Science.gov

Sample records for rotted cassava roots

  1. Fusarium species from the cassava root rot complex in west Africa.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Ranajit; Mwangi, Maina; Aigbe, Sylvester O; Leslie, John F

    2006-06-01

    ABSTRACT Fusarium species are a significant component of the set of fungi associated with cassava root rot. Yield losses due to root rot average 0.5 to 1 ton/ha but losses >3 ton/ha, an equivalent of 15 to 20% yield, often occur. This paper reviews previous work on cassava root rot and summarizes a few recent studies on Fusarium species associated with the disease. Our studies in Cameroon showed that 30% of rotted tubers were infected by Fusarium spp. 12 months after planting and represented 25% of all the fungal isolates recovered. Other commonly recovered fungi were Botryodiplodia theobromae and Armillaria spp. Numerous and diverse species of Fusarium were associated with rotted cassava roots in Nigeria and Cameroon. At least 13 distinct amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) groups of Fusarium were distinguishable, each group probably a distinct species, and many of them might represent previously undescribed Fusarium species. The two largest of the AFLP groups correspond to F. oxysporum and F. solani species complex. The distribution of Fusarium spp. varied among countries and among locations within a country, suggesting that germ plasm resistant at one location may not be resistant at another. Fusarium spp. also cause seedling blight of cassava and can be recovered from the stems of infected plants up to 1 m above the ground. Therefore, the pathogen can spread with stems cut as planting material. Fusarium spp. also can colonize Chromolaena odorata, the dominant weed in short fallows, which could further complicate management efforts by serving as an alternative host for strains that colonize cassava. PMID:18943189

  2. BLACK ROOT ROT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Black Root Rot Prepared by G. S. Abawi, Revised by L.E. Hanson Black root rot is caused by Thielaviopsis basicola (syn. Chalara elegans). The pathogen is widely distributed, can infect more than 130 plant species in 15 families, and causes severe black root rot diseases in ornamentals and crops suc...

  3. Corky root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corky root rot (corchosis) was first reported in Argentina in 1985, but the disease was presumably present long before that. The disease occurs in most alfalfa-growing areas of Argentina but is more common in older stands. In space-planted alfalfa trials scored for root problems, corky root rot was ...

  4. Pythium Root Rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pythium root rot is a disease that is found in agricultural and nursery soils throughout the United States and Canada. It is caused by several Pythium species, and the symptoms are typified by leaf or needle chlorosis, stunting, root rot, and plant death. The disease is favored by wet soils, overc...

  5. Armillaria root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    First described on grapevines in California in the 1880s, Armillaria root rot occurs in all major grape-growing regions of the state. The causal fungus, Armillaria mellea, infects woody grapevine roots and the base of the trunk (the root collar), resulting in a slow decline and eventual death of the...

  6. Cylindrocarpon root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cylindrocarpon root rot of alfalfa has been found sporadically in Canada and the northern United States. The etiology of this disease is not fully understood, but the priority for research has not been high because of its infrequent occurrence. The infected area of the root initially has a water-soa...

  7. Pythium Root Rot (and Feeder Root Necrosis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pythium species cause a number of diseases on corn. Among the Pythium diseases, root rot presents the least conspicuous aboveground symptoms. Broadly defined, root rot also includes feeder root necrosis. At least 16 species of Pythium are known to cause root rot of corn. These include P. acanthicu...

  8. Violet root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus causing violet root rot, Helicobasidium brebissonii (anamorph Rhizoctonia crocorum), is widely distributed in Europe and North America but is rarely of much economic importance on alfalfa. The disease has also been reported in Australia, Argentina, and Iran. The disease is characterized b...

  9. Stachbotrys Root Rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stachybotrys root rot is caused by Stachybotrys chartarum, a cellulytic saprophytic hyphomycete fungus. The pathogen produces mycotoxins including a host of immunosupressant compounds for human and is one of the causes of the "sick building syndrome." Although S. chartarum is rarely known as a plan...

  10. Disease notes - Bacterial root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial root rot initiated by lactic acid bacteria, particularly Leuconostoc, occurs every year in Idaho sugarbeet fields. Hot fall weather seems to make the problem worse. Although Leuconostoc initiates the rot, other bacteria and yeast frequently invade the tissue as well. The acetic acid bac...

  11. Dry root rot of chickpea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dry root rot of chickpea is a serious disease under dry hot summer conditions, particularly in the semi-arid tropics of Ethiopia, and in central and southern India. It usually occurs at reproductive stages of the plant. Symptoms include drooping of petioles and leaflets of the tips, but not the low...

  12. Rhizoctonia root rot of lentil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia root rot is a soilborne disease of lentil caused by the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, and is favored by cool (11-19 C or 52 - 66 F) and wet soil conditions. The disease starts as reddish or dark brown lesions on lentil plants near the soil line, and develops into sunken lesions an...

  13. Brown Root Rot of Alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This bulletin describes the disease of alfalfa called brown root rot (BRR) including: the disease symptoms, the fungal pathogen and its biology, its distribution, and disease management. Since the 1920s, BRR has been regarded as an important disease of forage legumes, including alfalfa, in northern ...

  14. Cultivar selection for sugarbeet root rot resistance.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal and bacterial root rots in sugar beet caused by Rhizoctonia solani (Rs) and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum (Lm) can lead to root yield losses greater than 50%. To reduce the impact of these root rots on sucrose loss in the field, storage, and factories, studies were conducted t...

  15. Cassava root membrane proteome reveals activities during storage root maturation.

    PubMed

    Naconsie, Maliwan; Lertpanyasampatha, Manassawe; Viboonjun, Unchera; Netrphan, Supatcharee; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Ogasawara, Naotake; Narangajavana, Jarunya

    2016-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is one of the most important crops of Thailand. Its storage roots are used as food, feed, starch production, and be the important source for biofuel and biodegradable plastic production. Despite the importance of cassava storage roots, little is known about the mechanisms involved in their formation. This present study has focused on comparison of the expression profiles of cassava root proteome at various developmental stages using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS. Based on an anatomical study using Toluidine Blue, the secondary growth was confirmed to be essential during the development of cassava storage root. To investigate biochemical processes occurring during storage root maturation, soluble and membrane proteins were isolated from storage roots harvested from 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month-old cassava plants. The proteins with differential expression pattern were analysed and identified to be associated with 8 functional groups: protein folding and degradation, energy, metabolism, secondary metabolism, stress response, transport facilitation, cytoskeleton, and unclassified function. The expression profiling of membrane proteins revealed the proteins involved in protein folding and degradation, energy, and cell structure were highly expressed during early stages of development. Integration of these data along with the information available in genome and transcriptome databases is critical to expand knowledge obtained solely from the field of proteomics. Possible role of identified proteins were discussed in relation with the activities during storage root maturation in cassava. PMID:26547558

  16. Sugarbeet Cultivar Evaluation for Bacterial Root Rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial root rot of sugarbeet caused by Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum is a disease problem recently described in the United States. To ameliorate the impact of bacterial root rot on sucrose loss in the field, storage piles, and factories, studies were conducted to establish an assa...

  17. Rhizoctonia seed, seedling, and wet root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wet root rot caused by Rhizoctonia solani Kühn can cause seed and seedling rot of both lentil and chickpea as well as many other agricultural crops worldwide. The pathogen is favored in cool, sandy soil with high organic matter under no-till or reduced-till soil management practices. Survival spor...

  18. Root rot in sugar beet piles at harvest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar beet root rots are not only a concern because of reduced yields, but can also be associated with losses in storage. Our primary sugar beet root rot disease problem in the Amalgamated production area is Rhizoctonia root rot. However, this rot frequently only penetrates a short distance past t...

  19. Black streak root rot of lentil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Black streak root rot of lentil is caused by the soil borne fungus Thielaviopsis basicola. The pathogen is widespread. The disease shows symptoms of black streaking on root, and stunted plants. The disease is favored by cool and moist weather. Management of the disease rely on avoiding fields wi...

  20. Rhizoctonia damping-off stem canker and root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia solani has been reported to cause damping-off and root rot of rhododendrons and azaleas. Damping-off often includes groups of dying and dead seedlings. Decline of rooted plants in containers results from both root rot and stem necrosis below or above the soil line. Root rot is usually no...

  1. Cultivar selection for bacterial root rot in sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial root rot of sugar beet caused by Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum is a disease problem recently described in the United States, which has frequently been found in association with Rhizoctonia root rot. To reduce the impact of bacterial root rot on sucrose loss in the field, st...

  2. Response of the Andean diversity panel to root rot in a root rot nursery in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Andean Diversity Panel (ADP) was evaluated under low-fertility and root rot conditions in two trials conducted in 2013 and 2015 in Isabela, Puerto Rico. About 246 ADP lines were evaluated in the root rot nursery with root rot and stem diseases caused predominantly by Fusarium solani, which cause...

  3. Modification of cell wall polysaccharides during retting of cassava roots.

    PubMed

    Ngolong Ngea, Guillaume Legrand; Guillon, Fabienne; Essia Ngang, Jean Justin; Bonnin, Estelle; Bouchet, Brigitte; Saulnier, Luc

    2016-12-15

    Retting is an important step in traditional cassava processing that involves tissue softening of the roots to transform the cassava into flour and various food products. The tissue softening that occurs during retting was attributed to the degradation of cell wall pectins through the action of pectin-methylesterase and pectate-lyase that possibly originated from a microbial source or the cassava plant itself. Changes in cell wall composition were investigated during retting using chemical analysis, specific glycanase degradation and immuno-labelling of cell wall polysaccharides. Pectic 1,4-β-d-galactan was the main cell wall polysaccharide affected during the retting of cassava roots. This result suggested that better control of pectic galactan degradation and a better understanding of the degradation mechanism by endogenous endo-galactanase and/or exogenous microbial enzymes might contribute to improve the texture properties of cassava products. PMID:27451197

  4. Cultivar Selection for Sugar Beet Root Rot Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal and bacterial root rots in sugar beet caused by Rhizoctonia solani (Rs) and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum (Lm) can lead to root yield losses greater than 50%. To reduce the impact of these root rots on sucrose loss in the field, storage, and factories, studies were conducted t...

  5. Melatonin attenuates postharvest physiological deterioration of cassava storage roots.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiuxiang; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Zhen-Yu

    2016-05-01

    Melatonin reportedly increases abiotic and biotic stress tolerance in plants, but information on its in vivo effects during postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) in cassava is limited. In this study, we investigated the effect of melatonin in regulating cassava PPD. Treatment with 500 mg/L melatonin significantly delayed cassava PPD and reduced the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) while increasing the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione reductase (GR), but not ascorbate peroxidase (APX). Transcript analysis further showed that expression of copper/zinc SOD (MeCu/ZnSOD), MeCAT1, glutathione peroxidase (MeGPX), peroxidase 3 (MePX3), and glutathione S-transferases (MeGST) was higher in cassava roots sliced treated with 500 mg/L melatonin than in those not exposed to exogenous melatonin. These data demonstrate that melatonin delays cassava PPD by directly or indirectly maintaining homoeostasis of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that accumulation of endogenous melatonin and the transcript levels of melatonin biosynthesis genes changed dynamically during the PPD process. This finding suggested that endogenous melatonin acts as a signal modulator for maintaining cassava PPD progression and that manipulation of melatonin biosynthesis genes through genetic engineering might prevent cassava root deterioration. PMID:26989849

  6. Dig Alfalfa Plants to Assess Root Rots and Yield Potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Digging alfalfa plants and inspecting their crowns and roots for rot is critical to assess stand health and production potential. Brown root rot (BRR) has been a significant plant disease on alfalfa for decades but until recently was thought to only cause significant damage in western Canada. With i...

  7. A diagnostic guide for Fusarium Root Rot of pea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium root rot, caused by Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi, is a major root rot pathogen in pea production areas worldwide. Here we provide a diagnostic guide that describes: the taxonomy of the pathogen, signs and symptoms of the pathogen, host range, geographic distribution, methods used to isolate ...

  8. Management of Rhizoctonia root and crown rot of subarbeet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia root and crown rot is caused by the fungus Rhizoctonia solani and is one of the most severe soil-borne diseases of sugarbeet in Minnesota and North Dakota. Rhizoctonia root and crown rot may reduce yield significantly, and diseased beets may cause problems in storage piles. Fields with...

  9. Characters related to higher starch accumulation in cassava storage roots.

    PubMed

    Li, You-Zhi; Zhao, Jian-Yu; Wu, San-Min; Fan, Xian-Wei; Luo, Xing-Lu; Chen, Bao-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta) is valued mainly for high content starch in its roots. Our understanding of mechanisms promoting high starch accumulation in the roots is, however, still very limited. Two field-grown cassava cultivars, Huanan 124(H124) with low root starch and Fuxuan 01(F01) with high root starch, were characterised comparatively at four main growth stages. Changes in key sugars in the leaves, stems and roots seemed not to be strongly associated with the final amount of starch accumulated in the roots. However, when compared with H124, F01 exhibited a more compact arrangement of xylem vascular bundles in the leaf axils, much less callose around the phloem sieve plates in the stems, higher starch synthesis-related enzymatic activity but lower amylase activity in the roots, more significantly up-regulated expression of related genes, and a much higher stem flow rate (SFR). In conclusion, higher starch accumulation in the roots results from the concurrent effects of powerful stem transport capacity highlighted by higher SFR, high starch synthesis but low starch degradation in the roots, and high expression of sugar transporter genes in the stems. A model of high starch accumulation in cassava roots was therefore proposed and discussed. PMID:26892156

  10. Characters related to higher starch accumulation in cassava storage roots

    PubMed Central

    Li, You-Zhi; Zhao, Jian-Yu; Wu, San-Min; Fan, Xian-Wei; Luo, Xing-Lu; Chen, Bao-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta) is valued mainly for high content starch in its roots. Our understanding of mechanisms promoting high starch accumulation in the roots is, however, still very limited. Two field-grown cassava cultivars, Huanan 124(H124) with low root starch and Fuxuan 01(F01) with high root starch, were characterised comparatively at four main growth stages. Changes in key sugars in the leaves, stems and roots seemed not to be strongly associated with the final amount of starch accumulated in the roots. However, when compared with H124, F01 exhibited a more compact arrangement of xylem vascular bundles in the leaf axils, much less callose around the phloem sieve plates in the stems, higher starch synthesis-related enzymatic activity but lower amylase activity in the roots, more significantly up-regulated expression of related genes, and a much higher stem flow rate (SFR). In conclusion, higher starch accumulation in the roots results from the concurrent effects of powerful stem transport capacity highlighted by higher SFR, high starch synthesis but low starch degradation in the roots, and high expression of sugar transporter genes in the stems. A model of high starch accumulation in cassava roots was therefore proposed and discussed. PMID:26892156

  11. Towards the identification of cassava root protein genes.

    PubMed

    De Souza, C R B; Carvalho, L J C B; De Almeida, E R P; Gander, E S

    2002-01-01

    The protein population of cassava root layers was characterized by SDS-PAGE and bidimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. SDS-Page revealed the presence of a protein population in the molecular weight range between 94 and 20 kDa. The expression pattern of these proteins was well-defined within the different layers. Partial protein sequence analyses and preliminary results on the layer-specific expression pattern obtained with Northern analyses are presented. PMID:12602941

  12. Natural variation in expression of genes associated with biosynthesis and accumulation in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) storage root

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several groups have reported on massive accumulation of total carotenoids in cassava storage root (CSR). Naturally occurring color variation associated with carotenoid accumulation was observed in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) storage root of landraces from Amazon. Here carotenoid profiles from...

  13. Natural variation in expression of genes associated with carotenoid biosynthesis and accumulation in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) storage root

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several groups have reported on massive accumulation of total carotenoids in cassava storage root (CSR). Naturally occurring color variation associated with carotenoid accumulation was observed in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) storage root of landraces from Amazon. Here carotenoid profiles from...

  14. Etiology and Epidemiological Conditions Promoting Fusarium Root Rot in Sweetpotato.

    PubMed

    Scruggs, A C; Quesada-Ocampo, L M

    2016-08-01

    Sweetpotato production in the United States is limited by several postharvest diseases, and one of the most common is Fusarium root rot. Although Fusarium solani is believed to be the primary causal agent of disease, numerous other Fusarium spp. have been reported to infect sweetpotato. However, the diversity of Fusarium spp. infecting sweetpotato in North Carolina is unknown. In addition, the lack of labeled and effective fungicides for control of Fusarium root rot in sweetpotato creates the need for integrated strategies to control disease. Nonetheless, epidemiological factors that promote Fusarium root rot in sweetpotato remain unexplored. A survey of Fusarium spp. infecting sweetpotato in North Carolina identified six species contributing to disease, with F. solani as the primary causal agent. The effects of storage temperature (13, 18, 23, 29, and 35°C), relative humidity (80, 90, and 100%), and initial inoculum level (3-, 5-, and 7-mm-diameter mycelia plug) were examined for progression of Fusarium root rot caused by F. solani and F. proliferatum on 'Covington' sweetpotato. Fusarium root rot was significantly reduced (P < 0.05) at lower temperatures (13°C), low relative humidity levels (80%), and low initial inoculum levels for both pathogens. Sporulation of F. proliferatum was also reduced under the same conditions. Qualitative mycotoxin analysis of roots infected with one of five Fusarium spp. revealed the production of fumonisin B1 by F. proliferatum when infecting sweetpotato. This study is a step toward characterizing the etiology and epidemiology of Fusarium root rot in sweetpotato, which allows for improved disease management recommendations to limit postharvest losses to this disease. PMID:27050570

  15. Reducing Alfalfa Brown Root Rot with Crop Rotation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stand injury resulting from brown root rot (BRR) of alfalfa, caused by Phoma sclerotioides, may be noted this spring as warmer temperatures promote stand emergence. BRR development occurs primarily over the winter and is favored when stands are covered with snow for an extended period of time. It is...

  16. Root rots of common and tepary beans in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root rots are a disease complex affecting common bean and can be severe in bean growing areas in the tropics and subtropics. The presence of several pathogens makes it difficult to breed for resistance because of the synergistic effect of the pathogens in the host and the interaction of soil factors...

  17. Aphanomyces root rot of alfalfa: widespread distribution of race 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The early spring of 2012 with prolonged wet soil conditions in many parts of the country resulted in reports of poor performance of alfalfa due to Aphanomyces root rot (ARR). Varieties with resistance to ARR are available, although fewer varieties have resistance to both race 1 and race 2 of the pat...

  18. Ground-based technologies for cotton root rot control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phymatotrichum, or cotton root rot (CRR), is a fungus currently affecting broadleaf crops including cotton in the southwestern U.S. and northern Mexico. The ability of CRR to lie dormant in the soil for several years tends to negate the effects of crop rotation, and it remains a problem for cotton...

  19. Phytophthora root rot resistance in soybean E00003

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora root rot (PRR), caused by the oomycete Phytophthora sojae, is a devastating disease in soybean production. Using resistant cultivars has been suggested as the best solution for disease management. Michigan elite soybean E00003 is resistant to P. sojae and has been used as a PRR resist...

  20. Cultural Practices and Chemical Treatments Affect Phytophthora Root Rot Severity of Blueberries Grown in Southern Mississippi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora root rot is an important disease of commercial blueberries and is most severe when blueberries are grown in wet soils with poor drainage. Symptoms of Phytophthora root rot include small, yellow or red leaves, lack of new growth, root necrosis, and a smaller than normal root system. Inf...

  1. Survival of southern highbush blueberry cultivars in Phytophthora Root Rot Infested fields in South Mississippi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora root rot is an important disease of commercial blueberries and is most severe when blueberries are grown in wet soils with poor drainage. Symptoms of Phytophthora root rot include small, yellow or red leaves, lack of new growth, root necrosis, and a smaller root system than healthy plan...

  2. Root traits associated with Phytophthora root rot resistance in red raspberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora root rot is a serious problem for commercial production of red raspberry. A study was initiated in 2009 to identify root traits in raspberry associated with little or no Phytophthora infection so that the traits can be selected and incorporated into breeding material to develop new cul...

  3. Two cassava promoters related to vascular expression and storage root formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Bohl-Zenger, Susanne; Puonti-Kaerlas, Johanna; Potrykus, Ingo; Gruissem, Wilhelm

    2003-12-01

    Cassava ( Manihot esculenta Crantz) storage roots, organs accumulating large amounts of starch, develop from primary roots via secondary growth. The availability of promoters related to storage-root formation is a prerequisite for engineering root traits in cassava. Two cDNAs, c15 and c54, were identified from a storage-root cDNA library of cassava MCol1505 via differential screening. The transcripts of c15 and c54 were detected in storage roots but not in leaves by Northern analysis. Homology analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences showed that C15 is likely to be related to cytochrome P450 proteins, which are involved in the oxidative degradation of various compounds, while C54 may be related to Pt2L4, a cassava glutamic acid-rich protein. The promoter regions of c15 and c54 were isolated from the corresponding clones in a cassava genomic library. A 1,465-bp promoter fragment ( p15/1.5) of c15 and a 1,081-bp promoter region ( p54/1.0) of c54 were translationally fused to the uidA reporter gene, and introduced into cassava and Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. The expression patterns of p15/1.5::uidA and p54/1.0::uidA in transgenic plants showed that both promoters are predominantly active in phloem, cambium and xylem vessels of vascular tissues from leaves, stems, and root systems. More importantly, strong beta-glucuronidase activity was also detected in the starch-rich parenchyma cells of transgenic storage roots. Our results demonstrate that the two promoters are related to vascular expression and secondary growth of storage roots in cassava. PMID:13680228

  4. Influence of iron on cylindrocarpon root rot development on ginseng.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mahfuzur; Punja, Zamir K

    2006-11-01

    ABSTRACT Cylindrocarpon root rot, caused by Cylindrocarpon destructans, is an important disease on ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) in Canada. We studied the effects of iron (Fe) on disease severity and pathogen growth. When Hoagland's solution was amended with Fe at 56 and 112 mug/ml compared with 0 mug/ml, disease initiation and final severity on hydroponically maintained ginseng roots was significantly (P<0.0001) enhanced. Under field conditions, wounding of roots with a fine needle followed by application of 0.05% FeNaEDTA to the rhizosphere of treated plants significantly enhanced Cylindrocarpon root rot in 2003 and 2004 compared with unwounded roots with Fe or wounded roots without Fe. Foliar applications of Fe (as FeNaEDTA) to ginseng plants three times during the 2002 and 2003 growing seasons significantly increased Fe levels in root tissues. These roots developed larger lesions following inoculation with C. destructans in vitro. When radioactive Fe ((59)Fe) was applied to the foliage of ginseng plants, it was detected in the secondary phloem and in cortical and epidermal tissues within 1 week. Artificially wounded areas on the roots accumulated more (59)Fe than healthy areas. Diseased tissue also had threefold higher levels of phenolic compounds and Fe compared with adjoining healthy tissues. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed enhanced levels of protocatechuic acid, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, cinnamic acid, phloridizin, and quercetin. Phenolic compounds produced in diseased and wounded tissues sequestered Fe in vitro. The effects of Fe on mycelial growth, conidial germ tube length, and secondary branching of germ tubes of C. destructans were examined in vitro. When grown on Chrome-azurol S medium, Fe also was sequestered by C. destructans through siderophore production, which was visualized as a clearing pigmented zone at the margin of colonies. Mycelial dry weight was significantly increased in glucose/ yeast broth

  5. Influence of Rhizoctonia-Bacterial root rot complex on storability of sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The root rot complex, caused by Rhizoctonia solani and Leuconostoc mesenteroides, can lead to yield loss in the field but may also lead to problems with sucrose loss in storage. Thus, studies were conducted to investigate if placing sugar beet roots suffering from root rot together with healthy roo...

  6. Bacteria and yeast associated with sugar beet root rot at harvest in the Intermountain West

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An undescribed bacterial-like root rot has been observed in sugar beets at harvest time in the Intermountain West. This root rot was observed during surveys of recently harvested sugar beets in 2004 and 2005. Microorganisms recovered from 287 roots fell into the following groups: lactic acid bacte...

  7. Cloning and characterization of a tuberous root-specific promoter from cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz).

    PubMed

    Koehorst-van Putten, Herma J J; Wolters, Anne-Marie A; Pereira-Bertram, Isolde M; van den Berg, Hans H J; van der Krol, Alexander R; Visser, Richard G F

    2012-12-01

    In order to obtain a tuberous root-specific promoter to be used in the transformation of cassava, a 1,728 bp sequence containing the cassava granule-bound starch synthase (GBSSI) promoter was isolated. The sequence proved to contain light- and sugar-responsive cis elements. Part of this sequence (1,167 bp) was cloned into binary vectors to drive expression of the firefly luciferase gene. Cassava cultivar Adira 4 was transformed with this construct or a control construct in which the luciferase gene was cloned behind the 35S promoter. Luciferase activity was measured in leaves, stems, roots and tuberous roots. As expected, the 35S promoter induced luciferase activity in all organs at similar levels, whereas the GBSSI promoter showed very low expression in leaves, stems and roots, but very high expression in tuberous roots. These results show that the cassava GBSSI promoter is an excellent candidate to achieve tuberous root-specific expression in cassava. PMID:23132522

  8. Pre-breeding for root rot resistance using root morphology and shoot length.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our goal is to identify new wheat varieties that display field resistance/tolerance to root rot diseases, such as those caused by Rhizoctonia and Pythium. We are tapping into the genetic diversity of ‘synthetic’ hexaploid wheats (genome composition AABBDD), which were generated at CIMMYT by artifici...

  9. Pre-Breeding for root rot resistance using root morphology traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root rot caused by the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani can be a major yield-limiting disease in minimal tillage or direct-seeded cereal production systems. Reduced tillage greatly influences the plant residue retained on the soil surfaces. This retained residue (green bridge) provides increased d...

  10. Impact of Heterobasidion root-rot on fine root morphology and associated fungi in Picea abies stands on peat soils.

    PubMed

    Gaitnieks, Talis; Klavina, Darta; Muiznieks, Indrikis; Pennanen, Taina; Velmala, Sannakajsa; Vasaitis, Rimvydas; Menkis, Audrius

    2016-07-01

    We examined differences in fine root morphology, mycorrhizal colonisation and root-inhabiting fungal communities between Picea abies individuals infected by Heterobasidion root-rot compared with healthy individuals in four stands on peat soils in Latvia. We hypothesised that decreased tree vitality and alteration in supply of photosynthates belowground due to root-rot infection might lead to changes in fungal communities of tree roots. Plots were established in places where trees were infected and in places where they were healthy. Within each stand, five replicate soil cores with roots were taken to 20 cm depth in each root-rot infected and uninfected plot. Root morphological parameters, mycorrhizal colonisation and associated fungal communities, and soil chemical properties were analysed. In three stands root morphological parameters and in all stands root mycorrhizal colonisation were similar between root-rot infected and uninfected plots. In one stand, there were significant differences in root morphological parameters between root-rot infected versus uninfected plots, but these were likely due to significant differences in soil chemical properties between the plots. Sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer of fungal nuclear rDNA from ectomycorrhizal (ECM) root morphotypes of P. abies revealed the presence of 42 fungal species, among which ECM basidiomycetes Tylospora asterophora (24.6 % of fine roots examined), Amphinema byssoides (14.5 %) and Russula sapinea (9.7 %) were most common. Within each stand, the richness of fungal species and the composition of fungal communities in root-rot infected versus uninfected plots were similar. In conclusion, Heterobasidion root-rot had little or no effect on fine root morphology, mycorrhizal colonisation and composition of fungal communities in fine roots of P. abies growing on peat soils. PMID:26861482

  11. Using airborne multispectral imagery to monitor cotton root rot expansion within a growing season

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton root rot is a serious and destructive disease that affects cotton production in the southwestern United States. Accurate delineation of cotton root rot infestations is important for cost-effective management of the disease. The objective of this study was to use airborne multispectral imagery...

  12. RESPONSE OF SOYBEAN ISOLINES DIFFERING IN PHYTOPHTHORA ROOT ROT RESISTANCE TO FIELD FLOODING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora root rot (PRR) and flooding in soybeans is often a problem on heavy clays or poorly drained soils. Phytophthora root rot (PRR) resistance could decrease losses due to flooding? Alleles for PRR resistance in soybean have been found at eight loci with some loci having more than one all...

