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  1. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome].

    PubMed

    Fischer, M; Schmutzhard, E

    2016-06-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome refers to a neurological disorder characterized by headache, disorders of consciousness, visual disturbances, epileptic seizures, and subcortical vasogenic edema. About two thirds of patients develop neurological symptoms, which are associated with blood pressure fluctuations. One hypothesis is that hypertensive episodes cause autoregulatory failure, and values above the upper limit of cerebral autoregulation result in a breakthrough followed by hyperperfusion and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. In another hypothesis, endothelial dysfunction triggered by numerous factors including preeclampsia, immunosuppressive agents, chemotherapeutics, sepsis, or autoimmune disorders is thought to be the key pathomechanism. Endo- or exogenic toxic agents including pharmacological substances, cytokines, or bacterial toxins are supposed to trigger endothelial activation and dysfunction resulting in the release of vasoconstrictors, pro-inflammatory mediators, and vascular leakage. Diagnosis is usually based on clinical and neuroimaging findings that frequently show a bilateral, symmetric, and parietooccipital pattern. However, the diagnosis can often only be confirmed during the course of disease after excluding important differential diagnoses. Currently, there is no specific treatment available. Lowering of arterial blood pressure and eliminating the underlying cause usually leads to an improvement of clinical and neuroradiological findings. Admission to a critical care unit is required in about 40 % of patients due to complicating conditions including status epilepticus, cerebral vasoconstriction, ischemia, or intracerebral hemorrhage. Prognosis is favorable; in the majority of patients neurological deficits and imaging findings resolve completely. PMID:27272329

  2. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in ALL.

    PubMed

    Millichap, J Gordon

    2015-07-01

    Investigators from Soochow University, Suzhou, China, studied the possible pathogenetic mechanisms and treatment of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) observed in 11 cases of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) after induction chemotherapy. PMID:26933594

  3. Reversing the Effects of Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogren, Marilee P.; Lombroso, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    A research on how synaptic plasticity is abnormally regulated in fragile X syndrome and how this abnormality can be reversed by therapeutic interventions is presented. Fragile X syndrome is a disorder of synaptic plasticity that contributes to abnormal development and interferes with normal learning and memory.

  4. Reversible postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Abdulla, Aza; Rajeevan, Thirumagal

    2015-01-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a relatively rare syndrome recognised since 1940. It is a heterogenous condition with orthostatic intolerance due to dysautonomia and is characterised by rise in heart rate above 30 bpm from base line or to more than 120 bpm within 5-10 min of standing with or without change in blood pressure which returns to base line on resuming supine position. This condition present with various disabling symptoms such as light headedness, near syncope, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, tremor, palpitations and mental clouding, etc. However there are no identifiable signs on clinical examination and patients are often diagnosed to have anxiety disorder. The condition predominantly affects young female between the ages of 15-50 but is rarely described in older people. We describe an older patient who developed POTS which recovered over 12 mo. Recognising this condition is important as there are treatment options available to alleviate the disabling symptoms. PMID:26244158

  5. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome: a comprehensive update.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, Ali; Hajj-Ali, Rula A

    2014-09-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a clinico-radiological syndrome characterized by recurrent thunderclap headache, with or without neurologic symptoms, and reversible vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries. RCVS affects patients in various racial and ethnic groups and in all age groups, although most commonly in the fourth decade of life. Many conditions and exposures have been linked to RCVS, including vasoactive drugs and the peripartum period. Disturbance of the cerebral vascular tone is thought to contribute to the disease's pathophysiology. RCVS generally follows a monophasic course. Associated strokes and cerebral hemorrhages are not uncommon. In this review we will attempt to provide a comprehensive overview of RCVS, with emphasis on the controversies in the field and the newest findings in the reported literature. PMID:25138149

  6. Reverse mutations in fragile X syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.T.; Nolin, S.; Houck, G.E.

    1994-09-01

    The fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited form of mental retardation. Yet new mutations have not been described and no affected child has been born to a carrier mother having less than 60 FMR-1 CGG triplet repeats. Reverse mutations also appear to be very rare. We have previously identified the daughter of a premutation mother (95 CGGs) who inherited a normal repeat size of 35 as a reverse mutation. In the process of carrier testing by PCR, we have now identified two additional females with reverse mutations. All three of these reverse mutation women were previously tested by linkage as part of known fragile X families (subsequently confirmed by direct analysis), and assigned a > 99% risk as a carrier. In the second family, the mother carries a premutation allele of 95 repeats and the daughter inherited a 43 repeat allele. Prior to direct DNA testing, she had a positive prenatal diagnosis by linkage (> 99% risk) and cytogenetics with 3/450 cells apparently positive. Subsequent retesting of the products of conception by PCR now reveals a 43 repeat allele from her carrier mother with an 82 repeat allele. Testing with close CA markers (FRAXAC1 and DXS548) confirmed that these women inherited the same chromosome and their full mutation brothers. Further analysis is pending. These examples of reverse mutations are the only ones we have identified in our study of offspring of more than 200 carriers (400+ meioses) examined to date. Therefore, we conclude the frequency of fragile X back mutations is likely to be less than 1%. Retesting of linkage positive carriers is recommended to detect reverse mutations and assure accurate genetic counseling.

  7. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Complicating Traumatic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sigurtà, Anna; Terzi, Valeria; Regna-Gladin, Caroline; Fumagalli, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We are reporting a case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) developed in an unusual clinical scenario without the presence of the most described symptoms. PRES is a neurological and radiological syndrome described in many different clinical conditions. In children it has been mostly reported in association with hematological and renal disorders. Our patient was a 15 years old boy, admitted to our intensive care unit for pancreatitis after blunt abdominal trauma. During the stay in the intensive care unit, he underwent multiple abdominal surgical interventions for pancreatitis complications. He had a difficult management of analgesia and sedation, being often agitated with high arterial pressure, and he developed a bacterial peritonitis. After 29 days his neurological conditions abruptly worsened with neuroimaging findings consistent with PRES. His clinical conditions progressively improved after sedation and arterial pressure control. He was discharged at home with complete resolution of the neurological and imaging signs 2 months later. The pathophysiology of PRES is controversial and involves disordered autoregulation ascribable to hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. In this case both hypertension and endothelial activation, triggered by sepsis and pancreatitis, could represent the culprits of PRES onset. Even if there is no specific treatment for this condition, a diagnosis is mandatory to start antihypertensive and supportive treatment. We are therefore suggesting to consider PRES in the differential diagnosis of a neurological deterioration preceded by hypertension and/or septic state, even without other “typical” clinical features. PMID:27258506

  8. Mycophenolate-Induced Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khajuria, Bhavik; Khajuria, Mansi; Agrawal, Yashwant

    2016-01-01

    A 29-year-old woman presented with diffuse anasarca and shortness of breath. Workup revealed a creatinine of 3.3 and a glomerular filtration rate of 17. The patient was also found to be pancytopenic with evidence of hemolytic anemia. A renal biopsy showed evidence of stage IV lupus nephritis with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Her lupus was further classified as ANA negative and anti-dsDNA positive. Mycophenolate and triweekly hemodialysis were started along with a steroid burst of methylprednisolone 1 g for 3 days followed by prednisone 60 mg daily. Four days after discharge, the patient represented with a witnessed 3-minute seizure involving bowel incontinence, altered mental status, and tongue biting. She was given 2 mg intravenous lorazepam and loaded with 1000 mg levetiracetam for seizure prophylaxis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the head revealed bilateral posterior hemispheric subcortical edema, and the diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome was made. Mycophenolate was immediately discontinued and replaced with cyclophosphamide. Strict blood pressure control below 140/90 mm Hg was maintained initially with intravenous nicardipine drip and then transitioned to oral nifedipine, clonidine, losartan, and minoxidil. A repeat head magnetic resonance imaging 8 days later showed resolved subcortical edema consistent with the patient's improved mental status. No permanent neurologic sequelae were recorded as a result of this hospital episode. PMID:25933141

  9. Rapidly reversible visual loss in posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: An ophthalmologist's enigma.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Virender; Garg, Ravi; Pathengay, Avinash; Chandrasekharan, Anjali; Kekunnaya, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) may present with a sudden onset reversible visual loss under special visual conditions. Such patients' may initially be misdiagnosed as Malingering. Ophthalmologists may be the first physicians to be confronted by such patients. Hence, a knowledge of this condition is vital to diagnosis and management of such conditions. PMID:26903736

  10. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome after neurosurgery: A literature review].

    PubMed

    Durán Paz, S; Moreno Casanova, I; Benatar-Haserfaty, J

    2015-12-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a clinical-radiological characterized by decreased level of consciousness, seizures, and visual disturbances, as well as radiologically ras brain edema, predominantly in parieto-occipital white matter regions. There are many situations that can trigger the disorder, including the administration of immunosuppressants, chemotherapy agents, hypertensive disorders, and sepsis. The case is described of a patient diagnosed with stage IV prostate adenocarcinoma, receiving chemotherapy, andundergoing a posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome after surgery for resection of brain metastasis. PMID:25866131

  11. Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome: A Report on Three Cases.

    PubMed

    Roongpiboonsopit, Duangnapa; Kongbunkiat, Kannikar; Phanthumchinda, Kammant

    2016-01-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS), a recently recognized syndrome, is defined as an intermittent segmental vasospasm of cerebral arteries accompanied by thunderclap headache. The major complications of RCVS include ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, which may cause morbidity and mortality. It is important to detect RCVS in clinical practice because misdiagnosis may lead to inappropriate treatment. In Thailand, there are only two reported cases of RCVS, which may reflect an underdiagnosis of this syndrome. To raise awareness of RCVS, we reported a case series of three RCVS cases. Two of the presented cases had interesting precipitating factors, and two cases had an unusual delayed clinical course. PMID:27455831

  12. Isolated Posterior Fossa Involvement in Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Yukie; Tha, Khin Khin; Iguchi, Akihiro; Cho, Yuko; Yoshida, Atsushi; Fujima, Noriyuki; Tsukahara, Akiko; Shirato, Hiroki; Terae, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Summary Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is characterized by reversible vasogenic edema affecting the subcortical white matter of bilateral occipital and parietal lobes. We describe a case of isolated posterior fossa involvement of PRES which occurred during remission induction chemotherapy for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Both the brainstem and cerebellum were extensively involved, but the supratentorial structures were completely spared. The follow-up magnetic resonance images revealed reversibility of most lesions. The knowledge of atypical radiological features of PRES is essential for prompt diagnosis. PMID:24199811

  13. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome and nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Barboza, Miguel A; Maud, Alberto; Rodriguez, Gustavo J

    2014-01-01

    Background Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome was first described by Call, Fleming, and colleagues. Clinically this entity presents acutely, with severe waxing and waning headaches (“thunderclap”), and occasional fluctuating neurological signs. Case presentation We present four subsequent cases of patients with severe thunderclap headache and brain tomography with evidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage. The brain angiogram showed no aneurysm but intracranial vasculopathy consistent with multiple areas of stenosis and dilatation (angiographic beading) in different territories. Conclusion Neurologists should be aware of Call Fleming syndrome presenting with severe headache and associated convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage. After other diagnoses are excluded, patients can be reassured about favorable prognosis with symptomatic management. Abbreviations RCVS Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome CT Computed tomography SAH Subarachnoid hemorrhage MR Magnetic resonance CTA Computed tomography angiography MRA Magnetic resonance angiography PMID:25132905

