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Sample records for routine flow linear

  1. CULA: hybrid GPU accelerated linear algebra routines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphrey, John R.; Price, Daniel K.; Spagnoli, Kyle E.; Paolini, Aaron L.; Kelmelis, Eric J.

    2010-04-01

    The modern graphics processing unit (GPU) found in many standard personal computers is a highly parallel math processor capable of nearly 1 TFLOPS peak throughput at a cost similar to a high-end CPU and an excellent FLOPS/watt ratio. High-level linear algebra operations are computationally intense, often requiring O(N3) operations and would seem a natural fit for the processing power of the GPU. Our work is on CULA, a GPU accelerated implementation of linear algebra routines. We present results from factorizations such as LU decomposition, singular value decomposition and QR decomposition along with applications like system solution and least squares. The GPU execution model featured by NVIDIA GPUs based on CUDA demands very strong parallelism, requiring between hundreds and thousands of simultaneous operations to achieve high performance. Some constructs from linear algebra map extremely well to the GPU and others map poorly. CPUs, on the other hand, do well at smaller order parallelism and perform acceptably during low-parallelism code segments. Our work addresses this via hybrid a processing model, in which the CPU and GPU work simultaneously to produce results. In many cases, this is accomplished by allowing each platform to do the work it performs most naturally.

  2. Collection of parallel linear equations routines for the Denelcor HEP

    SciTech Connect

    Dongarra, J.J.; Hiromoto, R.E.

    1983-09-01

    This note describes the implementation and performance results for a few standard linear algebra routines on the Denelcor HEP computer. The algorithms used here are based on high-level modules which facilitate portability and perform efficiently in a wide range of environments.

  3. Optimization techniques for OpenCL-based linear algebra routines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozacik, Stephen; Fox, Paul; Humphrey, John; Kuller, Aryeh; Kelmelis, Eric; Prather, Dennis W.

    2014-06-01

    The OpenCL standard for general-purpose parallel programming allows a developer to target highly parallel computations towards graphics processing units (GPUs), CPUs, co-processing devices, and field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). The computationally intense domains of linear algebra and image processing have shown significant speedups when implemented in the OpenCL environment. A major benefit of OpenCL is that a routine written for one device can be run across many different devices and architectures; however, a kernel optimized for one device may not exhibit high performance when executed on a different device. For this reason kernels must typically be hand-optimized for every target device family. Due to the large number of parameters that can affect performance, hand tuning for every possible device is impractical and often produces suboptimal results. For this work, we focused on optimizing the general matrix multiplication routine. General matrix multiplication is used as a building block for many linear algebra routines and often comprises a large portion of the run-time. Prior work has shown this routine to be a good candidate for high-performance implementation in OpenCL. We selected several candidate algorithms from the literature that are suitable for parameterization. We then developed parameterized kernels implementing these algorithms using only portable OpenCL features. Our implementation queries device information supplied by the OpenCL runtime and utilizes this as well as user input to generate a search space that satisfies device and algorithmic constraints. Preliminary results from our work confirm that optimizations are not portable from one device to the next, and show the benefits of automatic tuning. Using a standard set of tuning parameters seen in the literature for the NVIDIA Fermi architecture achieves a performance of 1.6 TFLOPS on an AMD 7970 device, while automatically tuning achieves a peak of 2.7 TFLOPS

  4. INTERP3: A computer routine for linear interpolation of trivariate functions defined by nondistinct unequally spaced variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, D. C.; Morris, S. J., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A report on the computer routine INTERP3 is presented. The routine is designed to linearly interpolate a variable which is a function of three independent variables. The variables within the parameter arrays do not have to be distinct, or equally spaced, and the array variables can be in increasing or decreasing order.

  5. The calculation of steady non-linear transonic flow over finite wings with linear theory aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, A. M., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of calculating steady mean flow solutions for nonlinear transonic flow over finite wings with a linear theory aerodynamic computer program is studied. The methodology is based on independent solutions for upper and lower surface pressures that are coupled through the external flow fields. Two approaches for coupling the solutions are investigated which include the diaphragm and the edge singularity method. The final method is a combination of both where a line source along the wing leading edge is used to account for blunt nose airfoil effects; and the upper and lower surface flow fields are coupled through a diaphragm in the plane of the wing. An iterative solution is used to arrive at the nonuniform flow solution for both nonlifting and lifting cases. Final results for a swept tapered wing in subcritical flow show that the method converges in three iterations and gives excellent agreement with experiment at alpha = 0 deg and 2 deg. Recommendations are made for development of a procedure for routine application.

  6. SINDA/SINFLO computer routine, volume 1, revision A. [for fluid flow system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oren, J. A.; Williams, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    The SINFLO package was developed to modify the SINDA preprocessor to accept and store the input data for fluid flow systems analysis and adding the FLOSOL user subroutine to perform the flow solution. This reduced and simplified the user input required for analysis of flow problems. A temperature calculation method, the flow-hybrid method which was developed in previous VSD thermal simulator routines, was incorporated for calculating fluid temperatures. The calculation method accuracy was improved by using fluid enthalpy rather than specific heat for the convective term of the fluid temperature equation. Subroutines and data input requirements are described along with user subroutines, flow data storage, and usage of the plot program.

  7. A linearized Euler analysis of unsteady transonic flows in turbomachinery

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, K.C.; Clark, W.S.; Lorence, C.B. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science)

    1994-07-01

    A computational method for efficiently predicting unsteady transonic flows in two- and three-dimensional cascades is presented. The unsteady flow is modeled using a linearized Euler analysis whereby the unsteady flow field is decomposed into a nonlinear mean flow plus a linear harmonically varying unsteady flow. The equations that govern the perturbation flow, the linearized Euler equations, are linear variable coefficient equations. For transonic flows containing shocks, shock capturing is used to model the shock impulse (the unsteady load due to the harmonic motion of the shock). A conservative Lax-Wendroff scheme is used to obtain a set of linearized finite volume equations that describe the harmonic small disturbance behavior of the flow. Conditions under which such a discretization will correctly predict the shock impulse are investigated. Computational results are presented that demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the present method as well as the essential role of unsteady shock impulse loads on the flutter stability of fans.

  8. The Piece Wise Linear Reactive Flow Model

    SciTech Connect

    Vitello, P; Souers, P C

    2005-08-18

    For non-ideal explosives a wide range of behavior is observed in experiments dealing with differing sizes and geometries. A predictive detonation model must be able to reproduce many phenomena including such effects as: variations in the detonation velocity with the radial diameter of rate sticks; slowing of the detonation velocity around gentle corners; production of dead zones for abrupt corner turning; failure of small diameter rate sticks; and failure for rate sticks with sufficiently wide cracks. Most models have been developed to explain one effect at a time. Often, changes are made in the input parameters used to fit each succeeding case with the implication that this is sufficient for the model to be valid over differing regimes. We feel that it is important to develop a model that is able to fit experiments with one set of parameters. To address this we are creating a new generation of models that are able to produce better fitting to individual data sets than prior models and to simultaneous fit distinctly different regimes of experiments. Presented here are details of our new Piece Wise Linear reactive flow model applied to LX-17.

  9. Dilatonic non-linear sigma models and Ricci flow extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carfora, M.; Marzuoli, A.

    2016-09-01

    We review our recent work describing, in terms of the Wasserstein geometry over the space of probability measures, the embedding of the Ricci flow in the renormalization group flow for dilatonic non-linear sigma models.

  10. Thermal and flow analysis subroutines for the SINDA-version 9 computer routine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oren, J. A.; Williams, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    Fluid flow analysis, special thermal analysis and input/output capabilities of the MOTAR routine were incorporated into the SINDA routine. All the capabilities were added in the form of user subroutines so that they may be added to different versions of SINDA with a minimum of programmer effort. Two modifications were made to the existing subroutines of SINDA/8 to incorporate the above subroutines. These were: (1) A modification to the preprocessor to permit actual values of array numbers, conductor numbers, node numbers or constant numbers supplied as array data to be converted to relative numbers. (2) Modifications to execution subroutine CNFAST to make it compatible with the radiant interchange user subroutine, RADIR. This modified version of SINDA has been designated SINDA/version 9. A detailed discussion of the methods used for the capabilities added is presented. The modifications for the SINDA subroutines are described, as well as user subroutines. All subroutines added or modified are listed.

  11. Many-core graph analytics using accelerated sparse linear algebra routines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozacik, Stephen; Paolini, Aaron L.; Fox, Paul; Kelmelis, Eric

    2016-05-01

    Graph analytics is a key component in identifying emerging trends and threats in many real-world applications. Largescale graph analytics frameworks provide a convenient and highly-scalable platform for developing algorithms to analyze large datasets. Although conceptually scalable, these techniques exhibit poor performance on modern computational hardware. Another model of graph computation has emerged that promises improved performance and scalability by using abstract linear algebra operations as the basis for graph analysis as laid out by the GraphBLAS standard. By using sparse linear algebra as the basis, existing highly efficient algorithms can be adapted to perform computations on the graph. This approach, however, is often less intuitive to graph analytics experts, who are accustomed to vertex-centric APIs such as Giraph, GraphX, and Tinkerpop. We are developing an implementation of the high-level operations supported by these APIs in terms of linear algebra operations. This implementation is be backed by many-core implementations of the fundamental GraphBLAS operations required, and offers the advantages of both the intuitive programming model of a vertex-centric API and the performance of a sparse linear algebra implementation. This technology can reduce the number of nodes required, as well as the run-time for a graph analysis problem, enabling customers to perform more complex analysis with less hardware at lower cost. All of this can be accomplished without the requirement for the customer to make any changes to their analytics code, thanks to the compatibility with existing graph APIs.

  12. Capsule deformation and orientation in general linear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szatmary, Alex; Eggleton, Charles

    2010-11-01

    We considered the response of spherical and non-spherical capsules to general flows. (A capsule is an elastic membrane enclosing a fluid, immersed in fluid.) First, we established that nonspherical capsules align with the imposed irrotational linear flow; this means that initial orientation does not affect steady-state capsule deformation, so this steady-state deformation can be determined entirely by the capillary number and the type of flow. The type of flow is characterized by r: r=0 for axisymmetric flows, and r=1 for planar flows; intermediate values of r are combinations of planar and axisymmetric flow. By varying the capillary number and r, all irrotational linear Stokes flows can be generated. For the same capillary number, planar flows lead to more deformation than uniaxial or biaxial extensional flows. Deformation varies monotonically with r, so one can determine bounds on capsule deformation in general flow by only looking at uniaxial, biaxial, and planar flow. These results are applicable to spheres in all linear flows and to ellipsoids in irrotational linear flow.

  13. Will 3-dimensional PET-CT enable the routine quantification of myocardial blood flow?

    PubMed

    deKemp, Robert A; Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Beanlands, Rob S B

    2007-01-01

    Quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and flow reserve has been used extensively with positron emission tomography (PET) to investigate the functional significance of coronary artery disease. Increasingly, flow quantification is being applied to investigations of microvascular dysfunction in early atherosclerosis and in nonatherosclerotic microvascular disease associated with primary and secondary cardiomyopathies. Fully three-dimensional (3D) acquisition is becoming the standard imaging mode on new equipment, bringing with it certain challenges for cardiac PET, but also the potential for MBF to be measured simultaneously with routine electrocardiography (ECG)-gated perfusion imaging. Existing 3D versus 2D comparative studies support the use of 3D cardiac PET for flow quantification, and these protocols can be translated to PET-CT, which offers a virtually noise-free attenuation correction. This technology combines the strengths of cardiac CT for evaluation of anatomy with cardiac PET for quantification of the hemodynamic impact on the myocardium. High throughput clinical imaging protocols are needed to evaluate the incremental diagnostic and prognostic value of this technology. PMID:17556173

  14. A linearized Euler analysis of unsteady flows in turbomachinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Kenneth C.; Crawley, Edward F.

    1987-06-01

    A method for calculating unsteady flows in cascades is presented. The model, which is based on the linearized unsteady Euler equations, accounts for blade loading shock motion, wake motion, and blade geometry. The mean flow through the cascade is determined by solving the full nonlinear Euler equations. Assuming the unsteadiness in the flow is small, then the Euler equations are linearized about the mean flow to obtain a set of linear variable coefficient equations which describe the small amplitude, harmonic motion of the flow. These equations are discretized on a computational grid via a finite volume operator and solved directly subject to an appropriate set of linearized boundary conditions. The steady flow, which is calculated prior to the unsteady flow, is found via a Newton iteration procedure. An important feature of the analysis is the use of shock fitting to model steady and unsteady shocks. Use of the Euler equations with the unsteady Rankine-Hugoniot shock jump conditions correctly models the generation of steady and unsteady entropy and vorticity at shocks. In particular, the low frequency shock displacement is correctly predicted. Results of this method are presented for a variety of test cases. Predicted unsteady transonic flows in channels are compared to full nonlinear Euler solutions obtained using time-accurate, time-marching methods. The agreement between the two methods is excellent for small to moderate levels of flow unsteadiness. The method is also used to predict unsteady flows in cascades due to blade motion (flutter problem) and incoming disturbances (gust response problem).

  15. A linearized Euler analysis of unsteady flows in turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Kenneth C.; Crawley, Edward F.

    1987-01-01

    A method for calculating unsteady flows in cascades is presented. The model, which is based on the linearized unsteady Euler equations, accounts for blade loading shock motion, wake motion, and blade geometry. The mean flow through the cascade is determined by solving the full nonlinear Euler equations. Assuming the unsteadiness in the flow is small, then the Euler equations are linearized about the mean flow to obtain a set of linear variable coefficient equations which describe the small amplitude, harmonic motion of the flow. These equations are discretized on a computational grid via a finite volume operator and solved directly subject to an appropriate set of linearized boundary conditions. The steady flow, which is calculated prior to the unsteady flow, is found via a Newton iteration procedure. An important feature of the analysis is the use of shock fitting to model steady and unsteady shocks. Use of the Euler equations with the unsteady Rankine-Hugoniot shock jump conditions correctly models the generation of steady and unsteady entropy and vorticity at shocks. In particular, the low frequency shock displacement is correctly predicted. Results of this method are presented for a variety of test cases. Predicted unsteady transonic flows in channels are compared to full nonlinear Euler solutions obtained using time-accurate, time-marching methods. The agreement between the two methods is excellent for small to moderate levels of flow unsteadiness. The method is also used to predict unsteady flows in cascades due to blade motion (flutter problem) and incoming disturbances (gust response problem).

  16. Comparison between a linear versus a macrocyclic contrast agent for whole body MR angiography in a clinical routine setting

    PubMed Central

    Seeger, Achim; Kramer, Ulrich; Fenchel, Michael; Grimm, Florian; Bretschneider, Christiane; Döring, Jörg; Klumpp, Bernhard; Tepe, Gunnar; Rittig, Kilian; Seidensticker, Peter R; Claussen, Claus D; Miller, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous experiences of whole body MR angiography are predominantly available in linear 0.5 M gadolinium-containing contrast agents. The aim of this study was to compare image quality on a four-point scale (range 1–4) and diagnostic accuracy of a 1.0 M macrocyclic contrast agent (gadobutrol, n = 80 patients) with a 0.5 M linear contrast agent (gadopentetate dimeglumine, n = 85 patients) on a 1.5 T whole body MR system. Digital subtraction angiography served as standard of reference. Results All examinations yielded diagnostic image quality. There was no significant difference in image quality (3.76 ± 0.3 versus 3.78 ± 0.3, p = n.s.) and diagnostic accuracy observed. Sensitivity and specificity of the detection of hemodynamically relevant stenoses was 93%/95% in the gadopentetate dimeglumine group and 94%/94% in the gadobutrol group, respectively. Conclusion The high diagnostic accuracy of gadobutrol in the clinical routine setting is of high interest as medical authorities (e.g. the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products) recommend macrocyclic contrast agents especially to be used in patients with renal failure or dialysis. PMID:19116027

  17. Two-dimensional motion of Brownian swimmers in linear flows.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Mario; Jimenez, Alonso

    2016-03-01

    The motion of viruses and bacteria and even synthetic microswimmers can be affected by thermal fluctuations and by external flows. In this work, we study the effect of linear external flows and thermal fluctuations on the diffusion of those swimmers modeled as spherical active (self-propelled) particles moving in two dimensions. General formulae for their mean-square displacement under a general linear flow are presented. We also provide, at short and long times, explicit expressions for the mean-square displacement of a swimmer immersed in three canonical flows, namely, solid-body rotation, shear and extensional flows. These expressions can now be used to estimate the effect of external flows on the displacement of Brownian microswimmers. Finally, our theoretical results are validated by using Brownian dynamics simulations. PMID:26428909

  18. Instrument Induced Linear Flow Resistance In Öresund

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, M.; Stigebrandt, A.

    Previous studies of the flow resistance in Öresund indicate the presence of a linear rela- tionship between sea-level and flow rate. The linear term is superposed on the common quadratic relationship from bottom friction and form drag. In previous works, cross- stream geostrophy or generation of internal waves have explained the linear term. The present analysis is based on two different flow-rate data sets. The first set was the same data set used in earlier studies showing the linear term. It consists of data from RCM7 and S4. The second set was taken with ADCP. The observations were fitted to two different strait flow models. The first model had a quadratic flow resistance term only, whereas the second had both a quadratic and a linear term. In addition to the current data, sea-level observations from both ends of the strait were used. The analyses showed that the linear term is significant in the first data set but not in the second. This result holds regardless of season and part of data set and current meter and sea-level gauge combination. The only explanation is that it is an artefact caused by non-linear current meter response by the RCM7 and S4 instruments. These meters underestimate the velocity if it is higher than approximately 50 cm/s, which often is the case in Öresund. Published papers support this statement. The linear term is thus an artefact generated by the instruments, and unfortunately not a feature of the physics of the strait flow.

  19. The routine measurement of platelet volume: a comparison of aperture-impedance and flow cytometric systems.

    PubMed

    Reardon, D M; Hutchinson, D; Preston, F E; Trowbridge, E A

    1985-01-01

    The effect of dipotassium ethylenediaminetetraaceticacid (EDTA) on the platelet count and mean volume (MPV) was evaluated using two routine measurement systems, a Coulter S Plus Phase 1 (S+) and a Technicon H6000 (H6000). In normal subjects (n = 29) MPV increased by 17% during 39 h storage in EDTA when measured by the S+. In contrast MPV decreased by 22% when measured by the H6000. MPV differences of up to 40% were observed between the two systems. Concomitant platelet counts, in both systems, changed by less than 4%. Using the anticoagulant sodium citrate and prostaglandin E1 (Na-citrate/PGE1 there were no significant changes in MPV measured by the S+ during 7 h storage, although a linear decrease in platelet count was observed. A decrease in H6000 MPV was observed whether the blood was stored in EDTA or Na-citrate/PGE1. Methodology, anticoagulation and storage time all influence MPV. Until these determinants are standardized the clinical value of MPV cannot be assessed. PMID:3935360

  20. Non-linear system identification in flow-induced vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Spanos, P.D.; Zeldin, B.A.; Lu, R.

    1996-12-31

    The paper introduces a method of identification of non-linear systems encountered in marine engineering applications. The non-linearity is accounted for by a combination of linear subsystems and known zero-memory non-linear transformations; an equivalent linear multi-input-single-output (MISO) system is developed for the identification problem. The unknown transfer functions of the MISO system are identified by assembling a system of linear equations in the frequency domain. This system is solved by performing the Cholesky decomposition of a related matrix. It is shown that the proposed identification method can be interpreted as a {open_quotes}Gram-Schmidt{close_quotes} type of orthogonal decomposition of the input-output quantities of the equivalent MISO system. A numerical example involving the identification of unknown parameters of flow (ocean wave) induced forces on offshore structures elucidates the applicability of the proposed method.

  1. Assessment of erythroid dysplasia by "difference from normal" in routine clinical flow cytometry work-up.

    PubMed

    Eidenschink Brodersen, Lisa; Menssen, Andrew J; Wangen, Jamie R; Stephenson, Christine F; de Baca, Monica E; Zehentner, Barbara K; Wells, Denise A; Loken, Michael R

    2014-10-21

    Introduction: While multidimensional flow cytometry (MDF) has great utility in diagnostic work-ups of patients with suspected myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), only the myeloid lineage has demonstrated reproducible abnormalities from multiple laboratories. With the effects of ammonium chloride (NH4 Cl) lysis on erythroid progenitors previously described, we applied this protocol to a patient cohort with diagnosed MDS to investigate phenotypic abnormalities that indicate erythroid dysplasia. Method: Bone marrow specimens [39 MDS, 9 acute myeloid leukemia (AML), 7 JAK2(V617F) positive myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), 5 nutritional deficiencies] were processed by NH4 Cl lysis and Ficoll preparation and evaluated by MDF using a difference from normal algorithm. Results: For the MDS cohort, phenotypic abnormalities on the mature erythroid progenitors were frequent for CD71 and CD36 (36% for each antigen); abnormalities for CD235a (8%) were observed. Among immature erythroid progenitors, abnormal maturation patterns (≤5%) and increased CD105 intensity (9%) were seen. Increased frequency of CD105 bright cells was observed (18%). While antigenic abnormalities correlated between NH4 Cl lysis and Ficoll preparation, the lysis method demonstrated the most consistent quantitative antigen intensities. Mean erythroid phenotypic abnormalities and prognostic cytogenetic subgroups correlated strongly. Morphologic and erythroid phenotypic abnormalities correlated, as did increasing FCSS and number of erythroid abnormalities, albeit without further increase for AML patients. Discussion: These data expand the understanding of erythropoiesis and define immunophenotypic abnormalities that indicate dyserythropoiesis in MDS utilizing a lysis protocol practical for routine implementation in clinical flow cytometric work-up. Preliminary studies also indicate strong correlation between phenotypic erythroid dysplasia and poor prognosis, as classified cytogenetically. © 2014 Clinical

  2. Linearized analysis of Richtmyer-Meshkov flow for elastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plohr, Jeeyeon N.; Plohr, Bradley J.

    2005-08-01

    We present a study of Richtmyer Meshkov flow for elastic materials. This flow, in which a material interface is struck by a shock wave, was originally investigated for gases, where growth of perturbations of the interface is observed. Here we consider two elastic materials in frictionless contact. The governing system of equations comprises conservation laws supplemented by constitutive equations. To analyse it, we linearize the equations around a one-dimensional background solution under the assumption that the perturbation is small. The background problem defines a Riemann problem that is solved numerically; its solution contains transmitted and reflected shock waves in the longitudinal modes. The linearized Rankine Hugoniot condition provides the interface conditions at the longitudinal and shear waves; the frictionless material interface conditions are also linearized. The resulting equations, a linear system of partial differential equations, is solved numerically using a finite-difference method supplemented by front tracking. In verifying the numerical code, we reproduce growth of the interface in the gas case. For the elastic case, in contrast, we find that the material interface remains bounded: the non-zero shear stiffness stabilizes the flow. In particular, the linear theory remains valid at late time. Moreover, we identify the principal mechanism for the stability of Richtmyer Meshkov flow for elastic materials: the vorticity deposited on the material interface during shock passage is propagated away by the shear waves, whereas for gas dynamics it stays on the interface.

  3. Transient growth in linearly stable Taylor-Couette flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maretzke, Simon; Hof, Björn; Avila, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Non-normal transient growth of disturbances is considered as an essential prerequisite for subcritical transition in shear flows, i.e. transition to turbulence despite linear stability of the laminar flow. In this work we present numerical and analytical computations of linear transient growth covering all linearly stable regimes of Taylor--Couette flow. Our numerical experiments reveal comparable energy amplifications in the different regimes. For high shear Reynolds numbers Re the optimal transient energy growth always follows a 2/3-scaling with Re, which allows for large amplifications even in regimes where the presence of turbulence remains debated. In co-rotating Rayleigh-stable flows the optimal perturbations become increasingly columnar in their structure, as the optimal axial wavenumber goes to zero. In this limit of axially invariant perturbations we show that linear stability and transient growth are independent of the cylinders' rotation-ratio and we derive a universal 2/3-scaling of optimal energy growth with Re using WKB-theory. Based on this, a semi-empirical formula for the estimation of linear transient growth valid in all regimes is obtained.

  4. Linear stability analysis of swirling turbulent flows with turbulence models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vikrant; Juniper, Matthew

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we consider the growth of large scale coherent structures in turbulent flows by performing linear stability analysis around a mean flow. Turbulent flows are characterized by fine-scale stochastic perturbations. The momentum transfer caused by these perturbations affects the development of larger structures. Therefore, in a linear stability analysis, it is important to include the perturbations' influence. One way to do this is to include a turbulence model in the stability analysis. This is done in the literature by using eddy viscosity models (EVMs), which are first order turbulence models. We extend this approach by using second order turbulence models, in this case explicit algebraic Reynolds stress models (EARSMs). EARSMs are more versatile than EVMs, in that they can be applied to a wider range of flows, and could also be more accurate. We verify our EARSM-based analysis by applying it to a channel flow and then comparing the results with those from an EVM-based analysis. We then apply the EARSM-based stability analysis to swirling pipe flows and Taylor-Couette flows, which demonstrates the main benefit of EARSM-based analysis. This project is supported by EPSRC and Rolls-Royce through a Dorothy Hodgkin Research Fellowship.

  5. Application of Linear and Non-Linear Harmonic Methods for Unsteady Transonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundevia, Rayomand

    This thesis explores linear and non-linear computational methods for solving unsteady flow. The eventual goal is to apply these methods to two-dimensional and three-dimensional flutter predictions. In this study the quasi-one-dimensional nozzle is used as a framework for understanding these methods and their limitations. Subsonic and transonic cases are explored as the back-pressure is forced to oscillate with known amplitude and frequency. A steady harmonic approach is used to solve this unsteady problem for which perturbations are said to be small in comparison to the mean flow. The use of a linearized Euler equations (LEE) scheme is good at capturing the flow characteristics but is limited by accuracy to relatively small amplitude perturbations. The introduction of time-averaged second-order terms in the Non-Linear Harmonic (NLH) method means that a better approximation of the mean-valued solution, upon which the linearization is based, can be made. The nonlinear time-accurate Euler solutions are used for comparison and to establish the regimes of unsteadiness for which these schemes fails. The usefulness of the LEE and NLH methods lie in the gains in computational efficiency over the full equations.

  6. On the linear stability of compressible plane Couette flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duck, Peter W.; Erlebacher, Gordon; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1991-01-01

    The linear stability of compressible plane Couette flow is investigated. The correct and proper basic velocity and temperature distributions are perturbed by a small amplitude normal mode disturbance. The full small amplitude disturbance equations are solved numerically at finite Reynolds numbers, and the inviscid limit of these equations is then investigated in some detail. It is found that instability can occur, although the stability characteristics of the flow are quite different from unbounded flows. The effects of viscosity are also calculated, asymptotically, and shown to have a stabilizing role in all the cases investigated. Exceptional regimes to the problem occur when the wavespeed of the disturbances approaches the velocity of either of the walls, and these regimes are also analyzed in some detail. Finally, the effect of imposing radiation-type boundary conditions on the upper (moving) wall (in place of impermeability) is investigated, and shown to yield results common to both bounded and unbounded flows.

  7. Piecewise linear manifolds: Einstein metrics and Ricci flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Robert

    2016-05-01

    This article provides an attempt to extend concepts from the theory of Riemannian manifolds to piecewise linear (p.l.) spaces. In particular we propose an analogue of the Ricci tensor, which we give the name of an Einstein vector field. On a given set of p.l. spaces we define and discuss (normalized) Einstein flows. p.l. Einstein metrics are defined and examples are provided. Criteria for flows to approach Einstein metrics are formulated. Second variations of the total scalar curvature at a specific Einstein space are calculated. Dedicated to Ludwig Faddeev on the occasion of his 80th birthday.

  8. Linear stability analysis of inclined two-layer stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negretti, M. Eletta; Socolofsky, Scott A.; Jirka, Gerhard H.

    2008-09-01

    Two-layer stratified flows are commonly observed in geophysical and environmental contexts. At the interface between the two layers, both velocity shear and buoyancy interplay, resulting in various modes of instability. Results from a temporal linear stability analysis of a two-layer stratified exchange flow under the action of a mean advection are presented, investigating the effect of a mild bottom slope on the stability of the interface. The spatial acceleration is directly included in the governing stability equations. The results demonstrate that increasing the bottom slope has a similar effect on the stability of the flow as does increasing the ratio R of the thickness of the velocity mixing layer δν to that of the density layer δρ as it causes the flow to be more unstable to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The transition from Kelvin-Helmholtz modes to stable flow occurs at lower Richardson numbers and wavenumbers compared to the horizontal two-layer flow. Kelvin-Helmholtz modes are decreasingly amplified for 1

  9. Linear and radial flow targets for characterizing downhole flow in perforations

    SciTech Connect

    Deo, M. ); Tariq, S.M. ); Halleck, P.M. )

    1989-08-01

    Two types of sandstone targets are commonly used to test flow efficiency of shaped-charge jet perforations: linear targets, in which flow enters only the unperforated end of the cylindrical sample, and radial targets, in which flow enters through the end and sides of the sample. To determine which of these targets best represents downhole conditions, the flow distribution along the length of a perforation has been studied by three-dimensional (3D) finite-element analyses. Linear and radial laboratory targets have been compared with downhole perforations under varying conditions. For ideal perforations, the low-shot-density (LSD) case is adequately represented by the radial target, while the high-shot-density (HSD) case falls between the two targets. With realistic crushed and damaged zones, the HSD closely matches the linear target, and the LSD case falls between the two targets.

  10. Linearized pipe flow to Reynolds number 10 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meseguer, Á.; Trefethen, L. N.

    2003-03-01

    A Fourier-Chebyshev Petrov-Galerkin spectral method is described for high-accuracy computation of linearized dynamics for flow in an infinite circular pipe. Our code is unusual in being based on solenoidal velocity variables and in being written in MATLAB. Systematic studies are presented of the dependence of eigenvalues, transient growth factors, and other quantities on the axial and azimuthal wave numbers and the Reynolds number R for R ranging from 10 2 to the idealized (physically unrealizable) value 10 7. Implications for transition to turbulence are considered in the light of recent theoretical results of S.J. Chapman.

  11. ILUBCG2-11: Solution of 11-banded nonsymmetric linear equation systems by a preconditioned biconjugate gradient routine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-M.; Koniges, A. E.; Anderson, D. V.

    1989-10-01

    The biconjugate gradient method (BCG) provides an attractive alternative to the usual conjugate gradient algorithms for the solution of sparse systems of linear equations with nonsymmetric and indefinite matrix operators. A preconditioned algorithm is given, whose form resembles the incomplete L-U conjugate gradient scheme (ILUCG2) previously presented. Although the BCG scheme requires the storage of two additional vectors, it converges in a significantly lesser number of iterations (often half), while the number of calculations per iteration remains essentially the same.

  12. Asymptotic behavior of linearized pipe flow and implications for transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meseguer, Alvaro; Trefethen, Lloyd N.

    2000-11-01

    A solenoidal Petrov-Galerkin MATLAB spectral code is described for high-accuracy computation of linearized dynamics for Hagen-Poiseuille flow in an infinite circular pipe. Systematic studies are presented of the dependence of eigenvalues, transient growth factors, and other quantities on the discretization parameters, the axial and azimuthal wave numbers, and the Reynolds number Re for Re ranging from 10^2 to the idealized (physically unrealizable) value 10^7. Implications for transition to turbulence are considered in the light of the recent theoretical results of S. J. Chapman. Our computations are in agreement with Chapman's predicted threshold amplitude for transition of order Re-3/2 as Re --> ∞.

  13. Nonaxisymmetric linear instability of cylindrical magnetohydrodynamic Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Child, Adam; Kersalé, Evy; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2015-09-01

    We consider the nonaxisymmetric modes of instability present in Taylor-Couette flow under the application of helical magnetic fields, mainly for magnetic Prandtl numbers close to the inductionless limit, and conduct a full examination of marginal stability in the resulting parameter space. We allow for the azimuthal magnetic field to be generated by a combination of currents in the inner cylinder and fluid itself and introduce a parameter governing the relation between the strength of these currents. A set of governing eigenvalue equations for the nonaxisymmetric modes of instability are derived and solved by spectral collocation with Chebyshev polynomials over the relevant parameter space, with the resulting instabilities examined in detail. We find that by altering the azimuthal magnetic field profiles the azimuthal magnetorotational instability, nonaxisymmetric helical magnetorotational instability, and Tayler instability yield interesting dynamics, such as different preferred mode types and modes with azimuthal wave number m >1 . Finally, a comparison is given to the recent WKB analysis performed by Kirillov et al. [Kirillov, Stefani, and Fukumoto, J. Fluid Mech. 760, 591 (2014), 10.1017/jfm.2014.614] and its validity in the linear regime.

  14. The routine leukocyte differential flow cytometry HematoFlow™ method: A new flagging system for automatic validation.

