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Sample records for routine clinical practice

  1. COPD management: role of symptom assessment in routine clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    van der Molen, Thys; Miravitlles, Marc; Kocks, Janwillem WH

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) present with a variety of symptoms that significantly impair health-related quality of life. Despite this, COPD treatment and its management are mainly based on lung function assessments. There is increasing evidence that conventional lung function measures alone do not correlate well with COPD symptoms and their associated impact on patients’ everyday lives. Instead, symptoms should be assessed routinely, preferably by using patient-centered questionnaires that provide a more accurate guide to the actual burden of COPD. Numerous questionnaires have been developed in an attempt to find a simple and reliable tool to use in everyday clinical practice. In this paper, we review three such patient-reported questionnaires recommended by the latest Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines, ie, the modified Medical Research Council questionnaire, the clinical COPD questionnaire, and the COPD Assessment Test, as well as other symptom-specific questionnaires that are currently being developed. PMID:24143085

  2. Sitagliptin: Is It Effective in Routine Clinical Practice?

    PubMed Central

    Mohan Dallumal, Rita; Chua, Siew Siang; Wu, David Bin-Chia; Vethakkan, Shireene Ratna

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The present study was conducted to determine the glycaemic effects of sitagliptin in type 2 diabetes patients. Methods. Data was collected from patient medical records of a major teaching hospital in Malaysia, from 2009 to 2012. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values prior to and up to 12 months after the initiation of sitagliptin were analysed. The change in HbA1c values was accounted for based on a generalized linear model generated using the Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) method. Results and Discussion. Of the 457 patients, 53.6% were elderly and 81.4% were overweight. The mean HbA1c (standard deviation) before initiation of sitagliptin was 8.5 (1.4)%. This dropped to 7.7 (1.4)%, 3 to 6 months after initiation of sitagliptin, with a mean difference of 0.8% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.7–1.0; P < 0.001). However, this value increased to 8.0 (1.7)% after 7 to 12 months on sitagliptin (P = 0.002) with a mean difference from baseline of 0.6% (95% CI: 0.4–0.7; P < 0.001). Conclusion. In routine clinical practice, sitagliptin produces a significant reduction in mean HbA1c (0.8%) within the first 6 months of use which corresponds to efficacy data obtained in controlled clinical trials. However, this reduction was lesser, 7 to 12 month later. PMID:26089904

  3. Diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome in routine clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Hills, J; Machin, SJ; Cohen, H

    2013-01-01

    The updated international consensus criteria for definite antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are useful for scientific clinical studies. However, there remains a need for diagnostic criteria for routine clinical use. We audited the results of routine antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) in a cohort of 193 consecutive patients with aPL positivity-based testing for lupus anticoagulant (LA), IgG and IgM anticardiolipin (aCL) and anti-ß2glycoprotein-1 antibodies (aß2GPI). Medium/high-titre aCL/aβ2GPI was defined as >99th percentile. Low-titre aCL/aβ2GPI positivity (>95th < 99th percentile) was considered positive for obstetric but not for thrombotic APS. One hundred of the 145 patients fulfilled both clinical and laboratory criteria for definite APS. Twenty-six women with purely obstetric APS had persistent low-titre aCL and/or aβ2GPI. With the inclusion of these patients, 126 of the 145 patients were considered to have APS. Sixty-seven out of 126 patients were LA-negative, of whom 12 had aCL only, 37 had aβ2GPI only and 18 positive were for both. The omission of aCL or aβ2GPI testing from investigation of APS would have led to a failure to diagnose APS in 9.5% and 29.4% of patients, respectively. Our data suggest that LA, aCL and aβ2GPI testing are all required for the accurate diagnosis of APS and that low-titre antibodies should be included in the diagnosis of obstetric APS. PMID:22988029

  4. Replacing manual sphygmomanometers with automated blood pressure measurement in routine clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Myers, Martin G

    2014-01-01

    1. Conventional manual measurement of blood pressure (BP) in clinical practice is no longer considered to be the best method for evaluating a patient's BP status. Home BP and 24 h ambulatory BP monitoring are now recommended for the diagnosis and management of hypertension.  2. Recent studies provide an alternative to conventional office BP, namely automated office (AO) BP, which involves multiple BP readings taken with a fully automated device with the patient resting quietly alone. Automated office BP is preferable to routine manual office BP in that it exhibits improved accuracy and a stronger relationship to both ambulatory BP and target organ damage. 3. Having the patient alone eliminates conversation between the patient and the observer, a cause of 'white coat hypertension'. The use of an automated device improves accuracy, reduces digit preference, minimizes observer bias and facilitates the recording of multiple BP readings.  4. Comparative BP data obtained in clinical studies in both research settings and routine community practice support the use of a cut-off point of 135/85 mmHg for defining hypertension using AOBP, which is the same cut-off point currently recommended for awake ambulatory BP and home BP. 5. Reduction of the white coat response using AOBP should reduce the need to monitor patients with ambulatory BP and home BP after initiation of antihypertensive therapy. There is now sufficient evidence to consider replacing manual office BP with AOBP in routine clinical practice. PMID:23819734

  5. Peroral small-intestinal biopsy: experience with the hydraulic multiple biopsy instrument in routine clinical practice.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, B B; Losowsky, M S

    1976-01-01

    Experience of the peroral, hydraulic, multiple, small-bowel biopsy instrument is recorded and compared with reported experience of other peroral biopsy instruments. It is concluded that, in routine clinical practice, there is no particular danger associated with this instrument despite warnings to the contrary. Furthermore, biopsies are obtained at least as quickly as with other instruments and with great reliability. Since this instrument also enables multiple, precisely located biopsies to be taken from various levels of the small intestine, it could be considered the instrument of choice for peroral jejunal biopsy. PMID:1086269

  6. Incorporation of pharmacogenomics into routine clinical practice: the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) guideline development process.

    PubMed

    Caudle, Kelly E; Klein, Teri E; Hoffman, James M; Muller, Daniel J; Whirl-Carrillo, Michelle; Gong, Li; McDonagh, Ellen M; Sangkuhl, Katrin; Thorn, Caroline F; Schwab, Matthias; Agundez, Jose A G; Freimuth, Robert R; Huser, Vojtech; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; Iwuchukwu, Otito F; Crews, Kristine R; Scott, Stuart A; Wadelius, Mia; Swen, Jesse J; Tyndale, Rachel F; Stein, C Michael; Roden, Dan; Relling, Mary V; Williams, Marc S; Johnson, Samuel G

    2014-02-01

    The Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) publishes genotype-based drug guidelines to help clinicians understand how available genetic test results could be used to optimize drug therapy. CPIC has focused initially on well-known examples of pharmacogenomic associations that have been implemented in selected clinical settings, publishing nine to date. Each CPIC guideline adheres to a standardized format and includes a standard system for grading levels of evidence linking genotypes to phenotypes and assigning a level of strength to each prescribing recommendation. CPIC guidelines contain the necessary information to help clinicians translate patient-specific diplotypes for each gene into clinical phenotypes or drug dosing groups. This paper reviews the development process of the CPIC guidelines and compares this process to the Institute of Medicine's Standards for Developing Trustworthy Clinical Practice Guidelines. PMID:24479687

  7. Incorporation of Pharmacogenomics into Routine Clinical Practice: the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) Guideline Development Process

    PubMed Central

    Caudle, Kelly E.; Klein, Teri E.; Hoffman, James M.; Müller, Daniel J.; Whirl-Carrillo, Michelle; Gong, Li; McDonagh, Ellen M.; Sangkuhl, Katrin; Thorn, Caroline F.; Schwab, Matthias; Agúndez, José A.G.; Freimuth, Robert R.; Huser, Vojtech; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; Iwuchukwu, Otito F.; Crews, Kristine R.; Scott, Stuart A.; Wadelius, Mia; Swen, Jesse J.; Tyndale, Rachel F.; Stein, C. Michael; Roden, Dan; Relling, Mary V.; Williams, Marc S.; Johnson, Samuel G.

    2014-01-01

    The Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) publishes genotype-based drug guidelines to help clinicians understand how available genetic test results could be used to optimize drug therapy. CPIC has focused initially on well-known examples of pharmacogenomic associations that have been implemented in selected clinical settings, publishing nine to date. Each CPIC guideline adheres to a standardized format and includes a standard system for grading levels of evidence linking genotypes to phenotypes and assigning a level of strength to each prescribing recommendation. CPIC guidelines contain the necessary information to help clinicians translate patient-specific diplotypes for each gene into clinical phenotypes or drug dosing groups. This paper reviews the development process of the CPIC guidelines and compares this process to the Institute of Medicine’s Standards for Developing Trustworthy Clinical Practice Guidelines. PMID:24479687

  8. Feasibility and Validity of the Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis Activity Index in Routine Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Dotson, Jennifer L.; Crandall, Wallace V.; Zhang, Peixin; Forrest, Christopher B; Bailey, L. Charles; Colletti, Richard B.; Kappelman, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis Activity Index (PUCAI) is a non-invasive disease activity index developed as a clinical trial endpoint. More recently, practice guidelines have recommended the use of PUCAI in routine clinical care. We therefore sought to evaluate the feasibility, validity and responsiveness of PUCAI in a large, diverse collection of pediatric gastroenterology practices. Methods We extracted data from the two most recent encounters for patients with ulcerative colitis in the ImproveCareNow registry. Feasibility was determined by the percent of patients for whom all PUCAI components were recorded, validity by correlation of PUCAI scores across Physician Global Assessment (PGA) categories, and responsiveness to change by the correlation between the change in PUCAI and PGA scores between visits. Results 2503 patients were included (49.5% male, age 15.2±4.1 years, disease duration 3.7±3.2 years). All items in the PUCAI were completed for 96% of visits. PUCAI demonstrated excellent discriminatory ability between remission, mild and moderate disease; discrimination between moderate and severe disease was less robust. There was good correlation with PGA [r=0.76 (p<0.001), weighted kappa k=0.73 (p<0.001)]. The PUCAI change scores correlated well with PGA change scores (p<0.001). Test-retest reliability of the PUCAI was good (intra-class correlation coefficient=0.72 [95% CI 0.70–0.75], p<0.001). Guyatt’s responsiveness statistic was 1.18 and the correlation of ΔPUCAI with ΔPGA was 0.69 (p<0.001). Conclusions The PUCAI is feasible to use in routine clinical settings. Evidence of its validity and responsiveness support its use as a clinical tool for monitoring disease activity for patients with ulcerative colitis. PMID:25221935

  9. Atrial Fibrillation Management Strategies in Routine Clinical Practice: Insights from the International RealiseAF Survey

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chern-En; Naditch-Brûlé, Lisa; Brette, Sandrine; Silva-Cardoso, José; Gamra, Habib; Murin, Jan; Zharinov, Oleg J.; Steg, Philippe Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) can be managed with rhythm- or rate-control strategies. There are few data from routine clinical practice on the frequency with which each strategy is used and their correlates in terms of patients’ clinical characteristics, AF control, and symptom burden. Methods RealiseAF was an international, cross-sectional, observational survey of 11,198 patients with AF. The aim of this analysis was to describe patient profiles and symptoms according to the AF management strategy used. A multivariate logistic regression identified factors associated with AF management strategy at the end of the visit. Results Among 10,497 eligible patients, 53.7% used a rate-control strategy, compared with 34.5% who used a rhythm-control strategy. In 11.8% of patients, no clear strategy was stated. The proportion of patients with AF-related symptoms (EHRA Class > = II) was 78.1% (n = 4396/5630) for those using a rate-control strategy vs. 67.8% for those using a rhythm-control strategy (p<0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that age <75 years or the paroxysmal or persistent form of AF favored the choice of a rhythm-control strategy. A change in strategy was infrequent, even in patients with European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) Class > = II. Conclusions In the RealiseAF routine clinical practice survey, rate control was more commonly used than rhythm control, and a change in strategy was uncommon, even in symptomatic patients. In almost 12% of patients, no clear strategy was stated. Physician awareness regarding optimal management strategies for AF may be improved. PMID:26800084

  10. The cardiac troponins: uses in routine clinical practice. Experiences from GUSTO and other clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, P

    1998-11-01

    Recent advances in pharmacological and mechanical approaches to acute coronary syndromes have led to rapid changes in the management of patients admitted with acute coronary syndromes. These changes have been mirrored by the appearance of newer highly specific biochemical markers of myocardial damage particularly the cardiac troponins. When new biochemical markers become available it is the responsibility of the clinical chemist to evaluate them critically in terms of sensitivity, specificity, efficiency and analyzer precision, in the rigid setting of quality control that laboratories practise, and to compare them with other markers. When the data are shown to Clinical Cardiologists with supporting statements such as 'useful management tool' and 'can be used for early diagnosis of Myocardial Infarction', a different set of questions may need to be answered. The 'So what?' response is most frequent and is the most important hurdle that these newer biochemical markers have to overcome to convince physicians to change their current practice. This presentation will review the results of studies that have examined the potential clinical usefulness of the cardiac troponins with respect to diagnosis and risk stratification of patients admitted with suspected acute coronary syndromes. Any troponin variable that survives the 'so what' question has one further major hurdle to overcome. This is the requirement to inform physicians what different therapeutic strategies they should follow if the variable is present. Available clinical trial evidence about differing management options for patients according to their troponin status will be reviewed and outline management algorithms will be presented. Many questions remain unanswered and these will be included at the time points where they may be relevant. PMID:9857942

  11. Implementing computerized adaptive tests in routine clinical practice: experience implementing CATs.

    PubMed

    Hart, Dennis L; Deutscher, Daniel; Werneke, Mark W; Holder, Judy; Wang, Ying-Chih

    2010-01-01

    This paper traces the development, testing and use of CATs in outpatient rehabilitation from the perspective of one proprietary international medical rehabilitation database management company, Focus On Therapeutic Outcomes, Inc. (FOTO). Between the FOTO data in the United States and Maccabi Healthcare Services data in Israel, over 1.5 million CATs have been administered. Using findings from published studies and results of internal public relations surveys, we discuss (1) reasons for CAT development, (2) how the CATs were received by clinicians and patients in the United States and Israel, (3) results of psychometric property assessments of CAT estimated measures of functional status in routine clinical practice, (4) clinical interpretation of CAT functional status measures, and (5) future development directions. Results of scientific studies and business history provide confidence that CATs are pertinent and valuable to clinicians, patients and payers, and suggest CATs will be prominent in the development of future integrated computerized electronic medical record systems with electronic outcomes data collection. PMID:20847476

  12. [Acceptance of electronic data processing supported documentation of ultrasound findings in routine clinical practice. A survey].

    PubMed

    Birkner, B; Fischer, J; Heyder, N

    1994-10-01

    We carried out a survey to determine the acceptance of the ultrasound documentation software, CUBUS, in clinical practice. Since August 1, 1988, CUBUS, versions V1.01 to V2.02 has been employed in clinical routine. By October 1991 10,850 reports had been stored in version 2.02. The software is installed on a personal computer (Siemens PCD-2, 40MB, 640 KB RAM) to which a laserprinter is connected. The work of operating the system is shared between the nursing and medical staff. In order to investigate the acceptance of the printed reports produced with this system, we carried out a poll among the physicians working at the hospital. Among the 86 physicians who receive 95% of the US reports, 58% (n = 50) responded. On the basis of the categories good, satisfactory, adequate and poor, we requested an assessment of layout, presentation, comprehension, completeness and overall impression. The overall impression was assessed as good or satisfactory in 34% and 42%, respectively. In the case of the individual criteria (see above), the categories good and satisfactory scored 62% and 34%, 58% and 32%, 68% and 18% and 72% and 24%, respectively. The terminology used was accepted by 84%. Addition of, for example, image documentation, and endosonography, will expand the advantages of the input of findings and further improve the good overall impression made by the report printout in our survey, so that the relatively long input time requirement accounting for some 30% of the total examination time, is accordingly justified. PMID:7801098

  13. Health related quality of life assessment in the routine clinical practice of a dermatology unit.

    PubMed

    Tabolli, Stefano; Baliva, Giannandrea; Lombardo, Giuseppe Alfonso; Sampogna, Francesca; Di Pietro, Cristina; Mannooranparampil, T J; Alvetreti, Gabriele; Abeni, Damiano

    2006-01-01

    A descriptive study in a Dermatological Research Institution in Rome, Italy, was conducted to test the feasibility and acceptability of health related quality of life (HRQoL) assessment in the daily routine. Quality of life, and psychosocial distress evaluations were obtained for each patient. Patients were invited to complete the Skindex-29, GHQ-12, and SF-36. Results were returned to the clinical staff using standardised feed-back forms with: a) "categories" of QoL scores to help interpreting Skindex-29 scores; b) "warnings" pointing out problems that patients experienced "all the time"; c) categories of GHQ-12 scores for minor psychiatric problems; d) the classical SF-36 graph depicting the patient's "QoL profile" with normative references. The clinical staff were trained, and then their attitudes and behaviours were surveyed using a standardised questionnaire. For all 170 participants enrolled (63% males, 35% age > 64 years), feed-back forms were provided within three hours from data collection. For patients with repeated hospitalisations time-trends in HRQoL measurements were also provided. The acceptability, both for patients and the clinical staff, was high but the actual impact on clinical activities was limited. The routine assessment of HRQoL in dermatology is feasible and well accepted both by patients and by the clinical staff. The application of these widely used questionnaires should be implemented in a larger scale and evaluated in different settings. PMID:16935800

  14. Prevalence and predictors of recovery from chronic fatigue syndrome in a routine clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Flo, Elisabeth; Chalder, Trudie

    2014-12-01

    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is one of the treatments of choice for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). However, the factors that predict recovery are unknown. The objective of this study was to ascertain the recovery rate among CFS patients receiving CBT in routine practice and to explore possible predictors of recovery. Recovery was defined as no longer meeting Oxford or CDC criteria for CFS measured at 6 months follow-up. A composite score representing full recovery additionally included the perception of improvement, and normal population levels of fatigue and of physical functioning. Logistic regression was used to examine predictors of recovery. Predictors included age, gender, cognitive and behavioural responses to symptoms, work and social adjustment, beliefs about emotions, perfectionism, anxiety and depression at baseline. At 6 months follow-up 37.5% of the patients no longer met either the Oxford or the CDC criteria for CFS while 18.3% were fully recovered. Multivariate analyses showed that worse scores on the work and social adjustment scale, unhelpful beliefs about emotions, high levels of depression and older age were associated with reduced odds for recovery. Recovery rates in this routine practice were comparable to previous RCTs. There was a wide spectrum of significant predictors for recovery. PMID:25222752

  15. Feasibility of quality of life assessment in routine clinical oncology practice: a Tunisian study.

    PubMed

    Masmoudi, A; Frikha, M; Daoud, J

    2009-01-01

    Limited research has been devoted to quality of life (QOL) of cancer patients in developing countries. To assess the feasibility of QOL assessment in a cohort of Tunisian cancer patients, the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire was administered to 23 women treated with adjuvant chemotherapy for early breast cancer on an outpatient basis at baseline and during the 3rd cycle of chemotherapy. We observed a significant deterioration in physical functioning, cognitive functioning and social functioning during chemotherapy. However, a wide range of methodological and practical obstacles to routine QOL evaluation were identified through this study. Further improvement of cancer care infrastructure and public education is still needed before reliable QOL studies can be performed. PMID:19554983

  16. Dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography in routine clinical practice in 2013.

    PubMed

    Badr, S; Laurent, N; Régis, C; Boulanger, L; Lemaille, S; Poncelet, E

    2014-03-01

    To date, analysis of the vascularisation of breast lesions mainly relies on MR imaging. However, the accessibility of MRI is sometimes limited and has led to the development of new means of imaging, such as dual-energy contrast-enhanced mammography, which provides data on the vascularisation of the breast along with the usual morphological information. The purpose of this paper is to present this new imaging technique as well as the recent references, illustrated by clinical reports derived from our everyday practice to focus on the advantages and disadvantages of this new breast exploration. Dual-energy contrast-enhanced mammography is a recent, seemingly promising technique, in the management of breast cancer. The main advantages consist of its easy installation, the good tolerance and the comfort in the interpretation of difficult to read mammograms. However, the indications and the role of dual-energy contrast-enhanced mammography still have to be determined within the diagnostic strategy of breast tumours. New studies are expected, especially to compare dual-energy contrast-enhanced mammography with breast MRI. PMID:24238816

  17. Barium swallow study in routine clinical practice: a prospective study in patients with chronic cough*,**

    PubMed Central

    Nin, Carlos Shuler; Marchiori, Edson; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Paludo, Artur de Oliveira; Alves, Giordano Rafael Tronco; Hochhegger, Daniela Reis; Hochhegger, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the routine use of barium swallow study in patients with chronic cough. METHODS: Between October of 2011 and March of 2012, 95 consecutive patients submitted to chest X-ray due to chronic cough (duration > 8 weeks) were included in the study. For study purposes, additional images were obtained immediately after the oral administration of 5 mL of a 5% barium sulfate suspension. Two radiologists systematically evaluated all of the images in order to identify any pathological changes. Fisher's exact test and the chi-square test for categorical data were used in the comparisons. RESULTS: The images taken immediately after barium swallow revealed significant pathological conditions that were potentially related to chronic cough in 12 (12.6%) of the 95 patients. These conditions, which included diaphragmatic hiatal hernia, esophageal neoplasm, achalasia, esophageal diverticulum, and abnormal esophageal dilatation, were not detected on the images taken without contrast. After appropriate treatment, the symptoms disappeared in 11 (91.6%) of the patients, whereas the treatment was ineffective in 1 (8.4%). We observed no complications related to barium swallow, such as contrast aspiration. CONCLUSIONS: Barium swallow improved the detection of significant radiographic findings related to chronic cough in 11.5% of patients. These initial findings suggest that the routine use of barium swallow can significantly increase the sensitivity of chest X-rays in the detection of chronic cough-related etiologies. PMID:24473762

  18. Coronary artery calcification in clinical practice: what we have learned and why should it routinely be reported on chest CT?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The recent acceptance of low dose chest computed tomography (LDCT) as a screening modality for early lung cancer detection will significantly increase the number of LDCT among high risk population. The target subjects are at the same time at high risk to develop cardiovascular (CV) events. The routine report on coronary artery calcification (CAC) will therefore, enhances the screening benefit by providing the clinicians with an additive powerful risk stratification tool for the management or primary prevention of CV events. This review will provide the radiologists with helpful information for the daily practice regarding on what is CAC, its clinical applications and how to diagnose, quantify and report on CAC while reading the LDCT. PMID:27195277

  19. Coronary artery calcification in clinical practice: what we have learned and why should it routinely be reported on chest CT?

    PubMed

    Shemesh, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    The recent acceptance of low dose chest computed tomography (LDCT) as a screening modality for early lung cancer detection will significantly increase the number of LDCT among high risk population. The target subjects are at the same time at high risk to develop cardiovascular (CV) events. The routine report on coronary artery calcification (CAC) will therefore, enhances the screening benefit by providing the clinicians with an additive powerful risk stratification tool for the management or primary prevention of CV events. This review will provide the radiologists with helpful information for the daily practice regarding on what is CAC, its clinical applications and how to diagnose, quantify and report on CAC while reading the LDCT. PMID:27195277

  20. Appropriate use criteria in clinical routine practice: implications in a nuclear cardiology lab.

    PubMed

    Gimelli, Alessia; Rovai, Ilaria; Liga, Riccardo; Pasanisi, Emilio Maria; Marzullo, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    The efforts for a broad application of the appropriate use criteria to reduce inappropriate nuclear stress testing have frequently been unsuccessful and the reported rates of inappropriateness have varied widely between studies. We sought to analyze the criteria of clinical appropriateness of a cohort of consecutive patients referred to our nuclear cardiology laboratory to perform stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and to assess the relationships between test appropriateness and the evaluation of ischaemia. A cohort of 251 consecutive patients, admitted to our Institute from January to March 2015, who underwent stress/rest MPI on a dedicated cardiac camera equipped with cadmium-zinc-telluride detectors, was selected. The level of clinical appropriateness of each MPI test was categorized in each patient according to the AUC criteria. According to the accepted criteria, the majority of the MPI stress-tests could be classified as clinically appropriate (218 of 251, 87 % of the tests), while only 16 (6 %) and 17 (7 %) resulted of uncertain appropriateness or clearly inappropriate, respectively. Of the 251 appropriate tests, 22 (10 %), 65 (30 %), and 131 (60 %) showed the presence of a mild (SDS < 4), moderate (4 ≥ SDS < 7), and severe (SDS ≥ 7) ischemic burden, respectively, while none of the inappropriate test showed moderate-to-severe ischaemia (P < 0.001 for comparisons). The rate of inappropriate MPI tests is considerably low in a high-volume laboratory. Appropriate and inappropriate studies identify patients at high and low probability of significant ischemia, respectively, providing insights on the effects of the level of appropriateness on stress-test results. PMID:26961179

  1. Can higher end tonometers be used interchangeably in routine clinical practice?

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kunjan Jayantilal; Jain, Saurabh P; Kapadia, Priti R; Patel, Nikunj V; Patel, Saurabh; Patel, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Context: Precise intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement is important in glaucoma practise. Various instruments are available today to accurately measure IOP. Thus, the question arises about which instrument to use and whether all of them can be used interchangeably. Aims: To assess the agreement between noncontact tonometer (NCT), rebound tonometer (RBT), Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT), and dynamic contour tonometer (DCT) in measuring IOP. Subjects and Methods: 499 eyes of 250 patients were evaluated during a period of 24 months from September 2010 to August 2012 and measurement of IOP by NCT, RBT, GAT, and DCT was done in the given sequence. The agreement was assessed by use of the Bland–Altman plot keeping GAT as a gold standard technique. Results: The mean IOP value of NCT, RBT, GAT, and DCT was 15.9 ± 5.5, 15.9 ± 5.8, 15.9 ± 4.9, and 16.0 ± 4.7 mm of Hg, respectively. The limits of agreement of GAT with DCT, NCT, and RBT were found to be +5.4 to −5.2, −4.7 to +4.6, and −5.2 to +5.1 mm of Hg, respectively. Conclusions: A positive and strong correlation was found between newer tonometers and GAT, but the limit of agreement was clinically unacceptable. The use of a single tonometer should be practised at a glaucoma clinic for a patient at each follow-up. PMID:27050348

  2. Endoscopic Imaging in Barrett's Oesophagus: Applications in Routine Clinical Practice and Future Outlook

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Sam

    2011-01-01

    The practice for endoscopic surveillance of Barrett's oesophagus has evolved from "blind" or random 4 quadrant biopsies (Seattle protocol) to a more "intelligent" targeted biopsy approach. This evolution has been possible due to the rapid advances in endoscopic imaging technology and expertise in the last decade. Previous endoscopes had relatively poor image resolution that often did not allow the subtle mucosal changes associated with dysplastic Barrett's mucosa to be identified. Newer endoscopic imaging techniques available today may allow endoscopists to identify areas of dysplasia or malignancy and target biopsies accordingly. These modalities which include narrow band imaging, chromoendoscopy, autofluorescence imaging, and confocal endomicroscopy as well as a few novel imaging modalities on the horizon will be discussed further. PMID:22741118

  3. Should pre-implantation genetic screening be implemented to routine clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Orvieto, Raoul; Shuly, Yulia; Brengauz, Masha; Feldman, Baruch

    2016-06-01

    The utilization of trophectoderm biopsy combined with comprehensive chromosome screening (CCS) tests for embryonic aneuploidy was recently suggested to improve IVF outcome, however, not without criticisms. Since mosaicism has been reported in as high as 90% of blastocyst-stage embryos, we aimed to evaluate the accuracy of trophectoderm multiple biopsies using next-generation sequencing (NGS). Eight top quality blastocysts underwent three trophectoderm biopsies each, followed by NGS. In four blastocysts, the rest of the embryo, which included the inner cell mass, was also analyzed. Five of the 24 (20.8%) trophectoderm biopsies revealed inconclusive results, while 4 (16.6%) demonstrated embryonic mosaicism. Overall, 10 (35.7%) of the 28 (24 trophectoderms and 4 inner cell masses) biopsies revealed mosaicism or inconclusive results. Our preliminary observations contribute to the ongoing discussion on the unrestricted clinical adoption of PGS, suggesting, that until proper evaluation of its effectiveness and cost-effectiveness will be provided, PGS should be offered only under study conditions, and with appropriate informed consents. PMID:26872945

  4. Dydrogesterone treatment for menstrual-cycle regularization in routine clinical practice: a multicenter observational study.

    PubMed

    Podzolkova, Natalia; Tatarchuk, Tetiana; Doshchanova, Aikerm; Eshimbetova, Gulsara; Pexman-Fieth, Claire

    2016-03-01

    Dydrogesterone is an oral retroprogesterone widely used to treat progesterone deficiencies, including irregular menstrual cycles (MCs). This prospective, non-interventional, single-arm, post-marketing, observational study evaluated the effects of dydrogesterone on MC regularization. Women aged 18-40 years who had been prescribed dydrogesterone to treat irregular MCs due to progesterone deficiency were enrolled across 64 centers in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. Study objectives included: patients reporting ≥1 regular MC during treatment; the number of regular MCs after the end of treatment over a 6-month follow-up (FU) period. In total, 996 women were enrolled. Of those who completed treatment, 946/955 patients (99.1%) achieved ≥1 regular MC. During FU, 680/860 patients (79.1%) maintained ≥6 regular MCs. Patient grading of menstrual pain and anxiety decreased significantly during treatment (p ≤ 0.0001 versus baseline); this persisted during FU. Dydrogesterone was associated with high or very high patient satisfaction (856/955; 89.6%); the clinical response was considered good or excellent in 819/955 patients (85.8%). In total, 16/986 patients (1.6%) reported an adverse event (AE); two had serious AEs (SAEs) (unrelated to treatment) and three discontinued treatment due to non-SAEs. Dydrogesterone therapy was effective in achieving MC regularization and reducing menstrual pain and anxiety, during both treatment and 6-month FU. PMID:26613278

  5. Routine implementation of EGFR mutation testing in clinical practice in Flanders: 'HERMES' project.

    PubMed

    Janssens, A; De Droogh, E; Lefebure, A; Kockx, M; Pauwels, P; Germonpre, P; van Meerbeeck, J P

    2014-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) is the recommended first-line treatment in metastatic EGFR-mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Such a personalized treatment requires fast EGFR mutation testing. This study was performed to determine the turn around time (TAT) for EGFR mutation testing on tumour samples of NSCLC in the clinical care in the region of Antwerp (Belgium). The secondary aim was to determine the frequency of EGFR mutations in this Flemish population. Tumour tissue was prospectively obtained from lung cancer patients in participating hospitals and sent from the local pathology laboratory (lab) to two central laboratories (labs) where EGFR-mutation analysis was performed. Results were returned from the central labs to the clinicians and the local pathology lab. TAT was defined as the interval between the request from the oncologist and the result obtained by the oncologist. One hundred and seven specimens were analysed. The clinician got the result from the local lab in a median time of 10 days (3-37 days) and from the central lab in 9 days (3-29 days). We detected seven mutations (7%) in this study population, all occurring in tumours with an adenocarcinoma histology, four (57%) in men and five (71%) in (ex-)smokers. There were six exon 19 deletions and one L858R mutation. It is possible to implement EGFR-mutation testing with timely reporting of the EGFR-mutation status. EGFR-mutation occurs in 7% of Flemish patients with NSCLC. Patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC should be tested for EGFR mutation regardless of their gender and smoking history. PMID:24724747

  6. Efficacy of Trastuzumab in Routine Clinical Practice and After Progression for Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients: The Observational Hermine Study

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, Eric C.; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Delozier, Thierry; Kerbrat, Pierre; Bethune-Volters, Anne; Guastalla, Jean-Paul; Spielmann, Marc; Mauriac, Louis; Misset, Jean-Louis; Serin, Daniel; Campone, Mario; Hebert, Christophe; Remblier, Céline; Bergougnoux, Loïc; Campana, Frank; Namer, Moïse

    2010-01-01

    Background. The Hermine study observed the use of trastuzumab for metastatic breast cancer (MBC) in routine practice, including patients who received trastuzumab treatment beyond progression (TBP). Patients and Methods. The study observed 623 patients for ≥2 years. Treatment was given according to oncologists' normal clinical practices. Endpoints included duration of treatment, efficacy, and cardiac safety. The TBP subanalysis compared overall survival (OS) in 177 patients who received first-line trastuzumab and either continued trastuzumab for ≥30 days following progression or stopped at or before progression. Results. The median treatment duration was 13.3 months. In the first-, second-, and third-line or beyond treatment groups, the median time to progression (TTP) were 10.3 months, 9.0 months, and 6.3 months, and the median OS times were 30.3 months, 27.1 months, and 23.2 months, respectively. Heart failure was observed in 2.6% of patients, although no cardiac-associated deaths occurred. In the TBP subanalysis, the median OS duration from treatment initiation and time of disease progression were longer in patients who continued receiving trastuzumab TBP (>27.8 months and 21.3 months, respectively) than in those who stopped (16.8 months and 4.6 months, respectively). However, the groups were not completely comparable, because patients who continued trastuzumab TBP had better prognoses at treatment initiation. The median TTP was longer in patients who continued trastuzumab TBP (10.2 months) than in those who stopped (7.1 months). Conclusion. The Hermine findings confirm that the pivotal trials of first-line trastuzumab treatment in MBC patients are applicable in clinical practice. The subanalysis suggests that trastuzumab TBP offers a survival benefit to MBC patients treated with first-line trastuzumab. PMID:20671105

  7. Effectiveness of Behavioral Parent Training for Children with ADHD in Routine Clinical Practice: A Randomized Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Den Hoofdakker, Barbara J.; Van Der Veen-Mulders, Lianne; Sytema, Sjoerd; Emmelkamp, Paul M. G.; Minderaa, Ruud B.; Nauta, Maaike H.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effectiveness of behavioral parent training (BPT) as adjunct to routine clinical care (RCC). Method: After a first phase of RCC, 94 children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) ages 4-12, all referred to a Dutch outpatient mental health clinic, were randomly assigned to 5 months of BPT plus concurrent…

  8. Post-marketing surveillance study with iodixanol in 20 185 Chinese patients from routine clinical practices

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, B-C; Hou, L; Lv, B

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the incidence of immediate and delayed adverse drug reactions (ADRs), and to assess patient discomfort following administration of iodixanol during imaging examinations in routine clinical practice. Methods: A total of 20 185 patients across 95 clinical centres were enrolled in a prospective post-marketing surveillance registry with iodixanol. Patients were monitored for occurrence of ADRs immediately following iodixanol administration and for up to 7 days after administration. Results: The overall rate of ADRs was 1.52%, of which 0.58% was immediate and 0.97% was delayed onset. Two patients had non-fatal serious ADRs (0.01%). The ADRs were significantly more common in patients who underwent contrast-enhanced CT/coronary CT angiography vs others (p < 0.001), in those receiving pre-heated iodixanol vs non-heating (p < 0.001), in those aged 70 years or younger (p < 0.001), in those in whom a power injector was used for contrast delivery (p < 0.001) and in those with a history of an allergic reaction to contrast (p = 0.024). Multivariate analysis showed that female gender, intravenous route of contrast injection, body weight ≥80 kg, age less than 65 years, contrast flow rate ≥4 ml s−1 and prior reaction to iodinated contrast medium were all significant and independent contributors to ADRs. Pre-treatment contrast volume and history of cardiac disease, gout, hypertension, diabetes mellitus or asthma did not affect the rate of ADRs. Discomfort was generally mild, with 94.8% of patients reporting a composite score of 0–3. Conclusion: The safety of iodixanol in routine clinical practice was shown to be similar to the published safety profiles of other non-ionic iodinated contrast agents. Patient discomfort during administration was mild or absent in most patients. Advances in knowledge: The major strength of this study is that it included 20 185 patients enrolled in various types of imaging examinations. The

  9. Promoting Early Presentation of Breast Cancer in Older Women: Implementing an Evidence-Based Intervention in Routine Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Lindsay J. L.; Forster, Alice S.; Dodd, Rachael H.; Tucker, Lorraine; Laming, Rachel; Sellars, Sarah; Patnick, Julietta; Ramirez, Amanda J.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Women over 70 with breast cancer have poorer one-year survival and present at a more advanced stage than younger women. Promoting early symptomatic presentation in older women may reduce stage cost effectively and is unlikely to lead to overdiagnosis. After examining efficacy in a randomised controlled trial, we piloted a brief health professional-delivered intervention to equip women to present promptly with breast symptoms, as an integral part of the final invited mammogram at age ~70, in the English National Health Service Breast Screening Programme. Methods. We trained mammographers, who then offered the intervention to older women in four breast screening services. We examined breast cancer awareness at baseline and one month in women receiving the intervention, and also in a service where the intervention was not offered. Results. We trained 27 mammographers to deliver the intervention confidently to a high standard. Breast cancer awareness increased 7-fold at one month in women receiving the intervention compared with 2-fold in the comparison service (odds ratio 15.2, 95% confidence interval 10.0 to 23.2). Conclusions. The PEP Intervention can be implemented in routine clinical practice with a potency similar to that achieved in a randomised controlled trial. It has the potential to reduce delay in diagnosis for breast cancer in older women. PMID:23213334

