCT) are frequent and increase with age. Why do only a relatively small percentage cause a permanent severe handicap justifying surgery? Is there a relationship between size and site of the tear and the clinical symptoms? How do they influence the postoperative result? These questions were answered in a prospective study of 76 operated patients. We adopted

  6. Glenoid damage from articular protrusion of metal suture anchor after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yang-Soo; Ok, Ji-Hoon; Garzon-Muvdi, Juan; McFarland, Edward G

    2015-03-01

    Arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tears has been shown to be effective and safe. The use of suture anchors has increased the ability to perform rotator cuff repairs arthroscopically. However, the use of suture anchors for any surgery around the shoulder can result in complications if the devices are not used and inserted properly. Complications that have been reported with the use of suture anchors for rotator cuff surgery include prominent anchors in the tuberosities, dislodged anchors secondary to pull-out or improper insertion, and osteolysis around the anchors. We report a case of articular cartilage damage secondary to a suture anchor protruding through the humeral head because of improper anchor insertion. Our patient's case reminds surgeons not only to be careful of the depth of insertion of suture anchors when performing rotator cuff surgery but also to obtain radiographs to evaluate the anchor position if patients continue to have symptoms after rotator cuff repair using these devices. PMID:25750956

  7. Association of Sonographically Detected Subacromial\\/Subdeltoid Bursal Effusion and Intraarticular Fluid with Rotator Cuff Tear

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary S. Hollister; Laurence A. Mack; Randall M. Patten; Thomas C. Winter; Fredrick A. Matsen; Ryan A. Veith

    OBJECTIVE. Although an association between sonographically detected joint fluid and rotator cuff disease has been reported, the significance of sonographically detected subacromial\\/subdeitold bursal effusion has not been studied. We examined a group of patients who had shoulder sonography and surgery to determine the associa- tion between bursal and joint effusion and surgically proved tears of the rotator cuff. MATERIALS AND

  8. The Factors Affecting Pain Pattern after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Wan; Kim, Dong-Gyun

    2014-01-01

    Background We evaluated the factors that affect pain pattern after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Methods From June 2009 to October 2010, 210 patients underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair operations. Of them, 84 patients were enrolled as subjects of the present study. The evaluation of postoperative pain was conducted by visual analog scale (VAS) scores during postoperative outpatient interviews at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months. The factors that were thought to affect postoperative pain were evaluated by dividing into three categories: preoperative, operative, and postoperative. Results Pain after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery showed a strictly decreasing pain pattern. In single analysis and multiple regression tests for factors influencing the strictly decreasing pain pattern, initial VAS and pain onset were shown to be statistically significant factors (p = 0.012, 0.012, 0.044 and 0.028, respectively). With regard to the factors influencing lower than average intensity pain pattern for each period, the stiffness of internal rotation at 3 months postoperatively was shown to be a statistically significant factor in single and multiple regression tests (p = 0.017 and p = 0.004, respectively). Conclusions High initial VAS scores and the acute onset of pain affected the strictly decreasing postoperative pain pattern. Additionally, stiffness of internal rotation at postoperative 3 months affected the higher than average intensity pain pattern for each period after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. PMID:25436062

  9. Rotator cuff tear measurement by arthropneumotomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kilcoyne, R.F.; Matsen, F.A. III

    1983-02-01

    Five years of experience with a method of shoulder arthrography using upright tomography in cases of suspected or known rotator cuff tears has demonstrated its effectiveness. The value of the procedure lies in its ability to demonstrate the size of the cuff tear and the thickness of the remaining cuff tissue. This information provides the surgeon with a preoperative estimate of the difficulty of the repair and the prognosis for a good functional recovery. In 33 cases, there was good correlation between the upright thin-section tomogram findings and the surgical results. The tomograms provided better information about the size of the tear and the quality of the remaining cuff than did plain arthrograms.

  10. Accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging in determining the presence and size of recurrent rotator cuff tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ali R Motamedi; Luis H Urrea; Robert E Hancock; Richard J Hawkins; Charles Ho

    2002-01-01

    We attempted to assess the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in determining the size of recurrent cuff tears in correlation with size measured at surgery. Thirty-seven shoulders in 33 patients who had reoperation for a presumed failed rotator cuff repair were retrospectively evaluated. All patients had preoperative MRI, the results of which were read by a musculoskeletal radiologist to

  11. Single row rotator cuff repair with modified technique.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sang-Hun; Shin, Seung-Myeong

    2012-12-18

    Rotator cuff tear is a common medical condition. We introduce various suture methods that can be used for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, review the single row rotator cuff repair method with modified technique, and introduce the Ulsan-University (UU) stich. We compare the UU stitch with the modified Mason-Allen (MA) suture method. The UU stitch configuration is a simple alternative to the modified MA suture configuration for rotator cuff repair. PMID:23362463

  12. Comparison of Open and Arthroscopically Assisted Rotator Cuff Repairs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Champ L. Baker; Stephen H. Liu

    1995-01-01

    Open rotator cuff repair has shown reliable results in terms of pain relief and improved shoulder function. Re cently, however, arthroscopically assisted rotator cuff repair has shown promising preliminary results. We compared the results of these two procedures with re gard to pain, function, range of motion, strength, patient satisfaction, and return to previous activity. Thirty-seven rotator cuff repairs were

  13. Mechanisms of rotator cuff tendinopathy: Intrinsic, extrinsic, or both?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amee L. Seitz; Philip W. McClure; Sheryl Finucane; N. Douglas Boardman; Lori A. Michener

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of rotator cuff tendinopathy is multi-factorial, and has been attributed to both extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms. Extrinsic factors that encroach upon the subacromial space and contribute to bursal side compression of the rotator cuff tendons include anatomical variants of the acromion, alterations in scapular or humeral kinematics, postural abnormalities, rotator cuff and scapular muscle performance deficits, and decreased

  14. Biologically based strategies to augment rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Schaer, M.; Schober, M.; Berger, S.; Boileau, P.; Zumstein, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Lesions of the rotator cuff (RC) are among the most frequent tendon injuries. In spite of the developments in both open and arthroscopic surgery, RC repair still very often fails. In order to reduce the failure rate after surgery, several experimental in vitro and in vivo therapy methods have been developed for biological improvement of the reinsertion. This article provides an overview of the current evidence for augmentation of RC reconstruction with growth factors. Furthermore, potential future therapeutic approaches are discussed. We performed a comprehensive search of the PubMed database using various combinations of the keywords “tendon,” “rotator cuff,” “augmentation,” “growth factor,” “platelet-rich fibrin,” and “platelet-rich plasma” for publications up to 2011. Given the linguistic capabilities of the research team, we considered publications in English, German, French, and Spanish. We excluded literature reviews, case reports, and letters to the editor. PMID:22787334

  15. Arthroscopic assessment of full-thickness rotator cuff tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hervé Thomazeau; Pascal Gleyze; Laurent Lafosse; Gilles Walch; François Kelbérine; Henri Coudane

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the reliability of the arthroscopic assessment of full-thickness rotator cuff tears, 117 cases were prospectively investigated by imaging, arthroscopy, and open surgery. The confidence of the surgeon, his accuracy, and the surgeon-dependent character of arthroscopic assessment were evaluated in terms of the description of the main anatomic parameters. The surgeons were confident and accurate in diagnosing a full-thickness

  16. Partial-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew J. Matava; Derek B. Purcell; Jonas R. Rudzki

    2005-01-01

    Partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff have been diagnosed with increased frequency because of a heightened awareness of the condition by clinicians and improved diagnostic methods. Research into the causes, natural history, and optimal treatment of this condition lags behind that of full-thickness tears. However, despite the limitations in the existing literature, there has emerged a consensus among shoulder experts

  17. Regenerative Medicine in Rotator Cuff Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Randelli, Pietro; Ragone, Vincenza; Menon, Alessandra; Cabitza, Paolo; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Rotator cuff injuries are a common source of shoulder pathology and result in an important decrease in quality of patient life. Given the frequency of these injuries, as well as the relatively poor result of surgical intervention, it is not surprising that new and innovative strategies like tissue engineering have become more appealing. Tissue-engineering strategies involve the use of cells and/or bioactive factors to promote tendon regeneration via natural processes. The ability of numerous growth factors to affect tendon healing has been extensively analyzed in vitro and in animal models, showing promising results. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a whole blood fraction which contains several growth factors. Controlled clinical studies using different autologous PRP formulations have provided controversial results. However, favourable structural healing rates have been observed for surgical repair of small and medium rotator cuff tears. Cell-based approaches have also been suggested to enhance tendon healing. Bone marrow is a well known source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Recently, ex vivo human studies have isolated and cultured distinct populations of MSCs from rotator cuff tendons, long head of the biceps tendon, subacromial bursa, and glenohumeral synovia. Stem cells therapies represent a novel frontier in the management of rotator cuff disease that required further basic and clinical research. PMID:25184132

  18. Muscle progenitor cell regenerative capacity in the torn rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Gretchen A; Farris, Ashley L; Sato, Eugene; Gibbons, Michael; Lane, John G; Ward, Samuel R; Engler, Adam J

    2015-03-01

    Chronic rotator cuff (RC) tears affect a large portion of the population and result in substantial upper extremity impairment, shoulder weakness, pain, and limited range of motion. Regardless of surgical or conservative treatment, persistent atrophic muscle changes limit functional restoration and may contribute to surgical failure. We hypothesized that deficits in the skeletal muscle progenitor (SMP) cell pool could contribute to poor muscle recovery following tendon repair. Biopsies were obtained from patients undergoing arthroscopic RC surgery. The SMP population was quantified, isolated, and assayed in culture for its ability to proliferate and fuse in vitro and in vivo. The SMP population was larger in muscles from cuffs with partial tears compared with no tears or full thickness tears. However, SMPs from muscles in the partial tear group also exhibited reduced proliferative ability. Cells from all cuff states were able to fuse robustly in culture and engraft when injected into injured mouse muscle, suggesting that when given the correct signals, SMPs are capable of contributing to muscle hypertrophy and regeneration regardless of tear severity. The fact that this does not appear to happen in vivo helps focus future therapeutic targets for promoting muscle recovery following rotator cuff repairs and may help improve clinical outcomes. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 33:???-???, 2015. PMID:25410765

  19. Orthopaedic Surgery Sports Medicine

    E-print Network

    Kim, Duck O.

    Orthopaedic Surgery Sports Medicine How Does Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Surgery Work? Rev. 2 Sports Medicine How Does Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Surgery Work? Rev. 2/13 2 Rotator Cuff;Orthopaedic Surgery Sports Medicine How Does Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Surgery Work? Rev. 2/13 3 Figure

  20. Primary anterior shoulder dislocation and rotator cuff tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roger Berbig; Dominik Weishaupt; Jürg Prim; Osama Shahin

    1999-01-01

    In a prospective controlled study 167 patients with 167 primary traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations underwent early ultrasonographic evaluation for rotator cuff tears. We found 53 (31.7%) full-thickness cuff tears in this group. Compared with a group of 93 healthy volunteers, we found with statistical significance more cuff tears in the patients aged

  1. Rotator cuff tears in anterior dislocation of the shoulder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Itoi; S. Tabata

    1992-01-01

    We diagnosed 16 rotator cuff tears in 109 shoulders in 104 patients with a traumatic anterior dislocation. Twelve of these were followed up for an average of 32 months. A surgical repair of the cuff was carried out in eleven and the results were satisfactory in eight (73%) regardless of a Bankart lesion. The repair of a torn cuff seems

  2. Anomalous biceps origin from the rotator cuff

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Samik; Patel, Vipul R

    2015-01-01

    Variations in the origin of the long head of biceps tendon (LHBT) have been described in literature; however, its clinical significance remains uncertain. We describe in this report, the history, physical examination and the arthroscopic findings in a patient who had an anomalous origin of the LHBT from the rotator cuff, resulting in restriction of range of motion. This anomalous origin of the long head of biceps tendon causing capsular contracture and restriction of movements leading to secondary internal impingement, has not been extensively reported in the literature. Shoulder arthroscopists should be aware that, although, an uncommon clinical condition, the aberrant congenital origin of the LHBT from the rotator cuff can rarely become pathologic in middle age and lead to shoulder dysfunction. In such cases, release of the anomalous band may be required, along with the treatment of other concomitant intraarticular pathologies in the glenohumeral joint. PMID:25593361

  3. Anomalous biceps origin from the rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Patel, Vipul R

    2015-01-01

    Variations in the origin of the long head of biceps tendon (LHBT) have been described in literature; however, its clinical significance remains uncertain. We describe in this report, the history, physical examination and the arthroscopic findings in a patient who had an anomalous origin of the LHBT from the rotator cuff, resulting in restriction of range of motion. This anomalous origin of the long head of biceps tendon causing capsular contracture and restriction of movements leading to secondary internal impingement, has not been extensively reported in the literature. Shoulder arthroscopists should be aware that, although, an uncommon clinical condition, the aberrant congenital origin of the LHBT from the rotator cuff can rarely become pathologic in middle age and lead to shoulder dysfunction. In such cases, release of the anomalous band may be required, along with the treatment of other concomitant intraarticular pathologies in the glenohumeral joint. PMID:25593361

  4. Delivered growth factor therapy to improve healing after rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Emilie V; Silverio, Luz; Yao, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Background Degenerative rotator cuff tears are a significant cause of shoulder pain in the aging population. Rotator cuff repair surgery may be more successful when growth factors are delivered to the repair site. This study was designed to determine the cellular processes involved in normal bone-to-tendon healing and the current approaches used for biologic augmentation of rotator cuff repair. Methods This review focuses on animal studies of rotator cuff repair and early human trials. Results Regular bone-to-tendon healing forms a fibrous junction between tendon and bone that is markedly different from the original bone-to-tendon junction. Tendon augmentation with cellular components serves as scaffolding for endogenous fibroblastic cells and a possible source of growth factors and fibroblastic cells. Extracellular matrices provide a scaffold for incoming fibroblastic cells. However, research in extracellular matrices is not conclusive due to intermanufacturer variation and the lack of human subject research. Growth factors and platelet-rich plasma are established in other fields of research and show promise, but have not yet been rigorously tested in rotator cuff repair augmentation. Conclusions Rotator cuff repair can benefit from biologic augmentation. However, research in this field is still young and has not yet demonstrated that the benefits in healing rates are significant enough to merit regular clinical use. Randomized controlled trials will elucidate the use of biologic augmentation in rotator cuff repairs. PMID:24198519

  5. Biological Augmentation of Rotator Cuff Tendon Repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Kovacevic; Scott A. Rodeo

    2008-01-01

    A histologically normal insertion site does not regenerate following rotator cuff tendon-to-bone repair, which is likely due\\u000a to abnormal or insufficient gene expression and\\/or cell differentiation at the repair site. Techniques to manipulate the biologic\\u000a events following tendon repair may improve healing. We used a sheep infraspinatus repair model to evaluate the effect of osteoinductive\\u000a growth factors and BMP-12 on

  6. Shoulder ultrasound: Diagnostic accuracy for impingement syndrome, rotator cuff tear, and biceps tendon pathology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John W Read; Mark Perko

    1998-01-01

    We sought to determine the accuracy of ultrasound for the preoperative evaluation of shoulder impingement syndrome, rotator cuff tear, and abnormalities of the long head of the biceps tendon. The findings in 42 consecutive surgical cases were compared with the preoperative sonographic readings. Ultrasound detected all of the 10 full-thickness cuff tears identified at surgery (sensitivity 1.0, specificity 0.97) but

  7. The low incidence of suprascapular nerve injury after primary repair of massive rotator cuff tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert M. Zanotti; James E. Carpenter; Ralph B. Blasier; Mary Lou V. H. Greenfield; Ronald S. Adler; Mark B. Bromberg

    1997-01-01

    We measured the incidence of cuff retear and injury to the suprascapular nerve after mobilization and repair of a massive rotator cuff tear. Of one hundred four rotator cuff repairs performed over a 5-year period, 10 patients (7 men and 3 women, age range 22 to 68 years) had primary repairs of massive rotator cuff tears requiring cuff mobilization and

  8. Shoulder Impingement/Rotator Cuff Tendinitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the biceps tendon (biceps tendonitis), or a partial rotator cu? tear. Open surgical technique. In open surgery, your doctor will make a small incision in the front of your shoulder. This allows your doctor to see the acromion and rotator cu? directly. Rehabilitation. A er surgery, your arm ...

  9. The 'dropping' and 'hornblower's' signs in evaluation of rotator-cuff tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gilles Walch; Aziz Boulahia; Salvatore Calderone; Andrew H. N. Robinson

    1998-01-01

    e studied 54 patients operated on for combined supraspinatus and infraspinatus rotator-cuff tears. The presence or absence of the dropping and hornblower's clinical signs of impaired external rotation were correlated with Goutallier stage-3 or stage-4 fatty degeneration of infraspinatus and teres minor. These grades of fatty degeneration have previously been correlated with a poorer outcome from reconstructive surgery. We found

  10. Repair of rotator cuff tears in tennis players

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louis U. Bigiliani; Jay Kimmel; Peter D. McCann; Ira Wolfe

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-three tennis players with a symptomatic full- thickness rotator cuff tear underwent anterior acro mioplasty and rotator cuff repair. There were 8 small tears (<1 cm), 5 moderate tears (1 to 3 cm), 2 large tears (3 to 5 cm), and 8 massive tears (>5 cm). The dominant shoulder was involved in all patients and all were unable to play

  11. Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: 4- to 10Year Results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eugene M. Wolf; William T. Pennington; Vivek Agrawal

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to report the 4- to 10-year results of arthroscopic repair of full- thickness rotator cuff tears. Type of Study: This is a retrospective study evaluating a series of arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs performed by a single surgeon from February 1990 to February 1996. Methods: Retrospective chart reviews and telephone interviews were performed to

  12. Shockwave therapy under ultrasonographic guidance in rotator cuff calcific tendinitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeanne Elisabeth Charrin; Eric Robert Noël

    2001-01-01

    Objectives. This is the first efficacy evaluation in patients with rotator cuff calcific tendinitis treated with shockwave therapy delivered using a dedicated extracorporeal lithotripter and ultrasonographic guidance. Patients and methods. Thirty-two patients with rotator cuff calcific tendinitis received shockwave therapy delivered using a lithotripter specifically designed for the musculoskeletal system (DORNIER EPOS ULTRA), under ultrasonography guidance (which is not part of

  13. Rotator Cuff Disease and Injury--Evaluation and Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Randy

    This presentation considers the incidence, evaluation, and management of rotator cuff disease and injury. Pathogenesis, symptoms, physical findings, treatment (therapeutic and surgical), and prevention are discussed. It is noted that rotator cuff problems, common in athletes, are usually related to an error in training or lack of training. They…

  14. Management of disorders of the rotator cuff: proceedings of the ISAKOS upper extremity committee consensus meeting.

    PubMed

    Arce, Guillermo; Bak, Klaus; Bain, Gregory; Calvo, Emilio; Ejnisman, Benno; Di Giacomo, Giovanni; Gutierrez, Vicente; Guttmann, Dan; Itoi, Eiji; Ben Kibler, W; Ludvigsen, Tom; Mazzocca, Augustus; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Savoie, Felix; Sugaya, Hiroyuki; Uribe, John; Vergara, Francisco; Willems, Jaap; Yoo, Yon Sik; McNeil, John W; Provencher, Matthew T

    2013-11-01

    The goal of this article is to consolidate the International Society of Arthroscopy, Knee Surgery & Orthopaedic Sports Medicine (ISAKOS) Upper Extremity Committee's (UEC's) current knowledge on rotator cuff disease and management, as well as highlight key unresolved issues. The rotator cuff is an anatomically complex structure important for providing glenohumeral function and stability as part of a closed chain system. Current consensus suggests rotator cuff injuries are most accurately diagnosed, at levels similar to diagnosis by magnetic resonance imaging, with a combination of cuff- and impingement-specific clinical tests. Updates in the understanding of acromion morphology, the insertional anatomy of the rotator cuff, and the role of suprascapular nerve release may require changes to current classification systems and surgical strategies. Although initial management focuses on nonoperative protocols, discussion continues on whether surgery for isolated impingement is clinically more beneficial than rehabilitation. However, clear indications have yet to be established for the use of single- versus double-row repair because evidence confirms neither is clinically efficacious than the other. Biceps tenodesis, however, in non-isolated cuff tears has proven more successful in addressing the etiology of shoulder pain and yields improved outcomes over tenotomy. Data reviewing the benefits of tendon transfers, shoulder prostheses, and mechanical scaffolds, as well as new research on the potential benefit of platelet-rich plasma, pluripotential stem cells, and gene therapies, will also be presented. PMID:24041864

  15. [Rotator cuff tear of the hip].

    PubMed

    Jeanneret, Luc; Kurmann, Patric T; van Linthoudt, Daniel

    2008-05-14

    We report the observations of two women with a recurrent periarthritis of the hip complicated by a spontaneous rupture of the tendons of the gluteus medius and minimus. These patients usually complain from an acute lateral hip pain and show a Trendelenburg gait. When the rupture is complete, clinical evaluation reveals a drop of the pelvis on the non-stance side and resisted rotation starting from the extreme external rotation position is weak. MRI plays a key role in the diagnosis and the evaluation of a possible surgical repair. Hip rotator-cuff rupture is probably insufficiently diagnosed by ignorance. Nonetheless, optimized handling could relieve the pain of most these patients and improve the disability of some of them. PMID:18561829

  16. Calcific Tendinitis of the Rotator Cuff: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kachewar, Sushil G; Kulkarni, Devidas S

    2013-01-01

    Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff is a common disorder; its underlying mechanism still remains unknown. Although details of the clinical presentation(s) and pathological changes which are associated with calcific tendinitis are available, conservative management of this condition remains a topic of debate. About 90% of the patients can be treated non – operatively, but as some are resistant to conservative treatment; newer techniques or surgery should be indicated. Rheumatologists and radiologists have often described this shoulder abnormality, leading to its progressive differentiation from other painful shoulder syndromes. The conservative treatment includes the use of non – steroidal anti – inflammatory agents, roentegen therapy, physical modalities for controlling the pain and for preventing loss of joint mobility, local steroid injections, and open or arthroscopic surgeries. Results of non – operative treatments have also been satisfactory. These include heat, cold, range of motion and pendulum exercises, diathermy, short – wave, and radiation therapy. Rest, immobilization with a sling, and oral non – steroidal and steroid anti – inflammatory medications have also been mentioned. This review aimed at looking at calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff with a wide vision in the light of modern advances; while at the same time, not disregarding the past experiences. PMID:23998102

  17. Living with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear ‘bad days, bad nights’: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain. There is an absence of information about symptomatic rotator cuffs from the patients’ perspective; this limits the information clinicians can share with patients and the information that patients can access via sources such as the internet. This study describes the experiences of people with a symptomatic rotator cuff, their symptoms, the impact upon their daily lives and the coping strategies utilised by study participants. Methods An interpretive phenomenological analysis approach was used. 20 participants of the UKUFF trial (The United Kingdom Rotator Cuff Surgery Trial) agreed to participate in in-depth semi-structured interviews about their experiences about living with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear. Interviews were digitally recorded and fully transcribed. Field notes, memos and a reflexive diary were used. Data was coded in accordance with interpretive phenomenological analysis. Peer review, code-recode audits and constant comparison of data, codes and categories occurred throughout. Results The majority of patients described intense pain and severely disturbed sleep. Limited movement and reduced muscle strength were described by some participants. The predominantly adverse impact that a symptomatic rotator cuff tear had upon activities of daily living, leisure activities and occupation was described. The emotional and financial impact and impact upon caring roles were detailed. Coping strategies included attempting to carry on as normally as possible, accepting their condition, using their other arm, using analgesics, aids and adaptions. Conclusions Clinicians need to appreciate and understand the intensity and shocking nature of pain that may be experienced by participants with known rotator cuff tears and understand the detrimental impact tears can have upon all areas of patient’s lives. Clinicians also need to be aware of the potential emotional impact caused by cuff tears and to ensure that patients needing help for conditions such as depression are speedily identified and provided with support, explanation and appropriate treatment. PMID:25008095

  18. Arthroscopic repair of medium to large full-thickness rotator cuff tears: Outcome at 2- to 6-year follow-up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas F Murray; Georg Lajtai; Robert M Mileski; Stephen J Snyder

    2002-01-01

    Medium-term follow-up of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was evaluated in 48 consecutive arthroscopic repairs of medium to large rotator cuff tears. Mean rotator cuff tear size was 2.4 cm (range, 2-4 cm), mean age at surgery was 57.6 years (range, 38-80 years), and mean follow-up was 39 months (range, 24-66 months). Mean University of California at Los Angeles End-Result Scores

  19. Management of Rotator Cuff and Impingement Injuries in the Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Gerald R.; Kelley, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To review current concepts of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of rotator cuff and impingement injuries in the athlete. Data Sources: The information we present was compiled from a review of classic and recently published material regarding rotator cuff and impingement injuries. These materials were identified through a search of a personal literature database compiled by the authors, as well as by selective searching of the MEDLINE. In addition, much of the information presented represents observations and opinions of the authors developed over 8 to 10 years of treating shoulder injuries in athletes. Data Synthesis: Biomechanics of the normal shoulder and pathophysiology of rotator cuff injuries in the athletic population are discussed, followed by a summary of the important diagnostic features of rotator cuff and impingement injuries. The principles of rehabilitation are extensively presented, along with indications and important technical aspects of selected surgical procedures. General principles and specific protocols of postoperative rehabilitation are also summarized. Conclusions/Recommendations: Rotator cuff and impingement injuries in the athletic population are multifactorial in etiology, exhibiting significant overlap with glenohumeral instability. Nonoperative treatment is successful in most athletic patients with rotator cuff and impingement injuries. When nonoperative treatment fails, arthroscopic surgical techniques such as rotator cuff repair and subacromial decompression may be successful in returning the athlete to competition. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 12.Figure 13. PMID:16558644

  20. Mechanisms of rotator cuff tendinopathy: intrinsic, extrinsic, or both?

    PubMed

    Seitz, Amee L; McClure, Philip W; Finucane, Sheryl; Boardman, N Douglas; Michener, Lori A

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of rotator cuff tendinopathy is multi-factorial, and has been attributed to both extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms. Extrinsic factors that encroach upon the subacromial space and contribute to bursal side compression of the rotator cuff tendons include anatomical variants of the acromion, alterations in scapular or humeral kinematics, postural abnormalities, rotator cuff and scapular muscle performance deficits, and decreased extensibility of pectoralis minor or posterior shoulder. A unique extrinsic mechanism, internal impingement, is attributed to compression of the posterior articular surface of the tendons between the humeral head and glenoid and is not related to subacromial space narrowing. Intrinsic factors that contribute to rotator cuff tendon degradation with tensile/shear overload include alterations in biology, mechanical properties, morphology, and vascularity. The varied nature of these mechanisms indicates that rotator cuff tendinopathy is not a homogenous entity, and thus may require different treatment interventions. Treatment aimed at addressing mechanistic factors appears to be beneficial for patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy, however, not for all patients. Classification of rotator cuff tendinopathy into subgroups based on underlying mechanism may improve treatment outcomes. PMID:20846766

  1. Rotator Cuff Damage: Reexamining the Causes and Treatments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Heyward L.

    1988-01-01

    Sports medicine specialists are beginning to reexamine the causes and treatments of rotator cuff problems, questioning the role of primary impingement in a deficient or torn cuff and trying new surgical procedures as alternatives to the traditional open acromioplasty. (Author/CB)

  2. New designs of cuff seals for rotating shafts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. V. Burenin

    2008-01-01

    The reliability of hydraulic machine tools, automatic lines, industrial robots, and other machines and mechanisms largely depends on the safe operation of seals for rotary joints (in rotating shafts). In such cases, cuff seals (cuffs), usually made of rubber, plastic, and other rubbery materials are widely used as contact seals [1, 2]. The quality requirements on seals are rising sharply,

  3. Arthroscopic “Interval Slide” in the Repair of Large Rotator Cuff Tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph C. Tauro

    1999-01-01

    Summary: An arthroscopic technique for coracohumeral ligament release from a retracted supraspinatus tendon is presented. The procedure is technically simple and can greatly improve the mobility of retracted rotator cuff tears, thus expanding the application of arthroscopic repair to larger tears.Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery, Vol 15, No 5 (July-August), 1999: pp 527–530

  4. Dual-camera technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Tuttle, John R; Ramos, Paul; DaSilva, Manuel F

    2014-12-01

    An all-arthroscopic rotator cuff repair demands a high level of technical skill and is associated with a steep learning curve. It is well accepted that small rotator cuff tears or partial tears can be more difficult than large or even massive tears to repair. Part of the reason is the difficulty in visualizing the tear, as well as important surrounding structures, during repair. To improve visibility during the repair process, we have introduced a second arthroscopic camera. Two cameras allow the surgeon to observe the rotator cuff from both the articular and bursal sides. We find this technique has merit in small or partial-thickness rotator cuff tears; however, there may be other applications. PMID:25685668

  5. Dual-Camera Technique for Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Tuttle, John R.; Ramos, Paul; DaSilva, Manuel F.

    2014-01-01

    An all-arthroscopic rotator cuff repair demands a high level of technical skill and is associated with a steep learning curve. It is well accepted that small rotator cuff tears or partial tears can be more difficult than large or even massive tears to repair. Part of the reason is the difficulty in visualizing the tear, as well as important surrounding structures, during repair. To improve visibility during the repair process, we have introduced a second arthroscopic camera. Two cameras allow the surgeon to observe the rotator cuff from both the articular and bursal sides. We find this technique has merit in small or partial-thickness rotator cuff tears; however, there may be other applications. PMID:25685668

  6. Tendon transfer for irreparable rotator cuff tears: indications and surgical rationale

    PubMed Central

    Merolla, Giovanni; Chillemi, Claudio; Franceschini, Vincenzo; Cerciello, Simone; Ippolito, Giorgio; Paladini, Paolo; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: treatment of symptomatic irreparable rotator cuff tears is extremely challenging because, at present, there are no ideal solutions to this problem. Many patients respond favorably to nonsurgical treatment. However, when conservative measures fail to improve the patient’s pain and disability, surgery should be considered. Methods: different surgical techniques are available and the choice of the most appropriate procedure depends on the presenting symptoms, age of the patient, functional demand, medical comorbidities, joint stability and presence of arthritic changes. The transposition of the surrounding muscles to replace the rotator cuff function represents a viable option in the treatment of younger patients without glenohumeral osteoarthritis and with severe functional limitation. Purpose: aim of this study is to give an overview of the currently available evidence regarding tendon transfer procedures for irreparable rotator cuff tears.

  7. Arthroscopic treatment options for irreparable rotator cuff tears of the shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Anley, Cameron M; Chan, Samuel KL; Snow, Martyn

    2014-01-01

    The management of patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears remains a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons with the final treatment option in many algorithms being either a reverse shoulder arthroplasty or a tendon transfer. The long term results of these procedures are however still widely debated, especially in younger patients. A variety of arthroscopic treatment options have been proposed for patients with an irreparable rotator cuff tear without the presence of arthritis of the glenohumeral joint. These include a simple debridement with or without a biceps tenotomy, partial rotator cuff repair with or without an interval slide, tuberplasty, graft interposition of the rotator cuff, suprascapular nerve ablation, superior capsule reconstruction and insertion of a biodegradable spacer (Inspace) to depress the humeral head. These options should be considered as part of the treatment algorithm in patients with an irreparable rotator cuff and could be used as either as an interim procedure, delaying the need for more invasive surgery in the physiologically young and active, or as potential definitive procedures in the medically unfit. The aim of this review is to highlight and summarise arthroscopic procedures and the results thereof currently utilised in the management of these challenging patients. PMID:25405083

  8. Bipolar hemiarthroplasty for chronic rotator cuff tear arthropathy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ioannis K. Sarris; Nicholas G. Papadimitriou; Dean G. Sotereanos

    2003-01-01

    Massive rotator cuff tears associated with glenohumeral arthritis are currently an unsolvable clinical entity. We review our series of 14 patients with rotator cuff tear arthropathy (RCTA) who underwent a bipolar prosthesis of the shoulder. The average follow up was 27.8 months (range, 24–48 months), and the average age was 71 years (range, 57–84 years). Of these 14 patients, 9

  9. Improved apparatus for predictive diagnosis of rotator cuff disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, Anup; Hall, Brittany N.; Thigpen, Charles A.; Kwartowitz, David M.

    2014-03-01

    Rotator cuff disease impacts over 50% of the population over 60, with reports of incidence being as high as 90% within this population, causing pain and possible loss of function. The rotator cuff is composed of muscles and tendons that work in tandem to support the shoulder. Heavy use of these muscles can lead to rotator cuff tear, with the most common causes is age-related degeneration or sport injuries, both being a function of overuse. Tears ranges in severity from partial thickness tear to total rupture. Diagnostic techniques are based on physical assessment, detailed patient history, and medical imaging; primarily X-ray, MRI and ultrasonography are the chosen modalities for assessment. The final treatment technique and imaging modality; however, is chosen by the clinician is at their discretion. Ultrasound has been shown to have good accuracy for identification and measurement of full-thickness and partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. In this study, we report on the progress and improvement of our method of transduction and analysis of in situ measurement of rotator cuff biomechanics. We have improved the ability of the clinician to apply a uniform force to the underlying musculotendentious tissues while simultaneously obtaining the ultrasound image. This measurement protocol combined with region of interest (ROI) based image processing will help in developing a predictive diagnostic model for treatment of rotator cuff disease and help the clinicians choose the best treatment technique.

  10. Glenoid loosening in total shoulder arthroplasty. Association with rotator cuff deficiency.

    PubMed

    Franklin, J L; Barrett, W P; Jackins, S E; Matsen, F A

    1988-01-01

    Seven cases of total shoulder arthroplasty exhibiting major glenoid radiolucent lines or actual translation of the glenoid component were evaluated to identify factors associated with glenoid loosening. The average time from arthroplasty was 30 months (range, 14-44 months). Six of the patients had severe, incompletely reconstructable rotator cuff tears present at the time of surgery, and one patient developed a cuff tear within 1 year of surgery. The amount of superior migration of the humeral component was closely correlated with the degree of glenoid loosening. With superior displacement of the humeral component, superior tipping of the glenoid component was observed: a "rocking horse" glenoid. For comparison, a contemporary group of 16 consecutive total shoulder arthroplasty patients with intact rotator cuffs were reviewed. The control group had no glenoid loosening an average of 5 years after operation. Upward riding of the prosthetic humeral head in patients with rotator cuff deficiency may contribute to loosening of the glenoid component in total shoulder arthroplasty. PMID:3361319

  11. Subacromial Spacer Placement for Protection of Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Szöllösy, Gregor; Rosso, Claudio; Fogerty, Simon; Petkin, Kalojan; Lafosse, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Rotator cuff repairs have a high failure rate proportional to the tear size. Various techniques have been described to improve the repair strength and failure rate. The described surgical technique uses a biodegradable subacromial balloon-shaped spacer (InSpace; OrthoSpace, Caesarea, Israel) that is implanted arthroscopically to protect our tendon repair. We describe the introduction technique and suggest some hints and tricks. The spacer is placed under direct vision in the subacromial space after the rotator cuff repair is finished. Correct placement is verified by moving the arm freely. The subacromial spacer may help to protect the rotator cuff repair by centering the humeral head and reducing friction between suture knots and the acromion. It may also help to flatten dog-ear formations. PMID:25473615

  12. Subacromial spacer placement for protection of rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Szöllösy, Gregor; Rosso, Claudio; Fogerty, Simon; Petkin, Kalojan; Lafosse, Laurent

    2014-10-01

    Rotator cuff repairs have a high failure rate proportional to the tear size. Various techniques have been described to improve the repair strength and failure rate. The described surgical technique uses a biodegradable subacromial balloon-shaped spacer (InSpace; OrthoSpace, Caesarea, Israel) that is implanted arthroscopically to protect our tendon repair. We describe the introduction technique and suggest some hints and tricks. The spacer is placed under direct vision in the subacromial space after the rotator cuff repair is finished. Correct placement is verified by moving the arm freely. The subacromial spacer may help to protect the rotator cuff repair by centering the humeral head and reducing friction between suture knots and the acromion. It may also help to flatten dog-ear formations. PMID:25473615

  13. Cyclic Loading of Transosseous Rotator Cuff Repairs" Tension Overload as a Possible Cause of Failure

    E-print Network

    Athanasiou, Kyriacos

    failed first and by the largest magnitude. This study suggests that rotator cuff tears that are repairedCyclic Loading of Transosseous Rotator Cuff Repairs" Tension Overload as a Possible Cause. Athanasiou, Ph.D. Summary: Previous experimental studies of failure of rotator cuff repair have involved

  14. Cyclic Loading of Anchor-Based Rotator Cuff Repairs" Confirmation of the Tension Overload Phenomenon and

    E-print Network

    Athanasiou, Kyriacos

    Cyclic Loading of Anchor-Based Rotator Cuff Repairs" Confirmation of the Tension Overload experimental studies of failure of rotator cuff repair have involved single pull to ultimate load rotator cuff defects in 16 cadaver shoulders, repaired each defect with three Mitek- RC suture anchors

  15. An arthroscopic stitch for massive rotator cuff tears: the mac stitch

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John D. MacGillivray; C. Benjamin Ma

    2004-01-01

    Arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tears has become popular with the advancement in technology and arthroscopic technique. As we attempt to arthroscopically repair larger rotator cuff tears, we are relying more on tissue fixation. The tendon–suture interface has been recognized as the weak link in rotator cuff repair. In this article, we propose the use of the Mac stitch—a simple

  16. Novel Nanofiber-Based Scaffold for Rotator Cuff Repair and Augmentation

    E-print Network

    Lu, Helen H.

    and Helen H. Lu, Ph.D.1,4 The debilitating effects of rotator cuff tears and the high incidence of failure and actively control shoulder kine- matics. Rotator cuff tears are among the most common in- juries afflictingNovel Nanofiber-Based Scaffold for Rotator Cuff Repair and Augmentation Kristen L. Moffat, M.S.,1

  17. Limited sensitivity of ultrasound for the detection of rotator cuff tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cynthia L. Miller; David Karasick; Alfred B. Kurtz; John M. Fenlin

    1989-01-01

    Bilateral rotator cuff sonography was performed on 56 patients referred for shoulder arthrography to detect rotator cuff tears. Since one patient had bilateral arthrography there were 57 arthrograms. Twenty-seven shoulders had rotator cuff tears shown on arthrography, 15 of which were detected by sonography. Eleven were false negative by sonography, and one was indeterminate. Of the 30 shoulders with negative

  18. The effect of rotator cuff tears on reaction forces at the glenohumeral joint

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. M Parsons; IV; Maria Apreleva; Freddie H. Fu; Savio L.-Y. Woo

    2002-01-01

    The rotator cuff muscles maintain glenohumeral stability by compressing the humeral head into the glenoid. Disruption of the rotator cuff compromises concavity compression and can directly affect the loads on the glenohumeral joint. The purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of rotator cuff tears on the magnitude and direction of glenohumeral joint reaction forces during active shoulder

  19. Subacromial Internal Spacer for Rotator Cuff Tendon Repair: “The Balloon Technique”

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexandre S. Kilinc; Mohammad H. Ebrahimzadeh; Laurent Lafosse

    2009-01-01

    Lateral reattachment of the rotator cuff and the more recent introduction of the double-row rotator cuff repair technique require adequate visualization to define the rotator cuff footprint and the greater tuberosity. In many cases extensive debridement in this area is required to remove the overlying subdeltoid bursa, which can impair visualization laterally on the proximal humerus. Inadequate visualization laterally may

  20. Preclinical Models for Translating Regenerative Medicine Therapies for Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Andrew Ryan; Iannotti, Joseph P.; McCarron, Jesse A.

    2010-01-01

    Despite improvements in the understanding of rotator cuff pathology and advances in surgical treatment options, repairs of chronic rotator cuff tears often re-tear or fail to heal after surgery. Hence, there is a critical need for new regenerative repair strategies that provide effective mechanical reinforcement of rotator cuff repair as well as stimulate and enhance the patient's intrinsic healing potential. This article will discuss and identify appropriate models for translating regenerative medicine therapies for rotator cuff repair. Animal models are an essential part of the research and development pathway; however, no one animal model reproduces all of the features of the human injury condition. The rat shoulder is considered the most appropriate model to investigate the initial safety, mechanism, and efficacy of biologic treatments aimed to enhance tendon-to-bone repair. Whereas large animal models are considered more appropriate to investigate the surgical methods, safety and efficacy of the mechanical—or combination biologic/mechanical—strategies are ultimately needed for treating human patients. The human cadaver shoulder model, performed using standard-of-care repair techniques, is considered the best for establishing the surgical techniques and mechanical efficacy of various repair strategies at time zero. While preclinical models provide a critical aspect of the translational pathway for engineered tissues, controlled clinical trials and postmarketing surveillance are also needed to define the efficacy, proper indications, and the method of application for each new regenerative medicine strategy. PMID:19663651

  1. Decision-making in massive rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Thès, André; Hardy, Philippe; Bak, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Treatment of massive rotator cuff tears has developed over many years ranging from conservative treatment to open and arthroscopic repair, muscle transfers and reversed arthroplasty. The evolution of more advanced techniques in arthroscopic repair has changed the treatment approach and improved the prognosis for functional outcome despite low healing rates. Due to this rapid development, our evidence-based knowledge today is mainly founded in Level 3 and Level 4 studies. Based on the literature, the current knowledge on treatment of symptomatic massive rotator cuff tears is proposed in an algorithm. Level of evidence V. PMID:25502477

  2. Subacromial-subdeltoid lipoma arborescens associated with a rotator cuff tear

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J.-F. Nisolle; E. Blouard; V. Baudrez; Y. Boutsen; P. De Cloedt; W. Esselinckx

    1999-01-01

    A 44-year-old man presented with lipoma arborescens of the right shoulder, associated with a rotator cuff tear. MRI revealed\\u000a villous proliferations with signal intensity of fat on all pulse sequences. At surgery, this bursa was found to contain moderately\\u000a yellow cloudy fluid without fat globules. Histological examination of the lesion showed subsynovial accumulation of mature\\u000a fat cells.

  3. Massive tears of the rotator cuff treated with a deltoid flap

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric Vandenbussche; Moncef Bensaïda; Céline Mutschler; Thierry Dart; Bernard Augereau

    2004-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 29 patients younger than 65 years at surgery treated with deltoid flap reconstruction for massive postero-superior rotator cuff tears. All tears involved supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons and were associated with tendon stump retraction to the glenoid rim, a preservable long biceps tendon, and an intact subscapularis tendon. Mean follow-up was 10.5 years. Patient satisfaction

  4. Functional evaluation of patient after arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tear

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rohit; Jadhav, Umesh

    2014-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff tear is a common problem either after trauma or after degenerative tear in old age group. Arthroscopic repair is the current concept of rotator cuff repair. Here, we are trying to evaluate the functional outcome after arthroscopic repair of full thickness rotator cuff tear (single row) in Indian population. Materials and methods Twenty five patients (14 males and 11 females) who underwent arthroscopic repair of full thickness rotator cuff tear at a single institution were included in the study. Postoperatively patient's shoulder was rated according to UCLA score, pain was graded according to the visual analog score. The range of motion was analysed and documented. Results The mean age of the patients were 50.48 years. The preoperative VAS score mode was 7 and post operative VAS was 1 (p value <0.001). The UCLA grading was good in 80% (n = 20), fair in 12% (n = 3), excellent in 8% (n = 2) and poor results were seen in none of the patients. The mean UCLA improved from a score of 15.84 to 30.28 with a p value <0.001. Mean postoperative forward flexion was 161.6°, mean abduction was 147.6° and mean external rotation was 45.4°. Conclusion Arthroscopic repair is a good procedure for full thickness rotator cuff tear with minimal complications. The newer double row repair claims to be biomechanically superior with faster healing rates without functional advantages, hence we used a single row repair considering the Indian population and the cost effectiveness of the surgery with good to excellent results.

