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Sample records for rotavirus vaccine live

  1. Rotavirus Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Why get vaccinated?Rotavirus is a virus that causes diarrhea, mostly in babies and young children. The diarrhea can be severe, and lead ... and fever are also common in babies with rotavirus.Before rotavirus vaccine, rotavirus disease was a common ...

  2. Rotavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Barnes, G

    1998-01-01

    Encouraging results have been reported from several large trials of tetravalent rhesus rotavirus vaccine, with efficacy of 70-80% against severe disease. A recent Venezuelan study showed similar results to trials in USA and Europe. The vaccine may soon be licensed in USA. It provides the exciting prospect of a strategy to prevent one of the world's major child killers. Other candidate vaccines are under development including human-bovine reassortants, neonatal strains, non-replicating rotaviruses, vector vaccines and other genetically engineered products. Second and third generation rotavirus vaccines are on the horizon. The need for a rotavirus vaccine is well accepted by paediatricians, but public health authorities need to be lobbied. Other issues which need to be addressed include relative importance of non-group A rotaviruses, possible administration with OPV, the influence of breast feeding, and most importantly, cost. It is essential that rotavirus vaccine is somehow made available to all of the world's children, not just those in developed countries. PMID:9553287

  3. Rotavirus vaccine: a review.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Goel Manish; Arun, Kumar; Bilas, Jain Ram; Ruchi, Jain; Pardeep, Khanna; Pradeep, Siwach

    2012-12-01

    Worldwide, large proportion i.e., 37% of deaths due to diarrhea in young children is attributed to rotavirus. A monovalent P1A[8] G1 vaccine and a pentavalent bovine-human reassortant vaccine human rotavirus vaccine had shown good clinical efficacy without any increase in intussusception among vaccine recipients. WHO recommends that the first dose of rotavirus vaccine should be administered to infants up to age of 6-15 weeks irrespective of the prior history of rotavirus infection and the maximum age for administering the last dose of the vaccine should be 32 weeks. Booster doses are not recommended. The current update reviews the issues related to rotavirus vaccines and their usages like milestones in the development of rotavirus vaccines, concerns regarding their efficacy and cost-effectiveness, immunity after natural infection, potential for changes in virus strains, current recommendations, post marketing surveillance, and future challenges and scope for further research regarding rotavirus vaccines. PMID:25145068

  4. Stability of live attenuated rotavirus vaccine with selected preservatives and primary containers.

    PubMed

    Lal, Manjari; Jarrahian, Courtney; Zhu, Changcheng; Hosken, Nancy A; McClurkan, Chris L; Koelle, David M; Saxon, Eugene; Roehrig, Andrew; Zehrung, Darin; Chen, Dexiang

    2016-05-11

    Rotavirus infection, which can be prevented by vaccination, is responsible for a high burden of acute gastroenteritis disease in children, especially in low-income countries. An appropriate formulation, packaging, and delivery device for oral rotavirus vaccine has the potential to reduce the manufacturing cost of the vaccine and the logistical impact associated with introduction of a new vaccine, simplify the vaccination procedure, and ensure that the vaccine is safely and accurately delivered to children. Single-dose prefilled presentations can be easy to use; however, they are typically more expensive, can be a bottleneck during production, and occupy a greater volume per dose vis-à-vis supply chain storage and medical waste disposal, which is a challenge in low-resource settings. Multi-dose presentations used thus far have other issues, including increased wastage of vaccine and the need for separate delivery devices. In this study, the goals were to evaluate both the technical feasibility of using preservatives to develop a liquid multi-dose formulation and the primary packaging alternatives for orally delivered, liquid rotavirus vaccines. The feasibility evaluation included evaluation of commonly used preservatives for compatibility with rotavirus vaccines and stability testing of rotavirus vaccine in various primary containers, including Lameplast's plastic tubes, BD's oral dispenser version of Uniject™ (Uniject DP), rommelag's blow-fill-seal containers, and MEDInstill's multi-dose vial and pouch. These presentations were compared to a standard glass vial. The results showed that none of the preservatives tested were compatible with a live attenuated rotavirus vaccine because they had a detrimental effect on the viability of the virus. In the presence of preservatives, vaccine virus titers declined to undetectable levels within 1 month. The vaccine formulation without preservatives maintained a stability profile over 12 months in all primary containers

  5. Rotavirus Vaccine -- Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... to these vaccines. The infant's immune response to influenza vaccine administered at the same time as rotavirus vaccine ... previously that an inactivated vaccine (e.g., inactivated influenza vaccine) may be administered either simultaneously or at any ...

  6. Rotavirus vaccines: successes and challenges.

    PubMed

    Glass, Roger I; Parashar, Umesh; Patel, Manish; Gentsch, Jon; Jiang, Baoming

    2014-01-01

    Since 2006, the availability of two new rotavirus vaccines has raised enthusiasm to consider the eventual control and elimination of severe rotavirus diarrhea through the global use of vaccines. Rotavirus remains the most severe cause of acute diarrhea in children worldwide responsible for several hundred thousands of deaths in low income countries and up to half of hospital admissions for diarrhea around the world. The new vaccines have been recommended by WHO for all infants and in more than 47 countries, their introduction into routine childhood immunization programs has led to a remarkable decline in hospital admissions and even deaths within 3 years of introduction. Challenges remain with issues of vaccine finance globally and the problem that these live oral vaccines perform less well in low income settings where they are needed most. Ongoing research that will accompany vaccine introduction might help address these issues of efficacy and new vaccines and novel financing schemes may both help make these vaccines universally available and affordable in the decade. PMID:24156947

  7. Rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Esona, Mathew D; Gautam, Rashi

    2015-06-01

    Group A rotavirus (RVA) is the major cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in young children worldwide. Introduction of two live, attenuated rotavirus vaccines, Rotarix® and RotaTeq®, has dramatically reduced RVA-associated AGE and mortality. High-throughput, sensitive and specific techniques are required to rapidly diagnose and characterize rotavirus strains in stool samples for proper patient treatment and to monitor circulating vaccine and wild-type rotavirus strains. New molecular assays are rapidly developed that are more sensitive and specific than the conventional assays for detection, genotyping and full genome characterization of circulating rotavirus wild-type and vaccine (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) strains causing AGE. PMID:26004648

  8. Mice develop effective but delayed protective immune responses when immunized as neonates either intranasally with nonliving VP6/LT(R192G) or orally with live rhesus rotavirus vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    VanCott, John L; Prada, Anne E; McNeal, Monica M; Stone, Susan C; Basu, Mitali; Huffer, Bert; Smiley, Kristi L; Shao, Mingyuan; Bean, Judy A; Clements, John D; Choi, Anthony H-C; Ward, Richard L

    2006-05-01

    Rotavirus vaccines are delivered early in life, when the immune system is immature. To determine the effects of immaturity on responses to candidate vaccines, neonatal (7 days old) and adult mice were immunized with single doses of either Escherichia coli-expressed rotavirus VP6 protein and the adjuvant LT(R192G) or live rhesus rotavirus (RRV), and protection against fecal rotavirus shedding following challenge with the murine rotavirus strain EDIM was determined. Neonatal mice immunized intranasally with VP6/LT(R192G) were unprotected at 10 days postimmunization (dpi) and had no detectable rotavirus B-cell (antibody) or CD4(+) CD8(+) T-cell (rotavirus-inducible, Th1 [gamma interferon and interleukin-2 {IL-2}]-, Th2 [IL-5 and IL-4]-, or ThIL-17 [IL-17]-producing spleen cells) responses. However, by 28 and 42 dpi, these mice were significantly (P >or= 0.003) protected and contained memory rotavirus-specific T cells but produced no rotavirus antibody. In contrast, adult mice were nearly fully protected by 10 dpi and contained both rotavirus immunoglobulin G and memory T cells. Neonates immunized orally with RRV were also less protected (P=0.01) than adult mice by 10 dpi and produced correspondingly less rotavirus antibody. Both groups contained few rotavirus-specific memory T cells. Protection levels by 28 dpi for neonates or adults were equal, as were rotavirus antibody levels. This report introduces a neonatal mouse model for active protection studies with rotavirus vaccines. It indicates that, with time, neonatal mice develop full protection after intranasal immunization with VP6/LT(R192G) or oral immunization with a live heterologous rotavirus and supports reports that protection depends on CD4(+) T cells or antibody, respectively. PMID:16641286

  9. Oral live attenuated human rotavirus vaccine (Rotarix™) offers sustained high protection against severe G9P[8] rotavirus gastroenteritis during the first two years of life in Brazilian children.

    PubMed

    Justino, Maria Cleonice A; Araújo, Eliete C; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Oliveira, Consuelo S; Gabbay, Yvone B; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc P; Miranda, Yllen S; Guerra, Sylvia de Fátima S; Silva, Veronilce B da; Linhares, Alexandre C

    2012-11-01

    In a large Phase III trial conducted in 10 Latin American countries, the safety and efficacy of the live attenuated monovalent rotavirus vaccine RIX4414 was evaluated in 15,183 healthy infants followed up during the first two years of life. Belém was the only site in Brazil included in this multicentre trial. The study in Belém included a subset of 653 infants who were followed up until 24 months of age for protection against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis. These subjects were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive two doses of vaccine (n = 328) or two doses of placebo (n = 325) at approximately two and four months of age. Of the 653 enrolled infants, 23 dropped out during the study period. For the combined two-year period, the efficacy of RIX4414 was 72.3% [95% confidence interval (CI) 37.5-89.1%] against severe rotavirus-related gastroenteritis, reaching a protection rate of 81.8% (95% CI 36.4-96.6%) against circulating wild-type G9 rotavirus strains. It is concluded that two doses of RIX4414 are highly efficacious against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in Belém during the first two years of life and provide high protection against the worldwide emergence and spread of G9P[8] strains. PMID:23147138

  10. A reverse evidence of rotavirus vaccines impact.

    PubMed

    Martinón-Torres, Federico; Aramburo, Angela; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Cebey, Miriam; Seoane-Pillado, María Teresa; Redondo-Collazo, Lorenzo; Martinón-Sánchez, Jose Maria

    2013-06-01

    In 2010, and due to a quality problem identified in the vaccine manufacture, the rotavirus (RV) vaccination was withheld in Spain during 5 months. Our study aimed to evaluate the impact that this sudden cease had on rotavirus acute gastroenteritis (RAGE) hospitalizations. An increase in RAGE hospitalization was observed in parallel to the drop in vaccine coverage. Here, we report the first reverse evidence of rotavirus vaccine impact. PMID:23836258

  11. A reverse evidence of rotavirus vaccines impact

    PubMed Central

    Martinón-Torres, Federico; Aramburo, Angela; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Cebey, Miriam; Seoane-Pillado, María Teresa; Redondo-Collazo, Lorenzo; Martinón-Sánchez, Jose Maria

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, and due to a quality problem identified in the vaccine manufacture, the rotavirus (RV) vaccination was withheld in Spain during 5 months. Our study aimed to evaluate the impact that this sudden cease had on rotavirus acute gastroenteritis (RAGE) hospitalizations. An increase in RAGE hospitalization was observed in parallel to the drop in vaccine coverage. Here, we report the first reverse evidence of rotavirus vaccine impact. PMID:23836258

  12. Rotavirus vaccine-derived shedding and viral reassortants.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Michael D; Payne, Daniel C

    2012-11-01

    EVALUATION OF: Donato CM, Ch’ng LS, Boniface KF et al. Identification of strains of RotaTeq rotavirus vaccine in infants with gastroenteritis following routine vaccination. J. Infect. Dis. 206(3), 377–383 (2012).Two live, attenuated rotavirus vaccines, RotaTeq(®) (Merck) and Rotarix(®) (GlaxoSmithKline), have been used in Australia since July 2007 to prevent severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in children. Using active postvaccination monitoring, passive surveillance and state-of-the-art laboratory techniques, Donato et al. report that RotaTeq rotavirus vaccine and vaccine-derived strains were detected actively in stool samples from 13 out of 61 (21.3%) infants having diarrhea within 2 weeks of rotavirus vaccination, and among three out of 460 (0.7%) cases with acute gastroenteritis captured via the Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program. Six (37.5%) of these 16 vaccine-derived viral specimens were associated with a G1P[8] strain thought to be the result of genetic reassortment between two component RotaTeq strains. Although nearly half of these reassortant-associated cases had underlying medical conditions, such as severe combined immunodeficiency disorder, further study is needed to understand the relationship between shedding, viral reassortants and underlying medical conditions. PMID:23249230

  13. Detection of Novel Rotavirus Strain by Vaccine Postlicensure Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Teel, Elizabeth N.; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Payne, Daniel C.; Roy, Sunando; Foytich, Kimberly; Parashar, Umesh D.; Gentsch, Jon R.; Bowen, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Surveillance for rotavirus-associated diarrhea after implementation of rotavirus vaccination can assess vaccine effectiveness and identify disease-associated genotypes. During active vaccine postlicensure surveillance in the United States, we found a novel rotavirus genotype, G14P[24], in a stool sample from a child who had diarrhea. Unusual rotavirus strains may become more prevalent after vaccine implementation. PMID:23876297

  14. [Universal vaccination for Rotavirus infection control].

    PubMed

    Mita, Valentin; Capanna, Alessandra; Gervasi, Giuseppe; Zaratti, Laura; Franco, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the most common etiological cause for pediatric acute gastroenteritis, particularly in children under 5 years of age or immunocompromised. Since 2008, vaccination program has determined a decrease in Rotavirus-related hospitalization, outpatient's visits, emergency department visits and mortality. These indicators of illness for Rotaviruses diseases remain high in those countries where there is no access to rehydrating therapies. In Italy vaccine coverage is very low, even if the burden of RV disease is well known, and at present vaccination is offered free of charge in a single region. PMID:26519750

  15. Impact of rotavirus vaccine on premature infants.

    PubMed

    Roué, Jean-Michel; Nowak, Emmanuel; Le Gal, Grégoire; Lemaitre, Thomas; Oger, Emmanuel; Poulhazan, Elise; Giroux, Jean-Dominique; Garenne, Armelle; Gagneur, Arnaud

    2014-10-01

    Infants born preterm are at a higher risk of complications and hospitalization in cases of rotavirus diarrhea than children born at term. We evaluated the impact of a rotavirus vaccination campaign (May 2007 to May 2010) on hospitalizations for rotavirus gastroenteritis in a population of children under 3 years old born prematurely (before 37 weeks of gestation) in the Brest University Hospital birth zone. Active surveillance from 2002 to 2006 and a prospective collection of hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea were initiated in the pediatric units of Brest University Hospital until May 2010. Numbers of hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea among the population of children born prematurely, before and after the start of the vaccination program, were compared using a Poisson regression model controlling for epidemic-to-epidemic variation. A total of 217 premature infants were vaccinated from 2007 to 2010. Vaccine coverage for a complete course of three doses was 41.9%. The vaccine safety in premature infants was similar to that in term infants. The vaccination program led to a division by a factor of 2.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 to 5.2) in the number of hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea during the first two epidemic seasons following vaccine introduction and by a factor of 11 (95% CI, 3.5 to 34.8) during the third season. We observed significant effectiveness of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine on the number of hospitalizations in a population of prematurely born infants younger than 3 years of age. A multicenter national study would provide better assessment of this impact. (This study [Impact of Systematic Infants Vaccination Against Rotavirus on Gastroenteritis Hospitalization: a Prospective Study in Brest District, France (IVANHOE)] has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00740935.). PMID:25080553

  16. Rotavirus vaccine - what you need to know

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by other germs. Another virus called porcine circovirus (or parts of it) can be found in ... get rotavirus vaccine. Babies who have had a type of bowel blockage called "intussusception" should not get ...

  17. Measuring indirect effects of rotavirus vaccine in low income countries.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Aisleen; Bar-Zeev, Naor; Cunliffe, Nigel A

    2016-08-17

    Widespread introduction of rotavirus vaccines has led to major reductions in the burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis worldwide. Vaccine effectiveness is diminished, however, in low income countries, that harbour the greatest burden of rotavirus attributed morbidity and mortality. Indirect effects of rotavirus vaccine (herd immunity and herd protection) could increase population level impact and improve vaccine cost effectiveness in such settings. While rotavirus vaccine indirect effects have been demonstrated in high and middle income countries, there are very little data from low income countries where force of infection, population structures and vaccine schedules differ. Targeted efforts to evaluate indirect effects of rotavirus vaccine in low income countries are required to understand the total impact of rotavirus vaccine on the global burden of rotavirus disease. PMID:27443593

  18. Estimating rotavirus vaccine effectiveness in Japan using a screening method

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Kaoru; Hara, Megumi; Sakanishi, Yuta; Shimanoe, Chisato; Nishida, Yuichiro; Matsuo, Muneaki; Tanaka, Keitaro

    2016-01-01

    abstract Rotavirus gastroenteritis is a highly contagious, acute viral disease that imposes a significant health burden worldwide. In Japan, rotavirus vaccines have been commercially available since 2011 for voluntary vaccination, but vaccine coverage and effectiveness have not been evaluated. In the absence of a vaccination registry in Japan, vaccination coverage in the general population was estimated according to the number of vaccines supplied by the manufacturer, the number of children who received financial support for vaccination, and the size of the target population. Patients with rotavirus gastroenteritis were identified by reviewing the medical records of all children who consulted 6 major hospitals in Saga Prefecture with gastroenteritis symptoms. Vaccination status among these patients was investigated by reviewing their medical records or interviewing their guardians by telephone. Vaccine effectiveness was determined using a screening method. Vaccination coverage increased with time, and it was 2-times higher in municipalities where the vaccination fee was supported. In the 2012/13 season, vaccination coverage in Saga Prefecture was 14.9% whereas the proportion of patients vaccinated was 5.1% among those with clinically diagnosed rotavirus gastroenteritis and 1.9% among those hospitalized for rotavirus gastroenteritis. Thus, vaccine effectiveness was estimated as 69.5% and 88.8%, respectively. This is the first study to evaluate rotavirus vaccination coverage and effectiveness in Japan since vaccination began. PMID:26680277

  19. Estimating rotavirus vaccine effectiveness in Japan using a screening method.

    PubMed

    Araki, Kaoru; Hara, Megumi; Sakanishi, Yuta; Shimanoe, Chisato; Nishida, Yuichiro; Matsuo, Muneaki; Tanaka, Keitaro

    2016-05-01

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis is a highly contagious, acute viral disease that imposes a significant health burden worldwide. In Japan, rotavirus vaccines have been commercially available since 2011 for voluntary vaccination, but vaccine coverage and effectiveness have not been evaluated. In the absence of a vaccination registry in Japan, vaccination coverage in the general population was estimated according to the number of vaccines supplied by the manufacturer, the number of children who received financial support for vaccination, and the size of the target population. Patients with rotavirus gastroenteritis were identified by reviewing the medical records of all children who consulted 6 major hospitals in Saga Prefecture with gastroenteritis symptoms. Vaccination status among these patients was investigated by reviewing their medical records or interviewing their guardians by telephone. Vaccine effectiveness was determined using a screening method. Vaccination coverage increased with time, and it was 2-times higher in municipalities where the vaccination fee was supported. In the 2012/13 season, vaccination coverage in Saga Prefecture was 14.9% whereas the proportion of patients vaccinated was 5.1% among those with clinically diagnosed rotavirus gastroenteritis and 1.9% among those hospitalized for rotavirus gastroenteritis. Thus, vaccine effectiveness was estimated as 69.5% and 88.8%, respectively. This is the first study to evaluate rotavirus vaccination coverage and effectiveness in Japan since vaccination began. PMID:26680277

  20. Catching-up with pentavalent vaccine: Exploring reasons behind lower rotavirus vaccine coverage in El Salvador.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Castaneda, Eduardo; Burnett, Eleanor; Elas, Miguel; Baltrons, Rafael; Pezzoli, Lorenzo; Flannery, Brendan; Kleinbaum, David; de Oliveira, Lucia Helena; Danovaro-Holliday, M Carolina

    2015-11-27

    Rotavirus vaccine was introduced in El Salvador in 2006 and is recommended to be given concomitantly with DTP-HepB-Haemophilus influenzae type b (pentavalent) vaccine at ages 2 months (upper age limit 15 weeks) and 4 months (upper age limit 8 months) of age. However, rotavirus vaccination coverage continues to lag behind that of pentavalent vaccine, even in years when national rotavirus vaccine stock-outs have not occurred. We analyzed factors associated with receipt of oral rotavirus vaccine among children who received at least 2 doses of pentavalent vaccine in a stratified cluster survey of children aged 24-59 months conducted in El Salvador in 2011. Vaccine doses included were documented on vaccination cards (94.4%) or in health facility records (5.6%). Logistic regression and survival analysis were used to assess factors associated with vaccination status and age at vaccination. Receipt of pentavalent vaccine by age 15 weeks was associated with rotavirus vaccination (OR: 5.1; 95% CI 2.7, 9.4), and receipt of the second pentavalent dose by age 32 weeks was associated with receipt of two rotavirus vaccine doses (OR: 5.0; 95% CI 2.1-12.3). Timely coverage with the first pentavalent vaccine dose was 88.2% in the 2007 cohort and 91.1% in the 2008 cohort (p=0.04). Children born in 2009, when a four-month national rotavirus vaccine stock-out occurred, had an older median age of receipt of rotavirus vaccine and were less likely to receive rotavirus on the same date as the same dose of pentavalent vaccine than children born in 2007 and 2008. Upper age limit recommendations for rotavirus vaccine administration contributed to suboptimal vaccination coverage. Survey data suggest that late rotavirus vaccination and co-administration with later doses of pentavalent vaccine among children born in 2009 helped increase rotavirus vaccine coverage following shortages. PMID:26263200

  1. Burden of Norovirus and Rotavirus in Children After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction, Cochabamba, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    McAtee, Casey L; Webman, Rachel; Gilman, Robert H; Mejia, Carolina; Bern, Caryn; Apaza, Sonia; Espetia, Susan; Pajuelo, Mónica; Saito, Mayuko; Challappa, Roxanna; Soria, Richard; Ribera, Jose P; Lozano, Daniel; Torrico, Faustino

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine in the field may set the stage for a changing landscape of diarrheal illness affecting children worldwide. Norovirus and rotavirus are the two major viral enteropathogens of childhood. This study describes the prevalence of norovirus and rotavirus 2 years after widespread rotavirus vaccination in Cochabamba, Bolivia. Stool samples from hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and outpatients aged 5-24 months without AGE were recruited from an urban hospital serving Bolivia's third largest city. Both viruses were genotyped, and norovirus GII.4 was further sequenced. Norovirus was found much more frequently than rotavirus. Norovirus was detected in 69/201 (34.3%) of specimens from children with AGE and 13/71 (18.3%) of those without diarrhea. Rotavirus was detected in 38/201 (18.9%) of diarrheal specimens and 3/71 (4.2%) of non-diarrheal specimens. Norovirus GII was identified in 97.8% of norovirus-positive samples; GII.4 was the most common genotype (71.4% of typed specimens). Rotavirus G3P[8] was the most prevalent rotavirus genotype (44.0% of typed specimens) and G2P[4] was second most prevalent (16.0% of typed specimens). This community is likely part of a trend toward norovirus predominance over rotavirus in children after widespread vaccination against rotavirus. PMID:26598569

  2. Diarrheal Diseases Hospitalization in Yemen before and after Rotavirus Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Amood Al-Kamarany, Mohammed; Al-Areqi, Lina; Mujally, Abulatif; Alkarshy, Fawzya; Nasser, Arwa; Jumaan, Aisha O

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to assess the impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on diarrheal diseases hospitalization and to identify the rotavirus genotypes most prevalent before and after vaccine introduction among children ≤ 5 years of age. Rotarix™ ® rotavirus vaccine is currently licensed for infants in Yemen and was introduced in 2012. The vaccination course consists of two doses. The first dose is administrated at 6 weeks of age and the second dose is completed by 10 weeks. Based on a longitudinal observational study, we assessed the impact of vaccination on rotavirus hospitalization before and after vaccination among children ≤ 5 years of age at the Yemeni-Swedish Hospital (YSH) in Taiz, Yemen. Prevaccination covered January 2009-July 2012 during which 2335 fecal samples were collected from children ≤ 5 years old. Postvaccination covered January 2013-December 2014 during which 1114 fecal samples were collected. Rotavirus was detected by Enzyme Linkage Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). The incidence of rotavirus hospitalization decreased from 43.79% in 2009 to 10.54% in 2014. Hospitalization due to rotavirus diarrhea was reduced by 75.93%. Vaccine coverage increased from 23% in 2012 to 72% in 2014. Also, the results showed that the most predominant genotypes in prevaccination period were G2P[4] (55.0%), followed by G1P[8] (15.0%), while in postvaccination period G1P[8] (31%) was the predominant genotype, followed by G9P[8] (27.5%). In conclusion, rotavirus vaccination in Yemen resulted in sharp reduction in diarrheal hospitalization. A successful rotavirus vaccination program in Yemen will rely upon efficient vaccine delivery systems and sustained vaccine efficacy against diverse and evolving rotavirus strains. PMID:27437161

  3. Diarrheal Diseases Hospitalization in Yemen before and after Rotavirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Al-Areqi, Lina; Mujally, Abulatif; Alkarshy, Fawzya; Nasser, Arwa; Jumaan, Aisha O.

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to assess the impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on diarrheal diseases hospitalization and to identify the rotavirus genotypes most prevalent before and after vaccine introduction among children ≤ 5 years of age. Rotarix™ ® rotavirus vaccine is currently licensed for infants in Yemen and was introduced in 2012. The vaccination course consists of two doses. The first dose is administrated at 6 weeks of age and the second dose is completed by 10 weeks. Based on a longitudinal observational study, we assessed the impact of vaccination on rotavirus hospitalization before and after vaccination among children ≤ 5 years of age at the Yemeni-Swedish Hospital (YSH) in Taiz, Yemen. Prevaccination covered January 2009–July 2012 during which 2335 fecal samples were collected from children ≤ 5 years old. Postvaccination covered January 2013–December 2014 during which 1114 fecal samples were collected. Rotavirus was detected by Enzyme Linkage Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). The incidence of rotavirus hospitalization decreased from 43.79% in 2009 to 10.54% in 2014. Hospitalization due to rotavirus diarrhea was reduced by 75.93%. Vaccine coverage increased from 23% in 2012 to 72% in 2014. Also, the results showed that the most predominant genotypes in prevaccination period were G2P[4] (55.0%), followed by G1P[8] (15.0%), while in postvaccination period G1P[8] (31%) was the predominant genotype, followed by G9P[8] (27.5%). In conclusion, rotavirus vaccination in Yemen resulted in sharp reduction in diarrheal hospitalization. A successful rotavirus vaccination program in Yemen will rely upon efficient vaccine delivery systems and sustained vaccine efficacy against diverse and evolving rotavirus strains. PMID:27437161

  4. Estimated impact and cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in India: effects of geographic and economic disparities.

    PubMed

    Rheingans, Richard; Anderson, John D; Anderson, Benjamin; Chakraborty, Poulomy; Atherly, Deborah; Pindolia, Deepa

    2014-08-11

    India accounts for 23% of global rotavirus mortality in under-five children, with more than 100,000 deaths from rotavirus annually. Introduction of a vaccine in India is considered to be the most effective intervention for preventing rotavirus mortality. Recent research suggests that there is considerable variation in rotavirus mortality burden across regional, gender and socio-economic subpopulations within India. In addition, there is potential variability in who would likely receive rotavirus vaccine if introduced. We use available household data to estimate heterogeneity in rotavirus mortality risk, vaccination benefits, and cost-effectiveness across geographic and socio-economic groups within India. We account for heterogeneity by modeling estimated three-dose routine vaccinations as a proxy for a generalized rotavirus vaccine, and mortality for subpopulations of children aggregated by region and state, socio-economic status and sex, separately. Results are presented for six geographic regions and for Bihar, Uttar Pradesh, and Madhya Pradesh, three high mortality states accounting for 56% of national mortality estimates. Impact estimates accounting for disparities predict rotavirus vaccine introduction will prevent 35,000 deaths at an average cost of $118/DALY averted (7292 INR/DALY averted). Rotavirus vaccines are most cost-effective for the poor living in high mortality regions and states. Reductions in geographic and socio-economic disparities based on regional estimates could prevent an additional 9400 deaths annually, while reductions in socio-economic disparities in the three highest morality states alone could prevent an additional 10,600 deaths annually. Understanding the impact of heterogeneity can help improve strategies to maximize the benefits of rotavirus vaccination introduction, leading to fewer lives lost as a result of rotavirus disease. PMID:25091669

  5. Prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis in infants and children: rotavirus vaccine safety, efficacy, and potential impact of vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Aruna; Fitzwater, Sean; Zhen, Anjie; Santosham, Mathuram

    2010-01-01

    Rotavirus infection is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis globally, with greater than 86% of deaths occurring in low-income and middle-income countries. There are two rotavirus vaccines currently licensed in the United States and prequalified by the World Health Organization. RV1 is a monovalent attenuated human rotavirus strain, given orally in two doses. RV5 is a pentavalent human-bovine reassortant rotavirus vaccine, given orally in three doses. A third rotavirus vaccine, LLV, is a lamb rotavirus strain given orally as a single dose, which is currently available only in China. RV1 and RV5 have been shown to be highly efficacious in developed countries, and initial results from trials in Africa and Asia are promising as well. At least three other vaccines are in development, which are being developed by manufacturers of developing countries. Further studies are needed to clarify issues including administration of oral rotavirus vaccines with breastfeeding and other oral vaccines, and alterations in dosing schedule. Using new data on global diarrheal burden, rotavirus is estimated to cause 390,000 deaths in children younger than 5 years. Should rotavirus vaccines be introduced in the routine immunization programs of all countries, a potential of 170,000 deaths could be prevented annually. The largest impact on mortality would be seen in low-income and middle-income countries, despite poor immunization coverage and lower efficacy. Therefore, international efforts are needed to ensure that rotavirus vaccines reach the populations with highest burden of rotavirus disease. PMID:20714358

  6. Live Virus Smallpox Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index SMALLPOX FACT SHEET The Live Virus Smallpox Vaccine The vaccinia virus is the "live virus" used ... cannot cause smallpox. What is a "live virus" vaccine? A "live virus" vaccine is a vaccine that ...

  7. Effectiveness of rotavirus vaccines in preventing cases and hospitalizations due to rotavirus gastroenteritis in Navarre, Spain.

    PubMed

    Castilla, Jesús; Beristain, Xabier; Martínez-Artola, Víctor; Navascués, Ana; García Cenoz, Manuel; Alvarez, Nerea; Polo, Isabel; Mazón, Ana; Gil-Setas, Alberto; Barricarte, Aurelio

    2012-01-11

    Two rotavirus vaccines have been available since 2006. This study evaluates the effectiveness of these vaccines using a test-negative case-control design in Navarre, Spain. We included children 3-59 months of age who sought medical care for gastroenteritis and for whom stool samples were taken between January 2008 and June 2011. About 9% had received the pentavalent vaccine (RotaTeq) and another 8% received the monovalent vaccine (Rotarix). Cases were the 756 children with confirmed rotavirus and controls were the 6036 children who tested negative for rotavirus. Thirty-five percent of cases and 9% of controls had required hospitalization (p<0.0001). The adjusted effectiveness of complete vaccination was 78% (95% CI: 68-85%) in preventing rotavirus gastroenteritis and 83% (95% CI: 65-93%) in preventing hospitalization for rotavirus gastroenteritis. No differences between the two vaccines were detected (p=0.4523). Both vaccines were highly effective in preventing cases and hospital admissions in children due to rotavirus gastroenteritis. PMID:22122860

  8. Rotavirus-associated hospitalization and emergency department costs and rotavirus vaccine program impact☆

    PubMed Central

    Kilgore, April; Donauer, Stephanie; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Weinberg, Geoffrey A.; Payne, Daniel C.; Szilagyi, Peter G.; Rice, Marilyn; Cassedy, Amy; Ortega-Sanchez, Ismael R.; Parashar, Umesh D.; Staat, Mary Allen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the medical costs of laboratory-confirmed rotavirus hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits and estimate the economic impact of the rotavirus vaccine program. Patients and methods During 4 rotavirus seasons (2006–2009), children <3 years of age hospitalized or seen in the ED with laboratory-confirmed rotavirus were identified through active population-based rotavirus surveillance in three US counties. Medical costs were obtained from hospital and physician billing data, and factors associated with increased costs were examined. Annual national costs were estimated using rotavirus hospitalization and ED visit rates and medical costs for rotavirus hospitalizations and ED visits from our surveillance program for pre- (2006–2007) and post-vaccine (2008–2009) time periods. Results Pre-vaccine, for hospitalizations, the median medical cost per child was $3581, the rotavirus hospitalization rate was 22.1/10,000, with an estimated annual national cost of $91 million. Post-vaccine, the median medical cost was $4304, the hospitalization rate was 6.3/10,000 and the estimated annual national cost was $31 million. Increased costs were associated with study site, age <3 months, underlying medical conditions and an atypical acute gastroenteritis presentation. For ED visits, the pre-vaccine median medical cost per child was $574, the ED visit rate was 291/10,000 resulting in an estimated annual national cost of $192 million. Post-vaccine, the median medical cost was $794, the ED visit rate was 71/10,000 with an estimated annual national cost of $65 million. Conclusions After implementation of rotavirus immunization, the total annual medical costs decreased from $283 million to $96 million, an annual reduction of $187 million PMID:23845802

  9. The effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine in preventing acute gastroenteritis during rotavirus seasons among Polish children

    PubMed Central

    Kieltyka, Agnieszka; Majewska, Renata; Augustyniak, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rotavirus is the main etiological cause of intestinal infections in children. Voluntary rotavirus vaccines were included in the Polish vaccination schedule in 2007. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a completed rotavirus vaccination course in preventing acute gastroenteritis in Polish infants during their first five years of life. Material and methods This was a retrospective cohort study conducted in Lesser Poland (Malopolska Province). The sample population included a group of 303 children who received the completed rotavirus vaccination course and 303 children not vaccinated against rotavirus. The date of the child's acute gastroenteritis diagnosis and his or her vaccination history were extracted from the physicians’ records. Each kind of diagnosed acute gastroenteritis during winter-spring rotavirus seasons was treated as the endpoint. The relative risk of having gastrointestinal infection was assessed using the hazard ratio from the Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results In the examined group, 96 (15.8%) children had winter-spring gastrointestinal infections. In the non-vaccinated children, the cumulative incidence of these infections in the first 5 years of life was 20.8%, whereas in the children vaccinated with Rotarix it was only 10.9%. Those who were vaccinated with Rotarix had a 44% reduction in the risk of a winter-spring acute gastroenteritis infection compared to those not vaccinated with Rotarix (p = 0.005). Birth weight less than 2500 g increased the risk of the infection twofold and also reached statistical significance (p = 0.044). Conclusions The results showed that Rotarix is effective in preventing acute gastroenteritis in Polish children during rotavirus seasons. PMID:27279856

  10. Construction and Characterization of Human Rotavirus Recombinant VP8* Subunit Parenteral Vaccine Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xiaobo; Cao, Dianjun; Jones, Ronald W.; Li, Jianping; Szu, Shousun; Hoshino, Yasutaka

    2012-01-01

    Two currently licensed live oral rotavirus vaccines (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) are highly efficacious against severe rotavirus diarrhea. However, the efficacy of such vaccines in selected low-income African and Asian countries is much lower than that in middle or high-income countries. Additionally, these two vaccines have recently been associated with rare case of intussusception in vaccinated infants. We developed a novel recombinant subunit parenteral rotavirus vaccine which may be more effective in low-income countries and also avert the potential problem of intussusception. Truncated recombinant VP8* (ΔVP8*) protein of human rotavirus strain Wa P[8], DS-1 P[4] or 1076 P[6] expressed in E. coli was highly soluble and was generated in high yield. Guinea pigs hyperimmunized intramuscularly with each of the ΔVP8* proteins (i.e., (P[8], P[4] or P[6]) developed high levels of homotypic as well as variable levels of heterotypic neutralizing antibodies. Moreover, the selected ΔVP8* proteins when administered to mice at a clinically relevant dosage, route and schedule, elicited high levels of serum anti-VP8* IgG and/or neutralizing antibodies. Our data indicated that the ΔVP8* proteins may be a plausible additional candidate as new parenteral rotavirus vaccines. PMID:22885016

  11. Rotavirus vaccine: a cost effective control measure for India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun; Goel, Manish K; Jain, Ram Bilas; Khanna, Pardeep; Vibha, Vibha

    2012-04-01

    Globally, rotavirus diarrhea results in 453,000 deaths in children younger than 5 y—37% of deaths attributable to diarrhea and 5% of all deaths in children younger than 5 y. India alone accounts for 22% (~100,000 deaths) of all deaths attributable to rotavirus infection. Two oral rotavirus vaccines are available: Rotarix, a monovalent P1A[8] G1 vaccine (GlaxoSmithKline), and RotaTeq, a pentavalent bovine-human reassortant vaccine (Merck). Rotarix is administered in a 2-dose schedule with the first and second doses of DTP (DTP1, DTP2). RotaTeq requires a 3-dose schedule with DTP1, DTP2 and DTP3 with an interval of 4–10 weeks between doses. The first dose of either vaccine should be administered to infants aged 6–15 weeks irrespective of the history of previous rotavirus infection, and the maximum age for administering the last dose of either vaccine should be 32 weeks. Although India would require funding from international health organizations/GAVI until new indigenous rotavirus vaccine candidates are developed at a cheaper price, introduction of vaccination into the national immunization program would be a cost-effective step toward control of the rotavirus diarrhea-related morbidity and mortality in India. PMID:23071989

  12. Rotavirus vaccination coverage and adherence to recommended age among infants in Flanders (Belgium) in 2012.

    PubMed

    Braeckman, T; Theeten, H; Lernout, T; Hens, N; Roelants, M; Hoppenbrouwers, K; Van Damme, P

    2014-01-01

    In Belgium, rotavirus vaccination has been recommended and partially reimbursed since October 2006. Through a retrospective survey in 2012, we estimated the coverage rate of the rotavirus vaccination in Flanders among infants born in 2010. Using a standardised questionnaire, 874 families were interviewed at home, collecting information on demographic characteristics, socio-economic background and documented vaccination history (updated from medical files and vaccination database, if needed). Adherence to the recommended age for vaccination (8, 12 and 16 weeks) was also assessed. The coverage rate for two doses of rotavirus vaccination was 92.2% (95% confidence interval: 90.2-93.8). Respectively 31.7% and 10.1% of the children received their first and second dose at the recommended age. Incomplete vaccination was often a deliberate choice of the parents. Only eight children (1%) were vaccinated after the maximum age of 26 weeks. Factors identified by multiple logistic regression as related to incomplete vaccination were: living in the province of Antwerp, unemployed mother, and three or more older siblings in the household. Four years after introduction, the coverage rates were surprisingly high for a vaccine that is not fully reimbursed and not readily available in the vaccinator's fridge, which is the case for the other recommended infant vaccines. PMID:24871757

  13. Evidence of Vaccine-related Reassortment of Rotavirus, Brazil, 2008–2010

    PubMed Central

    Marques da Silva, Marcelle Figueira; Goméz, Mariela Martinéz; Resque, Hugo Reis; Ichihara, Maria Yury Travassos; Volotão, Eduardo de Mello; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of 27 rotavirus strains from vaccinated and unvaccinated children revealed reassortment events in 3 strains: a gene derived from a vaccine; a gene acquired from a circulating strain; and reassortment between circulating strains. Data suggest that the widespread use of this monovalent rotavirus vaccine may introduce vaccine genes into circulating human rotaviruses or vice versa. PMID:24188273

  14. Scope for rotavirus vaccination in India: revisiting the scientific evidence.

    PubMed

    Neogi, Sutapa Bandyopadhyay; Hasan, Habib; Sheikh, Kabir; Zodpey, Sanjay

    2011-10-01

    Rotavirus vaccines have been developed to prevent deaths resulting from severe diarrhea of rotavirus origin. The use of vaccines as an intervention at scale to prevent and control the burden of rotavirus diarrhea is supported by the argument that prevailing public health measures such as hygiene and sanitation, breast feeding and use of ORS have failed to prevent severe dehydration resulting from diarrhea. The article reviews the existing evidence on the rationale of using rotavirus vaccine as against the feasibility of scaling it up in developing countries like India. The vaccines currently available may not cover the strains circulating in Indian population. The diversity of Rotavirus infection in the country is tremendous and since the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy data has not been collected for India, there is first a need to conduct studies to measure the extent of protection and cross-protection provided by the available vaccines for local strains, before venturing into Rotavirus vaccination program. The potential benefits of immunization have to be first vetted against the risks involved by the policymakers and other stakeholders. PMID:21611712

  15. Effectiveness of the live attenuated rotavirus vaccine produced by a domestic manufacturer in China studied using a population-based case-control design.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Shan-Shan; Li, Yue; Wang, Song-Mei; Zhang, Xin-Jiang; Hao, Zhi-Yong; Chen, Ying; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Ma, Jing-Chen; Zhou, Peng; Zhang, Zhen; Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Wang, Xuan-Yi