    PubMed

    Allou, Kaoutar; Vial, Jean-Philippe; Béné, Marie C; Lacombe, Francis

    2015-01-01

    The complete blood cell count and white blood cell differential are the first step in the biological diagnosis of hematological diseases. Both are currently performed by automated instruments which control data and produce alerts. If such flags are activated, the automated differential cannot be validated and the operator must activate a visual blood smear review. Microscopic examination is still today the reference method despite its lack of sensitivity and reproducibility. The HematoFlow™ (Beckman Coulter) system is the first flow cytometry commercialized method designed for the routine differential. Using six markers in five colors and an automated gating strategy, it provides differentials proven to be reliable for 17 leukocyte subpopulations detection. Relying first on a retrospective analysis of 6,462 blood samples processed by HematoFlow™, thresholds were determined to detect the presence of immature granulocytes and/or blast cells. All possible gating strategy misclassifications of leukocyte subpopulations were then summarized in a systematic nomenclature leading to the development of an original flag system based on the detection of aberrant localization of cell events in specific new bivariate histograms. Ultimately, more than 50% of the results could be automatically validated using the HematoFlow™ system, without any false negative, thereby dramatically contributing to an important decrease of technicians' workload. Moreover a noticeable help was given for smear review interpretation and new immunological flags led to the confirmation of blood disease after classical immunophenotyping. These results were confirmed in a second prospective study including 15,335 cases, where more than 50% of the results were automatically validated by this new flag system. MFC stands as being more and more essential for analyzing differentials in routine and this new flag system could greatly improve its implementation. PMID:25906976

  15. Application of Crunch-Flow Routines to Constrain Present and Past Carbon Fluxes at Gas-Hydrate Bearing Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Marta

    2014-01-31

    In November 2012, Oregon State University initiated the project entitled: Application of Crunch-Flow routines to constrain present and past carbon fluxes at gas-hydrate bearing sites. Within this project we developed Crunch-Flow based modeling modules that include important biogeochemical processes that need to be considered in gas hydrate environments. Our modules were applied to quantify carbon cycling in present and past systems, using data collected during several DOE-supported drilling expeditions, which include the Cascadia margin in US, Ulleung Basin in South Korea, and several sites drilled offshore India on the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea. Specifically, we completed modeling efforts that: 1) Reproduce the compositional and isotopic profiles observed at the eight drilled sites in the Ulleung Basin that constrain and contrast the carbon cycling pathways at chimney (high methane flux) and non-chimney sites (low methane, advective systems); 2) Simulate the Ba record in the sediments to quantify the past dynamics of methane flux in the southern Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia margin; and 3) Provide quantitative estimates of the thickness of individual mass transport deposits (MTDs), time elapsed after the MTD event, rate of sulfate reduction in the MTD, and time required to reach a new steady state at several sites drilled in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) Basin off India. In addition we developed a hybrid model scheme by coupling a home-made MATLAB code with CrunchFlow to address the methane transport and chloride enrichment at the Ulleung Basins chimney sites, and contributed the modeling component to a study focusing on pore-scale controls on gas hydrate distribution in sediments from the Andaman Sea. These efforts resulted in two manuscripts currently under review, and contributed the modeling component of another pare, also under review. Lessons learned from these efforts are the basis of a mini-workshop to be held at Oregon State University (Feb 2014) to instruct

  16. Linear stability of general magnetically insulated electron flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swegle, J. A.; Mendel, C. W., Jr.; Seidel, D. B.; Quintenz, J. P.

    1984-03-01

    A linear stability theory for magnetically insulated systems was formulated by linearizing the general 3-D, time dependent theory of Mendel, Seidel, and Slut. It is found that, case of electron trajectories which are nearly laminar, with only small transverse motion, several suggestive simplifications occur in the eigenvalue equations.

  17. Linear stability of general magnetically insulated electron flow

    SciTech Connect

    Swegle, J.A.; Mendel, C.W. Jr.; Seidel, D.B.; Quintenz, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    We have formulated a linear stability theory for magnetically insulated systems by linearizing the general 3-D, time-dependent theory of Mendel, Seidel, and Slutz. In the physically interesting case of electron trajectories which are nearly laminar, with only small transverse motion, we have found that several suggestive simplifications occur in the eigenvalue equations.

  18. Enhancing the linear flow of fine granules through the addition of elongated particles

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhiguo; Chen, Xueli; Xu, Yang; Liu, Haifeng

    2015-01-01

    Sandglasses have been used to record time for thousands of years because of their constant flow rates; however, they now are drawing attention for their substantial scientific importance and extensive industrial applications. The presence of elongated particles in a binary granular system is believed to result in undesired flow because their shape implies a larger resistance to flow. However, our experiments demonstrate that the addition of elongated particles can substantially reduce the flow fluctuation of fine granules and produce a stable linear flow similar to that in an hourglass. On the basis of experimental data and previous reports of flow dynamics, we observed that the linear flow is driven by the “needle particle effect,” including flow orientation, reduced agglomeration, and local perturbation. This phenomenon is observed in several binary granular systems, including fine granules and secondary elongated particles, which demonstrates that our simple method can be widely applied to the accurate measurement of granular flows in industry. PMID:26551736

  19. Understanding heat and fluid flow in linear GTA welds

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1992-12-31

    A transient heat flow and fluid flow model was used to predict the development of gas tungsten arc (GTA) weld pools in 1.5 mm thick AISI 304 SS. The welding parameters were chosen so as to correspond to an earlier experimental study which produced high-resolution surface temperature maps. The motivation of the present study was to verify the predictive capability of the computational model. Comparison of the numerical predictions and experimental observations indicate good agreement.

  20. Understanding heat and fluid flow in linear GTA welds

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    A transient heat flow and fluid flow model was used to predict the development of gas tungsten arc (GTA) weld pools in 1.5 mm thick AISI 304 SS. The welding parameters were chosen so as to correspond to an earlier experimental study which produced high-resolution surface temperature maps. The motivation of the present study was to verify the predictive capability of the computational model. Comparison of the numerical predictions and experimental observations indicate good agreement.

  1. Linear coupling of acoustic and cyclotron waves in plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Rogava, Andria; Gogoberidze, Grigol

    2005-05-15

    It is found that in magnetized electrostatic plasma flows the velocity shear couples ion-acoustic waves with ion-cyclotron waves and leads, under favorable conditions, to their efficient reciprocal transformations. It is shown that in a two-dimensional setup this coupling has a remarkable feature: it is governed by equations that are mathematically equal to the ones describing coupling of sound waves with internal gravity waves [Rogava and Mahajan, Phys. Rev. E 55, 1185 (1997)] in neutral fluids. For flows with low shearing rates a fully analytic, quantitative description of the coupling efficiency, based on a noteworthy quantum-mechanical analogy, is given and transformation coefficients are calculated.

  2. Linear coupling of acoustic and cyclotron waves in plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogava, Andria; Gogoberidze, Grigol

    2005-05-01

    It is found that in magnetized electrostatic plasma flows the velocity shear couples ion-acoustic waves with ion-cyclotron waves and leads, under favorable conditions, to their efficient reciprocal transformations. It is shown that in a two-dimensional setup this coupling has a remarkable feature: it is governed by equations that are mathematically equal to the ones describing coupling of sound waves with internal gravity waves [Rogava and Mahajan, Phys. Rev. E 55, 1185 (1997)] in neutral fluids. For flows with low shearing rates a fully analytic, quantitative description of the coupling efficiency, based on a noteworthy quantum-mechanical analogy, is given and transformation coefficients are calculated.

  3. Non linear volume flow dependence on osmotic pressure difference in frog skin.

    PubMed

    Celentano, F; Monticelli, G; Orsenigo, M N

    1978-01-01

    The volume flow dependence upon the osmotic pressure difference of both impermeant (sucrose) and permeable (NaCl) species has been investigated in leg skin bags of Rana esculenta. It is concluded: 1. The hydration-dehydration error in the flow measurement with leg skin bags is negligible. 2. The flow-force relationship is non-linear. 3. Unstirred layers and solute permeation have little, if any, influence on non linearity. 4. Structural modifications of the skin induced with hypertonic solutions have been observed and may contribute to non linearity, as well as the multiple-barrier effect. PMID:310878

  4. A higher order panel method for linearized supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlers, F. E.; Epton, M. A.; Johnson, F. T.; Magnus, A. E.; Rubbert, P. E.

    1979-01-01

    The basic integral equations of linearized supersonic theory for an advanced supersonic panel method are derived. Methods using only linear varying source strength over each panel or only quadratic doublet strength over each panel gave good agreement with analytic solutions over cones and zero thickness cambered wings. For three dimensional bodies and wings of general shape, combined source and doublet panels with interior boundary conditions to eliminate the internal perturbations lead to a stable method providing good agreement experiment. A panel system with all edges contiguous resulted from dividing the basic four point non-planar panel into eight triangular subpanels, and the doublet strength was made continuous at all edges by a quadratic distribution over each subpanel. Superinclined panels were developed and tested on s simple nacelle and on an airplane model having engine inlets, with excellent results.

  5. Prediction of Undsteady Flows in Turbomachinery Using the Linearized Euler Equations on Deforming Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, William S.; Hall, Kenneth C.

    1994-01-01

    A linearized Euler solver for calculating unsteady flows in turbomachinery blade rows due to both incident gusts and blade motion is presented. The model accounts for blade loading, blade geometry, shock motion, and wake motion. Assuming that the unsteadiness in the flow is small relative to the nonlinear mean solution, the unsteady Euler equations can be linearized about the mean flow. This yields a set of linear variable coefficient equations that describe the small amplitude harmonic motion of the fluid. These linear equations are then discretized on a computational grid and solved using standard numerical techniques. For transonic flows, however, one must use a linear discretization which is a conservative linearization of the non-linear discretized Euler equations to ensure that shock impulse loads are accurately captured. Other important features of this analysis include a continuously deforming grid which eliminates extrapolation errors and hence, increases accuracy, and a new numerically exact, nonreflecting far-field boundary condition treatment based on an eigenanalysis of the discretized equations. Computational results are presented which demonstrate the computational accuracy and efficiency of the method and demonstrate the effectiveness of the deforming grid, far-field nonreflecting boundary conditions, and shock capturing techniques. A comparison of the present unsteady flow predictions to other numerical, semi-analytical, and experimental methods shows excellent agreement. In addition, the linearized Euler method presented requires one or two orders-of-magnitude less computational time than traditional time marching techniques making the present method a viable design tool for aeroelastic analyses.

  6. Calculation of unsteady flows in turbomachinery using the linearized Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Kenneth C.; Crawley, Edward F.

    1989-06-01

    A method for calculating unsteady flows in cascades is presented. The model, which is based on the linearized unsteady Euler equations, accounts for blade loading shock motion, wake motion, and blade geometry. The mean flow through the cascade is determined by solving the full nonlinear Euler equations. Assuming the unsteadiness in the flow is small, then the Euler equations are linearized about the mean flow to obtain a set of linear variable coefficient equations which describe the small amplitude, harmonic motion of the flow. These equations are discretized on a computational grid via a finite volume operator and solved directly subject to an appropriate set of linearized boundary conditions. The steady flow, which is calculated prior to the unsteady flow, is found via a Newton iteration procedure. An important feature of the analysis is the use of shock fitting to model steady and unsteady shocks. Use of the Euler equations with the unsteady Rankine-Hugoniot shock jump conditions correctly models the generation of steady and unsteady entropy and vorticity at shocks. In particular, the low frequency shock displacement is correctly predicted. Results of this method are presented for a variety of test cases. Predicted unsteady transonic flows in channels are compared to full nonlinear Euler solutions obtained using time-accurate, time-marching methods. The agreement between the two methods is excellent for small to moderate levels of flow unsteadiness. The method is also used to predict unsteady flows in cascades due to blade motion (flutter problem) and incoming disturbances (gust response problem).

  7. Effect of depth order on linear vection with optical flows.

    PubMed

    Seya, Yasuhiro; Tsuji, Takayuki; Shinoda, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of depth order on forward and backward vection were examined using optical flows simulating motion in depth (i.e., approaching or receding). In an experiment, space extending 10 or 20 m in depth was simulated, and the space was divided into foreground and background spaces. In each space, a random-dot pattern was presented and the binocular disparity, size, and velocity of each dot were continuously manipulated in a way consistent with the depth being simulated. Participants reported whether they perceived vection. Latency, total duration (i.e., the amount of time that participants reported perceiving vection during a 60-s presentation), and strong-vection duration (i.e., the amount of time that participants reported perceiving strong vection) were measured. The results indicated that, even though the dots making up the optical flow were much smaller and slower moving in the background space than in the foreground space, vection was strongly dependent on flow motion in the background space. This supports the idea that the perceptual system uses background stimulus motion as a reliable cue for self-motion perception. PMID:25926971

  8. Linear flow dynamics near a T/NT interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, Miguel; Silva, Carlos

    2011-11-01

    The characteristics of a suddenly-inserted T/NT interface separating a homogeneous and isotropic shear-free turbulence region from a non-turbulent flow region are investigated using rapid distortion theory (RDT), taking full account of viscous effects. Profiles of the velocity variances, TKE, viscous dissipation rate, turbulence length scales, and pressure statistics are derived, showing very good agreement with DNS. The normalized inviscid flow statistics at the T/NT interface do not depend on the form of the assumed TKE spectrum. In the non-turbulent region, where the flow is irrotational (except within a thin viscous boundary layer), the dissipation rate decays as z-6, where z is distance from the T/NT interface. The mean pressure exhibits a decrease towards the turbulence due to the associated velocity fluctuations, consistent with the generation of a mean entrainment velocity. The vorticity variance and dissipation rate display large maxima at the T/NT interface due to the existing inviscid discontinuities of the tangential velocity, and these maxima are quantitatively related to the thickness of the viscous boundary layer (VBL). At equilibrium, RDT suggests that the thickness of the T/NT interface scales on the Kolmogorov microscale. We acknowledge the financial support of FCT under Project PTDC/EME-MFE/099636/2008.

  9. Stochastic Estimation and Non-Linear Wall-Pressure Sources in a Separating/Reattaching Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naguib, A.; Hudy, L.; Humphreys, W. M., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Simultaneous wall-pressure and PIV measurements are used to study the conditional flow field associated with surface-pressure generation in a separating/reattaching flow established over a fence-with-splitter-plate geometry. The conditional flow field is captured using linear and quadratic stochastic estimation based on the occurrence of positive and negative pressure events in the vicinity of the mean reattachment location. The results shed light on the dominant flow structures associated with significant wall-pressure generation. Furthermore, analysis based on the individual terms in the stochastic estimation expansion shows that both the linear and non-linear flow sources of the coherent (conditional) velocity field are equally important contributors to the generation of the conditional surface pressure.

  10. Analytical Solution to the MHD Flow of Micropolar Fluid Over a Linear Stretching Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddheshwar, P. G.; Mahabaleshwar, U. S.

    2015-05-01

    The flow due to a linear stretching sheet in a fluid with suspended particles, modeled as a micropolar fluid, is considered. All reported works on the problem use numerical methods of solution or a regular perturbation technique. An analytical solution is presented in the paper for the coupled non-linear differential equations with inhomogeneous boundary conditions.

  11. Linear system identification of a cold flow circulating fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Panday, R; Woerner, B D; Ludlow, J C; Shadle, L J; Boyle, E J

    2009-02-01

    Knowledge of the solids circulation rate (SCR) is essential to the control and improved performance of a circulating fluidized bed system. In the present work, the noise model is derived using the prediction error method considering process and measurement noises acting on the cold flow circulating fluidized bed (CFCFB) with a cork particulate material. The outputs of the initial model are the total pressure drop across the riser, the pressure drop across the crossover, the pressure drop across the primary cyclone, the total pressure drop across the stand-pipe, the pressure drop across the loop seal, and the SCR. The stochastic estimate of SCR is determined from the noise model using the stochastic pressure drop estimates. The deterministic estimate is obtained through the inputs taken as move air flow, riser aeration, and loop seal fluidization air that are all independent variables of the given setup and under the control of the user. The theory has been developed to convert a complete blackbox model to a grey box model through the output-to-state transformation such that both the models of the CFCFB consists of all these output variables as the states of the system, and only pressure drops across the system as the output measurements. Thus, the final models do not include any fictitious terms and they are defined only in terms of physical parameters of the given system. Both components of SCR are separately analysed. The combined SCR response of both the noise model and deterministic model is compared with the validation data set of this state variable in terms of modelfit, and the results are shown.

  12. Transport equations for linear surface waves with random underlying flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, Guillaume; Chou, Tom

    1999-11-01

    We define the Wigner distribution and use it to develop equations for linear surface capillary-gravity wave propagation in the transport regime. The energy density a(r, k) contained in waves propagating with wavevector k at field point r is given by dota(r,k) + nabla_k[U_⊥(r,z=0) \\cdotk + Ω(k)]\\cdotnabla_ra [13pt] \\: hspace1in - (nabla_r\\cdotU_⊥)a - nabla_r(k\\cdotU_⊥)\\cdotnabla_ka = Σ(δU^2) where U_⊥(r, z=0) is a slowly varying surface current, and Ω(k) = √(k^3+k)tanh kh is the free capillary-gravity dispersion relation. Note that nabla_r\\cdotU_⊥(r,z=0) neq 0, and that the surface currents exchange energy density with the propagating waves. When an additional weak random current √\\varepsilon δU(r/\\varepsilon) varying on the scale of k-1 is included, we find an additional scattering term Σ(δU^2) as a function of correlations in δU. Our results can be applied to the study of surface wave energy transport over a turbulent ocean.

  13. The Hagen-Poiseuille, Plane Couette and Poiseuille Flows Linear Instability and Rogue Waves Excitation Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chefranov, Sergey; Chefranov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Linear hydrodynamic stability theory for the Hagen-Poiseuille (HP) flow yields a conclusion of infinitely large threshold Reynolds number, Re, value. This contradiction to the observation data is bypassed using assumption of the HP flow instability having hard type and possible for sufficiently high-amplitude disturbances. HP flow disturbance evolution is considered by nonlinear hydrodynamic stability theory. Similar is the case of the plane Couette (PC) flow. For the plane Poiseuille (PP) flow, linear theory just quantitatively does not agree with experimental data defining the threshold Reynolds number Re= 5772 ( S. A. Orszag, 1971), more than five-fold exceeding however the value observed, Re=1080 (S. J. Davies, C. M. White, 1928). In the present work, we show that the linear stability theory conclusions for the HP and PC on stability for any Reynolds number and evidently too high threshold Reynolds number estimate for the PP flow are related with the traditional use of the disturbance representation assuming the possibility of separation of the longitudinal (along the flow direction) variable from the other spatial variables. We show that if to refuse from this traditional form, conclusions on the linear instability for the HP and PC flows may be obtained for finite Reynolds numbers (for the HP flow, for Re>704, and for the PC flow, for Re>139). Also, we fit the linear stability theory conclusion on the PP flow to the experimental data by getting an estimate of the minimal threshold Reynolds number as Re=1040. We also get agreement of the minimal threshold Reynolds number estimate for PC with the experimental data of S. Bottin, et.al., 1997, where the laminar PC flow stability threshold is Re = 150. Rogue waves excitation mechanism in oppositely directed currents due to the PC flow linear instability is discussed. Results of the new linear hydrodynamic stability theory for the HP, PP, and PC flows are published in the following papers: 1. S.G. Chefranov, A

  14. Iterative solution of large, sparse linear systems on a static data flow architecture - Performance studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, D. A.; Patrick, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    The applicability of static data flow architectures to the iterative solution of sparse linear systems of equations is investigated. An analytic performance model of a static data flow computation is developed. This model includes both spatial parallelism, concurrent execution in multiple PE's, and pipelining, the streaming of data from array memories through the PE's. The performance model is used to analyze a row partitioned iterative algorithm for solving sparse linear systems of algebraic equations. Based on this analysis, design parameters for the static data flow architecture as a function of matrix sparsity and dimension are proposed.

  15. Linear response range characterization and in vivo application of laser speckle imaging of blood flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Bernard; Ramírez-San-Juan, Julio C.; Lotfi, Justin; Nelson, J. S.

    2006-07-01

    Noninvasive blood flow imaging can provide critical information on the state of biological tissue and the efficacy of approaches to treat disease. With laser speckle imaging (LSI), relative changes in blood flow are typically reported, with the assumption that the measured values are on a linear scale. A linear relationship between the measured and actual flow rate values has been suggested. The actual flow rate range, over which this linear relationship is valid, is unknown. Herein we report the linear response range and velocity dynamic range (VDR) of our LSI instrument at two relevant camera integration times. For integration times of 1 and 10 ms, the best case VDR was 80 and 60 dB, respectively, and the worst case VDR was 20 and 50 dB. The best case VDR values were similar to those reported in the literature for optical Doppler tomography. We also demonstrate the potential of LSI for monitoring blood flow dynamics in the rodent dorsal skinfold chamber model. These findings imply that LSI can provide accurate wide-field maps of microvascular blood flow rate dynamics and highlight heterogeneities in flow response to the application of exogenous agents.

  16. Mechanical picture of the linear transient growth of vortical perturbations in incompressible smooth shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagelishvili, George; Hau, Jan-Niklas; Khujadze, George; Oberlack, Martin

    2016-08-01

    The linear dynamics of perturbations in smooth shear flows covers the transient exchange of energies between (1) the perturbations and the basic flow and (2) different perturbations modes. Canonically, the linear exchange of energies between the perturbations and the basic flow can be described in terms of the Orr and the lift-up mechanisms, correspondingly for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) perturbations. In this paper the mechanical basis of the linear transient dynamics is introduced and analyzed for incompressible plane constant shear flows, where we consider the dynamics of virtual fluid particles in the framework of plane perturbations (i.e., perturbations with plane surfaces of constant phase) for the 2D and 3D case. It is shown that (1) the formation of a pressure perturbation field is the result of countermoving neighboring sets of incompressible fluid particles in the flow, (2) the keystone of the energy exchange mechanism between the basic flow and perturbations is the collision of fluid particles with the planes of constant pressure in accordance with the classical theory of elastic collision of particles with a rigid wall, making the pressure field the key player in this process, (3) the interplay of the collision process and the shear flow kinematics describes the transient growth of plane perturbations and captures the physics of the growth, and (4) the proposed mechanical picture allows us to reconstruct the linearized Euler equations in spectral space with a time-dependent shearwise wave number, the linearized Euler equations for Kelvin modes. This confirms the rigor of the presented analysis, which, moreover, yields a natural generalization of the proposed mechanical picture of the transient growth to the well-established linear phenomenon of vortex-wave-mode coupling.

  17. Linear Instability of a Uni-Directional Transversely Sheared Mean Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wundrow, David W.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of spanwise-periodic mean-flow distortions (i.e. streamwise-vortex structures) on the evolution of small-amplitude, single-frequency instability waves in an otherwise two-dimensional shear flow is investigated. The streamwise-vortex structures are taken to be just weak enough so that the spatially growing instability waves behave (locally) like linear perturbations about a uni-directional transversely sheared mean flow. Numerical solutions are computed and discussed for both the mean flow and the instability waves. The influence of the streamwise-vortex wavelength on the properties of the most rapidly growing instability wave is also discussed.

  18. Non-Linear Dynamics and Stability of Circular Cylindrical Shells Containing Flowing Fluid. Part i: Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AMABILI, M.; PELLICANO, F.; PAÏDOUSSIS, M. P.

    1999-08-01

    The study presented is an investigation of the non-linear dynamics and stability of simply supported, circular cylindrical shells containing inviscid incompressible fluid flow. Non-linearities due to large-amplitude shell motion are considered by using the non-linear Donnell's shallow shell theory, with account taken of the effect of viscous structural damping. Linear potential flow theory is applied to describe the fluid-structure interaction. The system is discretiszd by Galerkin's method, and is investigated by using a model involving seven degrees of freedom, allowing for travelling wave response of the shell and shell axisymmetric contraction. Two different boundary conditions are applied to the fluid flow beyond the shell, corresponding to: (i) infinite baffles (rigid extensions of the shell), and (ii) connection with a flexible wall of infinite extent in the longitudinal direction, permitting solution by separation of variables; they give two different kinds of dynamical behaviour of the system, as a consequence of the fact that axisymmetric contraction, responsible for the softening non-linear dynamical behaviour of shells, is not allowed if the fluid flow beyond the shell is constrained by rigid baffles. Results show that the system loses stability by divergence.

  19. Subcritical transition in plane Poiseuille flow as a linear instability process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roizner, Federico; Karp, Michael; Cohen, Jacob

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a transition scenario is demonstrated, in which most of the stages are followed analytically. The transition is initiated by the linear transient growth mechanism in plane Poiseuille flow subjected to an infinitesimally small secondary disturbance. A novel analytical approximation of the linear transient growth mechanism enables us to perform a secondary linear stability analysis of the modified base-flow. Two possible routes to transition are highlighted here, both correspond to a small secondary disturbance superimposed on a linear transient growth. The first scenario is initiated by four decaying odd normal modes which form a counter-rotating vortex pair; the second is initiated by five even decaying modes which form a pair of counter-rotating pairs. The approximation of the linear transient growth stage by a combination of minimal number of modes allows us to follow the transition stages analytically by employing the multiple time scale method. In particular, the secondary instability stage is followed analytically using linear tools, and is verified by obtaining transition in a direct numerical simulation initiated by conditions dictated by the transient growth analytical expressions. Very good agreement is observed, verifying the theoretical model. The similarities between the two transition routes are discussed and the results are compared with similar results obtained for plane Couette flow.

  20. Linear stability of pressure-driven flow over longitudinal superhydrophobic grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, K. H.; Teo, C. J.; Khoo, B. C.

    2016-02-01

    The modal analysis of pressure-driven flows in channels patterned with superhydrophobic surfaces containing periodic grooves and ribs aligned longitudinally to the flow direction has been performed. The effects of shear-free fraction (" separators=" δ ) and groove-rib spatial period normalized by full-channel height (" separators=" L ) on the linear flow stability of such flows have been explored. By performing a BiGlobal linear stability analysis via the pseudo-spectral method, such surfaces have been found to potentially exert a stabilizing or destabilizing effect on the base flow, depending predominantly on the normalized groove-rib spacing. For small values of L (i.e., L = 0.01 and 0.02), a stabilizing effect is predicted for flows over longitudinal superhydrophobic grooves, in agreement with the results obtained using a local stability analysis which employs a homogeneous slip condition along the walls. For a moderate value of normalized groove-rib spacing where the groove-rib periodic spacing is one-tenth of the channel height, the presence of longitudinal superhydrophobic grooves leads to flow instabilities at a lower critical Reynolds number. The redistribution of the base flow resulting from the vanishing shear rates along the liquid-gas interface could give rise to an inflectional instability that promotes temporal instability. The effects of patterning the superhydrophobic surfaces on one or both channel walls are also examined.

  1. Calculation of linearized supersonic flow over slender cones of arbitrary cross section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mascitti, V. R.

    1972-01-01

    Supersonic linearized conical-flow theory is used to determine the flow over slender pointed cones having horizontal and vertical planes of symmetry. The geometry of the cone cross sections and surface velocities are expanded in Fourier series. The symmetry condition permits the uncoupling of lifting and nonlifting solutions. The present method reduces to Ward's theory for flow over a cone of elliptic cross section. Results are also presented for other shapes. Results by this method diverge for cross-sectional shapes where the maximum thickness is large compared with the minimum thickness. However, even for these slender-body shapes, lower order solutions are good approximations to the complete solution.

  2. Enhancement of aortic blood flow with a linear anionic macropolymer of extraordinary molecular length.

    PubMed

    Polimeni, P I; Ottenbreit, B; Coleman, P

    1985-07-01

    The addition of small amounts of high mol. wt polymers to a fluid moving through a pipe typically increases fluid viscosity and thereby diminishes the rate of flow. Under appropriate conditions of flow, however, the addition of linear polymers of high mol. wt--of the order of 10(5) to 10(7) daltons--may cause the flow to increase as much as 3-fold and occasionally more without altering the driving pressure. This effect, generally known to hydrodynamicists under the rubric 'Toms phenomenon' or as 'polymer drag reduction', generally occurs at high (greater than 1000) Reynolds numbers. However, flow also increases at much lower Reynolds numbers under certain conditions, including oscillatory, pulsatile, and helicoidal flows and flow through a column of sand. The Toms phenomenon has been repeatedly observed in various types of flow with both aqueous and organic solvents in combination with a wide variety of polymer additives. A marked fall in the pressure gradients of constant blood flows through pipes has also been observed upon the addition of polyacrylamide, poly(ethylene oxide), deoxyribonucleic acid, or a polysaccharide extracted from okra. It is the consensus among students of fluid mechanics that linear macromolecules suppress flow disturbances by stabilizing or laminizing the dynamic fluid structure when rod- or thread-like particles align themselves parallel to the axis of flow. Mostardi et al. demonstrated with hot film anemometry that aortic flow instabilities downstream from a temporary partial occlusion are dampened after infusion of a polymer drag-reducing agent, Separan AP-30 (Dow Chemical Co.).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4020886

  3. Linear stability, transient energy growth, and the role of viscosity stratification in compressible plane Couette flow.

    PubMed

    Malik, M; Dey, J; Alam, Meheboob

    2008-03-01

    Linear stability and the nonmodal transient energy growth in compressible plane Couette flow are investigated for two prototype mean flows: (a) the uniform shear flow with constant viscosity, and (b) the nonuniform shear flow with stratified viscosity. Both mean flows are linearly unstable for a range of supersonic Mach numbers (M). For a given M , the critical Reynolds number (Re) is significantly smaller for the uniform shear flow than its nonuniform shear counterpart; for a given Re, the dominant instability (over all streamwise wave numbers, alpha ) of each mean flow belongs to different modes for a range of supersonic M . An analysis of perturbation energy reveals that the instability is primarily caused by an excess transfer of energy from mean flow to perturbations. It is shown that the energy transfer from mean flow occurs close to the moving top wall for "mode I" instability, whereas it occurs in the bulk of the flow domain for "mode II." For the nonmodal transient growth analysis, it is shown that the maximum temporal amplification of perturbation energy, G(max), and the corresponding time scale are significantly larger for the uniform shear case compared to those for its nonuniform counterpart. For alpha=0 , the linear stability operator can be partitioned into L ~ L+Re(2) L(p), and the Re-dependent operator L(p) is shown to have a negligibly small contribution to perturbation energy which is responsible for the validity of the well-known quadratic-scaling law in uniform shear flow: G(t/Re) ~ Re(2). In contrast, the dominance of L(p) is responsible for the invalidity of this scaling law in nonuniform shear flow. An inviscid reduced model, based on Ellingsen-Palm-type solution, has been shown to capture all salient features of transient energy growth of full viscous problem. For both modal and nonmodal instability, it is shown that the viscosity stratification of the underlying mean flow would lead to a delayed transition in compressible Couette flow

  4. Comparison of the Single Molecule Dynamics of Linear and Circular DNAs in Planar Extensional Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanfei; Hsiao, Kai-Wen; Brockman, Christopher; Yates, Daniel; McKenna, Gregory; Schroeder, Charles; San Francisco, Michael; Kornfield, Julie; Anderson, Rae

    2015-03-01

    Chain topology has a profound impact on the flow behaviors of single macromolecules. The absence of free ends separates circular polymers from other chain architectures, i.e., linear, star, and branched. In the present work, we study the single chain dynamics of large circular and linear DNA molecules by comparing the relaxation dynamics, steady state coil-stretch transition, and transient molecular individualism behaviors for the two types of macromolecules. To this end, large circular DNA molecules were biologically synthesized and studied in a microfluidic device that has a cross-slot geometry to develop a stagnation point extensional flow. Although the relaxation time of rings scales in the same way as for the linear analog, the circular polymers show quantitatively different behaviors in the steady state extension and qualitatively different behaviors during a transient stretch. The existence of some commonality between these two topologies is proposed. Texas Tech University John R. Bradford Endowment.

  5. Losses estimation in transonic wet steam flow through linear blade cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykas, Sławomir; Majkut, Mirosław; Strozik, Michał; Smołka, Krystian

    2015-04-01

    Experimental investigations of non-equilibrium spontaneous condensation in transonic steam flow were carried out in linear blade cascade. The linear cascade consists of the stator blades of the last stage of low pressure steam turbine. The applied experimental test section is a part of a small scale steam power plant located at Silesian University of Technology in Gliwice. The steam parameters at the test section inlet correspond to the real conditions in low pressure part of 200MWe steam turbine. The losses in the cascade were estimated using measured static pressure and temperature behind the cascade and the total parameters at inlet. The static pressure measurements on the blade surface as well as the Schlieren pictures were used to assess the flow field in linear cascade of steam turbine stator blades.

  6. On the application of a linearized unsteady potential-flow analysis to fan-tip cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usab, W. J., Jr.; Verdon, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A linearized potential flow analysis, which accounts for the effects of nonuniform steady flow phenomena on the unsteady response to prescribed blade motions, has been applied to five two-dimensional cascade configurations. These include a flat-plate cascade and three cascades which are representative of the tip sections of current fan designs. Here the blades are closely spaced, highly staggered, and operate at low mean incidence. The fifth configuration is a NASA Lewis cascade of symmetric biconvex airfoils for which experimental measurements are available. Numerical solutions are presented that clearly illustrate the effects and importance of blade geometry and mean blade loading on the linearized unsteady response at high subsonic inlet Mach number and high blade-vibrational frequency. In addition, a good qualitative agreement is shown between the analytical predictions and experimental measurements for the cascade of symmetric biconvex airfoils. Finally, recommendations on the research needed to extend the range of application of linearized unsteady aerodynamic analyses are provided.

  7. Linear and nonlinear effect of sheared plasma flow on resistive tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qiming Hu, Xiwei; Yu, Q.

