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Sample records for royal netherlands institute

  1. Digitising the Past: The Beginning of a New Future at the Royal Tropical Institute of The Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levi, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe a project to digitise maps at the Royal Tropical Institute, or Koninklijk Instituut voor de Tropen (KIT), of The Netherlands. KIT has an extensive collection of maps and nautical charts of (sub-) tropical regions, including general maps and topographical map series, city maps, thematic maps and…

  2. Meeting Report: Patrick Moore at the Royal Institution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arditti, D.

    2010-02-01

    'Developments in amateur astronomy: past, present and future'. A special meeting in honour of Sir Patrick Moore to celebrate his 75 years as a BAA member, held on 2009 November 21 at the Royal Institution of Great Britain, Albemarle Street, London W1

  3. Humphry Davy and the Royal Institution of Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Unwin, Patrick R; Unwin, Robert W

    2009-03-20

    The abortive attempts of Sir Humphry Davy to introduce modest reforms at the Royal Society of London during his Presidency (1820-27) contrast with his (largely unstudied) earlier experience of administration at the Royal Institution of Great Britain (RI). Davy's attempts to combat the systemic weaknesses in governance and funding, and his role in effecting changes at the RI, in association with a core group of reformers, merit consideration. This paper analyses important aspects of the early management and social structure of the RI and examines the inner workings of the institution. It shows how and why the Library, its most valuable financial asset, and its celebrated Laboratory, developed along distinctive lines, each with its own support structures and intra-institutional interests. While acknowledging the roles traditionally ascribed to Count Rumford and Sir Joseph Banks, the paper highlights the contributions of other early patrons such as Thomas Bernard, son of a colonial governor of Massachusetts, and Earl Spencer, a leading European bibliophile and RI President from 1813 to 1825. The promotion of a Bill in Parliament in 1810, designed to transform the RI from a proprietary body politic into a corporation of members, and the subsequent framing of the bye-laws, provided opportunities to establish a more democratic structure of elected committees for the conduct of science. PMID:19579357

  4. Killers in the Brain - Essays in Science and Technology from the Royal Institution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Peter

    1999-09-01

    This fascinating and diverse selection of essays from the Royal Institution provides a glimpse of some of the most current and exciting scientific research, ranging from the global increase in asthma and allergies to neurodegenerative diseases known as "brain killers."

  5. Humphry Davy, nitrous oxide, the Pneumatic Institution, and the Royal Institution.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2014-11-01

    Humphry Davy (1778-1829) has an interesting place in the history of respiratory gases because the Pneumatic Institution in which he did much of his early work signaled the end of an era of discovery. The previous 40 years had seen essentially all of the important respiratory gases described, and the Institution was formed to exploit their possible value in medical treatment. Davy himself is well known for producing nitrous oxide and demonstrating that its inhalation could cause euphoria and heightened imagination. His thinking influenced the poets Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Wordsworth, and perhaps we can claim that our discipline colored the poetry of the Romantic Movement. Davy was also the first person to measure the residual volume of the lung. The Pneumatic Institution was the brainchild of Thomas Beddoes, who had trained in Edinburgh under Joseph Black, who discovered carbon dioxide. Later Davy moved to the Royal Institution in London formed, in part, to diffuse the knowledge of scientific discoveries to the general public. Davy was a brilliant lecturer and developed an enthusiastic following. In addition he exploited the newly described electric battery to discover several new elements. He also invented the safety lamp in response to a series of devastating explosions in coal mines. Ultimately Davy became president of the Royal Society, a remarkable honor for somebody with such humble origins. Another of his important contributions was to introduce Michael Faraday (1791-1867) to science. Faraday became one of the most illustrious British scientists of all time. PMID:25172910

  6. Integrating Social Sustainability in Engineering Education at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Björnberg, Karin Edvardsson; Skogh, Inga-Britt; Strömberg, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate what are perceived to be the main challenges associated with the integration of social sustainability into engineering education at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm. Design/methodology/approach: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with programme leaders and teachers from…

  7. Cosmic Rays - Essays in Science and Technology from the Royal Institution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catlow, Richard; Greenfield, Susan

    2002-04-01

    Since its foundation in 1799, the Royal Institution of Great Britain has inspired enthusiasm and excitement for science, as a means to understanding the world around us. The Friday Evening Discourses were initiated by Michael Faraday in 1826 and are one of the most prestigious series of popular science lectures in the world.This new selection of essays from the Royal Institution offers fascinating and authoritative accounts of current thinking in diverse areas of science, ranging from cosmic rays to the development of new materials that seem to have a life of their own. Also in this collection are essays that consider how scientists can better convey their work to the general public and to a younger generation.

  8. RICH - A new AMS facility at the Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage, Brussels, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudin, Mathieu; Van Strydonck, Mark; van den Brande, Tess; Synal, Hans-Arno; Wacker, Luckas

    2015-10-01

    Since 1989 the radiocarbon dating lab has their own graphitization system for 14C AMS dating but RICH (Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage) did not possess their own AMS and measurements were carried out in collaboration with other AMS facilities. In April 2013 the Micadas (Mini Carbon Dating System) AMS was installed at RICH in Brussels and after 1.5 year operation the high stability and performance of the Micadas can be demonstrated by repeated analyses of primary standard OXA II and secondary standards. Results of unknown samples measured on the RICH-Micadas and on other AMS systems are in good agreement.

  9. The importance of picking Porter: the Royal Institution, George Porter and the two cultures, 1959–64

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the cultural reasons why in 1964 the Royal Institution (RI) selected George Porter, who became the only person so far to have been Director of the Royal Institution (1966–85), President of the Royal Society (1985–90) and President of the British Association (1985–86) at the same time, to succeed William Lawrence Bragg as the institution's scientific director and resident professor. Porter was established as first choice by an inner group of RI Managers before the formal selection process began. In this article I argue that Porter won their favour by presenting himself, during his tenure as the RI's Professor of Chemistry (1963–66), as a candidate who fitted well with the Managers' ideas about the future role of the RI—ideas that were deeply influenced by the prevailing technocratic visions of ‘science and society’, particularly C. P. Snow's writings on the ‘two cultures’.

  10. Reprint of "Egon Matijević and The Royal Institution" [J. Colloid Interface Sci. 309 (2007) 189-191].

    PubMed

    Thomas, John Meurig

    2007-06-15

    The background to the Faraday Evening Discourse given by Egon Matijević in 1989, as well as its impact, is outlined, and so also is his participation in the special Faraday Discussion convened at the Royal Institution in September, 1991 to mark the bicentennial of Michael Faraday's birth. PMID:17472799

  11. Thomas Ferrar, MB, LRCSI (1797-1837): the absentee professor of surgery at the Royal Belfast Academical Institution.

    PubMed Central

    Froggatt, P.

    1996-01-01

    Thomas Ferrar was the second professor of surgery in the short-lived (1835-1849) medical school of the Royal Belfast Academical Institution. Appointed on 5 July 1836 he failed to turn up for the winter session and was accordingly discharged on 29 November. He died in Sligo in the following June aged 39. Nothing has been written about Ferrar who survives as a mere foot-note in Belfast medical history. The events leading to his dismissal are, however, unusual, equivocal, and worth recounting. The facts suggest that the Institution was clearly justified in its action but that Ferrar emerges with some credit for a certain if misplaced high-mindedness though overshadowed by his patent derelictions. Images Figure PMID:8979785

  12. Internationalization of Curricula in Higher Education Institutions in Comparative Perspectives: Case Studies of China, Japan and The Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Futao

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses the major issues and character of internationalization of curricula in higher education institutions in recent years in three non-English-speaking countries--China, Japan and The Netherlands. By making a comparative analysis of curricula provided for international students and curricula with international subjects,…

  13. Knowledge Transfer between SMEs and Higher Education Institutions: Differences between Universities and Colleges of Higher Education in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delfmann, Heike; Koster, Sierdjan

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge transfer (KT) between higher education institutions (HEIs) and businesses is seen as a key element of innovation in knowledge-driven economies: HEIs generate knowledge that can be adopted in the regional economy. This process of valorization has been studied extensively, mainly with a focus on universities. In the Netherlands, there is a…

  14. Changing Children’s Understanding of the Brain: A Longitudinal Study of the Royal Institution Christmas Lectures as a Measure of Public Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Gjersoe, Nathalia L.; Hood, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Demonstrating the impact of public engagement is an increasingly important activity for today’s academics and researchers. The difficulty is that many areas of interest do not lend themselves well to evaluation because the impact of each single intervention can be hard to trace and take time to become manifest. With this in mind, we evaluated a lecture based around the 2011 Royal Institution Christmas Lectures, ”Meet Your Brain,” delivered to school children from low performing schools. We compared knowledge about four neuroscience facts one week before, one week after and six weeks after the lecture. Analysis revealed significant knowledge transfer one week after the lecture that was retained five weeks later. We conclude that public engagement through tailored lectures can have significant impact in the moderate term with the potential to leave a lasting impression over a longer period. PMID:24260513

  15. 2D AND 3D dose verification at The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital using EPIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mijnheer, Ben; Mans, Anton; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Tielenburg, Rene; Van Herk, Marcel; Vijlbrief, Ron; Stroom, Joep

    2010-11-01

    A review is given of the clinical use of EPID dosimetry in the Department of Radiation Oncology of The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital. All curative plans (almost all IMRT or VMAT) are verified with EPID dosimetry, mostly in vivo. The 2D approach for IMRT verification and the 3D method for VMAT verification are elucidated and their clinical implementation described. It has been shown that EPID dosimetry plays an important role in the total chain of verification procedures that are implemented in our department. It provides a safety net for advanced treatments such as IMRT and VMAT, as well as a full account of the dose delivered.

  16. Clopidogrel in non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndromes: an overview of the submission by the British Cardiac Society and the Royal College of Physicians of London to the National Institute for Clinical Excellence, and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, S J; Spence, M S; Crossman, D; Adgey, A A J

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive appraisal was undertaken on behalf of the British Cardiac Society and the Royal College of Physicians of London to assess the use of clopidogrel in acute coronary syndromes. The appraisal was submitted to the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) in August 2003 and contributed to the development of the recently published guidelines for the use of clopidogrel in acute coronary syndromes. The submission to NICE and more recent publications evaluating the use of clopidogrel are reviewed. PMID:16103539

  17. Current status of 3D EPID-based in vivo dosimetry in The Netherlands Cancer Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mijnheer, B.; Olaciregui-Ruiz, I.; Rozendaal, R.; Spreeuw, H.; van Herk, M.; Mans, A.

    2015-01-01

    3D in vivo dose verification using a-Si EPIDs is performed routinely in our institution for almost all RT treatments. The EPID-based 3D dose distribution is reconstructed using a back-projection algorithm and compared with the planned dose distribution using 3D gamma evaluation. Dose-reconstruction and gamma-evaluation software runs automatically, and deviations outside the alert criteria are immediately available and investigated, in combination with inspection of cone-beam CT scans. The implementation of our 3D EPID- based in vivo dosimetry approach was able to replace pre-treatment verification for more than 90% of the patient treatments. Clinically relevant deviations could be detected for approximately 1 out of 300 patient treatments (IMRT and VMAT). Most of these errors were patient related anatomical changes or deviations from the routine clinical procedure, and would not have been detected by pre-treatment verification. Moreover, 3D EPID-based in vivo dose verification is a fast and accurate tool to assure the safe delivery of RT treatments. It provides clinically more useful information and is less time consuming than pre-treatment verification measurements. Automated 3D in vivo dosimetry is therefore a prerequisite for large-scale implementation of patient-specific quality assurance of RT treatments.

  18. Retrospective study of doctors' "end of life decisions" in caring for mentally handicapped people in institutions in The Netherlands.

    PubMed Central

    van Thiel, G. J.; van Delden, J. J.; de Haan, K.; Huibers, A. K.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To gain insight into the reasons behind and the prevalence of doctors' decisions at the end of life that might hasten a patient's death ("end of life decisions") in institutions caring for mentally handicapped people in the Netherlands, and to describe important aspects of the decisions making process. DESIGN: Survey of random sample of doctors caring for mentally handicapped people by means of self completed questionnaires and structured interviews. SUBJECTS: 89 of the 101 selected doctors completed the questionnaire. 67 doctors had taken an end of life decision and were interviewed about their most recent case. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence of end of life decisions; types of decisions; characteristics of patients; reasons why the decision was taken; and the decision making process. RESULTS: The 89 doctors reported 222 deaths for 1995. An end of life decision was taken in 97 cases (44%); in 75 the decision was to withdraw or withhold treatment, and in 22 it was to relieve pain or symptoms with opiates in dosages that may have shortened life. In the 67 most recent cases with an end of life decision the patients were mostly incompetent (63) and under 65 years old (51). Only two patients explicitly asked to die, but in 23 cases there had been some communication with the patient. In 60 cases the doctors discussed the decision with nursing staff and in 46 with a colleague. CONCLUSIONS: End of life decisions are an important aspect of the institutionalised care of mentally handicapped people. The proportion of such decisions in the total number of deaths is similar to that in other specialties. However, the discussion of such decisions is less open in the care of mental handicap than in other specialties. Because of distinctive features of care in this specialty an open debate about end of life decisions should not be postponed. PMID:9240047

  19. European Standards for Quality Assurance and Institutional Practices of Student Assessment in the UK, the Netherlands and the Czech Republic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohoutek, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This article analyses the student assessment procedures of 12 universities in the UK, the Netherlands and the Czech Republic with respect to their alignment with the European standards and guidelines on the quality of assessing higher education students (European Standards and Guidelines for Quality Assurance [ESG] 1.3). Based on qualitative…

  20. Changing Pedagogic and Didactic Approaches in Vocational Education in the Netherlands: From Institutional Interests to the Ambitions of Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bruijn, Elly

    2004-01-01

    At the Lisbon summit in 2000 the European Council set the strategic goal of becoming the most dynamic and competitive region in the world within 10 years. One of the responses of the Dutch government to this ambition is to invest in vocational education. Strengthening vocational education in the Netherlands must result in a second main route into…

  1. Astronomy in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boland, Wilfried; Habing, Harm

    2013-01-01

    We describe the state of astronomical research in the Netherlands per early 2012. We add some notes on its history of this research and on the strategic choices for the future. Compared to the size of the country (16 million people) the Netherlands is maintaining a high profile in astronomical research over a period of more than one century. The professional research community consists of about 650 people. This includes research staff, postdocs, PhD students, technical staff working on instrumentation projects and people involved in the operations of ground-based telescopes and astronomical space missions. We do not take into account staff working for international organizations based in the Netherlands. Astronomical research in the Netherlands is carried out at four university institutes and two national research institutes that fall under the umbrella of the national funding agency NWO. The Netherlands is the host of two international organizations: ESTEC, the technology division of the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe (JIVE). The Netherlands are one of the founding members of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and of ESA. This paper will address a number of significant multilateral collaborations.

  2. The Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Vries, Anthon K.

    1975-01-01

    Examines early childhood education in the Netherlands: its history, general conceptions of child upbringing and developmental psychology, organizational patterns, main research projects, and goals. (JH)

  3. Cross-institutional Flood Forecasting in Regional Water Systems;Innovative application of Delft-FEWS in The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heeringen, Klaas-Jan; Douben, Klaas-Jan; van de Wouw, Mark; IJpelaar, Ruben; van Loenen, Arnejan

    2015-04-01

    The regional water system in the North-Brabant province in The Netherlands is (operationally) managed by four different Water Authorities: Rijkswaterstaat Southern-Netherlands, and the three Regional Water Authorities (RWA's) Aa & Maas, De Dommel and Brabantse Delta. The water systems basically consist of mid-sized (navigable) canals, semi-natural brook valleys in mildly sloping sandy soils, and man-made watercourses in clayey polder areas. The management areas of the De Dommel and Brabantse Delta RWA's are bordering Belgium over a total length of approx. 185 km, and are prone to transboundary flood flows. The current project 'Dynamic Water Management' intends to improve the mutual cooperation and communication between the RWA's and Rijkswaterstaat during periods of both high and low water stages. The project deals with governance issues such as water agreements and water systems analyses. A powerful product of the project is a DSS for flood forecasting ('DSS Brabant'). One of the main benefits of cooperation between the RWA's and Rijkswaterstaat is to enable assistance during peak flows and flood events and to try to optimise operational water systems management by deploying drainage and storage facilities by using the connecting (navigable) canals. A set of hydraulic structures like pumps, weirs and sluices facilitate the control and routing of the water flows. Especially during peak flow and flood events, these canals allow to deviate excess flow to neighbours who suffer less from flooding. During regular conditions the water systems are fully independent, but during floods connections are made by using the canal system. The heart of DSS Brabant consists of a Delft-FEWS application, containing several RTC (1st) and hydrodynamic Sobek (2nd order) models FEWS is receiving a variety of data on hourly or six-hourly basis, consisting of measured and forecasted meteorological input (radar-precipitation/HIRLAM, evaporation and wind), water levels and discharges at

  4. Experiences of home and institution in a secured nursing home ward in The Netherlands: A participatory intervention study.

    PubMed

    Klaassens, Mirjam; Meijering, Louise

    2015-08-01

    Nursing homes have been criticised for not providing a home for their residents. This article aims to provide insight into (1) the features of home and institution as experienced by residents and caregivers of a secured ward in a nursing home, and (2) how interventions implemented on the ward can contribute to a more home-like environment. For this purpose, a participatory intervention study, involving both caregivers and residents, was carried out. We collected data through qualitative research methods: observations, in-depth interviews and diaries to evaluate the interventions over time. We adopted an informed grounded theory approach, and used conceptualisations of total institutions and home as a theoretical lens. We found that the studied ward had strong characteristics of a total institution, such as batch living, block treatment and limited privacy. To increase the sense of home, interventions were formulated and implemented by the caregivers to increase the residents' autonomy, control and privacy. In this process, caregivers' perceptions and attitudes towards the provision of care shifted from task-oriented to person-centred care. We conclude that it is possible to increase the home-like character of a secured ward by introducing core values of home by means of interventions involving both caregivers and residents. PMID:26162729

  5. Netherlands Antilles.

    PubMed

    1983-10-01

    This discussion of the Netherlands Antilles focuses on the following: geography, the people, history, government, political conditions, economy, and foreign relations. In 1980 the population totaled 253,400 with an annual growth rate of 1%. The Netherlands Antilles consists of 2 groups of 3 islands each, situated in the Caribbean Sea about 880 kilometers apart. 40 nationalities are represented. Dutch is the official language, but Spanish and English are spoken widely. Alonzo de Ojeda, a Spanish navigator, landed on Curacao in 1499, and in 1527 the Spanish took possession of Curacao, Bonaire, and Aruba. In 1634 the 3 islands passed to the Netherlands, where they have remained except for 2 short periods during the Napoleonic wars when the British ruled at Willemstad. According to the statute of 1954, which serves as the constitution, the Netherlands Antilles has a constitutional and parliamentary form of government. The highest power in the Kingdom of the Netherlands is the sovereign, Queen Beatrix, who is represented in the Antilles by an appointed governor. The independent court system is under the control of the chief justice of the Supreme Court of Justice. Each of the island territories has its own representative body, the Island Council. Politics are dominated by 3 issues: economic problems, the prospect of independence, and Aruban separatism. The economic well-being of the Netherlands Antilles is based principally on the operations of 2 huge oil refineries. Because of the high volume of shipments in and out of the 2 islands, Curacao and Aruba ports are among the busiest in the world. Until recently, petroleum or petroleum products accounted for about 85% of the dollar volume of imports and exports from the Netherlands Antilles. That figure has declined with the worldwide oil glut, and the refineries are using only 50-60% of capacity. The next most important industries are tourism and offshore investment and banking. The per capita income in the Antilles is one

  6. The Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oomen, Annemarie; de Vos, J. A. M.

    The labor market in the Netherlands is characterized by rapid economic and technological development. In response to this, a new approach to career development has been to expand individuals' career competencies. Education, employment policy, non-profit organizations, and corporate life are facing the task of developing career development services…

  7. Results of Infrasound Interferometry in Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke, J. T.; Ruigrok, E. N.; Evers, L. G.; Simons, D. G.; Wapenaar, K.

    2012-04-01

    The travel time of infrasound through the atmosphere depends on the temperature and the wind. These atmospheric conditions could be estimated by measuring the travel times between different receivers (microbarometers). For such an estimation an inverse model of the propagation of infrasound through the atmosphere is essential. In the first step it is useful to build a forward model. The inputs of our raytracing model are the atmospheric conditions and the positions of source and receiver. The model consists of three elements the source, the channel and the receiver. The source is a blast wave or microbaroms. The channel is the atmosphere and it takes into account the travel time along the eigen ray, the attenuation of the different atmospheric layers, the spreading of the rays and the influence of caustics. Each receiver is reached by different rays (eigen rays). To determine the eigen rays is part of the receiver element. As output the model generates synthetic barograms. The synthetic barograms can be used to explain measured barograms. Furthermore the synthetic barograms can also be used to evaluate the determination of the travel time. The accurate travel time is for the inverse model as input essential. Since small changes of the travel time lead to big changes of the output (temperature and wind). The travel time between two receivers is determined by crosscorrelating the barograms of these two receivers. This technique was already successfully applied in the troposphere (Haney, 2009). We show that the same can be achieved with more complicated stratospheric phases. Now we compare the crosscorrelation of synthetic barograms with the crosscorrelation of measured barograms. These barograms are measured with the 'Large Aperture Infrasound Array' (LAIA). LAIA is being installed by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) in the framework of the radio-astronomical 'Low Frequency Array' (LOFAR) initiative. LAIA will consist of thirty microbarometers

  8. First-year evaluation of IMERG - Final Run in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios Gaona, Manuel Felipe; Overeem, Aart; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2016-04-01

    For almost two years now, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission has provided worldwide satellite rainfall estimates at higher spatiotemporal resolutions than its predecessor TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission). Accurate rainfall estimates at higher resolutions are the main input in modeling physical processes relevant to society like floods, landslides, and weather extremes. Conversely to TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) products, the Netherlands is within the coverage of GPM Level-3 products, i.e., IMERG (Integrated Multi-satellite Retrievals for GPM). The IMERG spatiotemporal resolution is 0.1° x 0.1° every 30 min (180°W to 180°E, and 60&Deg;N to 60°S), with latencies of 6, 18 hours and 4 months. Here we evaluate the first full year of the IMERG Day 1 Final Run over the land surface of the Netherlands. IMERG Final Run is considered the research product, and provides the longest public data set among IMERG products. We compare half-hourly and daily IMERG rainfall maps against Dutch gauge-adjusted radar rainfall maps. Radar rainfall maps are provided by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), and are considered as the ground truth given its accuracy, spatiotemporal resolution and availability. In general, there is a tendency of GPM to underestimate rainfall intensities over the land surface of the Netherlands. Nevertheless, this underestimation is relatively low, which suggests a potential applicability of IMERG Final Run as a reliable source of rainfall estimates in diverse hydrological and hydrometeorological applications. The robustness and data availability of IMERG is an important asset, especially in places where rain gauge networks are scarce or poorly maintained, or where weather radar networks are too expensive to acquire and/or maintain.

  9. Reviews Book: Voyage to the Heart of the Matter: The ATLAS Experiment at CERN Equipment: SEP Spectroscope Books: Quantum Gods / The Universe Places to visit: The Royal Institution of Great Britain Book: What is this Thing Called Science? Book: Don't be Such a Scientist: Talking Substance in the Age of Style Equipment: La Crosse Anemometer Book: Wonder and Delight Web Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-05-01

    WE RECOMMEND SEP Spectroscope Flatpacked classroom equipment for pupils aged 10 and over Quantum Gods Book attacks spiritualism and religion with physics The Universe Study of whether physics alone can explain origin of universe La Crosse Anemometer Handheld monitor is packed with useful features Wonder and Delight Essays in science education in honour of Eric Rogers WORTH A LOOK Voyage to the Heart of the Matter: The ATLAS Experiment at CERN Pop-up book explains background to complex physics The Royal Institution of Great Britain RI museum proves interesting but not ideal for teaching What is this Thing Called Science? Theory and history of science in an opinionated study Don't be Such a Scientist: Talking Substance in the Age of Style Explanation of how science is best communicated to the public WEB WATCH Particle physics simulations vary in complexity, usefulness and how well they work

  10. Lessons from the United Kingdom's Royal Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Henry Lee

    2010-01-01

    Celebrating its 350th anniversary as a scholarly association devoted to scientific pursuits, the Royal Society (UK), in March 2010, published "The Scientific Century: Securing Our Future Prosperity." In its report, the Royal Society argues against both the notion of withdrawing public investment from its world-class universities and the haphazard,…

  11. The influence of temperature and climate change on the timing of pollen release in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Vliet, Arnold J. H.; Overeem, Aart; de Groot, Rudolf S.; Jacobs, Adrie F. G.; Spieksma, Frits T. M.

    2002-11-01

    In the last decade it has become clear that the timing of many phenological processes, like the start of flowering and leaf unfolding in spring, have changed. The increase in temperature is believed to be the main cause. The earlier start of flowering will have consequences for the start of the pollen season, and thus for the start of the hay fever season. Millions of people world-wide will therefore experience the impact of climate change in their daily lives during spring and summer. In this paper we analyse the relation between climate parameters, especially temperature, and the start of the pollen season in the western part of the Netherlands based on daily pollen counts of the Leiden University Medical Centre and temperature measurements from 1969 till 2000 by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute in De Bilt. The results indicate that there is a strong correlation between temperature and start of the pollen season. An advance of the start of the pollen season of 3 to 22 days has been observed. The potential future changes in the start of the pollen season under climate change scenarios are also discussed.

  12. Persistent Identifiers for Dutch cultural heritage institutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ras, Marcel; Kruithof, Gijsbert

    2016-04-01

    Over the past years, more and more collections belonging to archives, libraries, media, museums, and knowledge institutes are being digitised and made available online. These are exciting times for ALM institutions. They are realising that, in the information society, their collections are goldmines. Unfortunately most heritage institutions in the Netherlands do not yet meet the basic preconditions for long-term availability of their collections. The digital objects often have no long lasting fixed reference yet. URL's and web addresses change. Some digital objects that were referenced in Europeana and other portals can no longer be found. References in scientific articles have a very short life span, which is damaging for scholarly research. In 2015, the Dutch Digital Heritage Network (NDE) has started a two-year work program to co-ordinate existing initiatives in order to improve the (long-term) accessibility of the Dutch digital heritage for a wide range of users, anytime, anyplace. The Digital Heritage Network is a partnership established on the initiative of the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science. The members of the NDE are large, national institutions that strive to professionally preserve and manage digital data, e.g. the National Library, The Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision, the Netherlands Cultural Heritage Agency, the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Archive of the Netherlands and the DEN Foundation, and a growing number of associations and individuals both within and outside the heritage sector. By means of three work programmes the goals of the Network should be accomplished and improve the visibility, the usability and the sustainability of digital heritage. Each programme contains of a set of projects. Within the sustainability program a project on creating a model for persistent identifiers is taking place. The main goals of the project are (1) raise awareness among cultural heritage institutions on the

  13. [The insigne and suntuoso Royal Hospital of Granada (I). Royal foundations and the hospital regrouping (1501-1526)].

    PubMed

    Valenzuela Candelario, José

    2003-01-01

    In the 1520s the local authorities planned to set up a new modern hospital in the city of Granada by combining two existing Royal Hospitals: Alhambra and Reyes. As a public institution and as a new building, the new hospital could develop the mandates of the original foundation and extend its care to become a general hospital. In this way it would strengthen its status as a charitable undertaking and legacy of the Catholic Monarchs and, secondly, as a great architectural monument. PMID:14626277

  14. Multi-Dimensional Impact of the Public-Private Center for Translational Molecular Medicine (CTMM) in the Netherlands: Understanding New 21(st) Century Institutional Designs to Support Innovation-in-Society.

    PubMed

    Steuten, Lotte M

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge translation is at the epicenter of 21st century life sciences and integrative biology. Several innovative institutional designs have been formulated to cultivate knowledge translation. One of these organizational innovations has been the Center for Translational Molecular Medicine (CTMM), a multi-million public-private partnership in the Netherlands. The CTMM aims to accelerate molecular diagnostics and imaging technologies to forecast disease susceptibilities in healthy populations and early diagnosis and personalized treatment of patients. This research evaluated CTMM's impact on scientific, translational, clinical, and economic dimensions. A pragmatic, operationally-defined process indicators approach was used. Data were gathered from CTMM administrations, through a CTMM-wide survey (n = 167) and group interviews. We found that the CTMM focused on disease areas with high human, clinical, and economic burden to society (i.e., oncology, cardiovascular, neurologic, infection, and immunity diseases). CTMM displayed a robust scientific impact that rests 15%-80% above international reference values regarding publication volume and impact. Technology translation to the clinic was accelerated, with >50% of projects progressing from pre-clinical development to clinical testing within 5 years. Furthermore, CTMM has generated nearly 1500 Full Time Equivalent (FTE) of translational R&D capacity. Its positive impact on translational, (future) clinical, and economic aspects is recognized across all surveyed stakeholders. As organizational innovation is increasingly considered critical to forge linkages between life sciences discoveries and innovation-in-society, lessons learned from this study may inform other institutions with similar objectives such as the Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) Program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the United States. PMID:27195965

  15. The first President of the Royal Society.

    PubMed

    Fara, Patricia

    2003-12-01

    Few people know the name of the Royal Society's first President, even though he features prominently in Thomas Sprat's famous allegorical frontispiece. In promotional images, his individual identity is irrelevant for proclaiming the Society's allegiance to Francis Bacon and commitment to experimental investigation. By contrast, William Brouncker's name does appear on Peter Lely's large portrait, which hung at the Royal Society. Brouncker was a gifted mathematician as well as a conscientious administrator, and Lely's portrait reproduces the diagram of one of his innovative algebraic proofs. PMID:14652036

  16. Going Dutch: Higher Education in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, David

    2016-01-01

    This article outlines some of the policy issues currently faced by research-based universities in the Netherlands. The focus is on four leading universities (University of Amsterdam: UvA; Free University of Amsterdam: VU; Leiden University; and Delft University of Technology: TUD). The author visited these institutions as part of a Study Tour…

  17. Margaret Cavendish and the Royal Society

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Emma

    2014-01-01

    It is often claimed that Margaret Cavendish was an anti-experimentalist who was deeply hostile to the activities of the early Royal Society—particularly in relation to Robert Hooke's experiments with microscopes. Some scholars have argued that her views were odd or even childish, while others have claimed that they were shaped by her gender-based status as a scientific ‘outsider’. In this paper I examine Cavendish's views in contemporary context, arguing that her relationship with the Royal Society was more nuanced than previous accounts have suggested. This contextualized approach reveals two points: first, that Cavendish's views were not isolated or odd when compared with those of her contemporaries, and second, that the early Royal Society was less intellectually homogeneous than is sometimes thought. I also show that, although hostile to some aspects of experimentalism, Cavendish nevertheless shared many of the Royal Society's ambitions for natural philosophy, especially in relation to its usefulness and the importance of plain language as a means to disseminate new ideas. PMID:25254278

  18. Royal Naval nursing: 'testing but worth it'.

    PubMed

    Moore, Alison

    2014-08-19

    Inga Kennedy is the most senior nurse in the Royal Navy. She enjoys the commitment and discipline required by a career in the armed forces and says the work offers great opportunities for nurses. Her career highlights have included checking that injured personnel in Afghanistan were receiving the best care possible. PMID:25116541

  19. Margaret Cavendish and the Royal Society.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Emma

    2014-09-20

    It is often claimed that Margaret Cavendish was an anti-experimentalist who was deeply hostile to the activities of the early Royal Society--particularly in relation to Robert Hooke's experiments with microscopes. Some scholars have argued that her views were odd or even childish, while others have claimed that they were shaped by her gender-based status as a scientific 'outsider'. In this paper I examine Cavendish's views in contemporary context, arguing that her relationship with the Royal Society was more nuanced than previous accounts have suggested. This contextualized approach reveals two points: first, that Cavendish's views were not isolated or odd when compared with those of her contemporaries, and second, that the early Royal Society was less intellectually homogeneous than is sometimes thought. I also show that, although hostile to some aspects of experimentalism, Cavendish nevertheless shared many of the Royal Society's ambitions for natural philosophy, especially in relation to its usefulness and the importance of plain language as a means to disseminate new ideas. PMID:25254278

  20. 76 FR 80433 - In the Matter of Royal Oak Capital Management, LLC, 6173 Bellevue Road, Royal Oak, MD 21662...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION In the Matter of Royal Oak Capital Management, LLC, 6173 Bellevue Road, Royal Oak, MD 21662...''), cancelling the registration of Royal Oak Capital Management, LLC, hereinafter referred to as the...

  1. [A tale of 2 cities. The dispute over the true origins of the Royal Society].

    PubMed

    Beeley, Philip

    2008-01-01

    When the Royal Society was founded in November 1660 it took scientific societies already existing in other European countries as its model. However, at a time when the new mathematical and experimental sciences were still generally without a secure institutional foundation there was also great interest in the new society on the part of scientists and scholars abroad. Soon visitors such as Christiaan Huygens and Balthazar de Monconys were able to report positively on its practical orientation, while among others Johannes Hevelius and Philipp Jacob Sachs von Lewenhaimb in letters to the founder member John Wallis and to the secretary Henry Oldenburg requested more information on its origins and statutes. Meanwhile, in England the Royal Society found itself the object of vociferous criticism, especially from the universities, which saw their own role as centres of learning increasingly compromised by the existence of an institution dedicated to the promotion of modern science. The Royal Society responded to this interest from abroad and criticism at home by commissioning an official history written by Thomas Sprat, a man with a university as well as a literary background. However, despite the author's good credentials, the History of the Royal Society presents a one-sided account of the institution, mainly from the perspective of the circle around John Wilkins to which Sprat had belonged. According to their point of view the Royal Society arose from meetings which Wilkins had organized at Wadham College in Oxford in the early 1650s. For members of the old guard, such as Wallis and William Brouncker, the origins of the Royal Society were, however, not in Oxford but rather in London, where meetings involving a significant number of members of the future institution had taken place already in the mid-1640s. This was not simply a question of historical accuracy, but also of the way in which the Royal Society conceived itself: while the circle around Wilkins was in

  2. [A brief history of Chinese royal court medicines].

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Sheng

    2010-09-01

    With the establishment of an emperor and a royal court, the court physician came into being and the royal court medicines gradually began to evolve. In the first year of Kai Huang of the Sui dynasty (581), King Wendi of the Sui dynasty established the imperial medical bureau. Since then the royal court medicines entered a period of development and prosperity. In the Yuan dynasty, the scope of official duty of the imperial hospital narrowed, the development of royal court medicines lacked new growth. To the Ming and Qing dynasties, the royal court medicine began to decline and eventually ended with the demise of the Qing dynasty. PMID:21163077

  3. Fiber digestibility in royal antelope (Neotragus pygmaeus).

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Debra A; Schlegel, Michael L; Galyean, Michael L

    2014-12-01

    Royal antelope (Neotragus pygmaeus) are among the smallest ungulate species and are browsing ruminants. To date, their capacities for fiber fermentation and nutrient digestion have not been quantified. This study compared apparent digestibilities of a typical high-fiber herbivore pellet (ADF 25) and a low-starch, high-fiber diet (WHP) in royal antelope in a crossover design (seven subjects in the first period and four in the second). Animals on ADF 25 pellets had greater intake concentrations (P < 0.05) of dry matter, crude protein, lignin, and crude fat; however, animals fed the WHP diets had greater (P < 0.05) apparent digestibility of dry matter, acid detergent fiber, neutral detergent fiber, and crude fat. Identifying the capacity to which these smaller ruminants can degrade fiber will help to establish more appropriate feeding guidelines for small, browsing ruminants in captivity. PMID:25632658

  4. Henry Oldenburg - Shaping the Royal Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boas Hall, Marie

    2002-03-01

    Henry Oldenburg, born in 1619 in Bremen, Germany, first came to England as a diplomat on a mission to see Oliver Cromwell. He stayed on in England and in 1662 became the Secretary of the Royal Society, and its best known member to the entire learned world of his time. Through his extensive correspondence, now published, he disseminated the Society's ideals and methods at home and abroad. He fostered and encouraged the talents of many scientists later to be far more famous than he, including Newton, Flamsteed, Malpighi, and Leeuwenhoek with whom, as with many others, he developed real friendship. He founded and edited the Philosophical Transactions, the world's oldest scientific journal.His career sheds new light on the intellectual world of his time, especially its scientific aspects, and on the development of the Royal Society; his private life expands our knowledge of social mobility, the urban society, and the religious views of his time.

  5. Inca Royal Estates in the Sacred Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKim Malville, J.

    The royal estates lying between Cusco and Machu Picchu illustrate the remarkable variety by which the sun was honored and worshipped in the Inca Empire. The terraced basins of Moray combine the sun at both solstices and, perhaps, the zenith sun, with flowing water and offerings to Pachamama. The complex astronomy at Urubamba involves the palace of Quespiwanka, horizon pillars, solstices, and mountain worship. Ollantaytambo contains horizontal shadow-casting gnomons with a major water shrine.

  6. Birds of Isle Royale in Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krefting, L.W.; Lee, F.B.; Shelton, P.C.; Gilbert, K.T.

    1966-01-01

    This report constitutes an annotated list of 197 species of birds reported from Isle Royale National Park, a 210-square-mile archipelago in northwestern Lake Superior including some 200 islets and rock outcrops. The island is 45 miles long and 8 miles wide at its widest point. Bird distribution and habitats are described, along with geography and vegetation; 62 species are known to have bred at least once, 26 are thought to be breeders, and the rest are migrants.

  7. Psychotraumatology in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Vermetten, Eric; Olff, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    The contribution to psychotrauma literature from Dutch authors has a long tradition. The relatively high lifetime prevalence of trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is not unique for the Netherlands and does not fully explain the interest in trauma and its consequences. In this overview of psychotraumatology in the Netherlands, we will discuss some of the key events and processes that contribute to the current interest. We outlined the historical basis and development of the field in the Netherlands, including the impact of World War II, the effects of major man-made or natural disasters, engagement in military conflicts, as well as smaller scale traumatic events like sexual abuse and traffic accidents. The liberal and open culture may have reduced stigma to trauma, while other sociocultural aspects may have contributed to increased prevalence. Finally, we describe Dutch psychotraumatology today and how history and culture have shaped the current scientific basis. PMID:23671764

  8. Psychotraumatology in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Vermetten, Eric; Olff, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    The contribution to psychotrauma literature from Dutch authors has a long tradition. The relatively high lifetime prevalence of trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is not unique for the Netherlands and does not fully explain the interest in trauma and its consequences. In this overview of psychotraumatology in the Netherlands, we will discuss some of the key events and processes that contribute to the current interest. We outlined the historical basis and development of the field in the Netherlands, including the impact of World War II, the effects of major man-made or natural disasters, engagement in military conflicts, as well as smaller scale traumatic events like sexual abuse and traffic accidents. The liberal and open culture may have reduced stigma to trauma, while other sociocultural aspects may have contributed to increased prevalence. Finally, we describe Dutch psychotraumatology today and how history and culture have shaped the current scientific basis. PMID:23671764

  9. Rare royal families in honeybees, Apis mellifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritz, Robin F. A.; Lattorff, H. Michael G.; Neumann, Peter; Kraus, F. Bernhard; Radloff, Sarah E.; Hepburn, H. Randall

    2005-10-01

    The queen is the dominant female in the honeybee colony, Apis mellifera, and controls reproduction. Queen larvae are selected by the workers and are fed a special diet (royal jelly), which determines caste. Because queens mate with many males a large number of subfamilies coexist in the colony. As a consequence, there is a considerable potential for conflict among the subfamilies over queen rearing. Here we show that honeybee queens are not reared at random but are preferentially reared from rare “royal” subfamilies, which have extremely low frequencies in the colony's worker force but a high frequency in the queens reared.

  10. Media in the Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaver, Franca

    This 2-part report summarizes Dutch policy on mass media and reviews the status of cable television in the Netherlands. The first part defines the underlying principles of a national policy on mass media in relation to the press, commercial and educational television broadcasting, radio, cable television, and media research. Parliamentary debate…

  11. Comparing distinct ground-based lightning location networks covering the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vos, Lotte; Leijnse, Hidde; Schmeits, Maurice; Beekhuis, Hans; Poelman, Dieter; Evers, Läslo; Smets, Pieter

    2015-04-01

    Lightning can be detected using a ground-based sensor network. The Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) monitors lightning activity in the Netherlands with the so-called FLITS-system; a network combining SAFIR-type sensors. This makes use of Very High Frequency (VHF) as well as Low Frequency (LF) sensors. KNMI has recently decided to replace FLITS by data from a sub-continental network operated by Météorage which makes use of LF sensors only (KNMI Lightning Detection Network, or KLDN). KLDN is compared to the FLITS system, as well as Met Office's long-range Arrival Time Difference (ATDnet), which measures Very Low Frequency (VLF). Special focus lies on the ability to detect Cloud to Ground (CG) and Cloud to Cloud (CC) lightning in the Netherlands. Relative detection efficiency of individual flashes and lightning activity in a more general sense are calculated over a period of almost 5 years. Additionally, the detection efficiency of each system is compared to a ground-truth that is constructed from flashes that are detected by both of the other datasets. Finally, infrasound data is used as a fourth lightning data source for several case studies. Relative performance is found to vary strongly with location and time. As expected, it is found that FLITS detects significantly more CC lightning (because of the strong aptitude of VHF antennas to detect CC), though KLDN and ATDnet detect more CG lightning. We analyze statistics computed over the entire 5-year period, where we look at CG as well as total lightning (CC and CG combined). Statistics that are considered are the Probability of Detection (POD) and the so-called Lightning Activity Detection (LAD). POD is defined as the percentage of reference flashes the system detects compared to the total detections in the reference. LAD is defined as the fraction of system recordings of one or more flashes in predefined area boxes over a certain time period given the fact that the reference detects at least one

  12. Friend Not Foe: The Role of Curriculum Committee in Supporting the Development of Curriculum at Royal Roads University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Curriculum Committee at Royal Roads University (RRU) is mandated with ensuring that program and course curricula are of sufficient high academic integrity, consistent with other academic institutions, delivered in a manner consistent with program outcomes, and align with the recently adopted Learning and Teaching Model. Yet, the apparent…

  13. 1. VIEW SHOWING FOUNDATIONS OF HOISTING WORKS, ROYAL MINE, 1988, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW SHOWING FOUNDATIONS OF HOISTING WORKS, ROYAL MINE, 1988, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. GLORY HOLE DROPS OFF TO LEFT, AND EXCAVATED TRENCH FOR THE 1920s SURFACE TRAM IN RIGHT FOREGROUND - Royal Consolidated Gold Mine & Mills, Hoisting Work, 4.0 Air Miles Northwest of Copperopolis, Copperopolis, Calaveras County, CA

  14. The case for watchful waiting with Isle Royale's wolf population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L. David

    2013-01-01

    In "Should Isle Royale Wolves be Reintroduced? A Case Study on Wilderness Management in a Changing World," Vucetich et al. concluded with the hope that their analysis “motivates broader discussion that deepens understanding of the specifics on Isle Royale and the underlying principles” (2012: 137). This article represents an attempt to continue that discussion.

  15. 36 CFR 7.38 - Isle Royale National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Isle Royale National Park. 7.38 Section 7.38 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.38 Isle Royale National Park. (a)...

  16. 36 CFR 7.38 - Isle Royale National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Isle Royale National Park. 7.38 Section 7.38 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.38 Isle Royale National Park. (a)...

  17. 36 CFR 7.38 - Isle Royale National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Isle Royale National Park. 7.38 Section 7.38 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.38 Isle Royale National Park. (a)...

  18. 36 CFR 7.38 - Isle Royale National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Isle Royale National Park. 7.38 Section 7.38 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.38 Isle Royale National Park. (a)...

  19. 36 CFR 7.38 - Isle Royale National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Isle Royale National Park. 7.38 Section 7.38 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.38 Isle Royale National Park. (a)...

  20. Increased osteoarthritis in moose from Isle Royale.

    PubMed

    Peterson, R O

    1988-07-01

    Over the past 30 yr, moose (Alces alces) in Isle Royale National Park (Michigan, USA) exhibited a several-fold increase in the prevalence of osteoarthritis, or degenerative joint disease (DJD). Available evidence points to an environmental explanation for this change. Greater physical activity among afflicted moose is not a likely contributing factor, nor is genetic change in the population. The possible introduction of an unspecified disease agent cannot be dismissed at this time. Moose exhibiting the highest prevalence of DJD were those born during a period of severe undernutrition, and it is hypothesized that nutritional stress early in life was responsible for increased joint disease during senescence. Such an etiology for osteoarthritis has not been suggested previously for any species. PMID:3411702

  1. Passive smoking in the Royal Navy.

    PubMed

    Cannon, L B

    1994-01-01

    Passive smoking is an emotive issue and one which has received considerable coverage in the past few years from both the scientific community and the media. The arguments for and against links between passive smoking and disease are as fiercely contested among members of the Royal Navy as among civilians. This article aims to present the current evidence in favour of such a link and also the views on the matter as expressed by the ship's company of a Type 22 frigate. Their views will be compared to the result of a similar survey carried out among civilian workforces. Finally, based on the evidence and results presented, strategies for tackling this problem will be discussed. PMID:8027967

  2. The Netherlands: country profile.

    PubMed

    1985-12-01

    This discussion of the Netherlands covers the country's cities and regions, population growth, households and families, housing, contruction, and spatial planning; ethnicity and religion; education; labor force and income; consumption; and transport and communications. As a small and mineral poor nation with a seafaring tradition, the Netherlands survives on foreign trade. In 1983, total export earnings amounted to nearly 62% of the entire national income. Over 72% of Dutch exports go to other member countries of the European Economic Community (EEC), but imports are more diversified, with 47% originating outside the EEC. Since 1848, the Netherlands has been a constitutional monarchy with a parliamentary form of government. As such, it is one of the most stable democracies in the world. The main administrative units are the 11 provinces, of which Noord-Holland and Zuid-Holland are the most populous and economically most important. Amsterdam remains the commercial center of the country, but its role as the principal port city has been taken over by Rotterdam. No community has more than 700,000 inhabitants, but the country as a whole is highly urbanized because of the large numbers of medium-sized cities. In 1983 the population of the Netherlands totaled 14.34 million, compared to 5.10 million at the turn of the century. In 1965, the total fertility rate was 3.0. The death rate has virtually stabilized at 8/1000. The Dutch life expectancy stands at 72.7 years for men and 79.4 for women (1983). Natural increase has already dropped to 0.4% a year. Apart from the slight impact of net immigration, the positive growth rate reflects the large proportion (53%) of the population in its reproductive years. Mean household sizes in the 11 provinces vary from 2.5 in Noord-Holland (in 1981) to nearly 3 in Overijssel and Noord-Brabant, whereas the proportion of 1 person households ranges from 16% in Drenthe and 17% in the somewhat traditionalist southern provinces of Limburg and

  3. The Netherlands: health system review.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Willemijn; Kroneman, Madelon; Boerma, Wienke; van den Berg, Michael; Westert, Gert; Devillé, Walter; van Ginneken, Ewout

    2010-01-01

    The Health Systems in Transition (HiT) profiles are country-based reports that provide a detailed description of health systems and of policy initiatives in progress or under development. HiTs examine different approaches to the organization, financing and delivery of health services and the role of the main actors in health systems. They also describe the institutional framework, process, content, and implementation of health and health care policies, highlighting challenges and areas that require more in-depth analysis. Undoubtedly the dominant issue in the Dutch health care system at present is the fundamental reform that came into effect in 2006. With the introduction of a single compulsory health insurance scheme, the dual system of public and private insurance for curative care became history. Managed competition for providers and insurers became a major driver in the health care system. This has meant fundamental changes in the roles of patients, insurers, providers and the government. Insurers now negotiate with providers on price and quality and patients choose the provider they prefer and join a health insurance policy which best fits their situation. To allow patients to make these choices, much effort has been made to make information on price and quality available to the public. The role of the national government has changed from directly steering the system to safeguarding the proper functioning of the health markets. With the introduction of market mechanisms in the health care sector and the privatization of former sickness funds, the Dutch system presents an innovative and unique variant of a social health insurance system. Since the stepwise realization of the blueprint of the system has not yet been completed, the health care system in The Netherlands should be characterized as being in transition. Many measures have been taken to move from the old to the new system as smoothly as possible. Financial measures intended to prevent sudden budgetary

  4. NCI at Frederick Receives a Royal Visit | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Cancer Research (CCR) and NCI at Frederick recently had the honor of hosting Professor Dr. Her Royal Highness Princess Chulabhorn Mahidol of Thailand. Her Royal Highness has a special interest in scientific research related to the use of natural products for treating disease. The purpose of her visit was to discuss the work on natural products being undertaken at NCI at Frederick. Her Royal Highness attended talks by researchers from both the Molecular Targets Laboratory (MTL), CCR, and the Natural Products Branch (NPB), Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP), Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD).

  5. NCI at Frederick Receives a Royal Visit | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Cancer Research (CCR) and NCI at Frederick recently had the honor of hosting Professor Dr. Her Royal Highness Princess Chulabhorn Mahidol of Thailand.  Her Royal Highness has a special interest in scientific research related to the use of natural products for treating disease. The purpose of her visit was to discuss the work on natural products being undertaken at NCI at Frederick. Her Royal Highness attended talks by researchers from both the Molecular Targets Laboratory (MTL), CCR, and the Natural Products Branch (NPB), Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP), Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD).

  6. 19. ROYAL WALNUT. STORAGE SHED PART OF HOUSING DEVELOPMENT. WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. ROYAL WALNUT. STORAGE SHED PART OF HOUSING DEVELOPMENT. WEST PROPERTY LINE ADJACENT TO TREE AND RUNS ALONG SIDE OF SHED. LOOKING NORTH AND SLIGHTLY EAST FROM ADJOINING PROPERTY. - Gold Ridge Farm, 7777 Bodega Avenue, Sebastopol, Sonoma County, CA

  7. VIEW OF DATE DRIVE, SHOWING ROYAL PALMS ALONG THE STREET. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF DATE DRIVE, SHOWING ROYAL PALMS ALONG THE STREET. VIEW FACING EAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. Organizational Culture in Adult Basic Education in the Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, M. J. M. van den

    Recent legislation on adult basic education (ABE) in the Netherlands has two important aims: to offer one uniform organizational financial structure and to improve educational quality. ABE institutes have concentrated on restructuring the organization and merging the precursors. The change in structure is supported by a change in organizational…

  9. Study in the Netherlands: Small Countries Have To Be Smarter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Netherlands Organisation for International Cooperation in Higher Education, The Hague.

    This booklet describes opportunities for higher education study in the Netherlands along with information, addresses, and practical tips for foreign students who are considering taking a course or earning a degree at a Dutch institution of higher education. Six sections cover: (1) the investment of study abroad, (2) background on contemporary…

  10. Vocational and Technical Education in the Netherlands: Changes and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson-Benninger, Barbara

    Higher education in the Netherlands is divided into three sectors: traditional universities; schools for higher occupational education, known as "hoger beroepsonderwijs," or HBOs; and the Open University, which offers both university and HBO degrees for students unable or unprepared to attend traditional institutions. The HBO system, having…

  11. Meteorological variation in daily travel behaviour: evidence from revealed preference data from the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creemers, Lieve; Wets, Geert; Cools, Mario

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the meteorological variation in revealed preference travel data. The main objective of this study is to investigate the impact of weather conditions on daily activity participation (trip motives) and daily modal choices in the Netherlands. To this end, data from the Dutch National Travel Household Survey of 2008 were matched to hourly weather data provided by the Royal Dutch Meteorological Institute and were complemented with thermal indices to indicate the level of thermal comfort and additional variables to indicate the seasonality of the weather conditions. Two multinomial logit-generalised estimation equations (MNL-GEE) models were constructed, one to assess the impact of weather conditions on trip motives and one to assess the effect of weather conditions on modal choice. The modelling results indicate that, depending on the travel attribute of concern, other factors might play a role. Nonetheless, the thermal component, as well as the aesthetical component and the physical component of weather play a significant role. Moreover, the parameter estimates indicate significant differences in the impact of weather conditions when different time scales are considered (e.g. daily versus hourly based). The fact that snow does not play any role at all was unexpected. This finding can be explained by the relatively low occurrence of this weather type in the study area. It is important to consider the effects of weather in travel demand modelling frameworks because this will help to achieve higher accuracy and more realistic traffic forecasts. These will in turn allow policy makers to make better long-term and short-term decisions to achieve various political goals, such as progress towards a sustainable transportation system. Further research in this respect should emphasise the role of weather conditions and activity-scheduling attributes.

  12. The Observers Observed: Charles Dickens at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, in 1850

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, A.

    2005-12-01

    In 1850 the magazine Household Words, which Charles Dickens edited, published three articles describing the instruments and workings of the Royal Observatory, Greenwich. These 'popular' articles are invaluable primary sources for the historian of astronomy. They convey some of the Victorian public's fascination with an Institution believed by some to be a lighthouse for night-time shipping on the river Thames; by others, a national repository of 'divining rods' and 'magic mirrors'. Dickens was clearly impressed by the pragmatic usefulness of the Observatory to a commercial and maritime nation, and by seemingly magical, self-acting and recording instruments whereby the wind wrote its own 'Aeolian Autobiography'.

  13. Netherlands: Health System Review.

    PubMed

    Kroneman, Madelon; Boerma, Wienke; van den Berg, Michael; Groenewegen, Peter; de Jong, Judith; van Ginneken, Ewout

    2016-03-01

    This analysis of the Dutch health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, healthcare provision, health reforms and health system performance. Without doubt, two major reforms implemented since the mid-2000s are among the main issues today. The newly implemented long-term care reform will have to realize a transition from publicly provided care to more self-reliance on the part of the citizens and a larger role for municipalities in its organization. A particular point of attention is how the new governance arrangements and responsibilities in long-term care will work together. The 2006 reform replaced the division between public and private insurance by one universal social health insurance and introduced managed competition as a driving mechanism in the healthcare system. Although the reform was initiated almost a decade ago, its stepwise implementation continues to bring changes in the healthcare system in general and in the role of actors in particular. In terms of performance, essential healthcare services are within easy reach and waiting times have been decreasing. The basic health insurance package and compensations for lower incomes protect citizens against catastrophic spending. Out-of-pocket payments are low from an international perspective. Moreover, the Dutch rate the quality of the health system and their health as good. International comparisons show that the Netherlands has low antibiotic use, a low number of avoidable hospitalizations and a relatively low avoidable mortality. National studies show that healthcare has made major contributions to the health of the Dutch population as reflected in increasing life expectancy. Furthermore, some indicators such as the prescription of generics and length of stay reveal improvements in efficiency over the past years. Nevertheless, the Netherlands still has one of the highest per capita health expenditures in Europe, although growth has slowed considerably after

  14. Determination of trans-10-hydroxy-2-decenoic acid content in pure royal jelly and royal jelly products by column liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Genç, M; Aslan, A

    1999-04-16

    In this research, several royal jellies and commercial products containing royal jelly were analysed for their trans-10-hydroxy-2-decenoic acid (10-HDA) content by using a column liquid chromatography technique. Ten samples claimed to be pure royal jelly, containing 10-HDA between 0.75 and 2.54%. Seven samples claimed to contain royal jelly as an ingredient which ranged from non-detectable to 0.054%. The technique was found to be rapid with high recovery. PMID:10327631

  15. Conservation genetics of the endangered Isle Royale gray wolf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wayne, R.K.; Lehman, N.; Girman, D.; Gogan, P.J.P.; Gilbert, D.A.; Hansen, K.; Peterson, R.O.; Seal, U.S.; Eisenhawer, A.; Mech, L.D.; Krumenaker, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    The small group of wolves on Isle Royale has been studied for over three decades as a model of the relationship between large carnivores and their prey. During the last ten years the population declined from 50 individuals to as few as 12 individuals. The causes of this decline may be food shortages, disease, or reduced genetic variability. We address the issues of genetic variability and relationships of Isle Royale wolves using allozyme electrophoresis, mtDNA restriction-site analysis, and multilocus hypervariable minisatellite DNA analysis (genetic fingerprinting). Our results indicate that approximately 50% of the allozyme heterozygosity has been lost in the island population, a decline similar to that expected if no immigration had occurred from the mainland. The genetic fingerprinting data indicate that the seven sampled Isle Royale wolves are as similar as captive populations of siblings. Surprisingly, the Isle Royale wolves have an mtDNA genotype that is very rare on the mainland, being found in only one of 144 mainland wolves. This suggests that the remaining Isle Royale wolves are probably derived from a single female founder.

