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Sample records for rpos mrna leader

  1. Ribosomal Protein S1 Specifically Binds to the 5′ Untranslated Region of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Stationary-Phase Sigma Factor rpoS mRNA in the Logarithmic Phase of Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ševo, Milica; Buratti, Emanuele; Venturi, Vittorio

    2004-01-01

    The rpoS gene encodes the stationary-phase sigma factor (RpoS or σs), which was identified in several gram-negative bacteria as a central regulator controlling the expression of genes involved in cell survival in response to cessation of growth (stationary phase) and providing cross-protection against various stresses. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the levels of σs increase dramatically at the onset of the stationary phase and are regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. The P. aeruginosa rpoS gene is transcribed as a monocistronic rpoS mRNA transcript comprised of an unusually long 373-bp 5′ untranslated region (5′ UTR). In this study, the 5′ UTR and total protein extracts from P. aeruginosa logarithmic and stationary phases of growth were used in order to investigate the protein-RNA interactions that may modulate the translational process. It was observed that a 69-kDa protein, which corresponded to ribosomal protein S1, preferentially binds the 5′ UTR of the rpoS mRNA in the logarithmic phase and not in the stationary phase. This is the first report of a protein-rpoS mRNA 5′ UTR interaction in P. aeruginosa, and the possible involvement of protein S1 in translation regulation of rpoS is discussed. PMID:15262927

  2. Dual Posttranscriptional Regulation via a Cofactor-Responsive mRNA Leader

    PubMed Central

    Patterson-Fortin, Laura M.; Vakulskas, Christopher A.; Yakhnin, Helen; Babitzke, Paul; Romeo, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Riboswitches are cis-acting mRNA elements that regulate gene expression in response to ligand binding. Recently, a class of riboswitches was proposed to respond to the molybdenum cofactor (Moco), which serves as a redox center for metabolic enzymes. The 5′ leader of the Escherichia coli moaABCDE transcript exemplifies this candidate riboswitch class. This mRNA encodes enzymes for Moco biosynthesis, and moaA expression is feedback inhibited by Moco. Previous RNA-seq analyses showed that moaA mRNA copurified with the RNA binding protein CsrA (carbon storage regulator), suggesting that CsrA binds to this RNA in vivo. Among its global regulatory roles, CsrA represses stationary phase metabolism and activates central carbon metabolism. Here, we used gel mobility shift analysis to determine that CsrA binds specifically and with high affinity to the moaA 5′ mRNA leader. Northern blotting and studies with a series of chromosomal lacZ reporter fusions showed that CsrA posttranscriptionally activates moaA expression without altering moaA mRNA levels, indicative of translation control. Deletion analyses, nucleotide replacement studies and footprinting with CsrA-FeBABE identified two sites for CsrA binding. Toeprinting assays suggested that CsrA binding causes changes in moaA RNA structure. We propose that the moaA mRNA leader forms an aptamer, which serves as a target of posttranscriptional regulation by at least two different factors, Moco and the protein CsrA. While we are not aware of similar dual posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms, additional examples are likely to emerge. PMID:23274138

  3. Herpes simplex virus virion stimulatory protein mRNA leader contains sequence elements which increase both virus-induced transcription and mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Blair, E D; Blair, C C; Wagner, E K

    1987-08-01

    To investigate the role of 5' noncoding leader sequence of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) mRNA in infected cells, the promoter for the 65,000-dalton virion stimulatory protein (VSP), a beta-gamma polypeptide, was introduced into plasmids bearing the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene together with various lengths of adjacent viral leader sequences. Plasmids containing longer lengths of leader sequence gave rise to significantly higher levels of CAT enzyme in transfected cells superinfected with HSV-1. RNase T2 protection assays of CAT mRNA showed that transcription was initiated from an authentic viral cap site in all VSP-CAT constructs and that CAT mRNA levels corresponded to CAT enzyme levels. Use of cis-linked simian virus 40 enhancer sequences demonstrated that the effect was virus specific. Constructs containing 12 and 48 base pairs of the VSP mRNA leader gave HSV infection-induced CAT activities intermediate between those of the leaderless construct and the VSP-(+77)-CAT construct. Actinomycin D chase experiments demonstrated that the longest leader sequences increased hybrid CAT mRNA stability at least twofold in infected cells. Cotransfection experiments with a cosmid bearing four virus-specified transcription factors (ICP4, ICP0, ICP27, and VSP-65K) showed that sequences from -3 to +77, with respect to the viral mRNA cap site, also contained signals responsive to transcriptional activation. PMID:3037112

  4. Leader length and secondary structure modulate mRNA function under conditions of stress

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, M.

    1988-07-01

    Simina virus 40-based plasmids that direct the synthesis of preproinsulin in cultured monkey cells were used to study the effects of mRNA structure on translational efficiency. Lengthening the leader sequence enhanced translation in this system. The enhancement was most obvious when an unstructured sequence (two, four, or eight copies of the oligonculeotide AGCTAAGTAAGTAAGTA) was inserted upstream from a region of deliberate secondary structure; the degree of enhancement was proportional to the number of copies of the inserted oligonucleotide. Lengthening the leader sequence on the 3' side of a stem-and-loop structure, in contrast, did not offset the potentially inhibitory effect of the hairpin structure. Both the facilitating effect of length and the inhibitory effect of secondary structure were demonstrated most easily under conditions of mRNA competition, which was brought about by an abrupt shift in the tonicity of the culture medium. These experiments suggest a simple structural basis for the long-recognized differential response of viral and cellular mRNAs to hypertonic stress. The fact that the translatability of structure-prone mRNAs varies with changes in the environment may also have general implications for gene expression in eucaryotic cells.

  5. Selective translation of heat shock mRNA in Drosophila melanogaster depends on sequence information in the leader.

    PubMed Central

    Klemenz, R; Hultmark, D; Gehring, W J

    1985-01-01

    One of the effects of a temperature increase above 35 degrees C on Drosophila melanogaster is a rapid switch in selectivity of the translational apparatus. Protein synthesis from normal, but not from heat shock, mRNA is much reduced. Efficient translation at high temperature might be a result of the primary sequence of heat shock genes. Alternatively a mRNA modification mechanism, altered as a consequence of heat shock, might allow for efficient high temperature translation of any mRNA synthesized during a heat shock. The gene for alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) was fused to the controlling elements of a heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) gene. Authentic Adh mRNA, synthesized from this fusion gene at elevated temperatures was not translated during heat shock. A second Adh fusion gene in which the mRNA synthesized contained the first 95 nucleotides of the Hsp70 non-translated leader sequence gave rise, at high temperature, to mRNA which was translated during the heat shock. Thus, the signal(s) in the mRNAs controlling translation efficiency at heat shock temperatures is encoded within the heat shock genes. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 8. PMID:2933251

  6. RpoS expression and the general stress response in Azotobacter vinelandii during carbon and nitrogen diauxic shifts.

    PubMed

    Sandercock, James R; Page, William J

    2008-02-01

    The general stress response mediated by the sigma factor RpoS is important for survival of bacteria in adverse environments. A mutant unable to produce RpoS was constructed using the diazotrophic bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii strain UW. Under nondesiccating, solid-medium growth conditions the wild type was culturable for 16.5 years, while the rpoS mutant remained viable for only 10 months. The rpoS mutant exhibited reduced survival compared to the wild type following hydrogen peroxide stress, and stationary phase cells were killed rapidly by 15 mM H2O2. Three catalases (Kat1, Kat2, and Kat3) were expressed in the wild type under the conditions used. Kat2 was expressed in exponential phase during shake flask growth and could be induced under highly aerated conditions in all growth phases, suggesting that there was induction by reactive oxygen intermediates. Kat3 was possibly an isoform of Kat2. In contrast, Kat1 was expressed in an RpoS-dependent manner during the mid-exponential to late stationary phases. RpoS expression did not occur exclusively in stationary phase but was influenced by changes in carbon and nitrogen source availability. There was 26- to 28-fold induction of the RpoS protein during acetate-to-glucose and ammonium-to-N2 diauxic shifts. Following recovery of growth on the alternative carbon or nitrogen source, RpoS protein concentrations declined rapidly to a basal level. However, rpoS mRNA levels did not correlate directly to RpoS levels, suggesting that there was posttranscriptional regulation. Evidence obtained using the RpoS-dependent reporter Kat1 suggested that there is regulation of the RNAP:RpoS holoenzyme at the level of complex formation or activity. PMID:18055600

  7. The 5' leader of the mRNA encoding the mouse neurotrophin receptor TrkB contains two internal ribosomal entry sites that are differentially regulated.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, Stephanie L; Pfingsten, Jennifer S; Kieft, Jeffrey S; Krushel, Les A

    2008-01-01

    A single internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) in conjunction with IRES transactivating factors (ITAFs) is sufficient to recruit the translational machinery to a eukaryotic mRNA independent of the cap structure. However, we demonstrate that the mouse TrkB mRNA contains two independent IRESes. The mouse TrkB mRNA consists of one of two 5' leaders (1428 nt and 448 nt), both of which include the common 3' exon (Ex2, 344 nt). Dicistronic RNA transfections and in vitro translation of monocistronic RNA demonstrated that both full-length 5' leaders, as well as Ex2, exhibit IRES activity indicating the IRES is located within Ex2. Additional analysis of the upstream sequences demonstrated that the first 260 nt of exon 1 (Ex1a) also contains an IRES. Dicistronic RNA transfections into SH-SY5Y cells showed the Ex1a IRES is constitutively active. However, the Ex2 IRES is only active in response to retinoic acid induced neural differentiation, a state which correlates with the synthesis of the ITAF polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB1). Correspondingly, addition or knock-down of PTB1 altered Ex2, but not Ex1a IRES activity in vitro and ex vivo, respectively. These results demonstrate that the two functionally independent IRESes within the mouse TrkB 5' leader are differentially regulated, in part by PTB1. PMID:18779873

  8. Translation of the mRNA of the maize transcriptional activator Opaque-2 is inhibited by upstream open reading frames present in the leader sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Lohmer, S; Maddaloni, M; Motto, M; Salamini, F; Thompson, R D

    1993-01-01

    The protein encoded by the Opaque-2 (O2) gene is a transcription factor, translated from an mRNA that possesses an unusually long 5' leader sequence containing three upstream open reading frames (uORFs). The efficiency of translation of O2 mRNA has been tested in vivo by a transient assay in which the level of activation of the b32 promoter, a natural target of O2 protein, is measured. We show that uORF-less O2 alleles possess a higher transactivation value than the wild-type allele and that the reduction in transactivation due to the uORFs is a cis-dominant effect. The data presented indicate that both uORF1 and uORF2 are involved in the reducing effect and suggest that both are likely to be translated. PMID:8439744

  9. Role of the Histone-Like Nucleoid Structuring Protein in the Regulation of rpoS and RpoS-Dependent Genes in Vibrio cholerae▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Anisia J.; Sultan, Syed Zafar; Liang, Weili; Benitez, Jorge A.

    2008-01-01

    Production of the Zn-metalloprotease hemagglutinin (HA)/protease by Vibrio cholerae has been reported to enhance enterotoxicity in rabbit ileal loops and the reactogenicity of live cholera vaccine candidates. Expression of HA/protease requires the alternate sigma factor σS (RpoS), encoded by rpoS. The histone-like nucleoid structuring protein (H-NS) has been shown to repress rpoS expression in Escherichia coli. In V. cholerae strains of the classical biotype, H-NS has been reported to silence virulence gene expression. In this study we examined the role of H-NS in the expression of HA/protease and motility in an El Tor biotype strain by constructing a Δhns mutant. The Δhns mutant exhibited multiple phenotypes, such as production of cholera toxin in nonpermissive LB medium, reduced resistance to high osmolarity, enhanced resistance to low pH and hydrogen peroxide, and reduced motility. Depletion of H-NS by overexpression of a dominant-negative allele or by deletion of hns resulted in diminished expression of HA/protease. Epistasis analysis of HA/protease expression in Δhns, ΔrpoS, and Δhns ΔrpoS mutants, analysis of RpoS reporter fusions, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR measurements, and ectopic expression of RpoS in ΔrpoS and ΔrpoS Δhns mutants showed that H-NS posttranscriptionally enhances RpoS expression. The Δhns mutant exhibited a lower degree of motility and lower levels of expression of flaA, flaC, cheR-2, and motX mRNAs than the wild type. Comparison of the mRNA abundances of these genes in wild-type, Δhns, ΔrpoS, and Δhns ΔrpoS strains revealed that deletion of rpoS had a more severe negative effect on their expression. Interestingly, deletion of hns in the rpoS background resulted in higher expression levels of flaA, flaC, and motX, suggesting that H-NS represses the expression of these genes in the absence of σS. Finally, we show that the cyclic AMP receptor protein and H-NS act along the same pathway to positively affect RpoS

  10. Signal Transduction and Regulatory Mechanisms Involved in Control of the σS (RpoS) Subunit of RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Hengge-Aronis, Regine

    2002-01-01

    The σS (RpoS) subunit of RNA polymerase is the master regulator of the general stress response in Escherichia coli and related bacteria. While rapidly growing cells contain very little σS, exposure to many different stress conditions results in rapid and strong σS induction. Consequently, transcription of numerous σS-dependent genes is activated, many of which encode gene products with stress-protective functions. Multiple signal integration in the control of the cellular σS level is achieved by rpoS transcriptional and translational control as well as by regulated σS proteolysis, with various stress conditions differentially affecting these levels of σS control. Thus, a reduced growth rate results in increased rpoS transcription whereas high osmolarity, low temperature, acidic pH, and some late-log-phase signals stimulate the translation of already present rpoS mRNA. In addition, carbon starvation, high osmolarity, acidic pH, and high temperature result in stabilization of σS, which, under nonstress conditions, is degraded with a half-life of one to several minutes. Important cis-regulatory determinants as well as trans-acting regulatory factors involved at all levels of σS regulation have been identified. rpoS translation is controlled by several proteins (Hfq and HU) and small regulatory RNAs that probably affect the secondary structure of rpoS mRNA. For σS proteolysis, the response regulator RssB is essential. RssB is a specific direct σS recognition factor, whose affinity for σS is modulated by phosphorylation of its receiver domain. RssB delivers σS to the ClpXP protease, where σS is unfolded and completely degraded. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the molecular functions and interactions of these components and tries to establish a framework for further research on the mode of multiple signal input into this complex regulatory system. PMID:12208995

  11. An Upstream Hfq Binding Site in the fhlA mRNA Leader Region Facilitates the OxyS-fhlA Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Nilshad N.; Feig, Andrew L.

    2010-01-01

    Background To survive, bacteria must be able to adapt to environmental stresses. Small regulatory RNAs have been implicated as intermediates in a variety of stress-response pathways allowing dynamic gene regulation. The RNA binding protein Hfq facilitates this process in many cases, helping sRNAs base pair with their target mRNAs and initiate gene regulation. Although Hfq has been identified as a critical component in many RNPs, the manner by which Hfq controls these interactions is not known. Methodology/Principal Findings To test the requirement of Hfq in these mRNA-sRNA complexes, the OxyS-fhlA system was used as a model. OxyS is induced in response to oxidative stress and down regulates the translation of fhlA, a gene encoding a transcriptional activator for formate metabolism. Biophysical characterization of this system previously used a minimal construct of the fhlA mRNA which inadvertently removed a critical element within the leader sequence of this mRNA that effected thermodynamics and kinetics for the interaction with Hfq. Conclusions/Significance Herein, we report thermodynamic, kinetic and structural mapping studies during binary and ternary complex formation between Hfq, OxyS and fhlA mRNA. Hfq binds fhlA mRNA using both the proximal and distal surfaces and stimulates association kinetics between the sRNA and mRNA but remains bound to fhlA forming a ternary complex. The upstream Hfq binding element within fhlA is similar to (ARN)x elements recently identified in other mRNAs regulated by Hfq. This work leads to a kinetic model for the dynamics of these complexes and the regulation of gene expression by bacterial sRNAs. PMID:20927406

  12. Role of CspC and CspE in regulation of expression of RpoS and UspA, the stress response proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Phadtare, S; Inouye, M

    2001-02-01

    Nine homologous proteins, CspA to CspI, constitute the CspA family of Escherichia coli. Recent studies are aimed at elucidating the individual cellular functions of these proteins. Two members of this family, CspC and CspE, are constitutively produced at 37 degrees C. In the present study, these two proteins were evaluated for their cellular role(s). The expression of three stress proteins, OsmY, Dps, and UspA, is significantly affected by the overexpression and deletion of CspC and CspE. RpoS is a regulatory element for osmY and dps. Further analysis showed a larger amount and greater stability of the rpoS mRNA as well as a higher level of RpoS itself with the overexpression of CspC and CspE. This suggests that CspC and CspE upregulate the expression of OsmY and Dps by regulating the expression of RpoS itself. Indeed, this upregulation is lost in the Delta rpoS strain. Other RpoS-controlled proteins such as ProP and KatG, are also upregulated by the overexpression of CspC. The present study suggests that CspC and CspE are the important elements involved in the regulation of the expression of RpoS, a global stress response regulator, and UspA, a protein responding to numerous stresses. In the light of these observations, it seems plausible that CspC and CspE function as regulatory elements for the expression of stress proteins in the complex stress response network of E. coli. PMID:11157932

  13. In Vivo Analysis of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Cox2 mRNA 5'-Untranslated Leader Functions in Mitochondrial Translation Initiation and Translational Activation

    PubMed Central

    Dunstan, H. M.; Green-Willms, N. S.; Fox, T. D.

    1997-01-01

    We have used mutational and revertant analysis to study the elements of the 54-nucleotide COX2 5'-untranslated leader involved in translation initiation in yeast mitochondria and in activation by the COX2 translational activator, Pet111p. We generated a collection of mutants with substitutions spanning the entire COX2 5'-UTL by in vitro mutagenesis followed by mitochondrial transformation and gene replacement. The phenotypes of these mutants delimit a 31-nucleotide segment, from -16 to -46, that contains several short sequence elements necessary for COX2 5'-UTL function in translation. The sequences from -16 to -47 were shown to be partially sufficient to promote translation in a foreign context. Analysis of revertants of both the series of linker-scanning alleles and two short deletion/insertion alleles has refined the positions of several possible functional elements of the COX2 5'-untranslated leader, including a putative RNA stem-loop structure that functionally interacts with Pet111p and an octanucleotide sequence present in all S. cerevisiae mitochondrial mRNA 5'-UTLs that is a potential rRNA binding site. PMID:9286670

  14. Phenotypic Diversity Caused by Differential RpoS Activity among Environmental Escherichia coli Isolates▿†

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Sarah M.; Dong, Tao; Edge, Thomas A.; Schellhorn, Herb E.

    2011-01-01

    Enteric bacteria deposited into the environment by animal hosts are subject to diverse selective pressures. These pressures may act on phenotypic differences in bacterial populations and select adaptive mutations for survival in stress. As a model to study phenotypic diversity in environmental bacteria, we examined mutations of the stress response sigma factor, RpoS, in environmental Escherichia coli isolates. A total of 2,040 isolates from urban beaches and nearby fecal pollution sources on Lake Ontario (Canada) were screened for RpoS function by examining growth on succinate and catalase activity, two RpoS-dependent phenotypes. The rpoS sequence was determined for 45 isolates, including all candidate RpoS mutants, and of these, six isolates were confirmed as mutants with the complete loss of RpoS function. Similarly to laboratory strains, the RpoS expression of these environmental isolates was stationary phase dependent. However, the expression of RpoS regulon members KatE and AppA had differing levels of expression in several environmental isolates compared to those in laboratory strains. Furthermore, after plating rpoS+ isolates on succinate, RpoS mutants could be readily selected from environmental E. coli. Naturally isolated and succinate-selected RpoS mutants had lower generation times on poor carbon sources and lower stress resistance than their rpoS+ isogenic parental strains. These results show that RpoS mutants are present in the environment (with a frequency of 0.003 among isolates) and that, similarly to laboratory and pathogenic strains, growth on poor carbon sources selects for rpoS mutations in environmental E. coli. RpoS selection may be an important determinant of phenotypic diversification and, hence, the survival of E. coli in the environment. PMID:21948830

  15. A stable hairpin preceded by a short open reading frame promotes nonlinear ribosome migration on a synthetic mRNA leader.

    PubMed Central

    Hemmings-Mieszczak, M; Hohn, T

    1999-01-01

    The regulation of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) pregenomic 35S RNA translation occurs via nonlinear ribosome migration (ribosome shunt) and is mediated by an elongated hairpin structure in the leader. The replacement of the viral leader by a series of short, low-energy stems in either orientation supports efficient ribosomal shunting, showing that the stem per se, and not its sequence, is recognized by the translation machinery. The requirement for cis-acting sequences from the unstructured terminal regions of the viral leader was analyzed: the 5'-terminal polypyrimidine stretch and the short upstream open reading frame (uORF) A stimulate translation, whereas the 3'-flanking region seems not to be essential. Based on these results, an artificial leader was designed with a stable stem flanked by unstructured sequences derived from parts of the 5'- and 3'-proximal regions of the CaMV 35S RNA leader. This artificial leader is shunt-competent in translation assays in vivo and in vitro, indicating that a low-energy stem, broadly used as a device to successfully interfere with ribosome scanning, can efficiently support translation, if preceded by a short uORF. The synthetic 140-nt leader can functionally replace the CaMV 35S RNA 600-nt leader, thus implicating the universal role that nonlinear ribosome scanning could play in translation initiation in eukaryotes. PMID:10496216

  16. How Leaders Develop Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Eli; Tichy, Noel

    1997-01-01

    Effective leaders who have been instrumental in their companies' success must contribute to continuing success by personally developing leaders at all levels. They should share their teachable point of view, including ideas, values, edge, and energy. (JOW)

  17. Role of RpoS in the Virulence of Citrobacter rodentium▿

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Tao; Coombes, Brian K.; Schellhorn, Herb E.

    2009-01-01

    Citrobacter rodentium is a mouse enteropathogen that is closely related to Escherichia coli and causes severe colonic hyperplasia and bloody diarrhea. C. rodentium infection requires expression of genes of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island, which simulates infection by enteropathogenic E. coli and enterohemorrhagic E. coli in the human intestine, providing an effective model for studying enteropathogenesis. In this study we investigated the role of RpoS, the stationary phase sigma factor, in virulence in C. rodentium. Sequence analysis showed that the rpoS gene is highly conserved in C. rodentium and E. coli, exhibiting 92% identity. RpoS was critical for survival under heat shock conditions and during exposure to H2O2 and positively regulated the expression of catalase KatE (HPII). The development of the RDAR (red dry and rough) morphotype, an important virulence trait in E. coli, was also mediated by RpoS in C. rodentium. Unlike E. coli, C. rodentium grew well in the mouse colon, and the wild-type strain colonized significantly better than rpoS mutants. However, a mutation in rpoS conferred a competitive growth advantage over the wild type both in vitro in Luria-Bertani medium and in vivo in the mouse colon. Survival analysis showed that the virulence of an rpoS mutant was attenuated. The expression of genes on the LEE pathogenicity island, which are essential for colonization and virulence, was reduced in the rpoS mutant. In conclusion, RpoS is important for the stress response and is required for full virulence in C. rodentium. PMID:18981255

  18. Analysis of the RpoS regulon in Borrelia burgdorferi in response to mammalian host signals provides insight into RpoS function during the enzootic cycle

    PubMed Central

    Caimano, Melissa J.; Iyer, Radha; Eggers, Christian H.; Gonzalez, Cynthia; Morton, Elizabeth A.; Gilbert, Michael A.; Schwartz, Ira; Radolf, Justin D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) adapts to its arthropod and mammalian hosts by altering its transcriptional and antigenic profiles in response to environmental signals associated with each of these milieus. In studies presented here, we provide evidence to suggest that mammalian host signals are important for modulating and maintaining both the positive and negative aspects of mammalian host adaptation mediated by the alternative sigma factor RpoS in Bb. Although considerable overlap was observed between genes induced by RpoS during growth within the mammalian host and following temperature-shift, comparative microarray analyses demonstrated unequivocally that RpoS-mediated repression requires mammalian host-specific signals. A substantial portion of the in vivo RpoS regulon was uniquely upregulated within dialysis membrane chambers, further underscoring the importance of host-derived environmental stimuli for differential gene expression in Bb. Expression profiling of genes within the RpoS regulon by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) revealed a level of complexity to RpoS-dependent gene regulation beyond that observed by microarray, including a broad range of expression levels and the presence of genes whose expression is only partially dependent on RpoS. Analysis of Bb-infected ticks by qRT-PCR established that expression of rpoS is induced during the nymphal blood meal but not within unfed nymphs or engorged larvae. Together, these data have led us to postulate that RpoS acts as a gatekeeper for the reciprocal regulation of genes involved in the establishment of infection within the mammalian host and the maintenance of spirochetes within the arthropod vector. PMID:17645733

  19. Effect of rpoS Mutation on the Stress Response and Expression of Virulence Factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Sang-Jin; Silo-Suh, Laura; Woods, Donald E.; Hassett, Daniel J.; West, Susan E. H.; Ohman, Dennis E.

    1999-01-01

    The sigma factor RpoS (ςS) has been described as a general stress response regulator that controls the expression of genes which confer increased resistance to various stresses in some gram-negative bacteria. To elucidate the role of RpoS in Pseudomonas aeruginosa physiology and pathogenesis, we constructed rpoS mutants in several strains of P. aeruginosa, including PAO1. The PAO1 rpoS mutant was subjected to various environmental stresses, and we compared the resistance phenotype of the mutant to that of the parent. The PAO1 rpoS mutant was slightly more sensitive to carbon starvation than the wild-type strain, but this phenotype was obvious only when the cells were grown in a medium supplemented with glucose as the sole carbon source. In addition, the PAO1 rpoS mutant was hypersensitive to heat shock at 50°C, increased osmolarity, and prolonged exposure to high concentrations of H2O2. In accordance with the hypersensitivity to H2O2, catalase production was 60% lower in the rpoS mutant than in the parent strain. We also assessed the role of RpoS in the production of several exoproducts known to be important for virulence of P. aeruginosa. The rpoS mutant produced 50% less exotoxin A, but it produced only slightly smaller amounts of elastase and LasA protease than the parent strain. The levels of phospholipase C and casein-degrading proteases were unaffected by a mutation in rpoS in PAO1. The rpoS mutation resulted in the increased production of the phenazine antibiotic pyocyanin and the siderophore pyoverdine. This increased pyocyanin production may be responsible for the enhanced virulence of the PAO1 rpoS mutant that was observed in a rat chronic-lung-infection model. In addition, the rpoS mutant displayed an altered twitching-motility phenotype, suggesting that the colonization factors, type IV fimbriae, were affected. Finally, in an alginate-overproducing cystic fibrosis (CF) isolate, FRD1, the rpoS101::aacCI mutation almost completely abolished the

  20. Stress sigma factor RpoS degradation and translation are sensitive to the state of central metabolism.

    PubMed

    Battesti, Aurelia; Majdalani, Nadim; Gottesman, Susan

    2015-04-21

    RpoS, the stationary phase/stress sigma factor of Escherichia coli, regulates a large cohort of genes important for the cell to deal with suboptimal conditions. Its level increases quickly in the cell in response to many stresses and returns to low levels when growth resumes. Increased RpoS results from increased translation and decreased RpoS degradation. Translation is positively regulated by small RNAs (sRNAs). Protein stability is positively regulated by anti-adaptors, which prevent the RssB adaptor-mediated degradation of RpoS by the ClpXP protease. Inactivation of aceE, a subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), was found to increase levels of RpoS by affecting both translation and protein degradation. The stabilization of RpoS in aceE mutants is dependent on increased transcription and translation of IraP and IraD, two known anti-adaptors. The aceE mutation also leads to a significant increase in rpoS translation. The sRNAs known to positively regulate RpoS are not responsible for the increased translation; sequences around the start codon are sufficient for the induction of translation. PDH synthesizes acetyl-CoA; acetate supplementation allows the cell to synthesize acetyl-CoA by an alternative, less favored pathway, in part dependent upon RpoS. Acetate addition suppressed the effects of the aceE mutant on induction of the anti-adaptors, RpoS stabilization, and rpoS translation. Thus, the bacterial cell responds to lowered levels of acetyl-CoA by inducing RpoS, allowing reprogramming of E. coli metabolism. PMID:25847996

  1. Stress sigma factor RpoS degradation and translation are sensitive to the state of central metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Battesti, Aurelia; Majdalani, Nadim; Gottesman, Susan

    2015-01-01

    RpoS, the stationary phase/stress sigma factor of Escherichia coli, regulates a large cohort of genes important for the cell to deal with suboptimal conditions. Its level increases quickly in the cell in response to many stresses and returns to low levels when growth resumes. Increased RpoS results from increased translation and decreased RpoS degradation. Translation is positively regulated by small RNAs (sRNAs). Protein stability is positively regulated by anti-adaptors, which prevent the RssB adaptor-mediated degradation of RpoS by the ClpXP protease. Inactivation of aceE, a subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), was found to increase levels of RpoS by affecting both translation and protein degradation. The stabilization of RpoS in aceE mutants is dependent on increased transcription and translation of IraP and IraD, two known anti-adaptors. The aceE mutation also leads to a significant increase in rpoS translation. The sRNAs known to positively regulate RpoS are not responsible for the increased translation; sequences around the start codon are sufficient for the induction of translation. PDH synthesizes acetyl-CoA; acetate supplementation allows the cell to synthesize acetyl-CoA by an alternative, less favored pathway, in part dependent upon RpoS. Acetate addition suppressed the effects of the aceE mutant on induction of the anti-adaptors, RpoS stabilization, and rpoS translation. Thus, the bacterial cell responds to lowered levels of acetyl-CoA by inducing RpoS, allowing reprogramming of E. coli metabolism. PMID:25847996

  2. RpoS differentially affects the general stress response and biofilm formation in the endophytic Serratia plymuthica G3.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoguang; Wu, Yan; Chen, Yuanyuan; Xu, Fang; Halliday, Nigel; Gao, Kexiang; Chan, Kok Gan; Cámara, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    The σ(S) subunit RpoS of RNA polymerase functions as a master regulator of the general stress response in Escherichia coli and related bacteria. RpoS has been reported to modulate biocontrol properties in the rhizobacterium Serratia plymuthica IC1270. However, the role of RpoS in the stress response and biofilm formation in S. plymuthica remains largely unknown. Here we studied the role of RpoS from an endophytic S. plymuthica G3 in regulating these phenotypes. Mutational analysis demonstrated that RpoS positively regulates the global stress response to acid or alkaline stresses, oxidative stress, hyperosmolarity, heat shock and carbon starvation, in addition to proteolytic and chitinolytic activities. Interestingly, rpoS mutations resulted in significantly enhanced swimming motility, biofilm formation and production of the plant auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), which may contribute to competitive colonization and environmental fitness for survival. These findings provide further insight into the strain-specific role of RpoS in the endophytic strain G3 of S. plymuthica, where it confers resistance to general stresses encountered within the plant environment. The heterogeneous functionality of RpoS in rhizosphere and endophytic S. plymuthica populations may provide a selective advantage for better adaptation to various physiological and environmental stresses. PMID:26671319

  3. A key role for the mRNA leader structure in translational control of ribosomal protein S1 synthesis in gamma-proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Tchufistova, Ludmila S; Komarova, Anastassia V; Boni, Irina V

    2003-12-01

    The translation initiation region (TIR) of the Escherichia coli rpsA mRNA coding for ribosomal protein S1 is characterized by a remarkable efficiency in driving protein synthesis despite the absence of the canonical Shine-Dalgarno element, and by a strong and specific autogenous repression in the presence of free S1 in trans. The efficient and autoregulated E.coli rpsA TIR comprises not less than 90 nt upstream of the translation start and can be unambiguously folded into three irregular hairpins (HI, HII and HIII) separated by A/U-rich single-stranded regions (ss1 and ss2). Phylogenetic comparison revealed that this specific fold is highly conserved in the gamma-subdivision of proteobacteria (but not in other subdivisions), except for the Pseudomonas group. To test phylogenetic predictions experimentally, we have generated rpsA'-'lacZ translational fusions by inserting the rpsA TIRs from various gamma-proteobacteria in-frame with the E.coli chromosomal lacZ gene. Measurements of their translation efficiency and negative regulation by excess protein S1 in trans have shown that only those rpsA TIRs which share the structural features with that of E.coli can govern efficient and regulated translation. We conclude that the E.coli-like mechanism for controlling the efficiency of protein S1 synthesis evolved after divergence of Pseudomona. PMID:14627832

  4. Eukaryotic initiation factor 3 (eIF3) and 5’ mRNA leader sequences as agents of translational regulation in Arabidopsis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    von Arnim, Albrecht G.

    2015-02-04

    Protein synthesis, or translation, consumes a sizable fraction of the cell’s energy budget, estimated at 5% and up to 50% in differentiated and growing cells, respectively. Plants also invest significant energy and biomass to construct and maintain the translation apparatus. Translation is regulated by a variety of external stimuli. Compared to transcriptional control, attributes of translational control include reduced sensitivity to stochastic fluctuation, a finer gauge of control, and more rapid responsiveness to environmental stimuli. Yet, our murky understanding of translational control allows few generalizations. Consequently, translational regulation is underutilized in the context of transgene regulation, although synthetic biologists are now beginning to appropriate RNA-level gene regulation into their regulatory circuits. We also know little about how translational control contributes to the diversity of plant form and function. This project explored how an emerging regulatory mRNA sequence element, upstream open reading frames (uORFs), is integrated with the general translation initiation machinery to permit translational regulation on specific mRNAs.

  5. rpoS gene expression in carbon-starved cultures of the Polyhydroxyalkanoate-accumulating species Pseudomonas oleovorans.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Jimena A; López, Nancy I; Méndez, Beatriz S

    2004-06-01

    The expression of the rpoS gene during PHA depolymerization was monitored in Pseudomonas oleovorans GPo1 and its mutant defective in PHA degradation by analyzing the tolerance to oxidative and thermal stresses and the RpoS intracellular content. An increase in the tolerance to H2O2 and heat shock was observed coincidentally with PHA degradation. Western blotting experiments performed in carbon-starved cultures showed that the RpoS levels were higher in the wild type than in the mutant strain. Complementation of the phaZ mutation restores the wild-type RpoS levels. These results suggest a probable association between PHA depolymerization and the stress tolerance phenotype controlled by RpoS. PMID:15170232

  6. Influence of rpoS mutations on the response of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Oppezzo, Oscar J; Costa, Cristina S; Pizarro, Ramón A

    2011-01-10

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is an important pathogen, and exhibits considerable resistance to the lethal effects of solar radiation. To evaluate the involvement of the RpoS transcription factor in the defense mechanisms of this organism, the sunlight response of a wild type strain (ATCC14028) was compared with that of an rpoS mutant, which exhibited increased sensitivity. Kinetics of cell death was complex in both strains, probably due to the presence of a variety of targets for the radiation. When ultraviolet radiation was excluded from the incident sunlight, lethal effects were abolished independently of the allelic state of rpoS. Reduction of oxygen concentration in the irradiation medium provided moderate protection to ATCC14028, but notably improved survival of the mutant. Similar assays were developed with another S. enterica strain (DA1468), which is a derivative of strain LT2 and produces low levels of RpoS. In this strain the loss of viability reveals the dependence on solar ultraviolet and oxygen concentration found for ATCC14028, but radiation resistance was slightly reduced. Increased sensitivity was observed in an rpoS mutant derived from DA1468, indicating that RpoS functions related to photoprotection are conserved in this strain. In addition, notable differences in the shape of the survival curves obtained for mutants derived from ATCC14028 and DA1468 were found, suggesting that genes beyond RpoS control are relevant in the sunlight response of these mutants. PMID:20875749

  7. In silico analysis and molecular modeling of RNA polymerase, sigma S (RpoS) protein in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Sedighi, Mansour; Moghoofei, Mohsen; Kouhsari, Ebrahim; Pournajaf, Abazar; Emadi, Behzad; Tohidfar, Masoud; Gholami, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sigma factors are proteins that regulate transcription in bacteria. Sigma factors can be activated in response to different environmental conditions. The rpoS (RNA polymerase, sigma S) gene encodes sigma-38 (σ38, or RpoS), a 37.8 kDa protein in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) strains. RpoS is a central regulator of the general stress response and operates in both retroactive and proactive manners; not only does it allow the cell to survive environmental challenges; it also prepares the cell for subsequent stresses (cross-protection). Methods: The significance of RpoS for stress resistance and protein expression in stationary-phase P. aeruginosa cells was assessed. The goal of the current study was to characterize RpoS of P. aeruginosa PAO1 using bioinformatics tools. Results: The results showed that RpoS is an unstable protein that belongs to the sigma-70 factor family. Secondary structure analysis predicted that random coil is the predominant structure followed by extended alpha helix. The three-dimensional (3D) structure was modeled using SWISS-MODEL Workspace. Conclusion: Determination of sequence, function, structure, and predicted epitopes of RpoS is important for modeling of inhibitors that will help in the design of new drugs to combat multi-drug-resistant (MDR) strains. Such information may aid in the development of new diagnostic tools, drugs, and vaccines for treatment in endemic regions. PMID:26989748

  8. Burkholderia pseudomallei rpoS mediates iNOS suppression in human hepatocyte (HC04) cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanongkiet, Sucharat; Ponnikorn, Saranyoo; Udomsangpetch, Rachanee; Tungpradabkul, Sumalee

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an intracellular Gram-negative bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis, a widespread disease in Southeast Asia. Reactive nitrogen, in an intermediate form of nitric oxide (NO), is one of the first lines of defense used by host cells to eliminate intracellular pathogens, through the stimulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Studies in phagocytotic cells have shown that the iNOS response is muted in B. pseudomallei infection, and implicated the rpoS sigma factor as a key regulatory factor mediating suppression. The liver is a main visceral organ affected by B. pseudomallei, and there is little knowledge about the interaction of liver cells and B. pseudomallei. This study investigated the induction of iNOS, as well as autophagic flux and light-chain 3 (LC3) localization in human liver (HC04) cells in response to infection with B. pseudomallei and its rpoS deficient mutant. Results showed that the rpoS mutant was unable to suppress iNOS induction and that the mutant showed less induction of autophagy and lower co-localization with LC3, and this was coupled with a lower intracellular growth rate. Combining these results suggest that B. pseudomallei rpoS is an important factor in establishing infection in liver cells. PMID:27324398

  9. RpoS Regulates Essential Virulence Factors Remaining to Be Identified in Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qilong; Shi, Yanlin; Dadhwal, Poonam; Liang, Fang Ting

    2012-01-01

    Background Since the RpoN-RpoS regulatory network was revealed in the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi a decade ago, both upstream and downstream of the pathway have been intensively investigated. While significant progress has been made into understanding of how the network is regulated, most notably, discovering a relationship of the network with Rrp2 and BosR, only three crucial virulence factors, including outer surface protein C (OspC) and decorin-binding proteins (Dbps) A and B, are associated with the pathway. Moreover, for more than 10 years no single RpoS-controlled gene has been found to be critical for infection, raising a question about whether additional RpoS-dependent virulence factors remain to be identified. Methodology/Principal Findings The rpoS gene was deleted in B. burgdorferi; resulting mutants were modified to constitutively express all the known virulence factors, OspC, DbpA and DbpB. This genetic modification was unable to restore the rpoS mutant with infectivity. Conclusions/Significance The inability to restore the rpoS mutant with infectivity by simultaneously over-expressing all the three virulence factors allows us to conclude RpoS also regulates essential genes that remain to be identified in B. burgdorferi. PMID:23300893

  10. Burkholderia pseudomallei rpoS mediates iNOS suppression in human hepatocyte (HC04) cells.

    PubMed

    Sanongkiet, Sucharat; Ponnikorn, Saranyoo; Udomsangpetch, Rachanee; Tungpradabkul, Sumalee

    2016-08-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an intracellular Gram-negative bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis, a widespread disease in Southeast Asia. Reactive nitrogen, in an intermediate form of nitric oxide (NO), is one of the first lines of defense used by host cells to eliminate intracellular pathogens, through the stimulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Studies in phagocytotic cells have shown that the iNOS response is muted in B. pseudomallei infection, and implicated the rpoS sigma factor as a key regulatory factor mediating suppression. The liver is a main visceral organ affected by B. pseudomallei, and there is little knowledge about the interaction of liver cells and B. pseudomallei This study investigated the induction of iNOS, as well as autophagic flux and light-chain 3 (LC3) localization in human liver (HC04) cells in response to infection with B. pseudomallei and its rpoS deficient mutant. Results showed that the rpoS mutant was unable to suppress iNOS induction and that the mutant showed less induction of autophagy and lower co-localization with LC3, and this was coupled with a lower intracellular growth rate. Combining these results suggest that B. pseudomallei rpoS is an important factor in establishing infection in liver cells. PMID:27324398

  11. Small RNAs in the control of RpoS, CsgD, and biofilm architecture of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mika, Franziska; Hengge, Regine

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid curli fibers and cellulose are extracellular matrix components produced in the stationary phase top layer of E. coli macrocolonies, which confer physical protection, strong cohesion, elasticity, and wrinkled morphology to these biofilms. Curli and cellulose synthesis is controlled by a three-level transcription factor (TF) cascade with the RpoS sigma subunit of RNA polymerase at the top, the MerR-like TF MlrA, and the biofilm regulator CsgD, with two c-di-GMP control modules acting as key switching devices. Additional signal input and fine-tuning is provided by an entire series of small RNAs—ArcZ, DsrA, RprA, McaS, OmrA/OmrB, GcvB, and RydC—that differentially control all three TF modules by direct mRNA interaction. This review not only summarizes the mechanisms of action of these sRNAs, but also addresses the question of how these sRNAs and the regulators they target contribute to building the intriguing three-dimensional microarchitecture and macromorphology of these biofilms. PMID:25028968

  12. The Polymorphic Aggregative Phenotype of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli O111 Depends on RpoS and Curli

    PubMed Central

    Diodati, M. E.; Bates, A. H.; Miller, W. G.; Carter, M. Q.; Zhou, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli O111 is an emerging non-O157:H7 serotype of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). We previously reported that outbreak and environmental, but not sporadic-case, strains of STEC O111 share a distinct aggregation phenotype (M. E. Diodati, A. H. Bates, M. B. Cooley, S. Walker, R. E. Mandrell, and M. T. Brandl, Foodborne Pathog Dis 12:235−243, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/fpd.2014.1887). We show here the natural occurrence of nonaggregative variants in single STEC O111 strains. These variants do not produce curli fimbriae and lack RpoS function but synthesize cellulose. The deletion of csgBAC or rpoS in an aggregative outbreak strain abolished aggregate formation, which was rescued when curli biogenesis or RpoS function, respectively, was restored. Complementation of a nonaggregative variant with RpoS also conferred curli production and aggregation. These observations were supported by Western blotting with an anti-CsgA antibody. Immunomicroscopy revealed that curli were undetectable on the cells of the nonaggregative variant and the RpoS mutant but were present in large quantities in the intercellular matrix of the assemblages formed by aggregative strains. Sequence analysis of rpoS in the aggregative strain and its variant showed a single substitution of threonine for asparagine at amino acid 124. Our results indicate that the multicellular behavior of STEC O111 is RpoS dependent via positive regulation of curli production. Aggregation may confer a fitness advantage in O111 outbreak strains under stressful conditions in hydrodynamic environments along the food production chain and in the host, while the occurrence of nonaggregative variants may allow the cell population to adapt to conditions benefiting a planktonic lifestyle. PMID:26712542

  13. The rpoS Gene Is Predominantly Inactivated during Laboratory Storage and Undergoes Source-Sink Evolution in Escherichia coli Species

    PubMed Central

    Bleibtreu, Alexandre; Clermont, Olivier; Darlu, Pierre; Glodt, Jérémy; Branger, Catherine; Picard, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    The rpoS gene codes for an alternative RNA polymerase sigma factor, which acts as a general regulator of the stress response. Inactivating alleles of rpoS in collections of natural Escherichia coli isolates have been observed at very variable frequencies, from less than 1% to more than 70% of strains. rpoS is easily inactivated in nutrient-deprived environments such as stab storage, which makes it difficult to determine the true frequency of rpoS inactivation in nature. We studied the evolutionary history of rpoS and compared it to the phylogenetic history of bacteria in two collections of 82 human commensal and extraintestinal E. coli strains. These strains were representative of the phylogenetic diversity of the species and differed only by their storage conditions. In both collections, the phylogenetic histories of rpoS and of the strains were congruent, indicating that horizontal gene transfer had not occurred at the rpoS locus, and rpoS was under strong purifying selection, with a ratio of the nonsynonymous mutation rate (Ka) to the synonymous substitution rate (Ks) substantially smaller than 1. Stab storage was associated with a high frequency of inactivating alleles, whereas almost no amino acid sequence variation was observed in RpoS in the collection studied directly after isolation of the strains from the host. Furthermore, the accumulation of variations in rpoS was typical of source-sink dynamics. In conclusion, rpoS is rarely inactivated in natural E. coli isolates within their mammalian hosts, probably because such strains rapidly become evolutionary dead ends. Our data should encourage bacteriologists to freeze isolates immediately and to avoid the use of stab storage. PMID:25266386

  14. BadR (BB0693) controls growth phase-dependent induction of rpoS and bosR in Borrelia burgdorferi via recognizing TAAAATAT motifs.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Zhiming; Zhou, Jianli

    2015-12-01

    In Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb), the alternative sigma factor RpoS plays a central role during Bb's adaptation to ticks and mammals. Previous studies have demonstrated that RpoS is not expressed during the early stages of spirochetal growth or when Bb resides in ticks during the intermolt phase, but the molecular details of these events remain unknown. In the current study, biomagnetic bead separation of rpoS promoter-binding proteins, coupled with genetic inactivation, was employed to identify BadR (BB0693) as a negative regulator that controls growth phase-dependent induction of rpoS and bosR in Bb. When badR was inactivated, the expression of rpoS and bosR was induced only during the early stages of bacterial growth, but not during the stationary growth phase. Recombinant BadR bound to the promoter DNA of rpoS and the regulatory region upstream of bosR via AT-rich TAAAATAT motifs. Mutations in this motif markedly inhibited or abolished rBadR binding. These results suggest that BadR directly influences the expression of both rpoS and bosR in Bb. This newly recognized role for BadR to fine-tune the activation of the RpoN-RpoS pathway at strategic times in Bb's life cycle potentially represents another layer of gene control over σ(54)-dependent gene regulation. PMID:26331438

  15. The alternate sigma factor RpoS protects against silver ion toxicity in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alternative sigma factor, RpoS controls the expression of many stress response genes, including genes involved in acid and oxidative stresses. In this study, we demonstrated metal tolerance in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, and silver ion showed the highest toxicity among the tested metal ions...