  13. Comparison of airborne multispectral and hyperspectral imagery for mapping cotton root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton root rot, caused by the soilborne fungus, Phymatotrichum omnivorum, is a major cotton disease affecting cotton production in the southwestern and south central U.S. Accurate delineation of root rot infestations is necessary for cost-effective management of the disease. The objective of this s...

  14. Efficacy of management tools for control of Pythium root rot of Douglas fir seedlings, 2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the efficacy of management tools for control of Pythium root rot of Douglas fir seedlings. This effort was conducted as part of the IR-4 Ornamental Horticulture program to evaluate fungicides and biopesticides for management of root, crown and stem rot of ornamental plants ca...

  15. Mapping cotton root rot infestations over a 10-year interval with airborne multispectral imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton root rot, caused by the pathogen Phymatotrichopsis omnivora, is a very serious and destructive disease of cotton grown in the southwestern and south central U.S. Accurate information regarding temporal changes of cotton root rot infestations within fields is important for the management and c...

  16. Candidate genes associated with QTL controlling resistance to fusarium root rot in pea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium root rot (FRR) of pea (Pisum sativum L.) is a serious pathogen in the USA and Europe and genetic resistance offers an effective and economical control for this pathogen. Fusarium root rot is caused by the fungus pathogen (Haematonectria haematococca (Berk. & Broome) (Anamorph): Fusarium sol...

  17. Comparison of airborne multispectral and hyperspectral imagery for mapping cotton root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton root rot caused by the soilborne fungus, Phymatotrichum omnivorum, is a major cotton disease affecting cotton production in the southwestern and south central U.S. Accurate delineation of root rot infestations is necessary for cost-effective management of the disease. The objective of this st...

  18. Experimental Sugar Beet Cultivars Evaluated for Resistance Bacterial Root Rot in Idaho, 2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial root rot of sugar beet caused by Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum is a disease problem recently described in the United States. To ameliorate the impact of bacterial root rot on sucrose loss in the field, storage piles, and factories, a study was conducted to identify resistan...

  19. Monitoring cotton root rot progression within a growing season using airborne multispectral imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton root rot, caused by the fungus Phymatotrichopsis omnivora, is a serious and destructive disease affecting cotton production in the southwestern United States. Accurate delineation of cotton root rot infections is important for cost-effective management of the disease. The objective of this st...

  20. Commercial Sugar Beet Cultivars Evaluated for Resistance to Bacterial Root Rot in Idaho, 2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial root rot of sugar beet caused by Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum is a disease problem recently described in the United States. To ameliorate the impact of bacterial root rot on sucrose loss in the field, storage piles, and factories, a study was conducted to identify resistan...

  1. Interaction of Rhizoctonia solani and Rhizopus stolonifer Causing Root Rot of Sugar Beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years, growers in Michigan and other sugar beet production areas of the United States have reported increasing incidence of root rot with little or no crown or foliar symptoms in sugar beet with Rhizoctonia crown and root rot. In addition, Rhizoctonia-resistant beets have been reported wit...

  2. Control of wheat root rots under field condtions with compounds produced by Fusarium sambucinum strain FS-94

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Appreciable yield losses from root rot epidemics on wheat caused by Fusarium fungi are frequently observed in Russia. Chemical fungicides are not always effective in controlling fusarial root rots on wheat. Biocontrol agents may provide an alternative or additional method for managing root rots. Lab...

  3. Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae endophytically colonize cassava roots following soil drench inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Melinda; Gómez-Jiménez, María I.; Ortiz, Viviana; Vega, Fernando E.; Kramer, Matthew; Parsa, Soroush

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the fungal entomopathogens Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae to determine if endophytic colonization could be achieved in cassava. An inoculation method based on drenching the soil around cassava stem cuttings using conidial suspensions resulted in endophytic colonization of cassava roots by both entomopathogens, though neither was found in the leaves or stems of the treated cassava plants. Both fungal entomopathogens were detected more often in the proximal end of the root than in the distal end. Colonization levels of B. bassiana were higher when plants were sampled at 7–9 days post-inoculation (84%) compared to 47–49 days post-inoculation (40%). In contrast, the colonization levels of M. anisopliae remained constant from 7–9 days post-inoculation (80%) to 47–49 days post-inoculation (80%), which suggests M. anisopliae is better able to persist in the soil, or as an endophyte in cassava roots over time. Differences in colonization success and plant growth were found among the fungal entomopathogen treatments. PMID:27103778

  4. Iron Biofortification and Homeostasis in Transgenic Cassava Roots Expressing the Algal Iron Assimilatory Gene, FEA1

    PubMed Central

    Ihemere, Uzoma E.; Narayanan, Narayanan N.; Sayre, Richard T.

    2012-01-01

    We have engineered the tropical root crop cassava (Manihot esculenta) to express the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii iron assimilatory gene, FEA1, in its storage roots with the objective of enhancing the root nutritional qualities. Iron levels in mature cassava storage roots were increased from 10 to 36 ppm in the highest iron accumulating transgenic lines. These iron levels are sufficient to meet the minimum daily requirement for iron in a 500 g meal. Significantly, the expression of the FEA1 gene in storage roots did not alter iron levels in leaves. Transgenic plants also had normal levels of zinc in leaves and roots consistent with the specific uptake of ferrous iron mediated by the FEA1 protein. Relative to wild-type plants, fibrous roots of FEA1 expressing plants had reduced Fe (III) chelate reductase activity consistent with the more efficient uptake of iron in the transgenic plants. We also show that multiple cassava genes involved in iron homeostasis have altered tissue-specific patterns of expression in leaves, stems, and roots of transgenic plants consistent with increased iron sink strength in transgenic roots. These results are discussed in terms of strategies for the iron biofortification of plants. PMID:22993514

  5. Molecular systematics of the cotton root rot pathogen, Phymatotrichopsis omnivora.

    PubMed

    Marek, S M; Hansen, K; Romanish, M; Thorn, R G

    2009-06-01

    Cotton root rot is an important soilborne disease of cotton and numerous dicot plants in the south-western United States and Mexico. The causal organism, Phymatotrichopsis omnivora (= Phymatotrichum omnivorum), is known only as an asexual, holoanamorphic (mitosporic) fungus, and produces conidia resembling those of Botrytis. Although the corticoid basidiomycetes Phanerochaete omnivora (Polyporales) and Sistotrema brinkmannii (Cantharellales; both Agaricomycetes) have been suggested as teleomorphs of Phymatotrichopsis omnivora, phylogenetic analyses of nuclear small- and large-subunit ribosomal DNA and subunit 2 of RNA polymerase II from multiple isolates indicate that it is neither a basidiomycete nor closely related to other species of Botrytis (Sclerotiniaceae, Leotiomycetes). Phymatotrichopsis omnivora is a member of the family Rhizinaceae, Pezizales (Ascomycota: Pezizomycetes) allied to Psilopezia and Rhizina. PMID:20198139

  6. Toward better understanding of postharvest deterioration: biochemical changes in stored cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) roots.

    PubMed

    Uarrota, Virgílio Gavicho; Nunes, Eduardo da Costa; Peruch, Luiz Augusto Martins; Neubert, Enilto de Oliveira; Coelho, Bianca; Moresco, Rodolfo; Domínguez, Moralba Garcia; Sánchez, Teresa; Meléndez, Jorge Luis Luna; Dufour, Dominique; Ceballos, Hernan; Becerra Lopez-Lavalle, Luis Augusto; Hershey, Clair; Rocha, Miguel; Maraschin, Marcelo

    2016-05-01

    Food losses can occur during production, postharvest, and processing stages in the supply chain. With the onset of worldwide food shortages, interest in reducing postharvest losses in cassava has been increasing. In this research, the main goal was to evaluate biochemical changes and identify the metabolites involved in the deterioration of cassava roots. We found that high levels of ascorbic acid (AsA), polyphenol oxidase (PPO), dry matter, and proteins are correlated with overall lower rates of deterioration. On the other hand, soluble sugars such as glucose and fructose, as well as organic acids, mainly, succinic acid, seem to be upregulated during storage and may play a role in the deterioration of cassava roots. Cultivar Branco (BRA) was most resilient to postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD), while Oriental (ORI) was the most susceptible. Our findings suggest that PPO, AsA, and proteins may play a distinct role in PPD delay. PMID:27247771

  7. Host resistance and soil treatments for managing Pythium root rot and southern root-knot nematode in pepper

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five pepper (Capsicum annuum) genotypes differing in reactions to Phytophthora capsici and southern root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) were studied in combination with four soil treatments for managing Pythium root rot and southern root-knot nematode in field trials in Charleston, SC and Cit...

  8. Interaction of Pratylenchus penetrans and Rhizoctonia fragariae in Strawberry Black Root Rot

    PubMed Central

    LaMondia, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    A split-root technique was used to examine the interaction between Pratylenchus penetrans and the cortical root-rotting pathogen Rhizoctonia fragariae in strawberry black root rot. Plants inoculated with both pathogens on the same half of a split-root crown had greater levels of root rot than plants inoculated separately or with either pathogen alone. Isolation of R. fragariae from field-grown roots differed with root type and time of sampling. Fungal infection of structural roots was low until fruiting, whereas perennial root colonization was high. Isolation of R. fragariae from feeder roots was variable, but was greater from feeder roots on perennial than from structural roots. Isolation of the fungus was greater from structural roots with nematode lesions than from non-symptomatic roots. Rhizoctonia fragariae was a common resident on the sloughed cortex of healthy perennial roots. From this source, the fungus may infect additional roots. The direct effects of lesion nematode feeding and movement are cortical cell damage and death. Indirect effects include discoloration of the endodermis and early polyderm formation. Perhaps weakened or dying cells caused directly or indirectly by P. penetrans are more susceptible to R. fragariae, leading to increased disease. PMID:19265969

  9. Diaporthaceae associated with root and crown rot of maize.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Sandra C; Crous, Pedro W; Groenewald, Johannes Z; Tewoldemedhin, Yared T; Marasas, Walter F O

    2011-06-01

    Several isolates of coelomycetous fungi with pigmented conidia were consistently isolated from diseased roots of Zea mays in irrigated plots monitored in the KwaZulu-Natal Province of South Africa. Based on their morphology, these isolates could be identified as representative of Stenocarpella macrospora, S. maydis, and Phaeocytostroma ambiguum. Although species of Stenocarpella are well-known as causal agents of cob and stalk rot and leaf blight of maize in South Africa, the occurrence and importance of P. ambiguum is less well documented and understood. To determine the role of P. ambiguum as a root pathogen of maize, pathogenicity tests were conducted under glasshouse conditions at 18 °C night and 28 °C day temperatures using a pasteurised soil, river sand and perlite medium and a 0.5 % sand-bran inoculum. Based on these results, P. ambiguum was shown to be a primary pathogen of maize, but to be less virulent than the positive control, S. maydis. Furthermore, to clarify the higher-level phylogeny of these fungal genera, isolates were subjected to DNA sequencing of the nuclear ribosomal DNA (ITS & LSU). Partial gene sequences of the translation elongation factor 1-alpha gene were added to confirm the species monophyly. To resolve the generic placement of Phaeocytostroma, additional species such as P. sacchari, P. plurivorum and P. megalosporum were also added to the analysis. Based on these results, Stenocarpella and Phaeocytostroma were shown to be two well defined genera, belonging to Diaporthales, Diaporthaceae, being closely allied to Phomopsis (Diaporthe). All three genera were also observed to form alpha as well as beta conidia, and although this phenomenon is well documented for Phomopsis and Phaeocytostroma, it is a new observation for Stenocarpella. In spite of the differences in conidial pigmentation, no support could be obtained for polyphyly in Diaporthaceae, suggesting that as observed in Botryosphaeriaceae (Botryosphaeriales), conidial

  10. Large-Scale Proteomics of the Cassava Storage Root and Identification of a Target Gene to Reduce Postharvest Deterioration.

    PubMed

    Vanderschuren, Hervé; Nyaboga, Evans; Poon, Jacquelyne S; Baerenfaller, Katja; Grossmann, Jonas; Hirsch-Hoffmann, Matthias; Kirchgessner, Norbert; Nanni, Paolo; Gruissem, Wilhelm

    2014-05-29

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta) is the most important root crop in the tropics, but rapid postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) of the root is a major constraint to commercial cassava production. We established a reliable method for image-based PPD symptom quantification and used label-free quantitative proteomics to generate an extensive cassava root and PPD proteome. Over 2600 unique proteins were identified in the cassava root, and nearly 300 proteins showed significant abundance regulation during PPD. We identified protein abundance modulation in pathways associated with oxidative stress, phenylpropanoid biosynthesis (including scopoletin), the glutathione cycle, fatty acid α-oxidation, folate transformation, and the sulfate reduction II pathway. Increasing protein abundances and enzymatic activities of glutathione-associated enzymes, including glutathione reductases, glutaredoxins, and glutathione S-transferases, indicated a key role for ascorbate/glutathione cycles. Based on combined proteomics data, enzymatic activities, and lipid peroxidation assays, we identified glutathione peroxidase as a candidate for reducing PPD. Transgenic cassava overexpressing a cytosolic glutathione peroxidase in storage roots showed delayed PPD and reduced lipid peroxidation as well as decreased H2O2 accumulation. Quantitative proteomics data from ethene and phenylpropanoid pathways indicate additional gene candidates to further delay PPD. Cassava root proteomics data are available at www.pep2pro.ethz.ch for easy access and comparison with other proteomics data. PMID:24876255

  11. Overexpression of hydroxynitrile lyase in cassava roots elevates protein and free amino acids while reducing residual cyanogen levels.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Narayanan N; Ihemere, Uzoma; Ellery, Claire; Sayre, Richard T

    2011-01-01

    Cassava is the major source of calories for more than 250 million Sub-Saharan Africans, however, it has the lowest protein-to-energy ratio of any major staple food crop in the world. A cassava-based diet provides less than 30% of the minimum daily requirement for protein. Moreover, both leaves and roots contain potentially toxic levels of cyanogenic glucosides. The major cyanogen in cassava is linamarin which is stored in the vacuole. Upon tissue disruption linamarin is deglycosylated by the apolplastic enzyme, linamarase, producing acetone cyanohydrin. Acetone cyanohydrin can spontaneously decompose at pHs >5.0 or temperatures >35°C, or is enzymatically broken down by hydroxynitrile lyase (HNL) to produce acetone and free cyanide which is then volatilized. Unlike leaves, cassava roots have little HNL activity. The lack of HNL activity in roots is associated with the accumulation of potentially toxic levels of acetone cyanohydrin in poorly processed roots. We hypothesized that the over-expression of HNL in cassava roots under the control of a root-specific, patatin promoter would not only accelerate cyanogenesis during food processing, resulting in a safer food product, but lead to increased root protein levels since HNL is sequestered in the cell wall. Transgenic lines expressing a patatin-driven HNL gene construct exhibited a 2-20 fold increase in relative HNL mRNA levels in roots when compared with wild type resulting in a threefold increase in total root protein in 7 month old plants. After food processing, HNL overexpressing lines had substantially reduced acetone cyanohydrin and cyanide levels in roots relative to wild-type roots. Furthermore, steady state linamarin levels in intact tissues were reduced by 80% in transgenic cassava roots. These results suggest that enhanced linamarin metabolism contributed to the elevated root protein levels. PMID:21799761

  12. Kinetics of mass transfer during deep fat frying of yellow fleshed cassava root slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyedeji, A. B.; Sobukola, O. P.; Henshaw, F. O.; Adegunwa, M. O.; Sanni, L. O.; Tomlins, K. I.

    2016-05-01

    Kinetics of mass transfer [moisture content, oil uptake, total carotenoid (TC) and shrinkage] during frying of yellow fleshed cassava roots (TMS 01/1371) was investigated. Slices were divided into (i) fresh and (ii) pre-dried to 75 % moisture content before atmospheric frying and (iii) vacuum fried. Percentage TC and activation energies of vacuum, fresh and pre-dried fried samples were 76, 63 and 61 %; and 82, 469.7, 213.7 kJ/mol, respectively.

  13. Extending cassava root shelf life via reduction of reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Zidenga, Tawanda; Leyva-Guerrero, Elisa; Moon, Hangsik; Siritunga, Dimuth; Sayre, Richard

    2012-08-01

    One of the major constraints facing the large-scale production of cassava (Manihot esculenta) roots is the rapid postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) that occurs within 72 h following harvest. One of the earliest recognized biochemical events during the initiation of PPD is a rapid burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. We have investigated the source of this oxidative burst to identify possible strategies to limit its extent and to extend cassava root shelf life. We provide evidence for a causal link between cyanogenesis and the onset of the oxidative burst that triggers PPD. By measuring ROS accumulation in transgenic low-cyanogen plants with and without cyanide complementation, we show that PPD is cyanide dependent, presumably resulting from a cyanide-dependent inhibition of respiration. To reduce cyanide-dependent ROS production in cassava root mitochondria, we generated transgenic plants expressing a codon-optimized Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mitochondrial alternative oxidase gene (AOX1A). Unlike cytochrome c oxidase, AOX is cyanide insensitive. Transgenic plants overexpressing AOX exhibited over a 10-fold reduction in ROS accumulation compared with wild-type plants. The reduction in ROS accumulation was associated with a delayed onset of PPD by 14 to 21 d after harvest of greenhouse-grown plants. The delay in PPD in transgenic plants was also observed under field conditions, but with a root biomass yield loss in the highest AOX-expressing lines. These data reveal a mechanism for PPD in cassava based on cyanide-induced oxidative stress as well as PPD control strategies involving inhibition of ROS production or its sequestration. PMID:22711743

  14. Effect of feeding cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) root meal on growth performance, hydrocyanide intake and haematological parameters of broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Akapo, Abiola Olajetemi; Oso, Abimbola Oladele; Bamgbose, Adeyemi Mustapha; Sanwo, Kehinde A; Jegede, Adebayo Vincent; Sobayo, Richard Abayomi; Idowu, Olusegun Mark; Fan, Juexin; Li, Lili; Olorunsola, Rotimi A

    2014-10-01

    The effect of feeding cassava root meal on growth performance, hydrocyanide intake, haematological indices and serum thiocyanate concentration of broiler chicks was investigated using 300-day-old male broilers. There were five dietary treatments arranged in a 2 × 2 + 1 factorial arrangement of two processing methods of cassava root (peeled and unpeeled) included at two levels (100 and 200 g/kg) plus a control diet (maize-based diet, containing no cassava root). Each treatment was replicated six times with ten birds per replicate. The feeding trial lasted for 28 days. Control-fed birds had the highest overall (P < 0.01) final liveweight and weight gain, least (P < 0.05) hydrocyanide (HCN) intake and best (P < 0.05) feed-to-gain ratio. Chicks fed with control and diet containing 100 g/kg peeled cassava root meal (PCRM) had the least (P < 0.05) feed cost per weight gain. Chicks fed with diet containing 100 g/kg cassava root meal had higher (P < 0.05) final liveweight and weight gain and reduced (P < 0.05) HCN intake than chicks fed with diet containing 200 g/kg cassava root meal. Dietary inclusion of peeled cassava root meal (PCRM) for broiler chicks resulted in increased final liveweight (P < 0.05), weight gain (P < 0.01) and feed intake (P < 0.01) when compared with birds fed with diet containing unpeeled cassava root meal (UCRM). The least (P < 0.01) final liveweight and weight gain and worst (P < 0.05) feed-to-gain ratio were obtained with chicks fed with diet containing 200 g/kg UCRM. Increased dietary inclusion levels of cassava root resulted in significant increase (P < 0.05) in white blood cell (WBC) count, heterophil count and serum thiocyanate concentration. In comparison with chicks fed with diet containing UCRM, dietary inclusion of PCRM resulted in increased (P < 0.05) red blood cell (RBC) count and haemoglobin (Hb) concentration and reduced (P < 0.05) white blood cell (WBC) count and serum

  15. Management of Phytophthora cinnamomi root rot disease of blueberry with gypsum and compost

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root rot disease of blueberry caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi is becoming more prevalent as a consequence of widespread adoption of drip irrigation. This creates higher moisture content in the root zone more conducive for the pathogen. Options for disease control under organic management are limi...

  16. Rhizoctonia root rot of lentil caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG 2-1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lentil root rot symptoms were observed in commercial fields in the US Pacific Northwest during the unusually cool and moist spring weather of 2010. Symptoms included sunken lesions on root and stem with brown discoloration, resembling diseases caused by Rhizoctonia solani. Rhizoctonia solani was i...

  17. Inducible proteins in citrus rootstocks with different tolerance towards the root rot pathogen Phytophthora palmivora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activities of defense-related proteins (ß-1,3-glucanases, chitinases and peroxidases) and concentrations of total soluble phenolics were measured in roots and leaves of uninfected and infected plants to investigate the response of different citrus rootstock genotypes to the root rot pathogen Phytoph...

  18. Transgenic sugar beet cultivars evaluated for resistance to bacterial root rot in Idaho, 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial root rot caused by Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum is an important problem in sugar beets because of issues it causes in the field, storage, and factories. Thirty-three transgenic (roundup ready) sugar beet cultivars were grown in a commercial irrigated field. Four roots fro...

  19. Occurrence of Root Rot and Vascular Wilt Diseases in Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) in Upper Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Naglaa; Shimizu, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) family Malvaceae is an important crop used in food, cosmetics and pharmaceutics industries. Roselle is cultivated mainly in Upper Egypt (Qena and Aswan governorates) producing 94% of total production. Root rot disease of roselle is one of the most important diseases that attack both seedlings and adult plants causing serious losses in crop productivity and quality. The main objective of the present study is to identify and characterize pathogens associated with root rot and wilt symptoms of roselle in Qena, Upper Egypt and evaluate their pathogenicity under greenhouse and field condition. Fusarium oxysporum, Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium solani, Fusarium equiseti and Fusarium semitectum were isolated from the natural root rot diseases in roselle. All isolated fungi were morphologically characterized and varied in their pathogenic potentialities. They could attack roselle plants causing damping-off and root rot/wilt diseases in different pathogenicity tests. The highest pathogenicity was caused by F. oxysporum and M. phaseolina followed by F. solani. The least pathogenic fungi were F. equiseti followed by F. semitectum. It obviously noted that Baladi roselle cultivar was more susceptible to infection with all tested fungi than Sobhia 17 under greenhouse and field conditions. This is the first report of fungal pathogens causing root rot and vascular wilt in roselle in Upper Egypt. PMID:24808737

  20. Occurrence of Root Rot and Vascular Wilt Diseases in Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) in Upper Egypt.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Naglaa; Shimizu, Masafumi; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro

    2014-03-01

    Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) family Malvaceae is an important crop used in food, cosmetics and pharmaceutics industries. Roselle is cultivated mainly in Upper Egypt (Qena and Aswan governorates) producing 94% of total production. Root rot disease of roselle is one of the most important diseases that attack both seedlings and adult plants causing serious losses in crop productivity and quality. The main objective of the present study is to identify and characterize pathogens associated with root rot and wilt symptoms of roselle in Qena, Upper Egypt and evaluate their pathogenicity under greenhouse and field condition. Fusarium oxysporum, Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium solani, Fusarium equiseti and Fusarium semitectum were isolated from the natural root rot diseases in roselle. All isolated fungi were morphologically characterized and varied in their pathogenic potentialities. They could attack roselle plants causing damping-off and root rot/wilt diseases in different pathogenicity tests. The highest pathogenicity was caused by F. oxysporum and M. phaseolina followed by F. solani. The least pathogenic fungi were F. equiseti followed by F. semitectum. It obviously noted that Baladi roselle cultivar was more susceptible to infection with all tested fungi than Sobhia 17 under greenhouse and field conditions. This is the first report of fungal pathogens causing root rot and vascular wilt in roselle in Upper Egypt. PMID:24808737

  1. Comparative Proteome Analysis of the Tuberous Roots of Six Cassava (Manihot esculenta) Varieties Reveals Proteins Related to Phenotypic Traits.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Gabriela Justamante Händel; de Magalhães Andrade, Jonathan; Valle, Teresa Losada; Labate, Carlos Alberto; do Nascimento, João Roberto Oliveira

    2016-04-27

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is a staple food and an important source of starch, and the attributes of its tuberous root largely depend on the variety. The proteome of cassava has been investigated; however, to date, no study has focused on varieties that reveal the molecular basis of phenotypical characteristics. Therefore, we aimed to compare the proteome of the tuberous roots of six cassava varieties that differed in carbohydrates, carotenoids, and resistance to diseases, among other attributes. Two-dimensional gels showed 146 differential spots between the varieties, and the functional roles of some differential proteins were correlated to phenotypic characteristics of the varieties, such as the amount of carbohydrates or carotenoids and the resistance to biotic or abiotic stresses. The results obtained here highlight elements that might help to direct the improvement of new cultivars of cassava, which is an economically and socially relevant crop worldwide. PMID:26982619

  2. Provitamin A accumulation in cassava (Manihot esculenta) roots driven by a single nucleotide polymorphism in a phytoene synthase gene.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Ralf; Arango, Jacobo; Bär, Cornelia; Salazar, Bertha; Al-Babili, Salim; Beltrán, Jesús; Chavarriaga, Paul; Ceballos, Hernan; Tohme, Joe; Beyer, Peter

    2010-10-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta) is an important staple crop, especially in the arid tropics. Because roots of commercial cassava cultivars contain a limited amount of provitamin A carotenoids, both conventional breeding and genetic modification are being applied to increase their production and accumulation to fight vitamin A deficiency disorders. We show here that an allelic polymorphism in one of the two expressed phytoene synthase (PSY) genes is capable of enhancing the flux of carbon through carotenogenesis, thus leading to the accumulation of colored provitamin A carotenoids in storage roots. A single nucleotide polymorphism present only in yellow-rooted cultivars cosegregates with colored roots in a breeding pedigree. The resulting amino acid exchange in a highly conserved region of PSY provides increased catalytic activity in vitro and is able to increase carotenoid production in recombinant yeast and Escherichia coli cells. Consequently, cassava plants overexpressing a PSY transgene produce yellow-fleshed, high-carotenoid roots. This newly characterized PSY allele provides means to improve cassava provitamin A content in cassava roots through both breeding and genetic modification. PMID:20889914

  3. Retention during processing and bioaccessibility of β-carotene in high β-carotene transgenic cassava root.

    PubMed

    Failla, Mark L; Chitchumroonchokchai, Chureeporn; Siritunga, Dimuth; De Moura, Fabiana F; Fregene, Martin; Manary, Mark J; Sayre, Richard T

    2012-04-18

    Cassava is a root crop that serves as a primary caloric source for many African communities despite its low content of β-carotene (βC). Carotenoid content of roots from wild type (WT) and three transgenic lines with high βC were compared after cooking and preparation of nonfermented and fermented flours according to traditional African methods. The various methods of processing all decreased βC content per gram dry weight regardless of genotype. The greatest loss of βC occurred during preparation of gari (dry fermentation followed by roasting) from WT and transgenic lines. The quantities of βC in cooked transgenic cassava root that partitioned into mixed micelles during in vitro digestion and transported into Caco-2 cells were significantly greater than those for identically processed WT root. These results suggest that transgenic high βC cassava will provide individuals with greater quantities of bioaccessible βC. PMID:22458891

  4. FIELD AND GREENHOUSE EVALUATION OF BEAN GERMPLASM FOR ROOT ROT AND OTHER DISEASES IN NEW YORK, 2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root rot is a significant production constraint in beans worldwide in both temperate and tropical soils leading to complete crop loss under severe conditions. Two trials were conducted on common bean lines under root rot conditions in the field at the Cornell’s Vegetable Research Farm near Geneva, N...

  5. Effect of cultural practices and fungicide treatments on the severity of Phytophthora root rot of blueberries grown in Mississippi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effect of cultural practices and fungicide treatments on the severity of Phytophthora root rot of blueberries grown in Mississippi Melinda Miller-Butler and Barbara J. Smith ABSTRACT. Phytophthora root rot is an important disease of blueberries especially when grown in areas with poor drainage. Re...

  6. Assessment of organic seed treatments in a pea disease nursery to manage seed and root rot on peas, 2008.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty-one organic seed treatments consisting of biological, non-biological and a combination of each were evaluated in a pea root rot field nursery in Prosser, WA for their potential to manage seed and root rot pathogens of processed peas. Non-treated seed and a commercial seed treatment (Capta...