    2015-10-01

    A universal rotavirus (RV) immunization program is a potentially cost-effective measure for preventing RV infection in China. However, the efficacy of the only licensed RV vaccine (Lanzhou lamb rotavirus vaccine, LLR), which is made by a domestic manufacturer, has not been proven by a properly designed clinical trial. In October 2011 to March 2012, to measure the potential protection provided by LLR, a case-control study nested in a population-based active diarrhea surveillance study of children <5 years of age was conducted in rural Zhengding county. During the study period, 308 episodes of diarrhea were identified as being caused by RV infection, resulting in an incidence rate of 48.0/1000 people/year. The predominant RV serotype was G3 (61.5%), followed by G1 (15.2%), and G9 (6.5%). Overall, a protection of 35.0% (95% confidence interval (CI), 13.0%-52.0%) was identified, and higher protection was found among moderate RV gastroenteritis cases caused by the serotype G3 (52.0% 95% CI: 2.0%-76.1%). A concurrently conducted case-control study comparing non-RV viral diarrheal cases with non-diarrheal controls in the same population found that the RV vaccine offered no protection against non-RV diarrhea. Even under a less ideal immunization schedule, the oral LLR conferred a certain level of protection against RV gastroenteritis. However, further studies are needed to understand the full characteristics of the LLR, including its efficacy when administered following the optimal regimen, the potential risk of inducing intussusception, and the direct and indirect protective effects of LLR. PMID:26576341

  16. Effectiveness of the live attenuated rotavirus vaccine produced by a domestic manufacturer in China studied using a population-based case–control design

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Shan-Shan; Li, Yue; Wang, Song-Mei; Zhang, Xin-Jiang; Hao, Zhi-Yong; Chen, Ying; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Ma, Jing-Chen; Zhou, Peng; Zhang, Zhen; Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Wang, Xuan-Yi

    2015-01-01

    A universal rotavirus (RV) immunization program is a potentially cost-effective measure for preventing RV infection in China. However, the efficacy of the only licensed RV vaccine (Lanzhou lamb rotavirus vaccine, LLR), which is made by a domestic manufacturer, has not been proven by a properly designed clinical trial. In October 2011 to March 2012, to measure the potential protection provided by LLR, a case–control study nested in a population-based active diarrhea surveillance study of children <5 years of age was conducted in rural Zhengding county. During the study period, 308 episodes of diarrhea were identified as being caused by RV infection, resulting in an incidence rate of 48.0/1000 people/year. The predominant RV serotype was G3 (61.5%), followed by G1 (15.2%), and G9 (6.5%). Overall, a protection of 35.0% (95% confidence interval (CI), 13.0%–52.0%) was identified, and higher protection was found among moderate RV gastroenteritis cases caused by the serotype G3 (52.0% 95% CI: 2.0%–76.1%). A concurrently conducted case–control study comparing non-RV viral diarrheal cases with non-diarrheal controls in the same population found that the RV vaccine offered no protection against non-RV diarrhea. Even under a less ideal immunization schedule, the oral LLR conferred a certain level of protection against RV gastroenteritis. However, further studies are needed to understand the full characteristics of the LLR, including its efficacy when administered following the optimal regimen, the potential risk of inducing intussusception, and the direct and indirect protective effects of LLR. PMID:26576341

  17. Comparative analysis of pentavalent rotavirus vaccine strains and G8 rotaviruses identified during vaccine trial in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Heylen, Elisabeth; Zeller, Mark; Ciarlet, Max; Lawrence, Jody; Steele, Duncan; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2015-01-01

    RotaTeqTM is a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine based on a bovine rotavirus genetic backbone in vitro reassorted with human outer capsid genes. During clinical trials of RotaTeqTM in Sub-Saharan Africa, the vaccine efficacy over a 2-year follow-up was lower against the genotypes contained in the vaccine than against the heterotypic G8P[6] and G8P[1] rotavirus strains of which the former is highly prevalent in Africa. Complete genome analyses of 43 complete rotavirus genomes collected during phase III clinical trials of RotaTeqTM in Sub-Saharan Africa, were conducted to gain insight into the high level of cross-protection afforded by RotaTeqTM against these G8 strains. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of a high number of bovine rotavirus gene segments in these human G8 strains. In addition, we performed an in depth analysis on the individual amino acid level which showed that G8 rotaviruses were more similar to the RotaTeqTM vaccine than non-G8 strains. Because RotaTeqTM possesses a bovine genetic backbone, the high vaccine efficacy against G8 strains might be partially explained by the fact that all these strains contain a complete or partial bovine-like backbone. Altogether, this study supports the hypothesis that gene segments other than VP7 and VP4 play a role in vaccine-induced immunity. PMID:26440913

  18. Symptomatic Infection and Detection of Vaccine and Vaccine-Reassortant Rotavirus Strains in 5 Children: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Boom, Julie A.; Sahni, Leila C.; Payne, Daniel C.; Gautam, Rashi; Lyde, Freda; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Bowen, Michael D.; Tate, Jacqueline E.; Rench, Marcia A.; Gentsch, Jon R.; Parashar, Umesh D.; Baker, Carol J.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine or vaccine-reassortant rotavirus strains were detected in fecal specimens from 5 of 106 (4.7%) immunocompetent children who required treatment for rotavirus gastroenteritis at a large pediatric hospital in Texas in 2009–2010. Four strains were related to pentavalent rotavirus vaccine, whereas one was related to monovalent rotavirus vaccine. The contribution of these strains to each patient’s illness was unclear given that 2 patients had prominent respiratory symptoms and 2 were concurrently infected with another pathogen (group F adenovirus and norovirus). Continued monitoring is necessary to assess the role of vaccine strains and vaccine-reassortant strains in pediatric rotavirus infections. PMID:22872730

  19. Rotavirus Diversity and Evolution in the Post-Vaccine World

    PubMed Central

    Patton, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are a large genetically diverse population of segmented double-stranded (ds) RNA viruses that are important causes of gastroenteritis in many animal species. The human RVs are responsible for the deaths of nearly 450,000 infants and young children each year, most occurring in developing countries. Recent large-scale sequencing efforts have revealed that the genomes of human RVs typically consist of phylogenetically linked constellations of eleven dsRNA segments. The presence of such preferred constellations indicate that the human RV genes have co-evolved to produce protein sets that work optimally together to support virus replication. Two of the viral genes encode virion outer capsid proteins (VP7 and VP4) whose antigenic properties define the G/P type of the virus. From year-to-year and place-to-place, the G/P type of human RVs associated with disease can fluctuate dramatically, phenomena that can be associated with the presence and behavior of genetically distinct RV clades. The recent introduction of two live attenuated RV vaccines (RotaReq™ and Rotarix™) into the childhood vaccination programs of various countries has been highly effective in reducing the incidence of RV diarrheal disease. Whether the widespread use of these vaccines will introduce selective pressures on human RVs, triggering genetic and antigenic changes that undermine the effectiveness of vaccinations programs, is uncertain and will require continued surveillance of human RVs. PMID:22284787

  20. Dynamic modeling of cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination, Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Freiesleben de Blasio, Birgitte; Flem, Elmira; Latipov, Renat; Kuatbaeva, Ajnagul; Kristiansen, Ivar Sønbø

    2014-01-01

    The government of Kazakhstan, a middle-income country in Central Asia, is considering the introduction of rotavirus vaccination into its national immunization program. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis of rotavirus vaccination spanning 20 years by using a synthesis of dynamic transmission models accounting for herd protection. We found that a vaccination program with 90% coverage would prevent ≈880 rotavirus deaths and save an average of 54,784 life-years for children <5 years of age. Indirect protection accounted for 40% and 60% reduction in severe and mild rotavirus gastroenteritis, respectively. Cost per life year gained was US $18,044 from a societal perspective and US $23,892 from a health care perspective. Comparing the 2 key parameters of cost-effectiveness, mortality rates and vaccine cost at vaccination program costs would be entirely offset. To further evaluate efficacy of a vaccine program, benefits of indirect protection conferred by vaccination warrant further study. PMID:24378188

  1. Prevalence of rotavirus antibodies in breast milk and inhibitory effects to rotavirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Trang, Nguyen V; Braeckman, Tessa; Lernout, Tinne; Hau, Vu T B; Anh, Le T K; Luan, Le T; Van Damme, Pierre; Anh, Dang D

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is the most common cause of childhood diarrhea worldwide, and several vaccines have been successfully developed to reduce the burden of disease. However, lower vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy in developing countries might be related to the virus-neutralizing activity of breast milk. We examined possible differences in breast milk antibody levels (total IgA antibody, RV-specific antibodies, and RV-neutralizing antibodies) between healthy mothers living in a rural area (n = 145) and mothers living in an urban area (n = 147) of Vietnam. Total IgA concentration was significantly higher in samples from mothers in the rural region than in samples from mothers in the urban region, whereas urban mothers had significantly higher RV-specific IgA antibody titers than did rural mothers. Neutralizing antibodies against RV strain G1P[8] were undetected in nearly one-half of the breast milk samples (45–48%), whereas the majority of the remaining samples had low antibody titers (2–16). Despite these low titers, the breast milk still reduced vaccine strain titers (2 × 106 plaque forming units/mL) up to 80% or more, even at a milk-to-virus ratio of 1:8. An increase in neutralizing anti-G1P[8] antibody titers (P < 0.05) in rural infants over time suggests a continuous exposure to circulating RV. These results contribute to the understanding of the potential interference of breast milk with RV vaccine efficacy and immunogenicity in Vietnamese infants. PMID:25668672

  2. The cost effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in Iran.

    PubMed

    Mousavi Jarrahi, Yasaman; Zahraei, Seyed Mohsen; Sadigh, Nader; Esmaeelpoor Langeroudy, Keyhan; Khodadost, Mahmoud; Ranjbaran, Mehdi; Sanjari Moghaddam, Ali; Besharat, Mehdi; Mosavi Jarrahi, Alireza

    2016-03-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhea leading to hospitalization or disease-specific death among young children. Effective vaccines have recently been approved and successful vaccination program implemented. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost effectiveness of mass rotavirus vaccination program in Iran. We developed a Markov model that reflects key features of rotavirus natural history. Parameters of the model were assessed by field study or developed through literature search and published data. We applied the model to the 2009 Iranian birth cohort and evaluated the cost-effectiveness of including the rotavirus vaccine (Rotarix®) into Iranian expanded immunization program (EPI). With an estimated hospitalization rate of 0.05 and outpatient rate of 0.23 cases per person-year, vaccinating cohort of 1231735 infants in Iran with 2 doses of (Rotarix®), would prevent 32092 hospitalizations, 158750 outpatient visits, and 1591 deaths during 5 y of follow-up. Under base-case assumption of $10 cost per course of vaccine, the vaccination would incur an extra cost of $1,019,192 from health care perspective and would avert 54680 DALYs. From societal perspective, there would be $15,192,568 saving for the society with the same averted DALYs. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio showed a cost of $19 US dollars per averted DALY from health care perspective and a saving of $278 US dollars for each averted DALY from societal perspective. Introducing rotavirus vaccine into EPI program would be highly cost-effective public health intervention in Iran. PMID:26360331

  3. Demographic variability, vaccination, and the spatiotemporal dynamics of rotavirus epidemics.

    PubMed

    Pitzer, Virginia E; Viboud, Cécile; Simonsen, Lone; Steiner, Claudia; Panozzo, Catherine A; Alonso, Wladimir J; Miller, Mark A; Glass, Roger I; Glasser, John W; Parashar, Umesh D; Grenfell, Bryan T

    2009-07-17

    Historically, annual rotavirus activity in the United States has started in the southwest in late fall and ended in the northeast 3 months later; this trend has diminished in recent years. Traveling waves of infection or local environmental drivers cannot account for these patterns. A transmission model calibrated against epidemiological data shows that spatiotemporal variation in birth rate can explain the timing of rotavirus epidemics. The recent large-scale introduction of rotavirus vaccination provides a natural experiment to further test the impact of susceptible recruitment on disease dynamics. The model predicts a pattern of reduced and lagged epidemics postvaccination, closely matching the observed dynamics. Armed with this validated model, we explore the relative importance of direct and indirect protection, a key issue in determining the worldwide benefits of vaccination. PMID:19608910

  4. Cost effectiveness of a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in Oman

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rotavirus gastroenteritis (RGE) is the leading cause of diarrhea in young children in Oman, incurring substantial healthcare and economic burden. We propose to formally assess the potential cost effectiveness of implementing universal vaccination with a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5) on reducing the health care burden and costs associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis (RGE) in Oman Methods A Markov model was used to compare two birth cohorts, including children who were administered the RV5 vaccination versus those who were not, in a hypothetical group of 65,500 children followed for their first 5 years of life in Oman. The efficacy of the vaccine in reducing RGE-related hospitalizations, emergency department (ED) and office visits, and days of parental work loss for children receiving the vaccine was based on the results of the Rotavirus Efficacy and Safety Trial (REST). The outcome of interest was cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained from health care system and societal perspectives. Results A universal RV5 vaccination program is projected to reduce, hospitalizations, ED visits, outpatient visits and parental work days lost due to rotavirus infections by 89%, 80%, 67% and 74%, respectively. In the absence of RV5 vaccination, RGE-related societal costs are projected to be 2,023,038 Omani Rial (OMR) (5,259,899 United States dollars [USD]), including 1,338,977 OMR (3,481,340 USD) in direct medical costs. However, with the introduction of RV5, direct medical costs are projected to be 216,646 OMR (563,280 USD). Costs per QALY saved would be 1,140 OMR (2,964 USD) from the health care payer perspective. An RV5 vaccination program would be considered cost saving, from the societal perspective. Conclusions Universal RV5 vaccination in Oman is likely to significantly reduce the health care burden and costs associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis and may be cost-effective from the payer perspective and cost saving from the societal

  5. Impact of rotavirus vaccination on coverage and timing of pentavalent vaccination - Experience from 2 Latin American countries.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, A; Pessler, F; Akmatov, M K

    2016-05-01

    We examined the coverage and timing of rotavirus vaccination and the impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on coverage and timing of the pentavalent vaccine. We used data from the Demographic and Health Surveys in Honduras (2011/2012) and Peru (2012). The samples were divided into 2 subcohorts: children born before and after the introduction of rotavirus vaccine. We compared coverage and timing of the pentavalent vaccine in the aforementioned subcohorts. Coverage with the first and second doses of rotavirus vaccination was 95% (95% confidence intervals: 93-97%) and 91% (89-95%) in Honduras and 79% (77-82%) and 72% (69-75%) in Peru, respectively. Coverage increased in both countries over the years. The proportion of children vaccinated according to age-appropriate vaccination schedules varied between 67% (second dose of rotavirus vaccinations in Peru) and 89% (first dose of rotavirus vaccination in Honduras). Coverage with the first and second doses of pentavalent vaccination remained constant over the years in Honduras, while in Peru there was a significant increase in coverage over the years (p for trend, <0.0001). In both countries, timing of pentavalent vaccination was better in post-rota-cohorts than in pre-rota-cohorts. Since its introduction, coverage of rotavirus vaccination has improved over time in both countries. An introduction of rotavirus vaccination in both countries appears to have improved the coverage and timing of other similarly scheduled vaccinations. PMID:26833132

  6. Value of post-licensure data on benefits and risks of vaccination to inform vaccine policy: The example of rotavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Umesh D; Cortese, Margaret M; Payne, Daniel C; Lopman, Benjamin; Yen, Catherine; Tate, Jacqueline E

    2015-11-27

    In 1999, the first rhesus-human reassortant rotavirus vaccine licensed in the United States was withdrawn within a year of its introduction after it was linked with intussusception at a rate of ∼1 excess case per 10,000 vaccinated infants. While clinical trials of 60,000-70,000 infants of each of the two current live oral rotavirus vaccines, RotaTeq (RV5) and Rotarix (RV1), did not find an association with intussusception, post-licensure studies have documented a risk in several high and middle income countries, at a rate of ∼1-6 excess cases per 100,000 vaccinated infants. However, considering this low risk against the large health benefits of vaccination that have been observed in many countries, including in countries with a documented vaccine-associated intussusception risk, policy makers and health organizations around the world continue to support the routine use of RV1 and RV5 in national infant immunization programs. Because the risk and benefit data from affluent settings may not be directly applicable to developing countries, further characterization of any associated intussusception risk following rotavirus vaccination as well as the health benefits of vaccination is desirable for low income settings. PMID:26122581

  7. Value of Post-Licensure Data on Benefits and Risks of Vaccination to Inform Vaccine Policy: The Example of Rotavirus Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Umesh D; Cortese, Margaret M; Payne, Daniel C; Lopman, Benjamin; Yen, Catherine; Tate, Jacqueline E

    2015-12-01

    In 1999, the first rhesus-human reassortant rotavirus vaccine licensed in the U.S. was withdrawn within a year of its introduction after it was linked with intussusception at a rate of ~1 excess case per 10,000 vaccinated infants. While clinical trials of 60,000-70,000 infants of each of the two current live oral rotavirus vaccines, RotaTeq (RV5) and Rotarix (RV1), did not find an association with intussusception, post-licensure studies have documented a risk in several high and middle income countries, at a rate of ~1-6 excess cases per 100,000 vaccinated infants. However, considering this low risk against the large health benefits of vaccination that have been observed in many countries, including in countries with a documented vaccine-associated intussusception risk, policy makers and health organizations around the world continue to support the routine use of RV1 and RV5 in national infant immunization programs. Because the risk and benefit data from affluent settings may not be directly applicable to developing countries, further characterization of any associated intussusception risk following rotavirus vaccination as well as the health benefits of vaccination is desirable for low income settings. PMID:26590437

  8. 75 FR 48706 - Proposed Vaccine Information Materials for Rotavirus Vaccine

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... these materials is included in a December 17, 1999 Federal Register notice (64 FR 70914). Proposed..., rotavirus, hepatitis A, meningococcal, human papillomavirus (HPV), and trivalent influenza...

  9. Intussusception following rotavirus vaccination in the Valencia Region, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Vilar, Silvia; Díez-Domingo, Javier; Puig-Barberà, Joan; Gil-Prieto, Ruth; Romio, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown high intussusception rates in Spain. We performed a hospital-based retrospective observational study of the intussusception risk following rotavirus vaccinations among infants in Valencia, a region of Spain with an annual birth cohort of approximately 48,000 children, during 2007–2011, using a self-controlled case series design. We performed medical record review of all cases using Brighton Collaboration´s case definition and assessed the positive predictive value (PPV) of the intussusception diagnosis code. Among 151 hospitalized cases discharged as intussusception, we confirmed 136 as Brighton Collaboration's Levels 1 or 2, resulting in a PPV of 93% (95% CI: 87%–96%). Three confirmed cases occurred within days 1–7 following the first rotavirus vaccination. The incidence rate ratio was 9.0 (95% CI: 0.9–86.5) (crude) and 4.7 (95% CI:0.3–74.1)(age adjusted). In this first study in Europe, the intussusception risk point estimate was comparable to other studies, although results were not statistically significant, maybe due to limited power. The high PPV found will facilitate implementation of a larger study without requiring medical record review. Our finding of very few vaccinated cases despite a thorough 5-year investigation in a country that, according to previous studies, may have a large background rate of intussusception is reassuring and should contribute to deliberations about the need to include rotavirus vaccines in the official Spanish calendars. PMID:26083707

  10. Health Impact of Rotavirus Vaccination in Developing Countries: Progress and Way Forward.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Umesh D; Johnson, Hope; Steele, A Duncan; Tate, Jacqueline E

    2016-05-01

    Two rotavirus vaccines have been licensed in >100 countries worldwide since 2006. As of October 2105, these vaccines have been implemented in the national immunization programs of 79 countries, including 36 low-income countries that are eligible for support for vaccine purchase from Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. Rotavirus vaccines were initially introduced in Australia and countries of the Americas and Europe after completion of successful clinical trials in these regions, and the impact of routine vaccination in reducing the health burden of severe childhood gastroenteritis in these regions has been well documented. Because of concerns around the performance of orally administered rotavirus vaccines in developing countries, vaccine implementation in these settings only began after additional clinical trials were completed and the World Health Organization issued a global recommendation for use of rotavirus vaccines in 2009. This supplementary issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases includes a collection of articles describing the impact and effectiveness of routine rotavirus vaccination in developing countries that were among the early adopters of rotavirus vaccine. The data highlight the benefits of vaccination and should provide valuable evidence to sustain vaccine use in these countries and encourage other countries to adopt routine rotavirus vaccination to reduce the health burden of severe childhood gastroenteritis. PMID:27059361

  11. Diarrhea incidence and intestinal infections among rotavirus vaccinated infants from a poor area in Brazil: a spatial analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute diarrhea is the second leading cause of mortality among children under 5 years of age in developing countries. The pathogen most strongly associated with diarrhea is rotavirus followed by enteric pathogens such as bacteria, helminthes and protozoan. Adequate sanitation and water supply contribute to decrease acute diarrhea incidence of most etiologic agents, although vaccination remains the most important intervention to control rotavirus acute diarrhea. This study aimed to describe environmental conditions and analyze spatially the acute diarrhea and intestinal infection among rotavirus vaccinated infants from Laranjeiras-Sergipe, Brazil. Methods Children were enrolled between 2 and 11 months of age and followed through 12 months. Demographic, socioeconomic and environmental data were obtained from a questionnaire, and immunization data were obtained from children vaccination card. Children stool samples were collected each month in order to run laboratory analyses. The household spatial localization was obtained by using a Global Positioning System (GPS). Spatial analysis was performed using the TerraView computer program and Kernel intensity estimation. Results A total of 1,113 stool samples were collected with 80 being diarrhea associated. Diarrhea incidence rate was 0.5 ± 1.0 episodes/child/year. The overall infection rates by Ascaris lumbricoides, Endolimax nana, Giardia lamblia and rotavirus were 5.1%, 3.0%, 0.9% and 2.6%, respectively. 3.8% of diarrhea-associated stool samples were positive for rotavirus and 11.3% were positive for helminths and protozoans. There were some changes on spatial distribution of intestinal infections and diarrhea episodes along the four trimesters evaluated. Conclusions The studied infants live equally in precarious conditions of sanitation which probably explain the significant rates of parasitic infections appearing in early life. The low acute diarrhea incidence in the studied rotavirus vaccinated

  12. Pentavalent Rotavirus Vaccine in Infants With Surgical Gastrointestinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Eric J.; Thomas, Ron; Duggan, Christopher; Asmar, Basim I.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5) has been shown to be well-tolerated and efficacious in preventing rotavirus gastroenteritis in healthy infants. Safety and immunogenicity of RV5 in infants with surgical gastrointestinal disease have not been studied. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of RV5 in infants with a history of congenital or acquired intestinal disease requiring resection compared with healthy infants. Methods Infants with intestinal resection were matched by gestational age and chronological age to healthy infants (controls). Dose 1 of RV5 was given at 10 to 12 weeks of chronological age. Doses 2 and 3 were given at intervals of 4 to 10 weeks, with all 3 doses given by 32 weeks. All infants were monitored for adverse events (AEs) by telephone calls, clinic visits, and parental written reports during the first 42 days after each dose and monthly thereafter by telephone for 12 months. Serum anti-rotavirus immunoglobulin A (IgA) titers were measured prevaccination and 2 weeks after dose 3. Results A total of 5 infants with surgical gastrointestinal disease and 3 control subjects were enrolled. All participants (100%) mounted a 3-fold increase in serum anti-rotavirus IgA geometric mean titer postvaccination. RV5 administration to surgical infants was well tolerated with a majority of AEs being attributed to the underlying medical condition. Conclusions Postvaccination serum anti-rotavirus IgA levels indicate that RV5 is immunogenic in infants with a history of bowel resection, despite varying lengths of residual bowel. RV5 was well tolerated with few vaccine-related AEs. PMID:24614127

  13. Impact of vaccination uptake on hospitalizations due to rotavirus acute gastroenteritis in 2 different socioeconomic areas of Spain.

    PubMed

    Giménez Sánchez, Francisco; Nogueira, Esperanza Jiménez; Sánchez Forte, Miguel; Ibáñez Alcalde, Mercedes; Cobo, Elvira; Angulo, Raquel; Garrido Fernández, Pablo

    2016-04-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of hospitalization due to acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in infants and toddlers. However, rotavirus vaccination has been associated with a decline in hospitalization rates due to rotavirus AGE. A descriptive retrospective study was conducted to analyze the impact of rotavirus vaccination on the rate of hospitalizations due to AGE among children ≤2 years old in 2 areas of the province of Almería, Spain. After eight years of rotavirus vaccination, rates of hospitalizations due to rotavirus AGE are diminished. This decline is closely related to vaccine coverage in the studied areas. PMID:26810147

  14. Analysis of factors in response to rotavirus vaccination counselling in a private paediatric clinic.

    PubMed

    Kannan Kutty, P; Pathmanathan, G; Salleh, N M

    2010-06-01

    Rotavirus vaccine is available as an optional vaccine in Malaysia. The counselling of optional vaccines is considered an integral part of the health services offered in a private paediatric clinic. While ensuring that all babies are up-todate with their compulsory immunization, counselling of optional vaccines like the rotavirus vaccine could give parents the choice to make an informed decision on the acceptance of this vaccine. Over a period of two years, we counselled the parents regarding diarrhoea caused by rotavirus disease and the rotavirus vaccine. In this study, the factors that were significantly associated with the acceptance of the rotavirus vaccine were the gender of the baby, the mother's age, the mother's occupation, the mode of payment for the vaccine, the number of previous visits to the clinic by the parents, the number of counselling sessions given to the parents and the pre-counselling awareness or knowledge of rotavirus disease and rotavirus vaccine. It is hoped that these findings may assist busy clinicians in their continuous efforts to provide health education and vaccination counselling to the parents of their patients. PMID:23756797

  15. A universal infant rotavirus vaccine program in two delivery models: Effectiveness and adverse events following immunization

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, Carolyn; Langley, Joanne M; Halperin, Scott A; Zelman, Mitchell; Maritime Universal Rotavirus Vaccination Program, MURVP

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of diarrhea leading to hospitalization in young children. Rotavirus vaccines are available in Canada but have not been introduced in all provinces. In a controlled trial, 2 study sites (Prince Edward Island and the Capital District Health Authority (District 9, Nova Scotia) introduced universal rotavirus vaccine programs for infants at 2 and 4 months of age beginning 1 December 2010, using public health nurse or general practitioner-delivery models, respectively. A third site (Saint John, NB) served as the non-intervention control setting. Vaccine coverage, rotavirus hospitalizations, intussusception and all-cause diarrhea were monitored. A universal rotavirus vaccine program with >90% coverage was associated with reductions in rotavirus-associated hospitalizations (from a peak of 52.8 hospitalizations/100,000 population to 0 hospitalizations) in infants < 12 months and 1 to < 2 y of age 12 months after program implementation. No apparent reduction occurred in the site with vaccine coverage of < 40%, or in the non-intervention control site. No cases of intussusception were associated with vaccine receipt, and no increase in all-cause diarrhea was observed. A universal infant rotavirus vaccine program with high coverage was associated with reductions in rotavirus and no safety signals; no reduction was observed in settings with low vaccine coverage. PMID:25746110

  16. Evaluation of the Intussusception Risk after Pentavalent Rotavirus Vaccination in Finnish Infants

    PubMed Central

    Leino, Tuija; Ollgren, Jukka; Strömberg, Nina; Elonsalo, Ulpu

    2016-01-01

    Background An association between rotavirus immunisation and intussusception (IS) has been suggested with present rotavirus vaccines in post-licensure studies. In Finland, rotavirus vaccination programme was implemented in September 2009 using a 2, 3, and 5 months schedule with the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine. By the end of 2013, it is estimated that 719 000 rotavirus vaccine doses have been given in the national programme of which 240 000 were first doses. Nationwide register allows us to evaluate the association between rotavirus vaccination and IS. Methods and Materials Cases of IS diagnosed during 1999–2013 were identified from National Hospital Discharge Register. All cases under 250 days of age diagnosed during 2009–2013 were confirmed by reviewing medical charts. Self-controlled case-series method was used to assess the risk of IS during 1–21 days compared to 22–42 days post vaccination. Findings In register data the relative incidence of IS at 2 months of age between the post and pre vaccination era was 9.1 (95%CI 2.0–84.3). We identified 22 verified cases with date of admission less than 43 days after any of the three rotavirus vaccine doses. The incidence of IS in the risk period after the 1st dose relative to the control period was 2.0 (95% CI 0.5–8.4; p = 0.34.) Number of excess IS cases per 100 000 first vaccine doses was therefore estimated to be 1.04 (95% CI 0.0–2.5), i.e. one additional IS case per 96 000 first doses of rotavirus vaccine (95% CI 54 600 to ∞). There was no risk detected after 2nd and 3rd doses. Conclusion The finding is in line with the recent published estimates. The benefits of rotavirus immunisation programme outweigh possible small risks of intussusception. PMID:26950702

  17. Uptake of oral rotavirus vaccine and timeliness of routine immunization in Brazil’s National Immunization Program

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Brendan; Samad, Samia; de Moraes, José Cássio; Tate, Jacqueline E.; Danovaro-Holliday, M. Carolina; de Oliveira, Lúcia Helena; Rainey, Jeanette J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In March, 2006, oral rotavirus vaccine was added to Brazil’s infant immunization schedule with recommended upper age limits for initiating (by age 14 weeks) and completing (by age 24 weeks) the two-dose series to minimize age-specific risk of intussusception following rotavirus vaccination. Several years after introduction, estimated coverage with rotavirus vaccine (83%) was lower compared to coverage for other recommended childhood immunizations (≥94%). Methods We analyzed data from Brazil’s national immunization program on uptake of oral rotavirus vaccine by geographic region and compared administrative coverage estimates for first and second doses of oral rotavirus vaccine (Rota1 and Rota2) with first and second doses of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine (DTP-Hib1 and DTP-Hib2). For 27 Brazilian cities, we compared differences between estimated rotavirus and DTP-Hib coverage in 2010 with delayed receipt of DTP-Hib vaccine among a cohort of children surveyed before rotavirus introduction. Results In 2010, infant vaccination coverage was 99.0% for DTP-Hib1 versus 95.2% for Rota1 (3.8% difference), and 98.4% for DTP-Hib2 versus 83.0% for Rota2 (15.4% difference), with substantial regional variation. Differences between DTP-Hib and rotavirus vaccination coverage in Brazilian cities correlated with delay in DTP-Hib vaccination among children surveyed. Age restrictions for initiating and completing the rotavirus vaccination series likely contributed to lower coverage with rotavirus vaccine in Brazil. Conclusion To maximize benefits of rotavirus vaccination, strategies are needed to improve timeliness of routine immunizations; monitoring rotavirus vaccine uptake and intussusception risk is needed to guide further recommendations for rotavirus vaccination. PMID:23313652

  18. Group A rotavirus gastroenteritis: post-vaccine era, genotypes and zoonotic transmission

    PubMed Central

    Luchs, Adriana; Timenetsky, Maria do Carmo Sampaio Tavares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This article provides a review of immunity, diagnosis, and clinical aspects of rotavirus disease. It also informs about the changes in epidemiology of diarrheal disease and genetic diversity of circulating group A rotavirus strains following the introduction of vaccines. Group A rotavirus is the major pathogen causing gastroenteritis in animals. Its segmented RNA genome can lead to the emergence of new or unusual strains in human populations via interspecies transmission and/or reassortment events. PMID:27462899

  19. Safety and immunogenicity of pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in healthy elderly subjects

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Jody; He, Su; Martin, Jason; Schödel, Florian; Ciarlet, Max; Murray, Alexander V

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus may be an important causative agent of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in the elderly, a population that is particularly vulnerable due to waning immunity. It is estimated that rotavirus may account for 2–5% of adult gastroenteritis hospitalizations in the United States. This is the first study to assess the safety and immunogenicity of the live pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5) in an elderly population. In this study, healthy, independently living adults aged 65–80 years were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive three 2-mL oral doses of RV5 or placebo administered 28–42 days apart. All subjects were followed for safety for 42 days post any vaccination and up to 180 days after the final vaccination for clinical adverse events. Immunogenicity of RV5 was measured by serum anti-rotavirus IgA enzyme immunoassay and serum neutralizing antibody responses to human rotavirus serotypes prior to and after each dose. Results of this study demonstrated that RV5 was generally safe and well tolerated in healthy elderly adults, where 9% of placebo and 27% of RV5 recipients experienced a vaccine-related adverse event of mild or moderate intensity. Immune responses (serum anti-rotavirus immunoglobulin A [IgA] and serum neutralizing antibodies against human rotavirus serotypes in the vaccine) were augmented in this population after a single dose of RV5, despite the factors of older age and preexisting antibodies to the virus. Therefore, if vaccination in the elderly is needed, further evaluation of RV5 as a candidate vaccine in this age group may be warranted. PMID:25424929

  20. Early impact of rotavirus vaccination in a large paediatric hospital in the UK.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, D; Read, J M; Cooke, R P D; Vivancos, R; Iturriza-Gómara, M; Allen, D J; French, N; Cunliffe, N

    2016-06-01

    The impact of routine rotavirus vaccination on community-acquired (CA) and healthcare-associated (HA) rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) at a large paediatric hospital, UK, was investigated over a 13-year period. A total of 1644 hospitalized children aged 0-15 years tested positive for rotavirus between July 2002 and June 2015. Interrupted time-series analysis demonstrated that, post vaccine introduction (July 2013 to June 2015), CA- and HA-RVGE hospitalizations were 83% [95% confidence interval (CI): 72-90%) and 83% (95% CI: 66-92%] lower than expected, respectively. Rotavirus vaccination has rapidly reduced the hospital rotavirus disease burden among both CA- and HA-RVGE cases. PMID:26876744

  1. Cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in the Netherlands; the results of a consensus model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Each year rotavirus gastroenteritis results in thousands of paediatric hospitalisations and primary care visits in the Netherlands. While two vaccines against rotavirus are registered, routine immunisation of infants has not yet been implemented. Existing cost-effectiveness studies showed inconsistent results for these vaccines because of lack of consensus on the impact. We aimed to investigate which factors had a major impact on cost-effectiveness and were primarily responsible for the large differences in previously estimated cost-effectiveness ratios. Methods Based on updated data on health outcomes and cost estimates, we re-assessed the cost-effectiveness of routine paediatric rotavirus vaccination within the National Immunization Program for the Netherlands. Two consensus meetings were organised with national and international experts in the field to achieve consensus and resolve potential controversies. Results It was estimated that rotavirus vaccination in the Netherlands could avert 34,214 cases of rotavirus gastroenteritis in children aged less than 5 years. Notably, 2,779 hospitalisations were averted of which 315 were extensions of existing hospital stays due to nosocomial rotavirus infection. With a threshold varying from 20K€ - 50K€ per QALY and according to the base-case scenario, the full vaccination costs per child leading to cost-effectiveness was €57.76 -€77.71. Results were sensitive to the inclusion of potential vaccine induced herd protection, QALY losses and number of deaths associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis. Conclusions Our economic analysis indicates that inclusion of rotavirus vaccination in the Dutch National Immunization Program might be cost-effective depending on the cost of the vaccine and the impact of rotavirus gastroenteritis on children's quality of life. PMID:21663620

  2. Sustained low rotavirus activity and hospitalisation rates in the post-vaccination era in Belgium, 2007 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Sabbe, Martine; Berger, Nicolas; Blommaert, Adriaan; Ogunjimi, Benson; Grammens, Tine; Callens, Michiel; Van Herck, Koen; Beutels, Philippe; Van Damme, Pierre; Bilcke, Joke

    2016-07-01

    In 2006, Belgium was the first country in the European Union to recommend rotavirus vaccination in the routine infant vaccination schedule and rapidly achieved high vaccine uptake (86-89% in 2007). We used regional and national data sources up to 7 years post-vaccination to study the impact of vaccination on laboratory-confirmed rotavirus cases and rotavirus-related hospitalisations and deaths. We showed that (i) from 2007 until 2013, vaccination coverage remained at 79-88% for a complete course, (ii) in children 0-2 years, rotavirus cases decreased by 79% (95% confidence intervals (CI): 68--89%) in 2008-2014 compared to the pre-vaccination period (1999--2006) and by 50% (95% CI: 14-82%) in the age group ≥ 10 years, (iii) hospitalisations for rotavirus gastroenteritis decreased by 87% (95% CI: 84-90%) in 2008--2012 compared to the pre-vaccination period (2002--2006), (iv) median age of rotavirus cases increased from 12 months to 17 months and (v) the rotavirus seasonal peak was reduced and delayed in all post-vaccination years. The substantial decline in rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalisations and in rotavirus activity following introduction of rotavirus vaccination is sustained over time and more pronounced in the target age group, but with evidence of herd immunity. PMID:27418466

  3. Analysis by rotavirus gene 6 reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay of rotavirus-positive gastroenteritis cases observed during the vaccination phase of the Rotavirus Efficacy and Safety Trial (REST)

    PubMed Central

    Matson, David O; Vesikari, Timo; Dennehy, Penelope; Dallas, Michael D; Goveia, Michelle G; Itzler, Robbin F; Ciarlet, Max

    2014-01-01

    During the vaccination phase of the Rotavirus Efficacy and Safety Trial (REST), the period between the administration of dose 1 through 13 days after the administration of dose 3, there were more wild-type rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) cases among vaccine recipients compared with placebo recipients using the protocol-specified microbiological plaque assay in the clinical-efficacy cohort, a subset of subjects where vaccine efficacy against RVGE of any severity was assessed. In this study, a rotavirus genome segment 6-based reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction assay was applied post hoc to clarify the accuracy of type categorization of all these RVGE cases in vaccine recipients during the vaccination phase of REST. The assay characterized 147 (90%) of 163 re-assayed RVGE cases or rotavirus-associated health care contacts as type-determinable: either wild-type or vaccine-type rotavirus strains. In the clinical-efficacy cohort (N = 5673), 19 (18.8%) of 101 samples from RVGE cases contained wild-type rotavirus, 70 (69.3%) vaccine virus, and 12 (11.9%) were indeterminable. In the large-scale cohort (N = 68,038), 10 (34.5%) of 29 samples from RVGE-related health care contacts contained wild-type rotavirus strains, 15 (51.7%) vaccine-type rotavirus strains, and 4 (13.8%) were indeterminable. Of the 33 samples from RVGE cases in placebo recipients, all were confirmed to contain wild-type rotaviruses. Altogether, this post-hoc re-evaluation showed that the majority (75%) of type-determinable RVGE cases or health care contacts that occurred during the vaccination phase of REST in vaccine recipients were associated with vaccine-type rotavirus strains rather than wild-type rotavirus strains. PMID:25424931

  4. Detection of Rotavirus Genotypes in Korea 5 Years after the Introduction of Rotavirus Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ju-Young; Kim, Min-Sung; Jung, Tae Woong; Kim, Seong Joon; Kang, Jin-Han; Han, Seung Beom; Kim, Sang Yong; Rhim, Jung Woo; Kim, Hwang-Min; Park, Jae Hong; Jo, Dae Sun; Ma, Sang Hyuk; Jeong, Hye-Sook; Cheon, Doo-Sung; Kim, Jong-Hyun

    2015-10-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is one of the most important viral etiologic agents of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in children. Although effective RV vaccines (RVVs) are now used worldwide, novel genotypes and outbreaks resulting from rare genotype combinations have emerged. This study documented RV genotypes in a Korean population of children with AGE 5 yr after the introduction of RVV and assessed potential genotype differences based on vaccination status or vaccine type. Children less than 5-yr-old diagnosed with AGE between October 2012 and September 2013 admitted to 9 medical institutions from 8 provinces in Korea were prospectively enrolled. Stool samples were tested for RV by enzyme immunoassay and genotyped by multiplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. In 346 patients, 114 (32.9%) were RV-positive. Among them, 87 (76.3%) patients were infected with RV alone. Eighty-six of 114 RV-positive stool samples were successfully genotyped, and their combinations of genotypes were G1P[8] (36, 41.9%), G2P[4] (12, 14.0%), and G3P[8] (6, 7.0%). RV was detected in 27.8% of patients in the vaccinated group and 39.8% in the unvaccinated group (P=0.035). Vaccination history was available for 67 of 86 cases with successfully genotyped RV-positive stool samples; RotaTeq (20, 29.9%), Rotarix (7, 10.4%), unvaccinated (40, 59.7%). The incidence of RV AGE is lower in the RV-vaccinated group compared to the unvaccinated group with no evidence of substitution with unusual genotype combinations. PMID:26425045

  5. Exceptionally low rotavirus incidence in the Netherlands in 2013/14 in the absence of rotavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Hahné, S; Hooiveld, M; Vennema, H; van Ginkel, A; de Melker, H; Wallinga, J; van Pelt, W; Bruijning-Verhagen, P

    2014-01-01

    An unexpected drop in rotavirus (RV) detections was observed in the Netherlands in 2014, without RV vaccination. The estimated decrease in RV detections and gastroenteritis consultations in under five year-olds, in January-April 2014, compared to the same months in previous years, was 72% and 36%, respectively. The low birth rate, mild winter, high RV incidence in the previous year and the introduction of RV vaccination in neighbouring countries may have contributed to this decrease. PMID:25375899