  10. Quality of life under oxycodone/naloxone, oxycodone, or morphine treatment for chronic low back pain in routine clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Ueberall, Michael A; Eberhardt, Alice; Mueller-Schwefe, Gerhard HH

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the quality of life of patients with moderate-to-severe chronic low back pain under treatment with the WHO-step III opioids oxycodone/naloxone, oxycodone, or morphine in routine clinical practice. Study design Prospective, 12-week, randomized, open-label, blinded end-point study in 88 medical centers in Germany. Patients and methods A total of 901 patients requiring around-the-clock pain treatment with a WHO-step III opioid were randomized to either morphine, oxycodone, or oxycodone/naloxone (1:1:1). Changes from baseline to week 12 in quality of life were assessed using different validated tools (EuroQoL-5 Dimensions [EQ-5D], Short Form 12 [SF-12], quality of life impairment by pain inventory [QLIP]). Results EQ-5D weighted index scores significantly improved over the 12-week treatment period under all three opioids (P<0.001) with significantly greater improvements under oxycodone/naloxone (65.2% vs 49.6% for oxycodone and 48.2% for morphine, P<0.001). The proportion of patients without EQ-5D complaints was also significantly higher under oxycodone/naloxone (P<0.001). Although quality of life ratings with the QLIP inventory showed significant improvements in all the three treatment arms, improvements were significantly higher under oxycodone/naloxone than under oxycodone and morphine (P<0.001): 90.7% of all oxycodone/naloxone patients achieved ≥30% improvements in quality of life, 72.8% had ≥50%, and 33.2% ≥70% improvements. Similarly, both physical and mental SF-12 component scores showed significantly greater improvements under oxycodone/naloxone with both scores close to the German population norm after 12 weeks. Conclusion Treatment with morphine, oxycodone, or oxycodone/naloxone under routine daily practice conditions significantly improved state of health and quality of life of patients with moderate-to-severe low back pain over a 12-week treatment period. Comparison between the treatment groups showed significantly greater

  11. Durability and Effectiveness of Maraviroc-Containing Regimens in HIV-1-Infected Individuals with Virological Failure in Routine Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Potard, Valérie; Reynes, Jacques; Ferry, Tristan; Aubin, Céline; Finkielsztejn, Laurent; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Costagliola, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Limited data are available on the durability and effectiveness of maraviroc in routine clinical practice. We assessed the durability of maraviroc-containing regimens during a 30-month period, as well as their immunovirological and clinical efficacy, according to viral tropism in treatment-experienced individuals with viral load (VL) >50 copies/ml in the French Hospital Database on HIV. Methods Virological success was defined as VL<50 copies/ml, immunological success as a confirmed increase of at least 100 CD4 cells/mm3 measured twice at least one month apart, and clinical failure as hospitalization for a non-AIDS event, an AIDS event, or death. Multivariable Cox regression models adjusted for potential confounders were used to assess the influence of viral tropism on durability, the immunovirological responses, and clinical outcome. Results 356 individuals started maraviroc with VL>50 copies/ml of whom 223 harbored R5 viruses, 44 non-R5 viruses and 89 viruses of unknown tropism. Individuals with non-R5 viruses were more likely than individuals with R5 viruses to discontinue maraviroc (75% vs 34%, p<0.0001). At 30 months, the estimated rates of virological and immunological success were respectively 89% and 51% in individuals with R5 viruses and 48% and 23% in individuals with non-R5 viruses. In multivariable analysis, non-R5 viruses were associated with a lower likelihood of both virological success (hazard ratio (HR): 0.42; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.25–0.70) and immunological success (HR: 0.37; 95% CI, 0.18–0.77). No difference in clinical outcome was found between individuals with R5 and non-R5 viruses. The effectiveness of maraviroc-containing regimens in individuals with unknown viral tropism was not significantly different from that in individuals with R5 viruses. A limitation of the study is the absence of genotypic susceptibility score. Conclusion In this observational study, maraviroc-containing regimens yielded high rates of viral

  12. Predicting frequent asthma exacerbations using blood eosinophil count and other patient data routinely available in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Price, David; Wilson, Andrew M; Chisholm, Alison; Rigazio, Anna; Burden, Anne; Thomas, Michael; King, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Acute, severe asthma exacerbations can be difficult to predict and thus prevent. Patients who have frequent exacerbations are of particular concern. Practical exacerbation predictors are needed for these patients in the primary-care setting. Patients and methods Medical records of 130,547 asthma patients aged 12–80 years from the UK Optimum Patient Care Research Database and Clinical Practice Research Datalink, 1990–2013, were examined for 1 year before (baseline) and 1 year after (outcome) their most recent blood eosinophil count. Baseline variables predictive (P<0.05) of exacerbation in the outcome year were compared between patients who had two or more exacerbations and those who had no exacerbation or only one exacerbation, using uni- and multivariable logistic regression models. Exacerbation was defined as asthma-related hospital attendance/admission (emergency or inpatient) or acute oral corticosteroid (OCS) course. Results Blood eosinophil count >400/µL (versus ≤400/µL) increased the likelihood of two or more exacerbations >1.4-fold (odds ratio [OR]: 1.48 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.39, 1.58); P<0.001). Variables that significantly increased the odds by up to 1.4-fold included increasing age (per year), female gender (versus male), being overweight or obese (versus normal body mass index), being a smoker (versus nonsmoker), having anxiety/depression, diabetes, eczema, gastroesophageal reflux disease, or rhinitis, and prescription for acetaminophen or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Compared with treatment at British Thoracic Society step 2 (daily controller ± reliever), treatment at step 0 (none) or 1 (as-needed reliever) increased the odds by 1.2- and 1.6-fold, respectively, and treatment at step 3, 4, or 5 increased the odds by 1.3-, 1.9-, or 3.1-fold, respectively (all P<0.05). Acute OCS use was the single best predictor of two or more exacerbations. Even one course increased the odds by more than threefold (OR: 3.75 [95% CI: 3

  13. Clinical Neuropathology practice news 1-2014: Pyrosequencing meets clinical and analytical performance criteria for routine testing of MGMT promoter methylation status in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Preusser, Matthias; Berghoff, Anna S.; Manzl, Claudia; Filipits, Martin; Weinhäusel, Andreas; Pulverer, Walter; Dieckmann, Karin; Widhalm, Georg; Wöhrer, Adelheid; Knosp, Engelbert; Marosi, Christine; Hainfellner, Johannes A.

    2014-01-01

    Testing of the MGMT promoter methylation status in glioblastoma is relevant for clinical decision making and research applications. Two recent and independent phase III therapy trials confirmed a prognostic and predictive value of the MGMT promoter methylation status in elderly glioblastoma patients. Several methods for MGMT promoter methylation testing have been proposed, but seem to be of limited test reliability. Therefore, and also due to feasibility reasons, translation of MGMT methylation testing into routine use has been protracted so far. Pyrosequencing after prior DNA bisulfite modification has emerged as a reliable, accurate, fast and easy-to-use method for MGMT promoter methylation testing in tumor tissues (including formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples). We performed an intra- and inter-laboratory ring trial which demonstrates a high analytical performance of this technique. Thus, pyrosequencing-based assessment of MGMT promoter methylation status in glioblastoma meets the criteria of high analytical test performance and can be recommended for clinical application, provided that strict quality control is performed. Our article summarizes clinical indications, practical instructions and open issues for MGMT promoter methylation testing in glioblastoma using pyrosequencing. PMID:24359605

  14. Considerations on the Improved Integration of Medical Guidelines into Routine Clinical Practice – a Review and Concept Proposal

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, M. W.; Schlieter, H.; Richter, P.; Wesselmann, S.

    2016-01-01

    Medical guidelines have become established as the standard for the comprehensive synopsis of all available information (scientific trials, expert opinion) on diagnosis and treatment recommendations. The transfer of guidelines to clinical practice and subsequent monitoring has however proven difficult. In particular the potential interaction between guideline developers and guideline users has not been fully utilised. This review article analyses the status quo and existing methodological and technical information solutions supporting the guideline life cycle. It is shown that there are numerous innovative developments that in isolation do not provide comprehensive support. The vision of the “Living Guidelines 2.0” is therefore presented. This outlines the merging of guideline development and implementation on the basis of clinical pathways and guideline-based quality control, and building on this, the generation of information for guideline development and research. PMID:27134291

  15. [Premature ejaculation in urological routine practice].

    PubMed

    Mathers, M J; Sommer, F; Degener, S; Brandt, A S; Roth, S

    2013-01-01

    Premature ejaculation is a frequent male sexual complaint or sexual disturbance found in urological practices and outpatient units. The frequency in the individual practices varies considerably. In large studies the prevalence is strongly dependent on the definition and ranges between 3% and 25%. Subjectively, the inability to delay ejaculation and the distress resulting from it, is relevant for the patient and his partner. Intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) is used as an objective parameter. Nevertheless, in the everyday routine practice this objective parameter is not practical. Clinically 2 questionnaires have asserted themselves (Premature Ejaculation Profile and Index of Premature Ejaculation). Studies have shown that the self-assessment of patients correlates relatively well with the objective IELT measured by means of a stopwatch. Beside topical anaesthetics and elective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), especially Dapexetine which has been approved in Germany since 2009, are treatment options. These drugs differ particularly in their use (daily or on-demand) and their effectiveness (measured by x-fold increase of IELT). This article deals with the clinical approach to EP. Beside the definition, prevalence, aetiology and neurophysiology of EP, the different pharmacological therapies as well as the guidelines of the International Society for Sexual Medicine are discussed. PMID:23381878

  16. Radioimmunotherapy of relapsed indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma with 131I-rituximab in routine clinical practice: 10-year single-institution experience of 142 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Leahy, Michael F; Turner, J Harvey

    2011-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy of indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) has achieved objective response rates in clinical trials comparable with standard rituximab with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone chemotherapy, but is relatively underused in routine practice. In this article, we report our clinical experience in 142 consecutive patients who received iodine-131 rituximab radioimmunotherapy for low-grade, predominantly follicular, relapsed NHL. Objective response rates of 67%, with complete response (CR) in 50% and median overall survival of 32 months, matched the response rates in a phase 2 clinical trial of (131)I-rituximab radioimmunotherapy and compares favorably with those reported for (131)I-tositumomab or (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan. Progression-free survival was 18 months overall and 32 months in CR or CR-unconfirmed patients. Our patients comprised 107 (75%) follicular lymphoma, 21 (15%) small lymphocytic lymphoma, 6 (4%) mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue/marginal zone lymphoma, and 8 (6%) mantle-cell lymphoma, with median follow-up of 32 months and 8-year overall survival of 48%. Toxicity was limited to hematologic grade 4 neutropenia, occurring in 10% and thrombocytopenia in 6%. There were no episodes of bleeding or infection requiring hospital admission. Radioimmunotherapy with (131)I-rituximab in routine clinical outpatient practice provides cost-effective, safe treatment of relapsed/refractory indolent NHL, with half of patients achieving durable, complete remission with potential for repeat radioimmunotherapy on relapse. PMID:20864582

  17. Efficacy and safety of insulin degludec in Japanese patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes: 24-week results from the observational study in routine clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Kobuke, Kazuhiro; Yoneda, Masayasu; Nakanishi, Shuhei; Ohno, Haruya; Maeda, Shusaku; Egusa, Genshi

    2016-01-01

    This is first observational prospective study of insulin degludec in routine clinical practice that we evaluated the effect on glycemic control and risk of hypoglycemia in basal-bolus insulin therapy. We found that insulin degludec can maintain glycemic control at a lower insulin dose and frequency of hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes, while it can improve glycemic control at equally insulin dose in type 2 diabetes. These results mean that insulin degludec is of use in routine clinical practice. PMID:26816606

  18. Transformation of Physical DVHs to Radiobiologically Equivalent Ones in Hypofractionated Radiotherapy Analyzing Dosimetric and Clinical Parameters: A Practical Approach for Routine Clinical Practice in Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Thrapsanioti, Zoi; Karanasiou, Irene; Platoni, Kalliopi; Efstathopoulos, Efstathios P.; Matsopoulos, George; Dilvoi, Maria; Patatoukas, George; Chaldeopoulos, Demetrios; Kelekis, Nikolaos; Kouloulias, Vassilis

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to transform DVHs from physical to radiobiological ones as well as to evaluate their reliability by correlations of dosimetric and clinical parameters for 50 patients with prostate cancer and 50 patients with breast cancer, who were submitted to Hypofractionated Radiotherapy. Methods and Materials. To achieve this transformation, we used both the linear-quadratic model (LQ model) and the Niemierko model. The outcome of radiobiological DVHs was correlated with acute toxicity score according to EORTC/RTOG criteria. Results. Concerning the prostate radiotherapy, there was a significant correlation between RTOG acute rectal toxicity and D50 (P < 0.001) and V60 (P = 0.001) dosimetric parameters, calculated for α/β = 10 Gy. Moreover, concerning the breast radiotherapy there was a significant correlation between RTOG skin toxicity and V≥60 dosimetric parameter, calculated for both α/β = 2.3 Gy (P < 0.001) and α/β = 10 Gy (P < 0.001). The new tool seems reliable and user-friendly. Conclusions. Our proposed model seems user-friendly. Its reliability in terms of agreement with the presented acute radiation induced toxicity was satisfactory. However, more patients are needed to extract safe conclusions. PMID:24348743

  19. Microbiological quality and quality control of purified water and ultrapure dialysis fluids for online hemodiafiltration in routine clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Penne, E Lars; Visser, Linda; van den Dorpel, Marinus A; van der Weerd, Neelke C; Mazairac, Albert H A; van Jaarsveld, Brigit C; Koopman, Marion G; Vos, Pieter; Feith, Geert W; Kremer Hovinga, Ton K; van Hamersvelt, Henk W; Wauters, Inge M; Bots, Michiel L; Nubé, Menso J; Ter Wee, Piet M; Blankestijn, Peter J; Grooteman, Muriel P C

    2009-09-01

    During online hemodiafiltration, patients are directly infused with sterile substitution solutions to maintain fluid balance. Adequate water treatment and a well-organized quality control process are essential to provide non-pyrogenic fluids with consistent optimal quality. We sought to assess water quality, the water treatment system, and the methods for surveillance of microbiological water quality in 10 Dutch dialysis centers that routinely treat patients with hemodiafiltration. Microbiological monitoring results (micro-organisms and endotoxins) were collected over a 1-year period representing 11,258 hemodiafiltration sessions covering 97 patients. In all centers, water purification was based on a reverse osmosis module in combination with a second reverse osmosis and/or an electrodeionizer. All centers regularly and routinely monitored the microbiological purity of the dialysis water with adequate analytical methods but with variable monitoring frequency. Microbiological assessments were compliant with reference quality levels in 3923 of 3961 samples. Our study suggests that non-pyrogenic substitution fluids can be produced online for a prolonged period of time. It is likely that the current Dutch Quality of Care Guideline has contributed to high-quality water treatment and a well-organized control process. PMID:19606080

  20. Spot scanning proton therapy plan assessment: design and development of a dose verification application for use in routine clinical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustine, Kurt E.; Walsh, Timothy J.; Beltran, Chris J.; Stoker, Joshua B.; Mundy, Daniel W.; Parry, Mark D.; Bues, Martin; Fatyga, Mirek

    2016-04-01

    The use of radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer has been carried out clinically since the late 1800's. Early on however, it was discovered that a radiation dose sufficient to destroy cancer cells can also cause severe injury to surrounding healthy tissue. Radiation oncologists continually strive to find the perfect balance between a dose high enough to destroy the cancer and one that avoids damage to healthy organs. Spot scanning or "pencil beam" proton radiotherapy offers another option to improve on this. Unlike traditional photon therapy, proton beams stop in the target tissue, thus better sparing all organs beyond the targeted tumor. In addition, the beams are far narrower and thus can be more precisely "painted" onto the tumor, avoiding exposure to surrounding healthy tissue. To safely treat patients with proton beam radiotherapy, dose verification should be carried out for each plan prior to treatment. Proton dose verification systems are not currently commercially available so the Department of Radiation Oncology at the Mayo Clinic developed its own, called DOSeCHECK, which offers two distinct dose simulation methods: GPU-based Monte Carlo and CPU-based analytical. The three major components of the system include the web-based user interface, the Linux-based dose verification simulation engines, and the supporting services and components. The architecture integrates multiple applications, libraries, platforms, programming languages, and communication protocols and was successfully deployed in time for Mayo Clinic's first proton beam therapy patient. Having a simple, efficient application for dose verification greatly reduces staff workload and provides additional quality assurance, ultimately improving patient safety.

  1. [Experimental ultrasound analysis of the appendix. Contribution to improving the diagnosis of acute inflammation in routine clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Meiser, G; Meissner, K; Sattlegger, P

    1989-03-01

    Sonographic investigations of fresh operative specimens - 50 non-infected, 50 chronic and 50 acute inflammatory appendices - and also of 335 pertinent operated patients with "typical" appendiceal disorders were performed. All other entities, mimicking acute or perforated appendicitis were excluded from this study. Under experimental conditions, negative, chronic and acute or phlegmonous appendices appeared as "cockade" or "pseudokidney sign" with reflecting wall and echoless lumen. The application of a 5 Mz linear transducer made the differentiation of three wall layers feasible, in negative appendices as well as in dilated acute appendicitis, whereas in chronic inflammation and in obliterating acute appendicitis a wall layer stratification was not possible. In clinical application of 335 operated patients we only could demonstrate cases of acute or perforated appendicitis (n = 182/220), but no cases of non-infected appendix. In 57% of pertinent cases the objectivation of lumen dilatation, in 35% a wall layer stratification was feasible. Acute, phlegmonous or perforated appendicitis was proven by demonstrating an immobile "pseudotumor mass" with dominating constant hypodense reflex property. The pertinent diameters as measured in clinical acute appendicitis exceeded significantly the diameters observed in experimental sonography of negative appendices with a differential intact mobility. Intraluminary coproliths and hyperdense reflecting attached omental segments facilitated a sonographic diagnosis. In 101/115 patients correct negative diagnosis was established. On the basis of these criteria, a sensitivity of 83%, a specificity of 88% and a diagnostic accuracy of 85% related to the diagnosis of acute or perforated appendicitis was obtained in this study. PMID:2656123

  2. [Radiologic medical desktop conferences--clinical evaluation of the KAMEDIN teleradiology system in routine practice of a radiologic institute].

    PubMed

    Bolte, R; Lehmann, K J; Walz, M; Loose, R; Lütgemeier, J; Seibert, F; Busch, C; Schinkmann, M; Georgi, M

    1996-07-01

    KAMEDIN is a teleradiology project of "Deutsche Telekom". ISDN based image transfer, visualisation and online-presentation of digital radiological images is performed. In this study the suitability of the KAMEDIN-system has been tested in a clinical environment. The software has been adapted to the requirements of radiological image visualisation. During 6 months over 50 conferences took place with an average of 36 CT-slices per patient. The amount of time was approximately 10 min for conference preparation, 20 min for image transfer and 8 min for conferencing. Software problems occurred and were solved. Image quality on the monitor as well as online presentation including "simultaneous cursors" showed high performance and achieved high acceptance by the clinicians. Thus KAMEDIN is a useful teleradiology system, especially if the system is adapted to the requirements of radiology departments. PMID:8924455

  3. Adult severe haemophilia A patients under long-term prophylaxis with factor VIII in routine clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mingot-Castellano, María E; González-Díaz, Laura; Tamayo-Bermejo, Rocio; Heiniger-Mazo, Anabel I

    2015-07-01

    There is no clear consensus on the best practice for long-term prophylaxis in adults with severe haemophilia A. This is a single-centre prospective case series study. We describe here the demographic data, type and reason of prophylaxis in adult patients (>18 years old) with severe (<1%) haemophilia A, treated in our centre from 2006 to 2013. Prophylaxis was tailored according to pharmacokinetic studies and posterior factor VIII (FVIII) trough level adjustment. We analysed FVIII consumption, bleeding rate, adherence and adverse events in this group of patients. In adult patients who initiated long-term prophylaxis during this period, we compared FVIII consumption and bleeding rate with the previous on-demand period. We analysed data from 18 patients. Median annual FVIII consumption was 2374.2 IU/kg/year. Among the patients receiving tertiary prophylaxis, initiated from 2006 onwards, the annual FVIII consumption was 2557.8 vs. 1696.8 IU/kg per year during the on-demand period (P = 0.312). In this group of patients, there was a decrease in annual bleeding events of 88.3% during prophylaxis compared with the on-demand therapy (P < 0.0001). A high adherence to prophylaxis was observed (84%). No cases of anaphylaxis or symptomatic thromboembolic events were recorded. In adult severe haemophilia A patients, the type of and reason to indicate long-term prophylaxis are diverse nowadays. FVIII consumption varies depending on the justification of prophylaxis. The observations reported provide further support for the efficacy of long-term prophylaxis in adult haemophilia A patients. PMID:25767895

  4. Safety and effectiveness of controlled-release paroxetine in routine clinical practice: results of a postmarketing surveillance study of patients with depression

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Masaki; Kimura, Toshifumi; Kimura, Takeshi; Hara, Terufumi

    2015-01-01

    Objective Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are commonly used in the pharmacotherapy of depression. However, adverse events can lead to their early discontinuation. This study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of paroxetine controlled-release (CR) tablets in Japanese patients with depression/depressive state (hereafter referred to as depression) in routine clinical practice in Japan. Patients and methods This was an open-label, noninterventional, prospective, postmarketing surveillance study. A total of 3,213 patients aged 12–92 years with depression were prescribed paroxetine CR for 8 weeks at the physician’s discretion. Safety was evaluated on the basis of the reporting of adverse drug reactions. Effectiveness was evaluated on the basis of the physician’s assessment using the Clinical Global Impression-Global Improvement (CGI-GI) and the Clinical Global Impression-Severity of Illness (CGI-SI) scales, as well as on the basis of the patients’ self-reported satisfaction. The primary effectiveness outcome was the improvement rate based on the physician’s assessment using the CGI-GI. Results The incidence of adverse drug reactions was 11.2% (359/3,213; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.1%–12.3%). The common adverse drug reactions that accounted for 1.0% or more of the incidence were nausea (3.5%) and somnolence (2.7%). The proportion of patients who continued paroxetine CR at week 8 was 80.2% (2,577/3,213; 95% CI: 78.8%–81.6%). The improvement rate at week 8 (last observation carried forward) was 72.8% (2,132/2,927; 95% CI: 71.2%–74.4%). The proportion of patients with CGI-SI scores of moderately or severely ill decreased from 63.6% at baseline to 17.9% at week 8. The proportion of patients who were satisfied with paroxetine CR treatment was 69.8% (2,040/2,921; 95% CI: 68.1%–71.5%). Conclusion The results of this study suggest that paroxetine CR is a well-tolerated and efficacious treatment for depression in routine clinical practice. PMID

  5. Feasibility and effectiveness of the implementation of a primary prevention programme for type 2 diabetes in routine primary care practice: a phase IV cluster randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to perform an independent evaluation of the feasibility and effectiveness of an educational programme for the primary prevention of type 2 diabetes (DM2) in high risk populations in primary care settings, implanted within the Basque Health Service - Osakidetza. Methods/design This is a prospective phase IV cluster clinical trial conducted under routine conditions in 14 primary health care centres of Osakidetza, randomly assigned to an intervention or control group. We will recruit a total sample of 1089 individuals, aged between 45 and 70 years old, without diabetes but at high risk of developing the condition (Finnish Diabetes Risk Score, FINDRISC ≥ 14) and follow them up for 2 years. Primary health care nursing teams of the intervention centres will implement DE-PLAN, a structured educational intervention program focused on changing healthy lifestyles (diet and physical activity); while the patients in the control centres will receive the usual care for the prevention and treatment of DM2 currently provided in Osakidetza. The effectiveness attributable to the programme will be assessed by comparing the changes observed in patients exposed to the intervention and those in the control group, with respect to the risk of developing DM2 and lifestyle habits. In terms of feasibility, we will assess indicators of population coverage and programme implementation. Discussion The aim of this study is to provide the scientific basis for disseminate the programme to the remaining primary health centres in Osakidetza, as a novel way of addressing prevention of DM2. The study design will enable us to gather information on the effectiveness of the intervention as well as the feasibility of implementing it in routine practice. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01365013 PMID:23158830

  6. Guide to good practices for shift routines and operating practices

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This Guide to Good Practices is written to enhance understanding of, and provide direction for, ``Shift Routines and Operating Practices,`` Chapter 2 of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities. The practices in this guide should be considered when planning or reviewing shift routines and operating practices. ``Shift Routines and Operating Practices`` is an element of an effective Conduct of Operations program. The complexity and array of activities performed in DOE facilities dictate the necessity for a high standard of professional conduct and sound operating practices to promote safe and efficient operations. Recently, guidance pertaining to this element has been strengthened for nuclear power reactors. This additional guidance is given in Appendix C for information purposes. Though this guidance and good practices pertain to nuclear power reactors, DOE sites may choose to use a graded approach for implementing these in nuclear facilities.

  7. The challenge to bring personalized cancer medicine from clinical trials into routine clinical practice: the case of the Institut Gustave Roussy.

    PubMed

    Arnedos, Monica; André, Fabrice; Farace, Françoise; Lacroix, Ludovic; Besse, Benjamin; Robert, Caroline; Soria, Jean Charles; Eggermont, Alexander M M

    2012-04-01

    Research with high throughput technologies has propitiated the segmentation of different types of tumors into very small subgroups characterized by the presence of very rare molecular alterations. The identification of these subgroups and the apparition of new agents targeting these infrequent alterations are already affecting the way in which clinical trials are being conducted with an increased need to identify those patients harboring specific molecular alterations. In this review we describe some of the currently ongoing and future studies at the Institut Gustave Roussy that aim for the identification of potential therapeutic targets for cancer patients with the incorporation of high throughput technologies into daily practice including aCGH, next generation sequencing and the creation of a software that allows for target identification specific for each tumor. The initial intention is to enrich clinical trials with cancer patients carrying certain molecular alterations in order to increase the possibility of demonstrating benefit from a targeted agent. Mid and long term aims are to facilitate and speed up the process of drug development as well as to implement the concept of personalized medicine. PMID:22483534

  8. Modeling the longitudinal latent effect of pregabalin on self-reported changes in sleep disturbances in outpatients with generalized anxiety disorder managed in routine clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Miguel A; Álvarez, Enrique; Carrasco, Jose L; Olivares, José M; Pérez, María; Rejas, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are among the most common psychiatric illnesses, with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) being one of the most common. Sleep disturbances are highly prevalent in GAD patients. While treatment with pregabalin has been found to be associated with significant improvement in GAD-related sleep disturbance across many controlled clinical trials, mediational analysis has suggested that a substantial portion of this effect could be the result of a direct effect of pregabalin. Thus, the objective of this study was to model the longitudinal latent effect of pregabalin or usual care (UC) therapies on changes in sleep in outpatients with GAD under routine clinical practice. Methods Male and female GAD outpatients, aged 18 years or above, from a 6-month prospective noninterventional trial were analyzed. Direct and indirect effects of either pregabalin or UC changes in anxiety symptoms (assessed with Hamilton Anxiety Scale) and sleep disturbances (assessed with Medical Outcomes Study-Sleep Scale [MOS-S]) were estimated by a conditional latent curve model applying structural equation modeling. Results A total of 1,546 pregabalin-naïve patients were analyzed, 984 receiving pregabalin and 562 UC. Both symptoms of anxiety and sleep disturbances were significantly improved in both groups, with higher mean (95% confidence interval) score reductions in subjects receiving pregabalin: −15.9 (−15.2; −16.6) vs −14.5 (−13.5; −15.5), P=0.027, in Hamilton Anxiety Scale; and −29.7 (−28.1; −31.3) vs −24.0 (−21.6; −26.4), P<0.001, in MOS-S. The conditional latent curve model showed that the pregabalin effect on sleep disturbances was significant (γ =−3.99, P<0.001), after discounting the effect on reduction in anxiety symptoms. A mediation model showed that 70% of the direct effect of pregabalin on sleep remained after discounting the mediated effect of anxiety improvement. Conclusion A substantial proportion of the incremental

  9. Effectiveness, durability, and safety of darunavir/ritonavir in HIV-1-infected patients in routine clinical practice in Italy: a postauthorization noninterventional study

    PubMed Central

    Antinori, Andrea; Meraviglia, Paola; Monforte, Antonella d’Arminio; Castagna, Antonella; Mussini, Cristina; Bini, Teresa; Gianotti, Nicola; Rusconi, Stefano; Colella, Elisa; Airoldi, Giuseppe; Mancusi, Daniela; Termini, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Current antiretroviral (ARV) therapy for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)-infected patients provides long-term control of viral load (VL). Darunavir (DRV) is a nonpeptidomimetic protease inhibitor approved for use with a ritonavir booster (DRV/r). This study evaluated the effectiveness of DRV/r in combination with other ARV agents in routine clinical practice in Italy. In this descriptive observational study, data on utilization of DRV/r, under the conditions described in the marketing authorization, were collected from June 2009 to December 2012. Effectiveness (VL <50 copies/mL), tolerability, and durability in four patient groups (two DRV/r-experienced, one ARV-experienced DRV/r-naïve, and one ARV-naïve) were analyzed. Secondary objectives included immunological response, safety, and persistence/discontinuation rates. In total, 875 of 883 enrolled patients were included in the analysis: of these, 662 (75.7%) completed the follow-up until the end of 2012 and 213 (24.3%) withdrew from the study earlier. Initial DRV dose was 600 mg twice daily (67.1%) or 800 mg once daily (32.9%). Only 16 patients (1.8%) withdrew from the study due to virological failure. Virological response proportions were higher in patients virologically suppressed at study entry versus patients with baseline VL ≥50 copies/mL in each ARV-experienced group, while there was no consistent difference across study groups and baseline VL strata according to baseline CD4+ cell count. CD4+ cell count increased from study entry to last study visit in all the four groups. DRV/r was well tolerated, with few discontinuations due to study-emergent nonfatal adverse events (3.0% overall, including 2.1% drug-related) or deaths (3.0% overall, all non-drug-related); 35.3% of patients reported ≥1 adverse events. These observational data show that DRV/r was effective and well tolerated in the whole patient population described here. The DRV/r-containing regimen provided viral suppression

  10. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry: a Fundamental Shift in the Routine Practice of Clinical Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrew E.; Kaleta, Erin J.; Arora, Amit

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Within the past decade, clinical microbiology laboratories experienced revolutionary changes in the way in which microorganisms are identified, moving away from slow, traditional microbial identification algorithms toward rapid molecular methods and mass spectrometry (MS). Historically, MS was clinically utilized as a high-complexity method adapted for protein-centered analysis of samples in chemistry and hematology laboratories. Today, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) MS is adapted for use in microbiology laboratories, where it serves as a paradigm-shifting, rapid, and robust method for accurate microbial identification. Multiple instrument platforms, marketed by well-established manufacturers, are beginning to displace automated phenotypic identification instruments and in some cases genetic sequence-based identification practices. This review summarizes the current position of MALDI-TOF MS in clinical research and in diagnostic clinical microbiology laboratories and serves as a primer to examine the “nuts and bolts” of MALDI-TOF MS, highlighting research associated with sample preparation, spectral analysis, and accuracy. Currently available MALDI-TOF MS hardware and software platforms that support the use of MALDI-TOF with direct and precultured specimens and integration of the technology into the laboratory workflow are also discussed. Finally, this review closes with a prospective view of the future of MALDI-TOF MS in the clinical microbiology laboratory to accelerate diagnosis and microbial identification to improve patient care. PMID:23824373

  11. A 2-Year, Phase IV, Multicentre, Observational Study of Ranibizumab 0.5 mg in Patients with Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Routine Clinical Practice: The EPICOHORT Study

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Stephen; Perez-Salvador Garcia, Eduardo; Reynders, Stefaan; Si Bouazza, Abdelkader; Pilz, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the safety profile of ranibizumab 0.5 mg in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) in routine clinical practice. Methods. This 2-year, multicentre, observational study was conducted to capture real-world early practice and outcomes across Europe, shortly after European licensing of ranibizumab for nAMD. Being observational in nature, the study did not impose diagnostic/therapeutic interventions/visit schedule. Patients were to be treated as per the EU summary of product characteristics (SmPC) in effect during the study. Key outcome measures were incidence of selected adverse events (AEs), treatment exposure, bilateral treatment, compliance to the EU SmPC, and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) over 2 years. Results. 755 of 770 patients received treatment. Ranibizumab was generally well tolerated with low incidence of selected AEs (0%–1.9%). Patients received 6.2 (mean) injections and 133 patients received bilateral treatment over 2 years. Protocol deviation to treatment compliance was reported in majority of patients. The observed decline in mean BCVA (Month 12, +1.5; Month 24, –1.3 letters) may be associated with undertreatment as suggested by BCVA subgroup analysis. Conclusion. The EPICOHORT study conducted in routine clinical practice reinforces the well-established safety profile of ranibizumab in nAMD. In early European practice it appeared that the nAMD patients were undertreated. PMID:24868458

  12. A prospective, multicenter, post marketing surveillance study to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the Superia-Sirolimus Eluting Coronary Stent System (SSECSS) implanted during routine clinical practice in India

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Praveen; Kumar, Tarun

    2014-01-01

    Aim A prospective, multicenter, post marketing surveillance study to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the Superia-Sirolimus Eluting Coronary Stent System (SSECSS) implanted during routine clinical practice in India. Objectives Primary objective: 1. To study the MACE and in stent and In-segment Loss at Six Months (in a pre selected group of 50 patients). Secondary objective: 1. Clinical and procedural success. Materials and methods This is a prospective, open label, single-arm, multicenter (16 sites), post marketing observational study enrolling patients implanted with Superia-Sirolimus Eluting Coronary Stent (SSECS) in routine clinical practice in India. A total of 200 Patients of coronary Artery Disease (CAD) implanted with Superia-Sirolimus Eluting Coronary Stent (SSECS) were enrolled. Clinical assessments were done at 30 days, 180 days and at 1, 2 years either telephonically or office visit. A cohort of 50 pre-selected patients were followed up for angiographic evaluation at 180 days. Results MACE at 12 month of follow up was 1.71%.Late lumen loss, in segment was 0.14 and in stent was 0.10 mm at 6 month of follow-up. TLR was required only in 2 patients. Conclusion Superia stent is as safe as other biodegradable polymer stent in the market and time has come for biodegradable polymer stent with thin struts. PMID:25634405

  13. A controlled time-series trial of clinical reminders: using computerized firm systems to make quality improvement research a routine part of mainstream practice.

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, H. I.; Neighbor, W. E.; Cheadle, A. D.; Ramsey, S. D.; Diehr, P.; Gore, E.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the feasibility of conducting unobtrusive interventional research in community practice settings by integrating firm-system techniques with time-series analysis of relational-repository data. STUDY SETTING: A satellite teaching clinic divided into two similar, but geographically separated, primary care group practices called firms. One firm was selected by chance to receive the study intervention. Forty-two providers and 2,655 patients participated. STUDY DESIGN: A nonrandomized controlled trial of computer-generated preventive reminders. Net effects were determined by quantitatively combining population-level data from parallel experimental and control interrupted time series extending over two-month baseline and intervention periods. DATA COLLECTION: Mean rates at which mammography, colorectal cancer screening, and cholesterol testing were performed on patients due to receive each maneuver at clinic visits were the trial's outcome measures. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mammography performance increased on the experimental firm by 154 percent (0.24 versus 0.61, p = .03). No effect on fecal occult blood testing was observed. Cholesterol ordering decreased on both the experimental (0.18 versus 0.1 1, p = .02) and control firms (0.13 versus 0.07, p = .03) coincident with national guidelines retreating from recommending screening for young adults. A traditional uncontrolled interrupted time-series design would have incorrectly attributed the experimental-firm decrease to the introduction of reminders. The combined analysis properly indicated that no net prompting effect had occurred, as the difference between firms in cholesterol testing remained stochastically stable over time (0.05 versus 0.04, p = .75). A logistic-regression analysis applied to individual-level data produced equivalent findings. The trial incurred no supplementary data collection costs. CONCLUSIONS: The apparent validity and practicability of our reminder implementation study should

  14. Usefulness of the Spanish version of the mood disorder questionnaire for screening bipolar disorder in routine clinical practice in outpatients with major depression

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background According to some studies, almost 40% of depressive patients – half of them previously undetected – are diagnosed of bipolar II disorder when systematically assessed for hypomania. Thus, instruments for bipolar disorder screening are needed. The Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) is a self-reported questionnaire validated in Spanish in stable patients with a previously known diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to evaluate in the daily clinical practice the usefulness of the Spanish version of the MDQ in depressive patients. Methods Patients (n = 87) meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for a major depressive episode, not previously known as bipolar were included. The affective module of the Structured Clinical Interview (SCID) was used as gold standard. Results MDQ screened 24.1% of depressive patients as bipolar, vs. 12.6% according to SCID. For a cut-off point score of 7 positive answers, sensitivity was 72.7% (95% CI = 63.3 – 82.1) and specificity 82.9% (95% CI = 74.9–90.9). Likelihood ratio of positive and negative tests were 4,252 y 0,329 respectively. Limitations The small sample size reduced the power of the study to 62%. Conclusion Sensitivity and specificity of the MDQ were high for screening bipolar disorder in patients with major depression, and similar to the figures obtained in stable patients. This study confirms that MDQ is a useful instrument in the daily clinical assessment of depressive patients. PMID:18498637

  15. Routines, Roles, and Responsibilities for Aligning Scientific and Classroom Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Michael J.; Wargo, Brian M.