  7. Root Rot of Balloon Flower (Platycodon grandiflorum) Caused by Fusarium solani and Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Chi Sung; Kim, Gyoung Hee; Son, Kyeong In; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Jeon, Kwon-Seok; Yoon, Jun-Hyuck; Koh, Young Jin

    2013-12-01

    Balloon flower (Platycodon grandiflorum) is a kind of mountain herbs whose roots have restorative properties and the cultivating acreage of balloon flower has been steadily increasing in Korea. More frequent rain and high amount of rainfalls as a result of climate changes predisposed balloon flower to the outbreaks of root rot at high-density cultivation area in recent years. Root crowns were usually discolored into brown to blackish brown at first and the infected plants showed slight wilting symptom at early infection stage. Severely infected roots were entirely rotted and whole plants eventually died at late infection stage. The overall disease severities of root rot of balloon flower were quite variable according to the surveyed fields in Jeonnam, Gyeongnam and Jeju Provinces, which ranged from 0.1% to 40%. The root rot occurred more severely at the paddy or clay soils than the sandy soils and their severities were much higher at lowland than upland in the same localty. The disease increased with aging of the balloon flower. The causal fungi were identified as Fusarium solani and F. oxysporum on the basis of their mycological characteristics. The optimum temperature ranges of their mycelial growths was found to be 24°C. The pathogenic characters of F. solani and F. oxysporum treated by artificial wounding inoculation on healthy roots of balloon flower revealed that F. solani was more virulent than F. oxysporum. This study identified the causal agents of root rot of balloon flower as Fusarium solani and F. oxysporum, probably for the first time. PMID:25288973

  8. Sugar-mediated semidian oscillation of gene expression in the cassava storage root regulates starch synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, Christer; Baguma, Yona; Sun, Chuanxin; Boren, Mats; Olsson, Helena; Rosenqvist, Sara; Mutisya, Joel; Rubaihayo, Patrick R.; Jansson, Christer

    2008-01-15

    Starch branching enzyme (SBE) activity in the cassava storage root exhibited a diurnal fluctuation, dictated by a transcriptional oscillation of the corresponding SBE genes. The peak of SBE activity coincided with the onset of sucrose accumulation in the storage, and we conclude that the oscillatory mechanism keeps the starch synthetic apparatus in the storage root sink in tune with the flux of sucrose from the photosynthetic source. When storage roots were uncoupled from the source, SBE expression could be effectively induced by exogenous sucrose. Turanose, a sucrose isomer that cannot be metabolized by plants, mimicked the effect of sucrose, demonstrating that downstream metabolism of sucrose was not necessary for signal transmission. Also glucose and glucose-1-P induced SBE expression. Interestingly, induction by sucrose, turanose and glucose but not glucose-1-P sustained an overt semidian (12-h) oscillation in SBE expression and was sensitive to the hexokinase (HXK) inhibitor glucosamine. These results suggest a pivotal regulatory role for HXK during starch synthesis. Abscisic acid (ABA) was another potent inducer of SBE expression. Induction by ABA was similar to that of glucose-1-P in that it bypassed the semidian oscillator. Both the sugar and ABA signaling cascades were disrupted by okadaic acid, a protein phosphatase inhibitor. Based on these findings, we propose a model for sugar signaling in regulation of starch synthesis in the cassava storage root.

  9. Quantitative trait locus responsible for resistance to Aphanomyces root rot (black root) caused by Aphanomyces cochlioides Drechs. in sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Kazunori; Ogata, Naoki; Kubo, Tomohiko; Kawasaki, Shinji; Mikami, Tetsuo

    2009-01-01

    Aphanomyces root rot, caused by Aphanomyces cochlioides Drechs., is one of the most serious diseases of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.). Identification and characterization of resistance genes is a major task in sugar beet breeding. To ensure the effectiveness of marker-assisted screening for Aphanomyces root rot resistance, genetic analysis of mature plants' phenotypic and molecular markers' segregation was carried out. At a highly infested field site, some 187 F(2) and 66 F(3) individuals, derived from a cross between lines 'NK-310mm-O' (highly resistant) and 'NK-184mm-O' (susceptible), were tested, over two seasons, for their level of resistance to Aphanomyces root rot. This resistance was classified into six categories according to the extent and intensity of whole plant symptoms. Simultaneously, two selected RAPD and 159 'NK-310mm-O'-coupled AFLP were used in the construction of a linkage map of 695.7 cM. Each of nine resultant linkage groups was successfully anchored to one of nine sugar beet chromosomes by incorporating 16 STS markers. Combining data for phenotype and molecular marker segregation, a single QTL was identified on chromosome III. This QTL explained 20% of the variance in F(2) population (in the year 2002) and 65% in F(3) lines (2003), indicating that this QTL plays a major role in the Aphanomyces root rot resistance. This is the first report of the genetic mapping of resistance to Aphanomyces-caused diseases in sugar beet. PMID:18813904

  10. The cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) root proteome: protein identification and differential expression.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, Jeanne; Taylor, Nigel; Fauquet, Claude; Chen, Sixue

    2006-03-01

    Using high-resolution 2-DE, we resolved proteins extracted from fibrous and tuberous root tissues of 3-month-old cassava plants. Gel image analysis revealed an average of 1467 electrophoretically resolved spots on the fibrous gels and 1595 spots on the tuberous gels in pH 3-10 range. Protein spots from both sets of gels were digested with trypsin. The digests were subjected to nanoelectrospray quadrupole TOF tandem mass analysis. Currently, we have obtained 299 protein identifications for 292 gel spots corresponding to 237 proteins. The proteins span various functional categories from energy, primary and secondary metabolism, disease and defense, destination and storage, transport, signal transduction, protein synthesis, cell structure, and transcription to cell growth and division. Gel image analysis has shown unique, as well as up- and down-regulated proteins, present in the tuberous and the fibrous tissues. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of the cassava root proteome is an important step towards further characterization of differentially expressed proteins and the elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the development and biological functions of the two types of roots. PMID:16421938

  11. Evaluation of pea accessions and commercial cultivars for Fusarium Root Rot resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium root rot caused by Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi (Fsp) can result in major yield losses in pea (Pisum sativum L.). Currently no fungicides effectively manage this disease. Previous studies evaluated the Pisum germplasm collection for resistance to Fsp, however, evaluations of commercial marke...

  12. Rhizosphere ecology and phytoprotection in soils naturally suppressive to Thielaviopsis black root rot of tobacco.

    PubMed

    Almario, Juliana; Muller, Daniel; Défago, Geneviève; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan

    2014-07-01

    Soil suppressiveness to disease is an intriguing emerging property in agroecosystems, with important implications because it enables significant protection of susceptible plants from soil-borne pathogens. Unlike many soils where disease suppressiveness requires crop monoculture to establish, certain soils are naturally suppressive to disease, and this type of specific disease suppressiveness is maintained despite crop rotation. Soils naturally suppressive to Thielaviopsis basicola-mediated black root rot of tobacco and other crops occur in Morens region (Switzerland) and have been studied for over 30 years. In Morens, vermiculite-rich suppressive soils formed on morainic deposits while illite-rich conducive soils developed on sandstone, but suppressiveness is of microbial origin. Antagonistic pseudomonads play a role in black root rot suppressiveness, including Pseudomonas protegens (formerly P. fluorescens) CHA0, a major model strain for research. However, other types of rhizobacterial taxa may differ in prevalence between suppressive and conducive soils, suggesting that the microbial basis of black root rot suppressiveness could be far more complex than solely a Pseudomonas property. This first review on black root rot suppressive soils covers early findings on these soils, the significance of recent results, and compares them with other types of suppressive soils in terms of rhizosphere ecology and plant protection mechanisms. PMID:24650207

  13. Change detection of cotton root rot infection over a 10-year interval using airborne multispectral imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton root rot is a very serious and destructive disease of cotton grown in the southwestern and south central United States. Accurate information regarding the spatial and temporal infections of the disease within fields is important for effective management and control of the disease. The objecti...

  14. Rhizoctonia root rot resistance of Beta PIs from the USDA-ARS NPGS, 2007.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty-two plant introductions (PI) from the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS) (including garden beet, sugar beet, leaf beet, fodder beet, and wild beet) were evaluated for resistance to Rhizoctonia root rot. The trial was a randomized complete-block design with five replications in ...

  15. Temperature, Moisture, and Fungicide Effects in Managing Rhizoctonia Root and Crown Rot of Sugar Beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia solani AG-2-2 is the causal agent of Rhizoctonia root and crown rot in sugar beet. To assess the capacity at which other anastomosis groups (AGs) are able to infect sugar beet, 15 AGs and subgroups were tested for pathogenicity on resistant (FC708 CMS) and susceptible (Monohikari) seedl...

  16. Monitoring cotton root rot progression within and across growing seasons using remote sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton root rot, caused by the soilborne fungus Phymatotrichopsis omnivore Shear (Duggar), is one of the most destructive plant diseases occurring throughout the southwestern U.S. More recently, a fungicide, flutriafol, has been evaluated in Texas and was found to have the potential for controlling ...

  17. Identification of resistance to Rhizoctonia root rot in mutant and wild barley (Hordeum vulgare subsp. spontaneum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Direct seeding cereal crops into non-tilled fields is a practice that is gaining importance in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. Unfortunately, Rhizoctonia root rot and bare-patch caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG-8 limits the yield of direct-seeded cereals in this region. No resistan...

  18. Ground-based technologies for cotton root rot control: an update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The overall goal of this research is to develop ground-based technologies for early detection and site-specific management of CRR (cotton root rot). Early detection could facilitate a more economical solution than those that might be used after plant infection had become more severe and widespread. ...

  19. Mycoleptodiscus Crown and Root Rot on Alfalfa in Minnesota and Wisconsin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoleptodiscus crown and root rot, caused by Mycoleptodiscus terrestris, was identified causing severe disease in seven commercial production fields in southeastern Minnesota and southwestern Wisconsin during the summer of 2009. Both newly seeded fields and established fields were affected. In the ...

  20. Evaluating spectral measures derived from airborne multispectral imagery for detecting cotton root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton root rot, caused by the soilborne fungus Phymatotrichopsis omnivore, is one of the most destructive plant diseases occurring throughout the southwestern United States. This disease has plagued the cotton industry for more than 100 years, but effective practices for its control are still lacki...

  1. Evaluating unsupervised and supervised image classification methods for mapping cotton root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton root rot, caused by the soilborne fungus Phymatotrichopsis omnivora, is one of the most destructive plant diseases occurring throughout the southwestern United States. This disease has plagued the cotton industry for over a century, but effective practices for its control are still lacking. R...

  2. Remote sensing for assessing cotton defoliation, regrowth control and root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton defoliation and post-harvest destruction are important cultural practices for cotton production. Cotton root rot is a serious and destructive disease that affects cotton yield and lint quality. This paper presents exemplary applications of remote sensing technology for evaluating cotton def...

  3. Impact of rolling and phosphorous acid on root rot of dry peas in the Pacific Northwest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rolling soil after planting is standard in dry pea production areas in the Pacific Northwest but can increase compaction resulting in increase of root rot by oomycetes and other pathogens. Phosphorous acid has been used to manage oomycete pathogens, therefore, the impact of not rolling soil after s...

  4. Sugar Beet Resistance to Rhizoctonia Root and Crown Rot: Where does it fit in?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.), Rhizoctonia root- or crown-rot is caused by Rhizoctonia solani (AG-2-2). Seedling damping-off in sugar beet is caused by R. solani of both anastomosis groups, AG-2-2 and AG-4. Rhizoctonia solani subgroup AG-2-2 IV had been considered to be the primary cause of Rhi...

  5. Rhizoctonia crown and root rot resistance evaluation of Beta PIs in Fort Collins, CO, 2015

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty beet accessions of either cultivated beet or sea beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris or Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima (L.) Arcang) from the Beta collection of the USDA-Agricultural Research Service National Plant Germplasm System were screened for resistance to Rhizoctonia crown and root rot ...

  6. Controlled release fungicide, soil amendments and biofumigation effects on cotton root rot suppression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cotton root rot pathogen (Phymatotrichopsis ominora) causes major losses in cotton produced in the Southwest. Granular controlled release formulations (CRF) of the fungicide, Propiconazole, developed to be soil applied at planting were studied at 1.0 and 3.0 lb a.i./ac. applications and with tw...

  7. Using mosaicked airborne imagery to assess cotton root rot infection on a regional basis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton root rot is a serious and destructive disease in many of the cotton production areas in Texas. Since 2012, many cotton growers in Texas have used the Topguard fungicide to control this disease in their fields under Section 18 emergency exemptions. Airborne images have been used to monitor the...

  8. Efficacy of management tools for control of Pythium root rot of Douglas-fir seedlings, 2013

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted as part of the IR-4 Ornamental Horticulture program to evaluate fungicides and biopesticides for management of root, crown and stem rots of ornamental plants caused by Pythium species. Pythium species used in this study were P. vipa (isolate 09), P. dissotocum (isolate 41-08...

  9. Site-specific relationships between cotton root rot and soil properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton Root Rot (CRR), caused by Phymatotrichopsis ominvora, is a problem across the southwestern United States and northern Mexico, commonly killing plants in infected portions of fields and greatly reducing overall yields. Over several decades a few studies have attempted to determine how soil pro...

  10. Mycoleptodiscus Crown and Root Rot of Alfalfa: An Emerging Problem in Minnesota and Wisconsin?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoleptodiscus crown and root rot was observed on alfalfa plants from southeastern MN and southwestern WI during the summer of 2009. The disease was observed in new plantings and established stands. Although the disease has been known since the 1950's, it has not caused severe problems in alfalfa p...

  11. Combining fuzzy set theory and nonlinear stretching enhancement for unsupervised classification of cotton root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton root rot is a destructive disease affecting cotton production. Accurate identification of infected areas within fields is useful for cost-effective control of the disease. The uncertainties caused by various infection stages and newly infected plants make it difficult to achieve accurate clas...

  12. Creating prescription maps from historical imagery for site-specific management of cotton root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton root rot, caused by the soilborne fungus Phymatotrichopsis omnivore, is a severe plant disease that has affected cotton production for over a century. Recent research found that a commercial fungicide, Topguard (flutriafol), was able to control this disease. As a result, Topguard Terra Fungic...

  13. Assessment of organic seed treatments to manage seed and root rot on peas, 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five biological and seventeen non-biological seed treatment, were evaluated in a commercial organic field (silt loam soil) in Moses Lake, WA to manage seed and root rot of processed peas. The soil from the field site had a mean of 456 colonies of Pythium per gram of soil. Emergence o...

  14. Ground-based technologies for cotton root rot control: Results from a three-year experiment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The overall goal of this research is to develop ground-based technologies for disease detection and mapping which can maximize the effectiveness and efficiency of CRR (cotton root rot) treatments. Accurately mapping CRR could facilitate a much more economical solution than treating entire fields. Th...

  15. Rhizoctonia crown and root rot resistance evaluation of Beta PIs in Fort Collins, CO, 2014

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty-six sugar beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris) germplasm from the USDA-Agricultural Research Service pre-breeding program at Fort Collins, Colorado were screened for resistance to Rhizoctonia crown and root rot (RCRR) at the Colorado State University ARDEC facility in Fort Collins, CO. There...

  16. Development of Phytophthora root rot-resistant avocado rootstocks for the Caribbean.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophtora root rot (PRR), caused by Phytopthora cinnamoni Rands, poses the greatest limitation to avocado production worldwide. Through a collaborative effort between researchers at the USDA-ARS facility in Miami and the University of Florida in Homestead, PRR-resistant avocado rootstocks are bein...

  17. The Genetic Basis of Fusarium Root Rot Tolerance in the Afghanistan Pea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genetic basis of tolerance to Fusarium root rot found in many landraces grown in the region that includes Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nepal and northwestern India was examined in a recombinant inbred population derived from a cross between a tolerant accession. Three loci appear to be primarily resp...

  18. Screening of pea genotypes for resistance to root rot caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG 8, 2012.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia solani AG 8 is one of the major pathogens that causes pea root rot and stunting in the Columbia Basin of Oregon and Washington. The disease is most severe in fields where wheat has been mono-cropped for a number of years or where cereal cover crops are incorporated just before pea seedin...

  19. Managing peach tree short life and Armillaria root rot in peach orchards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peach tree short life (PTSL) and Armillaria root rot (ARR) are the two most important causes of premature mortality of commercial peach trees in the southeastern US. These two problems separately or together are also significant problems in many other stone fruit production areas throughout the wor...

  20. Rhizoctonia Crown and Root Rot Resistance of Beta PI's from the USDA-ARS NPGS, 2009.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta vulgaris plant introductions (PI) were screened for Rhizoctonia root and crown rot, at the USDA-ARS Fort Collins, CO Research Farm. Inoculum of R. solani isolate R-9 (AG-2-2), colonized to dry barley and course ground, was applied to the crown of plants at a rate of 4.8 g/m. Beets were lifted...

  1. Plant growth promotion may compensate for losses due to moderate Aphanomyces root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A two-year study was conducted to investigate the use of chemically-induced resistance and biocontrol bacteria for reducing sugar beet root rot disease caused by the oomycete organism Aphanomyces cochlioides. Stand establishment, yield, and quality analysis of sugarbeets from replicated field plots...

  2. Influence of sugarbeet tillage Systems on the rhizoctonia-bacterial root rot complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Rhizoctonia-bacterial root rot complex in sugarbeet caused by Rhizoctonia solani and Leuconostoc mesenteroides can cause significant yield losses. To investigate the impact of different tillage systems on this complex, field studies were conducted from 2009 to 2011. Split blocks with conventio...

  3. Biological Implications in Cassava for the Production of Amylose-Free Starch: Impact on Root Yield and Related Traits

    PubMed Central

    Karlström, Amanda; Calle, Fernando; Salazar, Sandra; Morante, Nelson; Dufour, Dominique; Ceballos, Hernán

    2016-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta, Crantz) is an important food security crop, but it is becoming an important raw material for different industrial applications. Cassava is the second most important source of starch worldwide. Novel starch properties are of interest to the starch industry, and one them is the recently identified amylose-free (waxy) cassava starch. Waxy mutants have been found in different crops and have been often associated with a yield penalty. There are ongoing efforts to develop commercial cassava varieties with amylose-free starch. However, little information is available regarding the biological and agronomic implications of starch mutations in cassava, nor in other root and tuber crops. In this study, siblings from eight full-sib families, segregating for the waxy trait, were used to determine if the mutation has implications for yield, dry matter content (DMC) and harvest index in cassava. A total of 87 waxy and 87 wild-type starch genotypes from the eight families were used in the study. The only significant effect of starch type was on DMC (p < 0.01), with waxy clones having a 0.8% lower content than their wild type counterparts. There was no effect of starch type on fresh root yield (FRY), adjusted FRY and harvest index. It is not clear if lower DMC is a pleiotropic effect of the waxy starch mutation or else the result of linked genes introgressed along with the mutation. It is expected that commercial waxy cassava varieties will have competitive FRYs but special efforts will be required to attain adequate DMCs. This study contributes to the limited knowledge available of the impact of starch mutations on the agronomic performance of root and tuber crops. PMID:27242813

  4. Biological Implications in Cassava for the Production of Amylose-Free Starch: Impact on Root Yield and Related Traits.

    PubMed

    Karlström, Amanda; Calle, Fernando; Salazar, Sandra; Morante, Nelson; Dufour, Dominique; Ceballos, Hernán

    2016-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta, Crantz) is an important food security crop, but it is becoming an important raw material for different industrial applications. Cassava is the second most important source of starch worldwide. Novel starch properties are of interest to the starch industry, and one them is the recently identified amylose-free (waxy) cassava starch. Waxy mutants have been found in different crops and have been often associated with a yield penalty. There are ongoing efforts to develop commercial cassava varieties with amylose-free starch. However, little information is available regarding the biological and agronomic implications of starch mutations in cassava, nor in other root and tuber crops. In this study, siblings from eight full-sib families, segregating for the waxy trait, were used to determine if the mutation has implications for yield, dry matter content (DMC) and harvest index in cassava. A total of 87 waxy and 87 wild-type starch genotypes from the eight families were used in the study. The only significant effect of starch type was on DMC (p < 0.01), with waxy clones having a 0.8% lower content than their wild type counterparts. There was no effect of starch type on fresh root yield (FRY), adjusted FRY and harvest index. It is not clear if lower DMC is a pleiotropic effect of the waxy starch mutation or else the result of linked genes introgressed along with the mutation. It is expected that commercial waxy cassava varieties will have competitive FRYs but special efforts will be required to attain adequate DMCs. This study contributes to the limited knowledge available of the impact of starch mutations on the agronomic performance of root and tuber crops. PMID:27242813

  5. Factors Influencing Development of Root Rot on Ginseng Caused by Cylindrocarpon destructans.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mahfuzur; Punja, Zamir K

    2005-12-01

    ABSTRACT The fungus Cylindrocarpon destructans (Zins) Scholten is the cause of root rot (disappearing root rot) in many ginseng production areas in Canada. A total of 80 isolates of C. destructans were recovered from diseased roots in a survey of ginseng gardens in British Columbia from 2002-2004. Among these isolates, 49% were classified as highly virulent (causing lesions on unwounded mature roots) and 51% were weakly virulent (causing lesions only on previously wounded roots). Pectinase and polyphenoloxidase enzymes were produced in vitro by C. destructans isolates when they were grown on pectin and phenol as a substrate, respectively. However, highly virulent isolates produced significantly (P < 0.001) higher enzyme levels compared with weakly virulent isolates. Histopathological studies of ginseng roots inoculated with a highly virulent isolate revealed direct hyphal penetration through the epidermis, followed by intracellular hyphal growth in the cortex. Subsequent cell disintegration and accumulation of phenolic compounds was observed. Radial growth of highly and weakly virulent isolates on potato dextrose agar was highest at 18 and 21 degrees C, respectively and there was no growth at 35 degrees C. Mycelial mass production was significantly (P roots were grown hydroponically in Hoagland's solution. Lesions were significantly larger (P < 0.001) at pH 5.0 compared with pH 7.0 and wounding enhanced disease by a highly virulent isolate at both pHs. In artificially infested soil, 2-year-old ginseng roots were most susceptible to Cylindrocarpon root rot among all root ages tested (1 to 4 years) when evaluated using a combined scale of disease incidence and severity. Root rot severity was significantly (P < 0.002) enhanced by increasing the inoculum density from 3.45 x 10(2) CFU/g of soil to 1.86 x 10(3) CFU/g of soil. Disease

  6. Leuconostoc spp. Associated with Root Rot in Sugar Beet and Their Interaction with Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Strausbaugh, Carl A

    2016-05-01

    Rhizoctonia root and crown rot is an important disease problem in sugar beet caused by Rhizoctonia solani and also shown to be associated with Leuconostoc spp. Initial Leuconostoc studies were conducted with only a few isolates and the relationship of Leuconostoc with R. solani is poorly understood; therefore, a more thorough investigation was conducted. In total, 203 Leuconostoc isolates were collected from recently harvested sugar beet roots in southern Idaho and southeastern Oregon during 2010 and 2012: 88 and 85% Leuconostoc mesenteroides, 6 and 15% L. pseudomesenteroides, 2 and 0% L. kimchi, and 4 and 0% unrecognized Leuconostoc spp., respectively. Based on 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing, haplotype 11 (L. mesenteroides isolates) comprised 68 to 70% of the isolates in both years. In pathogenicity field studies with commercial sugar beet 'B-7', all Leuconostoc isolates caused more rot (P < 0.0001; α = 0.05) when combined with R. solani than when inoculated alone in both years. Also, 46 of the 52 combination treatments over the 2 years had significantly more rot (P < 0.0001; α = 0.05) than the fungal check. The data support the conclusion that a synergistic interaction leads to more rot when both Leuconostoc spp. and R. solani are present in sugar beet roots. PMID:26735061

  7. Studies on variation of carotenoid-proteins content in Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) storage root reveal implications for breeding and the use of induced mutations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein content in storage roots of cassava is low but variable and characterization of this variability is lacking. Total buffer extractable proteins (TBEP) content in pigmented cassava landraces varied from 0.9-7.5 (mg/gDWt.) and correlated with total carotenoid content (R2=0.4757). More than 3x T...

  8. Cassava (Manihot esculenta Krantz) genome harbors KNOX genes differentially expressed during storage root development.

    PubMed

    Guo, D; Li, H L; Tang, X; Peng, S Q

    2014-01-01

    In plants, homeodomain proteins play a critical role in regulating various aspects of plant growth and development. KNOX proteins are members of the homeodomain protein family. The KNOX transcription factors have been reported from Arabidopsis, rice, and other higher plants. The recent publication of the draft genome sequence of cassava (Manihot esculenta Krantz) has allowed a genome-wide search for M. esculenta KNOX (MeKNOX) transcription factors and the comparison of these positively identified proteins with their homologs in model plants. In the present study, we identified 12 MeKNOX genes in the cassava genome and grouped them into two distinct subfamilies based on their domain composition and phylogenetic analysis. Furthermore, semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to elucidate the expression profiles of these genes in different tissues and during various stages of root development. The analysis of MeKNOX expression profiles of indicated that 12 MeKNOX genes display differential expressions either in their transcript abundance or expression patterns. PMID:25526192

  9. Recombinant inbred line differential identifies race-specific resistance to phytophthora root rot in Capsicum annuum.

    PubMed

    Sy, O; Steiner, R; Bosland, P W

    2008-08-01

    A differential series is the normal method for identification of races within a plant pathogen and a host interaction. A host differential is extremely useful for phytopathological as well as breeding purposes. A set of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) were developed and characterized for race differentiation of Phytophthora root rot caused by Phytophthora capsici. The highly resistant Capsicum annuum accession Criollo de Morelos-334 was hybridized to a susceptible cultivar, Early Jalapeno, to generate the RIL population. The host differential characterized 17 isolates of P. capsici into 13 races. The establishment of a stable host differential for the P. capsici and C. annuum interaction will assist researchers in understanding the complex inheritance of resistance to Phytophthora root rot and to develop resistant cultivars. PMID:18943204

  10. Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae endophytically colonize cassava roots following soil drench inoculation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungal entomopathogens Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae were investigated to determine if endophytic colonization could be achieved in cassava. An inoculation method based on drenching the soil around cassava stems using conidial suspensions resulted in endophytic colonization of ca...