  14. Reverse mutation in fragile X syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Antinolo, G.; Borrego, S.; Cabeza, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    The fragile X syndrome is the most common cause of familial mental retardation, with an incidence of {approximately}1/1,500 in males and 1/2,500 in females. The clinical expression includes moderate to severe mental retardation, macroorchidism, dysmorphic facial features and behavior disturbances. In 1991, the FMR-1 gene was isolated from the region of the fragile X site. The fragile X phenotype has been found, in most cases, to be characterized at the molecular level by expansion of a (CGG){sub n} repeat and hypermethylation of a CpG island identified in the 5{prime}-UTR of the FMR-1 gene. It has been proposed, and some evidence has been shown, that germ cells carry only premutation alleles and that expansion occurs at a postzygotic stage. A few cases of reduction of the (CGG){sub n} repeat in fragile X syndrome have been reported. These reductions were from a larger premutation to a smaller premutation, in female-to-male transmission, from full mutation to a mosaic pattern, reduction from mosaic full-mutation/premutation females or regression from premutation to normal. We present here the novel observation of a phenotypically normal female carrying a nonmosaic full-mutation allele in somatic cells who transmits a premutation allele to her daughter. This daughter has three mosaic offspring with the full mutation and the premutation. Two of them are monozygotic (MZ) twins sharing a concordant mutation pattern. They are monoamniotic monochorionic, which indicates a late form of twinning. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Targeted estrogen delivery reverses the metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Brian; Yang, Bin; Ottaway, Nickki; Stemmer, Kerstin; Müller, Timo D; Yi, Chun-Xia; Habegger, Kirk; Schriever, Sonja C; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Kabra, Dhiraj G; Hembree, Jazzminn; Holland, Jenna; Raver, Christine; Seeley, Randy J; Hans, Wolfgang; Irmler, Martin; Beckers, Johannes; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Tiano, Joseph P; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Pfluger, Paul; Zhang, Lianshan; Gelfanov, Vasily; DiMarchi, Richard D; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2013-01-01

    We report the development of a new combinatorial approach that allows for peptide-mediated selective tissue targeting of nuclear hormone pharmacology while eliminating adverse effects in other tissues. Specifically, we report the development of a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-estrogen conjugate that has superior sex-independent efficacy over either of the individual hormones alone to correct obesity, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia in mice. The therapeutic benefits are driven by pleiotropic dual hormone action to improve energy, glucose and lipid metabolism, as shown by loss-of-function models and genetic action profiling. Notably, the peptide-based targeting strategy also prevents hallmark side effects of estrogen in male and female mice, such as reproductive endocrine toxicity and oncogenicity. Collectively, selective activation of estrogen receptors in GLP-1–targeted tissues produces unprecedented efficacy to enhance the metabolic benefits of GLP-1 agonism. This example of targeting the metabolic syndrome represents the discovery of a new class of therapeutics that enables synergistic co-agonism through peptide-based selective delivery of small molecules. Although our observations with the GLP-1–estrogen conjugate justify translational studies for diabetes and obesity, the multitude of other possible combinations of peptides and small molecules may offer equal promise for other diseases. PMID:23142820

  16. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome: rare or underrecognized in children?

    PubMed

    Probert, Rebecca; Saunders, Dawn E; Ganesan, Vijeya

    2013-04-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a clinicoradiological diagnosis comprising 'thunderclap' headaches and reversible segmental vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries, occasionally complicated by ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke. We report a case of RCVS in a 13-year-old male with severe thunderclap headaches and no focal neurological signs. Brain imaging showed multiple posterior circulation infarcts; cerebral computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and catheter angiography showed multifocal irregularity and narrowing, but in different arterial segments. Laboratory studies did not support a diagnosis of vasculitis. Symptoms resolved over 3 weeks; magnetic resonance angiography 3 months later was normal and remained so after 2 years. We highlight the typical clinical features of RCVS in this case and suggest that the diagnosis should be considered in children with thunderclap headaches or stroke syndromes where headache is a prominent feature, especially if cerebrovascular imaging studies appear to be evolving or discrepant. PMID:23066702

  17. [Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Associated with Cancer Therapy].

    PubMed

    Mitsuya, Koichi; Nakasu, Yoko; Hayashi, Nakamasa; Yasui, Hirofumi; Ikeda, Takashi; Kuji, Shiho; Onozawa, Yusuke; Endo, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome(PRES)is a subacute neurological syndrome typically manifesting with headache, cortical blindness, and seizures. This syndrome is associated with risk factors such as malignant hypertension, eclampsia, and renal failure. Numerous case reports depict its occurrence in cancer patients. The direct causal mechanisms of PRES in cancer patients have not yet been identified. Cytotoxic chemotherapy may cause direct endothelial damage, which would impact the blood brain barrier. Angiogenesis inhibitors also cause elevation in blood pressure;this is significant, because PRES onset may be solely related to hypertension. An increased number of case reports involving new molecular targeted agent suggests that incidence of PRES as an oncological emergency may increase in the future. PMID:26965062

  18. Parainfluenza virus infection associated with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a clinical and radiological entity. The most accepted theory of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a loss of autoregulation in cerebral blood flow with a subsequent increase in vascular permeability and leakage of blood plasma and erythrocytes, producing vasogenic edema. In infection-associated posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, a clinical pattern consistent with systemic inflammatory response syndrome develops. Parainfluenza virus has not been reported in the medical literature to be associated with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Case presentation We report herein the case of a 54-year-old Caucasian woman with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome associated with parainfluenza virus infection who presented with generalized headache, blurring of vision, new-onset seizure and flu-like symptoms. Conclusion Infection-associated posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome as well as hypertension-associated posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome favor the contribution of endothelial dysfunction to the pathophysiology of this clinicoradiological syndrome. In view of the reversible nature of this clinical entity, it is important that all physicians are well aware of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in patients presenting with headache and seizure activity. A detailed clinical assessment leading to the recognition of precipitant factors in posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is paramount. PMID:22448715

  19. Delayed reversible posterior encephalopathy syndrome following chemotherapy with oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Sharief, Ubaidullah; Perry, David J

    2009-07-01

    Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy (RPLS), also known as posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, is characterized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of reversible vasogenic subcortical edema without infarction. The clinical presentation is usually nonspecific and typically involves global encephalopathy, seizures, headache, or visual symptoms. MRI of the brain is essential to the diagnosis of RPLS. Typical findings of RPLS include high-intensity signal on T2-weighted images predominantly in the posterior lobes of the brain that is caused by subcortical white matter vasogenic edema. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences on MRI improve sensitivity and detect subtle peripheral lesions. This clinical radiographic syndrome has been described in a number of medical conditions, with hypertensive encephalopathy, eclampsia, and the use of immunosuppressant drugs (most notably calcineurin inhibitors) being the most common. It has occasionally been reported with cisplatin and rarely with carboplatin. Its occurrence with oxaliplatin is very unusual. An extensive literature search including PUBMED and direct contact with the drug manufacturer yielded only 2 known case reports. Herein, we describe a case that had classic clinical and radiologic features of RPLS. We also briefly describe 2 other patients who have been described to have RPLS with oxaliplatin in the literature. PMID:19632931

  20. Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome Without Typical Thunderclap Headache.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Valérie; Ducros, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by severe headache and diffuse segmental intracranial arterial constriction that resolve within three months. Stroke, which is the major complication of RCVS, can result in persistent neurological disability, and rarely causes death. Diagnosis of RCVS early in the clinical course might improve outcomes. Although recurrent thunderclap headache is the clinical hallmark of RCVS, the absence of such a pattern should not lead to discard the diagnosis. Our literature review shows that RCVS can also manifest as an unspecific headache, such as a single severe headache episode, a mild or a progressive headache. Moreover, a subset of patients with severe RCVS presents without any headache, but frequently with seizures, focal neurological deficits, confusion or coma, in the setting of stroke or posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. These patients may be aphasic or in comatose state, explaining their inability to give their own medical history. They may have forgotten the headache they had a few days before more dramatic symptoms, or may have a variant of the classical RCVS. By consequence, an RCVS should be suspected in patients with any unusual headache, whether thunderclap or not, and in patients with cryptogenic stroke or convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage, whether the patient also has headache or not. Diagnosis in such cases relies on the demonstration of reversible multifocal intracranial arterial stenosis and the exclusion of other causes. PMID:27016378

  1. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome: an under-recognized clinical emergency

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Pin; Fuh, Jong-Ling; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2010-01-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by recurrent thunderclap headaches and reversible cerebral vasoconstrictions. RCVS is more common than previously thought and should be differentiated from aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage. RCVS can be spontaneous or evoked by pregnancy or exposure to vasoactive substances. Patients tend to be middle-aged women but pediatric patients have been seen. Up to 80% of sufferers have identifiable triggers. Thunderclap headaches tend to recur daily and last for a period of around 2 weeks, while the vasoconstrictions may last for months. About one-third of patients have blood pressure surges accompanying headache attacks. The potential complications of RCVS include posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, ischemic strokes over watershed zones, cortical subarachnoid hemorrhage and intracerebral hemorrhage. Magnetic resonance images including angiography and venography and lumbar punctures are the studies of choice, whereas catheter angiography should not be implemented routinely. Patients with a mean flow velocity of the middle cerebral artery greater than 120 cm/s shown by transcranial color-coded sonography have a greater risk of ischemic complications than those without. The pathophysiology of RCVS remains unknown; sympathetic hyperactivity may play a role. Open-label trials showed calcium channel blockers, such as nimodipine may be an effective treatment in prevention of thunderclap headache attacks. In severe cases, intra-arterial therapy may be considered. Most patients with RCVS recover without sequelae; however, relapse has been reported in a small proportion of patients. PMID:21179608

  2. [Research advances of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in children].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Qin, Jiong

    2016-08-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-neuroradiological entity affecting the posterior brain, i.e. occipital and parietal lobes. The syndrome are characterized by headaches, altered mental status, seizures, and visual disturbances. Although the pathogenesis remains unclear, endothelial dysfunction may be a key factor. The basic disease may play a crucial role in the incidence of PRES. In most cases, PRES resolves spontaneously and patients show both clinical and radiological improvements. In severe forms, PRES might cause substantial morbidity with sequel and even mortality, as a result of acute hemorrhage or massive posterior fossa edema causing obstructive hydrocephalus or brainstem compression. Early identification, active and appropriate treatment is very important. PMID:27530801

  3. Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome Presenting With Visual Field Defects.

    PubMed

    Raven, Meisha L; Ringeisen, Alexander L; McAllister, Angela R; Knoch, Daniel W

    2016-06-01

    A 45-year-old woman with a history of depression and anxiety, treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), experienced acute, recurrent, and severe bifrontal headaches. Over time, she developed a left homonymous hemianopia and mental status changes. MRA revealed segmental vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries in multiple vascular distributions. She was treated with a calcium-channel blocker and magnesium, and there was resolution of her symptoms and cerebrovascular changes. Her clinical course and neuroimaging findings were consistent with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. Although rare, this disorder frequently manifests with visual complaints. Although the prognosis is generally favorable, patients with this syndrome require prompt diagnosis and care directed to avoid complications including stroke, seizure, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:26807800

  4. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome with neurological sequelae - a case report.

    PubMed

    Nesteruk, Marta; Kurdyła, Anna; Nesteruk, Tomasz; Dorobek, Małgorzata

    2016-04-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a set of neurological symptoms including impaired consciousness, cognitive disorders, seizures, blurred vision, dizziness and headache. The symptoms are closely related to the location of pathological changes in the brain; bilateral occipitto-parietal region is most often affected. Both focal neurological symptoms and encephalopathy are usually transient. We present the case of 64-year-old woman with PRES. She suffered from many internal diseases and was admitted to the hospital due to impaired consciousness, speech disorders, balance disorders. Significant neurological deterioration was observed within several days from the onset. Differential diagnosis included stroke and viral neuroinfection (cytosis 23 cells /ul, protein level of 93 mg/dl); magnetic resonance examination revealed lesions typical for posterior reversible encephalopathy.After 6 weeks of hospitalization patient condition improved, but did not restore to the premorbid state. The patient was discharged with generalized cognitive impairment. PMID:27137827

  5. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome following Rituximab Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wardrope, Katrina E; Manson, Lynn; Metcalfe, Wendy; Sullivan, Eoin D O

    2016-01-01

    The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab is associated with rare but significant adverse events, notably posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We report a case of concomitant ARDS and PRES developing after rituximab therapy for treatment of cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis. There are 7 reported cases of PRES complicating rituximab use. PRES onset varied from immediate to 21 days after administration. All patients recovered completely, and rituximab was reintroduced in half of the cases. The occurrence of ARDS in association with rituximab is rarer. Only 3 confirmed cases exist, and ARDS may occur as a delayed reaction. PMID:27275457

  6. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome following Rituximab Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wardrope, Katrina E.; Manson, Lynn; Metcalfe, Wendy; Sullivan, Eoin D. O

    2016-01-01

    The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab is associated with rare but significant adverse events, notably posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We report a case of concomitant ARDS and PRES developing after rituximab therapy for treatment of cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis. There are 7 reported cases of PRES complicating rituximab use. PRES onset varied from immediate to 21 days after administration. All patients recovered completely, and rituximab was reintroduced in half of the cases. The occurrence of ARDS in association with rituximab is rarer. Only 3 confirmed cases exist, and ARDS may occur as a delayed reaction.

