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Sample records for rubble mound breakwaters

  1. Effects of vertical wall and tetrapod weights on wave overtopping in rubble mound breakwaters under irregular wave conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Kil; Dodaran, Asgar Ahadpour; Han, Chong Soo; Shahmirzadi, Mohammad Ebrahim Meshkati

    2014-12-01

    Rubble mound breakwaters protect the coastal line against severe erosion caused by wave action. This study examined the performance of different sizes and properties (i.e. height of vertical wall and tetrapod size) of rubble mound breakwaters on reducing the overtopping discharge. The physical model used in this study was derived based on an actual rubble mound in Busan Yacht Harbor. This research attempts to fill the gap in practical knowledge on the combined effect of the armor roughness and vertical wall on wave overtopping in rubble mound breakwaters. The main governing parameters used in this study were the vertical wall height, variation of the tetrapod weights, initial water level elevation, and the volume of overtopping under constant wave properties. The experimental results showed that the roughness factor differed according to the tetrapod size. Furthermore, the overtopping discharge with no vertical wall was similar to that with relatively short vertical walls ( 1 γv = 1). Therefore, the experimental results highlight the importance of the height of the vertical wall in reducing overtopping discharge. Moreover, a large tetrapod size may allow coastal engineers to choose a shorter vertical wall to save cost, while obtaining better performance.

  2. Ecological effects of rubble-mound breakwater construction and channel dredging at West Harbor, Ohio (western Lake Erie)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manny, Bruce A.; Schloesser, Donald W.; Brown, Charles L.; French, John R. P., III

    1985-01-01

    The investigation reported herein indicated that breakwater construction and associated channel dredging activities by the US Army Corps of Engineers in western Lake Erie at the entrance to West Harbor (Ohio) had no detectable adverse impacts on the distributions or abundances of macrozoobenthos and fishes. Rather, increases were noted in the number of fish eggs and larvae and in the density and biomass of periphyton and macrozoobenthos on and near the breakwaters. The area also served as a nursery ground for 20 species of fishes both during and after construction and dredging activities. Colonization of the breakwaters by periphyton, primarily a green alga (Cladophora glomerata), diatoms (Gomphonema parvulum), and a bluegreen alga (Oscillatoria tenuis), and by macrozoobenthos, primarily worms (Oligochaeta), amphipods (Gammarus spp.), and midge larvae (Chironomidae), was rapid and extensive, indicating that the breakwaters provided new, favorable habitat for primary and secondary producer organisms. Marked adverse changes in water quality, especially reduced dissolved oxygen concentrations (25 mg/l), occurred around the entrance to West Harbor in 1983 following cessation of construction and dredging activities. These water quality changes, however, could not be ascribed with certainty to construction and dredging activities at West Harbor. Construction of additional breakwaters in the study area at that time by the State of Ohio served to confound determination of the responsible causal factors.

  3. Paleoenvironmental reconstruction of a downslope accretion history: From coralgal-coralline sponge rubble to mud mound deposits (Eocene, Ainsa Basin, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Marta; Reitner, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    In the Lutetian intraslope Ainsa sub-basin, small, sub-spherical, carbonate mud mounds occur associated with hemipelagic marls and mixed gravity flow deposits. The studied mud mounds consist of a mixture of allochthonous, parautochthonous and autochthonous components that show evidences of reworking, bioerosion, and accretion by different fossil assemblages at different growth stages. The crusts of microbial-lithistid sponges played an important role stabilizing the rubble of coralgal-coralline sponges and formed low-relief small benthic patches in a dominant marly soft slope environment. These accidental hard substrates turned into suitable initiation/nucleation sites for automicrite production (dense and peloidal automicrites) on which the small mud mounds dominated by opportunistic epi- and infaunal heterozoan assemblages grew. A detailed microfacies mapping and paleoenvironmental analysis reveals a multi-episodic downslope accretion history starred by demosponges (coralline and lithistid sponges), agariciid corals, calcareous red algae, putative microbial benthic communities and diverse sclerobionts from the upper slope to the middle slope. The analyzed mud mound microfacies are compared with similar fossil assemblages and growth fabrics described in many fossil mud mounds, and with recent deep-water fore reefs and cave environments.

  4. Rubble around Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has announced that Amalthea, a 270-km-long, potato-shaped inner moon of Jupiter, "apparently is a loosely packed pile of rubble," with empty space where the rubble does not fit well together.This is among the new findings about the moon announced by JPL astronomer John Anderson and his colleagues on 9 December at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco.

  5. Rubble around Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has announced that Amalthea, a 270-km-long, potato-shaped inner moon of Jupiter, “apparently is a loosely packed pile of rubble,” with empty space where the rubble does not fit well together.This is among the new findings about the moon announced by JPL astronomer John Anderson and his colleagues on 9 December at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco.

  6. Band of Rubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This artist's animation illustrates a massive asteroid belt in orbit around a star the same age and size as our Sun. Evidence for this possible belt was discovered by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope when it spotted warm dust around the star, presumably from asteroids smashing together.

    The view starts from outside the belt, where planets like the one shown here might possibly reside, then moves into to the dusty belt itself. A collision between two asteroids is depicted near the end of the movie. Collisions like this replenish the dust in the asteroid belt, making it detectable to Spitzer.

    The alien belt circles a faint, nearby star called HD 69830 located 41 light-years away in the constellation Puppis. Compared to our own solar system's asteroid belt, this one is larger and closer to its star - it is 25 times as massive, and lies just inside an orbit equivalent to that of Venus. Our asteroid belt circles between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter.

    Because Jupiter acts as an outer wall to our asteroid belt, shepherding its debris into a series of bands, it is possible that an unseen planet is likewise marshalling this belt's rubble. Previous observations using the radial velocity technique did not locate any large gas giant planets, indicating that any planets present in this system would have to be the size of Saturn or smaller.

    Asteroids are chunks of rock from 'failed' planets, which never managed to coalesce into full-sized planets. Asteroid belts can be thought of as construction sites that accompany the building of rocky planets.

  7. 1. View looking northwest, showing Saybrook west breakwater and Lynde ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View looking northwest, showing Saybrook west breakwater and Lynde Point Lighthouse in the right background - Saybrook Breakwater Light, South tip of west end of Saybrook Breakwater, Old Saybrook, Middlesex County, CT

  8. Late Mississippian lime mud mounds, Pitkin Formation, northern Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Manger, W.L.; Ar, V.P.; Webb, G.E.

    1984-04-01

    Carbonates deposited under shallow, open shelf conditions during the Late Mississippian in northern Arkansas exhibit numerous discrete to coalescing lime mud mounds up to 20 m (65 ft) high and tens of meters in diameter. The mounds are composed of a carbonate mud core, typically with fenestrate texture, entrapped by a loosely organized framework dominated by cystoporate bryozoans and rugose corals in the lower part, and by blue-green algae and cryptostomous bryozoans in the upper part. Disarticulated crinozoan detritus is common throughout the core, suggesting that these organisms also contributed to entrapment of lime mud. During deposition, the mud core was indurated enough to support and preserve vertical burrows. Also, rubble of core mudstone is found on the flanks of some mounds, suggesting some erosion. Intermound lithology is a shoaling-upward sequence dominated by oolitic and bioclastic grainstones and packstones. Shale is also present in minor amounts. The Pitkin mounds, interbedded with these intermound sequences, developed contemporaneously with them. Depositional relief was probably less than 3 m (10 ft). The mounds expanded laterally during periods of quieter water; their growth was impeded during times of higher energy. Contacts of the mound and intermound lithologic characteristics are sharp, truncating surfaces. Mound deposition ended with the onset of high energy conditions throughout the region.

  9. Are some meteoroids rubble piles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, Jiri

    2015-08-01

    It is generally accepted that some asteroids are rubble piles, i.e. strengthless aggregates of boulders of various sizes held together only by mutual gravity. This is particularly true for asteroids in the size range from ~ 200 m to 10 km, whose rotations are in almost all cases slower that the surface disruption barrier, at which the centrifugal force would exceed the gravitational force. On the other hand, smaller asteroids often rotate rapidly.Recently, Sánchez and Scheeres (2014, Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 49, 788) proposed that rubble piles may have some cohesive strength provided by van der Waals forces between small grains. They estimate the strength to be about 25 Pa. Such a low strength would be sufficient to hold some rapidly rotating small asteroids together against centrifugal force, even if they were rubble piles. In particular, Sánchez and Scheeres (2014) argued that asteroid 2008 TC3 was a rubble pile. That asteroid entered the Earth’s atmosphere and produced meteorites Almahata Sitta.Asteroids and meteoroids entering the atmosphere are subject to dynamic pressure p = ρv2, where ρ is atmospheric density and v is velocity. It can be expected that they break-up when the dynamic pressure exceeds their strength. Fragmentation of meteoroids is indeed common. For asteroidal bodies it usually occurs at pressures 0.1 - 10 MPa (Popova et al. 2011, Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 46, 1525). For example, the main break-up of 2008 TC3 occurred at 0.9 MPa. These pressures are lower than the strength of solid meteoric rocks but dramatically exceed the expected strength for rubble piles. They best correspond to fractured stones. Nevertheless, the first break-up of rubble piles can be expected at heights above 100 km, earlier than the intensive evaporation starts and the fireball begins to be visible. Is it possible that some meteoroids were broken-up already at the beginning of observation? I will discuss this question generally and also for several specific cases of

  10. Are some meteoroids rubble piles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    The possibility that some meteoroids in the size range 1 - 20 meters are rubble piles i.e. assembles of boulders of various sizes held together only by small van der Waals forces, is investigated. Such meteoroids are expected to start disrupting into individual pieces during the atmospheric entry at very low dynamic pressures of ~ 25 Pa, even before the onset of ablation. The heterogeneous bodies as Almahata Sitta (asteroid 2008 TC3) and Benešov are primary candidates for rubble piles. Nevertheless, by analyzing the deceleration, wake, and light curve of the Benešov bolide, we found that the meteoroid disruption started only at a height of 70 km under dynamic pressure of 50 kPa. No evidence for a very early fragmentation was found also for the Chelyabinsk event.

  11. Thermal Conductivity of Rubble Piles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Jing; Goldreich, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Rubble piles are a common feature of solar system bodies. They are composed of monolithic elements of ice or rock bound by gravity. Voids occupy a significant fraction of the volume of a rubble pile. They can exist up to pressure P≈ {ε }Yμ , where {ε }Y is the monolithic material's yield strain and μ its rigidity. At low P, contacts between neighboring elements are confined to a small fraction of their surface areas. As a result, the effective thermal conductivity of a rubble pile, {k}{con}≈ k{(P/({ε }Yμ ))}1/2, can be orders of magnitude smaller than the thermal conductivity of its monolithic elements, k. In a fluid-free environment, only radiation can transfer energy across voids. It contributes an additional component, {k}{rad}=16{\\ell }σ {T}3/3, to the total effective conductivity, {k}{eff}={k}{con}+{k}{rad}. Here ℓ, the inverse of the opacity per unit volume, is of the order of the size of the elements, and voids. An important distinction between {k}{con} and {k}{rad} is that the former is independent of the size of the elements, whereas the latter is proportional to it. Our expression for {k}{eff} provides a good fit to the depth dependence of thermal conductivity in the top 140 cm of the lunar regolith. It also offers a good starting point for detailed modeling of thermal inertias for asteroids and satellites. Measurement of the response of surface temperature to variable insolation is a valuable diagnostic of a regolith. There is an opportunity for careful experiments under controlled laboratory conditions to test models of thermal conductivity such as the one we outline.

  12. Eros is a Rubble Pile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asphaug, Erik

    2008-09-01

    Asteroid 433 Eros is regarded as "fractured monolith" or "shatter pile". But models of fragmentation and disruption (e.g. Benz and Asphaug 1999) predict that any large rocky asteroid should be transformed into a jumble of dust, gravel, talus and boulders, simply because it is much easier to comminute an asteroid than to catastrophically disrupt it. Sometimes the relatively high density of Eros is taken as evidence for a fractured monolithic structure, although the inferred bulk porosity of Eros ( 20-30%) is what one expects for a rubble pile, and is about the porosity of sand and talus. The focus here is that a rubble pile structure is contraindicated by the pronounced network of linear fault-like structures (Buczkowski et al. 2008), some of which radiate from recent large impacts such as Psyche, and which form rectangular boundaries around some of the medium-sized craters. This needs an explanation. Here it is proposed, and quantitatively addressed, that the majority of these faults occur just in the upper tens of meters, where cohesion exceeds gravitational stress even for loose piles of lunar-like regolith. Assuming Eros regolith has the cohesion ( 1 kPa) measured for lunar regolith, then faulting is expected to a depth of 10 m, directly analogous to how faults occur in the upper layers of beach sand. The fact that Eros has few steep slopes anywhere, except for the angles of repose within its craters, at a baseline of 100 m (Zuber et al. 2002), is satisfied by the hypothesis that Eros is a rubble pile rather than a shattered monolith. The low fault stress implied by the above, supports the findings of dense networks of linear structures, ubiquitous features which are otherwise difficult to explain as fractures in a rocky target which has not been disrupted or jumbled against its very low gravity.

  13. 15. Photo copy of drawing, June 2, 1985, SAYBROOK BREAKWATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photo copy of drawing, June 2, 1985, SAYBROOK BREAKWATER LIGHT, SAYBROOK, CONNECTICUT, MODERNIZATION 1985: REMOVALS. U.S. Coast Guard Civil Engineering Unit, Warwick, RI - Saybrook Breakwater Light, South tip of west end of Saybrook Breakwater, Old Saybrook, Middlesex County, CT

  14. Baseline Risk Assessment for the F-Area Burning/Rubble Pits and Rubble Pit

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.

    1996-03-01

    This document provides an overview of the Savannah River Site (SRS) and a description of the F-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (BRPs) and Rubble Pit (RP) unit. It also describes the objectives and scope of the baseline risk assessment (BRA).

  15. Stair-stepped Mound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-429, 22 July 2003

    This April 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a stair-stepped mound of sedimentary rock (right of center) on the floor of a large impact crater in western Arabia Terra near 11.0oN, 4.4oW. Sedimentary rock outcrops are common in the craters of this region. The repeated thickness and uniformity of the layers that make up this mound suggest that their depositional environment was one in which cyclic or episodic events occurred over some period of time. The sediments might have been deposited in a lake, or they may have settled directly out of the atmosphere. Most of the layered material was later eroded away, leaving this circular mound and the other nearby mesas and knobs. The image is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  16. Mound Supports Galileo

    SciTech Connect

    Monsanto Research Corporation

    1986-01-01

    This video describes the invention of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) at Mound Laboratory, and radioisotope heat source production from 1 watt-thermal to 2400 watts-thermal. RTGs have been used in many space vehicles, but the RTG built for the Galileo mission to orbit Jupiter is the largest. This RTG unit will produce 4400 watts-thermal and convert to 300 watts-electric. The plutonium-238 heat source assembly and test at Mound is described. The RTGs are tested under simulated mission conditions. The RTG leakage radiation is carefully measured for background compensation for on-board radiation monitoring instruments.

  17. The Strength of Rubble Pile Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeres, D. J.; Sanchez, P.

    2012-12-01

    The rubble pile hypothesis for small asteroids in the Near Earth and Main Belt populations have been driven by several factors, including the observed high porosity of those bodies whose mass have been measured, the evident limitation on spin rate of asteroids larger than ~500 meters, and direct observation of the surface morphology of these bodies. Given these observations, it has been presumed that small asteroids should evolve as if they were cohesionless collections of grains. Detailed geophysical analysis of these bodies by Holsapple (Icarus 2010) show that cohesionless bodies will evolve under the addition of angular momentum by the YORP effect into more distended and, paradoxically, more slowly rotating bodies. Additional analysis in Holsapple (Icarus 2007) has shown that cohesional strength within a rubble pile could strengthen a collection of grains to the point where they could sustain rapid rotation. In our current talk we use the above as a starting point and incorporate new observations of the asteroid morphology driven by recent analysis of asteroid Itokawa by the Hayabusa science team and research on the mechanics of grains in the space environment (Scheeres et al. 2010). Analysis of images of Itokawa determined a measured size distribution of 1/d^3 for larger grains on asteroid Itokawa (Michikami et al., Earth Planets Space, 60, 13-20, 2008). Analysis of the sample shows the presence of micron sized dust on that asteroid's surface (Tsuchiyama et al., Science 333, 1125, 2011). Combining these observations provides a global indication of grain distribution within rubble piles. Even assuming a less steep distribution of 1/d^2 for dust grains smaller than 1 mm in size, the interior of Itokawa should still be dominated by the finest dust grains, with the mean grain size equal to ~ twice the smallest grain in the distribution. One implication of this result is that fines are present on the surface of the rubble pile Itokawa and thus should be distributed

  18. Biodiversity of Spongosorites coralliophaga (Stephens, 1915) on coral rubble at two contrasting cold-water coral reef settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazanidis, Georgios; Henry, Lea-Anne; Roberts, J. Murray; Witte, Ursula F. M.

    2016-03-01

    Cold-water coral reefs (CWRs) in the northeast Atlantic harbor diverse sponge communities. Knowledge of deep-sea sponge ecology is limited and this leaves us with a fragmented understanding of the ecological roles that sponges play in CWR ecosystems. We present the first study of faunal biodiversity associated with the massive demosponge Spongosorites coralliophaga (Stephens, 1915) that typically colonizes coral debris fields of CWRs. Our study focused on the sessile fauna inhabiting sponges mixed with coral rubble at two contrasting settings in the northeast Atlantic: the shallow inshore (120-190 m water depth) Mingulay Reef Complex (MRC) and the deep offshore (500-1200 m) Logachev Mound (LM) coral province. MRC is dominated by the scleractinian Lophelia pertusa, while LM is dominated by L. pertusa and Madrepora oculata. Nine sponge-coral rubble associations were collected from MRC and four from LM. Measurements of abundance, species richness, diversity, evenness, dry biomass, and composition of sessile fauna on sponge and coral rubble microhabitats were undertaken. Differences in community composition between the two regions were mainly a response to changes in fauna with depth. Fauna composition was also different between sponge and coral rubble within each region. Infauna constituted a minor component of the sponge-associated fauna in MRC but had a higher contribution in LM. Sponge and coral rubble sessile fauna in both regions was mainly composed of cnidarians and molluscs, similarly to some previous studies. Sponges' outer surfaces at MRC were colonized by a species-rich community with high abundance and biomass suggesting that S. coralliophaga at MRC acts as a settlement surface for various organisms but such a role is not the case at LM. This difference in the role of S. coralliophaga as a biological structure is probably related to differences in fauna composition with depth, bottom current speed, and the quantity/quality of food supplied to the benthos.

  19. Lithifying Microbes Associated to Coral Rubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltran, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial communities taking part in calcium carbonate lithification processes are particularly relevant to coral reef formation in as much as this lithification allows the stabilization of secondary reef structure. This second framework promotes long-term permanence of the reef, favoring the establishment of macro-reef builders, including corals. The reef-bacterial crusts formed by microbial communities are composed of magnesium calcite. Although prokaryotes are not proper calcifiers, carbonate precipitation can be induced by their metabolic activity and EPS production. Coral reefs are rapidly declining due to several variables associated to environmental change. Specifically in the Caribbean, stony coral Acropora palmata have suffered damage due to diseases, bleaching and storms. Some reports show that in highly disturbed areas wide ridges of reef rubbles are formed by biological and physical lithification. In this study we explore microbial diversity associated to lithified rubbles left after the great decline of reef-building A. palmata.

  20. Mound publications for 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Nowka, Stephen L.

    1992-05-01

    This document is a compilation of all Mound formal technical publications and oral presentations for calendar year 1991. It is intended to serve as an aid to personnel in obtaining or referring to specific publications by giving the proper complete reference for each information item published during the year. Some items, such as proceedings publications, may have issue dates or periods of coverage prior to 1991; however, they were formally published during 1991.

  1. Polyhedron Modeling of Rubble-Pile Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korycansky, D. G.; Asphaug, E.

    2005-01-01

    We report on progress in modeling of asteroids as collections of rigid polyhedra ("rubble piles"). Such models are (idealized) candidates for asteroid structures: aggregates of irregular rocky subunits that are held together by self-gravity and friction. We have taken several steps toward greater realism and physical interest in construction of the models (although the gravitational fields are being treated in a simplified manner). -

  2. Mound facility physical characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Tonne, W.R.; Alexander, B.M.; Cage, M.R.; Hase, E.H.; Schmidt, M.J.; Schneider, J.E.; Slusher, W.; Todd, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a baseline physical characterization of Mound`s facilities as of September 1993. The baseline characterizations are to be used in the development of long-term future use strategy development for the Mound site. This document describes the current missions and alternative future use scenarios for each building. Current mission descriptions cover facility capabilities, physical resources required to support operations, current safety envelope and current status of facilities. Future use scenarios identify potential alternative future uses, facility modifications required for likely use, facility modifications of other uses, changes to safety envelope for the likely use, cleanup criteria for each future use scenario, and disposition of surplus equipment. This Introductory Chapter includes an Executive Summary that contains narrative on the Functional Unit Material Condition, Current Facility Status, Listing of Buildings, Space Plans, Summary of Maintenance Program and Repair Backlog, Environmental Restoration, and Decontamination and Decommissioning Programs. Under Section B, Site Description, is a brief listing of the Site PS Development, as well as Current Utility Sources. Section C contains Site Assumptions. A Maintenance Program Overview, as well as Current Deficiencies, is contained within the Maintenance Program Chapter.

  3. Geoprospection of Mound A, Etowah Mounds State Park, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reppert, P. M.; Schneider, K. A.; Garrison, E. G.

    2005-05-01

    Mound A, located at Etowah Mounds State Park, Georgia, was the subject of a multi-sensor geoprospection study in 2001-02. Mound A, a late prehistoric mound, built by the Mississippian Culture, ca. 1250 - 1400 AD,is, due to its size, ~ 1 ha in area at the base and 20 m in height, a formidable subject for the use of shallow geoprospection techniques. Techniques used were ground radar (GPR), conductivity (EM) and electrical (resistivity) methods. Common Mid-Point (CMP) radar data produced detail on the mound interior from surface to base. Electrical pesudo-sections produced excellent detail of the mound's interior. The EM data appears relevant for only the upper half of the mound, perhaps to a depth of 10 m, and suggests significant heterogeneity in the sediment fill used in the mound's construction. Our results speak directly to the efficacy of shallow geophyscial techniques in exploring large archeological mounds and tells. Another important aspect of this study is the use of a geoprospection approach as a non-invasice methodology for characterizing culturally sensitive archaeological sites.

  4. Sulphate release from building rubble of WWII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekiffer, Beate; Wessolek, Gerd; Vogeler, Iris; Brettholle, Mareike

    2010-05-01

    Sulphate concentration in the upper aquifer of Berlin, Germany is increasing continuously since 40 years. In downtown Berlin they particular exceed the precaution values of drinking water ordinance. We assume that the main source of sulphate in the groundwater is technogenic material, which is part of building rubble from WW II bombing. Nearly 115 Mio t of this material have been deposited in Berlin. Our aim is, ­ to identify rubble components which contain S and to quantify the S-pool of this material ­ to identify factors, influencing the release of SO4 and ­ to predict sulphate release from building rubble of WW II We analyzed total and water soluble S of various components and the fine earth fraction of the soils containing the rubble. We investigated the influence of physical and chemical parameters on the release of SO4 using unsaturated column experiments (With an automatic percolation system). Thereby, the particle size, the flow rate and the pH of the solution has been varied. Among the components, slag shows the highest total S-contents of up to 0,7% . Lignite Coal-ashes from Lusatia, Germany are also rich in SO4. The total S of brick varies between 0,01% and 0,3%. Mortar shows S-Values between 0,08 and 0,12%. In 75% of all samples show total S of less than 0,14%. There was no significant correlation between total S-amount and water-soluble SO4, which is caused by different chemical compounds in the samples. In the percolation experiments technogenic components with grain size <2mm cause a higher density, resulting in a lower percolation velocity. The concentration of ions in the according leachate is higher than in the leachate of coarse fraction (2 - 20mm). Gypsum-rich material (10%) released constant SO4 -concentration over the whole experiment. Slag-rich material released high initial SO4-concentrations which then fastly decreased. We concluded, that the kind of technogenic component and its grain size strongly influences the release of SO4 to the

  5. Solitary wave propagation influenced by submerged breakwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Zuo, Qi-hua; Wang, Deng-ting; Shukrieva, Shirin

    2013-10-01

    The form of Boussinesq equation derived by Nwogu (1993) using velocity at an arbitrary distance and surface elevation as variables is used to simulate wave surface elevation changes. In the numerical experiment, water depth was divided into five layers with six layer interfaces to simulate velocity at each layer interface. Besides, a physical experiment was carried out to validate numerical model and study solitary wave propagation. "Water column collapsing" method (WCCM) was used to generate solitary wave. A series of wave gauges around an impervious breakwater were set-up in the flume to measure the solitary wave shoaling, run-up, and breaking processes. The results show that the measured data and simulated data are in good agreement. Moreover, simulated and measured surface elevations were analyzed by the wavelet transform method. It shows that different wave frequencies stratified in the wavelet amplitude spectrum. Finally, horizontal and vertical velocities of each layer interface were analyzed in the process of solitary wave propagation through submerged breakwater.

  6. The Mud-Laden Mound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sams, Larry M.

    1990-01-01

    A family's trip to Winterville Indian Mounds State Park in Mississippi is described, focusing on the frustrations of a gifted six-year old who fell in the muck of the Great Temple Mound, and on the joys of seeing spectacular displays of ancient earthworks. (JDD)

  7. 7. DETAIL CENTRAL PIER (SKEWBACK) WITH BREAKWATER, UPSTREAM (EAST) SIDE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL CENTRAL PIER (SKEWBACK) WITH BREAKWATER, UPSTREAM (EAST) SIDE. NOTE FRACTURES ALONG BARREL ARCH EXTRADOS. - Roaring Creek Bridge, State Road 2005 spanning Roaring Creek in Locust Township, Slabtown, Columbia County, PA

  8. On the tsunami wave-submerged breakwater interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Filianoti, P.; Piscopo, R.

    2008-07-08

    The tsunami wave loads on a submerged rigid breakwater are inertial. It is the result arising from the simple calculation method here proposed, and it is confirmed by the comparison with results obtained by other researchers. The method is based on the estimate of the speed drop of the tsunami wave passing over the breakwater. The calculation is rigorous for a sinusoidal wave interacting with a rigid submerged obstacle, in the framework of the linear wave theory. This new approach gives a useful and simple tool for estimating tsunami loads on submerged breakwaters.An unexpected novelty come out from a worked example: assuming the same wave height, storm waves are more dangerous than tsunami waves, for the safety against sliding of submerged breakwaters.

  9. Integrated research on the Pen Duick cold-water coral mounds: the MiCROSYSTEMS approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rooij, David; de Mol, Lies; Blamart, Dominique; Mienis, Furu; Wehrmann, Laura M.; Barbieri, Roberto; Maignien, Lois; Templer, Stefanie P.; de Haas, Henk; Henriet, Jean-Pierre

    2010-05-01

    The ESF EuroDIVERSITY MiCROSYSTEMS project aimed to turn the cold-water coral (CWC) mounds on the Pen Duick Escarpment (PDE) in the Gulf of Cadiz into a natural laboratory, exploring this highly complex biotope and to characterize its biodiversity. A common point of discussion with all other CWC mound provinces, surpassing its broad range of regional and morphological variability, concerns the driving forces regarding the initiation of these complex deep-water systems. Both oceanographic and geological processes have been proposed to play a significant role in the mound nucleation, growth and decline. During IODP Expedition 307, the importance of biogeochemical processes was already elucidated. Here, we present the preliminary results of the MD169 campaign as an integrated case study of three PDE CWC mounds: Alpha, Beta and Gamma mounds. Although cold-water corals are a common feature on the adjacent cliffs, mud volcanoes and seafloor, no actual living reef has been observed during the many ROV surveys. This multidisciplinary study aims to present a comprehensive and holistic view on the local dynamic geological and oceanographic environment. Coring data suggests (past or present) methane seepage near the Pen Duick Escarpment. Several sources and pathways are proposed, among which a stratigraphic migration through uplifted Miocene series underneath PDE. Its dominant morphology has influenced the local hydrodynamics within the course of the Pliocene, as documented by the emplacement of a sediment drift. Predominantly during post-Middle Pleistocene glacial episodes, favourable conditions were present for mound growth. An additional advantage for CWC mound nucleation near the top of PDE is offered through seepage-related carbonate crusts which might offer elevated colonization positions. Present-day seabed observations also suggested a possible important role of open coral rubble frameworks in the mound building process. These graveyards not only act as sediment trap

  10. The sediment composition and predictive mapping of facies on the Propeller Mound—A cold-water coral mound (Porcupine Seabight, NE Atlantic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heindel, Katrin; Titschack, Jürgen; Dorschel, Boris; Huvenne, Veerle A. I.; Freiwald, André

    2010-10-01

    Here we provide a detailed qualitative and quantitative insight on recent sediment composition and facies distribution of a cold-water coral (CWC) mound using the example of the Propeller Mound on the Irish continental margin (Hovland Mound Province, Porcupine Seabight). Five facies types on Propeller Mound are defined: (1) living coral framework, (2) coral rubble, (3) dropstone, (4) hardground, representing the on-mound facies, and (5) hemipelagic sediment facies, which describes the off-mound area. This facies definition is based on already published video-data recorded by Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV), photo-data of gravity cores, box cores, and dredges from sediment surfaces as well as on the composition of the sediment fraction coarser than 125 μm, which has been analyzed on five selected box cores. Sediment compositions of the living coral framework and coral rubble facies are rather similar. Both sediment types are mainly produced by corals (34 and 35 wt%, respectively), planktonic foraminifers (22 and 29 wt%, respectively), benthic foraminifers (both 7 wt%), and molluscs (21 and 10 wt%, respectively), whereas the living coral framework characteristically features additional brachiopods (6 wt%). Hardgrounds are well-lithified coral rudstones rich in coral fragments (>30 surf%), foraminifers, echinoderms, and bivalves. The dropstone facies and the hemipelagic sediment typically carry high amounts of lithoclasts (36 and 53 wt%, respectively) and planktonic foraminifers (35 and 32 wt%, respectively); however, their faunal diversity is low compared with the coral-dominated facies (12 and <2 wt% coral fragments, 7 and 6 wt% benthic foraminifers, and 4 and 0 wt% balanids). Using the maximum likelihood algorithm within ArcGIS 9.2, spatial prediction maps of the previously described mound facies are calculated over Propeller Mound and are based on mound morphology parameters, ground-truthed with the sedimentary and faunal information from box cores, photographs

  11. Load transmission through ice rubble on the Gulf Molikpaq

    SciTech Connect

    Timco, G.W. )

    1993-11-01

    A test program has been performed in an ice modeling basin to measure the load apportioning through ice rubble around Gulf's Molikpaq, a steel caisson offshore structure. A model of the Molikpaq and its supporting submarine berm was built at a 1:75 scale. The Molikpaq and berm were instrumented independently, so the load apportioning could be determined. Thirty-six ice-loading events, including rubble formation from level ice as well as impacts through the rubble by extreme ice features, were analyzed. The results of the tests show that the ice rubble can deform and transmit load to the structure at force levels well below those predicted by a rigid-body analysis of the rubble.

  12. Gale Crater Mound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The eroded, layered deposit in Gale Crater is a mound of material rising 3 km above the crater floor. It has been sculpted by wind and possibly water to produce the dramatic landforms seen today. The origin of the sedimentary material that composes the mound remains a contested issue: was it produced from sedimentation in an ancient crater lake or by airfall onto dry land?

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -5.1, Longitude 137.5 East (222.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  13. Beach morphologies induced by breakwaters with different orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Nancy L.; Harley, Mitchell D.; Armaroli, Clara; Nordstrom, Karl F.

    2015-06-01

    A desired outcome in the construction of a detached emerged breakwater is the formation of an accretionary salient in its lee to augment the beach, improve beach amenity and provide an additional buffer from storm waves. The extent to which this salient forms and its morphology are strongly controlled by the breakwater geometry with respect to the original shoreline, sediment availability, and local wave climate. The purpose of this paper is to identify how breakwater geometry and orientation of gaps between individual breakwaters alter the direction of waves entering the gaps and change the asymmetry of the salients. Four distinct breakwater sites along the Emilia-Romagna coastline in Northern Italy were chosen for a detailed field and desktop study comprising three-dimensional topographic and bathymetric surveys, sediment sampling, LiDAR flights and historical shoreline mapping. The orientations of the shorelines at these four sites range over 43°, resulting in different exposures to the dominant waves. The oblique orientations of the gaps between individual breakwater segments at three of the four sites effectively create a "gap window" between breakwaters favoring the exposure of short-period waves from the north and diminishing the effect of longer waves from the dominant east. Salients can be symmetrical despite an acute angle of approach of the dominant deep water waves where refraction is enhanced by offshore topography and breakwaters are parallel to the shore. Waves approaching normal to the gap window undergo less diffraction due to their shorter length relative to the gap window width and undergo less attenuation by breaking and bottom friction if they are locally generated and have short periods. Greater breaking-wave energy on the gap-facing slope of the salient can create shoreline and morphological asymmetry. The implication is that breakwater orientations can be designed or altered to selectively dampen or facilitate wave energy to enhance

  14. Small asteroids - rubble piles or boulders?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Alan W.

    2013-10-01

    The asteroid rotation spin barrier at ~2.2 h period among asteroids 10 km > D > 200 m doesn’t prove all such asteroids are rubble piles, and the faster rotations among smaller asteroids doesn’t require monolithic strength, either. Only a very modest strength, perhaps no more than van der Waals force, might suffice to hold regolith together on a small super-fast rotator (Sanchez & Scheeres, 2013, arXif:1306.1622v1). The problem is that for a constant or only slowly varying strength with respect to diameter, the spin barrier becomes proportional to 1/D below the size where material strength is dominant, or perhaps a bit steeper if strength increases with decreasing D. What we observe in the distribution of asteroid spins versus diameter is that below D ~ 200 m, the spin barrier goes up at least ~D-3.5, if not abruptly. Models with constant or slowly varying strength fail to fit this observation, and the abrupt transition cannot be an observational selection effect: the void in the phase space of rotations would be among the easiest rotations to observe, e.g. the one conspicuous exception, 2001 OE84 (D ~ 0.7 km, P = 0.5 h) was easily and unambiguously measured (Pravec, et al. 2002, Proc. ACM 2002, ESA SP-500, 743-745). This abrupt transition is most easily explained as a real transition in material properties of asteroids in the size range ~200 m diameter, from “rubble pile” to “boulder”, although neither term may be fully descriptive of the actual structure. Two other lines of evidence suggest that this transition in properties is real: the dip in the size-frequency distribution of NEAs is maximum at ~150 m, suggesting that a transition to stronger material structure occurs about there, and we observe, e.g., Tunguska and the recent Chelyabinsk bolide, that bodies in the tens of meters size range entering the atmosphere behave more like solid rocks than rock piles (Boslough & Crawford 2008, Int. J. Imp. Eng. 35, 1441-1448). I encourage those doing computer

  15. Threat from Rubble-Pile Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, P. H.

    2015-12-01

    While chondrites are the most common meteoroids to enter our atmosphere, they represent a small fraction of recovered falls. Most stony meteorites disrupt during entry, consumed by ablation or lost by weathering; in contrast, small iron meteorites (<10 m) disrupt and disperse to create strewnfields due to interacting atmospheric bow shocks [e.g., Passey and Melosh, 1980]. The Carancas impact crater in 2007, however, challenged our understanding [Tancredi et al., 2008]: (a) first eyewitness of a crater formed by a stony meteorite; (b) undetected thermal entry at altitude; (c) no accessory meteorite falls; (d) "explosion" (not low-speed compression) crater; (e) infrasound/seismic data indicating a high-speed entry/collision; and (f) petrologic evidence for shock deformation/melting in breccias indicative of speeds >4 km/s. Although a monolithic chondrite (~ 10 m across) might allow surviving entry, most objects of this size contain multiple flaws, ensuring atmospheric disruption. Hence, an alternative "needle model" was proposed wherein a small rubble-pile object gradually re-shaped itself during entry [Schultz, 2008], a process that minimizes drag, thermal signatures of entry, and catastrophic disruption. First proposed to account for smaller than expected craters on Venus [Schultz, 1992], such a process resembles subsequent Shoemaker-Levy entry models [Boslough and Crawford, 1997] that predicted much deeper entry than standard models. Laboratory experiments at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range simulated this process by breaking-up hypervelocity projectiles into a cloud of debris and tracking its path at near-full atmospheric pressure. The resulting cloud of fragments exhibited less deceleration than a solid sphere at the same speed. Moreover, shadowgraphs revealed constituent fragments "surfing" the pressure jump within the mach cone/column. Previous models proposed that crater-forming impacts must be >50-100 m in diameter in order to survive entry [Bland and

  16. Seismic features of Winnipegosis mounds in Saskatchewan

    SciTech Connect

    Gendzwill, D.J.