    2014-12-15

    The effect of sheared plasma flow on the m/n = 2/1 tearing mode is studied numerically (m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers). It is found that in the linear phase the plasma flow with a weak or moderate shear plays a stabilizing effect on tearing mode. However, the mode is driven to be more unstable by sufficiently strong sheared flow when approaching the shear Alfvén resonance (AR). In the nonlinear phase, a moderate (strong) sheared flow leads to a smaller (larger) saturated island width. The stabilization of tearing modes by moderate shear plasma flow is enhanced for a larger plasma viscosity and a lower Alfvén velocity. It is also found that in the nonlinear phase AR accelerates the plasma rotation around the 2/1 rational surface but decelerates it at the AR location, and the radial location satisfying AR spreads inwards towards the magnetic axis.

  8. A novel crowd flow model based on linear fractional stable motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Juan; Zhang, Hong; Wu, Zhenya; He, Junlin; Guo, Yangyong

    2016-03-01

    For the evacuation dynamics in indoor space, a novel crowd flow model is put forward based on Linear Fractional Stable Motion. Based on position attraction and queuing time, the calculation formula of movement probability is defined and the queuing time is depicted according to linear fractal stable movement. At last, an experiment and simulation platform can be used for performance analysis, studying deeply the relation among system evacuation time, crowd density and exit flow rate. It is concluded that the evacuation time and the exit flow rate have positive correlations with the crowd density, and when the exit width reaches to the threshold value, it will not effectively decrease the evacuation time by further increasing the exit width.

  9. Routine detection of Epstein-Barr virus specific T-cells in the peripheral blood by flow cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, B. E.; Stowe, R. P.; Pierson, D. L.; Sams, C. F.

    2001-01-01

    The ability to detect cytomegalovirus-specific T-cells (CD4(+)) in the peripheral blood by flow cytometry has been recently described by Picker et al. In this method, cells are incubated with viral antigen and responding (cytokine producing) T-cells are then identified by flow cytometry. To date, this technique has not been reliably used to detect Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific T-cells primarily due to the superantigen/mitogenic properties of the virus which non-specifically activate T-cells. By modifying culture conditions under which the antigens are presented, we have overcome this limitation and developed an assay to detect and quantitate EBV-specific T-cells. The detection of cytokine producing T-cells by flow cytometry requires an extremely strong signal (such as culture in the presence of PMA and ionomycin). Our data indicate that in modified culture conditions (early removal of viral antigen) the non-specific activation of T-cells by EBV is reduced, but antigen presentation will continue uninhibited. Using this method, EBV-specific T-cells may be legitimately detected using flow cytometry. No reduction in the numbers of antigen-specific T-cells was observed by the early removal of target antigen when verified using cytomegalovirus antigen (a virus with no non-specific T-cell activation properties). In EBV-seropositive individuals, the phenotype of the EBV-specific cytokine producing T-cells was evaluated using four-color flow cytometry and found to be CD45(+), CD3(+), CD4(+), CD45RA(-), CD69(+), CD25(-). This phenotype indicates the stimulation of circulating previously unactivated memory T-cells. No cytokine production was observed in CD4(+) T-cells from EBV-seronegative individuals, confirming the specificity of this assay. In addition, the use of four color cytometry (CD45, CD3, CD69, IFNgamma/IL-2) allows the total quantitative assessment of EBV-specific T-cells while monitoring the interference of EBV non-specific mitogenic activity. This method may

  10. [Flow field test on the tangential section of polypropylene tubular membrane module annular gap in rotating linear tangential flow].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengduan; Chen, Wenmei; Li, Jianming; Jiang, Guangming

    2002-07-01

    A new type of polypropylene tubular membrane apparatus of rotating cross flow was designed to study experimentally the flow field characteristics of the tangential section of the membrane annular gap. The authors designed rotary linear tangential flow tubular membrane separator and its test system for the first time. Through the system, the flow field of rotary linear tangential flow with the advanced Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was tested for the first time. A lot of streamlines and vorticity maps of the tangential section of separator in different operation conditions were obtained. The velocity distribution characteristics were analyzed quantitatively: 1. At non-vortex area, no matter how the operation parameters change, the velocity near to rotary tangential flow entrance was higher than the velocity far from entrance at the same radial coordinates. At vortex area, generally the flow velocity of inner vortex was lower than the outer vortex. At the vortex center, the velocity was lowest, the tangential velocity were equal to zero generally. At the vortex center zone, the tangential velocity was less than the axial velocity. 2. Under test operations, the tangential velocity and axial velocity of vortices borders are 1-2 times of average axial velocity of membrane module annular gap. The maximum tangential velocity and axial velocity of ellipse vortices were 2-6 times of average axial velocity of membrane module annular gap. 3. The vortices that are formed on the tangential section, there existed mass transfer between inner and outer parts of fluid. Much fluid of outer vortices got into the inner ones, which was able to prevent membrane tube from particles blocking up very soon. PMID:12371104

  11. Transthoracic measurement of left coronary artery flow reserve improves the diagnostic value of routine dipyridamole-atropine stress echocardiogram

    PubMed Central

    Wejner-Mik, Paulina; Nouri, Aria; Szymczyk, Ewa; Krzemińska-Pakuła, Maria; Lipiec, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We hypothesized that coronary flow reserve (CFR) in the left anterior descending artery (LAD) can be effectively measured during an accelerated dipyridamole-atropine stress echocardiography (DASE) protocol to improve the diagnostic performance of the test. Material and methods In 64 patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease scheduled for coronary angiography DASE with concomitant CFR measurement in LAD was performed. Results Coronary flow reserve measurement and calculation were feasible in 83% of patients. The positive predictive value of undetectable LAD flow was 81% for severe LAD disease. Measured values of CFR were in the range 1.3–4.1 (mean: 2.2 ±0.7). Significantly lower CFR was found in patients with LAD disease (1.97 ±0.62 vs. 2.55 ±0.57, p = 0.0015). The optimal cutoff for detecting ≥ 50% stenosis was CFR ≤ 2.1 (ROC AUC 0.776), corresponding with 68% sensitivity and 84% specificity. In patients with negative DASE results 67% of patients with LAD disease had abnormal CFR, whereas in patients with a positive DASE result 92% of patients with normal LAD had normal CFR. The DASE diagnostic accuracy for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) increased from 75% to 85% when CFR measurement was added to wall motion abnormality (WMA) analysis. No test with both abnormalities was false positive for the detection of coronary disease. Conclusions Incorporation of CFR measurement into WMA-based stress echocardiography is feasible even in an accelerated DASE protocol and can be translated into an approximate gain of 10% in overall test accuracy. PMID:24273560

  12. Linear model describing three components of flow in karst aquifers using 18O data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, A.J.; Putnam, L.D.

    2004-01-01

    The stable isotope of oxygen, 18O, is used as a naturally occurring ground-water tracer. Time-series data for ??18O are analyzed to model the distinct responses and relative proportions of the conduit, intermediate, and diffuse flow components in karst aquifers. This analysis also describes mathematically the dynamics of the transient fluid interchange between conduits and diffusive networks. Conduit and intermediate flow are described by linear-systems methods, whereas diffuse flow is described by mass-balance methods. An automated optimization process estimates parameters of lognormal, Pearson type III, and gamma distributions, which are used as transfer functions in linear-systems analysis. Diffuse flow and mixing parameters also are estimated by these optimization methods. Results indicate the relative proximity of a well to a main conduit flowpath and can help to predict the movement and residence times of potential contaminants. The three-component linear model is applied to five wells, which respond to changes in the isotopic composition of point recharge water from a sinking stream in the Madison aquifer in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Flow velocities as much as 540 m/d and system memories of as much as 71 years are estimated by this method. Also, the mean, median, and standard deviation of traveltimes; time to peak response; and the relative fraction of flow for each of the three components are determined for these wells. This analysis infers that flow may branch apart and rejoin as a result of an anastomotic (or channeled) karst network.

  13. Linear stability analysis and direct numerical simulation of two layer channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kirti; Govindarajan, Rama; Tripathi, Manoj

    2015-11-01

    We study the stability of two-fluid flow through a plane channel at Reynolds numbers of a hundred to a thousand. The two fluids have the same density but different viscosities. The fluids, when miscible, are separated from each other by a mixed layer of small but finite thickness, across which viscosity changes from that of one fluid to that of the other. When immiscible, the interface is sharp. Our study spans a range of Schmidt numbers, viscosity ratios and location and thickness of the mixed layer. Our two-dimensional linear stability results predict well the behaviour displayed by our three-dimensional direct numerical simulations at early times. In both linear and non-linear regimes, the miscible flow is more unstable than the corresponding immiscible one, and the miscible flow breaks spanwise symmetry more readily to go into three-dimensionality. We show that the miscible flow over our range of parameters is always significantly more unstable than the corresponding immiscible case.

  14. Long-wave linear stability theory for two-fluid channel flow including compressibility effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segin, Tetyana M.; Kondic, Lou; Tilley, Burt S.

    2006-10-01

    We present the linear stability of the laminar flow of an immiscible system of a compressible gas and incompressible liquid separated by an interface with large surface tension in a thin inclined channel. The flow is driven by an applied pressure drop and gravity. Following the air-water case, which is found in a variety of engineering systems, the ratio of the characteristic values of the gas and liquid densities and viscosities are assumed to be disparate. Under the lubrication approximation, and assuming ideal gas behaviour and isothermal conditions, this approach leads to a coupled non-linear system of partial differential equations describing the evolution of the interface between the gas and the liquid and the streamwise density distribution of the gas. This system also includes the effects of viscosity stratification, inertia, shear and capillarity. A linear stability analysis that allows for physically relevant non-zero pressure-drop base state is then performed. In contrast to the zero-pressure drop case which is amenable to the classical normal-mode approach, this configuration requires numerically solving a boundary-value problem for the gas density and interfacial deviations from the base state in the streamwise coordinate. We find that the effect of the gas compressibility on the interfacial stability in the limit of vanishingly small wavenumber is destabilizing, even for Stokes flow in the liquid. However, for finite wavenumber disturbances, compressibility may have stabilizing effects. In this regime, sufficient shear is required to destabilize the flow.

  15. Three-dimensional linear stability analysis of incompressible viscous flows using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yan; Kawahara, Mutsuto

    1999-09-01

    The linear stability of incompressible flows is investigated on the basis of the finite element method. The two-dimensional base flows computed numerically over a range of Reynolds numbers are perturbed with three-dimensional disturbances. The three-dimensionality in the flow associated with the secondary instability is identified precisely. First, by using linear stability theory and normal mode analysis, the partial differential equations governing the evolution of perturbation are derived from the linearized Navier-Stokes equation with slight compressibility. In terms of the mixed finite element discretization, in which six-node quadratic Lagrange triangular elements with quadratic interpolation for velocities (P2) and three-node linear Lagrange triangular elements for pressure (P1) are employed, a non-singular generalized eigenproblem is formulated from these equations, whose solution gives the dispersion relation between complex growth rate and wave number. Then, the stabilities of two cases, i.e. the lid-driven cavity flow and flow past a circular cylinder, are examined. These studies determine accurately stability curves to identify the critical Reynolds number and the critical wavelength of the neutral mode by means of the Krylov subspace method and discuss the mechanism of instability. For the cavity flow, the estimated critical results are Rec=920.277+/-0.010 for the Reynolds number and kc=7.40+/-0.02 for the wave number. These results are in good agreement with the observation of Aidun et al. and are more accurate than those by the finite difference method. This instability in the cavity is associated with absolute instability [Huerre and Monkewitz, Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech., 22, 473-537 (1990)]. The Taylor-Göertler-like vortices in the cavity are verified by means of the reconstruction of three-dimensional flows. As for the flow past a circular cylinder, the primary instability result shows that the flow has only two-dimensional characteristics at the

  16. Flow of a binary mixture of linearly incompressible viscous fluids between two horizontal parallel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we use the classical Mixture Theory and present exact solutions to the equations of motion for the steady flow of two linearly viscous fluids between two horizontal plates. We show that for a saturated mixture and under very special conditions, namely when the body forces are assumed negligible, the only interaction force is due to relative velocity (drag force), and if the two velocities are assumed to be related to each other in a linear fashion, then it is possible to integrate the coupled ordinary differential equations and obtain analytical expressions for the velocities and the volume fraction.

  17. Flow of a binary mixture of linearly incompressible viscous fluids between two horizontal parallel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we use the classical Mixture Theory and present exact solutions to the equations of motion for the steady flow of two linearly viscous fluids between two horizontal plates. We show that for a saturated mixture and under very special conditions, namely when the body forces are assumed negligible, the only interaction force is due to relative velocity (drag force), and if the two velocities are assumed to be related to each other in a linear fashion, then it is possible to integrate the coupled ordinary differential equations and obtain analytical expressions for the velocities and the volume fraction.

  18. Plasma flow in peripheral region of detached plasma in linear plasma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Y.; Ohno, N.; Kajita, S.; Tanaka, H.

    2016-01-01

    A plasma flow structure is investigated using a Mach probe under detached plasma condition in a linear plasma device NAGDIS-II. A reverse flow along the magnetic field is observed in a steady-state at far-peripheral region of the plasma column in the upstream side from the recombination front. These experimental results indicate that plasma near the recombination front should strongly diffuse across the magnetic field, and it should be transported along the magnetic field in the reverse flow direction. Furthermore, bursty plasma density fluctuations associated with intermittent convective plasma transport are observed in the far-peripheral region of the plasma column in both upstream and downstream sides from the recombination front. Such a nondiffusive transport can contribute to the intermittent reverse plasma flow, and the experimental results indicate that intermittent transports are frequently produced near the recombination front.

  19. The structure of (linearly) stable double diffusive flow patterns in a laterally heated stratified liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranenborg, E. Jurjen; Dijkstra, Henk A.

    1995-03-01

    Layered double diffusive flow patterns in a laterally heated stably stratified liquid are considered in a configuration which allows for steady states to exist. For the heat/salt system, these flows are characterized by the thermal and solutal Rayleigh numbers RaT and RaS, or equivalently by RaT and the buoyancy ratio Rρ. The bifurcation structure of steady patterns with respect to RaT is computed for two cases: fixed RaS and fixed Rρ. For the first case, results in N. Tsitverblit and E. Kit [Phys. Fluids A 5, 1062 (1993)], are computed and extended, and it is shown that many of the previously found flow patterns are unstable; only in a small interval of RaT, multiple (linearly) stable steady states exist. For the second case, the physical relevance of the unstable steady states with respect to the evolution of the flow toward a stable steady state is demonstrated.

  20. Prediction of Transonic Vortex Flows Using Linear and Nonlinear Turbulent Eddy Viscosity Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional transonic flow over a delta wing is investigated with a focus on the effect of transition and influence of turbulence stress anisotropies. The performance of linear eddy viscosity models and an explicit algebraic stress model is assessed at the start of vortex flow, and the results compared with experimental data. To assess the effect of transition location, computations that either fix transition or are fully turbulent are performed. To assess the effect of the turbulent stress anisotropy, comparisons are made between predictions from the algebraic stress model and the linear eddy viscosity models. Both transition location and turbulent stress anisotropy significantly affect the 3D flow field. The most significant effect is found to be the modeling of transition location. At a Mach number of 0.90, the computed solution changes character from steady to unsteady depending on transition onset. Accounting for the anisotropies in the turbulent stresses also considerably impacts the flow, most notably in the outboard region of flow separation.

  1. Experimental Analyses of Flow Field Structures around Clustered Linear Aerospike Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Mashio; Mori, Hideo; Nishihira, Ryutaro; Niimi, Tomohide

    2005-05-01

    An aerospike nozzle has been expected as a candidate for an engine of a reusable space shuttle to respond to growing demand for rocket-launching and its cost reduction. In this study, the flow field structures in any cross sections around clustered linear aerospike nozzles are visualized and analyzed, using laser induced fluorescence (LIF) of NO seeded in the carrier gas N2. Since flow field structures are affected mainly by pressure ratio (Ps/Pa, Ps: the source pressure in a reservoir, Pa: the ambient pressure in the vacuum chamber), the clustered linear aerospike nozzle is set inside a vacuum chamber to carry out the experiments in the wide range of pressure ratios from 75 to 200. Flow fields are visualized in several cross-sections, demonstrating the complicated three-dimensional flow field structures. Pressure sensitive paint (PSP) of PtTFPP bound by poly-IBM-co-TFEM is also applied to measurement of the complicated pressure distribution on the spike surface, and to verification of contribution of a truncation plane to the thrust. Finally, to examine the effect of the sidewalls attached to the aerospike nozzle, the flow fields around the nozzle with the sidewalls are compared with those without sidewalls.

  2. A free-trailing vane flow direction indicator employing a linear output Hall effect transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter T.; Mcmahon, Robert D.

    1988-01-01

    The Hall effect vane (HEV) was developed to measure flow angularity in the NASA 40-by-80-foot and 80-by-120-foot wind tunnels. This indicator is capable of sensing flow direction at air speeds from 5 to 300 knots and over a + or - 40 deg angle range with a resolution of 0.1 deg. A free-trailing vane configuration employing a linear output Hall effect transducer as a shaft angle resolver was used. The current configuration of the HEV is designed primarily for wind tunnel calibration testing; however, other potential applications include atmospheric, flight or ground research testing. The HEV met initial design requirements.

  3. Cleavage of supercoiled plasmid DNA by autoantibody Fab fragment: application of the flow linear dichroism technique.

    PubMed Central

    Gololobov, G V; Chernova, E A; Schourov, D V; Smirnov, I V; Kudelina, I A; Gabibov, A G

    1995-01-01

    A highly effective method consisting of two affinity chromatography steps and ion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography steps was developed for purification of autoantibodies from human sera with DNA-hydrolyzing activity. Antibody Fab fragment, which had been purified 130-fold, was shown to catalyze plasmid DNA cleavage. The flow linear dichroism technique was used for quantitative and qualitative studying of supercoiled plasmid DNA cleavage by these autoantibodies in comparison with DNase I and EcoRI restriction endonuclease. The DNA autoantibody Fab fragment was shown to hydrolyze plasmid DNA by Mg(2+)-dependent single-strand multiple nicking of the substrate. Kinetic properties of the DNA autoantibody Fab fragment were evaluated from the flow linear dichroism and agarose gel electrophoresis data and revealed a high affinity (Kobsm = 43 nM) and considerable catalytic efficiency (kappcat/Kobsm = 0.32 min-1.nM-1) of the reaction. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7816827

  4. Linear and weakly nonlinear global instability of a fluid flow through a collapsible channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaouche, Mustapha; Di Labbio, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Interactions between an internal flow and wall deformation occur in many biological systems. Such interactions can involve a complex and rich dynamical behavior and a number of peculiarities which depend on the flow parameter range. The aim of this paper is to present a variant (obtained via a weighted residual approach) of the averaged one-dimensional model derived by Stewart et al. ["Local and global instabilities of flow in a flexible-walled channel," Eur. J. Mech. B/Fluids 28, 541-557 (2009)]. The asymptotic expansions for small Reynolds numbers of these two models, compared to the exact solution obtained from the lubrication approach, reveal some quantitative difference, even at higher Reynolds numbers. Qualitatively, the two models give similar results at least at a linear level. It is shown that for relatively low membrane tension (T), there are distinct regions in the (T, R) parameter space where steady bifurcating flows may occur. These flows can also be observed at vanishingly small Reynolds numbers combined with relatively high membrane tension. At sufficiently high T and R, the bifurcating flow is rather time periodic. A weakly nonlinear analysis is then performed in both cases leading to the derivation of evolution equations for the amplitudes of the bifurcating flows. The amplitude equations show that the saddle node bifurcation has a transcritical character while the Hopf bifurcation is either subcritical or supercritical, depending both on the mode number and membrane tension.

  5. Three-dimensional effects of the linear hydrodynamic instability on the plane wake flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mele, P.; Morganti, M.; Attili, F.

    The LINEAR hydrodynamic stability for plane shear flows considers planar disturbances super-imposed over the main flow. Squire transforms justify the use of disturbances of this kind in order to detect the critical Reynolds number. In this way the behavior of the onset of oscillations of the flow field is well described, especially for flows with a profile of the basic velocity with points of inflexion like wake profile flows. A tentative approach is pursued for the study of the behavior of the flow for a Reynolds number slightly greater than the critical value using the Squire transforms to obtain new solutions of the flow field, with disturbances neither amplified nor damped but of three-dimensional character. The two-dimensional mode is obtained as an eigenfunction of the Orr-Sommerfeld equation by an already tested Galerkin procedure. Hence the Poisson equation is solved in order to obtain the pressure field of the disturbance. The presence of more than one mode is analyzed with their influence on the two- and three-dimensional organized structures of large eddies. Numerical and experimental results are compared.

  6. Linear and nonlinear instability in vertical counter-current laminar gas-liquid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Patrick; Ó Náraigh, Lennon; Lucquiaud, Mathieu; Valluri, Prashant

    2016-04-01

    We consider the genesis and dynamics of interfacial instability in vertical gas-liquid flows, using as a model the two-dimensional channel flow of a thin falling film sheared by counter-current gas. The methodology is linear stability theory (Orr-Sommerfeld analysis) together with direct numerical simulation of the two-phase flow in the case of nonlinear disturbances. We investigate the influence of two main flow parameters on the interfacial dynamics, namely the film thickness and pressure drop applied to drive the gas stream. To make contact with existing studies in the literature, the effect of various density contrasts is also examined. Energy budget analyses based on the Orr-Sommerfeld theory reveal various coexisting unstable modes (interfacial, shear, internal) in the case of high density contrasts, which results in mode coalescence and mode competition, but only one dynamically relevant unstable interfacial mode for low density contrast. A study of absolute and convective instability for low density contrast shows that the system is absolutely unstable for all but two narrow regions of the investigated parameter space. Direct numerical simulations of the same system (low density contrast) show that linear theory holds up remarkably well upon the onset of large-amplitude waves as well as the existence of weakly nonlinear waves. For high density contrasts, corresponding more closely to an air-water-type system, linear stability theory is also successful at determining the most-dominant features in the interfacial wave dynamics at early-to-intermediate times. Nevertheless, the short waves selected by the linear theory undergo secondary instability and the wave train is no longer regular but rather exhibits chaotic motion. The same linear stability theory predicts when the direction of travel of the waves changes — from downwards to upwards. We outline the practical implications of this change in terms of loading and flooding. The change in direction of the

  7. Linear analysis of transient growth in stably-stratified, turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Alamo, Juan Carlos; Yanez, Carlos; Garcia-Villalba, Manuel

    2011-11-01

    We studied stably-stratified, fully-developed, turbulent channel flow using linear stability analysis. The analysis considered the mean velocity and density profiles extracted from DNS calculations as base flow, and included a linear model to represent the energy dissipation and scalar diffusion felt at the large scales as a consequence of the small scales. The flow was found to be asymptotically stable in all cases but transient growth of initial perturbations was observed. The perturbations showing maximal transient growth corresponded well with spanwise waves in the center of the channel and with streaks in the near wall region, which were both observed in the DNS. In particular, their sizes and convection velocities were reasonably well predicted by the linear model. Component-wise analysis revealed that, while the streaks were formed by the vertical stirring of mean shear, the transient amplification of the spanwise waves was reminiscent of the Orr mechanism. Supporte by the German Research Foundation, Project GA 1360/2-1.

  8. Linear drag law for high-Reynolds-number flow past an oscillating body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agre, Natalie; Childress, Stephen; Zhang, Jun; Ristroph, Leif

    2016-07-01

    An object immersed in a fast flow typically experiences fluid forces that increase with the square of speed. Here we explore how this high-Reynolds-number force-speed relationship is affected by unsteady motions of a body. Experiments on disks that are driven to oscillate while progressing through air reveal two distinct regimes: a conventional quadratic relationship for slow oscillations and an anomalous scaling for fast flapping in which the time-averaged drag increases linearly with flow speed. In the linear regime, flow visualization shows that a pair of counterrotating vortices is shed with each oscillation and a model that views a train of such dipoles as a momentum jet reproduces the linearity. We also show that appropriate scaling variables collapse the experimental data from both regimes and for different oscillatory motions into a single drag-speed relationship. These results could provide insight into the aerodynamic resistance incurred by oscillating wings in flight and they suggest that vibrations can be an effective means to actively control the drag on an object.

  9. Linear stability of the Couette flow of a vibrationally excited gas. 2. viscous problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigor'ev, Yu. N.; Ershov, I. V.

    2016-03-01

    Based on the linear theory, stability of viscous disturbances in a supersonic plane Couette flow of a vibrationally excited gas described by a system of linearized equations of two-temperature gas dynamics including shear and bulk viscosity is studied. It is demonstrated that two sets are identified in the spectrum of the problem of stability of plane waves, similar to the case of a perfect gas. One set consists of viscous acoustic modes, which asymptotically converge to even and odd inviscid acoustic modes at high Reynolds numbers. The eigenvalues from the other set have no asymptotic relationship with the inviscid problem and are characterized by large damping decrements. Two most unstable viscous acoustic modes (I and II) are identified; the limits of these modes were considered previously in the inviscid approximation. It is shown that there are domains in the space of parameters for both modes, where the presence of viscosity induces appreciable destabilization of the flow. Moreover, the growth rates of disturbances are appreciably greater than the corresponding values for the inviscid flow, while thermal excitation in the entire considered range of parameters increases the stability of the viscous flow. For a vibrationally excited gas, the critical Reynolds number as a function of the thermal nonequilibrium degree is found to be greater by 12% than for a perfect gas.

  10. Non-Linear Optical Flow Cytometry Using a Scanned, Bessel Beam Light-Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Bradley B.; Awasthi, Samir; Lieu, Deborah K.; Chan, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Modern flow cytometry instruments have become vital tools for high-throughput analysis of single cells. However, as issues with the cellular labeling techniques often used in flow cytometry have become more of a concern, the development of label-free modalities for cellular analysis is increasingly desired. Non-linear optical phenomena (NLO) are of growing interest for label-free analysis because of the ability to measure the intrinsic optical response of biomolecules found in cells. We demonstrate that a light-sheet consisting of a scanned Bessel beam is an optimal excitation geometry for efficiently generating NLO signals in a microfluidic environment. The balance of photon density and cross-sectional area provided by the light-sheet allowed significantly larger two-photon fluorescence intensities to be measured in a model polystyrene microparticle system compared to measurements made using other excitation focal geometries, including a relaxed Gaussian excitation beam often used in conventional flow cytometers. PMID:26021750

  11. Non-linear optical flow cytometry using a scanned, Bessel beam light-sheet.

    PubMed

    Collier, Bradley B; Awasthi, Samir; Lieu, Deborah K; Chan, James W

    2015-01-01

    Modern flow cytometry instruments have become vital tools for high-throughput analysis of single cells. However, as issues with the cellular labeling techniques often used in flow cytometry have become more of a concern, the development of label-free modalities for cellular analysis is increasingly desired. Non-linear optical phenomena (NLO) are of growing interest for label-free analysis because of the ability to measure the intrinsic optical response of biomolecules found in cells. We demonstrate that a light-sheet consisting of a scanned Bessel beam is an optimal excitation geometry for efficiently generating NLO signals in a microfluidic environment. The balance of photon density and cross-sectional area provided by the light-sheet allowed significantly larger two-photon fluorescence intensities to be measured in a model polystyrene microparticle system compared to measurements made using other excitation focal geometries, including a relaxed Gaussian excitation beam often used in conventional flow cytometers. PMID:26021750

  12. Linear stability of plane Poiseuille flow in an infinite elastic medium and volcanic tremors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuraba, Ataru; Yamauchi, Hatsuki

    2014-12-01

    The linear stability of a plane compressible laminar (Poiseuille) flow sandwiched between two semi-infinite elastic media was investigated with the aim of explaining the excitation of volcanic tremors. Our results show that there are several regimes of instability, and the nature of stability significantly depends on the symmetry of oscillatory fluid and solid motion. It has been shown that long-wave symmetric instability occurs at a very small value of the Reynolds number, but it is unlikely that this is the cause of volcanic tremors. We show that antisymmetric (flexural) instability also occurs, involving two parallel Rayleigh waves traveling against the Poiseuille flow, but the critical flow speed is faster than that of symmetric instability. However, if the basic flow profile is nonparabolic because of a nonuniform driving force or nonuniform viscosity, the critical flow speed of antisymmetric instability can be considerably slower than that of symmetric instability. Based on numerical calculations and analytical consideration, we conclude that this anomalous antisymmetric instability is possibly produced by a basaltic magma flow of a few meters per second through a dike with thickness of 1 m and extending for several kilometers; this origin can explain some of the characteristics of volcanic tremors.

  13. Unsteady flows in a two-dimensional linear cascade with low-pressure turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murawski, Christopher Gabriel

    Experimental studies of unsteady flow phenomena in a low pressure turbine linear cascade are presented. Turbine engine flow passages contain numerous loss mechanisms. The loss mechanisms investigated in this study are low Reynolds number and freestream turbulence effects, secondary flows and wake interactions. Also, a method is implemented which decreases the profile losses due to low Reynolds number effects. The results are presented in three segments. First, the effects of Reynolds number and freestream turbulence intensity on the low-pressure turbine cascade blade are investigated. The condition of the blade's boundary layer is the leading factor controlling the level of profile loss. The losses from the airfoil decrease as the Reynolds number and freestream turbulence increase due to a decrease in the size of the separation zone on the suction side of the turbine airfoil. Boundary layer separation occurs on the suction surface of the turbine. Changes to this region are achieved when attaching different length tail sets to the turbine airfoils which alters the axial chord of each blade. A clear improvement on suction side boundary layer behavior at low Reynolds numbers was seen when the tail extensions were shorter than about 9% of axial chord. Finally, the effect wake disturbance frequency on the secondary flow vortex structure in a turbine cascade is studied. Cylinders are traversed across the front of the blade row to simulate turbine blade disturbances. The response of the secondary flow structure to the movement of the wake generator shuttle with zero, one and multiple wake generator rods are presented. Multiple wake disturbance frequencies are varied from 12 Hz to 52 Hz. Multiple wake disturbance frequency below the axial chord flow frequency enable the secondary flow vortex structure to re-establish itself between each wake disturbance event. Axial chord flow frequency is defined as the axial velocity in the cascade divided by the axial chord length of

  14. Non-linear flow transients in fractured rock masses - the 1995 injection experiment in Soultz

    SciTech Connect

    Kohl, T.; Jung, R.; Hopkirk, R.J.; Rybach, L.

    1996-01-24

    In July 1995 in the course of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) site investigation studies in Soultz s.F. (France) multi rate hydraulic injection tests were conducted in the borehole GPK2. The downhole pressure records obtained from the lowermost depth domain between 3211 m and 3876 m demonstrate non-laminar hydraulic behavior. Such behavior was also observed earlier during a similar set of flow step tests in the GPKl borehole Soultz. Like the analysis of these earlier data sets, it could be shown that the pressure records from July 1995 are corresponding to empirical flow laws established for non-laminar hydraulic regimes. In this study a numerical model is described which is being developed for the analysis of non-laminar flow in fractures. Similar models have already been applied to production and injection tests at GPK1. The results show that the observed transient pressure record is well predicted by such a non-linear flow law. Conventional laminar flow models cannot reproduce these curves. An evaluation of the parameters resulting from both, steady state and transient analysis leads to assumptions on the geometry of the main fracture system. Our calculations show that surface areas above 0.05 km² and apertures in the order of 0.4 mm results in an excellent fit of the data.

  15. Corrections to Linear Hall MHD Arising From Heat Flow and Pressure Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenbarge, Jason

    2005-10-01

    Previous studies of the solutions to linear Hall MHD have neglected heat flow and pressure anisotropy. Although ignoring these quantities is safe in certain limits, in general heat flow and pressure anisotropy have the potential to play major roles in the evolution of a plasma system. Here we present a study of a two-fluid quasineutral, fully-conductive system with the inclusion of electron heat flow and pressure anisotropy. The ions receive the Chew, Golberger, Low treatment (pressure anisotropy but no heat flow). To include the effects of heat flow and pressure anisotropy, we employ appropriate fluid equations, derived previously by Hazeltine and Mahajan (2002). We find corrections to the standard Hall MHD solutions, from which the standard Hall MHD results presented in Ohsaki and Mahajan (2004) are recoverable when the fluid equations decouple from the equations of motion. 10 R. D. Hazeltine and S. M. Mahajan, Phys. Plasmas 9, 3341 (2002). S. Ohsaki and S. M. Mahajan, Phys. Plasmas 11, 898 (2004).

  16. On three-dimensional linear stability of Poiseuille flow of Bingham fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigaard, Ian; Nouar, Cherif

    2003-10-01

    Plane channel Poiseuille flow of a Bingham fluid is characterized by the Bingham number, B, which describes the ratio of yield and viscous stresses. Unlike purely viscous non-Newtonian fluids, which modify hydrodynamic stability studies only through the dissipation and the basic flow, inclusion of a yield stress additionally results in a modified domain and boundary conditions for the stability problem. We investigate the effects of increasing B on the stability of the flow, using eigenvalue bounds that incorporate these features. As B→∞ we show that three-dimensional linear stability can be achieved for a Reynolds number bound of form Re=O(B3/4), for all wavelengths. For long wavelengths this can be improved to Re=O(B), which compares well with computed linear stability results for two-dimensional disturbances [J. Fluid Mech. 263, 133 (1994)]. It is also possible to find bounds of form Re=O(B1/2), which derive from purely viscous dissipation acting over the reduced domain and are comparable with the nonlinear stability bounds in J. Non-Newt. Fluid Mech. 100, 127 (2001). We also show that a Squire-like result can be derived for the plane channel flow. Namely, if the equivalent eigenvalue bounds for a Newtonian fluid yield a stability criterion, then the same stability criterion is valid for the Bingham fluid flow, but with reduced wavenumbers and Reynolds numbers. An application of these results is to bound the regions of parameter space in which computational methods need to be used.