    2007-01-01

    Reform efforts in science education have focused on engaging students in authentic scientific practices. For these efforts to succeed, detailed articulations of scientific practice need to be linked to understandings of classroom practice. Here we characterize engagement in practice generally in terms of "3Rs": routines, roles, and…

  16. Complexity reduction of clinical samples for routine mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Mesmin, Cédric; van Oostrum, Jan; Domon, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    The precise measurement of protein abundance levels in highly complex biological samples such as plasma remains challenging. The wide range of protein concentrations impairs the detection of low-abundant species and the high number of peptide components to analyze results in interferences leading to erroneous quantitative results. The advances in MS instrumentation, with improved selectivity and sensitivity, partially address these issues, but sample preparation techniques remain the pivotal element to obtain robust routine mass spectrometric assays with a low LOD. A number of methodologies have been proposed and refined over the past two decades to reduce the range of protein concentrations and the number of peptide components. Whereas most of the methods have proven their utility for discovery studies, only a few are actually applicable to routine quantitative studies. In this account, common protein- and peptide-based fractionation methods are discussed, and illustrated with practical examples, with a focus on methods suited for clinical samples scheduled for biomarker validation assays and subsequent routine clinical mass spectrometric analyses. PMID:26680238

  17. An Element of Practical Knowledge in Education: Professional Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacourse, France

    2011-01-01

    The question of practical knowledge and its teaching has arisen more perceptibly since the appearance of the aim to professionalize teachers. How can imperceptible knowledge such as professional routines be taught? To establish a social fabric and effective class management, it is essential to call on creative and adaptive professional routines.…

  18. Changing Urban Bureaucracies: How New Practices Become Routinized.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.; And Others

    The goal of this report is to describe the process by which new service practices in urban bureaucracies become routinized. The routinization process is studied by examining the life histories of six types of innovations: computer-assisted instruction; police computer systems; mobile intensive care units; closed circuit television systems; breath…

  19. Clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Machteld A. G.; Zimmermann, Luc J. I.

    2010-01-01

    The most important goal of introducing noninvasive ventilation (NIV) has been to decrease the need for intubation and, therefore, mechanical ventilation in newborns. As a result, this technique may reduce the incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). In addition to nasal CPAP, improvements in sensors and flow delivery systems have resulted in the introduction of a variety of other types of NIV. For the optimal application of these novelties, a thorough physiological knowledge of mechanics of the respiratory system is necessary. In this overview, the modern insights of noninvasive respiratory therapy in newborns are discussed. These aspects include respiratory support in the delivery room; conventional and modern nCPAP; humidified, heated, and high-flow nasal cannula ventilation; and nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation. Finally, an algorithm is presented describing common practice in taking care of respiratory distress in prematurely born infants. PMID:20179966

  20. Factor XI replacement for inherited factor XI deficiency in routine clinical practice: results of the HEMOLEVEN prospective 3-year postmarketing study

    PubMed Central

    Bauduer, F; de Raucourt, E; Boyer-Neumann, C; Trossaert, M; Beurrier, P; Faradji, A; Peynet, J; Borg, J-Y; Chamouni, P; Chatelanaz, C; Henriet, C; Bridey, F; Goudemand, J

    2015-01-01

    Factor XI (FXI)-deficient patients may develop excessive bleeding after trauma or surgery. Replacement therapy should be considered in high-risk situations, especially when FXI levels are below 20 IU dL−1. HEMOLEVEN is a human plasma-derived factor XI concentrate available in France since 1992, but there are few data regarding its use by physicians. This prospective study assessed the use, efficacy and safety of HEMOLEVEN in common clinical practice. HEMOLEVEN was evaluated in FXI-deficient patients in 13 French centres in a 3-year postmarketing study. Forty-four patients (30 females, 14 males) received 67 treatments. The median age was 37 years (8 months–91 years). Basal FXI levels were <1 to 51 IU dL−1 (median: 5.5); 29 patients were severely FXI-deficient (<20 IU dL−1). FXI was administered prophylactically before 43 surgical procedures, 10 invasive procedures, 8 vaginal deliveries, or as curative treatment for six bleeds. The efficacy was assessed as excellent/good in 63, moderate in two and undetermined in two treatments. Seven patients experienced seven adverse effects, including two rated as serious: one sudden massive pulmonary embolism with fatal outcome and one case of inhibitor to FXI. HEMOLEVEN is effective for bleeding prevention in FXI deficiency. However, considering the benefit/risk ratio observed in relation to dosage in this study; firstly, it should be used sparingly due to its potential prothrombotic effect; secondly, new prescription procedures should be defined to adapt the dosage, especially in patients with intrinsic and/or acquired risk factors for thrombosis. PMID:25817556

  1. Multispecialty Clinic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Margolin, David A.; Beck, David E.

    2011-01-01

    A multispecialty clinic practice is a common practice arrangement for colorectal surgeons. This type of practice has a variety of features, both positive and negative. The authors explore location, practice patterns, lifestyles, compensation, and academic opportunities associated with a multispecialty clinic practice. This information can assist younger surgeons in choosing a practice opportunity and guide experienced surgeons through their career progression. PMID:22654568

  2. A comparison between the efficiency of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay and nested PCR in identifying Mycobacterium tuberculosis during routine clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Cheol-Hong; Woo, Heungjeong; Kim, Changhwan; Choi, Jeong-Hee; Jang, Seung-Hun; Park, Sang Myeon; Lee, Myung Goo; Jung, Ki-Suck; Hyun, Jeongwon; Kim, Hyun Soo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is more sensitive, specific, and rapid than the conventional methods of acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smear and culture. The aim of this study was to determine if the Xpert MTB/rifampicin (RIF) assay had additional advantages over nested PCR for the detection of MTB in a geographical area with intermediate tuberculosis (TB) incidence. Methods Between February and December 2013, the Xpert MTB/RIF assay and MTB nested PCR, as well as AFB smear and culture, were simultaneously performed on 198 clinical samples (160 pulmonary and 38 non-pulmonary specimens) collected from 171 patients hospitalized at Hallym University Medical Center for possible TB. The accuracy of the diagnosis of MTB culture-positive TB and the turnaround time of reporting laboratory results were calculated and compared. Rifampin resistance by the Xpert MTB/RIF assay was reviewed with that of conventional drug susceptibility testing (DST). Results The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay and MTB nested PCR for diagnosis of MTB culture-positive pulmonary TB were 86.1% vs. 69.4% (P=0.1563), 97.8% vs. 94.1% (P=0.2173), 91.2% vs. 75.8% (P=0.1695), and 96.4% vs. 92.0% (P=0.2032), respectively. The median turnaround times of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay and MTB nested PCR were 0 [0-4] days and 4 [1-11] days, respectively (P<0.001). Two cases of rifampin resistance, as determined by the Xpert MTB/RIF assay, were found to be multi-drug resistant (MDR) pulmonary TB by DST. Conclusions The Xpert MTB/RIF assay seemed to be sensitive, specific, and comparable to nested PCR for identifying MTB among clinically suspected TB patients, and the assay can be valuable in giving a timely identification of resistance to rifampin. PMID:24976983

  3. Hypothyroidism in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Qari, Faiza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypothyroidism is the most common endocrine disease that was seen in the clinical practice especially for family physicians. Methods: This review article covered the important practical clinical issues for managing overt hypothyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism and hypothyroidism during pregnancy. Conclusions: The clinical issues were addressed by clinical scenario followed by questions and stressed on the important clinical points. PMID:25161963

  4. Effect of telehealth on hospital utilisation and mortality in routine clinical practice: a matched control cohort study in an early adopter site

    PubMed Central

    Steventon, Adam; Ariti, Cono; Fisher, Elizabeth; Bardsley, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the effects of a home-based telehealth intervention on the use of secondary healthcare and mortality. Design Observational study of a mainstream telehealth service, using person-level administrative data. Time to event analysis (Cox regression) was performed comparing telehealth patients with controls who were matched using a machine-learning algorithm. Setting A predominantly rural region of England (North Yorkshire). Participants 716 telehealth patients were recruited from community, general practice and specialist acute care, between June 2010 and March 2013. Patients had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure or diabetes, and a history of associated inpatient admission. Patients were matched 1:1 to control patients, also selected from North Yorkshire, with respect to demographics, diagnoses of health conditions, previous hospital use and predictive risk score. Interventions Telehealth involved the remote exchange of medical data between patients and healthcare professionals as part of the ongoing management of the patient's health condition. Monitoring centre staff alerted healthcare professionals if the telemonitored data exceeded preset thresholds. Control patients received usual care, without telehealth. Primary and secondary outcome measures Time to the first emergency (unplanned) hospital admission or death. Secondary metrics included time to death and time to first admission, outpatient attendance and emergency department visit. Results Matched controls and telehealth patients were similar at baseline. Following enrolment, telehealth patients were more likely than matched controls to experience emergency admission or death (adjusted HR 1.34, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.56, p<0.001). They were also more likely to have outpatient attendances (adjusted HR=1.25, 1.11 to 1.40, p<0.001), but mortality rates were similar between groups. Sensitivity analyses showed that we were unlikely to have missed reductions in the

  5. Evaluation of red blood cell and platelet antigen genotyping platforms (ID CORE XT/ID HPA XT) in routine clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Finning, Kirstin; Bhandari, Radhika; Sellers, Fiona; Revelli, Nicoletta; Villa, Maria Antonietta; Muñiz-Díaz, Eduardo; Nogués, Núria

    2016-01-01

    Background High-throughput genotyping platforms enable simultaneous analysis of multiple polymorphisms for blood group typing. BLOODchip® ID is a genotyping platform based on Luminex® xMAP technology for simultaneous determination of 37 red blood cell (RBC) antigens (ID CORE XT) and 18 human platelet antigens (HPA) (ID HPA XT) using the BIDS XT software. Materials and methods In this international multicentre study, the performance of ID CORE XT and ID HPA XT, using the centres’ current genotyping methods as the reference for comparison, and the usability and practicality of these systems, were evaluated under working laboratory conditions. DNA was extracted from whole blood in EDTA with Qiagen methodologies. Ninety-six previously phenotyped/genotyped samples were processed per assay: 87 testing samples plus five positive controls and four negative controls. Results Results were available for 519 samples: 258 with ID CORE XT and 261 with ID HPA XT. There were three “no calls” that were either caused by human error or resolved after repeating the test. Agreement between the tests and reference methods was 99.94% for ID CORE XT (9,540/9,546 antigens determined) and 100% for ID HPA XT (all 4,698 alleles determined). There were six discrepancies in antigen results in five RBC samples, four of which (in VS, N, S and Doa) could not be investigated due to lack of sufficient sample to perform additional tests and two of which (in S and C) were resolved in favour of ID CORE XT (100% accuracy). The total hands-on time was 28–41 minutes for a batch of 16 samples. Compared with the reference platforms, ID CORE XT and ID HPA XT were considered simpler to use and had shorter processing times. Discussion ID CORE XT and ID HPA XT genotyping platforms for RBC and platelet systems were accurate and user-friendly in working laboratory settings. PMID:26674823

  6. Telemedicine in interdisciplinary work practices: On an IT system that met the criteria for success set out by its sponsors, yet failed to become part of every-day clinical routines

    PubMed Central

    de Bont, Antoinette; Bal, Roland

    2008-01-01

    Background Information systems can play a key role in care innovations including task redesign and shared care. Many demonstration projects have presented evidence of clinical and cost effectiveness and high levels of patient satisfaction. Yet these same projects often fail to become part of everyday clinical routines. The aim of the paper is to gain insight into a common paradox that a technology can meet the criteria for success set out at the start of the project yet fail to become part of everyday clinical routines. Methods We evaluated a telecare service set up to reduce the workload of ophthalmologists. In this project, optometrists in 10 optical shops made digital images to detect patients with glaucoma which were further assessed by trained technicians in the hospital. Over a period of three years, we conducted interviews with the project team and the users about the workability of the system and its integration in practice. Beside the interviews, we analyzed record data to measure the quality of the images. We compared the qualitative accounts with these measurements. Results According to our measurements, the quality of the images was at least satisfactory in 90% of the cases, i.e. the images could be used to screen the patients – reducing the workload of the ophthalmologist considerably. However, both the ophthalmologist and the optometrists became increasingly dissatisfied respectively with the perceived quality of the pictures and the perceived workload. Through a detailed analysis of how the professionals discussed the quality of the pictures, we re-constructed how the notion of quality of the images and being a good professional were constructed and linked. The IT system transformed into a quality system and, at the same time, transformed the notions of being a good professional. While a continuous dialogue about the quality of the pictures became an emblem for the quality of care, this dialogue was hindered by the system and the way the care

  7. [Use of PubMed to improve evidence-based medicine in routine urological practice].

    PubMed

    Rink, M; Kluth, L A; Shariat, S F; Chun, F K; Fisch, M; Dahm, P

    2013-03-01

    Applying evidence-based medicine in daily clinical practice is the basis of patient-centered medicine and knowledge of accurate literature acquisition skills is necessary for informed clinical decision-making. PubMed is an easy accessible, free bibliographic database comprising over 21 million citations from the medical field, life-science journals and online books. The article summarizes the effective use of PubMed in routine urological clinical practice based on a common case scenario. This article explains the simple use of PubMed to obtain the best search results with the highest evidence. Accurate knowledge about the use of PubMed in routine clinical practice can improve evidence-based medicine and also patient treatment. PMID:23503794

  8. Routines, roles, and responsibilities for aligning scientific and classroom practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Michael J.; Wargo, Brian M.

    2007-01-01

    Reform efforts in science education have focused on engaging students in authentic scientific practices. For these efforts to succeed, detailed articulations of scientific practice need to be linked to understandings of classroom practice. Here we characterize engagement in practice generally in terms of 3Rs: routines, roles, and responsibilities. We argue that there is a misalignment between the 3Rs of scientific practice and the practices common in classrooms, and that this misalignment poses a considerable obstacle for beginning teachers who attempt to implement reform pedagogy. As part of a secondary methods course, 16 preservice teachers (PSTs) participated in two exemplar activities designed to engage them in scientific practices. The PST performances suggest that at least initially, they did not consider authentic scientific practices appropriate for classroom activities, implying a pedagogical repertoire dominated by the 3Rs of traditional classrooms. PST performances, however, evidenced a shift in the 3Rs from those common in classrooms to those required by these activities, suggesting that their visions for classrooms are malleable and underlining the importance of aligning the 3Rs of scientific and classroom practices during teacher preparation.

  9. Integrative molecular profiling of routine clinical prostate cancer specimens

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, C. S.; Cani, A. K.; Hovelson, D. H.; Quist, M. J.; Douville, N. J.; Yadati, V.; Amin, A. M.; Nelson, P. S.; Betz, B. L.; Liu, C-J.; Knudsen, K. E.; Cooney, K. A.; Feng, F. Y.; McDaniel, A. S.; Tomlins, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Comprehensive molecular profiling led to the recognition of multiple prostate cancer (PCa) molecular subtypes and driving alterations, but translating these findings to clinical practice is challenging. Patients and methods We developed a formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue compatible integrative assay for PCa molecular subtyping and interrogation of relevant genetic/transcriptomic alterations (MiPC). We applied MiPC, which combines capture-based next generation sequencing and quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR), to 53 FFPE PCa specimens representing cases not well represented in frozen tissue cohorts, including 8 paired primary tumor and lymph node metastases. Results were validated using multiplexed PCR based NGS and Sanger sequencing. Results We identified known and novel potential driving, somatic mutations and copy number alterations, including a novel BRAF T599_V600insHT mutation and CYP11B2 amplification in a patient treated with ketoconazole (a potent CYP11B2 inhibitor). qRT-PCR integration enabled comprehensive molecular subtyping and provided complementary information, such as androgen receptor (AR) target gene module assessment in advanced cases and SPINK1 over-expression. MiPC identified highly concordant profiles for all 8 tumor/lymph node metastasis pairs, consistent with limited heterogeneity amongst driving events. MiPC and exome sequencing were performed on separately isolated conventional acinar PCa and prostatic small cell carcinoma (SCC) components from the same FFPE resection specimen to enable direct comparison of histologically distinct components. While both components showed TMPRSS2:ERG fusions, the SCC component exclusively harbored complete TP53 inactivation (frameshift variant and copy loss) and two CREBBP mutations. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the feasibility of integrative profiling of routine PCa specimens, which may have utility for understanding disease biology and enabling personalized

  10. Ethnographic study of ICT-supported collaborative work routines in general practice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Health informatics research has traditionally been dominated by experimental and quasi-experimental designs. An emerging area of study in organisational sociology is routinisation (how collaborative work practices become business-as-usual). There is growing interest in the use of ethnography and other in-depth qualitative approaches to explore how collaborative work routines are enacted and develop over time, and how electronic patient records (EPRs) are used to support collaborative work practices within organisations. Methods/design Following Feldman and Pentland, we will use 'the organisational routine' as our unit of analysis. In a sample of four UK general practices, we will collect narratives, ethnographic observations, multi-modal (video and screen capture) data, documents and other artefacts, and analyse these to map and compare the different understandings and enactments of three common routines (repeat prescribing, coding and summarising, and chronic disease surveillance) which span clinical and administrative spaces and which, though 'mundane', have an important bearing on quality and safety of care. In a detailed qualitative analysis informed by sociological theory, we aim to generate insights about how complex collaborative work is achieved through the process of routinisation in healthcare organisations. Discussion Our study offers the potential not only to identify potential quality failures (poor performance, errors, failures of coordination) in collaborative work routines but also to reveal the hidden work and workarounds by front-line staff which bridge the model-reality gap in EPR technologies and via which "automated" safety features have an impact in practice. PMID:21190583

  11. Screening for substance use disorders in neurodevelopmental disorders: a clinical routine?

    PubMed

    Palmqvist, Margita; Edman, Gunnar; Bölte, Sven

    2014-05-01

    Evidence suggests that substance use disorders (SUD) tend to be underdiagnosed in psychiatry. The objective of this study was to investigate whether drug and alcohol screening is a clinical routine in the assessment of two prominent neurodevelopmental disorders, namely ADHD and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We surveyed drug and alcohol screening routines in 34 general child and adolescent (only practice for adolescents, not children, was assessed) and 29 adult psychiatric outpatient departments in Stockholm County, Sweden. Structured telephone interviews mapping SUD screening procedures were conducted with department representatives in charge. Only a minority of child and adolescent departments regularly used SUD screening questionnaires (6 %) in ADHD and ASD assessment, while this was more common in adult psychiatry (55 %). Urine/blood-based toxicology tests were always used in 28 % and sometimes or in case of clinical suspicion in 38 % of the adult units. Such tests were used sometimes or in case of clinical suspicion in 15 % of the child psychiatric departments, but never routinely. Findings reveal that screening for SUD in ADHD and ASD is not an integral part of routine clinical assessments in psychiatry, although increasingly an integral part of many clinical guidelines. Thus, SUD might be underdiagnosed in neurodevelopmental disorders, which could be particularly true for child and adolescent psychiatry settings. PMID:23949101

  12. [Bioethics in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Gonzaléz, Miguel; Herreros, Benjamín

    2015-01-01

    Bioethics has grown exponentially in recent decades. Its most important schools include principlism, casuistry, virtue ethics and the ethics of care. These schools are not exclusive. Within bioethics, clinical ethics addresses the inherent clinical practice ethical problems, problems which are many and very varied. Bioethics training is essential for clinicians to address these bioethics' problems. But even the professionals are trained, there are problems that cannot be solved individually and require advisory groups in clinical ethics: clinical ethics committees. These committees are also responsible for education in bioethics in health institutions. Clinical bioethics is a practical discipline, oriented to address specific problems, so its development is necessary to improve the decision making in such complex problems, inevitable problems in healthcare. PMID:25680645

  13. Preanalytical management: serum vacuum tubes validation for routine clinical chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Oliveira, Gabriel; Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Montagnana, Martina; Picheth, Geraldo; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The validation process is essential in accredited clinical laboratories. Aim of this study was to validate five kinds of serum vacuum tubes for routine clinical chemistry laboratory testing. Materials and methods: Blood specimens from 100 volunteers in five diff erent serum vacuum tubes (Tube I: VACUETTE®, Tube II: LABOR IMPORT®, Tube III: S-Monovette®, Tube IV: SST® and Tube V: SST II®) were collected by a single, expert phlebotomist. The routine clinical chemistry tests were analyzed on cobas® 6000 module. The significance of the diff erences between samples was assessed by paired Student’s t-test after checking for normality. The level of statistical significance was set at P < 0.005. Finally, the biases from Tube I, Tube II, Tube III, Tube IV and Tube V were compared with the current desirable quality specifications for bias (B), derived from biological variation. Results and conclusions: Basically, our validation will permit the laboratory or hospital managers to select the brand’s vacuum tubes validated according him/her technical or economical reasons, in order to perform the following laboratory tests: glucose, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, triglycerides, total protein, albumin, blood urea nitrogen, uric acid, alkaline phosphatise, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyltransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, calcium, iron, sodium and potassium. On the contrary special attention will be required if the laboratory already performs creatinine, amylase, phosphate and magnesium determinations and the quality laboratory manager intend to change the serum tubes. We suggest that laboratory management should both standardize the procedures and frequently evaluate the quality of in vitro diagnostic devices. PMID:22838184

  14. Gamification of Clinical Routine: The Dr. Fill Approach.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Mark; Kühn, Martin; Zhao, Xiaoqing; Bettermann, Ralf; Jonas, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Gamification is used in clinical context in the health care education. Furthermore, it has shown great promises to improve the performance of the health care staff in their daily routine. In this work we focus on the medication sorting task, which is performed manually in hospitals. This task is very error prone and needs to be performed daily. Nevertheless, errors in the medication are crucial and lead to serious complications. In this work we present a real world gamification approach of the medication sorting task in a patient's daily pill organizer. The player of the game needs to sort the correct medication into the correct dispenser slots and is rewarded or punished in real time. At the end of the game, a score is given and the user can register in a leaderboard. PMID:27332203

  15. Toshiba General Hospital PACS for routine in- and outpatient clinics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toshimitsu, Akihiro; Okazaki, Nobuo; Kura, Hiroyuki; Nishihara, Eitaro; Tsubura, Shinichi

    1996-05-01

    The Toshiba General Hospital introduced a departmental RIS/PACS (Radiology Information System/Picture Archiving and Communication System) in the radiology department in May, 1993. It has been used routinely since that time. In order to provide efficient means for clinicians to find and read many images, the system has been expanded to the neurosurgery and urology clinics and wards since May, 1995, and five image referring workstations now provide digital images to clinicians. In this paper we discuss an algorithm for image migration, one of the key issues to accomplish the expansion to outpatient clinics successfully, and propose the WYWIWYG (what you want is what you get) image transfer logic. This is the logic used to transfer images that physicians require refer without increasing the traffic between the image server and referring workstations. We accomplish the WYWIWYG logic by prioritizing exams the physicians have not yet viewed and by finding historical exams according to the modality, anatomy, and marking. Clinicians gave us comments from their first use of the system and suggested that the PACS enables clinicians to review images more efficiently compared to a film-based system. Our experience suggests that it is a key to the effective application of PACS in outpatient clinics to incorporate consideration patterns of clinicians on the migration algorithm.

  16. [Comments on routine laboratory data that are of practical use for physicians].

    PubMed

    Honda, Takayuki; Matsuo, Shuji; Masaki, Mitsuru; Harada, Kenu; Takasaki, Tadashi; Nakamura, Fumihiko

    2013-03-01

    Routine laboratory data are not adequately used to follow a patient because medical students are not educated to comprehend them with time series analysis. The Department of Laboratory Medicine can support physicians by adding comments to laboratory data that are of practical use for following a patient. At Shinshu University School of Medicine, routine laboratory data are discussed by time series analysis in a reversed clinicopathological conference(R-CPC). The general status is checked and then the state of each organ is examined using routine laboratory data, and we can obtain much more information about the patient than from physical examinations. In this R-CPC, several specialists in laboratory medicine discussed routine laboratory data of a patient with severe inflammation. It was difficult to diagnose him with a bacterial infection. Elevation of white blood cell count and high C-reactive protein suggested bacterial infection, and decreased platelets showed the possibility of bacteremia. However, he was clinically diagnosed as having multiple trauma without bacterial infection after falling down a mountainside. If routine laboratory data are finely analyzed by specialists in laboratory medicine, physicians can obtain useful information for patient treatment from the Department of Laboratory Medicine. PMID:23785798

  17. Thinking Routines: Replicating Classroom Practices within Museum Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolberg, Rochelle Ibanez; Goff, Allison

    2012-01-01

    This article describes thinking routines as tools to guide and support young children's thinking. These learning strategies, developed by Harvard University's Project Zero Classroom, actively engage students in constructing meaning while also understanding their own thinking process. The authors discuss how thinking routines can be used in both…

  18. Good Clinical Practice Training

    PubMed Central

    Arango, Jaime; Chuck, Tina; Ellenberg, Susan S.; Foltz, Bridget; Gorman, Colleen; Hinrichs, Heidi; McHale, Susan; Merchant, Kunal; Shapley, Stephanie; Wild, Gretchen

    2016-01-01

    Good Clinical Practice (GCP) is an international standard for the design, conduct, performance, monitoring, auditing, recording, analyses, and reporting of clinical trials. The goal of GCP is to ensure the protection of the rights, integrity, and confidentiality of clinical trial participants and to ensure the credibility and accuracy of data and reported results. In the United States, trial sponsors generally require investigators to complete GCP training prior to participating in each clinical trial to foster GCP and as a method to meet regulatory expectations (ie, sponsor’s responsibility to select qualified investigators per 21 CFR 312.50 and 312.53(a) for drugs and biologics and 21 CFR 812.40 and 812.43(a) for medical devices). This training requirement is often extended to investigative site staff, as deemed relevant by the sponsor, institution, or investigator. Those who participate in multiple clinical trials are often required by sponsors to complete repeated GCP training, which is unnecessarily burdensome. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative convened a multidisciplinary project team involving partners from academia, industry, other researchers and research staff, and government to develop recommendations for streamlining current GCP training practices. Recommendations drafted by the project team, including the minimum key training elements, frequency, format, and evidence of training completion, were presented to a broad group of experts to foster discussion of the current issues and to seek consensus on proposed solutions. PMID:27390628

  19. Hepatitis B Virus Genotyping: Is the Time Ripe for Routine Clinical Use?

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Kaushal; Tyagi, Pankaj

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B is one of the major causes of end-stage liver disease and liver cancer worldwide. A number of host and viral factors influence the disease course and outcomes. One such viral factor is hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes. There are eight major HBV genotypes described from various geographic regions of the world. Although direct sequencing appears to be the gold standard for HBV genotyping, it is expensive and laborintensive and therefore cannot be applied for routine clinical use. The newer molecular methods including serotyping have made genotyping easier and simple to apply to large number of samples rapidly. The data collected mainly over the last decade have suggested that HBV genotypes may have a bearing over the natural course of the disease and its response to therapy. This review summarizes the available literature and highlights how genotyping could be incorporated into routine clinical practice in order to improve delivery of care to HBV-infected individuals. PMID:25755425

  20. Rapid targeted somatic mutation analysis of solid tumors in routine clinical diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Francaviglia, Ilaria; Dal Cin, Elena; Barbieri, Gianluca; Arrigoni, Gianluigi; Pecciarini, Lorenza; Doglioni, Claudio; Cangi, Maria Giulia

    2015-01-01

    Tumor genotyping is an essential step in routine clinical practice and pathology laboratories face a major challenge in being able to provide rapid, sensitive and updated molecular tests. We developed a novel mass spectrometry multiplexed genotyping platform named PentaPanel to concurrently assess single nucleotide polymorphisms in 56 hotspots of the 5 most clinically relevant cancer genes, KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, EGFR and PIK3CA for a total of 221 detectable mutations. To both evaluate and validate the PentaPanel performance,we investigated 1025 tumor specimens of 6 different cancer types (carcinomas of colon, lung, breast, pancreas, and biliary tract, and melanomas), systematically addressing sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of our platform. Sanger sequencing was also performed for all the study samples. Our data showed that PentaPanel is a high throughput and robust tool, allowing genotyping for targeted therapy selection of 10 patients in the same run, with a practical turnaround time of 2 working days. Importantly, it was successfully used to interrogate different DNAs isolated from routinely processed specimens (formalin-fixed paraffin embedded, frozen, and cytological samples), covering all the requirements of clinical tests. In conclusion, the PentaPanel platform can provide an immediate, accurate and cost effective multiplex approach for clinically relevant gene mutation analysis in many solid tumors and its utility across many diseases can be particularly relevant in multiple clinical trials, including the new basket trial approach, aiming to identify appropriate targeted drug combination strategies. PMID:26435479

  1. Myocarditis in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Sinagra, Gianfranco; Anzini, Marco; Pereira, Naveen L; Bussani, Rossana; Finocchiaro, Gherardo; Bartunek, Jozef; Merlo, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Myocarditis is a polymorphic disease characterized by great variability in clinical presentation and evolution. Patients presenting with severe left ventricular dysfunction and life-threatening arrhythmias represent a demanding challenge for the clinician. Modern techniques of cardiovascular imaging and the exhaustive molecular evaluation of the myocardium with endomyocardial biopsy have provided valuable insight into the pathophysiology of this disease, and several clinical registries have unraveled the disease's long-term evolution and prognosis. However, uncertainties persist in crucial practical issues in the management of patients. This article critically reviews current information for evidence-based management, offering a rational and practical approach to patients with myocarditis. For this review, we searched the PubMed and MEDLINE databases for articles published from January 1, 1980, through December 31, 2015, using the following terms: myocarditis, inflammatory cardiomyopathy, and endomyocardial biopsy. Articles were selected for inclusion if they represented primary data or were review articles published in high-impact journals. In particular, a risk-oriented approach is proposed. The different patterns of presentation of myocarditis are classified as low-, intermediate-, and high-risk syndromes according to the most recent evidence on prognosis, clinical findings, and both invasive and noninvasive testing, and appropriate management strategies are proposed for each risk class. PMID:27489051

  2. Voriconazole in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mikulska, Małgorzata; Novelli, Andrea; Aversa, Franco; Cesaro, Simone; de Rosa, Francesco Giuseppe; Girmenia, Corrado; Micozzi, Alessandra; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Viscoli, Claudio

    2012-12-01

    Invasive fungal diseases are associated with significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromized patients. Voriconazole is the first line treatment of invasive aspergillosis, and has been successfully used in other invasive fungal infections, such as candidiasis, fusariosis or scedosporidiosis. Voriconazole has non-linear pharmacokinetics and undergoes extensive hepatic metabolism by the cytochrome P450 system that depends on age, genetic factors, and interactions with other drugs. Thus, significant interpatient variability is observed after administration of the same dose. Additionally, the therapeutic window is narrow, with high risk of side effects at serum levels 3-5 times higher than the minimal threshold for efficacy. Therefore, the knowledge of pharmacological properties, metabolism, interactions, dosage indications in various populations and side effects is crucial. Therapeutic drug monitoring can help maximize the efficacy and minimize the risk of toxicity. Pharmacological, mycological and clinical aspects of the treatment with voriconazole are summarized in order to optimize its use in daily clinical practice. PMID:23174096

  3. Thiamin in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Frank, Laura L

    2015-07-01

    Thiamin is a water-soluble vitamin also known as vitamin B1. Its biologically active form, thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP), is a cofactor in macronutrient metabolism. In addition to its coenzyme roles, TPP plays a role in nerve structure and function as well as brain metabolism. Signs and symptoms of thiamin deficiency (TD) include lactic acidosis, peripheral neuropathy, ataxia, and ocular changes (eg, nystagmus). More advanced symptoms include confabulation and memory loss and/or psychosis, resulting in Wernicke's encephalopathy and/or Wernicke's Korsakoff syndrome, respectively. The nutrition support clinician should be aware of patients who may be at risk for TD. Risk factors include those patients with malnutrition due to 1 or more nutrition-related etiologies: decreased nutrient intake, increased nutrient losses, or impaired nutrient absorption. Clinical scenarios such as unexplained heart failure or lactic acidosis, renal failure with dialysis, alcoholism, starvation, hyperemesis gravidarum, or bariatric surgery may increase the risk for TD. Patients who are critically ill and require nutrition support may also be at risk for TD, especially those who are given intravenous dextrose void of thiamin repletion. Furthermore, understanding thiamin's role as a potential therapeutic agent for diabetes, some inborn errors of metabolism, and neurodegenerative diseases warrants further research. This tutorial describes the absorption, digestion, and metabolism of thiamin. Issues pertaining to thiamin in clinical practice will be described, and evidence-based practice suggestions for the prevention and treatment of TD will be discussed. PMID:25564426

  4. Routine HIV Screening in Portugal: Clinical Impact and Cost-Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Perelman, Julian; DiLorenzo, Madeline A.; Alves, Joana; Barros, Henrique; Mateus, Céu; Pereira, João; Mansinho, Kamal; Robine, Marion; Park, Ji-Eun; Ross, Eric L.; Losina, Elena; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Noubary, Farzad; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Paltiel, A. David

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of routine HIV screening in Portugal to the current practice of targeted and on-demand screening. Design We used Portuguese national clinical and economic data to conduct a model-based assessment. Methods We compared current HIV detection practices to strategies of increasingly frequent routine HIV screening in Portuguese adults aged 18-69. We considered several subpopulations and geographic regions with varying levels of undetected HIV prevalence and incidence. Baseline inputs for the national case included undiagnosed HIV prevalence 0.16%, annual incidence 0.03%, mean population age 43 years, mean CD4 count at care initiation 292 cells/μL, 63% HIV test acceptance, 78% linkage to care, and HIV rapid test cost €6 under the proposed routine screening program. Outcomes included quality-adjusted survival, secondary HIV transmission, cost, and incremental cost-effectiveness. Results One-time national HIV screening increased HIV-infected survival from 164.09 quality-adjusted life months (QALMs) to 166.83 QALMs compared to current practice and had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of €28,000 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY). Screening more frequently in higher-risk groups was cost-effective: for example screening annually in men who have sex with men or screening every three years in regions with higher incidence and prevalence produced ICERs of €21,000/QALY and €34,000/QALY, respectively. Conclusions One-time HIV screening in the Portuguese national population will increase survival and is cost-effective by international standards. More frequent screening in higher-risk regions and subpopulations is also justified. Given Portugal’s challenging economic priorities, we recommend prioritizing screening in higher-risk populations and geographic settings. PMID:24367639

  5. Real-Time Patient Survey Data During Routine Clinical Activities for Rapid-Cycle Quality Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Background Surveying patients is increasingly important for evaluating and improving health care delivery, but practical survey strategies during routine care activities have not been available. Objective We examined the feasibility of conducting routine patient surveys in a primary care clinic using commercially available technology (Web-based survey creation, deployment on tablet computers, cloud-based management of survey data) to expedite and enhance several steps in data collection and management for rapid quality improvement cycles. Methods We used a Web-based data management tool (survey creation, deployment on tablet computers, real-time data accumulation and display of survey results) to conduct four patient surveys during routine clinic sessions over a one-month period. Each survey consisted of three questions and focused on a specific patient care domain (dental care, waiting room experience, care access/continuity, Internet connectivity). Results Of the 727 available patients during clinic survey days, 316 patients (43.4%) attempted the survey, and 293 (40.3%) completed the survey. For the four 3-question surveys, the average time per survey was overall 40.4 seconds, with a range of 5.4 to 20.3 seconds for individual questions. Yes/No questions took less time than multiple choice questions (average 9.6 seconds versus 14.0). Average response time showed no clear pattern by order of questions or by proctor strategy, but monotonically increased with number of words in the question (<20 words, 21-30 words, >30 words)—8.0, 11.8, 16.8, seconds, respectively. Conclusions This technology-enabled data management system helped capture patient opinions, accelerate turnaround of survey data, with minimal impact on a busy primary care clinic. This new model of patient survey data management is feasible and sustainable in a busy office setting, supports and engages clinicians in the quality improvement process, and harmonizes with the vision of a learning health