  16. Unlocking the Royal Geographical Society Archives: The Experiences of a Fellow of the Society as a Teacher and as a Researcher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segell, Glen M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To detail a user's experiences of the digital archive project of the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers) (RGS-IBG). The "Unlocking the Archives" project has five facets: construction and conservation at its London archives; an online catalogue of its collections; digitisation of images and maps;…

  17. Octanoic acid confers to royal jelly varroa-repellent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazzi, Francesco; Bortolomeazzi, Renzo; Della Vedova, Giorgio; Del Piccolo, Fabio; Annoscia, Desiderato; Milani, Norberto

    2009-02-01

    The mite Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman is a parasite of the honeybee Apis mellifera L. and represents a major threat for apiculture in the Western world. Reproduction takes place only inside bee brood cells that are invaded just before sealing; drone cells are preferred over worker cells, whereas queen cells are not normally invaded. Lower incidence of mites in queen cells is at least partly due to the deterrent activity of royal jelly. In this study, the repellent properties of royal jelly were investigated using a lab bioassay. Chemical analysis showed that octanoic acid is a major volatile component of royal jelly; by contrast, the concentration is much lower in drone and worker larval food. Bioassays, carried out under lab conditions, demonstrated that octanoic acid is repellent to the mite. Field studies in bee colonies confirmed that the compound may interfere with the process of cell invasion by the mite.

  18. The Royal College of General Practitioners: Postgraduate Education in Britain

    PubMed Central

    Ayre, Burton

    1970-01-01

    The development and growth of the Royal College of General Practitioners in Britain against a background of escalating need for postgraduate courses within their society is outlined. The structuring of postgraduate medical education under government sponsorship with the inception of the National Health Service is described; and its evolution over the past 20 years. The main substance of this article grew out of tape recorded discussions between the author and Dr. John Hunt, President of the Royal College of General Practitioners; Dr. Patrick Byrne, Director, Department of General Practice, the University of Manchester, and Chief Examiner RCGP; Mr. Donald C. Bowie, FRCS, Regional Postgraduate Dean, The British Postgraduate Medical Federation, the University of London; Dr. J. S. K. Stevenson of McKenzie House, Edinburgh, Scotland. Some additional comments are based on extracts from The Royal Commission on Medical Education 1965-68 Report (Todd Report). Imagesp117-a PMID:20468491

  19. Octanoic acid confers to royal jelly varroa-repellent properties.

    PubMed

    Nazzi, Francesco; Bortolomeazzi, Renzo; Della Vedova, Giorgio; Del Piccolo, Fabio; Annoscia, Desiderato; Milani, Norberto

    2009-02-01

    The mite Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman is a parasite of the honeybee Apis mellifera L. and represents a major threat for apiculture in the Western world. Reproduction takes place only inside bee brood cells that are invaded just before sealing; drone cells are preferred over worker cells, whereas queen cells are not normally invaded. Lower incidence of mites in queen cells is at least partly due to the deterrent activity of royal jelly. In this study, the repellent properties of royal jelly were investigated using a lab bioassay. Chemical analysis showed that octanoic acid is a major volatile component of royal jelly; by contrast, the concentration is much lower in drone and worker larval food. Bioassays, carried out under lab conditions, demonstrated that octanoic acid is repellent to the mite. Field studies in bee colonies confirmed that the compound may interfere with the process of cell invasion by the mite. PMID:19050844

  20. Wolves, moose, and tree rings on isle royale.

    PubMed

    McLaren, B E; Peterson, R O

    1994-12-01

    Investigation of tree growth in Isle Royale National Park in Michigan revealed the influence of herbivores and carnivores on plants in an intimately linked food chain. Plant growth rates were regulated by cycles in animal density and responded to annual changes in primary productivity only when released from herbivory by wolf predation. Isle Royale's dendrochronology complements a rich literature on food chain control in aquatic systems, which often supports a trophic cascade model. This study provides evidence of top-down control in a forested ecosystem. PMID:17841718

  1. The Royal Society's Report on Primary School Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlen, Wynne

    2010-01-01

    The author summarises findings from the Royal Society's "state of the nation" report on 5-14 science and mathematics education in the UK. This is the Society's third report on aspects of science and mathematics education in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales, and the first where the focus has included primary practice, policy,…

  2. A Firefighting Training Unit for the Royal Navy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Mike

    1992-01-01

    Describes efforts to modernize the firefighting training facilities of the Royal Navy in the United Kingdom through the use of computer-controlled simulations of ship fires. The structure of a prototype compartment and the control system that sets up various training scenarios and modulates the environment in response to actions by the trainees…

  3. ROYAL PALMLINED WALK TO FACILITY 1041 (QUARTERS J) WITH FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ROYAL PALM-LINED WALK TO FACILITY 1041 (QUARTERS J) WITH FACILITY 1040 (QUARTERS 1) TO LEFT. TAKEN AT CORNER OF HALE ALII AVENUE AND EIGHTH STREET. VIEW FACING EAST. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Housing Area Hale Alii, Hale Alii Avenue, Eighth Street, & Avenue D, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. Photovoltaic-powered refrigerator experiment at Isle Royale National Park

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratajczak, A. F.

    1977-01-01

    The use of a photovoltaic power system to operate an electric refrigerator at a trail construction camp at Isle Royale, Michigan is investigated. The use of P/V power for refrigeration in a remote installation is demonstrated. System design as well as predicted and measured system performance are presented.

  5. Osteoporotic skull lesions in moose at Isle Royale National Park.

    PubMed

    Hindelang, M; Peterson, R O

    1996-01-01

    Osteoporotic lesions were evaluated in the skulls of moose (Alces alces) collected in Isle Royale National Park, Michigan (USA), from 1958 to 1994. Circular lesions which penetrated the outer table of the skull were distributed over the frontal and nasal bones asymmetrically in both sexes. About 32% of skulls recovered had some porotic lesions with slightly greater prevalence among males. PMID:8627919

  6. FACILITY 1042. FRONT OBLIQUE SHOWING ROYAL PALMS LINING FRONT WALK. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 1042. FRONT OBLIQUE SHOWING ROYAL PALMS LINING FRONT WALK. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Housing Area Hale Alii, Junior Officers' Quarters Type, 9-10 Hale Alii Avenue, 1-2 Eighth Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. Gall's visit to The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Eling, Paul; Draaisma, Douwe; Conradi, Matthijs

    2011-04-01

    In March 1805, Franz Joseph Gall left Vienna to start what has become known as his cranioscopic tour. He traveled through Germany, Denmark, and The Netherlands. In this article, we will describe his visit to The Netherlands in greater detail, as it has not yet received due attention. Gall was eager to go to Amsterdam because he was interested in the large collection of skulls of Petrus Camper. Gall presented a series of lectures, reports of which can be found in a local newspaper and in a few books, published at that time. We will summarize this material. We will first outline developments in the area of physiognomy, in particular in The Netherlands, and what the Dutch knew about Gall's doctrine prior to his arrival. We will then present a reconstruction of the contents of the lectures. Finally, we will discuss the reception of his ideas in the scientific community. PMID:21480037

  8. A Study of Testing Practices in the Royal Oak (Michigan) Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Ja Mille; And Others

    The testing program of the Royal Oak (Michigan) School District was examined and evaluated under agreement of the Royal Oak Teachers Association and the Administration of the Royal Oak School District. A committee was formed of people knowledgeable of the program and/or specialists in evaluation and testing. This study represents two days of…

  9. More than royal food - Major royal jelly protein genes in sexuals and workers of the honeybee Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the honeybee Apis mellifera, female larvae destined to become a queen are fed with royal jelly, a secretion of the hypopharyngeal glands of young nurse bees that rear the brood. The protein moiety of royal jelly comprises mostly major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs) of which the coding genes (mrjp1-9) have been identified on chromosome 11 in the honeybee’s genome. Results We determined the expression of mrjp1-9 among the honeybee worker caste (nurses, foragers) and the sexuals (queens (unmated, mated) and drones) in various body parts (head, thorax, abdomen). Specific mrjp expression was not only found in brood rearing nurse bees, but also in foragers and the sexuals. Conclusions The expression of mrjp1 to 7 is characteristic for the heads of worker bees, with an elevated expression of mrjp1-4 and 7 in nurse bees compared to foragers. Mrjp5 and 6 were higher in foragers compared to nurses suggesting functions in addition to those of brood food proteins. Furthermore, the expression of mrjp9 was high in the heads, thoraces and abdomen of almost all female bees, suggesting a function irrespective of body section. This completely different expression profile suggests mrjp9 to code for the most ancestral major royal jelly protein of the honeybee. PMID:24279675

  10. Making Kew Observatory: the Royal Society, the British Association and the politics of early Victorian science.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Lee T

    2015-09-01

    Built in 1769 as a private observatory for King George III, Kew Observatory was taken over in 1842 by the British Association for the Advancement of Science (BAAS). It was then quickly transformed into what some claimed to be a 'physical observatory' of the sort proposed by John Herschel - an observatory that gathered data in a wide range of physical sciences, including geomagnetism and meteorology, rather than just astronomy. Yet this article argues that the institution which emerged in the 1840s was different in many ways from that envisaged by Herschel. It uses a chronological framework to show how, at every stage, the geophysicist and Royal Artillery officer Edward Sabine manipulated the project towards his own agenda: an independent observatory through which he could control the geomagnetic and meteorological research, including the ongoing 'Magnetic Crusade'. The political machinations surrounding Kew Observatory, within the Royal Society and the BAAS, may help to illuminate the complex politics of science in early Victorian Britain, particularly the role of 'scientific servicemen' such as Sabine. Both the diversity of activities at Kew and the complexity of the observatory's origins make its study important in the context of the growing field of the 'observatory sciences'. PMID:26256312

  11. The Library of the Royal Society of Physicians in Budapest becomes today's Semmelweis Medical History Library

    PubMed Central

    Kaproncszay, Katalin; Magyar, László András; Putnam, Constance E

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The 170-year history of the library of the Royal Society of Medicine in Budapest illustrates both that political and cultural context matter and that “medical” libraries, if they survive, in due course become primarily “medical history” libraries. Methods: Two of the authors are on the staff of the Semmelweis Medical History Library; the third is a US scholar who makes frequent use of the library. Together, they avail themselves of archival and published materials—and personal experience with the collection—to establish the context that produced the original library, trace its evolution, and describe its present-day incarnation. Results: A tale of transformation emerges that reflects how collections are likely to change. The authors present events and individuals in the life of the Royal Society's library and paint a picture of the value of today's Semmelweis Medical History Library. Unique treasures in the collection are described. Conclusion: The story told here is of how a particular nineteenth-century library became a twenty-first–century institution. The authors establish its peculiarly Hungarian context and potential value to librarians and historians from outside Hungary. The overall message is that general medical libraries everywhere are perforce likely to become medical historical libraries over time. PMID:21243053

  12. A Compact Geography of the Netherlands. [Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information and Documentation Centre for the Geography of the Netherlands, Utrecht.

    This short booklet on the geography of the Netherlands, designed for use at the upper elementary and secondary levels, contains 17 short descriptive analyses of Dutch physical and human geography. Each section is well illustrated with diagrams and maps. Titles of the sections include (1) High Netherlands--Low Netherlands, (2) Land Reclamation, (3)…

  13. Family and family therapy in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar, Karin; Baars, Jan

    2012-04-01

    This article describes how families are functioning in the Netherlands, and how family therapy is used in mental healthcare. In the open Dutch society, new ideas are easily incorporated, as exemplified by the rapid introduction and growth of family therapy in the 1980s. In recent decades, however, family therapy has lost ground to other treatment models that are more individually orientated, and adhere to stricter protocols. This decline of family therapy has been exacerbated by recent budget cuts in mental healthcare. In regular healthcare institutes family therapy now has a marginal position at best, although family treatment models are used in specific areas such as forensic treatments. In addition, the higher trained family therapists have found their own niches to work with couples and families. We argue that a stronger position of family therapy would be beneficial for patients and for families, in order to counteract the strong individualization of Dutch society. PMID:22515464

  14. Identification of a Novel Hypocholesterolemic Protein, Major Royal Jelly Protein 1, Derived from Royal Jelly

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Saori; Kusada, Mio; Watanabe, Suzuyo; Kawashima, Takuji; Nakamura, Tadashi; Shimada, Masaya; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Nagaoka, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Royal jelly (RJ) intake lowers serum cholesterol levels in animals and humans, but the active component in RJ that lowers serum cholesterol level and its molecular mechanism are unclear. In this study, we set out to identify the bile acid-binding protein contained in RJ, because dietary bile acid-binding proteins including soybean protein and its peptide are effective in ameliorating hypercholesterolemia. Using a cholic acid-conjugated column, we separated some bile acid-binding proteins from RJ and identified the major RJ protein 1 (MRJP1), MRJP2, and MRJP3 as novel bile acid-binding proteins from RJ, based on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Purified MRJP1, which is the most abundant protein of the bile acid-binding proteins in RJ, exhibited taurocholate-binding activity in vitro. The micellar solubility of cholesterol was significantly decreased in the presence of MRJP1 compared with casein in vitro. Liver bile acids levels were significantly increased, and cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) mRNA and protein tended to increase by MRJP1 feeding compared with the control. CYP7A1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly increased by MRJP1 tryptic hydrolysate treatment compared with that of casein tryptic hydrolysate in hepatocytes. MRJP1 hypocholesterolemic effect has been investigated in rats. The cholesterol-lowering action induced by MRJP1 occurs because MRJP1 interacts with bile acids induces a significant increase in fecal bile acids excretion and a tendency to increase in fecal cholesterol excretion and also enhances the hepatic cholesterol catabolism. We have identified, for the first time, a novel hypocholesterolemic protein, MRJP1, in RJ. Interestingly, MRJP1 exhibits greater hypocholesterolemic activity than the medicine β-sitosterol in rats. PMID:25144734

  15. Aircrew cooperation in the Royal Air Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adcock, C. B.

    1987-01-01

    The progressive introduction of modern, high performance aircraft, coupled with a significant increase in the complexity of the operational environment, has highlighted crew co-operation as a critical factor in aircraft safety. Investigation into recent MAC aircraft accidents supports the conclusion reached by NASA and other U.S. research institutions that a positive training program is required to improve resource management in the cockpit and prevent a breakdown under stress of the crew process. Past training and regulation has concentrated on the attainment of individual flying skills, but group skills have been neglected through lack of knowledge and understanding of the group process. This long-standing deficiency is now being addressed in the U.S. by the progressive and widespread introduction of theoretical and practical training programs to improve crew co-operation. The RAF should provide similar training for its aircrews through the adaptation and development of existing training resources. Better crew co-operation would not only reduce the number of RAF aircraft accidents but also improve the morale of the Service.

  16. The Netherlands' School Building Prize.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PEB Exchange, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Presents awardees of the Netherland's School Building Prize: those schools that have shown they can embrace new directions in school building design while adhering to budgetary limitations. Highlights general findings of the judges on school design and construct as presented by the 41 participating schools. (GR)

  17. Pictorial Atlas of the Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information and Documentation Centre for the Geography of the Netherlands, Utrecht.

    The atlas contains almost 40 photographs and 40 maps of geographical aspects of the Netherlands: the coast, dikes, canals, towns, and farmland. Each page contains a photograph, a section of a map showing the area in which the photograph was taken, and a discussion of several paragraphs about the geographical problems of the area and how they have…

  18. CORRESPONDENCE EDUCATION IN THE NETHERLANDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SLOOS, ISAAEC; AND OTHERS

    RECENT TRENDS AND EVIDENCES OF PROGRESS IN CORRESPONDENCE EDUCATION IN THE NETHERLANDS ARE CONSIDERED, TOGETHER WITH RESEARCH ON THE SOCIOCULTURAL AND MOTIVATIONAL ASPECTS OF PARTICIPATION IN CORRESPONDENCE STUDY, AND THE SPECIAL FUNCTIONS AND ADVANTAGES OF THE CORRESPONDENCE METHOD. THEORIES AND IDEAS UNDERLYING THE DIDACTICS OF CORRESPONDENCE…

  19. Higher Vocational Education in the Netherlands: A Survey of the Current Situation in Higher Commercial Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Meel, R. M.; Jansen, B. P. G. M.

    The institutes that provide higher vocational education (HVE) constitute one of the three major branches of higher education in the Netherlands. Three actors play a decisive role in HVE: the government, the Council for Higher Vocational Education, and the institutes. The main factors exerting an influence on HVE include the following: the…

  20. Further Education and Training of the Labour Force. Country Report: The Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    In the Netherlands, 15 to 17.5 percent of the working age population participated in further education and training for adults in 1985-88. Enterprises, state ministries, and private institutions supply adult education; enterprises, ministries, and sectoral institutions finance it. The Ministry of Education and Sciences provides basic education,…

  1. The Royal College of Psychiatrists and the death penalty.

    PubMed

    Gunn, John

    2004-01-01

    The Royal College of Psychiatrists recently issued a revised statement on its position concerning capital punishment. The College proposes to support psychiatrists who refuse to be involved in the capital process, but accepts that some may take up limited involvement in the manner set out in the document. The Royal College is the professional body for psychiatric practitioners in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Almost no public statements are issued from the College without first being deliberated on within at least two of its three major committees. The new document on capital punishment remains in the spirit of the previous ones. The topic of capital punishment is noncontroversial within the British medical profession. In all European countries, capital punishment is against the law, because there is an overarching directive from the Council of Europe (a wide group of nations, wider than the European Union) insisting that it be abolished. PMID:15281424

  2. The Magnetic Observatory Buildings at the Royal Observatory, Cape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, I. S.

    2015-10-01

    During the 1830s there arose a strong international movement, promoted by Carl Friedrich Gauss and Alexander von Humboldt, to characterise the earth's magnetic field. By 1839 the Royal Society in London, driven by Edward Sabine, had organised a "Magnetic Crusade" - the establishment of a series of magnetic and meteorological observatories around the British Empire, including New Zealand, Australia, St Helena and the Cape. This article outlines the history of the latter installation, its buildings and what became of them.

  3. John Tyndall and the Royal Medal that was never struck

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Just once in its long history has a Royal Medal been awarded but not presented. John Tyndall FRS (1820–93) was the chosen recipient in 1853 for his early work on diamagnetism but declined to accept it. The story of why Tyndall felt compelled to turn down this considerable honour sheds light on the scientific politics and personal relationships of the time, on the importance given to the study of magnetism, and on Tyndall's own character and career. PMID:24921107

  4. Whitening Effect of Watersoluble Royal Jelly from South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kwan Kyu; Pak, Sok Cheon

    2015-01-01

    Royal jelly has been widely used as a health supplement worldwide. However, royal jelly has been implicated in allergic reactions, and we developed a water-soluble royal jelly (WSRJ) without the allergy inducing protein. In this study, we aimed to identify the anti-melanogenic efficacy of WSRJ. B16F1 melanoma cells were first treated with 10 nM α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) and then with various doses of WSRJ. In addition, we investigated the mRNA and protein expression of melanogenesis-related genes such as tyrosinase, tyrosinase related protein-1 (TRP-1) and TRP-2 by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. WSRJ directly inhibited tyrosinase and cellular tyrosinase activity, which decreased melanin synthesis in α-MSH stimulated B16F1 melanoma cells a level comparable to that observed with arbutin. WSRJ decreased the mRNA and protein expressions of tyrosinase, TRP-1, and TRP-2, which was comparable to that observed with arbutin. WSRJ has strong anti-melanogenic activity, which invoice direct inhibition of tyrosinase enzyme activity and suppression of expression of melanogenesis related genes. Results from this study suggests that WSRJ is a potential candidate for the treatment of skin pigmentation. PMID:26761901

  5. Functional properties of honey, propolis, and royal jelly.

    PubMed

    Viuda-Martos, M; Ruiz-Navajas, Y; Fernández-López, J; Pérez-Alvarez, J A

    2008-11-01

    Honey, propolis, and royal jelly, products originating in the beehive, are attractive ingredients for healthy foods. Honey has been used since ancient times as part of traditional medicine. Several aspects of this use indicate that it also has functions such as antibacterial, antioxidant, antitumor, anti-inflamatory, antibrowning, and antiviral. Propolis is a resinous substance produced by honeybees. This substance has been used in folk medicine since ancient times, due to its many biological properties to possess, such as antitumor, antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory effects, among others. Royal jelly has been demonstrated to possess numerous functional properties such as antibacterial activity, anti-inflammatory activity, vasodilative and hypotensive activities, disinfectant action, antioxidant activity, antihypercholesterolemic activity, and antitumor activity. Biological activities of honey, propolis, and royal jelly are mainly attributed to the phenolic compounds such as flavonoids. Flavonoids have been reported to exhibit a wide range of biological activities, including antibacterial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, and vasodilatory actions. In addition, flavonoids inhibit lipid peroxidation, platelet aggregation, capillary permeability and fragility, and the activity of enzyme systems including cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase. PMID:19021816

  6. Whitening Effect of Watersoluble Royal Jelly from South Korea.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang Mi; Kim, Jung Min; Hong, In Phyo; Woo, Soon Ok; Kim, Se Gun; Jang, Hye Ri; Park, Kwan Kyu; Pak, Sok Cheon

    2015-01-01

    Royal jelly has been widely used as a health supplement worldwide. However, royal jelly has been implicated in allergic reactions, and we developed a water-soluble royal jelly (WSRJ) without the allergy inducing protein. In this study, we aimed to identify the anti-melanogenic efficacy of WSRJ. B16F1 melanoma cells were first treated with 10 nM α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) and then with various doses of WSRJ. In addition, we investigated the mRNA and protein expression of melanogenesis-related genes such as tyrosinase, tyrosinase related protein-1 (TRP-1) and TRP-2 by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. WSRJ directly inhibited tyrosinase and cellular tyrosinase activity, which decreased melanin synthesis in α-MSH stimulated B16F1 melanoma cells a level comparable to that observed with arbutin. WSRJ decreased the mRNA and protein expressions of tyrosinase, TRP-1, and TRP-2, which was comparable to that observed with arbutin. WSRJ has strong anti-melanogenic activity, which invoice direct inhibition of tyrosinase enzyme activity and suppression of expression of melanogenesis related genes. Results from this study suggests that WSRJ is a potential candidate for the treatment of skin pigmentation. PMID:26761901

  7. Reproductive technology: in the Netherlands, tolerance and debate.

    PubMed

    De Wachter, Maurice A M; De Wert, Guido MWR

    1987-06-01

    Two ethicists from the Netherlands' Institute for Bioethics file a report on their country in one of six Hastings Center Report articles on the status of reproductive technologies around the world. The situation in the Netherlands reflects the tolerant attitudes of the Dutch toward what are regarded as private matters. Artificial insemination, in vitro fertilization, and surrogate motherhood are available, and research on embryos is in the planning stages. Facilities offering reproductive services are regulated by the Minister of Health, with advice from the independent Health Council on Artificial Reproduction, the National Council for Public Health, and various insurance companies and professional medical organizations. Public policy debates center around such issues as the value of parenthood; involvement of third parties; secrecy about a child's genetic origins; privacy for semen, ovum, and embryo donors; access to services; and insurance coverage of treatment. PMID:11644022

  8. Royal Society offers funds for technology start-ups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clery, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    Scientists with a good idea ripe for commercial exploitation will no longer have to hawk their wares to bankers and private investors to get financial backing: the Royal Society is also about to get into the venture-capital business. The society is planning to set up an enterprise fund to buy equity in start-up companies based on outstanding technology - covering everything from renewable energy and carbon capture to water purification. "If there are difficulties getting science into the marketplace, the society has a role helping with that," says chemical physicist Andrew Mackintosh, a former chief executive of Oxford Instruments who has been brought in to manage the fund.

  9. 78 FR 77772 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “A Royal Passion: Queen...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-24

    ... Photography'' SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the following determinations: Pursuant to the authority... ``A Royal Passion: Queen Victoria and Photography,'' imported from abroad for temporary...

  10. The "Three York Astronomers" and the Royal Society of London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Linda M.

    2011-01-01

    John Goodricke, the discoverer of the periodicity of Algol and Delta Cephei; his mentor and collaborator Edward Pigott; and Edward's father Nathaniel Pigott flourished in York, England in the 1780's. All three made substantial contributions to astronomy. Nathaniel and Edward had determined the longitudes of the principal cities of the Low Countries before moving to York. Edward worked closely with Goodricke on the observations of Algol and discovered the variability of Eta Aquilae, a Cepheid, before Goodricke discovered Delta Cephei's behavior. All three corresponded with members of the Royal Society, including Nevil Maskelyne and William Herschel, yet the treatment accorded them differed widely. Nathaniel Pigott was elected a member of the Society in 1772. Goodricke received the Society's Copley Medal for his paper on the periodicity of Algol in 1783 at the age of nineteen. In 1786, after being nominated by Nathaniel Pigott, Goodricke was elected to membership in the Royal Society. Edward Pigott was apparently never nominated. Some possible reasons why Goodricke was lionized and Edward Pigott passed over will be explored. This research was supported by an AAS Small Research Grant and by the Herbert C. Pollack Award of the Dudley Observatory.

  11. Compact Geography of the Netherlands. Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meijer, H.

    A short, concise summary of the geography of the Netherlands is presented in this document. The introduction describes the country's governmental forms, physical location, provinces, population, and history. Geographic coverage includes: (1) the high and low Netherlands; (2) the struggle against flooding and land reclamation; (3) the polders, or…

  12. Royal Decree No. 727/1988 on the restructuring of ministerial departments, 11 July 1988.

    PubMed

    1988-01-01

    This Decree restructures the Central Administration of Spain to include the Ministry of Social Affairs. Among the functions of the Ministry are the following: 1) the preparation and execution of the Government's policy for the promotion and encouragement of conditions that make possible the social equality of both sexes, and the participation of women in political, cultural, economic, and social life; and 2) the legal protection of minors and, in a general fashion, the analysis, formulation, and coordination of programs of action relating to the prevention of juvenile delinquency; the promotion of institutions for adoption and foster care; and the evaluation and inspection of organizations of family integration. Royal Decree No. 791/1988 of the Ministry of Social Affairs of 20 July 1988 sets forth the organic structure of the Ministry of Social Affairs. Among the departments of the Ministry is the General Directorate for the Protection of Minors, whose general objective is the analysis, formulation, coordination, and supervision of programs of action relating to the legal and social protection of minors and the prevention of the marginalization of infants and youth. Attached to the Ministry as an autonomous organization is the Women's Institute. PMID:12289257

  13. Gradual Retirement in the Netherlands: An Analysis Using Administrative Data.

    PubMed

    Bloemen, Hans; Hochguertel, Stefan; Zweerink, Jochem

    2016-02-01

    Gradual retirement by which individuals leave their career jobs and withdraw incrementally from the labor force is an important empirical phenomenon in the United States. We analyze the current state of gradual retirement in the Netherlands using administrative data that allow much more precise tracking of labor market transitions than most survey panel data. We estimate multinomial transition models, taking into account competing pathways out of career employment at older ages, and discuss institutional aspects that limit the scope of gradual retirement, such as financial incentives to retire early. PMID:25963739

  14. Design Research in the Netherlands: Introducing Logarithms Using Realistic Mathematics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, David C.; van der Kooij, Henk; Geist, Monica R.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes Realistic Mathematics Education (RME), a design theory for mathematics education proposed by Hans Freudenthal and developed over 40 years of developmental research at the Freudenthal Institute for Science and Mathematics Education in the Netherlands. Activities from a unit to develop student understanding of logarithms are…

  15. Study in the Netherlands: Small Countries Have To Be Smarter. General Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Netherlands Organisation for International Cooperation in Higher Education, The Hague.

    This booklet describes opportunities for higher education study in the Netherlands along with information, addresses, and practical tips for foreign students who are considering taking a course or earning a degree at a Dutch institution of higher education. Six sections cover: (1) the rewards of the investment in study abroad; (2) background on…

  16. Poster Session Presentation [from the Netherlands] [and] Seen at Close Quarters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergers, Ton

    Two papers examine vocational training, special education, and government services for the disabled in the Netherlands. Originally presented at a convention poster session of the 16th World Congress of Rehabilitation International, the first paper focuses on the national institute at Werkenrode which provides a residential practice-based education…

  17. Pre-service Teachers' Beliefs about Inclusive Education in the Netherlands: In Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Civitillo, Sauro; De Moor, Jan M. H.; Vervloed, Mathijs P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Teachers' beliefs are crucial to the success of inclusion programmes and reform efforts for children with special educational needs (SEN). Based on this evidence, one hundred and thirty-nine primary pre-service teachers from one training institution in the Netherlands completed an adapted version of a measure of beliefs towards inclusive…

  18. Training in the Retail Trade in the Netherlands. Report for the FORCE Programme. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Tillaart, Harry

    An international team of researchers studied the following aspects of training in the Netherlands' retail sector: structure and characteristics, institutional and social context, employment and labor, changing conditions and their implications for skill requirements, and training and recruitment. Data were collected from an analysis of social and…

  19. Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-11-01

    : Heriot-Watt University 4 Nov: Strathclyde University 17 Nov: York University 24 Nov: Bristol University 1 Dec: Open University 7 Dec: Kent University 14 Dec: Cardiff University 15 Dec: University of Wales, Swansea 24 Jan: Reading University 10 Feb: Abingdon School 16 Feb: Plymouth University 2 Mar: Sheffield University 7 Mar: CLRC Daresbury Laboratory 8 Mar: Liverpool University 9 Mar: Manchester 10 Mar: Lancaster University 15 Mar: Surrey University 16 Mar: Brighton University 17 Mar: St Vincent College, Gosport 22 Mar: Leeds University 23 Mar: Loughborough Grammar School 24 Mar: Oakham School 30 Mar: St Peter's School, Wolverhampton 18 May: University of Hertfordshire 11 Jul: Science Museum 12 Jul: Royal Institution The assistance of the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, CLRC Daresbury Laboratory and DERA Malvern is acknowledged in staging this year's events. Courses, lectures and competitions `Physics in perspective', the study course for sixth-formers and college students, will take place in London on 6 - 8 February 2000, offering insights into many different aspects of physics. The programme commences during the afternoon of Sunday 6 February at King's College London with a Balloon debate, followed by Brian O'Rourke's talk on the `Physics of Formula 1 cars'. On Monday 7 February at the Royal Institution, John Avison (former Honorary Editor of Physics Education) will develop the `Thinking physics' theme by presenting the audience with varied topics in an unusual and challenging way. The second talk of the afternoon, by Professor Roy Sambles, will cover `Lasers, light and liquid crystals'. On the final day (Tuesday 8 February), again at the Royal Institution, Sara Ellison will lead the audience in `Heavenly pursuits', whilst later Dr Colin Wright will entertain with `Juggling - theory and practice'. Futher information and bookings for the course can be made by contacting Mrs Leila Solomon at The Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH

  20. 76 FR 37300 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Illinois; Royal Fiberglass Pools...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ...EPA is proposing to approve into the Illinois State Implementation Plan (SIP) an adjusted standard for Royal Fiberglass Pools (``Royal'') at its Dix, Illinois facility. On November 8, 2010, the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) submitted to EPA for approval an adjustment to the general rule, Use of Organic Material Rule, commonly known as the eight pound per hour (8 lb/hr) rule,......

  1. Port Royal and the Seventeenth-Century Paradigm Shift in Language Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Malcolm J.

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on a scholarly, seventeenth century, religious society of Jansenists who founded the Port-Royal des Champs in Paris (France). States their writings and teachings were considered heretical. Finds Port-Royal's ideas later became popular culminating in the acceptance of Latin and language translation curricula. (KDR)

  2. Supplementation with major royal jelly proteins increases lifespan, feeding and fecundity in Drosophila

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The major royal-jelly proteins (MRJPs) are the main constituents responsible for the specific physiological role of royal jelly (RJ) in honeybees. Male and female Drosophila flies were fed diets containing either no MRJPs (A) or casein (B) at 1.25% (w/w) of diet or MRJPs at 1.25% (C), 2.50% (D), or ...

  3. Flamsteed's stars. New perspectives on the life and work of the first Astronomer Royal (1646 - 1719).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmoth, F.

    Contents: 1. Introduction: the King's "astronomical observer". 2. Flamsteed's career in astronomy: nobility, morality and public utility (J. Bennett). 3. Astronomy and strife: John Flamsteed and the Royal Society (M. Feingold). 4. Models for the practice of astronomy: Flamsteed, Horrocks and Tycho (F. Willmoth). 5. Flamsteed's optics and the identity of the astronomical observer (A. Johns). 6. Equipping an observatory: Flamsteed and Molyneux discuss an astronomical quadrant (H. Higton). 7. Mathematical characters: Flamsteed and Christ's Hospital Royal Mathematical School (R. Iliffe). 8. "Professor" John Flamsteed (I. G. Stewart). 9. Edmond Halley and John Flamsteed at the Royal Observatory (A. Cook). 10. A unique copy of Flamsteed's Historia coelestis (1712) (O. Gingerich). 11. "Labour harder than thrashing": John Flamsteed, property and intellectual labour in nineteenth-century England (W. J. Ashworth). 12. The Flamsteed papers in the archives of the Royal Greenwich Observatory. (A. Perkins). A summary catalogue of Flamsteed's papers in the Royal Greenwich Observatory archives (compiled by F. Willmoth).

  4. Hearing loss in the Royal Norwegian Navy: A longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Irgens-Hansen, Kaja; Baste, Valborg; Bråtveit, Magne; Lind, Ola; Koefoed, Vilhelm F; Moen, Bente E

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this longitudinal study were to investigate a significant threshold shift (STS) among personnel working on board the Royal Norwegian Navy's (RNoN) vessels between 2012 and 2014 and to identify possible determinants of STS. Hearing thresholds were measured by pure tone audiometry in two consecutive examinations (n = 226). STS was defined as an average change in hearing thresholds ≥ + 10 dB at 2,000 Hz, 3,000 Hz, and 4,000 Hz in either ear. Determinants of STS were assessed through a questionnaire. The incidence of STS was 23.0%. Significant determinants of STS were the number of episodes of temporary threshold shifts (TTS) in the Navy, exposure to continuous loud noise during work on board, and the number of gun shots (in the Navy, hunting, and sports). This study indicated a significant association between noise exposure on board Navy vessels and development of STS. PMID:27157689

  5. Compliance of Royal Naval ships with nitrogen oxide emissions legislation.

    PubMed

    Blatcher, D J; Eames, I

    2013-09-15

    Nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from marine diesel engines pose a hazard to human health and the environment. From 2021, demanding emissions limits are expected to be applied to sea areas that the Royal Navy (RN) accesses. We analyze how these future constraints affect the choice of NOx abatement systems for RN ships, which are subject to more design constraints than civilian ships. A weighted matrix approach is used to facilitate a quantitative assessment. For most warships to be built soon after 2021 Lean Nitrogen Traps (LNT) in conjunction with Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) represents a relatively achievable option with fewer drawbacks than other system types. Urea-selective catalytic reduction is likely to be most appropriate for ships that are built to civilian standards. The future technologies that are at an early stage of development are discussed. PMID:23906471

  6. Nineteenth century amputations at the Royal Berkshire Hospital, Reading.

    PubMed Central

    Galland, R. B.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To describe 19th century amputations carried out at the Royal Berkshire Hospital, Reading. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of hospital archives. RESULTS: Details of 276 amputations were analysed. The majority (86%) were in men and boys. The median age was 33 years. The ratio of leg:arm amputation was 2:1. Trauma accounted for 58% of amputations. Of 52 arm amputations, 42 were due to trauma, compared with 37 of 110 leg amputations (P < 0.001). Mortality was higher following amputation for trauma than for disease (P < 0.01). Mortality following leg amputation was 16% compared with 3.8% after arm amputation (P < 0.05). Death rate following compound fracture was 23%. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with today, the population undergoing amputation and the indications for amputation in the 19th century differ significantly. However, it is apparent that in those patients who were selected to undergo amputation acceptable survival figures could be achieved. PMID:14629880

  7. Hearing loss in the Royal Norwegian Navy: A longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Irgens-Hansen, Kaja; Baste, Valborg; Bråtveit, Magne; Lind, Ola; Koefoed, Vilhelm F.; Moen, Bente E

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this longitudinal study were to investigate a significant threshold shift (STS) among personnel working on board the Royal Norwegian Navy's (RNoN) vessels between 2012 and 2014 and to identify possible determinants of STS. Hearing thresholds were measured by pure tone audiometry in two consecutive examinations (n = 226). STS was defined as an average change in hearing thresholds ≥ + 10 dB at 2,000 Hz, 3,000 Hz, and 4,000 Hz in either ear. Determinants of STS were assessed through a questionnaire. The incidence of STS was 23.0%. Significant determinants of STS were the number of episodes of temporary threshold shifts (TTS) in the Navy, exposure to continuous loud noise during work on board, and the number of gun shots (in the Navy, hunting, and sports). This study indicated a significant association between noise exposure on board Navy vessels and development of STS. PMID:27157689

  8. Long-term breeding phenology shift in royal penguins.

    PubMed

    Hindell, Mark A; Bradshaw, Corey J A; Brook, Barry W; Fordham, Damien A; Kerry, Knowles; Hull, Cindy; McMahon, Clive R

    2012-07-01

    The Earth's climate is undergoing rapid warming, unprecedented in recent times, which is driving shifts in the distribution and phenology of many plants and animals. Quantifying changes in breeding phenology is important for understanding how populations respond to these changes. While data on shifts in phenology are common for Northern Hemisphere species (especially birds), there is a dearth of evidence from the Southern Hemisphere, and even fewer data available from the marine environment. Surface air temperatures at Macquarie Island have increased by 0.62°C during the 30-year study period (0.21°C decade(-1)) and royal penguins (Eudyptes schlegeli) commenced egg laying on average three days earlier in the 1990s than during the 1960s. This contrasts with other studies of Southern Ocean seabirds; five of nine species are now breeding on average 2.1 days later than during the 1950s. Despite the different direction of these trends, they can be explained by a single underlying mechanism: resource availability. There was a negative relationship between the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) and median laying date of royal penguins, such that low-productivity (low SAM) years delayed laying date. This accords with the observations of other seabird species from the Antarctic, where later laying dates were associated with lower sea ice and lower spring productivity. The unifying factor underpinning phenological trends in eastern Antarctica is therefore resource availability; as food becomes scarcer, birds breed later. These changes are not uniform across the region, however, with resource increases in the subantarctic and decreases in eastern Antarctica. PMID:22957162

  9. Royal dynasties as human inbreeding laboratories: the Habsburgs

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos, F C; Álvarez, G

    2013-01-01

    The European royal dynasties of the Early Modern Age provide a useful framework for human inbreeding research. In this article, consanguineous marriage, inbreeding depression and the purging of deleterious alleles within a consanguineous population are investigated in the Habsburgs, a royal dynasty with a long history of consanguinity over generations. Genealogical information from a number of historical sources was used to compute kinship and inbreeding coefficients for the Habsburgs. The marriages contracted by the Habsburgs from 1450 to 1750 presented an extremely high mean kinship (0.0628±0.009), which was the result of the matrimonial policy conducted by the dynasty to establish political alliances through marriage. A strong inbreeding depression for both infant and child survival was detected in the progeny of 71 Habsburg marriages in the period 1450–1800. The inbreeding load for child survival experienced a pronounced decrease from 3.98±0.87 in the period 1450–1600 to 0.93±0.62 in the period 1600–1800, but temporal changes in the inbreeding depression for infant survival were not detected. Such a reduction of inbreeding depression for child survival in a relatively small number of generations could be caused by elimination of deleterious alleles of a large effect according with predictions from purging models. The differential purging of the infant and child inbreeding loads suggest that the genetic basis of inbreeding depression was probably very different for infant and child survival in the Habsburg lineage. Our findings provide empirical support that human inbreeding depression for some fitness components might be purged by selection within consanguineous populations. PMID:23572123

  10. Royal dynasties as human inbreeding laboratories: the Habsburgs.

    PubMed

    Ceballos, F C; Alvarez, G

    2013-08-01

    The European royal dynasties of the Early Modern Age provide a useful framework for human inbreeding research. In this article, consanguineous marriage, inbreeding depression and the purging of deleterious alleles within a consanguineous population are investigated in the Habsburgs, a royal dynasty with a long history of consanguinity over generations. Genealogical information from a number of historical sources was used to compute kinship and inbreeding coefficients for the Habsburgs. The marriages contracted by the Habsburgs from 1450 to 1750 presented an extremely high mean kinship (0.0628±0.009), which was the result of the matrimonial policy conducted by the dynasty to establish political alliances through marriage. A strong inbreeding depression for both infant and child survival was detected in the progeny of 71 Habsburg marriages in the period 1450-1800. The inbreeding load for child survival experienced a pronounced decrease from 3.98±0.87 in the period 1450-1600 to 0.93±0.62 in the period 1600-1800, but temporal changes in the inbreeding depression for infant survival were not detected. Such a reduction of inbreeding depression for child survival in a relatively small number of generations could be caused by elimination of deleterious alleles of a large effect according with predictions from purging models. The differential purging of the infant and child inbreeding loads suggest that the genetic basis of inbreeding depression was probably very different for infant and child survival in the Habsburg lineage. Our findings provide empirical support that human inbreeding depression for some fitness components might be purged by selection within consanguineous populations. PMID:23572123

  11. Long-term breeding phenology shift in royal penguins

    PubMed Central

    Hindell, Mark A; Bradshaw, Corey J A; Brook, Barry W; Fordham, Damien A; Kerry, Knowles; Hull, Cindy; McMahon, Clive R

    2012-01-01

    The Earth's climate is undergoing rapid warming, unprecedented in recent times, which is driving shifts in the distribution and phenology of many plants and animals. Quantifying changes in breeding phenology is important for understanding how populations respond to these changes. While data on shifts in phenology are common for Northern Hemisphere species (especially birds), there is a dearth of evidence from the Southern Hemisphere, and even fewer data available from the marine environment. Surface air temperatures at Macquarie Island have increased by 0.62°C during the 30-year study period (0.21°C decade−1) and royal penguins (Eudyptes schlegeli) commenced egg laying on average three days earlier in the 1990s than during the 1960s. This contrasts with other studies of Southern Ocean seabirds; five of nine species are now breeding on average 2.1 days later than during the 1950s. Despite the different direction of these trends, they can be explained by a single underlying mechanism: resource availability. There was a negative relationship between the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) and median laying date of royal penguins, such that low-productivity (low SAM) years delayed laying date. This accords with the observations of other seabird species from the Antarctic, where later laying dates were associated with lower sea ice and lower spring productivity. The unifying factor underpinning phenological trends in eastern Antarctica is therefore resource availability; as food becomes scarcer, birds breed later. These changes are not uniform across the region, however, with resource increases in the subantarctic and decreases in eastern Antarctica. PMID:22957162

  12. Effect of Royal Jelly on new bone formation in rapid maxillary expansion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Özan, Fatih; Çörekçi, Bayram; Halicioğlu, Koray; Irgin, Celal; Yilmaz, Fahri; Hezenci, Yasin

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of long and short term systemic usage of royal jelly on bone formation in the expanded maxillary suture in a rat model. Material and Methods Twenty eight Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into 4 equal groups: Control (C); Only Expansion (OE), Royal Jelly (RJ) group, Royal Jelly was given to rats by oral gavage only during the expansion and retention period; Royal Jelly plus Nursery (RJN) group, Royal Jelly was given to rats by oral gavage during their nursery phase of 40 days and during the retention period. After the 5 day expansion period was completed, the rats underwent 12 days of mechanical retention. All rats were sacrificed in same time. Histological examination was performed to determine the number of osteoclasts, number of osteoblasts, number of capillaries, inflammatory cell infiltration, and new bone formation. Results New bone formation, number of osteoclasts, number of osteoblasts, and the number of capillaries in the expanded maxillary sutures were higher in the RJ and RJN groups than in the other groups. Statistical analysis also demonstrated that new bone formation and the number of osteoblasts was also highest in the RJN group. Conclusions The systemic administration of Royal Jelly in conjunction with rapid maxillary expansion may increase the quality of regenerated bone. Key words:Bone formation, rapid maxillary expansion, Royal jelly. PMID:26449428

  13. Body-enlarging effect of royal jelly in a non-holometabolous insect species, Gryllus bimaculatus

    PubMed Central

    Miyashita, Atsushi; Kizaki, Hayato; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Honeybee royal jelly is reported to have body-enlarging effects in holometabolous insects such as the honeybee, fly and silkmoth, but its effect in non-holometabolous insect species has not yet been examined. The present study confirmed the body-enlarging effect in silkmoths fed an artificial diet instead of mulberry leaves used in the previous literature. Administration of honeybee royal jelly to silkmoth from early larval stage increased the size of female pupae and adult moths, but not larvae (at the late larval stage) or male pupae. We further examined the body-enlarging effect of royal jelly in a non-holometabolous species, the two-spotted cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, which belongs to the evolutionarily primitive group Polyneoptera. Administration of royal jelly to G. bimaculatus from its early nymph stage enlarged both males and females at the mid-nymph and adult stages. In the cricket, the body parts were uniformly enlarged in both males and females; whereas the enlarged female silkmoths had swollen abdomens. Administration of royal jelly increased the number, but not the size, of eggs loaded in the abdomen of silkmoth females. In addition, fat body cells were enlarged by royal jelly in the silkmoth, but not in the cricket. These findings suggest that the body-enlarging effect of royal jelly is common in non-holometabolous species, G. bimaculatus, but it acts in a different manner than in holometabolous species. PMID:27185266

  14. Body-enlarging effect of royal jelly in a non-holometabolous insect species, Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Atsushi; Kizaki, Hayato; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2016-01-01

    Honeybee royal jelly is reported to have body-enlarging effects in holometabolous insects such as the honeybee, fly and silkmoth, but its effect in non-holometabolous insect species has not yet been examined. The present study confirmed the body-enlarging effect in silkmoths fed an artificial diet instead of mulberry leaves used in the previous literature. Administration of honeybee royal jelly to silkmoth from early larval stage increased the size of female pupae and adult moths, but not larvae (at the late larval stage) or male pupae. We further examined the body-enlarging effect of royal jelly in a non-holometabolous species, the two-spotted cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, which belongs to the evolutionarily primitive group Polyneoptera. Administration of royal jelly to G. bimaculatus from its early nymph stage enlarged both males and females at the mid-nymph and adult stages. In the cricket, the body parts were uniformly enlarged in both males and females; whereas the enlarged female silkmoths had swollen abdomens. Administration of royal jelly increased the number, but not the size, of eggs loaded in the abdomen of silkmoth females. In addition, fat body cells were enlarged by royal jelly in the silkmoth, but not in the cricket. These findings suggest that the body-enlarging effect of royal jelly is common in non-holometabolous species, G. bimaculatus, but it acts in a different manner than in holometabolous species. PMID:27185266

  15. Royal jelly modulates oxidative stress and tissue injury in gamma irradiated male Wister Albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Azab, Khaled Shaaban; Bashandy, Mohamed; Salem, Mahmoud; Ahmed, Osama; Tawfik, Zaki; Helal, Hamed

    2011-01-01

    Background: Royal jelly is a nutritive secretion produced by the worker bees, rich in proteins, carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals. Aim: The present study was designed to determine the possible protective effects of royal jelly against radiation induced oxidative stress, hematological, biochemical and histological alterations in male Wister albino rats. Materials and Methods: Male Wister albino rats were exposed to a fractionated dose of gamma radiation (2 Gy every 3 days up to 8 Gy total doses). Royal jelly was administrated (g/Kg/day) by gavages 14 days before exposure to the 1st radiation fraction and the treatment was continued for 15 days after the 1st irradiation fraction till the end of the experiment. The rats were sacrificed 3rd, equivalent to 3rd post 2nd irradiation fraction, and equivalent to 3rd day post last irradiation fraction. Results: In the present study, gamma- irradiation induced hematological, biochemical and histological effects in male Wister albino rats. In royal jelly treated irradiated group, there was a noticeable decrease recorded in thiobarbituric reactive substances concentration when compared to γ-irradiated group. Also, the serum nitric oxide concentration was significantly improved. The administration of royal jelly to irradiated rats according to the current experimental design significantly ameliorates the changes induced in serum lipid profile. Moreover, in royal jelly treated irradiated group, there was a noticeable amelioration recorded in all hematological parameters along the three experimental intervals. The microscopic examination of cardiac muscle of royal jelly treated irradiated rats demonstrated structural amelioration, improved nuclei and normal features of capillaries and veins in endomysium when compared to gamma-irradiated rats. Conclusion: It was suggested that the biochemical, hematological and histological amelioration observed in royal jelly (g/Kg/day) treated irradiated rats might be due to the antioxidant

  16. Cardioprotective effect of royal jelly on paclitaxel-induced cardio-toxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Malekinejad, Hassan; Ahsan, Sima; Delkhosh-Kasmaie, Fatemeh; Cheraghi, Hadi; Rezaei-Golmisheh, Ali; Janbaz-Acyabar, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Paclitaxel is a potent chemotherapy agent with severe side effects, including allergic reactions, cardiovascular problems, complete hair loss, joint and muscle pain, which may limit its use and lower its efficiency. The cardioprotective effect of royal jelly was investigated on paclitaxel-induced damages. Materials and Methods: Adult male Wistar rats were divided into control and test groups (n=8). The test group was assigned into five subgroups; 4 groups, along with paclitaxel administration (7.5 mg/kg BW, weekly), received various doses of royal jelly (50, 100, and 150 mg/kg BW) for 28 consecutive days. The last group received only royal jelly at 100 mg/kg. In addition to oxidative and nitrosative stress biomarkers, the creatine kinase (CK-BM) level was also determined. To show the cardioprotective effect of royal jelly on paclitaxel-induced damages, histopathological examinations were conducted. Results: Royal jelly lowered the paclitaxel-elevated malondialdehyde and nitric oxide levels in the heart. Royal jelly could also remarkably reduce the paclitaxel-induced cardiac biomarker of creatine kinase (CK-BM) level and pathological injuries such as diffused edema, hemorrhage, congestion, hyaline exudates, and necrosis. Moreover, royal jelly administration in a dose-dependent manner resulted in a significant (P<0.05) increase in the paclitaxel-reduced total antioxidant capacity. Conclusion: Our data suggest that the paclitaxel-induced histopathological and biochemical alterations could be protected by the royal jelly administration. The cardioprotective effect of royal jelly may be related to the suppression of oxidative and nitrosative stress. PMID:27081469

  17. Protective Effect of Royal Jelly on In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) in Male Mice Treated with Oxymetholone

    PubMed Central

    Zahmatkesh, Ensieh; Najafi, Gholamreza; Nejati, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate the effects of royal jelly (RJ) on catalase, total antioxidant capacity and embryo development in adult mice treated with oxymetholone (OXM). Materials and Methods In this exprimental study, 32 male and 96 female adult Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) mice (7-9 weeks of age) with a ratio of 1:3 for fertili- zation purposes were randomly divided into 4 groups as follows: i. Control group (n=8) receiving 0.1 ml/mice saline daily by gavage for 30 day, ii. RJ group (n=8) treated with RJ at a dose of 100 mg/kg daily by gavage for 30 days, iii. OXM group (n=8) receiving OXM at the dose of 5 mg/kg daily by gavage for 30 days and iv. RJ+OXM group (n=8) receiving RJ at the dose of 100 mg/kg daily by gavage concomitant with 100 mg/kg OXM adminis- tration for 30 days. Results Analysis revealed a significant reduction in catalase, total antioxidant, as well as embryo development in OXM group (P<0.05). However, RJ group showed a salient recovery in the all of the above mentioned parameters and embryo toxicity. Conclusion The results of this study indicated a partially protective effect of RJ against OXM-induced embryo toxicity. PMID:26464831

  18. Food for thought?: the relations between the Royal Society Food Committee and government, 1915-19.

    PubMed

    Hull, Andrew J

    2002-07-01

    This paper traces the relationship between the food committees of the Royal Society and government during the First World War, concentrating on the period up to the resignation of Lord Devonport as first Food Controller. It argues that, in the context of a radical public science discourse emanating from some sections of the scientific community and greatly increased contacts between scientists and the government, the food scientists of the committees were moved to press for a formalization of the committees' role in food policy. The members constantly manoeuvered to achieve this aim, but also used a network of alternative channels into the heart of the policy process to get their findings translated into hard policy. In doing so, they explicitly rehearsed characteristic 'public science' arguments. In the institutional blur of wartime state-science relations, scientists often got close to the policy-making process. Post-War, the state swiftly moved to clarify the position: science was to be given more money, but was to be specifically blocked by new administrative arrangements embodied in the Haldane Report on the Machinery of Government from having any say in the core areas of general policy, the expert domain of the generalist policy-maker. PMID:12164204

  19. Monitoring the Solar Radius from the Royal Observatory of the Spanish Navy since 1773

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaquero, J. M.; Gallego, M. C.; Ruiz-Lorenzo, J. J.; López-Moratalla, T.; Carrasco, V. M. S.; Aparicio, A. J. P.; González-González, F. J.; Hernández-García, E.

    2016-08-01

    The solar diameter has been monitored at the Royal Observatory of the Spanish Navy (today the Real Instituto y Observatorio de la Armada: ROA) almost continuously since its creation in 1753 ( i.e. during the past 250 years). After a painstaking effort to collect data in the historical archive of this institution, we present here the data of the solar semidiameter from 1773 to 2006, making up an extensive new database for solar-radius measurements, which can be considered. We have calculated the solar semidiameter from the transit times registered by the observers (except for values of the solar radius from the modern Danjon astrolabe, which were published by ROA). These data were analysed to reveal any significant long-term trends, but no such trends were found. Therefore, the data sample confirms the constancy of the solar diameter during the past 250 years (approximately) within instrumental and methodological limits. Moreover, no relationship between solar radius and the new sunspot-number index has been found from measurements of the ROA. Finally, the mean value for the solar semidiameter (with one standard deviation) calculated from the observations made in the ROA (1773 - 2006), after applying corrections for refraction and diffraction, is equal to 958.87^''±1.77^''.

  20. Proteomic characterization of royal jelly proteins in Chinese (Apis cerana cerana) and European (Apis mellifera) honeybees.

    PubMed

    Qu, Ning; Jiang, Jie; Sun, Liangxian; Lai, Changcheng; Sun, Lifang; Wu, Xueji

    2008-06-01

    In this study, the proteins contained in royal jelly (RJ) derived from Chinese and European honeybees have been analyzed in detail and compared. Remarkable differences were found in the heterogeneity of major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs), MRJP2 and MRJP3, in terms of molecular weight and isoelectric points between the two species of RJ. MRJP2 and MRJP3 produced by Chinese honeybee are less polymorphic than those produced by European honeybee. This study is a contribution to the description of the royal jelly proteome. PMID:18620533

  1. Plasma medicine in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroesen, Gerrit

    2012-10-01

    Eindhoven, the Netherlands was one of the locations were Plasma Medicine originated: Eva Stoffels was one of the founders of the field. Since then, the attention for the field steadily increased. Nowadays, strong collaborations exist between the Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) and the Red Cross Burn Wound Hospital in Beverwijk, the Amsterdam Medical Center, the Maxima Medical Center in Eindhoven, the Radboud University in Nijmegen, the Free University in Amsterdam, and also companies, both large industries (Philips) and SME's (Vabrema, Lavoisier, Plastech). At TU/e we focus on the plasma itself: developing real time non-invasive diagnostics like TALIF, LIF, IF absorption, Thomson, Rayleigh and Raman scattering, mass spectroscopy, etc, while at the same time developing numerical models on the MD2D platform. For the biology, microbiology and medical aspects we rely on our colleagues who have specialized in those areas. Lesions that are studied are burn wounds, permanent inflammations, diabetic feet, skin infections, and internal diseases like Crohn's disease.