  17. Linear analysis on the growth of non-spherical perturbations in supersonic accretion flows

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazuya; Yamada, Shoichi

    2014-10-20

    We analyzed the growth of non-spherical perturbations in supersonic accretion flows. We have in mind an application to the post-bounce phase of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). Such non-spherical perturbations have been suggested by a series of papers by Arnett, who has numerically investigated violent convections in the outer layers of pre-collapse stars. Moreover, Couch and Ott demonstrated in their numerical simulations that such perturbations may lead to a successful supernova even for a progenitor that fails to explode without fluctuations. This study investigated the linear growth of perturbations during the infall onto a stalled shock wave. The linearized equations are solved as an initial and boundary value problem with the use of a Laplace transform. The background is a Bondi accretion flow whose parameters are chosen to mimic the 15 M {sub ☉} progenitor model by Woosley and Heger, which is supposed to be a typical progenitor of CCSNe. We found that the perturbations that are given at a large radius grow as they flow down to the shock radius; the density perturbations can be amplified by a factor of 30, for example. We analytically show that the growth rate is proportional to l, the index of the spherical harmonics. We also found that the perturbations oscillate in time with frequencies that are similar to those of the standing accretion shock instability. This may have an implication for shock revival in CCSNe, which will be investigated in our forthcoming paper in more detail.

  18. Dynamic modeling of mass-flowing linear medium with large amplitude displacement and rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Difeng; Tang, Jiali; Ren, Gexue

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, a dynamic model of a linear medium with mass flow, such as traveling strings, cables, belts, beams or pipes conveying fluids, is proposed, in the framework of Arbitrary-Lagrange-Euler (ALE) description. The material coordinate is introduced to characterize the mass-flow of the medium, and the Absolute Nodal Coordinate Formulation (ANCF) is employed to capture geometric nonlinearity of the linear media under large displacement and rotation. The governing equations are derived in terms of d'Alembert's principle. When using an ALE description, complex mass-flowing boundary conditions can be easily enforced. Numerical examples are presented to validate the proposed method by comparison with analytical results of simplified models. The computed critical fluid velocity for the stability of a cantilevered pipe conveying fluid is correlated with the available theory in literature. The large amplitude limit-cycle oscillations of flexible pipes conveying fluid are presented, and the effect of the velocity of the fluid on the static equilibrium of the pipe under gravity is investigated.

  19. Performance of a linear robust control strategy on a nonlinear model of spatially developing flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric; Bewley, Thomas R.

    2004-08-01

    This paper investigates the control of self-excited oscillations in spatially developing flow systems such as jets and wakes using {mathcal H}_{infty} control theory on a complex Ginzburg Landau (CGL) model. The coefficients used in this one-dimensional equation, which serves as a simple model of the evolution of hydrodynamic instability waves, are those selected by Roussopoulos & Monkewitz (Physica D 1996, vol. 97, p. 264) to model the behaviour of the near-wake of a circular cylinder. Based on noisy measurements at a point sensor typically located inside the cylinder wake, the compensator uses a linear {mathcal H}_{infty} filter based on the CGL model to construct a state estimate. This estimate is then used to compute linear {mathcal H}_{infty} control feedback at a point actuator location, which is typically located upstream of the sensor. The goal of the control scheme is to stabilize the system by minimizing a weighted average of the ‘system response’ and the ‘control effort’ while rigorously bounding the response of the controlled linear system to external disturbances. The application of such modern control and estimation rules stabilizes the linear CGL system at Reynolds numbers far above the critical Reynolds number Re_c {≈} 47 at which linear global instability appears in the uncontrolled system. In so doing, many unstable modes of the uncontrolled CGL system are linearly stabilized by the single actuator/sensor pair and the model-based feedback control strategy. Further, the linear performance of the closed-loop system, in terms of the relevant transfer function norms quantifying the linear response of the controlled system to external disturbances, is substantially improved beyond that possible with the simple proportional measurement feedback proposed in previous studies. Above Re {≈} 84, the {mathcal H}_{infty} control designs significantly outperform the corresponding {mathcal H}_2 control designs in terms of their ability to stabilize

  20. The measurement of low-frequency linear viscoelastic properties of polyolefins using creeping squeeze flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cua, Edwin Matthew Chua

    The characterization of the low-frequency linear viscoelastic properties of polymers is a classical problem in rheometry, especially for broad molecular weight (MW), fractional melt-flow index (MFI) polyolefins with small time-temperature shift factors. By interconversion of high-temperature, low-shear steady-viscosity data in the terminal flow regime into low-frequency data using the Cox-Merz rule, the experimental window is expanded towards lower frequencies. A squeeze-flow apparatus using Newton interferometry as a drift-free transducer to measure the gap between a spherical lens and a flat glass plate with high spatial resolution was constructed. Trials with a Newtonian silicone oil and a viscoelastic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) gum were undertaken to examine the various experimental factors that might contribute to errors in the calculation of the viscosity. After taking into account those factors during the runs with PDMS gum, the squeeze-flow-derived viscosities at the terminal flow regime (at shear rates accessible to a commercial rheometer) were in good agreement with low frequency dynamic data. To achieve much lower shear rates for the runs with polyolefins, an increase in the working gap range was made by switching from Newton interferometry to Fizeau interferometry. A hermetically sealed high vacuum chamber was built to allow high-temperature runs with polyolefins with minimal degradation. Interconversion of the measured viscosities of a broad MW, 1.04 MFI high-density polyethylene (HDPE) with the squeeze flow apparatus resulted in complex viscosity data at ˜10-5 rad/s, expanding the experimental window by 2 decades. The squeeze-flow derived complex viscosity data was used to decide which of the two popular viscosity models was more accurate in predicting the zero-shear rate viscosity based on its fit to dynamic data limited to higher frequencies.

  1. Linear Stability and Nonlinear Evolution of 3D Vortices in Rotating Stratified Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdinia, Mani; Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Marcus, Philip

    2014-11-01

    Axisymmetric Gaussian vortices are widely-used to model oceanic vortices. We study their stability in rotating, stratified flows by using the full Boussinesq equations. We created a stability map as a function of the Burger and Rossby numbers of the vortices. We computed the linear growth rates of the most-unstable eigenmodes and their corresponding eigenmodes. Our map shows a significant cyclone/anti-cyclone asymmetry. The vortices are linearly unstable in most of the parameter space that we studied. However, the anticyclonic vortices, over most of the parameter space, have eigenmodes with only very weak growth rates - longer than 50 vortex turn-around times. For oceanic vortices, that time corresponds to several months, so we argue that this slow growth rate means that the oceanic anticyclones lifetimes are not determined by linear stability, but by other processes. We also use our full, nonlinear simulations to show an example of an unstable cyclone with a very fast growing linear eigenmodes. However, we show that cyclone quickly redistributes its vorticity and becomes a stable tripole with a large core that is nearly axisymmetric.

  2. Accelerated solution of non-linear flow problems using Chebyshev iteration polynomial based RK recursions

    SciTech Connect

    Lorber, A.A.; Carey, G.F.; Bova, S.W.; Harle, C.H.

    1996-12-31

    The connection between the solution of linear systems of equations by iterative methods and explicit time stepping techniques is used to accelerate to steady state the solution of ODE systems arising from discretized PDEs which may involve either physical or artificial transient terms. Specifically, a class of Runge-Kutta (RK) time integration schemes with extended stability domains has been used to develop recursion formulas which lead to accelerated iterative performance. The coefficients for the RK schemes are chosen based on the theory of Chebyshev iteration polynomials in conjunction with a local linear stability analysis. We refer to these schemes as Chebyshev Parameterized Runge Kutta (CPRK) methods. CPRK methods of one to four stages are derived as functions of the parameters which describe an ellipse {Epsilon} which the stability domain of the methods is known to contain. Of particular interest are two-stage, first-order CPRK and four-stage, first-order methods. It is found that the former method can be identified with any two-stage RK method through the correct choice of parameters. The latter method is found to have a wide range of stability domains, with a maximum extension of 32 along the real axis. Recursion performance results are presented below for a model linear convection-diffusion problem as well as non-linear fluid flow problems discretized by both finite-difference and finite-element methods.

  3. Asymptotic Behavior of Ensemble-Averaged Linear Disturbances in Homogeneous Shear Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thacker, W. D.; Grosch, C E.; Gatski, T. B.

    1999-01-01

    In order to expand the predictive capability of single-point turbulence closure models too account for the early-stage transition regime, a methodology for the formulation and calibration of model equations for the ensemble-averaged disturbance kinetic energy and energy dissipation rate is presented. The calibration is based on homogeneous shear flow where disturbances can be described by rapid distort,ion theory (RDT). The relationship between RDT and linear stability theory is exploit,c d in order to obtain a closed set, of modeled equations. The linear disturbance equations are solved directly so that, the numerical simulation yields a database from which the closure coefficient,s in the ensemble-averaged disturbance equations can he determined.

  4. On linear stability of Rayleigh-Bénard Poiseuille flow of viscoplastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Métivier, Christel; Nouar, Chérif

    2008-10-01

    The present paper deals with the onset of the two-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection for a plane channel flow of viscoplastic fluid. The influence of the yield stress on the instability and stability conditions characterized by the Rayleigh numbers denoted, respectively, RaL and RaE is investigated in the framework of linear analysis using modal and energetic approaches. The results show that the yield stress, represented by the Bingham number B, delays the onset of convection. For low values of the Reynolds number Re, the critical conditions RaL and RaE tend to be equal and the difference RaL-RaE increases with increasing Re, highlighting the non-normality of the linear operator. For Re<1 and large B (B ≥O(10)), it is shown that the critical Rayleigh number increases as B2 and the critical wave number evolves according to B1/4.

  5. Non-linear Paradigm for Drift Wave - Zonal Flow interplay: coherence, chaos and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonca, Fulvio

    2003-10-01

    Non-linear equations for the slow space-time evolution of the radial drift wave (DW) envelope and zonal flow (ZF) amplitude have been self-consistently derived for a model nonuniform tokamak equilibrium within the coherent 4-wave drift wave-zonal flow modulation interaction model of Chen, Lin and White(chen00). For the sake of simplicity, in this work we assume electrostatic fluctuations; but our formalism is readily extended to electromagnetic fluctuations(chen01). In the local limit, i.e. neglecting equilibrium profile variations, the coherent 4-wave DW-ZF modulation interaction model has successfully demonstrated spontaneous generation of ZFs and non-linear DW/ITG-ZF dynamics in toroidal plasmas(chen00). The present work is an extension of previous analyses to allow both (slow) temporal and spatial variations of the DW/ITG radial envelope; thus, it naturally incorporates the effects of equilibrium variations; i.e., turbulence spreading and size-dependence of the saturated wave intensities and transport coefficients(lin99). This approach makes it possible to treat equilibrium profile variations and non-linear interactions on the same footing, assuming that coupling among different DWs on the shortest non-linear time scale is mediated by ZF only. At this level, the competition between linear drive/damping, DW spreading due to finite linear (and nonlinear) group velocity(lin02,chen02,kim02) and non-linear energy transfer between DWs and ZF, determines the saturation levels of the fluctuating fields. Despite the coherence of the underlying non-linear dynamics at this level, this system exhibits both chaotic behavior and intermittency, depending on system size and proximity to marginal stability(chen02). The present model can be further extended to include longer time-scale physics such as 3-wave interactions and collisionless damping of zonal flows. 9 chen00 Liu Chen, Zhihong Lin and Roscoe White, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3129, (2000). chen01 L. Chen, Z. Lin, R.B. White and

  6. Modeling and experiments on differential pumping in linear plasma generators operating at high gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    Eck, H. J. N. van; Koppers, W. R.; Rooij, G. J. van; Goedheer, W. J.; Cardozo, N. J. Lopes; Kleyn, A. W.; Engeln, R.; Schram, D. C.

    2009-03-15

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method was used to investigate the efficiency of differential pumping in linear plasma generators operating at high gas flows. Skimmers are used to separate the neutrals from the plasma beam, which is guided from the source to the target by a strong axial magnetic field. In this way, the neutrals are prevented to reach the target region. The neutral flux to the target must be lower than the plasma flux to enable ITER relevant plasma-surface interaction (PSI) studies. It is therefore essential to control the neutral gas dynamics. The DSMC method was used to model the expansion of a hot gas in a low pressure vessel where a small discrepancy in shock position was found between the simulations and a well-established empirical formula. Two stage differential pumping was modeled and applied in the linear plasma devices Pilot-PSI and PLEXIS. In Pilot-PSI a factor of 4.5 pressure reduction for H{sub 2} has been demonstrated. Both simulations and experiments showed that the optimum skimmer position depends on the position of the shock and therefore shifts for different gas parameters. The shape of the skimmer has to be designed such that it has a minimum impact on the shock structure. A too large angle between the skimmer and the forward direction of the gas flow leads to an influence on the expansion structure. A pressure increase in front of the skimmer is formed and the flow of the plasma beam becomes obstructed. It has been shown that a skimmer with an angle around 53 deg. gives the best performance. The use of skimmers is implemented in the design of the large linear plasma generator Magnum-PSI. Here, a three stage differentially pumped vacuum system is used to reach low enough neutral pressures near the target, opening a door to PSI research in the ITER relevant regime.

  7. A parametric study of supersonic laminar flow for swept wings using linear stability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, Russell M.; Garcia, Joseph A.; Tu, Eugene L.

    1995-01-01

    A parametric study to predict the extent of laminar flow on the upper surface of a generic swept-back wing (NACA 64A010 airfoil section) at supersonic speeds was conducted. The results were obtained by using surface pressure predictions from an Euler/Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics code coupled with a boundary layer code, which predicts detailed boundary layer profiles, and finally with a linear stability code to determine the extent of laminar flow. The parameters addressed are Reynolds number, angle of attack, and leading-edge wing sweep. The results of this study show that an increase in angle of attack, for specific Reynolds numbers, can actually delay transition. Therefore, higher lift capability, caused by the increased angle of attack, as well as a reduction in viscous drag due to the delay in transition is possible for certain flight conditions.

  8. Linearized lattice Boltzmann method for micro- and nanoscale flow and heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yong; Yap, Ying Wan; Sader, John E.

    2015-07-01

    Ability to characterize the heat transfer in flowing gases is important for a wide range of applications involving micro- and nanoscale devices. Gas flows away from the continuum limit can be captured using the Boltzmann equation, whose analytical solution poses a formidable challenge. An efficient and accurate numerical simulation of the Boltzmann equation is thus highly desirable. In this article, the linearized Boltzmann Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook equation is used to develop a hierarchy of thermal lattice Boltzmann (LB) models based on half-space Gaussian-Hermite (GH) quadrature ranging from low to high algebraic precision, using double distribution functions. Simplified versions of the LB models in the continuum limit are also derived, and are shown to be consistent with existing thermal LB models for noncontinuum heat transfer reported in the literature. Accuracy of the proposed LB hierarchy is assessed by simulating thermal Couette flows for a wide range of Knudsen numbers. Effects of the underlying quadrature schemes (half-space GH vs full-space GH) and continuum-limit simplifications on computational accuracy are also elaborated. The numerical findings in this article provide direct evidence of improved computational capability of the proposed LB models for modeling noncontinuum flows and heat transfer at small length scales.

  9. Linearized lattice Boltzmann method for micro- and nanoscale flow and heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yong; Yap, Ying Wan; Sader, John E

    2015-07-01

    Ability to characterize the heat transfer in flowing gases is important for a wide range of applications involving micro- and nanoscale devices. Gas flows away from the continuum limit can be captured using the Boltzmann equation, whose analytical solution poses a formidable challenge. An efficient and accurate numerical simulation of the Boltzmann equation is thus highly desirable. In this article, the linearized Boltzmann Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook equation is used to develop a hierarchy of thermal lattice Boltzmann (LB) models based on half-space Gaussian-Hermite (GH) quadrature ranging from low to high algebraic precision, using double distribution functions. Simplified versions of the LB models in the continuum limit are also derived, and are shown to be consistent with existing thermal LB models for noncontinuum heat transfer reported in the literature. Accuracy of the proposed LB hierarchy is assessed by simulating thermal Couette flows for a wide range of Knudsen numbers. Effects of the underlying quadrature schemes (half-space GH vs full-space GH) and continuum-limit simplifications on computational accuracy are also elaborated. The numerical findings in this article provide direct evidence of improved computational capability of the proposed LB models for modeling noncontinuum flows and heat transfer at small length scales. PMID:26274307

  10. An Efficacious Multi-Objective Fuzzy Linear Programming Approach for Optimal Power Flow Considering Distributed Generation

    PubMed Central

    Warid, Warid; Hizam, Hashim; Mariun, Norman; Abdul-Wahab, Noor Izzri

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new formulation for the multi-objective optimal power flow (MOOPF) problem for meshed power networks considering distributed generation. An efficacious multi-objective fuzzy linear programming optimization (MFLP) algorithm is proposed to solve the aforementioned problem with and without considering the distributed generation (DG) effect. A variant combination of objectives is considered for simultaneous optimization, including power loss, voltage stability, and shunt capacitors MVAR reserve. Fuzzy membership functions for these objectives are designed with extreme targets, whereas the inequality constraints are treated as hard constraints. The multi-objective fuzzy optimal power flow (OPF) formulation was converted into a crisp OPF in a successive linear programming (SLP) framework and solved using an efficient interior point method (IPM). To test the efficacy of the proposed approach, simulations are performed on the IEEE 30-busand IEEE 118-bus test systems. The MFLP optimization is solved for several optimization cases. The obtained results are compared with those presented in the literature. A unique solution with a high satisfaction for the assigned targets is gained. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed MFLP technique in terms of solution optimality and rapid convergence. Moreover, the results indicate that using the optimal DG location with the MFLP algorithm provides the solution with the highest quality. PMID:26954783

  11. Entrainment and mixing dynamics of surface-stress-driven linearly stratified flow in a cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manucharyan, Georgy; Caulfield, C. P.

    2012-11-01

    We consider experimentally a linearly stratified fluid (with constant buoyancy frequency N) in a cylinder of depth H subject to surface stress forcing from a disk spinning at constant angular velocity Ω. A turbulent mixed layer develops bounded by a sharp interface of constant thickness. Its depth h / H ~(N / Ω)-2/3(Ωt)x2/9 . We argue this is a consequence of: the kinetic energy of the mixed layer staying constant with time (as previously observed in a two layer flow by Shravat et al. 2012) the entrainment at the interface being governed entirely by local processes; and the rate of increase of the total potential energy of the fluid being dependent only on the global dissipation rate and the ratio N2 /Ω2 . Below the moving primary interface, we also observe in some circumstances the formation of another partially mixed layer, separated by a secondary interface from the linearly stratified fluid below. Depending on the local flow properties, the secondary interfaces can exhibit rich time-dependent dynamics including drift towards or away from the primary interface, merger and/or decay. The secondary interfaces appear to develop due to the non-monotonic dependence of buoyancy flux on stratification as originally argued by Phillips (1972).

  12. An Efficacious Multi-Objective Fuzzy Linear Programming Approach for Optimal Power Flow Considering Distributed Generation.

    PubMed

    Warid, Warid; Hizam, Hashim; Mariun, Norman; Abdul-Wahab, Noor Izzri

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new formulation for the multi-objective optimal power flow (MOOPF) problem for meshed power networks considering distributed generation. An efficacious multi-objective fuzzy linear programming optimization (MFLP) algorithm is proposed to solve the aforementioned problem with and without considering the distributed generation (DG) effect. A variant combination of objectives is considered for simultaneous optimization, including power loss, voltage stability, and shunt capacitors MVAR reserve. Fuzzy membership functions for these objectives are designed with extreme targets, whereas the inequality constraints are treated as hard constraints. The multi-objective fuzzy optimal power flow (OPF) formulation was converted into a crisp OPF in a successive linear programming (SLP) framework and solved using an efficient interior point method (IPM). To test the efficacy of the proposed approach, simulations are performed on the IEEE 30-busand IEEE 118-bus test systems. The MFLP optimization is solved for several optimization cases. The obtained results are compared with those presented in the literature. A unique solution with a high satisfaction for the assigned targets is gained. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed MFLP technique in terms of solution optimality and rapid convergence. Moreover, the results indicate that using the optimal DG location with the MFLP algorithm provides the solution with the highest quality. PMID:26954783

  13. Flow Structure and Turbulence Characteristics downstream of a Spanwise Suspended Linear Canopy through Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Jundong; Delavan, Sarah

    2014-11-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to explore the mean flow structure and turbulence properties downstream of a spanwise suspended linear canopy in a 2-D open channel flow using the Particle Tracking Velocimetry technique. This canopy simulated the effect of one long-line structure of a mussel farm. Four experimental scenarios with the approach velocities 50, 80, 110, and 140 mm s-1 were under investigation. Three sub-layers formed downstream of the canopy. An internal canopy layer, where the time-averaged velocity decreases linearly with increasing distance downstream, a canopy mixing layer increasing in vertical extent with increasing distance downstream of the canopy, and an external canopy layer with higher velocity under the canopy, which may bring nutrients from the local ambient environment into this layer. The canopy turbulence results in upward momentum transport downstream of the canopy within a distance of 0.60 of the canopy depth and downward momentum transport beyond 1.20 of it. In the scenarios with relatively lower approach velocities 50 and 80 mm s1 , the wake turbulence results in upward momentum transport. The broader goal of this study is to offer guidelines for the design and site selection of more productive mussel farms. The results suggest that distance interval between the parallel long-lines in a mussel farm should be less than 0.6 times the height of a long-line dropper. Also, potential farm locations that are characterized with current velocity from 50 to 80 mm s1 are suggested.

  14. Energy Storage of Linear and Cyclic Electron Flows in Photosynthesis 1

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Yuan; Mauzerall, David C.

    1992-01-01

    The energy storage of photosynthesis in the green alga Chlorella vulgaris was determined by pulsed, time-resolved photoacoustics. The energy storage of the linear electron transfer process in photosynthesis, of cyclic photosystem (PS) I, and possibly of PSII was determined by selection of excitation wavelength and of flash interval. At 695 nm excitation, a rather large cyclic PSI energy storage of 0.68 ± 0.04 eV/quantum of energy at 8 ms after a 1-μs flash was obtained. This energy remained the same at flash intervals of 0.35 to 60 s and was independent of the presence of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea. We tentatively assign this energy to the ferredoxin-NADP-reductase-ferredoxin and oxidized cytochrome b6/f complexes. An efficient distribution of energy between cyclic and linear systems is obtained with the simple assumption that the turnover time of the cyclic system is slower than that of the linear system. The energy storage of linear electron flow was determined by 655 nm excitation of Chlorella with a short flash interval of 0.35 s per flash. It was calculated to be 0.50 ± 0.03 eV/hv, close to that expected for oxygen and NADPH formation. The energy storage of PSII is determined by excitation of Chlorella at 655 nm with a long flash interval of 60 s per flash. It was calculated to be 1.07 ± 0.05 eV/hv, consistent with the energy storage being in S-states and the secondary electron acceptor of PSII with a calculated redox energy of 1.03 eV/hv. In the presence of 1 μm 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea, the calculated energy storage in PSII is still significant, 0.53 ± 0.04 eV/hv. This probably indicates a significant cyclic electron flow around PSII. These cyclic flows may contribute considerably to energy storage in photosynthesis. PMID:16653211

  15. Linearization of DNA by a squeezing flow in a tunable nanoscale tube: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Minsub; Kim, Byoung Choul; Matsuoka, Toshiki; Takayama, Shuichi

    2014-03-01

    Deoxyribose nucleic acid(DNA) is the biomaterial for storage of genetic information of all living organisms. The linearization of DNA is an initial step in one of the important methods to probe the vital information in biological and clinical settings. Squeezing the solution in flexible nanoscale channel proved to be a highly effective method for fully linearizing DNA (Toshiki et al. Nano Lett 2012). The detailed physical basis of the process is studied by using dissipative particle dynamics simulation, whose results corresponds to the lambda DNA in the nanoscale PDMS channel in the experiment. The squeezing process typically consists of a large degree of elongation by the advective flow, which is followed by recoiling back and adjusting to the narrower confinement. Strong gradient in advection and nanoscale confinement are thus the major thrust for the stretching in the process. The degree of the linearization also depends on the initial position relative to the center in the axial direction as well as the contour length.

  16. Estimating {Omega} from galaxy redshifts: Linear flow distortions and nonlinear clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, B.C. |; Warren, M.S.; Zurek, W.H.

    1997-02-01

    We propose a method to determine the cosmic mass density {Omega} from redshift-space distortions induced by large-scale flows in the presence of nonlinear clustering. Nonlinear structures in redshift space, such as fingers of God, can contaminate distortions from linear flows on scales as large as several times the small-scale pairwise velocity dispersion {sigma}{sub {nu}}. Following Peacock & Dodds, we work in the Fourier domain and propose a model to describe the anisotropy in the redshift-space power spectrum; tests with high-resolution numerical data demonstrate that the model is robust for both mass and biased galaxy halos on translinear scales and above. On the basis of this model, we propose an estimator of the linear growth parameter {beta}={Omega}{sup 0.6}/b, where b measures bias, derived from sampling functions that are tuned to eliminate distortions from nonlinear clustering. The measure is tested on the numerical data and found to recover the true value of {beta} to within {approximately}10{percent}. An analysis of {ital IRAS} 1.2 Jy galaxies yields {beta}=0.8{sub {minus}0.3}{sup +0.4} at a scale of 1000kms{sup {minus}1}, which is close to optimal given the shot noise and finite size of the survey. This measurement is consistent with dynamical estimates of {beta} derived from both real-space and redshift-space information. The importance of the method presented here is that nonlinear clustering effects are removed to enable linear correlation anisotropy measurements on scales approaching the translinear regime. We discuss implications for analyses of forthcoming optical redshift surveys in which the dispersion is more than a factor of 2 greater than in the {ital IRAS} data. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  17. Modeling Wave Driven Non-linear Flow Oscillations: The Terrestrial QBO and a Solar Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, Hans G.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Quasi Biennial Oscillation (QBO) of the zonal circulation observed in the terrestrial atmosphere at low latitudes is driven by wave mean flow interaction as was demonstrated first by Lindzen and Holton (1968), shown in a laboratory experiment by Plumb and McEwan (1978), and modeled by others (e.g., Plumb, Dunkerton). Although influenced by the seasonal cycle of solar forcing, the QBO, in principle, represents a nonlinear flow oscillation that can be maintained by a steady source of upward propagating waves. The wave driven non-linearity is of third or odd order in the flow velocity, which regenerates the fundamental harmonic itself to keep the oscillation going - the fluid dynamical analog of the displacement mechanism in the mechanical clock. Applying Hines' Doppler Spread Parameterization (DSP) for gravity waves (GW), we discuss with a global-scale spectral model numerical experiments that elucidate some properties of the QBO and its possible effects on the climatology of the atmosphere. Depending on the period of the QBO, wave filtering can cause interaction with the seasonal variations to produce pronounced oscillations with beat periods around 10 years. Since the seasonal cycle and its variability influence the period of the QBO, it may also be a potent conduit of solar activity variations to lower altitudes. Analogous to the terrestrial QBO, we propose that a flow oscillation may account for the 22-year periodicity of the solar magnetic cycle, potentially answering Dicke (1978) who asked, "Is there a chronometer hidden deep inside the Sun?" The oscillation would occur below the convection region, where gravity waves can propagate. Employing a simplified, analytic model, Hines' DSP is applied to estimate the flow oscillation. Depending on the adopted horizontal wavelengths of GW's, wave amplitudes less than 10 m/s can be made to produce oscillating zonal flows of about 20 m/s that should be large enough to generate a significant oscillation in the magnetic

  18. Suspended particulate composition: evolution along a river linear and influence of regime flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Meur, Mathieu; Montargès-Pelletier, Emmanuelle; Bauer, Allan; Gley, Renaud; Migot, Sylvie; Mansuy-Huault, Laurence; Lorgeoux, Catherine; Razafitianamaharavo, Angelina; Villièras, Frédéric

    2015-04-01

    Suspended Particulate Matters are recognized to play a crucial role in the transport and fate of chemicals like trace metal elements. The affinity of trace metals with natural SPM is influenced by (i) the nature of metal (ii) physical-chemical conditions of the water column (iii) SPM physical characteristics (grain size, surface area) (iiii) SPM chemical characteristics (elemental composition, mineralogy, organic composition). Some authors observed that the SPM composition was the predominant factor controlling the affinity of trace metals with natural SPM. One purpose of this work is to follow the physical and chemical characteristics of SPM along the river linear in order to better understand the affinity between SPM and heavy metals. One other purpose is to study the influence of regime flow on SPM physical and chemical composition in order to detect any variation of SPM composition with regime flow. SPM were sampled along Moselle river (North East of France) following an urbanization gradient. Two tributaries were also sampled, the Madon river which drains an agricultural catchment and the Fensch stream which flows through an ancient steel-making basin. SPM were sampled several times during high flow and low flow. Particulate matter was extracted on field using continuous flow field centrifuge. Frozen-dried samples were then characterized in terms of size distribution, elemental composition (ICP - AES, ICP - MS), mineralogy (XRD, FTIR, SEM, TEM), surface properties (gas adsorption techniques) and organic composition (Py-GC-MS and GC-MS). Grain size distribution evidenced the presence of coarser particles during high flow but no difference in the grain size distribution could be evidenced between the different stations. The grain size distribution of collected SPM appeared globally identical, although the increase of conductivity due to the junction of Meurthe river . In terms of composition, major element contents in SPM are characterized by the predominance of

  19. Numerical simulation of compressible Couette flow stability: Non-linear and three-dimensional effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saati, Abdulmannan Abdulhamid

    1991-02-01

    The direct numerical simulation of the stability and transition of compressible Couette flow is studied. The effects of a constant body force along the vertical direction are also studied. Cartesian geometry is adopted to approximate Couette flow produced in the gap between two coaxial cylinders rotating at high-speed, with the body force representing the effects of the centrifugal force. A new, compressible flow solver for two- and three-dimensional, time dependent Navier-Stokes equations, using both the MacCormack and the high-order Two-Four methods was developed. In order to facilitate the simulations with greater detail and accuracy, a high-speed supercomputer with large core memory is required. Thus, the computer code was written in FORTRAN for its execution on the CRAY2, at NASA Langley. In a concurrent effort, in order to study the feasibility and efficiency of massively parallel super-computers and to speed up the computations, the work was further extended by rewriting the computer code in both C* and PARIS languages, for execution on the massively parallel Connection Machine CM 2 at the University of Colorado. Extensive testing of this new computer code was performed using wave propagation problems involving small- and large-amplitude two- and three-dimensional disturbances. Numerical simulations on the stability of compressible Couette flow between two infinite, parallel plates, with the inclusion of (1) a sudden body force, and (2) a body force in equilibrium, were performed. First, two-dimensional disturbances were considered and then the work was extended by considering three-dimensional disturbances on the rectangular Couette flow problem. Effects of body force magnitude, Mach number, and Reynolds number were also investigated. The simulations provide excellent agreement with the linear theory, thus documenting the phase and amplitude accuracy of the computed results; the overall amplitude error remains less than one percent. The results show that

  20. Dynamics of flows, fluctuations, and global instability under electrode biasing in a linear plasma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, T. R.; Gilmore, M.

    2016-05-01

    Grid biasing is utilized in a large-scale helicon plasma to modify an existing instability. It is shown both experimentally and with a linear stability analysis to be a hybrid drift-Kelvin-Helmholtz mode. At low magnetic field strengths, coherent fluctuations are present, while at high magnetic field strengths, the plasma is broad-band turbulent. Grid biasing is used to drive the once-coherent fluctuations to a broad-band turbulent state, as well as to suppress them. There is a corresponding change in the flow shear. When a high positive bias (10Te) is applied to the grid electrode, a large-scale ( n ˜/n ≈50 % ) is excited. This mode has been identified as the potential relaxation instability.

  1. A Vector Study of Linearized Supersonic Flow Applications to Nonplanar Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, John C

    1953-01-01

    A vector study of the partial-differential equation of steady linearized supersonic flow is presented. General expressions which relate the velocity potential in the stream to the conditions on the disturbing surfaces, are derived. In connection with these general expressions the concept of the finite part of an integral is discussed. A discussion of problems dealing with planar bodies is given and the conditions for the solution to be unique are investigated. Problems concerning nonplanar systems are investigated, and methods are derived for the solution of some simple nonplanar bodies. The surface pressure distribution and the damping in roll are found for rolling tails consisting of four, six, and eight rectangular fins for the Mach number range where the region of interference between adjacent fins does not affect the fin tips.

  2. Flow and heat transfer to modified second grade fluid over a non-linear stretching sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Masood; Rahman, Masood ur

    2015-08-01

    The objective of the present work is to analyze the two-dimensional boundary layer flow and heat transfer of a modified second grade fluid over a non-linear stretching sheet of constant surface temperature. The modelled momentum and energy equations are deduced to a system of ordinary differential equations by employing suitable transformations in boundary layer region and integrated numerically by fourth and fifth order Runge-Kutta Fehlberg method. Additionally, the analytic solutions of the governing problem are presented for some special cases. The secured results make it clear that the power-law index reduces both the momentum and thermal boundary layers. While the incremented values of the generalized second grade parameter leads to an increase in the momentum boundary layer and a decrease in the thermal boundary layer. To see the validity of the present results we have made a comparison with the previously published results as a special case with an outstanding compatibility.