  6. Prevalence of Rotavirus Genotypes in Children Younger than 5 Years of Age before the Introduction of a Universal Rotavirus Vaccination Program: Report of Rotavirus Surveillance in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Durmaz, Riza; Kalaycioglu, Atila Taner; Acar, Sumeyra; Bakkaloglu, Zekiye; Karagoz, Alper; Korukluoglu, Gulay; Ertek, Mustafa; Torunoglu, Mehmet Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background Group A rotaviruses are the most common causative agent of acute gastroenteritis among children less than 5 years of age throughout the world. This sentinel surveillance study was aimed to obtain baseline data on the rotavirus G and P genotypes across Turkey before the introduction of a universal rotavirus vaccination program. Methods Rotavirus antigen-positive samples were collected from 2102 children less than 5 years of age who attended hospitals participating in the Turkish Rotavirus Surveillance Network. Rotavirus antigen was detected in the laboratories of participating hospitals by commercial serological tests such as latex agglutination, immunochromatographic test or enzyme immunoassay. Rotavirus G and P genotypes were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using consensus primers detecting the VP7 and VP4 genes, followed by semi-nested type-specific multiplex PCR. Results RT-PCR found rotavirus RNA in 1644 (78.2%) of the samples tested. The highest rate of rotavirus positivity (38.7%) was observed among children in the 13 to 24 month age group, followed by children in the age group of 25 to 36 months (28.3%). A total of eight different G types, six different P types, and 42 different G–P combinations were obtained. Four common G types (G1, G2, G3, and G9) and two common P types (P[8] and P[4]) accounted for 95.1% and 98.8% of the strains, respectively. G9P[8] was the most common G/P combination found in 40.5% of the strains followed by G1P[8] (21.6%), G2P[8] (9.3%), G2P[4] (6.5%), G3P[8] (3.5%), and finally, G4P[8] (3.4%). These six common genotypes included 83.7% of the strains tested in this study. The rate of uncommon genotypes was 14%. Conclusion The majority of the strains analyzed belonged to the G1–G4 and G9 genotypes, suggesting high coverage of current rotavirus vaccines. This study also demonstrates a dramatic increase in G9 genotype across the country. PMID:25437502

  7. Burden of paediatric Rotavirus Gastroenteritis (RVGE) and potential benefits of a universal Rotavirus vaccination programme with a pentavalent vaccine in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Rotavirus is the most common cause of gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. The aim of the study was to assess the health outcomes and the economic impact of a universal rotavirus vaccination programme with RotaTeq, the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine, versus no vaccination programme in Spain. Methods A birth cohort was followed up to the age of 5 using a cohort model. Epidemiological parameters were taken from the REVEAL study (a prospective epidemiological study conducted in Spain, 2004-2005) and from the literature. Direct and indirect costs were assessed from the national healthcare payer and societal perspectives by combining health care resource utilisation collected in REVEAL study and unit costs from official sources. RotaTeq per protocol efficacy data was taken from a large worldwide rotavirus clinical trial (70,000 children). Health outcomes included home care cases, General Practioner (GP)/Paediatrician, emergency department visits, hospitalisations and nosocomial infections. Results The model estimates that the introduction of a universal rotavirus vaccination programme with RotaTeq (90% coverage rate) would reduce the rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) burden by 75% in Spain; 53,692 home care cases, 35,187 GP/Paediatrician visits, 34,287 emergency department visits, 10,987 hospitalisations and 2,053 nosocomial infections would be avoided. The introduction of RotaTeq would avoid about 76% of RVGE-related costs from both perspectives: €22 million from the national health system perspective and €38 million from the societal perspective. Conclusions A rotavirus vaccination programme with RotaTeq would reduce significantly the important medical and economic burden of RVGE in Spain. PMID:20698958

  8. Did Large-Scale Vaccination Drive Changes in the Circulating Rotavirus Population in Belgium?

    PubMed Central

    Pitzer, Virginia E.; Bilcke, Joke; Heylen, Elisabeth; Crawford, Forrest W.; Callens, Michael; De Smet, Frank; Van Ranst, Marc; Zeller, Mark; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination can place selective pressures on viral populations, leading to changes in the distribution of strains as viruses evolve to escape immunity from the vaccine. Vaccine-driven strain replacement is a major concern after nationwide rotavirus vaccine introductions. However, the distribution of the predominant rotavirus genotypes varies from year to year in the absence of vaccination, making it difficult to determine what changes can be attributed to the vaccines. To gain insight in the underlying dynamics driving changes in the rotavirus population, we fitted a hierarchy of mathematical models to national and local genotype-specific hospitalization data from Belgium, where large-scale vaccination was introduced in 2006. We estimated that natural- and vaccine-derived immunity was strongest against completely homotypic strains and weakest against fully heterotypic strains, with an intermediate immunity amongst partially heterotypic strains. The predominance of G2P[4] infections in Belgium after vaccine introduction can be explained by a combination of natural genotype fluctuations and weaker natural and vaccine-induced immunity against infection with strains heterotypic to the vaccine, in the absence of significant variation in strain-specific vaccine effectiveness against disease. However, the incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis is predicted to remain low despite vaccine-driven changes in the distribution of genotypes. PMID:26687288

  9. Improved immunogenicity of biodegradable polymer particles entrapped rotavirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Bismita; Ray, Alok R; Panda, Amulya K; Ray, Pratima

    2011-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) entrapped in polylactide (PLA) and polylactide-coglycolide (PLGA) polymer particles were formulated and evaluated in mice for improved immunogenicity using oral, intranasal (IN), and intramuscular (IM) routes of administration. Microparticles of size ranges between 1 and 8 µm were prepared using double emulsion solvent evaporation technique. Stabilizers like mouse serum albumin, sucrose, and sodium bicarbonate that were used during particle formulation helped in minimizing the denaturation of the entrapped antigen. Immunization with 20 µg of antigen entrapped in polymeric particles through various routes of administration elicited measurable amount of antibody titer in mice. The immunoglobulin A (IgA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) titer (≥4-fold rise between pre and post immunized sera) was analyzed by the use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PLGA encapsulated RV microparticles elicited better antibody response through IN route (90%) where as PLA encapsulated RV microparticles showed improved response when administrated through oral route (83.3%). Overall, the performance of IN route based immunization was significantly higher than oral and IM route ( p<0.001) with both the polymers. The results are of indication that, PLGA encapsulated RV microparticles have greater potential for vaccine formulation to combat rotavirus infection. PMID:20207774

  10. Synthesizing evidences for policy translation: a public health discourse on rotavirus vaccine in India.

    PubMed

    Panda, Samiran; Das, Aritra; Samanta, Saheli

    2014-08-11

    The debate on the relevance of rotavirus vaccine to immunization program in India, where 27 million children are born every year, rages on. We synthesized the issues raised during these debates and reviewed the current literature to identify themes that could inform public health policy decision. The paradigm we used integrated disease burden data, host and environmental factors, vaccine efficacy, immunization program issues, and economic considerations. Our synthesis reveals that substantive country specific information on disease burden and economic impact of rotavirus illness in India is constrained by lack of public discussion and qualitative studies on mothers' perceptions of the vaccine in concern. The need to improve the performance of current immunization program against six major vaccine preventable diseases (tuberculosis, diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, and measles) is often cited as a priority over introduction of rotavirus vaccine. Health in India being a state subject, we emphasize that the states which are in a position to reap the benefit of rotavirus vaccine, due to their good immunization program performance, should not be restrained from doing so. Meanwhile, the poorly performing states should step up their vaccination program and increase immunization coverage. Scientific, ethical and societal concerns captured through multiple sources indicate that the introduction of rotavirus vaccine would be a good investment for India. PMID:25091671

  11. Association of Maternal Immunity with Rotavirus Vaccine Immunogenicity in Zambian Infants

    PubMed Central

    Chilengi, Roma; Simuyandi, Michelo; Beach, Lauren; Mwila, Katayi; Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Emperador, Devy M.; Velasquez, Daniel E.; Bosomprah, Samuel; Jiang, Baoming

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Live attenuated oral vaccines against rotavirus (RV) have been shown to be less efficacious in children from developing countries. Reasons for this disparity are not fully understood. We assessed the role of maternal factors including breast milk RV-specific IgA, transplacentally acquired infant serum RV-specific IgG and maternal HIV status in seroconversion among Zambian infants routinely immunized with Rotarix™ (RV1). Methods 420 mother-child pairs were recruited at infant age 6–12 weeks in Lusaka. Clinical information and samples were collected at baseline and at one month following the second dose of RV1. Determination of breast milk RV-specific IgA and serum RV-specific IgA and IgG was done using standardized ELISA. Seroconversion was defined as a ≥ 4 fold rise in serum IgA titre from baseline to one-month post RV1 dose 2, while seropositivity of IgA was defined as serum titre ≥ 40 and antibody variables were modelled on log-base 2. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of the odds of seroconversion. Results Baseline infant seropositivity was 25.5% (91/357). The seroconversion frequency was 60.2% (130/216). Infants who were IgA seropositive at baseline were less likely to seroconvert compared to their seronegative counterparts (P = 0.04). There was no evidence of an association between maternal HIV status and seroconversion (P = 0.25). Higher titres of breast milk rotavirus-specific IgA were associated with a lower frequency of seroconverson (Nonparametric test for trend Z = -2.84; P<0.01): a two-fold increase in breast milk RV-specific IgA titres was associated with a 22% lower odds of seroconversion (OR = 0.80; 95% CI = 0.68–0.94; P = 0.01). There was seasonal variation in baseline breast milk rotavirus-specific IgA titres, with significantly higher GMTs during the cold dry months (P = 0.01). Conclusion Low immunogenicity of RV1 vaccine could be explained in part by exposure to high antibody titres in breast milk and

  12. Overcoming perceptions of financial barriers to rotavirus vaccine introduction in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, E Anthony S; de Quadros, Ciro A; Santosham, Mathuram; Parashar, Umesh D; Steele, A Duncan

    2013-01-01

    Despite a WHO recommendation in 2009, reaffirmed in 2013, that all countries should consider introducing rotavirus vaccines into their National Immunization Programs, as of June 2013 only 45 have done so. One major consideration appears to have been the costs of the vaccine to countries. Of concern, is that Asian countries have been slow to introduce rotavirus vaccines despite having robust data that could inform the decision-making process. Although decisions on new vaccine introduction are very complex and vary by country and region, economic evaluations are often pivotal once vaccine efficacy and safety has been established, and disease burden documented and communicated. Unfortunately, with private sector list prices of vaccines often used in economic evaluations, rather than a potential public health sector pricing structure, policy-makers may defer decisions on rotavirus vaccine introduction based on the belief that “the vaccine price is too high,” even though this might be based on erroneous data. The Pan American Health Organization’s Revolving Fund provides one example of how vaccine price can be made more competitive and transparent through a regional tendering process. Other mechanisms, such as tiered pricing and UNICEF procurement, also exist that could help Asian and other countries move forward more quickly with rotavirus vaccine introduction. PMID:23955246

  13. European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases consensus recommendations for rotavirus vaccination in Europe: update 2014.

    PubMed

    Vesikari, Timo; Van Damme, Pierre; Giaquinto, Carlo; Dagan, Ron; Guarino, Alfredo; Szajewska, Hania; Usonis, Vytautas

    2015-06-01

    The first evidence-based recommendations for rotavirus (RV) vaccination in Europe were prepared at the time of licensure of 2 live oral RV vaccines (Rotarix, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, and RotaTeq, Sanofi Pasteur MSD) in 2006 and published in 2008. Since then several countries in Europe and more globally have adopted universal RV vaccination of all healthy infants as part of their national immunization programs (NIPs). The experience from these NIPs has produced a wealth of post-introduction effectiveness data that, together with the evidence from prelicensure efficacy trials presented in the 2008 Recommendations, support the case of RV vaccination in Europe. The prelicensure safety trials of Rotarix and RotaTeq, each in populations of more than 60,000 infants, did not reveal risk of intussusception (IS), but postvaccination surveillance in several countries, particularly Australia and Mexico, has established that the risk of IS for both vaccines after the first dose might be between 1:50,000 and 1:80,000. Although it may be argued that the risk is acceptable vis-à-vis the great benefits of RV vaccination, this argument alone may not suffice, and every effort should be made to reduce the risk of IS. Considerable evidence, including postvaccination surveillance data from Germany, suggests that the risk of IS can be reduced by early administration of the first dose of oral RV vaccine. The previous European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases/European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition recommendations held that the first dose of oral RV vaccine should be given between 6 and 12 weeks of age; this recommendation is sustained but with an emphasis toward the lower range of the recommended age, that is, preferably between 6 and 8 weeks of age. At the time of the earlier recommendations, experience of RV vaccination in premature infants and other special target groups was limited. It is now recommended with greater confidence than

  14. Maintaining Vaccine Delivery Following the Introduction of the Rotavirus and Pneumococcal Vaccines in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bruce Y.; Assi, Tina-Marie; Rookkapan, Korngamon; Wateska, Angela R.; Rajgopal, Jayant; Sornsrivichai, Vorasith; Chen, Sheng-I; Brown, Shawn T.; Welling, Joel; Norman, Bryan A.; Connor, Diana L.; Bailey, Rachel R.; Jana, Anirban; Van Panhuis, Willem G.; Burke, Donald S.

    2011-01-01

    Although the substantial burdens of rotavirus and pneumococcal disease have motivated many countries to consider introducing the rotavirus vaccine (RV) and heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) to their National Immunization Programs (EPIs), these new vaccines could affect the countries' vaccine supply chains (i.e., the series of steps required to get a vaccine from their manufacturers to patients). We developed detailed computational models of the Trang Province, Thailand, vaccine supply chain to simulate introducing various RV and PCV-7 vaccine presentations and their combinations. Our results showed that the volumes of these new vaccines in addition to current routine vaccines could meet and even exceed (1) the refrigerator space at the provincial district and sub-district levels and (2) the transport cold space at district and sub-district levels preventing other vaccines from being available to patients who arrive to be immunized. Besides the smallest RV presentation (17.1 cm3/dose), all other vaccine introduction scenarios required added storage capacity at the provincial level (range: 20 L–1151 L per month) for the three largest formulations, and district level (range: 1 L–124 L per month) across all introduction scenarios. Similarly, with the exception of the two smallest RV presentation (17.1 cm3/dose), added transport capacity was required at both district and sub-district levels. Added transport capacity required across introduction scenarios from the provincial to district levels ranged from 1 L–187 L, and district to sub-district levels ranged from 1 L–13 L per shipment. Finally, only the smallest RV vaccine presentation (17.1 cm3/dose) had no appreciable effect on vaccine availability at sub-districts. All other RV and PCV-7 vaccines were too large for the current supply chain to handle without modifications such as increasing storage or transport capacity. Introducing these new vaccines to Thailand could have dynamic effects on

  15. Monitoring of group A rotaviruses in wild-living birds in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Ursu, K; Papp, H; Kisfali, P; Rigó, D; Melegh, B; Martella, V; Bányai, K

    2011-03-01

    Rotavirus is a common pathogen causing gastroenteritis in humans and domesticated animals. The incidence of rotavirus in wild-living animals, particularly in avian species, has not been systematically investigated. In this study 1220 fecal samples and cloacal swabs collected from wild-living birds during 2008 in Hungary were tested for the presence of group A rotaviruses by a VP6 gene-specific reverse-transcription-polymerase-chain-reaction assay. Of the 1220 samples, 276 and 944 were processed as individual and pooled specimens, respectively. Rotavirus was identified in two pooled pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) samples and two individual reed bunting samples (Emberiza schoeniclus). These data indicated a very low prevalence of group A rotaviruses (0.3%) in our sample set. Nonetheless, the present study, together with existing literature data, implies that rotavirus infections occur in a wide spectrum of feral bird species. These findings are exciting and suggest that pursuing rotavirus monitoring is needed to uncover avian rotavirus strain diversity and understand rotavirus ecology in nature. PMID:21500648

  16. Cost-Effectiveness of Rotavirus Vaccination for Under-Five Children in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Shakerian, Sareh; Moradi Lakeh, Maziar; Esteghamati, Abdoulreza; Zahraei, Mohsen; Yaghoubi, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rotavirus diarrhea is one of the most important causes of death among under-five children. Anti-rotavirus vaccination of these children may have a reducing effect on the disease. Objectives: this study is intended to contribute to health policy-makers of the country about the optimal decision and policy development in this area, by performing cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis on anti-rotavirus vaccination for under-5 children. Patients and Methods: A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed using a decision tree model to analyze rotavirus vaccination, which was compared with no vaccination with Iran’s ministry of health perspective in a 5-year time horizon. Epidemiological data were collected from published and unpublished sources. Four different assumptions were considered to the extent of the disease episode. To analyze costs, the costs of implementing the vaccination program were calculated with 98% coverage and the cost of USD 7 per dose. Medical and social costs of the disease were evaluated by sampling patients with rotavirus diarrhea, and sensitivity analysis was also performed for different episode rates and vaccine price per dose. Results: For the most optimistic assumption for the episode of illness (10.2 per year), the cost per DALY averted is 12,760 and 7,404 for RotaTeq and Rotarix vaccines, respectively, while assuming the episode of illness is 300%, they will be equal to 2,395 and 354, respectively, which will be highly cost-effective. Number of life-years gained is equal to 3,533 years. Conclusions: Assuming that the illness episodes are 100% and 300% for Rotarix and 300% for Rota Teq, the ratio of cost per DALY averted is highly cost-effective, based on the threshold of the world health organization (< 1 GDP per capita = 4526 USD). The implementation of a national rotavirus vaccination program is suggested. PMID:26396704

  17. A qualitative assessment of factors influencing acceptance of a new rotavirus vaccine among health care providers and consumers

    SciTech Connect

    Manish M Patel, Alan P Janssen, Richard Tardif, Mark Herring, Umesh Parashar

    2007-10-18

    In 2006, a new rotavirus vaccine (RotaTeq) was licensed in the US and recommended for routine immunization of all US infants. Because a previously licensed vaccine (Rotashield) was withdrawn from the US for safety concerns, identifying barriers to uptake of RotaTeq will help develop strategies to broaden vaccine coverage. Our qualitative assessment provides complementary data to recent quantitative surveys and suggests that physicians and parents are likely to adopt the newly licensed rotavirus vaccine. Increasing parental awareness of the rotavirus disease burden and providing physicians with timely post-marketing surveillance data will be integral to a successful vaccination program.

  18. Cost-effectiveness analysis of rotavirus vaccination among Libyan children using a simple economic model

    PubMed Central

    Alkoshi, Salem; Maimaiti, Namaitijiang; Dahlui, Maznah

    2014-01-01

    Background Rotavirus infection is a major cause of childhood diarrhea in Libya. The objective of this study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in that country. Methods We used a published decision tree model that has been adapted to the Libyan situation to analyze a birth cohort of 160,000 children. The evaluation of diarrhea events in three public hospitals helped to estimate the rotavirus burden. The economic analysis was done from two perspectives: health care provider and societal. Univariate sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess uncertainty in some values of the variables selected. Results The three hospitals received 545 diarrhea patients aged≤5 with 311 (57%) rotavirus positive test results during a 9-month period. The societal cost for treatment of a case of rotavirus diarrhea was estimated at US$ 661/event. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio with a vaccine price of US$ 27 per course was US$ 8,972 per quality-adjusted life year gained from the health care perspective. From a societal perspective, the analysis shows cost savings of around US$ 16 per child. Conclusion The model shows that rotavirus vaccination could be economically a very attractive intervention in Libya. PMID:25499622

  19. Prevention of rotavirus diarrhoea in foals by parenteral vaccination of the mares: field trial.

    PubMed

    Barrandeguy, M; Parreño, V; Lagos Mármol, M; Pont Lezica, F; Rivas, C; Valle, C; Fernandez, F

    1998-01-01

    Many countries have reported rotavirus diarrhoea in foals. In Argentina it causes important economic losses to the horse industry. In this work we present the results obtained using an experimental vaccine in a farm with enzootic infection of rotavirus. A hundred mares were vaccinated 60 and 30 days before foaling with inactivated rotavirus SA11 (G3P2), H2 (G3P12), Lincoln (G6P1), with aluminum hydroxide as adjuvant; 65 mares were included in the unvaccinated, control group. To evaluate the vaccine, morbidity, duration of the diarrhoea and rotavirus shedding were recorded. Antibody levels were established in serum, colostrum and milk of the vaccinated mares, and also in serum from the foals. In foals from vaccinated mares the morbidity was 30%, clinical signs were observed during 1.8 days, and rotavirus shedding was not detected. In the control group the morbidity reached 80%, the clinical signs lasted 7.3 days and rotavirus shedding was detected in 80% of the diarrhoeic foals. At foaling the serum antibody levels were 15 times higher with a mean neutralizing titre (NT) of 3.5 logs than before vaccination (2.4 logs), in colostrum 5.00 logs, and in milk at 90 days post partum 1.7 logs. In foals from vaccinated mares the level of neutralizing antibodies was 3.8 logs at 48 days of age, going down to 2.2 logs at 90 days of age. Immunization of the pregnant mare would be a good method for preventing diarrhoea in foals. PMID:9580371

  20. Predictors of Uptake and Timeliness of Newly Introduced Pneumococcal and Rotavirus Vaccines, and of Measles Vaccine in Rural Malawi: A Population Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chihana, Menard; Crampin, Amelia C.; Kabuluzi, Storn; Chirwa, Geoffrey; Mwansambo, Charles; Costello, Anthony; Cunliffe, Nigel A.; Heyderman, Robert S.; French, Neil; Bar-Zeev, Naor

    2016-01-01

    Background Malawi introduced pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) and monovalent rotavirus vaccine (RV1) in 2011 and 2012 respectively, and is planning the introduction of a second-dose measles vaccine (MV). We assessed predictors of availability, uptake and timeliness of these vaccines in a rural Malawian setting. Methods Commencing on the first date of PCV13 eligibility we conducted a prospective population-based birth cohort study of 2,616 children under demographic surveillance in Karonga District, northern Malawi who were eligible for PCV13, or from the date of RV1 introduction both PCV13 and RV1. Potential predictors of vaccine uptake and timeliness for PCV13, RV1 and MV were analysed respectively using robust Poisson and Cox regression. Results Vaccine coverage was high for all vaccines, ranging from 86.9% for RV1 dose 2 to 95.4% for PCV13 dose 1. Median time delay for PCV13 dose 1 was 17 days (IQR 7–36), 19 days (IQR 8–36) for RV1 dose 1 and 20 days (IQR 3–46) for MV. Infants born to lower educated or farming mothers and those living further away from the road or clinic were at greater risk of being not fully vaccinated and being vaccinated late. Delays in vaccination were also associated with non-facility birth. Vaccine stock-outs resulted in both a delay in vaccine timeliness and in a decrease in completion of schedule. Conclusion Despite high vaccination coverage in this setting, delays in vaccination were common. We identified programmatic and socio-demographic risk factors for uptake and timeliness of vaccination. Understanding who remains most vulnerable to be unvaccinated allows for focussed delivery thereby increasing population coverage and maximising the equitable benefits of universal vaccination programmes. PMID:27152612

  1. Rotavirus Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rotavirus Vaccine Program American Academy of Pediatrics Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... PATH's Rotavirus Vaccine Program American Academy of Pediatrics Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

  2. Rotavirus Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rotavirus Vaccine Program American Academy of Pediatrics Treatment Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... PATH's Rotavirus Vaccine Program American Academy of Pediatrics Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

  3. The composition of demand for newly launched vaccines: results from the pneumococcal and rotavirus vaccine introductions in Ethiopia and Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Kidane, Teklay; Chirwa, Geoffrey; Tesfaye, Neghist; Prescott, Marta R; Scotney, Soleine T; Valle, Moussa; Abebe, Sintayehu; Tambuli, Adija; Malewezi, Bridget; Mohammed, Tahir; Kobayashi, Emily; Wootton, Emily; Wong, Renee; Dosani, Rahima; Subramaniam, Hamsa; Joseph, Jessica; Yavuz, Elif; Apple, Aliza; Le Tallec, Yann; Kang’ethe, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Understanding post-launch demand for new vaccines can help countries maximize the benefits of immunization programmes. In particular, low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) should ensure adequate resource planning with regards to stock consumption and service delivery for new vaccines, whereas global suppliers must produce enough vaccines to meet demand. If a country underestimates the number of children seeking vaccination, a stock-out of commodities will create missed opportunities for saving lives. We describe the post-launch demand for the first dose of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV1) in Ethiopia and Malawi and the first dose of rotavirus vaccine (Rota1) in Malawi, with focus on the new birth cohort and the ‘backlog cohort’, comprised of older children who are still eligible for vaccination at the time of launch. PCV1 and Rota1 uptake were compared with the demand for the first dose of pentavalent vaccine (Penta1), a routine immunization that targets the same age group and immunization schedule. In the first year, the total demand for PCV1 was 37% greater than that of Penta1 in Ethiopia and 59% greater in Malawi. In the first 6 months, the demand of Rota1 was only 5.9% greater than Penta1 demand in Malawi. Over the first three post-introduction months, 70.7% of PCV1 demand in Ethiopia and 71.5% of demand in Malawi came from children in the backlog cohort, whereas only 28.0% of Rota1 demand in Malawi was from the backlog cohort. The composition of demand was impacted by time elapsed since vaccine introduction and age restrictions. Evidence suggests that countries’ plans should account for the impact of backlog demand, especially in the first 3 months post-introduction. LMICs should request for higher stock volumes when compared with routine needs, plan social mobilization activities to reach the backlog cohort and allocate human resources and cold chain capacity to accommodate high demand following vaccine introduction. PMID:26856361

  4. The composition of demand for newly launched vaccines: results from the pneumococcal and rotavirus vaccine introductions in Ethiopia and Malawi.

    PubMed

    Williams, B Adam; Kidane, Teklay; Chirwa, Geoffrey; Tesfaye, Neghist; Prescott, Marta R; Scotney, Soleine T; Valle, Moussa; Abebe, Sintayehu; Tambuli, Adija; Malewezi, Bridget; Mohammed, Tahir; Kobayashi, Emily; Wootton, Emily; Wong, Renee; Dosani, Rahima; Subramaniam, Hamsa; Joseph, Jessica; Yavuz, Elif; Apple, Aliza; Le Tallec, Yann; Kang'ethe, Alice

    2016-06-01

    Understanding post-launch demand for new vaccines can help countries maximize the benefits of immunization programmes. In particular, low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) should ensure adequate resource planning with regards to stock consumption and service delivery for new vaccines, whereas global suppliers must produce enough vaccines to meet demand. If a country underestimates the number of children seeking vaccination, a stock-out of commodities will create missed opportunities for saving lives. We describe the post-launch demand for the first dose of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV1) in Ethiopia and Malawi and the first dose of rotavirus vaccine (Rota1) in Malawi, with focus on the new birth cohort and the 'backlog cohort', comprised of older children who are still eligible for vaccination at the time of launch. PCV1 and Rota1 uptake were compared with the demand for the first dose of pentavalent vaccine (Penta1), a routine immunization that targets the same age group and immunization schedule. In the first year, the total demand for PCV1 was 37% greater than that of Penta1 in Ethiopia and 59% greater in Malawi. In the first 6 months, the demand of Rota1 was only 5.9% greater than Penta1 demand in Malawi. Over the first three post-introduction months, 70.7% of PCV1 demand in Ethiopia and 71.5% of demand in Malawi came from children in the backlog cohort, whereas only 28.0% of Rota1 demand in Malawi was from the backlog cohort. The composition of demand was impacted by time elapsed since vaccine introduction and age restrictions. Evidence suggests that countries' plans should account for the impact of backlog demand, especially in the first 3 months post-introduction. LMICs should request for higher stock volumes when compared with routine needs, plan social mobilization activities to reach the backlog cohort and allocate human resources and cold chain capacity to accommodate high demand following vaccine introduction. PMID:26856361

  5. Impact of Introducing the Pneumococcal and Rotavirus Vaccines Into the Routine Immunization Program in Niger

    PubMed Central

    Assi, Tina-Marie; Rajgopal, Jayant; Norman, Bryan A.; Chen, Sheng-I; Brown, Shawn T.; Slayton, Rachel B.; Kone, Souleymane; Kenea, Hailu; Welling, Joel S.; Connor, Diana L.; Wateska, Angela R.; Jana, Anirban; Wiringa, Ann E.; Van Panhuis, Willem G.; Burke, Donald S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated whether introducing the rotavirus and pneumococcal vaccines, which are greatly needed in West Africa, would overwhelm existing supply chains (i.e., the series of steps required to get a vaccine from the manufacturers to the target population) in Niger. Methods. As part of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation–funded Vaccine Modeling Initiative, we developed a computational model to determine the impact of introducing these new vaccines to Niger's Expanded Program on Immunization vaccine supply chain. Results. Introducing either the rotavirus vaccine or the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine could overwhelm available storage and transport refrigerator space, creating bottlenecks that would prevent the flow of vaccines down to the clinics. As a result, the availability of all World Health Organization Expanded Program on Immunization vaccines to patients might decrease from an average of 69% to 28.2% (range = 10%–51%). Addition of refrigerator and transport capacity could alleviate this bottleneck. Conclusions. Our results suggest that the effects on the vaccine supply chain should be considered when introducing a new vaccine and that computational models can help assess evolving needs and prevent problems with vaccine delivery. PMID:21940923

  6. Cost-effectiveness of introducing a rotavirus vaccine in developing countries: The case of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Valencia-Mendoza, Atanacio; Bertozzi, Stefano M; Gutierrez, Juan-Pablo; Itzler, Robbin

    2008-01-01

    Background In developing countries rotavirus is the leading cause of severe diarrhoea and diarrhoeal deaths in children under 5. Vaccination could greatly alleviate that burden, but in Mexico as in most low- and middle-income countries the decision to add rotavirus vaccine to the national immunisation program will depend heavily on its cost-effectiveness and affordability. The objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of including the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in Mexico's national immunisation program. Methods A cost-effectiveness model was developed from the perspective of the health system, modelling the vaccination of a hypothetical birth cohort of 2 million children monitored from birth through 60 months of age. It compares the cost and disease burden of rotavirus in an unvaccinated cohort of children with one vaccinated as recommended at 2, 4, and 6 months. Results Including the pentavalent vaccine in the national immunisation program could prevent 71,464 medical visits (59%), 5,040 hospital admissions (66%), and 612 deaths from rotavirus gastroenteritis (70%). At US$10 per dose and a cost of administration of US$13.70 per 3-dose regimen, vaccination would cost US$122,058 per death prevented, US$4,383 per discounted life-year saved, at a total net cost of US$74.7 million dollars to the health care system. Key variables influencing the results were, in order of importance, case fatality, vaccine price, vaccine efficacy, serotype prevalence, and annual loss of efficacy. The results are also very sensitive to the discount rate assumed when calculated per life-year saved. Conclusion At prices below US $15 per dose, the cost per life-year saved is estimated to be lower than one GNP per capita and hence highly cost effective by the WHO Commission on Macroeconomics and Health criteria. The cost-effectiveness estimates are highly dependent upon the mortality in the absence of the vaccine, which suggests that the vaccine is likely to be

  7. Genome-Wide Evolutionary Analyses of G1P[8] Strains Isolated Before and After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Mark; Donato, Celeste; Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Cowley, Daniel; Heylen, Elisabeth; Donker, Nicole C; McAllen, John K; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F; Lemey, Philippe; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Kirkwood, Carl D

    2015-09-01

    Rotaviruses are the most important etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. Among the first countries to introduce rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization programs were Belgium (November 2006) and Australia (July 2007). Surveillance programs in Belgium (since 1999) and Australia (since 1989) offer the opportunity to perform a detailed comparison of rotavirus strains circulating pre- and postvaccine introduction. G1P[8] rotaviruses are the most prominent genotype in humans, and a total of 157 G1P[8] rotaviruses isolated between 1999 and 2011 were selected from Belgium and Australia and their complete genomes were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis showed evidence of frequent reassortment among Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses. Although many different phylogenetic subclusters were present before and after vaccine introduction, some unique clusters were only identified after vaccine introduction, which could be due to natural fluctuation or the first signs of vaccine-driven evolution. The times to the most recent common ancestors for the Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses ranged from 1846 to 1955 depending on the gene segment, with VP7 and NSP4 resulting in the most recent estimates. We found no evidence that rotavirus population size was affected after vaccine introduction and only six amino acid sites in VP2, VP3, VP7, and NSP1 were identified to be under positive selective pressure. Continued surveillance of G1P[8] strains is needed to determine long-term effects of vaccine introductions, particularly now rotavirus vaccines are implemented in the national immunization programs of an increasing number of countries worldwide. PMID:26254487

  8. Genome-Wide Evolutionary Analyses of G1P[8] Strains Isolated Before and After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Mark; Donato, Celeste; Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Cowley, Daniel; Heylen, Elisabeth; Donker, Nicole C.; McAllen, John K.; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F.; Lemey, Philippe; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Kirkwood, Carl D.

    2015-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the most important etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. Among the first countries to introduce rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization programs were Belgium (November 2006) and Australia (July 2007). Surveillance programs in Belgium (since 1999) and Australia (since 1989) offer the opportunity to perform a detailed comparison of rotavirus strains circulating pre- and postvaccine introduction. G1P[8] rotaviruses are the most prominent genotype in humans, and a total of 157 G1P[8] rotaviruses isolated between 1999 and 2011 were selected from Belgium and Australia and their complete genomes were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis showed evidence of frequent reassortment among Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses. Although many different phylogenetic subclusters were present before and after vaccine introduction, some unique clusters were only identified after vaccine introduction, which could be due to natural fluctuation or the first signs of vaccine-driven evolution. The times to the most recent common ancestors for the Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses ranged from 1846 to 1955 depending on the gene segment, with VP7 and NSP4 resulting in the most recent estimates. We found no evidence that rotavirus population size was affected after vaccine introduction and only six amino acid sites in VP2, VP3, VP7, and NSP1 were identified to be under positive selective pressure. Continued surveillance of G1P[8] strains is needed to determine long-term effects of vaccine introductions, particularly now rotavirus vaccines are implemented in the national immunization programs of an increasing number of countries worldwide. PMID:26254487

  9. National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program: Addition of Intussusception as Injury for Rotavirus Vaccines to the Vaccine Injury Table. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-06-23

    On July 24, 2013, the Secretary of Health and Human Services (the Secretary) published in the Federal Register a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) proposing changes to the regulations governing the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP). Specifically, the Secretary proposed revisions to the Vaccine Injury Table (Table). The basis for this change is consistent with the Secretary's findings that intussusceptions can reasonably be determined in some circumstances to be caused by rotavirus vaccines. The Secretary is now making this amendment to the Table and to the Qualifications and Aids to Interpretation (QAI), described below under Background Information, as proposed in the NPRM. These regulations will apply only to petitions for compensation under the VICP filed after this final rule becomes effective. PMID:26103742

  10. Community Diarrhea Incidence Before and After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction in Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Meléndez, Marlon; Liu, Lan; Enrique Zambrana, Luis; Paniagua, Margarita; Weber, David J.; Hudgens, Michael G.; Cáceres, Mercedes; Källeståll, Carina; Morgan, Douglas R.; Espinoza, Félix; Peña, Rodolfo

    2013-01-01

    We estimated the incidence of watery diarrhea in the community before and after introduction of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in León, Nicaragua. A random sample of households was selected before and after rotavirus vaccine introduction. All children < 5 years of age in selected households were eligible for inclusion. Children were followed every 2 weeks for watery diarrhea episodes. The incidence rate was estimated as numbers of episodes per 100 child-years of exposure time. A mixed effects Poisson regression model was fit to compare incidence rates in the pre-vaccine and vaccine periods. The pre-vaccine cohort (N = 726) experienced 36 episodes per 100 child-years, and the vaccine cohort (N = 826) experienced 25 episodes per 100 child-years. The adjusted incidence rate ratio was 0.60 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.40, 0.91) during the vaccine period versus the pre-vaccine period, indicating a lower incidence of watery diarrhea in the community during the vaccine period. PMID:23817336

  11. The establishment of the infant intestinal microbiome is not affected by rotavirus vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Li; Arboleya, Silvia; Lihua, Guo; Chuihui, Yuan; Nan, Qin; Suarez, Marta; Solís, Gonzalo; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G.; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The microbial colonization of the intestine during the first months of life constitutes the most important process for the microbiota-induced host-homeostasis. Alterations in this process may entail a high-risk for disease in later life. However, the potential factors affecting this process in the infant are not well known. Moreover, the potential impact of orally administered vaccines upon the establishing microbiome remains unknown. Here we assessed the intestinal microbiome establishment process and evaluated the impact of rotavirus vaccination upon this process. Metagenomic, PCR-DGGE and faecal short chain fatty acids analyses were performed on faecal samples obtained from three infants before and after the administration of each dose of vaccine. We found a high inter-individual variability in the early life gut microbiota at microbial composition level, but a large similarity between the infants' microbiomes at functional level. Rotavirus vaccination did not show any major effects upon the infant gut microbiota. Thus, the individual microbiome establishment and development process seems to occur in a defined manner during the first stages of life and rotavirus vaccination appears to be inconsequential for this process. PMID:25491920

  12. The establishment of the infant intestinal microbiome is not affected by rotavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ang, Li; Arboleya, Silvia; Lihua, Guo; Chuihui, Yuan; Nan, Qin; Suarez, Marta; Solís, Gonzalo; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The microbial colonization of the intestine during the first months of life constitutes the most important process for the microbiota-induced host-homeostasis. Alterations in this process may entail a high-risk for disease in later life. However, the potential factors affecting this process in the infant are not well known. Moreover, the potential impact of orally administered vaccines upon the establishing microbiome remains unknown. Here we assessed the intestinal microbiome establishment process and evaluated the impact of rotavirus vaccination upon this process. Metagenomic, PCR-DGGE and faecal short chain fatty acids analyses were performed on faecal samples obtained from three infants before and after the administration of each dose of vaccine. We found a high inter-individual variability in the early life gut microbiota at microbial composition level, but a large similarity between the infants' microbiomes at functional level. Rotavirus vaccination did not show any major effects upon the infant gut microbiota. Thus, the individual microbiome establishment and development process seems to occur in a defined manner during the first stages of life and rotavirus vaccination appears to be inconsequential for this process. PMID:25491920

  13. The Impact of Socio-Economic Determinants on the Vaccination Rates with Rotavirus and Human Papiloma Virus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    GRDADOLNIK, Urška; SOČAN, Maja

    2016-01-01

    Background Socio-economic inequalities may have an impact on the uptake of selfpaid vaccines. The aim of the study was to identify the effect of some socio economic determinants on vaccination rates with self-paid human papilloma virus (HPV) and rotavirus (RV) vaccines. Methods Vaccination coverage data, available in electronic database cepljenje.net (administered by the National Institute of Public Health), were collected at administrative unit level. The socio-economic determinants (the average gross pay in euros, the unemployment rate, the educational and households structure, the population density, the number of inhabitants, the number of children aged from 0 to 4, the number of women aged from 15 to 30) were extracted from Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia web page. The strength of the correlation between socioeconomic variables and self-paid HPV and RV vaccination rates was determined. Results Rotavirus vaccination rates show a slight negative correlation with the number of residents per administrative unit (ρ=−0.29, p=0.04), and no correlation with other socio-economic variables. Likewise, no correlation has been found between HPV vaccination rates and the selected socio-economic variables. Conclusion Ecological study did not reveal any correlations between socio economic variables and vaccination rates with RV and HPV self-paid vaccines on administrative unit level.

  14. Molecular epidemiology of rotavirus in four provinces of Angola before vaccine introduction.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Aida; Nordgren, Johan; Pereira, Joana; Fortes, Filomeno; Dimbu, Rafael; Saraiva, Nilton; Mendes, Cristina; Istrate, Claudia

    2016-09-01

    Angola is a sub-Saharan country in southern Africa highly affected by diarrhoeal disease with limited epidemiological data regarding etiologic agents. This study was performed during 2012-2013, prior to rotavirus vaccine introduction, with the objective to detect and characterize the rotavirus strains circulating in four provinces of the country: Huambo, Luanda, Zaire, and Cabinda. A high rotavirus detection rate (35%, 117/334) was observed. G1 was the most common G-genotype (83.6%), whereas P[8] (50.9%) followed by P[6] (38.8%) were the most common P-types. G1P[8] was identified as the predominant combination (50%), followed by the unusual G1P[6] (29.3%). Strains such G2P[4], G8P[6], G9P[6], and G12P[6] were also found in lower frequencies (5.2-1.7%). The P[6] strains did not cluster in the phylogenetic trees according to their geographic origin or even the corresponding G-genotype, suggesting a limited number of recent introductions and extensive reassortment events. Our results represent the first report on rotavirus genotype profiles in Angola, showing a wide circulation of the unusual genotype G1P[6], and underline the importance of RV surveillance after the vaccine introduction. J. Med. Virol. 88:1511-1520, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26946356

  15. Influenza Vaccine, Live Intranasal

    MedlinePlus

    ... the next 7 days, who requires a protected environment (for example, following a bone marrow transplant). Sometimes ... The National Vaccine Injury Compensation ProgramThe National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP) is a federal program that was created to compensate people who may have ...