    1988-07-01

    The Winnipegosis Formation of southern Saskatchewan is characterized by reefs or reeflike mounds in its upper member. Several characteristic features of the mounds permit their identification from seismic-reflection data. These features include reflections from the flanks of the mound, a change in the reflection continuity in the middle and base of the mound, a velocity pullup under the mound, and subsidence of strata over the mound. Dissolution of the salt which surrounds the mounds sometimes occurs, resulting in a drape structure. Some or all of these features may be present at the correct seismic stratigraphic level for Winnipegosis mounds, depending on the local conditions. Subsidence of strata over the mounds indicates compaction and porosity loss from the original mound or possibly the degree of dolomitization or pressure dissolution. Salt-removal features over or adjacent to the mounds indicate fluid movements. Approximate ages can be estimated from stratigraphic thinning and thickening relationships above such features. Complications in identifying Winnipegosis mounds may arise from thin-bed effects if the mounds are not very thick compared to a seismic wavelength. Confusion may also arise from anhydrite, which may encase the mounds or which may form a thick horizontal layer at the tops of the mounds, causing an interfering signal.

  17. Earth melter with rubble walls and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Chris C.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is an improvement to the earth melter described and claimed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,443,618. The improvement is the use of rubble for retaining walls. More specifically, the retaining walls rest on ground level and extend above ground level piling rubble around a melt zone. A portion of the melter may be below grade wherein sidewalls are formed by the relatively undisturbed native soil or rock, and the rubble may be used as a backfill liner for the below grade sidewalls.

  18. Study of vertical breakwater reliability based on copulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Sheng; Li, Jingjing; Li, Xue; Wei, Yong

    2016-04-01

    The reliability of a vertical breakwater is calculated using direct integration methods based on joint density functions. The horizontal and uplifting wave forces on the vertical breakwater can be well fitted by the lognormal and the Gumbel distributions, respectively. The joint distribution of the horizontal and uplifting wave forces is analyzed using different probabilistic distributions, including the bivariate logistic Gumbel distribution, the bivariate lognormal distribution, and three bivariate Archimedean copulas functions constructed with different marginal distributions simultaneously. We use the fully nested copulas to construct multivariate distributions taking into account related variables. Different goodness fitting tests are carried out to determine the best bivariate copula model for wave forces on a vertical breakwater. We show that a bivariate model constructed by Frank copula gives the best reliability analysis, using marginal distributions of Gumbel and lognormal to account for uplifting pressure and horizontal wave force on a vertical breakwater, respectively. The results show that failure probability of the vertical breakwater calculated by multivariate density function is comparable to those by the Joint Committee on Structural Safety methods. As copulas are suitable for constructing a bivariate or multivariate joint distribution, they have great potential in reliability analysis for other coastal structures.

  19. 77. Plan of Proposed Concrete of Rubble Masonry Dam at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    77. Plan of Proposed Concrete of Rubble Masonry Dam at Frog Tanks on the Agua Fria River, Arizona. September 1903. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  20. 2. DETAIL OF RUBBLE ABUTMENT AT WEST END OF WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DETAIL OF RUBBLE ABUTMENT AT WEST END OF WEST MULTNOMAH FALLS VIADUCT. - Historic Columbia River Highway, West Multnomah Falls Viaduct, West of Multnomah Falls on Historic Columbia River Highway, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  1. 54. POWDER MAGAZINE, VENTILATION PASSAGE ALONG REAR. NOTE STONE RUBBLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. POWDER MAGAZINE, VENTILATION PASSAGE ALONG REAR. NOTE STONE RUBBLE CONSTRUCTION TO LEFT (SOUTHWEST); ENTRANCE TO A MAGAZINE TO THE RIGHT. VIEW IS NORTHWEST TO SOUTHEAST. - Fort Monroe, Fortress, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  2. 10. DETAIL OF RUBBLE MASONRY ABUTMENT ON THE SOUTH BANK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL OF RUBBLE MASONRY ABUTMENT ON THE SOUTH BANK AND DISINTEGRATING CONCRETE FACING; VIEW FROM WEST. - Mitchell's Mill Bridge, Spanning Winter's Run on Carrs Mill Road, west of Bel Air, Bel Air, Harford County, MD

  3. FEATURE A. CONCRETE ANTIAIRCRAFT GUN POSITION, SHOWING CORAL RUBBLE BERM, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE A. CONCRETE ANTI-AIRCRAFT GUN POSITION, SHOWING CORAL RUBBLE BERM, VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Battery-Anti-Aircraft Gun Position, South of Point Cruz Road & west of Coral Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  4. Bizarre Crater Mound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 5 June 2003

    The height of the interior mound of sediment inside this crater exceeds the crater rim heights by 900 meters (3,000 ft). This is a confounding problem. How does all this material get inside this crater and actually rise higher than its holding chamber? What is this material? Where did it come from? Why is it still here? It is exactly these kinds of enigmas that makes Mars so very interesting.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 12.2, Longitude 26.3 East (333.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  5. Structural stability of rubble-pile asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ishan

    2013-03-01

    Granular aggregates, like fluids, do not admit all manners of shapes and rotation rates. It is hoped that an analysis of a suspected granular asteroid’s equilibrium shape and its structural stability will help confirm its rubble-pile nature, and, perhaps, even constrain the asteroid’s material parameters. Equilibrium shapes have been analyzed in the past by several investigators (Holsapple, K.A. [2001]. Icarus 154, 432-448; Harris, A.W., Fahnestock, E.G., Pravec, P. [2009]. Icarus 199, 310-318; Sharma, I., Jenkins, J.T., Burns, J.A. [2009]. Icarus 200, 304-322). Here, we extend the classical Lagrange-Dirichlet stability theorem to the case of self-gravitating granular aggregates. This stability test is then applied to probe the stability of several near-Earth asteroids, and explore the influence of material parameters such as internal friction angle and plastic bulk modulus. Finally, we consider their structural stability to close planetary encounters. We find that it is possible for asteroids to be stable to small perturbations, but unstable to strong and/or extended perturbations as experienced during close flybys. Conversely, assuming stability in certain situations, it is possible to estimate material properties of some asteroids like, for example, 1943 Anteros.

  6. Modelling of Performance of Caisson Type Breakwaters under Extreme Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güney Doǧan, Gözde; Özyurt Tarakcıoǧlu, Gülizar; Baykal, Cüneyt

    2016-04-01

    Many coastal structures are designed without considering loads of tsunami-like waves or long waves although they are constructed in areas prone to encounter these waves. Performance of caisson type breakwaters under extreme swells is tested in Middle East Technical University (METU) Coastal and Ocean Engineering Laboratory. This paper presents the comparison of pressure measurements taken along the surface of caisson type breakwaters and obtained from numerical modelling of them using IH2VOF as well as damage behavior of the breakwater under the same extreme swells tested in a wave flume at METU. Experiments are conducted in the 1.5 m wide wave flume, which is divided into two parallel sections (0.74 m wide each). A piston type of wave maker is used to generate the long wave conditions located at one end of the wave basin. Water depth is determined as 0.4m and kept constant during the experiments. A caisson type breakwater is constructed to one side of the divided flume. The model scale, based on the Froude similitude law, is chosen as 1:50. 7 different wave conditions are applied in the tests as the wave period ranging from 14.6 s to 34.7 s, wave heights from 3.5 m to 7.5 m and steepness from 0.002 to 0.015 in prototype scale. The design wave parameters for the breakwater were 5m wave height and 9.5s wave period in prototype. To determine the damage of the breakwater which were designed according to this wave but tested under swell waves, video and photo analysis as well as breakwater profile measurements before and after each test are performed. Further investigations are carried out about the acting wave forces on the concrete blocks of the caisson structures via pressure measurements on the surfaces of these structures where the structures are fixed to the channel bottom minimizing. Finally, these pressure measurements will be compared with the results obtained from the numerical study using IH2VOF which is one of the RANS models that can be applied to simulate

  7. The Porcupine Bank Canyon coral mounds: oceanographic and topographic steering of deep-water carbonate mound development and associated phosphatic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzini, A.; Akhmetzhanov, A.; Monteys, X.; Ivanov, M.

    2012-06-01

    The head of a canyon system extending along the western Porcupine Bank (west of Ireland) and which accommodates a large field of giant carbonate mounds was investigated during two cruises (INSS 2000 and TTR-13). Multibeam and sidescan sonar data (600-1,150 m water depth) suggest that the pre-existing seabed topography acts as a significant factor controlling mound distribution and shape. The mounds are concentrated along the edges of the canyon or are associated with a complex fault system traced around the canyon head, comprising escarpments up to 60 m high and several km long. The sampling for geochemical and petrographic analysis of numerous types of authigenic deposits was guided by sidescan sonar and video recordings. Calcite-cemented biogenic rubble was observed at the top and on the flanks of the carbonate mounds, being associated with both living and dead corals ( Lophelia pertusa, Madrepora oculata and occasional Desmophyllum cristagalli). This can plausibly be explained by dissolution of coral debris facilitated by strong currents along the mound tops and flanks. In turn, the dissolved carbon is recycled and precipitated as interstitial micrite. Calcite, dolomite and phosphatic hardgrounds were identified in samples from the escarpment framing the eastern part of the survey area. The laterally extensive phosphatic hardgrounds represent a novel discovery in the region, supplying hard substrata for the establishment of new coral colonies. Based on existing knowledge of regional oceanographic conditions, complemented with new CTD measurements, it is suggested that water column stratification, enhanced bottom currents, and upwelling facilitate the deposition of organic matter, followed by phosphatisation leading to the formation of phosphate-glauconite deposits. The occurrence of strong bottom currents was confirmed by means of video observations combined with acoustic and sampling data, providing circumstantial evidence of fine- to medium-grained sand

  8. Mound calorimetry for explosive surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Shockey, G.C.; Rodenburg, W.W.

    1985-01-01

    Heat of reaction determinations of pyrotechnics and explosives is made at MRC-Mound by bomb calorimetry. Energy releases from ten calories to 94 kilocalories have been measured accurately using four different calorimeter systems. Each system is described and some heat of reaction results are given. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Numerical experiments with rubble piles: equilibrium shapes and spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Derek C.; Elankumaran, Pradeep; Sanderson, Robyn E.

    2005-02-01

    We present numerical experiments investigating the shape and spin limits of self-gravitating "perfect" rubble piles that consist of identical, smooth, rigid, spherical particles with configurable normal coefficient of restitution and no sliding friction. Such constructs are currently employed in a variety of investigations, ranging from the formation of asteroid satellites to the dynamical properties of Saturn's densest rings. We find that, owing to cannonball stacking behavior, rubble piles can maintain non-spherical shapes without bulk spin, unlike a fluid, and can spin faster than a perfect fluid before shedding mass, consistent with the theory for the more general continuum rubble pile model (Holsapple, 2004, Icarus 172, 272-303). Rubble piles that reassemble following a catastrophic disruption reconfigure themselves to lie within stability limits predicted by the continuum theory. We also find that coarse configurations consisting of a small number of particles are more resistant to tidal disruption than fine configurations with many particles. Overall this study shows that idealized rubble piles behave qualitatively in a manner similar to certain granular materials, at least in the limit where global shape readjustments and/or mass shedding begins. The limits obtained here may provide constraints on the possible internal structure of some small Solar System bodies that have extreme shapes or are under high stress. Amalthea is presented as a case study.

  10. MOISTURE CONTENT AND POROSITY OF CONCRETE RUBBLE STUDY.

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, M

    2005-10-07

    Tritium contaminated concrete rubble from the 232-F Tritium Facility was disposed in the Slit 1 Trenches 1 and 2 in 1997. A Special Analysis (SA) has been performed to evaluate any impact this disposal may have on the groundwater. The SA assumed that the disposed concrete rubble was fully saturated at the time of disposal, however if the concrete was less than fully saturated, migration of tritium out of the concrete would be slower than under fully saturated conditions. Therefore if the concrete at disposal was less than fully saturated, the PA assumption of full saturation would be a conservative assumption. In order to evaluate whether the PA assumption resulted in a conservative analysis from the standpoint of the concrete saturation, concrete rubble samples were collected from various facilities being demolished at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and evaluated for in-field moisture content, absorbable moisture, and water exchangeable porosity. The purpose of this task was to collect concrete rubble samples from various demolished SRS facilities for the purpose of determining in-field moisture content, absorbable moisture, and water exchangeable porosity. Since moisture content testing for concrete rubble is not typical, existing ASTM Standards were reviewed for method and procedure development.

  11. Paleoenvironmental setting of Paleozoic mud mounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wanless, H.R. . Dept. Geological Sciences); Tedesco, L.P. )

    1992-01-01

    Paleozoic carbonate mud mounds formed above storm wave base, which in many settings was in moderate to extremely shallow water. This is concluded by a comparative analysis of sedimentary structures, fabrics and small scale sequences occurring in Mississippian and Pennsylvanian mounds and in modern mud mounds and Halimeda bioherms. Most small mounds studied contain a shallowing sequence that represents shallowing into the zone of daily agitation. The bulk of each mound sequence is detrital deposition of layered mudstones to wackestones in the mound core and packstones to grainstones on the flanks and shoal cap. If macroskeletal fauna and flora are present, an autochthonous skeletal packstone may occur in the upper portion of the shallowing sequence beneath the detrital grainstone cap. Burrow excavations and grainy tubular tempestite infillings partially to completely modify the primary depositional fabric of all of these facies. Larger mounds studied are a composite of several to numerous smaller mound depositional sequences. High vertical relief of some larger mounds may be more the result of continued accommodation space provided by subsidence/downfaulting than be deposition in extremely deep water. Although the biotic components of carbonate mounds vary greatly through the Paleozoic, the contained sedimentary structures, fabrics and fundamental depositional sequences remain very similar. This suggests a general similarity in the mechanism and depositional setting of mound formation.

  12. Astronomical Aspects of Krakow's Monumental Mounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozakiewicz, Joanna

    2015-05-01

    Krakus' mound and Wanda's mound are the largest prehistoric mounds in the region. According to the legend, they were raised by prehistoric Slavs as the burial sites of Krakow's founder - Krakus (or Krak), and his daughter - Wanda. Archaeological excavations have only been conducted on the mound of Krakus. They revealed that the mound was erected not earlier than the 1st century AD and not later than the 10th century AD. Furthermore, the studies conducted in the 1970s by professor Kotlarczyk showed that the azimuth connecting these mounds points to the sunrise on 1 May. As this day marks an important festival in the Celtic calendar - Beltaine - the two mounds could be related to the Celtic culture. This study presents the findings of the latest research.

  13. Sea Ice Friction: The Effect of Ice Rubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scourfield, S.; Sammonds, P. R.; Lishman, B.; Riska, K.; Marchenko, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    Ice deformation processes in the Arctic often generate ice rubble, and situations arise where ice fragments of varying size separate sea ice floes. While the shear forces between sea ice floes in direct contact with each other are controlled by ice-ice friction, what is not known is how the slip of the floes is affected by the presence of rubble between the sliding surfaces. We present the result of field experiments undertaken on fjord ice in Svea, Svalbard, which investigated the velocity and hold time dependence of sea ice friction involving ice gouge. Average air temperature for the duration of time in which experiments were run was -12.4°C, and the thickness of the level fjord ice was 70 cm. A double-direct-shear experiment was done on floating sea ice in the field, with the addition of rubble ice between the sliding surfaces. This was achieved by moving a floating ice block through a channel of open water whilst subjected to normal loading, which was transferred through regions of ice rubble on both sides of the mobile block. The ice rubble regions were 30 cm deep and 50 cm wide. The displacement of the block and the force needed to move the block were measured. The rate dependence of friction was investigated for speeds of 10-3 to 10-2 ms-1. To investigate the state dependence of friction, slide-hold-slide (SHS) tests were conducted for hold times ranging from 1 second to 18 hours. When comparing the results from these experiments with a model for ice friction presented by Schulson and Fortt (2013), similar behaviour is seen at low hold times, where the peak coefficient of friction has a linear relationship with the logarithm of hold time. This is not the case for long hold times, however, and we attribute this to thermal consolidation of the ice rubble region.

  14. Ecology and distribution of the benthic community on the monterey breakwater, monterey, california

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, S.J.

    1981-03-01

    The Monterey breakwater was studied to determine an ecological baseline. The plants and animals occupying meter square quadrats along a cross sectional transect covering the breakwater and the adjacent mud bottom out to depths of 13 meters was surveyed qualitatively and quantitatively. It is found that the differences between the populations of the inner and outer parts of the breakwater are minor and those differences are in the relative abundance of only a few species.

  15. Stellar Rubble May be Planetary Building Blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for animation Birth of 'Phoenix' Planets?

    This artist's concept depicts a type of dead star called a pulsar and the surrounding disk of rubble discovered by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The pulsar, called 4U 0142+61, was once a massive star until about 100,000 years ago when it blew up in a supernova explosion and scattered dusty debris into space. Some of that debris was captured into what astronomers refer to as a 'fallback disk,' now circling the remaining stellar core, or pulsar. The disk resembles protoplanetary disks around young stars, out of which planets are thought to be born.

    Supernovas are a source of iron, nitrogen and other 'heavy metals' in the universe. They spray these elements out into space, where they eventually come together in clouds that give rise to new stars and planets. The Spitzer finding demonstrates that supernovas might also contribute heavy metals to their own planets, a possibility that was first suggested when astronomers discovered planets circling a pulsar called PSR B1257+12 in 1992.

    Birth of 'Phoenix' Planets? About the Movie This artist's animation depicts the explosive death of a massive star, followed by the creation of a disk made up of the star's ashes. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope was able to see the warm glow of such a dusty disk using its heat-seeking infrared vision. Astronomers believe planets might form in this dead star's disk, like the mythical Phoenix rising up out of the ashes.

    The movie begins by showing a dying massive star called a red giant. This bloated star is about 15 times more massive than our sun, and approximately 40 times bigger in diameter. When the star runs out of nuclear fuel, it collapses and ultimately blows apart in what is called a supernova. A lone planet around the star is shown being incinerated by the fiery blast. Astronomers do not know if stars of this heft host planets, but if they do, the

  16. Full wave solution for hydrodynamic behaviors of pile breakwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Da-tong

    2013-06-01

    Rayleigh expansion is used to study the water-wave interaction with a row of pile breakwater in finite water depth. Evanescent waves, the wave energy dissipated on the fluid resistance and the thickness of the breakwater are totally included in the model. The formulae of wave reflection and transmission coefficients are obtained. The accuracy of the present model is verified by a comparison with existing results. It is found that the predicted wave reflection and transmission coefficients for the zero order are all highly consistent with the experimental data (Hagiwara, 1984; Isaacson et al., 1998) and plane wave solutions (Zhu, 2011). The losses of the wave energy for the fluid passing through slits play an important role, which removes the phenomena of enhanced wave transmission.

  17. Martian Sedimentary Basins and Central Mound Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, K. A.; Bell, J. F., III

    2014-12-01

    Central mounds on Mars are observed as sedimentary deposits within crater interiors, but the specific processes responsible for their formation and subsequent modification are still debated. The deposits are hypothesized to have been created by either subaerial or subaqueous processes through one of two general formation mechanisms. The prevailing hypothesis suggests that after their craters were formed, sediment filled the entire crater and was later eroded into the morphologies we observe today. Alternatively, the sediment could have been deposited as the features we observe today without any significant erosion contributing to their mound shape. We conducted a survey of central mounds that occur within craters larger than 25 km in diameter located between ± 60° latitude on Mars. We use mound locations, mound offsets within their host craters, and mound heights to address various mound formation hypotheses. The results of this survey support the hypothesis that mound sediment once filled the entire host crater and was later eroded into the features we observe today. We propose that large Martian impact craters act as simplistic sedimentary basins. These basins "catch" any sediment that is being transported through the region. Any geologic process that involves transport of material (airfall dust, explosive volcanism, impact ejecta, etc.) could have contributed to the growth of this sediment fill, although the dominant process could vary based on location. During this depositional phase, several processes (ice/frost, water, etc.) could have cemented the material; then, at some point, the environment changed from depositional to erosional, leading to the formation of isolated mounds of sediment within these craters. Our study reveals that most mounds are offset from the center of their host crater in the same direction as the regional winds. For example, the mounds in Arabia Terra are offset towards the western portion of their craters. This observation is

  18. Impact Simulations on the Rubble Pile Asteroid (2867) Steins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deller, Jakob; Snodgrass, Colin; Lowry, Stephen C.; Price, Mark C.; Sierks, Holger

    2014-11-01

    Images from the OSIRIS camera system on board the Rosetta spacecraft (Keller et al. 2010) has revealed several interesting features on asteroid (2867) Steins. Its macro porosity of 40%, together with the shape that looks remarkably like a YORP evolved body, both indicate a rubble pile structure. A large crater on the southern pole is evidence for collisional evolution of this rubble pile asteroid. We have developed a new approach for simulating impacts on asteroid bodies that connects formation history to their collisional evolution. This is achieved by representing the interior as a ‘rubble pile’, created from the gravitational aggregation of spherical ‘pebbles’ that represent fragments from a major disruption event. These ‘pebbles’ follow a power law size function and constitute the building blocks of the rubble pile. This allows us to explicitly model the interior of rubble pile asteroids in hyper-velocity impact simulations in a more realistic way. We present preliminary results of a study validating our approach in a large series of simulated impacts on a typical small main belt rubble pile asteroid using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics solver in Autodyn. We show that this approach allows us to explicitly follow the behavior of a single ‘pebble’, while preserving the expected properties of the bulk asteroid as known from observations and experiments (Holsapple 2009). On the example of Steins, we use this model to investigate if surface features like the northern hill at 75/100 degrees lon/lat distance to the largest crater (Jorda et al. 2012), or the catena of depletion pits, can be explained by the displacement of large fragments in the interior of the asteroid during the impact. We do this by following the movement of pebbles below the surface feature in simulations that recreate the shape of the impact crater.Acknowledgements: Jakob Deller thanks the Planetary Science Institute for a Pierazzo International Student Travel Award that funds

  19. Impact simulations on the rubble pile asteroid (2867) Steins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deller, Jakob; Lowry, Stephen; Snodgrass, Colin; Price, Mark; Sierks, Holger

    2015-04-01

    Images from the OSIRIS camera system on board the Rosetta spacecraft (Keller et al. 2010) have revealed several interesting features on asteroid (2867) Steins. Its macro porosity of 40%, together with the shape that looks remarkably like a YORP evolved body, both indicate a rubble pile structure. A large crater on the southern pole is evidence for collisional evolution of this rubble pile asteroid. We have developed a new approach for simulating impacts on asteroid bodies that connects formation history to their collisional evolution. This is achieved by representing the interior as a 'rubble pile', created from the gravitational aggregation of spherical 'pebbles' that represent fragments from a major disruption event. These 'pebbles' follow a power-law size function and constitute the building blocks of the rubble pile. This allows us to explicitly model the interior of rubble pile asteroids in hyper-velocity impact simulations in a more realistic way. We present preliminary results of a study validating our approach in a large series of simulated impacts on a typical small main-belt rubble pile asteroid using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics solver in LS-DYNA. We show that this approach allows us to explicitly follow the behavior of a single 'pebble', while preserving the expected properties of the bulk asteroid as known from observations and experiments (Holsapple 2009). On the example of Steins, we use this model to relate surface features like the northern hill at 75/100 degrees lon/lat distance to the largest crater (Jorda et al. 2012), or the catena of depletion pits, to the displacement of large fragments in the interior of the asteroid during the impact. We do this by following the movement of pebbles below the surface feature in simulations that recreate the shape of the impact crater. We show that while it is not straightforward to explain the formation of the hill-like structure, the formation of cracks possibly leading to depletion zones can be

  20. Geological mounds and their seismic expression

    SciTech Connect

    Swarbrick, R.E. )

    1991-03-01

    Mound geometry (convex upward structure developed above a subhorizontal surface) is common in many geological environments and frequently observed in 2-dimensions on seismic sections. Seismic mounds are typically associated with deep-water clastic sediments, e.g. submarine fans and slumps, and with a variety of carbonate depositional settings, e.g., reefs and banks, but also exist in other depositional settings. Recognition will be dependent on mound dimension, velocity contrast, amplitude strength, and the resolution of the seismic data. Since mounds can represent an important exploration target and recognition of porous, hydrocarbon-bearing section is all-important, careful restitution of the original depositional morphology from the seismic data is required. Details of present velocity distribution are critical, along with a realistic concept of any post-depositional modification, such as compaction, which may have taken place during burial. Where differential compaction is taking place, for example between sand and shale, seismic expression of morphology will be continually modified during progressive burial. Analysis of structure at the top and base of the mound can provide support for lithological interpretation based on other criteria, such as seismic facies analysis based on internal and external reflections. Modeling, using parameters from mounds in a variety of known depositional settings, illustrates many of the interpretational problems associated with seismic mounds and provides some objective criteria for analysis of mound morphology. Comparison is made with real data, principally from northwest Europe and North America.

  1. Sulphur Extraction at Bryan Mound

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Carolyn L; Lord, Anna C. Snider

    2015-08-01

    The Bryan Mound caprock was subjected to extens ive sulphur mining prior to the development of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Undoubtedl y, the mining has modified the caprock integrity. Cavern wells at Bryan Mound have been subject to a host of well integr ity concerns with many likely compromised by the cavernous capro ck, surrounding corrosive environment (H 2 SO 4 ), and associated elevated residual temperatures al l of which are a product of the mining activities. The intent of this study was to understand the sulphur mining process and how the mining has affected the stability of the caprock and how the compromised caprock has influenced the integrity of the cavern wells. After an extensiv e search to collect pert inent information through state agencies, literature sear ches, and the Sandia SPR librar y, a better understanding of the caprock can be inferred from the knowledge gaine d. Specifically, the discovery of the original ore reserve map goes a long way towards modeling caprock stability. In addition the gained knowledge of sulphur mining - subs idence, superheated corrosive wa ters, and caprock collapse - helps to better predict the post mi ning effects on wellbore integrity. This page intentionally left blank

  2. Scaling law for Dictyostelium Discoideum mounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voeltz, Camilla; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2004-03-01

    Little is known about how multicellular organisms regulate the size of their tissues during development. The eukaryote Dictyostelium Discoideum, may be studied as a model system. When starved, these amoebae aggregate and form cell mounds. These mounds develop into moving slugs and fruiting bodies consisting of a spore mass held atop a rigid stem of stalk cells. We report experiments on the development of mounds of Dicty-cells when confined to different heights. At the smallest height the amoebae are confined to a monolayer of cells in a 2d-plane. We found that the confinement inhibited the development of moving slugs and fruiting bodies. The cells aggregated and formed mounds whose size was found to be proportional to the height of the mounds. The precise mechanism is yet unknown. We will present the data and discuss possible mechanisms. This work is supported by the NSF through the Biocomplexity Program.

  3. COCARDE: new view on old mounds - an international network of carbonate mound research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüggeberg, A.; Foubert, A.; Vertino, A.; van Rooij, D.; Spezzaferri, S.; Henriet, J.-P.; Dullo, W.-C.; Cocarde Science Community

    2012-04-01

    Carbonate mounds are important contributors of life in different settings, from warm-water to cold-water environments, and throughout geological history. Research on modern cold-water coral carbonate mounds over the last decades made a major contribution to our overall understanding of these particular sedimentary systems. By looking to the modern carbonate mound community with cold-water corals as main framework builders, some fundamental questions could be addressed, until now not yet explored in fossil mound settings. The international network COCARDE (http://www.cocarde.eu) is a platform for exploring new insights in carbonate mound research of recent and ancient mound systems. The aim of the COCARDE network is to bring together scientific communities, studying Recent carbonate mounds in midslope environments in the present ocean and investigating fossil mounds spanning the whole Phanerozoic time, respectively. Scientific challenges in modern and ancient carbonate mound research got well defined during the ESF Magellan Workshop COCARDE in Fribourg, Switzerland (21.-24.01.2009). The Special Volume Cold-water Carbonate Reservoir systems in Deep Environments - COCARDE (Marine Geology, Vol. 282) was the major outcome of this meeting and highlights the diversity of Recent carbonate mound studies. The following first joint Workshop and Field Seminar held in Oviedo, Spain (16.-20.09.2009) highlighted ongoing research from both Recent and fossil academic groups integrating the message from the industry. The field seminar focused on mounds from the Carboniferous platform of Asturias and Cantabria, already intensively visited by industrial and academic researchers. However, by comparing ancient, mixed carbonate-siliciclastic mound systems of Cantabria with the Recent ones in the Porcupine Seabight, striking similarities in their genesis and processes in mound development asked for an integrated drilling campaign to understand better the 3D internal mound build-up. The

  4. Investigation of Hydrodynamic Parameters and the Effects of Breakwaters During the 2011 Great East Japan Tsunami in Kamaishi Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozer Sozdinler, Ceren; Yalciner, Ahmet Cevdet; Zaytsev, Andrey; Suppasri, Anawat; Imamura, Fumihiko

    2015-12-01

    The March 2011 Great East Japan Tsunami was one of the most disastrous tsunami events on record, affecting the east coast of Japan to an extreme degree. Extensive currents combined with flow depths in inundation zones account for this devastating impact. Video footage taken by the eyewitnesses reveals the destructive effect and dragging capability of strong tsunami currents along the coast. This study provides a numerical modeling study in Kamaishi Bay, calculating the damage inflicted by tsunami waves on structures and coastlines in terms of the square of the Froude number Fr 2 ; and also other calculated hydrodynamic parameters, such as the distribution of instantaneous flow depths, maximum currents and water surface elevations that occurred during this catastrophic tsunami. Analyses were performed by using the tsunami numerical modeling code NAMI DANCE with nested domains at a higher resolution. The effect of the Kamaishi breakwater on the tsunami inundation distance and coastal damage was tested by using the conditions of "with breakwater," "without breakwater," and "damaged breakwater." Results show that the difference between the hydrostatic pressure on the seaward side of the breakwater and the leeward side of the breakwater is quite high, clarifying conditions contributing to failure of the breakwater. Lower water surface elevations were calculated in the case of a breakwater existing at the entrance, a partly valid condition for the damaged breakwater case. The results are different for current velocities and Fr_{max}2 in the "with breakwater" condition due to the concentration of energy through the breakwater gaps.

  5. Data Summary Report D-Area Burning/Rubble Pits

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.R.

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to verify that all analytical data collected at the D-Area Burning/Rubble Pits at the Savannah River Site for use in developing risk assessment and potential remediation procedures have been validated at the appropriate level. Any discrepancies or reasons why the data should be rejected for this purpose will be addressed. This report documents the data validation procedures used by Environmental Monitoring Section, Exploration Resources, and RUST Environment {ampersand} Infrastructure for Assigning qualifiers.

  6. Hydrodynamic performance of multiple-row slotted breakwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbisy, Moussa S.; Mlybari, Ehab M.; Helal, Medhat M.

    2016-06-01

    This study examines the hydrodynamic performance of multiple-row vertical slotted breakwaters. We developed a mathematical model based on an eigenfunction expansion method and a least squares technique for Stokes second-order waves. The numerical results obtained for limiting cases of double-row and triple-row walls are in good agreement with results of previous studies and experimental results. Comparisons with experimental measurements of the reflection, transmission, and dissipation coefficients ( C R , C T , and C E ) for double-row walls show that the proposed mathematical model adequately reproduces most of the important features. We found that for double-row walls, the C R increases with increasing wave number, kd, and with a decreasing permeable wall part, dm. The C T follows the opposite trend. The C E slowly increases with an increasing kd for lower kd values, reaches a maximum, and then decreases again. In addition, an increasing porosity of dm would significantly decrease the C R , while increasing the C T . At lower values of kd, a decreasing porosity increases the C E , but for high values of kd, a decreasing porosity reduces the C E . The numerical results indicate that, for triple-row walls, the effect of the arrangement of the chamber widths on hydrodynamic characteristics is not significant, except when kd<0.5. Double-row slotted breakwaters may exhibit a good wave-absorbing performance at kd>0.5, where by the horizontal wave force may be smaller than that of a single wall. On the other hand, the difference between double-row and triple-row vertical slotted breakwaters is marginal.

  7. Ecological value of submerged breakwaters for habitat enhancement on a residential scale.

    PubMed

    Scyphers, Steven B; Powers, Sean P; Heck, Kenneth L

    2015-02-01

    Estuarine shorelines have been degraded since humans arrived in the coastal zone. In recent history, a major cause of habitat degradation has been the armoring of shorelines with vertical walls to protect property from erosive wave energy; however, a lack of practical alternatives that maintain or enhance ecological function has limited the options of waterfront residents and coastal zone managers. We experimentally investigated the habitat value of two configurations of submerged breakwaters constructed along an eroding shoreline in northwest Mobile Bay, AL (USA). Breakwaters comprised of bagged oyster shell or Reef Ball™ concrete domes were built by a community-based restoration effort. Post-deployment monitoring found that: bagged oyster breakwaters supported much higher densities of live ribbed mussels than Reef Ball breakwaters; both breakwater configurations supported increased species richness of juvenile and smaller fishes compared to controls; and that larger fishes did not appear to be affected by breakwater presence. Our study demonstrates that ecologically degraded shorelines can be augmented with small-scale breakwaters at reasonable cost and that these complex structures can serve as habitat for filter-feeding bivalves, mobile invertebrates, and young fishes. Understanding the degree to which these structures mitigate erosive wave energy and protect uplands will require a longer time frame than our 2-year-long study. PMID:25365947

  8. Ecological Value of Submerged Breakwaters for Habitat Enhancement on a Residential Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scyphers, Steven B.; Powers, Sean P.; Heck, Kenneth L.