  16. Role of RpoS in Stress Tolerance and Environmental Fitness of the Phyllosphere Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens 122

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteria living epiphytically on aerial plant surfaces encounter severe and rapidly fluctuating environmental conditions, and their capacity to withstand stresses is considered to be a crucial factor contributing to epiphytic fitness. The stationary phase sigma factor RpoS is a key determinant in s...

  17. TetR Family Member PsrA Directly Binds the Pseudomonas rpoS and psrA Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Kojic, Milan; Aguilar, Claudio; Venturi, Vittorio

    2002-01-01

    We have previously described a Pseudomonas gene, psrA, which enhances transcription of the rpoS sigma factor gene at stationary phase. We present molecular data which demonstrate that in Pseudomonas putida PsrA binds specifically to the rpoS and psrA promoters in DNA regions having similar palindromic sequences, C/GAAAC N2-4 GTTTG/C, where N is any nucleotide. The position of the initiation of transcription was determined for both promoters, and PsrA binds from positions −59 to −35 in the rpoS promoter and from −18 to +20 in the psrA promoter with respect to the +1 transcription site. Expression studies with a psrA-lacZ transcriptional fusion in wild-type and psrA::Tn5 knockout mutants revealed that psrA was under additional control in response to growth phase. A model for the role of PsrA in the regulation of rpoS and psrA is presented. PMID:11914368

  18. Global Repression of Host-Associated Genes of the Lyme Disease Spirochete through Post-Transcriptional Modulation of the Alternative Sigma Factor RpoS

    PubMed Central

    Dulebohn, Daniel P.; Hayes, Beth M.; Rosa, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, is a vector-borne pathogen that transits between Ixodes ticks and vertebrate hosts. During the natural infectious cycle, spirochetes must globally adjust their transcriptome to survive in these dissimilar environments. One way B. burgdorferi accomplishes this is through the use of alternative sigma factors to direct transcription of specific genes. RpoS, one of only three sigma factors in B. burgdorferi, controls expression of genes required during tick-transmission and infection of the mammalian host. How spirochetes switch between different sigma factors during the infectious cycle has remained elusive. Here we establish a role for a novel protein, BBD18, in the regulation of the virulence-associated sigma factor RpoS. Constitutive expression of BBD18 repressed transcription of RpoS-dependent genes to levels equivalent to those observed in an rpoS mutant. Consistent with the global loss of RpoS-dependent transcripts, we were unable to detect RpoS protein. However, constitutive expression of BBD18 did not diminish the amount of rpoS transcript, indicating post-transcriptional regulation of RpoS by BBD18. Interestingly, BBD18-mediated repression of RpoS is independent of both the rpoS promoter and the 5’ untranslated region, suggesting a mechanism of protein destabilization rather than translational control. We propose that BBD18 is a novel regulator of RpoS and its activity likely represents a first step in the transition from an RpoS-ON to an RpoS-OFF state, when spirochetes transition from the host to the tick vector. PMID:24671196

  19. RpoS synthesis is growth rate regulated in Salmonella typhimurium, but its turnover is not dependent on acetyl phosphate synthesis or PTS function.

    PubMed

    Cunning, C; Elliott, T

    1999-08-01

    The RpoS sigma factor of enteric bacteria is either required for or augments the expression of a number of genes that are induced during nutrient limitation, growth into stationary phase, or in response to stresses, including high osmolarity. RpoS is regulated at multiple levels, including posttranscriptional control of its synthesis, protein turnover, and mechanisms that affect its activity directly. Here, the control of RpoS stability was investigated in Salmonella typhimurium by the isolation of a number of mutants specifically defective in RpoS turnover. These included 20 mutants defective in mviA, the ortholog of Escherichia coli rssB/sprE, and 13 mutants defective in either clpP or clpX which encode the protease active on RpoS. An hns mutant was also defective in RpoS turnover, thus confirming that S. typhimurium and E. coli have identical genetic requirements for this process. Some current models predict the existence of a kinase to phosphorylate the response regulator MviA, but no mutants affecting a kinase were recovered. An mviA mutant carrying the D58N substitution altering the predicted phosphorylation site is substantially defective, suggesting that phosphorylation of MviA on D58 is important for its function. No evidence was obtained to support models in which acetyl phosphate or the PTS system contributes to MviA phosphorylation. However, we did find a significant (fivefold) elevation of RpoS during exponential growth on acetate as the carbon and energy source. This behavior is due to growth rate-dependent regulation which increases RpoS synthesis at slower growth rates. Growth rate regulation operates at the level of RpoS synthesis and is mainly posttranscriptional but, surprisingly, is independent of hfq function. PMID:10438755

  20. RpoS proteolysis is regulated by a mechanism that does not require the SprE (RssB) response regulator phosphorylation site.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Celeste N; Ruiz, Natividad; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2004-11-01

    In Escherichia coli the response regulator SprE (RssB) facilitates degradation of the sigma factor RpoS by delivering it to the ClpXP protease. This process is regulated: RpoS is degraded in logarithmic phase but becomes stable upon carbon starvation, resulting in its accumulation. Because SprE contains a CheY domain with a conserved phosphorylation site (D58), the prevailing model posits that this control is mediated by phosphorylation. To test this model, we mutated the conserved response regulator phosphorylation site (D58A) of the chromosomal allele of sprE and monitored RpoS levels in response to carbon starvation. Though phosphorylation contributed to the SprE basal activity, we found that RpoS proteolysis was still regulated upon carbon starvation. Furthermore, our results indicate that phosphorylation of wild-type SprE occurs by a mechanism that is independent of acetyl phosphate. PMID:15489452

  1. Impact of co-deficiency of RpoN and RpoS on stress tolerance, virulence and gene regulation in Edwardsiella tarda.

    PubMed

    Liu, Enfu; Ye, Jiang; Song, ShanShan; Wang, Keping; Zhang, Yuanxing; Zhang, Huizhan

    2014-07-01

    Edwardsiella tarda the etiological agent for edwardsiellosis, a devastating fish disease prevailing in worldwide aquaculture industries was subjected to a molecular genetic study. To research into the influence when RpoN (σ(54) ) and RpoS (σ(38) ) were deleted simultaneously, the double deletion mutant of RpoN (σ(54) ) and RpoS (σ(38) ), namely rnrs, was constructed. Firstly, RpoN and RpoS are both essential for H2 O2 , starvation, high osmotic pressure and acid resistance, which have synergistic effect. Secondly, virulence of rnrs reduces significantly compared to E. tarda EIB 202 WT, ΔrpoN mutant and ΔrpoS mutant. Furthermore, transcriptional control of rpoS by rpoN in stationary phase was observed through qRT-PCR, while rpoS had no influence on rpoN in the level of transcription. Meanwhile, regulation of flagellar sigma factor σ(F) (FliA) and other flagella-related genes including flgA, flgK, flgL, motA, and motB by rpoS, and rpoN was found. fliA and other flagella-related genes were controlled positively by rpoN, while negatively by rpoS. At last, two differential expression genes in transcriptional level of rnrs strain were detected by DD-RT-PCR, namely cheY and narK. This study therefore indicated interaction between sigma factors RpoN and RpoS, which modulates stress response, virulence, motility, and provides new insights into the regulatory networks of E. tarda. PMID:24633758

  2. The Fur homologue BosR requires Arg39 to activate rpoS transcription in Borrelia burgdorferi and thereby direct spirochaete infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Katona, Laura I

    2015-11-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is the causative agent of Lyme disease. In B. burgdorferi, RpoS controls the expression of virulence genes needed for mammalian infection. The Fur homologue BosR regulates the transcription of rpoS and therefore BosR determines, albeit indirectly, the infection status of the spirochaete. Transcription of rpoS in B. burgdorferi is complex: rpoS can be transcribed either from an RpoD-dependent promoter to yield a long transcript or from an RpoN-dependent promoter to yield a short transcript. This study shows that BosR repressed synthesis of the long transcript while at the same time activating synthesis of the short transcript. How BosR does this is unclear. To address this, spirochaetes were engineered to express either BosR or the naturally occurring variant BosRR39K. Mice became infected by the spirochaetes expressing BosR but not by the spirochaetes expressing BosRR39K. Furthermore, the spirochaetes expressing BosR activated rpoS transcription during growth in culture whereas the spirochaetes expressing BosRR39K did not. Thus, BosR's activation of rpoS transcription somehow involves Arg39. This arginine is highly conserved in other FUR proteins and therefore other FUR proteins may also require this arginine to function. PMID:26318670

  3. The small RNA, DsrA, is essential for the low temperature expression of RpoS during exponential growth in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Sledjeski, D D; Gupta, A; Gottesman, S

    1996-01-01

    dsrA encodes a small, untranslated RNA. When over-expressed, DsrA antagonizes the H-NS-mediated silencing of numerous promoters. Cells devoid of DsrA grow normally and show little change in the expression of a number of H-NS-silenced genes. Expression of a transcriptional fusion of lacZ to dsrB, the gene next to dsrA, is significantly lower in cells carrying mutations in dsrA. All expression of beta-galactosidase from the dsrB::lacZ fusion is also dependent on the stationary phase sigma factor, RpoS. DsrA RNA was found to regulate dsrB::lacZ indirectly, by modulating RpoS synthesis. Levels of RpoS protein are substantially lower in a dsrA mutant, both in stationary and exponential phase cells. Mutations in dsrA decrease the expression of an RpoS::LacZ translational fusion, but not a transcriptional fusion, suggesting that DsrA is acting after transcription initiation. While RpoS expression is very low in exponential phase at temperatures of 30 degrees C and above, at 20 degrees C there is substantial synthesis of RpoS during exponential growth, all dependent on DsrA RNA. dsrA expression is also increased at low temperatures. These results suggest a new role for RpoS during exponential growth at low temperatures, mediated by DsrA. Images PMID:8670904

  4. The growth advantage in stationary-phase phenotype conferred by rpoS mutations is dependent on the pH and nutrient environment.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Michael J; Finkel, Steven E

    2003-12-01

    Escherichia coli cells that are aged in batch culture display an increased fitness referred to as the growth advantage in stationary phase, or GASP, phenotype. A common early adaptation to this culture environment is a mutant rpoS allele, such as rpoS819, that results in attenuated RpoS activity. However, it is important to note that during long-term batch culture, environmental conditions are in flux. To date, most studies of the GASP phenotype have focused on identifying alleles that render an advantage in a specific environment, Luria-Bertani broth (LB) batch culture. To determine what role environmental conditions play in rendering relative fitness advantages to E. coli cells carrying either the wild-type or rpoS819 alleles, we performed competitions under a variety of culture conditions in which either the available nutrients, the pH, or both were manipulated. In LB medium, we found that while the rpoS819 allele confers a strong competitive fitness advantage at basic pH, it confers a reduced advantage under neutral conditions, and it is disadvantageous under acidic conditions. Similar results were found using other media. rpoS819 conferred its greatest advantage in basic minimal medium in which either glucose or Casamino Acids were the sole source of carbon and energy. In acidic medium supplemented with either Casamino Acids or glucose, the wild-type allele conferred a slight advantage. In addition, populations were dynamic under all pH conditions tested, with neither the wild-type nor mutant rpoS alleles sweeping a culture. We also found that the strength of the fitness advantage gained during a 10-day incubation is pH dependent. PMID:14645263

  5. The Growth Advantage in Stationary-Phase Phenotype Conferred by rpoS Mutations Is Dependent on the pH and Nutrient Environment

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Michael J.; Finkel, Steven E.

    2003-01-01

    Escherichia coli cells that are aged in batch culture display an increased fitness referred to as the growth advantage in stationary phase, or GASP, phenotype. A common early adaptation to this culture environment is a mutant rpoS allele, such as rpoS819, that results in attenuated RpoS activity. However, it is important to note that during long-term batch culture, environmental conditions are in flux. To date, most studies of the GASP phenotype have focused on identifying alleles that render an advantage in a specific environment, Luria-Bertani broth (LB) batch culture. To determine what role environmental conditions play in rendering relative fitness advantages to E. coli cells carrying either the wild-type or rpoS819 alleles, we performed competitions under a variety of culture conditions in which either the available nutrients, the pH, or both were manipulated. In LB medium, we found that while the rpoS819 allele confers a strong competitive fitness advantage at basic pH, it confers a reduced advantage under neutral conditions, and it is disadvantageous under acidic conditions. Similar results were found using other media. rpoS819 conferred its greatest advantage in basic minimal medium in which either glucose or Casamino Acids were the sole source of carbon and energy. In acidic medium supplemented with either Casamino Acids or glucose, the wild-type allele conferred a slight advantage. In addition, populations were dynamic under all pH conditions tested, with neither the wild-type nor mutant rpoS alleles sweeping a culture. We also found that the strength of the fitness advantage gained during a 10-day incubation is pH dependent. PMID:14645263

  6. Exploring new roles for the rpoS gene in the survival and virulence of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Santander, Ricardo D; Monte-Serrano, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Herva, José J; López-Solanilla, Emilia; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo; Biosca, Elena G

    2014-12-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes fire blight in economically important plants of the family Rosaceae. This bacterial pathogen spends part of its life cycle coping with starvation and other fluctuating environmental conditions. In many Gram-negative bacteria, starvation and other stress responses are regulated by the sigma factor RpoS. We obtained an E. amylovora rpoS mutant to explore the role of this gene in starvation responses and its potential implication in other processes not yet studied in this pathogen. Results showed that E. amylovora needs rpoS to develop normal starvation survival and viable but nonculturable (VBNC) responses. Furthermore, this gene contributed to stationary phase cross-protection against oxidative, osmotic, and acid stresses and was essential for cross-protection against heat shock, but nonessential against acid shock. RpoS also mediated regulation of motility, exopolysaccharide synthesis, and virulence in immature loquats, but not in pear plantlets, and contributed to E. amylovora survival in nonhost tissues during incompatible interactions. Our results reveal some unique roles for the rpoS gene in E. amylovora and provide new knowledge on the regulation of different processes related to its ecology, including survival in different environments and virulence in immature fruits. PMID:25331301

  7. Spliced leader trans-splicing in the nematode Trichinella spiralis uses highly polymorphic, noncanonical spliced leaders.

    PubMed

    Pettitt, Jonathan; Müller, Berndt; Stansfield, Ian; Connolly, Bernadette

    2008-04-01

    The trans-splicing of short spliced leader (SL) RNAs onto the 5' ends of mRNAs occurs in a diverse range of taxa. In nematodes, all species so far characterized utilize a characteristic, conserved spliced leader, SL1, as well as variants that are employed in the resolution of operons. Here we report the identification of spliced leader trans-splicing in the basal nematode Trichinella spiralis, and show that this nematode does not possess a canonical SL1, but rather has at least 15 distinct spliced leaders, encoded by at least 19 SL RNA genes. The individual spliced leaders vary in both size and primary sequence, showing a much higher degree of diversity compared to other known trans-spliced leaders. In a survey of T. spiralis mRNAs, individual mRNAs were found to be trans-spliced to a number of different spliced leader sequences. These data provide the first indication that the last common ancestor of the phylum Nematoda utilized spliced leader trans-splicing and that the canonical spliced leader, SL1, found in Caenorhabditis elegans, evolved after the divergence of the major nematode clades. This discovery sheds important light on the nature and evolution of mRNA processing in the Nematoda. PMID:18256244

  8. Long-Chain Fatty Acid Sensor, PsrA, Modulates the Expression of rpoS and the Type III Secretion exsCEBA Operon in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.; Lunin, V. V.; Skarina, T.; Savchenko, A.; Schurr, M. J.; Hoang, T. T.

    2009-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa PsrA autorepressor has dual roles as a repressor of the fadBA5{beta}-oxidation operon and an activator of the stationary-phase sigma factor rpoS and exsCEBA operon of the type III secretion system (TTSS). Previously, we demonstrated that the repression of the fadBA5 operon by PsrA is relieved by long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs). However, the signal affecting the activation of rpoS and exsC via PsrA is unknown. In this study, microarray and gene fusion data suggested that LCFA (e.g. oleate) affected the expression of rpoS and exsC. DNA binding studies confirmed that PsrA binds to the rpoS and exsC promoter regions. This binding was inhibited by LCFA, indicating that LCFA directly affects the activation of these two genes through PsrA. LCFA decreased rpoS and exsC expression, resulting in increased N-(butyryl)-l-homoserine-lactone quorum sensing signal and decreased ExoS/T production respectively. Based on the crystal structure of PsrA, site-directed mutagenesis of amino acid residues, within the hydrophobic channel thought to accommodate LCFA, created two LCFA-non-responsive PsrA mutants. The binding and activation of rpoS and exsC by these PsrA mutants was no longer inhibited by LCFA. These data support a mechanistic model where LCFAs influence PsrA regulation to control LCFA metabolism and some virulence genes in P. aeruginosa.

  9. Live recombinant Salmonella Typhi vaccines constructed to investigate the role of rpoS in eliciting immunity to a heterologous antigen.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huoying; Santander, Javier; Brenneman, Karen E; Wanda, Soo-Young; Wang, Shifeng; Senechal, Patti; Sun, Wei; Roland, Kenneth L; Curtiss, Roy

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesized that the immunogenicity of live Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi vaccines expressing heterologous antigens depends, at least in part, on its rpoS status. As part of our project to develop a recombinant attenuated S. Typhi vaccine (RASTyV) to prevent pneumococcal diseases in infants and children, we constructed three RASTyV strains synthesizing the Streptococcus pneumoniae surface protein PspA to test this hypothesis. Each vector strain carried ten engineered mutations designed to optimize safety and immunogenicity. Two S. Typhi vector strains (chi9639 and chi9640) were derived from the rpoS mutant strain Ty2 and one (chi9633) from the RpoS(+) strain ISP1820. In chi9640, the nonfunctional rpoS gene was replaced with the functional rpoS gene from ISP1820. Plasmid pYA4088, encoding a secreted form of PspA, was moved into the three vector strains. The resulting RASTyV strains were evaluated for safety in vitro and for immunogenicity in mice. All three RASTyV strains were similar to the live attenuated typhoid vaccine Ty21a in their ability to survive in human blood and human monocytes. They were more sensitive to complement and were less able to survive and persist in sewage and surface water than their wild-type counterparts. Adult mice intranasally immunized with any of the RASTyV strains developed immune responses against PspA and Salmonella antigens. The RpoS(+) vaccines induced a balanced Th1/Th2 immune response while the RpoS(-) strain chi9639(pYA4088) induced a strong Th2 immune response. Immunization with any RASTyV provided protection against S. pneumoniae challenge; the RpoS(+) strain chi9640(pYA4088) provided significantly greater protection than the ISP1820 derivative, chi9633(pYA4088). In the pre-clinical setting, these strains exhibited a desirable balance between safety and immunogenicity and are currently being evaluated in a Phase 1 clinical trial to determine which of the three RASTyVs has the optimal safety and immunogenicity profile

  10. Genes expressed by the biological control bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 on seed surfaces under the control of the global regulators GacA and RpoS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The GacA/Rsm signal transduction system and the stationary phase sigma factor RpoS have both been shown to affect secondary metabolite production and biological control in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 and related strains. Microarray analysis of Pf-5 grown on pea seed surfaces showed that 595 genes ar...

  11. Mutations in the rpoS gene are the major limiting factor for biofilm formation in Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 clinical isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Biofilm formation is a complex process that is highly regulated through a battery of transcriptional regulators, small regulatory RNAs, and environmental conditions. RpoS sigma factor along with MlrA protein directly regulate the expression of the curli key regulator CsgD. In most serot...

  12. Stress-induced mutation rates show a sigmoidal and saturable increase due to the RpoS sigma factor in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Maharjan, Ram; Ferenci, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Stress-induced mutagenesis was investigated in the absence of selection for growth fitness by using synthetic biology to control perceived environmental stress in Escherichia coli. We find that controlled intracellular RpoS dosage is central to a sigmoidal, saturable three- to fourfold increase in mutation rates and associated changes in DNA repair proteins. PMID:25213168

  13. Elementary Mathematics Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fennell, Francis; Kobett, Beth McCord; Wray, Jonathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Elementary school mathematics leaders often come to the realization that their position, however titled and determined, although dedicated to addressing needs in math teaching and learning, also entails and directly involves leadership. Elementary school math specialists/instructional leaders (referenced here as elementary mathematics leaders, or…

  14. The Resilient Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Elle

    2012-01-01

    School leaders currently face so many challenges--some as basic as a lack of money to hire enough teachers--that they know they need to increase their resilience. According to Allison, who coaches school leaders, strong leaders know how important maintaining resilience is. They recognize when their reserves of hope--and those of their…

  15. Simulating Underwater Leader Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culver, Lee

    2005-11-01

    Dielectric breakdown in water is always preceded by the growth of leaders. The structure and growth of these leaders have been previously simulated with fractals; however, present mathematical models are rife with undesired parameters. We eliminate many of these parameters with a physical model that describes a leader as a protonic mobility wave. Graphical-simulation results will be presented and compared with photographic data.

  16. How Leaders Really Emerge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guastello, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Comments on the article by R. J. Hackman and R. Wageman (see record 2006-23492-007) which offered several research questions that should be productive for furthering leadership research. This comment summarizes some recent progress on one of those questions, "Not what are the traits of leaders, but how do leaders' personal attributes interact with…

  17. Developing Successful Global Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Everyone seems to agree the world desperately needs strong leaders who can manage a global workforce and all the inherent challenges that go with it. That's a big part of the raison d'etre for global leadership development programs. But are today's organizations fully utilizing these programs to develop global leaders, and, if so, are they…

  18. Portrait of a Leader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzarella, Jo Ann; Grundy, Thomas

    Chapter 1 of a revised volume on school leadership, this chapter examines several kinds of leader characteristics: inherited traits and those springing from early childhood experience; attitudes toward relationships with other people; and qualities differentiating effective from ineffective leaders. Modern researchers tend to stress nurture over…

  19. How leaders really emerge.

    PubMed

    Guastello, Stephen J

    2007-09-01

    Comments on the article by R. J. Hackman and R. Wageman which offered several research questions that should be productive for furthering leadership research. This comment summarizes some recent progress on one of those questions, "Not what are the traits of leaders, but how do leaders' personal attributes interact with situational properties to shape outcomes?" PMID:17874908

  20. The Inspirational Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benigni, Mark D.; Hughes, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Amid the focus on improved standardized test scores, differentiated instruction, value-added initiatives and improved teacher evaluation, one must not ignore an education leader's need to inspire and be inspired. But how do education leaders inspire their students and teachers during some of the most difficult economic times the nation has ever…

  1. Leaders from Nursing's History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fondiller, Shirley H.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Looks at the lives and accomplishments of four leaders in professional nursing: (1) Loretta Ford, who championed the cause of nurse practitioners; (2) Mable Staupers, a pioneer in community health and nursing; (3) Janet Geister, a leader in private nursing; and (4) Isabel Stewart, who led the movement to standardize nursing education. (JOW)

  2. Mentoring Latino School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magdaleno, Kenneth R.

    2006-01-01

    With the increasing number of Latina and Latino students in California schools, the need was clear for a mentoring program that not only increased the growth rate, but also supported the retention rate of Latina and Latino school superintendents and educational leaders. Such leaders are most often perceived by Latina and Latino students as…

  3. Leader Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoehn, Lilburn P., Ed.

    This document describes the Leader Training Program (LTP) component of the Teaching Behavior Improvement Program (TBIP). The LTP was funded under ESEA Title III and was designed to train school-based inservice leaders to implement the TBIP in their districts. The document suggests possible grouping of participants, materials, equipment, physical…

  4. Preparing Instructional Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, David; Lewis, Joe'l

    2011-01-01

    This publication is a "collection" of three separate manuscripts: (1) "A Paradigm Shift in Preparing Instructional Leaders" (published in December 2010); (2) "Transitions" (an introduction to the "Revisited manuscript"); and (3) "A Paradigm Shift in Preparing Instructional Leaders Revisited" (published in June 2011). The 2010 manuscript describes…

  5. Hfq binding changes the structure of Escherichia coli small noncoding RNAs OxyS and RprA, which are involved in the riboregulation of rpoS.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Charlotte A; Vincent, Helen A; Casamento, Alessandra; Stone, Carlanne M; Phillips, Jack O; Cary, Peter D; Sobott, Frank; Gowers, Darren M; Taylor, James E; Callaghan, Anastasia J

    2013-08-01

    OxyS and RprA are two small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) that modulate the expression of rpoS, encoding an alternative sigma factor that activates transcription of multiple Escherichia coli stress-response genes. While RprA activates rpoS for translation, OxyS down-regulates the transcript. Crucially, the RNA binding protein Hfq is required for both sRNAs to function, although the specific role played by Hfq remains unclear. We have investigated RprA and OxyS interactions with Hfq using biochemical and biophysical approaches. In particular, we have obtained the molecular envelopes of the Hfq-sRNA complexes using small-angle scattering methods, which reveal key molecular details. These data indicate that Hfq does not substantially change shape upon complex formation, whereas the sRNAs do. We link the impact of Hfq binding, and the sRNA structural changes induced, to transcript stability with respect to RNase E degradation. In light of these findings, we discuss the role of Hfq in the opposing regulatory functions played by RprA and OxyS in rpoS regulation. PMID:23804244

  6. Successful Transformational Radiology Leaders.

    PubMed

    Douget, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Transformational radiology leaders elevate subordinates, expand self-awareness, develop lasting relationships, strive to exceed expectations, and uphold the vision and goals of the organization. In order for radiology leaders to become more transformational in their leadership style there are four fundamental elements they must learn: idealized influence, individualized consideration, inspirational motivation, and intellectual stimulation. Leaders can utilize personality and self-assessments to learn more about themselves, identify areas of strengths and weaknesses, and learn to be more effective when leading employees. PMID:26710553

  7. mRNA imprinting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Following its synthesis in the nucleus, mRNA undergoes various stages that are critical for the proper synthesis, localization and possibly functionality of its encoded protein. Recently, we have shown that two RNA polymerase II (Pol II) subunits, Rpb4p and Rpb7p, associate with the nascent transcript co-transcriptionally. This “mRNA imprinting” lasts throughout the mRNA lifetime and is required for proper regulation of all major stages that the mRNA undergoes. Other possible cases of co-transcriptional imprinting are discussed. Since mRNAs can be transported from the synthesizing cell to other cells, we propose that mRNA imprinting can also affect the phenotype of the recipient cells. This can be viewed as “mRNA-based epigenetics.” PMID:21686103

  8. Tips for smart leaders.

    PubMed

    Moore, Alison

    2016-05-18

    Are you working for a transformational leader? The sort of person the NHS desperately needs who will enthuse and inspire all around them with 100 ideas a minute and boundless energy? Yes? Exhausting isn't it? PMID:27191454

  9. The Outdoor Leader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loewen, Lily

    1989-01-01

    Discusses some characteristics and skills of the effective outdoor leader: confidence, feeling "at home" in the outdoors, continuing awareness of and curiosity about the outdoors, good communication skills, creative thinking, and team-building abilities. (SV)

  10. Biosynthesis of the antifungal haterumalide, oocydin A, in Serratia, and its regulation by quorum sensing, RpoS and Hfq.

    PubMed

    Matilla, Miguel A; Leeper, Finian J; Salmond, George P C

    2015-08-01

    Polyketides represent an important class of bioactive natural products with a broad range of biological activities. We identified recently a large trans-acyltransferase (AT) polyketide synthase gene cluster responsible for the biosynthesis of the antifungal, anti-oomycete and antitumor haterumalide, oocydin A (ooc). Using genome sequencing and comparative genomics, we show that the ooc gene cluster is widespread within biocontrol and phytopathogenic strains of the enterobacteria, Serratia and Dickeya. The analysis of in frame deletion mutants confirmed the role of a hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase cassette, three flavin-dependent tailoring enzymes, a free-standing acyl carrier protein and two hypothetical proteins in oocydin A biosynthesis. The requirement of the three trans-acting AT domains for the biosynthesis of the macrolide was also demonstrated. Expression of the ooc gene cluster was shown to be positively regulated by an N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing system, but operating in a strain-dependent manner. At a post-transcriptional level, the RNA chaperone, Hfq, plays a key role in oocydin A biosynthesis. The Hfq-dependent regulation is partially mediated by the stationary phase sigma factor, RpoS, which was also shown to positively regulate the synthesis of the macrolide. Our results reveal differential regulation of the divergently transcribed ooc transcriptional units, highlighting the complexity of oocydin A production. PMID:25753587

  11. Biosynthesis of the antifungal haterumalide, oocydin A, in Serratia, and its regulation by quorum sensing, RpoS and Hfq

    PubMed Central

    Matilla, Miguel A; Leeper, Finian J; Salmond, George P C

    2015-01-01

    Polyketides represent an important class of bioactive natural products with a broad range of biological activities. We identified recently a large trans-acyltransferase (AT) polyketide synthase gene cluster responsible for the biosynthesis of the antifungal, anti-oomycete and antitumor haterumalide, oocydin A (ooc). Using genome sequencing and comparative genomics, we show that the ooc gene cluster is widespread within biocontrol and phytopathogenic strains of the enterobacteria, Serratia and Dickeya. The analysis of in frame deletion mutants confirmed the role of a hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase cassette, three flavin-dependent tailoring enzymes, a free-standing acyl carrier protein and two hypothetical proteins in oocydin A biosynthesis. The requirement of the three trans-acting AT domains for the biosynthesis of the macrolide was also demonstrated. Expression of the ooc gene cluster was shown to be positively regulated by an N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing system, but operating in a strain-dependent manner. At a post-transcriptional level, the RNA chaperone, Hfq, plays a key role in oocydin A biosynthesis. The Hfq-dependent regulation is partially mediated by the stationary phase sigma factor, RpoS, which was also shown to positively regulate the synthesis of the macrolide. Our results reveal differential regulation of the divergently transcribed ooc transcriptional units, highlighting the complexity of oocydin A production. PMID:25753587

  12. Exploring Leader Identity and Development.

    PubMed

    Priest, Kerry L; Middleton, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Taking on a leader identity can be a motivating force for pursuing leader development. This chapter explores the reciprocal and recursive nature of identity development and leader development, emphasizing how shifting views of self influence one's motivation to develop as a leader. PMID:26895262

  13. Human insulin-like growth factor II leader 2 mediates internal initiation of translation.

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Susanne K; Christiansen, Jan; Hansen, Thomas v O; Larsen, Martin R; Nielsen, Finn C

    2002-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is a fetal growth factor, which belongs to the family of insulin-like peptides. During fetal life, the IGF-II gene generates three mRNAs with different 5' untranslated regions (UTRs), but identical coding regions and 3' UTRs. We have shown previously that IGF-II leader 3 mRNA translation is regulated by a rapamycin-sensitive pathway, whereas leader 4 mRNA is constitutively translated, but so far the significance of leader 2 mRNA has been unclear. Here, we show that leader 2 mRNA is translated efficiently in an eIF4E-independent manner. In a bicistronic vector system, the 411 nt leader 2 was capable of internal initiation via a phylogenetically conserved internal ribosome entry site (IRES), located in the 3' half of the leader. The IRES is composed of an approx. 120 nt ribosome recruitment element, followed by an 80 nt spacer region, which is scanned by the ribosomal pre-initiation complex. Since cap-dependent translation is down-regulated during cell division, leader 2 might facilitate a continuous IGF-II production in rapidly dividing cells during development. PMID:11903044

  14. Leaders for Change 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Aid to Education, New York, NY.

    The Leaders for Change Award was established in 1994 to recognize and honor outstanding, long-term corporate commitment to education reform, from preschool through graduate school. A profile of the co-winners of the 1997 award--Chase Manhattan Bank's "Chase Active Learning Program (CAL)" and United Technologies Corporation's "Connecticut…

  15. Preparing School Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lashway, Larry

    1999-01-01

    This issue reviews five publications that provide a sampling of current perspectives on the preparation of school leaders. Joseph Murphy's "Preparation for the School Principalship: The United States' Story" traces the history of leadership preparation programs in the United States from the 19th century to the present. David L. Clark's "Searching…

  16. Outdoorsman, Leaders Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Agriculture, Edmonton.

    Intended as an activities and resource guide for the Outdoorsman Project, this leader's guide supports the project's objectives of providing opportunities for each 4-H member to experience practical and real situations in the outdoors, instilling an appreciation of the environment in the participants, and encouraging environmental awareness. The…

  17. IN SEARCH OF LEADERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SMITH, G. KERRY, ED.; AND OTHERS

    THE ROLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE NATION'S SEARCH FOR LEADERS IS EXAMINED IN THIS SERIES OF 52 PAPERS, WHICH DEAL WITH LEADERSHIP BOTH IN AND OUT OF THE EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION. TOPICS ARE GROUPED IN SEVEN UNITS--(1) THE QUEST FOR MORALITY, (2) ENLARGED RESPONSIBILITY, (3) APPROACHES TO LEADERSHIP, (4) BROADER VISIONS OF LEADERSHIP, (5) STUDENT…

  18. Empowering Leaders & Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umphrey, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Trevor Greene, the 2013 MetLife/NASSP National High School Principal of the Year, empowers staff members and students to be the best teachers and learners they can be and provides the community resources to support them. In this article, Greene, principal of Toppenish High School in Washington, shares his biggest motivator as a school leader and…

  19. Salesperson, Catalyst, Manager, Leader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worth, Michael J.; Asp, James W., II

    1996-01-01

    This article examines four roles of the college or university development officer: salesperson (when direct solicitation is seen as the officer's primary role); catalyst (or sales manager, adviser, expert, facilitator); manager (stressing the importance of the overall office functioning); and leader (who exerts a leadership role in the…

  20. So Few Women Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominici, Francesca; Fried, Linda P.; Zeger, Scott L.

    2009-01-01

    The authors present sobering findings of a study about women and leadership in higher education. The findings of the authors' study are based on the experiences of a small group of women faculty at Johns Hopkins University. The study found that, despite good intentions and occasional interventions by leaders in higher education, women are still …

  1. Cultivating Leaders from Within

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdette, Maggie; Schertzer, Kristen

    2005-01-01

    A major problem faced by school districts in the US is the paucity of applicants for the posts of school principals. A solution adopted by The Capistrano Unified School District (CUSD) in Orange County California was the cultivation of good leaders from within the district through the Teaching Assistant Principal (TAP) program.