  5. Effectiveness of Subacromial Anti-Adhesive Agent Injection after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Prospective Randomized Comparison Study

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chung Hee; Oh, Joo Han; Kim, Sae Hoon; Cho, Jae Hwan; Yoon, Jong Pil

    2011-01-01

    Background Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair generally has a good clinical outcome but shoulder stiffness after surgery due to subacromial adhesion is one of the most common and clinically important complications. Sodium hyaluronate (HA) has been reported to be an anti-adhesive agent in a range of surgical procedures. However, there are few reports of the outcomes of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair of the shoulder. This study examined whether a subacromial injection of HA/carboxymethylated cellulose (CMC) affected the postoperative shoulder stiffness and healing of rotator cuff repair, as well as the safety of an injection. Methods Between January 2008 and May 2008, 80 consecutive patients with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were enrolled. The patients were assigned randomly to the HA/CMC injection group (n = 40) or control group (n = 40). All patients were evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, passive range of motion at 2, 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12 months after surgery, and the functional scores at 6, 12 months postoperatively. Cuff healing was also evaluated using CT arthrography or ultrasonography at 6 or 12 months after surgery. Results The HA/CMC injection group showed faster recovery of forward flexion at 2 weeks postoperatively than the control group but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.09). There were no significant difference in pain VAS, internal rotation, external rotation and functional scores between two groups at each follow-up period. The functional scores improved 6 months after surgery in both groups but there were no differences between the two groups. The incidence of unhealed rotator cuff was similar in the two groups. There were no complications related to an injection of anti-adhesive agents including wound problems or infections. Conclusions A subacromial injection of an anti-adhesive agent after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair tended to produce faster recovery in forward flexion with no adverse effects on cuff healing. However, its anti-adhesive effects after rotator cuff repair should be considered carefully with further studies. PMID:21369479

  6. COMPREHENSIVE STRENGTH TRAINING PROGRAM FOR A RECREATIONAL SENIOR GOLFER 11-MONTHS AFTER A ROTATOR CUFF REPAIR

    PubMed Central

    Meira, Erik P.; En Gilpin, Hui; Brunette, Meredith

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Golf is a popular sport played by hundreds of thousands of individuals of all ages and of varying skill levels. An orthopedic or sports-related injury and/or surgery may limit an individual's sport participation, require him/her to complete a course of rehabilitation, and initiate (or resume) a sport-specific training program. Unlike the availability of evidence to guide postsurgical rehabilitation and sport-specific training of athletes from sports other than golf, there have only been two reports describing outcomes after surgery and for golfers. The purpose of this case report is to present a post-rehabilitation return to sport-training program for a recreational golfer 11-months after a rotator cuff repair. Case Description: The subject, a 67-year old female, injured her right shoulder requiring a rotator cuff repair 11-months prior to her participation in a golf fitness training program. The subject participated in six training sessions over seven week period consisting of general strengthening exercises (including exercises for the rotator cuff), exercises for the core, plyometrics, and power exercises. Outcomes: The subject made improvements in power and muscular endurance of the core. She was able to resume golf at the completion of the training program. Discussion: The subject was able to make functional improvements and return to golf after participation in a comprehensive strength program. Additional studies are necessary to improve program design for golfers who wish to return to sport after shoulder surgery. PMID:22163096

  7. A comparison of clinical estimation, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, and arthroscopy in determining the size of rotator cuff tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lawrence Bryant; Ron Shnier; Carl Bryant; George A. C Murrell

    2002-01-01

    This prospective study was undertaken to compare the ability of clinical estimation, diagnostic ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, and arthroscopy to estimate the size of rotator cuff tears. Estimates of rotator cuff tear size were compared with the findings at open operation in 33 consecutive patients with a presumptive diagnosis of rotator cuff tear. Arthroscopy estimates of rotator cuff tear size

  8. Reversed arthroscopic subacromial decompression for massive rotator cuff tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Markus Scheibel; Sven Lichtenberg; Peter Habermeyer

    2004-01-01

    This prospective study evaluates the results of a procedure for massive rotator cuff tears that we term reversed arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD). The procedure includes an arthroscopic debridement of the subacromial space and glenohumeral joint, an arthroscopic tuberoplasty, and depending on the pathologic condition of the long head of the biceps, a biceps tendon tenotomy. Reversed ASD avoids a classic

  9. Anatomical Considerations of the Suprascapular Nerve in Rotator Cuff Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Tom, James A.; Shah, Mitesh P.; Lee, Dan J.; Cerynik, Douglas L.; Amin, Nirav H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. When using the double interval slide technique for arthroscopic repair of chronic large or massive rotator cuff tears, the posterior interval release is directed toward the scapular spine until the fat pad that protects the suprascapular nerve is reached. Injury to the suprascapular nerve can occur due to the nerve's proximity to the operative field. This study aimed to identify safe margins for avoiding injury to the suprascapular nerve. Materials and Methods. For 20 shoulders in ten cadavers, the distance was measured from the suprascapular notch to the glenoid rim, the articular margin of the rotator cuff footprint, and the lateral border of the acromion. Results. From the suprascapular notch, the suprascapular nerve coursed an average of 3.42?cm to the glenoid rim, 5.34?cm to the articular margin of the rotator cuff footprint, and 6.09?cm to the lateral border of the acromion. Conclusions. The results of this study define a safe zone, using anatomic landmarks, to help surgeons avoid iatrogenic injury to the suprascapular nerve when employing the double interval slide technique in arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff. PMID:24724030

  10. The influence of acromioclavicular joint morphology on rotator cuff tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frances Cuomo; Frederick J. Kummer; Joseph D. Zuckerman; Thomas Lyon; Benjamin Blair; Todd Olsen

    1998-01-01

    A detailed anatomic study of 123 shoulders was performed to define the location of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint within the supraspinatus outlet and to determine the correlation of AC joint morphologic characteristics with the presence of full-thickness rotator cuff tears (RCTs). The presence, location, and extent of RCTs were first documented for each shoulder, and 2 anatomic landmarks consisting of

  11. The Results of Repair of Massive Tears of the Rotator Cuff

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CHRISTIAN GERBER; BRUNO FUCHS; JUERG HODLER

    2000-01-01

    Background: Massive tears of the tendons of the ro- tator cuff cause atrophy and fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff muscles and painful loss of function of the shoulder. Repair of massive rotator cuff tears is often followed by retears of the tendons, additional muscular degeneration, and a poor clinical outcome. The pur- poses of this study were to determine

  12. An Augmentation Suture Technique for Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Omae, Hiromichi; Yamamoto, Susumu; Mochizuki, Yu; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2014-01-01

    The double-row suture technique and the suture-bridge technique have been used for rotator cuff repair to decrease the occurrence of retears. However, when only the degenerated tendon end is sutured, the risk of retear remains. The augmentation suture technique is a new procedure that connects the intact medial tendon to the lateral greater tuberosity, and this approach may protect the initial repair site. The procedures for this technique are as follows: 2 sutures are placed through the medial intact tendon, the cuff tear is repaired by the single-row technique, 2 sutures are pulled laterally over the single-row repair site, and 2 sutures are fixed at the lateral greater tuberosity with a push-in–type anchor. This technique is simple and easy and does not require special equipment. Moreover, this approach can augment the single-row repair technique without creating high tension at the cuff end. PMID:25126493

  13. Isolated subscapularis repair for massive rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Austin, Luke; Chang, Edward S; Zmistowski, Benjamin; Nydick, Jason; Lazarus, Mark

    2014-11-01

    The best surgical treatment for an irreparable rotator cuff tear is controversial. In such cases, partial rotator cuff repair, primarily involving the posterior cuff in most reports, has been shown to be beneficial. The authors retrospectively investigated 41 patients who underwent arthroscopic subscapularis-only repair and greater tuberoplasty between April 2003 and August 2009 for massive 3-tendon cuff tears with irreparable supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons after 3 months of conservative management was unsuccessful. Twenty-five patients (61%) underwent biceps tenotomy, and the remaining 39% had preexisting biceps tenotomy or rupture. The patients were assessed with American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) and Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) scores. Of the 41 patients, 34 (83%) were available for a follow-up telephone questionnaire after a minimum of 12 months (mean, 35 months; range, 12-84 months). Mean ASES and SANE scores were 76% and 63%, respectively. Mean postoperative passive range of motion was 156° of forward flexion and 39° of external rotation. Of the patients queried, 74% (25 of 34) were able to actively raise their arms above shoulder level. For those with a positive belly-press test result preoperatively, 22 of 27 patients had a negative test result postoperatively. A total of 3 complications (7.3%) occurred. Workers' compensation claim was a strong predictor of lower shoulder scores. Arthroscopic subscapularis-only repair and greater tuberoplasty may offer a promising and safe method for treating massive rotator cuff tears when the supra-spinatus and infraspinatus tendons are irreparable. Workers' compensation claim may predict lower outcome scores. PMID:25361371

  14. Transtendon rotator-cuff repair of partial-thickness articular surface tears can lead to medial rotator-cuff failure

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Tom C; Carroll, Michael J; Nelson, Atiba A; More, Kristie D; Berdusco, Randa; Sohmer, Stephen; Boorman, Richard S; Lo, Ian KY

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and anatomic outcomes of patients following transtendon rotator-cuff repair of partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion (PASTA) lesions. Patients and methods Patients in the senior author’s practice who had isolated PASTA lesions treated by transtendon rotator-cuff repair were included (n=8) and retrospectively reviewed. All patients were evaluated preoperatively and at a mean of 21.2 months (±9.7 months) postoperatively using standardized clinical evaluation (physical exam, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, and Simple Shoulder Test). All patients underwent postoperative imaging with a magnetic resonance imaging arthrogram. Results There was a significant improvement in American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (42.7±17.5 to 86.9±25.2) and Simple Shoulder Test (4.6±3.2 to 10.1±3.8) scores from pre- to postoperative, respectively. Postoperative imaging demonstrated full-thickness medial cuff tearing in seven patients, and one patient with a persistent partial articular surface defect. Conclusion Transtendon repair of PASTA lesions may lead to improvements in clinical outcome. However, postoperative imaging demonstrated a high incidence of full-thickness rotator-cuff defects following repair. PMID:25114604

  15. Arthroscopic management of recalcitrant stiffness following rotator cuff repair: A retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Sanjeev; Mather, Richard C; Hsu, Andrew R; Ferry, Amon T; Romeo, Anthony A; Nicholson, Gregory P; Cole, Brian J; Verma, Nikhil N

    2013-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff repair surgery is one of the most commonly performed procedures in the world but limited literature exists for guidance of optimal management of post-operative arthrofibrosis following cuff repair. The purpose of this study is to report the results of arthroscopic capsular release, lysis of adhesions, manipulation under anesthesia, and aggressive physical therapy in patients with recalcitrant postoperative stiffness after rotator cuff repair. Materials and Methods: Twenty-nine patients who had recalcitrant arthrofibrosis following either an arthroscopic (62%), open (28%), or mini-open (10%) rotator cuff repair were included in study. The average age at the time of index cuff repair surgery was 49.8 years (range 24?70 years). Sixteen patients (55%) were involved in worker's compensation claims. The mean time from the date of index operation to lysis of adhesions was 9.7 months (range 4.2?36.2 months), and the mean time from lysis of adhesion to most recent follow-up 18.2 months (range 4.1?43.7 months). Post-operative evaluation was performed using American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Score (ASES), Visual Analog Score (VAS), Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE), and Simple Shoulder Test (SST) on 18 (62%), while range of motion (ROM), dynamometer strength testing, and Constant-Murley Scoring were performed on 13 (45%). Statistical analysis was performed using a Student's t-test. Results: Prior to arthroscopic lysis of adhesions, mean forward active elevation (FE) was 103.8°, (range 60-145° (SD 26.3) and external rotation at the side (ERS) was 25.3°, (range 5-70° SD 15.1°). Post-operatively, at the most recent follow-up, FE was significantly improved to 158.3°, (range 110?180° SD 22.3°), and ERS improved to 58.9°, (range 15?90° SD 18.6°) in both cases. Involvement in a worker's compensation claim resulted in a lower ASES, VAS, and SANE score, but there was no statistically significant difference in motion. Conclusion: Arthroscopic capsular release, lysis of adhesions, and manipulation under anesthesia is a safe, reliable method of treating persistent stiffness following rotator cuff repair. PMID:23682175

  16. Fatty Infiltration and Atrophy of the Rotator Cuff Do Not Improve After Rotator Cuff Repair and Correlate With Poor Functional Outcome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James N. Gladstone; Julie Y. Bishop; Ian K. Y. Lo; Evan L. Flatow

    2007-01-01

    Background: The role of degenerative changes in rotator cuff musculature with respect to the functional outcomes of rotator cuff repair have only recently been recognized and are still not well understood. In addition, the reversibility of these changes with repair of the tendons is questionable.Hypothesis: Poorer preoperative muscle quality negatively affects outcome, and a successful outcome (in terms of a

  17. Humeral head osteonecrosis following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Beauthier, V; Sanghavi, S; Roulot, E; Hardy, P

    2010-10-01

    Humeral head chondrolysis and osteonecrosis of the glenoid have been reported; however, there is no report to date about humeral head osteonecrosis following arthroscopic shoulder procedure. We report a case of osteonecrosis of the humeral head following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair what we believe is probably secondary to disruption of its blood supply after placement of multiple metallic suture anchors. The surgical records were also reviewed in an attempt to identify the cause of the humeral head osteonecrosis. PMID:20033673

  18. Feasibility assessment of shear wave elastography to rotator cuff muscle.

    PubMed

    Itoigawa, Yoshiaki; Sperling, John W; Steinmann, Scott P; Chen, Qingshan; Song, Pengfei; Chen, Shigao; Itoi, Eiji; Hatta, Taku; An, Kai-Nan

    2015-03-01

    Pre-surgical measurement of supraspinatus muscle extensibility is important for rotator cuff repair. The purpose of the present study was to explore the potential feasibility of a shear wave ultrasound elastography (SWE)-based method, combined with B-mode ultrasound, to measure the in vivo stiffness of the supraspinatus muscle non-invasively and thus obtain key information about supraspinatus muscle extensibility. Our investigation comprised two steps. First, we determined the orientation of the supraspinatus muscle fibers in cadaveric shoulders without rotator cuff tear in order to optimize the ultrasound probe positions for SWE imaging. Second, we investigated the feasibility of quantifying the stiffness of the normal supraspinatus muscle by SWE in vivo. The supraspinatus muscle was divided into four anatomical regions: anterior superficial (AS), posterior superficial (PS), anterior deep (AD), and posterior deep (PD). Each region was examined by SWE. The SWE stiffnesses of AD, AS, PD, and PS were 40.0?±?12.4, 34.0?±?9.9, 32.7?±?12.7, 39.1?±?15.7 kPa, respectively. SWE combined with B-Mode ultrasound imaging could be a feasible method for quantifying the local stiffness of the rotator cuff muscles. Clin. Anat. 28:213-218, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25557287

  19. Arthroscopic Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears Using Extracellular Matrix Graft

    PubMed Central

    Gilot, Gregory J.; Attia, Ahmed K.; Alvarez, Andres M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical technology, as well as generally good outcomes, repairs of full-thickness rotator cuff tears show a retear rate of 25% to 57% and may fail to provide full return of function. The repairs tend to fail at the suture-tendon junction, which is due to several factors, including tension at the repair site, quality of the tendon, and defective tissue repair. One strategy to augment repair of large to massive rotator cuff tears is the development of biological scaffold materials, composed of extracellular matrix (ECM). The goal is to strengthen and evenly distribute the mechanical load across the repair site, thus minimizing the rupture risk of the native tendon while providing the biological elements needed for healing. The promising results of ECM-derived materials and their commercial availability have increased their popularity among shoulder surgeons. In contrast to a traditional open or arthroscopically assisted mini-open approach, this completely arthroscopic technique offers the full advantages warranted by the use of a minimally invasive approach. This technical guide describes arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using an ECM graft technique. PMID:25276607

  20. Cross-sectional and longitudinal construct validity of two rotator cuff disease-specific outcome measures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Helen Razmjou; Andrea Bean; Varda van Osnabrugge; Joy C MacDermid; Richard Holtby

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Disease-specific Quality Of Life (QOL) measures are devised to assess the impact of a specific disease across a spectrum of important domains of life. The purpose of this study was to examine the cross-sectional and longitudinal construct validity (sensitivity to change) of two rotator cuff disease-specific measures, the Rotator Cuff-Quality Of Life (RC-QOL) and the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff

  1. Arthroscopic Single-Row Versus Double-Row Suture Anchor Rotator Cuff Repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Augustus D. Mazzocca; Peter J. Millett; Carlos A. Guanche; Stephen A. Santangelo; Robert A. Arciero

    2005-01-01

    Background: Recurrent defects after open and arthroscopic rotator cuff repair are common. Double-row repair techniques may improve initial fixation and quality of rotator cuff repair.Purpose: To evaluate the load to failure, cyclic displacement, and anatomical footprint of 4 arthroscopic rotator cuff repair techniques.Hypothesis: Double-row suture anchor repair would have superior structural properties and would create a larger footprint compared to

  2. Predicting Rotator Cuff Tears Using Data Mining and Bayesian Likelihood Ratios

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hsueh-Yi; Huang, Chen-Yuan; Su, Chwen-Tzeng; Lin, Chen-Chiang

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Rotator cuff tear is a common cause of shoulder diseases. Correct diagnosis of rotator cuff tears can save patients from further invasive, costly and painful tests. This study used predictive data mining and Bayesian theory to improve the accuracy of diagnosing rotator cuff tears by clinical examination alone. Methods In this retrospective study, 169 patients who had a preliminary diagnosis of rotator cuff tear on the basis of clinical evaluation followed by confirmatory MRI between 2007 and 2011 were identified. MRI was used as a reference standard to classify rotator cuff tears. The predictor variable was the clinical assessment results, which consisted of 16 attributes. This study employed 2 data mining methods (ANN and the decision tree) and a statistical method (logistic regression) to classify the rotator cuff diagnosis into “tear” and “no tear” groups. Likelihood ratio and Bayesian theory were applied to estimate the probability of rotator cuff tears based on the results of the prediction models. Results Our proposed data mining procedures outperformed the classic statistical method. The correction rate, sensitivity, specificity and area under the ROC curve of predicting a rotator cuff tear were statistical better in the ANN and decision tree models compared to logistic regression. Based on likelihood ratios derived from our prediction models, Fagan's nomogram could be constructed to assess the probability of a patient who has a rotator cuff tear using a pretest probability and a prediction result (tear or no tear). Conclusions Our predictive data mining models, combined with likelihood ratios and Bayesian theory, appear to be good tools to classify rotator cuff tears as well as determine the probability of the presence of the disease to enhance diagnostic decision making for rotator cuff tears. PMID:24733553

  3. Latissimus dorsi tendon transfers for rotator cuff deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, James; Pandit, Adam; Noorani, Ali; Douglas, Tania; Falworth, Mark; Lambert, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Latissimus dorsi tendon transfers are increasingly being used around the shoulder. We aim to assess any improvement in pain and function following a latissimus dorsi tendon transfer for massive, irreparable postero-superior cuff deficiency. Materials and Methods: At our institution, between 1996 and 2009, 38 latissimus dorsi tendon transfer procedures were performed. Sixteen of these were for massive irreparable rotator cuff deficiency associated with pain and impaired function. All patients were evaluated by means of interview or postal questionnaire and case note review. Pain and function were assessed using the Stanmore percentage of normal shoulder assessment (SPONSA) score, visual analogue scale and Oxford Shoulder Score. Forward elevation was also assessed and a significant improvement was thought to correlate with the success of the procedure at stabilizing the humeral head upon elevation. Results: Mean follow-up time was 70 months. There was a significant reduction in pain on the visual analogue scale from 6.4 to 3.4 (P < 0.05), an improved SPONSA score from 32.5 to 57.5 (P < 0.05), and an improved Oxford Shoulder Score from 40.75 to 29.6 (P < 0.05). Forward elevation improved from 40° preoperatively to 75° postoperatively (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Our results add to the body of evidence that latissimus dorsi tendon transfers for irreparable postero-superior cuff deficiency in selected patients reduce pain and improve shoulder function in the medium term. Level of Evidence: Level 4. PMID:22223959

  4. Classification of rotator cuff tendinopathy using high definition ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Hinsley, Hannah; Nicholls, Alex; Daines, Michael; Wallace, Gemma; Arden, Nigel; Carr, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: ultrasound is a valid cost effective tool in screening for rotator cuff pathology with high levels of accuracy in detecting full-thickness tears. To date there is no rotator cuff tendinopathy classification using ultrasound. The aims of this study are to define a valid high-definition ultrasound rotator cuff tendinopathy classification, which has discriminate validity between groups based upon anatomical principles. Methods: 464 women, aged 65–87, from an established general population cohort underwent bilateral shoulder ultrasound and musculoskeletal assessment. Sonographer accuracy was established in a separate study by comparing ultrasound findings to the gold standard intra-operative findings. Results: there were 510 normal tendons, 217 abnormal tendons, 77 partial tears, and 124 full-thickness tears. There was no statistical difference in age or the proportion with pain between the abnormal enthesis and partial tear groups, however both groups were statistically older (p<0.001) and had a greater proportion with pain (p<0.001 & p=0.050) than normal tendons. The full-thickness tears were statistically older than normal tendons (p<0.001), but not abnormal/partially torn tendons. The proportion with pain was significantly greater than both groups (p<0.001 & p=0.006). Symptomatic shoulders had a larger median tear size than asymptomatic shoulders (p=0.006). Using tear size as a predictor of pain likelihood, optimum sensitivity and specificity occurred when dividing tears into groups up to 2.5cm and >2.5cm, which corresponds with anatomical descriptions of the width of the supraspinatus tendon. Conclusion: the classification system is as follows: Normal Tendons; Abnormal enthesis/Partial-thickness tear; Single tendon full-thickness tears (0–2.5cm); Multi-tendon full-thickness tears (>2.5cm). PMID:25489559

  5. Upregulation of transforming growth factor-? signaling in a rat model of rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuhui; Joshi, Sunil K.; Ravishankar, Bharat; Laron, Dominique; Kim, Hubert T.; Feeley, Brian T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Muscle atrophy, fatty infiltration, and fibrosis of the muscle have been described as important factors governing outcome after rotator cuff injury and repair. Muscle fibrosis is also thought to have a role in determining muscle compliance at the time of surgery. The transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?) pathways are highly conserved pathways that exert a potent level of control over muscle gene expression and are critical regulators of fibrosis in multiple organ systems. It has been shown that TGF-? can regulate important pathways of muscle atrophy, including the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of TGF-? and its downstream effectors of fibrosis after a massive rotator cuff tear (RCT) in a previously established rat model. Methods To simulate a massive RCT, infraspinatus and supraspinatus tenotomy and suprascapular nerve transection were performed on Sprague-Dawley rats with use of a validated model. Two and 6 weeks after surgery, supraspinatus muscles were harvested to study alterations in TGF-? signaling by Western blotting, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and histologic analysis. Results There was a significant increase in fibrosis in the rotator cuff muscle after RCT in our animal model. There was a concomitant increase in TGF-? gene and protein expression at both 2 and 6 weeks after RCT. Evaluation of the TGF-? signaling pathway revealed an increase in SMAD2 activation but not in SMAD3. There was an increase in profibrotic markers collagen I, collagen III, and ?-smooth muscle actin. Conclusions TGF-? signaling is significantly upregulated in rat supraspinatus muscles after RCTs. PMID:24875732

  6. The Outcome and Repair Integrity of Completely Arthroscopically Repaired Large and Massive Rotator Cuff Tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    LEESA M. GALATZ; CRAIG M. BALL; SHARLENE A. TEEFEY; WILLIAM D. MIDDLETON; KEN YAMAGUCHI

    Background: The impact of a recurrent defect on the outcome after rotator cuff repair has been controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional and anatomic results after arthroscopic repair of large and mas- sive rotator cuff tears with use of ultrasound as an imaging modality to determine the postoperative integrity of the repair. Methods: Eighteen patients

  7. Histological analysis of the coracoacromial arch: Correlation between age-related changes and rotator cuff tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alfredo Schiavone Panni; Giuseppe Milano; Luciano Lucania; Carlo Fabbriciani; Carlo A. Logroscino

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze age-related changes in the coracoacromial arch and correlate these degenerative changes with rotator cuff tears. We obtained 80 shouldes from 40 cadavers. The mean age at death was 58.4 years. We performed a gross examination of the rotator cuff and the acromion and histological examination of the coracoacromial ligament. The statistical significance

  8. Association of osteopenia of the humeral head with full-thickness rotator cuff tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dominik C Meyer; Sandro F Fucentese; Bruno Koller; Christian Gerber

    2004-01-01

    Rotator cuff tendon repair may fail for various reasons. Although the role of repair techniques and of the musculotendinous unit has been studied, there is little information on the quality of the bone to which the tendon is to be repaired. Therefore, 14 cadaveric humeral heads, 7 specimens without and 7 with a full-thickness rotator cuff tendon tear, were quantitatively

  9. Age-related prevalence of rotator cuff tears in asymptomatic shoulders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Siegbert Tempelhof; Stefan Rupp; Romain Seil

    1999-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of rotator cuff tears in asymptomatic shoulders we conducted a prospective clinical and ultrasonographic study of 411 volunteers. We anticipated an age-dependent outcome and divided the patients into 4 age-groups. Overall, we found evidence of a rotator cuff tear in 23% of the patients. In group 1 (aged 50 to 59 years), 13% (22 of 167)

  10. Supraspinatus tendon organizational and mechanical properties in a chronic rotator cuff tear animal model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan A. Gimbel; Jonathan P. Van Kleunen; Samir Mehta; Stephanie M. Perry; Gerald R. Williams; Louis J. Soslowsky

    2004-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears of the shoulder are a common cause of pain and disability. The successful repair of rotator cuff tendon tears depends on the time from onset of injury to the time of surgical repair. However, the effect of time from injury to repair remains poorly understood. A rat model was used to investigate the supraspinatus tendon organizational and

  11. Effectiveness of tendon transfers for massive rotator cuff tears: a simulation study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Magermans; E. K. J. Chadwick; H. E. J. Veeger; P. M. Rozing; F. C. T van der Helm

    2004-01-01

    Objective. To determine what the most effective tendon transfer is in the case of a dysfunctional rotator cuff.Design. A tendon transfer procedure of latissimus dorsi, teres major or a combination of these two to the insertions of either teres minor, infraspinatus, supraspinatus, or subscapularis is simulated using a biomechanical musculoskeletal model of the upper extremity.Background. Massive rotator cuff tears are

  12. Repair of massive rotator cuff tears in patients older than 70 years

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard L Worland; Jorge Arredondo; Francesc Angles; Francisco Lopez-Jimenez

    1999-01-01

    Major ruptures of the rotator cuff are common in elderly patients, and their management has been a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons. This study was undertaken to evaluate the results obtained in patients older than 70 years who were treated with open surgical repair for massive ruptures of the rotator cuff tendons and to correlate the functional outcomes with the quality

  13. Modified Impingement Test Can Predict the Level of Pain Reduction After Rotator Cuff Repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joo Han Oh; Sae Hoon Kim; Kyung Hwan Kim; Chung Hee Oh; Hyun Sik Gong

    2010-01-01

    Background: Most patients experience a significant reduction in pain after rotator cuff repair. However, there is currently no method to predict the level of pain reduction that each patient will experience. This report explores the usefulness of the modified impingement test for prognosis in cases of rotator cuff repair.Hypothesis: The amount of pain reduction after injection of lidocaine into the

  14. The influence of variations of the coracoacromial arch on the development of rotator cuff tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Gohlke; T. Barthel; A. Gandorfer

    1993-01-01

    In order to define the geometry of the coracoacromial arch in both its bony and soft parts and to bring it into relationship with rotator cuff tears, 54 cadaver shoulders (from subjects aged 47–90 years) were dissected And X-rayed (anteroposterior projection and supraspinatus outlet view). Partial rotator cuff tears were assessed additionally by transillumination and polarized microscopy. After transfixation of

  15. Delineation of diagnostic criteria and a rehabilitation program for rotator cuff injuries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank W. Jobe; Diane Radovich Moynes

    1982-01-01

    In the examination and rehabilitation of patients with shoulder injuries it is necessary to isolate the individ ual rotator cuff muscles as much as possible. We subscribe to the belief that, independent of the deltoid, the rotator cuff muscles can become fatigued, injured, or atrophied individually. Accordingly, we feel that these muscles must be considered separately during examination and rehabilitation.This

  16. REHABILITATION AFTER ARTHROSCOPIC ROTATOR CUFF REPAIR: CURRENT CONCEPTS REVIEW AND EVIDENCE-BASED GUIDELINES

    PubMed Central

    Westgard, Paul; Chandler, Zachary; Gaskill, Trevor R.; Kokmeyer, Dirk; Millett, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To provide an overview of the characteristics and timing of rotator cuff healing and provide an update on treatments used in rehabilitation of rotator cuff repairs. The authors' protocol of choice, used within a large sports medicine rehabilitation center, is presented and the rationale behind its implementation is discussed. Background: If initial nonsurgical treatment of a rotator cuff tear fails, surgical repair is often the next line of treatment. It is evident that a successful outcome after surgical rotator cuff repair is as much dependent on surgical technique as it is on rehabilitation. To this end, rehabilitation protocols have proven challenging to both the orthopaedic surgeon and the involved physical therapist. Instead of being based on scientific rationale, traditionally most rehabilitation protocols are solely based on clinical experience and expert opinion. Methods: A review of currently available literature on rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff tear repair on PUBMED / MEDLINE and EMBASE databases was performed to illustrate the available evidence behind various postoperative treatment modalities. Results: There is little high-level scientific evidence available to support or contest current postoperative rotator cuff rehabilitation protocols. Most existing protocols are based on clinical experience with modest incorporation of scientific data. Conclusion: Little scientific evidence is available to guide the timing of postsurgical rotator cuff rehabilitation. To this end, expert opinion and clinical experience remains a large facet of rehabilitation protocols. This review describes a rotator cuff rehabilitation protocol that incorporates currently available scientific literature guiding rehabilitation. PMID:22530194

  17. Comma Sign–Directed Repair of Anterosuperior Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Dilisio, Matthew F.; Neyton, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    The comma sign was described as an arthroscopic landmark to identify the torn subscapularis stump to mobilize and repair the tendon in anterosuperior rotator cuff tears. It was hypothesized that it is composed of the humeral attachments of the superior glenohumeral and coracohumeral ligaments. This arthroscopic finding has since become accepted orthopaedic nomenclature pathognomonic for subscapularis tears and a key component of subscapularis tear classification. We propose an alternative theory of the pathoanatomy of the comma sign in anterosuperior rotator cuff tears and present the technique of comma sign–directed repairs of combined subscapularis and supraspinatus lesions. After appropriate releases, tendon-to-tendon repair of the distal-superior aspect of the comma sign to the upper border of the remnant subscapularis results in anatomic re-creation of the intra-articular portion of the torn subscapularis with concomitant reduction of the anterior leading edge of the supraspinatus and reconstitution of the rotator cable complex. A tension-free, single-anchor subscapularis repair is then performed to secure the tendon to the lesser tuberosity. After subscapularis repair, the supraspinatus that was previously retracted to the glenoid rim takes the appearance of a crescent-type tear that is easily approximated to its anatomic insertion. PMID:25685676

  18. Arthroscopic repair of massive, contracted, immobile rotator cuff tears using single and double interval slides: technique and preliminary results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian K. Y Lo; Stephen S Burkhart

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe the technique and review the preliminary results of arthroscopic repair of massive, contracted, immobile rotator cuff tears using an interval slide technique. Type of Study: Case series. Methods: From January 1999 to December 2000, the senior author (S.S.B.) performed arthroscopic rotator cuff repair on 94 massive rotator cuff tears. Of these,

  19. Rotator Cuff Repair in Upper Extremity Ambulators! Andrew Zganjar, 1Steven Grindel MD, 1Dara Mickschl PA-C!

    E-print Network

    or female patients with shoulder impingement or rotator cuff tear who rely on AWDs for mobility. 2Rotator Cuff Repair in Upper Extremity Ambulators! ! Andrew Zganjar, 1Steven Grindel MD, 1Dara! ! Introduction · Patients who rely on their upper extremities for mobility are particularly prone to rotator cuff

  20. Shoulder kinematics with two-plane x-ray evaluation in patients with anterior instability or rotator cuff tearing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George A Paletta; Jon J. P Warner; Russell F Warren; Allen Deutsch; David W Altchek

    1997-01-01

    The goals of this study were to define biplanar glenohumeral kinematics and glenohumeral-scapulothoracic motion relationships in normal patients with a two-plane radiograph series and then in patients with anterior shoulder instability or rotator cuff tear both before surgery and after surgical repair and postoperative rehabilitation. A two-plane radiographic series of x-ray films in the scapular and horizontal (axillary) planes was

  1. Factors affecting healing after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Abtahi, Amir M; Granger, Erin K; Tashjian, Robert Z

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff repair has been shown to have good long-term results. Unfortunately, a significant proportion of repairs still fail to heal. Many factors, both patient and surgeon related, can influence healing after repair. Older age, larger tear size, worse muscle quality, greater muscle-tendon unit retraction, smoking, osteoporosis, diabetes and hypercholesterolemia have all shown to negatively influence tendon healing. Surgeon related factors that can influence healing include repair construct-single vs double row, rehabilitation, and biologics including platelet rich plasma and mesenchymal stem cells. Double-row repairs are biomechanically stronger and have better healing rates compared with single-row repairs although clinical outcomes are equivalent between both constructs. Slower, less aggressive rehabilitation programs have demonstrated improved healing with no negative effect on final range of motion and are therefore recommended after repair of most full thickness tears. Additionally no definitive evidence supports the use of platelet rich plasma or mesenchymal stem cells regarding improvement of healing rates and clinical outcomes. Further research is needed to identify effective biologically directed augmentations that will improve healing rates and clinical outcomes after rotator cuff repair.

  2. Factors affecting healing after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Abtahi, Amir M; Granger, Erin K; Tashjian, Robert Z

    2015-03-18

    Rotator cuff repair has been shown to have good long-term results. Unfortunately, a significant proportion of repairs still fail to heal. Many factors, both patient and surgeon related, can influence healing after repair. Older age, larger tear size, worse muscle quality, greater muscle-tendon unit retraction, smoking, osteoporosis, diabetes and hypercholesterolemia have all shown to negatively influence tendon healing. Surgeon related factors that can influence healing include repair construct-single vs double row, rehabilitation, and biologics including platelet rich plasma and mesenchymal stem cells. Double-row repairs are biomechanically stronger and have better healing rates compared with single-row repairs although clinical outcomes are equivalent between both constructs. Slower, less aggressive rehabilitation programs have demonstrated improved healing with no negative effect on final range of motion and are therefore recommended after repair of most full thickness tears. Additionally no definitive evidence supports the use of platelet rich plasma or mesenchymal stem cells regarding improvement of healing rates and clinical outcomes. Further research is needed to identify effective biologically directed augmentations that will improve healing rates and clinical outcomes after rotator cuff repair. PMID:25793161

  3. Self-assessment questionnaires document substantial variability in the clinical expression of rotator cuff tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David G Duckworth; Kevin L Smith; Barry Campbell; Frederick A Matsen

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to document the variability in the clinical expression of full-thickness rotator cuff tears with practical and standardized patient self-assessment tools. One-hundred twenty-three consecutive patients with full-thickness cuff tears diagnosed by standard cuff-imaging methods (sonography, arthrography, or magnetic resonance imagery) assessed their own shoulder function and health status with the Simple Shoulder Test and the

  4. Clavicular hook plate may induce subacromial shoulder impingement and rotator cuff lesion - dynamic sonographic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Clavicular hook plates are effective fixation devices for distal clavicle fractures and severe acromioclavicular joint dislocations. However, increasing number of studies has revealed that subacromial portion of the hook may induce acromial bony erosion, shoulder impingement, or even rotator cuff damage. By sonographic evaluation, we thus intended to determine whether the presence of hook plate may induce subacromial shoulder impingement and its relationship relative to surrounding subacromial structures. Methods We prospectively followed 40 patients with either distal clavicle fracture or acromioclavicular joint dislocation that had surgery using the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) clavicular hook plate. All patients were evaluated by monthly clinical and radiographic examinations. Static and dynamic musculoskeletal sonography examinations were performed at final follow-up before implant removal. Clinical results for pain, shoulder function, and range of motion were evaluated using Constant-Murley and Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) scores. Results Clinically, 15 out of 40 patients (37.5%) presented with subacromial impingement syndrome and their functional scores were poorer than the non-impinged patients. Among them, six patients were noted to have rotator cuff lesion. Acromial erosion caused by hook pressure developed in 20 patients (50%). Conclusions We demonstrated by musculoskeletal sonography that clavicular hook plate caused subacromial shoulder impingement and rotator cuff lesion. The data also suggest an association between hardware-induced impingement and poorer functional scores. To our knowledge, the only solution is removal of the implant after bony consolidation/ligamentous healing has taken place. Thus, we advocate the removal of the implant as soon as bony union and/or ligamentous healing is achieved. PMID:24502688

  5. Tissue Engineering for Rotator Cuff Repair: An Evidence-Based Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Maffulli, Nicola; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Loppini, Mattia; Berton, Alessandra; Spiezia, Filippo; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to address the treatment of rotator cuff tears by applying tissue engineering approaches to improve tendon healing, specifically platelet rich plasma (PRP) augmentation, stem cells, and scaffolds. Our systematic search was performed using the combination of the following terms: “rotator cuff”, “shoulder”, “PRP”, “platelet rich plasma”, “stemcells”, “scaffold”, “growth factors”, and “tissue engineering”. No level I or II studies were found on the use of scaffolds and stem cells for rotator cuff repair. Three studies compared rotator cuff repair with or without PRP augmentation. All authors performed arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with different techniques of suture anchor fixation and different PRP augmentation. The three studies found no difference in clinical rating scales and functional outcomes between PRP and control groups. Only one study showed clinical statistically significant difference between the two groups at the 3-month follow up. Any statistically significant difference in the rates of tendon rerupture between the control group and the PRP group was found using the magnetic resonance imaging. The current literature on tissue engineering application for rotator cuff repair is scanty. Comparative studies included in this review suggest that PRP augmented repair of a rotator cuff does not yield improved functional and clinical outcome compared with non-augmented repair at a medium and long-term followup. PMID:25098365

  6. A Comparison of Conventional Ultrasonography and Arthrosonography in the Assessment of Cuff Integrity after Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Won; Chun, Tong Jin; Bae, Kyoung Wan; Choy, Won Sik; Park, Hyeon Jong

    2014-01-01

    Background This study was designed to perform conventional ultrasonography, magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) and arthrosonography exams after rotator cuff repair to compare the results of conventional ultrasonography and arthrosonography with those of MRA as the gold standard. Methods We prospectively studied 42 consecutive patients (14 males, 28 females; average age, 59.4 years) who received arthroscopic rotator cuff repair due to full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus tendon from 2008 to 2010. The integrity assessment of the repaired rotator cuff was performed 6 months postoperatively using conventional ultrasonography, MRA, and arthrosonography. Results The diagnostic accuracy of the conventional ultrasonography compared to MRA was 78.6% and the McNemar test results were 0.016 in full-thickness tear and 0.077 in partial-thickness tear. The diagnostic accuracy of arthrosonography compared to MRA was 92.9% and the McNemar test results were 0.998 in full-thickness tear and 0.875 in partial-thickness tear. Conclusions It was found that the integrity assessment of the repaired rotator cuff by ultrasonography must be guarded against and that arthrosonography is an effective alternative method in the postoperative integrity assessment. Also, an arthrosonography seems to be a suitable modality to replace the conventional ultrasonography. PMID:25177461

  7. The Global Percutaneous Shuttling Technique Tip for Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Vopat, Bryan G.; Murali, Jothi; Gowda, Ashok L.; Kaback, Lee; Blaine, Theodore

    2014-01-01

    Most arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs utilize suture passing devices placed through arthroscopic cannulas. These devices are limited by the size of the passing device where the suture is passed through the tendon. An alternative technique has been used in the senior author’s practice for the past ten years, where sutures are placed through the rotator cuff tendon using percutaneous passing devices. This technique, dubbed the global percutaneous shuttling technique of rotator cuff repair, affords the placement of sutures from nearly any angle and location in the shoulder, and has the potential advantage of larger suture bites through the tendon edge. These advantages may increase the area of tendon available to compress to the rotator cuff footprint and improve tendon healing and outcomes. The aim of this study is to describe the global percutaneous shuttling (GPS) technique and report our results using this method. The GPS technique can be used for any full thickness rotator cuff tear and is particularly useful for massive cuff tears with poor tissue quality. We recently followed up 22 patients with an average follow up of 32 months to validate its usefulness. American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores improved significantly from 37 preoperatively to 90 postoperatively (P<0.0001). This data supports the use of the GPS technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Further biomechanical studies are currently being performed to assess the improvements in tendon footprint area with this technique. PMID:25002932

  8. Assessment of the canine model of rotator cuff injury and repair

    PubMed Central

    Derwin, Kathleen A; Baker, Andrew R; Codsi, Michael J; Iannotti, Joseph P

    2007-01-01

    Animal shoulder models are used to systematically investigate the factors influencing rotator cuff injury and repair. Each model has advantages and disadvantages that must be considered in the context of the specific research questions being asked. Herein we evaluate the utility of the canine model for studies of acute, full-thickness rotator cuff tendon injury and repair. We found that time zero failure load is dependent on the suture type and configuration used for repair. Acute, full-width tendon repairs fail anatomically within the first days after surgery in the canine model, regardless of suture type, suture configuration or post-operative protocol. Robust scar tissue forms in the gap between the failed tendon end and the humerus, which can be visually, mechanically and histologically misconstrued as tendon if an objective test of repair connectivity is not performed. We conclude that a full-width injury and repair model in the canine will provide a rigorous test of whether a new repair strategy or post-operative protocol (such as casting or temporary muscle paralysis) can maintain repair integrity in a high load environment. Alternatively, a partial-width tendon injury model allows loads to be shared between the tendon repair and the remaining intact portion of the infraspinatus tendon and prohibits complete tendon retraction. Thus a partial-width injury in the canine may model the mechanical environment of many single tendon tears in the human injury condition and warrants further investigation. PMID:17560802

  9. Arthroscopic treatment of rotator cuff tear and greater tuberosity fracture nonunion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary M. Gartsman; Ettore Taverna

    1996-01-01

    The association of full-thickness rotator cuff tear combined with a nonunion of the greater tuberosity is uncommon. We present one case, describing management of both lesions using arthroscopic technique

  10. The coracoacromial ligament: the morphology and relation to rotator cuff pathology.

    PubMed

    Kesmezacar, Hayrettin; Akgun, Isik; Ogut, Tahir; Gokay, Selim; Uzun, Ibrahim

    2008-01-01

    We dissected 80 shoulders from 44 fresh cadavers to define variants of the coracoacromial ligament and their relationship to rotator cuff degeneration. The shapes and the geometric data of the ligaments were investigated, and the rotator cuffs of the cadavers were evaluated macroscopically. Five main types of coracoacromial ligaments were found: Y-shaped, broad band, quadrangular, V-shaped, and multiple-banded. The Y-shaped ligament was the most frequent type, with a frequency of 41.3%, and the V-shaped ligament (11.2%) has not been previously reported. Of the cadavers that were dissected bilaterally, 64% showed the same type of ligament. There was no statistical significance between rotator cuff degeneration and the type or geometric measurement of the ligament. However, the coracoacromial ligaments with more than 1 bundle showed significant association with rotator cuff degeneration with a longer lateral border and larger coracoid insertion. PMID:18036840

  11. Anterior versus posterior, and rim-rent rotator cuff tears: prevalence and MR sensitivity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Tuite; John R. Turnbull; John F. Orwin

    1998-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the relative distribution of the locations of rotator cuff tears, and the sensitivity of anterior versus posterior\\u000a tears on MR images. Patients and methods. We identified 110 consecutive patients who had a shoulder MR and either a partial-thickness or a small full-thickness rotator\\u000a cuff tear diagnosed at arthroscopy. From the arthroscopy videotapes, we classified the tears as

  12. Comparison of the Clinical Outcomes of Single and Double-row Repairs in Rotator Cuff Tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jin-Young Park; Sang-Hoon Lhee; Jin-Hyung Choi; Hong-Keun Park; Je-Wook Yu; Joong-Bae Seo

    2008-01-01

    Background: Although research has demonstrated the superiority of double-row rotator cuff repair over single-row methods from a biological and mechanical point of view, few studies have compared clinical outcome of the 2 methods, and no articles have been published describing the superiority of double-row methods in clinical aspects.Hypothesis: Arthroscopic double-row repair of a rotator cuff tear has superior clinical outcome

  13. The incidence of glenohumeral joint abnormalities associated with full-thickness, reparable rotator cuff tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary M. Gartsman; Ettore Taverna

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of associated glenohumeral lesions in patients with a full-thickness rotator cuff tear, an arthroscopic examination of the glenohumeral joint was performed in 200 shoulders in 195 consecutive patients before arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. One hundred twenty-one (60.5%) had coexisting intraarticular abnormalities. Ninety-six (48%) had minor abnormalities, and 25 patients (12.5%) had major coexisting intraarticular abnormalities. Major

  14. A new tear pattern of the rotator cuff and its treatment: Fosbury flop tears

    PubMed Central

    Lädermann, Alexandre; Denard, Patrick J.; Kolo, Frank C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this report is to describe a new full-thickness tear pattern of the posterosuperior rotator cuff with reversal healing. We describe the specific radiologic signs associated with this tear pattern and the arthroscopic rotator cuff repair technique. Materials and Methods: A prospective radiologic and clinical study collected all patients with a magnetic resonance imaging arthrogram that underwent an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair over a 1 year period. Results: Among 97 patients, five demonstrated a tear of the posterosuperior rotator cuff with reversal healing. Characteristic radiographic findings included a thicker tendon than normal, the presence of a stump and accumulation of liquid in the superior-medial part of the subacromial bursa, and adhesions between the supraspinatus tendon and the wall of the subacromial bursa. Conclusion: Avulsion of the posterosuperior rotator cuff with reversal healing on its bursal-side is a less common condition. This type of lesion and distinct radiographic signs that can be recognized to facilitate anatomic repair of the rotator cuff. Level of evidence: Level IV. PMID:25709239

  15. Evidence for an Inherited Predisposition Contributing to the Risk for Rotator Cuff Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tashjian, Robert Z.; Farnham, James M.; Albright, Frederick S.; Teerlink, Craig C.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: A genetic predisposition has been suggested to contribute to the risk for development of rotator cuff disease on the basis of observed family clusters of close relatives. We used a population-based resource combining genealogical data for Utah with clinical diagnosis data from a large Utah hospital to test the hypothesis of excess familial clustering for rotator cuff disease. Methods: The Utah Population Database contains combined health and genealogical data on over two million Utah residents. Current Procedural Terminology, Fourth Revision, codes (29827, 23412, 23410, and 23420) and International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes (726.1, 727.61, and 840.4) entered in patient records were used to identify patients with rotator cuff disease. We tested the hypothesis of excess familial clustering using two well-established methods (the Genealogical Index of Familiality test and the estimation of relative risks in relatives) in the overall study group (3091 patients) and a subgroup of the study group diagnosed before the age of forty years (652 patients). Results: The Genealogical Index of Familiality test in patients diagnosed before the age of forty years showed significant excess relatedness for individuals with rotator cuff disease in close and distant relationships (as distant as third cousins) (p = 0.001). The relative risk of rotator cuff disease in the relatives of patients diagnosed before the age of forty years was significantly elevated for second degree (relative risk = 3.66, p = 0.0076) and third degree (relative risk = 1.81, p = 0.0479) relatives. Conclusions: We analyzed a set of patients with diagnosed rotator cuff disease and a known genealogy to describe the familial clustering of affected individuals. The observations of significant excess relatedness of patients and the significantly elevated risks to both close and distant relatives of patients strongly support a heritable predisposition to rotator cuff disease. Clinical Relevance: A better understanding of the familial risk of rotator cuff disease could lead to the identification of candidate genes predisposing individuals to rotator cuff disease. Gene identification will possibly allow the development of improved treatments, including biologic augmentations of rotator cuff repairs, which may improve tendon healing and repair outcomes. Level of Evidence: Prognostic Level III. See Instructions to Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19411462

  16. Arthroscopic repair of large rotator cuff tears using the interval slide technique

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph C Tauro

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: In some cases of larger and chronic rotator cuff tears, the supraspinatus tendon may be held in a retracted position by the contracted tissue of the rotator interval and the attached coracohumeral ligament. This study was performed to evaluate the utility and clinical effectiveness of an arthroscopic release of the rotator interval from the supraspinatus tendon combined with repair

  17. Assessment and characterization of in situ rotator cuff biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trent, Erika A.; Bailey, Lane; Mefleh, Fuad N.; Raikar, Vipul P.; Shanley, Ellen; Thigpen, Charles A.; Dean, Delphine; Kwartowitz, David M.

    2013-03-01

    Rotator cuff disease is a degenerative disorder that is a common, costly, and often debilitating, ranging in severity from partial thickness tear, which may cause pain, to total rupture, leading to loss in function. Currently, clinical diagnosis and determination of disease extent relies primarily on subjective assessment of pain, range of motion, and possibly X-ray or ultrasound images. The final treatment plan however is at the discretion of the clinician, who often bases their decision on personal experiences, and not quantitative standards. The use of ultrasound for the assessment of tissue biomechanics is established, such as in ultrasound elastography, where soft tissue biomechanics are measured. Few studies have investigated the use of ultrasound elastography in the characterization of musculoskeletal biomechanics. To assess tissue biomechanics we have developed a device, which measures the force applied to the underlying musculotendentious tissue while simultaneously obtaining the related ultrasound images. In this work, the musculotendinous region of the infraspinatus of twenty asymptomatic male organized baseball players was examined to access the variability in tissue properties within a single patient and across a normal population. Elastic moduli at percent strains less than 15 were significantly different than those above 15 percent strain within the normal population. No significant difference in tissue properties was demonstrated within a single patient. This analysis demonstrated elastic moduli are variable across individuals and incidence. Therefore threshold elastic moduli will likely be a function of variation in local-tissue moduli as opposed to a specific global value.