  6. Musculoskeletal ultrasonography in routine rheumatology practice: data from Central and Eastern European countries.

    PubMed

    Mandl, Peter; Baranauskaite, Asta; Damjanov, Nemanja; Hojnik, Maja; Kurucz, Reka; Nagy, Orsolya; Nemec, Petr; Niedermayer, Dora; Perić, Porin; Petranova, Tzvetanka; Pille, Andres; Rednic, Simona; Vlad, Violeta; Zlnay, Martin; Balint, Peter V

    2016-06-01

    The main aim was to gain structured insight into the use of musculoskeletal ultrasonography (MSUS) in routine rheumatology practices in Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries. In a cross-sectional, observational, international, multicenter survey, a questionnaire was sent to investigational sites in CEE countries. Data on all subsequent routine MSUS examinations, site characteristics, MSUS equipment, and investigators were collected over 6 months or up to 100 examinations per center. A total of 95 physicians at 44 sites in 9 countries provided information on a total of 2810 MSUS examinations. The most frequent diagnoses were rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondyloarthritis (34.8 and 14.9 % of cases, respectively). Mean number of joints examined was 6.8. MSUS was most frequently performed for diagnostic purposes (58 %), particularly in patients with undifferentiated arthritis, suspected soft tissue disorders, or osteoarthritis (73.0-85.3 %). In RA patients, 56.3 % of examinations were conducted to monitor disease activity. Nearly all investigations (99 %) had clinical implications, while the results of 78.6 % of examinations (51.6-99.0 %) were deemed useful for patient education. This first standardized multicountry survey performed in CEEs provided a structured documentation of the routine MSUS use in participating countries. The majority of MSUS examinations were performed for diagnostic purposes, whereas one-third was conducted to monitor disease activity in RA. A majority of examinations had an impact on clinical decision making and were also found to be useful for patient education. PMID:26923691

  7. Cannabinoids in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Williamson, E M; Evans, F J

    2000-12-01

    Cannabis has a potential for clinical use often obscured by unreliable and purely anecdotal reports. The most important natural cannabinoid is the psychoactive tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC); others include cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabigerol (CBG). Not all the observed effects can be ascribed to THC, and the other constituents may also modulate its action; for example CBD reduces anxiety induced by THC. A standardised extract of the herb may be therefore be more beneficial in practice and clinical trial protocols have been drawn up to assess this. The mechanism of action is still not fully understood, although cannabinoid receptors have been cloned and natural ligands identified. Cannabis is frequently used by patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) for muscle spasm and pain, and in an experimental model of MS low doses of cannabinoids alleviated tremor. Most of the controlled studies have been carried out with THC rather than cannabis herb and so do not mimic the usual clincal situation. Small clinical studies have confirmed the usefulness of THC as an analgesic; CBD and CBG also have analgesic and antiinflammatory effects, indicating that there is scope for developing drugs which do not have the psychoactive properties of THC. Patients taking the synthetic derivative nabilone for neurogenic pain actually preferred cannabis herb and reported that it relieved not only pain but the associated depression and anxiety. Cannabinoids are effective in chemotherapy-induced emesis and nabilone has been licensed for this use for several years. Currently, the synthetic cannabinoid HU211 is undergoing trials as a protective agent after brain trauma. Anecdotal reports of cannabis use include case studies in migraine and Tourette's syndrome, and as a treatment for asthma and glaucoma. Apart from the smoking aspect, the safety profile of cannabis is fairly good. However, adverse reactions include panic or anxiety attacks, which are worse in the elderly and in women, and less

  8. Routine Clinical-Pathologic Correlation of Pigmented Skin Tumors Can Influence Patient Management

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Caterina; Piana, Simonetta; Lallas, Aimilios; Moscarella, Elvira; Lombardi, Mara; Raucci, Margherita; Pellacani, Giovanni; Argenziano, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Background Several studies have demonstrated the benefit of integrating clinical with pathologic information, to obtain a confident diagnosis for melanocytic tumors. However, all those studies were conducted retrospectively and no data are currently available about the role of a clinical-pathologic correlation approach on a daily basis in clinical practice. Aim of the Study In our study, we evaluated the impact of a routine clinical-pathologic correlation approach for difficult skin tumors seen over 3 years in a tertiary referral center. Results Interestingly, a re-appraisal was requested for 158 out of 2015 (7.7%) excised lesions because clinical-pathologic correlation was missing. Of note, in 0.6% of them (13 out of 2045) the first histologic diagnosis was revised in the light of clinical information that assisted the Pathologist to re-evaluate the histopathologic findings that might be bland or inconspicuous per se. Conclusion In conclusion, our study demonstrated that an integrated approach involving clinicians and pathologists allows improving management of selected patients by shifting from a simply disease-focused management (melanoma versus nevus) to a patient-centered approach. PMID:26325678

  9. Improving clinical practice guidelines for practicing cardiologists.

    PubMed

    Benhorin, Jesaia; Bodenheimer, Monty; Brown, Mary; Case, Robert; Dwyer, Edward M; Eberly, Shirley; Francis, Charles; Gillespie, John A; Goldstein, Robert E; Greenberg, Henry; Haigney, Mark; Krone, Ronald J; Klein, Helmut; Lichstein, Edgar; Locati, Emanuela; Marcus, Frank I; Moss, Arthur J; Oakes, David; Ryan, Daniel H; Bloch Thomsen, Poul E; Zareba, Wojciech

    2015-06-15

    Cardiac-related clinical practice guidelines have become an integral part of the practice of cardiology. Unfortunately, these guidelines are often long, complex, and difficult for practicing cardiologists to use. Guidelines should be condensed and their format upgraded, so that the key messages are easier to comprehend and can be applied more readily by those involved in patient care. After presenting the historical background and describing the guideline structure, we make several recommendations to make clinical practice guidelines more user-friendly for clinical cardiologists. Our most important recommendations are that the clinical cardiology guidelines should focus exclusively on (1) class I recommendations with established benefits that are supported by randomized clinical trials and (2) class III recommendations for diagnostic or therapeutic approaches in which quality studies show no benefit or possible harm. Class II recommendations are not evidence based but reflect expert opinions related to published clinical studies, with potential for personal bias by members of the guideline committee. Class II recommendations should be published separately as "Expert Consensus Statements" or "Task Force Committee Opinions," so that both majority and minority expert opinions can be presented in a less dogmatic form than the way these recommendations currently appear in clinical practice guidelines. PMID:25918027

  10. Yeast identification in routine clinical microbiology laboratory and its clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, S; Manchanda, V; Verma, N; Bhalla, P

    2011-01-01

    Rapid identification of yeast infections is helpful in prompt appropriate antifungal therapy. In the present study, the usefulness of chromogenic medium, slide culture technique and Vitek2 Compact (V2C) has been analysed. A total of 173 clinical isolates of yeast species were included in the study. An algorithm to identify such isolates in routine clinical microbiology laboratory was prepared and followed. Chromogenic medium was able to identify Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis and Trichosporon asahii. Chromogenic medium was also helpful in identifying "multi-species" yeast infections. The medium was unable to provide presumptive identification of C. pelliculosa, C. utilis, C. rugosa, C. glabrata and C. hemulonii. Vitek 2 compact (V2C) differentiated all pseudohypae non-producing yeast species. The algorithm followed was helpful in timely presumptive identification and final diagnosis of yeast infections, including multi-species yeast infections. PMID:21654115

  11. UGT1A1 genotype and irinotecan therapy: general review and implementation in routine practice.

    PubMed

    Etienne-Grimaldi, Marie-Christine; Boyer, Jean-Christophe; Thomas, Fabienne; Quaranta, Sylvie; Picard, Nicolas; Loriot, Marie-Anne; Narjoz, Céline; Poncet, Delphine; Gagnieu, Marie-Claude; Ged, Cécile; Broly, Franck; Le Morvan, Valérie; Bouquié, Régis; Gaub, Marie-Pierre; Philibert, Laurent; Ghiringhelli, François; Le Guellec, Chantal

    2015-06-01

    Irinotecan is a major drug in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer. Its active form is the SN38 metabolite, which is cleared by the biliary route after glucuronidation by uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1). UGT1A1 activity exhibits a wide intersubject variability, in part related to UGT1A1 gene polymorphisms. The present review on the impact of the deficient UGT1A1*28 variant on irinotecan efficacy and toxicity was produced by a French joint workgroup comprising the Group of Clinical Onco-pharmacology (GPCO-Unicancer) and the National Pharmacogenetics Network (RNPGx). It clearly emerges that for irinotecan doses at least equal to 180 mg/m(2) , patients homozygous for the UGT1A1*28 allele are at increased risk of developing hematological and/or digestive toxicities. Irinotecan dose reduction is thus recommended in homozygous *28/*28 patients. In addition, this personalized medicine strategy aims to secure high-dose irinotecan administration (≥240 mg/m(2) ) that have proven to be safe in homozygous *1/*1 patients only. The clinical relevance of this test is discussed in terms of treatment efficacy improvement, as increasing the irinotecan dose appears to be safe in patients not bearing a deficient allele. Best execution practices, cost-effectiveness, and result interpretation are discussed with the aim of facilitating the implementation of this analysis in clinical practice. The existence of networks of laboratories performing this test in routine hospital treatment, as in France, offers the prospect of widespread screening, thus guaranteeing equal access to safe treatment and optimized therapy for patients receiving irinotecan-based therapy in advanced colorectal cancer. PMID:25817555

  12. CMA Infobase: clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Roberta Bronson

    2008-01-01

    The CMA Infobase is a free Web-based resource that contains evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. The database is maintained by the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) and is available on its Web site. The CMA Infobase currently contains 1,200-plus clinical practice guidelines either developed or endorsed by an authoritative health care organization located in Canada. It is an alternative source of free clinical practice guidelines to the National Guideline Clearinghouse. This column will cover the basics of CMA Infobase, including searching, special features, and available resources which complement the database. PMID:19042721

  13. Understanding Barriers to Routine HIV Screening: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of Healthcare Providers in King County, Washington

    PubMed Central

    Shirreffs, Alexandra; Lee, David P.; Henry, Jsani; Golden, Matthew R.; Stekler, Joanne D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective In 2006, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended routine HIV screening in healthcare settings for persons between 13 and 64 years old. In 2010, the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) was changed to align testing rules with these recommendations. We designed this survey to ascertain the current state of HIV testing and barriers to routine screening in King County, Washington. Methods Between March 23 and April 16, 2010, a convenience sample of healthcare providers completed an online survey. Providers answered true-false and multiple choice questions about national recommendations and the WAC, policies in their primary clinical settings, and their personal HIV testing practices. Providers were asked to agree or disagree whether commonly reported barriers limited their implementation of routine HIV screening. Results Although 76% of the 221 respondents knew that the CDC recommended routine HIV screening for persons regardless of their risk, 99 (45%) providers reported that their primary clinical setting had a policy to target testing based on patient risk factors. Forty-four (20%) providers reported that their primary clinical setting had a policy of routine HIV screening, 54 (25%) reported no official policy, and 15 (7%) did not know whether a policy existed. Only 11 (5%) providers offer HIV testing to all patients at initial visits. When asked about barriers to routine screening, 57% of providers agreed that perception that their patient population is low risk limits the number of HIV tests they perform. Only 26 (13%) providers agreed that concern about reimbursement posed a barrier to testing. Conclusions Most providers participating in this survey continue to target HIV testing, despite knowledge of national recommendations. Efforts are still needed to educate providers and policymakers, clarify the recent WAC revisions, and implement structural changes in order to increase HIV testing in Washington State. PMID:22970215

  14. Frailty in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Cesari, Matteo; Vellas, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Frailty is a geriatric syndrome characterized by reduced homeostatic reserves, exposing the organism to extreme vulnerability to endogenous and exogenous stressors. Since disability is considered as an almost irreversible condition at advanced age, frailty has been indicated as a promising target for specific interventions in order to prevent disability. From a theoretical viewpoint, the concept of frailty has been well established, but its operationalization is still subject to controversy. This impediment leads to the postponement of the integration of frailty in the clinical setting. In the present article, we discuss the main issues regarding the frailty syndrome in the clinical setting, describe possible solutions (especially on the basis of our experience derived from the frailty clinic we have set up in Toulouse, France), and present the most relevant research perspectives in the field. PMID:26485035

  15. Aphasia in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kertesz, Andrew

    1983-01-01

    Aphasia is a central language impairment with word finding and comprehension deficit and paraphasias. The highlights of the essential language tests and the classification based on a scorable assessment are presented. The clinical syndromes of Broca's, global, Wernicke, conduction, anomic and transcortical aphasias are detailed with definition, localization, and prognosis. Modality specific disorders associated with aphasic syndromes are discussed. The management of the aphasic patient, consisting of informed support and coordination of available services, is often the responsibility of the family physician. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:21286589

  16. Integrating mobile technology with routine dietetic practice: the case of myPace for weight management.

    PubMed

    Harricharan, Michelle; Gemen, Raymond; Celemín, Laura Fernández; Fletcher, David; de Looy, Anne E; Wills, Josephine; Barnett, Julie

    2015-05-01

    The field of Mobile health (mHealth), which includes mobile phone applications (apps), is growing rapidly and has the potential to transform healthcare by increasing its quality and efficiency. The present paper focuses particularly on mobile technology for body weight management, including mobile phone apps for weight loss and the available evidence on their effectiveness. Translation of behaviour change theory into weight management strategies, including integration in mobile technology is also discussed. Moreover, the paper presents and discusses the myPace platform as a case in point. There is little clinical evidence on the effectiveness of currently available mobile phone apps in enabling behaviour change and improving health-related outcomes, including sustained body weight loss. Moreover, it is unclear to what extent these apps have been developed in collaboration with health professionals, such as dietitians, and the extent to which apps draw on and operationalise behaviour change techniques has not been explored. Furthermore, presently weight management apps are not built for use as part of dietetic practice, or indeed healthcare more widely, where face-to-face engagement is fundamental for instituting the building blocks for sustained lifestyle change. myPace is an innovative mobile technology for weight management meant to be embedded into and to enhance dietetic practice. Developed out of systematic, iterative stages of engagement with dietitians and consumers, it is uniquely designed to complement and support the trusted health practitioner-patient relationship. Future mHealth technology would benefit if engagement with health professionals and/or targeted patient groups, and behaviour change theory stood as the basis for technology development. Particularly, integrating technology into routine health care practice, rather than replacing one with the other, could be the way forward. PMID:25804507

  17. Mindfulness Meditation in Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Paul; Sephton, Sandra; Weissbecker, Inka; Hoover, Katherine; Ulmer, Christi; Studts, Jamie L.

    2004-01-01

    The practice of mindfulness is increasingly being integrated into contemporary clinical psychology. Based in Buddhist philosophy and subsequently integrated into Western health care in the contexts of psychotherapy and stress management, mindfulness meditation is evolving as a systematic clinical intervention. This article describes…

  18. Data quality and fitness for purpose of routinely collected data--a general practice case study from an electronic practice-based research network (ePBRN).

    PubMed

    Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Taggart, Jane; Dennis, Sarah; Yeo, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    The practice-based research network (PBRN) is a resource to recruit research participants; conduct developmental and pilot studies; and coordinate multicentre research, teaching, clinical care and quality assurance programs. It is a community-based laboratory for translational, clinical and health services research. The mining of clinical information systems of PBRNs can be used to monitor performance at the service unit level. However, are the routinely collected data of ePBRNs fit for the abovementioned purposes? We describe the establishment and governance of an ePBRN which included general practice and community health and hospital units, The general practice data quality was examined, using diabetes as the context, for completeness, correctness and consistency and assessed on its fitness for research, audit and quality assurance purposes. The quality of social determinants data was generally good while risk factors data were variable. Issues and strategies for improving data quality are discussed. PMID:22195136

  19. Clinical Practice. Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Black, Dennis M; Rosen, Clifford J

    2016-01-21

    Key Clinical Points Postmenopausal Osteoporosis Fractures and osteoporosis are common, particularly among older women, and hip fractures can be devastating. Treatment is generally recommended in postmenopausal women who have a bone mineral density T score of -2.5 or less, a history of spine or hip fracture, or a Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) score indicating increased fracture risk. Bisphosphonates (generic) and denosumab reduce the risk of hip, nonvertebral, and vertebral fractures; bisphosphonates are commonly used as first-line treatment in women who do not have contraindications. Teriparatide reduces the risk of nonvertebral and vertebral fractures. Osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical femur fractures have been reported with treatment but are rare. The benefit-to-risk ratio for osteoporosis treatment is strongly positive for most women with osteoporosis. Because benefits are retained after discontinuation of alendronate or zoledronic acid, drug holidays after 5 years of alendronate therapy or 3 years of zoledronic acid therapy may be considered for patients at lower risk for fracture. PMID:26789873

  20. Cherubism: best clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cherubism is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by bilateral and symmetric fibro-osseous lesions limited to the mandible and maxilla. In most patients, cherubism is due to dominant mutations in the SH3BP2 gene on chromosome 4p16.3. Affected children appear normal at birth. Swelling of the jaws usually appears between 2 and 7 years of age, after which, lesions proliferate and increase in size until puberty. The lesions subsequently begin to regress, fill with bone and remodel until age 30, when they are frequently not detectable. Fibro-osseous lesions, including those in cherubism have been classified as quiescent, non-aggressive and aggressive on the basis of clinical behavior and radiographic findings. Quiescent cherubic lesions are usually seen in older patients and do not demonstrate progressive growth. Non-aggressive lesions are most frequently present in teenagers. Lesions in the aggressive form of cherubism occur in young children and are large, rapidly growing and may cause tooth displacement, root resorption, thinning and perforation of cortical bone. Because cherubism is usually self-limiting, operative treatment may not be necessary. Longitudinal observation and follow-up is the initial management in most cases. Surgical intervention with curettage, contouring or resection may be indicated for functional or aesthetic reasons. Surgical procedures are usually performed when the disease becomes quiescent. Aggressive lesions that cause severe functional problems such as airway obstruction justify early surgical intervention. PMID:22640403

  1. Dosimetric prerequisites for routine clinical use of photon emitting brachytherapy sources with average energy higher than 50 kev

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zuofeng; Das, Rupak K.; De Werd, Larry A.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Rivard, Mark J.; Sloboda, Ronald S.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2007-01-15

    This paper presents the recommendations of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) on the dosimetric parameters to be characterized, and dosimetric studies to be performed to obtain them, for brachytherapy sources with average energy higher than 50 keV that are intended for routine clinical use. In addition, this document makes recommendations on procedures to be used to maintain vendor source strength calibration accuracy. These recommendations reflect the guidance of the AAPM and the ESTRO for its members, and may also be used as guidance to vendors and regulatory agencies in developing good manufacturing practices for sources used in routine clinical treatments.

  2. [Randomized clinical trials and real clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Heerlein, Andrés

    2009-01-01

    One of the emerging problems in modern medicine is that part of its highly efficacious treatments do not show significant effectiveness in real world systems of care. Efficacy studies address the appropriate dosages, short term response and feasibility of treatments in carefully selected populations, but they do not necessarily provide information for decisions in clinical practice. This review aims to present strengths and limitations of different methodological types of trials and to offer an overview of how knowledge from clinical trials can be used for clinical practice. The important effect of funding source on the outcome of randomized controlled trials is discussed. Some key questions in the treatment assessment of depression, schizophrenia and different medical conditions are discussed, with a focus on the possibilities and restrictions of translating clinical trial results into real-world settings. Empirical evidence shows that although randomized controlled trials are the gold standard for proving efficacy of a therapeutic procedure they often suffer from funding source bias and from lack of generalizability. Effectiveness studies evaluate effects of treatments under conditions approximating usual care. Another key area that can be addressed by effectiveness studies is the impact on important health policy measures such as disability days, days of work or medical costs, etc. Conclusions show that the future assessment of treatment regimes for clinical utility requires less biased efficacy studies and more effectiveness studies addressing major issues from all relevant perspectives. PMID:19543562

  3. [Implementation of therapeutic hypothermia into clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Himmel, Friederike; Desch, Steffen; Wolfrum, Sebastian

    2015-08-01

    Implementation of mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest into clinical practice is a continuing process. Although ILCOR recommendation was given in 2003, only 24% of the German hospitals reported the use of hypothermia in this setting in 2005. Growing evidence and most importantly the implementation of hypothermia into the guidelines led to a significant increase of acceptance of this therapeutic option leading to a user rate of 69% in 2009. Encouraged by the new guidelines from 2010 86% of German hospitals finally reported to use hypothermia after cardiac arrest routinely in 2012, a decade after publication of the mile stone studies. The phenomenon of a delayed implementation of hypothermia into clinical practice can be seen throughout the world as many surveys from different countries at different time points have shown. When hypothermia is used, hospitals go with the guidelines quite strictly with respect to indication, duration of treatment and target temperature. This strengthens the importance of guidelines in the process to implement new therapeutic options. However, although a recent study still promotes a strict target temperature management it questions the need for a markedly reduced target temperature of 33°C. It remains to be elucidated how this study will affect the daily routine in the hospitals and most interestingly how this study will change the coming guidelines in 2015. PMID:26261928

  4. Comparative efficacy versus effectiveness of initial antiretroviral therapy in clinical trials versus routine care

    PubMed Central

    Routman, Justin S.; Willig, James H.; Westfall, Andrew O.; Abroms, Sarah R.; Varshney, Mohit; Adusumilli, Sunil; Allison, Jeroan J.; Savage, Karen G.; Saag, Michael S.; Mugavero, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The generalizability of clinical trial findings (efficacy) to routine care (effectiveness) may be limited. The present study found similar first year virologic and CD4 outcomes among antiretroviral-naïve patients treated through routine care vs. those participating in clinical trials. Background The generalizability of clinical trial findings (efficacy) to routine care (effectiveness) may be limited due to study eligibility criteria and volunteer bias. While well chronicled in many conditions, the efficacy vs. effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy (ART) remains understudied. Methods A retrospective study of the UAB 1917 Clinic Cohort evaluated naïve patients starting ART between 1/1/00–12/31/06. Patients received ART through clinical trials or routine care. Multivariable logistic and linear regression models were fit to evaluate factors associated with virologic failure (VF=VL>50 copies/mL) and change from baseline CD4 count 6 and 12 months after ART initiation. Sensitivity analyses evaluated the impact of missing data on outcomes. Results Among 570 patients starting ART during the study period, 121 (21%) enrolled in clinical trials vs. 449 (79%) receiving ART via routine care. ART receipt through routine care was not associated with VF at either 6 (OR=1.00;95%CI=0.54–1.86) or 12 (OR=1.56;95%CI=0.80–3.05) months in primary analyses. No significant differences in CD4 count responses at 6 and 12 months were observed. Conclusions Though marked differences in efficacy vs. effectiveness have been observed in the therapeutic outcomes of other conditions, our analyses found no evidence of such divergence among our patients initiating antiretroviral therapy for HIV. PMID:20067423

  5. Improving an electronic system for measuring PROs in routine oncology practice

    PubMed Central

    White, Sharon M.; Blackford, Amanda L.; Wolff, Antonio C.; Carducci, Michael A.; Herman, Joseph M.; Snyder, Claire F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Our aim was to study how patients and their clinicians evaluated the usability of PatientViewpoint, a webtool designed to allow patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures to be used in clinical practice. Methods As part of a two-round quality improvement study, breast and prostate cancer patients and their medical and radiation oncology clinicians completed semi-structured interviews about their use of PatientViewpoint. The patient interview addressed different phases of the PRO completion workflow: reminders, completing the survey, and viewing the results. The clinician interviews asked about use of PatientViewpoint, integration with the clinical workflow, barriers to use, and helpful and desired features. Responses were recorded, categorized, and reviewed. After both rounds of interviews, modifications were made to PatientViewpoint. Results Across the two rounds, 42 unique patients (n=19 in round 1, n=23 in round 2) and 12 clinicians (all in both rounds) completed interviews. For patients, median age was 65, 81% were white, 69% were college graduates, 80% had performance status of 0, 69% had loco-regional disease, and 81% were regular computer users. In the quality improvement interviews, patients identified numerous strengths of the system, including its ability to flag issues for discussion with their provider. Comments included confusion about how scores were presented and that the value of the system was diminished if the doctor did not look at the results. Requests included tailoring questions to be applicable to the individual and providing more explanation about the score meaning, including having higher scores consistently indicating either better or worse status. Clinicians also provided primarily positive feedback about the system, finding it helpful in some cases, and confirmatory in others. Their primary concern was with impact on their workflow. Conclusions Systematically collected feedback from patients and clinicians was useful to identify

  6. The Impact of Iterative Reconstruction on Computed Tomography Radiation Dosimetry: Evaluation in a Routine Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Moorin, Rachael E.; Gibson, David A. J.; Forsyth, Rene K.; Fox, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of introduction of iterative reconstruction as a mandated software upgrade on radiation dosimetry in routine clinical practice over a range of computed tomography examinations. Methods Random samples of scanning data were extracted from a centralised Picture Archiving Communication System pertaining to 10 commonly performed computed tomography examination types undertaken at two hospitals in Western Australia, before and after the introduction of iterative reconstruction. Changes in the mean dose length product and effective dose were evaluated along with estimations of associated changes to annual cancer incidence. Results We observed statistically significant reductions in the effective radiation dose for head computed tomography (22–27%) consistent with those reported in the literature. In contrast the reductions observed for non-contrast chest (37–47%); chest pulmonary embolism study (28%), chest/abdominal/pelvic study (16%) and thoracic spine (39%) computed tomography. Statistically significant reductions in radiation dose were not identified in angiographic computed tomography. Dose reductions translated to substantial lowering of the lifetime attributable risk, especially for younger females, and estimated numbers of incident cancers. Conclusion Reduction of CT dose is a priority Iterative reconstruction algorithms have the potential to significantly assist with dose reduction across a range of protocols. However, this reduction in dose is achieved via reductions in image noise. Fully realising the potential dose reduction of iterative reconstruction requires the adjustment of image factors and forgoing the noise reduction potential of the iterative algorithm. Our study has demonstrated a reduction in radiation dose for some scanning protocols, but not to the extent experimental studies had previously shown or in all protocols expected, raising questions about the extent to which iterative reconstruction achieves dose

  7. Clinical Supervision: History, Practice, Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Robert; Miller, Kathleen

    1987-01-01

    There is a natural link between clinical supervision and its current interest in effective teaching. Describes how the process affects practice in schools today. Lists Morris Cogan's eight phases of supervision and Madeline Hunter's seven steps in the development of an effective teaching lesson. Includes five references. (Author/MD)

  8. Routine mortality monitoring for detecting mass murder in UK general practice: test of effectiveness using modelling

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Bruce; Love, Tom; Kaye, Rebecca; MacLeod, Margaret; Chalmers, Jim

    2008-01-01

    Background The Shipman Inquiry recommended mortality rate monitoring if it could be ‘shown to be workable’ in detecting a future mass murderer in general practice. Aim To examine the effectiveness of cumulative sum (CUSUM) charts, cross-sectional Shewhart charts, and exponentially-weighted, moving-average control charts in mortality monitoring at practice level. Design of study Analysis of Scottish routine general practice data combined with estimation of control chart effectiveness in detecting a ‘murderer’ in a simulated dataset. Method Practice stability was calculated from routine data to determine feasible lengths of monitoring. A simulated dataset of 405 000 ‘patients’ was created, registered with 75 ‘practices’ whose underlying mortality rates varied with the same distribution as case-mix-adjusted mortality in all Scottish practices. The sensitivity of each chart to detect five and 10 excess deaths was examined in repeated simulations. The sensitivity of control charts to excess deaths in simulated data, and the number of alarm signals when control charts were applied to routine data were estimated. Results Practice instability limited the length of monitoring and modelling was consequently restricted to a 3-year period. Monitoring mortality over 3 years, CUSUM charts were most sensitive but only reliably achieved >50% successful detection for 10 excess deaths per year and generated multiple false alarms (>15%). Conclusion At best, mortality monitoring can act as a backstop to detect a particularly prolific serial killer when other means of detection have failed. Policy should focus on changes likely to improve detection of individual murders, such as reform of death certification and the coroner system. PMID:18482483

  9. Reciproc vs. hand instrumentation in dental practice: a study in routine care.

    PubMed

    Bartols, Andreas; Reutter, Claudius A; Robra, Bernt-Peter; Walther, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Background. Little is known about the clinical impact of new root canal preparation systems in general dental practice under routine care conditions. Therefore, we compared hand instrumentation (H) with Reciproc (R) (VDW, Munich, Germany) preparation. The outcomes were endodontic related pain and oral health related quality of life (OHRQoL), evaluation of the procedures by the patients and the strain felt by the dentists during root canal therapy. Methods. Six dentists participated in the trial as practitioner-investigators. In the first phase of the trial they prepared root canals with H and in the second phase with R. The patients documented their pain felt with a visual analogue scale (VAS 100) and OHRQoL with the German short version of the oral health impact profile (OHIP-G-14) before treatment and before the completion of therapy and answered questions about how they experienced the treatment. The dentists documented their physical strain during treatment. Results. A total of 137 patients were included in the evaluation. 66 patients were treated with H, 71 with R. Pain reduction was 32.6 (SD 32.9) VAS (H) vs. 29.4 (SD 26.9) VAS (R) (p = 0.550), and the improvement of the OHIP-14 score was 5.5 (SD 9.2) (H) vs. 6.7 (SD 7.4) (R) (p = 0.383). There were no statistical differences in both groups. Significantly fewer patients felt stressed by the duration of treatment with R as with H (p = 0.018). Significantly more dentists reported that their general physical strain and the strain on their fingers were less severe with R than with H (p = 0.013 and p < 0.001). Discussion. H as well as R effectively reduced endodontic related pain and OHRQoL without statistical differences. R has advantages in terms of how patients experience the treatment and regarding the physical strain felt by the dentists. PMID:27375972

  10. Reciproc vs. hand instrumentation in dental practice: a study in routine care

    PubMed Central

    Reutter, Claudius A.; Robra, Bernt-Peter; Walther, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Background. Little is known about the clinical impact of new root canal preparation systems in general dental practice under routine care conditions. Therefore, we compared hand instrumentation (H) with Reciproc (R) (VDW, Munich, Germany) preparation. The outcomes were endodontic related pain and oral health related quality of life (OHRQoL), evaluation of the procedures by the patients and the strain felt by the dentists during root canal therapy. Methods. Six dentists participated in the trial as practitioner–investigators. In the first phase of the trial they prepared root canals with H and in the second phase with R. The patients documented their pain felt with a visual analogue scale (VAS 100) and OHRQoL with the German short version of the oral health impact profile (OHIP-G-14) before treatment and before the completion of therapy and answered questions about how they experienced the treatment. The dentists documented their physical strain during treatment. Results. A total of 137 patients were included in the evaluation. 66 patients were treated with H, 71 with R. Pain reduction was 32.6 (SD 32.9) VAS (H) vs. 29.4 (SD 26.9) VAS (R) (p = 0.550), and the improvement of the OHIP-14 score was 5.5 (SD 9.2) (H) vs. 6.7 (SD 7.4) (R) (p = 0.383). There were no statistical differences in both groups. Significantly fewer patients felt stressed by the duration of treatment with R as with H (p = 0.018). Significantly more dentists reported that their general physical strain and the strain on their fingers were less severe with R than with H (p = 0.013 and p < 0.001). Discussion. H as well as R effectively reduced endodontic related pain and OHRQoL without statistical differences. R has advantages in terms of how patients experience the treatment and regarding the physical strain felt by the dentists. PMID:27375972

  11. Assessment of erythroid dysplasia by "difference from normal" in routine clinical flow cytometry work-up.

    PubMed

    Eidenschink Brodersen, Lisa; Menssen, Andrew J; Wangen, Jamie R; Stephenson, Christine F; de Baca, Monica E; Zehentner, Barbara K; Wells, Denise A; Loken, Michael R

    2014-10-21

    Introduction: While multidimensional flow cytometry (MDF) has great utility in diagnostic work-ups of patients with suspected myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), only the myeloid lineage has demonstrated reproducible abnormalities from multiple laboratories. With the effects of ammonium chloride (NH4 Cl) lysis on erythroid progenitors previously described, we applied this protocol to a patient cohort with diagnosed MDS to investigate phenotypic abnormalities that indicate erythroid dysplasia. Method: Bone marrow specimens [39 MDS, 9 acute myeloid leukemia (AML), 7 JAK2(V617F) positive myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), 5 nutritional deficiencies] were processed by NH4 Cl lysis and Ficoll preparation and evaluated by MDF using a difference from normal algorithm. Results: For the MDS cohort, phenotypic abnormalities on the mature erythroid progenitors were frequent for CD71 and CD36 (36% for each antigen); abnormalities for CD235a (8%) were observed. Among immature erythroid progenitors, abnormal maturation patterns (≤5%) and increased CD105 intensity (9%) were seen. Increased frequency of CD105 bright cells was observed (18%). While antigenic abnormalities correlated between NH4 Cl lysis and Ficoll preparation, the lysis method demonstrated the most consistent quantitative antigen intensities. Mean erythroid phenotypic abnormalities and prognostic cytogenetic subgroups correlated strongly. Morphologic and erythroid phenotypic abnormalities correlated, as did increasing FCSS and number of erythroid abnormalities, albeit without further increase for AML patients. Discussion: These data expand the understanding of erythropoiesis and define immunophenotypic abnormalities that indicate dyserythropoiesis in MDS utilizing a lysis protocol practical for routine implementation in clinical flow cytometric work-up. Preliminary studies also indicate strong correlation between phenotypic erythroid dysplasia and poor prognosis, as classified cytogenetically. © 2014 Clinical

  12. Is Transducer Hygiene sufficient when Vaginal Probes are used in the Clinical Routine?

    PubMed

    Merz, E

    2016-04-01

    Vaginal ultrasound probes are semi-critical Group A medical products which must be disinfected following the manufacturer's instructions after every patient examination. According to the "Essential Requirements for Medical Devices (Directive 93/42/EEC, Annex I, paragraph 13)" the manufacturer's instructions for use for reusable products must contain suitable instructions for preparation processes. This presumes both an effective and material-compatible method. Evidence of effectiveness must be validated.In the Editorial in issue 1 Ultraschall in der Medizin/European Journal of Ultrasound 2005 we discussed the topic of transducer hygiene and stated that proper handling and cleaning as well as disinfection of probes in daily use are indispensable. This applies particularly to vaginal ultrasound probes routinely used in gynecological and obstetrical clinics, gynecological practices as well as IVF centers Normally the probe used in a transvaginal ultrasound examination is covered with a latex protective cover (with CE marking) which contains a certain amount of ultrasound gel. After the examination, the cover is removed and disposed of, and the gel is removed from the transducer. Since handling of the probe, ultrasound gel and cover can result in smear infections and cross-contamination with various pathogens (e. g. MRSA, HBV, HCV, HIV, herpes papilloma and cytomegalic viruses), after the protective cover is removed, the probe must be cleaned and subjected to disinfection with a bactericidal, fungicidal and virucidal effect. This is especially important in the event the cover ruptures during the vaginal examination, and the probe comes into direct contact with vaginal secretions or blood. The same likewise applies if the sterile protective cover is perforated during a follicular puncture. Usually special bactericidal, levurocidal and virucidal wipes or special submersion disinfection methods are available for disinfecting the vaginal ultrasound probes 11. Using

  13. Recombinant erythropoietin in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Ng, T; Marx, G; Littlewood, T; Macdougall, I

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of recombinant human erythropoietin (RHuEPO) has revolutionised the treatment of patients with anaemia of chronic renal disease. Clinical studies have demonstrated that RHuEPO is also useful in various non-uraemic conditions including haematological and oncological disorders, prematurity, HIV infection, and perioperative therapies. Besides highlighting both the historical and functional aspects of RHuEPO, this review discusses the applications of RHuEPO in clinical practice and the potential problems of RHuEPO treatment. PMID:12897214

  14. Handbook of clinical nursing practice

    SciTech Connect

    Asheervath, J.; Blevins, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Written in outline format, this reference will help nurses further their understanding of advanced nursing procedures. Information is provided on the physiological, psychological, environmental, and safety considerations of nursing activities associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Special consideration is given to the areas of pediatric nursing, nursing assessment, and selected radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures for each system. Contents: Clinical Introduction. Clinical Nursing Practice: Focus on Basics. Focus on Cardiovascular Function. Focus on Respiratory Function. Focus on Gastrointestinal Function. Focus on Renal and Genito-Urological Function. Focus on Neuro-Skeletal and Muscular Function. Appendices.