  2. The Intelligence of Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Howard

    1998-01-01

    Leaders possess certain intelligences. They are linguistically gifted; they can tell good stories and usually can write well. They have strong interpersonal skills, have a good intrapersonal sense of their abilities, and can help others address existential questions and feel engaged in meaningful quests. However, intelligence is no guarantor of…

  3. Today's Students, Tomorrow's Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2008-01-01

    According to Warren Bennis, professor at the University of Southern California's Marshall School of Business and a recognized authority on organizational development, leadership and change, becoming a leader is synonymous with becoming oneself. It is precisely that simple, and it is also that difficult. In career and technical student…

  4. World-Class Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2012-01-01

    Future leaders' creativity and problem-solving skills have been honed in leadership courses, but that doesn't mean they are ready to use those skills to further a company's place in the world. With emerging markets in Asia, South America, and other areas of the world, a workforce needs to have an understanding of and interest in cultures beyond…

  5. Principals as Instructional Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Ed

    2012-01-01

    At some level, principals always have been instructional leaders--but never before has their role been more prominent. First, the accountability movement--No Child Left Behind (NCLB) in particular--thrust principals into the spotlight on academic achievement. Then budget cuts peeled away capacity at both the district and school levels, thinning…

  6. Leaders Group Faces Shortcomings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    The Education Leaders Council (ELC), founded by dissident state policymakers nearly a decade ago to push a conservative agenda and now the recipient of millions in federal dollars, is trying to resolve questions about its management. Members of the board of directors have voiced concerns in recent months to Chief Executive Officer Lisa Graham…

  7. Developing Strategic Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Patricia; Terwilliger, Leatha; Alfred, Richard L.; Hartleb, David; Simone, Beverly

    2002-01-01

    Highlights the importance of developing community college leaders capable of demonstrating strategic leadership and responding to the global forces that influence community college education. Discusses the Consortium for Community College Development's Strategic Leadership Forum and its principles, format, content, and early results. (RC)

  8. Preparing Teacher Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felton, Mathew D.; Page, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Findings from an extensive four-year program with a single cohort of elementary and early middle school mathematics instructors highlight several important themes that can inform other efforts in developing teacher leaders. The authors describe the Arizona Master Teachers of Mathematics (AZ-MTM) program as an example that supports the development…

  9. Senior Leader Career Management: Implications for Senior Leaders and Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Jean

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative research study across three large consumer products organizations explored career management of senior leaders to gain an understanding of what is important to senior leaders in their careers and what strategies they are using for career management. It also investigated senior leaders' expectations of organizations for career…

  10. Can Teachers Really Be Leaders?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Ann

    2011-01-01

    This is a wonderfully provocative question that might be answered simply: Yes, teachers can be leaders! Much more complicated and interesting, though, are the specifics of how teachers become leaders and the different ways teachers lead. Before considering how teachers become leaders, there is a need to understand the context within which teachers…

  11. Leaders and Leadership in Academe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vroom, Victor H.

    1983-01-01

    Four contingency theories of leadership are explored and contrasted. Predictions of leader types and leader behaviors that would follow from each are counterposed. External functions of the leader and interactions with organizational members who are not subordinates are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  12. Christian School Leaders and Spirituality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banke, Susan; Maldonado, Nancy; Lacey, Candace H.

    2012-01-01

    This phenomenological study examined the spiritual experiences of Christian school leaders who are the spiritual leaders of their schools. A purposeful, nominated sample of 12 Christian school leaders was selected. In-depth, open-ended interviews were conducted, audio taped, and then transcribed verbatim. Data analysis was based on Rudestam and…

  13. Developing Efficacy in School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abusham, Jaymi

    2010-01-01

    Many new school leaders will be needed in the coming years, and the demands placed upon them are increasingly complex. Research has shown that leaders need a strong sense of self-efficacy in order to succeed. This study examined the relationship between the leadership readiness beliefs of prospective school leaders and the efficacy-building…

  14. Correlation between biofilm production, antibiotic susceptibility and exopolysaccharide composition in Burkholderia pseudomallei bpsI, ppk, and rpoS mutant strains.

    PubMed

    Mongkolrob, Rungrawee; Taweechaisupapong, Suwimol; Tungpradabkul, Sumalee

    2015-11-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the cause of melioidosis, a fatal tropical infectious disease, which has been reported to have a high rate of recurrence, even when an intensive dose of antibiotics is used. Biofilm formation is believed to be one of the possible causes of relapse because of its ability to increase drug resistance. EPS in biofilms have been reported to be related to the limitation of antibiotic penetration in B. pseudomallei. However, the mechanisms by which biofilms restrict the diffusion of antibiotics remain unclear. The present study presents a correlation between exopolysaccharide production in biofilm matrix and antibiotic resistance in B. pseudomallei using bpsI, ppk, and rpoS mutant strains. CLSM revealed a reduction in exopolysaccharide production and disabled micro-colony formation in B. pseudomallei mutants, which paralleled the antibiotic resistance. Different ratios of carbohydrate contents in the exopolysaccharides of the mutants were detected, although they have the same components, including glucose, galactose, mannose, and rhamnose, with the exception being that no detectable rhamnose peak was observed in the bpsI mutant. These results indicate that the correlation between these phenomena in the B. pseudomallei biofilm at least results from the exopolysaccharide, which may be under the regulation of bpsI, ppk, or rpoS genes. PMID:26486518

  15. RpoS Is Not Central to the General Stress Response in Borrelia burgdorferi but Does Control Expression of One or More Essential Virulence Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Caimano, Melissa J.; Eggers, Christian H.; Hazlett, Karsten R. O.; Radolf, Justin D.

    2004-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease spirochete, undergoes dramatic changes in antigenic composition as it cycles between its arthropod and mammalian hosts. A growing body of evidence suggests that these changes reflect, at least in part, the need for spirochetes to adapt to the physiological stresses imposed by abrupt changes in environmental conditions and nutrient availability. In many microorganisms, global responses are mediated by master regulators such as alternative sigma factors, with Escherichia coli RpoS (σS) serving as a prototype. The importance of this transcriptional activator in other bacteria, coupled with the report by Hübner et al. (A. Hübner, X. Yang, D. M. Nolen, T. G. Popova, F. C. Cabello, and M. V. Norgard, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98:12724-12729, 2001) demonstrating that the borrelial RpoS ortholog controls expression of OspC and decorin-binding protein A (DbpA), prompted us to examine more closely the roles of RpoS-dependent and -independent differential gene expression in physiological adaptation by the Lyme disease spirochete. We observed that B. burgdorferi rpoS (rpoSBb) was induced following temperature shift and transcript levels were further enhanced by reduced pH (pH 6.8). Using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), we demonstrated that, in contrast to its ortholog (rpoSEc) in Escherichia coli, rpoSBb was expressed at significant levels in B. burgdorferi throughout all phases of growth following temperature shift. By comparing a B. burgdorferi strain 297 rpoSBb mutant to its wild-type counterpart, we determined that RpoSBb was not required for survival following exposure to a wide range of environmental stresses (i.e., temperature shift, serum starvation, increased osmolality, reactive oxygen intermediates, and increased or reduced oxygen tension), although the mutant was more sensitive to extremes of pH. While B. burgdorferi strains lacking RpoS were able to survive within intraperitoneal dialysis

  16. What makes a leader?

    PubMed

    Goleman, D

    1999-01-01

    Superb leaders have very different ways of directing a team, a division, or a company. Some are subdued and analytical; others are charismatic and go with their gut. And different of situations call for different types of leadership. Most mergers need a sensitive negotiator at the helm whereas many turnarounds require a more forceful kind of authority. Psychologist and noted author Daniel Goleman has found, however, that effective leaders are alike in one crucial way: they all have a high degree of what has come to be known as emotional intelligence. In fact, Goleman's research at nearly 200 large, global companies revealed that emotional intelligence--especially at the highest levels of a company--is the sine qua non for leadership. Without it, a person can have first-class training, an incisive mind, and an endless supply of good ideas, but he still won't make a great leader. The components of emotional intelligence--self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skill--can sound unbusinesslike. But exhibiting emotional intelligence at the workplace does not mean simply controlling your anger or getting along with people. Rather it means understanding your own and other people's emotional makeup well enough to move people in the direction of accomplishing your company's goals. In this article, the author discusses each component of emotional intelligence and shows through examples how to recognize it in potential leaders, how and why it leads to measurable business results, and how it can be learned. It takes time and, most of all, commitment. But the benefits that come from having a well-developed emotional intelligence, both for the individual and the organization, make it worth the effort. PMID:10557873

  17. What makes a leader?

    PubMed

    Goleman, D

    1998-01-01

    Superb leaders have very different ways of directing a team, a division, or a company. Some are subdued and analytical; others are charismatic and go with their gut. And different situations call for different types of leadership. Most mergers need a sensitive negotiator at the helm, whereas many turnarounds require a more forceful kind of authority. Psychologist and noted author Daniel Goleman has found, however, that effective leaders are alike in one crucial way: they all have a high degree of what has come to be known as emotional intelligence. In fact, Goleman's research at nearly 200 large, global companies revealed that emotional intelligence--especially at the highest levels of a company--is the sine qua non for leadership. Without it, a person can have first-class training, an incisive mind, and an endless supply of good ideas, but he still won't make a great leader. The components of emotional intelligence--self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skill--can sound unbusinesslike. But exhibiting emotional intelligence at the workplace does not mean simply controlling your anger or getting along with people. Rather, it means understanding your own and other people's emotional makeup well enough to move people in the direction of accomplishing your company's goals. In this article, the author discusses each component of emotional intelligence and shows through examples how to recognize it in potential leaders, how and why it leads to measurable business results, and how it can be learned. It takes time and, most of all, commitment. But the benefits that come from having a well-developed emotional intelligence, both for the individual and the organization, make it worth the effort. PMID:10187249

  18. The wise leader.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Ikujiro; Takeuchi, Hirotaka

    2011-05-01

    In an era of increasing discontinuity, wise leadership has nearly vanished. Many leaders find it difficult to reinvent their corporations rapidly enough to cope with new technologies, demographic shifts, and consumption trends. They can't develop truly global organizations that operate effortlessly across borders. And they find it tough to ensure that their people adhere to values and ethics. The authors assert that leaders must acquire practical wisdom, or what Aristotle called phronesis: experiential knowledge that enables people to make ethically sound judgments. Wise leaders demonstrate six abilities: (i) They make decisions on the basis of what is good for the organization and for society. (2) They quickly grasp the essence of a situation and fathom the nature and meaning of people, things, and events. (3) They provide contexts in which executives and employees can interact to create new meaning. (4) They employ metaphors and stories to convert their experience into tacit knowledge that others can use. (5) They exert political power to bring people together and spur them to act. (6) They use apprenticeship and mentoring to cultivate practical wisdom in orders. PMID:21548419

  19. Alternate Sigma Factor RpoS Is Required for the In Vivo-Specific Repression of Borrelia burgdorferi Plasmid lp54-Borne ospA and lp6.6 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Caimano, Melissa J.; Eggers, Christian H.; Gonzalez, Cynthia A.; Radolf, Justin D.

    2005-01-01

    While numerous positively regulated loci have been characterized during the enzootic cycle of Borrelia burgdorferi, very little is known about the mechanism(s) involved in the repression of borrelial loci either during tick feeding or within the mammalian host. Here, we report that the alternative sigma factor RpoS is required for the in vivo-specific repression of at least two RpoD-dependent B. burgdorferi loci, ospA and lp6.6. The downregulation of ospA and Ip6.6 appears to require either a repressor molecule whose expression is RpoS dependent or an accessory factor which enables RpoS to directly interact with the ospA and Ip6.6 promoter elements, thereby blocking transcription by RpoD. The central role for RpoS during the earliest stages of host adaptation suggests that tick feeding imparts signals to spirochetes that trigger the RpoS-dependent repression, as well as expression, of in vivo-specific virulence factors critical for the tick-to-mammalian host transition. PMID:16267308

  20. Effect of Global Regulators RpoS and Cyclic-AMP/CRP on the Catabolome and Transcriptome of Escherichia coli K12 during Carbon- and Energy-Limited Growth.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Alessandro G; Ihssen, Julian; Egli, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    For heterotrophic microbes, limited availability of carbon and energy sources is one of the major nutritional factors restricting the rate of growth in most ecosystems. Physiological adaptation to this hunger state requires metabolic versatility which usually involves expression of a wide range of different catabolic pathways and of high-affinity carbon transporters; together, this allows for simultaneous utilization of mixtures of carbonaceous compounds at low concentrations. In Escherichia coli the stationary phase sigma factor RpoS and the signal molecule cAMP are the major players in the regulation of transcription under such conditions; however, their interaction is still not fully understood. Therefore, during growth of E. coli in carbon-limited chemostat culture at different dilution rates, the transcriptomes, expression of periplasmic proteins and catabolomes of strains lacking one of these global regulators, either rpoS or adenylate cyclase (cya), were compared to those of the wild-type strain. The inability to synthesize cAMP exerted a strong negative influence on the expression of alternative carbon source uptake and degradation systems. In contrast, absence of RpoS increased the transcription of genes belonging to high-affinity uptake systems and central metabolism, presumably due to reduced competition of σ(D) with σ(S). Phenotypical analysis confirmed this observation: The ability to respire alternative carbon substrates and to express periplasmic high-affinity binding proteins was eliminated in cya and crp mutants, while these properties were not affected in the rpoS mutant. As expected, transcription of numerous stress defence genes was negatively affected by the rpoS knock-out mutation. Interestingly, several genes of the RpoS stress response regulon were also down-regulated in the cAMP-negative strain indicating a coordinated global regulation. The results demonstrate that cAMP is crucial for catabolic flexibility during slow, carbon

  1. Effect of Global Regulators RpoS and Cyclic-AMP/CRP on the Catabolome and Transcriptome of Escherichia coli K12 during Carbon- and Energy-Limited Growth

    PubMed Central

    Egli, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    For heterotrophic microbes, limited availability of carbon and energy sources is one of the major nutritional factors restricting the rate of growth in most ecosystems. Physiological adaptation to this hunger state requires metabolic versatility which usually involves expression of a wide range of different catabolic pathways and of high-affinity carbon transporters; together, this allows for simultaneous utilization of mixtures of carbonaceous compounds at low concentrations. In Escherichia coli the stationary phase sigma factor RpoS and the signal molecule cAMP are the major players in the regulation of transcription under such conditions; however, their interaction is still not fully understood. Therefore, during growth of E. coli in carbon-limited chemostat culture at different dilution rates, the transcriptomes, expression of periplasmic proteins and catabolomes of strains lacking one of these global regulators, either rpoS or adenylate cyclase (cya), were compared to those of the wild-type strain. The inability to synthesize cAMP exerted a strong negative influence on the expression of alternative carbon source uptake and degradation systems. In contrast, absence of RpoS increased the transcription of genes belonging to high-affinity uptake systems and central metabolism, presumably due to reduced competition of σD with σS. Phenotypical analysis confirmed this observation: The ability to respire alternative carbon substrates and to express periplasmic high-affinity binding proteins was eliminated in cya and crp mutants, while these properties were not affected in the rpoS mutant. As expected, transcription of numerous stress defence genes was negatively affected by the rpoS knock-out mutation. Interestingly, several genes of the RpoS stress response regulon were also down-regulated in the cAMP-negative strain indicating a coordinated global regulation. The results demonstrate that cAMP is crucial for catabolic flexibility during slow, carbon-limited growth

  2. How successful leaders think.

    PubMed

    Martin, Roger

    2007-06-01

    In search of lessons to apply in our own careers, we often try to emulate what effective leaders do. Roger Martin says this focus is misplaced, because moves that work in one context may make little sense in another. A more productive, though more difficult, approach is to look at how such leaders think. After extensive interviews with more than 50 of them, the author discovered that most are integrative thinkers -that is, they can hold in their heads two opposing ideas at once and then come up with a new idea that contains elements of each but is superior to both. Martin argues that this process of consideration and synthesis (rather than superior strategy or faultless execution) is the hallmark of exceptional businesses and the people who run them. To support his point, he examines how integrative thinkers approach the four stages of decision making to craft superior solutions. First, when determining which features of a problem are salient, they go beyond those that are obviously relevant. Second, they consider multidirectional and nonlinear relationships, not just linear ones. Third, they see the whole problem and how the parts fit together. Fourth, they creatively resolve the tensions between opposing ideas and generate new alternatives. According to the author, integrative thinking is an ability everyone can hone. He points to several examples of business leaders who have done so, such as Bob Young, cofounder and former CEO of Red Hat, the dominant distributor of Linux opensource software. Young recognized from the beginning that he didn't have to choose between the two prevailing software business models. Inspired by both, he forged an innovative third way, creating a service offering for corporate customers that placed Red Hat on a path to tremendous success. PMID:17580648

  3. Biosynthesis of adenovirus type 2 i-leader protein.

    PubMed Central

    Symington, J S; Lucher, L A; Brackmann, K H; Virtanen, A; Pettersson, U; Green, M

    1986-01-01

    The i-leader is a 440-base-pair sequence located between 21.8 and 23.0 map units on the adenovirus type 2 genome and is spliced between the second and third segments of the major tripartite leader in certain viral mRNA molecules. The i-leader contains an open translational reading frame for a hypothetical protein of Mr about 16,600, and a 16,000-Mr polypeptide (16K protein) has been translated in vitro on mRNA selected with DNA containing the i-leader (A. Virtanen, P. Aleström, H. Persson, M. G. Katze, and U. Pettersson, Nucleic Acids Res. 10:2539-2548, 1982). To determine whether the i-leader protein is synthesized during productive infection and to provide an immunological reagent to study the properties and functions of the i-leader protein, we prepared antipeptide antibodies directed to a 16-amino acid synthetic peptide which is encoded near the N terminus of the hypothetical i-leader protein and contains a high acidic amino acid and proline content. Antipeptide antibodies immunoprecipitated from extracts of adenovirus type 2-infected cells a major 16K protein that comigrated with a 16K protein translated in vitro. Partial N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis by Edman degradation of radiolabeled 16K antigen showed that methionine is present at residue 1 and leucine is present at residues 8 and 10, as predicted from the DNA sequence, establishing that the 16K protein precipitated by this antibody is indeed the i-leader protein. Thus, the i-leader protein is a prominent species that is synthesized during productive infection. The i-leader protein is often seen as a doublet on polyacrylamide gels, suggesting that either two related forms of i-leader protein are synthesized in infected cells or that a posttranslational modification occurs. Time course studies using immunoprecipitation analysis with antipeptide antibodies revealed that the E1A 289R T antigen and the E1B-19K (175R) T antigen are synthesized beginning at 2 to 3 and 4 to 5 h postinfection

  4. On leadership and leaders.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Mary Jo

    2012-01-01

    Leadership is the vital ingredient to achieving organizational excellence and outstanding healthcare systems. There is so much to be celebrated when reflecting on the evolution of healthcare leadership over the past 50 years. However, in 50 years, we have created silos of care, of funding and of social policy that have undermined our progress in improving the care process, shifting away from health and toward healthcare, and we have lost the opportunity to promote streamlined care through the continuum of health needs. Exemplary healthcare leaders of tomorrow will need sophisticated business skills, balanced with the capacity to inspire innovation, in order to manage an ever-growing complex environment. PMID:23107908

  5. Borrelia burgdorferi Requires the Alternative Sigma Factor RpoS for Dissemination within the Vector during Tick-to-Mammal Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Dunham-Ems, Star M.; Caimano, Melissa J.; Eggers, Christian H.; Radolf, Justin D.

    2012-01-01

    While the roles of rpoSBb and RpoS-dependent genes have been studied extensively within the mammal, the contribution of the RpoS regulon to the tick-phase of the Borrelia burgdorferi enzootic cycle has not been examined. Herein, we demonstrate that RpoS-dependent gene expression is prerequisite for the transmission of spirochetes by feeding nymphs. RpoS-deficient organisms are confined to the midgut lumen where they transform into an unusual morphotype (round bodies) during the later stages of the blood meal. We show that round body formation is rapidly reversible, and in vitro appears to be attributable, in part, to reduced levels of Coenzyme A disulfide reductase, which among other functions, provides NAD+ for glycolysis. Our data suggest that spirochetes default to an RpoS-independent program for round body formation upon sensing that the energetics for transmission are unfavorable. PMID:22359504

  6. Online Leader Training Course: Nebraska Equine Extension Leader Certification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottle, Lena; D'Angelo, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    The Nebraska Equine Advancement Level Leader Certification Program is an online learning tool that clarifies principles of the Nebraska 4-H Equine Advancement Programs. Through an online Moodle course through eXtension.org, 4-H leaders and Extension educators are able to fulfill the certification requirement from any location before allowing youth…

  7. Coaching the toxic leader.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Manfred F R Kets

    2014-04-01

    In his work as an executive coach, psychotherapist Kets de Vries sometimes comes across bosses with mental demons. The four kinds he encounters most frequently are pathological narcissists, who are selfish and entitled, have grandiose fantasies, and pursue power at all costs; manic-depressives, who can leave a trail of emotional blazes behind them; passive-aggressives, who shy away from confrontation but are obstructive and under-handed; and the emotionally disconnected--literal-minded people who cannot describe or even recognize their feelings. Left unchecked, these personalities can warp the interactions, plans, and systems of entire organizations. But with appropriate coaching, toxic bosses can learn to manage their conditions and become effective mentors and leaders. This article describes how to recognize each pathology and, step by step, guide people who suffer from it toward healthier and more-productive interactions. PMID:24830286

  8. Leading Your Leaders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Wayne N.

    2008-01-01

    Even though working on a problem has been your primary effort for the past year, your leadership may have heard about this once in a briefing a decade ago. Now they are basically clueless. Pretend that you are talking to your daughter's fifth-grade class. Explain how your complicated gizmo works. If possible, do not use acronyms. Define your terms. Put your work in context. Assume your leader has no idea what you do, who you work for, or what your gizmo does. That is a good place to start. Remember, taking the next century to study the problem or spending the Gross National Product to invent a new solution are probably not going to be acceptable solutions. Real engineers and technicians build real hardware that works in the real world in a reasonable manner within a reasonable time at a reasonable cost. True, skimping on time or money can cause mistakes, but folks whose gizmos are delayed unreasonably or cost more than is practical get their programs canceled, force the business into bankruptcy, or give the market over to the competition. Real engineers and technicians always consider cost and schedule in their work. Raising questions is important. However, we are in the business of doing things. Engineers and technicians are paid to get things done. Yes, you have to identify the problem, frame the design, identify the tests, perform the analysis, and assemble the hardware. But the goal is to solve the problem. Nobody ever said flying in space was easy. We make it look easy the same way that an Olympic champion makes her sport look easy: by working hard at improving performance every day. Better are the results of a well-defined test. Remember that a test on a laboratory bench is always an approximation of reality, and rules similar to those for good analysis also apply. One should always be mindful of Mechelay's rule: "It is better to be stupid than to run a stupid test." Often we try to overtest. If a piece of hardware passes an unbelievably difficult test, then

  9. Team Leader System description

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, B.J.; Lundeen, T.F.; Moon, B.D.

    1996-10-01

    Purpose of the project is to design, develop, and demonstrate an advanced, prototype computer system to support on-site inspections. The system is a highly portable field computer with on-line access to facilities information, real-time communications, positioning information, and an electronic notebook for data capture. The Team Leader System provides an inspection team with a suite of advanced communication, data gathering, and data analysis tools and can be implemented on many PC-based hardware platforms. The suitcase unit is a transportable system for on-site support in a vehicle or at a stationary location at an inspection site; the personal unit is a wearable computer for in-facility or on-foot inspections.

  10. The uncompromising leader.

    PubMed

    Eisenstat, Russell A; Beer, Michael; Foote, Nathaniel; Fredberg, Tobias; Norrgren, Flemming

    2008-01-01

    Managing the tension between performance and people is at the heart of the CEO's job. But CEOs under fierce pressure from capital markets often focus solely on the shareholder, which can lead to employee disenchantment. Others put so much stock in their firms' heritage that they don't notice as their organizations slide into complacency. Some leaders, though, manage to avoid those traps and create high-commitment, high-performance (HCHP) companies. The authors' in-depth research of HCHP CEOs reveals several shared traits: These CEOs earn the trust of their organizations through their openness to the unvarnished truth. They are deeply engaged with their people, and their exchanges are direct and personal. They mobilize employees around a focused agenda, concentrating on only one or two initiatives. And they work to build collective leadership capabilities. These leaders also forge an emotionally resonant shared purpose across their companies. That consists of a three-part promise: The company will help employees build a better world and deliver performance they can be proud of, and will provide an environment in which they can grow. HCHP CEOs approach finding a firm's moral and strategic center in a competitive market as a calling, not an engineering problem. They drive their firms to be strongly market focused while at the same time reinforcing their firms' core values. They are committed to short-term performance while also investing in long-term leadership and organizational capabilities. By refusing to compromise on any of these terms, they build great companies. PMID:18681297

  11. Ten Roles for Teacher Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Cindy; Killion, Joellen

    2007-01-01

    Teacher leaders assume a wide range of roles to support school and student success. Harrison and Killion describe 10 roles that teacher leaders can fulfill in their schools. As resource providers, they provide materials to help their colleagues. Instructional specialists help colleagues with instructional strategies, and curriculum specialists…

  12. Master Leaders Produce Master Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeley, Mary Ellen; Scricca, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Two district leaders developed a set of processes for their district's principals, assistant principals, and curriculum directors. The professional development model they created included summer workshops, monthly seminars, observations, and workshops on effective hiring. The results affirmed that developing effective educational leaders is a…

  13. From the Field: Learning Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weigel, Kathleen; Jones, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Leadership is essential to successful schools. One of the ways to support effective school leadership is to share ideas and best practices to address the common challenges faced by school leaders. This question and response format addresses common challenges and questions from practicing school leaders in the manner that a mentor might respond to…

  14. Future Leaders: The Way Forward?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earley, Peter; Weindling, Dick; Bubb, Sara; Glenn, Meli

    2009-01-01

    The recruitment and retention of senior school leaders is high on the UK Government's agenda with much attention currently being given to succession planning. Future Leaders and other fast track leadership development programmes are, in part, a response to this "crisis" brought about by demographic change--many headteachers are due to retire in…

  15. Subordinates' Reactions to Female Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsyth, Donelson R.; Forsyth, Nancy M.

    Although recent reviews of the effectiveness of male versus female leaders reveal little evidence of male superiority, evaluative and perceptual biases (beliefs about what constitutes good leadership, and stereotyped beliefs about men and women) among group members persist. To examine attributional biases against female leaders, 85 college…

  16. Context Matters: Support for Leader Developmental Readiness.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Sara E; Reichard, Rebecca J

    2016-01-01

    Leader developers need to consider support for leader developmental readiness by examining organizational culture, job design and rewards, social support, and availability and structure of leader development programming. PMID:26895267

  17. A cis-acting function for the coronavirus leader in defective interfering RNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, R Y; Hofmann, M A; Sethna, P B; Brian, D A

    1994-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that the 65-nucleotide (nt) leader on subgenomic mRNAs suffices as a 5'-terminal cis-acting signal for RNA replication, a corollary to the notion that coronavirus mRNAs behave as replicons, synthetic RNA transcripts of a cloned, reporter-containing N mRNA (mRNA 7) of the bovine coronavirus with a precise 5' terminus and a 3' poly(A) of 68 nt were tested for replication after being transfected into helper virus-infected cells. No replication was observed, but synthetic transcripts of a cloned reporter-containing defective interfering (DI) RNA differing from the N mRNA construct by 433 nt of continuous 5'-proximal genomic sequence between the leader and the N open reading frame did replicate and become packaged, indicating the insufficiency of the leader alone as a 5' signal for replication of transfected RNA molecules. The leader was shown to be a necessary part of the cis-acting signal for DI RNA replication, however, since removal of terminal bases that destroyed a predicted intraleader stem-loop also destroyed replicating ability. Surprisingly, when the same stem-loop was disrupted by base substitutions, replication appeared only minimally impaired and the leader was found to have rapidly reverted to wild type during DI RNA replication, a phenomenon reminiscent of high-frequency leader switching in the mouse hepatitis coronavirus. These results suggest that once a minimal structural requirement for leader is fulfilled for initiation of DI RNA replication, the wild-type leader is strongly preferred for subsequent replication. They also demonstrate that, in contrast to reported natural mouse hepatitis coronavirus DI RNAs, the DI RNA of the bovine coronavirus does not require sequence elements originating from discontinuous downstream regions within the polymerase gene for replication or for packaging. Images PMID:7966615

  18. Remembering the Leaders of China.

    PubMed

    Fu, Mingchen; Xue, Yan; DeSoto, K Andrew; Yuan, Ti-Fei

    2016-01-01

    In two studies, we examined Chinese students' memory for the names of the leaders of China. In Study 1, subjects were cued with the names of periods from China's history. Subjects listed as many leaders as possible from each period and put them in the correct ordinal position when they could (see Roediger and DeSoto, 2014). Results showed that within each period, a primacy effect and sometimes a recency effect emerged. Moreover, the average recall probability for leaders within a specific period was a function of the ordinal position of the period. In Study 2, we asked another group of subjects to identify the sources through which they were able to recall each leader. We found that most subjects remembered leaders due to class and coursework. We also found a relation between a leader's recall probability and the amount of information available on that leader on the Internet. Our findings further imply that the serial position function captures the form of collective memory. PMID:27065899

  19. Perioperative Nurse Leaders and Professionalism.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Dawn

    2016-08-01

    Professionalism in nursing leadership encompasses key elements that include a common body of knowledge, autonomous practice, self-regulation through education and licensure, a set code of ethics, and a commitment to altruism. Perioperative nurse leaders also must embrace collaboration, vision, accountability, and patient and staff member advocacy based on established ethics, values, and standards of care. Nurse leaders who are committed to professional development through pursuit of higher degrees, application of evidence-based practice, collaboration with colleagues, and certification show a strong commitment to their profession and serve as role models for staff members. This article discusses professionalism in nursing and offers information specific to perioperative nurse leaders. PMID:27472973

  20. Leaders, managers, and employee care.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Della W

    2012-01-01

    With the economic and market changes currently taking place, organizations cannot survive or prosper without quality employees. Key to employee loyalty, performance, and retention is the relationship between the leader, manager, and employee. Leaders are visionaries who make sure that the right things are done for the organization. Managers are in a position to make sure that things are done right within the organization. There are traits and qualities that good leaders and managers must possess to ensure organizational success. Displaying these characteristics will ensure that employees are taken care of, which will benefit both the employees and the organization. PMID:22282003

  1. Vantage point - Everyone's a leader.

    PubMed

    Mazhindu, Debbie

    2016-05-01

    I RECENTLY had the privilege of judging the finalists for the Leadership Award, part of the RCNi Nurse Awards 2016. It was a difficult task and I was reminded of the recent NHS mantra 'everyone's a leader'. PMID:27138508

  2. Humor in Counseling: Leader Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldin, Eugene; Bordan, Terry; Araoz, Daniel L.; Gladding, Samuel T.; Kaplan, David; Krumboltz, John; Lazarus, Arnold

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the existence of humor in counseling from the perspectives of several leaders in the field. Specifically, the last 5 authors describe some of their thoughts and experiences regarding the emergence of humor in counseling.

  3. What leaders really do.

    PubMed

    Kotter, J P

    1990-01-01

    Leadership is different from management, but not for the reasons most people think. Leadership isn't mystical and mysterious. It has nothing to do with having "charisma" or other exotic personality traits. It is not the province of a chosen few. Nor is leadership necessarily better than management or a replacement for it. Rather, leadership and management are two distinctive and complementary systems of action. Each has its own function and characteristic activities. Both are necessary for success in today's business environment. Management is about coping with complexity. Its practices and procedures are largely a response to the emergence of large, complex organizations in the twentieth century. Leadership, by contrast, is about coping with change. Part of the reason it has become so important in recent years is that the business world has become more competitive and more volatile. More change always demands more leadership. Most U. S. corporations today are overmanaged and underled. They need to develop their capacity to exercise leadership. Successful corporations don't wait for leaders to come along. They actively seek out people with leadership potential and expose them to career experiences designed to develop that potential. Indeed, with careful selection, nurturing, and encouragement, dozens of people can play important leadership roles in a business organization. But while improving their ability to lead, companies should remember that strong leadership with weak management is no better, and is sometimes actually worse, than the reverse. The real challenge is to combine strong leadership and strong management and use each to balance the other. PMID:10104518

  4. Remembering the Leaders of China

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Mingchen; Xue, Yan; DeSoto, K. Andrew; Yuan, Ti-Fei

    2016-01-01

    In two studies, we examined Chinese students’ memory for the names of the leaders of China. In Study 1, subjects were cued with the names of periods from China’s history. Subjects listed as many leaders as possible from each period and put them in the correct ordinal position when they could (see Roediger and DeSoto, 2014). Results showed that within each period, a primacy effect and sometimes a recency effect emerged. Moreover, the average recall probability for leaders within a specific period was a function of the ordinal position of the period. In Study 2, we asked another group of subjects to identify the sources through which they were able to recall each leader. We found that most subjects remembered leaders due to class and coursework. We also found a relation between a leader’s recall probability and the amount of information available on that leader on the Internet. Our findings further imply that the serial position function captures the form of collective memory. PMID:27065899

  5. mRNA transcript therapy.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Drew

    2015-02-01

    mRNA is the central molecule of all forms of life. It is generally accepted that current life on Earth descended from an RNA world. mRNA, after its first therapeutic description in 1992, has recently come into increased focus as a method to deliver genetic information. The recent solution to the two main difficulties in using mRNA as a therapeutic, immune stimulation and potency, has provided the basis for a wide range of applications. While mRNA-based cancer immunotherapies have been in clinical trials for a few years, novel approaches; including, in vivo delivery of mRNA to replace or supplement proteins, mRNA-based generation of pluripotent stem cells, or genome engineering using mRNA-encoded meganucleases are beginning to be realized. This review presents the current state of mRNA drug technologies and potential applications, as well as discussing the challenges and prospects in mRNA development and drug discovery. PMID:25359562

  6. What Is an Innovative Educational Leader?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marron, Joseph M.; Cunniff, Dan

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlined the traits of an innovative educational leader in our changing society. It discussed the difference in a manager and leader, as well as the specific dispositions that differentiate the innovative educational leader from what many consider the average leader. The authors used the acronym "HELPSS" to highlight the…

  7. Identification of Combat Unit Leader Skills and Leader-Group Interaction Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henriksen, Kermit F.; And Others

    Research identified leader skills and leader-group interactive processes that have potential influence on unit performance in tactical situations. An historical review of the leader research literature was conducted, and leader models from leader research along with theory from industrial, managerial, and academic settings were reviewed. The…

  8. Requirement of the 5'-end genomic sequence as an upstream cis-acting element for coronavirus subgenomic mRNA transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Liao, C L; Lai, M M

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a defective interfering (DI) RNA containing a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene, placed behind an intergenic sequence, for studying subgenomic mRNA transcription of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), a prototype coronavirus. Using this system, we have identified the sequence requirement for MHV subgenomic mRNA transcription. We show that this sequence requirement differs from that for RNA replication. In addition to the previously identified requirement for an intergenic (promoter) sequence, additional sequences from the 5' end of genomic RNA are required for subgenomic mRNA transcription. These upstream sequences include the leader RNA and a spacer sequence between the leader and intergenic sequence, which is derived from the 5' untranslated region and part of gene 1. The spacer sequence requirement is specific, since only the sequence derived from the 5' end of RNA genome, but not from other MHV genomic regions or heterologous sequences, could initiate subgenomic transcription from the intergenic sequence. These results strongly suggest that the wild-type viral subgenomic mRNAs (mRNA2 to mRNA7) and probably their counterpart subgenomic negative-sense RNAs cannot be utilized for mRNA amplification. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that a partial leader sequence present at the 5' end of genome, which lacks the leader-mRNA fusion sequence, could still support subgenomic mRNA transcription. In this case, the leader sequences of the subgenomic transcripts were derived exclusively from the wild-type helper virus, indicating that the MHV leader RNA initiates in trans subgenomic mRNA transcription. Thus, the leader sequence can enhance subgenomic transcription even when it cannot serve as a primer for mRNA synthesis. These results taken together suggest that the 5'-end leader sequence of MHV not only provides a trans-acting primer for mRNA initiation but also serves as a cis-acting element required for the transcription of subgenomic mRNAs. The

  9. Preferential use of RNA leader sequences during influenza A transcription initiation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Geerts-Dimitriadou, Christina; Goldbach, Rob; Kormelink, Richard

    2011-01-01

    In vitro transcription initiation studies revealed a preference of influenza A virus for capped RNA leader sequences with base complementarity to the viral RNA template. Here, these results were verified during an influenza infection in MDCK cells. Alfalfa mosaic virus RNA3 leader sequences mutated in their base complementarity to the viral template, or the nucleotides 5' of potential base-pairing residues, were tested for their use either singly or in competition. These analyses revealed that influenza transcriptase is able to use leaders from an exogenous mRNA source with a preference for leaders harboring base complementarity to the 3'-ultimate residues of the viral template, as previously observed during in vitro studies. Internal priming at the 3'-penultimate residue, as well as "prime-and-realign" was observed. The finding that multiple base-pairing promotes cap donor selection in vivo, and the earlier observed competitiveness of such molecules in vitro, offers new possibilities for antiviral drug design. PMID:21030059

  10. RpoS and quorum sensing control expression and polar localization of Vibrio cholerae chemotaxis cluster III proteins in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ringgaard, Simon; Hubbard, Troy; Mandlik, Anjali; Davis, Brigid M.; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The diarrheal pathogen Vibrio cholerae contains 3 gene clusters that encode chemotaxis-related proteins, but only cluster II appears to be required for chemotaxis. Here, we present the first characterization of V. cholerae's “cluster III” chemotaxis system. We found that cluster III proteins assemble into foci at bacterial poles, like those formed by cluster II proteins, but the two systems assemble independently and do not colocalize. Cluster III proteins are expressed in vitro during stationary phase and in conjunction with growth arrest linked to carbon starvation. This expression, as well as expression in vivo in suckling rabbits, is dependent upon RpoS. V. cholerae's CAI-1 quorum sensing (QS) system is also required for cluster III expression in stationary phase and modulates its expression in vivo, but is not required for cluster III expression in response to carbon starvation. Surprisingly, even though the CAI-1 and AI-2 QS systems are thought to feed into the same signaling pathway, the AI-2 system inhibited cluster III gene expression, revealing that the outputs of the two QS systems are not always the same. The distinctions between genetic determinants of cluster III expression in vitro and in vivo highlight the distinctive nature of the in vivo environment. PMID:25989366

  11. Future Leaders Institute: Rising Leaders and the AACC Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallin, Desna L.

    2012-01-01

    The overall mission of the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) is "Building a Nation of Learners by Advancing America's Community Colleges." A significant component of this mission statement involves the development of leadership. The AACC believes that leadership can be learned and is committed to supporting and growing leaders. In…

  12. Strategic Communications for School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunther, Vicki; McGowan, James; Donegan, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Gunther, McGowan and Donegan draw on their own experiences and those of others in the field, to explain the importance of communication in school leadership. In focusing on the communication process--why it's critical for schools, and how it can be executed well--they make the case that communication must be a primary emphasis for leaders, not an…

  13. Recent Leaders in American Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    2012-01-01

    The writer would like to suggest eight recent leaders who have contributed much in assisting teachers to help pupils achieve well. These educators are largely from the twentieth century. Their contributions appear in educational journals, teacher education textbooks on the university level, as well as professional talks presented at international,…

  14. Principals as Morally Accountable Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrich, Lisa Catherine

    2000-01-01

    Moral (rather than "corporate") accountability in education is essential; so is a human-centered leadership approach. Findings from an Australian study that investigated elementary principals' responsiveness to teachers' learning show how these leaders exercised their moral, professional, and contractual accountability to support a caring,…

  15. American Religious Leaders. American Biographies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Timothy L.

    Founded on the principle of religious pluralism, the United States comprises scores of religious traditions. Although the spiritual lives of most people throughout the nation's history are private and undocumented, an examination of the lives and influence of U.S. religious leaders offers insights into the religious heritage of the United States.…

  16. The Search for Teacher Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Meena

    1993-01-01

    Interviews with 400 high school teachers nominated by colleagues suggest teacher leaders seek challenge, change, growth; are supportive of colleagues; serve as role models for students but not for other teachers. Interviewees felt their influence in the high school was curtailed by school-culture and professional norms, as well as self-imposed…

  17. Competencies for Community College Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community Colleges, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The development and availability of well-prepared leaders is vital to the continued success of community colleges and their students. Throughout its history, the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) has made proactive leadership development a central focus of its mission. Now, that focus takes on even greater urgency as the level of…

  18. The Principal as Instructional Leader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Thomas I.

    1986-01-01

    Effective schools research has verified that schools are rarely effective unless the principal is a proficient instructional leader. This article summarizes five recent studies examining the practices and qualities comprising good instructional leadership. A Seattle study by Richard L. Andrews disclosed a statistical correlation between student…

  19. Recruiting 4-H Volunteer Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Four-H Club Foundation, Washington, DC.

    The guide is intended to assist 4-H Club extension workers in recruiting volunteer adult and youth leaders. It discusses: why volunteers serve (organizational identity, desire to serve, involvement of other family members, future opportunities and obligations, community status, self interest, and public opinion); how to recruit (person-to-person…

  20. Preparing Effective Outdoor Pursuit Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priest, Simon

    Information related to selecting, training, and certifying outdoor leaders for high adventure pursuits, is provided by selected experts from five English-speaking nations (Great Britain, Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States). Patterns of differences and similarities among these nations regarding outdoor leadership components and…

  1. Research Administrators as Servant Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waite, Joann

    2011-01-01

    Within the sponsored research support offices in departments at research institutions, non-profits, and undergraduate institutions, research administrators are often perceived as servant leaders by their own membership organizations and those who work with them. This perception is influenced by survey results focusing on character. Parolini (2004)…

  2. Women Administrators as Instructional Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Beth A.

    2013-01-01

    Women are under-represented in educational research and are much less likely to hold administrative positions than are men. This study, using the Liberal Feminist Theory and Structural Barrier Theory, proffers possible explanations for this phenomenon. Four women leaders were interviewed to gain insight into their instructional leadership…

  3. Wilderness Leader Basic Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Paul; Baker, C. Woodson

    Focusing on the Outdoor Leader Basic Training Program, a major component of the Wilderness Encounter Training and Certification Project developed in Virginia to serve adjudicated youth, this document outlines the Leadership Certification process for Wilderness Encounter Programs. First is an overview of wilderness programing and the need for a…

  4. Lessons from Exceptional School Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Mark

    Leadership is situational and cannot be predicted or necessarily taught. This book is the distillation of ideas and practices derived from interviews with some of education's top leaders. Chapter 1, "Forming Beliefs," makes the point that teachers and administrators must carefully learn about excellence and then find the elements of excellence…

  5. Educating Earth-Literate Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Stephen; Jucker, Rolf

    2005-01-01

    The World Summit for Sustainable Development (WSSD) in Johannesburg made it clear that political leadership the world over is incapable of rising to the challenges of sustainability. Yet, most of the hundred or so world leaders who attended have a higher education degree from some of the world's most prestigious universities. This paper tries to…

  6. Teachers as Leaders in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahlberg, Pasi

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade, thousands of visitors have flocked to Finland--now a leader in education rankings--to uncover this small Nordic country's secret to its education success. In this article, Finnish educator and scholar Pasi Sahlberg explains how Finland has managed such a feat. A rigorous graduate degree and at least five years of…

  7. Why Teachers Trust School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handford, Victoria; Leithwood, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Trust among teachers in schools is significantly related to student achievement and trust in school leaders is an important influence on such trust. The purpose of this study is to identify leadership practices which teachers interpret as signs of trustworthiness on the part of their principals. Design/methodology/approach: Evidence for…

  8. Boston Structure Supports School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takata, Jennifer Welsh

    2008-01-01

    Boston Public Schools, winner of the 2006 Broad Prize for Urban Education, creates innovative programs to develop school leaders based on the idea that "school leadership is the single most important factor in schools' success." Teachers play an invaluable role in determining the quality of classroom instruction, but a principal is, in the words…

  9. Teacher Leaders: Advancing Mathematics Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinzer, Cathy J.; Rincón, Mari; Ward, Jana; Rincón, Ricardo; Gomez, Lesli

    2014-01-01

    Four elementary school instructors offer insights into their classrooms, their unique professional roles, and their leadership approaches as they reflect on their journey to advance teacher and student mathematics learning. They note a "teacher leader" serves as an example to other educators and strives to impact student learning;…

  10. Strategic Listening for School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Jeannine S.; Dunklee, Dennis R.

    2005-01-01

    The ability to communicate effectively with multiple constituencies is recognized as an essential characteristic of effective leaders. Listening strategically is a way of showing parents, students, faculty, staff, and others that their ideas and beliefs are of value. The authors' practitioner-friendly book concentrates on the importance of…

  11. A Leader, Not a Hero

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Lynda

    2005-01-01

    The author writes her experience in leading. She points out that a good leader should know when and how to let go than trying to do all the work by herself. It changed her focus on looking at details, implementation, dealing with the contractors, to leading leading people.