  2. Nutritional enrichment of fresh apple (Royal Gala) by vacuum impregnation.

    PubMed

    Xie, J; Zhao, Y

    2003-09-01

    This study evaluates the use of vacuum impregnation (VI) for developing nutritionally fortified fresh cut apples (Royal Gala). Cut apples were immersed in diluted high fructose corn syrup (20% w/w or 50% w/w) containing calcium or zinc. A vacuum pressure of 50 mmHg was applied for 15 min following atmospheric pressure restoration for 30 min while samples remained in the VI solution. Nutraceutical content and physicochemical properties of the apples immediately after VI were determined. Storability of VI apples at 6 degrees C and 90% relative humidity was also studied based on the color and texture of apples. Results indicated that 15-20% of the Daily Reference Intake of calcium and above 40% of the Daily Reference Intake of zinc could be obtained in 200 g fresh cut apples. VI treatments in 20% w/w high fructose corn syrup solutions had little effects on the physicochemical properties of apples. Storage study showed that VI with zinc significantly improved color stability, and calcium enhanced the firmness of the apples. PMID:12907403

  3. Nitrogen mineralization in a mature boreal forest, Isle Royale, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stottlemyer, R.; Toczydlowski, D.

    1999-01-01

    The 115-ha boreal Wallace Lake watershed, located on Isle Royale in the Lake Superior Basin, receives moderate anthropogenic atmospheric N inputs (3 kg ha-1 yr-1). Ecosystem response to atmospheric N inputs is, in part, determined by internal production and consumption of this limiting nutrient. The objectives of this 2-yr study on plots dominated by birch, spruce, or alder were to quantify forest floor and surface soil net and gross N mineralization rates, and examine potential effects of changes in temperature and moisture on these processes. Gross N mineralization rates were 23 times net mineralization rates, and increased with forest floor/soil temperature and moisture. Substrate quality was a likely factor in higher gross mineralization rates beneath birch and spruce. Ammonium immobilization increased with forest floor/soil temperature and moisture. Higher net N mineralization rates beneath alder resulted from lower microbial immobilization rather than greater gross N mineralization. The greatest differences between gross N mineralization and immobilization occurred in early summer. Ammonium immobilization averaged 62% of gross N mineralization. Net and gross nitrification rates differed by vegetation type, were highest in spring and fall, and increased with moisture. Gross nitrification was 19 times net nitrification rates. Nitrate immobilization increased with soil moisture, and equalled or exceeded gross nitrification. Net and gross N mineralization or nitrification rates were not correlated. Seasonal variation in forest floor and surface soil N cycling coupled with high ecosystem retention of precipitation N inputs suggest streamwater N concentrations and output reflect trends in soil processes.

  4. BOOK REVIEW: Robert Hooke and the Royal Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Neil

    2000-01-01

    Many physics students only come across Hooke when they learn his law of stretching springs, which is a pity because it is just one of his contributions to progress in science, and a minor one at that. His, Micrographia, the first great book of microscopical observations, arouses admiration to this day. He was also active in horology, astronomy, geology and surveying, and he took part in biological experiments, transfusing blood between animals. Much of his work was done while he was curator of experiments for the Royal Society, in which he was involved almost from its foundation. This was by no means a full-time occupation, however. After the Great Fire of London, Hooke was appointed one of the three surveyors for the rebuilding of the city. One of the others was Christopher Wren, a lifelong friend. In this role Hooke was responsible for the design of several buildings, including the Monument. Nichols writes about all these activities, as well as Hooke's childhood, his education at Westminster School, the University of Oxford when Hooke was an undergraduate, and the founding of the Royal Society. The book draws on research for a master's degree. Turning a dissertation into a popular book is risky. The author has avoided the pitfall of making it too academic, but the result is not satisfying. Nichols seems overawed by Hooke and his work, frequently seeming to credit Hooke with a far-reaching influence that he did not necessarily have. There may be a case for lauding Hooke as the father of English microscopy, the father of English meteorology, and the founder of English geology and earth sciences, but it needs to be made much more critically, even in a popular work. Hooke was full of good ideas, but he rarely continued long enough to put them into practice. There is no doubt that Hooke proposed using a balance wheel and spring to improve the timekeeping of a watch, for example, but he did not have a watch made to his design until after Christiaan Huygens had

  5. Experiences of New Faculty in a Transitional Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeo, Michelle; Bennett, Deb; Merkley, Cari; McNichol, Jane; Osakwe, Carlton; Pada, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    This research project studies the induction and socialization of new faculty at Mount Royal University, recently transitioned from college to undergraduate university status. There is extensive documentation in the literature on issues faced by new faculty in post-secondary institutions; however, very little is published on how a culture in flux…

  6. Genetic variability among lake whitefish from Isle Royale and the Upper Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stott, Wendylee; Todd, Thomas N.; Kallemeyn, Larry

    2004-01-01

    The coregonine fishes from Isle Royale National Park represent a unique group that has escaped the successional changes observed elsewhere in North America. Analysis of microsatellite DNA loci revealed significant genetic differences among samples of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) from Isle Royale, Lake Superior, and Lake Huron. The amount of genetic variation observed is consistent with that seen in other studies of whitefishes from North America. The lake whitefish from Isle Royale had previously been assigned sub-species status, but no evidence was found to support this. The effects of common ancestry and demographics both play a role in determining the relatedness of the populations. As with other fish species from Isle Royale and the upper Great Lakes, the lake whitefish have their origins in the Mississippi refugium.

  7. Two cases of 16th century head injuries managed in royal European families.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Kamilah A; Goodrich, James Tait

    2016-07-01

    In Europe, during the 16th century, there were a number of prominent general surgeons adventurous enough to consider operating on the brain for head injuries. From the time of Hippocrates, operating on the skull and brain was considered both treacherous and too dangerous to be undertaken except on rare occasions. Operating on a member of a royal court was considered even more exceptional because if the outcome was poor, the surgeon could lose a hand or limb, or, even worse, be beheaded. The authors present two interesting cases of royal family members who underwent surgery for head injuries that were quite severe. The surgeons involved, Ambroise Paré, Andreas Vesalius, and Berengario da Carpi, were among the most prominent surgeons in Europe. Despite very challenging political situations, all were willing to undertake a complex surgical intervention on the member of a prominent royal family. The individuals involved, both royal and medical, plus the neurosurgical injuries are discussed. PMID:27364255

  8. The Royal College of Nursing: a century of dedication to nurses and patients.

    PubMed

    Davies, Janet

    Janet Davies, Chief Executive of the Royal College of Nursing, reflects on the RCN's achievements since its foundation in 1916, and looks ahead to the challenges the nursing profession faces in 2016 and beyond. PMID:26911169

  9. The Royal Society Catalogue as an Index to Nineteenth Century American Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Clark A.

    1970-01-01

    The Royal Society Catalogue of Scientific Papers is investigated in terms of its coverage of American science journals and American scientists. The journals indexed by the catalogue are compared to other standard lists of journals from the nineteenth century. (Author)

  10. The Code of Ethics and Editorial Code of Practice of the Royal Astronomical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Whilst the Royal Astronomical Society has got by for more than 100 years without a written code of ethics, modern standards of governance suggested that such a code could be useful in the resolution of disputes. In 2005, the RAS adopted the Universal Code of Ethics for Science that had been formulated by the Royal Society of London. At the same time and for similar reasons the RAS adopted an Editorial Code of Practice.

  11. Euthanasia in Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg.

    PubMed

    2013-11-01

    Each of the Benelux countries (Belgium, Luxembourg, Netherlands) has enacted legislation that partially decriminalises euthanasia, defined as an act that intentionally terminates someone's life at their request. In the Netherlands and Luxembourg, but not in Belgium, the legislation partially decriminalised assisted suicide at the same time. In all three countries, euthanasia can only be performed by a doctor, in response to the patient's voluntary and well-considered request, and for patients who have an incurable disease that causes unbearable suffering, without any prospect of relief. In the Netherlands, minors can request euthanasia as of the age of 12 years. In 2011, reported euthanasia accounted for about 1% of deaths in Belgium and 3% in the Netherlands. In 75% of cases, cancer was the disease leading to a request for euthanasia. In the Netherlands, the number of cases of euthanasia reported by doctors in surveys matches the number that is officially declared. In Belgium, it is thought that there are as many unreported as reported cases of euthanasia. Since the enactment of euthanasia legislation, fewer deaths involve the intentional administration of lethal drugs without an explicit request from the patient. PMID:24427846

  12. Antifatigue effect of fresh royal jelly in mice.

    PubMed

    Kamakura, M; Mitani, N; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, M

    2001-12-01

    We investigated the antifatigue effect of royal jelly (RJ), which had been stored at -20 degrees C from immediately after collection, in male Std ddY mice. The mice were accustomed to swimming in an adjustable-current swimming pool, then subjected to forced swimming five times during 2 wk, and the total swimming period until exhaustion was measured. They were separated into three groups with equal swimming capacity, which were administered RJ, RJ stored at 40 degrees C for 7 d (40-7d RJ), or the control solution including casein, cornstarch, and soybean oil before swimming. All mice were forced to swim for 15 min once; then the maximum swimming time to fatigue was measured after a rest period. The swimming endurance of the RJ group significantly increased compared with those of the other groups. The mice in the RJ group showed significantly decreased accumulation of serum lactate and serum ammonia and decreased depletion of muscle glycogen after swimming compared with the other groups, whereas there was no significant difference between the 40-7d RJ group and the control group in these parameters after swimming. A quantitative analysis of constituents in RJ showed that 5 7-kDa protein, which we previously identified as a possible freshness marker of RJ, was specifically degraded in RJ stored at 40 degrees C for 7 d, whereas the contents of various vitamins, 10-hydroxy-2-decenoic acid, and other fatty acids in RJ were unchanged. These findings suggest that RJ can ameliorate the physical fatigue after exercise, and this antifatigue effect of RJ in mice seems to be associated with the freshness of RJ, possibly with the content of 5 7-kDa protein. PMID:11922114

  13. Ageing aircraft research in the Netherlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejonge, J. B.; Bartelds, G.

    1992-01-01

    The problems of aging aircraft are worldwide. Hence, international cooperative actions to overcome or prevent problems should be taken. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the Netherlands Civil Aviation Department (RLD) signed a Memorandum of Cooperation in the area of structural integrity, with specific reference to research on problems in the area of aging aircraft. Here, an overview is given of aging research that is going on in the Netherlands. The work described is done largely at the National Aerospace Laboratory; much of the research is part of the forementioned cooperative agreement.

  14. Compliance of ENT emergency surgery with the Royal College of Surgeons standards.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S; Yao, A; Mahalingam, S; Persaud, R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In 2011 The Royal College of Surgeons of England (RCS) set out best practice standards for emergency surgery. This national pilot audit aimed to determine the compliance of otolaryngology departments in England with these published guidelines. Methods A 26-item online questionnaire was devised that encompassed all the 36 best practices as set out by the RCS for ear, nose and throat (ENT) surgery. This was sent to ENT trainees and consultants based at units in England providing emergency ENT services. Results Data were obtained from 55 of the 102 units (response rate: 54%). A mean compliance of 71% was achieved (range: 25-94%). No units achieved all of the best practices. The standards with the highest compliance included 24-hour availability of blood transfusion and haematology opinion for patients with epistaxis, availability of a consultant or ST3/equivalent for immediate discussion of severe post-tonsillectomy bleeding, 24-hour access to blood transfusion for arrest of haemorrhage and immediate theatre access for arrest of haemorrhage. The areas with the lowest compliance were provision of a pathway for angiography/embolisation for epistaxis and provision of an equipped ENT room on a paediatric ward. Conclusions This audit has highlighted that the majority of departments in England are providing a good standard of ENT emergency care. There is room for improvement in certain areas, such as the provision of an embolisation pathway in the context of refractory epistaxis. We hope that this audit will encourage ENT departments to evaluate their current provision of emergency care and institute changes (where necessary) to maintain and improve their practices. PMID:26688399

  15. Courses and Study Programmes in English. Study in the Netherlands, Your Gateway to Europe. Edition 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Netherlands Organisation for International Cooperation in Higher Education, The Hague.

    In addition to regular degree programs, the Netherlands has been offering another form of higher education for almost 45 years. Advanced courses are conducted in English in what is known as International Education (IE). These advanced courses have traditionally been offered at special IE institutes, but now traditional universities and…

  16. Educational Innovation between Freedom and Fixation: The Cultural-Political Construction of Innovations in Early Childhood Education in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Oers, Bert

    2013-01-01

    As in many countries, in the Netherlands, governmental policy regulates the decisions of schools and care providers that concern and the control of the quality of education and care. Article 23 of the Dutch Constitution defines a fundamental right of freedom in matters of education within the context of institutions such as schools and other…

  17. Childcare in the Netherlands: Lessons in Privatisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akgunduz, Yusuf Emre; Plantenga, Janneke

    2014-01-01

    In 2005 the Child Care Act was introduced in the Netherlands. The explicit objective of the childcare reform has been to stimulate the operation of market forces so that childcare services are provided in an efficient way. The change towards a demand-driven financing system implies that there is no longer public provision of childcare services in…

  18. Rural Youth Culture: "Keten" in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haartsen, Tialda; Strijker, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    A remarkable present-day phenomenon in rural areas in the Netherlands is that young people, mostly males, often meet in small groups in self-built or at least self-fitted out sheds or caravans ("keten"). At first glance, these "keten" seem to be substitutes for more official entertainment sites in the relatively sparsely populated parts of the…

  19. Compact Geography of the Netherlands. (Third Edition).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information and Documentation Centre for the Geography of the Netherlands, Utrecht.

    This document presents information on the physical and human geography of the Netherlands. In this third revised edition, the contents have been brought up-to-date and expanded. In addition, sections on physical planning and environmental problems have been added. The booklet is intended for use by geography classroom teachers and students at…

  20. EUDISED R & D Information; Netherlands. Experimental Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Cultural Cooperation, Strasbourg (France). Ad Hoc Committee for Educational Documentation and Information.

    In connection with the first simulation exercise of the Council of Europe's EUDISED project carried out in the field of research and development in education, national agencies were asked to provide 5-page reports on completed research and pilot projects. The Netherlands report covers 12 projects, providing for each the theme, project team,…

  1. Vocational Education and Training in the Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romkens, Leon; Visser, Karel

    The structure, history, objectives, and delivery of vocational education in the Netherlands were characterized through a review of existing documents explaining/regulating the Dutch vocational system and input from representatives of government, business, and labor. Vocational education was discussed within the context of the Dutch political and…

  2. Moral Panic in the Netherlands? A Commentary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamers-Winkelman, Francien

    1994-01-01

    A Dutch physiotherapist expounds upon the conditions and culture surrounding the Bolderkar case. Despite being an extremely open society, the Netherlands has a strong Calvinistic tradition of noninterference in family matters. This was the primary reason for the public reaction about the case, and because of the denial of public officials of the…

  3. Education and Diversity in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeman, Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    This article sets out the Dutch approach to the multicultural question. It focuses on how national policies, schools, teachers and teacher educators are addressing and making sense of questions of cultural and religious diversity. The article shows how the Netherlands has partly accommodated itself to greater cultural diversity through compulsory…

  4. Review of aerodynamic design in the Netherlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labrujere, Th. E.

    1991-01-01

    Aerodynamic design activities in the Netherlands, which take place mainly at Fokker, the National Aerospace Laboratory (NLR), and Delft University of Technology (TUD), are discussed. The survey concentrates on the development of the Fokker 100 wing, glider design at TUD, and research at NLR in the field of aerodynamic design. Results are shown to illustrate these activities.

  5. Experiential Education, Outdoor Adventure As a Modality in Youth Care and Residential Treatment. A Survey of Programs, Principles, Research and Practice on the European Continent, Especially the Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duindam, Ton

    Orthopedagogisch Centrum Michiel is a multifunctional institution in the eastern Netherlands for youth with emotional problems. The staff of the institution's residential treatment center has gradually become involved with outdoor experiential education through training programs, conferences, special projects, and supervised programs. Activities…

  6. Nephroprotective effect of bee honey and royal jelly against subchronic cisplatin toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Abdelazim; Eldaim, Mabrouk A Abd; Abdel-Daim, Mohamed M

    2016-08-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most potent and effective chemotherapeutic agents. However, its antineoplastic use is limited due to its cumulative nephrotoxic side effects. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to examine the nephroprotective potential of dietary bee honey and royal jelly against subchronic cisplatin toxicity in rats. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into controls, cisplatin-treated, bee honey-pretreated cisplatin-treated and royal jelly-pretreated cisplatin-treated groups. Bee honey and royal jelly were given orally at doses of 20 and 100 mg/kg, respectively. Subchronic toxicity was induced by cisplatin (1 mg/kg bw, ip), twice weekly for 10 weeks. Cisplatin treated animals revealed a significant increase in serum level of renal injury products (urea, creatinine and uric acid). Histopathologically, cisplatin produced pronounced tubulointerstitial injuries, upregulated the fibrogenic factors, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and transforming growth factor β1(TGF-β1), and downregulated the cell proliferation marker, bromodeoxyuridine (Brdu). Dietary bee honey and royal jelly normalized the elevated serum renal injury product biomarkers, improved the histopathologic changes, reduced the expression of α-SMA and TGF-β1 and increased the expression of Brdu. Therefore, it could be concluded that bee honey, and royal jelly could be used as dietary preventive natural products against subchronic cisplatin-induced renal injury. PMID:25720368

  7. Effects of Royal Jelly Supplementation on Body Weight and Dietary Intake in Type 2 Diabetic Females

    PubMed Central

    Pourmoradian, Samira; Mahdavi, Reza; Mobasseri, Majid; Faramarzi, Elnaz; Mobasseri, Mehrnoosh

    2012-01-01

    Background: The objective of the current study was to assess the effects of royal jelly supple-mentation on body weight, total daily energy and macronutrients intakes in type2 diabetic fe-males. Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, fifty female volunteers with type2 diabetes were as-signed into the supplemented (n=25) and placebo (n=25) groups, given a daily dose of 1000 mg royal jelly soft gel or placebo, for 8 weeks, respectively. Before and after the intervention, body weight and height of subjects were measured and body mass index was calculated. Dietary intake of patients was assessed using 24-hour food recall questionnaire for three non consecutive days (including 1 weekend day) and analyzed with Nutritionist IV software. The normally distributed data were compared using paired and independent t-tests, where appropriate. Results: Royal jelly supplementation significantly (P<0.01) decreased the mean body weight (72.45±4.42 vs. 71.00±6.44 kg) while it increased insignificantly in placebo group (73.02±6.44 vs 73.52±6.80 kg). Royal jelly supplementation resulted in significant decrease of mean daily total energy (P<0.01) and carbohydrate (P<0.01) intakes, while in placebo group the mean daily total energy and fat intakes were increased significantly (P<0.05). Conclusion: Supplementation with royal jelly may be beneficial in weight management of di-abetic patients. PMID:24688939

  8. Faithful interpreters? Translation theory and practice at the early Royal Society

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Felicity

    2013-01-01

    The early Fellows of the Royal Society received letters, papers and printed books written in several European vernaculars. In many cases a translation was needed to make these texts accessible. Translators, though, had to negotiate the Society's corporate views on language and prose style, and also prevailing contemporary theories of literary translation set out by popular poets such as John Dryden and Abraham Cowley. This article examines the translation practices of early Fellows of the Royal Society, showing that translations formed part of a set of knowledge-making processes at meetings. It also discusses the statements about translation theory found in the prefaces to printed volumes produced by or for Royal Society Fellows, arguing that although translators were aware of the requirement for a faithful translation, in fact they often modified their source texts to make them more useful for an English audience.

  9. Presidential addresses of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene: 1907-2013.

    PubMed

    Hay, Simon I; McHugh, Gerri M

    2013-10-01

    Presidents have been required to give an inaugural address on commencing office at the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (RSTMH) since its foundation in 1907. All presidential addresses were identified, sourced and assembled into an annotated bibliography. The majority of presidential addresses have been published in Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Unpublished and in some cases 'lost' contributions have now been sourced where possible and archived at the RSTMH. This unique, rich and rewarding archive provides a vista into the development of the RSTMH and the discipline of tropical medicine. The archive is freely available to all. PMID:24026462

  10. High Royal Jelly-Producing Honeybees (Apis mellifera ligustica) (Hymenoptera: Apidae) in China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lian-Fei; Zheng, Huo-Qing; Pirk, Christian W W; Hu, Fu-Liang; Xu, Zi-Wei

    2016-04-01

    China is the largest producer and exporter of royal jelly (RJ) in the world, supplying >90% of the global market. The high production of RJ in China is principally owing to the high RJ-producing lineage of honeybees (Apis mellifera ligustica Spinola, 1806) established by beekeepers in the 1980s. We describe the development of high royal jelly-producing honeybees and the management of this lineage today. Previous research and recent advances in the genetic characterization of this lineage, and the molecular markers and mechanisms associated with high RJ production are summarized. The gaps in our knowledge and prospects for future research are also highlighted. PMID:26921226

  11. Glacial and Postglacial Geologic History of Isle Royale National Park, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huber, N. King

    1973-01-01

    Isle Royale was overridden by glacial ice during each of the four major glaciations of the Pleistocene Epoch, and each successive glaciation essentially obliterated all direct evidence of preceding glaciations on the island. In the waning phase of the last major glaciation, the Wisconsin Glaciation, the frontal ice margin retreated northward from at least the greater part of the Lake Superior basin, then readvanced into the basin during Valders time, about 11,000 years ago. We can attribute to the Valders ice the final aspect of glaciation on Isle Royale, including both erosional and depositional features. It is impossible to estimate the quantity of glacial debris or other surficial materials that might have been present on Isle Royale prior to the Valders readvance, but the readvancing ice appears to have removed most of what might have been present, as judged by the thin surficial cover on the eastern two-thirds of the island today. During the Valders retreat, a series of lakes formed in the Lake Superior basin in front of the retreating ice margin. The retreating ice opened successively lower outlets, and thus the general trend of lake elevations is downward. Distinct lake stages reflect periods of relative stability during which well- defined shoreline features developed. The ice front forming the north margin of the earlier lakes probably remained south of Isle Royale until about the time of glacial Lake Beaver Bay, when it retreated to a position straddling Isle Royale west of Lake Desor. Abundant deposits of glacial debris were left upon the newly deglaciated west end of the island, and the ice front remained stable long enough to build a complex of ice-margin deposits across the island. Shorelines formed by the glacial lake associated with this ice front are found on the western part of the island about 200 feet above present Lake Superior. Subsequent renewed and complete retreat of the ice margin from Isle Royale was rapid enough that only a minor amount

  12. Presidential addresses of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene: 1907–2013

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Simon I.; McHugh, Gerri M.

    2013-01-01

    Presidents have been required to give an inaugural address on commencing office at the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (RSTMH) since its foundation in 1907. All presidential addresses were identified, sourced and assembled into an annotated bibliography. The majority of presidential addresses have been published in Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Unpublished and in some cases ‘lost’ contributions have now been sourced where possible and archived at the RSTMH. This unique, rich and rewarding archive provides a vista into the development of the RSTMH and the discipline of tropical medicine. The archive is freely available to all. PMID:24026462

  13. Captain Edmond Halley, F.R.S., Royal Navy, and the practice of navigation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, D. W.

    Edmond Halley, Fellow of the Royal Society, Astronomer Royal (1720 - 42), is rarely thought of or mentioned as a sea captain or a scientific seaman. Yet his shiphandling in the course of three voyages in command of Their Majesties' Pink Paramore (1698 - 1701) is in itself proof that his seamanship was of the highest order. Similarly, the practical innovations that he made in the arts of navigation and pilotage, in the form of printed sea charts and sailing directions, were fundamentally scientific and therefore remain relevant today.

  14. Mechanism of action of recombinant Acc-royalisin from royal jelly of Chinese honeybee against gram-positive bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antibacterial activity of royalisin, an antimicrobial peptide from the royal jelly produced by honeybees has been addressed extensively. However, its mechanism of action remains unclear. In this study, a recombinant royalisin, RAcc-royalisin from the royal jelly of Chinese honeybee Apis cerana...

  15. 78 FR 23316 - The Royal Bank of Scotland plc, et al.; Notice of Application and Temporary Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ... COMMISSION The Royal Bank of Scotland plc, et al.; Notice of Application and Temporary Order April 12, 2013.... APPLICANTS: The Royal Bank of Scotland plc (``RBS plc''), Citizens Investment Advisors (``Citizens IA''), a... Exchange Commission, 100 F Street NE., Washington, DC 20549-1090. Applicants: RBS plc, RBS, Gogarburn,...

  16. ‘Because of Poverty brought into Hospital: . . .’A Casenote-Based Analysis of the Changing Role of the Edinburgh Royal Maternity Hospital, 1850-1912

    PubMed Central

    Nuttall, Alison

    2008-01-01

    Summary Although the shift from a social to a medical function which occurred in nineteenth-century general hospitals has been explored, the occurrence of such a change in maternity hospitals has not been considered. Recent analyses of such institutions have examined particular aspects only, and thus give a somewhat static picture. This paper uses analysis of patient records (themselves an under-exploited resource) to explore the changing function of the Edinburgh Royal Maternity Hospital from a provider of shelter during childbirth to the destitute to a source of skilled medical care. It concludes that, although the Hospital had adopted the outward features of a medical institution by 1890, its casebooks suggest that its purpose only truly changed in the early twentieth century, and thus can perhaps be more appropriately linked with national anxiety regarding the health of babies and their mothers. PMID:18605328

  17. Hospital quality assurance in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Peters, René

    2006-01-01

    Quality assurance in hospitals by means of an accreditation programme is becoming standard practice in more and more countries worldwide. Accreditation being defined as: "A self-assessment and external peer assessment process used by health care organizations to accurately assess their level of performance in relation to established standards and to implement ways to continuously improve". This article provides an overview of the current situation in The Netherlands. PMID:17249469

  18. The construction of a Central Netherlands temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Schrier, G.; van Ulden, A.; van Oldenborgh, G. J.

    2011-05-01

    The Central Netherlands Temperature (CNT) is a monthly daily mean temperature series constructed from homogenized time series from the centre of the Netherlands. The purpose of this series is to offer a homogeneous time series representative of a larger area in order to study large-scale temperature changes. It will also facilitate a comparison with climate models, which resolve similar scales. From 1906 onwards, temperature measurements in the Netherlands have been sufficiently standardized to construct a high-quality series. Long time series have been constructed by merging nearby stations and using the overlap to calibrate the differences. These long time series and a few time series of only a few decades in length have been subjected to a homogeneity analysis in which significant breaks and artificial trends have been corrected. Many of the detected breaks correspond to changes in the observations that are documented in the station metadata. This version of the CNT, to which we attach the version number 1.1, is constructed as the unweighted average of four stations (De Bilt, Winterswijk/Hupsel, Oudenbosch/Gilze-Rijen and Gemert/Volkel) with the stations Eindhoven and Deelen added from 1951 and 1958 onwards, respectively. The global gridded datasets used for detecting and attributing climate change are based on raw observational data. Although some homogeneity adjustments are made, these are not based on knowledge of local circumstances but only on statistical evidence. Despite this handicap, and the fact that these datasets use grid boxes that are far larger then the area associated with that of the Central Netherlands Temperature, the temperature interpolated to the CNT region shows a warming trend that is broadly consistent with the CNT trend in all of these datasets. The actual trends differ from the CNT trend up to 30 %, which highlights the need to base future global gridded temperature datasets on homogenized time series.

  19. Wind energy in the north Netherlands region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanheemstra, W.; Devries, B.

    1983-03-01

    A computer model was used to estimate the technical/economical potential of wind energy in the northern Netherlands. Local wind supply, technical and economic characteristics of wind turbines, and local energy consumptions were assessed. The data of an average dairy farm are investigated to determine the parameters to be used. Results for several consumer groups are determined. A potential estimate for the province of Friesland is presented.

  20. Determinants of hospital utilization in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van der Gaag, J; Rutten, F F; van Praag, B M

    1975-01-01

    Hospital use in the Netherlands is examined in a cross-section analysis of 1969 and 1971 data for 120 service regions. Elasticities of admissions with respect to bed supply and supply of general practitioners are calculated, and the substitutability of first level care (by general practitioners) for hospital care is considered. Substitution effects found indicate that the Dutch government's plan to reduce the ratio of hospital beds to population is feasible. PMID:1225868

  1. [In search of new paths. The self image of the Leopoldina and the Royal Society in London in its correspondence 1670-1677].

    PubMed

    Beeley, Philip; Scriba, Christoph J

    2008-01-01

    The article investigates the correspondence between members of the Academia Naturae Curiosorum and Henry Oldenburg, the secretary of the Royal Society, from 1670 until his death in 1677. In these years Oldenburg, originally a citizen of Bremen, continued to give support to fellow-countrymen such as Major and Sachs von Lewenhaimb whenever he could. But in contrast to the first ten years of the Royal Society, in which Oldenburg had often stressed differences in the character of the two scientific institutions, the future Leopoldina was able to establish a position of almost equal footing from 1670 onwards through its journal the Miscellanea curiosa medico-physica Academiae Naturae Curiosorum. This new self-confidence is reflected in the correspondence between Oldenburg and members of the first German academy. Alongside discussions on curiosities and monstrosities as well as on the topic of artificial gold, the discovery of phosphorus is a major theme of the correspondence in these later years. Oldenburg immediately recognized the importance of this German discovery and thereafter sought to obtain a sample of the substance for display to the Royal Society in London. His efforts were however fraught by various difficulties. Admittedly, Balduin early on sent a sample of his phosphorus to London, but it ultimately turned out not to be genuine. In the meantime Kunckel pretended to be the discoverer of the true phosphorus which he had seen when visiting Brand in Hamburg. When, in September 1677, Crafft eventually arrived in London with a sample of Brand's phosphorus Oldenburg had died tragically just a few days beforehand. PMID:20617620

  2. Drought Forecasting System of the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weerts, A. H.; Berendrecht, W. L.; Veldhuizen, A.; Goorden, N.; Vernimmen, R.; Lourens, A.; Prinsen, G.; Mulder, M.; Kroon, T.; Stam, J.

    2009-04-01

    During periods of droughts the National Coordinating Committee for Water Distribution of the Netherlands has to decide how the available surface water is used and allocated between different users (agriculture, navigation, industry etc). To support this decision making, real-time information is needed about the availability of surface water, groundwater levels, saturation of the root zone, etc. This real-time information must give insight into the current state of the system as well as into its state in the near future (i.e. 10 days ahead). For this purpose, the National Hydrological Instrument (NHI), running on a daily time step and consisting of a nationwide distribution model and surface water model coupled with a MODFLOW-METASWAP model of the saturated-unsaturated zone of the whole of the Netherlands, driven by measured and forecasted precipitation and evaporation (ECMWF-DET and -EPS), is used to obtain insight into the actual and forecasted states of the surface, ground and soil water in the Netherlands. The tool also gives insight in the actual and forecasted water demands by the different actors. The whole system is operationalised within Delft-FEWS, an operational forecasting system to manage data and models in a real time environment. The surface water and groundwater models can be compared with surface water measurements (discharges and water levels) and groundwater level measurements in real-time. ECMWF reforecasts will be used to gain insight in the performance of the drought forecasting system.

  3. Gene therapy legislation in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Bleijs, D A; Haenen, I T W C; Bergmans, J E N

    2007-10-01

    Several regulatory organisations are involved in the assessment of clinical gene therapy trials involving genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in The Netherlands. Medical, ethical and scientific aspects are, for instance, evaluated by the Central Committee on Research Involving Human Subjects (CCMO). The Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment (VROM) is the competent authority for the environmental risk assessment according to the deliberate release Directive 2001/18/EC. A Gene Therapy Office has been established in order to streamline the different national review processes and to enable the official procedures to be completed as quickly as possible. Although the Gene Therapy Office improved the application process at the national level, there is a difference of opinion between the EU member states with respect to the EU Directive according to which gene therapy trials are assessed, that urges for harmonisation. This review summarises the gene therapy legislation in The Netherlands and in particular The Netherlands rationale to follow Directive 2001/18/EC for the environmental risk assessment. PMID:17721872

  4. [Euthanasia and palliative care in the Netherlands].

    PubMed

    Boisseau, Nicolas

    2004-03-27

    THE BIRTH OF THE DUTCH LAW: Euthanasia has been recently legalized in the Netherlands (since April 1, 2002). In this Article, we present the various cultural and historical factors that contributed to the law, the guidelines for the procedure and the resulting controversy. THE INTERVENING FACTORS: Internationally, the attitude concerning end of life care are heterogenic and also directly depend on religious and cultural factors. In the Netherlands, the health system promotes the maintenance at home of the terminally ill. However, the financial aspects (private health insurance) interact with the management of these patients. The rules for euthanasia are very strict and a declaration must be registered. Dedicated commissions are organised to control that the rules are applied. The current debate concerns the pertinence of the regulations, the attitude towards handicapped people and children, and the need to develop palliative care. The latter have only recently been developed in the country. The priority is focusing on old peoples' homes. The Netherlands is slow in this regard, but a new draft law is soon to be presented to the Authorities, and will most probably enable the gaps to be bridged. PMID:15105777

  5. Implementing evidence-based policy in a network setting: road safety policy in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Bax, Charlotte; de Jong, Martin; Koppenjan, Joop

    2010-01-01

    In the early 1990s, in order to improve road safety in The Netherlands, the Institute for Road Safety Research (SWOV) developed an evidence-based "Sustainable Safety" concept. Based on this concept, Dutch road safety policy, was seen as successful and as a best practice in Europe. In The Netherlands, the policy context has now changed from a sectoral policy setting towards a fragmented network in which safety is a facet of other transport-related policies. In this contribution, it is argued that the implementation strategy underlying Sustainable Safety should be aligned with the changed context. In order to explore the adjustments needed, two perspectives of policy implementation are discussed: (1) national evidence-based policies with sectoral implementation; and (2) decentralized negotiation on transport policy in which road safety is but one aspect. We argue that the latter approach matches the characteristics of the newly evolved policy context best, and conclude with recommendations for reformulating the implementation strategy. PMID:20925155

  6. Similar problems, different solutions: comparing refuse collection in the Netherlands and Spain.

    PubMed

    Bel, Germà; Fageda, Xavier; Dijkgraaf, Elbert; Gradus, Raymond

    2010-01-01

    Because of differences in institutional arrangements, public service markets, and national traditions regarding government intervention, local public service provision can vary greatly. In this paper we compare the procedures adopted by the local governments of The Netherlands and Spain in arranging for the provision of solid waste collection. We find that Spain faces a problem of consolidation, opting more frequently to implement policies of privatization and cooperation, at the expense of competition. By contrast, The Netherlands, which has larger municipalities on average, resorts somewhat less to privatization and cooperation, and more to competition. Both options-cooperation and competition-have their merits when striving to strike a balance between transaction costs and scale economies. The choices made in organizational reform seem to be related to several factors, among which the nature of the political system and the size of municipalities appear to be relevant. PMID:20726160

  7. The William Houston Gold Medal of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh 2014, orthodontic cases.

    PubMed

    Almuzian, Mohammed

    2015-09-01

    The William Houston Medal is awarded to the individual achieving the highest mark at, the Membership in Orthodontics (MOrth) examination at the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh. As part of the examination the candidate must submit five clinical cases. Details of two cases treated by the winning candidate are presented in this paper. PMID:26082385

  8. THE ORIGIN OF THE NUCLEIC ACID BASES FOUND IN THE ROYAL JELLY OF THE HONEYBEE

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Theophilus S.

    1969-01-01

    The discovery that the royal jelly of the honeybee contains large quantities of nucleic acids raises the question, “Where do these nucleic acids come from?” A review of pertinent literature strongly suggests that the same mechanism is involved as in the case of the extrachromosomal DNA of amphibian oocytes. PMID:16591784

  9. Finding the Way: Improving Access to the Collections of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenton, Candida

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the Images for All digitisation project at the Royal Scottish Geographical Society, and lessons learned from it. Design/methodology/approach: This paper describes the background to the project and collections held. It focuses on the development of the project web site, the digitisation of 100…

  10. [Understanding the survey of the Royal Society of Medicine (1774-1793): source, problems and methodology].

    PubMed

    Borel, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    The treasures of many archives can be amazing for the historians such as those ones of the Royal Society of Medicine which listed all the diseases rife into the French provinces since 1774. The listing now appears as weather reports and nosology classifications. How to study these reports? What kind of methodology to be used? PMID:15977359

  11. Reflections on a Degree Initiative: The UK's Birmingham Royal Ballet Dancers Enter the University of Birmingham

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benn, Tansin

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides an opportunity to share experiences and perceptions of the first 5 years of a degree programme for professional dancers. A partnership developed in the mid-1990s between the UK's Birmingham Royal Ballet and the University of Birmingham, Westhill (now School of Education), to provide a part-time, post-experience, flexible study…

  12. Cardiac centres of excellence. 'Royal Brompton': the specialist centre in London that specialist centres consult.

    PubMed

    2011-06-01

    It may be diagnosing Thalassaemia with magnetic resonance, navigating catheters round tight corners with magnets, or treating Marfan's syndrome with the Brompton Sheath--but if it is state of the art and it works, the Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Foundation Trust, London, will almost certainly have pioneered it, reports Barry Shurlock MA, PhD. PMID:21815300

  13. 78 FR 42512 - Application to Export Electric Energy; Royal Bank of Canada

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... Application to Export Electric Energy; Royal Bank of Canada AGENCY: Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy... authority to transmit electric energy from the United States to Canada pursuant to section 202(e) of the... transmit electric energy from the United States to Canada as a power marketer for a five-year term...

  14. APPARENT 85KRYPTON AGES OF GROUNDWATER WITHIN THE ROYAL WATERSHED, MAINE, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    85Kr activities were determined in 264 domestic and municipal wells from 2002-2004 in the Royal watershed (361 km2), Maine. Gas extraction for 85Kr from wells was effected directly via a well-head methodology permitting efficient widespread analys...

  15. Mercury concentrations in deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) tissues from Isle Royale National Park.

    PubMed

    Vucetich, L M; Vucetich, J A; Cleckner, L B; Gorski, P R; Peterson, R O

    2001-01-01

    We used deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) to investigate variation in mercury exposure across the terrestrial ecosystem of Isle Royale National Park (Michigan, USA). Although previous work suggested that mercury (Hg) levels may be higher inside the Sargent Lake watershed of Isle Royale than outside the watershed, Hg concentrations in livers were higher outside the Sargent Lake watershed (100.13 ng Hg/g dry tissue) than inside the watershed (35.50 ng Hg/g dry tissue; P = 0.06). Mercury levels in kidneys did not differ significantly (P = 0.57) between samples collected outside (443.23 ng Hg/g dry tissue) and inside (360.62 ng Hg/g dry tissue) the Sargent Lake watershed. Mean Hg concentrations in the livers of mice at some sites in Isle Royale are not significantly lower (P = 0.62) than Hg concentrations considered by some government agencies to be unhealthy for human consumption. Although Hg concentrations in mouse tissues were not remarkably high (compared to heavily polluted sites), concern is warranted because: (1) Isle Royale National park is a protected area in a remote location; (2) any exposure in deer mice represents a path for biomagnification in the terrestrial food web; and (3) the source of this mercury remains unidentified. PMID:11443999

  16. Ruptured-yolk peritonitis and organochlorine residues in a royal tern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Locke, L.N.; Stafford, C.J.

    1977-01-01

    Ruptured-yolk peritonitis was responsible for the death of a royal tern. Lodgment of eggs in the oviduct was probably due to reverse peristalsis brought about by breakage of the thin-shelled eggs and secondary bacterial infection. The thin shells were apparently not related to the low levels of DDE and other organochlorine pollutants found in tissues and egg contents.

  17. From Sun King to Royal Twilight: Painting in Eighteenth Century France from the Musee Picardie, Amiens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mark M.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the traveling exhibition from the Musee de Picardie in Amiens, France, called "From the Sun King to the Royal Twilight: Painting in Eighteenth Century France," that provides an overview of French paintings from the reign of Louis IV to the fall of the monarchy. (CMK)

  18. Co-Operative Problem-Solving at the Royal Docks Community School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    This article responds to Henry Tam's article in this issue of FORUM by exploring opportunities for co-operative problem-solving for staff and students of the Royal Docks Community School in the London Borough of Newham. Becoming a co-operative trust helped the school move out of special measures and develop a strategy of participation and…

  19. Build Your Own Particle Smasher: The Royal Society Partnership Grants Scheme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article features the project, "Build Your Own Particle Smasher" and shares how to build a particle smasher project. A-level and AS-level students from Trinity Catholic School have built their own particle smashers, in collaboration with Nottingham Trent University, as part of The Royal Society's Partnership Grants Scheme. The project, "Build…

  20. MRJP microsatellite markers in Africanized Apis mellifera colonies selected on the basis of royal jelly production.

    PubMed

    Parpinelli, R S; Ruvolo-Takasusuki, M C C; Toledo, V A A

    2014-01-01

    It is important to select the best honeybees that produce royal jelly to identify important molecular markers, such as major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs), and hence contribute to the development of new breeding strategies to improve the production of this substance. Therefore, this study focused on evaluating the genetic variability of mrjp3, mrjp5, and mrjp8 and associated allele maintenance during the process of selective reproduction in Africanized Apis mellifera individuals, which were chosen based on royal jelly production. The three loci analyzed were polymorphic, and produced a total of 16 alleles, with 4 new alleles, which were identified at mrjp5. The effective number of alleles at mrjp3 was 3.81. The observed average heterozygosity was 0.4905, indicating a high degree of genetic variability at these loci. The elevated FIS values for mrjp3, mrjp5, and mrjp8 (0.4188, 0.1077, and 0.2847, respectively) indicate an excess of homozygotes. The selection of Africanized A. mellifera queens for royal jelly production has maintained the mrjp3 C, D, and E alleles; although, the C allele occurred at a low frequency. The heterozygosity and FIS values show that the genetic variability of the queens is decreasing at the analyzed loci, generating an excess of homozygotes. However, the large numbers of drones that fertilize the queens make it difficult to develop homozygotes at mrjp3. Mating through instrumental insemination using the drones of known genotypes is required to increase the efficiency of Africanized A. mellifera-breeding programs, and to improve the quality and efficiency of commercial royal jelly apiaries. PMID:25177952

  1. "NEVER REGARD YOURSELF AS ALREADY SO THOROUGHLY INFORMED": THE WITHDRAWAL OF ITS INVITATION TO RODNEY SYME TO ADDRESS ITS 2015 CONGRESS BY THE ROYAL AUSTRALASIAN COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS.

    PubMed

    Parker, Malcolm; Kerridge, Ian; Komesaroff, Paul

    2015-09-01

    In 1628, William Harvey presented his revolutionary theory of the circulation to ears at the Royal College of Physicians that had been deafened by the unquestionable authority of Galen's teachings, from one and a half millennia in the past. Harvey's theory was initially rejected, despite his faith in his colleagues being eager for truth and knowledge, and never regarding themselves as so well informed that they would not welcome "further information". Recently Rodney Syme, the retired Melbourne urologist who for a long time has agitated for the legalisation of assisted dying, and also challenged the authorities to apply the current law in response to his admitted assistance to a number of individuals, was invited to address the 2015 Congress of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians. At the eleventh hour, the invitation to speak was withdrawn. In this column, we trace the course of events leading to this withdrawal of the invitation, and describe some of the correspondence to and from the College in response to the withdrawal. We draw parallels between the experiences of Harvey and Syme, and point to lessons to be learnt from the recent episode of apparent unwillingness, on the part of an institution that seeks to present itself as outward-looking, progressive and socially aware, to fulfil this promise in the increasingly important area of the end-of-life. PMID:26554197

  2. Determination of royal jelly freshness by ELISA with a highly specific anti-apalbumin 1, major royal jelly protein 1 antibody*

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Li-rong; Wang, Yi-ran; Zhai, Liang; Zhou, Wen-xiu; Tan, Liang-liang; Li, Mei-lu; Liu, Dan-dan; Xiao, Fa

    2015-01-01

    Major royal jelly protein 1 (MRJP1), designated apalbumin 1, has been regarded as a freshness marker of royal jelly (RJ). A MRJP1-specific peptide (IKEALPHVPIFD) identified by bioinformatics analysis of homologous members of the major royal protein family was synthesized and used to raise polyclonal anti-MRJP1 antibody (anti-SP-MRJP1 antibody). Western blot analysis showed that anti-SP-MRJP1 antibody only reacted with MRJP1 in RJ. In contrast, the previously reported antibody against recombinant MRJP1 (anti-R-MRJP1 antibody) reacted with other members of MRJP family in RJ. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using anti-SP-MRJP1 antibody demonstrated that MRJP1 content in RJ stored at 40 °C significantly degraded by 37.3%, 55.9%, 58.0%, 60.6%, 65.7%, 72.7%, and 73.1% at 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, and 49 d, respectively, when compared with MRJP1 content in fresh RJ (0 d). Optical density analysis of MRJP bands from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) profiles demonstrated that the degradation of MRJP1, MRJP2, MRJP3, and MRJP5 in RJ was strongly and positively correlated with the period of storage (P<0.0001). Our results indicated anti-SP-MRJP1 antibody was highly specific for MRJP1, and ELISA using the antibody is a sensitive and easy-to-use method to determine the freshness and authenticity of RJ. PMID:25644470

  3. Simultaneous determination of seven fluoroquinolones in royal jelly by ultrasonic-assisted extraction and liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jinhui; Xue, Xiaofeng; Chen, Fang; Zhang, Jinzhen; Li, Yi; Wu, Liming; Chen, Lanzhen; Zhao, Jing

    2009-04-01

    A method for the quantitative determination of seven fluoroquinolone antibacterial agents (FQs) used in beekeeping, viz. ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, pefloxacin, danofloxacin, enrofloxacin, and difloxacin, in royal jelly samples was developed on the basis of high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Sample preparation included deproteination, ultrasonic-assisted extraction with a mixed inorganic solution of monopotassium phosphate (KH(2)PO(4)) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium salt (Na(2)EDTA), and clean-up on a solid-phase extraction cartridge. The extraction procedure was optimized with regard to the amount of inorganic solvent and the duration of sonication for royal jelly as a complicated matrix. Overall recoveries for FQs ranged from 85.9 to 99.1% for royal jelly with standard deviations between 2.79 and 6.27%. Limits of quantification were 2-40 ng/g for seven FQs in royal jelly. A total of 57 real royal jelly samples collected from beekeepers and supermarkets were analyzed. The three most abundant honeybee-use FQs, i. e. ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and norfloxacin, were determined in some royal jelly samples in concentrations ranging from 11.9 to 55.6 ng/g. Unexpectedly, however, difloxacin was found at concentrations of about 46.8 ng/g in one sample although it is rarely used in beekeeping. The presented method was successfully applied to quantify FQs in real royal jelly samples. PMID:19306254

  4. Music Confucius Institute: Evaluating Its Approach as an Agent for International Chinese Music Dissemination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Wei; Li, Sheng Bing

    2016-01-01

    The paper identifies the educational and presentational functions of the Confucius Institute (MCI) at the Royal Danish Academy of Music (RDAM) as its core approaches which mostly influence Chinese cultural dissemination in its host country. The MCI's utilization of the two dissemination approaches aligns with the "receiver-centered"…

  5. Energy R and D in the Netherlands

    SciTech Connect

    EEM Luiten; JJ Dooley; K Blok

    1999-09-07

    This report documents trends in R and D and in particular (public) energy R and D in the Netherlands. Besides quantitative information on R and D and energy R and D, the report gives an impression of changes in science and technology policy, energy policy and changes in energy research priorities (both organizational and financial). In the Netherlands, 2.09% of GDP (or $6.7 billion) was invested in R and D activities in 1995. The private sector financed 46% of all R and D in that year. A small but significant fraction (9.3%) of the research performed in the Netherlands is financed by foreign public and private sector entities. Energy R and D has been identified by the national Strategic Foresight Activity as an important area of R and D for government support in the future. This is due in part to the overall decline in public support for energy R and D that occurred from 1985 to 1995. However, recent concern over climate change and energy policy has resulted in increased budgets for energy R and D. Recent policy documents (e.g., the Memorandum on Energy R and D in April 1998) and initiatives (e.g., a recent university energy R and D program; intensification of climate policy, partly in R and D) indicate the growing interest in addressing the issue of climate change partly through energy R and D. The Dutch government believes that the liberalization of the energy market in the Netherlands justifies an active role for the government to guarantee the longer-term transformation to a sustainable energy system. In terms of climate policy, the expanded and more efficient use of natural gas is seen as a suitable transition option towards a sustainable energy system. However, energy efficiency (and in particular energy efficiency in the industrial sector) and the introduction of renewable technologies (solar energy, wind energy and biomass) are generally favored for the long term. Recently, additional funding was allocated for research on industrial ''breakthrough

  6. [Immigration from Netherlands Antilles and Aruba has strongly increased].

    PubMed

    1998-05-01

    This one-page article examines recent trends in migration from the Caribbean to the Netherlands. "The number of immigrants from the Netherlands Antilles and Aruba has risen since 1994. This increase is probably due to the economic situation in these countries." (EXCERPT) PMID:12293877

  7. The Future of Agricultural Education: The Case of the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulder, Martin; Kupper, Hendrik

    2006-01-01

    Agricultural education has been an essential factor in the success of agricultural development in the Netherlands. At present, as in many countries throughout the world, the position of agricultural education is threatened. Does agricultural education have a future in the Netherlands, and if so, what strategies are being used for its survive? This…

  8. Gay Affirmative Counseling and Psychotherapy in the Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schippers, Jan; Schorerstichting, J. A.

    During the last 20 years, the Netherlands has established a name for itself throughout the gay communities in the world as a tolerant country for homosexuality. This document addresses some theoretical issues that play a major role in gay affirmative counseling and psychotherapy in the Netherlands and discusses some examples of the work in the…

  9. A Comparative Analysis of Educational Donors in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Russell N., III; Wiepking, Pamala

    2008-01-01

    Using data from 1,373 households participating in the 2005 Giving in the Netherlands Panel Survey, this paper examines the characteristics of educational donors in comparison with other types of charitable donors and with nondonors. Charitable giving is quite common in the Netherlands, but there is no established higher education advancement…

  10. Young Migrants and Discourses on Young Migrants in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerritsen, Debby; Maier, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This article compares the perspectives of young migrants in the Netherlands with the dominant discourse on "migrants" at present. The integration of young "migrants" have been studied in the European research projects TRESEGY and PROFACITY with the help of a number of ethnographic studies and a questionnaire in the Netherlands. At present, the…

  11. Innovation in the Netherlands: Toward Guidelines for Knowledge Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiekema, Esther I.

    2005-01-01

    When the objectives of the Lisbon Convention were formulated in 2000, the Dutch Government decided that the Netherlands should give priority to achieving these objectives. In 2010 the Netherlands should be one of the most successful economies in Europe, which should itself be the most competitive knowledge-based economic region in the world. With…

  12. The Salient History of Dalton Education in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Ploeg, Piet

    2014-01-01

    In the Netherlands there are 400 Dalton schools, while Dalton education has all but disappeared elsewhere, including in its country of origin: the USA. Following a brief period in the 1920s in which it enjoyed strong international interest, it disappeared from the scene. How can it be that the Dalton Plan still exists only in the Netherlands? This…

  13. Institution Closures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Mary F., Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on the need to accelerate the closing of institutions for people with mental retardation. Articles are by both current and former residents of institutions and by professionals, and include: "The Realities of Institutions" (Tia Nelis); "I Cry Out So That I Won't Go Insane" (Mary F. Hayden); "Trends in…

  14. Urban Scaling of Cities in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    van Raan, Anthony F. J.; van der Meulen, Gerwin; Goedhart, Willem

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the socioeconomic scaling behavior of all cities with more than 50,000 inhabitants in the Netherlands and found significant superlinear scaling of the gross urban product with population size. Of these cities, 22 major cities have urban agglomerations and urban areas defined by the Netherlands Central Bureau of Statistics. For these major cities we investigated the superlinear scaling for three separate modalities: the cities defined as municipalities, their urban agglomerations and their urban areas. We find superlinearity with power-law exponents of around 1.15. But remarkably, both types of agglomerations underperform if we compare for the same size of population an agglomeration with a city as a municipality. In other words, an urban system as one formal municipality performs better as compared to an urban agglomeration with the same population size. This effect is larger for the second type of agglomerations, the urban areas. We think this finding has important implications for urban policy, in particular municipal reorganizations. A residual analysis suggests that cities with a municipal reorganization recently and in the past decades have a higher probability to perform better than cities without municipal restructuring. PMID:26751785

  15. Hydrocarbon habitat of the west Netherlands basin

    SciTech Connect

    De Jager, J. ); Doyle, M. ); Grantham, P. ); Mabillard, J. )

    1993-09-01

    The complex West Netherlands Basin contains oil and gas in Triassic and Upper Jurassic to Cretaceous clastic reservoir sequences. The understanding has always been that the Carboniferous coal measures have generated only gas and the Jurassic marine Posidonia Shale only oil. However, detailed geochemical analyses show that both source rocks have generated oil and gas. Geochemical fingerprinting established a correlation of the hydrocarbons with the main source rocks. The occurrence of these different hydrocarbons is consistent with migration routes. Map-based charge modeling shows that the main phase of hydrocarbon generation occurred prior to the Late Cretaceous inversion of the West Netherlands Basin. However, along the southwest flank of the basin and in lows between the inversion highs, significant charge continued during the Tertiary. Biodegradation of oils in Jurassic and Cretaceous reservoirs occurred during the earliest Tertiary, but only in reservoirs that were at that time at temperatures of less then 70 to 80[degrees]C, where bacteria could survive. This study shows that also in a mature hydrocarbon province an integrated hydrocarbon habitat study with modern analyses and state-of-the-art technology can lead to a much improved understanding of the distribution of oil and gas in the subsurface. The results of this study will allow a better risk assessment for remaining prospects, and an improved prediction of the type of trapped hydrocarbons in terms of gas, oil, and biodegraded oil.