    2015-02-01

    Estuarine shorelines have been degraded since humans arrived in the coastal zone. In recent history, a major cause of habitat degradation has been the armoring of shorelines with vertical walls to protect property from erosive wave energy; however, a lack of practical alternatives that maintain or enhance ecological function has limited the options of waterfront residents and coastal zone managers. We experimentally investigated the habitat value of two configurations of submerged breakwaters constructed along an eroding shoreline in northwest Mobile Bay, AL (USA). Breakwaters comprised of bagged oyster shell or Reef Ball™ concrete domes were built by a community-based restoration effort. Post-deployment monitoring found that: bagged oyster breakwaters supported much higher densities of live ribbed mussels than Reef Ball breakwaters; both breakwater configurations supported increased species richness of juvenile and smaller fishes compared to controls; and that larger fishes did not appear to be affected by breakwater presence. Our study demonstrates that ecologically degraded shorelines can be augmented with small-scale breakwaters at reasonable cost and that these complex structures can serve as habitat for filter-feeding bivalves, mobile invertebrates, and young fishes. Understanding the degree to which these structures mitigate erosive wave energy and protect uplands will require a longer time frame than our 2-year-long study.

  9. Sub-rubble communities of Curaçao and Bonaire coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meesters, E.; Knijn, R.; Willemsen, P.; Pennartz, R.; Roebers, G.; van Soest, R. W. M.

    1991-12-01

    The distribution and abundance of sessile organisms under coral rubble has been studied at Bonaire and Curaçao, Netherlands Antilles. Species richness under rubble is extremely high with at least 367 species of which sponges, tunicates and bryozoans are the most important. Shallow sub-rubble communities can be considered refuges as the majority of these species are crypt-obligate. Sub-rubble communities may also have a preserve function for sponges, but do not harbour enough corals to ensure a quick coral recolonization of the reef surface after a major disaster. Cryptic community composition is affected by depth and pollution, and differs substantially between the two neighbouring islands, possibly as a result of different bottom characteristics. Biomass of the sub-rubble communities may contribute considerably to total reef biomass. Diversity varies inversely with increased depth and increased rubble size, possibly indicating abiotic control (e.g. physical disturbance by wave action and reef slope substrate collapse).

  10. Thermoregulation and ventilation of termite mounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korb, Judith

    2003-05-01

    Some of the most sophisticated of all animal-built structures are the mounds of African termites of the subfamily Macrotermitinae, the fungus-growing termites. They have long been studied as fascinating textbook examples of thermoregulation or ventilation of animal buildings. However, little research has been designed to provide critical tests of these paradigms, derived from a very small number of original papers. Here I review results from recent studies on Macrotermes bellicosus that considered the interdependence of ambient temperature, thermoregulation, ventilation and mound architecture, and that question some of the fundamental paradigms of termite mounds. M. bellicosus achieves thermal homeostasis within the mound, but ambient temperature has an influence too. In colonies in comparably cool habitats, mound architecture is adapted to reduce the loss of metabolically produced heat to the environment. While this has no negative consequences in small colonies, it produces a trade-off with gas exchange in large colonies, resulting in suboptimally low nest temperatures and increased CO2 concentrations. Along with the alteration in mound architecture, the gas exchange/ventilation mechanism also changes. While mounds in the thermally appropriate savannah have a very efficient circular ventilation during the day, the ventilation in the cooler forest is a less efficient upward movement of air, with gas exchange restricted by reduced surface exchange area. These results, together with other recent findings, question entrenched ideas such as the thermosiphon-ventilation mechanism or the assumption that mounds function to dissipate internally produced heat. Models trying to explain the proximate mechanisms of mound building, or building elements, are discussed.

  11. Formation of Mima mounds: A seismic hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, A.W. )

    1990-03-01

    Mima mounds approximately 2.5 to 15 m in diameter and up to 3 m high occur on the ground surfaces at Mima Prairie, south of Olympia, Washington, in the Channeled Scabland of eastern Washington, and at many other locations in the United States and around the world. Small-scale Mima mounds can be produced experimentally by subjecting a plywood board covered with a thin veneer of loess to impacts that produce vibrations in the board. Experimentally produced mounds have characteristics that are nearly identical to those found in the field. This suggests that most Mima mounds formed as the result of seismic activity in conjunction with unconsolidated fine sediments on a relatively rigid planar substratum.

  12. Groundwater Mounding Beneath Stormwater Infiltration Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmer, M.; Thompson, A. M.; Misra, D.

    2007-12-01

    An accurate understanding of groundwater mound formation is important in the proper design of stormwater infiltration basins since these basins are often required to recharge a portion of pre-development infiltration volume. Mound formation due to localized recharge may reduce the infiltration rate of the basin and the ability of the soil to filter pollutants. The goal of this research was to understand groundwater mounding and the potential for contaminant transport resulting from recharge beneath stormwater infiltration basins. A 0.10 ha infiltration basin serving a 9.4 ha residential subdivision in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin was used in this study. Subsurface conditions included sand and gravel material and a groundwater table at 2.3 m below grade. Three storm events, 4.9 cm, 2.8 cm, and 4.3 cm, between August 2006 and April 2007 were modeled using the two-dimensional numerical model HYDRUS. The calibrated model was used to evaluate hypothetical basin operation scenarios for various basin sizes, soil types, ponding depths, and water table depths. The groundwater mound intersected the basin floor in most scenarios with loamy sand and sandy loam soils, an unsaturated thickness of 1.52 m, and a ponding depth of 0.61 m. No groundwater table response was observed with ponding depths less than 0.31 m with an unsaturated zone thickness of 6.09 m. The mound height was most sensitive to hydraulic conductivity and unsaturated zone thickness. A 7.6 cm sediment layer delayed the time to reach maximum mound height, but had a minimal effect on the magnitude of the mound. Mound heights increased as infiltration basin size increased.

  13. Conductive heat flow at the TAG Active Hydrothermal Mound: Results from 1993-1995 submersible surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, K.; Von Herzen, R.; Kirklin, J.; Evans, R.; Kadko, D.; Kinoshita, M.; Matsubayashi, O.; Mills, R.; Schultz, A.; Rona, P.

    We report 70 measurements of conductive heat flow at the 50-m-high, 200-m-diameter TAG active hydrothermal mound, made during submersible surveys with Alvin in 1993 and 1995 and Shinkai 6500 in 1994. The stations were all measured with 5-thermistor, 0.6- or 1-m-long Alvin heat flow probes, which are capable of determining both gradient and thermal conductivity, and were transponder-navigated to an estimated accuracy of ±5-10 m relative to the 10-m-diameter central complex of black smokers. Within 20 m of this complex, conductive heat flow values are extremely variable (0.1- > 100 W/m²), which can only be due to local spatial and possible temporal variability in the immediate vicinity of the vigorous discharge sites. A similar local variability is suggested in the “Kremlin” area of white smokers to the southeast of the black smoker complex. On the south and southeast side of the mound, there is very high heat flow (3.7- > 25 W/m²) on the sedimented terraces that slope down from the Kremlin area. Heat flow is also high (0.3-3 W/m²) in the pelagic carbonate sediments on the surrounding seafloor within a few tens of meters of the southwest, northwest, and northeast sides of the mound. On the west side of the sulfide rubble plateau that surrounds the central black smoker peak, there is a coherent belt of very low heat flow (<20 mW/m²) 20-50 m west of the smokers, suggestive of local, shallow recharge of bottom water. The three submersible surveys spanned nearly two years, but showed no indication of any temporal variability in conductive heat flow over this time scale, whether natural or induced by ODP drilling in 1994.

  14. Environmental changes and growth history of a cold-water carbonate mound (Propeller Mound, Porcupine Seabight)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüggeberg, Andres; Dullo, Christian; Dorschel, Boris; Hebbeln, Dierk

    2007-02-01

    On- and off-mound sediment cores from Propeller Mound (Hovland Mound province, Porcupine Seabight) were analysed to understand better the evolution of a carbonate mound. The evaluation of benthic foraminiferal assemblages from the off-mound position helps to determine the changes of the environmental controls on Propeller Mound in glacial and interglacial times. Two different assemblages describe the Holocene and Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 2 and late MIS 3 (˜31 kyr BP). The different assemblages are related to changes in oceanographic conditions, surface productivity and the waxing and waning of the British Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS) during the last glacial stages. The interglacial assemblage is related to a higher supply of organic material and stronger current intensities in water depth of recent coral growth. During the last glaciation the benthic faunas showed high abundances of cassidulinid species, implying cold bottom waters and a reduced availability of organic matter. High sedimentation rates and the domination of Elphidium excavatum point to shelf erosion related to sea-level lowering (˜50 m) and the progradation of the BIIS onto the shelf. A different assemblage described for the on-mound core is dominated by Discanomalina coronata, Gavelinopsis translucens, Planulina ariminensis, Cibicides lobatulus and to a lower degree by Hyrrokkin sarcophaga. These species are only found or show significantly higher relative abundances in on-mound samples and their maximum contribution in the lower part of the record indicates a higher coral growth density on Propeller Mound in an earlier period. They are less abundant during the Holocene, however. This dataset portrays the boundary conditions of the habitable range for the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa, which dominates the deep-water reefal ecosystem on the upper flanks of Propeller Mound. The growth of this ecosystem occurs during interglacial and interstadial periods, whereas a retreat of corals is documented in

  15. Wave transmission and mooring-force characteristics of pipe-tire floating breakwaters

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, Volker W.; Westerink, Joannes J.

    1980-10-01

    The results are presented of a series of prototype scale tests of a floating breakwater that incorporates massive cylindrical members (steel or concrete pipes, telephone poles, etc.) in a matrix of scrap truck or automobile tires, referred to as the Pipe-Tire Breakwater (PT-Breakwater). Tests were conducted in the large wave tank at the US Army Coastal Engineering Research Center (CERC). Breakwater modules were preassembled at SUNY in Buffalo, New York, and then transported to CERC by truck, where final assembly on location was again performed by SUNY personnel. Wave-tank tests were conducted jointly by CERC and SUNY personnel. A series of wave-tank experiments and mooring system load-deflection tests were performed, and are described. Wave-transmission and mooring-load characteristics, based on 402 separate tests, were established and are reported. (LCL)

  16. Dengue, related to rubble and building construction in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Angela Maria Marques; Kligerman, Débora Cynamon; Júnior, Sílvio Ferreira

    2009-11-01

    The fast-growing formation of solid waste, resulting from demographic density, presents itself as one of the most pressing problems to be addressed by governments of large cities all over the world. In Rio de Janeiro, 60% of solid waste stems from the construction industry. Although envisaged by under current municipal legislation, no application of policy regarding systematic recycling of this kind of waste exists in fact. Both sanitation experts and epidemiologists highlight that the deficient sanitary system contributes to the growth of endemic breeding sites, which may reach epidemic proportions. In Brazil, over the recent years, there has been an increase of Dengue Fever cases followed by deaths. In the first half of 2008, the State of Rio de Janeiro was plagued by an intense Dengue epidemic. The city of Rio de Janeiro alone accounted for 48.7% of the cases, in absolute values. By drawing upon an analytical method based on the interrelation between health and sanitation, the outcomes herein indicate that the city of Rio de Janeiro bears a direct relation between Dengue incidence rates and rubble formation from construction - measured by the total area built. Thus, there is a strong urge to implement recycling systems out of construction rubble as a sanitation measure in order to promote Dengue incidence reduction. PMID:19608399

  17. Stability of binaries. Part II: Rubble-pile binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ishan

    2016-10-01

    We consider the stability of the binary asteroids whose members are granular aggregates held together by self-gravity alone. A binary is said to be stable whenever both its members are orbitally and structurally stable to both orbital and structural perturbations. To this end, we extend the stability analysis of Sharma (Sharma [2015] Icarus, 258, 438-453), that is applicable to binaries with rigid members, to the case of binary systems with rubble members. We employ volume averaging (Sharma et al. [2009] Icarus, 200, 304-322), which was inspired by past work on elastic/fluid, rotating and gravitating ellipsoids. This technique has shown promise when applied to rubble-pile ellipsoids, but requires further work to settle some of its underlying assumptions. The stability test is finally applied to some suspected binary systems, viz., 216 Kleopatra, 624 Hektor and 90 Antiope. We also see that equilibrated binaries that are close to mobilizing their maximum friction can sustain only a narrow range of shapes and, generally, congruent shapes are preferred.

  18. Use of rubble from building demolition in mortars.

    PubMed

    Corinaldesi, V; Giuggiolini, M; Moriconi, G

    2002-01-01

    Because of increasing waste production and public concerns about the environment, it is desirable to recycle materials from building demolition. If suitably selected, ground, cleaned and sieved in appropriate industrial crushing plants, these materials can be profitably used in concrete. Nevertheless, the presence of masonry instead of concrete rubble is particularly detrimental to the mechanical performance and durability of recycled-aggregate concrete and the same negative effect is detectable when natural sand is replaced by fine recycled aggregate fraction. An alternative use of both masonry rubble and fine recycled material fraction could be in mortars. These could contain either recycled instead of natural sand or powder obtained by bricks crushing as partial cement substitution. In particular, attention is focused on the modification that takes place when either polypropylene or stainless steel fibers are added to these mortars. Polypropylene fibers are added in order to reduce shrinkage of mortars, stainless steel fibers for improving their flexural strength. The combined use of polypropylene fibers and fine recycled material from building demolition could allow the preparation of mortars showing good performance, in particular when coupled with bricks. Furthermore, the combined use of stainless steel fibers and mortars containing brick powder seems to be an effective way to guarantee a high flexural strength. PMID:12423051

  19. Tidal Disruption of Rubble-Pile Comets and Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movshovitz, Naor; Asphaug, E.; Korycansky, D.

    2010-10-01

    Following the investigations of Richardson et al. (2005) and Korycansky and Asphaug (2006, 2008), we study the shape and spin state of rubble-pile asteroids and cometary nuclei, focusing here on the process and aftermath of tidal disruption. A fast and robust commercial physics engine (www.nvidia.com/physx) is used to model thousands of polyhedral elements including self-gravity and intergranular forces such as friction and cohesion. The physics engine has been tested and validated with small scale laboratory experiments (granular avalanche, brazil-nut effects); its speed and its ability to deal with resting contacts allow us to use a variety of element shapes, from simple primitives to arbitrary polyhedra. Here we model the tidal disruption of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 and other split comets, extending the work of Asphaug and Benz (1996) to include bodies with realistic rubble properties. One result is that a modest cohesion can account for the absence of small tidal-disruption crater chains on Ganymede and Callisto.

  20. The Eugen Seibold coral mounds offshore western Morocco: oceanographic and bathymetric boundary conditions of a newly discovered cold-water coral province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glogowski, Silke; Dullo, Wolf-Christian; Feldens, Peter; Liebetrau, Volker; von Reumont, Jonas; Hühnerbach, Veit; Krastel, Sebastian; Wynn, Russell B.; Flögel, Sascha

    2015-08-01

    This study reports a new cold-water coral (CWC) province covering ~410 km2 off western Morocco (ca. 31°N) ~40 nautical miles north of the Agadir Canyon system between 678 and 863 m water depth, here named the Eugen Seibold coral mounds. Individual mounds are up to 12 m high with slope angles varying between 3° and 12°. Hydroacoustic data revealed mound axes lengths of 80 to 240 m. Slope angle, mound height, and density of mounds decrease with increasing water depth. The deepest mounds are composed of dead and fragmented Lophelia pertusa branches. Living CWCs, mainly L. pertusa, were sampled with box cores between 678 and 719 m water depth. Conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) measurements revealed living CWC colonies to occur within the deeper part of the North Atlantic Central Water (NACW; conservative temperature Θ of 9.78-9.94 °C, absolute salinity SA of ca. 35.632 g/kg, and seawater density σΘ of 27.31-27.33 kg/m3). Comparable CWC reefs off Mauritania (17°N-18°N) and on the Renard Ridge (35°N) in the Gulf of Cadiz, the latter consisting only of a dead CWC fabric, are also located in the deeper layer of the NACW slightly above the Mediterranean Outflow Water. The new CWC province, with its thin cover of living corals and much larger accumulations of dead thickets and fragmented coral rubble, was successfully discovered by CTD reconnaissance applying seawater density as a potential indicator of CWC occurrences, followed by hydroacoustic mapping. U-Th isotope systematics for macroscopically altered buried Lophelia material (25 cm sediment depth) yielded absolute ages dating back to the late Holocene at least.

  1. The Dangeard and Explorer canyons, South Western Approaches UK: Geology, sedimentology and newly discovered cold-water coral mini-mounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Heather A.; Davies, Jaime S.; Guinan, Janine; Howell, Kerry L.

    2014-06-01

    The Celtic Margin is a complex area in terms of sedimentary dynamics and evolution, with a number of submarine canyons dissecting the continental slope and outer continental shelf. The complex terrain and diverse range of sea-bed sediments play a part in submarine canyons being described as areas of high habitat heterogeneity. This study has concentrated on the heads of two canyons: Dangeard (also known as Dangaard) and Explorer (first named here) located in UK territorial waters, in water depths between 138 and 1165 m. Multibeam echosounder, 2D reflection seismic and photographic ground-truthing data have been combined to map the sea-bed geomorphology, sedimentary features and canyon megafauna of these canyons. In addition, two previously unknown provinces of cold-water coral (CWC) mini-mounds were discovered on the interfluves of the Dangeard and Explorer canyons. The study area comprises a dendritic network of gullies feeding into the canyon thalwegs. Amphitheatre rims, where slope angles are commonly in excess of 20°, occur along the margins and heads of both canyons and are interpreted as drainage basins indicative of retrogressive mass-wasting in a shelfward direction. The CWC mini-mounds occur in water depths between 250 m and 410 m, with more than 400 mounds identified. They are up to 3 m in height and 50-150 m in diameter with no sub-surface expression, suggesting these mounds are, in geological terms, relatively young and possibly Holocene in age. Biological analyses revealed that the mounds form a habitat for ophiuroids and Munida associated with Lophelia pertusa coral rubble, suggesting these mini-mounds are not present-day living features.

  2. The ecology of rubble structures of the South Atlantic Bight: A community profile. [Jetties

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M.E.; Sutherland, J.P.

    1988-09-01

    This community profile provides an introduction to the ecology of the communities living on and around rubble structures in the South Atlantic Bight (Cape Hatteras to Cape Canaveral). The most prominent rubble structures in the bight are jetties built at the entrances to major harbors. After an initial discussion of the various kinds of rubble structures and physical factors that affect the organisms associated with them, the major portion of the text is devoted to the ecology of rubble structure habitats. Community composition, distribution, seasonality, and the recruitment patterns of the major groups of organisms are described. The major physical and biological factors affecting the organization of intertidal, sunlit subtidal, and shaded subtidal communities are presented and the potential effects of complex interactions in structuring these communities are evaluated. The profile concludes with a general review of the effects of rubble structures on nearshore sediment dynamics and shoreline evolution. 295 refs., 33 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. A cold-water coral carbonate mound on the decline: Propeller Mound, northern Porcupine Seabight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorschel, B.; Hebbeln, D.; Rüggeberg, A.; Dullo, C.

    2003-04-01

    Radiocarbon and U/Th datings reveal that the top sediment sequence of the Propeller Mound in the Hovland Mound Province is incomplete and characterised by numerous hiatuses. Stable oxygen isotope data obtained on benthic foraminifera indicate that almost only interstadial sediments are preserved, while interglacial and full glacial sediments are missing. The Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW), assumed to be crucial for the development of the cold-water corals Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora occulata found on Propeller Mound and in its sediments, reaches the Porcupine Seabight in its full strength only during interglacials, while it is absent during glacials. ROV observations show that under present-day conditions the MOW supports coral growth at the top of Propeller Mound, while at the same time it causes substantial erosion on its flanks, where scouring might lead to subsequent slumping. Thus, the hiatuses found in the sediment sequence of Propeller Mound are most likely caused by the strong bottom currents associated with the MOW. Especially during the terminations when the MOW circulation was re-established most of the glacial sediments, deposited under rather smooth conditions, might have been eroded and/or wasted downslope. Such erosion-favourable conditions lasted through the interglacials resulting in the ongoing removal of the interglacial sediments. During the interstadials the interplay between bottom current strength, coral growth and sedimentation resulted in sediment sequences which had a bigger chance to get preserved. Through the last 300 000 years the netto sedimentation on Propeller Mound is by far less compared to the surrounding off-mound sediments. Thus, at least over this time span the mound is shrinking relative to the seafloor around it and if this development continues into the future the Propeller Mound will get buried and follow the fate of the already buried near-by Magellan Mounds.

  4. The giant cold-water coral mound as a nested microbial/metazoan system: physical, chemical, biological and geological picture (ESF EuroDiversity MiCROSYSTEMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriet, J. P.; Microsystems Team

    2009-04-01

    The MiCROSYSTEMS project under the ESF EUROCORES EuroDiversity scheme is a holistic and multi-scale approach in studying microbial diversity and functionality in a nested microbial/metazoan system, which thrives in deep waters: the giant cold-water coral mound. Studies on prolific cold-water coral sites have been carried out from the canyons of the Bay of Biscay to the fjords of the Norwegian margin, while the Pen Duick carbonate mound province off Morocco developed into a joint natural lab for studying in particular the impact of biogeochemical and microbial processes on modern sedimentary diagenesis within the reef sediments, in complement to the studies on I0DP Exp. 307 cores (Challenger Mound, off Ireland). Major outcomes of this research can be summarized as follows. • IODP Exp. 307 on Challenger Mound had revealed a significant prokaryotic community both within and beneath the carbonate mound. MiCROSYSTEMS unveils a remarkable degree of compartmentalization in such community from the seawater, the coral skeleton surface and mucus to the reef sediments. The occurrence of such multiple and distinct microbial compartments associated with cold-water coral ecosystems promotes opportunities for microbial diversity in the deep ocean. • New cases of co-habitation of cold-water corals and giant deep-water oysters were discovered in the Bay of Biscay, which add a new facet of macrofaunal diversity to cold-water coral reef systems. • The discovery of giant, ancient coral graveyards on the Moroccan mounds not only fuels the debate about natural versus anthropogenic mass extinction, but these open frameworks simultaneously invite for the study of bio-erosion and early diagenesis, in particular organo-mineralization, and of the possible role and significance of these thick, solid rubble patches in 3D mound-building and consolidation. • The assessment of the carbonate budget of a modern cold-water coral mound (Challenger Mound) reveals that only 33 to 40 wt % of

  5. Coarse fraction of soils from building rubble (WWII)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekiffer, Beate; Wessolek, Gerd; Scheytt, Traugott; Bussert, Robert; Nehls, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Soils, resulting from building rubble of WWII are wide spread in whole Europe. The parent material for pedogenesis originates from different kinds of buildings, which where destroyed of different ways. Also the kind of sorting and disposing was varying for this material. So the most important feature of soils, resulting from building rubble of WWII, is their heterogeneity. We investigated samples of soils developed from building rubble to answer the following questions: ­ What are the amounts of coarse fraction and what are their main components? ­ What are the chemical properties and what is the crystalline mineral composition of technogenic components? ­ What is the release of ions from coarse technogenic components? We sieved and hand sorted the materials, used the X-ray diffractometry and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and measured the ions released in 1:2-extract. In most cases, the soils have a high amount of coarse fraction (> 2mm) (median 25% w/w, N=52). Dominating components in the coarse fraction are in the order of decreasing abundance: bricks, mortar (incl. plaster and stucco), slag, ashes and unburned coals. The analyzed components show alkalescent to alkaline pH-values. 75% of the samples show low electrical conductivities of up to 141 µS/cm. Bricks mainly consist of Si oxides, followed by oxides of Al, Ca, Fe, Mg and K. X-Ray-diffractometry of bricks showed, that most common minerals are clay minerals (Kaolinit, Illit, Montmorillonit and Chlorit), Quarz, and Carbonates (Calcite and Dolomite, Siderite). Bricks contain Fe-Oxides (Hematite, Goethite), Sulphates and Sulfides (Gypsum, Pyrite, Markasite) in lower amounts. 5-20 % of the minerals are x-ray-amorphous. Mortar is characterized by a high amount of silicates (nearby 80%). The samples showed a lower percentage of Al- and Ca-compounds than bricks. Chemical composition of ashes and slag varies in wide ranges, depending on their genesis. We found mainly ashes from stove heating. They contained

  6. Mound-Interface Kinetics in Dictyostelium Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutu, Hiroki

    2002-09-01

    The mound development of the cellular slime mold amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum is studied with an interface kinetic model for the height of cell layers. As a competitive role for the chemotaxis, we compare two types of curvature relaxations; the surface relaxation induced by cell-substrate affinity (model A), and that comes from a cell-cell adhesive effect (model B). It is found that both models are characterized by the growth law for the maximum mound height. Based on a self-similarity scaling hypothesis for the spatial structure of streaming pattern, we suggest a scaling law for the growth of mound-height hmax ˜ t1-1/α+β/α with α = 2 (4) for the model A (B) and a number 0 ≤ β < 1.

  7. Oyster Reefs as Natural Breakwaters Mitigate Shoreline Loss and Facilitate Fisheries

    PubMed Central

    Scyphers, Steven B.; Powers, Sean P.; Heck, Kenneth L.; Byron, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    Shorelines at the interface of marine, estuarine and terrestrial biomes are among the most degraded and threatened habitats in the coastal zone because of their sensitivity to sea level rise, storms and increased human utilization. Previous efforts to protect shorelines have largely involved constructing bulkheads and seawalls which can detrimentally affect nearshore habitats. Recently, efforts have shifted towards “living shoreline” approaches that include biogenic breakwater reefs. Our study experimentally tested the efficacy of breakwater reefs constructed of oyster shell for protecting eroding coastal shorelines and their effect on nearshore fish and shellfish communities. Along two different stretches of eroding shoreline, we created replicated pairs of subtidal breakwater reefs and established unaltered reference areas as controls. At both sites we measured shoreline and bathymetric change and quantified oyster recruitment, fish and mobile macro-invertebrate abundances. Breakwater reef treatments mitigated shoreline retreat by more than 40% at one site, but overall vegetation retreat and erosion rates were high across all treatments and at both sites. Oyster settlement and subsequent survival were observed at both sites, with mean adult densities reaching more than eighty oysters m−2 at one site. We found the corridor between intertidal marsh and oyster reef breakwaters supported higher abundances and different communities of fishes than control plots without oyster reef habitat. Among the fishes and mobile invertebrates that appeared to be strongly enhanced were several economically-important species. Blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) were the most clearly enhanced (+297%) by the presence of breakwater reefs, while red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) (+108%), spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus) (+88%) and flounder (Paralichthys sp.) (+79%) also benefited. Although the vertical relief of the breakwater reefs was reduced over the course of our study and

  8. A global survey of martian central mounds: Central mounds as remnants of previously more extensive large-scale sedimentary deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Kristen A.; Bell, James F.

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a survey of central mounds within large (>25 km diameter) impact craters on Mars. We use mound locations, mound offsets within their host craters, and relative mound heights to address and extend various mound formation hypotheses. The results of this survey support the hypothesis that mound sediments once filled their host craters and were later eroded into the features we observe today. The majority of mounds are located near the boundaries of previously identified large-scale sedimentary deposits. We discuss the implications of the hypothesis that central mounds are part of previously more extensive sedimentary units that filled and overtopped underlying impact craters. In this scenario, as erosion of the sedimentary unit occurred, the sediment within impact craters was preserved slightly longer than the overlying sediment because it was sheltered by the crater walls. Our study also reveals that most mounds are offset from the center of their host crater in the same direction as the present regional winds (e.g., the mounds in Arabia Terra are offset towards the western portion of their craters). We propose that this implies that wind has been the dominant agent causing the erosion of central mounds. Mound offset (r) is normalized to each crater's radius. The Mound offset (θ) is such that 0 is north and 270 is west.

  9. Interplay of instabilities in mounded surface growth

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Buddhapriya; Dasgupta, Chandan

    2005-02-01

    We numerically study a one-dimensional conserved growth equation with competing linear (Ehrlich-Schwoebel) and nonlinear instabilities. As a control parameter is varied, this model exhibits a nonequilibrium phase transition between two mounded states, one of which exhibits slope selection and the other does not. The coarsening behavior of the mounds in these two phases is studied in detail. In the absence of noise, the steady-state configuration depends crucially on which of the two instabilities dominates the early time behavior.

  10. Simulations of impacts on rubble-pile asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deller, J.; Snodgrass, C.; Lowry, S.; Price, M.; Sierks, H.

    2014-07-01

    Rubble-pile asteroids can contain a high level of macroporosity. For some asteroids, porosities of 40 % or even more have been measured [1]. While little is known about the exact distribution of the voids inside rubble-pile asteroids, assumptions have to be made for the modeling of impact events on these bodies. Most hydrocodes do not distinguish between micro- and macroporosity, instead describing brittle material by a constitutive model as homogeneous. We developed a method to model rubble-pile structures in hypervelocity impact events explicitly. The formation of the asteroid is modelled as a gravitational aggregation of spherical `pebbles', that form the building blocks of our target. This aggregate is then converted into a high-resolution Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model, which also accounts for macroporosity inside the pebbles. We present results of a study that quantifies the influence of our model parameters on the outcome of a typical impact event of two small main-belt asteroids. The existence of void space in our model increases the resistance against collisional disruption, a behavior observed before [2]. We show that for our model no a priori knowledge of the rubble-pile constituents in the asteroid is needed, as the choice of the corresponding parameters does not directly correlate with the impact outcome. The size distribution of the pebbles used as building blocks in the formation of an asteroid is only poorly constrained. As a starting point, we use a power law N(>r) ∝ r^α to describe the distribution of radii of the pebbles. Reasonable values for the slope α range around α=-2.5, as found in the size distribution of main-belt objects [3,4]. The cut-off values for pebbles, r_{min} and r_{max} are given by practical considerations: In the SPH formalism, properties are represented by weighted averages of particles within their smoothing length h, preventing the resolution of structures below that scale. Using spheres with radius in the

  11. Structural Modeling Of Rubble Piles In Two And Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korycansky, Donald

    2012-10-01

    One of the puzzles about the structure of asteroids and other small bodies of the solar system is amount void space that is apparently present, from measurements of their bulk densities as compared to the mineral grain densities of their surfaces. In many cases, void fractions of 40% or more are inferred. The question arises as to whether this large void fraction is the result of large-scale internal structure ("macroporosity") or small-scale grain-density effects ("microporosity"). In this work I present results from modeling rubble piles. In particular, rubble piles are modeled as assemblages of irregular polyhedra. Modeling is done by a so-called "penalty method" where repulsive forces are applied to prevent interpenetration of the constitutent blocks. Displacements are proportional to the forces, so this is a first-order dynamics method (i.e.there is no inertia). Collision detection among the elements is done via Minkowski summation: compilation of the pairwise differences of the polyhedra vertices, followed by the application of a convex hull. Minkowski summation provides the minimum distance required to resolve a collision, but the location of the overlap region is lost. Thus, further operations are done to recover this information. Given the depth of overlaps and their locations, the positions and orientations of polyhedra are adjusted to reduce the overlap until a structure with minimal interpenetration is produced. Initial calculations done with 100 polyhedra derived from voronoi decomposition of a cube yield results with void fractions in the range of 20-25%. Further results will be reported at the DPS conference. This work was supported by NASA PG&G award NNX07AQ04G.

  12. Microwave life-detection systems for searching human subjects under earthquake rubble or behind barrier.

    PubMed

    Chen, K M; Huang, Y; Zhang, J; Norman, A

    2000-01-01

    A new sensitive microwave life-detection system which can be used to locate human subjects buried under earthquake rubble or hidden behind various barriers has been constructed. This system operating at 1150 MHz or 450 MHz can detect the breathing and heartbeat signals of human subjects through an earthquake rubble or a construction barrier of about 10-ft thickness. The basic physical principle for the operation of a microwave life-detection system is rather simple. When a microwave beam of appropriate frequency (L or S band) is aimed at a pile of earthquake rubble covering a human subject or illuminated through a barrier obstructing a human subject, the microwave beam can penetrate the rubble or the barrier to reach the human subject. When the human subject is illuminated by a microwave beam, the reflected wave from the human subject will be modulated by the subject's body movements, which include the breathing and the heartbeat. If the clutter consisting of the reflected wave from stationary background can be completely eliminated and the reflected wave from the human subject's body is properly modulated, the breathing and heartbeat signals of the subject can be extracted. Thus, a human subject buried under earthquake rubble or hidden behind barriers can be located. This system has been tested extensively in a simulated earthquake rubble in the laboratory and also in a field test using realistic earthquake rubble conducted by a Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Task Force. PMID:10646285

  13. Three-dimensional sampling method for characterizing ant mounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A field-portable 3D laser scanner was employed as a means of digitizing the surface of fire ant (Solenopsis invicta Buren) mounds for analysis of shape and orientation in Mississippi and Oklahoma. Estimates of above-ground mound volume obtained through manual measurements of mound length, width, an...

  14. Dynamic Thermal Structure of Imported Fire Ant Mounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was undertaken to characterize surface temperatures of imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta Buren, S. richteri Forel, and their hybrid) mounds as it relates to sun position and shape of the mounds, to better understand factors that affect absorption of solar radiation by the nest mound and ...

  15. Mounds View Environmental Education Project, Report #1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budde, Duane

    Prepared for the 1971 National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) Annual Meeting, this collection of ideas, activities, and unit plans from the Mounds View Environmental Education Project would be useful for junior and senior high school teachers and curriculum planners. Content includes: (1) a senior high course outline and daily lesson plans…

  16. Diurnal respiration of a termite mound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Hunter; Ocko, Samuel; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-11-01

    Many species of fungus-harvesting termites build largely empty, massive mound structures which protrude from the ground above their subterranean nests. It has been long proposed that the function of these mounds is to facilitate exchange of heat, humidity, and respiratory gases; this would give the colony a controlled climate in which to raise fungus and brood. However, the specific mechanism by which the mound achieves ventilation has remained a topic of debate, as direct measurement of internal air flows has remained difficult. By directly measuring these elusive, tiny flows with a custom sensor, we find that the mound architecture of the species Odontotermes obesus takes advantage of daily oscillations in ambient temperature to drive convection and gas transport. This contradicts previous theories, which point to internal metabolic heating and external wind as driving forces. Our result, a novel example of deriving useful work from a fluctuating scalar parameter, should contribute to better understanding insect swarm construction and possible development in passive human architecture, both of which have been spurred by previous research on termites. We acknowledge support from HFSP.

