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Sample records for rubisco activities properties

  1. Rubisco Activase Activity Assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activase functions as a mechano-chemical motor protein using the energy from ATP hydrolysis to contort the structure of its target protein, Rubisco. This action modulates the activation state of Rubisco by removing tightly-bound inhibitory s...

  2. Rubisco Catalytic Properties and Temperature Response in Crops.

    PubMed

    Hermida-Carrera, Carmen; Kapralov, Maxim V; Galmés, Jeroni

    2016-08-01

    Rubisco catalytic traits and their thermal dependence are two major factors limiting the CO2 assimilation potential of plants. In this study, we present the profile of Rubisco kinetics for 20 crop species at three different temperatures. The results largely confirmed the existence of significant variation in the Rubisco kinetics among species. Although some of the species tended to present Rubisco with higher thermal sensitivity (e.g. Oryza sativa) than others (e.g. Lactuca sativa), interspecific differences depended on the kinetic parameter. Comparing the temperature response of the different kinetic parameters, the Rubisco Km for CO2 presented higher energy of activation than the maximum carboxylation rate and the CO2 compensation point in the absence of mitochondrial respiration. The analysis of the Rubisco large subunit sequence revealed the existence of some sites under adaptive evolution in branches with specific kinetic traits. Because Rubisco kinetics and their temperature dependency were species specific, they largely affected the assimilation potential of Rubisco from the different crops, especially under those conditions (i.e. low CO2 availability at the site of carboxylation and high temperature) inducing Rubisco-limited photosynthesis. As an example, at 25°C, Rubisco from Hordeum vulgare and Glycine max presented, respectively, the highest and lowest potential for CO2 assimilation at both high and low chloroplastic CO2 concentrations. In our opinion, this information is relevant to improve photosynthesis models and should be considered in future attempts to design more efficient Rubiscos. PMID:27329223

  3. Quantifying the amount and activity of Rubisco in leaves.

    PubMed

    Kubien, David S; Brown, Christopher M; Kane, Heather J

    2011-01-01

    The CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco plays a crucial biological role as a primary determinant of both plant yield and the response of the biosphere to global change. Here, we describe techniques for measuring the amount and activity of Rubisco in higher plants. To accommodate a range of experimental capabilities, we describe basic radioisotopic methods as well as non-radioactive techniques. The required calculations are included. We discuss problems that commonly arise during the extraction and assay of Rubisco. PMID:20960142

  4. Enhanced expression of Rubisco activase splicing variants differentially affects Rubisco activity during low temperature treatment in Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    Jurczyk, Barbara; Pociecha, Ewa; Grzesiak, Maciej; Kalita, Katarzyna; Rapacz, Marcin

    2016-07-01

    Alternative splicing of the Rubisco activase gene was shown to be a point for optimization of photosynthetic carbon assimilation. It can be expected to be a stress-regulated event that depends on plant freezing tolerance. The aim of the study was to examine the relationships among Rubisco activity, the expression of two Rubisco activase splicing variants and photoacclimation to low temperature. The experiment was performed on two Lolium perenne genotypes with contrasting levels of freezing tolerance. The study investigated the effect of pre-hardening (15°C) and cold acclimation (4°C) on net photosynthesis, photosystem II photochemical activity, Rubisco activity and the expression of two splicing variants of the Rubisco activase gene. The results showed an induction of Rubisco activity at both 15°C and 4°C only in a highly freezing-tolerant genotype. The enhanced Rubisco activity after pre-hardening corresponded to increased expression of the splicing variant representing the large isoform, while the increase in Rubisco activity during cold acclimation was due to the activation of both transcript variants. These boosts in Rubisco activity also corresponded to an activation of non-photochemical mechanism of photoacclimation induced at low temperature exclusively in the highly freezing-tolerant genotype. In conclusion, enhanced expression of Rubisco activase splicing variants caused an increase in Rubisco activity during pre-hardening and cold acclimation in the more freezing-tolerant Lolium perenne genotype. The induction of the transcript variant representing the large isoform may be an important element of increasing the carbon assimilation rate supporting the photochemical mechanism of photosynthetic acclimation to cold. PMID:27152456

  5. The plastid casein kinase 2 phosphorylates Rubisco activase at the Thr-78 site but is not essential for regulation of Rubisco activation state

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubisco activase (RCA) is essential for the activation of Rubisco, the carboxylating enzyme of photosynthesis. In Arabidopsis, RCA is encoded by a single gene (At2g39730) that is alternatively spliced to form a large alpha-RCA and small beta-RCA isoform. The activity of Rubisco is controlled in res...

  6. A function-based screen for seeking RubisCO active clones from metagenomes: novel enzymes influencing RubisCO activity

    PubMed Central

    Böhnke, Stefanie; Perner, Mirjam

    2015-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) is a key enzyme of the Calvin cycle, which is responsible for most of Earth's primary production. Although research on RubisCO genes and enzymes in plants, cyanobacteria and bacteria has been ongoing for years, still little is understood about its regulation and activation in bacteria. Even more so, hardly any information exists about the function of metagenomic RubisCOs and the role of the enzymes encoded on the flanking DNA owing to the lack of available function-based screens for seeking active RubisCOs from the environment. Here we present the first solely activity-based approach for identifying RubisCO active fosmid clones from a metagenomic library. We constructed a metagenomic library from hydrothermal vent fluids and screened 1056 fosmid clones. Twelve clones exhibited RubisCO activity and the metagenomic fragments resembled genes from Thiomicrospira crunogena. One of these clones was further analyzed. It contained a 35.2 kb metagenomic insert carrying the RubisCO gene cluster and flanking DNA regions. Knockouts of twelve genes and two intergenic regions on this metagenomic fragment demonstrated that the RubisCO activity was significantly impaired and was attributed to deletions in genes encoding putative transcriptional regulators and those believed to be vital for RubisCO activation. Our new technique revealed a novel link between a poorly characterized gene and RubisCO activity. This screen opens the door to directly investigating RubisCO genes and respective enzymes from environmental samples. PMID:25203835

  7. A SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC ASSAY TO MEASURE RUBISCO ACTIVASE ACTIVATION ACTIVITY UNDER VARYING ATP:ADP RATIOS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ratio of ATP to ADP in the stroma is an important regulatory mechanism for controlling the activation state of Rubisco via Rubisco activase (activase). Understanding the response of activase to a varying ATP:ADP ratio should reveal insights into the regulation of photosynthesis. However, the cur...

  8. Rubisco catalytic properties of wild and domesticated relatives provide scope for improving wheat photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Prins, Anneke; Orr, Douglas J; Andralojc, P John; Reynolds, Matthew P; Carmo-Silva, Elizabete; Parry, Martin A J

    2016-04-01

    Rubisco is a major target for improving crop photosynthesis and yield, yet natural diversity in catalytic properties of this enzyme is poorly understood. Rubisco from 25 genotypes of the Triticeae tribe, including wild relatives of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum), were surveyed to identify superior enzymes for improving photosynthesis in this crop. In vitro Rubisco carboxylation velocity (V c), Michaelis-Menten constants for CO2 (K c) and O2 (K o) and specificity factor (S c/o) were measured at 25 and 35 °C. V c and K c correlated positively, while V c and S c/o were inversely related. Rubisco large subunit genes (rbcL) were sequenced, and predicted corresponding amino acid differences analysed in relation to the corresponding catalytic properties. The effect of replacing native wheat Rubisco with counterparts from closely related species was analysed by modelling the response of photosynthesis to varying CO2 concentrations. The model predicted that two Rubisco enzymes would increase photosynthetic performance at 25 °C while only one of these also increased photosynthesis at 35 °C. Thus, under otherwise identical conditions, catalytic variation in the Rubiscos analysed is predicted to improve photosynthetic rates at physiological CO2 concentrations. Naturally occurring Rubiscos with superior properties amongst the Triticeae tribe can be exploited to improve wheat photosynthesis and crop productivity. PMID:26798025

  9. Rubisco catalytic properties of wild and domesticated relatives provide scope for improving wheat photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Anneke; Orr, Douglas J.; Andralojc, P. John; Reynolds, Matthew P.; Carmo-Silva, Elizabete; Parry, Martin A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Rubisco is a major target for improving crop photosynthesis and yield, yet natural diversity in catalytic properties of this enzyme is poorly understood. Rubisco from 25 genotypes of the Triticeae tribe, including wild relatives of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum), were surveyed to identify superior enzymes for improving photosynthesis in this crop. In vitro Rubisco carboxylation velocity (V c), Michaelis–Menten constants for CO2 (K c) and O2 (K o) and specificity factor (S c/o) were measured at 25 and 35 °C. V c and K c correlated positively, while V c and S c/o were inversely related. Rubisco large subunit genes (rbcL) were sequenced, and predicted corresponding amino acid differences analysed in relation to the corresponding catalytic properties. The effect of replacing native wheat Rubisco with counterparts from closely related species was analysed by modelling the response of photosynthesis to varying CO2 concentrations. The model predicted that two Rubisco enzymes would increase photosynthetic performance at 25 °C while only one of these also increased photosynthesis at 35 °C. Thus, under otherwise identical conditions, catalytic variation in the Rubiscos analysed is predicted to improve photosynthetic rates at physiological CO2 concentrations. Naturally occurring Rubiscos with superior properties amongst the Triticeae tribe can be exploited to improve wheat photosynthesis and crop productivity. PMID:26798025

  10. Enhancing Rubisco activity at higher temperatures by re-engineering of Rubisco activase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report discusses the possibility of increasing plant performance under moderate heat stress by improving the thermal stability of Rubisco activase. • The research is driven by the observation that photosynthesis is acutely sensitive to inhibition by moderate heat stress and that this inhibitio...

  11. The regulatory properties of rubisco activase differ among species and affect photosynthetic induction during light transitions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubisco’s catalytic chaperone, Rubisco activase (Rca), uses the energy from ATP hydrolysis to restore catalytic competence to Rubisco. In Arabidopsis, inhibition of Rca activity by ADP is fine-tuned by redox regulation of the a-isoform. To elucidate the mechanism for Rca regulation in species contai...

  12. Heat tolerance in a wild Oryza species is attributed to maintenance of Rubisco activation by a thermally stable Rubisco activase ortholog.

    PubMed

    Scafaro, Andrew P; Gallé, Alexander; Van Rie, Jeroen; Carmo-Silva, Elizabete; Salvucci, Michael E; Atwell, Brian J

    2016-08-01

    The mechanistic basis of tolerance to heat stress was investigated in Oryza sativa and two wild rice species, Oryza meridionalis and Oryza australiensis. The wild relatives are endemic to the hot, arid Australian savannah. Leaf elongation rates and gas exchange were measured during short periods of supra-optimal heat, revealing species differences. The Rubisco activase (RCA) gene from each species was sequenced. Using expressed recombinant RCA and leaf-extracted RCA, the kinetic properties of the two isoforms were studied under high temperatures. Leaf elongation was undiminished at 45°C in O. australiensis. The net photosynthetic rate was almost 50% slower in O. sativa at 45°C than at 28°C, while in O. australiensis it was unaffected. Oryza meridionalis exhibited intermediate heat tolerance. Based on previous reports that RCA is heat-labile, the Rubisco activation state was measured. It correlated positively with leaf elongation rates across all three species and four periods of exposure to 45°C. Sequence analysis revealed numerous polymorphisms in the RCA amino acid sequence from O. australiensis. The O. australiensis RCA enzyme was thermally stable up to 42°C, contrasting with RCA from O. sativa, which was inhibited at 36°C. We attribute heat tolerance in the wild species to thermal stability of RCA, enabling Rubisco to remain active. PMID:27145723

  13. Downregulation of Rubisco Activity by Non-enzymatic Acetylation of RbcL.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Hong, Hui; Li, Wei-Chao; Yang, Lili; Huang, Jirong; Xiao, You-Li; Chen, Xiao-Ya; Chen, Gen-Yun

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is assimilated by the most abundant but sluggish enzyme, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). Here we show that acetylation of lysine residues of the Rubisco large subunit (RbcL), including Lys201 and Lys334 in the active sites, may be an important mechanism in the regulation of Rubisco activities. It is well known that Lys201 reacts with CO2 for carbamylation, a prerequisite for both carboxylase and oxygenase activities of Rubisco, and Lys334 contacts with ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP). The acetylation level of RbcL in plants is lower during the day and higher at night, inversely correlating with the Rubisco carboxylation activity. A search of the chloroplast proteome database did not reveal a canonical acetyltransferase; instead, we found that a plant-derived metabolite, 7-acetoxy-4-methylcoumarin (AMC), can non-enzymatically acetylate both native Rubisco and synthesized RbcL peptides spanning Lys334 or Lys201. Furthermore, lysine residues were modified by synthesized 4-methylumbelliferone esters with different electro- and stereo-substitutes, resulting in varied Rubisco activities. 1-Chloroethyl 4-methylcoumarin-7-yl carbonate (ClMC) could transfer the chloroethyl carbamate group to lysine residues of RbcL and completely inactivate Rubisco, whereas bis(4-methylcoumarin-7-yl) carbonate (BMC) improved Rubisco activity through increasing the level of Lys201 carbamylation. Our findings indicate that RbcL acetylation negatively regulates Rubisco activity, and metabolic derivatives can be designed to dissect and improve CO2 fixation efficiency of plants through lysine modification. PMID:27109602

  14. Small subunit of a cold-resistant plant, Timothy, does not significantly alter the catalytic properties of Rubisco in transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Fukayama, Hiroshi; Koga, Atsushi; Hatanaka, Tomoko; Misoo, Shuji

    2015-04-01

    Effects of overexpression of high activity-type Rubisco small subunit (RbcS) from a cold-resistant plant, timothy (Phleum pratense), on kinetic properties of Rubisco were studied in rice (Oryza sativa). The full-length mRNA sequence of timothy RbcS (PpRbcS1) was determined by 5'RACE and 3'RACE. The coding sequence of PpRbcS1 was fused to the chlorophyll a/b-binding protein promoter and introduced into rice. PpRbcS was highly expressed in leaf blade and accounted for approximately 30 % of total RbcS in homozygous transgenic lines. However, the catalytic turnover rate and K m for CO2 of Rubisco did not significantly change in these transgenic lines compared to non-transgenic rice, suggesting that PpRbcS1 is not effective for improvement of catalytic efficiency of rice Rubisco. The photosynthetic rate and growth were essentially unchanged, whereas the photosynthetic rate at low CO2 condition was marginally increased in transgenic lines. Rubisco content was significantly increased, whereas soluble protein, nitrogen, and chlorophyll contents were unchanged in transgenic lines compared to non-transgenic rice. Because the kinetic properties were similar, observed slight increase in photosynthetic rate at low CO2 is considered to be large due to increase in Rubisco content in transgenic lines. Introduction of foreign RbcS is an effective approach for the improvement of Rubisco kinetics and photosynthesis. However, in this study, it was suggested that RbcS of high activity-type Rubisco, even showing higher amino acid identity with rice RbcS, did not always enhance the catalytic turnover rate of Rubisco in rice. Thus, we should carefully select RbcS to be overexpressed before introduction. PMID:25595546

  15. Structural mechanism of RuBisCO activation by carbamylation of the active site lysine

    PubMed Central

    Stec, Boguslaw

    2012-01-01

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is a crucial enzyme in carbon fixation and the most abundant protein on earth. It has been studied extensively by biochemical and structural methods; however, the most essential activation step has not yet been described. Here, we describe the mechanistic details of Lys carbamylation that leads to RuBisCO activation by atmospheric CO2. We report two crystal structures of nitrosylated RuBisCO from the red algae Galdieria sulphuraria with O2 and CO2 bound at the active site. G. sulphuraria RuBisCO is inhibited by cysteine nitrosylation that results in trapping of these gaseous ligands. The structure with CO2 defines an elusive, preactivation complex that contains a metal cation Mg2+ surrounded by three H2O/OH molecules. Both structures suggest the mechanism for discriminating gaseous ligands by their quadrupole electric moments. We describe conformational changes that allow for intermittent binding of the metal ion required for activation. On the basis of these structures we propose the individual steps of the activation mechanism. Knowledge of all these elements is indispensable for engineering RuBisCO into a more efficient enzyme for crop enhancement or as a remedy to global warming. PMID:23112176

  16. Small Oligomers of Ribulose-bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase (Rubisco) Activase Are Required for Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Keown, Jeremy R.; Griffin, Michael D. W.; Mertens, Haydyn D. T.; Pearce, F. Grant

    2013-01-01

    Ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activase uses the energy from ATP hydrolysis to remove tight binding inhibitors from Rubisco, thus playing a key role in regulating photosynthesis in plants. Although several structures have recently added much needed structural information for different Rubisco activase enzymes, the arrangement of these subunits in solution remains unclear. In this study, we use a variety of techniques to show that Rubisco activase forms a wide range of structures in solution, ranging from monomers to much higher order species, and that the distribution of these species is highly dependent on protein concentration. The data support a model in which Rubisco activase forms an open spiraling structure rather than a closed hexameric structure. At protein concentrations of 1 μm, corresponding to the maximal activity of the enzyme, Rubisco activase has an oligomeric state of 2–4 subunits. We propose a model in which Rubisco activase requires at least 1 neighboring subunit for hydrolysis of ATP. PMID:23720775

  17. Decline of rubisco activity and net photosynthesis in ozone-treated potato foliage. [Solanum tuberosum

    SciTech Connect

    Dann, M.S.; Pell, E.J.

    1987-04-01

    The effect of O/sub 3/ on rubisco activity in Solanum tuberosum L. cv Norland foliage was studied as related to oxidant-induced premature senescence. Plants, 25 days old, were exposed to O/sub 3/ increasing from 0.06 to 0.08 ..mu..1/L for 6 h/day for 4 days in a controlled environment chamber. On day 5 plants were exposed to a 6 h simulated inversion in which O/sub 3/ peaked at 0.12 /sup +/1/L. The authors measured initial and total rubisco activities and net photosynthesis of leaves at full expansion on days 0,3,5,6,9 and 12. These parameters declined in both ozone and control plants throughout the course of the experiment. O/sub 3/ exacerbated the decline and produced a significantly greater decrease following the inversion. The enhanced reduction in rubisco activity over time may be an important characteristics of ozone-induced premature senescence. Rubisco activation (initial/total activity) did not change with the treatment. The decrease in activity is most likely due to a decrease in available protein rather than a decrease in the percentage of rubisco activated in vivo.

  18. The Catalytic Properties of Hybrid Rubisco Comprising Tobacco Small and Sunflower Large Subunits Mirror the Kinetically Equivalent Source Rubiscos and Can Support Tobacco Growth1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Sharwood, Robert Edward; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Maliga, Pal; Whitney, Spencer Michael

    2008-01-01

    Plastomic replacement of the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Rubisco large subunit gene (rbcL) with that from sunflower (Helianthus annuus; rbcLS) produced tobaccoRst transformants that produced a hybrid Rubisco consisting of sunflower large and tobacco small subunits (LsSt). The tobaccoRst plants required CO2 (0.5% v/v) supplementation to grow autotrophically from seed despite the substrate saturated carboxylation rate, Km, for CO2 and CO2/O2 selectivity of the LsSt enzyme mirroring the kinetically equivalent tobacco and sunflower Rubiscos. Consequently, at the onset of exponential growth when the source strength and leaf LsSt content were sufficient, tobaccoRst plants grew to maturity without CO2 supplementation. When grown under a high pCO2, the tobaccoRst seedlings grew slower than tobacco and exhibited unique growth phenotypes: Juvenile plants formed clusters of 10 to 20 structurally simple oblanceolate leaves, developed multiple apical meristems, and the mature leaves displayed marginal curling and dimpling. Depending on developmental stage, the LsSt content in tobaccoRst leaves was 4- to 7-fold less than tobacco, and gas exchange coupled with chlorophyll fluorescence showed that at 2 mbar pCO2 and growth illumination CO2 assimilation in mature tobaccoRst leaves remained limited by Rubisco activity and its rate (approximately 11 μmol m−2 s−1) was half that of tobacco controls. 35S-methionine labeling showed the stability of assembled LsSt was similar to tobacco Rubisco and measurements of light transient CO2 assimilation rates showed LsSt was adequately regulated by tobacco Rubisco activase. We conclude limitations to tobaccoRst growth primarily stem from reduced rbcLS mRNA levels and the translation and/or assembly of sunflower large with the tobacco small subunits that restricted LsSt synthesis. PMID:17993544

  19. In silico Identification of Ergosterol as a Novel Fungal Metabolite Enhancing RuBisCO Activity in Lycopersicum esculentum.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Joyeeta; Narad, Priyanka; Sengupta, Abhishek; Sharma, P D; Paul, P K

    2016-09-01

    RuBisCO (EC 4.1.1.39), a key enzyme found in stroma of chloroplast, is important for fixing atmospheric CO2 in plants. Alterations in the activity of RuBisCO could influence photosynthetic yield. Therefore, to understand the activity of the protein, knowledge about its structure is pertinent. Though the structure of Nicotiana RuBisCO has been modeled, the structure of tomato RuBisCO is still unknown. RuBisCO extracted from chloroplasts of tomato leaves was subjected to MALDI-TOF-TOF followed by Mascot Search. The protein sequence based on gene identification numbers was subjected to in silico model construction, characterization and docking studies. The primary structure analysis revealed that protein was stable, neutral, hydrophilic and has an acidic pI. The result though indicates a 90 % homology with other members of Solanaceae but differs from the structure of Arabidopsis RuBisCO. Different ligands were docked to assess the activity of RuBisCO against these metabolite components. Out of the number of modulators tested, ergosterol had the maximum affinity (E = -248.08) with RuBisCO. Ergosterol is a major cell wall component of fungi and has not been reported to be naturally found in plants. It is a known immune elicitor in plants. The current study throws light on its role in affecting RuBisCO activity in plants, thereby bringing changes in the photosynthetic rate. PMID:26253718

  20. Rubisco Activity in Guard Cells Compared with the Solute Requirement for Stomatal Opening 1

    PubMed Central

    Reckmann, Udo; Scheibe, Renate; Raschke, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    We investigated whether the reductive pentose phosphate path in guard cells of Pisum sativum had the capacity to contribute significantly to the production of osmotica during stomatal opening in the light. Amounts of ribulose 1,5-bisphophate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) were determined by the [14C]carboxyarabinitol bisphosphate assay. A guard cell contained about 1.2 and a mesophyll cell about 324 picograms of the enzyme; the ratio was 1:270. The specific activities of Rubisco in guard cells and in mesophyll cells were equal; there was no indication of a specific inhibitor of Rubisco in guard cells. Rubisco activity was 115 femtomol per guard-cell protoplast and hour. This value was different from zero with a probability of 0.99. After exposure of guard-cell protoplasts to 14CO2 for 2 seconds in the light, about one-half of the radioactivity was in phosphorylated compounds and <10% in malate. Guard cells in epidermal strips produced a different labelling pattern; in the light, <10% of the label was in phosphorylated compounds and about 60% in malate. The rate of solute accumulation in intact guard cells was estimated to have been 900 femto-osmol per cell and hour. If Rubisco operated at full capacity in guard cells, and hexoses were produced as osmotica, solutes could be supplied at a rate of 19 femto-osmol per cell and hour, which would constitute 2% of the estimated requirement. The capacity of guard-cell Rubisco to meet the solute requirement for stomatal opening in leaves of Pisum sativum is insignificant. Images Figure 1 PMID:16667255

  1. Rubisco activity in guard cells compared with the solute requirement for stomatal opening. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Reckmann, U.; Scheibe, R.; Raschke, K. )

    1990-01-01

    We investigated whether the reductive pentose phosphate path in guard cells of Pisum sativum had the capacity to contribute significantly to the production of osmotica during stomatal opening in the light. Amounts of ribulose 1,5-bisphophate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) were determined by the ({sup 14}C) carboxyarabinitol bisphosphate assay. A guard cell contained about 1.2 and a mesophyll cell about 324 picograms of the enzyme; the ratio was 1:270. The specific activities of Rubisco in guard cells and in mesophyll cells were equal; there was no indication of a specific inhibitor of Rubisco in guard cells. Rubisco activity was 115 femtomol per guard-cell protoplast and hour. This value was different from zero with a probability of 0.99. After exposure of guard-cell protoplasts to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} for 2 seconds in the light, about one-half of the radioactivity was in phosphorylated compounds and <10% in malate. Guard cells in epidermal strips produced a different labelling pattern; in the light, <10% of the label was in phosphorylated compounds and about 60% in malate. The rate of solute accumulation in intact guard cells was estimated to have been 900 femto-osmol per cell and hour. If Rubisco operated at full capacity in guard cells, and hexoses were produced as osmotica, solutes could be supplied at a rate of 19femto-osmol per cell and hour, which would constitute 2% of the estimated requirement. The capacity of guard-cell Rubisco to meet the solute requirement for stomatal opening in leaves of Pisum sativum is insignificant.

  2. The Plastid Casein Kinase 2 Phosphorylates Rubisco Activase at the Thr-78 Site but Is Not Essential for Regulation of Rubisco Activation State

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Y.; Bender, Kyle W.; Walker, Berkley J.; Zielinski, Raymond E.; Spalding, Martin H.; Ort, Donald R.; Huber, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    Rubisco activase (RCA) is essential for the activation of Rubisco, the carboxylating enzyme of photosynthesis. In Arabidopsis, RCA is composed of a large RCAα and small RCAβ isoform that are formed by alternative splicing of a single gene (At2g39730). The activity of Rubisco is controlled in response to changes in irradiance by regulation of RCA activity, which is known to involve a redox-sensitive disulfide bond located in the carboxy-terminal extension of the RCAα subunit. Additionally, phosphorylation of RCA threonine-78 (Thr-78) has been reported to occur in the dark suggesting that phosphorylation may also be associated with dark-inactivation of RCA and deactivation of Rubisco. In the present study, we developed site-specific antibodies to monitor phosphorylation of RCA at the Thr-78 site and used non-reducing SDS-PAGE to monitor the redox status of the RCAα subunit. By immunoblotting, phosphorylation of both RCA isoforms occurred at low light and in the dark and feeding peroxide or DTT to leaf segments indicated that redox status of the chloroplast stroma was a critical factor controlling RCA phosphorylation. Use of a knockout mutant identified the plastid-targeted casein kinase 2 (cpCK2α) as the major protein kinase involved in RCA phosphorylation. Studies with recombinant cpCK2α and synthetic peptide substrates identified acidic residues at the –1, +2, and +3 positions surrounding Thr-78 as strong positive recognition elements. The cpck2 knockout mutant had strongly reduced phosphorylation at the Thr-78 site but was similar to wild type plants in terms of induction kinetics of photosynthesis following transfer from darkness or low light to high light, suggesting that if phosphorylation of RCA Thr-78 plays a direct role it would be redundant to redox regulation for control of Rubisco activation state under normal conditions. PMID:27064346

  3. LIGHT MODULATION OF RUBISCO ACTIVATION IN SPECIES WITHOUT A LARGER ACTIVASE ISOFORM - EXISTANCE OF AN ACTIVASE REGULATORY PROTEIN?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubisco activase in some species like tobacco consists of only the shorter isoform. In Arabidopsis lack of the redox regulated, larger isoform results in an inability to modulate Rubisco activity in response to light intensity. However, light modulation can be observed in tobacco with characteristic...

  4. Changes of mesophyll and the rubisco activity in pea plants grown in clinostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamchuk, N. I.

    In earlier research, it was found that microgravity causes alteration of mesophyll cell parameters and dislication at the ultrastructural level (Kordyum et al., 1989, Nedukha et al., 1991, Kordyum, 1997, Adamchuk et al., 2002). Also, destruction of the fine structure of chloroplasts was reported by Abilov et al. (1986), Aliev et al. (1987), Kordyum et al. (1989), and Adamchuk et al. (1999). In addition, Abilov et al. (1986), Aliev et al. (1987), Brown et al. (1993) have discovered the decrease in starch volume. The objective of this work was to compare quantitative ultrastructural parameters of mesophyll cells (including properties of their chloroplasts) and the level of Rubisco activity detected in clinorotated and control plants of pea (Pisum sativum L.). Plants were grown for 12 days in the nutritional medium of Hogland on a clinostat (with 2 rev. min-1 speed of rotation) at a temperature of 23-25°C and illumination 230 μ mol per m-2s-1. The comparison of transversal cross-sections of leaves has revealed a significant increase of mesophyll cell volume and intercellular space under experimental conditions. This expansion of mesophyll cells has correlated with an increase of the number of chloroplasts. Essential ultrastructural changes have affected the total volume of thylakoids. Also, the value of the photosynthetic membranes development in the clinorotated plants was higher 17.11 ± 1.94 μ m3 then in control -- 12.65 ± 1.83 μ m3 due to extension of destacking thylakoids. Increase of the volume density of plastoglobuli in the clinorotated plants on the 1.63-fold suggested the effect of either greater accumulation of lipid or acceleration of chloroplasts senescence. Under influence of clinorotation, the partial volume of starch inclusions significantly decreased in the spongy mesophyll chloroplasts -- 10.46 ± 1.80 % to compare with control -- 31.34 ± 2.37 %. However, the clinorotation of plants resulted in an increase of the Rubisco activity. Intensities

  5. Effects of CO sub 2 concentration on rubisco activity, amount, and photosynthesis in soybean leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, W.J.; Allen, L.H. Jr.; Bowes, G. )

    1988-12-01

    Growth at an elevated CO{sub 2} concentration resulted in an enhanced capacity for soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. cv Bragg) leaflet photosynthesis. Plants were grown from seed in outdoor controlled-environment chambers under natural solar irradiance. Photosynthetic rates, measured during the seed filling stage, were up to 150% greater with leaflets grown at 660 compared to 330 microliters of CO{sub 2} per liter when measured across a range of intercellular CO{sub 2} concentrations and irradiance. Soybean plants grown at elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations had heavier pod weights per plant, 44% heavier with 660 compared to 330 microliters of CO{sub 2} per liter grown plants, and also greater specific leaf weights. Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco) activity showed no response (mean activity of 96 micromoles of CO{sub 2} per square meter per second expressed on a leaflet area basis) to short-term ({approximately}1 hour) exposures to a range of CO{sub 2} concentrations (110-880 microliters per liter), nor was a response of activity (mean activity of 1.01 micromoles of CO{sub 2} per minute per milligram of protein) to growth CO{sub 2} concentration (160-990 microliters per liter) observed. The amount of rubisco protein was constant, as growth CO{sub 2} concentration was varied, and averaged 55% of the total leaflet soluble protein. Although CO{sub 2} is required for activation of rubisco, results indicated that within the range of CO{sub 2} concentrations used (110-990 microliters per liter), rubisco activity in soybean leaflets, in the light, was not regulated by CO{sub 2}.

  6. Photosynthesis and regulation of rubisco activity in net phytoplankton from Delaware Bay

    SciTech Connect

    MacIntyre, H.L.; Geider, R.J.; McKay, R.M.

    1996-10-01

    Net phytoplankton (>20 {mu}m) comprised 51 {plus_minus} 9% of the total chlorophyll (Chl) in a Skeletonema costatum-dominated spring bloom in Delaware Bay. The net phytoplankton had low C:N and high protein:carbohydrate ratios, indicating that their growth was nutrient-replete. Their photosynthetic responses were characterized by low specific absorption, low light-limited and light-saturated rates of photosynthesis, and high quantum yields, indicative of acclimation to low irradiance and internal self-shading. High fucoxanthin: Chl ratios also indicated low light acclimation, but high photoprotective xanthophyll: Chl ratios suggested a high capacity for photoprotective energy dissipation. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) could be activated and deactivated in response to changes in irradiance and was fully activated at the surface of the water column and fully deactivated in aphotic deep water. Maximum Rubisco activity was correlated with Rubisco content and bulk protein content of the phytoplankton and with light-saturated rates of photosynthesis measured in short (<20-min) incubations. Long (60-min) incubations caused a decrease in the light-saturated rate of photosynthesis, possibly because of feedback limitation. While feedback limitation is unlikely to occur in the water column it should be considered when estimating productivity in well-mixed waters from fixed light-depth incubations. 90 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Regulation of Rubisco activase and its interaction with Rubisco

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The large, alpha-isoform of Rubisco activase confers redox regulation of the ATP/ADP response of the ATP hydrolysis and Rubisco activation activities of the multimeric activase holoenzyme complex. The alpha-isoform has a C-terminal extension that contains the redox-sensitive cysteine residues and is...

  8. Modulation of Rubisco Activity during the Diurnal Phases of the Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana.

    PubMed

    Maxwell; Borland; Haslam; Helliker; Roberts; Griffiths

    1999-11-01

    The regulation of Rubisco activity was investigated under high, constant photosynthetic photon flux density during the diurnal phases of Crassulacean acid metabolism in Kalanchoë daigremontiana Hamet et Perr. During phase I, a significant period of nocturnal, C(4)-mediated CO(2) fixation was observed, with the generated malic acid being decarboxylated the following day (phase III). Two periods of daytime atmospheric CO(2) fixation occurred at the beginning (phase II, C(4)-C(3) carboxylation) and end (phase IV, C(3)-C(4) carboxylation) of the day. During the 1st h of the photoperiod, when phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase was still active, the highest rates of atmospheric CO(2) uptake were observed, coincident with the lowest rates of electron transport and minimal Rubisco activity. Over the next 1 to 2 h of phase II, carbamylation increased rapidly during an initial period of decarboxylation. Maximal carbamylation (70%-80%) was reached 2 h into phase III and was maintained under conditions of elevated CO(2) resulting from malic acid decarboxylation. Initial and total Rubisco activity increased throughout phase III, with maximal activity achieved 9 h into the photoperiod at the beginning of phase IV, as atmospheric CO(2) uptake recommenced. We suggest that the increased enzyme activity supports assimilation under CO(2)-limited conditions at the start of phase IV. The data indicate that Rubisco activity is modulated in-line with intracellular CO(2) supply during the daytime phases of Crassulacean acid metabolism. PMID:10557233

  9. RUBISCO ACTIVASE --- RUBISCO'S CATALYTIC CHAPERONE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current status of research on the structure, regulation, mechanism and importance of Rubisco activase is reviewed. The activase is now recognized to be a member of the AAA+ family, whose members participate in macromolecular complexes that perform diverse chaperone-line functions. The conversed ...

  10. Regulation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco) activase: product inhibition, cooperativity, and magnesium activation.

    PubMed

    Hazra, Suratna; Henderson, J Nathan; Liles, Kevin; Hilton, Matthew T; Wachter, Rebekka M

    2015-10-01

    In many photosynthetic organisms, tight-binding Rubisco inhibitors are released by the motor protein Rubisco activase (Rca). In higher plants, Rca plays a pivotal role in regulating CO2 fixation. Here, the ATPase activity of 0.005 mm tobacco Rca was monitored under steady-state conditions, and global curve fitting was utilized to extract kinetic constants. The kcat was best fit by 22.3 ± 4.9 min(-1), the Km for ATP by 0.104 ± 0.024 mm, and the Ki for ADP by 0.037 ± 0.007 mm. Without ADP, the Hill coefficient for ATP hydrolysis was extracted to be 1.0 ± 0.1, indicating noncooperative behavior of homo-oligomeric Rca assemblies. However, the addition of ADP was shown to introduce positive cooperativity between two or more subunits (Hill coefficient 1.9 ± 0.2), allowing for regulation via the prevailing ATP/ADP ratio. ADP-mediated activation was not observed, although larger amounts led to competitive product inhibition of hydrolytic activity. The catalytic efficiency increased 8.4-fold upon cooperative binding of a second magnesium ion (Hill coefficient 2.5 ± 0.5), suggesting at least three conformational states (ATP-bound, ADP-bound, and empty) within assemblies containing an average of about six subunits. The addition of excess Rubisco (24:1, L8S8/Rca6) and crowding agents did not modify catalytic rates. However, high magnesium provided for thermal Rca stabilization. We propose that magnesium mediates the formation of closed hexameric toroids capable of high turnover rates and amenable to allosteric regulation. We suggest that in vivo, the Rca hydrolytic activity is tuned by fluctuating [Mg(2+)] in response to changes in available light. PMID:26283786

  11. Isolation and kinetic characterisation of hydrophobically distinct populations of form I Rubisco

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rubisco (Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) is a Calvin Cycle enzyme involved in CO2 assimilation. It is thought to be a major cause of photosynthetic inefficiency, suffering from both a slow catalytic rate and lack of specificity due to a competing reaction with oxygen. Revealing and understanding the engineering rules that dictate Rubisco’s activity could have a significant impact on photosynthetic efficiency and crop yield. Results This paper describes the purification and characterisation of a number of hydrophobically distinct populations of Rubisco from both Spinacia oleracea and Brassica oleracea extracts. The populations were obtained using a novel and rapid purification protocol that employs hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) as a form I Rubisco enrichment procedure, resulting in distinct Rubisco populations of expected enzymatic activities, high purities and integrity. Conclusions We demonstrate here that HIC can be employed to isolate form I Rubisco with purities and activities comparable to those obtained via ion exchange chromatography (IEC). Interestingly, and in contrast to other published purification methods, HIC resulted in the isolation of a number of hydrophobically distinct Rubisco populations. Our findings reveal a so far unaccounted diversity in the hydrophobic properties within form 1 Rubisco. By employing HIC to isolate and characterise Spinacia oleracea and Brassica oleracea, we show that the presence of these distinct Rubisco populations is not species specific, and we report for the first time the kinetic properties of Rubisco from Brassica oleracea extracts. These observations may aid future studies concerning Rubisco’s structural and functional properties. PMID:24987448

  12. Catalytic roles of flexible regions at the active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco)

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Harpel, M.R.; Chen, Yuh-Ru; Larson, E.M.; Larimer, F.W.