  11. Proteomics Profiling Reveals Carbohydrate Metabolic Enzymes and 14-3-3 Proteins Play Important Roles for Starch Accumulation during Cassava Root Tuberization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuchu; Chang, Lili; Tong, Zheng; Wang, Dongyang; Yin, Qi; Wang, Dan; Jin, Xiang; Yang, Qian; Wang, Liming; Sun, Yong; Huang, Qixing; Guo, Anping; Peng, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cassava is one of the most important root crops as a reliable source of food and carbohydrates. Carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation in cassava storage root is a cascade process that includes large amounts of proteins and cofactors. Here, comparative proteomics were conducted in cassava root at nine developmental stages. A total of 154 identified proteins were found to be differentially expressed during starch accumulation and root tuberization. Many enzymes involved in starch and sucrose metabolism were significantly up-regulated, and functional classification of the differentially expressed proteins demonstrated that the majority were binding-related enzymes. Many proteins were took part in carbohydrate metabolism to produce energy. Among them, three 14-3-3 isoforms were induced to be clearly phosphorylated during storage root enlargement. Overexpression of a cassava 14-3-3 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana confirmed that the older leaves of these transgenic plants contained higher sugar and starch contents than the wild-type leaves. The 14-3-3 proteins and their binding enzymes may play important roles in carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation during cassava root tuberization. These results not only deepened our understanding of the tuberous root proteome, but also uncovered new insights into carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation during cassava root enlargement. PMID:26791570

  12. Proteomics Profiling Reveals Carbohydrate Metabolic Enzymes and 14-3-3 Proteins Play Important Roles for Starch Accumulation during Cassava Root Tuberization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuchu; Chang, Lili; Tong, Zheng; Wang, Dongyang; Yin, Qi; Wang, Dan; Jin, Xiang; Yang, Qian; Wang, Liming; Sun, Yong; Huang, Qixing; Guo, Anping; Peng, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cassava is one of the most important root crops as a reliable source of food and carbohydrates. Carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation in cassava storage root is a cascade process that includes large amounts of proteins and cofactors. Here, comparative proteomics were conducted in cassava root at nine developmental stages. A total of 154 identified proteins were found to be differentially expressed during starch accumulation and root tuberization. Many enzymes involved in starch and sucrose metabolism were significantly up-regulated, and functional classification of the differentially expressed proteins demonstrated that the majority were binding-related enzymes. Many proteins were took part in carbohydrate metabolism to produce energy. Among them, three 14-3-3 isoforms were induced to be clearly phosphorylated during storage root enlargement. Overexpression of a cassava 14-3-3 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana confirmed that the older leaves of these transgenic plants contained higher sugar and starch contents than the wild-type leaves. The 14-3-3 proteins and their binding enzymes may play important roles in carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation during cassava root tuberization. These results not only deepened our understanding of the tuberous root proteome, but also uncovered new insights into carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation during cassava root enlargement. PMID:26791570

  13. Antagonistic Bacillus species as a biological control of ginseng root rot caused by Fusarium cf. incarnatum

    PubMed Central

    Song, Minjae; Yun, Hye Young; Kim, Young Ho

    2013-01-01

    Background This study aimed to develop a biocontrol system for ginseng root rot caused by Fusarium cf. incarnatum. Methods In total, 392 bacteria isolated from ginseng roots and various soils were screened for their antifungal activity against the fungal pathogen, and a bacterial isolate (B2-5) was selected as a promising candidate for the biocontrol because of the strong antagonistic activity of the bacterial cell suspension and culture filtrate against pathogen. Results The bacterial isolate B2-5 displayed an enhanced inhibitory activity against the pathogen mycelial growth with a temperature increase to 25°C, produced no pectinase (related to root rotting) and no critical rot symptoms at low [106 colony-forming units (CFU)/mL] and high (108 CFU/mL) inoculum concentrations. In pot experiments, pretreatment with the bacterial isolate in the presumed optimal time for disease control reduced disease severity significantly with a higher control efficacy at an inoculum concentration of 106 CFU/mL than at 108 CFU/mL. The establishment and colonization ability of the bacterial isolates on the ginseng rhizosphere appeared to be higher when both the bacterial isolate and the pathogen were coinoculated than when the bacterial isolate was inoculated alone, suggesting its target-oriented biocontrol activity against the pathogen. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the pathogen hyphae were twisted and shriveled by the bacterial treatment, which may be a symptom of direct damage by antifungal substances. Conclusion All of these results suggest that the bacterial isolate has good potential as a microbial agent for the biocontrol of the ginseng root rot caused by F. cf. incarnatum. PMID:24748838

  14. Enhanced reactive oxygen species scavenging by overproduction of superoxide dismutase and catalase delays postharvest physiological deterioration of cassava storage roots.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Duan, Xiaoguang; Yang, Jun; Beeching, John R; Zhang, Peng

    2013-03-01

    Postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) of cassava (Manihot esculenta) storage roots is the result of a rapid oxidative burst, which leads to discoloration of the vascular tissues due to the oxidation of phenolic compounds. In this study, coexpression of the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging enzymes copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (MeCu/ZnSOD) and catalase (MeCAT1) in transgenic cassava was used to explore the intrinsic relationship between ROS scavenging and PPD occurrence. Transgenic cassava plants integrated with the expression cassette p54::MeCu/ZnSOD-35S::MeCAT1 were confirmed by Southern-blot analysis. The expression of MeCu/ZnSOD and MeCAT1 was verified by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzymatic activity analysis both in the leaves and storage roots. Under exposure to the ROS-generating reagent methyl viologen or to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), the transgenic plants showed higher enzymatic activities of SOD and CAT than the wild-type plants. Levels of malondialdehyde, chlorophyll degradation, lipid peroxidation, and H2O2 accumulation were dramatically reduced in the transgenic lines compared with the wild type. After harvest, the storage roots of transgenic cassava lines show a delay in their PPD response of at least 10 d, accompanied by less mitochondrial oxidation and H2O2 accumulation, compared with those of the wild type. We hypothesize that this is due to the combined ectopic expression of Cu/ZnSOD and CAT leading to an improved synergistic ROS-scavenging capacity of the roots. Our study not only sheds light on the mechanism of the PPD process but also develops an effective approach for delaying the occurrence of PPD in cassava. PMID:23344905

  15. Control of Root Rot and Wilt Diseases of Roselle under Field Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Naglaa; Elsharkawy, Mohsen Mohamed; Shimizu, Masafumi; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro

    2014-12-01

    Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) is one of the most important medicinal crops in many parts of the world. In this study, the effects of microelements, antioxidants, and bioagents on Fusarium oxysporum, F. solani, and Macrophomina phaseolina, the causal pathogens of root rot and wilt diseases in roselle, were examined under field conditions. Preliminary studies were carried out in vitro in order to select the most effective members to be used in field control trials. Our results showed that microelements (copper and manganese), antioxidants (salicylic acid, ascorbic acid, and EDTA), a fungicide (Dithane M45) and biological control agents (Trichoderma harzianum and Bacillus subtilis) were significantly reduced the linear growth of the causal pathogens. Additionally, application of the previous microelements, antioxidants, a fungicide and biological control agents significantly reduced disease incidence of root rot and wilt diseases under field conditions. Copper, salicylic acid, and T. harzianum showed the best results in this respect. In conclusion, microelements, antioxidants, and biocontrol agents could be used as alternative strategies to fungicides for controlling root rot and wilt diseases in roselle. PMID:25606010

  16. The Genetic Structure of Phellinus noxius and Dissemination Pattern of Brown Root Rot Disease in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chia-Lin; Huang, Shun-Yuan; Huang, Yu-Ching; Tzean, Shean-Shong; Ann, Pao-Jen; Tsai, Jyh-Nong; Yang, Chin-Cheng; Lee, Hsin-Han; Huang, Tzu-Wei; Huang, Hsin-Yu; Chang, Tun-Tschu; Lee, Hui-Lin; Liou, Ruey-Fen

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1990s, brown root rot caused by Phellinus noxius (Corner) Cunningham has become a major tree disease in Taiwan. This fungal pathogen can infect more than 200 hardwood and softwood tree species, causing gradual to fast decline of the trees. For effective control, we must determine how the pathogen is disseminated and how the new infection center of brown root rot is established. We performed Illumina sequencing and de novo assembly of a single basidiospore isolate Daxi42 and obtained a draft genome of ~40 Mb. By comparing the 12,217 simple sequence repeat (SSR) regions in Daxi42 with the low-coverage Illumina sequencing data for four additional P. noxius isolates, we identified 154 SSR regions with potential polymorphisms. A set of 13 polymorphic SSR markers were then developed and used to analyze 329 P. noxius isolates collected from 73 tree species from urban/agricultural areas in 14 cities/counties all around Taiwan from 1989 to 2012. The results revealed a high proportion (~98%) of distinct multilocus genotypes (MLGs) and that none of the 329 isolates were genome-wide homozygous, which supports a possible predominant outcrossing reproductive mode in P. noxius. The diverse MLGs exist as discrete patches, so brown root rot was most likely caused by multiple clones rather than a single predominant strain. The isolates collected from diseased trees near each other tend to have similar genotype(s), which indicates that P. noxius may spread to adjacent trees via root-to-root contact. Analyses based on Bayesian clustering, FST statistics, analysis of molecular variance, and isolation by distance all suggest a low degree of population differentiation and little to no barrier to gene flow throughout the P. noxius population in Taiwan. We discuss the involvement of basidiospore dispersal in disease dissemination. PMID:26485142

  17. The Genetic Structure of Phellinus noxius and Dissemination Pattern of Brown Root Rot Disease in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chia-Lin; Huang, Shun-Yuan; Huang, Yu-Ching; Tzean, Shean-Shong; Ann, Pao-Jen; Tsai, Jyh-Nong; Yang, Chin-Cheng; Lee, Hsin-Han; Huang, Tzu-Wei; Huang, Hsin-Yu; Chang, Tun-Tschu; Lee, Hui-Lin; Liou, Ruey-Fen

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1990s, brown root rot caused by Phellinus noxius (Corner) Cunningham has become a major tree disease in Taiwan. This fungal pathogen can infect more than 200 hardwood and softwood tree species, causing gradual to fast decline of the trees. For effective control, we must determine how the pathogen is disseminated and how the new infection center of brown root rot is established. We performed Illumina sequencing and de novo assembly of a single basidiospore isolate Daxi42 and obtained a draft genome of ~40 Mb. By comparing the 12,217 simple sequence repeat (SSR) regions in Daxi42 with the low-coverage Illumina sequencing data for four additional P. noxius isolates, we identified 154 SSR regions with potential polymorphisms. A set of 13 polymorphic SSR markers were then developed and used to analyze 329 P. noxius isolates collected from 73 tree species from urban/agricultural areas in 14 cities/counties all around Taiwan from 1989 to 2012. The results revealed a high proportion (~98%) of distinct multilocus genotypes (MLGs) and that none of the 329 isolates were genome-wide homozygous, which supports a possible predominant outcrossing reproductive mode in P. noxius. The diverse MLGs exist as discrete patches, so brown root rot was most likely caused by multiple clones rather than a single predominant strain. The isolates collected from diseased trees near each other tend to have similar genotype(s), which indicates that P. noxius may spread to adjacent trees via root-to-root contact. Analyses based on Bayesian clustering, FST statistics, analysis of molecular variance, and isolation by distance all suggest a low degree of population differentiation and little to no barrier to gene flow throughout the P. noxius population in Taiwan. We discuss the involvement of basidiospore dispersal in disease dissemination. PMID:26485142

  18. Putative storage root specific promoters from cassava and yam: cloning and evaluation in transgenic carrots as a model system.

    PubMed

    Arango, Jacobo; Salazar, Bertha; Welsch, Ralf; Sarmiento, Felipe; Beyer, Peter; Al-Babili, Salim

    2010-06-01

    A prerequisite for biotechnological improvements of storage roots is the availability of tissue-specific promoters enabling high expression of transgenes. In this work, we cloned two genomic fragments, pMe1 and pDJ3S, controlling the expression of a gene with unknown function from cassava (Manihot esculenta) and of the storage protein dioscorin 3 small subunit gene from yam (Dioscorea japonica), respectively. Using beta-glucuronidase as a reporter, the activities of pMe1 and pDJ3S were evaluated in independent transgenic carrot lines and compared to the constitutive CaMV35S and the previously described cassava p15 promoters. Activities of pMe1 and pDJ3S in storage roots were assessed using quantitative GUS assays that showed pDJ3S as the most active one. To determine organ specificities, uidA transcript levels in leaves, stems and roots were measured by real-time RT-PCR analyses showing highest storage root specificity for pDJ3S. Root cross sections revealed that pMe1 was highly active in secondary xylem. In contrast, pDJ3S was active in all root tissues except for the central xylem. The expression patterns caused by the cassava p15 promoter in carrot storage roots were consistent with its previously described activities for the original storage organ. Our data demonstrate that the pDJ3S and, to a lesser extent, the pMe1 regulatory sequences represent feasible candidates to drive high and preferential expression of genes in carrot storage roots. PMID:20369359

  19. Differential effects on the cyanogenic glycoside content of fermenting cassava root pulp by beta-glucosidase and microbial activities.

    PubMed

    Maduagwu, E N

    1983-03-01

    The degradation of cyanogenic glycosides was studied in spontaneously fermenting cassava root pulp and in fresh pulp samples pretreated to prevent either endogenous beta-glycosidase activity, fermentation, or both. The rate of disappearance of the glycosides, as measured by hydrocyanic acid (HCN) production in situ, in membrane-sterilised media or in samples containing 1% sodium iodoacetate, was comparable with the untreated control in which 85% of the substrate was broken down within 72 h. Pretreatment of the fresh pulp with the beta-glucosidase inhibitor 1,5-gluconolactone (1%) markedly reduced the rate of disappearance of the cyanogens while inclusion of glucose in this test medium at the 3% level appeared to induce some hydrolysis. Loss of bound (glycosidic) cyanide in sterilised medium containing the glucosidase inhibitor was negligible. The results suggest that the contribution of the fermentation process in cyanide detoxification of pulped cassava roots is minimal. PMID:6404010

  20. Dose-dependent RNAi-mediated geminivirus resistance in the tropical root crop cassava.

    PubMed

    Vanderschuren, Hervé; Alder, Adrian; Zhang, Peng; Gruissem, Wilhelm

    2009-06-01

    Cassava mosaic disease is a major constraint for cassava production in Africa, resulting in significant economic losses. We have engineered transgenic cassava with resistance to African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV), by expressing ACMV AC1-homologous hairpin double-strand RNAs. Transgenic cassava lines with high levels of AC1-homologous small RNAs have ACMV immunity with increasing viral load and different inoculation methods. We report a correlation between the expression of the AC1-homologous small RNAs and the ACMV resistance of the transgenic cassava lines. Characterization of the small RNAs revealed that only some of the hairpin-derived small RNAs fall into currently known small interfering RNA classes in plants. The method is scalable to stacking by targeting multiple virus isolates with additional hairpins. PMID:19300911

  1. Screening a dry bean Andean diversity panel for potential sources of resistance to Rhizoctonia root rot and damping-off

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia root rot and damping-off, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, are among the most economically important root and hypocotyl diseases in the world and affect a wide range of hosts including the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). To identify potential sources of resistance, screening material was ...

  2. Screening of a dry bean Andean diversity panel for potential sources of resistance to Rhizoctonia crown and root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia crown and root rot (RCRR), caused by Rhizoctonia solani, is a major problem in most sugar beet production areas and can cause substantial losses in both yield and quality. Over the last decade, it has become the most prevalent root disease of sugar beet in Michigan and several other regi...

  3. In vitro Cultured Primary Roots Derived from Stem Segments of Cassava (Manihot esculenta) Can Behave Like Storage Organs

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Ricardo D.; Faloci, Mirta M.; Gonzalez, Ana M.; Mroginski, Luis A.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Cassava (Manihot esculenta) has three adventitious root types: primary and secondary fibrous roots, and storage roots. Different adventitious root types can also regenerate from in vitro cultured segments. The aim of this study was to investigate aspects of in vitro production of storage roots. Methods Morphological and anatomical analyses were performed to identify and differentiate each root type. Twenty-nine clones were assayed to determine the effect of genotype on the capacity to form storage roots in vitro. The effects of cytokinins and auxins on the formation of storage roots in vitro were also examined. Key Results Primary roots formed in vitro and in vivo had similar tissue kinds; however, storage roots formed in vitro exhibited physiological specialization for storing starch. The only consistent diagnostic feature between secondary fibrous and storage roots was their functional differentiation. Anatomical analysis of the storage roots formed in vitro showed that radial expansion as a consequence of massive proliferation and enlargement of parenchymatous cells occurred in the middle cortex, but not from cambial activity as in roots formed in vivo. Cortical expansion could be related to dilatation growth favoured by hormone treatments. Starch deposition of storage roots formed in vitro was confined to cortical tissue and occurred earlier than in storage roots formed in vivo. Auxin and cytokinin supplementation were absolutely required for in vitro storage root regeneration; these roots were not able to develop secondary growth, but formed a tissue competent for starch storing. MS medium with 5 % sucrose plus 0·54 μm 1-naphthaleneacetic acid and 0·44 μm 6-benzylaminopurine was one of the most effective in stimulating the storage root formation. Genotypes differed significantly in their capacity to produce storage roots in vitro. Storage root formation was considerably affected by the segment's primary position and strongly

  4. Glucanolytic Actinomycetes Antagonistic to Phytophthora fragariae var. rubi, the Causal Agent of Raspberry Root Rot

    PubMed Central

    Valois, D.; Fayad, K.; Barasubiye, T.; Garon, M.; Dery, C.; Brzezinski, R.; Beaulieu, C.

    1996-01-01

    A collection of about 200 actinomycete strains was screened for the ability to grow on fragmented Phytophthora mycelium and to produce metabolites that inhibit Phytophthora growth. Thirteen strains were selected, and all produced (beta)-1,3-, (beta)-1,4-, and (beta)-1,6-glucanases. These enzymes could hydrolyze glucans from Phytophthora cell walls and cause lysis of Phytophthora cells. These enzymes also degraded other glucan substrates, such as cellulose, laminarin, pustulan, and yeast cell walls. Eleven strains significantly reduced the root rot index when inoculated on raspberry plantlets. PMID:16535313

  5. Phenolic constituents of Celosia cristata L. susceptible to spinach root rot pathogen Aphanomyces cochlioides.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yaolin; Islam, Md Tofazzal; Tahara, Satoshi

    2006-10-01

    Cochliophilin A (5-hydroxy-6,7-methylenedioxyflavone, 1), known as a host-specific attractant towards the zoospores of Aphanomyces cochlioides, a cause of root rot and damping-off diseases of Chenopodiaceae, was found in the Amaranthaceae plant, Celosia cristata, that is susceptible to the pathogen. The content of 1 in Celosia seedlings was quantified as 1.4 microg/g fresh weight. A new isoflavone, cristatein (5-hydroxy-6-hydroxymethyl-7,2'-dimethoxyisoflavone, 2), and five known flavonoids were also identified. PMID:17031042

  6. Genetic parameters and prediction of genotypic values for root quality traits in cassava using REML/BLUP.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, E J; Santana, F A; Oliveira, L A; Santos, V S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the genetic parameters and predict the genotypic values of root quality traits in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) using restricted maximum likelihood (REML) and best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP). A total of 471 cassava accessions were evaluated over two years of cultivation. The evaluated traits included amylose content (AML), root dry matter (DMC), cyanogenic compounds (CyC), and starch yield (StYi). Estimates of the individual broad-sense heritability of AML were low (hg(2) = 0.07 ± 0.02), medium for StYi and DMC, and high for CyC. The heritability of AML was substantially improved based on mean of accessions (hm(2) = 0.28), indicating that some strategies such as increasing the number of repetitions can be used to increase the selective efficiency. In general, the observed genotypic values were very close to the predicted average of the improved population, most likely due to the high accuracy (>0.90), especially for DMC, CyC, and StYi. Gains via selection of the 30 best genotypes for each trait were 4.8 and 3.2% for an increase and decrease for AML, respectively, an increase of 10.75 and 74.62% for DMC for StYi, respectively, and a decrease of 89.60% for CyC in relation to the overall mean of the genotypic values. Genotypic correlations between the quality traits of the cassava roots collected were generally favorable, although they were low in magnitude. The REML/BLUP method was adequate for estimating genetic parameters and predicting the genotypic values, making it useful for cassava breeding. PMID:25177949

  7. Provitamin A Accumulation in Cassava (Manihot esculenta) Roots Driven by a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in a Phytoene Synthase Gene[W

    PubMed Central

    Welsch, Ralf; Arango, Jacobo; Bär, Cornelia; Salazar, Bertha; Al-Babili, Salim; Beltrán, Jesús; Chavarriaga, Paul; Ceballos, Hernan; Tohme, Joe; Beyer, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta) is an important staple crop, especially in the arid tropics. Because roots of commercial cassava cultivars contain a limited amount of provitamin A carotenoids, both conventional breeding and genetic modification are being applied to increase their production and accumulation to fight vitamin A deficiency disorders. We show here that an allelic polymorphism in one of the two expressed phytoene synthase (PSY) genes is capable of enhancing the flux of carbon through carotenogenesis, thus leading to the accumulation of colored provitamin A carotenoids in storage roots. A single nucleotide polymorphism present only in yellow-rooted cultivars cosegregates with colored roots in a breeding pedigree. The resulting amino acid exchange in a highly conserved region of PSY provides increased catalytic activity in vitro and is able to increase carotenoid production in recombinant yeast and Escherichia coli cells. Consequently, cassava plants overexpressing a PSY transgene produce yellow-fleshed, high-carotenoid roots. This newly characterized PSY allele provides means to improve cassava provitamin A content in cassava roots through both breeding and genetic modification. PMID:20889914

  8. Integrated options for the management of black root rot of strawberry caused by Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn.

    PubMed

    Asad-Uz-Zaman, Md; Bhuiyan, Mohammad Rejwan; Khan, Mohammad Ashik Iqbal; Alam Bhuiyan, Md Khurshed; Latif, Mohammad Abdul

    2015-02-01

    An investigation was made to manage strawberry black root rot caused by Rhizoctonia solani (R. solani) through the integration of Trichoderma harzianum (T. harzianum) isolate STA7, mustard oil cake and Provax 200. A series of preliminary experiments were conducted to select a virulent isolate of R. solani, an effective isolate of T. harzianum, a suitable organic amendment, and a suitable fungicide before setting the experiment for integration. The pathogenicity of the selected four isolates of R. solani was evaluated against strawberry and isolate SR1 was selected as the test pathogen due to its highest virulent (95.47% mortality) characteristics. Among the 20 isolates of T. harzianum, isolate STA7 showed maximum inhibition (71.97%) against the test pathogen (R. solani). Among the fungicides, Provax-200 was found to be more effective at lowest concentration (100 ppm) and highly compatible with Trichoderma isolates STA7. In the case of organic amendments, maximum inhibition (59.66%) of R. solani was obtained through mustard oil cake at the highest concentration (3%), which was significantly superior to other amendments. Minimum percentages of diseased roots were obtained with pathogen (R. solani)+Trichoderma+mustard oil cake+Provax-200 treatment, while the highest was observed with healthy seedlings with a pathogen-inoculated soil. In the case of leaf and fruit rot diseases, significantly lowest infected leaves as well as fruit rot were observed with a pathogen+Trichoderma+mustard oil cake+Provax-200 treatment in comparison with the control. A similar trend of high effectiveness was observed by the integration of Trichoderma, fungicide and organic amendments in controlling root rot and fruit diseases of strawberry. Single application of Trichoderma isolate STA7, Provax 200 or mustard oil cake did not show satisfactory performance in terms of disease-free plants, but when they were applied in combination, the number of healthy plants increased significantly. The

  9. The role of ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase, and polysaccharides in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) roots under postharvest physiological deterioration.

    PubMed

    Uarrota, Virgílio Gavicho; Moresco, Rodolfo; Schmidt, Eder Carlos; Bouzon, Zenilda Laurita; Nunes, Eduardo da Costa; Neubert, Enilto de Oliveira; Peruch, Luiz Augusto Martins; Rocha, Miguel; Maraschin, Marcelo

    2016-04-15

    This study aimed to investigate the role of ascorbate peroxidase (APX), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), polysaccharides, and protein contents associated with the early events of postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) in cassava roots. Increases in APX and GPX activity, as well as total protein contents occurred from 3 to 5 days of storage and were correlated with the delay of PPD. Cassava samples stained with Periodic Acid-Schiff (PAS) highlighted the presence of starch and cellulose. Degradation of starch granules during PPD was also detected. Slight metachromatic reaction with toluidine blue is indicative of increasing of acidic polysaccharides and may play an important role in PPD delay. Principal component analysis (PCA) classified samples according to their levels of enzymatic activity based on the decision tree model which showed GPX and total protein amounts to be correlated with PPD. The Oriental (ORI) cultivar was more susceptible to PPD. PMID:26617011

  10. Efficacy of Chaetomium Species as Biological Control Agents against Phytophthora nicotianae Root Rot in Citrus

    PubMed Central

    Wattanachai, Pongnak; Kasem, Soytong; Poeaim, Supattra

    2015-01-01

    Thailand is one of the largest citrus producers in Southeast Asia. Pathogenic infection by Phytophthora, however, has become one of major impediments to production. This study identified a pathogenic oomycete isolated from rotted roots of pomelo (Citrus maxima) in Thailand as Phytophthora nicotianae by the internal transcribed spacer ribosomal DNA sequence analysis. Then, we examined the in vitro and in vivo effects of Chaetomium globosum, Chaetomium lucknowense, Chaetomium cupreum and their crude extracts as biological control agents in controlling this P. nicotianae strain. Represent as antagonists in biculture test, the tested Chaetomium species inhibited mycelial growth by 50~56% and parasitized the hyphae, resulting in degradation of P. nicotianae mycelia after 30 days. The crude extracts of these Chaetomium species exhibited antifungal activities against mycelial growth of P. nicotianae, with effective doses of 2.6~101.4 µg/mL. Under greenhouse conditions, application of spores and methanol extracts of these Chaetomium species to pomelo seedlings inoculated with P. nicotianae reduced root rot by 66~71% and increased plant weight by 72~85% compared to that in the control. The method of application of antagonistic spores to control the disease was simple and economical, and it may thus be applicable for large-scale, highly effective biological control of this pathogen. PMID:26539045

  11. Determination of aflatoxin in processed dried cassava root: validation of a new analytical method for cassava flour.

    PubMed

    Gnonlonfin, G J Benoit; Katerere, David R; Adjovi, Yann; Brimer, Leon; Shephard, Gordon S; Sanni, Ambaliou

    2010-01-01

    A new method that uses HPLC with a photochemical reactor for enhanced detection was developed and validated for the determination of aflatoxins in cassava flour. Samples were spiked with a mixture of four aflatoxins at 5, 10, and 20 microg/kg mixed with either 1 or 5 g NaCI and extracted with methanol-water (80 + 20, v/v) by shaking for 10 or 30 min. An immunoaffinity column was used for cleanup. HPLC with postcolumn derivatization, for enhancement of aflatoxin fluorescence, and fluorescence determination were used for quantitation of the toxin concentration. The method was validated for recovery, linearity, and precision at the three concentrations tested. Recovery ranges were 52-70, 69-85, and 80-89% for the spiking levels of 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 microg/kg, respectively. It appears that the amount of salt (NaCl) and the shaking time are critical factors in this method; optimal performance was obtained when 1 g salt was used and the shaking time was 10 min. The good linearity and precision of the method allowed baseline separation from interferences, e.g., coumarins. PMID:21313816

  12. Using airborne multispectral imagery to monitor cotton root rot progression in fungicide-treated and non-treated cotton fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton root rot has affected cotton production in the southwestern and south central U.S for over 100 years. A fungicide, flutriafol, has shown considerable promise for controlling this disease in field studies in the last few years. With the temporary authorization for use of the fungicide to contr...

  13. Isolates of Rhizoctonia solani can produce both web blight and root rot symptoms in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia solani Kühn (Rs) is an important pathogen in the tropics, causing web blight (WB), and a widespread soil-borne root rot (RR) pathogen of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) worldwide. This pathogen is a species complex classified into 14 anastomosis groups (AG). Some AGs have been report...

  14. Using airborne imagery to monitor cotton root rot progression in fungicide-treated and untreated cotton fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton root rot is a serious and destructive disease that has affected cotton production in the southwestern and south central U.S for over a century. Recent field studies have shown that Topguard fungicide has considerable promise for controlling this disease. With the authorization (Section 18 exe...

  15. The effect of temperature on Rhizoctonia disease development and fungicide efficacy in controlling Rhizoctonia root rot on sugarbeet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia solani AG 2-2 is the causal agent of Rhizoctonia root and crown rot in sugarbeet. This disease has recently been increasing in occurrence and severity in sugarbeet production areas in the Red River Valley of Minnesota and North Dakota. Since the intraspecific groups AG 2-2 IIIB and AG 2-...

  16. Screening Rhizoctonia crown and root rot resistance of Beta PIs from the USDA-ARS, National Plant Germplasm System, 2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima (L.) Arcang and Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris L.) plant introduction (PI) accessions from the Beta collection of the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System were screened for resistance to Rhizoctonia root and crown rot, at the USDA-ARS Fort Collins, CO Re...

  17. Evaluation of Beta PIs from the USDA-ARS, NPGS for Rhizoctonia crown and root rot resistance, 2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty sea beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima (L.) Arcang) and beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris L.) plant introduction (PI) accessions from the Beta collection of the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System were screened for resistance to Rhizoctonia root and crown rot, at the USDA-ARS Fort Col...

  18. Influence of glyphosate on Rhizoctonia crown and root rot (Rhizoctonia solani) in glyphosate-resistant sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous greenhouse studies with a non-commercial glyphosate-resistant sugarbeet variety indicated that susceptibility to Rhizoctonia crown and root rot could increase after glyphosate was applied. Greenhouse and field experiments were conducted in 2008 and 2009 to determine if glyphosate influenced...