  17. Mound site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, L.R.

    1992-06-01

    Mound is a government-owned facility operated by EG&G Mound Applied Technologies for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This integrated production, development, and research site performs work in support of DOE`s weapon and energy related programs, with emphasis on explosive, nuclear, and energy technology. The purpose of this report is to inform the public about the impact of Mound`s operations on the population and the environment. This report summarizes data from the Environmental Monitoring Program, through which Mound maintains continuous surveillance of radiological and nonradiological substances released from the facility.

  18. Independent technical review of the Mound Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report documents an Independent Technical Review (ITR) of the facilities, organizations, plans, and activities required to transition particular elements of the Mound Plant from Defense Program (DP) funded operation as appropriate either to community developed reuse or safe deactivation leading to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The review was conducted at the request of the Dr. Willis Bixby, Deputy Assistant Secretary, U.S. Department of Energy EM-60, Office of Facility Transition and Management and is a consensus of the nine member ITR Team. Information for the review was drawn from documents provided to the ITR Team by the Miamisburg Area Office (MB) of the DOE, EG&G, the City of Miamisburg, and others; and from presentations, discussions, interviews, and facility inspections at the Mound Plant during the weeks of March 14 and March 28, 1994. During the week of April 25, 1994, the ITR Team met at Los Alamos, New Mexico to develop consensus recommendations. A presentation of the core recommendations was made at the Mound Plant on May 5, 1994. This is an independent assessment of information available to, and used by, the Mound Plant personnel. Repetition of the information is not meant to imply discovery by the ITR Team. Team members, however, acting as independent reviewers, frequently assess the information from a perspective that differs significantly from that of the Mound Plant personnel. The report is based on information obtained and conditions observed during the March 1994 review interval. The ITR process and normal site work often initiate rapid, beneficial changes in understanding and organization immediately following the review. These changes frequently alter conditions observed during the review, but the report does not address changes subsequent to the review interval.

  19. Prickly business: abundance of sea urchins on breakwaters and coral reefs in Dubai.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Andrew G; Dunshea, Glenn; Feary, David A; Hoey, Andrew S

    2016-04-30

    Echinometra mathaei is a common echinoid on tropical reefs and where abundant plays an important role in the control of algal communities. Despite high prevalence of E. mathaei on southern Persian/Arabian Gulf reefs, their abundance and distribution is poorly known. Spatial and temporal patterns in population abundance were examined at 12 sites between breakwater and natural reef habitats in Dubai (UAE) every 3 months from 2008 to 2010. Within the breakwater habitat, densities were greatest at shallow wave-exposed sites, and reduced with both decreasing wave-exposure and increasing depth. Interestingly, E. mathaei were significantly more abundant on exposed breakwaters than natural reef sites, presumably due to differences in habitat structure and benthic cover. Population abundances differed seasonally, with peak abundances during summer (July-September) and lower abundances in winter (December-February). Seasonal fluctuations are likely the result of peak annual recruitment pulses coupled with increased fish predation from summer to winter. PMID:26563547

  20. Settlement of breakwater on submarine soil due to wave-induced liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, F.; Yashima, A.; Miura, S.; Ohmaki, S.; Kamata, A.

    1995-12-31

    The stability and deformation of the seabed in response to ocean wave loading is an important consideration in the design of offshore structures such as breakwaters, anchors, platforms, and pipelines. In this study, the instability of the sandy seabed due to the wave-induced liquefaction is investigated based on intensive field observations and computational studies. A large settlement of the breakwater on loosely deposited sand bed was observed at a small fishery port in Hokkaido, Japan. To determine the appropriate countermeasure against this large settlement, intensive field observations and computational studies were carried out. It was found that the earthquake-type liquefaction phenomenon of the foundation sandy soil brought a significant settlement of the breakwater.

  1. Seismic decoupling of an explosion centered in a granite chimney rubble -- scaled experiment results. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, C.; Miller, S.; Florence, A.; Fogle, M.; Kilb, D.

    1991-12-01

    This report describes the small scale evaluation of the feasibility of significant decoupling by siting an explosion in granite rubble. The chimney characteristics scaled to laboratory dimensions were those of the PILE DRIVER event. The scaled charges were of 1 KT and 8KT in the PILE DRIVER chimney. The measure of the effect was the velocity field history in the granite outside the chimney volume with the chimney rubble and with no rubble. A number of chimney sizes and shapes were studied. The explosion process was modeled via two-din=mensional, finite-difference methods used for prediction of velocity histories at the Nevada Test Site. The result was that both the spectral shape and the magnitude of the transmitted shock wave were drastically altered. The chimney geometry was as important as the rubble characteristics.

  2. Environmental controls on cold-water coral mound distribution, morphology, and development in the straits of Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoes Correa, Thiago Barreto

    influenced by unidirectional flowing current, whereas the mounds on the GBB slope are influenced by tidal current regime. The GBB mounds also experience higher sedimentation rates relative to the sites away from the GBB slope. Sub-surface data document partially or completely buried mounds on the GBB sites. The sediments burying mounds are off-bank material transported downslope by mass gravity flow. Mass gravity transport creates complex slope architecture on the toe-of-slope of GBB, with canyons, slump scars, and gravity flow deposits. Cold-water corals use all three of these features as location for colonization. Coral mounds growing on such pre-existing topography keep up with off-bank sedimentation. In contrast, away from the GBB slope, off-bank sedimentation is absent and coral ridges grow independently of antecedent topography. In the sediment-starved Miami Terrace site, coral ridge initiation is related to a cemented mid-Miocene unconformity. In the center of the Straits, coral ridges and knobs develop over an unconsolidated sand sheet at the tail of the Pourtales drift. Coral features at the Miami Terrace and center of the Straits have intricate morphologies, including waveform and chevron-like ridges, which result from asymmetrical coral growth. Dense coral frameworks and living coral colonies grow preferentially on the current-facing ridge sides in order to optimize food particle capture, whereas coral rubble and mud-sized sediments accumulate in the ridge leesides. Finally, this study provides a method using solely acoustic data for discriminating habitats in which cold-water corals are actively growing. Results from this method can guide future research on and management of cold-water coral ecosystems. Taken together, spatial quantitative analyses of the large-scale, high-resolution integrated surveys indicate that cold-water coral habitats in the Straits of Florida: (1) are significantly more diverse and abundant than previously thought, and (2) can be

  3. Development of a separation method for molybdenum from zirconium, niobium, and major elements of rubble samples.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Asako; Ozawa, Mayumi; Yabuki, Koshi; Kimiyama, Kazuhiro; Sato, Kenji; Kameo, Yutaka

    2014-12-01

    A method for separation of Mo from Zr, Nb, and other major elements of rubble samples from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS) was developed to enable 93Mo assay of the rubble samples. Although (93)Mo analysis has been reported in a few studies, the known separation method is tedious and time consuming, or the target is a simple material. Therefore, a simple and rapid protocol for the separation of a complex material, i.e., the rubble sample, was developed in this study. Firstly, loss of Mo during the digestion of simulated rubble samples was evaluated. Next, weight distribution coefficients (Kd's) of Zr, Nb, and Mo between an extraction chromatographic resin (tetra valent actinide resin, TEVA resin) and acid solutions (HF-HCl and HF-HNO3 solutions) were determined to obtain suitable solution conditions for the separation of Mo from Zr and Nb. Based on the obtained Kd's, a chromatographic separation scheme was designed and applied to the digested solution of the simulated rubble sample. Consequently, Mo was successfully separated from Zr, Nb and other major metal ions of the simulated rubble sample. PMID:25456594

  4. Geology of Damon Mound Salt Dome, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, E.W.

    1989-01-01

    Geological investigation of the stratigraphy, cap-rock characteristics, deformation and growth history, and growth rate of a shallow coastal diapir. Damon Mound salt dome, located in Brazoria County, has salt less than 600 feet and cap rock less than 100 feet below the surface; a quarry over the dome provides excellent exposures of cap rock as well as overlying Oligocene to Pleistocene strata. These conditions make it ideal as a case study for other coastal diapirs that lack bedrock exposures. Such investigations are important because salt domes are currently being considered by chemical waste disposal companies as possible storage and disposal sites. In this book, the author reviews previous research, presents additional data on the subsurface and surface geology at Damon Mound, and evaluates Oligocene to post-Pleistocene diapir growth.

  5. The Magellan mound province in the Porcupine Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huvenne, V. A. I.; Bailey, W. R.; Shannon, P. M.; Naeth, J.; di Primio, R.; Henriet, J. P.; Horsfield, B.; de Haas, H.; Wheeler, A.; Olu-Le Roy, K.

    2007-02-01

    The Magellan mound province is one of the three known provinces of carbonate mounds or cold-water coral banks in the Porcupine Seabight, west of Ireland. It has been studied in detail using a large and varied data set: 2D and 3D seismic data, sidescan sonar imagery and video data collected during ROV deployment have been used to describe the mounds in terms of origin, growth processes and burial. The aim of this paper is to present the Magellan mounds and their setting in an integrated, holistic way. More than 1,000 densely spaced and mainly buried mounds have been identified in the area. They all seem to be rooted on one seismic reflection, suggesting a sudden mound start-up. Their size and spatial distribution characteristics are presented, together with the present-day appearance of the few mounds that reach the seabed. The underlying geology has been studied by means of fault analysis and numerical basin modelling in an attempt to identify possible hydrocarbon migration pathways below or in the surroundings of the Magellan mounds. Although conclusive evidence concerning the processes of mound initiation proves to be elusive, the results of both fault analysis and 2D numerical modelling failed to identify, with confidence, any direct pathways for focused hydrocarbon flow to the Magellan province. Diffuse seepage however may have taken place, as drainage area modelling suggests a possible link between mound position and structural features in the Hovland-Magellan area. During mound development and growth, the interplay of currents and sedimentation seems to have been the most important control. Mounds which could not keep pace with the sedimentation rates were buried, and on the few mounds which maintained growth, only a few corals survive at present.

  6. Upper Carboniferous reef mounds and climate change

    SciTech Connect

    West, R.R.; Archer, A.W. )

    1992-01-01

    Tetractinomorph demosponges (chaetetids) are a minor component of extant tropical reefs, but they were the major framebuilder of reef mounds during the Westphalian (Carboniferous). These chaetetids were confined to tropical latitudes during the Carboniferous, reached an abundance peak in the Westphalian, and then declined suddenly until the Upper Triassic. After their decline, red and green algae became the dominant reef builders of the Stephanian. The marked decline of chaetetids corresponds with the disappearance, and/or decline of other marine benthic invertebrates, as well as some terrestrial plants and is the basis for the biostratigraphic boundary between the Westphalian and Stephanian (Desmoinesian and Missourian). This biostratigraphic boundary coincides with a minor extinction event and a major'' climatic change. The Westphalian climate was wetter than that of the Stephanian, and in the midcontinent this change is recorded by a gradual decline in coals and siliciclastic lithologies and a corresponding increase in carbonate lithologies. A rise in water temperature might be expected in a drier tropical climate, and if extant chaetetids are any clue, elevated water temperature may have been detrimental. Extant chaetetids are associated with tropical coral reefs that are confined to a narrow temperature range. It is not unreasonable to suggest that elevated seawater temperatures were responsible, in part, for the disappearance of chaetetid reef mounds. Red and green algae, presumably more tolerate of higher water temperatures, became the major framebuilders of reef mounds in the Stephanian. Thus, the demise of chaetetid reef mounds, and other organisms at the end of the Westphalian, may be the result of global warming.

  7. EG G Mound Applied Technologies payroll system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-07

    EG G Mound Applied Technologies, Inc., manages and operates the Mound Facility, Miamisburg, Ohio, under a cost-plus-award-fee contract administered by the Department of Energy's Albuquerque Field Office. The contractor's Payroll Department is responsible for prompt payment in the proper amount to all persons entitled to be paid, in compliance with applicable laws, regulations, and legal decisions. The objective was to determine whether controls were in place to avoid erroneous payroll payments. EG G Mound Applied Technologies, Inc., did not have all the internal controls required by General Accounting Office Title 6, Pay, Leave, and Allowances.'' Specifically, they did not have computerized edits, separation of duties and responsibilities, and restricted access to payroll data files. This condition occurred because its managers were not aware of Title 6 requirements. As a result, the contractor could not assure the Department of Energy that payroll costs were processes accurately; and fraud, waste, or abuse of Department of Energy funds could go undetected. Our sample of 212 payroll transactions from a population of 66,000 in FY 1991 disclosed only two minor processing errors and no instances of fraud, waste or abuse.

  8. Experimental study of dissolved oxygen transport by regular waves through a perforated breakwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zegao; Yu, Ning; Liang, Bingchen; Zeng, Jixiong; Xie, Shaohua

    2016-02-01

    The perforated breakwater is an environmentally friendly coastal structure, and dissolved oxygen concentration levels are an important index to denote water quality. In this paper, oxygen transport experiments with regular waves through a vertical perforated breakwater were conducted. The oxygen scavenger method was used to reduce the dissolved oxygen concentration of inner water body with the chemicals Na2SO3 and CoCl2. The dissolved oxygen concentration and wave parameters of 36 experimental scenarios were measured with different perforated arrangements and wave conditions. It was found that the oxygen transfer coefficient through wave surface, K1 a 1, is much lower than the oxygen transport coefficient through the perforated breakwater, K2 a 2. If the effect of K1 a 1 is not considered, the dissolved oxygen concentration computation for inner water body will not be greatly affected. Considering the effect of a permeable area ratio a, relative location parameter of perforations δ and wave period T, the aforementioned data of 30 experimental scenarios, the dimensional analysis and the least squares method were used to derive an equation of K2 a 2 (K2 a 2=0.0042 a 0.5 δ 0.2 T -1). It was validated with 6 other experimental scenarios data, which indicates an approximate agreement. Therefore, this equation can be used to compute the DO concentration caused by the water transport through perforated breakwater.

  9. 3D laboratory experiments on a system of low-crested breakwaters under oblique wave attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papacharalampous, Georgia; Karantinos, Michalis; Giantsi, Theodora; Moutzouris, Constantinos

    2016-04-01

    Low-crested breakwaters are being increasingly used for shore protection. Hydrodynamics around coastal structures are complicated and have not been fully understood. A series of large scale (1:40) 3D laboratory experiments were carried out in the Laboratory of Harbour Works, National Technical University of Athens to investigate the wave disturbance around a system of two non-parallel to the shoreline breakwaters. The structures were of the type of low-crested, permeable and attacked by obliquely incident waves. Three different water depths were tested in the basin with a range of various different spectra. The transmission and reflection coefficients were measured in the middle of each breakwater. For this purpose, 1 gauge and 4 gauges (in line) were placed on the landward and seaward side of each breakwater respectively. The effect of diffraction is incorporate at the measured wave heights. The measured coefficients are being compared to their corresponding estimated using existing empirical formulas. Most of those formulas neglect wave obliquity.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Cylindrical Floating Breakwater Performance with different mooring configurations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Floating breakwaters are typically used on limited-fetch water bodies, such as lakes, reservoirs, and bays, where wavelengths are relatively short. They are also often preferred for sites with large water level changes. Common uses are to protect small marinas or for shoreline erosion control. While...

  11. Cartografical And Geodetical Aspects Of The Krakus Mound In Cracow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banasik, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    In this work the fate of the Krakus Mound, the oldest of all existing Krakow's mounds, has been presented. The work was carried out based on selected iconographic, cartographic and geodetic documents. Using as an example old views, panoramas of the city and maps, various functions that the Krakus Mound was fulfilling over its long history were shown. An attempt was made to document the military significance of this mound and the surrounding hills. The particular astro-geodetic importance of the Krakus Mound on the scale of the city and southern Poland region was widely discussed. The Krakus Mound also inscribed itself in the history of the use of GPS technology as well as research on the local determination of the geoid in the area of Krakow.

  12. Environmental control on cold-water carbonate mounds development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüggeberg, A.; Liebetrau, V.; Raddatz, J.; Flögel, S.; Dullo, W.-Chr.; Exp. 307 Scientific Party, Iodp

    2009-04-01

    Cold-water coral reefs are very abundant along the European continental margin in intermediate water depths and are able to build up large mound structures. These carbonate mounds particularly occur in distinct mound provinces on the Irish and British continental margins. Previous investigations resulted in a better understanding of the cold-water coral ecology and the development of conceptual models to explain carbonate mound build-up. Two different hypotheses were evoked to explain the origin and development of carbonate mounds, external versus internal control (e.g., Freiwald et al. 2004 versus e.g. Hovland 1990). Several short sediment cores have been obtained from Propeller Mound, Northern Porcupine Seabight, indicating that cold-water corals grew during interglacial and warm interstadial periods of the Late Pleistocene controlled by environmental and climatic variability supporting the external control hypothesis (e.g. Dorschel et al. 2005, R

  13. Mound site environmental report for calendar year 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, L.R.

    1993-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to inform the public about the impact of Mound operations on the population and the environment. Mound is a government-owned facility operated by EG&G Mound Applied Technologies for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This integrated production, development, and research site performs work in support of DOE`s weapon and energy related programs, with emphasis on explosive, nuclear and energy technologies.

  14. Temporal Evolution of A Carbonate Mound In The NE Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorschel, B.; Rüggeberg, A.; Hebbeln, D.; Dullo, C.; Freiwald, A.

    Even though carbonate mounds are quite common structures along the northeast At- lantic margin their history remains largely unknown. Besides the main question, what causes the initial development of these mounds; also their latest evolution in response to changing environmental conditions receives more and more interest. Here, this question has been tackled by new sets of stable isotope data, which provide informa- tion about the growth and accumulation pattern of these mounds for the last 100 ka. The investigated Propeller Mound (52r09'N/12r46'W) is part of the Hovland Mound Province located in the northern Porcupine Seabight. Its base is located in 800 m wa- ter depth and it expands 2 km in N-S direction and 0.7 km in E-W direction. Its top rises up to 150 m above the surrounding seafloor. In September 2000 eight gravity cores have been collected from the Propeller Mound and the surrounding area. Four cores taken from the mound contain cold-water corals and coral fragments in a matrix of silt and clay. The other cores collected from a moat around the mound and from a drift body in the northeast contain mainly sandy silty clays. All off-mound cores are easy to correlate using proxies like Ca ore Fe content. Inter-core correlations with on- mound cores turned out to be difficult. Fragments of the cold-water corals Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora occulata overprint the hemipelagic background signal. Here we use stable isotope data from benthic foraminifers for an inter-core correlation. In combination with 14C ages these data provide information about the evolutionof the mounds in relation to the off-mound area with respect to climate variations during the last 100 ka.

  15. Rubble-Pile Minor Planet Sylvia and Her Twins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-08-01

    the triple asteroid system showing the large asteroid 87 Sylvia spinning at a rapid rate and surrounded by two smaller asteroids (Remus and Romulus) in orbit around it. This computer animation is also available in broadcast quality to the media (please contact Herbert Zodet). One of these asteroids was 87 Sylvia, which was known to be double since 2001, from observations made by Mike Brown and Jean-Luc Margot with the Keck telescope. The astronomers used NACO to observe Sylvia on 27 occasions, over a two-month period. On each of the images, the known small companion was seen, allowing Marchis and his colleagues to precisely compute its orbit. But on 12 of the images, the astronomers also found a closer and smaller companion. 87 Sylvia is thus not double but triple! Because 87 Sylvia was named after Rhea Sylvia, the mythical mother of the founders of Rome [3], Marchis proposed naming the twin moons after those founders: Romulus and Remus. The International Astronomical Union approved the names. Sylvia's moons are considerably smaller, orbiting in nearly circular orbits and in the same plane and direction. The closest and newly discovered moonlet, orbiting about 710 km from Sylvia, is Remus, a body only 7 km across and circling Sylvia every 33 hours. The second, Romulus, orbits at about 1360 km in 87.6 hours and measures about 18 km across. The asteroid 87 Sylvia is one of the largest known from the asteroid main belt, and is located about 3.5 times further away from the Sun than the Earth, between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. The wealth of details provided by the NACO images show that 87 Sylvia is shaped like a lumpy potato, measuring 380 x 260 x 230 km (see ESO PR Photo 25a/05). It is spinning at a rapid rate, once every 5 hours and 11 minutes. The observations of the moonlets' orbits allow the astronomers to precisely calculate the mass and density of Sylvia. With a density only 20% higher than the density of water, it is likely composed of water ice and rubble

  16. Physical modeling of long-wave run-up mitigation using submerged breakwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yu-Ting; Wu, Yun-Ta; Hwung, Hwung-Hweng; Yang, Ray-Yeng

    2016-04-01

    Natural hazard due to tsunami inundation inland has been viewed as a crucial issue for coastal engineering community. The 2004 India Ocean tsunami and the 2011 Tohoku earthquake tsunami were caused by mega scale earthquakes that brought tremendous catastrophe in the disaster regions. It is thus of great importance to develop innovative approach to achieve the reduction and mitigation of tsunami hazards. In this study, new experiments have been carried out in a laboratory-scale to investigate the physical process of long-wave through submerged breakwaters built upon a mild slope. Solitary-wave is employed to represent the characteristic of long-wave with infinite wavelength and wave period. Our goal is twofold. First of all, through changing the positions of single breakwater and multiple breakwaters upon a mild slope, the optimal locations of breakwaters can be pointed out by means of maximum run-up reduction. Secondly, through using a state-of-the-art measuring technique Bubble Image Velocimetry, which features non-intrusive and image-based measurement, the wave kinematics in the highly aerated region due to solitary-wave shoaling, breaking and uprush can be quantitated. Therefore, the mitigation of long-wave due to the construction of submerged breakwaters built upon a mild slope can be evaluated not only for imaging run-up and run-down characteristics but also for measuring turbulent velocity fields due to breaking wave. Although we understand the most devastating tsunami hazards cannot be fully mitigated with impossibility, this study is to provide quantitated information on what kind of artificial coastal structure that can withstand which level of wave loads.

  17. A lone biodetrital mound in the Chesterian (Carboniferous) of Alabama?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kopaska-Merkel, D. C.; Haywick, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    A carbonate mound in the Chesterian Bangor Limestone of Lawrence County, Alabama, consists chiefly of packstone and grainstone dominated by echinoderm ossicles and fragments of fenestrate bryozoans. In-situ colonies of the rugose coral Caninia flaccida comprise about 8% of the mound by volume. The exposed portion of the mound is approximately 25 m wide, 1.6 m thick at the thickest point and roughly circular in plan. The mound developed on top of a shallow ooid shoal that had been cemented and stabilised during an earlier episode of sub-aerial exposure. Subsequent flooding of the exposed shoal surface permitted establishment of the mound biota. Lateral and vertical facies relationships suggest that the mound possessed about 45 cm of synoptic relief when fully developed. Rugose corals, fenestrate and ramose bryozoans, stalked echinoderms, and sessile soft-bodied organisms encrusted by foraminifera colonised the shoal, forming a mound. Baffling resulted in deposition of mixed-fossil packstone containing locally derived debris and coated grains from the surrounding sea floor. Strong currents within the mound are indicated by preferred orientation of corals and by coarse, commonly cross-stratified grainstone in channels between neighboring coral colonies. Corals are most abundant on the windward side of the mound, where they account for about 13% of the mound compared to 6- 10% in the central part of the mound, and 2-4% on the leeward flank. Biodetrital mounds such as the one described here are uncommon in upper Paleozoic strata and previously unknown in the Bangor Limestone. Of 10 carbonate buildups we examined in the Bangor in Alabama and Tennessee, only one is a biodetrital mound. Two are rugose coral-microbial reefs, one is a coral biostrome, and six are dominated by microbialite. The Bangor shelf, previously interpreted as sedimentologically simple, appears to contain many small mounds of quite varied characteristics. Also, the discovery of a biodetrital mound in

  18. The Goodlett-Denny mound: a glimpse at 45 years of Pennsylvania treethrow mound evolution with implications for mass wasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Thomas W.

    1997-03-01

    A rootplate/mound formed by the uprooting of a black cherry tree ( Prunus serotina) in Potter County, Pennsylvania, was photographed in 1950 near the time of formation and again in 1952 and 1963 by J.C. Goodlett and C.S. Denny. The mound was located and photographed by the author in 1989 with the aid of background trees with identifying peculiarities and using the earlier consistent perspectives. Between 1950 and 1963 most of the rootmass had decomposed, leaving a mound with an estimated volume of 5.28 m 3 in 1963. By 1989 the mound had lost 60% of its 1963 height and its volume had diminished to 2.09 m 3. Mean annual erosion on the mound from 1989 to 1995 was much less than during the 1963-1989 period indicating a diminishing sediment contribution to the forest floor commensurate with lowering of the mound surface.

  19. Investigation on bragg reflection of surface water waves induced by a train of fixed floating pontoon breakwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Huei-Tau; Chen, Kue-Hong; Tsai, Chi-Ming

    2015-11-01

    The water wave characteristics of Bragg reflections from a train of fixed floating pontoon breakwaters was studied numerically. A numerical model of boundary discretization type was developed to calculate the wave field. The model was verified by comparing to analytical data in literature and good agreements were achieved. Series of parametric studies were conducted systematically to investigate the dependence of the reflected coefficients by the Bragg scattering on the design variables, including the spacing between the breakwaters, the total number of installed breakwaters, the draft and width do the breakwater, and wave length. Certain wave characteristics of the Bragg reflections were observed and discussed in details which might be of help for practical engineering applications in shoreline protection from incident waves.

  20. Structural Failure Condition for Bifurcated Rubble Pile Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, M.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The present study investigates the structural failure conditions of uniformly rotating bifurcated asteroids with cohesion due to a static spin-up. We apply a newly derived technique (Hirabayashi and Scheeres, submitted) that probes the failure state of an asteroid. The technique determines an upper bound condition for structural failure of a slice normal to the minimum moment of inertia axis. The detailed study of these failure modes for cohesive, rotating rubble pile asteroid is motivated by recent observations of 'active asteroids,' bodies which are seemingly disintegrating and fissioning due to their rapid spin rates (Jewitt et al. 2013, 2014; Hirabayashi et al. 2014). Figure 1 shows the shape of 4486 Mithra. We compare 3 slices, slices 1 and 3 including the knobs and slice 2 being the neck (Fig. 1), to determine a more precise condition for structural failure. Figures 2 and 3 describe the limit of friction angle with cohesion of 0 Pa and 500 Pa, respectively. The narrow solid, dashed, and dotted lines give the limits of slices 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The bold solid lines indicate the limit of the total volume, i.e., the whole volume reaching the failure point, and that of the partial volume, i.e., the most sensitive condition among the slices. The shadowed areas show the structurally stable regions. The results show that Mithra's failure locations change as a function of its spin periods and cohesion. For the cohesionless case, the knobs are more sensitive to structural failure than the neck at a spin period ranging from 3.8 hr to 4.8 hr, while the neck fails first at other spin periods. For the 500 Pa cohesion case, the limits of friction angle shift to higher spin periods. Also, at higher spin periods, we find that a lower friction angle is sometimes stronger than a higher friction angle. This comes from the fact that under constant cohesion a lower friction angle can give wider stable regions below the yield envelope. Our study reveals that there exits a

  1. SIMULATING ASTEROID RUBBLE PILES WITH A SELF-GRAVITATING SOFT-SPHERE DISTINCT ELEMENT METHOD MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Paul; Scheeres, Daniel J.

    2011-02-01

    This paper applies a soft-sphere distinct element method Granular Dynamics code to simulate asteroid regolith and rubble piles. Applications to regolith studies in low gravity are also studied. Then an algorithm to calculate self-gravity is derived and incorporated for full-scale simulations of rubble-pile asteroids using Granular Dynamics techniques. To test its validity, the algorithm's results are compared with the exact direct calculation of the gravitational forces. Further avenues to improve the performance of the algorithm are also discussed.

  2. MODELING DYNAMIC THERMAL PROPERTIES OF IMPORTED FIRE ANT MOUNDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ground-based thermal infrared imagery, 3-dimensional modeling, and spatial analyses were used to model daily fluctuation in the temperature of imported fire ant mounds and their surroundings. The thermal center of the mound moved in a predictable fashion from east-southeast to west-southwest during...

  3. Morphology and environment of cold-water coral carbonate mounds on the NW European margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, A. J.; Beyer, A.; Freiwald, A.; de Haas, H.; Huvenne, V. A. I.; Kozachenko, M.; Olu-Le Roy, K.; Opderbecke, J.

    2007-02-01

    Cold-water coral carbonate mounds, owing their presence mainly to the framework building coral Lophelia pertusa and the activity of associated organisms, are common along the European margin with their spatial distribution allowing them to be divided into a number of mound provinces. Variation in mound attributes are explored via a series of case studies on mound provinces that have been the most intensely investigated: Belgica, Hovland, Pelagia, Logachev and Norwegian Mounds. Morphological variation between mound provinces is discussed under the premise that mound morphology is an expression of the environmental conditions under which mounds are initiated and grow. Cold-water coral carbonate mounds can be divided into those exhibiting “inherited” morphologies (where mound morphology reflects the morphology of the colonised features) and “developed” morphology (where the mounds assume their own gross morphology mainly reflecting dominant hydrodynamic controls). Finer-scale, surface morphological features mainly reflecting biological growth forms are also discussed.

  4. Asphalt mounds and associated biota on the Angolan margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Daniel O. B.; Walls, Anne; Clare, Michael; Fiske, Mike S.; Weiland, Richard J.; O'Brien, Robert; Touzel, Daniel F.

    2014-12-01

    Release of hydrocarbons from sediments is important in increasing habitat heterogeneity on deep ocean margins. Heterogeneity arises from variation in abiotic and biotic conditions, including changes in substratum, geochemistry, fluid flow, biological communities and ecological interactions. The seepage of heavy hydrocarbons to the seafloor is less well studied than most other cold seep systems and may lead to the formation of asphalt mounds. These have been described from several regions, particularly the Gulf of Mexico. Here, we describe the structure, potential formation and biology of a large asphalt mound province in Block 31SE Angola. A total of 2254 distinct mound features was identified by side-scan sonar, covering a total area of 3.7 km2 of seafloor. The asphalt mounds took a number of forms from small (<0.5 m diameter; 13% observations) mounds to large extensive (<50 m diameter) structures. Some of the observed mounds were associated with authigenic carbonate and active seepage (living chemosynthetic fauna present in addition to the asphalt). The asphalt mounds are seabed accumulations of heavy hydrocarbons formed from subsurface migration and fractionation of reservoir hydrocarbons primarily through a network of faults. In Angola these processes are controlled by subsurface movement of salt structures. The asphalt mounds were typically densely covered with epifauna (74.5% of mounds imaged had visible epifauna) although individual mounds varied considerably in epifaunal coverage. Of the 49 non-chemosynthetic megafaunal taxa observed, 19 taxa were only found on hard substrata (including asphalt mounds), 2 fish species inhabited the asphalt mounds preferentially and 27 taxa were apparently normal soft-sediment fauna. Antipatharians (3.6±2.3% s.e.) and poriferans (2.6±1.9% s.e.) accounted for the highest mean percentage of the observed cover, with actinarians (0.9±0.4% s.e.) and alcyonaceans (0.4±0.2% s.e.) covering smaller proportions of the area

  5. Artificial breakwaters as garbage bins: Structural complexity enhances anthropogenic litter accumulation in marine intertidal habitats.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Moisés A; Broitman, Bernardo R; Thiel, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Coastal urban infrastructures are proliferating across the world, but knowledge about their emergent impacts is still limited. Here, we provide evidence that urban artificial reefs have a high potential to accumulate the diverse forms of litter originating from anthropogenic activities around cities. We test the hypothesis that the structural complexity of urban breakwaters, when compared with adjacent natural rocky intertidal habitats, is a driver of anthropogenic litter accumulation. We determined litter abundances at seven sites (cities) and estimated the structural complexity in both urban breakwaters and adjacent natural habitats from northern to central Chile, spanning a latitudinal gradient of ∼15° (18°S to 33°S). Anthropogenic litter density was significantly higher in coastal breakwaters when compared to natural habitats (∼15.1 items m(-2) on artificial reefs versus 7.4 items m(-2) in natural habitats) at all study sites, a pattern that was temporally persistent. Different litter categories were more abundant on the artificial reefs than in natural habitats, with local human population density and breakwater extension contributing to increase the probabilities of litter occurrence by ∼10%. In addition, structural complexity was about two-fold higher on artificial reefs, with anthropogenic litter density being highest at intermediate levels of structural complexity. Therefore, the spatial structure characteristic of artificial reefs seems to enhance anthropogenic litter accumulation, also leading to higher residence time and degradation potential. Our study highlights the interaction between coastal urban habitat modification by establishment of artificial reefs, and pollution. This emergent phenomenon is an important issue to be considered in future management plans and the engineering of coastal ecosystems. PMID:27149151

  6. Environmental assessment for Mound Plant decontamination and decommissioning projects, Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) for seven decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) projects at the Mound Plant in Miamisburg, Ohio, that have not been previously addressed in the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Mound Facility (June 1979). Based on the information presented in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  7. Recovery in rubble fields: long-term impacts of blast fishing.

    PubMed

    Fox, Helen E; Pet, Jos S; Dahuri, Rokhmin; Caldwell, Roy L

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents initial results from a study of factors that inhibit or enhance hard coral recovery in rubble fields created by blast fishing in Komodo National Park and Bunaken National Park, Indonesia. Within nine sites monitored since 1998, there was no significant natural recovery. Levels of potential source coral larvae were assessed with settlement tiles in the rubble fields and in nearby high coral cover sites. Rubble movement was measured and shown to be detrimental to small scleractinians, especially in high current areas. In shallow water (2-6 m deep), rubble is often overgrown by soft corals and corallimorpharians, which inhibit hard coral survival. There is increased scleractinian recruitment in quadrats cleared of soft coral, and Acropora nubbins transplanted into soft coral fields suffer greater mortality than those transplanted above the soft coral canopy. Gaining an understanding of the prognosis for coral recovery is essential not only in order to assess the long-term impacts of blast fishing, but also to improve management decisions about protection of intact reefs and potential restoration of damaged areas. PMID:12907196

  8. Peak mooring forces in the horizontal interlaced multi-layered moored floating pipe breakwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mane, Vishwanath; Rajappa, Sacchi; Rao, Subba; Vittal, Hegde A.

    2011-06-01

    Present study aims to investigate the influence of relative breakwater width W/L (W=width of breakwater, L=wavelength), wave steepness Hi/gT2 (Hi=incident wave height, T=wave period) and relative wave height d/W (d=water depth) on forces in the moorings of horizontal interlaced multi-layered moored floating pipe breakwater (HIMMFPB) model. Studies were conducted on scaled down physical models having three layers of Poly Vinyl Chloride (PVC) pipes, wave steepness Hi/gT2 varying from 0.063 to 0.849, relative width W/L varying from 0.4 to 2.65 and relative spacing S/D=2 (S=horizontal centre-to-centre spacing of pipes, D=diameter of pipes). Peak mooring forces were also measured and data collected is analyzed by plotting non-dimensional graphs depicting variation of fs/γW2 (fs=Sea side Mooring force, γ=specific weight of water) & fl/γW2 (fl=Lee side Mooring force) with Hi/gT2 for d/W varying from 0.082 to 0.276 and also variation of fs/γW2 and fl/γW2 with W/L for Hi/d varying from 0.06 to 0.400.