  7. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in patient of severe preeclampsia with Hellp syndrome immediate postpartum

    PubMed Central

    Babahabib, Moulay Abdellah; Abdillahi, Ibrahima; Kassidi, Farid; Kouach, Jaouad; Moussaoui, Driss; Dehayni, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a rare clinico-neuroradiologic condition, not commonly reported in the literature. PRES is an uncommon complication of severe preeclampsia/eclampsia. We report the management of one patient with postpartum preeclampsia as an association of HELLP syndrome presenting with status-epileptics. Early diagnosis along with timely supportive therapy resulted in the successful management of this challenging case. Recent understanding on the pathophysiology of this uncommon condition is discussed. We highlight the importance to obstetricians, intensive-care physicians and anesthesiologists of recognizing such cases. PMID:26405496

  8. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in patient of severe preeclampsia with Hellp syndrome immediate postpartum.

    PubMed

    Babahabib, Moulay Abdellah; Abdillahi, Ibrahima; Kassidi, Farid; Kouach, Jaouad; Moussaoui, Driss; Dehayni, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a rare clinico-neuroradiologic condition, not commonly reported in the literature. PRES is an uncommon complication of severe preeclampsia/eclampsia. We report the management of one patient with postpartum preeclampsia as an association of HELLP syndrome presenting with status-epileptics. Early diagnosis along with timely supportive therapy resulted in the successful management of this challenging case. Recent understanding on the pathophysiology of this uncommon condition is discussed. We highlight the importance to obstetricians, intensive-care physicians and anesthesiologists of recognizing such cases. PMID:26405496

  9. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome with Bilateral Independent Epileptic Foci Precipitated By Guillain-Barrè Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Rosario; Saddi, Maria Valeria; Mela, Alessandro; Ticca, Anna

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 56-year-old woman who developed status epilepticus (SE) related to independent occipital foci as clinical manifestation of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) in the background of Guillain-Barrè syndrome (GBS). SE resulted from a series of focal seizures clinically characterized by left- and rightward deviations of the head and consequent oculoclonic movements. Electroencephalography recorded independent seizure activity in both occipital regions with alternate involvement of the two cerebral hemispheres. The epileptic foci corresponded topographically to parenchymal abnormalities of PRES in the occipital lobes. The manifestation of bilateral, independent occipital seizures with alternate deviations of the head and oculoclonic movements, previously not reported in patients with PRES, highlights the acute epileptogenicity of the cerebral lesions in this syndrome. Despite the variable clinical expression of seizures due to occipital damage in PRES, the development of independent seizure activity in both occipital lobes might represent a distinctive epileptic phenomenon of this encephalopathy. PMID:27403359

  10. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome with Bilateral Independent Epileptic Foci Precipitated By Guillain-Barrè Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Rosario; Saddi, Maria Valeria; Mela, Alessandro; Ticca, Anna

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 56-year-old woman who developed status epilepticus (SE) related to independent occipital foci as clinical manifestation of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) in the background of Guillain-Barrè syndrome (GBS). SE resulted from a series of focal seizures clinically characterized by left- and rightward deviations of the head and consequent oculoclonic movements. Electroencephalography recorded independent seizure activity in both occipital regions with alternate involvement of the two cerebral hemispheres. The epileptic foci corresponded topographically to parenchymal abnormalities of PRES in the occipital lobes. The manifestation of bilateral, independent occipital seizures with alternate deviations of the head and oculoclonic movements, previously not reported in patients with PRES, highlights the acute epileptogenicity of the cerebral lesions in this syndrome. Despite the variable clinical expression of seizures due to occipital damage in PRES, the development of independent seizure activity in both occipital lobes might represent a distinctive epileptic phenomenon of this encephalopathy. PMID:27403359

  11. Reversibility of hepatopulmonary syndrome evidenced by serial pulmonary perfusion scan.

    PubMed

    Shijo, H; Sasaki, H; Sakata, H; Kusuhara, H; Ueki, T; Okumura, M

    1993-02-01

    A patient with liver cirrhosis who exhibited marked hypoxemia is presented. An abnormal dilatation of intrapulmonary capillaries was evidenced by perfusion lung scan, contrast-enhanced echocardiography, and histological examinations of lungs. Serial perfusion lung scan disclosed that the radioisotope uptake by extrapulmonary organs was significantly increased and uptake by both lungs was significantly decreased during the state of severer hypoxemia. Shunt quantification method revealed that intrapulmonary right-to-left shunt ratio also paralleled the extent of hypoxemia. The pathophysiology of hepatopulmonary syndrome appeared to involve a reversible intrapulmonary vascular dilatation. The perfusion lung scan could semiquantitate the severity of intrapulmonary vascular dilatation and could offer the efficient method to follow their progress. PMID:8440418

  12. Magnesium for Treatment of Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mijalski, Christina; Dakay, Katarina; Miller-Patterson, Cameron; Saad, Ali; Silver, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We describe 2 cases of reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) with refractory headache aborted by intravenous magnesium. Case 1 is a 53-year-old woman with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to RCVS presented with refractory headache and persistent vasospasm, despite aggressive treatment with calcium channel blockers (CCBs) and systemic corticosteroids. Subsequently, she experienced dramatic relief of symptoms with intravenous magnesium therapy. She continued oral maintenance therapy and remained symptom free. Case 2 is a 71-year-old female with bilateral temporo-occipital infarcts due to RCVS, presented with refractory headache and persistent vasospasm on transcranial Doppler (TCD), despite aggressive treatment with CCBs. She experienced dramatic relief of symptoms with intravenous magnesium and resolution of vasospasm on TCD. Magnesium may be beneficial for the treatment of refractory headaches in patients with RCVS. Future studies are needed to determine whether it should be considered as a first-line agent. PMID:27366294

  13. The posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Nightingale, Sam; Wood, Chris; Ainsworth, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is often associated with hypertension, however recent advances in the understanding of this condition have shown that endothelial dysfunction is responsible for much of the pathogenesis and the condition can occur in the absence of hypertension. This case describes a 32-year-old lady with untreated HIV infection who developed PRES at a normal blood pressure and without opportunistic infection or other conditions known to precipitate PRES. HIV, particularly when untreated, is associated with endothelial dysfunction and this may have been sufficient to cause PRES in this patient. To our knowledge this is the first case to describe PRES in HIV without uncontrolled hypertension, sepsis or other precipitating cause. PMID:22736775

  14. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) After Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Tara; Al-Sharief, Khalid; Sethi, Vineeta; Ranger, Gurpreet S.

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is an unusual condition typified by acute visual impairment caused by sudden, marked parieto-occipital vasogenic edema. Thought to be inflammatory in origin, it has been described in patients undergoing chemotherapy, with autoimmune disease, and in some infections. We report a case of PRES that occurred one week after an episode of acute pancreatitis in an otherwise healthy 40-year-old female. There was progressive visual impairment over a 24-hour period with almost complete visual loss, with characteristic findings on magnetic resonance imaging. After treatment with steroids, the visual loss recovered. Clinicians should retain an index of suspicion of this rare condition in patients with visual impairment after acute pancreatitis. PMID:26759673

  15. Primary brain tumors and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya-Matsuoka, Carlos; Cachia, David; Olar, Adriana; Armstrong, Terri S.; Gilbert, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a neurotoxic encephalopathic state associated with reversible cerebral vasogenic edema. It is an increasingly recognized occurrence in the oncology population. However, it is very uncommon in patients with primary brain tumors (PBTs). The aim of this study was to analyze the clinicoradiological features and report the clinical outcomes of PRES in PBT patients. Methods We identified 4 cases with PBT who developed PRES at MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) between 2012 and 2014. Clinical and radiological data were abstracted from their records. In addition, we also solicited 8 cases from the literature. Results The median age at PRES onset was 19 years, male-to-female ratio was 1:1, and the syndrome occurred in patients with ependymoma (n = 4), glioblastoma (n = 3), diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG; n = 3), juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (n = 1), and atypical meningioma (n = 1). Two glioblastomas and 2 DIPG cases received bevacizumab and vandetanib before the onset of symptoms, respectively. The most common clinical presentation was seizures (n = 7). Three MDACC patients recovered completely in 3–4 weeks after the onset of symptoms. One patient died due to active cancer and several comorbidities including PRES. Conclusions Hypertension seems to be the most important coexisting risk factor for development of PRES; however, the potential effects of chemotherapeutic agents in the pathogenesis of PRES should also be examined. The clinicoradiological course of PRES in PBT patients did not vary from the classical descriptions of PRES found in other causes. PRES must be considered as part of the differential diagnosis in patients with PBTs presenting with seizures or acute encephalopathy. PMID:26034631

  16. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: another manifestation of CNS SLE?

    PubMed

    Ishimori, M L; Pressman, B D; Wallace, D J; Weisman, M H

    2007-01-01

    A variety of neuropsychiatric findings may complicate systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and pose diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas. We describe the clinical and radiographic features of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and distinguish PRES from other conditions seen in SLE. Patient charts and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of four patients with SLE on immunosuppressive therapy with acute or subacute neurologic changes initially suggesting cerebritis or stroke were reviewed. The English language literature was reviewed using the Medline databases from 1996-2006 for other reports of PRES with SLE. Literature review yielded 26 other SLE cases reported with PRES. SLE patients with PRES were more commonly on immunosuppressive drugs, had episodes of relative hypertension, and had renal involvement. Characteristic findings are seen on MRI, which differentiate PRES from other CNS complications of SLE. Clinical and radiographic resolution of abnormalities within 1-4 weeks is typically seen. PRES has been increasingly recognized. Reversible changes are found on brain MRI accompanied by sometimes dramatic signs and symptoms. The therapeutic implications for separating PRES from stroke or cerebritis are important. We propose that PRES should be considered in the differential diagnosis in SLE patients with new-onset neurologic signs and symptoms. PMID:17664235

  17. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in leukemic children: a sensitive issue.

    PubMed

    Kridis, Wala Ben; Mdhaffer, Moez; Hentati, Yosr; Kammoun, Fatma; Milad, Abir; Haddar, Sondes; Mahfoudh, Khaireddine Ben; Triki, Chahinez; Elloumi, Moez

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is an acute central nervous system disorder characterized by reversible brain vasogenic edema. We report here a new case of a nine-year-old boy with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) who developed PRES secondary to induction chemotherapy including dexamethasone (dexamethasone®), vincristine (oncovin(®)), daunorubicin (adriblastine(®)) and intrathecal injection. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed high signal intensity on T2 at cortical and sub cortical region of parieto-frontal and parieto-occipital lobes. The patient was put under sodium valproate (depakine(®)) and we decided to continue dexamethasone (dexamethasone(®)) and daunorubicin (adriblastine(®)) injection. The MRI, after four weeks, was normal. So, we resumed vincristine (oncovin(®)) and we started L-asparaginase injections. Then, the outcome was favorable. The treatment of PRES is based on the withdrawal of the triggering factor to avoid the risk of irreversible lesions. But, due to the severity of leukemia the discontinuation of chemotherapy is difficult because of the risk of disease progression. PMID:24919742

  18. Transient Global Amnesia with Reversible White Matter Lesions: A Variant of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome?