  19. USDA-ARS germplasm evaluated for resistance to Rhizoctonia crown and root rot in Fort Collins, CO, 2014

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty-six sugar beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris) germplasm from the USDA-Agricultural Research Service pre-breeding program at Fort Collins, Colorado were screened for resistance to Rhizoctonia crown and root rot (RCRR) at the Colorado State University ARDEC facility in Fort Collins, CO. There...

  20. The Interaction between Root-knot Nematode (Meloidogyne arenaria) and Cylindrocladium Black Rot (CBR) in Runner Peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cylindrocladium black rot (CBR), caused by Cylindrocladium parasiticum, and root-knot nematode, caused by Meloidogyne arenaria, are important soilborne diseases on peanut. Greenhouse and microplot experiments were conducted with the runner peanut genotypes C724-19-15 (resistant to M. arenaria), Geor...

  1. Biological control of Rhizoctonia root rot on bean by phenazine- and cyclic lipopeptide-producing Pseudomonas CMR12a

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas CMR12a was previously selected as an efficient biocontrol strain producing phenazines and cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs). In this study, biocontrol capacity of Pseudomonas CMR12a against Rhizoctonia root rot of bean and the involvement of phenazines and CLPs in this ability were tested. Two ...

  2. Effects of Cultural Practices and Chemical Treatments on Phytophthora Root Rot Severity of Blueberries Grown in Southern Mississippi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora root rot, caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands, is an important disease of highbush, southern highbush and rabbiteye blueberry. Southern highbush cultivars are being grown in the southeastern U.S. for their early fruit production and reduced chilling requirement; however, as the acre...

  3. Sugar beet breeding lines evaluated for resistance to Rhizoctonia crown and root rot in Fort Collins, CO, 2015

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty-nine beet sugar beet breeding lines (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris) from the USDA-Agricultural Research Service breeding program at Fort Collins, CO, were screened for resistance to Rhizoctonia crown and root rot (Rcrr) at the Colorado State University ARDEC facility in Fort Collins, CO. The...

  4. The prevalence of different strains of Rhizoctonia solani associated with Rhizoctonia crown and root rot symptoms in Ontario sugarbeet fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia crown and root rot (RCRR) [Rhizoctonia solani Kühn] is an important disease of sugarbeets in southwestern Ontario, Canada. A survey of commercial sugarbeet fields was completed in 2010 and 2011 to determine the range of R. solani anastomosis groups (AGs) and inter-specific groups (ISGs) ...

  5. Natural suppression of Rhizoctonia root rot by soil microbial communities in wheat from a Rhizoctonia decline site.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia root rot, caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG-8, limits yield in direct-seeded wheat, which develops distinct patches of stunted plants. At a cropping systems study near Ritzville, WA with continuously cropped wheat, bare patch reached a peak after 5 years of direct-seeding and then declined...

  6. Development of a DNA Microarray-Based Assay for the Detection of Sugar Beet Root Rot Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Liebe, Sebastian; Christ, Daniela S; Ehricht, Ralf; Varrelmann, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Sugar beet root rot diseases that occur during the cropping season or in storage are accompanied by high yield losses and a severe reduction of processing quality. The vast diversity of microorganism species involved in rot development requires molecular tools allowing simultaneous identification of many different targets. Therefore, a new microarray technology (ArrayTube) was applied in this study to improve diagnosis of sugar beet root rot diseases. Based on three marker genes (internal transcribed spacer, translation elongation factor 1 alpha, and 16S ribosomal DNA), 42 well-performing probes enabled the identification of prevalent field pathogens (e.g., Aphanomyces cochlioides), storage pathogens (e.g., Botrytis cinerea), and ubiquitous spoilage fungi (e.g., Penicillium expansum). All probes were proven for specificity with pure cultures from 73 microorganism species as well as for in planta detection of their target species using inoculated sugar beet tissue. Microarray-based identification of root rot pathogens in diseased field beets was successfully confirmed by classical detection methods. The high discriminatory potential was proven by Fusarium species differentiation based on a single nucleotide polymorphism. The results demonstrate that the ArrayTube constitute an innovative tool allowing a rapid and reliable detection of plant pathogens particularly when multiple microorganism species are present. PMID:26524545

  7. A DNA based method to detect the grapevine root-rotting fungus Roesleria subterranea in soil and root samples

    PubMed Central

    Neuhauser, Sigrid; Huber, Lars; Kirchmair, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Summary Roesleria subterranea causes root rot in grapevine and fruit trees. The fungus has long been underestimated as a weak parasite, but during the last years it has been reported to cause severe damages in German vineyards. Direct, observation-based detection of the parasite is time consuming and destructive, as large parts of the rootstocks have to be uprooted and screened for the tiny, stipitate, hypogeous ascomata of R. subterranea. To facilitate rapid detection in vineyards, protocols to extract DNA from soil samples and grapevine roots, and R.-subterranea-specific PCR primers were designed. Twelve DNA–extraction protocols for soil samples were tested in small-scale experiments, and selected parameters were optimised. A protocol based on ball-mill homogenization, DNA extraction with SDS, skim milk, chloroform, and isopropanol, and subsequent purification of the raw extracts with PVPP-spin-columns was most effective. This DNA extraction protocol was found to be suitable for a wide range of soil-types including clay, loam and humic-rich soils. For DNA extraction from grapevine roots a CTAB-based protocol was more reliable for various grapevine rootstock varieties. Roesleria-subterranea-specific primers for the ITS1–5.8S–ITS2 rDNA-region were developed and tested for their specificity to DNA extracts from eleven R. subterranea strains isolated from grapevine and fruit trees. No cross reactions were detected with DNA extracts from 44 different species of fungi isolated from vineyard soils. The sensitivity of the species-specific primers in combination with the DNA extraction method for soil was high: as little as 100 fg μl−1 R.-subterranea-DNA was sufficient for a detection in soil samples and plant material. Given that specific primers are available, the presented method will also allow quick and large-scale testing for other root pathogens. PMID:21442023

  8. Metabolomics combined with chemometric tools (PCA, HCA, PLS-DA and SVM) for screening cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) roots during postharvest physiological deterioration.

    PubMed

    Uarrota, Virgílio Gavicho; Moresco, Rodolfo; Coelho, Bianca; Nunes, Eduardo da Costa; Peruch, Luiz Augusto Martins; Neubert, Enilto de Oliveira; Rocha, Miguel; Maraschin, Marcelo

    2014-10-15

    Cassava roots are an important source of dietary and industrial carbohydrates and suffer markedly from postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD). This paper deals with metabolomics combined with chemometric tools for screening the chemical and enzymatic composition in several genotypes of cassava roots during PPD. Metabolome analyses showed increases in carotenoids, flavonoids, anthocyanins, phenolics, reactive scavenging species, and enzymes (superoxide dismutase family, hydrogen peroxide, and catalase) until 3-5days postharvest. PPD correlated negatively with phenolics and carotenoids and positively with anthocyanins and flavonoids. Chemometric tools such as principal component analysis, partial least squares discriminant analysis, and support vector machines discriminated well cassava samples and enabled a good prediction of samples. Hierarchical clustering analyses grouped samples according to their levels of PPD and chemical compositions. PMID:24837923

  9. Characterization of carotenoid-protein complexes and gene expression analysis associated with carotenoid sequestration in pigmented cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) storage root

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carotenoid-protein complex separation by size exclusion chromatography, protein fractionation by SDS-PAGE, and shotgun PROTEOMICS technology were used to identify and characterize carotenoid associated proteins (CAPs) of chromoplast-enriched suspensions from cassava intense yellow storage root. A no...

  10. Reaction of selected soybean cultivars to Rhizoctonia root rot and other damping-off disease agents.

    PubMed

    Amer, M A

    2005-01-01

    Eight soybean cultivars; Giza 21. Giza 22, Giza 35, Giza 82, Giza 83, Crawford, Holladay and Toamo were evaluated to Rhizoctonia root rot using agar plate and potted plant techniques. Data cleared that, in agar plate assay all soybean cultivars were moderately susceptible (MS), although the differences between them were significant (P=0.05). Generally, in potted assay, the reactions were resistant (R) or moderately resistant (MR) to root rots. Also, the differences between cultivars were significant (P=0.05). These cultivars were inoculated under greenhouse conditions with Fusarium solani, Macrophomina phaseolina, Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotium rolfsii Generally, G21 had the least pre-emergence damping-off followed by Giza 35, Crawford and Giza 83 with averages of 19.0, 20.0, 20.5 and 21.5%, respectively. In case of post-emergence, Giza 35 had the least values, followed by Giza 21, Crawford and Giza 82 with averages 3.95, 4.10, 4.10 and 4.25%, respectively. Under naturally infested soil in the field conditions the reactions of the same cultivars to damping-off were evaluated in two successive seasons. In 2002 season, G35 had the least pre-emergence damping-off % followed by Giza 21 and Giza 22 with averages of 22.61, 24.33 and 29.33%, respectively. Also, G35 had the least post-emergence damping-off % followed by Toamo and Giza 21 with averages of 9.40, 10.33 and 10.41%, respectively. In 2003 season, the same trend was appeared with light grade where Giza 35 had the least pre-emergence damping of % followed by Giza 22 and Giza 21 with averages of 30.67, 31.00 and 36.67%, respectively and Giza 35 was the most resistant cultivar against post-emergence damping-off, followed by Giza 21 and Giza 22 with averages of 10.91, 11.32 and 11.80%, respectively. Generally, Giza 21 significantly surpassed the other cultivars in plant height, number of pods per plant and 100-seed weight. Moreover, also it had second grade with the other traits. PMID:16637203

  11. Release of SR98 Sugarbeet Germplasm with High Levels of Resistance to Rhizoctonia Damping-Off, Crown and Root Rot, and Fusarium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SR98 (PI 655951) is a sugarbeet germplasm with smooth, low soil tare root and high levels of resistance to damping-off and crown and root rot caused by Rhizoctonia solani (AG2-2). Previous smooth–root releases have been highly susceptible to diseases caused by R. solani, and the SR98 has incorporate...

  12. Wide variation in virulence and genetic diversity of binucleate Rhizoctonia isolates associated with root rot of strawberry in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiangling; Finnegan, Patrick M; Barbetti, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    Strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa) is one of the most important berry crops in the world. Root rot of strawberry caused by Rhizoctonia spp. is a serious threat to commercial strawberry production worldwide. However, there is no information on the genetic diversity and phylogenetic status of Rhizoctonia spp. associated with root rot of strawberry in Australia. To address this, a total of 96 Rhizoctonia spp. isolates recovered from diseased strawberry plants in Western Australia were characterized for their nuclear condition, virulence, genetic diversity and phylogenetic status. All the isolates were found to be binucleate Rhizoctonia (BNR). Sixty-five of the 96 BNR isolates were pathogenic on strawberry, but with wide variation in virulence, with 25 isolates having high virulence. Sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacers of the ribosomal DNA separated the 65 pathogenic BNR isolates into six distinct clades. The sequence analysis also separated reference BNR isolates from strawberry or other crops across the world into clades that correspond to their respective anastomosis group (AG). Some of the pathogenic BNR isolates from this study were embedded in the clades for AG-A, AG-K and AG-I, while other isolates formed clades that were sister to the clades specific for AG-G, AG-B, AG-I and AG-C. There was no significant association between genetic diversity and virulence of these BNR isolates. This study demonstrates that pathogenic BNR isolates associated with root rot of strawberry in Western Australia have wide genetic diversity, and highlights new genetic groups not previously found to be associated with root rot of strawberry in the world (e.g., AG-B) or in Australia (e.g., AG-G). The wide variation in virulence and genetic diversity identified in this study will be of high value for strawberry breeding programs in selecting, developing and deploying new cultivars with resistance to these multi-genetic groups of BNR. PMID:23405226

  13. Wide Variation in Virulence and Genetic Diversity of Binucleate Rhizoctonia Isolates Associated with Root Rot of Strawberry in Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xiangling; Finnegan, Patrick M.; Barbetti, Martin J.

    2013-01-01

    Strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa) is one of the most important berry crops in the world. Root rot of strawberry caused by Rhizoctonia spp. is a serious threat to commercial strawberry production worldwide. However, there is no information on the genetic diversity and phylogenetic status of Rhizoctonia spp. associated with root rot of strawberry in Australia. To address this, a total of 96 Rhizoctonia spp. isolates recovered from diseased strawberry plants in Western Australia were characterized for their nuclear condition, virulence, genetic diversity and phylogenetic status. All the isolates were found to be binucleate Rhizoctonia (BNR). Sixty-five of the 96 BNR isolates were pathogenic on strawberry, but with wide variation in virulence, with 25 isolates having high virulence. Sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacers of the ribosomal DNA separated the 65 pathogenic BNR isolates into six distinct clades. The sequence analysis also separated reference BNR isolates from strawberry or other crops across the world into clades that correspond to their respective anastomosis group (AG). Some of the pathogenic BNR isolates from this study were embedded in the clades for AG-A, AG-K and AG-I, while other isolates formed clades that were sister to the clades specific for AG-G, AG-B, AG-I and AG-C. There was no significant association between genetic diversity and virulence of these BNR isolates. This study demonstrates that pathogenic BNR isolates associated with root rot of strawberry in Western Australia have wide genetic diversity, and highlights new genetic groups not previously found to be associated with root rot of strawberry in the world (e.g., AG-B) or in Australia (e.g., AG-G). The wide variation in virulence and genetic diversity identified in this study will be of high value for strawberry breeding programs in selecting, developing and deploying new cultivars with resistance to these multi-genetic groups of BNR. PMID:23405226

  14. Cyanogenesis in Cassava1

    PubMed Central

    White, Wanda L.B.; Arias-Garzon, Diana I.; McMahon, Jennifer M.; Sayre, Richard T.

    1998-01-01

    In the cyanogenic crop cassava (Manihot esculenta, Crantz), the final step in cyanide production is the conversion of acetone cyanohydrin, the deglycosylation product of linamarin, to cyanide plus acetone. This process occurs spontaneously at pH greater than 5.0 or enzymatically and is catalyzed by hydroxynitrile lyase (HNL). Recently, it has been demonstrated that acetone cyanohydrin is present in poorly processed cassava root food products. Since it has generally been assumed that HNL is present in all cassava tissues, we reinvestigated the enzymatic properties and tissue-specific distribution of HNL in cassava. We report the development of a rapid two-step purification protocol for cassava HNL, which yields an enzyme that is catalytically more efficient than previously reported (Hughes, J., Carvalho, F., and Hughes, M. [1994] Arch Biochem Biophys 311: 496–502). Analyses of the distribution of HNL activity and protein indicate that the accumulation of acetone cyanohydrin in roots is due to the absence of HNL, not to inhibition of the enzyme. Furthermore, the absence of HNL in roots and stems is associated with very low steady-state HNL transcript levels. It is proposed that the lack of HNL in cassava roots accounts for the high acetone cyanohydrin levels in poorly processed cassava food products. PMID:9536038

  15. Potential of Epicoccum purpurascens Strain 5615 AUMC as a Biocontrol Agent of Pythium irregulare Root Rot in Three Leguminous Plants

    PubMed Central

    Koutb, Mostafa

    2010-01-01

    Epicoccum purpurascens stain 5615 AUMC was investigated for its biocontrol activity against root rot disease caused by Pythium irregulare. E. purpurascens greenhouse pathogenicity tests using three leguminous plants indicated that the fungus was nonpathogenic under the test conditions. The germination rate of the three species of legume seeds treated with a E. purpurascens homogenate increased significantly compared with the seeds infested with P. irregulare. No root rot symptoms were observed on seeds treated with E. purpurascens, and seedlings appeared more vigorous when compared with the non-treated control. A significant increase in seedling growth parameters (seedling length and fresh and dry weights) was observed in seedlings treated with E. purpurascens compared to pathogen-treated seedlings. Pre-treating the seeds with the bioagent fungus was more efficient for protecting seeds against the root rot disease caused by P. irregulare than waiting for disease dispersal before intervention. To determine whether E. purpurascens produced known anti-fungal compounds, an acetone extract of the fungus was analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. The extract revealed a high percentage of the cinnamic acid derivative (trimethylsiloxy) cinnamic acid methyl ester. The E. purpurascens isolate grew more rapidly than the P. irregulare pathogen in a dual culture on potato dextrose agar nutrient medium, although the two fungi grew similarly when cultured separately. This result may indicate antagonism via antibiosis or competition. PMID:23956668

  16. Gene Co-Expression Analysis Inferring the Crosstalk of Ethylene and Gibberellin in Modulating the Transcriptional Acclimation of Cassava Root Growth in Different Seasons

    PubMed Central

    Saithong, Treenut; Saerue, Samorn; Kalapanulak, Saowalak; Sojikul, Punchapat; Narangajavana, Jarunya; Bhumiratana, Sakarindr

    2015-01-01

    Cassava is a crop of hope for the 21st century. Great advantages of cassava over other crops are not only the capacity of carbohydrates, but it is also an easily grown crop with fast development. As a plant which is highly tolerant to a poor environment, cassava has been believed to own an effective acclimation process, an intelligent mechanism behind its survival and sustainability in a wide range of climates. Herein, we aimed to investigate the transcriptional regulation underlying the adaptive development of a cassava root to different seasonal cultivation climates. Gene co-expression analysis suggests that AP2-EREBP transcription factor (ERF1) orthologue (D142) played a pivotal role in regulating the cellular response to exposing to wet and dry seasons. The ERF shows crosstalk with gibberellin, via ent-Kaurene synthase (D106), in the transcriptional regulatory network that was proposed to modulate the downstream regulatory system through a distinct signaling mechanism. While sulfur assimilation is likely to be a signaling regulation for dry crop growth response, calmodulin-binding protein is responsible for regulation in the wet crop. With our initiative study, we hope that our findings will pave the way towards sustainability of cassava production under various kinds of stress considering the future global climate change. PMID:26366737

  17. Molecular Differentiation and Detection of Ginseng-Adapted Isolates of the Root Rot Fungus Cylindrocarpon destructans.

    PubMed

    Seifert, K A; McMullen, C R; Yee, D; Reeleder, R D; Dobinson, K F

    2003-12-01

    ABSTRACT The soilborne fungus Cylindrocarpon destructans (teleomorph: Neonectria radicicola) causes root rot in a wide range of plant hosts; the disease is of particular concern in ginseng production, and in conifer and fruit tree nurseries. beta-Tubulin gene and rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence data and pathogenicity assays were used to characterize isolates of C. destructans from ginseng and other hosts. The results of these studies demonstrated a high amount of sequence divergence among strains identified as C. destructans or N. radicicola, suggesting the existence of several phylogenetic species in this complex. Accordingly, we propose that the two varieties of N. radicicola be raised to species status. Certain highly aggressive ginseng isolates from Ontario, Korea, and Japan have identical ITS and beta-tubulin sequences, and form a monophyletic clade (designated "clade a"); these strains are identified as C. destructans f. sp. panacis. Other ginseng strains clustered in monophyletic groups with strains from angiosperm and conifers. A subtractive hybridization method was used to isolate genomic DNA sequences with diagnostic potential from the aggressive C. destructans Ontario ginseng isolate 1640. One of these sequences was similar to the rRNA gene intergenic spacer from a Fusarium oxysporum isolate from Pinus ponderosa, and hybridized to DNA from F. oxysporum and all C. destructans isolates tested. Primers were designed that could be used to amplify this sequence specifically from the highly aggressive, ginsengadapted C. destructans isolates from Ontario and Korea and other members of clade a. PMID:18943617

  18. Direct Detection of Cylindrocarpon destructans, Root Rot Pathogen of Ginseng by Nested PCR from Soil Samples.

    PubMed

    Jang, Chang Soon; Lim, Jin Ha; Seo, Mun Won; Song, Jeong Young; Kim, Hong Gi

    2010-03-01

    We have successfully applied the nested PCR to detect Cylindrocarpon destructans, a major pathogen causing root rot disease from ginseng seedlings in our former study. The PCR assay, in this study, was used to detect the pathogen from soils. The nested PCR using internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1, 4 primer set and Dest 1, 4 primer set maintained the specificity in soils containing various microorganisms. For a soil DNA extraction method targeting chlamydospores, when several cell wall disrupting methods were tested, the combination of lyophilization and grinding with glass beads, which broke almost all the chlamydospores, was the strongest. The DNA extraction method which was completed based on the above was simple and time-saving because of exclusion of unnecessary stages, and efficient to apply in soils. As three ginseng fields whose histories were known were analyzed, the PCR assay resulted as our expectation derived from the field information. The direct PCR method will be utilized as a reliable and rapid tool for detecting and monitoring C. destructans in ginseng fields. PMID:23956622

  19. Plectosphaerella species associated with root and collar rots of horticultural crops in southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Carlucci, A; Raimondo, M L; Santos, J; Phillips, A J L

    2012-06-01

    Plectosphaerella cucumerina, most frequently encountered in its Plectosporium state, is well known as a pathogen of several plant species causing fruit, root and collar rot, and collapse. It is considered to pose a serious threat to melon (Cucumis melo) production in Italy. In the present study, an intensive sampling of diseased cucurbits as well as tomato and bell pepper was done and the fungal pathogens present on them were isolated. Phylogenetic relationships of the isolates were determined through a study of ribosomal RNA gene sequences (ITS cluster and D1/D2 domain of the 28S rRNA gene). Combining morphological, culture and molecular data, six species were distinguished. One of these (Pa. cucumerina) is already known. Four new species are described as Plectosphaerella citrullae, Pa. pauciseptata, Pa. plurivora and Pa. ramiseptata. Acremonium cucurbitacearum is shown to be a synonym of Nodulisporium melonis and is transferred to Plectosphaerella as Plectosphaerella melonis comb. nov. A further three known species of Plectosporium are recombined in Plectosphaerella. PMID:23105152

  20. Evolutionary history of the conifer root rot fungus Heterobasidion annosum sensu lato.

    PubMed

    Dalman, K; Olson, A; Stenlid, J

    2010-11-01

    We investigated two hypotheses for the origin of the root rot fungus Heterobasidion annosum species complex: (i) that geology has been an important factor for the speciation (ii) that co-evolutionary processes with the hosts drove the divergence of the pathogen species. The H. annosum species complex consists of five species: three occur in Europe, H. annosum s.s., Heterobasidion parviporum and Heterobasidion abietinum, and two in North America, Heterobasidion irregulare and Heterobasidion occidentale; all with different but partially overlapping host preferences. The evolution of the H. annosum species complex was studied using six partially sequenced genes, between 10 and 30 individuals of each species were analysed. Neighbour-joining trees were constructed for each gene, and a Bayesian tree was built for the combined data set. In addition, haplotype networks were constructed to illustrate the species relationships. For three of the genes, H. parviporum and H. abietinum share haplotypes supporting recent divergence and/or possible gene flow. We propose that the H. annosum species complex originated in Laurasia and that the H. annosum s.s./H. irregulare and H. parviporum/H. abietinum/H. occidentale ancestral species emerged between 45 and 60 Ma in the Palaearctic, well after the radiation of the host genera. Our data imply that H. irregulare and H. occidentale were colonizing North America via different routes. In conclusion, plate tectonics are likely to have been the main factor influencing Heterobasidion speciation and biogeography. PMID:20964759

  1. Evaluation of rhizobacterial indicators of tobacco black root rot suppressiveness in farmers' fields.

    PubMed

    Kyselková, Martina; Almario, Juliana; Kopecký, Jan; Ságová-Marečková, Markéta; Haurat, Jacqueline; Muller, Daniel; Grundmann, Geneviève L; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan

    2014-08-01

    Very few soil quality indicators include disease-suppressiveness criteria. We assessed whether 64 16S rRNA microarray probes whose signals correlated with tobacco black root rot suppressiveness in greenhouse analysis could also discriminate suppressive from conducive soils under field conditions. Rhizobacterial communities of tobacco and wheat sampled in 2 years from four farmers' fields of contrasted suppressiveness status were compared. The 64 previously identified indicator probes correctly classified 72% of 29 field samples, with nine probes for Azospirillum, Gluconacetobacter, Sphingomonadaceae, Planctomycetes, Mycoplasma, Lactobacillus crispatus and Thermodesulforhabdus providing the best prediction. The whole probe set (1033 probes) revealed strong effects of plant, field location and year on rhizobacterial community composition, and a smaller (7% variance) but significant effect of soil suppressiveness status. Seventeen additional probes correlating with suppressiveness status in the field (noticeably for Agrobacterium, Methylobacterium, Ochrobactrum) were selected, and combined with the nine others, they improved correct sample classification from 72% to 79% (100% tobacco and 63% wheat samples). Pseudomonas probes were not informative in the field, even those targeting biocontrol pseudomonads producing 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol, nor was quantitative polymerase chain reaction for 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol-synthesis gene phlD. This study shows that a subset of 16S rRNA probes targeting diverse rhizobacteria can be useful as suppressiveness indicators under field conditions. PMID:24992533

  2. Microbiota Characterization of Compost Using Omics Approaches Opens New Perspectives for Phytophthora Root Rot Control

    PubMed Central

    Blaya, Josefa; Marhuenda, Frutos C.; Pascual, Jose A.; Ros, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    Phytophthora root rot caused by Phytophthora nicotianae is an economically important disease in pepper crops. The use of suppressive composts is a low environmental impact method for its control. Although attempts have been made to reveal the relationship between microbiota and compost suppressiveness, little is known about the microorganisms associated with disease suppression. Here, an Ion Torrent platform was used to assess the microbial composition of composts made of different agro-industrial waste and with different levels of suppressiveness against P. nicotianae. Both bacterial and fungal populations responded differently depending on the chemical heterogeneity of materials used during the composting process. High proportions (67–75%) of vineyard pruning waste were used in the most suppressive composts, COM-A and COM-B. This material may have promoted the presence of higher relative abundance of Ascomycota as well as higher microbial activity, which have proved to be essential for controlling the disease. Although no unique fungi or bacteria have been detected in neither suppressive nor conducive composts, relatively high abundance of Fusarium and Zopfiella were found in compost COM-B and COM-A, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that studies compost metabolome. Surprisingly, composts and peat clustered together in principal component analysis of the metabolic data according to their levels of suppressiveness achieved. This study demonstrated the need for combining the information provided by different techniques, including metagenomics and metametabolomics, to better understand the ability of compost to control plant diseases. PMID:27490955

  3. Microbiota Characterization of Compost Using Omics Approaches Opens New Perspectives for Phytophthora Root Rot Control.

    PubMed

    Blaya, Josefa; Marhuenda, Frutos C; Pascual, Jose A; Ros, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    Phytophthora root rot caused by Phytophthora nicotianae is an economically important disease in pepper crops. The use of suppressive composts is a low environmental impact method for its control. Although attempts have been made to reveal the relationship between microbiota and compost suppressiveness, little is known about the microorganisms associated with disease suppression. Here, an Ion Torrent platform was used to assess the microbial composition of composts made of different agro-industrial waste and with different levels of suppressiveness against P. nicotianae. Both bacterial and fungal populations responded differently depending on the chemical heterogeneity of materials used during the composting process. High proportions (67-75%) of vineyard pruning waste were used in the most suppressive composts, COM-A and COM-B. This material may have promoted the presence of higher relative abundance of Ascomycota as well as higher microbial activity, which have proved to be essential for controlling the disease. Although no unique fungi or bacteria have been detected in neither suppressive nor conducive composts, relatively high abundance of Fusarium and Zopfiella were found in compost COM-B and COM-A, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that studies compost metabolome. Surprisingly, composts and peat clustered together in principal component analysis of the metabolic data according to their levels of suppressiveness achieved. This study demonstrated the need for combining the information provided by different techniques, including metagenomics and metametabolomics, to better understand the ability of compost to control plant diseases. PMID:27490955

  4. Development of formulations of biological agents for management of root rot of lettuce and cucumber.

    PubMed

    Amer, G A; Utkhede, R S

    2000-09-01

    The effect of various carrier formulations of Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida were tested on germination, growth, and yield of lettuce and cucumber crops in the presence of Pythium aphanidermatum and Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cucurbitacearum, respectively. Survival of B. subtilis and P. putida in various carriers under refrigeration (about 0 degree C) and at room temperature (about 22 degrees C) was also studied. In all carrier formulations, B. subtilis strain BACT-0 survived up to 45 days. After 45 days of storage at room temperature (about 22 degrees C), populations B. subtilis strain BACT-0 were significantly higher in vermiculite, kaolin, and bacterial broth carriers compared with other carriers. Populations of P. putida were significantly higher in vermiculite, peat moss, wheat bran, and bacterial broth than in other carriers when stored either under refrigeration (about 0 degree C) or at room temperature (about 22 degrees C) for 15 or 45 days. Germination of lettuce seed was not affected in vermiculite, talc, kaolin, and peat moss carriers, but germination was significantly reduced in alginate and bacterial broth carriers of B. subtilis compared to the non-treated control. Germination of cucumber seed was not affected by any of the carriers. Significantly higher fresh lettuce and root weights were observed in vermiculite and kaolin carriers of B. subtilis compared with P. aphanidermatum-inoculated control plants. Lettuce treated with vermiculite, and kaolin carriers of B. subtilis, or non-inoculated control lettuce plants had significantly lower root rot ratings than talc, peat moss, bacterial broth, and P. aphanidermatum-inoculated control plants. Growth and yield of cucumber plants were significantly higher in vermiculite-based carrier of P. putida than the other carriers and Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cucurbitacearum-inoculated plants. PMID:11006841

  5. Postharvest salicylic acid treatment reduces storage rots in water-stressed but no unstressed sugarbeet roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exogenous application of salicylic acid (SA) reduces storage rots in a number of postharvest crops. SA’s ability to protect sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) taproots from common storage rot pathogens, however, is unknown. To determine the potential of SA to reduce storage losses caused by three common...