  9. Biotic origin for Mima mounds supported by numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabet, Emmanuel J.; Perron, J. Taylor; Johnson, Donald L.

    2014-02-01

    Mima mounds are ~ 1-m-high hillocks found on every continent except Antarctica. Despite often numbering in the millions within a single field, their origin has been a mystery, with proposed explanations ranging from glacial processes to seismic shaking. One hypothesis proposes that mounds in North America are built by burrowing mammals to provide refuge from seasonally saturated soils. We test this hypothesis with a numerical model, parameterized with measurements of soil transport by gophers from a California mound field, that couples animal behavior with geomorphic processes. The model successfully simulates the development of the mounds as well as key details such as the creation of vernal pools, small intermound basins that provide habitat for endemic species. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the spatial structure of the modeled mound fields is similar to actual mound fields and provides an example of self-organized topographic features. We conclude that, scaled by body mass, Mima mounds are the largest structures built by nonhuman mammals and may provide a rare example of an evolutionary coupling between landforms and the organisms that create them.

  10. Biotic Origin for Mima Mounds Supported by Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabet, E. J.; Perron, J.; Johnson, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Mima mounds are ~1-m-high hillocks found on every continent except Antarctica. Despite often numbering in the millions within a single field, their origin has been a mystery, with proposed explanations ranging from glacial processes to seismic shaking. One hypothesis proposes that mounds in North America are built by burrowing mammals to provide refuge from seasonally saturated soils. We test this hypothesis with a numerical model, parameterized with measurements of soil transport by gophers from a California mound field, that couples animal behavior with geomorphic processes. The model successfully simulates the development of the mounds, as well as key details such as the creation of vernal pools, small intermound basins that provide habitat for endemic species. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the spatial structure of the modeled mound fields is similar to actual mound fields and provides an example of self-organized topographic features. We conclude that, scaled by body mass, Mima mounds are the largest structures built by non-human mammals, and may provide a rare example of an evolutionary coupling between landforms and the organisms that create them.

  11. Geochemical Arrays at Woolsey Mound Seafloor Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleeper, K.; Wilson, R. M.; Chanton, J.; Lapham, L.; Farr, N.; Camilli, R.; Martens, C. S.; Pontbriand, C.

    2011-12-01

    A suite of geochemical monitoring arrays has been developed for the Woolsey Mound Seafloor Observatory in the northern Gulf of Mexico to evaluate the oceanographic and tectonic forcing factors on the formation and stability of gas hydrates. These arrays are designed to collect sustained, time-series data of chemical concentrations, gradients and fluxes from the subsurface to the seafloor and into the near bottom water column. A Pore Fluid Array provides time-series measurements of methane, sulfate and salinity in subsurface pore waters to evaluate microbial activity, hydrate formation and/or hydrate dissociation. A Chimney Sampler Array collects in situ chemical and physical readings at the benthic boundary. The array is designed around a vertical cylinder with a known volume and washout rate for measuring chemical gradients and flux at the seafloor. The Benthic Boundary Layer Array extends into the water column with a package of sensors in a node close to the seafloor and a similar node 20 m above the seafloor to evaluate upward, downward and transversely advecting fluids. The three arrays can be used in concert to evaluate a release of methane by the dissociation of gas hydrates: the Pore Fluid Array identifies the breakdown of gas hydrates in the subsurface, the Chimney Array determines the rate of flux at the seafloor and the Benthic Boundary Layer Array evaluates the fate of the release in the water column. Combining the data from the geochemical arrays with output from the geophysical arrays provides key information to evaluate the specific and relative importance of tectonic and oceanographic triggers for hydrate dissociation. New probes and deployment platforms have been developed for the installation and maintenance of the arrays and new systems are in place and under development for the recovery of the data. Generally, the complete array or its components have to be recovered to download the data. However, this summer 2011, a new optic modem system was

  12. Burial, mounding key at Isle of Purbeck

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, C.G. )

    1989-07-17

    Design and installation of LPG storage for BP Petroleum Development Ltd.'s Wytch Farm Project on the Isle of Purbeck was guided by the central need to obscure the storage site from view and preserve the natural beauty of the island. The Wytch Farm oil field development is an expansion project aimed at increasing crude-oil production from 5,500 b/d to 60,000 b/d. The oil field is located beneath the southern shores of Poole Harbour on the south coast of the U.K. in an area of outstanding beauty and adjacent to sites of special scientific interest. The article is divided into the following areas: Storage needs; Mounding concrete; Pressure resistance; Fracture, cracking concerns; Coating criteria; Cleaning, application; Sand bed foundations; Earthworks, Preparation installation; Settlement monitoring.

  13. Integrated study of Mississippian Lodgepole Waulsortian Mounds, Williston Basin, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Kupecz, J.A.; Arestad, J.F.; Blott, J. E.

    1996-06-01

    Waulsortian-type carbonate buildups in the Mississippian Lodgepole Formation, Williston Basin, constitute prolific oil reservoirs. Since the initial discovery in 1993, five fields have been discovered: Dickinson Field (Lodgepole pool); Eland Field; Duck Creek Field, Versippi Field; and Hiline Field. Cumulative production (October, 1995) is 2.32 million barrels of oil and 1.34 BCF gas, with only 69,000 barrels of water. Oil gravity ranges from 41.4 to 45.3 API. Both subsurface cores from these fields as well as outcrop (Bridget Range, Big Snowy and Little Belt Mountains, Montana) are composed of facies representing deposition in mound, reworked mound, distal reworked mound, proximal flank, distal flank, and intermound settings. Porosity values within the mound and reworked mound facies are up to 15%; permeability values (in places fracture-enhanced) are up to tens of Darcies. Geometries of the mounds are variable. Mound thicknesses in the subsurface range from approximately 130-325 feet (40-100 meters); in outcrop thicknesses range from less than 30 ft (9 m) to over 250 ft (76 m). Subsurface areal dimensions range from approximately 0.5 x 1.0 mi (0.8 x 1.6 km) to 3.5 x 5.5 mi (5.6 x 8.8 km). Integration of seismic data with core and well-log models sheds light on the exploration for Lodgepole mounds. Seismic modeling of productive mounds in the Dickinson and Eland fields identifies characteristics useful for exploration, such as local thickening of the Lodgepole to Three Forks interval. These observations are confirmed in reprocessed seismic data across Eland field and on regional seismic data. Importantly, amplitude versus offset modeling identifies problems with directly detecting and identifying porosity within these features with amplitude analyses. In contrast, multicomponent seismic data has great potential for imaging these features and quantifying porous zones within them.

  14. Geotechnical characteristics of shallow ocean dredge spoil disposal mounds

    SciTech Connect

    Demars, K.R.; Dowling, J.J.; Long, R.P.; Morton, R.W.

    1984-05-01

    This paper summarizes the data obtained from site surveying and sediment sampling of dredge spoil disposal mounds at the Central Long Island Sound site. Emphasis is placed on the geotechnical and geological features of the mound and natural seabed. Since some of the spoil is contaminated, cappings of clean spoil have been used to isolate the spoil mounds from fauna and flora in the water column. Because of the contaminated spoil, improvements in the disposal techniques are needed and methodologies must be developed for evaluating short-term and long-term stability of these shallow ocean deposits which are subjected to loadings from waves, spoil disposal and capping operations.

  15. In Operando GISAXS Studies of Mound Coarsening in Electrochemical Homoepitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruge, Martin; Golks, Frederik; Zegenhagen, Jörg; Magnussen, Olaf M.; Stettner, Jochim

    2014-02-01

    Kinetic roughening during electrodeposition was studied by grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering for the case of Au(001) homoepitaxial growth in Cl- containing electrolytes. The formation and coarsening of an isotropic mound distribution on unreconstructed Au(001) and of [110]-oriented anisotropic mounds on the "hex" reconstructed surface was observed. The lateral mound coarsening is described by a well-defined scaling law. On unreconstructed Au a transition in the coarsening exponent from ≈1/4 to ≈1/3 with increasing potential is found, which can be explained by the pronounced potential dependence of surface transport processes in an electrochemical environment.

  16. In operando GISAXS studies of mound coarsening in electrochemical homoepitaxy.

    PubMed

    Ruge, Martin; Golks, Frederik; Zegenhagen, Jörg; Magnussen, Olaf M; Stettner, Jochim

    2014-02-01

    Kinetic roughening during electrodeposition was studied by grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering for the case of Au(001) homoepitaxial growth in Cl- containing electrolytes. The formation and coarsening of an isotropic mound distribution on unreconstructed Au(001) and of [110]-oriented anisotropic mounds on the "hex" reconstructed surface was observed. The lateral mound coarsening is described by a well-defined scaling law. On unreconstructed Au a transition in the coarsening exponent from ≈1/4 to ≈1/3 with increasing potential is found, which can be explained by the pronounced potential dependence of surface transport processes in an electrochemical environment. PMID:24580610

  17. Origin of the Mima Mounds, Thurston County region, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newcomb, R.C.

    1952-01-01

    There has been recent favorable consideration of the idea that the Mima mounds were made by gophers. The writer believes the evidence indicates that gophers function only in the reworking of the mound material, not in the primary construction. The plausibility of the earlier glacial or periglacial theory has been increased by recent knowledge of permafrost and of the deposits made by combined water and ice in cold climates. The gopher theory, as it has been applied to the Mima mounds, contains internal disharmonies and ignores significant field evidence supporting the earlier idea.

  18. Fractal-mound growth of pentacene thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorba, Serkan; Shapir, Yonathan; Gao, Yongli

    2006-12-01

    The growth mechanism of pentacene film formation on SiO2 substrate was investigated with a combination of atomic force microscopy measurements and numerical modeling. In addition to the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) that has already been shown to govern the growth of the ordered pentacene thin films, it is shown here that the Schwoebel barrier effect steps in and disrupts the desired epitaxial growth for the subsequent layers, leading to mound growth. The terraces of the growing mounds have a fractal dimension of 1.6, indicating a lateral DLA shape. This growth morphology thus combines horizontal DLA-like growth with vertical mound growth.

  19. Biodiversity and ecological composition of macrobenthos on cold-water coral mounds and adjacent off-mound habitat in the bathyal Porcupine Seabight, NE Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Lea-Anne; Roberts, J. Murray

    2007-04-01

    The cold-water scleractinian corals Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata form mound structures on the continental shelf and slope in the NE Atlantic. This study is the first to compare the taxonomic biodiversity and ecological composition of the macrobenthos between on- and off-mound habitats. Seven box cores from the summits of three mounds and four cores from an adjacent off-mound area in the Belgica Mound Province in the Porcupine Seabight yielded 349 species, including 10 undescribed species. On-mound habitat was three times more speciose, and was richer with higher evenness and significantly greater Shannon's diversity than off-mound. Species composition differed significantly between habitats and the four best discriminating species were Pliobothrus symmetricus (more frequent off-mound), Crisia nov. sp, Aphrocallistes bocagei and Lophelia pertusa (all more frequent on-mound). Filter/suspension feeders were significantly more abundant on-mound, while deposit feeders were significantly more abundant off-mound. Species composition did not significantly differ between mounds, but similarity within replicates decreased from Galway MoundMound. We propose that, despite having greater vertical habitat heterogeneity that supports higher biodiversity, coral mounds have a characteristic "reef fauna" linked to species' biology that contrasts with the higher horizontal habitat heterogeneity conferred by the action of deposit feeders and a varied seabed sedimentary facies off-mound. Standardisation of equipment and restriction of analyses to higher taxonomic levels would facilitate prospective comparative analyses of cold-water coral biodiversity across larger spatio-temporal scales.

  20. Audit of Mound Plant`s reduction in force

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-17

    Objective of this audit was to determine whether the Mound Plant`s Fiscal Year 1992 reduction in force (RIF) was effectively managed and implemented properly by DOE. DOE established policy to encourage contractors to reduce staffing by voluntary separations without unreasonable separation costs. EG&G Mound`s FY 1992 RIF was accomplished by voluntary separations; however, its implementation unreasonably increased costs because DOE did not have adequate criteria or guidelines for evaluating contractors` RIF proposals, and because EG&G Mound furnished inaccurate cost data to DOE evaluators. The unreasonable costs amounted to at least $21 million. Recommendations are made that DOE develop and implement guidelines to impose limitations on voluntary separation allowances, early retirement incentive payments, and inclusion of crucial employee classifications in voluntary RIFs.

  1. 1. Perspective view southwest of filtration bed with earth mounded ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Perspective view southwest of filtration bed with earth mounded over facility. Armory Street appears in the foreground. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  2. Evolution of Mound Morphology in Reversible Homoepitaxy on Cu(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, J.; Wendelken, J.

    1997-04-01

    Evolution of mound morphology in reversible homoepitaxy on Cu(100) was studied via spot-profile-analysis (SPA) LEED and scanning tunneling microscopy. The mound separation shows coarsening vs growth time with L(t){approximately}t{sup 1/4}, in support of theory based on capillarity between mounds. The growth ultimately reaches a steady state characterized by a selected mound angle of {approximately}5.6{degree}. We suggest that this results from a downhill current driven by step edge line tension in balance with an uphill current due to the Schwoebel barrier effect. Also, we have clarified the interpretation for the evolution of the SPA-LEED profile from a ring structure to a single time-invariant peak. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Simulation of Groundwater Mounding Beneath Hypothetical Stormwater Infiltration Basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carleton, Glen B.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater mounding occurs beneath stormwater management structures designed to infiltrate stormwater runoff. Concentrating recharge in a small area can cause groundwater mounding that affects the basements of nearby homes and other structures. Methods for quantitatively predicting the height and extent of groundwater mounding beneath and near stormwater Finite-difference groundwater-flow simulations of infiltration from hypothetical stormwater infiltration structures (which are typically constructed as basins or dry wells) were done for 10-acre and 1-acre developments. Aquifer and stormwater-runoff characteristics in the model were changed to determine which factors are most likely to have the greatest effect on simulating the maximum height and maximum extent of groundwater mounding. Aquifer characteristics that were changed include soil permeability, aquifer thickness, and specific yield. Stormwater-runoff variables that were changed include magnitude of design storm, percentage of impervious area, infiltration-structure depth (maximum depth of standing water), and infiltration-basin shape. Values used for all variables are representative of typical physical conditions and stormwater management designs in New Jersey but do not include all possible values. Results are considered to be a representative, but not all-inclusive, subset of likely results. Maximum heights of simulated groundwater mounds beneath stormwater infiltration structures are the most sensitive to (show the greatest change with changes to) soil permeability. The maximum height of the groundwater mound is higher when values of soil permeability, aquifer thickness, or specific yield are decreased or when basin depth is increased or the basin shape is square (and values of other variables are held constant). Changing soil permeability, aquifer thickness, specific yield, infiltration-structure depth, or infiltration-structure shape does not change the volume of water infiltrated, it changes the

  4. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT EARTH MOUND. NOTE THE RECTANGULAR OPENINGS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT EARTH MOUND. NOTE THE RECTANGULAR OPENINGS USED FOR OBSERVATION EQUIPMENT AND PERISCOPE TOPS. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  5. 2. CONCRETE PADDING AREA BETWEEN BERM MOUNDS, LOOKING NORTH FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. CONCRETE PADDING AREA BETWEEN BERM MOUNDS, LOOKING NORTH FROM TOP OF BERM. - NIKE Missile Base C-84, Acid Fueling Station, North of Launch Area Entrance Drive, eastern central portion of base, Barrington, Cook County, IL

  6. Environmental assessment for commercialization of the Mound Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-26

    In November 1993 US DOE decided to phase out operations at the Mound Plant in Miamisburg, Ohio, with the goal of releasing the site for commercial use. The broad concept is to transform the plant into an advanced manufacturing center with the main focus on commercializing products and other technology. DOE proposes to lease portions of the Mound Plant to commercial enterprises. This Environmental Impact statement has a finding of no significant impact in reference to such action.

  7. Integrated and holistic suitability assessment of recycling options for masonry rubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, T.; Rübner, K.; Meng, B.

    2012-04-01

    Our industrial society depends on continuous mining and consumption of raw materials and energy. Besides, the building sector causes one of the largest material streams in Germany. On the one hand, the building sector is connected with a high need in material and energetic resources as well as financial expenditures. On the other hand, nearly 50 % of the volume of waste arises from the building industry. During the last years, the limitation of natural resources, increasing negative environmental consequences as well as rising prices and shortages of dump space have led to a change in thinking in the building and waste industry to a closed substance cycle waste management. In consideration of the production figures of the main kinds of masonry units (clay bricks, sand-lime bricks, autoclaved aerated concrete brick, concrete blocks), a not unimportant quantity of masonry rubble (including gypsum plaster boards, renders, mortars and mineral insulating materials) of more than 20 million tons per year is generated in the medium term. With regard to a sustainable closed substance cycle waste management, these rest masses have to be recycled if possible. Processed aggregates made from masonry rubble can be recycled in the production of new masonry units under certain conditions. Even carefully deconstructed masonry units can once more re-used as masonry units, particularly in the area of the preservation of monuments and historical buildings. In addition, masonry rubble in different processing qualities is applied in earth and road construction, horticulture and scenery construction as well as concrete production. The choice of the most suitable recycling option causes technical, economical and ecological questions. At present, a methodology for a comprehensive suitability assessment with a passable scope of work does not exist. Basic structured and structuring information on the recycling of masonry rubble is absent up to now. This as well as the economic and technical

  8. Termite mounds harness diurnal temperature oscillations for ventilation

    PubMed Central

    King, Hunter; Ocko, Samuel; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-01-01

    Many species of millimetric fungus-harvesting termites collectively build uninhabited, massive mound structures enclosing a network of broad tunnels that protrude from the ground meters above their subterranean nests. It is widely accepted that the purpose of these mounds is to give the colony a controlled microclimate in which to raise fungus and brood by managing heat, humidity, and respiratory gas exchange. Although different hypotheses such as steady and fluctuating external wind and internal metabolic heating have been proposed for ventilating the mound, the absence of direct in situ measurement of internal air flows has precluded a definitive mechanism for this critical physiological function. By measuring diurnal variations in flow through the surface conduits of the mounds of the species Odontotermes obesus, we show that a simple combination of geometry, heterogeneous thermal mass, and porosity allows the mounds to use diurnal ambient temperature oscillations for ventilation. In particular, the thin outer flutelike conduits heat up rapidly during the day relative to the deeper chimneys, pushing air up the flutes and down the chimney in a closed convection cell, with the converse situation at night. These cyclic flows in the mound flush out CO2 from the nest and ventilate the colony, in an unusual example of deriving useful work from thermal oscillations. PMID:26316023

  9. Termite mounds harness diurnal temperature oscillations for ventilation.

    PubMed

    King, Hunter; Ocko, Samuel; Mahadevan, L

    2015-09-15

    Many species of millimetric fungus-harvesting termites collectively build uninhabited, massive mound structures enclosing a network of broad tunnels that protrude from the ground meters above their subterranean nests. It is widely accepted that the purpose of these mounds is to give the colony a controlled microclimate in which to raise fungus and brood by managing heat, humidity, and respiratory gas exchange. Although different hypotheses such as steady and fluctuating external wind and internal metabolic heating have been proposed for ventilating the mound, the absence of direct in situ measurement of internal air flows has precluded a definitive mechanism for this critical physiological function. By measuring diurnal variations in flow through the surface conduits of the mounds of the species Odontotermes obesus, we show that a simple combination of geometry, heterogeneous thermal mass, and porosity allows the mounds to use diurnal ambient temperature oscillations for ventilation. In particular, the thin outer flutelike conduits heat up rapidly during the day relative to the deeper chimneys, pushing air up the flutes and down the chimney in a closed convection cell, with the converse situation at night. These cyclic flows in the mound flush out CO2 from the nest and ventilate the colony, in an unusual example of deriving useful work from thermal oscillations. PMID:26316023

  10. Food preferences and mound-building behaviour of the mound-building mice Mus spicilegus.

    PubMed

    Hölzl, Michaela; Krištofík, Ján; Darolová, Alžbeta; Hoi, Herbert

    2011-10-01

    Optimal foraging strategies and food choice are influenced by various factors, e.g. availability, size and caloric content of the food type and predation risk. However, food choice criteria may change when food is not eaten immediately but has to be carried to a storage site for later use. For example, handling time in terms of harvesting and transport time should be optimized, particularly when the risk of predation is high. Thus, it is not clear whether food selected by hoarding animals reflects their food preference due to intrinsic features of the food type, e.g. size, caloric or lipid content, or whether the food type selected is a compromise that also considers the handling time required for harvesting and transport. We investigate this question in relation to food hoarding behaviour in mound-building mice. In autumn, mound-building mice Mus spicilegus collect seeds and other plant material and cover it with soil. Such above-ground storage is quite unusual for rodents. Here, we investigated whether there is a relationship between the seed species preferred as building materials and those preferred for food. We conducted a seed preference test using three most collected weed species for mound building. Controlling factors like food availability or predation risk, mice prefer Setaria spp. as food, although Amaranthus spp. and Chenopodium spp. were preferentially harvested and stored. By including the availability of the three species, our experimental results were confirmed, namely, a clear preference for Setaria spp. Also, handling time and seed size revealed to influence plant choice. PMID:21861181

  11. Food preferences and mound-building behaviour of the mound-building mice Mus spicilegus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölzl, Michaela; Krištofík, Ján; Darolová, Alžbeta; Hoi, Herbert

    2011-10-01

    Optimal foraging strategies and food choice are influenced by various factors, e.g. availability, size and caloric content of the food type and predation risk. However, food choice criteria may change when food is not eaten immediately but has to be carried to a storage site for later use. For example, handling time in terms of harvesting and transport time should be optimized, particularly when the risk of predation is high. Thus, it is not clear whether food selected by hoarding animals reflects their food preference due to intrinsic features of the food type, e.g. size, caloric or lipid content, or whether the food type selected is a compromise that also considers the handling time required for harvesting and transport. We investigate this question in relation to food hoarding behaviour in mound-building mice. In autumn, mound-building mice Mus spicilegus collect seeds and other plant material and cover it with soil. Such above-ground storage is quite unusual for rodents. Here, we investigated whether there is a relationship between the seed species preferred as building materials and those preferred for food. We conducted a seed preference test using three most collected weed species for mound building. Controlling factors like food availability or predation risk, mice prefer Setaria spp. as food, although Amaranthus spp. and Chenopodium spp. were preferentially harvested and stored. By including the availability of the three species, our experimental results were confirmed, namely, a clear preference for Setaria spp. Also, handling time and seed size revealed to influence plant choice.

  12. Facies architecture and diagenesis of Belgian Late Frasnian carbonate mounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulvain, Frédéric

    2001-12-01

    Late Frasnian Petit-Mont Member carbonate mounds occur in the southern part of the Dinant Synclinorium and in the Philippeville Anticline (SW Belgium). These mounds are 30 to 80 m thick and 100 to 250 m in diameter. They are embedded in shale, nodular shale and argillaceous limestone. Based on facies mapping of 14 buildups and related off-mound sediments, these mounds typically started from below the photic and storm wave base zones and builtup into shallow water environments. Above an argillaceous limestone substrate, the first carbonate mound facies consists of spiculitic wackestone with stromatactis (PM1), which becomes progressively enriched in crinoids and corals (PM2), then in peloids, stromatoporoids and cyanobacteria (PM3). PM4 consists of algal-coral-peloid wackestone and packstone with green algae and thick algal coatings. A core of algal and microbial bindstone (PM5) sporadically occurs within large mounds. The uppermost part of these mounds may show a recurrence of facies PM2 and PM1. PM1 to PM3 are coloured red by hematite derived from microaerophilic iron bacteria; PM4 and PM5 are grey. The transition from the aphotic to the cyanobacterial photic zone is recorded in the succession PM2-PM3; the transition from the cyanobacterial to the green algal photic zone is recorded by PM3-PM5. Storm wave base was reached within PM3 and fair-weather wave base within PM5. This paleobathymetric interpretation suggests a depth of 100-150 m during initial establishment of PM1. Three types of mounds can be distinguished on the basis of geometry and facies architecture: (1) "Les Bulants"-type mounds display a continuous vertical facies succession (PM2-3-4-5) and low relief; (2) although exhibiting the same facies succession as "Les Bulants", "Les Wayons"-type mounds show a distinct relief with steep flanks and bioclastic talus; (3) "St.-Rémy" mounds consist exclusively of PM1 and PM2, bioclastic flank deposits are not observed. From (1) to (3), these mound types

  13. Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631-6G Additonal Sampling and Monitor Well Installation Report

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.

    1995-02-01

    The Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631-6G was constructed in 1951 as an unlined earthen pit in surficial sediments for disposal and incineration of potentially hazardous substances, such as metals and organic solvents.

  14. The strength of rubble-pile bodies: Theory, observations, and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeres, D.; Sanchez, P.

    2014-07-01

    The strength and morphology of a rubble-pile body will control how fast it can rotate before shedding mass or deforming, influence the process by which multi-component asteroid systems are created, and could have significance for the mitigation of hazardous near-Earth asteroids (NEA) should this be necessary in the future [1,2,3]. The morphology of these bodies, including the size distribution of boulders and grains internal to the system, the macro-porosity of these bodies, and the shapes and spin states of these bodies, are important for understanding and interpreting spacecraft imaging of asteroids, for predicting the end-state evolution of these bodies, and for gaining insight into their formation circumstances. Despite these compelling issues and questions, real insight on the strength of rubble-pile bodies and their morphology remains elusive. We explore a theory recently developed by us [3] for the morphology and strength of a rubble-pile body based on the properties of cohesive powders and show that several observations of small asteroid properties are consistent with the predictions of this model. That small asteroids can be rubble-pile bodies is clear based on several lines of evidence, including spacecraft imaging and sample analysis of Itokawa [4,5], the existence of the rotation spin rate barrier for bodies larger than a few hundred meters [6], and the recent observations of disrupting asteroids in the main belt [7,8]. A simple extrapolation from these observations are that bodies of at least a few hundred meters and larger are composed of a size distribution of components that range from decameter-sized boulders down to micron-sized grains. The relevant questions then become what the characteristics of these size distributions are and what physical implications for the strength of these bodies arise from this morphology. Based on the theory of cohesive granular mechanics [9] combined with a thorough review of results from the Hayabusa mission [4

  15. From Shell Midden to Midden-Mound: The Geoarchaeology of Mound Key, an Anthropogenic Island in Southwest Florida, USA.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Victor D; Marquardt, William H; Cherkinsky, Alexander; Roberts Thompson, Amanda D; Walker, Karen J; Newsom, Lee A; Savarese, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mound Key was once the capital of the Calusa Kingdom, a large Pre-Hispanic polity that controlled much of southern Florida. Mound Key, like other archaeological sites along the southwest Gulf Coast, is a large expanse of shell and other anthropogenic sediments. The challenges that these sites pose are largely due to the size and areal extent of the deposits, some of which begin up to a meter below and exceed nine meters above modern sea levels. Additionally, the complex depositional sequences at these sites present difficulties in determining their chronology. Here, we examine the development of Mound Key as an anthropogenic island through systematic coring of the deposits, excavations, and intensive radiocarbon dating. The resulting data, which include the reversals of radiocarbon dates from cores and dates from mound-top features, lend insight into the temporality of site formation. We use these insights to discuss the nature and scale of human activities that worked to form this large island in the context of its dynamic, environmental setting. We present the case that deposits within Mound Key's central area accumulated through complex processes that represent a diversity of human action including midden accumulation and the redeposition of older sediments as mound fill. PMID:27123928

  16. From Shell Midden to Midden-Mound: The Geoarchaeology of Mound Key, an Anthropogenic Island in Southwest Florida, USA

    PubMed Central

    Cherkinsky, Alexander; Roberts Thompson, Amanda D.; Walker, Karen J.; Newsom, Lee A.; Savarese, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mound Key was once the capital of the Calusa Kingdom, a large Pre-Hispanic polity that controlled much of southern Florida. Mound Key, like other archaeological sites along the southwest Gulf Coast, is a large expanse of shell and other anthropogenic sediments. The challenges that these sites pose are largely due to the size and areal extent of the deposits, some of which begin up to a meter below and exceed nine meters above modern sea levels. Additionally, the complex depositional sequences at these sites present difficulties in determining their chronology. Here, we examine the development of Mound Key as an anthropogenic island through systematic coring of the deposits, excavations, and intensive radiocarbon dating. The resulting data, which include the reversals of radiocarbon dates from cores and dates from mound-top features, lend insight into the temporality of site formation. We use these insights to discuss the nature and scale of human activities that worked to form this large island in the context of its dynamic, environmental setting. We present the case that deposits within Mound Key’s central area accumulated through complex processes that represent a diversity of human action including midden accumulation and the redeposition of older sediments as mound fill. PMID:27123928

  17. [Relationships between mound size and captured ergate amount of Solenopsis invicta].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Lu, Yong-Yue; Xu, Yi-Juan; Liang, Guang-Wen; Zeng, Ling

    2009-08-01

    By the method of bait trapping, this paper studied the relationships between mound size (mound volume and mound surface base area) and captured ergate amount of Solenopsis invicta in wasteland and greenbelt. In wasteland, with the increase of mound size, the amount of captured S. invicta ergates increased rapidly at first, slowed down then, and kept stable at last. When the mound volume and surface base area were 11634 cm3 and 1308 cm2 respectively, the captured ergate amount reached the maximum, being 291 individuals per trap. Similar patterns were observed in greenbelt. The increase of captured S. invicta ergate amount slowed down rapidly when the mound volume was larger than 18089 cm3, and reached the maximum (232 individual per trap) when the mound volume was 25974 cm3. The Weibull equation could better describe the relationships between the mound volume and mound surface base area and the captured ergate amount of S. invicta. PMID:19947223

  18. Microbial composition of biofilms associated with lithifying rubble of Acropora palmata branches.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, Yislem; Cerqueda-García, Daniel; Taş, Neslihan; Thomé, Patricia E; Iglesias-Prieto, Roberto; Falcón, Luisa I

    2016-01-01

    Coral reefs are among the most productive ecosystems on the planet, but are rapidly declining due to global-warming-mediated changes in the oceans. Particularly for the Caribbean region, Acropora sp. stony corals have lost ∼80% of their original coverage, resulting in vast extensions of dead coral rubble. We analyzed the microbial composition of biofilms that colonize and lithify dead Acropora palmata rubble in the Mexican Caribbean and identified the microbial assemblages that can persist under scenarios of global change, including high temperature and low pH. Lithifying biofilms have a mineral composition that includes aragonite and magnesium calcite (16 mole% MgCO(3)) and calcite, while the mineral phase corresponding to coral skeleton is basically aragonite. Microbial composition of the lithifying biofilms are different in comparison to surrounding biotopes, including a microbial mat, water column, sediments and live A. palmata microbiome. Significant shifts in biofilm composition were detected in samples incubated in mesocosms. The combined effect of low pH and increased temperature showed a strong effect after two-week incubations for biofilm composition. Findings suggest that lithifying biofilms could remain as a secondary structure on reef rubble possibly impacting the functional role of coral reefs. PMID:26705570

  19. Controls on mound formation and effects of fluid ascent on the gas hydrate system of mound structures offshore Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planert, L.; Klaeschen, D.; Berndt, C.; Hensen, C.; Brueckmann, W.

    2010-12-01

    Our analysis of 2D MCS seismic data from the Middle America margin provides an insight into the buildup and formation mechanisms of mound structures and the effects of fluid ascent on the gas hydrate system observed on the continental slope offshore Costa Rica. Our targets, Mounds 11&12, are the sites of IODP drilling proposal 633-Full2, which aims to enhance the general understanding of complex forearc dewatering processes of the erosive subduction system off Costa Rica. Major sites of dewatering planned for drilling are mounds, related to mud diapirism/volcanism and precipitation of authigenic carbonates, and large-scale slides related to the subduction of seamounts. Geochemical analysis of methane hydrate and chloride anomalies as well as heat flow modeling of the mounds indicate deeply sourced fluids discharged by clay dehydration at the decollement. Hence, the hydrogeological system at this margin appears to be dominated by the fracture porosity of faults which extend through the overriding plate and provide the paths for fluids liberated by early dehydration reactions from the plate boundary. In order to test the hypothesis of deeply sourced and fault-controlled dewatering sites and to better understand the interactions between gas hydrate formation and dissociation with the fluid ascent from the deep sources, new pre-site survey seismic profiles were acquired using the 36-gun, four-string linear gun array of R/V Marcus Langseth, and a 240 channel streamer with 3000 m of active length. The seismic lines were prestack depth migrated, in which the velocity model is iteratively improved using depth focusing analysis and residual moveout correction on common image point gathers. Improvement of the deep imaging involved multiple attenuation and detailed velocity analysis of the lower sedimentary portions and beneath the basement down to the plate boundary. Our results reveal an upward bending of the bottom simulating reflection (BSR) directly beneath the mounds

  20. Detection of cohesive forces in the rubble-pile asteroid (29075) 1950 DA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozitis, Benjamin; MacLennan, Eric; Emery, Joshua P.

    2014-11-01

    The physical behavior of rubble-pile asteroids has traditionally been described using only gravitational and frictional forces within a granular material. Cohesive forces in the form of small van der Waals forces between constituent grains have recently been predicted to be important for small rubble-pile asteroids (less than 10 kilometers in size), and could potentially explain how small fast spinning asteroids remain intact. It is possible to infer the existence of cohesive forces within a rubble-pile asteroid by determining if it has insufficient self-gravity, dictated by its bulk density, to prevent rotational breakup by centrifugal forces. The kilometer-sized and potentially-hazardous asteroid (29075) 1950 DA is one of the largest known candidates for being held together by cohesive forces, as it has a rotation period of 2.1216 h that is just beyond the critical spin limit of 2.2 h estimated for a cohesionless asteroid. Using the Advanced Thermophysical Model (or ATPM), in combination with the radar shape model, WISE thermal-infrared data, and Yarkovsky orbital drift measurement, we determined the thermal inertia, bulk density, and cohesive strength of (29075) 1950 DA (Rozitis et al., 2014, Nature, 512, 174-176). The thermal inertia value is remarkably low at 24 +20/-14 SI units, which gives a corresponding bulk density of 1.7 ± 0.7 g/cm^3 in the Yarkovsky orbital drift analysis. This bulk density is typical of a rubble-pile asteroid, and a minimum cohesive strength of 64 +12/-20 Pa is therefore required to prevent surface mass shedding and structural failure by centrifugal forces. This strength is comparable to, though somewhat less than, the cohesive forces found between the grains of lunar regolith. Finally, as (29075) 1950 DA has a 1 in 19,800 chance of impacting the Earth in 2880, and has the potential to disrupt like main-belt comet P/2013 R3, it raises new implications for impact mitigation against fast spinning rubble-pile asteroids.

  1. Environmental monitoring at Mound: 1986 report

    SciTech Connect

    Carfagno, D.G.; Farmer, B.M.