  18. Electromyographic assessment of muscle fatigue in massive rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, D H; Alizadehkhaiyat, O; Kemp, G J; Fisher, A C; Roebuck, M M; Frostick, S P

    2015-02-01

    Shoulder muscle fatigue has not been assessed in massive rotator cuff tear (MRCT). This study used EMG to measure fatigability of 13 shoulder muscles in 14 healthy controls and 11 patients with MRCT. A hand grip protocol was applied to minimise artifacts due to pain experience during measurement. The fatigue index (median frequency slope) was significantly non-zero (negative) for anterior, middle, and posterior parts of deltoid, supraspinatus and subscapularis muscles in the controls, and for anterior, middle, and posterior parts of deltoid, and pectoralis major in patients (p?0.001). Fatigue was significantly greater in patients compared to the controls for anterior and middle parts of deltoid and pectoralis major (p?0.001). A submaximal grip task provided a feasible way to assess shoulder muscle fatigue in MRCT patients, however with some limitations. The results suggest increased activation of deltoid is required to compensate for lost supraspinatus abduction torque. Increased pectoralis major fatigue in patients (adduction torque) likely reflected strategy to stabilise the humeral head against superior subluxing force of the deltoid. Considering physiotherapy as a primary or adjunct intervention for the management of MRCT, the findings of this study generate a base for future clinical studies aiming at the development of evidence-based protocols. PMID:25301260

  19. Multivariate Analyses of Rotator Cuff Pathologies in Shoulder Disability

    PubMed Central

    Henseler, Jan F.; Raz, Yotam; Nagels, Jochem; van Zwet, Erik W.; Raz, Vered; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Disability of the shoulder joint is often caused by a tear in the rotator cuff (RC) muscles. Four RC muscles coordinate shoulder movement and stability, among them the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscle which are predominantly torn. The contribution of each RC muscle to tear pathology is not fully understood. We hypothesized that muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration, features of RC muscle degeneration, are predictive of superior humeral head translation and shoulder functional disability. Methods Shoulder features, including RC muscle surface area and fatty infiltration, superior humeral translation and RC tear size were obtained from a consecutive series of Magnetic Resonance Imaging with arthrography (MRA). We investigated patients with superior (supraspinatus, n = 39) and posterosuperior (supraspinatus and infraspinatus, n = 30) RC tears, and patients with an intact RC (n = 52) as controls. The individual or combinatorial contribution of RC measures to superior humeral translation, as a sign of RC dysfunction, was investigated with univariate or multivariate models, respectively. Results Using the univariate model the infraspinatus surface area and fatty infiltration in both the supraspinatus and infraspinatus had a significant contribution to RC dysfunction. With the multivariate model, however, the infraspinatus surface area only affected superior humeral translation (p<0.001) and discriminated between superior and posterosuperior tears. In contrast neither tear size nor fatty infiltration of the supraspinatus or infraspinatus contributed to superior humeral translation. Conclusion Our study reveals that infraspinatus atrophy has the strongest contribution to RC tear pathologies. This suggests a pivotal role for the infraspinatus in preventing shoulder disability. PMID:25710703

  20. Reusing Cadaveric Humeri for Fracture Testing After Testing Simulated Rotator Cuff Tendon Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Pitts, Todd C.; Knight, Alex N.; Burkhead, Wayne Z.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The financial cost of using human tissues in biomedical testing and surgical reconstruction is predicted to increase at a rate that is disproportionately greater than other materials used in biomechanical testing. Our first hypothesis is that cadaveric proximal humeri that had undergone monotonic failure testing of simulated rotator cuff repairs would not differ in ultimate fracture loads or in energy absorbed to fracture when compared to controls (i.e., bones without cuff repairs). Our second hypothesis is that there can be substantial cost savings if these cadaveric proximal humeri, with simulated cuff repairs, can be re-used for fracture testing. Results of fracture tests (conducted in a backwards fall configuration) and cost analysis support both hypotheses. Hence, the bones that had undergone monotonic failure tests of various rotator cuff repair techniques can be re-used in fracture tests because their load-carrying capacity is not significantly reduced. PMID:25371862

  1. Elevated plasma levels of TIMP-1 in patients with rotator cuff tear

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Extracellular matrix remodeling is altered in rotator cuff tears, partly due to altered expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors. It is unclear whether this altered expression can be traced as changes in plasma protein levels. We measured the plasma levels of MMPs and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) in patients with rotator cuff tears and related changes in the pattern of MMP and TIMP levels to the extent of the rotator cuff tear. Methods Blood samples were collected from 17 patients, median age 61 (39–77) years, with sonographically verified rotator cuff tears (partial- or full-thickness). These were compared with 16 age- and sex-matched control individuals with sonographically intact rotator cuffs. Plasma levels of MMPs and TIMPs were measured simultaneously using Luminex technology and ELISA. Results The plasma levels of TIMP-1 were elevated in patients with rotator cuff tears, especially in those with full-thickness tears. The levels of TIMP-1, TIMP-3, and MMP-9 were higher in patients with full-thickness tears than in those with partial-thickness tears, but only the TIMP-1 levels were significantly different from those in the controls. Interpretation The observed elevation of TIMP-1 in plasma might reflect local pathological processes in or around the rotator cuff, or a genetic predisposition in these patients. That the levels of TIMP-1 and of certain MMPs were found to differ significantly between partial and full-thickness tears may reflect the extent of the lesion or different etiology and pathomechanisms. PMID:23043271

  2. Fluoroscopy-guided implantation of subacromial "biodegradable spacer" using local anesthesia in patients with irreparable rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Gervasi, Enrico; Cautero, Enrico; Dekel, Assaf

    2014-08-01

    Treatment of massive rotator cuff tears can be challenging, especially when tears are considered irreparable or, when repaired, at significant risk of retear. A surgical technique is described using a biodegradable subacromial balloon-shaped spacer (InSpace; Ortho-Space, Caesarea, Israel) that, when implanted between the humeral head and acromion, permits smooth, frictionless gliding, supporting shoulder biomechanics. The specific insertion technique described herein is a simple procedure that can be performed in a day-care or outpatient setting with patients under local anesthesia, thus providing a treatment option for patients with multiple comorbidities complicating or contraindicating surgery, such as reverse arthroplasty under general anesthesia. PMID:25264508

  3. Epidemiology of the rotator cuff tears: a new incidence related to thyroid disease

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Francesco; Osti, Leonardo; Padulo, Johnny; Maffulli, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: in the last years the incidence of rotator cuff tears increased and one main cause still waiting to be clarified. Receptors for thyroid hormones in rotator cuff tendons suggest possible effects on tendons metabolism and status. We undertook a retrospective, observational cohort study of 441 patients who underwent arthroscopic and mini-open repair for non traumatic degenerative rotator cuff tears. Methods: all the patients, predominantly females (63%), were interview to assess the relationship (frequency for class age “20 yrs” and factor analysis) between lesions of the rotator cuff with the following variables: gender, thyroid disease, smoker, taking medications for diabetes, hypertension or high cholesterol; presence of associated conditions (diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia). Results: thyroid disease is highly frequently (until 63% for 60<80 yrs) in females group independent to the age. Conversely, males showed a high frequency for smoker 37<62% until 80 yrs and 50% hypercholesterolemia over 80 yrs for the clinical variable studied. Conclusions: this is the first clinical report that shown a relationship between thyroid pathologies and non-traumatic rotator cuff tear as increased risk factors. PMID:25489548

  4. Excursion of the Rotator Cuff Under the AcromionPatterns of Subacromial Contact

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Evan L. Flatow; Louis J. Soslowsky; Jonathan B. Ticker; Robert J. Pawluk; Matthew Hepler; Jon Ark; Van C. Mow; Louis U. Bigliani

    1994-01-01

    Nine fresh-frozen, human cadaveric shoulders were el evated in the scapular plane in two different humeral rotations by applying forces along action lines of rotator cuff and deltoid muscles. Stereophotogrammetry deter mined possible regions of subacromial contact using a proximity criterion; radiographs measured acromio humeral interval and position of greater tuberosity. Con tact starts at the anterolateral edge of the

  5. Rotator cuff disorders: How to write a surgically relevant magnetic resonance imaging report?

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Ahmed M; El-Morsy, Ahmad; Badran, Mohamed Aboelnour

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of rotator cuff is a common indication for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning of the shoulder. Conventional MRI is the most commonly used technique, while magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is reserved for certain cases. Rotator cuff disorders are thought to be caused by a combination of internal and external mechanisms. A well-structured MRI report should comment on the relevant anatomic structures including the acromial type and orientation, the presence of os acromiale, acromio-clavicular degenerative spurs and fluid in the subacromial subdeltoid bursa. In addition, specific injuries of the rotator cuff tendons and the condition of the long head of biceps should be accurately reported. The size and extent of tendon tears, tendon retraction and fatty degeneration or atrophy of the muscles are all essential components of a surgically relevant MRI report. PMID:24976930

  6. Synovial Chondromatosis of the Subacromial Bursa Causing a Bursal-Sided Rotator Cuff Tear

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Julie A.; Garrigues, Grant E.

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is an uncommon condition, and involvement of the shoulder is even more rare. We report on a 39-year-old female who presented with symptoms, radiographic features, and intraoperative findings consistent with multiple subacromial loose bodies resulting in a partial-thickness, bursal-sided rotator cuff tear of the supraspinatus muscle. She was treated with an arthroscopic removal of loose bodies, complete excision of the subacromial/subdeltoid bursa, acromioplasty, and rotator cuff repair. To our knowledge, this is the first report of arthroscopic treatment for a bursal-sided, partial-thickness rotator cuff tear treated with greater than two-year clinical and radiographic follow-up. We utilized shoulder scores, preoperative and postoperative range of motion, and imaging to assess the results of treatment and surveillance for recurrence in our patient after two-year follow-up.

  7. Arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears: A prospective cohort with 2- to 4-year follow-up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William F. Bennett

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study is to report on the complete arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears. Type of Study: Prospective cohort study. Methods: Between 1997 and 1999, 37 patients underwent complete arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears. The preoperative and postoperative outcomes of these 37 patients were analyzed using the constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow

  8. Surgical treatment of full-thickness rotator cuff tears in patients 40 years of age or younger

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard J Hcwkins; William D Morin; Peter M Bonutti

    1999-01-01

    Full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff are uncommon in the first 4 decades of life. A retrospective analysis was conducted of 19 consecutive patients who were 40 years of age or younger and had been treated surgically for a full-thickness tear of the rotator cuff. Sixteen patients (84%) recalled an acute injury that heralded the onset of symptoms. Five of

  9. Arthroscopic Debridement and Acromioplasty Versus Mini-Open Repair in the Treatment of Significant Partial-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen C. Weber

    1999-01-01

    Summary: Partial tears of the rotator cuff, especially of the articular side, have received attention only with the recent ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthroscopy to diagnose these lesions. Several early reports showed nearly 100% success in managing these lesions with arthroscopic debridement with or without acromioplasty. This series compares 32 patients with significant partial-thickness rotator cuff tears

  10. Matrix Metalloproteinase and Tissue Inhibitor of Matrix Metalloproteinase mRNA Levels are Specifically Altered in Torn Rotator Cuff Tendons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian K. Y. Lo; Linda L. Marchuk; Robert Hollinshead; David A. Hart; Cyril B. Frank

    2004-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff tears are a cause of pain and disability in the shoulder. The molecular changes associated with rotator cuff tearing are unclear. A subset of matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase, which are involved in extracellular matrix remodeling and degradation, were evaluated.Hypothesis: There would be an increase in the mRNA level of spcific matrix metalloproteinase and a

  11. Conventional rotator cuff repair complemented by the aid of mononuclear autologous stem cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    João L. Ellera Gomes; Ricardo Canquerini da Silva; Lúcia M. R. Silla; Marcelo R. Abreu; Roberto Pellanda

    Purpose  To investigate the behavior of rotator cuff tears treated with conventional repair technique with the aid of autologous bone\\u000a marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Fourteen consecutive patients (9 women, 5 men, mean age of 59.2 years) with complete rotator cuff tears (mean preoperative\\u000a UCLA score of 12 ± 3.0) were fixed by transosseous stitches through mini-open incision, with subsequent injection of BMMC\\u000a into the

  12. Fatal pulmonary embolism after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Durant, Thomas J.S.; Cote, Mark P.; Arciero, Robert A.; Mazzocca, Augustus D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: pulmonary embolism (PE) is a rare and serious complication of arthroscopic orthopaedic surgery. Currently there is great paucity in the literature regarding PE events following arthroscopic rotator cuff (ARCR) surgery. The purpose of this case series was to (1) report our known incidence rate of symptomatic PE following ARCR for a single surgeon and (2) describe five cases of pulmonary embolism following ARCR, detailing patient medical history and potential perioperative risk factors. Methods: the number of PE events were queried retrospectively from the institutional database with the ICD-9 code 415.1 within a 10 year time frame (2003–2013). Cases of PE identified by ICD-9 query were reviewed for type of procedure, postoperative day of event, and surgeon. Only patients with a confirmed diagnosis by computed tomography (CT) scan or post-mortem exam, were included in this study. Patient medical records belonging to affected patients were ordered and reviewed by a single investigator. Pre, intra, and postoperative information was obtained and summarized. Results: 5 cases of PE were identified, two of which were fatal. All events occurred in the perioperative period following ARCR. The 10 year incidence rate for PE following ARCR was 0.89%. Medical record review revealed significant risk factors for these patients when compared to current VTE prophylactic guidelines. Conclusions: our ten year incidence rate of PE following arthroscopic shoulder surgery and ARCR was 0.25 and 0.89% respectively. These rates were found to be considerably higher than reported rates of PE in the general population and following arthroscopic shoulder surgery. In addition, our methods failed to detect subclinical PE events, resulting in the likelihood of this value to be an underestimate of the true incidence. Medical record review revealed risk factors which would qualify patients for chemoprophylaxis under certain guidelines, however, the validity of available risk stratification methods continue to be a topic of debate. Level of Evidence: Level IV; case series. PMID:25332941

  13. Arthroscopic Technique for Patch Augmentation of Rotator Cuff Repairs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc R. Labbé

    2006-01-01

    The patient is placed in the lateral position, and an arthroscopic cuff repair is performed according to standard techniques. The line of repair is usually in the shape of a “T” or an “L.” The repair is viewed through the lateral portal, with fluid inflow through the scope. Mattress sutures are placed in the anterior and posterior portions of the

  14. Prevalence of peripheral neurologic injuries in rotator cuff tears with atrophy.

    PubMed

    Vad, Vijay B; Southern, Daniel; Warren, Russell F; Altchek, David W; Dines, David

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to define the prevalence of peripheral nerve injury associated with full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff presenting with shoulder muscle atrophy. Twenty-five patients with the diagnosis of full-thickness rotator cuff tear were included. Electrodiagnostic testing, including nerve conduction studies and needle examination, was performed on all patients. There were 7 abnormal electromyographic examinations. The most common diagnosis was upper trunk brachial plexopathy severely affecting the axillary nerve (4/7), followed by suprascapular neuropathy (2/7) and cervical radiculopathy (1/7). The prevalence of associated peripheral neuropathy was found to be 28%. Greater degrees of atrophy were significantly associated with the presence of neuropathy in these patients. Careful neurologic screening in all patients and electromyographic examination in clinically suspicious groups are recommended in patients with full-thickness cuff tears before surgical repair. PMID:12934025

  15. Margin convergence: A method of reducing strain in massive rotator cuff tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen S. Burkhart; K. A. Athanasiou; Michael A. Wirth

    1996-01-01

    Increased security of fixation in rotator cuff repair is usually achieved by increasing the strength of fixation. Paradoxically, the problem can be approached by techniques that decrease the strain at the margins of the tear so that weaker fixation will still be adequate. Such techniques provide greater safety tolerances for the strength characteristics of suture, tendon, and bone. The principle

  16. Transplantation of teres major muscle for infraspinatus muscle in irreparable rotator cuff tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luigi Celli; Claudio Rovesta; Maria Carmen Marongiu; Stetano Manzieri

    1998-01-01

    The authors suggest transfer of teres major muscle for a detached and atrophic infraspinatus muscle in irreparable rotator cuff tears. Original studies were done on cadavers. In the period between November 1993 and June 1994, we used this technique on 6 patients. Those patients were evaluated with the Constant-Murley test and improved from an average of 40 points (minimum 27

  17. Semiconstrained total shoulder arthroplasty for glenohumeral arthritis and massive rotator cuff tearing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anthony C. Nwakama; Robert H. Cofield; Brian F. Kavanagh; J. F. Loehr

    2000-01-01

    Each of 6 patients (7 shoulders) underwent semiconstrained total shoulder arthroplasty for glenohumeral arthritis, subluxation, and extensive rotator cuff tearing to obtain a more balanced joint and achieve consistent pain relief. A hooded glenoid component (Neer 600%) was used to contain the humeral head within the joint. Patients were followed for an average of 69 months (range, 26-125 months) or

  18. Natural history of asymptomatic rotator cuff tears: A longitudinal analysis of asymptomatic tears detected sonographically

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ken Yamaguchi; A. Marc Tetro; Oren Blam; Bradley A. Evanoff; Sharlene A. Teefey; William D. Middleton

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine longitudinally the natural history of asymptomatic rotator cuff tears over a 5-year period and to assess the risk for development of symptoms and tear progression. Since 1985 through the present, bilateral sonograms were done on all patients. A review of consecutive sonograms done from 1989 to 1994 revealed 58 potential patients with

  19. A Multicenter Study of 210 Rotator Cuff Tears Treated by Arthroscopic Acromioplasty

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-François Kempf; Pascal Gleyze; François Bonnomet; Gilles Walch; Daniel Mole; André Frank; Philippe Beaufils; Christophe Levigne; Bruno Rio; André Jaffe

    1999-01-01

    Summary: We followed 210 cases of rotator cuff tears treated in four French centers by arthroscopic acromioplasty in 195 cases and by a tenotomy of the Long Head of Biceps (LHB) in 15 cases. All patients were evaluated by means of the Constant score (CS) and radiographic imaging. The mean age was 61 years and the mean follow-up period was

  20. Differential ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy signaling following rotator cuff tears and suprascapular nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sunil K.; Kim, Hubert T.; Feeley, Brian T.; Liu, Xuhui

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have evaluated role of Akt/mTOR signaling in rotator cuff muscle atrophy and determined that there was differential in signaling following tendon transection (TT) and suprascapular nerve (SSN) denervation (DN), suggesting that atrophy following TT and DN was modulated by different protein degradation pathways. In this study, two muscle proteolytic systems that have been shown to be potent regulators of muscle atrophy in other injury models, the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and autophagy, were evaluated following TT and DN. In addition to examining protein degradation, this study assessed protein synthesis rate following these two surgical models to understand how the balance between protein degradation and synthesis results in atrophy following rotator cuff injury. In contrast to the traditional theory that protein synthesis is decreased during muscle atrophy, this study suggests that protein synthesis is up-regulated in rotator cuff muscle atrophy following both surgical models. While the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway was a major contributor to the atrophy seen following DN, autophagy was a major contributor following TT. The findings of this study suggest that protein degradation is the primary factor contributing to atrophy following rotator cuff injury. However, different proteolytic pathways are activated if SSN injury is involved. PMID:24018537

  1. Incidence and Treatment of Postoperative Stiffness Following Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David P. Huberty; John D. Schoolfield; Paul C. Brady; Antonio P. Vadala; Paolo Arrigoni; Stephen S. Burkhart

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of clinically significant postoperative stiffness following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. This study also sought to determine the clinical and surgical factors that were associated with higher rates of postoperative stiffness. Finally, we analyzed the result of arthroscopic lysis of adhesions and capsular release for treatment of patients who developed

  2. Eccentric training as a new approach for rotator cuff tendinopathy: Review and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Paula R; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco; Salvini, Tania F

    2014-01-01

    Excessive mechanical loading is considered the major cause of rotator cuff tendinopathy. Although tendon problems are very common, they are not always easy to treat. Eccentric training has been proposed as an effective conservative treatment for the Achilles and patellar tendinopathies, but less evidence exists about its effectiveness for the rotator cuff tendinopathy. The mechanotransduction process associated with an adequate dose of mechanical load might explain the beneficial results of applying the eccentric training to the tendons. An adequate load increases healing and an inadequate (over or underuse) load can deteriorate the tendon structure. Different eccentric training protocols have been used in the few studies conducted for people with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Further, the effects of the eccentric training for rotator cuff tendinopathy were only evaluated on pain, function and strength. Future studies should assess the effects of the eccentric training also on shoulder kinematics and muscle activity. Individualization of the exercise prescription, comprehension and motivation of the patients, and the establishment of specific goals, practice and efforts should all be considered when prescribing the eccentric training. In conclusion, eccentric training should be used aiming improvement of the tendon degeneration, but more evidence is necessary to establish the adequate dose-response and to determine long-term follow-up effects. PMID:25405092

  3. A New Technique for Patch Augmentation of Rotator Cuff Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Mihara, Shuzou; Ono, Teruyasu; Inoue, Hirofumi; Kisimoto, Tetsurou

    2014-01-01

    Massive rotator cuff tears defying primary repair have been treated with debridement, arthroscopic subacromial decompression, partial repair, muscle-tendon transfer, and joint prosthesis, among other techniques. However, the treatment results have not been satisfactory compared with those of small- to medium-sized rotator cuff tears; each procedure has its merits and demerits, and currently, there is no single established method. For massive rotator cuff tears defying primary repair, the arthroscopic patch graft procedure has been reported as an effective surgical procedure, and this procedure is chosen as the first-line treatment in our department. In this procedure, suture anchors are generally used to fix the patch graft to the footprint on the side of the greater tuberosity. However, tendon-to-bone healing is frequently difficult to achieve, and bone-to-bone healing seems more advantageous for the repair of the rotator cuff attachment site. To improve the results of treatment, a new patch graft procedure was developed, in which the iliotibial ligament with bone was collected at Gerdy's tubercle and the bone was anchored to the footprint on the side of the greater tuberosity. With this procedure, excellent results were obtained, although only short-term results are available at present. The technique and its results so far are reported. PMID:25126505

  4. IMMUNOLOCALIZATION OF CYTOKINES AND GROWTH FACTORS IN SUBACROMIAL BURSA OF ROTATOR CUFF TEAR PATIENTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroshige SAKAI; Kenji FUJITA; Yoshitada SAKAI; Kosaku MIZUNO

    Inflammation in the subacromial bursa causes pain in patients suffering from rotator cuff tear, with this long-lasting inflammation leading to fibrosis and thickening of the subacromial bursa. Both inflammatory cytokines and mechanical stress, and impingement in the subacromial space, might induce and worsen this inflammation. However, little is known of the mechanism of this inflammation. In this study, we used

  5. T lymphocytes are not required for the development of fatty degeneration after rotator cuff tear

    PubMed Central

    Gumucio, J.; Flood, M.; Harning, J.; Phan, A.; Roche, S.; Lynch, E.; Bedi, A.; Mendias, C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Rotator cuff tears are among the most common and debilitating upper extremity injuries. Chronic cuff tears result in atrophy and an infiltration of fat into the muscle, a condition commonly referred to as ‘fatty degeneration’. While stem cell therapies hold promise for the treatment of cuff tears, a suitable immunodeficient animal model that could be used to study human or other xenograft-based therapies for the treatment of rotator cuff injuries had not previously been identified. Methods A full-thickness, massive supraspinatus and infraspinatus tear was induced in adult T-cell deficient rats. We hypothesised that, compared with controls, 28 days after inducing a tear we would observe a decrease in muscle force production, an accumulation of type IIB fibres, and an upregulation in the expression of genes involved with muscle atrophy, fibrosis and inflammation. Results Chronic cuff tears in nude rats resulted in a 30% to 40% decrease in muscle mass, a 23% reduction in production of muscle force, and an induction of genes that regulate atrophy, fibrosis, lipid accumulation, inflammation and macrophage recruitment. Marked large lipid droplet accumulation was also present. Conclusions The extent of degenerative changes in nude rats was similar to what was observed in T-cell competent rats. T cells may not play an important role in regulating muscle degeneration following chronic muscle unloading. The general similarities between nude and T-cell competent rats suggest the nude rat is likely an appropriate preclinical model for the study of xenografts that have the potential to enhance the treatment of chronically torn rotator cuff muscles. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:262–72. PMID:25185444

  6. Pulsed electromagnetic fields after rotator cuff repair: a randomized, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Buono, Angelo Del; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    The current study tested the hypothesis that the use of pulsed electromagnetic fields after rotator cuff repair is effective in the short term as an adjuvant treatment to reduce local inflammation, postoperative joint swelling, and recovery time, as well as to induce pain relief. Sixty-six patients who underwent shoulder arthroscopy for repair of small to medium rotator cuff tears were randomly divided into 2 groups with a block randomization procedure. Thirty-two patients underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and application of pulsed electromagnetic fields postoperatively; 34 patients underwent rotator cuff repair and placebo treatment (placebo group). All patients had the same postoperative rehabilitation protocol. At 3 months from the index procedure, visual analog scale, range of motion, and University of California at Los Angeles and Constant scores were significantly better in the pulsed electromagnetic fields group than in the placebo group (P<.05). Three patients in the pulsed electromagnetic fields group and 7 patients in the placebo group had mild to moderate capsulitis (P=.2). Severe capsulitis occurred in 1 patient in the pulsed electromagnetic fields group and 2 patients in the placebo group (P=.6). At the last follow-up (minimum, 2 years), clinical and functional outcomes were further improved in both groups, with no significant intergroup differences. Application of pulsed electromagnetic fields after rotator cuff repair is safe and reduces postoperative pain, analgesic use, and stiffness in the short term. At 2 years, no difference was seen in outcomes in patients who did or did not undergo treatment with pulsed electromagnetic fields. [Orthopedics. 2015; 38(3):e223-e228.]. PMID:25760511

  7. Biochemical markers in the synovial fluid of glenohumeral joints from patients with rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Y; Hamada, K; Nakajima, T; Fujikawa, K; Fukuda, H

    2001-07-01

    It is known that rotator cuff tears are sometimes accompanied by joint destruction. Our purpose was to elucidate the pathology with this condition. Thirty-two synovial fluid (SF) samples aspirated from the glenohumeral joints of patients with rotator cuff tears, including 7 with partial-thickness and 25 with full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff (10 massive and 15 isolated supraspinatus tendon (SSp) tears), were examined. Collagenase (MMP-1), stromelysin 1 (MMP-3), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) and carboxy-terminal type II procollagen peptide (pCOL Il-C) were measured in the SF using the respective sandwich enzyme immunoassays. Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) was also quantified with a cationic dye binding method using 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue. Levels of any molecules except pCOL II-C in the SF appeared to be higher in full-thickness tears than those in partial-thickness tears. Moreover, levels of MMP-1, MMP-3 and GAG in the SF were significantly higher in massive tears of the rotator cuff in comparison with those in isolated SSp tears. Such significance was not observed in the levels of TIMP-1 or pCOL II C in the SF. We examined the relation of those levels with operative findings or clinical parameters from full-thickness tears, and observed significant correlations of the tear size with the levels of MMP-1, MMP-3 and GAG in the SF. Although these marker molecules in SF do not always originate from cartilage, our results may indicate the potential for accelerated cartilage-degrading activity in the glenohumeral joint in massive tears of the rotator cuff. PMID:11518264

  8. Latissimus dorsi tendon transfer: A comparative analysis of primary and salvage reconstruction of massive, irreparable rotator cuff tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jon J. P. Warner; I. M. Parsons

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of a modified Constant scoring system, we compared outcomes for 16 patients who underwent latissimus dorsi transfer as a salvage reconstruction for a failed prior rotator cuff repair with outcomes for 6 patients who underwent a primary reconstruction for an irreparable cuff defect. There was a statistically significant difference in Constant score between groups, which measured 55%

  9. Synthetic and degradable patches: an emerging solution for rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Hakimi, Osnat; Mouthuy, Pierre-Alexis; Carr, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The use of rotator cuff augmentation has increased dramatically over the last 10 years in response to the high rate of failure observed after non-augmented surgery. However, although augmentations have been shown to reduce shoulder pain, there is no consensus or clear guideline as to what is the safest or most efficacious material. Current augmentations, either available commercially or in development, can be classified into three categories: non-degradable structures, extra cellular matrix (ECM)-based patches and degradable synthetic scaffolds. Non-degradable structures have excellent mechanical properties, but can cause problems of infection and loss of integrity in the long-term. ECM-based patches usually demonstrate excellent biological properties in vitro, but studies have highlighted complications in vivo due to poor mechanical support and to infection or inflammation. Degradable synthetic scaffolds represent the new generation of implants. It is proposed that a combination of good mechanical properties, active promotion of biological healing, low infection risk and bio-absorption are the ideal characteristics of an augmentation material. Among the materials with these features, those processed by electrospinning have shown great promis. However, their clinical effectiveness has yet to be proven and well conducted clinical trials are urgently required. PMID:23837794

  10. Artrhoscopic rotator cuff repair with augmentation: the V-sled technique.

    PubMed

    Chillemi, Claudio; El Boustany, Stefano; Giudici, Luca Dei; Ippolito, Giorgio

    2012-05-01

    Numerous techniques have been described for patch positioning in rotator cuff shoulder arthroscopic surgery. These techniques seem to be difficult challenges for the majority of arthroscopic surgeons, and because of that they are called "highly demanding" techniques. Without the use of dedicated instruments and cannulas, the authors propose a V-sled technique that seems to be more reproducible, quicker and less difficult to perform for arthroscopic shoulder surgeons. The patient is placed in the lateral position. All arthroscopic procedures are performed without the use of cannulas. The standard posterior portal is used for the glenohumeral (GH) joint arthroscopy with fluid inflowing through the scope. After an accurate evaluation of the GH space, the scope is then introduced into the subacromial space. With the use of a spinal needle, a lateral portal is performed. The great tuberosity is prepared with a bur to place two 5.5 mm triple-loaded radiolucent anchors. In addition, two free high strength sutures are passed through the muscle, respectively. The repair is performed using two high strength sutures from each anchor. The third wire from each anchor is retrieved out of the accessories portals used for the insertion of the anchors. In addition, two free high strength sutures are passed through the muscle, and the patch sizing is done using a measuring probe introduced through the lateral portal. Next, the patch is then prepared and is introduced into the subacromial space, and then the patch is stabilized, and the free sutures are tied. PMID:22615157

  11. Effects of selective paralysis of the supraspinatus muscle using botulinum neurotoxin a in rotator cuff healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Ficklscherer, Andreas; Hartl, Tessa-Katharina; Scharf, Markus; Sievers, Birte; Schröder, Christian; Milz, Stefan; Niethammer, Thomas; Pietschmann, Matthias F; Müller, Peter E

    2013-05-01

    We hypothesized that a temporary rotator cuff paralysis using botulinum-neurotoxin A (BoNtA) would lead to an improved tendon-to-bone healing after repair of supraspinatus lesions. One hundred sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to either the BoNtA or the control (saline) group. BoNtA/saline-solution was injected into the supraspinatus muscle 1 week prior to surgery. A supraspinatus defect was made; we distinguished between a lesion with normal and increased repair load. Furthermore, one subgroup had the operated shoulder immobilized in a cast. Histologic analysis and biomechanical testing followed. Specimens from the BoNtA-group, which were treated with an increased repair load, showed less cellularity and more organization in the interface tissue compared to the saline control group. In addition, we found that the collagen 1-3 quotient in the BoNtA specimen was significantly (p?=?0.0051) higher than in the control group. Ultimate load at failure between the groups was not significantly different (p?>?0.05). We did not observe any significant differences between the mobilized and immobilized specimen (p?=?0.2079). The study shows that tendon-to-bone healing after rotator cuff repair can be altered positively using BoNtA pre-operatively. Tears with increased repair load seem to benefit the most-at least histologically. PMID:23239559

  12. Relationship between muscle fatty infiltration and the biological characteristics and stimulation potential of tenocytes from rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Klatte-Schulz, Franka; Gerhardt, Christian; Scheibel, Markus; Wildemann, Britt; Pauly, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    The healing after rotator cuff surgery is still dissatisfying, and increased muscle fatty infiltration even more impairs the healing success. To achieve sufficient healing after rotator cuff reconstructions, the use of growth factors may be one possibility. The aim of the study was to identify a possible relationship between fatty infiltration of the supraspinatus muscle and cellular biological characteristics and stimulation potential of tenocyte-like cells (TLCs). TLCs of 3 donor groups differing in grade of muscle fatty infiltration were analyzed for their cellular characteristics and were stimulated with BMP-2 or BMP-7 in a 3D scaffold culture. The cell count and potency for self-renewal were significantly decreased in TLCs from donors with high muscle fatty infiltration compared to the lower fatty infiltration groups. Cell count and collagen-I expression as well as protein synthesis were stimulated by growth factors. Interestingly, TLCs of the high fatty infiltration group exhibited a weaker stimulation potential compared to the other groups. TLCs from donors with high muscle fatty infiltration generally revealed inferior characteristics compared to cells of lower fatty infiltration groups, which may be one reason for a weaker healing potential and may represent a possible starting point for the development of future treatment options. PMID:24022826

  13. The MRI geyser sign: acromioclavicular joint cysts in the setting of a chronic rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Cooper, H John; Milillo, Ralph; Klein, Devon A; DiFelice, Gregory S

    2011-06-01

    We present the case of a 71-year-old man with a large acromioclavicular (AC) joint cyst successfully managed with surgical excision. AC joint cysts are soft tissue masses generally signifying underlying rotator cuff pathology. Traditionally, these cysts were identified with shoulder arthrography as a "geyser" of fluid escaping through the AC joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is today's preferred imaging modality; we describe the MRI equivalent of the "geyser sign," signifying synovial fluid escaping through the cuff defect, across the subacromial bursa, and decompressing superiorly through a degenerated AC joint. Surgical management is preferred for symptomatic cysts. Based on a review of limited retrospective case series, recommendations for management of these lesions are as follows. Repair of the rotator cuff is preferable whenever possible. In the case of an irreparable defect, good results can be achieved through excisional AC joint arthroplasty and resection of the cyst base. Aspiration of these cysts should not be attempted, due to the high recurrence rate and potential for a draining sinus. Hemiarthroplasty also may be effective in indirectly decompressing these cysts; but given the invasive nature of this procedure, it should be reserved for patients who are also symptomatic from cuff arthropathy. PMID:21869946

  14. Transtendon, Double-Row, Transosseous-Equivalent Arthroscopic Repair of Partial-Thickness, Articular-Surface Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Dilisio, Matthew F.; Miller, Lindsay R.; Higgins, Laurence D.

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic transtendinous techniques for the arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness, articular-surface rotator cuff tears offer the advantage of minimizing the disruption of the patient's remaining rotator cuff tendon fibers. In addition, double-row fixation of full-thickness rotator cuff tears has shown biomechanical advantages. We present a novel method combining these 2 techniques for transtendon, double-row, transosseous-equivalent arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness, articular-surface rotator cuff tears. Direct visualization of the reduction of the retracted articular tendon layer to its insertion on the greater tuberosity is the key to the procedure. Linking the medial-row anchors and using a double-row construct provide a stable repair that allows early shoulder motion to minimize the risk of postoperative stiffness. PMID:25473606

  15. Two 6-year follow-up studies of large and massive rotator cuff tears: Comparison of outcome measures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert M. Hollinshead; Nicholas G. H. Mohtadi; Robert A. Vande Guchte; Veronica M. R. Wadey

    2000-01-01

    The purposes of this report are (1) to describe the development of a quality-of-life outcome measure for rotator cuff disease (RC-QOL) and a new simple test of rotator cuff function, the Functional Shoulder Elevation Test (FSET), and (2) to compare these with the SF-36 and the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Assessment (ASESA) in a cohort of 86 patients with

  16. Efficacy of standardised manual therapy and home exercise programme for chronic rotator cuff disease: randomised placebo controlled trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kim Bennell; Elin Wee; Sally Coburn; Sally Green; Anthony Harris; Margaret Staples; Andrew Forbes; Rachelle Buchbinder

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy of a programme of manual therapy and exercise treatment compared with placebo treatment delivered by physiotherapists for people with chronic rotator cuff disease.Design Randomised, participant and single assessor blinded, placebo controlled trial.Setting Metropolitan region of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.Participants 120 participants with chronic (>3 months) rotator cuff disease recruited through medical practitioners and from the community.Interventions

  17. Rehabilitation following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a review of current literature.

    PubMed

    Ross, David; Maerz, Tristan; Lynch, Jamie; Norris, Sarah; Baker, Kevin; Anderson, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Physical rehabilitation following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has conventionally involved a 4- to 6-week period of immobilization; there are two schools of thought regarding activity level during this period. Some authors encourage early, more aggressive rehabilitation along with the use of a continuous passive motion device; others propose later, more conservative rehabilitation. Although some studies report trends in improved early range of motion, pain relief, and outcomes scores with aggressive rehabilitation following rotator cuff repair, no definitive consensus exists supporting a clinical difference resulting from rehabilitation timing in the early stages of healing. Rehabilitation timing does not affect outcomes after 6 to 12 months postoperatively. Given the lack of information regarding which patient groups benefit from aggressive rehabilitation, individualized patient care is warranted. PMID:24382874

  18. New Solution for Massive, Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears: The Subacromial “Biodegradable Spacer”

    PubMed Central

    Savarese, Eugenio; Romeo, Rocco

    2012-01-01

    Massive, irreparable rotator cuff tears are a source of pain and disability. Although most rotator cuff tears can be completely repaired, a significant number are considered massive and irreparable. Numerous operative techniques have been described for the treatment of these kinds of tears including arthroscopic debridement, biceps tenotomy, tendon transfer, grafting, and reverse arthroplasty. We describe a surgical technique using a biodegradable subacromial balloon spacer (InSpace; OrthoSpace, Kfar Saba, Israel) implanted between the humeral head and acromion that permits smooth, frictionless gliding, restoring the shoulder biomechanics. The technique is easy to perform and is less invasive than the conventional surgical techniques available, and it may potentially serve as a bridging option in patients with massive, irreparable tears who are normally candidates for reverse arthroplasty. PMID:23766979

  19. A Load-Sharing Rip-Stop Fixation Construct for Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Denard, Patrick J.; Burkhart, Stephen S.

    2012-01-01

    Despite advancements in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair techniques, achieving tendon-to-bone healing can be difficult in the setting of poor-quality tendon. Moreover, medial tendon tears or tears with lateral tendon loss may preclude standard techniques. Rip-stop suture configurations have been shown to improve load to failure compared with simple or mattress stitch patterns and may be particularly valuable in these settings. The purpose of this report is to describe a technical modification of a rip-stop rotator cuff repair that combines the advantages of a rip-stop suture (by providing resistance to tissue cutout) and a double row of load-sharing suture anchors (minimizing the load per anchor and therefore the load per suture within each anchor). PMID:23766972

  20. Comparison between single-row and double-row rotator cuff repair: a biomechanical study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giuseppe Milano; Andrea Grasso; Donatella Zarelli; Laura Deriu; Mario Cillo; Carlo Fabbriciani

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical behavior under cyclic loading test of single-row and double-row rotator\\u000a cuff repair with suture anchors in an ex-vivo animal model. For the present study, 50 fresh porcine shoulders were used. On\\u000a each shoulder, a crescent-shaped full-thickness tear of the infraspinatus was performed. Width of the tendon tear was 2 cm.\\u000a The

  1. OPERATIVE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC RUPTURES OF THE ROTATOR CUFF OF THE SHOULDER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. P. PACKER; P. T. CALVERT; J. I. L. BAYLEY; LIPMANN KESSEL

    1983-01-01

    The results of 63 operative repairs of chronic tears of the rotator cuff in 61 patients are reviewed retrospectively; the mean follow-up was 32.7 months. Fifty-four patients presented with symptoms of persistent pain and seven patients with gross loss of movement. All the patients had failed to respond to conservative freatment. Results were assessed in terms of relief of pain,

  2. Biomechanical analysis of rotator cuff repairs with extracellular matrix graft augmentation.

    PubMed

    Ely, Erin E; Figueroa, Nathania M; Gilot, Gregory J

    2014-09-01

    Despite advances in surgical techniques, 20% to 90% of rotator cuff (RTC) repairs fail. They tend to fail at the suture-tendon junction due to tension at the repair and gap formation prior to healing. This study evaluated the gap formation and ultimate tensile failure loads of a RTC repair with a decellularized human dermal allograft. Augmentation of a RTC repair with an extracellular matrix graft decreased gap formation and increased load to failure in a human RTC repair model. PMID:25350614

  3. Comparison of rotator cuff muscle architecture between humans and other selected vertebrate species

    PubMed Central

    Mathewson, Margie A.; Kwan, Alan; Eng, Carolyn M.; Lieber, Richard L.; Ward, Samuel R.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we compare rotator cuff muscle architecture of typically used animal models with that of humans and quantify the scaling relationships of these muscles across mammals. The four muscles that correspond to the human rotator cuff – supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis and teres minor – of 10 commonly studied animals were excised and subjected to a series of comparative measurements. When body mass among animals was regressed against physiological cross-sectional area, muscle mass and normalized fiber length, the confidence intervals suggested geometric scaling but did not exclude other scaling relationships. Based on the architectural difference index (ADI), a combined measure of fiber length-to-moment arm ratio, fiber length-to-muscle length ratio and the fraction of the total rotator cuff physiological cross-sectional area contributed by each muscle, chimpanzees were found to be the most similar to humans (ADI=2.15), followed closely by capuchins (ADI=2.16). Interestingly, of the eight non-primates studied, smaller mammals such as mice, rats and dogs were more similar to humans in architectural parameters compared with larger mammals such as sheep, pigs or cows. The force production versus velocity trade-off (indicated by fiber length-to-moment arm ratio) and the excursion ability (indicated by fiber length-to-muscle length ratio) of humans were also most similar to those of primates, followed by the small mammals. Overall, primates provide the best architectural representation of human muscle architecture. However, based on the muscle architectural parameters of non-primates, smaller rather than larger mammals may be better models for studying muscles related to the human rotator cuff. PMID:24072803

  4. Arthroscopic Lamina-Specific Double-Row Fixation for Large Delaminated Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Daisuke; Funakoshi, Noboru; Yamashita, Fumiharu

    2014-01-01

    Delamination is a commonly observed finding at the time of rotator cuff repair, but few studies have described the surgical techniques used for delaminated rotator cuff tears (RCTs) or their clinical outcomes. We developed a technique using a combination of a double row and an additional row, which we call lamina-specific double-row fixation, for large delaminated RCTs. The lamina-specific double-row technique is performed using an additional row (lamina-specific lateral row) of suture anchors placed between the typical medial and lateral rows of suture anchors. The technique is performed as follows: (1) medial-row sutures are passed through the inferior (articular-side) and superior (bursal-side) layers in a mattress fashion; (2) lamina-specific lateral-row simple sutures are passed through the inferior layer; and (3) lateral-row simple sutures are passed through the superior layer. We believe that this technique offers the following advantages: (1) creation of a larger area of contact between the inferior layer and the footprint, (2) higher initial fixation strength of the articular-side components of the repaired rotator cuff tendon, and (3) an adaptation between the superficial and inferior layers. This technique represents an alternative option in the operative treatment of large delaminated RCTs. PMID:25685671

  5. Advantages and techniques of utilizing anterolateral portal in delaminated rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Prithviraj; Gothelf, Todd K; Nord, Keith M; Garrett, William H; Nord, Keith D

    2014-01-01

    Typically, rotator cuff repair is performed two-dimensionally while visualizing the subacromial space. To achieve a more complete repair, sutures can be retrieved from inside the joint utilizing a penetrating suture device through the anterolateral portal, which permits visualization of the articular side and bursal side of the rotator cuff tear. Utilizing other portals can leave the sutures out of sight and reach. The anterolateral portal helps capture both leaves of a delaminated tear and places the sutures in the center of the field for retrieval and tying. The anterolateral portal is located with a spinal needle just off the anterolateral corner of the acromion, and the suture anchor is inserted into the greater tuberosity through this portal. The sutures are passed into the joint through the tear in the rotator cuff with a suture grasper. The scope is redirected intraarticularly, and the suture is visualized. The sutures are positioned, and the penetrator is passed through the tendon. The scope is placed back in the bursa for tying sutures and capturing both leaves of a delaminated tear. It works equally well for simple complete tears and partial articular-sided supraspinatus tendon avulsion lesions. PMID:25153817

  6. Exercise Therapy for Total Tear of Rotator Cuff: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nejati, Parisa; Akbari, Faramarz

    2013-01-01

    Background Shoulder pain is one of the most common problems in ages older than 60 years of age. Rotator cuff pathology is the most common etiology of shoulder pain. Most of rotator cuff pathologies are treated conservatively in old ages and exercise therapy is not an accepted intervention for management of rotator cuff tear yet. Case presentation The case was a man of 53 years age with shoulder pain who had total tear of supraspinatus tendon and biceps tendinitis in the right shoulder. He had regularly gone swimming, mountain climbing and running in the last 10 years. The case was managed by exercise therapy for 3 months and physical modalities for 20 sessions. Shoulder pain and his function and right shoulder range of motion increased after 3 months. Para clinical findings did not change after treatment, though. The improvements continued 15 months after the beginning of the treatment. Conclusion Exercise therapy was very effective for improving pain and function in total tear of supraspinatus tendon and tendinitis of biceps. PMID:24868434

  7. mTOR Regulates Fatty Infiltration through SREBP-1 and PPARg after a Combined Massive Rotator Cuff Tear and Suprascapular Nerve Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sunil K.; Liu, Xuhui; Samagh, Sanjum P.; Lovett, David H.; Bodine, Sue C.; Kim, Hubert T.; Feeley, Brian T.