  16. [Aquaculture in the Netherlands: problems and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Hogendoorn, H

    1986-11-15

    New interest is being focussed on the more than 100-year-old field of fish culture in the Netherlands. The systems of production available show varying degrees of control of the fish and their environment, and they have a corresponding yield: 0.01-250 kg/m3/year. The recently developed recirculation systems (40-80 kg/m3) make possible the commercial production of luxury species of fish, independently of climatological conditions and having minimum effects on the environment. Some technical aspects of reproduction, housing, nutrition, growth, health control and marketing of the fish require further attention. But the absence of a solid tradition of fish culture is the main problem in the development of fish culture in the Netherlands today. Good fish stockmanship is required at farmers' level. And the organisation and governmental support, that turned agriculture into a highly successful industry, are also essential. For the moment, the most promising commercial prospects are provided by a number of luxury fish species: trout, salmon, eel, sole, turbot, tilapia, catfish, seabass and seabream. A joint effort may help to overcome the remaining technical and logistical uncertainties. PMID:3798438

  17. Dealing with future risks in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van Tuyll, Maaike

    2013-09-01

    The national security strategy is the Dutch government's instrument for multihazard risk management and is intended to contribute to the prevention of societal disruption as a consequence of a (future) disaster or crisis in the Netherlands. It considers the likelihood that a certain incident will occur, the impact if it should occur, and what can be done to prevent the occurrence and/or reduce the impact. In other words, "which threats is the Netherlands faced with, how serious are they, and what can be done to mitigate the consequences?" By annually assessing the likelihood and impact of different scenarios, the government is able to continually improve its overview of risks and to determine priorities regarding the allocation of resources for the prevention of, preparation for, and response to threats. At the start of the annual cycle of the implementation of the national security strategy, possible scenarios are identified. These scenarios are then drawn up and assessed by the Network of Analysts for National Security, resulting in the national risk assessment (NRA). On the basis of this risk assessment, a capabilities analysis is performed. This capabilities analysis assesses whether the country (government, private sector, and civilians) has sufficient capabilities (people, material, knowledge, skills, and procedures) at its disposal to adequately deal with the threat, and it considers which capabilities should be strengthened or developed. Finally, a report is prepared for the council of ministers. On the basis of this report, the cabinet decides which capabilities will be strengthened. PMID:23971823

  18. Convergance experiments with a hydrodynamic model of Port Royal Sound, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.K.; Schaffranek, R.W.; Baltzer, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    A two-demensional, depth-averaged, finite-difference, flow/transport model, SIM2D, is being used to simulate tidal circulation and transport in the Port Royal Sound, South Carolina, estuarine system. Models of a subregion of the Port Royal Sound system have been derived from an earlier-developed model of the entire system having a grid size of 600 ft. The submodels were implemented with grid sizes of 600, 300, and 150 ft in order to determine the effects of changes in grid size on computed flows in the subregion, which is characterized by narrow channels and extensive tidal flats that flood and dewater with each rise and fall of the tide. Tidal amplitudes changes less than 5 percent as the grid size was decreased. Simulations were performed with the 300-foot submodel for time steps of 60, 30, and 15 s. Study results are discussed.

  19. Sir William Burnett (1779-1861), professional head of the Royal Naval Medical Department and entrepreneur.

    PubMed

    Penn, Christopher

    2004-08-01

    Sir William Burnett (1779-1861) had an active career as a Royal Navy surgeon in the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, including service at the battles of St Vincent, the Nile and Trafalgar. From 1822 to 1855 he was professional head of the Royal Naval Medical Department, when he provided effective leadership in a time of great change. Although his official work earned him the reputation of a "hard-working, unimaginative, somewhat harsh man", his correspondence shows a very humane centre under the official carapace. His official performance and reputation were both eroded towards the end of his career by his determined promotion of zinc chloride, for which he held lucrative patents. PMID:15257349

  20. Organochlorine and metal residues in royal terns nesting on the central Texas coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, K.A.; LeFever, C.A.; Mulhern, B.M.

    1983-01-01

    Royal Tern eggs collected from Pelican and Sundown islands on the central Texas coast in 1978 contained relatively low levels of organochlorine and metal pollutants. DDE and PCBs were found most frequently, but levels were below those known to have an adverse effect on avian reproduction and survival. Average metal residues did not vary significantly between study areas, and with the possible exception of mercury, were present only at background levels. Shells of eggs collected in 1978 were no thinner than eggshells collected before 1947. There was a significant imporvement in mean eggshell thickness from 1970 to 1978 and a corresponding decline in DDE and PCB residues. No deformed or abnormal young were observed. Although elevated levels of industrial contaminants were reported in sediments and sea grasses of Corpus Christi Bay, little of those contaminants appear to have accumulated in the Royal Tern.

  1. The Royal Medical Society of Edinburgh: Sale of its Library at Sotheby's *

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Helen

    1970-01-01

    The library of the Royal Medical Society of Edinburgh, which has been in existence for nearly 250 years, was sold by Sotheby & Co. of London at three auction sales during 1969. The author describes her attendance at the three sales, with emphasis on the most valuable items sold and the considerable acquisitions made for the Middleton Medical Library of the University of Wisconsin. Concluding observations concern some of the practical problems of acquiring antiquarian books at auction. Images PMID:5496237

  2. Ground water for public water supply at Windigo, Isle Royale National Park, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grannemann, N.G.; Twenter, F.R.

    1982-01-01

    Three test holes drilled at Windigo in Isle Royale National Park in 1981 indicate that the ophitic basaltic lava flows underlying the area contain little water and cannot be considered a source for public water supply. The holes were 135, 175, and 71 feet deep. One hole yielded about 1 gallon of water perminute; the other two yielded less. Glacial deposits seem to offer the best opportunity for developing a ground-water supply of 5 to 10 gallons per minute. (USGS)

  3. History of the Royal College of General Practitioners--the first 40 years.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, D P

    1992-01-01

    A steering committee met in 1952 to plan for the formation of a new college of general practitioners. An analysis of the work of the Royal College of General Practitioners over its first 40 years suggests that the published aims of the steering committee were largely fulfilled and in some ways exceeded. The unifying theme of the College's development appears to have been the wish to establish general medical practice as a scientific discipline. PMID:1586530

  4. The End of Alchemy? The Repudiation and Persistence of Chrysopoeia at the Académie Royale des Sciences in the Eighteenth Century.

    PubMed

    Principe, Lawrence M

    2014-01-01

    The general abandonment of serious endeavor toward metallic transmutation represents a major development in the history of chemistry, yet its exact causes and timing remain unclear. This essay examines the fate of chrysopoeia at the eighteenth-century Académie Royale des Sciences. It reveals a long-standing tension between Académie chemists, who pursued transmutation, and administrators, who tried to suppress it. This tension provides background for Etienne-François Geoffroy's 1722 paper describing fraudulent practices around transmutation. Although transmutation seems to disappear after Geoffroy's paper, manuscripts reveal that most of the institution's chemists continued to pursue it privately until at least the 1760s, long after widely accepted dates for the "demise of alchemy" in learned circles. PMID:26103750

  5. Death and the dead-house in Victorian asylums: necroscopy versus mourning at the Royal Edinburgh Asylum, c. 1832–1901

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the management and meaning of post-mortem examinations, and the spatial ordering of patients’ death, dissection and burial at the Victorian asylum, referencing a range of institutional contexts and exploiting a case study of the Royal Edinburgh Asylum. The routinizing of dissection and the development of the dead-house from a more marginal asylum sector to a lynchpin of laboratory medicine is stressed. External and internal pressure to modernize pathological research facilities is assessed alongside governmental, public and professional critiques of variable necroscopy practices. This is contextualized against wider issues and attitudes surrounding consent and funereal rituals. Onus is placed on tendencies in anatomizing insanity towards the conversion of deceased lunatics – pauper lunatics especially – into mere pathological specimens. On the other hand, significant but compromised resistance on the part of a minority of practitioners, relatives and the wider public is also identified. PMID:22701924

  6. The marginal success of regulated competition policy in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Lieverdink, H

    2001-04-01

    In the second half of the 1980s the government in the Netherlands adopted a regulated competition policy as part of a comprehensive programme designed to restructure the health care system. The programme was a product of its social and political context, promoted by a group of political entrepreneurs and created to improve efficiency. Despite the initial political support and a long political debate the government had to acknowledge by 1992 that the restructuring would not take place. But changes fostered limited competition between sickness funds and more extensive competition in the small market for supplementary policies. This, however, has not led to sickness funds becoming powerful purchasers that forced hospitals and doctors to improve their efficiency. Rather, they compete for subscribers, become part of large insurance conglomerates, and market more supplementary options. Culturally, health care institutions have become more entrepreneurial, taken up more business concepts, and made the language of markets, products and consumer sovereignty more common. The impact of these changes on the health care system is still unknown, but they create pressure for more health care services, leaving the government with problems that equal those of the 1980s. PMID:11281402

  7. The efficacy of topical Royal Jelly on diabetic foot ulcers healing: A case series*

    PubMed Central

    Siavash, Mansour; Shokri, Saeideh; Haghighi, Sepehr; Mohammadi, Mahbubeh; Shahtalebi, Mohammad Ali; Farajzadehgan, Ziba

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Foot ulcers and infections are the major sources of morbidity in individuals with diabetes mellitus. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of topical Royal Jelly (a worker honey bee product) on healing diabetic foot ulcers. METHODS: Diabetic patients with foot ulcers that were referred to our clinic at Khorshid Hospital, Isfahan, Iran; were evaluated three times a week and treated according to standard treatments consisted of offloading, infection control, vascular improvement and debridement if required. In addition, all ulcers were measured and then topical sterile 5% Royal Jelly was applied on the total surface area of the wounds. Eventually, they were covered with sterile dressings. Each patient was followed for a period of three months or until the complete healing. RESULTS: A total of eight patients were enrolled in this study. Of these, two had two ulcers and, therefore, ten ulcers were evaluated. Two ulcers were excluded. Seven of the remained eight ulcers healed. Mean duration of complete healing was 41 days. One ulcer did not completely heal but improved to 40% smaller in length, 32% in width and 28% in depth. The mean length, width and depth reduction rates were 0.35 mm/day, 0.28 mm/day and 0.11 mm/day, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Royal Jelly dressing may be an effective method for treating diabetic foot ulcers besides standard treatments. PMID:22279458

  8. Major royal jelly proteins as markers of authenticity and quality of honey.

    PubMed

    Bilikova, Katarina; Kristof Krakova, Tatiana; Yamaguchi, Kikuji; Yamaguchi, Yoshihisa

    2015-12-01

    Until now, the properties of honey have been defined based exclusively on the content of plant components in the nectar of given plant. We showed that apalbumin1, the major royal jelly (RJ) protein, is an authentic and regular component of honey. Apalbumin1 and other RJ proteins and peptides are responsible for the immunostimulatory properties and antibiotic activity of honey. For the quantification of apalbumin1, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed using polyclonal anti-apalbumin1 antibody. The method is suitable for honey authenticity determination; moreover it is useful for detection of the honey, honeybee pollen and RJ in products of medicine, pharmacy, cosmetics, and food industry, where presences of these honeybee products are declared. Results from the analysis for presence and amount of apalbumin1 in honeys will be used for high-throughput screening of honey samples over the world. On the basis of our experiments which show that royal jelly proteins are regular and physiologically active components of honey we propose to change the definition of honey (according to the EU Honey Directive 2001/110/EC) as follows: Honey is a natural sweet substance produced by honey bees from nectar of plants or from secretions of plants, or excretions of plant sucking insects, which honey bees collect, transform by combining with major royal jelly proteins and other specific substances of their own, deposit, dehydrate, store and leave in the honey comb to ripen and mature. PMID:26751857

  9. Heat Resistant Characteristics of Major Royal Jelly Protein 1 (MRJP1) Oligomer

    PubMed Central

    Moriyama, Takanori; Ito, Aimi; Omote, Sumire; Miura, Yuri; Tsumoto, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Soluble royal jelly protein is a candidate factor responsible for mammiferous cell proliferation. Major royal jelly protein 1 (MRJP1), which consists of oligomeric and monomeric forms, is an abundant proliferative protein in royal jelly. We previously reported that MRJP1 oligomer has biochemical heat resistance. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effects of several heat treatments (56, 65 and 96°C) on the proliferative activity of MRJP1 oligomer. Heat resistance studies showed that the oligomer molecular forms were slightly maintained until 56℃, but the molecular forms were converted to macromolecular heat-aggregated MRJP1 oligomer at 65℃ and 96℃. But, the growth activity of MRJP1 oligomer treated with 96°C was slightly attenuated when compared to unheated MRJP1 oligomer. On the other hand, the cell proliferation activity was preserved until 96℃ by the cell culture analysis of Jurkat cells. In contrast, those of IEC-6 cells were not preserved even at 56°C. The present observations suggest that the bioactive heat-resistance properties were different by the origin of the cells. The cell proliferation analysis showed that MRJP1 oligomer, but not MRJP2 and MRJP3, significantly increased cell numbers, suggesting that MRJP1 oligomer is the predominant proliferation factor for mammiferous cells. PMID:26020775

  10. Life history variation among four lake trout morphs at Isle Royale, Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Michael J.; Nate, Nancy A.; Muir, Andrew M.; Bronte, Charles R.; Zimmerman, Mara S.; Krueger, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    Life history traits were compared among four morphs of lake trout at Isle Royale, Lake Superior. Of 738 lake trout caught at Isle Royale, 701 were assigned to a morph (119 humpers, 160 leans, 85 redfins, and 337 siscowets) using a combination of statistical analysis of head and body shape and visual assignment. On average, redfins were longer (544 mm), heavier (1,481 g), heavier at length (Wr = 94), more buoyant, and older (22 years) than siscowets (519 mm; 1,221 g; 90; 19 years), leans (479 mm; 854 g; 82; 13 years), and humpers (443 mm; 697 g; 87; 17 years). On average, leans grew from a younger age at length = 0 and shorter length at age = 0, at a faster early growth rate to a longer asymptotic length than the other three morphs, while redfins grew at a slower instantaneous rate and humpers grew to a shorter asymptotic length than other morphs. On average, leans were longer (562 mm) and older (15 years) at 50% maturity than redfins (427 mm, 12 years), siscowets (401 mm, 11 years), or humpers (394 mm, 13 years). Life history parameters did not differ between males and females within each morph. We conclude that differences in life history attributes of lean, humper, redfin, and siscowet morphs of lake trout are consistent with differential habitat use in waters around Isle Royale, Lake Superior.

  11. Evaluation and review of the safety management system implementation in the Royal Thai Air Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaiwan, Sakkarin

    This study was designed to determine situation and effectiveness of the safety management system currently implemented in the Royal Thai Air Force. Reviewing the ICAO's SMS and the RTAF's SMS was conducted to identify similarities and differences between the two safety management systems. Later, the researcher acquired safety statistics from the RTAF Safety Center to investigate effectiveness of its safety system. The researcher also collected data to identify other factors affecting effectiveness of the safety system during conducting in-depth interviews. Findings and Conclusions: The study shows that the Royal Thai Air Force has never applied the International Civil Aviation Organization's Safety management System to its safety system. However, the RTAF's SMS and the ICAO's SMS have been developed based on the same concepts. These concepts are from Richard H. Woods's book, Aviation safety programs: A management handbook. However, the effectiveness of the Royal Thai Air Force's safety system is in good stance. An accident rate has been decreasing regularly but there are no known factors to describe the increasing rate, according to the participants' opinion. The participants have informed that there are many issues to be resolved to improve the RTAF's safety system. Those issues are cooperation among safety center's staffs, attitude toward safety of the RTAF senior commanders, and safety standards.

  12. Effect of storage under extremely low oxygen on the volatile composition of 'Royal Gala' apples.

    PubMed

    Both, Vanderlei; Brackmann, Auri; Thewes, Fabio Rodrigo; Ferreira, Daniele de Freitas; Wagner, Roger

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the profile of volatile compounds in 'Royal Gala' apples stored under controlled atmosphere (CA), with O(2) levels ranging from 1.0kPa to as low as 0.5kPa during 8months (0.5°C), followed by 7days of shelf-life at 20°C. Volatile compounds were collected via solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and analysed by gas chromatography. Straight and branched-chain esters exhibited a distinct pattern. The emission of straight-chain esters decreased under extremely low O(2) (0.5kPa), while branched-chain esters were not significantly affected in such condition. 2-Methyl-butyl acetate, a significant contributor to the 'Royal Gala' aroma, was higher in intermediate O(2) concentration, suggesting that lowering the O(2) levels down to 0.7kPa does not negatively affect the volatile composition of 'Royal Gala' apples, as compared to the standard CA (1.0kPa O(2)). The remaining volatile compounds were not strongly affected by storing fruits under extremely low O(2). PMID:24629937

  13. Relation of environmental factors to breeding status of royal and sandwich terns in South Carolina, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Prouty, R.M.; Neely, B.S., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The population ecology of the royal tern Sterna maxima and sandwich tern Sterna sandvicensis was investigated in South Carolina from 1970 through 1977. Royal and sandwich terns nested together in all of the colonies that we located. The peak in egg laying usually occurred in early May; peak hatching occurred from late May to mid-June. Clutch size for both species was one egg. Tidal flooding was the major factor in egg loss. The breeding population was 15,499 pairs in 1974 and 18,096 pairs in 1975; sandvicensis made up about 5% of the breeding population. The average number of young fledged per nest ranged from 0?36 to 0?44. Residues of organochlorine pollutants in most eggs and tissues were low and posed no identifiable threat to the terns. There was a decline in DDE and dieldrin residues in eggs of maxima. The future of royal and sandwich terns in South Carolina seems fairly secure as the population is apparently at or near carrying capacity and most of the major nesting sites are dedicated to protection of nesting birds.

  14. The Impact of New Technologies on Occupational Profiles in the Banking Sector. Case Studies in Luxembourg, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and France. CEDEFOP Panorama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitali, Laurence; Freiche, Jeanine; Matthews, Alison; Warmerdam, John

    The impact of new technologies on occupational profiles in the banking sector was examined through case studies in four European countries: Luxembourg, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and France. In each country, three types of banking institutions were studied: merchant (Eurobank); "counter" (universal) bank; and telebank (bank operating…

  15. Van Koetsveld and His "School for Idiots" in the Hague (1855-1920): Gender and the History of Special Education in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Drenth, Annemieke

    2005-01-01

    This article examines how one of the first initiatives in what now is known as "special education" came into existence in the historical context of the Netherlands. It focuses on the first private and autonomous institution for mentally retarded pupils, the so-called "School for Idiots", established in 1855 in The Hague by the Reverend Cornelis…

  16. "Making a Mess in the Mud": The Discovery of Toddlers' Special Needs by Child Scientists in the 1930s in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakker, Nelleke

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses plans that were launched at three consecutive conferences on care for toddlers between 1929 and 1938 in the Netherlands. These plans and their realisation are evaluated in terms of what was seen as the missing link in the supply of institutional care for young children. The author identifies the professional…

  17. HBO Social Studies: Learning How To Learn in Social Studies. An Impression of the Social Studies Program of the Noordelijke Hogeschool Leeuwarden (NHL) in the Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steur, Rick

    This booklet describes the offerings of the Noordelijke Hogeschool Leeuwarden, a large institute of higher education (a polytechnic) in the north of The Netherlands. Special emphasis is placed on the social studies teacher training programs and the social studies general and applied programs. Blending the definition of the social studies of the…

  18. Differences and Similarities in the Use of the Portfolio and Personal Development Plan for Career Guidance in Various Vocational Schools in The Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mittendorff, Kariene; Jochems, Wim; Meijers, Frans; den Brok, Perry

    2008-01-01

    In The Netherlands, a growing number of vocational education and training institutes are implementing competence-based approaches to learning, including new career guidance practices. These practices often involve instruments such as portfolios or personal development plans, and are aimed at supporting students in their search for a sense of…

  19. Landmine detection technology research in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleijpen, H. M. A.

    2003-09-01

    This paper gives an overview of the activities on research and development in the technology area for landmine detection in the Netherlands. The main players, their projects and the long term and short term project goals are presented. The projects cover the range from military applications to humanitarian demining. In the "conventional" detection systems area the activities on Metal detection, Ground Penetrating Radar and Thermal Infrared are covered. Signal processing and Sensor fusion are key activities in this area and examples of these activities are shown as well. The focus for these techniques is on vehicle mounted and airborne multi-sensor systems. The activities are supported by more fundamental modeling of the interaction of sensors with the landmines and especially the effects of the environment of the mines on this interaction. In the area of more future oriented techniques the following techniques are discussed: forward looking Polarised Infrared for moving platforms, Neutron Backscattering techniques and Laser Vibrometry for acoustic detection.

  20. PV in the Netherlands, learning while growing

    SciTech Connect

    Kimman, J.T.N.; Horst, E.W. ter; Lysen, E.H.

    1994-12-31

    The main goal of the Netherlands Photovoltaic Program is to create conditions to let photovoltaic solar energy play an important role in the dutch energy supply for the 21st century. Four of the most important conditions are: to create social support; to achieve progress in solar cell and PV-system R and D; to create a market for stand-alone PV-systems; and to gain experience with grid-connected systems in the built environment. For the grid-connected systems a plan has been adopted to reach 250 MWp of installed solar capacity in 2010. The main purpose of this so-called PV pilot plan is not just a scaling up of the production volume but to reach specific learning goals. In this way the scaling-up is an important and justified by-product.

  1. Medical murder in Belgium and the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Materstvedt, Lars Johan; Magelssen, Morten

    2016-09-01

    This article is a response to Raphael Cohen-Almagor's paper entitled 'First do no harm: intentionally shortening lives of patients without their explicit request in Belgium'. His paper deals with very important matters of life and death, however its concept usage is in part misleading. For instance, the fact that medical murder takes place both in Belgium and the Netherlands is missed. Cohen-Almagor calls such acts 'worrying' and considers them to be 'abuse'. However, it remains an open question whether or not there can be such a thing as legitimate murder in a medical context. From the combined perspectives of justice and the duty to end unbearable suffering, there might be. Thus, key arguments for euthanasia are also prominent in an argument for medical murder. PMID:27114470

  2. Regulating Privacy and Biobanks in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Aart C; van Hellemondt, Rachèl E

    2016-03-01

    The Netherlands does not have any specific legislation pertaining to human biological materials and data collection by biobanks. Instead, these issues are governed by a patchwork of laws, codes of practices, and other ethical instruments, where special emphasis is given to the right to privacy and self-determination. While draft legislation for biobanking was scheduled to enter into force in 2007, as of mid-2015 such legislation was still under consideration, with the intent that it would focus particularly on individual self-determination, the interests of research, the use of bodily materials collected by biobanks for criminal law purposes, and dilemmas around results that are clinically relevant for biobank participants. Under the current framework, the amount of privacy protection afforded to data is linked to its level of identifiability. International sharing of personal data to non-EU/European Economic Area countries is allowed if these countries provide adequate protection. PMID:27256125

  3. Experiences of foreign European nurses in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    de Veer, Anke; den Ouden, Dirk-Jan; Francke, Anneke

    2004-04-01

    As a result of the shortage of nurses, Dutch health care organizations want to recruit nurses from outside Europe (e.g. Indonesia, South Africa). The Dutch government, however, is not encouraging this policy and prefers to recruit within the European Union. In order to better support such nurses, it is important to know the problems European nurses encounter in The Netherlands. This study is about the experience of nurses from other European countries in The Netherlands. This paper addresses itself to three principal questions. First, how many nurses qualified in other EU or EU candidate states are starting to work in The Netherlands. Second, why do they come to The Netherlands. And finally what problems do they encounter when working in The Netherlands. A questionnaire has been send to all registered nurses trained in another EU or EU candidate state. The response has been 987 or 67%. Thus, far approximately 1500 nurses from other EU/candidate states have come to The Netherlands. Personal reasons, including marriage, are the most important reasons for their coming here. Half of the nurses took one or more courses before starting work in nursing in The Netherlands. These were often Dutch language courses. The nurses had to make a number of adjustments. Major difficulties were unfamiliarity with Dutch laws and the fiscal and social security systems, recognition of their qualifications and application for permits. Some basic issues, such as how to write a letter of application, caused problems. The language and unfamiliarity with the Dutch health care system made it difficult to find a job. When they had gained employment in nursing these problems remained the most serious. The conclusion is that international employment mobility in nursing is rather low in the case of The Netherlands. If the Dutch government decides to encourage the employment of nurses from abroad, several measures can be taken to make working in The Netherlands more attractive. PMID:15033553

  4. An evaluation of the Royal Air Force helicopter search and rescue services in Britain with reference to Royal Air Force Valley 1980-1989.

    PubMed Central

    Liskiewicz, W J

    1992-01-01

    The Royal Air Force (RAF) operates a helicopter Search and Rescue (SAR) service in the United Kingdom and territorial waters; it also provides a similar service in several locations abroad. A 10-year retrospective study of the SAR helicopter service operating from the RAF base at Valley on the island of Anglesey in North Wales is presented, with national SAR statistics over a similar period provided for comparison. Analysis of records kept by SAR aircrew at RAF Valley shows that their assistance had been requested on 1490 occasions during the 10-year period studied; most of these requests were the result of incidents involving holidaymakers, particularly in the mountains or along the coast. The results illustrate the versatility and life-saving potential of a highly skilled and motivated service able to work in adverse weather and dangerous locations. In the light of current debate, the value of aeromedical evacuation of seriously ill patients using helicopters is discussed. PMID:1494160

  5. [Adaptation of Einthoven's string galvanometer for electrocardiography in the Netherlands].

    PubMed

    Wyers, P J

    2001-12-22

    After the Dutch physiologist Willem Einthoven (1860-1927) published the construction of his string galvanometer in 1901, the development of electrocardiography in the Netherlands was slow. During the next twenty years only a few string galvanometers were in use in the Netherlands, mostly in physiology laboratories. Publications concerning electrocardiographic tests on patients were scarce. In 1924, Einthoven was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine for discovering the mechanism of the electrocardiogram. From that moment onwards, electrocardiography developed rapidly in the Netherlands and during the following 30 years particular use was made of the French string galvanometer designed by Boulitte. PMID:11789151

  6. Institutional Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Warren J.

    1984-01-01

    Institutional economics remains a viable alternative approach to economics. It stresses power, technology, and a holistic and evolutionary approach while critiquing the neoclassical approach. General features of institutional economics are examined, and the work of institutionalists in specific areas is discussed. (RM)

  7. [Institutional Renewal].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Peggy, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The theme of this journal issue is "Institutional Renewal." Projects designed to address the issues of the 1980s at 18 colleges are described, and 15 definitions of institutional renewal are presented. Participating colleges were provided expert advice through the Association of American College's (AAC) Project Lodestar (renamed Consultation and…

  8. Institutional History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohlstedt, Sally Gregory

    1985-01-01

    Discusses recent work on scientific institutions in the United States, indicating that although historians have explored the origins of institutions, few have pursued these organizations into their later and perhaps equally complex years. Learned/professional organizations, museums, publications, and philanthropy are among the major topic areas…

  9. Netherlands to Aid Central, Eastern Europe in Halting Pollution Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Dermot A.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed are efforts originating in the Netherlands to assist the Soviet Union and Eastern European counties to form and carry out significant air and water pollution improvement policies. Examples of proposals and programs being formed are described. (CW)

  10. Potential impacts of discharging tertiary-treated wastewater into Port Royal Sound, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Speiran, G.K.; Belval, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    An assessment of physical characteristics of Port Royal Sound was combined with the results of a dye tracer study and with data collected from a previous environmental study to describe the impact on the water quality from discharging tertiary treated wastewater into the sound. Calculated velocities for the time of maximum velocity in the tidal cycle ranged from 2.32 ft/sec near the bottom to 4.65 ft/sec near the surface of the sound in a cross section in the vicinity of a proposed wastewater outfall. Vertical velocity distributions calculated for the time of maximum velocity were similar at all stations at which velocities were measured except the station in shallow water near the shore. A recent bathymetric chart of the vicinity of the proposed outfall indicates that a bar extends farther along the northern shore of Hilton Head Island than indicated on earlier nautical charts of Port Royal Sound. Continued extension of this bar could alter the impact on water quality from discharge of treated wastewater into the sound. Further study may be needed to monitor changes in the bar if the outfall is located between the bar and Hilton Head Island. Conservative calculations based on the results of the dye tracer study indicate that the discharge of 10.9 million gallons/day of wastewater having concentrations of biochemical oxygen demand and suspended solids of 15 mg/L will result in a maximum cumulative increase in concentrations of biochemical oxygen demand of < 0.01 mg/L and no increase in concentrations of suspended solids at high slack tide in the part of Port Royal Sound most affected by the proposed wastewater discharge. (Author 's abstract)

  11. The Royal Naval Medical Services: delivering medical operational capability. the 'black art' of Medical Operational Planning.

    PubMed

    Faye, M

    2013-01-01

    This article looks to dispel the mysteries of the 'black art' of Medical Operational Planning whilst giving an overview of activity within the Medical Operational Capability area of Medical Division (Med Div) within Navy Command Headquarters (NCHQ) during a period when the Royal Naval Medical Services (RNMS) have been preparing and reconfiguring medical capability for the future contingent battle spaces. The rolling exercise program has been used to illustrate the ongoing preparations taken by the Medical Operational Capability (Med Op Cap) and the Medical Force Elements to deliver medical capability in the littoral and maritime environments. PMID:24511796

  12. The ejection experience of the Royal Australian Air Force: 1951-92.

    PubMed

    Newman, D G

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews the ejection experience of the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) between 1951 and 1992. During this period 84 aircrew ejected from their aircraft, with 77 survivors and 7 fatalities. The causes of these ejections were examined, and the injuries received by the ejectees were classified into four categories: fatal, major, minor, and no injuries. Vertebral fractures were the most common type of major injury (35%). Most ejectees received at least one minor injury. There were 7 reported cases in which the ejectee received no injuries. The RAAF ejection experience was found to be comparable with other international series, both in terms of survival rates and injury patterns. PMID:7695551

  13. Royal Society reports on Science Base,' suggests five-year fellowships

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, W.

    1992-12-01

    In October, Britain's Royal Society released its long-awaited report, 'The Future of the Science Base,' the product of an 18 month review of how the nation's basic research is organized and the factors that might make it more successful. The science base report has been treated with considerable respect in the United Kingdom. Its conclusions, which are related in this article, may be of interest to Americans, as many of the trends and dilemmas identified in this report are also found in the U.S. This article review the specific recommendations of the report and also lists demographic and funding information.

  14. Over my dead body: body donation and the rise in donor registrations in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Sophie; Eisinga, Rob; Altena, Marga; Venbrux, Eric; Gerrits, Peter O

    In The Netherlands, the number of body donor registrations has been increasing for several years. Body donors are people who register at an anatomical institute to donate their entire body, after death, for scientific education and research. Although only 0.1% of the Dutch population is registered as a body donor, this is sufficient to realize the anatomical demand of about 650 bodies annually. Due to the recent rise of registrations many anatomical institutes have (temporarily) stopped registering new donors to prevent a surplus of bodies. Based on a large body donor survey (n=759) and in-depth anthropological interviews with 20 body donors, we try to give an explanation for the rising registration numbers. We argue that the choice for body donation in contemporary, individualized Dutch society is an autonomous way to give meaning and sense to life and death outside the framework of institutionalized religion. PMID:23495537

  15. Hydrocarbon Induced Seismicity in Northern Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dost, B.; Spetzler, J.; Kraaijpoel, D.; Caccavale, M.

    2015-12-01

    The northern Netherlands has been regarded aseismic until the first earthquakes started in 1986, after more than 25 years of gas production from the one of the largest on-shore gas-fields in the World, the Groningen field, and accompanying smaller gas fields. Due to the shallow sources, at approximately 3 km depth, even small magnitude events cause considerable damage to buildings in the region. Since the largest recorded event in the Groningen field in 2012 with ML= 3,6, more than 30.000 damage claims were received by the mining company. Since 1995 a seismic monitoring network is operational in the region, consisting of 8 200m deep boreholes with 4 levels of 3C 4,5 Hz geophones. The network was designed for a location threshold of ML=1,5 over a 40x 80 km region. Average station separation was 20 km. At the end of 2014, 245 events have been recorded with ML ≥ 1,5, out of a total of 1100. Since 2003 a new mining law is in place in the Netherlands, which requires for each gas field in production a seismic risk analysis. Initially, due to the small number of events for specific fields, a general hazard (PSHA) was calculated for all gas-fields and a maximum magnitude was estimated at ML = 3,9. Since 2003 an increase in the activity rate is observed for the Groningen field, leading to the development of new models and a re-assessment of parameters like the maximum magnitude. More recently these models are extended to seismic risk, where also the fragility of the regional buildings is taken into account. Understanding the earthquake process is essential in taking mitigation measures. Continued research is focused on reducing the uncertainties in the hazard and risk models and is accompanied by an upgrade of the monitoring network. In 2014 a new dense network was designed to monitor the Groningen gas field in this region (30*40 km) with an average separation of 4 km. This allows an improved location threshold (M>0,5) and location accuracy (50-100m). A detailed P- and S

  16. CSCAPES Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Alex Pothen

    2008-10-26

    We report on the progress made by researchers of the CSCAPES Institute at Old Dominion University for the years 2007 and 2008 in the areas of research, software creation, education and training, and outreach activities.

  17. Keynes, Newton and the Royal Society: the events of 1942 and 1943.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Daniel

    2013-03-20

    Most discussions of John Maynard Keynes's activities in connection with Newton are restricted to the sale in 1936 at Sotheby's of Newton's Portsmouth Papers and to Keynes's 1946 essay 'Newton, the Man'. This paper provides a history of Keynes's Newton-related work in the interim, highlighting especially the events of 1942 and 1943, which were particularly relevant to the Royal Society's role in the domestic and international promotion of Newton's legacy. During this period, Keynes lectured twice on Newton, leaving notes that would later be read by his brother Geoffrey in the famous commemoration of the Newton tercentenary in 1946. In 1943 Keynes assisted the Royal Society in its recognition of the Soviet celebrations and in the acquisition and preservation of more of the Newton library. In each instance Keynes took the opportunity to promote his interpretation of Newton as 'the last of the magicians': a scientist who had one foot in the pre-modern world and whose approach to understanding the world was as much intuitive as it was methodical. PMID:24686919

  18. Observing the skies of Lisbon. Isaac de Sequeira Samuda, an estrangeirado in the Royal Society.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Carla Costa

    2014-06-20

    Elected in 1723, Isaac de Sequeira Samuda (1681-1729) was the first Jewish Fellow of the Royal Society. He had arrived in London just a few years earlier, escaping from the Portuguese Inquisition. Despite his past, he had no difficulty in establishing links with his country's diplomatic representatives in London. A physician and adviser on scientific subjects, he became a conduit between the emerging world of Portuguese astronomy and the British scientific community. He reported to the Royal Society on astronomical observations made in the new observatories in Lisbon and helped with the acquisition of scientific instruments and books destined for Portugal. These activities were facets of Samuda's unusual career and the diverse though often converging associations that he established until his death. As the member of a network active in the diffusion of new ideas and in the modernization of Portuguese science, Samuda can be regarded as an estrangeirado, as this term has come to be used in the modern literature. PMID:24921106

  19. Royal College of Nursing (Rcn) code of professional conduct: a discussion document.

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, J D; Altschul, A T; Sampson, C; Smith, A M

    1977-01-01

    We are printing in its entirety the discussion document which sets out a code of professional conduct for nurses published by the Royal College of Nursing in November 1976 together with commentaries by the Assistant Secretary of the British Medical Association, a professor of nursing studies, student nurses and a lawyer. The image of the nurse is still that of one of Florence Nightingale's young ladies or of a member of a religious order who is wholly dedicated to caring for the sick. Today, as this document and the comments upon it show, 'dedication' is still part of the motive which leads a man or woman to become a nurse but in addition, and this is where the public may be ignorant or choose to be ignorant, nursing offers a career where intellectual achievement and the satisfaction of a demanding job bring their proper financial reward and place in the professional community. We are grateful to the Royal College of Nursing for permission to publish this document. PMID:926130

  20. Supplementation with Major Royal-Jelly Proteins Increases Lifespan, Feeding, and Fecundity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Xin, Xiao-Xuan; Chen, Yong; Chen, Di; Xiao, Fa; Parnell, Laurence D; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Liang; Ordovas, Jose M; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Shen, Li-Rong

    2016-07-27

    The major royal-jelly proteins (MRJPs) are the main constituents responsible for the specific physiological role of royal jelly (RJ) in honeybees. Male and female Drosophila flies were fed diets containing either no MRJPs (A) or casein (B) at 1.25% (w/w) of diet or MRJPs at 1.25% (C), 2.50% (D), or 5.00% (E). Diets B, C, D, and E increased mean lifespan by 4.3%, 9.0%, 12.4%, and 13.9% in males and by 5.8%, 9.7%, 20.0%, and 11.8% in females in comparison to results from diet A, respectively. The diet supplemented with 2.50% MRJPs seems to have the optimal dose to improve both physiological and biochemical measures related to aging in both sexes. Interestingly, lifespan extension by MRJPs in Drosophila was positively associated with feeding and fecundity and up-regulation of copper and zinc-superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) and the Egfr-mediated signaling pathway. This study provides strong evidence that MRJPs are important components of RJ for prolonging lifespan in Drosophila. PMID:27388939

  1. The 'royal disease'--haemophilia A or B? A haematological mystery is finally solved.

    PubMed

    Lannoy, N; Hermans, C

    2010-11-01

      'History can change blood. And blood can change the course of history'. Haemophilia is an illustration of this, as this congenital hereditary coagulation disorder, passed through the majority of royal European families at the beginning of the 20th century by Queen Victoria of England and Empress of the Indies, had indisputable political consequences, which led to one of the most defining moments of contemporary history: the Bolshevik Revolution. Today, none of Queen Victoria's living descendents carry haemophilia. Because of this, the characterization of haemophilia (deficit of either factor VIII or XI) and the identification of the causal mutation are rendered impossible. In 1991, a tomb containing the remains of Czar Nicolas II's entire family was discovered. A second tomb was discovered in 2007, allowing Russian and American scientists to fill in this gap in medical history. Following a scientific approach combining current genetic experimentation tools and the development of biological information technology, researchers were able to identify each body, allowing them to obtain precious genetic material from the young Czar Alexis, who was stricken by the disease, which revealed a causal substitution in the splice acceptor site of exon 4 in the F9 gene. This mutation that is responsible for haemophilia B had traumatized European royal families throughout the 20th century! PMID:20557352

  2. The Paediatric Board of the Royal College of Physicians of London: its role in the college.

    PubMed

    Chambers, T

    1992-01-01

    Conscious of its responsibilities to its Fellows and Members who are paediatricians, the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) is anxious to play its part, along with others, in maintaining and improving standards in paediatrics. Recognising the importance and prominence of the specialty within the generality of specialist medicine, and alongside general internal medicine, it has established a Paediatric Board, reporting directly to Council, which will deal with and advise on all matters concerning paediatrics and child health, and thus enhance the autonomy and influence of the specialty both within the College and on medical affairs in general. It will do this in close association with the British Paediatric Association (BPA) which will nominate members of the Board. In particular the RCP will continue to set standards in paediatrics through examinations, accreditation, representatives on consultant advisory appointment committees, and its membership of the GMC and the Conference of Medical Royal Colleges and their Faculties, to which the Paediatric Board will make a substantial contribution. The network of regional paediatric advisers to the RCP will ensure that the Board is kept in touch with paediatric opinion throughout England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Relationships with Scottish paediatrics and paediatricians will be important, for example, in the organisation and development of the MRCP(UK) examination and its paediatric Part II. Links with paediatricians in the Irish Republic exist through the Joint Committee on Higher Medical Training. PMID:1573597

  3. Abnormal chemical element concentrations in lichens of Isle Royale National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Lichens have been used for many years to monitor changes in deposited airborne chemical elements in many areas, but few studies have focused on areas suspected of experiencing slightly elevated pollution. Detection of subtle patterns of slightly elevated pollutants calls for developing several lines of evidence as opposed to single line studies used in heavily polluted areas. This study of two lichen species, Hypogymnia physodes and Evernia mesomorpha, in Isle Royale National Park, Michigan compares the concentrations and ranks of elements with the concentrations and ranks of the elements in the earth's crust, changes in element concentrations over a nine year period, and the geography of element concentrations in the park. S, Zn, Pb, Cd and Se were elevated in both species and higher in rank compared to the concentrations and ranks in the earth's crust. Toxic elements increased 123% in Hypogymnia and 62% in Evernia over 9 years, compared to increases of 45% and 59% for non-toxic elements in each species, respectively. Geographically, the lichens at certain localities with higher exposures experienced higher than average element concentrations. Finally, tissue concentrations of Mn, S and Se at some localities were above levels known to be either toxic or similar to those found in polluted areas. These four lines of evidence suggest that Isle Royale National Park is experiencing the onset of chronic air pollution stress from a number of sources.

  4. Three intervention levels for improving smoking behavior among Royal Thai Army conscripts.

    PubMed

    Pantaewan, Pannee; Kengganpanich, Mondha; Tanasugarn, Chanuantong; Tansakul, Supreya; Termsirikulchai, Lakkhana; Nityasuddhi, Dechavudh

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated a smoking cessation program based on an ecological model among Royal Thai Army conscripts with three levels of behavioral change intervention: intrapersonal level, interpersonal level and organizational level. The program applied processes of change in the Transtheoretical Model for intervention at the intrapersonal level; social support from the family at the interpersonal level; strengthening policies and activities to support quitting, including providing a smoke-free workplace at the organizational level. Eighty-nine participants were purposively selected from the first regiment of conscripts at the King's Royal Guard, recruited into the Army in 2009. The behavioral change intervention was conducted during their first six months of duty. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data between May and November 2009. Individual interviews and checklist observations were employed to collect data. Data was analyzed using inferential statistics, comparing means by paired t-test and the chi-square test was used to analyze correlations. Qualitative data were analyzed thematically. Sixty-three percent of participants significantly (p<0.001) reduced the number of cigarettes smoked, and 4.5% quit smoking. There was significant improvement in self-efficacy for improving smoking behavior (p=0.002) and making an effort to quit (p<0.001). PMID:23077826

  5. Observing the skies of Lisbon. Isaac de Sequeira Samuda, an estrangeirado in the Royal Society

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Carla Costa

    2014-01-01

    Elected in 1723, Isaac de Sequeira Samuda (1681–1729) was the first Jewish Fellow of the Royal Society. He had arrived in London just a few years earlier, escaping from the Portuguese Inquisition. Despite his past, he had no difficulty in establishing links with his country's diplomatic representatives in London. A physician and adviser on scientific subjects, he became a conduit between the emerging world of Portuguese astronomy and the British scientific community. He reported to the Royal Society on astronomical observations made in the new observatories in Lisbon and helped with the acquisition of scientific instruments and books destined for Portugal. These activities were facets of Samuda's unusual career and the diverse though often converging associations that he established until his death. As the member of a network active in the diffusion of new ideas and in the modernization of Portuguese science, Samuda can be regarded as an estrangeirado, as this term has come to be used in the modern literature. PMID:24921106

  6. Action Stations! 100 years of trauma care on maritime and amphibious operations in the Royal Navy.

    PubMed

    Osborne, M; Smith, J E

    2015-01-01

    Over the past century trauma care within the Royal Navy (RN) has evolved; wartime experiences and military medical research have combined to allow significant improvement in the care of casualties. This article describes the key maritime and amphibious operations that have seen the Royal Navy Medical Service (RNMS) deliver high levels of support to wherever the Naval Service has deployed in the last 100 years. Key advancements in which progress has led to improved outcomes for injured personnel are highlighted--the control and treatment of blood loss, wound care, and the prevention and management of organ failure with optimal resuscitation. Historians often point out how slowly military medicine progressed for the first few thousand years of its recorded history, and how quickly it has progressed in the last century. This reflective article will show how the RNMS has been an integral part of that story, and how the lessons learnt by our predecessors have shaped our modern day doctrine surrounding trauma care. PMID:26292385

  7. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of royal palm tree (Roystonea regia) peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Leandra; Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Zamorano, Laura S.; Shnyrov, Valery L.; Polikarpov, Igor

    2007-09-01

    The purification, crystallization, X-ray diffraction data acquisition and molecular-replacement results of royal palm tree (R. regia) peroxidase are described. Royal palm tree peroxidase (RPTP), which was isolated from Roystonea regia leaves, has an unusually high stability that makes it a promising candidate for diverse applications in industry and analytical chemistry [Caramyshev et al. (2005 ▶), Biomacromolecules, 6, 1360–1366]. Here, the purification and crystallization of this plant peroxidase and its X-ray diffraction data collection are described. RPTP crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.8 Å. The crystals belong to the trigonal space group P3{sub 1}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 116.83, c = 92.24 Å, and contain one protein molecule per asymmetric unit. The V{sub M} value and solvent content are 4.07 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and 69.8%, respectively.

  8. Keynes, Newton and the Royal Society: the events of 1942 and 1943

    PubMed Central

    Kuehn, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Most discussions of John Maynard Keynes's activities in connection with Newton are restricted to the sale in 1936 at Sotheby's of Newton's Portsmouth Papers and to Keynes's 1946 essay ‘Newton, the Man’. This paper provides a history of Keynes's Newton-related work in the interim, highlighting especially the events of 1942 and 1943, which were particularly relevant to the Royal Society's role in the domestic and international promotion of Newton's legacy. During this period, Keynes lectured twice on Newton, leaving notes that would later be read by his brother Geoffrey in the famous commemoration of the Newton tercentenary in 1946. In 1943 Keynes assisted the Royal Society in its recognition of the Soviet celebrations and in the acquisition and preservation of more of the Newton library. In each instance Keynes took the opportunity to promote his interpretation of Newton as ‘the last of the magicians’: a scientist who had one foot in the pre-modern world and whose approach to understanding the world was as much intuitive as it was methodical. PMID:24686919

  9. Noise zoning around airports in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evers, F. W. R.

    1980-01-01

    The situation in the Netherlands with respect to noise abatement is dominated by a steadily increasing activity both at the political and the administrative level. A new law with respect to the designation of noise zones around existing and future airports and military airfields was enacted on 1 October 1978. A comprehensive new noise nuisance act was signed by the Queen on 16 February 1979. Both laws were accepted by Parliament unanimously. This article describes the new regulations with respect to noise zoning around airports. To maintain the habitability of the environment around airports, a demarcation will be made between the interest of the people living there and those of aviation. A noise zone will be designated outside which the noise load from aircraft movements may not exceed a fixed maximum. Within this area, where a noise load above the fixed maximum is allowed, planning and building design measures will have to be taken. Although the exclusion of new housing within the noise zone is an essential element, the area will be used for other purposes by exchanging previously intended developments with those from areas outside the zone. The Minister in charge of physical planning will issue directives concerning the contents of local development plans and will indicate how such plans, once amended, should be put into effect. Termination of the use or habitation of existing buildings is possible as well as soundproofing of buildings. The costs of measures taken to prevent undesirable new developments and measures taken to improve the existing state of affairs are borne by the central government. But a charge has to be paid by the users of the airports to defray the costs.

  10. Institutional Paralysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarmolinsky, Adam

    1975-01-01

    Institutional paralysis of higher education is the result of the disjunction between faculty and administration; the disjunction between substantive planning and bugetary decision-making; the disjunction between departmental structures and functional areas of university concern; and the disjunction between the theory of direct democracy and its…

  11. Institutional betrayal.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carly Parnitzke; Freyd, Jennifer J

    2014-09-01

    A college freshman reports a sexual assault and is met with harassment and insensitive investigative practices leading to her suicide. Former grade school students, now grown, come forward to report childhood abuse perpetrated by clergy, coaches, and teachers--first in trickles and then in waves, exposing multiple perpetrators with decades of unfettered access to victims. Members of the armed services elect to stay quiet about sexual harassment and assault during their military service or risk their careers by speaking up. A Jewish academic struggles to find a name for the systematic destruction of his people in Nazi Germany during the Holocaust. These seemingly disparate experiences have in common trusted and powerful institutions (schools, churches, military, government) acting in ways that visit harm upon those dependent on them for safety and well-being. This is institutional betrayal. The purpose of this article is to describe psychological research that examines the role of institutions in traumatic experiences and psychological distress following these experiences. We demonstrate the ways in which institutional betrayal has been left unseen by both the individuals being betrayed as well as the field of psychology and introduce means by which to identify and address this betrayal. PMID:25197837

  12. Institutional Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allard, M. June

    Institutional bonding was examined at a public, urban commuter college with exceptionally high attrition and visibly low morale. Changes in bonding and attrition were measured 6 years after a 2-year effort to develop school identity and student feelings of membership. It was found that a simple index of campus morale is provided by level of…

  13. Institution Morphisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goguen, Joseph; Rosu, Grigore; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Institutions formalize the intuitive notion of logical system, including both syntax and semantics. A surprising number of different notions of morphisim have been suggested for forming categories with institutions as objects, and a surprising variety of names have been proposed for them. One goal of this paper is to suggest a terminology that is both uniform and informative to replace the current rather chaotic nomenclature. Another goal is to investigate the properties and interrelations of these notions. Following brief expositions of indexed categories, twisted relations, and Kan extensions, we demonstrate and then exploit the duality between institution morphisms in the original sense of Goguen and Burstall, and the 'plain maps' of Meseguer, obtaining simple uniform proofs of completeness and cocompleteness for both resulting categories; because of this duality, we prefer the name 'comorphism' over 'plain map.' We next consider 'theoroidal' morphisms and comorphisims, which generalize signatures to theories, finding that the 'maps' of Meseguer are theoroidal comorphisms, while theoroidal morphisms are a new concept. We then introduce 'forward' and 'semi-natural' morphisms, and appendices discuss institutions for hidden algebra, universal algebra, partial equational logic, and a variant of order sorted algebra supporting partiality.

  14. Diagnosis and management of von Willebrand disease in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    de Wee, Eva M; Leebeek, Frank W G; Eikenboom, Jeroen C J

    2011-07-01

    In the Netherlands, specialized care for patients with a bleeding disorder, including hemophilia, von Willebrand disease (VWD), and allied disorders, is concentrated in 13 Hemophilia Treatment Centers. The Dutch Hemophilia Treaters Society, the Dutch Hemophilia Nurses' Society, and the Netherlands Hemophilia Patients Society collaborate to optimize management of patients with a bleeding disorder. A recently updated consensus guideline of hemophilia and allied bleeding disorders provide guidance on the current optimal diagnostic strategy and treatment of VWD. Genetic testing is not routinely performed in the Netherlands. Desmopressin (DDAVP) is the choice of treatment in VWD patients responsive to DDAVP, as determined by a test infusion. Coagulation factor concentrates are used in nonresponsive individuals, in case of a contraindication for DDAVP, or in type 2B and type 3 VWD. These concentrates are available for all patients in the Netherlands; however, these may only be administered in a Hemophilia Treatment Center or under the care of a Hemophilia Treatment Center. Recently a study on moderate and severe VWD (the Willebrand in Netherlands study) was initiated to obtain more insight on VWD diagnosis, treatment, and the burden of the disease. PMID:22102190

  15. Expression of recombinant AccMRJP1 protein from royal jelly of Chinese honeybee in Pichia pastoris and its proliferation activity in an insect cell line

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Main royal jelly protein 1 (MRJP1) is the most abundant member of the main royal jelly protein (MRJP) family among honeybees. Mature MRJP1 cDNA of the Chinese honeybee (Apis cerana cerana MRJP1, or AccMRJP1) was expressed in Pichia pastoris. SDS-PAGE showed that recombinant AccMRJP1 was identical in...

  16. Two major mumps genotype G variants dominated recent mumps outbreaks in the Netherlands (2009-2012).

    PubMed

    Gouma, Sigrid; Sane, Jussi; Gijselaar, Daphne; Cremer, Jeroen; Hahné, Susan; Koopmans, Marion; van Binnendijk, Rob

    2014-05-01

    During three seasons of mumps outbreaks in the Netherlands (September 2009-August 2012), 822 mumps cases were laboratory-confirmed at the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM). Most patients were vaccinated young adults. Given the protracted endemic circulation, we studied the genetic diversity and changes of mumps virus over a period of 3 years. Phylogenetic analysis of the small hydrophobic (SH) gene (316 bp) was performed on a representative set of 808 specimens that tested positive for mumps via PCR. Additionally, the haemagglutinin/neuraminidase (HN) gene (1749 bp) and fusion (F) gene (1617 bp) were sequenced for a subset of samples (n = 17). Correlations between different sequence types and epidemiological and clinical data were investigated. The outbreaks in the Netherlands were dominated by two SH gene sequence types within genotype G, termed MuVs/Delft.NLD/03.10 (variant 1) and MuVs/Scheemda.NLD/12.10 (variant 2). Sequence analysis of the HN and F genes indicated that the outbreaks were initiated by separately introduced genetic lineages. The predominance of variant 2 by the end of the first outbreak season could not be explained by any of the epidemiological factors investigated. Orchitis was more frequently reported in males infected with variant 2, irrespective of age and vaccination status. These findings illustrate genetic heterogeneity of an emerging mumps genotype, and raise questions about the mechanisms driving mumps epidemiology and immunity in relation to vaccination. PMID:24603524

  17. Overcoming fragmentation in health care: chronic care in Austria, Germany and The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Nolte, Ellen; Knai, Cécile; Hofmarcher, Maria; Conklin, Annalijn; Erler, Antje; Elissen, Arianne; Flamm, Maria; Fullerton, Brigit; Sönnichsen, Andreas; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M

    2012-01-01

    The growing recognition of care fragmentation is causing many countries to explore new approaches to healthcare delivery that can bridge the boundaries between professions, providers and institutions and so better support the rising number of people with chronic health problems. This paper examines the role of the regulatory, funding and organisational context for the development and implementation of approaches to chronic care, using examples from Austria, Germany and the Netherlands. We find that the three countries have implemented a range of policies and approaches to achieve better coordination within and across the primary and secondary care interface and so better meet the needs of patients with chronic conditions. This has involved changes to the regulatory framework to support more coordinated approaches to care (Austria, Germany), coupled with financial incentives (Austria, Germany) or changes in payment systems (the Netherlands). What is common to the three countries is the comparative 'novelty' of policies and approaches aimed at fostering coordinated care; however, the evidence of their impact remains unclear. PMID:22221931

  18. The Netherlands study of depression in older persons (NESDO); a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To study late-life depression and its unfavourable course and co morbidities in The Netherlands. Methods We designed the Netherlands Study of Depression in Older Persons (NESDO), a multi-site naturalistic prospective cohort study which makes it possible to examine the determinants, the course and the consequences of depressive disorders in older persons over a period of six years, and to compare these with those of depression earlier in adulthood. Results From 2007 until 2010, the NESDO consortium has recruited 510 depressed and non depressed older persons (≥ 60 years) at 5 locations throughout the Netherlands. Depressed persons were recruited from both mental health care institutes and general practices in order to include persons with late-life depression in various developmental and severity stages. Non-depressed persons were recruited from general practices. The baseline assessment included written questionnaires, interviews, a medical examination, cognitive tests and collection of blood and saliva samples. Information was gathered about mental health outcomes and demographic, psychosocial, biological, cognitive and genetic determinants. The baseline NESDO sample consists of 378 depressed (according to DSM-IV criteria) and 132 non-depressed persons aged 60 through 93 years. 95% had a major depression and 26.5% had dysthymia. Mean age of onset of the depressive disorder was around 49 year. For 33.1% of the depressed persons it was their first episode. 41.0% of the depressed persons had a co morbid anxiety disorder. Follow up assessments are currently going on with 6 monthly written questionnaires and face-to-face interviews after 2 and 6 years. Conclusions The NESDO sample offers the opportunity to study the neurobiological, psychosocial and physical determinants of depression and its long-term course in older persons. Since largely similar measures were used as in the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA; age range 18-65 years), data

  19. Controlled Containment, Radioactive Waste Management in the Netherlands

    SciTech Connect

    Codee, H.

    2002-02-26

    All radioactive waste produced in The Netherlands is managed by COVRA, the central organization for radioactive waste. The Netherlands forms a good example of a country with a small nuclear power program which will end in the near future. However, radioisotope production, nuclear research and other industrial activities will continue to produce radioactive waste. For the small volume, but broad spectrum of radioactive waste, including TENORM, The Netherlands has developed a management system based on the principles to isolate, to control and to monitor the waste. Long term storage is an essential element of the management system and forms a necessary step in the strategy of controlled containment that will ultimately result in final removal of the waste. Since the waste will remain retrievable for long time new technologies and new disposal options can be applied when available and feasible.

  20. [Number of children of Turks and Moroccans in the Netherlands].