    PubMed

    Nakamizo, Tomoki; Tsuzuki, Ippei; Koide, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a self-limited disease characterized by isolated amnesia, which resolves within 24 h. In contrast, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a potentially life-threatening disease that usually presents with seizures, altered mental status, headache, and visual disturbances. It is characterized by reversible vasogenic edema that predominantly involves the parieto-occipital subcortical white matter as shown by neuroimaging studies. To date, there have been no reported cases of PRES with a clinical course resembling TGA. Here we report the case of a 58-year-old woman who presented with isolated amnesia and headache. On admission, her blood pressure was 187/100 mmHg. She had complete anterograde amnesia and slight retrograde amnesia without other neurological findings. After the treatment of her hypertension, the amnesia resolved within 24 h. Although the initial magnetic resonance image (MRI) was almost normal, the fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) images of the MRI on the next day revealed several small foci of high intensity areas in the fronto-parieto-occipital subcortical white matter, presumed to be vasogenic edema in PRES. The lesions disappeared one month later. This case suggests that PRES can mimic the clinical course of TGA. PRES should be considered in the differential diagnosis for TGA. PMID:26697246

  19. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Henoch-Schonlein Purpura and Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fidan, Kibriya; Kandur, Yasar; Ucar, Murat; Gucuyener, Kivilcim; Soylemezoglu, Oguz

    2016-07-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-radiological syndrome, composed of symptoms such as headache, seizures, visual disturbances, lethargy, confusion, stupor, focal neurologic findings and radiological findings of bilateral gray and white matter abnormalities suggestive of edema in the posterior regions of the cerebral hemispheres. PRES is associated with significant morbidity and mortality if it is not expeditiously recognized. Magnetic resonance image (MRI) represents the most sensitive imaging technique for recognizing PRES. PRES has been seen in various clinical settings including renal disorders such as acute glomerulonephritis, lupus nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and drug usage such as calcineurin inhibitors. We aimed to present two study cases for such clinical setting. In this report, we present two patients with PRES in whom the primary diagnosis was hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP). Both of them were treated with anticonvulsant and proper antihypertensive drugs. A repeated MRI scan of the head, an ophthalmologic assessment, and a follow-up electroencephalogram produced normal results with no sequelae. Early recognition of PRES as a complication during different diseases and therapies in childhood may facilitate the appropriate treatment, so that intensive treatment should be performed as soon as possible to avoid neurological sequelae. PMID:27298664

  20. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Samuel; Grommes, Christian; Reiner, Anne S.; Rosenblum, Marc K.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is characterized by neurologic symptoms with typical lesions on neuroimaging and may be associated with chemotherapy and immunosuppressive agents used in patients with cancer. We described the spectrum of PRES at a major cancer center. Methods. We reviewed charts of adults with PRES between 2005 and 2011 at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center for clinical information and outcome. Results. We identified 21 women (68%) and 10 men (median cohort age: 58 years). Solid tumors (n = 22, 71%) were more common than hematologic (n = 8) or primary brain malignancies (n = 1). Prior brain irradiation (16%) and central nervous system metastases (10%) were uncommon. There were 55% who received chemotherapy or targeted therapy within the month preceding PRES, including 6 patients who received bevacizumab; PRES followed allogeneic stem cell transplantation in 5 (16%). Presenting symptoms included confusion (71%), seizure (58%), and headache (48%). Maximum systolic and diastolic blood pressures were similar among patients grouped by cancer type, chemotherapy or bevacizumab use, and atypical imaging. Moreover, 37% of patients with both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) had normal CT concurrent with PRES on MRI, and 84% returned to neurologic baseline at a median of 7.5 days (range: 1–167 days) from onset. Successful anticonvulsant taper was achieved in 51%. Chemotherapy rechallenge was attempted in 41% without recurrent PRES. Autopsy revealed nonspecific changes isolated to radiographically affected areas in one of two patients. Conclusion. Recent chemotherapy, particularly bevacizumab, is common in cancer patients with PRES. Clinical and radiographic presentations may vary; MRI appears more sensitive than CT. Anticonvulsant taper and chemotherapy rechallenge is often possible. Implications for Practice: Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is characterized by neurologic symptoms

  1. Clinicoradiological Spectrum of Reversible Splenial Lesion Syndrome (RESLES) in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuo; Ma, Yan; Feng, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The presence of reversible lesions that involve the splenium of the corpus callosum (SCC) has been reported in patients with a broad spectrum of diseases and conditions and is referred to as reversible splenial lesion syndrome (RESLES). To describe the clinicoradiological features and establish a clinical position for this disease, we retrospectively examined the clinicoradiological features of adult RESLES patients, as well as discuss the potential pathophysiological mechanisms of this disease. The clinical and MRI findings of patients who presented with RESLES accompanied by symptoms of neurological disorders were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were classified into 2 subgroups (favorable and poor outcome subgroups), which corresponded to the severity of the disability using the Modified Oxford Handicap Scale. In addition, we compared the clinical and neuroimaging features between the 2 outcome subgroups. Eight patients with RESLES associated with various diseases and conditions were included. The clinical presentation was nonspecific; however, MRI exhibited consistent lesions in the SCC with a hypointensity on apparent diffusion coefficient maps and a hyperintensity via diffusion-weighted imaging, which disappeared after a variable lapse. The number of patients with a severe disturbance of consciousness, extracallosal lesions, or diffuse slow waves in the poor outcome subgroup was significantly increased compared with the favorable outcome subgroup (P < 0.05). Thus, the clinicoradiological spectrum of RESLES could be classified into 2 principal categories according to differential outcomes. RESLES is a rare entity with a broad clinicoradiological spectrum because of the various diseases and conditions. Although the overall symptoms of RESLES patients tend to be alleviated, the prognosis of patients with a severe disturbance of consciousness, extracallosal lesions, or diffuse slow waves is likely unfavorable. PMID:25674746

  2. XY sex reversal and a nonprogressive neurologic disorder: a new syndrome?

    PubMed

    Mahbubul Huq, A H; Nigro, M A

    2000-10-01

    We report a patient with a unique combination of clinical findings: XY sex reversal, spastic paraplegia, mental retardation, dysmorphism, and infantile-onset olivopontocerebellar hypoplasia. The phenotype of our patient did not coincide with any of the described forms of XY reversal syndromes, hereditary or sporadic spastic paraplegias, or congenital or infantile-onset cerebellar or olivopontocerebellar atrophies or hypoplasias. The disorder of this patient likely represents a genetic condition with pleiotropic effects on brain development and sex determination and adds further evidence for the heterogeneity of spastic paraplegia/infantile olivopontocerebellar hypoplasia syndromes and sex reversal syndromes. PMID:11068172

  3. KLK5 Inactivation Reverses Cutaneous Hallmarks of Netherton Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Furio, Laetitia; Pampalakis, Georgios; Michael, Iacovos P; Nagy, Andras; Sotiropoulou, Georgia; Hovnanian, Alain

    2015-09-01

    Netherton Syndrome (NS) is a rare and severe autosomal recessive skin disease which can be life-threatening in infants. The disease is characterized by extensive skin desquamation, inflammation, allergic manifestations and hair shaft defects. NS is caused by loss-of-function mutations in SPINK5 encoding the LEKTI serine protease inhibitor. LEKTI deficiency results in unopposed activities of kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) and aberrantly increased proteolysis in the epidermis. Spink5⁻/⁻ mice recapitulate the NS phenotype, display enhanced epidermal Klk5 and Klk7 protease activities and die within a few hours after birth because of a severe skin barrier defect. However the contribution of these various proteases in the physiopathology remains to be determined. In this study, we developed a new murine model in which Klk5 and Spink5 were both knocked out to assess whether Klk5 deletion is sufficient to reverse the NS phenotype in Spink5⁻/⁻ mice. By repeated intercrossing between Klk5⁻/⁻ mice with Spink5⁻/⁻ mice, we generated Spink5⁻/⁻Klk5⁻/⁻ animals. We showed that Klk5 knock-out in Lekti-deficient newborn mice rescues neonatal lethality, reverses the severe skin barrier defect, restores epidermal structure and prevents skin inflammation. Specifically, using in situ zymography and specific protease substrates, we showed that Klk5 knockout reduced epidermal proteolytic activity, particularly its downstream targets proteases KLK7, KLK14 and ELA2. By immunostaining, western blot, histology and electron microscopy analyses, we provide evidence that desmosomes and corneodesmosomes remain intact and that epidermal differentiation is restored in Spink5⁻/⁻Klk5⁻/⁻. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses and immunostainings revealed absence of inflammation and allergy in Spink5⁻/⁻Klk5⁻/⁻ skin. Notably, Il-1β, Il17A and Tslp levels were normalized. Our results provide in vivo evidence that KLK5 knockout is sufficient to reverse NS-like symptoms

  4. KLK5 Inactivation Reverses Cutaneous Hallmarks of Netherton Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Iacovos P.; Nagy, Andras; Sotiropoulou, Georgia; Hovnanian, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Netherton Syndrome (NS) is a rare and severe autosomal recessive skin disease which can be life-threatening in infants. The disease is characterized by extensive skin desquamation, inflammation, allergic manifestations and hair shaft defects. NS is caused by loss-of-function mutations in SPINK5 encoding the LEKTI serine protease inhibitor. LEKTI deficiency results in unopposed activities of kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) and aberrantly increased proteolysis in the epidermis. Spink5-/- mice recapitulate the NS phenotype, display enhanced epidermal Klk5 and Klk7 protease activities and die within a few hours after birth because of a severe skin barrier defect. However the contribution of these various proteases in the physiopathology remains to be determined. In this study, we developed a new murine model in which Klk5 and Spink5 were both knocked out to assess whether Klk5 deletion is sufficient to reverse the NS phenotype in Spink5-/- mice. By repeated intercrossing between Klk5-/- mice with Spink5-/- mice, we generated Spink5-/-Klk5-/- animals. We showed that Klk5 knock-out in Lekti-deficient newborn mice rescues neonatal lethality, reverses the severe skin barrier defect, restores epidermal structure and prevents skin inflammation. Specifically, using in situ zymography and specific protease substrates, we showed that Klk5 knockout reduced epidermal proteolytic activity, particularly its downstream targets proteases KLK7, KLK14 and ELA2. By immunostaining, western blot, histology and electron microscopy analyses, we provide evidence that desmosomes and corneodesmosomes remain intact and that epidermal differentiation is restored in Spink5-/-Klk5-/-. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses and immunostainings revealed absence of inflammation and allergy in Spink5-/-Klk5-/- skin. Notably, Il-1β, Il17A and Tslp levels were normalized. Our results provide in vivo evidence that KLK5 knockout is sufficient to reverse NS-like symptoms manifested in Spink5-/- skin. These

  5. Reverse Genetics System for Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Benjamin; Li, Ping; Zhang, Shuo; Li, Aqian; Liang, Mifang; Li, Dexin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) is an emerging tick-borne pathogen that was first reported in China in 2009. Phylogenetic analysis of the viral genome showed that SFTS virus represents a new lineage within the Phlebovirus genus, distinct from the existing sandfly fever and Uukuniemi virus groups, in the family Bunyaviridae. SFTS disease is characterized by gastrointestinal symptoms, chills, joint pain, myalgia, thrombocytopenia, leukocytopenia, and some hemorrhagic manifestations with a case fatality rate of about 2 to 15%. Here we report the development of reverse genetics systems to study STFSV replication and pathogenesis. We developed and optimized functional T7 polymerase-based M- and S-segment minigenome assays, which revealed errors in the published terminal sequences of the S segment of the Hubei 29 strain of SFTSV. We then generated recombinant viruses from cloned cDNAs prepared to the antigenomic RNAs both of the minimally passaged virus (HB29) and of a cell culture-adapted strain designated HB29pp. The growth properties, pattern of viral protein synthesis, and subcellular localization of viral N and NSs proteins of wild-type HB29pp (wtHB29pp) and recombinant HB29pp viruses were indistinguishable. We also show that the viruses fail to shut off host cell polypeptide production. The robust reverse genetics system described will be a valuable tool for the design of therapeutics and the development of killed and attenuated vaccines against this important emerging pathogen. IMPORTANCE SFTSV and related tick-borne phleboviruses such as Heartland virus are emerging viruses shown to cause severe disease in humans in the Far East and the United States, respectively. Study of these novel pathogens would be facilitated by technology to manipulate these viruses in a laboratory setting using reverse genetics. Here, we report the generation of infectious SFTSV from cDNA clones and demonstrate that the behavior of recombinant viruses

  6. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and hypomagnesemia: A frequent association?