    1987-05-11

    The local environment around Mound was monitored for tritium and plutonium-238. The results are reported for 1986. Environmental media analyzed included air, water, vegetation, foodstuffs, and sediment. The average concentrations of plutonium-238 and tritium were within the DOE interim air and water Derived Concentration Guides (DCG) for these radionuclides. The average incremental concentrations of plutonium-238 and tritium oxide in air measured at all offsite locations during 1986 were 0.03% and 0.01%, respectively, of the DOE DCGs for uncontrolled areas. The average incremental concentration of plutonium-238 measured at all locations in the Great Miami River during 1986 was 0.0005% of the DOE DCG. The average incremental concentration of tritium measured at all locations in the Great Miami River during 1986 was 0.005% of the DOE DCG. The average incremental concentrations of plutonium-238 found during 1986 in surface and area drinking water were less than 0.00006% of the DOE DCG. The average incremental concentration of tritium in surface water was less than 0.005% of the DOE DCG. All tritium in drinking water data is compared to the US EPA Drinking Water Standard. The average concentrations in local private and municipal drinking water systems were less than 25% and 1.5%, respectively. Although no DOE DCG is available for foodstuffs, the average concentrations are a small fraction of the water DCG (0.04%). The concentrations of sediment samples obtained at offsite surface water sampling locations were extremely low and therefore represent no adverse impact to the environment. The dose equivalent estimates for the average air, water, and foodstuff concentrations indicate that the levels are within 1% of the DOE standard of 100 mrem. None of these exceptions, however, had an adverse impact on the water quality of the Great Miami River or caused the river to exceed Ohio Stream Standards. 20 refs., 5 figs., 31 tabs.

  2. The Mounds of Cydonia - A Case Study for Planetary SETI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crater, H. W.

    The Society for Planetary SETI Research (SPSR) has as its aim the study of features on planetary surfaces, to evaluate possible signs of ET activity in the form of landscape modifications or other alterations not easily attributable to natural geological formation. This paper displays one such study, based in part on a previous one which showed that a group of twelve mound-like formations in the Cydonia area of Mars, of relatively small and nearly uniform size, have relative positions that repeatedly display symmetries well beyond chance. It focuses primarily on five of those mounds, showing that they display some unusual and precise geometrical features highlighted by close connections to sequences of prime numbers. This paper also reviews the related statistical anomaly found in the relative placement of these mounds and discusses some recent critiques of that work. Previous work showed that the frequency of appearance of related right and isosceles triangles in the mound distribution cluster sharply in density about a certain value of the angle defining those related triangles. In order to assess the role of the special angle itself as a possible source in the sharp clustering in the density of appearances of these triangles, this paper reports a new statistical study that confirms the extent to which the favored and redundant geometry implied by that angle has a self-duplication property. It involves an examination of each of 1 million randomly generated sets of 12 mounds with the same analysis techniques used for the actual Cydonia mounds. It is found that this property can account for only a small portion of the statistical anomaly found in the earlier work. Proposed further work includes an examination of a clear distinction between the 5 and 12 mound configurations and its possible relation to mound shapes using recent MGS high resolution images. Finally a discussion is given of a repeated connection between the triangles that appear in the ideal geometry

  3. The Gale Crater Mound in a Regional Geologic Setting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Korn, L. K.

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory Rover Curiosity is commencing a two-year investigation of Gale crater and Mt. Sharp, the crater s prominent central mound. Gale is a 155 km, late Noachian / early Hesperian impact crater located near the dichotomy boundary separating the southern highlands from the northern plains. The central mound is composed of layered sedimentary rock, with upper and lower mound units separated by a prominent erosional unconformity (Milliken et al., 2010). The lower mound is of particular interest, as it contains secondary minerals indicative of a striking shift from water-rich to water-poor conditions on early Mars. A key unknown in the history of Gale is the relationship between the sedimentary units in the mound and sedimentary sequences in the surrounding region. We employed orbital remote sensing data to determine if areas within a 1,000 km radius of Gale match the characteristics of sedimentary units in Mt. Sharp. Regions of interest were defined based on: the mound s inferred age (late Noachian to early Hesperian), altitude range (-4,600 m to +400 m), and THEMIS nighttime brightness (a proxy for thermal inertia). This combination of characteristics is matched by two extensive units, the late Noachian subdued cratered unit Npl2 and Noachian / Hesperian undivided material HNu (Greeley and Guest, 1987), located along the dichotomy. Geomorphic units have been mapped within the Gale mound by Thomson et al. (2011) based on albedo, layering and erosional characteristics. Using orbital CTX, MOC and HiRISE images we examined all areas within our regions of interest for analogous geomorphic units in the same altitude ranges as the corresponding units in Mt. Sharp. The most convincing geomorphic analogs to lower mound units, dominated by fine-scale layering and prominent yardangs, were located approximately 200 km northeast and southeast of Gale in late Noachian unit Npl2. The most convincing geomorphic analogs to upper mound layered units are located

  4. Steady State Perched Groundwater Mounds on Thick Sublayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Richard R.

    1982-04-01

    Perched mounds that develop beneath a strip recharge basin are considered using the potential theory for a saturated flow. The mounds are assumed to develop upon an aquitard or sublayer whose thickness is large enough so that the vertical velocity at the base of the mound does not vary with distance from the centerline of the basin. A finite difference technique was used to solve the potential theory, and 20 mound profiles were determined for K/KL = 10, 50, 100, 500 and R/K = 0.2, 0.35, 0.50, 0.65, 0.80. K/KL is the ratio of the permeabilities, and R is the recharge rate. These profiles are compared to those based on the approximate Dupuit-Forchheimer (DF) theory, and a criterion for the range of validity of the DF theory for predicting the maximum mount thickness H0 is derived. It is found that for a sufficiently large value of K/KL, which depends on R/K and the desired accuracy, the DF theory is adequate. For smaller values of K/KL the potential theory must be used. Equipotential lines and velocity distributions are presented for a typical case where the potential and DF mound profiles are quite different.

  5. HiRISE observations of fractured mounds: Possible Martian pingos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dundas, Colin M.; Mellon, Michael T.; McEwen, Alfred S.; Lefort, Alexandra; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; Thomas, Nicolas

    2008-02-01

    Early images from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera have revealed small fractured mounds in the Martian mid-latitudes. HiRISE resolves fractures on the mound surfaces, indicating uplift, and shows that the mound surface material resembles that of the surrounding landscape. Analysis of Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images shows that in Utopia Planitia the mounds lie almost exclusively between 35-45°N. This range coincides with the peak-abundance latitudes of several landforms attributed to ground water or ice, including gullies, and suggests a ground ice-related origin. The best terrestrial analogues for the observed mound morphology are pingos, although some differences are noted. The presence of uncollapsed pingos would indicate the presence of near-surface ground ice in the Martian mid-latitudes, at depths greater than the ~1 meter sampled by orbital spectrometers. Pingo formation may require near-surface liquid water, which is consistent with a shallow groundwater model for the origin of gullies.

  6. HiRISE observations of fractured mounds: Possible Martian pingos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dundas, C.M.; Mellon, M.T.; McEwen, A.S.; Lefort, A.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Thomas, N.

    2008-01-01

    Early images from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera have revealed small fractured mounds in the Martian mid-latitudes. HiRISE resolves fractures on the mound surfaces, indicating uplift, and shows that the mound surface material resembles that of the surrounding landscape. Analysis of Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images shows that in Utopia Planitia the mounds lie almost exclusively between 35-45??N. This range coincides with the peak-abundance latitudes of several landforms attributed to ground water or ice, including gullies, and suggests a ground ice-related origin. The best terrestrial analogues for the observed mound morphology are pingos, although some differences are noted. The presence of uncollapsed. pingos would indicate the presence of near-surface ground ice in the Martian mid-latitudes, at depths greater than the ???1 meter sampled by orbital spectrometers. Pingo formation may require near-surface liquid water, which is consistent with a shallow groundwater model for the origin of gullies. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Wave pressure acting on V-shaped floating breakwater in random seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Ding, Ning; Lin, Jie; Hou, Jiajia

    2015-12-01

    Wave pressure on the wet surface of a V-shaped floating breakwater in random seas is investigated. Considering the diffraction effect, the unit velocity potential caused by the single regular waves around the breakwater is solved using the finite-depth Green function and boundary element method, in which the Green function is solved by integral method. The Response-Amplitude Operator (RAO) of wave pressure is acquired according to the Longuet-Higgins' wave model and the linear Bernoulli equation. Furthermore, the wave pressure's response spectrum is calculated according to the wave spectrum by discretizing the frequency domain. The wave pressure's characteristic value corresponding to certain cumulative probability is determined according to the Rayleigh distribution of wave heights. The numerical results and field test results are compared, which indicates that the wave pressure calculated in random seas agrees with that of field measurements. It is found that the bigger angle between legs will cause the bigger pressure response, while the increase in leg length does not influence the pressure significantly. The pressure at the side of head sea is larger than that of back waves. When the incident wave angle changes from 0° to 90°, the pressure at the side of back waves decreases clearly, while at the side of head sea, the situation is more complicated and there seems no obvious tendency. The concentration of wave energy around low frequency (long wavelength) will induce bigger wave pressure, and more attention should be paid to this situation for the structure safety.

  8. Numerical analyses of caisson breakwaters on soft foundations under wave cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan-zhan; Yan, Zhen; Wang, Yu-chi

    2016-03-01

    A caisson breakwater is built on soft foundations after replacing the upper soft layer with sand. This paper presents a dynamic finite element method to investigate the strength degradation and associated pore pressure development of the intercalated soft layer under wave cyclic loading. By combining the undrained shear strength with the empirical formula of overconsolidation clay produced by unloading and the development model of pore pressure, the dynamic degradation law that describes the undrained shear strength as a function of cycle number and stress level is derived. Based on the proposed dynamic degradation law and M-C yield criterion, a dynamic finite element method is numerically implemented to predict changes in undrained shear strength of the intercalated soft layer by using the general-purpose FEM software ABAQUS, and the accuracy of the method is verified. The effects of cycle number and amplitude of the wave force on the degradation of the undrained shear strength of the intercalated soft layer and the associated excess pore pressure response are investigated by analyzing an overall distribution and three typical sections underneath the breakwater. By comparing the undrained shear strength distributions obtained by the static method and the quasi-static method with the undrained shear strength distributions obtained by the dynamic finite element method in the three typical sections, the superiority of the dynamic finite element method in predicting changes in undrained shear strength is demonstrated.

  9. Cell Sorting in the Mound Stage of Dictyostelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yi; Levine, Herbert; Glazier, James

    1998-03-01

    In the mound stage of slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, cells differentiated into two types: pre-stalk and pre-spore. Pre-stalk cells sort and form a tip at the apex of the mound of prespore cells. How this pattern forms is as yet unknown. A cellular level model allows us to simulate both differential cell adhesion and chemotaxis, two principle mechanisms for cell migration. Simulations show that with differential adhesion only, pre-stalk cells move to the surface of the mound but form no tip. With chemotaxis driven by an outgoing circular wave only, a tip forms but contains both pre-stalk and pre-spore cells. Only for a narrow range of relative strengths between differential adhesion and chemotaxis, can both mechanisms work in concert to form a tip which contains only pre-stalk cells. The simulations provide a method to determine the processes necessary for patterning and suggest a series of further experiments.

  10. Environmental survey preliminary report, Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Mound Plant, conducted August 18 through 29, 1986. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Mound Plant. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Mound Plant, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey found no environmental problems at the Mound Plant that represent an immediate threat to human life. The environmental problems identified at the Mound Plant by the Survey confirm that the site is confronted with a number of environmental problems which are by and large a legacy from past practices at a time when environmental problems were less well understood. Theses problems vary in terms of their magnitude and risk, as described in this report. Although the sampling and analysis performed by the Mound Plant Survey will assist in further identifying environmental problems at the site, a complete understanding of the significance of some of the environmental problems identified requires a level of study and characterization that is beyond the scope of the Survey. Actions currently under way or planned at the site, particularly the Phase II activities of the Comprehensive Environmental Analysis and Response Program (CEARP) as developed and implemented by the Albuquerque Operations Office, will contribute toward meeting this requirement. 85 refs., 24 figs., 20 tabs.

  11. Perennial mounds in Utopia Planitia: (HiRISE) Evidence of a Glacial Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soare, R. J.; Osinski, G. R.; Thomson, L.

    2009-03-01

    Here, we use HiRISE and high-resolution MOC images to discuss sub-kilometer pingo-like mounds in Utopia Planita. The mounds show geological characteristics consistent with formation by glacial accumulation, and ablation by sublimation.

  12. Shallow water mud-mounds of the Early Devonian Buchan Group, East Gippsland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosolini, A.-M. P.; Wallace, M. W.; Gallagher, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Lower Devonian Rocky Camp Member of the Murrindal Limestone, Buchan Group of southeastern Australia consists of a series of carbonate mud-mounds and smaller lagoonal bioherms. The Rocky Camp mound is the best exposed of the mud-mounds and has many characteristics in common with Waulsortian (Carboniferous) mounds. Detailed paleoecological and sedimentological studies indicate that the mound initially accumulated in the photic zone, in contrast to most of the previously recorded mud-mounds. Five facies are present in the mud-mound: a Dasycladacean Wackestone Facies at the base of the mound represents a moderate energy, shallow water bank environment within the photic zone. A Crinioidal Wackestone Facies was deposited in a laterally equivalent foreslope setting. A Poriferan-Crinoidal Mudstone Facies developed in a quiet, deeper water, lee-side mound setting associated with a minor relative sea-level rise. A Stromatoporoid-Coralline Packstone Facies in the upper part of the mound deposited in a high-energy, fair-weather wave base, mound-front environment. The crest of the mound is represented by a Crinoidal-Receptaculitid Packstone Facies indicative of a moderate-energy mound-top environment in the photic zone, sheltered by the mound-front stromatoporoid-coral communities. A mound flank facies is present on the southern side of the mound and this consists of high-energy crinoidal grainstones. Mud-mound deposition was terminated by a transgression that deposited dark gray, fossil-poor marl of the overlying Taravale Formation. The Rocky Camp mound appears to have originated in shallow water photic zone conditions and grew into a high-energy environment, with the mound being eventually colonized by corals and stromatoporoids. The indications of a high-energy environment during later mound growth (growth form of colonial metazoans and grainstones of the flanking facies) suggest that the micrite in the mound was autochthonous and implies the presence of an energy

  13. Analysis of Subsidence Data for the Bryan Mound Site, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Stephen J.

    1999-07-01

    The elevation change data measured at the Bryan Mound Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) site over the last 16+ years has been studied and a model utilized to project elevation changes into the future. The subsidence rate at Bryan Mound is low in comparison with other Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites and has decreased with time due to the maintenance of higher operating pressures and the normal decrease in creep closure rate of caverns with time. However, the subsidence at the site is projected to continue. A model was developed to project subsidence values 20 years into the future; no subsidence related issues are apparent from these projections.

  14. Native American Calendric Orientation at Town Creek Indian Mound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiede, V. R.

    2005-12-01

    Evidence is presented for a newly discovered set of interior solar alignments - the equinox and summer solstice meridian transits - at a prehistoric Native American structure in the Southeast United States. Because North Carolina's Town Creek Indian Mound is the only Mississippian temple-mound accurately reconstructed from overhead photo-mosaics, the site is uniquely suited for applying the techniques of astro-archaeology (G. S. Hawkins 1983). Implications of the new findings for interpreting Muskogean ethnographic literature as well as future archaeoastronomical research at other Southeastern sites (e.g., Ocmulgee National Monument Earth Lodge, Georgia) are discussed.

  15. The Gale Crater Mound in a Regional Geologic Setting: Mapping and Probing Surrounding Outcrops for Areas Akin to the Central Mound at Gale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korn, Lisa; Allen, Carlton

    2013-01-01

    There are several hypotheses on the origin of Gale Crater s central mound. These include ground water upwelling [1], aeolian, ice, volcanic [1-3], lacustrine [1-3], hydrothermal [1-3], and polar deposits [2]. The Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, landed in Gale Crater on August 6, 2012. It is currently analyzing samples along its traverse towards a channel and layered deposits that will provide insight into the sedimentary history of the crater [4]. Located at 5S, 138E, Gale is a 155km diameter, Late Noachian/Early Hesperian crater. It is situated along the southern highlands/northern lowlands dichotomy boundary and contains a central mound that rises approximately 5km from the crater floor [1]. The highest parts of Mt. Sharp are higher than the northern rim, but are roughly the same height as the southern rim. Mt. Sharp is divided into an upper mound and a lower mound, which are separated by an erosional unconformity [2]. The lower mound s sequences span the Late Noachian/Early Hesperian Epoch [1], while the upper mound s age is poorly constrained. The lower mound s sequences feature parallel beds of varying thickness, albedo, texture, and dip angle that are eroded into channels and yardangs [2]. The upper mound has finer layers at higher angles [1] with yardangs, serrated erosional patterns, and lobate features [3]. The lower mound also exhibits an upward progression of phyllosilicate to sulfate rich sediments, contrasting the upper mound s lack of hydrated minerals [4].

  16. A coral-rubble ridge as evidence for hurricane overwash, Anegada (British Virgin Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiske, M.; Halley, R. B.

    2014-01-01

    A coral-rubble ridge fringes part of the north shore of Anegada, a low-lying island in the northern Caribbean. Both historical reports and the geological record underline its vulnerability to tsunami and hurricanes. In this study we document the sedimentary characteristics of a coral-rubble ridge, which extends discontinuously along 1.5-1.8 km of chiefly north-facing shores at Soldier Wash. The ridge is less distinctive and appears only in patches along the west-facing shoreline at Windless Bight, where the wave regime is calmer. It is located ca. 8 m from the fair-weather shore, has a maximum width of 15 m and a maximum thickness of 0.8 m. The lower seaward-facing slope of the ridge is relatively flat, probably due to successive reworking, whereas the upper seaward slope is steep and partly displays avalanching faces. The landward flank is gently sloping and terminates abruptly. The ridge is mainly composed of well-rounded, encrusted and bored coral rubble (average diameter of 16 cm) that has been reworked in the shallow marine environment prior to transport. Only a few pieces of angular beach rock and karstified Pleistocene limestone are incorporated. The components build a clast-supported framework. No sand is present in the interstices. Imbrication of flat clasts indicates a deposition during landward bed load transport. The ridge morphology, composition and related hydrodynamic conditions during its emplacement are typical for coral-rubble ridges deposited by hurricane-induced storm surges. In comparison, nearby evidence for tsunami inundation is very different because the tsunami-transported coral boulders on Anegada are much bigger (2 m) than the biggest components in the ridge, they are deposited much farther inland (up to 1.5 km), and the corals seem to have been freshly broken out of the reef by the tsunami. The age of the ridge is difficult to estimate. The dark grey surface of the ridge is caused by bioweathering by endolithic organisms that takes tens

  17. Radiocarbon dating of large termite mounds of the miombo woodland of Katanga, DR Congo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erens, Hans; Boudin, Mathieu; Mees, Florias; Dumon, Mathijs; Mujinya, Basile; Van Strydonck, Mark; Baert, Geert; Boeckx, Pascal; Van Ranst, Eric

    2015-04-01

    The miombo woodlands of South Katanga (D.R. Congo) are characterized by a high spatial density of large conic termite mounds built by Macrotermes falciger (3 to 5 ha-1, ~5 m high, ~15 m in diameter). The time it takes for these mounds to attain this size is still largely unknown. In this study, the age of four of these mounds is determined by 14C-dating the acid-insoluble organic carbon fraction of samples taken along the central vertical axis of two active and two abandoned mounds. The age sequence in the active mounds is erratic, but the results for the abandoned mounds show a logical increase of 14C-age with depth. The ages measured at 50 cm above ground level were 2335 - 2119 cal yr BP for the large abandoned mound (630 cm high), and 796 - 684 cal yr BP for the small abandoned mound (320 cm high). Cold-water-extractable organic carbon (CWEOC) measurements combined with spectroscopic analysis revealed that the lower parts of the active mounds may have been contaminated with recent carbon that leached from the active nest. Nonetheless, this method appears to provide reliable age estimates of large, abandoned termite mounds, which are older than previously estimated. Furthermore, historical mound growth rates seem to correspond to past temperature changes, suggesting a relation between past environmental conditions and mound occupancy. Keywords : 14C, water-extractable carbon, low-temperature combustion

  18. A new approach to modelling impacts on rubble pile asteroid simulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deller, J. F.; Lowry, S. C.; Snodgrass, C.; Price, M. C.; Sierks, H.

    2016-02-01

    Many asteroids with low bulk densities must have a rubble pile structure and internal voids. Although little is known about their internal structure, numerical simulations of impact events on these asteroids rely on assumptions on how the voids are distributed. We present a new approach to model impacts on rubble pile asteroids that explicitly takes into account their internal structure. The formation of the asteroid is modelled as a rubble pile aggregate of spherical pebbles of different sizes. This aggregate is then converted into a high-resolution smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model, accounting for macroporosity inside the pebbles. We compare impact-event outcomes for a large set of internal configurations to explore the parameter space of our model-building process. The analysis of the fragment size distribution and the disruption threshold quantifies the specific influence of each input parameter. The size distribution of the pebbles used in our model is a simple power law, containing three free parameters: the slope α, the lower cut-off radius rmin and the upper cut-off radius rmax. The influence of all three parameters on the outcome is assessed in this paper. The existence of void space in our model increases the resistance against collisional disruption, a behaviour previously reported based on numerical simulations using a continuum description of porous material (Holsapple 2009). We show, for a set of asteroid collisions typical for small asteroids in the main belt, that no a priori knowledge of the exact size distribution of the pebbles inside the asteroid is needed, as the choice of the corresponding parameters does not directly correlate with the impact outcome.

  19. A Geophysical Laboratory for Rubble Pile Asteroids: The BASiX Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeres, Daniel J.; Chesley, Steven; Anderson, Robert C.

    2014-11-01

    Small rubble pile asteroids exhibit a diverse range of evolutionary behaviors and morphologies, driven by an array of poorly understood geophysical effects. The complex ways that these bodies evolve belies their simple structure: gravitational aggregates of shattered primitive bodies. Their evolution can be dramatic, such as seen in the active asteroids P/2013 P5 and P/2013 R3, or may be subtly masked, such as in the tide-BYORP equilibria of singly-synchronous binary asteroids. Their evolutionary outcomes can defy the imagination, such as asteroid 1950 DA which is spinning faster than its gravitational attraction yet is held together by weak van der Waals forces (Rozitis et al. 2014), or present us with profound mysteries, such as how the Almahata Sitta meteorite could be comprised of such diverse components. Beyond these motivations, the study of rubble pile asteroid geophysics can shed insight into any solar system environment where gravitational aggregates interact in a micro-gravity setting, ranging from the protoplanetary disc to planetary ring systems. The broad study of the geophysics of aggregates in such micro-gravity environments is becoming both a unifying theme and emerging field of study. Out of the many diverse and complex forms that rubble pile asteroids take on, the study of NEA binary asteroids can in particular be used to expose the geophysics of micro-gravity aggregates. Binaries are an expression of micro-gravity geophysics due to the manner in which they form and their continuing evolution. Due to our ability to visit, probe and interact with NEA, we can also turn them into geophysical laboratories. This talk will introduce the science of the Binary Asteroid in-situ Explorer (BASiX) Discovery mission, which proposes to turn the primitive C-Type binary asteroid (175706) 1996 FG3 into such a geophysical laboratory. Exploring this body enables us to probe a broad range of rubble pile asteroid properties: internal tidal dissipation (through FG3

  20. TMI-2 criticality studies: lower-vessel rubble and analytical benchmarking

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, R.M.; Knight, J.R.; Fox, P.B.; Herman, O.W.; Turner, J.C.

    1985-12-01

    A bounding strategy has been adopted for assuring subcriticality during all TMI-2 defueling operations. The strategy is based upon establishing a safe soluble boron level for the entire reactor core in an optimum reactivity configuration. This paper presents the determination of a fuel rubble model which yields a maximum infinite lattice multiplication factor and the subsequent application of cell-averaged constants in finite system analyses. Included in the analyses are the effects of fuel burnup determined from a simplified power history of the reactor. A discussion of the analytical methods employed and the determination of an analytical bias with benchmark crictical experiments completes the presentation. 17 tabs.

  1. Imported Fire Ant Mound Building in Response to Simulated Rainfall

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Imported fire ant (Solenopsis richteri x invicta) mounds in northeastern Mississippi were subjected to four treatments from late July through early September, 2006: application of water (7.5 L) and placement of an inverted 19 L bucket on top; application of water only; application of an inverted buc...

  2. Mound ambient air surveillance program: Description and path forward

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, L R

    1992-08-01

    The ambient air monitoring program in place at Mound has undergone a number of changes since its installation. These changes have resulted from revisions to prevailing environmental regulations and guidance. Additional voluntary upgrades and modifications are planned. This report serves to update information on sampling station locations, equipment designs, operational criteria, and planned upgrades.

  3. Transient solutions to groundwater mounding in bounded and unbounded aquifers.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Serdar

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the well-known Hantush solution procedure for groundwater mounding under infinitely long infiltration strips is extended to finite and semi-infinite aquifer cases. Initially, the solution for infinite aquifers is presented and compared to those available in literature and to the numerical results of MODFLOW. For the finite aquifer case, the method of images, which is commonly used in well hydraulics, is used to be able to represent the constant-head boundaries at both sides. It is shown that a finite number of images is enough to obtain the results and sustain the steady state. The effect of parameters on the growth of the mound and on the time required to reach the steady state is investigated. The semi-infinite aquifer case is emphasized because the growth of the mound is not symmetric. As the constant-head boundary limits the growth, the unbounded side grows continuously. For this reason, the groundwater divide shifts toward the unbounded side. An iterative solution procedure is proposed. To perform the necessary computations a code was written in Visual Basic of which the algorithm is presented. The proposed methodology has a wide range of applicability and this is demonstrated using two practical examples. The first one is mounding under a stormwater dispersion trench in an infinite aquifer and the other is infiltration from a flood control channel into a semi-infinite aquifer. Results fit very well with those of MODFLOW. PMID:22974408

  4. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT THE EARTH MOUND USED TO ENCASE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT THE EARTH MOUND USED TO ENCASE THE INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL TANKS AND PROTECT EQUIPMENT. NOTE THE TEST STAND IN THE BACKGROUND RIGHT. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  5. 32. Overall view taken from top of water storage mound ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Overall view taken from top of water storage mound showing building 154, missile assembly building in center, and building 161, fallout shelter in lower right corner, looking west - Nike Missile Battery MS-40, County Road No. 260, Farmington, Dakota County, MN

  6. 28. Overall view taken from top of water storage mound ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Overall view taken from top of water storage mound showing building 154, missile assembly building on right, Minnesota Department of Transportation communication tower in center, and Minnesota Bureau of Mines wind tunnel on left, looking southwest toward launch pad area - Nike Missile Battery MS-40, County Road No. 260, Farmington, Dakota County, MN

  7. Test fire environmental testing operations at Mound Applied Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    1992-03-01

    This paper describes Mound Laboratory`s environmental testing operations. The function of environmental testing is to perform quality environmental (thermal, mechanical, spin, resistance, visual) testing/conditioning of inert/explosive products to assure their compliance with specified customer acceptance criteria. Capabilities, organization, equipment specifications, and test facilities are summarized.

  8. 29. Overall view taken from top of water storage mound ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Overall view taken from top of water storage mound showing building 104, mess hall in lower left, building 101, administration, recreation, and storage building in center, and building 103, non-commissioned officers quarters and enlisted men barracks on far right, looking northeast - Nike Missile Battery MS-40, County Road No. 260, Farmington, Dakota County, MN

  9. Coastal defence through low crested breakwater structures: jumping out of the frying pan into the fire?

    PubMed

    Munari, Cristina; Corbau, Corinne; Simeoni, Umberto; Mistri, Michele

    2011-08-01

    The Adriatic coast of Punta Marina (Ravenna) is protected by 3-km long low crested breakwater structures (LCSs). Through a 3-years long multidisciplinar study, we assessed the impact of such defensive structures on environmental and biological condition. LCSs create pools where conditions are very different from the surrounding nearshore system. Mechanical disturbance by currents and waves varied greatly in intensity and frequency between seaward and landward sides of the structures. Sedimentary budget was positive at the landward side, but it was due to a gain on the seafloor and not on the emerged beach. The budget at seaward was negative. LCSs determine differences in benthic assemblages, alter the seasonal pattern of communities, and modify seasonal fluctuations of animal assemblages. Landward sheltered areas can be seen as "lagoonal island" surrounded by a "sea of marine habitat". Differences in ecological quality status, obtained through M-AMBI, are due to the sum of these factors. PMID:21722927

  10. Backwash process of marine macroplastics from a beach by nearshore currents around a submerged breakwater.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Tomoya; Hinata, Hirofumi; Kato, Shigeru

    2015-12-30

    A key factor for determining the residence time of macroplastics on a beach is the process by which the plastics are backwashed offshore (backwash process). Here, we deduced the backwash process of plastic fishing floats on Wadahama Beach based on the analysis of two-year mark-recapture experiments as well as nearshore current structures revealed by sequential images taken by za webcam installed at the edge of a cliff behind the beach. The analysis results revealed the occurrence of a combination of offshore currents and convergence of alongshore currents in the surf zone in storm events around a submerged breakwater off the northern part of the beach, where 48% of the backwashed floats were last found. We conclude that the majority of the floats on the beach were transported alongshore and tended to concentrate in the convergence zone, from where they were backwashed offshore by the nearshore currents generated in the events. PMID:26561445

  11. Exploring the city of Rubble: botanical fieldwork in bombed cities in Germany after World War II.

    PubMed

    Lachmund, Jens

    2003-01-01

    In recent decades, the flora and fuana of cities have become the objects of the inter-disciplinary research field of urban ecology and related policies of urban nature conservation. Although the term "urban ecology" is quite recent, it is argued in this paper that the formation of urban nature as an object of ecological knowledge has a much longer history. For example, in Germany, after World War II, the large rubble areas that existed in all bombed cities soon became important research fields for botanists studying plant migration and vegetation development in the context of the city. This paper uses the case of these botanical research activities to shed light on the historical origins of ecological thinking about nature in the city. Drawing upon a socio-spatial approach to science and practice, the paper explores the interaction between the social and material order of the city and the formation of ecological knowledge. As will be shown, botanists studying the rubble areas created various representations (e.g., lists, statistical tabulations, maps) of urban space that contributed to the transformation of the cultural and political meaning of urban wastelands. At the same time, it will be argued, urban wastelands were practically appropriated as scientific workplaces in which these representations were locally crafted. What later became the science and politics of urban ecology is to a large extent the outcome of this mutual shaping of knowledge and urban space in the post-Second World War period. PMID:12966933

  12. A large submarine sand-rubble flow on kilauea volcano, hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fornari, D.J.; Moore, J.G.; Calk, L.

    1979-01-01

    Papa'u seamount on the south submarine slope of Kilauea volcano is a large landslide about 19 km long, 6 km wide, and up to 1 km thick with a volume of about 39 km3. Dredge hauls, remote camera photographs, and submersible observations indicate that it is composed primarily of unconsolidated angular glassy basalt sand with scattered basalt blocks up to 1 m in size; no lava flows were seen. Sulfur contents of basalt glass from several places on the sand-rubble flow and nearby areas are low (< 240 ppm), indicating that the clastic basaltic material was all erupted on land. The Papa'u sandrubble flow was emplaced during a single flow event fed from a large near-shore bank of clastic basaltic material which in turn was formed as lava flows from the summit area of Kilauea volcano disintegrated when they entered the sea. The current eruptive output of the volcano suggests that the material in the submarine sand-rubble flow represents about 6000 years of accumulation, and that the flow event occurred several thousand years ago. ?? 1979.

  13. How cold-water coral mounds modify their physical environment and therefore influence reef development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mienis, F.; Duineveld, G.; Lavaleye, M.; van Haren, H.; Mohn, C.; Cyr, F.

    2015-12-01

    Cold-water coral framework acts as a sediment trap and as a result kilometres long and up to 360m high mound structures have formed on the SE Rockall Bank. Earlier observations showed that most of the mounds have their summits around 550 m water depth and summits have been reported as being covered with living coral. Pelagia cruises in 2012 and 2013 revealed completely new insights in mound development. Video transects across mounds with different morphology showed that summits of the highest and largest mounds are presently not covered by living coral as opposed to smaller and lower mounds which are covered with a thriving living coral framework. Measurements in the water column with CTD and near-bottom with benthic landers and thermistor string showed that turbulence is likely the most important factor influencing nutrient and food supply and thus coral growth. It seems that the large mounds have outgrown themselves and that their relatively large size and flat summits are limiting turbulence, thereby limiting oxygen, nutrient and food replenishment. Redistribution of nutrients, oxygen and food is vital for ecosystem functioning and reef development. The presence of a healthy coral cover on the summits of the small mounds was also shown by the vertical mound growth rate measured in sediment cores. These showed fourfold higher sedimentation rates during the Holocene on small mounds compared to highest mounds.

  14. Diversity of fungi from the mound nests of Formica ulkei and adjacent non-nest soils.

    PubMed

    Duff, Lyndon B; Urichuk, Theresa M; Hodgins, Lisa N; Young, Jocelyn R; Untereiner, Wendy A

    2016-07-01

    Culture-based methods were employed to recover 3929 isolates of fungi from soils collected in May and July 2014 from mound nests of Formica ulkei and adjacent non-nest sites. The abundance, diversity, and richness of species from nest mounds exceeded those of non-mound soils, particularly in July. Communities of fungi from mounds were more similar to those from mounds than non-mounds; this was also the case for non-mound soils with the exception of one non-mound site in July. Species of Aspergillus, Paecilomyces, and Penicillium were dominant in nest soils and represented up to 81.8% of the taxa recovered. Members of the genus Aspergillus accounted for the majority of Trichocomaceae from nests and were represented almost exclusively by Aspergillus navahoensis and Aspergillus pseudodeflectus. Dominant fungi from non-mound sites included Cladosporium cladosporioides, Geomyces pannorum, and species of Acremonium, Fusarium, Penicillium, and Phoma. Although mound nests were warmer than adjacent soils, the dominance of xerotolerant Aspergillus in soils from mounds and the isolation of the majority of Trichocomaceae at 25 and 35 °C suggests that both temperature and water availability may be determinants of fungal community structure in nests of F. ulkei. PMID:27192606

  15. Growth and form of the mound in Gale Crater, Mars: Slope wind enhanced erosion and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kite, Edwin S.; Lewis, Kevin W.; Lamb, Michael P.; Newman, Claire E.; Richardson, Mark I.