  12. Ethics Issues Snare School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on ethics issues involving school leaders. Some superintendents have landed in murky ethical waters for their ties to for-profit companies, highlighting the temptations administrators face as industry and education increasingly intersect. Some questionable judgments by superintendents--from accepting company-paid trips to…

  13. Educating School Leaders for Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moos, Lejf

    2010-01-01

    In order to be able to discuss, in meaningful ways, how school leaders should be educated one needs to sketch the context in which they are going to lead, that is the visions and purpose of education and the schooling, which is dominant in society. In most societies one sees clashes of many discourses and cultural/political fights. In order to…

  14. Essential Lessons for School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    This gold mine of wisdom from top education researcher and the best-selling author of "Turning Around Failing Schools and Connecting Teacher Leadership and School Improvement" contains key tips and strategies every school leader should know. Award-winning professor and former school administrator Joseph F. Murphy's concise and instructive lessons…

  15. Women Religious Leaders and Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayburn, Carole A.; And Others

    This study examined stress, strain, and coping mechanisms in women religious leaders. Subjects were nuns (N=51), Reform women rabbis (N=45), Episcopal women priests (N=32), United Methodist clergywomen (N=45) and Presbyterian clergywomen (N=45), matched for age and years on the job and pulpit assignments. All subjects were given the Osipow and…

  16. Leadership, Leaders, and Leading (Part One).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Peter J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents an historical overview of the leadership literature. Highlights include "great man" theories; studies of leaders' traits; studies of leaders' behavioral style; studies of leadership functions; and studies of the situational aspects of leadership. (LRW)

  17. Managers and Leaders: Are They Different?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaleznik, Abraham

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the differences between managers and leaders in terms of personality, attitudes toward goals, conceptions of work, relations with others, and senses of self. Also examines the development of leadership and how organizations can develop leaders. (CT)

  18. The Nurse Leader Role in Crisis Management.

    PubMed

    Edmonson, Cole; Sumagaysay, Dio; Cueman, Marie; Chappell, Stacey

    2016-09-01

    Leaders from the American Organization of Nurse Executives describe the dynamic state of today's healthcare system related to crisis management. Adaptive leadership, driven by strong values and morality, can guide leaders and organizations through the most difficult times. PMID:27556647

  19. Evaluation of a Salmonella Strain Lacking the Secondary Messenger C-di-GMP and RpoS as a Live Oral Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Latasa, Cristina; Echeverz, Maite; García, Begoña; Gil, Carmen; García-Ona, Enrique; Burgui, Saioa; Casares, Noelia; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Lasarte, Juan José; Lasa, Iñigo; Solano, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Salmonellosis is one of the most important bacterial zoonotic diseases transmitted through the consumption of contaminated food, with chicken and pig related products being key reservoirs of infection. Although numerous studies on animal vaccination have been performed in order to reduce Salmonella prevalence, there is still a need for an ideal vaccine. Here, with the aim of constructing a novel live attenuated Salmonella vaccine candidate, we firstly analyzed the impact of the absence of cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) in Salmonella virulence. C-di-GMP is an intracellular second messenger that controls a wide range of bacterial processes, including biofilm formation and synthesis of virulence factors, and also modulates the host innate immune response. Our results showed that a Salmonella multiple mutant in the twelve genes encoding diguanylate cyclase proteins that, as a consequence, cannot synthesize c-di-GMP, presents a moderate attenuation in a systemic murine infection model. An additional mutation of the rpoS gene resulted in a synergic attenuating effect that led to a highly attenuated strain, referred to as ΔXIII, immunogenic enough to protect mice against a lethal oral challenge of a S. Typhimurium virulent strain. ΔXIII immunogenicity relied on activation of both antibody and cell mediated immune responses characterized by the production of opsonizing antibodies and the induction of significant levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-17 and IL-10. ΔXIII was unable to form a biofilm and did not survive under desiccation conditions, indicating that it could be easily eliminated from the environment. Moreover, ΔXIII shows DIVA features that allow differentiation of infected and vaccinated animals. Altogether, these results show ΔXIII as a safe and effective live DIVA vaccine. PMID:27537839

  20. Evaluation of a Salmonella Strain Lacking the Secondary Messenger C-di-GMP and RpoS as a Live Oral Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    García, Begoña; Gil, Carmen; García-Ona, Enrique; Burgui, Saioa; Casares, Noelia; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Lasarte, Juan José; Lasa, Iñigo

    2016-01-01

    Salmonellosis is one of the most important bacterial zoonotic diseases transmitted through the consumption of contaminated food, with chicken and pig related products being key reservoirs of infection. Although numerous studies on animal vaccination have been performed in order to reduce Salmonella prevalence, there is still a need for an ideal vaccine. Here, with the aim of constructing a novel live attenuated Salmonella vaccine candidate, we firstly analyzed the impact of the absence of cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) in Salmonella virulence. C-di-GMP is an intracellular second messenger that controls a wide range of bacterial processes, including biofilm formation and synthesis of virulence factors, and also modulates the host innate immune response. Our results showed that a Salmonella multiple mutant in the twelve genes encoding diguanylate cyclase proteins that, as a consequence, cannot synthesize c-di-GMP, presents a moderate attenuation in a systemic murine infection model. An additional mutation of the rpoS gene resulted in a synergic attenuating effect that led to a highly attenuated strain, referred to as ΔXIII, immunogenic enough to protect mice against a lethal oral challenge of a S. Typhimurium virulent strain. ΔXIII immunogenicity relied on activation of both antibody and cell mediated immune responses characterized by the production of opsonizing antibodies and the induction of significant levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-17 and IL-10. ΔXIII was unable to form a biofilm and did not survive under desiccation conditions, indicating that it could be easily eliminated from the environment. Moreover, ΔXIII shows DIVA features that allow differentiation of infected and vaccinated animals. Altogether, these results show ΔXIII as a safe and effective live DIVA vaccine. PMID:27537839

  1. A Phenomenology of Outdoor Education Leader Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Stephanie C.; Lauzon, Lara L.; Meldrum, John T.

    2016-01-01

    Limited qualitative research exists on the experiences of outdoor education leaders. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the job-related experiences of outdoor education leaders within and outside the workplace. Five participants who had experience as outdoor education leaders completed in-depth, one-on-one interviews about…

  2. Holding on to 4-H Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hass, Glen

    1979-01-01

    Data from a survey of 4-H Club leaders in Saskatchewan, Canada, were used to determine the effect of attendance at leadership training events on leaders' decisions to re-enroll or discontinue. It was found that involvement in 4-H activities, supported by leadership training, increased leaders' satisfaction and likelihood of re-enrolling. (MF)

  3. Encouraging Civility as a Community College Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsner, Paul A., Ed.; Boggs, George R., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    The contributors relate examples of situations in which leaders encountered unexpected and sometimes unprecedented incivility in their role as community college leaders. The chapters present their experiences, observations, lessons, and recommendations for handling crises that may befall leaders in an academic setting. This book contains the…

  4. Adult Education Programs with Church Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacy, W. H.; Tait, John L.

    This document is a historical resume of adult education programs with church leaders sponsored by the Cooperative Extension Service of Iowa State University since the early 20th century. Supported by research, resident teaching and administrative leaders in the institution, the Extension Division has cooperated educationally with church leaders,…

  5. Training Guides for Teacher Corps Team Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saxe, Richard W.; And Others

    These guides are process and product of a continuing effort to design a training program for Teacher Corps team leaders. As a process, they represent one phase in the delineation of a training program. As a product, they are drawn form observations of team leaders in action in 10 cities, a survey of all Teacher Corps leaders and directors, and the…

  6. How to grow great leaders.

    PubMed

    Ready, Douglas A

    2004-12-01

    Few leaders excel at both the unit and enterprise levels. More than ever, though, corporations need people capable of running business units, functions, or regions and focusing on broader company goals. It's up to organizations to develop leaders who can manage the inherent tensions between unit and enterprise priorities. Take the example of RBC Financial Group, one of the largest, most profitable companies in Canada. In the mid-1990's, RBC revamped its competitive strategy in a couple of ways. After the government announced that the Big Six banks in Canada could neither merge with nor acquire one another, RBC decided to grow through cross-border acquisitions. Additionally, because customers were starting to seek bundled products and services, RBC reached across its traditional stand-alone businesses to offer integrated solutions. These changes in strategy didn't elicit immediate companywide support. Instinctively, employees reacted against what would amount to a delicate balancing act: They would have to lift their focus out of their silos while continuing to meet unit goals. However, by communicating extensively with staff members, cross-fertilizing talent across unit boundaries, and targeting rewards to shape performance, RBC was able to cultivate rising leaders with the unit expertise and the enterprise vision to help the company fulfill its new aims. Growing such well-rounded leaders takes sustained effort because unit-enterprise tensions are quite real. Three common conditions reinforce these tensions. First, most organizational structures foster silo thinking and unimaginative career paths. Second, most companies lack venues for airing and resolving conflicts that arise when there are competing priorities. Third, many have misguided reward systems that pit unit performance against enterprise considerations. Such long-established patterns of organizational behavior are tough to break. Fortunately, as RBC discovered, people can be trained to think and work

  7. Conformational heterogeneity in the Salmonella typhimurium pyrC and pyrD leader mRNAs produced in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, K I

    1994-01-01

    In Salmonella typhimurium, different conformations of the pyrC and pyrD leader transcripts are produced as a result of nucleotide sensitive selection of the transcriptional start site. The CTP-initiated transcripts, synthesized at high intracellular CTP/GTP pool ratios (repressing conditions), have the potential of forming a stable secondary structure at the 5' end, thereby sequestering the site for translational initiation. At low CTP/GTP pool ratios (derepressing conditions), transcription starts 2-3 bp further downstream, resulting in transcripts with limited potential for stem-loop formation and therefore open for translational initiation. The conformation of the leader regions of wild type pyrC and pyrD mRNA has been investigated by chemical and enzymatic probing of RNA isolated from cultures grown in repressing and derepressing conditions. As controls and to obtain further information on the relation between the leader RNA conformation and the regulatory mechanism, the probing experiments also included pyrC and pyrD mRNA from mutants that contain a base substitution at a position that destabilizes the putative hairpin. In accordance with predictions based on the nucleotide sequence, the results showed that the 5' end of pyrC and pyrD leader mRNA isolated from repressed cultures is folded into a secondary structure, whereas it is largely unstructured in mRNA isolated from derepressed cultures. Images PMID:7510398

  8. International military leaders' survey on operational stress.

    PubMed

    Adler, Amy B; Cawkill, Paul; van den Berg, Coen; Arvers, Philippe; Puente, José; Cuvelier, Yves

    2008-01-01

    Despite the importance of military leaders in moderating the impact of deployment stressors on unit members, little attention has focused on the training leaders receive in managing unit stress. As part of a NATO Research Panel (Human Factors and Medicine (HFM)-081/Research and Technology Organization Task Group (RTG)), 16 nations participated in a needs assessment survey of military leaders who had returned from an operation within the previous 2 years. Findings from 172 leaders emphasized the lack of training specifically geared for leaders to address operational stress issues for unit members and their families and the need for integrated mental health support across the deployment cycle. In general, most leaders regarded stress-related mental health problems as normal and were supportive of help-seeking. The information obtained here was used to develop a Human Factors and Medicine -081/RTG Leader's Guide on operational stress. PMID:18251326

  9. Branched dart leaders preceding lightning return strokes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenburg, Maribeth; Marshall, Thomas C.; Karunarathne, Sumedhe; Karunarathna, Nadeeka; Orville, Richard E.

    2014-04-01

    This study describes the occurrence of branches in lightning dart leaders, based on data acquired in Florida using a high-speed video camera and electric field change sensors. More than half (57%) of 72 flashes with analyzable dart leaders show at least one successful branched dart leader (BDL), and nine flashes have two successful BDLs. Overall, 18% of 282 visible successful dart leaders are branched. Most (42 of 50) cases of BDLs occur in the first dart leader after a stepped leader/return stroke sequence, and the data indicate that 55% of first dart leaders are visibly branched. Compared to first dart leaders in the 31 flashes without any branched dart leaders, BDLs tend to follow stepped leader/return strokes with significantly larger average peak currents (-31.3 versus -20.6 kA) and shorter average interstroke intervals (71.94 versus 94.64 ms). Average peak current of BDL strokes is 62% larger (-17.8 versus -11 kA) than that for unbranched first dart leader strokes. Branched dart leaders generally travel in the some of the most recently used lightning channels, but they are not always within the main channel of the prior return stroke. Successful BDLs may dart all the way to ground when in a prior stroke channel, or they may become stepped leaders when they reach the lower end of the prior stroke branch. Electric field change data for all the BDL cases exhibit an erratic pulse character for at least part of the leader duration; in some cases, the erratic character ends when the branches vanish.

  10. The role of rpoS, hmp, and ssrAB in Salmonella enterica Gallinarum and evaluation of a triple-deletion mutant as a live vaccine candidate in Lohmann layer chickens

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Youngjae; Park, Yoon Mee; Barate, Abhijit Kashinath; Park, So-Yeon; Park, Hee Jeong; Lee, Mi Rae; Truong, Quang Lam; Yoon, Jang Won

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica Gallinarum (SG) causes fowl typhoid (FT), a septicemic disease in avian species. We constructed deletion mutants lacking the stress sigma factor RpoS, the nitric oxide (NO)-detoxifying flavohemoglobin Hmp, and the SsrA/SsrB regulator to confirm the functions of these factors in SG. All gene products were fully functional in wild-type (WT) SG whereas mutants harboring single mutations or a combination of rpoS, hmp, and ssrAB mutations showed hypersusceptibility to H2O2, loss of NO metabolism, and absence of Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI)-2 expression, respectively. A triple-deletion mutant, SGΔ3 (SGΔrpoSΔhmpΔssrAB), was evaluated for attenuated virulence and protection efficacy in two-week-old Lohmann layer chickens. The SGΔ3 mutant did not cause any mortality after inoculation with either 1 × 106 or 1 × 108 colony-forming units (CFUs) of bacteria. Significantly lower numbers of salmonellae were recovered from the liver and spleen of chickens inoculated with the SGΔ3 mutant compared to chickens inoculated with WT SG. Vaccination with the SGΔ3 mutant conferred complete protection against challenge with virulent SG on the chickens comparable to the group vaccinated with a conventional vaccine strain, SG9R. Overall, these results indicate that SGΔ3 could be a promising candidate for a live Salmonella vaccine against FT. PMID:25549217

  11. Leader self-sacrifice and leadership effectiveness: the moderating role of leader prototypicality.

    PubMed

    van Knippenberg, Barbara; van Knippenberg, Daan

    2005-01-01

    Self-sacrificing behavior of the leader and the extent to which the leader is representative of the group (i.e., group prototypical) are proposed to interact to influence leadership effectiveness. The authors expected self-sacrificing leaders to be considered more effective and to be able to push subordinates to a higher performance level than non-self-sacrificing leaders, and these effects were expected to be more pronounced for less prototypical leaders than for more prototypical leaders. The results of a laboratory experiment showed that, as expected, productivity levels, effectiveness ratings, and perceived leader group-orientedness and charisma were positively affected by leader self-sacrifice, especially when leader prototypicality was low. The main results were replicated in a scenario experiment and 2 surveys. PMID:15641888

  12. Sigma factor selectivity in Borrelia burgdorferi: RpoS recognition of the ospE/ospF/elp promoters is dependent on the sequence of the -10 region.

    PubMed

    Eggers, Christian H; Caimano, Melissa J; Radolf, Justin D

    2006-03-01

    Members of the ospE/ospF/elp lipoprotein gene families of Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease agent, are transcriptionally upregulated in response to the influx of blood into the midgut of an infected tick. We recently have demonstrated that despite the high degree of similarity between the promoters of the ospF (P(ospF)) and ospE (P(ospE)) genes of B. burgdorferi strain 297, the differential expression of ospF is RpoS-dependent, while ospE is controlled by sigma(70). Herein we used wild-type and RpoS-deficient strains of B. burgdorferi and Escherichia coli to analyse transcriptional reporters consisting of a green fluorescent protein (gfp) gene fused to P(ospF), P(ospE), or two hybrid promoters in which the -10 regions of P(ospF) and P(ospE) were switched [P(ospF ) ((E - 10)) and P(ospE) ((F - 10)) respectively]. We found that the P(ospF)-10 region is both necessary and sufficient for RpoS-dependent recognition in B. burgdorferi, while sigma(70) specificity for P(ospE) is dependent on elements outside of the -10 region. In E. coli, sigma factor selectivity for these promoters was much more permissive, with expression of each being primarily due to sigma(70). Alignment of the sequences upstream of each of the ospE/ospF/elp genes from B. burgdorferi strains 297 and B31 revealed that two B31 ospF paralogues [erpK (BBM38) and erpL (BBO39)] have -10 regions virtually identical to that of P(ospF). Correspondingly, expression of gfp reporters based on the erpK and erpL promoters was RpoS-dependent. Thus, the sequence of the P(ospF)-10 region appears to serve as a motif for RpoS recognition, the first described for any B. burgdorferi promoter. Taken together, our data support the notion that B. burgdorferi utilizes sequence differences at the -10 region as one mechanism for maintaining the transcriptional integrity of RpoS-dependent and -independent genes activated at the onset of tick feeding. PMID:16553889

  13. Leader charisma and affective team climate: the moderating role of the leader's influence and interaction.

    PubMed

    Hernández Baeza, Ana; Araya Lao, Cristina; García Meneses, Juliana; González Romá, Vicente

    2009-11-01

    In this study, we evaluate the role of leader charisma in fostering positive affective team climate and preventing negative affective climate. The analysis of a longitudinal database of 137 bank branches by means of hierarchical moderated regression shows that leader charisma has a stronger effect on team optimism than on team tension. In addition, the leader's influence and the frequency of leader-team interaction moderate the relationship between charisma and affective climate. However, whereas the leader's influence enhances the relationship between leader charisma and positive affective climate, the frequency of interaction has counterproductive effects. PMID:19861091

  14. Developing first-level leaders.

    PubMed

    Priestland, Andreas; Hanig, Robert

    2005-06-01

    Oil and energy corporation BP was well aware of the importance of its work group managers on the front lines. Their decisions, in aggregate, make an enormous difference in BP's turnover, costs, quality control, safety, innovation, and environmental performance. There were about 10,000 such supervisors, working in every part of the company-from solar plants in Spain, to drilling platforms in the North Sea, to marketing teams in Chicago. Some 70% to 80% of BP employees reported directly to these lower-level managers. Yet, until recently, the corporation didn't have a comprehensive training program--let alone an official name--for them. For their part, the frontline managers felt disconnected; it was often hard for them to understand how their individual decisions contributed to the growth and reputation of BP as a whole. In this article, BP executive Andreas Priestland and Dialogos VP Robert Hanig describe how BP in the past five years has learned to connect with this population of managers. After one and a half years of design and development, there is now a companywide name--"first-level leaders"--and a comprehensive training program for this cohort. The authors describe the collaborative effort they led to create the program's four components: Supervisory Essentials, Context and Connections, the Leadership Event, and Peer Partnerships. The design team surveyed those it had deemed first-level leaders and others throughout BP; extensively benchmarked other companies' training efforts for lower-level managers; and conducted a series of pilot programs that involved dozens of advisers. The training sessions were first offered early in 2002, and since then, more than 8000 of BP's first-level leaders have attended. The managers who've been through training are consistently ranked higher in performance than those who haven't, both by their bosses and by the employees who report to them, the authors say. PMID:15938442

  15. Do dentists make poor leaders?

    PubMed

    Nalliah, R P

    2016-04-22

    Dentists work, largely, alone (apart from subordinates) with little feedback from colleagues and other health professionals. The author of this article argues that dentists do not lead, they manage. Moreover, dentists face unique challenges in becoming effective leaders because many innate skills that help dentists excel in their profession are in conflict with good leadership. The purpose of this article is to stir debate and raise the awareness that dentists do not, innately, have strong leadership skills and must pursue formal training in leadership to succeed in the modern era of collaborative healthcare. PMID:27103286

  16. Leaders break ground for INFINITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Community leaders from Mississippi and Louisiana break ground for the new INFINITY at NASA Stennis Space Center facility during a Nov. 20 ceremony. Groundbreaking participants included (l to r): Gottfried Construction representative John Smith, Mississippi Highway Commissioner Wayne Brown, INFINITY board member and Apollo 13 astronaut Fred Haise, Stennis Director Gene Goldman, Studio South representative David Hardy, Leo Seal Jr. family representative Virginia Wagner, Hancock Bank President George Schloegel, Mississippi Rep. J.P. Compretta, Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians representative Charlie Benn and Louisiana Sen. A.G. Crowe.

  17. mRNA stability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J

    1995-01-01

    This review concerns how cytoplasmic mRNA half-lives are regulated and how mRNA decay rates influence gene expression. mRNA stability influences gene expression in virtually all organisms, from bacteria to mammals, and the abundance of a particular mRNA can fluctuate manyfold following a change in the mRNA half-life, without any change in transcription. The processes that regulate mRNA half-lives can, in turn, affect how cells grow, differentiate, and respond to their environment. Three major questions are addressed. Which sequences in mRNAs determine their half-lives? Which enzymes degrade mRNAs? Which (trans-acting) factors regulate mRNA stability, and how do they function? The following specific topics are discussed: techniques for measuring eukaryotic mRNA stability and for calculating decay constants, mRNA decay pathways, mRNases, proteins that bind to sequences shared among many mRNAs [like poly(A)- and AU-rich-binding proteins] and proteins that bind to specific mRNAs (like the c-myc coding-region determinant-binding protein), how environmental factors like hormones and growth factors affect mRNA stability, and how translation and mRNA stability are linked. Some perspectives and predictions for future research directions are summarized at the end. PMID:7565413

  18. Passion in today's health care leaders.

    PubMed

    Piper, Llewellyn E

    2005-01-01

    Passion in today's health care leaders is essential as health care organizations face increasing demands for survival. Leaders in health care have been educated, selected, promoted, and retained based on their analytical and creativity skills. Today's health care leaders must also have emotional intelligence. Emotional intelligence is primal for passion. Emotional intelligence, which leads to passion, is crucial to the survivability of today's health care organizations. In order for health care organizations to go from good to great, the leader must inspire followers through passion. This article encourages health care leaders to gain awareness of emotional intelligence and to use emotional intelligence as part of their leadership to inspire passion. Through passion, leaders and followers become more motivated to accomplish the health care mission of serving others. PMID:15825818

  19. Styles and qualities of effective leaders.

    PubMed

    Sims, Jennifer M

    2009-01-01

    In today's healthcare climate, there is a shortage of nurses and nursing faculty. We need effective leaderships to navigate through this crisis. Although all nurses are leaders, we must develop the necessary skills to be effective. This article will briefly describe a few of the types of leaders, identify the essential qualities of an effective leader, and discuss the concept of teaching leadership. PMID:19855205

  20. Be seen as a leader.

    PubMed

    Galinsky, Adam D; Kilduff, Gavin J

    2013-12-01

    When a new work group forms, people often make snap judgments about who is qualified to lead. If the players don't already know one another, they tend to afford status to teammates on the basis of factors such as age, gender, race, attractiveness, and rank. These are characteristics beyond your control, but they don't necessarily predetermine the influence you can have on a group. Anyone, the authors say, can achieve higher status and more influence by getting in the right mind-set before engaging with new teammates. There are three psychological states that can increase the optimism, confidence, and proactive behavior that people associate with leaders: promotion focus (defined as a focus on goals and positive outcomes), happiness, and a feeling of power. And all it takes to help you enter one of these states is a simple five-minute exercise before starting a group task: Write about your ambitions or a time when you felt happy or powerful. The authors report that study subjects who did exactly that were more likely than others to speak up, steer decision making, and be viewed by their teammates as leaders--both in initial group meetings and in follow-up meetings two days later. PMID:24383350

  1. Science leaders discuss budget crunch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Although funding for research fared relatively well in the budget proposed by the Reagan Administration for fiscal year (FY) 1987, leaders of the science community should expect lean times ahead for federal funding and should plan accordingly. This was the message delivered February 26-27, 1986, to nearly 400 participants in a conference at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, D.C.Leaders and policymakers from all segments of the research establishment were invited to attend the 2-day conference, which was sponsored by the Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable, an independent group associated with NAS, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. Discussions at the conference revolved around the question “What research strategies best serve the national interest in a period of budgetary stress?” After hearing perspectives from representatives from the Administration, industry, federal agencies, universities, and a federal laboratory, participants were divided into seven working groups. Each group was assigned a topic of discussion, such as “Management at the Campus Level,” “The Relative Roles of Federal Laboratories and Outside Research Institutions,” and “Possible Non-Federal Sources of Support: States, Industry, and Foundations.” On the second day of the conference, the working group chairmen reported back to the conference at large.

  2. Science Teacher Leaders: Exploring Practices and Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinson, John Kevin

    It has become standard practice for teachers to step into the role of "teacher leaders" and perform a variety of curriculum, instruction and assessment tasks for schools and school districts. The literature regarding these Ohio K-12 teacher leaders, who may perform these tasks in addition to or in lieu of regular teaching assignments, rarely includes a disciplinary focus. In this exploratory, descriptive study the results of a web-based survey containing both closed and open-ended items were used in an inquiry into teacher leaders working with the discipline of science. Data from Ohio teachers responding to the survey were used first to create a standard profile for science teacher leaders. Descriptive statistics and correlations were then performed on quantitative survey data to explore science teacher leader tasks and factors that influence task performance. Analysis of data included descriptions of sense of purpose for their role held by these science teacher leaders. Results indicate that science teacher leaders appear to embrace their role as advocates for science and have great potential for implementing science education reform as well as other science-related school initiatives. Aligning performance, administrative oversight, impact on student achievement and teacher training concerning tasks science teacher leaders are expected to perform would enhance this potential. However, science teacher leaders face challenges to realizing that potential due to ambiguity of their leadership role, the breadth of tasks they tend to perform and lack of alignment between task and outcomes.

  3. Developing Socially Responsible Leaders in Academic Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cauthen, T. W., III

    2016-01-01

    This chapter begins the exploration of what leadership education is through examining the relationship between educational involvement and academic autonomy in the development of socially responsible leaders.

  4. Leader emergence through interpersonal neural synchronization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jing; Chen, Chuansheng; Dai, Bohan; Shi, Guang; Ding, Guosheng; Liu, Li; Lu, Chunming

    2015-04-01

    The neural mechanism of leader emergence is not well understood. This study investigated (i) whether interpersonal neural synchronization (INS) plays an important role in leader emergence, and (ii) whether INS and leader emergence are associated with the frequency or the quality of communications. Eleven three-member groups were asked to perform a leaderless group discussion (LGD) task, and their brain activities were recorded via functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS)-based hyperscanning. Video recordings of the discussions were coded for leadership and communication. Results showed that the INS for the leader-follower (LF) pairs was higher than that for the follower-follower (FF) pairs in the left temporo-parietal junction (TPJ), an area important for social mentalizing. Although communication frequency was higher for the LF pairs than for the FF pairs, the frequency of leader-initiated and follower-initiated communication did not differ significantly. Moreover, INS for the LF pairs was significantly higher during leader-initiated communication than during follower-initiated communications. In addition, INS for the LF pairs during leader-initiated communication was significantly correlated with the leaders' communication skills and competence, but not their communication frequency. Finally, leadership could be successfully predicted based on INS as well as communication frequency early during the LGD (before half a minute into the task). In sum, this study found that leader emergence was characterized by high-level neural synchronization between the leader and followers and that the quality, rather than the frequency, of communications was associated with synchronization. These results suggest that leaders emerge because they are able to say the right things at the right time. PMID:25831535

  5. Educators as Serving Leaders in the Classroom and on Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Counterintuitively, the more one develops as a leader, the less of a leader one becomes. What do great leaders do? Great leaders are ambitious first and foremost for the cause, the mission, the work--not themselves. Educators as "serving leaders" sense that every action they take, together with every decision that they make, either…

  6. The IT Leader as Alchemist: Finding the True Gold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleed, Ron

    2006-01-01

    The Information technology (IT) leader within higher education can be viewed from three scenarios: (1) the IT leader as plumber; (2) the IT leader as gardener; and (3) the IT leader as alchemist. In the first scenario, the college or university network consists of pipes, and the role of the IT leader resembles that of a plumber, who keeps the…

  7. Key Characteristics of Teacher Leaders in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumpkin, Angela; Claxton, Heather; Wilson, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Teacher leaders who share their specialized knowledge, expertise, and experience with other teachers broaden and sustain school and classroom improvement efforts. Teacher leaders can transform classrooms into learning laboratories where every student is engaged in relevant and well-designed curricular content, every teacher embraces the use of…

  8. Today's Leader--"An Endangered Species"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tregoe, Ben

    1976-01-01

    Leadership behavior derives from the different ways in which leaders respond to different situations. Problems arise when only one type of behavior is utilized in a variety of different situations. A list of variables to be considered by leaders in making appropriate behavioral decisions is provided. (EC)

  9. The Space between: Women Teachers as Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podjasek, Heidi L.

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative, phenomenological study focused on listening to the voices of women teacher leaders regarding their leadership experiences within one elementary school. The question guiding this dissertation was "How do women elementary school teacher leaders perceive leadership?" Within the stories of the participants, two essential theme…

  10. The Power of Videotape in Educating Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jentz, Barry

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the power of videotape in educating leaders. He asks leaders to go on videotape so they can confront the sharp discrepancies between how they see themselves (their self-images) and how they actually behave. He believes that carefully structured use of videotaped role-playing can bring that power to leadership…

  11. Where the Leaders of 1989 Are Now

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hvistendahl, Mara

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the current lives of the Chinese leaders of 1989. Wang Dan, an active organizer year before the demonstrations and quickly became a leader in the square, has completed a Ph.D. in Chinese history at Harvard University last year and is now on a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Oxford. Wu'er Kaixi, who took a…

  12. Science Teacher Leaders: Exploring Practices and Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinson, John Kevin

    2013-01-01

    It has become standard practice for teachers to step into the role of "teacher leaders" and perform a variety of curriculum, instruction and assessment tasks for schools and school districts. The literature regarding these Ohio K-12 teacher leaders, who may perform these tasks in addition to or in lieu of regular teaching assignments,…

  13. The Called, Chosen, and Faithful Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Hartwell T. Paul

    2009-01-01

    Leaders are made, not born. Like so many other of life's complex issues, the question of nature vs. nurture in leadership is one that is analyzed, researched, and debated by educators, philosophers, social scientist, and even leaders themselves. Leadership has been dissected as to personality, character, and behavior. Researchers have developed…

  14. Leader Succession and Socialization: A Synthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Ann Weaver

    1991-01-01

    Leader-succession research is refocused on its interactive roots whereas the advances of recent succession inquiry are explored in this synthesis of the literature. The approach capitalizes on efforts to understand leader-succession research from a multidimensional and social viewpoint. Organizational socialization is used to frame the discussion.…

  15. New Roles for Teachers: Instructional Team Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porod, Gregory N.

    1993-01-01

    Instructional teams, an integral part of the middle school philosophy, need strong leadership from the administration and the team leader. Ensuring that team leaders have the necessary skills requires careful selection, appropriate training, regular meetings, decision making, communication, motivation, follow-up, and easy transition. To lead…

  16. Vermont Guidelines for Teacher & Leader Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermont Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    In March 2011, the State of Vermont Department of Education charged the Vermont Task Force on Teacher & Leader Effectiveness to develop guidelines for teacher and leader evaluation. Knowing and respecting the fiercely independent nature of Vermonters, Task Force members were committed to developing these guidelines for creating and assessing…

  17. District Leaders' Framing of Educator Evaluation Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woulfin, Sarah L.; Donaldson, Morgaen L.; Gonzales, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Educator evaluation systems have recently undergone scrutiny and reform, and district and school leaders play a key role in interpreting and enacting these systems. This article uses framing theory to understand district leaders' interpretation and advancement of a state's new educator evaluation policy. Research Methods: The article…

  18. Get Organized! Time Management for School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Too often, time-management books target the business executive. Although it is true that those in the educational arena share many of the same challenges, it is also true that schools are unique places. This book is written for school leaders. Its scenarios specifically address the day-to-day situations school leaders face on a regular basis. This…

  19. Modern American Agricultural Leaders: Four from Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colbert, Thomas B.

    1991-01-01

    Profiles four Iowans who became agricultural leaders and committed themselves to addressing farmers' needs: Henry Wallace, James R. Howard, Milo Reno, and Ruth Buxton Sayre. Identifies farm organizations with which each was affiliated, such as the Farm Bureau and the Farmers' Union. Summarizes each leader's major accomplishments and political…

  20. Take Me to Your (Male) Leader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Bob

    2001-01-01

    Examined the Scottish Mountain Leader Training Board's training and assessment scheme for mountain leaders, how people progressed through the scheme, why they entered and left, and how men and women viewed particular aspects of the scheme. Surveys indicated that there were gender differences in occupational status, in the way men and women used…

  1. Growing the Next Generation of Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Rebecca; Unger, Elizabeth; Bacon, Annie

    2008-01-01

    Most CIOs and IT leaders agree that the community must work deliberately to develop talent among the IT staff, not wait for it to appear. However, responsibility for professional development also lies with the individual. There is no one right way for would-be leaders to hone their skills, but rather a multitude of strategies that will support a…

  2. Characteristics Related to Female & Male Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Agnes M.

    2004-01-01

    The following research investigated gender and the leadership role and determined if there are differences in leadership styles, behaviors, traits, and characteristics between female leaders and male leaders. Literature suggests there are specific gender leadership differences between males and females in leadership styles, behaviors, traits, and…

  3. Fourteen characteristics of effective leaders in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Gordon J

    2004-01-01

    Leadership can be learned, especially through careful observation of effective leaders. Fourteen characteristics of effective leaders in the dental office and in organized dentistry are discussed. These include: positive mental attitude, faith, goals in life, organization, time management, interdependency and synergy, consistency, communication, self-renewal, empathy and humility, creativity, personal responsibility and drive, ability to say no, and charisma. PMID:15948488

  4. Orange County Outdoor School: Cabin Leader's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orange County Dept. of Education, Santa Ana, CA.

    Presented in five sections, the manual furnishes cabin leaders (high school students) with background information concerning philosophy, teaching, objectives, daily schedule, and cabin leader responsibilities in the Orange County Outdoor School program. The welcome section contains the history of the Outdoor School, staff responsibilities,…

  5. Blue & C--Personality Traits of Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Virgil

    2009-01-01

    School superintendents and school leaders can be most effective if they understand their personality traits and the traits of those they learn and work with. A school leader can maximize their effectiveness by examining their own behaviors, thinking and habits as well as recognizing the behaviors of others. The DISC Pure Behavioral styles and the…

  6. Preparing Preservice Teachers to become Teacher Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    Since PreK-12 student achievement is the primary focus of schools, all teachers are called to serve as teachers leaders and improve learning on their campuses. Rather than waiting until they have gained experience, teachers can begin acquiring the knowledge, skills, and dispositions of teacher leaders during their preservice programs. Drawing upon…

  7. Should School Administrators Be Leaders or Managers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, W. Warner

    Research in leadership relevant to school administrators is reviewed and summarized here. The author maintains that most previous authors identified two primary leader functions, concerns, types, or dimensions. These authors include Wortman, who, following in the footsteps of Zaleznick, saw a dichotomy between leaders and managers; Burns, who…

  8. How Sociological Leaders Teach: Some Key Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persell, Caroline Hodges; Pfeiffer, Kathryn M.; Syed, Ali

    2008-01-01

    This paper arose from a larger study designed to explore what leaders in the field of sociology think are the most important goals and principles for students to understand after taking a college-level introductory course and how they teach those principles. A population of scholarly leaders in sociology was defined by various forms of peer…

  9. Middle Leaders' Learning in a University Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franken, Margaret; Penney, Dawn; Branson, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on the phenomenon of middle leadership in a university context and directs attention to the significance of learning as a central facet of leadership development. Drawing on the reflections of two of the authors as new middle leaders (chairpersons of departments), this article critically examines how middle leaders learn…

  10. "Yes, but...": Education Leaders Discuss Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Catherine; Ward, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This article presents answers to the question: What do powerful educational leaders think about training practitioners for social justice? The data are drawn from interviews with a former governor and leaders from the American Association of School Administration (AASA), National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP), National…

  11. Giving School Leaders the Inner Edge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes-Ponder, Kathleen; Ponder, Gerald; Bell, Pandora

    This paper presents ways to transform leadership by transforming leaders. It advocates an increased knowledge about self and a deeper connection with the purpose for living. It outlines the spiritual condition of school leaders and the importance of spiritual development. This increased spirituality is fostered by developing an awareness of…

  12. Preparing Educational Leaders to Close Achievement Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Joseph F., Jr.; Uline, Cynthia L.

    2005-01-01

    For more than 25 years, researchers have described the critical roles leaders play in creating effective schools and school districts. If U.S. schools are to close achievement gaps, their leaders must possess the appropriate knowledge, dispositions, and skills to assume these critical roles. The Interstate School Leadership Licensure Consortium…

  13. The Expert School Leader: Accelerating Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasman, Naftaly S.; Glasman, Lynette D.