    PubMed

    Chardain, A; Mesnage, V; Alamowitch, S; Bourdain, F; Crozier, S; Lenglet, T; Psimaras, D; Demeret, S; Graveleau, P; Hoang-Xuan, K; Levy, R

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a serious neurological condition encountered in various medical fields. Pathophysiological factor(s) common to PRES cases of apparently unrelated etiologies are yet to be found. Based on the hypothesis that hypomagnesemia might participate in the cascade leading to PRES, our study sought to verify whether hypomagnesemia is frequently associated with PRES regardless of etiology. From a retrospective study of a cohort of 57 patients presenting with PRES of different etiologies, presented here are the findings of 19 patients with available serum magnesium levels (SMLs) during PRES. In the acute phase of PRES, hypomagnesemia was present in all 19 patients in spite of differences in etiology (including immunosuppressive drugs, hypertensive encephalopathy, eclampsia, systemic lupus erythematosus, iatrogenic etiology and unknown). SMLs were within normal ranges prior to PRES and below normal ranges during the first 48h of PRES, with a significant decrease in SMLs during the acute phase. In this retrospective study, constant hypomagnesemia was observed during the acute phase of PRES regardless of its etiology. These results now require larger studies to assess the particular importance of acute hypomagnesemia in PRES and especially the possible need to treat PRES with magnesium sulfate. PMID:27371132

  7. THE DIAGNOSTIC AND MANAGEMENT CHALLENGES FOR POSTERIOR REVERSIBLE LEUCOENCEPHALOPATHY SYNDROME.

    PubMed

    Çoban, Eda Kiliç; Gez, Sedat; Kara, Batuhan; Soysal, Aysun

    2015-11-30

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiological entity characterized by epileptic seizures, headaches, altered mental status and focal neurological signs. Hypertension is the second most common condition associated with PRES. The 50-year-old-male patient with, right-sided hemiparesis and speech disturbances admitted to our clinic. His blood pressure at the emergency service was 220/140 mmHg. A left putaminal hematoma was seen in his CT and MRI. In his brain MRI, FLAIR and T2 -weighted sequences showed bilateral symmetric diffuse hyperintensities in the brain stem, basal ganglia, and occipital, parietal, frontal, and temporal lobes. After the intense antihypertensive drug treatment, his blood pressure came to normal limits within a week. During his hospitalisation he had a recurrent speech disturbance lasting an hour. His electroencephalography was normal. In his repeated diffusion weighted MRI, an acute lacunary infarct was seen on right centrum semiovale. Two months later, the control MRI showed only the previous lacuner infarcts and the chronic putaminal hematoma. We presented a case developping either a cerebral hemorrhage or a lacunar infarction due to PRES. The main reason of the following complications of the disease was delayed diagnosis. Uncontrolled hypertension was guilted for the events. PMID:26821517

  8. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Occurring After Uterine Artery Embolization for Uterine Myoma

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Satoshi Tanigawa, Noboru; Kariya, Syuji; Komemushi, Atsushi; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Tokuda, Takanori; Kishimoto, Masanobu; Tomino, Atsutoshi; Fujioka, Masayuki; Kitazawa, Yasuhide; Sawada, Satoshi

    2011-02-15

    This case report describes posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) occurring after uterine artery embolization (UAE) for uterine myoma. This is the first report of PRES occurring after uterine vascular radiologic intervention. The mechanism by which UAE induced PRES is unclear.

  9. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a child with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Jianhua; Chen, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a rare and serious syndrome of central nervous system that can develop in both adults and children. It is characterized by acute onset of headache, confusion, seizures or focal neurological deficits along with radiological findings of white matter abnormalities in the parietal and occipital lobes. In the past ten years, this syndrome has been described mainly in adults, rare in children. Here, we report a case of PRES presenting in a 12-year-old girl with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome. Her neurological symptom was rapidly recovered after control of hypertension without discontinuation of cyclosporine A. PMID:25120830

  10. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a child with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Jianhua; Chen, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a rare and serious syndrome of central nervous system that can develop in both adults and children. It is characterized by acute onset of headache, confusion, seizures or focal neurological deficits along with radiological findings of white matter abnormalities in the parietal and occipital lobes. In the past ten years, this syndrome has been described mainly in adults, rare in children. Here, we report a case of PRES presenting in a 12-year-old girl with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome. Her neurological symptom was rapidly recovered after control of hypertension without discontinuation of cyclosporine A. PMID:25120830

  11. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES): electroencephalographic findings and seizure patterns.

    PubMed

    Kastrup, Oliver; Gerwig, Markus; Frings, Markus; Diener, Hans-Christoph

    2012-07-01

    To better describe seizure type, frequency, and electroencephalographic (EEG) findings in posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and correlate these data with clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, we retrospectively assessed medical charts and EEG studies of patients with PRES treated between 2004 and 2011. Data collected included patients' underlying pathology, lesion distribution by MRI, seizure type and frequency, EEG pathologic background activity, focal pathology, and epileptogenic activity. Thirty-eight of 49 adults with PRES suffered from seizures; 17 underwent EEG and were included in the analysis. Perpetuating factors were similar to those reported in the literature. In 15 of 17 patients, MRI showed widespread involvement rather than purely occipital lesions. Nine patients had subcortical and cortical involvement. Seizures were single short grand mal (GM) in 11, serial GM in 2, recurrent GM in 2, and additional focal seizures in 2. No seizures were noted beyond the first day. After discontinuation of antiepileptic medication, no patients experienced seizure recurrence during 6-month follow-up. EEG showed diffuse theta/delta slowing in 13 patients and epileptogenic activity with focal sharp-wave and periodic lateralizing epileptiform discharges in 2 patients. Seizures in PRES are most commonly single GM and are usually of limited duration. EEG shows variable theta/delta slowing. Focal EEG pathology is seen in patients with focal seizures. Seizures occur early after disease onset and terminate spontaneously or under therapy during the first 24 h. Seizure recurrence beyond 24 h and chronic epilepsy were not seen. Seizures in PRES are frequent but appear to be uncomplicated and do not herald worse prognosis. EEG is helpful in evaluating the degree of encephalopathy and monitoring epileptic activity. Long-term antiepileptic medication does not appear to be warranted. PMID:22189837

  12. Normalization of reverse redistribution of thallium-201 with procainamide pretreatment in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Nii, T.; Nakashima, Y.; Nomoto, J.; Hiroki, T.; Ohshima, F.; Arakawa, K. )

    1991-03-01

    Stress thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging was performed in a patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Reverse redistribution phenomenon was observed in the absence of coronary artery disease. This seems to be the first report of normalization of this phenomenon in association with reversion of accessory pathway to normal atrioventricular conduction after pretreatment with procainamide.

  13. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) as a complication of Guillain-Barre' syndrome (GBS).

    PubMed

    Nabi, Sumaira; Rajput, Haris Majid; Badshah, Mazhar; Ahmed, Shahzad

    2016-01-01

    A 17-year-old Pakistani female patient presented with acute onset flaccid quadriparesis with nerve conduction studies showing demyelinating polyneuropathy consistent with Guillain-Barre' syndrome. She was treated with 4 plasmapheresis sessions. She developed raised blood pressure, headache, visual loss and generalised seizures on the 13th day of admission. MRI of the brain on contrast showed findings of altered signals low on T1-weighted image, high on T2-weighted image and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery in the white matter of bilateral occipital, parietal and right frontal lobe consistent with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. The patient was administered antiepileptic and antihypertensive drugs to control seizures and blood pressure. She was discharged in a stable state. On follow-up her visual loss had recovered completely and she had regained full motor strength in all four extremities after 6 weeks. Fresh MRI of the brain revealed complete resolution of lesions. Antihypertensive and antiepileptic medication was discontinued. She is independent in all her daily activities. PMID:27489061

  14. Reduced circulating endothelial progenitor cells in reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The pathophysiology of reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) remains elusive. Endothelial dysfunction might play a role, but direct evidence is lacking. This study aimed to explore whether patients with RCVS have a reduced level of circulating circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) to repair the dysfunctional endothelial vasomotor control. Methods We prospectively recruited 24 patients with RCVS within one month of disease onset and 24 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. Flow cytometry was used to quantify the numbers of circulating EPCs, defined as KDR+CD133+, CD34+CD133+, and CD34+KDR+ double-positive mononuclear cells. The Lindegaard index, an index of vasoconstriction, was calculated by measuring the mean flow velocity of middle cerebral arteries and distal extracranial internal carotid arteries via color-coded sonography on the same day as blood drawing. A Lindegaard index of 2 was chosen as the cutoff value for significant vasoconstriction of middle cerebral arteries based on our previous study. Results Patients with RCVS had a reduced number of CD34+KDR+ cells (0.009 ± 0.006% vs. 0.014 ± 0.010%, p = 0.031) but not KDR+CD133+ cells or CD34+CD133+ EPCs, in comparison with controls. The number of CD34+KDR+ cells was inversely correlated with the Lindegaard index (rs = -0.418, p = 0.047). Of note, compared to controls, patients with a Lindegaard index > 2 (n = 13) had a reduced number of CD34+KDR+ cells (0.007 ± 0.005% vs. 0.014 ± 0.010%, p = 0.010), but those with a Lindegaard index ≤ 2 did not. Conclusions Patients with RCVS had reduced circulating CD34+KDR+ EPCs, which were correlated with the severity of vasoconstriction. Endothelial dysfunction might contribute to the pathogenesis of RCVS. PMID:25466718

  15. Pupil-sparing third nerve palsies and hemiataxia: Claude's and reverse Claude's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bateman, James R; Murty, Pavan; Forbes, Michael; Collier, Kisha Young; Tememe, Danoushka; Marchena, Octavio de; Powers, William J

    2016-06-01

    We report two patients with midbrain infarction with pupil-sparing third nerve palsies and hemiataxia: one with contralateral ataxia (Claude's syndrome) and one with ipsilateral ataxia (which we refer to as reverse Claude's syndrome). We highlight the importance of a thorough neurologic evaluation with partial oculomotor palsies and describe, to our knowledge, the fourth account in the literature of a pupil-sparing third nerve palsy with ipsilateral cerebellar ataxia. PMID:26883351

  16. Blood transfusion in sickle cell disease leading to posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES).

    PubMed

    Raj, Shashi; Killinger, James; Overby, Philip

    2013-10-01

    Children with sickle cell disease have a very high risk of lifelong neurologic morbidity and mortality. Cerebrovascular accidents are a known complication in children with sickle cell disease. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a constellation of acute neurologic findings increasingly recognized in pediatric critical care population with evidence of vasogenic edema on brain imaging possibly due to cerebral vascular endothelial cell dysfunction. This report, for the first time, describes a young adult with sickle cell disease who developed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome following blood transfusion. PMID:22899796

  17. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome following sepsis in a Crohn’s disease patient: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Papaconstantinou, Ioannis; Mantzos, Dionysios S; Pantiora, Eirini; Tasoulis, Marios K; Vassilopoulou, Sofia; Mantzaris, Gerassimos

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-ragiological syndrome presenting with neurological symptoms and characteristic radiologic findings. PRES occurs in the setting of various clinical conditions and requires prompt management of the causative factor for a full recovery. This is a case report of a Crohn’s disease patient who developed PRES syndrome during a complicated post-operative course. In the presence of multiple causative factors, sepsis was considered as the predominant one. After prompt management, the patient recovered with no permanent neurological damage. PMID:27099860

  18. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome following sepsis in a Crohn's disease patient: A case report.