    PubMed

    Van Hoorn, W D

    1987-09-01

    A multivariate analysis of the 1984 Quality of Life-Survey, which was held among Turkish and Moroccan heads of households in the Netherlands, shows that their fertility is affected by factors concerning their native country as well as by some aspects of life in the Netherlands. A low current number of children is associated with a higher education in the native country, an urban background and no strong commitment to Islam. In addition, the marital status at immigration and the nationality of the woman also show a particular correlation with the fertility. Some socio-cultural characteristics such as the woman's work and house-ownership also have a certain association with the family size. The likelihood of further declines in fertility among Turks and Moroccans living in the Netherlands is discussed. PMID:12314889

  1. The impact of the Bristol Royal Infirmary disaster and inquiry on public services in the UK.

    PubMed

    Alaszewski, Andy

    2002-11-01

    The inquiry into the services provided by the paediatric cardiac surgical team at Bristol Royal Infirmary between 1984 and 1995 marks a watershed in the development of health and social care services in the UK. There was an organisational failure of foresight based on a series of systemic and communication failures which contributed to oversight of an 'incubating' hazard which ultimately led to disaster. The recommendations of the Bristol inquiry have provided a major stimulus to the modernisation programme and especially of governance in health and social care which aims to restore public confidence and create 'high-trust' organisations. While it is premature to evaluate the impact of the changes, there is little evidence at present to indicate that they will improve the quality of professional decision making and the safety of users or enhance user and public confidence in the NHS and other public services. PMID:12487845

  2. Study for the replacement of Kodak Royal-X Pan film

    SciTech Connect

    Bunker, F.J.

    1989-08-01

    Kodak Royal-X Pan (RXP) film has been the prime film for oscilloscope camera recording at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) since 1962. Kodak discontinued making this film in 1987, however, so it became necessary to find a substitute that had as many of the photographic characteristics of RXP as possible --- spectral sensitivity, image quality, recording speed, base plus fog background density, and processing parameters. (RXP and Kodak 857 developer will continue being used at NTS until the film supply is exhausted.) RXP 2{1/4} {times} 3{1/4}-inch film has been the film of choice for oscillography at NTS because of its sensitivity to the blue radiation from P-11 phosphor, which constitutes the coating of oscilloscope tubes, and its ability to record fast transient occurrences, such as oscilloscope traces, in or near nanosecond exposure times. 1 ref., 40 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Deposition and cycling of sulfur controls mercury accumulation in Isle Royale fish

    SciTech Connect

    Paul E. Drevnick; Donald E. Canfield; Patrick R. Gorski

    2007-11-01

    Mercury contamination of fish is a global problem. Consumption of contaminated fish is the primary route of methylmercury exposure in humans and is detrimental to health. Newly mandated reductions in anthropogenic mercury emissions aim to reduce atmospheric mercury deposition and thus mercury concentrations in fish. However, factors other than mercury deposition are important for mercury bioaccumulation in fish. In the lakes of Isle Royale, U.S.A., reduced rates of sulfate deposition since the Clean Air Act of 1970 have caused mercury concentrations in fish to decline to levels that are safe for human consumption, even without a discernible decrease in mercury deposition. Therefore, reductions in anthropogenic sulfur emissions may provide a synergistic solution to the mercury problem in sulfate-limited freshwaters. 71 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. The Phenotypic Effects of Royal Jelly on Wild-Type D. melanogaster Are Strain-Specific

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Stefanie L.; Seggio, Joseph A.; Hicks, Jasmin A.; Sharp, Katherine A.; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.; Wang, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    The role for royal jelly (RJ) in promoting caste differentiation of honeybee larvae into queens rather than workers is well characterized. A recent study demonstrated that this poorly understood complex nutrition drives strikingly similar phenotypic effects in Drosophila melanogaster, such as increased body size and reduced developmental time, making possible the use of D. melanogaster as a model system for the genetic analysis of the cellular mechanisms underlying RJ and caste differentiation. We demonstrate here that RJ increases the body size of some wild-type strains of D. melanogaster but not others, and report significant delays in developmental time in all flies reared on RJ. These findings suggest that cryptic genetic variation may be a factor in the D. melanogaster response to RJ, and should be considered when attempting to elucidate response mechanisms to environmental changes in non-honeybee species. PMID:27486863

  5. The Royal Princess Anna Vasa. Historical note and radiological examination of her skeleton.

    PubMed

    Grzegorzewski, M; Borón, Z; Lasek, W; Florkowski, A

    1996-03-01

    Radiological findings on the skeleton of the Royal Princess Anna Vasa are presented. Anna Vasa (1568-1625) was the sister of Sigismund Vasa, who reigned as Sigismund III, king of Sweden and Poland. She was born in Sweden but spent most of her life in Poland. Her skeleton was removed from the tomb in Toruń during restoration work at St. Mary's Church in April 1994. It was then subjected to anthropological and radiological examinations (conventional radiography and CT). The studies revealed a number of anatomical deviations and pathological abnormalities; e.g. basilar impression and congenital anomalies of the spine. These findings can explain many of the complaints troubling Anna Vasa during her lifetime. A fragmentary historical outline and biography of Anna Vasa and Sigismund III are also presented. PMID:8600947

  6. The Phenotypic Effects of Royal Jelly on Wild-Type D. melanogaster Are Strain-Specific.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Stefanie L; Seggio, Joseph A; Nascimento, Nara F; Huh, Dana D; Hicks, Jasmin A; Sharp, Katherine A; Axelrod, Jeffrey D; Wang, Kevin C

    2016-01-01

    The role for royal jelly (RJ) in promoting caste differentiation of honeybee larvae into queens rather than workers is well characterized. A recent study demonstrated that this poorly understood complex nutrition drives strikingly similar phenotypic effects in Drosophila melanogaster, such as increased body size and reduced developmental time, making possible the use of D. melanogaster as a model system for the genetic analysis of the cellular mechanisms underlying RJ and caste differentiation. We demonstrate here that RJ increases the body size of some wild-type strains of D. melanogaster but not others, and report significant delays in developmental time in all flies reared on RJ. These findings suggest that cryptic genetic variation may be a factor in the D. melanogaster response to RJ, and should be considered when attempting to elucidate response mechanisms to environmental changes in non-honeybee species. PMID:27486863

  7. The letter from Dublin: climate change, colonialism, and the Royal Society in the seventeenth century.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Brant

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses an anonymous letter published in the Philosophical Transactions in 1676 that reports the theories of American colonists about the cause of their warming climate (cultivation and deforestation), and offers Ireland's colonial experience as a counterexample: Ireland was a colony with decreased cultivation, but the same perceived warming. That such an objection seemed necessary to the author shows that anthropogenic climate change could be a subject of debate and that the concept of climate was tied into theories of land use and to the colonial enterprise. Since he was liminal to both the Royal Society of London and the intellectual circles of Dublin, his skepticism, contextualized here, questions both the elite discourse and the discourse at the colonial periphery. PMID:21936189

  8. The discovery of microorganisms by Robert Hooke and Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek, fellows of the Royal Society.

    PubMed

    Gest, Howard

    2004-05-01

    The existence of microscopic organisms was discovered during the period 1665-83 by two Fellows of The Royal Society, Robert Hooke and Antoni van Leeuwenhoek. In Micrographia (1665), Hooke presented the first published depiction of a microganism, the microfungus Mucor. Later, Leeuwenhoek observed and described microscopic protozoa and bacteria. These important revelations were made possible by the ingenuity of Hooke and Leeuwenhoek in fabricating and using simple microscopes that magnified objects from about 25-fold to 250-fold. After a lapse of more than 150 years, microscopy became the backbone of our understanding of the roles of microbes in the causation of infectious diseases and the recycling of chemical elements in the biosphere. PMID:15209075

  9. AN AUTOPSIC ART: DRAWINGS OF 'DR GRANVILLE'S MUMMY' IN THE ROYAL SOCIETY ARCHIVES.

    PubMed

    Riggs, Christina

    2016-06-20

    In 1821 Augustus Bozzi Granville FRS unwrapped and dissected an ancient Egyptian mummy, presenting the results of his examination to the Royal Society in 1825. He commissioned artist Henry Perry to draw the process in stages; these drawings were subsequently engraved by James Basire for publication in Philosophical Transactions. This article presents the original drawings for the first time, allowing comparison with their engravings. Taken together with Granville's accounts of the unwrapping of the mummy, the drawings demonstrate the significant role of illustration and other visual practices in anatomical argumentation in the early nineteenth century, as well as the prestige that commissioned illustrations lent to the performance and dissemination of scientific expertise. Moreover, the drawings include one of the key visual tropes of race science--a skull in left-facing profile, mapped with a facial angle--and thus indicate the early incorporation of Egyptian mummies into typologies of race. PMID:27386713

  10. Management practices that concentrate visitor activities: Camping impact management at Isle Royale National Park, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marion, J.L.; Farrell, T.A.

    2002-01-01

    This study assessed campsite conditions and the effectiveness of campsite impact management strategies at Isle Royale National Park, USA. Protocols for assessing indicators of vegetation and soil conditions were developed and applied to 156 campsites and 88 shelters within 36 backcountry campgrounds. The average site was 68 m2 and 83% of sites lost vegetation over areas less than 47 m2. Results reveal that management actions to spatially concentrate camping activities and reduce camping disturbance have been highly successful. Comparisons of disturbed area/overnight stay among other protected areas reinforces this assertion. These reductions in area of camping disturbance are attributed to a designated site camping policy, limitation on site numbers, construction of sites in sloping terrain, use of facilities, and an ongoing program of campsite maintenance. Such actions are most appropriate in higher use backcountry and wilderness settings.

  11. Management practices that concentrate visitor activities: camping impact management at Isle Royale National Park, USA.

    PubMed

    Marion, Jeffrey L; Farrell, Tracy A

    2002-10-01

    This study assessed campsite conditions and the effectiveness of campsite impact management strategies at Isle Royale National Park, USA. Protocols for assessing indicators of vegetation and soil conditions were developed and applied to 156 campsites and 88 shelters within 36 backcountry campgrounds. The average site was 68 m2 and 83% of sites lost vegetation over areas less than 47 m2. We believe that management actions implemented to spatially concentrate camping activities and reduce camping disturbance have been highly successful. Comparisons of disturbed area/overnight stay among other protected areas reinforces this assertion. These reductions in area of camping disturbance are attributed to a designated site camping policy, limitation on site numbers, construction of sites in sloping terrain, use of facilities, and an ongoing program of campsite maintenance. Such actions are most appropriate in higher use backcountry and wilderness settings. PMID:12418164

  12. Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists guidelines: How evidence-based are they?

    PubMed Central

    Prusova, K.; Churcher, L.; Tyler, A.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine aims to translate scientific research into good medical practice. The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists publishes recommendations and guidelines to guide clinicians in decision-making. In this study, the evidence base underlying the ‘Green-top Guidelines’ has been analysed in order to establish the quality of research underlying recommendations. During this descriptive study of 1,682 individual recommendations, the authors found that only 9–12% of the guidelines were based on the best quality (Grade A) evidence. The authors believe that this type of analysis serves to provide greater clarity for clinicians and patients using guidelines and recommendations in the field of obstetrics and gynaecology to make collaborative clinical decisions. PMID:24922406

  13. Seventeenth-century 'treasure' found in Royal Society archives: the Ludus helmontii and the stone disease.

    PubMed

    Alfonso-Goldfarb, Ana Maria; Ferraz, Márcia Helena Mendes; Rattansi, Piyo M

    2014-09-20

    Our archival researches at the Royal Society reveal that a small envelope attached to a 1675 letter from an Antwerp apothecary, A. Boutens, contained a sample of the 'Ludus' prepared as a remedy for the 'stone disease' then sweeping through Europe, which was first announced in J. B. van Helmont's De lithiasi (1644). After examining the fascination with the medical use of the Ludus (which required the 'alkahest' for its preparation) and the tenacious efforts to procure it, we trace the fortunae of two other ludi in England, brought to and offered by Francis Mercurius van Helmont during his English sojourn. Both eventually found their way to the geologist John Woodward, one of them through Sir Isaac Newton. Finally we show how the allure of the Ludus helmontii vanished, with transformations in mineral analysis and reclassifications from Woodward to John Hill. PMID:25254277

  14. Abnormal attentions toward the British Royal Family: factors associated with approach and escalation.

    PubMed

    James, David V; Meloy, J Reid; Mullen, Paul E; Pathé, Michele T; Farnham, Frank R; Preston, Lulu F; Darnley, Brian J

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal approach and escalation from communication to physical intrusion are central concerns in managing risk to prominent people. This study was a retrospective analysis of police files of those who have shown abnormal attentions toward the British Royal Family. Approach (n = 222), compared with communication only (n = 53), was significantly associated with specific factors, most notably serious mental illness and grandiosity. In a sample of those who engaged in abnormal communication (n = 132), those who approached (n = 79) were significantly more likely to evidence mental illness and grandiosity, to use multiple communications, to employ multiple means of communication, and to be driven by motivations that concerned a personal entitlement to the prominent individual. Logistic regression produced a model comprising grandiosity, multiple communications, and multiple means of communication, for which receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis gave an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.82. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to those for other target groups. PMID:20852218

  15. The royal road for genetic algorithms: Fitness landscapes and GA performance

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M.; Holland, J.H. ); Forrest, S. . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1991-01-01

    Genetic algorithms (GAs) play a major role in many artificial-life systems, but there is often little detailed understanding of why the GA performs as it does, and little theoretical basis on which to characterize the types of fitness landscapes that lead to successful GA performance. In this paper we propose a strategy for addressing these issues. Our strategy consists of defining a set of features of fitness landscapes that are particularly relevant to the GA, and experimentally studying how various configurations of these features affect the GA's performance along a number of dimensions. In this paper we informally describe an initial set of proposed feature classes, describe in detail one such class ( Royal Road'' functions), and present some initial experimental results concerning the role of crossover and building blocks'' on landscapes constructed from features of this class. 27 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  16. Organochlorine and metal residues in royal terns nesting on the central Texas coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, K.A.; LeFever, C.A.; Mulhern, B.M.

    1982-01-01

    Royal Tern (Sterna maxima) eggs collected from two study areas on the central Texas coast in 1978 contained organochlorine residues at levels below those known to have adverse effects on avian reproduction and survival. Residues of zinc, copper, selenium, and arsenic were present at what appeared to be background levels. Mercury residues were elevated. Average organochlorine and metals residues did not differ significantly between an agricultural-industrial study area and a less developed control area. The thickness of eggshells collected in 1978 was statistically similar to the thickness of shells collected before 1943. There was a significant improvement in mean eggshell thickness from 1970 to 1978 with a corresponding decline in DDE and PCB residues.

  17. Improving efficiency in robotic theatres in the Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust: a gynaecology theatres perspective.

    PubMed

    Harding, V; Williams, J

    2016-03-01

    Improving efficiency within the operating theatre is always a key concern when running a successful operating list. However, with robotic surgery, this can become paramount. Robotic procedures require a more technical set up, additional planning, and good solid communication within the multidisciplinary team. Efficiency needs to be at the forefront of everyone's mind. Forward planning requires knowledge of the procedures being carried out and adequate training with the robot. Trouble shooting will also improve efficiency in robotic surgery, as being able to expect the unexpected can be a major advantage. This article looks at the hurdles encountered by the theatre team at Royal Wolverhampton Trust at the implementation of the robotic programme, and how the theatre team made adjustments to working practice in order to minimise disruption and maximise efficiency. PMID:27149833

  18. Sir Robert Stawell Ball (1840-1913): Royal Astronomer in Ireland and astronomy's public voice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Allan

    2007-11-01

    Nineteenth-century Ireland, and especially Dublin, had a vibrant scientific tradition. And astronomy in particular was seriously cultivated, being part of an Irish tradition extending back to early medieval times. This paper examines principally the career of Sir Robert Stawell Ball, who, while holding three prestigious posts in Ireland, namely those of Andrews Professor at Trinity College, Dublin, Royal Astronomer of Ireland, and Director of the Dunsink Observatory, became famous for his genius as a popular astronomical interpreter, lecturer, and writer. The paper looks at Ball's wider career, the circumstances that provided a receptive market for astronomical information across the English-speaking world, and his massive outreach as both a lecturer and a writer.

  19. THE LOGIC OF SCIENTIFIC UNITY? MEDAWAR, THE ROYAL SOCIETY AND THE ROTHSCHILD CONTROVERSY 1971-72.

    PubMed

    Calver, Neil; Parker, Miles

    2016-03-20

    In 1971 Lord (Victor) Rothschild published his report for the government, The organisation and management of government R&D, and Sir Peter Medawar launched a campaign for the election of Sir Karl Popper to Fellowship of the Royal Society. We explore these two developments in the contexts of the then current views of the role and purpose of science, and their underpinning philosophy. Although the political battle was won by Rothschild, resulting in major changes to the funding and management of applied R&D, we argue that, despite this, Medawar's campaign for Popper provided an embattled science community with a philosophical basis for defending pure research and the unity of basic and applied science. PMID:27017681

  20. Lessons From a 17-Year Radiosurgery Experience at the Royal Adelaide Hospital

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, Daniel E.; Brophy, Brian P.; Taylor, James

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To illustrate some of the potential pitfalls of cranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and its planning based on prospectively gathered data from a 17-year experience at the Royal Adelaide Hospital. Methods and Materials: More than 250 treatments have been planned since 1993 using previously described standard SRS techniques for intracranial benign and malignant lesions. Results: Five case studies are presented (1 meningioma, 1 acoustic neuroma, 2 solitary brain metastasis, 1 arteriovenous malformation), each of which demonstrates at least one salutary lesson. Conclusions: Because SRS delivers a highly conformal dose distribution, it is unforgiving of any geographic miss due to inaccurate outlining and thus dependent on neuroradiological expertise and collaboration. There are also potentially significant implications of misdiagnosis in SRS cases without histological proof-in particular, presumed brain metastases.

  1. The College as an educational institution.

    PubMed

    Bogduk, N

    1997-10-01

    This is an edited transcript of a plenary lecture delivered at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons in May 1996. The author argues that undergraduate curricula in Australia have evolved away from exposing students to rigorous surgical basic sciences. In order to fill the gap left between undergraduate teaching and the Part I examinations, he argues that the College should become an educational institution by developing objectives and providing resources that enable candidates to learn not only what is pertinent to surgical basic training but also how to learn it and why. The call is for the College to take a leading role in education of surgical trainees. PMID:9322714

  2. Effect of Royal Jelly on Formalin Induced-Inflammation in Rat Hind Paw

    PubMed Central

    Arzi, Ardeshir; Olapour, Samaneh; Yaghooti, Hamid; Sistani Karampour, Neda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Royal Jelly (RJ), a food item secreted by worker honeybees, is a mixture that contains protein, glucose, lipid, vitamins, and minerals; it is widely used as a commercial medical product. Previous studies have shown that RJ has a number of physiological effects, such as anti-inflammatory, antitumor, antiallergic and antioxidant activities. Objectives: In the present study, the anti-inflammatory properties of RJ were investigated in formalin-induced rat paw edema. Materials and Methods: In this study, 30 male Wistar albino rats were divided into five equal groups (n = 6) as follows: test groups received different doses (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg, ip) of RJ and a negative control group received normal saline (5 mL/kg) and a positive control group received aspirin (300 mg/kg, i.p). Edema was induced on the right hind paw of the rat by a subplantar injection of 100 µL of formalin (2.5%) after 30 minutes. Paw edema was measured in the rats received the drugs, saline and aspirin before and after the formalin injection during 5 hours, using a plethysmometer. Results: The results showed that RJ has a dose-dependent anti-inflammatory effect and the highest anti-inflammatory effect was observed in the doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg. Conclusions: Royal jelly has potent anti-inflammatory effects compared to aspirin and it could be used in the treatment of inflammation. However, further studies are required to determine the active components in RJ responsible for this effect and its mechanism of action. PMID:25866724

  3. Crystal structure and statistical coupling analysis of highly glycosylated peroxidase from royal palm tree (Roystonea regia).

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Leandra; de Moura, Patricia Ribeiro; Bleicher, Lucas; Nascimento, Alessandro S; Zamorano, Laura S; Calvete, Juan J; Sanz, Libia; Pérez, Alicia; Bursakov, Sergey; Roig, Manuel G; Shnyrov, Valery L; Polikarpov, Igor

    2010-02-01

    Royal palm tree peroxidase (RPTP) is a very stable enzyme in regards to acidity, temperature, H(2)O(2), and organic solvents. Thus, RPTP is a promising candidate for developing H(2)O(2)-sensitive biosensors for diverse applications in industry and analytical chemistry. RPTP belongs to the family of class III secretory plant peroxidases, which include horseradish peroxidase isozyme C, soybean and peanut peroxidases. Here we report the X-ray structure of native RPTP isolated from royal palm tree (Roystonea regia) refined to a resolution of 1.85A. RPTP has the same overall folding pattern of the plant peroxidase superfamily, and it contains one heme group and two calcium-binding sites in similar locations. The three-dimensional structure of RPTP was solved for a hydroperoxide complex state, and it revealed a bound 2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid molecule (MES) positioned at a putative substrate-binding secondary site. Nine N-glycosylation sites are clearly defined in the RPTP electron-density maps, revealing for the first time conformations of the glycan chains of this highly glycosylated enzyme. Furthermore, statistical coupling analysis (SCA) of the plant peroxidase superfamily was performed. This sequence-based method identified a set of evolutionarily conserved sites that mapped to regions surrounding the heme prosthetic group. The SCA matrix also predicted a set of energetically coupled residues that are involved in the maintenance of the structural folding of plant peroxidases. The combination of crystallographic data and SCA analysis provides information about the key structural elements that could contribute to explaining the unique stability of RPTP. PMID:19854274

  4. Two Years on: Koha 3.0 in Use at the CAMLIS Library, Royal London Homoeopathic Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bissels, Gerhard; Chandler, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the further development of the Koha 3.0 library management system (LMS) and the involvement of external software consultants at the Complementary and Alternative Medicine Library and Information Service (CAMLIS), Royal London Homoeopathic Hospital. Design/methodology/approach: The paper takes the…

  5. Implementation of an Open Source Library Management System: Experiences with Koha 3.0 at the Royal London Homoeopathic Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bissels, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the selection process and criteria that led to the implementation of the Koha 3.0 library management system (LMS) at the Complementary and Alternative Medicine Library and Information Service (CAMLIS), Royal London Homoeopathic Hospital. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is a report based on…

  6. Children at Risk in School: Proceedings of a Day Conference at the Royal Commonwealth Society on Wednesday, February 5, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for the Care and Resettlement of Offenders, (England).

    This booklet consists of ther proceedings of a day conference at the Royal Commonwealth Society to explore the subject of crime prevention in relation to children in school. It is divided into several sections which speak to the following: (1) report summary of comments made by the various participants; (2) how teachers can help to combat crime;…

  7. First Report of Veronica Rust by Puccinia veronicae-longifoliae in Minnesota on Veronica spicata Royal Candles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In September 2008, Veronica spicata Royal Candles plants showing foliar symptoms typical of a rust infection were brought to the Plant Disease Clinic at the University of Minnesota by a commercial nursery. A dark brown discoloration was apparent on the upper surface of the leaf with lighter brown pu...

  8. Present Practices and Background to Teaching and Learning at the Royal University of Bhutan (RUB): A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gyamtso, Deki; Maxwell, T. W.

    2012-01-01

    In Bhutan relatively few studies at the higher education level have been done and fewer still reported in international journals. This pilot study highlights the present practices and culture of teaching and learning at one of the teacher education colleges of the Royal University of Bhutan (RUB). It looks broadly across the issues of…

  9. A Critical Appraisal of the Performance of Royal Dutch Shell as a Learning Organisation in the 1990s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Emily

    2002-01-01

    Although Royal Dutch Shell had been identified as a "premiere learning organization," it had its worst results in 1998. Reasons included loss of commitment and community, leadership complacency, and inability to create a shared vision. Although management espoused learning organization principles, learning was not used for communal well-being.…

  10. Storage temperature and 1-MCP treatment affect storage disorders and physiological attributes of ‘Royal Gala’ apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Royal Gala’ apples [Malus domestica (Borkh.) Mansf.] can develop postharvest disorders such as flesh browning, senescent breakdown, peeling, cracking, or shriveling during and after cold storage. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of storage temperature and a range of 1-methylc...

  11. Landfill reduction experience in The Netherlands

    SciTech Connect

    Scharff, Heijo

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • ‘Zero waste’ initiatives never consider risks, side effects or experience of achieved low levels of landfill. • This paper provides insight into what works and what not. • Where strong gradients in regulations and tax occur between countries, waste will find its way to landfills across borders. • Strong landfill reduction can create a fierce competition over the remaining waste to be landfilled resulting in losses. • At some point a public organisation should take responsibility for the operation of a ‘safety net’ in waste management. - Abstract: Modern waste legislation aims at resource efficiency and landfill reduction. This paper analyses more than 20 years of landfill reduction in the Netherlands. The combination of landfill regulations, landfill tax and landfill bans resulted in the desired landfill reduction, but also had negative effects. A fierce competition developed over the remaining waste to be landfilled. In 2013 the Dutch landfill industry generated €40 million of annual revenue, had €58 million annual costs and therefore incurred an annual loss of €18 million. It is not an attractive option to prematurely end business. There is a risk that Dutch landfill operators will not be able to fulfil the financial obligations for closure and aftercare. Contrary to the polluter pays principle the burden may end up with society. EU regulations prohibiting export of waste for disposal are in place. Strong differentials in landfill tax rate between nations have nevertheless resulted in transboundary shipment of waste and in non-compliance with the self-sufficiency and proximity principles. During the transformation from a disposal society to a recycling society, it is important to carefully plan required capacity and to guide the reorganisation of the landfill sector. At some point, it is no longer profitable to provide landfill services. It may be necessary for public organisations or the state to take responsibility for the

  12. Implications of legalising euthanasia in The Netherlands: greater regulatory control?

    PubMed

    Thynne, Kelisiana

    2002-11-01

    Euthanasia has been decriminalised in The Netherlands for the last 30 years, but it was only in April 2001 that the Dutch Parliament legalised voluntary physician-assisted suicide. The legislation incorporates developments in case law, including scope for peer review, and provides common ethical principles for a clear system of control over doctors' actions in regard to patients who request euthanasia. The legalised regulatory system may prove more effective in controlling voluntary and non-voluntary euthanasia in The Netherlands than in countries where euthanasia remains illegal. PMID:12497737

  13. J.G. Crowther's War: Institutional strife at the BBC and British Council.

    PubMed

    Jones, Allan

    2016-06-01

    Science writer, historian and administrator J.G. Crowther (1899-1983) had an uneasy relationship with the BBC during the 1920s and 1930s, and was regarded with suspicion by the British security services because of his left politics. Nevertheless the Second World War saw him working for 'establishment' institutions. He was closely associated with the BBC's Overseas Service and employed by the British Council's Science Committee. Both organizations found Crowther useful because of his wide, international knowledge of science and scientists. Crowther's political views, and his international aspirations for the British Council's Science Committee, increasingly embroiled him in an institutional conflict with the Royal Society and with its president, Sir Henry Dale, who was also chairman of the British Council's Science Committee. The conflict centred on the management of international scientific relations, a matter close Crowther's heart, and to Dale's. Dale considered that the formal conduct of international scientific relations was the Royal Society's business rather than the British Council's. Crowther disagreed, and eventually resigned from the British Council Science Committee in 1946. The article expands knowledge of Crowther by drawing on archival documents to elucidate a side of his career that is only lightly touched on in his memoirs. It shows that 'Crowther's war' was also an institutional war between the Science Committee of the British Council and the Royal Society. Crowther's unhappy experience of interference by the Royal Society plausibly accounts for a retreat from his pre-war view that institutional science should plan and manage BBC science broadcasts. PMID:27076038

  14. The screening and scoping of Environmental Impact Assessment and Strategic Environmental Assessment of Carbon Capture and Storage in the Netherlands

    SciTech Connect

    Koornneef, J.; Faaij, A.; Turkenburg, W.

    2008-08-15

    The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) and Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) are procedural tools which have as goal to assess and evaluate possible environmental effects of, respectively, a proposed project or policy plan. The goal of this article is to explore possible bottlenecks in applying both the EIA and SEA procedures on Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) activities in the Netherlands, as experience is currently minimal or lacking. In this study we focus mainly on the institutional and procedural aspects of the screening and scoping phases of both procedures. This is achieved by reviewing EIA and SEA procedures for analogue projects for the three distinctive process steps of a CCS project, namely the power plant with capture, the transport and finally the underground storage of the CO{sub 2}. Additionally, EIA and SEA or similar procedures on CCS in other countries are reviewed and the legal framework for the Dutch EIA and SEA is studied. This article shows a concise overview of the EIA and SEA procedure in the Netherlands and the relation between both procedures. Based on our findings we have constructed a conceptual taxonomy for the scope of both procedures for CCS in the Netherlands. This taxonomy conceptualizes the possible integration of assessing the environmental impacts for tiered levels of decision making. This integration might be needed for first CCS projects as decisions on the strategic (spatial planning) level are currently absent for CCS in the Netherlands. Perpendicular to such integration is the integration of linked activities in the CCS chain and their alternatives, into one procedure. We argue that it would be beneficial to combine the separate EIA procedures for CCS activities into one procedure or at least provide close linkage between them.

  15. [Surinamese, Antillian, and Aruban persons and families in the Netherlands, January 1, 1992].

    PubMed

    Harmsen, C N; Van Der Heijdt, J

    1993-09-01

    The authors provide data from a 1992 enumeration taken from computerized municipal population registers in the Netherlands. Information is included on characteristics of persons born in Suriname, the Netherlands Antilles, and Aruba who live in the Netherlands. (SUMMARY IN ENG) PMID:12286844

  16. What is the impact of policy differences on nursing home utilization? The cases of Germany and the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Alders, Peter; Costa-Font, Joan; de Klerk, Mirjam; Frank, Richard

    2015-06-01

    Though need factors would predict a higher rate of institutional use in Germany, in 2004 the percentage of people over 65 in institutions in the Netherlands was almost double the percentage in Germany. The lower nursing home utilization in Germany coincided with lower out-of-pocket costs, de facto means-testing of social assistance for such care, a lower perceived quality of nursing home, and less acceptance of the nursing home as a main care modality for adults experiencing functional impairments. These factors have developed over time and are consistent with a--relatively--large government responsibility toward care for the elderly and a preference for institutional care over home care in the Netherlands. The policy to encourage older adults to move to elderly homes to decrease the housing shortage after WWII might have had long-lasting effects. This paper points out that a key in the success of a reform is a behavioral change in the system. As there seems to be no single factor to decrease the percentage of older adults in nursing homes, a sequence of policies might be a more promising route. PMID:25799174

  17. The implementation of the Water Framework Directive in The Netherlands: Does it promote integrated management?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junier, S. J.; Mostert, E.

    The Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC; WFD) is one of the most important European water directives of the past years. The WFD follows an integrated approach, but does it also promote integrated management in practice? In the Netherlands, the WFD has been implemented keeping the existing legal, financial and institutional framework intact as much as possible. An advantage of this arrangement is that the setting of objectives, the selection of measures for reaching the objectives and funding are well tuned to each other. This creates good conditions for the implementation of the programme of measures. A downside of this arrangement is the complexity of coordination. Coordination between different levels within the water management sector was relatively successful, but coordination with other sectors was not so successful, leading to a programme of measures consisting almost exclusively of water management measures. In the various coordination processes the role of intermediaries was significant, by supplying expertise or improving the coordination process or smoothing relations.

  18. NEWS: Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    When Mary took up her appointment in the Institute's Education Department in June 1997, she indicated that she wished to return to teaching in two or three years. We have just heard that in September she will be joining the staff of the Science Department at Camden Girls' School, London. Mary's departure from the Institute is a great loss to the Department, where she has worked tirelessly, and with great imagination, to support those who teach physics at all secondary levels - and at primary level too when the opportunity presented itself. She has made tremendous contributions to the careers side of the Department's work, supporting careers events, providing informal training for others willing to do the same, helping to develop new careers materials and identifying people whom the Institute could use as role models or as the subject of case studies in print or electronic publications. Mary has been equally happy and willing to support pupils, students and teachers, and has been a wonderful role model herself, coming from an industrial research background, training for teaching after a career break and willing and able to teach biology, chemistry and design technology as well as physics. Mary has also written and edited Phases virtually single-handed. We are delighted to hear that Mary will continue to support the department's work as one of its teacher `volunteers'. Ilya Eigenbrot We are pleased to report that Ilya Eigenbrot, who will be known to some through his work at the Royal Institution and his appearances at the Christmas Lectures in a technical support role, has agreed to give the IOP Schools (touring) Lecture next year. The subject will be Lasers and this will follow nicely on to Zbig's lecture this year. Resources (print) Physics on Course The tenth issue of the Institute's popular guide to higher education, Physics on Course 2001, will be published early in July and distributed to all schools and colleges in the United Kingdom and the Republic of

  19. Esophageal and Gastric Cancer Pearl: a nationwide clinical biobanking project in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Haverkamp, L; Parry, K; van Berge Henegouwen, M I; van Laarhoven, H W; Bonenkamp, J J; Bisseling, T M; Siersema, P D; Sosef, M N; Stoot, J H; Beets, G L; de Steur, W O; Hartgrink, H H; Verspaget, H W; van der Peet, D L; Plukker, J T; van Etten, B; Wijnhoven, B P L; van Lanschot, J J; van Hillegersberg, R; Ruurda, J P

    2016-07-01

    Esophageal and gastric cancer is associated with a poor prognosis since many patients develop recurrent disease. Treatment requires specific expertise and a structured multidisciplinary approach. In the Netherlands, this type of expertise is mainly found at the University Medical Centers (UMCs) and a few specialized nonacademic centers. Aim of this study is to implement a national infrastructure for research to gain more insight in the etiology and prognosis of esophageal and gastric cancer and to evaluate and improve the response on (neoadjuvant) treatment. Clinical data are collected in a prospective database, which is linked to the patients' biomaterial. The collection and storage of biomaterial is performed according to standard operating procedures in all participating UMCs as established within the Parelsnoer Institute. The collected biomaterial consists of tumor biopsies, blood samples, samples of malignant and healthy tissue of the resected specimen and biopsies of recurrence. The collected material is stored in the local biobanks and is encoded to respect the privacy of the donors. After approval of the study was obtained from the Institutional Review Board, the first patient was included in October 2014. The target aim is to include 300 patients annually. In conclusion, the eight UMCs of the Netherlands collaborated to establish a nationwide database of clinical information and biomaterial of patients with esophageal and gastric cancer. Due to the national coverage, a high number of patients are expected to be included. This will provide opportunity for future studies to gain more insight in the etiology, treatment and prognosis of esophageal and gastric cancer. PMID:25824294

  20. Space Radar Image of Flevoland, Netherlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a three-frequency false color image of Flevoland, The Netherlands, centered at 52.4 degrees north latitude, 5.4 degrees east longitude. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard space shuttle Endeavour on April 14, 1994. It was produced by combining data from the X-band, C-band and L-band radars. The area shown is approximately 25 kilometers by 28 kilometers (15-1/2 by 17-1/2 miles). Flevoland, which fills the lower two-thirds of the image, is a very flat area that is made up of reclaimed land that is used for agriculture and forestry. At the top of the image, across the canal from Flevoland, is an older forest shown in red; the city of Harderwijk is shown in white on the shore of the canal. At this time of the year, the agricultural fields are bare soil, and they show up in this image in blue. The changes in the brightness of the blue areas are equal to the changes in roughness. The dark blue areas are water and the small dots in the canal are boats. This SIR-C/X-SAR supersite is being used for both calibration and agricultural studies. Several soil and crop ground-truth studies will be conducted during the shuttle flight. In addition, about 10calibration devices and 10 corner reflectors have been deployed to calibrate and monitor the radar signal. One of these transponders can be seen as a bright star in the lower right quadrant of the image. This false-color image was made using L-band total power in the red channel, C-band total power in the green channel, and X-band VV polarization in the blue channel. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be

  1. Laboratories for Educational Innovation: Honors Programs in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfensberger, Marca V. C.; Van Eijl, Pierre; Pilot, Albert

    2012-01-01

    In Dutch universities, honors programs are a fast growing development. The first such programs started in 1993. Twenty years later a large number of programs are implemented at nearly all research universities and also at many universities of applied sciences in the Netherlands. Recent data have revealed significant diversity in the types and…

  2. Development and Analysis of Vocational Maturity Tests in the Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helbing, J. C.

    Although this report is several years old, it explores test development in another country, specifically the Netherlands, using American-developed and normed-instruments. The development of vocational maturity tests and the adaptation of Crites' Vocational Developmental Inventory (VDI), Super's Career Development Inventory (CDI) and Westbrook's…

  3. Balancing Curriculum Freedom and Regulation in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieveen, Nienke; Kuiper, Wilmad

    2012-01-01

    The extent to which the goals and contents of (compulsory) education should to be regulated has been a complicated balancing act in the Netherlands. Against a background of a long-standing statutory tradition of freedom of education, governmental decisions about "what knowledge is of most worth" have been delicate. The purpose of the analysis…

  4. Sign Language Planning in the Netherlands between 1980 and 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schermer, Trude

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses several aspects of language planning with respect to Sign Language of the Netherlands, or Nederlandse Gebarentaal (NGT). For nearly thirty years members of the Deaf community, the Dutch Deaf Council (Dovenschap) have been working together with researchers, several organizations in deaf education, and the organization of…

  5. Clostridium difficile Ribotype 027, Toxinotype III, the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Renate J.; Debast, Sylvia; Visser, Caroline E.; Veenendaal, Dick; Troelstra, Annet; van der Kooi, Tjallie; van den Hof, Susan; Notermans, Daan W.

    2006-01-01

    Outbreaks due to Clostridium difficile polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotype 027, toxinotype III, were detected in 7 hospitals in the Netherlands from April 2005 to February 2006. One hospital experienced at the same time a second outbreak due to a toxin A–negative C. difficile PCR ribotype 017 toxinotype VIII strain. The outbreaks are difficult to control. PMID:16704846

  6. Child Guidance and Mental Health in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakker, Nelleke

    2006-01-01

    In the Netherlands, as in the United States, the introduction of the concept of "mental health" in education is closely related to the development of a network of child guidance clinics. The first of these was established in Amsterdam in 1928. However, a substantial movement to actively promote mental health did not come into existence until after…

  7. Teaching Gender and Geography: The Case of the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortuijn, Joos Droogleever

    2011-01-01

    Feminist geography teaching in universities in the Netherlands originated 30 years ago in an academic context that counteracted this new development for ideological reasons. Nowadays, the neoliberal conditions of the market have replaced the conservative ideology that prevailed 30 years ago. Feminist geography is supported as far as it returns…

  8. The Master in Addiction Medicine Program in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Jong, Cornelis; Luycks, Lonneke; Delicat, Jan-Wilm

    2011-01-01

    Since 2007 there is a full-time, 2-year professional training in addiction medicine in the Netherlands. The aim of this article is to describe in detail the development and present status of the Dutch Master in Addiction Medicine (MiAM) program. In this competency-based professional training, theoretical courses are integrated with learning in…

  9. The Netherlands in Fifty Maps: An Annotated Atlas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamsma, R.

    1988-01-01

    Statistical data relating to The Netherlands is presented in 50 maps that were originally published in the "Journal of Economic and Social Geography" between 1977 and 1986. Lengthy annotations accompanying each map provide important background information on the issues depicted. These elucidations were written with the foreign reader in mind, who…

  10. Dropout Prevention Measures in the Netherlands, an Explorative Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Witte, Kristof; Cabus, Sofie J.

    2013-01-01

    In line with the Lisbon Agenda, set by the European Council in the year 2000, European governments formulated ambitious plans to halve the level of early school-leavers by 2012. This paper outlines the dropout prevention measures in the Netherlands and analyzes their influence at both the individual and school level. While most policy measures…

  11. Working Economics: Labor Policy and Conducive Economy in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korver, Ton

    2004-01-01

    The conducive economy challenges both the conceptual foundations and the practices of present-day economies. In the Netherlands, a few initiatives during the 1980s and early 1990s looked promising, in particular, as these initiatives focused on work quality as one major precondition for reducing disability and enhancing labor participation.…

  12. Vocational Training in the Netherlands: Reform and Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    This volume presents a report on recent developments and current policy objectives in vocational education and training in the Netherlands. The study is based on a conceptual and analytical framework jointly elaborated by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development Secretariat and representatives of member countries. Organized in two…

  13. New Viruses in Idiopathic Human Diarrhea Cases, the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Schapendonk, Claudia M.E.; van Beek, Janko; Vennema, Harry; Schürch, Anita C.; Schipper, Debby; Bodewes, Rogier; Haagmans, Bart L.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Koopmans, Marion P.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging viral infections can be identified by using a viral metagenomics approach for clinical human material. Diarrhea samples of patients with unexplained gastroenteritis from the Netherlands were analyzed by using viral metagenomics. Novel circular DNA viruses, bufaviruses, and genogroup III picobirnaviruses were identified. These data expand our knowledge of the human virome. PMID:24964003

  14. Private Education Provision and Public Finance: The Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrinos, Harry Anthony

    2013-01-01

    One of the key features of the Dutch education system is freedom of education--freedom to establish schools and organize teaching. Almost 70% of schools in the Netherlands are administered by private school boards, and all schools are government funded equally. This allows school choice. Using an instrument to identify private school attendance,…

  15. OECD Review of Career Guidance Policies. Netherlands: Country Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    The Netherlands' career guidance system and policies were evaluated. Data were collected through meetings with policymakers and guidance practitioners in the public and private sectors, analysis of data from a national questionnaire, and a review of pertinent documentation. The evaluation focused on the following areas: markets and the role of…

  16. Teaching in Innovative Vocational Education in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bruijn, Elly

    2012-01-01

    The orientation of vocational education towards competence-based education has led to fundamental changes in the work of vocational education teachers. This article pictures teaching in innovative, competence-based vocational education in the Netherlands. In a multiple case study, the teaching practices of 10 teachers from five vocational schools…

  17. Islamic Schools in the Netherlands: Expansion or Marginalization?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driessen, Geert; Merry, Michael S.

    2006-01-01

    In the Netherlands, the constitutional freedom of education offers the opportunity for the growing number of Muslims to establish state-funded Islamic schools. At the moment there are 46 Islamic primary schools; a number of schools are in the process of being established and there is still a need for an additional 120 such schools. Right from the…

  18. Rethinking Postgraduate Education in Geography: The Case of the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortuijn, Joos Droogleever

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses reforms in postgraduate education in geography in the Netherlands in the context of Europeanization and globalization. Europeanization and globalization have resulted in challenges as well as opportunities for students and universities. In terms of internationalization, Europeanization and the global economic crisis have…

  19. The seroprevalence of Lawsonia intracellularis in horses in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Kranenburg, L C; van Ree, H E M I; Calis, A N M; de Pater, M; Buter, G J; van Maanen, C; Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaarn, M M

    2011-04-01

    Equine proliferative enteropathy caused by Lawsonia intracellularis is an emerging disease of weanling foals and affects their growth and development. The prevalence of Lawsonia intracellularis in The Netherlands is not known. The aim of the study was to investigate the seroprevalence of Lawsonia intracellularis in horses in The Netherlands. Blood samples were taken from healthy foals before and after weaning and from healthy yearlings and mature horses on farms throughout The Netherlands. These samples were analysed for the presence of Lawsonia intracellularis-specific antibodies with a blocking ELISA. White blood cell count, packed cell volume, and total protein concentration were also measured in all foals. Information regarding housing, pasture access, and contact with pig manure on the premises was obtained for all animals. The prevalence of Lawsonia intracellularis antibodies in foals increased significantly from 15% before weaning to 23% after weaning (p = 0.019); it was 89% in yearlings and 99% in horses older than 2 years. There was no significant difference in seroprevalence between the pasture-kept and stable-confined adult horses (97% and 100%, respectively), and there was no significant influence of contact with pig manure. None of the sampled animals showed clinical disease. In conclusion, the results suggest that Lawsonia intracellularis is widespread in The Netherlands and that seropositivity is not necessarily associated with clinical problems. The high seroprevalence in adult horses suggests long-term persistence of antibodies against Lawsonia intracellularis or constant exposure to the bacterium. PMID:21528618

  20. Social Partners and Vocational Education in the Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Dijk, Cor; And Others

    This document on the links between the world of work and the world of vocational training in the Netherlands includes 5 chapters, a list of abbreviations, and a 42-item reference list. Chapter 1 introduces the report. Chapter 2 outlines the Dutch system of industrial relations and presents the concept of "neocorporatism." Chapter 3 identifies…

  1. Child Health in the Netherlands: Facts and Figures, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirasing, R. A.; van Zaal, M. A. E.; Meulmeester, J. F.; Verbrugge, H. P.

    This book presents information on the current health status of children and adolescents in the Netherlands. Chapter 1 discusses demographic factors, including population trends and life expectancy. Chapter 2 focuses on children's health status, reporting on child mortality rates, abortion, birth rate, family planning, perinatal health problems,…

  2. 75 FR 30431 - Carboxymethylcellulose from Finland, Mexico, Netherlands, and Sweden

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... 207), as most recently amended at 74 FR 2847 (January 16, 2009). \\1\\ No response to this request for... carboxymethylcellulose from Finland, Mexico, Netherlands, and Sweden (70 FR 39734). The Commission is conducting reviews... employment statute for Federal employees, and Commission rule 201.15(b)(19 CFR 201.15(b)), 73 FR 24609 (May...

  3. Pesticide Reduction Programs in Denmark, the Netherlands, and Sweden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Peter

    1992-01-01

    The Netherlands, Denmark, and Sweden are leaders in introducing comprehensive and targeted risk reduction programs for pesticides. Describes these programs and their implementation, incorporating material obtained through interviews with representatives of the main constituencies involved in reduction Tables list pesticides that do not meet the…

  4. Stagnation in Mortality Decline among Elders in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssen, Fanny; Nusselder, Wilma J.; Looman, Caspar W. N.; Mackenbach, Johan P.; Kunst, Anton E.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: This study assesses whether the stagnation of old-age (80+) mortality decline observed in The Netherlands in the 1980s continued in the 1990s and determines which factors contributed to this stagnation. Emphasis is on the role of smoking. Design and Methods: Poisson regression analysis with linear splines was applied to total and…

  5. Pica and the Academic Libraries in the Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oosterop, Danielle

    1996-01-01

    Describes Pica, an organization in the Netherlands which evolved from the Project for Integrated Catalogue Automation that includes the National Library and all university libraries. Topics include the organizational structure, the shared online cataloging system, interlibrary loan, library networks and database access, and electronic document…

  6. Situation Reports--Bahamas, Brasil, Guatemala, Netherlands Antilles (Curacao), Uruguay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    Data relating to population and family planning in four foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Bahamas, Guatemala, Netherlands Antilles (Curacao), and Uruguay. Information is provided under two topics, general background and family planning situation, where appropriate and if it is available. General…

  7. Initiative for Transformative Sustainability Education at Wageningen University, The Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wals, Arjen E. J.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about a student-initiated Initiative for Transformative Sustainability Education (ITSE) at Wageningen University in The Netherlands which has led to the development of an undergraduate minor called Sustainability-in-Action consisting of four interlinked courses. When formally approved, the minor will be offered…

  8. Protective effect of royal jelly on the sperm parameters and testosterone level and lipid peroxidation in adult mice treated with oxymetholone

    PubMed Central

    Zahmatkesh, Ensieh; Najafi, Gholamreza; Nejati, Vahid; Heidari, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objectives : The aim of the present study was to evaluate protective effect of royal jelly on sperm parameters, testosterone level, and malondialdehyde (MDA) production in mice. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two adult male NMRI mice weighing 30±2 g were used. All the animals were divided into 4 groups. Control group: received saline 0.1 ml/mouse/day orally for 30 days. Royal jelly group (RJ): received royal jelly at dose of 100 mg/kg daily for 30 days orally. Oxymetholone group: the received Oxymetholone (OX) at dose of 5 mg/kg daily for 30 days orally. Royal jelly+Oxymetholone group: received royal jelly at dose of 100 mg/kg/day orally concomitant with OX administration. Sperm count, sperm motility, viability, maturity, and DNA integrity were analyzed. Furthermore, serum testosterone and MDA concentrations were determined. Results: In Oxymetholone group, sperm count, motility as well as testosterone concentration reduced significantly (p<0.05), while significant (p<0.05) increases in immature sperm, sperm with DNA damaged, and MDA concentration were announced in Oxymetholone group in comparison with control group and Royal jelly+Oxymetholone group. RJ caused partially amelioration in all of the above- mentioned parameters in Royal Jelly+Oxymetholone group. Conclusion: In conclusion, RJ may be used in combination with OX to improve OX-induced oxidative stress and male infertility. PMID:25050300

  9. Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-11-01

    Joining the team A new member of staff has recently joined the Institute of Physics Education Department (Schools and Colleges) team. (Dr) Steven Chapman will have managerial responsibility for physics education issues in the 11 - 16 age range, particularly on the policy side. He will work closely with Mary Wood, who spends much of her time out and about doing the practical things to support physics education pre-16. Catherine Wilson will be spending more of her time working to support the Post-16 Physics Initiative but retains overall responsibility for the department. Steven graduated in Physics and Astronomy and then went on to do his doctorate at Sussex University. He stayed in the research field for a while, including a period at NPL. Then, having decided to train as a teacher, he taught for the last five years, most recently at a brand new school in Sutton where he was Head of Physics. Physics update Dates for `Physics Update' courses in 2000, intended for practising science teachers, are as follows: 1 - 3 April: Malvern College 9 - 10 June: Stirling University 8 - 10 July: York University 8 - 10 December: Oxford University The deadline for applications for the course to be held on 11 - 13 December 1999 at the School of Physics, Exeter University, is 12 November, so any late enquiries should be sent to Leila Solomon at The Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH (tel: 020 7470 4821) right away. Name that teacher! Late nominations are still welcome for the Teachers of Physics/Teachers of Primary Science awards for the year 2000. Closing date for nominations is `the last week in November'. Further details can be obtained from Catherine Wilson or Barbara Hill in the Institute's Education Department. Forward and back! The Education Group's one-day meeting on 13 November is accepting bookings until almost the last minute, so don't delay your application! The day is entitled `Post-16 physics: Looking forward, learning from the past' and it aims to

  10. Gay and lesbian studies in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Hekma, G; van der Meer, T

    1992-01-01

    Gay and Lesbian Studies have been rather successful on an institutional level at Dutch universities. The article discusses the social and scholarly backgrounds of this development, the work being done, and the social reception of gay and lesbian studies. The deployment of gay and lesbian studies was possible thanks to the democratic structure of Dutch universities, and to a general acceptance of the aims of gay and lesbian emancipation in Dutch society. The article delineates also the limitations of the Dutch situation, in terms of the "cordon sanitaire" or minority perspective in which gays and lesbians seem to become enclosed. Also, the future perspectives of gay and lesbian studies are discussed. PMID:1299699

  11. Porters, watchmen, and the crime of William Sayers: the non-scientific staff of the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, in Victorian times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Allan

    2003-06-01

    A careful study of the detailed archives of the Victorian Royal Observatory makes it possible to build up a picture of the employment and working conditions not only of the astronomical staff who worked at Greenwich, but also of the labourers, watchmen, and gate porters. Indeed, the archives open up a window on to how the Observatory was run on a daily basis: how its non-scientific staff were recruited and paid, and what were their terms of employment. They also say a great deal about how Sir George Biddell Airy directed and controlled every aspect of the Observatory's life. Yet while Airy was a strict employer, he emerges as a man who was undoubtedly fair-minded and sometimes even generous to his non-scientific work-force. A study of the Observatory staff files also reveals the relationship between the Observatory labouring staff and the Airy family's domestic servants. And of especial interest is the robbery committed by William Sayers, the Airy family footman in 1868, bringing to light as it does Sir George and Lady Richarda Airy's views on crime and its social causes and consequences, the prison rehabilitation service in 1868, and their opinions on the reform of offenders. Though this paper is not about astronomy as such, it illuminates a fascinating interface where the world of astronomical science met and worked alongside the world of ordinary Victorian people within the walls of one of the nineteenth century's most illustrious astronomical institutions.

  12. Demographic rates of northern royal albatross at Taiaroa Head, New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Perriman, Lyndon; Lalas, Chris; Abraham, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    Demographic rates, such as annual survival rate, are generally difficult to estimate for long-lived seabirds, because of the length of time required for this kind of study and the remoteness of colonies. However, a small colony of northern royal albatross (Diomedea sanfordi) established itself on the mainland of New Zealand at Taiaroa Head, making possible regular banding and monitoring of its individuals since the first chick fledged, in 1938. Data on the presence/absence of birds, as well as on breeding outcomes, were available for the period from 1989–90 to 2011–12, and included 2128 annual resightings of 355 banded individuals of known age. The main goal of the present study was to estimate the annual survival rate of juveniles, pre-breeders, and adults at Taiaroa Head. These rates were estimated simultaneously in a single Bayesian multi-state capture-recapture model. Several models were fitted to the data, with different levels of complexity. From the most parsimonious model, the overall annual adult survival rate was estimated as 0.950 (95% CI [0.941–0.959]). In this model, adult survival declined with age, from 0.976 (95% CI [0.963–0.988]) at 6 years, the minimum age at first breeding, to 0.915 (95% CI [0.879–0.946]) at 40 years. Mean annual survival of pre-breeders was 0.966 (95% CI [0.950–0.980]), and 0.933 (95% CI [0.908–0.966]) for juveniles. There was no discernible difference in survival between males and females, and there was no apparent trend in survival over time. Estimates of other demographic rates were also obtained during the estimation process. The mean age at first return of juveniles to the colony was estimated as 4.8 years (95% CI [4.6–5.1]), and the mean age at first breeding as 8.9 years (95% CI [8.5–9.3]). Because all the birds of the colony were banded, it was possible to estimate the total population size. The number of northern royal albatross present annually at the Taiaroa Head colony has doubled since 1989–90

  13. Atmospheric transport, deposition, and fate of triazine herbicides and their metabolites in pristine areas at Isle Royale National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Cromwell, A.E.

    2000-01-01

    Trace concentrations of triazine herbicides, used in the Midwestern United States, are being transported atmospherically hundreds of kilometers and deposited by precipitation onto pristine areas, such as Isle Royale National Park (Lake Superior). Atrazine, deethylatrazine, deisopropylatrazine, and cyanazine were detected in Isle Royale rainfall from mid-May to early July (1992-1994) at concentrations of less than 0.005 to 1.8 ??g/L. Analysis of predominant wind direction indicated that the herbicides originated from the upper Midwestern United States. The annual mass of herbicides deposited by rainfall varied between years, from 13.4 ??g/m2/yr for 1992, 3.7 ??g/m2/yr for 1993, and 54 ??g/m2/yr for 1994. Atrazine and deethylatrazine were found also in concentrations of less than 5-22 ng/L in lakes across Isle Royale. Concentrations of atrazine in the surface layer of the lakes increased during deposition periods and decreased later in the year. The fate of triazines in shallow lakes suggests faster degradation and shorter half-lives, while deeper lakes have residence times for atrazine that may exceed 10 years.Trace concentrations of triazine herbicides, used in the Midwestern United States, are being transported atmospherically hundreds of kilometers and deposited by precipitation onto pristine areas, such as Isle Royale National Park (Lake Superior). Atrazine, deethylatrazine, deisopropylatrazine, and cyanazine were detected in Isle Royale rainfall from mid-May to early July (1992-1994) at concentrations of less than 0.005 to 1.8 ??g/L. Analysis of predominant wind direction indicated that the herbicides originated from the upper Midwestern United States. The annual mass of herbicides deposited by rainfall varied between years, from 13.4 ??g/m2/yr for 1992, 3.7 ??g/m2/yr for 1993, and 54 ??g/m2/yr for 1994. Atrazine and deethylatrazine were found also in concentrations of less than 5-22 ng/L in lakes across Isle Royale. Concentrations of atrazine in the surface

  14. SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY EXPERIMENTA, MAGISTERIAL FORMULAE AND THE 'ANIMAL ALKAHEST': NEW DOCUMENTS FOUND IN ROYAL SOCIETY ARCHIVES.