  15. Fluorescence photodiagnosis in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Moghissi, K; Stringer, M R; Dixon, Kate

    2008-12-01

    Fluorescence diagnosis has become an important method of investigation in clinical practice particularly in identification and localisation of pre and early cancerous lesions as well as image guided therapy. The method relies on the principle of differential fluorescence emission between abnormal and normal tissues in response to excitation by a specific wavelength of light within the visible spectrum range. In clinical practice two types of fluorescence diagnostic methods are used, namely autofluorescence and drug-induced fluorescence. The former relies on the differential fluorescence of "native" fluorophores whereas the latter requires a photosensitiser which enhances the differential fluorescence emission of the normal versus the abnormal tissues. Development and advances in fibreoptic, endoscopic instrumentation currently permit fluorescence endoscopy to be carried out in a number of situations. PMID:19356662

  16. Exercise Dose in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Wasfy, Meagan M; Baggish, Aaron L

    2016-06-01

    There is wide variability in the physical activity patterns of the patients in contemporary clinical cardiovascular practice. This review is designed to address the impact of exercise dose on key cardiovascular risk factors and on mortality. We begin by examining the body of literature that supports a dose-response relationship between exercise and cardiovascular disease risk factors, including plasma lipids, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and obesity. We next explore the relationship between exercise dose and mortality by reviewing the relevant epidemiological literature underlying current physical activity guideline recommendations. We then expand this discussion to critically examine recent data pertaining to the impact of exercise dose at the lowest and highest ends of the spectrum. Finally, we provide a framework for how the key concepts of exercise dose can be integrated into clinical practice. PMID:27267537

  17. Clinical practice guideline series update.

    PubMed

    Blissitt, Patricia A

    2013-10-01

    Approximately 20 per 100,000 people in the United States are currently living with myasthenia gravis (MG). MG is a chronic condition that occurs in all genders, ethnicities, and ages. The result of a defect at the neuromuscular junction, MG is characterized by fluctuating muscle weakness and fatigue. The purpose of the first edition of this American Association of Neuroscience Nurses' Clinical Practice Guideline is to summarize what is currently known about MG and to provide the reader with nursing-specific recommendations based on supporting evidence from nursing and other disciplines. Nursing Management of the Patient with Myasthenia Gravis includes information on epidemiology; types and classification of MG; pathophysiology; clinical features; clinical course; diagnostic tests; assessment; pharmacological, immunological, and surgical management; and the nurses' pivotal role in the care of the patient with MG. PMID:24025471

  18. Whiteboards: mediating professional tensions in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Riley, Robin; Forsyth, Rowena; Manias, Elizabeth; Iedema, Rick

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we argue that whiteboards in clinical settings play a hybrid role: communicating inter- and intraprofessional directives, mediating professional tensions, and mitigating potentially face-threatening acts. The data upon which this paper is based emanate from two independently conducted ethnographic studies: the first explored a range of nurse-nurse and nurse-doctor communication practices in operating rooms, while the second explored work routines and communication methods in oncology wards. Data collection included fieldwork using observations, interviews assisted by photographic methods, and in the first study, a personal diary. A deconstructive analysis was independently undertaken. As a communication method, the use of whiteboards in clinical settings provided a focal point for the coordination of clinical work activities and for the dissemination of information to large groups of people. Whiteboards were a conduit for potentially face-threatening information in that they facilitated the policing and disciplining of staff, while distancing communicators from one another. We conclude that whiteboards are 'pseudo-synchronous' in nature, enabling 'communication at a distance'. In doing so, whiteboards may facilitate and economize clinical communication but they also perpetuate the invisibility of nurses' contribution to ensuring safe care, and they mask the symbolic violence that is committed within and between health professionals. PMID:18052816

  19. Clinical Decision Making and Outcome in Routine Care for People with Severe Mental Illness (CEDAR): Study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A considerable amount of research has been conducted on clinical decision making (CDM) in short-term physical conditions. However, there is a lack of knowledge on CDM and its outcome in long-term illnesses, especially in care for people with severe mental illness. Methods/Design The study entitled "Clinical decision making and outcome in routine care for people with severe mental illness" (CEDAR) is carried out in six European countries (Denmark, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Switzerland and UK). First, CEDAR establishes a methodology to assess CDM in people with severe mental illness. Specific instruments are developed (and psychometric properties established) to measure CDM style, key elements of CDM in routine care, as well as CDM involvement and satisfaction from patient and therapist perspectives. Second, these instruments are being put to use in a multi-national prospective observational study (bimonthly assessments during a one-year observation period; N = 560). This study investigates the immediate, short- and long-term effect of CDM on crucial dimensions of clinical outcome (symptom level, quality of life, needs) by taking into account significant variables moderating the relationship between CDM and outcome. Discussion The results of this study will make possible to delineate quality indicators of CDM, as well as to specify prime areas for further improvement. Ingredients of best practice in CDM in the routine care for people with severe mental illness will be extracted and recommendations formulated. With its explicit focus on the patient role in CDM, CEDAR will also contribute to strengthening the service user perspective. This project will substantially add to improving the practice of CDM in mental health care across Europe. Trial register ISRCTN75841675. PMID:21062508

  20. Can research influence clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Juan Pablo

    2007-06-01

    After briefly reviewing the unfavourable reception accorded empirical research by parts of the psychoanalytic community, as well as some of the benefits to clinical practice of analysts being involved in research activities, the author examines whether the findings of process and outcome research in psychotherapy and psychoanalysis can help identify the most appropriate forms of intervention for producing therapeutic change, given the specific condition of the patient and the relationship that the individual establishes with the analyst. He argues that research findings can influence clinical practice on various levels and in different areas, and goes on to examine a number of related issues: the specificity of therapeutic interventions versus the relevance of common curative factors; the dyadic conception of technique and ways of understanding the therapeutic action of the treatment alliance; and the strategic or heuristic conception in psychoanalytic therapy. Finally, the author presents clinical material with the aim of illustrating how the knowledge acquired through research can be applied to psychoanalytic treatment. PMID:17537698

  1. Recovery and Identification of Anaerobes: a System Suitable for the Routine Clinical Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Ellner, Paul D.; Granato, Paul A.; May, Carolyn B.

    1973-01-01

    A system for the isolation of anaerobes based upon the use of reducible solid media is described. Plates of reducible media prepared and stored aerobically were reduced before use by incubation in a GasPak jar for 24 h. Clinical specimens for culture were carefully selected. The value of Amies transport medium was confirmed. Selective and nonselective formulations of reducible media were used for primary isolation. Abbreviated identification schemes based in part on gas-liquid chromatography are presented. The suitability of this system for improving the recovery and identification of anaerobes in a routine clinical laboratory is documented. PMID:4588198

  2. Proton therapy in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation dose escalation and acceleration improves local control but also increases toxicity. Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized cancers that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. Compared with photon therapy, proton therapy spares more critical structures due to its unique physics. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications. By modulating the Bragg peak of protons in energy and time, a conformal radiation dose with or without intensity modulation can be delivered to the target while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Thus, proton therapy is ideal when organ preservation is a priority. However, protons are more sensitive to organ motion and anatomy changes compared with photons. In this article, we review practical issues of proton therapy, describe its image-guided treatment planning and delivery, discuss clinical outcome for cancer patients, and suggest challenges and the future development of proton therapy. PMID:21527064

  3. Psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation – Outcome Measure

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Adriana; Feixas, Guillem; Bados, Arturo; García-Grau, Eugeni; Salla, Marta; Medina, Joan Carles; Montesano, Adrián; Soriano, José; Medeiros-Ferreira, Leticia; Cañete, Josep; Corbella, Sergi; Grau, Antoni; Lana, Fernando; Evans, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this paper is to assess the reliability and validity of the Spanish translation of the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation – Outcome Measure, a 34-item self-report questionnaire that measures the client’s status in the domains of Subjective well-being, Problems/Symptoms, Life functioning, and Risk. Method Six hundred and forty-four adult participants were included in two samples: the clinical sample (n=192) from different mental health and primary care centers; and the nonclinical sample (n=452), which included a student and a community sample. Results The questionnaire showed good acceptability and internal consistency, appropriate test–retest reliability, and acceptable convergent validity. Strong differentiation between clinical and nonclinical samples was found. As expected, the Risk domain had different characteristics than other domains, but all findings were comparable with the UK referential data. Cutoff scores were calculated for clinical significant change assessment. Conclusion The Spanish version of the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation – Outcome Measure showed acceptable psychometric properties, providing support for using the questionnaire for monitoring the progress of Spanish-speaking psychotherapy clients. PMID:27382288

  4. Routine application of the polymerase chain reaction for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in clinical samples.

    PubMed Central

    Noordhoek, G T; Kaan, J A; Mulder, S; Wilke, H; Kolk, A H

    1995-01-01

    AIM--To investigate the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the routine laboratory for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in clinical samples. METHODS--Samples were divided and processed separately for the detection of M tuberculosis by microscopy, culture and PCR. After DNA extraction, PCR was performed with primers specific for the insertion element IS6110 and the product was analysed by agarose gel electrophoresis, Southern blotting or dot blotting and hybridisation with a digoxigenin labelled internal probe. Each sample was tested for inhibitors of Taq polymerase with the aid of an internal control. Multiple negative and positive controls were used to monitor each step of the procedure. RESULTS--The data from two laboratories, using the same operating procedures, were combined. Of 1957 specimens, 79 (4%) were culture and PCR positive, while 1839 (93.9%) were negative in both tests. Thirty specimens (1.5%) were PCR positive only and nine (0.5%) were culture positive but PCR negative. CONCLUSION--Using culture and clinical history as the gold standard, sensitivity and specificity for PCR were 92.1% and 99.8%, respectively. With elaborate precautions, PCR is a suitable and reliable method for the detection of M tuberculosis in clinical samples in a routine microbiology laboratory. Images PMID:7490312

  5. Body composition in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, Angela; Garaci, Francesco; Cafarelli, Francesco Pio; Guglielmi, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    Nutritional status is the results of nutrients intake, absorption and utilization, able to influence physiological and pathological conditions. Nutritional status can be measured for individuals with different techniques, such as CT Body Composition, quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Ultrasound, Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry and Bioimpendance. Because obesity is becoming a worldwide epidemic, there is an increasing interest in the study of body composition to monitor conditions and delay in development of obesity-related diseases. The emergence of these evidence demonstrates the need of standard assessment of nutritional status based on body weight changes, playing an important role in several clinical setting, such as in quantitative measurement of tissues and their fluctuations in body composition, in survival rate, in pathologic condition and illnesses. Since body mass index has been shown to be an imprecise measurement of fat-free and fat mass, body cell mass and fluids, providing no information if weight changes, consequently there is the need to find a better way to evaluate body composition, in order to assess fat-free and fat mass with weight gain and loss, and during ageing. Monitoring body composition can be very useful for nutritional and medical interventional. This review is focused on the use of Body Composition in Clinical Practice. PMID:26971404

  6. Bariatric Surgery in the United Kingdom: A Cohort Study of Weight Loss and Clinical Outcomes in Routine Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Ian J.; Bhaskaran, Krishnan; Batterham, Rachel L.; Smeeth, Liam

    2015-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery is becoming a more widespread treatment for obesity. Comprehensive evidence of the long-term effects of contemporary surgery on a broad range of clinical outcomes in large populations treated in routine clinical practice is lacking. The objective of this study was to measure the association between bariatric surgery, weight, body mass index, and obesity-related co-morbidities. Methods and Findings This was an observational retrospective cohort study using data from the United Kingdom Clinical Practice Research Datalink. All 3,882 patients registered in the database and with bariatric surgery on or before 31 December 2014 were included and matched by propensity score to 3,882 obese patients without surgery. The main outcome measures were change in weight and body mass index over 4 y; incident diagnoses of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hypertension, angina, myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, fractures, obstructive sleep apnoea, and cancer; mortality; and resolution of hypertension and T2DM. Weight measures were available for 3,847 patients between 1 and 4 mo, 2,884 patients between 5 and 12 mo, and 2,258 patients between 13 and 48 mo post-procedure. Bariatric surgery patients exhibited rapid weight loss for the first four postoperative months, at a rate of 4.98 kg/mo (95% CI 4.88–5.08). Slower weight loss was sustained to the end of 4 y. Gastric bypass (6.56 kg/mo) and sleeve gastrectomy (6.29 kg/mo) were associated with greater initial weight reduction than gastric banding (2.77 kg/mo). Protective hazard ratios (HRs) were detected for bariatric surgery for incident T2DM, 0.68 (95% CI 0.55–0.83); hypertension, 0.35 (95% CI 0.27–0.45); angina, 0.59 (95% CI 0.40–0.87);MI, 0.28 (95% CI 0.10–0.74); and obstructive sleep apnoea, 0.55 (95% CI 0.40–0.87). Strong associations were found between bariatric surgery and the resolution of T2DM, with a HR of 9.29 (95% CI 6.84–12.62), and between bariatric surgery and the resolution of

  7. Clinical efficacy of 99m-technetium mercaptoacetylglycine kit formulation in routine renal scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    duCret, R.P.; Boudreau, R.J.; Gonzalez, R.; Carpenter, R.; Tennison, J.; Kuni, C.C.

    1989-07-01

    99m-Technetium mercaptoacetylglycine is a promising new renal radiopharmaceutical undergoing phase III trials in the United States. In a preliminary investigation of the efficacy and safety of mercaptoacetylglycine in 30 adult patients with suspected renal disease we used simultaneous imaging with orthoiodohippurate as the physiological ''gold standard''. Of these patients 11 had undergone renal transplantation. Factors, such as time to peak renal activity, clearance half-life and regional functional comparison, were similar by orthoiodohippurate and mercaptoacetylglycine imaging. Visual and quantitative analysis of angiograms and renograms was markedly facilitated with the use of mercaptoacetylglycine. Several morphological abnormalities were apparent only during mercaptoacetylglycine evaluation. No adverse effects, changes in vital signs or significant changes in clinical laboratory status were encountered. Since mercaptoacetylglycine combined an excellent technetium image with the pharmacokinetics of orthoiodohippurate, mercaptoacetylglycine may supplant all other agents for routine clinical use.

  8. Performance of the VITEK2 system for identification and susceptibility testing of routine Enterobacteriaceae clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vázquez, M; Oliver, A; Sánchez del Saz, B; Loza, E; Baquero, F; Cantón, R

    2001-05-01

    The VITEK2 system was evaluated with 138 fresh consecutive routine clinical Enterobacteriaceae isolates. Susceptibility results to 10 beta-lactams, three aminoglycosides and a quinolone were compared with those obtained following the NCCLS standard microdilution. API20E was used as reference method for identification. All but three isolates were correctly identified in 3 h at species level (97.8%), two isolates (1.4%) at genus level and only one isolate was misidentified. Overall essential agreement for susceptibility testing was 97.1%. Discrepancies were mainly observed with piperacillin (1.1%), cefuroxime (0.6%) and amoxycillin/clavulanate (0.3%). Discrepancies for aminoglycosides and ciprofloxacin were low (<0.1%). Minor, major and very major errors (NCCLS categories) were 4.1%, 0.2% and 6.1%, respectively. Very major errors were due to piperacillin (4.5%), ampicillin (0.8%) and amoxycillin/clavulanate (0.8%). The VITEK2 system gave accurate identification and susceptibility testing results of routine Enterobacteriaceae clinical isolates. PMID:11337223

  9. The 15-item Systemic Clinical Outcome and Routine Evaluation (SCORE-15) Scale: Portuguese Validation Studies.

    PubMed

    Vilaça, Margarida; de Sousa, Bruno; Stratton, Peter; Relvas, Ana Paula

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on the validity of the 15-item Portuguese version of the Systemic Clinical Outcome Routine Evaluation (SCORE-15; Vilaça, Silva, & Relvas, 2014), a brief and comprehensive measure of family functioning. Previous studies with SCORE-15 show that this version replicates the three-factor solution found for the original English version: Family strengths, Family communication and Family difficulties. In addition to reviewing previous studies, this article analyses the discriminant, convergent and predictive validity of the Portuguese SCORE-15. To do so, the SCORE-15 was administered to family members attending systemic family or couple's therapy at the start of the first and fourth sessions and also to a group of non-clinical individuals. Overall, data are reported from 618 participants, including 136 from families attending systemic therapy and 482 community family members. Comparisons of community and clinical samples (discriminant validity) showed statistically significant differences for the total scale and subscales (p < .001), with the community participants presenting healthier family functioning than the clinical ones. Analyses using SCORE-15 and the Quality of Life - adult version, another family measure applied simultaneously (convergent validity), indicate that both scales are significantly (p < .01) and moderately (r = -.47) correlated. Mean score analysis of SCORE-15's therapeutic sensitivity to change (predictive validity) showed that only the Family communication subscale was sensitive to statistically significant improvement (p < .05) from session 1 to session 4, whereas the SCORE-15's reliability change index points to its ability to detect clinical improvements (RCI = 14%). PMID:26585316

  10. Reproducibility of visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure measured as part of routine clinical care

    PubMed Central

    MUNTNER, Paul; JOYCE, Cara; LEVITAN, Emily B; HOLT, Elizabeth; SHIMBO, Daichi; WEBBER, Larry S; OPARIL, Suzanne; RE, Richard; KROUSEL-WOOD, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Secondary analysis of clinical trial data suggests visit-to-visit variability (VVV) of blood pressure is strongly associated with the incidence of cardiovascular disease. Measurement of blood pressure in usual practice settings may be subject to substantial error, calling into question the value of VVV in real-world settings. Methods We analyzed data on adults ≥ 65 years of age with diagnosed hypertension who were taking antihypertensive medication from the Cohort Study of Medication Adherence among Older Adults (n=772 with 14 or more blood pressure measurements). All blood pressure measurements, taken as part of routine out-patient care over a median of 2.8 years, were abstracted from patients’ medical charts. Results Using each participant’s first 7 systolic blood pressure (SBP) measurements, the mean intra-individual standard deviation was 13.5 mmHg. The intra-class correlation coefficient for the standard deviation based on the first 7 and second 7 SBP measurements was 0.28 (95% CI: 0.20 – 0.34). Individuals in the highest quintile of standard deviation of SBP based on their first 7 measurements were more likely to be in the highest quintile of VVV using their second 7 measurements (observed/expected ratio = 1.71, 95% CI: 1.29 – 2.22). Results were similar for other metrics of VVV. The intra-class correlation coefficient was lower for diastolic blood pressure (DBP) than SBP. Conclusions These data suggest VVV of SBP measured in a real-world setting is not random. Future studies are needed to assess the prognostic value of VVV of SBP assessed in routine clinical practice. PMID:22025235

  11. [ECG mapping in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Boudík, F; Aschermann, M; Anger, Z

    2002-12-01

    First the authors present a review of important cornerstones in the history of the electrocardiogram (ECG) and ECG mapping. The first to describe the electric cardiac field based on twenty ECGs was A.D. Waller in 1889. The decisive cornerstone for practical use was the introduction of a string galvanometer in 1901 by W. Einthoven and his triaxial lead system. Another very important cornerstone in the development of ECG were the findings of F.N. Wilson. Merits as regards the development and application of ECG mapping are due to B. Taccardi. Workers of the Second Medical Clinic in Prague enhanced after 15 years of studies and comparison of ECG maps with coronarographic findings in subjects with ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and microvascular coronary dysfunction (syndrome X--SyX) substantially the specificity of this method in impaired myocardial vascularization. Better diagnosis was achieved by introduction of diagnostic tests which influence coronary vascularization such as e.g. hyperventilation, as well as other tests. After their application progression of chronic myocardial ischaemia occurs, e.g. by the mechanism of the "steal phenomenon" or restriction of the microcirculation after hyperventilation in patients with SyX. Furthermore the authors present examples of ECG maps after PTCA, after application of diagnostic tests in IHD and SyX and also regression of myocardial ischaemia after marked reduction of total cholesterol. PMID:12744039

  12. The barriers and facilitators to routine outcome measurement by allied health professionals in practice: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Allied Health Professionals today are required, more than ever before, to demonstrate their impact. However, despite at least 20 years of expectation, many services fail to deliver routine outcome measurement in practice. This systematic review investigates what helps and hinders routine outcome measurement of allied health professionals practice. Methods A systematic review protocol was developed comprising: a defined search strategy for PsycINFO, MEDLINE and CINHAL databases and inclusion criteria and systematic procedures for data extraction and quality appraisal. Studies were included if they were published in English and investigated facilitators and/or barriers to routine outcome measurement by allied health professionals. No restrictions were placed on publication type, design, country, or year of publication. Reference lists of included publications were searched to identify additional papers. Descriptive methods were used to synthesise the findings. Results 960 papers were retrieved; 15 met the inclusion criteria. Professional groups represented were Physiotherapy, Occupational Therapy, and Speech and Language Therapy. The included literature varied in quality and design. Facilitators and barriers to routine outcome measurement exist at individual, managerial and organisational levels. Key factors affecting professionals’ use of routine outcome measurement include: professionals’ level of knowledge and confidence about using outcome measures, and the degree of organisational and peer-support professionals received with a view to promoting their work in practice. Conclusions Whilst the importance of routinely measuring outcomes within the allied health professions is well recognised, it has largely failed to be delivered in practice. Factors that influence clinicians’ ability and desire to undertake routine outcome measurement are bi-directional: they can act as either facilitators or barriers. Routine outcome measurement may only be

  13. Incidental copy-number variants identified by routine genome testing in a clinical population

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Philip M.; Soens, Zachry T.; Campbell, Ian M.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Cheung, Sau Wai; Patel, Ankita; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Plon, Sharon E.; Shaw, Chad A.; McGuire, Amy L.; Lupski, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Mutational load of susceptibility variants has not been studied on a genomic scale in a clinical population, nor has the potential to identify these mutations as incidental findings during clinical testing been systematically ascertained. Methods Array comparative genomic hybridization, a method for genome-wide detection of DNA copy-number variants, was performed clinically on DNA from 9,005 individuals. Copy-number variants encompassing or disrupting single genes were identified and analyzed for their potential to confer predisposition to dominant, adult-onset disease. Multigene copy-number variants affecting dominant, adult-onset cancer syndrome genes were also assessed. Results In our cohort, 83 single-gene copy-number variants affected 40 unique genes associated with dominant, adult-onset disorders and unrelated to the patients’ referring diagnoses (i.e., incidental) were found. Fourteen of these copy-number variants are likely disease-predisposing, 25 are likely benign, and 44 are of unknown clinical consequence. When incidental copy-number variants spanning up to 20 genes were considered, 27 copy-number variants affected 17 unique genes associated with dominant, adult-onset cancer predisposition. Conclusion Copy-number variants potentially conferring susceptibility to adult-onset disease can be identified as incidental findings during routine genome-wide testing. Some of these mutations may be medically actionable, enabling disease surveillance or prevention; however, most incidentally observed single-gene copy-number variants are currently of unclear significance to the patient. PMID:22878507

  14. Impact of transitioning from HIV clinical trials to routine medical care on clinical outcomes and patient perceptions.

    PubMed

    Yehia, Baligh R; Long, Judith A; Stearns, Cordelia R; French, Benjamin; Tebas, Pablo; Frank, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Participation in antiretroviral therapy clinical trials (ART-RCTs) offers many advantages including access to new drugs, close monitoring, and cost savings. These same benefits may pose a risk to patients ending ART-RCTs and returning to routine care; as they may experience changes to their drug regimen, decreased monitoring, and new out-of-pocket costs. We aimed to evaluate this transition and determine its effects on viral outcomes and patient perceptions. A retrospective cohort was assembled from participants of naïve ART-RCTs at the University of Pennsylvania between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2009. Data were collected in the 12 months prior to and after trial completion. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate viral failure rates and to identify factors associated with viral failure. Qualitative interviews were held with a subset of patients. Content analysis was used to identify thematic differences between patients with viral failure and those with viral suppression. In total, 116 patients enrolled in 5 ART-RCTs from 2000 to 2009. Viral failure was observed in 39 patients (34%). Nonwhites, high enrollment CD4 count, and trial completion in 1999-2002 were risk factors for failure. Patients transitioning from ART-RCTs to routine care had a 20% increased odds of failure (Adjusted Odds Ratio 1.20 (95% CI [0.37, 3.88])). Nine patients with viral suppression and three with viral failure in the year after trail completion were interviewed. Suppressed patients were more eager to continue trial participation, nervous about leaving the trial, and felt prepared to return to routine care. In contrast, those with viral failure were less concerned about the transition. These findings suggest that the posttrial period may be a vulnerable time for patients. Patients without a healthy fear of transitioning from ART-RCTs to routine care may be at increased risk of viral failure. Focus should be given to assisting patients during this transition. PMID

  15. Cognitive Processes in Clinical Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witkin, Stanley L.

    1982-01-01

    Explores the cognitive processes that can lead social workers to make erroneous judgements about clients, and inappropriate practice decisions. Similarities between the assessment and practice methods advocated underscore the notion of practice as a process of systematic exploration and problem solving. (Author/JAC)

  16. Procedures for Using Clinical Practice Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargrove, Patricia; Griffer, Mona; Lund, Bonnie

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article provides information about clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) to facilitate their application to the practice of speech-language pathology. CPGs are sets of recommendations based on evidence, including expert clinical opinion, that have been developed by a panel of reviewers. In this article, CPGs are defined and their…

  17. Evidence Based Surgery: How Difficult is the Implication in Routine Practice?

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Gaurav; Maheshwari, Namrata

    2012-01-01

    Surgery as a discipline has perhaps been slower than other specialties to embrace evidence based principles. Today, surgeons all over Asia are prepared to challenge the dogma of yesterday. Surgical science which rests on a strong foundation of laboratory and clinical research can now be broadened to include the armamentarium of evidence based practice to advance surgical knowledge. The sheer volume of easily accessed information creates a new challenge. This article discusses keeping up with new information and finding the best available answers to specific questions amidst all the other information. PMID:22359733

  18. Factors affecting urine specific gravity in apparently healthy cats presenting to first opinion practice for routine evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rishniw, Mark; Bicalho, Rodrigo

    2015-04-01

    Evidence suggests that apparently healthy cats presenting for routine evaluation should have a randomly sampled urine specific gravity (USG) >1.035. A USG <1.035 might reflect inappropriate concentrating ability warranting further investigation. We measured the USG of 1040 apparently healthy cats presenting to first opinion practice in an observational study, using either in-clinic refractometers or measurements provided by reference laboratories, and examined factors that might affect USG. In-clinic refractometers were calibrated using distilled water (specific gravity = 1.000). The USG was >1.030 in 91% of cats and >1.035 in 88% of cats; 121 adult cats (⩾6 months old) and five young cats (<6 months old) had USGs of <1.035. Of these 126 cats, a pathological cause was identified in 27 adult cats - of these, 26 were >9 years old - but no young cats. No cause was identified in 43 adult cats, and further investigation was not pursued in 51 adult cats. Factors that affected USG included age, diet type, sex, fasting status, drinking avidity, refractometer type, and the interaction between sex and diet - increasing dietary moisture content lowered USG only in female cats. Most factors minimally affected USG. The odds of having a USG <1.035 without apparent pathology included age and dietary moisture content. Drinking avidity decreased with increasing dietary moisture content. Our results show that most apparently healthy cats presenting to first-opinion practice should have a USG >1.035. Dietary management strategies to lower USG might be less effective than anticipated, and warrant monitoring of USG to determine efficacy. Older cats with USG <1.035 are more likely to have pathological causes identified, although clinicians are more likely to examine these cats for possible pathology. A lack of stringent refractometer calibration could have caused some errors in estimates of USG by some observers, but would be unlikely to alter markedly the findings. PMID:25030955

  19. Clinical routine operation of a filmless radiology department: three years experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosser, Hans M.; Paertan, Gerald; Hruby, Walter

    1995-05-01

    This paper communicates the operational implementation of filmless digital radiology in clinical routine, its feasibility and its effect on the radiology profession, based on the three years clinical experience from the filmless digital radiology department of the Danube Hospital, a major teaching hospital in Vienna, Austria, with currently 850 acute-care beds. Since April 1992 all radiological modalities are reported from the monitors of 16 reporting consoles in the radiology department. Images and reports are distributed by the hospital-wide network (Sienet, Siemens Medical Systems, Erlangen), and can be viewed on 60 display consoles throughout the hospital. Filmless radiology primarily is an efficient hospital-wide infrastructure to deliver radiological services along with other medical information, providing safe and fast access to this information anytime and anywhere, necessary for the conduct of the diagnostic and therapeutic task of patient care. In a comparative study of the Danube Hospital with the film based Rudolfstiftung Hospital in Vienna, we found a significant decrease of the mean patient length of hospital stay (1.99 to 3.72 days) that partially might be attributed to the implementation of filmless radiology.

  20. Endogenous glucocorticoid analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in routine clinical laboratories.

    PubMed

    Hawley, James M; Keevil, Brian G

    2016-09-01

    Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is a powerful analytical technique that offers exceptional selectivity and sensitivity. Used optimally, LC-MS/MS provides accurate and precise results for a wide range of analytes at concentrations that are difficult to quantitate with other methodologies. Its implementation into routine clinical biochemistry laboratories has revolutionised our ability to analyse small molecules such as glucocorticoids. Whereas immunoassays can suffer from matrix effects and cross-reactivity due to interactions with structural analogues, the selectivity offered by LC-MS/MS has largely overcome these limitations. As many clinical guidelines are now beginning to acknowledge the importance of the methodology used to provide results, the advantages associated with LC-MS/MS are gaining wider recognition. With their integral role in both the diagnosis and management of hypo- and hyperadrenal disorders, coupled with their widespread pharmacological use, the accurate measurement of glucocorticoids is fundamental to effective patient care. Here, we provide an up-to-date review of the LC-MS/MS techniques used to successfully measure endogenous glucocorticoids, particular reference is made to serum, urine and salivary cortisol. PMID:27208627

  1. Look what else we found - clinically significant abnormalities detected during routine ROP screening

    PubMed Central

    Jayadev, Chaitra; Vinekar, Anand; Bauer, Noel; Mangalesh, Shwetha; Mahendradas, Padmamalini; Kemmanu, Vasudha; Mallipatna, Ashwin; Shetty, Bhujang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to report the spectrum of anterior and posterior segment diagnoses in Asian Indian premature infants detected serendipitously during routine retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) screening during a 1 year period. Methods: A retrospective review of all Retcam (Clarity MSI, USA) imaging sessions during the year 2011 performed on infants born either <2001 g at birth and/or <34.1 weeks of gestation recruited for ROP screening was performed. All infants had a minimum of seven images at each session, which included the dilated anterior segment, disc, and macula center and the four quadrants using the 130° lens. Results: Of the 8954 imaging sessions of 1450 new infants recruited in 2011, there were 111 (7.66%) with a diagnosis other than ROP. Anterior segment diagnoses seen in 31 (27.9%) cases included clinically significant cataract, lid abnormalities, anophthalmos, microphthalmos, and corneal diseases. Posterior segment diagnoses in 80 (72.1%) cases included retinal hemorrhages, cherry red spots, and neonatal uveitis of infective etiologies. Of the 111 cases, 15 (13.5%) underwent surgical procedures and 24 (21.6%) underwent medical procedures; importantly, two eyes with retinoblastoma were detected which were managed timely. Conclusions: This study emphasizes the importance of ocular digital imaging in premature infants. Visually significant, potentially life-threatening, and even treatable conditions were detected serendipitously during routine ROP screening that may be missed or detected late otherwise. This pilot data may be used to advocate for a possible universal infant eye screening program using digital imaging. PMID:26139795

  2. Current routine practice and clinico-pathological characteristics associated with acute promyelocytic leukemia in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sunhyun; Park, Joon Seong; Jeong, Seong Hyun; Lee, Hyun Woo; Park, Jun Eun; Kim, Mi Hyang; Kim, Yang Soo; Lee, Ho Sup; Park, Tae Sung; You, Eunkyoung; Rheem, Insoo; Park, Joowon; Huh, JI Young; Kang, Myung Seo

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) can be life threatening, necessitating emergency therapy with prompt diagnosis by morphologic findings, immunophenotyping, cytogenetic analysis, or molecular studies. This study aimed to assess the current routine practices in APL and the clinico-pathologic features of APL. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 48 Korean patients (25 men, 23 women; median age, 51 (20-80) years) diagnosed with APL in 5 university hospitals between March 2007 and February 2012. Results The WBC count at diagnosis and platelet count varied from 0.4 to 81.0 (median 2.0)×109/L and 2.7 to 124.0 (median 54.5)×109/L, respectively. The median values for prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were 14.7 (11.3-44.1) s and 29 (24-62) s, respectively. All but 2 patients (96%) showed a fibrin/fibrinogen degradation product value of >20 µg/mL. The D-dimer median value was 5,000 (686-55,630) ng/mL. The t(15;17)(q22;q12 and PML-RARA fusion was found in all patients by chromosome analysis and/or multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), with turnaround times of 8 (2-19) d and 7 (2-13) d, respectively. All patients received induction chemotherapy: all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) alone (N=11, 26%), ATRA+idarubicin (N=25, 58%), ATRA+cytarabine (N=3, 7%), ATRA+idarubicin+cytarabine (N=4, 9%). Conclusion Since APL is a medical emergency and an accurate diagnosis is a prerequisite for prompt treatment, laboratory support to implement faster diagnostic tools to confirm the presence of PML-RARA is required. PMID:23589792

  3. Routine Testing for Anaerobic Bacteria in Cerebrospinal Fluid Cultures Improves Recovery of Clinically Significant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Pittman, Meredith E.; Thomas, Benjamin S.; Wallace, Meghan A.; Weber, Carol J.

    2014-01-01

    In North America, the widespread use of vaccines targeting Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae have dramatically altered the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis, while the methodology for culturing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens has remained largely unchanged. The aims of this study were 2-fold: to document the current epidemiology of bacterial meningitis at a tertiary care medical center and to assess the clinical utility of routinely querying for anaerobes in CSF cultures. To that end, we assessed CSF cultures submitted over a 2-year period. A brucella blood agar (BBA) plate, incubated anaerobically for 5 days, was included in the culture procedure for all CSF specimens during the second year of evaluation. In the pre- and postimplementation years, 2,353 and 2,302 CSF specimens were cultured, with 49 and 99 patients having positive culture results, respectively. The clinical and laboratory data for patients with positive cultures were reviewed. Anaerobic bacteria were isolated in the CSF samples from 33 patients post-BBA compared to two patients pre-BBA (P = 0.01). The anaerobic isolates included Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (n = 1), Propionibacterium species (n = 15), and Propionibacterium acnes (n = 19) isolates; all of these isolates were recovered on the BBA. Eight of the 35 patients from whom anaerobic organisms were isolated received antimicrobial therapy. Although six of these patients had central nervous system hardware, two patients did not have a history of a neurosurgical procedure and had community-acquired anaerobic bacterial meningitis. This study demonstrates that the simple addition of an anaerobically incubated BBA to the culture of CSF specimens enhances the recovery of clinically significant anaerobic pathogens. PMID:24622102

  4. Implementation of Cognitive Therapy for PTSD in routine clinical care: Effectiveness and moderators of outcome in a consecutive sample☆

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, Anke; Grey, Nick; Wild, Jennifer; Stott, Richard; Liness, Sheena; Deale, Alicia; Handley, Rachel; Albert, Idit; Cullen, Deborah; Hackmann, Ann; Manley, John; McManus, Freda; Brady, Francesca; Salkovskis, Paul; Clark, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Trauma-focused psychological treatments are recommended as first-line treatments for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), but clinicians may be concerned that the good outcomes observed in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) may not generalize to the wide range of traumas and presentations seen in clinical practice. This study investigated whether Cognitive Therapy for PTSD (CT-PTSD) can be effectively implemented into a UK National Health Service Outpatient Clinic serving a defined ethnically mixed urban catchment area. Method A consecutive sample of 330 patients with PTSD (age 17–83) following a wide range of traumas were treated by 34 therapists, who received training and supervision in CT-PTSD. Pre and post treatment data (PTSD symptoms, anxiety, depression) were collected for all patients, including dropouts. Hierarchical linear modeling investigated candidate moderators of outcome and therapist effects. Results CT-PTSD was well tolerated and led to very large improvement in PTSD symptoms, depression and anxiety. The majority of patients showed reliable improvement/clinically significant change: intent-to-treat: 78.8%/57.3%; completer: 84.5%/65.1%. Dropouts and unreliable attenders had worse outcome. Statistically reliable symptom exacerbation with treatment was observed in only 1.2% of patients. Treatment gains were maintained during follow-up (M = 280 days, n = 220). Few of the selection criteria used in some RCTs, demographic, diagnostic and trauma characteristics moderated treatment outcome, and only social problems and needing treatment for multiple traumas showed unique moderation effects. There were no random effects of therapist on symptom improvement, but therapists who were inexperienced in CT-PTSD had more dropouts than those with greater experience. Conclusions The results support the effectiveness of CT-PTSD and suggest that trauma-focused cognitive behavior therapy can be successfully implemented in routine clinical services

  5. Utilization of incontinence clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Roe, B; Moore, K N

    2001-11-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are evidence-based recommendations for best practice and have been developed with the assumption they will be embraced by practitioners; a further assumption is that clinical practice guidelines will improve the delivery of care. In this article, we provide a working definition of evidence-based practice, discuss the strengths and limitations of CPGs, describe the implementation of CPGs in the context of urinary incontinence, and consider the steps that the WOCN has taken to initiate evidence-based practice. Current issues are presented along with initiatives that have resulted in clinical practice guidelines on incontinence from the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada. On the basis of the current literature, it is concluded that clinical practice guidelines can play an important role in WOCN practice and that the implementation of guidelines may improve clinical practice. However, guidelines are only as valid as the evidence on which they are based and may not take into account gender or cultural differences or the effect that comorbid conditions can have on treatment outcomes. Finally, guidelines must follow a comprehensive approach that involves management and staff and includes education, facilitation, evaluation, feedback, and an understanding of change strategies. PMID:11707762

  6. Advanced practice: the clinical nurse specialist.

    PubMed

    Sparacino, P

    1992-01-01

    Historically, the clinically expert nurse who wanted to continue in direct patient care had few career options. That dilemma is changing in response to the recognised need for greater knowledge and clinical expertise in the domain of patient care. The clinical nurse specialist role is an answer to this concern. The clinical nurse specialist practices within a framework of theoretically-based knowledge and combines that knowledge with clinical expertise. The role is also pivotal in the promotion of patient care focused scientific inquiry and in the generation and refinement of nursing theories. Career options are more versatile than for the educator, researcher, or administrator. While the clinical nurse specialist is an essential person in influencing quality care in the traditional practice settings, there are now opportunities with clientele and practice settings which have expanded beyond the conventional boundaries. PMID:1528295

  7. The Quality of Clinical Maternal and Neonatal Healthcare – A Strategy for Identifying ‘Routine Care Signal Functions’

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Stephan; De Allegri, Manuela; Gabrysch, Sabine; Chinkhumba, Jobiba; Sarker, Malabika; Muula, Adamson S.