    1995-12-31

    Chemical and mutagenesis studies of Rubisco have identified Lys329 and Glu48 as active-site residues that are located in distinct, interacting domains from adjacent subunits. Crystallographic analyses have shown that Lys329 is the apical residue in a 12-residue flexible loop (loop 6) of the {Beta},{alpha}-barrel domain of the active site and that Glu48 resides at the end of helix B of the N-terminal domain of the active site. When phosphorylated ligands are bound by the enzyme, loop 6 adopts a closed conformation and, in concert with repositioning of helix B, thereby occludes the active site from the external environment. In this closed conformation, the {gamma}-carboxylate of Glu48 and the {epsilon}-amino group of Lys329 engage in intersubunit electrostatic interaction. By use of appropriate site-directed mutants of Rhodospirillum rubrum Rubisco, we are addressing several issues: the catalytic roles of Lys329 and Glu48, the functional significance of the intersubunit salt bridge comprised of these two residues, and the roles of loop 6 and helix B in stabilizing labile reaction intermediates. Characterization of novel products derived from misprocessing of D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) by the mutant proteins have illuminated the structure of the key intermediate in the normal oxygenase pathway.

  13. Modified rubisco large subunit n-methyltransferase useful for targeting molecules to the active-site vicinity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate

    DOEpatents

    Houtz, Robert L.

    2012-03-20

    The present invention generally relates to a modified Rubisco large subunit .sup..epsilon.N-Methyltransferase (Rubisco LSMT, or RLSMT). The present invention also relates to a modified RLSMT-carbonic anhydrase (RLSMT-CA). This modified RLSMT-CA improves the efficiency of the reduction of CO.sub.2 during photosynthesis, which may increase plant growth rates. The present invention also relates to nucleic acids encoding the modified RLSMT-CA or modified RLSMT. Also, the present invention relates to cells including the modified RLSMT-CA or modified RLSMT, plants containing the modified RLSMT-CA or modified RLSMT, and methods using compositions of the present invention. In addition, the present invention relates to antibodies conjugated to CA which may bind to Rubisco, and antibodies which bind a modified RLSMT-CA. The invention also relates to modified forms of the LS and SS of Rubisco where the modified forms are fusions with CA or biologically active fragments thereof. The present invention provides methods of altering Rubisco carboxylase activity and altering plant growth.

  14. Biophysical characterization of higher plant Rubisco activase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubisco activase (Rca) is a chaperone-like protein of the AAA+ family, which uses mechanochemical energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to release tightly bound inhibitors from the active site of the primary carbon fixing enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate oxygenase/carboxylase (Rubisco). Mechanistic and...

  15. Structural changes associated with the acute thermal instability of Rubisco activase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The inhibition of photosynthesis at moderately high temperatures has been linked to a decrease in Rubisco activation, thought to be a consequence of the thermal instability of Rubisco's chaperone, Rubisco activase. To determine the structural basis for inactivation of Rubisco activase, the effects o...

  16. Purification of Rubisco activase from leaves or after expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Barta, Csengele; Carmo-Silva, A Elizabete; Salvucci, Michael E

    2011-01-01

    Rubisco activase is a molecular chaperone that modulates the activation state of Rubisco by catalyzing the ATP-dependent removal of tightly-bound inhibitory sugar-phosphates from Rubisco's catalytic sites. This chapter reports methods developed for the purification of native and recombinant Rubisco activase from leaves and bacterial cells, respectively. PMID:20960143

  17. Effect of CO sub 2 enrichment and high photosynthetic photon flux densities (PPFD) on rubisco and PEP-case activities of in vitro cultured strawberry plants

    SciTech Connect

    Desjardins, Y.; Beeson, R.; Gosselin, A. )

    1989-04-01

    Standard growing conditions in vitro (low light and CO{sub 2}) are not conducive to autotrophy. An experiment was conducted to improve photosynthesis in vitro in the hope of increasing survival in acclimatization. A factorial experiment was elaborated where CO{sub 2} and PPFD were supplied to in vitro cultured strawberry plants in the rooting stage. Activities of carboxylating enzymes were determined after 4 weeks of culture. The activities of non-activated and activated rubisco and PEP-Case were measured after extraction of the enzymes and a reaction with NaH{sup 14}CO{sub 3} followed by scintillation counting spectroscopy. High CO{sub 2} concentration significantly increased net assimilation rates (NAR) by 165% over the control for both 1650 and 3000 ppm CO{sub 2}. High PPFD only increased NAR by 12 and 35% for 150 and 250 {mu}mol{center dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center dot}s{sup {minus}1} respectively over the control. Plants grown at 3000 ppm CO{sub 2} had the highest level of chlorophyll/g FW with 97% more than the control. The activity of PEP-Case was the highest at high light levels and high CO{sub 2} with rates of 1.65 for 1650 ppm versus 1.22 mmol CO{sub 2} mg{sup {minus}1} chl. h{sup {minus}1} at 250 {mu}mol{center dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center dot}s{sup {minus}1}. There was no difference in PEP activity at low light levels. The rubisco activity was lower at 1650 and 3000 ppm CO{sub 2}. Increases in NAR correlate more closely to the PEP-Case than to Rubisco activity. Physiological significance of high activity of PEP-Case over rubisco will be discussed.

  18. OLIGOMERIZATION STATE OF RUBISCO ACTIVASE REVEALED BY DYNAMIC LIGHT SCATTERING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The self-association of Rubisco activase has been suggested to be required for Rubisco activation via ATP hydrolysis. To study the oligmerization patterns in detail, we initially measured the size of each isoform (42 KDa and 45 KDa) of recombinant spinach activase using dynamic light scattering spec...

  19. Purification of Rubisco Activase from Leaves or after Expression in Escherichia coli.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubisco activase is a molecular chaperone that modulates the activation state of Rubisco by catalyzing the ATP-dependent removal of tightly-bound inhibitory sugar-phosphates from Rubisco’s catalytic sites. This chapter reports methods developed for the purification of native and recombinant Rubisco...

  20. Atomic resolution x-ray structure of the substrate recognition domain of higher plant rubisco activase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rapid release of tight-binding inhibitors from dead-end Rubisco complexes requires the activity of Rubisco activase, an AAA+ ATPase that utilizes chemo-mechanical energy to catalyze the reactivation of Rubisco. Activase is thought to play a central role in coordinating the rate of CO2 fixation w...

  1. Exogenous sucrose supply changes sugar metabolism and reduces photosynthesis of sugarcane through the down-regulation of Rubisco abundance and activity.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Ana Karla Moreira; de Oliveira Martins, Marcio; Lima Neto, Milton Costa; Machado, Eduardo Caruso; Ribeiro, Rafael Vasconcelos; Silveira, Joaquim Albenisio Gomes

    2015-05-01

    Photosynthetic modulation by sugars has been known for many years, but the biochemical and molecular comprehension of this process is lacking. We studied how the exogenous sucrose supplied to leaves could affect sugar metabolism in leaf, sheath and stalk and inhibit photosynthesis in four-month old sugarcane plants. Exogenous sucrose 50mM sprayed on attached leaves strongly impaired the net CO2 assimilation (PN) and decreased the instantaneous carboxylation efficiency (PN/Ci), suggesting that the impairment in photosynthesis was caused by biochemical restrictions. The photosystem II activity was also affected by excess sucrose as indicated by the reduction in the apparent electron transport rate, effective quantum yield and increase in non-photochemical quenching. In leaf segments, sucrose accumulation was related to increases in the activities of soluble acid and neutral invertases, sucrose synthase and sucrose phosphate synthase, whereas the contents of fructose increased and glucose slightly decreased. Changes in the activities of sucrose hydrolyzing and synthesizing enzymes in leaf, sheath and stalk and sugar profile in intact plants were not enough to identify which sugar(s) or enzyme(s) were directly involved in photosynthesis modulation. However, exogenous sucrose was able to trigger down-regulation in the Rubisco abundance, activation state and enzymatic activity. Despite the fact that PN/Ci had been notably decreased by sucrose, in vitro activity and abundance of PEPCase did not change, suggesting an in vivo modulation of this enzyme. The data reveal that sucrose and/or other derivative sugars in leaves inhibited sugarcane photosynthesis by down-regulation of Rubisco synthesis and activity. Our data also suggest that sugar modulation was not exerted by a feedback mechanism induced by the accumulation of sugars in immature sugarcane stalk. PMID:25863283

  2. Temperature Responses of C4 Photosynthesis: Biochemical Analysis of Rubisco, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase, and Carbonic Anhydrase in Setaria viridis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Ryan A.; Gandin, Anthony; Cousins, Asaph B.

    2015-01-01

    The photosynthetic assimilation of CO2 in C4 plants is potentially limited by the enzymatic rates of Rubisco, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc), and carbonic anhydrase (CA). Therefore, the activity and kinetic properties of these enzymes are needed to accurately parameterize C4 biochemical models of leaf CO2 exchange in response to changes in CO2 availability and temperature. There are currently no published temperature responses of both Rubisco carboxylation and oxygenation kinetics from a C4 plant, nor are there known measurements of the temperature dependency of the PEPc Michaelis-Menten constant for its substrate HCO3−, and there is little information on the temperature response of plant CA activity. Here, we used membrane inlet mass spectrometry to measure the temperature responses of Rubisco carboxylation and oxygenation kinetics, PEPc carboxylation kinetics, and the activity and first-order rate constant for the CA hydration reaction from 10°C to 40°C using crude leaf extracts from the C4 plant Setaria viridis. The temperature dependencies of Rubisco, PEPc, and CA kinetic parameters are provided. These findings describe a new method for the investigation of PEPc kinetics, suggest an HCO3− limitation imposed by CA, and show similarities between the Rubisco temperature responses of previously measured C3 species and the C4 plant S. viridis. PMID:26373659

  3. Degradation of potent Rubisco inhibitor by selective sugar phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Bracher, Andreas; Sharma, Anurag; Starling-Windhof, Amanda; Hartl, F Ulrich; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit

    2015-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyses the conversion of atmospheric carbon dioxide into organic compounds in photosynthetic organisms. Alongside carboxylating the five-carbon sugar ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP)(1-3), Rubisco produces a small amount of xylulose-1,5-bisphosphate (XuBP), a potent inhibitor of Rubisco(4). The AAA+ protein Rubisco activase removes XuBP from the active site of Rubisco in an ATP-dependent process(5,6). However, free XuBP rapidly rebinds to Rubisco, perpetuating its inhibitory effect. Here, we combine biochemical and structural analyses to show that the CbbY protein of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Arabidopsis thaliana is a highly selective XuBP phosphatase. We also show that CbbY converts XuBP to the non-inhibitory compound xylulose-5-phosphate, which is recycled back to RuBP. We solve the crystal structures of CbbY from R. sphaeroides and A. thaliana, and through mutational analysis show that the cap domain of the protein confers the selectivity for XuBP over RuBP. Finally, in vitro experiments with CbbY from R. sphaeroides reveal that CbbY cooperates with Rubisco activase to prevent a detrimental build-up of XuBP at the Rubisco active site. We suggest that CbbY, which is conserved in algae and plants, is an important component of the cellular machinery that has evolved to deal with the shortcomings of the ancient enzyme Rubisco. PMID:27246049

  4. Rapid inactivation of chloroplastic ascorbate peroxidase is responsible for oxidative modification to Rubisco in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) under cadmium stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai-Lang; Shen, Lin; Wang, Jia-Qi; Sheng, Ji-Ping

    2008-04-01

    To investigate the sensitive site of antioxidant systems in chloroplast under cadmium stress and its consequence on reactive oxygen species production and action, the sub-organellar localization of chloroplast superoxide dismutases (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) and ascorbic peroxidase (APX, EC 1.11.1.11) isoenzymes and changes of enzymes activities under cadmium stress were investigated in tomato seedlings. Two APX isoforms, one thylakoid-bound and one stromal, were detected. Cd at 50 microM induced a moderate increase of SOD activities but a rapid inactivation of both APX isoenzymes. APX inactivation was mainly related to the decrease of ascorbate concentration, as supported by in vitro treatment of exogenous ascorbate and APX kinetic properties under Cd stress. H2O2 accumulation in chloroplast, as a consequence of APX inactivation, was associated with a 60% loss of Rubisco (EC 4.1.1.39) activity, which could be partially accounted for by a 10% loss of Rubisco content. Protein oxidation assay found that the Rubisco large subunit was the most prominent carbonylated protein; the level of carbonylated Rubisco large subunit increased fivefold after Cd exposure. Thiol groups in the Rubisco large subunit were oxidized, as indicated by non-reducing electrophoresis. Treating crude extract with H2O2 resulted in a similar pattern of protein oxidation and thiols oxidation with that observed in Cd-treated plants. Our study indicates that APXs in the chloroplast is a highly sensitive site of antioxidant systems under Cd stress, and the inactivation of APX could be mainly responsible for oxidative modification to Rubisco and subsequent decrease in its activity. PMID:18713375

  5. Influence of salicylic acid on rubisco and rubisco activase in tobacco plant grown under sodium chloride in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So Young; Damodaran, Puthanveettil Narayanankutty; Roh, Kwang Soo

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the influence of salicylic acid (SA) on the growth of salt stress (sodium chloride) induced in tobacco plants. In addition, quantification of rubisco and rubisco activase contents of the plants was also determined in treatments with the control, 10−4 mM SA, 50 mM NaCl, 100 mM NaCl, 150 mM NaCl, SA + 50 mM NaCl, SA + 100 mM NaCl and SA + 150 mM NaCl, respectively after in vitro culture for 5 weeks. The growth of the tobacco plant decreased in 50 mM and 100 mM NaCl when not treated with SA. However, the growth was accelerated by SA, and the growth retardation caused by NaCl was improved by SA. The content of rubisco was improved by SA only in plants treated with 50 mM NaCl, and the activity of rubisco was increased by SA resulting in the decreased effect of NaCl, but only in 50 mM NaCl treated plants. The content of rubisco activase decreased due to NaCl, and SA did not improve the effect caused by NaCl. The activity of rubisco activase was increased by SA resulting in decreased activity caused by NaCl, but increased effect by SA was not recovered to the level of NaCl untreated plants. The activity of rubisco and rubisco activase, which decreased due to denaturing agents, did not demonstrate significant improvement when compared to the control. PMID:25313276

  6. Influence of salicylic acid on rubisco and rubisco activase in tobacco plant grown under sodium chloride in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, So Young; Damodaran, Puthanveettil Narayanankutty; Roh, Kwang Soo

    2014-11-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the influence of salicylic acid (SA) on the growth of salt stress (sodium chloride) induced in tobacco plants. In addition, quantification of rubisco and rubisco activase contents of the plants was also determined in treatments with the control, 10(-4) mM SA, 50 mM NaCl, 100 mM NaCl, 150 mM NaCl, SA + 50 mM NaCl, SA + 100 mM NaCl and SA + 150 mM NaCl, respectively after in vitro culture for 5 weeks. The growth of the tobacco plant decreased in 50 mM and 100 mM NaCl when not treated with SA. However, the growth was accelerated by SA, and the growth retardation caused by NaCl was improved by SA. The content of rubisco was improved by SA only in plants treated with 50 mM NaCl, and the activity of rubisco was increased by SA resulting in the decreased effect of NaCl, but only in 50 mM NaCl treated plants. The content of rubisco activase decreased due to NaCl, and SA did not improve the effect caused by NaCl. The activity of rubisco activase was increased by SA resulting in decreased activity caused by NaCl, but increased effect by SA was not recovered to the level of NaCl untreated plants. The activity of rubisco and rubisco activase, which decreased due to denaturing agents, did not demonstrate significant improvement when compared to the control. PMID:25313276

  7. Rubisco mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii enhance photosynthetic hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Pinto, T S; Malcata, F X; Arrabaça, J D; Silva, J M; Spreitzer, R J; Esquível, M G

    2013-06-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is an ideal fuel characterized by high enthalpy change and lack of greenhouse effects. This biofuel can be released by microalgae via reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen catalyzed by hydrogenases. The main competitor for the reducing power required by the hydrogenases is the Calvin cycle, and rubisco plays a key role therein. Engineered Chlamydomonas with reduced rubisco levels, activity and stability was used as the basis of this research effort aimed at increasing hydrogen production. Biochemical monitoring in such metabolically engineered mutant cells proceeded in Tris/acetate/phosphate culture medium with S-depletion or repletion, both under hypoxia. Photosynthetic activity, maximum photochemical efficiency, chlorophyll and protein levels were all measured. In addition, expression of rubisco, hydrogenase, D1 and Lhcb were investigated, and H2 was quantified. At the beginning of the experiments, rubisco increased followed by intense degradation. Lhcb proteins exhibited monomeric isoforms during the first 24 to 48 h, and D1 displayed sensitivity under S-depletion. Rubisco mutants exhibited a significant decrease in O2 evolution compared with the control. Although the S-depleted medium was much more suitable than its complete counterpart for H2 production, hydrogen release was observed also in sealed S-repleted cultures of rubisco mutated cells under low-moderate light conditions. In particular, the rubisco mutant Y67A accounted for 10-15-fold higher hydrogen production than the wild type under the same conditions and also displayed divergent metabolic parameters. These results indicate that rubisco is a promising target for improving hydrogen production rates in engineered microalgae. PMID:23649352

  8. Widespread positive selection in the photosynthetic Rubisco enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Kapralov, Maxim V; Filatov, Dmitry A

    2007-01-01

    Background Rubisco enzyme catalyzes the first step in net photosynthetic CO2 assimilation and photorespiratory carbon oxidation and is responsible for almost all carbon fixation on Earth. The large subunit of Rubisco is encoded by the chloroplast rbcL gene, which is widely used for reconstruction of plant phylogenies due to its conservative nature. Plant systematicists have mainly used rbcL paying little attention to its function, and the question whether it evolves under Darwinian selection has received little attention. The purpose of our study was to evaluate how common is positive selection in Rubisco among the phototrophs and where in the Rubisco structure does positive selection occur. Results We searched for positive selection in rbcL sequences from over 3000 species representing all lineages of green plants and some lineages of other phototrophs, such as brown and red algae, diatoms, euglenids and cyanobacteria. Our molecular phylogenetic analysis found the presence of positive selection in rbcL of most analyzed land plants, but not in algae and cyanobacteria. The mapping of the positively selected residues on the Rubisco tertiary structure revealed that they are located in regions important for dimer-dimer, intradimer, large subunit-small subunit and Rubisco-Rubisco activase interactions, and that some of the positively selected residues are close to the active site. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that despite its conservative nature, Rubisco evolves under positive selection in most lineages of land plants, and after billions of years of evolution Darwinian selection still fine-tunes its performance. Widespread positive selection in rbcL has to be taken into account when this gene is used for phylogenetic reconstructions. PMID:17498284

  9. Large variation in the Rubisco kinetics of diatoms reveals diversity among their carbon-concentrating mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Young, Jodi N; Heureux, Ana M C; Sharwood, Robert E; Rickaby, Rosalind E M; Morel, François M M; Whitney, Spencer M

    2016-05-01

    While marine phytoplankton rival plants in their contribution to global primary productivity, our understanding of their photosynthesis remains rudimentary. In particular, the kinetic diversity of the CO2-fixing enzyme, Rubisco, in phytoplankton remains unknown. Here we quantify the maximum rates of carboxylation (k cat (c)), oxygenation (k cat (o)), Michaelis constants (K m) for CO2 (K C) and O2 (K O), and specificity for CO2 over O2 (SC/O) for Form I Rubisco from 11 diatom species. Diatom Rubisco shows greater variation in K C (23-68 µM), SC/O (57-116mol mol(-1)), and K O (413-2032 µM) relative to plant and algal Rubisco. The broad range of K C values mostly exceed those of C4 plant Rubisco, suggesting that the strength of the carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) in diatoms is more diverse, and more effective than previously predicted. The measured k cat (c) for each diatom Rubisco showed less variation (2.1-3.7s(-1)), thus averting the canonical trade-off typically observed between K C and k cat (c) for plant Form I Rubisco. Uniquely, a negative relationship between K C and cellular Rubisco content was found, suggesting variation among diatom species in how they allocate their limited cellular resources between Rubisco synthesis and their CCM. The activation status of Rubisco in each diatom was low, indicating a requirement for Rubisco activase. This work highlights the need to better understand the correlative natural diversity between the Rubisco kinetics and CCM of diatoms and the underpinning mechanistic differences in catalytic chemistry among the Form I Rubisco superfamily. PMID:27129950

  10. Large variation in the Rubisco kinetics of diatoms reveals diversity among their carbon-concentrating mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jodi N.; Heureux, Ana M.C.; Sharwood, Robert E.; Rickaby, Rosalind E.M.; Morel, François M.M.; Whitney, Spencer M.

    2016-01-01

    While marine phytoplankton rival plants in their contribution to global primary productivity, our understanding of their photosynthesis remains rudimentary. In particular, the kinetic diversity of the CO2-fixing enzyme, Rubisco, in phytoplankton remains unknown. Here we quantify the maximum rates of carboxylation (k cat c), oxygenation (k cat o), Michaelis constants (K m) for CO2 (K C) and O2 (K O), and specificity for CO2 over O2 (SC/O) for Form I Rubisco from 11 diatom species. Diatom Rubisco shows greater variation in K C (23–68 µM), SC/O (57–116mol mol−1), and K O (413–2032 µM) relative to plant and algal Rubisco. The broad range of K C values mostly exceed those of C4 plant Rubisco, suggesting that the strength of the carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) in diatoms is more diverse, and more effective than previously predicted. The measured k cat c for each diatom Rubisco showed less variation (2.1–3.7s−1), thus averting the canonical trade-off typically observed between K C and k cat c for plant Form I Rubisco. Uniquely, a negative relationship between K C and cellular Rubisco content was found, suggesting variation among diatom species in how they allocate their limited cellular resources between Rubisco synthesis and their CCM. The activation status of Rubisco in each diatom was low, indicating a requirement for Rubisco activase. This work highlights the need to better understand the correlative natural diversity between the Rubisco kinetics and CCM of diatoms and the underpinning mechanistic differences in catalytic chemistry among the Form I Rubisco superfamily. PMID:27129950

  11. Quantification of Rubisco activase content in leaf extracts.

    PubMed

    Yamori, Wataru; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Rubisco activase functions to promote and maintain the catalytic activity of Rubisco. Studies with the activase-lacking Arabidopsis rca mutant (Salvucci et al. Photosynth Res 7:193-201, 1985; Salvucci et al. Plant Physiol 80:655-659, 1986), antisense activase tobacco, Arabidopsis and Flaveria bidentis plants (Mate et al. Plant Physiol 102:1119-1128, 1993; Eckardt et al. Plant Physiol 113:575-586, 1997; von Caemmerer et al. Plant Physiol 137:747-755, 2005) have shown that photosynthesis at atmospheric levels of CO2 is severely impaired when plants lack activase because Rubisco becomes sequestered in an inactive form. Activase protein has been detected in all plant species, including C3 and C4 plants and green algae (Salvucci et al. Plant Physiol 84:930-936, 1987). Rubisco activase is essential in all these photosynthetic organisms for photosynthesis and plant growth. The physiological importance of Rubisco activase is reinforced by recent studies indicating that it plays a role in the response of photosynthesis to temperature. In this chapter, we describe how to extract and quantify Rubisco activase content in leaf. PMID:20960145

  12. NanoESI Mass Spectrometry of Rubisco and Rubisco Activase Structures and Their Interactions with Nucleotides and Sugar Phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blayney, Michelle J.; Whitney, Spencer M.; Beck, Jennifer L.

    2011-09-01

    Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is the protein that is responsible for the fixation of carbon dioxide in photosynthesis. Inhibitory sugar phosphate molecules, which can include its substrate ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP), can bind to Rubisco catalytic sites and inhibit catalysis. These are removed by interaction with Rubisco activase (RA) via an ATP hydrolytic reaction. Here we show the first nanoESI mass spectra of the hexadecameric Rubisco and of RA from a higher plant (tobacco). The spectra of recombinant, purified RA revealed polydispersity in its oligomeric forms (up to hexamer) and that ADP was bound. ADP was removed by dialysis against a high ionic strength solution and nucleotide binding experiments showed that ADP bound more tightly to RA than AMP-PNP (a non-hydrolysable ATP analog). There was evidence that there may be two nucleotide binding sites per RA monomer. The oligomerization capacity of mutant and wild-type tobacco RA up to hexamers is analogous to the subunit stoichiometry for other AAA+ enzymes. This suggests assembly of RA into hexamers is likely the most active conformation for removing inhibitory sugar phosphate molecules from Rubisco to enable its catalytic competency. Stoichiometric binding of RuBP or carboxyarabinitol bisphosphate (CABP) to each of the eight catalytic sites of Rubisco was observed.

  13. Biochemical characterization of predicted Precambrian RuBisCO.

    PubMed

    Shih, Patrick M; Occhialini, Alessandro; Cameron, Jeffrey C; Andralojc, P John; Parry, Martin A J; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2016-01-01

    The antiquity and global abundance of the enzyme, RuBisCO, attests to the crucial and longstanding role it has played in the biogeochemical cycles of Earth over billions of years. The counterproductive oxygenase activity of RuBisCO has persisted over billions of years of evolution, despite its competition with the carboxylase activity necessary for carbon fixation, yet hypotheses regarding the selective pressures governing RuBisCO evolution have been limited to speculation. Here we report the resurrection and biochemical characterization of ancestral RuBisCOs, dating back to over one billion years ago (Gyr ago). Our findings provide an ancient point of reference revealing divergent evolutionary paths taken by eukaryotic homologues towards improved specificity for CO2, versus the evolutionary emphasis on increased rates of carboxylation observed in bacterial homologues. Consistent with these distinctions, in vivo analysis reveals the propensity of ancestral RuBisCO to be encapsulated into modern-day carboxysomes, bacterial organelles central to the cyanobacterial CO2 concentrating mechanism. PMID:26790750

  14. Biochemical characterization of predicted Precambrian RuBisCO

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Patrick M.; Occhialini, Alessandro; Cameron, Jeffrey C.; Andralojc, P John; Parry, Martin A. J.; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2016-01-01

    The antiquity and global abundance of the enzyme, RuBisCO, attests to the crucial and longstanding role it has played in the biogeochemical cycles of Earth over billions of years. The counterproductive oxygenase activity of RuBisCO has persisted over billions of years of evolution, despite its competition with the carboxylase activity necessary for carbon fixation, yet hypotheses regarding the selective pressures governing RuBisCO evolution have been limited to speculation. Here we report the resurrection and biochemical characterization of ancestral RuBisCOs, dating back to over one billion years ago (Gyr ago). Our findings provide an ancient point of reference revealing divergent evolutionary paths taken by eukaryotic homologues towards improved specificity for CO2, versus the evolutionary emphasis on increased rates of carboxylation observed in bacterial homologues. Consistent with these distinctions, in vivo analysis reveals the propensity of ancestral RuBisCO to be encapsulated into modern-day carboxysomes, bacterial organelles central to the cyanobacterial CO2 concentrating mechanism. PMID:26790750

  15. Evolving Methanococcoides burtonii archaeal Rubisco for improved photosynthesis and plant growth

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Robert H.; Alonso, Hernan; Whitney, Spencer M.

    2016-01-01

    In photosynthesis Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyses the often rate limiting CO2-fixation step in the Calvin cycle. This makes Rubisco both the gatekeeper for carbon entry into the biosphere and a target for functional improvement to enhance photosynthesis and plant growth. Encumbering the catalytic performance of Rubisco is its highly conserved, complex catalytic chemistry. Accordingly, traditional efforts to enhance Rubisco catalysis using protracted “trial and error” protein engineering approaches have met with limited success. Here we demonstrate the versatility of high throughput directed (laboratory) protein evolution for improving the carboxylation properties of a non-photosynthetic Rubisco from the archaea Methanococcoides burtonii. Using chloroplast transformation in the model plant Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) we confirm the improved forms of M. burtonii Rubisco increased photosynthesis and growth relative to tobacco controls producing wild-type M. burtonii Rubisco. Our findings indicate continued directed evolution of archaeal Rubisco offers new potential for enhancing leaf photosynthesis and plant growth. PMID:26926260

  16. Evolving Methanococcoides burtonii archaeal Rubisco for improved photosynthesis and plant growth.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert H; Alonso, Hernan; Whitney, Spencer M

    2016-01-01

    In photosynthesis Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyses the often rate limiting CO2-fixation step in the Calvin cycle. This makes Rubisco both the gatekeeper for carbon entry into the biosphere and a target for functional improvement to enhance photosynthesis and plant growth. Encumbering the catalytic performance of Rubisco is its highly conserved, complex catalytic chemistry. Accordingly, traditional efforts to enhance Rubisco catalysis using protracted "trial and error" protein engineering approaches have met with limited success. Here we demonstrate the versatility of high throughput directed (laboratory) protein evolution for improving the carboxylation properties of a non-photosynthetic Rubisco from the archaea Methanococcoides burtonii. Using chloroplast transformation in the model plant Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) we confirm the improved forms of M. burtonii Rubisco increased photosynthesis and growth relative to tobacco controls producing wild-type M. burtonii Rubisco. Our findings indicate continued directed evolution of archaeal Rubisco offers new potential for enhancing leaf photosynthesis and plant growth. PMID:26926260

  17. Functional metagenomic selection of RubisCOs from uncultivated bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varaljay, Vanessa A; Satagopan, Sriram; North, Justin A.; Witteveen, Briana; Dourado, Manuella N.; Anantharaman, Karthik; Arbing, Mark A.; McCann, Shelley; Oremland, Ronald S.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Tabita, F. Robert

    2016-01-01

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) is a critical yet severely inefficient enzyme that catalyses the fixation of virtually all of the carbon found on Earth. Here, we report a functional metagenomic selection that recovers physiologically active RubisCO molecules directly from uncultivated and largely unknown members of natural microbial communities. Selection is based on CO2-dependent growth in a host strain capable of expressing environmental deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), precluding the need for pure cultures or screening of recombinant clones for enzymatic activity. Seventeen functional RubisCO-encoded sequences were selected using DNA extracted from soil and river autotrophic enrichments, a photosynthetic biofilm and a subsurface groundwater aquifer. Notably, three related form II RubisCOs were recovered which share high sequence similarity with metagenomic scaffolds from uncultivated members of theGallionellaceae family. One of the Gallionellaceae RubisCOs was purified and shown to possessCO2/O2 specificity typical of form II enzymes. X-ray crystallography determined that this enzyme is a hexamer, only the second form II multimer ever solved and the first RubisCO structure obtained from an uncultivated bacterium. Functional metagenomic selection leverages natural biological diversity and billions of years of evolution inherent in environmental communities, providing a new window into the discovery of CO2-fixing enzymes not previously characterized.

  18. A protein with an inactive pterin-4a-carbinolamine dehydratase domain is required for Rubisco biogenesis in plants.

    PubMed

    Feiz, Leila; Williams-Carrier, Rosalind; Belcher, Susan; Montano, Monica; Barkan, Alice; Stern, David B

    2014-12-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) plays a critical role in sustaining life by catalysis of carbon fixation in the Calvin-Benson pathway. Incomplete knowledge of the assembly pathway of chloroplast Rubisco has hampered efforts to fully delineate the enzyme's properties, or seek improved catalytic characteristics via directed evolution. Here we report that a Mu transposon insertion in the Zea mays (maize) gene encoding a chloroplast dimerization co-factor of hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 (DCoH)/pterin-4α-carbinolamine dehydratases (PCD)-like protein is the causative mutation in a seedling-lethal, Rubisco-deficient mutant named Rubisco accumulation factor 2 (raf2-1). In raf2 mutants newly synthesized Rubisco large subunit accumulates in a high-molecular weight complex, the formation of which requires a specific chaperonin 60-kDa isoform. Analogous observations had been made previously with maize mutants lacking the Rubisco biogenesis proteins RAF1 and BSD2. Chemical cross-linking of maize leaves followed by immunoprecipitation with antibodies to RAF2, RAF1 or BSD2 demonstrated co-immunoprecipitation of each with Rubisco small subunit, and to a lesser extent, co-immunoprecipitation with Rubisco large subunit. We propose that RAF2, RAF1 and BSD2 form transient complexes with the Rubisco small subunit, which in turn assembles with the large subunit as it is released from chaperonins. PMID:25279696

  19. The differential response of photosynthesis to high temperature for a boreal and temperate Populus species relates to differences in Rubisco activation and Rubisco activase properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Significant inhibition of photosynthesis occurs at temperatures only a few degrees (less than or equal to 10 degrees Celsius) above the optimum, resulting in considerable loss of potential productivity. Most studies of heat stress have focused on crop or weedy annual plants, whereas similar studies...

  20. Structure and functional annotation of hypothetical proteins having putative Rubisco activase function from Vitis vinifera.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Rubisco is a very large, complex and one of the most abundant proteins in the world and comprises up to 50% of all soluble protein in plants. The activity of Rubisco, the enzyme that catalyzes CO2 assimilation in photosynthesis, is regulated by Rubisco activase (Rca). In the present study, we searched for hypothetical protein of Vitis vinifera which has putative Rubisco activase function. The Arabidopsis and tobacco Rubisco activase protein sequences were used as seed sequences to search against Vitis vinifera in UniprotKB database. The selected hypothetical proteins of Vitis vinifera were subjected to sequence, structural and functional annotation. Subcellular localization predictions suggested it to be cytoplasmic protein. Homology modelling was used to define the three-dimensional (3D) structure of selected hypothetical proteins of Vitis vinifera. Template search revealed that all the hypothetical proteins share more than 80% sequence identity with structure of green-type Rubisco activase from tobacco, indicating proteins are evolutionary conserved. The homology modelling was generated using SWISS-MODEL. Several quality assessment and validation parameters computed indicated that homology models are reliable. Further, functional annotation through PFAM, CATH, SUPERFAMILY, CDART suggested that selected hypothetical proteins of Vitis vinifera contain ATPase family associated with various cellular activities (AAA) and belong to the AAA+ super family of ring-shaped P-loop containing nucleoside triphosphate hydrolases. This study will lead to research in the optimization of the functionality of Rubisco which has large implication in the improvement of plant productivity and resource use efficiency. PMID:25780274

  1. Discoveries in Rubisco: a historical perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Historic discoveries and key observations related to Rubisco (ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase), from 1947 to 2006, are presented. Currently, around 200 papers describing Rubisco research are published each year and the literature contains more than 5000 manuscripts on the subject. Wh...