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears (RCTs) are among the most common injuries seen in orthopedic patients. Chronic tears can result in the development of muscular atrophy and fatty infiltration. Despite the prevalence of RCTs, little is known about the underlying molecular pathways that produce these changes. Recently, we have shown that mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling plays an important role in muscle atrophy that results from massive RCTs in a rat model. The purpose of this study was therefore to extend our understanding of mTOR signaling and evaluate its role in fatty infiltration after a combined tendon transection and suprascapular nerve denervation surgery. Akt/mTOR signaling was significantly increased and resulted in the up-regulation of two transcription factors: SREBP-1 and PPAR?. We also saw an increase in expression of adipogenic markers: C/EBP-? and FASN. Upon treatment with rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR, we observed a decrease in mTOR signaling, activity of transcription factors, and reduction in fatty infiltration. Therefore, our study suggests that mTOR signaling mediates rotator cuff fatty infiltration via SREBP-1 and PPAR?. Clinically, our finding may alter current treatment methods to address rotator cuff fatty infiltration. © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society. PMID:23239524

  8. Effects of humeral head compression taping on the isokinetic strength of the shoulder external rotator muscle in patients with rotator cuff tendinitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moon-Hwan; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of humeral head compression taping (HHCT) on the strength of the shoulder external rotator muscle in patients with rotator cuff tendinitis. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty patients with rotator cuff tendinitis were recruited. The shoulder external rotator strength was measured using a Biodex isokinetic dynamometer system. A paired t-test was performed to evaluate within-group differences in the strength of the shoulder external rotator muscle. [Results] Significantly higher shoulder external rotator peak torque and peak torque per body weight were found in the HHCT condition than in the no-taping condition. [Conclusion] HHCT may effectively increase the shoulder external rotator muscle strength in patients with rotator cuff tendinitis. PMID:25642053

  9. Functional Outcome and Health-Related Quality of Life After Surgical Repair of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tear Using a Mini-Open Technique

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deniz Baysal; Robert Balyk; David Otto; Charlene Luciak-Corea; Lauren Beaupre

    2005-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff tear, a common shoulder injury, can lead to shoulder pain and functional loss.Hypothesis: Surgical repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears using the mini-open surgical technique will improve shoulder function and health-related quality of life.Study Design: Cohort study. Level of evidence, 2.Methods: Patients with a full-thickness rotator cuff tear who underwent a mini-open repair were evaluated for (1)

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Rotator Cuff Tears in Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Freygant, Magdalena; Dziurzy?ska-Bia?ek, Ewa; Guz, Wies?aw; Samojedny, Antoni; Go?ofit, Andrzej; Kostkiewicz, Agnieszka; Terpin, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Shoulder joint is a common site of musculoskeletal pain caused, among other things, by rotator cuff tears due to narrowing of subacromial space, acute trauma or chronic shoulder overload. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent modality for imaging of soft tissues of the shoulder joint considering a possibility of multiplanar image acquisition and non-invasive nature of the study. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of partial and complete rotator cuff tears in magnetic resonance images of patients with shoulder impingement syndrome and to review the literature on the causes and classification of rotator cuff tears. Material/Methods We retrospectively analyzed the results of 137 shoulder MRI examinations performed in 57 women and 72 men in Magnetic Resonance facility of the Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging at the St. Jadwiga the Queen Regional Hospital No. 2 in Rzeszow between June 2010 and February 2013. Examinations were performed using Philips Achieva 1.5T device, including spin echo and gradient echo sequences with T1-, T2- and PD-weighted as well as fat saturation sequences in transverse, frontal and sagittal oblique planes. Patients were referred from hospital wards as well as from outpatient clinics of the subcarpathian province. Results The most frequently reported injuries included partial supraspinatus tendon tear and complete tearing most commonly involved the supraspinatus muscle tendon. The smallest group comprised patients with complete tear of subscapularis muscle tendon. Among 137 patients in the study population, 129 patients suffered from shoulder pain, including 57 patients who reported a history of trauma. There was 44% women and 56% men in a group of patients with shoulder pain. Posttraumatic shoulder pain was predominantly reported by men, while women comprised a larger group of patients with shoulder pain not preceded by injury. Conclusions Rotator cuff injury is a very common pathology in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. Isolated supraspinatus tendon injury or complete tearing is most frequent, rather than in conjunction with injuries to other rotator cuff tendons. We did not observe isolated complete tears of infraspinatus and subscapular muscle tendons. PMID:25374626

  11. Biological augmentation of rotator cuff repair using bFGF-loaded electrospun poly(lactide-co-glycolide) fibrous membranes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Song; Zhao, Jingwen; Dong, Shikui; Huangfu, Xiaoqiao; Li, Bin; Yang, Huilin; Zhao, Jinzhong; Cui, Wenguo

    2014-01-01

    Clinically, rotator cuff tear (RCT) is among the most common shoulder pathologies. Despite significant advances in surgical techniques, the re-tear rate after rotator cuff (RC) repair remains high. Insufficient healing capacity is likely the main factor for reconstruction failure. This study reports on a basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-loaded electrospun poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) fibrous membrane for repairing RCT. Implantable biodegradable bFGF–PLGA fibrous membranes were successfully fabricated using emulsion electrospinning technology and then characterized and evaluated with in vitro and in vivo cell proliferation assays and repairs of rat chronic RCTs. Emulsion electrospinning fabricated ultrafine fibers with a core-sheath structure which secured the bioactivity of bFGF in a sustained manner for 3 weeks. Histological observations showed that electrospun fibrous membranes have excellent biocompatibility and biodegradability. At 2, 4, and 8 weeks after in vivo RCT repair surgery, electrospun fibrous membranes significantly increased the area of glycosaminoglycan staining at the tendon–bone interface compared with the control group, and bFGF–PLGA significantly improved collagen organization, as measured by birefringence under polarized light at the healing enthesis compared with the control and PLGA groups. Biomechanical testing showed that the electrospun fibrous membrane groups had a greater ultimate load-to-failure and stiffness than the control group at 4 and 8 weeks. The bFGF–PLGA membranes had the highest ultimate load-to-failure, stiffness, and stress of the healing enthesis, and their superiority compared to PLGA alone was significant. These results demonstrated that electrospun fibrous membranes aid in cell attachment and proliferation, as well as accelerating tendon–bone remodeling, and bFGF-loaded PLGA fibrous membranes have a more pronounced effect on tendon–bone healing. Therefore, augmentation using bFGF–PLGA electrospun fibrous membranes is a promising treatment for RCT. PMID:24868155

  12. Vaginal Treatment of Vaginal Cuff Dehiscence with Visceral Loop Prolapse: A New Challenge in Reparative Vaginal Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Di Naro, Edoardo; Schonauer, Luca Maria; Loverro, Maria Teresa; Indellicati, Beatrice; Barnaba, Mario; Loverro, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Vaginal cuff dehiscence is a rare, but potentially morbid, complication of total hysterectomy and refers to separation of the vaginal cuff closure. The term vaginal cuff dehiscence is frequently interchanged with the terms of cuff separation or cuff rupture. All denote the separation of a vaginal incision that was previously closed at time of total hysterectomy. After dehiscence of the vaginal cuff, abdominal or pelvic contents may prolapse through the vaginal opening. Bowel evisceration, outside the vulvar introitus, can lead to serious sequelae, including peritonitis, bowel injury and necrosis, or sepsis. Therefore, although prompt surgical and medical intervention is required to replace prolapsed structures, the main problem remains the reconstruction of vaginal vault. In case of recent hysterectomy, vaginal reparation only requires the approximation of vaginal walls, including their fascia, while if dehiscence occurs after a long time from hysterectomy, the adequate suspension of the vaginal vault has to be taken into consideration. In this report we describe the case of a postmenopausal patient, undergoing surgical emergency because of the evisceration of an intestinal loop through a dehiscence of vaginal vault, after numerous reconstructive vaginal surgeries for vaginal prolapse. This paper analyzes clinical circumstances, risk factors, comorbidity, and clinical and surgical management of this complication. PMID:25525534

  13. Dead Men and Radiologists Don't Lie: A Review of Cadaveric and Radiological Studies of Rotator Cuff Tear Prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, P; Macleod, I; Macfarlane, R; Windley, J; Emery, RJH

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Rotator cuff tears are a common pathology, with a varied prevalence reported. PATIENTS AND METHODS A literature review was undertaken to determine the cadaveric and radiological (ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) prevalence of rotator cuff tear. The radiological studies were subdivided into symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects. RESULTS Cadaveric rotator cuff tears were found in 4629 shoulders of which only 2553 met the inclusion criteria. The prevalence of full-thickness tears was 11.75% and partial thickness 18.49% (total tears 30.24%). The total tear rate in ultrasound asymptomatic was 38.9% and ultrasound symptomatic 41.4%. The total rate in MRI asymptomatic was 26.2% whilst MRI symptomatic was 49.4%. DISCUSSION The unselected cadaveric population should contain both symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects. A prevalence of tears between the symptomatic and asymptomatic radiological groups would be expected. However, apart from the MRI asymptomatic group, the radiological prevalence of rotator cuff tears exceeds the cadaveric. CONCLUSIONS Rotator cuff tears are frequently asymptomatic. Tears demonstrated during radiological investigation of the shoulder may be asymptomatic. It is important to correlate radiological and clinical findings in the shoulder. PMID:16551396

  14. Towards the development of a novel experimental shoulder simulator with rotating scapula and individually controlled muscle forces simulating the rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Daniel; Tomas, Daniel; Gossweiler, Lukas; Siegl, Walter; Osterhoff, Georg; Heinlein, Bernd

    2014-03-01

    A preclinical analysis of novel implants used in shoulder surgery requires biomechanical testing conditions close to physiology. Existing shoulder experiments may only partially apply multiple cycles to simulate postoperative, repetitive loading tasks. The aim of the present study was therefore the development of an experimental shoulder simulator with rotating scapula able to perform multiple humeral movement cycles by simulating individual muscles attached to the rotator cuff. A free-hanging, metallic humerus pivoted in a polyethylene glenoid is activated by tension forces of linear electroactuators to simulate muscles of the deltoideus (DELT), supraspinatus (SSP), infraspinatus/teres minor and subscapularis. The abductors DELT and SSP apply forces with a ratio of 3:1 up to an abduction angle of 85°. The rotating scapular part driven by a rotative electro actuator provides one-third to the overall arm abduction. Resulting joint forces and moments are measured by a 6-axis load cell. A linear increase in the DELT and SSP motors is shown up to a maximum of 150 and 50 N for the DELT and SSP, respectively. The force vector in the glenoid resulted in 253 N at the maximum abduction. The present investigation shows the contribution of individual muscle forces attached to the moving humerus to perform active abduction in order to reproducibly test shoulder implants. PMID:24170552

  15. Rotator cuff healing after continuous subacromial bupivacaine infusion: an in vivo rabbit study

    PubMed Central

    FRIEL, NICOLE A.; WANG, VINCENT M.; SLABAUGH, MARK A.; WANG, FANCHIA; CHUBINSKAYA, SUSAN; COLE, BRIAN J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of continuous subacromial bupivacaine infusion on supraspinatus muscle and rotator cuff tendon healing via gross, biomechanical, and histologic analyses. Methods Thirty-three New Zealand White rabbits underwent unilateral supraspinatus transection and rotator cuff repair (RCR). Rabbits were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: (1)RCR only, (2)RCR with continuous saline infusion for 48 hours, or (3)RCR with continuous 0.25% bupivacaine with epinephrine (1:200,000) infusion for 48 hours. Rabbits were sacrificed at either 2 (for histologic assessment) or 8 weeks post-operatively (for biomechanical and histologic assessment). Results Tensile testing showed significantly higher load to failure in intact tendons compared to repaired tendons (p<0.01); however, no statistical differences were detected among RCR only, RCR Saline, and RCR Bupivacaine groups. Histologically, the enthesis of repaired tendons showed increased cellularity and disorganized collagen fibers compared to intact tendons, with no differences between treatment groups. Muscle histology demonstrated scattered degenerative muscle fibers at 2 weeks in both RCR Saline and RCR Bupivacaine, but no degeneration was noted at 8 weeks. Conclusions The healing supraspinatus tendons exposed to bupivacaine infusion showed similar histologic and biomechanical characteristics compared to untreated and saline infused RCR groups. Muscle histology showed fiber damage at 2 weeks for both the saline and bupivacaine treated groups, with no apparent disruption at 8 weeks, suggesting a recovery process. Therefore, subacromial bupivacaine infusion in this rabbit rotator cuff model does not appear to impair muscle or tendon following acute injury and repair. Level Of Evidence Basic science study PMID:22818894

  16. Hybrid Repair of Large Crescent Rotator Cuff Tears Using a Modified SpeedBridge and Double-Pulley Technique

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Aakash; Regal, Steven; Frank, Darren A.

    2014-01-01

    An ideal rotator cuff repair maximizes the tendon-bone interface and has adequate biomechanical strength that can withstand a high level of demand. Arthroscopic transosseous-equivalent rotator cuff repairs have become popular and have been shown to be superior to many other methods of fixation. We present an alternative method of repair for large crescent rotator cuff tears that combines 2 well-known methods of fixation: modified SpeedBridge (Arthrex, Naples, FL) and double-pulley techniques. These 2 repair constructs were combined to provide the greatest amount of compression across the footprint while also providing rigid fixation. Ultimately, this can provide an optimal environment for healing in otherwise significant injuries. PMID:25126513

  17. Surgically Repaired Massive Rotator Cuff Tears: MRI of Tendon Integrity, Muscle Fatty Degeneration, and Muscle Atrophy Correlated with Intraoperative and Clinical Findings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Mellado; J. Calmet; M. Olona; C. Esteve; A. Camins; L. Pérez del Palomar; J. Giné; A. Saurí

    OBJECTIVE. Our goal in this study was to evaluate by means of MRI the clinical signif- icance of tendon integrity, muscle fatty degeneration, and muscle atrophy in surgically repaired massive rotator cuff tears and to correlate these and other prognostic factors with intraoperative and clinical findings. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Twenty-eight surgically proven massive rotator cuff tears were retrospectively included in

  18. Comparison of shoulder ultrasound and MR imaging in diagnosing full-thickness rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Yen; Wang, Su-Fang; Chiou, Hong-Jen; Ma, Hsiao-Li; Sun, Ying-Chou; Wu, Hong-Dar

    2002-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 422 cases were evaluated to compare the feasibility in diagnosing full-thickness rotator cuff tears (FTRCTs). On the basis of different US performers, they were divided into two groups: Group 1 performed by a 5-year experience technician and Group 2 performed by a 10-year experience radiologist. Sensitivity, negative predictive value (NPV), accuracy of US, and correlation between the two modalities were better in Group 2. When an expert is available, US can be used for diagnosing FTRCTs; otherwise, MRI should be performed. PMID:11814754

  19. Altered neuromuscular control of a hand muscle in chronic rotator cuff tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander Berth; Géza Pap; Wolfram Neumann; Friedemann Awiszus

    2010-01-01

    Introduction  Previous EMG studies have shown that chronic rotator cuff tears (RCT) may be associated with an altered activation of adjacent\\u000a shoulder muscles. The effect of RCT on central neuromuscular control mechanisms of hand muscles has as yet not been studied\\u000a in detail. This study investigated the cortico-motor excitability of the first dorsal interosseus muscle (FDI) in patients\\u000a with RCT.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials

  20. Shoulder muscle activation and coordination in patients with a massive rotator cuff tear: an electromyographic study.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, David H; Alizadehkhaiyat, Omid; Kemp, Graham J; Fisher, Anthony C; Roebuck, Margaret M; Frostick, Simon P

    2012-07-01

    Adaptive muscle activation strategies following a massive rotator cuff tear (MRCT) are inadequately understood, and the relationship among muscles during everyday activities has not been considered. Thirteen healthy subjects comprised the control group, and 11 subjects with a MRCT the patient group. Upper limb function was assessed using the Functional Impairment test-hand, neck, shoulder, and arm (FIT-HaNSA). Electromyography (EMG) was recorded from 13 shoulder muscles, comprising five muscle groups, during a shelf-lifting task. Mean FIT-HaNSA scores were significantly lower in MRCT patients (p?0.001), reflecting a severe functional deficit. In MRCT patients, EMG signal amplitude was significantly higher for the biceps brachii-brachioradialis (p?rotator cuff. Re-education towards an alternate neuromuscular control strategy appears necessary to restore function. PMID:22213234

  1. Greater Tuberosity Osteotomy and Teres Minor Transfer for Irreparable Superior Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Brian R; Bries, Andrew D; Nepola, James V

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mid- to long- term objective, subjective and radiographic results of patients who underwent anterior-superior transfer of remaining infraspinatus tendon and teres minor tendon for irreparable superior rotator cuff tears. thirteen patients were identified who underwent infraspinatus tendon transfer to a more superior position on the humeral head between January 1, 1990 and december 31, 2001. nine shoulders in eight patients were available for clinical examination, radiographs and questionnaire follow-up at an average of 83.5 ± 31.4 months. radiographic examination revealed 1 fibrous union and 6 united tuberosity osteotomies. Samilson-Prieto grading of radiographs revealed 4 shoulders with mild, and 4 shoulders with moderate, OA. Seven of the patients were satisfied with their shoulder. there were two poor outcomes. Local antero-superior teres minor and residual infraspinatus transfer provides a viable option for irreparable rotator cuff defects. Mid- to long-term satisfactory outcome was achieved in 7 out of 9 shoulders. PMID:17907433

  2. Rotator Cuff Metastases: A Report of Two Cases with Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Soker, Gokhan; Soker, Eda; Gulek, Bozkurt; Acikalin, Arbil; Asut, Elife; Kaya, Omer; Dilek, Okan; Yilmaz, Cengiz

    2014-01-01

    Context: Distant metastases of primary malignancies to the skeletal muscle tissue are a very rare event. Distant metastases that affect the rotator cuff are even rarer, and only a few of cases have been reported so far. Case Report: The present article reports two cases that presented to our hospital with the complaint of shoulder pain and had a soft tissue mass affecting the muscles of the rotator cuff and invading the neighboring bone compartments. One of the patients developed mucoepidermoid cancer metastasis of the submandibular gland, and the other was found to have a malignant epithelial tumor metastasized from the lower lobe of the right lung, whose primary origin could not be diagnosed until the imaging examinations were employed. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging findings are presented in this paper. Conclusion: Metastases to the muscle tissues could be misdiagnosed as primary sarcomas. Because the therapy regiments and prognoses are fairly different for these two entities, the possibility of a metastasis to the muscle tissue must be considered as a differential diagnosis for case of painful soft tissue mass. Ultrasound is very useful in detection of the lesion and acts as a very important tool during guidance for biopsy. Magnetic resonance imaging, however, is a very valuable asset in the evaluation of the borders of the soft tissue mass and its invasive effect on the bony tissues. Particularly when the features such as lobulated contours, peripheral edema, and intratumoral necrosis exist, the possibility of metastases must be considered. PMID:25599056

  3. Arthroscopic treatment for synovial chondromatosis of the subacromial bursa associated with partial rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Xu, Caiqi; Yang, Xingguang; Zhao, Jinzhong

    2015-02-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is characterized by benign synovial proliferation that leads to chondral or osteochondral foci formation. In this case report, a right-handed female suffered from progressively worsening pain and limited mobility of forward elevation, abduction and external rotation in her right shoulder. A shoulder arthroscopy was conducted, during which, thickened bursal synovium and several loose bodies were observed, associated with bursal side tear of rotator cuff. A thorough synovectomy, subacromial debridement and acromioplasty were conducted. The pathological findings were consistent with synovial chondromatosis. After systematic rehabilitation, the patient had relief of shoulder pain and full range of motions in 14-months follow-up. Level of evidence Case report, Level IV. PMID:25217318

  4. Rotator cuff muscle size and the interpretation of scapular shape in primates.

    PubMed

    Larson, Susan G

    2015-03-01

    Scapular shape variation among primates is widely viewed as being strongly related to locomotor differences. The relative importance of overhead forelimb elevation in the locomotor repertoire of a species, as reflected in muscular leverage for scapular rotation or in the sizes of attachment areas for muscles involved in glenohumeral elevation, has proven to be a useful organizing principle for understanding this variation. While generally successful in sorting primate scapulae into functional groups, the scapulae of some species do not entirely match predictions based on the perceived importance of forelimb elevation. A recent study has shown that scapular fossa sizes in apes are not as accurate predictors of the sizes of the muscles arising from them as has been assumed. To further explore the degree of correspondence between actual and predicted muscle size based on the perceived importance of forelimb elevation, the current study examines the relative sizes of the rotator cuff muscles in a wider sample of primate taxa using published data on muscle mass and cross-sectional area. The results do not support some of the accepted generalizations about the relative sizes of members of the rotator cuff based on measurements of the sizes of scapular fossae. For example, orthograde apes do not display enlarged supraspinatus muscles compared to pronograde monkeys. Differences in assessments of relative muscle size based on mass compared to those based on cross-sectional area suggest that poor correspondence between muscle size predicted from scapular fossa size and actual muscle size may be related to constraints on scapular form associated with muscular leverage for scapular rotation and with scapular position on the thorax. PMID:25681014

  5. Intra-articular changes precede extra-articular changes in the biceps tendon following rotator cuff tears in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Peltz, Cathryn D.; Hsu, Jason E.; Zgonis, Miltiadis H.; Trasolini, Nicholas A.; Glaser, David L.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Biceps tendon pathology is common with rotator cuff tears. The mechanisms for biceps changes, and therefore its optimal treatment, are unknown. Our objective was to determine the effect of rotator cuff tears on regional biceps tendon pathology. We hypothesized that histological and compositional changes would appear before organizational changes, both would appear before mechanical changes, and changes would begin at the tendon’s insertion site. Methods Sixty-five Sprague-Dawley rats received either detachment of supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons or sham surgery. Rats were sacrificed at 1, 4 or 8 weeks for regional measurements of histological, compositional, organizational (1, 4 and 8 weeks) or mechanical properties (4 and 8 weeks only). Results One week following tendon detachments, decreased organization and more rounded cell shape were found in the intra-articular space of the biceps tendon. Aggrecan expression was increased along the entire length of the tendon while all other compositional changes were at the tendon’s proximal insertion into bone only. With time, this disorganization and more rounded cell shape extended the length of the tendon. Organizational and cell shape changes also preceded detrimental mechanical changes, as decreased modulus in the intra-articular space was found after 8 weeks. Conclusions Results support a degenerative component to pathology in the biceps tendon. Additionally, changes resembling a tendon exposed to compressive loading occurring first in the intra-articular space indicate that the biceps tendon plays an increased role as a load bearing structure against the humeral head in the presence of rotator cuff tears. PMID:21816629

  6. The diagnostic value of the combination of patient characteristics, history, and clinical shoulder tests for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tear

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is unknown which combination of patient information and clinical tests might be optimal for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears. This study aimed to determine the diagnostic value of nine individual clinical tests for evaluating rotator cuff tear and to develop a prediction model for diagnosing rotator cuff tear. Methods This prospective cohort study included 169 patients with shoulder complaints. Patients who reported a previous shoulder dislocation were excluded from the analysis (N?=?69). One experienced clinician conducted 25 clinical tests of which 9 are specifically designed to diagnose rotator cuff pathology (empty can, Neer, Hawkins-Kenney, drop arm, lift-off test, painful arc, external rotation lag sign, drop sign, infraspinatus muscle strength test). The final diagnosis, based on magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA), was determined by consensus between the clinician and a radiologist, who were blinded to patient information. A prediction model was developed by logistic regression analysis. Results and discussion In this cohort, 38 patients were diagnosed with rotator cuff tears. The individual overall accuracy of the rotator cuff clinical tests was 61%–75%. After backward selection, the model determined that the most important predictors of rotator cuff tears were higher age and a positive Neer test. This internally validated prediction model had good discriminative ability (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC)?=?0.73). Conclusion Our results showed that individual clinical shoulder tests had moderate diagnostic value for diagnosing rotator cuff tear. Our prediction model showed improved diagnostic value. However, the prediction value is still relatively low, supporting a low threshold for additional diagnostic tests for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears. Level of evidence Study of diagnostic test: level I. PMID:25099359

  7. Proteomics Perspectives in Rotator Cuff Research: A Systematic Review of Gene Expression and Protein Composition in Human Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sejersen, Maria Hee Jung; Frost, Poul; Hansen, Torben Bæk; Deutch, Søren Rasmussen; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff

    2015-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff tendinopathy including tears is a cause of significant morbidity. The molecular pathogenesis of the disorder is largely unknown. This review aimed to present an overview of the literature on gene expression and protein composition in human rotator cuff tendinopathy and other tendinopathies, and to evaluate perspectives of proteomics – the comprehensive study of protein composition - in tendon research. Materials and Methods We conducted a systematic search of the literature published between 1 January 1990 and 18 December 2012 in PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. We included studies on objectively quantified differential gene expression and/or protein composition in human rotator cuff tendinopathy and other tendinopathies as compared to control tissue. Results We identified 2199 studies, of which 54 were included; 25 studies focussed on rotator cuff or biceps tendinopathy. Most of the included studies quantified prespecified mRNA molecules and proteins using polymerase chain reactions and immunoassays, respectively. There was a tendency towards an increase of collagen I (11 of 15 studies) and III (13 of 14), metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 (6 of 12), -9 (7 of 7), -13 (4 of 7), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 (4 of 7), and vascular endothelial growth factor (4 of 7), and a decrease in MMP-3 (10 of 12). Fourteen proteomics studies of tendon tissues/cells failed inclusion, mostly because they were conducted in animals or in vitro. Conclusions Based on methods, which only allowed simultaneous quantification of a limited number of prespecified mRNA molecules or proteins, several proteins appeared to be differentially expressed/represented in rotator cuff tendinopathy and other tendinopathies. No proteomics studies fulfilled our inclusion criteria, although proteomics technologies may be a way to identify protein profiles (including non-prespecified proteins) that characterise specific tendon disorders or stages of tendinopathy. Thus, our results suggested an untapped potential for proteomics in tendon research. PMID:25879758

  8. [Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) in tendinosis calcarea of the rotator cuff. Long-term results and efficacy].

    PubMed

    Daecke, W; Kusnierczak, D; Loew, M

    2002-07-01

    Calcifying tendinitis (TC) of the rotator cuff is a transient shoulder disease with a high rate of spontaneous resorption of the deposit. Therefore, primary treatment should be conservative. In cases of persistent pain despite conservative treatment, extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) can be performed as an alternative minimally invasive method. Various short-term studies have demonstrated the efficiency of ESWT for TC. To evaluate the short- and long-term results, complications, and the number of operations avoided by ESWT, a prospective study with 115 patients was performed over a period of 4 years. The patients had received high-energy ESWT once (group A: n = 56) or twice (group B: n = 59). Six months after therapy, 47% in group A and 77% in group B showed evidence of disappearance or disintegration of the calcium deposits. Pain relief was achieved in 45% of group A and 53% of group B. Four years after treatment, 20% of the patients had undergone surgery on the involved shoulder. Of the remaining patients, 59% (68 patients) were seen for follow-up. Subjectively, 78% of group A and 87% of group B judged the treatment to be successful. X-ray examination revealed complete or partial resorption of the calcium deposit in 93% in both groups. The Constant score increased from 45 before treatment to 88 in group A and 85 in group B after treatment. ESWT was successful for about 70% of the treated patients with no long-term complications seen. PMID:12219662

  9. Extracting Information about the Rotator Cuff from Magnetic Resonance Images Using Deterministic and Random Techniques

    PubMed Central

    De Los Ríos, F. A.; Paluszny, M.

    2015-01-01

    We consider some methods to extract information about the rotator cuff based on magnetic resonance images; the study aims to define an alternative method of display that might facilitate the detection of partial tears in the supraspinatus tendon. Specifically, we are going to use families of ellipsoidal triangular patches to cover the humerus head near the affected area. These patches are going to be textured and displayed with the information of the magnetic resonance images using the trilinear interpolation technique. For the generation of points to texture each patch, we propose a new method that guarantees the uniform distribution of its points using a random statistical method. Its computational cost, defined as the average computing time to generate a fixed number of points, is significantly lower as compared with deterministic and other standard statistical techniques. PMID:25650281

  10. Arthroscopic Double-Locked Stitch: A New Technique for Suturing Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto N.; Zanella, Luiz A.Z.; La Salvia, João C.; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro D.; da Silva, Luciana A.; Sella, Guilherme do Vall; Checchia, Sergio L.

    2014-01-01

    There are a number of reasons for failed rotator cuff tear repair. In such cases the suture-tendon interface seems to be the most vulnerable area, especially when tendon degeneration is present. We describe a new technique, the arthroscopic double-locked suture, that increases the tendon fixation and has the added benefit of being placed parallel to the blood vessels, therefore avoiding damage to the tendon vascularization. The suture may be achieved by use of knots or knotless anchors and suture passers, without the need for any additional instrumentation. The new technique is especially helpful in cases in which the tendon is retracted and degeneration is present, impeding the use of the double-row technique or its transosseous equivalents. PMID:24904764

  11. Extracting information about the rotator cuff from magnetic resonance images using deterministic and random techniques.

    PubMed

    De Los Ríos, F A; Paluszny, M

    2015-01-01

    We consider some methods to extract information about the rotator cuff based on magnetic resonance images; the study aims to define an alternative method of display that might facilitate the detection of partial tears in the supraspinatus tendon. Specifically, we are going to use families of ellipsoidal triangular patches to cover the humerus head near the affected area. These patches are going to be textured and displayed with the information of the magnetic resonance images using the trilinear interpolation technique. For the generation of points to texture each patch, we propose a new method that guarantees the uniform distribution of its points using a random statistical method. Its computational cost, defined as the average computing time to generate a fixed number of points, is significantly lower as compared with deterministic and other standard statistical techniques. PMID:25650281

  12. "V"ictory transosseous equivalent suture configuration for arthroscopic rotator cuff tear repairs of iatrogenically completed PASTA lesions and full-thickness "U"-shaped tears.

    PubMed

    Lewicky, Yuri M

    2009-10-01

    The cost of numerous anchors in rotator cuff surgery is high from both an economic standpoint as well as a physiologic one. More anchors means increased cost and increased surgical time; additionally, the greater number of anchors placed, the greater the expense on the native bone that they inevitably replace. It is therefore in the surgeon's and patient's best interest to use the appropriate number of anchors, no more and no less, with the appropriate number being that which allows for strong, stable fixation with minimal gap formation and maximal healing potential and recovery. The transosseous equivalent repair technique described herein uses a single double-loaded bioabsorbable suture anchor placed along the medial border of the rotator cuff foot print and the humeral head articular cartilage margin followed by 1 pushlock (Arthrex, Naples, Florida) anchor placed laterally on the vertical aspect of the greater tuberosity. It is designed for small to medium "U"-shaped tears and for iatrogenically completed partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsions of moderate to large size, the so-called PASTA lesion. The use of selective knot placement allows for the conversion of a linear construct into a "V" configuration, optimizing repair strength and allowing for earlier rehabilitation while maximizing the healing biology seen with increased footprint contact dimensions and less repair gap formation. PMID:19824586

  13. Comparison between single-row and double-row rotator cuff repair: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Milano, Giuseppe; Grasso, Andrea; Zarelli, Donatella; Deriu, Laura; Cillo, Mario; Fabbriciani, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical behavior under cyclic loading test of single-row and double-row rotator cuff repair with suture anchors in an ex-vivo animal model. For the present study, 50 fresh porcine shoulders were used. On each shoulder, a crescent-shaped full-thickness tear of the infraspinatus was performed. Width of the tendon tear was 2 cm. The lesion was repaired using metal suture anchors. Shoulders were divided in four groups, according the type of repair: single-row tension-free repair (Group 1); single-row tension repair (Group 2); double-row tension-free repair (Group 3); double-row tension repair (Group 4); and a control group. Specimens were subjected to a cyclic loading test. Number of cycles at 5 mm of elongation and at failure, and total elongation were calculated. Single-row tension repair showed significantly poorest results for all the variables considered, when compared with the other groups. Regarding the mean number of cycles at 5 mm of elongation and at failure, there was a nonsignificant difference between Groups 3 and 4, and both of them were significantly greater than Group 1. For mean total elongation, the difference between Groups 1, 3, and 4 was not significant, but all of them were significantly lower than the control group. A single-row repair is particularly weak when performed under tension. Double-row repair is significantly more resistant to cyclic displacement than single-row repair in both tension-free and tension repair. Double-row repair technique can be primarily considered for large, unstable rotator cuff tears to improve mechanical strength of primary fixation of tendons to bone. PMID:17684730

  14. Efficacy of arthroscopically placed pain catheter adjacent to the suprascapular nerve (continuous arthroscopically assisted suprascapular nerve block) following arthroscopic rotator-cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Yamakado, Kotaro

    2014-01-01

    Background Rotator-cuff surgery is well recognized to be a painful procedure. Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an arthroscopically placed perineural catheter at the scapular notch to provide a continuous block of the suprascapular nerve (continuous arthroscopically assisted suprascapular nerve block [ca-SSNB]) following arthroscopic rotator-cuff repair (ARCR). Materials and methods This level II, prospective, randomized, controlled trial without postoperative blinding included 40 patients, who had a 48-hour pain pump, with 0.2% ropivacaine infusion and a continuous rate of 3 mL/hour, placed via an arthroscopically placed catheter following ARCR with arthroscopic release of the superior transverse ligament: 21 patients had a ca-SSNB, and 19 patients had a continuous subacromial bursal block (SAB). The visual analog scale (at 6 hours and on the first, second, and third postoperative days) and the total number of additional pain-reduction attempts during the 3 postoperative days were calculated. Results The respective visual analog scale scores (mm) obtained from the ca-SSNB and SAB groups were 62.4 and 67.6 (P=0.73) before surgery, 9.1 and 19.4 (P=0.12) at 6 hours after surgery, 24.4 and 44.6 (P=0.019) on the first postoperative day, 19.4 and 40.4 (P=0.0060) on the second postoperative day, and 18.5 and 27.8 (P=0.21) on the third postoperative day. Total additional pain-reduction attempts recorded for the ca-SSNB and SAB groups during the 3 postoperative days were 0.3 times and 1.2 times (P=0.0020), respectively. Conclusion ca-SSNB was highly effective in controlling postoperative pain after ARCR. PMID:24982592

  15. Arthroscopic versus mini-open salvage repair of the rotator cuff tear: outcome analysis at 2 to 6 years’ follow-up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seung-Ho Kim; Kwon-Ick Ha; Jong-Hyuk Park; Jin-Seok Kang; Sung-Kyun Oh; Irvin Oh

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of arthroscopic repair of medium and large rotator cuff tears with the outcomes for mini-open repair of similar tears in which arthroscopic repair was technically unsuccessful. Type of Study: Retrospective case series. Methods: We evaluated 76 patients who were treated for full-thickness rotator cuff tears either by all-arthroscopic (42

  16. Effects of 8 Weeks’ Specific Physical Training on the Rotator Cuff Muscle Strength and Technique of Javelin Throwers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeyoung; Lee, Youngsun; Shin, Insik; Kim, Kitae; Moon, Jeheon

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] For maximum efficiency and to prevent injury during javelin throwing, it is critical to maintain muscle balance and coordination of the rotator cuff and the glenohumeral joint. In this study, we investigated the change in the rotator cuff muscle strength, throw distance and technique of javelin throwers after they had performed a specific physical training that combined elements of weight training, function movement screen training, and core training. [Subjects] Ten javelin throwers participated in this study: six university athletes in the experimental group and four national-level athletes in the control group. [Methods] The experimental group performed 8 weeks of the specific physical training. To evaluate the effects of the training, measurements were performed before and after the training for the experimental group. Measurements comprised anthropometry, isokinetic muscle strength measurements, the function movement screen test, and movement analysis. [Results] After the specific physical training, the function movement screen score and external and internal rotator muscle strength showed statistically significant increases. Among kinematic factors, only pull distance showed improvement after training. [Conclusion] Eight weeks of specific physical training for dynamic stabilizer muscles enhanced the rotator cuff muscle strength, core stability, throw distance, and flexibility of javelin throwers. These results suggest that specific physical training can be useful for preventing shoulder injuries and improving the performance for javelin throwers. PMID:25364111

  17. Short-term results after reversed shoulder arthroplasty (Delta III) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and irreparable rotator cuff tear

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael John; Géza Pap; Felix Angst; Matthias P. Flury; Sebastian Lieske; Hans-Kaspar Schwyzer; Beat Rene Simmen

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the outcome after reversed Delta III shoulder prosthesis in patients with rheumatoid\\u000a arthritis (RA) and irreparable rotator cuff tear. Fifteen patients (17 joints) were prospectively analysed using the Constant-Murley\\u000a score (CS). Comprehensive outcome measure was carried out by means of four widely used questionnaires as well as clinical\\u000a and radiographic examinations at

  18. Skeletal muscle fibrosis and stiffness increase after rotator cuff tendon injury and neuromuscular compromise in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Sato, Eugene J; Killian, Megan L; Choi, Anthony J; Lin, Evie; Esparza, Mary C; Galatz, Leesa M; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Ward, Samuel R

    2014-09-01

    Rotator cuff tears can cause irreversible changes (e.g., fibrosis) to the structure and function of the injured muscle(s). Fibrosis leads to increased muscle stiffness resulting in increased tension at the rotator cuff repair site. This tension influences repairability and healing potential in the clinical setting. However, the micro- and meso-scale structural and molecular sources of these whole-muscle mechanical changes are poorly understood. Here, single muscle fiber and fiber bundle passive mechanical testing was performed on rat supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles with experimentally induced massive rotator cuff tears (Tenotomy) as well as massive tears with chemical denervation (Tenotomy + BTX) at 8 and 16 weeks post-injury. Titin molecular weight, collagen content, and myosin heavy chain profiles were measured and correlated with mechanical variables. Single fiber stiffness was not different between controls and experimental groups. However, fiber bundle stiffness was significantly increased at 8 weeks in the Tenotomy + BTX group compared to Tenotomy or control groups. Many of the changes were resolved by 16 weeks. Only fiber bundle passive mechanics was weakly correlated with collagen content. These data suggest that tendon injury with concomitant neuromuscular compromise results in extra-cellular matrix production and increases in stiffness of the muscle, potentially complicating subsequent attempts for surgical repair. PMID:24838823

  19. Predictors of Pain and Function in Patients With Symptomatic, Atraumatic Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: A Time-Zero Analysis of a Prospective Patient Cohort Enrolled in a Structured Physical Therapy Program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joshua D. Harris; Angela Pedroza; Grant L. Jones

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although the prevalence of full-thickness rotator cuff tears increases with age, many patients are asymptomatic and may not require surgical repair. The factors associated with pain and loss of function in patients with rotator cuff tears are not well defined.Purpose: To determine which factors correlate with pain and loss of function in patients with symptomatic, atraumatic full-thickness rotator cuff

  20. Direction-specific recruitment of rotator cuff muscles during bench press and row.

    PubMed

    Wattanaprakornkul, Duangjai; Halaki, Mark; Cathers, Ian; Ginn, Karen A

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies indicate that rotator cuff (RC) muscles are recruited in a reciprocal, direction-specific pattern during shoulder flexion and extension exercises. The main purpose of this study was to determine if similar reciprocal RC recruitment occurs during bench press (flexion-like) and row (extension-like) exercises. In addition, shoulder muscle activity was comprehensively compared between bench press and flexion; row and extension; and bench press and row exercises. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded from 9 shoulder muscles sites in 15 normal volunteers. All exercises were performed at 20, 50 and 70% of subjects' maximal load. EMG data were normalized to standard maximal voluntary contractions. Infraspinatus activity was significantly higher than subscapularis during bench press, with the converse pattern during the row exercise. Significant differences in activity levels were found in pectoralis major, deltoid and trapezius between the bench press and flexion exercises and in lower trapezius between the row and extension exercises. During bench press and row exercises, the recruitment pattern in each active muscle did not vary with load. During bench press and row exercises, RC muscles contract in a reciprocal direction-specific manner in their role as shoulder joint dynamic stabilizers to counterbalance antero-posterior translation forces. PMID:21978788

  1. A systematic review of the histological and molecular changes in rotator cuff disease

    PubMed Central

    Dean, B. J. F.; Franklin, S. L.; Carr, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The pathogenesis of rotator cuff disease (RCD) is complex and not fully understood. This systematic review set out to summarise the histological and molecular changes that occur throughout the spectrum of RCD. Methods We conducted a systematic review of the scientific literature with specific inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results A total of 101 studies met the inclusion criteria: 92 studies used human subjects exclusively, seven used animal overuse models, and the remaining two studies involved both humans and an animal overuse model. A total of 58 studies analysed supraspinatus tendon exclusively, 16 analysed subacromial bursal tissue exclusively, while the other studies analysed other tissue or varying combinations of tissue types including joint fluid and muscle. The molecular biomarkers that were altered in RCD included matrix substances, growth factors, enzymes and other proteins including certain neuropeptides. Conclusions The pathogenesis of RCD is being slowly unravelled as a result of the significant recent advances in molecular medicine. Future research aimed at further unlocking these key molecular processes will be pivotal in developing new surgical interventions both in terms of the diagnosis and treatment of RCD. PMID:23610686

  2. Dose- and time-dependent effects of triamcinolone acetonide on human rotator cuff-derived cells

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Y.; Kokubu, T.; Mifune, Y.; Inui, A.; Sakata, R.; Muto, T.; Takase, F.; Kurosaka, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the appropriate dose and interval for the administration of triamcinolone acetonide (TA) in treating tendinopathy to avoid adverse effects such as tendon degeneration and rupture. Methods Human rotator cuff-derived cells were cultured using three media: regular medium (control), regular medium with 0.1 mg/mL of TA (low TA group), and with 1.0 mg/mL of TA (high TA group). The cell morphology, apoptosis, and viability were assessed at designated time points. Results In the low TA group, the cells became flattened and polygonal at seven days then returned to normal at 21 days. The cell apoptosis ratio and messenger ribonucleic acid expression of caspase-3, 7, 8, and 9 increased, and viability was reduced in the low and high groups at seven days. In the low TA group, apoptosis and viability returned to normal at 21 days, however, in the high TA group, the cell morphology, apoptosis ratio, caspase-3, 7, 8, and 9 and viability did not return by day 21. Re-administration was performed in the low TA group at 7-, 14-, and 21-day intervals, and cell viability did not return to the control level at the 7- and 14-day intervals. Conclusion A 0.1 mg/mL dose of TA temporarily decreased cell viability and increased cell apoptosis, which was recovered at 21 days, however, 1 mg/mL of TA caused irreversible damage to cell morphology and viability. An interval > three weeks was needed to safely re-administer TA. These findings may help determine the appropriate dose and interval for TA injection therapy. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:328–34. PMID:25477418

  3. Comparison of the cheese-wiring effects among three sutures used in rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Lambrechts, Mark; Nazari, Behrooz; Dini, Arash; O'Brien, Michael J.; Heard, Wendell M. R.; Savoie, Felix H.; You, Zongbing

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to compare the cheese-wiring effects of three sutures with different coefficients of friction. Materials and Methods: Sixteen human cadaveric shoulders were dissected to expose the distal supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscle tendons. Three sutures were stitched through the tendons: #2 Orthocord™ suture (reference #223114, DePuy Mitek, Inc., Raynham, MA), #2 ETHIBOND* EXCEL Suture, and #2 FiberWire® suture (FiberWire®, Arthrex, Naples, FL). The sutures were pulled by cyclic axial forces from 10 to 70 N at 1 Hz for 1000 cycles through a MTS machine. The cut-through distance on the tendon was measured with a digital caliper. Results: The cut-through distance in the supraspinatus tendons (mean ± standard deviation, n = 12) were 2.9 ± 0.6 mm for #2 Orthocord™ suture, 3.2 ± 1.2 mm for #2 ETHIBOND* suture, and 4.2 ± 1.7 mm for #2 FiberWire® suture. The differences were statistically significant analyzing with analysis of variance (P = 0.047) and two-tailed Student's t-test, which showed significance between Orthocord™ and FiberWire® sutures (P = 0.026), but not significant between Orthocord™ and ETHIBOND* sutures (P = 0.607) or between ETHIBOND* and FiberWire® sutures (P = 0.103). Conclusion: The cheese-wiring effect is less in the Orthocord™ suture than in the FiberWire® suture in human cadaveric supraspinatus tendons. Clinical Relevance: Identification of sutures that cause high levels of tendon cheese-wiring after rotator cuff repair can lead to better suture selection. PMID:25258499

  4. Are occupational repetitive movements of the upper arm associated with rotator cuff calcific tendinopathies?

    PubMed

    Sansone, Valerio C; Meroni, Roberto; Boria, Paola; Pisani, Salvatore; Maiorano, Emanuele

    2015-02-01

    Calcifying tendinopathy (CT) of the shoulder is a common painful disorder, although the etiology and pathogenesis remain largely unknown. Recent theories about the role of excessive mechanical load in the genesis of CT have been proposed. Driven by the interest for these new theories, we investigated the hypothesis of a relationship between work-related repetitive movements of the upper arm, considered a potential cause of shoulder overload, and the presence of shoulder CT. A secondary aim was to obtain data on CT prevalence in a female sample from the working-age general population, as little data currently exist. 199 supermarket cashiers and 304 female volunteers recruited from the general population underwent a high-resolution ultrasonography of the rotator cuffs of both shoulders, and the presence of tendinopathies, with or without calcification, was recorded. The prevalence of calcific tendinopathy was 22.6 % in the cashiers group and 24.4 % in the control group. There were no statistically significant differences in the prevalence of calcifications between the two groups (p = 0.585), either for the dominant shoulder [OR = 0.841 (95 % CI 0.534-1.326)] or for the non-dominant shoulder [OR = 0.988 (95 % CI 0.582-1.326)]. We observed bilateral calcifications in 8.5 % of cashiers, and 9.6 % of controls, and an increase in prevalence of CT with age in both groups. Work-related repetitive movements of the upper arm did not induce a higher prevalence of shoulder CT compared with the female sample from the general population. If CT etiopathogenesis is related to mechanical load, CT onset may be influenced not only by loading history, but also by individual factors. Level of evidence Prognosis study, Level II. PMID:25000922

  5. Physical therapy with subacromial tenoxicam injection in patients with open subacromial decompression and rotator cuff tear repair: a pilot randomized controlled study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Korhan Ozkan; Hakan Cift; Koray Unay; Feyza Unlu Ozkan; Baris Kadioglu; Budak Akman; Mahir Mahiroglu

    2010-01-01

    Introduction  To investigate the effects of subacromial tenoxicam injection during physical therapy after rotator cuff tear and subacromial\\u000a decompression.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  This is a prospective controlled clinical study. Fourteen patients who had a moderate-size rotator cuff tear were included\\u000a in the study. Two injections of tenoxicam were made to patients in the tenoxicam group into the subacromial space, and two\\u000a injections

  6. Identification of suitable reference genes for gene expression studies in tendons from patients with rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio; Cohen, Carina; Loyola, Leonor Casilla; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Smith, Marília Cardoso; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moises

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tear is one of the most common causes of shoulder dysfunction. Gene expression analysis may be a useful tool for understanding tendon tears and the failure of cuff healing, and reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) has become an effective method for such studies. However, this technique requires the use of suitable reference genes for data normalization. Here, we evaluate the suitability of six reference genes (18S, ACTB, B2M, GAPDH, HPRT1 and TBP) using samples from the rotator cuff tendons of 28 individuals with tendon tears (3 tendons regions) and 8 controls (2 tendon regions); for the tear patients, we evaluated ruptured and non-ruptured tendon samples. The stability of the candidate reference genes was determined using the NormFinder, geNorm, BestKeeper and DataAssist software packages. Overall, HPRT1 was the best single reference gene, and HPRT1+TBP composed the best pair and HPRT1+TBP+ACTB composed the best trio of reference genes from the analysis of different groups, including the simultaneous analysis of all tissue samples. To identify the optimal combination of reference genes, we evaluated the expression of COL1A1 and COL3A1, and no obvious differences were observed when using 2, 3 or 4 reference genes for most of the analyses. However, COL3A1 expression differed between ruptured and non-ruptured (posterior superior region) tendons of patients only when normalized by HPRT1+TBP+B2M and HPRT1+TBP. On the other hand, the comparison between these two groups using the best trio of reference genes (HPRT1+TBP+ACTB) and 4 reference genes did not revealed a significant difference in COL3A1 expression. Consequently, the use of suitable reference genes for a reliable gene expression evaluation by RT-qPCR should consider the type of tendon samples investigated. HPRT1+TBP+ACTB seems to be the best combination of reference genes for the analysis of involving different tendon samples of individuals with rotator cuff tears. PMID:25768100

  7. Identification of Suitable Reference Genes for Gene Expression Studies in Tendons from Patients with Rotator Cuff Tear

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio; Cohen, Carina; Loyola, Leonor Casilla; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Smith, Marília Cardoso; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moises

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tear is one of the most common causes of shoulder dysfunction. Gene expression analysis may be a useful tool for understanding tendon tears and the failure of cuff healing, and reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) has become an effective method for such studies. However, this technique requires the use of suitable reference genes for data normalization. Here, we evaluate the suitability of six reference genes (18S, ACTB, B2M, GAPDH, HPRT1 and TBP) using samples from the rotator cuff tendons of 28 individuals with tendon tears (3 tendons regions) and 8 controls (2 tendon regions); for the tear patients, we evaluated ruptured and non-ruptured tendon samples. The stability of the candidate reference genes was determined using the NormFinder, geNorm, BestKeeper and DataAssist software packages. Overall, HPRT1 was the best single reference gene, and HPRT1+TBP composed the best pair and HPRT1+TBP+ACTB composed the best trio of reference genes from the analysis of different groups, including the simultaneous analysis of all tissue samples. To identify the optimal combination of reference genes, we evaluated the expression of COL1A1 and COL3A1, and no obvious differences were observed when using 2, 3 or 4 reference genes for most of the analyses. However, COL3A1 expression differed between ruptured and non-ruptured (posterior superior region) tendons of patients only when normalized by HPRT1+TBP+B2M and HPRT1+TBP. On the other hand, the comparison between these two groups using the best trio of reference genes (HPRT1+TBP+ACTB) and 4 reference genes did not revealed a significant difference in COL3A1 expression. Consequently, the use of suitable reference genes for a reliable gene expression evaluation by RT-qPCR should consider the type of tendon samples investigated. HPRT1+TBP+ACTB seems to be the best combination of reference genes for the analysis of involving different tendon samples of individuals with rotator cuff tears. PMID:25768100

  8. [Muscle efficiency in total shoulder prosthesis implantation: dependence on position of the humeral head and rotator cuff function].