    2015-01-01

    Background A variety of clinical process indicators exists to measure the quality of care provided by maternal and neonatal health (MNH) programs. To allow comparison across MNH programs in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), a core set of essential process indicators is needed. Although such a core set is available for emergency obstetric care (EmOC), the ‘EmOC signal functions’, a similar approach is currently missing for MNH routine care evaluation. We describe a strategy for identifying core process indicators for routine care and illustrate their usefulness in a field example. Methods We first developed an indicator selection strategy by combining epidemiological and programmatic aspects relevant to MNH in LMICs. We then identified routine care process indicators meeting our selection criteria by reviewing existing quality of care assessment protocols. We grouped these indicators into three categories based on their main function in addressing risk factors of maternal or neonatal complications. We then tested this indicator set in a study assessing MNH quality of clinical care in 33 health facilities in Malawi. Results Our strategy identified 51 routine care processes: 23 related to initial patient risk assessment, 17 to risk monitoring, 11 to risk prevention. During the clinical performance assessment a total of 82 cases were observed. Birth attendants’ adherence to clinical standards was lowest in relation to risk monitoring processes. In relation to major complications, routine care processes addressing fetal and newborn distress were performed relatively consistently, but there were major gaps in the performance of routine care processes addressing bleeding, infection, and pre-eclampsia risks. Conclusion The identified set of process indicators could identify major gaps in the quality of obstetric and neonatal care provided during the intra- and immediate postpartum period. We hope our suggested indicators for essential routine care processes

  8. Clinical and administrative review in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Stott, N. C. H.; Davis, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    Clinical and administrative review in primary medical care can be an enjoyable and creative part of group-practice life. A series of such reviews are described which improve internal or external communication for the primary care team. PMID:1223278

  9. Positive interventions in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Tayyab

    2009-05-01

    Mainstream psychotherapy has made huge strides in treating symptoms and disorders, but it has largely overlooked happiness as a therapeutic goal despite frequently hearing from clients, "Doctor, I want to be happy." This issue of Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session describes a number of positive interventions for specific clinical problems, such as depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, loss, grief, and relationship distress. Although the name may suggest it, positive interventions do not imply that rest of psychotherapies are negative. Neither are negatives denied nor minimized. Distinct from self-help recipes proffering instant changes, positive psychology interventions refer to systematic approaches to overcome challenges by using clients' strengths and assets. A hybrid psychotherapy-coaching model and strength-based assessment can ask a client "What is right with you?" All articles are supplemented with rich case illustrations. PMID:19294745

  10. Genetics of Epilepsy in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Genetics should now be part of everyday clinical epilepsy practice. Good data exist to provide empiric risks based on epilepsy syndrome diagnosis. Investigation of the molecular basis of some epilepsies is now a practical clinical task and is of clear value to the patient and family. In some cases, specific therapeutic decisions can now be made based on genetic findings, and this scenario of precision therapy is likely to increase in the coming years. PMID:26316866

  11. The clinical value of daily routine chest radiographs in a mixed medical–surgical intensive care unit is low

    PubMed Central

    Graat, Marleen E; Choi, Goda; Wolthuis, Esther K; Korevaar, Johanna C; Spronk, Peter E; Stoker, Jaap; Vroom, Margreeth B; Schultz, Marcus J

    2006-01-01

    Introduction The clinical value of daily routine chest radiographs (CXRs) in critically ill patients is unknown. We conducted this study to evaluate how frequently unexpected predefined major abnormalities are identified with daily routine CXRs, and how often these findings lead to a change in care for intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Method This was a prospective observational study conducted in a 28-bed, mixed medical–surgical ICU of a university hospital. Results Over a 5-month period, 2,457 daily routine CXRs were done in 754 consecutive ICU patients. The majority of these CXRs did not reveal any new predefined major finding. In only 5.8% of daily routine CXRs (14.3% of patients) was one or more new and unexpected abnormality encountered, including large atelectases (24 times in 20 patients), large infiltrates (23 in 22), severe pulmonary congestion (29 in 25), severe pleural effusion (13 in 13), pneumothorax/pneumomediastinum (14 in 13), and malposition of the orotracheal tube (32 in 26). Fewer than half of the CXRs with a new and unexpected finding were ultimately clinically relevant; in only 2.2% of all daily routine CXRs (6.4% of patients) did these radiologic abnormalities result in a change to therapy. Subgroup analysis revealed no differences between medical and surgical patients with regard to the incidence of new and unexpected findings on daily routine CXRs and the effect of new and unexpected CXR findings on daily care. Conclusion In the ICU, daily routine CXRs seldom reveal unexpected, clinically relevant abnormalities, and they rarely prompt action. We propose that this diagnostic examination be abandoned in ICU patients. PMID:16420655

  12. Collaborative Clinical Practice: An Alternate Field Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dee, Amy Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Teacher education in the 21st century is encountering increased scrutiny, added pressure, and escalating external regulations but does not have practical and immediate solutions for improving programs. While reforms in teacher education call for additional and improved clinical practice for candidates, through strengthened partnerships with local…

  13. Towards the system-wide implementation of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health in routine practice: Lessons from a pilot study in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianan; Prodinger, Birgit; Reinhardt, Jan D; Stucki, Gerold

    2016-06-13

    In 2011 the Chinese leadership in rehabilitation, in collaboration with the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Research Branch, embarked on an effort towards the system-wide implementation of the ICF in the healthcare system in China. We report here on the lessons learned from the pilot phase of testing the ICF Generic Set, a parsimonious set of 7 ICF categories, which have been shown to best describe functioning across the general population and people with various health conditions, for use in routine clinical practice in China. The paper discusses whether classification and measurement are compatible, what number of ICF categories should be included in data collection in routine practice, and the usefulness of a functioning profile and functioning score in clinical practice and health research planning. In addition, the paper reflects on the use of ICF qualifiers in a rating scale and the particularities of certain ICF categories contained in the ICF Generic Set when used as items in the context of Chinese rehabilitation and healthcare. Finally, the steps required to enhance the utility of system-wide implementation of the ICF in rehabilitation and healthcare services are set out. PMID:27008243

  14. Reshaping Clinical Practice for the New Millennium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, Christine A.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the need to train clinical practitioners in social work to address ongoing issues of oppression. Describes a second-year Master's in Social Work clinical practice sequence taught from feminist, poststructuralist, postmodern, and social constructionist perspectives, where students learn to assess the impacts of oppression, discover…

  15. Thymomas: Review of Current Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszek, Sandra; Wigle, Dennis A.; Keshavjee, Shaf; Fischer, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Thymomas are the most common tumors of the mediastinum. The introduction of multimodality treatment strategies, as well as novel approaches to the diagnosis of these tumors, has led to changes in the clinical management of thymomas. Here we review the literature for current clinical practice in the diagnosis, management, and treatment of thymomas. PMID:19463649

  16. American Clinical Magnetoencephalography Society Clinical Practice Guideline 2: Presurgical Functional Brain Mapping Using Magnetic Evoked Fields*

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Richard C.; Funke, Michael E.; Bowyer, Susan M.; Lewine, Jeffrey D.; Kirsch, Heidi E.; Bagić, Anto I.

    2012-01-01

    The following are “minimum standards” for the routine clinical recording of magnetic evoked fields (MEFs) in all age-groups. Practicing at minimum standards should not be the goal of a magnetoencephalography (MEG) center but rather a starting level for continued improvement. Minimum standards meet only the most basic responsibilities to the patient and the referring physician. These minimum standards have been put forth to improve standardization of procedures, to facilitate interchange of recordings and reports among laboratories in the United States, and to confirm the expectations of referring physicians. Recommendations regarding Laboratory (Center) Environment and Preparation for MEG Recordings are detailed in the American Clinical Magnetoencephalography Society Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) 1 : Recording and Analysis of Spontaneous Cerebral Activity, except for its EEG aspect that is not considered necessary (although may be helpful in trained hands) for MEFs (presurgical functional brain mapping). PMID:21811122

  17. [Malnutrition screening in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Hankard, R; Colomb, V; Piloquet, H; Bocquet, A; Bresson, J-L; Briend, A; Chouraqui, J-P; Darmaun, D; Dupont, C; Frelut, M-L; Girardet, J-P; Goulet, O; Rieu, D; Simeoni, U; Turck, D; Vidailhet, M

    2012-10-01

    Protein energy malnutrition (PEM) occurs when energy and protein intake do not meet requirements. It has a functional and structural impact and increases both morbidity and mortality of a given disease. The Nutrition Committee of the French Pediatric Society recommends weighing and measuring any child when hospitalized or seen in consultation. The body mass index (BMI) must be calculated and analyzed according to references any time growth kinetics cannot be analyzed. Any child with a BMI below the third centile or -2 standard deviations for age and sex needs to be examined looking for clinical signs of malnutrition and signs orienting toward an etiology and requires having his BMI and height dynamics plotted on a chart. PEM warrants drawing up a nutritional strategy along with the overall care plan. A target weight needs to be determined as well as the quantitative and qualitative nutritional care including its implementation. This plan must be evaluated afterwards in order to adapt the nutritional therapy. PMID:22959889

  18. Modifying the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation Measure for Use with People Who Have a Learning Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Keith; Willoughby-Booth, Simon

    2007-01-01

    There are few reliable self-report measures suitable for people with a learning disability in reporting psychological distress. This study examines the modification of the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation-Outcome Measure (CORE-OM), exploring its reliability, using two different presentation styles. One style included a sequencing task then…

  19. Who Wrote This Clinical Practice Guideline?

    PubMed

    Tunkel, David E; Jones, Stephanie L

    2015-12-01

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation clinical practice guidelines address a variety of otolaryngologic diseases and/or procedures. It may seem reasonable to create these guidelines by assembling a team of expert clinicians familiar with the pertinent clinical issues and the available evidence, with debate and eventual agreement leading to recommendations. However, trustworthy clinical practice guidelines are in fact created via a defined process to assemble a guideline development group composed of diverse stakeholders: clinician generalists and specialists, content experts, methodologists, physicians and nonphysicians, patients, and advocates. Such a guideline development group can create a valuable and trusted guideline for clinicians and affected patients. PMID:26443479

  20. [Genomic Tests: From Basic Research to Clinical Practice].

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Kaname; Mochiki, Ikuyo

    2015-03-01

    Advanced genomic analytical technologies are developing and challenging the current framework of clinical laboratory testing. However, most genomic tests have been devised as laboratory-developed tests (LDTs) without sufficient validation of their analytical validity. Quality assurance (QA) of tests is mandatory for routine clinical practice. External quality management systems such as ISO add QA. Other than QAs of pre-analysis, analytical procedures, reports, and laboratory personnel should be regularly assessed using appropriate best practices and guidelines for analytical validity. Moreover, ethical, legal, and social issues concerning genomic information should be resolved in genomic tests. Taken together, clinicians and health care policymakers must consider the accuracy with which a test identifies a patient's clinical status and the risks and benefits resulting from test use. Genomic tests in current use vary in terms of their accuracy and potential to improve health outcomes. Recently, high-throughput analysis using next-generation sequencing and microarrays is being developed and introduced into clinical practice. As analysis of these data sets is a huge challenge, it requires novel analytical processes that include data quality assessment, comprehensive analysis, interpretation of the results, and presenting the results to users. Especially, human resources are required to develop genome informatics to interpret large amounts of data. Another issue is to regulate Direct To Consumers (DTC) genetic tests by medical institutions as a salutary health service. Although advanced genomic analytical technologies present some issues, they are useful and powerful tools in clinical practice. Thus, they will be properly introduced into clinical practices in a step by step manner. PMID:26524861

  1. Prevalence and Clinical Correlates of a Short Onset REM Period (SOREMP) during Routine PSG

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, Alyssa; Bogan, Richard

    2015-01-01

    (PSG) short onset REM peroid (SOREMP) for the diagnosis of narcolepsy may be altered by a history of shift/night work and/ or other factors that may allow for a rebound of REM sleep (e.g., undergoing a positive airway pressure titration), supporting published guidelines that other sleep disorders and insufficient and/or poorly timed sleep should be ruled out and/or adequately controlled for prior to conducting sleep testing. Further research is needed to understand racial differences in PSG SOREMP and narcolepsy. This study was limited in that data on cataplexy (with exception to that in final diagnosis) and habitual sleep duration were not available. Citation: Cairns A, Bogan R. Prevalence and clinical correlates of a short onset REM period (SOREMP) during routine PSG. SLEEP 2015;38(10):1575–1581. PMID:26039966

  2. Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin: Ready for Routine Clinical Use? An International Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ronco, Claudio; Legrand, Matthieu; Goldstein, Stuart L.; Hur, Mina; Tran, Nam; Howell, Eric C.; Cantaluppi, Vincenzo; Cruz, Dinna N.; Damman, Kevin; Bagshaw, Sean M.; Di Somma, Salvatore; Lewington, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) remains a challenge in terms of diagnosis and classification, its morbidity and mortality remaining high in the face of improving clinical protocols. Current clinical criteria use serum creatinine (sCr) and urine output to classify patients. Ongoing research has identified novel biomarkers that may improve the speed and accuracy of patient evaluation and prognostication, yet the route from basic science to clinical practice remains poorly paved. International evidence supporting the use of plasma neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) as a valuable biomarker of AKI and chronic kidney disease (CKD) for a number of clinical scenarios was presented at the 31st International Vicenza Course on Critical Care Nephrology, and these data are detailed in this review. NGAL was shown to be highly useful alongside sCr, urinary output, and other biomarkers in assessing kidney injury; in patient stratification and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) selection in paediatric AKI; in assessing kidney injury in conjunction with sCr in sepsis; in guiding resuscitation protocols in conjunction with brain natriuretic peptide in burn patients; as an early biomarker of delayed graft function and calcineurin inhibitor nephrotoxicity in kidney transplantation from extended criteria donors; as a biomarker of cardiovascular disease and heart failure, and in guiding CRRT selection in the intensive care unit and emergency department. While some applications require further clarification by way of larger randomised controlled trials, NGAL nevertheless demonstrates promise as an independent biological marker with the potential to improve earlier diagnosis and better assessment of risk groups in AKI and CKD. This is a critical element in formulating quick and accurate decisions for individual patients, both in acute scenarios and in long-term care, in order to improve patient prognostics and outcomes. PMID:25012891

  3. Promoting Early Literacy via Practicing Invented Spelling: A Comparison of Different Mediation Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Iris; Aram, Dorit

    2013-01-01

    The present study compared the effects of different mediation routines provided to kindergartners from families of low socioeconomic status on the students' invented spelling attempts and on their gains obtained on spelling and other early literacy skills (letter naming, sounds of letters, word segmentation, and word decoding). The effects of…

  4. Step 6: Does Not Routinely Employ Practices, Procedures Unsupported by Scientific Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Goer, Henci; Sagady Leslie, Mayri; Romano, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Step 6 of the Ten Steps of Mother-Friendly Care addresses two issues: 1) the routine use of interventions (shaving, enemas, intravenous drips, withholding food and fluids, early rupture of membranes, and continuous electronic fetal monitoring; and 2) the optimal rates of induction, episiotomy, cesareans, and vaginal births after cesarean. Rationales for compliance and systematic reviews are presented. PMID:18523680

  5. Impact of routine bedside infectious disease consultation on clinical management and outcome of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Saunderson, R.B.; Gouliouris, T.; Nickerson, E.K.; Cartwright, E.J.P.; Kidney, A.; Aliyu, S.H.; Brown, N.M.; Limmathurotsakul, D.; Peacock, S.J.; Török, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) is a common, serious infection that is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Evidence suggests that infectious disease consultation (IDC) improves clinical management in patients with SAB. We examined whether the introduction of a routine bedside IDC service for adults with SAB improved clinical management and outcomes compared to telephone consultation. We conducted an observational cohort study of 571 adults with SAB at a teaching hospital in the United Kingdom between July 2006 and December 2012. A telephone consultation was provided on the day of positive blood culture in all cases, but an additional bedside IDC was provided after November 2009 (routine IDC group). Compared to patients in the pre-IDC group, those in the routine IDC group were more likely to have a removable focus of infection identified, echocardiography performed and follow-up blood cultures performed. They also received longer courses of antimicrobial therapy, were more likely to receive combination antimicrobial therapy and were more likely to have SAB recorded in the hospital discharge summary. There was a trend towards lower mortality at 30 days in the routine IDC group compared to the pre-IDC group (12% vs. 22%, p 0.07). Our findings suggest that routine bedside IDC should become the standard of care for adults with SAB. PMID:26033668

  6. Thrombophilia: clinical-practical aspects.

    PubMed

    Moll, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    No consensus exists as to who should be tested for thrombophilia, mainly due to the lack of good quality clinical outcome data in relationship to presence or absence of a given thrombophilia. Testing may be considered if (a) finding a thrombophilia predicts recurrent thrombosis and, thus, influences length of anticoagulation treatment decisions; (b) identifying a thrombophilia has implications on management of asymptomatic family members who are carriers of the detected thrombophilia; (c) a patient wishes to better understand why a thrombotic event occurred. Testing may be helpful in patients with venous thromboembolism at intermediate risk of recurrence in whom the finding of a strong thrombophilia can be one of the arguments for long-term anticoagulation--the "risk-of-recurrence-triangle" may be a useful aid in this decision process. Patients whose venous thromboembolism was provoked by a major transient risk factor should not be tested for thrombophilia. Thrombophilia tests should only be ordered by health care professionals who can provide the "4P": (a) appropriately select which patient to test, (b) provide pre-test counseling, (c) properly interpret the test results, and (d) provide education and advice to the patient. If testing is embarked on in patients with venous thromboembolism, it is advisable to be done at the time of decision making whether to stop or continue anticoagulation, i.e. typically after 3 months of anticoagulant therapy. Thrombophilia testing is best not done at the time of an acute thrombotic event and while a patient is on an anticoagulant. PMID:25724822

  7. Clinical Practice Update: Pediculosis Capitis.

    PubMed

    Bohl, Brittany; Evetts, Jessica; McClain, Kymberli; Rosenauer, Amanda; Stellitano, Emily

    2015-01-01

    A review of the current evidence on primary treatment modalities of head lice demonstrates increasing resistance to current regimens. New and alternative therapies are now available. A treatment algorithm was created to address safety and efficacy of treatments, as well as to guide clinicians through navigation of the regimens. Through an online journal search, 59 articles were selected for the review. Literature searches were performed through PubMed, Medline, Ebsco Host, and CINAHL, with key search words of "Pediculosis capitis" and "head lice" in the title, abstract, and index. Meta-analyses and controlled clinical trials were viewed with greater weight if they had a large sample size, were statistically significant, and did not allude to bias. When resistant infestations are well-documented in a locality, changes to the treatment regimen are indicated, and alternative treatments should be considered. Recent studies and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approvals have changed the available treatment options for Pediculosis capitis, including benzyl alcohol, topical ivermectin, spinosad, and the LouseBuster. Further, environmental management and prevention measures should be taken to avoid reinfestation and to prevent the spread of head lice. Continued study is recommended to establish long-term safety of new and alternative agents. PMID:26665422

  8. Good clinical practice and phytotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kusche, J

    1993-05-01

    The GCP Guideline of the European Community on the performance of clinical trials became obligatory in June 1991. As the GCP standards have mainly been set for innovative drugs, there is a certain danger that these criteria could not be fulfilled by medicines used in phytotherapy. As regards, the chances and risks of the European guideline, especially for herbal medicines, the differences between chemically-defined and herbal drugs, as well as the extent, to which herbal medicines might be concerned by the guideline, have to be taken into account. Herbal medicines are different from chemically defined medicines in their character as well as in their medicinal use. They always contain a mixture of numerous substances. Data on preclinical investigations are often incomplete, whereas, on the other hand, physicians and patients have a long-term experience in applying these medicines. They are, in general, well-tolerated and therefore suitable for the treatment of chronic diseases. Due to a characteristic taste and smell, the production of placebos is often impossible. The GCP directive also contains basic elements concerning chemically defined drugs as well as herbal medicines in a similar way. PMID:8361262

  9. Comparing effectiveness with efficacy: outcomes of palliative chemotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer in routine practice

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, L.D.; Zhang–Salomons, J.; Mates, M.; Booth, C.M.; King, W.D.; Mackillop, W.J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Randomized controlled trials (rcts) are the “gold standard” for establishing treatment efficacy; however, efficacy does not automatically translate to a comparable level of effectiveness in routine practice. Our objectives were to □ describe outcomes of palliative platinum-doublet chemotherapy (ppdc) in non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc) in routine practice, in terms of survival and well-being; and□ compare the effectiveness of ppdc in routine practice with its efficacy in rcts. Methods Electronic treatment records were linked to the Ontario Cancer Registry to identify patients who underwent ppdc for nsclc at Ontario’s regional cancer centres between April 2008 and December 2011. At each visit to the cancer centre, a patient’s symptoms are recorded using the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (esas). Score on the esas “well-being” item was used here as a proxy for quality of life (qol). Survival in the cohort was compared with survival in rcts, adjusting for differences in case mix. Changes in the esas score were measured 2 months after treatment start. The proportion of patients having improved or stable well-being was compared with the proportion having improved or stable qol in relevant rcts. Results We identified 906 patients with pre-ppdc esas records. Median survival was 31 weeks compared with 28–48 weeks in rcts. After accounting for deaths and cases lost to follow-up, we estimated that, at 2 months, 62% of the cohort had improved or stable well-being compared with 55%–63% who had improved or stable qol in rcts. Conclusions The effectiveness of ppdc for nsclc in routine practice in Ontario is consistent with its efficacy in rcts, both in terms of survival and improvement in well-being. PMID:26089717

  10. [Drug flow. Good manufacturing practices, good clinical practices].

    PubMed

    Dupin-Spriet, T; Spriet, A

    1991-01-01

    On a worldwide basis, the drug development circuit in clinical trials undergoes a general movement towards improvement which is sensitive to the degree of quality. The methods used to achieve this are found at the interface of Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) and Good Clinical Practices (GCP). They consist primarily of two types, for which examples are given here: strengthening of controls (verification of the resemblance of test drugs in double-blind comparison by a "jury" and computerized systems of drug accountability), improvement in "compliance with therapy at the site of investigation" (use of more "intelligent" drug packages and labels). PMID:2020929

  11. [Lanthanum carbonate in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Torregrosa Prats, V

    2008-01-01

    Lanthanum is an element belonging to the group called rare earths. Due to its low solubility, lanthanum carbonate has been widely studied as an intestinal phosphate binder. The results of different clinical trials show that it is an effective and well-tolerated phosphate binder used in monotherapy. Serum phosphate levels are controlled in approximately 70% of patients at 5 years without causing hypercalcemia. The only significant adverse effects observed are a low percentage of gastrointestinal disturbances (6%). Lanthanum carbonate does not alter serum values of liposoluble vitamins or affect the pharmacokinetics of digoxin, warfarin, furosemide, phenytoin, ACE inhibitors or beta-blockers. However, it does alter the pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin (quinolones in general), tetracyclines and doxycycline. Lanthanum carbonate (Fosrenol) is available in Spain as 500 mg, 750 mg, and 1,000 mg chewable tablets, which should not be swallowed without chewing to avoid loss of efficacy. The initial dose recommended by the WHO is 2,250 mg/day, which is equivalent to one 750 mg at each meal. Lanthanum carbonate or lanthanum phosphate can be clearly visualized on a plain x-ray of the abdomen in patients who have recently ingested it. In summary, lanthanum carbonate is a widely studied potent phosphate binder, which offers the possibility of improving control of serum phosphate in patients with chronic kidney disease, without significant side effects. The fact that it is available as chewable tablets and that the number of daily tablets required has been significantly reduced will probably facilitate better patient compliance. PMID:18847414

  12. Hemodialysis safety: Evaluation of clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Fadili, Wafaa; Adnouni, Adil; Laouad, Inass

    2016-05-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) safety has become a clinical priority; therefore, the use of checklists for making the dialysis session safe is now widely adopted. The aim of our study was to assess different shortcomings in the clinical practice of nurses working in different Moroccan dialysis centers and to discuss the interest of using such checklists. This cross-sectional study was performed in 13 chronic HD centers. Clinical practice of nurses was evaluated through checklists used in European outpatient dialysis units. We noted several deficiencies mainly related to the clinical evaluation of dialysis patients and to aspects related to hygiene and protection measures against contamination. Optimal safety of dialysis sessions requires the use of simple and reproducible means that improve clinical skills of the health staff. PMID:27215249

  13. Routine prenatal ultrasound anomaly screening program in a Nigerian university hospital: Redefining obstetrics practice in a developing African country

    PubMed Central

    Akinmoladun, J.A.; Ogbole, G.I.; Lawal, T.A.; Adesina, O.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Congenital anomalies are among the leading causes of fetal and infant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Prenatal ultrasound (US) screening has become an essential part of antenatal care in the developed world. Such practice is just evolving in the developing countries such as Nigeria. The aim of this article is to present our initial experience and demonstrate the effectiveness of a prenatal US screening program in detecting congenital malformation in a developing country. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective evaluation of the prenatal US screenings conducted at a major referral hospital in Southwestern Nigeria. All pregnant women referred to the antenatal clinic for mid-trimester screening during the period of study were assessed. Results: Two hundred and eighty-seven pregnant women (5 with twin gestations) were presented for fetal anomaly scan during the study period. Twenty-nine anomalies (9.9%) were detected among the scanned population. Sixteen of the anomalies were followed to delivery/termination with a specificity of 93.5%. The commonest malformations were demonstrated in the genitourinary tract (34.5%) followed by malformations within the central nervous system (27.6%). Six (20.6%) of the anomalies were lethal. Five of the anomalies were surgically correctable. Conclusion: Institutions and hospitals across Nigeria and other low- and middle-income countries need to develop policies and programs that would incorporate a standardized routine screening prenatal US in order to improve feto-maternal well-being and reduce the high perinatal mortality and morbidity in developing nations. PMID:26759511

  14. The path to routine use of genomic biomarkers in the cancer clinic

    PubMed Central

    Boutros, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    It has been almost 15 years since the first microarray-based studies creating multigene biomarkers to subtype and predict survival of cancer patients. This Perspective looks at why only a handful of genomic biomarkers have reached clinical application and what advances are needed over the next 15 years to grow this number. I discuss challenges in creating biomarkers and reproducing them at the genomic and computational levels, including the problem of spatio-genomic heterogeneity in an individual cancer. I then outline the challenges in translating newly discovered genome-wide or regional events, like trinucleotide mutation signatures, kataegis, and chromothripsis, into biomarkers, as well as the importance of incorporating prior biological knowledge. Lastly, I outline the practical problems of pharmaco-economics and adoption: Are new biomarkers viewed as economically rational by potential funders? And if they are, how can their results be communicated effectively to patients and their clinicians? Genomic-based diagnostics have immense potential for transforming the management of cancer. The next 15 years will see a surge of research into the topics here that, when combined with a stream of new targeted therapies being developed, will personalize the cancer clinic. PMID:26430161

  15. The path to routine use of genomic biomarkers in the cancer clinic.

    PubMed

    Boutros, Paul C

    2015-10-01

    It has been almost 15 years since the first microarray-based studies creating multigene biomarkers to subtype and predict survival of cancer patients. This Perspective looks at why only a handful of genomic biomarkers have reached clinical application and what advances are needed over the next 15 years to grow this number. I discuss challenges in creating biomarkers and reproducing them at the genomic and computational levels, including the problem of spatio-genomic heterogeneity in an individual cancer. I then outline the challenges in translating newly discovered genome-wide or regional events, like trinucleotide mutation signatures, kataegis, and chromothripsis, into biomarkers, as well as the importance of incorporating prior biological knowledge. Lastly, I outline the practical problems of pharmaco-economics and adoption: Are new biomarkers viewed as economically rational by potential funders? And if they are, how can their results be communicated effectively to patients and their clinicians? Genomic-based diagnostics have immense potential for transforming the management of cancer. The next 15 years will see a surge of research into the topics here that, when combined with a stream of new targeted therapies being developed, will personalize the cancer clinic. PMID:26430161

  16. Leading Horses to Water: Lessons from a Decade of Helping Psychological Therapy Services Use Routine Outcome Measurement to Improve Practice.

    PubMed

    Mellor-Clark, John; Cross, Simone; Macdonald, James; Skjulsvik, Tommy

    2016-05-01

    We summarise the recent reflections of five thought leaders in the field of routine outcome measurement (ROM) for psychological therapy, and then add our own experience of introducing a national ROM system in the UK. We highlight, in particular, the post-implementation challenge of securing data of sufficient reliability to help inform service quality improvements. We ground our conclusions and recommendations in the rapidly evolving discipline of implementation science, and offer a best practice model for applying research recommendations in practice settings. In this context we portray ROM implementation as significant organizational change that benefits from rigorous process and clearly defined, well-communicated targets. PMID:25179755

  17. A clinical academic practice partnership: a clinical education redesign.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Pamela R; Rose, Linda; Belcher, Anne E; Dang, Deborah; Hochuli, Jo Fava; Fleischmann, Debbie; Gerson, Linda; Greene, Mary Ann; Jordan, Elizabeth Betty T; Krohn, Vicki L; Sartorius-Merganthaler, Susan; Walrath, Jo M

    2013-01-01

    The clinical academic practice partnership (CAPP), a clinical redesign based on the dedicated education unit concept, was developed and implemented by large, private school of nursing in collaboration with 4 clinical partners to provide quality clinical education, to explore new clinical models for the future, and to test an innovative clinical education design. An executive steering committee consisting of nursing leaders and educators from the school of nursing and the clinical institutions was established as the decision-making and planning components, with several collaborative task forces initiated to conduct the work and to accomplish the goals. This article will describe methods to initiate and to organize the key elements of this dedicated education unit-type clinical model, providing examples and an overview of the steps and elements needed as the development proceeded. After 18 months of implementation in 4 different nursing programs in 4 different clinical institutions, the clinical redesign has shown to be a positive initiative, with students actively requesting CAPP units for their clinical experiences. Preliminary findings and outcomes will be discussed, along with nursing education implications for this new clinical redesign. PMID:23706965

  18. Clinical practice guidelines. New-to-practice family physicians' attitudes.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrier, B. M.; Woodward, C. A.; Cohen, M.; Williams, A. P.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the attitudes toward clinical practice guidelines of a group of family physicians who had recently entered practice in Ontario, and to compare them with the attitudes of a group of internists from the United States. DESIGN: Mailed questionnaire survey of all members of a defined cohort. SETTING: Ontario family practices. PARTICIPANTS: Certificants of the College of Family Physicians of Canada who received certification in 1989, 1990, and 1991 and who were practising in Ontario. Of 564-cohort members, 395 (70%) responded. Men (184) and women (211) responded at the same rate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Levels of agreement with 10 descriptive statements about practice guidelines and analyses of variance of these responses for several physician characteristics. RESULTS: Of respondents in independent practice, 80% were in group practice. Women were more likely to have chosen group practice, in which they were more likely to use practice guidelines than men. Generally favourable attitudes toward guidelines were observed. Physician characteristics occasionally influenced agreement with the descriptors. The pattern of agreement was similar to that noted in the study of American internists, but, in general, Ontario physicians were more supportive. CONCLUSIONS: This group of relatively new-to-practice Ontario family physicians shows little resistance to guidelines and appears to read less threat of external control in them than does the US group. PMID:8616286

  19. Implementing human factors in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Timmons, Stephen; Baxendale, Bryn; Buttery, Andrew; Miles, Giulia; Roe, Bridget; Browes, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To understand whether aviation-derived human factors training is acceptable and useful to healthcare professionals. To understand whether and how healthcare professionals have been able to implement human factors approaches to patient safety in their own area of clinical practice. Methods Qualitative, longitudinal study using semi-structured interviews and focus groups, of a multiprofessional group of UK NHS staff (from the emergency department and operating theatres) who have received aviation-derived human factors training. Results The human factors training was evaluated positively, and thought to be both acceptable and relevant to practice. However, the staff found it harder to implement what they had learned in their own clinical areas, and this was principally attributed to features of the informal organisational cultures. Conclusions In order to successfully apply human factors approaches in hospital, careful consideration needs to be given to the local context and informal culture of clinical practice. PMID:24631959

  20. Routine HIV Testing in Botswana: A Population-Based Study on Attitudes, Practices, and Human Rights Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, Sheri D; Heisler, Michele; Leiter, Karen; Percy-de Korte, Fiona; Tlou, Sheila; DeMonner, Sonya; Phaladze, Nthabiseng; Bangsberg, David R; Iacopino, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    Background The Botswana government recently implemented a policy of routine or “opt-out” HIV testing in response to the high prevalence of HIV infection, estimated at 37% of adults. Methods and Findings We conducted a cross-sectional, population-based study of 1,268 adults from five districts in Botswana to assess knowledge of and attitudes toward routine testing, correlates of HIV testing, and barriers and facilitators to testing, 11 months after the introduction of this policy. Most participants (81%) reported being extremely or very much in favor of routine testing. The majority believed that this policy would decrease barriers to testing (89%), HIV-related stigma (60%), and violence toward women (55%), and would increase access to antiretroviral treatment (93%). At the same time, 43% of participants believed that routine testing would lead people to avoid going to the doctor for fear of testing, and 14% believed that this policy could increase gender-based violence related to testing. The prevalence of self-reported HIV testing was 48%. Adjusted correlates of testing included female gender (AOR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1–1.9), higher education (AOR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.5–2.7), more frequent healthcare visits (AOR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.3–2.7), perceived access to HIV testing (AOR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.1–2.5), and inconsistent condom use (AOR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.2–2.1). Individuals with stigmatizing attitudes toward people living with HIV and AIDS were less likely to have been tested for HIV/AIDS (AOR = 0.7, 95% CI = 0.5–0.9) or to have heard of routine testing (AOR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.45–0.76). While experiences with voluntary and routine testing overall were positive, 68% felt that they could not refuse the HIV test. Key barriers to testing included fear of learning one's status (49%), lack of perceived HIV risk (43%), and fear of having to change sexual practices with a positive HIV test (33%). Conclusions Routine testing appears to be widely supported and may

  1. Application of The APA Practice Guidelines on Suicide to Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Douglas G; Brewer, Margaret L

    2006-06-01

    This article presents charts from The American Psychiatric Association Practice Guideline for the Assessment and Treatment of Patients with Suicidal Behaviors, part of the Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders Compendium, and a summary of the assessment information in a format that can be used in routine clinical practice. Four steps in the assessment process are presented: the use of a thorough psychiatric examination to obtain information about the patient's current presentation, history, diagnosis, and to recognize suicide risk factors therein; the necessity of asking very specific questions about suicidal ideation, intent, plans, and attempts; the process of making an estimation of the patient's level of suicide risk is explained; and the use of modifiable risk and protective factors as the basis for treatment planning is demonstrated. Case reports are used to clarify use of each step in this process. PMID:16816784

  2. Minimum qualifications for clinical pharmacy practice faculty.

    PubMed

    Engle, Janet P; Erstad, Brian L; Anderson, Douglas C; Bucklin, Mason H; Chan, Alexandre; Donaldson, Amy R; Hagemann, Tracy M; O'Connell, Mary Beth; Rodgers, Philip T; Tennant, Sarah; Thomas, Zachariah

    2014-05-01

    The American College of Clinical Pharmacy 2013 Educational Affairs Committee was charged with developing recommendations for the minimum qualifications required for clinical pharmacy practice faculty in United States colleges and schools of pharmacy with respect to education, postgraduate training, board certification, and other experiences. From a review of the literature, the committee recommends that clinical pharmacy practice faculty possess the following minimum qualifications, noting that, for some positions, additional qualifications may be necessary. Clinical pharmacy practice faculty should possess the Doctor of Pharmacy degree from an Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education–accredited institution. In addition, faculty should have completed a postgraduate year one (PGY1) residency or possess at least 3 years of direct patient care experience. Faculty who practice in identified areas of pharmacotherapy specialization, as identified by American Society of Health-System Pharmacists postgraduate year two (PGY2) residency guidelines, should have completed a PGY2 residency in that area of specialty practice. Alternatively, faculty should have completed a minimum of a PGY1 residency and 1 additional year of practice, with at least 50% of time spent in their area of specialization, which is documented in a portfolio, or 4 years of direct patient care in their area of specialization, which is documented in a portfolio. Fellowship training or a graduate degree (e.g., Ph.D.) should be required for research-intensive clinical faculty positions. All faculty should obtain structured teaching experience during or after postgraduate training, preferably through a formal teaching certificate program or through activities documented in a teaching portfolio. A baseline record of scholarship should be obtained before hire as clinical pharmacy practice faculty through exposure in postgraduate programs or previous employment. Faculty should be board certified before hire

  3. Health-related quality of life assessment in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Meers, C; Singer, M A

    1996-01-01

    Assessment of biochemical responses to therapy is routine in the management of patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD). Assessment of health-related quality of life (HRQOL), however, is less common. Previous research indicates that HRQOL is a meaningful indicator that should be integrated into clinical practice. HRQOL is longitudinally evaluated in in-centre hemodialysis patients using the RAND 36-item Health Survey 1.0. Caregivers incorporate scores from this instrument into their assessment of patient functioning and well-being. HRQOL scores can be utilized to evaluate responses to changes in therapy, and to direct clinical decision-making, adding an important dimension to holistic, quality care for ESRD patients. PMID:8900807

  4. Follow up policy after treatment for Hodgkin's disease: too many clinic visits and routine tests? A review of hospital records.