    2006-01-01

    Accountable school leaders are the key to school improvement, but while school leadership has been described often in many different ways, accountability has been mentioned only in general terms. In "The Expert School Leader," the authors detail a new approach to identifying, analyzing, acquiring, and using specific competencies that are needed…

  14. Show and tell: how supervisors facilitate leader development among transitioning leaders.

    PubMed

    Dragoni, Lisa; Park, Haeseen; Soltis, Jim; Forte-Trammell, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    We argue that studying leaders experiencing a job transition offers a unique opportunity to explore initial changes in leaders' development in their cognition and action. Here, we examine 2 early indicators of leaders' development-their acquisition of knowledge regarding their new role (a cognitive outcome) and the time they allocate toward leading others (a behavioral outcome)-and how supervisors can facilitate these forms of development among transitioning leaders. With a sample of 110 first-line leaders who we tracked over approximately 10 months at 4 different points in time, we tested the efficacy of supervisors' support in the form of modeling effective leadership behavior (i.e., "show") and the provision of job information (i.e., "tell"). Results from random coefficient modeling revealed that the interactive effect of supervisors' "show" and "tell" accelerates the rate of transitioning leaders' self-perceived role knowledge acquisition over time. This upward trajectory is even more pronounced for transitioning leaders who have not been exposed to an exceptional leader during their careers. Further, with a lagged design, we found that leaders who report greater role knowledge allocate more time toward leading others, thus indicating initial changes in these leaders' behavior. We discuss these findings in light of their theoretical and practical importance to the field of leader development. PMID:24060160

  15. Principals of Effective Schools Are Strong Instructional Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Ian

    1986-01-01

    Examines research on effective schools and on principals as instructional leaders. Research shows that principals of effective schools are strong instructional leaders. Mention is made of weaknesses found in the research on principals as instructional leaders. (MD)

  16. Leader emergence through interpersonal neural synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jing; Chen, Chuansheng; Dai, Bohan; Shi, Guang; Ding, Guosheng; Liu, Li; Lu, Chunming

    2015-01-01

    The neural mechanism of leader emergence is not well understood. This study investigated (i) whether interpersonal neural synchronization (INS) plays an important role in leader emergence, and (ii) whether INS and leader emergence are associated with the frequency or the quality of communications. Eleven three-member groups were asked to perform a leaderless group discussion (LGD) task, and their brain activities were recorded via functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS)-based hyperscanning. Video recordings of the discussions were coded for leadership and communication. Results showed that the INS for the leader–follower (LF) pairs was higher than that for the follower–follower (FF) pairs in the left temporo-parietal junction (TPJ), an area important for social mentalizing. Although communication frequency was higher for the LF pairs than for the FF pairs, the frequency of leader-initiated and follower-initiated communication did not differ significantly. Moreover, INS for the LF pairs was significantly higher during leader-initiated communication than during follower-initiated communications. In addition, INS for the LF pairs during leader-initiated communication was significantly correlated with the leaders’ communication skills and competence, but not their communication frequency. Finally, leadership could be successfully predicted based on INS as well as communication frequency early during the LGD (before half a minute into the task). In sum, this study found that leader emergence was characterized by high-level neural synchronization between the leader and followers and that the quality, rather than the frequency, of communications was associated with synchronization. These results suggest that leaders emerge because they are able to say the right things at the right time. PMID:25831535

  17. Are you a collaborative leader?

    PubMed

    Ibarra, Herminia; Hansen, Morten T

    2011-01-01

    Social media and technologies have put connectivity on steroids and made collaboration more integral to business than ever. But without the right leadership, collaboration can go astray. Employees who try to collaborate on everything may wind up stuck in endless meetings, struggling to reach agreement. On the other side of the coin, executives who came of age during the heyday of "command and control" management can have trouble adjusting their style to fit the new realities. In their research on top-performing CEOs, Insead professors Ibarra and Hansen have examined what it takes to be a collaborative leader. They've found that it requires connecting people and ideas outside an organization to those inside it, leveraging diverse talent, modeling collaborative behavior at the top, and showing a strong hand to keep teams from getting mired in debate. In this article, they describe tactics that executives from Akamai, GE, Reckitt Benckiser, and other firms use in those four areas and how they foster high-performance collaborative cultures in their organizations. PMID:21800471

  18. Translational control of germ cell-expressed mRNA imposed by alternative splicing: opioid peptide gene expression in rat testis.

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, J E; Collard, M W; Douglass, J O

    1989-01-01

    The three genes encoding the opioid peptide precursors (prodynorphin, proenkephalin, and proopiomelanocortin) are expressed in the rat testis. The sizes of the three opioid mRNAs in the testis differ from the sizes of the corresponding mRNAs in other rat tissues in which these genes are expressed. The smaller testicular proopiomelanocortin mRNA has previously been demonstrated to arise from alternative transcriptional initiation. In the present study, we found that the smaller testicular prodynorphin mRNA, expressed in Sertoli cells, results from alternative mRNA processing. Exon 2, which makes up 5' untranslated sequence, is removed from the mature transcript. Polysome analysis of brain and testis RNA indicates that the alteration of the prodynorphin leader sequence in the testis-specific transcript does not affect the efficiency of translation of this mRNA. The larger testicular proenkephalin transcript, expressed in developing germ cells, also results from alternative mRNA processing. Alternative acceptor site usage in the splicing of intron A results in a germ cell-specific proenkephalin transcript with a 491-nucleotide 5' untranslated leader sequence preceding the preproenkephalin-coding sequence. Polysome analysis indicates that this germ cell-specific proenkephalin mRNA is not efficiently translated. Mechanisms by which alternative mRNA splicing may serve to confer translational regulation upon the testicular proenkephalin transcript are discussed. Images PMID:2573832

  19. Biomaterials for mRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Reesor, Emma K G; Xu, Yingjie; Zope, Harshal R; Zetter, Bruce R; Shi, Jinjun

    2015-12-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) has recently emerged with remarkable potential as an effective alternative to DNA-based therapies because of several unique advantages. mRNA does not require nuclear entry for transfection activity and has a negligible chance of integrating into the host genome which excludes the possibility of potentially detrimental genomic alternations. Chemical modification of mRNA has further enhanced its stability and decreased its activation of innate immune responses. Additionally, mRNA has been found to have rapid expression and predictable kinetics. Nevertheless, the ubiquitous application of mRNA remains challenging given its unfavorable attributes, such as large size, negative charge and susceptibility to enzymatic degradation. Further refinement of mRNA delivery modalities is therefore essential for its development as a therapeutic tool. This review provides an exclusive overview of current state-of-the-art biomaterials and nanotechnology platforms for mRNA delivery, and discusses future prospects to bring these exciting technologies into clinical practice. PMID:26280625

  20. Biomaterials for mRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Reesor, Emma K. G.; Xu, Yingjie; Zope, Harshal R.; Zetter, Bruce R.; Shi, Jinjun

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) has recently emerged with remarkable potential as an effective alternative to DNA-based therapies because of several unique advantages. mRNA does not require nuclear entry for transfection activity and has a negligible chance of integrating into the host genome which excludes the possibility of potentially detrimental genomic alternations. Chemical modification of mRNA has further enhanced its stability and decreased its activation of innate immune responses. Additionally, mRNA has been found to have rapid expression and predictable kinetics. Nevertheless, the ubiquitous application of mRNA remains challenging given its unfavorable attributes, such as large size, negative charge and susceptibility to enzymatic degradation. Further refinement of mRNA delivery modalities is therefore essential for its development as a therapeutic tool. This review provides an exclusive overview of current state-of-the-art biomaterials and nanotechnology platforms for mRNA delivery, and discusses future prospects to bring these exciting technologies into clinical practice. PMID:26280625

  1. A Conserved Domain in the Leader Proteinase of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus is Required for Proper Sub-Cellular Localization and Function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The leader proteinase (Lpro) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is involved in antagonizing the innate immune response by blocking the expression of interferon (IFN) protein and by reducing the immediate-early induction of IFN beta mRNA and IFN stimulated genes. In addition to its role in shutti...

  2. A Conserved Domain in the Leader Proteinase of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus is Required for Proper Subcellular Localization and Function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The leader proteinase (Lpro) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is involved in antagonizing the innate immune response by blocking the expression of interferon (IFN) protein and by reducing the immediate-early induction of IFNß mRNA and IFN stimulated genes. Recently we have shown that expressio...

  3. Erythromycin-induced ribosome stall in the ermA leader: a barricade to 5'-to-3' nucleolytic cleavage of the ermA transcript.

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, P; Weisblum, B

    1989-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus ermA gene, whose product confers resistance to the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B family of antibiotics, is induced at the level of translation by nanomolar concentrations of erythromycin. Erythromycin also specifically stabilizes ermA transcripts, and the induced stabilization requires in-phase translation of at least one of two small leader peptides in the 5' leader region of the transcript. Erythromycin-induced mRNA stabilization was tested in three constructions in which the ermA transcript was elongated by making insertions at the ermA transcription start. Whereas mRNA downstream of the leader peptide is stabilized by erythromycin, mRNA upstream is not. In the presence of erythromycin, specific mRNA decay intermediates in both the extended ermA genes and the wild-type ermA gene were detected by both Northern blotting and S1 nuclease mapping. The 5' ends of the intermediates map to the sequences that encode each of the two ermA leader peptides, suggesting that the intermediates are produced by stalled erythromycin-bound ribosomes acting as barricades to degradation by 5'-to-3' RNases. In addition, whereas erythromycin was found previously to stabilize ermA transcripts only physically, an ermC-cat-86 hybrid transcript was stabilized both physically and functionally by erythromycin. Images PMID:2592348

  4. Endorsement of formal leaders: an integrative model.

    PubMed

    Michener, H A; Lawler, E J

    1975-02-01

    This experiment develops an integrative, path-analytic model for the endorsement accorded formal leaders. The model contains four independent variables reflecting aspects of group structure (i.e., group success-failure, the payoff distribution, the degree of support by others members for the leader, and the vulnerability of the leader). Also included are two intervening variables reflecting perceptual processes (attributed competence and attributed fairness), and one dependent variable endorsement). The results indicate that endorsement is greater when the group's success is high, when the payoff distribution is flat rather than hierarchial, and when the leader is not vulnerable to removal from office. Other support had no significant impact on endorsement. Analyses further demonstrate that the effect of success-failure on endorsement is mediated by attributed competence, while the effect of the payoff distributed is mediated by attributed fairness. These results suggest that moral and task evaluations are distinct bases of endorsement. PMID:1123712

  5. Motivation to Develop as a Leader.

    PubMed

    Rosch, David M; Villanueva, Josh C

    2016-03-01

    This chapter explains the role of motivation in readying leaders to succeed. Suggestions are also offered for leadership developers in harnessing motivational factors to optimize their educational programs. PMID:26895263

  6. Beyond Individual Leader Development: Cultivating Collective Capacities.

    PubMed

    Dugan, John P; Turman, Natasha T; Torrez, Mark A

    2015-12-01

    This chapter addresses the overemphasis on individual-leader development in leadership education, offering insights and pragmatic approaches for advancing collective leadership focused on social and political change. PMID:26895165

  7. Solving multi-leader-common-follower games.

    SciTech Connect

    Leyffer, S.; Munson, T.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2010-01-01

    Multi-leader-common-follower games arise when modelling two or more competitive firms, the leaders, that commit to their decisions prior to another group of competitive firms, the followers, that react to the decisions made by the leaders. These problems lead in a natural way to equilibrium problems with equilibrium constraints (EPECs). We develop a characterization of the solution sets for these problems and examine a variety of nonlinear optimization and nonlinear complementarity formulations of EPECs. We distinguish two broad cases: problems where the leaders can cost-differentiate and problems with price-consistent followers. We demonstrate the practical viability of our approach by solving a range of medium-sized test problems.

  8. Why Leaders Can't Lead.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennis, Warren

    1989-01-01

    Managers are people who do things right; leaders are people who do the right thing. Both roles are crucial, but differ profoundly. Four competencies of leadership are management of attention, of meaning, of trust, and of self. (JOW)

  9. Recognizing and defining clinical nurse leaders.

    PubMed

    Stanley, David

    This article addresses the issue of clinical leadership and how it is defined. The concepts and definitions of clinical leadership are considered as well as the results of new research that suggests that clinical leaders can be seen as experts in their field, and because they are approachable and are effective communicators, are empowered to act as a role model, motivating others by matching their values and beliefs about nursing and care to their practice. This is supported by a new leadership theory, congruent leadership, proposed as the most appropriate leadership theory to support an understanding of clinical leadership. Congruent leaders (clinical nurse leaders) are followed because there is a match between the leader's values and beliefs and their actions. PMID:16493288

  10. Nurse managers as transformational and transactional leaders.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Elaine; Kennerly, Susan M

    2006-01-01

    Nurse managers demonstrating transformational leadership are more likely than transactional leaders to have committed staff nurse followers. Committed followers exert extra effort, thus improving unit performance and enhancing the organization's competitive advantage. PMID:16967888

  11. Creating tomorrow's leaders today: the Emerging Nurse Leaders Program of the Texas Nurses Association.

    PubMed

    Sportsman, Susan; Wieck, Lynn; Yoder-Wise, Patricia S; Light, Kathleen M; Jordan, Clair

    2010-06-01

    The Texas Nurses Association initiated an Emerging Nurse Leaders Program as an approach to engaging new nurses in the leadership of the professional association. This article explains the program's origin, the commitment of the Texas Nurses Association to this process, the implementation of the plan, and the discussions that launched a new way of connecting leaders across generations. Further, it is an approach that any professional organization can use to encourage the involvement of new leaders. PMID:20411880

  12. Anomalous light output from lightning dart leaders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, C.; Krider, E. P.

    1985-01-01

    About 5 percent of the multiple-stroke cloud-to-ground lightning discharges recorded at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 1981 contained dart leaders that produced an unusually large light output. An analysis of these cases indicates that the average peak light output per unit length in the leader may be comparable to or even exceed that of the return stroke that follows.

  13. It's Not Just the Leader's Vision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouzes, James M.; Posner, Barry Z.

    2008-01-01

    At some point during all this talk over the years about the importance of being future-oriented, leaders got the sense that they were the ones that had to be the visionaries. Often with the encouragement of a lot of leadership developers, leaders came to assume that if others expected them to be forward-looking, then they had to go off all alone…

  14. Four mistakes leaders keep making.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Robert H

    2010-09-01

    Again and again, senior managers fall into four behavioral traps that thwart organizational change. The behaviors are difficult to recognize and reverse because they serve to protect egos and prevent anxiety--but executives can overcome them. First, managers fail to set proper expectations. When they announce major directional changes or new goals, they don't spell out credible plans or specify who's accountable. Second, they excuse subordinates from the pursuit of overall goals, allowing people to remain preoccupied with their own units. Third, executives essentially collude with staff experts and consultants by going along with a deeply flawed contract: The experts agree to deliver and implement a "product" (a new system, for instance) but don't include measurable gains as part of the deal. Fourth, managers wait while associates overprepare. After challenging their employees to make needed improvements, they accept the response "Yes, but first we have to..." Finish the sentence: Train our people. Set up focus groups. Bring in Six Sigma. And so on. The best way to confront the traps is to conduct small personal experiments that rapidly produce tangible results, incur little risk of failure, and are confined enough to demonstrate a clear link between trial and outcome. For example, one iron plant addressed quality problems by targeting five areas for improvement, setting clear and measurable goals for each, and holding team Leaders accountable for outcomes. AlL five experiments succeeded and were extended to the rest of the plant. Quality problems eased up within 100 days and virtually disappeared a few months later. PMID:20821968

  15. In search of global leaders.

    PubMed

    Green, Stephen; Hassan, Fred; Immelt, Jeffrey; Marks, Michael; Meiland, Daniel

    2003-08-01

    For all the talk about global organizations and executives, there's no definitive answer to the question of what we really mean by "global." A presence in multiple countries? Cultural adaptability? A multilingual top team? We asked four CEOs and the head of an international recruiting agency--HSBC's Stephen Green, Schering-Plough's Fred Hassan, GE's Jeffrey-lmmelt, Flextronics's Michael Marks, and Egon Zehnder's Daniel Meiland--to tell us what they think. They share some common ground. They all agree, for example, that the shift from a local to a global marketplace is irreversible and gaining momentum. "We're losing sight of the reality of globalization. But we should pay attention, because national barriers are quickly coming down", Daniel Meiland says. "If you look ahead five or ten years, the people with the top jobs in large corporations ... will be those who have lived in several cultures and who can converse in at least two languages." But the CEOs also disagree on many issues--on the importance of overseas assignments, for instance, and on the degree to which you need to adhere to local cultural norms. Some believe strongly that the global leader should, as a prerequisite to the job, live and work in other countries. As Stephen Green put it, "If you look at the executives currently running [HSBC's] largest businesses, all of them have worked in more than one, and nearly all in more than two, major country markets." Others downplay the importance of overseas assignments. "Putting people in foreign settings doesn't automatically imbue new attitudes, and it is attitudes rather than experiences that make a culture global," says Fred Hassan. The executives' essays capture views that are as diverse and multidimensional as the companies they lead. PMID:12884666

  16. Leader narcissism and follower outcomes: The counterbalancing effect of leader humility.

    PubMed

    Owens, Bradley P; Wallace, Angela S; Walker, Angela S; Waldman, David A

    2015-07-01

    [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 100(4) of Journal of Applied Psychology (see record 2015-29666-001). The last name of the second author was misspelled in the Online First version of the article. All versions of this article have been corrected.] In response to recent calls to theorize and examine how multiple leader characteristics may work together in their effects, the current research examines how leader narcissism and humility interact to predict perceived leader effectiveness and follower (i.e., direct-report) job engagement and performance. Although an examination of leaders who are narcissistic yet humble may seem oxymoronic and even paradoxical, researchers have suggested that seemingly contradictory personal attributes may exist simultaneously and may actually work together to produce positive outcomes. Results from survey data from followers and leaders working for a large health insurance organization showed that the interaction of leader narcissism and leader humility is associated with perceptions of leader effectiveness, follower job engagement, and subjective and objective follower job performance. Together, these results suggest that narcissistic leaders can have positive effects on followers when their narcissism is tempered by humility. PMID:25621592

  17. 20 CFR 404.1010 - Farm crew leader as employer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Farm crew leader as employer. 404.1010....1010 Farm crew leader as employer. A farm crew leader furnishes workers to do agricultural labor for another person, usually a farm operator. If the crew leader pays the workers (the money can be the...

  18. 20 CFR 404.1010 - Farm crew leader as employer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Farm crew leader as employer. 404.1010....1010 Farm crew leader as employer. A farm crew leader furnishes workers to do agricultural labor for another person, usually a farm operator. If the crew leader pays the workers (the money can be the...

  19. 20 CFR 404.1010 - Farm crew leader as employer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Farm crew leader as employer. 404.1010....1010 Farm crew leader as employer. A farm crew leader furnishes workers to do agricultural labor for another person, usually a farm operator. If the crew leader pays the workers (the money can be the...

  20. 20 CFR 404.1010 - Farm crew leader as employer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Farm crew leader as employer. 404.1010....1010 Farm crew leader as employer. A farm crew leader furnishes workers to do agricultural labor for another person, usually a farm operator. If the crew leader pays the workers (the money can be the...

  1. 20 CFR 404.1010 - Farm crew leader as employer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Farm crew leader as employer. 404.1010....1010 Farm crew leader as employer. A farm crew leader furnishes workers to do agricultural labor for another person, usually a farm operator. If the crew leader pays the workers (the money can be the...

  2. 75 FR 74703 - Leader One Energy, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ... COMMISSION Leader One Energy, LLC; Notice of Application November 23, 2010 Take notice that on November 15, 2010, Leader One Energy, LLC (Leader One), 4643 South Ulster Street, Suite 1100, Denver, Colorado 80237...) seeking authorization to construct and operate the Leader One Gas Storage Project in Adams...

  3. Leader-Member Exchange Theory in Higher and Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Robert Leo

    2013-01-01

    Unlike many other prominent leadership theories, leader-member exchange (LMX) theory does not focus on the specific characteristics of an effective organizational leader. Rather, LMX focuses on the nature and quality of the relationships between a leader and his or her individual subordinates. The ideal is for a leader to develop as many…

  4. Cytoplasmic mRNA turnover and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Borbolis, Fivos; Syntichaki, Popi

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) turnover that determines the lifetime of cytoplasmic mRNAs is a means to control gene expression under both normal and stress conditions, whereas its impact on ageing and age-related disorders has just become evident. Gene expression control is achieved at the level of the mRNA clearance as well as mRNA stability and accessibility to other molecules. All these processes are regulated by cis-acting motifs and trans-acting factors that determine the rates of translation and degradation of transcripts. Specific messenger RNA granules that harbor the mRNA decay machinery or various factors, involved in translational repression and transient storage of mRNAs, are also part of the mRNA fate regulation. Their assembly and function can be modulated to promote stress resistance to adverse conditions and over time affect the ageing process and the lifespan of the organism. Here, we provide insights into the complex relationships of ageing modulators and mRNA turnover mechanisms. PMID:26432921

  5. Final report: FASEB Summer Research Conference on ''Post-transcriptional control of gene expression: Effectors of mRNA decay'' [agenda and attendees list

    SciTech Connect

    Maquat, Lynne

    2002-12-01

    The goal of this meeting was to provide an interactive forum for scientists working on prokaryotic and eukaryotic mRNA decay. A special seminar presented by a leader in the field of mRNA decay in S. cerevisiae focused on what is known and what needs to be determined, not only for yeast but for other organisms. The large attendance (110 participants) reflects the awareness that mRNA decay is a key player in gene regulation in a way that is affected by the many steps that precede mRNA formation. Sessions were held on the following topics: mRNA transport and mRNP; multicomponent eukaryotic nucleases; nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and nonsense-associated altered splicing; Cis-acting sequences/Trans-acting factors of mRNA decay; translational accuracy; multicomponent bacterial nucleases; interplay between mRNA polyadenylation, translation and decay in prokaryotes and prokaryotic organelles; and RNA interference and other RNA mediators of gene expression. In addition to the talks and two poster sessions, there were three round tables: (1) Does translation occur in the nucleus? (2) Differences and similarities in the mechanisms of mRNA decay in different eukaryotes, and (3) RNA surveillance in bacteria?

  6. It takes chutzpah: oncology nurse leaders.

    PubMed

    Green, E

    1999-01-01

    Chutzpah, according to the Oxford Dictionary of Current English (1996) is a slang term from the Yiddish language which means shameless audacity. Chutzpah has been used to identify people with courage who take on situations that others avoid and somehow achieve the impossible. Tim Porter-O'Grady (1997) recently wrote that management is dead, and has been replaced by process leadership. Health care organizations have made shifts from hierarchical structures to process or program models where people have dual/multiple reporting/communication relationship. In this new orientation, management functions of controlling, directing, organizing and disciplining are replaced by process leadership functions of coordinating, facilitating, linking and sustaining (Porter O'Grady, 1997). Herein lies the challenge for oncology nurse leaders: "what lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us" (Ralph Waldo Emerson). Leadership is not a function of job title. The evidence for this is clear in current practice.... There are no/few positions of nurse leaders. Titles have changed to eliminate the professional discipline, and reflect a non-descript orientation. The new titles are process leaders, program leaders, professional practice leaders. Nurse leaders need new points of reference to take in the challenges of influencing, facilitating and linking. Those points of reference are: principle-centered leadership, integrity and chutzpah. This presentation will focus on examining current thinking, defining key characteristics and attributes, and using scenarios to illustrate the impact of leadership. We, as leaders in oncology nursing, must use chutzpah to make positive change and long-term gains for patient care and the profession of nursing. PMID:10232143

  7. Key challenges facing American nurse leaders.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Pamela A

    2008-11-01

    What are the key challenges facing nurse leaders in the United States? To find out, I asked 20 prominent nurse leaders to respond to that question and tell me their top three issues. Their voices tell a compelling story on challenges faced by the nurse leaders in American healthcare. The focus is no longer just on the process of how care is delivered, but on the outcomes of that care. More attention is being given to documenting that the care is provided according to specific standards associated with better outcomes. Many of the standards are directly related to the care given by nurses, including some indicators that are specifically sensitive to nurse intervention. There is also a new focus on federal reporting of patient satisfaction with the services provide. Producing quality outcomes, high patient satisfaction and effective measurements of both are now a central theme for the entire hospital administrative team. For the nurse leader, however, it represents explicit accountability for managing and leading the staff responsible for providing the patient care. Safety and quality issues are directly linked to financial pressure. Reimbursement for hospital is being whittled away as financial accountability for services receives greater scrutiny from the federal government and private insurers. Close on the heels of the financial challenge is the ever present workforce shortage. The most troublesome challenge identified by these nurse leaders is the absence of an adequate pipeline for nursing leaders. It is an exciting time for nursing in the United States. Challenges to be sure, but these nurse leaders have identified the priorities that will create a successful future. PMID:19094102

  8. In praise of the incomplete leader.

    PubMed

    Ancona, Deborah; Malone, Thomas W; Orlikowski, Wanda J; Senge, Peter M

    2007-02-01

    Today's top executives are expected to do everything right, from coming up with solutions to unfathomably complex problems to having the charisma and prescience to rally stakeholders around a perfect vision of the future. But no one leader can be all things to all people. It's time to end the myth of the complete leader, say the authors. Those at the top must come to understand their weaknesses as well as their strengths. Only by embracing the ways in which they are incomplete can leaders fill in the gaps in their knowledge with others' skills. The incomplete leader has the confidence and humility to recognize unique talents and perspectives throughout the organization--and to let those qualities shine. The authors' work studying leadership over the past six years has led them to develop a framework of distributed leadership. Within that model, leadership consists of four capabilities: sensemaking, relating, "visioning," and inventing. Sensemaking involves understanding and mapping the context in which a company and its people operate. A leader skilled in this area can quickly identify the complexities of a given situation and explain them to others. The second capability, relating, means being able to build trusting relationships with others through inquiring (listening with intention), advocating (explaining one's own point of view), and connecting (establishing a network of allies who can help a leader accomplish his or her goals). Visioning, the third capability, means coming up with a compelling image of the future. It is a collaborative process that articulates what the members of an organization want to create. Finally, inventing involves developing new ways to bring that vision to life. Rarely will a single person be skilled in all four areas. That's why it's critical that leaders find others who can offset their limitations and complement their strengths. Those who don't will not only bear the burden of leadership alone but will find themselves at the helm

  9. Leadership and Leader Developmental Self-Efficacy: Their Role in Enhancing Leader Development Efforts.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Susan Elaine; Johnson, Stefanie K

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the role of two types of self-efficacy-leader self-efficacy and leader developmental efficacy-for enhancing leadership development. Practical implications for designing and developing leadership programs that take into account these two types of self-efficacy are discussed. PMID:26895265

  10. A Comparison of Student Leader and Non Leader Attitudes Toward Legalizing Marihuana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bittner, John R.; Cash, William B.

    1971-01-01

    The data tends to imply that campus leaders have attitudes on the issue of marihuana legalization which conform to the norms of a major midwestern university sampling. Drug education programs might include student leaders with local credibility and who may possess attitudes very similar to their peers. (Author/BY)

  11. The School Leader Communication Model: An Emerging Method for Bridging School Leader Preparation and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dotger, Benjamin H.

    2011-01-01

    School leaders make countless decisions but do not receive adequate preparation for communicating their decisions to parents, students, and teachers. Building on the need to prepare school leaders for a variety of complex professional situations, this article introduces the medical education pedagogy of standardized patients to the field of school…

  12. Leaders Unlimited; Resources for Training. Developed in Junior Leaders Schools 1961-1965.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colton, Winifred J.

    This study of Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) junior leader training programs for teenagers, 1961-65, investigated program elements thought to affect leader growth and development. The training experience was keyed to broad YMCA purposes, objectives of the training schools, and individual goals. Personal goal setting, stressed as a means…

  13. Attractiveness and Leader Style: Evaluations of Male and Female Leaders by Male and Female Evaluators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sopasakis, Maria; Snodgrass, Sara E.

    Previous research has suggested that men are stereotypically believed to be better leaders than women; that more physically attractive people are evaluated more positively than less attractive people; and that men and women use different leadership styles. This study examined the interactions of sex, leader style, and physical attractiveness on…

  14. The Impact of Educational Change on School Leaders: Experiences of Pakistani School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razzaq, Jamila; Forde, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The Pakistani education system, like many other countries across the world, is going through a phase of concerted change in the first decade of the 21st century and school leaders are expected to play a crucial role in the management of this change programme. This article considers the impact of educational change on a group of school leaders who…

  15. Leader to Leader: Enduring Insights on Leadership from the Drucker Foundation's Award-Winning Journal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesselbein, Frances, Ed.; Cohen, Paul M., Ed.

    Amid unprecedented social, demographic, and economic changes, leaders must enhance performance and deliver desired results. The growing importance of managing the explosion in information requires attention to defining organizational missions and visions. The 37 chapters in this work are divided into 7 parts. Part 1, "On Leaders and Leadership,"…

  16. Leaders who create change and those who manage it. How leaders limit success.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, John G

    2004-01-01

    There is no formula for either leading or managing change. Every organization and leader is unique. Leading change, however, is more art than science. Managing change is more science than art. Leading change is not simply a matter of a leader's style or personality; it is a leader's philosophy of how to generate and mobilize the total resources of an organization to enable it to be its best. Managing change, on the other hand, is focused on maintaining stability in an organization and containing the effects of unwanted and unexpected change. Leaders set the limits of success in their organizations by how they manage change. The different approaches of 2 leaders who have created change to correct problems in our health care delivery system are discussed. PMID:15192993

  17. Leaders in Social Networks, the Delicious Case

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Linyuan; Zhang, Yi-Cheng; Yeung, Chi Ho; Zhou, Tao

    2011-01-01

    Finding pertinent information is not limited to search engines. Online communities can amplify the influence of a small number of power users for the benefit of all other users. Users' information foraging in depth and breadth can be greatly enhanced by choosing suitable leaders. For instance in delicious.com, users subscribe to leaders' collection which lead to a deeper and wider reach not achievable with search engines. To consolidate such collective search, it is essential to utilize the leadership topology and identify influential users. Google's PageRank, as a successful search algorithm in the World Wide Web, turns out to be less effective in networks of people. We thus devise an adaptive and parameter-free algorithm, the LeaderRank, to quantify user influence. We show that LeaderRank outperforms PageRank in terms of ranking effectiveness, as well as robustness against manipulations and noisy data. These results suggest that leaders who are aware of their clout may reinforce the development of social networks, and thus the power of collective search. PMID:21738620

  18. Leaders in social networks, the Delicious case.

    PubMed

    Lü, Linyuan; Zhang, Yi-Cheng; Yeung, Chi Ho; Zhou, Tao

    2011-01-01

    Finding pertinent information is not limited to search engines. Online communities can amplify the influence of a small number of power users for the benefit of all other users. Users' information foraging in depth and breadth can be greatly enhanced by choosing suitable leaders. For instance in delicious.com, users subscribe to leaders' collection which lead to a deeper and wider reach not achievable with search engines. To consolidate such collective search, it is essential to utilize the leadership topology and identify influential users. Google's PageRank, as a successful search algorithm in the World Wide Web, turns out to be less effective in networks of people. We thus devise an adaptive and parameter-free algorithm, the LeaderRank, to quantify user influence. We show that LeaderRank outperforms PageRank in terms of ranking effectiveness, as well as robustness against manipulations and noisy data. These results suggest that leaders who are aware of their clout may reinforce the development of social networks, and thus the power of collective search. PMID:21738620

  19. Leader affective presence and innovation in teams.

    PubMed

    Madrid, Hector P; Totterdell, Peter; Niven, Karen; Barros, Eduardo

    2016-05-01

    Affective presence is a novel personality construct that describes the tendency of individuals to make their interaction partners feel similarly positive or negative. We adopt this construct, together with the input-process-output model of teamwork, to understand how team leaders influence team interaction and innovation performance. In 2 multisource studies, based on 350 individuals working in 87 teams of 2 public organizations and 734 individuals working in 69 teams of a private organization, we tested and supported hypotheses that team leader positive affective presence was positively related to team information sharing, whereas team leader negative affective presence was negatively related to the same team process. In turn, team information sharing was positively related to team innovation, mediating the effects of leader affective presence on this team output. The results indicate the value of adopting an interpersonal individual differences approach to understanding how affect-related characteristics of leaders influence interaction processes and complex performance in teams. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26783828

  20. Optimal parameters of leader development in lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrov, N. I.; Petrova, G. N.

    1991-01-01

    The dependences between the different parameters of a leader in lightning are obtained theoretically. The physical mechanism of the instability leading to the formation of the streamer zone is proposed. The instability has the wave nature and is caused by the self-influence effects of the space charge. Using a stability condition of the leader propagation, a dependence is obtained between the current across the leader head and its velocity of motion. The dependence of the streamer zone length on the gap length is also obtained. It is shown that the streamer zone length is saturated with the increasing of the gap length. A comparison between the obtained dependences and the experimental data is presented.

  1. The five messages leaders must manage.

    PubMed

    Hamm, John

    2006-05-01

    If you want to know why so many organizations sink into chaos, look no further than their leaders' mouths. Over and over, leaders present grand, overarching-yet fuzzy-notions of where they think the company is going. They assume everyone shares their definitions of"vision;" "accountability," and "results". The result is often sloppy behavior and misalignment that can cost a company dearly. Effective communication is a leader's most critical tool for doing the essential job of leadership: inspiring the organization to take responsibility for creating a better future. Five topics wield extraordinary influence within a company: organizational structure and hierarchy, financial results, the leader's sense of his or her job, time management, and corporate culture. Properly defined, disseminated, and controlled, these topics give the leader opportunities for increased accountability and substantially better performance. For example, one CEO always keeps communications about hierarchy admirably brief and to the point. When he realized he needed to realign internal resources, he told the staff: "I'm changing the structure of resources so that we can execute more effectively." After unveiling a new organization chart, he said, "It's 10:45. You have until noon to be annoyed, should that be your reaction. At noon, pizza will be served. At one o'clock, we go to work in our new positions." The most effective leaders ask themselves, "What needs to happen today to get where we want to go? What vague belief or notion can I clarify or debunk?" A CEO who communicates precisely to ten direct reports, each of whom communicates with equal precision to 40 other employees, aligns the organization's commitment and energy with a well-understood vision of the firm's real goals and opportunities. PMID:16649703

  2. Self-amplifying mRNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Brito, Luis A; Kommareddy, Sushma; Maione, Domenico; Uematsu, Yasushi; Giovani, Cinzia; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Otten, Gillis R; Yu, Dong; Mandl, Christian W; Mason, Peter W; Dormitzer, Philip R; Ulmer, Jeffrey B; Geall, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief introduction to nucleic acid-based vaccines and recent research in developing self-amplifying mRNA vaccines. These vaccines promise the flexibility of plasmid DNA vaccines with enhanced immunogenicity and safety. The key to realizing the full potential of these vaccines is efficient delivery of nucleic acid to the cytoplasm of a cell, where it can amplify and express the encoded antigenic protein. The hydrophilicity and strong net negative charge of RNA impedes cellular uptake. To overcome this limitation, electrostatic complexation with cationic lipids or polymers and physical delivery using electroporation or ballistic particles to improve cellular uptake has been evaluated. This chapter highlights the rapid progress made in using nonviral delivery systems for RNA-based vaccines. Initial preclinical testing of self-amplifying mRNA vaccines has shown nonviral delivery to be capable of producing potent and robust innate and adaptive immune responses in small animals and nonhuman primates. Historically, the prospect of developing mRNA vaccines was uncertain due to concerns of mRNA instability and the feasibility of large-scale manufacturing. Today, these issues are no longer perceived as barriers in the widespread implementation of the technology. Currently, nonamplifying mRNA vaccines are under investigation in human clinical trials and can be produced at a sufficient quantity and quality to meet regulatory requirements. If the encouraging preclinical data with self-amplifying mRNA vaccines are matched by equivalently positive immunogenicity, potency, and tolerability in human trials, this platform could establish nucleic acid vaccines as a versatile new tool for human immunization. PMID:25620012

  3. Meaning of Educating Science Volunteer Leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Masa-aki; Hoshino, T.; Yoshimura, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Uchida, T.; Kawakatsu, H.

    2010-07-01

    We hold many science events for non-scientists such as primary school students and their parents in a year. We prepare and carry out these events with students who are mainly fast-track students belonging to our center. We encourage them to be instructors in some events, and they teach simple science experiments to children and their parents. While they have experiences to hold several events, they learn a lot of science knowledge and experiments gradually, and become so-called science volunteer leaders. In this article, we consider the meaning of educating science volunteer leaders such as them.

  4. Isolation of mRNA from specific tissues of Drosophila by mRNA tagging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiyong; Edenberg, Howard J; Davis, Ronald L

    2005-01-01

    To study the function of specific cells or tissues using genomic tools like microarray analyses, it is highly desirable to obtain mRNA from a homogeneous source. However, this is particularly challenging for small organisms, like Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. We have optimized and applied a new technique, mRNA tagging, to isolate mRNA from specific tissues of D.melanogaster. A FLAG-tagged poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) is expressed in a specific tissue and mRNA from that tissue is thus tagged by the recombinant PABP and separated from mRNA in other tissues by co-immunoprecipitation with a FLAG-tag specific antibody. The fractionated mRNA is then amplified and used as probe in microarray experiments. As a test system, we employed the procedures to identify genes expressed in Drosophila photoreceptor cells. We found that most known photoreceptor cell-specific mRNAs were identified by mRNA tagging. Furthermore, at least 11 novel genes have been identified as enriched in photoreceptor cells. mRNA tagging is a powerful general method for profiling gene expression in specific tissues and for identifying tissue-specific genes. PMID:16204451

  5. Transcriptional and Post-Transcriptional Modulation of SPI1 and SPI2 Expression by ppGpp, RpoS and DksA in Salmonella enterica sv Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Christopher J.; Ramachandran, Vinoy K.; Shearer, Neil; Thompson, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    The expression of genes within Salmonella Pathogenicity Islands 1 and 2 (SPI1, SPI2) is required to facilitate invasion and intracellular replication respectively of S. Typhimurium in host cell lines. Control of their expression is complex and occurs via a variety of factors operating at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels in response to the environmental stimuli found within the host. Several of the factors that modulate SPI1 and SPI2 expression are involved in the redistribution or modification of RNA polymerase (RNAP) specificity. These factors include the bacterial alarmone, ppGpp, the alternative sigma factor, RpoS, and the RNAP accessory protein, DksA. In this report we show not only how these three factors modulate SPI1 and SPI2 expression but also how they contribute to the ‘phased’ expression of SPI1 and SPI2 during progress through late-log and stationary phase in aerobic rich broth culture conditions. In addition, we demonstrate that the expression of at least one SPI1-encoded protein, SipC is subject to DksA-dependent post-transcriptional control. PMID:26039089

  6. Diagnosis of trypanosomatid infections: targeting the spliced leader RNA.

    PubMed

    González-Andrade, Pablo; Camara, Mamady; Ilboudo, Hamidou; Bucheton, Bruno; Jamonneau, Vincent; Deborggraeve, Stijn

    2014-07-01

    Trypanosomatids transcribe their genes in large polycistronic clusters that are further processed into mature mRNA molecules by trans-splicing. During this maturation process, a conserved spliced leader RNA (SL-RNA) sequence of 39 bp is physically linked to the 5' end of the pre-mRNA molecules. Trypanosomatid infections cause a series of devastating diseases in man (sleeping sickness, leishmaniasis, Chagas disease) and animals (nagana, surra, dourine). Here, we investigated the SL-RNA molecule for its diagnostic potential using reverse transcription followed by real-time PCR. As a model, we used Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, which causes sleeping sickness in west and central Africa. We showed that the copy number of the SL-RNA molecule in one single parasitic cell is at least 8600. We observed a lower detection limit of the SL-RNA assay in spiked blood samples of 100 trypanosomes per milliliter of blood. We also proved that we can detect the trypanosome's SL-RNA in the blood of sleeping sickness patients with a sensitivity of 92% (95% CI, 78%-97%) and a specificity of 96% (95% CI, 86%-99%). The SL-RNA is thus an attractive new molecular target for next-generation diagnostics in diseases caused by trypanosomatids. PMID:24814957

  7. Sensitivity of mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    Poker, Gilad; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    Using the dynamic mean-field approximation of the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP), we investigate the effect of small changes in the initiation, elongation, and termination rates along the mRNA strand on the steady-state protein translation rate. We show that the sensitivity of mRNA translation is equal to the sensitivity of the maximal eigenvalue of a symmetric, nonnegative, tridiagonal, and irreducible matrix. This leads to new analytical results as well as efficient numerical schemes that are applicable for large-scale models. Our results show that in the usual endogenous case, when initiation is more rate-limiting than elongation, the sensitivity of the translation rate to small mutations rapidly increases towards the 5′ end of the ORF. When the initiation rate is high, as may be the case for highly expressed and/or heterologous optimized genes, the maximal sensitivity is with respect to the elongation rates at the middle of the mRNA strand. We also show that the maximal possible effect of a small increase/decrease in any of the rates along the mRNA is an increase/decrease of the same magnitude in the translation rate. These results are in agreement with previous molecular evolutionary and synthetic biology experimental studies. PMID:26238363

  8. Nursing Education Leaders' Perceived Leadership Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLong, Dianne

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the leadership practices perceived by nursing education leaders as measured by the Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI). The framework used was a contemporary transformational leadership model described in "The Leadership Challenge" ("4th ed.") by Dr. James Kouzes and Dr. Barry Posner, which identifies the…

  9. School Leaders, ICT Competence and Championing Innovations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Lindsay H.; Mills, Annette M.; Remus, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    The implementation of new technology is becoming more important to schools and the success of such implementations is often due to the presence of ICT champions. This article examines ICT champions to determine whether the intention to champion ICT is determined by the ICT competence of school leaders. This article, based on responses from 64…

  10. The Future of Instructional Teacher Leader Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangin, Melinda M.; Stoelinga, Sara Ray

    2010-01-01

    In response to increased performance expectations, schools and districts are turning to nonsupervisory, school-based, instructional teacher leader roles to help improve teachers' instruction and enhance student learning. Increased opportunities to learn about teacher leadership may facilitate the implementation and institutionalization of…

  11. Lived Experience of University Continuing Education Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landry, Janice

    2011-01-01

    This article is based on a study that explored the professional lives of eight leaders of continuing education in Canadian universities, with a focus on their administrative role, to provide a deeper understanding of how they live within their practice (lived experience). A practical listing of 56 horizons of experience was identified, useful as…

  12. How Leaders Can Make a Big Difference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsh, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Time and collaborative learning experiences are key to successful implementation of literacy standards. Leadership is just as important. What do system and school leaders do that teachers value most and identify as most helpful in their efforts to ensure high-quality literacy and standards-based instruction for all students? According survey…

  13. Review of "Great Teachers and Great Leaders"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaker, Paul

    2010-01-01

    "Great Teachers and Great Leaders" (GTGL) is one of six research summaries issued by the U.S. Department of Education in support of its Blueprint for Reform. This review examines the presentation of research about improving teacher and administrator quality in GTGL. The review concludes that there are serious flaws in the research summary. The…

  14. The New Leader of the Free World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Kevin D.

    2012-01-01

    On January 20, 2009, Dr. Manmohan Singh, the prime minister of India, became the leader of the free world. The free world's attention was focused elsewhere: Senator Barack Obama, who on that day became President Barack Obama, quietly abdicated the role now taken up by Dr. Singh, having run an election campaign premised upon the ever-present but…

  15. The Next Generation of Community College Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArdle, Michele K.

    2013-01-01

    Nearly a decade ago, Sullivan presented her interpretation of the four generations of community college leaders by describing them as "the founding fathers, the good managers, the collaborators, and the millennium generation" (Sullivan, 2001, p. 559). She predicted a shift to frames utilizing the Four-Frame Model of Leadership by Bolman…

  16. Outreach to Future Hispanic Educational Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serafin, Ana Gil

    This paper discusses issues related to the recruitment of Hispanic-American educational leaders, focusing on the El Centro de Recursos Educativos outreach center at Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago, which began operation in Fall 1997. It examines the characteristics of successful programs for Hispanic recruitment and retention and the…

  17. Wise Use of Buy Power: Leader Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Continental Illinois National Bank and Trust Co., Chicago.