  16. Inclusion of a universal tetanus toxoid CD4+ T cell epitope P2 significantly enhanced the immunogenicity of recombinant rotavirus ΔVP8* subunit parenteral vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xiaobo; Wen, Ke; Cao, Dianjun; Li, Guohua; Jones, Ronald W.; Li, Jianping; Szu, Shousun; Hoshino, Yasutaka; Yuan, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    Currently available live oral rotavirus vaccines, Rotarix® and RotaTeq®, are highly efficacious in developed countries. However, the immunogenicity and efficacy of such vaccines in some developing countries are low. We reported previously that bacterially-expressed rotavirus ΔVP8* subunit vaccine candidates with P[8], P[4] or P[6] specificity elicited high-titer virus neutralizing antibodies in animals immunized intramuscularly. Of note was the finding that antibodies induced with the P[8]ΔVP8* vaccine neutralized both homotypic P[8] and heterotypic P[4] rotavirus strains to high titer. To further improve its vaccine potential, a tetanus toxoid universal CD4+ T cell epitope P2 was introduced into P[8] or P[6]ΔVP8* construct. The resulting recombinant fusion proteins expressed in Escherichia coli were of high solubility and were produced with high yield. Two doses (10 or 20μg/dose) of the P2-P[8]ΔVP8* vaccine or P2-P[6]ΔVP8* vaccine with aluminum phosphate adjuvant elicited significantly higher geometric mean homologous neutralizing antibody titers than the vaccines without P2 in intramuscularly immunized guinea pigs. Interestingly, high levels of neutralizing antibody responses induced in guinea pigs with 3 doses of the P2-P[8]ΔVP8* vaccine persisted for at least 6 months. Furthermore, in the gnotobiotic piglet challenge study, three intramuscular doses (50μg/dose) of the P2-P[8]ΔVP8* vaccine with aluminum phosphate adjuvant significantly delayed the onset of diarrhea and significantly reduced the duration of diarrhea and the cumulative diarrhea score after oral challenge with virulent human rotavirus Wa (G1P[8]) strain. The P2-P[8]ΔVP8* vaccine induced serum virus neutralizing antibody and VP4-specific IgG antibody production prechallenge, and primed the pigs for higher antibody and intestinal and systemic virus-specific IFN-γ producing CD4+ T cell responses postchallenge. These two subunit vaccines could be used at a minimum singly or preferably in

  17. Correlates of protection for rotavirus vaccines: Possible alternative trial endpoints, opportunities, and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Juana; Steele, A Duncan; Franco, Manuel A

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is a major vaccine-preventable killer of young children worldwide. Two RV vaccines are globally commercially available and other vaccines are in different stages of development. Due to the absence of a suitable correlate of protection (CoP), all RV vaccine efficacy trials have had clinical endpoints. These trials represent an important challenge since RV vaccines have to be introduced in many different settings, placebo-controlled studies are unethical due to the availability of licensed vaccines, and comparator assessments for new vaccines with clinical endpoints are very large, complex, and expensive to conduct. A CoP as a surrogate endpoint would allow predictions of vaccine efficacy for new RV vaccines and enable a regulatory pathway, contributing to the more rapid development of new RV vaccines. The goal of this review is to summarize experiences from RV natural infection and vaccine studies to evaluate potential CoP for use as surrogate endpoints for assessment of new RV vaccines, and to explore challenges and opportunities in the field. PMID:25483685

  18. Introduction of a new Rotavirus vaccine: Initial results of uptake and impact on laboratory confirmed cases in Anglia and Essex, United Kingdom, July 2015.

    PubMed

    Inns, Thomas; Trindall, Amy; Dunling-Hall, Sara; Shankar, Ananda Giri

    2016-04-01

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis accounts for an estimated 130,000 GP consultations and 13,000 hospitalisations for children under 5 y old each year in England and Wales. In July 2013, an oral live attenuated rotavirus vaccine (Rotarix®) was introduced into the UK infant immunisation program as a 2 dose schedule at 2 and 3 months of age. We collected vaccination uptake from October 2013 to March 2015 and laboratory confirmed cases data on children under the age of 5 y from 1 January 2004 to 31 May 2015. The vaccine uptake rates and laboratory confirmed cases were compared to provide evidence of the impact of this vaccination program. Vaccine uptake rates were available from sentinel data with between 91-98% of GP practices in Anglia and Essex providing data every month. These data showed from February 2014 to March 2015 between 90-92% of infants received the recommended 2 doses of Rotarix® each month. The numbers of rotavirus cases reported by laboratories decreased on average by 82% in the post vaccination seasons. The mean number of cases reported in weeks 1-22 for 2004-2013 in Anglia and Essex was 1,318. For the same period in 2014, 256 cases were reported and initial data for 2015 report 226 cases. In the first 5 months 2014 the greatest reduction in cases (89%) was seen in those under 1 yr (who would have been directly affected by vaccination) with case numbers falling to 59 from a mean 537 cases in the equivalent period for 2004-2013. Initially data suggests a 92% reduction in 2015 compared to the same pre-vaccination periods. For those aged 1 to <5 y who would not have been vaccinated, a reduction of 75% was also evident in 2014 and 77% in 2015, suggesting indirect protection in this group. In conclusion, initial results following the introduction of the Rotavirus vaccine clearly indicates a very good uptake of the vaccine and a significant reduction in the numbers of laboratory confirmed cases. PMID:26618660

  19. Dietary rice bran protects against rotavirus diarrhea and promotes Th1-type immune responses to human rotavirus vaccine in gnotobiotic pigs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingdong; Wen, Ke; Tin, Christine; Li, Guohua; Wang, Haifeng; Kocher, Jacob; Pelzer, Kevin; Ryan, Elizabeth; Yuan, Lijuan

    2014-10-01

    Rice bran (RB) contains a distinct stoichiometry of phytochemicals that can promote gut mucosal immune responses against enteric pathogens. The effects of RB on rotavirus diarrhea and immunogenicity of an attenuated human rotavirus (HRV) vaccine were evaluated in gnotobiotic pigs. The four treatment groups studied were RB plus vaccine, vaccine only, RB only, and mock control. Pigs in the RB groups were fed the amount of RB that replaced 10% of the pigs' total daily calorie intake from milk starting from 5 days of age until they were euthanized. Pigs in the vaccine groups were orally inoculated with two doses of the attenuated HRV vaccine. A subset of pigs from each group was orally challenged with the homologous virulent HRV on postinoculation day 28. Diarrhea and virus shedding were monitored daily from postchallenge day 0 to day 7. RB feeding significantly protected against diarrhea upon virulent HRV challenge and enhanced the protective rate of the vaccine against rotavirus diarrhea. Consistent with protection, RB significantly increased gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses in intestinal and systemic lymphoid tissues. Furthermore, RB also increased the number of total IgM- and IgA-secreting cells, total serum IgM, IgG, and IgA titers, and HRV-specific IgA titers in intestinal contents. RB reduced the numbers of intestinal and systemic HRV-specific IgA and IgG antibody-secreting cells and reduced serum HRV-specific IgA and IgG antibody titers before the challenge. These results demonstrate clear beneficial effects of RB in protection against rotavirus diarrhea and stimulation of nonspecific and HRV-specific immune responses, as well as its biased Th1-type adjuvant effect for the vaccine. PMID:25080551

  20. A Multi-Center, Qualitative Assessment of Pediatrician and Maternal Perspectives on Rotavirus Vaccines and the Detection of Porcine circovirus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In 2010, researchers using novel laboratory techniques found that US-licensed rotavirus vaccines contain DNA or DNA fragments from Porcine circovirus (PCV), a virus common among pigs but not believed to cause illness in humans. We sought to understand pediatricians' and mothers' perspectives on this finding. Methods We conducted three iterations of focus groups for pediatricians and non-vaccine hesitant mothers in Seattle, WA, Cincinnati, OH, and Rochester, NY. Focus groups explored perceptions of rotavirus disease, rotavirus vaccination, and attitudes about the detection of PCV material in rotavirus vaccines. Results Pediatricians understood firsthand the success of rotavirus vaccines in preventing severe acute gastroenteritis among infants and young children. They measured this benefit against the theoretical risk of DNA material from PCV in rotavirus vaccines, determining overall that the PCV finding was of no clinical significance. Particularly influential was the realization that the large, randomized clinical trials that found both vaccines to be highly effective and safe were conducted with DNA material from PCV already in the vaccines. Most mothers supported the ideal of full disclosure regarding vaccination risks and benefits. However, with a scientific topic of this complexity, simplified information regarding PCV material in rotavirus vaccines seemed frightening and suspicious, and detailed information was frequently overwhelming. Mothers often remarked that if they did not understand a medical or technical topic regarding their child's health, they relied on their pediatrician's guidance. Many mothers and pediatricians were also concerned that persons who abstain from pork consumption for religious or personal reasons may have unsubstantiated fears of the PCV finding. Conclusions Pediatricians considered the detection of DNA material from PCV in rotavirus vaccines a "non-issue" and reported little hesitation in continuing to recommend the

  1. Rotavirus and the Vaccine (Drops) to Prevent It

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC-INFO or visit www. cdc. gov/ vaccines/ parents. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Academy of Family Physicians, and the American Academy of Pediatrics strongly recommend all children receive their vaccines according to the recommended schedule.

  2. Rotavirus and the Vaccine (Drops) to Prevent It

    MedlinePlus

    ... 800-CDC-INFO or visit CDC Vaccines for Parents site . The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Academy of Family Physicians, and the American Academy of Pediatrics strongly recommend all children receive their vaccines according ... Diseases and the Vaccines that Prevent Them Chickenpox ...

  3. Direct, indirect, total, and overall effectiveness of the rotavirus vaccines for the prevention of gastroenteritis hospitalizations in privately insured US children, 2007-2010.

    PubMed

    Panozzo, Catherine A; Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Pate, Virginia; Weber, David J; Jonsson Funk, Michele; Stürmer, Til; Brookhart, M Alan

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate how direct, indirect, total, and overall effectiveness estimates and absolute benefits of rotavirus vaccines vary through the years following vaccine introduction. Privately insured US children in a large claims database were followed from age 8 months until they 1) experienced a hospitalization for rotavirus or acute gastroenteritis; 2) lost continuous health plan enrollment; 3) turned 20 months of age; or 4) reached the end of the study period. Vaccine effectiveness estimates in preventing rotavirus and acute gastroenteritis hospitalizations were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression, stratified by calendar year and adjusted for birth month. Incidence rate differences were estimated to determine the absolute number of gastroenteritis hospitalizations prevented in the cohort. Among 905,718 children, 51%, 66%, 80%, and 86% received 1 or more doses of rotavirus vaccine in each year from 2007 to 2010. The direct vaccine effectiveness of 1 or more doses of rotavirus vaccine in preventing rotavirus gastroenteritis hospitalizations ranged from 87% to 92% each year. Accounting for indirect protection increased estimates of vaccine effectiveness by an additional 3%-8% among those vaccinated. Failing to account for population-level vaccine benefits in 2010, when circulation of rotavirus was low, could underestimate the sustained impact of the vaccine program. PMID:24578359

  4. Direct, Indirect, Total, and Overall Effectiveness of the Rotavirus Vaccines for the Prevention of Gastroenteritis Hospitalizations in Privately Insured US Children, 2007–2010

    PubMed Central

    Panozzo, Catherine A.; Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Pate, Virginia; Weber, David J.; Jonsson Funk, Michele; Stürmer, Til; Brookhart, M. Alan

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate how direct, indirect, total, and overall effectiveness estimates and absolute benefits of rotavirus vaccines vary through the years following vaccine introduction. Privately insured US children in a large claims database were followed from age 8 months until they 1) experienced a hospitalization for rotavirus or acute gastroenteritis; 2) lost continuous health plan enrollment; 3) turned 20 months of age; or 4) reached the end of the study period. Vaccine effectiveness estimates in preventing rotavirus and acute gastroenteritis hospitalizations were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression, stratified by calendar year and adjusted for birth month. Incidence rate differences were estimated to determine the absolute number of gastroenteritis hospitalizations prevented in the cohort. Among 905,718 children, 51%, 66%, 80%, and 86% received 1 or more doses of rotavirus vaccine in each year from 2007 to 2010. The direct vaccine effectiveness of 1 or more doses of rotavirus vaccine in preventing rotavirus gastroenteritis hospitalizations ranged from 87% to 92% each year. Accounting for indirect protection increased estimates of vaccine effectiveness by an additional 3%–8% among those vaccinated. Failing to account for population-level vaccine benefits in 2010, when circulation of rotavirus was low, could underestimate the sustained impact of the vaccine program. PMID:24578359

  5. Rotavirus Genotypes and Vaccine Effectiveness from a Sentinel, Hospital-Based, Surveillance Study for Three Consecutive Rotavirus Seasons in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Zainab; Harastani, Houda; Hammadi, Moza; Reslan, Lina; Ghanem, Soha; Hajar, Farah; Sabra, Ahmad; Haidar, Amjad; Inati, Adlette; Rajab, Mariam; Fakhouri, Hassan; Ghanem, Bassam; Baasiri, Ghassan; Gerbaka, Bernard; Zaraket, Hassan; Matar, Ghassan M.; Dbaibo, Ghassan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Globally, rotavirus (RV) is the leading cause of gastroenteritis (GE) in children. Longitudinal data about changes in RV genotype distribution and vaccine effectiveness (VE) are scarce. This study was conducted in Lebanon over 3 consecutive RV seasons to estimate the rate of RVGE hospitalization, identify RV genotypes, determine the seasonal and geographical variations, and calculate RV VE. Materials and Methods This prospective, multicenter, hospital-based surveillance study was conducted between 2011 and 2013 and enrolled children (<5 years) admitted for GE. Socio-demographic and clinical data about the current episode of GE at admission were collected. Genotypes were determined from stool samples testing positive for RV by PCR. Results Of 1,414 cases included in the final analysis, 83% were <2 years old and 55.6% were boys. Median duration of hospitalization was 4 days and 91.6% of GE cases were severe (Vesikari score ≥11). PCR testing showed that 30.3% of subjects were RV-positive of which 62.1% had fever versus 71.1% of RV-negative subjects (P = 0.001). RV was predominantly detected in the cold season from November till March (69.9%). G and P genotype pairs for all RV-positive stool specimens showed a predominance of G1P[8] in 36% (n = 154) of specimens, G9P[8] in 26.4% (n = 113), and G2P[4] in 17.8% (n = 76). RV-negative subjects were more likely to be RV-vaccinated (21%) compared to the RV-positive subjects (11.3%) (P<0.001), with a vaccine breakthrough rate of 18.8%. The ratio of RV1-vaccinated for each RV5-vaccinated subject was 7.8 and VE against RV disease was 68.4% (95%CI, 49.6%-80.2%). Conclusion RV is a major cause of GE requiring hospitalization of children under 5 years of age in Lebanon. A few genotypes predominated over the three RV seasons studied. Mass RV vaccination will likely decrease the burden of hospitalization due to RV. VE is similar to what has been observed for other middle-income countries. PMID:27571515

  6. Serum IgA levels induced by rotavirus natural infection, but not following immunization with the RRV-TV vaccine (Rotashield), correlate with protection.

    PubMed

    González, Rosabel; Franco, Manuel; Sarmiento, Luis; Romero, Milagros; Schael, Irene Pérez

    2005-08-01

    To directly compare serum rotavirus specific IgA as a marker of protection in children vaccinated with the RRV-TV (Rotashield) vaccine and in naturally infected children, we studied pre-existing rotavirus IgA antibodies by ELISA assays in these groups of children within the first 5 days after the onset of a diarrhea episode, due or not to rotavirus. In immunized children, rotavirus IgA titers were similar between infected and non-RV infected children. In non-immunized children, the proportion with rotavirus IgA titers was significantly greater in non-RV infected children (58%) than in infected children (31%). Additionally, a titer >/=1:800 was associated with 68% protection. Thus, in this study serum rotavirus IgA showed a good correlation with protection in children pre-exposed to natural infection but not in those immunized with the RRV-TV vaccine. PMID:15977224

  7. Ovine rotaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Gazal, S.; Mir, I.A.; Iqbal, A.; Taku, A.K.; Kumar, B.; Bhat, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Rotavirus has been recognized as a predominant cause of acute diarrhea in young animals and humans. Rotavirus has segmented genome composed of 11 segments of double stranded RNA. The virus has a triple layered protein shell consisting of a core, an inner capsid and an outer capsid. The inner capsid protein is responsible for group specificity and based on it rotaviruses are classified into seven groups. Ovine rotavirus strains have only been identified into two serogroups (A and B). The two outer capsid proteins (VP7 and VP4) are responsible for G and P typing of rotavirus, respectively. Although rotavirus has been frequently reported in many animal species, data regarding ovine rotavirus strains is very scanty and limited. Only a few ovine rotaviruses have been isolated and characterized so far. Recently, the G and P types circulating in ovines have been identified. The ovine rotavirus strain NT isolated from a diarrheic lamb in China is being considered as a promising vaccine candidate for human infants. PMID:26623281

  8. A stable live bacterial vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kunda, Nitesh K; Wafula, Denis; Tram, Meilinn; Wu, Terry H; Muttil, Pavan

    2016-06-01

    Formulating vaccines into a dry form enhances its thermal stability. This is critical to prevent administering damaged and ineffective vaccines, and to reduce its final cost. A number of vaccines in the market as well as those being evaluated in the clinical setting are in a dry solid state; yet none of these vaccines have achieved long-term stability at high temperatures. We used spray-drying to formulate a recombinant live attenuated Listeria monocytogenes (Lm; expressing Francisella tularensis immune protective antigen pathogenicity island protein IglC) bacterial vaccine into a thermostable dry powder using various sugars and an amino acid. Lm powder vaccine showed minimal loss in viability when stored for more than a year at ambient room temperature (∼23°C) or for 180days at 40°C. High temperature viability was achieved by maintaining an inert atmosphere in the storage container and removing oxygen free radicals that damage bacterial membranes. Further, in vitro antigenicity was confirmed by infecting a dendritic cell line with cultures derived from spray dried Lm and detection of an intracellularly expressed protective antigen. A combination of stabilizing excipients, a cost effective one-step drying process, and appropriate storage conditions could provide a viable option for producing, storing and transporting heat-sensitive vaccines, especially in regions of the world that require them the most. PMID:27020530

  9. The First Rotavirus Vaccine and the Politics of Acceptable Risk

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jason L

    2012-01-01

    Context Vaccination in the United States is a frequent source of controversy, with critics alleging failures by public health officials to adequately identify, monitor, and respond to risks associated with vaccines. In response to these charges, the case of RotaShield, a vaccine withdrawn in 1999 following confirmation of a serious adverse event associated with its use, is regularly invoked as evidence of the effectiveness of current vaccine safety activities. Methods This article examines the history of RotaShield, with particular attention paid to decision making regarding its use in the United States and internationally. I reviewed and analyzed federal advisory committee meeting transcripts, international conference reports, government and scientific publications, media coverage, and other primary and secondary source materials. I also conducted six semistructured interviews with former senior officials and advisory committee members at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention who participated in decisions regarding the vaccine. Findings Decision making regarding RotaShield, including the ultimate withdrawal of its recommendation for use, was shaped significantly by government health officials’ concern for preserving public confidence in overall U.S. vaccination efforts amid several unrelated vaccine risk controversies ongoing at that time. This attention to public perception and external pressures occurred in tandem with the evaluation of the quantitative evidence regarding the magnitude and severity of the risk associated with the vaccine. The decisions made in the United States resulted in foreseen but unintended consequences for international use of the vaccine, including in nations where the profile of risks and potential benefits was dramatically different. Conclusions As enthusiasm for evidence-based decision making grows throughout medicine and public health, greater explicit attention should be directed to the processes by which decision

  10. Population Impact and Effectiveness of Monovalent Rotavirus Vaccination in Urban Malawian Children 3 Years After Vaccine Introduction: Ecological and Case-Control Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Zeev, Naor; Jere, Khuzwayo C.; Bennett, Aisleen; Pollock, Louisa; Tate, Jacqueline E.; Nakagomi, Osamu; Iturriza-Gomara, Miren; Costello, Anthony; Mwansambo, Charles; Parashar, Umesh D.; Heyderman, Robert S.; French, Neil; Cunliffe, Nigel A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Rotavirus vaccines have been introduced in many low-income African countries including Malawi in 2012. Despite early evidence of vaccine impact, determining persistence of protection beyond infancy, the utility of the vaccine against specific rotavirus genotypes, and effectiveness in vulnerable subgroups is important. Methods. We compared rotavirus prevalence in diarrheal stool and hospitalization incidence before and following rotavirus vaccine introduction in Malawi. Using case-control analysis, we derived vaccine effectiveness (VE) in the second year of life and for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–exposed and stunted children. Results. Rotavirus prevalence declined concurrent with increasing vaccine coverage, and in 2015 was 24% compared with prevaccine mean baseline in 1997–2011 of 32%. Since vaccine introduction, population rotavirus hospitalization incidence declined in infants by 54.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 32.8–68.8), but did not fall in older children. Comparing 241 rotavirus cases with 692 test-negative controls, VE was 70.6% (95% CI, 33.6%–87.0%) and 31.7% (95% CI, −140.6% to 80.6%) in the first and second year of life, respectively, whereas mean age of rotavirus cases increased from 9.3 to 11.8 months. Despite higher VE against G1P[8] than against other genotypes, no resurgence of nonvaccine genotypes has occurred. VE did not differ significantly by nutritional status (78.1% [95% CI, 5.6%–94.9%] in 257 well-nourished and 27.8% [95% CI, −99.5% to 73.9%] in 205 stunted children; P = .12), or by HIV exposure (60.5% [95% CI, 13.3%–82.0%] in 745 HIV-unexposed and 42.2% [95% CI, −106.9% to 83.8%] in 174 exposed children; P = .91). Conclusions. Rotavirus vaccination in Malawi has resulted in reductions in disease burden in infants <12 months, but not in older children. Despite differences in genotype-specific VE, no genotype has emerged to suggest vaccine escape. VE was not demonstrably affected by HIV exposure

  11. Human and bovine serotype G8 rotaviruses may be derived by reassortment.

    PubMed

    Browning, G F; Snodgrass, D R; Nakagomi, O; Kaga, E; Sarasini, A; Gerna, G

    1992-01-01

    The origin of, and relationship between human and bovine serotype G8 rotaviruses were investigated by genomic hybridisation. Radiolabelled mRNAs of human G8 rotaviruses 69M (isolated in Indonesia) and HAL1271 (isolated in Finland), and bovine rotaviruses KK3 (G10) and NCDV (G6), were used as probes. The products of liquid hybridisation between the probes and the genomic RNA of human and bovine rotaviruses, including bovine G8 rotavirus 678 (isolated in Scotland) and two other Finnish human G8 rotaviruses HAL1166 and HAL8590, were examined by separation in polyacrylamide gels. The genomes of Finnish human G8 rotaviruses were similar to those of bovine G6 and G10 rotaviruses. Neither Indonesian human G8 nor bovine G8 viruses had high levels of similarity to each other or to other bovine and human rotaviruses. Thus these three epidemiologically distinct G8 rotaviruses have different origins and may be derived by reassortment with rotaviruses of a third, as yet unknown, host species. The similarity between the Finnish isolates and the bovine isolate NCDV suggests that they have diverged recently and that these human G8 rotaviruses may be derived from a zoonotic infection, or alternatively, from the live rotavirus vaccine of bovine origin which has been used to vaccinate Finnish children. PMID:1322648

  12. Probiotics and colostrum/milk differentially affect neonatal humoral immune responses to oral rotavirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chattha, Kuldeep S; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Esseili, Malak A; Siegismund, Christine; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2013-04-01

    Breast milk (colostrum [col]/milk) components and gut commensals play important roles in neonatal immune maturation, establishment of gut homeostasis and immune responses to enteric pathogens and oral vaccines. We investigated the impact of colonization by probiotics, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 (Bb12) with/without col/milk (mimicking breast/formula fed infants) on B lymphocyte responses to an attenuated (Att) human rotavirus (HRV) Wa strain vaccine in a neonatal gnotobiotic pig model. Col/milk did not affect probiotic colonization in AttHRV vaccinated pigs. However, unvaccinated pigs fed col/milk shed higher numbers of probiotic bacteria in feces than non-col/milk fed colonized controls. In AttHRV vaccinated pigs, col/milk feeding with probiotic treatment resulted in higher mean serum IgA HRV antibody titers and intestinal IgA antibody secreting cell (ASC) numbers compared to col/milk fed, non-colonized vaccinated pigs. In vaccinated pigs without col/milk, probiotic colonization did not affect IgA HRV antibody titers, but serum IgG HRV antibody titers and gut IgG ASC numbers were lower, suggesting that certain probiotics differentially impact HRV vaccine responses. Our findings suggest that col/milk components (soluble mediators) affect initial probiotic colonization, and together, they modulate neonatal antibody responses to oral AttHRV vaccine in complex ways. PMID:23453730

  13. Group A rotavirus gastroenteritis: post-vaccine era, genotypes and zoonotic transmission.

    PubMed

    Luchs, Adriana; Timenetsky, Maria do Carmo Sampaio Tavares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACTThis article provides a review of immunity, diagnosis, and clinical aspects of rotavirus disease. It also informs about the changes in epidemiology of diarrheal disease and genetic diversity of circulating group A rotavirus strains following the introduction of vaccines. Group A rotavirus is the major pathogen causing gastroenteritis in animals. Its segmented RNA genome can lead to the emergence of new or unusual strains in human populations via interspecies transmission and/or reassortment events.RESUMOEste artigo fornece uma revisão sobre imunidade, diagnóstico e aspectos clínicos da doença causada por rotavírus. Também aponta as principais mudanças no perfil epidemiológico da doença diarreica e na diversidade genética das cepas circulantes de rotavírus do grupo A, após a introdução vacinal. O rotavírus do grupo A é o principal patógeno associado à gastroenterite em animais. Seu genoma RNA segmentado pode levar ao surgimento de cepas novas ou incomuns na população humana, por meio de transmissão entre espécies e eventos de rearranjo. PMID:27462899

  14. Formulation, characterization and evaluation of rotavirus encapsulated PLA and PLGA particles for oral vaccination.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Bismita; Panda, Amulya K; Ray, Pratima; Ray, Alok R

    2009-03-01

    Polylactide (PLA) and polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) particles entrapping rotavirus (strain SA11) were formulated using a solvent evaporation technique. To minimize denaturation of viral antigen during the emulsification process, serum albumin was used as a stabilizer. Use of NaHCO(3) and sucrose during the primary emulsification step resulted in uniform stabilized particles entrapping rotavirus. Sonication during the primary emulsion and homogenization during the secondary emulsion process resulted in particles of sizes 2-8 microm, whereas nanoparticles were formed when sonication was used during both primary and secondary emulsion processes. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopy showed uniform pores and roughness throughout the polymer particle surface. Single dose oral immunization with 20 microg of antigen entrapped in PLA particles elicited improved and long-lasting IgA and IgG antibody titer in comparison to the soluble antigen. The study shows results illustrating the usefulness of polymeric microparticles as a potential oral delivery system for rotavirus vaccine. PMID:18608800

  15. Bayesian network meta-analysis suggests a similar effectiveness between a monovalent and a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Masato

    2014-01-01

    To assess the comparative effectiveness of a monovalent and a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV1 and RV5), a Bayesian network meta-analysis was conducted. Data of randomized trials from the Cochrane Review in 2012 were extracted and synthesized. For the prevention of severe rotavirus disease up to 2 years, no statistical difference was found in the effectiveness between the 2 types of vaccine (odds ratio: 2.23, 95% credible interval: 0.71–5.20). Similarly, the comparative effectiveness of RV1 and RV5 appeared equivalent for other rotavirus-associated outcome measures, such as prevention of severe disease up to 1 year and all severity of rotavirus infections for up to both 1- and 2-year follow-ups. These results indicates that, overall, RV1 and RV5 offer similar benefits to prevent rotavirus diseases; nonetheless, credible intervals are generally wide, highlighting the necessity of further meta-analyses including updated information or, ideally, controlled trials comparing both vaccines directly. PMID:24608099

  16. Etiology of Childhood Diarrhea Following Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction: A Prospective, Population-Based Study in Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Bucardo, Filemon; Vilchez, Samuel; Zambrana, Luis Enrique; Liu, Lan; Weber, David J.; Peña, Rodolfo; Barclay, Leslie; Vinjé, Jan; Hudgens, Michael G.; Nordgren, Johan; Svensson, Lennart; Morgan, Douglas R.; Espinoza, Félix; Paniagua, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    Background Nicaragua was the first developing nation to implement routine immunization with the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5). In this RV5-immunized population, understanding infectious etiologies of childhood diarrhea is necessary to direct diarrhea treatment and prevention efforts. Methods We followed a population-based sample of children less than 5 years in León, Nicaragua for diarrhea episodes through household visits. Information was obtained on RV5 history and sociodemographics. Stool samples collected during diarrhea episodes and among healthy children underwent laboratory analysis for viral, bacterial, and parasitic enteropathogens. Detection frequency and incidence of each enteropathogen was calculated. Results The 826 children in the cohort experienced 677 diarrhea episodes during 607.5 child-years of exposure time (1.1 episodes per child-year). At least one enteropathogen was detected among 61.1% of the 337 diarrheal stools collected. The most common enteropathogens among diarrheal stools were: norovirus (20.4%), sapovirus (16.6%), enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC, 11.3%), Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (8.3%), Giardia lamblia (8.0%), and enterotoxigenic E.coli (ETEC, 7.7%), with rotavirus detected among 5.3% of diarrheal stools. EPEC and ETEC were frequently detected among stools from healthy children. Among children with diarrhea, norovirus was more commonly detected among younger children (< 2 years) and G. lamblia was more commonly detected among older children (2-4 years). The mean age of rotavirus detection was 34.6 months. Conclusions In this Central American community following RV5 introduction, rotavirus was not commonly detected among children with diarrhea. Prevention and appropriate management of norovirus and sapovirus should be considered to further reduce the burden of diarrheal disease. PMID:24879131

  17. Impact of Withholding Breastfeeding at the Time of Vaccination on the Immunogenicity of Oral Rotavirus Vaccine—A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Asad; Kazi, Abdul Momin; Cortese, Margaret M.; Fleming, Jessica A.; Moon, SungSil; Parashar, Umesh D.; Jiang, Baoming; McNeal, Monica M.; Steele, Duncan; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Zaidi, Anita K. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast milk contains anti-rotavirus IgA antibodies and other innate immune factors that inhibit rotavirus replication in vitro. These factors could diminish the immunogenicity of oral rotavirus vaccines, particularly if breastfeeding occurs close to the time of vaccine administration. Methods Between April 2011 and November 2012, we conducted an open label, randomized trial to compare the immunogenicity of Rotarix (RV1) in infants whose breastfeeding was withheld one hour before through one hour after vaccination with that in infants breastfed at the time of vaccination. The trial was conducted in the peri-urban area of Ibrahim Hyderi in Karachi, Pakistan. Both groups received three doses of RV1 at 6, 10 and 14 weeks of age. Seroconversion (anti-rotavirus IgA antibodies ≥20 U/mL in subjects seronegative at 6 weeks of age) following three vaccine doses (6, 10 and 14 weeks) was determined at 18 weeks of age (primary objective) and seroconversion following two doses (6 and 10 weeks) was determined at 14 weeks of age (secondary objective). Results Four hundred eligible infants were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio between the withholding breastfeeding and immediate breastfeeding arms. Overall, 353 (88.3%) infants completed the study according to protocol; 181 in the withholding breastfeeding group and 172 in the immediate breastfeeding group. After three RV1 doses, anti-rotavirus IgA antibody seroconversion was 28.2% (95% CI: 22.1; 35.1) in the withholding arm and 37.8% (95% CI: 30.9; 45.2) in the immediate breastfeeding arm (difference: -9.6% [95% CI: -19.2; 0.2] p=0.07). After two doses of RV1, seroconversion was 16.6% (95% CI: 11.9; 22.7) in the withholding arm and 29.1% (95% CI: 22.8, 36.3) in the immediate breastfeeding arm (difference: -12.5% [95% CI: -21.2,-3.8] p=0.005). Conclusions Withholding breastfeeding around the time of RV1 vaccine administration did not lead to increased anti-rotavirus IgA seroconversion compared with that seen with a

  18. Whole genome analyses of G1P[8] rotavirus strains from vaccinated and non-vaccinated South African children presenting with diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Magagula, Nonkululeko B; Esona, Mathew D; Nyaga, Martin M; Stucker, Karla M; Halpin, Rebecca A; Stockwell, Timothy B; Seheri, Mapaseka L; Steele, A Duncan; Wentworth, David E; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVAs) are the leading cause of severe gastroenteritis and eventually death among infants and young children worldwide, and disease prevention and management through vaccination is a public health priority. In August 2009, Rotarix™ was introduced in the South African Expanded Programme on Immunisation. As a result, substantial reductions in RVA disease burden have been reported among children younger than 5 years old. Rotavirus strain surveillance post-vaccination is crucial to, inter alia, monitor and study the evolution of vaccine escape strains. Here, full-genome sequence data for the 11 gene segments from 11 South African G1P[8] rotavirus strains were generated, including 5 strains collected from non-vaccinated children during the 2004-2009 rotavirus seasons and 6 strains collected from vaccinated children during the 2010 rotavirus season. These data were analyzed to gain insights into the overall genetic makeup and evolution of South African G1P[8] rotavirus strains and to compare their genetic backbones with those of common human Wa-like RVAs from other countries, as well as with the Rotarix™ and RotaTeq™ G1P[8] vaccine components. All 11 South African G1P[8] strains revealed a complete Wa-like genotype constellation of G1-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1. On the basis of sequence similarities, the South African G1P[8] strains (with the exception of strain RVA/Human-wt/ZAF/1262/2004/G1P[8]) were closely related to each other (96-100% identity in all gene segments). Comparison to the Rotarix™ and RotaTeq™ G1P[8] vaccine components revealed a moderate nucleotide identity of 89-96% and 93-95%, respectively. The results indicated that none of the gene segments of these 11 South African G1P[8] strains were vaccine-derived. This study illustrates that large-scale next generation sequencing will provide crucial information on the influence of the vaccination program on evolution of rotavirus strains. This is the first report to describe

  19. Protect Your Child from Rotavirus Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... within the first week after the first or second dose of rotavirus vaccine.​ CDC continues to recommend that infants receive rotavirus vaccine. The benefits of the vaccine far outweigh the small risk ...

  20. Noninterference of Rotavirus Vaccine With Measles-Rubella Vaccine at 9 Months of Age and Improvements in Antirotavirus Immunity: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, K.; Fleming, Jessica A.; Victor, John C.; Yunus, Mohammad; Bari, Tajul Islam A.; Azim, Tasnim; Rahman, Mustafizur; Mowla, Syed Mohammad Niaz; Bellini, William J.; McNeal, Monica; Icenogle, Joseph P.; Lopman, Ben; Parashar, Umesh; Cortese, Margaret M.; Steele, A. Duncan; Neuzil, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The burden of rotavirus morbidity and mortality is high in children aged <5 years in developing countries, and evaluations indicate waning protection from rotavirus immunization in the second year. An additional dose of rotavirus vaccine may enhance the immune response and lengthen the period of protection against disease, but coadministration of this dose should not interfere with immune responses to concurrently given vaccines. Methods. A total of 480 9-month-old participants from Matlab, Bangladesh, were enrolled in a study with a primary objective to establish noninferiority of concomitant administration of measles-rubella vaccine (MR) and a third dose of human rotavirus vaccine (HRV; MR + HRV), compared with MR given alone. Secondary objectives included noninferiority of rubella antibody seroconversion and evaluating rotavirus IgA/IgG seroresponses in MR + HRV recipients. Results. Two months after vaccination, 75.3% and 74.3% of MR + HRV and MR recipients, respectively, had seroprotective levels of measles virus antibodies; 100.0% and 99.6%, respectively, showed anti–rubella virus immunoglobulin G (IgG) seroprotection. In the MR + HRV group, antirotavirus immunoglobulin A and IgG seropositivity frequencies before vaccination (52.7% and 66.3%, respectively) increased to 69.6% and 88.3% after vaccination. Conclusions. Vaccine-induced measles and rubella antibody responses are not negatively affected by concomitant administration of HRV. The HRV dose increases antirotavirus serum antibody titers and the proportion of infants with detectable antirotavirus antibody. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01700621. PMID:26823338

  1. A Cost Effectiveness and Capacity Analysis for the Introduction of Universal Rotavirus Vaccination in Kenya: Comparison between Rotarix and RotaTeq Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Albert Jan; Ngama, Mwanajuma; Ismail, Amina; Chuma, Jane; Cheburet, Samuel; Mutonga, David; Kamau, Tatu; Nokes, D. James

    2012-01-01

    Background Diarrhoea is an important cause of death in the developing world, and rotavirus is the single most important cause of diarrhoea associated mortality. Two vaccines (Rotarix and RotaTeq) are available to prevent rotavirus disease. This analysis was undertaken to aid the decision in Kenya as to which vaccine to choose when introducing rotavirus vaccination. Methods Cost-effectiveness modelling, using national and sentinel surveillance data, and an impact assessment on the cold chain. Results The median estimated incidence of rotavirus disease in Kenya was 3015 outpatient visits, 279 hospitalisations and 65 deaths per 100,000 children under five years of age per year. Cumulated over the first five years of life vaccination was predicted to prevent 34% of the outpatient visits, 31% of the hospitalizations and 42% of the deaths. The estimated prevented costs accumulated over five years totalled US$1,782,761 (direct and indirect costs) with an associated 48,585 DALYs. From a societal perspective Rotarix had a cost-effectiveness ratio of US$142 per DALY (US$5 for the full course of two doses) and RotaTeq US$288 per DALY ($10.5 for the full course of three doses). RotaTeq will have a bigger impact on the cold chain compared to Rotarix. Conclusion Vaccination against rotavirus disease is cost-effective for Kenya irrespective of the vaccine. Of the two vaccines Rotarix was the preferred choice due to a better cost-effectiveness ratio, the presence of a vaccine vial monitor, the requirement of fewer doses and less storage space, and proven thermo-stability. PMID:23115650

  2. In Silico Study of Rotavirus VP7 Surface Accessible Conserved Regions for Antiviral Drug/Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Ambarnil; Chattopadhyay, Shiladitya; Chawla-Sarkar, Mamta; Nandy, Papiya; Nandy, Ashesh

    2012-01-01

    Background Rotaviral diarrhoea kills about half a million children annually in developing countries and accounts for one third of diarrhea related hospitalizations. Drugs and vaccines against the rotavirus are handicapped, as in all viral diseases, by the rapid mutational changes that take place in the DNA and protein sequences rendering most of these ineffective. As of now only two vaccines are licensed and approved by the WHO (World Health Organization), but display reduced efficiencies in the underdeveloped countries where the disease is more prevalent. We approached this issue by trying to identify regions of surface exposed conserved segments on the surface glycoproteins of the virion, which may then be targeted by specific peptide vaccines. We had developed a bioinformatics protocol for these kinds of problems with reference to the influenza neuraminidase protein, which we have refined and expanded to analyze the rotavirus issue. Results Our analysis of 433 VP7 (Viral Protein 7 from rotavirus) surface protein sequences across 17 subtypes encompassing mammalian hosts using a 20D Graphical Representation and Numerical Characterization method, identified four possible highly conserved peptide segments. Solvent accessibility prediction servers were used to identify that these are predominantly surface situated. These regions analyzed through selected epitope prediction servers for their epitopic properties towards possible T-cell and B-cell activation showed good results as epitopic candidates (only dry lab confirmation). Conclusions The main reasons for the development of alternative vaccine strategies for the rotavirus are the failure of current vaccines and high production costs that inhibit their application in developing countries. We expect that it would be possible to use the protein surface exposed regions identified in our study as targets for peptide vaccines and drug designs for stable immunity against divergent strains of the rotavirus. Though this

  3. Cost-Effectiveness of Monovalent Rotavirus Vaccination of Infants in Malawi: A Postintroduction Analysis Using Individual Patient–Level Costing Data

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Zeev, Naor; Tate, Jacqueline E.; Pecenka, Clint; Chikafa, Jean; Mvula, Hazzie; Wachepa, Richard; Mwansambo, Charles; Mhango, Themba; Chirwa, Geoffrey; Crampin, Amelia C.; Parashar, Umesh D.; Costello, Anthony; Heyderman, Robert S.; French, Neil; Atherly, Deborah; Cunliffe, Nigel A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Rotavirus vaccination reduces childhood hospitalization in Africa, but cost-effectiveness has not been determined using real-world effectiveness and costing data. We sought to determine monovalent rotavirus vaccine cost-effectiveness in Malawi, one of Africa's poorest countries and the first Gavi-eligible country to report disease reduction following introduction in 2012. Methods. This was a prospective cohort study of children with acute gastroenteritis at a rural primary health center, a rural first referral–level hospital and an urban regional referral hospital in Malawi. For each participant we itemized household costs of illness and direct medical expenditures incurred. We also collected Ministry of Health vaccine implementation costs. Using a standard tool (TRIVAC), we derived cost-effectiveness. Results. Between 1 January 2013 and 21 November 2014, we recruited 530 children aged <5 years with gastroenteritis. Costs did not differ by rotavirus test result, but were significantly higher for admitted children and those with increased severity on Vesikari scale. Adding rotavirus vaccine to the national schedule costs Malawi $0.42 per dose in system costs. Vaccine copayment is an additional $0.20. Over 20 years, the vaccine program will avert 1 026 000 cases of rotavirus gastroenteritis, 78 000 inpatient admissions, 4300 deaths, and 136 000 disability-adjusted-life-years (DALYs). For this year's birth cohort, it will avert 54 000 cases of rotavirus and 281 deaths in children aged <5 years. The program will cost $10.5 million and save $8.0 million in averted healthcare costs. Societal cost per DALY averted was $10, and the cost per rotavirus case averted was $1. Conclusions. Gastroenteritis causes substantial economic burden to Malawi. The rotavirus vaccine program is highly cost-effective. Together with the demonstrated impact of rotavirus vaccine in reducing population hospitalization burden, its cost-effectiveness makes a strong argument

  4. Rotavirus vaccination in a Medicaid infant population from four US states: compliance, vaccination completion rate, and predictors of compliance

    PubMed Central

    Calnan, Michaela; Krishnarajah, Girishanthy; Duh, Mei Sheng; Haider, Batool A.; Yermakov, Sander; Davis, Matthew; Yan, Songkai

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A retrospective observational cohort study was conducted using Medicaid administrative claims data from four states in the United States (US) to analyze overall and state-specific compliance and completion rates for rotavirus (RV) vaccines. Compliance was based on an infant receiving the recommended number of doses each within the appropriate time frame, and completion was based on an infant receiving the recommended number of doses over a recommended time period. Compliance and completion were defined separately for RV vaccines by package insert (PI) and Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) guidelines. Infants born between 1 May 2008 and 31 October 2011 in Florida, 31 July 2012 in Iowa and Kansas, and 30 April 2013 in Mississippi, and continuously enrolled in Medicaid with medical and pharmacy benefits for ≥8 months from birth were included. Study participants were assigned to cohorts based on type of RV vaccinations received within recommended vaccination windows. Using the PI guidelines, there were 658,219 eligible infants; 40% received no RV vaccines. The RV1 cohort had a significantly higher proportion of compliant infants compared to the RV5 cohort (54% vs. 25%; p <0.001). For infants initiating RV1, 55% completed both doses; for infants initiating RV5, 44% completed all three doses (p<0.001). Analysis by state and by ACIP guidelines yielded similar trends. Major predictors of compliance to RV vaccination were use of RV1 vaccine and DTaP vaccination completion. Increased awareness to the importance and timeliness of vaccination is needed. PMID:26900728

  5. High prevalence of G12P[8] rotavirus strains in Rio Branco, Acre, Western Amazon, in the post-rotavirus vaccine introduction period.