    PubMed

    Alfonso-Goldfarb, Ana Maria; Mendes Ferraz, Márcia Helena; Rattansi, Piyo M

    2015-12-20

    In this paper we present three newly rediscovered documents from the Royal Society archives that, together with the four described in our previous publications, constitute a set on a cognate theme. The documents were written by, or addressed to, members of the early Royal Society, and their subject is several magisterial formulae, including J. B. van Helmont's alkahest and Ludus. In addition to the interest in those formulae as medicines for various grave illnesses, our analysis showed that some seventeenth-century scholars sought to explain operations of the animal body by invoking similar but natural substances, while attempting to assimilate the latest anatomical discoveries into a novel framework. The complete set of documents sheds some new light on the interests of seventeenth-century networks of scholars concerned with experimenta. PMID:26665488

  15. Noise and sleep on board vessels in the Royal Norwegian Navy

    PubMed Central

    Sunde, Erlend; Bråtveit, Magne; Pallesen, Ståle; Moen, Bente Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Previous research indicates that exposure to noise during sleep can cause sleep disturbance. Seamen on board vessels are frequently exposed to noise also during sleep periods, and studies have reported sleep disturbance in this occupational group. However, studies of noise and sleep in maritime settings are few. This study's aim was to examine the associations between noise exposure during sleep, and sleep variables derived from actigraphy among seamen on board vessels in the Royal Norwegian Navy (RNoN). Data were collected on board 21 RNoN vessels, where navy seamen participated by wearing an actiwatch (actigraph), and by completing a questionnaire comprising information on gender, age, coffee drinking, nicotine use, use of medication, and workload. Noise dose meters were used to assess noise exposure inside the seamen's cabin during sleep. Eighty-three sleep periods from 68 seamen were included in the statistical analysis. Linear mixed-effects models were used to examine the association between noise exposure and the sleep variables percentage mobility during sleep and sleep efficiency, respectively. Noise exposure variables, coffee drinking status, nicotine use status, and sleeping hours explained 24.9% of the total variance in percentage mobility during sleep, and noise exposure variables explained 12.0% of the total variance in sleep efficiency. Equivalent noise level and number of noise events per hour were both associated with increased percentage mobility during sleep, and the number of noise events was associated with decreased sleep efficiency. PMID:26960785

  16. The Ripley Scroll of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh.

    PubMed

    McCallum, R I

    1996-01-01

    Alchemical scrolls associated with George Ripley are unusual documents which illustrate the pursuit of the Philosophers Stone. Scrolls vary from about 5 feet in length by 5 inches wide to over 20 feet long and about 3 feet wide. There are 16 scrolls in libraries in the UK and 4 in the USA. Ripley whose name is attached to the scrolls was a Canon of Bridlington in Yorkshire and lived from about 1415 to 1495. He is renowned as an alchemist and author of alchemical works in rhyme, and his verses are used on the scrolls. Some of the scrolls were produced in the 16th century, in Lübeck, probably at the request of John Dee the Elizabethan polymath. A Ripley scroll is in the library of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh to which it was presented in 1707. The only published description of this scroll appeared in 1876, and it has not apparently been studied since. Interest in Ripley scrolls has grown in recent years and there have been a number of publications describing them since 1990. The Edinburgh scroll is described and is compared with the other scrolls which have been seen personally or for which detailed descriptions have been published. The origin, significance and use of Ripley Scrolls are discussed in an attempt to define their contemporary role. PMID:11618578

  17. Accelerating vaccine development and deployment: report of a Royal Society satellite meeting

    PubMed Central

    Bregu, Migena; Draper, Simon J.; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Greenwood, Brian M.

    2011-01-01

    The Royal Society convened a meeting on the 17th and 18th November 2010 to review the current ways in which vaccines are developed and deployed, and to make recommendations as to how each of these processes might be accelerated. The meeting brought together academics, industry representatives, research sponsors, regulators, government advisors and representatives of international public health agencies from a broad geographical background. Discussions were held under Chatham House rules. High-throughput screening of new vaccine antigens and candidates was seen as a driving force for vaccine discovery. Multi-stakeholder, small-scale manufacturing facilities capable of rapid production of clinical grade vaccines are currently too few and need to be expanded. In both the human and veterinary areas, there is a need for tiered regulatory standards, differentially tailored for experimental and commercial vaccines, to allow accelerated vaccine efficacy testing. Improved cross-fertilization of knowledge between industry and academia, and between human and veterinary vaccine developers, could lead to more rapid application of promising approaches and technologies to new product development. Identification of best-practices and development of checklists for product development plans and implementation programmes were seen as low-cost opportunities to shorten the timeline for vaccine progression from the laboratory bench to the people who need it. PMID:21893549

  18. Comprehensive identification of novel proteins and N-glycosylation sites in royal jelly

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Royal jelly (RJ) is a proteinaceous secretion produced from the hypopharyngeal and mandibular glands of nurse bees. It plays vital roles in honeybee biology and in the improvement of human health. However, some proteins remain unknown in RJ, and mapping N-glycosylation modification sites on RJ proteins demands further investigation. We used two different liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry techniques, complementary N-glycopeptide enrichment strategies, and bioinformatic approaches to gain a better understanding of novel and glycosylated proteins in RJ. Results A total of 25 N-glycosylated proteins, carrying 53 N-glycosylation sites, were identified in RJ proteins, of which 42 N-linked glycosylation sites were mapped as novel on RJ proteins. Most of the glycosylated proteins were related to metabolic activities and health improvement. The 13 newly identified proteins were also mainly associated with metabolic processes and health improvement activities. Conclusion Our in-depth, large-scale mapping of novel glycosylation sites represents a crucial step toward systematically revealing the functionality of N-glycosylated RJ proteins, and is potentially useful for producing a protein with desirable pharmacokinetic and biological activity using a genetic engineering approach. The newly-identified proteins significantly extend the proteome coverage of RJ. These findings contribute vital and new knowledge to our understanding of the innate biochemical nature of RJ at both the proteome and glycoproteome levels. PMID:24529077

  19. Changes in hepatic gene expression associated with the hypocholesterolaemic activity of royal jelly.

    PubMed

    Kamakura, Masaki; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Sakaki, Toshiyuki

    2006-12-01

    Royal jelly (RJ) has various pharmacological actions, including hypolipidaemic, hypocholesterolaemic and anti-atherosclerotic effects, in experimental animals but the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. Here, we investigated changes in the expression of lipid metabolism-associated genes in the liver of RJ-treated mice by means of a DNA microarray technique to obtain clues to the mechanism of the hypocholesterolaemic action of RJ. We compared the hepatic gene expression profiles in three groups of mice fed a diet containing 5% RJ, a diet containing 5% RJ stored at 40 degrees C for 7 days (40-7d RJ) or a control diet which provided the same total energy as the other diets. RJ decreased gene expression of squalene epoxidase (SQLE), which is a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis, and sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREB)-1, which may be a transcriptional factor of SQLE. It increased gene expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), which is involved in cholesterol incorporation in liver. Thus, the hypocholesterolaemic action of RJ appears to be associated with a decrease of SQLE and an increase of LDLR in mice. PMID:17331334

  20. Sugar composition of French royal jelly for comparison with commercial and artificial sugar samples.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Gaëlle; Casabianca, Hervé

    2012-09-15

    A gas chromatographic method was developed to quantify the major and minor sugars of 400 Royal Jellies (RJs). Their contents were compared in relation to the geographical origins and different production methods. A reliable database was established from the analysis of 290 RJs harvested in different French areas that took into account the diversity of geographical origin, harvesting season, forage sources available in the environment corresponding to natural food of the bees: pollen and nectar. Around 30 RJ samples produced by Italian beekeepers, about sixty-ones from French market, and around thirty-ones derived from feeding experiments were analysed and compared with our database. Fructose and glucose contents are in the range 2.3-7.8% and 3.4-7.7%, respectively, whatever the RJ's origin. On the contrary, differences in minor sugar composition are observed. Indeed sucrose and erlose contents in French RJs are lesser than 1.7% and 0.3%, respectively, whereas they reach 3.9% and 2.0% in some commercial samples and 5.1% and 1.7% in RJs produced from feeding experiments. This study could be used to discriminate different production methods and provide an additional tool for identifying unknown commercial RJs. PMID:23107723

  1. The Effects of Royal Jelly on Fitness Traits and Gene Expression in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Shorter, John R.; Geisz, Matthew; Özsoy, Ergi; Magwire, Michael M.; Carbone, Mary Anna; Mackay, Trudy F. C.

    2015-01-01

    Royal Jelly (RJ) is a product made by honey bee workers and is required for queen differentiation and accompanying changes in queen body size, development time, lifespan and reproductive output relative to workers. Previous studies have reported similar changes in Drosophila melanogaster in response to RJ. Here, we quantified viability, development time, body size, productivity, lifespan and genome wide transcript abundance of D. melanogaster reared on standard culture medium supplemented with increasing concentrations of RJ. We found that lower concentrations of RJ do induce significant differences in body size in both sexes; higher concentrations reduce size, increase mortality, shorten lifespan and reduce productivity. Increased concentrations of RJ also consistently lengthened development time in both sexes. RJ is associated with changes in expression of 1,581 probe sets assessed using Affymetrix Drosophila 2.0 microarrays, which were enriched for genes associated with metabolism and amino acid degradation. The transcriptional changes are consistent with alterations in cellular processes to cope with excess nutrients provided by RJ, including biosynthesis and detoxification, which might contribute to accelerated senescence and reduced lifespan. PMID:26226016

  2. 'Bio-nano interactions: new tools, insights and impacts': summary of the Royal Society discussion meeting.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Iseult; Feitshans, Ilise L; Kendall, Michaela

    2015-02-01

    Bio-nano interactions can be defined as the study of interactions between nanoscale entities and biological systems such as, but not limited to, peptides, proteins, lipids, DNA and other biomolecules, cells and cellular receptors and organisms including humans. Studying bio-nano interactions is particularly useful for understanding engineered materials that have at least one dimension in the nanoscale. Such materials may consist of discrete particles or nanostructured surfaces. Much of biology functions at the nanoscale; therefore, our ability to manipulate materials such that they are taken up at the nanoscale, and engage biological machinery in a designed and purposeful manner, opens new vistas for more efficient diagnostics, therapeutics (treatments) and tissue regeneration, so-called nanomedicine. Additionally, this ability of nanomaterials to interact with and be taken up by cells allows nanomaterials to be used as probes and tools to advance our understanding of cellular functioning. Yet, as a new technology, assessment of the safety of nanomaterials, and the applicability of existing regulatory frameworks for nanomaterials must be investigated in parallel with development of novel applications. The Royal Society meeting 'Bio-nano interactions: new tools, insights and impacts' provided an important platform for open dialogue on the current state of knowledge on these issues, bringing together scientists, industry, regulatory and legal experts to concretize existing discourse in science law and policy. This paper summarizes these discussions and the insights that emerged. PMID:25533104

  3. William Brouncker MD Viscount Castlelyons (c 1620-84) First President of the Royal Society.

    PubMed

    Breathnach, Caoimhghín S

    2006-11-01

    William Brouncker was the grandson of Sir Henry Brouncker, President of Munster during the Elizabethan Plantation of Ireland in the 16th century. William's date and place of birth are uncertain; he was born about 1620, most probably at Castlelyons, County Cork, and educated at Oxford where he shone in mathematics and languages. Until his death in 1684 he served the Stuarts as a senior member of the Navy Board from which sprang the Admiralty, and we owe much of what we know about his life to the warts-and-all diary of his younger naval colleague, Samuel Pepys (1633-1703). Although William was granted a doctorate in medicine by Oxford in 1646, music and mathematics were his major interests. He was the first President of the Royal Society and he held that position from 1662 to 1677, when his tenure was brought to a reluctant close by an election, sardonically recorded in the diary of the curator of experiments, Robert Hooke (1635-1703). If Brouncker did not add any empirical facts, he certainly contributed to the promotion and dissemination of natural knowledge. PMID:19817061

  4. An evaluation of camping impacts and their management at Isle Royale National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrell, T.A.; Marion, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    Results from the development and application of a monitoring program to assess visitor impacts on back-country campsites at Isle Royale National Park are presented. Survey staff assessed conditions on 244 sites within 36 back-country campgrounds, including 113 individual campsites, 43 group campsites, and 88 shelters. Site conditions are generally quite good. Site size and other areal measures of disturbance are exceptionally small attributed to the placement of most sites on cut-and-fill constructed ?benches? within sloping terrain. Relational analyses revealed that campsites in Spruce and Fir forests and under more open forest canopies have significantly lower areal measures of disturbance. Areal disturbance is also reduced on sites where shelters and picnic tables are present, suggesting that these facilities act to concentrate visitor use. Site locational attributes, such as intersite visibility and proximity to trails, indicate a low potential for solitude within some campgrounds. Recommendations regarding site number, distribution, arrangement, facilities, maintenance, and monitoring are offered for management consideration.

  5. Conservation of Stone Cladding on the FAÇADE of Royal Palace in Caserta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titomanlio, I.

    2013-07-01

    The beauty of cultural heritage and monumental architecture, is often linked to their non-structural elements and decorative stones façades cladding. The collapse of these elements causes significant consequences that interest the social, the economic, the historical and the technical fields. Several regulatory documents and literature studies contain methods to address the question of relief and of the risk analysis and due to the non - structural stones security. Among the references are widespread international regulatory documents prepared by the Federal Emergency Management Agency of the United States by Applied Technology Council and California. In Italy there are some indications contained in the Norme Tecniche per le Costruzioni and the Direttiva del Presidente del Consiglio dei Ministri in 2007, finalize to the reduction of seismic risk assessment of cultural heritage. The paper, using normative references and scientific researches, allows to analyze on Royal Palace of Caserta the safety and the preservation of cultural heritage and the vulnerability of non-structural stones façade cladding. Using sophisticated equipments of Laboratory ARS of the Second University of Naples, it was possible to analyze the collapse of stone elements due to degradation caused by natural phenomena of deterioration (age of the building, type of materials, geometries , mode of fixing of the elements themselves). The paper explains the collapse mechanisms of stones façade cladding of Luigi Vanvitelli Palace.

  6. The Lyophilization Process Maintains the Chemical and Biological Characteristics of Royal Jelly

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Larissa Ariana Roveroni; Ferreira, Nathália Ursoli; Moreno, Gabriela de Padua; Uahib, Fernanda Grassi Mangolini; Barizon, Edna Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    The alternative use of natural products, like royal jelly (RJ), may be an important tool for the treatment of infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. RJ presents a large number of bioactive substances, including antimicrobial compounds. In this study, we carried out the chemical characterization of fresh and lyophilized RJ and investigated their antibacterial effects with the purpose of evaluating if the lyophilization process maintains the chemical and antibacterial properties of RJ. Furthermore, we evaluated the antibacterial efficacy of the main fatty acid found in RJ, the 10-hydroxy-2-decenoic acid (10H2DA). Chromatographic profile of the RJ samples showed similar fingerprints and the presence of 10H2DA in both samples. Furthermore, fresh and lyophilized RJ were effective against all bacteria evaluated; that is, the lyophilization process maintains the antibacterial activity of RJ and the chemical field of 10H2DA. The fatty acid 10H2DA exhibited a good antibacterial activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae. Therefore, it may be used as an alternative and complementary treatment for infections caused by antibiotic-resistant S. pneumoniae. PMID:26064175

  7. Antioxidant properties of royal jelly associated with larval age and time of harvest.

    PubMed

    Liu, Je-Ruei; Yang, Yuan-Chang; Shi, Li-Shian; Peng, Chi-Chung

    2008-12-10

    This study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant properties of royal jelly (RJ) collected from larvae of different ages that were transferred in artificial bee queen cells for 24, 48, and 72 h. RJ harvested from the 1 day old larvae 24 h after the graft displayed predominant antioxidant properties, including scavenging activity of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals, inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation, and reducing power. Regardless of the initial larval age, lower antioxidant activities were observed in the RJ harvested later than 24 h except for the activity of superoxide dismutase. In addition, higher contents of proteins and polyphenolic compounds were determined in the RJ harvested 24 h than that harvested 48 or 72 h after the graft. It implied that the polyphenolic compounds may be the major component for giving the antioxidant activities in RJ. In summary, the time of harvest and the initial larval age did affect the antioxidant potencies in RJ, and RJ collected 24 h after the larval transfer showed the most substantial antioxidant activities. PMID:19007163

  8. Royal Jelly alleviates sperm toxicity and improves in vitro fertilization outcome in Stanozolol-treated mice

    PubMed Central

    Shalizar Jalali, Ali; Najafi, Gholamreza; Hosseinchi, Mohammadreza; Sedighnia, Ashkan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stanozolol (ST) is a synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroid often abused by athletes. An increasing body of evidence points towards the role of ST misuses in the pathogenesis of a wide range of adverse effects including reprotoxicity. Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the possible reproprotective effect of royal jelly (RJ) as an efficient antioxidant in ST-treated mice. Materials and Methods: Adult male mice were divided into four groups (n=5). Two groups of mice received ST (4.6 mg/kg/day) via gavage for 35 days. RJ was given orally to one of these groups at the dose level of 100 mg/kg body weight per day synchronously. Untreated control group and RJ-only treated group were also included. Epididymal sperm characteristics and in vitro fertilizing capacity were evaluated after 35 days. Results: ST treatment caused a significant (p<0.05) decrease in sperm count and motility and fertilization rate along with poor blastocyst formation and increased sperm DNA damage. Moreover, the incidence of apoptosis and abnormality in spermatozoa was significantly (p<0.05) higher in ST-exposed mice than those of control. The above-mentioned parameters were restored to near normal level by RJ co-administration. Conclusion: Data from the current study suggest that RJ has a potential repro-protective action against ST-induced reproductive toxicity in mice. However, clinical studies are warranted to investigate such an effect in human subjects. PMID:25653671

  9. Accelerating vaccine development and deployment: report of a Royal Society satellite meeting.

    PubMed

    Bregu, Migena; Draper, Simon J; Hill, Adrian V S; Greenwood, Brian M

    2011-10-12

    The Royal Society convened a meeting on the 17th and 18th November 2010 to review the current ways in which vaccines are developed and deployed, and to make recommendations as to how each of these processes might be accelerated. The meeting brought together academics, industry representatives, research sponsors, regulators, government advisors and representatives of international public health agencies from a broad geographical background. Discussions were held under Chatham House rules. High-throughput screening of new vaccine antigens and candidates was seen as a driving force for vaccine discovery. Multi-stakeholder, small-scale manufacturing facilities capable of rapid production of clinical grade vaccines are currently too few and need to be expanded. In both the human and veterinary areas, there is a need for tiered regulatory standards, differentially tailored for experimental and commercial vaccines, to allow accelerated vaccine efficacy testing. Improved cross-fertilization of knowledge between industry and academia, and between human and veterinary vaccine developers, could lead to more rapid application of promising approaches and technologies to new product development. Identification of best-practices and development of checklists for product development plans and implementation programmes were seen as low-cost opportunities to shorten the timeline for vaccine progression from the laboratory bench to the people who need it. PMID:21893549

  10. Towards evidence-based emergency medicine: Best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary.

    PubMed

    Mackway-Jones, Kevin C

    2013-07-01

    Best Evidence Topic reports (BETs) summarise the evidence pertaining to particular clinical questions. They are not systematic reviews, but rather contain the best (highest level) evidence that can be practically obtained by busy practicing clinicians. The search strategies used to find the best evidence are reported in detail in order to allow clinicians to update searches whenever necessary. Each BET is based on a clinical scenario and ends with a clinical bottom line which indicates, in the light of the evidence found, what the reporting clinician would do if faced with the same scenario again. The BETs published below were first reported at the Critical Appraisal Journal Club at the Manchester Royal Infirmary¹ or placed on the BestBETs website. Each BET has been constructed in the four stages that have been described elsewhere.² The BETs shown here together with those published previously and those currently under construction can be seen at http://www.bestbets.org.³ Three BETs are included in this issue of the journal. Capillary blood gases as an alternative to arterial puncture in diabetic ketoacidosis. Effect of warming local anaesthetics on pain of infiltration. Use of tamsulosin in patients with urinary calculi to increase spontaneous stone passage. PMID:23765766

  11. Ethanol reduces ripening of 'Royal Gala' apples stored in controlled atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Weber, Anderson; Brackmann, Auri; Both, Vanderlei; Pavanello, Elizandra P; Anese, Rogerio O; Schorr, Márcio R W

    2016-03-01

    This work aims at evaluate ethanol effect of acetaldehyde application in post-storage quality of 'Royal Gala' apples maintenance, and to compare them with consolidated storage techniques. Thus two experiments were performed during the years of 2008 and 2009. In the first experiment (2008), the application of ethanol, acetaldehyde or 1-MCP and ethylene scrubbing were tested. Fruits were stored in controlled atmosphere (CA) with 1.0kPa O2 and 2.0kPa CO2 at 0.5°C. In the second experiment (2009), the treatments tested were ethanol application combined or not with low relative humidity (LRH) and LRH alone. In this experiment, apples were stored in CA with 1.2kPa O2 + 2.5kPa CO2 at 0.5°C. After eight months of storage, 0.5 mL ethanol kg-1 apples month-1 or 0.25 mL acetaldehyde kg-1 apples month-1 increased mealiness, flesh browning, and decays incidence and reduced flesh firmness. In contrast, 0.3 mL ethanol kg-1 apples month-1, tested on second experiment, prevented fruit softening and decreased ACC oxidase activity and ethylene production. Although lower relative humidity was not efficient in maintaining post-storage quality, it enhanced the positive effect of ethanol application at 0.3 mL kg-1 apples month-1. PMID:26871493

  12. A review of the (60)Co internal dosimetry at Devonport Royal Dockyard.

    PubMed

    Vickers, J M A; Collison, R; Collision, R

    2010-03-01

    The physico-chemical properties of (60)Co contaminants arising from the UK Naval Nuclear Propulsion Programme (NNPP) pressurised water reactor (PWR) plants have been investigated in order to review individual monitoring requirements at Devonport Royal Dockyard (DRD). This has been achieved through laboratory tests on NNPP primary component samples and interpretation of direct bioassay measurements using internal dosimetry modelling software. Interpretation of lung measurements was completed for two inhalation events involving material originating from a PWR plant and post-primary circuit decontamination. Initial estimates of intake and dose were calculated using International Commission on Radiological Protection default parameter values. However, a good fit could only be achieved by fitting the data to alternative absorption parameters where 90-95% of the material dissolved and absorbed rapidly at a rate of 1 day(-1). As a consequence of this review, a number of improvements have been made to monitoring arrangements at DRD. A minimum of three direct measurements are now taken during the 0-30 day period after an intake, the capability of the Canberra Accuscan has been enhanced and dissolution tests are being carried out by the Health Protection Agency (HPA) on samples taken from PWR plants. PMID:20220215

  13. Stable isotope ratio measurements of royal jelly samples for controlling production procedures: impact of sugar feeding.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Gaëlle; Wytrychowski, Marine; Batteau, Magali; Guibert, Sylvie; Casabianca, Hervé

    2011-07-30

    The carbon and nitrogen stable ratios of royal jelly (RJ) samples from various origins are determined using an elemental analyser linked online to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer to evaluate authenticity and adulteration. The (13)C/(12)C and (15)N/(14)N stable isotope ratios are measured in more than 500 RJs (domestic, imported and derived from feeding experiments) in order to obtain isotopic measurements that take into account seasonal, botanical and geographical effects. Authenticity intervals are established for traditional beekeeping practices, without feeding, in the range -22.48 to -27.90‰ for δ(13)C. For these samples, the δ(15)N values range from -1.58 to 7.98‰, depending on the plant sources of pollen and nectar. The δ(13)C values of the commercial samples vary from -18.54 to -26.58‰. High δ(13)C values are typical of sugar cane or corn syrups which have distinctive isotopic (13)C signatures because both plants use the C4 photosynthetic cycle, in contrast to most RJs which are derived from C3 plants. These differences in the (13)C-isotopic composition allow the detection of the addition of such sugars. RJs from traditional sources and from industrial production by sugar feeding are thus successfully distinguished. PMID:21698675

  14. Age, growth, maturity, and fecundity of 'humper' lake trout, Isle Royale, Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rahrer, Jerold F.

    1965-01-01

    Humper lake trout are one of the several races or subpopulations of lake trout in Lake Superior. This study is based on 3,705 fish collected on a reef south of Isle Royale near the eastern end. The mean lengths of humper trout from commercial gill nets were smaller than those of lean lake trout. Members of age-groups VII, VIII, and IX represented 81.5 per cent of the commercial humper catch. The body-scale relation was described by two intersecting straight lines. The weight of humper trout increased as the 3.282 power of the length. Growth in length was slow and ranged from 1.6 to 3.5 inches per year. Annual increments were greatest in the first, sixth, and seventh years. Growth in weight was also slow but increased each year. Humper trout became legal (1 1/2 pounds) in the eighth year of life and reached 5 pounds in 11 years. All fish longer than 19.1 inches and older than age-group VIII were mature; the shortest mature fish were: males, 12.7 inches; females, 14.7 inches. At minimum legal size, 98 per cent of the males and 56 per cent of the females were mature. Humper trout produced an average of 1,351 eggs per fish or 516 per pound.

  15. Freeze-dried royal jelly maintains its developmental and physiological bioactivity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kayashima, Yasunari; Yamanashi, Keiko; Sato, Ayaka; Kumazawa, Shigenori; Yamakawa-Kobayashi, Kimiko

    2012-01-01

    Royal jelly (RJ), a honeybee-derived product, has been found to possess developmental and physiological bioactivity in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, but little is known about the in vivo bioactivity of freeze-dried RJ (FDRJ) powder, which is another form of RJ processed for human use. To address this, we used Drosophila as a model animal to examine the effects of FDRJ in multicellular organisms. When flies were reared on food supplemented with FDRJ, the developmental time from larva to adult was shortened, the adult male lifespan was prolonged, and female fecundity was increased without any significant morphological alterations. Moreover, the expression of dilp5, an insulin-like peptide, its receptor InR, and the nutrient sensing molecule TOR, the target of rapamycin, was significantly increased in FDRJ-fed female flies as compared with ones reared on standard and on protein-enriched food. These findings suggest that like RJ, FDRJ maintains its bioactivity even after processing from RJ, what is expected to have bioactivity for multicellular organisms, including humans. PMID:23132575

  16. The Royal Society of Chemistry and the delivery of chemistry data repositories for the community.

    PubMed

    Williams, Antony; Tkachenko, Valery

    2014-10-01

    Since 2009 the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) has been delivering access to chemistry data and cheminformatics tools via the ChemSpider database and has garnered a significant community following in terms of usage and contribution to the platform. ChemSpider has focused only on those chemical entities that can be represented as molecular connection tables or, to be more specific, the ability to generate an InChI from the input structure. As a structure centric hub ChemSpider is built around the molecular structure with other data and links being associated with this structure. As a result the platform has been limited in terms of the types of data that can be managed, and the flexibility of its searches, and it is constrained by the data model. New technologies and approaches, specifically taking into account a shift from relational to NoSQL databases, and the growing importance of the semantic web, has motivated RSC to rearchitect and create a more generic data repository utilizing these new technologies. This article will provide an overview of our activities in delivering data sharing platforms for the chemistry community including the development of the new data repository expanding into more extensive domains of chemistry data. PMID:25086851

  17. Healthcare coverage for undocumented migrants in Spain: Regional differences after Royal Decree Law 16/2012.

    PubMed

    Cimas, Marta; Gullon, Pedro; Aguilera, Eva; Meyer, Stefan; Freire, José Manuel; Perez-Gomez, Beatriz

    2016-04-01

    The economic crisis has prompted the debate on how to regulate health coverage of undocumented migrants in publicly funded healthcare systems. Spain, as one of the most heavily affected countries in Europe, can be considered a case of particular interest. In 2012 the Spanish Government issued a Royal Decree Law (RDL 16/2012) which revoked their previous full right to public healthcare coverage, now limited for some exceptions. However, the Spanish National Health System is highly decentralized, and this Central Government decree had to be implemented by the Regional Health Authorities. Our aim is to compare regional policies regarding entitlement to healthcare for undocumented migrants after RDL 16/2012 in the 17 Autonomous Regions by performing an exhaustive review of the regional health policy regulations published after the enactment of RDL 16/2012. Our analysis shows that many Regions adopted legal, legislative and administrative actions to void or limit its effects, while others applied it as intended, resulting in huge differences in healthcare coverage for irregular migrants among Spanish Regions. The unequal implementation of this Law constitutes a paradigmatic example of the complexity of nation-wide regulation of controversial key issues in decentralized health systems. In addition, our results highlight that within-country differences in access and/or entitlement can be as relevant as those reported among-country when there is healthcare decentralization. PMID:26948703

  18. NEWS: Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    When Mary took up her appointment in the Institute's Education Department in June 1997, she indicated that she wished to return to teaching in two or three years. We have just heard that in September she will be joining the staff of the Science Department at Camden Girls' School, London. Mary's departure from the Institute is a great loss to the Department, where she has worked tirelessly, and with great imagination, to support those who teach physics at all secondary levels - and at primary level too when the opportunity presented itself. She has made tremendous contributions to the careers side of the Department's work, supporting careers events, providing informal training for others willing to do the same, helping to develop new careers materials and identifying people whom the Institute could use as role models or as the subject of case studies in print or electronic publications. Mary has been equally happy and willing to support pupils, students and teachers, and has been a wonderful role model herself, coming from an industrial research background, training for teaching after a career break and willing and able to teach biology, chemistry and design technology as well as physics. Mary has also written and edited Phases virtually single-handed. We are delighted to hear that Mary will continue to support the department's work as one of its teacher `volunteers'. Ilya Eigenbrot We are pleased to report that Ilya Eigenbrot, who will be known to some through his work at the Royal Institution and his appearances at the Christmas Lectures in a technical support role, has agreed to give the IOP Schools (touring) Lecture next year. The subject will be Lasers and this will follow nicely on to Zbig's lecture this year. Resources (print) Physics on Course The tenth issue of the Institute's popular guide to higher education, Physics on Course 2001, will be published early in July and distributed to all schools and colleges in the United Kingdom and the Republic of

  19. Efficacy of bayer suspend poly zone against stable flies and house flies when applied to trigger royal cloth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    METHODS: PolyZone (PZ)(Deltamethrin 4.75% AI) was mixed with water according to label instructions (45.4 ml per 3.79 liters H2O = 0.06% solution) for application to 10 x 10 cm squares of blue Trigger-Royal Box fabric (65% polyester and 35% cotton, Galey & Lord, Inc., New York). PZ was applied to run...

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of a Serratia marcescens Strain Isolated from a Preterm Neonatal Blood Sepsis Patient at the Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Kropp, K A; Lucid, A; Carroll, J; Belgrudov, V; Walsh, P; Kelly, B; Smith, C; Dickinson, P; O'Driscoll, A; Templeton, K; Ghazal, P; Sleator, R D

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we report the draft genome sequence for isolate ED-NGS-1015 of Serratia marcescens, cultivated from a blood sample obtained from a neonatal sepsis patient at the Royal Infirmary in Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom. PMID:25212627

  1. Molecular and biochemical characterization of the major royal jelly protein in bumblebees suggest a non-nutritive function.

    PubMed

    Kupke, Jens; Spaethe, Johannes; Mueller, Martin J; Rössler, Wolfgang; Albert, Štefan

    2012-09-01

    Honeybee queens are generated on purpose by extensive feeding with a glandular secretion termed royal jelly. Major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs) are the dominant proteinaceous component of royal jelly. One of them, MRJP1, was found to play a central role in honeybee queen development. Genes encoding MRJPs were reported to originate from a single originator, and several of them have evolved nutritive function. Phylogenetic analysis provides evidence that the same originator has multiplied independently in Nasonia and ant lineages. Here we show that bumblebees represent a transition species preserving a single-copy pre-multiplication stage of MRJP evolution. By exploring the single-copy BtRJPL gene, we found striking similarities with MRJPs of the honeybee such as gene structure and expression regulation. At the same time it turned out that BtRJPL does not fulfill criteria for functioning as a nutritive protein. Instead we found evidence that BtRJPL is involved in food digestion or modification, which appears to be the original MRJP function, at least in this lineage. Thus, the evolutionary pattern of MRJPs in hymenopterans constitutes an excellent example of a functional diversification combined with the origin of new properties followed by intensive gene duplication events. PMID:22617191

  2. From Abydos to the Valley of the Kings and Amarna: the conception of royal funerary landscapes in the New Kingdom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magli, G.

    Royal funerary landscapes in Egypt show a remarkable continuity in the use of symbols and in the interplay between natural and man-built features. In such a context directionality, both in the sense of succession of elements and of orientation of single buildings and tombs, plays a relevant role in governing the landscape in accordance with the idea of "cosmic" order, the basis of the temporal power of the Pharaoh. This paper investigates cognitive aspects of the funerary royal landscapes of the New Kingdom, with special emphasis on the connections with astronomy and orientation. A close similarity between the sacred landscape at western Thebes and the early dynastic funerary landscape at Abydos comes out and such a similarity may have been one of the reasons for the choice of Valley of the Kings as royal Necropolis. The original, actually unique way in which old symbols and features were re-elaborated by Akhenaten in planning his funerary landscape at Amarna is also highlighted.

  3. Towards risk-based drought management in the Netherlands: quantifying the welfare effects of water shortage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Vat, Marnix; Femke, Schasfoort; Rhee Gigi, Van; Manfred, Wienhoven; Nico, Polman; Joost, Delsman; den Hoek Paul, Van; Maat Judith, Ter; Marjolein, Mens

    2016-04-01

    sectors hydrological data was lacking to make a reliable estimate of drought return periods. By 2021, the Netherlands Government aims to agree on the water supply service levels, which should describe water availability and quality that can be delivered with a certain return period. The Netherlands' Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment, representatives of the regional water boards and Rijkswaterstaat (operating the main water system) as well as several consultants and research institutes are important stakeholders for further development of the method, evaluation of cases and the development of a quantitative risk-informed decision-making tool.

  4. Primary care obstetrics and perinatal health in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Hingstman, L

    1994-01-01

    The Netherlands is the only industrialized country in which a large percentage of obstetric care takes place at home. Almost 31% of all deliveries are home confinements under supervision of a midwife or a general practitioner, and 84% of all postnatal care is given at home by maternity care assistants. To gain a better understanding of this unique situation, the structure of Dutch obstetric care is examined with special attention to the four pillars on which the system rests: the special protected position of the midwife, a generally accepted screening system for high-risk pregnancies, a well-organized maternity home care system, and the sociocultural environment in The Netherlands in which pregnancy and childbirth are considered normal physiological processes. Description of the obstetric system shows a degree of competition between the obstetricians, midwives, and general practitioners, in which the general practitioner has lost a considerable part of the "obstetric market." PMID:7830147

  5. CME for neurosurgeons in the Netherlands: the "quality" conferences.

    PubMed

    Mooij, J J A; Albrecht, K W; Grotenhuis, J A; Zeilstra, D J; Staal, M J; Koot, R W

    2009-02-01

    In 1993 the Netherlands Society for Neurosurgery started a yearly event, a "Quality Conference", specifically devoted to continuous medical education (CME). These conferences differ from "normal" scientific meetings, in the choice for specific topics, in the preparation with inquiries among all the Dutch neurosurgical centres, and in the way the results of these inquiries are discussed, preceded by lectures concerning the chosen topic by guest faculty and Dutch neurosurgeons. Each year's principal guest delivers the "Beks Lecture", named after the former professor in Neurosurgery in Groningen, Jan Beks. On several occasions, the foreign guests suggested to present this format for a larger neurosurgical forum. Therefore, it was decided to describe the various aspects of this format for CME in the Netherlands in a paper for Acta Neurochirugica. Examples of topics are given, a summary of two recent inquiries are presented and discussed, and the way of organizing such a conference including finance and the obligatory character are described. PMID:19194649

  6. Gastroenteritis in sentinel general practices,The Netherlands.

    PubMed Central

    de Wit, M. A.; Koopmans, M. P.; Kortbeek, L. M.; van Leeuwen, N. J.; Bartelds, A. I.; van Duynhoven, Y. T.

    2001-01-01

    From 1996 to 1999, the incidence of gastroenteritis in general practices and the role of a broad range of pathogens in the Netherlands were studied. All patients with gastroenteritis who had visited a general practitioner were reported. All patients who had visited a general practitioner for gastroenteritis (cases) and an equal number of patients visiting for nongastrointestinal symptoms (controls) were invited to participate in a case-control study. The incidence of gastroenteritis was 79.7 per 10,000 person years. Campylobacter was detected most frequently (10% of cases), followed by Giardia lamblia (5%), rotavirus (5%), Norwalk-like viruses (5%) and Salmonella (4%). Our study found that in the Netherlands (population 15.6 million), an estimated 128,000 persons each year consult their general practitioner for gastroenteritis, slightly less than in a comparable study in 1992 to 1993. A pathogen could be detected in almost 40% of patients (bacteria 16%, viruses 15%, parasites 8%). PMID:11266298

  7. Quality in education and training in photonics in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroobach, P.; Boerefijn, Ivar J.

    1997-12-01

    The object of this study was to find the connection of photonic training in the Netherlands between the participating schools and the trade and industry. The Dutch Society of Optics did an enquiry into the quality of photonic education at the MBO/HBO level during the period of November 1996 to July 1997. The research was about the connection of the schools which educate photonics and the trade and industry. The main target of the research is to have a better understanding of the quality of the connection. Both from a students and/or graduate point of view as well as from a trainee mentors one. This research was strongly supported by the schools in the Netherlands who teach this kind of education. The way of research was by poll, which is held under a population of students and graduated people which at least had been in contact with the trade and industry in the area of photonics and their mentors.

  8. Women in physics in the Netherlands: Progress and developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, Petra; de Graaf, Noortje; Koornstra, Renée-Andrée; van Tijn, Paula; Kool, Dorien

    2015-12-01

    The visibility of women and the awareness of a healthy gender balance in physics in the Netherlands have clearly improved over the last few years. Initiatives to promote women and their possibilities to pursue a career in physics are plentiful and commendable. Nevertheless, the numbers do not yet show the desired impact of all these initiatives. Although student numbers have increased, the percentage of female first-year student remains at approximately 13% of the total students in physics. Similarly, the relative numbers of female PhD candidates and postdocs have been stable over the last years at (both) approximately 20% to 25%. Despite the number of women obtaining a PhD in physics and continuing a scientific career as postdoc, the presence of women further up on the scientific ladder in physics remains strikingly low. We will here focus on the current status, ambitions, and initiatives in the Netherlands to promote women, and especially to keep them, in physics.

  9. Sounding-derived parameters associated with large hail and tornadoes in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenemeijer, P. H.; van Delden, A.

    2007-02-01

    A study is presented focusing on the potential value of parameters derived from radiosonde data or data from numerical atmospheric models for the forecasting of severe weather associated with convective storms. Parameters have been derived from soundings in the proximity of large hail, tornadoes (including tornadoes over water: waterspouts) and thunderstorms in the Netherlands. 66,365 radiosonde soundings from six stations in and around the Netherlands between 1 Dec. 1975 to 31 Aug. 2003 were classified as being associated or not associated with these weather phenomena using observational data from voluntary observers, the Dutch National Meteorological Institute (KNMI) and lightning data from the U.K. Met. Office. It was found that instability as measured by the Lifted Index or CAPE and 0-6 km wind shear independently have considerable skill in distinguishing environments of large hail and of non-hail-producing thunderstorms. It was also found that CAPE released below 3 km above ground level is on average high near waterspouts and weak tornadoes that mostly occur with low shear in the lowest 1 km above the Earth's surface. On the other hand, low-level shear is strong in environments of stronger (F1 and F2) tornadoes and increases with increasing F-scale. This is consistent with the notion that stretching of pre-existing vertical vorticity is the most important mechanism for the formation of weak tornadoes while the tilting of vorticity is more important with stronger tornadoes. The presented results may assist forecasters to assess the likelihood of severe hail or tornadoes.

  10. Water quality and hydrology in a coastal region of The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Rees Vellinga, E.; Toussaint, C. G.; Wit, K. E.

    For horticultural and agricultural water use, as well as with regard to environmental needs, it is imperative to maintain a good quality of the surface waters in central-west Netherlands. However, many factors with a deteriorating influence exist. To determine the influence of the various factors, a multidisciplinary investigation was carried out and the results were laid down in an extensive report in 1976 by the Institute for Land and Water Management Research (I.C.W.). This paper gives the summary of this geological and hydrological survey, and the data of groundwater as well as surface water quality. Information about the chemical composition of the surface waters and the groundwater aquifers is given in maps and graphs, and the methods with which the geohydrological data have been analyzed and applied are discussed. The influence on surface water quality of the most important polluting sources was established, and a conspectus of their contribution is given. Of these sources some are natural ones, whose contribution is almost impossible to be lowered. Other sources are the result of human activities within the area, which could be and are combated. A special and external source is the inlet water coming from the river Rhine. Fresh water is supplied to the central-west Netherlands region to compensate evaporation from the crops and also to flush the canals and ditches in order to combat the influence of the natural internal sources (in particular saline seepage) and the remainder of the other internal ones. In this context the quality of the Rhine water, the only source of fresh inlet water, remains of grave concern.

  11. Constructing land-use maps of the Netherlands in 2030.

    PubMed

    de Nijs, Ton C M; de Niet, R; Crommentuijn, L

    2004-08-01

    The National Environmental Assessment Agency of the RIVM in the Netherlands is obliged to report on future trends in the environment and nature every 4 years. The last report, Nature Outlook 2, evaluated the effects of four alternative socio-economic and demographic scenarios on nature and the landscape. Spatially detailed land-use maps are needed to assess effects on nature and landscape. The objective of the study presented here was how to create spatially detailed land-use maps of the Netherlands in 2030 using the Environment Explorer, a Cellular Automata-based land-use model to construct land-use maps from four scenarios. One of these is discussed in great detail to show how the maps were constructed from the various scenario elements, story lines and additional data and assumptions on national, regional and local land-use developments. It was the first time in the history of our outlooks that consistent, spatially detailed land-use maps of the Netherlands for 2030 were constructed from national economic and demographic scenarios. Each map represents a direct reflection of model input and assumptions. The maps do not show the most probable developments in the Netherlands but describe the possible change in land use if Dutch society were to develop according to one of the four scenarios. The large (societal) uncertainties are reflected in the total set of future land-use maps. The application of a land-use model such as the Environment Explorer ensures that all relevant aspects of a scenario, i.e. economic and demographic developments, zoning policies and urban growth, are integrated systematically into one consistent framework. PMID:15246572

  12. The lameness of King Philip II and Royal Tomb I at Vergina, Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Bartsiokas, Antonis; Arsuaga, Juan-Luis; Santos, Elena; Algaba, Milagros; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier

    2015-08-11

    King Philip II was the father of Alexander the Great. He suffered a notorious penetrating wound by a lance through his leg that was nearly fatal and left him lame in 339 B.C.E. (i.e., 3 y before his assassination in 336 B.C.E.). In 1977 and 1978 two male skeletons were excavated in the Royal Tombs II and I of Vergina, Greece, respectively. Tomb I also contained another adult (likely a female) and a newborn skeleton. The current view is that Philip II was buried in Tomb II. However, the male skeleton of Tomb II bears no lesions to his legs that would indicate lameness. We investigated the skeletal material of Tomb I with modern forensic techniques. The male individual in Tomb I displays a conspicuous case of knee ankylosis that is conclusive evidence of lameness. Right through the overgrowth of the knee, there is a hole. There are no obvious signs that are characteristic of infection and osteomyelitis. This evidence indicates that the injury was likely caused by a severe penetrating wound to the knee, which resulted in an active inflammatory process that stopped years before death. Standard anthropological age-estimation techniques based on dry bone, epiphyseal lines, and tooth analysis gave very wide age ranges for the male, centered around 45 y. The female would be around 18-y-old and the infant would be a newborn. It is concluded that King Philip II, his wife Cleopatra, and their newborn child are the occupants of Tomb I. PMID:26195763

  13. The lameness of King Philip II and Royal Tomb I at Vergina, Macedonia

    PubMed Central

    Bartsiokas, Antonis; Arsuaga, Juan-Luis; Santos, Elena; Algaba, Milagros; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier

    2015-01-01

    King Philip II was the father of Alexander the Great. He suffered a notorious penetrating wound by a lance through his leg that was nearly fatal and left him lame in 339 B.C.E. (i.e., 3 y before his assassination in 336 B.C.E.). In 1977 and 1978 two male skeletons were excavated in the Royal Tombs II and I of Vergina, Greece, respectively. Tomb I also contained another adult (likely a female) and a newborn skeleton. The current view is that Philip II was buried in Tomb II. However, the male skeleton of Tomb II bears no lesions to his legs that would indicate lameness. We investigated the skeletal material of Tomb I with modern forensic techniques. The male individual in Tomb I displays a conspicuous case of knee ankylosis that is conclusive evidence of lameness. Right through the overgrowth of the knee, there is a hole. There are no obvious signs that are characteristic of infection and osteomyelitis. This evidence indicates that the injury was likely caused by a severe penetrating wound to the knee, which resulted in an active inflammatory process that stopped years before death. Standard anthropological age-estimation techniques based on dry bone, epiphyseal lines, and tooth analysis gave very wide age ranges for the male, centered around 45 y. The female would be around 18-y-old and the infant would be a newborn. It is concluded that King Philip II, his wife Cleopatra, and their newborn child are the occupants of Tomb I. PMID:26195763

  14. Faculty of Prehospital Care, Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh guidance for medical provision for wilderness medicine.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Adrian; Dodds, Naomi; Joshi, Raj; Hall, John; Dhillon, Sundeep; Hollis, Sarah; Davis, Pete; Hillebrandt, David; Howard, Eva; Wilkes, Matthew; Langdana, Burjor; Lee, David; Hinson, Nigel; Williams, Thomas Harcourt; Rowles, Joe; Pynn, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    To support leaders and those involved in providing medical care on expeditions in wilderness environments, the Faculty of Pre-Hospital Care (FPHC) of The Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh convened an expert panel of leading healthcare professionals and expedition providers. The aims of this panel were to: (1) provide guidance to ensure the best possible medical care for patients within the geographical, logistical and human factor constraints of an expedition environment. (2) Give aspiring and established expedition medics a 'benchmark' of skills they should meet. (3) Facilitate expedition organisers in selecting the most appropriate medical cover and provider for their planned activity. A system of medical planning is suggested to enable expedition leaders to identify the potential medical risks and their mitigation. It was recognised that the scope of practice for wilderness medicine covers elements of primary healthcare, pre-hospital emergency medicine and preventative medicine. Some unique competencies were also identified. Further to this, the panel recommends the use of a matrix and advisory expedition medic competencies relating to the remoteness and medical threat of the expedition. This advice is aimed at all levels of expedition medic, leader and organiser who may be responsible for delivering or managing the delivery of remote medical care for participants. The expedition medic should be someone equipped with the appropriate medical competencies, scope of practice and capabilities in the expedition environment and need not necessarily be a qualified doctor. In addition to providing guidance regarding the clinical competencies required of the expedition medic, the document provides generic guidance and signposting to the more pertinent aspects of the role of expedition medic. PMID:26629337

  15. Factors affecting enhanced mercury bioaccumulation in inland lakes of Isle Royale National Park, USA.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Patrick R; Cleckner, Lisa B; Hurley, James P; Sierszen, Michael E; Armstrong, David E

    2003-03-20

    We investigated factors causing mercury (Hg) concentrations in northern pike to exceed the consumption advisory level (>500 ng/g) in some inland lakes of Isle Royale National Park. Using Hg-clean techniques, we collected water, zooplankton, macro invertebrates, and fishes in 1998 and 1999 from one advisory lake, Sargent Lake, for analysis of total mercury (Hg(T)) and methylmercury (MeHg). For comparison, samples were also collected from a non-advisory lake, Lake Richie. Concentrations of Hg(T) in northern pike were significantly higher in Sargent Lake (P<0.01). Counter to expectations, mean concentrations of both Hg(T) and MeHg in open water samples were slightly higher in Lake Richie. However, zooplankton in Sargent Lake contained higher average concentrations of Hg(T) and MeHg than in Lake Richie. Mercury concentrations in macro invertebrates were similar between lakes, but different between taxa. The two lakes exhibited similar Hg(T) concentrations in age-1 yellow perch and adult perch but concentrations in large adult perch (>160 mm) in Sargent Lake were twice the concentrations in Lake Richie. Analysis of stable isotopes (delta(13)C and delta(15)N) in biota showed that pike from the two lakes are positioned at the same trophic level (4.2 and 4.3), but that the food web is more pelagic-based in Sargent and benthic-based in Richie. Factors causing concentrations in large pike to be higher in Sargent Lake may include higher bioavailability of methylmercury and a food web that enhances bioaccumulation. PMID:12663194

  16. Noise exposure and cognitive performance: A study on personnel on board Royal Norwegian Navy vessels

    PubMed Central

    Irgens-Hansen, Kaja; Gundersen, Hilde; Sunde, Erlend; Baste, Valborg; Harris, Anette; Bråtveit, Magne; Moen, Bente E.

    2015-01-01

    Prior research shows that work on board vessels of the Royal Norwegian Navy (RNoN) is associated with noise exposure levels above recommended standards. Further, noise exposure has been found to impair cognitive performance in environmental, occupational, and experimental settings, although prior research in naval and maritime settings is sparse. The aim of this study was to evaluate cognitive performance after exposure to noise among personnel working on board vessels in the RNoN. Altogether 87 Navy personnel (80 men, 7 women; 31 ± 9 years) from 24 RNoN vessels were included. Noise exposure was recorded by personal noise dosimeters at a minimum of 4 h prior to testing, and categorized into 4 groups for the analysis: <72.6 dB(A), 72.6-77.0 dB(A), 77.1-85.2 dB(A), and >85.2 dB(A). The participants performed a visual attention test based on the Posner cue-target paradigm. Multivariable general linear model (GLM) analyses were performed to analyze whether noise exposure was associated with response time (RT) when adjusting for the covariates age, alertness, workload, noise exposure in test location, sleep the night before testing, use of hearing protection device (HPD), and percentage of errors. When adjusting for covariates, RT was significantly increased among personnel exposed to >85.2 dB(A) and 77.1-85.2 dB(A) compared to personnel exposed to <72.6 dB(A). PMID:26356374

  17. Visitors' perception of thermal comfort during extreme heat events at the Royal Botanic Garden Melbourne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Cho Kwong Charlie; Loughnan, Margaret; Tapper, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Outdoor thermal comfort studies have mainly examined the perception of local residents, and there has been little work on how those conditions are perceived differently by tourists, especially tourists of diverse origins. This issue is important because it will improve the application of thermal indices in predicting the thermal perception of tourists. This study aims to compare the differences in thermal perception and preferences between local and overseas visitors to the Royal Botanic Garden (RBG) in Melbourne during summer. An 8-day survey was conducted in February 2014 at four sites in the garden (n = 2198), including 2 days with maximum temperature exceeding 40 °C. The survey results were compared with data from four weather stations adjacent to the survey locations. One survey location, `Fern Gully', has a misting system and visitors perceived the Fern Gully to be cooler than other survey locations. As the apparent temperature exceeded 32.4 °C, visitors perceived the environment as being `warm' or `hot'. At `hot' conditions, 36.8 % of European visitors voted for no change to the thermal conditions, which is considerably higher than the response from Australian visitors (12.2 %) and Chinese visitors (7.5 %). Study results suggest that overseas tourists have different comfort perception and preferences compared to local Australians in hot weather based at least in part on expectations. Understanding the differences in visitors' thermal perception is important to improve the garden design. It can also lead to better tour planning and marketing to potential visitors from different countries.