    PubMed

    Klages, A; Hurschler, C; Wülker, N; Windhagen, H

    2001-09-01

    Modern shoulder prostheses permit an anatomic reconstruction of the joint, although the biomechanical advantages are not proven. The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between position of the humeral head and function of the shoulder prosthesis (muscle efficiency). Shoulder elevation-motion and rotator cuff defects were simulated in vitro in a robot-assisted shoulder simulator. The EPOCA Custom Offset shoulder prosthesis (Argomedical AG, Cham, CH) was implanted in seven normal shoulders (77 +/- 20 kg, 55 +/- 14 years). Active elevation was simulated by hydraulic cylinders, and scapulothoratic motion by a specially programmed industrial robot. Muscle efficiency (elevation-angle/muscle-force of the deltoid muscle) was measured in anatomic (ANA), medialised (MED) and lateralised (LAT) positions of the humeral head, with or without rotator cuff muscle deficiency. Medialisation increased efficiency by 0.03 +/- 0.04 deg/N (p = 0.022), lateralisation decreased it by 0.04 +/- 0.06 deg/N (p = 0.009). Supraspinatus muscle deficiency increased the deltoid force required to elevate the arm, and thus decreased efficiency (ANA p = 0.091, MED p = 0.018, LAT p = 0.028). The data confirm that the position of the humeral head affects the mechanics of total shoulder arthroplasty. Medialisation increases efficiency of the deltoid muscle and may prove useful in compensating isolated supraspinatus muscle deficiency. Lateralisation, in contrast, leads to an unfavorable situation. PMID:11593981

  9. Arthroscopic Treatment of Partial Rotator Cuff Tears in Young AthletesA Preliminary Report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Loel Z. Payne; David W. Altchek; Edward V. Craig; Russell F. Warren

    1997-01-01

    Forty-three athletes under age 40, more than half of which were collegiate or professional, with partial rota tor cuff tears were treated arthroscopically and ob served for a minimum of 24 months. By history and mechanism of injury, two main groups were identified. Group A had 14 patients with acute, traumatic injuries. All 14 had inflamed subacromial bursas, but increased

  10. The geyser sign and torn rotator cuff: clinical significance and pathomechanics.

    PubMed

    Craig, E V

    1984-12-01

    The geyser radiographic sign on shoulder arthrogram is characterized by leakage of dye from the glenohumeral joint into the subdeltoid bursa. The dye outlines the acromioclavicular joint. It is usually an indication of a full-thickness cuff tear of long duration. The clinical occurrence and pathomechanics of this finding indicate that repair is generally difficult. PMID:6499313

  11. Effect of mechanical stimulation on bone marrow stromal cell-seeded tendon slice constructs: A potential engineered tendon patch for rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ting-Wu; Sun, Yu-Long; Thoreson, Andrew R; Steinmann, Scott P; Amadio, Peter C; An, Kai-Nan; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2015-05-01

    Cell-based tissue engineered tendons have potential to improve clinical outcomes following rotator cuff repair, especially in large or massive rotator cuff tears, which pose a great clinical challenge. The aim of this study was to develop a method of constructing a functional engineered tendon patch for rotator cuff repair with cyclic mechanical stimulation. Decellularized tendon slices (DTSs) were seeded with BMSCs and subjected to cyclic stretching for 1, 3, or 7 days. The mechanical properties, morphologic characteristics and tendon-related gene expression of the constructs were investigated. Viable BMSCs were observed on the DTS after 7 days. BMSCs penetrated into the DTSs and formed dense cell sheets after 7 days of mechanical stretching. Gene expression of type I collagen, decorin, and tenomodulin significantly increased in cyclically stretched BMSC-DTS constructs compared with the unstrained control group (P < 0.05). The ultimate tensile strength and stiffness of the cyclically stretched tendon constructs were similar to the unstrained control group (P > 0.05). In conclusion, mechanical stimulation of BMSC-DTS constructs upregulated expression of tendon-related proteins, promoted cell tenogenic differentiation, facilitated cell infiltration and formation of cell sheets, and retained mechanical properties. The patch could be used as a graft to enhance the surgical repair of rotator cuff tears. PMID:25770996

  12. A Prospective, Double-Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Subacromial Injection of Betamethasone and Xylocaine to Xylocaine alone in Chronic Rotator Cuff Tendinosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine M. Alvarez; Robert Litchfield; Dianne Jackowski; Sharon Griffin; Alexandra Kirkley

    2005-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff tendinosis is a common problem with significant health and economic effects. Nonoperative management includes the widespread use of subacromial steroid injections despite the lack of evidence of its efficacy.Hypothesis: A subacromial injection of betamethasone will be more effective than xylocaine alone in improving the quality of life, impingement sign, and range of motion in patients who have

  13. A simple technique to restore needle patency during percutaneous lavage and aspiration of calcific rotator cuff tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Jelsing, Elena J; Maida, Eugene; Smith, Jay

    2013-03-01

    Calcific rotator cuff tendinopathy caused by symptomatic calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition is a well-established cause of shoulder pain. In refractory or acutely symptomatic cases, sonographically guided percutaneous lavage and aspiration can significantly reduce pain in approximately 60%-92% of cases. Although the complication rate of sonographically guided percutaneous lavage and aspiration is apparently low, needle clogging attributable to impacted calcific debris has been described by several authors and in our experience can occur in daily practice. Traditionally, an inability to relieve the obstruction via needle repositioning or increased syringe plunger pressure has required needle removal and replacement. In this article, we outline a simple technique that can be used to restore patency of the obstructed lavage needle without necessitating needle removal and replacement. PMID:23399296

  14. Treatment of the calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff by ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle lavage. Two years prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-González, Federico Del; Ramos-Álvarez, Juan José; Rodríguez-Fabián, Guillermo; González-Pérez, José; Calderón-Montero, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: to evaluate the short and long term effectiveness of ultrasonography (US)-guided percutaneous needle lavage in calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff. To study the evolution of the size of calcifications and pain in the two years after treatment. Methods: study design: A 2 year longitudinal prospective study is carried out after applying the UGPL technique on a number of patients diagnosed with calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff. Clinical, ultrasound and radiology follow-up controls were performed, 3 months, 6 months, one year and two years after the treatment. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was used to assess the pain. The degree and point of pain is selected on a 10 cm line, arranged horizontally or vertically. The “0” represents no pain and “10” represents worst pain. The population studied was made up of 121 patients that required our service as a result of suffering from a painful shoulder. Results: the pain (VAS) and the size of the calcification significantly decreased with the application of the technique (p< 0,001 in both cases) and regardless of the sex (p: 0.384 for pain and p: 0.578 for the size of the calcification). This occurred from the first check-up (3 months) and was maintained for two year. Conclusions: we consider this technique to be a valid alternative as a first-choice treatment of calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. The intervention is simple, cost-effective, does not require hospitalization, involves no complications, rehabilitation treatment is not required and it shows very few side effects without sequelae, significantly reducing the size of the calcification and pain in the majority of patients. PMID:25332939

  15. Treatment of the calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff by ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle lavage. Two years prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Del Castillo-González, Federico; Ramos-Álvarez, Juan José; Rodríguez-Fabián, Guillermo; González-Pérez, José; Calderón-Montero, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Summary Purpose: to evaluate the short and long term effectiveness of ultrasonography (US)-guided percutaneous needle lavage in calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff. To study the evolution of the size of calcifications and pain in the two years after treatment. Methods: a 2 year longitudinal prospective study is carried out after applying the UGPL technique on a number of patients diagnosed with calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff. Clinical, ultrasound and radiology follow-up controls were performed, 3 months, 6 months, one year and two years after the treatment. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was used to assess the pain. The degree and point of pain is selected on a 10cm line, arranged horizontally or vertically. The “0” represents no pain and “10” represents worst pain. The population studied was made up of 121 patients that required our service as a result of suffering from a painful shoulder. Results: the pain (VAS) and the size of the calcification significantly decreased with the application of the technique (p< 0,001 in both cases) and regardless of the sex (p: 0.384 for pain and p: 0.578 for the size of the calcification). This occurred from the first check-up (3 months) and was maintained for two year. Conclusion: we consider this technique to be a valid alternative as a first-choice treatment of calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. The intervention is simple, cost-effective, does not require hospitalization, involves no complications, rehabilitation treatment is not required and it shows very few side effects without sequelae, significantly reducing the size of the calcification and pain in the majority of patients.

  16. High-energy extracorporeal shock-wave therapy for calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Albert, J-D; Meadeb, J; Guggenbuhl, P; Marin, F; Benkalfate, T; Thomazeau, H; Chalès, G

    2007-03-01

    In a prospective randomised trial of calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff, we compared the efficacy of dual treatment sessions delivering 2500 extracorporeal shock waves at either high- or low-energy, via an electromagnetic generator under fluoroscopic guidance. Patients were eligible for the study if they had more than a three-month history of calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff, with calcification measuring 10 mm or more in maximum dimension. The primary outcome measure was the change in the Constant and Murley Score. A total of 80 patients were enrolled (40 in each group), and were re-evaluated at a mean of 110 (41 to 255) days after treatment when the increase in Constant and Murley score was significantly greater (t-test, p = 0.026) in the high-energy treatment group than in the low-energy group. The improvement from the baseline level was significant in the high-energy group, with a mean gain of 12.5 (-20.7 to 47.5) points (p < 0.0001). The improvement was not significant in the low-energy group. Total or subtotal resorption of the calcification occurred in six patients (15%) in the high-energy group and in two patients (5%) in the low-energy group. High-energy shock-wave therapy significantly improves symptoms in refractory calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder after three months of follow-up, but the calcific deposit remains unchanged in size in the majority of patients. PMID:17356145

  17. Efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a physiotherapy program for chronic rotator cuff pathology: A protocol for a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kim Bennell; Sally Coburn; Elin Wee; Sally Green; Anthony Harris; Andrew Forbes; Rachelle Buchbinder

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic rotator cuff pathology (CRCP) is a common shoulder condition causing pain and disability. Physiotherapy is often the first line of management for CRCP yet there is little conclusive evidence to support or refute its effectiveness and no formal evaluation of its cost-effectiveness. METHODS\\/DESIGN: This randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial will involve 200 participants with CRCP recruited from medical practices,

  18. In vivo measurement of subacromial space width during shoulder elevation: Technique and preliminary results in patients following unilateral rotator cuff repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael J. Bey; Stephanie K. Brock; William N. Beierwaltes; Roger Zauel; Patricia A. Kolowich; Terrence R. Lock

    2007-01-01

    BackgroundThe shoulder’s subacromial space is of significant clinical interest due to its association with rotator cuff disease. Previous studies have estimated the subacromial space width to be 2–17mm, but no study has measured in vivo subacromial space width during shoulder motion. The purpose of this study was to measure the in vivo subacromial space width during shoulder elevation in patients

  19. The effects of chronic unloading and gap formation on tendon-to-bone healing in a rat model of massive rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Killian, Megan L.; Cavinatto, Leonardo; Shah, Shivam A.; Sato, Eugene J.; Ward, Samuel R.; Havlioglu, Necat; Galatz, Leesa M.; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the effect of pre-repair rotator cuff chronicity on post-repair healing outcomes using a chronic and acute multi-tendon rat rotator cuff injury model. Full-thickness dual tendon injuries (supra- and infraspinatus) were created unilaterally in adult male Sprague Dawley rats, and left chronically detached for 8 or 16 weeks. After chronic detachment, tears were repaired and acute dual tendon injuries were created and immediately repaired on contralateral shoulders. Tissue level outcomes for bone, tendon, and muscle were assessed 4 or 8 weeks after repair using histology, microcomputed tomography, biomechanical testing, and biochemical assays. Substantial gap formation was seen in 35% of acute repairs and 44% of chronic repairs. Gap formation negatively correlated with mechanical and structural outcomes for both healing time points regardless of injury duration. Bone and histomorphometry, as well as biomechanics, were similar between acute and chronic injury and repair regardless of chronicity and duration of healing. This study was the first to implement a multi-tendon rotator cuff injury with surgical repair following both chronic and acute injuries. Massive tear in a rodent model resulted in gap formation regardless of injury duration which had detrimental effects on repair outcomes. PMID:24243733

  20. Rotator cuff repair augmentation using a novel polycarbonate polyurethane patch: preliminary results at 12 months’ follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Encalada-Diaz, Ivan; Cole, Brian J.; MacGillivray, John D.; Ruiz-Suarez, Michell; Kercher, James S.; Friel, Nicole A.; Valero-Gonzalez, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Background Preventing anatomic failure after rotator cuff repair (RCR) remains a challenge. Augmentation with a surgical mesh may permanently reinforce the repair and decrease failure rates. The purpose of this study is to assess the postoperative outcomes of open RCR augmented with a novel reticulated polycarbonate polyurethane patch. Materials and methods Ten patients with supraspinatus tendon tears underwent open RCR augmented with a polycarbonate polyurethane patch secured in a 6-point fixation construct placed over the repaired tendon. Patients were evaluated with preoperative and postoperative outcome measures, including the Simple Shoulder Test, visual analog pain scale, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons shoulder score, Cumulative Activities of Daily Living score, and University of California, Los Angeles shoulder scale, as well as range of motion. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging was used to evaluate repair status. Results Patients showed significant improvements in visual analog pain scale, Simple Shoulder Test, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons shoulder scores at both 6 and 12 months postoperatively (P <.05 and P < .01, respectively). The University of California, Los Angeles postoperative score was good to excellent in 7 patients at 6 months and in 8 patients at 12 months. Range of motion in forward flexion, abduction, internal rotation, and external rotation was significantly improved at both 6 and 12 months postoperatively (P < .05 and P < .01, respectively). Magnetic resonance imaging at 12 months showed healing in 90%; one patient had a definitive persistent tear. We found no adverse events associated with the patch, including the absence of fibrosis, mechanical symptoms, or visible subacromial adhesions. Discussion The polycarbonate polyurethane patch was designed to support tissue in growth and enhance healing as shown by preclinical animal studies. Clinically, the patch is well tolerated and shows promising efficacy, with a 10% retear rate at the 12-month time point. Level of evidence Level IV, Case Series, Treatment Study. PMID:21106404

  1. Evaluation of a cross-linked acellular porcine dermal patch for rotator cuff repair augmentation in an ovine model.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Gregory P; Breur, Gert J; Van Sickle, David; Yao, Jian Q; Kim, J; Blanchard, Cheryl R

    2007-01-01

    In this study we evaluated 2 commercially available rotator cuff repair augmentation patches in an in vivo sheep model using mechanical testing and histologic techniques. Bilateral infraspinatus tears were created and repaired in 2 groups of 8 adult ewes. Each group (killed at 9 or 24 weeks) included 5 repaired with suture alone, 6 repaired and augmented with a cross-linked acellular porcine dermal (PD) patch (Zimmer Collagen Repair Patch), and 5 repaired and augmented with a porcine small intestine submucosa (SIS) patch (Restore Orthobiologic Soft Tissue Implant; DePuy Orthopaedics). At 3 weeks, sheep with suture repair and an SIS patch had significant elevation of plasma fibrinogen levels (P < .05) whereas sheep with suture repair and a PD patch elicited no elevation in plasma fibrinogen levels. At 9 weeks, the mean failure load was 201 +/- 60 lb for suture repairs, 182 +/- 63 lb for PD repairs, and 137 +/- 16 lb for SIS repairs. Within any individual sheep, the shoulder undergoing PD repair always had a higher failure load than the contralateral suture or shoulder undergoing SIS repair. At 9 weeks, macrophages were seen on all PD surfaces whereas most of the SIS materials were resorbed. At 24 weeks, failure loads were identical between groups. Macrophages had disappeared from the PD groups, and integration of the PD patch into the surrounding tissue with vascular and fibroblastic invasion was seen. For the SIS group, diverse tissue types (including ectopic bone) were seen. PMID:17574876

  2. High-resolution ultrasound of rotator cuff and biceps reflection pulley in non-elite junior tennis players: anatomical study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tennis is believed to be potentially harmful for the shoulder, therefore the purpose of this study is to evaluate the anatomy of the rotator cuff and the coraco-humeral ligament (CHL) in a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players with high-resolution ultrasound (US). Methods From August 2009 to September 2010 n?=?90 a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players (mean age?±?standard deviation: 15?±?3) and a control group of age- and sex- matched subjects were included. Shoulder assessment with a customized standardized protocol was performed. Body mass index, dominant arm, years of practice, weekly hours of training, racket weight, grip (Eastern, Western and semi-Western), kind of strings were recorded. Results Abnormalities were found at ultrasound in 14/90 (15%) players. Two players had supraspinatus tendinosis, two had subacromial impingement and ten had subacromial bursitis. CHL thickness resulted comparable in the dominant and non-dominant arms (11.3?±?4.4 mm vs. 13?±?4.2, p?>?0.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that no association was present among CHL thickness and the variables evaluated. In the control group, abnormalities were found at ultrasound in 6/60 (10%) subjects (sub-acromial bursitis). No statistically significant differences between players and control group were found (p?=?0.71). Conclusion In a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players only minor shoulder abnormalities were found. PMID:25034864

  3. Characteristics and Stimulation Potential with BMP-2 and BMP-7 of Tenocyte-Like Cells Isolated from the Rotator Cuff of Female Donors

    PubMed Central

    Klatte-Schulz, Franka; Pauly, Stephan; Scheibel, Markus; Greiner, Stefan; Gerhardt, Christian; Hartwig, Jelka; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Wildemann, Britt

    2013-01-01

    Tendon bone healing of the rotator cuff is often associated with non-healing or recurrent defects, which seems to be influenced by the patient’s age and sex. The present study aims to examine cellular biological characteristics of tenocyte-like cells that may contribute to this impaired rotator cuff healing. Moreover, a therapeutic approach using growth factors could possibly stimulate tendon bone healing. Therefore, our second aim was to identify patient groups who would particularly benefit from growth factor stimulation. Tenocyte-like cells isolated from supraspinatus tendons of female donors younger and older than 65 years of age were characterized with respect to different cellular biological parameters, such as cell density, cell count, marker expression, collagen-I protein synthesis, and stem cell potential. Furthermore, cells of the donor groups were stimulated with BMP-2 and BMP-7 (200 and 1000 ng/ml) in 3D-culture and analyzed for cell count, marker expression and collagen-I protein synthesis. Female donors older than 65 years of age showed significantly decreased cell count and collagen-I protein synthesis compared to cells from donors younger than 65 years. Cellular biological parameters including cell count, collagen-I and –III expression, and collagen-I protein synthesis of cells from both donor groups were stimulated with BMP-2 and BMP-7. The cells from donors older than 65 years revealed a decreased stimulation potential for cell count compared to the younger group. Cells from female donors older than 65 years of age showed inferior cellular biological characteristics. This may be one reason for a weaker healing potential observed in older female patients and should be taken into consideration for tendon bone healing of the rotator cuff. PMID:23825642

  4. Delaminated tears of the rotator cuff: prevalence, characteristics, and diagnostic accuracy using indirect MR arthrography.

    PubMed

    Choo, Hye Jung; Lee, Sun Joo; Kim, Jung-Han; Kim, Dong Wook; Park, Young-Mi; Kim, Ok Hwa; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, radiologic characteristics, and accuracy of diagnosing delaminated tears at the supraspinatus tendon-infraspinatus tendon (SST-IST) on indirect MR arthrography. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Of 531 consecutive shoulders that underwent indirect MR arthrography, 231 shoulders with tears at the SST-IST were included. On the MR images, delaminated tears at the SST-IST, defined as intratendinous horizontal splitting between the articular and bursal layers of the SST-IST with or without different degrees of retraction between the two layers, were identified and classified into six types. Other radiologic findings of the SST-IST, such as the presence of intramuscular cysts, were evaluated. We used video records of 127 arthroscopic surgeries to determine the diagnostic accuracy of indirect MRI for the detection of the delaminated tears at the SST-IST. RESULTS. On MRI, 56% (129/231) of shoulders with SST-IST tears had delaminated tears. Articular-delaminated full-thickness tears (n = 58) and articular-delaminated partial-thickness tears (n = 64) were the most common types. Approximately 82% (36/44) of articular-delaminated full-thickness tears occurring at the SST were combined with articular-delaminated partial-thickness tears at the IST. SST-IST footprint tears and intramuscular cysts were significantly more common in the shoulders with delaminated tears. The sensitivity and specificity of indirect MR arthrography for detection of delaminated tears were 92% and 94%, respectively. CONCLUSION. On indirect MR arthrography, approximately half of the shoulders with SST-IST tears had delaminated tears. The diagnostic accuracy of indirect MR arthrography for detection of delaminated tears was high. PMID:25615759

  5. Rotator Cuff Exercises

    MedlinePLUS

    ... you finish doing all 4 exercises, put an ice pack on your shoulder for 20 minutes. It's best to use a plastic bag with ice cubes in it or a bag of frozen peas, not gel packs. If you do all 4 exercises 3 to ...

  6. Rotator Cuff Pathology

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower Safety Pumpkin Carving Safety Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Safety Removing ... Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower Safety Pumpkin Carving Safety Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Safety Removing ...

  7. Effect of Platelet-Rich Plasma and Bioactive Glass Powder for the Improvement of Rotator Cuff Tendon-to-Bone Healing in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yang; Dong, Yu; Chen, Shiyi; Li, Yunxia

    2014-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that a platelet-rich plasma (PRP) plus bioactive glass (BG) mixture could shorten the tendon-bone healing process in rotator cuff tendon repair, thirty mature male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups, Control, PRP, and PRP + BG. All groups underwent a surgical procedure to establish a rotator cuff tendon healing model. Mechanical examinations and histological assays were taken to verify the adhesion of the tendon-bone. Real-time PCR was adopted to analyze Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 (BMP-2). The maximum load-to-failure value in mechanical examinations was significantly higher in the PRP + BG group than that in the control group after six weeks (Control 38.73 ± 8.58, PRP 54.49 ± 8.72, PRP + BG 79.15 ± 7.62, p < 0.001), but it was not significantly different at 12 weeks (PRP 74.27 ± 7.74, PRP + BG 82.57 ± 6.63, p = 0.145). In histological assays, H&E (hematoxylin-eosin) staining showed that the interface between the tendon-bone integration was much sturdier in the PRP + BG group compared to the other two groups at each time point, and more ordered arranged tendon fibers can be seen at 12 weeks. At six weeks, the mRNA expression levels of BMP-2 in the PRP + BG group were higher than those in the other groups (PRP + BG 0.65 ± 0.11, PRP 2.284 ± 0.07, Control 0.12 ± 0.05, p < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in the mRNA expression levels of BMP-2 among the three groups at 12 weeks (p = 0.922, 0.067, 0.056). BMP-2 levels in PRP and PRP+BG groups were significantly lower at 12 weeks compared to six weeks (p = 0.006, <0.001).We found that the PRP + BG mixture could enhance tendon-bone healing in rotator cuff tendon repair. PMID:25464384

  8. Results of the latissimus dorsi and teres major tendon transfer on to the rotator cuff for brachial plexus palsy at birth.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, G Ivan; Toh, Satoshi; Arai, Hisamichi; Arai, Kouichi; Harata, Seiko

    2002-01-01

    Brachial plexus palsy at birth remains a serious problem. Although most cases resolve during the first few months by spontaneous regeneration, several operations have been used to correct the residual deformity. In the present study we describe the results of the latissimus dorsi and teres major tendons transfer on to the rotator cuff to improve shoulder function. Six patients were included in the study: three girls and three boys; four right shoulders, and two left. The types of palsy were four Erb's palsy (C5, C6) and two C5-C7 palsy. The median age at the time of operation was 11 years and 1 month and the median follow-up period was 54.2 months. Median preoperative passive external rotation was 51 degrees, and active abduction 67 degrees. Median postoperative active external rotation was 72 degrees, and postoperative active abduction 109 degrees. This procedure increased the ranges of external rotation and abduction, and provided considerable improvement in shoulder function. PMID:12426994

  9. Minimally invasive transrotator cuff approach for arthroscopic stabilization of the posterosuperior glenoid labrum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heber C Crockett; John M Wright; Daniel P Slawski; Bruce Kohtz; Dwain Rosse; Sandra Rosse

    2004-01-01

    We describe a novel technique for repair of the superior glenoid labrum posterior to the biceps anchor. This approach optimizes access for fixation of the superior and posterosuperior labrum, but involves significantly less trauma to the rotator cuff and subacromial space compared with previously described transrotator cuff methods. We suspect that the relative lack of trauma to the rotator cuff

  10. The Tendon-to-Bone Transition of the Rotator Cuff: A Preliminary Raman Spectroscopic Study Documenting the Gradual Mineralization Across the Insertion in Rat Tissue Samples

    PubMed Central

    WOPENKA, BRIGITTE; KENT, ALISTAIR; PASTERIS, JILL D.; YOON, YOUNG; THOMOPOULOS, STAVROS

    2009-01-01

    We applied Raman spectroscopy to monitor the distribution of minerals and the degree of mineralization across the tendon–bone insertion site in the shoulders of five rats. We acquired Raman spectra from 100 to 4000 ?cm-1 on individual 1 ?m points across the 120 ?m wide transition zone of each tissue sample and identified all the peaks detected in pure tendon and in pure bone, as well as in the transition zone. The intensity of the 960 ?cm-1 P–O stretch for apatite (normalized to either the 2940 ?cm-1 C–H stretch or the 1003 ?cm-1 C–C stretch for collagen) was used as an indicator of the abundance of mineral. We relate the observed histological morphology in the tissue thin section with the observed Raman peaks for both the organic component (mostly collagen) and the inorganic component (a carbonated form of the mineral apatite) and discuss spectroscopic issues related to peak deconvolution and quantification of overlapping Raman peaks. We show that the mineral-to-collagen ratio at the insertion site increases linearly (R2 = 0.8 for five samples) over the distance of 120 ?m from tendon to bone, rather than abruptly, as previously inferred from histological observations. In addition, narrowing of the 960 ?cm-1 band across the traverse indicates that the crystalline ordering within the apatite increases concomitantly with the degree of mineralization. This finding of mineral gradation has important clinical implications and may explain why the uninjured tendon-to-bone connection of the rotator cuff can sustain very high stress concentrations without failure. Our finding is also consistent with recent mechanical models and calculations developed to better understand the materials properties of this unusually strong interface. PMID:19094386

  11. Regional Medical Center (The MED) Plastic Surgery Rotation

    E-print Network

    Cui, Yan

    to perform the following plastic surgery procedures including but not limited to: · Skin grafting and flap · Operations incorporating the full spectrum of flaps and grafts including skin grafts, local flaps, fascial closure of soft tissue defects of the upper extremity · Specific grafting techniques including

  12. The effect of endotracheal tube cuff pressure control on postextubation throat pain in orthognathic surgeries: a randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Ladan; Bohluli, Behnam; Mahaseni, Hamidreza; Valaei, Naser; Sadr-Eshkevari, Pooyan; Rashad, Ashkan

    2014-02-01

    Pain in the throat after extubation is one of the most common complaints after maxillofacial operations under general anaesthesia. We have evaluated the amount of pain after extubation when we controlled the pressure in the endotracheal cuff during operation by analysing the records of 43 patients who had maxillofacial operations under general anaesthesia. In the study group (n=20) the cuff pressure of the endotracheal tube was adjusted using a pressure gauge at the beginning of intubation and every hour during operation. In the control group (n=23), an experienced anaesthetist adjusted the pressure only at the beginning of the operation by palpating the pilot balloon. Throat pain was evaluated 1, 6, and 24h postoperatively on a visual analogue scale (VAS), and the pain scores in the control and study groups postoperatively was 5.3 (1.1) compared with 3.9 (1.5) (p=0.002); 4.5 (1.3) compared with 3.1 (1.5) (p=0.002); and 1.9 (1.1) compared with 1.6 (1.2) (p=0.4), respectively. The differences between the two groups at 1h and 6h postoperatively were significant, but that at 24h was not. Control of the cuff pressure of the endotracheal tube with a gauge at the beginning of the operation, and adjustment of the pressure during operation, can reduce postoperative complications such as throat pain. PMID:24268872

  13. Suprascapular Nerve: Is It Important in Cuff Pathology?

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lewis L.; Freehill, Michael T.; Yannopoulos, Paul; Warner, Jon J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Suprascapular nerve and rotator cuff function are intimately connected. The incidence of suprascapular neuropathy has been increasing due to improved understanding of the disease entity and detection methods. The nerve dysfunction often results from a traction injury or compression, and a common cause is increased tension on the nerve from retracted rotator cuff tears. Suprascapular neuropathy should be considered as a diagnosis if patients exhibit posterosuperior shoulder pain, atrophy or weakness of supraspinatus and infraspinatus without rotator cuff tear, or massive rotator cuff with retraction. Magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography studies are indicated to evaluate the rotator cuff and function of the nerve. Fluoroscopically guided injections to the suprascapular notch can also be considered as a diagnostic option. Nonoperative treatment of suprascapular neuropathy can be successful, but in the recent decade there is increasing evidence espousing the success of surgical treatment, in particular arthroscopic suprascapular nerve decompression. There is often reliable improvement in shoulder pain, but muscle atrophy recovery is less predictable. More clinical data are needed to determine the role of rotator cuff repair and nerve decompression in the same setting. PMID:23193484

  14. Shoulder surgery - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    ... chap 52. Matsen III FA, Fehringer EV, Lippitt SB, Wirth MA, Rockwood Jr. CA. Rotator cuff. In: ... CA Jr, Matsen FA III, Wirth MA, Lippitt SB, eds. The Shoulder . 4th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders ...

  15. Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for ENews Home > Lung Disease > COPD > Treating COPD Surgery Some COPD patients with very severe symptoms may ... lung surgery. Are You a Candidate for Lung Surgery? Some people with COPD have improved lung function ...

  16. Special report: Occlusive cuff controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    A mechanical occlusive cuff controller suitable for blood flow experiments in space shuttle flights is described. The device requires 115 volt ac power and a pressurized gas source. Two occluding cuff pressures (30 and 50 mmHg) are selectable by a switch on the front panel. A screw driver adjustment allows accurate cuff pressurization levels for under or oversized limbs. Two pressurization cycles (20 second and 2 minutes) can be selected by a front panel switch. Adjustment of the timing cycles is also available through the front panel. A pushbutton hand switch allows remote start of the cuff inflation cycle. A stop/reset switch permits early termination of the cycle and disabling of the controller to prevent inadvertent reactivation. Pressure in the cuff is monitored by a differential aneroid barometer. In addition, an electrocardiogram trigger circuit permits the initiation of the pressurization cycle by an externally supplied ECG cycle.

  17. Rolling cuff flexible bellows

    DOEpatents

    Lambert, Donald R. (Livermore, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A flexible connector apparatus used to join two stiff non-deformable members, such as piping. The apparatus is provided with one or more flexible sections or assemblies each utilizing a bellows of a rolling cuff type connected between two ridge members, with the bellows being supported by a back-up ring, such that only the curved end sections of the bellows are unsupported. Thus, the bellows can be considered as being of a tube-shaped configuration and thus have high pressure resistance. The components of the flexible apparatus are sealed or welded one to another such that it is fluid tight.

  18. Using your shoulder after surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... possible. Your arm should bend at a 90° angle (a right angle) at your elbow. The sling should support your ... Fehringer EV, Lippitt SB, Wirth MA, Rockwood Jr. CA. Rotator cuff. In: Rockwood CA Jr, Matsen FA ...

  19. Scapulothoracic and Glenohumeral Kinematics Following an External Rotation

    E-print Network

    Karduna, Andrew

    and shoulder pa- thology have been identified in impingement syndrome,35,38,72 ro- tator cuff tears,52- mation of the rotator cuff and are collectively referred to as the ex- ternal rotators of the shoulderScapulothoracic and Glenohumeral Kinematics Following an External Rotation Fatigue Protocol D

  20. Barbed Suture for Vaginal Cuff Closure in Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Byron Cardoso; Riaño, Giovanni; Hoyos, Luis R.; Otalora, Camila

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Our aim was to evaluate whether the use of barbed suture for vaginal cuff closure is associated with a decrease in postoperative vaginal bleeding compared with cuff closure with polyglactin 910 in patients who have undergone laparoscopic hysterectomy. Methods: We performed a cohort study of patients who underwent laparoscopic hysterectomy between January 2008 and July 2012 by the minimally invasive gynecologic surgery division of the Gynecology, Obstetrics and Human Reproduction Department at Fundación Santa Fe de Bogotá University Hospital, Bogotá, Colombia. Results: A total of 232 women were studied: 163 were in the polyglactin 910 group, and 69 were in the barbed suture group. The main outcome, postoperative vaginal bleeding, was documented in 53 cases (32.5%) in the polyglactin 910 group and in 13 cases (18.8%) in the barbed suture group (relative risk, 0.57; 95% confidence interval, 0.34–0.9; P = .03). No statistically significant differences were found in other postoperative outcomes, such as emergency department admission, vaginal cuff dehiscence, infectious complications, and the presence of granulation tissue. Conclusion: In this study an inverse association was observed between the use of barbed suture for vaginal cuff closure during laparoscopic hysterectomy and the presence of postoperative vaginal bleeding. PMID:24680149

  1. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5275 Nerve cuff. (a) Identification. A nerve cuff is a tubular silicone rubber sheath used to encase a nerve for aid in repairing the nerve (e.g., to prevent ingrowth of scar tissue)...

  2. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5275 Nerve cuff. (a) Identification. A nerve cuff is a tubular silicone rubber sheath used to encase a nerve for aid in repairing the nerve (e.g., to prevent ingrowth of scar tissue)...

  3. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5275 Nerve cuff. (a) Identification. A nerve cuff is a tubular silicone rubber sheath used to encase a nerve for aid in repairing the nerve (e.g., to prevent ingrowth of scar tissue)...

  4. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5275 Nerve cuff. (a) Identification. A nerve cuff is a tubular silicone rubber sheath used to encase a nerve for aid in repairing the nerve (e.g., to prevent ingrowth of scar tissue)...

  5. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5275 Nerve cuff. (a) Identification. A nerve cuff is a tubular silicone rubber sheath used to encase a nerve for aid in repairing the nerve (e.g., to prevent ingrowth of scar tissue)...

  6. Rotator-cuff tear of the hip.

    PubMed

    Bunker, T D; Esler, C N; Leach, W J

    1997-07-01

    We describe an apparently unreported finding during hip operations: a tear at the insertion of gluteus medius and gluteus minimus. This defect may well be known to many surgeons with experience of hip replacement and hemiarthroplasty for fractures of the neck of the femur, but a Medline search has failed to find a previous description. We made a prospective study of 50 consecutive patients with fractures of the neck of the femur to quantify the incidence of this condition: 11 (22%) had such a tear. PMID:9250749

  7. Rotator Cuff Tears: Surgical Treatment Options

    MedlinePLUS

    ... getting you back to your daily activities. A physical therapy program will help you regain shoulder strength and ... it is a slow process, your commitment to rehabilitation is key to a successful outcome. Outcome The ...

  8. Rotator cuff function during a golf swing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank W. Jobe; Diane R. Moynes; Daniel J. Antonelli

    1986-01-01

    A study of bilateral shoulder muscle activity during the golf swing was undertaken using electromyography and high-speed photography. Understanding of the muscle firing patterns could lead to injury prevention and development of appropriate training and condition ing regimens. The swings of seven adult male right- handed professional golfers without shoulder problems were examined. Indwelling electrodes were inserted into the supraspinatus,

  9. Massive cuff tears treated with arthroscopically assisted latissimus dorsi transfer. Surgical technique.

    PubMed

    De Cupis, Vincenzo; De Cupis, Mauro

    2012-04-01

    Latissimus dorsi transfer is our preferred treatment for active disabled patients with a posterosuperior massive cuff tear. We present an arthroscopically assisted technique which avoids an incision through the deltoid obtaining a better and faster clinical outcome. The patient is placed in lateral decubitus. After the arthroscopic evaluation of the lesion through a posterior and a posterolateral portal, with the limb in traction we perform the preparation of the greater tuberosity of the humerus. We place the arm in abduction and internal rotation and we proceed to the harvest of the latissimus dorsi and the tendon preparation by stitching the two sides using very resistant sutures. After restoring limb traction, under arthroscopic visualization, we pass a curved grasper through the posterolateral portal by going to the armpit in the space between the teres minor and the posterior deltoid. Once the grasper has exited the access at the level of the axilla we fix two drainage transparent tubes, each with a wire inside, and, withdrawing it back, we shuttle the two tubes in the subacromial space. After tensioning the suture wires from the anterior portals these are assembled in a knotless anchor of 5.5 mm that we place in the prepared site on the greater tuberosity of the humerus. A shoulder brace at 15° of abduction and neutral rotation protect the patient for the first month post-surgery but physical therapy can immediately start. PMID:23738290

  10. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870...Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has...

  11. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870...Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has...

  12. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870...Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has...

  13. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section 868.5750 Food... § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an...

  14. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section 868.5750 Food... § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an...

  15. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870...Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has...

  16. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870...Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has...

  17. External Rotator Sparing with Posterior Acetabular Fracture Surgery: Does It Change Outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Ceylan, Halil; Inanir, Murat; Sarlak, Ahmet Y.

    2014-01-01

    This study analyses the results of the treatment with external rotator sparing approach in acetabular fractures to determine whether muscle sparing has a positive impact on functional outcome. 20 patients with a mean age of 45.9 years (range: 26–64) that had been treated for displaced acetabular fractures were included in this series. Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment (SMFA) questionnaire and hip muscle strength measurement were done at the 24-month of follow-up period. The radiographic results at the final followup were excellent in 9 hips (45%), good in 6 hips (30%), fair in 4 hips (20%), and poor in one hip (5%) according to the criteria developed by Matta. The average SMFA score for all of the patients was 18.3 (range: 0–55.4). The mean dysfunctional and bother indexes were 17.2 and 20.6, respectively. The overall muscle strength deficit was 11.8%. The greatest loss of strength was in internal rotation. In patients with better postoperative reduction quality of acetabular fracture, peak torque, and maximum work of hip flexion, extension and also internal rotation maximum work deficit were significantly lower (P < 0.05). Accurate initial reduction and longer postoperative muscle strengthening exercise programs seem critical to decrease postoperative hip muscle weakness after acetabular fractures. PMID:25110590

  18. Rolling-cuff flexible bellows

    DOEpatents

    Lambert, D.R.

    1982-09-27

    A flexible connector apparatus used to join two stiff non-deformable members, such as piping, is described. The apparatus is provided with one or more flexible sections or assemblies each utilizing a bellows of a rolling cuff type connected between two ridge members, with the bellows being supported by a back-up ring, such that only the curved end sections of the bellows are unsupported. Thus, the bellows can be considered as being of a tube-shaped configuration and thus have high pressure resistance. The components of the flexible apparatus are sealed or welded one to another such that it is fluid tight.

  19. Rotationally actuated prosthetic helping hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E. (inventor); Belcher, Jewell G., Jr. (inventor); Carden, James R. (inventor); West, Thomas W. (inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A prosthetic device has been developed for below-the-elbow amputees. The device consists of a cuff, a stem, a housing, two hook-like fingers, an elastic band for holding the fingers together, and a brace. The fingers are pivotally mounted on a housing that is secured to the amputee's upper arm with the brace. The stem, which also contains a cam, is rotationally mounted within the housing and is secured to the cuff, which fits over the amputee's stump. By rotating the cammed stem between the fingers with the lower arm, the amputee can open and close the fingers.

  20. Relapse of skeletal class III with anterior open bite after bimaxillary orthognathic surgery depending on maxillary posterior impaction and mandibular counterclockwise rotation.

    PubMed

    Kor, Hok Sim; Yang, Hoon Joo; Hwang, Soon Jung

    2014-07-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate relapse after orthognathic surgery of skeletal class III with anterior open bite depending on the posterior impaction and mandibular counterclockwise rotation. Patients (n = 29) were divided into two groups according to the change of mandibular occlusal plane angle (MnOP): Group A had a clockwise change of MnOP > 0° (n = 11) and Group B had a counterclockwise change of MnOP < -2° (n = 18). Lateral cephalograms were analyzed preoperatively, and at immediate stage, six weeks, six months, and one year after surgery. One year after surgery, the stability of the maxilla was good in both groups. Upward movement of the mandible was observed six weeks after surgery due to mandibular autorotation. The amount of mean relapse was small, although a significant difference was observed horizontally between groups. Group B demonstrated more forward movement of B point, pogonion, and menton than Group A (p < 0.05). SNB angle increased in both groups (p < 0.05). At one year follow up, good occlusal stability was observed in both groups with positive overbite. Our study suggested that bimaxillary procedures with clockwise and counterclockwise rotation of mandibular occlusal planes for correction of mandibular prognathism with anterior open bite appeared to be relatively stable procedures. PMID:24954529

  1. Prehospital endotracheal intubation; need for routine cuff pressure measurement?

    PubMed

    Peters, Joost H; Hoogerwerf, Nico

    2013-10-01

    In endotracheal intubation, a secured airway includes an insufflated cuff distal to the vocal cords. High cuff pressures may lead to major complications occurring after a short period of time. Cuff pressures are not routinely checked after intubation in the prehospital setting, dealing with a vulnerable group of patients. We reviewed cuff pressures after intubation by Helicopter Emergency Medical Services and paramedics noted in a dispatch database. Initial cuff pressures are almost all too high, needing adjustment to be in the safe zone. Dutch paramedics lack manometers and, therefore, only few paramedic intubations are followed by cuff pressure measurements. We recommend cuff pressure measurements after all (prehospital) intubations and, therefore, all ambulances need to be equipped with cuff manometers. PMID:23100319

  2. Forearm rescue cuff improves tourniquet tolerance during intravenous regional anesthesia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anahi Perlas; Philip W. H. Peng; Miguel Barrera Plaza; William J. Middleton; Vincent W. S. Chan; Khashayar Sanandaji

    2003-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Tourniquet pain during intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA) of the upper limb is common and can limit tourniquet inflation time. We hypothesize that a forearm rescue cuff is better tolerated than the traditional rescue cuff of a double-cuff tourniquet. Methods: After Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval and informed consent, 10 healthy unmedicated volunteers took part in a prospective,

  3. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section 868.5800 Food...868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed...

  4. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section 868.5800 Food...868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed...

  5. Pressure-pain function in desensitized and hypersensitized muscle and skin assessed by cuff algometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Romanas Polianskis; Thomas Graven-Nielsen; Lars Arendt-Nielsen

    2002-01-01

    This study assessed a newly developed cuff pressure algometry during discrete leg skin\\/muscle sensitization and anesthesia. Experimental setup consisted of a pneumatic tourniquet cuff, a computer-controlled air compressor, and an electronic visual analog scale (VAS). The first experiment assessed cuff algometry before and after selective anesthesia of the skin and the muscle under the cuff. The second experiment assessed cuff

  6. Control device for prosthetic urinary sphincter cuff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinicke, Robert H. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A device for controlling flow of fluid to and from a resilient inflatable cuff implanted about the urethra to control flow of urine therethrough. The device comprises a flexible bulb reservoir and a control unit that includes a manually operated valve that opens automatically when the bulb is squeezed to force fluid into the cuff for closing the urethra. The control unit also includes a movable valve seat member having a relatively large area exposed to pressure of fluid in a chamber that is connected to the cuff and which moves to a position in which the valve member is unseated by an abutment when fluid pressure in the chamber exceeds a predetermined value to thereby relieve excess fluid pressure in the cuff. The arrangement is such that the valve element is held closed against the seat member by the full differential in fluid pressures acting on both sides of the valve element until the seat member is moved away from the valve element to thus insure positive closing of the valve element until the seat member is moved out of engagement with the valve element by excess pressure differential.

  7. NERVE CUFF ELECTRODES FOR PROSTHETIC AND RESEARCH APPLICATIONS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Hoffer; K. Kallesøe

    A new generation of nerve cuffs suitable for stimulation, recording and modulation of nerve activity has been tested in our laboratory and elsewhere. The walls are molded of low-durometer silicone and incorporate flexible electrodes, Teflon? -coated stainless steel leads and an interlocking opening\\/closing system. Stimulation and recording cuffs can be either single-channel or multi- channel. Single-channel cuffs have coiled circumferential

  8. Sphygmomanometer cuffs: a potential source of infection!

    PubMed

    Zargaran, David; Hardwick, Sarah; Adel, Reeja; Hill, George; Stubbins, Daniel; Salmasi, Abdul Majeed

    2015-02-01

    We evaluated the potential pathogenic hazard of sphygmomanometer blood pressure cuffs (BPCs) in a hospital setting. Prospectively, the presence of bacterial organisms on 120 BPCs in 14 medical wards and outpatient clinics in a district general hospital in London was assessed. Swabs taken from the inner aspect of the cuffs were cultured using standard microbiological techniques. Bacterial organisms were found in 85% (102) of the 120 BPCs assessed. The highest rates of contamination were found in the outpatients department (90%). There were differences in the most common bacterial species isolated between the samples obtained from the outpatient clinics and the wards, with coagulase-negative Staphylococcus and diphtheroids being the most prevalent species in the wards and outpatient clinics, respectively. These findings highlight the necessity to eliminate this potential risk of infection. PMID:24569512

  9. Cerebrovascular effects of the thigh cuff maneuver.

    PubMed

    Panerai, R B; Saeed, N P; Robinson, T G

    2015-04-01

    Arterial hypotension can be induced by sudden release of inflated thigh cuffs (THC), but its effects on the cerebral circulation have not been fully described. In nine healthy subjects [aged 59 (9) yr], bilateral cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) was recorded in the middle cerebral artery (MCA), noninvasive arterial blood pressure (BP) in the finger, and end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2 ) with nasal capnography. Three THC maneuvers were performed in each subject with cuff inflation 20 mmHg above systolic BP for 3 min before release. Beat-to-beat values were extracted for mean CBFV, BP, ETCO2 , critical closing pressure (CrCP), resistance-area product (RAP), and heart rate (HR). Time-varying estimates of the autoregulation index [ARI(t)] were also obtained using an autoregressive-moving average model. Coherent averages synchronized by the instant of cuff release showed significant drops in mean BP, CBFV, and RAP with rapid return of CBFV to baseline. HR, ETCO2 , and ARI(t) were transiently increased, but CrCP remained relatively constant. Mean values of ARI(t) for the 30 s following cuff release were not significantly different from the classical ARI [right MCA 5.9 (1.1) vs. 5.1 (1.6); left MCA 5.5 (1.4) vs. 4.9 (1.7)]. HR was strongly correlated with the ARI(t) peak after THC release (in 17/22 and 21/24 recordings), and ETCO2 was correlated with the subsequent drop in ARI(t) (19/22 and 20/24 recordings). These results suggest a complex cerebral autoregulatory response to the THC maneuver, dominated by myogenic mechanisms and influenced by concurrent changes in ETCO2 and possible involvement of the autonomic nervous system and baroreflex. PMID:25659488

  10. Effect of tear size, corticosteroids and subacromial decompression surgery on the hierarchical structural properties of torn supraspinatus tendons

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, J. M. R.; Murphy, R. J.; Chaudhury, S.; Czernuszka, J. T.; Carr, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The effects of disease progression and common tendinopathy treatments on the tissue characteristics of human rotator cuff tendons have not previously been evaluated in detail owing to a lack of suitable sampling techniques. This study evaluated the structural characteristics of torn human supraspinatus tendons across the full disease spectrum, and the short-term effects of subacromial corticosteroid injections (SCIs) and subacromial decompression (SAD) surgery on these structural characteristics. Methods Samples were collected inter-operatively from supraspinatus tendons containing small, medium, large and massive full thickness tears (n = 33). Using a novel minimally invasive biopsy technique, paired samples were also collected from supraspinatus tendons containing partial thickness tears either before and seven weeks after subacromial SCI (n = 11), or before and seven weeks after SAD surgery (n = 14). Macroscopically normal subscapularis tendons of older patients (n = 5, mean age = 74.6 years) and supraspinatus tendons of younger patients (n = 16, mean age = 23.3) served as controls. Ultra- and micro-structural characteristics were assessed using atomic force microscopy and polarised light microscopy respectively. Results Significant structural differences existed between torn and control groups. Differences were identifiable early in the disease spectrum, and increased with increasing tear size. Neither SCI nor SAD surgery altered the structural properties of partially torn tendons seven weeks after treatment. Conclusions These findings may suggest the need for early clinical intervention strategies for torn rotator cuff tendons in order to prevent further degeneration of the tissue as tear size increases. Further work is required to establish the long-term abilities of SCI and SAD to prevent, and even reverse, such degeneration. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:252–61. PMID:25106417

  11. Return to Sport Following Shoulder Surgery in the Elite Pitcher

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Joshua D.; Frank, Jonathan M.; Jordan, Mark A.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Romeo, Anthony A.; Gupta, Anil K.; Abrams, Geoffrey D.; McCormick, Frank M.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2013-01-01

    Context: The ability to return to elite pitching, performance, and clinical outcomes of shoulder surgery in elite baseball pitchers are not definitively established. Objective: To determine (1) the rate of return to sport (RTS) in elite pitchers following shoulder surgery, (2) postoperative clinical outcomes upon RTS, and (3) performance upon RTS and to compare RTS rates in different types of shoulder surgery. Data Sources: Using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines and checklist, Medline, SciVerse Scopus, SportDiscus, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched. Study Selection: Levels I-IV evidence were eligible for inclusion if performance-based (eg, RTS) and/or clinical outcome–based reporting of outcomes were reported following surgical treatment of shoulder pathology in elite pitchers (major or minor league or collegiate). Data Extraction: Subject, shoulder, and pre- and postoperative performance-based variables of interest were extracted. All shoulder surgery types were potentially inclusive (eg, open, arthroscopic, rotator cuff, labrum, biceps, acromioclavicular joint, fracture). Study methodological quality was analyzed using the Modified Coleman Methodology Score (MCMS). Results: Six studies were analyzed (287 elite male pitchers [mean age, 27 years] who underwent shoulder surgery, with 99% on the dominant, throwing shoulder). MCMS was 38 (poor). Most pitchers were professional, with a mean career length of 6.58 years and postoperative clinical follow-up of 3.62 years. In 5 of 6 studies, multiple diagnoses were addressed concomitantly at surgery. Rate of RTS was 68% at mean 12 months following surgery. Twenty-two percent of Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers never RTS in MLB. Overall performance did improve following surgery; however, this did not improve to pre-injury levels. Conclusion: In this systematic review, the rate of return to elite baseball pitching following surgery was established. Performance tended to decrease prior to surgery and gradually improve postoperatively, though not reaching pre-injury levels of pitching. Level of Evidence: IV (systematic review of studies level I-IV evidence), therapeutic. PMID:24459557

  12. Rotator Cuff Tendinitis and Tear (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... M Simons, MD, FACSM Co-Director South Bend Sports Medicine Fellowship Michael Roberts, MPT, CSCS Michael Roberts, MPT, ... Section Editor — Adult Orthopedics Section Editor — Primary Care Sports Medicine Professor of Family Medicine and Sports Medicine University ...