    2013-05-01

    Ancient sediments provide archives of climate and habitability on Mars. Gale Crater, the landing site for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), hosts a 5-km-high sedimentary mound (Mount Sharp/Aeolis Mons). Hypotheses for mound formation include evaporitic, lacustrine, fluviodeltaic, and aeolian processes, but the origin and original extent of Gale’s mound is unknown. Here we show new measurements of sedimentary strata within the mound that indicate ˜3° outward dips oriented radially away from the mound center, inconsistent with the first three hypotheses. Moreover, although mounds are widely considered to be erosional remnants of a once crater-filling unit, we find that the Gale mound’s current form is close to its maximal extent. Instead we propose that the mound’s structure, stratigraphy, and current shape can be explained by growth in place near the center of the crater mediated by wind-topography feedbacks. Our model shows how sediment can initially accrete near the crater center far from crater-wall katabatic winds, until the increasing relief of the resulting mound generates mound-flank slope winds strong enough to erode the mound. The slope wind enhanced erosion and transport (SWEET) hypothesis indicates mound formation dominantly by aeolian deposition with limited organic carbon preservation potential, and a relatively limited role for lacustrine and fluvial activity. Morphodynamic feedbacks between wind and topography are widely applicable to a range of sedimentary and ice mounds across the Martian surface, and possibly other planets.

  16. Are termite mounds biofilters for methane? - Challenges and new approaches to quantify methane oxidation in termite mounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauer, Philipp A.; Hutley, Lindsay B.; Bristow, Mila; Arndt, Stefan K.

    2015-04-01

    Methane emissions from termites contribute around 3% to global methane in the atmosphere, although the total source estimate for termites is the most uncertain among all sources. In tropical regions, the relative source contribution of termites can be far higher due to the high biomass and relative importance of termites in plant decomposition. Past research focused on net emission measurements and their variability, but little is known about underlying processes governing these emissions. In particular, microbial oxidation of methane (MOX) within termite mounds has rarely been investigated. In well-studied ecosystems featuring an oxic matrix above an anoxic methane-producing habitat (e.g. landfills or sediments), the fraction of oxidized methane (fox) can reach up to 90% of gross production. However, conventional mass-balance approaches to apportion production and consumption processes can be challenging to apply in the complex-structured and almost inaccessible environment of a termite mound. In effect, all field-based data on termite-mound MOX is based on one study that measured isotopic shifts in produced and emitted methane. In this study a closed-system isotope fractionation model was applied and estimated fox ranged from 10% to almost 100%. However, it is shown here that by applying an open-system isotope-pool model, the measured isotopic shifts can also be explained by physical transport of methane alone. Different field-based methods to quantify MOX in termite mounds are proposed which do not rely on assumptions of physical gas transport. A simple approach is the use of specific inhibitors for MOX, e.g. difluoromethane (CH2F2), combined with chamber-based flux measurements before and after their application. Data is presented on the suitability of different inhibitors and first results of their application in the field. Alternatively, gas-tracer methods allow the quantification of methane oxidation and reaction kinetics without knowledge of physical gas

  17. Spatial variability in community composition on a granite breakwater versus natural rocky shores: lack of microhabitats suppresses intertidal biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Moisés A; Broitman, Bernardo R; Thiel, Martin

    2014-10-15

    Strong differences have been observed between the assemblages on artificial reefs and on natural hard-bottom habitats worldwide, but little is known about the mechanisms that cause contrasting biodiversity patterns. We examined the influence of spatial attributes in relation to both biogenic and topographic microhabitats, in the distribution and composition of intertidal species on both artificial and natural reefs. We found higher small-scale spatial heterogeneity on the natural reef compared with the study breakwater. Species richness and diversity were associated with a higher availability of crevices, rock pools and mussels in natural habitats. Spatial distribution of certain grazers corresponded well with the spatial structure of microhabitats. In contrast, the lack of microhabitats on the breakwater resulted in the absence of several grazers reflected in lower species richness. Biogenic and topographic microhabitats can have interactive effects providing niche opportunities for multiple species, explaining differences in species diversity between artificial versus natural reefs. PMID:25103901

  18. Effects of unsaturated zone on ground-water mounding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sumner, D.M.; Rolston, D.E.; Marino, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    The design of infiltration basins used to dispose of treated wastewater or for aquifer recharge often requires estimation of ground-water mounding beneath the basin. However, the effect that the unsaturated zone has on water-table response to basin infiltration often has been overlooked in this estimation. A comparison was made between two methods used to estimate ground-water mounding-an analytical approach that is limited to the saturated zone and a numerical approach that incorporates both the saturated and the unsaturated zones. Results indicate that the error that is introduced by a method that ignores the effects of the unsaturated zone on ground-water mounding increases as the basin-loading period is shortened; as the depth to the water table increases, with increasing subsurface anisotropy; and with the inclusion of fine-textured strata. Additionally, such a method cannot accommodate the dynamic nature of basin infiltration, the finite transmission time of the infiltration front to the water table, or the interception of the basin floor by the capillary fringe.The design of infiltration basins used to dispose of treated wastewater or for aquifer recharge often requires estimation of ground-water mounding beneath the basin. However, the effect that the unsaturated zone has on water-table response to basin infiltration often has been overlooked in this estimation. A comparison was made between two methods used to estimate ground-water mounding - an analytical approach that is limited to the saturated zone and a numerical approach that incorporates both the saturated and the unsaturated zones. Results indicate that the error that is introduced by a method that ignores the effects of the unsaturated zone on ground-water mounding increases as the basin-loading period is shortened; as the depth to the water table increases, with increasing subsurface anisotropy; and with the inclusion of fine-textured strata. Additionally, such a method cannot accommodate the

  19. A non-intrusive and continuous-in-space technique to investigate the wave transformation and breaking over a breakwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Simone; Grazia Badas, Maria; Querzoli, Giorgio

    2016-03-01

    To design longshore breakwaters, the evaluation of the wave motion transformations over the structures and of the energy they are able to absorb, dissipate and reflect is necessary. To characterize features and transformations of monochromatic wave trains above a breakwater, both submerged and emerged, we have designed and developed a non-intrusive and continuous-in-space technique, based on Image Analysis, and carried out an experimental campaign, in a laboratory flume equipped with a wave-maker, in order to test it. The investigation area was lighted with a light sheet and images were recorded by a video-camera. The working fluid was seeded with non buoyant particles to make it bright and clearly distinct from dark background and breakwater. The technique, that is based on a robust algorithm to identify the free surface, has showed to properly work also in prohibitive situations for traditional resistive probes (e.g., very shallow waters and/or breaking waves) and to be able to measure the free surface all over the investigation field in a non-intrusive way. Two kind of analysis were mainly performed, a statistical and a spectral one. The peculiarities of the measurement technique allowed to describe the whole wave transformation and to supply useful information for design purposes.

  20. Spectral response of the coral rubble, living corals, and dead corals: study case on the Spermonde Archipelago, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurdin, Nurjannah; Komatsu, Teruhisa; Yamano, Hiroya; Arafat, Gulam; Rani, Chair; Akbar AS, M.

    2012-10-01

    Coral reefs play important ecological services such as providing foods, biodiversity, nutrient recycling etc. for human society. On the other hand, they are threatened by human impacts such as illegal fishing and environmental changes such as rises of sea water temperature and sea level due to global warming. Thus, it is very important to monitor dynamic spatial distributions of coral reefs and related habitats such as coral rubble, dead coral, bleached corals, seagrass, etc. Hyperspectral data, in particular, offer high potential for characterizing and mapping coral reefs because of their capability to identify individual reef components based on their detailed spectral response. We studied the optical properties by measuring in situ spectra of living corals, dead coral and coral rubble covered with algae. Study site was selected in Spermonde archipelago, South Sulawesi, Indonesia because this area is included in the highest diversity of corals in the world named as Coral Triangle, which is recognized as the global centre of marine biodiversity and a global priority for conservation. Correlation analysis and cluster analysis support that there are distinct differences in reflectance spectra among categories. Common spectral characteristic of living corals, dead corals and coral rubble covered with algae was a reflectance minimum at 674 nm. Healthy corals, dead coral covered with algae and coral rubble covered with algae showed high similarity of spectral reflectance. It is estimated that this is due to photsynthetic pigments.

  1. Cohesive forces prevent the rotational breakup of rubble-pile asteroid (29075) 1950 DA.

    PubMed

    Rozitis, Ben; MacLennan, Eric; Emery, Joshua P

    2014-08-14

    Space missions and ground-based observations have shown that some asteroids are loose collections of rubble rather than solid bodies. The physical behaviour of such 'rubble-pile' asteroids has been traditionally described using only gravitational and frictional forces within a granular material. Cohesive forces in the form of small van der Waals forces between constituent grains have recently been predicted to be important for small rubble piles (ten kilometres across or less), and could potentially explain fast rotation rates in the small-asteroid population. The strongest evidence so far has come from an analysis of the rotational breakup of the main-belt comet P/2013 R3 (ref. 7), although that was indirect and poorly constrained by observations. Here we report that the kilometre-sized asteroid (29075) 1950 DA (ref. 8) is a rubble pile that is rotating faster than is allowed by gravity and friction. We find that cohesive forces are required to prevent surface mass shedding and structural failure, and that the strengths of the forces are comparable to, though somewhat less than, the forces found between the grains of lunar regolith. PMID:25119234

  2. Reef mounds indicate timing of hydrocarbon charge off Seychelles

    SciTech Connect

    Plummer, P.

    1998-07-06

    Carbonate mounds developed on Coetivy Bank and the northern Seychelles Plateau appear to have formed in response to pulses of hydrocarbon fluid migration along underlying faults during the late Paleocene and late Eocene. Gas chimneys emanating from these mounds are evident on seismic data, while gas sniffer and/or UV fluorescence anomalies have been recorded in the overlying waters. Such a combination of hydrocarbon anomalies is indicative of minor active gas seepage and confirms the prospectivity of these features and their underlying sequences. Recently it has also been realized that both authigenic and biogenic carbonates proliferate above faults from which hydrocarbon seepage occurs, forming chemosynthetic reefs. When identified on seismic data, such reef/fault associations constitute seismic hydrocarbon indicators (SHIs), and the reefs/faults off Seychelles have been interpreted as SHIs. This paper discusses the geology, source rocks, thermal history, and chemosynthetic reefs.

  3. A Reevaluation of the DeKalb Mounds of Northern Illinois

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konen, M.; Curry, B.

    2007-12-01

    We re-examined the classic DeKalb Mounds of Northern Illinois in order to better understand their genesis, morphology, spatial distribution, and usefulness in reconstructing deglacial and postglacial environments. Flemal et al. (1973) interpreted the mounds to be relict pingos resulting from an intense periglacial environment during the late Wisconsin. Thousands of mounds occur in the study area. The mounds range in size from 20 m to more than 5 km in diameter and typically rise 1 to 8 m above the surrounding loess mantled till surface. These low relief mounds are composed of either a raised border surrounding a low center ("donuts") or are flat-topped ("pancakes"). Modern soil properties are strongly related to mound position and subtle sedimentologic and topographic changes. In some locations multiple mounds appear to be superimposed on one another. The typical mound stratigraphy includes subglacial diamicton at the base, less than 1 m of glaciofluvial sands and gravels or debris flow diamicton, 1 to 6 m of fossiliferous, rhythmically bedded lake sediment, 0.3 to 3 m of glaciofluvial sands and gravels or debris flow diamicton, all capped by approximately 1.2 m of loess. The lake sediment is rich in ostracodes and tundra plant remains. Smaller mounds are typically symmetrical while the larger mounds are more elliptical in shape with a long axis trending northeast to southwest. Many of the larger mounds appear to be aggregates of smaller lakes that coalesced as glacial ice stagnated. Our reinterpretation of the mounds is that there genesis is related to deglaciation and ice-stagnation and not to post glacial permafrost processes. We interpret all of the DeKalb Mounds to be ice-walled lakes and not pingos.

  4. Seismic characterization of mound reservoirs using iterative modeling procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Rafison, B.J.; Stuart, C.J.

    1989-04-01

    A seismic stratigraphic analysis based on seismic attribute and stratigraphic modeling techniques was done on Paleocene submarine fan mounds in two North Sea blocks. The principal objective of these studies was to develop new interpretation concepts for resolving and mapping sandstone buildups and channel fills. Improved resolution and interpretation of these features should contribute to development of Paleocene exploration plays and reservoir characterization in these blocks.

  5. Non-dune eolian sand in Indian mounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, William F.

    1980-02-01

    Indian mounds, near Careyville, Florida, about 2.0 m high, are located on hillsides and hilltops 10 to 20 m above the floodplain of the nearest river (Choctawhatchee). Each mound is composed largely of quartz sand, with a scattering of artefacts and stream pebbles (not in layers), but with no visible bedding. Probability plots showed 25 Gaussian distributions, 18 having the 'dune hump', three having the 'surf break' and nine being doubly-truncated or having other patterns of unknown or uncertain origin. The surf breaks probably were inherited from pre-Pleistocene marine terraces in the area. The pebbles and the sand were not introduced by the same agency. The sand probability plots, taken as a set, indicate an eolian origin. The rough symmetry of the mounds, and the lack of cross-bedding, argue against a migrating dune origin. On a variability plot (showing the variability of the means versus the variability of the standard deviations), one suite of samples fell clearly within the 'dune' number field, a second suite in the overlap area between 'dune' and 'beach', and a third suite, taken immediately adjacent to a creek bed, plotted in the overlap area between 'beach' and 'coastal plain stream'. The pebbles, of common Southern Appalachian types, are attributed to the activities of the inhabitants, perhaps children. The sand is thought to have been carried by the wind, perhaps from nearby river sand bars, or from areas burned either by lightning-set wildfires or as part of "slash-and-burn" agriculture. The mounds are thought to represent clearings (for huts), and hence good trapping devices for wind-borne sand.

  6. Are reefs and mud mounds really so different?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Rachel

    2001-12-01

    Although both 'ecologic reefs' and mud mounds are demonstrably rigid, framework reefs, they are still considered to be distinct in terms of their dominant processes of formation and preferred environmental settings. This distinction has rested largely upon the assumption that ecologic reefs are dominated by skeletal metazoans growing in shallow waters, in contrast to the complex autochthonous micrite-supported cavity systems that characterise deep-water mud mounds, now considered to represent either organomineralic deposits (where carbonate precipitation has taken place in association with nonliving organic substrates to form 'automicrite') or various types of microbialite (where carbonate forms as a direct result of the physiological activity or decay of benthic microorganisms). Yet, such autochthonous micrite is increasingly recognised as an important component of many ancient shallow ecologic reefs as well as some modern coral reefs, and indeed may contribute locally up to 80% of the reef rock. These observations raise doubts as to the validity of current fabric-based definitions used to distinguish between mud mounds and ecologic reefs. Whether the autochthonous micrite in mud mounds proves to be dominated by either automicrite or microbialite, both require particular environmental conditions for their formation. Automicrites form where surplus organic matter from metazoans has degraded to release quantities of acidic amino acids with a significant ability to bind Ca 2+ , and microbialite formation also often requires either unusual marine chemistries or ecological conditions. Such conditions might include changes in terrigenous influx, ground water seepage, local anoxia, and increases in the pH of interstitial reef waters or in nutrient concentration.

  7. EG&G Mound Applied Technologies payroll system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-07

    EG&G Mound Applied Technologies, Inc., manages and operates the Mound Facility, Miamisburg, Ohio, under a cost-plus-award-fee contract administered by the Department of Energy`s Albuquerque Field Office. The contractor`s Payroll Department is responsible for prompt payment in the proper amount to all persons entitled to be paid, in compliance with applicable laws, regulations, and legal decisions. The objective was to determine whether controls were in place to avoid erroneous payroll payments. EG&G Mound Applied Technologies, Inc., did not have all the internal controls required by General Accounting Office Title 6, ``Pay, Leave, and Allowances.`` Specifically, they did not have computerized edits, separation of duties and responsibilities, and restricted access to payroll data files. This condition occurred because its managers were not aware of Title 6 requirements. As a result, the contractor could not assure the Department of Energy that payroll costs were processes accurately; and fraud, waste, or abuse of Department of Energy funds could go undetected. Our sample of 212 payroll transactions from a population of 66,000 in FY 1991 disclosed only two minor processing errors and no instances of fraud, waste or abuse.

  8. Incineration of LWR-type waste at Mound Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, B.M.; Grimm, R.S.; Doty, J.W. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The Mound Cyclone Incinerator, demonstrated over several years for the combustion of radwaste containing plutonium, is now being developed for volume reduction of radwaste containing mixed beta- and gamma-emitters, from LWR facilities. To this end, a laboratory-scale feasibility study was developed and executed. Development of the feasibility study was based on known characteristics of LWR waste and on operating data compiled for the Mound Cyclone Incinerator since 1975. Feed spiked with several isotopes found in LWR waste was burned in the laboratory-scale cyclone incinerator, and samples were collected and analyzed. From these data, the applicability of cyclone incineration was demonstrated, and an efficient scrub liquor composition was chosen for the offgas treatment system. A Health Physics survey of the incinerator system after incineration of 220 ..mu..Ci of beta/gamma activity showed no exposure readings above background level. Future work planned includes incineration of simulated LWR waste in the full-scale Mound Cyclone Incinerator to begin later this year.

  9. Cold Water Coral Mounds and Early Holocene Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Readman, P. W.; O'Reilly, B. M.; Shannon, P. M.

    2003-12-01

    Cold-water coral mounds occur in discrete clustered populations over a broad region from the glaciated Norwegian continental margins to the non-glaciated margins of Iberia and northwest Africa. They are potentially sensitive indicators of change in oceanic circulation, coupled to past climate change. Here we report on an interesting correlation between the Holocene growth of a mound population west of Ireland and early Holocene palaeoclimatic variations in the North Atlantic region, notably the well documented 8.2 kyr cold event. An accurate age structure for the mound population is calculated using recent growth rate estimates for the main coral framework constructor L. pertusa and a previously formulated population growth model. The calculated curve for the Holocene period fits the observed population data well, except for a pronounced and significant deflection in the data trend beginning at about 8500 calendar years (cal. yr) ago in the early Holocene. This date corresponds to the time (~8470 cal. yr) that the glacial lakes Agassiz and Ojibway, which were once dammed by a remnant of the Laurentide ice sheet, drained catastrophically into the Labrador sea releasing >1014 m3 of fresh water. The 8.2 kyr event had as much a global effect on the large-scale structure of deep-water aphotic ecosystems as it did on continental shelf and terrestrial ecosystems.

  10. Characterization of the Burma Road Rubble Pit at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, K.G.; Frazier, W.L.; McAdams, T.D.; McFalls, S.L.; Rabin, M.; Voss, L. |

    1996-05-01

    The Burma Road Rubble Pit (BRRP) is located at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The BRRP unit consists of two unlined earthen pits dug into surficial soil and filled with various waste materials. It was used from 1973--1983 for the disposal of dry inert rubble such as metal, concrete, lumber, poles, light fixtures, and glass. No record of the disposal of hazardous substances at the BRRP has been found. In 1983, the BRRP was closed by covering it with soil. In September 1988, a Ground Penetrating Radar survey detected three disturbed areas of soil near the BRRP, and a detailed and combined RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation was conducted from November 1993 to February 1994 to determine whether hazardous substances were present in the subsurface, to evaluate the nature and extent of contamination, and to evaluate the risks posed to the SRS facility due to activities conducted at the BRRP site. Metals, semi-volatile organic compounds, volatile organic compounds, radionuclides and one pesticide (Aldrin) were detected in soil and groundwater samples collected from seventeen BRRP locations. A baseline risk assessment (BRA) was performed quantitatively to evaluate whether chemical and radionuclide concentrations detected in soil and groundwater at the BRRP posed an unacceptable threat to human health and the environment. The exposure scenarios identifiable for the BRRP were for environmental researchers, future residential and occupational land use. The total site noncancer hazard indices were below unity, and cancer risk levels were below 1.0E-06 for the existing and future case environmental researcher scenario. The future case residential and occupational scenarios showed total hazard and risk levels which exceeded US EPA criterion values relative to groundwater scenarios. For the most part, the total carcinogenic risks were within the 1.0E-04 to 1.0E-06 risk range. Only the future adult residential scenario was associated with risks exceeding 1.0E-04.

  11. Using Cold-water Coral Mini-mounds as Analogue for Giant Mound Growth: Assessment of Environmental Drivers and Anthropogenic Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collart, T.; Stewart, H. A.; Howell, K.; Bourillet, J. F.; Llave, E.; Blamart, D.; Mienis, F.; Van Rooij, D.

    2015-12-01

    Cold-water coral (CWC) reefs are formed by framework building scleratinians Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata that baffle sediment and over time, have the potential to develop into large coral mounds of up to 300m high (e.g. Belgica Mound Province). The detailed mechanisms of initiation and build-up of such large CWC mounds are however not yet fully understood. It is therefore essential to study smaller mounds (often termed "mini-mounds") that can be interpreted as earlier growth stages that haven't had the time to coalesce and develop into larger mounds. The FWO Minimound project (2013-2017) aims to investigate CWC mini-mounds within the Bay of Biscay (European Margin) in order to determine the impact of: (1) palaeoceanographic changes related to glacial-interglacial climate change in the last 15 ka, (2) hydrocarbon seepage processes and (3) anthropogenic fishing activities on CWC habitats. The project targets three minimound provinces: the Ferrol Canyon (Cantabrian Margin), the Guilvinec Canyon (Armorican Margin) and the Explorer and Dangeard Canyons (Celtic Margin). These mini-mounds are fossil and occur at relative shallow depths on the interface between the Eastern North Atlantic Central Water (ENACW) and the Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW). Contrastingly, most living CWC reefs in this region of the Atlantic, dwell in the deeper MOW depth range, relying on the density and dynamics of this water mass for their food supply. In order to investigate the initiation, growth and demise of CWC mini-mounds, 35m of USBL guided sediment cores were retrieved from the Explorer and Dangeard Interfluves. We present data of sedimentological, geochemical and palaeoceanographic analyses throughout the cores, coupled with high-resolution geophysical data. Preliminary results indicate that the mound base is associated with a strong shift in sedimentation regime potentially linked to climate driven palaeoceanographic changes of the MOW-ENACW interface.

  12. Small-Scale Gopher and Plant Activity Organizes a Simulated Landscape Into Mound-Pool Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, C. P.

    2011-12-01

    The Mima-mound-and-vernal-pool topography of California is rich in endemic species, but we do not know how this unusual environment is created or maintained. Fossorial rodents have been observed to move soil upwards at annual rates sufficient to maintain the mounds despite erosion, but there is no tested explanation of this behavior. We propose that the mounds are an emergent effect of small-scale (10 cm, 1 day) interactions between topography, hydrology, plant growth, and rodent burrowing. A cellular automata simulation of these both generates and maintains mound-pool topography with minimal dependence on initial conditions, and can also describe mound morphogenesis on slopes, where observed mound geometry is distinct from that on level ground.

  13. Variability of soil properties within large termite mounds in South Katanga, DRC - origins and applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erens, Hans; Bazirake Mujinya, Basile; Boeckx, Pascal; Baert, Geert; Mees, Florias; Van Ranst, Eric

    2014-05-01

    The miombo woodlands of South Katanga (D.R. Congo) are characterized by a high spatial density of large conic termite mounds built by Macrotermes falciger (3 to 5 ha-1). With an average height of 5.05 m and diameter of 14.88 m, these are some of the largest biogenic structures in the world. The mound material is known to differ considerably from the surrounding Ferralsols. Specifically, mound material exhibits a finer texture, higher CEC and exchangeable basic cation content, lower organic matter content, and an accumulation of phosphorous, nitrate and secondary carbonates. However, as demonstrated by the present study, these soil properties are far from uniform within the volume of the mound. The termites' nesting and foraging activity, combined with pedogenic processes over extended periods of time, generates a wide range of physical, chemical, and biological conditions in different parts of the mound. Analysis of samples taken along a cross-section of a large active mound allowed generating contour plots, thus visualizing the variability of soil properties within the mound. The central columns of three other mounds were sampled to confirm apparent trends. The contour plots show that the mounds comprise four functional zones: (i) the active nest, found at the top; (ii) an accumulation zone , in more central parts of the mound; (iii) a dense inactive zone, surrounding the accumulation zone and consisting of accumulated erosion products from former active nests; and (iv) the outer mantle, characterized by intense varied biological activity and by a well-developed soil structure. Intermittent leaching plays a key role in explaining these patterns. Using radiocarbon dating, we found that some of these mounds are at least 2000 years old. Their current size and shape is likely the result of successive stages of erosion and rebuilding, in the course of alternating periods of mound abandonment and recolonization. Over time, termite foraging combined with limited leaching

  14. Prediction of seaward slope recession in berm breakwaters using M5' machine learning approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Alireza Sadat; Shafieefar, Mehdi

    2016-03-01

    In the design process of berm breakwaters, their front slope recession has an inevitable rule in large number of model tests, and this parameter being studied. This research draws its data from Moghim's and Shekari's experiment results. These experiments consist of two different 2D model tests in two wave flumes, in which the berm recession to different sea state and structural parameters have been studied. Irregular waves with a JONSWAP spectrum were used in both test series. A total of 412 test results were used to cover the impact of sea state conditions such as wave height, wave period, storm duration and water depth at the toe of the structure, and structural parameters such as berm elevation from still water level, berm width and stone diameter on berm recession parameters. In this paper, a new set of equations for berm recession is derived using the M5' model tree as a machine learning approach. A comparison is made between the estimations by the new formula and the formulae recently given by other researchers to show the preference of new M5' approach.

  15. Thermal Analysis of the Mound One Kilowatt Package

    SciTech Connect

    Or, Chuen T.

    1993-01-01

    The Mound One Kilowatt (1 KW) package was designed for the shipment of plutonium (Pu-238) with not more than 1 kW total heat dissipation. To comply with regulations, the Mound 1 kW package has to pass all the requirements under Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT; 38 degrees C ambient temperature) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC; package engulfed in fire for 30 minutes). Analytical and test results were presented in the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) for the Mound 1 kW package, revision 1, April 1991. Some issues remained unresolved in that revision. In March 1992, Fairchild Space and Defense Corporation was commissioned by the Department of Energy to perform the thermal analyses. 3-D thermal models were created to perform the NCT and HAC analyses. Four shipping configurations in the SARP revision 3 were analyzed. They were: (1) The GPHS graphite impact shell (GIS) in the threaded product can (1000 W total heat generation); (2) The fueled clads in the welded product can (1000 W total heat generation); (3) The General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module (750 W total heat generation); and (4) The Multi-Hundred Watt (MHW) spheres (810 W total heat generation). Results from the four cases show that the GIS or fuel clad in the product can is the worse case. The temperatures predicted under NCT and HAC in all four cases are within the design limits. The use of helium instead of argon as cover gas provides a bigger safety margin. There is a duplicate copy.

  16. Morphology and spatial patterns of Macrotermes mounds in the SE Katanga, D.R. Congo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazirake Mujinya, Basile; Mees, Florias; Erens, Hans; Baert, Geert; Van Ranst, Eric

    2015-04-01

    The spatial distribution patterns and morphological characteristics of Macrotermes falciger mounds were investigated in the Lubumbashi area, D.R. Congo. Examination of the spatial patterns of M. falciger mounds on high resolution satellite images reveals a mean areal number density of 2.9 ± 0.4 mounds ha-1. The high relative number of inactive mounds in the region, along with their regular distribution pattern, suggests that current termite mound occurrences are largely palaeostructures. Mound positions in the habitat are consistent with intraspecific competition rather than soil and substrate characteristics as controlling factor. Detailed morphological description of five deep termite-mound profiles (~7 m height/depth) shows that carbonate pedofeatures are present in all studied profiles, in contrast to the control soils. They mainly occur in the form of soft powdery masses, nodules and coatings on ped faces, all clearly pedogenic. Carbonate coatings occur mainly between 1 m above the soil surface and 1 m below that level in all mound profiles. Carbonate nodules do show a different distribution pattern at each site. Furthermore, when the studied profiles are considered to represent a toposequence, the stone layer occurs at greater depth in topographically low areas compared to crest and slope positions, which is mainly conditioned by erosion. The clay content of epigeal mounds increases from the summit to the toe slope, which can be largely related to differences in parent material. The Mn-Fe oxide concentrations occurring in all studied termite mound profiles reflect a seasonally high perched water table beneath the mound, which is more pronounced at the lower slope positions.

  17. Characteristics and origin of Earth-mounds on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Tullis, J.A.

    1995-09-01

    Earth-mounds are common features on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. The mounds are typically round or oval in plan view, <0.5 m in height, and from 8 to 14 m in diameter. They are found on flat and sloped surfaces, and appear less frequently in lowland areas. The mounds have formed on deposits of multiple sedimentary environments. Those studied included alluvial gravel terraces along the Big Lost River (late Pleistocene/early Holocene age), alluvial fan segments on the flanks of the Lost River Range (Bull Lake and Pinedale age equivalents), and loess/slopewash sediments overlying basalt flows. Backhoe trenches were dug to allow characterization of stratigraphy and soil development. Each mound has features unique to the depositional and pedogenic history of the site; however, there are common elements to all mounds that are linked to the history of mound formation. Each mound has a {open_quotes}floor{close_quotes} of a sediment or basement rock of significantly different hydraulic conductivity than the overlying sediment. These paleosurfaces are overlain by finer-grained sediments, typically loess or flood-overbank deposits. Mounds formed in environments where a sufficient thickness of fine-grained sediment held pore water in a system open to the migration to a freezing front. Heaving of the sediment occurred by the growth of ice lenses. Mound formation occurred at the end of the Late Pleistocene or early in the Holocene, and was followed by pedogenesis. Soils in the mounds were subsequently altered by bioturbation, buried by eolian deposition, and eroded by slopewash runoff. These secondary processes played a significant role in maintaining or increasing the mound/intermound relief.

  18. Plant Mounds as Concentration and Stabilization Agents for Actinide Soil Contaminants in Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    D.S. Shafer; J. Gommes

    2009-02-03

    Plant mounds or blow-sand mounds are accumulations of soil particles and plant debris around the base of shrubs and are common features in deserts in the southwestern United States. An important factor in their formation is that shrubs create surface roughness that causes wind-suspended particles to be deposited and resist further suspension. Shrub mounds occur in some plant communities on the Nevada Test Site, the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), and Tonopah Test Range (TTR), including areas of surface soil contamination from past nuclear testing. In the 1970s as part of early studies to understand properties of actinides in the environment, the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) examined the accumulation of isotopes of Pu, 241Am, and U in plant mounds at safety experiment and storage-transportation test sites of nuclear devices. Although aerial concentrations of these contaminants were highest in the intershrub or desert pavement areas, the concentration in mounds were higher than in equal volumes of intershrub or desert pavement soil. The NAEG studies found the ratio of contaminant concentration of actinides in soil to be greater (1.6 to 2.0) in shrub mounds than in the surrounding areas of desert pavement. At Project 57 on the NTTR, 17 percent of the area was covered in mounds while at Clean Slate III on the TTR, 32 percent of the area was covered in mounds. If equivalent volumes of contaminated soil were compared between mounds and desert pavement areas at these sites, then the former might contain as much as 34 and 62 percent of the contaminant inventory, respectively. Not accounting for radionuclides associated with shrub mounds would cause the inventory of contaminants and potential exposure to be underestimated. In addition, preservation of shrub mounds could be important part of long-term stewardship if these sites are closed by fencing and posting with administrative controls.

  19. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit (631-16G) - March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.

    1996-03-01

    Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit is located on the west side of SRS. In the early to mid 1980`s, while work was being performed in this area, nine empty, partially buried drums, labeled `du Pont Freon 11`, were found. As a result, Gunsite 720 became one of the original waste units specified in the SRS RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA). The drums were excavated on July 30, 1987 and placed on a pallet at the unit. Both the drums and pallet were removed and disposed of in October 1989. The area around the drums was screened during the excavation and the liquid (rainwater) that collected in the excavated drums was sampled prior to disposal. No evidence of hazardous materials was found. Based on the review of the analytical data and screening techniques used to evaluate all the chemicals of potential concern at Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit, it is recommended that no further remedial action be performed at this unit.

  20. Estimating the angle of friction of blocks on rubble-pile asteroid Itokawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, T.; Nakamura, A.; Hirata, N.

    2014-07-01

    The angle of internal friction and cohesion are measures of the mobility or strength of granular material and are key parameters that control granular processes such as landslides. The shape and spin of a rubble pile or self-gravitating body are dependent on these parameters [1]. These are also thought to be responsible for the crater-formation process [2]. Therefore, it is important to be able to estimate these parameters to better understand how granular processes work on rubble- pile bodies and regolith surfaces. This paper presents an estimate of the angle of internal friction of blocks on the surface of the near-Earth asteroid Itokawa [3]. Our analysis is based on a study of terrestrial granular particles that showed a linear relationship between the angle of friction and the circularity of the two-dimensional projected image of the particles [4]. The circularity is defined as 4πA / L^2, where A and L denote the projected area and the circumference, respectively. The circularity of the contour of the Itokawa block was measured using Image-J [5]. Similar image analyses were conducted for a range of granular materials in the laboratory. The figure shows that the circularity of the Itokawa blocks is similar to that of collisional fragments [6] and silica sand particles. We measured the angle of internal friction for some of the granular materials used in the shape analyses in a direct shear test and obtained a linear relationship between the circularity and angle of internal friction. Using this empirical relationship and the measured circularity of the Itokawa blocks, we estimated that the angle of internal friction of the Itokawa blocks is about 40 degrees. This is consistent with the slope distribution of the Itokawa surface: most of the surface of Itokawa is inclined within 40 degrees [3]. We use the resulting angle of internal friction to discuss the stability of a large boulder, called Pencil. Pencil has a distinct positive relief, as if part of the

  1. A 2 km-size asteroid challenging the rubble-pile spin barrier - A case for cohesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polishook, D.; Moskovitz, N.; Binzel, R. P.; Burt, B.; DeMeo, F. E.; Hinkle, M. L.; Lockhart, M.; Mommert, M.; Person, M.; Thirouin, A.; Thomas, C. A.; Trilling, D.; Willman, M.; Aharonson, O.

    2016-03-01

    The rubble pile spin barrier is an upper limit on the rotation rate of asteroids larger than ∼200-300 m. Among thousands of asteroids with diameters larger than ∼300 m, only a handful of asteroids are known to rotate faster than 2.0 h, all are in the sub-km range (⩽0.6 km). Here we present photometric measurements suggesting that (60716) 2000 GD65, an S-complex, inner-main belt asteroid with a relatively large diameter of 2.3-0.7+0.6km , completes one rotation in 1.9529 ± 0.0002h . Its unique diameter and rotation period allow us to examine scenarios about asteroid internal structure and evolution: a rubble pile bound only by gravity; a rubble-pile with strong cohesion; a monolithic structure; an asteroid experiencing mass shedding; an asteroid experiencing YORP spin-up/down; and an asteroid with a unique octahedron shape results with a four-peak lightcurve and a 3.9 h period. We find that the most likely scenario includes a lunar-like cohesion that can prevent (60716) 2000 GD65 from disrupting without requiring a monolithic structure or a unique shape. Due to the uniqueness of (60716) 2000 GD65, we suggest that most asteroids typically have smaller cohesion than that of lunar regolith.

  2. The Rubble Rescue Radar (RRR): A low power hand-held microwave device for the detection of trapped human personnel

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, W.S.