  18. The impact of The Royal College of Surgeons of England research fellowship scheme.

    PubMed

    Shalhoub, J; Cromwell, D; Coomer, M; Alderson, D

    2016-07-01

    Introduction The research fellowship scheme for surgeons in training run by The Royal College of Surgeons of England (RCS) had its 20th anniversary in 2013. A survey was undertaken to assess outcomes of the scheme during those 20 years. Methods Fellowship recipients were invited to complete an online 20-item questionnaire about their fellowship research and research activities since its completion. The questionnaire covered type of research undertaken, higher research degree enrolment, publications resulting from the fellowship research and subsequent research career. Results Of the 502 RCS fellowship recipients, 361 responded (72%). Their research covered a broad array of topics, Almost two-thirds (62%) undertook laboratory-based research and most of the remainder conducted patient-based clinical research. The vast majority (96%) of respondents had enrolled for a higher degree, with a high completion rate: 91% of fellowship recipients in the first 15 years of the scheme obtained their degree. Of the fellowships from the first 15 years of the scheme, between a fifth and a third of recipients subsequently held an academic position. The median number of peer reviewed articles and presentations per recipient was 3 and 6 respectively. Almost two-thirds (60%) of respondents had obtained funding for further research, with over half of these receiving grants from national research funding bodies. Conclusions The RCS research fellowship scheme has helped trainee surgeons to undertake research towards the start of their career. Most trainees used RCS fellowships as part of their funding towards a higher degree and this was regularly achieved, along with a number of peer reviewed publications. A significant proportion of fellowship recipients progressed into academic positions in surgery. PMID:27138854

  19. Survival of the fittest? The scientific basis for the Royal Navy pre-joining fitness test.

    PubMed

    Allsopp, A J; Scarpello, E G; Andrews, S; Pethybridge, R J

    2003-01-01

    The Royal Navy introduced a pre-joining fitness test to the selection procedures for RN Ratings from Summer 2003. The scientific basis for the test came from the present study to investigate if anthropometric and physical fitness measures predicted training failure. Fitness and anthropometric data from 1641 trainees were collected, together with their training outcome (i.e. pass or fail), during the period from September 2001 to March 2002. In addition, a retrospective interrogation of medical records identified those who reported any lower limb injuries. The overall rate of training attrition was 22%. Success in training was associated with: gender; age; physical fitness; and, in the case of females, Body Mass Index (BMI). The reported incidence of lower limb injury (LLI) was associated with: gender; physical fitness; and, for female trainees, BMI. The reported incidence of LLI was approximately 50% in the 'least-fit' female group compared to 10% in the 'most-fit' male group. 16% of females and 2% of males were considered 'unfit' (i.e. did not attain the prescribed run standards of 13 min 15 s and 11 min 13 s respectively). 3% of trainees were considered 'obese' (a BMI > 30 kg.m-2) whereas more than 25% were overweight (BMI > 25 kg.m-2). As a result of this work, selection candidates must now demonstrate a minimum standard of aerobic fitness prior to arrival at HMS Raleigh. The future impact of this selection measure on the reported incidence of lower limb injury and financial costs of training requires further investigation. PMID:14655422

  20. Amino acid composition of royal jelly harvested at different times after larval transfer.

    PubMed

    Jie, H; Li, P M; Zhao, G J; Feng, X L; Zeng, D J; Zhang, C L; Lei, M Y; Yu, M; Chen, Q

    2016-01-01

    The amino acids in royal jelly (RJ) have a wide range of pharmacological and health-promoting functions in humans. Multiple studies on the amino acid quality and composition in RJ have investigated RJ harvested at 72 h after larval transfer. In contrast, the concentration of amino acids in RJ harvested before 72 h remains unknown. In this study, the concentration of free amino acids (FAAs) and total amino acids (TAAs) in RJ harvested at 13 time points between 24 and 72 h after transfer of ten Apis mellifera colonies were measured. Our results indicated that the most abundant FAAs were Pro, Phe, Lys, Glu, and Tyr, whereas the most abundant TAAs were Asp, Glu, Leu, Lys, and Val. The total FAA concentration in RJ increased with increasing harvest time, from 4.30 mg/g at 24 h to 9.48 mg/g at 72 h. In contrast, the variation in concentration of TAAs observed was a decrease-increase-decrease trend with 40 h (149.53 mg/g) and 52 h (169.62 mg/g) as inflection points. The highest and lowest concentrations of TAA were 197.96 and 121.32 mg/g at 24 and 72 h, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the concentration changes of FAAs and TAAs prior to 72 h after transfer. Our results will provide theoretical support to guide production practices of beekeeping, as well as elucidate the relationship between the harvest time point and RJ content. PMID:27525943

  1. Lessons from history: morbidity of cold injury in the Royal Marines during the Falklands Conflict of 1982

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Environmental conditions in the Falklands Conflict of 1982 favoured the genesis of cold injuries. Immediately, post-war, cold injury morbidity and its contributory factors were assessed, in the personnel of UK 3 Commando Brigade (3 Cdo Bde). Methods A questionnaire survey of the 3,006 members of 3 Cdo Bde who landed on the islands was conducted within 6–10 weeks of the end of hostilities. Questions included those relating to features of cold injury, body morphology, age, symptoms experienced, past medical history and other possible contributory causes. Additionally, the unit medical team conducted a cursory examination. Data were sent to the Royal Navy Institute of Naval Medicine (INM), where the degree of likely cold injury was broadly classified (‘asymptomatic’ ‘mild’, ‘moderate’ or ‘severe’). A sample (total 109) was then selected at random from each category and subsequently examined and tested at the INM (nerve conduction, photoplethysmography and thermography testing). Forty-seven non-cold exposed sailors acted as a control group. These contemporaneous records have now been identified and interrogated. Results Some 2,354 (78%) completed questionnaires were returned, revealing that 1,505 (64%) had experienced symptoms of non-freezing cold injury. The morbidity in the infantry units was significantly greater than that in the support troops (1,051 (76%) vs 454 (46%), p < 0.05). No evidence was found to support an influence of a number of factors, commonly believed to have an aetiological role in the production of cold injury. Whilst there was no significant relationship between past history and cold injury morbidity in the brigade as a whole, or within the infantry units alone, an association was identified in the collective infantry units (73%) and the support/headquarter units (59%) (p < 0.05). In comparison with uninjured sailors who acted as controls (n = 47), nerve conduction was impaired in 35% of those screened

  2. Microbial monitoring in treated stone at the Royal Chapel of Granada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jroundi, Fadwa; Pinar, Guadalupe; González-Muñoz, Maria Theresa; Sterflinger, Katja

    2014-05-01

    Biomineralization processes have been applied in situ to protect and consolidate decayed ornamental stone of the Royal Chapel in Granada (Spain). In few years, this conservation treatment has gained worth attention as environmentally friendly methodology for protection and consolidation of limestone because of the compatibilities shown between the new calcium carbonate cement and the original stone substrate. Moreover, the success of this approach may be related to the diversity of the microbiota inhabiting the stone and activated upon the biotreatment application and throughout the time. González-Muñoz et al. (2008) proposed a nutritional solution that activate among the bacteria inhabiting the stone those with carbonatogenic activity. In this study, a long-term (one, two and three years) monitoring of the microbiota present on the treated and untreated stones was done using a molecular strategy, including total DNA extraction, PCR amplification of 16S rRNA sequences, construction of clone libraries and fingerprinting by DGGE (Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis) analysis. Sequencing of the 16S rDNA revealed the dominant occurrence of members of Actinobacteria (44.20%), Gamma-proteobacteria (30.24%) and Chloroflexi (25.56%) after one year of the biotreatment. Whereas after two years, members of Cyanobacteria (22.10%) appeared and three years after, the microbiota consisted of only Actinobacteria and Cyanobacteria with approximately the same percentage in comparison with the untreated stones, dominated exclusively by Actinobacteria (100%). Fungal diversity followed the same dynamic as bacterial diversity being Ascomicota the predominant order before treatment. After one year, members of Basidiomycota and Viridiplantae appeared on the stone while two years after, the Viridiplantae dominated with a percentage of 84.77%. Finally, three years after the treatment, fungi population started to stabilize again and Ascomicota predominated next to 16.67% of

  3. Systemic immunotherapy delays photoreceptor cell loss and prevents vascular pathology in Royal College of Surgeons rats

    PubMed Central

    Adamus, Grazyna; Kyger, Madison; Worley, Aneta; Burrows, Gregory G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Degenerative retinopathies, including retinitis pigmentosa, age-related retinal degeneration, autoimmune retinopathy, and related diseases affect millions of people around the world. Currently, there is no effective treatment for most of those diseases. We investigated systemic recombinant T-cell receptor ligand (RTL) immunotherapy for preventing retinal degeneration and vascular damage in the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat model of retinal degeneration. Methods RCS rats were treated with RTL220 tethered to interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein (IRBP) peptide or control RTL101 without peptide by subcutaneous administration starting at the onset of photoreceptor degeneration or after the degenerative process began daily or every other day and performed for a 13-week period. The retinal cross sections and whole mounts were prepared to determine histopathology, leaking vessels, and formation of vascular complexes. Immunofluorescent studies evaluated microglia and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 chemokine in treated retinas. Optokinetic studies were performed to determine visual acuity. Results Systemic treatment with RTL220 prevented decreases in outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness and showed a significantly higher number of nuclei than control rats treated with RTL101 or vehicle. RTL220 was also effective in protecting retinal vasculature from leakage and the formation of abnormal vascular complexes even when the treatment was administered after the degenerative process was initiated. Visual acuity measurement showed that rats treated with RTL220 performed significantly better than those with RTL101 and untreated age-matched controls at P60 and P90. Biodistribution studies showed that RTL220 cleared slowly from the administration site. Moreover, RTL220-treated retinas had a significantly reduced number of activated microglia in the subretinal space, decreased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production in the retina, inhibited T

  4. Royal College of General Practitioners Research and Surveillance Centre (RCGP RSC) sentinel network: a cohort profile

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Ana; Hinton, William; McGovern, Andrew; van Vlymen, Jeremy; Yonova, Ivelina; Jones, Simon; de Lusignan, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The Royal College of General Practitioners Research and Surveillance Centre (RCGP RSC) is one of the longest established primary care sentinel networks. In 2015, it established a new data and analysis hub at the University of Surrey. This paper evaluates the representativeness of the RCGP RSC network against the English population. Participants and method The cohort includes 1 042 063 patients registered in 107 participating general practitioner (GP) practices. We compared the RCGP RSC data with English national data in the following areas: demographics; geographical distribution; chronic disease prevalence, management and completeness of data recording; and prescribing and vaccine uptake. We also assessed practices within the network participating in a national swabbing programme. Findings to date We found a small over-representation of people in the 25–44 age band, under-representation of white ethnicity, and of less deprived people. Geographical focus is in London, with less practices in the southwest and east of England. We found differences in the prevalence of diabetes (national: 6.4%, RCPG RSC: 5.8%), learning disabilities (national: 0.44%, RCPG RSC: 0.40%), obesity (national: 9.2%, RCPG RSC: 8.0%), pulmonary disease (national: 1.8%, RCPG RSC: 1.6%), and cardiovascular diseases (national: 1.1%, RCPG RSC: 1.2%). Data completeness in risk factors for diabetic population is high (77–99%). We found differences in prescribing rates and costs for infections (national: 5.58%, RCPG RSC: 7.12%), and for nutrition and blood conditions (national: 6.26%, RCPG RSC: 4.50%). Differences in vaccine uptake were seen in patients aged 2 years (national: 38.5%, RCPG RSC: 32.8%). Owing to large numbers, most differences were significant (p<0.00015). Future plans The RCGP RSC is a representative network, having only small differences with the national population, which have now been quantified and can be assessed for clinical relevance for specific studies. This

  5. Abnormal fiber end migration in Royal College of Surgeons rats during posterior subcapsular cataract formation

    PubMed Central

    Joy, Anita; Al-Ghoul, Kristin J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Prior structural studies of posterior subcapsular cataract (PSC) development in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats suggest that migration of basal fiber ends was disrupted, ultimately resulting in a PSC. Therefore the goal of this study was to assess the overall migration patterns as well as changes to the structure and cytoskeleton of basal fiber ends during PSC development. Methods Lenses from 48 RCS dystrophic rats (RCS/Lav) and 24 genetically matched control animals (RCS-rdy+/Lav) from 2 to 8 weeks old were examined. Equatorial diameters were measured and suture patterns were photographed immediately following enucleation/dissection. Right eye lenses were fixed and processed to visualize the actin cytoskeleton via laser scanning confocal microcopy (LSCM), left eye lenses were decapsulated, fixed and processed for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Scaled 3D-computer assisted drawings (CADs) and animations were constructed from the data to depict the changes in suture patterns and fiber end architecture. Results At 2 weeks, dystrophic lenses displayed an inverted Y suture on the posterior, and by 3 weeks most lenses had at least one sub-branch. Additional sub-branches were observed with time, opacities being visible as early as 4 weeks and progressing into PSC plaques by 6 weeks. Control lenses displayed inverted Y sutures at all ages and were transparent. SEM of dystrophic lenses revealed fiber ends with normal size, shape, arrangement, and filopodia at 2 weeks; scattered areas of dome-shaped fiber ends and small filopodia were present at 3 weeks. At 4 weeks the irregularly arranged domed fiber ends had extremely long filopodia with ‘boutons’ at their tips. By 6 weeks all fiber ends within plaques displayed rounded or domed basal membranes and lacked filopodial extensions. Control lenses at all time points had comparable ultrastructure to the 2 week old dystrophic lenses. F-actin arrangement within the basal membrane complex (BMC) of control

  6. South[ern] Africa's "Dar ul-'Ulums": Institutions of Social Change for the Common Good?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haron, Muhammed

    2014-01-01

    Muslim communities in principally non-Muslim nation states (e.g. South Africa, United States of America, the United Kingdom and the Netherlands) established a plethora of Muslim theological institutions. They have done so with the purpose of educating and reinforcing their Muslim identity. These educational structures have given rise to numerous…

  7. Institutional Priority for Diversity at Christian Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paredes-Collins, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    This evaluative study explored the relationship between institutional priority for diversity and minority enrollment at four schools within the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities, a consortium of Christian institutions. This institutional evaluation utilized public resources in order to gather descriptive data on minority enrollment…

  8. Effect of Processed Honey and Royal Jelly on Cancer-Related Fatigue: A Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mofid, Bahram; Rezaeizadeh, Hossein; Termos, Abdulkarim; Rakhsha, Afshin; Mafi, Ahmad Rezazadeh; Taheripanah, Taiebeh; Ardakani, Mehran Mirabzadeh; Taghavi, Seyed Mohammad Esmaeil; Moravveji, Seyyed Alireza; Kashi, Amir Shahram Yousefi

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is experienced by 50% to 90% of cancer patients and can severely affect their quality of life and functional capacity. Several randomized trials have recommended various ways to alleviate the symptoms of CRF with or without recourse to medications. Objective The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of processed honey and royal jelly on the symptoms of CRF in cancer patients who are undergoing hormone therapy, chemotherapy, chemo-radiation, or radiotherapy. Methods Fifty-two participants from the patients who visited the oncology clinic of Shohada-e-Tajrish hospital in Tehran (Iran) between May 2013 and August 2014 were selected and divided into two groups. The study group (26 patients) received processed honey and royal jelly, while the control group received pure honey. Both groups were instructed to consume their 5mL supplement twice daily for 4 weeks. Both groups were assessed at the beginning of the study, after 2 weeks, and then at the end of 4 weeks of treatment. Fatigue was measured using a visual analogue fatigue scale (VAFS) and fatigue severity scale (FSS). The results were compared between the two arms of study, and equality of probability distributions was assessed using a Kolmogorov–Smirnov test. Results The mean age of the 52 patients was 54.84. After two and four weeks of treatment with processed honey and royal jelly, VAFS and FSS due to treatment was better in the study group than in the control group, and the differences were statistically significant (p<0.001, p<0.001, respectively). Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, our study provided support for the use of processed honey and royal jelly to ameliorate CRF. The positive results of this study warrant further studies in this field. Clinical Trial Registration The study was registered in the Iranian Clinical Trial Registry Center (http://www.irct.ir) with the registration code: IRCT2015081423426N1. Funding The authors received no

  9. Three Licentiates of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh who were decorated with the Victoria Cross.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, M H

    2011-08-01

    Since the Victoria Cross was introduced in January 1856 by Queen Victoria to reward acts of valour in the face of the enemy, initially during the Crimean War, over 1350 medals have been awarded. Of these, three were awarded to medical officers who had previously gained the Licentiate Diploma of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (LRCS Edin) - Valentine Munbee McMaster on 25 September 1857, Henry Thomas Sylvester on 20 November 1857 (although the acts of valour for which he was awarded his VC occurred on two occasions in September 1855) and Campbell Mellis (or Millis) Douglas on 7 May 1867. PMID:21810849

  10. Hydraulics for Royal Gardens: Water Art as a Challenge for 18th Century Science and 21st Century Physics Teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Michael

    2007-06-01

    Hydraulics is an engineering specialty and largely neglected as a topic in physics teaching. But the history of hydraulics from the Renaissance to the Baroque, merits our attention because hydraulics was then more broadly conceived as a practical and theoretical science; it served as a constant bone of contention for mechanics and mathematics; its obvious practical importance from raising water in mines to the playful fountains in royal gardens illustrates the social role of science like few others do. The playful character of historic hydraulics problems makes it also an appealing topic for modern science education.

  11. The origin of ambient particulate matter concentrations in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriks, Carlijn; Kranenburg, Richard; Kuenen, Jeroen; van Gijlswijk, René; Wichink Kruit, Roy; Segers, Arjo; Denier van der Gon, Hugo; Schaap, Martijn

    2013-04-01

    Particulate matter poses a significant threat to human health. To be able to develop effective mitigation strategies, the origin of particulate matter needs to be established. The regional air quality model LOTOS-EUROS, equipped with a newly developed labeling routine, was used to establish the origin of PM10 and PM2.5 in the Netherlands for 2007-2009 at the source sector level, distinguishing between national and foreign sources. The results suggest that 70-80% of modeled PM10 and 80-95% of PM2.5 in the Netherlands is of anthropogenic origin. About 1/3 of anthropogenic PM10 is of Dutch origin and 2/3 originates in foreign countries. Agriculture and transport are the Dutch sectors with the largest contribution to PM10 mass in the Netherlands, whereas the foreign contribution is more equally apportioned to road transport, other transport, industry, power generation and agriculture. For the PM2.5 fraction, a larger share is apportioned to foreign and anthropogenic origin than for PM10, but the same source sectors are dominant. The national contribution to PM levels is significantly higher in the densely populated Randstad area than for the country on average and areas close to the borders. In general, the Dutch contribution to the concentration of primary aerosol is larger than for secondary species. The sectoral origin varies per component and is location and time dependent. During peak episodes, natural sources are less important than under normal conditions, whereas especially road transport and agriculture become more important.

  12. Crop loss due to air pollution in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van der Eerden, L J; Tonneijck, A E; Wijnands, J H

    1988-01-01

    The extent of yield reduction and economic loss caused by air pollution has been estimated for The Netherlands. Based on available data on direct effects only, each species was designated as sensitive, moderately sensitive or tolerant. On a nationwide scale, only ozone (O3), sulphur dioxide (SO2), and hydrogen fluoride (HF) exceeded effect thresholds. Effects from pollutant combinations were assumed to be additive. Yield reductions were calculated, using 10 exposure-response relationships and concentration data from the Dutch air pollution monitoring network. Changes in air pollution levels result in changes in supply. By multiplying the supply with the current price, the so-called crop volume was calculated. Subsequently, changes in crop volume were converted into economic terms, taking into account demand elasticity. On the basis of these calculations, air pollution in The Netherlands reduces total crop volume by 5%:3.4% by O3, 1.2% by SO2, and 0.4% by HF. The slope of the nonlinear relationship between crop volume reduction and exposure level increases at higher concentrations. In general, air pollution causes relatively little loss to producers, since yield reductions are largely compensated by higher prices. If air pollution in The Netherlands would be reduced to background concentrations, consumers would experience a net gain of Dfl 640 million (US 320 million dollars). Although large amounts of data were attained through literature and our own experience for this study, many assumptions still had to be made to arrive at these conclusions. With the current available knowledge, validation of our results in the field is not yet possible. PMID:15092562

  13. Economic Analysis of Classical Swine Fever Surveillance in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Guo, X; Claassen, G D H; Oude Lansink, A G J M; Loeffen, W; Saatkamp, H W

    2016-06-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a highly contagious pig disease that causes economic losses and impaired animal welfare. Improving the surveillance system for CSF can help to ensure early detection of the virus, thereby providing a better initial situation for controlling the disease. Economic analysis is required to compare the benefits of improved surveillance with the costs of implementing a more intensive system. This study presents a comprehensive economic analysis of CSF surveillance in the Netherlands, taking into account the specialized structure of Dutch pig production, differences in virulence of CSF strains and a complete list of possible surveillance activities. The starting point of the analysis is the current Dutch surveillance system (i.e. the default surveillance-setup scenario), including the surveillance activities 'daily clinical observation by the farmer', 'veterinarian inspection after a call', 'routine veterinarian inspection', 'pathology in AHS', 'PCR on tonsil in AHS', 'PCR on grouped animals in CVI' and 'confirmatory PCR by NVWA'. Alternative surveillance-setup scenarios were proposed by adding 'routine serology in slaughterhouses', 'routine serology on sow farms' and 'PCR on rendered animals'. The costs and benefits for applying the alternative surveillance-setup scenarios were evaluated by comparing the annual mitigated economic losses because of intensified CSF surveillance with the annual additional surveillance costs. The results of the cost-effectiveness analysis show that the alternative surveillance-setup scenarios with 'PCR on rendered animals' are effective for the moderately virulent CSF strain, whereas the scenarios with 'routine serology in slaughterhouses' or 'routine serology on sow farms' are effective for the low virulent strain. Moreover, the current CSF surveillance system in the Netherlands is cost-effective for both moderately virulent and low virulent CSF strains. The results of the cost-benefit analysis for the

  14. Institute Study Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann; Steadman, Jackie; Little, Sally; Underwood, Debra; Blackman, Mack; Simonds, Judy

    1997-01-01

    This report documents a study conducted by the MSFC working group on Institutes in 1995 on the structure, organization and business arrangements of Institutes at a time when the agency was considering establishing science institutes. Thirteen institutes, ten science centers associated with the state of Georgia, Stanford Research Institute (SRI), and IIT Research Institute (IITRI), and general data on failed institutes were utilized to form this report. The report covers the working group's findings on institute mission, structure, director, board of directors/advisors, the working environment, research arrangements, intellectual property rights, business management, institute funding, and metrics.

  15. The effect of same-sex marriage laws on different-sex marriage: evidence from the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Trandafir, Mircea

    2014-02-01

    It has long been argued that the legalization of same-sex marriage would have a negative impact on marriage. In this article, I examine how different-sex marriage in the Netherlands was affected by the enactment of two laws: a 1998 law that provided all couples with an institution almost identical to marriage (a "registered partnership") and a 2001 law that legalized same-sex marriage for the first time in the world. I first construct a synthetic control for the Netherlands using OECD data for the period 1988-2005 and find that neither law had significant effects on either the overall or different-sex marriage rate. I next construct a unique individual-level data set covering the period 1995-2005 by combining the Dutch Labor Force Survey and official municipal records. The estimates from a discrete-time hazard model with unobserved heterogeneity for the first-marriage decision confirm the findings in the aggregate analysis. The effects of the two laws are heterogeneous, with presumably more-liberal individuals (as defined by their residence or ethnicity) marrying less after passage of both laws and potentially more-conservative individuals marrying more after passage of each law. PMID:24190101

  16. [A comparison of parrot food commercially available in The Netherlands].

    PubMed

    Robben, J H; Lumeij, J T

    1989-01-01

    The composition of a number of parrot foods commercially available in the Netherlands was put to the test for the (partly hypothetical) needs of the larger psittacine birds such as African Grey parrots, Amazon parrots, macaws and cockatoos. These studies showed that the majority of the foods is multideficient. When the deficient foods are supplied to parrots without any additions, this will give rise to the appearance of disease. However, some of the products recently put on the market (Bogena and Kasper Fauna Food) comply better with the requirements of a 'complete parrot food'. As regards public enlightenment, food producers, petshops, consumer organisations and veterinarians are obviously responsible. PMID:2913689

  17. The R and D program for IGCC in the Netherlands

    SciTech Connect

    Bolt, N.

    1994-12-31

    Early 1994 the 250 MWe IGCC demonstration plant in Buggenum, the Netherlands has been commissioned. Start-up of the integrated plant is in progress. From 1994 till 1996 a demonstration program is to be performed concentrating on economical aspects of IGCC, environmental aspects of IGCC, the IGCC performance, operation, control and availability and single component behavior. The IGCC demonstration project is accompanied by a long term R and D program which aims at reduced investment costs and improved efficiency, high availability and low maintenance costs, fulfillment of (Dutch) environmental requirements.

  18. Experiences with frozen blood products in the Netherlands military.

    PubMed

    Lelkens, C C M; Koning, J G; de Kort, B; Floot, I B G; Noorman, F

    2006-06-01

    For peacekeeping and peace enforcing missions abroad the Netherlands Armed Forces decided to use universal donor frozen blood products in addition to liquid products. This article describes our experiences with the frozen blood inventory, with special attention to quality control. It is shown that all thawed (washed) blood products are in compliance with international regulations and guidelines. By means of the -80 degrees C frozen stock of red cells, plasma and platelets readily available after thaw (and wash), we can now safely reduce shipments and abandon the backup 'walking' blood bank, without compromising the availability of blood products in theatre. PMID:16815757

  19. Reconstruction of a paleolandscape in the Hunzebasin (Northern Netherlands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zomer, Jeroen; Spek, Theo

    2013-04-01

    In recent decades, significant changes have occurred in ways of thinking about the genesis of the coastal areas of Northwest Europe. In the study of the Holocene coastal genesis of Northwest Europe, a new diversified model has been developed. While the old model was based on a synchronized and coherent development of the entire Northwest European coast, the new model focuses attention on domain-specific natural processes. At the same time, the interaction between man and nature in the coastal zone is put into another perspective. The idea that man unilaterally conformed to the natural influence of the sea has gradually been replaced by a more dynamic and co-adaptive model. These developments in ways of thinking are also important for the research of medieval reclamation of peatlands in the coastal area in the Northern Netherlands (present provinces of Friesland and Groningen). This research has long been overshadowed by theories and research concerning other areas, particularly the Western Netherlands. The classic uniform reclamation model, which has until now been applied to the peatland reclamations in the Northern Netherlands, needs revision. In my PhD research, I develop a new diversified reclamation model based on interdisciplinary research into the natural landscape and the reclamation history. The study focusses on the medieval peatland reclamations in the Hunze basin. The Hunze basin is a deeply eroded Pleistocene valley filled up with Holocene sediments in the Northern Netherlands, where in the late Holocene a tidal system has developed with its own domain-specific characteristics. This paper, based on empirical research, covers the reconstruction of the 'natural' early medieval coastal peatlands in the Hunze basin. From previous research, it is known that the complete study area was covered with a layer of peat. In these studies, however, no statements are made about the peat landscape itself or the vegetation. At present a major part of the peatlands has

  20. Weichselian Aeolian Geoheritage Top 20 of the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Ancker, Hanneke; Jungerius, Pieter Dirk; Platform Aardkundige Waarden, members

    2016-04-01

    The Netherlands are known world-wide for its engineered landscapes, its deep polders and bulb fields. The deep polders, up to more than 5 meters below sea level, originated by reclaiming peat lakes and peat quarries made for fuel. Its bulb fields are situated on levelled permeable dunes on which the precise water management is possible that growing bulbs requires. The Waddensea and -islands are less widely known (except by German bathers), although they are a World Heritage. The Waddensea is a highly pristine tidal landscape that already occurs along the Dutch coast for over 10,000 years and an important Natura 2000 area. The Wadden islands have an interesting history of erosion and re-growth and old cultural landscapes that show the interaction of land use and small-scale differences in geology and geomorphology during different cultural periods. Therefore, it is time to change the international perception of foreign visitors to The Netherlands and add the high variety of its historical landscapes, partly pristine and partly old cultural landscapes, to its tourism qualities. The poster presents a Top 20 of a less spectacular but another internationally important Dutch landscape: the coversand sites of the Netherlands. The Top 20 is selected by Geoheritage NL's Platform Aardkundige Waarden. The coversands evolved during the Late Weichselian, when the Netherlands was not covered by land ice and for a long period of time was part of a polar desert. The coversand landscape with dunes of 0,5 m up to 15 metres is not spectacular, but very characteristic. The coversands comprise of more than half a kilometre broad and 40 kilometre long dunes, series of river dunes as well as isolated dunes. The coversands and related Holocene drift sands make up about a quarter of the Dutch landscape. Over a century ago more than half of this landscape still had its pristine topography. Now less than a few percent is remaining. Especially the few remaining heathlands on coversand are an

  1. Plastic ingestion by harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Bravo Rebolledo, Elisa L; Van Franeker, Jan A; Jansen, Okka E; Brasseur, Sophie M J M

    2013-02-15

    Abundance of ingested debris by seals has been mentioned as a potential indicator of marine litter in the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). A sample of 107 stomachs, 100 intestines and 125 scats of harbour seals from the Netherlands was analysed for the presence of plastics. Incidence of plastic was 11% for stomachs, 1% for intestines, and 0% for scats. Younger animals, up to 3 years of age, were most affected. This is the first quantitative study of plastic ingestion by phocid seals. The observed level of incidence is of environmental concern, but is low in the sense of suitability of seals for MSFD monitoring purposes. PMID:23245459

  2. Mission Statements of Christian Elementary Schools in the United States and the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zandstra, Anne M.

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the mission statements of a small sample of Christian elementary schools in the United States and the Netherlands. In the United States, Christian schools are private schools, while in the Netherlands Christian schools receive state funding, just like public schools. Content analysis of mission statements revealed similarities…

  3. The Dangers of Schooling: The Introduction of School Medical Inspection in the Netherlands (c.1900)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakker, Nelleke; de Beer, Fedor

    2009-01-01

    In this article the authors address the question of why school medical inspection in the Netherlands developed not only considerably slower than the British service but did so also on a more modest scale in terms of the impact on children's lives. In the Netherlands school doctors were not allowed to treat children's illnesses and therefore never…

  4. Market Mechanisms in Education: School Choice in the Netherlands, England and Scotland in a Comparative Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teelken, Christine

    1999-01-01

    Analyzes differences in the availability of school choice in the Netherlands, England, and Scotland, focusing on trends in 10 choice-related variables. Concludes that all three countries are moving toward an increased market mechanism but exhibit extensive differences, with the Netherlands approaching the market mechanism most closely. Contains 61…

  5. Report to the Government of the Netherlands Antilles on Workers' Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Labour Office, Geneva (Switzerland).

    At the request of the government of the Netherlands Antilles for assistance in the field of workers' education, the United Nations Development Program and the International Labor Office agreed to implement a three months mission in 1972 for an expert to advise and assist the government and the trade unions of the Netherlands Antilles to develop a…

  6. Education as Cultural Mobilisation: The Great War and Its Effects on Moral Education in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolk, Vincent; Los, Willeke; Karsten, Sjoerd

    2014-01-01

    Education during World War I has been a relatively unexplored field of research, especially in the case of countries with a neutral stance in that war. The Netherlands is one such country. This article argues that even though the Netherlands was politically neutral, it was and considered itself a part of western civilisation and shared in the…

  7. 76 FR 66687 - Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From the Netherlands: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ... Carboxymethylcellulose from the Netherlands; Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 76 FR 36519... clarification, see Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Proceedings: Assessment of Antidumping Duties, 68 FR... Netherlands and Sweden, 70 FR 39734 (July 11, 2005). These cash-deposit requirements, when imposed,...

  8. The Role of the Company in Generating Skills. The Learning Effects of Work Organization. The Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onstenk, Jeroen; Voncken, Eva

    The impact of developments in work organizations on the skilling process in the Netherlands was studied through a macro analysis of available statistical information about the development of education for work in the Netherlands and case studies of three Dutch firms. The macro analysis focused on the following: vocational education in the…

  9. Same Goals, Different Strategies: Funding Higher Education in England and the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakker, Mervin

    2007-01-01

    For the Netherlands and England, higher education (HE) is of particular importance. Their knowledge-intensive economies would not remain competitive without highly qualified human resources and innovative research. Despite the importance of higher education in public and political debate, both England and the Netherlands spend a lower percentage…

  10. Characterization of royal jelly proteins in both Africanized and European honeybees (Apis mellifera) by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sano, Osamu; Kunikata, Toshio; Kohno, Keizo; Iwaki, Kanso; Ikeda, Masao; Kurimoto, Masashi

    2004-01-14

    In this study, the proteins contained in royal jelly (RJ) produced by Africanized honeybees and European honeybees (Apis mellifera) haven been analyzed in detail and compared using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and the N-terminal amino acid sequence of each spot has been determined. Most spots were assigned to major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs). Remarkable differences were found in the heterogeneity of the MRJPs, in particular MRJP3, in terms of molecular weights and isoelectric points between the two species of RJ. Furthermore, during the determination of the N-terminal amino acid sequence of each spot, for the first time, MRJP4 protein has been identified, the existence of which had been only implied by cloning of its cDNA sequence. The presence of heterogeneous bands of glucose oxidase was also identified. Thus, the results suggest that two-dimensional gel electrophoresis provides a suitable method for the qualitative analysis of the proteins contained in RJ derived from different honeybee species. PMID:14709007

  11. Whole-genome resequencing of honeybee drones to detect genomic selection in a population managed for royal jelly.

    PubMed

    Wragg, David; Marti-Marimon, Maria; Basso, Benjamin; Bidanel, Jean-Pierre; Labarthe, Emmanuelle; Bouchez, Olivier; Le Conte, Yves; Vignal, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Four main evolutionary lineages of A. mellifera have been described including eastern Europe (C) and western and northern Europe (M). Many apiculturists prefer bees from the C lineage due to their docility and high productivity. In France, the routine importation of bees from the C lineage has resulted in the widespread admixture of bees from the M lineage. The haplodiploid nature of the honeybee Apis mellifera, and its small genome size, permits affordable and extensive genomics studies. As a pilot study of a larger project to characterise French honeybee populations, we sequenced 60 drones sampled from two commercial populations managed for the production of honey and royal jelly. Results indicate a C lineage origin, whilst mitochondrial analysis suggests two drones originated from the O lineage. Analysis of heterozygous SNPs identified potential copy number variants near to genes encoding odorant binding proteins and several cytochrome P450 genes. Signatures of selection were detected using the hapFLK haplotype-based method, revealing several regions under putative selection for royal jelly production. The framework developed during this study will be applied to a broader sampling regime, allowing the genetic diversity of French honeybees to be characterised in detail. PMID:27255426

  12. Adopting seven-day working in practice: a report by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow.

    PubMed

    Scott, H R; Isles, C J; Fisher, B M; Long, J; Dunn, F G

    2014-11-01

    Following the UK Academy of Medical Royal Colleges Report on seven day consultant present care, the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow held a symposium to explore clinicians' views on the ways in which clinical care should best be enhanced outside 'normal' working hours. In addition, a survey of members and fellows was undertaken to identify the tests which would make the greatest impact on care out of hours. Key messages were: (a) that seven-day consultant delivered care would not achieve the desired benefit to patient care if introduced in isolation from other inter-relating factors. These include alternatives to hospital admission, enhanced nursing support, increased junior medical, pharmacy, social care and ambulance availability and greater access to selected diagnostic services; (b) that the care of hospital inpatients is a service which is one part of the totality of secondary care provision. Any significant change in the deployment of staff for inpatient care must be carefully managed so as not to result in a reduced quality of care provided by the rest of the system. PMID:25351425

  13. Thomas Birch's 'Weekly Letter' (1741-66): correspondence and history in the mid-eighteenth-century Royal Society.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Markman

    2014-09-20

    Thomas Birch (1705-66), Secretary of the Royal Society from 1752 to 1765, and Philip Yorke, second Earl of Hardwicke (1720-90), wrote a 'Weekly Letter' from 1741 to 1766, an unpublished correspondence of 680 letters now housed in the British Library (Additional Mss 35396-400). The article examines the dimensions and purposes of this correspondence, an important conduit of information for the influential coterie of the 'Hardwicke circle' gathered around Yorke in the Royal Society. It explores the writers' self-conception of the correspondence, which was expressed in deliberately archaic categories of seventeenth-century news exchange, such as the newsletter, aviso and a-la-main. It shows how the letter writers negotiated their difference in status through the discourse of friendship, and concludes that the 'Weekly Letter' constituted for the correspondents a form of private knowledge, restricted in circulation to their discrete group, and as such unlike the open and networked model of Enlightenment science. PMID:25254279

  14. Case series of pectoralis major rupture requiring operative intervention sustained on the Royal Marines ‘Tarzan’ assault course

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Chris; Guyver, Paul Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present (with intra-operative imaging) four patients who sustained pectoralis major (PM) ruptures on the same piece of equipment of the ‘Tarzan’ assault course at the Commando Training Centre, Royal Marines (CTCRM). Recruits jump at running pace, carrying 21 lbs of equipment and a weapon (8 lbs) across a 6-feet gap onto a vertical cargo-net. The recruits punch horizontally through the net, before adducting their arm to catch themselves, and all weight, on their axilla. All patients presented with immediate pain and reduced function. Two had ruptures demonstrated on magnetic resonance imaging, one on an ultrasound scan and one via clinical examination. All four patients were found, at operation, to have sustained type IIIE injuries. All patients underwent PM repair using a unicortical button fixation and had an uneventful immediate postoperative course. Patient 1 left Royal Marines training after the injury (out of choice; not because of failure to rehabilitate). All other patients are under active rehabilitation, hoping to return to training. Review of 10 years of records at CTCRM reveal no documented PM rupture prior to our first case in October 2013. There has been no change to the obstacle or technique used and all patients deny the use of steroids.

  15. Thomas Birch's ‘Weekly Letter’ (1741–66): correspondence and history in the mid-eighteenth-century Royal Society

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Markman

    2014-01-01

    Thomas Birch (1705–66), Secretary of the Royal Society from 1752 to 1765, and Philip Yorke, second Earl of Hardwicke (1720–90), wrote a ‘Weekly Letter’ from 1741 to 1766, an unpublished correspondence of 680 letters now housed in the British Library (Additional Mss 35396–400). The article examines the dimensions and purposes of this correspondence, an important conduit of information for the influential coterie of the ‘Hardwicke circle’ gathered around Yorke in the Royal Society. It explores the writers' self-conception of the correspondence, which was expressed in deliberately archaic categories of seventeenth-century news exchange, such as the newsletter, aviso and a-la-main. It shows how the letter writers negotiated their difference in status through the discourse of friendship, and concludes that the ‘Weekly Letter’ constituted for the correspondents a form of private knowledge, restricted in circulation to their discrete group, and as such unlike the open and networked model of Enlightenment science. PMID:25254279

  16. Attitudes to face transplantation: results of a public engagement exercise at the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Alex; Simmons, Jon; White, Paul; Withey, Simon; Butler, Peter E M

    2006-01-01

    Hettiaratchy and Butler (Lancet 2002;360:5-6) framed face transplantation as the next logical step on the reconstructive ladder for severe facial injury, in particular, pan-facial burns. The procedure formed the basis for a Royal College of Surgeons of England working party report. Ethical, surgical, and psychological issues were identified as research priorities before face transplantation is attempted in the United Kingdom. Public engagement is a vital mechanism if people are to be informed about the risks and benefits of the technique and ultimately to be able to consent to either receiving or donating facial tissue. To sample public opinion about the procedure, 304 people attending the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition were sampled by online questionnaire to determine their attitude toward face transplantation. Although people were more cautious about face transplantation when comparing this with solid-organ transplantation, most of the sample were in favor of the procedure, whether receiving a donor face or donating their own face after their death. Only 10% were against the idea in principle. Concerns about altered identity were not a barrier to face transplantation for 69% of the sample, with most people appropriately identifying the long-term problems of immunosuppression as the issue that most concerned them. There is a substantial population of people who, given the right circumstances, would contemplate face transplantation for themselves and would be willing to donate their own face for transplantation after their death. PMID:16679911

  17. [Determination of five macrolide antibiotic residues in royal jelly samples by using high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen; Ding, Huiying; Xi, Junyang; Qian, Yan; Huang, Leifang

    2007-05-01

    The macrolides are lipophilic molecules having a central lactone ring bearing 12 to 20 atoms to which several amino and/or neutral sugars are bound. They are broad spectrum antibiotics active against Gram-positive bacteria and mycoplasmas, as well as some Gram-negative organisms and members of the chlamydia group. Macrolides are a group of antibacterial compounds that have been widely used in medical and veterinary practices. A method of high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) was developed for the confirmation of five macrolide antibiotic residues (spiramycin, oleandomycin, tylosin, roxithromycin, josamycin) in royal jelly samples. Trichloroacetic acid solution was used to precipitate the protein in the sample. The upper layer solution was extracted with acetonitrile. Then it was cleaned up with a C18 column. The one precursor/two product ion transitions for each macrolide antibiotics were monitored. The results show that the working curves for five macrolide antibiotics were linear in the range of 0.002 - 0.05 mg/L by HPLC-MS/MS in selective ion monitoring model. The limits of quantitation of the antibiotics in royal jelly were all 20 microg/kg. The recoveries were between 73.0% -90.2% at three spiked levels (20, 100 and 200 microg/kg for each macrolide antibiotic), and the relative standard deviations were between 5.6% - 10.5%. PMID:17679440

  18. Whole-genome resequencing of honeybee drones to detect genomic selection in a population managed for royal jelly

    PubMed Central

    Wragg, David; Marti-Marimon, Maria; Basso, Benjamin; Bidanel, Jean-Pierre; Labarthe, Emmanuelle; Bouchez, Olivier; Le Conte, Yves; Vignal, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Four main evolutionary lineages of A. mellifera have been described including eastern Europe (C) and western and northern Europe (M). Many apiculturists prefer bees from the C lineage due to their docility and high productivity. In France, the routine importation of bees from the C lineage has resulted in the widespread admixture of bees from the M lineage. The haplodiploid nature of the honeybee Apis mellifera, and its small genome size, permits affordable and extensive genomics studies. As a pilot study of a larger project to characterise French honeybee populations, we sequenced 60 drones sampled from two commercial populations managed for the production of honey and royal jelly. Results indicate a C lineage origin, whilst mitochondrial analysis suggests two drones originated from the O lineage. Analysis of heterozygous SNPs identified potential copy number variants near to genes encoding odorant binding proteins and several cytochrome P450 genes. Signatures of selection were detected using the hapFLK haplotype-based method, revealing several regions under putative selection for royal jelly production. The framework developed during this study will be applied to a broader sampling regime, allowing the genetic diversity of French honeybees to be characterised in detail. PMID:27255426

  19. Barriers to Health Care for Chinese in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cha-Hsuan; Ingleby, David; Meeuwesen, Ludwien

    2011-01-01

    This study examines utilisation of the Dutch health care system by Chinese people in the Netherlands as well as their attitudes to the system, paying special attention to mental health. Information was gathered by semistructured interviews (n = 102). The main issues investigated are access, help-seeking behaviour, and quality of care. Results showed that most respondents used Dutch health care as their primary method of managing health problems. Inadequate knowledge about the system and lack of Dutch language proficiency impede access to care, in particular registration with a General Practitioner (GP). Users complained that the care given differed from what they expected. Results also showed that the major problems are to be found in the group coming from the Chinese-speaking region. Western concepts of mental health appear to be widely accepted by Chinese in the Netherlands. However, almost half of our respondents believed that traditional Chinese medicine or other methods can also help with mental health problems. The provision of relevant information in Chinese appears to be important for improving access. Better interpretation and translation services, especially for first-generation migrants from the Chinese-speaking region, are also required. PMID:22295191

  20. Impact of wind turbine noise in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Verheijen, Edwin; Jabben, Jan; Schreurs, Eric; Smith, Kevin B

    2011-01-01

    The Dutch government aims at an increase of wind energy up to 6 000 MW in 2020 by placing new wind turbines on land or offshore. At the same time, the existing noise legislation for wind turbines is being reconsidered. For the purpose of establishing a new noise reception limit value expressed in L den , the impact of wind turbine noise under the given policy targets needs to be explored. For this purpose, the consequences of different reception limit values for the new Dutch noise legislation have been studied, both in terms of effects on the population and regarding sustainable energy policy targets. On the basis of a nation-wide noise map containing all wind turbines in The Netherlands, it is calculated that 3% of the inhabitants of The Netherlands are currently exposed to noise from wind turbines above 28 dB(A) at the faηade. Newly established dose-response relationships indicate that about 1500 of these inhabitants are likely to be severely annoyed inside their dwellings. The available space for new wind turbines strongly depends on the noise limit value that will be chosen. This study suggests an outdoor A-weighted reception limit of L den = 45 dB as a trade-off between the need for protection against noise annoyance and the feasibility of national targets for renewable energy. PMID:22122963

  1. Risk analysis and safety policy developments in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Bottelberghs, P H

    2000-01-01

    In the Netherlands, external safety policy has been developed and implemented since the early eighties on the basis of a risk-based approach involving quantitative criteria for the tolerability of risk. Good experiences have been gained with the risk policy that applies to some 4000 establishments in the Netherlands where hazardous substances are present. On the basis of these experiences, legislation is now being prepared to give the risk tolerability criteria a full legal basis. This is aimed, in particular, to balance between risk control measures at the source through the licensing system, and spatial planning instruments to protect, e.g. residential areas against major hazards. The revision of the Seveso directive (96/82/EC) leads to the implementation of an integrated form of safety reporting, evaluation and inspection. Practical tools were developed for this implementation, e.g. for facilitating the selection of establishments and for assessing risks from major hazard establishments to surface water. In the past few years, the application of risk-based safety policy has been extended to other fields than establishments, e.g. for transport of hazardous chemicals and external safety of airports. PMID:10677654

  2. Increasing flood exposure in the Netherlands: implications for risk financing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongman, B.; Koks, E. E.; Husby, T. G.; Ward, P. J.

    2014-05-01

    The effectiveness of disaster risk management and financing mechanisms depends on an accurate assessment of current and future hazard exposure. The increasing availability of detailed data offers policy makers and the insurance sector new opportunities to understand trends in risk, and to make informed decisions on ways to deal with these trends. In this paper we show how comprehensive property level information can be used for the assessment of exposure to flooding on a national scale, and how this information provides valuable input to discussions on possible risk financing practices. The case study used is the Netherlands, which is one of the countries most exposed to flooding globally, and which is currently undergoing a debate on strategies for the compensation of potential losses. Our results show that flood exposure has increased rapidly between 1960 and 2012, and that the growth of the building stock and its economic value in flood-prone areas has been higher than in non-flood-prone areas. We also find that property values in flood-prone areas are lower than those in non-flood-prone areas. We argue that the increase in the share of economic value located in potential flood-prone areas can have a negative effect on the feasibility of private insurance schemes in the Netherlands. The methodologies and results presented in this study are relevant for many regions around the world where the effects of rising flood exposure create a challenge for risk financing.

  3. Aichi virus in sewage and surface water, the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Lodder, Willemijn J; Rutjes, Saskia A; Takumi, Katsuhisa; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2013-08-01

    Detection of Aichi virus in humans was initially reported in Japan in 1989. To establish a timeline for the prevalence of Aichi virus infection among humans in the Netherlands, we conducted molecular analysis of archival water samples from 1987-2000 and 2009-2012. Aichi virus RNA was detected in 100% (8/8) of sewage samples and 100% (7/7) of surface water samples collected during 1987-2000 and 100% (8/8) of sewage samples and 71% (5/7) of surface water samples collected during 2009-2012. Several genotype A and B Aichi virus lineages were observed over the 25-year period studied, but the time course of viral genetic diversity showed recent expansion of the genotype B population over genotype A. Our results show that Aichi virus has been circulating among the human population in the Netherlands since before its initial detection in humans was reported and that genotype B now predominates in this country. PMID:23876456

  4. Aichi Virus in Sewage and Surface Water, the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Rutjes, Saskia A.; Takumi, Katsuhisa; Husman, Ana Maria de Roda

    2013-01-01

    Detection of Aichi virus in humans was initially reported in Japan in 1989. To establish a timeline for the prevalence of Aichi virus infection among humans in the Netherlands, we conducted molecular analysis of archival water samples from 1987–2000 and 2009–2012. Aichi virus RNA was detected in 100% (8/8) of sewage samples and 100% (7/7) of surface water samples collected during 1987–2000 and 100% (8/8) of sewage samples and 71% (5/7) of surface water samples collected during 2009–2012. Several genotype A and B Aichi virus lineages were observed over the 25-year period studied, but the time course of viral genetic diversity showed recent expansion of the genotype B population over genotype A. Our results show that Aichi virus has been circulating among the human population in the Netherlands since before its initial detection in humans was reported and that genotype B now predominates in this country. PMID:23876456

  5. Revision and update of the stratigraphic nomenclature of Netherlands

    SciTech Connect

    Van Adrichem Boogaert, A. ); Kouwe, W. )

    1993-09-01

    In 1991, the Geological Survey of the Netherlands started a project for revision and updating of the pre-Quaternary lithostratigraphy of Netherlands. This had not been done systematically since 1980. Main objective of the study are (1) to bring the lithostratigraphic ideas into agreement with new findings and increased knowledge of Dutch subsurface geology (lithostratigraphy was extended into the Lower Carboniferous and Devonian), (2) expansion and standardization of the definitions and descriptions of existing lithostratigraphic units, (3) application of modern concepts (e.g. sequence stratigraphy) in order to describe better the distribution of reservoir-prone sediments, and (4) to reach consensus on a number of stratigraphy-related subjects, such as a chronological time frame, application of biozonations, and the designation of the behavior of main structural elements through time. Eight working groups were formed, each working on a specific aspect or stratigraphic interval, under the supervision of a steering committee. Both working groups and steering committee were composed of persons from the Geological Survey, several leading oil companies and, in some cases, universities. Several working groups have completed their tasks, and updates of these stratigraphic intervals are available at the conference. Posters will display stratigraphic updates of lithostratigraphy for the Carboniferous, Zechstein, Lower Triassic, and Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous.

  6. An Early Warning System for fluvial flooding in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davids, Femke; Stam, Jasper; Sprokkereef, Eric; van Dijk, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Fluvial flooding is one of the major natural hazards in the modern world. In a densely populated area, such as The Netherlands, the possibility of flooding of the Rhine and Meuse poses a significant threat to society. There is a clear need for reliable and robust hydrological forecasting. The Water Management Centre for the Netherlands and Deltares have developed an early warning system that uses real-time data provided by a large number of European meteorological and hydrological gauging stations, weather forecasts from three different weather services, and rainfall-runoff and hydraulic models. Data assimilation techniques are used to update both model states and parameter outputs. In addition, a post processing method, quantile regression, is applied to hydrological ensemble output. This presentation will demonstrate the operational flood early warning system (based on Delft-FEWS) applied to these rivers. Recent challenges are, for example, the visualization of uncertainties on deterministic and probabilistic forecasts, the clear communication and visualization of the enormous amount of data available, and snow modelling.

  7. Epidemiology of pyridoxine dependent seizures in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Been, J; Bok, L; Andriessen, P; Renier, W

    2005-01-01

    Background: Pyridoxine dependent epilepsy is a rare cause of seizures in childhood. The diagnosis is made on clinical criteria, that in many cases are never met. Therefore, epidemiological data on pyridoxine dependency are scarce. Aims: To study the epidemiology of pyridoxine dependent epilepsy in the Netherlands, and to determine whether the diagnosis is based on the appropriate criteria. Methods: Nationwide all departments of paediatrics (n = 113) and of paediatric or neonatal neurology (n = 17) were asked to report cases of pyridoxine dependent seizures. Birth incidences were calculated using national data on live births from 1991 to 2003. Results: Response was received from 67% of paediatric departments, including all university hospitals and 94% of child neurology departments. Thirteen patients were reported. Four definite (31%), three probable (23%), and four possible cases (31%) were identified. Two cases (15%) did not meet criteria for either of these groups. The birth incidence was 1:396 000 for definite and probable cases and 1:252 000 when possible cases are included. Conclusions: Thus far, epidemiological data on pyridoxine dependent seizures were only available from the UK and Ireland. A higher incidence was found in the Netherlands, in accordance with earlier suggestions of a regional difference. The study shows that the diagnosis is often made without performance of a formal trial of withdrawal. The importance of confirming the diagnosis, concerning the consequences as for individual prognosis, the potential side effects of prolonged pyridoxine substitution, and the possibility of treating the mother in case of future pregnancies are emphasised. PMID:16159904

  8. Race, class and the shaping of a policy for immigrants: the case of the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Entzinger, H B

    1987-03-01

    Ethnic stratification constitutes a (potential) threat to social stability. The major factors that determine the immigrants' position are 1) ethnic differences between them and the original population (and among the various immigrant groups themselves) and 2) the social system of the receiving society and the way in which the major distribution mechanisms in that system operate. For a very long period immigration policy in the Netherlands was based on the principle that it was not a country of immigration and it would not become one. Thus, it had a rather liberal admissions policy until 1980 because immigration was not expected to lead to permanent settlement. Ethnic minority groups constitute about 4.3% of the total population, but they are heavily overrepresented in the metropolitan areas. The culturalist approach in Dutch policy allowed opportunities for migrants to retain their own "cultural identity." During the 1970s the government supported the creation of a variety of institutions which served exclusively the different immigrant groups. After the policy change in the 1980s the Dutch allowed the immigrant institutions to continue to exist, to provide a "shelter" which would help the migrants emancipate within Dutch society. Meanwhile, they launched campaigns to inform the Dutch about immigrant cultures. This approach encountered difficulties: 1) the relatively small size of each immigrant group, the large and growing differences and oppositions within these groups, and their geographical dispersal, often made it impossible to set up separate institutions with even minimal viability; 2) there was a lack of leaders in most minority groups; 3) the economic crisis of the early 1980s hit the immigrants much more strongly than the general population; and 4) a "blame-the-victim" attitude developed among a growing number of Dutchmen. In 1983 the government shifted to a structuralist approach, by striving to overcome social disadvantage and achieve legal equality

  9. Noise and exposure of personnel aboard vessels in the Royal Norwegian Navy.

    PubMed

    Sunde, Erlend; Irgens-Hansen, Kaja; Moen, Bente E; Gjestland, Truls; Koefoed, Vilhelm F; Oftedal, Gunnhild; Bråtveit, Magne

    2015-03-01

    Despite awareness of noise aboard vessels at sea, few studies have reported measured noise levels aboard ships. This study aimed to describe the noise levels aboard vessels in the Royal Norwegian Navy (RNoN), and to assess the noise exposure of personnel aboard RNoN vessels. In 2012/2013 noise measurements were conducted aboard 14 RNoN vessels from four different vessel classes (frigates, coastal corvettes, mine vessels, and coast guard vessels) which were included in this study. Mean and median A-weighted noise levels (L p,A) in decibel (dB(A)) were calculated for different locations in each vessel class. The noise exposure of RNoN personnel was assessed by dosimeter measurements, and with a task-based (TB) strategy. The TB strategy used means of area measured noise levels in locations and the personnel's mean reported time spent in the respective locations to estimate the exposure. Area measurements of noise during sailing with typical operating modes, showed that for all vessel classes the noise levels were high in engine rooms with median L p,A ranging from 86.4 to 105.3 dB(A). In all the other locations the vessel class with the highest noise levels (coastal corvettes) had a median L p,A ranging from 71.7 to 95.0 dB(A), while the vessel class with the lowest noise levels (coast guard vessels) had a median L p,A ranging from 41.5 to 57.8 dB(A). For all vessel classes the engineers and electricians had amongst the highest 24-hour noise exposure (L p,A,24h), both before and after adjusting for estimated use of hearing protective devices (L p,A,24h > 67.3 dB(A)). The vessel class with the highest personnel exposure levels (coastal corvettes) had L p,A,24h ranging from 76.6 to 79.3 dB(A). The vessel class with the lowest personnel exposure levels (coast guard vessels) had an L p,A,24h ranging from 47.4 to 67.3 dB(A). In general, the dosimeter measurements gave higher exposure levels than those estimated with the TB strategy. All vessel classes, except the coast

  10. The EUI Data Center at the Royal Observatory of Belgium: challenges and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeeck, Cis; Stegen, Koen; Berghmans, David; West, Matthew; Kraaikamp, Emil; Gissot, Samuel; Giordanengo, Boris; Nicula, Bogdan

    ESA’s Solar Orbiter mission is conceived to perform a close-up study of the Sun and the inner heliosphere. With a perihelion close at 0.29 AU and a maximum aphelion at about 0.85 AU, Solar Orbiter ventures closer to the Sun than any spacecraft before. Furthermore, about 3 years after launch, the spacecraft will begin an out-of-ecliptic phase, with inclinations gradually increasing up to 30 degrees. Solar Orbiter will be launched in 2017 and its nominal mission will last until 2024 (with the possibility of an extended mission until 2026). It will provide unique data and imagery of the Sun. The Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUI) suite onboard Solar Orbiter is composed of two High Resolution Imagers (HRI, one at Lyman-alpha and one at 174 Angstrom), and one dual band Full-Sun imager (FSI) working alternatively at the 174 and 304 Angstrom EUV passbands. The EUI Data Center (EDC), under PI supervision and located at the Royal Observatory of Belgium (Brussels), will be the single point of contact for instrument planning activities and for data deliveries to the Solar Orbiter archive at ESAC (Madrid), and is currently in its design phase. The EUI Data Center will be responsible for delivery to ESAC and the maintenance of the pipeline software that will process EUI data from telemetry packets to higher level data products. It will also ensure the delivery of these data products to the Solar Orbiter Data Archive, and maintain the instrument user manual that documents the processing of EUI non-science TM packets at ESOC (Darmstadt). The EDC will monitor any anomaly affecting the EUI instrument and produce on a regular basis the Instrument Operations Reports including an instrument health and science performance review. Here, we present an overview of the EDC and how it envisages to tackle some specific challenges. Since EUI will only observe during three “science windows” of 10 days each per orbit of about 165 days and in view of a severely limited telemetry, it is

  11. Implementing Quality Assurance at Royal University of Phnom Penh, Cambodia: Perceptions, Practices and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ros, Soveacha

    2010-01-01

    Quality Assurance in higher education has been an ongoing international issue for discussion. As higher education institutions move toward an era of accountability and accreditation, groups of stakeholders require proof of high-quality academic programs and services from higher education providers. Since the mid-1990s, most providers have strived…

  12. Implementing the Netherlands code of conduct for scientific practice-a case study.

    PubMed

    Schuurbiers, Daan; Osseweijer, Patricia; Kinderlerer, Julian

    2009-06-01

    Widespread enthusiasm for establishing scientific codes of conduct notwithstanding, the utility of such codes in influencing scientific practice is not self-evident. It largely depends on the implementation phase following their establishment--a phase which often receives little attention. The aim of this paper is to provide recommendations for guiding effective implementation through an assessment of one particular code of conduct in one particular institute. Based on a series of interviews held with researchers at the Department of Biotechnology of Delft University of Technology, this paper evaluates how the Netherlands Code of Conduct for Scientific Practice is received by those it is supposed to govern. While respondents agreed that discussion of the guiding principles of scientific conduct is called for, they did not consider the code as such to be a useful instrument. As a tool for the individual scientific practitioner, the code leaves a number of important questions unanswered in relation to visibility, enforcement, integration with daily practice and the distribution of responsibility. Recommendations are provided on the basis of these questions. There is more at stake than merely holding scientific practitioners to a proper exercise of their duties; implementation of scientific society codes of conduct also concerns the further motives and value commitments that gave rise to their establishment in the first place. PMID:19156537

  13. Potential interoperability problems facing multi-site radiation oncology centers in The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheurleer, J.; Koken, Ph; Wessel, R.