  2. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) Gene Expression and Photosynthetic Activity in Nutrient-enriched Mesocosm Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, M.; Davies, J. T.; Weston, K.; Crawford, D. W.; Purdie, D. A.

    1998-02-01

    The temporal variability in carbon dioxide fixation rates and the relative abundance ofrbcLSmRNA (encoding the large subunit of the Calvin cycle enzyme, RubisCO) was determined for nutrient-stimulated populations of marine phytoplankton enclosed in diatom-dominated and coccolithophorid-dominated mesocosms. Both mesocosms were characterized by successive bloom events that were preceded by marked increases in the level of RubisCO gene expression. In general, maxima inrbcLmRNA abundance showed the strongest temporal covariation with peaks in the value of the photosynthetic parameter PBmax, the chlorophyll-specific maximum rate of CO2fixation. Somewhat looser temporal co-variations were observed between peaks in transcript levels and maxima in chlorophyll concentrations or phytoplankton biomass. The specific contribution of the haptophyteEmiliania huxleyito the overall level of gene expression in the diatom-dominated enclosure was investigated using an homologousrbcLgene probe. The results were compared to data obtained at lower hybridization stringency using a generalrbcLprobe originating from the oceanic cyanobacteriumSynechococcusWH8103. The comparative data suggest that, whereas diatoms made a substantial contribution to the mRNA signal during the initial part of the experiment, the contribution ofE. huxleyito the overall level of gene expression increased as the experiment progressed.

  3. Directed disassembly of an interfacial rubisco protein network.

    PubMed

    Onaizi, Sagheer A; Malcolm, Andrew S; He, Lizhong; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2007-05-22

    We present the first study of the directed disassembly of a protein network at the air-water interface by the synergistic action of a surfactant and an enzyme. We seek to understand the fundamentals of protein network disassembly by using rubisco adsorbed at the air-water interface as a model. We propose that rubisco adsorption at the air-water interface results in the formation of a fishnet-like network of interconnected protein molecules, capable of transmitting lateral force. The mechanical properties of the rubisco network during assembly and disassembly at the air-water interface were characterized by direct measurement of laterally transmitted force through the protein network using the Cambridge interfacial tensiometer. We have shown that, when used individually, either 2 ppm of the surfactant, sodium dodecyl benzyl sulfonate (SDOBS), or 2 ppm of the enzyme, subtilisin A (SA), were insufficient to completely disassemble the rubisco network within 1 h of treatment. However, a combination of 2 ppm SDOBS and 2 ppm SA led to almost complete disassembly within 1 h. Increasing the concentration of SA in the mixture from 2 to 10 ppm, while keeping the SDOBS concentration constant, significantly decreased the time required to completely disassemble the rubisco network. Furthermore, the initial rate of network disassembly using formulations containing SDOBS was surprisingly insensitive to this increase in SA concentration. This study gives insight into the role of lateral interactions between protein molecules at interfaces in stabilizing interfacial protein networks and shows that surfactant and enzyme working in combination proves more effective at disrupting and mobilizing the interfacial protein network than the action of either agent alone. PMID:17447802

  4. RubisCO is not a major fraction of total protein in marine phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losh, J.; Young, J. N.; Morel, F. M.

    2012-12-01

    Ribulose 1,5 bisphosphate carboxylase oxygnenase (Rubisco) concentrations were quantified as a proportion of total protein in diatoms to determine whether Rubisco is as abundant in phytoplankton as previously thought. This enzyme has been assumed to be a major fraction of total protein in phytoplankton, as has been demonstrated in plants, potentially constituting a large sink for cellular nitrogen (N). Marine diatoms were grown in batch cultures, and in N-limited continuous cultures at various carbon dioxide (CO2) levels. Quantitative western blots were performed using commercially available global antibodies and protein standards. Field incubations with natural populations of organisms from the coast of California were conducted under both N-limited and N-replete incubations with varying CO2. In all experiments, Rubisco represented less than 5% of total protein. Within exponentially growing batch cultures, concentrations ranged from 2-4%, while in N-limited laboratory and field cultures, concentrations were less than 1%. In some experiments under N-limiting conditions, Rubisco concentrations decreased with decreasing growth rates or with increasing CO2. These results were used as a basis of a theoretical calculation of maximum Rubisco activity and suggest that phytoplankton contain the minimum amount of Rubisco necessary to operate. Unlike plants, Rubisco is not a major sink of cellular N in phytoplankton. This has implications for phytoplankton's response to increasing CO2 under N-limitation.

  5. Differential Expression of Rubisco in Sporophytes and Gametophytes of Some Marine Macroalgae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangce; Niu, Jianfeng; Zhou, Baicheng

    2011-01-01

    Rubisco (ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase), a key enzyme of photosynthetic CO2 fixation, is one of the most abundant proteins in both higher plants and algae. In this study, the differential expression of Rubisco in sporophytes and gametophytes of four seaweed species — Porphyra yezoensis, P. haitanensis, Bangia fuscopurpurea (Rhodophyte) and Laminaria japonica (Phaeophyceae) — was studied in terms of the levels of transcription, translation and enzyme activity. Results indicated that both the Rubisco content and the initial carboxylase activity were notably higher in algal gametophytes than in the sporophytes, which suggested that the Rubisco content and the initial carboxylase activity were related to the ploidy of the generations of the four algal species. PMID:21283730

  6. Control of Rubisco function via homeostatic equilibration of CO2 supply

    PubMed Central

    Igamberdiev, Abir U.

    2015-01-01

    Rubisco is the most abundant protein on Earth that serves as the primary engine of carbon assimilation. It is characterized by a slow rate and low specificity for CO2 leading to photorespiration. We analyze here the challenges of operation of this enzyme as the main carbon fixation engine. The high concentration of Rubisco exceeds that of its substrate CO2 by 2–3 orders of magnitude; however, the total pool of available carbon in chloroplast, i.e., mainly bicarbonate, is comparable to the concentration of Rubisco active sites. This makes the reactant stationary assumption (RSA), which is essential as a condition of satisfying the Michaelis–Menten (MM) kinetics, valid if we assume that the delivery of CO2 from this pool is not limiting. The RSA is supported by active carbonic anhydrases (CA) that quickly equilibrate bicarbonate and CO2 pools and supply CO2 to Rubisco. While the operation of stromal CA is independent of light reactions, the thylakoidal CA associated with PSII and pumping CO2 from the thylakoid lumen is coordinated with the rate of electron transport, water splitting and proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane. At high CO2 concentrations, CA becomes less efficient (the equilibrium becomes unfavorable), so a deviation from the MM kinetics is observed, consistent with Rubisco reaching its Vmax at approximately 50% lower level than expected from the classical MM curve. Previously, this deviation was controversially explained by the limitation of RuBP regeneration. At low ambient CO2 and correspondingly limited capacity of the bicarbonate pool, its depletion at Rubisco sites is relieved in that the enzyme utilizes O2 instead of CO2, i.e., by photorespiration. In this process, CO2 is supplied back to Rubisco, and the chloroplastic redox state and energy level are maintained. It is concluded that the optimal performance of photosynthesis is achieved via the provision of continuous CO2 supply to Rubisco by carbonic anhydrases and photorespiration

  7. Revisiting rubisco as a protein substrate for insect midgut proteases.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Usha; Bhardwaj, Amit; Kumar, Rakesh; Leelavathi, Sadhu; Reddy, Vanga Siva; Mazumdar-Leighton, Sudeshna

    2014-01-01

    Gene fragments encoding the large subunit (LS) of Rubisco (RBCL) were cloned from various species of host plants of phytophagous Lepidoptera and expressed as recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. Recombinant RBCLs were compared among each other along with casein and native Rubisco as proteinaceous substrates for measuring total midgut protease activities of fourth instar larvae of Helicoverpa armigera feeding on casein, Pieris brassicae feeding on cauliflower, and Antheraea assamensis feeding on Litsea monopetala and Persea bombycina. Cognate rRBCL (from the pertinent host plant species) substrates performed similar to noncognate rRBCL reflecting the conserved nature of encoding genes and the versatile use of these recombinant proteins. Casein and recombinant RBCL generally outperformed native Rubisco as substrates, except where inclusion of a reducing agent in the enzyme assay likely unfolded the plant proteins. Levels of total midgut protease activities detected in A. assamensis larvae feeding on two primary host species were similar, suggesting that the suite(s) of digestive enzymes in these insects could hydrolyze a plant protein efficiently. Protease activities detected in the presence of protease inhibitors and the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) suggested that recombinant RBCL was a suitable protein substrate for studying insect proteases using in vitro enzyme assays and substrate zymography. PMID:24338735

  8. A compendium of temperature responses of Rubisco kinetic traits: variability among and within photosynthetic groups and impacts on photosynthesis modeling

    PubMed Central

    Galmés, Jeroni; Hermida-Carrera, Carmen; Laanisto, Lauri; Niinemets, Ülo

    2016-01-01

    The present study provides a synthesis of the in vitro and in vivo temperature responses of Rubisco Michaelis–Menten constants for CO2 (Kc) and O2 (Ko), specificity factor (Sc,o) and maximum carboxylase turnover rate (kcatc) for 49 species from all the main photosynthetic kingdoms of life. Novel correction routines were developed for in vitro data to remove the effects of study-to-study differences in Rubisco assays. The compilation revealed differences in the energy of activation (∆Ha) of Rubisco kinetics between higher plants and other photosynthetic groups, although photosynthetic bacteria and algae were under-represented and very few species have been investigated so far. Within plants, the variation in Rubisco temperature responses was related to species’ climate and photosynthetic mechanism, with differences in ∆Ha for kcatc among C3 plants from cool and warm environments, and in ∆Ha for kcatc and Kc among C3 and C4 plants. A negative correlation was observed among ∆Ha for Sc/o and species’ growth temperature for all data pooled, supporting the convergent adjustment of the temperature sensitivity of Rubisco kinetics to species’ thermal history. Simulations of the influence of varying temperature dependences of Rubisco kinetics on Rubisco-limited photosynthesis suggested improved photosynthetic performance of C3 plants from cool habitats at lower temperatures, and C3 plants from warm habitats at higher temperatures, especially at higher CO2 concentration. Thus, variation in Rubisco kinetics for different groups of photosynthetic organisms might need consideration to improve prediction of photosynthesis in future climates. Comparisons between in vitro and in vivo data revealed common trends, but also highlighted a large variability among both types of Rubisco kinetics currently used to simulate photosynthesis, emphasizing the need for more experimental work to fill in the gaps in Rubisco datasets and improve scaling from enzyme kinetics to

  9. A compendium of temperature responses of Rubisco kinetic traits: variability among and within photosynthetic groups and impacts on photosynthesis modeling.

    PubMed

    Galmés, Jeroni; Hermida-Carrera, Carmen; Laanisto, Lauri; Niinemets, Ülo

    2016-09-01

    The present study provides a synthesis of the in vitro and in vivo temperature responses of Rubisco Michaelis-Menten constants for CO2 (Kc) and O2 (Ko), specificity factor (Sc,o) and maximum carboxylase turnover rate (kcatc) for 49 species from all the main photosynthetic kingdoms of life. Novel correction routines were developed for in vitro data to remove the effects of study-to-study differences in Rubisco assays. The compilation revealed differences in the energy of activation (∆Ha) of Rubisco kinetics between higher plants and other photosynthetic groups, although photosynthetic bacteria and algae were under-represented and very few species have been investigated so far. Within plants, the variation in Rubisco temperature responses was related to species' climate and photosynthetic mechanism, with differences in ∆Ha for kcatc among C3 plants from cool and warm environments, and in ∆Ha for kcatc and Kc among C3 and C4 plants. A negative correlation was observed among ∆Ha for Sc/o and species' growth temperature for all data pooled, supporting the convergent adjustment of the temperature sensitivity of Rubisco kinetics to species' thermal history. Simulations of the influence of varying temperature dependences of Rubisco kinetics on Rubisco-limited photosynthesis suggested improved photosynthetic performance of C3 plants from cool habitats at lower temperatures, and C3 plants from warm habitats at higher temperatures, especially at higher CO2 concentration. Thus, variation in Rubisco kinetics for different groups of photosynthetic organisms might need consideration to improve prediction of photosynthesis in future climates. Comparisons between in vitro and in vivo data revealed common trends, but also highlighted a large variability among both types of Rubisco kinetics currently used to simulate photosynthesis, emphasizing the need for more experimental work to fill in the gaps in Rubisco datasets and improve scaling from enzyme kinetics to realized

  10. Molecular Evolution of the Substrate Specificity of Chloroplastic Aldolases/Rubisco Lysine Methyltransferases in Plants.

    PubMed

    Ma, Sheng; Martin-Laffon, Jacqueline; Mininno, Morgane; Gigarel, Océane; Brugière, Sabine; Bastien, Olivier; Tardif, Marianne; Ravanel, Stéphane; Alban, Claude

    2016-04-01

    Rubisco and fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolases (FBAs) are involved in CO2 fixation in chloroplasts. Both enzymes are trimethylated at a specific lysine residue by the chloroplastic protein methyltransferase LSMT. Genes coding LSMT are present in all plant genomes but the methylation status of the substrates varies in a species-specific manner. For example, chloroplastic FBAs are naturally trimethylated in both Pisum sativum and Arabidopsis thaliana, whereas the Rubisco large subunit is trimethylated only in the former species. The in vivo methylation status of aldolases and Rubisco matches the catalytic properties of AtLSMT and PsLSMT, which are able to trimethylate FBAs or FBAs and Rubisco, respectively. Here, we created chimera and site-directed mutants of monofunctional AtLSMT and bifunctional PsLSMT to identify the molecular determinants responsible for substrate specificity. Our results indicate that the His-Ala/Pro-Trp triad located in the central part of LSMT enzymes is the key motif to confer the capacity to trimethylate Rubisco. Two of the critical residues are located on a surface loop outside the methyltransferase catalytic site. We observed a strict correlation between the presence of the triad motif and the in vivo methylation status of Rubisco. The distribution of the motif into a phylogenetic tree further suggests that the ancestral function of LSMT was FBA trimethylation. In a recent event during higher plant evolution, this function evolved in ancestors of Fabaceae, Cucurbitaceae, and Rosaceae to include Rubisco as an additional substrate to the archetypal enzyme. Our study provides insight into mechanisms by which SET-domain protein methyltransferases evolve new substrate specificity. PMID:26785049

  11. The rate of Photosynthesis remains relatively high at moderately high temperatures in Arabidopsis thaliana rca mutant expressing thermostable chimeric Rubisco Activase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rate of photosynthesis declines at moderately high temperatures (30-42 deg C) in temperate plants like Arabidopsis. The decline is due to deactivation of Rubisco which in turn is due to a reduced ability of activase to activate Rubisco (Crafts-Brandner and Salvucci, PNAS 97:13430-13435, 2000). W...

  12. Identification and characterization of multiple rubisco activases in chemoautotrophic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yi-Chin Candace; Lapina, Maria Claribel; Bhushan, Shashi; Mueller-Cajar, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco) is responsible for almost all biological CO2 assimilation, but forms inhibited complexes with its substrate ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) and other sugar phosphates. The distantly related AAA+ proteins rubisco activase and CbbX remodel inhibited rubisco complexes to effect inhibitor release in plants and α-proteobacteria, respectively. Here we characterize a third class of rubisco activase in the chemolithoautotroph Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. Two sets of isoforms of CbbQ and CbbO form hetero-oligomers that function as specific activases for two structurally diverse rubisco forms. Mutational analysis supports a model wherein the AAA+ protein CbbQ functions as motor and CbbO is a substrate adaptor that binds rubisco via a von Willebrand factor A domain. Understanding the mechanisms employed by nature to overcome rubisco's shortcomings will increase our toolbox for engineering photosynthetic carbon dioxide fixation. PMID:26567524

  13. Identification and characterization of multiple rubisco activases in chemoautotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Chin Candace; Lapina, Maria Claribel; Bhushan, Shashi; Mueller-Cajar, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco) is responsible for almost all biological CO2 assimilation, but forms inhibited complexes with its substrate ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) and other sugar phosphates. The distantly related AAA+ proteins rubisco activase and CbbX remodel inhibited rubisco complexes to effect inhibitor release in plants and α-proteobacteria, respectively. Here we characterize a third class of rubisco activase in the chemolithoautotroph Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. Two sets of isoforms of CbbQ and CbbO form hetero-oligomers that function as specific activases for two structurally diverse rubisco forms. Mutational analysis supports a model wherein the AAA+ protein CbbQ functions as motor and CbbO is a substrate adaptor that binds rubisco via a von Willebrand factor A domain. Understanding the mechanisms employed by nature to overcome rubisco's shortcomings will increase our toolbox for engineering photosynthetic carbon dioxide fixation. PMID:26567524

  14. Rubisco is a small fraction of total protein in marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Losh, Jenna L; Young, Jodi N; Morel, François M M

    2013-04-01

    Ribulose 1,5 bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco) concentrations were quantified as a proportion of total protein in eight species of microalgae. This enzyme has been assumed to be a major fraction of total protein in phytoplankton, as has been demonstrated in plants, potentially constituting a large sink for cellular nitrogen. Representative microalgae were grown in batch and continuous cultures under nutrient-replete, nitrogen (N)-limited, or phosphorus (P)-limited conditions with varying CO(2). Quantitative Western blots were performed using commercially available global antibodies and protein standards. Field incubations with natural populations of organisms from the coast of California were conducted under both nutrient-replete and N-limited conditions with varying CO(2). In all experiments, Rubisco represented < 6% of total protein. In nutrient-replete exponentially growing batch cultures, concentrations ranged from 2% to 6%, while in nutrient-limited laboratory and field cultures, concentrations were < 2.5%. Rubisco generally decreased with increasing CO(2) and with decreasing growth rates. Based on a calculation of maximum Rubisco activity, these results suggest that phytoplankton contain the minimum concentration of enzyme necessary to support observed growth rates. Unlike in plants, Rubisco does not account for a major fraction of cellular N in phytoplankton. PMID:23343368

  15. Competing carboxylases: circadian and metabolic regulation of Rubisco in C3 and CAM Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L.

    PubMed

    Davies, B N; Griffiths, H

    2012-07-01

    The temporal co-ordination of ribulose 1·5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc) activities by Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L. in C(3) and crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) modes was investigated under conventional light-dark (LD) and continuous light (LL) conditions. When C(3) , net CO(2) assimilation rate increased during each subjective night under LL with maximum carboxylation unrelated to Rubisco activation state. The CAM circadian rhythm of CO(2) uptake was more pronounced, with CO(2) assimilation rate maximal towards the end of each subjective night. In vivo and in vitro techniques were integrated to map carboxylase enzyme regulation to the framework provided by CAM LL gas exchange activity. Rubisco was activated in vitro throughout each subjective dark period and consistently deactivated at each subjective dawn, similar to that observed at true dawn in constitutive CAM species. Instantaneous carbon isotope discrimination showed in vivo carboxylase co-dominance during the CAM subjective night, initially by Rubisco and latterly C(4) (PEPc), despite both enzymes seemingly activated in vitro. The circadian rhythm in titratable acidity accumulation was progressively damped over successive subjective nights, but maintenance of PEPc carboxylation capacity ensures that CAM plants do not become progressively more 'C(3) -like' with time under LL. PMID:22239463

  16. Characterization of a barley Rubisco activase gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.A.; Rundle, S.J.; Zielinski, R. )

    1990-05-01

    Barley Rubisco Activase (Rca) is a nuclear encoded chloroplast enzyme that activates Rubisco to catalytic competence. Rca mRNA accumulation in barley is light-regulated; the 5{prime}-flanking region of a highly expressed barley Rca gene (HvRca-1) contains several sequence motifs similar to those found in the promoter of other light-regulated, nuclear genes. We have characterized the cis-acting regulatory regions of HvRca-1 by deletion analysis of the 5{prime} flanking region of a cloned gene. These constructs have been assayed in vitro by gel mobility shift assays, as well as by DNA footprinting. Putative regulatory sequences detected in vitro have also been tested in vivo by constructing chimeric genes consisting of deletion mutant promoters fused to a promoterless {beta}-glucuronidase reporter gene. Comparison of results obtained from complimentary parallel in vitro and in vivo assays of identical promoter deletions have provided information on cis-acting regulatory regions of HvRca-1.

  17. Structural Changes Associated with the Acute Thermal Instability of Rubisco Activase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The inhibition of photosynthesis at moderately high temperatures has been linked to a decrease in ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activation. This decrease is thought to be a consequence of the thermal instability of Rubisco’s chaperone, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxyla...

  18. Variation in Rubisco and other photosynthetic parameters in the life cycle of Haematococcus pluvialis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhangfan; Wang, Guangce; Niu, Jianfeng

    2012-01-01

    Cells of Haematococcus pluvialis Flot. et Will were collected in four different growth phases. We quantified the initial and total enzyme activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) in crude extracts, and the relative expression of large-subunit ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate caboxylase / oxygenase ( rbcL) mRNA. We measured the ratio of photosynthetic rate to respiration rate (P/R), maximal effective quantum yield of photosystem II ( F v/ F m), electron transport rate (ETR), actual photochemical efficiency of PSII in the light (PSII), and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). Green vegetative cells were found to be in the most active state, with a relatively higher P/R ratio. These cells also displayed the lowest NPQ and the highest F v/ F m, ETR, and PSII, indicating the most effective PSII. However, both Rubisco activity and rbcL mRNA expression were the lowest measured. In orange resting cysts with relatively lower P/R and NPQ, Rubisco activity and rbcL expression reached a peak, while F v/ F m, ETR, and ΦPSII were the lowest measured. Taking into account the methods of astaxanthin induction used in industry, we suggest that Rubisco may participate in astaxanthin accumulation in H. pluvialis. A continuous and sufficient supply of a carbon source such as CO2 may therefore aid the large scale production of astaxanthin.

  19. CONSEQUENCES OF ALTERING RUBISCO REGULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Salvucci, Michael

    2013-12-31

    Research examined the thermal stability and propensity for aggregation of wild type and the C- and N-terminally modified forms of activase to determine if loss of activity under heat stress is dependent on protein aggregation. The results showed that 1) loss of activity at high temperature is independent of aggregation; 2) activase with both C- and N-terminal S-Tags are more susceptible to aggregation than wild type activase, 3) aggregation is highly dependent on the concentration of Mg2+ and 4) the ATP analog, ATPgammaS, protects against both thermal inactivation and aggregation.

  20. Role of Small Subunit in Mediating Assembly of Red-type Form I Rubisco

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Jidnyasa; Mueller-Cajar, Oliver; Tsai, Yi-Chin C.; Hartl, F. Ulrich; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit

    2015-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is the key enzyme involved in photosynthetic carbon fixation, converting atmospheric CO2 to organic compounds. Form I Rubisco is a cylindrical complex composed of eight large (RbcL) subunits that are capped by four small subunits (RbcS) at the top and four at the bottom. Form I Rubiscos are phylogenetically divided into green- and red-type. Some red-type enzymes have catalytically superior properties. Thus, understanding their folding and assembly is of considerable biotechnological interest. Folding of the green-type RbcL subunits in cyanobacteria is mediated by the GroEL/ES chaperonin system, and assembly to holoenzyme requires specialized chaperones such as RbcX and RAF1. Here, we show that the red-type RbcL subunits in the proteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides also fold with GroEL/ES. However, assembly proceeds in a chaperone-independent manner. We find that the C-terminal β-hairpin extension of red-type RbcS, which is absent in green-type RbcS, is critical for efficient assembly. The β-hairpins of four RbcS subunits form an eight-stranded β-barrel that protrudes into the central solvent channel of the RbcL core complex. The two β-barrels stabilize the complex through multiple interactions with the RbcL subunits. A chimeric green-type RbcS carrying the C-terminal β-hairpin renders the assembly of a cyanobacterial Rubisco independent of RbcX. Our results may facilitate the engineering of crop plants with improved growth properties expressing red-type Rubisco. PMID:25371207

  1. INTER- AND INTRAMOLECULAR SUBUNIT INTERACTIONS OF RUBISCO AND ACTIVASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubisco activase functions as a molecular chaperone, physically interacting with Rubisco to maintain the enzyme in a conformation competent for CO2 fixation. This action of activase is essential for photosynthesis and is the first reaction of photosynthesis disrupted by moderate heat stress. Directe...

  2. Rubisco decrease is involved in chloroplast protrusion and Rubisco-containing body formation in soybean (Glycine max.) under salt stress.

    PubMed

    He, Yi; Yu, Chenliang; Zhou, Li; Chen, Yue; Liu, Ao; Jin, Junhua; Hong, Jian; Qi, Yanhua; Jiang, Dean

    2014-01-01

    Salt stress often induces declination of net photosynthetic rate (Pn), partially resulted from Rubisco degradation. The chloroplast protrusions (CPs) is one of the pathways of Rubisco exclusion from chloroplasts. To explore the relationship between the Rubisco contents and CPs under salt stress, Pn, maximum photochemical efficiency of PSII (F(v)/F(m)), carboxylation efficiency (CE) and concentration of Rubisco, number of CPs and Rubisco-containing Body (RCBs) were investigated with two differently salt-responding varieties in this experiment. We observed that 150 mM salt treatment resulted in not only significant decrease in Pn, CE and Rubisco content, but also obvious increase in the number of CPs and RCBs in salt-sensitive variety. Under salt stress formation of CPs resulted in production of much more RCBs, which could immigrate into and combine with vacuole. It may be a kind of important mechanism for rapid degradation of Rubisco under salt stress. Our conclusion provides a new sight for how Rubisco can be fast degraded under salt stress. PMID:24291158

  3. Transgenic tobacco plants with improved cyanobacterial Rubisco expression but no extra assembly factors grow at near wild-type rates if provided with elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Occhialini, Alessandro; Lin, Myat T; Andralojc, P John; Hanson, Maureen R; Parry, Martin A J

    2016-01-01

    Introducing a carbon-concentrating mechanism and a faster Rubisco enzyme from cyanobacteria into higher plant chloroplasts may improve photosynthetic performance by increasing the rate of CO2 fixation while decreasing losses caused by photorespiration. We previously demonstrated that tobacco plants grow photoautotrophically using Rubisco from Synechococcus elongatus, although the plants exhibited considerably slower growth than wild-type and required supplementary CO2 . Because of concerns that vascular plant assembly factors may not be adequate for assembly of a cyanobacterial Rubisco, prior transgenic plants included the cyanobacterial chaperone RbcX or the carboxysomal protein CcmM35. Here we show that neither RbcX nor CcmM35 is needed for assembly of active cyanobacterial Rubisco. Furthermore, by altering the gene regulatory sequences on the Rubisco transgenes, cyanobacterial Rubisco expression was enhanced and the transgenic plants grew at near wild-type growth rates, although still requiring elevated CO2 . We performed detailed kinetic characterization of the enzymes produced with and without the RbcX and CcmM35 cyanobacterial proteins. These transgenic plants exhibit photosynthetic characteristics that confirm the predicted benefits of introduction of non-native forms of Rubisco with higher carboxylation rate constants in vascular plants and the potential nitrogen-use efficiency that may be achieved provided that adequate CO2 is available near the enzyme. PMID:26662726

  4. Mesophyll conductance to CO2 and Rubisco as targets for improving intrinsic water use efficiency in C3 plants.

    PubMed

    Flexas, J; Díaz-Espejo, A; Conesa, M A; Coopman, R E; Douthe, C; Gago, J; Gallé, A; Galmés, J; Medrano, H; Ribas-Carbo, M; Tomàs, M; Niinemets, Ü

    2016-05-01

    Water limitation is a major global constraint for plant productivity that is likely to be exacerbated by climate change. Hence, improving plant water use efficiency (WUE) has become a major goal for the near future. At the leaf level, WUE is the ratio between photosynthesis and transpiration. Maintaining high photosynthesis under water stress, while improving WUE requires either increasing mesophyll conductance (gm ) and/or improving the biochemical capacity for CO2 assimilation-in which Rubisco properties play a key role, especially in C3 plants at current atmospheric CO2 . The goals of the present analysis are: (1) to summarize the evidence that improving gm and/or Rubisco can result in increased WUE; (2) to review the degree of success of early attempts to genetically manipulate gm or Rubisco; (3) to analyse how gm , gsw and the Rubisco's maximum velocity (Vcmax ) co-vary across different plant species in well-watered and drought-stressed conditions; (4) to examine how these variations cause differences in WUE and what is the overall extent of variation in individual determinants of WUE; and finally, (5) to use simulation analysis to provide a theoretical framework for the possible control of WUE by gm and Rubisco catalytic constants vis-à-vis gsw under water limitations. PMID:26297108

  5. Characterization of heat-set gels from RuBisCO in comparison to those from other proteins.

    PubMed

    Martin, Anneke H; Nieuwland, Maaike; de Jong, Govardus A H

    2014-11-01

    To anticipate a future shortage in functional proteins, it is important to study the functionality of new alternative protein sources. Native RuBisCO was extracted from spinach, and its gelation behavior was compared to other native proteins from animal and plant origins. Protein gels were analyzed for their mechanical gel properties during small and large deformation and for their microstructure. Heat-induced aggregation and network formation of RuBisCO resulted in gels with unique characteristics compared to, for example, whey protein and egg white protein. Having a very low critical gelling concentration and low denaturation temperature, RuBisCO readily forms a network with a very high gel strength (G', fracture stress), but upon deformation it has a brittle character (low critical strain, low fracture strain). This breakdown behavior can be explained by the dominant role of hydrophobic and hydrogen bonds between RuBisCO molecules during network formation and by the coarse microstructure. RuBisCO was shown to exhibit high potential as a functional ingredient giving opportunities for the design of new textures at low protein concentration. PMID:25314325

  6. Analysis of carboxysomes from Synechococcus PCC7942 reveals multiple Rubisco complexes with carboxysomal proteins CcmM and CcaA.

    PubMed

    Long, Benedict M; Badger, Murray R; Whitney, Spencer M; Price, G Dean

    2007-10-01

    In cyanobacteria, the key enzyme for photosynthetic CO(2) fixation, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), is bound within proteinaceous polyhedral microcompartments called carboxysomes. Cyanobacteria with Form IB Rubisco produce beta-carboxysomes whose putative shell proteins are encoded by the ccm-type genes. To date, very little is known of the protein-protein interactions that form the basis of beta-carboxysome structure. In an effort to identify such interactions within the carboxysomes of the beta-cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7942, we have used polyhistidine-tagging approaches to identify at least three carboxysomal subcomplexes that contain active Rubisco. In addition to the expected L(8)S(8) Rubisco, which is the major component of carboxysomes, we have identified two Rubisco complexes containing the putative shell protein CcmM, one of which also contains the carboxysomal carbonic anhydrase, CcaA. The complex containing CcaA consists of Rubisco and the full-length 58-kDa form of CcmM (M58), whereas the other is made up of Rubisco and a short 35-kDa form of CcmM (M35), which is probably translated independently of M58 via an internal ribosomal entry site within the ccmM gene. We also show that the high CO(2)-requiring ccmM deletion mutant (DeltaccmM) can achieve nearly normal growth rates at ambient CO(2) after complementation with both wild type and chimeric (His(6)-tagged) forms of CcmM. Although a significant amount of independent L(8)S(8) Rubisco is confined to the center of the carboxysome, we speculate that the CcmM-CcaA-Rubisco complex forms an important assembly coordination within the carboxysome shell. A speculative carboxysome structural model is presented. PMID:17675289

  7. Diverse nucleotide compositions and sequence fluctuation in Rubisco protein genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Todd; Dehipawala, S.; Cheung, E.; Bienaime, R.; Ye, J.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Schneider, P.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2011-10-01

    The Rubisco protein-enzyme is arguably the most abundance protein on Earth. The biology dogma of transcription and translation necessitates the study of the Rubisco genes and Rubisco-like genes in various species. Stronger correlation of fractal dimension of the atomic number fluctuation along a DNA sequence with Shannon entropy has been observed in the studied Rubisco-like gene sequences, suggesting a more diverse evolutionary pressure and constraints in the Rubisco sequences. The strategy of using metal for structural stabilization appears to be an ancient mechanism, with data from the porphobilinogen deaminase gene in Capsaspora owczarzaki and Monosiga brevicollis. Using the chi-square distance probability, our analysis supports the conjecture that the more ancient Rubisco-like sequence in Microcystis aeruginosa would have experienced very different evolutionary pressure and bio-chemical constraint as compared to Bordetella bronchiseptica, the two microbes occupying either end of the correlation graph. Our exploratory study would indicate that high fractal dimension Rubisco sequence would support high carbon dioxide rate via the Michaelis- Menten coefficient; with implication for the control of the whooping cough pathogen Bordetella bronchiseptica, a microbe containing a high fractal dimension Rubisco-like sequence (2.07). Using the internal comparison of chi-square distance probability for 16S rRNA (~ E-22) versus radiation repair Rec-A gene (~ E-05) in high GC content Deinococcus radiodurans, our analysis supports the conjecture that high GC content microbes containing Rubisco-like sequence are likely to include an extra-terrestrial origin, relative to Deinococcus radiodurans. Similar photosynthesis process that could utilize host star radiation would not compete with radiation resistant process from the biology dogma perspective in environments such as Mars and exoplanets.

  8. Regulation of Rubisco gene expression in C4 plants.

    PubMed

    Berry, James O; Mure, Christopher M; Yerramsetty, Pradeep

    2016-06-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate-carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) incorporates inorganic carbon into an organic form, making this chloroplastic enzyme one of the most essential factors for all life on earth. Despite its central role in photosynthesis, research into regulation of the chloroplast rbcL and nuclear RbcS genes that encode this enzyme has lagged behind other plant gene systems. A major characteristic of kranz-type C4 plants is the accumulation of Rubisco only within chloroplasts of internalized bundle sheath cells that surround the leaf vascular centers. In plants that utilize the less common single cell C4 system, Rubisco accumulates only within one type of dimorphic chloroplasts localized to a specific region of leaf chlorenchyma cells. Understanding regulatory processes that restrict Rubisco gene expression to only one cell type or chloroplast type is a major focus of C4 research. Regulatory steps may include transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and post-translational processes. PMID:27026038

  9. Low stable carbon isotope fractionation by coccolithophore RubisCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boller, Amanda J.; Thomas, Phaedra J.; Cavanaugh, Colleen M.; Scott, Kathleen M.

    2011-11-01

    The 13C/ 12C ratio of carbon compounds is used to identify sources and sinks in the global carbon cycle. However, the relatively enriched 13C content observed for marine organic carbon remains enigmatic. The majority of oceanic carbon is fixed by algae and cyanobacteria via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle, yet isotopic discrimination by the CO 2 fixation enzyme, RubisCO (ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase), has only been measured for a single marine cyanobacterium. Different forms of RubisCO occur in different phytoplankton species (overall amino acid identity varying by as much as ˜75%) and thus may vary in the degree to which they fractionate carbon. Here we measured isotope discrimination by RubisCO from the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi, a cosmopolitan species used as a marine algal model .E. huxleyi RubisCO discriminated substantially less ( ɛ = 11.1‰) against 13CO 2 than other RubisCO enzymes (18-29‰), despite having Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters ( K = 72 μM; Vmax = 0.66 μmol min -1 mg -1 protein) similar to those measured for RubisCO enzymes from different organisms. If widespread, decreased isotope discrimination of 13C by phytoplankton RubisCO may be a major factor influencing the enriched 13C content of marine organic carbon. This finding emphasizes the necessity of (a) determining ɛ values for RubisCOs of other marine phytoplankton and (b) re-evaluation of δ13C values from physiological, environmental, and geological studies.