    The guide was designed for use by leaders of adult groups working in the area of personal money management. The content of the guide (presented in 10 lessons) includes the following areas reported to be most pressing by persons competent in the field of money management who counsel middle and lower-income groups: the role of advertising in the…

  18. Emory U. Trains Its Own Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selingo, Jeffrey J.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes Emory University's Excellence Through Leadership program. Started in 2006, the yearlong program is designed to help up to 20 administrators and faculty members annually improve their leadership skills, as well as create a pipeline to eventually replace senior leaders at the institution. Emory's leadership program is just one…

  19. Recording the Hard Times: A Leader's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behm, Karen; Futrell, Eloise

    This document contains a leader's guide for Recording the Hard Times, a program designed to help young people between the ages of 11 and 15 handle the stress in their lives or the stress of their friends. It notes that the workbook is designed to be used in a group setting while the specific recording sessions are designed to be completed…

  20. Reflections of a Faraday Challenge Day Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewell, Keira

    2014-01-01

    Keira Sewell has just finished her second year as a Challenge Leader for the Faraday Challenge, a STEM-based scheme run by the Institution of Engineering and Technology. Aimed at 12-13 year-old students, its purpose is to engage students in future careers in engineering. Each year, a new challenge is held in over sixty schools and universities…

  1. Job Satisfaction of Secondary Content Area Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Christine K.

    2012-01-01

    Educational researchers have examined both observed and perceived influences of the job satisfaction levels of secondary teachers and post-secondary department chairs. However, researchers have largely ignored a third group of educators: secondary Content Area Leaders (CALs). The overall satisfaction levels and the potentially influencing factors…

  2. Developing the Girl as a Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hembrow-Beach, Rose

    2011-01-01

    Single-sex educational environments can create young women who are engaged, active leaders. Girls receive differential treatment in combined-sex education environments. Girls often do not receive the encouragement or instruction to assume leadership. I want to identify the elements of single-sex education that foster female leadership and consider…

  3. Best Practices of Successful Elementary School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crum, Karen S.; Sherman, Whitney H.; Myran, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study is one in a series which aims to examine the theories of actions developed and internalized by school principals that help them serve as successful leaders in the tumultuous accountability climate. The dearth of recent empirical research focusing on best practices of successful school principals in a post-NCLB nation sets the…

  4. Lost Leaders: Women in the Global Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morley, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on data gathered from British Council seminars in Hong Kong, Tokyo and Dubai on "Absent Talent: Women in Research and Academic Leadership" (2012-2013), this paper discusses academic women's experiences and explanations for women's under-representation as knowledge leaders and producers in the global academy.…

  5. Financial Resources and What Leaders Should Know.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey, Kate Donnelly

    2001-01-01

    Suggests that credibility and communication are keys to expanding library funding and that library leaders must be aggressive in forging connections both within their institutions and among their communities. Discusses fiscal responsibility and upper administration, finances and staff, and development work. (Author/LRW)

  6. Connecting Leaders and Learning--"In Conversation"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macpherson, Wendy; Dorgan, Fran

    2012-01-01

    Last September ten Australian educators set out to explore how the Paradise Valley School District in Phoenix Arizona cultivates world class thinkers and leaders. Over the course of a week, study Tour delegates were immersed in K-12 schools where a district-wide approach fosters equity and empowers teachers and students to use technology…

  7. Outdoor Leaders' Emotional Intelligence and Transformational Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayashi, Aya; Ewert, Alan

    2006-01-01

    This study explored the concept of outdoor leadership from the perspectives of emotional intelligence and transformational leadership. Levels of emotional intelligence, multifactor leadership, outdoor experience, and social desirability were examined using 46 individuals designated as outdoor leaders. The results revealed a number of unique…

  8. Rural Leaders and Leadership Development in Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Lee L.; Lindsey, Maria Julietta

    2011-01-01

    Throughout Pennsylvania, rural residents have taken on leadership roles to support and promote their communities and their residents. The challenges these leaders face continue to become more complex, as economic, political, social, cultural and even global forces influence local events. This research was conducted to understand how a sample of…

  9. Global Population Trends: Challenges Facing World Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scommegna, Paola, Ed.

    This pamphlet explores the dynamics of world population, highlighting steps world leaders can take to address population problems and improve the lives of people worldwide. With jet-age transportation and electronic communication, economic and social interdependence of nations is greater than ever before and is likely to increase in the future.…

  10. Preparing the Next IT Leaders: Financial Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Karen L.

    2007-01-01

    The next generation of IT leaders must learn to navigate the complexities of higher education financial planning and negotiation. Technology infrastructure, hardware, software, and services are very expensive to provide and will continue to be so for some time to come. Most CIOs have learned about complex IT finances the hard way--they were handed…

  11. Reflections from One Community College Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Velvie

    2008-01-01

    Research on gender provides a framework for understanding what it means to be a woman working within the community college; however, the voice of experience helps to add meaning to what it means to live as a woman leader of color within these institutions. Dr. Green provides a reflection on her career leading up to her presidency, and she outlines…

  12. David Ben-Gurion: A Creative Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosemarin, Shoshana

    2014-01-01

    David Ben-Gurion (1886-1973), the first Prime Minister of Israel, is included in Pasternak's (2001) list of the nine most memorable leaders of the twentieth century. All of them are remembered for the reforms they initiated. Roosevelt (USA), Stalin (Russia), Castro (Cuba), and Thatcher (England) focused on social-economical changes, whereas…

  13. My School Principal Is Not a Leader!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okutan, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of new approaches in educational management, have made mandatory to consider the school administration as "school leader". School principals of today's schools, are obliged to become individuals who influence teachers and students by dint of their personal characteristics, getting rid of being one who utilizes legal…

  14. Suburban District Leaders' Perception of Their Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia France, Roxanne

    2013-01-01

    In the field of district leadership, most studies focus only on the context and conditions existing in large urban districts in need of reform. This study examined whether district leadership practices have applicability to district leaders working within the suburban context. In addition, it determined whether district conditions (i.e., district…

  15. A Framing Primer for Community College Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nausieda, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to be a tool for community college leaders, as well as campus members, to positively and effectively utilize framing on their campuses. The fictional case of Maggie Pascal at Midwestern Community College illustrates the process of framing the change of a new partnership with Wind Energy Corporation to internal…

  16. Creating the Leaders of Tomorrow Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Students who participated in Career and Technical Student Organizations (CTSOs) have gone on to become leaders in business, education, and public service in the nation. Among former CTSO members are university presidents, governors, U.S. Congressmen and Senators, and a former President of the United States, FFA member Jimmy Carter. The CTSOs…

  17. The School Leader's Guide to Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Ronald; Johnston, J. Howard

    2012-01-01

    Social media has exploded onto American culture--including our schools--giving educators a unique opportunity to shape this phenomenon into a powerful tool for improving educational leadership practices. With real-world examples and practical tips, this essential guide shows school leaders how to address both the potential benefits and common…

  18. Using the Expedition Leader Style Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Maurice L.; Phipps, Cynthia A.

    The Expedition Leader Style Analysis (ELSA) is an inventory designed to measure leadership style adaptability and effectiveness in terms of the situational leadership model. Situational leadership arose from the Experiential Leadership Education model, which is used in business and management, by replacing management jargon and phrases with…

  19. A Student Perspective on Leaders and Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruitt, Randall P.

    A survey involving 98 speech communication majors enrolled in a leadership communication course at a large midwestern university was conducted to determine what students in the field of communication think regarding leadership. Respondents were asked for their opinions regarding the ideal traits of leaders, how leadership has changed in the last…

  20. Attributes of Successful Leaders in Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willenberg, Kelly M.

    2014-01-01

    What makes a leader successful? As the Director of Research at the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center's (VICC) Clinical Trials Office, the author had to think of new ways to engage employees when becoming the director nearly 15 years ago. The staff started a GLUE (Greater Loyalty Utilizing Empowerment) Committee. The committee was established to…

  1. Recognizing and Preventing Burnout among Orthopaedic Leaders

    PubMed Central

    Quick, James Campbell; Sime, Wesley E.; Novicoff, Wendy M.; Einhorn, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    Stress, emotional exhaustion, and burnout are widespread in the medical profession in general and in orthopaedic surgery in particular. We attempted to identify variables associated with burnout as assessed by validated instruments. Surveys were sent to 282 leaders from orthopaedic surgery academic departments in the United States by e-mail and mail. Responses were received from 195 leaders for a response rate of 69%. The average surgeon worked 68.3 hours per week and more than ½ of this time was allocated to patient care. Highest stressors included excessive workload, increasing overhead, departmental budget deficits, tenure and promotion, disputes with the dean, and loss of key faculty. Personal-professional life imbalance was identified as an important risk factor for emotional exhaustion. Withdrawal, irritability, and family disagreements are early warning indicators of burnout and emotional exhaustion. Orthopaedic leaders can learn, and potentially model, ways to mitigate stress from other high-stress professions. Building on the strength of marital and family bonds, improving stress management skills and self-regulation, and improving efficiency and productivity can combine to assist the orthopaedic surgery leader in preventing burnout and emotional exhaustion. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11999-008-0622-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:19030943

  2. How Leaders Can Enrich the School Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honaker, Connie J.

    2004-01-01

    Principals are the leaders of their schools, they are responsible for both student and professional learning. With thought, organization, and communication, welcoming and assisting beginning teachers as they enter their new profession can be done efficiently and effectively. An administrator who not only understands the difficult induction year,…

  3. Role Perceptions and Satisfaction with Leader Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creed, Philip J.; Enns, Frederick

    1979-01-01

    Reports on a study of the levels of personal and job satisfaction experienced by employees in the central office of a large urban school system as they responded to the leader behavior of their immediate superiors. The study tests aspects of propositions put forward in Path-Goal Theory. (Author/IRT)

  4. Virtual Mentoring: Developing Global Leaders for Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohlson, Matthew; Froman, Russell

    2012-01-01

    CAMP (Collegiate Achievement Mentoring Program) Gator is a leadership-mentoring program in which collegiate student leaders serve as mentors to at-risk K-12 students. In addition, partnerships with Cisco and Franklin Covey Education have provided the program with the technology resources to conduct "virtual leadership mentoring" sessions with…

  5. The Conductor as a Transformational Leader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Susan; Armstrong, Scott

    1996-01-01

    Identifies charisma and inspirational leadership as the most important characteristics of transformational leaders. Discusses how middle and secondary school music conductors can use the transformational leadership model. Summarizes key components of this model including positive modeling, sharing vision, and empowering others. Provides relevant…

  6. Presidential Power and the Modern College Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcy, Mary B.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author notes that an academic institution is essentially a political, not a corporate, system, and that its leader is more akin to the president of the United States than to a corporate chief executive. This is in spite of the argument, particularly when defending the compensation of college presidents, that leading an…

  7. Making Progress as Leaders among University Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quah, Cheng Sim; Sim, Sandra Phek Lin

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the overview of how individuals in their respective teams operated and contributed to their organization. This study also identified the salient characteristics of how the respondents made progress as leaders in their respective faculties or departments towards identifying directions for innovative future practice through…

  8. Values Perception and Future Educational Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Robert P.; Norris, Cynthia J.

    1991-01-01

    Describes an effort to incorporate personal values awareness into a university preparation program aimed at future school administrators. This model allows future leaders opportunities to identify the values governing their actions, clarify their philosophical leadership foundations, reflect on current educational practices, and determine…

  9. Teacher Leaders: A Catalyst for Instructional Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pate, James L.; James, Lori; Leech, Donald

    2005-01-01

    The concept of the principal as the sole instructional leader of a school is quickly changing. Substantial evidence from schools with successful instructional programs indicate this responsibility has been spread among many staff members. Teachers who have been trained in the functions of leadership, instruction, and student learning are becoming…

  10. Leader Challenge: What Would You Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Chris; Self, Nate; Garven, Sena; Allen, Nate

    2011-01-01

    Given the complex environment in which the U.S. military operates, leaders at all levels must be prepared for a force that is more responsive to regional combatant commanders needs, better employs joint capabilities, facilitates force packaging and rapid deployment, and fights self contained units in non-linear, non-contiguous battle space. This…

  11. Resilient Women Leaders: A Qualitative Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Julia; Maldonado, Nancy L.; Lacey, Candace H.; Efinger, Joan

    2004-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated perceptions of resilient, transformational, successful women leaders regarding their own resiliency and leadership. The ten participants provided information during semi-structured, open-ended, audio taped interviews which were transcribed, hand coded, and then analyzed with QSR N6 software. Findings indicated…

  12. Mexican-American: Movements and Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larralde, Carlos

    Biographical studies of 20 influential Chicano leaders trace Mexican American history from 1848 to the present. The book is organized chronologically by four historical periods: (1) The Cortinista Movement, 1848-1876; (2) The Teresita Movement, 1888-1905; (3) The Magonista Movement, 1904-1919; and (4) The Chicano Activists, 1920 ;o the present.…

  13. Leaders as Linchpins for Framing Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddy, Pamela L.

    2010-01-01

    Community college leaders serve as linchpins for framing meaning on campus. The current pressures on institutions (given declining financial resources, demands for accountability, changing faculty ranks, and societal need for new knowledge) require presidents to juggle multiple priorities while presenting a cohesive message to campus constituents.…

  14. The Right Leader at the Right Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Mark F.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the importance of educational leadership's sustainability and finding the right leader to fit in the system at the right time. Just as book quality and preferences vary from author to author and critic to critic, the quality of educational leadership and the culture of individual schools or school districts…

  15. Poison Awareness: A Discussion Leader's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Evaluation Systems, Inc., Amherst, MA.

    Because over 40,000 children are annually poisoned by household products, this guide for group leaders emphasizes hazards and preventive actions. Major objectives are defined: (1) to raise the audience's knowledge/awareness level concerning major hazards associated with potentially poisonous household products, (2) to point out primary hazard…

  16. Coach as Transformational Leader: Pragmatic Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, C. B.; Dierks, Dan

    The Transformational Leadership theory proposed by J. M. Burns (1978) may be profitably applied to the role of debate/forensic coach. A Transformational Leader aims to fulfill the personal needs of followers by giving them the power to think and act for themselves, thus empowering them to work toward the group vision. A Transformational Leader…

  17. Strategic Thinking: The Untapped Resource for Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfred, Richard L.

    2001-01-01

    Strategic thinking is an organized, analytical process by which college leaders can assess: (1) existing and potential competitors; (2) sources of competitive advantage; and (3) college capabilities and competitive position. Three outcomes of strategic thinking are: (1) clear institutional strategy and direction; (2) improved institutional…

  18. Emerging Leaders: AED's Open World Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Sandra

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Open World Program, funded and administered by the Library of Congress, with support from private organizations such as the Academy for Educational Development (AED). Open World Program allows community colleges to participate by hosting delegations from other countries. Some themes include: environment, women as leaders, economic…

  19. Industry Leader Perceptions of Workplace Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Erik Scott

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the perceptions of workplace safety held by industry leaders who were near completion of a Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree. This was a qualitative study that utilized interpretivism as the theoretical framework. The study sought to answer four research questions. (1) How do participants conceptualize…

  20. Tennessee Killing Underscores Job Dangers for Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonn, Jessica L.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author stresses the dangers facing school leaders on the job. The school shooting at Campbell County Comprehensive High School in Jacksboro, Tennessee, on November 8, 2005, which left one assistant principal dead and the principal and another assistant principal seriously wounded, is an extreme example of dangers school…

  1. Principals' Collaborative Roles as Leaders for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitchen, Margaret; Gray, Susan; Jeurissen, Maree

    2016-01-01

    This article draws on data from three multicultural New Zealand primary schools to reconceptualize principals' roles as leaders for learning. In doing so, the writers build on Sinnema and Robinson's (2012) article on goal setting in principal evaluation. Sinnema and Robinson found that even principals hand-picked for their experience fell short on…

  2. Trip Leaders Guide. Outdoor Expeditions and Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leister, Bob

    Written to help teachers or leaders plan and lead field trips, excursions, or expeditions which stimulate a motivation to positive action, this pamphlet provides assistance in conducting learning experiences outside the classroom. Topics and subtopics discussed include: (1) Campsites: selection; firebuilding; knives, axes, saws; neat campsites;…

  3. Caesar Chavez: Labor Leader. Hispanic Heritage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cedeno, Maria E.

    Written for young people, this book traces the accomplishments of Cesar Chavez, a labor leader who fought to improve the lives of Mexican-American farmworkers in California. Chavez was born in 1927 in the Gila Valley, Arizona. When Chavez was 10, his family lost their farm and was forced to move to California and become migrant workers. Chavez and…

  4. For Creative Leaders: False Starts, Happy Mistakes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armes, Nancy

    1983-01-01

    Discusses creativity and the creative process. Delineates four habits that may be prevalent among community college educators that inhibit creativity (e.g., the pursuit of perfection and the need for personal control). Argues for creativity in leadership and suggests strategies by which educational leaders may encourage their own and others'…

  5. Exploring emotional intelligence. Implications for nursing leaders.

    PubMed

    Vitello-Cicciu, Joan M

    2002-04-01

    Emotional intelligence is being touted in the popular literature as an important characteristic for successful leaders. However, caution needs to be exercised regarding the connection between emotional intelligence and workplace success. The author contrasts 2 current models of emotional intelligence, the measurements being used, and the ability of emotional intelligence to predict success. Implications for the workplace are discussed. PMID:11984256

  6. Servant Leader Development at Southeastern University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohm, Fredric W., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Servant leadership as envisioned by Robert Greenleaf (1970) is a philosophy whereby leaders put the interests and growth of the follower ahead of themselves. Though the concept has been around since antiquity, scholars and practitioners in organizations began to embrace and expand the idea since the early 1990s. There are currently 20 models of…

  7. Leaders Go to School on Business Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    Lots of districts like to think they have close-knit leadership teams. But few school leaders can say they've ironed their clothes together, which became a morning ritual for a group from San Francisco that spent a week at the Harvard Business School in Boston. Joined by similar teams from seven other large districts, they camped out in dorm-like…

  8. A Vision for Tomorrow: Transformational Nursing Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Kelley

    2002-01-01

    Interviews with eight transformational nursing leaders revealed that all strive for excellence, value integrity, shape their environment for success, demonstrate perseverance, attempt to improve the lives of others, possess a genuine love for people, motivate others, invent the future, and share the path toward self-discovery. (Contains 24…

  9. College Prep: A Timeline for Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Howard; Williamson, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Everyone acknowledges the importance of leadership in good schools, but sometimes a leader's influence extends into unexpected areas. Getting admitted to and succeeding in college is certainly the result of hard work on the part of individual students and their families, but for many kids, particularly those from impoverished backgrounds or from…

  10. The Learning Leader: Reflecting, Modeling, and Sharing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Jacqueline E.; O'Gorman, Kevin L.

    2012-01-01

    With this book, principals, principals-in-training, and other school leaders get practical, easy-to-implement strategies for professional growth, strengthening relationships with faculty and staff, and making the necessary changes to improve K-12 learning environments. Grounded in specific, real-world examples and personal experiences, "The…

  11. The Professional Development of Kosovan Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goddard, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    In this article the author provides a discussion around issues related to the professional development of educational leaders in a resource-free, post-conflict environment. Drawing upon the author's ongoing experiences (2001-present) in Kosovo, the author presents a series of vignettes concerning leadership development in the Balkans. Lessons…

  12. Lead on! Motivational Lessons for School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Pete

    2012-01-01

    Every school leader will benefit from this must-have book by award-winning educator Pete Hall. In it he shares his wisdom, insights, and lessons lived and learned with educators at all stages of their careers. His lively, readable style makes it easy to follow his practical tips and strategies for taking action, goal-setting, motivating others,…

  13. Characteristics of successful aviation leaders of Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutz, Mary N. Hill

    Scope and method of study. The purpose of the study was to examine the personal traits, skills, practices, behaviors, background, academic, and career success patterns of selected aviation leaders in Oklahoma. A purposive sample of 18 leaders who had achieved a top-ranked position of aviation leadership in an organization or a position of influence in the community was selected for interview. The leaders chosen for interview came from a variety of aviation organizations including government, academia, military, corporate aviation, and air carrier leadership as well as community leadership (specifically those aviation personnel who were engaged in a political or civic leadership role). Findings and conclusions. This study identified no common career choices, educational, family, or other background factors exclusively responsible for leadership success of all of the participants. Some of the more significant findings were that a high percentage of the leaders held undergraduate and advanced degrees; however, success had been achieved by some who had little or no college education. Aviation technical experience was not a prerequisite for aviation leadership success in that a significant number of the participants held no airman rating and some had entered positions of aviation leadership from non-aviation related careers. All had received some positive learning experience from their family background even those backgrounds which were less than desirable. All of the participants had been involved in volunteer civic or humanitarian leadership roles, and all had received numerous honors. The most frequently identified value expressed by the leaders was honesty; the predominant management style was participative with a strong backup style for directing, the most important skills were communication and listening skills, and the most frequently mentioned characteristics of success were honesty, credibility, vision, high standards, love for aviation and fiscal

  14. Athletic Training Clinical Instructors as Situational Leaders

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Linda Platt

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To present Situational Leadership as a model that can be implemented by clinical instructors during clinical education. Effective leadership occurs when the leadership style is matched with the observed followers' characteristics. Effective leaders anticipate and assess change and adapt quickly and grow with the change, all while leading followers to do the same. As athletic training students' levels of readiness change, clinical instructors also need to transform their leadership styles and strategies to match the students' ever-changing observed needs in different situations. Data Sources: CINAHL (1982–2002), MEDLINE (1990–2001), SPORT Discus (1949–2002), ERIC (1966–2002), and Internet Web sites were searched. Search terms included leadership, situational leadership, clinical instructors and leadership, teachers as leaders, and clinical education. Data Synthesis: Situational Leadership is presented as a leadership model to be used by clinical instructors while teaching and supervising athletic training students in the clinical setting. This model can be implemented to improve the clinical-education process. Situational leaders, eg, clinical instructors, must have the flexibility and range of skills to vary their leadership styles to match the challenges that occur while teaching athletic training students. Conclusions/Recommendations: This leadership style causes the leader to carry a substantial responsibility to lead while giving power away. Communication is one of the most important leadership skills to develop to become an effective leader. It is imperative for the future of the profession that certified athletic trainers continue to develop effective leadership skills to address the changing times in education and expectations of the athletic training profession. PMID:12937555

  15. The Value of Physician Leaders to Nonphysician Coworkers.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    With few exceptions, physician leaders are perceived as valuable to their organizations, helping to define goals, set priorities, and plan future direction. In some cases, however, physician leaders are misunderstood or devalued by senior business leaders. There could be several reasons for this observation: (1) the roles and responsibilities of physician leaders may be unclear to business leaders; (2) nonmedical leaders may question the business relevance of the activities performed by physician leaders; and (3) some business executives may believe (erroneously) that the activities performed by physician leaders are nonessential, or could be performed equally well by lesser trained healthcare professionals. Under such circumstances, physicians may become demoralized and indignant, but they should never lose sight of their importance to the everyday coworkers who are the most valuable asset of any organization. PMID:26223099

  16. Observations of corona in triggered dart-stepped leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamerota, W. R.; Uman, M. A.; Hill, J. D.; Jordan, D. M.

    2015-03-01

    Corona streamers are a critical component of lightning leader step formation and are postulated to produce the very high electric fields at their tips that produce runaway electrons resulting in the observed X-ray bursts associated with leader stepping. Corona emanating from the vicinity of the leader tip between leader steps was analyzed using three sequential high-speed video sequences of dart-stepped leaders in three different triggered lightning flashes during the summers of 2013 and 2014 in northeast Florida. Images were recorded at 648 kiloframes per second (1.16 µs exposure time, 380 ns dead time) at an altitude of 65 m or less. In each image sequence, the leader propagates downward in consecutive frames, with corona streamers observed to fan outward from the bright leader tip in less than the image frame time of about 1.5 µs. In 21 exposures, corona streamers propagate, on average, 9 m below the bright leader tip.

  17. Engaging the next generation of health leaders: perspectives of emerging health leaders.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Jennifer C; Gruenwoldt, Emily; Lyster, Adrienne Hagen

    2011-01-01

    Identifying and engaging the next generation of emerging health leaders (EHLs) is a foremost challenge for the Canadian healthcare system. If intellectual capital is the currency of the 21st century, identifying and developing EHLs must be a strategic objective of innovative and progressive health organizations. We have integrated our experiential knowledge with some relevant findings from the literature and data collected from a cohort of EHLs to assist senior leaders and organizations with this challenge. PMID:21630621

  18. Aspiring and Residing IT Leaders: A Legacy for the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Keith W.

    2012-01-01

    Many people think there is a quick road to leadership success. Those who want to become IT leaders--that is, "aspiring leaders"--often think: "If I just do my job well, I will rise to a leadership position." Those who are already IT leaders--that is, "residing leaders"--often think: "If I just do my job well, I will leave a lasting legacy." Doing…

  19. One member, two leaders: extending leader-member exchange theory to a dual leadership context.

    PubMed

    Vidyarthi, Prajya R; Erdogan, Berrin; Anand, Smriti; Liden, Robert C; Chaudhry, Anjali

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we develop and test a model that extends leader-member exchange (LMX) theory to a dual leadership context. Drawing upon relative deprivation theory, we assert that when employees work for 2 leaders, each relationship exists within the context of the other relationship. Thus, the level of alignment or misalignment between the 2 relationships has implications for employees' job satisfaction and voluntary turnover. Employing polynomial regression on time-lagged data gathered from 159 information technology consultants nested in 26 client projects, we found that employee outcomes are affected by the quality of the relationship with both agency and client leaders, such that the degree of alignment between the 2 LMXs explained variance in outcomes beyond that explained by both LMXs. Results also revealed that a lack of alignment in the 2 LMXs led to asymmetric effects on outcomes, such that the relationship with agency leader mattered more than the relationship with one's client leader. Finally, frequency of communication with the agency leader determined the degree to which agency LMX affected job satisfaction in the low client LMX condition. PMID:24417554

  20. The Hidden Leader: Leadership Lessons on the Potential Within

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brubaker, Dale L.; Coble, Larry D.

    2004-01-01

    The best leaders are visionaries--individuals who possess a strong sense of purpose that inspires and motivates others. This book offers practical tools and insights designed to help school leaders access the power of their personal vision and translate it into truly dynamic leadership. This exciting new guide to becoming an authentic leader is…

  1. Healthcare Leaders' Intention to Serve as Organizational Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aggarwal, Sushma Kumari

    2014-01-01

    Today's organizational leaders are expected to actively participate and facilitate learning. A highly engaged and knowledgeable workforce, inspired by leaders, may increase the quality of service, and aid in maintaining and attracting loyal employees and customers. These leaders are now being asked to serve as organizational teachers. However,…

  2. Teachers and Coaches as Leaders Demonstrating Character and Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumpkin, Angela

    2010-01-01

    In a time of scandalous actions and me-first behaviors, teachers and coaches as leaders of character and competence are needed. Leaders have integrity and demonstrate their character by adhering to moral principles and displaying moral values. The competence of leaders is based on knowledge, skills, and abilities and enhanced by exploring varying…

  3. What Do Students Experience as Peer Leaders of Learning Teams?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Erik C.; Robbins, Brett A.; Loui, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    In a course for engineering freshmen, peer leaders facilitated optional study sessions, which implemented peer-led team learning workshops. Some leaders were paid teaching assistants, but most were undergraduate volunteers. To understand the experiences of the peer leaders, we asked them to keep weekly reflective journals. By performing a basic…

  4. Learn to Lead: Mapping Workplace Learning of School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulsbos, Frank Arnoud; Evers, Arnoud Theodoor; Kessels, Joseph Willem Marie

    2016-01-01

    In recent years policy makers' interest in the professional development of school leaders has grown considerably. Although we know some aspect of formal educational programs for school leaders, little is known about school leaders' incidental and non-formal learning in the workplace. This study aims to grasp what workplace learning activities…

  5. How External Institutions Penetrate Schools through Formal and Informal Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Min; Frank, Kenneth A.; Penuel, William R.; Kim, Chong Min

    2013-01-01

    Purposes: This study investigates the role of formal and informal leaders in the diffusion of external reforms into schools and to teachers' practices. Formal leaders are designated by their roles in the formal organization of the school (e.g., principals, department chairs, and instructional coaches) and informal leaders refer to those who…

  6. School Leader Succession: A Description of Transitional Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Judith A.

    2007-01-01

    This qualitative case study describes the transitional experiences (first 4 1/2 months) of four school leaders. The "life cycle" of leaders is often short, necessitating job changes with resulting transitions, when new leaders must simultaneously learn their positions and make changes to improve schools. Using previous leadership…

  7. The Uniform Salary Schedule: A Progressive Leader Proposes Differential Pay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jupp, Brad

    2005-01-01

    For at least two and a half decades, political leaders and opinion makers have been telling teachers and union leaders that it is high time to move away from the single salary schedule. For a long time, it was easy for teachers and union leaders to dismiss those calls for change. Recently, with more voices joining the choir calling for change, it…

  8. Leading Coherently: Reflections from Leaders around the World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford-Blair, Nancy; Dickmann, Michael H.

    2005-01-01

    "Leading Coherently" draws insight from 36 exemplary leaders to describe a natural and potent relationship between leadership formation, performance, and sustainability. Through sharing their leadership stories, leaders from across the globe reveal prominent themes about how leaders are formed to the role of influencing others toward the…

  9. The Preparation of Inclusive Social Justice Education Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celoria, Davide

    2016-01-01

    This article is intended to spark dialogue and debate related to the preparation of inclusive social justice education leaders in a time of colorblindness. Drawing attention to the reductionist construction of the professional standards for educational leaders when it comes to preparing educational leaders who are ready to address and eliminate…

  10. Expertise of Team Leaders in Analysing Team Conflicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupprecht, Maria; Strasser, Josef; Gruber, Hans; Harteis, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Team leaders are expected to adequately analyse team conflicts. Both content and analytical depth of cognitive processes determine team leaders' performance and are assumed to differ with level of expertise. A study is reported in which team leaders at four different levels of expertise (novices, semi-experts, experts, mediators) were compared in…

  11. Ethical Practice: A Study of Chilean School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuellar, Carolina; Giles, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This article seeks to report on a research inquiry that explored the educational praxis of ethical school leaders in Chile. Behaving ethically is an imperative for school leaders. Being an ethical educational leader is something different. It is not only about behaving according to standards, but also rather involves an ethical way of…

  12. Heterosexual Student Leader Attitudes Regarding Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horne, Sharon; Rice, N. Dewaine; Israel, Tania

    2004-01-01

    This study examined student leaders' attitudes towards lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) students and compared resident advisors' (RAs) attitudes to those of other student leaders. Despite careful selection, training, and supervision of RAs, results revealed no differences between RAs' attitudes and those of other student leaders. The number of LGB…

  13. 26 CFR 31.3121(o)-1 - Crew leader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Crew leader. 31.3121(o)-1 Section 31.3121(o)-1... Contributions Act (Chapter 21, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) General Provisions § 31.3121(o)-1 Crew leader. The... crew leader within the meaning of section 3121(o) and of this section if he does not pay...

  14. 26 CFR 31.3121(o)-1 - Crew leader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Crew leader. 31.3121(o)-1 Section 31.3121(o)-1... Contributions Act (Chapter 21, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) General Provisions § 31.3121(o)-1 Crew leader. The... crew leader within the meaning of section 3121(o) and of this section if he does not pay...

  15. Teacher Leader Model Standards: Implications for Preparation, Policy, and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Jill Harrison; Carver, Cynthia L.; Mangin, Melinda M.

    2014-01-01

    Teacher leadership is increasingly recognized as a resource for instructional improvement. Consequently, teacher leader initiatives have expanded rapidly despite limited knowledge about how to prepare and support teacher leaders. In this context, the "Teacher Leader Model Standards" represent an important development in the field. In…

  16. Christian School Leaders and Spirituality: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banke, Susan; Maldonado, Nancy; Lacey, Candace H.

    2011-01-01

    This phenomenological study examined the spiritual experiences of Christian school leaders who are the spiritual leaders of their schools. A purposeful, nominated sample of 12 Christian school leaders was selected. In-depth, open-ended interviews were conducted, audio taped, and then transcribed verbatim. Data analysis was based on Rudestam and…

  17. Eta Sigma Gamma: Preparing Leaders Today for Tomorrow's Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kelli McCormack

    2007-01-01

    There is no one definition for a leader or for leadership, but most people can identify a leader and can provide qualities of a good leader or good leadership. The founders of Eta Gamma Gamma--William Bock, Warren Schaller, and Robert Synovitz--all displayed a critical characteristic of leadership by having and acting on a vision. Leadership has…

  18. 26 CFR 31.3121(o)-1 - Crew leader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Crew leader. 31.3121(o)-1 Section 31.3121(o)-1... Contributions Act (Chapter 21, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) General Provisions § 31.3121(o)-1 Crew leader. The... crew leader within the meaning of section 3121(o) and of this section if he does not pay...

  19. 26 CFR 31.3121(o)-1 - Crew leader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Crew leader. 31.3121(o)-1 Section 31.3121(o)-1... Contributions Act (Chapter 21, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) General Provisions § 31.3121(o)-1 Crew leader. The... crew leader within the meaning of section 3121(o) and of this section if he does not pay...

  20. 26 CFR 31.3121(o)-1 - Crew leader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Crew leader. 31.3121(o)-1 Section 31.3121(o)-1... Contributions Act (Chapter 21, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) General Provisions § 31.3121(o)-1 Crew leader. The... crew leader within the meaning of section 3121(o) and of this section if he does not pay...

  1. Mechanism of Cytoplasmic mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a fundamental process in gene expression that depends upon the abundance and accessibility of the mRNA transcript as well as the activity of many protein and RNA-protein complexes. Here we focus on the intricate mechanics of mRNA translation in the cytoplasm of higher plants. This chapter includes an inventory of the plant translational apparatus and a detailed review of the translational processes of initiation, elongation, and termination. The majority of mechanistic studies of cytoplasmic translation have been carried out in yeast and mammalian systems. The factors and mechanisms of translation are for the most part conserved across eukaryotes; however, some distinctions are known to exist in plants. A comprehensive understanding of the complex translational apparatus and its regulation in plants is warranted, as the modulation of protein production is critical to development, environmental plasticity and biomass yield in diverse ecosystems and agricultural settings. PMID:26019692

  2. Helping Leaders Help Youth. An Evaluation Report of a Program for Illinois Volunteer 4-H Leaders, 1973-75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Cooperative Extension Service.

    Conceived by the staff of the University of Illinois Cooperative Extension Service as a means of aiding County Extension Advisors in working with volunteer 4-H leaders in Illinois, "Helping Leaders Help Youth" employed a combination of vinyl sound sheets for home study and a leader development meeting series supported by audiovisual aids and…

  3. A 5'-proximal RNA sequence of murine coronavirus as a potential initiation site for genomic-length mRNA transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X; Lai, M M

    1996-01-01

    Coronavirus transcription is a discontinuous process, involving interactions between a trans-acting leader and the intergenic transcription initiation sequences. A 9-nucleotide (nt) sequence (UUUAUAAAC), which is located immediately downstream of the leader at the 5' terminus of the mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) genomic RNA, contains a sequence resembling the consensus intergenic sequence (UCUAAAC). It has been shown previously that the presence of the 9-nt sequence facilitates leader RNA switching and may enhance subgenomic mRNA transcription. It is unclear how the 9-nt sequence exerts these functions. In this study, we inserted the 9-nt sequence into a defective interfering (DI) RNA reporter system and demonstrated that mRNA transcription could be initiated from the 9-nt sequence almost as efficiently as from the intergenic sequence between genes 6 and 7. Sequence analysis of the mRNAs showed that the 9-nt sequence served as a site of fusion between the leaders and mRNA. The transcription initiation function of the 9-nt sequence could not be substituted by other 5'-terminal sequences. When the entire 5'-terminal sequence, including four copies of the UCUAA sequence plus the 9-nt sequence, was present, transcription could be initiated from any of the UCUAA copies or the 9-nt sequence, resulting in different copy numbers of the UCUAA sequence and the deletion of the 9-nt sequence in some mRNAs. All of these heterogeneous RNA species were also detected from the 5'-terminal region of the viral genomic-length RNA in MHV-infected cells. These results thus suggest tha the heterogeneity of the copy number of UCUAA sequences at the 5' end, the deletion of the 9-nt sequence in viral and DI RNAs, and the leader RNA switching are the results of transcriptional initiation from the 9-nt site. They also show that an mRNA species (mRNA 1) that lacks the 9-nt sequence can be synthesized during MHV infection. Therefore, MHV genomic RNA replication and mRNA 1 transcription may be

  4. Leader communication styles and organizational health.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Joel M

    2011-01-01

    Communication is perhaps one of the greatest challenges facing managers and leaders today. Clearly articulating ideas and expectations to employees is vital to the productivity and the longevity of an organization. Furthermore, the style in which the communication is delivered has an influence on the satisfaction levels of employees. Research has discovered that there are many different styles in which a leader may communicate with employees. Research has provided several methods that aid in determining which style is the most appropriate for any given circumstance. Research has demonstrated how appropriate and effective communication is used to promote organizational health. Furthermore, research has demonstrated how inappropriate communication may decrease employee satisfaction. Finally, research has provided methods to aid in improving communication styles and delivery. PMID:21248553

  5. Why leaders punish: A power perspective.

    PubMed

    Mooijman, Marlon; van Dijk, Wilco W; Ellemers, Naomi; van Dijk, Eric

    2015-07-01

    We propose that power fundamentally changes why leaders punish and we develop a theoretical model that specifies how and why this occurs. Specifically, we argue that power increases the reliance on deterrence, but not just deserts, as a punishment motive and relate this to power fostering a distrustful mindset. We tested our model in 9 studies using different instantiations of power, different measurements and manipulations of distrust while measuring punishment motives and recommended punishments across a number of different situations. These 9 studies demonstrate that power fosters distrust and hereby increases both the reliance on deterrence as a punishment motive and the implementation of punishments aimed at deterrence (i.e., public punishments, public naming of rule breakers and punishments with a mandatory minimum). We discuss the practical implications for leaders, managers and policymakers and the theoretical implications for scholars interested in power, trust, and punishments. PMID:26030053

  6. The evolution of spliced leader trans-splicing in nematodes.

    PubMed

    Pettitt, Jonathan; Harrison, Neale; Stansfield, Ian; Connolly, Bernadette; Müller, Berndt

    2010-08-01

    Spliced leader trans-splicing occurs in many primitive eukaryotes including nematodes. Most of our knowledge of trans-splicing in nematodes stems from the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans and relatives, and from work with Ascaris. Our investigation of spliced leader trans-splicing in distantly related Dorylaimia nematodes indicates that spliced-leader trans-splicing arose before the nematode phylum and suggests that the spliced leader RNA gene complements in extant nematodes have evolved from a common ancestor with a diverse set of spliced leader RNA genes. PMID:20659016

  7. Creativity and the role of the leader.

    PubMed

    Amabile, Teresa M; Khaire, Mukti

    2008-10-01

    In today's innovation-driven economy, understanding how to generate great ideas has become an urgent managerial priority. Suddenly, the spotlight has turned on the academics who've studied creativity for decades. How relevant is their research to the practical challenges leaders face? To connect theory and practice, Harvard Business School professors Amabile and Khaire convened a two-day colloquium of leading creativity scholars and executives from companies such as Google, IDEO, Novartis, Intuit, and E Ink. In this article, the authors present highlights of the research presented and the discussion of its implications. At the event, a new leadership agenda began to take shape, one rooted in the awareness that you can't manage creativity--you can only manage for creativity. A number of themes emerged: The leader's job is not to be the source of ideas but to encourage and champion ideas. Leaders must tap the imagination of employees at all ranks and ask inspiring questions. They also need to help their organizations incorporate diverse perspectives, which spur creative insights, and facilitate creative collaboration by, for instance, harnessing new technologies. The participants shared tactics for enabling discoveries, as well as thoughts on how to bring process to bear on creativity without straitjacketing it. They pointed out that process management isn't appropriate in all stages of creative work; leaders should apply it thoughtfully and manage the handoff from idea generators to commercializers deftly. The discussion also examined the need to clear paths through bureaucracy, weed out weak ideas, and maximize the organization's learning from failure. Though points of view varied, the theories and frameworks explored advance the understanding of creativity in business and offer executives a playbook for increasing innovation. PMID:18822674

  8. Where will we find tomorrow's leaders?

    PubMed

    Hill, Linda A

    2008-01-01

    Unless we challenge long-held assumptions about how business leaders are supposed to act and where they're supposed to come from, many people who could become effective global leaders will remain invisible, warns Harvard Business School professor Hill. Instead of assuming that leaders must exhibit take-charge behavior, broaden the definition of leadership to include creating a context in which other people are willing and able to guide the organization. And instead of looking for the next generation of global leaders in huge Western corporations and elite business schools, expand the search to developing countries. In this conversation with HBR senior editor Paul Hemp, Hill describes the changing nature of leadership and what we can learn from parts of the world where people have not, until recently, had opportunities to become globally savvy executives. In South Africa, for instance, the African National Congress has provided rigorous leadership preparation for many black executives. Hill has also observed two approaches--in developed and developing economies alike--that she believes will be necessary in an increasingly complex business environment. The first, leading from behind, involves letting people hand off the reins to one another, depending on their strengths, as situations change. The second, leadership as collective genius, calls for both unleashing and harnessing individuals' collective talents, particularly to spur innovation. Through her descriptions of these approaches in such companies as Sekunjalo Investments, HCL Technologies, and IBM, Hill highlights the challenges of finding and preparing people who can lead by stepping back and letting others come forward to make their own judgments and take risks. PMID:18271324

  9. Ames Lab Named an Industry Safety Leader

    SciTech Connect

    Wessels, Tom

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has been named a 2010 Industry Leader Award winner by the National Safety Council. The Ames Laboratory was one of only 81 companies/organizations to receive the award for their safety performance and the only DOE national laboratory on the list. The award represents the top 5 percent of members that have qualified for the National Safety Council 2010 Occupational Excellence Achievement Award, based on 2009 calendar year data.