    PubMed

    Papaconstantinou, Ioannis; Mantzos, Dionysios S; Pantiora, Eirini; Tasoulis, Marios K; Vassilopoulou, Sofia; Mantzaris, Gerassimos

    2016-04-16

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-ragiological syndrome presenting with neurological symptoms and characteristic radiologic findings. PRES occurs in the setting of various clinical conditions and requires prompt management of the causative factor for a full recovery. This is a case report of a Crohn's disease patient who developed PRES syndrome during a complicated post-operative course. In the presence of multiple causative factors, sepsis was considered as the predominant one. After prompt management, the patient recovered with no permanent neurological damage. PMID:27099860

  19. Primary and Reversible Pisa Syndrome in Juvenile Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E.; Pradilla, Gustavo; del Rosario Zambrano, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Objective To report a case of Pisa syndrome in a patient with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus, who had never been exposed to psychotropic medications. Methods A 26 years-old, Colombian, male patient, was referred because he had cognitive abnormalities, gait disturbances and urinary incontinence. This patient also displayed pleurothotonos. Neurofunctional evaluation of sensory and motor integration at peripheral and central nervous system levels were done. Results Pisa syndrome disappeared after spinal tap drainage with further gait, balance and behavioral improvement. A brainstem-thalamocortical deregulation of the central sensory and motor programming, due to the chaotic enlargement of brain ventricles was thought to be the pathophysiological mechanism underlying this case. Conclusion NPH must not be longer considered as an exclusive geriatric disorder. Further, uncommon movement disorders may appear with this disorder, which should be carefully approached to avoid iatrogenic and deleterious pharmacological interventions. PMID:23794788

  20. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome with spinal cord involvement (PRES-SCI): A case report.

    PubMed

    Khokhar, Harsh Vardhan; Choudhary, Pradeep; Saxena, Sangeeta; Arif, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome with spinal cord involvement (PRES-SCI) is a recently described entity with a handful of cases reported in literature. We describe a case of PRES in setting of Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) with involvement of brain stem and spinal cord. PMID:27011648

  1. Stimulus-Reward Association and Reversal Learning in Individuals with Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zalla, Tiziana; Sav, Anca-Maria; Leboyer, Marion

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, performance of a group of adults with Asperger Syndrome (AS) on two series of object reversal and extinction was compared with that of a group of adults with typical development. Participants were requested to learn a stimulus-reward association rule and monitor changes in reward value of stimuli in order to gain as many…

  2. [A paraneoplastic Sharp syndrome reversible after resection of a benign schwannoma: a paraneoplastic syndrome?].

    PubMed

    Slimani, S; Sahraoui, M; Bennadji, A; Ladjouze-Rezig, A

    2014-08-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes commonly occur in malignancies and often precede the first symptoms of the tumor. By definition, paraneoplastic syndromes are only associated with malignancies although some exceptions have been reported, occurring with benign tumors. We report a patient presenting with a clinical and serological Sharp syndrome, followed a few months later by a cervical schwannoma. Curative surgical resection of the mass resulted in a clinical and serological healing from the Sharp syndrome. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a benign schwannoma complicated by a possible paraneoplastic Sharp syndrome. PMID:24951380

  3. Reversible Pisa syndrome associated to subdural haematoma: case-report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pisa Syndrome or Pleurothotonus is a relatively rare truncal dystonia, characterized by tonic flexion of the trunk and head to one side with slight rotation of the body. Since frequently associated to specific drugs such as antipsychotics and cholinesterase inhibitors or to Parkinson Disease, a pathophysiological role of cholinergic-dopaminergic imbalance has been suggested. We report here the first case of Pisa Syndrome due to an extracerebral pathology as subdural haematoma. Case presentation A hypertensive patient was admitted to Our Department for subacute onset of tonic flexion and slight rotation of the trunk associated to progressive motor deficit in left upper limb after a mild head trauma without loss of consciousness occurred around three month before. No previous or current pharmacological interventions with antidepressant, neuroleptic or anticholinergic drugs were anamnestically retrieved. Familiar and personal history was negative for neurological disorders other than acute cerebrovascular diseases. Acutely performed cerebral MRI with DWI showed a voluminous right subdural haematoma with mild shift of median line. After surgical evacuation, both motor deficit and truncal dystonia were dramatically resolved. At one-year follow up, the patient did not develop any extrapyramidal and cognitive signs or symptoms. Conclusions According to many Authors, the occurrence of truncal dystonia during several pharmacologic treatments and neurodegenerative disorders (such as Alzheimer disease and parkinsonian syndromes) supported the hypothesis that a complex dysregulation of multiple neurotransmitter systems are involved. We suggest a possible role of basal ganglia compression in pathogenesis of truncal dystonia by means of thalamo-cortical trait functional disruption and loss of proprioceptive integration. A further contribution of the subcortical structure displacement that alters motor cortex connectivity to basal ganglia may be postulated. PMID

  4. Reversible man-in-the-barrel syndrome in myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Poornima A; Wadia, Pettarusp Murzban

    2016-01-01

    Man-in-the-barrel syndrome (MBS) is an uncommon presentation due to bilateral, predominantly proximal muscle weakness that has not been described to be associated with myasthenia gravis. We describe a case of myasthenia gravis presenting as MBS. Additionally, he had significant wasting of the deltoids bilaterally with fibrillations on electromyography (EMG) at rest and brief duration (3-6 ms) bi/triphasic motor unit potentials (MUPs) on submaximal effort apart from a decremental response on repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS) at 2 Hz. While electrophysiology is an important tool in the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis, pathological EMG patterns do not exclude the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis. PMID:27011638

  5. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and cerebrovascular constriction syndrome in the differential diagnosis of post-partum headaches].

    PubMed

    Ruiz López, N; Cano Hernández, B; Balbás Álvarez, S

    2016-02-01

    Postpartum headache can be due to many causes. In a patient with previous epidural analgesia, the headache can be attributed to post-dural puncture headache, even if the symptoms are not typical of this clinical entity. We report a case of a post-partum with accidental dural tap during the insertion of an epidural catheter for labour analgesia, and who referred to headaches in the third post-partum day. Initially, a post-dural puncture headache was suspected, but the subsequent onset of seizures and visual impairment meant that the diagnosis had to be reconsidered. In this case report, the clinical and pathophysiological features of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, as well as the differential diagnosis of post-partum headaches are described. PMID:26056067

  6. Reversible sinusoidal obstruction syndrome associated with tacrolimus following liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tian; Feng, Xiao-Wen; Geng, Lei; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2015-01-01

    Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), previously known as hepatic veno-occlusive disease, is a rare disorder in solid organ transplant patients, and is an uncommon complication after liver transplantation. Severe SOS with hepatic failure causes considerable mortality. Tacrolimus has been reported to be an offending agent, which potentially plays a role in the pathophysiological process of SOS. SOS due to tacrolimus has been reported in lung and pancreatic transplantations, but has never been described in a liver transplant recipient. Herein, we present a case of SOS after liver transplantation, which was possibly related to tacrolimus. A 27-year-old man developed typical symptoms of SOS with painful hepatomegaly, ascites and jaundice after liver transplantation, which regressed following withdrawal of tacrolimus. By excluding other possible predisposing factors, we concluded that tacrolimus was the most likely cause of SOS. PMID:26034381

  7. Minimally symptomatic posterior reversible encephalopathy in Guillain-Barré syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Piccolo, Giovanni; Borutti, Giuseppina; Franciotta, Diego; Arbasino, Carla; Dallocchio, Carlo; Camana, Claudia; Gola, Giada; Egitto, Maria Grazia

    2015-01-01

    Summary Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a rare occurrence in patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Two patients with neuroradiological evidence of PRES without central nervous system (CNS) symptoms were recently reported. We present the case of a GBS patient with minimal CNS symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging findings consistent with PRES. PRES in GBS might be an underestimated condition. It should be suspected in GBS patients in the presence of even mild CNS symptoms. A timely PRES diagnosis along with early correction of autonomic system dysfunction in GBS patients is recommended to prevent possible dangerous CNS complications. PMID:26214029

  8. Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome Associated with Treatment for Acute Exacerbation of Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Shinsuke; Orii, Fumika; Maemoto, Atsuo; Ashida, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS) is a clinical syndrome of varying etiologies with similar neuroimaging findings. This is a case report of a 25-year-old woman who developed typical, neurological symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities after treatment for the acute exacerbation of ulcerative colitis (UC), which included blood transfusion, the systemic administration of prednisolone, and the administration of metronidazole. It has been reported that these treatments may contribute to the development of RPLS. RPLS should therefore be considered in the differential diagnosis of UC patients who exhibit impaired consciousness, seizures or visual deficits during treatment. We report a rare case of RPLS in a patient with UC. PMID:26935366

  9. [Role of twin reversed arterial perfusion syndrome in the development of fetus acardius].

    PubMed

    Nizyaeva, N V; Kostyukov, K V; Gladkova, K A; Kulikova, G V; Shchegolev, A I

    2016-01-01

    Monochorionic multiple pregnancy has a higher risk for obstetric complications, including those due to the development of twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome and reversed arterial perfusion syndrome (TRAP sequence). The latter occurs in 0.1% of all monochorionic pregnancies. The basis for TRAP sequence is a relationship between arterial and venous anastomoses from the appropriate placental areas, causing a recipient fetus to develop at the expense of a donor fetus. The presence of abnormal anastomoses is considered to be a main cause of acardia. The prognosis for a donor fetus is also unfavorable: the mortality rates in the absence of intrauterine correction are as high as 55%. PMID:27600783

  10. Late postpartum eclampsia complicated with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: a case report and a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lihong; Wang, Yacong; Shi, Liang; Cao, Jianhui

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a rare but serious clinical-neuroradiological entity characterized by headache, vomiting, visual disturbances, altered mental status, seizures, and unconsciousness associated with the characteristic imaging findings including sub-cortical vasogenic edema at the bilateral parietal and occipital lobes. We describe a case of 28-year-old PRES patient secondary to delayed maternal postpartum eclampsia. This patient was not initially diagnosed with pre-eclampsia and PRES. The diagnosis was established after magnetic resonance imaging. After treatment this patient’s PRES resolved. Early diagnosis and treatment are the keys to reverse PRES. A literature review for PRES is provided in this report. PMID:26807372

  11. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is not associated with mutations in aquaporin-4.

    PubMed

    Matiello, Marcelo; Muralidharan, Rajanandini; Sun, David; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Weinshenker, Brian G

    2015-08-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is characterized by acute reversible subcortical vasogenic edema that is typically bilateral and self-limiting. It preferentially affects posterior regions of the brain. Clinical manifestations include encephalopathy, seizures, headache, and cortical blindness. PRES may be precipitated by hypertensive crises such as eclampsia and by immunosuppressive agents. The pathophysiology of PRES is incompletely understood. Disordered cerebral autoregulation leading to protein and fluid extravasation is thought to be important.(1) Other theories implicate endothelial dysfunction or vasospasm.(2). PMID:27066556

  12. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in pediatric acute leukemia: Case series and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Appachu, M. Sandhya; Purohit, Samit; Lakshmaiah, K. C.; Kumari, B.S. Aruna; Appaji, L.