    PubMed

    Neves, Mayara A O; Pinheiro, Helder H C; Silva, Rita S U; Linhares, Alexandre C; Silva, Luciana D; Gabbay, Yvone B; Silva, Mônica C M; Loureiro, Edvaldo C B; Soares, Luana S; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc P

    2016-05-01

    The present study aimed to provide a molecular characterization of circulating rotavirus (RVA) strains in Rio Branco, Acre, in the post-rotavirus vaccination period, particularly with regard to the emerging, increasingly prevalent G12P[8] genotype. A total of 488 fecal specimens from diarrheic and non-diarrheic children were obtained between January and December 2012. RVA detection was initially performed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method, followed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using specific primers. RVA was detected in 18.3% (44/241) of the children with acute diarrhea and in 1.2% (3/247) of the non-diarrheic children (P < 0.001), with overall RVA-positivity of 9.6% (47/488). The most common genotype was G2P[4] with 43.2% (19/44) of the diarrheic cases, followed by G12P[8] (27.3%, 12/44), G3P[6] (18.2%, 8/44), G3P[8] (4.5%, 2/44), and G12P[6] (2.3%, 1/44). G12 samples belonged to lineage III and were from children aged 4-52 months. All of these children had acute diarrhea associated with fever (83.3%, 10/12) and vomiting (66.7%, 8/12). Most of the cases occurred in August (58.3%, 7/12), 75% (9/12) of which having received the full vaccination scheme with Rotarix™. For the first time G12 was reported at relative high prevalence in Brazil. Our findings warrant further monitoring studies on the molecular characterization of circulating RVA strains after rotavirus vaccine introduction in Brazil and elsewhere, since the occurrence of either unusual our emerging genotypes may pose a challenge to vaccination strategies. J. Med. Virol. 88:782-789, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26466923

  6. Live attenuated vaccines for invasive Salmonella infections.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; Levine, Myron M

    2015-06-19

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi produces significant morbidity and mortality worldwide despite the fact that there are licensed Salmonella Typhi vaccines available. This is primarily due to the fact that these vaccines are not used in the countries that most need them. There is growing recognition that an effective invasive Salmonella vaccine formulation must also prevent infection due to other Salmonella serovars. We anticipate that a multivalent vaccine that targets the following serovars will be needed to control invasive Salmonella infections worldwide: Salmonella Typhi, Salmonella Paratyphi A, Salmonella Paratyphi B (currently uncommon but may become dominant again), Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Choleraesuis (as well as other Group C Salmonella). Live attenuated vaccines are an attractive vaccine formulation for use in developing as well as developed countries. Here, we describe the methods of attenuation that have been used to date to create live attenuated Salmonella vaccines and provide an update on the progress that has been made on these vaccines. PMID:25902362

  7. Trivalent Combination Vaccine Induces Broad Heterologous Immune Responses to Norovirus and Rotavirus in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tamminen, Kirsi; Lappalainen, Suvi; Huhti, Leena; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna

    2013-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) and norovirus (NoV) are the two major causes of viral gastroenteritis (GE) in children worldwide. We have developed an injectable vaccine design to prevent infection or GE induced with these enteric viruses. The trivalent combination vaccine consists of NoV capsid (VP1) derived virus-like particles (VLPs) of GI-3 and GII-4 representing the two major NoV genogroups and tubular RV recombinant VP6 (rVP6), the most conserved and abundant RV protein. Each component was produced in insect cells by a recombinant baculovirus expression system and combined in vitro. The vaccine components were administered intramuscularly to BALB/c mice either separately or in the trivalent combination. High levels of NoV and RV type specific serum IgGs with high avidity (>50%) as well as intestinal IgGs were detected in the immunized mice. Cross-reactive IgG antibodies were also elicited against heterologous NoV VLPs not used for immunization (GII-4 NO, GII-12 and GI-1 VLPs) and to different RVs from cell cultures. NoV-specific serum antibodies blocked binding of homologous and heterologous VLPs to the putative receptors, histo-blood group antigens, suggesting broad NoV neutralizing activity of the sera. Mucosal antibodies of mice immunized with the trivalent combination vaccine inhibited RV infection in vitro. In addition, cross-reactive T cell immune responses to NoV and RV-specific antigens were detected. All the responses were sustained for up to six months. No mutual inhibition of the components in the trivalent vaccine combination was observed. In conclusion, the NoV GI and GII VLPs combination induced broader cross-reactive and potentially neutralizing immune responses than either of the VLPs alone. Therefore, trivalent vaccine might induce protective immune responses to the vast majority of circulating NoV and RV genotypes. PMID:23922988

  8. One-step multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay for detecting and genotyping wild-type group A rotavirus strains and vaccine strains (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) in stool samples.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Rashi; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Esona, Mathew D; Tam, Ka Ian; Quaye, Osbourne; Bowen, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Background. Group A rotavirus (RVA) infection is the major cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in young children worldwide. Introduction of two live-attenuated rotavirus vaccines, RotaTeq® and Rotarix®, has dramatically reduced RVA associated AGE and mortality in developed as well as in many developing countries. High-throughput methods are needed to genotype rotavirus wild-type strains and to identify vaccine strains in stool samples. Quantitative RT-PCR assays (qRT-PCR) offer several advantages including increased sensitivity, higher throughput, and faster turnaround time. Methods. In this study, a one-step multiplex qRT-PCR assay was developed to detect and genotype wild-type strains and vaccine (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) rotavirus strains along with an internal processing control (Xeno or MS2 RNA). Real-time RT-PCR assays were designed for VP7 (G1, G2, G3, G4, G9, G12) and VP4 (P[4], P[6] and P[8]) genotypes. The multiplex qRT-PCR assay also included previously published NSP3 qRT-PCR for rotavirus detection and Rotarix® NSP2 and RotaTeq® VP6 qRT-PCRs for detection of Rotarix® and RotaTeq® vaccine strains respectively. The multiplex qRT-PCR assay was validated using 853 sequence confirmed stool samples and 24 lab cultured strains of different rotavirus genotypes. By using thermostable rTth polymerase enzyme, dsRNA denaturation, reverse transcription (RT) and amplification (PCR) steps were performed in single tube by uninterrupted thermocycling profile to reduce chances of sample cross contamination and for rapid generation of results. For quantification, standard curves were generated using dsRNA transcripts derived from RVA gene segments. Results. The VP7 qRT-PCRs exhibited 98.8-100% sensitivity, 99.7-100% specificity, 85-95% efficiency and a limit of detection of 4-60 copies per singleplex reaction. The VP7 qRT-PCRs exhibited 81-92% efficiency and limit of detection of 150-600 copies in multiplex reactions. The VP4 qRT-PCRs exhibited 98

  9. One-step multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay for detecting and genotyping wild-type group A rotavirus strains and vaccine strains (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) in stool samples

    PubMed Central

    Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Esona, Mathew D.; Tam, Ka Ian; Quaye, Osbourne; Bowen, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Group A rotavirus (RVA) infection is the major cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in young children worldwide. Introduction of two live-attenuated rotavirus vaccines, RotaTeq® and Rotarix®, has dramatically reduced RVA associated AGE and mortality in developed as well as in many developing countries. High-throughput methods are needed to genotype rotavirus wild-type strains and to identify vaccine strains in stool samples. Quantitative RT-PCR assays (qRT-PCR) offer several advantages including increased sensitivity, higher throughput, and faster turnaround time. Methods. In this study, a one-step multiplex qRT-PCR assay was developed to detect and genotype wild-type strains and vaccine (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) rotavirus strains along with an internal processing control (Xeno or MS2 RNA). Real-time RT-PCR assays were designed for VP7 (G1, G2, G3, G4, G9, G12) and VP4 (P[4], P[6] and P[8]) genotypes. The multiplex qRT-PCR assay also included previously published NSP3 qRT-PCR for rotavirus detection and Rotarix® NSP2 and RotaTeq® VP6 qRT-PCRs for detection of Rotarix® and RotaTeq® vaccine strains respectively. The multiplex qRT-PCR assay was validated using 853 sequence confirmed stool samples and 24 lab cultured strains of different rotavirus genotypes. By using thermostable rTth polymerase enzyme, dsRNA denaturation, reverse transcription (RT) and amplification (PCR) steps were performed in single tube by uninterrupted thermocycling profile to reduce chances of sample cross contamination and for rapid generation of results. For quantification, standard curves were generated using dsRNA transcripts derived from RVA gene segments. Results. The VP7 qRT-PCRs exhibited 98.8–100% sensitivity, 99.7–100% specificity, 85–95% efficiency and a limit of detection of 4–60 copies per singleplex reaction. The VP7 qRT-PCRs exhibited 81–92% efficiency and limit of detection of 150–600 copies in multiplex reactions. The VP4 qRT-PCRs exhibited 98.8

  10. National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program: addition of vaccines against rotavirus to the program. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Public Health Service (PHS), Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). Final rule.

    PubMed

    1999-07-27

    This final rule amends the existing regulations governing the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP) by adding vaccines against rotavirus to the Table of Injuries, which lists the vaccines covered under the VICP. This action is taken under section 2114(e) of the Public Health Service Act (the Act). The VICP provides a system of no-fault compensation for certain individuals who have been injured by specific childhood vaccines. The two prerequisites for adding vaccines against rotavirus to the VICP have been satisfied. An excise tax of 75 cents per dose was enacted on October 21, 1998, and took effect for sales of the vaccines after October 21, 1998. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recommended to the Secretary of HHS that this vaccine be routinely administered to children. Thus, vaccines against rotavirus are now included in the VICP. PMID:10558598

  11. Diarrhoea-related hospitalizations in children before and after implementation of monovalent rotavirus vaccination in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Esparza-Aguilar, Marcelino; Sánchez-Uribe, Edgar; Desai, Rishi; Parashar, Umesh D; Richardson, Vesta; Patel, Manish

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess, by socioeconomic setting, the effect of nationwide vaccination against species A rotavirus (RVA) on childhood diarrhoea-related hospitalizations in Mexico. Methods Data on children younger than 5 years who were hospitalized for diarrhoea in health ministry hospitals between 1 January 2003 and 31 December 2011 were collected from monthly discharge reports. Human development indexes were used to categorize the states where hospitals were located as having generally high, intermediate or low socioeconomic status. Annual rates of hospitalization for diarrhoea – per 10 000 hospitalizations for any cause – were calculated. Administrative data were used to estimate vaccine coverage. Findings In the states with high, intermediate and low socioeconomic status, coverage with a two-dose monovalent RVA vaccine – among children younger than 5 years – had reached 93%, 86% and 71%, respectively, by 2010. The corresponding median annual rates of hospitalization for diarrhoea – per 10 000 admissions – fell from 1001, 834 and 1033 in the “prevaccine” period of 2003–2006, to 597, 497 and 705 in the “postvaccine” period from 2008 to 2011, respectively. These decreases correspond to rate reductions of 40% (95% confidence interval, CI: 38–43), 41% (95% CI: 38–43) and 32% (95% CI: 29–34), respectively. Nationwide, RVA vaccination appeared to have averted approximately 16 500 hospitalizations for childhood diarrhoea in each year of the postvaccine period. Conclusion Monovalent RVA vaccination has substantially reduced childhood diarrhoea-related hospitalizations for four continuous years in discretely different socioeconomic populations across Mexico. PMID:24623905

  12. Determinants of Parents' Decision to Vaccinate Their Children against Rotavirus: Results of a Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dube, E.; Bettinger, J. A.; Halperin, B.; Bradet, R.; Lavoie, F.; Sauvageau, C.; Gilca, V.; Boulianne, N.

    2012-01-01

    Rotavirus disease is a common cause of health care utilization and almost all children are affected by the age of 5 years. In Canada, at the time of this survey (2008-09), immunization rates for rotavirus were less than 20%. We assessed the determinants of a parent's acceptance to have their child immunized against rotavirus. The survey…

  13. Assessment of Live Plague Vaccine Candidates.

    PubMed

    Feodorova, Valentina A; Sayapina, Lidiya V; Motin, Vladimir L

    2016-01-01

    Since its creation in the early twentieth century, live plague vaccine EV has been successfully applied to millions of people without severe complications. This vaccine has been proven to elicit protection against both bubonic and pneumonic plague, and it is still in use in populations at risk mainly in the countries of the former Soviet Union. Despite extensive efforts in developing subunit vaccines, there is a reviving interest in creation of a precisely attenuated strain of Yersinia pestis superior to the EV that can serve as a live plague vaccine with improved characteristics. Here we summarize decades of experience of the Russian anti-plague research in developing a standard protocol for early-stage evaluation of safety and immunogenicity of live plague vaccines. This protocol allows step-by-step comparison of the novel test candidates with the EV vaccine by using subcutaneous immunization and bubonic plague infection models in two animal species, e.g., guinea pigs and mice. PMID:27076149

  14. [A full economic evaluation of extensive vaccination against rotavirus with RIX4414 vaccine at National and Regional level in Italy].

    PubMed

    Vitale, F; Barbieri, M; Dirodi, B; Vitali Rosati, G; Franco, E

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination of all healthy children against rotavirus (RV) has been recommended, since the availability of vaccines, both in Europe (PIDJ) and Italy (pediatricians). The aims of universal vaccination against RV include the protection of children against moderate/severe gastroenteritis forms by RV (GARV), prevent hospitalizations, reduce the severity and duration of the disease, and reduce morbidity and socioeconomic costs. Payers need to informed regarding the efficacy and the healthcare utilization related to RV vaccination in order to decide in favour of its extensive implementation. The aim of this paper is to assess the clinical and financial impact of the extensive vaccination aganist RV both at National and Regional level. Particular attention, compared to the previous analysis (Standaert et al, 2008) has been given to the influence of herd immunity (HI) on cost-utility results of vaccination against-RV. Methods. The analysis was conducted with the Markovian model previously used by Standaert B et al and updated for comparing costs and benefits associated with a situation of vaccination anti-RV that includes efficacy data due to HI, with a situation without vaccination. For the base case is assumed an annual coverage of 90%, where the effect of HI is present in the population at risk (0-5 years) and extended to children who have not been vaccinated, adding as conservative assumption, a further 10% to the efficacy of the vaccine, compared to 15% determined by several published studies. Two analysis have been made based on this model: a cost-utility analysis that compared vaccination with two doses of RIX441410 administered at 2 and 3 months after birth compared with no vaccination from National Health Service and Society perspective; a budget impact analysis at National and Regional level. The evaluation has as its main element the reduction of cases of infection through universal vaccination and consequent reduction of Garv events and nosocomial infections

  15. Molecular and biological characterization of the 5 human-bovine rotavirus (WC3)-based reassortant strains of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine, RotaTeq (registered)

    SciTech Connect

    Matthijnssens, Jelle; Joelsson, Daniel B.; Warakomski, Donald J.; Zhou, Tingyi; Mathis, Pamela K.; Maanen, Marc-Henri van; Ranheim, Todd S.; Ciarlet, Max

    2010-08-01

    RotaTeq (registered) is a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine that contains five human-bovine reassortant strains (designated G1, G2, G3, G4, and P1) on the backbone of the naturally attenuated tissue culture-adapted parental bovine rotavirus (BRV) strain WC3. The viral genomes of each of the reassortant strains were completely sequenced and compared pairwise and phylogenetically among each other and to human rotavirus (HRV) and BRV reference strains. Reassortants G1, G2, G3, and G4 contained the VP7 gene from their corresponding HRV parent strains, while reassortants G1 and G2 also contained the VP3 gene (genotype M1) from the HRV parent strain. The P1 reassortant contained the VP4 gene from the HRV parent strain and all the other gene segments from the BRV WC3 strain. The human VP7s had a high level of overall amino acid identity (G1: 95-99%, G2: 94-99% G3: 96-100%, G4: 93-99%) when compared to those of representative rotavirus strains of their corresponding G serotypes. The VP4 of the P1 reassortant had a high identity (92-97%) with those of serotype P1A[8] HRV reference strains, while the BRV VP7 showed identities ranging from 91% to 94% to those of serotype G6 HRV strains. Sequence analyses of the BRV or HRV genes confirmed that the fundamental structure of the proteins in the vaccine was similar to those of the HRV and BRV references strains. Sequences analyses showed that RotaTeq (registered) exhibited a high degree of genetic stability as no mutations were identified in the material of each reassortant, which undergoes two rounds of replication cycles in cell culture during the manufacturing process, when compared to the final material used to fill the dosing tubes. The infectivity of each of the reassortant strains of RotaTeq (registered) , like HRV strains, did not require the presence of sialic acid residues on the cell surface. The molecular and biologic characterization of RotaTeq (registered) adds to the significant body of clinical data supporting the

  16. Molecular and biological characterization of the 5 human-bovine rotavirus (WC3)-based reassortant strains of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine, RotaTeq.

    PubMed

    Matthijnssens, Jelle; Joelsson, Daniel B; Warakomski, Donald J; Zhou, Tingyi; Mathis, Pamela K; van Maanen, Marc-Henri; Ranheim, Todd S; Ciarlet, Max

    2010-08-01

    RotaTeq is a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine that contains five human-bovine reassortant strains (designated G1, G2, G3, G4, and P1) on the backbone of the naturally attenuated tissue culture-adapted parental bovine rotavirus (BRV) strain WC3. The viral genomes of each of the reassortant strains were completely sequenced and compared pairwise and phylogenetically among each other and to human rotavirus (HRV) and BRV reference strains. Reassortants G1, G2, G3, and G4 contained the VP7 gene from their corresponding HRV parent strains, while reassortants G1 and G2 also contained the VP3 gene (genotype M1) from the HRV parent strain. The P1 reassortant contained the VP4 gene from the HRV parent strain and all the other gene segments from the BRV WC3 strain. The human VP7s had a high level of overall amino acid identity (G1: 95-99%, G2: 94-99% G3: 96-100%, G4: 93-99%) when compared to those of representative rotavirus strains of their corresponding G serotypes. The VP4 of the P1 reassortant had a high identity (92-97%) with those of serotype P1A[8] HRV reference strains, while the BRV VP7 showed identities ranging from 91% to 94% to those of serotype G6 HRV strains. Sequence analyses of the BRV or HRV genes confirmed that the fundamental structure of the proteins in the vaccine was similar to those of the HRV and BRV references strains. Sequences analyses showed that RotaTeq exhibited a high degree of genetic stability as no mutations were identified in the material of each reassortant, which undergoes two rounds of replication cycles in cell culture during the manufacturing process, when compared to the final material used to fill the dosing tubes. The infectivity of each of the reassortant strains of RotaTeq, like HRV strains, did not require the presence of sialic acid residues on the cell surface. The molecular and biologic characterization of RotaTeq adds to the significant body of clinical data supporting the consistent efficacy, immunogenicity, and safety of Rota

  17. ROTAVIRUS GENOTYPES CIRCULATING IN BRAZIL, 2007-2012: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE VACCINE PROGRAM

    PubMed Central

    LUCHS, Adriana; CILLI, Audrey; MORILLO, Simone Guadagnucci; CARMONA, Rita de Cássia Compagnoli; TIMENETSKY, Maria do Carmo Sampaio Tavares

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Regarding public health in Brazil, a new scenario emerged with the establishment of universal rotavirus (RV) vaccination programs. Herein, the data from the five years of surveillance (2007-2012) of G- and P-type RV strains isolated from individuals with acute gastroenteritis in Brazil are reported. A total of 6,196 fecal specimens were investigated by ELISA and RT-PCR. RVs were detected in 19.1% (1,181/6,196). The peak of RV incidence moved from June-August to September. RV was detected less frequently (19.5%) among children ≤ 5 years than in older children and adolescents (6-18 years) (40.6%). Genotype distribution showed a different profile for each year: G2P[4] strains were most prevalent during 2007-2010, G9P[8] in 2011, and G12P[8] in 2012. Mixed infections (G1+G2P[4], G2+G3P[4]+P[8], G2+G12P[8]), unusual combinations (G1P[4], G2P[6]), and rare strains (G3P[3]) were also identified throughout the study period. Widespread vaccination may alter the RV seasonal pattern. The finding of RV disease affecting older children and adolescents after vaccine implementation has been reported worldwide. G2P[4] emergence most likely follows a global trend seemingly unrelated to vaccination, and G12, apparently, is emerging in the Brazilian population. The rapidly changing RV genotype patterns detected during this study illustrate a dynamic population of co-circulating wildtype RVs in Brazil. PMID:26422154

  18. Decline in rotavirus hospitalizations following the first three years of vaccination in Castile-La Mancha, Spain.

    PubMed

    Redondo, Olga; Cano, Rosa; Simón, Lorena

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus is a major burden on the Spanish Healthcare System. Rotarix(®) and RotaTeq(®) were simultaneously commercialized in Spain by February, 2007. The objective is to analyze the incidence and seasonality of rotavirus hospitalizations (RH) in Castile-La Mancha (CLM), following the first 3 y of commercialization. A cross-sectional study of the hospital discharge registry's Minimum Basic Data Set (MBDS) in CLM between 2003 and 2009 was performed. We used the Poisson regression model to quantify the percentage of change in the rotavirus incidence rate (IR) for 2007-09 vs. 2003-05, adjusting for age, sex, and province. To analyze changes between epidemic seasons the chi-square test was used. The median IR in 2003-09 was 224.71 per 10(5) [interquartile range (IQR): 185.24-274.70], which represents 60% of hospital admissions due to infectious acute gastroenteritis. The median rate in 2007-09 decreased [incidence rate ratio (IRR): 0.86, 95% CI: 0.78-0.96], significantly in Toledo (IRR: 0.54, 95% CI: 0.39-0.75). An incipient decline at the beginning of the last cold season was observed, preceded by a significant decrease of 68% in the autumn season of 2009. Despite its limited coverage, the rotavirus vaccine may have contributed to decrease RH in CLM. PMID:25644531

  19. Decline in rotavirus hospitalizations following the first three years of vaccination in Castile-La Mancha, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Redondo, Olga; Cano, Rosa; Simón, Lorena

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus is a major burden on the Spanish Healthcare System. Rotarix® and RotaTeq® were simultaneously commercialized in Spain by February, 2007. The objective is to analyze the incidence and seasonality of rotavirus hospitalizations (RH) in Castile-La Mancha (CLM), following the first 3 y of commercialization. A cross-sectional study of the hospital discharge registry's Minimum Basic Data Set (MBDS) in CLM between 2003 and 2009 was performed. We used the Poisson regression model to quantify the percentage of change in the rotavirus incidence rate (IR) for 2007–09 vs. 2003–05, adjusting for age, sex, and province. To analyze changes between epidemic seasons the chi-square test was used. The median IR in 2003–09 was 224.71 per 105 [interquartile range (IQR): 185.24–274.70], which represents 60% of hospital admissions due to infectious acute gastroenteritis. The median rate in 2007–09 decreased [incidence rate ratio (IRR): 0.86, 95% CI: 0.78–0.96], significantly in Toledo (IRR: 0.54, 95% CI: 0.39–0.75). An incipient decline at the beginning of the last cold season was observed, preceded by a significant decrease of 68% in the autumn season of 2009. Despite its limited coverage, the rotavirus vaccine may have contributed to decrease RH in CLM. PMID:25644531

  20. Development and evaluation of two subunit vaccine candidates containing antigens of hepatitis E virus, rotavirus, and astrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ming; Wei, Chao; Wang, Leyi; Cao, Dianjun; Meng, Xiang-Jin; Jiang, Xi; Tan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), rotavirus (RV), and astrovirus (AstV) are important pathogens that transmit through a common fecal-oral route, causing hepatitis (HEV) and gastroenteritis (RV and AstV) respectively in humans. In this study, we developed and evaluated two subunit vaccine candidates that consisted of the same protruding or spike protein antigens of the three viruses in two formats, a fusion of the three antigens into one molecule (fused vaccine) vs. a mixture of the three free antigens together (mixed vaccine). Both vaccines were easily made via E. coli expression system. Mouse immunization experiments showed that the fused vaccine elicited significantly higher antibody responses against the three viral antigens than those induced by the mixed vaccine. In addition, the mouse post-immune antisera of the fused vaccine revealed significantly higher neutralizing titers against HEV infection in cell culture, as well as significantly higher 50% blocking titers (BT50) against RV VP8-HBGA receptor interactions than those of the post-immune antisera after immunization of the mixed vaccine. Thus, the fused vaccine is a promising trivalent vaccine candidate against HEV, RV, and AstV, which is worth for further development. PMID:27194006

  1. Development and evaluation of two subunit vaccine candidates containing antigens of hepatitis E virus, rotavirus, and astrovirus.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ming; Wei, Chao; Wang, Leyi; Cao, Dianjun; Meng, Xiang-Jin; Jiang, Xi; Tan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), rotavirus (RV), and astrovirus (AstV) are important pathogens that transmit through a common fecal-oral route, causing hepatitis (HEV) and gastroenteritis (RV and AstV) respectively in humans. In this study, we developed and evaluated two subunit vaccine candidates that consisted of the same protruding or spike protein antigens of the three viruses in two formats, a fusion of the three antigens into one molecule (fused vaccine) vs. a mixture of the three free antigens together (mixed vaccine). Both vaccines were easily made via E. coli expression system. Mouse immunization experiments showed that the fused vaccine elicited significantly higher antibody responses against the three viral antigens than those induced by the mixed vaccine. In addition, the mouse post-immune antisera of the fused vaccine revealed significantly higher neutralizing titers against HEV infection in cell culture, as well as significantly higher 50% blocking titers (BT50) against RV VP8-HBGA receptor interactions than those of the post-immune antisera after immunization of the mixed vaccine. Thus, the fused vaccine is a promising trivalent vaccine candidate against HEV, RV, and AstV, which is worth for further development. PMID:27194006

  2. Influenza (Flu) vaccine (Live, Intranasal): What you need to know

    MedlinePlus

    ... is taken in its entirety from the CDC Influenza Live, Intranasal Flu Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/vaccines/ ... flulive.html . CDC review information for Live, Intranasal Influenza VIS: Vaccine Information Statement Influenza Page last reviewed: ...

  3. Methodology and lessons-learned from the efficacy clinical trial of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Zaman, K; Yunus, M; El Arifeen, Shams; Azim, Tasnim; Faruque, A S G; Huq, Ehsanul; Hossain, Ilias; Luby, Stephen P; Victor, John C; Dallas, Michael J; Lewis, Kristen D C; Rivers, Stephen B; Steele, A Duncan; Neuzil, Kathleen M; Ciarlet, Max; Sack, David A

    2012-04-27

    An efficacy clinical trial with pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (PRV), RotaTeq(®), was conducted at Matlab field site of ICDDR,B, Bangladesh from March 2007 to March 2009. The methodology, including operation logistics, and lessons-learned are described in this report. Vaccination was organized at 41 fixed-site clinics twice/month. A total of 1136 infants were randomized 1:1 to receive 3 doses of PRV/placebo at approximately 6-, 10-, and 14-weeks of age with routine vaccines of the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) schedule. Twelve field-workers routinely visited study participants for safety and efficacy follow-up. The study was conducted following good clinical practices and maintaining cold-chain requirements. There were no temperature deviations of clinical vaccine supplies. Data entry was done using the source documents to a central database developed by the sponsor which was linked to web. Among enrolled infants, 1128 (99.3%) received 3 doses of PRV/placebo and efficacy follow-up was conducted for a median of 554 days. For the evaluation of immunogenicity, blood samples were collected from 150 participants predose 1 and from 147 (98%) of the same participants post dose 3. Stool samples were collected from 778 (99.9%) acute gastroenteritis episodes among children who reported to diarrhoea treatment centres. Thirty-nine serious adverse events, including 6 deaths, occurred among study participants. The efficacy of PRV against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis was 42.7% through the entire follow-up period; serum anti-rotavirus IgA response was 78.1%. Inclement weather, difficult transportation, and movement of study participants were some of the challenges identified. This is the first vaccine trial in rural Bangladesh with online data entry. The study was well accepted in the community and was completed successfully. PMID:22520143

  4. Developing live vaccines against Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Roland, Kenneth L.; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Three great plague pandemics caused by the gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis have killed nearly 200 million people and it has been linked to biowarfare in the past. Plague is endemic in many parts of the world. In addition, the risk of plague as a bioweapon has prompted increased research to develop plague vaccines against this disease. Injectable subunit vaccines are being developed in the United States and United Kingdom. However, the live attenuated Y. pestis-EV NIIEG strain has been used as a vaccine for more than 70 years in the former Soviet Union and in some parts of Asia and provides a high degree of efficacy against plague. This vaccine has not gained general acceptance because of safety concerns. In recent years, modern molecular biological techniques have been applied to Y. pestis to construct strains with specific defined mutations designed to create safe, immunogenic vaccines with potential for use in humans and as bait vaccines to reduce the load of Y. pestis in the environment. In addition, a number of live, vectored vaccines have been reported using attenuated viral vectors or attenuated Salmonella strains to deliver plague antigens. Here we summarize the progress of live attenuated vaccines against plague. PMID:21918302

  5. Post‐marketing monitoring of intussusception after rotavirus vaccination in Japan†

    PubMed Central

    Bauchau, Vincent; Van Holle, Lionel; Mahaux, Olivia; Holl, Katsiaryna; Sugiyama, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose Rotarix TM was launched in November 2011 in Japan to prevent rotavirus gastroenteritis. Some studies suggest that Rotarix TM may have a temporal association with a risk of intussusception (IS). We assessed a possible association between IS and Rotarix TM vaccination in Japan. Methods All IS cases spontaneously reported post‐vaccination (Brighton collaboration levels 1, 2, and 3) were extracted from the GlaxoSmithKline spontaneous report database on the 11th of January 2013. Expected numbers of IS cases were estimated using the number of vaccine doses distributed and the Japanese incidence rate of IS stratified by month of age. The observed versus expected analysis considered the IS cases for each risk period (7 and 30 days post‐vaccination) and for each vaccine dose (two doses). Results Before January 2013, approximately 601 000 Rotarix TM doses were distributed in Japan. For a risk period of 7 days post‐dose 1 and post‐dose 2, 10 and five IS cases were observed, whereas 3.4 and 7.6 were expected, providing an observed‐to‐expected ratio of 2.96 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.42; 5.45) and 0.66 (95% CI: 0.21; 1.53), respectively. For a risk period of 30 days post‐dose 1 and post‐dose 2, 14 and eight cases were observed, whereas 14.5 and 32.7 were expected, providing an observed‐to‐expected ratio of 0.97 (95% CI: 0.53; 1.62) and 0.24 (95% CI: 0.11; 0.48), respectively. Conclusion A statistically significant excess of IS cases was observed within 7 days post‐dose 1, but not post‐dose 2. These results are consistent with previous observations in large post‐marketing safety studies in other world regions. © 2015 The Authors. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26013569

  6. Evaluation of oral Lanzhou lamb rotavirus vaccine via passive transfusion with CD4(+)/CD8(+) T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Du, Jialiang; Lan, Zhiling; Liu, Yueyue; Liu, Yan; Yu, Qingchuan; Li, Yanchao; Guo, Tai

    2016-06-01

    Lanzhou Lamb derived Rotavirus (RV) Vaccine (namely LLR) for children is only used in China. Since there were no reports on evaluation of LLR, even the data of phase IV clinical trial, we proceed the evaluation of LLR through focusing on T-cell to investigate whether LLR could induce the potential function involving in protection as a vaccine. Four groups of nude mice were transfused with CD4(+)/CD8(+) T-cells isolated from LLR-immunized (primed) and LLR-unimmunized (naïve) mice via intraperitonea (i.p.) respectively. Consequently, the adoption mice were challenged with mice-origin wild rotavirus EDIM (Epizootic Diarrhea of Infant Mice) by intragastric administration. Series of fecal/serum samples were collected and viral shedding, then serum IgA/IgG and secreted IgA were assayed. Compared to the mice transfused with T lymphocytes from naïve mice, the nude mice transfused with CD4(+) T lymphocytes from primed mice induce fecal and serum IgA increasing more rapidly, and have a shorter duration of virus shedding too. Whereas, no significant difference in virus clearance was found between the mice transfused with CD8(+) T lymphocytes isolated from primed and naïve mice. Therefore, we cleared the distinct roles of transfused CD4(+)/CD8(+) T lymphocytes for rotavirus clearance in nude mice, that the viral clearance conducted by CD4(+) T lymphocytes. Meanwhile, it has ability to help induction of LLR specific immunogenicity. Comparing with the transfusion of cell from primed and naïve mice, LLR can induce CD4(+) T lymphocytes memory which is a potential index to reflect the immunogenicity and protection, while CD8(+) T lymphocytes remove rotavirus by CTL with little memory ability. PMID:27025573

  7. Predominance of Norovirus and Sapovirus in Nicaragua after Implementation of Universal Rotavirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Bucardo, Filemón; Reyes, Yaoska; Svensson, Lennart; Nordgren, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite significant reduction of rotavirus (RV) infections following implementation of RotaTeq vaccination in Nicaragua, a large burden of patients with diarrhea persists. Methods We conducted a community- and hospital-based study of the burden of RV, norovirus (NV) and sapovirus (SV) infections as cause of sporadic acute gastroenteritis (GE) among 330 children ≤ 5 years of age between September 2009 and October 2010 in two major cities of Nicaragua with a RotaTeq coverage rate of 95%. Results We found that NV, SV and RV infections altogether accounted for 45% of cases of GE. Notably, NV was found in 24% (79/330) of the children, followed by SV (17%, 57/330) and RV (8%, 25/330). The detection rate in the hospital setting was 27%, 15% and 14% for NV, SV and RV respectively, whereas in the community setting the detection rate of RV was < 1%. Among each of the investigated viruses one particular genogroup or genotype was dominant; GII.4 (82%) for NV, GI (46%) for SV and G1P[8] (64%) in RV. These variants were also found in higher proportions in the hospital setting compared to the community setting. The GII.4.2006 Minerva strain circulating globally since 2006 was the most common among genotyped NV in this study, with the GII.4-2010 New Orleans emerging in 2010. Conclusions This study shows that NV has become the leading viral cause of gastroenteritis at hospital and community settings in Nicaragua after implementation of RV vaccination. PMID:24849288

  8. Influenza virus vaccine live intranasal--MedImmune vaccines: CAIV-T, influenza vaccine live intranasal.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    MedImmune Vaccines (formerly Aviron) has developed a cold-adapted live influenza virus vaccine [FluMist] that can be administered by nasal spray. FluMist is the first live virus influenza vaccine and also the first nasally administered vaccine to be marketed in the US. The vaccine will be formulated to contain live attenuated (att) influenza virus reassortants of the strains recommended by the US Public Health Service for each 'flu season. The vaccine is termed cold-adapted (ca) because the virus has been adapted to replicate efficiently at 25 degrees C in the nasal passages, which are below normal body temperature. The strains used in the seasonal vaccine will also be made temperature sensitive (ts) so that their replication is restricted at 37 degrees C (Type B strains) and 39 degrees C (Type A strains). The combined effect of the antigenic properties and the att, ca and ts phenotypes of the influenza strains contained in the vaccine enables the viruses to replicate in the nasopharynx to produce protective immunity. The original formulation of FluMist requires freezer storage throughout distribution. Because many international markets do not have distribution channels well suited to the sale of frozen vaccines, Wyeth and MedImmune are collaborating to develop a second generation, refrigerator-stable, liquid trivalent cold-adapted influenza vaccine (CAIV-T), which is in phase III trials. Initially, the frozen formulation will only be available in the US. For the 2003-2004 season, FluMist will contain A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1), A/Panama/2007/99 (H3N2) (A/Moscow/10/99-like) and B/Hong Kong/330/2001. Aviron was acquired by MedImmune on 15 January 2002. Aviron is now a wholly-owned subsidiary of MedImmune and is called MedImmune Vaccines. Aviron acquired FluMist in March 1995 through a Co-operative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the US NIAID, and a licensing agreement with the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA. In June 2000, the CRADA was

  9. Intellectual property rights and challenges for development of affordable human papillomavirus, rotavirus and pneumococcal vaccines: Patent landscaping and perspectives of developing country vaccine manufacturers.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Amin, Tahir; Kim, Joyce; Furrer, Eliane; Matterson, Anna-Carin; Schwalbe, Nina; Nguyen, Aurélia

    2015-11-17

    The success of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance depends on the vaccine markets providing appropriate, affordable vaccines at sufficient and reliable quantities. Gavi's current supplier base for new and underutilized vaccines, such as the human papillomavirus (HPV), rotavirus, and the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine is very small. There is growing concern that following globalization of laws on intellectual property rights (IPRs) through trade agreements, IPRs are impeding new manufacturers from entering the market with competing vaccines. This article examines the extent to which IPRs, specifically patents, can create such obstacles, in particular for developing country vaccine manufacturers (DCVMs). Through building patent landscapes in Brazil, China, and India and interviews with manufacturers and experts in the field, we found intense patenting activity for the HPV and pneumococcal vaccines that could potentially delay the entry of new manufacturers. Increased transparency around patenting of vaccine technologies, stricter patentability criteria suited for local development needs and strengthening of IPRs management capabilities where relevant, may help reduce impediments to market entry for new manufacturers and ensure a competitive supplier base for quality vaccines at sustainably low prices. PMID:26368398

  10. Rotavirus Prevalence in the Primary Care Setting in Nicaragua after Universal Infant Rotavirus Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Paniagua, Margarita; Zambrana, Luis Enrique; Bucardo, Filemon; Hudgens, Michael G.; Weber, David J.; Morgan, Douglas R.; Espinoza, Félix

    2011-01-01

    Nicaragua was the first developing nation to implement universal infant rotavirus immunization with the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5). Initial studies of vaccine effectiveness in Nicaragua and other developing nations have focused on the prevention of hospitalizations and severe rotavirus diarrhea. However, rotavirus diarrhea is more commonly treated in the primary care setting, with only 1–3% of rotavirus cases receiving hospital care. We measured the prevalence of rotavirus infection in primary care clinics in León, Nicaragua, after introduction of the immunization program. In the post-vaccine period, 3.5% (95% confidence interval = 1.9–5.8) of children seeking care for diarrhea tested positive for rotavirus. A high diversity of rotavirus genotypes was encountered among the few positive samples. In conclusion, rotavirus was an uncommon cause of childhood diarrhea in this primary care setting after implementation of a rotavirus immunization program. PMID:22049057

  11. Disease Caused by Rotavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Che-Liang; Chen, Shou-Chien; Liu, Shyun-Yeu; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2014-01-01

    Although rotavirus vaccines are available, rotaviruses remain the major cause of childhood diarrheal disease worldwide. The Rotarix (GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals Rixensart, Belgium) and RotaTeq (Merck and Co., Inc. Whitehouse Station, New Jersey, USA) vaccines are effective for reducing the morbidity and mortality of rotavirus infection. This article aims to assess the epidemiology of rotaviral gastroenteritis and the efficacy and effectiveness of licensed rotavirus vaccines. This review concludes by presenting challenges in the field that require further exploration by and perspectives from basic and translational research in the future. PMID:25553142

  12. Proceedings of the Consensus Day Meeting: Implications for Rotavirus Vaccination in the 2014 Apulian Lifetime Immunization Schedule. Foggia, 17 April 2015.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, D; Fortunato, F; Cappelli, M G; Gallone, M S; Tafuri, S; Prato, R

    2015-01-01

    Recommendations for vaccination against rotavirus (RV) were issued in Apulia in 2006; the vaccine was free of charge to children who entered day care or nursery school by 1 year of age or those affected by chronic diseases for which diarrhea caused by rotavirus can increase the risk of complications and hospitalization. In 2014, vaccination became available to all healthy children with only a copayment. However, there has not been a significant increase in vaccination coverage. On April 17, 2015, Apulian public health physicians and paediatricians met to share strategies to promote the RV vaccine indications provided in the regional immunization schedule. During the meeting, presentation of data reports were interspersed with discussions that were led with a "bottom-up" approach. The discussants responded to pre-planned questions raised by the participants and encouraged by the discussion. PMID:26835797

  13. Brucellosis: The Case for Live, Attenuated Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ficht, Thomas A.; Kahl-McDonagh, Melissa M.; Arenas-Gamboa, Angela M.; Rice-Ficht, Allison C.