  10. Structural Analysis of the Rubisco-Assembly Chaperone RbcX-II from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cuimin; Hartl, F. Ulrich; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit

    2015-01-01

    The most prevalent form of the Rubisco enzyme is a complex of eight catalytic large subunits (RbcL) and eight regulatory small subunits (RbcS). Rubisco biogenesis depends on the assistance by specific molecular chaperones. The assembly chaperone RbcX stabilizes the RbcL subunits after folding by chaperonin and mediates their assembly to the RbcL8 core complex, from which RbcX is displaced by RbcS to form active holoenzyme. Two isoforms of RbcX are found in eukaryotes, RbcX-I, which is more closely related to cyanobacterial RbcX, and the more distant RbcX-II. The green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii contains only RbcX-II isoforms, CrRbcX-IIa and CrRbcX-IIb. Here we solved the crystal structure of CrRbcX-IIa and show that it forms an arc-shaped dimer with a central hydrophobic cleft for binding the C-terminal sequence of RbcL. Like other RbcX proteins, CrRbcX-IIa supports the assembly of cyanobacterial Rubisco in vitro, albeit with reduced activity relative to cyanobacterial RbcX-I. Structural analysis of a fusion protein of CrRbcX-IIa and the C-terminal peptide of RbcL suggests that the peptide binding mode of RbcX-II may differ from that of cyanobacterial RbcX. RbcX homologs appear to have adapted to their cognate Rubisco clients as a result of co-evolution. PMID:26305355

  11. Rubisco small-subunit α-helices control pyrenoid formation in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Moritz T.; Genkov, Todor; Skepper, Jeremy N.; Jouhet, Juliette; Mitchell, Madeline C.; Spreitzer, Robert J.; Griffiths, Howard

    2012-01-01

    The pyrenoid is a subcellular microcompartment in which algae sequester the primary carboxylase, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). The pyrenoid is associated with a CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM), which improves the operating efficiency of carbon assimilation and overcomes diffusive limitations in aquatic photosynthesis. Using the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we show that pyrenoid formation, Rubisco aggregation, and CCM activity relate to discrete regions of the Rubisco small subunit (SSU). Specifically, pyrenoid occurrence was shown to be conditioned by the amino acid composition of two surface-exposed α-helices of the SSU: higher plant-like helices knock out the pyrenoid, whereas native algal helices establish a pyrenoid. We have also established that pyrenoid integrity was essential for the operation of an active CCM. With the algal CCM being functionally analogous to the terrestrial C4 pathway in higher plants, such insights may offer a route toward transforming algal and higher plant productivity for the future. PMID:23112177

  12. MODULATION OF RUBISCO ACTIVASE GENE EXPRESSION DURING HEAT STRESS IN COTTON (GOSSYPIUM HIRSUTUM L.) INVOLVES POST-TRANSCRIPTIONAL MECHANISMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inhibition of photosynthesis by heat stress involves deactivation of Rubisco and is exacerbated by the low thermal stability of Rubisco’s chaperone, activase. Activase structure, activity and protein expression have been the focus of previous work examining the effect of heat stress on this enzyme....

  13. Mechanistic Diversity in the RuBisCO Superfamily: The Enolase in the Methionine

    SciTech Connect

    Imker,H.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2007-01-01

    D-Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), the most abundant enzyme, is the paradigm member of the recently recognized mechanistically diverse RuBisCO superfamily. The RuBisCO reaction is initiated by abstraction of the proton from C3 of the D-ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate substrate by a carbamate oxygen of carboxylated Lys 201 (spinach enzyme). Heterofunctional homologues of RuBisCO found in species of Bacilli catalyze the tautomerization ('enolization') of 2,3-diketo-5-methylthiopentane 1-phosphate (DK-MTP 1-P) in the methionine salvage pathway in which 5-methylthio-D-ribose (MTR) derived from 5'-methylthioadenosine is converted to methionine [Ashida, H., Saito, Y., Kojima, C., Kobayashi, K., Ogasawara, N., and Yokota, A. (2003) A functional link between RuBisCO-like protein of Bacillus and photosynthetic RuBisCO, Science 302, 286-290]. The reaction catalyzed by this 'enolase' is accomplished by abstraction of a proton from C1 of the DK-MTP 1-P substrate to form the tautomerized product, a conjugated enol. Because the RuBisCO- and 'enolase'-catalyzed reactions differ in the regiochemistry of proton abstraction but are expected to share stabilization of an enolate anion intermediate by coordination to an active site Mg{sup 2+}, we sought to establish structure-function relationships for the 'enolase' reaction so that the structural basis for the functional diversity could be established. We determined the stereochemical course of the reaction catalyzed by the 'enolases' from Bacillus subtilis and Geobacillus kaustophilus. Using stereospecifically deuterated samples of an alternate substrate derived from D-ribose (5-OH group instead of the 5-methylthio group in MTR) as well as of the natural DK-MTP 1-P substrate, we determined that the 'enolase'-catalyzed reaction involves abstraction of the 1-proS proton. We also determined the structure of the activated 'enolase' from G. kaustophilus (carboxylated on Lys 173) liganded with Mg{sup 2+} and 2

  14. Directed mutation of the Rubisco large subunit of tobacco influences photorespiration and growth.

    PubMed

    Whitney, S M; von Caemmerer, S; Hudson, G S; Andrews, T J

    1999-10-01

    The gene for the large subunit of Rubisco was specifically mutated by transforming the chloroplast genome of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Codon 335 was altered to encode valine instead of leucine. The resulting mutant plants could not grow without atmospheric CO2 enrichment. In 0.3% (v/v) CO2, the mutant and wild-type plants produced similar amounts of Rubisco but the extent of carbamylation was nearly twice as great in the mutants. The mutant enzyme's substrate-saturated CO2-fixing rate and its ability to distinguish between CO2 and O2 as substrates were both reduced to 25% of the wild type's values. Estimates of these parameters obtained from kinetic assays with the purified mutant enzyme were the same as those inferred from measurements of photosynthetic gas exchange with leaves of mutant plants. The Michaelis constants for CO2, O2, and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate were reduced and the mutation enhanced oxygenase activity at limiting O2 concentrations. Consistent with the reduced CO2 fixation rate at saturating CO2, the mutant plants grew slower than the wild type but they eventually flowered and reproduced apparently normally. The mutation and its associated phenotype were inherited maternally. The chloroplast-transformation strategy surmounts previous obstacles to mutagenesis of higher-plant Rubisco and allows the consequences for leaf photosynthesis to be assessed. PMID:10517850

  15. Structure and expression of nuclear genes encoding rubisco activase. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinski, R.E.

    1994-06-01

    Rubisco activase (Rca) is a soluble chloroplast protein that catalyzes the activation of rubisco, the enzyme that initiates the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle, to catalytic competency. Rca in barley consists of three polypeptides, one of 46- and two of 42-kDa, but the quaternary structure of the protein is not known. The authors have isolated and completely sequenced 8.8 kb of barley genomic DNA containing two, tandemly oriented activase genes (RcaA and RcaB) and three different cDNAs encoding the 42- and 46-kDa Rca polypeptide isoforms. Genomic Southern blot assays indicate that these sequences represent the entire Rca gene family in barley. Pre-mRNAs transcribed from the RcaA gene are alternatively spliced to give mRNAs encoding both 46- (RcaA1) and 42-kDa (RcaA2) Rca isoforms. The RcaB gene encodes a single polypeptide of 42 kDa. Primer extension and northern blot assays indicate that RcaB mRNA is expressed at a level that is 10- to 100-fold lower than RcaA mRNA. Analyses at the mRNA and protein level showed that Rca gene expression is coordinated by that of the rubisco subunits during barley leaf development.

  16. (Structure and expression of nuclear genes encoding rubisco activase): Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Our first year's activities include: (1) completing a survey of the basic characteristics of activase gene expression in barley; and (2) isolating and structurally characterizing cDNA and genomic DNA sequences encoding activase from barley. Our goal was to determine whether activase mRNA and protein accumulation are coordinated with those of the rubisco subunits. We utilized the first leaves of barley as an experimental system for these studies because they can be used in two ways to study the expression of leaf genes: by following the naturally occurring differentiation of leaf cells, which occurs acropetally along the barley leaf; and by following the photomorphogenesis of etiolated barley seedlings. In the acropetal gradient of leaf cell differentiation, activase mRNA and mRNA and polypeptide expression is tightly coordinated with rubisco subunit mRNA and polypeptide expression. Although we have not measured their precise stoichiometry at each stage of leaf differentiation, activase protein is expressed at the level of about one polypeptide per rubisco holoenzyme in mature regions of the leaf. Coordination of the expression of activase mRNAs and polypeptides indicates that in the barley leaf gradient, activase gene expression is largely controlled at the level of transcription. However, translational controls may play a role in regulating activase expression on a short term basis.

  17. The RUBISCO to Photosystem II Ratio Limits the Maximum Photosynthetic Rate in Picocyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zorz, Jackie K.; Allanach, Jessica R.; Murphy, Cole D.; Roodvoets, Mitchell S.; Campbell, Douglas A.; Cockshutt, Amanda M.

    2015-01-01

    Marine Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus are picocyanobacteria predominating in subtropical, oligotrophic marine environments, a niche predicted to expand with climate change. When grown under common low light conditions Synechococcus WH 8102 and Prochlorococcus MED 4 show similar Cytochrome b6f and Photosystem I contents normalized to Photosystem II content, while Prochlorococcus MIT 9313 has twice the Cytochrome b6f content and four times the Photosystem I content of the other strains. Interestingly, the Prochlorococcus strains contain only one third to one half of the RUBISCO catalytic subunits compared to the marine Synechococcus strain. The maximum Photosystem II electron transport rates were similar for the two Prochlorococcus strains but higher for the marine Synechococcus strain. Photosystem II electron transport capacity is highly correlated to the molar ratio of RUBISCO active sites to Photosystem II but not to the ratio of cytochrome b6f to Photosystem II, nor to the ratio of Photosystem I: Photosystem II. Thus, the catalytic capacity for the rate-limiting step of carbon fixation, the ultimate electron sink, appears to limit electron transport rates. The high abundance of Cytochrome b6f and Photosystem I in MIT 9313, combined with the slower flow of electrons away from Photosystem II and the relatively low level of RUBISCO, are consistent with cyclic electron flow around Photosystem I in this strain. PMID:25658887

  18. Directing the evolution of Rubisco and Rubisco activase: first impressions of a new tool for photosynthesis research.

    PubMed

    Mueller-Cajar, Oliver; Whitney, Spencer M

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade the practice of laboratory-directed protein evolution has become firmly established as a versatile tool in biochemical research by enabling molecular evolution toward desirable phenotypes or detection of novel structure-function interactions. Applications of this technique in the field of photosynthesis research are still in their infancy, but recently first steps have been reported in the directed evolution of the CO(2)-fixing enzyme Rubisco and its helper protein Rubisco activase. Here we summarize directed protein evolution strategies and review the progressive advances that have been made to develop and apply suitable selection systems for screening mutant forms of these enzymes that improve the fitness of the host organism. The goal of increasing photosynthetic efficiency of plants by improving the kinetics of Rubisco has been a long-term goal scoring modest successes. We discuss how directed evolution methodologies may one day be able to circumvent the problems encountered during this venture. PMID:18626786

  19. Stable Carbon Isotope Discrimination by Form IC Rubisco Enzymes of the Extremely Metabolically Versatile Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Ralstonia eutropha}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, P. J.; Boller, A. J.; Zhao, Z.; Tabita, F. R.; Cavanaugh, C. M.; Scott, K. M.

    2006-12-01

    Variations in the relative amounts of 12C and 13C in microbial biomass can be used to infer the pathway(s) autotrophs use to fix and assimilate dissolved inorganic carbon. Discrimination against 13C by the enzymes catalyzing autotrophic carbon fixation is a major factor dictating biomass stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C = {[13C/12Csample/13C/12Cstandard] - 1} × 1000). Five different forms of RubisCO (IA, IB, IC, ID, and II) are utilized by algae and autotrophic bacteria reliant on the Calvin-Benson cycle for carbon fixation. To date, isotope discrimination has been measured for form IA, IB, and II RubisCOs, and their ɛ values (={[12k/13k] - 1} × 1000; 12k and 13k = rates of 12C and 13C fixation) range from 18 to 29‰, explaining the variation in biomass δ13C values of autotrophs utilizing these enzymes. Isotope discrimination by form IC RubisCO has not been measured, despite the presence of this enzyme in many proteobacteria of ecological interest, including marine manganese-oxidizing bacteria, some nitrifying and nitrogen-fixing bacteria, and extremely metabolically versatile organisms such as Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Ralstonia eutropha. The purpose of this work was to determine the ɛ values for form IC RubisCO enzymes from R. sphaeroides and R. eutropha. Recombinant form IC RubisCOs were purified by conventional column chromatography procedures. Assay conditions (pH, dissolved inorganic carbon concentration) were tested to determine which parameters were conducive to the high rates of carbon fixation necessary for ɛ determination. Under standard conditions (pH 8.5 and 5 mM DIC), form IC RubisCO activities were sufficient for ɛ determination. Experiments are currently being conducted to measure the ɛ values of these enzymes. Sampling the full phylogenetic breadth of RubisCO enzymes for isotopic discrimination makes it possible to constrain the range of δ13C values of organisms fixing carbon via the Calvin-Benson cycle. These results are

  20. Antisense RNA Inhibition of RbcS Gene Expression Reduces Rubisco Level and Photosynthesis in the C4 Plant Flaveria bidentis.

    PubMed

    Furbank, R. T.; Chitty, J. A.; Von Caemmerer, S.; Jenkins, CLD.

    1996-07-01

    The C4 dicot Flaveria bidentis was genetically transformed with an antisense RNA construct targeted to the nuclear-encoded gene for the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco; RbcS). RbcS mRNA levels in leaves of transformants were reduced by as much as 80% compared to wild-type levels, and extractable enzyme activity was reduced by up to 85%. There was no significant effect of transformation with the gene construct on levels of other photosynthetic enzymes. Antisense transformants with reduced Rubisco activity exhibited a stunted phenotype. Rates of photosynthesis were reduced in air at high light and over a range of CO2 concentrations but were unaffected at low light. From these results we conclude that, as is the case in C3 plants, Rubisco activity is a major determinant of photosynthetic flux in C4 plants under high light intensities and air levels of CO2. PMID:12226324

  1. Rubisco activase and wheat productivity under heat stress conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubisco activase (RCA) constrains the photosynthetic potential of plants at high temperature (heat stress). We hypothesized that endogenous levels of RCA could serve as an important determinant of plant productivity under heat stress conditions. In this study, we investigated the possible relation...

  2. INCREASED SENSITIVITY OF OXIDIZED LARGE ISOFORM OF RUBISCO ACTIVASE TO ADP INHIBITION IS DUE TO AN INTERACTION BETWEEN ITS CARBOXYL-EXTENSION AND NUCLEOTIDE-BINDING POCKET

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Arabidopsis, oxidation of the large (46-kDa) isoform activase to form a disulfide bond in the carboxyl-terminal extension (C-extension) significantly increases its ADP sensitivity for both ATP hydrolysis and Rubisco activation, thereby decreasing both activities at physiological ratios of ADP/ATP...

  3. Electron flow to oxygen in higher plants and algae: rates and control of direct photoreduction (Mehler reaction) and rubisco oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Badger, M R; von Caemmerer, S; Ruuska, S; Nakano, H

    2000-10-29

    mechanism and under conditions that are clearly limiting with respect to inorganic carbon supply. A part explanation for this could be that many algal rubsicos have considerably different oxygenase kinetic properties and exhibit far less oxygenase activity in air. This would lead to the conclusion that perhaps a greater proportion of the observed O2 uptake may be due to a Mehler reaction and less to rubisco, compared with C3 plants. In contrast to algae and higher plants, cyanobacteria appear to have a high capacity for Mehler O2 uptake, which appears to be not well coupled or limited by ATP consumption. It is likely that in all higher plants and algae, which have a well-developed non-photochemical quenching mechanism, non-radiative energy dissipation is the major mechanism for dissipating excess photons absorbed by the light-harvesting complexes under stressful conditions. However, for cyanobacteria, with a lack of significant non-photochemical quenching, the situation may well be different. PMID:11127997

  4. Enhancement in leaf photosynthesis and upregulation of rubisco in the C4 sorghum plant at elevated growth carbon dioxide and temperature occur at early stages of leaf ontogeny.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grain sorghum was grown at 350 and 700 (high) ppm CO2, and at daytime maximum/nighttime minimum temperatures of 30/20 and 36/26C. Gas exchange rates, activities of Rubisco and PEP carboxylase (PEPC), leaf area, and biomass of various plant components were determined at different stages of leaf and p...

  5. RuBisCO depletion improved proteome coverage of cold responsive S-nitrosylated targets in Brassica juncea

    PubMed Central

    Sehrawat, Ankita; Abat, Jasmeet K.; Deswal, Renu

    2013-01-01

    Although in the last few years good number of S-nitrosylated proteins are identified but information on endogenous targets is still limiting. Therefore, an attempt is made to decipher NO signaling in cold treated Brassica juncea seedlings. Treatment of seedlings with substrate, cofactor and inhibitor of Nitric-oxide synthase and nitrate reductase (NR), indicated NR mediated NO biosynthesis in cold. Analysis of the in vivo thiols showed depletion of low molecular weight thiols and enhancement of available protein thiols, suggesting redox changes. To have a detailed view, S-nitrosylation analysis was done using biotin switch technique (BST) and avidin-affinity chromatography. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is S-nitrosylated and therefore, is identified as target repeatedly due to its abundance. It also competes out low abundant proteins which are important NO signaling components. Therefore, RuBisCO was removed (over 80%) using immunoaffinity purification. Purified S-nitrosylated RuBisCO depleted proteins were resolved on 2-D gel as 110 spots, including 13 new, which were absent in the crude S-nitrosoproteome. These were identified by nLC-MS/MS as thioredoxin, fructose biphosphate aldolase class I, myrosinase, salt responsive proteins, peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase and malate dehydrogenase. Cold showed differential S-nitrosylation of 15 spots, enhanced superoxide dismutase activity (via S-nitrosylation) and promoted the detoxification of superoxide radicals. Increased S-nitrosylation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase sedoheptulose-biphosphatase, and fructose biphosphate aldolase, indicated regulation of Calvin cycle by S-nitrosylation. The results showed that RuBisCO depletion improved proteome coverage and provided clues for NO signaling in cold. PMID:24032038

  6. RuBisCO depletion improved proteome coverage of cold responsive S-nitrosylated targets in Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Sehrawat, Ankita; Abat, Jasmeet K; Deswal, Renu

    2013-01-01

    Although in the last few years good number of S-nitrosylated proteins are identified but information on endogenous targets is still limiting. Therefore, an attempt is made to decipher NO signaling in cold treated Brassica juncea seedlings. Treatment of seedlings with substrate, cofactor and inhibitor of Nitric-oxide synthase and nitrate reductase (NR), indicated NR mediated NO biosynthesis in cold. Analysis of the in vivo thiols showed depletion of low molecular weight thiols and enhancement of available protein thiols, suggesting redox changes. To have a detailed view, S-nitrosylation analysis was done using biotin switch technique (BST) and avidin-affinity chromatography. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is S-nitrosylated and therefore, is identified as target repeatedly due to its abundance. It also competes out low abundant proteins which are important NO signaling components. Therefore, RuBisCO was removed (over 80%) using immunoaffinity purification. Purified S-nitrosylated RuBisCO depleted proteins were resolved on 2-D gel as 110 spots, including 13 new, which were absent in the crude S-nitrosoproteome. These were identified by nLC-MS/MS as thioredoxin, fructose biphosphate aldolase class I, myrosinase, salt responsive proteins, peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase and malate dehydrogenase. Cold showed differential S-nitrosylation of 15 spots, enhanced superoxide dismutase activity (via S-nitrosylation) and promoted the detoxification of superoxide radicals. Increased S-nitrosylation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase sedoheptulose-biphosphatase, and fructose biphosphate aldolase, indicated regulation of Calvin cycle by S-nitrosylation. The results showed that RuBisCO depletion improved proteome coverage and provided clues for NO signaling in cold. PMID:24032038

  7. Role of the Rubisco small subunit. Final report for period May 1, 1997--April 30,2000

    SciTech Connect

    Spreitzer, Robert J.

    2000-10-04

    CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} are mutually competitive at the active site of ribulose-1,5-biphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). Rubisco contains two subunits, each present in eight copies. The 15-kD small subunit is coded by a family of nuclear RbcS genes. Until now, the role of the small subunit in Rubisco structure or catalytic efficiency is not known. Because of other work in eliminating the two RbcS genes in the green algo Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, it is now possible to address questions about the structure-function relationships of the eukaryotic small subunit. There are three specific aims in this project: (1) Alanine scanning mutagenesis is being used to dissect the importance of the {beta}A/{beta}B loop, a feature unique to the eukaryotic small subunit. (2) Random mutagenesis is being used to identify additional residues or regions of the small subunit that are important for holoenzyme assembly and function. (3) Attempts are being made to express foreign small subunits in Chlamydomonas to examine the contribution of small subunits to holoenzyme assembly, catalytic efficiency, and CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} specificity.

  8. Relationship between rubisco sulfhydryl content and relative sensitivity of potato cultivars to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Enyedi, A.J.; Pell, E.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Ozone (O{sub 3}) induced a reduction in quantity of rubisco in potato foliage. In vitro, O{sub 3} predisposed purified rubisco to elevated proteolysis; reagents which protected sulfhydryl (SH) groups suppressed this effect. We hypothesized that rubisco SH content correlated directly with foliar O{sub 3} sensitivity. Rubisco was purified from Solanum tuberosum L. O{sub 3}-tolerant cv. Superior (SP) and Norgold Russet (NR), and O{sub 3}-susceptible cv. Norland (NL) and Cherokee (CK). When native rubisco was titrated with DTNB, protein of NL contained 1.33 and 1.26 times more SH groups than SP and NR, respectively. Rubisco from CK also contained more SH groups than SP and NR, but the difference was not significant. Rubisco of SP, NR and CK denatured by SDS exhibited identical number of SH groups, however, NL exhibited 1.15 times more SH groups. The greater number of SH groups in rubisco from NL versus SP and NR may explain its relative sensitivity to ozone. The role of SH groups in ozone-sensitivity of CK will require further study.

  9. Property Blocks: Games and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Alan, Ed.; Dailey, Jean, Ed.

    This pamphlet describes the property blocks produced by MINNEMAST, and discusses their use in the development of thinking processes. Classification systems, including block diagrams and tree diagrams, are discussed. Sixteen classroom activities and eleven games which use the blocks are described. Suggestions to the teacher for further reading are…

  10. Diversity and Expression of RubisCO Genes in a Perennially Ice-Covered Antarctic Lake during the Polar Night Transition

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Weidong; Ream, David C.; Priscu, John C.

    2012-01-01

    The autotrophic communities in the lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, have generated interest since the early 1960s owing to low light transmission through the permanent ice covers, a strongly bimodal seasonal light cycle, constant cold water temperatures, and geographical isolation. Previous work has shown that autotrophic carbon fixation in these lakes provides an important source of organic matter to this polar desert. Lake Bonney has two lobes separated by a shallow sill and is one of several chemically stratified lakes in the dry valleys that support year-round biological activity. As part of an International Polar Year initiative, we monitored the diversity and abundance of major isoforms of RubisCO in Lake Bonney by using a combined sequencing and quantitative PCR approach during the transition from summer to polar winter. Form ID RubisCO genes related to a stramenopile, a haptophyte, and a cryptophyte were identified, while primers specific for form IA/B RubisCO detected a diverse autotrophic community of chlorophytes, cyanobacteria, and chemoautotrophic proteobacteria. Form ID RubisCO dominated phytoplankton communities in both lobes of the lake and closely matched depth profiles for photosynthesis and chlorophyll. Our results indicate a coupling between light availability, photosynthesis, and rbcL mRNA levels in deep phytoplankton populations. Regulatory control of rbcL in phytoplankton living in nutrient-deprived shallow depths does not appear to be solely light dependent. The distinct water chemistries of the east and west lobes have resulted in depth- and lobe-dependent variability in RubisCO diversity, which plays a role in transcriptional activity of the key gene responsible for carbon fixation. PMID:22492447

  11. A repeat protein links Rubisco to form the eukaryotic carbon-concentrating organelle

    PubMed Central

    Mackinder, Luke C. M.; Meyer, Moritz T.; Mettler-Altmann, Tabea; Chen, Vivian K.; Mitchell, Madeline C.; Caspari, Oliver; Freeman Rosenzweig, Elizabeth S.; Pallesen, Leif; Reeves, Gregory; Itakura, Alan; Roth, Robyn; Sommer, Frederik; Geimer, Stefan; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Goodenough, Ursula; Stitt, Mark; Griffiths, Howard; Jonikas, Martin C.

    2016-01-01

    Biological carbon fixation is a key step in the global carbon cycle that regulates the atmosphere's composition while producing the food we eat and the fuels we burn. Approximately one-third of global carbon fixation occurs in an overlooked algal organelle called the pyrenoid. The pyrenoid contains the CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco and enhances carbon fixation by supplying Rubisco with a high concentration of CO2. Since the discovery of the pyrenoid more that 130 y ago, the molecular structure and biogenesis of this ecologically fundamental organelle have remained enigmatic. Here we use the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to discover that a low-complexity repeat protein, Essential Pyrenoid Component 1 (EPYC1), links Rubisco to form the pyrenoid. We find that EPYC1 is of comparable abundance to Rubisco and colocalizes with Rubisco throughout the pyrenoid. We show that EPYC1 is essential for normal pyrenoid size, number, morphology, Rubisco content, and efficient carbon fixation at low CO2. We explain the central role of EPYC1 in pyrenoid biogenesis by the finding that EPYC1 binds Rubisco to form the pyrenoid matrix. We propose two models in which EPYC1’s four repeats could produce the observed lattice arrangement of Rubisco in the Chlamydomonas pyrenoid. Our results suggest a surprisingly simple molecular mechanism for how Rubisco can be packaged to form the pyrenoid matrix, potentially explaining how Rubisco packaging into a pyrenoid could have evolved across a broad range of photosynthetic eukaryotes through convergent evolution. In addition, our findings represent a key step toward engineering a pyrenoid into crops to enhance their carbon fixation efficiency. PMID:27166422

  12. A repeat protein links Rubisco to form the eukaryotic carbon-concentrating organelle.

    PubMed

    Mackinder, Luke C M; Meyer, Moritz T; Mettler-Altmann, Tabea; Chen, Vivian K; Mitchell, Madeline C; Caspari, Oliver; Freeman Rosenzweig, Elizabeth S; Pallesen, Leif; Reeves, Gregory; Itakura, Alan; Roth, Robyn; Sommer, Frederik; Geimer, Stefan; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Goodenough, Ursula; Stitt, Mark; Griffiths, Howard; Jonikas, Martin C

    2016-05-24

    Biological carbon fixation is a key step in the global carbon cycle that regulates the atmosphere's composition while producing the food we eat and the fuels we burn. Approximately one-third of global carbon fixation occurs in an overlooked algal organelle called the pyrenoid. The pyrenoid contains the CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco and enhances carbon fixation by supplying Rubisco with a high concentration of CO2 Since the discovery of the pyrenoid more that 130 y ago, the molecular structure and biogenesis of this ecologically fundamental organelle have remained enigmatic. Here we use the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to discover that a low-complexity repeat protein, Essential Pyrenoid Component 1 (EPYC1), links Rubisco to form the pyrenoid. We find that EPYC1 is of comparable abundance to Rubisco and colocalizes with Rubisco throughout the pyrenoid. We show that EPYC1 is essential for normal pyrenoid size, number, morphology, Rubisco content, and efficient carbon fixation at low CO2 We explain the central role of EPYC1 in pyrenoid biogenesis by the finding that EPYC1 binds Rubisco to form the pyrenoid matrix. We propose two models in which EPYC1's four repeats could produce the observed lattice arrangement of Rubisco in the Chlamydomonas pyrenoid. Our results suggest a surprisingly simple molecular mechanism for how Rubisco can be packaged to form the pyrenoid matrix, potentially explaining how Rubisco packaging into a pyrenoid could have evolved across a broad range of photosynthetic eukaryotes through convergent evolution. In addition, our findings represent a key step toward engineering a pyrenoid into crops to enhance their carbon fixation efficiency. PMID:27166422

  13. Properties of stellar activity cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Heidi

    2015-08-01

    The current photometric datasets, that span decades, allow for studying long-term magentic cycles on active stars. Complementary Ca H&K observations give information also on the cycles of normal solar-like stars, which have significantly smaller, and less easily detectable, spots. In recent years, high precision space-based observations, for example from the Kepler satellite, have allowed also to study the sunspot-like spot sizes in other stars. In this talk I will review what is known about the properties of the cyclic stellar activity in other stars than our Sun, and also discuss the future prospects in this field.

  14. Variation in Rubisco activase (RCAβ) gene promoters and expression in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr].

    PubMed

    Chao, Maoni; Yin, Zhitong; Hao, Derong; Zhang, Jinyu; Song, Haina; Ning, Ailing; Xu, Xiaoming; Yu, Deyue

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of Rubisco activase (RCA) gene regulation and altering its expression levels to optimize Rubisco activation may provide an approach to enhance plant productivity. However, the genetic mechanisms and the effect of RCA expression on phenotype are still unknown in soybean. This work analysed the expression of RCA genes and demonstrated that two RCA isoforms presented different expression patterns. Compared with GmRCAα, GmRCAβ was expressed at higher mRNA and protein levels. In addition, GmRCAα and GmRCAβ were positively correlated with chlorophyll fluorescence parameters and seed yield, suggesting that changes in expression of RCA has a potential applicability in breeding for enhanced soybean productivity. To identify the genetic factors that cause expression level variation of GmRCAβ, expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) mapping was combined with allele mining in a natural population including 219 landraces. The eQTL mapping showed that a combination of both cis- and trans-acting eQTLs might control GmRCAβ expression. As promoters can affect both cis- and trans-acting eQTLs by altering cis-acting regulatory elements or transcription factor binding sites, this work subsequently focused on the promoter region of GmRCAβ. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the GmRCAβ promoter were identified and shown to correlate with expression level diversity. These SNPs were classified into two groups, A and B. Further transient expression showed that GUS expression driven by the group A promoter was stronger than that by the group B promoter, suggesting that promoter sequence types could influence gene expression levels. These results would improve understanding how variation within promoters affects gene expression and, ultimately, phenotypic diversity in natural populations. PMID:24170743

  15. Improving recombinant Rubisco biogenesis, plant photosynthesis and growth by coexpressing its ancillary RAF1 chaperone.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Spencer M; Birch, Rosemary; Kelso, Celine; Beck, Jennifer L; Kapralov, Maxim V

    2015-03-17

    Enabling improvements to crop yield and resource use by enhancing the catalysis of the photosynthetic CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco has been a longstanding challenge. Efforts toward realization of this goal have been greatly assisted by advances in understanding the complexities of Rubisco's biogenesis in plastids and the development of tailored chloroplast transformation tools. Here we generate transplastomic tobacco genotypes expressing Arabidopsis Rubisco large subunits (AtL), both on their own (producing tob(AtL) plants) and with a cognate Rubisco accumulation factor 1 (AtRAF1) chaperone (producing tob(AtL-R1) plants) that has undergone parallel functional coevolution with AtL. We show AtRAF1 assembles as a dimer and is produced in tob(AtL-R1) and Arabidopsis leaves at 10-15 nmol AtRAF1 monomers per square meter. Consistent with a postchaperonin large (L)-subunit assembly role, the AtRAF1 facilitated two to threefold improvements in the amount and biogenesis rate of hybrid L8(A)S8(t) Rubisco [comprising AtL and tobacco small (S) subunits] in tob(AtL-R1) leaves compared with tob(AtL), despite >threefold lower steady-state Rubisco mRNA levels in tob(AtL-R1). Accompanying twofold increases in photosynthetic CO2-assimilation rate and plant growth were measured for tob(AtL-R1) lines. These findings highlight the importance of ancillary protein complementarity during Rubisco biogenesis in plastids, the possible constraints this has imposed on Rubisco adaptive evolution, and the likely need for such interaction specificity to be considered when optimizing recombinant Rubisco bioengineering in plants. PMID:25733857

  16. Effects of in vitro ozone treatment on proteolysis of purified rubisco from two hybrid poplar clones. [Populus maximowizii x trichocarpa

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, L.G.; Pell, E.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Plants exposed to ozone (O{sub 3}) exhibited symptoms of premature senescence, including early decline in quantity of rubisco. O{sub 3}-induced oxidation may cause changes in protein conformation of rubisco, resulting in enhanced proteolysis. To test this hypothesis, rubisco was purified from two hybrid clones of Populus maximowizii x trichocarpa, clones 388 and 245, and treated in vitro with O{sub 3} or air. Rubisco was then challenged with bromelain, papain, chymotrypsin, carboxypeptidase A, or endoproteinase Glu-C and percent degradation measured by SDS-PAGE and densitometric scanning of the gels. Degree of rubisco sensitivity to oxidation may be related to available sulfhydryl (SH) groups on the protein. The number of SH groups in native and denatured rubisco was measured for purified rubisco of both clones by DTNB titration method. The relationship between sensitivity to proteolysis and number and availability of SH groups is discussed.

  17. Prospects for improving CO2 fixation in C3-crops through understanding C4-Rubisco biogenesis and catalytic diversity.

    PubMed

    Sharwood, Robert E; Ghannoum, Oula; Whitney, Spencer M

    2016-06-01

    By operating a CO2 concentrating mechanism, C4-photosynthesis offers highly successful solutions to remedy the inefficiency of the CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco. C4-plant Rubisco has characteristically evolved faster carboxylation rates with low CO2 affinity. Owing to high CO2 concentrations in bundle sheath chloroplasts, faster Rubisco enhances resource use efficiency in C4 plants by reducing the energy and carbon costs associated with photorespiration and lowering the nitrogen investment in Rubisco. Here, we show that C4-Rubisco from some NADP-ME species, such as maize, are also of potential benefit to C3-photosynthesis under current and future atmospheric CO2 pressures. Realizing this bioengineering endeavour necessitates improved understanding of the biogenesis requirements and catalytic variability of C4-Rubisco, as well as the development of transformation capabilities to engineer Rubisco in a wider variety of food and fibre crops. PMID:27131319

  18. Structure-Function Studies with the Unique Hexameric Form II Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase (Rubisco) from Rhodopseudomonas palustris*

    PubMed Central

    Satagopan, Sriram; Chan, Sum; Perry, L. Jeanne; Tabita, F. Robert

    2014-01-01

    The first x-ray crystal structure has been solved for an activated transition-state analog-bound form II ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). This enzyme, from Rhodopseudomonas palustris, assembles as a unique hexamer with three pairs of catalytic large subunit homodimers around a central 3-fold symmetry axis. This oligomer arrangement is unique among all known Rubisco structures, including the form II homolog from Rhodospirillum rubrum. The presence of a transition-state analog in the active site locked the activated enzyme in a “closed” conformation and revealed the positions of critical active site residues during catalysis. Functional roles of two form II-specific residues (Ile165 and Met331) near the active site were examined via site-directed mutagenesis. Substitutions at these residues affect function but not the ability of the enzyme to assemble. Random mutagenesis and suppressor selection in a Rubisco deletion strain of Rhodobacter capsulatus identified a residue in the amino terminus of one subunit (Ala47) that compensated for a negative change near the active site of a neighboring subunit. In addition, substitution of the native carboxyl-terminal sequence with the last few dissimilar residues from the related R. rubrum homolog increased the enzyme's kcat for carboxylation. However, replacement of a longer carboxyl-terminal sequence with termini from either a form III or a form I enzyme, which varied both in length and sequence, resulted in complete loss of function. From these studies, it is evident that a number of subtle interactions near the active site and the carboxyl terminus account for functional differences between the different forms of Rubiscos found in nature. PMID:24942737

  19. Identification of Putative RuBisCo Activase (TaRca1)-The Catalytic Chaperone Regulating Carbon Assimilatory Pathway in Wheat (Triticum aestivum) under the Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ranjeet R; Goswami, Suneha; Singh, Khushboo; Dubey, Kavita; Singh, Shweta; Sharma, Renu; Verma, Neeraj; Kala, Yugal K; Rai, Gyanendra K; Grover, Monendra; Mishra, Dwijesh C; Singh, Bhupinder; Pathak, Himanshu; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Rai, Anil; Praveen, Shelly

    2016-01-01

    RuBisCo activase (Rca) is a catalytic chaperone involved in modulating the activity of RuBisCo (key enzyme of photosynthetic pathway). Here, we identified eight novel transcripts from wheat through data mining predicted to be Rca and cloned a transcript of 1.4 kb from cv. HD2985, named as TaRca1 (GenBank acc. no. KC776912). Single copy number of TaRca1 was observed in wheat genome. Expression analysis in diverse wheat genotypes (HD2985, Halna, PBW621, and HD2329) showed very high relative expression of TaRca1 in Halna under control and HS-treated, as compared to other cultivars at different stages of growth. TaRca1 protein was predicted to be chloroplast-localized with numerous potential phosphorylation sites. Northern blot analysis showed maximum accumulation of TaRca1 transcript in thermotolerant cv. during mealy-ripe stage, as compared to thermosusceptible. Decrease in the photosynthetic parameters was observed in all the cultivars, except PBW621 in response to HS. We observed significant increase in the Rca activity in all the cultivars under HS at different stages of growth. HS causes decrease in the RuBisCo activity; maximum reduction was observed during pollination stage in thermosusceptible cvs. as validated through immunoblotting. We observed uniform carbon distribution in different tissues of thermotolerant cvs., as compared to thermosusceptible. Similarly, tolerance level of leaf was observed maximum in Halna having high Rca activity under HS. A positive correlation was observed between the transcript and activity of TaRca1 in HS-treated Halna. Similarly, TaRca1 enzyme showed positive correlation with the activity of RuBisCo. There is, however, need to manipulate the thermal stability of TaRca1 enzyme through protein engineering for sustaining the photosynthetic rate under HS-a novel approach toward development of "climate-smart" crop. PMID:27462325

  20. Photosynthetic electron sinks in transgenic tobacco with reduced amounts of Rubisco: little evidence for significant Mehler reaction.