  6. Effect of Environment and Sugar Beet Genotype on Root Rot Development and Pathogen Profile During Storage.

    PubMed

    Liebe, Sebastian; Varrelmann, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Storage rots represent an economically important factor impairing the storability of sugar beet by increasing sucrose losses and invert sugar content. Understanding the development of disease management strategies, knowledge about major storage pathogens, and factors influencing their occurrence is crucial. In comprehensive storage trials conducted under controlled conditions, the effects of environment and genotype on rot development and associated quality changes were investigated. Prevalent species involved in rot development were identified by a newly developed microarray. The strongest effect on rot development was assigned to environment factors followed by genotypic effects. Despite large variation in rot severity (sample range 0 to 84%), the spectrum of microorganisms colonizing sugar beet remained fairly constant across all treatments with dominant species belonging to the fungal genera Botrytis, Fusarium, and Penicillium. The intensity of microbial tissue necrotization was strongly correlated with sucrose losses (R² = 0.79 to 0.91) and invert sugar accumulation (R² = 0.91 to 0.95). A storage rot resistance bioassay was developed that could successfully reproduce the genotype ranking observed in storage trials. Quantification of fungal biomass indicates that genetic resistance is based on a quantitative mechanism. Further work is required to understand the large environmental influence on rot development in sugar beet. PMID:26474333

  7. Biological Control of Pathogens Causing Root Rot Complex in Field Pea Using Clonostachys rosea Strain ACM941.

    PubMed

    Xue, Allen G

    2003-03-01

    ABSTRACT Pea root rot complex (PRRC), caused by Alternaria alternata, Aphanomyces euteiches, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pisi, F. solani f. sp. pisi, Mycosphaerella pinodes, Pythium spp., Rhizoctonia solani, and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, is a major yield-limiting factor for field pea production in Canada. A strain of Clonostachys rosea (syn. Gliocladium roseum), ACM941 (ATCC 74447), was identified as a mycoparasite against these pathogens. When grown near the pathogen, ACM941 often was stimulated to produce lateral branches that grew directly toward the pathogen mycelium, typically entwining around the pathogen mycelium. When applied to the seed, ACM941 propagated in the rhizosphere and colonized the seed coat, hypocotyl, and roots as the plant developed and grew. ACM941 significantly reduced the recovery of all fungal pathogens from infected seed, increased in vitro seed germination by 44% and seedling emergence by 22%, and reduced root rot severity by 76%. The effects were similar to those of thiram fungicide, which increased germination and emergence by 33 and 29%, respectively, and reduced root rot severity by 65%. When soil was inoculated with selected PRRC pathogens in a controlled environment, seed treatment with ACM941 significantly increased emergence by 26, 38, 28, 13, and 21% for F. oxysporum f. sp. pisi, F. solani f. sp. pisi, M. pinodes, R. solani, and S. sclerotiorum, respectively. Under field conditions from 1995 to 1997, ACM941 increased emergence by 17, 23, 22, 13, and 18% and yield by 15, 6, 28, 6, and 19% for the five respective pathogens. The seed treatment effects of ACM941 on these PRRC pathogens were greater or statistically equivalent to those achieved with thiram. Results of this study suggest that ACM941 is an effective bioagent in controlling PRRC and is an alternative to existing chemical products. PMID:18944343

  8. The root rot fungus Armillaria mellea introduced into South Africa by early Dutch settlers.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, M P; Wingfield, B D; Harrington, T C; Steimel, J; Coutinho, T A; Wingfield, M J

    2001-02-01

    Dead and dying oak (Quercus) and numerous other woody ornamental trees and shrubs showing signs and symptoms of Armillaria root rot were identified in the Company Gardens, Cape Town, South Africa, which were established in the mid-1600s by the Dutch East Indies Trading Company. Nineteen isolates from dying trees or from mushrooms were collected and analysed to identify and characterize the Armillaria sp. responsible for the disease. The AluI digestion of the amplified product of the first intergenic spacer region (IGS-1) of the rRNA operon of 19 isolates from the Company Gardens was identical to that of some of the European isolates of A. mellea s. s. The IGS-1 region and the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) were sequenced for some of the Cape Town isolates. Phylogenetic analyses placed the Cape Town isolates in the European clade of A. mellea, which is distinct from the Asian and North American clades of this species. Identification based on sexual compatibility was conducted using A. mellea tester strains in diploid-haploid pairings, which showed some compatibility between the Cape Town isolates and testers from Europe. Somatic compatibility tests (diploid-diploid pairings) and DNA fingerprinting with multilocus, microsatellite probes indicated that the Cape Town isolates were genetically identical and may have resulted from vegetative (clonal) spread from a single focus in the centre of the original Company Gardens (c. 1652). The colonized area is at least 345 m in diameter. Assuming a linear spread rate underground of 0.3 m/year to 1.6 m/year, the genet (clone) was estimated to be between 108 and 575 years old. These data suggest that A. mellea was introduced into Cape Town from Europe, perhaps on potted plants, such as grapes or citrus, planted in the Company Gardens more than 300 years ago. PMID:11298953

  9. Pseudomonas induces salinity tolerance in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and resistance to Fusarium root rot through the modulation of indole-3-acetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Egamberdieva, Dilfuza; Jabborova, Dilfuza; Hashem, Abeer

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic stresses cause changes in the balance of phytohormones in plants and result in inhibited root growth and an increase in the susceptibility of plants to root rot disease. The aim of this work was to ascertain whether microbial indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) plays a role in the regulation of root growth and microbially mediated control of root rot of cotton caused by Fusarium solani. Seed germination and seedling growth were improved by both NaCl and Mg2SO4 (100 mM) solutions when treated with root-associated bacterial strains Pseudomonas putida R4 and Pseudomonas chlororaphis R5, which are able to produce IAA. These bacterial strains were also able to reduce the infection rate of cotton root rot (from 70 to 39%) caused by F. solani under gnotobiotic conditions. The application of a low concentration of IAA (0.01 and 0.001 μg/ml) stimulated plant growth and reduced disease incidence caused by F. solani (from 70 to 41–56%, respectively). Shoot and root growth and dry matter increased significantly and disease incidence was reduced by bacterial inoculants in natural saline soil. These results suggest that bacterial IAA plays a major role in salt stress tolerance and may be involved in induced resistance against root rot disease of cotton. PMID:26587006

  10. Root Interactions in a Maize/Soybean Intercropping System Control Soybean Soil-Borne Disease, Red Crown Rot

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiang; Wu, Man; Xu, Ruineng; Wang, Xiurong; Pan, Ruqian; Kim, Hye-Ji; Liao, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Background Within-field multiple crop species intercropping is well documented and used for disease control, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. As roots are the primary organ for perceiving signals in the soil from neighboring plants, root behavior may play an important role in soil-borne disease control. Principal Findings In two years of field experiments, maize/soybean intercropping suppressed the occurrence of soybean red crown rot, a severe soil-borne disease caused by Cylindrocladium parasiticum (C. parasiticum). The suppressive effects decreased with increasing distance between intercropped plants under both low P and high P supply, suggesting that root interactions play a significant role independent of nutrient status. Further detailed quantitative studies revealed that the diversity and intensity of root interactions altered the expression of important soybean PR genes, as well as, the activity of corresponding enzymes in both P treatments. Furthermore, 5 phenolic acids were detected in root exudates of maize/soybean intercropped plants. Among these phenolic acids, cinnamic acid was released in significantly greater concentrations when intercropped maize with soybean compared to either crop grown in monoculture, and this spike in cinnamic acid was found dramatically constrain C. parasiticum growth in vitro. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first report to demonstrate that intercropping with maize can promote resistance in soybean to red crown rot in a root-dependent manner. This supports the point that intercropping may be an efficient ecological strategy to control soil-borne plant disease and should be incorporated in sustainable agricultural management practices. PMID:24810161

  11. Suppressive Potential of Paenibacillus Strains Isolated from the Tomato Phyllosphere against Fusarium Crown and Root Rot of Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Ikuo; Yoshida, Shigenobu; Iwamoto, Yutaka; Aino, Masataka; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro; Shimizu, Masafumi; Takahashi, Hideki; Ando, Sugihiro; Tsushima, Seiya

    2014-01-01

    The suppressive potentials of Bacillus and Paenibacillus strains isolated from the tomato phyllosphere were investigated to obtain new biocontrol candidates against Fusarium crown and root rot of tomato. The suppressive activities of 20 bacterial strains belonging to these genera were examined using seedlings and potted tomato plants, and two Paenibacillus strains (12HD2 and 42NP7) were selected as biocontrol candidates against the disease. These two strains suppressed the disease in the field experiment. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the treated bacterial cells colonized the root surface, and when the roots of the seedlings were treated with strain 42NP7 cells, the cell population was maintained on the roots for at least for 4 weeks. Although the bacterial strains had no direct antifungal activity against the causal pathogen in vitro, an increase was observed in the antifungal activities of acetone extracts from tomato roots treated with the cells of both bacterial strains. Furthermore, RT-PCR analysis verified that the expression of defense-related genes was induced in both the roots and leaves of seedlings treated with the bacterial cells. Thus, the root-colonized cells of the two Paenibacillus strains were considered to induce resistance in tomato plants, which resulted in the suppression of the disease. PMID:24920171

  12. Role of Antagonistic Microorganisms and Organic Amendment in Stimulating the Defense System of Okra Against Root Rotting Fungi.

    PubMed

    Shafique, Hafiza Asma; Sultana, Viqar; Ara, Jehan; Ehteshamul-Haque, Syed; Athar, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Without application of chemical pesticides control of soilborne diseases is a great challenge. Stimulation of natural plant's defense is considered as one of the most promising alternative strategy for crop protection. Organic amendment of soil besides direct suppressing the pathogen, has been reported to have an influence on phytochemicals in plants. In the present study, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium and Paecilomyces lilacinus, an egg parasite of root knot and cysts nematodes were examined individually and in combination in soil amended with cotton cake for suppressing the root rotting fungi and stimulating the synthesis of polyphenols and improving the antioxidant status in okra. Application of P. aeruginosa and P. lilacinus in soil amended with cotton cake significantly (P < 0.05) suppressed Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium oxysporum, and Fusarium solani with complete reduction of Rhizoctonia solani. Combine use of biocontrol agents in cotton cake amended soil showed maximum positive impact on plant growth, polyphenol concentration and antioxidant activity in okra. PMID:26373176

  13. Protoporphyrinogen oxidase inhibitor herbicide effects on pythium root rot of sugarcane, pythium species, and the soil microbial community.

    PubMed

    Daugrois, J H; Hoy, J W; Griffin, J L

    2005-03-01

    ABSTRACT The effects of three protoporphyrinogen oxidase inhibitor herbicides, azafenidin, flumioxazin, and sulfentrazone, on Pythium root rot of sugarcane and the soil microbial community were evaluated in greenhouse experiments. Herbicides were applied as foliar and soil treatments. There were no consistent effects on plant growth or disease parameters. However, some herbicide treatments affected the relative frequency of isolation of Pythium spp. from roots and reduced colonization by the pathogenic species Pythium arrhenomanes. A comparison of sole carbon source utilization profiles indicated that soil-applied herbicides altered the functional diversity of the soil microbial community, with some variation depending on herbicide used. All three herbicides inhibited the in vitro mycelial growth of P. arrhenomanes, P. aphanidermatum, and P. ultimum. Active ingredients were less inhibitory than formulated product for azafenidin and flumioxazin but not for sulfentrazone. PMID:18943113

  14. Digestible and metabolizable energy concentrations in copra meal, palm kernel meal, and cassava root fed to growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Son, A R; Ji, S Y; Kim, B G

    2012-12-01

    An experiment was conducted to measure DE and ME in copra (Cocos nucifera) meal (CM), palm kernel meal (PKM), and cassava (Manihot esculenta) root (CR) in growing pigs. Eight boars with an initial BW of 67.3 ± 5.8 kg were individually housed in metabolism crates that were equipped with a feeder and a nipple drinker. A replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design was used with 4 dietary treatments, 4 periods, and 8 animals. A basal diet mainly contained corn (Zea mays) and soybean (Glycine max) meal. Three additional diets were formulated to contain 30% of CM, PKM, and CR. All diets contained the same proportion of corn:soybean meal ratio at 4.14:1. The apparent total tract digestibility of energy was 89.5, 84.1, 82.4, and 87.9% (P < 0.001) in the basal, CM, PKM, and CR diets, respectively. The DE in CM and PKM were greater (P < 0.05) than in CR (3440 and 3238 vs. 2966 kcal/kg as-fed). The ME in CM was greater (P < 0.05) than in CR (3340 vs. 2935 kcal/kg as-fed) but not different from the ME in PKM (3168 kcal/kg as-fed). In conclusion, CM and PKM have a higher DE value than CR, and CM has a higher ME value than CR. PMID:23365309

  15. Rhizoctonia Crown and Root Rot Resistance of Beta Plant Introductions from the USDA, Agricultural Research Service's National Plant Germplasm System, 2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty wild beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima (L.) Arcang) plant introduction (PI) accessions from the Beta collection of the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System were screened for resistance to Rhizoctonia root and crown rot, at the USDA-ARS Fort Collins, CO Research Farm. The Rhizoctonia sc...

  16. Registration of FC723 and FC723 CMS Monogerm Sugarbeet Germplasm Resistant to Rhizoctonia Root Rot and moderately Resistant to Cercospora Leaf Spot.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) germplasms FC723 and FC723CMS (Reg. nos. GP-GP-, PI 639917 and PI 639918, respectively) were developed by the USDA-ARS, at Fort Collins, Colorado, in cooperation with the Beet Sugar Development Foundation, Denver, CO. FC723 has good resistance to root-rotting strains (A...

  17. Genetic architecture and evolution of the mating type locus in fusaria that cause soybean sudden death syndrome and bean root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium tucumaniae is the only known sexually reproducing species among the seven closely related fusaria that cause soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS) or bean root rot (BRR). Laboratory mating of F. tucumaniae required two mating-compatible strains, indicating that it is heterothallic. To assess ...

  18. Biocontrol of fusarium crown and root rot and promotion of growth of tomato by paenibacillus strains isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sheng Jun; Kim, Byung Sup

    2014-06-01

    In this study, bacterial strains were isolated from soils from 30 locations of Samcheok, Gangwon province. Of the isolated strains, seven showed potential plant growth promoting and antagonistic activities. Based on cultural and morphological characterization, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing, these strains were identified as Paenibacillus species. All seven strains produced ammonia, cellulase, hydrocyanic acid, indole-3-acetic acid, protease, phosphatase, and siderophores. They also inhibited the mycelial growth of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici in vitro. The seven Paenibacillus strains enhanced a range of growth parameters in tomato plants under greenhouse conditions, in comparison with non-inoculated control plants. Notably, treatment of tomato plants with one identified strain, P. polymyxa SC09-21, resulted in 80.0% suppression of fusarium crown and root rot under greenhouse conditions. The plant growth promoting and antifungal activity of P. polymyxa SC09-21 identified in this study highlight its potential suitability as a bioinoculant. PMID:25071385

  19. Biocontrol of Fusarium Crown and Root Rot and Promotion of Growth of Tomato by Paenibacillus Strains Isolated from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Sheng Jun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, bacterial strains were isolated from soils from 30 locations of Samcheok, Gangwon province. Of the isolated strains, seven showed potential plant growth promoting and antagonistic activities. Based on cultural and morphological characterization, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing, these strains were identified as Paenibacillus species. All seven strains produced ammonia, cellulase, hydrocyanic acid, indole-3-acetic acid, protease, phosphatase, and siderophores. They also inhibited the mycelial growth of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici in vitro. The seven Paenibacillus strains enhanced a range of growth parameters in tomato plants under greenhouse conditions, in comparison with non-inoculated control plants. Notably, treatment of tomato plants with one identified strain, P. polymyxa SC09-21, resulted in 80.0% suppression of fusarium crown and root rot under greenhouse conditions. The plant growth promoting and antifungal activity of P. polymyxa SC09-21 identified in this study highlight its potential suitability as a bioinoculant. PMID:25071385

  20. Cassava root husks powder as green adsorbent for the removal of Cu(II) from natural river water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgetto, A. O.; Silva, R. I. V.; Saeki, M. J.; Barbosa, R. C.; Martines, M. A. U.; Jorge, S. M. A.; Silva, A. C. P.; Schneider, J. F.; Castro, G. R.

    2014-01-01

    Through a series of simple processes, cassava root husks were turned into a fine powder of controlled particle size (63-75 μm). FTIR spectrum demonstrated the existence of alcohol, amine and carboxylic groups; and elemental analysis confirmed the presence of elements of interest such as sulphur, nitrogen and oxygen. Cross-polarized {1H}13C NMR technique indicated the existence of methionine and thiamine through the signals observed at 55 ppm and 54 ppm, respectively, and the point of zero charge (pHpzc) was achieved at pH 5.2. The material was applied in solid-phase extraction of Cu(II) via batch experiments. Optimum adsorption pH was found to be in range of 3-6 and in the kinetic experiment the equilibrium was attained in 1 min. The highest adsorption capacity was 0.14 mmol g-1. The adsorption data were fit to the modified Langmuir equation, and the maximum amount of metal species extracted from the solution, Ns, was determined to be ˜0.14 mmol g-1, which is an indicative that the main adsorption mechanism is through chemisorption. Under optimized conditions, the material was utilized in preconcentration experiments, which culminated in an enrichment factor of 41.3-fold. With the aid of the enrichment factor, experiments were carried out to determine the Cu(II) content in tap water and natural water. Preconcentration method was also applied to a certified reference material (1643e) and the concentration found was 23.03 ± 0.79 μg L-1, whereas the specified Cu(II) concentration was 22.7 ± 0.31 μg L-1.

  1. First report of root rot of lentil caused by Aphanomyces euteiches in Idaho

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In June 2008, apparently diseased lentil plants (Lens culinaris L. cv. Crimson) were observed in a production field in Kendrick, ID. Symptoms included stunting, leaf chlorosis, reddening of abaxial leaf surfaces, browning of entire root systems and root necrosis. Roots of symptomatic plants were sur...

  2. Prediction of gross energy and digestible energy in copra meal, palm kernel meal, and cassava root fed to pigs.

    PubMed

    Park, C S; Son, A R; Kim, B G

    2012-12-01

    Many of the available prediction equations for feed energy value may not be applicable for ingredients such as copra (Cocos nucifera) meal (CM), palm kernel meal (PKM), and cassava (Manihot esculenta) root (CR). Therefore, we developed novel equations for estimating GE and DE concentrations in CM, PKM, CR, and diets containing these ingredients. Data for GE and DE concentrations were obtained from previous experiments in which the chemical composition in the ingredients and diets were determined. In addition, in vitro DM digestibility (IVDMD) values in 3 samples of ingredients including CM, PKM, and CR and 4 samples of diets including a corn (Zea mays)-soybean (Glycine max) meal-based diet and 3 diets containing CM, PKM, and CR were determined. Based on the model R(2), conceptual predictive criterion, and the P-value of the equation, the best equation for GE concentration (kcal/kg) was GE = 3313 + (24.81 × CP) + (9.83 × NDF) with R(2) = 0.93, root mean square error = 102, and P = 0.005 (CP and NDF values are percentages). Regression analysis was conducted between the DE:GE ratio and IVDMD (%). The DE:GE ratio was 0.81, 0.73, 0.83, 0.89, 0.84, 0.82, and 0.88 in CM, PKM, CR, a corn-soybean meal-based diet, and diets containing CM, PKM, or CR, respectively. The values for IVDMD were 70.3, 42.6, 88.2, 93.4, 86.7, 75.5, and 91.3%, respectively. The DE:GE ratio may be calculated by (0.0030 × IVDMD) + 0.5986 (R(2) = 0.91; P = 0.001). Using the estimated GE concentration and IVDMD, the prediction equation for DE concentration (kcal/kg) was DE = -1965 + (1.02 × GE) + (15.33 × IVDMD) with R(2) = 0.88 and P = 0.007. In conclusion, IVDMD values are useful in estimating energy digestibility in CM, PKM, CR, and diets containing these ingredients. PMID:23365336

  3. Isolation, characterization, and formulation of antagonistic bacteria for the management of seedlings damping-off and root rot disease of cucumber.

    PubMed

    Khabbaz, Salah Eddin; Abbasi, Pervaiz A

    2014-01-01

    Antagonistic bacteria are common soil inhabitants with potential to be developed into biofungicides for the management of seedling damping-off, root rot, and other soil-borne diseases of various crops. In this study, antagonistic bacteria were isolated from a commercial potato field and screened for their growth inhibition of fungal and oomycete pathogens in laboratory tests. The biocontrol potential of the 3 most effective antagonistic bacteria from the in vitro tests was evaluated against seedling damping-off and root rot of cucumber caused by Pythium ultimum. Based on phenotypic characteristics, biochemical tests, and sequence analysis of 16S-23S rDNA gene, the 3 antagonistic bacteria were identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens (isolate 9A-14), Pseudomonas sp. (isolate 8D-45), and Bacillus subtilis (isolate 8B-1). All 3 bacteria promoted plant growth and suppressed Pythium damping-off and root rot of cucumber seedlings in growth-room assays. Both pre- and post-planting application of these bacteria to an infested peat mix significantly increased plant fresh masses by 113%-184% and percentage of healthy seedlings by 100%-290%, and decreased damping-off and root rot severity by 27%-50%. The peat and talc formulations of these antagonistic bacteria applied as seed or amendment treatments to the infested peat mix effectively controlled Pythium damping-off and root rot of cucumber seedlings and enhanced plant growth. The survival of all 3 antagonistic bacteria in peat and talc formulations decreased over time at room temperature, but the populations remained above 10(8) CFU/g during the 180-day storage period. The peat formulation of a mixture of 3 bacteria was the best seed treatment, significantly increasing the plant fresh masses by 245% as compared with the Pythium control, and by 61.4% as compared with the noninfested control. This study suggests that the indigenous bacteria from agricultural soils can be developed and formulated as biofungicides for minimizing

  4. Pathogenicity of some Rhizoctonia solaniz isolates associated with root/collar rots on the cultivars of bean in greenhouse.

    PubMed

    Bohlooli, A; Okhovvat, S M; Javan-Nikkhah, M

    2006-01-01

    One hundred and eighteen isolates of Rhizoctonia solani were gathered from infected roots and hypocotyls of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) grown in the fields of Tehran Province, Iran. Two isolates of the collected samples belonged to binucleate and 81 isolates to multinucleate of R. solani. The multinucleate isolates showed different anastomosis groups as AG-4 (subg. AG-4 HGI, AG-4HGII), AG-6 and AG-2. In greenhouse, pathogenicity tests carried out on bean cv. Naz in randomized design with 4 replications and each replication (pots) with 5 seeds of bean. Infection was done with seeds of wheat which were infected to the fungus with pasteurized soil. Results showed that the highest disease severity was caused by AG-4 (Rs21) isolates, whereas AG-4 (Rs74) isolates were weakly pathogenic with 90% and 21% infection, respectively. In this test the major pathogenic isolates belonged to AG-4 and they caused seed rot and damping-off of bean and AG-6 isolates were non-pathogenic. Five isolates of the fungus with major pathogenicity (Rs7, Rs18, Rs21, Rs62 and Rs71) selected and used for the reaction with different cultivars of bean. In this test, the cultivars and lines of bean (Pinto, red, white, green) studied in factorial experiment as randomized block design with 4 replications (pots). Results showed that none of the cultivars was completely resistant, however green bean cv. Sanry and pinto cv. Shad with number 4.8 disease severities had the highest susceptibility to seed rot and damping-off and red bean cv. Goli with 2.58 had the lowest susceptibility to the infection. Reaction of the cultivars and lines to the isolates of R. solani was significantly different at 1% level. Isolates of the fungus, Rs7, Rs21 with 84%, 90% pathogenicity was more virulent than the others. PMID:17390878

  5. Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz).

    PubMed

    Bull, Simon E

    2015-01-01

    Genetic transformation of plants is an indispensable technique used for fundamental research and crop improvement. Recent advances in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) transformation have facilitated the effective generation of stably transformed cassava plants with favorable traits. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of friable, embryogenic callus has evolved to become the most widely used approach and has been adopted by research laboratories in Africa. This procedure utilizes axillary meristem tissue (buds) to produce primary and secondary somatic embryos and subsequently friable, embryogenic callus. Agrobacterium harboring a binary expression cassette is used to transform this tissue, which is regenerated via cotyledons and shoot organogenesis to produce rooted in vitro plantlets. This chapter details each step of the procedure using the model cultivar 60444 and provides supplementary notes to successfully produce transgenic cassava. PMID:25416250

  6. Utilization of unpeeled cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) root meal supplemented with or without charcoal by broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Oso, A O; Akapo, O; Sanwo, K A; Bamgbose, A M

    2014-06-01

    A 42-day feeding trial was conducted using 480-day-old, male Marshall broilers to study the utilization of unpeeled cassava root meal (UCRM) supplemented with or without 6 g/kg charcoal. The experimental design was laid out in a 3 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments having three inclusion levels of UCRM (0, 100 and 200 g/kg) with or without 6 g/kg charcoal supplementation. Each treatment consisted of 80 birds replicated eight times with 10 birds per replicate. Main effect of inclusion level of UCRM and supplementation of charcoal showed reduced (p < 0.05) final live weight, weight gain, feed intake and apparent crude protein digestibility of the birds with increasing inclusion levels of UCRM. Birds fed diets supplemented with charcoal showed higher (p < 0.05) final live weight, weight gain and feed intake than birds fed diets without charcoal. Supplementation of charcoal in diet containing 100 g/kg UCRM resulted in improved (p < 0.05) weight gain when compared with birds fed similar diet but not supplemented with charcoal. Broilers fed diet containing no UCRM but supplemented with charcoal had the highest overall (p < 0.05) final live weight and weight gain, while birds fed diet containing 200 g/kg UCRM supplemented with charcoal recorded the poorest (p < 0.05) final live weight and weight gain. Serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT) and serum thiocyanate concentration increased (p < 0.05) with increasing dietary inclusion levels of UCRM. Dietary supplementation of charcoal resulted in increased (p < 0.05) concentration of serum glucose and cholesterol and reduced (p < 0.05) SGOT concentration. Birds fed diets containing UCRM had high (p < 0.05) serum thiocyanate concentration irrespective of dietary supplementation or not with 6 g/kg charcoal. In conclusion, supplementation of diet containing up to 100 g/kg UCRM with 6 g/kg charcoal showed improved weight gain without any deleterious effect on serum metabolites. PMID:23721067

  7. Cassava For Space Diet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Naomi; Yamashita, Masamichi; Njemanze, Philip; Nweke, Felix; Mitsuhashi, Jun; Hachiya, Natumi; Miyashita, Sachiko; Hotta, Atuko

    Space agriculture is an advanced life support enginnering concept based on biological and ecological system ot drive the materials recycle loop and create pleasant life environment on distant planetary bodies. Choice of space diet is one of primary decision required ot be made at designing space agriculture. We propose cassava, Manihot esculenta and, for one major composition of space food materials, and evaluate its value and feasibility of farming and processing it for space diet. Criteria to select space crop species could be stated as follows. 1) Fill th enutritional requirements. There is no perfect food material to meet this requirements without making a combination with others. A set of food materials which are adopted inthe space recipe shall fit to the nutritional requirement. 2) Space food is not just for maintaining physiological activities of human, but an element of human culture. We shall consider joy of dining in space life. In this context, space foos or recipe should be accepted by future astronauts. Food culture is diverse in the world, and has close relatioship to each cultural background. Cassava root tuber is a material to supply mainly energy in the form of carbohydrate, same as cereals and other tuber crops. Cassava leaf is rich in protein high as 5.1 percents about ten times higher content than its tuber. In the food culture in Africa, cassava is a major component. Cassava root tuber in most of its strain contains cyanide, it should be removed during preparation for cooking. However certain strain are less in this cyanogenic compound, and genetically modified cassava can also aboid this problem safely.