    2009-01-01

    The successful control of animal brucellosis and associated reduction in human exposure has limited the development of human brucellosis vaccines. However, the potential use of Brucella in bioterrorism or biowarfare suggests that direct intervention strategies are warranted. Although the dominant approach has explored the use of live attenuated vaccines, side-effects associated with their use has prevented widespread use in humans. Development of live, attenuated Brucella vaccines that are safe for use in humans has focused on the deletion of important genes required for survival. However, the enhanced safety of deletion mutants is most often associated with reduced efficacy. For this reason recent efforts have sought to combine the optimal features of a attenuated live vaccine that is safe, free of side effects and efficacious in humans with enhanced immune stimulation through microencapsulation. The competitive advantages and innovations of this approach are: (1) use of a highly attenuated, safe, gene knockout, live Brucella mutants; (2) manufacturing with unique disposable closed system technologies, and (3) oral/intranasal delivery in a novel microencapsulation-mediated controlled release formula to optimally provide the long term mucosal immunostimulation required for protective immunity. Based upon preliminary data, it is postulated that such vaccine delivery systems can be storage stable, administered orally or intranasally, and generally applicable to a number of agents. PMID:19837284

  14. Exploring the potential impact of rotavirus vaccination on work absenteeism among female administrative personnel of the City of Antwerp through a retrospective database analysis

    PubMed Central

    Standaert, Baudouin; Van de Mieroop, Els; Nelen, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Rotavirus vaccination has been reimbursed in Belgium since November 2006 with a high uptake (>85%). Economic analyses of the vaccine have been reported, including estimates of indirect cost gain related to the reduction in work absenteeism. The objective of this study was to evaluate the latter parameter using real-life data. Design and setting A simple model estimated the reduction in absent workdays per working mother with a firstborn baby after the introduction of the rotavirus vaccine. Next, data on work absences were retrospectively analysed (from 2003 to 2012) using a database of administrative employees (n=11 600 working women per year) in the City of Antwerp. Observed reductions in absenteeism after the introduction of the vaccine were compared with the results from the model. These reductions would most likely be observed during the epidemic periods of rotavirus (from January to the end of May) for short-duration absences of ≤5 days. We compared data from outside epidemic periods (from June to December), expecting no changes over time prevaccine and postvaccine introduction, as well as with a control group of women aged 30–35 years with no first child. Results Model estimates were 0.73 working days gained per working mother. In the database of the City of Antwerp, we identified a gain of 0.88 working days during the epidemic period, and an accumulated gain of 2.24 days over a 3-year follow-up period. In the control group, no decrease in absenteeism was measured. Giving vaccine access to working mothers resulted in an estimated accumulated net cost gain of €187 per mother. Conclusions Reduction in absenteeism among working mothers was observed during periods of the epidemic after the introduction of the rotavirus vaccine in Belgium. This reduction is in line with estimates of indirect cost gains used in economic evaluations of the rotavirus vaccine. Trial registration number HO-12-12768. PMID:26129633

  15. Clinical and cost burden of rotavirus infection before and after introduction of rotavirus vaccines among commercially and Medicaid insured children in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Krishnarajah, Girishanthy; Demissie, Kitaw; Lefebvre, Patrick; Gaur, Sunanda; Sheng Duh, Mei

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to quantify clinical and economic burden of rotavirus (RV) infection pre- and post-vaccine introduction in commercially insured and Medicaid populations. Beneficiaries with continuous enrollment for ≥6 months while <5 years of age were identified separately in commercial (2000–2010) and Medicaid (2002–2009) claims databases. Commercial and Medicaid databases included 3 998 708 and 1 034 440 eligible children, respectively, observed from enrollment start date(s) to end of eligibility or 5-years-old. Rates of RV-coded and diarrhea-coded encounters and first RV episodes, and incremental cost of first RV episodes were calculated. In the post-vaccine period, rates per 10 000 person-years for RV-coded hospitalizations, outpatient visits and ER visits were 5.58 (95% CI, 5.37–5.80), 6.96 (95% CI, 6.75–7.20), and 4.85 (95% CI, 4.66–5.06), respectively (pre-vaccine, 16.67 [95% CI, 16.19–17.15], 13.20 [95% CI, 12.78–13.63], 11.26 [95% CI, 10.87–11.66], respectively), for commercially insured. In Medicaid the corresponding rates were 10.53 (95% CI, 9.60–11.56), 11.72 (95% CI, 10.73–12.80), and 9.11 (95% CI, 8.24–10.07) (pre-vaccine, 19.78 [95% CI, 19.14–20.45], 19.39 [95% CI, 18.75–20.05], 27.61 [95% CI, 26.84–28.40]). Incidence rate per 10 000 person-years for first RV episode pre- vs. post-vaccine were 27.03 (95% CI, 26.42–27.65) vs. 10.14 (95% CI, 9.86–10.44) in the commercially insured population and 37.71 (95% CI, 36.81–38.63) vs. 18.64 (95% CI, 17.37–19.99) in Medicaid. Incremental per-patient per-month cost of first RV episode was $3363 (95% CI, $3308-$3418) among commercially insured and $1831 (95% CI, $1768-$1887) in Medicaid. Since vaccine introduction clinical burden of RV disease decreased among children; costs associated with RV episodes remained significant across insured populations. PMID:25424930

  16. No Evidence of Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Viruses in Live Attenuated Human Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Switzer, William M.; Zheng, HaoQiang; Simmons, Graham; Zhou, Yanchen; Tang, Shaohua; Shankar, Anupama; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Delwart, Eric L.; Heneine, Walid

    2011-01-01

    Background The association of xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV)-related virus (XMRV) in prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome reported in previous studies remains controversial as these results have been questioned by recent data. Nonetheless, concerns have been raised regarding contamination of human vaccines as a possible source of introduction of XMRV and MLV into human populations. To address this possibility, we tested eight live attenuated human vaccines using generic PCR for XMRV and MLV sequences. Viral metagenomics using deep sequencing was also done to identify the possibility of other adventitious agents. Results All eight live attenuated vaccines, including Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) (SA-14-14-2), varicella (Varivax), measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR-II), measles (Attenuvax), rubella (Meruvax-II), rotavirus (Rotateq and Rotarix), and yellow fever virus were negative for XMRV and highly related MLV sequences. However, residual hamster DNA, but not RNA, containing novel endogenous gammaretrovirus sequences was detected in the JEV vaccine using PCR. Metagenomics analysis did not detect any adventitious viral sequences of public health concern. Intracisternal A particle sequences closest to those present in Syrian hamsters and not mice were also detected in the JEV SA-14-14-2 vaccine. Combined, these results are consistent with the production of the JEV vaccine in Syrian hamster cells. Conclusions We found no evidence of XMRV and MLV in eight live attenuated human vaccines further supporting the safety of these vaccines. Our findings suggest that vaccines are an unlikely source of XMRV and MLV exposure in humans and are consistent with the mounting evidence on the absence of these viruses in humans. PMID:22216219

  17. Molecular characterization of equine rotaviruses isolated in Europe in 2013: implications for vaccination.

    PubMed

    Matthijnssens, Jelle; Ons, Ellen; De Coster, Sarah; Conceição-Neto, Nádia; Gryspeerdt, Annick; Van Ranst, Marc; Raue, Rudiger

    2015-03-23

    Equine group A rotavirus (RVAs) mainly cause disease in foals under the age of 3 months. Only sporadic data are available on the circulation of RVAs in equine populations in Europe. In this study, 65 diarrheic samples from foals under 4 months of age were collected in Belgium (n=32), Germany (n=17), Slovenia (n=5), Sweden (n=4), Hungary (n=3), Italy (n=2), France (n=1) and The Netherlands (n=1). Forty percent of these samples (n=26) were found to be RVA positive by a quantitative RT-PCR assay. The viral load in 11 of these samples was sufficiently high to be (partially) genotyped. G3, G14 and P[12] were the main genotypes detected, and phylogenetic analyses revealed that they were closely related to contemporary equine RVA strains detected in Europe as well as in Brazil and South Africa. Regional variation was observed with only G14 and P[12] being detected in Germany, whereas mainly G3P[12] was encountered in Belgium. Surprisingly the only G14P[12] RVA strain detected in Belgium was also found to possess the very rare P[18] genotype, which has been described only once from equine RVA strain L338 detected in the UK in 1991. Despite the identification of this uncommon P[18] genotype, G3P[12] and G14P[12] RVA strains remained the most important genotypes in Europe during the study period. Based on this finding and the knowledge that G3P[12] and G14P[12] serotypes are partially cross-reactive it can be assumed that a vaccine based on an inactivated virus of the G3P[12] genotype is still relevant in the current European epidemiological situation, although the addition of a G14 strain would most likely be beneficial. PMID:25637313

  18. Characterization and protective efficacy in an animal model of a novel truncated rotavirus VP8 subunit parenteral vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Xue, Miaoge; Yu, Linqi; Che, Yaojian; Lin, Haijun; Zeng, Yuanjun; Fang, Mujin; Li, Tingdong; Ge, Shengxiang; Xia, Ningshao

    2015-05-21

    The cell-attachment protein VP8* of rotavirus is a potential candidate parenteral vaccine. However, the yield of full-length VP8 protein (VP8*, residues 1-231) expressed in Escherichia coli was low, and a truncated VP8 protein (ΔVP8*, residues 65-231) cannot elicit efficient protective immunity in a mouse model. In this study, tow novel truncated VP8 proteins, VP8-1 (residues 26-231) and VP8-2 (residues 51-231), were expressed in E. coli and evaluated for immunogenicity and protective efficacy, compared with VP8* and ΔVP8*. As well as ΔVP8*, the protein VP8-1 and VP8-2 were successfully expressed in high yield and purified in homogeneous dimeric forms, while the protein VP8* was expressed with lower yield and prone to aggregation and degradation in solution. Although the immunogenicity of the protein VP8*, VP8-1, VP8-2 and ΔVP8* was comparable, immunization of VP8* and VP8-1 elicited significantly higher neutralizing antibody titers than that of VP8-2 and ΔVP8* in mice. Furthermore, when assessed using a mouse maternal antibody model, the efficacy of VP8-1 to protect against rotavirus-induced diarrhea in pups was comparable to that of VP8*, both were dramatically higher than that of VP8-2 and ΔVP8*. Taken together, the novel truncated protein VP8-1, with increased yield, improved homogeneity and high protective efficacy, is a viable candidate for further development of a parenterally administrated prophylactic vaccine against rotavirus infection. PMID:25882173

  19. Mycoplasma gallisepticum: Control by live attenuated vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercially available attenuated strains of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) are commonly used within the layer industry to control MG-induced mycoplasmosis. Among these are two live MG vaccines derived from the moderately pathogenic MG “chick F” strain. In the present study, the commercially availa...

  20. Rotavirus mortality in India: estimates based on a nationally representative survey of diarrhoeal deaths

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Shally; Khera, Ajay; Bassani, Diego G; Kang, Gagandeep; Parashar, Umesh D; Kumar, Rajesh; Shet, Anita; Glass, Roger I; Jha, Prabhat

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To estimate the number of rotavirus-associated deaths among Indian children younger than five years. Methods We surveyed more than 23 000 child deaths from a nationally representative survey of 1.1 million Indian households during 2001–2003. Diarrhoeal deaths were characterized by region, age and sex and were combined with the proportion of deaths attributable to rotavirus, as determined by hospital microbiologic data collected by the Indian Rotavirus Strain Surveillance Network from December 2005 to November 2007. Rotavirus vaccine efficacy data from clinical trials in developing countries were used to estimate the number of deaths preventable by a national vaccination programme. Data were analysed using Stata SE version 10. Findings Rotavirus caused an estimated 113 000 deaths (99% confidence interval, CI: 86 000–155 000); 50% (54 700) and 75% (85 400) occurred before one and two years of age, respectively. One child in 242 died from rotavirus infection before five years of age. Rotavirus-associated mortality rates overall, among girls and among boys were 4.14 (99% CI: 3.14–5.68), 4.89 (99% CI: 3.75–6.79) and 3.45 (99% CI: 2.58–4.66) deaths per 1000 live births, respectively. Rates were highest in Bihar, Uttar Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh, which together accounted for > 50% of deaths (64 400) nationally. Rotavirus vaccine could prevent 41 000–48 000 deaths among children aged 3–59 months. Conclusion The burden of rotavirus-associated mortality is high among Indian children, highlighting the potential benefits of rotavirus vaccination. PMID:23109739

  1. Characterization of a G1P[8] rotavirus causing an outbreak of gastroenteritis in the Northern Territory, Australia, in the vaccine era

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Celeste M; Cowley, Daniel; Snelling, Thomas L; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F; Kirkwood, Carl D

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, a large outbreak of rotavirus gastroenteritis occurred in the Alice Springs region of the Northern Territory, Australia. The outbreak occurred 43 months after the introduction of the G1P[8] rotavirus vaccine Rotarix®. Forty-three infants were hospitalized during the outbreak and analysis of fecal samples from each infant revealed a G1P[8] rotavirus strain. The outbreak strain was adapted to cell culture and neutralization assays were performed using VP7 and VP4 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. The outbreak strain exhibited a distinct neutralization resistance pattern compared to the Rotarix® vaccine strain. Whole genome sequencing of the 2010 outbreak virus strain demonstrated numerous amino acid differences compared to the Rotarix® vaccine strain in the characterized neutralization epitopes of the VP7 and VP4 proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of the outbreak strain revealed a close genetic relationship to global strains, in particular RVA/Human-wt/BEL/BE0098/2009/G1P[8] and RVA/Human-wt/BEL/BE00038/2008/G1P[8] for numerous genes. The 2010 outbreak strain was likely introduced from a globally circulating population of strains rather than evolving from an endemic Australian strain. The outbreak strain possessed antigenic differences in the VP7 and VP4 proteins compared to the Rotarix® vaccine strain. The outbreak was associated with moderate vaccine coverage and possibly low vaccine take in the population. PMID:26038746

  2. Characterization of a G1P[8] rotavirus causing an outbreak of gastroenteritis in the Northern Territory, Australia, in the vaccine era.

    PubMed

    Donato, Celeste M; Cowley, Daniel; Snelling, Thomas L; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F; Kirkwood, Carl D

    2014-07-01

    In 2010, a large outbreak of rotavirus gastroenteritis occurred in the Alice Springs region of the Northern Territory, Australia. The outbreak occurred 43 months after the introduction of the G1P[8] rotavirus vaccine Rotarix(®). Forty-three infants were hospitalized during the outbreak and analysis of fecal samples from each infant revealed a G1P[8] rotavirus strain. The outbreak strain was adapted to cell culture and neutralization assays were performed using VP7 and VP4 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. The outbreak strain exhibited a distinct neutralization resistance pattern compared to the Rotarix(®) vaccine strain. Whole genome sequencing of the 2010 outbreak virus strain demonstrated numerous amino acid differences compared to the Rotarix(®) vaccine strain in the characterized neutralization epitopes of the VP7 and VP4 proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of the outbreak strain revealed a close genetic relationship to global strains, in particular RVA/Human-wt/BEL/BE0098/2009/G1P[8] and RVA/Human-wt/BEL/BE00038/2008/G1P[8] for numerous genes. The 2010 outbreak strain was likely introduced from a globally circulating population of strains rather than evolving from an endemic Australian strain. The outbreak strain possessed antigenic differences in the VP7 and VP4 proteins compared to the Rotarix(®) vaccine strain. The outbreak was associated with moderate vaccine coverage and possibly low vaccine take in the population. PMID:26038746

  3. Systemic features of rotavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Rivero-Calle, Irene; Gómez-Rial, José; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2016-07-01

    A growing body of evidence warrants a revision of the received/conventional wisdom of rotavirus infection as synonymous with acute gastroenteritis. Rotavirus vaccines have boosted our interest and knowledge of this virus, but also importantly, they may have changed the landscape of the disease. Extraintestinal spread of rotavirus is well documented, and the clinical spectrum of the disease is widening. Furthermore, the positive impact of current rotavirus vaccines in reducing seizure hospitalization rates should prompt a reassessment of the actual burden of extraintestinal manifestations of rotavirus diseases. This article discusses current knowledge of the systemic extraintestinal manifestations of rotavirus infection and their underlying mechanisms, and aims to pave the way for future clinical, public health and research questions. PMID:27181101

  4. Development of Streptococcus pneumoniae Vaccines Using Live Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shifeng; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae still causes severe morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in young children and the elderly. Much effort has been dedicated to developing protein-based universal vaccines to conquer the current shortcomings of capsular vaccines and capsular conjugate vaccines, such as serotype replacement, limited coverage and high costs. A recombinant live vector vaccine delivering protective antigens is a promising way to achieve this goal. In this review, we discuss the researches using live recombinant vaccines, mainly live attenuated Salmonella and lactic acid bacteria, to deliver pneumococcal antigens. We also discuss both the limitations and the future of these vaccines. PMID:25309747

  5. Stabilization of live Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccines during vaccination with second generation Spray-Vac® vaccine stabilizer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dilutions and application of live Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccines without the use of vaccine stabilizing compounds may lead to significant loss of vaccine viability and loss of vaccine efficacy. Vaccine viability may decreases due to osmotic lysis of the mycoplasma as well as the presence of chlo...

  6. Rotavirus capsid VP6 protein acts as an adjuvant in vivo for norovirus virus-like particles in a combination vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Blazevic, Vesna; Malm, Maria; Arinobu, Daisuke; Lappalainen, Suvi; Vesikari, Timo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rotavirus (RV) and norovirus (NoV) are the 2 leading causes of acute viral gastroenteritis worldwide. We have developed a non-live NoV and RV vaccine candidate consisting of NoV virus-like particles (VLPs) and recombinant polymeric RV VP6 protein produced in baculovirus-insect cell expression system. Both components have been shown to induce strong potentially protective immune responses. As VP6 nanotubes are highly immunogenic, we investigated here a possible adjuvant effect of these structures on NoV-specific immune responses in vivo. BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with a suboptimal dose (0.3 μg) of GII.4 or GI.3 VLPs either alone or in a combination with 10 μg dose of VP6 and induction of NoV-specific antibodies in sera of experimental animals were measured. Blocking assay using human saliva or synthetic histo-blood group antigens was employed to test NoV blocking antibodies. Suboptimal doses of the VLPs alone did not induce substantial anti-NoV antibodies. When co-administered with the VP6, considerable titers of not only type-specific but also cross-reactive IgG antibodies against NoV VLP genotypes not included in the vaccine composition were induced. Most importantly, NoV-specific blocking antibodies, a surrogate for neutralizing antibodies, were generated. Our results show that RV VP6 protein has an in vivo adjuvant effect on NoV-specific antibody responses and support the use of VP6 protein as a part of the NoV-RV combination vaccine, especially when addition of external adjuvants is not desirable. PMID:26467630

  7. Rotavirus capsid VP6 protein acts as an adjuvant in vivo for norovirus virus-like particles in a combination vaccine.

    PubMed

    Blazevic, Vesna; Malm, Maria; Arinobu, Daisuke; Lappalainen, Suvi; Vesikari, Timo

    2016-03-01

    Rotavirus (RV) and norovirus (NoV) are the 2 leading causes of acute viral gastroenteritis worldwide. We have developed a non-live NoV and RV vaccine candidate consisting of NoV virus-like particles (VLPs) and recombinant polymeric RV VP6 protein produced in baculovirus-insect cell expression system. Both components have been shown to induce strong potentially protective immune responses. As VP6 nanotubes are highly immunogenic, we investigated here a possible adjuvant effect of these structures on NoV-specific immune responses in vivo. BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with a suboptimal dose (0.3 μg) of GII.4 or GI.3 VLPs either alone or in a combination with 10 μg dose of VP6 and induction of NoV-specific antibodies in sera of experimental animals were measured. Blocking assay using human saliva or synthetic histo-blood group antigens was employed to test NoV blocking antibodies. Suboptimal doses of the VLPs alone did not induce substantial anti-NoV antibodies. When co-administered with the VP6, considerable titers of not only type-specific but also cross-reactive IgG antibodies against NoV VLP genotypes not included in the vaccine composition were induced. Most importantly, NoV-specific blocking antibodies, a surrogate for neutralizing antibodies, were generated. Our results show that RV VP6 protein has an in vivo adjuvant effect on NoV-specific antibody responses and support the use of VP6 protein as a part of the NoV-RV combination vaccine, especially when addition of external adjuvants is not desirable. PMID:26467630

  8. Real-time RT-PCR assays to differentiate wild-type group A rotavirus strains from Rotarix(®) and RotaTeq(®) vaccine strains in stool samples.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Rashi; Esona, Mathew D; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Ian Tam, Ka; Gentsch, Jon R; Bowen, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are the leading cause of severe diarrhea in young children worldwide. Two live-attenuated RVA vaccines, Rotarix(®) and RotaTeq(®) are recommended by World Health Organization (WHO) for routine immunization of all infants. Rotarix(®) and RotaTeq(®) vaccines have substantially reduced RVA associated mortality but occasionally have been associated with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) cases identified in vaccinees and their contacts. High-throughput assays are needed to monitor the prevalence of vaccine strains in AGE cases and emergence of new vaccine-derived strains following RVA vaccine introduction. In this study, we have developed quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) assays for detection of Rotarix(®) and RotaTeq(®) vaccine components in stool samples. Real-time RT-PCR assays were designed for vaccine specific targets in the genomes of Rotarix(®) (NSP2, VP4) and RotaTeq(®) (VP6, VP3-WC3, VP3-human) and validated on sequence confirmed stool samples containing vaccine strains, wild-type RVA strains, and RVA-negative stools. For quantification, standard curves were generated using dsRNA transcripts derived from RVA gene segments. Rotarix(®) NSP2 and VP4 qRT-PCR assays exhibited 92-100% sensitivity, 99-100% specificity, 94-105% efficiency, and a limit of detection of 2-3 copies per reaction. RotaTeq(®) VP6, VP3-WC3, and VP3-human qRT-PCR assays displayed 100% sensitivity, 94-100% specificity, 91-102% efficiency and limits of detection of 1 copy, 2 copies, and 140 copies, respectively. These assays permit rapid identification of Rotarix(®) and RotaTeq(®) vaccine components in stool samples from clinical and surveillance studies and will be helpful in determining the frequency of vaccine strain-associated AGE. PMID:24342877

  9. Real-time RT-PCR assays to differentiate wild-type group A rotavirus strains from Rotarix® and RotaTeq® vaccine strains in stool samples

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Rashi; Esona, Mathew D; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Ian Tam, Ka; Gentsch, Jon R; Bowen, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are the leading cause of severe diarrhea in young children worldwide. Two live-attenuated RVA vaccines, Rotarix® and RotaTeq® are recommended by World Health Organization (WHO) for routine immunization of all infants. Rotarix® and RotaTeq® vaccines have substantially reduced RVA associated mortality but occasionally have been associated with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) cases identified in vaccinees and their contacts. High-throughput assays are needed to monitor the prevalence of vaccine strains in AGE cases and emergence of new vaccine-derived strains following RVA vaccine introduction. In this study, we have developed quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) assays for detection of Rotarix® and RotaTeq® vaccine components in stool samples. Real-time RT-PCR assays were designed for vaccine specific targets in the genomes of Rotarix® (NSP2, VP4) and RotaTeq® (VP6, VP3-WC3, VP3-human) and validated on sequence confirmed stool samples containing vaccine strains, wild-type RVA strains, and RVA-negative stools. For quantification, standard curves were generated using dsRNA transcripts derived from RVA gene segments. Rotarix® NSP2 and VP4 qRT-PCR assays exhibited 92–100% sensitivity, 99–100% specificity, 94–105% efficiency, and a limit of detection of 2–3 copies per reaction. RotaTeq® VP6, VP3-WC3, and VP3-human qRT-PCR assays displayed 100% sensitivity, 94–100% specificity, 91–102% efficiency and limits of detection of 1 copy, 2 copies, and 140 copies, respectively. These assays permit rapid identification of Rotarix® and RotaTeq® vaccine components in stool samples from clinical and surveillance studies and will be helpful in determining the frequency of vaccine strain-associated AGE. PMID:24342877

  10. Genetic engineering of live rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, K; McGettigan, J P; Foley, H D; Hooper, D C; Dietzschold, B; Schnell, M J

    2001-05-14

    Rabies virus is not a single entity but consists of a wide array of variants that are each associated with different host species. These viruses differ greatly in the antigenic makeup of their G proteins, the primary determinant of pathogenicity and major inducer of protective immunity. Due to this diversity, existing rabies vaccines have largely been targeted to individual animal species. In this report, a novel approach to the development of rabies vaccines using genetically modified, reverse-engineered live attenuated rabies viruses is described. This approach entails the engineering of vaccine rabies virus containing G proteins from virulent strains and modification of the G protein to further reduce pathogenicity. Strategies employed included exchange of the arginine at position 333 for glutamine and modification of the cytoplasmic domain. The recombinant viruses obtained were non-neuroinvasive when administered via a peripheral route. The ability to confer protective immunity depended largely upon conservation of the G protein antigenic structure between the vaccine and challenge virus, as well as on the route of immunization. PMID:11348722

  11. Live bacterial vaccine vectors: An overview

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Adilson José; Zangirolami, Teresa Cristina; Novo-Mansur, Maria Teresa Marques; Giordano, Roberto de Campos; Martins, Elizabeth Angélica Leme

    2014-01-01

    Genetically attenuated microorganisms, pathogens, and some commensal bacteria can be engineered to deliver recombinant heterologous antigens to stimulate the host immune system, while still offering good levels of safety. A key feature of these live vectors is their capacity to stimulate mucosal as well as humoral and/or cellular systemic immunity. This enables the use of different forms of vaccination to prevent pathogen colonization of mucosal tissues, the front door for many infectious agents. Furthermore, delivery of DNA vaccines and immune system stimulatory molecules, such as cytokines, can be achieved using these special carriers, whose adjuvant properties and, sometimes, invasive capacities enhance the immune response. More recently, the unique features and versatility of these vectors have also been exploited to develop anti-cancer vaccines, where tumor-associated antigens, cytokines, and DNA or RNA molecules are delivered. Different strategies and genetic tools are constantly being developed, increasing the antigenic potential of agents delivered by these systems, opening fresh perspectives for the deployment of vehicles for new purposes. Here we summarize the main characteristics of the different types of live bacterial vectors and discuss new applications of these delivery systems in the field of vaccinology. PMID:25763014

  12. Public Health Impact of Complete and Incomplete Rotavirus Vaccination among Commercially and Medicaid Insured Children in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Krishnarajah, Girishanthy; Duh, Mei Sheng; Korves, Caroline; Demissie, Kitaw

    2016-01-01

    Background This study (NCT01682005) aims to assess clinical and cost impacts of complete and incomplete rotavirus (RV) vaccination. Methods Beneficiaries who continuously received medical and pharmacy benefits since birth were identified separately in Truven Commercial Claims and Encounters (2000–2011) and Truven Medicaid Claims (2002–2010) and observed until the first of end of insurance eligibility or five years. Infants with ≥1 RV vaccine within the vaccination window (6 weeks-8 months) were divided into completely and incompletely vaccinated cohorts. Historically unvaccinated (before 2007) and contemporarily unvaccinated (2007 and after) cohorts included children without RV vaccine. Claims with International Classification of Disease 9th edition (ICD-9) codes for diarrhea and RV were identified. First RV episode incidence, RV-related and diarrhea-related healthcare resource utilization after 8 months old were calculated and compared across groups. Poisson regressions were used to generate incidence rates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Mean total, inpatient, outpatient and emergency room costs for first RV and diarrhea episodes were calculated; bootstrapping was used to construct 95% CIs to evaluate cost differences. Results 1,069,485 Commercial and 515,557 Medicaid patients met inclusion criteria. Among commercially insured, RV incidence per 10,000 person-years was 3.3 (95% CI 2.8–3.9) for completely, 4.0 (95% CI 3.3–5.0) for incompletely vaccinated, and 20.9 (95% CI 19.5–22.4) for contemporarily and 40.3 (95% CI 38.6–42.1) for historically unvaccinated. Rates in Medicaid were 7.5 (95% CI 4.8–11.8) for completely, 9.0 (95% CI 6.5–12.3) for incompletely vaccinated, and 14.6 (95% CI 12.8–16.7) for contemporarily and 52.0 (95% CI 50.2–53.8) for historically unvaccinated. Mean cost for first RV episode per cohort member was $15.33 (95% CI $12.99-$18.03) and $4.26 ($95% CI $2.34-$6.35) lower for completely vaccinated versus contemporarily

  13. Use of a current varicella vaccine as a live polyvalent vaccine vector.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kouki; Mori, Yasuko

    2016-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is the causative agent of varicella and zoster. The varicella vaccine was developed to control VZV infection in children. The currently available Oka vaccine strain is the only live varicella vaccine approved by the World Health Organization. We previously cloned the complete genome of the Oka vaccine strain into a bacterial artificial chromosome vector and then successfully reconstituted the virus. We then used this system to generate a recombinant Oka vaccine virus expressing mumps virus gene(s). The new recombinant vaccine may be an effective polyvalent live vaccine that provides protection against both varicella and mumps viruses. In this review, we discussed about possibility of polyvalent live vaccine(s) using varicella vaccine based on our recent studies. PMID:25444800

  14. The "Performance of Rotavirus and Oral Polio Vaccines in Developing Countries" (PROVIDE) study: description of methods of an interventional study designed to explore complex biologic problems.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Beth D; Colgate, E Ross; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C; Haque, Rashidul; Dickson, Dorothy M; Carmolli, Marya P; Nayak, Uma; Taniuchi, Mami; Naylor, Caitlin; Qadri, Firdausi; Ma, Jennie Z; Alam, Masud; Walsh, Mary Claire; Diehl, Sean A; Petri, William A

    2015-04-01

    Oral vaccines appear less effective in children in the developing world. Proposed biologic reasons include concurrent enteric infections, malnutrition, breast milk interference, and environmental enteropathy (EE). Rigorous study design and careful data management are essential to begin to understand this complex problem while assuring research subject safety. Herein, we describe the methodology and lessons learned in the PROVIDE study (Dhaka, Bangladesh). A randomized clinical trial platform evaluated the efficacy of delayed-dose oral rotavirus vaccine as well as the benefit of an injectable polio vaccine replacing one dose of oral polio vaccine. This rigorous infrastructure supported the additional examination of hypotheses of vaccine underperformance. Primary and secondary efficacy and immunogenicity measures for rotavirus and polio vaccines were measured, as well as the impact of EE and additional exploratory variables. Methods for the enrollment and 2-year follow-up of a 700 child birth cohort are described, including core laboratory, safety, regulatory, and data management practices. Intense efforts to standardize clinical, laboratory, and data management procedures in a developing world setting provide clinical trials rigor to all outcomes. Although this study infrastructure requires extensive time and effort, it allows optimized safety and confidence in the validity of data gathered in complex, developing country settings. PMID:25711607

  15. Passive immunity to bovine rotavirus in newborn calves fed colostrum supplements from immunized or nonimmunized cows.

    PubMed Central

    Saif, L J; Redman, D R; Smith, K L; Theil, K W

    1983-01-01

    Colostrum was collected and pooled from each of five cows in three experimental groups: group I cows received intramuscular and intramammary inoculations of adjuvanted modified live Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center rotavirus vaccine; group II cows were injected intramuscularly with a commercial modified-live rota-coronavirus vaccine; and group III cows were uninoculated controls. Pooled colostrum from group I cows had higher (P less than 0.05) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) immunoglobulin G (IgG1) and virus neutralization (VN) rotavirus antibody titers (ELISA IgG1 = 2,413,682; VN = 360,205) than did colostrum from group II (ELISA IgG1 = 8,192; VN = 4,395) or group III cows (ELISA IgG1 = 5,916; VN = 2,865). The antibody titers of these last two colostrum pools did not differ (P greater than 0.05). Samples of these colostrum pools were fed as daily supplements (percent [vol/vol] in cow's milk infant formula) to 28 newborn, unsuckled, antibody-seronegative, male Holstein calves. Eight calves received no supplemental colostrum. The calves were orally challenged with virulent bovine rotavirus and monitored daily for diarrhea and fecal rotavirus shedding. Diarrhea and rotavirus shedding occurred in the eight calves fed no supplemental colostrum and persisted longest in this group. The pooled colostrum from group I cows protected eight of eight calves from both rotavirus diarrhea and shedding when fed as a 1% supplement. The pooled colostrum from neither group II nor group III cows protected 12 other calves against rotavirus diarrhea or shedding when fed at the same concentration (1%). Six rotavirus-challenged calves fed 0.1% supplemental colostrum from group I cows and two calves fed 10 and 50% supplemental colostrum from control cows displayed partial passive immunity, exemplified by delayed onset and shortened duration of rotavirus-associated diarrhea and virus shedding. PMID:6309660

  16. DNA-launched live-attenuated vaccines for biodefense applications.

    PubMed

    Pushko, Peter; Lukashevich, Igor S; Weaver, Scott C; Tretyakova, Irina

    2016-09-01

    A novel vaccine platform uses DNA immunization to launch live-attenuated virus vaccines in vivo. This technology has been applied for vaccine development against positive-strand RNA viruses with global public health impact including alphaviruses and flaviviruses. The DNA-launched vaccine represents the recombinant plasmid that encodes the full-length genomic RNA of live-attenuated virus downstream from a eukaryotic promoter. When administered in vivo, the genomic RNA of live-attenuated virus is transcribed. The RNA initiates limited replication of a genetically defined, live-attenuated vaccine virus in the tissues of the vaccine recipient, thereby inducing a protective immune response. This platform combines the strengths of reverse genetics, DNA immunization and the advantages of live-attenuated vaccines, resulting in a reduced chance of genetic reversions, increased safety, and improved immunization. With this vaccine technology, the field of DNA vaccines is expanded from those that express subunit antigens to include a novel type of DNA vaccines that launch live-attenuated viruses. PMID:27055100

  17. 76 FR 3075 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live Canarypox Vector AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA... testing, and then to field test, an unlicensed Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live Canarypox Vector. The.... Product: Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live Canarypox Vector. Field Test Locations: Alabama,...

  18. Rotavirus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Rotavirus is a virus that causes gastroenteritis. Symptoms include severe diarrhea, vomiting, fever, and dehydration. Almost all ... the U.S. are likely to be infected with rotavirus before their 5th birthday. Infections happen most often ...

  19. "R"-living vaccine against colibacillosis. Communication I.

    PubMed

    Parnas, J; Dam, A; Jorgensen, J B

    1977-04-01

    After our estimation of the LD100 of enteropathogenic E. coli 0149 and 0138 (and their toxins) in rabbits and mice (intravenously and subcutaneously or intraperitoneally, respectively), rabbits and mice were vaccinated subcutaneously by the living "R" 0149 vaccine. All animals showed resistance against the LD100 of both E. coli serotypes; this state of resistance lasted 1-5 months in rabbits, and 1-3 months in mice. Sera of vaccinated rabbits showed bactericidal activity against both E. coli serotypes. The R-E-system of rabbits which were immunized by the endotoxin of "R" 0149 living vaccine, showed mobilization of immunocytes. The vaccine seems to be harmless to newborn piglets after oral vaccination; 2 colostrum deprived piglets, despite vaccination at once after birth, did not survive the big chalenge with 100 ml of broth culture of E. coli 0149 "S" (anapylactic shock). But in comparison to 1 not vaccinated control piglet, the two piglests showed only few E. coli colonies in the intestines, while the intestine of the control animal was very massively colonized by the virulent strain. As the immunizing potency of the "R" 0149 living vaccine was clearly shown in rabbits and mice, further investigations on piglets (newborns, weaning epriod, and after weaning) are needed, to state whether the value of this vaccine corresponds with the immunizing potency shown in our preliminary experiments. The "R"-vaccine seems to open some perspective in colibacillosis prevention of children and animals, and therefore it deserves our attention. PMID:325952

  20. The second Geneva Consensus: Recommendations for novel live TB vaccines.

    PubMed

    Walker, K B; Brennan, M J; Ho, M M; Eskola, J; Thiry, G; Sadoff, J; Dobbelaer, R; Grode, L; Liu, M A; Fruth, U; Lambert, P H

    2010-03-01

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis continues to be a major public health burden in most developing parts of the world and efforts to develop effective strategies for containing the disease remain a priority. It has long been evident that effective mass vaccination programmes are a cost effective and efficient approach to controlling communicable diseases in a public health setting and tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a major target. One approach with increasing acceptance is based upon on live mycobacterial vaccines, either as recombinant BCG or rationally attenuated M. tuberculosis, thus generating a new live TB vaccine. The Geneva Consensus published in March 2005 set out the opinion on priorities and requirements for developing live mycobacterial vaccines for Phase I trials. In the intervening period much progress has been made in both preclinical and clinical development of new TB vaccines and has provided the impetus for organising the second Geneva Consensus (held at WHO headquarters, April 2009) to discuss issues, including: i. Explore the regulatory requirements for live TB vaccines to enter Phase I trials, in particular those based on attenuated M. tuberculosis. Particular attention was paid to the characterisation and safety package likely to be required, including issues of attenuation, the presence of antibiotic resistance markers in live vaccines and the nature of any attenuated vaccine phenotype. ii. To identify the general criteria for further clinical development from Phase I through to Phase III. iii. Obtain a perspective of the regulatory landscape of developing countries where Phase II and III trials are to be held. iv. Review manufacturing considerations for live TB vaccines and relevance of the WHO and European Pharmacopeia guidelines and requirements for BCG vaccine. v. Consider requirements and associated issues related to the use of these new vaccines within an existing BCG vaccination programme. PMID:20074686

  1. Molecular characterisation of wild-type G1P[8] and G3P[8] rotaviruses isolated in Vietnam 2008 during a vaccine trial.