    PubMed Central

    Radford, J. A.; Eardley, A.; Woodman, C.; Crowther, D.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effectiveness of routine clinic review in detecting relapse after treatment for Hodgkin's disease. DESIGN: Review of hospital records. SETTING: Regional centre for cancer treatment and research. SUBJECTS: 210 patients with Hodgkin's disease recruited to a chemotherapy trial protocol between 1984 and the end of 1990 who had achieved a complete or partial remission after treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The number of clinic visits made by patients over the period of observation, the number of relapses occurring during that time, and the route by which relapse was detected. RESULTS: The 210 patients generated 2512 outpatient reviews, and 37 relapses were detected. Thirty relapses (81%) were diagnosed in patients who described symptoms, which in 15 cases had resulted in an earlier appointment being arranged. In only four cases (11%; 95% confidence interval 4% to 25%) was relapse detected as a result of routine physical examination on investigation of a patient who did not have symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Relapse of Hodgkin's disease after treatment is usually detected as a result of the investigation of symptoms rather than by routine screening of asymptomatic patients. It is therefore proposed that the frequency of routine follow up visits should be reduced and greater emphasis placed on patient education. This should underline the importance of symptoms and encourage patients to arrange an earlier appointment if these develop. PMID:9040326

  5. Implementation and Spread of Interventions Into the Multilevel Context of Routine Practice and Policy: Implications for the Cancer Care Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Green, Lawrence W.; Glanz, Karen; Ayanian, John Z.; Mittman, Brian S.; Chollette, Veronica; Rubenstein, Lisa V.

    2012-01-01

    The promise of widespread implementation of efficacious interventions across the cancer continuum into routine practice and policy has yet to be realized. Multilevel influences, such as communities and families surrounding patients or health-care policies and organizations surrounding provider teams, may determine whether effective interventions are successfully implemented. Greater recognition of the importance of these influences in advancing (or hindering) the impact of single-level interventions has motivated the design and testing of multilevel interventions designed to address them. However, implementing research evidence from single- or multilevel interventions into sustainable routine practice and policy presents substantive challenges. Furthermore, relatively few multilevel interventions have been conducted along the cancer care continuum, and fewer still have been implemented, disseminated, or sustained in practice. The purpose of this chapter is, therefore, to illustrate and examine the concepts underlying the implementation and spread of multilevel interventions into routine practice and policy. We accomplish this goal by using a series of cancer and noncancer examples that have been successfully implemented and, in some cases, spread widely. Key concepts across these examples include the importance of phased implementation, recognizing the need for pilot testing, explicit engagement of key stakeholders within and between each intervention level; visible and consistent leadership and organizational support, including financial and human resources; better understanding of the policy context, fiscal climate, and incentives underlying implementation; explication of handoffs from researchers to accountable individuals within and across levels; ample integration of multilevel theories guiding implementation and evaluation; and strategies for long-term monitoring and sustainability. PMID:22623601

  6. Implementation and spread of interventions into the multilevel context of routine practice and policy: implications for the cancer care continuum.

    PubMed

    Yano, Elizabeth M; Green, Lawrence W; Glanz, Karen; Ayanian, John Z; Mittman, Brian S; Chollette, Veronica; Rubenstein, Lisa V

    2012-05-01

    The promise of widespread implementation of efficacious interventions across the cancer continuum into routine practice and policy has yet to be realized. Multilevel influences, such as communities and families surrounding patients or health-care policies and organizations surrounding provider teams, may determine whether effective interventions are successfully implemented. Greater recognition of the importance of these influences in advancing (or hindering) the impact of single-level interventions has motivated the design and testing of multilevel interventions designed to address them. However, implementing research evidence from single- or multilevel interventions into sustainable routine practice and policy presents substantive challenges. Furthermore, relatively few multilevel interventions have been conducted along the cancer care continuum, and fewer still have been implemented, disseminated, or sustained in practice. The purpose of this chapter is, therefore, to illustrate and examine the concepts underlying the implementation and spread of multilevel interventions into routine practice and policy. We accomplish this goal by using a series of cancer and noncancer examples that have been successfully implemented and, in some cases, spread widely. Key concepts across these examples include the importance of phased implementation, recognizing the need for pilot testing, explicit engagement of key stakeholders within and between each intervention level; visible and consistent leadership and organizational support, including financial and human resources; better understanding of the policy context, fiscal climate, and incentives underlying implementation; explication of handoffs from researchers to accountable individuals within and across levels; ample integration of multilevel theories guiding implementation and evaluation; and strategies for long-term monitoring and sustainability. PMID:22623601

  7. Highly Sensitive PCR Assay for Routine Diagnosis of African Swine Fever Virus in Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Agüero, M.; Fernández, J.; Romero, L.; Sánchez Mascaraque, C.; Arias, M.; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    This work provides a novel, highly sensitive, hot start PCR method for rapid and specific detection of African swine fever virus (ASFV) that can be used as a routine diagnostic test for ASFV in surveillance, control, and eradication programs. A confirmatory test of the specificity of this method based on restriction endonuclease analysis was also developed. PMID:12958285

  8. Modified cIg-FISH protocol for multiple myeloma in routine cytogenetic laboratory practice.

    PubMed

    Gole, Leena; Lin, Adeline; Chua, Constance; Chng, Wee Joo

    2014-01-01

    The International Myeloma Working Group recommends that fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) be performed on specifically identified plasma cells (PC). This is because chromosomal abnormalities are not frequently detected by traditional karyotyping due to the low proliferative rate of PC in multiple myeloma (MM). Conventional FISH enhances the sensitivity but lacks the specificity, as it does not distinguish PC from other hematopoetic cells. To fulfill this recommendation, PC need to be selected either by flow cytometry or immunomagnetic bead-based PC sorting or by concomitant labeling of the cytoplasmic immunoglobulin light chain, which allows for unambiguous identification. These techniques require expertise, time, and funding and are not easily incorporated into the routine workflow of the cytogenetic laboratory. We have modified and refined the technique using fixed cell pellets to achieve nicely separated and easily identifiable PC. With immunostaining and subsequent FISH (i.e., cytoplasmic immunoglobulin FISH, cIg-FISH), this technique can be easily incorporated into every cytogenetic laboratory. Twenty samples from patients with MM were subjected to routine FISH, cIg-FISH, and chromosomal karyotyping and the results were compared. Three FISH probes, which enabled detection of the t(4;14), t(14;16) and deletion of TP53, were used to validate this modified technique successfully. PMID:24485403

  9. Experience with routine vaginal pH testing in a family practice setting.

    PubMed Central

    Pavletic, Adriana J; Hawes, Stephen E; Geske, Jenenne A; Bringe, Kathy; Polack, Susan H

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite recommendations by Centers for Disease Control and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, pH testing is infrequently performed during the evaluation of vaginitis. Consequently, little information exists on its use in a primary care setting. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe our experience with routine pH testing, particularly the relationship between symptoms, pH and wet-mount microscopy. METHOD: A retrospective chart review was performed on 203 consecutive cases evaluated for vaginitis by wet-mount microscopy. RESULTS: Of the 203 cases, 21 had normal pH and no symptoms and 182 had symptoms, elevated pH or both; 85% of cases had abnormal wet-mount findings, including 75% with clue cells, 14% with Trichomonas vaginalis, 13% with yeast and 14% with mixed infections. Asymptomatic infection was present in 42% of cases with clue cells alone, 44% of cases with Trichomonas vaginalis alone, 38% of all trichomoniasis cases and 33% of cases with mixed infections. Elevated pH was associated with clue cells (p < 0.001), trichomoniasis (p = 0.01) and mixed infections (p = 0.003). Normal pH was associated with negative wet mount (p < 0.001) and to a lesser degree with uncomplicated vulvovaginal candidiasis (p = 0.06). CONCLUSION: Routine pH testing increased detection of trichomoniasis and bacterial vaginosis by prompting microscopy in a significant proportion of asymptomatic cases. PMID:15739819

  10. Myeloperoxidase and coronary arterial disease: from research to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Roman, Raquel Melchior; Wendland, Andrea Elisabet; Polanczyk, Carisi Anne

    2008-07-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an enzyme derived of leukocytes that catalyze formation of numerous reactive oxidant species. Besides members of the innate host defense, evidences have been proving the contribution of these oxidants to tissue injury during inflammation. MPO participates in proatherogenic biological activities related to the evolution of cardiovascular disease, including initiation, propagation and acute complications of atherosclerotic process. Thereby, MPO and its inflammatory cascade represents an attractive target for prognostical investigation and therapeutics in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. In this review, we present the state of the art in the understanding of biological actions to clinical evidences of the relationship between MPO and coronary arterial disease. Several studies point to the independent effect of MPO levels in the evolution of disease and incidence of events in patients with acute coronary syndrome. However, the additional predictive value of MPO levels in the cardiovascular risk assessment, to incorporate it to the clinical practice as marker of plaque vulnerability, is still not consistent. Additional studies are necessary to confirm its role in the different forms of presentation of ischemic disease, besides the standardization of the assay, fundamental point for transition of this marker from research atmosphere to use in clinical routine: : from laboratory to clinical practice. PMID:18660935

  11. An investigation of general predictors for cognitive–behavioural therapy outcome for anxiety disorders in a routine clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Sara Kerstine Kaya; Vangkilde, Signe; Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate B; Daniel, Sarah Ingrid Franksdatter; Hageman, Ida

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) is effective for treating anxiety disorders and is offered in most mental health services around the world. However, a relatively large number of patients with anxiety disorders do not benefit from CBT, experience relapses or drop out. Reliable predictors of treatment effects are lacking. The aim of this study is to investigate the predictive value of emotion regulation and attentional control for CBT outcome in a routine setting. Methods and analysis In this prospective and practice-based study, 112 patients with anxiety disorders referred for manual-based group CBT at two psychiatric outpatient clinics will be recruited. Emotion regulation, severity of anxiety and attentional control will be assessed with self-report measures and with an experimental computer-based attentional control task at baseline, post-treatment and at a 6-month follow-up. Emotion regulation will be measured with Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Questionnaire, severity of anxiety will be assessed with Beck Anxiety Inventory and attentional control will be measured with the self-report questionnaire, Attention Control Scale, and with an experimental computer-based attentional control task based on theory of visual attention. Data will be analysed using multilevel mixed-effects modelling. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the Danish National Ethical Board, the Department of Psychology Ethical Board, University of Copenhagen and by the Danish Data Protection Agency. Study findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journal publications and conference presentations. The Danish Committee System on Health Research Ethics has been notified about the project. Trial registration number NCT02638363. PMID:27016248

  12. Scaffolding Student Learning in Clinical Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spouse, Jenny

    1998-01-01

    A longitudinal study of nursing students showed that without sponsorship by clinical staff students found it difficult to participate and learn. The strategy of scaffolding, building on Vygotsky's Zone of Proximal Development, enables recognition of learning needs and the relationship between theory and practice. (SK)

  13. Balancing Certainty and Uncertainty in Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamhi, Alan G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, I question how practitioners can balance the certainty and confidence that they can help their patients with the uncertainty that makes them continually question their beliefs and assumptions. Method: I compare the mechanisms of science and models of clinical practice that may help practitioners achieve the right balance…

  14. How Physicians Integrate Advances into Clinical Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockyer, Jocelyn M.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Family physicians and specialists were asked to identify the sources of information they used in the process of making changes in their clinical practices. An average of 3.08 sources of information were utilized for each change and over 50 percent of the changes were complete in less than one year. (CT)

  15. Facilitating Critical Thinking in Clinical Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persaud, Deanna; And Others

    Activities to promote the transfer of theoretical knowledge into clinical practice have been developed to facilitate learning by individuals with various learning styles, reduce student stress, and improve teaching methods in a baccalaureate nursing program at the California State University, Chico. Specific activities included innovative…

  16. Building a Vita for the Clinical Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tentoni, Stuart C.

    Vita review is used by most prospective employers to determine which applicants will be interviewed for a particular position opening in clinical practice. Most graduate students have little knowledge and no training in this topic, which is vital for professional development. Specific examples of vitae construction are provided for one of the…

  17. Balancing Certainty and Uncertainty in Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamhi, Alan G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In this epilogue, I respond to each of the five commentaries, discussing in some depth a central issue raised in each commentary. In the final section, I discuss how my thinking about certainty and uncertainty in clinical practice has evolved since I wrote the initial article. Method: Topics addressed include the similarities/differences…

  18. Physicians Reentering Clinical Practice: Characteristics and Clinical Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Elizabeth S.; Korinek, Elizabeth J.; Weitzel, Lindsay B.; Wentz, Dennis K.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Limited information exists to describe physicians who return to practice after absences from patient care. The Center for Personalized Education for Physicians (CPEP) is an independent, not-for-profit organization that provides clinical competency assessment and educational programs for physicians, including those reentering…

  19. Moving from Efficacy to Effectiveness in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Psychosis: A Randomized Clinical Practice Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Tania M.; Ziegler, Michael; Mehl, Stephanie; Kesting, Marie-Luise; Lullmann, Eva; Westermann, Stefan; Rief, Winfried

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Randomized controlled trials have attested the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in reducing psychotic symptoms. Now, studies are needed to investigate its effectiveness in routine clinical practice settings. Method: Eighty patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders who were seeking outpatient treatment were randomized…

  20. [Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and cardiac computed tomography in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Barone-Rochette, G; Jankowski, A; Rodiere, M

    2014-11-01

    Technological advances have enabled the rapid development of cardiovascular imaging techniques. Cardiac computed tomography (CT) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have become diagnostic and prognostic tools for the management of patients in routine clinical practice. This review gives the main indications and describes the performance of both techniques. PMID:25023720

  1. Routine Quality Control of Clinical Nuclear Medicine Instrumentation: A Brief Review*

    PubMed Central

    Zanzonico, Pat

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews routine quality-control (QC) procedures for current nuclear medicine instrumentation, including the survey meter, dose calibrator, well counter, intraoperative probe, organ (“thyroid”) uptake probe, γ-camera, SPECT and SPECT/CT scanner, and PET and PET/CT scanner. It should be particularly useful for residents, fellows, and other trainees in nuclear medicine, nuclear cardiology, and radiology. The procedures described and their respective frequencies are presented only as general guidelines. PMID:18587088

  2. [FEES in the stroke unit: recommendations for implementation in the clinical routine].

    PubMed

    Dziewas, R; Busse, O; Glahn, J; Grond, M; Hamann, G F; Ickenstein, G W; Nabavi, D G; Prosiegel, M; Schäbitz, W-R; Schellinger, P D; Stanschus, S

    2013-06-01

    Dysphagia occurs in about 50 % of patients with acute stroke, is strongly related to early complications, such as aspiration pneumonia and is a major cause of increased morbidity and mortality in acute stroke. Flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) has proven to be an easy to use, non-invasive tool for assessment of dysphagia in acute stroke, significantly adding accuracy to the clinical evaluation of dysphagia. With respect to the growing use of FEES in German stroke units this article summarizes recommendations for implementation and execution.A 3-step process is recommended to acquire the relevant knowledge and skills for carrying out FEES. After a systematic training (first step), swallowing endoscopy should be done under close supervision (second step) which is then followed by independent practice coupled with indirect supervision (third step). In principle, FEES should adopt a team approach involving both neurologists and speech language pathologists (SLP) or alternatively speech therapists. The allocation of responsibilities between these two professions should be kept flexible and should be adjusted to the individual level of education. Reducing the role of the SLP to mere assistance work in particular should be avoided. To enhance interprofessional communication and to allow for a smooth and efficient workflow, endoscopic grading of stroke-related dysphagia should adopt a standardized score that also includes protective and rehabilitative measures as well as nutritional recommendations. A major task for the future is to develop an educational curriculum for FEES that takes the specific needs of stroke unit care into account and is applicable to both physicians and SLPs. PMID:23695003

  3. Mould Routine Identification in the Clinical Laboratory by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Cassagne, Carole; Ranque, Stéphane; Normand, Anne-Cécile; Fourquet, Patrick; Thiebault, Sandrine; Planard, Chantal; Hendrickx, Marijke; Piarroux, Renaud

    2011-01-01

    Background MALDI-TOF MS recently emerged as a valuable identification tool for bacteria and yeasts and revolutionized the daily clinical laboratory routine. But it has not been established for routine mould identification. This study aimed to validate a standardized procedure for MALDI-TOF MS-based mould identification in clinical laboratory. Materials and Methods First, pre-extraction and extraction procedures were optimized. With this standardized procedure, a 143 mould strains reference spectra library was built. Then, the mould isolates cultured from sequential clinical samples were prospectively subjected to this MALDI-TOF MS based-identification assay. MALDI-TOF MS-based identification was considered correct if it was concordant with the phenotypic identification; otherwise, the gold standard was DNA sequence comparison-based identification. Results The optimized procedure comprised a culture on sabouraud-gentamicin-chloramphenicol agar followed by a chemical extraction of the fungal colonies with formic acid and acetonitril. The identification was done using a reference database built with references from at least four culture replicates. For five months, 197 clinical isolates were analyzed; 20 were excluded because they were not identified at the species level. MALDI-TOF MS-based approach correctly identified 87% (154/177) of the isolates analyzed in a routine clinical laboratory activity. It failed in 12% (21/177), whose species were not represented in the reference library. MALDI-TOF MS-based identification was correct in 154 out of the remaining 156 isolates. One Beauveria bassiana was not identified and one Rhizopus oryzae was misidentified as Mucor circinelloides. Conclusions This work's seminal finding is that a standardized procedure can also be used for MALDI-TOF MS-based identification of a wide array of clinically relevant mould species. It thus makes it possible to identify moulds in the routine clinical laboratory setting and opens new avenues

  4. Binge eating disorder: from clinical research to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Goracci, Arianna; Casamassima, Francesco; Iovieno, Nadia; di Volo, Silvia; Benbow, Jim; Bolognesi, Simone; Fagiolini, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes the clinical course of a young woman suffering from binge eating disorder (BED) associated with obesity. It illustrates the efficacy of different medications in the treatment of BED and related conditions and is followed by the comments and clinical observations of 2 practicing psychiatrists. The issues described in this paper have important clinical implications and are topical, given that BED is now recognized as a specific disorder in the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition classification system, but neither the US Food and Drug Administration nor any other regulatory agency has yet approved a drug for treatment of this disease, despite its very prevalent and disabling nature. Growing evidence from the fields of psychopathology and neurobiology, including preclinical and clinical studies, converges to support the idea that "overeating" has much in common with other behavioral addictions, and substance abuse treatment agents may show promise for the treatment of BED. PMID:25629882

  5. An Opportunity to Bridge the Gap Between Clinical Research and Clinical Practice: Implications for Clinical Training

    PubMed Central

    Hershenberg, Rachel; Drabick, Deborah A. G.; Vivian, Dina

    2013-01-01

    Clinical researchers and clinical practitioners share a goal of increasing the integration of research and clinical practice, which is reflected in an evidence-based practice (EBP) approach to psychology. The EBP framework involves the integration of research findings with clinical expertise and client characteristics, values, and preferences, and consequently provides an important foundation for conducting clinically relevant research, as well as empirically based and clinically sensitive practice. Given the critical role that early training can play in the integration of science and practice and in promoting the future of the field, the present article addresses predoctoral training programs as a context for adopting an EBP approach to clinical work. We address training in the three components of EBP and provide suggestions for curriculum development and practicum training that we hope will contribute to bridging the gap between research and practice. PMID:22642520

  6. High-Resolution Manometry in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Pandolfino, John E.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution manometry (HRM) is the primary method used to evaluate esophageal motor function. Displayed and interpreted by esophageal pressure topography (EPT), HRM/ EPT provides a detailed assessment of esophageal function that is useful in the evaluation of patients with nonobstructive dysphagia and before foregut surgery. Esophageal motility diagnoses are determined systematically by applying objective metrics of esophageal sphincter and peristaltic function to the Chicago Classification of esophageal motility disorders. This article discusses HRM study, EPT interpretation, and the translation of EPT findings into clinical practice. Examples are provided to illustrate several clinical challenges. PMID:27118931

  7. Short QT Syndrome in Current Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Khera, Sahil; Jacobson, Jason T

    2016-01-01

    Short QT syndrome is a rare inherited autosomal dominant cardiac channelopathy associated with malignant ventricular and atrial arrhythmias. A shortened corrected QT interval is a marker for risk of malignant arrhythmias, which are secondary to increased transmural dispersion of repolarization. The underlying gain of function mutations in the potassium channels are most common but genetic testing remains low yield. This review discusses the cellular mechanisms, genetic involvement, clinical presentation, and current recommended management of patients with short QT syndrome relevant to current clinical practice. PMID:26440650

  8. The Influence of Race and Socioeconomic Status on Routine Screening Practices of Physician Assistants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collett, DeShana Ann

    2013-01-01

    Health disparities in minorities and those of low socioeconomic status persist despite efforts to eliminate potential causes. Differences in the delivery of services can result in different healthcare outcomes and therefore, a health disparity. Some of this difference in care may attribute to discrimination resulting from clinical biases and…

  9. Antianemic Treatment of Cancer Patients in German Routine Practice: Data from a Prospective Cohort Study—The Tumor Anemia Registry

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Tilman; Schröder, Jan; Plath, Margarete; Link, Hartmut; Vogt, Michèle; Frank, Melanie; Marschner, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this prospective cohort study was to assess current antianemic treatment of cancer patients in German routine practice, including diagnostics, treatments, and quality of life (QoL). 88 study sites recruited 1018 patients at the start of antianemic treatment with hemoglobin (Hb) levels <11 g/dL (females) or <12 g/dL (males). Patients were followed up for 12 weeks. 63% of the patients had inoperable solid tumors, 22% operable solid tumors, and 15% hematological malignancies. Over 85% received chemotherapy. Median age was 67 years; 48% were male. Red blood cell transfusions (RBCTx) were given to 59% of all patients and to 55% of the patients with Hb ≥8 g/dL on day 1 of the observation period (day 1 treatment). Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) were the second most frequently applied day 1 treatment (20%), followed by intravenous (IV) iron (15%) and ESA + IV iron (6%). Only about a third of patients were tested for blood serum iron parameters at the start of treatment. Overall, more than half of the patients had long-term responses to antianemic therapy. Our data suggest that in routine practice diagnostics for treatable causes of anemia are underused. A high proportion of cancer patients receive RBCTx. It should be discussed whether thorough diagnostics and earlier intervention could decrease the need for RBCTx. This trial is registered with NCT01795690. PMID:26966573

  10. Antianemic Treatment of Cancer Patients in German Routine Practice: Data from a Prospective Cohort Study-The Tumor Anemia Registry.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Tilman; Schröder, Jan; Plath, Margarete; Link, Hartmut; Vogt, Michèle; Frank, Melanie; Marschner, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this prospective cohort study was to assess current antianemic treatment of cancer patients in German routine practice, including diagnostics, treatments, and quality of life (QoL). 88 study sites recruited 1018 patients at the start of antianemic treatment with hemoglobin (Hb) levels <11 g/dL (females) or <12 g/dL (males). Patients were followed up for 12 weeks. 63% of the patients had inoperable solid tumors, 22% operable solid tumors, and 15% hematological malignancies. Over 85% received chemotherapy. Median age was 67 years; 48% were male. Red blood cell transfusions (RBCTx) were given to 59% of all patients and to 55% of the patients with Hb ≥8 g/dL on day 1 of the observation period (day 1 treatment). Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) were the second most frequently applied day 1 treatment (20%), followed by intravenous (IV) iron (15%) and ESA + IV iron (6%). Only about a third of patients were tested for blood serum iron parameters at the start of treatment. Overall, more than half of the patients had long-term responses to antianemic therapy. Our data suggest that in routine practice diagnostics for treatable causes of anemia are underused. A high proportion of cancer patients receive RBCTx. It should be discussed whether thorough diagnostics and earlier intervention could decrease the need for RBCTx. This trial is registered with NCT01795690. PMID:26966573

  11. Clinical practice guidelines for dementia in Australia.

    PubMed

    Laver, Kate; Cumming, Robert G; Dyer, Suzanne M; Agar, Meera R; Anstey, Kaarin J; Beattie, Elizabeth; Brodaty, Henry; Broe, Tony; Clemson, Lindy; Crotty, Maria; Dietz, Margaret; Draper, Brian M; Flicker, Leon; Friel, Margeret; Heuzenroeder, Louise Mary; Koch, Susan; Kurrle, Susan; Nay, Rhonda; Pond, C Dimity; Thompson, Jane; Santalucia, Yvonne; Whitehead, Craig; Yates, Mark W

    2016-03-21

    About 9% of Australians aged 65 years and over have a diagnosis of dementia. Clinical practice guidelines aim to enhance research translation by synthesising recent evidence for health and aged care professionals. New clinical practice guidelines and principles of care for people with dementia detail the optimal diagnosis and management in community, residential and hospital settings. The guidelines have been approved by the National Health and Medical Research Council. The guidelines emphasise timely diagnosis; living well with dementia and delaying functional decline; managing symptoms through training staff in how to provide person-centred care and using non-pharmacological approaches in the first instance; and training and supporting families and carers to provide care. PMID:26985848

  12. Clinical Question: Does Medical Evidence Support Routine Oronasopharyngeal Suction at Delivery?

    PubMed

    Evans, M Blake; Po, William D

    2016-01-01

    Oronasopharyngeal suction (ONPS) is regularly performed in neonates at delivery in many hospitals across the country today. Although ONPS is a technique that has essentially become habitual for most obstetricians, its theorized usefulness to help promote expeditious lung aeration after delivery by removal of amniotic fluid, meconium, mucus and blood that may otherwise be aspirated by the newborn, is currently not recommended. ONPS can cause vagal stimulation-induced bradycardia and thus hypercapnea, iatrogenic infection due to mucous membrane injury, and development of subsequent neonatal brain injury due to changes in cerebral blood flow regulation, particularly in premature infants. Multiple studies that have been performed comparing routine use of ONPS to no intervention controls indicate that newborns receiving ONPS took a longer time to achieve normal oxygen saturations, caused apneic episodes, and caused disturbances in heart rate (mainly bradycardia) compared to the control groups. Although the ONPS groups revealed no significantly different APGAR scores at 1 and 5 minutes, the ONPS groups took longer than the control group to reach an arterial oxygen saturation greater than or equal to 92% in the first minutes of life. Currently, Neonatal Resuscitation Program guidelines discourage the use of or meconium-stained amniotic fluid and in the absence of obvious obstruction. Furthermore, this manuscript highlights various literature sources revealing that the routine use of ONPS at the time of delivery can cause more harm than good, if any good at all. PMID:27328554

  13. Concordance between Clinical Practice and Published Evidence: Findings from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Wynne E.; Funkhouser, Ellen; Makhija, Sonia K.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Bader, James D.; Rindal, D. Brad; Pihlstrom, Daniel J.; Hilton, Thomas J.; Frantsve-Hawley, Julie; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Documenting the gap between what is occurring in clinical practice and what published research suggests is an important step toward improving care. This study quantified concordance between clinical practice and published evidence across preventive, diagnostic and treatment procedures among a sample of dentists in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network. Methods. Network dentists completed one questionnaire about their demographic characteristics and another about how they treat patients across 12 scenarios/clinical practice behaviors. Responses to each clinical practice were coded as consistent (i.e., ‘1’) or inconsistent (i.e., ‘0’) with published evidence, summed, and divided by the number of all non-missing to create an overall ‘concordance’ score, calculated as the mean percent of responses that were consistent with published evidence. Results. Analyses were limited to participants in the United States (N = 591). Mean concordance at the practitioner level was 62% (SD = 18); procedure-specific concordance ranged from 8-100%. Affiliation with a large group practice, being a female practitioner, and receiving a dental degree before 1990 were independently associated with high concordance (≥75%). Conclusions. Dentists reported a medium-range concordance between practice and evidence. Clinical Implications. Efforts to bring research findings into routine practice are needed. PMID:24379327

  14. High-sensitivity cardiac troponin testing in routine practice: economic and organizational advantages.

    PubMed

    Galli, Claudio; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    Very seldom, if ever, a single laboratory test has provided such a paradigm shift in the managed care as cardiac troponin (cTn) testing. More than twenty years of improvements in test design and analytical features have contributed to revolutionize the clinical recommendations and guidelines, and the diagnosis of myocardial infarction (MI) is now highly dependent upon the kinetics of cTn within a suggestive clinical setting. Despite the advent of high-sensitivity cTn (HS-cTn) immunoassays has allowed a more accurate and timely diagnosis as well as a higher prognostic accuracy, the focus is now shifting on the most suitable algorithms and on a comprehensive approach to the clinical management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). In this article we aim to discuss the implications of HS-cTn testing for ruling out and ruling in ACS. In the latter instance, main improvements are related to ACS diagnosis in women, in whom this pathology is still often underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed. A quick and accurate rule out will also regarded as a great advantage from both an organizational and economic standpoint. The advantages that will stem from this new approach have been recently assessed, and shortening of repeated testing 1 or 2 h from conventional algorithms entailing blood sampling at 3 and 6 h seems attainable. The larger benefits will definitely occur in clinical settings where the actual diagnosis rate of MI among patients with suspect ACS is lower and, consequently, the negative predictive value (NPV) of HS-cTn is the highest. PMID:27500158

  15. High-sensitivity cardiac troponin testing in routine practice: economic and organizational advantages

    PubMed Central

    Lippi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Very seldom, if ever, a single laboratory test has provided such a paradigm shift in the managed care as cardiac troponin (cTn) testing. More than twenty years of improvements in test design and analytical features have contributed to revolutionize the clinical recommendations and guidelines, and the diagnosis of myocardial infarction (MI) is now highly dependent upon the kinetics of cTn within a suggestive clinical setting. Despite the advent of high-sensitivity cTn (HS-cTn) immunoassays has allowed a more accurate and timely diagnosis as well as a higher prognostic accuracy, the focus is now shifting on the most suitable algorithms and on a comprehensive approach to the clinical management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). In this article we aim to discuss the implications of HS-cTn testing for ruling out and ruling in ACS. In the latter instance, main improvements are related to ACS diagnosis in women, in whom this pathology is still often underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed. A quick and accurate rule out will also regarded as a great advantage from both an organizational and economic standpoint. The advantages that will stem from this new approach have been recently assessed, and shortening of repeated testing 1 or 2 h from conventional algorithms entailing blood sampling at 3 and 6 h seems attainable. The larger benefits will definitely occur in clinical settings where the actual diagnosis rate of MI among patients with suspect ACS is lower and, consequently, the negative predictive value (NPV) of HS-cTn is the highest. PMID:27500158

  16. Review of clinical medicine and religious practice.

    PubMed

    Stewart, William C; Adams, Michelle P; Stewart, Jeanette A; Nelson, Lindsay A

    2013-03-01

    The purpose was to evaluate faith-based studies within the medical literature to determine whether there are ways to help physicians understand how religion affects patients’ lives and diseases. We reviewed articles that assessed the influence of religious practices on medicine as a primary or secondary variable in clinical practice. This review evaluated 49 articles and found that religious faith is important to many patients, particularly those with serious disease, and patients depend on it as a positive coping mechanism. The findings of this review can suggest that patients frequently practice religion and interact with God about their disease state. This spiritual interaction may benefit the patient by providing comfort, increasing knowledge about their disease, greater treatment adherence, and quality of life. The results of prayer on specific disease states appear inconsistent with cardiovascular disease but stronger in other disease states. PMID:23484213

  17. Clinical practice: between Aristotle and Cochrane.

    PubMed

    Fugelli, P

    1998-02-01

    Health and disease consist of amino acids and self image, cell membranes and human ideals, muscles and politics. Only to a limited extent can clinical practice be based on science. It can never be carried on in isolation from political, and cultural forces that influence patients' health behaviour. Evidence-based medicine is essential but not sufficient. A continuous relationship with patients is a conditio sine qua non for general practice. The general practitioner must be a master of pragmatic medicine. Rationality, the dominant modern trend, may be dangerous for patients and doctors: (1) advances in technology can give patients and doctors the illusion of mastering the universe; (2) patients complain of being treated like biomachines, without human touch. Another symptom of modernity is the decline of religion. But patients and doctors are by no means rational beings. God, destiny and hope are replaced by modern medico-scientific megalomania. Modern medicine is also strongly influenced by commercialization and invasion by bureaucrats. Instead of becoming a biomedical robot, the general practitioner must learn to value the Aristotelian concept of phronesis. It means practical wisdom and can only be gained by personal experience; a form of learning by doing. Good clinical practice cannot come from science alone, or from personal experience alone. It is an amalgam of scientia and phronesis. PMID:9540138

  18. Mismatch repair deficiency testing in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Buza, Natalia; Ziai, James; Hui, Pei

    2016-05-01

    Lynch syndrome, an autosomal dominant inherited disorder, is caused by inactivating mutations involving DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. This leads to profound genetic instability, including microsatellite instability (MSI) and increased risk for cancer development, particularly colon and endometrial malignancies. Clinical testing of tumor tissues for the presence of MMR gene deficiency is standard practice in clinical oncology, with immunohistochemistry and PCR-based microsatellite instability analysis used as screening tests to identify potential Lynch syndrome families. The ultimate diagnosis of Lynch syndrome requires documentation of mutation within one of the four MMR genes (MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and MSH6) or EPCAM, currently achieved by comprehensive sequencing analysis of germline DNA. In this review, the genetic basis of Lynch syndrome, methodologies of MMR deficiency testing, and current diagnostic algorithms in the clinical management of Lynch syndrome, are discussed. PMID:26895074

  19. The Turning Point Social Marketing National Excellence Collaborative: integrating social marketing into routine public health practice.