  3. Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) dumps water after first in-flight cold flow test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The NASA SR-71A successfully completed its first cold flow flight as part of the NASA/Rocketdyne/Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California on March 4, 1998. During a cold flow flight, gaseous helium and liquid nitrogen are cycled through the linear aerospike engine to check the engine's plumbing system for leaks and to check the engine operating characterisitics. Cold-flow tests must be accomplished successfully before firing the rocket engine experiment in flight. The SR-71 took off at 10:16 a.m. PST. The aircraft flew for one hour and fifty-seven minutes, reaching a maximum speed of Mach 1.58 before landing at Edwards at 12:13 p.m. PST. 'I think all in all we had a good mission today,' Dryden LASRE Project Manager Dave Lux said. Flight crew member Bob Meyer agreed, saying the crew 'thought it was a really good flight.' Dryden Research Pilot Ed Schneider piloted the SR-71 during the mission. Lockheed Martin LASRE Project Manager Carl Meade added, 'We are extremely pleased with today's results. This will help pave the way for the first in-flight engine data-collection flight of the LASRE.' The LASRE experiment was designed to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics and the handling of the SR-71 linear aerospike experiment configuration. The goal of the project was to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin validate the computational predictive tools it was using to determine the aerodynamic performance of a future reusable launch vehicle. The joint NASA, Rocketdyne (now part of Boeing), and Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) completed seven initial research flights at Dryden Flight Research Center. Two initial flights were used to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the LASRE apparatus (pod) on the back of the SR-71. Five later flights focused on the experiment itself. Two were used to cycle gaseous

  4. CONDUCTION IN LOW MACH NUMBER FLOWS. I. LINEAR AND WEAKLY NONLINEAR REGIMES

    SciTech Connect

    Lecoanet, Daniel; Brown, Benjamin P.; Zweibel, Ellen G.; Burns, Keaton J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Vasil, Geoffrey M.

    2014-12-20

    Thermal conduction is an important energy transfer and damping mechanism in astrophysical flows. Fourier's law, in which the heat flux is proportional to the negative temperature gradient, leading to temperature diffusion, is a well-known empirical model of thermal conduction. However, entropy diffusion has emerged as an alternative thermal conduction model, despite not ensuring the monotonicity of entropy. This paper investigates the differences between temperature and entropy diffusion for both linear internal gravity waves and weakly nonlinear convection. In addition to simulating the two thermal conduction models with the fully compressible Navier-Stokes equations, we also study their effects in the reduced ''soundproof'' anelastic and pseudoincompressible (PI) equations. We find that in the linear and weakly nonlinear regime, temperature and entropy diffusion give quantitatively similar results, although there are some larger errors in the PI equations with temperature diffusion due to inaccuracies in the equation of state. Extrapolating our weakly nonlinear results, we speculate that differences between temperature and entropy diffusion might become more important for strongly turbulent convection.

  5. Mixing of a stable linear density stratification in Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oglethorpe, R. L. F.; Caulfield, C. P.; Woods, Andrew W.

    2011-11-01

    We consider mixing of an initially linear stable salt stratification in turbulent Taylor-Couette flow. The fluid is confined to a cylindrical annulus with a vertical axis. Mixing is caused by rotating the inner cylinder at a constant rate. The outer cylinder is fixed. Experimental measurements show that at high initial bulk Richardson number, defined as Ri0 =N2 /Ω2 , where N is the buoyancy frequency of the initial stratification and Ω is the rotation rate of the inner cylinder, an initially linear salt stratification develops a series of well mixed layers separated by sharp interfaces. The size of these layers appears to depend on Ri0 and the gap width between the cylinders, ΔR. With time, the layers at the top and bottom of the tank evolve in salinity. This leads to entrainment from and eventual mixing with the adjacent layers as the salinity contrast across these interfaces decreases. As a result of successive merger events, eventually the system becomes well mixed. The salinity of the inner layers appears to remain constant, so that salt is transported from the bottom layer to the top layer without changing the structure of the interior. The salt flux through an interface appears to depend only on the rotation rate Ω of the inner cylinder, consistent with our previous study for an initial two-layer salt stratification (Woods et al. (2010) J Fluid Mech. 663, 347-357).

  6. A comparative numerical analysis of linear and nonlinear aerodynamic sound generation by vortex disturbances in homentropic constant shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hau, Jan-Niklas; Chagelishvili, George; Khujadze, George; Oberlack, Martin; Tevzadze, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Aerodynamic sound generation in shear flows is investigated in the light of the breakthrough in hydrodynamics stability theory in the 1990s, where generic phenomena of non-normal shear flow systems were understood. By applying the thereby emerged short-time/non-modal approach, the sole linear mechanism of wave generation by vortices in shear flows was captured [G. D. Chagelishvili, A. Tevzadze, G. Bodo, and S. S. Moiseev, "Linear mechanism of wave emergence from vortices in smooth shear flows," Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 3178-3181 (1997); B. F. Farrell and P. J. Ioannou, "Transient and asymptotic growth of two-dimensional perturbations in viscous compressible shear flow," Phys. Fluids 12, 3021-3028 (2000); N. A. Bakas, "Mechanism underlying transient growth of planar perturbations in unbounded compressible shear flow," J. Fluid Mech. 639, 479-507 (2009); and G. Favraud and V. Pagneux, "Superadiabatic evolution of acoustic and vorticity perturbations in Couette flow," Phys. Rev. E 89, 033012 (2014)]. Its source is the non-normality induced linear mode-coupling, which becomes efficient at moderate Mach numbers that is defined for each perturbation harmonic as the ratio of the shear rate to its characteristic frequency. Based on the results by the non-modal approach, we investigate a two-dimensional homentropic constant shear flow and focus on the dynamical characteristics in the wavenumber plane. This allows to separate from each other the participants of the dynamical processes — vortex and wave modes — and to estimate the efficacy of the process of linear wave-generation. This process is analyzed and visualized on the example of a packet of vortex modes, localized in both, spectral and physical, planes. Further, by employing direct numerical simulations, the wave generation by chaotically distributed vortex modes is analyzed and the involved linear and nonlinear processes are identified. The generated acoustic field is anisotropic in the wavenumber plane, which

  7. A comparative numerical analysis of linear and nonlinear aerodynamic sound generation by vortex disturbances in homentropic constant shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Hau, Jan-Niklas Oberlack, Martin; Chagelishvili, George; Khujadze, George; Tevzadze, Alexander

    2015-12-15

    Aerodynamic sound generation in shear flows is investigated in the light of the breakthrough in hydrodynamics stability theory in the 1990s, where generic phenomena of non-normal shear flow systems were understood. By applying the thereby emerged short-time/non-modal approach, the sole linear mechanism of wave generation by vortices in shear flows was captured [G. D. Chagelishvili, A. Tevzadze, G. Bodo, and S. S. Moiseev, “Linear mechanism of wave emergence from vortices in smooth shear flows,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 3178-3181 (1997); B. F. Farrell and P. J. Ioannou, “Transient and asymptotic growth of two-dimensional perturbations in viscous compressible shear flow,” Phys. Fluids 12, 3021-3028 (2000); N. A. Bakas, “Mechanism underlying transient growth of planar perturbations in unbounded compressible shear flow,” J. Fluid Mech. 639, 479-507 (2009); and G. Favraud and V. Pagneux, “Superadiabatic evolution of acoustic and vorticity perturbations in Couette flow,” Phys. Rev. E 89, 033012 (2014)]. Its source is the non-normality induced linear mode-coupling, which becomes efficient at moderate Mach numbers that is defined for each perturbation harmonic as the ratio of the shear rate to its characteristic frequency. Based on the results by the non-modal approach, we investigate a two-dimensional homentropic constant shear flow and focus on the dynamical characteristics in the wavenumber plane. This allows to separate from each other the participants of the dynamical processes — vortex and wave modes — and to estimate the efficacy of the process of linear wave-generation. This process is analyzed and visualized on the example of a packet of vortex modes, localized in both, spectral and physical, planes. Further, by employing direct numerical simulations, the wave generation by chaotically distributed vortex modes is analyzed and the involved linear and nonlinear processes are identified. The generated acoustic field is anisotropic in the wavenumber

  8. Robust control of linear global instability in models of non-parallel shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric; Bewley, Thomas

    2000-11-01

    The present study investigates the control of self-excited oscillations in spatially developing flows such as jets and wakes using H_∞ control theory on a linear complex Ginzburg Landau model. The coefficients of this 1D model equation, which is known to exhibit a generic hydrodynamic instability behavior, are those scaled by Roussopoulos & Monkewitz ( Physica D, 1996) to display behavior modeling that of the near-wake of a circular cylinder, in which a large pocket of local absolute instability is embedded within a convectively unstable flow. Based on noisy measurements at a point sensor typically located inside the wake, the compensator uses an \\cal H_∞ filter to construct a state estimate. This estimate is then used to compute \\cal H_∞ control feedback at a point actuator location, which is typically located upstream of the sensor. The goal of the control scheme is to stabilize the system by minimizing a weighted average of the ``system response'' and the ``control effort'' (both appropriately defined) while rigorously bounding the response of the controlled system to external disturbances. The application of such modern control rules leads to better performance than the control feedback proposed by previous studies by delaying the Reynolds number at which the onset of global instability appears by a factor of 3 and substantially decreasing the sensitivity of the system to external perturbations.

  9. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces with gas pockets using linearized boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jongmin; Bose, Sanjeeb; Garcia-Mayoral, Ricardo; Mani, Ali

    2012-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces are shown to be effective for surface drag reduction under laminar regime by both experiments and simulations (see for example, Ou and Rothstein, Phys. Fluids 17:103606, 2005). However, such drag reduction for fully developed turbulent flow maintaining the Cassie-Baxter state remains an open problem due to high shear rates and flow unsteadiness of turbulent boundary layer. Our work aims to develop an understanding of mechanisms leading to interface breaking and loss of gas pockets due to interactions with turbulent boundary layers. We take advantage of direct numerical simulation of turbulence with slip and no-slip patterned boundary conditions mimicking the superhydrophobic surface. In addition, we capture the dynamics of gas-water interface, by deriving a proper linearized boundary condition taking into account the surface tension of the interface and kinematic matching of interface deformation and normal velocity conditions on the wall. We will show results from our simulations predicting the dynamical behavior of gas pocket interfaces over a wide range of dimensionless surface tensions. Supported by the Office of Naval Research and the Kwanjeong Educational Scholarship Foundation.

  10. Perpendicular wavenumber dependence of the linear stability of global ion temperature gradient modes on E × B flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, P.; Saarelma, S.; McMillan, B.; Peeters, A.; Verwichte, E.

    2012-06-01

    Sheared E × B flows are known to stabilize turbulence. This paper investigates how the linear stability of the ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) mode depends on k⊥ in both circular and MHD geometry. We study the effects of both rotation profiles of constant shear and of purely toroidal flow taken from experiment, using the global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell code NEMORB. We find that in order to effectively stabilize the linear mode, the fastest growing mode requires a shearing rate (γE) around 1-2 times its linear growth rate without flow (γ0), while both longer and shorter wavelength modes need much larger flow shear compared with their static linear growth rates. Modes with kθρi < 0.2 need γE as much as 10 times their γ0. This variation exists in both large-aspect ratio circular cross-section and small-aspect ratio MHD geometries, with both analytic constant shear and experimental flow profiles. There is an asymmetry in the suppression with respect to the sign of γE, due to competition between equilibrium profile variation and flow shear. The maximum growth rate for cases using the experimental profile in MAST equilibria occurs at shearing rates of 10% the experimental level.

  11. Response analysis of a laminar premixed M-flame to flow perturbations using a linearized compressible Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, M.; Schuller, T.; Sipp, D.; Schmid, P. J.

    2015-04-01

    The response of a laminar premixed methane-air flame subjected to flow perturbations around a steady state is examined experimentally and using a linearized compressible Navier-Stokes solver with a one-step chemistry mechanism to describe combustion. The unperturbed flame takes an M-shape stabilized both by a central bluff body and by the external rim of a cylindrical nozzle. This base flow is computed by a nonlinear direct simulation of the steady reacting flow, and the flame topology is shown to qualitatively correspond to experiments conducted under comparable conditions. The flame is then subjected to acoustic disturbances produced at different locations in the numerical domain, and its response is examined using the linearized solver. This linear numerical model then allows the componentwise investigation of the effects of flow disturbances on unsteady combustion and the feedback from the flame on the unsteady flow field. It is shown that a wrinkled reaction layer produces hydrodynamic disturbances in the fresh reactant flow field that superimpose on the acoustic field. This phenomenon, observed in several experiments, is fully interpreted here. The additional perturbations convected by the mean flow stem from the feedback of the perturbed flame sheet dynamics onto the flow field by a mechanism similar to that of a perturbed vortex sheet. The different regimes where this mechanism prevails are investigated by examining the phase and group velocities of flow disturbances along an axis oriented along the main direction of the flow in the fresh reactant flow field. It is shown that this mechanism dominates the low-frequency response of the wrinkled shape taken by the flame and, in particular, that it fully determines the dynamics of the flame tip from where the bulk of noise is radiated.

  12. Response analysis of a laminar premixed M-flame to flow perturbations using a linearized compressible Navier-Stokes solver

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, M.; Schuller, T.; Sipp, D.; Schmid, P. J.

    2015-04-15

    The response of a laminar premixed methane-air flame subjected to flow perturbations around a steady state is examined experimentally and using a linearized compressible Navier-Stokes solver with a one-step chemistry mechanism to describe combustion. The unperturbed flame takes an M-shape stabilized both by a central bluff body and by the external rim of a cylindrical nozzle. This base flow is computed by a nonlinear direct simulation of the steady reacting flow, and the flame topology is shown to qualitatively correspond to experiments conducted under comparable conditions. The flame is then subjected to acoustic disturbances produced at different locations in the numerical domain, and its response is examined using the linearized solver. This linear numerical model then allows the componentwise investigation of the effects of flow disturbances on unsteady combustion and the feedback from the flame on the unsteady flow field. It is shown that a wrinkled reaction layer produces hydrodynamic disturbances in the fresh reactant flow field that superimpose on the acoustic field. This phenomenon, observed in several experiments, is fully interpreted here. The additional perturbations convected by the mean flow stem from the feedback of the perturbed flame sheet dynamics onto the flow field by a mechanism similar to that of a perturbed vortex sheet. The different regimes where this mechanism prevails are investigated by examining the phase and group velocities of flow disturbances along an axis oriented along the main direction of the flow in the fresh reactant flow field. It is shown that this mechanism dominates the low-frequency response of the wrinkled shape taken by the flame and, in particular, that it fully determines the dynamics of the flame tip from where the bulk of noise is radiated.

  13. Hydrodynamic effects and receptor interactions of platelets and their aggregates in linear shear flow.

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, P; Diamond, S L

    1997-01-01

    We have modeled platelet aggregation in a linear shear flow by accounting for two body collision hydrodynamics, platelet activation and receptor biology. Considering platelets and their aggregates as unequal-sized spheres with DLVO interactions (psi(platelet) = -15 mV, Hamaker constant = 10(-19) J), detailed hydrodynamics provided the flow field around the colliding platelets. Trajectory calculations were performed to obtain the far upstream cross-sectional area and the particle flux through this area provided the collision frequency. Only a fraction of platelets brought together by a shearing fluid flow were held together if successfully bound by fibrinogen cross-bridging GPIIb/IIIa receptors on the platelet surfaces. This fraction was calculated by modeling receptor-mediated aggregation using the formalism of Bell (Bell, G. I. 1979. A theoretical model for adhesion between cells mediated by multivalent ligands. Cell Biophys. 1:133-147) where the forward rate of bond formation dictated aggregation during collision and was estimated from the diffusional limited rate of lateral association of receptors multiplied by an effectiveness factor, eta, to give an apparent rate. For a value of eta = 0.0178, we calculated the overall efficiency (including both receptor binding and hydrodynamics effects) for equal-sized platelets with 50,000 receptors/platelet to be 0.206 for G = 41.9 s(-1), 0.05 for G = 335 s(-1), and 0.0086 for G = 1920 s(-1), values which are in agreement with efficiencies determined from initial platelet singlet consumption rates in flow through a tube. From our analysis, we predict that bond formation proceeds at a rate of approximately 0.1925 bonds/microm2 per ms, which is approximately 50-fold slower than the diffusion limited rate of association. This value of eta is also consistent with a colloidal stability of unactivated platelets at low shear rates. Fibrinogen was calculated to mediate aggregation quite efficiently at low shear rates but not at

  14. A semi-intrusive deterministic approach to uncertainty quantification in non-linear fluid flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abgrall, Rémi; Congedo, Pietro Marco

    2013-02-01

    This paper deals with the formulation of a semi-intrusive (SI) method allowing the computation of statistics of linear and non linear PDEs solutions. This method shows to be very efficient to deal with probability density function of whatsoever form, long-term integration and discontinuities in stochastic space. Given a stochastic PDE where randomness is defined on Ω, starting from (i) a description of the solution in term of a space variables, (ii) a numerical scheme defined for any event ω∈Ω and (iii) a (family) of random variables that may be correlated, the solution is numerically described by its conditional expectancies of point values or cell averages and its evaluation constructed from the deterministic scheme. One of the tools is a tessellation of the random space as in finite volume methods for the space variables. Then, using these conditional expectancies and the geometrical description of the tessellation, a piecewise polynomial approximation in the random variables is computed using a reconstruction method that is standard for high order finite volume space, except that the measure is no longer the standard Lebesgue measure but the probability measure. This reconstruction is then used to formulate a scheme on the numerical approximation of the solution from the deterministic scheme. This new approach is said semi-intrusive because it requires only a limited amount of modification in a deterministic solver to quantify uncertainty on the state when the solver includes uncertain variables. The effectiveness of this method is illustrated for a modified version of Kraichnan-Orszag three-mode problem where a discontinuous pdf is associated to the stochastic variable, and for a nozzle flow with shocks. The results have been analyzed in terms of accuracy and probability measure flexibility. Finally, the importance of the probabilistic reconstruction in the stochastic space is shown up on an example where the exact solution is computable, the viscous

  15. A semi-intrusive deterministic approach to uncertainty quantification in non-linear fluid flow problems

    SciTech Connect

    Abgrall, Rémi; Congedo, Pietro Marco

    2013-02-15

    This paper deals with the formulation of a semi-intrusive (SI) method allowing the computation of statistics of linear and non linear PDEs solutions. This method shows to be very efficient to deal with probability density function of whatsoever form, long-term integration and discontinuities in stochastic space. Given a stochastic PDE where randomness is defined on Ω, starting from (i) a description of the solution in term of a space variables, (ii) a numerical scheme defined for any event ω∈Ω and (iii) a (family) of random variables that may be correlated, the solution is numerically described by its conditional expectancies of point values or cell averages and its evaluation constructed from the deterministic scheme. One of the tools is a tessellation of the random space as in finite volume methods for the space variables. Then, using these conditional expectancies and the geometrical description of the tessellation, a piecewise polynomial approximation in the random variables is computed using a reconstruction method that is standard for high order finite volume space, except that the measure is no longer the standard Lebesgue measure but the probability measure. This reconstruction is then used to formulate a scheme on the numerical approximation of the solution from the deterministic scheme. This new approach is said semi-intrusive because it requires only a limited amount of modification in a deterministic solver to quantify uncertainty on the state when the solver includes uncertain variables. The effectiveness of this method is illustrated for a modified version of Kraichnan–Orszag three-mode problem where a discontinuous pdf is associated to the stochastic variable, and for a nozzle flow with shocks. The results have been analyzed in terms of accuracy and probability measure flexibility. Finally, the importance of the probabilistic reconstruction in the stochastic space is shown up on an example where the exact solution is computable, the viscous

  16. PAN AIR - A higher order panel method for predicting subsonic or supersonic linear potential flows about arbitrary configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, R. L.; Erickson, L. L.

    1981-01-01

    PAN AIR is a computer program for predicting subsonic or supersonic linear potential flow about arbitrary configurations. It uses linear source and quadratic doublet strength distributions. These higher-order distributions have been implemented in a manner that greatly reduces the numerical stability problems that have plagued earlier attempts to make surface paneling methods work successfully for supersonic flow. PAN AIR's problem-solving capability, numerical approach, modeling features, and program architecture are described. Numerical results are presented for a variety of geometries at supersonic Mach numbers.

  17. Linear stability of optimal streaks in the log-layer of turbulent channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizard, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    The importance of secondary instability of streaks for the generation of vortical structures attached to the wall in the logarithmic region of turbulent channels is studied. The streaks and their linear instability are computed by solving equations associated with the organized motion that include an eddy-viscosity modeling the effect of incoherent fluctuations. Three friction Reynolds numbers, Reτ = 2000, 3000, and 5000, are investigated. For all flow cases, optimal streamwise vortices (i.e., having the highest potential for linear transient energy amplification) are used as initial conditions. Due to the lift-up mechanism, these optimal perturbations lead to the nonlinear growth of streaks. Based on a Floquet theory along the spanwise direction, we observe the onset of streak secondary instability for a wide range of spanwise wavelengths when the streak amplitude exceeds a critical value. Under neutral conditions, it is shown that streak instability modes have their energy mainly concentrated in the overlap layer and propagate with a phase velocity equal to the mean streamwise velocity of the log-layer. These neutral log-layer modes exhibit a sinuous pattern and have characteristic sizes that are proportional to the wall distance in both streamwise and spanwise directions, in agreement with the Townsend's attached eddy hypothesis (A. Townsend, the structure of turbulent shear flow, Cambridge university press, 1976 2nd edition). In particular, for a distance from the wall varying from y+ ≈ 100 (in wall units) to y ≈ 0.3h, where h is half the height of the channel, the neutral log-layer modes are self-similar with a spanwise width of λz ≈ y/0.3 and a streamwise length of λx ≈ 3λz, independently of the Reynolds number. Based on this observation, it is suggested that compact vortical structures attached to the wall can be ascribed to streak secondary instabilities. In addition, spatial distributions of fluctuating vorticity components show that the onset

  18. Sensitivity of free bar morphology in rivers to secondary flow modeling: Linear stability analysis and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Toshiki; Shimizu, Yasuyuki; Kimura, Ichiro

    2016-06-01

    A number of numerical models have been proposed to understand and simulate fluvial river morphodynamics; however, it is somewhat unclear whether all the models are able to consistently simulate flow-bed instability phenomena. This study investigates the sensitivity of free bar morphology in rivers to secondary flow models used in depth-averaged models using linear stability analyses and numerical simulations. Both the linear analyses and numerical simulations suggest that under certain hydraulic conditions, an equilibrium-type secondary flow model, which has been widely used in river morphodynamic models, fails to generate a finite wavelength and bar mode, allowing the inception of bars of infinitely short scale and infinitely high mode. Using a nonequilibrium-type secondary flow model avoids the unphysical formation of these incipient free bars, and gives better solutions regarding finite amplitude bars. Since free bars are essential, intrinsic river morphological features, the findings of this study can be applied to a wide range of river morphodynamic calculations.

  19. Linear stability of a circular Couette flow under a radial thermoelectric body force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, H. N.; Meyer, A.; Crumeyrolle, O.; Mutabazi, I.

    2015-03-01

    The stability of the circular Couette flow of a dielectric fluid is analyzed by a linear perturbation theory. The fluid is confined between two concentric cylindrical electrodes of infinite length with only the inner one rotating. A temperature difference and an alternating electric tension are applied to the electrodes to produce a radial dielectrophoretic body force that can induce convection in the fluid. We examine the effects of superposition of this thermoelectric force with the centrifugal force including its thermal variation. The Earth's gravity is neglected to focus on the situations of a vanishing Grashof number such as microgravity conditions. Depending on the electric field strength and of the temperature difference, critical modes are either axisymmetric or nonaxisymmetric, occurring in either stationary or oscillatory states. An energetic analysis is performed to determine the dominant destabilizing mechanism. When the inner cylinder is hotter than the outer one, the circular Couette flow is destabilized by the centrifugal force for weak and moderate electric fields. The critical mode is steady axisymmetric, except for weak fields within a certain range of the Prandtl number and of the radius ratio of the cylinders, where the mode is oscillatory and axisymmetric. The frequency of this oscillatory mode is correlated with a Brunt-Väisälä frequency due to the stratification of both the density and the electric permittivity of the fluid. Under strong electric fields, the destabilization by the dielectrophoretic force is dominant, leading to oscillatory nonaxisymmetric critical modes with a frequency scaled by the frequency of the inner-cylinder rotation. When the outer cylinder is hotter than the inner one, the instability is again driven by the centrifugal force. The critical mode is axisymmetric and either steady under weak electric fields or oscillatory under strong electric fields. The frequency of the oscillatory mode is also correlated with the

  20. Generalized linear stability of non-inertial rimming flow in a rotating horizontal cylinder.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Himanshu; Tiwari, Naveen

    2015-10-01

    The stability of a thin film of viscous liquid inside a horizontally rotating cylinder is studied using modal and non-modal analysis. The equation governing the film thickness is derived within lubrication approximation and up to first order in aspect ratio (average film thickness to radius of the cylinder). Effect of gravity, viscous stress and capillary pressure are considered in the model. Steady base profiles are computed in the parameter space of interest that are uniform in the axial direction. A linear stability analysis is performed on these base profiles to study their stability to axial perturbations. The destabilizing behavior of aspect ratio and surface tension is demonstrated which is attributed to capillary instability. The transient growth that gives maximum amplification of any initial disturbance and the pseudospectra of the stability operator are computed. These computations reveal weak effect of non-normality of the operator and the results of eigenvalue analysis are recovered after a brief transient period. Results from nonlinear simulations are also presented which also confirm the validity of the modal analysis for the flow considered in this study. PMID:26496740

  1. Linear ground-water flow, flood-wave response program for programmable calculators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kernodle, John Michael

    1978-01-01

    Two programs are documented which solve a discretized analytical equation derived to determine head changes at a point in a one-dimensional ground-water flow system. The programs, written for programmable calculators, are in widely divergent but commonly encountered languages and serve to illustrate the adaptability of the linear model to use in situations where access to true computers is not possible or economical. The analytical method assumes a semi-infinite aquifer which is uniform in thickness and hydrologic characteristics, bounded on one side by an impermeable barrier and on the other parallel side by a fully penetrating stream in complete hydraulic connection with the aquifer. Ground-water heads may be calculated for points along a line which is perpendicular to the impermeable barrie and the fully penetrating stream. Head changes at the observation point are dependent on (1) the distance between that point and the impermeable barrier, (2) the distance between the line of stress (the stream) and the impermeable barrier, (3) aquifer diffusivity, (4) time, and (5) head changes along the line of stress. The primary application of the programs is to determine aquifer diffusivity by the flood-wave response technique. (Woodard-USGS)

  2. A Nth-order linear algorithm for extracting diffuse correlation spectroscopy blood flow indices in heterogeneous tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2014-09-01

    Conventional semi-infinite analytical solutions of correlation diffusion equation may lead to errors when calculating blood flow index (BFI) from diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) measurements in tissues with irregular geometries. Very recently, we created an algorithm integrating a Nth-order linear model of autocorrelation function with the Monte Carlo simulation of photon migrations in homogenous tissues with arbitrary geometries for extraction of BFI (i.e., αDB). The purpose of this study is to extend the capability of the Nth-order linear algorithm for extracting BFI in heterogeneous tissues with arbitrary geometries. The previous linear algorithm was modified to extract BFIs in different types of tissues simultaneously through utilizing DCS data at multiple source-detector separations. We compared the proposed linear algorithm with the semi-infinite homogenous solution in a computer model of adult head with heterogeneous tissue layers of scalp, skull, cerebrospinal fluid, and brain. To test the capability of the linear algorithm for extracting relative changes of cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in deep brain, we assigned ten levels of αDB in the brain layer with a step decrement of 10% while maintaining αDB values constant in other layers. Simulation results demonstrate the accuracy (errors < 3%) of high-order (N ≥ 5) linear algorithm in extracting BFIs in different tissue layers and rCBF in deep brain. By contrast, the semi-infinite homogenous solution resulted in substantial errors in rCBF (34.5% ≤ errors ≤ 60.2%) and BFIs in different layers. The Nth-order linear model simplifies data analysis, thus allowing for online data processing and displaying. Future study will test this linear algorithm in heterogeneous tissues with different levels of blood flow variations and noises.

  3. A Nth-order linear algorithm for extracting diffuse correlation spectroscopy blood flow indices in heterogeneous tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2014-09-29

    Conventional semi-infinite analytical solutions of correlation diffusion equation may lead to errors when calculating blood flow index (BFI) from diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) measurements in tissues with irregular geometries. Very recently, we created an algorithm integrating a Nth-order linear model of autocorrelation function with the Monte Carlo simulation of photon migrations in homogenous tissues with arbitrary geometries for extraction of BFI (i.e., αD{sub B}). The purpose of this study is to extend the capability of the Nth-order linear algorithm for extracting BFI in heterogeneous tissues with arbitrary geometries. The previous linear algorithm was modified to extract BFIs in different types of tissues simultaneously through utilizing DCS data at multiple source-detector separations. We compared the proposed linear algorithm with the semi-infinite homogenous solution in a computer model of adult head with heterogeneous tissue layers of scalp, skull, cerebrospinal fluid, and brain. To test the capability of the linear algorithm for extracting relative changes of cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in deep brain, we assigned ten levels of αD{sub B} in the brain layer with a step decrement of 10% while maintaining αD{sub B} values constant in other layers. Simulation results demonstrate the accuracy (errors < 3%) of high-order (N ≥ 5) linear algorithm in extracting BFIs in different tissue layers and rCBF in deep brain. By contrast, the semi-infinite homogenous solution resulted in substantial errors in rCBF (34.5% ≤ errors ≤ 60.2%) and BFIs in different layers. The Nth-order linear model simplifies data analysis, thus allowing for online data processing and displaying. Future study will test this linear algorithm in heterogeneous tissues with different levels of blood flow variations and noises.

  4. Non-Linear Dynamics and Stability of Circular Cylindrical Shells Containing Flowing Fluid. Part Iv: Large-Amplitude Vibrations with Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AMABILI, M.; PELLICANO, F.; PAÏDOUSSIS, M. P.

    2000-11-01

    The response of a shell conveying fluid to harmonic excitation, in the spectral neighbourhood of one of the lowest natural frequencies, is investigated for different flow velocities. The theoretical model has already been presented in Part I of the present study. Non-linearities due to moderately large-amplitude shell motion are considered by using Donnell's non-linear shallow-shell theory. Linear potential flow theory is applied to describe the fluid-structure interaction by using the model proposed by Paı̈doussis and Denise. For different amplitudes and frequencies of the excitation and for different flow velocities, the following are investigated numerically: (1) periodic response of the system; (2) unsteady and stochastic motion; (3) loss of stability by jumps to bifurcated branches. The effect of the flow velocity on the non-linear periodic response of the system has also been investigated. Poincaré maps and bifurcation diagrams are used to study the unsteady and stochastic dynamics of the system. Amplitude modulated motions, multi-periodic solutions, chaotic responses, cascades of bifurcations as the route to chaos and the so-called “blue sky catastrophe” phenomenon have all been observed for different values of the system parameters; the latter two have been predicted here probably for the first time for the dynamics of circular cylindrical shells.

  5. MODERATELY STABLE FLOW OVER A THREE-DIMENSIONAL HILL - A COMPARISON OF LINEAR THEORY WITH LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several series of experiments were performed in a stratified towing tank to study the near-field flow of a linearly stratified fluid over an isolated three-dimensional hill. he streamlines were obtained in the laboratory using a stereographic method to determine the paths of plum...

  6. Shear thinning behavior of linear polymer melts under shear flow via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaolei; Chen, Jizhong; An, Lijia

    2014-05-01

    The properties of both untangled and entangled linear polymer melts under shear flow are studied by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The results reveal that the dependence of shear viscosity η on shear rate dot{γ }, expressed by η ˜ dot{γ }^{-n}, exhibits three distinct regimes. The first is the well-known Newtonian regime, namely, η independent of shear rate at small shear rates dot{γ }<τ 0^{-1} (where τ0 is the longest polymer relaxation time at equilibrium). In the non-Newtonian regime (dot{γ }>τ 0^{-1}), the shear dependence of viscosity exhibits a crossover at a critical shear rate dot{γ }c dividing this regime into two different regimes, shear thinning regime I (ST-I) and II (ST-II), respectively. In the ST-I regime (τ ^{-1}_0dot{γ }c) a universal power law η ˜ dot{γ }^{-0.37} is found for considered chain lengths. Furthermore, the longer the polymer chain is, the smaller the shear viscosity for a given shear rate in the ST-II regime. The simulation also shows that a characteristic chain length, below which dot{γ }c will be equal to τ 0^{-1}, lies in the interval 30 < N < 50. For all considered chain lengths in the ST-II regime, we also find that the first and second normal stress differences N1 and N2 follow power laws of N1 ˜ dot{γ }^{2/3} and N2 ˜ dot{γ }^{0.82}, respectively; the orientation resistance parameter mG follows the relation mG ˜ dot{γ }^{0.75} and the tumbling frequency ftb follows f_{tb} ˜ dot{γ }^{0.75}. These results imply that the effects of entanglement on the shear dependences of these properties may be negligible in the ST-II regime. These findings may shed some light on the nature of shear thinning in flexible linear polymer melts.