  8. Nutritional composition of fufu analog flour produced from Cassava root (Manihot esculenta) and Cocoyam (Colocasia esculenta) tuber.

    PubMed

    Bamidele, Oluwaseun P; Fasogbon, Mofoluwaso B; Oladiran, Dolapo A; Akande, Ebunoluwa O

    2015-11-01

    Nutritional properties of fufu analog produced from co-processing of cassava and cocoyam were studied. Cassava and cocoyam were fermented for 72 h, dried to obtain fufu flour. Proximate, functional, minerals, antinutritional factor, pasting properties, and sensory evaluation of various samples were determined. The results revealed that the moisture contents of the samples showed significant difference from control with values between 6.50 and 7.30%. The protein contents (1.68-4.98%), ash (1.84-4.01%), and crude fiber (1.42-4.56%) showed significant increase with increasing level of cocoyam, while the crude fat and carbohydrate reduced with increase in cocoyam. The minerals also increased with increase in cocoyam level with sample E having the highest value of Magnesium (32.15 mg/100 g). The antinutritional factors were very low and the pasting properties revealed the importance of cocoyam in the fufu analog produced. In conclusion, fufu produced from co-processing of cassava and cocoyam has more nutritional qualities than the common fufu made from cassava alone. PMID:26788301

  9. Biocontrol of Phytophthora cactorum the causal agent of root and crown rot on apple (Malus domestica) by formulated Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Farzaneh, M; Sharifi-Tehrani, A; Ahmadzadeh, M; Zad, J

    2007-01-01

    In this study 284 isolates were isolated of apple trees' rhizosphere from Iran and 128 isolates were obtained from the collection of Research Department of Biological Control of University of Tehran. Four strains (P60, P61, P96, and P97) of Pseudomonas fluorescens were selected for greenhouse trials. The results of greenhouse trials showed dipping the crown and root of apple seedlings (MM106) combined with soil drench was more effective than dipping the crown and root on reducing the disease. After 6 weeks, strain P60 in dipping method combined with soil drench with 70% control, exhibited greatest effect on reducing the crown and root rot and was more effective than the fungicide metalaxyl-mancozeb. After 12 weeks, strains P60 and P96 in dipping method combined with soil drench with 55.6% and 44.5% control respectively, exhibited greatest effects on reducing the diseases Study of media on growth rate populations of effective strains exhibited that the beet molasses yeast extract (1:1) had more effect than nutrient broth(NB) medium. The initial high populations of powder formulations of strains P60 and P96 decreased during the storage at 4 and 25 degrees C over a 150-day period. In addition, formulations of strains stored at 4 degrees C had longer shelf life than those stored at 25 degrees C. In glasshouse trials, after 6 weeks, formulation of strain P60 and unformulated P60, obtained from NB medium and formulated P60, obtained from molasses yeast extract medium, and metalaxyl-mancozeb had highest effect on reducing the disease on apple rootstocks. After 12 weeks, formulation of strain P60 and unformulated bacteria obtained from both media, and metalaxyl-mancozeb with 57.1% control showed greatest effect on reducing the disease. PMID:18396826

  10. Differential Responses of Vanilla Accessions to Root Rot and Colonization by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-vanillae.

    PubMed

    Koyyappurath, Sayuj; Conéjéro, Geneviève; Dijoux, Jean Bernard; Lapeyre-Montès, Fabienne; Jade, Katia; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Gatineau, Frédéric; Verdeil, Jean Luc; Besse, Pascale; Grisoni, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Root and stem rot (RSR) disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-vanillae (Forv) is the most damaging disease of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia and V. × tahitensis, Orchidaceae). Breeding programs aimed at developing resistant vanilla varieties are hampered by the scarcity of sources of resistance to RSR and insufficient knowledge about the histopathology of Forv. In this work we have (i) identified new genetic resources resistant to RSR including V. planifolia inbreds and vanilla relatives, (ii) thoroughly described the colonization pattern of Forv into selected vanilla accessions, confirming its necrotic non-vascular behavior in roots, and (iii) evidenced the key role played by hypodermis, and particularly lignin deposition onto hypodermal cell walls, for resistance to Forv in two highly resistant vanilla accessions. Two hundred and fifty-four vanilla accessions were evaluated in the field under natural conditions of infection and in controlled conditions using in vitro plants root-dip inoculated by the highly pathogenic isolate Fo072. For the 26 accessions evaluated in both conditions, a high correlation was observed between field evaluation and in vitro assay. The root infection process and plant response of one susceptible and two resistant accessions challenged with Fo072 were studied using wide field and multiphoton microscopy. In susceptible V. planifolia, hyphae penetrated directly into the rhizodermis in the hairy root region then invaded the cortex through the passage cells where it induced plasmolysis, but never reached the vascular region. In the case of the resistant accessions, the penetration was stopped at the hypodermal layer. Anatomical and histochemical observations coupled with spectral analysis of the hypodermis suggested the role of lignin deposition in the resistance to Forv. The thickness of lignin constitutively deposited onto outer cell walls of hypodermis was highly correlated with the level of resistance for 21 accessions

  11. Differential Responses of Vanilla Accessions to Root Rot and Colonization by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-vanillae

    PubMed Central

    Koyyappurath, Sayuj; Conéjéro, Geneviève; Dijoux, Jean Bernard; Lapeyre-Montès, Fabienne; Jade, Katia; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Gatineau, Frédéric; Verdeil, Jean Luc; Besse, Pascale; Grisoni, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Root and stem rot (RSR) disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-vanillae (Forv) is the most damaging disease of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia and V. × tahitensis, Orchidaceae). Breeding programs aimed at developing resistant vanilla varieties are hampered by the scarcity of sources of resistance to RSR and insufficient knowledge about the histopathology of Forv. In this work we have (i) identified new genetic resources resistant to RSR including V. planifolia inbreds and vanilla relatives, (ii) thoroughly described the colonization pattern of Forv into selected vanilla accessions, confirming its necrotic non-vascular behavior in roots, and (iii) evidenced the key role played by hypodermis, and particularly lignin deposition onto hypodermal cell walls, for resistance to Forv in two highly resistant vanilla accessions. Two hundred and fifty-four vanilla accessions were evaluated in the field under natural conditions of infection and in controlled conditions using in vitro plants root-dip inoculated by the highly pathogenic isolate Fo072. For the 26 accessions evaluated in both conditions, a high correlation was observed between field evaluation and in vitro assay. The root infection process and plant response of one susceptible and two resistant accessions challenged with Fo072 were studied using wide field and multiphoton microscopy. In susceptible V. planifolia, hyphae penetrated directly into the rhizodermis in the hairy root region then invaded the cortex through the passage cells where it induced plasmolysis, but never reached the vascular region. In the case of the resistant accessions, the penetration was stopped at the hypodermal layer. Anatomical and histochemical observations coupled with spectral analysis of the hypodermis suggested the role of lignin deposition in the resistance to Forv. The thickness of lignin constitutively deposited onto outer cell walls of hypodermis was highly correlated with the level of resistance for 21 accessions

  12. Identification, detection and quantification of Pythium species causing root rot of calla lily in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Monterey and Santa Cruz countries of California, hybrid calla lilies are highly limited by soilborne pathogens, particularly Pythium species. Fifty samples were collected from heavily infected calla lily roots from at least six field sets respectively in 2010 and 2013. Pathogens were isolated fro...

  13. First report of root rot of Chicory caused by Phytophthora cryptogea in Chile

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chicory (Cichorium intybus L. var sativum Bisch.), a relatively new high value crop in Chile, was introduced for commercial production of inulin. Inulins are polysaccharides extracted from chicory tap roots that are used in processed foods due to their beneficial gastrointestinal properties. Approxi...

  14. Leuconostoc spp. associated with root rot in sugar beet and their interaction with rhizoctonia solani

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia root and crown is an important disease problem in sugar beet caused by Rhizoctonia solani and also shown to be associated with Leuconostoc. Since, the initial Leuconostoc studies were conducted with only a few isolates and the relationship of Leuconostoc with R. solani is poorly underst...

  15. Detecting Root Rot Stress in Geranium by Measuring Changes in Leaf Temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to determine if changes in geranium leaf temperature, measured by infrared (IR) transducers aimed at the plant canopy or individual leaves, correlate with root infection by pathogenic water molds. This is the first report to our knowledge that addresses the use of environmental se...

  16. The use of fluorescent reporter protein tagging to study the interaction between Root-Knot Nematodes and Soft Rot Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Mongae, A; Kubheka, G C; Moleleki, N; Moleleki, L N

    2013-04-01

    The study of plant parasitic nematodes such as Meloidogyne spp. and their interactions with phytopathogenic bacteria remains underexplored. One of the challenges towards establishing such interactions is the dependence on symptom development as a measure of interaction. In this study, mCherry was employed as a reporter protein to investigate the interaction between the soft rot Enterobacteriaceae (SRE) Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis (Pcb) and root-knot nematode (M. incognita). Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis was transformed with pMP7604 generating Pcb_mCherry strain. This strain was shown to attach to the surface coat of M.incognita J2 at the optimum temperature of 28°C. This suggests that RKN juveniles may play a role in disseminating Pcb in soils that are heavily infested with Pcb. The presence of RKN juveniles was shown to play a role in introducing Pcb_mCherry into potato tubers potentially acting as a source of latent tuber infections. PMID:23347004

  17. Pseudomonas stutzeri YPL-1 Genetic Transformation and Antifungal Mechanism against Fusarium solani, an Agent of Plant Root Rot

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ho-Seong; Kim, Yong-Su; Kim, Sang-Dal

    1991-01-01

    An actively antagonistic bacterium that could be used as a biocontrol agent against Fusarium solani, which causes root rots with considerable losses in many important crops, was isolated from a ginseng rhizosphere and identified as a strain of Pseudomonas stutzeri. In several biochemical tests with culture filtrates of P. stutzeri YPL-1 and in mutational analyses of antifungal activities of reinforced or defective mutants, we found that the anti-F. solani mechanism of the bacterium may involve a lytic enzyme rather than a toxic substance or antibiotic. P. stutzeri YPL-1 produced extracellular chitinase and laminarinase when grown on different polymers such as chitin, laminarin, or F. solani mycelium. These lytic extracellular enzymes markedly inhibited mycelial growth rather than spore germination and also caused lysis of F. solani mycelia and germ tubes. Scanning electron microscopy revealed degradation of the F. solani mycelium. Abnormal hyphal swelling and retreating were caused by the lysing agents from P. stutzeri YPL-1, and a penetration hole was formed on the hyphae in the region of interaction with the bacterium; the walls of this region were rapidly lysed, causing leakage of protoplasm. Genetically bred P. stutzeri YPL-1 was obtained by transformation of the bacterium with a broad-host-range vector, pKT230. Also, the best conditions for the transformation were investigated. Images PMID:16348417

  18. Genetic Differentiation and Spatial Structure of Phellinus noxius, the Causal Agent of Brown Root Rot of Woody Plants in Japan.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Mitsuteru; Ota, Yuko; Tsai, Isheng J; Hattori, Tsutomu; Sahashi, Norio; Kikuchi, Taisei

    2015-01-01

    Phellinus noxius is a pathogenic fungus that causes brown root rot disease in a variety of tree species. This fungus is distributed in tropical and sub-tropical regions of Southeast and East Asia, Oceania, Australia, Central America and Africa. In Japan, it was first discovered on Ishigaki Island in Okinawa Prefecture in 1988; since then, it has been found on several of the Ryukyu Islands. Recently, this fungus was identified from the Ogasawara (Bonin) Islands, where it has killed trees, including rare endemic tree species. For effective control or quarantine methods, it is important to clarify whether the Japanese populations of P. noxius are indigenous to the area or if they have been introduced from other areas. We developed 20 microsatellite markers from genome assembly of P. noxius and genotyped 128 isolates from 12 of the Ryukyu Islands and 3 of the Ogasawara Islands. All isolates had unique genotypes, indicating that basidiospore infection is a primary dissemination method for the formation of new disease foci. Genetic structure analyses strongly supported genetic differentiation between the Ryukyu populations and the Ogasawara populations of P. noxius. High polymorphism of microsatellite loci suggests that Japanese populations are indigenous or were introduced a very long time ago. We discuss differences in invasion patterns between the Ryukyu Islands and the Ogasawara Islands. PMID:26513585

  19. Genetic Differentiation and Spatial Structure of Phellinus noxius, the Causal Agent of Brown Root Rot of Woody Plants in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Akiba, Mitsuteru; Ota, Yuko; Tsai, Isheng J.; Hattori, Tsutomu; Sahashi, Norio; Kikuchi, Taisei

    2015-01-01

    Phellinus noxius is a pathogenic fungus that causes brown root rot disease in a variety of tree species. This fungus is distributed in tropical and sub-tropical regions of Southeast and East Asia, Oceania, Australia, Central America and Africa. In Japan, it was first discovered on Ishigaki Island in Okinawa Prefecture in 1988; since then, it has been found on several of the Ryukyu Islands. Recently, this fungus was identified from the Ogasawara (Bonin) Islands, where it has killed trees, including rare endemic tree species. For effective control or quarantine methods, it is important to clarify whether the Japanese populations of P. noxius are indigenous to the area or if they have been introduced from other areas. We developed 20 microsatellite markers from genome assembly of P. noxius and genotyped 128 isolates from 12 of the Ryukyu Islands and 3 of the Ogasawara Islands. All isolates had unique genotypes, indicating that basidiospore infection is a primary dissemination method for the formation of new disease foci. Genetic structure analyses strongly supported genetic differentiation between the Ryukyu populations and the Ogasawara populations of P. noxius. High polymorphism of microsatellite loci suggests that Japanese populations are indigenous or were introduced a very long time ago. We discuss differences in invasion patterns between the Ryukyu Islands and the Ogasawara Islands. PMID:26513585

  20. FcStuA from Fusarium culmorum controls wheat foot and root rot in a toxin dispensable manner.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Matias; Spanu, Francesca; Scherm, Barbara; Balmas, Virgilio; Hoffmann, Lucien; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E; Beyer, Marco; Migheli, Quirico

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium culmorum is one of the most harmful pathogens of durum wheat and is the causal agent of foot and root rot (FRR) disease. F. culmorum produces the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) that is involved in the pathogenic process. The role of the gene FcStuA, a StuA ortholog protein with an APSES domain sharing 98.5% homology to the FgStuA protein (FGSG10129), was determined by functional characterisation of deletion mutants obtained from two F. culmorum wild-type strains, FcUk99 (a highly pathogenic DON producer) and Fc233B (unable to produce toxin and with a mild pathogenic behavior). The ΔFcStuA mutants originating from both strains showed common phenotypic characters including stunted vegetative growth, loss of hydrophobicity of the mycelium, altered pigmentation, decreased activity of polygalacturonic enzymes and catalases, altered and reduced conidiation, delayed conidial germination patterns and complete loss of pathogenicity towards wheat stem base/root tissue. Glycolytic process efficiency [measured as growth on glucose as sole carbon (C) source] was strongly impaired and growth was partially restored on glutamic acid. Growth on pectin-like sources ranked in between glucose and glutamic acid with the following order (the lowest to the highest growth): beechwood xylan, sugarbeet arabinan, polygalacturonic acid, citrus pectin, apple pectin, potato azogalactan. DON production in the mutants originating from FcUK99 strain was significantly decreased (-95%) in vitro. Moreover, both sets of mutants were unable to colonise non-cereal plant tissues, i.e. apple and tomato fruits and potato tubers. No differences between mutants, ectopic and wild-type strains were observed concerning the level of resistance towards four fungicides belonging to three classes, the demethylase inhibitors epoxiconazole and tebuconzole, the succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor isopyrazam and the cytochrome bc1 inhibitor trifloxystrobin. StuA, given its multiple functions in cell regulation

  1. Effects of mesophilic and thermophilic composts on suppression of Fusarium root and stem rot of greenhouse cucumber.

    PubMed

    Kannangara, T; Utkhede, R S; Paul, J W; Punja, Z K

    2000-11-01

    Three composts were tested for their ability to suppress root and stem rot caused by the soil borne fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-cucumerinum (FORC) on cucumber. Two of the composts were prepared from separated dairy solids either by windrow (WDS) or vermicomposting (VMC) while the third, obtained from International Bio-Recovery (IBR), was prepared from vegetable refuse using aerobic digestion. Three sets of potting mixes were prepared by mixing the composts with sawdust at varying ratios, and seeded with cucumber cv. Corona. After 14 days of growth in the greenhouse, inoculum of FORC (20 mL of 5 x 10(6) micro-conidia per mL) was applied to each pot at three different times (14, 21, and 35 days). In unamended inoculated pots, the pathogen caused stunted growth and reduced flowers. Amendment of WDS in the potting mix suppressed these symptoms, while VMC and IBR had no effect. All three composts reduced the FORC colony forming units (cfu) at the end of the experiment (10 weeks). There was a large increase of fluorescent bacteria near the vicinity of roots particularly in WDS amended potting mixes. When water extracts of the composts were plated onto acidified potato dextrose agar (APDA), only IBR contained a potent thermostable inhibitor to FORC. This inhibitor was removed by activated charcoal but was not partitioned into petroleum ether at acid, basic, or neutral pH. Inhibition of FORC by IBR was not due to electrical conductivity or trace elements in the compost. Contrasting effectiveness of the WDS and VMC made from the same waste suggests that composting method can influence the disease suppression properties of the finished compost. PMID:11109490

  2. Identification of root rot fungi in nursery seedlings by nested multiplex PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Hamelin, R C; Bérubé, P; Gignac, M; Bourassa, M

    1996-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) subunit repeat was sequenced in 12 isolates of Cylindrocladium floridanum and 11 isolates of Cylindrocarpon destructans. Sequences were aligned and compared with ITS sequences of other fungi in GenBank. Some intraspecific variability was present within our collections of C. destructans but not in C. floridanum. Three ITS variants were identified within C. destructans, but there was no apparent association between ITS variants and host or geographic origin. Two internal primers were synthesized for the specific amplification of portions of the ITS for C. floridanum, and two primers were designed to amplify all three variants of C. destructans. The species-specific primers amplified PCR products of the expected length when tested with cultures of C, destructans and C. floridanum from white spruce, black spruce, Norway spruce, red spruce, jack pine, red pine, and black walnut from eight nurseries and three plantations in Quebec. No amplification resulted from PCR reactions on fungal DNA from 26 common contaminants of conifer roots. For amplifications directly from infected tissues, a nested primer PCR using two rounds of amplification was combined with multiplex PCR approach resulting in the amplification of two different species-specific PCR fragments in the same reaction. First, the entire ITS was amplified with one universal primer and a second primer specific to fungi; a second round of amplification was carried out with species-specific primers that amplified a 400-bp PCR product from C. destructans and a 328-bp product from C. floridanum. The species-specific fragments were amplified directly from infected roots from which one or the two fungi had been isolated. PMID:8899993

  3. Genetic diversity analysis of cyanogenic potential (CNp) of root among improved genotypes of cassava using simple sequence repeat markers.

    PubMed

    Moyib, O K; Mkumbira, J; Odunola, O A; Dixon, A G

    2012-12-01

    Cyanogenic potential (CNp) of cassava constitutes a serious problem for over 500 million people who rely on the crop as their main source of calories. Genetic diversity is a key to successful crop improvement for breeding new improved variability for target traits. Forty-three improved genotypes of cassava developed by International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (ITA), Ibadan, were characterized for CNp trait using 35 Simple Sequence.Repeat (SSR) markers. Essential colorimetry picric test was used for evaluation of CNp on a color scale of 1 to 14. The CNp scores obtained ranged from 3 to 9, with a mean score of 5.48 (+/- 0.09) based on Statistical Analysis System (SAS) package. TMS M98/ 0068 (4.0 +/- 0.25) was identified as the best genotype with low CNp while TMS M98/0028 (7.75 +/- 0.25) was the worst. The 43 genotypes were assigned into 7 phenotypic groups based on rank-sum analysis in SAS. Dissimilarity analysis representatives for windows generated a phylogenetic tree with 5 clusters which represented hybridizing groups. Each of the clusters (except 4) contained low CNp genotypes that could be used for improving the high CNp genotypes in the same or near cluster. The scatter plot of the genotypes showed that there was little or no demarcation for phenotypic CNp groupings in the molecular groupings. The result of this study demonstrated that SSR markers are powerful tools for the assessment of genetic variability, and proper identification and selection of parents for genetic improvement of low CNp trait among the IITA cassava collection. PMID:23678653

  4. Improvement of Biocontrol of Damping-off and Root Rot/Wilt of Faba Bean by Salicylic Acid and Hydrogen Peroxide.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Monaim, Montaser Fawzy

    2013-03-01

    Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium solani, F. oxysporum, and Macrophomina phaseolina were found to be associated with root rott and wilt symptoms of faba bean plants collected from different fieldes in New Valley governorate, Egypt. All the obtained isolates were able to attack faba bean plants (cv. Giza 40) causing damping-off and root rot/wilt diseases. R. solani isolates 2 and 5, F. solani isolate 8, F. oxysporum isolate 12 and M. phaseolina isolate 14 were the more virulent ones in the pathogenicity tests. Biocontrol agents (Trichoderma viride and Bacillus megaterium) and chemical inducers (salicylic acid [SA] and hydrogen peroxide) individually or in combination were examined for biological control of damping-off and root rot/wilt and growth promoting of faba bean plants in vitro and in vivo. Both antagonistic biocontrol agents and chemical inducers either individually or in combination inhibited growth of the tested pathogenic fungi. Biocontrol agents combined with chemical inducers recorded the highest inhibited growth especially in case SA + T. viride and SA + B. megaterium. Under green house and field conditions, all treatments significantly reduced damping-off and root rot/wilt severity and increased of survival plants. Also, these treatments increased fresh and weights of the survival plants in pots compared with control. The combination between biocontrol agents and chemical inducers were more effective than used of them individually and SA + T. viride was the best treatment in this respect. Also, under field conditions, all these treatments significantly increased growth parameters (plant height and number of branches per plant) and yield components (number of pods per plant and number of seeds per plant, weight of 100 seeds and total yield per feddan) and protein content in both seasons (2010~2011 and 2011~2012). Faba bean seeds soaked in SA + T. viride and SA + B. megaterium were recorded the highest growth parameters and yield components. Generally, the

  5. Effect of inoculum density and soil tillage on the development and severity of rhizoctonia root rot.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, K L; Paulitz, T C

    2008-03-01

    Rhizoctonia spp. cause substantial yield losses in direct-seeded cereal crops compared with conventional tillage. To investigate the mechanisms behind this increased disease, soils from tilled or direct-seeded fields were inoculated with Rhizoctonia spp. at population densities from 0.8 to 250 propagules per gram and planted with barley (Hordeum vulgare). The incidence and severity of disease did not differ between soils with different tillage histories. Both R. solani AG-8 and R. oryzae stunted plants at high inoculum densities, with the latter causing pre-emergence damping-off. High inoculum densities of both species stimulated early production of crown roots in barley seedlings. Intact soil cores from these same tilled and direct-seeded fields were used to evaluate the growth of Rhizoctonia spp. from colonized oat seeds. Growth of R. oryzae was not affected by previous tillage history. However, R. solani AG-8 grew more rapidly through soil from a long-term direct-seeded field compared to tilled soils. The differential response between these two experiments (mixed, homogenized soil versus intact soil) suggests that soil structure plays a major role in the proliferation of R. solani AG-8 through soils with different tillage histories. PMID:18944081

  6. FcStuA from Fusarium culmorum Controls Wheat Foot and Root Rot in a Toxin Dispensable Manner

    PubMed Central

    Scherm, Barbara; Balmas, Virgilio; Hoffmann, Lucien; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E.; Beyer, Marco; Migheli, Quirico

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium culmorum is one of the most harmful pathogens of durum wheat and is the causal agent of foot and root rot (FRR) disease. F. culmorum produces the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) that is involved in the pathogenic process. The role of the gene FcStuA, a StuA ortholog protein with an APSES domain sharing 98.5% homology to the FgStuA protein (FGSG10129), was determined by functional characterisation of deletion mutants obtained from two F. culmorum wild-type strains, FcUk99 (a highly pathogenic DON producer) and Fc233B (unable to produce toxin and with a mild pathogenic behavior). The ΔFcStuA mutants originating from both strains showed common phenotypic characters including stunted vegetative growth, loss of hydrophobicity of the mycelium, altered pigmentation, decreased activity of polygalacturonic enzymes and catalases, altered and reduced conidiation, delayed conidial germination patterns and complete loss of pathogenicity towards wheat stem base/root tissue. Glycolytic process efficiency [measured as growth on glucose as sole carbon (C) source] was strongly impaired and growth was partially restored on glutamic acid. Growth on pectin-like sources ranked in between glucose and glutamic acid with the following order (the lowest to the highest growth): beechwood xylan, sugarbeet arabinan, polygalacturonic acid, citrus pectin, apple pectin, potato azogalactan. DON production in the mutants originating from FcUK99 strain was significantly decreased (−95%) in vitro. Moreover, both sets of mutants were unable to colonise non-cereal plant tissues, i.e. apple and tomato fruits and potato tubers. No differences between mutants, ectopic and wild-type strains were observed concerning the level of resistance towards four fungicides belonging to three classes, the demethylase inhibitors epoxiconazole and tebuconzole, the succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor isopyrazam and the cytochrome bc1 inhibitor trifloxystrobin. StuA, given its multiple functions in cell

  7. The role of defoliation and root rot pathogen infection in driving the mode of drought-related physiological decline in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.).

    PubMed

    Aguadé, D; Poyatos, R; Gómez, M; Oliva, J; Martínez-Vilalta, J

    2015-03-01

    Drought-related tree die-off episodes have been observed in all vegetated continents. Despite much research effort, however, the multiple interactions between carbon starvation, hydraulic failure and biotic agents in driving tree mortality under field conditions are still not well understood. We analysed the seasonal variability of non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) in four organs (leaves, branches, trunk and roots), the vulnerability to embolism in roots and branches, native embolism (percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity (PLC)) in branches and the presence of root rot pathogens in defoliated and non-defoliated individuals in a declining Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) population in the NE Iberian Peninsula in 2012, which included a particularly dry and warm summer. No differences were observed between defoliated and non-defoliated pines in hydraulic parameters, except for a higher vulnerability to embolism at pressures below -2 MPa in roots of defoliated pines. No differences were found between defoliation classes in branch PLC. Total NSC (TNSC, soluble sugars plus starch) values decreased during drought, particularly in leaves. Defoliation reduced TNSC levels across tree organs, especially just before (June) and during (August) drought. Root rot infection by the fungal pathogen Onnia P. Karst spp. was detected but it did not appear to be associated to tree defoliation. However, Onnia infection was associated with reduced leaf-specific hydraulic conductivity and sapwood depth, and thus contributed to hydraulic impairment, especially in defoliated pines. Infection was also associated with virtually depleted root starch reserves during and after drought in defoliated pines. Moreover, defoliated and infected trees tended to show lower basal area increment. Overall, our results show the intertwined nature of physiological mechanisms leading to drought-induced mortality and the inherent difficulty of isolating their contribution under field conditions. PMID

  8. The BioCassava Plus program: Biofortification of cassava for sub-Saharan Africa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than 250 million Africans rely on the starchy root crop cassava (Manihot esculenta) as their staple source of calories. A typical cassava-based diet, however, provides less than 30% of the minimum daily requirement for protein and only 10-20% of that for iron, zinc, and vitamin A. The BioCassav...