  10. Ames Lab Named an Industry Safety Leader

    ScienceCinema

    Wessels, Tom

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has been named a 2010 Industry Leader Award winner by the National Safety Council. The Ames Laboratory was one of only 81 companies/organizations to receive the award for their safety performance and the only DOE national laboratory on the list. The award represents the top 5 percent of members that have qualified for the National Safety Council 2010 Occupational Excellence Achievement Award, based on 2009 calendar year data.

  11. The Lactobacillus acidophilus S-layer protein gene expression site comprises two consensus promoter sequences, one of which directs transcription of stable mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Boot, H J; Kolen, C P; Andreadaki, F J; Leer, R J; Pouwels, P H

    1996-01-01

    S-proteins are proteins which form a regular structure (S-layer) on the outside of the cell walls of many bacteria. Two S-protein-encoding genes are located in opposite directions on a 6.0-kb segment of the chromosome of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 bacteria. Inversion of this chromosomal segment occurs through recombination between two regions with identical sequences, thereby interchanging the expressed and the silent genes. In this study, we show that the region involved in recombination also has a function in efficient S-protein production. Two promoter sequences are present in the S-protein gene expression site, although only the most downstream promoter (P-1) is used to direct mRNA synthesis. S-protein mRNA directed by this promoter has a half-life of 15 min. Its untranslated leader can form a stable secondary structure in which the 5' end is base paired, whereas the ribosome-binding site is exposed. Truncation of this leader sequence results in a reduction in protein production, as shown by reporter gene analysis of Lactobacillus casei. The results obtained indicate that the untranslated leader sequence of S-protein mRNA is involved in efficient S-protein production. PMID:8808926

  12. Working well with the informal leaders in your practice.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Anyone with an up-to-date organizational chart can determine the formal leadership roles in a medical practice. What many practice administrators fail to realize, however, is that there is another, complementary leadership model that exists between the lines in an org chart: informal leadership. This article defines the term informal leadership and describes informal leaders' three bases of power. It suggests seven characteristics of informal leaders and the specific techniques a practice administrator can use to identify the real informal leaders in the practice. This article also offers practice administrators practical tips for dealing effectively with informal leaders who oppose them. It suggests strategies for counseling a reluctant informal leader and for developing the informal leaders in a medical practice. Finally, this article argues that informal leaders can be a source of great help for medical practices that have been downsized or restructured. PMID:25807624

  13. Identifying Network Public Opinion Leaders Based on Markov Logic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weizhe; Li, Xiaoqiang; He, Hui; Wang, Xing

    2014-01-01

    Public opinion emergencies have important effect on social activities. Recognition of special communities like opinion leaders can contribute to a comprehensive understanding of the development trend of public opinion. In this paper, a network opinion leader recognition method based on relational data was put forward, and an opinion leader recognition system integrating public opinion data acquisition module, data characteristic selection, and fusion module as well as opinion leader discovery module based on Markov Logic Networks was designed. The designed opinion leader recognition system not only can overcome the incomplete data acquisition and isolated task of traditional methods, but also can recognize opinion leaders comprehensively with considerations to multiple problems by using the relational model. Experimental results demonstrated that, compared with the traditional methods, the proposed method can provide a more accurate opinion leader recognition and has good noise immunity. PMID:24977188

  14. Coronavirus mRNA transcription: UV light transcriptional mapping studies suggest an early requirement for a genomic-length template.

    PubMed Central

    Yokomori, K; Banner, L R; Lai, M M

    1992-01-01

    Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) synthesizes seven to eight mRNAs, each of which contains a leader RNA derived from the 5' end of the genome. To understand the mechanism of synthesis of these mRNAs, we studied how the synthesis of each mRNA was affected by UV irradiation at different time points after infection. When MHV-infected cells were UV irradiated at a late time in infection (5 h postinfection), the syntheses of the various mRNAs were inhibited to different extents in proportion to the sizes of the mRNAs. Analysis of the UV inactivation kinetics revealed that the UV target size of each mRNA was equivalent to its own physical size. In contrast, when cells were irradiated at 2.5 or 3 h postinfection, there appeared to be two different kinetics of inhibition of mRNA synthesis: the synthesis of every mRNA was inhibited to the same extent by a small UV dose, but the remaining mRNA synthesis was inhibited by additional UV doses at different rates for different mRNAs in proportion to RNA size. The analysis of the UV inactivation kinetics indicated that the UV target sizes for the majority of mRNAs were equivalent to that of the genomic-size RNA early in the infection. These results suggest that MHV mRNA synthesis requires the presence of a genomic-length RNA template at least early in the infection. In contrast, later in the infection, the sizes of the templates used for mRNA synthesis were equivalent to the physical sizes of each mRNA. The possibility that the genomic-length RNA required early in the infection was used only for the synthesis of a polymerase rather than as a template for mRNA synthesis was ruled out by examining the UV sensitivity of a defective interfering (DI) RNA. We found that the UV target size for the DI RNA early in infection was much smaller than that for mRNAs 6 and 7, which are approximately equal to or smaller in size than the DI RNA. This result indicates that even though DI RNA and viral mRNAs are synthesized by the same polymerase, m

  15. Identification and Characterization of the Functional Elements within the Tobacco Etch Virus 5′ Leader Required for Cap-Independent Translation

    PubMed Central

    Niepel, Mario; Gallie, Daniel R.

    1999-01-01

    Translation in plants is highly cap dependent, and the only plant mRNAs known to naturally lack a cap structure (m7GpppN) are viral in origin. The genomic RNA of tobacco etch virus (TEV), a potyvirus that belongs to the picornavirus superfamily, is a polyadenylated mRNA that is naturally uncapped and yet is a highly competitive mRNA during translation. The 143-nucleotide 5′ leader is responsible for conferring cap-independent translation even on reporter mRNAs. We have carried out a deletion analysis of the TEV 5′ leader to identify the elements responsible for its regulatory function and have identified two centrally located cap-independent regulatory elements (CIREs) that promote cap-independent translation. The introduction of a stable stem-loop structure upstream of each element demonstrated that CIRE-1 is less 5′ end dependent in function than CIRE-2. In a dicistronic mRNA, the presence of the TEV 5′ leader sequence in the intercistronic region increased expression of the second cistron, suggesting that the viral sequence can function in a 5′-distal position. Interestingly, the introduction of a stable stem-loop upstream of the TEV leader sequence or upstream of either CIRE in dicistronic constructs markedly increased their regulatory function. These data suggest that the TEV 5′ leader contains two elements that together promote internal initiation but that the function of one element, in particular, is facilitated by proximity to the 5′ end. PMID:10516014

  16. Human leader and robot follower team: correcting leader's position from follower's heading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borenstein, Johann; Thomas, David; Sights, Brandon; Ojeda, Lauro; Bankole, Peter; Fellars, Donald

    2010-04-01

    In multi-agent scenarios, there can be a disparity in the quality of position estimation amongst the various agents. Here, we consider the case of two agents - a leader and a follower - following the same path, in which the follower has a significantly better estimate of position and heading. This may be applicable to many situations, such as a robotic "mule" following a soldier. Another example is that of a convoy, in which only one vehicle (not necessarily the leading one) is instrumented with precision navigation instruments while all other vehicles use lower-precision instruments. We present an algorithm, called Follower-derived Heading Correction (FDHC), which substantially improves estimates of the leader's heading and, subsequently, position. Specifically, FHDC produces a very accurate estimate of heading errors caused by slow-changing errors (e.g., those caused by drift in gyros) of the leader's navigation system and corrects those errors.

  17. Leadership Behaviors of Athletic Training Leaders Compared With Leaders in Other Fields

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Timothy G; Bradney, Debbie A

    2007-01-01

    Context: Athletic trainers are in positions of leadership. Objective: To determine self-reported leadership practices of head athletic trainers (HATCs) and program directors (PDs). Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Respondents' academic institutions. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 238 athletic training leaders completed the Leadership Practices Inventory. Of these, 50.4% (n = 120) were HATCs and 49.6% (n = 118) were PDs; 69.3% (n = 165) were men and 30.7% (n = 73) were women; almost all respondents (97.1%, n = 231) were white. Respondents typically reported having 11 to 15 years of experience as an athletic trainer (n = 57, 23.9%) and being between the ages of 30 and 39 years (n = 109, 45.8%). Main Outcome Measure(s): Categories of leadership behaviors (ie, Model, Inspire, Challenge, Encourage, and Enable) were scored from 1 (almost never) to 10 (almost always). Item scores were summed to compute mean category scores. We analyzed demographic information; used t ratios to compare the data from athletic training leaders (PDs and HATCs) with normative data; compared sex, age, position, ethnicity, and years of experience with leadership practices; and computed mean scores. Results: Athletic training leaders reported using leadership behaviors similar to those of other leaders. The PDs reported using inspiring, challenging, enabling, and encouraging leadership behaviors more often than did the HATCs. No differences were found by ethnicity, age, years of experience, or leadership practices. Conclusions: Athletic training leaders are transformational leaders. Athletic training education program accreditation requirements likely account for the difference in leadership practices between PDs and HATCs. PMID:17597953

  18. Two Essential Roles: Health Care Network Nurse Leaders and Local Nurse Leaders.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    American health care organizations are experiencing increasing change driven by emerging partnerships, market demographics, population health initiatives, and merger and acquisition trends. The health care business environment necessitates alterations in how companies operate on a larger scale. New regional leadership roles are being created to provide leadership to systematize networks, build market share, and strengthen market needs. It is important and necessary to explore, review, and contrast the roles, skills, and behaviors of regional leader's roles and the solo organization leaders. It is also imperative to review the benefits of new affiliations for the community and hospital entity. PMID:27584890

  19. An effective model of developing teacher leaders in STEM education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sublette, Heidi

    In the last 5 years, industries have begun to recognize a growing gap in the production of college graduates in areas of STEM. Researchers in various industries believe this gap will create a significant loss of competitive edge in the STEM fields, which will leave the United States pursuing STEM graduates from foreign countries and may ultimately leave the US behind in the industry of science, technology and innovation. This qualitative study analyzes the value and impact of STEM teacher leaders in secondary education. A phenomenological study was conducted with 10 secondary school science and math teacher leaders in order to gain a better understanding of teacher leaders' perceptions, classroom practices and the role of a STEM teacher leader. This study addresses the following research questions: 1) What attributes define effective STEM teacher leaders, according to teacher leaders who have completed the Center for Math and Science Teaching system? 2) What success strategies, among teacher leaders of the Center for Math and Science Teaching program, have enabled further development of teacher leadership? 3) What is the best model in developing teacher leaders, according to literature from 2005 to present? 4) What is an optimal model of developing STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) teacher leaders within secondary education? This research aims to explore teacher leaders' perceptions of their role as a teacher leader based on strategies learned from CMAST and past experiences. Findings from this study provide critical data for making informed decisions on including important elements when implementing an effective STEM teacher leader system or program, and the impact it can create on science and math teaching and learning in secondary education. The investigator concludes this study with the development of a STEM teacher leader model that merges these findings with existing research.

  20. SOME PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CAMPUS STUDENT LEADERS--A COMPARISON OF SOCIAL-POLITICAL ACTION LEADERS WITH FOUR OTHER CATEGORIES OF STUDENT LEADERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WINBORN, BOB B.

    THIS INVESTIGATION WAS DESIGNED TO PROVIDE DATA ABOUT THE CHARACTERISTICS OF SOCIAL-POLITICAL ACTION LEADERS AT ONE UNIVERSITY AND TO COMPARE THOSE CHARACTERISTICS WITH OTHER TYPES OR CATEGORIES OF STUDENT LEADERS. NINE RESEARCH HYPOTHESES IN NULL FORM WERE FORMULATED TO FACILITATE STATISTICAL TREATMENT OF THE DATA. FROM A TOTAL OF 559 ELECTED…

  1. The seven ages of the leader.

    PubMed

    Bennis, Warren G

    2004-01-01

    Leaders go through many transitions in their careers. Each brings new crises and challenges--from taking over a damaged organization to having to fire somebody to passing the baton to the next generation. These moments can be wrenching--and can threaten your confidence--but they're also predictable. Knowing what to expect can help you get through and perhaps emerge stronger. In this engaging article, Warren G. Bennis, professor and founding chairman of the University of Southern California's Leadership Institute, reflects on leadership, recounting his own experiences as a young lieutenant in the infantry in World War II, as the new president of a university, and as the mentor to a unique nursing student. Bennis also describes the experiences of other leaders he has known throughout his career. Drawing on more than 50 years of academic research and business expertise--and borrowing from Shakespeare's seven ages of man--Bennis says the leader's life unfolds in seven stages. "The infant executive" seeks to recruit a mentor for guidance. "The schoolboy" must learn how to do the job in public, subjected to unsettling scrutiny of every word and act. "The lover with a woeful ballad" struggles with the tsunami of problems every organization presents. "The bearded soldier" must be willing--even eager--to hire people better than he is, because he knows that talented underlings can help him shine. "The general" must become adept at not simply allowing people to speak the truth but at actually being able to hear what they are saying. "The statesman" is hard at work preparing to pass on wisdom in the interests of the organization. And, finally, "the sage" embraces the role of mentor to young executives. PMID:14723176

  2. The leader proteinase of foot-and-mouth disease virus: structure-function relationships in a proteolytic virulence factor

    PubMed Central

    Steinberger, Jutta; Skern, Tim

    2016-01-01

    The leader proteinase (Lpro) of foot-and-mouth disease virus, inhibits the host innate immune response by at least three different mechanisms. The most well characterised is the prevention of the synthesis of cytokines such as interferons immediately after infection, brought about by specific proteolytic cleavage of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4G. This prevents the recruitment of capped cellular mRNA; the viral RNA can however be translated under these conditions. The two other mechanisms are the induction of NF-κB cleavage and the deubiquitination of immune signalling molecules. This review focuses on the structure-function relationships in Lpro responsible for these widely divergent activities. PMID:24670358

  3. Leaders and emotional intelligence: a view from those who follow.

    PubMed

    Zakariasen, Ken; Victoroff, Kristin Zakariasen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract-Boyatzis and Goleman state that Emotional Intelligence (EI) "is an important predictor of success." In their book Primal Leadership, they refer to "the leadership competencies of emotional intelligence: how leaders handle themselves and their relationships." The leadership exercises reported here examined the practices of effective and ineffective leaders as identified by individuals who have worked under such leaders (ie, followers/subordinates). We sought to ascertain to what extent these practices are related to EI. The 2-year data from these leadership exercises show the strong relationships between perceived leadership effectiveness and emotionally intelligent leadership practices as observed by leaders' followers. For example, whether considering the practices that made effective leaders effective or the practices that ineffective leaders needed to adopt or significantly improve upon (in the eyes of subordinates), these practices were almost exclusively related to EI. These findings are supported in the EI literature, as is the strength of subordinates' assessments in predicting leadership effectiveness. PMID:22931014

  4. The servant leader: a higher calling for dental professionals.

    PubMed

    Certosimo, Fred

    2009-09-01

    The dental profession is guided by normative principles that provide guidance to our leaders and practicing dentists in addressing the needs of patients and the profession, yet there is room for incorporating new ideas that help dental professionals meet their professional obligations. The purpose of this essay is to discuss the concept of "servant leadership," especially in contrast with "self-serving leaders," and to suggest that servant leadership is consistent with the high ethical and professional ideals of the dental profession. The servant leader is the antithesis of the self-serving leader, who incessantly seeks more power and acquisition of material possessions. The servant leader's highest priority is the people (patients/students/customers) he or she serves. The concept of the servant-leader can take us away from self-serving, top-down leadership and encourage us to think harder about how to respect, value, and motivate people and ultimately provide better service to our patients. PMID:19734247

  5. Preparing Principals as Instructional Leaders: Perceptions of University Faculty, Expert Principals, and Expert Teacher Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor Backor, Karen; Gordon, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Although research has established links between the principal's instructional leadership and student achievement, there is considerable concern in the literature concerning the capacity of principal preparation programs to prepare instructional leaders. This study interviewed educational leadership faculty as well as expert principals and teacher…

  6. The Leader's Leader: Examining the HR Executive's Role as Performance Coach at the Management Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strodel, Neil; Novak, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    Higher education human resource professionals know the importance of performance management and coaching for university employees. However, the standards of performance often are not enforced to those in high-level positions. Neil Strodel and Christopher Novak examine how HR leaders are in a unique position to extend performance coaching to those…

  7. Corona discharges and their effect on lightning attachment revisited: Upward leader initiation and downward leader interception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, Marley

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies have suggested the possibility of using glow corona discharges to control the frequency of lightning flashes to grounded objects. In order to revisit the theoretical basis of this proposal, the self-consistent leader inception and propagation model - SLIM - is used together with a two-dimensional glow corona drift model. The analysis is performed to quantify the effect of glow corona generated at the tip of ground-based objects on the initiation and propagation of upward positive connecting leaders under the influence of downward lightning leaders. It is found that the presence of glow corona does not influence the performance of Franklin lightning rods shorter than 15 m, while it slightly reduces the lateral distance of rods up to 60 m tall by a maximum of 10%. Furthermore, the results indicate that it is not possible to suppress the initiation of upward connecting leaders by means of glow corona. It is found instead that unconventional lightning protection systems based on the generation of glow corona attract downward lightning flashes in a similar way as a standard lightning rod with the same height.

  8. Coaching Secrets for School Leaders. The School Improvement Leader: Four Perspectives on Change in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Douglas S.; Eiseman, Jeffrey W.

    This document comprises the first of four training models prepared for use by professionals responsible for enhancing the leadership skills of current and future educators. This first module, "Coaching Secrets for School Leaders," is designed to involve participants in an analysis of coaching situations, behaviors, and competencies that are…

  9. Building Relevant Leaders: Identifying the Development Needs of the Modern Construction Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shands, Mike

    2014-01-01

    "Do senior level construction leaders possess a common set of leadership development needs that can be addressed to better prepare them to lead and retain the Millennial workforce?" As older generations begin to retire in-mass, many organizations are reevaluating their approach to employee recruitment, performance, and retention. This…

  10. Progression features of a stepped leader process with four grounded leader branches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qie, Xiushu; Kong, Xiangzhen

    2007-03-01

    The propagation features of stepped leader with four grounded branches during a negative CG flash have been analyzed by using the data from a high-speed digital camera with 1 ms time resolution in correlation with wide-band electric field change signatures. Four branches that initiated from a main leader trunk connected to ground in sequence and induced four separate return strokes. The propagation speed of four grounded leader branches shows an increase tendency when they progressed downward to ground. The average 2-D speed of four grounded branches was estimated to be about 1.1 × 105 m/s. The electric field changes caused by the stepped leader were characterized by clustered pulses near the time of return stroke. Each cluster of pulses was composed of 3-4 pulses with an average time interval in a cluster of about 7.7 μs, and the time interval between two first pulses in two adjacent clusters was 30.1 μs.

  11. Leaders Learning from Leaders as an Emergent Action Learning Strategy Type of Paper: Account of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Carol A.; Rodríguez, Mariela A.; Allen, Tawannah G.

    2015-01-01

    This account of practice describes what three executive leaders in a professional association have learned about action learning and their own practices of organizational renewal. Data are approached narratively and stories are told from the perspectives of diverse educators' experiences, agency, and expertise. Mature organizations can be…

  12. The Effect of Teacher Leader Certification Academy (TLCA) on Teacher Leaders: Five Practices of Exemplary Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Wendy M.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative research measuring teacher leadership's impact in education is lacking, specifically at the site level. It has been proven time and again that most successful schools have well-established and strong leaders with a great capacity to lead. While the world of transformational teacher leadership is intensifying on many levels, it…

  13. Leaders of Learning: How District, School, and Classroom Leaders Improve Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuFour, Richard; Marzano, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    In their first coauthored book, Dr. DuFour and Dr. Marzano have combined their passions to articulate how effective leaders foster continuous improvement at the district, school, and classroom levels. The book focuses on district leadership, principal leadership, and team leadership and addresses how individual teachers can be most effective in…

  14. Simulations Help School Leaders Hone People Skills: Simulations Help School Leaders Practice "Tough Conversations"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a simulation training program for school leaders at Syracuse University. The project is creating a series of parent, teacher, student, and community-member roles to help principals and teachers learn how to handle tricky conversations. Supported by a three-year grant from the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of…

  15. Evaluating the Effectiveness of the New Jersey Leaders to Leaders Induction Program: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parent, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Since the publication of the groundbreaking 1983 report A Nation At Risk: The Imperative For Educational Reform and the enactment of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) in 2001, America's public schools have undergone dramatic changes. These significant changes have required school administrators to be more of an educational leader to students and…

  16. How School Leaders Perceive the Leadership Role of Middle Leaders in Singapore Primary Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Hak Hiang; Gurr, David; Drysdale, Lawrie; Ang, Li Li

    2011-01-01

    Middle leaders are "recognised as a significant source in ensuring that quality education reaches out to pupils" (Low and Lim "1997", p. 77) for they are "the human link between national education policy as manifested in school-level strategic planning...and the teaching staff whose "field tactics" are used to implement such strategies" (Chew…

  17. Education Week Leaders to Learn From, 2013: Lessons from District Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.; Klein, Alyson; Samuels, Christina A.; Casey, Diette Courrege; Shah, Nirvi; Sawchuk, Stephen; Molnar, Michele; Zubrzycki, Jaclyn; Adams, Caralee; Davis, Michelle R.; Sparks, Sarah D.; Robelen, Erik W.

    2013-01-01

    In an environment of tight resources, tough academic challenges, and increasingly stiff competition from new education providers, smart leadership may matter more than ever for the success of America's school districts. Against this backdrop, "Education Week" introduces the first of what will be an annual "Leaders To Learn From" report--a way to…

  18. Accelerated mRNA decay in conditional mutants of yeast mRNA capping enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Schwer, B; Mao, X; Shuman, S

    1998-01-01

    Current models of mRNA decay in yeast posit that 3' deadenylation precedes enzymatic removal of the 5' cap, which then exposes the naked end to 5' exonuclease action. Here, we analyzed gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells bearing conditional mutations of Ceg1 (capping enzyme), a 52 kDa protein that transfers GMP from GTP to the 5' end of mRNA to form the GpppN cap structure. Shift of ceg1 mutants to restrictive temperature elicited a rapid decline in the rate of protein synthesis, which correlated with a sharp reduction in the steady-state levels of multiple individual mRNAs. ceg1 mutations prevented the accumulation of SSA1 and SSA4 mRNAs that were newly synthesized at the restrictive temperature. Uncapped poly(A)+ SSA4 mRNA accumulated in cells lacking the 5' exoribonuclease Xrn1. These findings provide genetic evidence for the long-held idea that the cap guanylate is critical for mRNA stability. The deadenylation-decapping-degradation pathway appears to be short-circuited when Ceg1 is inactivated. PMID:9547258

  19. Cultivating tomorrow's leaders: comprehensive development strategies ensure continued success.

    PubMed

    Squazzo, Jessica D

    2010-01-01

    It's no secret that strong leaders are the backbone of any successful organization. Watch a high-performing healthcare organization in action, and you know a team of talented leaders is at the helm. But successful organizations not only have to have top talent in place--they have to know how to identify high-potential leaders, cultivate them and retain them. PMID:20614680

  20. Stepped-to-dart leaders preceding lightning return strokes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenburg, Maribeth; Marshall, Thomas C.; Karunarathne, Sumedhe; Karunarathna, Nadeeka; Warner, Tom A.; Orville, Richard E.

    2013-09-01

    time-correlated high-speed video and electric field change data, three cases are described in which dart leaders toward ground are immediately preceded by stepped leaders that find and use previously used channels. These "stepped-to-dart leaders" occur in three natural negative ground flashes. Prior to the stepped-to-dart connection, the leaders have characteristics of stepped leaders, including average two-dimensional speeds of 1.6-2.7 × 105 m s-1 (visible from 5.5, 3.4, and 0.9 km altitude). After the connection, they behave as dart (or dart-stepped) leaders, with larger amplitude E-change pulses and faster average speeds of 3.4-7.8 × 106 m s-1. Connection altitudes are 3.32, 1.57, and 0.75 km. Immediately after the connection, there is a brief lighting in a short part of the prior return stroke channel. Luminosity travels up the stepped leader path after the connection, while the dart leader proceeds toward ground. In two cases, all the strokes subsequent to the stepped-to-dart stroke follow the visible portion of its channel. The other case has two subsequent strokes which do not reuse any portion of the stepped-to-dart channel. For the other 12 strokes in these flashes, stepped leader average speeds range from 1.7 to 3.0 × 105 m s-1, and dart leader average speeds are 0.82 to 16.67 × 106 m s-1. Overall, the return stroke waveforms give reasonable indication of the type of leader that preceded the stroke. Stepped-to-dart leaders are apparently rare in optical data, occurring in about 1% of subsequent strokes and 2.5% of flashes.

  1. Characteristics of negative lightning leaders to ground observed by TVLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Shi; Jiang, Zhidong; Shi, Lihua; Niu, Zhencong; Zhang, Peng

    2015-12-01

    The Thunder and VHF lightning Locating System (termed TVLS) is established and utilized to observe leader behaviors of negative cloud to ground (CG) flashes. This system takes advantages of VHF broadband interferometer and thunder imaging technique, which could provide the temporal and quasi-3D spatial evolution of lightning discharges. In conjunction with synchronized electric field changes (E-changes) and electric field derivatives (dE/dt) records, 10 leaders from two CG flashes are presented and analyzed. Based on the characteristic evolution of leader velocities, E-changes, dE/dt waveforms and VHF intervals, three stepped leaders, five dart leaders and two dart-stepped leaders are identified. The stepped leaders behave impulsive while approaching ground, with average speed (1.3∼3.9)×105 m/s. All normal dart leaders presented here exhibit irregular (or termed "chaotic") fluctuations in E-change and dE/dt waveforms, with the similar speeds ((1.0∼2.9)×107 m/s) and durations ((300∼700) μs) of the "chaotic" leaders observed by other investigators. The irregular fluctuations would be weak if the channels keep conductive until the leader enters the less conductive branches, coinciding with VHF radiations in time sequence. The dart-stepped leader could be divided into the dart stage and the stepped stage by a transition region, which usually lies around the branch junctions of previous active channel. The dart stage resembles the normal dart leader, and the stepped stage usually associates with regular pulse trains in E-change and dE/dt waveforms.

  2. Characteristics of lightning leader propagation and ground attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Rubin; Qie, Xiushu; Wang, Zhichao; Zhang, Hongbo; Lu, Gaopeng; Sun, Zhuling; Liu, Mingyuan; Li, Xun

    2015-12-01

    The grounding process and the associated leader behavior were analyzed by using high-speed video record and time-correlated electric field change for 37 natural negative cloud-to-ground flashes. Weak luminous grounded channel was recognized below the downward leader tip in the frame preceding the return stroke, which is inferred as upward connecting leader considering the physical process of lightning attachment, though not directly confirmed by sequential frames. For stepped leader-first return strokes, the upward connecting leaders tend to be induced by those downward leader branches with brighter luminosity and lower channel tip above ground, and they may accomplish the attachment with great possibility. The upward connecting leaders for 2 out of 61 leader-subsequent stroke sequences were captured in the frame prior to the return stroke, exhibiting relatively long channel lengths of 340 m and 105 m, respectively. The inducing downward subsequent leaders were of the chaotic type characterized by irregular electric field pulse train with duration of 0.2-0.3 ms. The transient drop of the high potential difference between stepped leader system and ground when the attachment occurred would macroscopically terminate the propagation of those ungrounded branches while would not effectively prevent the development of the existing space stem systems in the low-conductivity streamer zone apart from the leader tip. When the ungrounded branches are of poor connection with the main stroke channel, their further propagation toward ground would be feasible. These two factors may contribute to the occurrence of multiple grounding within the same leader-return stroke sequence.

  3. Asymmetries in bidirectional leader development of lightning flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velde, Oscar A.; Montanyà, Joan

    2013-12-01

    flashes develop as a bidirectional tree, with a negative and a positive end propagating simultaneously into cloud charges of the opposite polarity. In recent years, this process has been modeled assuming that the bidirectional channel remains a zero-net-charge perfect conductor starting at the electric potential of its initial location. So far, both leader ends were treated identically. We summarize characteristics of bidirectional leader development of various lightning flashes registered by the Ebro 3-D Lightning Mapping Array at the east coast of Spain, supplemented by high-speed camera records. In order to follow the horizontal development of positive and negative leaders over time, a time-distance-altitude graph was designed, using the flash origin or a cloud-to-ground stroke as reference. The examples confirm that negative and positive leaders propagate at characteristic horizontal speeds (105 and 2 · 104 m s-1). The positive leader's low apparent speed corresponds to the phase when recoil processes are active. Very fast negative leaders (up to 8 · 105 m s-1) are detected in association with positive cloud-to-ground strokes. Negative leaders respawn repeatedly from the origin or as a retrograde negative leader at the positive branch. Positive leaders remain propagating throughout the flash or until reaching ground. We show that the velocity difference shifts the potential of the leader, increasing the gradient with cloud charge at the positive end while reducing it at the negative end. The positive section lowers its potential through retrograde negative leaders, eventually making it possible to emit a new negative leader into the upper positive potential well.

  4. Messenger RNA (mRNA) nanoparticle tumour vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phua, Kyle K. L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-06-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA's biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research.

  5. Teacher Leaders in Research Based Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rector, T. A.; Jacoby, S. H.; Lockwood, J. F.; McCarthy, D. W.

    2001-12-01

    NOAO facilities will be used in support of ``Teacher Leaders in Research Based Science Education" (TLRBSE), a new Teacher Retention and Renewal program that will be funded through the National Science Foundation's Directorate for Education and Human Resources. The goal of TLRBSE is to provide professional development for secondary teachers of mathematics and science in an effort to support novice teachers beginning their careers as well as to motivate and retain experienced teachers. Within the context of astronomy, TLRBSE will develop master teachers who will mentor a second tier of novice teachers in the exemplary method of research-based science education, a proven effective teaching method which models the process of inquiry and exploration used by scientists. Participants will be trained through a combination of in-residence workshops at Kitt Peak National Observatory and the National Solar Observatory, a distance-learning program during the academic year, interaction at professional meetings and mentor support from teacher leaders and professional astronomers. A total of 360 teachers will participate in the program over five years.

  6. Teacher Leaders in Research Based Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rector, T. A.; Jacoby, S. H.; Lockwood, J. F.; McCarthy, D. W.

    2001-05-01

    NOAO facilities will be used in support of ``Teacher Leaders in Research Based Science Education" (TLRBSE), a new Teacher Retention and Renewal program that will be funded through the National Science Foundation's Directorate for Education and Human Resources. The goal of TLRBSE is to provide professional development for secondary teachers of mathematics and science in an effort to support novice teachers beginning their careers as well as to motivate and retain experienced teachers. Within the context of astronomy, TLRBSE will develop master teachers who will mentor a second tier of novice teachers in the exemplary method of research-based science education, a proven effective teaching method which models the process of inquiry and exploration used by scientists. Participants will be trained through a combination of in-residence workshops at Kitt Peak National Observatory and the National Solar Observatory, a distance-learning program during the academic year, interaction at professional meetings and mentor support from teacher leaders and professional astronomers. A total of 360 teachers will participate in the program over five years.

  7. Trabecular bone texture classification using wavelet leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Zilong; Yang, Jie; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios; Jennane, Rachid; Cheng, Erkang; Ling, Haibin

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we propose to use the Wavelet Leader (WL) transformation for studying trabecular bone patterns. Given an input image, its WL transformation is defined as the cross-channel-layer maximum pooling of an underlying wavelet transformation. WL inherits the advantage of the original wavelet transformation in capturing spatial-frequency statistics of texture images, while being more robust against scale and orientation thanks to the maximum pooling strategy. These properties make WL an attractive alternative to replace wavelet transformations which are used for trabecular analysis in previous studies. In particular, in this paper, after extracting wavelet leader descriptors from a trabecular texture patch, we feed them into two existing statistic texture characterization methods, namely the Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) and the Gray Level Run Length Matrix (GLRLM). The most discriminative features, Energy of GLCM and Gray Level Non-Uniformity of GLRLM, are retained to distinguish two different populations between osteoporotic patients and control subjects. Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curves are used to measure performance of classification. Experimental results on a recently released benchmark dataset show that WL significantly boosts the performance of baseline wavelet transformations by 5% in average.

  8. Managers, leaders, and teams in a team-based environment.

    PubMed

    DeMent, J

    1996-08-01

    In order to succeed in today's dynamic environment, abundant with corporate restructuring and downsizing, into what must today's manager transform? Part of the answer lies in "leadership." Some managers are leaders, some leaders are managers, but the two are not synonymous. There are notable differences between managers and leaders, particularly in the role each plays in the transition towards organizations that are customer-focused, empowered, and team-based. The evolution towards team-based organizations begins with three different, concurrent transitions: of managers into leaders, of employees into teammates, and of functional hierarchical organizations into those of team empowerment. PMID:10159794

  9. A challenge to nursing: promoting followers as well as leaders.

    PubMed

    DiRienzo, S M

    1994-10-01

    It is believed that 70% of our lives is spent in the role of follower. Even so, the focus in formal education and seminars remains leadership issues because of the unfavorable stereotypes that accompany the term follower. Nurturing effective followership requires doing away with the misconception that leaders do all the thinking and followers mindlessly heed orders. Can followers and leaders ever be deemed separate but equal? It is vital to understand that, without effective followers in nursing, our leaders face severe limitations. Current leaders and educators must share and promote the vision of enlightened followership if nursing is to achieve its potential. PMID:7798346

  10. Designing and implementing the Army Nursing Leader Academy.

    PubMed

    Dunemn, Kathleen; Hopkins-Chadwick, Denise L; Connally, Tina; Bramley, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, the Chief of the Army Nurse Corps directed a thorough review of existing training programs available to and provided for Army Nursing personnel for the development of full-spectrum leaders for Army Nursing. The review provided the gap analysis necessary to restructure courses provided by the Department of Nursing Science at the Army Medical Department Center and School. This new grouping of courses is referred to as the Army Nursing Leader Academy. The Army Nursing Leader Academy is the first of its kind in that it addresses career-long learning of all Army Nursing by focusing on building skills, knowledge, and behaviors to produce sustainable, full-spectrum leaders. The Nursing Leader Academy consists of a series of sequential nurse leader development courses combined with a web based resource center. Grounded in the Patient CaringTouch System, guided by nurse competencies, and gauged by the Leader Capabilities Map, the Nursing Leader Academy provides learning that is relevant and timely designed to reinforce enterprise values and culture to ensure readiness for successive roles and positions. Full implementation of the Nursing Leader Academy will include the evidence-based elements of formal schooling, coaching, self-development, functional/technical (competency attainment), and professional experiences. PMID:22124867

  11. Transient Luminosity along Negative Stepped Leaders in Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenburg, Maribeth; Marshall, Thomas; Karunarathne, Sumedhe; Karunarathna, Nadeeka; Orville, Richard

    2016-04-01

    We present observations of abandoned stepped leader branches that briefly reconnect to the main stepped leader trunk or another active branch during the negative stepped leader advance in natural cloud-to-ground lightning strokes. The transient luminous features described, termed sparks, are common, bright and fast based on high-speed video data with 20 us image interval. Sparks typically reach maximum visible extent of a few hundred meters or less and peak intensity of one to three times that of their parent leader within 40 us. Most sparks connect to a parent leader within their first 20 us and are visible for less than 120 us. Generally, there are several milliseconds (average 3.3 ms) before the spark during which its branch is visibly abandoned, i.e., apparently neither propagating nor connected to the active stepped leader system. There is a tendency for sparks to occur late in the stepped leader advance, averaging 900 us before the return stroke for 90 sparks in 14 strokes. Sparks occur at altitudes at least as high as the visible stepped leader top (about 3000 m in these data), but they have not been observed below 500 m altitude. Parent leaders typically get brighter below the connection point after the spark, and in some cases their speed of advance increases. Nearby time-correlated electric field change data show a distinct spark signature characterized by a relatively large bipolar pulse, followed by a slower decrease over 40-100 us, ending with another relatively large pulse.

  12. Proteins encoded near the adenovirus late messenger RNA leader segments

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J.B.; Anderson, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    Small fragments of adenovirus 2 DNA cloned into the single-strand phage M13 were used to select adenoviral messenger RNAs transcribed from the R-strand between map positions 16 and 30. Cell-free translation of these mRNAs produced proteins of 13.5K, 13.6K, and 11.5K, respectively encoded between the first and second segments of the tripartite major late leader, within the ''i''-leader segment, and immediately preceding the third leader segment. Partial sequence analysis of the 13.6K protein is consistent with the hypothesis that it is encoded within the i-leader segment.

  13. When ethical leader behavior breaks bad: How ethical leader behavior can turn abusive via ego depletion and moral licensing.