  7. Periodic and chaotic responses of an sdf system with piecewise linear stiffness subjected to combined harmonic and flow induced excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, S.; Sekar, P.

    1995-07-01

    The response of a single-degree-of-freedom (sdf) vibrating system with unsymmetrical piecewise linear stiffness subjected to combined harmonic and flow induced excitations is investigated. Motion limiting stops, different tension and compression behavior, etc., may introduce an unsymmetrical piecewise linear stiffness characteristic. A multi-harmonic balance cum Newton-Raphson procedure in conjunction with an FFT algorithm is adopted to determine the stable and unstable periodic solutions. The stability of the periodic solutions is investigated by using Floquet theory. Digital simulation results reveal periodic, quasi-periodic and chaotic motions of the system in a range of flow velocities. Mode locked oscillations with period 5 motions are found to occur in certain range of flow velocities. Bifurcation diagrams and Lyapunov exponents are also presented.

  8. Making Routine Letters Have Positive Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, S. M.

    While few business people dispute the importance of carefully crafting persuasive, demanding, conciliatory, and bad-news letters, the regular flow of routine communications receives very little meaningful consideration or scrutiny. These routine communications (letters, inquiries, requests, collection letters, complaints, confirmations,…

  9. Applying non-linear dynamics to atrial appendage flow data to understand and characterize atrial arrhythmia

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.; Grimm, R.A.; Katz, R.; Thomas, J.D.

    1996-06-01

    The aim of this study was to better understand and characterize left atrial appendage flow in atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation and flutter are the most common cardiac arrhythmias affecting 15% of the older population. The pulsed Doppler velocity profile data was recorded from the left atrial appendage of patients using transesophageal echocardiography. The data was analyzed using Fourier analysis and nonlinear dynamical tools. Fourier analysis showed that appendage mechanical frequency ({ital f{sub f}}) for patients in sinus rhythm was always lower (around1 Hz) than that in atrial fibrillation (5-8 Hz). Among patients with atrial fibrillation spectral power below {ital f{sub f}} was significantly different suggesting variability within this group of patients. Results that suggested the presence of nonlinear dynamics were: a) the existence of two arbitrary peak frequencies {ital f{sub 1}, f{sub 2}}, and other peak frequencies as linear combinations thereof ({ital mf{sub 1}{+-}nf{sub 2}}), and b) the similarity between the spectrum of patient data and that obtained using the Lorenz equation. Nonlinear analysis tools, including Phase plots and differential radial plots, were also generated from the velocity data using a delay of 10. In the phase plots, some patients displayed a torus-like structure, while others had a more random-like pattern. In the differential radial plots, the first set of patients (with torus-like phase plots) showed fewer values crossing an arbitrary threshold of 10 than did the second set (8 vs. 27 in one typical example). The outcome of cardioversion was different for these two set of patients. Fourier analysis helped to: differentiate between sinus rhythm and atrial fibrillation, understand the characteristics of the wide range of atrial fibrillation patients, and provide hints that atrial fibrillation could be a nonlinear process. Nonlinear dynamical tools helped to further characterize and sub-classify atrial fibrillation.

  10. Linear stability of radially-heated circular Couette flow with simulated radial gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagg, Randy; Weidman, Patrick D.

    2007-05-01

    The stability of circular Couette flow between vertical concentric cylinders in the presence of a radial temperature gradient is considered with an effective “radial gravity.” In addition to terrestrial buoyancy - ρg e z we include the term - ρg m f(r)e r where g m f(r) is the effective gravitational acceleration directed radially inward across the gap. Physically, this body force arises in experiments using ferrofluid in the annular gap of a Taylor Couette cell whose inner cylinder surrounds a vertical stack of equally spaced disk magnets. The radial dependence f(r) of this force is proportional to the modified Bessel function K 1(κr), where 2π/κ is the spatial period of the magnetic stack and r is the radial coordinate. Linear stability calculations made to compare with conditions reported by Ali and Weidman (J. Fluid Mech., 220, 1990) show strong destabilization effects, measured by the onset Rayleigh number R, when the inner wall is warmer, and strong stabilization effects when the outer wall is warmer, with increasing values of the dimensionless radial gravity γ = g m /g. Further calculations presented for the geometry and fluid properties of a terrestrial laboratory experiment reveal a hitherto unappreciated structure of the stability problem for differentially-heated cylinders: multiple wavenumber minima exist in the marginal stability curves. Transitions in global minima among these curves give rise to a competition between differing instabilities of the same spiral mode number, but widely separated axial wavenumbers.

  11. Computer Program For Linear Algebra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krogh, F. T.; Hanson, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Collection of routines provided for basic vector operations. Basic Linear Algebra Subprogram (BLAS) library is collection from FORTRAN-callable routines for employing standard techniques to perform basic operations of numerical linear algebra.

  12. Investigation of Flow Separation in a Transonic-fan Linear Cascade Using Visualization Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, Jan; Chima, Rodrick V.; Jett, Thomas A.; Bencic, Timothy J.; Weiland, Kenneth E.

    2000-01-01

    An extensive study into the nature of the separated flows on the suction side of modem transonic fan airfoils at high incidence is described in the paper. Suction surface.flow separation is an important flow characteristic that may significantly contribute to stall flutter in transonic fans. Flutter in axial turbomachines is a highly undesirable and dangerous self-excited mode of blade oscillations that can result in high cycle fatigue blade failure. The study basically focused on two visualization techniques: surface flow visualization using dye oils, and schlieren (and shadowgraph) flow visualization. The following key observations were made during the study. For subsonic inlet flow, the flow on the suction side of the blade is separated over a large portion of the blade, and the separated area increases with increasing inlet Mach number. For the supersonic inlet flow condition, the flow is attached from the leading edge up to the point where a bow shock from the upper neighboring blade hits the blade surface. Low cascade solidity, for the subsonic inlet flow, results in an increased area of separated flow. For supersonic flow conditions, a low solidity results in an improvement in flow over the suction surface. Finally, computational results modeling the transonic cascade flowfield illustrate our ability to simulate these flows numerically.

  13. Application of Gas-Kinetic BGK Scheme for Solving 2-D Compressible Inviscid Flow around Linear Turbine Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdusslam, Saleh N.; Chit, Ong J.; Hamdan, Megat M.; Omar, Ashraf A.; Asrar, Waqar

    2006-12-01

    Fluid flows within turbomachinery tend to be extremely complex. Understanding such flows is crucial in the effort to improve current turbomachinery designs. Hence, computational approaches can be used to great advantage in this regard. In this paper, gas-kinetic BGK (Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook) scheme is developed for simulating compressible inviscid flow around a linear turbine cascade. BGK scheme is an approximate Riemann solver that uses the collisional Boltzmann equation as the governing equation for flow evolutions. For efficient computations, particle distribution functions in the general solution of the BGK model are simplified and used for the flow simulations. Second-order accuracy is achieved via the reconstruction of flow variables using the MUSCL (Monotone Upstream-Centered Schemes for Conservation Laws) interpolation technique together with a multistage Runge-Kutta method. A multi-zone H-type mesh for the linear turbine cascades is generated using a structured algebraic grid generation method. Computed results are compared with available experimental data and found to be in agreement with each other. In order to further substantiate the performance of the BGK scheme, another test case, namely a wedge cascade, is used. The numerical solutions obtained via this test are validated against analytical solutions, which showed to be in good agreement.

  14. A dual-well step drawdown method for the estimation of linear and non-linear flow parameters and wellbore skin factor in confined aquifer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, Rajandrea

    2011-03-01

    SummaryIn this study a method based on dual-well step drawdown test (i.e. a combination of an aquifer and a well performance test) for the determination of hydrodynamic parameters (namely storage coefficient and hydraulic conductivity), mechanical wellbore finite thickness skin factor, non-linear wellbore and non-linear aquifer parameters in an homogeneous confined aquifer is presented in order to put together aquifer and well tests. The interpretation procedure is based on the application of superposition principle to a large time logarithmic approximation of the solution. The advantages of this method, that can be considered an extension of Jacob step-test (1947) and Cooper-Jacob approximation (1946), are that: (I) it is possible to determine simultaneously aquifer and well properties in a single test; (II) the method is based on a large time approximation and it is therefore independent from wellbore storage; (III) if the well skin is absent, the aquifer parameters (storage coefficient and hydraulic conductivity) can be derived just from a single-well test; (IV) the interpretation procedure is easy to apply and robust and does not require any specific numeric code or software. The same procedure can be easily adapted to gas well testing. It is also shown that, even in the presence of linear and non-linear flow, skin effect and wellbore storage, the hydraulic conductivity (and not the storage coefficient) of the aquifer can be correctly estimated by the Cooper and Jacob (1946) method applied to a single-rate pumping test, using exclusively the large time drawdown data measured at the pumping well.

  15. Dynamics of Fluctuations, Flows and Global Stability Under Electrode Biasing in a Linear Plasma Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Tiffany

    2015-11-01

    Various bias electrodes have been inserted into the Helicon-Cathode (HelCat) device at the University of New Mexico, in order to affect intrinsic drift-wave turbulence and flows. The goal of the experiments was to suppress and effect the intrinsic turbulence and with detailed measurements, understand the changes that occur during biasing. The drift-mode in HelCat varies from coherent at low magnetic field (<1kG) to broad-band turbulent at high magnetic fields (>1kG). The first electrode consists of 6 concentric rings set in a ceramic substrate; these rings act as a boundary condition, sitting at the end of the plasma column 2-m away from the source. A negative bias has been found to have no effect on the fluctuations, but a positive bias (Vr>5Te) is required in order to suppress the drift-mode. Two molybdenum grids can also be inserted into the plasma and sit close to the source. Floating or grounding a grid results in suppressing the drift-mode of the system. A negative bias (>-5Te) is found to return the drift-mode, and it is possible to drive a once coherent mode into a broad-band turbulent one. From a bias voltage of -5Te10Te, a new large-scale global mode is excited. This mode exhibits fluctuations in the ion saturation current, as well as in the potential, with a magnitude >50%. This mode has been identified as the potential relaxation instability (PRI). In order to better understand the modes and changes observed in the plasma, a linear stability code, LSS, was employed. As well, a 1D3V-PIC code utilizing Braginskii's equations was also utilized to understand the high-bias instability.

  16. Hard-sphere dispersions: Small-wave-vector structure-factor measurements in a linear shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerson, Bruce J.; van der Werff, Jos; de Kruif, C. G.

    1988-06-01

    Small-scattering-wave-vector structure-factor measurements have been made for model hard-sphere suspensions undergoing a steady linear shear flow. The samples are comprised of sterically stabilized silica particles in cyclohexane and have been well characterized previously by rheological, light scattering, and neutron scattering measurements. These combined measurements provide a strict test of recent theories of microscopic order in suspensions undergoing shear and suggest a picture which unifies several intuitive notions about suspensions undergoing shear flow: distortion of the pair correlation function, clustering, layering, and nonequilibrium phase transitions.

  17. Rotating Flow of Magnetite-Water Nanofluid over a Stretching Surface Inspired by Non-Linear Thermal Radiation.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, M; Mushtaq, A; Hayat, T; Alsaedi, A

    2016-01-01

    Present study explores the MHD three-dimensional rotating flow and heat transfer of ferrofluid induced by a radiative surface. The base fluid is considered as water with magnetite-Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Novel concept of non-linear radiative heat flux is considered which produces a non-linear energy equation in temperature field. Conventional transformations are employed to obtain the self-similar form of the governing differential system. The arising system involves an interesting temperature ratio parameter which is an indicator of small/large temperature differences in the flow. Numerical simulations with high precision are determined by well-known shooting approach. Both uniform stretching and rotation have significant impact on the solutions. The variation in velocity components with the nanoparticle volume fraction is non-monotonic. Local Nusselt number in Fe3O4-water ferrofluid is larger in comparison to the pure fluid even at low particle concentration. PMID:26894690

  18. Rotating Flow of Magnetite-Water Nanofluid over a Stretching Surface Inspired by Non-Linear Thermal Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, M.; Mushtaq, A.; Hayat, T.; Alsaedi, A.

    2016-01-01

    Present study explores the MHD three-dimensional rotating flow and heat transfer of ferrofluid induced by a radiative surface. The base fluid is considered as water with magnetite-Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Novel concept of non-linear radiative heat flux is considered which produces a non-linear energy equation in temperature field. Conventional transformations are employed to obtain the self-similar form of the governing differential system. The arising system involves an interesting temperature ratio parameter which is an indicator of small/large temperature differences in the flow. Numerical simulations with high precision are determined by well-known shooting approach. Both uniform stretching and rotation have significant impact on the solutions. The variation in velocity components with the nanoparticle volume fraction is non-monotonic. Local Nusselt number in Fe3O4–water ferrofluid is larger in comparison to the pure fluid even at low particle concentration. PMID:26894690

  19. Flow of a non-linear (density-gradient-dependent) viscous fluid with heat generation, viscous dissipation and radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad; Tran, P.X.

    2008-09-22

    In this paper, we study the flow of a compressible (density-gradient-dependent) non-linear fluid down an inclined plane, subject to radiation boundary condition. The convective heat transfer is also considered where a source term, similar to the Arrhenius type reaction, is included. The non-dimensional forms of the equations are solved numerically and the competing effects of conduction, dissipation, heat generation and radiation are discussed

  20. Flow of a non-linear (density-gradient-dependent) viscous fluid with heat generation, viscous dissipation and radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad; Phuoc, Tran X.

    2008-09-25

    In this paper, we study the flow of a compressible (density-gradient-dependent) non-linear fluid down an inclined plane, subject to radiation boundary condition. The convective heat transfer is also considered where a source team, similar to the Arrhenius type reaction, is included. The non-dimensional forms of the equations are solved numerically and the competing effects of conduction, dissipation, heat generation and radiation are discussed.

  1. Development of flow network analysis code for block type VHTR core by linear theory method

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. H.; Yoon, S. J.; Park, J. W.; Park, G. C.

    2012-07-01

    VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) is high-efficiency nuclear reactor which is capable of generating hydrogen with high temperature of coolant. PMR (Prismatic Modular Reactor) type reactor consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks. The flow paths in the prismatic VHTR core consist of coolant holes, bypass gaps and cross gaps. Complicated flow paths are formed in the core since the coolant holes and bypass gap are connected by the cross gap. Distributed coolant was mixed in the core through the cross gap so that the flow characteristics could not be modeled as a simple parallel pipe system. It requires lot of effort and takes very long time to analyze the core flow with CFD analysis. Hence, it is important to develop the code for VHTR core flow which can predict the core flow distribution fast and accurate. In this study, steady state flow network analysis code is developed using flow network algorithm. Developed flow network analysis code was named as FLASH code and it was validated with the experimental data and CFD simulation results. (authors)

  2. Routines for Computing Pressure Drops in Venturis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Quay, Laurence

    2004-01-01

    A set of computer-program routines has been developed for calculating pressure drops and recoveries of flows through standard venturis, nozzle venturis, and orifices. Relative to prior methods used for such calculations, the method implemented by these routines offers greater accuracy because it involves fewer simplifying assumptions and is more generally applicable to wide ranges of flow conditions. These routines are based on conservation of momentum and energy equations for real nonideal fluids, the properties of which are calculated by curve-fitting subroutines based on empirical properties data. These routines are capable of representing cavitating, choked, non-cavitating, and unchoked flow conditions for liquids, gases, and supercritical fluids. For a computation of flow through a given venturi, nozzle venturi, or orifice, the routines determine which flow condition occurs: First, they calculate a throat pressure under the assumption that the flow is unchoked or non-cavitating, then they calculate the throat pressure under the assumption that the flow is choked or cavitating. The assumption that yields the higher throat pressure is selected as the correct one.

  3. A Godunov-type method in Lagrangian coordinates for computing linearly-perturbed planar-symmetric flows of gas dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarisse, Jean-Marie; Jaouen, Stéphane; Raviart, Pierre-Arnaud

    2004-07-01

    Linear stability studies of complex flows require that efficient numerical methods be devised for predicting growth rates of multi-dimensional perturbations. For one-dimensional (1D) basic flows - i.e. of planar, cylindrical or spherical symmetry - a general numerical approach is viable which consists in solving simultaneously the one-dimensional equations of gas dynamics and their linearized forms for three-dimensional perturbations. Extensions of artificial viscosity methods have thus been used in the past. More recently [Equations aux dérivées partielles et applications, articles dédiés à J.-L. Lions, 1998], Godunov-type schemes for single-fluid flows of gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics have been proposed. Pursuing this effort, we introduce, within the Lagrangian perturbation approach, a class of Godunov-type schemes which is well suited for solving multi-material problems of gas dynamics. These schemes are developed here for the planar-symmetric case and comprise two second-order extensions. The numerical capabilities of these methods are illustrated by computations of Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities occurring at a single material interface. A systematic comparison of numerically computed growth rates with results of the linear theory for the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is provided.

  4. Data format translation routines

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, R.D.

    1981-02-01

    To enable the effective connection of several dissimilar computers into a network, modification of the data being passed from one computer to another may become necessary. This document describes a package of routines which permit the translation of data in PDP-8 formats to PDP-11 or DECsystem-10 formats or from PDP-11 format to DECsystem-10 format. Additional routines are described which permit the effective use of the translation routines in the environment of the Fusion Energy Division (FED) network and the Elmo Bumpy Torus (EBT) data base.

  5. Databased comparison of Sparse Bayesian Learning and Multiple Linear Regression for statistical downscaling of low flow indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Deepti; St-Hilaire, André; Daigle, Anik; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.

    2013-04-01

    SummaryThis study attempts to compare the performance of two statistical downscaling frameworks in downscaling hydrological indices (descriptive statistics) characterizing the low flow regimes of three rivers in Eastern Canada - Moisie, Romaine and Ouelle. The statistical models selected are Relevance Vector Machine (RVM), an implementation of Sparse Bayesian Learning, and the Automated Statistical Downscaling tool (ASD), an implementation of Multiple Linear Regression. Inputs to both frameworks involve climate variables significantly (α = 0.05) correlated with the indices. These variables were processed using Canonical Correlation Analysis and the resulting canonical variates scores were used as input to RVM to estimate the selected low flow indices. In ASD, the significantly correlated climate variables were subjected to backward stepwise predictor selection and the selected predictors were subsequently used to estimate the selected low flow indices using Multiple Linear Regression. With respect to the correlation between climate variables and the selected low flow indices, it was observed that all indices are influenced, primarily, by wind components (Vertical, Zonal and Meridonal) and humidity variables (Specific and Relative Humidity). The downscaling performance of the framework involving RVM was found to be better than ASD in terms of Relative Root Mean Square Error, Relative Mean Absolute Bias and Coefficient of Determination. In all cases, the former resulted in less variability of the performance indices between calibration and validation sets, implying better generalization ability than for the latter.

  6. Numerical study of the flow field through a transonic linear turbine cascade at design and off-design conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Batsh, Hesham

    The flow field through a transonic linear turbine cascade is studied in this paper at design and off-design conditions. The compressible flow field is obtained by solving the equations governing the fluid flow and heat transfer. Two eddy-viscosity turbulence models are used to simulate the turbulence in turbine cascades: the standard k-e model and the Spalart Allmaras model. The standard k-e model is the most universal and popular model for industrial flow and heat transfer simulations. It has the shortcoming of accurately predicting the profile loss in turbomachinery applications. The Spalart Allmaras model is a relatively recent and simple one-equation model. In this paper, the model is tested for turbomachinery applications. The ability of the model to accurately predict the flow field in turbine cascade is tested. Blade loading, downstream wake distribution, total pressure loss coefficient, and exit flow angle are used in this study with comparisons to the standard k-e model and experimental data. The design condition and the off-design conditions are considered.

  7. Numerical study of acoustic instability in a partly lined flow duct using the full linearized Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Bo; Sun, Dakun; Jing, Xiaodong; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2016-07-01

    Lined ducts are extensively applied to suppress noise emission from aero-engines and other turbomachines. The complex noise/flow interaction in a lined duct possibly leads to acoustic instability in certain conditions. To investigate the instability, the full linearized Navier-Stokes equations with eddy viscosity considered are solved in frequency domain using a Galerkin finite element method to compute the sound transmission in shear flow in the lined duct as well as the flow perturbation over the impedance wall. A good agreement between the numerical predictions and the published experimental results is obtained for the sound transmission, showing that a transmission peak occurs around the resonant frequency of the acoustic liner in the presence of shear flow. The eddy viscosity is an important influential factor that plays the roles of both providing destabilizing and making coupling between the acoustic and flow motions over the acoustic liner. Moreover, it is shown from the numerical investigation that the occurrence of the sound amplification and the magnitude of transmission coefficient are closely related to the realistic velocity profile, and we find it essential that the actual variation of the velocity profile in the axial direction over the liner surface be included in the computation. The simulation results of the periodic flow patterns possess the proper features of the convective instability over the liner, as observed in Marx et al.'s experiment. A quantitative comparison between numerical and experimental results of amplitude and phase of the instability is performed. The corresponding eigenvalues achieve great agreement.

  8. Non-linear hydrotectonic phenomena: Part I - fluid flow in open fractures under dynamical stress loading

    SciTech Connect

    Archambeau, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    A fractured solid under stress loading (or unloading) can be viewed as behaving macroscopically as a medium with internal, hidden, degrees of freedom, wherein changes in fracture geometry (i.e. opening, closing and extension) and flow of fluid and gas within fractures will produce major changes in stresses and strains within the solid. Likewise, the flow process within fractures will be strongly coupled to deformation within the solid through boundary conditions on the fracture surfaces. The effects in the solid can, in part, be phenomenologically represented as inelastic or plastic processes in the macroscopic view. However, there are clearly phenomena associated with fracture growth and open fracture fluid flows that produce effects that can not be described using ordinary inelastic phenomenology. This is evident from the fact that a variety of energy release phenomena can occur, including seismic emissions of previously stored strain energy due to fracture growth, release of disolved gas from fluids in the fractures resulting in enhanced buoyancy and subsequent energetic flows of gas and fluids through the fracture system which can produce raid extension of old fractures and the creation of new ones. Additionally, the flows will be modulated by the opening and closing of fractures due to deformation in the solid, so that the flow process is strongly coupled to dynamical processes in the surrounding solid matrix, some of which are induced by the flow itself.

  9. Daily exercise routines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Patrick L.; Amoroso, Michael T.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on daily exercise routines are presented. Topics covered include: daily exercise and periodic stress testings; exercise equipment; physiological monitors; exercise protocols; physiological levels; equipment control; control systems; and fuzzy logic control.

  10. Routine sputum culture

    MedlinePlus

    Sputum culture ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Culture, routine. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, ... . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:409- ...

  11. Importance of Family Routines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share The Importance of Family Routines Page Content ​Every family needs ... child to sleep. These rituals can include storytelling, reading aloud, conversation, and songs. Try to avoid exciting ...

  12. Non-linear interactions between consumers and flow determine the probability of plant community dominance on Maine rocky shores.

    PubMed

    Silliman, Brian R; McCoy, Michael W; Trussell, Geoffrey C; Crain, Caitlin M; Ewanchuk, Patrick J; Bertness, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    Although consumers can strongly influence community recovery from disturbance, few studies have explored the effects of consumer identity and density and how they may vary across abiotic gradients. On rocky shores in Maine, recent experiments suggest that recovery of plant- or animal- dominated community states is governed by rates of water movement and consumer pressure. To further elucidate the mechanisms of consumer control, we examined the species-specific and density-dependent effects of rocky shore consumers (crabs and snails) on community recovery under both high (mussel dominated) and low flow (plant dominated) conditions. By partitioning the direct impacts of predators (crabs) and grazers (snails) on community recovery across a flow gradient, we found that grazers, but not predators, are likely the primary agent of consumer control and that their impact is highly non-linear. Manipulating snail densities revealed that herbivorous and bull-dozing snails (Littorina littorea) alone can control recovery of high and low flow communities. After ∼1.5 years of recovery, snail density explained a significant amount of the variation in macroalgal coverage at low flow sites and also mussel recovery at high flow sites. These density-dependent grazer effects were were both non-linear and flow-dependent, with low abundance thresholds needed to suppress plant community recovery, and much higher levels needed to control mussel bed development. Our study suggests that consumer density and identity are key in regulating both plant and animal community recovery and that physical conditions can determine the functional forms of these consumer effects. PMID:23940510

  13. Non-Linear Interactions between Consumers and Flow Determine the Probability of Plant Community Dominance on Maine Rocky Shores

    PubMed Central

    Silliman, Brian R.; McCoy, Michael W.; Trussell, Geoffrey C.; Crain, Caitlin M.; Ewanchuk, Patrick J.; Bertness, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Although consumers can strongly influence community recovery from disturbance, few studies have explored the effects of consumer identity and density and how they may vary across abiotic gradients. On rocky shores in Maine, recent experiments suggest that recovery of plant- or animal- dominated community states is governed by rates of water movement and consumer pressure. To further elucidate the mechanisms of consumer control, we examined the species-specific and density-dependent effects of rocky shore consumers (crabs and snails) on community recovery under both high (mussel dominated) and low flow (plant dominated) conditions. By partitioning the direct impacts of predators (crabs) and grazers (snails) on community recovery across a flow gradient, we found that grazers, but not predators, are likely the primary agent of consumer control and that their impact is highly non-linear. Manipulating snail densities revealed that herbivorous and bull-dozing snails (Littorina littorea) alone can control recovery of high and low flow communities. After ∼1.5 years of recovery, snail density explained a significant amount of the variation in macroalgal coverage at low flow sites and also mussel recovery at high flow sites. These density-dependent grazer effects were were both non-linear and flow-dependent, with low abundance thresholds needed to suppress plant community recovery, and much higher levels needed to control mussel bed development. Our study suggests that consumer density and identity are key in regulating both plant and animal community recovery and that physical conditions can determine the functional forms of these consumer effects. PMID:23940510

  14. Study of Separation and Transition of Boundary Layer For Flow Through Linear Turbine Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutnuri, Pavan Kumar; Ayyalasomayajula, Haritha; Ghia, Urmila; "Karman" Ghia, Kirti

    2002-11-01

    The objective of the present work is to study the boundary-layer separation of unsteady flow in turbomachines. A parallel, Chimera version of FDL3DI is used as the flow solver. The code uses second and fourth-order damping for a stable numerical solution. The use of fourth-order damping terms necessitates a minimum of 4-cell overlap at inter-block boundaries. The extended overlap is also necessary for the later intended use of a higher-order accurate differencing technique. The blocks are extended in such a way that the grid points in the overlap region coincide with the grid points in the neighboring-block (under-lapping) region and hence direct injection may be used for inter-block communication. This maintains the order of accuracy of the difference scheme; otherwise, any interpolation involved in inter-block communication needs to be of the same high-order accuracy as the difference scheme of the flow equations. PEGASUS is used to update the flow variables at the block interfaces. A 12-block structured grid of multiple topologies generated by GRIDPRO is used. Low-Re separated flow results are examined and will be presented for a cascade configuration. Passive control methodology is also planned for application to unsteady boundary-layer flow separation in the cascade.

  15. Frequency-domain Monte Carlo method for linear oscillatory gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladiges, Daniel R.; Sader, John E.

    2015-03-01

    Gas flows generated by resonating nanoscale devices inherently occur in the non-continuum, low Mach number regime. Numerical simulations of such flows using the standard direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method are hindered by high statistical noise, which has motivated the development of several alternate Monte Carlo methods for low Mach number flows. Here, we present a frequency-domain low Mach number Monte Carlo method based on the Boltzmann-BGK equation, for the simulation of oscillatory gas flows. This circumvents the need for temporal simulations, as is currently required, and provides direct access to both amplitude and phase information using a pseudo-steady algorithm. The proposed method is validated for oscillatory Couette flow and the flow generated by an oscillating sphere. Good agreement is found with an existing time-domain method and accurate numerical solutions of the Boltzmann-BGK equation. Analysis of these simulations using a rigorous statistical approach shows that the frequency-domain method provides a significant improvement in computational speed.

  16. Effect of Coannular Flow on Linearized Euler Equation Predictions of Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, R.; Shih, S.-H.; Mankbadi, Reda R.

    1997-01-01

    An improved version of a previously validated linearized Euler equation solver is used to compute the noise generated by coannular supersonic jets. Results for a single supersonic jet are compared to the results from both a normal velocity profile and an inverted velocity profile supersonic jet.

  17. Particle behavior in linear shear flow: an experimental and numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathi, Nima; Ingber, Marc; Vorobieff, Peter

    2012-11-01

    We study particle behavior in low Reynolds number flows. Our experimental setup can produce both Couette flow and Pouseuille flow at low Reynolds numbers. Spherical particles are suspended in gravity-stratified Newtonian fluid. Their predominantly two-dimensional motion is driven by moving belts (and/or piston) that produce shear in the fluids. Particle migration and translational velocity have been studied. The irreversibility of particle motion has been investigated. The experimental results are compared to the numerical simulations performed with discrete phase element method (DPM). Particle trajectories with the same boundary conditions in viscous fluids have been studied. The irreversibility in numerical simulation has been modeled for different cases. Results show the particle migration is a function of shear rate, particle size, degree of symmetry of the fluid domain, and also of the initial starting position, the latter playing an important role in the irreversibility of particle motion. This research is partly supported by Procter & Gamble.

  18. On Three-Dimensional Flow and Heat Transfer over a Non-Linearly Stretching Sheet: Analytical and Numerical Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Junaid Ahmad; Mustafa, Meraj; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This article studies the viscous flow and heat transfer over a plane horizontal surface stretched non-linearly in two lateral directions. Appropriate wall conditions characterizing the non-linear variation in the velocity and temperature of the sheet are employed for the first time. A new set of similarity variables is introduced to reduce the boundary layer equations into self-similar forms. The velocity and temperature distributions are determined by two methods, namely (i) optimal homotopy analysis method (OHAM) and (ii) fourth-fifth-order Runge-Kutta integration based shooting technique. The analytic and numerical solutions are compared and these are found in excellent agreement. Influences of embedded parameters on momentum and thermal boundary layers are sketched and discussed. PMID:25198696

  19. Predictions of flow through an isothermal serpentine passage with linear eddy-viscosity Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes models.

    SciTech Connect

    Laskowski, Gregory Michael

    2005-12-01

    Flows with strong curvature present a challenge for turbulence models, specifically eddy viscosity type models which assume isotropy and a linear and instantaneous equilibrium relation between stress and strain. Results obtained from three different codes and two different linear eddy viscosity turbulence models are compared to a DNS simulation in order to gain some perspective on the turbulence modeling capability of SIERRA/Fuego. The Fuego v2f results are superior to the more common two-layer k-e model results obtained with both a commercial and research code in terms of the concave near wall behavior predictions. However, near the convex wall, including the separated region, little improvement is gained using the v2f model and in general the turbulent kinetic energy prediction is fair at best.

  20. On three-dimensional flow and heat transfer over a non-linearly stretching sheet: analytical and numerical solutions.

    PubMed

    Khan, Junaid Ahmad; Mustafa, Meraj; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This article studies the viscous flow and heat transfer over a plane horizontal surface stretched non-linearly in two lateral directions. Appropriate wall conditions characterizing the non-linear variation in the velocity and temperature of the sheet are employed for the first time. A new set of similarity variables is introduced to reduce the boundary layer equations into self-similar forms. The velocity and temperature distributions are determined by two methods, namely (i) optimal homotopy analysis method (OHAM) and (ii) fourth-fifth-order Runge-Kutta integration based shooting technique. The analytic and numerical solutions are compared and these are found in excellent agreement. Influences of embedded parameters on momentum and thermal boundary layers are sketched and discussed. PMID:25198696

  1. Magnetohydrodynamic flow of Carreau fluid over a convectively heated surface in the presence of non-linear radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Masood; Hashim; Hussain, M.; Azam, M.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a study of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer flow of a non-Newtonian Carreau fluid over a convectively heated surface. The analysis of heat transfer is further performed in the presence of non-linear thermal radiation. The appropriate transformations are employed to bring the governing equations into dimensionless form. The numerical solutions of the partially coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations are obtained by using the Runge-Kutta Fehlberg integration scheme. The influence of non-dimensional governing parameters on the velocity, temperature, local skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt number is studied and discussed with the help of graphs and tables. Results proved that there is significant decrease in the velocity and the corresponding momentum boundary layer thickness with the growth in the magnetic parameter. However, a quite the opposite is true for the temperature and the corresponding thermal boundary layer thickness.

  2. Piecewise linear hamiltonian flows associated to zero-sum games: Transition combinatorics and questions on ergodicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovski, Georg; van Strien, Sebastian

    2011-02-01

    In this paper we consider a class of piecewise affine Hamiltonian vector fields whose orbits are piecewise straight lines. We give a first classification result of such systems and show that the orbit-structure of the flow of such a differential equation is surprisingly rich.

  3. [The effect of gravity on linear blood flow velocity in different parts of the venous system in humans].