    PubMed

    Ruuska, S A; Badger, M R; Andrews, T J; von Caemmerer, S

    2000-02-01

    Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. W38) plants with an antisense gene directed against the mRNA of the small subunit of Rubisco were used to investigate the role of O2 as an electron acceptor during photosynthesis. The reduction in Rubisco has reduced the capacity for CO2-fixation in these plants without a similar reduction in electron transport capacity. Concurrent measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence and CO2 assimilation at different CO2 and O2 partial pressures showed close linear relationships between chloroplast electron transport rates calculated from chlorophyll fluorescence and those calculated from CO2-fixation. These relationships were similar for wild-type and transgenic plants, indicating that the reduced capacity for CO2 fixation in the transgenic plants did not result in extra electron transport not associated with the photosynthetic carbon reduction (PCR) or photorespiratory carbon oxidation (PCO) cycle. This was further investigated with mass spectrometric measurements of 16O2 and 18O2 exchange made concurrently with measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence. In all tobacco lines the rates of 18O2 uptake in the dark were similar to the 18O2 uptake rates at very high CO2 partial pressures in the light. Rates of oxygenase activity calculated from 18O2 uptake at the compensation point were linearly related to the Rubisco content of leaves. The ratios of oxygenase to carboxylase rates were calculated from measurements of 16O2 evolution and 18O2 uptake at the compensation point. These ratios were lower in the transgenic plants, consistent with their higher CO2 compensation points. It is concluded that although there may be some electron transport to O2 to balance conflicting demands of NADPH to ATP requirements, this flux must decrease in proportion with the reduced demand for ATP and NADPH consumption in the transgenic lines. The altered balance between electron transport and Rubisco capacity, however, does not result in rampant electron

  1. Identification of Two bZIP Transcription Factors Interacting with the Promoter of Soybean Rubisco Activase Gene (GmRCAα)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinyu; Du, Hongyang; Chao, Maoni; Yin, Zhitong; Yang, Hui; Li, Yakai; Huang, Fang; Yu, Deyue

    2016-01-01

    Rubisco activase (RCA), a key photosynthetic protein, catalyses the activation of Rubisco and thus plays an important role in photosynthesis. Although the RCA gene has been characterized in a variety of species, the molecular mechanism regulating its transcription remains unclear. Our previous studies on RCA gene expression in soybean suggested that expression of this gene is regulated by trans-acting factors. In the present study, we verified activity of the GmRCAα promoter in both soybean and Arabidopsis and used a yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) system for screening a leaf cDNA expression library to identify transcription factors (TFs) interacting with the GmRCAα promoter. Four basic leucine zipper (bZIP) TFs, GmbZIP04g, GmbZIP07g, GmbZIP1, and GmbZIP71, were isolated, and GmbZIP04g and GmbZIP07g were confirmed as able to bind to a 21-nt G-box-containing sequence. Additionally, the expression patterns of GmbZIP04g, GmbZIp07g, and GmRCAα were analyzed in response to abiotic stresses and during a 24-h period. Our study will help to advance elucidation of the network regulating GmRCAα transcription. PMID:27242832

  2. Arabidopsis thaliana ggt1 photorespiratory mutants maintain leaf carbon/nitrogen balance by reducing RuBisCO content and plant growth.

    PubMed

    Dellero, Younès; Lamothe-Sibold, Marlène; Jossier, Mathieu; Hodges, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Metabolic and physiological analyses of glutamate:glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 (GGT1) mutants were performed at the global leaf scale to elucidate the mechanisms involved in their photorespiratory growth phenotype. Air-grown ggt1 mutants showed retarded growth and development, that was not observed at high CO2 (3000 μL L(-1) ). When compared to wild-type (WT) plants, air-grown ggt1 plants exhibited glyoxylate accumulation, global changes in amino acid amounts including a decrease in serine content, lower organic acid levels, and modified ATP/ADP and NADP(+) /NADPH ratios. When compared to WT plants, their net CO2 assimilation rates (An ) were 50% lower and this mirrored decreases in ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) contents. High CO2 -grown ggt1 plants transferred to air revealed a rapid decrease of An and photosynthetic electron transfer rate while maintaining a high energetic state. Short-term (a night period and 4 h of light) transferred ggt1 leaves accumulated glyoxylate and exhibited low serine contents, while other amino acid levels were not modified. RuBisCO content, activity and activation state were not altered after a short-term transfer while the ATP/ADP ratio was lowered in ggt1 rosettes. However, plant growth and RuBisCO levels were both reduced in ggt1 leaves after a long-term (12 days) acclimation to air from high CO2 when compared to WT plants. The data are discussed with respect to a reduced photorespiratory carbon recycling in the mutants. It is proposed that the low An limits nitrogen-assimilation, this decreases leaf RuBisCO content until plants attain a new homeostatic state that maintains a constant C/N balance and leads to smaller, slower growing plants. PMID:26216646

  3. Cytonuclear evolution of rubisco in four allopolyploid lineages.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lei; Olson, Mischa; Wendel, Jonathan F

    2014-10-01

    Allopolyploidization in plants entails the merger of two divergent nuclear genomes, typically with only one set (usually maternal) of parental plastidial and mitochondrial genomes and with an altered cytonuclear stoichiometry. Thus, we might expect cytonuclear coevolution to be an important dimension of allopolyploid evolution. Here, we investigate cytonuclear coordination for the key chloroplast protein rubisco (ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase), which is composed of nuclear-encoded, small subunits (SSUs) and plastid-encoded, large subunits. By studying gene composition and diversity as well as gene expression in four model allopolyploid lineages, Arabidopsis, Arachis, Brassica, and Nicotiana, we demonstrate that paralogous nuclear-encoded rbcS genes within diploids are subject to homogenization via gene conversion and that such concerted evolution via gene conversion characterizes duplicated genes (homoeologs) at the polyploid level. Many gene conversions in the polyploids are intergenomic with respect to the diploid progenitor genomes, occur in functional domains of the homoeologous SSUs, and are directionally biased, such that the maternal amino acid states are favored. This consistent preferential maternal-to-paternal gene conversion is mirrored at the transcriptional level, with a uniform transcriptional bias of the maternal-like rbcS homoeologs. These data, repeated among multiple diverse angiosperm genera for an important photosynthetic enzyme, suggest that cytonuclear coevolution may be mediated by intergenomic gene conversion and altered transcription of duplicated, now homoeologous nuclear genes. PMID:25015644

  4. Exploiting transplastomically modified Rubisco to rapidly measure natural diversity in its carbon isotope discrimination using tuneable diode laser spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    von Caemmerer, Susanne; Tazoe, Youshi; Evans, John R.; Whitney, Spencer M.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon isotope discrimination (Δ) during C3 photosynthesis is dominated by the fractionation occurring during CO2-fixation by the enzyme Rubisco. While knowing the fractionation by enzymes is pivotal to fully understanding plant carbon metabolism, little is known about variation in the discrimination factor of Rubisco (b) as it is difficult to measure using existing in vitro methodologies. Tuneable diode laser absorption spectroscopy has improved the ability to make rapid measurements of Δ concurrently with photosynthetic gas exchange. This study used this technique to estimate b in vivo in five tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Petit Havana [N,N]) genotypes expressing alternative Rubisco isoforms. For transplastomic tobacco producing Rhodospirillum rubrum Rubisco b was 23.8±0.7‰, while Rubisco containing the large subunit Leu-335-Val mutation had a b-value of 13.9±0.7‰. These values were significantly less than that for Rubisco from wild-type tobacco (b=29‰), a C3 species. Transplastomic tobacco producing chimeric Rubisco comprising tobacco Rubisco small subunits and the catalytic large subunits from either the C4 species Flaveria bidentis or the C3-C4 species Flaveria floridana had b-values of 27.8±0.8 and 28.6±0.6‰, respectively. These values were not significantly different from tobacco Rubisco. PMID:24687980

  5. Depletion of abundant plant RuBisCO protein using the protamine sulfate precipitation method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Ji; Lee, Hye Min; Wang, Yiming; Wu, Jingni; Kim, Sang Gon; Kang, Kyu Young; Park, Ki Hun; Kim, Yong Chul; Choi, In Soo; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Rakwal, Randeep; Kim, Sun Tae

    2013-07-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is the most abundant plant leaf protein, hampering deep analysis of the leaf proteome. Here, we describe a novel protamine sulfate precipitation (PSP) method for the depletion of RuBisCO. For this purpose, soybean leaf total proteins were extracted using Tris-Mg/NP-40 extraction buffer. Obtained clear supernatant was subjected to the PSP method, followed by 13% SDS-PAGE analysis of total, PS-supernatant and -precipitation derived protein samples. In a dose-dependent experiment, 0.1% w/v PS was found to be sufficient for precipitating RuBisCO large and small subunits (LSU and SSU). Western blot analysis confirmed no detection of RuBisCO LSU in the PS-supernatant proteins. Application of this method to Arabidopsis, rice, and maize leaf proteins revealed results similar to soybean. Furthermore, 2DE analyses of PS-treated soybean leaf displayed enriched protein profile for the protein sample derived from the PS-supernatant than total proteins. Some enriched 2D spots were subjected to MALDI-TOF-TOF analysis and were successfully assigned for their protein identity. Hence, the PSP method is: (i) simple, fast, economical, and reproducible for RuBisCO precipitation from the plant leaf sample; (ii) applicable to both dicot and monocot plants; and (iii) suitable for downstream proteomics analysis. PMID:23576416

  6. Effect of Nd{sup 3+} ion on carboxylation activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Chao; Hong Fashui . E-mail: Hongfsh_cn@sina.com; Wu Kang; Ma, Hong-bing; Zhang Xueguang; Hong Chengjiao; Wu Cheng; Gao Fengqing; Yang Fan; Zheng Lei; Wang Xuefeng; Liu Tao; Xie Yaning; Xu Jianhua; Li Zhongrui

    2006-03-31

    Neodymium (Nd), as a member of rare earth elements, proved to enhance the photosynthesis rate and organic substance accumulation of spinach through the increase in carboxylation activity of Rubisco. Although the oxygenase activity of spinach Rubisco was slightly changed with the Nd{sup 3+} treatment, the specific factor of Rubisco was greatly increased. It was partially due to the promotion of Rubisco activase (R-A) activity but mainly to the formation of Rubisco-Rubisco activase super-complex, a heavier molecular mass protein (about 1200 kD) comprising both Rubisco and Rubisco activase. This super-complex was found during the extraction procedure of Rubisco by the gel electrophoresis and Western-blot studies. The formation of Rubisco-R-A super-complex suggested that the secondary structure of the protein purified from the Nd{sup 3+}-treated spinach was different from that of the control. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure study of the 'Rubisco' purified from the Nd{sup 3+}-treated spinach revealed that Nd was bound with four oxygen atoms and two sulfur atoms of amino acid residues at the Nd-O and Nd-S bond lengths of 2.46 and 2.89 A, respectively.

  7. Cloning and characterization of the Rubisco activase gene from Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; He, Bowen; Zhou, Shuang; Li, Yi; Zhang, Yizheng

    2010-02-01

    A full-length cDNA of Rubisco activase (IBrcaI) was cloned from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam) using Rapid-Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE). IBrcaI contains a 1,347 bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 439 amino acids. The sequence alignment of multiple Rubisco activase genes from sweet potato and other plants showed high homology at two previously described ATP-binding sites. Western blot analysis indicated that there are two Rubisco activase proteins in sweet potato. Expression of IBrcaI was only detected in leaves. In the 14 h light and 10 h dark photoperiods, maximal and minimal IBrcaI mRNA expression levels were detected at 8:00 in the morning and at midnight, respectively. PMID:19296237

  8. Temperature dependence of in vitro Rubisco kinetics in species of Flaveria with different photosynthetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, Juan Alejandro; Cavanagh, Amanda P; Kubien, David S; Galmés, Jeroni

    2015-04-01

    There is general consensus in the literature that plants with different photosynthetic mechanisms (i.e. C3 vs. C4) have Rubiscos characterised by different kinetic performances. However, potential differences in the temperature dependencies of Rubisco kinetic parameters between C3 and C4 plants are uncertain. Accordingly, six species of Flaveria with contrasting photosynthetic mechanisms (C3, C3/C4 and C4) were selected and their Rubisco Michaelis-Menten constants for CO2 and RuBP (K c and K RuBP), carboxylase catalytic turnover rate ([Formula: see text]) and CO2/O2 specificity factor (S c/o) were measured between 10 and 40 °C. The results confirmed different Rubisco characteristics between C3 and C4 plants. Rubisco from the C3 species had higher E a for K c and [Formula: see text] than that from C4 species, which were translated into differences in the temperature response of the carboxylase catalytic efficiency ([Formula: see text]/K c). However, E a did not differ for S c/o or K RuBP. Although a mechanism remains uncertain, it appears that the Asp/Glu-149-Ala and Met-309-Ile substitutions lead to differences in the temperature responses of catalysis between C3 and C4 Rubiscos in Flaveria. Therefore, the above observations are consistent with the fact that C3 species have a higher photosynthetic efficiency and ecological dominance in cool environments, with respect to C4 species in temperate environments. PMID:25663529

  9. Distribution and diversity of autotrophic bacteria in groundwater systems based on the analysis of RubisCO genotypes.

    PubMed

    Alfreider, Albin; Vogt, Carsten; Geiger-Kaiser, Margot; Psenner, Roland

    2009-04-01

    A molecular approach, based on the detection of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) large subunit genes, was applied to investigate the distribution and diversity of autotrophic bacteria in groundwater systems. DNA extracts from 48 sampling stations, including a variety of pristine and polluted, shallow and deep-subsurface groundwater samples obtained from Germany and Austria, served as a template for the PCR amplification of form I (cbbL) and form II (cbbM) large subunit RubisCO genes. The majority of the samples (>80%) contained two different forms of RubisCO. In 17 samples, all three forms of RubisCO were identified. PCR products from four selected groundwater habitats containing all three forms of RubisCO were used to construct clone libraries. Based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, 109 RubisCO-clone-inserts were subjected to sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. With the exception of a form IA RubisCO sequence cluster obtained from deep subsurface samples, which was identical to the RubisCO genes described for Ralstonia metallidurans CH34, most sequences were distantly related to a variety of RubisCO species in chemolithoautotrophic Proteobacteria. Several sequences occurred in isolated lineages. These findings suggest that autotrophic bacteria with the capability to assimilate CO2 via the Calvin Cycle pathway are widespread inhabitants of groundwater systems. PMID:19157743

  10. Isolated spinach ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxgenase large subunit .epsilon. n-methyltransferase and method of inactivating ribulose-1,5-bishosphatase .epsilon. n-methyltransferase activity

    DOEpatents

    Houtz, Robert L.

    2001-01-01

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS) .sup..epsilon. N-methyltansferase (protein methylase III or Rubisco LSMT) from a plant which has a des(methyl) lysyl residue in the LS is disclosed. In addition, the full-length cDNA clones for Rubisco LSMT are disclosed. Transgenic plants and methods of producing same which have the Rubisco LSMT gene inserted into the DNA are also provided. Further, methods of inactivating the enzymatic activity of Rubisco LSMT are also disclosed.

  11. Isolated spinach ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit .sup..epsilon. N-methyltransferase and method of inactivating ribulose-1,5-bisphosphatase carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit .sup..epsilon. N-methyltransferase activity

    DOEpatents

    Houtz, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS) .sup..epsilon. N-methyltransferase (protein methylase III or Rubisco LSMT) from a plant which has a des(methyl) lysyl residue in the LS is disclosed. In addition, the full-length cDNA clones for Rubisco LSMT are disclosed. Transgenic plants and methods of producing same which have the Rubisco LSMT gene inserted into the DNA are also provided. Further, methods of inactivating the enzymatic activity of Rubisco LSMT are also disclosed.

  12. Structure and identification of a pterin dehydratase-like protein as a ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) assembly factor in the α-carboxysome.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Nicole M; Sundberg, Christopher D; Gidaniyan, Soheil D; Cascio, Duilio; Yeates, Todd O

    2014-03-14

    Carboxysomes are proteinaceous bacterial microcompartments that increase the efficiency of the rate-limiting step in carbon fixation by sequestering reaction substrates. Typically, α-carboxysomes are genetically encoded as a single operon expressing the structural proteins and the encapsulated enzymes of the microcompartment. In addition, depending on phylogeny, as many as 13 other genes are found to co-occur near or within α-carboxysome operons. One of these genes codes for a protein with distant homology to pterin-4α-carbinolamine dehydratase (PCD) enzymes. It is present in all α-carboxysome containing bacteria and has homologs in algae and higher plants. Canonical PCDs play an important role in amino acid hydroxylation, a reaction not associated with carbon fixation. We determined the crystal structure of an α-carboxysome PCD-like protein from the chemoautotrophic bacterium Thiomonas intermedia K12, at 1.3-Å resolution. The protein retains a three-dimensional fold similar to canonical PCDs, although the prominent active site cleft present in PCD enzymes is disrupted in the α-carboxysome PCD-like protein. Using a cell-based complementation assay, we tested the PCD-like proteins from T. intermedia and two additional bacteria, and found no evidence for PCD enzymatic activity. However, we discovered that heterologous co-expression of the PCD-like protein from Halothiobacillus neapolitanus with RuBisCO and GroELS in Escherichia coli increased the amount of soluble, assembled RuBisCO recovered from cell lysates compared with co-expression of RuBisCO with GroELS alone. We conclude that this conserved PCD-like protein, renamed here α-carboxysome RuBisCO assembly factor (or acRAF), is a novel RuBisCO chaperone integral to α-carboxysome function. PMID:24459150

  13. Expression of a foreign Rubisco small subunit in tobacco with reduced levels of the native protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cDNA, ArRbcS3, for the small subunit of Rubisco from Amaranthus retroflexus (pigweed) was expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) under the control of a strong leaf-specific Lhcb promoter. The coding region of the ArRbcS3 was fused to the plastid targeting sequence of the native tobacco rbcS to...

  14. The Transport Properties of Activated Carbon Fibers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    di Vittorio, S. L.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Endo, M.; Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons.

  15. The transport properties of activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    di Vittorio, S.L. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Dresselhaus, M.S. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA . Dept. of Physics); Endo, M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Identification of Putative RuBisCo Activase (TaRca1)—The Catalytic Chaperone Regulating Carbon Assimilatory Pathway in Wheat (Triticum aestivum) under the Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Suneha; Singh, Khushboo; Dubey, Kavita; Singh, Shweta; Sharma, Renu; Verma, Neeraj; Kala, Yugal K.; Rai, Gyanendra K.; Grover, Monendra; Mishra, Dwijesh C.; Singh, Bhupinder; Pathak, Himanshu; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Rai, Anil; Praveen, Shelly

    2016-01-01

    RuBisCo activase (Rca) is a catalytic chaperone involved in modulating the activity of RuBisCo (key enzyme of photosynthetic pathway). Here, we identified eight novel transcripts from wheat through data mining predicted to be Rca and cloned a transcript of 1.4 kb from cv. HD2985, named as TaRca1 (GenBank acc. no. KC776912). Single copy number of TaRca1 was observed in wheat genome. Expression analysis in diverse wheat genotypes (HD2985, Halna, PBW621, and HD2329) showed very high relative expression of TaRca1 in Halna under control and HS-treated, as compared to other cultivars at different stages of growth. TaRca1 protein was predicted to be chloroplast-localized with numerous potential phosphorylation sites. Northern blot analysis showed maximum accumulation of TaRca1 transcript in thermotolerant cv. during mealy-ripe stage, as compared to thermosusceptible. Decrease in the photosynthetic parameters was observed in all the cultivars, except PBW621 in response to HS. We observed significant increase in the Rca activity in all the cultivars under HS at different stages of growth. HS causes decrease in the RuBisCo activity; maximum reduction was observed during pollination stage in thermosusceptible cvs. as validated through immunoblotting. We observed uniform carbon distribution in different tissues of thermotolerant cvs., as compared to thermosusceptible. Similarly, tolerance level of leaf was observed maximum in Halna having high Rca activity under HS. A positive correlation was observed between the transcript and activity of TaRca1 in HS-treated Halna. Similarly, TaRca1 enzyme showed positive correlation with the activity of RuBisCo. There is, however, need to manipulate the thermal stability of TaRca1 enzyme through protein engineering for sustaining the photosynthetic rate under HS—a novel approach toward development of “climate-smart” crop. PMID:27462325

  17. Isotopic discrimination and kinetic parameters of RubisCO from the marine bloom-forming diatom, Skeletonema costatum.

    PubMed

    Boller, A J; Thomas, P J; Cavanaugh, C M; Scott, K M

    2015-01-01

    The cosmopolitan, bloom-forming diatom, Skeletonema costatum, is a prominent primary producer in coastal oceans, fixing CO2 with ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) that is phylogenetically distinct from terrestrial plant RubisCO. RubisCOs are subdivided into groups based on sequence similarity of their large subunits (IA-ID, II, and III). ID is present in several major oceanic primary producers, including diatoms such as S. costatum, coccolithophores, and some dinoflagellates, and differs substantially in amino acid sequence from the well-studied IB enzymes present in most cyanobacteria and in green algae and plants. Despite this sequence divergence, and differences in isotopic discrimination apparent in other RubisCO enzymes, stable carbon isotope compositions of diatoms and other marine phytoplankton are generally interpreted assuming enzymatic isotopic discrimination similar to spinach RubisCO (IB). To interpret phytoplankton δ(13) C values, S. costatum RubisCO was characterized via sequence analysis, and measurement of its KCO2 and Vmax , and degree of isotopic discrimination. The sequence of this enzyme placed it among other diatom ID RubisCOs. Michaelis-Menten parameters were similar to other ID enzymes (KCO2 = 48.9 ± 2.8 μm; Vmax = 165.1 ± 6.3 nmol min(-1 ) mg(-1) ). However, isotopic discrimination (ε = [(12) k/(13) k - 1] × 1000) was low (18.5‰; 17.0-19.9, 95% CI) when compared to IA and IB RubisCOs (22-29‰), though not as low as ID from coccolithophore, Emiliania huxleyi (11.1‰). Variability in ε-values among RubisCOs from primary producers is likely reflected in δ(13) C values of oceanic biomass. Currently, δ(13) C variability is ascribed to physical or chemical factors (e.g. illumination, nutrient availability) and physiological responses to these factors (e.g. carbon-concentrating mechanisms). Estimating the importance of these factors from δ(13) C measurements requires an accurate ε-value, and a mass

  18. (Structure and expression of nuclear genes encoding rubisco activase)

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinski, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    Our activities during the past year have centered around two basic aspects of the project: describing more thoroughly the diurnal and light irradiance effects on activase gene expression in barley; and isolating and structurally characterizing cDNA and genomic DNA sequences encoding activase from barley. Three appendices are included that summarize these activities.

  19. An acidified thermostabilizing mini-peptide derived from the carboxyl extension of the larger isoform of the plant Rubisco activase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengru; Li, Xujuan; Yang, Yumei; Luo, Zhu; Liu, Chang; Gong, Ming; Zou, Zhurong

    2015-10-20

    Thermostable fusion peptide partners are valuable in engineering thermostability in proteins. We evaluated the Arabidopsis counterpart (AtRAce) and an acidified derivative (mRAce) of the conserved carboxyl extension (RAce) of plant Rubisco activase (RCA) for their thermostabilizing properties in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a protein fusion strategy. We used AtRAce and mRAce as fusion tails for the thermolabile protein RCA2 from Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum. The homologous fusion of AtRAce with Arabidopsis RCA2 and the heterologous fusion of AtRAce with tobacco RCA2 increased the thermostability of both proteins. The acidified derivative mRAce conferred greater thermostability upon both proteins as compared with AtRAce. Moreover, mRAce enhanced the thermostability of other two thermolabile proteins from Jatropha curcas: the cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase 1 (JcAPX1) and the TATA-box binding protein isoform 1 (JcTBP1). We further report - for the first time - that JcTBP1 mediates heat tolerance in vivo in yeast. Thus, our study identifies a C-terminal acidic mini-peptide - the acidified derivative mRAce - with potential uses in improving the thermostability of heat-labile proteins and their associated heat tolerance in host organisms. PMID:26321073

  20. Chloroplast EF-Tu and thermal aggregation of Rubisco activase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chloroplast protein synthesis elongation factor, EF-Tu, has been implicated in heat tolerance in maize. The recombinant precursor of this protein, pre-EF-Tu, has been found to exhibit chaperone activity and protect heat-labile proteins, such as citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase, from therma...

  1. Active material based active sealing technology: Part 1. Active seal requirements vs. active material actuator properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Christopher P.; Carter, William; Herrera, Guillermo A.; McKnight, Geoffrey P.; Browne, Alan L.; Johnson, Nancy L.; Bazzi, Imad F.

    2010-04-01

    Current seals used for vehicle closures/swing panels are essentially flexible, frequently hollow structures whose designs are constrained by numerous requirements, many of them competing, including door closing effort (both air bind and seal compression), sound isolation, prevention of water leaks, and accommodation of variations in vehicle build. This paper documents the first portion of a collaborative research study/exploration of the feasibility of and approaches for using active materials with shape and stiffness changing attributes to produce active seal technologies, seals with improved performance. An important design advantage of an active material approach compared to previous active seal technologies is the distribution of active material regions throughout the seal length, which would enable continued active function even with localized failure. Included as a major focus of this study was the assessment of polymeric active materials because of their potential ease of integration into the current seal manufacturing process. In Part 1 of this study, which is documented in this paper, potential materials were evaluated in terms of their cost, activation mechanisms, and mechanical and actuation properties. Based on these properties, simple designs were proposed and utilized to help determine which materials are best suited for active seals. Shape memory alloys (SMA) and electroactive polymers (EAP) were judged to be the most promising.

  2. Metabolic indicators of drought stress tolerance in wheat: glutamine synthetase isoenzymes and Rubisco.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zoltán; Németh, Edit; Guóth, Adrienn; Bona, Lajos; Wodala, Barnabás; Pécsváradi, Attila

    2013-06-01

    Drought stress has a considerable impact on the ecosystem and agriculture. Continuous water deficit induces early leaf senescence in plants. During this process, chloroplasts are degraded and photosynthesis drastically drops. The objective of this investigation was to look into the regulation of nitrogen and carbon metabolism during water deficit. Rubisco (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase; EC 4.1.1.39) and the total protein contents inform us of the sink-source relation in plants. Glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2) isoenzymes are good markers of plastid status (GS2) and the nitrogen metabolism (GS1). Tolerant and sensitive wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genotypes were tested, which are widely used in agriculture. The amount of protein, Rubisco and GS isoforms in leaves were measured during the grain filling period, as indicative traits that ultimately determine the onset and stage of senescence. The symptoms of senescence first appeared on the oldest and finally on the youngest leaves. Drought stress disrupted the sequentiality of senescence in the sensitive varieties. An untimely senescence appeared in flag leaves, earlier than in the older leaves. Total protein and Rubisco contents decreased and the GS2 isoenzyme declined considerably in the youngest leaves. In the tolerant varieties, however, these physiological parameters did not change under drought, only the sequential senescence of leaf levels accelerated in some cases compared to the control, well-watered plants. Our results revealed that GS is a good indicator of drought stress, which can be applied for the characterization of wheat cultivars in terms of drought stress tolerance. PMID:23542183

  3. Diversity of RuBisCO and ATP citrate lyase genes in soda lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, Olga L; Tourova, Tatjana P; Muyzer, Gerard; Kolganova, Tatjana V; Sorokin, Dimitry Y

    2011-01-01

    Sediments from six soda lakes of the Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia) and from hypersaline alkaline lakes of Wadi Natrun (Egypt) were analyzed for the presence of cbb and aclB genes encoding key enzymes Ci assimilation (RuBisCO in Calvin-Benson and ATP citrate lyase in rTCA cycles, respectively). The cbbL gene (RuBisCO form I) was found in all samples and was most diverse, while the cbbM (RuBisCO form II) and aclB were detected only in few samples and with a much lower diversity. The cbbL libraries from hypersaline lakes were dominated by members of the extremely haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing Ectothiorhodospiraceae, i.e. the chemolithotrophic Thioalkalivibrio and the phototrophic Halorhodospira. In the less saline soda lakes from the Kulunda Steppe, the cbbL gene comprised up to ten phylotypes with a domination of members of a novel phototrophic Chromatiales lineage. The cbbM clone libraries consisted of two major unidentified lineages probably belonging to chemotrophic sulfur-oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria. One of them, dominating in the haloalkaline lakes from Wadi Natrun, was related to a cbbM phylotype detected previously in a hypersaline lake with a neutral pH, and another, dominating in lakes from the Kulunda Steppe, was only distantly related to the Thiomicrospira cluster. The aclB sequences detected in two samples from the Kulunda Steppe formed a single, deep branch in the Epsilonproteobacteria, distantly related to Arcobacter sulfidicus. PMID:21073490

  4. Rubisco Mechanism: Dissection of the Enolization Partial Reaction. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F. C.

    2003-06-11

    To test experimentally, the prior theoretical deduction that active-site residue Lys166 of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase participates in the carboxylation step of overall catalysis, site-directed mutants and chemically rescued site-directed mutants were characterized by kinetics and product analysis. Although position-166 mutants are able to catalyze normal enolization of ribulose bisphosphate, the enediol intermediate does not undergo carboxylation but rather eliminates phosphate. Furthermore, the chemically rescued mutant (aminoethylation of the severely impaired Lys66Cys mutant) generates a highly active mimic, which displays an enhanced carboxylation/oxygenation partition ratio. These two distinct lines of experimentation document a crucial role of Lys166 in carboxylation and in discrimination between CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. To ascertain whether Lys166 functions as an acid or base in facilitation of enolization, the chemically rescued mutant bearing {sup 15}N was titrated by NM R. From pH 6.5-9.5, the amino group of Lys166 remains unprotonated, indicating that it promotes enolization by hydrogen bonding to the ketone group of the substrate.

  5. Effect of ozone on degradation and mRNA levels of Rubisco in relation to potato leaf age

    SciTech Connect

    Eckardt, N.A.; Pell, E.J. )

    1993-05-01

    Leaf senescence is characterized by loss of the major photosynthetic enzyme, Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco). Exposure to ozone (O[sub 3]) is often associated with a premature decline in the quantity of this enzyme. Declines in Rubisco quantity could arise through inhibition of synthesis or enhancement of degradation. Several experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of O[sub 3] on these events in immature and mature leaves of potato. The effect of O[sub 3] on Rubisco synthesis was investigated indirectly by measuring the relative quantities of mRNA for the rubisco large (rbcL) and small (rbcS) subunits following a 5 hour exposure to 0.309 [mu]L L[sup [minus]1] O[sup 3] or charcoal-filtered air. O[sup 3] treatment was associated with a significant loss in rbcS mRNA in immature and mature potato leaves sampled immediately following the exposure. After the O[sup 3] exposure, a set of plants was placed in the dark at 30 C for two days. Levels of rbcS mRNA declined rapidly during the first twelve hours of dark incubation, thus declines in Rubisco quantity following two days of dark incubation were ascribed to degradation. Enhanced degradation due to O[sub 3] during the dark incubation was observed in the mature leaves, but not in the immature leaves. We conclude that O[sub 3] can cause both inhibited synthesis and enhanced degradation of Rubisco, and the response in dependent on leaf age.

  6. Contribution of carbon fixed by Rubisco and PEPC to phloem export in the Crassulacean acid metabolism plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana.

    PubMed

    Wild, Birgit; Wanek, Wolfgang; Postl, Wolfgang; Richter, Andreas

    2010-03-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants exhibit a complex interplay between CO(2) fixation by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco), and carbon demand for CAM maintenance and growth. This study investigated the flux of carbon from PEPC and direct Rubisco fixation to different leaf carbon pools and to phloem sap over the diurnal cycle. Concentrations and carbon isotope compositions of starch, soluble sugars, and organic acids were determined in leaves and phloem exudates of Kalanchoë daigremontiana Hamet et Perr., and related to CO(2) fixation by PEPC and Rubisco. Three types of leaf carbon pools could be distinguished. (i) Starch and malate pools were dominant and showed a pattern of reciprocal mobilization and accumulation (85/54 and 13/48 mg C g(-1) DW, respective, at the beginning/end of phase I). The carbon isotope composition of these pools was compatible with predominant PEPC fixation (delta(13)C values of -13 and -11 per thousand for starch and malate compared to -11 per thousand of PEPC fixed carbon). (ii) Isotopic composition (-17 per thousand and -14 per thousand) and concentration of glucose and fructose (2 and 3 mg C g(-1) DW, respectively) were not affected by diurnal metabolism, suggesting a low turnover. (iii) Sucrose (1-3 mg C g(-1) DW), in contrast, exhibited large diurnal changes in delta(13)C values (from -17 per thousand in the evening to -12 per thousand in the morning), which were not matched by net changes in sucrose concentration. This suggests a high sucrose turnover, fed by nocturnal starch degradation and direct Rubisco fixation during the day. A detailed dissection of the carbon fixation and mobilization pattern in K. daigremontiana revealed that direct fixation of Rubisco during the light accounted for 30% of phloem sucrose, but only 15% of fixed carbon, indicating that carbon from direct Rubisco fixation was preferentially used for leaf export. PMID:20159885

  7. Affinity chromatography reveals RuBisCO as an ecdysteroid-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Uhlik, Ondrej; Kamlar, Marek; Kohout, Ladislav; Jezek, Rudolf; Harmatha, Juraj; Macek, Tomas

    2008-12-22

    The aim of this work was to isolate plant ecdysteroid-binding proteins using affinity chromatography. Ecdysteroids as insect hormones have been investigated thoroughly but their function and the mechanism of action in plants and other organisms is still unknown although ecdysteroids occur in some plants in a relatively large amount. Therefore, 20-hydroxyecdysone was immobilized on a polymeric carrier as a ligand for affinity chromatography in order to isolate plant ecdysteroid-binding proteins from the cytosolic extract of New Zealand spinach (Tetragonia tetragonoides). Non-specifically bound proteins were eluted with a rising gradient of concentration of sodium chloride, and 3% (v/v) acetic acid was used for the elution of the specifically bound proteins. Using this method, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) was isolated. The influence of ecdysteroids on RuBisCO was further studied. Our results show that ecdysteroids are able to increase the yield of RuBisCO-mediated reaction in which CO(2) is fixed into organic matter by more than 10%. PMID:18761365

  8. Mechanistic Diversity in the RuBisCO Superfamily: RuBisCO from Rhodospirillum rubrum is Not Promiscuous for Reactions Catalyzed by RuBisCO-Like Proteins (RLPs)†

    PubMed Central

    Warlick, Benjamin P. E.; Imker, Heidi J.; Sriram, Jaya; Tabita, F. Robert; Gerlt, John A.