  9. Cassava biology and physiology.

    PubMed

    El-Sharkawy, Mabrouk A

    2004-11-01

    Cassava or manioc (Manihot esculenta Crantz), a perennial shrub of the New World, currently is the sixth world food crop for more than 500 million people in tropical and sub-tropical Africa, Asia and Latin America. It is cultivated mainly by resource-limited small farmers for its starchy roots, which are used as human food either fresh when low in cyanogens or in many processed forms and products, mostly starch, flour, and for animal feed. Because of its inherent tolerance to stressful environments, where other food crops would fail, it is often considered a food-security source against famine, requiring minimal care. Under optimal environmental conditions, it compares favorably in production of energy with most other major staple food crops due to its high yield potential. Recent research at the Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT) in Colombia has demonstrated the ability of cassava to assimilate carbon at very high rates under high levels of humidity, temperature and solar radiation,which correlates with productivity across all environments whether dry or humid. When grown on very poor soils under prolonged drought for more than 6 months, the crop reduce both its leaf canopy and transpiration water loss, but its attached leaves remain photosynthetically active, though at greatly reduced rates. The main physiological mechanism underlying such a remarkable tolerance to drought was rapid stomatal closure under both atmospheric and edaphic water stress, protecting the leaf against dehydration while the plant depletes available soil water slowly during long dry periods. This drought tolerance mechanism leads to high crop water use efficiency values. Although the cassava fine root system is sparse, compared to other crops, it can penetrate below 2 m soil,thus enabling the crop to exploit deep water if available. Leaves of cassava and wild Manihot possess elevated activities of the C4 enzyme PEP carboxylase but lack the leaf Kranz anatomy typical of C4

  10. Transgenic sweet potato expressing thionin from barley gives resistance to black rot disease caused by Ceratocystis fimbriata in leaves and storage roots.

    PubMed

    Muramoto, Nobuhiko; Tanaka, Tomoko; Shimamura, Takashi; Mitsukawa, Norihiro; Hori, Etsuko; Koda, Katsunori; Otani, Motoyasu; Hirai, Masana; Nakamura, Kenzo; Imaeda, Takao

    2012-06-01

    Black rot of sweet potato caused by pathogenic fungus Ceratocystis fimbriata severely deteriorates both growth of plants and post-harvest storage. Antimicrobial peptides from various organisms have broad range activities of killing bacteria, mycobacteria, and fungi. Plant thionin peptide exhibited anti-fungal activity against C. fimbriata. A gene for barley α-hordothionin (αHT) was placed downstream of a strong constitutive promoter of E12Ω or the promoter of a sweet potato gene for β-amylase of storage roots, and introduced into sweet potato commercial cultivar Kokei No. 14. Transgenic E12Ω:αHT plants showed high-level expression of αHT mRNA in both leaves and storage roots. Transgenic β-Amy:αHT plants showed sucrose-inducible expression of αHT mRNA in leaves, in addition to expression in storage roots. Leaves of E12Ω:αHT plants exhibited reduced yellowing upon infection by C. fimbriata compared to leaves of non-transgenic Kokei No. 14, although the level of resistance was weaker than resistance cultivar Tamayutaka. Storage roots of both E12Ω:αHT and β-Amy:αHT plants exhibited reduced lesion areas around the site inoculated with C. fimbriata spores compared to Kokei No. 14, and some of the transgenic lines showed resistance level similar to Tamayutaka. Growth of plants and production of storage roots of these transgenic plants were not significantly different from non-transgenic plants. These results highlight the usefulness of transgenic sweet potato expressing antimicrobial peptide to reduce damages of sweet potato from the black rot disease and to reduce the use of agricultural chemicals. PMID:22212462

  11. Pyramided QTL underlying tolerance to Phytophthora root rot in mega-environments from soybean cultivars 'Conrad' and 'Hefeng 25'.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiuping; Han, Yingpeng; Teng, Weili; Zhang, Shuzheng; Yu, Kangfu; Poysa, Vaino; Anderson, Terry; Ding, Junjie; Li, Wenbin

    2010-08-01

    Phytophthora root rot (PRR) of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) is the second most important cause of yield loss by disease in North America, surpassed only by soybean cyst nematode (Wrather et al. in Can J Plant Pathol 23:115-121, 2001). Tolerance can provide economically useful disease control, conditioning partial resistance of soybean to PRR. The aims of this study were to identify new quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying tolerance to PRR, and to evaluate the effects of pyramided or stacked loci on the level of tolerance. A North American cultivar 'Conrad' (tolerant to PRR) was crossed with a northeastern China cultivar 'Hefeng 25' (tolerant to PRR). Through single-seed descent, 140 F2:5 and F2:6 recombinant inbred lines were advanced. A total of 164 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were used to construct a genetic linkage map. The percentage of seedling death was measured over 2 years (2007 and 2008) in the field at four naturally infested locations in Canada and China following additional soil infestation and in the greenhouse following inoculation with Phytophthora sojae isolate. A total of eight QTL underlying tolerance to PRR were identified, located in five linkage groups (F, D1b+w, A2, B1, and C2). The phenotypic variation contributed by the loci ranged from 4.24 to 27.98%. QPRR-1 (anchored in the interval of SSR markers Satt325 and Satt343 of LG F), QPRR-2 (anchored in the interval of Satt005 and Satt600 of LG D1b+w), and QPRR-3 (anchored in the interval of Satt579 and Sat_089 of LG D1b+w) derived their beneficial allele from 'Conrad'. They were located at chromosomal locations known to underlie PRR tolerance in diverse germplasm. Five QTL that derived beneficial alleles from 'Hefeng 25' were identified. The QTL (QPRR-1 to QPRR-7) that were detected across at least three environments were selected for loci stacking and to analyze the relationship between number of tolerance loci and disease loss percentage. The accumulation of tolerance loci was

  12. Microbial Properties of Composts That Suppress Damping-Off and Root Rot of Creeping Bentgrass Caused by Pythium graminicola.

    PubMed

    Craft, C M; Nelson, E B

    1996-05-01

    pressure was high (i.e., disease ratings high in uninoculated plots). A 1991 batch of turkey litter compost and the 1990 batch of Endicott biosolids were consistently suppressive to foliar symptoms of Pythium root rot on creeping bentgrass. This study indicates that suppression of Pythium diseases of creeping bentgrass in batches of brewery sludge and Endicott biosolids composts, and possibly in other suppressive composts examined in less detail in this study, is related directly to the microbial activities in the composts. On the other hand, the mechanisms of Pythium suppression in turkey litter and perhaps other poultry-based composts is not related directly to the compost microbial activity. Although turkey litter showed a lack of suppressiveness in laboratory bioassays and low microbial populations and activity, it resulted in a significant and consistent level of suppressiveness in field experiments. Therefore, the microbiological properties of Pythium-suppressive composts may differ substantially, and measurements of microbial populations and activity may not be predictive of the level of disease suppression in all composts. PMID:16535307

  13. Microbial Properties of Composts That Suppress Damping-Off and Root Rot of Creeping Bentgrass Caused by Pythium graminicola

    PubMed Central

    Craft, C. M.; Nelson, E. B.

    1996-01-01

    pressure was high (i.e., disease ratings high in uninoculated plots). A 1991 batch of turkey litter compost and the 1990 batch of Endicott biosolids were consistently suppressive to foliar symptoms of Pythium root rot on creeping bentgrass. This study indicates that suppression of Pythium diseases of creeping bentgrass in batches of brewery sludge and Endicott biosolids composts, and possibly in other suppressive composts examined in less detail in this study, is related directly to the microbial activities in the composts. On the other hand, the mechanisms of Pythium suppression in turkey litter and perhaps other poultry-based composts is not related directly to the compost microbial activity. Although turkey litter showed a lack of suppressiveness in laboratory bioassays and low microbial populations and activity, it resulted in a significant and consistent level of suppressiveness in field experiments. Therefore, the microbiological properties of Pythium-suppressive composts may differ substantially, and measurements of microbial populations and activity may not be predictive of the level of disease suppression in all composts. PMID:16535307

  14. The influence of soil moisture and Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis and intraspecific group on the incidence of damping-off and the incidence and severity of Rhizoctonia crown and root rot in sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia crown and root rot (Rhizoctonia solani) reduces plant stands, sugar quality and yield in sugar beet. To evaluate the influence of R. solani anastomosis (AG) and intraspecific groups and soil moisture on disease incidence and severity, a field trial was established in Ridgetown, Ontario, ...

  15. Iron and protein biofortification of cassava: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Guerrero, Elisa; Narayanan, Narayanan N; Ihemere, Uzoma; Sayre, Richard T

    2012-04-01

    Over two hundred and fifty million Africans rely on the starchy root crop cassava (Manihot esculenta) as their primary source of calories. Cassava roots, however, have the lowest protein:energy ratio of all the world's major staple crops. Furthermore, a typical cassava-based diet provides less than 10-20% of the required amounts of iron, zinc, vitamin A and vitamin E. The BioCassava Plus program employed modern biotechnologies to improve the health of Africans through development and delivery of novel cassava germplasm with increased nutrient levels. Here we describe the development of molecular strategies and their outcomes to meet minimum daily allowances for protein and iron in cassava based diets. We demonstrate that cyanogens play a central role in cassava nitrogen metabolism and that strategies employed to increase root protein levels result in reduced cyanogen levels in roots. We also demonstrate that enhancing root iron uptake has an impact on the expression of genes that regulate iron homeostasis in multiple tissues. These observations demonstrate the complex metabolic interactions involved in enhancing targeted nutrient levels in plants and identify potential new strategies for further enhancing nutrient levels in cassava. PMID:22226461

  16. Diversity in oil content and fatty acid profile in seeds of wild cassava germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta) is the only commercial species of the Manihot genus, cultivated for its starchy tuber roots. However, cassava seeds are known to be rich in oils and fats, there are scant reports on the content and properties of oil from cassava seeds and its wild relatives. Wild Manihot ...

  17. Unlocking the potential of tropical root crop biotechnology in east Africa by establishing a genetic transformation platform for local farmer-preferred cassava cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Nyaboga, Evans; Njiru, Joshua; Nguu, Edward; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Vanderschuren, Herve; Tripathi, Leena

    2013-01-01

    Cassava genetic transformation capacity is still mostly restricted to advanced laboratories in the USA, Europe and China; and its implementation and maintenance in African laboratories has remained scarce. The impact of transgenic technologies for genetic improvement of cassava will depend largely on the transfer of such capabilities to researchers in Africa, where cassava has an important socioeconomic niche. A major constraint to the development of genetic transformation technologies for cassava improvement has been the lack of an efficient and robust transformation and regeneration system. Despite the success achieved in genetic modification of few cassava cultivars, including the model cultivar 60444, transgenic cassava production remains difficult for farmer-preferred cultivars. In this study, a protocol for cultivar 60444 developed at ETH Zurich was successfully implemented and optimized to establish transformation of farmer-preferred cassava cultivars popular in east Africa. The conditions for production and proliferation of friable embryogenic calli (FEC) and Agrobacterium-mediated transformation were optimized for three east African farmer-preferred cultivars (Ebwanatereka, Kibandameno and Serere). Our results demonstrated transformation efficiencies of about 14–22 independent transgenic lines per 100 mg of FEC for farmer-preferred cultivars in comparison to 28 lines per 100 mg of the model cultivar 60444. The presence, integration and expression of the transgenes were confirmed by PCR, Southern blot analysis and histochemical GUS assay. This study reports the establishment of a cassava transformation platform at International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) hosted by Biosciences eastern and central Africa (BecA) hub in Kenya and provides the basis for transferring important traits such as virus resistance and prolonged shelf-life to farmer-preferred cultivars in east Africa. We anticipate that such platform will also be instrumental to transfer

  18. Cassava; African perspective on space agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Naomi; Njemanze, Philip; Nweke, Felix; Space Agriculture Task Force, J.; Katayama, Naomi; Yamashita, Masamichi

    Looking on African perspective in space agriculture may contribute to increase diversity, and enforce robustness for advanced life support capability. Cassava, Manihot esculentaand, is one of major crop in Africa, and could be a candidate of space food materials. Since resource is limited for space agriculture in many aspects, crop yield should be high in efficiency, and robust as well. The efficiency is measured by farming space and time. Harvest yield of cassava is about 41 MJ/ m2 (70 ton/ha) after 11 months of farming. Among rice, wheat, potato, and sweet potato, cassava is ranked to the first place (40 m2 ) in terms of farming area required to supply energy of 5 MJ/day, which is recommended for one person. Production of cassava could be made under poor condition, such as acidic soil, shortage of fertilizer, draught. Laterite, similar to Martian regolith. Propagation made by stem cutting is an advantage of cassava in space agriculture avoiding entomophilous or anemophilous process to pollinate. Feature of crop storage capability is additional factor that determines the efficiency in the whole process of agriculture. Cassava root tuber can be left in soil until its consumption. Cassava might be an African contribution to space agriculture.

  19. RNAi-mediated resistance to Cassava brown streak Uganda virus in transgenic cassava.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Jitender S; Ogwok, Emmanuel; Wagaba, Henry; Patil, Basavaprabhu L; Bagewadi, Basavaraj; Alicai, Titus; Gaitan-Solis, Eliana; Taylor, Nigel J; Fauquet, Claude M

    2011-09-01

    Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD), caused by Cassava brown streak Uganda virus (CBSUV) and Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV), is of new epidemic importance to cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) production in East Africa, and an emerging threat to the crop in Central and West Africa. This study demonstrates that at least one of these two ipomoviruses, CBSUV, can be efficiently controlled using RNA interference (RNAi) technology in cassava. An RNAi construct targeting the near full-length coat protein (FL-CP) of CBSUV was expressed constitutively as a hairpin construct in cassava. Transgenic cassava lines expressing small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against this sequence showed 100% resistance to CBSUV across replicated graft inoculation experiments. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed the presence of CBSUV in leaves and some tuberous roots from challenged controls, but not in the same tissues from transgenic plants. This is the first demonstration of RNAi-mediated resistance to the ipomovirus CBSUV in cassava. PMID:21726367

  20. First Report of Rhizoctonia spp. causing a root rot of the invasive rangeland weed Lepidium draba in North America.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The exotic, invasive perennial rangeland weed Lepidium draba spreads rapidly and reduces native species diversity. The extensive root system of L. draba constitutes 76% of plant biomass. Thus searches have been done for biocontrol agents that target root tissue or that may interact with a weevil, Ce...

  1. Comparative effect of partial root-zone drying and deficit irrigation on incidence of blossom-end rot in tomato under varied calcium rates.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanqi; Feng, Hao; Liu, Fulai

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated the comparative effects of reduced irrigation regimes--partial root-zone drying (PRD) and conventional deficit irrigation (DI)--on the incidence of blossom-end rot (BER) in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) under three Ca-fertilization rates: 0, 100, and 200mg Ca kg(-1) soil (denoted Ca0, Ca1, and Ca2, respectively). The plants were grown in split-root pots in a climate-controlled glasshouse and treated with PRD and DI during early flowering to the fruit maturity stage. The results showed that, in comparison with DI treatment, PRD significantly reduced BER incidence. A greater xylem sap abscisic acid concentration, lower stomatal conductance, and higher plant water status in the PRD in relation to the DI plants might have contributed to the increased fruit Ca uptake, and could have reduced BER development in tomato fruits. Therefore, under conditions with limited freshwater resources, application of PRD irrigation could be a promising approach for saving water and for preventing BER development in tomatoes. PMID:23530128

  2. Comparative effect of partial root-zone drying and deficit irrigation on incidence of blossom-end rot in tomato under varied calcium rates

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yanqi; Feng, Hao; Liu, Fulai

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the comparative effects of reduced irrigation regimes—partial root-zone drying (PRD) and conventional deficit irrigation (DI)—on the incidence of blossom-end rot (BER) in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) under three Ca-fertilization rates: 0, 100, and 200mg Ca kg–1 soil (denoted Ca0, Ca1, and Ca2, respectively). The plants were grown in split-root pots in a climate-controlled glasshouse and treated with PRD and DI during early flowering to the fruit maturity stage. The results showed that, in comparison with DI treatment, PRD significantly reduced BER incidence. A greater xylem sap abscisic acid concentration, lower stomatal conductance, and higher plant water status in the PRD in relation to the DI plants might have contributed to the increased fruit Ca uptake, and could have reduced BER development in tomato fruits. Therefore, under conditions with limited freshwater resources, application of PRD irrigation could be a promising approach for saving water and for preventing BER development in tomatoes. PMID:23530128

  3. An overview of protein identification studies in cassava.

    PubMed

    Batista de Souza, Cláudia R; dos Reis, Sávio P; Castelo Branco Carvalho, Luiz J

    2015-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) belongs to the Euphorbiaceae family and is originated from the Southern Amazon basin. The storage root is the most important product of cassava as food for more than 800 million people in Africa, Asia and Latin America. In this review, we present a retrospective of studies aiming the identification of cassava proteins, starting from the first investigations using SDS-PAGE and classical two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) to recent studies with advanced technologies such as high-resolution 2DE, mass spectrometry, and iTRAQ-based analysis that have contributed for characterization of cassava proteome. Several cassava proteins have been identified, including those involved in the storage root formation and post-harvest physiological deterioration processes. PMID:25707473

  4. Generation of cyanogen-free transgenic cassava.

    PubMed

    Siritunga, Dimuth; Sayre, Richard T

    2003-07-01

    Cassava ( Manihot esculenta Crantz.) is the major source of calories for subsistence farmers in sub-Saharan Africa. Cassava, however, contains potentially toxic levels of the cyanogenic glucoside, linamarin. The cyanogen content of cassava foods can be reduced to safe levels by maceration, soaking, rinsing and baking; however, short-cut processing techniques can yield toxic food products. Our objective was to eliminate cyanogens from cassava so as to eliminate the need for food processing. To achieve this goal we generated transgenic acyanogenic cassava plants in which the expression of the cytochrome P450 genes ( CYP79D1 and CYP79D2), that catalyze the first-dedicated step in linamarin synthesis, was inhibited. Using a leaf-specific promoter to drive the antisense expression of the CYP79D1/ CYP79D2 genes we observed up to a 94% reduction in leaf linamarin content associated with an inhibition of CYP79D1 and CYP79D2 expression. Importantly, the linamarin content of roots also was reduced by 99% in transgenic plants having between 60 and 94% reduction in leaf linamarin content. Analysis of CYP79D1/ CYP79D2 transcript levels in transgenic roots indicated they were unchanged relative to wild-type plants. These results suggest that linamarin is transported from leaves to roots and that a threshold level of leaf linamarin production is required for transport. PMID:14520563

  5. The BioCassava plus program: biofortification of cassava for sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Sayre, Richard; Beeching, John R; Cahoon, Edgar B; Egesi, Chiedozie; Fauquet, Claude; Fellman, John; Fregene, Martin; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Mallowa, Sally; Manary, Mark; Maziya-Dixon, Bussie; Mbanaso, Ada; Schachtman, Daniel P; Siritunga, Dimuth; Taylor, Nigel; Vanderschuren, Herve; Zhang, Peng

    2011-01-01

    More than 250 million Africans rely on the starchy root crop cassava (Manihot esculenta) as their staple source of calories. A typical cassava-based diet, however, provides less than 30% of the minimum daily requirement for protein and only 10%-20% of that for iron, zinc, and vitamin A. The BioCassava Plus (BC+) program has employed modern biotechnologies intended to improve the health of Africans through the development and delivery of genetically engineered cassava with increased nutrient (zinc, iron, protein, and vitamin A) levels. Additional traits addressed by BioCassava Plus include increased shelf life, reductions in toxic cyanogenic glycosides to safe levels, and resistance to viral disease. The program also provides incentives for the adoption of biofortified cassava. Proof of concept was achieved for each of the target traits. Results from field trials in Puerto Rico, the first confined field trials in Nigeria to use genetically engineered organisms, and ex ante impact analyses support the efficacy of using transgenic strategies for the biofortification of cassava. PMID:21526968

  6. Antagonistic effects of several bacteria on Fusarium oxysporum, the causal agent of root and crown rot of onion under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Sharifi-Tehrani, A; Saberi-Riseh, R; Heidarian, R

    2004-01-01

    Onion (Allium cepa) is one of the most important vegetable crop which is commonly used as a food supplement. This plant is found to be vulnerable to various pathogenic infections during its growth development. Among different onion diseases, root and crown rot,caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cepa, s considered an importantfungal disease. In this study, the inhibitory effect of Bacillus cereus (isolates 22 and 52), B. subtilis (isolate 126), Pseudomonas fluorescens (isolates 48 and CHAO), benomyl fungicide and a combination of isolates CHAO and 22 and isolate 52 and benomyl were investigated on disease development under the field condition. This experiment was carried out in a randomize complete blocks with 10 treatments and three repetitions. Grouping of treatments was done at 5% level using Duncan multiple comparison test. It was also demonstrated that isolate 126 was the most effective antagonist with regard to crop yield but other treatments despite showing significant on plant growth factors were less effective in increasing crop yield. PMID:15756854

  7. Genome sequences of two Phytophthora species responsible for Sudden Oak Death and Soybean Root Rot provide novel insights into their evolutionary origins and mechanisms of pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, Brett M.; Tripathi, Sucheta; Aerts, Andrea; Bensasson, Douda; Dehal, Paramvir; Dubchak, Inna; Garbelotto, Matteo; Gijzen, Mark; Huang, Wayne; Ivors, Kelly; Jiang, Rays; Kamoun, Sophien; Krampis, Konstantinos; Lamour, Kurt; McDonald, Hayes; Medina, Monica; Morris, Paul; Putnam, Nik; Rash, Sam; Salamov, Asaf; Smith, Brian; Smith, Joe; Terry, Astrid; Torto, Trudy; Grigoriev, Igor; Rokhsar, Daniel; Boore, Jeffrey

    2005-12-01

    The approximately 60 species of Phytophthora are all destructive pathogens, causing rots of roots, stems, leaves and fruits of a wide range of agriculturally and ornamentally important plants (1). Some species, such as P. cinnamomi, P. parasitica and P. cactorum, each attack hundreds of different plant host species, whereas others are more restricted. Some of the crops where Phytophthora infections cause the greatest financial losses include potato, soybean, tomato, alfalfa, tobacco, peppers, cucurbits, pineapple, strawberry, raspberry and a wide range of perennial tree crops, especially citrus, avocado, almonds, walnuts, apples and cocoa, and they also heavily affect the ornamental, nursery and forestry industries. The economic damage overall to crops in the United States by Phytophthora species is estimated in the tens of billions of dollars, including the costs of control measures, and worldwide it is many times this amount (1). In the northern midwest of the U.S., P. sojae causes $200 million in annual losses to soybean alone, and worldwide causes around $1-2 billion in losses per year. P. infestans infections resulted in the Irish potato famine last century and continues to be a difficult and worsening problem for potato and tomato growers worldwide, with worldwide costs estimated at $5 billion per year.

  8. Engineering cyanogen synthesis and turnover in cassava (Manihot esculenta).

    PubMed

    Siritunga, Dimuth; Sayre, Richard

    2004-11-01

    Cassava is the major root crop for a quarter billion subsistence farmers in sub-Saharan Africa. It is valued for its ability to grow in adverse environments and the food security it provides. Cassava contains potentially toxic levels of cyanogenic glycosides (linamarin) which protect the plant from herbivory and theft. The cyanogens, including linamarin and its deglycosylated product, acetone cyanohydrin, can be efficiently removed from the root by various processing procedures. Short-cuts in processing, which may occur during famines, can result in only partial removal of cyanogens. Residual cyanogens in cassava foods may cause neurological disorders or paralysis, particularly in nutritionally compromised individuals. To address this problem and to further understand the function of cyanogenic glycosides in cassava, we have generated transgenic cassava in which cyanogenic glycoside synthesis has been selectively inhibited in leaves and roots by antisense expression of CYP79D1/D2 gene fragments. The CYP79D1/D2 genes encode two highly similar cytochrome P450s that catalyze the first-dedicated step in cyanogenic glycoside synthesis. Transgenic plants in which the expression of these genes was selectively inhibited in leaves had substantially reduced (60- 94% reduction) linamarin leaf levels. Surprisingly, these plants also had a greater than a 99% reduction in root linamarin content. In contrast, transgenic plants in which the CYP79D1/D2 transcripts were reduced to non-detectable levels in roots had normal root linamarin levels. These results demonstrate that linamarin synthesized in leaves is transported to the roots and accounts for nearly all of the root linamarin content. Importantly, transgenic plants having reduced leaf and root linamarin content were unable to grow in the absence of reduced nitrogen (NH3) . Cassava roots have previously been demonstrated to have an active cyanide assimilation pathway leading to the synthesis of amino acids. We propose that

  9. Phytophthora pseudosyringae sp. nov., a new species causing root and collar rot of deciduous tree species in Europe.

    PubMed

    Jung, Thomas; Nechwatal, Jan; Cooke, David E L; Hartmann, Günther; Blaschke, Markus; Osswald, Wolfgang F; Duncan, James M; Delatour, Claude

    2003-07-01

    In several studies of oak decline in Europe, a semi-papillate homothallic Phytophthora taxon was consistently isolated, together with other Phytophthora species, from rhizosphere soil samples. It was also found associated with necrotic fine roots and stem necroses of Fagus sylvatica and Alnus glutinosa. Due to morphological and physiological similarities, the semi-papillate isolates were previously identified as P. syringae by various authors. The morphology, physiology and pathogenicity against fine roots of Quercus robur, Q. petraea and F. sylvatica, bark of A. glutinosa, leaves of Ilex aquifolium and apple fruits of this Phytophthora species are described and compared with those of related and similar Phytophthora species, namely P. ilicis, P. psychrophila, P. quercina, P. citricola and P. syringae. The phylogenetic placement on the basis of ITS and mtDNA sequence data was also examined. Isolates of this taxon produce colonies with stellate to rosaceous growth patterns and limited aerial mycelium on various agar media. Antheridia are predominantly paragynous. In water culture catenulate hyphal swellings and semi-papillate caducous sporangia, that are usually limoniform, ellipsoid or ovoid, are formed abundandly, mostly in lax or dense sympodia. This taxon is a moderately slow growing, low temperature species with optimum and maximum temperatures around 20 and 25 degrees C, respectively. Tested isolates are moderately aggressive to fine roots of oaks and beech, highly aggressive to holly leaves and apple fruits, and slightly pathogenic to alder bark. Thirteen tested isolates had an identical and distinct ITS sequence which was more similar to that of P. ilicis and P. psychrophila than any other known taxa. On the basis of their unique combination of morphological characters, colony growth patterns, cardinal temperatures for growth, growth rates, pathogenicity to oaks, beech, alder, apple and holly, their host range, and ITS and mtDNA sequences the semi

  10. Cassava genetic transformation and its application in breeding.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Zheng, Qijie; Ma, Qiuxiang; Gadidasu, Kranthi Kumar; Zhang, Peng

    2011-07-01

    As a major source of food, cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is an important root crop in the tropics and subtropics of Africa and Latin America, and serves as raw material for the production of starches and bioethanol in tropical Asia. Cassava improvement through genetic engineering not only overcomes the high heterozygosity and serious trait separation that occurs in its traditional breeding, but also quickly achieves improved target traits. Since the first report on genetic transformation in cassava in 1996, the technology has gradually matured over almost 15 years of development and has overcome cassava genotype constraints, changing from mode cultivars to farmer-preferred ones. Significant progress has been made in terms of an increased resistance to pests and diseases, biofortification, and improved starch quality, building on the fundamental knowledge and technologies related to planting, nutrition, and the processing of this important food crop that has often been neglected. Therefore, cassava has great potential in food security and bioenergy development worldwide. PMID:21564542