  13. Comprehensive Approach to Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Options and Techniques

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... we're going to entertain questions from four locations. These locations are Atlanta, Minneapolis, Philadelphia, and as far away ... marked out here, and then you see the location of the B portal. The D and the ...

  14. Treatment Options for Rotator Cuff Tears: A Guide for Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or health care provider about what kind of rehabilitation therapy is best for you. Making a Decision Ask your doctor Given my tear, what benefits and harms for using non-surgical or surgical treatments should I consider? If ...

  15. Technical communication: design and in vitro testing of a pressure-sensing syringe for endotracheal tube cuffs.

    PubMed

    Slocum, Alexander H; Slocum, Alexander H; Spiegel, Joan E

    2012-05-01

    Endotracheal intubation is a frequently performed procedure in the prehospital setting, intensive care unit, and for patients undergoing surgery. The endotracheal tube cuff must be inflated to a pressure that prevents air leaks without compromising tracheal mucosal blood flow. For simultaneous endotracheal tube cuff inflation and measurement, we designed and tested a novel pressure-sensing syringe in vitro. The prototype was developed using a standard 10-mL polycarbonate syringe body that houses a plunger and a silicone rubber bellows, the pressure-sensing element. Bellow feasibility was determined and modeled using finite element analysis. Repeatability testing at each pressure measurement for each bellows (pressure versus deflection) was within an average standard deviation of 0.3 cm to 1.61 cm (1%-5% error). Using an aneroid manometer for comparison, there was excellent linear correlation with a Spearman rank of 0.99 (P < 0.001), up to 30 cm H(2)O. PMID:22492187

  16. Treatment of localized gingival recession using the free rotated papilla autograft combined with coronally advanced flap by conventional (macrosurgery) and surgery under magnification (microsurgical) technique: A comparative clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Suraj; Mehta, D. S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare the conventional (macro-surgical) and microsurgical approach in performing the free rotated papilla autograft combined with coronally advanced flap surgery in treatment of localized gingival recession. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 sites from 10 systemically healthy patients were selected for the study. The selected sites were randomly divided into experimental site A and experimental site B by using the spilt mouth design. Conventional (macro-surgical) approach for site A and micro-surgery for site B was applied in performing the free rotated papilla autograft combined with coronally advanced flap. Recession depth (RD), recession width (RW) clinical attachment level (CAL.) and width of keratinized tissue (WKT.) were recorded at baseline, 3 months and 6 months post-operatively. Results: Both (macro- and microsurgery) groups showed significant clinical improvement in all the parameters (RD, RW, CAL and WKT). However, on comparing both the groups, these parameters did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion: Both the surgical procedures were equally effective in treatment of localized gingival recession by the free rotated papilla autograft technique combined with coronally advanced flap. However, surgery under magnification (microsurgery) may be clinically better than conventional surgery in terms of less post-operative pain and discomfort experienced by patients at the microsurgical site. PMID:24554888

  17. Vaginal Cuff Dehiscence: Risk Factors and Associated Morbidities

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs Weizman, Noga; Einarsson, Jon I.; Wang, Karen C.; Vitonis, Allison F.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To evaluate whether the route and surgical technique by which hysterectomy is performed influence the incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of total hysterectomy cases performed at Brigham and Woman's Hospital or Faulkner Hospital during 2009 through 2011. Results: During the study period, 2382 total hysterectomies were performed; 23 of these (0.96%) were diagnosed with cuff dehiscence, and 4 women had recurrent dehiscence. Both laparoscopic (odds ratio, 23.4; P = .007) and robotic (odds ratio, 73; P = .0006) hysterectomies were associated with increased odds of cuff dehiscence in a multivariate regression analysis. The type of energy used during colpotomy, mode of closure (hand sewn, laparoscopic suturing, or suturing assisted by a device), and suture material did not differ significantly between groups; however, continuous suturing of the cuff was a protective factor (odds ratio, 0.24; P = .03). Women with dehiscence had more extensive procedures, as well as an increased incidence of additional major postoperative complications (17.4% vs 3%, P = .004). Conclusion: The rate of cuff dehiscence in our cohort correlates with the current literature. This study suggests that the risk of dehiscence is influenced mainly by the scope and complexity of the surgical procedure. It seems that different colpotomy techniques do not influence the rate of cuff dehiscence; however, continuous suturing of the cuff may be superior to interrupted suturing.

  18. Rate of Vaginal Cuff Separation Following Laparoscopic or Robotic Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Nick, Alpa M.; Lange, Jimena; Frumovitz, Michael; Soliman, Pamela T.; Schmeler, Kathleen M.; Schlumbrecht, Matthew P.; dos Reis, Ricardo; Ramirez, Pedro T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Vaginal cuff separation is a rare but serious complication following hysterectomy. The goal of our study was to determine the rate of vaginal cuff separation and associated risk factors in patients undergoing laparoscopic or robotic hysterectomy. Methods We retrospectively identified patients who underwent a minimally invasive simple or radical hysterectomy at one institution between January 2000 and 2009. Fisher's exact test, Wilcoxon rank sum test and multiple logistic regression was used to determine associations between variables and increased risk of separation. Results A total of 417 patients underwent laparoscopic (n=285) or robotic (n=132) hysterectomy during the study period. Three hundred and sixty-two underwent simple hysterectomy (249 laparoscopic, 113 robotic) and 57 underwent radical hysterectomy (36 laparoscopic, 19 robotic). Seven (1.7%) patients developed a cuff complication and all had a diagnosis of malignancy. Three (1.1%) patients in the laparoscopy group suffered a vaginal cuff evisceration (n=2) or separation (n=1). Four patients in the robotic group (3.0%) had a vaginal evisceration (n=1) or separation (n=3). There was no difference based on surgical approach (p=0.22). Vaginal cuff complications were 9.46-fold higher among patients who had a radical hysterectomy (p<0.01). Median time to presentation of vaginal cuff complication was 128 days (58–175) in the laparoscopy group and 37 days (range: 32–44) in the robotic group. Conclusions The overall risk of vaginal cuff complication was 1.7%. There appears to be no difference in cuff complication rates based on surgical approach. Radical hysterectomy, however, was associated with a 9-fold increase in vaginal cuff complications. PMID:20869763

  19. Effect of specific exercise strategy on need for surgery in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome: randomised controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate if a specific exercise strategy, targeting the rotator cuff and scapula stabilisers, improves shoulder function and pain more than unspecific exercises in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome, thereby decreasing the need for arthroscopic subacromial decompression. Design Randomised, participant and single assessor blinded, controlled study. Setting Department of orthopaedics in a Swedish university hospital. Participants 102 patients with long standing (over six months) persistent subacromial impingement syndrome in whom earlier conservative treatment had failed, recruited through orthopaedic specialists. Interventions The specific exercise strategy consisted of strengthening eccentric exercises for the rotator cuff and concentric/eccentric exercises for the scapula stabilisers in combination with manual mobilisation. The control exercise programme consisted of unspecific movement exercises for the neck and shoulder. Patients in both groups received five to six individual guided treatment sessions during 12 weeks. In between these supervised sessions the participants performed home exercises once or twice a day for 12 weeks. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was the Constant-Murley shoulder assessment score evaluating shoulder function and pain. Secondary outcomes were patients’ global impression of change because of treatment and decision regarding surgery. Results Most (97, 95%) participants completed the 12 week study. There was a significantly greater improvement in the Constant-Murley score in the specific exercise group than in the control exercise group (24 points (95% confidence interval 19 to 28.0) v 9 points (5 to 13); mean difference between group: 15 points (8.5 to 20.6)). Significantly more patients in the specific exercise group reported successful outcome (defined as large improvement or recovered) in the patients’ global assessment of change because of treatment: 69% (35/51) v 24% (11/46); odds ratio 7.6, 3.1 to 18.9; P<0.001. A significantly lower proportion of patients in the specific exercise group subsequently chose to undergo surgery: 20% (10/51) v 63% (29/46); odds ratio 7.7, 3.1 to 19.4; P<0.001). Conclusion A specific exercise strategy, focusing on strengthening eccentric exercises for the rotator cuff and concentric/eccentric exercises for the scapula stabilisers, is effective in reducing pain and improving shoulder function in patients with persistent subacromial impingement syndrome. By extension, this exercise strategy reduces the need for arthroscopic subacromial decompression within the three month timeframe used in the study. Trial registration Clinical trials NCT01037673 PMID:22349588

  20. The changes of endotracheal tube cuff pressure by the position changes from supine to prone and the flexion and extension of head

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deokkyu; Jeon, Byeongdo; Son, Ji-Seon; Lee, Jun-Rae; Ko, Seonghoon

    2015-01-01

    Background The proper cuff pressure is important to prevent complications related to the endotracheal tube (ETT). We evaluated the change in ETT cuff pressure by changing the position from supine to prone without head movement. Methods Fifty-five patients were enrolled and scheduled for lumbar spine surgery. Neutral angle, which was the angle on the mandibular angle between the neck midline and mandibular inferior border, was measured. The initial neutral pressure of the ETT cuff was measured, and the cuff pressure was subsequently adjusted to 26 cmH2O. Flexed or extended angles and cuff pressure were measured in both supine and prone positions, when the patient's head was flexed or extended. Initial neutral pressure in prone was compared with adjusted neutral pressure (26 cmH2O) in supine. Flexed and extended pressure were compared with adjusted neutral pressure in supine or prone, respectively. Results There were no differences between supine and prone position for neutral, flexed, and extended angles. The initial neutral pressure increased after changing position from supine to prone (26.0 vs. 31.5 ± 5.9 cmH2O, P < 0.001). Flexed and extended pressure in supine were increased to 38.7 ± 6.7 (P < 0.001) and 26.7 ± 4.7 cmH2O (not statistically significant) than the adjusted neutral pressure. Flexed and extended pressure in prone were increased to 40.5 ± 8.8 (P < 0.001) and 29.9 ± 8.7 cmH2O (P = 0.002) than the adjusted neutral pressure. Conclusions The position change from supine to prone without head movement can cause a change in ETT cuff pressure. PMID:25664152

  1. Robotic surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Robot-assisted surgery; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery; Laparoscopic surgery with robotic assistance ... Robotic surgery is similar to laparoscopic surgery. It can be performed through smaller cuts than open surgery. ...

  2. Required Rotations 1. Emergency Rotation. Each resident has a 52 week rotation approximate (8 hours per week

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Steven A.

    tissue impacted third molars. 4. To enhance skills in preprosthetic and alveoplastic surgery. 5 problems. 2. Oral Surgery Rotation at EDC. Each resident has a 3 month rotation (8 hours per week) in Oral Surgery focusing on surgical removal of third molars (rotation can be extended). Residents

  3. What went wrong and what was done about it: pitfalls in the treatment of common shoulder surgery.

    PubMed

    Wiesel, Brent B; Gartsman, Gary M; Press, Cyrus M; Spencer, Edwin E; Morris, Brent J; Zuckerman, Joseph D; Roghani, Reza; Williams, Gerald R

    2014-01-01

    When performing revision shoulder surgery, it is important that the surgeon understands why the index procedure failed and has a clear plan to address problems in the revision procedure. The most common cause of failure after anterior instability shoulder surgery is a failure to treat the underlying glenoid bone loss. For most defects, a Latarjet transfer can effectively restore anterior glenoid bone stock and restore shoulder stability. Persistent anterior shoulder pain after rotator cuff surgery may be the result of missed biceps pathology. This can be effectively treated via a biceps tenodesis. The most difficult failures to treat after acromioclavicular joint reconstruction surgery are those involving fractures of either the coracoid or the clavicle. Clavicle hook plates can be used as supplemental fixation during the treatment of these fractures to help offload the fracture site and allow healing while restoring stability to the acromioclavicular articulation. A failed hemiarthroplasty for a proximal humeral fracture frequently results when the tuberosities fail to heal correctly. This complication can be avoided by paying close attention to the implant position and the tuberosity fixation. If hemiarthroplasty is unsuccessful, the patient is best treated with conversion to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty. PMID:24720296

  4. Cuff Sign’ a new maneuver for decision-making in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Basiri, Keivan; Abrishamkar, Saeid; Fatehi, Farzad; Ansari, Behnaz; Meamar, Rokhsareh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common entrapment neuropathy that results from compression of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel. In most patients, the diagnosis can be proposed based on patient history and clinical symptoms, with physical findings being attributed only in more severely affected patients. The purpose of this study is to introduce a reliable and accurate method for the proper selection of patients with mild carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), for surgery. Materials and Methods: Electerodiagnostic studies are performed before and after placement of the cuff of the sphygmomanometer at the arm (Cuff sign), at a mean arterial pressure, for three minutes. Thirty symptomatic patients with mild findings on electrodiagnostic studies and 49 asymptomatic control hands have been included. Results: Fifteen patients reported good pain relief on the first postoperative day (50%), which increased to 21 on the fouteenth postoperative day (70%). The sensory latency changes were significantly higher in the pain relief group, both on the first and fourteenth postoperative days. Conclusion: Considering the fact that cooperation of the patients is not necessary and the double effects of direct pressure and ischemia over the proximal parts of the median nerve leads to prolonged latencies, this test is a useful method for decision-making in patients with severe symptoms of CTS, despite the mild electrodiagnostic findings.

  5. Blood flow in a brachial artery compressed externally by a pneumatic cuff.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, M

    1992-02-01

    Blood flow in human brachial arteries, compressed by a pneumatic cuff for blood pressure measurement, is examined using several different noninvasive techniques. From the experimental results it is shown that, when arterial pressure distal to the cuff is always lower than cuff pressure, flow in the artery under the cuff becomes supercritical near the cuff downstream margin and no reflection occurs there and the reflected wave from the peripheral vascular system of the arm does not propagate beyond the cuff downstream margin. Therefore an unsteady transition from supercritical to subcritical flow occurs near the cuff downstream margin. When the peak value of distal arterial pressure exceeds cuff pressure, a reflection occurs near the cuff downstream margin. The reflection becomes stronger corresponding to decrement of the cuff pressure and the whole artery segment under the cuff inflates fully at systole. At diastole, however, the artery segment under the cuff does not collapse completely and, hence, the phenomenon becomes that of pressure wave propagation in a partially collapsed artery segment. PMID:1491590

  6. Leakage of fluid around endotracheal tube cuffs: a cadaver study

    PubMed Central

    Lucius, Ralph; Ewald, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the leakage of liquid past the cuffs of tracheal tubes in fresh frozen human heads. Methods Six truncated fresh frozen heads were used and intubated with 8.0 mm endotracheal tubes. The intracuff pressures tested were 30 and 100 cmH2O. Subsequently, 20 ml of each of two oral antiseptic rinses (0.2% chlorhexidine and octenidine [octenidol®, Schülke & Mayr GmbH, Norderstedt, Germany]) was applied for thirty seconds in the mouth. During the trial, leakage of the cuffs was examined. Results The sealing between the tracheal cuff and tracheal wall was leakage-proof for all tested intracuff pressures and all tested antiseptic rinses. However, approximately 5.6 ml and 1.8 ml leaked into the esophagus and remained as a cuff-puddle, respectively. Conclusions The sealing between an endotracheal tube cuff with an intracuff pressure of 30 cmH2O and the tracheal wall is leakage-proof during oral care with antiseptic rinsing. An increase of intracuff pressure to 100 cmH2O does not appear to be required. PMID:24363847

  7. Effects of Wing-Cuff on NACA 23015 Aerodynamic Performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, S. M. A.; Belhenniche, M.; Madani Fouatih, O.; Imine, B.

    2014-03-01

    The main subject of this work is the numerical study control of flow separation on a NACA 23015 airfoil by using wing cuff. This last is a leading edge modification done to the wing. The modification consists of a slight extension of the chord on the outboard section of the wings. Different numerical cases are considered for the baseline and modified airfoil NACA 23015 according at different angle of incidence. The turbulence is modeled by two equations k-epsilon model. The results of this numerical investigation showed several benefits of the wing cuff compared with a conventional airfoil and an agreement is observed between the experimental data and the present study. The most intriguing result of this research is the capability for wing cuff to perform short take-offs and landings.

  8. Perivascular fluid cuffs decrease lung compliance by increasing tissue resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Kevin; Alvarez, Diego F.; King, Judy A.; Stevens, Troy

    2010-01-01

    Objective Lung inflammation causes perivascular fluid cuffs to form around extra-alveolar blood vessels; however, the physiologic consequences of such cuffs remain poorly understood. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that perivascular fluid cuffs, without concomitant alveolar edema, are sufficient to decrease lung compliance. Design Prospective, randomized, controlled study. Setting Research laboratory. Subjects One hundred twenty male CD40 rats. Interventions To test this hypothesis, the plant alkaloid thapsigargin was used to activate store-operated calcium entry and increase cytosolic calcium in endothelium. Thapsigargin was infused into a central venous catheter of intact, sedated, and mechanically ventilated rats. Measurements Static and dynamic lung mechanics and hemodynamics were measured continuously. Main Results Thapsigargin produced perivascular fluid cuffs along extra-alveolar vessels but did not cause alveolar flooding or blood gas abnormalities. Lung compliance dose-dependently decreased after thapsigargin infusion, attributable to an increase in tissue resistance that was attributed to increased tissue damping and tissue elastance. Airway resistance was not changed. Neither central venous pressure nor left ventricular end diastolic pressure was altered by thapsigargin. Heart rate did not change, although thapsigargin decreased pressure over time sufficient to reduce cardiac output by 50%. Infusion of the type 4 phosphodiesterase inhibitor, rolipram, prevented thapsigargin from inducing perivascular cuffs and decreasing lung compliance. Rolipram also normalized pressure over time and corrected the deficit in cardiac output. Conclusions Our findings resolve for the first time that perivascular cuff formation negatively impacts mechanical coupling between the bronchovascular bundle and the lung parenchyma, decreasing lung compliance without impacting central venous pressure. PMID:20400904

  9. Learning Fourier Descriptors for Computer-Aided Diagnosis of the Supraspinatus1

    E-print Network

    Hamarneh, Ghassan

    of the rotator cuff, which is a group of muscles and tendons responsible for shoulder movement and stabilization. Disorders affecting the rotator cuff can cause pain and reduce patient mobility [1], and their occurrence. The standard procedure for the diagnosis of rotator cuff disorders is shoulder arthroscopy, which is a surgery

  10. Rhabdomyosarcoma: Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is rhabdomyosarcoma treated? Next Topic Chemotherapy for rhabdomyosarcoma Surgery for rhabdomyosarcoma Surgery is an important part of ... be done at all. What to expect with surgery The type and extent of surgery can vary ...

  11. Neuroblastoma: Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... neuroblastoma treated? Next Topic Chemotherapy for neuroblastoma Neuroblastoma surgery Surgery can be used both to help diagnose ... long, thin instruments and remove pieces of tumor. Surgery as treatment After neuroblastoma is diagnosed, surgery is ...

  12. Endotracheal tube cuff pressure before, during, and after fixed-wing air medical retrieval.

    PubMed

    Brendt, Peter; Schnekenburger, Marc; Paxton, Karen; Brown, Anthony; Mendis, Kumara

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background. Increased endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff pressure is associated with compromised tracheal mucosal perfusion and injuries. No published data are available for Australia on pressures in the fixed-wing air medical retrieval setting. Objective. After introduction of a cuff pressure manometer (Mallinckrodt, Hennef, Germany) at the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) Base in Dubbo, New South Wales (NSW), Australia, we assessed the prevalence of increased cuff pressures before, during, and after air medical retrieval. Methods. This was a retrospective audit in 35 ventilated patients during fixed-wing retrievals by the RFDS in NSW, Australia. Explicit chart review of ventilated patients was performed for cuff pressures and changes during medical retrievals with pressurized aircrafts. Pearson correlation was calculated to determine the relation of ascent and ETT cuff pressure change from ground to flight level. Results. The mean (± standard deviation) of the first ETT cuff pressure measurement on the ground was 44 ± 20 cmH2O. Prior to retrieval in 11 patients, the ETT cuff pressure was >30 cmH2O and in 11 patients >50 cmH2O. After ascent to cruising altitude, the cuff pressure was >30 cmH2O in 22 patients and >50 cmH2O in eight patients. The cuff pressure was reduced 1) in 72% of cases prior to take off and 2) in 85% of cases during flight, and 3) after landing, the cuff pressure increased in 85% of cases. The correlation between ascent in cabin altitude and ETT cuff pressure was r = 0.3901, p = 0.0205. Conclusions. The high prevalence of excessive cuff pressures during air medical retrieval can be avoided by the use of cuff pressure manometers. Key words: cuff pressure; air medical retrieval; prehospital. PMID:23252881

  13. Dose-Response Evaluation of Braslet-M Occlusion Cuffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebert, Douglas; Garcia, Kathleen; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Ham, David; Hamilton, Douglas; Dulchavsky, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Braslet-M is a set of special elasticized thigh cuffs used by the Russian space agency to reduce the effects of the head-ward fluid shift during early adaptation to microgravity by sequestering fluid in the lower extremities. Currently, no imaging modalities are used in the calibration of the device, and the pressure required to produce a predictable physiological response is unknown. This investigation intends to relate the pressure exerted by the cuffs to the extent of fluid redistribution and commensurate physiological effects. Materials and Methods: Ten healthy subjects with standardized fluid intake participated in the study. Data collection included femoral and internal jugular vein imaging in two orthogonal planes, pulsed Doppler of cervical and femoral vessels and middle cerebral artery, optic nerve imaging, and echocardiography. Braslet-M cuff pressure was monitored at the skin interface using pre-calibrated pressure sensors. Using 6 and 30 head-down tilt in two separate sessions, the effect of Braslet-M was assessed while incrementally tightening the cuffs. Cuffs were then simultaneously released to document the resulting hemodynamic change. Results: Preliminary analysis shows correlation between physical pressure exerted by the Braslet-M device and several parameters such as jugular and femoral vein cross-sections, resistivity of the lower extremity vascular bed, and others. A number of parameters reflect blood redistribution and will be used to determine the therapeutic range of the device and to prevent unsafe application. Conclusion: Braslet-M exerts a physical effect that can be measured and correlated with many changes in central and peripheral hemodynamics. Analysis of the full data set will be required to make definitive recommendations regarding the range of safe therapeutic application. Objective data and subjective responses suggest that a safer and equally effective use of Braslet can be achieved when compared with the current non-imaging calibration techniques.

  14. Rotational thromboelastometry and multiple electrode platelet aggregometry in four patients with abnormal routine coagulation studies before removal of epidural catheters after major surgery: a case series and research study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Routine coagulation tests have a low predictability for perioperative bleeding complications, and spinal hematoma after removal of epidural catheters is very infrequent. Thromboelastometry and point-of-care platelet aggregometry may improve hemostatic monitoring but have not been studied in the context of safety around epidural removal. Methods Twenty patients who received an epidural catheter for major thoracoabdominal and abdominal surgery were included prospectively. In addition to routine coagulation tests, rotational thromboelastometry and multiple electrode platelet aggregometry were carried out. Results A coagulation deficit was suggested by routine coagulation tests on the intended day of epidural catheter removal in four out of 20 patients. Prothrombin time-international normalized ratio was elevated to 1.5 in one patient (normal range: 0.9 to 1.2) while rotational thromboelastometry and multiple electrode platelet aggregometry parameters were within normal limits. Activated partial thromboplastin time was elevated to 47 to 50 seconds in the remaining three patients (normal range 28 to 45 seconds). Rotational thromboelastometry showed that one of the patients’ results was due to heparin effect: the clotting time with the HEPTEM® activator was 154 seconds as compared to 261 seconds with INTEM. The three remaining patients with prolonged routine coagulation test results had all received over 1L of hydroxyethyl starch (Venofundin®) and thrombosis prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin (enoxaparin). Rotational thromboelastometry and multiple electrode platelet aggregometrygave normal or hypercoagulative signals in most patients. Conclusions This case series is new in that it examines rotational thromboelastometry and multiple electrode platelet aggregometry postoperatively in the context of epidural analgesia and shows that they may be clinically useful. These methods should be validated before they can be used for standard patient care. PMID:24377397

  15. Lung surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Pneumonectomy; Lobectomy; Lung biopsy; Thoracoscopy; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery; VATS ... You will have general anesthesia before surgery. You will be asleep and unable to feel pain. Two common ways to do surgery on your lungs are thoracotomy and video- ...

  16. Computerized cuff pressure algometry: A new method to assess deep-tissue hypersensitivity in fibromyalgia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anders Jespersen; Lene Dreyer; Sally Kendall; Thomas Graven-Nielsen; Lars Arendt-Nielsen; Henning Bliddal; Bente Danneskiold-Samsoe

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of computerized cuff pressure algometry (CPA) in fibromyalgia (FM) and to correlate deep-tissue sensitivity assessed by CPA with other disease markers of FM. Forty-eight women with FM and 16 healthy age-matched women were included. A computer-controlled, pneumatic tourniquet cuff was placed over the gastrocnemius muscle. The cuff was inflated, and

  17. A Validated Model of Calf Compression and Deep Vessel Collapse During External Cuff Inflation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. J. Narracott; G. W. John; R. J. Morris; J. P. Woodcock; D. R. Hose; P. V. Lawford

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a validated model of calf compression with an external pressure cuff as used for deep vein thrombosis. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of calf geometry were used to generate subject-specific finite-element (FE) models of the calf cross section. Ultrasound images of deep vessel collapse obtained through a water-filled cuff were used to validate model behavior. Calf\\/cuff pressure interface

  18. } Surgery 7 weeks } Medicine 7 weeks

    E-print Network

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    #12;} Surgery 7 weeks } Medicine 7 weeks } Pediatrics 7 weeks } OB-GYN 7 weeks } Psychiatry 7 weeks;} Medicine, Surgery, Pediatrics 8 weeks } OB-GYN, Family Med, Psychiatry 6 weeks } Elective block 6 weeks;} Educational and LCME concerns } Student wish for longer Medicine and Surgery rotations } National norms

  19. Wearable PWV technologies to measure Blood Pressure: eliminating brachial cuffs.

    PubMed

    Solá, J; Proença, M; Chételat, O

    2013-01-01

    The clinical demand for technologies to monitor Blood Pressure (BP) in ambulatory scenarios with minimal use of inflation cuffs is strong: new generation of BP monitors are expected to be not only accurate, but also non-occlusive. In this paper we review recent advances on the use of the so-called Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) technologies to estimate BP in a beat-by-beat basis. After introducing the working principle and underlying methodological limitations, two implementation examples are provided. Pilot studies have demonstrated that novel PWV-based BP monitors depict accuracy scores falling within the limits of the British Hypertensive Society (BHS) Grade A standard. The reported techniques pave the way towards ambulatory-compliant, continuous and non-occlusive BP monitoring devices, where the use of inflation cuffs is drastically reduced. PMID:24110633

  20. Postanesthesia patients with large upper arm circumference: is use of an "extra-long" adult cuff or forearm cuff placement accurate?

    PubMed

    Watson, Sheri; Aguas, Marita; Bienapfl, Tracy; Colegrove, Pat; Foisy, Nancy; Jondahl, Bonnie; Yosses, Mary Beth; Yu, Larissa; Anastas, Zoe

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if blood pressure (BP) measured in the forearm or with an extra-long BP cuff in the upper arm accurately reflects BP measured in the upper arm with an appropriately sized BP cuff in patients with large upper arm circumference. A method-comparison design was used with a convenience sample of 49 PACU patients. Noninvasive blood pressures were obtained in two different locations (forearm; upper arm) and in the upper arm with an extra-long adult and recommended large adult cuff sizes. Data were analyzed by calculating bias and precision for the BP cuff size and location and Student's t-tests, with P < .0125 considered significant. Significantly higher forearm systolic (P < .0001) and diastolic (P < .0002) BP measurements were found compared to BP obtained in the upper arm with the reference standard BP cuff. Significantly higher systolic (t(48df) = 5.38, P < .0001), but not diastolic (t(48df) = 4.11, P < .019), BP differences were found for BP measured with the extra-long cuff at the upper arm site compared to the upper arm, reference standard BP. Findings suggest that the clinical practice of using the forearm or an extra-long cuff in the upper arm for BP measurement in post anesthesia patients with large upper arm circumferences may result in inaccurate BP values. PMID:21641528

  1. Stability of the input-output properties of chronically implanted multiple contact nerve cuff stimulating electrodes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Warren M. Grill; J. Thomas Mortimer

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to measure the input-output (EO) properties of chronically implanted nerve cuff electrodes. Silicone rubber spiral nerve cuff electrodes, containing 12 individual platinum electrode contacts, were implanted on the sciatic nerve of 7 adult cats for 28-34 weeks. Measurements of the torque generated at the ankle joint by electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve were

  2. Pelvic Surgical Site Infections in Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lachiewicz, Mark P.; Moulton, Laura J.; Jaiyeoba, Oluwatosin

    2015-01-01

    The development of surgical site infection (SSI) remains the most common complication of gynecologic surgical procedures and results in significant patient morbidity. Gynecologic procedures pose a unique challenge in that potential pathogenic microorganisms from the skin or vagina and endocervix may migrate to operative sites and can result in vaginal cuff cellulitis, pelvic cellulitis, and pelvic abscesses. Multiple host and surgical risk factors have been identified as risks that increase infectious sequelae after pelvic surgery. This paper will review these risk factors as many are modifiable and care should be taken to address such factors in order to decrease the chance of infection. We will also review the definitions, microbiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of pelvic SSIs after gynecologic surgery. PMID:25788822

  3. Pelvic surgical site infections in gynecologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lachiewicz, Mark P; Moulton, Laura J; Jaiyeoba, Oluwatosin

    2015-01-01

    The development of surgical site infection (SSI) remains the most common complication of gynecologic surgical procedures and results in significant patient morbidity. Gynecologic procedures pose a unique challenge in that potential pathogenic microorganisms from the skin or vagina and endocervix may migrate to operative sites and can result in vaginal cuff cellulitis, pelvic cellulitis, and pelvic abscesses. Multiple host and surgical risk factors have been identified as risks that increase infectious sequelae after pelvic surgery. This paper will review these risk factors as many are modifiable and care should be taken to address such factors in order to decrease the chance of infection. We will also review the definitions, microbiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of pelvic SSIs after gynecologic surgery. PMID:25788822

  4. Detection of endobronchial intubation by monitoring the CO2 level above the endotracheal cuff.

    PubMed

    Efrati, Shai; Deutsch, Israel; Weksler, Nathan; Gurman, Gabriel M

    2015-02-01

    Early detection of accidental endobronchial intubation (EBI) is still an unsolved problem in anesthesia and critical care daily practice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of monitoring above cuff CO2 to detect EBI (the working hypothesis was that the origin of CO2 is from the unventilated, but still perfused, lung). Six goats were intubated under general anesthesia and the ETT positioning was verified by a flexible bronchoscope. The AnapnoGuard system, already successfully used to detect air leak around the ETT cuff, was used for continuous monitoring of above-the-cuff CO2 level. When the ETT distal tip was located in the trachea, with an average cuff pressure of 15 mmHg, absence of CO2 above the cuff was observed. The ETT was then deliberately advanced into one of the main bronchi under flexible bronchoscopic vision. In all six cases the immediate presence of CO2 above the cuff was identified. Further automatic inflation of the cuff, up to a level of 27 mmHg, did not affect the above-the-cuff measured CO2 level. Withdrawal of the ETT and repositioning of its distal tip in mid-trachea caused the disappearance of CO2 above the cuff in a maximum of 3 min, confirming the absence of air leak and the correct positioning of the ETT. Our results suggest that measurement of the above-the-cuff CO2 level could offer a reliable, on-line solution for early identification of accidental EBI. Further studies are planned to validate the efficacy of the method in a clinical setup. PMID:24870932

  5. Cosmetic Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... keep in mind if you are thinking about plastic surgery: Talk to your parents or guardians about any ... and is certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery. Some doctors won’t perform certain procedures if ...

  6. Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... her forehead lightened with a laser? What Is Plastic Surgery? Just because the name includes the word " ... two such treatments. Continue Why Do Teens Get Plastic Surgery? Most teens don't, of course. But ...

  7. Cataract Surgery

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... truck driver from Chandler, Arizona, is having cataract surgery today on his left eye. A month ago ... anesthesia to numb the eye area. With microscopic surgery the surgeon can make a very small incision, ...

  8. Turbinate surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Turbinectomy; Turbinoplasty; Turbinate reduction; Nasal airway surgery ... There are several types of turbinate surgery: Turbinectomy: All or part of the lower turbinate is taken out. This can be done in several different ways, but sometimes a ...

  9. Bone-prosthesis composite with rotating hinged-knee prosthesis in limb salvage surgery for high-grade sarcoma around the knee.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chien-Shun; Wu, Po-Kuei; Chen, Cheng-Fong; Chen, Wei-Ming; Liu, Chien-Lin; Chen, Tain-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    Bone prosthesis composite (BPC) had been widely-used in reconstruction after wide excision of malignant tumors around the knee. However, implant selection for BPC remains a dilemma. Forty-one patients with high-grade malignant bone tumors around the knee who underwent excision and reconstruction with BPC and rotating hinged knee (RHK) prosthesis were included. The mean follow-up time was 54 months (range, 31-78 months). The average Musculoskeletal Tumor Society Rating score was 93.4% (range, 73-100%). The mean range of motion was 125°. Complications included 2 local recurrences, 2 nonunions, and 1 peri-prosthetic fracture. The reconstruction with BPC using the RHK prosthesis provided consistently good functional results with a low complication rate. The RHK prosthesis is a promising choice for BPC reconstruction. PMID:25155237

  10. Cuff electrodes for very small diameter nerves -- prototyping and first recordings in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ordonez, Juan S; Pikov, Victor; Wiggins, Harvey; Patten, Craig; Stieglitz, Thomas; Rickert, J; Schuettler, Martin

    2014-01-01

    A fabrication method for cuff electrodes to interface small nerves was developed. Medical grade silicone rubber conforms the body of the cuff and insulation of the wires, platinum was used as metal for the embedded wiring and contacts. Planar electrode arrays where fabricated using a picosecond laser and then positioned into a carrying tube to provide the third dimension with the desired inner diameter (Ø 0.3-0.5 mm). The post preparation of the cuffs after structuring allows the fabrication of a stable self-closing flap that insulates the opening slit of the cuff without the need of extra sutures. Basic for the success of the cuff is the laser-based local thinning of both the silicone rubber and the metal at defined sections. This is critical to permit the PDMS' body to dominate the mechanical properties. Finite element modeling was applied to optimize the displacement ability of the cuff, leading to design capable of withstanding multiple implantation procedures without wire damage. Furthermore, the contact's surface was roughened by laser patterning to increase the charge injection capacity of Pt to 285 ?C/cm(2) measured by voltage transient detection during pulse testing. The cuff electrodes were placed on a small sympathetic nerve of an adult female Sprague-Dawley rat for recording of spontaneous and evoked neural activity in vivo. PMID:25571569

  11. Murine cervical heart transplantation model using a modified cuff technique.

    PubMed

    Oberhuber, Rupert; Cardini, Benno; Kofler, Markus; Ritschl, Paul; Oellinger, Robert; Aigner, Felix; Sucher, Robert; Schneeberger, Stefan; Pratschke, Johann; Brandacher, Gerald; Maglione, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Mouse models are of special interest in research since a wide variety of monoclonal antibodies and commercially defined inbred and knockout strains are available to perform mechanistic in vivo studies. While heart transplantation models using a suture technique were first successfully developed in rats, the translation into an equally widespread used murine equivalent was never achieved due the technical complexity of the microsurgical procedure. In contrast, non-suture cuff techniques, also developed initially in rats, were successfully adapted for use in mice(1-3). This technique for revascularization involves two major steps I) everting the recipient vessel over a polyethylene cuff; II) pulling the donor vessel over the formerly everted recipient vessel and holding it in place with a circumferential tie. This ensures a continuity of the endothelial layer, short operating time and very high patency rates(4). Using this technique for vascular anastomosis we performed more than 1,000 cervical heart transplants with an overall success rate of 95%. For arterial inflow the common carotid artery and the proximal aortic arch were anastomosed resulting in a retrograde perfusion of the transplanted heart. For venous drainage the pulmonary artery of the graft was anastomosed with the external jugular vein of the recipient(5). Herein, we provide additional details of this technique to supplement the video. PMID:25350682

  12. Fluid leakage past tracheal tube cuffs: evaluation of the new Microcuff endotracheal tube

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander Dullenkopf; Andreas Gerber; Markus Weiss

    2003-01-01

    ObjectiveThis study compared the recently introduced Microcuff endotracheal tube HVLP ICU featuring an ultrathin (7-µm) polyurethane cuff membrane with endotracheal tubes from different manufacturers regarding fluid leakage past the tube cuff.DesignIn vitro setup.Measurements and resultsThe following endotracheal tubes (ID 7.5 mm) were compared: Mallinckrodt HiLo, Microcuff HVLP ICU, Portex Profile Soft Seal, Rüsch Super Safety Clear, and Sheridan CF. A vertical

  13. Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... surgery: The sinuses are physically close to the brain, the eye, and major arteries, always areas of concern when a fiber optic tube is inserted into the sinus region. The growing use of a new technology, image guided endoscopic surgery, is alleviating that concern. ...

  14. [Microbial contamination of cuffs lab coats during health care].

    PubMed

    Margarido, Carla Auxiliadora; Villas Boas, Tamires Monteiro; Mota, Valeria Siqueira; da Silva, Cristiane Karina Malvezzi; Poveda, Vanessa de Brito

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the bacterial contamination in lab coats worn by nursing students, before and after being worn in health care practices. A quantitative and descriptive study was carried out, in which the students' coats were collected, washed and ironed in a standardized way and wore for four hours in assistance activities. Subsequently, samples from the cuffs were collected with sterile cotton swabs in order to be incubated in order to analyze microbial growth through morphological analysis by Gram's Method and antibiogram. There was bacterial growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis in 50% of the collected samples and Staphylococcus aureus, found in patients with wounds in outpatient care, showed resistance to antibiotics such as Vancomycin, Chloramphenicol and Sulfonamides. The data demonstrated that the lab coats wore during assistance activities, even in short periods, are effectively contaminated by strains resistant to antibiotics and can potentially cause infection related to health care. PMID:24676079

  15. Optimal tracheal tube cuff inflation in infants: implications for mechanical ventilation and respiratory mechanics.

    PubMed

    Habib, R H

    2001-11-01

    Uncuffed tracheal tubes (TT) are used to intubate infants and children to avoid laryngotracheal tissue injury. The geometric mismatch resulting from such intubation limits the efficacy of mechanical ventilation, and reliability of derived respiratory mechanical properties. This study tested the hypotheses that (1) normal stresses applied to the cuff surface by leak flows during ventilation result in intracuff pressure (Pcuff) fluctuations proportionate to leak magnitudes, and (2) these fluctuations reach a steady minimum when cuff volume reaches a critical value (Vcrit) at which the TT-airway mismatch is removed. Physical model and piglet measurements showed that, during simultaneous cuff inflation and mechanical ventilation, Pcuff consisted of a leak-dependent (Pcuff,l) component that cycles with the ventilator superimposed on a ramp rise due to cuff inflation. The breath-to-breath peak Pcuff,l (max Pcuff,l) decreased as leak flows are reduced, and these were relatively greater for higher ventilator flows and when the load impedance is increased such as by disease. These results describe a reproducible method of TT cuff inflation that removes leaks without increased risk of laryngotracheal tissue injury. Moreover, inflation of the TT cuff more securely improved ventilation efficacy and allowed for accurate respiratory mechanics. PMID:11791682

  16. Unnecessary surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Leape, L L

    1989-01-01

    The extent of unnecessary surgery has been the object of considerable speculation and occasional wild accusation in recent years. Most evidence of the existence of unnecessary surgery, such as information from studies of geographic variations and the results of second surgical opinion programs, is circumstantial. However, results from the few studies that have measured unnecessary surgery directly indicate that for some highly controversial operations the fraction that are unwarranted could be as high as 30 percent. Most unnecessary surgery results from physician uncertainty about the effectiveness of an operation. Elimination of this uncertainty requires more efficient production and dissemination of scientific information about clinical effectiveness. In the absence of adequate data from scientific studies, the use of a consensus of expert opinion, disseminated by means of comprehensive practice guidelines, offers the best opportunity to identify and eliminate unnecessary surgery. PMID:2668237

  17. Surgical Sciences Cardiovascular Surgery, Thoracic Surgery ------------------------------------------------------

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    38 Surgical Sciences Cardiovascular Surgery, Thoracic Surgery ------------------------------------------------------ http://ctstokyo.umin.ne.jp/ We are leading in Japan by annual surgery case volume of 700. New knowledge. ·Clinical research · Brain and spinal cord protection in thoracic aortic surgery · Minimally invasive

  18. Runway Rotations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-11-16

    Students will use small paper airplanes to model rotations required to turn onto a runway. Students will rotate planes 45, 90, 180, 270, and 360 degrees. Students will identify and describe the results of rotations using benchmark angles.

  19. Strabismus Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... surgery? The type of anesthesia depends on age/health and patient preference. Most children undergo general anesthesia. Adults typically have general anesthesia, conscious sedation or local anesthesia. The procedure is usually ...

  20. Brain surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  1. Maze Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... some cases, on the morning of surgery. Small metal disks called electrodes will be attached to your ... throat, into your stomach. This tube will stop liquid and air from collecting in your stomach, so ...

  2. Heart Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... surgery for adults is coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). During CABG, a healthy artery or vein from the body ... rich blood to flow to the heart muscle. CABG can relieve chest pain and may lower your ...

  3. A simple versatile method for measuring tail cuff systolic blood pressure in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Widdop, R E; Li, X C

    1997-09-01

    1. The non-invasive measurement of tail cuff systolic blood pressure in conscious rats is routinely used in long-term cardiovascular studies. There are a number of commercially available tail cuff systems, however, these apparatus are generally expensive and are dedicated for single-task operations. In the present study, a simple method for measuring systolic blood pressure, which requires only minor modifications to the existing hardware found in most cardiovascular laboratories, is described. 2. Systolic blood pressure measurements were made in the conventional manner by determining the systolic blood pressure which coincided with the restoration of the caudal artery pulse. This was achieved by using an inexpensive piezo-electric pulse transducer to detect the pulse, and this was coupled to a standard data-acquisition system (MacLab, ADInstruments) normally set up to record blood pressure. This method was compared with another established tail cuff method, as well as with direct intra-arterial recordings. 3. It was found that the results obtained using both tail cuff systems were in good agreement when systolic blood pressure was measured in Wistar-Kyoto rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats. In addition, systolic blood pressure was measured over 4 weeks in 2K1C rats and sham-operated rats, with both tail cuff methods producing similar results, which were not significantly different from direct intra-arterial recordings in the same animals. 4. Thus, in the present study, with only minor modifications, the same equipment was used for both direct and indirect determinations of systolic blood pressure. This situation differs from other conventional tail cuff systems since these items are designed for a single purpose. Therefore, the current method using piezo-electric sensor/MacLab-technology should be viewed as a relatively simple, flexible and cheap alternative method to measure tail cuff systolic blood pressure in conscious rats. PMID:9337632

  4. Bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Karmali, Shahzeer; Stoklossa, Carlene Johnson; Sharma, Arya; Stadnyk, Janet; Christiansen, Sandra; Cottreau, Danielle; Birch, Daniel W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To review the management of bariatric surgical patients. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched, as well as PubMed US National Library, from January 1950 to December 2009. Evidence was levels I, II, and III. MAIN MESSAGE Bariatric surgery should be considered for obese patients at high risk of morbidity and mortality who have not achieved adequate weight loss with lifestyle and medical management and who are suffering from the complications of obesity. Bariatric surgery can result in substantial weight loss, resolution of comorbid conditions, and improved quality of life. The patient’s weight-loss history; his or her personal accountability, responsibility, and comprehension; and the acceptable level of risk must be taken into account. Complications include technical failure, bleeding, abdominal pain, nausea or vomiting, excess loose skin, bowel obstruction, ulcers, and anastomotic stricture. Lifelong monitoring by a multidisciplinary team is essential. CONCLUSION Limited long-term success of behavioural and pharmacologic therapies in severe obesity has led to renewed interest in bariatric surgery. Success with bariatric surgery is more likely when multidisciplinary care providers, in conjunction with primary care providers, assess, treat, monitor, and evaluate patients before and after surgery. Family physicians will play a critical role in counseling patients about bariatric surgery and will need to develop skills in managing these patients in the long-term. PMID:20841586

  5. Cell and matrix changes associated with pathological calcification of the human rotator cuff tendons.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, R S; Bayley, J I; Archer, C W; Ali, S Y

    1993-01-01

    The causative mechanism of tendon calcification ('calcifying tendinitis') is unknown. In this report, pathological human tendon samples were examined to give morphological and ultrastructural detail of the calcified regions and these findings were compared with those from normal tendon. Selected specimens were cryosectioned to enable histochemical and immunohistochemical comparison of the occurrence and distribution of specific matrix molecules in diseased and normal tendon tissues. The lack of collagen type II and alkaline phosphatase in the pathological regions suggests that the calcification process is not mediated through an endochondral transition. In contrast, the pathological areas were characterised by widespread labelling for chondroitin-4-sulphate/dermatan sulphate and intense pericellular localisation of chondroitin-6-sulphate. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:8509292

  6. Effect of steroid injections on the rotator cuff: An experimental study in rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bo Tillander; Lennart E Franzén; Maria H Karlsson; Rolf Norlin

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of repeated steroid injections into the subacromial space. Thirty rats were injected either 3 or 5 times with triamcinolone in a dosage equivalent to that given to human beings or 3 or 5 times with saline into the subacromial space. One rat received no injection. The supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons

  7. Structural changes of the rotator cuff caused by experimental subacromial impingement in the rat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alberto G Schneeberger; Richard W Nyffeler; Christian Gerber

    1998-01-01

    Subacromial impingement of the infraspinatus tendon was experimentally created in 28 young adult rats by thickening the undersurface of the acromion with either one or two platelike bony transplants of the ipsilateral scapular spine. Nine nonoperated and eight shoulders that had undergone a sham operation served as control groups. The rats were killed after 2 days and after 1, 2,

  8. Adolescent hypertension identified with correct cuff and its cardiovascular and gestational problems after 29 years

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Sandra Regina Ramos; Arcuri, Edna Apparecida Moura; Isabella, Adriana Paula Jordão; Arcuri, Silvia Maria; Santos, Jair Lício Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Objective to identify, in 2011, rates of hypertension, cardiovascular and gestational problems in subjects presenting high blood pressure in 1982, when correct cuff size was used, according to the American Heart Association Arm Circumference/Cuff Width ratio of 0.40. Methods high blood pressure was defined in 2011 as systolic = 115 mmHg and diastolic = 80mmHg, resulting in 20 subjects between 39 and 43 years old. (Risk Group). They were compared to 20 subjects from the original sample with lower blood pressure values (Control group). Results the rates of hypertension, cardiovascular and gestational problems were significantly higher (Fisher: p=0.02) in the Risk Group, with one case of cardiovascular death. Our findings arouse speculations about whether, if a proper cuff had been used in clinical practice, the complications and death could have been avoided. Conclusions data suggest compliance with the use of cuff width corresponding to 40% of arm circumference, despite polemics concerning cuff availability and difficulties of using many sizes. PMID:24553697

  9. Blood flow restriction: effects of cuff type on fatigue and perceptual responses to resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Loenneke, J P; Thiebaud, R S; Fahs, C A; Rossow, L M; Abe, T; Bemben, M G

    2014-06-01

    Blood flow restriction (BFR) combined with low load resistance training has been shown to result in muscle hypertrophy similar to that observed with higher loads. However, not all studies have found BFR efficacious, possibly due to methodological differences. It is presently unclear whether there are differences between cuffs of similar size (5 cm) but different material (nylon vs. elastic). The purpose was to determine if there are differences in repetitions to fatigue and perceptual ratings of exertion (RPE) and discomfort between narrow elastic and narrow nylon cuffs. Sixteen males and females completed three sets of BFR knee extension exercise in a randomized cross-over design using either elastic or nylon restrictive cuffs applied at the proximal thigh. There were no differences in repetitions to fatigue (marker of blood flow) or perceptual ratings between narrow elastic and narrow nylon cuffs. This data suggests that either elastic or nylon cuffs of the same width should cause similar degrees of BFR at the same pressure during resistance exercise. PMID:24901077

  10. Possibilities offered by implantable miniaturized cuff-electrodes for insect neurophysiology.

    PubMed

    Hartbauer, Manfred; Krüger, Thilo B; Stieglitz, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Recent advances in microsystems technology led to a miniaturization of cuff-electrodes, which suggests these electrodes not just for long-term neuronal recordings in mammalians, but also in medium-sized insects. In this study we investigated the possibilities offered by cuff-electrodes for neuroethology using insects as a model organism. The implantation in the neck of a tropical bushcricket resulted in high quality extracellular nerve recordings of different units responding to various acoustic, vibratory, optical and mechanical stimuli. In addition, multi-unit nerve activity related to leg movements was recorded in insects walking on a trackball. A drawback of bi-polar nerve recordings obtained during tethered flight was overlay of nerve activity with large amplitude muscle potentials. Interestingly, cuff-electrode recordings were robust to withstand walking and flight activity so that good quality nerve recordings were possible even three days after electrode implantation. Recording multi-unit nerve activity in intact insects required an elaborate spike sorting algorithm in order to discriminate neuronal units responding to external stimuli from background activity. In future, a combination of miniaturized cuff-electrodes and light-weight amplifiers equipped with a wireless transmitter will allow the investigation of neuronal processes underlying natural behavior in freely moving insects. By this means cuff-electrodes may contribute to the development of realistic neuronal models simulating neuronal processes underlying natural insect behavior, such like mate choice and predator avoidance. PMID:23576843

  11. DEHN SURGERY 1. Introduction

    E-print Network

    Hachimori, Masahiro

    DEHN SURGERY 1. Introduction Dehn surgery hyperbolic knot exceptional surgery (§2) link Dehn surgery (§3) 2. Exceptional surgery and boundary slopes hyperbolic knot exceptional surgery ? S3 ( S3 homotopy S3 ) Dehn surgery K S3 knot E(K) = S3 -intN(K) exterior prim- itive class H1(E(K); Z) ( ) m K

  12. Laparoscopic surgery - series (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of different procedures can be performed laparoscopically, including gallbladder removal (laparoscopic cholecystectomy), esophageal surgery (laparoscopic fundoplication), colon surgery (lapraoscopic colectomy), and surgery ...