    2012-01-01

    D-Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenases (RuBisCOs) are promiscuous, catalyzing not only carboxylation and oxygenation of D-ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate but also other promiscuous, presumably nonphysiological, reactions initiated by abstraction of the 3-proton of D-ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. Also, RuBisCO has homologues that do not catalyze carboxylation; these are designated RuBisCO-like proteins or RLPs. Members of the two families of RLPs catalyze reactions in the recycling of 5′-methylthioadenosine (MTA) generated by polyamine synthesis: 1) the 2,3-diketo-5-methylthiopentane 1-phosphate (DK-MTP 1-P) “enolase” reaction in the well-known “methionine salvage” pathway in species of Bacilli; and 2) the 5-methylthio-D-ribulose 1-phosphate (MTRu 1-P) 1,3-isomerase reaction in the recently discovered “MTA-isoprenoid shunt” that generates 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) for nonmevalonate isoprene synthesis in Rhodospirillum rubrum. We first studied the structure and reactivity of DK-MTP 1-P which was reported to decompose rapidly [Ashida, H., Saito, Y., Kojima, C., and Yokota, A. (2008) Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 72, 959–67]. The 2-carbonyl group of DK-MTP 1-P is rapidly hydrated in solution and can undergo enolization both nonenzymatically and enzymatically via the small amount of unhydrated material that is present. We then examined the ability of RuBisCO from R. rubrum to catalyze both of the RLP-catalyzed reactions. Contrary to a previous report [Ashida, H., Saito, Y., Kojima, C., Kobayashi, K., Ogasawara, N., and Yokota, A. (2003) Science 302, 286–290], we were unable to confirm that this RuBisCO catalyzes the DK-MTP 1-P “enolase” reaction either in vitro or in vivo. We also determined that this RuBisCO does not catalyze the MTRu 1-P 1,3-isomerase reaction in vitro. Thus, although RuBisCOs can be functionally promiscuous, RuBisCO from R. rubrum is not promiscuous for either of the known RLP-catalyzed reactions. PMID:23110715

  9. RuBisCO in Non-Photosynthetic Alga Euglena longa: Divergent Features, Transcriptomic Analysis and Regulation of Complex Formation.

    PubMed

    Záhonová, Kristína; Füssy, Zoltán; Oborník, Miroslav; Eliáš, Marek; Yurchenko, Vyacheslav

    2016-01-01

    Euglena longa, a close relative of the photosynthetic model alga Euglena gracilis, possesses an enigmatic non-photosynthetic plastid. Its genome has retained a gene for the large subunit of the enzyme RuBisCO (rbcL). Here we provide new data illuminating the putative role of RuBisCO in E. longa. We demonstrated that the E. longa RBCL protein sequence is extremely divergent compared to its homologs from the photosynthetic relatives, suggesting a possible functional shift upon the loss of photosynthesis. Similarly to E. gracilis, E. longa harbors a nuclear gene encoding the small subunit of RuBisCO (RBCS) as a precursor polyprotein comprising multiple RBCS repeats, but one of them is highly divergent. Both RBCL and the RBCS proteins are synthesized in E. longa, but their abundance is very low compared to E. gracilis. No RBCS monomers could be detected in E. longa, suggesting that processing of the precursor polyprotein is inefficient in this species. The abundance of RBCS is regulated post-transcriptionally. Indeed, blocking the cytoplasmic translation by cycloheximide has no immediate effect on the RBCS stability in photosynthetically grown E. gracilis, but in E. longa, the protein is rapidly degraded. Altogether, our results revealed signatures of evolutionary degradation (becoming defunct) of RuBisCO in E. longa and suggest that its biological role in this species may be rather unorthodox, if any. PMID:27391690

  10. RuBisCO in Non-Photosynthetic Alga Euglena longa: Divergent Features, Transcriptomic Analysis and Regulation of Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Záhonová, Kristína; Füssy, Zoltán; Oborník, Miroslav; Eliáš, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Euglena longa, a close relative of the photosynthetic model alga Euglena gracilis, possesses an enigmatic non-photosynthetic plastid. Its genome has retained a gene for the large subunit of the enzyme RuBisCO (rbcL). Here we provide new data illuminating the putative role of RuBisCO in E. longa. We demonstrated that the E. longa RBCL protein sequence is extremely divergent compared to its homologs from the photosynthetic relatives, suggesting a possible functional shift upon the loss of photosynthesis. Similarly to E. gracilis, E. longa harbors a nuclear gene encoding the small subunit of RuBisCO (RBCS) as a precursor polyprotein comprising multiple RBCS repeats, but one of them is highly divergent. Both RBCL and the RBCS proteins are synthesized in E. longa, but their abundance is very low compared to E. gracilis. No RBCS monomers could be detected in E. longa, suggesting that processing of the precursor polyprotein is inefficient in this species. The abundance of RBCS is regulated post-transcriptionally. Indeed, blocking the cytoplasmic translation by cycloheximide has no immediate effect on the RBCS stability in photosynthetically grown E. gracilis, but in E. longa, the protein is rapidly degraded. Altogether, our results revealed signatures of evolutionary degradation (becoming defunct) of RuBisCO in E. longa and suggest that its biological role in this species may be rather unorthodox, if any. PMID:27391690

  11. An improved PCR method for direct identification of Porphyra (Bangiales, Rhodophyta) using conchocelis based on a RUBISCO intergenic spacer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Dong, Dong; Wang, Guangce; Zhang, Baoyu; Peng, Guang; Xu, Pu; Tang, Xiaorong

    2009-09-01

    An improved method of PCR in which the small segment of conchocelis is amplified directly without DNA extraction was used to amplify a RUBISCO intergenic spacer DNA fragment from nine species of red algal genus Porphyra (Bangiales, Rhodophyta), including Porphyra yezoensis (Jiangsu, China), P. haitanensis (Fujian, China), P. oligospermatangia (Qingdao, China), P. katadai (Qingdao, China), P. tenera (Qingdao, China), P. suborboculata (Fujian, China), P. pseudolinearis (Kogendo, Korea), P. linearis (Devon, England), and P. fallax (Seattle, USA). Standard PCR and the method developed here were both conducted using primers specific for the RUBISCO spacer region, after which the two PCR products were sequenced. The sequencing data of the amplicons obtained using both methods were identical, suggesting that the improved PCR method was functional. These findings indicate that the method developed here may be useful for the rapid identification of species of Porphyra in a germplasm bank. In addition, a phylogenetic tree was constructed using the RUBISCO spacer and partial rbcS sequence, and the results were in concordant with possible alternative phylogenies based on traditional morphological taxonomic characteristics, indicating that the RUBISCO spacer is a useful region for phylogenetic studies.

  12. A rapid method for depletion of Rubisco from soybean (Glycine max) leaf for proteomic analysis of lower abundance proteins.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Hari B; Natarajan, Savithiry S

    2009-12-01

    2-DE analysis of complex plant proteomes has limited dynamic resolution because only abundant proteins can be detected. Proteomic assessment of the low abundance proteins within leaf tissue is difficult when it is comprised of 30-50% of the CO(2) fixation enzyme Rubisco. Resolution can be improved through depletion of Rubisco using fractionation techniques based upon different physiological or biochemical principles. We have developed a fast and simple fractionation technique using 10 mM Ca(2+) and 10 mM phytate to precipitate Rubisco from soybean leaf soluble protein extract. This method is not only rapid, but also inexpensive, and capable of removing 85% of the extremely abundant Rubisco enzyme from soybean leaf soluble protein extract. This method allowed for roughly 230 previously inconspicuous protein spots in soybean leaf to be more easily detectable (3-fold increase in vol%) using fluorescent detection and allowed 28 phosphorylated proteins previously undetected, to be isolated and identified by MALDI-TOF-MS. PMID:19766275

  13. Temperature response of mesophyll conductance. Implications for the determination of Rubisco enzyme kinetics and for limitations to photosynthesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bernacchi, Carl J; Portis, Archie R; Nakano, Hiromi; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Long, Stephen P

    2002-12-01

    CO(2) transfer conductance from the intercellular airspaces of the leaf into the chloroplast, defined as mesophyll conductance (g(m)), is finite. Therefore, it will limit photosynthesis when CO(2) is not saturating, as in C3 leaves in the present atmosphere. Little is known about the processes that determine the magnitude of g(m). The process dominating g(m) is uncertain, though carbonic anhydrase, aquaporins, and the diffusivity of CO(2) in water have all been suggested. The response of g(m) to temperature (10 degrees C-40 degrees C) in mature leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv W38) was determined using measurements of leaf carbon dioxide and water vapor exchange, coupled with modulated chlorophyll fluorescence. These measurements revealed a temperature coefficient (Q(10)) of approximately 2.2 for g(m), suggesting control by a protein-facilitated process because the Q(10) for diffusion of CO(2) in water is about 1.25. Further, g(m) values are maximal at 35 degrees C to 37.5 degrees C, again suggesting a protein-facilitated process, but with a lower energy of deactivation than Rubisco. Using the temperature response of g(m) to calculate CO(2) at Rubisco, the kinetic parameters of Rubisco were calculated in vivo from 10 degrees C to 40 degrees C. Using these parameters, we determined the limitation imposed on photosynthesis by g(m). Despite an exponential rise with temperature, g(m) does not keep pace with increased capacity for CO(2) uptake at the site of Rubisco. The fraction of the total limitations to CO(2) uptake within the leaf attributable to g(m) rose from 0.10 at 10 degrees C to 0.22 at 40 degrees C. This shows that transfer of CO(2) from the intercellular air space to Rubisco is a very substantial limitation on photosynthesis, especially at high temperature. PMID:12481082

  14. Temperature Response of Mesophyll Conductance. Implications for the Determination of Rubisco Enzyme Kinetics and for Limitations to Photosynthesis in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bernacchi, Carl J.; Portis, Archie R.; Nakano, Hiromi; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Long, Stephen P.

    2002-01-01

    CO2 transfer conductance from the intercellular airspaces of the leaf into the chloroplast, defined as mesophyll conductance (gm), is finite. Therefore, it will limit photosynthesis when CO2 is not saturating, as in C3 leaves in the present atmosphere. Little is known about the processes that determine the magnitude of gm. The process dominating gm is uncertain, though carbonic anhydrase, aquaporins, and the diffusivity of CO2 in water have all been suggested. The response of gm to temperature (10°C–40°C) in mature leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv W38) was determined using measurements of leaf carbon dioxide and water vapor exchange, coupled with modulated chlorophyll fluorescence. These measurements revealed a temperature coefficient (Q10) of approximately 2.2 for gm, suggesting control by a protein-facilitated process because the Q10 for diffusion of CO2 in water is about 1.25. Further, gm values are maximal at 35°C to 37.5°C, again suggesting a protein-facilitated process, but with a lower energy of deactivation than Rubisco. Using the temperature response of gm to calculate CO2 at Rubisco, the kinetic parameters of Rubisco were calculated in vivo from 10°C to 40°C. Using these parameters, we determined the limitation imposed on photosynthesis by gm. Despite an exponential rise with temperature, gm does not keep pace with increased capacity for CO2 uptake at the site of Rubisco. The fraction of the total limitations to CO2 uptake within the leaf attributable to gm rose from 0.10 at 10°C to 0.22 at 40°C. This shows that transfer of CO2 from the intercellular air space to Rubisco is a very substantial limitation on photosynthesis, especially at high temperature. PMID:12481082

  15. [Oregano: properties, composition and biological activity].

    PubMed

    Arcila-Lozano, Cynthia Cristina; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe; Lecona-Uribe, Salvador; González de Mejía, Elvira

    2004-03-01

    The oregano spice includes various plant species. The most common are the genus Origanum, native of Europe, and the Lippia, native of Mexico. Among the species of Origanum. their most important components are the limonene, gamma-cariofilene, rho-cymenene, canfor, linalol, alpha-pinene, carvacrol and thymol. In the genus Lippia, the same compounds can be found. The oregano composition depends on the specie, climate, altitude, time of recollection and the stage of growth. Some of the properties of this plant's extracts are being currently studied due to the growing interest for substituting synthetic additives commonly found in foods. Oregano has a good antioxidant capacity and also presents antimicrobial activity against pathogenic microorganisms like Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, among others. These are all characteristics of interest for the food industry because they may enhance the safety and stability of foods. There are also some reports regarding the antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic effect of oregano; representing an alternative for the potential treatment and/or prevention of certain chronic ailments, like cancer. PMID:15332363

  16. Functional analysis of the rice rubisco activase promoter in transgenic Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhipan; Lu, Qingtao; Wen, Xiaogang; Chen, Fan; Lu, Congming

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rice rubisco activase promoter was analyzed in transgenic Arabidopsis system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Region conferring tissue specific and light inducible expression of Rca was identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer -58 to +43 bp region mediates tissue-specific expression of rice Rca. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Light inducible expression of rice Rca is mediated by -297 to -58 bp region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rice nuclear proteins bind specifically with the light inducible region. -- Abstract: To gain a better understanding of the regulatory mechanism of the rice rubisco activase (Rca) gene, variants of the Rca gene promoter (one full-length and four deletion mutants) fused to the coding region of the bacterial reporter gene {beta}-glucuronidase (GUS) were introduced into Arabidopsis via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Our results show that a 340 bp fragment spanning from -297 to +43 bp relative to the transcription initiation site is enough to promote tissue-specific and light-inducible expression of the rice Rca gene as done by the full-length promoter (-1428 to +43 bp). Further deletion analysis indicated that the region conferring tissue-specificity of Rca expression is localized within a 105 bp fragment from -58 to +43 bp, while light-inducible expression of Rca is mediated by the region from -297 to -58 bp. Gel shift assays and competition experiments demonstrated that rice nuclear proteins bind specifically with the fragment conferring light responsiveness at more than one binding site. This implies that multiple cis-elements may be involved in light-induced expression of the rice Rca gene. These works provide a useful reference for understanding transcriptional regulation mechanism of the rice Rca gene, and lay a strong foundation for further detection of related cis-elements and trans-factors.

  17. Spectroscopic properties of pharmacologically active phenols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Bel'kov, M. V.; Shadyro, O. I.; Polozov, G. I.; Sorokin, V. L.; Ksendzova, G. A.

    2012-05-01

    The IR Fourier-transform spectra of pharmacologically active phenol molecules in solutions in CCl4 and in the crystalline state have been studied. Phenol derivatives with different directivities and different levels of pharmacological efficiency have been examined. Based on analysis of the IR spectra of screened phenols, the antimicrobial activity of phenols with free hydroxyl groups has been shown to be highest. The high antimicrobial activity of aminophenols is related to the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. For aminophenols that are active against herpesviruses, O-H...N hydrogen bonds are formed in molecules. The main characteristic of the high antiviral activity against A-type influenza is predominance of intramolecular hydrogen bonds of the O-H...O=C type in molecules. Sulfur-containing aminophenols, which manifest activity against HIV infection, are characterized by the occurrence of hydrogen bonds that involve the participation of the OH, NH, and SO2 groups.

  18. The growth of soybean under free air [CO(2)] enrichment (FACE) stimulates photosynthesis while decreasing in vivo Rubisco capacity.

    PubMed

    Bernacchi, Carl J; Morgan, Patrick B; Ort, Donald R; Long, Stephen P

    2005-01-01

    Down-regulation of light-saturated photosynthesis (A(sat)) at elevated atmospheric CO(2) concentration, [CO(2)], has been demonstrated for many C(3) species and is often associated with inability to utilize additional photosynthate and/or nitrogen limitation. In soybean, a nitrogen-fixing species, both limitations are less likely than in crops lacking an N-fixing symbiont. Prior studies have used controlled environment or field enclosures where the artificial environment can modify responses to [CO(2)]. A soybean free air [CO(2)] enrichment (FACE) facility has provided the first opportunity to analyze the effects of elevated [CO(2)] on photosynthesis under fully open-air conditions. Potential ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) carboxylation (V(c,max)) and electron transport through photosystem II (J(max)) were determined from the responses of A(sat) to intercellular [CO(2)] (C(i)) throughout two growing seasons. Mesophyll conductance to CO(2) (g(m)) was determined from the responses of A(sat) and whole chain electron transport (J) to light. Elevated [CO(2)] increased A(sat) by 15-20% even though there was a small, statistically significant, decrease in V(c,max). This differs from previous studies in that V(c,max)/J(max) decreased, inferring a shift in resource investment away from Rubisco. This raised the C(i) at which the transition from Rubisco-limited to ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate regeneration-limited photosynthesis occurred. The decrease in V(c,max) was not the result of a change in g(m), which was unchanged by elevated [CO(2)]. This first analysis of limitations to soybean photosynthesis under fully open-air conditions reveals important differences to prior studies that have used enclosures to elevate [CO(2)], most significantly a smaller response of A(sat) and an apparent shift in resources away from Rubisco relative to capacity for electron transport. PMID:15252734

  19. Emergent properties in experiments with active microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacci, Jeremie

    Self-propelled micro-particles are intrinsically out-of-equilibrium. This renders their physics far richer than passive colloids and give rise to the emergence of complex phenomena e.g. collective behavior, swarming... I will present experimental demonstration of emergent properties beyond equilibrium.

  20. SOME CHEMICAL PROPERTIES UNDERLYING ARSENIC'S BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    In this paper some of the chemical properties of arsenicals (atomic
    and molecular orbitals, electronegativity, valence state, changes between
    valence state, nucleophilicity, the hard/soft acid/base principle) that may
    account for some of the b...

  1. Interaction between potyvirus P3 and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) of host plants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Luo, Zhaopeng; Yan, Fei; Lu, Yuwen; Zheng, Hongying; Chen, Jianping

    2011-08-01

    The P3 protein encoded by Shallot yellow stripe virus onion isolate (SYSV-O) interacted in the Yeast Two-hybrid (Y2H) system and in co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assays with the large subunit of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) protein that is encoded by the rbcL gene of its onion host. Dissection analysis by Y2H showed that the main part of SYSV P3 (amino acids 1-390) and onion RbcL (amino acids 1-137) were responsible for the interaction. The P3 proteins encoded by Onion yellow dwarf virus (OYDV), Soybean mosaic virus Pinellia isolate (SMV-P), and Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) also interacted with RbcL, suggesting that a P3/RbcL interaction might exist generally for potyviruses. An interaction between P3 of these potyviruses and the small subunit of RubisCO (RbcS) was also demonstrated. Moreover, the P3N-PIPO protein encoded by a newly identified open reading frame embedded within the P3 cistron also interacted with both RbcL and RbcS. It is possible that the potyvirus P3 protein affects the normal functions of RubisCO which thus contributes to symptom development. PMID:21400205

  2. Decline of Activity and Quantity of Ribulose Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase and Net Photosynthesis in Ozone-Treated Potato Foliage 1

    PubMed Central

    Dann, Michael S.; Pell, Eva J.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of ozone (O3) on ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activity and quantity and net photosynthesis in greenhouse-grown Solanum tuberosum L. cv `Norland' foliage was studied in relation to oxidant-induced premature senescence. Plants, 26 days old, were exposed to 0.06 to 0.08 microliters per liter O3 from 1000 to 1600 hours for 4 days in a controlled environment chamber. On day 5, plants were exposed to a 6-hour simulated inversion in which O3 peaked at 0.12 microliters per liter. Net photosynthesis declined in response to O3 but recovered to near control levels 3 days after the exposure ended. Rubisco activity and quantity in control potato foliage increased and then decreased during the 12-day interval of the study. In some experiments foliage studied was physiologically mature and Rubisco activity had peaked when O3 exposure commenced. In those cases, O3 accelerated the decline in Rubisco activity. When less mature foliage was treated with O3, the leaves never achieved the maximal level of Rubisco activity observed in control foliage and also exhibited more rapid decline in initial and total activity. Percent activation of Rubisco (initial/total activity) was not affected significantly by treatment. Quantity of Rubisco decreased in concert with activity. The decrease in activities is most likely due to a decrease in available protein rather than a decrease in the percentage of Rubisco activated in vivo. The reduction in the quantity of Rubisco, an important foliar storage protein, could contribute to premature senescence associated with toxicity of this air pollutant. PMID:16667037

  3. Immunostimulatory properties and antitumor activities of glucans

    PubMed Central

    VANNUCCI, LUCA; KRIZAN, JIRI; SIMA, PETR; STAKHEEV, DMITRY; CAJA, FABIAN; RAJSIGLOVA, LENKA; HORAK, VRATISLAV; SAIEH, MUSTAFA

    2013-01-01

    New foods and natural biological modulators have recently become of scientific interest in the investigation of the value of traditional medical therapeutics. Glucans have an important part in this renewed interest. These fungal wall components are claimed to be useful for various medical purposes and they are obtained from medicinal mushrooms commonly used in traditional Oriental medicine. The immunotherapeutic properties of fungi extracts have been reported, including the enhancement of anticancer immunity responses. These properties are principally related to the stimulation of cells of the innate immune system. The discovery of specific receptors for glucans on dendritic cells (dectin-1), as well as interactions with other receptors, mainly expressed by innate immune cells (e.g., Toll-like receptors, complement receptor-3), have raised new attention toward these products as suitable therapeutic agents. We briefly review the characteristics of the glucans from mycelial walls as modulators of the immunity and their possible use as antitumor treatments. PMID:23739801

  4. Dosimetric properties of activated lithium tetraborate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majchrowski, Andrzej; Malecki, M.; Zmija, Jozef; Warkocki, Stanislaw; Warkocki, Wodzislaw

    1993-10-01

    This paper describes preliminary investigations of Li2B4O7 thermoluminescent phosphors as candidates for gamma radiation dosimetry materials. Single crystals, glasses, and polycrystals of lithium tetraborate activated with different dopants have been investigated.

  5. Statistical Properties of Extreme Solar Activity Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lioznova, A. V.; Blinov, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    A study of long-term solar variability reflected in indirect indices of past solar activity leads to stimulating results. We compare the statistics of intervals of very low and very high solar activity derived from two cosmogenic radionuclide records and look for consistency in their timing and physical interpretation. According to the applied criteria, the numbers of minima and of maxima are 61 and 68, respectively, from the 10Be record, and 42 and 46 from the 14C record. The difference between the enhanced and depressed states of solar activity becomes apparent in the difference in their statistical distributions. We find no correlation between the level or type (minimum or maximum) of an extremum and the level or type of the predecessor. The hypothesis of solar activity as a periodic process on the millennial time scale is not supported by the existing proxies. A new homogeneous series of 10Be measurements in polar ice covering the Holocene would be of great value for eliminating the existing discrepancy in the available solar activity reconstructions.

  6. Ectopic Expression of Rubisco Subunits in Maize Mesophyll Cells Does Not Overcome Barriers to Cell Type-Specific Accumulation1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wostrikoff, Katia; Clark, Aimee; Sato, Shirley; Clemente, Tom; Stern, David

    2012-01-01

    In maize (Zea mays), Rubisco accumulates in bundle sheath but not mesophyll chloroplasts, but the mechanisms that underlie cell type-specific expression are poorly understood. To explore the coordinated expression of the chloroplast rbcL gene, which encodes the Rubisco large subunit (LS), and the two nuclear RBCS genes, which encode the small subunit (SS), RNA interference was used to reduce RBCS expression. This resulted in Rubisco deficiency and was correlated with translational repression of rbcL. Thus, as in C3 plants, LS synthesis depends on the presence of its assembly partner SS. To test the hypothesis that the previously documented transcriptional repression of RBCS in mesophyll cells is responsible for repressing LS synthesis in mesophyll chloroplasts, a ubiquitin promoter-driven RBCS gene was expressed in both bundle sheath and mesophyll cells. This did not lead to Rubisco accumulation in the mesophyll, suggesting that LS synthesis is impeded even in the presence of ectopic SS expression. To attempt to bypass this putative mechanism, a ubiquitin promoter-driven nuclear version of the rbcL gene was created, encoding an epitope-tagged LS that was expressed in the presence or absence of the Ubi-RBCS construct. Both transgenes were robustly expressed, and the tagged LS was readily incorporated into Rubisco complexes. However, neither immunolocalization nor biochemical approaches revealed significant accumulation of Rubisco in mesophyll cells, suggesting a continuing cell type-specific impairment of its assembly or stability. We conclude that additional cell type-specific factors limit Rubisco expression to bundle sheath chloroplasts. PMID:22744982

  7. Automated flow-based anion-exchange method for high-throughput isolation and real-time monitoring of RuBisCO in plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Ruth; Miró, Manuel; Cerdà, Víctor; Perdomo, Juan Alejandro; Galmés, Jeroni

    2011-06-15

    In this work, a miniaturized, completely enclosed multisyringe-flow system is proposed for high-throughput purification of RuBisCO from Triticum aestivum extracts. The automated method capitalizes on the uptake of the target protein at 4°C onto Q-Sepharose Fast Flow strong anion-exchanger packed in a cylindrical microcolumn (105 × 4 mm) followed by a stepwise ionic-strength gradient elution (0-0.8 mol/L NaCl) to eliminate concomitant extract components and retrieve highly purified RuBisCO. The manifold is furnished downstream with a flow-through diode-array UV/vis spectrophotometer for real-time monitoring of the column effluent at the protein-specific wavelength of 280 nm to detect the elution of RuBisCO. Quantitation of RuBisCO and total soluble proteins in the eluate fractions were undertaken using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and the spectrophotometric Bradford assay, respectively. A comprehensive investigation of the effect of distinct concentration gradients on the isolation of RuBisCO and experimental conditions (namely, type of resin, column dimensions and mobile-phase flow rate) upon column capacity and analyte breakthrough was effected. The assembled set-up was aimed to critically ascertain the efficiency of preliminary batchwise pre-treatments of crude plant extracts (viz., polyethylenglycol (PEG) precipitation, ammonium sulphate precipitation and sucrose gradient centrifugation) in terms of RuBisCO purification and absolute recovery prior to automated anion-exchange column separation. Under the optimum physical and chemical conditions, the flow-through column system is able to admit crude plant extracts and gives rise to RuBisCO purification yields better than 75%, which might be increased up to 96 ± 9% with a prior PEG fractionation followed by sucrose gradient step. PMID:21641435

  8. Rubisco activity is associated with photosynthetic thermotolerance in a wild rice (Oryza meridionalis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oryza meridionalis is a wild species of rice, endemic to tropical Australia. It shares a significant genome homology with the common domesticated rice Oryza sativa. Exploiting the fact that the two species are highly related but O. meridionalis has superior heat tolerance, experiments were undertake...

  9. The cytonuclear dimension of allopolyploid evolution: an example from cotton using rubisco.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lei; Salmon, Armel; Yoo, Mi-Jeong; Grupp, Kara K; Wang, Zining; Paterson, Andrew H; Wendel, Jonathan F

    2012-10-01

    During allopolyploid speciation, two divergent nuclear genomes merge, yet only one (usually the maternal) of the two sets of progenitor organellar genomes is maintained. Rubisco (1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) is composed of nuclear-encoded small subunits (SSUs) and plastome-encoded large subunits (LSUs), providing an ideal system to explore the evolutionary process of cytonuclear accommodation. Here, we take initial steps in this direction, using Gossypium allopolyploids as our model. SSU copies from divergent (5-10 My) progenitor diploids ("A" and "D" genomes) were combined at the time of polyploid formation 1-2 Ma, with the LSU encoded by the maternal A-genome parent. LSU genes from A- and D-genome diploids and AD-genome allopolyploids were sequenced, revealing several nonsynonymous substitutions and suggesting the possibility of differential selection on the nuclear-encoded rbcS partner following allopolyploid formation. Sequence data for the rbcS gene family revealed nonreciprocal homoeologous recombination between A- and D-rbcS homoeologs in all polyploid species but not in a synthetic intergenomic F1 hybrid, demonstrating "gene conversion" during allopolyploid evolution. All progenitor rbcS genes are retained and expressed in the five extant allopolyploid species, but analysis of the leaf transcriptome showed that A-homoeologs are preferentially expressed in both the allopolyploid and hybrid, consistent with the maternal origin of rbcL. Although rbcS genes from both progenitor genomes are expressed, some appear to have experienced mutations that may represent cytonuclear coevolution. PMID:22490824

  10. Psychometric Properties of the Commitment to Physical Activity Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBate, Rita DiGioacchino; Huberty, Jennifer; Pettee, Kelley

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess psychometric properties of the Commitment to Physical Activity Scale (CPAS). Methods: Girls in third to fifth grades (n = 932) completed the CPAS before and after a physical activity intervention. Psychometric measures included internal consistency, factor analysis, and concurrent validity. Results: Three CPAS factors emerged:…

  11. Decline of activity and quantity of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and net photosynthesis in ozone-treated potato foliage

    SciTech Connect

    Dann, M.S.; Pell, E.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The effect of ozone (O{sub 3}) on ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activity and quantity and net photosynthesis in greenhouse-grown Solanum tuberosum L. cv Norland foliage was studied in relation to oxidant-induced premature senescence. Plants, 26 days old, were exposed to 0.06 to 0.08 microliters per liter O{sub 3} from 1,000 to 1,600 hours for 4 days in a controlled environment chamber. On day 5, plants were exposed to a 6-hour simulated inversion in which O{sub 3} peaked at 0.12 microliters per liter. Net photosynthesis declined in response to O{sub 3} but recovered to near control levels 3 days after the exposure ended. Rubisco activity and quantity in control potato foliage increased and then decreased during the 12-day interval of the study. In some experiments foliage studied was physiologically mature and Rubisco activity had peaked when O{sub 3} exposure commenced. In those cases, O{sub 3} accelerated the decline in Rubisco activity. When less mature foliage was treated with O{sub 3}, the leaves never achieved the maximal level of Rubisco activity observed in control foliage and also exhibited more rapid decline in initial and total activity. Percent activation of Rubisco (initial/total activity) was not affected significantly by treatment. Quantity of Rubisco decreased in concert with activity. The reduction in the quantity of Rubisco, an important foliage storage protein, could contribute to premature senescence associated with toxicity of this air pollutant.

  12. Contribution of carbon fixed by Rubisco and PEPC to phloem export in the Crassulacean acid metabolism plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Birgit; Wanek, Wolfgang; Postl, Wolfgang; Richter, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants exhibit a complex interplay between CO2 fixation by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco), and carbon demand for CAM maintenance and growth. This study investigated the flux of carbon from PEPC and direct Rubisco fixation to different leaf carbon pools and to phloem sap over the diurnal cycle. Concentrations and carbon isotope compositions of starch, soluble sugars, and organic acids were determined in leaves and phloem exudates of Kalanchoë daigremontiana Hamet et Perr., and related to CO2 fixation by PEPC and Rubisco. Three types of leaf carbon pools could be distinguished. (i) Starch and malate pools were dominant and showed a pattern of reciprocal mobilization and accumulation (85/54 and 13/48 mg C g−1 DW, respective, at the beginning/end of phase I). The carbon isotope composition of these pools was compatible with predominant PEPC fixation (δ13C values of –13 and –11‰ for starch and malate compared to –11‰ of PEPC fixed carbon). (ii) Isotopic composition (–17‰ and –14‰) and concentration of glucose and fructose (2 and 3 mg C g−1 DW, respectively) were not affected by diurnal metabolism, suggesting a low turnover. (iii) Sucrose (1–3 mg C g−1 DW), in contrast, exhibited large diurnal changes in δ13C values (from –17‰ in the evening to –12‰ in the morning), which were not matched by net changes in sucrose concentration. This suggests a high sucrose turnover, fed by nocturnal starch degradation and direct Rubisco fixation during the day. A detailed dissection of the carbon fixation and mobilization pattern in K. daigremontiana revealed that direct fixation of Rubisco during the light accounted for 30% of phloem sucrose, but only 15% of fixed carbon, indicating that carbon from direct Rubisco fixation was preferentially used for leaf export. PMID:20159885

  13. Workability and mechanical properties of alkali activated slag concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, F.G.; Sanjayan, J.G.

    1999-03-01

    This paper reports the results of an investigation on concrete containing alkali activated slag (AAS) as the binder, with emphasis on achievement of reasonable workability and equivalent one-day strength to portland cement concrete at normal curing temperatures. Two types of activators were used: sodium hydroxide in combination with sodium carbonate and sodium silicate in combination with hydrated lime. The fresh concrete properties reported include slump and slump loss, air content, and bleed. Mechanical properties of AAS concrete, including compressive strength, elastic modulus, flexural strength, drying shrinkage, and creep are contrasted with those of portland cement concrete.

  14. Study of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni antioxidant activities and cellular properties.

    PubMed

    Bender, Cecilia; Graziano, Sara; Zimmermann, Benno F

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the antioxidant activities, cytotoxicity and proliferative properties in Stevia rebaudiana leaves and stems. Leaves extracts exhibited a higher antioxidant activity than stems extract, through oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) and cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assays. Stevioside and rebaudioside A, the main sweetening metabolites in stevia leaves, exhibited a low ORAC value in comparison with plant extracts, while did not elicit any CAA. Stevia rebaudiana did not exhibit toxicity against HepG2 (hepatocellular carcinoma) human cells. No proliferative nor catalase modulations were observed in cells treated with such extracts. Our findings support the promising role of stevia that, apart from its sweetness, can act as a source of antioxidants, even at the intracellular level. This activity makes S. rebaudiana crude extract an interesting resource of natural sweetness with antioxidant properties which may find numerous applications in foods and nutritional supplements industries. PMID:26008718

  15. Isotope labelling of Rubisco subunits provides in vivo information on subcellular biosynthesis and exchange of amino acids between compartments

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Doug K; Laclair, Russell W; Ohlrogge, John B; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2012-01-01

    The architecture of plant metabolism includes substantial duplication of metabolite pools and enzyme catalyzed reactions in different subcellular compartments. This poses challenges for understanding the regulation of metabolism particularly in primary metabolism and amino acid biosynthesis. To explore the extent to which amino acids are made in single compartments and to gain insight into the metabolic precursors from which they derive, we used steady state 13C labelling and analysed labelling in protein amino acids from plastid and cytosol. Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is a major component of green tissues and its large and small subunits are synthesized from different pools of amino acids in the plastid and cytosol, respectively. Developing Brassica napus embryos were cultured in the presence of [U-13C]-sucrose, [U-13C]-glucose, [U-13C]-glutamine or [U-13C]-alanine to generate proteins. The large subunits (LSU) and small subunits (SSU) of Rubisco were isolated and the labelling in their constituent amino acids was analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Amino acids including alanine, glycine and serine exhibited different 13C enrichment in the LSU and SSU, demonstrating that these pools have different metabolic origins and are not isotopically equilibrated between the plastid and cytosol on the time scale of cellular growth. Potential extensions of this novel approach to other macromolecules, organelles and cell types of eukaryotes are discussed. PMID:22292468

  16. Environment and properties of obscured and unobscured active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taormina, M.; Bornancini, C.

    We analyze the properties of obscured and unobscured active galactic nuclei selected using mid-infrared colors in the redshift range 1 < z < 3. We find that obscured objects are located in a denser local galaxy environment compared to the unobscured sample.

  17. Effects of Soil Property Uncertainty on Projected Active Layer Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, D. R.; Atchley, A. L.; Coon, E.; Painter, S. L.; Wilson, C. J.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Liljedahl, A.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainty in future climate is often assumed to contribute the largest uncertainty to active layer thickness (ALT) projections. However, the impact of soil property uncertainty on these projections may be significant. In this research, we evaluate the contribution of soil property uncertainty on ALT projections at the Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska. The effect of variations in porosity, thermal conductivity, saturation, and water retention properties of peat and mineral soil are evaluated. The micro-topography of ice wedge polygons present at the site is included in the analysis using three 1D column models to represent polygon center, rim and trough features. The Arctic Terrestrial Simulator (ATS) is used to model multiphase thermal and hydrological processes in the subsurface. We apply the Null-Space Monte Carlo (NSMC) algorithm to identify an ensemble of soil property combinations that produce simulated temperature profiles that are consistent with temperature measurements available from the site. ALT is simulated for the ensemble of soil property combinations for four climate scenarios. The uncertainty in ALT due to soil properties within and across climate scenarios is evaluated. This work was supported by LANL Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project LDRD201200068DR and by the The Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic) project. NGEE-Arctic is supported by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in the DOE Office of Science.