    PubMed

    Modin, A Iu

    2002-01-01

    Effects of gravity on linear blood velocity in jugular, femoral and popliteal veins were examined in 45 healthy male and female subjects. The zero-g effects were simulated by putting the subjects in the recumbent position, and the gravity effects were provoked by active orthostasis. Blood velocity was measured with CW Doppler (4 MHz). No difference was determined in velocity of the blood flow along the veins in recumbent subjects. In the head-up position, blood flow was significantly increased in the jugular vein and decreased in the leg veins. In several instances, brief contraction of the crus muscles caused a noticeable rise in the peak velocity along the femoral vein. In the head-up position this hemodynamic effect of the crus pump was much more pronounced. PMID:12098950

  4. Analysis and accurate numerical solutions of the integral equation derived from the linearized BGKW equation for the steady Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shidong; Luo, Li-Shi

    2016-07-01

    The integral equation for the flow velocity u (x ; k) in the steady Couette flow derived from the linearized Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook-Welander kinetic equation is studied in detail both theoretically and numerically in a wide range of the Knudsen number k between 0.003 and 100.0. First, it is shown that the integral equation is a Fredholm equation of the second kind in which the norm of the compact integral operator is less than 1 on Lp for any 1 ≤ p ≤ ∞ and thus there exists a unique solution to the integral equation via the Neumann series. Second, it is shown that the solution is logarithmically singular at the endpoints. More precisely, if x = 0 is an endpoint, then the solution can be expanded as a double power series of the form ∑n=0∞∑m=0∞cn,mxn(xln ⁡ x) m about x = 0 on a small interval x ∈ (0 , a) for some a > 0. And third, a high-order adaptive numerical algorithm is designed to compute the solution numerically to high precision. The solutions for the flow velocity u (x ; k), the stress Pxy (k), and the half-channel mass flow rate Q (k) are obtained in a wide range of the Knudsen number 0.003 ≤ k ≤ 100.0; and these solutions are accurate for at least twelve significant digits or better, thus they can be used as benchmark solutions.

  5. Estimation of streamflow, base flow, and nitrate-nitrogen loads in Iowa using multiple linear regression models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, K.E.; Wolter, C.F.

    2005-01-01

    Nineteen variables, including precipitation, soils and geology, land use, and basin morphologic characteristics, were evaluated to develop Iowa regression models to predict total streamflow (Q), base flow (Qb), storm flow (Qs) and base flow percentage (%Qb) in gauged and ungauged watersheds in the state. Discharge records from a set of 33 watersheds across the state for the 1980 to 2000 period were separated into Qb and Qs. Multiple linear regression found that 75.5 percent of long term average Q was explained by rainfall, sand content, and row crop percentage variables, whereas 88.5 percent of Qb was explained by these three variables plus permeability and floodplain area variables. Qs was explained by average rainfall and %Qb was a function of row crop percentage, permeability, and basin slope variables. Regional regression models developed for long term average Q and Qb were adapted to annual rainfall and showed good correlation between measured and predicted values. Combining the regression model for Q with an estimate of mean annual nitrate concentration, a map of potential nitrate loads in the state was produced. Results from this study have important implications for understanding geomorphic and land use controls on streamflow and base flow in Iowa watersheds and similar agriculture dominated watersheds in the glaciated Midwest. (JAWRA) (Copyright ?? 2005).

  6. 1r2dinv: A finite-difference model for inverse analysis of two dimensional linear or radial groundwater flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohling, G.C.; Butler, J.J., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a program for inverse analysis of two-dimensional linear or radial groundwater flow problems. The program, 1r2dinv, uses standard finite difference techniques to solve the groundwater flow equation for a horizontal or vertical plane with heterogeneous properties. In radial mode, the program simulates flow to a well in a vertical plane, transforming the radial flow equation into an equivalent problem in Cartesian coordinates. The physical parameters in the model are horizontal or x-direction hydraulic conductivity, anisotropy ratio (vertical to horizontal conductivity in a vertical model, y-direction to x-direction in a horizontal model), and specific storage. The program allows the user to specify arbitrary and independent zonations of these three parameters and also to specify which zonal parameter values are known and which are unknown. The Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is used to estimate parameters from observed head values. Particularly powerful features of the program are the ability to perform simultaneous analysis of heads from different tests and the inclusion of the wellbore in the radial mode. These capabilities allow the program to be used for analysis of suites of well tests, such as multilevel slug tests or pumping tests in a tomographic format. The combination of information from tests stressing different vertical levels in an aquifer provides the means for accurately estimating vertical variations in conductivity, a factor profoundly influencing contaminant transport in the subsurface. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Extraction of diffuse correlation spectroscopy flow index by integration of Nth-order linear model with Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Yu; Lin, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang; Li, Ting; Chen, Lei; Toborek, Michal

    2014-05-12

    Conventional semi-infinite solution for extracting blood flow index (BFI) from diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) measurements may cause errors in estimation of BFI (αD{sub B}) in tissues with small volume and large curvature. We proposed an algorithm integrating Nth-order linear model of autocorrelation function with the Monte Carlo simulation of photon migrations in tissue for the extraction of αD{sub B}. The volume and geometry of the measured tissue were incorporated in the Monte Carlo simulation, which overcome the semi-infinite restrictions. The algorithm was tested using computer simulations on four tissue models with varied volumes/geometries and applied on an in vivo stroke model of mouse. Computer simulations shows that the high-order (N ≥ 5) linear algorithm was more accurate in extracting αD{sub B} (errors < ±2%) from the noise-free DCS data than the semi-infinite solution (errors: −5.3% to −18.0%) for different tissue models. Although adding random noises to DCS data resulted in αD{sub B} variations, the mean values of errors in extracting αD{sub B} were similar to those reconstructed from the noise-free DCS data. In addition, the errors in extracting the relative changes of αD{sub B} using both linear algorithm and semi-infinite solution were fairly small (errors < ±2.0%) and did not rely on the tissue volume/geometry. The experimental results from the in vivo stroke mice agreed with those in simulations, demonstrating the robustness of the linear algorithm. DCS with the high-order linear algorithm shows the potential for the inter-subject comparison and longitudinal monitoring of absolute BFI in a variety of tissues/organs with different volumes/geometries.

  8. Transition to asymmetry in pipe flow of shear-thinning fluids: a linear instability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, David; Wen, Chaofan; Poole, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies of shear-thinning fluids in pipe flow discovered that, although the time-averaged velocity profile was axisymmetric when the flow was laminar or fully turbulent, contrary to expectations it was asymmetric in the laminar-turbulent transition regime. We reveal that in fact the asymmetry is not induced by the laminar-turbulent transition process, but is an instability of the laminar state. Furthermore, the transition process is responsible for returning symmetry to the flow (i.e. the opposite to what was previously believed), which explains why the fully turbulent case is axisymmetric. The experiment was performed using an aqueous solution of xanthan gum (0.15%), an essentially inelastic shear-thinning polymer solution. Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry was used to measure the 3C velocity vectors over the entire circular cross-section of the pipe, 220 pipe diameters downstream of the inlet. The deviation from the axisymmetric laminar state is observed to develop in the form of a supercritical bifurcation with square-root dependence on Reynolds number. The asymmetry is non-hysteretic and reversible, not only having a favoured location, but a preferred route between axisymmetry and asymmetry, which it adheres to regardless of the direction of the transition.

  9. Routine DNA testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Routine DNA testing. It’s done once you’ve Marker-Assisted Breeding Pipelined promising Qantitative Trait Loci within your own breeding program and thereby established the performance-predictive power of each DNA test for your germplasm under your conditions. By then you are ready to screen your par...

  10. PROPER: Optical propagation routines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krist, John E.

    2014-05-01

    PROPER simulates the propagation of light through an optical system using Fourier transform algorithms (Fresnel, angular spectrum methods). Distributed as IDL source code, it includes routines to create complex apertures, aberrated wavefronts, and deformable mirrors. It is especially useful for the simulation of high contrast imaging telescopes (extrasolar planet imagers like TPF).

  11. Routine neonatal circumcision?

    PubMed Central

    Tran, P. T.; Giacomantonio, M.

    1996-01-01

    Routine neonatal circumcision is still a controversial procedure. This article attempts to clarify some of the advantages and disadvantages of neonatal circumcision. The increased rate of penile cancer among uncircumcised men appears to justify the procedure, but that alone is not sufficient justification. The final decision on neonatal circumcision should be made by parents with balanced counsel from attending physicians. PMID:8939321

  12. Graph-Plotting Routine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.

    1987-01-01

    Plotter routine for IBM PC (AKPLOT) designed for engineers and scientists who use graphs as integral parts of their documentation. Allows user to generate graph and edit its appearance on cathode-ray tube. Graph may undergo many interactive alterations before finally dumped from screen to be plotted by printer. Written in BASIC.

  13. Convective flows generated by evaporation: experiments, linear stability analysis and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunstan, Jocelyn; Lee, Kyoung Jin; Park, Simon; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    A novel form of convection was observed in a suspension of non-motile Photobacterium phosphoreum bacteria. The pattern resembles classical bioconvection, however this strain has limited if any motility, which excludes this possible explanation. After performing a series of control experiments we found that the convection was actually driven by the evaporation of the salty bacterial medium, and the same kind of plumes were observed using polystyrene beads suspended in water with salt added. A mathematical model was formulated for the process and studied using a linear stability analysis and finite element method simulations, reproducing most of the observed experimental features. From the linear stability analysis, a threshold in salt concentration to observe convective motion was obtained, as well as the wavelength of the pattern at the onset of the instability. This was complemented by finite element simulations, which produced plume dynamics remarkably similar to the experimental observations. Evaporation-driven convection on the millimeter scale has not been studied extensively, and its effect may have been underestimated in other experiments.

  14. Linear and nonlinear instability and ligament dynamics in 3D laminar two-layer liquid/liquid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ó Náraigh, Lennon; Valluri, Prashant; Scott, David; Bethune, Iain; Spelt, Peter

    2013-11-01

    We consider the linear and nonlinear stability of two-phase density-matched but viscosity contrasted fluids subject to laminar Poiseuille flow in a channel, paying particular attention to the formation of three-dimensional waves. The Orr-Sommerfeld-Squire analysis is used along with DNS of the 3D two-phase Navier-Stokes equations using our newly launched TPLS Solver (http://edin.ac/10cRKzS). For the parameter regimes considered, we demonstrate the existence of two distinct mechanisms whereby 3D waves enter the system, and dominate at late time. There exists a direct route, whereby 3D waves are amplified by the standard linear mechanism; for certain parameter classes, such waves grow at a rate less than but comparable to that of most-dangerous two-dimensional mode. Additionally, there is a weakly nonlinear route, whereby a purely spanwise wave couples to a streamwise mode and grows exponentially. We demonstrate these mechanisms in isolation and in concert. Consideration is also given to the ultimate state of these waves: persistent three-dimensional nonlinear waves are stretched and distorted by the base flow, thereby producing regimes of ligaments, ``sheets,'' or ``interfacial turbulence.'' HECToR RAP/dCSE Project e174, HPC-Europa 2.

  15. Linear analysis of time dependent properties of Child-Langmuir flow

    SciTech Connect

    Rokhlenko, A.

    2013-01-15

    We continue our analysis of the time dependent behavior of the electron flow in the Child-Langmuir system, removing an approximation used earlier. We find a modified set of oscillatory decaying modes with frequencies of the same order as the inverse of the electron transient time. This range (typically MHz) allows simple experimental detection and maybe exploitation. We then study the time evolution of the current in response to a slow change of the anode voltage where the same modes of oscillations appear too. The cathode current in this case is systematically advanced or retarded depending on the direction of the voltage change.

  16. Higher order nonlocal formalism for linear analysis of a magnetized multispecies plasma with inhomogeneous flows

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrishchaka, V.V.; Ganguli, G.I.; Bakshi, P.M.; Koepke, M.E.

    1998-01-01

    The formalism necessary to study the collective properties of a plasma system with inhomogeneous flows is nonlocal and generally in the form of an integrodifferential equation. Usually the eigenvalue condition is reduced to a second-order differential equation for simplicity. While the gross physical behavior of the system can be obtained from the second-order differential equation level of description, higher-order corrections are necessary for greater accuracy. The limit in which the scale-size of the velocity inhomogeneity is large compared to the ion gyroradius is considered and a transverse flow profile sharply localized in space ({open_quotes}top-hat{close_quotes} profile) is assumed. In this limit, a simple analytical method for the solution of the general eigenvalue condition to all orders is developed. A comparison of the properties of the solutions obtained from the second-order differential equation level of description with those obtained from higher orders is presented. Both the resonant (dissipative) and the nonresonant (reactive) effects of velocity shear are considered. It is found that while the overall features are well represented by the second-order level of description, the higher-order corrections moderate the destabilizing effects due to velocity shear, which can be quite significant in some cases. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Non-Linear Characterisation of Cerebral Pressure-Flow Dynamics in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Saqib; Teal, Paul D.; Kleijn, W. Bastiaan; O’Donnell, Terrence; Witter, Trevor; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral metabolism is critically dependent on the regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF), so it would be expected that vascular mechanisms that play a critical role in CBF regulation would be tightly conserved across individuals. However, the relationships between blood pressure (BP) and cerebral blood velocity fluctuations exhibit inter-individual variations consistent with heterogeneity in the integrity of CBF regulating systems. Here we sought to determine the nature and consistency of dynamic cerebral autoregulation (dCA) during the application of oscillatory lower body negative pressure (OLBNP). In 18 volunteers we recorded BP and middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAv) and examined the relationships between BP and MCAv fluctuations during 0.03, 0.05 and 0.07Hz OLBNP. dCA was characterised using project pursuit regression (PPR) and locally weighted scatterplot smoother (LOWESS) plots. Additionally, we proposed a piecewise regression method to statistically determine the presence of a dCA curve, which was defined as the presence of a restricted autoregulatory plateau shouldered by pressure-passive regions. Results show that LOWESS has similar explanatory power to that of PPR. However, we observed heterogeneous patterns of dynamic BP-MCAv relations with few individuals demonstrating clear evidence of a dCA central plateau. Thus, although BP explains a significant proportion of variance, dCA does not manifest as any single characteristic BP-MCAv function. PMID:26421429

  18. BiGlobal linear stability analysis on low-Re flow past an airfoil at high angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Samtaney, Ravi

    2016-04-01

    We perform BiGlobal linear stability analysis on flow past a NACA0012 airfoil at 16° angle of attack and Reynolds number ranging from 400 to 1000. The steady-state two-dimensional base flows are computed using a well-tested finite difference code in combination with the selective frequency damping method. The base flow is characterized by two asymmetric recirculation bubbles downstream of the airfoil whose streamwise extent and the maximum reverse flow velocity increase with the Reynolds number. The stability analysis of the flow past the airfoil is carried out under very small spanwise wavenumber β = 10-4 to approximate the two-dimensional perturbation, and medium and large spanwise wavenumbers (β = 1-8) to account for the three-dimensional perturbation. Numerical results reveal that under small spanwise wavenumber, there are at most two oscillatory unstable modes corresponding to the near wake and far wake instabilities; the growth rate and frequency of the perturbation agree well with the two-dimensional direct numerical simulation results under all Reynolds numbers. For a larger spanwise wavenumber β = 1, there is only one oscillatory unstable mode associated with the wake instability at Re = 400 and 600, while at Re = 800 and 1000 there are two oscillatory unstable modes for the near wake and far wake instabilities, and one stationary unstable mode for the monotonically growing perturbation within the recirculation bubble via the centrifugal instability mechanism. All the unstable modes are weakened or even suppressed as the spanwise wavenumber further increases, among which the stationary mode persists until β = 4.

  19. The piecewise-linear predictor-corrector code - A Lagrangian-remap method for astrophysical flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lufkin, Eric A.; Hawley, John F.

    1993-01-01

    We describe a time-explicit finite-difference algorithm for solving the nonlinear fluid equations. The method is similar to existing Eulerian schemes in its use of operator-splitting and artificial viscosity, except that we solve the Lagrangian equations of motion with a predictor-corrector and then remap onto a fixed Eulerian grid. The remap is formulated to eliminate errors associated with coordinate singularities, with a general prescription for remaps of arbitrary order. We perform a comprehensive series of tests on standard problems. Self-convergence tests show that the code has a second-order rate of convergence in smooth, two-dimensional flow, with pressure forces, gravity, and curvilinear geometry included. While not as accurate on idealized problems as high-order Riemann-solving schemes, the predictor-corrector Lagrangian-remap code has great flexibility for application to a variety of astrophysical problems.

  20. Traveling wave linear accelerator with RF power flow outside of accelerating cavities

    DOEpatents

    Dolgashev, Valery A.

    2016-06-28

    A high power RF traveling wave accelerator structure includes a symmetric RF feed, an input matching cell coupled to the symmetric RF feed, a sequence of regular accelerating cavities coupled to the input matching cell at an input beam pipe end of the sequence, one or more waveguides parallel to and coupled to the sequence of regular accelerating cavities, an output matching cell coupled to the sequence of regular accelerating cavities at an output beam pipe end of the sequence, and output waveguide circuit or RF loads coupled to the output matching cell. Each of the regular accelerating cavities has a nose cone that cuts off field propagating into the beam pipe and therefore all power flows in a traveling wave along the structure in the waveguide.

  1. Self-organisation and non-linear dynamics in driven magnetohydrodynamic turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallas, V.; Alexakis, A.

    2015-04-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulent flows driven by random, large-scale, mechanical and electromagnetic external forces of zero helicities are investigated by means of direct numerical simulations. It is shown that despite the absence of helicities in the forcing, the system is attracted to helical states of large scale condensates that exhibit laminar behaviour despite the large value of the Reynolds numbers examined. We demonstrate that the correlation time of the external forces controls the time spent on these states, i.e., for short correlation times, the system remains in the turbulent state while as the correlation time is increased, the system spends more and more time in the helical states. As a result, time averaged statistics are significantly affected by the time spent on these states. These results have important implications for MHD and turbulence theory and they provide insight into various physical phenomena where condensates transpire.

  2. Parametric instability of a many point-vortex system in a multi-layer flow under linear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhov, Eugene A.; Koshel, Konstantin V.

    2016-05-01

    The paper deals with a dynamical system governing the motion of many point vortices located in different layers of a multi-layer flow under external deformation. The deformation consists of generally independent shear and rotational components. First, we examine the dynamics of the system's vorticity center. We demonstrate that the vorticity center of such a multi-vortex multi-layer system behaves just like the one of two point vortices interacting in a homogeneous deformation flow. Given nonstationary shear and rotational components oscillating with different magnitudes, the vorticity center may experience parametric instability leading to its unbounded growth. However, we then show that one can shift to a moving reference frame with the origin coinciding with the position of the vorticity center. In this new reference frame, the new vorticity center always stays at the origin of coordinates, and the equations governing the vortex trajectories look exactly the same as if the vorticity center had never moved in the original reference frame. Second, we studied the relative motion of two point vortices located in different layers of a two-layer flow under linear deformation. We analyze their regular and chaotic dynamics identifying parameters resulting in effective and extensive destabilization of the vortex trajectories.

  3. Linear impact of thermal inhomogeneities on mesoscale atmospheric flow with zero synoptic wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalu, G. A.; Pielke, R. A.; Avissar, R.; Kallos, G.; Baldi, M.; Guerrini, A.

    1991-01-01

    An analytical evaluation of the perturbations to mesoscale atmospheric flows induced by thermal inhomogeneities in the convective boundary layer is presented. The time evolution of these perturbations as a function of the intensity and of the horizontal and vertical scales of the diabatic forcing is studied. The problem is approached using Laplace transform theory for the time behavior and Green function theory for the spatial structure. Results show that the growth of the atmospheric perturbations closely follows the growth of the convective boundary layer; the transient being characterized by a number of inertia-gravity oscillations of decreasing intensity. The vertical scale is determined by the depth of the convective boundary layer; and the horizontal scale is determined by the local Rossby deformation radius. Sinusoidally periodic thermal forcing induce periodic atmospheric cells of the same horizontal scale. The intensity of mesoscale cells increases for increasing values of the wave number, reaches its maximum value when the wavelength of the forcing is of the order of the local Rossby radius, and then decreases as the wavelength of the forcing decreases.

  4. High shear rate flow in a linear stroke magnetorheological energy absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, W.; Wereley, N. M.; Hiemenz, G. J.; Ngatu, G. T.

    2014-05-01

    To provide adaptive stroking load in the crew seats of ground vehicles to protect crew from blast or impact loads, a magnetorheological energy absorber (MREA) or shock absorber was developed. The MREA provides appropriate levels of controllable stroking load for different occupant weights and peak acceleration because the viscous stroking load generated by the MREA force increases with velocity squared, thereby reducing its controllable range at high piston velocity. Therefore, MREA behavior at high piston velocity is analyzed and validated experimentally in order to investigate the effects of velocity and magnetic field on MREA performance. The analysis used to predict the MREA force as a function of piston velocity squared and applied field is presented. A conical fairing is mounted to the piston head of the MREA in order reduce predicted inlet flow loss by 9% at nominal velocity of 8 m/s, which resulted in a viscous force reduction of nominally 4%. The MREA behavior is experimentally measured using a high speed servo-hydraulic testing system for speeds up to 8 m/s. The measured MREA force is used to validate the analysis, which captures the transient force quite accurately, although the peak force is under-predicted at the peak speed of 8 m/s.

  5. Non-linear dynamics of annular creeping flow enclosed by an elastic membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbaz, Shai; Gat, Amir

    2015-11-01

    This study deals with the fluid-structure-interaction problem of longitudinal annular flow about a varying cross-section centre-body enclosed by an elastic membrane. The gap between the centre-body and membrane wall may be initially filled with a thin fluid layer or devoid of it. We employ elastic shell theory and the lubrication approximation and obtain a forced nonlinear diffusion equation governing the problem. In the case of an advancing liquid front in an initially unpenetrated interface (viscous peeling) the governing equation degenerates into a forced porous medium equation, for which several closed-form solutions can be obtained. Based on self-similarity we define propagation laws for the fluid-elastic interaction which in turn provide the basis for numerical investigation of compound solutions such as pulse trains and other waveforms. The presented interaction between viscosity and elasticity may be applied to fields such as soft-robotics and micro-scale or larger swimmers by allowing for the time-dependent control of a compliant boundary.

  6. Observation of fluctuation-driven particle flux reduction by low-frequency zonal flow in a linear magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, R.; Xie, J. L. Yu, C. X.; Liu, A. D.; Lan, T.; Li, H.; Liu, W. D.; Zhang, S. B.; Kong, D. F.; Hu, G. H.

    2015-01-15

    Low-frequency zonal flow (ZF) has been observed in a linear magnetic plasma device, exhibiting significant intermittency. Using the conditional analysis method, a time-averaged fluctuation-induced particle flux was observed to consistently decrease as ZF increased in amplitude. A dominant fraction of the flux, which is driven by drift-wave harmonics, is reversely modulated by ZF in the time domain. Spectra of the flux, together with each of the related turbulence properties, are estimated subject to two conditions, i.e., when potential fluctuation series represents a strong ZF intermittency or a very weak ZF component. Comparison of frequency-domain results demonstrates that ZF reduces the cross-field particle transport primarily by suppressing the density fluctuation as well as decorrelating density and potential fluctuations.

  7. Reduction effect of neutral density on the excitation of turbulent drift waves in a linear magnetized plasma with flow

    SciTech Connect

    Saitou, Y.; Yonesu, A.; Shinohara, S.; Ignatenko, M. V.; Kasuya, N.; Kawaguchi, M.; Terasaka, K.; Nishijima, T.; Nagashima, Y.; Kawai, Y.; Yagi, M.; Itoh, S.-I.; Azumi, M.; Itoh, K.

    2007-07-15

    The importance of reducing the neutral density to reach strong drift wave turbulence is clarified from the results of the extended magnetohydrodynamics and Monte Carlo simulations in a linear magnetized plasma. An upper bound of the neutral density relating to the ion-neutral collision frequency for the excitation of drift wave instability is shown, and the necessary flow velocity to excite this instability is also estimated from the neutral distributions. Measurements of the Mach number and the electron density distributions using Mach probe in the large mirror device (LMD) of Kyushu University [S. Shinohara et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 37, 1015 (1995)] are reported as well. The obtained results show a controllability of the neutral density and provide the basis for neutral density reduction and a possibility to excite strong drift wave turbulence in the LMD.

  8. Linear stability analysis of pressure-driven channel flow of a Newtonian and a Herschel-Bulkley fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kirti; Valluri, Prashant; Spelt, Peter; Matar, Omar

    2007-11-01

    The linear stability of pressure-driven channel flow of a Newtonian layer past a non-Newtonian fluid is studied; the latter is assumed to possess a finite yield stress and to exhibit a power-law behaviour. Coupled Orr-Sommerfeld-type eigenvalue equations are derived and solved using a spectral collocation method in the absence of unyielded regions. The numerical solutions of these equations are in agreement with analytical predictions valid in the long-wave limit. Our results indicate that increasing the yield stress (prior to the formation of unyielded regions) and shear thickening tendency of the non-Newtonian fluid promote instability. An analysis of the disturbance `energy' illustrates the presence of an unstable, `interfacial' mode at all Reynolds numbers studied, and an additional, less unstable `shear' mode at relatively high Reynolds numbers. The influence of non-Newtonian rheology on the stability characteristics of these modes is elucidated.

  9. Linear instability of pressure-driven channel flow of a Newtonian and a Herschel-Bulkley fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, K. C.; Valluri, P.; Spelt, P. D. M.; Matar, O. K.

    2007-12-01

    The linear stability characteristics of pressure-driven two-layer channel flow are considered, wherein a Newtonian fluid layer overlies a layer of a Herschel-Bulkley fluid. A pair of coupled Orr-Sommerfeld eigenvalue equations are derived and solved using an efficient spectral collocation method for cases in which unyielded regions are absent. An asymptotic analysis is also carried out in the long-wave limit, the results of which are in excellent agreement with the numerical predictions. Our analytical and numerical results indicate that increasing the dimensionless yield stress, prior to the formation of unyielded plugs below the interface, is destabilizing. Increasing the shear-thinning tendency of the lower fluid is stabilizing.

  10. AQMAN; linear and quadratic programming matrix generator using two-dimensional ground-water flow simulation for aquifer management modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lefkoff, L.J.; Gorelick, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    A FORTRAN-77 computer program code that helps solve a variety of aquifer management problems involving the control of groundwater hydraulics. It is intended for use with any standard mathematical programming package that uses Mathematical Programming System input format. The computer program creates the input files to be used by the optimization program. These files contain all the hydrologic information and management objectives needed to solve the management problem. Used in conjunction with a mathematical programming code, the computer program identifies the pumping or recharge strategy that achieves a user 's management objective while maintaining groundwater hydraulic conditions within desired limits. The objective may be linear or quadratic, and may involve the minimization of pumping and recharge rates or of variable pumping costs. The problem may contain constraints on groundwater heads, gradients, and velocities for a complex, transient hydrologic system. Linear superposition of solutions to the transient, two-dimensional groundwater flow equation is used by the computer program in conjunction with the response matrix optimization method. A unit stress is applied at each decision well and transient responses at all control locations are computed using a modified version of the U.S. Geological Survey two dimensional aquifer simulation model. The program also computes discounted cost coefficients for the objective function and accounts for transient aquifer conditions. (Author 's abstract)

  11. Linear-Algebra Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, C. L.; Krogh, F. T.; Gold, S. S.; Kincaid, D. R.; Sullivan, J.; Williams, E.; Hanson, R. J.; Haskell, K.; Dongarra, J.; Moler, C. B.

    1982-01-01

    The Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms (BLAS) library is a collection of 38 FORTRAN-callable routines for performing basic operations of numerical linear algebra. BLAS library is portable and efficient source of basic operations for designers of programs involving linear algebriac computations. BLAS library is supplied in portable FORTRAN and Assembler code versions for IBM 370, UNIVAC 1100 and CDC 6000 series computers.

  12. Flows of dioxins and furans in coastal food webs: inverse modeling, sensitivity analysis, and applications of linear system theory.

    PubMed

    Saloranta, Tuomo M; Andersen, Tom; Naes, Kristoffer

    2006-01-01

    Rate constant bioaccumulation models are applied to simulate the flow of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in the coastal marine food web of Frierfjorden, a contaminated fjord in southern Norway. We apply two different ways to parameterize the rate constants in the model, global sensitivity analysis of the models using Extended Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (Extended FAST) method, as well as results from general linear system theory, in order to obtain a more thorough insight to the system's behavior and to the flow pathways of the PCDD/Fs. We calibrate our models against observed body concentrations of PCDD/Fs in the food web of Frierfjorden. Differences between the predictions from the two models (using the same forcing and parameter values) are of the same magnitude as their individual deviations from observations, and the models can be said to perform about equally well in our case. Sensitivity analysis indicates that the success or failure of the models in predicting the PCDD/F concentrations in the food web organisms highly depends on the adequate estimation of the truly dissolved concentrations in water and sediment pore water. We discuss the pros and cons of such models in understanding and estimating the present and future concentrations and bioaccumulation of persistent organic pollutants in aquatic food webs. PMID:16494250

  13. Determination of cost coefficients of a priority-based water allocation linear programming model - a network flow approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, F. N.-F.; Wu, C.-W.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a method to establish the objective function of a network flow programming model for simulating river-reservoir system operations and associated water allocation, with an emphasis on situations when the links other than demand or storage have to be assigned with nonzero cost coefficients. The method preserves the priorities defined by rule curves of reservoir, operational preferences for conveying water, allocation of storage among multiple reservoirs, and transbasin water diversions. Path enumeration analysis transforms these water allocation rules into linear constraints that can be solved to determine link cost coefficients. An approach to prune the original system into a reduced network is proposed to establish the precise constraints of nonzero cost coefficients, which can then be efficiently solved. The cost coefficients for the water allocation in the Feitsui and Shihmen reservoirs' joint operating system of northern Taiwan was adequately assigned by the proposed method. This case study demonstrates how practitioners can correctly utilize network-flow-based models to allocate water supply throughout complex systems that are subject to strict operating rules.

  14. Determination of cost coefficients of priority-based water allocation linear programming model - a network flow approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, F. N.-F.; Wu, C.-W.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a method to establish the objective function of a network flow programming model for simulating river/reservoir system operations and associated water allocation, with an emphasis on situations when the links other than demand or storage have to be assigned with nonzero cost coefficients. The method preserves the priorities defined by rule curves of reservoir, operational preferences for conveying water, allocation of storage among multiple reservoirs, and trans-basin water diversions. Path enumeration analysis transforms these water allocation rules into linear constraints that can be solved to determine link cost coefficients. An approach to prune the original system into a reduced network is proposed to establish the precise constraints of nonzero cost coefficients which can then be efficiently solved. The cost coefficients for the water allocation in the Feitsui and Shihmen Reservoirs joint operating system of northern Taiwan was adequately assigned by the proposed method. This case study demonstrates how practitioners can correctly utilize network-flow-based models to allocate water supply throughout complex systems that are subject to strict operating rules.

  15. Effect of fluid and particle inertia on the rotation of an oblate spheroidal particle suspended in linear shear flow.

    PubMed

    Rosén, T; Do-Quang, M; Aidun, C K; Lundell, F

    2015-05-01

    This work describes the inertial effects on the rotational behavior of an oblate spheroidal particle confined between two parallel opposite moving walls, which generate a linear shear flow. Numerical results are obtained using the lattice Boltzmann method with an external boundary force. The rotation of the particle depends on the particle Reynolds number, Re(p)=Gd(2)ν(-1) (G is the shear rate, d is the particle diameter, ν is the kinematic viscosity), and the Stokes number, St=αRe(p) (α is the solid-to-fluid density ratio), which are dimensionless quantities connected to fluid and particle inertia, respectively. The results show that two inertial effects give rise to different stable rotational states. For a neutrally buoyant particle (St=Re(p)) at low Re(p), particle inertia was found to dominate, eventually leading to a rotation about the particle's symmetry axis. The symmetry axis is in this case parallel to the vorticity direction; a rotational state called log-rolling. At high Re(p), fluid inertia will dominate and the particle will remain in a steady state, where the particle symmetry axis is perpendicular to the vorticity direction and has a constant angle ϕ(c) to the flow direction. The sequence of transitions between these dynamical states were found to be dependent on density ratio α, particle aspect ratio r(p), and domain size. More specifically, the present study reveals that an inclined rolling state (particle rotates around its symmetry axis, which is not aligned in the vorticity direction) appears through a pitchfork bifurcation due to the influence of periodic boundary conditions when simulated in a small domain. Furthermore, it is also found that a tumbling motion, where the particle symmetry axis rotates in the flow-gradient plane, can be a stable motion for particles with high r(p) and low α. PMID:26066258

  16. Indoor fitness routine

    MedlinePlus

    ... own by filling gallon milk jugs with water. Warm up. Get your blood flowing by walking in place. ... prevent some injuries. You should continue with your warm up until your body feels warm and you are ...

  17. Applicability of linearized-theory attached-flow methods to design and analysis of flap systems at low speeds for thin swept wings with sharp leading edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Harry W.; Darden, Christine M.

    1987-01-01

    Low-speed experimental force and data on a series of thin swept wings with sharp leading edges and leading and trailing-edge flaps are compared with predictions made using a linearized-theory method which includes estimates of vortex forces. These comparisons were made to assess the effectiveness of linearized-theory methods for use in the design and analysis of flap systems in subsonic flow. Results demonstrate that linearized-theory, attached-flow methods (with approximate representation of vortex forces) can form the basis of a rational system for flap design and analysis. Even attached-flow methods that do not take vortex forces into account can be used for the selection of optimized flap-system geometry, but design-point performance levels tend to be underestimated unless vortex forces are included. Illustrative examples of the use of these methods in the design of efficient low-speed flap systems are included.