    2014-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a neurotoxic state coupled with a unique radio imaging appearance. We describe this rare, mostly reversible condition in five cases undergoing similar treatment under preset protocol (MCP-841) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at our centre. Hypertension is a well-known adverse effect of high-dose corticosteroid therapy primarily mediated by its effects on the mineralocorticoid receptor especially in pediatric population and we hypothesize that this may be the etiology of PRES in two of these patients. PMID:25006290

  13. Recurarization in a successfully managed case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) for emergency caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Suchita; Tavri, Snehlata; Mohite, Shubha

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiologic syndrome of headache, visual changes, altered mental status and seizures with radiologic findings of posterior cerebral white matter edema. It is seen in hypertensive encephalopathy, renal failure, and autoimmune disorders or in patients on immunosuppressants. We report a case of 24-year-old primigravida who presented at term with sudden onset hypertension, neurological deficits, and an episode of the visual blackout. Magnetic resonance imaging showed features suggestive of PRES. She was posted for emergency lower segment cesarean section. General anesthesia was administered and blood pressure managed with antihypertensives. Postoperatively, she developed acute respiratory depression after prophylactic administration of injection magnesium sulfate. This case highlights that good clinical acumen along with early neuroimaging helps in prompt diagnosis, treatment and prevention of long-term neurological sequelae in PRES and the anesthetic implications of administering magnesium sulfate in the immediate post neuromuscular block reversal phase. PMID:27212776

  14. Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome, Part 2: Diagnostic Work-Up, Imaging Evaluation, and Differential Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, T R; Shivashankar, R; Mossa-Basha, M; Gandhi, D

    2015-09-01

    The diagnostic evaluation of a patient with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome integrates clinical, laboratory, and radiologic findings. Imaging plays an important role by confirming the presence of cerebral vasoconstriction; monitoring potential complications such as ischemic stroke; and suggesting alternative diagnoses, including CNS vasculitis and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Noninvasive vascular imaging, including transcranial Doppler sonography and MR angiography, has played an increasingly important role in this regard, though conventional angiography remains the criterion standard for the evaluation of cerebral artery vasoconstriction. Newer imaging techniques, including high-resolution vessel wall imaging, may help in the future to better discriminate reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome from primary angiitis of the CNS, an important clinical distinction. PMID:25614476

  15. Recurarization in a successfully managed case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) for emergency caesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Suchita; Tavri, Snehlata; Mohite, Shubha

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiologic syndrome of headache, visual changes, altered mental status and seizures with radiologic findings of posterior cerebral white matter edema. It is seen in hypertensive encephalopathy, renal failure, and autoimmune disorders or in patients on immunosuppressants. We report a case of 24-year-old primigravida who presented at term with sudden onset hypertension, neurological deficits, and an episode of the visual blackout. Magnetic resonance imaging showed features suggestive of PRES. She was posted for emergency lower segment cesarean section. General anesthesia was administered and blood pressure managed with antihypertensives. Postoperatively, she developed acute respiratory depression after prophylactic administration of injection magnesium sulfate. This case highlights that good clinical acumen along with early neuroimaging helps in prompt diagnosis, treatment and prevention of long-term neurological sequelae in PRES and the anesthetic implications of administering magnesium sulfate in the immediate post neuromuscular block reversal phase. PMID:27212776

  16. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: an acute manifestation of systemic lupus erythematous.

    PubMed

    Chan, Dexter Yak Seng; Ong, Yin Sheng

    2013-09-01

    Stroke mimickers are common, and they represent a diagnostic dilemma for clinicians. Many, like posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), are easily reversible. The manifestation of PRES is characterised by headaches, convulsions, altered mental functioning and blindness. In most cases, computed tomography of the brain will show hypodense lesions in the parieto-occpitial lobe, which only further confounds the physician. Although this syndrome is uncommon, prompt and accurate recognition allows early treatment, which has been shown to produce favourable outcomes. Herein, we report the case of a 54-year-old woman, who presented with PRES, as an acute manifestation of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) and lupus nephritis. The patient was initially thought to be experiencing an ischaemic stroke, but the diagnosis was later changed. On management of her underlying condition, her symptoms resolved. PRES should be recognised as an acute emergency manifestation of SLE. It should not be mistaken for an ischaemic stroke as inappropriate treatment could have adverse outcomes. PMID:24068069

  17. Reverse or inverted apical ballooning in a case of refeeding syndrome.

    PubMed

    Robles, Pablo; Monedero, Isabel; Rubio, Amador; Botas, Javier

    2015-06-26

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is characterized by the development of transient left ventricular regional wall motion abnormalities, in the absence of significant coronary artery obstruction. This syndrome usually occurs in women and is frequently associated with an intense emotional or physical stress. It usually involves apical segments, but in the recent years atypical forms have been described. Inverted or reverse Takotsubo is a variant in which the basal and midventricular segments are hypokinetic, sparing contractile function of the apex. In this report we describe the case of a 54-year-old woman, with chronic malnutrition, initially admitted because of hypoglycemia and severe electrolyte disturbance due to a refeeding syndrome. Within the next hours she experienced acute cardiac symptoms and developed heart failure with low cardiac output. Electrocardiogram (ECG), elevation of troponin and echocardiographic findings were consistent with inverted Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first incidence reported of inverted Takotsubo triggered by refeeding syndrome. PMID:26131342

  18. An intensive care approach to posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES): An analysis of 7 cases

    PubMed Central

    Demirel, İsmail; Kavak, Burçin Salih; Özer, Ayşe B.; Bayar, Mustafa K.; Erhan, Ömer L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the intensive care unit treatments applied to obstetrics patients with a diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). Material and Methods The cases of 7 pregnant patients who had been diagnosed with PRES between July 2011 and July 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. The patients’ clinical data, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images before and after treatment, and neuropsychological tests were evaluated. Results Five out of 7 patients had eclampsia, 1 patient had severe preeclampsia, and 1 patient developed HELLP syndrome secondary to PRES. Calcium channel blockers and β-blockers were used as antihypertensive treatment. All patients were treated with parenteral magnesium sulfate. In addition, sodium thiopental was given to control sedation and convulsions in all patients except 1. The neurological and radiological findings of all cases treated in the intensive care unit improved. Conclusion Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a clinical condition with a multifactorial etiology and can result in different clinical findings. Radiological imaging techniques can be used for the diagnosis of PRES. Pregnancy and the postpartum period often lead to this syndrome. In some cases, PRES can cause irreversible neurological deficits or death. For patients with severe radiological findings, early diagnosis and thiopental infusion, in addition to treatment with antihypertensive agents and magnesium sulfate, may lead to quicker and more effective recovery from clinical manifestations. We suggest supplementation of standard treatment with early thiopental infusion. PMID:25584029

  19. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Mimicking a Left Middle Cerebral Artery Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Terranova, Santo; Kumar, Jai Dev; Libman, Richard B

    2012-01-01

    Certain Acute Clinical presentations are highly suggestive of stroke caused by specific mechanisms. One example of this would be the sudden onset of aphasia without hemiparesis often reflecting cerebral embolism, frequently from a cardiac source. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) describes a usually reversible neurologic syndrome with a variety of presenting symptoms from headache, altered mental status, seizures, vomiting, diminished spontaneity and speech, abnormalities of visual perception and visual loss. We report a patient presenting with elevated blood pressure, CT characteristics of PRES but a highly circumscribed neurologic syndrome (Wernicke's Aphasia without hemiparesis) suggestive of a cardioembolic stroke affecting the left MCA territory. That is, PRES mimicked a focal stroke syndrome. The importance of recognizing this possibility is that his deficits resolved with blood pressure control, while other treatments, such as intensifying his anticoagulation would have been inappropriate. In addition, allowing his blood pressure to remain elevated as is often done in the setting of an acute stroke might have perpetuated the underlying pathophysiology of PRES leading to a worse clinical outcome. For this reason PRES needs to be recognized quickly and treated appropriately. PMID:22371821

  20. Oxaliplatin-induced posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome with isolated involvement of pons.

    PubMed

    Tang, Koay Hean

    2015-01-01

    Isolated pontine lesion can be caused by the posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). It does occur in the normotensive patient who is treated with oxaliplatin. We reported a case of 81-year-old Chinese man with metastatic colorectal carcinoma who was initially treated with capecitabine. No significant adverse effects were noted. However, the response to the treatment was poor. Subsequently, Xelox was given. He developed transient altered mental status. Oxaliplatin was thought to be the causative agent and was withheld. Magnetic resonance imaging brain revealed vasogenic edema in the pons that was reversible after 2 weeks, as well as complete resolution of clinical symptoms. Early identification of the reversible cause of isolated pontine lesion, such as chemo, triggered PRES is crucial to facilitate prompt treatment by removing the offending agent or reducing the dose. PMID:26881576

  1. Iatrogenic Coagulopathy and the Development of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome after L-asparaginase Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rota, Eugenia; Vallisa, Daniele; Morelli, Nicola; Scagnelli, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinical and radiological syndrome mostly related to hypertension, eclampsia, renal failure, or to chemotherapy and/or immunosuppressive drugs. Although the PRES pathophysiology is multifactorial, hypertension and endothelial dysfunction are hypothesized to be the pivotal factors. Here we report a case of PRES in an adult patient after chemotherapy (Escherichia coli L-asparaginase [L-ASP], daunorubicin, vincristine, and intrathecal methotrexate) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The development of the PRES was strictly associated with an iatrogenic coagulopathy induced by L-ASP, which inhibits the biosynthesis of hepatic coagulation factors. The nadir of platelet count, antithrombin III (ATIII) and fibrinogen curve was coincident with the onset of the PRES neurological picture; subsequently, the normalization of the ATIII and fibrinogen levels seemed to parallel the good clinical evolution. This case seems to provide new insights into the PRES pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:27014503

  2. Atypical presentation of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: Clinical and radiological characteristics in eclamptic patients.

    PubMed

    Aracki-Trenkić, Aleksandra; Stojanov, Dragan; Trenkić, Milan; Radovanović, Zoran; Ignjatović, Jelena; Ristić, Saša; Trenkić-Bozinović, Marija

    2016-08-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is an obstetric emergency frequently occurring in a pregnant or puerperal woman, manifested with an acute headache, consciousness impairment, seizures, and visual deficits and is associated with white matter changes predominantly affecting the posterior parietal and occipital lobes of the brain. Apart from the above-described typical location of the changes, the most common atypical location involves the brain stem and basal ganglia. Since magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is more sensitive and specific imaging technique compared to computerized tomography, establishing the diagnosis and follow-up in patients with PRES is based mainly on MRI findings. It is particularly important not to exclude PRES as a possible diagnosis when we have the appropriate clinical presentation accompanied by the atypical radiological findings, since this clinical-radiological syndrome can often be manifested with an atypical MRI image. PMID:27322924

  3. Iatrogenic Coagulopathy and the Development of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome after L-asparaginase Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Eugenia; Vallisa, Daniele; Morelli, Nicola; Scagnelli, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinical and radiological syndrome mostly related to hypertension, eclampsia, renal failure, or to chemotherapy and/or immunosuppressive drugs. Although the PRES pathophysiology is multifactorial, hypertension and endothelial dysfunction are hypothesized to be the pivotal factors. Here we report a case of PRES in an adult patient after chemotherapy (Escherichia coli L-asparaginase [L-ASP], daunorubicin, vincristine, and intrathecal methotrexate) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The development of the PRES was strictly associated with an iatrogenic coagulopathy induced by L-ASP, which inhibits the biosynthesis of hepatic coagulation factors. The nadir of platelet count, antithrombin III (ATIII) and fibrinogen curve was coincident with the onset of the PRES neurological picture; subsequently, the normalization of the ATIII and fibrinogen levels seemed to parallel the good clinical evolution. This case seems to provide new insights into the PRES pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:27014503

  4. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Pediatric Hematologic-Oncologic Disease: Literature Review and Case Presentation

    PubMed Central

    ARZANIAN, Mohammad Thaghi; SHAMSIAN, Bibi Shahin; KARIMZADEH, Parvaneh; KAJIYAZDI, Mohammad; MALEK, Fatima; HAMMOUD, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Objective Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a cliniconeuroradiological disease entity, which is represented by characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of subcortical/cortical hyperintensity in T2-weighted sequences. It is more often seen in parietaloccipital lobes, and is accompanied by clinical neurological changes. PRES is a rare central nervous system (CNS) complication in patients with childhood hematologic-oncologic disese and shows very different neurological symptoms between patients, ranging from numbness of extremities to generalized seizure. In this article, we will review PRES presentation in hematologic-oncologic patients. Then, we will present our patient, a 7-year-old boy with Evans syndrome on treatment with cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and prednisone, with seizure episodes and MRI finding in favour of PRES. PMID:24949044

  5. Twin Reversed Arterial Perfusion Syndrome (TRAP or Acardiac Twin)-A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    R., Kalyani; Bindra, Mandeep S.