  18. Elevated temperature creep properties for selected active metal braze alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.J.

    1997-02-01

    Active metal braze alloys reduce the number of processes required for the joining of metal to ceramic components by eliminating the need for metallization and/or Ni plating of the ceramic surfaces. Titanium (Ti), V, and Zr are examples of active element additions which have been used successfully in such braze alloys. Since the braze alloy is expected to accommodate thermal expansion mismatch strains between the metal and ceramic materials, a knowledge of its elevated temperature mechanical properties is important. In particular, the issue of whether or not the creep strength of an active metal braze alloy is increased or decreased relative to its non-activated counterpart is important when designing new brazing processes and alloy systems. This paper presents a survey of high temperature mechanical properties for two pairs of conventional braze alloys and their active metal counterparts: (a) the conventional 72Ag-28Cu (Cusil) alloy, and the active braze alloy 62.2Ag- 36.2Cu-1.6Ti (Cusil ABA), and (b) the 82Au-18Ni (Nioro) alloy and the active braze alloy Mu-15.5M-0.75Mo-1.75V (Nioro ABA). For the case of the Cusil/Cusil ABA pair, the active metal addition contributes to solid solution strengthening of the braze alloy, resulting in a higher creep strength as compared to the non-active alloy. In the case of the Nioro/Nioro ABA pair, the Mo and V additions cause the active braze alloy to have a two-phase microstructure, which results in a reduced creep strength than the conventional braze alloy. The Garofalo sinh equation has been used to quantitatively describe the stress and temperature dependence of the deformation behavior. It will be observed that the effective stress exponent in the Garofalo sinh equation is a function of the instantaneous value of the stress argument.

  19. Inhibition of RuBisCO cloned from Thermosynechococcus vulcanus and expressed in Escherichia coli with compounds predicted by Molecular Operation Environment (MOE).

    PubMed

    Iwaki, Toshio; Shiota, Kazunori; Al-Taweel, Khaled; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Suzuki, Kensaku; Yui, Toshifumi; Wadano, Akira

    2008-01-01

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) of a thermophilic cyanobacterium, Thermosynechococcus vulcanus, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme had higher thermostability than RuBisCOs isolated from mesophilic cyanobacteria. Prediction of the tertiary structure was performed using the software Molecular Operating Environment (MOE). The predicted structure did not give any clue about the basis of thermostability. Then, the molecular docking of substrates and inhibitors in the catalytic site were carried out to test analogs for consistency of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate, a RuBisCO substrate. The analogs were searched in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), and 99 compounds were selected for the docking. The mol files from LIGAND Database in KEGG were changed to a three dimensional (3D) structure for use in docking simulation. The docking simulation was performed on ASEDock of MOE, and the SiteFinder command suggested about 20 candidates for the docking site of the compounds. Based on the homology of these candidate sites with the xylulose 1,5-bisphosphate (XBP)-binding site of RuBisCO isolated from Synechococcus PCC 6301, one site was selected for the docking simulation. The 40 compounds with the highest docking energies included synthetic organic substances that had never been demonstrated to be inhibitors of RuBisCO. The total docking energies were -102 kcal/mol, -104 kcal/mol, -94.0 kcal/mol, and -57.7 kcal/mol for ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP), etidronate, risedronate, and citrate respectively. Kinetic analysis of RuBisCO revealed a K(m) value of 315 microM for RuBP, and K(i) values of 1.70, 0.93, and 2.04 mM for etidronate, risedronate, and citrate respectively. From these values, the binding energies were estimated to be -4.85, -3.84, -4.20, and -3.73 kcal/mol for RuBP, etidronate, risedronate, and citrate respectively. The differences between the values estimated from experimental data and by

  20. Study of erodable paint properties involved in antifouling activity.

    PubMed

    Thouvenin, M; Langlois, V; Briandet, R; Langlois, J Y; Guerin, P H; Peron, J J; Haras, D; Vallee-Rehel, K

    2003-06-01

    To produce ecological marine paints, it is necessary to understand the phenomena involved in antifouling activity. Due to the multivariable components which have to be taken into account and due to their analytical intricacy, only studies based on selected properties are conceivable. In this study, four properties have been chosen, viz. erosion, biocide release, roughness and the physicochemical characteristics of the film surface. A principal-component analysis (PCA) of the experimental data has shown that, among the selected properties, only erosion affected antifouling efficiency. A more detailed investigation of erosion by quantifying global hydration and hydrolysis of immersed paints revealed the difficulty in linking the chemical structure of binders to the final erosion properties. Biocide release from paints, quantified by chromatographic methods coupled with UV detection, was inferior to the doses stated by the paint producers. These observations allowed the conceiving of formulations with reduced amounts of active molecules. The development of erodable, biodegradable binders associated with non toxic compounds is a promising way to obtain efficient antifouling paints compatible with existing, preventive systems. PMID:14619286

  1. Comparative Study of Surface-Active Properties and Antimicrobial Activities of Disaccharide Monoesters

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi; Song, Fei; Taxipalati, Maierhaba; Wei, Wei; Feng, Fengqin

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the effect of sugar or fatty acid in sugar ester compounds on the surface-active properties and antimicrobial activities of these compounds. Disaccharides of medium-chain fatty acid monoesters were synthesized through transesterifications by immobilized lipase (Lipozyme TLIM) to yield nine monoesters for subsequent study. Their antimicrobial activities were investigated using three pathogenic microorganisms: Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Candida albicans. Their surface-active properties including air–water surface tension, critical micelle concentration, and foaming and emulsion power and stability were also studied. The results showed that all of the tested monoesters were more effective against Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive bacterium) than against Escherichia coli O157:H7 (Gram-negative bacterium). The results demonstrated that the carbon chain length was the most important factor influencing the surface properties, whereas degree of esterification and hydrophilic groups showed little effect. PMID:25531369

  2. Comparative study of surface-active properties and antimicrobial activities of disaccharide monoesters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Song, Fei; Taxipalati, Maierhaba; Wei, Wei; Feng, Fengqin

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the effect of sugar or fatty acid in sugar ester compounds on the surface-active properties and antimicrobial activities of these compounds. Disaccharides of medium-chain fatty acid monoesters were synthesized through transesterifications by immobilized lipase (Lipozyme TLIM) to yield nine monoesters for subsequent study. Their antimicrobial activities were investigated using three pathogenic microorganisms: Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Candida albicans. Their surface-active properties including air-water surface tension, critical micelle concentration, and foaming and emulsion power and stability were also studied. The results showed that all of the tested monoesters were more effective against Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive bacterium) than against Escherichia coli O157:H7 (Gram-negative bacterium). The results demonstrated that the carbon chain length was the most important factor influencing the surface properties, whereas degree of esterification and hydrophilic groups showed little effect. PMID:25531369

  3. Interactive effects of and light on growth rates and RUBISCO content of small and large centric diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Campbell, D. A.

    2015-10-01

    Among marine phytoplankton groups, diatoms span the widest range of cell size, with resulting effects upon their nitrogen uptake, photosynthesis and growth responses to light. We grew two strains of marine centric diatoms, the small Thalassiosira pseudonana and the larger T. punctigera in high and low nitrogen media, across a range of growth light levels. Nitrogen and total proteins per cell decreased with increasing growth light in both species when grown under low nitrogen media. Surprisingly, low nitrogen increased the cellular allocation to RUBISCO and the rate of electron transport away from Photosystem II for the smaller diatom under low growth light, and for the larger diatom across the range of growth lights. Low nitrogen decreased the growth rate of the smaller diatom, particularly under higher light, but stimulated the growth rate of the larger diatom. Our results show that the high nitrogen in common growth media favours the growth rate of a small diatom but inhibits growth of a larger species.

  4. Biological and therapeutic activities, and anticancer properties of curcumin

    PubMed Central

    PERRONE, DONATELLA; ARDITO, FATIMA; GIANNATEMPO, GIOVANNI; DIOGUARDI, MARIO; TROIANO, GIUSEPPE; LO RUSSO, LUCIO; DE LILLO, ALFREDO; LAINO, LUIGI; LO MUZIO, LORENZO

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant. Curcumin has been used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine, as it is nontoxic and exhibits a variety of therapeutic properties, including antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic activities. Recently, certain studies have indicated that curcumin may exert anticancer effects in a variety of biological pathways involved in mutagenesis, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, cell cycle regulation and metastasis. The present study reviewed previous studies in the literature, which support the therapeutic activity of curcumin in cancer. In addition, the present study elucidated a number of the challenges concerning the use of curcumin as an adjuvant chemotherapeutic agent. All the studies reviewed herein suggest that curcumin is able to exert anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet, antioxidative, hepatoprotective and antitumor activities, particularly against cancers of the liver, skin, pancreas, prostate, ovary, lung and head neck, as well as having a positive effect in the treatment of arthritis. PMID:26640527

  5. Antioedematogenic activity, acetylcholinesterase inhibition and antimicrobial properties of Jacaranda oxyphylla.

    PubMed

    Pereira, V V; Silva, R R; Dos Santos, M H; Dias, D F; Moreira, M E C; Takahashi, J A

    2016-09-01

    Jacaranda oxyphylla Cham. (Bignoniaceae) is a shrub found in the Brazilian cerrado and used in folk medicine to treat microbial infections. The aim of this study was to carry out a phytochemical screening and evaluate antioedematogenic, antimicrobial and antiacetylcholinesterase properties of J. oxyphylla crude extracts. All extracts analysed showed presence of terpenoids, which are potentially active chemical substances. A high AChE inhibitory activity for hexane extract from leaves and for the extracts from twigs was found. Ethanol extract from leaves of J. oxyphylla showed activity against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. This extract was also effective in inhibiting the stages of inflammation evaluated. Biological investigation and phytochemical screening of J. oxyphylla extracts provided additional evidence of its traditional medicinal value. PMID:26469996

  6. Protonophore properties of hyperforin are essential for its pharmacological activity

    PubMed Central

    Sell, Thomas S.; Belkacemi, Thabet; Flockerzi, Veit; Beck, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Hyperforin is a pharmacologically active component of the medicinal plant Hypericum perforatum (St. John's wort), recommended as a treatment for a range of ailments including mild to moderate depression. Part of its action has been attributed to TRPC6 channel activation. We found that hyperforin induces TRPC6-independent H+ currents in HEK-293 cells, cortical microglia, chromaffin cells and lipid bilayers. The latter demonstrates that hyperforin itself acts as a protonophore. The protonophore activity of hyperforin causes cytosolic acidification, which strongly depends on the holding potential, and which fuels the plasma membrane sodium-proton exchanger. Thereby the free intracellular sodium concentration increases and the neurotransmitter uptake by Na+ cotransport is inhibited. Additionally, hyperforin depletes and reduces loading of large dense core vesicles in chromaffin cells, which requires a pH gradient in order to accumulate monoamines. In summary the pharmacological actions of the “herbal Prozac” hyperforin are essentially determined by its protonophore properties shown here. PMID:25511254

  7. Effect of substrate mechanical properties on T cell activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, King; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2013-03-01

    T cell activation is a key process in cell-mediated immunity, and engagement of T cell receptors by peptides on antigen presenting cells leads to activation of signaling cascades as well as cytoskeletal reorganization and large scale membrane deformations. While significant advances have been made in understanding the biochemical signaling pathways, the effects imposed by the physical environment and the role of mechanical forces on cell activation are not well understood. In this study, we have used anti-CD3 coated elastic polyacrylamide gels as stimulatory substrates to enable the spreading of Jurkat T cells and the measurement of cellular traction forces. We have investigated the effect of substrate stiffness on the dynamics of T cell spreading and cellular force generation. We found that T cells display more active and sustained edge dynamics on softer gels and that they exert increased traction stresses with increasing gel stiffness. A dynamic actin cytoskeleton was required to maintain the forces generated during activation, as inferred from small molecule inhibition experiments. Our results indicate an important role for physical properties of the antigen presenting cell as well as cytoskeleton-driven forces in signaling activation.

  8. Active doublet method for measuring small changes in physical properties

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, Peter M.; Fehler, Michael C.; Johnson, Paul A.; Phillips, W. Scott

    1994-01-01

    Small changes in material properties of a work piece are detected by measuring small changes in elastic wave velocity and attenuation within a work piece. Active, repeatable source generate coda wave responses from a work piece, where the coda wave responses are temporally displaced. By analyzing progressive relative phase and amplitude changes between the coda wave responses as a function of elapsed time, accurate determinations of velocity and attenuation changes are made. Thus, a small change in velocity occurring within a sample region during the time periods between excitation origin times (herein called "doublets") will produce a relative delay that changes with elapsed time over some portion of the scattered waves. This trend of changing delay is easier to detect than an isolated delay based on a single arrival and provides a direct measure of elastic wave velocity changes arising from changed material properties of the work piece.

  9. Brain Mechanical Property Measurement Using MRE with Intrinsic Activation

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, Adam J.; McGarry, Matthew D.; Perreard, Irina M.; Swienckowski, Jessica G.; Eskey, Clifford J.; Lollis, S. Scott; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2013-01-01

    the MRE procedures were repeated on the same day. Cardiac pulsation, termed intrinsic activation, produces sufficient motion to allow mechanical properties to be recovered. The poroelastic model is more consistent with the measured data from brain at low frequencies than the linear elastic model. Intrinsic activation allows MR elastography to be performed without a device shaking the head so the patient notices no differences between it and the other sequences in an MR examination. PMID:23079508

  10. Brain mechanical property measurement using MRE with intrinsic activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, John B.; Pattison, Adam J.; McGarry, Matthew D.; Perreard, Irina M.; Swienckowski, Jessica G.; Eskey, Clifford J.; Lollis, S. Scott; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-11-01

    , termed intrinsic activation, produces sufficient motion to allow mechanical properties to be recovered. The poroelastic model is more consistent with the measured data from brain at low frequencies than the linear elastic model. Intrinsic activation allows MRE to be performed without a device shaking the head so the patient notices no differences between it and the other sequences in an MR examination.

  11. Manipulating lipid bilayer material properties using biologically active amphipathic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafuzzaman, Md; Lampson, M. A.; Greathouse, D. V.; Koeppe, R. E., II; Andersen, O. S.

    2006-07-01

    Lipid bilayers are elastic bodies with properties that can be manipulated/controlled by the adsorption of amphipathic molecules. The resulting changes in bilayer elasticity have been shown to regulate integral membrane protein function. To further understand the amphiphile-induced modulation of bilayer material properties (thickness, intrinsic monolayer curvature and elastic moduli), we examined how an enantiomeric pair of viral anti-fusion peptides (AFPs)—Z-Gly-D-Phe and Z-Gly-Phe, where Z denotes a benzyloxycarbonyl group, as well as Z-Phe-Tyr and Z-D-Phe-Phe-Gly—alters the function of enantiomeric pairs of gramicidin channels of different lengths in planar bilayers. For both short and long channels, the channel lifetimes and appearance frequencies increase as linear functions of the aqueous AFP concentration, with no apparent effect on the single-channel conductance. These changes in channel function do not depend on the chirality of the channels or the AFPs. At pH 7.0, the relative changes in channel lifetimes do not vary when the channel length is varied, indicating that these compounds exert their effects primarily by causing a positive-going change in the intrinsic monolayer curvature. At pH 4.0, the AFPs are more potent than at pH 7.0 and have greater effects on the shorter channels, indicating that these compounds now change the bilayer elastic moduli. When AFPs of different anti-fusion potencies are compared, the rank order of the anti-fusion activity and the channel-modifying activity is similar, but the relative changes in anti-fusion potency are larger than the changes in channel-modifying activity. We conclude that gramicidin channels are useful as molecular force transducers to probe the influence of small amphiphiles upon lipid bilayer material properties.

  12. Immunoenhancing properties and antiviral activity of 7-deazaguanosine in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Smee, D F; Alaghamandan, H A; Gilbert, J; Burger, R A; Jin, A; Sharma, B S; Ramasamy, K; Revankar, G R; Cottam, H B; Jolley, W B

    1991-01-01

    The nucleotide analog 7-deazaguanosine has not previously been reported to possess biological (antiviral or antitumor) properties in cell culture or in vivo. Up to 10(5) U of interferon per ml was detected in mouse sera 1 to 4 h following oral (200-mg/kg of body weight) and intraperitoneal (50-mg/kg) doses of the compound. 7-Deazaguanosine also caused significant activation of natural killer and phagocytic cells but did not augment T- and B-cell blastogenesis. Intraperitoneal treatments of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/day administered 24 and 18 h before virus inoculation were highly protective in mice inoculated with lethal doses of Semliki Forest or San Angelo viruses. Less but still significant survivor increases were evident in treated mice infected with banzi or encephalomyocarditis viruses. In most cases, the degree of antiviral activity was similar to that exhibited by the biological response modifier 7-thia-8-oxoguanosine. 7-Thia-8-oxoguanosine was more potent than 7-deazaguanosine against encephalomyocarditis virus in mice, however. Oral efficacy was achieved with 7-deazaguanosine treatments of greater than or equal to 100 mg/kg against all virus infections, whereas 7-thia-8-oxoguanosine is reported to be devoid of oral activity in rodents. Thus, 7-deazaguanosine represents the first reported orally active nucleoside biological response modifier exhibiting broad-spectrum antiviral activity against particular types of RNA viruses. PMID:1707603

  13. Swarming Bristle-Bots: Exploring Properties of Active Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forstner, Martin B.; Beasock, Damian

    Active Matter describes an ubiquitous class of non-equilibrium systems that encompasses a diverse range of phenomena in the living and non-living realm. Examples are microscopic bio-filaments and their associated motor proteins, flocks of birds and fish, vibrated rods and disks, or nanoscale colloids actuated by catalytic activity on their surface. What unifies these systems is that they are all composed of self-driven units. In consequence, these systems are not driven into non-equilibrium by energy input at their boundary, but by local energy injection. As fascinating as these systems are, there are currently barely any laboratory systems that allow for controlled experiments in dry active matter. That is, systems not immersed in a fluid that can be observed without specialized equipment. Here we present a two-dimensional `active matter' system consisting of hundreds of macroscopic (~0.05 m long), modified, commercially available bristle-bots. We show that this swarm of toys classifies as active matter as it exhibits properties such as dynamic phase separation. Because of their straight forward implementation, their size and controllability, such swarms can not only answer scientific questions, but they have great potential as educational tools in teaching labs and classrooms.

  14. Xanthorrhizol: a review of its pharmacological activities and anticancer properties.

    PubMed

    Oon, Seok Fang; Nallappan, Meenakshii; Tee, Thiam Tsui; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Kassim, Nur Kartinee; Sa'ariwijaya, Mohd Shazrul Fazry; Cheah, Yew Hoong

    2015-01-01

    Xanthorrhizol (XNT) is a bisabolane-type sesquiterpenoid compound extracted from Curcuma xanthorrhiza Roxb. It has been well established to possess a variety of biological activities such as anticancer, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antihyperglycemic, antihypertensive, antiplatelet, nephroprotective, hepatoprotective, estrogenic and anti-estrogenic effects. Since many synthetic drugs possess toxic side effects and are unable to support the increasing prevalence of disease, there is significant interest in developing natural product as new therapeutics. XNT is a very potent natural bioactive compound that could fulfil the current need for new drug discovery. Despite its importance, a comprehensive review of XNT's pharmacological activities has not been published in the scientific literature to date. Here, the present review aims to summarize the available information in this area, focus on its anticancer properties and indicate the current status of the research. This helps to facilitate the understanding of XNT's pharmacological role in drug discovery, thus suggesting areas where further research is required. PMID:26500452

  15. Biological activities and medicinal properties of Gokhru (Pedalium murex L.)

    PubMed Central

    Rajashekar, V; Rao, E Upender; P, Srinivas

    2012-01-01

    Bada Gokhru (Pedalium murex L.) is perhaps the most useful traditional medicinal plant in India. Each part of the neem tree has some medicinal property and is thus commercially exploitable. During the last five decades, apart from the chemistry of the Pedalium murex compounds, considerable progress has been achieved regarding the biological activity and medicinal applications of this plant. It is now considered as a valuable source of unique natural products for development of medicines against various diseases and also for the development of industrial products. This review gives a bird's eye view mainly on the biological activities of some of this compounds isolated, pharmacological actions of the extracts, clinical studies and plausible medicinal applications of gokharu along with their safety evaluation. PMID:23569975

  16. Rocket effluent: Its ice nucleation activity and related properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parungo, F. P.; Allee, P. A.

    1978-01-01

    To investigate the possibility of inadvertent weather modification from rocket effluent, aerosol samples were collected from an instrumented aircraft subsequent to the Voyager 1 and 2 launches. The aerosol's morphology, concentration, and size distribution were examined with an electron microscope. The elemental compositions of individual particles were analyzed with an X-ray energy spectrometer. Ice nucleus concentration was measured with a thermal diffusion chamber. The particles' physical and chemical properties were related to their ice nucleation activity. A laboratory experiment on rocket propellant exhaust was conducted under controlled conditions. Both laboratory and field experimental results indicated that rocket propellant exhaust can produce active ice nuclei and modify local weather in suitable meteorological conditions.

  17. Rocket effluent - Its ice nucleation activity and related properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parungo, F. P.; Allee, P. A.

    1978-01-01

    To investigate the possibility of inadvertent weather modification from rocket effluent, aerosol samples were collected from an instrumented aircraft subsequent to the Voyager I and II launches. The aerosol's morphology, concentration and size distribution were examined with an electron microscope. The elemental compositions of individual particles were analyzed with an X-ray energy spectrometer. Ice nucleus concentration was measured with a subfreezing thermal diffusion chamber. The particles' physical and chemical properties were related to their ice nucleation activity. A laboratory experiment on rocket propellant exhaust was conducted under controlled conditions. Both laboratory and field experimental results indicated that rocket propellant exhaust can produce active ice nuclei. Their consequences for potential inadvertant weather modification demand additional study.

  18. Properties and Performance of Alkali-Activated Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Robert J.

    Alkali-activated concrete (AAC) made with industrial byproducts as the sole binder is rapidly emerging as a sustainable alternative to ordinary portland cement concrete (PCC). Despite its exemplary mechanical performance and durability, there remain several barriers to widespread commercialization of AAC. This dissertation addresses several of these barriers. Mathematical models are proposed which efficiently and accurately predict the compressive strength of AAC as a function of activator composition, binder type, and curing condition. The relationships between compressive strength and other mechanical properties (i.e., tensile strength and modulus of elasticity) are discussed, as are stress-strain relationships. Several aspects related to the durability of AAC are also discussed, including dimensional stability under drying conditions, alkali-silica reactivity, and chloride permeability. The results of these experimental investigations are disseminated in the context of real-world applicability.

  19. Enhanced capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon by re-activation in molten carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Beihu; Xiao, Zuoan; Zhu, Hua; Xiao, Wei; Wu, Wenlong; Wang, Dihua

    2015-12-01

    Simple, affordable and green methods to improve capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon (AC) are intriguing since ACs possess a predominant role in the commercial supercapacitor market. Herein, we report a green reactivation of commercial ACs by soaking ACs in molten Na2CO3-K2CO3 (equal in mass ratios) at 850 °C combining the merits of both physical and chemical activation strategies. The mechanism of molten carbonate treatment and structure-capacitive activity correlations of the ACs are rationalized. Characterizations show that the molten carbonate treatment increases the electrical conductivity of AC without compromising its porosity and wettability of electrolytes. Electrochemical tests show the treated AC exhibited higher specific capacitance, enhanced high-rate capability and excellent cycle performance, promising its practical application in supercapacitors. The present study confirms that the molten carbonate reactivation is a green and effective method to enhance capacitive properties of ACs.

  20. Faster Rubisco Is the Key to Superior Nitrogen-Use Efficiency in NADP-Malic Enzyme Relative to NAD-Malic Enzyme C4 Grasses1

    PubMed Central

    Ghannoum, Oula; Evans, John R.; Chow, Wah Soon; Andrews, T. John; Conroy, Jann P.; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2005-01-01

    In 27 C4 grasses grown under adequate or deficient nitrogen (N) supplies, N-use efficiency at the photosynthetic (assimilation rate per unit leaf N) and whole-plant (dry mass per total leaf N) level was greater in NADP-malic enzyme (ME) than NAD-ME species. This was due to lower N content in NADP-ME than NAD-ME leaves because neither assimilation rates nor plant dry mass differed significantly between the two C4 subtypes. Relative to NAD-ME, NADP-ME leaves had greater in vivo (assimilation rate per Rubisco catalytic sites) and in vitro Rubisco turnover rates (kcat; 3.8 versus 5.7 s−1 at 25°C). The two parameters were linearly related. In 2 NAD-ME (Panicum miliaceum and Panicum coloratum) and 2 NADP-ME (Sorghum bicolor and Cenchrus ciliaris) grasses, 30% of leaf N was allocated to thylakoids and 5% to 9% to amino acids and nitrate. Soluble protein represented a smaller fraction of leaf N in NADP-ME (41%) than in NAD-ME (53%) leaves, of which Rubisco accounted for one-seventh. Soluble protein averaged 7 and 10 g (mmol chlorophyll)−1 in NADP-ME and NAD-ME leaves, respectively. The majority (65%) of leaf N and chlorophyll was found in the mesophyll of NADP-ME and bundle sheath of NAD-ME leaves. The mesophyll-bundle sheath distribution of functional thylakoid complexes (photosystems I and II and cytochrome f) varied among species, with a tendency to be mostly located in the mesophyll. In conclusion, superior N-use efficiency of NADP-ME relative to NAD-ME grasses was achieved with less leaf N, soluble protein, and Rubisco having a faster kcat. PMID:15665246

  1. The coupling of glycolysis and the Rubisco-based pathway through the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway to achieve low carbon dioxide emission fermentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya-Han; Ou-Yang, Fan-Yu; Yang, Cheng-Han; Li, Si-Yu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, Rubisco-based engineered Escherichia coli, containing two heterologous enzymes of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoribulokinase (PrkA), has been shown to be capable of the in situ recycling of carbon dioxide (CO2) during glycolysis. Two alternative approaches have been proposed to further enhance the carbon flow from glycolysis to a Rubisco-based pathway through the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (NOPPP). The first is achieved by elevating the expression of transketolase I (TktA) and the second by blocking the native oxidation-decarboxylation reaction of E. coli by deleting the zwf gene from the chromosome (designated as JB/pTA and MZB, respectively). Decreases in the CO2 yield and the CO2 evolution per unit mole of ethanol production by at least 81% and 40% are observed. It is demonstrated in this study that the production of one mole of ethanol using E. coli strain MZB, the upper limit of CO2 emission is 0.052mol. PMID:25846189

  2. Design of a novel chimeric tissue plasminogen activator with favorable Vampire bat plasminogen activator properties.

    PubMed

    Kazemali, MohammadReza; Majidzadeh-A, Keivan; Sardari, Soroush; Saadatirad, Amir Hossein; Khalaj, Vahid; Zarei, Najmeh; Barkhordari, Farzaneh; Adeli, Ahmad; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2014-12-01

    Fibrinolytic agents are widely used in treatment of the thromboembolic disorders. The new generations like recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA, alteplase) are not showing promising results in clinical practice in spite of displaying specific binding to fibrin in vitro. Vampire bat plasminogen activator (b-PA) is a plasminogen activator with higher fibrin affinity and specificity in comparison to t-PA resulting in reduced probability of hemorrhage. b-PA is also resistant to plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) showing higher half-life compared to other variants of t-PA. However, its non-human origin was a driving force to design a human t-PA with favorable properties of b-PA. In the present study, we designed a chimeric t-PA with desirable b-PA properties and this new molecule was called as CT-b. The construct was prepared through kringle 2 domain removal and replacement of t-PA finger domain with b-PA one. In addition, the KHRR sequence at the initial part of protease domain was replaced by four alanine residues. The novel construct was integrated in Pichia pastoris genome by electroporation. Catalytic activity was investigated in the presence and absence of fibrin. The purified protein was analyzed by western blot. Fibrin binding and PAI resistance assays were also conducted. The activity of the recombinant protein in the presence of fibrin was 1560 times more than its activity in the absence of fibrin, showing its higher specificity to fibrin. The fibrin binding of CT-b was 1.2 fold more than t-PA. In addition, it was inhibited by PAI enzyme 44% less than t-PA. Although the presented data demonstrate a promising in vitro activity, more in vivo studies are needed to confirm the therapeutic advantage of this novel plasminogen activator. PMID:25442953

  3. Properties of carbachol-induced oscillatory activity in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Williams, J H; Kauer, J A

    1997-11-01

    Properties of carbachol-induced oscillatory activity in rat hippocampus. J. Neurophysiol. 78: 2631-2640, 1997. The recent resurgence of interest in carbachol oscillations as an in vitro model of theta rhythm in the hippocampus prompted us to evaluate the circuit mechanisms involved. In extracellular recordings, a regularly spaced bursting pattern of field potentials was observed in both CA3 and CA1 subfields in the presence of carbachol. Removal of the CA3 region abolished oscillatory activity observed in CA1, suggesting that the oscillatory generator is located in CA3. An alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonist, 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX), blocked carbachol oscillations, indicating that AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic currents are necessary for the population oscillation. Moreover, the spread of oscillatory activity into CA1 required intact N-methyl--aspartate receptors. These data are more consistent with epileptiform bursting than with theta rhythm described in vivo. In the presence of carbachol, individual CA3 pyramidal cells exhibited a slow, rhythmic intrinsic oscillation that was not blocked by DNQX and that was enhanced by membrane hyperpolarization. We hypothesize that this slower oscillation is the fundamental oscillator that participates in triggering the population oscillation by exciting multiple synaptically connected CA3 neurons. gamma-aminobutyric acid-A (GABAA) receptors are not necessary for carbachol to elicit synchronous CA3 field events but are essential to the bursting pattern observed. Neither GABAB nor metabotropic glutamate receptors appear to be necessary for carbachol oscillations. However, both nicotinic and M1 and M3 muscarinic cholinergic receptors contribute to the generation of this activity. These results establish the local circuit elements and neurotransmitter receptors that contribute to carbachol-induced oscillations and indicate that carbachol-induced oscillations are

  4. Missense mutation in the Chlamydomonas chloroplast gene that encodes the Rubisco large subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Spreitzer, R.J.; Brown, T.; Chen, Zhixiang; Zhang, Donghong; Al-Abed, S.R. )

    1988-04-01

    The 69-12Q mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii lacks ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity, but retains holoenzyme protein. It results from a mutation in the chloroplast large-subunit gene that causes an isoleucine-for-threonine substitution at amino-acid residue 173. Considering that lysine-175 is involved in catalysis, it appears that mutations cluster at the active site.

  5. Passive and active membrane properties contribute to the temporal filtering properties of midbrain neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fortune, E S; Rose, G J

    1997-05-15

    This study examined the contributions of passive and active membrane properties to the temporal selectivities of electrosensory neurons in vivo. The intracellular responses to time-varying (2-30 Hz) electrosensory stimulation and current injection of 27 neurons in the midbrain of the weakly electric fish Eigenmannia were recorded. Each neuron was filled with biocytin to reveal its anatomy. Neurons were divided into two biophysically distinct groups based on their frequency-dependent responses to sinusoidal current injection over the range 2-30 Hz. Fourteen neurons showed low-pass filtering, with a maximum decline in the amplitude of voltage responses of >2.6 dB (X = 4.30 dB, s = 1.10 dB) to sinusoidal current injection. These neurons also showed low-pass filtering of electrosensory information but with larger maximum declines in postsynaptic potential amplitude (X = 9.53 dB, s = 3.34 dB; n = 10). These neurons had broad dendritic arbors and relatively spiny dendrites. Five neurons showed all-pass filtering, having maximum decline in the amplitude of voltage responses of <2.0 dB (X = 1.16 dB, s = 0.61 dB). For electrosensory stimuli, however, these neurons showed low-, band-, or high-pass filtering. These neurons had small dendritic arbors and few or no spines. Voltage-dependent "active" conductances were revealed in eight neurons by using several levels of current clamp. In four of these neurons, the duration of the voltage-dependent conductances decreased in concert with the period of the electrosensory stimulus, whereas in the other four neurons the duration of the voltage-dependent conductances was relatively short (<30 msec) and nearly constant across sensory stimulation frequencies. These conductances enhanced the temporal filtering properties of neurons. PMID:9133400

  6. Optical Properties of Anisotropic Polycrystalline Ce+3 activated LSO

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sudesna; Lingertat, Helmut; Brecher, Charles; Sarin, Vinod

    2012-01-01

    Polycrystalline cerium activated lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO:Ce) is highly desirable technique to make cost effective and highly reproducible radiation detectors for medical imaging. In this article methods to improve transparency in polycrystalline LSO:Ce were explored. Two commercially available powders of different particulate sizes (average particle size 30 and 1500 nm) were evaluated for producing dense LSO:Ce by pressure assisted densification routes, such as hot pressing and hot isostatic pressing. Consolidation of the powders at optimum conditions produced three polycrystalline ceramics with average grain sizes of 500 nm, 700 and 2000 nm. Microstructural evolution studies showed that for grain sizes larger than 1 µm, anisotropy in thermal expansion coefficient and elastic constants of LSO, resulted in residual stress at grain boundaries and triple points that led to intragranular microcracking. However, reducing the grain size below 1 µm effectively avoids microcracking, leading to more favorable optical properties. The optical scattering profiles generated by a Stover scatterometer, measured by a He-Ne laser of wavelength 633 nm, showed that by reducing the grain size from 2 µm to 500 nm, the in-line transmission increased by a factor of 103. Although these values were encouraging and showed that small changes in grain size could increase transmission by almost 3 orders of magnitude, even smaller grain sizes need to be achieved in order to get truly transparent material with high in-line transmission. PMID:23505329

  7. Characterization and metal sorptive properties of oxidized active carbon.

    PubMed

    Strelko, Vladimir; Malik, Danish J

    2002-06-01

    A commercial activated carbon Chemviron F 400 has been oxidized using nitric acid in order to introduce a variety of acidic surface functional groups. Both unoxidized and oxidized carbon samples were characterized using nitrogen porosimetry, elemental analysis, pH titration, Boehm's titration, and electrophoretic mobility measurements. Results show that oxidation treatment reduced surface area and pore volume. However, the carbon surface acquires an acidic character with carboxylic groups being the dominant surface functional groups. The modified sample displays cation-exchange properties over a wide range of pH values and exhibits polyfunctional nature. Both carbon samples were challenged for the removal of transition metals such as copper(II), nickel(II), cobalt(II), zinc(II), and manganese(II). The affinity series Mn2+Zn2+ has been found to coincide with the general stability sequence of metal complexes (the Irving-Williams series). The higher preference displayed by carbons toward copper(II) is a consequence of the fact that copper(II) often forms distorted and more stable octahedral complexes. PMID:16290653

  8. Dynamic properties of biologically active synthetic heparin-like hexasaccharides.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Jesús; Hricovíni, Milos; Gairi, Margarida; Guerrini, Marco; de Paz, José Luis; Ojeda, Rafael; Martín-Lomas, Manuel; Nieto, Pedro M

    2005-10-01

    A complete study of the dynamics of two synthetic heparin-like hexasaccharides, D-GlcNHSO3-6-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-L-IdoA-2-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-D-GlcNHSO3-6-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-L-IdoA-2-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-D-GlcNHSO3-6-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-L-IdoA-2-SO4-alpha-1-->iPr (1) and -->4)-L-IdoA-2-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-D-GlcNHAc-6-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-L-IdoA-alpha-(1-->4)-D-GlcNHSO3-alpha-(1-->4)-L-IdoA-2-SO4-alpha-1-->iPr (2), has been performed using 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation parameters, T1, T2, and heteronuclear nuclear Overhauser effect (NOEs). Compound 1 is constituted from sequences corresponding to the major polysaccharide heparin region, while compound 2 contains a sequence never found in natural heparin. They differ from each other only in sulphation patterns, and are capable of stimulating fibroblast growth factors (FGFs)-1 induced mitogenesis. Both oligosaccharides exhibit a remarkable anisotropic overall motion in solution as revealed by their anisotropic ratios (tau /tau||), 4.0 and 3.0 respectively. This is a characteristic behaviour of natural glycosaminoglycans (GAG) which has also been observed for the antithrombin (AT) binding pentasaccharide D-GlcNHSO3-6-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-D-GlcA-beta-(1-->4)-D-GlcNHSO3-(3,6-SO4)-alpha-(1-->4)-L-IdoA-2-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-D-GlcNHSO3-6-SO4-alpha-1-->Me (3) (Hricovíni, M., Guerrini, M., Torri, G., Piani, S., and Ungarelli, F. (1995) Conformational analysis of heparin epoxide in aqueous solution. An NMR relaxation study. Carbohydr. Res., 277, 11-23). The motional properties observed for 1 and 2 provide additional support to the suitability of these compounds as heparin models in agreement with previous structural (de Paz, J.L., Angulo, J., Lassaletta, J.M., Nieto, P.M., Redondo-Horcajo, M., Lozano, R.M., Jiménez-Gallego, G., and Martín-Lomas, M. (2001) The activation of fibroblast growth factors by heparin: synthesis, structure and biological activity of heparin-like oligosaccharides. Chembiochem, 2, 673-685; Ojeda, R

  9. Heterologous expression and initial characterization of recombinant RbcX protein from Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 and the role of RbcX in RuBisCO assembly.