    2014-03-01

    Aim: To identify potential interoperability problems facing multi-site Radiation Oncology (RO) departments in the Netherlands and solutions for unambiguous multi-system workflows. Specific challenges confronting the RO department of VUmc (RO-VUmc), which is soon to open a satellite department, were characterized. Methods: A nationwide questionnaire survey was conducted to identify possible interoperability problems and solutions. Further detailed information was obtained by in-depth interviews at 3 Dutch RO institutes that already operate in more than one site. Results: The survey had a 100% response rate (n=21). Altogether 95 interoperability problems were described. Most reported problems were on a strategic and semantic level. The majority were DICOM(-RT) and HL7 related (n=65), primarily between treatment planning and verification systems or between departmental and hospital systems. Seven were identified as being relevant for RO-VUmc. Departments have overcome interoperability problems with their own, or with tailor-made vendor solutions. There was little knowledge about or utilization of solutions developed by Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise Radiation Oncology (IHE-RO). Conclusions: Although interoperability problems are still common, solutions have been identified. Awareness of IHE-RO needs to be raised. No major new interoperability problems are predicted as RO-VUmc develops into a multi-site department.

  14. Taming the fear of voice: Dilemmas in maintaining a high vaccination rate in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Geelen, Els; van Vliet, Hans; de Hoogh, Pieter; Horstman, Klasien

    2016-03-01

    In the context of international public debates on vaccination the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), the Dutch public health body responsible for the National Immunization Programme (NIP), fears that the high vaccination rate of children in the Netherlands obscures the many doubts and criticisms parents may have about vaccination. The question arises as to how the robustness of this vaccination rate and the resilience of the NIP can be assessed. To answer this question, we explore the vaccination practices and relationships between professionals and parents using qualitative methods. Drawing on Hirschman's concepts of exit, voice and loyalty, we distinguish between two different approaches to vaccination: one which enforces parental loyalty to the vaccination programme, and one which allows for voice. The analysis shows that due to their lack of voice in the main vaccination setting, parents' considerations are unknown and insight into their loyalty is lacking. We argue that the Dutch vaccination programme is caught between the insecurity of enforced parental loyalty to the NIP and the insecurity of enabling parental voice and negotiating space. We conclude that to increase the resilience of the NIP, experimenting with voice and exit is inevitable. PMID:26867207

  15. A one-year intensified study of outbreaks of gastroenteritis in The Netherlands.

    PubMed Central

    van Duynhoven, Y. T. H. P.; de Jager, C. M.; Kortbeek, L. M.; Vennema, H.; Koopmans, M. P. G.; van Leusden, F.; van der Poel, W. H. M.; van den Broek, M. J. M.

    2005-01-01

    In 2002, in The Netherlands a national study of gastroenteritis outbreaks was performed. Epidemiological information was collected by the Public Health Services (PHS) and the Food Inspection Services (FIS) using standardized questionnaires. Stool samples were collected for diagnostic testing. For foodborne outbreaks, food samples were taken. In total, 281 gastroenteritis outbreaks were included, mainly from nursing homes and homes for the elderly (57%), restaurants (11%), hospitals (9%) and day-care centres (7%). Direct person-to-person spread was the predominant transmission route in all settings (overall 78%), except for restaurant outbreaks where food was suspected in almost 90% (overall in 21% of outbreaks). The most common pathogen was norovirus (54%), followed by Salmonella spp. (4%), rotavirus group A (2%), Campylobacter spp. (1%) and only incidentally others. In conclusion, most outbreaks were reported from health and residential institutions, with norovirus as the dominant agent. Control should aim at reducing person-to-person spread. In foodborne outbreaks norovirus was common, due to contamination of food by food handlers. Salmonella, as the second foodborne pathogen, was mainly associated with raw shell eggs. These results stress the continuous need for food safety education, complementary to governmental regulation. PMID:15724705

  16. International Forum on Reactor Ageing Management (IFRAM); Proceedings of the European Engagement Workshop held in Petten, The Netherlands, 25th – 27th May 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Oliver; Bieth, Michel; Bond, Leonard J.; Carpenter, C. E.

    2010-08-14

    The report provides the proceedings of the workshop that engaged European representatives to discuss the formation of an International Forum for Reactor Aging Management. There were 29 participants who came from the following countries or international/European Organizations: IAEA, Belgium, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, The Netherlands, Romania, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine, USA and EC/JRC. There was a large variety in types of organisations, i.e. utilities, safety authorities, TVOs and research institutes, providing large variety in the presentations. The meeting supported establishing an IFRAM Global Steering Committee and moving forward with the development of this important network.

  17. Governing new technology: A comparative analysis of government support for nanotechnology in the Netherlands and the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eijmberts, Johannes

    This study examines this variance in national government support for nanotechnology---its shape, size, and policy priorities---by comparing the United States and the Netherlands. Our operating hypothesis is that national government support for nanotechnology development is driven not by the intrinsic nature of the technology but by longstanding structural and institutional arrangements. That is, in the U.S., pluralist political traditions and reliance on classical liberal market economics would suggest a detached national government approach, leaving any initiative to market actors. At the same time, legacies of corporatism in the Dutch political system and a tradition of greater direct government involvement in the national economy would suggest a government-led policy on nanotechnology development. The findings show otherwise. Early on, the U.S. government established the National Nanotechnology Initiative, an overarching federal mechanism to promote and coordinate nanotechnology development. Yet, despite its appearance of central direction and coordination, the NNI reflected pluralist arrangements by leaving ample autonomy for participating federal departments and agencies. The creation of the NNI was driven particularly by concerns of about foreign challenges to American global leadership in science and technology. In the Netherlands, by contrast, the path taken shows the legacy of Dutch corporatist practice---slow, incremental, and embedded in pre-existing institutional arrangements. The Dutch government initially took no directive role, relying instead on established links among universities, public research funding organizations, and industries to advance nanotechnology development in the Netherlands. However, over time, Dutch government involvement in nanotechnology grew to be more supportive, sizeable, comprehensive, and directive---particulary by requiring substantial investments in risk-related research as a condition for public funding and, notably, by

  18. Improving access to data on climate change and its impacts in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homan, C. D.; Bessembinder, J.; Schaap, B.; Reidsma, P.; Delsman, J.; Witte, F.; Jacobs, C.; van Bodegom, P.; Verboom, J.

    2010-09-01

    Recent research on climate change, its possible impacts and adaptation options in the Netherlands has been substantial and promising. However: Results are often not available in a format that can be used directly by stakeholders who need to develop climate adaptation strategies. For example, the information on climate change in the brochure on the KNMI'06 climate scenarios (KNMI, 2006) only indicates the percentage change in the average and extreme rainfall. However, hydrologists, ecologists and agricultural researchers need time series or statistics to simulate the impact of changes in rainfall on groundwater levels, nature and crop production. In the Netherlands several organisations work on the same discipline, for example on hydrology and ecosystems, all with their own specialisations. A cross-sectoral overview of the available data and information on climate change and its impacts is not available. Between various disciplines the results are often inconsistent. Firstly because different climate scenarios, different spatial and/or temporal scales, and different reference periods are used to compile the climate data sets. Furthermore, assumptions and simplifications made in one discipline (e.g. groundwater levels in agricultural models) may not reflect the knowledge from other disciplines (in this case hydrology). These shortcomings hamper the dissemination and proper use of data and information on climate change and its impacts. In order to overcome some of the above-mentioned shortcomings, the 'Climate Knowledge Facility - Tailoring' project was started in 2009. In this project we work on: A common web portal (pilot) to give an overview and access to data and information on climate change and its impacts for different disciplines (climate, hydrology, nature/ecology, agriculture and land use); Consultation on stakeholder requirements and feedback on the web portal; Pre- and post processing of data and information on climate, hydrology, nature

  19. Deinstitutionalisation of mental health care in the Netherlands: towards an integrative approach

    PubMed Central

    Ravelli, Dick P.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Objective The objective of this policy paper is to put recent developments in Dutch mental health reform in an international perspective and draw conclusions for future directions in policy. Context of the case The practice of Western psychiatry in the second half and particularly in the last decade of the 20th century has fundamentally changed. Dutch psychiatry has traditionally been prominently bed-based and various policies in the last ten years have been intended to reduce the influence of the mental hospitals. Until the mid-1990s, this had not resulted in reducing the psychiatric bed rate in comparison to other countries. Since then, there have been rapid, dramatic changes. Data sources We summarised two recent national studies on this subject and placed them in a national and international context, using documents on psychiatric reforms, government and advisory board reports and reviews on deinstitutionalisation in different countries. Case description The practice of psychiatry in the second half, and particularly in the last decade, of the 20th century has fundamentally changed. This has resulted in a spectacular decline in the number of beds in mental hospitals, increased admissions, decreased length of stay, closure of the large asylums and in community treatment away from asylums and in society, although this is a reform process. This article examines how the Dutch mental health care system has developed at the national level. The main topics cover the size, nature, aims and effects of the process of deinstitutionalisation and how alternative facilities have been developed to replace the old-fashioned institutes. Conclusions and discussion There are two contrasting aspects of deinstitutionalisation in Dutch mental health care: the tendency towards rehospitalisation in relation to the sudden, late, but rapid reduction of the old mental hospitals and their premises; and a relatively large scale for community-based psychiatry in relation to

  20. Wine from the Netherlands: investigating the effect of soil-type on taste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vis, Geert-Jan; Maljers, Denise; Beurskens, Stan

    2016-04-01

    During the last decade professional viticulture has seen a strong increase in the Netherlands, reaching 270 ha in 2015. Although on a European scale this is a small area, the number of prize-winning quality wines is steadily growing. This growth can largely be ascribed to new grape varieties from Germany and Switzerland, that are better adapted to the cooler and moister climate at the northern fringe of the viticultural zone, as well as to increasing viticultural expertise. The distribution of vineyards across the Netherlands shows that they occur on a plethora of substrates. Dutch substrate is dominated by typical lowland deposits such as fluvial and marine sands and clays and aeolian sands. Unlike many European countries, bedrock is scarce. Only in the south-eastern extremity and in the east of the country, carbonate bedrock is present at or near the surface. This wide variety of substrate triggered our interest in the effect of the various soil-types on the smell and taste characteristics of wines. An effect which is often mentioned concerning well-known foreign wines. We wondered whether an Auxerrois wine from carbonate rocks tastes significantly different from a wine from the same grape variety from loess. And how about a Johanniter wine from fluvial deposits versus windblown sands? And what happens if you make wine in exactly the same way with the same grape variety and from the same vineyard, but with three different yeast types? To answer our questions, we selected ten Dutch vineyards with varying soil-types and the grape varieties Auxerrois and Johanniter. In October 2014 we harvested the grapes and wine was made under controlled identical conditions (in a double setup). The wines were scientifically tested at the institute of Viticulture and Oenology in Neustadt, Germany. The results show no significant effect of soil-type on the smell and taste of Dutch wines in our experiment. Varying yeast types (Cryarome, 3079, VL2) used on Souvignier Gris grapes from

  1. The role of hospital midwives in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Most midwives in the Netherlands work in primary care where they are the lead professionals providing care to women with 'normal' or uncomplicated pregnancies, while some midwives work in hospitals ("clinical midwives"). The actual involvement of midwives in maternity care in hospitals is unknown, because in all statistics births in secondary care are registered as births assisted by gynaecologists. The aim of this study is to gain insight in the involvement of midwives with births in secondary care, under supervision of a gynaecologist. This is done using data from the PRN (The Netherlands Perinatal Registry), a voluntary registration of births in the Netherlands. The PRN covers 97% to 99% of all births taking place under responsibility of a gynaecologist. Methods All births registered in secondary care in the period 1998-2007 (1,102,676, on average 61% of all births) were selected. We analyzed trends in socio-demographic, obstetric and organisational characteristics, associated with the involvement of midwives, using frequency tables and uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses. As main outcome measure the percentage of births in secondary care with a midwife 'catching' the baby was used. Results The proportion of births attended by a midwife in secondary care increased from 8.3% in 1998 to 26.06% in 2007, the largest increase involving spontaneous births of a second or later child, on weekdays during day shifts (8.00-20.00 hr) from younger mothers with a gestational age (almost) at term. After 2002, parallel to the growing numbers of midwives working in hospitals, the percentage of instrumental births decreased. Conclusions In 2007 more midwives are assisting with more births in secondary care than in 1998. Hospital-based midwives are primarily involved with uncomplicated births of women with relatively low risk demographical and obstetrical characteristics. However, they are still only involved with half of the less complicated births

  2. From research institution to astronomical museum: a history of the Stockholm Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaskell, Steven Haywood

    2008-07-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (RSAS) (or Kungliga Vetenskapsakademien [KvA] in Swedish) founded 1739, opened its first permanent building, an astronomical and meteorological observatory, on 20 September 1753. This was situated at Brunkebergsåsen (formerly Observatorie Lunden, or Observatory Hill), on a high terrace in a northern quarter of Stockholm. This historic building is still sometimes called Gamla Observatoriet (the Old Observatory) and now is formally the Observatory Museum. This paper reviews the history of the Observatory from its function as a scientific astronomical institution to its relatively-recent relegation to museum status.

  3. Annotated type catalogue of the Orthalicoidea (Mollusca, Gastropoda) in the Royal Belgian Institute of Sciences, Brussels, with descriptions of two new species

    PubMed Central

    Breure, Abraham S.H.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The type status is described of 57 taxa from the superfamily Orthalicoidea in the collection of the Brussels museum. Two new species are described: Stenostylus perturbatus sp. n., and Suniellus adriani sp. n. New lectotypes are designated for Bulimulus (Naesiotus) amastroides Ancey, 1887; Bulimulus blanfordianus Ancey, 1903; Bulimulus montivagus chacoensis Ancey, 1897; Bulimus coloratus Nyst, 1845; Plecochilus dalmasi Dautzenberg, 1900; Placostylus porphyrostomus elata Dautzenberg, 1923; Bulimulus ephippium Ancey, 1904; Bulimus fulminans Nyst, 1843; Bulimus funckii Nyst, 1843; Orphnus thompsoni lutea Cousin, 1887; Bulimus melanocheilus Nyst, 1845; Orphnus thompsoni nigricans Cousin, 1887; Orphnus thompsoni olivacea Cousin, 1887; Bulimulus pollonerae Ancey, 1897; Orphnus thompsoni zebra Cousin, 1887. New combinations are: Bostryx borellii (Ancey, 1897); Bostryx carandaitiensis (Preston, 1907); Protoglyptus mazei (Crosse, 1874); Kuschelenia (Vermiculatus) sanborni (Haas, 1947). New synonymies are established for the following nominal taxa: Orphnus thompsoni var. lutea Cousin, 1887 = Kara thompsonii (Pfeiffer, 1845); Orphnus thompsoni var. nigricans Cousin, 1887 = Kara thompsonii (Pfeiffer, 1845); Thaumastus nystianus var. nigricans Cousin, 1887 = Drymaeus (Drymaeus) nystianus (Pfeiffer, 1853); Orphnus thompsoni var. olivacea Cousin, 1887 = Kara thompsonii (Pfeiffer, 1845); Orphnus thompsoni var. zebra Cousin, 1887 = Kara thompsonii (Pfeiffer, 1845). PMID:21747669

  4. Time space distribution of childhood leukaemia in the Netherlands.

    PubMed Central

    van Steensel-Moll, H A; Valkenburg, H A; Vandenbroucke, J P; van Zanen, G E

    1983-01-01

    In the western part of the Netherlands during 1973-80 leukaemia was diagnosed in 293 patients aged under 15 years. An overall incidence rate of 2.91 per 100000 person years was calculated. No seasonal influence on months of birth or months of diagnosis of these patients could be traced by the method of Edwards. Time space clustering was looked for by both methods of Mantel and Knox. No significant time space clustering of date and place of diagnosis of childhood leukaemia was found in all types of leukaemia, acute lymphocytic leukaemia (ALL), ALL in boys and girls, ALL in children under 6 years at diagnosis, and in acute non-lymphocytic leukaemia. PMID:6577127

  5. [The Health Council of the Netherlands' advice on Lyme disease].

    PubMed

    Verbon, Annelies

    2013-01-01

    There are many misconceptions about Lyme disease. At the initiative of the Dutch Association for Lyme Patients, the Lower House of the Dutch Parliament requested a report on Lyme disease. The Health Council of the Netherlands advised standardization of Lyme serology in all Dutch laboratories as soon as possible. Standardization of diagnostic serological tests was strongly recommended. Studies into new tests which discriminate between active disease and past infection were recommended. Patients with Lyme disease were divided in those with Lyme specific and non-specific symptoms and duration of symptoms. Treatment advice was given for each of these 6 patient categories with a prominent role for the decision of the attending physician. Additionally it was advised to set up specialized treatment centers with a multidisciplinary approach. The report clearly shows the problems in care for Lyme patients from the perspective of both patients and physicians, but is cautious in the solutions offered. PMID:23859114

  6. Rotterdam: main port for organ transplantation research in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Kwekkeboom, Jaap; van der Laan, Luc J W; Betjes, Michiel G H; Manintveld, Olivier C; Hoek, Rogier A S; Cransberg, Karlien; de Bruin, Ron W F; Dor, Frank J M F; de Jonge, Jeroen; Boor, Patrick P C; van Gent, Rogier; van Besouw, Nicole M; Boer, Karin; Litjens, Nicolle H R; Hesselink, Dennis A; Hoogduijn, Martin J; Massey, Emma; Rowshani, Ajda T; van de Wetering, Jacqueline; de Jong, Huib; Hendriks, Rudi W; Metselaar, Herold J; van Gelder, Teun; Weimar, Willem; IJzermans, Jan N M; Baan, Carla C

    2014-10-01

    This overview describes the full spectrum of current pre-clinical and clinical kidney-, liver-, heart- and lung transplantation research performed in Erasmus MC - University Medical Centre in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. An update is provided on the development of a large living donor kidney transplantation program and on optimization of kidney allocation, including the implementation of a domino kidney-donation program. Our current research efforts to optimize immunosuppressive regimens and find novel targets for immunosuppressive therapy, our recent studies on prevention of ischemia-reperfusion-induced graft injury, our newest findings on stimulation of tissue regeneration, our novel approaches to prevent rejection and viral infection, and our latest insights in the regulation of allograft rejection, are summarized. PMID:25240732

  7. Human Leptospirosis Trends, the Netherlands, 1925–2008

    PubMed Central

    Boer, Kimberly R.; Duarte, Tamara A.T.E.; Kliffen, Suzanne J.; Hartskeerl, Rudy A.

    2013-01-01

    To increase knowledge of leptospirosis in the Netherlands and identify changing trends of this disease over time, we analyzed historical passive surveillance reports for an 84-year period (1925–2008). We found that 2,553 mainly severe leptospirosis cases were diagnosed (average annual incidence rate 0.25 cases/100,000 population). The overall case-fatality rate for patients with reported leptospirosis was 6.5% but decreased over the period, probably because of improved treatment. Ninety percent of reported leptospirosis cases were in male patients. Most autochthonous leptospirosis infections were associated with recreational exposures, but 15.5% of the cases were attributed to accidents that resulted in injury and to concomitant water contact. Since the end of the 1950s, the proportion of imported infections gradually increased, reaching 53.1% of the total during 2005–2008. Most (80.1%) imported infections were associated with sporting and adventurous vacation activities. PMID:23622144

  8. New developments in waste management in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Goorhuis, Maarten; Reus, Pieter; Nieuwenhuis, Ellen; Spanbroek, Natascha; Sol, Mario; van Rijn, Jørgen

    2012-09-01

    With a current recycling rate of 51% the Netherlands has one of the leading positions in the recycling of household waste in Europe. However, in the last 10-15 years there have been few developments made in the recycling of household waste. The introduction of producer responsibility for waste electrical and electronic equipment in 1999 and for packaging in 2005 have been the biggest changes in this period. However, these measures have, so far, not significantly influenced the overall recycling rate for household waste. In order to plan the next steps, which are necessary to reach the goals of the National Waste Management plan, new innovative methods are needed. A number of Dutch municipalities and waste collection companies are investigating promising new paths to enhance separate collection and recycling of household waste. This article reports on three of the most interesting initiatives. PMID:22993136

  9. Experience with guidelines for wastewater characterisation in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Roeleveld, P J; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2002-01-01

    In this paper experiences and results are presented with guidelines for wastewater characterisation that are standardised in The Netherlands for modelling purposes with ASM. The wastewater characterisation is based on a physical-chemical method to characterise the soluble and particulate fractions, combined with a BOD-analysis for characterising the biodegradable fraction of the influent COD. By following the guidelines, a sufficiently detailed and practical characterisation is obtained, and the results can be used for simulation studies on treatment plants for process optimisation, trouble-shooting and design assistance. At present, five years of experience is gained with the guidelines and they were used for the simulation of circa 100 treatment plants. The guidelines are evaluated as simple and easy to implement in routine analysis programs. PMID:11989880

  10. Climate change impacts on dunes erosion in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Winter, Renske; Ruessink, Gerben

    2016-04-01

    The dunes in the Netherlands are occasionally eroded as a result of storms and corresponding storm surge levels and extreme waves. We discuss the effect of climate change and the corresponding sea level rise on dune erosion. With the XBeach dune erosion model we studied two representative profiles and analysed the effect of sea-level rise ranging from 0.20 to 2.50 m on dune erosion, as well as changes in the angle of wave incidence. The eroded volume in our XBeach model under storm conditions is in the order of magnitude of previous studies. In contrast with the Bruun-rule, which suggests a relation between sea-level rise and retreat distance, we found a linear relation between SLR and the amount of eroded volume of the dunes. Changes in the wave angle from shore normal to ~40 degrees, increase the erosion volume to the same extend as 40 cm sea-level rise.

  11. Overt and covert narcissism in Poland and The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Zondag, Hessel J; Van Halen, Cor; Wojtkowiak, Joanna

    2009-06-01

    This article reports a study of the relation between narcissism as a personality characteristic and the cultural dimension of individualism/collectivism. Participants from a more collectivistic society (Poland; n = 167) were compared with participants from a more individualistic society (The Netherlands; n = 156). Two dimensions of narcissism were distinguished: overt and covert. The cultural tendency for narcissism was measured by comparing average scores on both types of narcissism in both countries, as well as by the meaning that overt and covert narcissism seems to have for psychological well-being. More specifically, the correlations were compared among both types of narcissism and depression and meaning of life. In the Polish sample, the average score on covert narcissism was higher. In the Dutch sample, on the other hand, depression and meaning of life were significantly related to covert narcissism. PMID:19708410

  12. Cardiovascular effects of environmental noise: research in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Kempen, Elise van

    2011-01-01

    The impact of environmental noise on public health, in The Netherlands, is limited: Less than 1% of the myocardial infarction cases per year are attributable to long-term exposure to road traffic noise. Furthermore, although the Dutch noise policy is not directed to prevent cardiovascular disease due to noise exposure, health does play a role in Dutch noise policy. These are the main conclusions of a systematic review of Dutch observational studies, investigating the possible impact of road traffic and aircraft noise exposure on the cardiovascular system. Since 1970, 14 Dutch studies were published investigating the possible impact of road traffic and aircraft noise exposure on the cardiovascular system. Within these studies a large variety of outcomes were investigated, ranging from blood pressure changes to cardiovascular mortality. The results of the studies were not consistent and only weak associations were found. PMID:21537106

  13. Quality assurance in the health care system in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Reerink, E

    1987-03-01

    Thirteen years of activities in the field of quality assurance in the health care field in The Netherlands bring to life the many ups and some downs in this intriguing endeavour. Back in 1974, quality assurance was in the minds of few individuals and in the hands of nobody. This has changed dramatically: not only are there now functioning programmes carried out by knowledgeable and dedicated health care providers, there is legislation that suits the convenience of quality assurance, and a firm delineation of responsibilities. At the same time there is flexibility which enables the various actors to interpret their roles according to their capabilities and tastes. The various contributions in this issue are part of this national development. PMID:3566639

  14. Nutrient flows for poultry production in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    De Boer, I J; Van Der Togt, P L; Grossman, M; Kwakkel, R P

    2000-02-01

    Government targets for ammonia emission and for N and P loss per hectare (ha) of agricultural land were used to assess carrying capacity for poultry production in The Netherlands with data from 1990. In addition, the effect of alternative management strategies on carrying capacity was determined. Ammonia emission from poultry production in 1990 [20.5 gigagrams (Gg) N] exceeded the target for 2000 (i.e., 6.9 Gg N). Targets defined for 2000 and 2010 (i.e., 4.6 Gg N) can be achieved, however, without reducing poultry numbers, assuming national introduction of measurements studied. Measures that reduced ammonia emission directly, i.e., introduction of low-emission housing or manure application techniques, were most effective. In 1990, N and P losses equalled 215 kg/ha for N and 31 kg/ha for P. The N loss was slightly lower than the target for 2000 (219 kg N/ha) but exceeded the target for 2010 (144 kg N/ha). Reduction of application of artificial N fertilizer, however, reduced N loss effectively from 215 to 22 kg/ha. National P loss in 1990 exceeded the target for 2000 (15.3 kg P/ha). Reduction of application of artificial P fertilizer reduced P loss most effectively from 31 to 14 kg/ha. To achieve the target for 2010 (8.7 kg P/ha), additional reduction in P excretion by poultry is required. This reduction can be achieved by use of phytase in layer and broiler feed and by use of a coarse Ca source in layer feed. Unlike pig production, carrying capacity for poultry production in The Netherlands is not limited by governmental targets for acidification, eutrophication, or drinking water contamination. PMID:10735744

  15. The Diabetes Pearl: Diabetes biobanking in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes is associated with considerable comorbidity and severe complications, which reduce quality of life of the patients and require high levels of healthcare. The Diabetes Pearl is a large cohort of patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, covering different geographical areas in the Netherlands. The aim of the study is to create a research infrastructure that will allow the study of risk factors, including biomarkers and genetic determinants for severe diabetes complications. Methods/design Baseline examinations began November 2009 and will continue through 2012. By the end of 2012, it is expected that 7000 patients with type 2 diabetes will be included in the Diabetes Pearl cohort. To ensure quality of the data collected, standard operation procedures were developed and used in all 8 recruitment centers. From all patients who provide informed consent, the following information is collected: personal information, medication use, physical examination (antropometry, blood pressure, electrocardiography (ECG), retina photographs, ankle-brachial index, peripheral vibration perception), self-report questionnaire (socio-economic status, lifestyle, (family) history of disease, and psychosocial well-being), laboratory measurements (glucose, A1c, lipid profile, kidney function), biobank material (storage of urine and blood samples and isolated DNA). All gathered clinical data and biobank information is uploaded to a database for storage on a national level. Biobanks are maintained locally at all recruitment centers. Discussion The Diabetes Pearl is large-scale cohort of type 2 diabetes patients in the Netherlands aiming to study risk factors, including biomarkers and genetic markers, for disease deterioration and the development of severe diabetes complications. As a result of the well-designed research design and the national coverage, the Diabetes Pearl data can be of great value to national and international researchers with an interest in diabetes

  16. Morphological Assessment of Reconstructed Lowland Streams in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoitink, T.; Eekhout, J.; de Brouwer, J.; Verdonschot, P.

    2014-12-01

    Channelisation measures taken halfway the 20th century have had destructive consequences for the diversity of the ecology in the majority of the lowland streams in countries such as the Netherlands. Re-meandering is the common practice in restoring these lowland streams. Three lowland streams were monitored during the initial two years after construction of a new channel. The monitoring program included morphological surveys, sediment sampling, habitat pattern surveys, and discharge and water level measurements. Adjustments of the longitudinal bed profile formed the main morphological response. These adjustments were most likely caused by a lack of longitudinal connectivity of the streams as a whole, interrupting transport of sediment at locations of weirs and culverts. Bank erosion was observed only in a limited number of channel bends, and was often related to floodplain heterogeneity. Longitudinal channel bed adjustments and bank erosion were mainly caused by exogenous influences. In channel bends, the cross-sectional shape transformed from trapezoidal to the typical asymmetrical shape as found in meandering rivers. This behaviour can be attributed to an autogenous response to the prevailing flow conditions. Due to the prevailing fine sediment characteristics, bed material is readily set in motion and is being transported during the entire year. The existing design principles fail to address the initial morphological development after reconstruction. An evaluation of pre-set targets to realize water depth and flow velocity ranges shows the current procedures to be deficient. Based on this unfavourable evaluation, and the two-dimensional nature of habitat patterns needed to improve the conditions for stream organisms, we recommend to predict morphological developments as part of the design procedures for lowland stream restoration in the Netherlands.

  17. Population structure, migration, and diversifying selection in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Abdellaoui, Abdel; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Knijff, Peter de; Nivard, Michel G; Xiao, Xiangjun; Scheet, Paul; Brooks, Andrew; Ehli, Erik A; Hu, Yueshan; Davies, Gareth E; Hudziak, James J; Sullivan, Patrick F; van Beijsterveldt, Toos; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation in a population can be summarized through principal component analysis (PCA) on genome-wide data. PCs derived from such analyses are valuable for genetic association studies, where they can correct for population stratification. We investigated how to capture the genetic population structure in a well-characterized sample from the Netherlands and in a worldwide data set and examined whether (1) removing long-range linkage disequilibrium (LD) regions and LD-based SNP pruning significantly improves correlations between PCs and geography and (2) whether genetic differentiation may have been influenced by migration and/or selection. In the Netherlands, three PCs showed significant correlations with geography, distinguishing between: (1) North and South; (2) East and West; and (3) the middle-band and the rest of the country. The third PC only emerged with minimized LD, which also significantly increased correlations with geography for the other two PCs. In addition to geography, the Dutch North–South PC showed correlations with genome-wide homozygosity (r=0.245), which may reflect a serial-founder effect due to northwards migration, and also with height (♂: r=0.142, ♀: r=0.153). The divergence between subpopulations identified by PCs is partly driven by selection pressures. The first three PCs showed significant signals for diversifying selection (545 SNPs - the majority within 184 genes). The strongest signal was observed between North and South for the functional SNP in HERC2 that determines human blue/brown eye color. Thus, this study demonstrates how to increase ancestry signals in a relatively homogeneous population and how those signals can reveal evolutionary history. PMID:23531865

  18. Population structure, migration, and diversifying selection in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Abdellaoui, Abdel; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; de Knijff, Peter; Nivard, Michel G; Xiao, Xiangjun; Scheet, Paul; Brooks, Andrew; Ehli, Erik A; Hu, Yueshan; Davies, Gareth E; Hudziak, James J; Sullivan, Patrick F; van Beijsterveldt, Toos; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2013-11-01

    Genetic variation in a population can be summarized through principal component analysis (PCA) on genome-wide data. PCs derived from such analyses are valuable for genetic association studies, where they can correct for population stratification. We investigated how to capture the genetic population structure in a well-characterized sample from the Netherlands and in a worldwide data set and examined whether (1) removing long-range linkage disequilibrium (LD) regions and LD-based SNP pruning significantly improves correlations between PCs and geography and (2) whether genetic differentiation may have been influenced by migration and/or selection. In the Netherlands, three PCs showed significant correlations with geography, distinguishing between: (1) North and South; (2) East and West; and (3) the middle-band and the rest of the country. The third PC only emerged with minimized LD, which also significantly increased correlations with geography for the other two PCs. In addition to geography, the Dutch North-South PC showed correlations with genome-wide homozygosity (r=0.245), which may reflect a serial-founder effect due to northwards migration, and also with height (♂: r=0.142, ♀: r=0.153). The divergence between subpopulations identified by PCs is partly driven by selection pressures. The first three PCs showed significant signals for diversifying selection (545 SNPs - the majority within 184 genes). The strongest signal was observed between North and South for the functional SNP in HERC2 that determines human blue/brown eye color. Thus, this study demonstrates how to increase ancestry signals in a relatively homogeneous population and how those signals can reveal evolutionary history. PMID:23531865

  19. Inverse carbon dioxide flux estimates for the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meesters, A. G. C. A.; Tolk, L. F.; Peters, W.; Hutjes, R. W. A.; Vellinga, O. S.; Elbers, J. A.; Vermeulen, A. T.; van der Laan, S.; Neubert, R. E. M.; Meijer, H. A. J.; Dolman, A. J.

    2012-10-01

    CO2 fluxes for the Netherlands and surroundings are estimated for the year 2008, from concentration measurements at four towers, using an inverse model. The results are compared to direct CO2flux measurements by aircraft, for 6 flight tracks over the Netherlands, flown multiple times in each season. We applied the Regional Atmospheric Mesoscale Modeling system (RAMS) coupled to a simple carbon flux scheme (including fossil fuel), which was run at 10 km resolution, and inverted with an Ensemble Kalman Filter. The domain had 6 eco-regions, and inversions were performed for the four seasons separately. Inversion methods with pixel-dependent and -independent parameters for each eco-region were compared. The two inversion methods, in general, yield comparable flux averages for each eco-region and season, whereas the difference from the prior flux may be large. Posterior fluxes co-sampled along the aircraft flight tracks are usually much closer to the observations than the priors, with a comparable performance for both inversion methods, and with best performance for summer and autumn. The inversions showed more negative CO2 fluxes than the priors, though the latter are obtained from a biosphere model optimized using the Fluxnet database, containing observations from more than 200 locations worldwide. The two different crop ecotypes showed very different CO2uptakes, which was unknown from the priors. The annual-average uptake is practically zero for the grassland class and for one of the cropland classes, whereas the other cropland class had a large net uptake, possibly because of the abundance of maize there.

  20. Risk characterization of detergent surfactants in the Netherlands

    SciTech Connect

    Feijtel, T.; Plassche, E. van de

    1995-12-31

    The Dutch Soap Association (NVZ) and the Dutch Environmental Ministry (VROM) developed in 1991 an aquatic hazard priority list of all detergent ingredients. The agreed priority list consisted of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS), alcohol ethoxylates (AE), alcohol ethoxylated sulfates (AES), and soap. A stepwise or tiered risk assessment approach was adopted as the recommended approach to evaluate the risk of these surfactants. This implies that depending on the risk (or PEC/PNEC) ratio, the sequential test program or assessment would proceed further, to ensure adequate protection of the ecosystem. The agreed calculation scheme for the aquatic compartment is based on the comparison of the 90th percentile of Predicted Environmental Concentrations (PEC) in the Netherlands -- at 1,000 meter below the sewage outfall -- to the Predicted No Effect Concentration (PNEC) for ecosystems. The 90th percentile surfactant concentrations at 1,000 meter below the sewage outfall can be calculated using information or data on (1) release, (2) in-sewer removal, (3) treatment efficiency, (4) dilution and (5) instream-removal and/or measured in representative sites in The Netherlands. In addition, all toxicological data was critically reviewed by company experts and experts of RIVM and VROM to present a rationale for a sound database for the derivation of a Predicted No Effect Concentration (PNEC). It was concluded that the risk of LAS, AE and AES and soap for the aquatic environment is low. Also taking the estimated uncertainty into account, the predicted environmental concentrations are always considerably lower that the predicted no effect concentrations.

  1. Seventeenth-century ‘treasure’ found in Royal Society archives: The Ludus helmontii and the stone disease

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso-Goldfarb, Ana Maria; Ferraz, Márcia Helena Mendes; Rattansi, Piyo M.

    2014-01-01

    Our archival researches at the Royal Society reveal that a small envelope attached to a 1675 letter from an Antwerp apothecary, A. Boutens, contained a sample of the ‘Ludus’ prepared as a remedy for the ‘stone disease’ then sweeping through Europe, which was first announced in J. B. van Helmont's De lithiasi (1644). After examining the fascination with the medical use of the Ludus (which required the ‘alkahest’ for its preparation) and the tenacious efforts to procure it, we trace the fortunae of two other ludi in England, brought to and offered by Francis Mercurius van Helmont during his English sojourn. Both eventually found their way to the geologist John Woodward, one of them through Sir Isaac Newton. Finally we show how the allure of the Ludus helmontii vanished, with transformations in mineral analysis and reclassifications from Woodward to John Hill. PMID:25254277

  2. Why patients take part in the Royal College of Physicians Practical Assessment of Clinical Examination Skills (MRCP PACES).

    PubMed

    McFarland, Lorraine; Barlow, Julie; Nwokolo, Chuka

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine patients' motivation to participate in the Royal College of Physicians Practical Assessment of Clinical Examination Skills (PACES). An exploratory cross-sectional study was performed with data collected via telephone interviews. All patients aged 18+ who participated in PACES at University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire in the last two years were invited to take part; 28 patients were interviewed. Data were analysed using thematic content analysis. Motivational factors identified included the opportunity to give something back for the care received, contributing to doctors' learning processes, altruism and being able to learn more about one's own condition. Patients believed that they offered real-life experiences that cannot be provided by actors. The social environment during PACES played a large part in volunteer retention. Recruitment of patient volunteers needs to emphasise the altruistic nature of the role in assisting the learning process for doctors and the subsequent benefit for future patients. PMID:22372221

  3. Shaping the military wound: issues surrounding the reconstruction of injured servicemen at the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Evriviades, Demetrius; Jeffery, Steven; Cubison, Tania; Lawton, Graham; Gill, Martin; Mortiboy, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    The conflict in Afghanistan has produced injuries similar to those produced from military conflicts for generations. What distinguishes the modern casualty of the conflict in Afghanistan from those of other conflicts is the effectiveness of modern field medical care that has led to individuals surviving with injuries, which would have been immediately fatal even a few years ago. These patients present several challenges to the reconstructive surgeon. These injured individuals present early challenges of massive soft-tissue trauma, unstable physiology, complex bony and soft-tissue defects, unusual infections, limited reconstructive donor sites, peripheral nerve injuries and traumatic amputations. Late challenges to rehabilitation include the development of heterotopic ossification in amputation stumps. This paper outlines the approach taken by the reconstructive team at the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine in managing these most difficult of reconstructive challenges. PMID:21149357

  4. New porcellioidean gastropods from early Devonian of Royal Creek area, Yukon Territory, Canada, with notes on their early phylogeny

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fryda, J.; Blodgett, R.B.; Lenz, A.C.; Manda, S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a description of new gastropods belonging to the superfamily Porcellioidea (Vetigastropoda) from the richly diverse Lower Devonian gastropod fauna of the Road River Formation in the Royal Creek area, Yukon Territory. This fauna belongs to Western Canada Province of the Old World Realm. The Pragian species Porcellia (Porcellia) yukonensis n. sp. and Porcellia (Paraporcellia) sp. represent the oldest presently known members of subgenera Porcellia (Porcellia) and Porcellia (Paraporcellia). Their simple shell ornamentation fits well with an earlier described evolutionary trend in shell morphology of the Porcellinae. Late Pragian to early Emsian Perryconcha pulchra n. gen. and n. sp. is the first member of the Porcellioidea bearing a row of tremata on adult teleoconch whorls. The occurrence of this shell feature in the Porcellioidea is additional evidence that the evolution of the apertural slit was much more complicated than has been proposed in classical models of Paleozoic gastropod evolution. Copyright ?? 2008, The Paleontological Society.

  5. Comparisons of wartime and peacetime disease and non-battle injury rates aboard ships of the British Royal Navy.

    PubMed

    Blood, C G; Pugh, W M; Gauker, E D; Pearsall, D M

    1992-12-01

    Disease and non-battle injury rates were computed for ships of the British Royal Navy which were deployed during wartime and peacetime operations. The wartime sick list admission rates were lower aboard carriers, battleships, and cruisers when compared with their counterparts deployed in peacetime; rate differences for battleships and cruisers were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Several categories of disease also yielded significant differences in the wartime/peacetime contrasts. Infections and parasitic disorders aboard carriers, skin diseases aboard battleships, and skin diseases, injuries, and generative system disorders occurring on cruisers were all lower during wartime than on peacetime deployments. Illness rates also varied by ship type, with the lowest rates evidenced aboard carriers. PMID:1470374

  6. Hilda Mary Woods MBE, DSc, LRAM, FSS (1892–1971): reflections on a Fellow of the Royal Statistical Society

    PubMed Central

    Farewell, Vern; Johnson, Tony; Gear, Rosemary

    2012-01-01

    We have previously described the content of a text by Woods and Russell, An Introduction to Medical Statistics, compared it with Principles of Medical Statistics by Hill and set both volumes against the background of vital statistics up until 1937. The two books mark a watershed in the history of medical statistics. Very little has been recorded about the life and career of the first author of the earlier textbook, who was a Fellow of the Royal Statistical Society for at least 25 years, an omission which we can now rectify with this paper. We describe her education, entry into medical statistics, relationship with Major Greenwood and her subsequent career and life in Ceylon, Kenya, Australia, England and South Africa. PMID:22973076

  7. William Russ Pugh's remarkable life: natural scientist, innovative anaesthetist and founding member of the Royal Society of Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Paull, J D

    2011-07-01

    While well known in anaesthetic circles for being the first to provide ether anaesthesia for a surgical procedure in June 1847 in Launceston, Tasmania, William Russ Pugh's achievements in the field of natural history are less well known. He personally assisted Count Peter de Strzelecki in the chemical analysis of Australian coal and mineral samples and provided the laboratory space and equipment. His analytic skills were utilised by coroners in cases of poisoning. He was consulted about a ship's cargo which threatened to spontaneously combust in Launceston's port. He was a founding member of the Tasmanian Society and subsequently of the Royal Society of Tasmania. He made many presentations on geology, zoology, botany, mineralogy and meteorology to meetings of both Societies. These scientific interests may have provided the knowledge and motivation which encouraged Pugh to proceed so confidently with the introduction of ether anaesthesia. PMID:21916111

  8. Re-examination of the Daily Number of Sunspot Groups for the Royal Observatory, Greenwich (1874 - 1885)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, D. M.; Wild, M. N.; Warburton, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    The daily number of sunspot groups on the solar disk, as recorded by the programme of sunspot observations performed under the aegis of the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, UK, and subsequently the Royal Greenwich Observatory (RGO), is re-examined for the interval 1874 - 1885. The motivation for this re-examination is the key role that the RGO number of sunspot groups plays in the calculation of Group Sunspot Numbers (Hoyt and Schatten in Solar Phys. 179, 189, 1998a; Solar Phys. 181, 491, 1998b). A new dataset has been derived for the RGO daily number of sunspot groups in the interval 1874 - 1885. This new dataset attempts to achieve complete consistency between the sunspot data presented in the three main sections of the RGO publications and also incorporates all known errata and additions. It is argued that days for which no RGO solar photograph was acquired originally should be regarded, without exception, as being days without meaningful sunspot data. The daily number of sunspot groups that Hoyt and Schatten assign to days without RGO photographs is frequently just a lower limit. Moreover, in the absence of a solar photograph, the daily number of sunspot groups is inevitably uncertain because of the known frequent occurrence of sunspot groups that exist for just a single day. The elimination of days without photographs changes the list of inter-comparison days on which both the primary RGO observer and a specified secondary comparison observer saw at least one sunspot group. The resulting changes in the personal correction factors of secondary observers then change the personal correction factors of overlapping tertiary observers, etc. In this way, numerical changes in the personal correction factors of secondary observers propagate away from the interval 1874 - 1885, thereby potentially changing the arithmetical calculation of Group Sunspot Numbers over an appreciably wider time interval.

  9. Angles of repose of the Palisadoes sandspit, Port Royal, Jamaica: Potential for catastrophic submarine landslips during future earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L. A.; Hornbach, M.; Mann, P.

    2009-12-01

    Kingston, the most populous city in Jamaica, is located adjacent to the 7th largest natural harbour in the world. Most of Jamaica’s infrastructure is located along Kingston harbor waterfront, including an international airport, the Jamaica Defence Force Coast Guard, the marine port facilities, oil refineries, power generating plants, and a cement company. The Kingston area is an active earthquake zone, making the region highly vulnerable to seismic events, and the area has experienced two of the most damaging earthquakes and tsunamis in the Caribbean: the 1692 and 1907 earthquake of Port Royal and Kingston, respectively. Past studies also indicate long-shore drift changes the shape, character, and depth of the harbour over short (~100 yr) time-scales. Analysis of recently collected 3.5 KHz seismic data within the harbour show very steep surfaces abutting parts of the shoreline. In particular, slope angles of 35 degrees in water depths of approximately 15 metres exist in the Port Royal region of the Harbour. Sediments along these slopes consist of granular material, and therefore may be near a critical angle of repose, and poised for failure. These data has also been corroborated with a more detailed bathymetric data of Kingston harbor that is used to create DEMs and slope angles measurements. This research exposes the levels of vulnerability of the harbour (and city) to slope failure during moderate-to-high magnitude seismic events which recent studies suggest may occur every 50 -100 years. From these observations, we are able to generate tsunami wave models that assess how Kingston Harbor may be impacted by future earthquake-generated slope failure events.

  10. Effects of propolis, royal jelly, honey and bee pollen on growth performance and immune system of Japanese quails.

    PubMed

    Babaei, Sakine; Rahimi, Shaeban; Karimi Torshizi, Mohammad Amir; Tahmasebi, Golamhosein; Khaleghi Miran, Seyed Naser

    2016-01-01

    Effect of ethanolic extract of propolis, royal jelly, honey and bee pollen in comparison with virginiamycin (as growth promoter antibiotic) as regards the performance and immune system of Japanese quail were assessed. We used 256 mixed-sex quail chicks in a completely randomized design by eight treatments, including control, ethanolic extract of propolis 1000 (PE1) and 5000 (PE2) mg kg(-1), pollen powder 1000 (PO1) and 5000 (PO2) mg kg(-1), royal jelly 100 mg kg(-1) (RJ), honey 22 g L(-1) of drinking water (H) and virginiamycin 150 mg kg(-1) (V), and four replicates of eight birds in each replication for 42 days. There was significant differences for weight gain (WG), feed intakes (FI) and feed conversion ratio (FCR) between experimental groups. In addition, WG in V treatment (18.82%), H and PO2 treatments (16.87%) and RJ treatment (12.00%) were significantly higher than to control group (p < 0.01). Significantly higher values of FCR were recorded in control group while group PE2 exhibited a significant decrease for 1 to 42 day (p < 0.05). The results of effect of bee products on antibodies titer showed an increase in the Newcastle disease (ND) titer when compared with control and virginiamycin groups (p < 0.01). There was significant difference in antibody production against avian influenza (AI) and sheep red blood cells (p < 0.01). Significant differences were observed in heterophils to lymphocytes ratio among PE1, PE2, PO1 and PO2 with V and control groups (p < 0.01). PMID:27226882

  11. Evaluation of the major royal jelly proteins as an alternative to fetal bovine serum in culturing human cell lines*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Di; Xin, Xiao-xuan; Qian, Hao-cheng; Yu, Zhang-yin; Shen, Li-rong

    2016-01-01

    Royal jelly (RJ) is a well-known bioactive substance. It contains large amounts of major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs), which express growth-factor-like activity in several animal and human cell lines. However, the question on whether MRJPs possess growth-factor-like activity on all types of cell cultures remains. In order to determine whether MRJPs can be used as an alternative to fetal bovine serum (FBS) in different types of human cell culture, the proliferation of the complex serum with different ratios of MRJPs/FBS (M/F) was evaluated on five cell lines: 293T, HFL-I, 231, HCT116, and Changliver using MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) assay. The proliferation activity of the combination of the complex M/F serum with cytokines on the test cell lines was also measured. The results demonstrated that the complex serum with M/F 6/4 possessed the highest proliferation activity similar to or in excess of FBS. However, no activity of complex medium with M/F 6/4 was observed in 231 cells, indicating a selectivity of MRJPs on cell types. Compared with the complex medium with M/F 6/4, the complex medium with M/F 6/4 together with two cytokines, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-transferrin-selenium (ITS), promoted proliferations of Changliver, 293T, HCT116, and HFL-I by 18.73%‒56.19% (P<0.01). Our findings demonstrate that MRJPs could partially replace FBS in culturing many human cell lines. PMID:27256681

  12. Mechanism of action of recombinant acc-royalisin from royal jelly of Asian honeybee against gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lirong; Liu, Dandan; Li, Meilu; Jin, Feng; Din, Meihui; Parnell, Laurence D; Lai, Chao-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of royalisin, an antimicrobial peptide from the royal jelly produced by honeybees, has been addressed extensively. However, its mechanism of action remains unclear. In this study, a recombinant royalisin, RAcc-royalisin from the royal jelly of Asian honeybee Apis cerana cerana, was expressed by fusing with glutathione S-transferase (GST) in Escherichia coli BL21, isolated and purified. The agar dilution assays with inhibition zone showed that RAcc-royalisin, similar to nisin, inhibits the growth of Gram-positive bacteria. The antibacterial activity of RAcc-royalisin was associated with its concentration, and was weakened by heat treatment ranging from 55°C to 85°C for 15 min. Both RAcc-royalisin and nisin exhibited the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 62.5 µg/ml, 125 µg/ml, and 250 µg/ml against Gram-positive bacterial strains, Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus flavus and Staphyloccocus aureus in the microplate assay, respectively. However, RAcc-royalisin did not show antimicrobial activity against tested Gram-negative bacterial and fungal strains. The antibacterial activity of RAcc-royalisin agrees well with the decrease in bacterial cell hydrophobicity, the leakage of 260-nm absorbing materials, and the observation by transmission electron microscopy, all indicating that RAcc-royalisin induced the disruption and dysfunction of cell walls and membranes. This is the first report detailing the antibacterial mechanism of royalisin against Gram-positive bacteria, and provides insight into the application of recombinant royalisin in food and pharmaceutical industries as an antimicrobial agent. PMID:23056609

  13. Evaluation of the major royal jelly proteins as an alternative to fetal bovine serum in culturing human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Xin, Xiao-Xuan; Qian, Hao-Cheng; Yu, Zhang-Yin; Shen, Li-Rong

    2016-06-01

    Royal jelly (RJ) is a well-known bioactive substance. It contains large amounts of major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs), which express growth-factor-like activity in several animal and human cell lines. However, the question on whether MRJPs possess growth-factor-like activity on all types of cell cultures remains. In order to determine whether MRJPs can be used as an alternative to fetal bovine serum (FBS) in different types of human cell culture, the proliferation of the complex serum with different ratios of MRJPs/FBS (M/F) was evaluated on five cell lines: 293T, HFL-I, 231, HCT116, and Changliver using MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) assay. The proliferation activity of the combination of the complex M/F serum with cytokines on the test cell lines was also measured. The results demonstrated that the complex serum with M/F 6/4 possessed the highest proliferation activity similar to or in excess of FBS. However, no activity of complex medium with M/F 6/4 was observed in 231 cells, indicating a selectivity of MRJPs on cell types. Compared with the complex medium with M/F 6/4, the complex medium with M/F 6/4 together with two cytokines, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-transferrin-selenium (ITS), promoted proliferations of Changliver, 293T, HCT116, and HFL-I by 18.73%‒56.19% (P<0.01). Our findings demonstrate that MRJPs could partially replace FBS in culturing many human cell lines. PMID:27256681

  14. Effects of propolis, royal jelly, honey and bee pollen on growth performance and immune system of Japanese quails

    PubMed Central

    Babaei, Sakine; Rahimi, Shaeban; Karimi Torshizi, Mohammad Amir; Tahmasebi, Golamhosein; Khaleghi Miran, Seyed Naser

    2016-01-01

    Effect of ethanolic extract of propolis, royal jelly, honey and bee pollen in comparison with virginiamycin (as growth promoter antibiotic) as regards the performance and immune system of Japanese quail were assessed. We used 256 mixed-sex quail chicks in a completely randomized design by eight treatments, including control, ethanolic extract of propolis 1000 (PE1) and 5000 (PE2) mg kg-1, pollen powder 1000 (PO1) and 5000 (PO2) mg kg-1, royal jelly 100 mg kg-1 (RJ), honey 22 g L-1 of drinking water (H) and virginiamycin 150 mg kg-1 (V), and four replicates of eight birds in each replication for 42 days. There was significant differences for weight gain (WG), feed intakes (FI) and feed conversion ratio (FCR) between experimental groups. In addition, WG in V treatment (18.82%), H and PO2 treatments (16.87%) and RJ treatment (12.00%) were significantly higher than to control group (p < 0.01). Significantly higher values of FCR were recorded in control group while group PE2 exhibited a significant decrease for 1 to 42 day (p < 0.05). The results of effect of bee products on antibodies titer showed an increase in the Newcastle disease (ND) titer when compared with control and virginiamycin groups (p < 0.01). There was significant difference in antibody production against avian influenza (AI) and sheep red blood cells (p < 0.01). Significant differences were observed in heterophils to lymphocytes ratio among PE1, PE2, PO1 and PO2 with V and control groups (p < 0.01). PMID:27226882

  15. The Kulturarw3 Project--The Royal Swedish Web Archiw3e--An Example of "Complete" Collection of Web Pages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arvidson, Allan; Persson, Krister; Mannerheim, Johan

    This paper describes the Kulturarw3 Project, a project of the Royal Library of Sweden to test methods of collecting, preserving, and providing access to Swedish electronic documents that are accessible on the World Wide Web in such a way that they can be regarded as published. The first section discusses issues related to collecting electronic…

  16. 78 FR 76711 - Royal City Charter Coach Lines Ltd.-Acquisition of Control-Quick Coach Lines Ltd. d/b/a Quick...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ... Surface Transportation Board Royal City Charter Coach Lines Ltd.--Acquisition of Control-- Quick Coach Lines Ltd. d/b/a Quick Shuttle Service AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board, DOT. ACTION: Notice... to: Surface Transportation Board, 395 E Street SW., Washington, DC 20423-0001. In addition,...

  17. The State of Integration of the Virtual Learning Environment and ICT into the Pedagogy of the Royal University of Bhutan: A Descriptive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choeda; Penjor, Tandin; Dupka, Dorji; Zander, Pär-Ola

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a descriptive research study on the integration of ICT and pedagogy in the colleges of the Royal University of Bhutan. It investigates whether ICT is integrated into the pedagogy and, if so, in what way. The study identifies the use of a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) as the key technology, which is used as part of…

  18. Teaching a Contextual and Feminist History of Geography through Role Play: Women's Membership of the Royal Geographical Society (1892-1893)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddrell, Avril

    2007-01-01

    Focusing on the debate around women's membership of the Royal Geographical Society (UK) 1892-1893, a role play was written using archive and secondary sources and is reproduced here as a resource. In the first instance the role play makes women visible in the late nineteenth-century geographical discourse. It also shows how institutional…

  19. The Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences: five decades of collaborative medical research.

    PubMed

    Brown, Arthur; Nitayaphan, Sorachai

    2011-05-01

    The Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences (AFRIMS) is a 50-year-old joint institute of the US and Royal Thai Army Medical Departments located in Bangkok, Thailand. Investigators from the Institute have carried out research in Thailand and the region, in collaboration with many partners, focused on a large number of tropical infectious diseases. In celebration of the 50th anniversary, this paper summarizes highlights of this research, focusing on malaria, Japanese encephalitis, dengue, diarrhea and HIV. In addition, research done in support of the medical problems of refugees and of the health of Thai peace-keeping forces are summarized. The research carried out by AFRIMS and added to the scientific literature has contributed significantly to advancement in multiple areas of tropical infectious disease. PMID:21706925

  20. National Institutes of Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stem Cell Information OppNet NIDB NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research Institutes at NIH List of Institutes, Centers & ... be prevented. Pneumonia Causes, symptoms, diagnosis and treatments. Learning Disabilities Early interventions offer help with learning problems. ...