    PubMed

    Lin, Szu-Han Joanna; Ma, Jingjing; Johnson, Russell E

    2016-06-01

    The literature to date has predominantly focused on the benefits of ethical leader behaviors for recipients (e.g., employees and teams). Adopting an actor-centric perspective, in this study we examined whether exhibiting ethical leader behaviors may come at some cost to leaders. Drawing from ego depletion and moral licensing theories, we explored the potential challenges of ethical leader behavior for actors. Across 2 studies which employed multiwave designs that tracked behaviors over consecutive days, we found that leaders' displays of ethical behavior were positively associated with increases in abusive behavior the following day. This association was mediated by increases in depletion and moral credits owing to their earlier displays of ethical behavior. These results suggest that attention is needed to balance the benefits of ethical leader behaviors for recipients against the challenges that such behaviors pose for actors, which include feelings of mental fatigue and psychological license and ultimately abusive interpersonal behaviors. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26867103

  14. mRNA quality control goes transcriptional

    PubMed Central

    Kilchert, Cornelia; Vasiljeva, Lidia

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNAs are extensively processed to generate functional transcripts, which are 5′ capped, spliced and 3′ polyadenylated. Accumulation of unprocessed (aberrant) mRNAs can be deleterious for the cell, hence processing fidelity is closely monitored by QC (quality control) mechanisms that identify erroneous transcripts and initiate their selective removal. Nucleases including Xrn2/Rat1 and the nuclear exosome have been shown to play an important role in the turnover of aberrant mRNAs. Recently, with the growing appreciation that mRNA processing occurs concomitantly with polII (RNA polymerase II) transcription, it has become evident that QC acts at the transcriptional level in addition to degrading aberrant RNAs. In the present review, we discuss mechanisms that allow cells to co-transcriptionally initiate the removal of RNAs as well as down-regulate transcription of transcripts where processing repeatedly fails. PMID:24256272

  15. Metastable structures and refolding kinetics in hok mRNA of plasmid R1.

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, J H; Gultyaev, A P; Gerdes, K; Pleij, C W

    1999-01-01

    Programmed cell death by hok/sok of plasmid R1 and pnd/pndB of R483 mediates plasmid maintenance by killing of plasmid-free cells. It has been previously suggested that premature translation of the plasmid-mediated toxin is prevented during transcription of the hok and pnd mRNAs by the formation of metastable hairpins in the mRNA at the 5' end. Here, experimental evidence is presented for the existence of metastable structures in the 5' leader of the hok and pnd mRNAs in vitro. The kinetics of refolding from the metastable to the stable structure in the isolated fragments of the 5' ends of both the hok and pnd mRNAs could be estimated, in agreement with the structural rearrangement in this region, as predicted to occur during transcription and mRNA activation. The refolding rates of hok and pnd structures are slow enough to allow for the formation of downstream hairpin structures during elongation of the mRNAs, which thereby helps to stabilize the metastable structures. Thus, the kinetic refolding parameters of the hok and pnd mRNAs are consistent with the proposal that the metastable structures prevent premature translation and/or antisense RNA binding during transcription. PMID:10580469

  16. Myc and mRNA capping.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Sianadh; Cowling, Victoria H

    2015-05-01

    c-Myc is upregulated in response to growth factors and transmits the signal to proliferate by altering the gene expression landscape. When genetic alterations result in growth factor-independent c-Myc expression, it can become an oncogene. The majority of human tumour types exhibit a degree of c-Myc deregulation, resulting in unrestrained cell proliferation. c-Myc binds proximal to the promoter region of genes and recruits co-factors including histone acetyltransferases and RNA pol II kinases, which promote transcription. c-Myc also promotes formation of the cap structure at the 5' end of mRNA. The cap is 7-methylguanosine linked to the first transcribed nucleotide of RNA pol II transcripts via a 5' to 5' triphosphate bridge. The cap is added to the first transcribed nucleotide by the capping enzymes, RNGTT and RNMT-RAM. During the early stages of transcription, the capping enzymes are recruited to RNA pol II phosphorylated on Serine-5 of the C-terminal domain. The mRNA cap protects transcripts from degradation during transcription and recruits factors which promote RNA processing including, splicing, export and translation initiation. The proportion of transcripts with a cap structure is increased by elevating c-Myc expression, resulting in increased rates of translation. c-Myc promotes capping by promoting RNA pol II phosphorylation and by upregulating the enzyme SAHH which neutralises the inhibitory bi-product of methylation reactions, SAH. c-Myc-induced capping is required for c-Myc-dependent gene expression and cell proliferation. Targeting capping may represent a new therapeutic opportunity to inhibit c-Myc function in tumours. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Myc proteins in cell biology and pathology. PMID:24681440

  17. Nucleotide sequence of the mRNA encoding the pre-alpha-subunit of mouse thyrotropin.

    PubMed Central

    Chin, W W; Kronenberg, H M; Dee, P C; Maloof, F; Habener, J F

    1981-01-01

    We have constructed and cloned in bacteria recombinant DNA molecules containing DNA sequences coding for the precursor of the alpha subunit of thyrotropin (pre-TSH-alpha). Double-stranded DNA complementary to total poly(A)+RNA derived from a mouse pituitary thyrotropic tumor was prepared enzymatically, inserted into the Pst I site of the plasmid pBR322 by using poly(dC).poly(dG) homopolymeric extensions, and cloned in Escherichia coli chi 1776. Cloned cDNAs encoding pre-TSH-alpha were identified by their hybridization to pre-TSH-alpha mRNA as determined by cell-free translations of hybrid-selected and hybrid-arrested RNA. The nucleotide sequences of two cDNAs (510 and 480 base pairs) were determined with chemical methods and corresponded to much of the region coding for the alpha subunit and the 3' untranslated region of pre-TSH-alpha mRNA. The sequence of the 5' end of the mRNA was determined from cDNA synthesized by using total mRNA as template and a restriction enzyme DNA fragment as primer. Together these sequences represented greater than 90% of the coding and noncoding regions of full-length pre-TSH-alpha mRNA, which was determined to be 800 bases long. The amino acid sequence of the pre-TSH-alpha deduced from the nucleotide sequence showed a NH2-terminal leader sequence of 24 amino acids followed by the 96-amino-acid sequence of the apoprotein of TSH-alpha. There is greater than 90% homology in the amino acid sequences among the murine, ruminant, and porcine alpha subunits and 75-80% homology among the murine, equine, and human alpha subunits. Several regions of the sequence remain absolutely conserved among all species, suggesting that these particular regions are essential for the biological function of the subunit. The successful cloning of the alpha subunit of TSH will permit further studies of the organization of the genes coding for the glycoprotein hormone subunits and the regulation of their expression. Images PMID:6272299

  18. Tryptophan inhibits Proteus vulgaris TnaC leader peptide elongation, activating tna operon expression.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Vera, Luis R; Yang, Rui; Yanofsky, Charles

    2009-11-01

    Expression of the tna operon of Escherichia coli and of Proteus vulgaris is induced by L-tryptophan. In E. coli, tryptophan action is dependent on the presence of several critical residues (underlined) in the newly synthesized TnaC leader peptide, WFNIDXXL/IXXXXP. These residues are conserved in TnaC of P. vulgaris and of other bacterial species. TnaC of P. vulgaris has one additional feature, distinguishing it from TnaC of E. coli; it contains two C-terminal lysine residues following the conserved proline residue. In the present study, we investigated L-tryptophan induction of the P. vulgaris tna operon, transferred on a plasmid into E. coli. Induction was shown to be L-tryptophan dependent; however, the range of induction was less than that observed for the E. coli tna operon. We compared the genetic organization of both operons and predicted similar folding patterns for their respective leader mRNA segments. However, additional analyses revealed that L-tryptophan action in the P. vulgaris tna operon involves inhibition of TnaC elongation, following addition of proline, rather than inhibition of leader peptide termination. Our findings also establish that the conserved residues in TnaC of P. vulgaris are essential for L-tryptophan induction, and for inhibition of peptide elongation. TnaC synthesis is thus an excellent model system for studies of regulation of both peptide termination and peptide elongation, and for studies of ribosome recognition of the features of a nascent peptide. PMID:19767424

  19. Behavioral characteristics of effective crew leaders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ginnett, Robert C.

    1989-01-01

    The behaviors of effective versus less effective captains as they form and lead their crews in line operations are analyzed. The research examines real work groups in an actual organization with a specific and consequential task to perform and is based on a normative model of work group effectiveness. Selection of captains is outlined, as well as data collection over the course of six months of crew and cockpit observations including over 300 hours of direct crew observations and 110 hours of actual flight time. Common characteristics of the effective leaders as well as the deviations of the less effective are described, and organizational implications are assessed. The concept of 'shells' depicted as a series of concentric circles moving outward from the group's task execution at the center is introduced and discussed.

  20. Course strategies for clinical nurse leader development.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Sally; Grossman, Sheila; Godfrey, Marjorie

    2012-01-01

    The scope of the clinical nurse leader (CNL) is evolving in practice across the country. The preparation of this pivotal role in a complex healthcare environment has prompted the collaboration of nurse academics, nurse administrators, and clinicians to design unique educational experiences to maximize best practice. Knowledge attained regarding healthcare improvement and patient safety must not only be theoretical, but personal and application focused. Utilizing the American Association of Colleges of Nursing's CNL white paper and published resources faculty developed a clinical leadership course focused on active learning and reflection. Students explore concepts of improvement and quality related to business models of high functioning organizations including healthcare. Three key components of the course are described in detail; "quality is personal", executive interviews and the "5P" clinical microsystems assessment. Evaluation outcomes are discussed. Course content and innovative teaching/learning strategies for CNL are shared which may support the growth of CNL program development nationally. PMID:22640946

  1. Training the Future Leaders in Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Mason-Suares, Heather; Sweetser, David A.; Lindeman, Neal I.; Morton, Cynthia C.

    2016-01-01

    The era of personalized medicine has arrived, and with it a need for leaders in this discipline. This generation of trainees requires a cadre of new skill sets to lead the implementation of personalized medicine into mainstream healthcare. Traditional training programs no longer provide trainees with all the skills they will need to optimize implementation of this revolution now underway in medicine. Today’s trainees must manage clinical teams, act as clinical and molecular diagnostic consultants, train other healthcare professionals, teach future generations, and be knowledgeable about clinical trials to facilitate genomic-based therapies. To prepare trainees for the transition to junior faculty positions, contemporary genomic training programs must emphasize the development of these management, teaching, and clinical skills. PMID:26751479

  2. Ashley W. Oughterson, MD: Surgeon, Soldier, Leader

    PubMed Central

    Kunstman, John W.; Longo, Walter E.

    2015-01-01

    Ashley W. Oughterson, MD, (1895-1956) was a longtime faculty surgeon at Yale University. He performed some of the earliest pancreatic resections in the United States. During World War II, Colonel Oughterson was the primary “Surgical Consultant” in the South Pacific and present at nearly every major battle. His meticulously kept diary is regarded as the foremost source detailing wartime surgical care. Colonel Oughterson led the initial Army team to survey Hiroshima and Nagasaki following the nuclear attacks. Thoughout his academic career at Yale, Oughterson was a key leader in several medical and surgical societies. As scientific director of the American Cancer Society, Oughterson lectured widely and guided research priorities in oncology following World War II. Oughterson also authored numerous benchmark papers in surgical oncology that continue to be cited today. These extensive contributions are examined here and demonstrate the wide-ranging impact Oughterson exerted during a formative period of American surgery. PMID:26029018

  3. Emerging Leader for Education and Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholow, S.

    2013-12-01

    Polar Educators International (PEI) is a global professional network for those who educate in, for, and about the polar regions. Our goal is to connect educators, scientists, and community members to share expertise around the world and to rekindle student and public engagement with global environmental change. The growing membership in over 30 countries is now recognized as a leading organization capable of fulfilling E&O goals of international science organizations and training educators to facilitate outstanding polar science and climate change education in classrooms. This session will address the importance of dedicated, high-caliber, interpersonal professional networks that are linked directly to the expert science community to better serve science goals and education in classrooms. Discover that the educators and scientists in the network are resources themselves to help you become a leader in polar and climate education; arguably our most important content at the international level.

  4. What your leader expects of you.

    PubMed

    Bossidy, Larry

    2007-04-01

    The success of an executive team depends heavily on the relationships the boss has with his or her direct reports. Yet the leadership literature has had little to say about what is expected in those relationships-on either side. Larry Bossidy, formerly the chairman and CEO of Honeywell, and before that of AlliedSignal, shares what he calls "the CEO compact," detailing the behaviors a leader should look for in subordinates and what they should be able to expect in return. A CEO's best people, he says, know when a situation calls for them to get involved. They generate ideas-remembering that some of the best ones may sound crazy at first. They are willing to collaborate, putting the long-term good of the company above short-term goals of their divisions. They step up to lead initiatives, even if the outcome is uncertain. They develop leaders among their people, especially through direct involvement in performance appraisals. They stay current on world events and anticipate how those events may affect the company and its competition. They drive their own growth by exposing themselves to new people and ideas and by accepting demanding assignments. And they sustain these behaviors in bad times as well as good. On the other side of the compact, the boss should provide clarity of direction; set goals and objectives; give frequent, specific, and immediate feedback; be decisive and timely; demonstrate honesty and candor; and offer an equitable compensation plan. Executives who aren't lucky enough to have such a boss can create a compact with their own subordinates, Bossidy says, and demonstrate by example. The result will be to improve team and company performance and accelerate individual growth. PMID:17432153

  5. John Bryant Curtis: neurosurgeon, leader and mentor.

    PubMed

    Lai, Leon; Kaye, Andrew H; Buckley, Penelope

    2009-10-01

    In every generation of neurosurgeons, there are those whose judgment and professional accomplishments gain distinction among their peers. Such exceptional leaders often exhibit unique talent and inevitably, they exert a lasting influence on their field of endeavour. John Bryant Curtis was one of these. Rising from humble roots, Curtis made his impact in neurosurgery starting at the age of 36. A legendary and a master neurosurgeon for his period, he became the second director of Neurosurgery at The Royal Melbourne Hospital, succeeding R. S. Hooper in 1967. Like Hooper, Curtis had undertaken a three years Fellowship in Oxford at the Radcliffe Infirmary to train under Sir Hugh Cairns in 1947. On his return to Australia in 1950, he was among the pioneers in introducing percutaneous angiography into the country, which earned him the honourable Hunterian Professorship at the Royal College of Surgeons of England in 1958. This was in recognition for his contribution to the investigation of intracranial aneurysms. Among the many neurosurgeons whom John Bryant Curtis trained at the Royal Melbourne Hospital and at the Prince Henry Hospital, he was considered, by a few, a controversial figure. Others found the experience very positive. He was a distinguished neurosurgeon with expert clinical judgment, but simultaneously a stern and formidable character who demanded only the best from his staff and trainees. He was contrastingly thoughtful and gentle to his patients. Behind every great leader, there is a personal side, often more gentle and vulnerable than the public persona. Curtis was a generous, loving, funny, although at times eccentric human being. Although he died in 1989, ironically from metastatic brain tumours, his dynamic personality and work ethic imprinted a lasting impression on those who had met him. PMID:19604697

  6. Developing physician leaders in academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Bachrach, D J

    1997-01-01

    While physicians have historically held positions of leadership in academic medical centers, there is an increasing trend that physicians will not only guide the clinical, curriculum and scientific direction of the institution, but its business direction as well. Physicians are assuming a greater role in business decision making and are found at the negotiating table with leaders from business, insurance and other integrated health care delivery systems. Physicians who lead "strategic business units" within the academic medical center are expected to acquire and demonstrate enhanced business acumen. There is an increasing demand for formal and informal training programs for physicians in academic medical centers in order to better prepare them for their evolving roles and responsibilities. These may include the pursuit of a second degree in business or health care management; intramurally conducted courses in leadership skill development, management, business and finance; or involvement in extramurally prepared and delivered training programs specifically geared toward physicians as conducted at major universities, often in their schools of business or public health. While part one of this series, which appeared in Volume 43, No. 6 of Medical Group Management Journal addressed, "The changing role of physician leaders at academic medical centers," part 2 will examine as a case study the faculty leadership development program at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. These two articles were prepared by the author from his research into, and the presentation of a thesis entitled. "The importance of leadership training and development for physicians in academic medical centers in an increasingly complex health care environment," prepared for the Credentials Committee of the American College of Healthcare Executives in partial fulfillment of the requirements for Fellowship in this College.* PMID:10164266

  7. Community College and Community Leader Expectations of the "Village"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deggs, David M.; Miller, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    A level of consistency between community college leaders and community leaders is necessary to demonstrate behaviors, actions, and beliefs that shape, represent, and support expected community values. Likewise, communities, which are collectives of suborganizations, play an important role in aiding individual development, especially related to…

  8. Managing Polarity, Paradox, and Dilemma during Leader Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manderscheid, Steven V.; Freeman, Peter D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to review literature relevant to leader transition and the navigation of polarities, paradoxes, and dilemmas that exist in organizations. Furthermore, the researchers aim to critique the literature and provide suggestions for practitioners and researchers interested in leader transition through the lens of…

  9. Intergenerational Learning Practices--Digital Leaders in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Passey, Don

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the management and outcomes of a specific model of intergenerational learning, concerned with student digital leader support in a number of secondary schools in England. A local educational partnership set up a student digital leader project late in 2011, which aimed to develop a range of skills and outcomes for both the…

  10. As Leaders Learn: Personal Stories of Growth in School Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Gordon A., Jr., Ed.; Marnik, George F., Ed.

    This book presents the stories of a group of Maine educators--teacher leaders, teaching principals, and principals--who met at the Maine Academy for School Leaders (MASL) in 1992 to share their experiences and frustrations and to help each other improve their understanding and practice of educational leadership. They share personal accounts of how…

  11. Job Attainment and Perceived Role Differences of Cyberschool Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Jayson W.; Beck, Dennis; LaFrance, Jason; McLeod, Scott

    2016-01-01

    As cyberschooling options expand, it is vital that we understand the nuances of these particular learning opportunities. Because little research exists on leaders of K-12 cyberschools, this exploratory case study had two purposes. We first examined how 18 cyberschool leaders in the United States obtained their position. Second, we explored the…

  12. A Response to Glickman's "Preparing Thoughtful Educational Leaders"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hair; Mary John; Reitzug, Ulrich C.

    2006-01-01

    This is a response to an article by Carl Glickman entitled "Across the Void: Preparing Thoughtful Educational Leaders for Today's Schools" that appeared in the September 2005 issue of the "Journal of School Leadership." In his article, Glickman argues that the preparation of educational leaders must shake the assumptions that are generally held…

  13. Districts, Teacher Leaders, and Distributed Leadership: Changing Instructional Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firestone, William A.; Martinez, M. Cecilia

    2007-01-01

    Using case studies of four schools in three districts, this article explores how leadership is distributed in districts and asks about the role of teacher leaders. It proposes that teacher leaders and districts can share three leadership tasks: procuring and distributing materials, monitoring improvement, and developing people. The district and…

  14. Educating Danish School Leaders to Meet New Expectations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moos, Lejf

    2011-01-01

    There is no shared understanding of what school leaders are expected to do. Schools have many external as well as internal stakeholders and each of them has different expectations as to leadership practice. Thus school leadership is a "fluid signifier". This article first outlines external expectations that school leaders are faced with and have…

  15. Toward a Framework for Preparing Leaders for Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capper, Colleen A.; Theoharis, George; Sebastian, James

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to propose one possible framework for conceptualizing the preparation of leaders for social justice. To this end, three central questions guided this conceptualization: "What are the common themes in the literature and research on preparing leaders for social justice?"; "How can this framework serve as a…

  16. The Lived Transitions of Senior Student Affairs Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuk, Linda; King, Margaret; Forrest, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    This study of student affairs leaders who have left senior roles used an interpretive qualitative approach to explore these lived transitional experiences. The context of the departure, its immediate impact, the ensuing emotions, the change navigation process, and the envisioned future appear to shape the departing leaders' perceptions of the…

  17. Leader Positivity and Follower Creativity: An Experimental Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avey, James B.; Richmond, F. Lynn; Nixon, Don R.

    2012-01-01

    Using an experimental research design, 191 working adults were randomly assigned to two experimental conditions in order to test a theoretical model linking leader and follower positive psychological capital (PsyCap). Multiple methods were used to gather information from the participants. We found when leader PsyCap was manipulated experimentally,…

  18. Strategic Planning: An Imperative Procedure for Educational Leaders to Employ

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloud, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    Strategic planning is a process that educational leaders must utilize to allow the organization to make its vision come into fruition. Bryson asserts that leaders must be masterful in this process to allow the organization to " . . . fulfill (its) mission, meet (its) mandates, and satisfy (its) constituents in the years ahead" (Bryson 1995, pg.…

  19. National Agenda: Establishing Authority as an Educational Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kritsonis, William Allen; Cloud, Michelle Annette

    2006-01-01

    Educational leaders must continually refine their skills to successfully utilize the following leadership components: reward, coercive, expert, and legitimate and referent power to help schools achieve and sustain their vision. The intent of this article is to examine how educational leaders can positively and successfully establish authority to…

  20. Distributed but Undefined: New Teacher Leader Roles to Change Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolis, Jason; Huggins, Kristin Shawn

    2012-01-01

    This article examines teacher leader role development and definition by looking at one emergent model of distributed leadership: the hybrid teacher leader (HTL). HTLs are teachers whose official schedule includes both teaching K-12 students and leading teachers in some capacity. Participants included six HTLs across four school districts over 2…

  1. Insights into Action: Successful School Leaders Share What Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterrett, William L.

    2011-01-01

    What does it take to be a great school leader? An award-winning former principal poses this question to renowned school leaders and experts in the field to provide you with insight into the actions that lead to success. These giants in the field of educational leadership--including Baruti Kafele, Rick DuFour, Carol Ann Tomlinson, and James…

  2. Describing an "Effective" Principal: Perceptions of the Central Office Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parylo, Oksana; Zepeda, Sally J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine how district leaders of two school systems in the USA describe an effective principal. Membership categorisation analysis revealed that district leaders believed an effective principal had four major categories of characteristics: (1) documented characteristics (having a track record and being a…

  3. Learning to Lead: Lessons from the NYSAIS Emerging Leaders Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Marcy; Swain, George

    2014-01-01

    In a time of great flux and dynamic change in schools, from where will our future school leaders come? The answer, of course, is from a variety of places. By and large, however, most of these leaders are already in the nation's schools. Some are highly engaging teachers who have a particular knack with parents, some are department chairs…

  4. Guide for Team Leaders in Technical Assistance Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agency for International Development (Dept. of State), Washington, DC. Bureau for Technical Assistance.

    The guide reflects the experience gained in over two decades of work with developers of institutions in less-developed countries and focuses on the leader of a team of experts under contract to an external assistance agency such as the Agency for Inrernational Development (AID). Discussing the role of the team leader as mainly that of technical…

  5. The Wounded Leader and Emotional Learning in the Schoolhouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Richard; Maslin-Ostrowski, Pat

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers the emotional dimensions of leadership by exploring what a self-described leadership crisis or 'wounding' experience means to educational leaders and how it influences their professional and personal growth. It focuses on how leaders cope with the endemic and chronic conditions of leadership life: vulnerability, isolation,…

  6. Anxieties of Group Leaders in Police-Community Confrontations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connell, Walter E.; Hanson, Philip G.

    In a community confrontation program with police and community members, group leaders face many problems dissimilar from those found in group therapy. Dealing with authority (police) was difficult when the leader held a low self-esteem. Dealing with very vocal, rebellious community members presented difficulties in accepting their reports as truth…

  7. Involving Handicapped Cub Scouts: Instructor's Guide. Cub Scout Leader Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boy Scouts of America, New Brunswick, NJ.

    The Instructor's Guide is intended for use in training adult leaders to foster understanding and involvement of the handicapped in Cub Scout activities. Suggestions are offered for organizing two leadership training sessions which include defining types of handicaps leaders may encounter, conducting buzz group discussions on similarities between…

  8. Practical School Community Partnerships Leading to Successful Educational Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kladifko, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    School leaders must have knowledge and understanding of the various external and internal entities in their school community. Partnerships, with a focus on communication and interaction with diverse community leaders and professionals, are essential for school success. In this article, the author discusses successful practical experiences and…

  9. Leveraging Facilities for Institutional Success. APPA Thought Leaders Series 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    APPA: Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 Thought Leaders Symposium, sponsored in part by DTZ, a UGL company, and Jacobs, focused on the issues and challenges related to leveraging campus facility assets to achieve desired institutional outcomes. More than three dozen higher education leaders--including presidents, provosts, business officers, consultants, association executives,…

  10. The Rising Cost of Higher Education. APPA Thought Leaders 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    APPA: Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The 2013 Thought Leaders Symposium, sponsored in part by DTZ, a UGL company, and Jacobs, focused on the topic of the rising cost of higher education. More than three dozen higher education leaders--including presidents, provosts, business officers, consultants, association executives, and facilities professionals--participated in a facilitated…

  11. Advocacy for School Leaders: Becoming a Strong Voice for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    In today's political and global world, it's not enough to remain a solid educational leader; leaders must become advocates for education--on Capitol Hill, in state legislatures, and within communities. In this book, Sandra Whitaker examines key issues facing education, demonstrates methods for unpacking the issues, and discusses strategies to…

  12. Role Orientation and Communication Behaviors of Faculty Governance Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael T.; Pope, Myron L.

    This study, part of the National Data Base on Faculty Involvement in Governance project at the University of Alabama, attempted to profile the role orientations of faculty governance unit leaders, and to determine if those orientations differed under conditions of communication apprehension (how a unit leader interacts with others) or were…

  13. 76 FR 14678 - Communications Unit Leader Prerequisite and Evaluation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ... SECURITY Communications Unit Leader Prerequisite and Evaluation AGENCY: National Protection and Programs... Leader (COML) Prerequisite and Evaluation. DHS previously published this information collection request in the Federal Register on February 3, 2010, at 75 FR 5608-5609, for a 60-day public comment...

  14. Winging It: Good Leaders Master the Art of Improvising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goens, George

    2003-01-01

    Because life is unpredictable and plans often go awry, improvisation can be an important skill for educational leaders. This article explains the importance of improvisation; describes what drives it; and provide five questions to ask for assessing how leader improvisation, or lack of it, can affect a school district. (WFA)

  15. Leadership by Consensus at MU: A Look at Two Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayar, Adem; Kerns, James H.

    2014-01-01

    The researchers are interested in the views and perceptions, about leadership, of two leaders within the University of Missouri at the Columbia campus. Therefore, the aim of this research is to understand and to compare and contrast the leadership styles of these two leaders. In order to reach the aim of this recent study, the researchers have…

  16. Culture of Sharing: North Slope Leaders Forge Trail into Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patkotak, Elise Sereni

    2010-01-01

    To create a strong local economy, the community needs a workforce. In Native communities, the workforce should be grounded in the local culture and values. On the North Slope of Alaska, this has long been a goal of leaders. To achieve this goal, North Slope leaders came together February 2010 in Barrow, Alaska, for the "Tumitchiat" Leadership…

  17. Disability Identity of Leaders in the Self-Advocacy Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Life stories and perspectives of leaders in the self-advocacy movement were explored to enhance knowledge about disability identity formation. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 13 leaders in the self-advocacy movement. Five major themes emerged: (a) resistance-claiming personhood and voice; (b) connection with disability…

  18. Preparing "Educational" Leaders in Managerialist Times: An Australian Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eacott, Scott

    2011-01-01

    The preparation of educational leaders is a global phenomenon. Education systems have developed numerous means by which current and aspiring leaders are prepared for the role. Through the example of a large public school system in Australia, this paper argues that the doxa of school leadership establishes a particular identity of the…

  19. Accountability in Education: A Primer for School Leaders. HSLA Monograph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heim, Michael

    School leaders are increasingly coming under the gun of accountability, and this monograph is designed to help leaders think about, understand, and respond thoughtfully and effectively to the increasing demands for accountability in education. It provides a comprehensive and rather sophisticated set of concepts and insights into accountability…

  20. Fostering Trust in Outdoor Leaders: The Role of Personal Attributes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shooter, Wynn; Paisley, Karen; Sibthorp, Jim

    2012-01-01

    This study examined trust development between participants of outdoor education programs and outdoor leaders. Participants were college students enrolled in outdoor education courses. Using a factorial survey design, the technical ability, interpersonal ability, benevolence, integrity, and gender of an outdoor leader was displayed randomly in a…

  1. Taoist Lessons for Educational Leaders: Gentle Pathways to Resolving Conflicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This book explores ways in which educational leaders can apply the wisdom of the Tao in their day-to-day work in schools. It offers an alternative to the standard ways of western thinking to give the leader more possibilities when confronting a situation. We tend to value immediate and decisive action, winning, directing, and getting one's way.…

  2. Leadership Competency Assessment for Rural Community Education Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemlo, John S.; Belcher, Marcia J.

    Major goals of this project were to determine the process leadership competencies needed by rural community education leaders; to assess the training opportunities available to community education leaders in the southern U.S.; and to develop a model curriculum for acquisition of identified process leadership skills. Current and relevant findings…

  3. Growing Teacher Leaders in a Culture of Excellence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searby, Linda; Shaddix, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Viewing teachers as leaders requires a paradigm shift about the concept of leadership in a school system. The Teachers as Leaders program of the Mountain Brook, Alabama Schools represents that shift and is empowering teachers to utilize their leadership skills and contribute to the system as it fulfills its mission to offer education to its…

  4. What Would They Do? Latino Church Leaders and Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behnke, Andrew O.; Ames, Natalie; Hancock, Tina U.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding what Latino church leaders believe about domestic violence, and what they do when they confront it, is a key step in developing programs to help them engage in domestic violence prevention and intervention activities in their congregations. This article presents the findings from an exploratory study of 28 Latino church leaders. The…

  5. Peer Leaders in Drug Abuse Prevention. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohai, Caroline E.

    Although peer leaders have been effectively assisting school staffs since the 1960s, they have recently assumed their most critical role to date. Peer leaders are leading other students through drug prevention curricula, particularly those based on the Special Influence Model (SIM), which seeks to stregthen students' awareness of and resistance to…

  6. A Self-Study on Preparing Future School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, William C.; Riley, Ann T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a self-study project that goes beyond the surface of praxis to examine the internal academic teaching process of a PK-12 school leader educator. The study systematically relates one professor's intrapersonal struggle and professional challenge in addressing his lived contradiction of teaching aspiring school leaders. Results…

  7. The Engagement of Reflective Practice among Instructional Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, Patrina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the engagement of reflective practice among school leaders utilizing a qualitative case study methodology. While there have been studies conducted about school leaders and reflective practice, there was an unparalleled amount in comparison to the extensive research on teaching and reflective practice.…

  8. Characteristics of successful opinion leaders in a bounded confidence model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuwei; Glass, David H.; McCartney, Mark

    2016-05-01

    This paper analyses the impact of competing opinion leaders on attracting followers in a social group based on a bounded confidence model in terms of four characteristics: reputation, stubbornness, appeal and extremeness. In the model, reputation differs among leaders and normal agents based on the weights assigned to them, stubbornness of leaders is reflected by their confidence towards normal agents, appeal of the leaders is represented by the confidence of followers towards them, and extremeness is captured by the opinion values of leaders. Simulations show that increasing reputation, stubbornness or extremeness makes it more difficult for the group to achieve consensus, but increasing the appeal will make it easier. The results demonstrate that successful opinion leaders should generally be less stubborn, have greater appeal and be less extreme in order to attract more followers in a competing environment. Furthermore, the number of followers can be very sensitive to small changes in these characteristics. On the other hand, reputation has a more complicated impact: higher reputation helps the leader to attract more followers when the group bound of confidence is high, but can hinder the leader from attracting followers when the group bound of confidence is low.

  9. A Leader's Top Task Is to Nurture Talent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louis, Karen Seashore

    2016-01-01

    In her full essay exploring the Leadership standard in "Reach the Highest Standard in Professional Learning: Leadership," author Karen Seashore Louis offers keen insights into the question of how leaders affect the learning of other adults in a school. She writes particularly about how "school leaders can create a school culture in…

  10. The Role of Programme Directors as Academic Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milburn, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory study investigates the academic leadership roles and responsibilities performed by programme directors in higher education (also known as programme leaders or course leaders). It will be argued there has been a lack of recognition and research into the leadership role for programme directors, attention instead focusing on…

  11. Assessing Intercultural Competence for Educational Leaders: An Empirical Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Ganzoury, Hala A.

    2012-01-01

    The growing diversity of multi-cultural student populations in public schools coupled with the persistent challenge of narrowing the racial achievement gap raises questions about the preparedness of educational leaders to meet the needs of their diverse student population. Educational leaders are facing the challenge of responding to the needs of…

  12. Overcoming Adversity: Resilience Development Strategies for Educational Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Tod Allen

    2010-01-01

    School leadership has never been easy. However, some experts like Garcia (2005) wrote that current school leaders are facing a variety of difficulties that make sustaining school reform efforts exceedingly difficult. Collectively, these modern day challenges have the capacity to form the perfect storm. School leaders need effective strategies to…

  13. Foundations of Change for the Scholar-Practitioner Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Donna R.

    2010-01-01

    Change is a fact of life, and educational reform is replete with change. However, cosmetic changes fail to bring about real improvement. Rather than remodel the existing concept of public education, leaders must create a new one. The schools must be recultured. The change leader must build trust with open communication supporting followers through…

  14. Twenty under 30: Emerging Leaders in Indian Country.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Nicole

    2003-01-01

    Profiles 20 emerging young leaders in Indian Country, Hawaii, and Alaska, who have contributed to their indigenous communities in diverse ways, including educators; college students; tribal leaders and managers; businessmen; and professionals in law, archeology, and public health. Includes descriptions of accomplishments and educational background…

  15. Thought-Leaders in Asynchronous Online Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Jim

    2012-01-01

    The growth of online learning has exposed fundamental gaps in our knowledge, both theoretical and pragmatic. This research investigated some questions of the role of emergent leaders in online leaning and the influence of different behaviors. Firstly are there any common factors that identify thought-leaders? Secondly does the presence of…

  16. How HR Leaders Can Add Value to an Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smallwood, Norm; Ulrich, Dave

    2006-01-01

    Generally speaking, it is safe to say that human resource leaders whole-heartedly believe that the HR function should add value to an organization. However, many wonder where to start. In this article, the authors outline three ways in which the HR function, and the HR leader, can create sustained value for an organization and its stakeholders.

  17. Lacking Leaders: The Challenges of Principal Recruitment, Selection, and Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Daniela; Locke, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    Principals are vitally important. But ever-rising accountability standards, limited authority over key decisions, and mediocre pay make the job more and more demanding and less and less attractive to talented leaders. At a time when schools need high-quality leaders more than ever, the grueling nature of the job makes it a tough sell, and…

  18. Leaders' Perceptions of Mobile Technology in the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Kristin R.

    2012-01-01

    Leaders have limited understanding regarding mobile technology (Ramo & Edenius, 2008). However, with over 1 billion users (Meeker, Devitt & Wu, 2011), managers are tasked with making leadership decisions regarding technology adoption, management and use. Leaders may find this difficult to undertake given the limited body of knowledge in…

  19. Inside-Outside: Finding Future Community College Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strom, Stephen L.; Sanchez, Alex A.; Downey-Schilling, JoAnna

    2011-01-01

    Over the next decade, as the community college's current generation of leaders and administrators begin retiring in large numbers, important steps must be taken to identify and develop future leaders for the institution. A variety of internal opportunities (e.g., internships, leadership development programs, graduate school programs) provide…

  20. Why Teacher Leaders Don't Want to Be Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Paul M.; Denny, George S.; Pijanowski, John C.

    2011-01-01

    This article examines reasons why teachers who were identified by their school principal as leaders or having leadership potential, chose not to become school principals. While the literature reports a shortage of qualified applicants for school administrative positions, the deterrents that teacher leaders most often identify include…

  1. Competency Concerns in Group Co-Leader Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atieno Okech, Jane E.; Kline, William B.

    2006-01-01

    Group co-leaders' descriptions of their experiences and perceptions of each other as they led groups together illuminated competency concerns as a factor that strongly influenced their relationships and performance. Based on their narratives, group co-leaders' perceptions of their ability to form intimate relationships and beliefs regarding their…

  2. External Mandates and Instructional Leadership: School Leaders as Mediating Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louis, Karen Seashore; Robinson, Viviane M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine how US school leaders make sense of external mandates, and the way in which their understanding of state and district accountability policies affects their work. It is posited that school leaders' responses to external accountability are likely to reflect a complex interaction between their…

  3. Developing a Global Mindset: Learning of Global Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cseh, Maria; Davis, Elizabeth B.; Khilji, Shaista E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this qualitative research study was to explore the requirements of leading in a global environment as perceived by the leaders participating in this study as well as the way these leaders learn and develop their global mindset. Design/methodology/approach: The research methodology informed by social constructivism included…

  4. Choosing a Values-Based Leader: An Experiential Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Anne H.; Ehlinger, Sara

    2007-01-01

    Scandals throughout corporate America have encouraged companies to seek leaders who can sustain profitability and embody positive values within the organization. This group exercise highlights some of the key challenges involved in choosing a values-based leader. Participants assess three hypothetical companies' values during a period of change…

  5. Impact of the Supplemental Instruction Experience on Science SI Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockie, Nancy M.; Van Lanen, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study describes the experiences of SI leaders in science courses. Analysis of data using Colaizzi's phenomenological approach has indicated the following advantages of the SI experience for SI leaders: (a) greater appreciation of the diversity of student learning styles, (b) increased understanding of the subject matter, (c)…

  6. A Death at School: What School Leaders Should Do

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garran, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    All school leaders at some point will find themselves confronted by the need to shepherd their school communities through emotionally draining experiences. Death requires school leaders to act with compassion, care, and awareness that they are modeling for young people how to grieve. Few better examples of servant leadership exist. Communication…

  7. Investing in Leaders and Leadership to Secure a Desirable Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Hal A.

    2014-01-01

    Investments in the select few who already are or will become academic leaders are essential but insufficient. Investments also need to be made in collective leadership because leadership is an activity or function, not merely a person. Both good leaders and collective leadership are needed in the never-ending journey toward selective excellence. A…

  8. We Are the Leaders We've Been Waiting for

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargas, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    As the Latino community in the United States grows and matures, the inevitable question continues to be asked: who is the leader of this community of 50 million? "Leadership" in the Latino community has been hotly debated for many years. Many decry the absence of the "great Brown hope," a single leader who can unite the community of 50 million…

  9. Educating Leaders: Is There Anything to Learn from Business Management?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallinger, Philip; Snidvongs, Kamontip

    2008-01-01

    The current focus on school leader preparation reflects the importance societies around the world are placing upon the goal of improving their educational systems. The investment of substantial new resources into leadership preparation and development activities is based upon "the belief that school leaders make a difference" in both the…

  10. Developing Leaders through Mentoring: A Brief Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leavitt, Carol C.

    2011-01-01

    Our rapidly-changing, ambiguous, global business arena demands a unique and evolving set of insights and capabilities by which leaders may effectively navigate this new terrain. Mentoring can accomplish exactly that, as its processes orient, train, and advance the skills, knowledge, and experiences of aspiring leaders. Best utilized, mentoring is…

  11. What's the 411? High School Leaders' Perceptions of Inclusion Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamison, Arnella L.

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative, descriptive study explored and described urban and suburban school leaders' perceptions of the definition of "inclusion" and perceptions of their level of involvement in the implementation of inclusion. Additionally, the study determined if there was a significant difference in the urban and suburban school leaders'…

  12. Poverty and the Multiple Stakeholder Challenge for Global Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reade, Carol; Todd, Anne Marie; Osland, Asbjorn; Osland, Joyce

    2008-01-01

    The article presents a case study in which business leaders deal with challenging problems related to poverty, involving multiple stakeholders. This emphasizes the importance of training prospective global leaders to manage stakeholder relationships and engage in stakeholder dialogue. The authors highlight the stakeholder role played by…

  13. Profile of a 1:1 Technology Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirt, Howard Todd

    2012-01-01

    There is a great amount of emphasis placed on the impact a principal has on a school. Likewise, there is an abundance of research focused on the necessary skills needed to be a successful school leader. The purpose of this study is to develop a profile that includes common characteristics and attributes of successful school leaders in a one-to-one…

  14. Citizen Leader: A Community Service Option for College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perreault, Gerri E.

    1997-01-01

    Compares and contrasts three approaches to community service: charity, service learning, and citizen leader. Advocates using the citizen leader framework because it educates students for leadership and emphasizes reciprocal learning for all involved. Claims that this framework complements the goals of institutions of higher education. (RJM)

  15. Using Leadered Groups in Organizational Behavior and Management Survey Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andre, Rae

    2011-01-01

    In organizational behavior and management survey courses, students are likely to maximize certain career-appropriate knowledge when their classroom groups are leadered rather than leaderless. Using leadered groups facilitates the learning of the professional and managerial skills associated with formal leadership while reducing some problematic…

  16. Wounded Leader: An Archetypal Embodiment of Compassionate Transcendent Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mears, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to seek to further the formation of the emerging transcendent leadership model by exploring the archetypal image identified as wounded leader. The wounded leader archetype is introduced as a leadership style of influence that fits well within the framework of the transcendent leadership model. This study…

  17. High-Stakes Testing and the Moral Decisions of Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Chris

    2011-01-01

    As a charter school faces continued poor performance and the need to show drastic improvement in its data, school leaders are faced with a moral dilemma. To help the schools testing data, leaders consider being selective with whom they test. They consider whether they can help the short-term outcomes of the school while risking later consequences…

  18. The Charismatic Leader. Behind the Mystique of Exceptional Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conger, Jay A.

    A systematic understanding of how various behavioral components (vision, articulation skills, empowerment, unconventionality, and risk-taking) work together to set apart certain individuals as charismatic leaders is presented. Using illustrations from the careers of charismatic leaders, including Steve Jobs, Lee Iacocca, Mary Kay, John DeLorean,…

  19. Transformational Leadership Characteristics Necessary for Today's Leaders in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basham, Lloyd Moman

    2012-01-01

    This study is concerned with the traits and characteristics of presidents of institutions of higher education who are considered transformational leaders. The study adds current data to the published and perceived characterization of leaders in higher education and their approaches to changing the learning environment at their institutions. This…

  20. Career Patterns of Selected Women Leaders: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, L. Sunny; And Others

    For 10 years, the Minneapolis (Minnesota) Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) has honored local women for outstanding achievement in their occupational field and in the community at a Leader Lunch. In March of 1987, a 100-item survey was mailed to 73 past recipients of the Leader Lunch Award. Completed surveys were received from 48 women.…