  13. Tracheal cuff pressure monitoring in the ICU: a literature review and survey of current practice in Queensland.

    PubMed

    Talekar, C R; Udy, A A; Boots, R J; Lipman, J; Cook, D

    2014-11-01

    The application of tracheal cuff pressure monitoring is likely to vary between institutions. The aim of this study was therefore to review current evidence concerning this intervention in the intensive care unit (ICU) and to appraise regional practice by performing a state-wide survey. Publications for review were identified through searches of PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane (1977 to 2014). All studies in English relevant to critical care and with complete data were included. Survey questions were developed by small-group consensus. Public and private ICUs across Queensland were contacted, with responses obtained from a representative member of the medical or nursing staff. Existing literature suggests significant variability in tracheal cuff pressure monitoring in the ICU, particularly in the applied technique, frequency of assessment and optimal intra-cuff pressures. Twenty-nine respondents completed the survey, representing 80.5% (29/36) of ICUs in Queensland. Twenty-eight out of twenty-nine respondents reported routinely monitoring tracheal cuff function, primarily employing cuff pressure measurement (26/28). Target cuff pressures varied, with 3/26 respondents aiming for 10 to 20 cmH2O, 10/26 for 21 to 25 cmH2O, and 13/26 for 26 to 30 cmH2O. Fifteen out of twenty-nine reported they had no current guideline or protocol for tracheal cuff management and only 16/29 indicated there was a dedicated area in the clinical record for reporting cuff intervention. Our results indicate that many ICUs across Queensland routinely measure tracheal cuff function, with most utilising pressure monitoring devices. Consistent with existing literature, the optimum cuff pressure remains uncertain. Most, however, considered that this should be a routine part of ICU care. PMID:25342409

  14. Fabrication and performance analysis of a DEA cuff designed for dry-suit applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, S.; Camacho Mattos, A.; Barbazza, A.; Soleimani, M.; Boscariol, P.; Menon, C.

    2013-03-01

    A method for manufacturing a cylindrical dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) is presented. The cylindrical DEA can be used in fabricating the cuff area of dry-suits where the garment is very tight and wearing the suit is difficult. When electrically actuated, the DEA expands radially and the suit can be worn more comfortably. In order to study the performance of the DEA, a customized testing setup was designed, and silicone-made cuff samples with different material stiffnesses were tested. Analytical and FEM modeling were considered to evaluate the experimental output. The results revealed that although the stiffness of the DEA material has a direct relationship with the radial constrictive pressure caused by mechanically stretching the DEA, it has a minor effect on the actuation pressure. It was also found that stacking multiple layers of the DEA to fabricate a laminated structure enabled the attainment of a desired variation of pressure required for the implementation of an electrically tunable cuff.

  15. Cosmetic surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    The psychotherapeutic nature of cosmetic surgery is emphasised by outlining the range of symptoms from which patients suffer and by explaining the sequence of psychological reactions which cause them. The principles which govern the selection of patients are defined. A brief account of each of the main cosmetic operations is given together with notes on their limitations and risks. PMID:2589786

  16. Varicocele Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Varicocele Surgery Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY February 24, 2009 Welcome to this "OR Live" Webcast presentation premiering from Beth Israel ... allowed to shower within three days of the operation and resumes activities usually ... broadcast from the Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City. I hope you’ve ...

  17. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  18. [Laparoscopic surgery in day surgery].

    PubMed

    Micali, S; Bitelli, M; Torelli, F; Valitutti, M; Micali, F

    1998-06-01

    Since ten years laparoscopic techniques have been employed as alternatives of many established open procedures in gynecologic, abdominal and finally urologic surgery. Laparoscopic techniques show significant advantages compared to open surgery, such as less hospitalization, reduced need of analgesic drugs, quick return to daily activities and far a better cosmetic results. Laparoscopic surgery has been advocated for urologic, uro-gynecologic and andrologic diseases. Since 1983 one-day surgery was proposed for only a few gynecologic and abdominal procedures and only recently for laparoscopic renal biopsy and abdominal testis evaluation. In these preliminary experiences the conditions for a correct management of laparoscopic one-day surgery have been clearly pointed out: 1. correct surgical indication; 2. through knowledge of surgical technique; 3. duration of the procedure less than 90 minutes; 4. correct anesthesia. Technique of anesthesia must be adapted to the surgical procedure required, its duration and the physical features of the patient. General anesthesia is usually preferred for either longer and more complex procedures or when a higher abdominal insufflation pressure is needed. Spinal or local anesthesia are preferred for simpler procedures or when only one trocar is required. At date only few urologic procedures seem to be suitable to one-day laparoscopic surgery. 1) Varicocele: although laparoscopic varicocelectomy in one-day surgery has never been reported previously, it can be performed in a short time, only 3 trocars are needed and insufflation pressure can be maintained within 15 mm Hg. 2) Renal biopsy and marsupialization of renal cysts. These are usually managed percutaneously but in some particular indications procedures under direct vision should be preferable. Both are short-lasting and only superficial general anesthesia is required; as surgical access is retroperitoneal only two trocars are sufficient; at date only renal biopsies have previously been reported. 3) Diagnostic procedures on abdominal testis. The procedure is brief only superficial general anesthesia is needed and only one trocar is required. Conclusions. One-day laparoscopic surgery will require in the future a more and more strict cooperation between urologists and anesthetists in order to tailor the correct anesthesiological and laparoscopic technique to the procedure required and the features of the patient. PMID:9707775

  19. Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Weight Loss Surgery: Stacie's Story (Video) Preparing Your Child for Surgery Keeping Portions Under Control Healthy Eating Overweight and Obesity Weight and Diabetes Metabolic Syndrome Is Dieting OK ...

  20. Does primary brachial plexus surgery alter palliative tendon transfer surgery outcomes in children with obstetric paralysis?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The surgical management of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy can generally be divided into two groups; early reconstructions in which the plexus or affected nerves are addressed and late or palliative reconstructions in which the residual deformities are addressed. Tendon transfers are the mainstay of palliative surgery. Occasionally, surgeons are required to utilise already denervated and subsequently reinnervated muscles as motors. This study aimed to compare the outcomes of tendon transfers for residual shoulder dysfunction in patients who had undergone early nerve surgery to the outcomes in patients who had not. Methods A total of 91 patients with obstetric paralysis-related shoulder abduction and external rotation deficits who underwent a modified Hoffer transfer of the latissimus dorsi/teres major to the greater tubercle of the humerus tendon between 2002 and 2009 were retrospectively analysed. The patients who had undergone neural surgery during infancy were compared to those who had not in terms of their preoperative and postoperative shoulder abduction and external rotation active ranges of motion. Results In the early surgery groups, only the postoperative external rotation angles showed statistically significant differences (25 degrees and 75 degrees for total and upper type palsies, respectively). Within the palliative surgery-only groups, there were no significant differences between the preoperative and postoperative abduction and external rotation angles. The significant differences between the early surgery groups and the palliative surgery groups with total palsy during the preoperative period diminished postoperatively (p < 0.05 and p > 0.05, respectively) for abduction but not for external rotation. Within the upper type palsy groups, there were no significant differences between the preoperative and postoperative abduction and external rotation angles. Conclusions In this study, it was found that in patients with total paralysis, satisfactory shoulder abduction values can be achieved with tendon transfers regardless of a previous history of neural surgery even if the preoperative values differ. PMID:21489264

  1. Rotational Symmetry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-01-01

    With this interactive Java Sketchpad applet students use spatial reasoning and visualization to explore rotation of a quadrilateral. The vertices and the center of rotation can be moved. Also included are tasks that focus the learner's manipulations.

  2. Spine surgery - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Intervertebral foramina - discharge; Spine surgery - foraminotomy - discharge; Lumbar decompression - discharge; Decompressive laminectomy - discharge; Spine surgery - laminectomy - discharge; ...

  3. Rotational geophone

    SciTech Connect

    Cowles, C.S.

    1986-07-29

    A combination velocity and rotational geophone apparatus is described for obtaining data for seismic records representing the direction of propagation of shear waves in a seismic wave, the apparatus comprising: a velocity geophone; and a rotational geophone, the rotational geophone being disposed in relation to the velocity geophone to respond to the rate of rotational waves in a plane including the sensitive axis of the velocity geophone.

  4. Microvascular anastomosis using fibrin glue and venous cuff in rat carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Sacak, Bulent; Tosun, Ugur; Egemen, Onur; Sakiz, Damlanur; Ugurlu, Kemal

    2015-04-01

    Conventional anastomosis with interrupted sutures can be time-consuming, can cause vessel narrowing, and can lead to thrombosis at the site of repair. The amount of suture material inside the lumen can impair the endothelium of the vessel, triggering thrombosis. In microsurgery, fibrin sealants have the potential beneficial effects of reducing anastomosis time and promoting accurate haemostasis at the anastomotic site. However, there has been a general reluctance to use fibrin glue for microvascular anastomoses because the fibrin polymer is highly thrombogenic and may not provide adequate strength. To overcome these problems, a novel technique was defined for microvascular anastomosis with fibrin glue and a venous cuff. Sixty-four rats in two groups are included in the study. In the experimental group (n = 32), end-to-end arterial anastomosis was performed with two stay sutures, fibrin glue, and a venous cuff. In the control group (n = 32), conventional end-to-end arterial anastomosis was performed. Fibrin glue assisted anastomosis with a venous cuff took less time, caused less bleeding at the anastomotic site, and achieved a patency rate comparable to that provided by the conventional technique. Fibrin sealant assisted microvascular anastomosis with venous cuff is a rapid, easy, and reliable technique compared to the end-to-end arterial anastomosis. PMID:25529101

  5. The Single Needle Lockstitch Machine. [Making and Setting Cuffs.] Module 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This module on making and setting cuffs, one in a series on the single needle lockstitch sewing machine for student self-study, contains three sections. Each section includes the following parts: an introduction, directions, an objective, learning activities, student information, student self-check, check-out activities, and an instructor's final…

  6. Biomechanical and functional variation in rat sciatic nerve following cuff electrode implantation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nerve cuff electrodes are commonly and successfully used for stimulating peripheral nerves. On the other hand, they occasionally induce functional and morphological changes following chronic implantation, for reasons not always clear. We hypothesize that restriction of nerve mobility due to cuff implantation may alter nerve conduction. Methods We quantified acute changes in nerve-muscle electrophysiology, using electromyography, and nerve kinematics in anesthetized Sprague Dawley rat sciatic nerves during controlled hindlimb joint movement. We compared electrophysiological and biomechanical response in uncuffed nerves and those secured within a cuff electrode using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and regression analysis. Results Tethering resulting from cuff implantation resulted in altered nerve strain and a complex biomechanical environment during joint movement. Coincident with biomechanical changes, electromyography revealed significantly increased variability in the response of conduction latency and amplitude in cuffed, but not free, nerves following joint movement. Conclusion Our findings emphasize the importance of the mechanical interface between peripheral nerves and their devices on neurophysiological performance. This work has implications for nerve device design, implantation, and prediction of long-term efficacy. PMID:24758405

  7. Elec 331 -Minimally Invasive Surgery Minimally Invasive Surgery

    E-print Network

    Pulfrey, David L.

    Elec 331 - Minimally Invasive Surgery 1 Minimally Invasive Surgery · Small incision ­ Low risk surgery ­ Laparoscopic surgery ­ Arthroscopic surgery Instruments Laparoscope / Arthroscope Trocar Forceps / Scissors Elevator / Retractor Stapler #12;Elec 331 - Minimally Invasive Surgery 2 Instrument Types · Trocar

  8. Effect of respiration on Korotkoff sounds and oscillometric cuff pressure pulses during blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dingchang; Di Marco, Luigi Yuri; Murray, Alan

    2014-05-01

    Blood pressure (BP) measurement accuracy depends on consistent changes in Korotkoff sounds (KorS) for manual measurement and oscillometric pulses for automated measurement, yet little is known about the direct effect of respiration on these physiological signals. The aim of this research was to quantitatively assess the modulation effect of respiration on Korotkoff sounds and oscillometric pulses. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured manually from 30 healthy subjects (age 41 ± 12 years). Three static cuff pressure conditions were studied for two respiratory rates. Cuff pressure [with oscillometric pulses (OscP)], ECG, chest motion respiration [respiration signal (Resp), from magnetometer] and Korotkoff sounds (KorS, from digital stethoscope) were recorded twice for 20 s. The physiological data were evenly resampled. Respiratory frequency was calculated from Resp (fR), OscP (fO) and KorS (fK) from peak spectral frequency. There was no statistically significant difference between fR and fO or fK. Respiratory modulation was observed in all subjects. OscP amplitude modulation changed significantly between the two respiratory rates (p < 0.05) and between the three cuff pressures (p < 0.0001), and decreased significantly with decreasing cuff pressure (p < 0.05). The phase shift between Resp and modulation of OscP was statistically significant with respiratory rates (p < 0.05), but not with cuff pressures. It is accepted that BP in individuals is variable and that this relates to respiration; we now show that this respiration modulates oscillometric pulse and Korotkoff sound amplitudes from which BP is measured. PMID:24668326

  9. Hemorrhoid Surgery

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Patient Education Institute

    This patient education program explains what hemorrhoids are, symptoms, alternative treatments, as well as the benefits and risks of surgery. This is a MedlinePlus Interactive Health Tutorial from the National Library of Medicine, designed and developed by the Patient Education Institute. NOTE: The tutorial requires a special Flash plug-in, version 4 or above. If you do not have Flash, you will be prompted to obtain a free download of the software before you start the tutorial. You will also need an Acrobat Reader, available as a free download, in order to view the Reference Summary.

  10. Sinus Surgery

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Patient Education Institute

    This patient education program explains the benefits and risks of sinus surgery. It reviews sinus anatomy, causes, diagnosis, and treatments for sinus problems. This is a MedlinePlus Interactive Health Tutorial from the National Library of Medicine, designed and developed by the Patient Education Institute. NOTE: The tutorial requires a special Flash plug-in, version 4 or above. If you do not have Flash, you will be prompted to obtain a free download of the software before you start the tutorial. You will also need an Acrobat Reader, available as a free download, in order to view the Reference Summary.

  11. Thyroid Surgery

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Patient Education Institute

    This patient education program explains the most common diseases that can affect the thyroid gland. It also explains treatment options including medications and surgery. This is a MedlinePlus Interactive Health Tutorial from the National Library of Medicine, designed and developed by the Patient Education Institute. NOTE: The tutorial requires a special Flash plug-in, version 4 or above. If you do not have Flash, you will be prompted to obtain a free download of the software before you start the tutorial. You will also need an Acrobat Reader, available as a free download, in order to view the Reference Summary.

  12. [Robotic surgery].

    PubMed

    Sándor, József; Haidegger, Tamás; Kormos, Katalin; Ferencz, Andrea; Csukás, Domokos; Bráth, Endre; Szabó, Györgyi; Wéber, György

    2013-10-01

    Due to the fast spread of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, surgical procedures have been changed essentially. The new techniques applied for both abdominal and thoracic procedures provided the possibility for minimally invasive access with all its advantages. Robots - originally developed for industrial applications - were retrofitted for laparoscopic procedures. The currently prevailing robot-assisted surgery is ergonomically more advantageous for the surgeon, as well as for the patient through the more precise preparative activity thanks to the regained 3D vision. The gradual decrease of costs of robotic surgical systems and development of new generations of minimally invasive devices may lead to substantial changes in routine surgical procedures. PMID:24144815

  13. Effect of the Push-up Plus (PUP) Exercise at Different Shoulder Rotation Angles on Shoulder Muscle Activities

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Baek, Il-Hun; Cheon, Ju Young; Cho, Min Jung; Choi, Mi Young; Jung, Da Hye

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Although the Push-Up Plus is a useful exercise method for shoulder stabilization, few studies have examined its effects at different angles of shoulder rotation. Therefore, the present study investigated the most effective exercise method for shoulder stabilization by analyzing muscle activities of the rotator cuff muscles at different angles of shoulder rotation. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy university students in their 20s were the subjects of this study. [Methods] Changes in muscle EMG related to shoulder stabilization were analyzed by performing the Push-Up Plus in shoulder positions of neutral, internal and external rotation. [Results] The highest muscle activity was found in external rotation, and in internal rotation the pectoralis major and levator scapula showed significantly lower activities than the other positions. [Conclusion] Selectively changing the rotation angle of the shoulder for different purposes of the shoulder exercise would be an effective exercise method. PMID:25435689

  14. DEHN SURGERY SIDDHARTHA GADGIL

    E-print Network

    Gadgil, Siddhartha

    DEHN SURGERY SIDDHARTHA GADGIL Contents 1. Introduction 1 2. Co-ordinates for surgery 1 3. Some algebraic topology 2 4. The theorem of Lickorish and Wallace 3 5. Surgeries and Cobordisms 4 6. The Kirby Calculus 5 7. Constructing knots using surgery 5 8. Surgeries about knots 5 References 6 1. Introduction

  15. Rotating Wavepackets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Any free-particle wavepacket solution of Schrodinger's equation can be converted by differentiations to wavepackets rotating about the original direction of motion. The angular momentum component along the motion associated with this rotation is an integral multiple of [h-bar]. It is an "intrinsic" angular momentum: independent of origin and…

  16. Continuous endotracheal tube cuff pressure control system protects against ventilator-associated pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The use of a system for continuous control of endotracheal tube cuff pressure reduced the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in one randomized controlled trial (RCT) with 112 patients but not in another RCT with 142 patients. In several guidelines on the prevention of VAP, the use of a system for continuous or intermittent control of endotracheal cuff pressure is not reviewed. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of VAP in a large sample of patients (n?=?284) treated with either continuous or intermittent control of endotracheal tube cuff pressure. Methods We performed a prospective observational study of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation during more than 48 hours in an intensive care unit (ICU) using either continuous or intermittent endotracheal tube cuff pressure control. Multivariate logistic regression analysis (MLRA) and Cox proportional hazard regression analysis were used to predict VAP. The magnitude of the effect was expressed as odds ratio (OR) or hazard ratio (HR), respectively, and 95% confidence interval (CI). Results We found a lower incidence of VAP with the continuous (n?=?150) than with the intermittent (n?=?134) pressure control system (22.0% versus 11.2%; p?=?0.02). MLRA showed that the continuous pressure control system (OR?=?0.45; 95% CI?=?0.22-0.89; p?=?0.02) and the use of an endotracheal tube incorporating a lumen for subglottic secretion drainage (SSD) (OR?=?0.39; 95% CI?=?0.19-0.84; p?=?0.02) were protective factors against VAP. Cox regression analysis showed that the continuous pressure control system (HR?=?0.45; 95% CI?=?0.24-0.84; p?=?0.01) and the use of an endotracheal tube incorporating a lumen for SSD (HR?=?0.29; 95% CI?=?0.15-0.56; p?cuff pressure control system (continuous or intermittent) and endotracheal tube (with or without SSD) was not statistically significant in MLRA (OR?=?0.41; 95% CI?=?0.07-2.37; p?=?0.32) or in Cox analysis (HR?=?0.35; 95% CI?=?0.06-1.84; p?=?0.21). Conclusions The use of a continuous endotracheal cuff pressure control system and/or an endotracheal tube with a lumen for SSD could help to prevent VAP in patients requiring more than 48 hours of mechanical ventilation. PMID:24751286

  17. Who Needs Heart Surgery?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Who Needs Heart Surgery? Heart surgery is used to treat many heart problems. For ... t worked or can't be used, heart surgery might be an option. Specialists Involved Your primary ...

  18. Preparing for Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Preparing for Surgery If you are preparing for surgery, there are some critical steps you can take to help ensure the ... eat or drink anything after midnight before your surgery. Under some circumstances, your physician anesthesiologist may give ...

  19. Open heart surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and a camera to perform the surgery. During robot-assisted valve surgery, the surgeon makes two to ... results than traditional surgery methods. You will not need to be on a heart-lung machine for ...

  20. Cosmetic breast surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Cosmetic breast surgery is done at an outpatient surgery clinic or in a hospital. Most women receive ... with a plastic surgeon if you are considering cosmetic breast surgery. Discuss how you expect to look ...

  1. Orthopaedic Surgery Sports Medicine

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Orthopaedic Surgery Sports Medicine Hip Arthroscopy for Labral Tear Postoperative Rehabilitation;Orthopaedic Surgery Sports Medicine Hip Arthroscopy for Labral Tear Postoperative Rehabilitation Protocol Conditioning: Stationary bike Treadmill #12;Orthopaedic Surgery Sports Medicine Hip Arthroscopy for Labral Tear

  2. Pancreatic Cancer: Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Topic Ablation or embolization treatments for pancreatic cancer Surgery for pancreatic cancer There are 2 general types ... and risks of such surgery carefully. Potentially curative surgery Fewer than 1 in 5 pancreatic cancers appear ...

  3. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... t help, you may need coronary artery bypass surgery. The surgery creates a new path for blood to flow ... more than one bypass. The results of the surgery usually are excellent. Many people remain symptom-free ...

  4. Laser surgery - skin

    MedlinePLUS

    Surgery using a laser ... used is directly related to the type of surgery being performed and the color of the tissue ... Laser surgery can be used to: Close small blood vessels to reduce blood loss Remove warts , moles , sunspots, and ...

  5. Robotic Surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Automated Endoscopic System for Optimal Positioning, or AESOP, was developed by Computer Motion, Inc. under a SBIR contract from the Jet Propulsion Lab. AESOP is a robotic endoscopic positioning system used to control the motion of a camera during endoscopic surgery. The camera, which is mounted at the end of a robotic arm, previously had to be held in place by the surgical staff. With AESOP the robotic arm can make more precise and consistent movements. AESOP is also voice controlled by the surgeon. It is hoped that this technology can be used in space repair missions which require precision beyond human dexterity. A new generation of the same technology entitled the ZEUS Robotic Surgical System can make endoscopic procedures even more successful. ZEUS allows the surgeon control various instruments in its robotic arms, allowing for the precision the procedure requires.

  6. Hip fracture surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... neck fracture repair; Trochanteric fracture repair; Hip pinning surgery ... You may receive general anesthesia before this surgery. This means ... spinal anesthesia. With this kind of anesthesia, medicine is ...

  7. High-dose-rate postoperative vaginal cuff irradiation alone for stage Ib and Ic endometrial cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John M Anderson; Baldassarre Stea; Alton V Hallum; Edward Rogoff; Joel Childers

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of postoperative high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal cuff irradiation alone (1500 cGy in 3 fractions) in patients with Stage Ib and Ic endometrial cancer.Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective review of 102 patients with Stage Ib and Ic endometrial cancer treated with a hysterectomy and postoperative HDR intracavitary therapy alone during the period of 1\\/1\\/90–12\\/31\\/96. Each

  8. Rotational aerophones.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, N H; Tarnopolsky, A Z; Lai, J C S

    2002-03-01

    Free rotational aerophones such as the bullroarer, which consists of a wooden slat whirled around on the end of a string, and which emits a loud pulsating roar, have been used in many ancient and traditional societies for ceremonial purposes. This article presents an experimental and theoretical investigation of this instrument. The aerodynamics of rotational behavior is elucidated, and relates slat rotation frequency to slat width and velocity through the air. Analysis shows that sound production is due to generation of an oscillating-rotating dipole across the slat, the role of the vortices shed by the slat being relatively minor. Apparent discrepancies between the behavior of a bullroarer slat and a slat mounted on an axle in a wind tunnel are shown to be due to viscous friction in the bearings of the wind-tunnel experiment. PMID:11931296

  9. Selectivity for specific cardiovascular effects of vagal nerve stimulation with a multi-contact electrode cuff.

    PubMed

    Ordelman, Simone C M A; Kornet, Lilian; Cornelussen, Richard; Buschman, Hendrik P J; Veltink, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    The cardiovascular system can be influenced by electrically stimulating the vagal nerve. Selectivity for specific cardiac fibers may be limited when stimulating at the cervical level. Our objective was to increase effectiveness and selectivity for cardiovascular effects of vagal nerve stimulation by using local bipolar stimulation in one nerve cross section using a multi-contact cuff instead of less localized stimulation using a tripolar ring electrode. Both types of cuff electrodes were compared with respect to their relative effects on R-R interval (RRI), P-Q interval (PQI), left ventricular contractility (LVC), and left ventricular pressure (P(LV)) in seven pigs. Stimulation using the optimal bipolar configuration on the multi-contact cuff significantly affected RRI, PQI, LVC, and P(LV), whereas stimulation with the ring electrode only significantly affected RRI and PQI. The cardiovascular parameters that could be significantly influenced varied between the bipolar configurations. These novel findings may be relevant for optimizing electrode configurations for clinical cardiac applications of vagal nerve stimulation. PMID:22987542

  10. Optimal care and design of the tracheal cuff in the critically ill patient

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of non-invasive ventilation and high-flow nasal-oxygen therapy, intubation is still performed in a large proportion of critically ill patients. The aim of this narrative review is to discuss recent data on long-term intubation-related complications, such as microaspiration, and tracheal ischemic lesions. These complications are common in critically ill patients, and are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Recent data suggest beneficial effects of tapered cuffed tracheal tubes in reducing aspiration. However, clinical data are needed in critically ill patients to confirm this hypothesis. Polyurethane-cuffed tracheal tubes and continuous control of cuff pressure could be beneficial in preventing microaspiration and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). However, large multicenter studies are needed before recommending their routine use. Cuff pressure should be maintained between 20 and 30 cmH2O to prevent intubation-related complications. Tracheal ischemia could be prevented by manual or continuous control of cuff pressure. PMID:24572178

  11. Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To conduct an evidence-based analysis of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery. Background Obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) of at last 30 kg/m2.1 Morbid obesity is defined as a BMI of at least 40 kg/m2 or at least 35 kg/m2 with comorbid conditions. Comorbid conditions associated with obesity include diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemias, obstructive sleep apnea, weight-related arthropathies, and stress urinary incontinence. It is also associated with depression, and cancers of the breast, uterus, prostate, and colon, and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Obesity is also associated with higher all-cause mortality at any age, even after adjusting for potential confounding factors like smoking. A person with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 has about a 50% higher risk of dying than does someone with a healthy BMI. The risk more than doubles at a BMI of 35 kg/m2. An expert estimated that about 160,000 people are morbidly obese in Ontario. In the United States, the prevalence of morbid obesity is 4.7% (1999–2000). In Ontario, the 2004 Chief Medical Officer of Health Report said that in 2003, almost one-half of Ontario adults were overweight (BMI 25–29.9 kg/m2) or obese (BMI ? 30 kg/m2). About 57% of Ontario men and 42% of Ontario women were overweight or obese. The proportion of the population that was overweight or obese increased gradually from 44% in 1990 to 49% in 2000, and it appears to have stabilized at 49% in 2003. The report also noted that the tendency to be overweight and obese increases with age up to 64 years. BMI should be used cautiously for people aged 65 years and older, because the “normal” range may begin at slightly above 18.5 kg/m2 and extend into the “overweight” range. The Chief Medical Officer of Health cautioned that these data may underestimate the true extent of the problem, because they were based on self reports, and people tend to over-report their height and under-report their weight. The actual number of Ontario adults who are overweight or obese may be higher. Diet, exercise, and behavioural therapy are used to help people lose weight. The goals of behavioural therapy are to identify, monitor, and alter behaviour that does not help weight loss. Techniques include self-monitoring of eating habits and physical activity, stress management, stimulus control, problem solving, cognitive restructuring, contingency management, and identifying and using social support. Relapse, when people resume old, unhealthy behaviour and then regain the weight, can be problematic. Drugs (including gastrointestinal lipase inhibitors, serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, and appetite suppressants) may be used if behavioural interventions fail. However, estimates of efficacy may be confounded by high rates of noncompliance, in part owing to the side effects of the drugs. In addition, the drugs have not been approved for indefinite use, despite the chronic nature of obesity. The Technology Morbidly obese people may be eligible for bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery for morbid obesity is considered an intervention of last resort for patients who have attempted first-line forms of medical management, such as diet, increased physical activity, behavioural modification, and drugs. There are various bariatric surgical procedures and several different variations for each of these procedures. The surgical interventions can be divided into 2 general types: malabsorptive (bypassing parts of the gastrointestinal tract to limit the absorption of food), and restrictive (decreasing the size of the stomach so that the patient is satiated with less food). All of these may be performed as either open surgery or laparoscopically. An example of a malabsorptive technique is Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Examples of restrictive techniques are vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG) and adjustable gastric banding (AGB). The Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP) Schedule of Benefits for Physician Services includ

  12. Challenges of Laparoscopic Surgery

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

    Students teams use a laparoscopic surgical trainer to perform simple laparoscopic surgery tasks (dissections, sutures) using laparoscopic tools. Just like in the operating room, where the purpose is to perform surgery carefully and quickly to minimize patient trauma, students' surgery time and mistakes are observed and recorded to quantify their performances. They learn about the engineering component of surgery.

  13. Orthopaedic Surgery Sports Medicine

    E-print Network

    Kim, Duck O.

    Orthopaedic Surgery Sports Medicine How Does Arthroscopic Shoulder Instability Surgery Work? Rev. 2 as part of a home exercise program. #12;Orthopaedic Surgery Sports Medicine How Does Arthroscopic Shoulder the surgically repaired glenoid labrum. #12;Orthopaedic Surgery Sports Medicine How Does Arthroscopic Shoulder

  14. Development of adaptive pneumatic tourniquet systems based on minimal inflation pressure for upper limb surgeries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pneumatic tourniquets are medical devices that occlude blood flow to distal part of extremities and are commonly used in upper limb surgeries to provide a dry, clean and bloodless field. To decrease pressure-related injuries and potential risk of complications subjected to the high inflation pressure of pneumatic tourniquet, minimal inflation pressures are recommended. Methods A new occlusion pressure mathematical model for the upper limb was established based on the correlation analysis between several possible influencing parameters and the minimal pneumatic tourniquet pressure at which the peripheral pulse disappeared was recorded using a digital plethysmograph. A prototype of an adaptive pneumatic tourniquet which automatically varies the pressure in the tourniquet cuff according to the above prediction model was developed for the upper limb which used the lowest possible inflation pressure to achieve occlusion. The prototype comprises a blood pressure monitoring module, an inflatable tourniquet cuff, and a pressure relief mechanism to maintain an optimal cuff inflation pressure. Simulation experiments were conducted to verify the function and stability of the designed adaptive pneumatic tourniquet and clinical experiments using volunteers were undertaken to evaluate the performance of the prototype design in achieving adequate haemostasis in the upper limb. Results Results demonstrated that the mean arterial occlusion pressure was 152.3?±?16.7 mmHg, obviously below the 250 to 300 mmHg previously recommended (J Bone Joint Surg Br 68:625-628, 1986 and Arthroscopy 11:307–311, 1995). Conclusions In conclusion, this adaptive method and apparatus which can provide minimal inflation pressure may be a clinically practical alternative for upper limb surgery performed with pneumatic tourniquets. PMID:24053348

  15. Cardiac and Vascular Responses to Thigh Cuffs and Respiratory Maneuvers on Crewmembers of the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Douglas; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Garcia, Kathleen; Ebert, Douglas; Whitson, Peggy A.; Feiveson, Alan; Alferova, Irina V.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Matveev, Vladimir P.; Bogomolov, Valery V.; Duncan, J. Michael

    2011-01-01

    The transition to microgravity eliminates the hydrostatic gradients in the vascular system. The resulting fluid redistribution commonly manifests as facial edema, engorgement of the external neck veins, and a decrease in leg diameter. This experiment examined the responses to modified Valsalva and Mueller maneuvers measured by cardiac and vascular ultrasound (ECHO) in a baseline steady state and during preload reduction introduced with thigh occlusion cuffs used as a counter-measure device (Braslet cuffs) measured by cardiac and vascular ultrasound examinations. Methods: Nine International Space Station crewmember subjects (Expeditions 16 - 20) were examined in 15 experiment sessions 101 +/- 46.days after launch (mean +/- SD; 33 - 185). Twenty Seven cardiac and vascular parameters were obtained with/without respiratory maneuvers before and after tightening of the Braslet cuffs. Results: Non-physicians performed diagnostic-quality cardiac and vascular ultrasound examinations using remote guidance. Three of 27 combinations of maneuvers and Braslet or Braslet alone were identified as being significant changed when compared to baseline. Eleven of 81 differences between combinations of Mueller, Valsalva or baseline were significant and related to cardiac preload reduction or increase in lower extremity venous volume. Conclusions: Acute application of Braslet occlusion cuffs causes lower extremity fluid sequestration and exerts commensurate measurable effects on cardiac performance in microgravity. Ultrasound techniques to measure the hemodynamic effects of thigh cuffs in combination with respiratory maneuvers may serve as an invaluable tool in determining the volume status of the cardiac patient at the 'microgravity bedside'.

  16. Rotation Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In aircraft turbine engine research, certain investigations require extremely precise measurement of the position of a rotating part, such as the rotor, a disc-like part of the engine's compressor which revolves around a shaft at extremely high speeds. For example, in studies of airflow velocity within a compressor, researchers need to know-for data correlation the instantaneous position of a given spot on the rotor each time a velocity measurement is made. Earlier methods of measuring rotor shaft angle required a physical connection to the shaft, which limited the velocity of the rotating object.

  17. Repeat gas insufflation for successful closure of idiopathic macular hole following failed primary surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rishi, Pukhraj; Reddy, Sumanth; Rishi, Ekta

    2014-01-01

    A 65-year-old lady presented with decreased vision in left eye since seven months. Vision was 6/9 in right eye and 6/36 in left. Examination revealed idiopathic, full-thickness macular hole in left eye; confirmed by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Patient underwent phacoemulsification with intraocular lens (IOL) implantation, vitrectomy, internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling and 14% C3F8 gas injection. OCT repeated after six weeks revealed type II closure with cuff of subretinal fluid. Four weeks later, patient underwent fluid–gas exchange with 14% C3F8 gas and postoperative positioning. OCT was repeated after two weeks, which showed complete closure of the macular hole. OCT can help in selection of eyes for re-surgery that stand a better chance for hole closure. Macular holes with cuff of subretinal fluid are probably more likely to close on re-surgery than those without. However, larger studies with longer follow-up are required to validate this finding. PMID:24008807

  18. 2009 survey results: surgeon practice patterns regarding arthroscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Redfern, John; Burks, Robert

    2009-12-01

    A survey was conducted to collect information on the surgical management and practice preferences of the audience members at a recent continuing medical education conference. Participants were polled on a variety of surgical topics, and their responses were recorded using a wireless audience response system. The answers were tabulated and are presented in this report. The majority of respondents preferred an arthroscopic repair for rotator cuff tears (52%) and shoulder instability (71%). Most (50%) perform single-row repair; 33% perform double-row repair. For simple knee arthroscopy, most use preoperative antibiotics (85%), no tourniquet (53%), and no chemical anticoagulation or only compression boots (69%). For cruciate ligament reconstruction, the majority preferred only a preoperative antibiotic (67%), no chemical anticoagulation or only compression boots (56%), and single-bundle reconstruction (88%) using a transtibial femoral tunnel (78%). Most (47%) prefer an all inside suture-based meniscus repair device. PMID:19962073

  19. Rotation Matrices

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David Smith

    Using Maple, Mathmatica, or MatLab, learner should be able to introduce the concept of using matrix multiplication to rotate vectors in two-dimensional space; to provide motivation for the definition of matrix multiplication; to lay the groundwork for using matrices to work with graphics.

  20. Difficulty with cuff deflation of reinforced tracheal tube caused by inflation line occlusion with silk thread ligation and fixation.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Sayoko; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Imai, Eriko; Kawamata, Mikito

    2015-01-01

    A reinforced tracheal tube, ligated with silk threads, was inserted into a tracheostomy orifice and fixed to the skin. The cuff inflation line of the reinforced tracheal tube became occluded. Reinforced 'armoured' tracheal tubes have a spiral of wire embedded into the wall of the tube to give strength and flexibility, and may be sharply bent without compromising the tube lumen. The tracheal cuff attached to the tube is inflated by injecting air through a narrow-diameter tube welded to the outside of the tracheal tube. When a reinforced tracheal tube is ligated and fixed with silk threads, it should be confirmed whether the tracheal tube cuff can be deflated and inflated after fixation. Moreover, because occlusion can be eliminated by removing all silk threads used to ligate a tracheal tube, they should be removed before extubation. PMID:25743860

  1. Ear Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Ear Plastic Surgery Ear Plastic Surgery Patient Health Information News media interested in covering the latest from ... they may improve appearance and self-confidence. Can Ear Deformities Be Corrected? Formation of the ear during ...

  2. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... best performed by a trained surgeon with specialized education and training. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, ...

  3. Gastric bypass surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... be inserted through the other cuts. Advantages of laparoscopy over open surgery include: Shorter hospital stay and quicker recovery. Less pain. Smaller scars and a lower risk of getting a hernia or infection. This surgery takes about 2 to ...

  4. Surgery for Testicular Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this surgery, even those that have spread. Retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND) Depending on the type and stage ... it has been like for them. Effects of lymph node dissection: Surgery to remove retroperitoneal lymph nodes is ...

  5. Septoplasty and Turbinate Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... may be asked to use saline sprays or irrigations after your surgery. Please check with your surgeon ... may be asked to use saline sprays or irrigations after your surgery. Please check with your surgeon ...

  6. Refractive corneal surgery - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    ... after surgery, it should be okay to use artificial tears. Check with your doctor. Do NOT wear contact lenses on the eye that had surgery, even if you have blurry vision. Do NOT use any makeup, creams, or lotions ...

  7. Facial Plastic Surgery Today

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Shopping Cart Trust Your Face To A Facial Plastic Surgeon.® Home Meetings & Courses Find a Surgeon Physicians’ ... FAQ's For Patients Procedures What is a Facial Plastic Surgeon Facelift Surgery Wrinkle Treatment Nose Surgery Eyelid ...

  8. Periodontal Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Periodontal plastic surgery is designed to restore form and function to the gum tissue, periodontal ligament, and the bone ... with conservative behavioral changes and extending to periodontal plastic surgery. Treating Periodontal Disease Periodontal disease does not ...

  9. Weight Loss Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Weight loss surgery helps people with extreme obesity to lose weight. It may be an option if you cannot lose weight ... obesity. There are different types of weight loss surgery. They often limit the amount of food you ...

  10. Assessment of air pockets in high-dose-rate vaginal cuff brachytherapy using cylindrical applicators

    PubMed Central

    Hassouna, Ashraf; Constantinescu, Camelia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To retrospectively assess the incidence and magnitude of air pockets around vaginal cylinders and its impact on dose distribution in vaginal cuff image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Material and methods Fifty endometrial carcinoma patients treated by postoperative HDR vaginal cuff brachytherapy were included in the study. The average age of patients was 58.3 ± 11.8 years (range: 31-87 years). Brachytherapy was performed using cylindrical applicators, and the dose prescribed to 0.5 cm from the applicator's surface, over a length of 5 cm from the applicator's tip. Computed tomography (CT) simulation was used for each brachytherapy fraction. The incidence, vaginal mucosa displacement, volume, and dosimetric effect of air pockets around the vaginal cylinder were evaluated. Results A total of 78 air pockets were found in 29/50 patients (58%) and 45/135 (33%) brachytherapy plans. They were located at the apex: 16/78 (20%) and lateral to the applicator: 62/78 (80%). The volume of air pockets ranged between 0.01 and 2.1 cm3 (mean: 0.15 cm3 ± 0.36 cm3), and the maximum displacement of vaginal mucosa from cylinder surface was between 0.1 and 1.09 cm (mean: 0.34 cm ± 0.2 cm). The dose reduction to the vaginal mucosa generated by the air pockets ranged from 0.5 to 66% (mean: 26.4% ± 13.9%). Conclusions The presence of air pockets around vaginal cylinder applicators is frequently noticed in post-operative vaginal cuff brachytherapy. The dose to the vaginal mucosa is reduced, as a result of displacement generated by air pockets. The effect on the clinical outcome of this dose reduction is yet to be determined. PMID:25337128

  11. Drinking Citrus Fruit Juice Inhibits Vascular Remodeling in Cuff-Induced Vascular Injury Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Arika; Asayama, Rie; Mogi, Masaki; Nakaoka, Hirotomo; Kan-no, Harumi; Tsukuda, Kana; Chisaka, Toshiyuki; Wang, Xiao-Li; Bai, Hui-Yu; Shan, Bao-Shuai; Kukida, Masayoshi; Iwanami, Jun; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2015-01-01

    Citrus fruits are thought to have inhibitory effects on oxidative stress, thereby attenuating the onset and progression of cancer and cardiovascular disease; however, there are few reports assessing their effect on vascular remodeling. Here, we investigated the effect of drinking the juice of two different citrus fruits on vascular neointima formation using a cuff-induced vascular injury mouse model. Male C57BL6 mice were divided into five groups as follows: 1) Control (water) (C), 2) 10% Citrus unshiu (CU) juice (CU10), 3) 40% CU juice (CU40), 4) 10% Citrus iyo (CI) juice (CI10), and 5) 40% CI juice (CI40). After drinking them for 2 weeks from 8 weeks of age, cuff injury was induced by polyethylene cuff placement around the femoral artery. Neointima formation was significantly attenuated in CU40, CI10 and CI40 compared with C; however, no remarkable preventive effect was observed in CU10. The increases in levels of various inflammatory markers including cytokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1?, and tumor necrosis factor-? in response to vascular injury did not differ significantly between C, CU10 and CI10. The increases in cell proliferation and superoxide anion production were markedly attenuated in CI10, but not in CU10 compared with C. The increase in phosphorylated ERK expression was markedly attenuated both in CU10 and CI10 without significant difference between CU10 and CI10. Accumulation of immune cells did not differ between CU10 and CI10. These results indicate that drinking citrus fruit juice attenuates vascular remodeling partly via a reduction of oxidative stress. Interestingly, the preventive efficacy on neointima formation was stronger in CI than in CU at least in part due to more prominent inhibitory effects on oxidative stress by CI. PMID:25692290

  12. Design, fabrication and evaluation of a conforming circumpolar peripheral nerve cuff electrode for acute experimental use

    PubMed Central

    Foldes, Emily L.; Ackermann, D. Michael; Bhadra, Niloy; Kilgore, Kevin L.; Bhadra, Narendra

    2011-01-01

    Nerve cuff electrodes are a principle tool of basic and applied electro-neurophysiology studies and are championed for their ability to achieve good nerve recruitment with low thresholds. We describe the design and method of fabrication for a novel circumpolar peripheral nerve electrode for acute experimental use. This cylindrical cuff-style electrode provides approximately 270 degrees of radial electrode contact with a nerve for each of an arbitrary number of contacts, has a profile that allows for simple placement and removal in an acute nerve preparation, and is designed for adjustment of the cylindrical diameter to ensure a close fit on the nerve. For each electrode, the electrical contacts were cut from 25 µm platinum foil as an array so as to maintain their positions relative to each other within the cuff. Lead wires were welded to each intended contact. The structure was then molded in silicone elastomer, after which the individual contacts were electrically isolated. The final electrode was curved into a cylindrical shape with an inner diameter corresponding to that of the intended target nerve. The positions of these contacts were well maintained during the molding and shaping process and failure rates during fabrication due to contact displacements were very low. Established electrochemical measurements were made on one electrode to confirm expected behavior for a platinum electrode and to measure the electrode impedance to applied voltages at different frequencies. These electrodes have been successfully used for nerve stimulation, recording, and conduction block in a number of different acute animal experiments by several investigators. PMID:21187115

  13. Robotic liver surgery

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Universe

    2014-01-01

    Robotic surgery is an evolving technology that has been successfully applied to a number of surgical specialties, but its use in liver surgery has so far been limited. In this review article we discuss the challenges of minimally invasive liver surgery, the pros and cons of robotics, the evolution of medical robots, and the potentials in applying this technology to liver surgery. The current data in the literature are also presented. PMID:25392840

  14. Surgery for an Inguinal Hernia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Inguinal Hernia" /> Consumer Summary – Jul. 24, 2013 Surgery for an Inguinal Hernia Formats View PDF (PDF) ... pronounced lah-puh-ruh-SKAHP-ik) surgery. Open Surgery In an open surgery, the surgeon makes a ...

  15. Intracranial Hypertension: Medication and Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Espanol. STORE Shop the IHRF Store Medication and Surgery Medication and Surgery Both drugs and surgery are used to treat ... http://www.ihrfoundation.org/intracranial/hypertension/info/C172 Surgery Optic Nerve Fenestration When sight is at risk ...

  16. Pediatric heart surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... There are many kinds of heart defects. Some are minor, and others are more serious. Defects can occur inside the heart or in the large blood vessels ...

  17. Pediatric Surgery Gallengangatresie

    E-print Network

    Manstein, Dietmar J.

    1 Pediatric Surgery Gallengangatresie: eine seltene Erkrankung fällt durch die Maschen eines Versorgungsnetzes C. Petersen, B. M. Ure Pediatric Surgery Warum machen wir so viel Wirbel um eine seltene Surgery Die Gallengangatresie ist ein Problem! Seltene Erkrankung: ca. 1: 18.000 In Deutschland ca. 40

  18. Rotation Matrices

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Blake, Lewis

    Created by Lewis Blake and David Smith for the Connected Curriculum Project, the purposes of this module are to introduce the concept of using matrix multiplication to rotate vectors in two-dimensional space; to provide motivation for the definition of matrix multiplication; to lay the groundwork for using matrices to work with graphics. This is part of a larger collection of learning modules hosted by Duke University.

  19. Rotational Equilibrium

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    IEEE

    2014-05-22

    In this activity, learners explore the concept of rotational equilibrium. Learners work in teams to estimate and determine the force within a mobile design. Learners solve algebraic equations, apply graphing techniques, compare results and discuss findings. Designing the mobile requires learners to solve a set of two linear algebraic equations. Learners solve the equations using three different methods: by substitution, by graphing the equations and finding the intersection, and by using determinants.