    PubMed

    Do, L P; Doan, Y H; Nakagomi, T; Kaneko, M; Gauchan, P; Ngo, C T; Nguyen, M B; Yamashiro, T; Dang, A D; Nakagomi, O

    2016-04-01

    Rotavirus vaccines work better in developed countries than in developing countries, leading to the question of whether the circulating strains are different in these two settings. In 2008, a clinical trial of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine was performed in Nha Trang, Vietnam, in which the efficacy was reported to be 64 %. Although samples were collected independently from the clinical trial, we examined faecal specimens from children hospitalised for rotavirus diarrhoea and found that G3P[8] and G1P[8] were co-dominant at the time of the clinical trial. The aim of this study was to explore whether they were divergent from the strains circulating in the developed countries where the vaccine efficacy is high. Two G3P[8] and two G1P[8] strains that were regarded as representatives based on their electropherotypes were selected for full-genome sequencing. The genotype constellation was G1/G3-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1. All but the VP4 genes, one of which belonged to the emerging P[8]b genotype (OP354-like VP4), clustered into one or more lineages/alleles with the strains circulating in developed countries, with ≥97.5 % nucleotide sequence identity. Additionally, 10 G1 and 12 G3 VP7 sequences as well as 31 VP4 sequences were determined. No amino acid differences were observed between the Vietnamese strains and strains in the developed countries that were likely to have affected the neutralisation specificity of their VP7 and VP4. In conclusion, apart from prevalent P[8]b VP4, virtually no differences were observed between the predominant strains circulating in Vietnam at the time of the clinical trial and the strains in the developed countries; hence, the lower vaccine efficacy was more likely to be due to factors other than strain divergence. PMID:26711453

  2. Binding specificity of P[8] VP8* proteins of rotavirus vaccine strains with histo-blood group antigens.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoman; Guo, Nijun; Li, Dandi; Jin, Miao; Zhou, Yongkang; Xie, Guangcheng; Pang, Lili; Zhang, Qing; Cao, Youde; Duan, Zhao-Jun

    2016-08-01

    RotaTeq(®) and Rotarix™ are two common human rotavirus (RV) vaccines currently on the market worldwide. Recent studies indicate histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) may be attachment factors for RVs. The P[8] VP8* proteins of RotaTeq and Rotarix were expressed and purified, and their binding specificities were evaluated. Saliva-based binding assays showed that the VP8* proteins bound to the saliva samples of secretors irrespective of ABO blood types. However, in the oligosaccharide binding assay, the VP8* proteins displayed no specific binding to the HBGAs tested, including Lewis b and H1. The structure of RotaTeq P[8] VP8* was solved at 1.9Å. Structural comparisons revealed that the putative receptor binding site was different to that of other genotypes and displayed a novel potential binding region. These findings indicate RotaTeq and Rotarix may have better efficiency in areas with a high percentage of secretors. PMID:27209447

  3. Live Vaccination Tactics: Possible Approaches for Controlling Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Saljoughian, Noushin; Taheri, Tahareh; Rafati, Sima

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination with durable immunity is the main goal and fundamental to control leishmaniasis. To stimulate the immune response, small numbers of parasites are necessary to be presented in the mammalian host. Similar to natural course of infection, strategy using live vaccine is more attractive when compared to other approaches. Live vaccines present the whole spectrum of antigens to the host immune system in the absence of any adjuvant. Leishmanization was the first effort for live vaccination and currently used in a few countries against cutaneous leishmaniasis, in spite of their obstacle and safety. Then, live attenuated vaccines developed with similar promotion of creating long-term immunity in the host with lower side effect. Different examples of attenuated strains are generated through long-term in vitro culturing, culturing under drug pressure, temperature sensitivity, and chemical mutagenesis, but none is safe enough and their revision to virulent form is possible. Attenuation through genetic manipulation and disruption of virulence factors or essential enzymes for intracellular survival are among other approaches that are intensively under study. Other designs to develop live vaccines for visceral form of leishmaniasis are utilization of live avirulent microorganisms such as Lactococcus lactis, Salmonella enterica, and Leishmania tarentolae called as vectored vaccine. Apparently, these vaccines are intrinsically safer and can harbor the candidate antigens in their genome through different genetic manipulation and create more potential to control Leishmania parasite as an intracellular pathogen. PMID:24744757

  4. The role of human adenoviruses type 41 in acute diarrheal disease in Minas Gerais after rotavirus vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Thaís Aparecida Vieira; Assis, Andrêssa Silvino Ferreira; do Valle, Daniel Almeida; Barletta, Vívian Honorato; de Carvalho, Iná Pires; Rose, Tatiana Lundgren; Portes, Silvana Augusta Rodrigues; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; da Rosa e Silva, Maria Luzia

    2016-01-01

    distribution. These data indicate the significant involvement of HAdV-F type 41 in the etiology of ADD in Minas Gerais, which demonstrates the importance of other viral agents in the development of the disease after the introduction of rotavirus vaccine immunization. PMID:26887251

  5. Establishment of indirect immunofluorescence assay for rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Tao, J; Zhang, J; Liu, X; Jin, H; Jiang, C; Yin, Y

    2016-03-01

    Rotavirus infection is the most frequent cause of infantile gastroenteritis worldwide and a significant cause of death in infants and young children, following severe diarrhea and dehydration. Rotavirus vaccines are considered the most effective way to prevent rotavirus infections. In the process of developing rotavirus vaccines, it is crucial to establish a reliable and standardized method to determine vaccine titer. In this study, we developed an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) to determine the infectious titer of Lanzhou lamb rotavirus (LLR) vaccine grown in MA104 cells. The activating concentration of trypsin was 1 µg/ml for healthy monolayers of MA104 cells at 100% confluence. After incubation for 18 hr, a rabbit anti-SA11 polyclonal antibody, diluted at 1:800 in PBS, was added to all wells, followed by an Alexa-488-conjugated secondary antibody diluted at 1:500 in PBS. Cells were examined with a fluorescence microscope. Our results show that IFA was more reproducible, more sensitive, simpler, and more rapid than the log 50% cell culture infectious dose-ELISA (lgCCID50-ELISA) in measuring the rotavirus vaccines. IFA provided a reliable basis for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of rotavirus, and the certification of rotavirus vaccine production. PMID:26982471

  6. The impact of deposition site on vaccination efficiency of a live bacterial poultry vaccine.

    PubMed

    Evans, J D; Leigh, S A; Purswell, J L; Collier, S D; Kim, E J; Boykin, D L; Branton, S L

    2015-08-01

    Vaccines are utilized within the poultry industry to minimize disease-associated losses and spray vaccination is a commonly utilized means for the mass application of poultry vaccines. During this process, vaccine-laden particles are deposited upon target areas (e.g., eyes, nares, and oral cavity) resulting in the direct internalization of the vaccine. However, particles are also deposited on nontarget areas such as the exterior of the subject and its surrounding environment. To better determine the fate of particles deposited upon nontarget areas and the impact of deposition site on the efficiency of vaccine application, a live bacterial poultry vaccine (AviPro(®) MG F) was applied via spray using a spray cabinet with a slotted partition allowing for head-only, body-only, and whole-bird spray application. At 11 wk age, Hy-Line(®) W-36 pullets (n = 280) were allocated equally among 7 treatments including: nonvaccinated controls, pullets spray-vaccinated at the manufacturer's recommended dose (1X) in a site-specific manner (head-only, body-only, and whole-bird), pullets spray-vaccinated at 5X the recommended level (body-only), pullets vaccinated by manual eye-drop application (1X), and pullets eye-drop vaccinated at a level approximating that achieved during the spray vaccination process (1/700X). At 6 to 7 wk postvaccination, vaccination efficiency was assessed via serological-based assays [serum plate agglutination (SPA) and ELISA] and the detection of vaccine-derived in vivo populations. Results indicate an additive contribution of the vaccine deposited on the body to the overall vaccination efficiency of this live bacterial live poultry vaccine. PMID:26049801

  7. Global Seasonality of Rotavirus Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Manish M.; Pitzer, Virginia; Alonso, Wladimir J.; Vera, David; Lopman, Ben; Tate, Jacqueline; Viboud, Cecile; Parashar, Umesh D.

    2012-01-01

    Background A substantial number of surveillance studies have documented rotavirus prevalence among children admitted for dehydrating diarrhea. We sought to establish global seasonal patterns of rotavirus disease before widespread vaccine introduction. Methods We reviewed studies of rotavirus detection in children with diarrhea published since 1995. We assessed potential relationships between seasonal prevalence and locality by plotting the average monthly proportion of diarrhea cases positive for rotavirus according to geography, country development, and latitude. We used linear regression to identify variables that were potentially associated with the seasonal intensity of rotavirus. Results Among a total of 99 studies representing all six geographical regions of the world, patterns of year-round disease were more evident in low- and low-middle income countries compared with upper-middle and high income countries where disease was more likely to be seasonal. The level of country development was a stronger predictor of strength of seasonality (P=0.001) than geographical location or climate. However, the observation of distinctly different seasonal patterns of rotavirus disease in some countries with similar geographical location, climate and level of development indicate that a single unifying explanation for variation in seasonality of rotavirus disease is unlikely. Conclusion While no unifying explanation emerged for varying rotavirus seasonality globally, the country income level was somewhat more predictive of the likelihood of having seasonal disease than other factors. Future evaluation of the effect of rotavirus vaccination on seasonal patterns of disease in different settings may help understand factors that drive the global seasonality of rotavirus disease. PMID:23190782

  8. Immunogenicity and reactogenicity of the human rotavirus vaccine, RIX4414 oral suspension, when co-administered with routine childhood vaccines in Chinese infants.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong-Cheng; Huang, Teng; Li, Yanping; Wang, Lao-Hong; Tao, Junhui; Fu, Botao; Si, Guoai; Nong, Yi; Mo, Zhaojun; Liao, XueYan; Luan, Ivy; Tang, Haiwen; Rathi, Niraj; Karkada, Naveen; Han, Htay Htay

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated the immunogenicity of the human rotavirus (RV) vaccine (RIX4414) when co-administered with routine childhood vaccines in Chinese infants (NCT01171963). Healthy infants aged 6-16 weeks received 2 doses of either RIX4414 or placebo according to a 0, 1-month schedule. Infants received routine diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTPa) and oral poliovirus (OPV) vaccines either separately from or concomitantly with RIX4414/placebo (separate and co-administration cohorts, respectively). Anti-RV IgA seroconversion rates (one month post-dose-2) and seropositivity rates (at one year of age) were measured using ELISA. Immune responses against the DTPa and OPV antigens were measured one month post-DTPa dose-3 in the co-administration cohort. Solicited local and general symptoms were recorded for 8-days post-vaccination (total cohort). The according-to-protocol immunogenicity population included 511 infants in the separate cohort and 275 in the co-administration cohort. One month post-RIX4414 dose-2, anti-RV IgA seroconversion rates were 74.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 68.9-79.9) and 64.2% (95% CI: 55.4-72.3) in the separate and co-administration cohorts; seropositivity rates at one year of age were 71.5% (95% CI: 65.5-77.1) and 50.0% (95% CI: 40.9-59.1), respectively. One month post-DTPa dose-3, all infants in the co-administration cohort were seroprotected against diphtheria and tetanus, and seropositive for pertussis toxoid, pertactin and filamentous haemaglutinin. Two months post-OPV dose-3, seroprotection rates against anti-poliovirus types 1, 2 and 3 were >99% in the co-administration cohort. Reactogenicity profiles were similar in both cohorts. RIX4414 was immunogenic and well-tolerated in Chinese infants and did not appear to interfere with the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of co-administered routine childhood vaccines. PMID:27149266

  9. Immunogenicity and reactogenicity of the human rotavirus vaccine, RIX4414 oral suspension, when co-administered with routine childhood vaccines in Chinese infants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rong-cheng; Huang, Teng; Li, Yanping; Wang, Lao-Hong; Tao, Junhui; Fu, Botao; Si, Guoai; Nong, Yi; Mo, Zhaojun; Liao, XueYan; Luan, Ivy; Tang, Haiwen; Rathi, Niraj; Karkada, Naveen; Han, Htay Htay

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study evaluated the immunogenicity of the human rotavirus (RV) vaccine (RIX4414) when co-administered with routine childhood vaccines in Chinese infants (NCT01171963). Healthy infants aged 6–16 weeks received 2 doses of either RIX4414 or placebo according to a 0, 1-month schedule. Infants received routine diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTPa) and oral poliovirus (OPV) vaccines either separately from or concomitantly with RIX4414/placebo (separate and co-administration cohorts, respectively). Anti-RV IgA seroconversion rates (one month post-dose-2) and seropositivity rates (at one year of age) were measured using ELISA. Immune responses against the DTPa and OPV antigens were measured one month post-DTPa dose-3 in the co-administration cohort. Solicited local and general symptoms were recorded for 8-days post-vaccination (total cohort). The according-to-protocol immunogenicity population included 511 infants in the separate cohort and 275 in the co-administration cohort. One month post-RIX4414 dose-2, anti-RV IgA seroconversion rates were 74.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 68.9–79.9) and 64.2% (95% CI: 55.4–72.3) in the separate and co-administration cohorts; seropositivity rates at one year of age were 71.5% (95% CI: 65.5–77.1) and 50.0% (95% CI: 40.9–59.1), respectively. One month post-DTPa dose-3, all infants in the co-administration cohort were seroprotected against diphtheria and tetanus, and seropositive for pertussis toxoid, pertactin and filamentous haemaglutinin. Two months post-OPV dose-3, seroprotection rates against anti-poliovirus types 1, 2 and 3 were >99% in the co-administration cohort. Reactogenicity profiles were similar in both cohorts. RIX4414 was immunogenic and well-tolerated in Chinese infants and did not appear to interfere with the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of co-administered routine childhood vaccines. PMID:27149266

  10. Transmission of a live Eimeria acervulina vaccine strain and response to infection in vaccinated and contact-vaccinated broilers.

    PubMed

    Velkers, Francisca C; Bouma, Annemarie; Stegeman, J Arjan; de Jong, Mart C M

    2012-01-01

    Live vaccines for coccidiosis control are infrequently used in broilers, mainly due to variability in efficacy and relatively high costs. More insight in transmission of vaccine and wild-type strains can facilitate optimization of vaccination strategies and might increase its use as an alternative for anticoccidial drugs. The aim of this study was to quantify transmission of a live Eimeria acervulina vaccine strain and to determine the degree of protection against a subsequent infection with a wild-type E. acervulina strain. An experiment was carried out with 4 groups of 22 SPF broilers. At 2 days of age, 11 birds of groups 2 to 4 were vaccinated directly by oral application of E. acervulina oocysts of the Paracox™ vaccine and 11 birds were placed in contact with these birds (contact-vaccinated). Birds in group 1 remained unvaccinated (controls) and were not exposed to vaccinated birds. At day 28 of age, 6 groups of 10 birds were formed, with 2 groups (duplo) for each treatment group, i.e. vaccinated, contact-vaccinated or unvaccinated control birds. Five birds of each group were orally inoculated with wild-type E. acervulina oocysts and five were contact-exposed. Single droppings were examined daily from days 5 to 49 of age for oocyst output and to determine the time of infection. The transmission rate of the vaccine strain was estimated to be 1.6 per day and of the wild-type strain 2.3, 8.7 and 20.8 per day for vaccinated, contact-vaccinated and unvaccinated birds, respectively. Although transmission of wild-type coccidia was not significantly reduced in vaccinated or contact-vaccinated groups, both groups were equally protected against high oocyst output after infection compared to unvaccinated groups. These results suggest that factors influencing transmission of live vaccine strains in flocks may be important targets for improvement of vaccine efficacy and warrant further research. PMID:22075084

  11. Influenza vaccination with live-attenuated and inactivated virus-vaccines during an outbreak of disease.

    PubMed Central

    Rocchi, G.; Ragona, G.; Piga, C.; Pelosio, A.; Volpi, A.; Vella, S.; Legniti, N.; de Felici, A.

    1979-01-01

    Immunization procedures with live attenuated and inactivated vaccines were carried out on a group of young recruits at the beginning of an outbreak of infection due to an A/Victoria/3/75-related virus strain, which occurred in February 1977 in a military camp. A retrospective investigation on protection from clinical influenza was then performed in order to investigate whether immunization with live virus vaccines, administered at the beginning of an epidemic, could provide early protection from the disease. In the course of the two weeks following vaccination, laboratory-confirmed clinical influenza cases occurred in 4 subjects among the 110 volunteers of the control group which received placebo, and in 8, 7 and 4 subjects respectively of the 3 groups of about 125 individuals, each of which received one of the following vaccine preparations: (a), live attenuated A/Victoria/3/75 influenza virus oral vaccine, grown on chick embryo kidney culture; (b), live attenuated nasal vaccine, a recombinant of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 with A/Victoria/3/75 virus; and (c), inactivated A/Victoria/3/75 virus intramuscular vaccine. These data do not support the hypothesis that, during an epidemic of infection, early protection from clinical influenza can be achieved through immunization with live attenuated or inactivated influenza virus vaccines, in spite of the high immunizing capability of the vaccine preparations. PMID:512351

  12. Analysis of host range restriction determinants in the rabbit model: comparison of homologous and heterologous rotavirus infections.

    PubMed

    Ciarlet, M; Estes, M K; Barone, C; Ramig, R F; Conner, M E

    1998-03-01

    The main limitation of both the rabbit and mouse models of rotavirus infection is that human rotavirus (HRV) strains do not replicate efficiently in either animal. The identification of individual genes necessary for conferring replication competence in a heterologous host is important to an understanding of the host range restriction of rotavirus infections. We recently reported the identification of the P type of the spike protein VP4 of four lapine rotavirus strains as being P[14]. To determine whether VP4 is involved in host range restriction in rabbits, we evaluated infection in rotavirus antibody-free rabbits inoculated orally with two P[14] HRVs, PA169 (G6) and HAL1166 (G8), and with several other HRV strains and animal rotavirus strains of different P and G types. We also evaluated whether the parental rhesus rotavirus (RRV) (P5B[3], G3) and the derived RRV-HRV reassortant candidate vaccine strains RRV x D (G1), RRV x DS-1 (G2), and RRV x ST3 (G4) would productively infect rabbits. Based on virus shedding, limited replication was observed with the P[14] HRV strains and with the SA11 Cl3 (P[2], G3) and SA11 4F (P6[1], G3) animal rotavirus strains, compared to the homologous ALA strain (P[14], G3). However, even limited infection provided complete protection from rotavirus infection when rabbits were challenged orally 28 days postinoculation (DPI) with 10(3) 50% infective doses of ALA rabbit rotavirus. Other HRVs did not productively infect rabbits and provided no significant protection from challenge, in spite of occasional seroconversion. Simian RRV replicated as efficiently as lapine ALA rotavirus in rabbits and provided complete protection from ALA challenge. Live attenuated RRV reassortant vaccine strains resulted in no, limited, or productive infection of rabbits, but all rabbits were completely protected from heterotypic ALA challenge. The altered replication efficiency of the reassortants in rabbits suggests a role for VP7 in host range restriction

  13. Evaluation of immune responses by live infectious bursal disease vaccines to avoid vaccination failures.

    PubMed

    Jakka, P; Reddy, Y K; Kirubaharan, J J; Chandran, N D J

    2014-06-01

    Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD) is a viral, contagious immunosuppressive disease posing an important threat to the commercial poultry industry. Evolution of highly virulent strains of IBD virus warranted the need for detailed characterization of the immune responses offered by the currently available vaccines. Two extensively used live vaccines of varied attenuation levels - intermediate and intermediate plus - strains were analyzed for the induction of immune responses. Both the vaccines induced protective antibody titers with the onset, quicker and higher with the intermediate plus vaccine. The intermediate plus strain vaccinate was observed to induce higher levels of IFN-γ in the birds. These results were supported by immunophenotype analyses with an increase in CD8+ and simultaneous decrease in CD4+ cell population. Both vaccine strains conferred protective immunity against virulent challenge. The study warrants the use of intermediate plus vaccines in disease endemic regions and intermediate vaccines in non-endemic regions to prevent IBD infection. PMID:24883198

  14. A Novel Live-Attenuated Vaccine Candidate for Mayaro Fever

    PubMed Central

    Weise, William J.; Hermance, Meghan E.; Forrester, Naomi; Adams, A. Paige; Langsjoen, Rose; Gorchakov, Rodion; Wang, Eryu; Alcorn, Maria D. H.; Tsetsarkin, Konstantin; Weaver, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    Mayaro virus (MAYV) is an emerging, mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes a dengue-like illness in many regions of South America, and which has the potential to urbanize. Because no specific treatment or vaccine is available for MAYV infection, we capitalized on an IRES-based approach to develop a live-attenuated MAYV vaccine candidate. Testing in infant, immunocompetent as well as interferon receptor-deficient mice demonstrated a high degree of attenuation, strong induction of neutralizing antibodies, and efficacy against lethal challenge. This vaccine strain was also unable to infect mosquito cells, a major safety feature for a live vaccine derived from a mosquito-borne virus. Further preclinical development of this vaccine candidate is warranted to protect against this important emerging disease. PMID:25101995

  15. Live attenuated influenza vaccine tetravalent: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Bandell, Allyn R; Simões, Eric A F

    2015-07-01

    Live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) has been available as a trivalent formulation in the EU since 2012. Influenza B strains from two lineages have co-circulated outside Asia in Europe, Israel and North America since the early 2000s. The trivalent vaccine contained a single influenza B lineage virus chosen primarily on the basis of the previous year's circulating lineage. Failure to align the vaccine virus with the circulating virus leaves even vaccinated patients, particularly children, at risk for infection with B viruses from the other lineage. Recently, a tetravalent formulation was approved and use will begin during the 2014-2015 influenza season. Approval of LAIV Tetra was based on the established efficacy and safety of trivalent LAIV and studies demonstrating similar immunogenicity between the trivalent and tetravalent vaccines. Addition of a fourth strain to the vaccine will address the issue of co-circulation of influenza B viruses and provide a broader range of protection. PMID:25864428

  16. Rotavirus immune responses and correlates of protection

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A.; Greenberg, Harry B.

    2012-01-01

    Selected topics in the field of rotavirus immunity are reviewed focusing on recent developments that may improve efficacy and safety of current and future vaccines. Rotaviruses have developed multiple mechanisms to evade interferon-mediated innate immunity. Compared to more developed regions of the world, protection induced by natural infection and vaccination is reduced in developing countries where, among other factors, high viral challenge loads are common and where infants are infected at an early age. Studies in developing countries indicate that rotavirus-specific serum IgA levels are not an optimal correlate of protection following vaccination, and better correlates need to be identified. Protection against rotavirus following vaccination is substantially heterotypic; nonetheless, a role for homotypic immunity in selection of circulating post vaccination strains needs further study. PMID:22677178

  17. 9 CFR 113.71 - Chlamydia Psittaci Vaccine (Feline Pneumonitis), Live Chlamydia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Chlamydia Psittaci Vaccine (Feline... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.71 Chlamydia Psittaci Vaccine (Feline Pneumonitis), Live Chlamydia. Chlamydia Psittaci Vaccine (Feline Pneumonitis), Live Chlamydia, shall...

  18. 9 CFR 113.71 - Chlamydia Psittaci Vaccine (Feline Pneumonitis), Live Chlamydia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Chlamydia Psittaci Vaccine (Feline... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.71 Chlamydia Psittaci Vaccine (Feline Pneumonitis), Live Chlamydia. Chlamydia Psittaci Vaccine (Feline Pneumonitis), Live Chlamydia, shall...

  19. In-season and out-of-season variation of rotavirus genotype distribution and age of infection across 12 European countries before the introduction of routine vaccination, 2007/08 to 2012/13.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, Daniel; Vivancos, Roberto; Read, Jonathan M; Pitzer, Virginia E; Cunliffe, Nigel; French, Neil; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren

    2016-01-01

    The EuroRotaNet surveillance network has conducted rotavirus genotype surveillance since 2007 in 16 European countries. Using epidemiological and microbiological data from 39,786 genotyped rotavirus-positive specimens collected between September 2007 and August 2013, we assessed genotype distribution and age distribution of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) cases in and out of peak season in 12 countries which were yet to implement routine rotavirus vaccination. In multinomial multivariate logistic regression, adjusting for year, country and age, the odds of infection caused by genotype-constellation 2 DS-1-like stains (adjusted multinomial odds ratio (aM-OR) = 1.25; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.13-1.37; p < 0.001), mixed or untypable genotypes (aM-OR = 1.55; 95% CI: 1.40-1.72; p < 0.001) and less common genotypes (aM-OR = 2.11; 95% CI:1.78-2.51; p < 0.001) increased out of season relative to G1P[8]. Age varied significantly between seasons; the proportion of RVGE cases younger than 12 months in the United Kingdom increased from 34% in season to 39% out of season (aM-OR = 1.66; 95% CI: 1.20-2.30), and the proportion five years and older increased from 9% in season to 17% out of season (aM-OR = 2.53; 95% CI: 1.67-3.82). This study provides further understanding of the rotavirus ecology before vaccine introduction, which will help interpret epidemiological changes in countries introducing or expanding rotavirus vaccination programmes. PMID:26794258

  20. Herpes Simplex Vaccines: Prospects of Live-attenuated HSV Vaccines to Combat Genital and Ocular infections

    PubMed Central

    Stanfield, Brent; Kousoulas, Konstantin Gus

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) and its closely related type-2 (HSV-2) viruses cause important clinical manifestations in humans including acute ocular disease and genital infections. These viruses establish latency in the trigeminal ganglionic and dorsal root neurons, respectively. Both viruses are widespread among humans and can frequently reactivate from latency causing disease. Currently, there are no vaccines available against herpes simplex viral infections. However, a number of promising vaccine approaches are being explored in pre-clinical investigations with few progressing to early phase clinical trials. Consensus research findings suggest that robust humoral and cellular immune responses may partially control the frequency of reactivation episodes and reduce clinical symptoms. Live-attenuated viral vaccines have long been considered as a viable option for generating robust and protective immune responses against viral pathogens. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) belongs to the same alphaherpesvirus subfamily with herpes simplex viruses. A live-attenuated VZV vaccine has been extensively used in a prophylactic and therapeutic approach to combat primary and recurrent VZV infection indicating that a similar vaccine approach may be feasible for HSVs. In this review, we summarize pre-clinical approaches to HSV vaccine development and current efforts to test certain vaccine approaches in human clinical trials. Also, we discuss the potential advantages of using a safe, live-attenuated HSV-1 vaccine strain to protect against both HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections. PMID:27114893

  1. Live Attenuated Tularemia Vaccines: Recent Developments and Future Goals

    PubMed Central

    Marohn, Mark E.; Barry, Eileen M.

    2013-01-01

    In the aftermath of the 2001 anthrax attacks in the U.S., numerous efforts were made to increase the level of preparedness against a biological attack both in the US and worldwide. As a result, there has been an increase in research interest in the development of vaccines and other countermeasures against a number of agents with the potential to be used as biological weapons. One such agent, Francisella tularensis, has been the subject of a surge in the level of research being performed, leading to a substantial increase in knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms of the organism and the induced immune responses. This information has facilitated the development of multiple new Francisella vaccine candidates. Herein we review the latest live attenuated F. tularensis vaccine efforts. Historically, live attenuated vaccines have demonstrated the greatest degree of success in protection against tularemia and the greatest promise in recent efforts to develop of a fully protective vaccine. This review summarizes recent live attenuated Francisella vaccine candidates and the lessons learned from those studies, with the goal of collating known characteristics associated with successful attenuation, immunogenicity, and protection. PMID:23764535

  2. Rational Considerations about Development of Live Attenuated Y. pestis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-01-01

    The risk of plague as a bioweapon has prompted increasing research efforts to develop plague vaccines due to its extreme virulence and the ease of its transmission. Subunit vaccines that contain F1 and LcrV antigens of Y. pestis have been tested for safety and immunogenicity, but doubts have been raised about whether subunit vaccines that engender antibody responses will protect against pneumonic plague, which requires both humeral and cellular immune responses for protection. The live, attenuated vaccine EV76, a pgm locus deficient Y. pestis strain, has been used for a long time in the Former Soviet Union and some Asian countries, but is not commercially available in the US and Europe due to safety concerns. However, the live attenuated Y. pestis vaccines are still considered to be the most effective way to prevent plague. In this review, we present our opinions about rationally creating live, safe and immunogenic Y. pestis vaccines with potential use for human based on established researches. PMID:24372254

  3. Biological safety concepts of genetically modified live bacterial vaccines.

    PubMed

    Frey, Joachim

    2007-07-26

    Live vaccines possess the advantage of having access to induce cell-mediated and antibody-mediated immunity; thus in certain cases they are able to prevent infection, and not only disease. Furthermore, live vaccines, particularly bacterial live vaccines, are relatively cheap to produce and easy to apply. Hence they are suitable to immunize large communities or herds. The induction of both cell-mediated immunity as well as antibody-mediated immunity, which is particularly beneficial in inducing mucosal immune responses, is obtained by the vaccine-strain's ability to colonize and multiply in the host without causing disease. For this reason, live vaccines require attenuation of virulence of the bacterium to which immunity must be induced. Traditionally attenuation was achieved simply by multiple passages of the microorganism on growth medium, in animals, eggs or cell cultures or by chemical or physical mutagenesis, which resulted in random mutations that lead to attenuation. In contrast, novel molecular methods enable the development of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) targeted to specific genes that are particularly suited to induce attenuation or to reduce undesirable effects in the tissue in which the vaccine strains can multiply and survive. Since live vaccine strains (attenuated by natural selection or genetic engineering) are potentially released into the environment by the vaccinees, safety issues concerning the medical as well as environmental aspects must be considered. These involve (i) changes in cell, tissue and host tropism, (ii) virulence of the carrier through the incorporation of foreign genes, (iii) reversion to virulence by acquisition of complementation genes, (iv) exchange of genetic information with other vaccine or wild-type strains of the carrier organism and (v) spread of undesired genes such as antibiotic resistance genes. Before live vaccines are applied, the safety issues must be thoroughly evaluated case-by-case. Safety assessment

  4. Effectiveness of live or killed plague vaccines in man

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, K. F.

    1970-01-01

    While the safety of the available live plague vaccine EV 76 (Paris) continues to be the subject of further study, the USP formol-killed, virulent Pasteurella pestis (Yersinia pestis) suspension capable of protecting 60% of non-human primates, particularly Hanuman langurs (Presbytis entellus), warrants further clinical tests and field trials. Inoculated in a dosage of 2×109 killed plague bacilli (1 ml), followed by a booster of 400 million organisms (0.2 ml) in 1-3 months, this vaccine stimulates the appearance of passive mouse-protection antibodies (below an index of 10) and passive haemagglutinins in 60%-65% of human subjects. Recent experiences in Viet-Nam demonstrate that personnel vaccinated with the USP vaccine, although frequently exposed, enjoy almost complete freedom from the disease. One of the 4 known and confirmed cases of bubonic plague in North Americans occurred in an unvaccinated individual. Among individuals inoculated with the USP vaccine, 2 confirmed cases of pneumonic plague and 1 case of asymptomatic pharyngeal plague have been recorded. The incidence of plague in the Republic of Viet-Nam during the past 3 years is estimated at 13 263 cases in a population in part vaccinated with a live plague which exhibited inadequate immunogenic efficacy in experimental tests. PMID:4988692

  5. Live vaccines for human metapneumovirus designed by reverse genetics.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Ursula J; Nagashima, Kunio; Murphy, Brian R; Collins, Peter L

    2006-10-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) was first described in 2001 and has quickly become recognized as an important cause of respiratory tract disease worldwide, especially in the pediatric population. A vaccine against HMPV is required to prevent severe disease associated with infection in infancy. The primary strategy is to develop a live-attenuated virus for intranasal immunization, which is particularly well suited against a respiratory virus. Reverse genetics provides a means of developing highly characterized 'designer' attenuated vaccine candidates. To date, several promising vaccine candidates have been developed, each using a different mode of attenuation. One candidate involves deletion of the G glycoprotein, providing attenuation that is probably based on reduced efficiency of attachment. A second candidate involves deletion of the M2-2 protein, which participates in regulating RNA synthesis and whose deletion has the advantageous property of upregulating transcription and increasing antigen synthesis. A third candidate involves replacing the P protein gene of HMPV with its counterpart from the related avian metapneumovirus, thereby introducing attenuation owing to its chimeric nature and host range restriction. Another live vaccine strategy involves using an attenuated parainfluenza virus as a vector to express HMPV protective antigens, providing a bivalent pediatric vaccine. Additional modifications to provide improved vaccines will also be discussed. PMID:17181442

  6. Efficacy of live adjuvanted mesogenic Newcastle disease vaccine in chickens.

    PubMed

    Roy, P; Venugopalan, A T; Koteeswaran, A

    1999-06-01

    120 white leghorn chickens primed with a lentogenic Newcastle disease (ND) live vaccine at 7 days of age were divided into three equal groups of 8 weeks of age and vaccinated with a live mesogenic ND vaccine (NDV). One group received only Newcastle disease mesogenic vaccine (RDVK) in normal saline, the second group received RDVK with groundnut oil as adjuvant and the third group received RDVK with liquid paraffin as adjuvant. Sera were collected at different time points for the assessment of antibody level against ND virus (NDV) by the haemagglutination inhibition (HI) test. The commonly used non-adjuvanted RDVK could not evince 100% protective HI titre beyond 11 weeks of age but in both the adjuvanted groups 100% protective HI titre was evident up to 20 weeks of age. On challenge at 20 weeks of age both the adjuvanted groups withstood challenge but in the non-adjuvanted group 80% of chickens withstood the challenge. A significant difference in immune response between the adjuvanted and non-adjuvanted groups was seen but not between both the adjuvanted groups. The advantage of vegetable oil (groundnut oil) as an adjuvant for live mesogenic ND vaccine has been discussed. PMID:10418918

  7. The Sabin live poliovirus vaccination trials in the USSR, 1959.

    PubMed Central

    Horstmann, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    Widespread use of the Sabin live attenuated poliovirus vaccine has had tremendous impact on the disease worldwide, virtually eliminating it from a number of countries, including the United States. Early proof of its safety and effectiveness was presented in 1959 by Russian investigators, who had staged massive trials in the USSR, involving millions of children. Their positive results were at first viewed in the United States and elsewhere with some skepticism, but the World Health Organization favored proceeding with large-scale trials, and responded to the claims made by Russian scientists by sending a representative to the USSR to review in detail the design and execution of the vaccine programs and the reliability of their results. The report that followed was a positive endorsement of the findings and contributed to the acceptance of the Sabin vaccine in the United States, where it has been the polio vaccine of choice since the mid-1960s. PMID:1814062

  8. HPV Vaccine Awareness and Knowledge Among Women Living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Wigfall, L T; Bynum, S A; Brandt, H M; Hébert, J R

    2016-03-01

    Cervical cancer risk is increased among women living with HIV (WLH). Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination has been shown to be safe and immunogenic among WLH. We examined HPV vaccine awareness and HPV knowledge among WLH. This cross-sectional study collected data from 145 WLH between March 2011 and April 2012. An interviewer-administered survey assessed HPV vaccine awareness and knowledge. Stata/IC 13 was used to perform chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Our sample was 90 % non-Hispanic black and 64 % earned <$10,000/year. Few (38 %) had heard of the HPV vaccine. Half (50 %) knew that HPV caused cervical cancer. HPV vaccine awareness was ten times higher among WLH who knew HPV caused cervical cancer (OR = 10.17; 95 % CI 3.82-27.06). HPV vaccine awareness is low among WLH. Cancer prevention efforts aimed at raising awareness about the HPV vaccine and increasing knowledge about HPV are necessary first steps in reducing cervical cancer disparities among WLH. PMID:26561426

  9. Global antibody response to Staphylococcus aureus live-cell vaccination.

    PubMed

    Selle, Martina; Hertlein, Tobias; Oesterreich, Babett; Klemm, Theresa; Kloppot, Peggy; Müller, Elke; Ehricht, Ralf; Stentzel, Sebastian; Bröker, Barbara M; Engelmann, Susanne; Ohlsen, Knut

    2016-01-01

    The pathogen Staphylococcus aureus causes a broad range of severe diseases and is feared for its ability to rapidly develop resistance to antibiotic substances. The increasing number of highly resistant S. aureus infections has accelerated the search for alternative treatment options to close the widening gap in anti-S. aureus therapy. This study analyses the humoral immune response to vaccination of Balb/c mice with sublethal doses of live S. aureus. The elicited antibody pattern in the sera of intravenously and intramuscularly vaccinated mice was determined using of a recently developed protein array. We observed a specific antibody response against a broad set of S. aureus antigens which was stronger following i.v. than i.m. vaccination. Intravenous but not intramuscular vaccination protected mice against an intramuscular challenge infection with a high bacterial dose. Vaccine protection was correlated with the strength of the anti-S. aureus antibody response. This study identified novel vaccine candidates by using protein microarrays as an effective tool and showed that successful vaccination against S. aureus relies on the optimal route of administration. PMID:27103319

  10. Global antibody response to Staphylococcus aureus live-cell vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Selle, Martina; Hertlein, Tobias; Oesterreich, Babett; Klemm, Theresa; Kloppot, Peggy; Müller, Elke; Ehricht, Ralf; Stentzel, Sebastian; Bröker, Barbara M.; Engelmann, Susanne; Ohlsen, Knut

    2016-01-01

    The pathogen Staphylococcus aureus causes a broad range of severe diseases and is feared for its ability to rapidly develop resistance to antibiotic substances. The increasing number of highly resistant S. aureus infections has accelerated the search for alternative treatment options to close the widening gap in anti-S. aureus therapy. This study analyses the humoral immune response to vaccination of Balb/c mice with sublethal doses of live S. aureus. The elicited antibody pattern in the sera of intravenously and intramuscularly vaccinated mice was determined using of a recently developed protein array. We observed a specific antibody response against a broad set of S. aureus antigens which was stronger following i.v. than i.m. vaccination. Intravenous but not intramuscular vaccination protected mice against an intramuscular challenge infection with a high bacterial dose. Vaccine protection was correlated with the strength of the anti-S. aureus antibody response. This study identified novel vaccine candidates by using protein microarrays as an effective tool and showed that successful vaccination against S. aureus relies on the optimal route of administration. PMID:27103319

  11. Efficacy of a modified live Flavobacterium columnare vaccine in fish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavobacterium columnare is an aquatic bacterium that is responsible for columnaris disease. This aquatic pathogen has a worldwide distribution and is highly infectious to both warm and cold water fish. A modified live F. columnare vaccine was developed through repeated passage of a virulent strai...

  12. Humoral immune responses to VP4 and its cleavage products VP5* and VP8* in infants vaccinated with rhesus rotavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Noriega, L; Fiore, L; Rennels, M B; Losonsky, G A; Mackow, E R; Greenberg, H B

    1992-01-01

    The humoral immune response to rhesus rotavirus (RRV) VP4 and its cleavage products VP5* and VP8* was determined in paired serum samples from 44 infants vaccinated with RRV or human rotavirus-RRV reassortants and 5 placebo recipients. Our aim was to try to measure the response to those regions of VP4 most closely related to protection. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to measure the immunoglobulin G immune response to baculovirus-expressed full-length RRV VP4, full-length VP8*, and the amino-terminal polypeptide of VP5* called VP5*(1) (amino acids 248 to 474). The two antigenic regions of VP4 selected for study, VP5*(1) and VP8*, have previously been shown to contain most of the cross-reactive and strain-specific neutralization epitopes, respectively, while the remaining carboxy-terminal half of VP5* (amino acids 475 to 776) has not been clearly associated with neutralization. All three recombinant proteins were antigenically conserved, since they reacted with a library of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies directed at VP4. There was a high percentage of seroresponders to VP4 (61%) or to VP8* (52%), but fewer infants seroresponded to VP5*(1) (11%). In addition, infants responding to VP5*(1) had considerably lower titers than to VP4 or VP8*. Immune response to VP4 correlated strongly with the responses detected by the plaque reduction neutralization assay but did not correlate with the responses detected by the ELISA to whole RRV. These data imply that the VP5*(1) region is less immunogenic than the VP8* region of VP4 in infants immunized with RRV or RRV reassortants. The low immunogenicity of VP5* might adversely affect the efficacy of RRV vaccine candidates. PMID:1320626

  13. Dominance of emerging G9 and G12 genotypes and polymorphism of VP7 and VP4 of rotaviruses from Bhutanese children with severe diarrhea prior to the introduction of vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wangchuk, Sonam; Mitui, Marcelo T; Tshering, Kinlay; Yahiro, Takaaki; Bandhari, Purushotam; Zangmo, Sangay; Dorji, Tshering; Tshering, Karchung; Matsumoto, Takashi; Nishizono, Akira; Ahmed, Kamruddin

    2014-01-01

    A prospective study was performed to determine the molecular characteristics of rotaviruses circulating among children aged <5 years in Bhutan. Stool samples were collected from February 2010 through January 2011 from children who attended two tertiary care hospitals in the capital Thimphu and the eastern regional headquarters, Mongar. The samples positive for rotavirus was mainly comprised genotype G1, followed by G12 and G9. The VP7 and VP4 genes of all genotypes clustered mainly with those of neighboring countries, thereby indicating that they shared common ancestral strains. The VP7 gene of Bhutanese G1 strains belonged to lineage 1c, which differed from the lineages of vaccine strains. Mutations were also identified in the VP7 gene of G1 strains, which may be responsible for neutralization escape strains. Furthermore, we found that lineage 4 of P[8] genotype differed antigenically from the vaccine strains, and mutations were identified in Bhutanese strains of lineage 3. The distribution of rotavirus genotypes varies among years, therefore further research is required to determine the distribution of rotavirus strain genotypes in Bhutan. PMID:25330070

  14. In-Depth Characterization of Live Vaccines Used in Europe for Oral Rabies Vaccination of Wildlife.

    PubMed

    Cliquet, Florence; Picard-Meyer, Evelyne; Mojzis, Miroslav; Dirbakova, Zuzana; Muizniece, Zita; Jaceviciene, Ingrida; Mutinelli, Franco; Matulova, Marta; Frolichova, Jitka; Rychlik, Ivan; Celer, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Although rabies incidence has fallen sharply over the past decades in Europe, the disease is still present in Eastern Europe. Oral rabies immunization of wild animal rabies has been shown to be the most effective method for the control and elimination of rabies. All rabies vaccines used in Europe are modified live virus vaccines based on the Street Alabama Dufferin (SAD) strain isolated from a naturally-infected dog in 1935. Because of the potential safety risk of a live virus which could revert to virulence, the genetic composition of three commercial attenuated live rabies vaccines was investigated in two independent laboratories using next genome sequencing. This study is the first one reporting on the diversity of variants in oral rabies vaccines as well as the presence of a mix of at least two different variants in all tested batches. The results demonstrate the need for vaccine producers to use new robust methodologies in the context of their routine vaccine quality controls prior to market release. PMID:26509266

  15. In-Depth Characterization of Live Vaccines Used in Europe for Oral Rabies Vaccination of Wildlife

    PubMed Central

    Cliquet, Florence; Picard-Meyer, Evelyne; Mojzis, Miroslav; Dirbakova, Zuzana; Muizniece, Zita; Jaceviciene, Ingrida; Mutinelli, Franco; Matulova, Marta; Frolichova, Jitka; Rychlik, Ivan; Celer, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Although rabies incidence has fallen sharply over the past decades in Europe, the disease is still present in Eastern Europe. Oral rabies immunization of wild animal rabies has been shown to be the most effective method for the control and elimination of rabies. All rabies vaccines used in Europe are modified live virus vaccines based on the Street Alabama Dufferin (SAD) strain isolated from a naturally-infected dog in 1935. Because of the potential safety risk of a live virus which could revert to virulence, the genetic composition of three commercial attenuated live rabies vaccines was investigated in two independent laboratories using next genome sequencing. This study is the first one reporting on the diversity of variants in oral rabies vaccines as well as the presence of a mix of at least two different variants in all tested batches. The results demonstrate the need for vaccine producers to use new robust methodologies in the context of their routine vaccine quality controls prior to market release. PMID:26509266

  16. Inflammatory and oxidative stress in rotavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Carlos A; Acosta, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the single leading cause of life-threatening diarrhea affecting children under 5 years of age. Rotavirus entry into the host cell seems to occur by sequential interactions between virion proteins and various cell surface molecules. The entry mechanisms seem to involve the contribution of cellular molecules having binding, chaperoning and oxido-reducing activities. It appears to be that the receptor usage and tropism of rotaviruses is determined by the species, cell line and rotavirus strain. Rotaviruses have evolved functions which can antagonize the host innate immune response, whereas are able to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling. A networking between ER stress, inflammation and oxidative stress is suggested, in which release of calcium from the ER increases the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria. Sustained ER stress potentially stimulates inflammatory response through unfolded protein response pathways. However, the detailed characterization of the molecular mechanisms underpinning these rotavirus-induced stressful conditions is still lacking. The signaling events triggered by host recognition of virus-associated molecular patterns offers an opportunity for the development of novel therapeutic strategies aimed at interfering with rotavirus infection. The use of N-acetylcysteine, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and PPARγ agonists to inhibit rotavirus infection opens a new way for treating the rotavirus-induced diarrhea and complementing vaccines. PMID:27175349

  17. Inflammatory and oxidative stress in rotavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Carlos A; Acosta, Orlando

    2016-05-12

    Rotaviruses are the single leading cause of life-threatening diarrhea affecting children under 5 years of age. Rotavirus entry into the host cell seems to occur by sequential interactions between virion proteins and various cell surface molecules. The entry mechanisms seem to involve the contribution of cellular molecules having binding, chaperoning and oxido-reducing activities. It appears to be that the receptor usage and tropism of rotaviruses is determined by the species, cell line and rotavirus strain. Rotaviruses have evolved functions which can antagonize the host innate immune response, whereas are able to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling. A networking between ER stress, inflammation and oxidative stress is suggested, in which release of calcium from the ER increases the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria. Sustained ER stress potentially stimulates inflammatory response through unfolded protein response pathways. However, the detailed characterization of the molecular mechanisms underpinning these rotavirus-induced stressful conditions is still lacking. The signaling events triggered by host recognition of virus-associated molecular patterns offers an opportunity for the development of novel therapeutic strategies aimed at interfering with rotavirus infection. The use of N-acetylcysteine, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and PPARγ agonists to inhibit rotavirus infection opens a new way for treating the rotavirus-induced diarrhea and complementing vaccines. PMID:27175349

  18. Live Attenuated Rubella Vaccine (Cendehill Strain) in School Children

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Patricia A.; Izumi, Toshiaki; Davidson, W. George; Grocott, H. C.; Martin, Hulda M.