    PubMed

    Tarnawski, Miroslaw; Gubernator, Beata; Kolesinski, Piotr; Szczepaniak, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    In the cyanobacterial RuBisCO operon from Thermosynechococcus elongatus the rbcX gene is juxtaposed and cotranscribed with the rbcL and rbcS genes which encode large and small RuBisCO subunits, respectively. It has been suggested that the rbcX position is not random and that the RbcX protein could be a chaperone for RuBisCO. In this study, the RbcX protein from T. elongatus was overexpressed, purified and preliminary functional studies were conducted. The recombinant protein purified from Escherichia coli extracts was predominantly present in a soluble fraction in a dimeric form. Coexpression experiments have demonstrated that RbcX can mediate RbcL dimer (L(2)) formation, and that it is essential for the L(8) core complex assembly. This is the first characterization of the RbcX protein from a thermophilic organism. PMID:19081849

  10. Influence of process parameters on the surface and chemical properties of activated carbon obtained from biochar by chemical activation.

    PubMed

    Angın, Dilek; Altintig, Esra; Köse, Tijen Ennil

    2013-11-01

    Activated carbons were produced from biochar obtained through pyrolysis of safflower seed press cake by chemical activation with zinc chloride. The influences of process variables such as the activation temperature and the impregnation ratio on textural and chemical-surface properties of the activated carbons were investigated. Also, the adsorptive properties of activated carbons were tested using methylene blue dye as the targeted adsorbate. The experimental data indicated that the adsorption isotherms are well described by the Langmuir equilibrium isotherm equation. The optimum conditions resulted in activated carbon with a monolayer adsorption capacity of 128.21 mg g(-1) and carbon content 76.29%, while the BET surface area and total pore volume corresponded to 801.5m(2)g(-1) and 0.393 cm(3)g(-1), respectively. This study demonstrated that high surface area activated carbons can be prepared from the chemical activation of biochar with zinc chloride as activating agents. PMID:24080293

  11. Surface active properties of chitosan and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Elsabee, Maher Z; Morsi, Rania Elsayed; Al-Sabagh, A M

    2009-11-01

    This review discusses the definition of surface active agents and specifically natural polymeric surface active agents. Chitosan by itself was found to have weak surface activity since it has no hydrophobic segments. Chemical modifications of chitosan could improve such surface activity. This is achieved by introducing hydrophobic substituents in its glucosidic group. Several examples of chitosan derivatives with surfactant activity have been surveyed. The surface active polymers form micelles and aggregates which have enormous importance in the entrapment of water-insoluble drugs and consequently applications in the controlled drug delivery and many biomedical fields. Chitosan also interacts with several substrates by electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions with considerable biomedical applications. PMID:19682870

  12. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    Reflecting widespread unhappiness with the growing tax burdens in this country, the most active area of litigation reported in the property chapter this year involves various attempts by taxpayers to prevent the construction or remodeling of public school facilities. While some taxpayers fought to keep schools from being built, others in New York…

  13. Microstructure and surface properties of lignocellulosic-based activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-García, P.; Centeno, T. A.; Urones-Garrote, E.; Ávila-Brande, D.; Otero-Díaz, L. C.

    2013-01-01

    Low cost activated carbons have been produced via chemical activation, by using KOH at 700 °C, from the bamboo species Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata and the residues from shells of the fruits of Castanea Sativa and Juglans Regia as carbon precursors. The scanning electron microscopy micrographs show the conservation of the precursor shape in the case of the Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata activated carbons. Transmission electron microscopy analyses reveal that these materials consist of carbon platelet-like particles with variable length and thickness, formed by highly disordered graphene-like layers with sp2 content ≈ 95% and average mass density of 1.65 g/cm3 (25% below standard graphite). Textural parameters indicate a high porosity development with surface areas ranging from 850 to 1100 m2/g and average pore width centered in the supermicropores range (1.3-1.8 nm). The electrochemical performance of the activated carbons shows specific capacitance values at low current density (1 mA/cm2) as high as 161 F/g in the Juglans Regia activated carbon, as a result of its textural parameters and the presence of pseudocapacitance derived from surface oxygenated acidic groups (mainly quinones and ethers) identified in this activated carbon.

  14. Adsorption properties and photocatalytic activity of TiO2/activated carbon fiber composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shuhua; Song, Shuangping; Shi, Zhongliang

    2014-06-01

    Photocatalysts of titanium dioxide (TiO2) and TiO2/activated carbon fiber (TiO2/ACF) composite were prepared by sol-gel method, followed by calcining the pure TiO2 sols and the TiO2/ACF sols at 500°C for 2 h in a N2 atmosphere, respectively. These photocatalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms measurement. Batch experiments were conducted to study the adsorption property of TiO2/ACF composite using methylene blue as adsorbate. The adsorption data obtained from different batch experiments were analyzed using pseudo-second-order kinetic model, the experimental data can be adequately described by the pseudo-second-order equation. The photodecomposition behavior of TiO2/ACF was investigated in aqueous solution using methylene blue as target pollutant. It was found that methylene blue could be removed rapidly from water by TiO2/ACF, the photocatalytic decomposition was obviously improved when the photocatalyst was used. Kinetics analysis revealed that the photocatalytic decomposition reaction can be described well by a first-order rate equation.

  15. Biochemical Properties and Possible Roles of Ectophosphatase Activities in Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Freitas-Mesquita, Anita Leocadio; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Ectophosphatases are surface membrane-bound proteins whose active sites face the extracellular medium. These enzymes have been reported in several microorganisms including a large number of medically relevant fungal species. An effective technique for identifying ectophosphatases is performing phosphatase activity assays using living intact cells. Biochemical characterization of these activities has shown their differential modulation by classical phosphatase inhibitors, divalent metals and pH range. The physiological roles of ectophosphatases are not well established; however, it has been suggested that these enzymes play important roles in nutrition, proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, virulence and infection. Adhesion to host cells is the first step in establishing a fungal infection and ectophosphatases may be one of the first parasite proteins that come into contact with the host cells. Several results indicate that ectophosphatase activities increase the capacity of fungi to adhere to the host cells. In this context, the present review provides an overview of recent discoveries related to the occurrence and possible roles of ectophosphatase activities in fungal cells. PMID:24509700

  16. Diffusion properties of active particles with directional reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Großmann, R.; Peruani, F.; Bär, M.

    2016-04-01

    The diffusion properties of self-propelled particles which move at constant speed and, in addition, reverse their direction of motion repeatedly are investigated. The internal dynamics of particles triggering these reversal processes is modeled by a stochastic clock. The velocity correlation function as well as the mean squared displacement is investigated and, furthermore, a general expression for the diffusion coefficient for self-propelled particles with directional reversal is derived. Our analysis reveals the existence of an optimal, finite rotational noise amplitude which maximizes the diffusion coefficient. We comment on the relevance of these results with regard to biological systems and suggest further experiments in this context.

  17. Phytoplankton carbon fixation gene (RuBisCO) transcripts and air-sea CO2 flux in the Mississippi River plume

    SciTech Connect

    John, David E.; Wang, Zhaohui A.; Liu, Xuewu; Byrne, Robert H.; Corredor, Jorge E.; López, José M.; Cabrera, Alvaro; Bronk, Deborah A.; Tabita, F. Robert; Paul, John H.

    2007-08-30

    River plumes deliver large quantities of nutrients to oligotrophic oceans, often resulting in significant CO2 drawdown. To determine the relationship between expression of the major gene in carbon fixation (large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, RuBisCO) and CO2 dynamics, we evaluated rbcL mRNA abundance using novel quantitative PCR assays, phytoplankton cell analyses, photophysiological parameters, and pCO2 in and around the Mississippi River plume (MRP) in the Gulf of Mexico. Lower salinity (30–32) stations were dominated by rbcL mRNA concentrations from heterokonts, such as diatoms and pelagophytes, which were at least an order of magnitude greater than haptophytes, alpha-Synechococcus or high-light Prochlorococcus. However, rbcL transcript abundances were similar among these groups at oligotrophic stations (salinity 34–36). Diatom cell counts and heterokont rbcL RNA showed a strong negative correlation to seawater pCO2. While Prochlorococcus cells did not exhibit a large difference between low and high pCO2 water, Prochlorococcus rbcL RNA concentrations had a strong positive correlation to pCO2, suggesting a very low level of RuBisCO RNA transcription among Prochlorococcus in the plume waters, possibly due to their relatively poor carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). These results provide molecular evidence that diatom/pelagophyte productivity is largely responsible for the large CO2 drawdown occurring in the MRP, based on the co-occurrence of elevated RuBisCO gene transcript concentrations from this group and reduced seawater pCO2 levels. This may partly be due to efficient CCMs that enable heterokont eukaryotes such as diatoms to continue fixing CO2 in the face of strong CO2 drawdown. Finally, our work represents the first attempt to relate in situ microbial gene expression to contemporaneous CO2 flux

  18. Surface-active properties of humic and sulfochlorohumic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabova, I.N.; Mustafina, G.A.; Akkulova, Z.G.; Satymbaeva, A.S.

    2009-10-15

    The surface tension of alkaline solutions of humic acids and their sulfochloroderivatives, which are synthesized by sulfonation of chlorohumic acids isolated from coal chlorinated by the electrochemical method, is investigated. It is established that humic compounds possess weak surface activity. Basic adsorption parameters are calculated.

  19. Physical Properties and Microbial Activity in Forest Residual Substrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many growers in the horticulture industry have expressed concern that switching from a pine bark-based substrate to one with a significant wood content will increase microbial activity, resulting in nitrogen (N) immobilization. This study evaluated four growth substrates (pine bark, peat moss and tw...

  20. Prediction of Antibacterial Activity from Physicochemical Properties of Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Manuel N.; Ferre, Rafael; Feliu, Lídia; Bardají, Eduard; Planas, Marta; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.

    2011-01-01

    Consensus is gathering that antimicrobial peptides that exert their antibacterial action at the membrane level must reach a local concentration threshold to become active. Studies of peptide interaction with model membranes do identify such disruptive thresholds but demonstrations of the possible correlation of these with the in vivo onset of activity have only recently been proposed. In addition, such thresholds observed in model membranes occur at local peptide concentrations close to full membrane coverage. In this work we fully develop an interaction model of antimicrobial peptides with biological membranes; by exploring the consequences of the underlying partition formalism we arrive at a relationship that provides antibacterial activity prediction from two biophysical parameters: the affinity of the peptide to the membrane and the critical bound peptide to lipid ratio. A straightforward and robust method to implement this relationship, with potential application to high-throughput screening approaches, is presented and tested. In addition, disruptive thresholds in model membranes and the onset of antibacterial peptide activity are shown to occur over the same range of locally bound peptide concentrations (10 to 100 mM), which conciliates the two types of observations. PMID:22194847

  1. Scintillation Properties of Eu2+-Activated Barium Fluoroiodide

    SciTech Connect

    Gundiah, Gautam; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Bizarri, Gregory; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew; Moses, William W.; Derenzo, Stephen E.

    2009-11-18

    The scintillation properties of powders and single-crystals of BaFI doped with Eu2+ are presented. Single crystals were grown by the vertical Bridgman technique. Under optical and X-ray excitation, the samples exhibit a narrow E2+ 5d-4f transition emission centered at 405 nm. The scintillation light output is estimated to be 55,000+-5,000 photons/MeV at 662 keV with 85percent of the light decaying within 600 ns. An energyresolution of 8.5percent full width at half maximum (FWHM) has been achieved using this scintillator for 662 keV excitation (137Cs source) at room temperature.

  2. Surface-Active and Performance Properties of Cationic Imidazolinium Surfactants Based on Different Fatty Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajpai, Divya; Tyagi, V. K.

    Imidazoline surfactants belong to the category of cationic surfactants. Cationic surfactants are often quaternary nitrogen salts and are widely used both in nonaqueous systems and in applications such as textile softeners, dispersants, and emulsifiers. This study describes the surface-active properties of cationic imidazolinium surfactants synthesized from different fatty acids. Their laundry performance in combination with nonionic surfactants like detergency, foaming property, softening property, rewettability etc., is also emphasized.

  3. Biological activities and medicinal properties of Cajanus cajan (L) Millsp.

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Dilipkumar; Mishra, Pragya; Sachan, Neetu; Ghosh, Ashoke K.

    2011-01-01

    Cajanus cajan (L) Millsp. (Sanskrit: Adhaki, Hindi: Arhar, English: Pigeon pea, Bengali: Tur) (family: Fabaceae) is the most important grain legume crop of rain-fed agriculture in semi-arid tropics. It is both a food crop and a cover/forage crop with high levels of proteins and important amino acids like methionine, lysine and tryptophan. During the last few decades extensive studies have been carried out regarding the chemistry of C. cajan and considerable progress has been achieved regarding its biological activities and medicinal applications. This review article gives an overview on the biological activities of the compounds isolated, pharmacological actions and clinical studies of C. cajan extracts apart from its general details. PMID:22247887

  4. Cytotoxic activity and DNA-binding properties of isoeuxanthone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui Fang; Yan, Hong; Gao, Xianghua; Niu, Baolong; Guo, Ruijie; Wei, Liqiao; Xu, Bingshe; Tang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the interactions of different groups substituted isoeuxanthone derivatives with calf thymus DNA (ct DNA) were investigated by spectrophotometric methods and viscosity measurements. Results indicated that the xanthone derivatives could intercalate into the DNA base pairs by the plane of xanthone ring and the various substituents may influence the binding affinity with DNA according to the calculated quenching constant values. Furthermore, two tumor cell lines including the human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) and human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) were used to evaluate the cytotoxic activities of xanthone derivatives by acid phosphatase assay. Analyses showed that the oxiranylmethoxy substituted xanthone exhibited more effective cytotoxic activity against the cancer cells than the other substituted xanthones. The effects on the inhibition of tumor cells in vitro agreed with the studies of DNA-binding. PMID:24583780

  5. Biological activities and medicinal properties of Cajanus cajan (L) Millsp.

    PubMed

    Pal, Dilipkumar; Mishra, Pragya; Sachan, Neetu; Ghosh, Ashoke K

    2011-10-01

    Cajanus cajan (L) Millsp. (Sanskrit: Adhaki, Hindi: Arhar, English: Pigeon pea, Bengali: Tur) (family: Fabaceae) is the most important grain legume crop of rain-fed agriculture in semi-arid tropics. It is both a food crop and a cover/forage crop with high levels of proteins and important amino acids like methionine, lysine and tryptophan. During the last few decades extensive studies have been carried out regarding the chemistry of C. cajan and considerable progress has been achieved regarding its biological activities and medicinal applications. This review article gives an overview on the biological activities of the compounds isolated, pharmacological actions and clinical studies of C. cajan extracts apart from its general details. PMID:22247887

  6. Synthesis, antiproliferative activity and molecular properties predictions of galloyl derivatives.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marciane Maximo; Comin, Marina; Duarte, Thiago Santos; Foglio, Mary Ann; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; do Vieira, Maria Carmo; Formagio, Anelise Samara Nazari

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the in vitro antiproliferative activity against ten human cancer cell lines of a series of galloyl derivatives bearing substituted-1,3,4-oxadiazole and carbohydrazide moieties. The compounds were also assessed in an in silico study of the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) in the human body using Lipinski's parameters, the topological polar surface area (TPSA) and percentage of absorption (%ABS). In general, the introduction of N'-(substituted)-arylidene galloyl hydrazides 4-8 showed a moderate antitumor activity, while the 2-methylthio- and 2-thioxo-1,3,4-oxadiazol-5-yl derivatives 9 and 10 led to increased inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. The precursor compound methyl gallate 2 and the intermediary galloyl hydrazide 3 showed greater antiproliferative activity with GI50 values < 5.54 µM against all human tumor cell lines tested. A higher inhibition effect against ovarian cancer (OVCAR-3) (GI50 = 0.05-5.98 µM) was also shown, with compounds 2, 3, 9 and 10 with GI50 ≤ 0.89 µM standing out in this respect. The in silico study revealed that the compounds showed good intestinal absorption. PMID:25816079

  7. PREDICTING THE ADSORPTION CAPACITY OF ACTIVATED CARBON FOR ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS FROM ADSORBENT AND ADSORBATE PROPERTIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) was developed and combined with the Polanyi-Dubinin-Manes model to predict adsorption isotherms of emerging contaminants on activated carbons with a wide range of physico-chemical properties. Affinity coefficients (βl

  8. PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF THE LARGE SUBUNIT RUBISCO GENE SUPPORTS THE EXCLUSION OF AVRAINVILLEA AND CLADOCEPHALUS FROM THE UDOTEACEAE (BRYOPSIDALES, CHLOROPHYTA)(1).

    PubMed

    Curtis, Nicholas E; Dawes, Clinton J; Pierce, Sidney K

    2008-06-01

    The placement of Avrainvillea and Cladocephalus in the family Udoteaceae (order Bryopsidales) has been questioned on the basis of nuclear, plastid, and other ultrastructural characteristics unique to these genera. Bayesian analysis of the chloroplast-encoded LSU RUBISCO (rbcL) gene showed that the Udoteaceae is paraphyletic. Cladocephalus luteofuscus (P. Crouan et H. Crouan) Børgesen, Avrainvillea nigricans f. floridana D. Littler et Littler, and A. mazei G. Murray et Boodle form a clade with the freshwater alga Dichotomosiphon tuberosus (A. Braun ex Kütz.) A. Ernst that is basal to a clade that includes other members of the Udoteaceae, the Halimedaceae, and the Caulerpaceae. The noncalcified species Boodleopsis pusilla (Collins) W. R. Taylor, A. B. Joly et Bernat. groups with species of the calcified Udoteacean genera Penicillus, Rhipocephalus, Udotea, and Halimeda. PMID:27041434

  9. [SEROLOGICAL PROPERTIES AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF PANTOEA AGGLOMERANS LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDES].

    PubMed

    Bulygina, T V; Yakovleva, L M; Brovarska, O S; Varbanets, L D

    2015-01-01

    The serological and phytotoxic properties of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of plant pathogens--Pantoea agglomerans were studied. It is known that the thin variations in the structure of the O-specific polysaccharides determining serological specificity of gram- negative bacteria and used as a molecular basis of serological classification schemes. For P. agglomerans still does not exist a classification scheme based on serology specificity of their LPS. The results of cross serological tests demonstrate immunochemical heterogeneity of species P agglomerans. Only three strains of the 8488, 8490 and 7969 according to the agglutination of O-antigens and direct hemagglutination and inhibition direct hemagglutination can be attributed to a single serogroup. Other strains--each separate group, although some have a relationship. Compared with control plants under the influence of seed treatment of LPS in plants may be reduced, and in some cases increased root length, height and weight sprout, depending on the strain from which the selected LPS. Dive seedlings of tomatoes in the solutions of the studied preparations FSC caused the loss, and after some time, restore turgor. PMID:26829835

  10. Aerosol activation properties and CCN closure during TCAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, F.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Shilling, J. E.; Wilson, J. M.; Zelenyuk, A.; Chand, D.; Comstock, J. M.; Hubbe, J.; Berg, L. K.; Schmid, B.

    2013-12-01

    The indirect effects of atmospheric aerosols currently remain the most uncertain components in forcing of climate change over the industrial period (IPCC, 2007). This large uncertainty is partially due to our incomplete understanding of the ability of particles to form cloud droplets under atmospherically relevant supersaturation. In addition, there is a large uncertainty in the aerosol optical depth (AOD) simulated by climate models near the North American coast and a wide variety in the types of clouds are observed over this region. The goal of the US Department of Energy Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) is to understand the processes responsible for producing and maintaining aerosol distributions and associated radiative and cloud forcing off the coast of North America. During the TCAP study, aerosol total number concentration, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra and aerosol chemical composition were in-situ measured from the DOE Gulfstream 1 (G-1) research aircraft during two Intensive Operations Periods (IOPs), one conducted in July 2012 and the other in February 2013. An overall aerosol size distribution was achieved by merging the observations from several instruments, including Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer - Airborne (UHSAS-A, DMT), Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP-200, DMT), and Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS, DMT). Aerosol chemical composition was characterized using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS, Aerodyne Inc.) and single particle mass spectrometer, mini-SPLAT. Based on the aerosol size distribution, CCN number concentration (characterized by a DMT dual column CCN counter with a range from 0.1% to 0.4%), and chemical composition, a CCN closure was obtained. The sensitivity of CCN closure to organic hygroscopicity was investigated. The differences in aerosol/CCN properties between two columns, and between two phases, will be discussed.

  11. Nanoscale Properties and Stability Simulations of Alkali Activated Cement Phases from First Principle Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcelik, Ongun; White, Claire

    Using first principle density functional calculations, we present the nanoscale properties of interactions, local bonds, charge distributions, mechanical properties and strength of alkali activated cement phases which are the most promising alternative to the ordinary Portland cement with a much lower cost to the environment. We present results on the stability and long term durability of various alkali activated cement structures, effects of external alkali agents on their properties and ways of utilizing them for further applications. We compare the calculated properties of alkali activated cement with those of ordinary Portland cement and contribute to the formation of long term durability data of these phases. Comparison with X-ray and neutron scattering experiment results are also provided via pair distribution functions extracted from simulation results.

  12. Laser and spectroscopic properties of chromium-activated forsterite

    SciTech Connect

    Petricevic, V.; Gayen, S.K.; Alfano, R.R. )

    1989-10-20

    Room-temperature pulsed laser action has been obtained in chromium-activated forsterite (Cr:Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) for both 532-nm and 1064-nm pumping. Free running laser emission in both cases is centered at 1235 nm and has bandwidth of {similar to}20 nm. Slope efficiency as high as 22% has been measured. Using different sets of output mirrors and a single birefringent plate as the intracavity wavelength-selecting element tunability over the 1167--1268 nm spectral range has been demonstrated. Continuous-wave laser operation at room temperature has been obtained for 1064-nm pumping from a cw Nd:YAG laser. The output power slope efficiency is 6.8%. The gain cross section is estimated to be 1.1{times}10{sup {minus}19} cm{sup 2}. Spectroscopic studies suggest that the laser action is due to a center' other than the trivalent chromium (Cr{sup 3+}), presumably the tetravalent chromium (Cr{sup 4+}) in a tetrahedrally coordinated site.

  13. Antioxidant, Antimicrobial Activity and Medicinal Properties of Grewia asiatica L.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Ritu; Sharma, Dinesh C; Baig, Mohammad H; Bano, Shabana; Roy, Sudeep; Provazník, Ivo; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2016-01-01

    Since ancient time, India is a well known subcontinent for medicinal plants where diversity of plants is known for the treatment of many human disorders. Grewia asiatica is a dicot shrub belonging to the Grewioideae family and well known for its medicinally important fruit commonly called Falsa. G. asiatica, a seasonal summer plant is distributed in the forest of central India, south India, also available in northern plains and western Himalaya up to the height of 3000 ft. Fruits of G. asiatica are traditionally used as a cooling agent, refreshing drink, anti-inflammatory agent and for the treatment of some urological disorders. Recent advancement of Falsa researches concluded its antimicrobial and anti-diabetic activity. Since ancient time medicinal plants are traditionally used for the treatment of different diseases G. asiatica fruit is the edible and tasty part of the plant, now considered as a valuable source of unique natural product for the development of medicines which are used in different disease conditions like anti-diabetic, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancerous and antimicrobial. Now a days, G. asiatica is being used in different Ayurvedic formulation for the cure of different types of diseases. Different pharmacological investigations reveal the presence of phenols, saponnins, flavonoids and tannins compound in the fruits. Present review highlights the phytopharmacological and different traditional use of G. asiatica which is mentioned in ancient Ayurvedic texts. This review stimulates the researchers and scientists for further research on G. asiatica. PMID:26516779

  14. Optical Properties of Active Regions in Terahertz Quantum Cascade Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyksik, M.; Motyka, M.; Rudno-Rudziński, W.; Sęk, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Pucicki, D.; Kosiel, K.; Sankowska, I.; Kubacka-Traczyk, J.; Bugajski, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, AlGaAs/GaAs superlattice, with layers' sequence and compositions imitating the active and injector regions of a quantum cascade laser designed for emission in the terahertz spectral range, was investigated. Three independent absorption-like optical spectroscopy techniques were employed in order to study the band structure of the minibands formed within the conduction band. Photoreflectance measurements provided information about interband transitions in the investigated system. Common transmission spectra revealed, in the target range of intraband transitions, mainly a number of lines associated with the phonon-related processes, including two-phonon absorption. In contrast, differential transmittance realized by means of Fourier-transform spectroscopy was utilized to probe the confined states of the conduction band. The obtained energy separation between the second and third confined electron levels, expected to be predominantly contributing to the lasing, was found to be ~9 meV. The optical spectroscopy measurements were supported by numerical calculations performed in the effective mass approximation and XRD measurements for layers' width verification. The calculated energy spacings are in a good agreement with the experimental values.

  15. 24 CFR 570.513 - Lump sum drawdown for financing of property rehabilitation activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... property rehabilitation activities. 570.513 Section 570.513 Housing and Urban Development Regulations... rehabilitation activities. Subject to the conditions prescribed in this section, recipients may draw funds from the letter of credit in a lump sum to establish a rehabilitation fund in one or more private...

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTIVATED CARBONS' PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES IN RELATION TO THEIR MERCURY ADSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a characterization of the physical and chemical properties of the activated carbons used for elemental mercury (Hgo) adsorption, in order to understand the role of oxygen surface functional groups on the mechanism of Hgo adsorption by activated carbons....

  17. Statistical Properties of Longitudinal Time-Activity Data for Use in Human Exposure Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the longitudinal properties of the time spent in different locations and activities is important in characterizing human exposure to pollutants. The results of a four-season longitudinal time-activity diary study in eight working adults are presented, with the goal ...

  18. 26 CFR 1.924(e)-1 - Activities relating to the disposition of export property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Activities relating to the disposition of export property. 1.924(e)-1 Section 1.924(e)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Earned Income of Citizens of United States § 1.924(e)-1 Activities relating to...

  19. Influence of post-treatment strategies on the properties of activated chars from broiler manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are a myriad of carbonaceous precursors that can be used advantageously to produce activated carbons or chars, due to their low cost, availability and intrinsic properties. Because of the nature of the raw material, production of granular activated chars from broiler manure results in a signif...

  20. Antioxidant activity and functional properties of enzymatic protein hydrolysates from common carp (Cyprinus carpio) roe (egg).

    PubMed

    Chalamaiah, M; Jyothirmayi, T; Diwan, Prakash V; Dinesh Kumar, B

    2015-09-01

    Previously, we have reported the composition, molecular mass distribution and in vivo immunomodulatory effects of common carp roe protein hydrolysates. In the current study, antioxidative activity and functional properties of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) roe (egg) protein hydrolysates, prepared by pepsin, trypsin and Alcalase, were evaluated. The three hydrolysates showed excellent antioxidant activities in a dose dependent manner in various in vitro models such as 2,2 diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6)-sulfonic acid (ABTS(+)) radical scavenging activity, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and ferrous ion (Fe(2+)) chelating ability. Enzymatic hydrolysis significantly increased protein solubility of the hydrolysates to above 62 % over a wide pH range (2-12). Carp roe hydrolysates exhibited good foaming and emulsification properties. The results suggest that bioactive carp roe protein hydrolysates (CRPHs) with good functional properties could be useful in health food/nutraceutical/pharmaceutical industry for various applications. PMID:26344996

  1. Chemical properties and toxicity of soils contaminated by mining activity.

    PubMed

    Agnieszka, Baran; Tomasz, Czech; Jerzy, Wieczorek

    2014-09-01

    This research is aimed at assessing the total content and soluble forms of metals (zinc, lead and cadmium) and toxicity of soils subjected to strong human pressure associated with mining of zinc and lead ores. The research area lay in the neighbourhood of the Bolesław Mine and Metallurgical Plant in Bukowno (Poland). The study obtained total cadmium concentration between 0.29 and 51.91 mg, zinc between 7.90 and 3,614 mg, and that of lead between 28.4 and 6844 mg kg(-1) of soil d.m. The solubility of the heavy metals in 1 mol dm(-3) NH4NO3 was 1-49% for zinc, 5-45% for cadmium, and <1-10% for lead. In 1 mol HCl dm(-3), the solubility of the studied metals was much higher and obtained values depending on the collection site, from 45 to 92% for zinc, from 74 to 99%, and from 79 to 99% for lead. The lower solubility of the heavy metals in 1 mol dm(-3) NH4NO3 than 1 mol HCl dm(-3) is connected with that, the ammonium nitrate has low extraction power, and it is used in determining the bioavailable (active) form of heavy metals. Toxicity assessment of the soil samples was performed using two tests, Phytotoxkit and Microtox(®). Germination index values were between 22 and 75% for Sinapis alba, between 28 and 100% for Lepidium sativum, and between 10 and 28% for Sorghum saccharatum. Depending on the studied soil sample, Vibrio fischeri luminescence inhibition was 20-96%. The sensitivity of the test organisms formed the following series: S. saccharatum > S. alba = V. fischeri > L. sativum. Significant positive correlations (p ≤ 0.05) of the total and soluble contents of the metals with luminescence inhibition in V. fischeri and root growth inhibition in S. saccharatum were found. The general trend observed was an increase in metal toxicity measured by the biotest with increasing available metal contents in soils. All the soil samples were classified into toxicity class III, which means that they are toxic and present severe danger. Biotest are a good complement to

  2. Enhanced leavening properties of baker's yeast by reducing sucrase activity in sweet dough.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui-Ying; Lin, Xue; Feng, Bing; Liu, Xiao-Er; Bai, Xiao-Wen; Xu, Jia; Pi, Li; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2016-07-01

    Leavening ability in sweet dough is required for the commercial applications of baker's yeast. This property depends on many factors, such as glycolytic activity, sucrase activity, and osmotolerance. This study explored the importance of sucrase level on the leavening ability of baker's yeast in sweet dough. Furthermore, the baker's yeast strains with varying sucrase activities were constructed by deleting SUC2, which encodes sucrase or replacing the SUC2 promoter with the VPS8/TEF1 promoter. The results verify that the sucrase activity negatively affects the leavening ability of baker's yeast strains under high-sucrose conditions. Based on a certain level of osmotolerance, sucrase level plays a significant role in the fermentation performance of baker's yeast, and appropriate sucrase activity is an important determinant for the leavening property of baker's yeast in sweet dough. Therefore, modification on sucrase activity is an effective method for improving the leavening properties of baker's yeast in sweet dough. This finding provides guidance for the breeding of industrial baker's yeast strains for sweet dough leavening. The transformants BS1 with deleted SUC2 genetic background provided decreased sucrase activity (a decrease of 39.3 %) and exhibited enhanced leavening property (an increase of 12.4 %). Such a strain could be useful for industrial applications. PMID:27041690

  3. Materials Property Profiles for Actively Cooled Panels: An Illustration for Scramjet Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermaak, N.; Valdevit, L.; Evans, A. G.

    2009-04-01

    A scheme for identifying and visualizing the material properties that limit the performance of candidate materials for actively cooled aerospace propulsion components is presented and illustrated for combustor panels for Mach 7 hypersonic vehicles. The method provides a framework for exploring the nonlinear interactions between design and materials optimization. By probing the active constraints along the border of feasible design space, the limiting properties have been elucidated for a representative group of candidate materials. Property vectors that enhance design options have also been determined. For one of the promising candidate alloys (the Ni-based superalloy, INCONEL X-750), the possibilities of reclaiming design space and lowering optimal combustor panel weight by tailoring its strength properties are assessed.

  4. Antiarrhythmic and antioxidant activity of novel pyrrolidin-2-one derivatives with adrenolytic properties

    PubMed Central

    Nowaczyk, Alicja; Kulig, Katarzyna

    2010-01-01

    A series of novel pyrrolidin-2-one derivatives (17 compounds) with adrenolytic properties was evaluated for antiarrhythmic, electrocardiographic and antioxidant activity. Some of them displayed antiarrhythmic activity in barium chloride-induced arrhythmia and in the rat coronary artery ligation-reperfusion model, and slightly decreased the heart rate, prolonged P–Q, Q–T intervals and QRS complex. Among them, compound EP-40 (1-[2-hydroxy-3-[4-[(2-hydroxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl]propyl]pyrrolidin-2-one showed excellent antiarrhythmic activity. This compound had significantly antioxidant effect, too. The present results suggest that the antiarrhythmic effect of compound EP-40 is related to their adrenolytic and antioxidant properties. A biological activity prediction using the PASS software shows that compound EP-35 and EP-40 can be characterized by antiischemic activity; whereas, compound EP-68, EP-70, EP-71 could be good tachycardia agents. PMID:20949258

  5. Thermophysical and mechanical properties of Fe-(8-9)%Cr reduced activation steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Robertson, J.P.; Klueh, R.L.

    1998-09-01

    The key thermophysical and mechanical properties for 8--9%Cr reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels are summarized, including temperature-dependent tensile properties in the unirradiated and irradiated conditions, stress-rupture behavior, elastic constants, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, specific heat, and ductile-to-brittle transition temperature. The estimated lower and upper temperatures limits for structural applications are 250 and 550 C due to radiation hardening/embrittlement and thermal creep considerations, respectively.

  6. Interactions of C4 subtype metabolic activities and transport in maize are revealed through the characterization of DCT2 mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    C4 photosynthesis is an elaborate set of metabolic pathways that utilize specialized anatomical and biochemical adaptations to concentrate CO2 around RuBisCO. The activities of the C4 pathways are coordinated between two specialized leaf cell types, mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS), and rely hea...

  7. 41 CFR 102-75.130 - If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, what specific information must an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Utilization of Excess Real Property Title Report § 102-75.130 If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, what specific information must an agency include in the title report? If hazardous... activity took place on the property, what specific information must an agency include in the title...

  8. 41 CFR 102-75.130 - If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, what specific information must an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Utilization of Excess Real Property Title Report § 102-75.130 If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, what specific information must an agency include in the title report? If hazardous... activity took place on the property, what specific information must an agency include in the title...

  9. 41 CFR 102-75.130 - If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, what specific information must an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Utilization of Excess Real Property Title Report § 102-75.130 If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, what specific information must an agency include in the title report? If hazardous... activity took place on the property, what specific information must an agency include in the title...

  10. 41 CFR 102-75.130 - If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, what specific information must an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Utilization of Excess Real Property Title Report § 102-75.130 If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, what specific information must an agency include in the title report? If hazardous... activity took place on the property, what specific information must an agency include in the title...