    PubMed

    Pirani, Sylvia; Reizes, Tom

    2005-01-01

    Social marketing can be an effective tool for achieving public health goals. Social marketing uses concepts from commercial marketing to plan and implement programs designed to bring about behavior change that will benefit individuals and society. Although social marketing principles have been used to address public health problems, efforts have been dominated by message-based, promotion-only strategies, and effective implementation has been hampered by both lack of understanding of and use of all of the components of a social marketing approach and lack of training. The Turning Point initiative's Social Marketing National Excellence Collaborative (SMNEC) was established to promote social marketing principles and practices to improve public health across the nation. After 4 years, the Collaborative's work has resulted in improved understanding of social marketing among participating members and the development of new tools to strengthen the social marketing skills among public health practitioners. The Collaborative has also made advances in incorporating and institutionalizing the practice of social marketing within public health in participating states. PMID:15711443

  20. The use of risk sharing tools for post adoption surveillance of a non pharmacological technology in routine practice: results after one year

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To report results obtained by combining risk sharing tools with post-adoption surveillance mechanisms in order to control quality of care and implement a value-based reimbursement scheme for Neuro-reflexotherapy (NRT), a non-pharmacological treatment proven effective for neck pain (NP), thoracic pain (TP) and low back pain (LBP). Methods Pre-post prospective cohort study in routine clinical practice, carried out in primary care centers in the Spanish National Health Service in the Balearic Islands (Ib-Salut). Eight-hundred and seventy-one subacute and chronic NP, TP and LBP patients treated in Ib-Salut, who underwent NRT during 2011. A shared risk contract (SRC) was developed, where payments for NRT were linked to results on patients’ clinical evolution, reduction in medication and proportion of patients undergoing spinal surgery. Main outcome measures were local pain (NP, TP or LBP), referred pain, LBP-related disability and NP-related disability, measured using previously validated instruments at referral and 3 months later, use of medication assessed at referral and discharge, and rates of spinal surgery prescription after undergoing NRT. Results Median improvements at discharge corresponded to 57.1% of baseline value for local pain, 75.0% for referred pain, 53.8% for LBP-related disability and 45.0% for NP-related disability. Patients taking medication at discharge represented 29.0% of those taking it at referral. The proportion of patients in whom spinal surgery was prescribed after undergoing NRT was 0%. These results were consistent with those from previous randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and studies in routine practice, and complied with the standards set in the SRC. Conclusions It is feasible and effective to enhance post adoption surveillance methods with risk sharing tools to improve quality control and support value-based reimbursement decisions for NRT. The feasibility of generalising this approach to other settings and to other non

  1. Obstetrics in a Time of Violence: Mexican Midwives Critique Routine Hospital Practices.

    PubMed

    Zacher Dixon, Lydia

    2015-12-01

    Mexican midwives have long taken part in a broader Latin American trend to promote "humanized birth" as an alternative to medicalized interventions in hospital obstetrics. As midwives begin to regain authority in reproductive health and work within hospital units, they come to see the issue not as one of mere medicalization but of violence and violation. Based on ethnographic fieldwork with midwives from across Mexico during a time of widespread social violence, my research examines an emergent critique of hospital birth as a site of what is being called violencia obstétrica (obstetric violence). In this critique, women are discussed as victims of explicit abuse by hospital staff and by the broader health care infrastructures. By reframing obstetric practices as violent-as opposed to medicalized-these midwives seek to situate their concerns about women's health care in Mexico within broader regional discussions about violence, gender, and inequality. PMID:25411151

  2. Effects of probiotic supplementation over 5 months on routine haematology and clinical chemistry measures in healthy active adults.

    PubMed

    Cox, A J; West, N P; Horn, P L; Lehtinen, M J; Koerbin, G; Pyne, D B; Lahtinen, S J; Fricker, P A; Cripps, A W

    2014-11-01

    Use of probiotic-containing foods and probiotic supplements is increasing; however, few studies document safety and tolerability in conjunction with defined clinical end points. This paper reports the effects of 150 days of supplementation with either a single- (Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl-04) or a double-strain (Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bi-07) probiotic on routine haematology and clinical chemistry measures in healthy active adults. Pre- to post-intervention changes in laboratory measures were determined and compared between supplement and placebo groups. Overall there were few differences in routine haematology and clinical chemistry measures between supplement and placebo groups post-intervention. Exceptions included plasma calcium (P=0.03) and urea (P=0.015); however, observed changes were small and within assay-specific laboratory reference ranges. These data provide evidence supporting the use of these probiotic supplements over a period of 5 months in healthy active adults without obvious safety or tolerability issues. PMID:25052229

  3. Diagnostic Methods for Bile Acid Malabsorption in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Vijayvargiya, Priya; Camilleri, Michael; Shin, Andrea; Saenger, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Altered bile acid (BA) concentrations in the colon may cause diarrhea or constipation. BA malabsorption (BAM) accounts for >25% of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea and chronic diarrhea in Western countries. As BAM is increasingly recognized, proper diagnostic methods are desired in clinical practice to help direct the most effective treatment course for the chronic bowel dysfunction. This review appraises the methodology, advantages and disadvantages of 4 tools that directly measure BAM: 14C-glycocholate breath and stool test, 75Selenium HomotauroCholic Acid Test (SeHCAT), 7 α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) and fecal BAs. 14C-glycocholate is a laborious test no longer widely utilized. 75SeHCAT is validated, but not available in the United States. Serum C4 is a simple, accurate method that is applicable to a majority of patients, but requires further clinical validation. Fecal measurements to quantify total and individual fecal BAs are technically cumbersome and not widely available. Regrettably, none of these tests are routinely available in the U.S., and a therapeutic trial with a BA binder is used as a surrogate for diagnosis of BAM. Recent data suggest there is an advantage to studying fecal excretion of the individual BAs and their role in BAM; this may constitute a significant advantage of the fecal BA method over the other tests. Fecal BA test could become a routine addition to fecal fat measurement in patients with unexplained diarrhea. In summary, availability determines the choice of test among C4, SeHCAT and fecal BA; more widespread availability of such tests would enhance clinical management of these patients. PMID:23644387

  4. Effectiveness and efficiency in clinical orthodontic practice.

    PubMed

    Rinchuse, Daniel J; Cozzani, Mauro

    2015-12-01

    Proffitt et al. have described "effectiveness and efficiency" (E&E) as achieving desired results without wasting the orthodontist's and patients' time. In 1972, Archibald Cochrane published a monograph entitled "Effectiveness and Efficiency," which challenged the medical community to use medical protocols that were evidence-based. As a possible starting point for E&E, the orthodontist could consider an "Evidence-based clinical practice" (EBCP) model, which integrates the best research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values. This model considers scientific or evidence-based orthodontics (EBO) together with patient preferences and patient autonomy, clinical or patient circumstances, and clinical experience and judgment. In this paper, therefore, E&E will be discussed from an EBCP perspective which, for our purposes, includes relevant evidence but also our clinical experience and rationale. We will discuss: wire sequence; NiTi Wire types; space closure by sliding; canine retraction versus en masse retraction, 18" slot versus 22" slot, the Bidimensional System; self-ligating brackets (SL); vertical slot; economic aspects. PMID:26527490

  5. Why use automated office blood pressure measurements in clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Andreadis, Emmanuel A; Angelopoulos, Epameinondas T; Agaliotis, Gerasimos D; Tsakanikas, Athanasios P; Mousoulis, George P

    2011-09-01

    Automated office blood pressure (AOBP) measurement with the patient resting alone in a quiet examining room can eliminate the white-coat effect associated with conventional readings taken by manual sphygmomanometer. The key to reducing the white-coat response appears to be multiple blood pressure (BP) readings taken in a non-observer office setting, thus eliminating any interaction that could provoke an office-induced increase in BP. Furthermore, AOBP readings have shown a higher correlation with the mean awake ambulatory BP compared with BP readings recorded in routine clinical practice. Although there is a paucity of studies connecting AOBP with organ damage, AOBP values were recently found to be equally associated with left ventricular mass index as those of ambulatory BP. This concludes that in contrast to routine manual office BP, AOBP readings compare favourably with 24-hour ambulatory BP measurements in the appraisal of cardiac remodelling and, as such, could be complementary to ambulatory readings in a way similar to home BP measurements. PMID:21950780

  6. Role modeling excellence in clinical nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Perry, R N Beth

    2009-01-01

    Role modeling excellence in clinical nursing practice is the focus of this paper. The phenomenological research study reported involved a group of 8 nurses identified by their colleagues as exemplary. The major theme revealed in this study was that these exemplary nurses were also excellent role models in the clinical setting. This paper details approaches used by these nurses that made them excellent role models. Specifically, the themes of attending to the little things, making connections, maintaining a light-hearted attitude, modeling, and affirming others are presented. These themes are discussed within the framework of Watson [Watson, J., 1989. Human caring and suffering: a subjective model for health services. In: Watson, J., Taylor, R. (Eds.), They Shall Not Hurt: Human Suffering and Human Caring. Colorado University, Boulder, CO] "transpersonal caring" and [Bandura, A., 1997. Social Learning Theory. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ] "Social Learning Theory." Particular emphasis in the discussion is on how positive role modeling by exemplary practitioners can contribute to the education of clinical nurses in the practice setting. PMID:18590978

  7. Narrative medicine in clinical genetics practice.

    PubMed

    Nowaczyk, Małgorzata J M

    2012-08-01

    Over the last 30 years medicine has undergone a significant paradigm shift. Due to the tremendous advances of modern medicine more and more people are living longer with their illnesses. These people have stories to tell, and they want these stories to be heard: They are reclaiming their voices. As clinical geneticists we need to hear what these voices are telling us, especially so in our area of clinical care where cures are rare, and disease states can be permanent. Narrative medicine is an important new skill set that hones abilities to do just that.This article highlights how integral narrative medicine is to clinical genetics practice, how geneticists already employ many of its tools and how they practice it diligently every day. I will show how geneticists can further improve their abilities to hear and honor patients' stories by writing and sharing stories with patients and with each other as doctors, counselors, and nurses, social workers and chaplains. The review presents the skills of close reading and how they improve patient care and illustrates how geneticists can, by using reflective writing, reshape their emotions in order to understand them, to let them go, and to make room for more. It presents the major types of illness narratives whose recognition allows us to hear and understand patients' stories. When used, the tools of narrative medicine can result in better patient care. PMID:22753050

  8. Is rapid antibacterial susceptibility testing medium reliable for routine laboratory practices?

    PubMed Central

    Yagmur, Gulhan; Ercal, Baris Derya; Mengeloglu, Zafer; Sariguzel, Fatma Mutlu; Berk, Elife; Saglam, Derya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Early detection of antibiotic susceptibility profile of the isolates has critical importance in terms of immediate beginning of the appropriate treatment and increasing of treatment success, such as meningitis, bacteriemia and sepsis. In the present study, it was aimed to compare the antibiotic susceptibility results of Quicolor (Salubris Inc., Massachusetts, USA) and standard disk diffusion method. Methods: One hundred twenty three isolates were included in this study (80 Enterobacteriaceae, 15 Staphylococci and 28 nonfermentative Gram-negative bacteria). Antibiotic susceptibility in clinical isolates was evaluated using Mueller-Hinton (MH) agar and Quicolor (ES and NF) agar plates. Results: For Enterobacteriaceae, frequency of total concordance, major error, and minor error between the tests were found as 96.8%, 0.8%, and 2.4%, respectively. For Staphylococci, frequency of total concordance, major error, and minor error among the tests were found as 95.7%, 3.5%, and 0.8%, respectively. For non fermentative bacteria, frequency of total concordance, major error, and minor error among the tests were found as 83.9%, 9.6%, and 6.4%, respectively. Conclusions: Quicolor media provided reliable susceptibility results in enteric bacteria and Staphylococci. However, further studies including higher number of nonfermentative bacteria are required to determine whether the chromogenic media are appropriate for this group of bacteria. PMID:26101489

  9. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator clinic casualties: inadvertent reprogramming during routine implantable cardioverter defibrillator follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ozahowski, T P; Greenberg, M L; Mock, P; Holzberger, P T; Gerling, B; Zalinger, C; Perry, C

    1996-10-01

    On one occasion during a busy ICD follow-up clinic, the preceding patient's parameters for rate, PDF, and delay were inadvertently programmed into the subsequent patient's generator using the CPI Programmer Model 2035. This occurred after capacitor reformation, without pressing the "Program" button. The source of this reprogramming error was failure to clear the programmer memory of the previous patient's data, usually achieved by turning the programmer off between patients (or selecting "New Patient" from the menu). At our next ICD follow-up clinic, we purposely did not turn off the programmer between two sets of patients. On both occasions the above finding was repeated and confirmed. These observations indicate the potential for serious reprogramming errors that can occur simply by not clearing the programmer's memory between clinic patients. PMID:8904549

  10. ‘Indirect’ challenges from science to clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Sandra D.

    2016-01-01

    Indirect challenges act to provoke bronchoconstriction by causing the release of endogenous mediators and are used to identify airway hyper-responsiveness. This paper reviews the historical development of challenges, with exercise, eucapnic voluntary hyperpnoea (EVH) of dry air, wet hypertonic saline, and with dry powder mannitol, that preceded their use in clinical practice. The first challenge developed for clinical use was exercise. Physicians were keen for a standardized test to identify exercise-induced asthma (EIA) and to assess the effect of drugs such as disodium cromoglycate. EVH with dry air became a surrogate for exercise to increase ventilation to very high levels. A simple test was developed with EVH and used to identify EIA in defence force recruits and later in elite athletes. The research findings with different conditions of inspired air led to the conclusion that loss of water by evaporation from the airway surface was the stimulus to EIA. The proposal that water loss caused a transient increase in osmolarity led to the development of the hypertonic saline challenge. The wet aerosol challenge with 4.5% saline, provided a known osmotic stimulus, to which most asthmatics were sensitive. To simplify the osmotic challenge, a dry powder of mannitol was specially prepared and encapsulated. The test pack with different doses and an inhaler provided a common operating procedure that could be used at the point of care. All these challenge tests have a high specificity to identify currently active asthma. All have been used to assess the benefit of treatment with inhaled corticosteroids. Over the 50 years, the methods for testing became safer, less complex, and less expensive and all used forced expiratory volume in 1 sec to measure the response. Thus, they became practical to use routinely and were recommended in guidelines for use in clinical practice. PMID:26908255

  11. Comparative efficacy evaluation of disinfectants routinely used in hospital practice: India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Malkit; Sharma, Rahul; Gupta, Pramod K; Rana, Jatinder K; Sharma, Meera; Taneja, Neelam

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare practically achieved disinfection efficacy of some locally available disinfectants on surfaces and infectious microbiological hospital waste. Materials and Methods: Seven disinfectants were tested at concentrations recommended by manufacturers on rough and smooth surfaces that were contaminated experimentally by locally circulating isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, standard isolate of Salmonella typhi and Candida albicans. Reduction in microbial counts before and after surface disinfection was expressed as log reduction. A very heavy microbial waste load was simulated by immersing culture plates with heavy microbial growth in disinfectants. Daily, a sample of disinfectant was taken and subjected to in-use test. Results: The highest average log reduction of test microbes on the rough surface was given by DesNet (5.05) and Bacillocid special (5.02). A comparable average log reduction of test microbes on a smooth steel surface was noted (5.68, 5.67, 5.50) for Lysol, Bacillocid sp. and DesNet, respectively. In the discard jars, Bacillocid special worked satisfactorily for 4 days, DesNet for 3 days and Hi-giene Germitol for 1 day. The remainder of the disinfectants failed in the in-use test on Day 1. Phenolics, although widely used in our settings, may not be as good surface disinfectants as newer formulations like DesNet and Bacillocid special. Conclusions: Newer quaternary ammonium compounds and aldehyde formulations were found to be the best disinfectants for disinfection of heavy contamination. PMID:23188950

  12. Primary health care staff’s opinions about changing routines in practice: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In health care organizations, there is a mutual interest from politicians, managers, practitioners and patients that the best available care is provided. Efforts are made to translate new knowledge and evidence-based practices into routine care, but there are a number of obstacles to this translation process. Factors related to the new practice as well as factors related to the implementation process are important, but there is still a knowledge gap regarding how to achieve effective implementation. The aim of the present study was to assess opinions about practice change among staff in primary health care (PHC), focusing on factors related to a new practice and factors related to the implementation process. Methods A questionnaire was sent to 470 staff members at 22 PHC centres where a new tool for lifestyle intervention had recently been implemented. Thirteen items regarding the characteristics of the new practice and nine items regarding the implementation process were to be judged from not at all important to very important. A factor analysis was performed, and statistical analysis was done using the Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test. Results Four factors regarding the characteristics of the new practice were identified. Most important was Objective characteristics, followed by Evidence base, Subjectively judged characteristics and Organizational level characteristics. Two factors were identified regarding the implementation process: Bottom-up strategies were judged most important and Top-down strategies less important. The most important single items regarding characteristics were “easy to use” and “respects patient privacy”, and the most important implementation process item was “information about the new practice”. Nurses differed most from the other professionals, and judged the factors Evidence base and Organizational level characteristics more important than the others. Staff with more than 10 years experience in their profession

  13. Litigations and the Obstetrician in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Adinma, JIB

    2016-01-01

    The expectation of obstetrics is a perfect outcome. Obstetrics malpractice can cause morbidity and mortality that may engender litigation. Globally, increasing trend to litigation in obstetrics practice has resulted in high indemnity cost to the obstetrician with consequent frustration and overall danger to the future of obstetrics practice. The objective was to review litigations and the Obstetrician in Clinical Practice, highlighting medical ethics, federation of gynecology and obstetrics (FIGO’s) ethical responsibility guideline on women's sexual and reproductive health and right; examine the relationship between medical ethics and medical laws; X-ray medical negligence and litigable obstetrics malpractices; and make recommendation towards the improvement of obstetrics practices to avert misconduct that would lead to litigation. Review involves a literature search on the internet in relevant journals, textbooks, and monographs. Knowledge and application of medical ethics are important to the obstetricians to avert medical negligence that will lead to litigation. A medical negligence can occur in any of the three triads of medicare viz: Diagnosis, advice/counseling, and treatment. Lawsuits in obstetrics generally center on errors of omission or commission especially in relation to the failure to perform caesarean section or to perform the operation early enough. Fear of litigation, high indemnity cost, and long working hours are among the main reasons given by obstetricians for ceasing obstetrics practice. Increasing global trend in litigation with high indemnity cost to the obstetrician is likely to jeopardize the future of obstetrics care especially in countries without medical insurance coverage for health practitioners. Litigation in obstetrics can be prevented through the Obstetrician's mindfulness of its possibility; acquainting themselves of the medical laws and guidelines related to their practice; ensuring adequate communication with, and consent of

  14. Litigations and the Obstetrician in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Adinma, Jib

    2016-01-01

    The expectation of obstetrics is a perfect outcome. Obstetrics malpractice can cause morbidity and mortality that may engender litigation. Globally, increasing trend to litigation in obstetrics practice has resulted in high indemnity cost to the obstetrician with consequent frustration and overall danger to the future of obstetrics practice. The objective was to review litigations and the Obstetrician in Clinical Practice, highlighting medical ethics, federation of gynecology and obstetrics (FIGO's) ethical responsibility guideline on women's sexual and reproductive health and right; examine the relationship between medical ethics and medical laws; X-ray medical negligence and litigable obstetrics malpractices; and make recommendation towards the improvement of obstetrics practices to avert misconduct that would lead to litigation. Review involves a literature search on the internet in relevant journals, textbooks, and monographs. Knowledge and application of medical ethics are important to the obstetricians to avert medical negligence that will lead to litigation. A medical negligence can occur in any of the three triads of medicare viz: Diagnosis, advice/counseling, and treatment. Lawsuits in obstetrics generally center on errors of omission or commission especially in relation to the failure to perform caesarean section or to perform the operation early enough. Fear of litigation, high indemnity cost, and long working hours are among the main reasons given by obstetricians for ceasing obstetrics practice. Increasing global trend in litigation with high indemnity cost to the obstetrician is likely to jeopardize the future of obstetrics care especially in countries without medical insurance coverage for health practitioners. Litigation in obstetrics can be prevented through the Obstetrician's mindfulness of its possibility; acquainting themselves of the medical laws and guidelines related to their practice; ensuring adequate communication with, and consent of

  15. Timing of Therapies in the Multidisciplinary Treatment of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: Available Evidence and Implications for Routine Practice.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, Francesco; Chau, Ian

    2016-07-01

    A multimodality disciplinary approach is paramount for the management of locally advanced rectal cancer. Over the last decade, (chemo)radiotherapy followed by surgery plus or minus adjuvant chemotherapy has represented the mainstay of treatment for this disease. Nevertheless, robust evidence suggesting the optimal timing and sequence of therapies in this setting has been overall limited. A number of questions are still unsolved including the length of the interval between neoadjuvant radiotherapy and surgery or the timing of systemic chemotherapy. Interestingly, emerging data support the contention that altering sequence or timing or both of the components of this multimodality approach may provide an opportunity to implement treatment strategies that far better address the risk and expectations of individual patients. In this article, we review the available evidence on timing of therapies in the multidisciplinary treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer and discuss the potential implications for routine practice that may derive from a change of the currently accepted treatment paradigm. PMID:27238468

  16. Sleep problems in general practice: a national survey of assessment and treatment routines of general practitioners in Norway.

    PubMed

    Sivertsen, Børge; Nordhus, Inger H; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Pallesen, Ståle

    2010-03-01

    The aim of the current national survey of all general practitioners (GPs) practising in Norway was to explore assessment, treatment practice and perceived efficacy of treatment of sleep problems in general practice. A short questionnaire, including self-report measures of the frequency and routines of treatment and assessment of sleep problems, was sent to all 4049 GPs in Norway, of whom 1465 (36.7%) provided valid responses. The prevalence of sleep problems among patients in general practice was estimated to be 11.2%, of which almost two-thirds were believed to be caused by a medical condition. Anamnestic information and blood tests were the most common assessment of sleep problems, whereas GPs rarely referred patients to all-night polysomnographic recording. Sleep hygiene advices were the most commonly used treatment strategy, whereas hypnotics were believed to have the best short-term efficacy. Antidepressives were considered to be the best option for long-term management of sleep problems. About one-third of the patients were prescribed benzodiazepines or 'Z-drugs' for more than 6 months. This study demonstrates that sleep problems are recognized by GPs, but despite evidence that non-pharmacological treatment is superior in the long-term management of insomnia, the current study shows that hypnotics are still considered by GPs to be the most successful treatment. PMID:19732316

  17. Accuracy and Robustness Improvements of Echocardiographic Particle Image Velocimetry for Routine Clinical Cardiac Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Brett; Vlachos, Pavlos; Charonko, John; Giarra, Matthew; Goergen, Craig

    2015-11-01

    Echo Particle Image Velocimetry (echoPIV) is a recent development in flow visualization that provides improved spatial resolution with high temporal resolution in cardiac flow measurement. Despite increased interest a limited number of published echoPIV studies are clinical, demonstrating that the method is not broadly accepted within the medical community. This is due to the fact that use of contrast agents are typically reserved for subjects whose initial evaluation produced very low quality recordings. Thus high background noise and low contrast levels characterize most scans, which hinders echoPIV from producing accurate measurements. To achieve clinical acceptance it is necessary to develop processing strategies that improve accuracy and robustness. We hypothesize that using a short-time moving window ensemble (MWE) correlation can improve echoPIV flow measurements on low image quality clinical scans. To explore the potential of the short-time MWE correlation, evaluation of artificial ultrasound images was performed. Subsequently, a clinical cohort of patients with diastolic dysfunction was evaluated. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons between echoPIV measurements and Color M-mode scans were carried out to assess the improvements delivered by the proposed methodology.

  18. The Sherlock Holmes method in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Sopeña, B

    2014-04-01

    This article lists the integral elements of the Sherlock Holmes method, which is based on the intelligent collection of information through detailed observation, careful listening and thorough examination. The information thus obtained is analyzed to develop the main and alternative hypotheses, which are shaped during the deductive process until the key leading to the solution is revealed. The Holmes investigative method applied to clinical practice highlights the advisability of having physicians reason through and seek out the causes of the disease with the data obtained from acute observation, a detailed review of the medical history and careful physical examination. PMID:24457141

  19. GLUT1 deficiency syndrome in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Klepper, Joerg

    2012-07-01

    GLUT1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1DS) is caused by impaired glucose transport into brain and is effectively treated by means of a ketogenic diet. In clinical practice the diagnosis of GLUT1DS often is challenging due to the increasing complexity of symptoms, diagnostic cut-offs for hypoglycorrhachia and genetic heterogeneity. In terms of treatment alternative ketogenic diets and their long-term side effects as well as novel compounds such as alpha-lipoic acid and triheptanoin have raised a variety of issues. The current diagnostic and therapeutic approach to GLUT1DS is discussed in this review in view of these recent developments. PMID:21382692

  20. Advanced clinical insights & practice: ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Benner, Randall W; Zavarella, Matthew S

    2008-03-01

    This issue sees the debut of a new series of continuing education articles. The series, Advanced Clinical Insights & Practice, is designed to provide continuing education to an ever-expanding realm of paramedicine that needs more of it: the critical care transport paramedic. Secondly, and equally important, are the benefits that can be reaped by other certification levels reading this feature. For EMT-Basics and Intermediates, it will provide a great enhancement to your core knowledge, although most of the interventions discussed will be beyond your traditional scope. For paramedics, it will augment both your pathophysiological understanding and clinical assessment/management skills of diseases and injuries discussed. Ultimately though, it is hoped that anyone who reads these articles will become a better clinician. The next article will appear in the July issue. PMID:18814637

  1. Biosensors in Clinical Practice: Focus on Oncohematology

    PubMed Central

    Fracchiolla, Nicola S.; Artuso, Silvia; Cortelezzi, Agostino

    2013-01-01

    Biosensors are devices that are capable of detecting specific biological analytes and converting their presence or concentration into some electrical, thermal, optical or other signal that can be easily analysed. The first biosensor was designed by Clark and Lyons in 1962 as a means of measuring glucose. Since then, much progress has been made and the applications of biosensors are today potentially boundless. This review is limited to their clinical applications, particularly in the field of oncohematology. Biosensors have recently been developed in order to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients affected by hematological malignancies, such as the biosensor for assessing the in vitro pre-treatment efficacy of cytarabine in acute myeloid leukemia, and the fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based biosensor for assessing the efficacy of imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia. The review also considers the challenges and future perspectives of biosensors in clinical practice. PMID:23673681

  2. Integrating Pain Management in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Jamison, Robert N.; Edwards, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    There is much evidence to suggest that psychological and social issues are predictive of pain severity, emotional distress, work disability, and response to medical treatments among persons with chronic pain. Psychologists can play an important role in the identification of psychological and social dysfunction and in matching personal characteristics to effective interventions as part of a multidisciplinary approach to pain management, leading to a greater likelihood of treatment success. The assessment of different domains using semi-structured clinical interviews and standardized self-report measures permits identification of somatosensory, emotional, cognitive, behavioral and social issues in order to facilitate treatment planning. We briefly describe measures to assess constructs related to pain and intervention strategies for the behavioral treatment of chronic pain and discuss related psychiatric and substance abuse issues. Finally, we offer a future look at the role of integrating pain management in clinical practice in the psychological assessment and treatment for persons with chronic pain. PMID:22383018

  3. [Breaking bad news in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Herrera, Andrea; Ríos, Matías; Manríquez, José Manuel; Rojas, Gonzalo

    2014-10-01

    Breaking bad news is a complex task that requires multiple communication skills from health professionals. Clinical practice demands to communicate all type of bad news, from a diagnosis of cancer to adverse effects of a treatment. On the other hand, since the beginning of the health reform in 2003, the need to improve the quality of services was proposed, among which the concern about the rights and duties of patients stands out. Therefore, the health care provider-patient relationship becomes again the subject of discussion and study, and a topic of great importance for clinical work. We revise the consequences of breaking bad news for the patient and for the health care provider, as well as the current protocols available for this purpose. The importance of developing communication skills both for future health professionals as for those who currently work in the area is emphasized. PMID:25601116

  4. Breath analysis: translation into clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Brodrick, Emma; Davies, Antony; Neill, Paul; Hanna, Louise; Williams, E Mark

    2015-06-01

    Breath analysis in respiratory disease is a non-invasive technique which has the potential to complement or replace current screening and diagnostic techniques without inconvenience or harm to the patient. Recent advances in ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) have allowed exhaled breath to be analysed rapidly, reliably and robustly thereby facilitating larger studies of exhaled breath profiles in clinical environments. Preliminary studies have demonstrated that volatile organic compound (VOC) breath profiles of people with respiratory disease can be distinguished from healthy control groups but there is a need to validate, standardise and ensure comparability between laboratories before real-time breath analysis becomes a clinical reality. It is also important that breath sampling procedures and methodologies are developed in conjunction with clinicians and the practicalities of working within the clinical setting are considered to allow the full diagnostic potential of these techniques to be realised. A protocol is presented, which has been developed over three years and successfully deployed for quickly and accurately collecting breath samples from 323 respiratory patients recruited from 10 different secondary health care clinics. PMID:25971863

  5. Spontaneous Pathology and Routine Clinical Pathology Parameters in Aging Beagle Dogs: A Comparison With Adolescent and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Barnes, J; Cotton, P; Robinson, S; Jacobsen, M

    2016-03-01

    AstraZeneca ran a bespoke study to generate age-matched clinical pathology and histopathology data from a cohort of Beagle dogs aged between 25 and 37 months to support the use of these older animals in routine preclinical toxicology studies. As the upper age range of Beagle dogs routinely used in toxicology studies does not normally exceed 24 months, there is an absence of appropriate age-matched historical control data. The generation of such data was crucial to understand whether age-related differences in spontaneous findings might confound the interpretation of toxicology study data. While the majority of the histopathology findings in all the older dogs occurred at a similar prevalence as those expected in young adult dogs (<24 months), a number of differences were observed in the thymus (involution), bone marrow (increased adiposity), testes (degenerative changes), and lung (fibrosis, pigment and alveolar hyperplasia) that could be misinterpreted as a test article effect. Minor differences in some clinical pathology values (hemoglobin, alkaline phosphatase, absolute reticulocytes) were of a small magnitude and considered unlikely to affect the interpretation of study data. PMID:26553522

  6. Real-Time PCR in Clinical Microbiology: Applications for Routine Laboratory Testing

    PubMed Central

    Espy, M. J.; Uhl, J. R.; Sloan, L. M.; Buckwalter, S. P.; Jones, M. F.; Vetter, E. A.; Yao, J. D. C.; Wengenack, N. L.; Rosenblatt, J. E.; Cockerill, F. R.; Smith, T. F.

    2006-01-01

    Real-time PCR has revolutionized the way clinical microbiology laboratories diagnose many human microbial infections. This testing method combines PCR chemistry with fluorescent probe detection of amplified product in the same reaction vessel. In general, both PCR and amplified product detection are completed in an hour or less, which is considerably faster than conventional PCR detection methods. Real-time PCR assays provide sensitivity and specificity equivalent to that of conventional PCR combined with Southern blot analysis, and since amplification and detection steps are performed in the same closed vessel, the risk of releasing amplified nucleic acids into the environment is negligible. The combination of excellent sensitivity and specificity, low contamination risk, and speed has made real-time PCR technology an appealing alternative to culture- or immunoassay-based testing methods for diagnosing many infectious diseases. This review focuses on the application of real-time PCR in the clinical microbiology laboratory. PMID:16418529

  7. Routine radiopharmaceutical production for positron emission tomography in a clinical setting

    SciTech Connect

    Barrio, J.R.; Bida, G.T.; Satyamurthy, N.; Phelps, M.E.

    1985-11-01

    With the development of positron emission tomography (PET), many cellular processes can now be investigated in humans. To perform this task, positron-emitting radioisotopes, which decay by emission of coincidence photons externally detected after positron annihilation, are used in PET. Thus, biochemically and pharmacologically active compounds can be labeled with cyclotron-produced positron-emitting radioisotopes of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine to probe enzyme reaction rates, membrane transport, metabolism, synthesis processes, and various pharmacological parameters. The development of PET technology for clinical applications requires not only the development of a minicyclotron technology, but also the targetry and reliable synthetic procedures for labeled compounds, all of which must be finally integrated into automated delivery systems. Although an integrated unit (cyclotron, chemistry, imaging device) specially designed for PET in clinical settings has never been developed, the work in progress in this area indicates that its implementation is immediately possible.

  8. Quantification of Unmethylated Alu (QUAlu): a tool to assess global hypomethylation in routine clinical samples

    PubMed Central

    Buj, Raquel; Mallona, Izaskun; Díez-Villanueva, Anna; Barrera, Víctor; Mauricio, Dídac; Puig-Domingo, Manel; Reverter, Jordi L.; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Azuara, Daniel; Ramírez, Jose L.; Alonso, Sergio; Rosell, Rafael; Capellà, Gabriel; Perucho, Manuel; Robledo, Mercedes; Peinado, Miguel A.; Jordà, Mireia

    2016-01-01

    Hypomethylation of DNA is a hallmark of cancer and its analysis as tumor biomarker has been proposed, but its determination in clinical settings is hampered by lack of standardized methodologies. Here, we present QUAlu (Quantification of Unmethylated Alu), a new technique to estimate the Percentage of UnMethylated Alu (PUMA) as a surrogate for global hypomethylation. QUAlu consists in the measurement by qPCR of Alu repeats after digestion of genomic DNA with isoschizomers with differential sensitivity to DNA methylation. QUAlu performance has been evaluated for reproducibility, trueness and specificity, and validated by deep sequencing. As a proof of use, QUAlu has been applied to a broad variety of pathological examination specimens covering five cancer types. Major findings of the preliminary application of QUAlu to clinical samples include: (1) all normal tissues displayed similar PUMA; (2) tumors showed variable PUMA with the highest levels in lung and colon and the lowest in thyroid cancer; (3) stools from colon cancer patients presented higher PUMA than those from control individuals; (4) lung squamous cell carcinomas showed higher PUMA than lung adenocarcinomas, and an increasing hypomethylation trend associated with smoking habits. In conclusion, QUAlu is a simple and robust method to determine Alu hypomethylation in human biospecimens and may be easily implemented in research and clinical settings. PMID:26859682

  9. Clinical trials and the new good clinical practice guideline in Japan. An economic perspective.

    PubMed

    Ono, S; Kodama, Y

    2000-08-01

    Japanese clinical trials have been drastically changing in response to the implementation of the International Conference on Harmonisation-Good Clinical Practice (ICH-GCP) guideline in 1997. The most important aim of the new guideline is to standardise the quality of clinical trials in the US, European Union and Japan, but it inevitably imposes substantial costs on investigators, sponsors and even patients in Japan. The study environment in Japan differs from that in the US in several ways: (i) historical lack of a formal requirement for informed consent; (ii) patients' attitudes to clinical trials in terms of expectation of positive outcomes; (iii) the implications of universal health insurance for trial participation; (iv) the historical absence of on-site monitoring by the sponsor, with the attendant effects on study quality; and (v) the lack of adequate financial and personnel support for the conduct of trials. Implementation of the new GCP guideline will improve the ethical and scientific quality of trials conducted in Japan. It may also lead to an improved relationship between medical professionals and patients if the requirement for explicit informed consent in clinical trials leads to the provision of a similar level of patient information in routine care and changes the traditional paternalistic attitude of physicians to patients. The initial response of the Japanese 'market' for clinical trials to the implementation of the ICH-GCP guideline has been clinical trial price increases and a decrease in the number of study contracts. These changes can be explained by applying a simple demand-supply scheme. Whether clinical trials undertaken in Japan become more or less attractive to the industry in the long term will depend on other factors such as international regulations on the acceptability of foreign clinical trials and the reform of domestic healthcare policies. PMID:11067647

  10. Implementing RapidArc into clinical routine: A comprehensive program from machine QA to TPS validation and patient QA

    SciTech Connect

    Van Esch, Ann; Huyskens, Dominique P.; Behrens, Claus F.; Samsoee, Eva; Sjoelin, Maria; Bjelkengren, Ulf; Sjoestroem, David; Clermont, Christian; Hambach, Lionel; Sergent, Francois

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: With the increased commercial availability of intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) comes the need for comprehensive QA programs, covering the different aspects of this newly available technology. This manuscript proposes such a program for the RapidArc (RA) (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto) IMAT solution. Methods: The program was developed and tested out for a Millennium120 MLC on iX Clinacs and a HighDefinition MLC on a Novalis TX, using a variety of measurement equipment including Gafchromic film, 2D ion chamber arrays (Seven29 and StarCheck, PTW, Freiburg, Germany) with inclinometer and Octavius phantom, the Delta4 systam (ScandiDos, Uppsala, Sweden) and the portal imager (EPID). First, a number of complementary machine QA tests were developed to monitor the correct interplay between the accelerating/decelerating gantry, the variable dose rate and the MLC position, straining the delivery to the maximum allowed limits. Second, a systematic approach to the validation of the dose calculation for RA was adopted, starting with static gantry and RA specific static MLC shapes and gradually moving to dynamic gantry, dynamic MLC shapes. RA plans were then optimized on a series of artificial structures created within the homogeneous Octavius phantom and within a heterogeneous lung phantom. These served the double purpose of testing the behavior of the optimization algorithm (PRO) as well as the precision of the forward dose calculation. Finally, patient QA on a series of clinical cases was performed with different methods. In addition to the well established in-phantom QA, we evaluated the portal dosimetry solution within the Varian approach. Results: For routine machine QA, the ''Snooker Cue'' test on the EPID proved to be the most sensitive to overall problem detection. It is also the most practical one. The ''Twinkle'' and ''Sunrise'' tests were useful to obtain well differentiated information on the individual treatment delivery components. The AAA8