  18. CALIPSO User-Provided Routines

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-01

    ... data files. These routines are written in Interactive Data Language (IDL). A README file demonstrating use of the routines is also available. Interactive Data Language (IDL) is available from  Exelis Visual Information Solutions . ...

  19. Non-linear flow law of rockglacier creep determined from geomorphological observations: A case study from the Murtèl rockglacier (Engadin, SE Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel; Amschwand, Dominik; Gärtner-Roer, Isabelle

    2016-04-01

    Rockglaciers consist of unconsolidated rock fragments (silt/sand-rock boulders) with interstitial ice; hence their creep behavior (i.e., rheology) may deviate from the simple and well-known flow-laws for pure ice. Here we constrain the non-linear viscous flow law that governs rockglacier creep based on geomorphological observations. We use the Murtèl rockglacier (upper Engadin valley, SE Switzerland) as a case study, for which high-resolution digital elevation models (DEM), time-lapse borehole deformation data, and geophysical soundings exist that reveal the exterior and interior architecture and dynamics of the landform. Rockglaciers often feature a prominent furrow-and-ridge topography. For the Murtèl rockglacier, Frehner et al. (2015) reproduced the wavelength, amplitude, and distribution of the furrow-and-ridge morphology using a linear viscous (Newtonian) flow model. Arenson et al. (2002) presented borehole deformation data, which highlight the basal shear zone at about 30 m depth and a curved deformation profile above the shear zone. Similarly, the furrow-and-ridge morphology also exhibits a curved geometry in map view. Hence, the surface morphology and the borehole deformation data together describe a curved 3D geometry, which is close to, but not quite parabolic. We use a high-resolution DEM to quantify the curved geometry of the Murtèl furrow-and-ridge morphology. We then calculate theoretical 3D flow geometries using different non-linear viscous flow laws. By comparing them to the measured curved 3D geometry (i.e., both surface morphology and borehole deformation data), we can determine the most adequate flow-law that fits the natural data best. Linear viscous models result in perfectly parabolic flow geometries; non-linear creep leads to localized deformation at the sides and bottom of the rockglacier while the deformation in the interior and top are less intense. In other words, non-linear creep results in non-parabolic flow geometries. Both the

  20. High Reynolds number analysis of flat plate and separated afterbody flow using non-linear turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, John R.

    1996-01-01

    The ability of the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes method, PAB3D, to simulate the effect of Reynolds number variation using non-linear explicit algebraic Reynolds stress turbulence modeling was assessed. Subsonic flat plate boundary-layer flow parameters such as normalized velocity distributions, local and average skin friction, and shape factor were compared with DNS calculations and classical theory at various local Reynolds numbers up to 180 million. Additionally, surface pressure coefficient distributions and integrated drag predictions on an axisymmetric nozzle afterbody were compared with experimental data from 10 to 130 million Reynolds number. The high Reynolds data was obtained from the NASA Langley 0.3m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. There was generally good agreement of surface static pressure coefficients between the CFD and measurement. The change in pressure coefficient distributions with varying Reynolds number was similar to the experimental data trends, though slightly over-predicting the effect. The computational sensitivity of viscous modeling and turbulence modeling are shown. Integrated afterbody pressure drag was typically slightly lower than the experimental data. The change in afterbody pressure drag with Reynolds number was small both experimentally and computationally, even though the shape of the distribution was somewhat modified with Reynolds number.

  1. Modular thermal analyzer routine, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oren, J. A.; Phillips, M. A.; Williams, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    The Modular Thermal Analyzer Routine (MOTAR) is a general thermal analysis routine with strong capabilities for performing thermal analysis of systems containing flowing fluids, fluid system controls (valves, heat exchangers, etc.), life support systems, and thermal radiation situations. Its modular organization permits the analysis of a very wide range of thermal problems for simple problems containing a few conduction nodes to those containing complicated flow and radiation analysis with each problem type being analyzed with peak computational efficiency and maximum ease of use. The organization and programming methods applied to MOTAR achieved a high degree of computer utilization efficiency in terms of computer execution time and storage space required for a given problem. The computer time required to perform a given problem on MOTAR is approximately 40 to 50 percent that required for the currently existing widely used routines. The computer storage requirement for MOTAR is approximately 25 percent more than the most commonly used routines for the most simple problems but the data storage techniques for the more complicated options should save a considerable amount of space.

  2. Adjoint-based estimation of plate coupling in a non-linear mantle flow model: theory and examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnaswamy, Vishagan; Stadler, Georg; Gurnis, Michael

    2015-08-01

    We develop and validate a systematic approach to infer plate boundary strength and rheological parameters in models of mantle flow from surface velocity observations. Based on a realistic rheological model that includes yielding and strain rate weakening from dislocation creep, we formulate the inverse problem in a Bayesian inference framework. To study the distribution of parameters that are consistent with the observations, we compute the maximum a posteriori (MAP) point, Gaussian approximations of the parameter distribution around that MAP point, and employ Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The computation of the MAP point and the Gaussian approximation require first and second derivatives of an objective function subject to non-linear Stokes equations; these derivatives are computed efficiently using adjoint Stokes equations. We set up 2-D numerical experiments with many of the elements expected in a global geophysical inversion. This setup incorporates three subduction zones with slab and weak zone (interplate fault) geometry consistent with average seismic characteristics. With these experiments, we demonstrate that when the temperature field is known, we can recover the strength of plate boundaries, the yield stress and strain rate exponent in the upper mantle. When the number of uncertain parameters increases, there are trade-offs between the inferred parameters. These trade-offs depend on how well the observational data represents the surface velocities, and on the weakness of plate boundaries. As the plate boundary coupling drops below a threshold, the uncertainty of the inferred parameters increases due to insensitivity of plate motion to plate coupling. Comparing the trade-offs between inferred rheological parameters found from the Gaussian approximation of the parameter distribution and from MCMC sampling, we conclude that the Gaussian approximation-which is significantly cheaper to compute-is often a good approximation, in particular

  3. Cosmic flows and the expansion of the local Universe from non-linear phase-space reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heß, Steffen; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we investigate the impact of cosmic flows and density perturbations on Hubble constant H0 measurements using non-linear phase-space reconstructions of the Local Universe (LU). In particular, we rely on a set of 25 precise constrained N-body simulations based on Bayesian initial conditions reconstructions of the LU using the Two-Micron Redshift Survey galaxy sample within distances of about 90 h-1 Mpc. These have been randomly extended up to volumes enclosing distances of 360 h-1 Mpc with augmented Lagrangian perturbation theory (750 simulations in total), accounting in this way for gravitational mode coupling from larger scales, correcting for periodic boundary effects, and estimating systematics of missing attractors (σlarge = 134 s-1 km). We report on Local Group (LG) speed reconstructions, which for the first time are compatible with those derived from cosmic microwave background-dipole measurements: |vLG| = 685 ± 137 s-1 km. The direction (l, b) = (260.5° ± 13.3°, 39.1 ± 10.4°) is found to be compatible with the observations after considering the variance of large scales. Considering this effect of large scales, our local bulk flow estimations assuming a Λ cold dark matter model are compatible with the most recent estimates based on velocity data derived from the Tully-Fisher relation. We focus on low-redshift supernova measurements out to 0.01 < z < 0.025, which have been found to disagree with probes at larger distances. Our analysis indicates that there are two effects related to cosmic variance contributing to this tension. The first one is caused by the anisotropic distribution of supernovae, which aligns with the velocity dipole and hence induces a systematic boost in H0. The second one is due to the inhomogeneous matter fluctuations in the LU. In particular, a divergent region surrounding the Virgo Supercluster is responsible for an additional positive bias in H0. Taking these effects into account yields a correction of ΔH0 = -1

  4. Analytic study of developing flows in a tube laden with non-evaporating and evaporating drops via a modified linearization of the two-phase momentum equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosid, S.; Tambour, Y.

    A novel modification of the classical Langhaar linearization of the mutually coupled momentum equations for developing two-phase flows in circular ducts is presented. This modification enables us to treat: (i) flows developing from spatially periodic initial velocity distributions without the presence of droplets, and (ii) two-phase flows in which monosize, non-evaporating and evaporating droplets suspended in a developing gas flow of an initially uniform velocity distribution exchange momentum with the host-gas flow. New solutions are presented for the downstream evolution in the velocity profiles which develop from spatially periodic initial velocity distributions that eventually reach the fully developed Poiseuille velocity profile. These solutions are validated by employing known numerical procedures, providing strong support for the physical underpinnings of the present modified linearization. New solutions are also presented for the evolution in drop velocities and vapour spatial distributions for evaporating droplets suspended in an initially uniform velocity profile of the host gas. Asymptotic solutions are presented for the flow region which lies very close to the inlet of the tube, where the relative velocity between the droplets and the host gas is high, and thus the velocity fields of the two phases are mutually coupled. These solutions provide new explicit formulae for the droplet velocity field as a function of the initial conditions and droplet diameter (relative to the tube diameter) for non-evaporating drops, and also as a function of evaporation rate for evaporating drops.

  5. Lidar Altitude Data Read Routine

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-19

    ... Profile products. It is written in Interactive Data Language (IDL) and uses HDF routine calls to read the altitude data which are ... Data Read routine  (1.5 KB) Interactive Data Language (IDL) is available from  Exelis Visual Information Solutions . ...

  6. A conformal mapping technique to correlate the rotating flow around a wing section of vertical axis wind turbine and an equivalent linear flow around a static wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimoto, Hiromichi; Hara, Yutaka; Kawamura, Takafumi; Nakamura, Takuju; Lee, Yeon-Seung

    2013-12-01

    In a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT), turbine blades are subjected to the curved flow field caused by the revolution of turbine. However, performance prediction of VAWT is usually based on the fluid dynamic coefficients obtained in wind tunnel measurements of the two-dimensional static wing. The difference of fluid dynamic coefficients in the curved flow and straight flow deteriorates the accuracy of performance prediction. To find the correlation between the two conditions of curved and straight flow, the authors propose a conformal mapping method on complex plane. It provides bidirectional mapping between the two flow fields. For example, the flow around a symmetric wing in the curved flow is mapped to that around a curved (cambered) wing in the straight flow. Although the shape of mapped wing section is different from the original one, its aerodynamic coefficients show a good correlation to those of the original in the rotating condition. With the proposed method, we can reproduce the local flow field around a rotating blade from the flow data around the mapped static wing in the straight flow condition.

  7. SPECT with (/sup 99m/Tc)-d,l-hexamethyl-propylene amine oxime (HM-PAO) compared with regional cerebral blood flow measured by PET: effects of linearization

    SciTech Connect

    Yonekura, Y.; Nishizawa, S.; Mukai, T.; Fujita, T.; Fukuyama, H.; Ishikawa, M.; Kikuchi, H.; Konishi, J.; Andersen, A.R.; Lassen, N.A.

    1988-12-01

    In order to validate the use of technetium-99m-d,l-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HM-PAO) as a flow tracer, a total of 21 cases were studied with single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT), and compared to regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) measured by position emission tomography (PET) using the oxygen-15 CO2 inhalation technique. Although HM-PAO SPECT and rCBF PET images showed a similar distribution pattern the HM-PAO SPECT image showed less contrast between high and low activity flow regions than the rCBF image and a nonlinear relationship between HM-PAO activity and rCBF was shown. Based on the assumption of flow-dependent backdiffusion of HM-PAO from the brain, we applied a linearization algorithm to correct the HM-PAO SPECT images. The corrected HM-PAO SPECT images revealed a good linear correlation with rCBF (r = 0.901, p less than 0.001). The results indicated HM-PAO can be used as a flow tracer with SPECT after proper correction.

  8. Application of local linearization and the transonic equivalence rule to the flow about slender analytic bodies at Mach numbers near 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyson, R. W.; Muraca, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The local linearization method for axisymmetric flow is combined with the transonic equivalence rule to calculate pressure distribution on slender bodies at free-stream Mach numbers from .8 to 1.2. This is an approximate solution to the transonic flow problem which yields results applicable during the preliminary design stages of a configuration development. The method can be used to determine the aerodynamic loads on parabolic arc bodies having either circular or elliptical cross sections. It is particularly useful in predicting pressure distributions and normal force distributions along the body at small angles of attack. The equations discussed may be extended to include wing-body combinations.

  9. Linear Inviscid Damping for Monotone Shear Flows in a Finite Periodic Channel, Boundary Effects, Blow-up and Critical Sobolev Regularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zillinger, Christian

    2016-03-01

    In a previous article (Zillinger, Linear inviscid damping for monotone shear flows, 2014), we have established linear inviscid damping for a large class of monotone shear flows in a finite periodic channel and have further shown that boundary effects asymptotically lead to the formation of singularities of derivatives of the solution as {t → &infty}; . As the main results of this article, we provide a detailed description of the singularity formation and establish stability in all sub-critical fractional Sobolev spaces and blow-up in all super-critical spaces. Furthermore, we discuss the implications of the blow-up to the problem of nonlinear inviscid damping in a finite periodic channel, where high regularity would be essential to control nonlinear effects.

  10. Linear Inviscid Damping for Monotone Shear Flows in a Finite Periodic Channel, Boundary Effects, Blow-up and Critical Sobolev Regularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zillinger, Christian

    2016-09-01

    In a previous article (Zillinger, Linear inviscid damping for monotone shear flows, 2014), we have established linear inviscid damping for a large class of monotone shear flows in a finite periodic channel and have further shown that boundary effects asymptotically lead to the formation of singularities of derivatives of the solution as {t → infty}. As the main results of this article, we provide a detailed description of the singularity formation and establish stability in all sub-critical fractional Sobolev spaces and blow-up in all super-critical spaces. Furthermore, we discuss the implications of the blow-up to the problem of nonlinear inviscid damping in a finite periodic channel, where high regularity would be essential to control nonlinear effects.

  11. Impact of data distribution on the parallel performance of iterative linear solvers with emphasis on CFD of incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaily-Moghadam, M.; Bazilevs, Y.; Marsden, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    A parallel data structure that gives optimized memory layout for problems involving iterative solution of sparse linear systems is developed, and its efficient implementation is presented. The proposed method assigns a processor to a problem subdomain, and sorts data based on the shared entries with the adjacent subdomains. Matrix-vector-product communication overhead is reduced and parallel scalability is improved by overlapping inter-processor communications and local computations. The proposed method simplifies the implementation of parallel iterative linear equation solver algorithms and reduces the computational cost of vector inner products and matrix-vector products. Numerical results demonstrate very good performance of the proposed technique.

  12. Aero-thermal performances of leakage flows injection from the endwall slot in linear cascade of high-pressure turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghopa, Wan Aizon W.; Harun, Zambri; Funazaki, Ken-ichi; Miura, Takemitsu

    2015-02-01

    The existence of a gap between combustor and turbine endwall in the real gas turbine induces to the leakages phenomenon. However, the leakages could be used as a coolant to protect the endwall surfaces from the hot gas since it could not be completely prevented. Thus, present study investigated the potential of leakage flows as a function of film cooling. In present study, the flow field at the downstream of high-pressure turbine blade has been investigated by 5-holes pitot tube. This is to reveal the aerodynamic performances under the influenced of leakage flows while the temperature measurement was conducted by thermochromic liquid crystal (TLC). Experimental has significantly captured theaerodynamics effect of leakage flows near the blade downstream. Furthermore, TLC measurement illustrated that the film cooling effectiveness contours were strongly influenced by the secondary flows behavior on the endwall region. Aero-thermal results were validated by the numerical simulation adopted by commercial software, ANSYS CFX 13. Both experimental and numerical simulation indicated almost similar trendinaero and also thermal behavior as the amount of leakage flows increases.

  13. Recent advances in simulating unsteady flow phenomena brought about by passage of shock waves in a linear turbine cascade

    SciTech Connect

    Collie, J.C.; Moses, H.L.; Schetz, J.A. ); Gregory, B.A. . Turbine Aero and Cooling Technology)

    1993-10-01

    High-pressure-ratio turbines have flows dominated by shock structures that pass downstream into the next blade row in an unsteady fashion. Recent numerical results have indicated that these unsteady shocks may significantly affect the aerodynamic and mechanical performance of turbine blading. High cost and limited accessibility of turbine rotating equipment severely restrict the quantitative evaluation of the unsteady flow field in that environment. Recently published results of the Virginia Tech transonic cascade facility indicate high integrity in simulation of the steady state flow phenomena. The facility has recently been modified to study the unsteady effects of passing shock waves. Shock waves are generated by a shotgun blast upstream of the blade row. Shadowgraph photos and high-response pressure data are compared to previously published experimental and numerically predicted results. Plots are included that indicate large fluctuations in estimated blade lift and cascade loss.

  14. Non-Linear Dynamics and Stability of Circular Cylindrical Shells Containing Flowing Fluid, Part II: Large-Amplitude Vibrations Without Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AMABILI, M.; PELLICANO, F.; PAÏDOUSSIS, M. P.

    1999-12-01

    The non-linear response of empty and fluid-filled circular cylindrical shells to harmonic excitations is investigated. Both modal and point excitations have been considered. The model is suitable to study simply supported shells with and without axial constraints. Donnell's non-linear shallow-shell theory is used. The boundary conditions on radial displacement and the continuity of circumferential displacement are exactly satisfied. The radial deflection of the shell is expanded by using a basis of seven linear modes. The effect of internal quiescent, incompressible and inviscid fluid is investigated. The equations of motion, obtained in Part I of this study, are studied by using a code based on the collocation method. The validation of the present model is obtained by comparison with other authoritative results. The effect of the number of axisymmetric modes used in the expansion on the response of the shell is investigated, clarifying questions open for a long time. The results show the occurrence of travelling wave response in the proximity of the resonance frequency, the fundamental role of the first and third axisymmetric modes in the expansion of the radial deflection with one longitudinal half-wave, and limit cycle responses. Modes with two longitudinal half-waves are also investigated.

  15. Ada Linear-Algebra Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpp, A. R.; Lawson, C. L.

    1988-01-01

    Routines provided for common scalar, vector, matrix, and quaternion operations. Computer program extends Ada programming language to include linear-algebra capabilities similar to HAS/S programming language. Designed for such avionics applications as software for Space Station.

  16. On the effect of a non-uniform longitudinal ion flow on the linear ITG mode stability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lontano, Maurizio; Lazzaro, Enzo; Varischetti, Maria Cecilia

    2006-10-01

    A one-dimensional model for slab ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes, in the presence of an inhomogeneous equilibrium plasma velocity along the main magnetic field direction, has been formulated in the frame of a two-fluid guiding-center approximation. The physical effects of a magnetic field gradient and of the line curvature are included by means of a gravitational drift velocity. The magnetic shear across the plasma slab is also taken into account. The linear stability of slow plasma dynamics, under the assumptions of quasi-neutrality and adiabatic electrons, is described by means of a third-degree dispersion relation. Generally speaking, the presence of a sheared longitudinal ion velocity leads to the linear destabilization of the ITG modes, especially for flat equilibrium density profiles. Transverse quasi-linear fluxes of ion thermal energy and longitudinal momentum are calculated for different equilibrium profiles of the density, temperature, momentum, and magnetic shear. Plasma configurations leading to zero transverse (or even negative) momentum fluxes are exploited and discussed in the light of their experimental implementation.

  17. A Linear Programming Approach to Routing Control in Networks of Constrained Nonlinear Positive Systems with Concave Flow Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arneson, Heather M.; Dousse, Nicholas; Langbort, Cedric

    2014-01-01

    We consider control design for positive compartmental systems in which each compartment's outflow rate is described by a concave function of the amount of material in the compartment.We address the problem of determining the routing of material between compartments to satisfy time-varying state constraints while ensuring that material reaches its intended destination over a finite time horizon. We give sufficient conditions for the existence of a time-varying state-dependent routing strategy which ensures that the closed-loop system satisfies basic network properties of positivity, conservation and interconnection while ensuring that capacity constraints are satisfied, when possible, or adjusted if a solution cannot be found. These conditions are formulated as a linear programming problem. Instances of this linear programming problem can be solved iteratively to generate a solution to the finite horizon routing problem. Results are given for the application of this control design method to an example problem. Key words: linear programming; control of networks; positive systems; controller constraints and structure.

  18. Drainage-system development in consecutive melt seasons at a polythermal, Arctic glacier, evaluated by flow-recession analysis and linear-reservoir simulation

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkins, Richard; Cooper, Richard; Tranter, Martyn; Wadham, Jemma

    2013-01-01

    [1] The drainage systems of polythermal glaciers play an important role in high-latitude hydrology, and are determinants of ice flow rate. Flow-recession analysis and linear-reservoir simulation of runoff time series are here used to evaluate seasonal and inter-annual variability in the drainage system of the polythermal Finsterwalderbreen, Svalbard, in 1999 and 2000. Linear-flow recessions are pervasive, with mean coefficients of a fast reservoir varying from 16 (1999) to 41 h (2000), and mean coefficients of an intermittent, slow reservoir varying from 54 (1999) to 114 h (2000). Drainage-system efficiency is greater overall in the first of the two seasons, the simplest explanation of which is more rapid depletion of the snow cover. Reservoir coefficients generally decline during each season (at 0.22 h d−1 in 1999 and 0.52 h d−1 in 2000), denoting an increase in drainage efficiency. However, coefficients do not exhibit a consistent relationship with discharge. Finsterwalderbreen therefore appears to behave as an intermediate case between temperate glaciers and other polythermal glaciers with smaller proportions of temperate ice. Linear-reservoir runoff simulations exhibit limited sensitivity to a relatively wide range of reservoir coefficients, although the use of fixed coefficients in a spatially lumped model can generate significant subseasonal error. At Finsterwalderbreen, an ice-marginal channel with the characteristics of a fast reservoir, and a subglacial upwelling with the characteristics of a slow reservoir, both route meltwater to the terminus. This suggests that drainage-system components of significantly contrasting efficiencies can coexist spatially and temporally at polythermal glaciers. PMID:25598557

  19. Learning Routines in Innovation Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoeve, Aimee; Nieuwenhuis, Loek F. M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to generate both a theoretical and an empirical basis for a research model that serves in further research as an analytical tool for understanding the complex phenomenon of learning at different levels in a work organisation. The key concept in this model is the routine concept of Nelson and Winter.…

  20. MISR Conversion to ASCII Routines

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-01

    ... These routines are written in Exelis Visual Information Solutions IDL programming language. They can be run either with a licensed ... with IDL and is available from  Exelis Visual Information Solutions . The IDL VM software can be downloaded from this site or ordered ...

  1. Aero-thermal investigation of a highly loaded transonic linear turbine guide vane cascade. A test case for inviscid and viscous flow computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arts, T.; Lambertderouvroit, M.; Rutherford, A. W.

    1990-09-01

    An experimental aerothermal investigation of a highly loaded transonic turbine nozzle guide vane mounted in a linear cascade arrangement is presented. The measurements were performed in a short duration isentropic light piston compression tube facility, allowing a correct simulation of Mach and Reynolds numbers as well as of the gas to wall temperature ratio compared to the values currently observed in modern aeroengines. The experimental program consisted of the following: (1) flow periodicity checks by means of wall static pressure measurements and Schlieren flow visualizations; (2) blade velocity distribution measurements by means of static pressure tappings; (3) blade convective heat transfer measurements by means of static pressure tappings; (4) blade convective heat transfer measurements by means of platinium thin films; (5) downstream loss coefficient and exit flow angle determinations by using a new fast traversing mechanism; and (6) free stream turbulence intensity and spectrum measurements. These different measurements were performed for several combinations of the free stream flow parameters looking at the relative effects on the aerodynamic blade performance and blade convective heat transfer of Mach number, Reynolds number, and freestream turbulence intensity.

  2. Non-Linear Dynamics and Stability of Circular Cylindrical Shells Containing Flowing Fluid. Part Iii: Truncation Effect Without Flow and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AMABILI, M.; PELLICANO, F.; PAÏDOUSSIS, M. P.

    2000-11-01

    The response of simply supported circular cylindrical shells to harmonic excitation in the spectral neighbourhood of one of the lowest natural frequencies is investigated by using improved mode expansions with respect to those assumed in Parts I and II of the present study. Two cases are studied: (1) shells in vacuo; and (2) shells filled with stagnant water. The improved expansions allow checking the accuracy of the solutions previously obtained and giving definitive results within the limits of Donnell's non-linear shallow-shell theory. The improved mode expansions include: (1) harmonics of the circumferential mode number n under consideration, and (2) only the principal n, but with harmonics of the longitudinal mode included. The effect of additional longitudinal modes is absolutely insignificant in both the driven and companion mode responses. The effect of modes with 2 n circumferential waves is very limited on the trend of non-linearity, but is significant in the response with companion mode participation in the case of lightly damped shells (empty shells). In particular, the travelling wave response appears for much lower vibration amplitudes and presents a frequency range without stable responses, corresponding to a beating phenomenon. A liquid (water) contained in the shell generates a much stronger softening behaviour of the system. Experiments with a water-filled circular cylindrical shell made of steel are in very good agreement with the present theory.

  3. Linear Stability Analysis of Convective Flow in a Confined Layer of Volatile Liquid Driven by a Horizontal Temperature Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, Roman; Qin, Tongran

    2015-11-01

    Convection in layers of nonvolatile liquids with a free surface driven by a horizontal temperature gradient is a fairly well-studies problem. It is described by several nondimensional parameters: the Prandtl number Pr , the Marangoni number Ma , and the Rayleigh number Ra (or the dynamic Bond number BoD = Ra / Ma). Previous studies mostly focused on characterizing the critical Ma and the nature of the convective pattern (e.g., stationary rolls or traveling waves) as a function of Pr and BoD . To understand convection in volatile liquids one also has to consider the transport of heat and mass in the gas layer above the liquid. In confined geometries, the composition of the gas phase plays a very important role, since air tends to suppress phase change at the interface and thereby the amount of latent heat released or absorbed at the interface as a result of evaporation or condensation. Linear stability analysis of the problem based on a two-sided model shows that, for BoD = O (1) , both the critical Ma and the critical wave length of the pattern increase as the average concentration of air decreases. The predictions of linear stability analysis are found to be in good agreement with previous experimental and numerical studies of both nonvolatile and volatile fluids.

  4. Stochastic-deterministic modeling of bed load transport in shallow water flow over erodible slope: Linear stability analysis and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohorquez, Patricio; Ancey, Christophe

    2015-09-01

    In this article we propose a stochastic bed load transport formulation within the framework of the frictional shallow-water equations in which the sediment transport rate results from the difference between the entrainment and deposition of particles. First we show that the Saint-Venant-Exner equations are linearly unstable in most cases for a uniform base flow down an inclined erodible bed for Shields numbers in excess of the threshold for incipient sediment motion allowing us to compute noise-induced pattern formation for Froude numbers below 2. The wavelength of the bed forms are selected naturally due to the absolute character of the bed instability and the existence of a maximum growth rate at a finite wavelength when the particle diffusivity coefficient and the water eddy viscosity are present as for Turing-like instability. A numerical method is subsequently developed to analyze the performance of the model and theoretical results through three examples: the simulation of the fluctuations of the particle concentration using a stochastic Langevin equation, the deterministic simulation of anti-dunes formation over an erodible slope in full sediment-mobility conditions, and the computation of noise-induced pattern formation in hybrid stochastic-deterministic flows down a periodic flume. The full non-linear numerical simulations are in excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We conclude highlighting that the proposed depth-averaged formulation explains the developments of upstream migrating anti-dunes in straight flumes since the seminar experiments by Gilbert (1914).

  5. [Pharmacogenomics in routine medical care].

    PubMed

    Rosskopf, D; Meyer zu Schwabedissen, H E; Kroemer, H K; Siegmund, W

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics investigates inherited differences in drug responses including beneficial and adverse reactions. While a considerable amount of evidence for genetic influences on drug responses has been accumulated within the last decade, predominantly in small studies, its value in routine therapy is still a matter of debate. The aim of this review is to discuss well established examples where pharmacogenomic techniques can improve routine treatment. Examples include genotyping of CYP2D6 in the context of antidepressant therapy, analysis of TPMT variants for the prediction of mercaptopurine-induced bone marrow depression, VKORC1 and CYP2C9 analyses for a better control of anticoagulant administration and the SLCO1B1 variant in the context of statin-induced myopathies. PMID:20101557

  6. Memos trace routine radiation overexposures

    SciTech Connect

    Lobsenz, G.

    1994-03-09

    Workers at the Energy Department's Fernald plant routinely received [open quotes]gross,[close quotes] [open quotes]unacceptable[close quotes] and [open quotes]undue[close quotes] radiation exposures during uranium processing operations from the 1950s through the early 1970s, according to internal Fernald memos. The documents come to light as DOE continues to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars every month to defend its former Fernald contractor, NLO Inc., from a workers' lawsuit seeking compensation for alleged injuries from poor safety practices at the Ohio facility. DOE officials have contended the NLO defense effort is justified because there is no evidence that any former Fernald workers have suffered injury as a result of radiation exposures at the plant. However, the internal Fernald memos document major concerns expressed by Fernald health officials about unsafe working conditions at the plant and what appear in some cases to be routine overexposures of workers.

  7. MATHEMATICAL ROUTINES FOR ENGINEERS AND SCIENTISTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, A. V.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this package is to provide the scientific and engineering community with a library of programs useful for performing routine mathematical manipulations. This collection of programs will enable scientists to concentrate on their work without having to write their own routines for solving common problems, thus saving considerable amounts of time. This package contains sixteen subroutines. Each is separately documented with descriptions of the invoking subroutine call, its required parameters, and a sample test program. The functions available include: maxima, minima, and sort of vectors; factorials; random number generator (uniform or Gaussian distribution); complimentary error function; fast Fourier Transformation; Simpson's Rule integration; matrix determinate and inversion; Bessel function (J Bessel function for any order, and modified Bessel function for zero order); roots of a polynomial; roots of non-linear equation; and the solution of first order ordinary differential equations using Hamming's predictor-corrector method. There is also a subroutine for using a dot matrix printer to plot a given set of y values for a uniformly increasing x value. This package is written in FORTRAN 77 (Super Soft Small System FORTRAN compiler) for batch execution and has been implemented on the IBM PC computer series under MS-DOS with a central memory requirement of approximately 28K of 8 bit bytes for all subroutines. This program was developed in 1986.

  8. A new linearized theory of laminar film condensation of two phase annular flow in a capillary pumped loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Y. K.; Swanson, T.; Mcintosh, R.

    1988-01-01

    Future large space based facilities, such as Space Station, will require energy management systems capable of transporting tens of kilowatts of heat over a hundred meters or more. This represents better than an order of magnitude improvement over current technology. Two-phase thermal systems are currently being developed to meet this challenge. Condensation heat transfer plays a very important role in this system. The present study attempts an analytic solution to the set of linearized partial differential equations. The axial velocity and temperature functions were found to be Bessel functions which have oscillatory behavior. This result agrees qualitatively with the experimental evidence from tests at both NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and elsewhere.

  9. Electron-transfer kinetics in cyanobacterial cells: methyl viologen is a poor inhibitor of linear electron flow.

    PubMed

    Sétif, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    The inhibitor methyl viologen (MV) has been widely used in photosynthesis to study oxidative stress. Its effects on electron transfer kinetics in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 cells were studied to characterize its electron-accepting properties. For the first hundreds of flashes following MV addition at submillimolar concentrations, the kinetics of NADPH formation were hardly modified (less than 15% decrease in signal amplitude) with a significant signal decrease only observed after more flashes or continuous illumination. The dependence of the P700 photooxidation kinetics on the MV concentration exhibited a saturation effect at 0.3 mM MV, a concentration which inhibits the recombination reactions in photosystem I. The kinetics of NADPH formation and decay under continuous light with MV at 0.3 mM showed that MV induces the oxidation of the NADP pool in darkness and that the yield of linear electron transfer decreased by only 50% after 1.5-2 photosystem-I turnovers. The unexpectedly poor efficiency of MV in inhibiting NADPH formation was corroborated by in vitro flash-induced absorption experiments with purified photosystem-I, ferredoxin and ferredoxin-NADP(+)-oxidoreductase. These experiments showed that the second-order rate constants of MV reduction are 20 to 40-fold smaller than the competing rate constants involved in reduction of ferredoxin and ferredoxin-NADP(+)-oxidoreductase. The present study shows that MV, which accepts electrons in vivo both at the level of photosystem-I and ferredoxin, can be used at submillimolar concentrations to inhibit recombination reactions in photosystem-I with only a moderate decrease in the efficiency of fast reactions involved in linear electron transfer and possibly cyclic electron transfer. PMID:25448535

  10. Routine outcome measurement in Australia.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Philip; Pirkis, Jane; Coombs, Tim

    2015-08-01

    Australia has been implementing routine outcome measurement in its specialized public sector mental health services for over a decade. It uses a range of clinician-rated and consumer-rated measures that are administered at set times during episodes of inpatient, ambulatory and community residential episodes of care. Routine outcome measurement is now embedded in service delivery, and data are made available in a variety of ways to different audiences. These data are used by policy-makers and planners to inform decisions about system-wide reforms, by service managers to monitor quality and effectiveness, and by clinicians to guide clinical decision-making and to promote dialogue with consumers. Consumers, carers and the general community can use these data to ensure that services are accountable for the care they deliver. This paper describes the status quo in Australia with respect to routine outcome measurement, discusses the factors that led to its successful implementation, and considers the steps that are necessary for its continued development. PMID:25768326