    1997-04-10

    Each year, innocent human lives are lost in collapsed structures as a result of both natural and man-made disasters. We have developed a prototype device, called the Rubble Rescue Radar (RRR) as a aid to workers trying to locate trapped victims in urban search and rescue operations. The RRR is a motion sensor incorporating Micropower Impulse Radar and is capable of detecting human breathing motions through reinforced concrete. It is lightweight, and designed to be handled by a single operator for local searches in areas where trapped victims are expected. Tests of the first prototype device were conducted on site at LLNL using a mock rubble pile consisting of a reinforced concrete pipe with two concrete floor slabs placed against one side, and random concrete and asphalt debris piled against the other. This arrangement provides safe and easy access for instruments and/or human subjects. Breathing signals of a human subject were recorded with the RRR through one floor slab plus the wall of the pipe, two slabs plus the wall of the pipe, and the random rubble plus the wall of the pipe. Breathing and heart beat signals were also recorded of a seated human subject at a distance of 1 meter with no obstructions. Results and photographs of the experimental work are presented, and a design concept for the next generation device is described.

  3. IMPORTED FIRE ANT (HYMENOPTERA: FORMICIDAE) MOUND SHAPE CHARACTERISTICS ALONG A NORTH-SOUTH GRADIENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Imported fire ant mound shape characteristics (south facing slope angle and area, mound height, and basal elongation in the plane of the ground) were quantified in 2005 and 2006 at a number of locations from about 30° 25’ N (Long Beach, Mississippi, USA) to 35° 3’ N (Fayetteville, Tennessee, USA). ...

  4. An Exercise in Field Archaeology for the Gifted: Fake Mound, Genuine Scholarship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, John R.

    1992-01-01

    At an archaeology camp program for gifted youngsters, students ages 11-16 built a mound with 5 archaeological levels, for future exploration. The "fake" mound ensured that student interest would be maintained, that students would learn about special problems and situations, and that irreplaceable bits of prehistory would not risk being damaged.…

  5. Dupuit-Forchheimer theories for the shape of groundwater recharge mounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Richard R.

    1991-05-01

    The nonlinear Dupuit-Forchheimer theory and two linearized versions are considered as to their applicability for giving accurate results on recharge mound shapes beneath strip and square basins. Results on mound rises from the approximate theories are compared with those from the nonlinear theory to determine criteria for the use of the approximate theories.

  6. Controls on Pennsylvanian algal-mound distribution in mid-continent North America

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.C.; Mitchell, J.C.; Ravn, R.L.

    1985-02-01

    Middle (Desmoinesian) and Upper (Missourian) Pennsylvanian phylloid algal-mound distribution in Missouri, Kansas, and Oklahoma is largely controlled by subtle sea-floor topography. Topographic highs served as loci favoring initiation and continued growth of complexes. Topographic highs controlling mound distribution are the shelf-edge rise in northeastern Oklahoma, the Bourbon arch in southeastern Kansas and the Mine Creek prodeltaic shale buildup in west-central Missouri. Outcrop studies document controls on development of these mounds and reveal the potential for development of stacked mounds. This will help exploration for these features in the subsurface to the west. The shelf-edge rise and Mine Creek prodeltaic shale buildup control the location of the Oologah algal-mound complex and an isolated algal mound in the Pawnee Limestone, respectively. These apparently were positive features only during Middle Pennsylvanian time. In contrast, the Bourbon arch apparently was controlled by basement faulting and remained high for a more-extended period of time. Both Middle and Upper Pennsylvanian algal mounds coincide with the geographic position of the Bourbon arch and result in a stacked-mound complex. Evidence suggesting that the Bourbon arch was a positive feature are (1) thinning of clastics over the feature and (2) change from anoxic, black, fissile, and phosphatic basinal shales to oxygenated, diversely fossiliferous gray shales over the arch.

  7. Plants in Your Ants: Using Ant Mounds to Test Basic Ecological Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zettler, Jennifer A.; Collier, Alexander; Leidersdorf, Bil; Sanou, Missa Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Urban students often have limited access to field sites for ecological studies. Ubiquitous ants and their mounds can be used to study and test ecology-based questions. We describe how soil collected from ant mounds can be used to investigate how biotic factors (ants) can affect abiotic factors in the soil that can, in turn, influence plant growth.

  8. Rubble masonry response under cyclic actions: The experience of L'Aquila city (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonti, Roberta; Barthel, Rainer; Formisano, Antonio; Borri, Antonio; Candela, Michele

    2015-12-01

    Several methods of analysis are available in engineering practice to study old masonry constructions. Two commonly used approaches in the field of seismic engineering are global and local analyses. Despite several years of research in this field, the various methodologies suffer from a lack of comprehensive experimental validation. This is mainly due to the difficulty in simulating the many different kinds of masonry and, accordingly, the non-linear response under horizontal actions. This issue can be addressed by examining the local response of isolated panels under monotonic and/or alternate actions. Different testing methodologies are commonly used to identify the local response of old masonry. These range from simplified pull-out tests to sophisticated in-plane monotonic tests. However, there is a lack of both knowledge and critical comparison between experimental validations and numerical simulations. This is mainly due to the difficulties in implementing irregular settings within both simplified and advanced numerical analyses. Similarly, the simulation of degradation effects within laboratory tests is difficult with respect to old masonry in-situ boundary conditions. Numerical models, particularly on rubble masonry, are commonly simplified. They are mainly based on a kinematic chain of rigid blocks able to perform different "modes of damage" of structures subjected to horizontal actions. This paper presents an innovative methodology for testing; its aim is to identify a simplified model for out-of-plane response of rubbleworks with respect to the experimental evidence. The case study of L'Aquila district is discussed.

  9. Rubble masonry response under cyclic actions: The experience of L’Aquila city (Italy)

    SciTech Connect

    Fonti, Roberta Barthel, Rainer; Formisano, Antonio; Borri, Antonio; Candela, Michele

    2015-12-31

    Several methods of analysis are available in engineering practice to study old masonry constructions. Two commonly used approaches in the field of seismic engineering are global and local analyses. Despite several years of research in this field, the various methodologies suffer from a lack of comprehensive experimental validation. This is mainly due to the difficulty in simulating the many different kinds of masonry and, accordingly, the non-linear response under horizontal actions. This issue can be addressed by examining the local response of isolated panels under monotonic and/or alternate actions. Different testing methodologies are commonly used to identify the local response of old masonry. These range from simplified pull-out tests to sophisticated in-plane monotonic tests. However, there is a lack of both knowledge and critical comparison between experimental validations and numerical simulations. This is mainly due to the difficulties in implementing irregular settings within both simplified and advanced numerical analyses. Similarly, the simulation of degradation effects within laboratory tests is difficult with respect to old masonry in-situ boundary conditions. Numerical models, particularly on rubble masonry, are commonly simplified. They are mainly based on a kinematic chain of rigid blocks able to perform different “modes of damage” of structures subjected to horizontal actions. This paper presents an innovative methodology for testing; its aim is to identify a simplified model for out-of-plane response of rubbleworks with respect to the experimental evidence. The case study of L’Aquila district is discussed.

  10. Recycling of rubble from building demolition for low-shrinkage concretes.

    PubMed

    Corinaldesi, Valeria; Moriconi, Giacomo

    2010-04-01

    In this project concrete mixtures were prepared that were characterized by low ductility due to desiccation by using debris from building demolition, which after a suitable treatment was used as aggregate for partial replacement of natural aggregates. The recycled aggregate used came from a recycling plant, in which rubble from building demolition was selected, crushed, cleaned, sieved, and graded. Such aggregates are known to be more porous as indicated by the Saturated Surface Dry (SSD) moisture content. The recycled concrete used as aggregates were added to the concrete mixture in order to study their influence on the fresh and hardened concrete properties. They were added either after water pre-soaking or in dry condition, in order to evaluate the influence of moisture in aggregates on the performance of concrete containing recycled aggregate. In particular, the effect of internal curing, due to the use of such aggregates, was studied. Concrete behavior due to desiccation under dehydration was studied by means of both drying shrinkage test and German angle test, through which shrinkage under the restrained condition of early age concrete can be evaluated. PMID:20022737

  11. System for producing a uniform rubble bed for in situ processes

    DOEpatents

    Galloway, Terry R.

    1983-01-01

    A method and a cutter for producing a large cavity filled with a uniform bed of rubblized oil shale or other material, for in situ processing. A raise drill head (72) has a hollow body (76) with a generally circular base and sloping upper surface. A hollow shaft (74) extends from the hollow body (76). Cutter teeth (78) are mounted on the upper surface of the body (76) and relatively small holes (77) are formed in the body (76) between the cutter teeth (78). Relatively large peripheral flutes (80) around the body (76) allow material to drop below the drill head (72). A pilot hole is drilled into the oil shale deposit. The pilot hole is reamed into a large diameter hole by means of a large diameter raise drill head or cutter to produce a cavity filled with rubble. A flushing fluid, such as air, is circulated through the pilot hole during the reaming operation to remove fines through the raise drill, thereby removing sufficient material to create sufficient void space, and allowing the larger particles to fill the cavity and provide a uniform bed of rubblized oil shale.

  12. System for producing a uniform rubble bed for in situ processes

    DOEpatents

    Galloway, T.R.

    1983-07-05

    A method and a cutter are disclosed for producing a large cavity filled with a uniform bed of rubblized oil shale or other material, for in situ processing. A raise drill head has a hollow body with a generally circular base and sloping upper surface. A hollow shaft extends from the hollow body. Cutter teeth are mounted on the upper surface of the body and relatively small holes are formed in the body between the cutter teeth. Relatively large peripheral flutes around the body allow material to drop below the drill head. A pilot hole is drilled into the oil shale deposit. The pilot hole is reamed into a large diameter hole by means of a large diameter raise drill head or cutter to produce a cavity filled with rubble. A flushing fluid, such as air, is circulated through the pilot hole during the reaming operation to remove fines through the raise drill, thereby removing sufficient material to create sufficient void space, and allowing the larger particles to fill the cavity and provide a uniform bed of rubblized oil shale. 4 figs.

  13. Nonlinear dynamics of coiling, and mounding in viscoelastic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majmudar, Trushant; Ober, Thomas; McKinley, Gareth

    2009-11-01

    Free surface continuous jets of non-Newtonian fluids, although relevant for many industrial processes like bottle filling, remain poorly understood in terms of fundamental fluid dynamics. Here we present a systematic study of the effect of viscoelasticity on the dynamics of continuous jets of worm-like micellar surfactant solutions of varying viscosities and elasticities, and model yield-stress fluids. We systematically vary the height of the drop and the flow rate in order to study the effects of varying geometric and kinematic parameters. We observe that for fluids with higher elastic relaxation times, folding is the preferred mode. In contrast, for low elasticity fluids we observe complex nonlinear dynamics consisting of coiling, folding, and irregular meandering as the height of the fall increases. Beyond this regime, the jet dynamics smoothly crosses over to exhibit the ``leaping shampoo" or the Kaye effect. Upon increasing the flow rate to very high values, the ``leaping shampoo" state disappears and is replaced by a pronounced mounding or ``heaping". A subsequent increase in the flow rate results in finger-like protrusions to emerge out of the mound and climb up towards the nozzle. This novel transition is currently under investigation and remains a theoretical challenge.

  14. Contaminant exposures at the 4H shell mounds in the Santa Barbara Channel.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Charles R; Salazar, Michael H; Salazar, Sandra M; Snyder, Barry J

    2006-12-01

    Remobilization, bioavailability, and potential toxicity of chemical contaminants were evaluated at the 4H shell mounds - the site of abandoned offshore oil and gas production platforms in the Santa Barbara Channel region of the Southern California Bight. Evaluations used a weight-of-evidence approach based on results from bulk phase chemical analyses and laboratory toxicity testing of shell mound cores, in situ field bioassays using caged mussels, and surficial sediment chemistry. Shell mound cores contained elevated concentrations of metals associated with drilling wastes (e.g., Ba, Cr, Pb, and Zn), as well as monocyclic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The highest concentrations along with pockets of free oil were associated with the middle "cuttings" stratum. Sediments composited from all core strata caused significant acute toxicity and bioaccumulation of Ba and PAHs in test organisms during laboratory exposures. In contrast, caged mussels placed at each of the shell mounds for a period of 57-58 days had greater than 90% survival, and there were no significant differences in survival of mussels placed at the shell mounds and corresponding reference sites. While all mussel samples exhibited increases in shell length, whole animal weight, and tissue lipid content, in some cases growth metrics for the shell mound mussels were significantly higher than those for the reference sites. Concentrations of metals, PAHs, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in tissues of the shell mound mussels were not significantly different from those at reference sites. The presence of labile aromatic hydrocarbons in shell mound cores and absence of significant contaminant accumulation of tissues of caged mussels indicated that chemical contaminants are not being remobilized from the 4H shell mounds. Surficial bottom sediments near the shell mounds contained elevated Ba concentrations that probably were associated with drilling wastes. However, concentrations did not

  15. Variety and complexity in the mound of sedimentary rock in Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgett, K. S.; Malin, M. C.

    2011-12-01

    NASA's Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, will be used to explore a portion of the lower stratigraphic record of the northwest side of a mound of layered rock ˜5 km thick in the 155 km-diameter Gale Crater. The rock materials are of a sedimentary origin, though the proportions of clastic sediment, tephra, and chemical precipitates are presently unknown. The mound is usually described as having lower and upper units separated by an erosional unconformity. However, some investigators recognize that it is considerably more complex. The stratigraphy displays vertical and lateral complexity; multiple erosional unconformities; filled, buried, interbedded, and exhumed or partly exhumed impact craters; evidence for deposition along the base of the mound followed by retreat of less-resistant rocks and abandonment of erosion-resistant materials shed from the mound; lithified sediments deposited at the mouths of streams that cut mound rock; inversion of intra-canyon stream channel sediment; and widening of canyons. On the northeast side of the mound there are landslide deposits, shed from the mound, that contain large blocks (10s to 100s of m) of layered rock in various orientations. The mound's highest feature does not exhibit layering and has been interpreted by some as being Gale's impact-generated central peak. However, its highest elevation exceeds that of most of the crater rim, an observation inconsistent with central peaks (where they occur at all) in martian craters of diameters similar to Gale. The layered materials that occur highest in the mound are also at elevations that exceed most of the crater rim; these exhibit repeated stratal packages that drape previously-eroded mound topography; they produce boulders as they erode, attesting to their lithified nature and requiring that a lithification process occurred in materials located ≥ 5 km above the deepest part of Gale. The lower mound strata, including the Curiosity field site, are diverse materials

  16. Electromagnetic surveying of seafloor mounds in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, M.; Evans, R.L.; Hutchinson, D.; Hart, P.; Gardner, J.; Hagen, R.

    2008-01-01

    Seafloor controlled source electromagnetic data, probing the uppermost 30 m of seafloor sediments, have been collected with a towed magnetic dipole-dipole system across two seafloor mounds at approximately 1300 m water depth in the northern Gulf of Mexico. One of these mounds was the focus of??a recent gas hydrate research drilling program. Rather than the highly resistive response expected of massive gas hydrate within the confines of the mounds, the EM data are dominated by the effects of raised temperatures and pore fluid salinities that result in an electrically conductive seafloor. This structure suggests that fluid advection towards the seafloor is taking place beneath both mounds. Similar responses are seen at discrete locations away from the mounds in areas that might be associated with faults, further suggesting substantial shallow fluid circulation. Raised temperatures and salinities may inhibit gas hydrate formation at depth as has been suggested at other similar locations in the Gulf of Mexico. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. The nature and origin of Mafic Mound in the South Pole-Aitken Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, Daniel P.; Pieters, Carle M.

    2015-10-01

    "Mafic Mound" is a distinctive and enigmatic feature 75 km across and 1 km high near the center of the vast South Pole-Aitken Basin (SPA). Using several modern data sets, we characterize the composition, morphology, and gravity signature of the structure in order to assess its origin. Mafic Mound is found to exhibit a perched circular depression and a homogeneous high-Ca pyroxene-bearing composition. Several formation hypotheses based on known lunar processes are evaluated, including the possibilities that Mafic Mound represents (1) uplifted mantle, (2) SPA-derived impact melt, (3) a basalt-filled impact crater, or (4) a volcanic construct. Individually, these common processes cannot fully reproduce the properties of Mafic Mound. Instead, we propose a hybrid origin in which Mafic Mound is an edifice formed by magmatic processes induced by the formation and evolution of SPA. This form of nonmare volcanism has not previously been documented on the Moon.

  18. Kentucky and Tennessee. Mounds of potential pay in Ft. Payne reef trend

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, T.

    1983-06-01

    It is one of the hottest areas in Tennessee. Largely centered in Fentress, Scott and Morgan counties, the Ft. Payne reefs are a series of subsurface mounds, parallel to one another, that seemingly align in a northeast- southwest direction. The mounds are at depths of 1000 to 2500 ft. To the west near the Cincinnati Arch, the mounds are relatively shallow. Whereas to the southeast the mounds downdip at a rate of ca 50 ft/mile toward the Appalachian fold belt. Most activity to date has been in the shallower Ft. Payne. Production varies greatly, from 5 bopd/well to more than 900 bopd/well. There are 21 producing fields in the Ft. Payne, with total production in excess of 6 million bbl. The mounds are of Lower Mississippian age and are thought to have been deposited along a transgressive/regressive shoreline.

  19. On the influence of cold-water coral mound size on flow hydrodynamics, and vice versa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyr, Frédéric; Haren, Hans; Mienis, Furu; Duineveld, Gerard; Bourgault, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Using a combination of in situ observations and idealistic 2-D nonhydrostatic numerical simulations, the relation between cold-water coral (CWC) mound size and hydrodynamics is explored for the Rockall Bank area in the North Atlantic Ocean. It is shown that currents generated by topographically trapped tidal waves in this area cause large isopycnal depressions resulting from an internal hydraulic control above CWC mounds. The oxygen concentration distribution is used as a tracer to visualize the flow behavior and the turbulent mixing above the mounds. By comparing two CWC mounds of different sizes and located close to each other, it is shown that the resulting mixing is highly dependent on the size of the mound. The effects of the hydraulic control for mixing, nutrient availability, and ecosystem functioning are also discussed.

  20. Elimination of the Mound-Building Termite, Nasutitermes exitiosus (Isoptera: Termitidae) in South-Eastern Australia Using Bistrifluron Bait.

    PubMed

    Webb, Garry A; Mcclintock, Charles

    2015-12-01

    Bistrifluron, a benzoylphenylurea compound, was evaluated for efficacy against Nasutitermes exitiosus (Hill), a mound-building species in southern Australia. Bistrifluron bait (trade name Xterm) was delivered as containerized pellets inserted into plastic feeding stations implanted in the sides of mounds-60 g for bistrifluron bait-treated mounds and 120 g of blank bait for untreated mounds. Termites actively tunneled in the gaps between pellets and removed bait from the canisters. All five treated mounds were eventually eliminated, and all five untreated mounds remained active at the end of the trial. Four of the five treated mounds were considered dead and excavated after 26 wk, but there were earlier signs of mound distress-reduced repair of experimental casement damage and reduced activity in bait canisters by 22 wk and reduced internal mound temperature after 11 wk. One treated mound showed activity in the bait station right through until almost the end of the trial (47 wk), but excavation at 49 wk showed no further activity in the mound. The five untreated colonies removed on average 97% of blank bait offered, while the five treated colonies removed on average 39.1% of bait offered. There was a wide variation in temperature profiles of mounds (up to 15°C for both minimum and maximum internal temperatures), from the beginning of the trial and even before the effects of baiting were evident. PMID:26470378

  1. Effigy mound sites as cultural landscapes: A geophysical spatial analysis of two Late Woodland sites in southeastern Wisconsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Kira E.

    This dissertation is a spatial analysis of a class of sacred sites known as Effigy Mounds during the Late Woodland period in southeast Wisconsin, circa A.D. 700--1100. Effigy Mounds are earthworks in the shape of animals, conical, linear, or geometric shapes. The research is focused on the upper Rock River Drainage in southern Wisconsin, a region where Effigy Mounds are very common. Although there are many theories concerning the meanings of Effigy Mounds, there is no cohesive description of Effigy Mounds as landscape elements and their function in the use of space by Late Woodland people. This research connects cultural and cognitive aspects of Native American cosmology with physical manifestations on the landscape. Effigy Mounds are examined from ideological and physical perspectives that are not mutually exclusive. Effigy Mounds are viewed as signifiers with multiple levels of function and meaning including sacred space, territorial markers, and mechanisms of social control and cohesion. Investigation at two Late Woodland Effigy Mound sites, Indian Mounds County Park in Jefferson County and Nitschke Mounds County Park in Dodge County, shows that landscape utilization varied significantly within and among Effigy Mound sites. An alternative model to understand Late Woodland Effigy Mound sites as ritual landscapes explores these features, their distribution across space, and the connection to internal site structures by synthesizing multidisciplinary data from historical ethnographic accounts, previous archaeological surveys, and new geophysical data. This multidisciplinary approach provides an example applicable to other landscape studies.

  2. Transition and Closeout of the Former DOE Mound Plant Site: Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, C. P.; Marks, M. L.; Smiley, S.L.; Gallaher, D. M.

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) manages the Miamisburg Closure Project (MCP) by cleaning up the Mound site, located in Miamisburg, Ohio, to specific environmental standards, conveying all excess land parcels to the Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation, and transferring all continuing DOE post-closure responsibilities to the Office of Legacy Management (LM). Presently, the EM cleanup contract of the Mound site with CH2M Hill Mound Inc. is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2006. LM manages the Mound transition efforts and also post-closure responsibilities at other DOE sites via a contract with the S.M. Stoller Corporation. The programmatic transfer from EM to LM is scheduled to take place on October 1, 2006. The transition of the Mound site has required substantial integration and coordination between the EM and LM. Several project management principles have been implemented to help facilitate the transfer of programmatic responsibility. As a result, several lessons learned have been identified to help streamline and improve integration and coordination of the transfer process. Lessons learned from the Mound site transition project are considered a work in progress and have been summarized according to a work breakdown structure for specific functional areas in the transition schedule. The functional areas include program management, environmental, records management, information technology, property management, stakeholder and regulatory relations, procurement, worker pension and benefits, and project closeout. Specific improvements or best practices have been recognized and documented by the Mound transition team. The Mound site is one of three major cleanup sites within the EM organization scheduled for completion in 2006. EM, EM cleanup contractor, LM, and LM post-closure contractor have identified lessons learned during the transition and closure of the Mound site. The transition effort from

  3. A Biomechanical Comparison of Pitching From a Mound Versus Flat Ground in Adolescent Baseball Pitchers

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Carl W.; Solomito, Matthew; Garibay, Erin; Õunpuu, Sylvia; Westwell, Melany

    2013-01-01

    Background: Baseball professionals believe that pitching from a mound can increase the stresses placed on the body. Hypothesis: There is no difference in kinematics or kinetics in pitching from a mound versus flat-ground conditions in adolescent baseball pitchers. Study Design: Laboratory investigation. Methods: The fastball pitching motions of 15 adolescent baseball pitchers, including upper extremity kinematics and kinetics and lead- and trail-leg kinematics, were evaluated while pitching from the mound and flat ground. Student t tests were used to determine the differences between the 2 testing conditions. Results: Maximum external glenohumeral rotation was similar between the 2 conditions (134° ± 14° mound vs 133° ± 14° flat ground, P = 0.10). Ankle plantar flexion of the lead leg at ball release was greater in the flat-ground condition (−20° ± 10° mound vs −15° ± 12° flat ground, P = 0.01). A statistically significant increase in glenohumeral internal rotation moment (33.6 ± 12.1 Nm mound vs 31.7 ± 11.6 Nm flat ground, P = 0.01) and an increase in elbow varus moment (33.3 ± 12.3 Nm mound vs 31.4 ± 11.8 Nm flat ground, P = 0.02) was measured when pitching from the mound as compared with flat ground. Conclusion: Pitching from the mound causes increased stress on the shoulder and elbow of adolescent pitchers as compared with that from flat ground. Clinical Relevance: The differences in kinematics as well as increased moments in the shoulder and elbow are helpful for pitchers and their coaches to know at the beginning of their season or as they return from injury or surgery. Pitchers in these situations should start their pitching progression on flat ground and progress to the mound. PMID:24427428

  4. Hydrographic Conditions At The Carbonate Mound Locations In The NE Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Weering, T.; de Hass, H.; White, M.; de Stigter, H.

    As part of the component 5th framework projects that form part of the OMARC clus- ter, hydrographic measurements have been made in the region of the deep water car- bonate mounds provinces of the NE Atlantic. These mounds are located at depths 600-1000m depth along the continental slopes of the Porcupine Sea Bight and Bank and the SE Rockall Bank. These regions correspond to the vertical and horizontal boundaries of the intermediate water masses that occupy the region, providing differ- ent hydrographic regimes between mound locations,. In addition there is a large vari- ability in temperature/salinity conditions and both characteristics have implications for the distribution of mound fauna. The deep water coral associated with carbonate mound structures coincide with strong benthic current activity and this is confirmed from benthic current measurements from landers and current meters at the SE Rockall and NW Porcupine Bank mound loca- tions. Near seabed currents are strong, with a typical mean speed of 20cm/s and a max- imum in excess of 50cm/s. At the SE Rockall Bank site, a mean SW along isobath flow is measured, whilst at the NW Porcupine mound location, a poleward slope current is measured. Bottom Ekman dynamics is apparent with a changes in near seabed verti- cal stratification related to changes to overlying slope current strength. Strong diurnal variability is found at the Rockall Bank site, providing strong cross-slope currents. The diurnal current forcing over both the Rockall and Porcupine Banks may result in enclosed circulation patterns over the banks and retention of organic material supplied to the mounds. In contrast, currents at the Hovland and Magellan mound sites in the northern Porcupine Sea Bight, where there are numerous buried mounds, are relatively low.

  5. COCARDE - a research platform for a new look to ancient mounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüggeberg, Andres; Henriet, Jean-Pierre; Foubert, Anneleen; van Rooij, David; Samankassou, Elias; Dullo, Wolf-Christian; Spezzaferri, Silvia; Science Community, Cocarde

    2010-05-01

    Carbonate mounds are important contributors of life in different settings, from warm-water to cold-water environments, and throughout geological history. Research on modern carbonate mounds over the last years made a major contribution to our overall understanding of these particular sedimentary systems. By looking to the modern carbonate mound community, some fundamental questions could be addressed, until now not yet explored in fossil mound settings. The international network COCARDE (Cold-Water Carbonate Reservoir Systems in Deep Environment) is a platform for exploring new insights in cold- and warm-water carbonate mound research of recent and ancient mound systems (http://www.cocarde.eu). One aim of the COCARDE network is to bring scientific communities together, to study recent carbonate mounds in midslope environments in the present ocean, and to investigate fossil mounds spanning the whole Phanerozoic time. Scientific challenges on modern and ancient carbonate mound systems got already well defined during two dedicated workshops of the COCARDE network: 1) the ESF Magellan COCARDE Workshop in Fribourg, Switzerland, January 21-24, 2009, and 2) the ESF MiCROSYSTEMS - FWO COCARDE Flanders - ESF CHECREEF Workshop and Field Seminar, Oviedo, Spain, September 16-20, 2009. The wide spectrum of disciplines in geosciences and biology are summarized in the following five topics for the carbonate mound research: i) Palaeoenvironment; ii) The Microbial Filter; iii) Petrophysical Characterization; iv) Connectivity and Compartmentalization - the Fluid System; v) Advancing our Insight in Phanerozoic Reef Systems - the Slope Niche. One of the most important outcomes of these meetings was the identification of the need for combined research efforts on fossil and modern carbonate settings to provide the baseline reference standard for a better understanding of these exceptional systems and their potential as hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  6. Low-speed impacts between rubble piles modeled as collections of polyhedra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korycansky, D. G.; Asphaug, Erik

    2006-04-01

    We present results of modeling rubble piles as collections of polyhedra. The use of polyhedra allows more realistic (irregular) shapes and interactions (e.g. collisions), particularly for objects of different sizes. Rotational degrees of freedom are included in the modeling, which may be important components of the motion. We solved the equations of rigid-body dynamics, including frictional/inelastic collisions, for collections of up to several hundred elements. As a demonstration of the methods and to compare with previous work by other researchers, we simulated low-speed collisions between km-scale bodies with the same general parameters as those simulated by Leinhardt et al. [Leinhardt, Z.M., Richardson, D.C., Quinn, T., 2000. Icarus 146, 133-151]. High-speed collisions appropriate to present-day asteroid encounters require additional treatment of shock effects and fragmentation and are the subject of future work; here we study regimes appropriate to planetesimal accretion and re-accretion in the aftermath of catastrophic events. Collisions between equal-mass objects at low speeds ( <10 cms) were simulated for both head-on and off-center collisions between rubble piles made of a power-law mass spectrum of sub-elements. Very low-speed head-on collisions produce single objects from the coalescence of the impactors. For slightly higher speeds, extensive disruption occurs, but re-accretion produces a single object with most of the total mass. For increasingly higher speeds, the re-accreted object has smaller mass, finally resulting in complete catastrophic disruption with all sub-elements on escape trajectories and only small amounts of mass in re-accreted bodies. Off-center collisions at moderately low speeds produce two re-accreted objects of approximately equal mass, separating at greater than escape speed. At high speed, complete disruption occurs as with the high-speed head-on collisions. Head-on collisions at low to moderate speeds result in objects of mostly

  7. Coral-rubble ridges as dynamic coastal features - short-term reworking and weathering processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiske, Michaela

    2016-02-01

    A coral-rubble ridge built by storm waves at Anegada (British Virgin Islands) underwent remarkable changes in shape and weathering in a 23-month period. The ridge is located along the island's north shore, in the lee of a fringing reef and a reef flat. This coarse-clast ridge showed two major changes between March 2013, when first examined, and February 2015, when revisited. First, a trench dug in 2013, and intentionally left open for further examination, was found almost completely infilled in 2015, and the ridge morphology was modified by slumping of clasts down the slope and by reworking attributable to minor storm waves. In size, composition and overall condition, most of the clasts that filled the trench resemble reworked clasts from the ridge itself; only a small portion had been newly brought ashore. Second, a dark gray patina formed on the whitish exteriors of the carbonate clasts that had been excavated in 2013. These biologically weathered, darkened clasts had become indistinguishable from clasts that had been at the ridge surface for a much longer time. The findings have two broader implications. First, coastal coarse-clast ridges respond not solely to major storms, but also to tropical storms or minor hurricanes. The modification and reworking of the ridge on Anegada most probably resulted from hurricane Gonzalo which was at category 1-2 as it passed about 60 km north of the island in October 2014. Second, staining of calcareous clasts by cyanobacteria in the supralittoral zone occurs within a few months. In this setting, the degree of darkening quickly saturates as a measure of exposure age.

  8. Residual indoor contamination from world trade center rubble fires as indicated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon profiles.

    PubMed

    Pleil, Joachim D; Funk, William E; Rappaport, Stephen M

    2006-02-15

    The catastrophic destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) on Sept. 11, 2001 (9/11) created an immense dust cloud followed by fires that emitted smoke and soot into the air of New York City (NYC) well into December. Outdoor pollutant levels in lower Manhattan returned to urban background levels after about 200 days as the fires were put out and the debris cleanup was completed. However, particulate matter (PM) from the original collapse and fires also penetrated into commercial and residential buildings. This has created public concern because WTC dust is thought to cause adverse pulmonary symptoms including "WTC cough" and reduced lung capacity. Additionally, some recent studies have suggested a possible link between exposure to WTC contamination and other adverse health effects. Distinguishing between normal urban pollutant infiltration and residual WTC dust remaining in interior spaces is difficult; efforts are underway to develop such discriminator methods. Some progress has been made in identifying WTC dust by the content of fibers believed to be associated with the initial building collapse. There are also contaminants created by the fires that burned for 100 days in the debris piles of the building rubble. Using WTC ambient air samples, we have developed indicators for fire related PM based on the relative amounts of specific particle bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the mass fraction of PAHs per mass of PM. These two parameters are combined, and we show a graphical method for discriminating between fire sources and urban particulate sources as applied to samples of settled dusts. We found that our PAHs based discriminator method can distinguish fire source contributions to WTC related particulate matter and dusts. Other major building fires or large open burn events could have similar PAHs characteristics. We found that random samples collected approximately 3.5 years after the WTC event from occupied indoor spaces (primarily residential

  9. Cumulative Damage in Strength-Dominated Collisions of Rocky Asteroids: Rubble Piles and Brick Piles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housen, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory impact experiments were performed to investigate the conditions that produce large-scale damage in rock targets. Aluminum cylinders (6.3 mm diameter) impacted basalt cylinders (69 mm diameter) at speeds ranging from 0.7 to 2.0 km/s. Diagnostics included measurements of the largest fragment mass, velocities of the largest remnant and large fragments ejected from the periphery of the target, and X-ray computed tomography imaging to inspect some of the impacted targets for internal damage. Significant damage to the target occurred when the kinetic energy per unit target mass exceeded roughly 1/4 of the energy required for catastrophic shattering (where the target is reduced to one-half its original mass). Scaling laws based on a rate-dependent strength were developed that provide a basis for extrapolating the results to larger strength-dominated collisions. The threshold specific energy for widespread damage was found to scale with event size in the same manner as that for catastrophic shattering. Therefore, the factor of four difference between the two thresholds observed in the lab also applies to larger collisions. The scaling laws showed that for a sequence of collisions that are similar in that they produce the same ratio of largest fragment mass to original target mass, the fragment velocities decrease with increasing event size. As a result, rocky asteroids a couple hundred meters in diameter should retain their large ejecta fragments in a jumbled rubble-pile state. For somewhat larger bodies, the ejection velocities are sufficiently low that large fragments are essentially retained in place, possibly forming ordered "brick-pile" structures.

  10. Methane oxidation by termite mounds estimated by the carbon isotopic composition of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Atsuko; Inoue, Tetsushi; Kirtibutr, Nit; Abe, Takuya

    1998-12-01

    Emission rates and carbon isotope ratios of CH4, emitted by workers of termites, and of CH4, emitted from their mounds, were observed in a dry evergreen forest in Thailand to estimate the proportion of CH4 oxidized during emission through the mound. The δ13C of CH4 emitted from a termite mound (-70.9 to -82.4‰) was higher than that of CH4 emitted by workers in the mound (-85.4 to -97. l‰). Using a fractionation factor (a = 0.987) for oxidation of CH4 which was obtained in the incubation experiment, an emission factor defined as (CH4 emitted from a termite mound/CH4 produced by termites) was calculated. The emission factor obtained in each termite mound was nearly zero for Macrotermes (fungus-growing termites), of which the nest has a thick soil wall and subterrannean termites, and 0.17 to 0.47 for Termitinae (small-mound-making termites). Global CH4 emission by termites was estimated on the basis of the CH4 emission rates by workers and termite biomass with the emission factors. The calculated result was 1.5 to 7.4 Tg/y (0.3 to 1.3% of total source), which is considerably smaller than the estimate by the IPCC [1994].