  20. Single-site robotic surgery in gynecologic cancer: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ha-Na; Lee, Yoo-Young; Choi, Chel Hun; Lee, Jeong-Won; Bae, Duk-Soo; Kim, Byoung-Gie

    2015-01-01

    Objective To discuss the feasibility of single-site robotic surgery for benign gynecologic tumors and early stage gynecologic cancers. Methods In this single institution, prospective analysis, we analyzed six patients who had undergone single-site robotic surgery between December 2013 and August 2014. Surgery was performed using the da Vinci Si Surgical System. Patient characteristics and surgical outcomes were analyzed. Results Single-site robotic surgery was performed successfully in all six cases. The median patient age was 48 years, and the median body mass index was 25.5 kg/m2 (range, 22 to 33 kg/m2). The median total operative time was 211 minutes, and the median duration of intracorporeal vaginal cuff suturing was 32 minutes (range, 22 to 47 minutes). The median duration of pelvic lymph node dissection was 31 minutes on one side and 27 minutes on the other side. Patients' postoperative courses were uneventful. The median postoperative hospital stay was 4 days. No postoperative complications occurred. Conclusion When used to treat benign gynecologic tumors and early stage gynecologic cancers, the single-site da Vinci robotic surgery is feasible, safe, and produces favorable surgical outcomes. PMID:25609162

  1. Model-based analysis and design of nerve cuff electrodes for restoring bladder function by selective stimulation of the pudendal nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Alexander R.; Grill, Warren M.

    2013-06-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve (PN) is being developed as a means to restore bladder function in persons with spinal cord injury. A single nerve cuff electrode placed on the proximal PN trunk may enable selective stimulation of distinct fascicles to maintain continence or evoke micturition. The objective of this study was to design a nerve cuff that enabled selective stimulation of the PN. Approach. We evaluated the performance of both flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) cuff and round cuff designs, with a range of FINE cuff heights and number of contacts, as well as multiple contact orientations. This analysis was performed using a computational model, in which the nerve and fascicle cross-sectional positions from five human PN trunks were systematically reshaped within the nerve cuff. These cross-sections were used to create finite element models, with electric potentials calculated and applied to a cable model of a myelinated axon to evaluate stimulation selectivity for different PN targets. Subsequently, the model was coupled to a genetic algorithm (GA) to identify solutions that used multiple contact activation to maximize selectivity and minimize total stimulation voltage. Main results. Simulations did not identify any significant differences in selectivity between FINE and round cuffs, although the latter required smaller stimulation voltages for target activation due to preserved localization of targeted fascicle groups. Further, it was found that a ten contact nerve cuff generated sufficient selectivity for all PN targets, with the degree of selectivity dependent on the relative position of the target within the nerve. The GA identified solutions that increased fitness by 0.7-45.5% over single contact activation by decreasing stimulation of non-targeted fascicles. Significance. This study suggests that using an optimal nerve cuff design and multiple contact activation could enable selective stimulation of the human PN trunk for restoration of bladder function.

  2. Cuff leak test and laryngeal survey for predicting post-extubation stridor

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anit B; Ani, Chizobam; Feeney, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Evidence for the predictive value of the cuff leak test (CLT) for post-extubation stridor (PES) is conflicting. We evaluated the association and accuracy of CLT alone or combined with other laryngeal parameters with PES. Methods: Fifty-one mechanically ventilated adult patients in a medical-surgical intensive care unit were tested prior to extubation using; CLT, laryngeal ultrasound and indirect laryngoscopy. Biometric, laryngeal and endotracheal tube (ETT) parameters were recorded. Results: PES incidence was 4%. CLT demonstrated ‘no leak’ in 20% of patients. Laryngeal oedema was present in 10% of the patients on indirect laryngoscopy, and 71% of the patients had a Grades 1-3 indirect laryngoscopic view. Mean air column width on laryngeal ultrasound was 0.66 ± 0.15 cm (cuff deflated), mean ratio of ETT to laryngeal diameter was 0.48 ± 0.07, and the calculated CLT and laryngeal survey composite was 0.86 ± 1.25 (range 0-5). CLT and the CLT and Laryngeal survey composite measure were not associated with or predict PES. Age, sex, peri-extubation steroid use, intubation duration and body mass index were not associated with PES. Conclusion: Even including ultrasonographic and indirect laryngoscopic examination of the airway, no single aspect of the CLT or combination with laryngeal parameters accurately predicts PES. PMID:25788742

  3. Successful incorporation of robotic surgery into gynecologic oncology fellowship training

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Pamela T.; Iglesias, David; Munsell, Mark F.; Frumovitz, Michael; Westin, Shannon N.; Nick, Alpa M.; Schmeler, Kathleen M.; Ramirez, Pedro T.

    2013-01-01

    Background The increasing role of robotic surgery in gynecologic oncology may impact fellowship training. The purpose of this study was to review the proportion of robotic procedures performed by fellows at the console, and compare operative times and lymph node yields to faculty surgeons. Methods A prospective database of women undergoing robotic gynecologic surgery has been maintained since 2008. Intra-operative datasheets completed include surgical times and primary surgeon at the console. Operative times were compared between faculty and fellows for simple hysterectomy (SH), bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO), pelvic (PLND) and paraaortic lymph node dissection (PALND) and vaginal cuff closure (VCC). Lymph nodes counts were also compared. Results Times were recorded for 239 SH, 43 BSOs, 105 right PLNDs, 104 left PLNDs, 34 PALND and 269 VCC. Comparing 2008 to 2011, procedures performed by the fellow significantly increased; SH 16% to 83% (p<0.001), BSO 7% to 75% (p=0.005), right PLND 4% to 44% (p<0.001), left PLND 0% to 56% (p<0.001), and VCC 59% to 82% (p=0.024). Console times (min) were similar for SH (60vs. 63, p= 0.73), BSO (48 vs. 43, p=0.55), and VCC (20 vs. 22, p=0.26). Faculty times (min) were shorter for PLND (right 26 vs. 30, p=0.04, left 23 vs. 27, p=0.02). Nodal counts were not significantly different (right 7 vs. 8, p=0.17 or left 7 vs. 7, p=0.87). Conclusions Robotic surgery can be successfully incorporated into gynecologic oncology fellowship training. With increased exposure to robotic surgery, fellows had similar operative times and lymph node yields as faculty surgeons. PMID:24055616

  4. Rotating Light

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Exploratorium

    2011-12-06

    In this activity, learners explore what happens when polarized white light passes through a sugar solution. Learners use a relatively simple setup to investigate light polarization and reveal beautiful colors. Learners will discover that the colors change as the depth of the sugar solution changes or as the polarizing filter rotates. Learners can also explore what happens when they place a colored filter under the tube holding the sugar solution and/or try a variety of transparent liquids and solutions (e.g. honey) to test whether some are better than others at changing the direction of polarization.

  5. Journal ofNeuroscienceMethods64(1996)95-103 Cuff electrodes for chronic stimulation and recording of peripheral nerve

    E-print Network

    Loeb, Gerald E.

    ; Chronic recording; Neurogram; Electrophysiology; Silicone rubber 1. Introduction Many physiological silicone rubber tubing (L.oeb et al., 19801, wrapping wires around the nerve and malding them in situ siliconerubberwaswrappedaroundandintra-operativelysealedto alongitudinallyslit, tripolar cuff made by dip-coating silicone over

  6. Comparative analysis of transverse intrafascicular multichannel, longitudinal intrafascicular and multipolar cuff electrodes for the selective stimulation of nerve fascicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badia, Jordi; Boretius, Tim; Andreu, David; Azevedo-Coste, Christine; Stieglitz, Thomas; Navarro, Xavier

    2011-06-01

    The selection of a suitable nerve electrode for neuroprosthetic applications implies a trade-off between invasiveness and selectivity, wherein the ultimate goal is achieving the highest selectivity for a high number of nerve fascicles by the least invasiveness and potential damage to the nerve. The transverse intrafascicular multichannel electrode (TIME) is intended to be transversally inserted into the peripheral nerve and to be useful to selectively activate subsets of axons in different fascicles within the same nerve. We present a comparative study of TIME, LIFE and multipolar cuff electrodes for the selective stimulation of small nerves. The electrodes were implanted on the rat sciatic nerve, and the activation of gastrocnemius, plantar and tibialis anterior muscles was recorded by EMG signals. Thus, the study allowed us to ascertain the selectivity of stimulation at the interfascicular and also at the intrafascicular level. The results of this study indicate that (1) intrafascicular electrodes (LIFE and TIME) provide excitation circumscribed to the implanted fascicle, whereas extraneural electrodes (cuffs) predominantly excite nerve fascicles located superficially; (2) the minimum threshold for muscle activation with TIME and LIFE was significantly lower than with cuff electrodes; (3) TIME allowed us to selectively activate the three tested muscles when stimulating through different active sites of one device, both at inter- and intrafascicular levels, whereas selective activation using multipolar cuff (with a longitudinal tripolar stimulation configuration) was only possible for two muscles, at the interfascicular level, and LIFE did not activate selectively more than one muscle in the implanted nerve fascicle.

  7. Continuous and Noninvasive Recording of Cardiovascular Parameters with the Finapres Finger Cuff Enhances Undergraduate Student Understanding of Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Yvonne; Choate, Julia

    2012-01-01

    The Finapres finger cuff recording system provides continuous calculations of beat-to-beat variations in cardiac output (CO), total peripheral resistance, heart rate (HR), and blood pressure (BP). This system is unique in that it allows experimental subjects to immediately, continuously, and noninvasively visualize changes in CO at rest and during…

  8. Effect of the thigh-cuffs on the carotid artery diameter jugular vein section and facial skin edema: HDT study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jerome Roumy; Stephane Diridillou; Stephane Herault; Galina Fomina; Irina Alferova; Philippe Arbeille

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the distal arterial, venous and skin changes in a group using thigh cuffs during daytime and in a control group. Method: Cardiac, arterial, venous parameters were measured by echography and Doppler. Skin thickness was measured by high frequency echography. Results & discussion: Head down position induced plasma volume reduction, increased cerebral resistance, reduced lower limb resistance. The

  9. Chronic stability and selectivity of four-contact spiral nerve-cuff electrodes in stimulating the human femoral nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, L. E.; Tyler, D. J.; Anderson, J. S.; Triolo, R. J.

    2009-08-01

    This study describes the stability and selectivity of four-contact spiral nerve-cuff electrodes implanted bilaterally on distal branches of the femoral nerves of a human volunteer with spinal cord injury as part of a neuroprosthesis for standing and transfers. Stimulation charge threshold, the minimum charge required to elicit a visible muscle contraction, was consistent and low (mean threshold charge at 63 weeks post-implantation: 23.3 ± 8.5 nC) for all nerve-cuff electrode contacts over 63 weeks after implantation, indicating a stable interface with the peripheral nervous system. The ability of individual nerve-cuff electrode contacts to selectively stimulate separate components of the femoral nerve to activate individual heads of the quadriceps was assessed with fine-wire intramuscular electromyography while measuring isometric twitch knee extension moment. Six of eight electrode contacts could selectively activate one head of the quadriceps while selectively excluding others to produce maximum twitch responses of between 3.8 and 8.1 N m. The relationship between isometric twitch and tetanic knee extension moment was quantified, and selective twitch muscle responses scaled to between 15 and 35 N m in tetanic response to pulse trains with similar stimulation parameters. These results suggest that this nerve-cuff electrode can be an effective and chronically stable tool for selectively stimulating distal nerve branches in the lower extremities for neuroprosthetic applications.

  10. Randomised clinical trial comparing the effects of acupuncture and a newly designed placebo needle in rotator cuff tendinitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julia Kleinhenz; Konrad Streitberger; Jürgen Windeler; Albert Güßbacher; Georg Mavridis; Eike Martin

    1999-01-01

    Acupuncture has gained increasing attention in the treatment of chronic pain. The lack of a satisfying placebo method has made it impossible to show whether needling is an important part of the method or whether the improvement felt by the patient is due to the therapeutic setting and psychological phenomena. Also, the effectiveness of acupuncture has not been demonstrated sufficiently.

  11. Type II SLA P lesions: three subtypes and their relationships to superior instability and rotator cuff tears

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CD Morgan; SS Burkhart; M Palmeri; M Gillespie

    1998-01-01

    One hundred two type II SLAP lesions without associated anterior instability, Bankart lesion, or anterior inferior labral pathology were surgically treated under arthroscopic control. There were three distinct type II SLAP lesions based on anatomic location: anterior (37%), posterior (31%), and combined anterior and posterior (31%). Preoperatively, the Speed and O'Brien tests were useful in predicting anterior lesions, whereas the

  12. Current concept for the use of PRP in arthroscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nourissat, G; Mainard, D; Kelberine, F

    2013-12-01

    PRP is commonly used in sports medicine and because it is supposed to increase healing capacities of damaged tissues, it is expected to be increase efficiency or god clinical outcomes when added to arthroscopic surgical procedure. The current review of literature explores the evidence-based medicine supporting the use of PRP in three arthroscopic related disorders. Regarding cartilage lesions of the knee, many studies are exploring several aspect of cartilage lesion treatment. It appears that PRP, in some protocols with specific concentration, should be more efficient than current therapies in the treatment of early stages of knee OA, but only in the field of rheumatology or sport medicine, not when used during surgery. PRP have been used in ACL reconstruction, no benefit has been reported in any study regarding clinical or radiological outcomes. In shoulder cuff disorder, to date, no clinical benefit nor increased healing rate have been clearly reported. Thus, in 2013, it is clear that there is no evidence base medicine data supporting the use of PRP in arthroscopic surgery. PMID:24239107

  13. [Aesthetic surgery and history].

    PubMed

    Glicenstein, J

    2003-10-01

    The history of aesthetic surgery is linked to that of the 20th century. The first operations allowed by the progress of anesthesia and asepsis are the correction of "prominent ears" by Ely then rhinoplasty with endonasal incision by Roe. Considered by some as a precursor and a quack by others, C.C. Miller was the first surgeon to specialize and write books on the subject. Before world war I, aesthetic surgery was seldom practiced and publications were few. The war was at the origin of several units of maxillo-facial surgery created for the huge number of casualties with face trauma due to trench warfare. Many of those who will become great names in plastic surgery operated in these units: Blair, Davis, Léon Dufourmentel, Virenque, Morestin and Gillies. After the war, American surgeons were regrouped in scientific societies. Plastic surgery was privileged and aesthetic surgery was lifted for "quacks". In France, several surgeons such as Suzanne Noël, Passot, Bourguet, Dartigues showed an important creativity and described several techniques that inspired recent ones. The Dujarier case discredited French aesthetic surgery but did not stop the creation of the first French Society of Plastic Surgery in 1930. World war II led to new orientations. In England, the East Grinstead center with Gillies and McIndoe during and after the war was at the origin of many vocations. After the war, many national and international societies of plastic surgery started to appear. The French Society of Plastic Surgery was born in 1952. PMID:14599899

  14. A case of severe low back pain after surgery.

    PubMed

    Rhodin, Annica

    2014-06-01

    The etiology of chronic back pain is often unknown but can include failed spinal surgery. Pain can often be of mixed type and it is important to evaluate pain mechanisms. Comorbid factors often contribute to pain chronicity. Multimodal treatment, including opioid rotation where indicated, may offer a successful management approach. Other rehabilitative procedures such as physiotherapy, exercise therapy, and good sleep hygiene may have a profound impact on patient quality of life. Spinal cord stimulation may be an effective option for some patients with failed spinal surgery syndrome. A case of severe low back pain after surgery in a 45-year-old man is presented to illustrate this. PMID:24801975

  15. SURGERY CLERKSHIP EVALUATIONS DRIVE IMPROVED PROFESSIONALISM

    PubMed Central

    Biagioli, Frances E.; Rdesinski, Rebecca E.; Elliot, Diane L.; Chappelle, Kathryn G.; Kwong, Karen L.; Toffler, William L.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine whether a brief student survey can differentiate amongst third-year clerkship student’s professionalism experiences and whether sharing specific feedback with surgery faculty and residents can lead to improvements. METHODS Medical students completed a survey on professionalism at the conclusion of each third-year clerkship specialty rotation during academic years 2007-2010. RESULTS 2007-2008 comparisons of survey items revealed significantly lower ratings for the surgery clerkship on both Excellence (F = 10.75, p < 0.001) and Altruism/Respect (F = 15.59, p < 0.001) subscales. This data was shared with clerkship directors, prompting the surgery department to discuss student perceptions of professionalism with faculty and residents. Post-meeting ratings of surgery professionalism significantly improved on both Excellence and Altruism/Respect dimensions (p < 0.005 for each). CONCLUSIONS A brief survey can be used to measure student perceptions of professionalism and an intervention as simple as a surgery department openly sharing results and communicating expectations appears to drive positive change in student experiences. COMPETENCIES Professionalism, Interpersonal and Communication Skills PMID:23337685

  16. [Day surgery and anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Takeda, J

    2000-10-01

    Ambulatory surgery comprised up to 70% of scheduled surgery in the USA during the past decades. The main reason for the increase was economic. In Japan, day surgery has been performed in the pediatric field, such as for inguinal hernia. However, recently day surgery has been performed in adult patients, because of medical economics as well as to improve the quality of life of patients. Patient safety is the most important issue in the increasing number of day surgeries in Japan. Postoperative care occurs at home. To reduce postoperative complications, skilled surgery, prompt recovery from anesthesia, and postoperative care using sophisticated systems, manpower, and equipment are necessary. To ensure patient safety, the Japan Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia announced a set of "safety standards for ambulatory anesthesia" in 1999 and we continue to work to developing protocols that maximize the safety of and benefits to patients. PMID:11107594

  17. Rotating Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues currently being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  18. CV Surgery Online

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Stanford University's HighWire Press has announced the online publication of several journals. CV Surgery Online offers "a fully searchable online compilation of articles pertinent to the cardiothoracic and vascular surgeon from the 5 American Heart Association Journals: Circulation, Circulation Research, Hypertension, Stroke, and Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Surgery." Published by the American Heart Association in conjunction with HighWire Press, the free trial period for CV Surgery Online ended December 31, 2000.

  19. Hyperoxaluria and Bariatric Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asplin, John R.

    2007-04-01

    Bariatric surgery as a means to treat obesity is becoming increasingly common in the United States. An early form of bariatric surgery, the jejunoileal bypass, had to be abandoned in 1980 due to numerous complications, including hyperoxaluria and kidney stones. Current bariatric procedures have not been systematically evaluated to determine if they cause hyperoxaluria. Presented here are data showing that hyperoxaluria is the major metabolic abnormality in patients with bariatric surgery who form kidney stones. Further studies are needed to assess the prevalence of hyperoxaluria in all patients with bariatric surgery.

  20. Periodontal Plastic Surgery Procedures

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Comprehensive Periodontal Evaluation Periodontal Treatments and Procedures Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatments Gum Graft Surgery Laser Treatment for Gum Disease Regenerative Procedures Dental Crown ...

  1. Gum Graft Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Comprehensive Periodontal Evaluation Periodontal Treatments and Procedures Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatments Gum Graft Surgery Laser Treatment for Gum Disease Regenerative Procedures Dental Crown ...

  2. Cosmetic Plastic Surgery Statistics

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Medical Specialties-recognized boards. © ASPS, 2013 2012 Cosmetic Plastic Surgery Statistics Cosmetic Procedure Trends COSMETIC SURGICAL PROCEDURES201220112000 % CHANGE 2012 vs. 2011 % CHANGE 2012 ...

  3. Laparoscopic surgery in children.

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Mark

    2003-01-01

    A review of laparoscopy as used in paediatric surgery with special reference to cholecystectomy, appendicectomy, fundoplication, the undescended testicle, inguinal hernia and hydroceles. PMID:14594537

  4. Clostridium difficile contamination of blood pressure cuffs: a call for a closer look at gloving practices in the era of universal precautions.

    PubMed

    Manian, F A; Meyer, L; Jenne, J

    1996-03-01

    We report an outbreak of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea at our medical center following adoption of Universal Precautions. Environmental cultures revealed unexpected contamination of blood pressure cuffs at a rate similar to that for bedside commodes (10% and 11.5%, respectively). An observational survey revealed that healthcare workers in the patient care areas not infrequently failed to remove their potentially stool-contaminated gloves prior to touching clean surfaces, which might have contributed to contamination of blood pressure cuffs. PMID:8708361

  5. Adult Reconstructive Surgery Foot and Ankle Surgery Hand, Upper Extremity and Microvascular Surgery Oncology Orthopaedic Research Pediatric Surgery Spine Surgery Sports Medicine

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Adult Reconstructive Surgery Foot and Ankle Surgery Hand, Upper Extremity and Microvascular Surgery Oncology Orthopaedic Research Pediatric Surgery Spine Surgery Sports Medicine Trauma and Post Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 4860 Y Street, 1700 Sacramento, CA 95817 P: 916.734.2700 F: 916

  6. Adult Reconstructive Surgery Foot and Ankle Surgery Hand, Upper Extremity and Microvascular Surgery Oncology Orthopaedic Research Pediatric Surgery Spine Surgery Sports Medicine

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Adult Reconstructive Surgery Foot and Ankle Surgery Hand, Upper Extremity and Microvascular Surgery Oncology Orthopaedic Research Pediatric Surgery Spine Surgery Sports Medicine Trauma and Post______________________________: This letter is to welcome you to the University of California, Davis Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

  7. Adult Reconstructive Surgery Foot and Ankle Surgery Hand, Upper Extremity and Microvascular Surgery Oncology Orthopaedic Research Pediatric Surgery Spine Surgery Sports Medicine

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Adult Reconstructive Surgery Foot and Ankle Surgery Hand, Upper Extremity and Microvascular Surgery Oncology Orthopaedic Research Pediatric Surgery Spine Surgery Sports Medicine Trauma and Post OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 4860 Y Street, Suite 3800 Sacramento, CA 95817 P: 916

  8. Nonabsorbable-Suture-Induced Osteomyelitis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Cheng Hong; Russell, Nick C.; Sharpe, Tom

    2012-01-01

    We are reporting a case of nonabsorbable suture-induced osteomyelitis in patient who had an open rotator cuff repair with nonabsorbable Ethibond anchor suture. Patient in this case presented with very subtle clinical features of osteomyelitis of the left proximal humerus 15 years after initial rotator cuff repair surgery. Literature had shown that deep infection following rotator cuff repairs, although rare, can be easily missed and can cause severe complications. Absorbable suture had been demonstrated to be more superior, in terms of rate of deep infection, as compared to nonabsorbable suture when used in rotator cuff repair surgery. Both absorbable and nonabsorbable suture had been demonstrated to have similar mechanical properties by several different studies. The case demonstrated that initial presentation of deep infection can be subtle and easily missed by clinicians and leads to further complications. PMID:23259121

  9. Cervix Uteri Surgery Codes

    Cancer.gov

    Cervi x Uteri C530–C539 (Except for M9727, 9733, 9741-9742, 9764-9809, 9832, 9840-9931, 9945-9946, 9950-9967, 9975-9992) [SEER Note: Do not code dilation and curettage (D&C) as Surgery of Primary Site for invasive cancers] Codes 00 None; no surgery

  10. Corpus Uteri Surgery Codes

    Cancer.gov

    Corpus Uteri C540–C559 (Except for M9727, 9733, 9741-9742, 9764-9809, 9832, 9840-9931, 9945-9946, 9950-9967, 9975-9992) [SEER Note: Do not code dilation and curettage (D&C) as Surgery of Primary Site for invasive cancers] Codes 00 None; no surgery

  11. Surgery for bronchiectasis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Prieto; João Bernardo; Maria João Matos; Lu??s Eugénio; Manuel Antunes

    2001-01-01

    Objective: The incidence of bronchiectasis has declined markedly in developed countries. However, a reasonable number of patients still need surgery, despite aggressive physiotherapy and antibiotic therapy. We have reviewed our patients to clarify the benefits from surgery and to analyse the complications. Material and methods: Between 1988 and 1999, we have operated on 119 patients with bronchiectasis, 71 female and

  12. Robot assisted knee surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. C. Ho; R. D. Hibberd; B. L. Davies

    1995-01-01

    Discusses establishing a force control strategy incorporating active motion constraint. The following subjects are considered: problems with conventional surgery; robot assisted surgery; control strategy; representing the motion constraint; design of the desired position; force control strategy; implicit force control; modified damping control; experimental results

  13. Economics of epilepsy surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sadanand, Venkatraman

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Surgical decision-making is a complex process. First, a medical decision is made to determine if surgery is necessary. Second, another medical decision is made to determine the type of surgery. Third, a corporate decision is made if such a surgery is financially feasible. Finally, a legal decision is made to proceed or refuse the chosen surgery. This paper examines these issues in the case of surgery for medically intractable epilepsy and proposes a method of decision analysis to guide epilepsy surgery. Materials and Methods: A stochastic game of imperfect information using techniques of game theory and decision analysis is introduced as an analytical tool for surgical decision-making. Results: Surgery for appropriately chosen patients suffering from medically intractable epilepsy may not only be feasible, but may be the best medical option and the best financial option for the patient, families, society and the healthcare system. Such a situation would then make it legally or ethically difficult to reject or postpone surgery for these patients. Conclusions: A process to collect data to quantify the parameters used in the decision analysis is hereby proposed. PMID:24791079

  14. Training in pediatric surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barry O'Donnell

    1985-01-01

    Pediatric surgery is a small, popular specialty with a limited number of formal, structured training programs. Basic training should place emphasis on the general principles of surgery. Picking a trainer and working in a program that gives a genuine mix of training and experience with adequate supervision are the next steps. The importance of research, the discipline of writing, and

  15. Surgery for thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Callender, Glenda G; Carling, Tobias; Christison-Lagay, Emily; Udelsman, Robert

    2014-06-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer, particularly papillary thyroid cancer, is rising at an epidemic rate. The mainstay of treatment of most patients with thyroid cancer is surgery. Considerable controversy exists about the extent of thyroid surgery and lymph node resection in patients with thyroid cancer. Surgical experience in judgment and technique is required to achieve optimal patient outcomes. PMID:24891171

  16. What Is Refractive Surgery?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... widely performed type of refractive surgery is LASIK (laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis) , where a laser is used to reshape the cornea. For people ... most appropriate procedure for you. Next Page: LASIK — Laser Eye Surgery Find An Eye M.D. Enter ...

  17. Virtual Knee Surgery

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-06-26

    In this online activity, learners assist in performing a virtual total knee replacement surgery. There is a great deal of information about this procedure specifically as well as general surgical information, along with questions the learner must answer (using information given onscreen) before the surgery can proceed.

  18. [Evolution on rotation manipulation].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi

    2013-07-01

    Through review of ancient literature, the developing history of rotation manipulation is traced, various rotation manipulation techniques in different historical periods are analyzed, and evolution process of rotation manipulation is also summarized. It is found that uni-direction rotation was mainly adopted before the establishment of the Republic of China (1911). Influenced by Japanese technique, back and fro rotation took place of the uni-direction rotation, and became the mainstay of the rotation manipulations. However, it is held that the uni-direction rotation has stronger stimulative effects as well as soft tissue relaxation effect, which can be applied for treatment of various diseases. PMID:24032195

  19. Thrombosis of the external jugular vein: a rare complication of a proximal humerus fracture treated with collar and cuff immobilisation.

    PubMed

    Gale, Michael; Craxford, Simon; Taylor, Leia; Montgomery, Helen; Pickering, Simon

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of an 87-year-old woman who developed a thrombosis of her external jugular vein after sustaining a proximal humerus fracture managed nonoperatively with a collar and cuff. At review in fracture clinic she was found to have an enlarged external jugular vein which was subsequently found to be thrombosed. Her collar and cuff had been applied very tightly and it was felt by the ENT team to be the cause of the thrombosis of her external jugular vein. She was fully anticoagulated with warfarin after subsequently developing a deep vein thrombosis in the subclavian and axillary veins. She made a full recovery following anticoagulation. In this case, we review the potential causes of this rare and underdiagnosed condition, as well as the usual investigations and treatments. We also review the common complications of this fracture and the alternative treatment options available. PMID:25247102

  20. Pediatric epilepsy surgery.

    PubMed

    Dorfmüller, Georg; Delalande, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Whereas there is no specific neurosurgical technique in pediatric epilepsy, the frequency of each type of surgery is very different from epilepsy surgery applied in adults, and reflects the underlying etiologies, which are much more diverse in children, with malformations of cortical development and tumors as the prevailing etiologies. Extensive resective or disconnective procedures for extratemporal epilepsy are more frequently performed in infants and younger children, whereas temporo-mesial resection is by far the most common surgical treatment for adults with epilepsy. More recently, less invasive techniques in children with an extensive epileptogenic zone, such as multilobar disconnection, hemispherotomy and other functional hemispherectomy variants, have been introduced in order to reduce duration of surgery, perioperative morbidity and length of hospital stay. Likewise, minimally invasive techniques are utilized, such as the endoscopic disconnection of hypothalamic hamartomas for gelastic epilepsy. This development has been encouraged with the introduction of image-guided navigation systems for the preoperative planning and during surgery. Historically, epilepsy surgery for children has been established much later than for adults. Apart from the particular aspects in perioperative management of younger infants, surgery-related morbidity as well as seizure outcome is in general similar to those in adults, depending rather on each type of surgery. PMID:23622226

  1. ORTHOGNATHIC SURGERY AND INSURANCE ISSUES 1. Orthognathic surgery (surgery for the treatment of a dentofacial deformity) is

    E-print Network

    Mullins, Dyche

    ORTHOGNATHIC SURGERY AND INSURANCE ISSUES 1. Orthognathic surgery (surgery for the treatment. 2. Although there are some medical plans that specifically exclude orthognathic surgery, most insurance plans in California do permit the authorization of orthognathic surgery "when medically necessary

  2. Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery Resident Otolaryngology Faculty Roster 5 3. Otolaryngology Residency Application Requirements 6 4. Resident Rotation Schedule 7 4.1 Resident Rotation Block Schedule 9 5. Otolaryngology Post-Graduate Educational Program 10

  3. Endotracheal tube cuff pressure assessment maneuver induces drop of expired tidal volume in the postoperative of coronary artery bypass grafting

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous investigations reported that the cuff pressure (CP) can decrease secondary to the CP evaluation itself. However is not established in literature if this loss of CP is able to generate alterations on expired tidal volume (ETV). Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the potential consequences of the endotracheal CP assessment maneuver on CP levels and ETV in the early postoperative of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Methods A total of 488 patients were analyzed. After the operation, the lungs were ventilated in pressure-assist-control mode and the same ventilatory settings were adjusted for all patients. After intensive care unit arrival, the cuff was fully deflated and then progressively inflated by air injection, to promote a minimal volume to occlude the trachea. To assist the cuff inflation and the air leakage identification, the graphical monitoring of the volume-time curve was adopted. After 20 minutes a first cuff pressure evaluation was performed (P1) and a second measurement (P2) was taken after 20 minutes with an analog manometer. ETV was obtained always pre and post P1 measurement. Results The CP assessment maneuver promoted a significant drop of P2 in relation to P1 when the manometer was attached to the pilot balloon (p?

  4. What is the safest endotracheal tube for Nd-YAG laser surgery? A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sosis, M B

    1989-12-01

    To determine whether a safe endotracheal tube for Nd-YAG surgery could be found, an Nd-YAG laser operating at 50 W was directed at six different endotracheal tubes that had 5 L/min of oxygen flowing through them. A plain Rusch red rubber endotracheal tube, a Bivona Fome-cuff laser endotracheal tube, a stainless steel Mallinckrodt Laser-Flex endotracheal tube, and a Xomed Laser-shield endotracheal tube were all ignited and perforated by the laser within 12 s. The combustion of the Mallinckrodt endotracheal tube can be explained by the high energy density of the laser that, in rapidly heating the metal, was able to cause its combustion in 100% oxygen. Red rubber endotracheal tubes wrapped with 3M No. 425 or Venture copper foil tape were unaffected by 1 min of exposure to the laser beam. They are recommended for clinical use. PMID:2589662

  5. Oncoplastic breast conserving surgery

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Avi; Cutress, Ramsey I.

    2013-01-01

    Oncoplastic breast conserving surgery is a fundamental component of the repertoire for the management of breast cancer. It facilitates removal of large volumes of breast tissue, and can improve cosmetic outcomes and patient satisfaction whilst maintaining good oncological principles, reducing re-excision and mastectomy rates and assisting in adjuvant radiotherapy planning. We review the various techniques for oncoplastic breast conserving surgery that have emerged over recent years and describe their utilisation in excising tumours from various locations within the breast, and the pertinent patient specific factors that must be considered in technique selection. Finally complications and the evidence for the oncological safety specific to this type of surgery are discussed. PMID:25083477

  6. Physical Therapy and Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Valle-Onate, Rafael; Ward, Michael M.; Kerr, Gail S.

    2012-01-01

    Physical therapy and orthopedic surgery are important components in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Supervised physical therapy is more effective that individual or unsupervised exercise in improving symptoms, but controlled trials suggest than combined inpatient and outpatient therapy provides the greatest improvement. Recommendations for exercise are universal, but the best types and sequence of therapies are not known. Total hip replacement is the surgery most commonly performed for AS, with good long-term implant survival. Heterotopic ossification may occur no more frequently after hip replacement in patients with AS than in patients with other diseases. Corrective spinal surgery is rarely performed and requires specialized centers and experienced surgeons. PMID:22543536

  7. Minimally Invasive Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, William S.; Carter, Kristine M.; Fuhrman, George M.; Bolton, John S.; Bowen, John C.

    2000-01-01

    In the last decade, laparoscopy has been the most innovative surgical movement in general surgery. Minimally invasive surgery performed through a few small incisions, laparoscopy is the standard of care for the treatment of gallbladder disease and the gold standard for the treatment of reflux disease. The indications for a laparoscopic approach to abdominal disease continue to increase, and many diseases may be treated with laparoscopic techniques. At Ochsner, laparoscopic techniques have demonstrated better cosmetic results, shorter recovery times, and an earlier return to normal activity compared with open surgery. PMID:21765684

  8. UCF COLLEGE OF MEDICINE M.D. CURRICULUM Surgery Surgery

    E-print Network

    Foroosh, Hassan

    UCF COLLEGE OF MEDICINE M.D. CURRICULUM May Vacation Surgery Surgery Vacation IM/FM (Continued) Internal Medicine/Family Medicine Surgery FIREMiniConference Longitudinal Curricular Themes Ethics wks) S-6 Brain and Behavior (7 wks) March April FIREMiniConference Capstone Surg Select Surgery Select

  9. Spines, backbones and orthopedic surgery. Spines, backbones and orthopedic surgery.

    E-print Network

    1/ 17 Spines, backbones and orthopedic surgery. Spines, backbones and orthopedic surgery. Simon;2/ 17 Spines, backbones and orthopedic surgery. Motivation #12;2/ 17 Spines, backbones and orthopedic surgery. Motivation Recent work (B-boys & Schweinsberg, Aidekon-Harris) considers branching Brownian

  10. Effect of the thigh-cuffs on the carotid artery diameter jugular vein section and facial skin edema: HDT study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roumy, Jerome; Diridillou, Stephane; Herault, Stephane; Fomina, Galina; Alferova, Irina; Arbeille, Philippe

    2001-08-01

    Objective: To evaluate the distal arterial, venous and skin changes in a group using thigh cuffs during daytime and in a control group. Method: Cardiac, arterial, venous parameters were measured by echography and Doppler. Skin thickness was measured by high frequency echography. Results & discussion: Head down position induced plasma volume reduction, increased cerebral resistance, reduced lower limb resistance. The jugular vein increased whereas the femoral and popliteal veins decreased. All these changes were already observed in previous HDT. Common carotid diameter decreased, Front head skin thickness increased and Tibial skin thickness decreased. Eight hours with thigh cuffs increased the cardiac and carotid sizes which is in agreement with the plasma volume increase. Conversely they reduced the cerebral vascular resistance, jugular section and front head edema which may explain the sensation of comfort reported by the subjects. At the lower limb level the thigh cuffs restored the skin thickness to pre-HDT level but enlarged markedly the femoral and popliteal veins. HR, BP, CO, TPR did not change.

  11. Teaching plastic surgery from different perspectives.

    PubMed

    Cable, Christian; Chong, Tae; Pratt, Daniel D

    2012-06-01

    Just as everyone has a different learning style, teachers too approach the task from different perspectives. There are five basic teaching perspectives or styles: transmission, apprenticeship, developmental, nurturing, and social justice. The acronym BIAS is useful to describe the beliefs, intentions, assessments, and strategies associated with each perspective. The authors present a hypothetical 1-week rotation in plastic and reconstructive surgery in which a student encounters instructors who embody the five basic teaching perspectives. By presenting these perspectives, the authors introduce valuable teaching techniques that can benefit all those charged with the education of learners along the spectrum from premedical to continuing education venues. Educational objectives include the following: (1) explain and illustrate different approaches to effective teaching in plastic surgery; (2) introduce readers to the Teaching Perspectives Inventory as a means of determining their primary teaching style; and (3) argue for a "plurality of the good" in teaching. PMID:22634660

  12. What to Expect during Heart Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What To Expect During Heart Surgery Heart surgery is done in a hospital, ... surgery, takes about 3–6 hours. Traditional Open-Heart Surgery For this type of surgery, you'll ...

  13. Veteran's Administration Medical Center General Plastic Surgery Rotation

    E-print Network

    Cui, Yan

    Biannually #12;· Skin grafting and flap closure of soft tissue defects of the upper extremity · Specific including skin grafts, local flaps, fascial and musculocutaneous flaps, free tissue transfers, bone grafts including skin graft loss, flap necrosis, wound dehiscence and wound infection. Clinical teaching

  14. Plastic Surgery for Teenagers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry 1995. 34:1637-1647. Simis, K.J., Hovius, S. ... applying for plastic surgery? Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry 2000; 42:669-678.

  15. Preparing for Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... be given an ID bracelet. It will include your name, birth date, and health care provider’s name. Be ... Your health care provider or team will confirm your name, birth date, and type of surgery before you ...

  16. Complications of Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... impairment is often temporary but can be prolonged. Nasal obstruction : Much of the nasal septum is made of ... undergoing surgery for a refractory chronic sinus infection. Nasal obstruction, dryness and pain: (see above) Revised 01/20/ ...

  17. Brain Tumor Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... The surgical removal of a portion of the skull. Doing so allows the neurosurgeon to find the ... much of it as possible. The piece of skull that was removed is replaced following surgery. Craniectomy: ...

  18. Anaesthesia in war surgery 

    E-print Network

    Brydon, Adam

    1918-01-01

    For the past fifteen months, I have been attached to the Third Australian General Hospital as Anaesthetist, and now record my experiences gleaned from somewhere over a thousand cases of anaesthesia in war surgery. I may conveniently divide up...

  19. Deep breathing after surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... One way to do so is by doing deep breathing exercises. Deep breathing keeps your lungs well-inflated and healthy ... be uncomfortable. But if you do not practice deep breathing after surgery, you may develop lung problems, ...

  20. Knee microfracture surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Cartilage regeneration - knee ... Three types of anesthesia may be used for knee arthroscopy surgery: Medicine to relax you, and shots of painkillers to numb the knee Spinal (regional) anesthesia General anesthesia (you will be ...

  1. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... as swelling of the arm and chest ( lymphedema ). Lymph node surgery To find out if the breast cancer ... nodes are checked in 2 major ways. Axillary lymph node dissection: In this operation, about 10 to 40 ( ...

  2. Surgery, Hospitals, and Medications

    MedlinePLUS

    Patient Education Sheet Sjögren’s, Surgery, Hospitals, and Medications The SSF thanks Lynn Petruzzi, RN, MSN, for this Patient Education Sheet. Educate your healthcare givers! • Tell your surgeon, ...

  3. Blood donation before surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or further tests. Many communities have a blood bank at which any healthy person can donate blood. ... to arrange with your hospital or local blood bank before your surgery to have directed donor blood. ...

  4. Alternative Refractive Surgery Procedures

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of artificial lenses. Following are some of the alternative refractive surgery procedures to LASIK . Wavefront-Guided LASIK ... that releases controlled amounts of radio frequency (RF) energy, instead of a laser, to apply heat to ...

  5. Sculptures honour wartime surgery.

    PubMed

    2014-11-18

    The Florence Nightingale Museum has marked the centenary of the first world war with a display of life-size sculptures of soldiers from different wars who had reconstructive surgery after experiencing appalling facial injuries. PMID:25388690

  6. Carotid artery surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... artery surgery is a procedure to restore proper blood flow to the brain. The carotid artery brings needed ... these arteries on each side of your neck. Blood flow in this artery can become partly or totally ...

  7. Expectations of Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... after surgery, it can be treated with antibiotics. Steroids - One of the underlying causes of some forms ... forms of swelling, your doctor may prescribe oral steroids or topical (spray, irrigation) steroids or both. Packing – ...

  8. Joint Replacement Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... such as walking, climbing stairs, and taking a bath. What Happens During Surgery? First, the surgical team ... of Graciela S. Alarcón, M.D., M.P.H., University of Alabama School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL; Agustin ...

  9. [Urology and ambulatory surgery].

    PubMed

    Cuvelier, G

    2012-11-01

    The ambulatory surgery is the realization of a surgical act with entrance and taken out the same day. The evolution of the surgery in traditional hospitalization towards the ambulatory is a cultural revolution. The function care and accommodation of our establishments of health are disconnected. The ambulatory surgery is source of progress for the surgery, the anesthesia, our organizations. She corresponds to a demand of the public. She is ethical. There is an institutional will shared by all the actors of health today. The AFU measured its delay and has the objective to facilitate to the urologic community this mode of taken care. Learned recommendations are going to be produced in association with the HAS. The role of the IDE of urology is specified there. PMID:23101963

  10. Breast Cancer Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Prosthesis • Chemotherapy and Side Effects • Radiation Therapy and Side Effects ©2013 Susan G. Komen ® Item No. KOMEED024000 12/13 You are not alone If you need breast cancer surgery, remember there are many women who have ...

  11. Lung Carcinoid Tumor: Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... will increase the risk of the carcinoid tumor spreading even farther, to other organs. If this happens, ... can’t have major surgery because you have reduced lung function or other serious medical problems, or ...

  12. Stellar Evolution with Rotation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Meynet; A. Maeder

    2006-01-01

    Abstract. Grids of models for rotating stars are constructed in the range of 9 to 120 M,at solar metallicity. The following effects of rotation are included: shellular rotation, new struc- ture equations for non?conservative case, surface distortions, increase of mass loss with rotation, meridional circulation and interaction with horizontal turbulence, shear instability and cou- pling with thermal effects, advection and

  13. A new dimension in endo surgery: Micro endo surgery.

    PubMed

    Pecora, Gabriele Edoardo; Pecora, Camilla Nicole

    2015-01-01

    There is an immense difference between tradizional Endodontic Surgery and Micro-Endo Surgery. Microsurgical techniques made possible and accessible results,that were unimaginable before. Under microscopic control,the operative techniques reached continous changes,allowing a better precision and quality standards. The dramatic evolution from Endo Surgery to Micro-Endo Surgery has enlarged the horizon of therapeutic options. Illumination and magnification through the Microscope has fundamentally and radically changed the way endo surgery can be performed. PMID:25657519

  14. A new dimension in endo surgery: Micro endo surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pecora, Gabriele Edoardo; Pecora, Camilla Nicole

    2015-01-01

    There is an immense difference between tradizional Endodontic Surgery and Micro-Endo Surgery. Microsurgical techniques made possible and accessible results,that were unimaginable before. Under microscopic control,the operative techniques reached continous changes,allowing a better precision and quality standards. The dramatic evolution from Endo Surgery to Micro-Endo Surgery has enlarged the horizon of therapeutic options. Illumination and magnification through the Microscope has fundamentally and radically changed the way endo surgery can be performed. PMID:25657519

  15. Department of Surgery Reunion Gala

    E-print Network

    Haykin, Simon

    Department of Surgery Reunion Gala Report A celebration of over 40 years of the Department of Surgery October25th&26th2013 #12;October25th2013:Wine&Cheese Surgery Reunion Gala Weekend: Wine & Cheese On Friday October 25, 2013 the Surgery Reunion Gala weekend kicked off with a wine and cheese event

  16. 2013 PLASTIC SURGERY VISITING PROFESSOR

    E-print Network

    Shoubridge, Eric

    2013 PLASTIC SURGERY VISITING PROFESSOR Dr. Mutaz B. Habal June 6, 2013 McGill University Division of Plastic Surgery 2013 PLASTIC SURGERY VISITING PROFESSOR Special thanks to our sponsors: Representative Surgery MUHC McGill University Campagne Les meilleurs soins pour la vie The Best Care for Life Campaign

  17. Postoperative Instructions Following Facial Surgery

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Postoperative Instructions Following Facial Surgery 1. Your surgery will be performed in the Surgery Center on the 4th floor of the Center for Health and Healing (CHH) at Oregon Health & Sciences University. The procedure is done under anesthesia administered by an anesthesiologist. After surgery, you

  18. Robotic surgery in gynecology

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Rooma; Sanjay, Madhumati; Rupa, B.; Kumari, Samita

    2015-01-01

    FDA approved Da Vinci Surgical System in 2005 for gynecological surgery. It has been rapidly adopted and it has already assumed an important position at various centers where this is available. It comprises of three components: A surgeon's console, a patient-side cart with four robotic arms and a high-definition three-dimensional (3D) vision system. In this review we have discussed various robotic-assisted laparoscopic benign gynecological procedures like myomectomy, hysterectomy, endometriosis, tubal anastomosis and sacrocolpopexy. A PubMed search was done and relevant published studies were reviewed. Surgeries that can have future applications are also mentioned. At present most studies do not give significant advantage over conventional laparoscopic surgery in benign gynecological disease. However robotics do give an edge in more complex surgeries. The conversion rate to open surgery is lesser with robotic assistance when compared to laparoscopy. For myomectomy surgery, Endo wrist movement of robotic instrument allows better and precise suturing than conventional straight stick laparoscopy. The robotic platform is a logical step forward to laparoscopy and if cost considerations are addressed may become popular among gynecological surgeons world over. PMID:25598600

  19. Surgery for childhood epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Jayalakshmi, Sita; Panigrahi, Manas; Nanda, Subrat Kumar; Vadapalli, Rammohan

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 60% of all patients with epilepsy suffer from focal epilepsy syndromes. In about 15% of these patients, the seizures are not adequately controlled with antiepileptic drugs; such patients are potential candidates for surgical treatment and the major proportion is in the pediatric group (18 years old or less). Epilepsy surgery in children who have been carefully chosen can result in either seizure freedom or a marked (>90%) reduction in seizures in approximately two-thirds of children with intractable seizures. Advances in structural and functional neuroimaging, neurosurgery, and neuroanaesthesia have improved the outcomes of surgery for children with intractable epilepsy. Early surgery improves the quality of life and cognitive and developmental outcome and allows the child to lead a normal life. Surgically remediable epilepsies should be identified early and include temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis, lesional temporal and extratemporal epilepsy, hemispherical epilepsy, and gelastic epilepsy with hypothalamic hamartoma. These syndromes have both acquired and congenital etiologies and can be treated by resective or disconnective surgery. Palliative procedures are performed in children with diffuse and multifocal epilepsies who are not candidates for resective surgery. The palliative procedures include corpus callosotomy and vagal nerve stimulation while deep brain stimulation in epilepsy is still under evaluation. For children with “surgically remediable epilepsy,” surgery should be offered as a procedure of choice rather than as a treatment of last resort. PMID:24791093

  20. Cardioprotection during cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hausenloy, Derek J.; Boston-Griffiths, Edney; Yellon, Derek M.

    2012-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. For a large number of patients with CHD, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery remains the preferred strategy for coronary revascularization. Over the last 10 years, the number of high-risk patients undergoing CABG surgery has increased significantly, resulting in worse clinical outcomes in this patient group. This appears to be related to the ageing population, increased co-morbidities (such as diabetes, obesity, hypertension, stroke), concomitant valve disease, and advances in percutaneous coronary intervention which have resulted in patients with more complex coronary artery disease undergoing surgery. These high-risk patients are more susceptible to peri-operative myocardial injury and infarction (PMI), a major cause of which is acute global ischaemia/reperfusion injury arising from inadequate myocardial protection during CABG surgery. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are required to protect the heart in this high-risk patient group. In this article, we review the aetiology of PMI during CABG surgery, its diagnosis and clinical significance, and the endogenous and pharmacological therapeutic strategies available for preventing it. By improving cardioprotection during CABG surgery, we may be able to reduce PMI, preserve left ventricular systolic function, and reduce morbidity and mortality in these high-risk patients with CHD. PMID:22440888