    1970-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to further determine the efficacy and safety in school children of the Cendehill strain of live attenuated rubella vaccine. Parental permission was requested for 255 children in Grades I, II and VI, attending two adjacent schools, to have blood taken for rubella hemagglutination-inhibition studies at the beginning and end of the study, and for each child seronegative on initial testing to participate as a vaccinee or a control. Vaccinees received either 0.5 ml. (full recommended dose) or 0.25 ml. of rubella virus vaccine, live attenuated, Cendehill strain (Smith Kline & French). Eighty-one per cent of the parents consented to have their child take part. Seventy-nine per cent of Grade I and II pupils and 41% of Grade VI pupils were found to be susceptible to rubella at the time of the initial test (HI titres [unk] 8). Eighty children received rubella vaccine and 98.7% showed at least a four-fold rise in antibody titre. One child who received 0.25 ml. showed only a two-fold rise. Clinical reactions to the vaccine were absent or minimal. Thirty-eight controls remained serologically negative during the study. The good response to half-doses of Cendehill vaccine is not significant because there were >3000 TCID50 in a full dose (three times the dose recommended). This information was unknown by the investigators until the termination of the study. PMID:5506107

  19. [Diarrhea and vaccines: current developments].

    PubMed

    Landry, P

    2006-05-10

    Diarrhoea is a main concern for travellers, populations of developing countries and children. Causative pathogens are numerous. An efficient vaccine against cholera is available, also offering a 50% cross-protection against E. Coli enterotoxin (ETEC), however its efficacy is only 23% against all-causes traveller's diarrhoea. Rotavirus can be responsible for severe diarrhoea in infants but rarely causes traveller's diarrhoea. Two new vaccines being under development appear effective and well-tolerated but too expensive for developing countries which most need them. To date, the live oral Ty21a vaccine remains frequently prescribed in Switzerland, with limited indications and suboptimal efficacy. A new oral vaccine is under development. PMID:16767878

  20. Results from a Randomized Clinical Trial of Coadministration of RotaTeq, a Pentavalent Rotavirus Vaccine, and NeisVac-C, a Meningococcal Serogroup C Conjugate Vaccine ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Vesikari, Timo; Karvonen, Aino; Borrow, Ray; Kitchin, Nick; Baudin, Martine; Thomas, Stéphane; Fiquet, Anne

    2011-01-01

    RotaTeq (Merck & Co. Inc./Sanofi Pasteur MSD) is a three-dose, oral pentavalent rotavirus vaccine for the immunization of infants from 6 weeks of age for the prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis. The primary objective of the present trial was to demonstrate that RotaTeq can be coadministered with meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccine (MenCC; NeisVac-C; Baxter Healthcare) to healthy infants without impairing the protective immune responses to MenCC. This was an open-label, randomized, comparative study conducted in Finland. The study was designed to assess concomitant versus sequential administration of RotaTeq and MenCC on the immune response to both vaccines. Healthy infants (n = 247), aged 6 to 7 weeks, were recruited. Coadministration of MenCC with RotaTeq was noninferior to sequential administration for the seroprotection rate against meningococcal serogroup C (the proportion of infants with a serum bactericidal antibody titer using baby rabbit complement of ≥8 was 100% in both groups). The other responses to MenCC (titer of ≥1:128, ≥4-fold increase in titer, and geometric mean titers [GMTs]) and the responses to RotaTeq (IgA and SNA response to G1 to G4 and P1A[8], GMTs, and ≥3-fold increase in titer) were comparable between groups, including a ≥3-fold IgA increase in >96% of the infants in both groups. Concomitant administration of the first doses of MenCC, diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccine, inactivated poliovirus vaccine, and Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine (DTaP-IPV-Hib), and RotaTeq was associated with a higher rate of vomiting and diarrhea than concomitant administration of MenCC and DTaP-IPV-Hib, but that was not observed after the second concomitant administration. The convenience of concomitant administration of RotaTeq and MenCC may, however, outweigh the additive effect of mostly mild adverse events reported after the individual administration of each vaccine. These results support the

  1. New approaches to the development of live attenuated rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Dietzschold, Bernhard; Schnell, Matthias J

    2002-04-01

    In the United States, extensive reservoirs of the rabies virus exist in many diverse wild animal species, which continue to pose a serious risk of lethal infection of humans and cause an economic burden exceeding $1 billion annually. Previous experience with rabies control in foxes in Europe has clearly demonstrated that oral immunization with live vaccines is the only practical approach to eradicate rabies in free-ranging animals. However, unlike Europe where vulpine rabies was the only major reservoir, the Americas harbor a variety of species including raccoons, skunks, coyotes, and bats that serve as the primary reservoirs of rabies. Each of these animal reservoirs carries an antigenically distinct virus variant. The currently available modified-live rabies virus vaccines have either safety problems or do not induce sufficient protective immunity in particular wildlife species. Therefore, there is a need for the development of new live rabies virus vaccines that are very safe and highly effective in particular wildlife species. Based on previous observations indicating that the potency of a vaccine is significantly increased if the G protein of the vaccine strain is identical to that of the target virus, we have used a reverse genetics approach to engineer viruses that contain G proteins from virus strains associated with relevant wildlife species. Furthermore, because our recent data also indicate that the pathogenicity of a particular rabies virus strain is inversely proportional to its ability to induce apoptosis and that low-level apoptosis-inducing ability is associated with low anti-viral immune responses, we inserted genes encoding pro-apoptotic proteins to stimulate immunity or otherwise interfere with viral pathogenesis into these recombinant viruses to enhance their efficacy and safety. PMID:12031103

  2. Live attenuated vaccines: Historical successes and current challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Minor, Philip D.

    2015-05-15

    Live attenuated vaccines against human viral diseases have been amongst the most successful cost effective interventions in medical history. Smallpox was declared eradicated in 1980; poliomyelitis is nearing global eradication and measles has been controlled in most parts of the world. Vaccines function well for acute diseases such as these but chronic infections such as HIV are more challenging for reasons of both likely safety and probable efficacy. The derivation of the vaccines used has in general not been purely rational except in the sense that it has involved careful clinical trials of candidates and subsequent careful follow up in clinical use; the identification of the candidates is reviewed. - Highlights: • Live vaccines against human diseases caused by viruses have been very successful. • They have been developed by empirical clinical studies and problems identified in later use. • It can be difficult to balance ability to cause disease and ability to immunise for a strain. • There is currently no reliable basis for predicting success from pure virological studies. • Vaccinia, which eradicated smallpox, is the paradigm for all successes and issues.

  3. Characterization of a multicomponent live, attenuated Shigella flexneri vaccine.

    PubMed

    DeLaine, BreOnna C; Wu, Tao; Grassel, Christen L; Shimanovich, Avital; Pasetti, Marcela F; Levine, Myron M; Barry, Eileen M

    2016-07-01

    Shigella flexneri is a leading cause of diarrheal disease in children under five in developing countries. There is currently no licensed vaccine and broad spectrum protection requires coverage of multiple serotypes. The live attenuated vaccines CVD 1213 and CVD 1215 were derived from two prominent S. flexneri serotypes: S. flexneri 3a and S. flexneri 6. To provide broad-spectrum immunity, they could be combined with CVD 1208S, a S. flexneri 2a strain that demonstrated promising results in phase I and II clinical trials. Each strain contains a mutation in the guaBA operon. These vaccine candidates were tested in vitro and in vivo and were found to be auxotrophic for guanine and defective in intracellular replication, but capable of inducing cytokine production from both epithelial cells and macrophages. Both strains were attenuated for virulence in the guinea pig Serény test and induced robust serotype-specific antibody responses following immunization. Each strain induced homologous serotype protection against challenge and a mixed inoculum of the three S. flexneri vaccines conferred protection against all three virulent wild-type strains. These data support the use of CVD 1213, CVD 1215 and CVD 1208S in a multivalent vaccine to confer broad protection against disease caused by Shigella flexneri. PMID:27106253

  4. Principles underlying rational design of live attenuated influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yo Han

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent innovative advances in molecular virology and the developments of vaccines, influenza virus remains a serious burden for human health. Vaccination has been considered a primary countermeasure for prevention of influenza infection. Live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs) are particularly attracting attention as an effective strategy due to several advantages over inactivated vaccines. Cold-adaptation, as a classical means for attenuating viral virulence, has been successfully used for generating safe and effective donor strains of LAIVs against seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics. Recently, the advent of reverse genetics technique expedited a variety of rational strategies to broaden the pool of LAIVs. Considering the breadth of antigenic diversity of influenza virus, the pool of LAIVs is likely to equip us with better options for controlling influenza pandemics. With a brief reflection on classical attenuating strategies used at the initial stage of development of LAIVs, especially on the principles underlying the development of cold-adapted LAIVs, we further discuss and outline other attenuation strategies especially with respect to the rationales for attenuation, and their practicality for mass production. Finally, we propose important considerations for a rational vaccine design, which will provide us with practical guidelines for improving the safety and effectiveness of LAIVs. PMID:23596576

  5. Live bacterial vaccines – a review and identification of potential hazards

    PubMed Central

    Detmer, Ann; Glenting, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    The use of live bacteria to induce an immune response to itself or to a carried vaccine component is an attractive vaccine strategy. Advantages of live bacterial vaccines include their mimicry of a natural infection, intrinsic adjuvant properties and their possibility to be administered orally. Derivatives of pathogenic and non-pathogenic food related bacteria are currently being evaluated as live vaccines. However, pathogenic bacteria demands for attenuation to weaken its virulence. The use of bacteria as vaccine delivery vehicles implies construction of recombinant strains that contain the gene cassette encoding the antigen. With the increased knowledge of mucosal immunity and the availability of genetic tools for heterologous gene expression the concept of live vaccine vehicles gains renewed interest. However, administration of live bacterial vaccines poses some risks. In addition, vaccination using recombinant bacteria results in the release of live recombinant organisms into nature. This places these vaccines in the debate on application of genetically modified organisms. In this review we give an overview of live bacterial vaccines on the market and describe the development of new live vaccines with a focus on attenuated bacteria and food-related lactic acid bacteria. Furthermore, we outline the safety concerns and identify the hazards associated with live bacterial vaccines and try to give some suggestions of what to consider during their development. PMID:16796731

  6. Demystifying FluMist, a new intranasal, live influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Mossad, Sherif B

    2003-09-01

    FluMist--a cold-adapted, live-attenuated, trivalent, intranasal influenza virus vaccine approved by the US Food and Drug Administration on June 17, 2003--has been shown to be safe and effective, but its role in the general prevention of influenza is yet to be defined. Intranasal administration is expected to be more acceptable than parenteral, particularly in children, but the potential for the shedding of live virus may pose a risk to anyone with a compromised immune system. PMID:14518575

  7. Rotavirus antigen test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003349.htm Rotavirus antigen test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The rotavirus antigen test detects rotavirus in the feces. This ...

  8. Effective prophylaxis against rotavirus diarrhea using a combination of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Neha; Marcotte, Harold; Brüssow, Harald; Svensson, Lennart; Hammarström, Lennart

    2007-01-01

    Background Rotavirus is a worldwide cause of infectious infantile diarrhea that claims over 600,000 lives annually. Recently, two new vaccine candidates have been developed but their efficacy in developing countries, still remains to be proven. Oral delivery of specific immunoglobulins provides passive immunity and is a fast acting treatment for rotavirus diarrhea. Probiotic bacteria have also gained considerable attention lately as treatment for rotavirus diarrhea. Here we report an evaluation of the therapeutic potential of different probiotics and their combination with anti – rotavirus antibodies in a mouse model of rotavirus diarrhea. Results Of the six probiotic bacteria tested, Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG had the strongest influence in reducing prevalence, duration and severity of diarrhea and was therefore chosen for combination treatment with immunoglobulins. The combination treatment reduced the diarrhea outcome measures significantly, prevented histopathological changes and reduced the virus load in the intestines. Conclusion The advantages associated with immunoglobulins and probiotics based therapy is that the treatment provides a rapid therapeutic effect and is cost efficient. These components do not require special storage conditions and could potentially complement the rehydration therapy that is currently used. PMID:17900343

  9. Development of a live attenuated antigenic marker classical swine fever vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical Swine Fever, caused by Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV), is a highly contagious disease affecting swine worldwide. The two main strategies for disease control are prophylactic vaccination and non-vaccination “stamping out” policies. In a vaccination-to-live strategy, marker vaccines coul...

  10. Live-attenuated influenza A virus vaccines using a B virus backbone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The currently FDA-licensed live attenuated influenza virus vaccine contains a trivalent mixture of types A (H1N1 and H3N2) and B vaccine viruses. The two A virus vaccines have the backbone of a cold-adapted influenza A virus and the B virus vaccine has the six backbone segments derived from a cold-...

  11. Maternal outcomes among pregnant women receiving live attenuated influenza vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Toback, Seth L.; Beigi, Richard; Tennis, Patricia; Sifakis, Frangiscos; Calingaert, Brian; Ambrose, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Toback et al. (2012) Maternal outcomes among pregnant women receiving live attenuated influenza accine. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(1), 44–51. Background  Although the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) prescribing information contains warnings/precautions against use during pregnancy, administration of LAIV to pregnant women does occur. Data regarding maternal outcomes after LAIV administration during pregnancy are limited. Objectives  Maternal outcomes after LAIV vaccination during pregnancy were examined. Methods  Data from a health insurance claims database that covers approximately 50 million individuals were analyzed for the six influenza seasons from 2003–2004 through 2008–2009. Emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations occurring within 42 days of vaccination were analyzed by primary diagnosis; outcomes were categorized as cardiopulmonary, obstetric, and other. Cohort characteristics were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results  Of 834 999 pregnancies identified, 138 (0·017%) were among women who received LAIV vaccinations. Of the 138 pregnant women, 13% were ≤19 years, 67% were 20–34 years, and 20% were ≥35 years of age. Eight events occurred within 42 days of vaccination: one ED visit for bronchitis, two hospitalizations for hyperemesis gravidarum and premature labor, and five ED visits/hospitalizations for common medical conditions. All outcomes identified after LAIV exposure occurred at rates similar to rates in unvaccinated pregnant women reported in the medical literature. Conclusions  Administration of LAIV to pregnant women is rare; the rate has remained constant since 2004–2005. In this cohort, there was no evidence of significant maternal adverse outcomes after receipt of LAIV. These data may offer some reassurance to providers and pregnant women in the event of inadvertent LAIV administration, but do not support the routine use of LAIV in

  12. H5N1 Vaccine-Specific B Cell Responses in Ferrets Primed with Live Attenuated Seasonal Influenza Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qi; Zhou, Helen; Kulkarni, Deepali; Subbarao, Kanta; Kemble, George; Jin, Hong

    2009-01-01

    Background Live attenuated influenza H5N1 vaccines have been produced and evaluated in mice and ferrets that were never exposed to influenza A virus infection (Suguitan et al., Plos Medicine, e360:1541, 2006). However, the preexisting influenza heterosubtypic immunity on live attenuated H5N1 vaccine induced immune response has not been evaluated. Methodology and Principal Findings Primary and recall B cell responses to live attenuated H5N1 vaccine viruses were examined using a sensitive antigen-specific B cell ELISpot assay to investigate the effect of preexisting heterosubtypic influenza immunity on the development of H5N1-specific B cell immune responses in ferrets. Live attenuated H5N1 A/Hong Kong/213/03 and A/Vietnam/1203/04 vaccine viruses induced measurable H5-specific IgM and IgG secreting B cells after intranasal vaccination. However, H5-specific IgG secreting cells were detected significantly earlier and at a greater frequency after H5N1 inoculation in ferrets previously primed with trivalent live attenuated influenza (H1N1, H3N2 and B) vaccine. Priming studies further revealed that the more rapid B cell responses to H5 resulted from cross-reactive B cell immunity to the hemagglutinin H1 protein. Moreover, vaccination with the H1N1 vaccine virus was able to induce protective responses capable of limiting replication of the H5N1 vaccine virus to a level comparable with prior vaccination with the H5N1 vaccine virus without affecting H5N1 vaccine virus induced antibody response. Conclusion The findings indicate that previous vaccination with seasonal influenza vaccine may accelerate onset of immunity by an H5N1 ca vaccine and the heterosubtypic immunity may be beneficial for pandemic preparedness. PMID:19209231

  13. Rotavirus Infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The avian rotaviruses are members of the Reoviridae family, which is characterized by virions that contain 10-12 linear double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) segments. The Reoviridae consists of 15 genera which can be placed into two recognized subfamilies based upon the presence or absence of structural “tur...

  14. Yellow fever vector live-virus vaccines: West Nile virus vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, J; Miller, C A; Catalan, J; Monath, T P

    2001-08-01

    By combining molecular-biological techniques with our increased understanding of the effect of gene sequence modification on viral function, yellow fever 17D, a positive-strand RNA virus vaccine, has been manipulated to induce a protective immune response against viruses of the same family (e.g. Japanese encephalitis and dengue viruses). Triggered by the emergence of West Nile virus infections in the New World afflicting humans, horses and birds, the success of this recombinant technology has prompted the rapid development of a live-virus attenuated candidate vaccine against West Nile virus. PMID:11516995

  15. Epidemiology of rotavirus diarrhoea in Africa: a review to assess the need for rotavirus immunization.

    PubMed Central

    Cunliffe, N. A.; Kilgore, P. E.; Bresee, J. S.; Steele, A. D.; Luo, N.; Hart, C. A.; Glass, R. I.

    1998-01-01

    Rapid progress towards the development of rotavirus vaccines has prompted a reassessment of the disease burden of rotavirus diarrhoea in developing countries and the possible impact of these vaccines in reducing diarrhoeal morbidity and mortality among infants and young children. We examined the epidemiology and disease burden of rotavirus diarrhoea among hospitalized and clinic patients in African countries through a review of 43 published studies of the etiology of diarrhoea. The studies were carried out from 1975 through 1992, and only those in which a sample of more than 100 patients with diarrhoea were specifically screened for rotavirus by using an established diagnostic test were included. Rotavirus was detected in a median of 24% of children hospitalized for diarrhoea and in 23% who were treated as outpatients; 38% of the hospitalized patients with rotavirus were < 6 months and 81% were < 1 year of age. Rotavirus was detected year-round in nearly every country and generally exhibited distinct seasonal peaks during the dry months. In 5 countries where rotavirus strains had been G-typed, 74% of strains were of one of the four common serotypes (G1 to G4), G1 was the predominant serotype, and 26% were non-typeable. This cumulative experience from 15 African countries suggests that rotavirus is the most important cause of severe diarrhoea in African children and that most strains in circulation today belong to common G types that are included in reassortant vaccines. Wherever large numbers of cases of rotavirus diarrhoea occur early in infancy, immunization at birth may protect the children before their first symptomatic infection. PMID:9868844

  16. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of the Impact of Alternative Dosing Schedules on the Immune Response to Human Rotavirus Vaccine in Rural Ghanaian Infants

    PubMed Central

    Armah, George; Lewis, Kristen D. C.; Cortese, Margaret M.; Parashar, Umesh D.; Ansah, Akosua; Gazley, Lauren; Victor, John C.; McNeal, Monica M.; Binka, Fred; Steele, A. Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Background. The recommended schedule for receipt of 2-dose human rotavirus vaccine (HRV) coincides with receipt of the first and second doses of diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus vaccine (ie, 6 and 10 weeks of age, respectively). Alternative schedules and additional doses of HRV have been proposed and may improve vaccine performance in low-income countries. Methods. In this randomized trial in rural Ghana, HRV was administered at ages 6 and 10 weeks (group 1), 10 and 14 weeks (group 2), or 6, 10, and 14 weeks (group 3). We compared serum antirotavirus immunoglobulin A (IgA) seroconversion (≥20 U/mL) and geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) between group 1 and groups 2 and 3. Results. Ninety-three percent of participants (424 of 456) completed the study per protocol. In groups 1, 2, and 3, the IgA seroconversion frequencies among participants with IgA levels of <20 U/mL at baseline were 28.9%, 37.4%, and 43.4%, respectively (group 1 vs group 3, P = .014; group 1 vs group 2, P = .163). Postvaccination IgA GMCs were 22.1 U/mL, 26.5 U/mL, and 32.6 U/mL in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively (group 1 vs group 3, P = .038; group 1 vs group 2, P = .304). Conclusions. A third dose of HRV resulted in increased seroconversion frequencies and GMCs, compared with 2 doses administered at 6 and 10 weeks of age. Since there is no correlate of protection, a postmarketing effectiveness study is required to determine whether the improvement in immune response translates into a public health benefit in low-income countries. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT015751. PMID:26823335

  17. Photopolymerized hydrogel carriers for live vaccine ballistic delivery.

    PubMed

    Christie, R J; Findley, D J; Dunfee, M; Hansen, R D; Olsen, S C; Grainger, D W

    2006-02-27

    Photopolymerized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-crosslinked hydrogels were assessed for their ability to serve as a payload vehicle to deliver a viable bacterial vaccine (Brucella abortus strain RB51 (RB51) to bison in Yellowstone National Park) ballistically using thermoplastic degradable Biobullets. PEG modified with degradable glycolide or lactide oligomers capped with photopolymerizable methacrylate groups served to crosslink the hydrogel vaccine carrier inside commercial hydroxypropylcellulose Biobullets. Release of 1 microm diameter model fluorescent particles from hydrogels followed known degradation trends for glycolide- and lactide-modified PEG hydrogels. All particles were released from PEG-co-glycolide hydrogels after approximately 10 days and PEG-co-lactide hydrogels after approximately 45 days following gel degradation. Minimal particle release was observed from pure PEG dimethacrylate hydrogels over 40 days. P. aeruginosa (strain PAO1) and RB51 live vaccines exhibit excellent viability following exposure to photopolymerization encapsulation within these gel matrices. Hydrogels photopolymerized into the payload chamber of Biobullets exhibit similar ballistic properties to commercially available Biobullets and penetrate and remain intact when fired intramuscularly into live elk for release of their gel payload in the host. PMID:16246467

  18. Antibody response of cattle to vaccination with commercial modified live rabies vaccines in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Amy; Greenberg, Lauren; Moran, David; Alvarez, Danilo; Alvarado, Marlon; Garcia, Daniel L; Peruski, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Vampire bat rabies is a public and animal health concern throughout Latin America. As part of an ecological study of vampire bat depredation on cattle in southern Guatemala, we conducted a vaccine seroconversion study among three dairy farms. The main objectives of this cross sectional and cohort study were to understand factors associated with bat bites among cattle, to determine whether unvaccinated cattle had evidence of rabies virus exposure and evaluate whether exposure was related to bat bite prevalence, and to assess whether cattle demonstrate adequate seroconversion to two commercial vaccines used in Guatemala. In 2012, baseline blood samples were collected immediately prior to intramuscular inoculation of cattle with one of two modified live rabies vaccines. Post vaccination blood samples were collected 13 and 393 days later. Sera were tested for rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (rVNA) by the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). Across two years of study, 36% (254/702) of inspected cattle presented gross evidence of vampire bat bites. Individual cattle with a bat bite in 2012 were more likely have a bat bite in 2013. Prior to vaccination, 12% (42/350) of cattle sera demonstrated rVNA, but bite status in 2012 was not associated with presence of rVNA. Vaccine brand was the only factor associated with adequate rVNA response of cattle by day 13. However, vaccine brand and rVNA status at day 13 were associated with an adequate rVNA titer on day 393, with animals demonstrating an adequate titer at day 13 more likely to have an adequate titer at day 393. Our findings support stable levels of vampire bat depredation and evidence of rVNA in unvaccinated cattle. Brand of vaccine may be an important consideration impacting adequate rVNA response and long-term maintenance of rVNA in cattle. Further, the results demonstrate that initial response to vaccination is associated with rVNA status over one year following vaccination. PMID:25466762

  19. Virulence-Associated Genome Mutations of Murine Rotavirus Identified by Alternating Serial Passages in Mice and Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Tatsumi, Masatoshi; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although significant clinical efficacy and safety of rotavirus vaccines were recently revealed in many countries, the mechanism of their attenuation is not well understood. We passaged serially a cell culture-adapted murine rotavirus EB strain in mouse pups or in cell cultures alternately and repeatedly and fully sequenced all 11 genes of 21 virus samples passaged in mice or in cell cultures. Sequence analysis revealed that mouse-passaged viruses that regained virulence almost consistently acquired four kinds of amino acid (aa) substitutions in VP4 and substitution in aa 37 (Val to Ala) in NSP4. In addition, they gained and invariably conserved the 3′ consensus sequence in NSP1. The molecular changes occurred along with the acquisition of virulence during passages in mice and then disappeared following passages in cell cultures. Intraperitoneal injection of recombinant NSP4 proteins confirmed the aa 37 site as important for its diarrheagenic activity in mice. These genome changes are likely to be correlated with rotavirus virulence. IMPORTANCE Serial passage of a virulent wild-type virus in vitro often results in loss of virulence of the virus in an original animal host, while serial passage of a cell culture-adapted avirulent virus in vivo often gains virulence in an animal host. Actually, live attenuated virus vaccines were originally produced by serial passage in cell cultures. Although clinical efficacy and safety of rotavirus vaccines were recently revealed, the mechanism of their attenuation is not well understood. We passaged serially a murine rotavirus by alternating switch of host (mice or cell cultures) repeatedly and sequenced the eleven genes of the passaged viruses to identify mutations associated with the emergence or disappearance of virulence. Sequence analysis revealed that changes in three genes (VP4, NSP1, and NSP4) were associated with virulence in mice. Intraperitoneal injection of recombinant NSP4 proteins confirmed its

  20. Live Eimeria vaccination success in the face of artificial non-uniform vaccine administration in conventionally reared pullets.

    PubMed

    Price, Kayla R; Hafeez, Mian A; Bulfon, Julia; Barta, John R

    2016-01-01

    Live Eimeria vaccines against coccidiosis in poultry initiate immunity using a vaccine dose containing few oocysts; protection is enhanced through subsequent faecal-oral transmission ("cycling") of parasites in the poultry house. Spray-administered Eimeria vaccines can permit wide variations in doses ingested by individual chicks; some chicks may receive no primary vaccination at all. Consequently, protective immunity for the entire flock depends on successful environmental cycling of vaccine progeny. Pullets missing primary vaccination at day of age can become protected from coccidial challenge through cycling of vaccine progeny oocysts from vaccinated (V) cage mates. This study tested whether 40% cage floor coverage (CFC) with a durable material could improve protection against challenge in these "contact-vaccinated" (CV) or successfully V pullets. The six treatment groups tested were CV, V or sham-vaccinated pullets cage-reared on either 0% or 40% CFC. Oocyst output was measured separately for each group for 30 days following vaccine administration. Lesion scores, body weights and total oocyst outputs were measured to quantify protection at 30 days of age against single or mixed Eimeria species challenge infections. Use of 40% CFC to promote low-level oocyst cycling impacted the flock in two ways: (1) more uniform flock immunity was achieved in the 40% CFC (CV similar to V pullets) compared with 0% CFC and (2) protection was enhanced in the 40% CFC compared with the 0% CFC. The use of CFC is an easily adopted means of improving live Eimeria vaccination of caged pullets. PMID:26743571

  1. Efficacy of HVT-IBD vector vaccine compared to attenuated live vaccine using in-ovo vaccination against a Korean very virulent IBDV in commercial broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Roh, J-H; Kang, M; Wei, B; Yoon, R-H; Seo, H-S; Bahng, J-Y; Kwon, J-T; Cha, S-Y; Jang, H-K

    2016-05-01

    The production performance, efficacy, and safety of two types of vaccines for infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) were compared with in-ovo vaccination of Cobb 500 broiler chickens for gross and microscopic examination of the bursa of Fabricius, bursa/body weight (b/B) ratio, flow cytometry, and serologic response to Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccination. One vaccine was a recombinant HVT-IBD vector vaccine (HVT as for herpesvirus of turkeys) and the other was an intermediate plus live IBDV vaccine. A significant difference was detected at 21 d. Eight of 10 chickens that received the IBDV live vaccine had severe bursal lesions and a relatively low b/B ratio of 0.95, and an inhibited NDV vaccine response. On the other hand, the HVT-IBD vector vaccine resulted in mild bursal lesions and a b/B ratio of 1.89. Therefore, the live vaccine had lower safety than that of the HVT-IBD vector vaccine. To determine the protective efficacy, chickens were intraocularly challenged at 24 d. Eight of 10 chickens in the IBDV live vaccination group showed gross and histological lesions characterized by hemorrhage, cyst formation, lymphocytic depletion, and a decreased b/B ratio. In contrast, the HVT-IBD vector vaccinated chickens showed mild gross and histological lesions in three of 10 chickens with a b/B ratio of 1.36, which was similar to that of the unchallenged controls. Vaccinated chickens showed a significant increase in IBDV antibody titers, regardless of the type of vaccine used. In addition, significantly better broiler flock performance was observed with the HVT-IBD vector vaccine compared to that of the live vaccine. Our results revealed that the HVT-IBD vector vaccine could be used as an alternative vaccine to increase efficacy, and to have an improved safety profile compared with the IBDV live vaccine using in-ovo vaccination against the Korean very virulent IBDV in commercial broiler chickens. PMID:26944964

  2. Rotavirus in India: Forty Years of Research.

    PubMed

    Kang, Gagandeep

    2016-07-01

    Rotavirus was first identified as a human pathogen just over 40 years ago, and work on this pathogen in India started shortly thereafter. Subsequent studies have confirmed its pre-eminent role in gastroenteritis in children in India. Standardized surveillance has enabled the documentation of the high burden of disease, and has demonstrated that there is considerable geographic and temporal variation in strain circulation. Internationally licensed vaccines, vaccine candidates based on indigenous strains and out-licensed strains have been tested for safety, immunogenicity and efficacy; three vaccines are now licensed in India and are used in the private sector. Public sector vaccination has begun, and it will be path-breaking for Indian vaccinologists to measure impact of vaccine introduction in terms of safety and effectiveness. So far, India has kept pace with international epidemiologic and vaccine research on rotavirus, and these efforts should continue. PMID:27508532

  3. Substantial Receptor-induced Structural Rearrangement of Rotavirus VP8*: Potential Implications for Cross-Species Infection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xing; Mishra, Rahul; Holloway, Gavan; von Itzstein, Mark; Coulson, Barbara S; Blanchard, Helen

    2015-10-12

    Rotavirus-cell binding is the essential first step in rotavirus infection. This binding is a major determinant of rotavirus tropism, as host cell invasion is necessary to initiate infection. Initial rotavirus-cell interactions are mediated by carbohydrate-recognizing domain VP8* of the rotavirus capsid spike protein VP4. Here, we report the first observation of significant structural rearrangement of VP8* from human and animal rotavirus strains upon glycan receptor binding. The structural adaptability of rotavirus VP8* delivers important insights into how human and animal rotaviruses utilize the wider range of cellular glycans identified as VP8* binding partners. Furthermore, our studies on rotaviruses with atypical genetic makeup provide information expected to be critical for understanding the mechanisms of animal rotavirus gene emergence in humans and support implementation of epidemiologic surveillance of animal reservoirs as well as future vaccination schemes. PMID:26250751

  4. Transcriptional profiling of recall responses to Francisella live vaccine strain.

    PubMed

    Paranavitana, Chrysanthi; DaSilva, Luis; Vladimirova, Antoaneta; Pittman, Phillip R; Velauthapillai, Mahendran; Nikolich, Mikeljon

    2014-03-01

    Global gene expression profile changes were monitored in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) after challenge with the live vaccine strain (LVS) of Francisella tularensis. Because these PBMCs were from individuals previously immunized with LVS, stimulating these cells with LVS should activate memory responses. The Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool identified pathways, functions, and networks associated with this in vitro recall response, including novel pathways triggered by the memory response. Dendritic cell (DC) maturation was the most significant among the more than 25 relevant pathways discovered. Interleukin 15, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 signaling pathways were also significant. Pathway analysis indicated that Class 1 antigen presentation may not be optimal with LVS vaccination. The top three biological functions were antigen presentation, cell-mediated and humoral immune responses. Network analysis revealed that the top network associated with these functions had IFNγ and TNFα in central interactive positions. Our results suggest that DC maturation is a key factor in the recall responses and that more effective antigen processing and presentation is needed for cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. Taken together, these considerations are critical for future tularemia vaccine development studies. PMID:24453125

  5. Efficacy of combined killed-in-oil emulsion and live Newcastle disease vaccines in chickens.

    PubMed

    Folitse, R; Halvorson, D A; Sivanandan, V

    1998-01-01

    Following the introduction of routine vaccination regimes with different types of Newcastle disease (ND) vaccines, the incidence of velogenic viscerotropic Newcastle disease (VVND) in commercial poultry worldwide has declined dramatically. Unfortunately, these vaccination regimes are not feasible in free-range and backyard systems of poultry production practiced in many developing countries. In this study, we sought to develop a single vaccination regime in chickens with ND vaccines to elicit a long-lasting high level of ND virus (NDV) antibodies adequate to protect chickens against ND. The level of antibody response, as measured by the hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) test, and the degree of protection against the virulent strain of NDV were studied in chickens immunized with different vaccines. The vaccines used were: killed-in-oil emulsion (subcutaneous; s.c.) plus live virus (oculanasal; o.n.), given concurrently; experimental vaccine (s.c.) plus live virus (o.n.), given concurrently; killed-in-oil (s.c.); experimental vaccine prepared by homogenizing commercial live vaccine and oil emulsion (s.c.); and live virus (o.n.). The results obtained in this study indicate that concurrent administration of oil emulsion and live NDV vaccines induced the best antibody response, but there was no significant difference in protection among the vaccinated groups. PMID:9533096

  6. Rotavirus gene structure and function.

    PubMed Central

    Estes, M K; Cohen, J

    1989-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure and function of the genes and proteins of the rotaviruses has expanded rapidly. Information obtained in the last 5 years has revealed unexpected and unique molecular properties of rotavirus proteins of general interest to virologists, biochemists, and cell biologists. Rotaviruses share some features of replication with reoviruses, yet antigenic and molecular properties of the outer capsid proteins, VP4 (a protein whose cleavage is required for infectivity, possibly by mediating fusion with the cell membrane) and VP7 (a glycoprotein), show more similarities with those of other viruses such as the orthomyxoviruses, paramyxoviruses, and alphaviruses. Rotavirus morphogenesis is a unique process, during which immature subviral particles bud through the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). During this process, transiently enveloped particles form, the outer capsid proteins are assembled onto particles, and mature particles accumulate in the lumen of the ER. Two ER-specific viral glycoproteins are involved in virus maturation, and these glycoproteins have been shown to be useful models for studying protein targeting and retention in the ER and for studying mechanisms of virus budding. New ideas and approaches to understanding how each gene functions to replicate and assemble the segmented viral genome have emerged from knowledge of the primary structure of rotavirus genes and their proteins and from knowledge of the properties of domains on individual proteins. Localization of type-specific and cross-reactive neutralizing epitopes on the outer capsid proteins is becoming increasingly useful in dissecting the protective immune response, including evaluation of vaccine trials, with the practical possibility of enhancing the production of new, more effective vaccines. Finally, future analyses with recently characterized immunologic and gene probes and new animal models can be expected to provide a basic understanding of what regulates the

  7. Comparison of probiotic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria effects, immune responses and rotavirus vaccines and infection in different host species.

    PubMed

    Vlasova, Anastasia N; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Chattha, Kuldeep S; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2016-04-01

    Different probiotic strains of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium genera possess significant and widely acknowledged health-promoting and immunomodulatory properties. They also provide an affordable means for prevention and treatment of various infectious, allergic and inflammatory conditions as demonstrated in numerous human and animal studies. Despite the ample evidence of protective effects of these probiotics against rotavirus (RV) infection and disease, the precise immune mechanisms of this protection remain largely undefined, because of limited mechanistic research possible in humans and investigated in the majority of animal models. Additionally, while most human clinical probiotic trials are well-standardized using the same strains, uniform dosages, regimens of the probiotic treatments and similar host age, animal studies often lack standardization, have variable experimental designs, and non-uniform and sometime limited selection of experimental variables or observational parameters. This review presents selected data on different probiotic strains of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria and summarizes the knowledge of their immunomodulatory properties and the associated protection against RV disease in diverse host species including neonates. PMID:26809484

  8. Association of serum antibody levels following vaccination with a modified live BVDV vaccine and protection from clinical disease upon challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    : Measurements of antigen specific serum antibodies following vaccination of cattle with a modified live vaccine (MLV) were conducted to examine the range of responses elicited against bovine viral diarrhea virus type 2 (BVDV2). Cattle averaging 130 weeks of age were housed in a commercial setting ...

  9. Arenavirus Genome Rearrangement for the Development of Live Attenuated Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Benson Yee Hin; Ortiz-Riaño, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several members of the Arenaviridae family cause hemorrhagic fever disease in humans and pose serious public health problems in their geographic regions of endemicity as well as a credible biodefense threat. To date, there have been no FDA-approved arenavirus vaccines, and current antiarenaviral therapy is limited to an off-label use of ribavirin that is only partially effective. Arenaviruses are enveloped viruses with a bisegmented negative-stranded RNA genome. Each genome segment uses an ambisense coding strategy to direct the synthesis of two viral polypeptides in opposite orientations, separated by a noncoding intergenic region. Here we have used minigenome-based approaches to evaluate expression levels of reporter genes from the nucleoprotein (NP) and glycoprotein precursor (GPC) loci within the S segment of the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). We found that reporter genes are expressed to higher levels from the NP than from the GPC locus. Differences in reporter gene expression levels from the NP and GPC loci were confirmed with recombinant trisegmented LCM viruses. We then used reverse genetics to rescue a recombinant LCMV (rLCMV) containing a translocated viral S segment (rLCMV/TransS), where the viral NP and GPC open reading frames replaced one another. The rLCMV/TransS showed slower growth kinetics in cultured cells and was highly attenuated in vivo in a mouse model of lethal LCMV infection, but immunization with rLCMV/TransS conferred complete protection against a lethal challenge with wild-type LCMV. Attenuation of rLCMV/TransS was associated with reduced NP expression levels. These results open a new avenue for the development of arenavirus live attenuated vaccines based on rearrangement of their viral genome. IMPORTANCE Several arenaviruses cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and also pose a credible bioterrorism threat. Currently, no FDA-licensed vaccines are available to combat arenavirus infections and

  10. 9 CFR 113.27 - Detection of extraneous viable bacteria and fungi in live vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... bacteria and fungi in live vaccines. 113.27 Section 113.27 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... bacteria and fungi in live vaccines. Unless otherwise specified by the Administrator or elsewhere exempted... Seed Bacteria shall be tested for extraneous viable bacteria and fungi as prescribed in this section....