    2014-01-01

    Twin reversed arterial perfusion (TRAP) syndrome is a rare condition (0.3:10,000 births) that occurs in monochorionic twin pregnancies, resulting in coexistence of a normal “pump” twin and an acardiac twin. The acardiac twin is dependent upon the normal twin to provide circulation by means of vascular anastomosis. Many of the bizarre defects are felt to be caused by low oxygen tension and this causes dramatic alteration in the twin fetal physiology and high prenatal mortality. The acardiac twin is a parasite, putting the pump fetus at risk of high output cardiac failure. Overall only 50% of pump twins survive. We present a case in a twenty year female, gravida two, para one, living one, full term normal pregnancy, ultrasound showed twin pregnancy. Following delivery, the first fetus survived only for one day and the second fetus showed features of TRAP syndrome. PMID:24596758

  6. Acampomelic campomelic syndrome and sex reversal associated with de novo t(12;17) translocation.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, S; Narahara, K; Tsuji, K; Yokoyama, Y; Ito, S; Seino, Y

    1995-03-13

    The association of rare chromosomal rearrangements involving a specific 17q breakpoint with campomelic syndrome (CMPS) and/or sex reversal (SR) has led to an assignment of the CMPS1/SRA1 locus to 17q24.3-->q25.1. We describe a patient with multiple anomalies and SR, who had a de novo t(12;17) translocation. The phenotype was consistent with that of CMPS except for the lack of lower limb bowing and talipes equinovarus. Chromosome painting indicated that the breakpoints appeared to have occurred at 12q21.32 and 17q24.3 or q25.1. This study suggests that acampomelic CMPD with SR represents a variant of the CMPS1/SRA1 locus disorder. We emphasize the likelihood that CMPS may be a contiguous gene syndrome. PMID:7747782

  7. Acampomelic campomelic syndrome and sex reversal associated with de novo t(12;17) translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Ninomiya, Shinsuke; Narahara, Kouji; Tsuji, Kazushiro

    1995-03-13

    The association of rare chromosomal rearrangements involving a specific 17q breakpoint with campomelic syndrome (CMPS) and/or sex reversal (SR) has led to an assignment of the CMPS1/SRA1 locus to 17q24.3 {yields} q25.1. We describe a patient with multiple anomalies and SR, who had a de novo t(12;17) translocation. The phenotype was consistent with that of CMPS except for the lack of lower limb bowing and talipes equinovarus. Chromosome painting indicated that the breakpoints appeared to have occurred at 12q21.32 and 17q24.3 or q25.1. CMPD with SR represents a variant of the CMPS1/SRA1 locus disorder. We emphasize the likelihood that CMPS may be a contiguous gene syndrome. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Atypical presentation of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: Clinical and radiological characteristics in eclamptic patients.

    PubMed

    Aracki-Trenkić, Aleksandra; Stojanov, Dragan; Trenkić, Milan; Radovanović, Zoran; Ignjatović, Jelena; Ristić, Saša; Trenkić-Bozinović, Marija

    2016-08-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is an obstetric emergency frequently occurring in a pregnant or puerperal woman, manifested with an acute headache, consciousness impairment, seizures, and visual deficits and is associated with white matter changes predominantly affecting the posterior parietal and occipital lobes of the brain. Apart from the above-described typical location of the changes, the most common atypical location involves the brain stem and basal ganglia. Since magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is more sensitive and specific imaging technique compared to computerized tomography, establishing the diagnosis and follow-up in patients with PRES is based mainly on MRI findings. It is particularly important not to exclude PRES as a possible diagnosis when we have the appropriate clinical presentation accompanied by the atypical radiological findings, since this clinical-radiological syndrome can often be manifested with an atypical MRI image. PMID:27483175

  9. Neuromyelitis Optica in Pregnancy Complicated by Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome, Eclampsia and Fetal Death

    PubMed Central

    Igel, Catherine; Garretto, Diana; Robbins, Matthew S; Swerdlow, Michael; Judge, Nancy; Dayal, Ashlesha

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a demyelinating syndrome characterized by optic neuritis and acute myelitis with poor recovery and a progressive course. We report a poor outcome complicated by posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and eclampsia and review available literature and current evidence for anticipation of adverse fetal and maternal effects. After a pregnancy complicated by multiple admissions for painful NMO exacerbations, a primiparous patient with seropositive NMO presented at 31 + 3/7 weeks with eclampsia, HELLP and subsequent fetal death. MRI confirmed PRES. NMO may be associated with eclampsia and leads to adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Posited mechanisms include antibody-mediated placental damage and a heightened risk of eclampsia-associated PRES. Further characterization of the course of NMO and its relationship with pregnancy outcomes in larger series would be invaluable. PMID:25584107

  10. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a child with Henoch-Schönlein purpura

    PubMed Central

    Sivrioglu, Ali Kemal; Incedayi, Mehmet; Mutlu, Hakan; Meral, Cihan

    2013-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a small vessel vasculitis that affects the gastrointestinal and central nervous systems and the kidneys. The disease primarily affects children, but may occur in elderly children with allergic purpura and also in adults. Central nervous system involvement may be the first sign; however, it is rarely encountered. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinical syndrome of encephalopathy, headache, visual disturbance and seizures. Its radiological signs can be observed in grey and white matter at the posterior region of the cerebral hemispheres. HSP should be considered in children with PRES in the presence of rash, joint and gastrointestinal symptoms. We reported a 5-year-old patient who developed acute renal failure and PRES by reason of HSP. PMID:23946524

  11. Atypical presentation of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: Clinical and radiological characteristics in eclamptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Aracki-Trenkić, Aleksandra; Stojanov, Dragan; Trenkić, Milan; Radovanović, Zoran; Ignjatović, Jelena; Ristić, Saša; Trenkić-Bozinović, Marija

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is an obstetric emergency frequently occurring in a pregnant or puerperal woman, manifested with an acute headache, consciousness impairment, seizures, and visual deficits and is associated with white matter changes predominantly affecting the posterior parietal and occipital lobes of the brain. Apart from the above-described typical location of the changes, the most common atypical location involves the brain stem and basal ganglia. Since magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is more sensitive and specific imaging technique compared to computerized tomography, establishing the diagnosis and follow-up in patients with PRES is based mainly on MRI findings. It is particularly important not to exclude PRES as a possible diagnosis when we have the appropriate clinical presentation accompanied by the atypical radiological findings, since this clinical-radiological syndrome can often be manifested with an atypical MRI image.

  12. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage After Lumboperitoneal Shunt for Fulminant Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fok, Anthony; Chandra, Ronil V; Gutman, Matthew; Ligtermoet, Matthew; Seneviratne, Udaya; Kempster, Peter

    2016-06-01

    A 33-year-old woman presented with severe visual loss from fulminant idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Her lumbar puncture opening pressure was 97 cm H2O. Soon after lumboperitoneal shunt surgery, she had a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated frontal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and neuroimaging findings consistent with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). We hypothesize that an abrupt drop in intracranial pressure after lumboperitoneal shunting led to maladjustment of cerebral vascular autoregulation, which caused SAH and PRES. PMID:26919070

  13. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a hypertensive patient with renal failure.

    PubMed

    Aatif, T; El Farouki, M R; Benyahia, M

    2016-03-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinical and neuroimaging entity characterized by headache, visual field deficits, changes in mentation and seizures, and by typical neuro-imaging features such as areas of sub-cortical edema, occasionally cortical, involving predominantly the occipital and parietal lobes of both hemispheres. Hypertension, uremia, immunosuppressive drugs neurotoxicity, preeclampsia or eclampsia, renal disease, and sepsis are the most common etiologies of PRES. Less common, it has been described in the setting of autoimmune disease. We report a case of PRES which was associated with hypertensive crisis in a patient with renal failure. Antihypertensive therapy and hemodialysis resulted in complete recovery. PMID:26997402

  14. Good outcome after posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) despite elevated cerebral lactate: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kondziella, Daniel; Danielsen, Else R; Thomsen, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) may cause irreversible brain damage. The diagnosis is confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), where vasogenic edema may be seen especially in the posterior parts of the brain. MR spectroscopy (MRS) may be included to help predict the outcome by measuring selected metabolites for instance lactate. Usually lactate is immeasurable in brain tissue, but elevates in cases of hypoxia, and it has been associated with poor outcome. We report a case of a patient with eclampsia and PRES, who had elevated lactate initially, but complete remission clinically and on MRI. PMID:26331088

  15. Two cases of the nephrotic syndrome with a reversible coagulation defect.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, M. R.; Davies, J. A.; Tate, G. M.; Lee, M. R.

    1979-01-01

    Two cases of the nephrotic syndrome with an apparently identical defect of blood coagulation, discovered during preparation for renal biopsy are described. Plasma from both patients showed prolongation of thrombin and kaolin cephalin times which was probably due to abnormally slow polymerization of fibrin monomer. Corticosteroid therapy reversed the abnormal times in one case. One of the patients showed seasonal relapses which occurred in relation to episodes of hay fever associated with allergy to grass pollen. The other patient showed some similar features, but on renal biopsy was found to have proliferative glomerulonephritis. Images Fig. 1 PMID:537968

  16. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome with PLEDs-plus due to mesalamine

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Ajith; Soumya, C. V.; Iype, Thomas; Mathew, Mini; Sandeep, P.; Thadam, Jessline K.; Chithra, P.

    2014-01-01

    A 32-year-old lady developed status epilepticus and acute visual loss while on mesalamine for Crohn's disease. Her clinical course and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). She had periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges plus (PLEDs-plus) on electroencephalogram (EEG), which responded to sodium valproate. Her vision improved from counting fingers at one-meter distance to 6/12. Though different cytotoxic drugs have been implicated as causative agents, this is the first case report of mesalamine-induced PRES. This case highlights the need for aggressive treatment of PLEDs-plus with EEG monitoring using a broad-spectrum antiepileptic drug like valproate, which has contributed to the rapid reversibility of vision in PRES subjects, and the need for a thorough drug history for etiological clues. PMID:24741259

  17. Atypical Reversible Leucoencephalopathy Syndrome after Bevacizumab/Folfox Regimen for Metastatic Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Salmi, Narimane; Elghissassi, Ibrahim; Bellahammou, Khadija; Lakhdissi, Asmaa; Mrabti, Hind; Errihani, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    We are reporting a case of multifocal reversible leucoencephalopathy syndrome induced by chemotherapy based on Folfox-Bevacizumab regimen. A 44-year-old female, with no history of hypertension, received a chemotherapy based on Folfox-Bevacizumab for her metastatic colon cancer (5 FU: 325 mg/m2 d1 by intravenous infusion, Oxaliplatin 80 mg/m2 d1, and Bevacizumab: 7.5 mg/Kg d1). During the fourth cure, she presented delirium, seizures, and visual disturbances. The computed tomography (CT) of the brain showed hypodense lesions of the white matter of frontal, parietal, and occipital lobes, which were bilateral and symmetrical. The clinical table was reversible under symptomatic treatment. PMID:25400959

  18. Reversible posterior encephalopathy syndrome associated with late onset postpartum eclampsia: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Bo, Qi-Yu; Zhao, Xiu-He; Yang, Xue; Wang, Sheng-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Late onset postpartum eclampsia (LPE) is defined by its onset at >48 h after delivery. Reversible posterior encephalopathy syndrome (RPES) associated with LPE is uncommon, with the majority of RPES cases having a late postpartum onset within 4 weeks after childbirth. The present study reported the case of a 15-year old female presenting with convulsions that began 5 weeks after delivery. A magnetic resonance imaging scan of the brain revealed multiple lesions in the cortex, subcortical region and deep white matter of the bilateral cerebellum, and occipital, frontal and parietal lobes. The clinical manifestations and radiological abnormalities were readily resolved subsequent to antihypertension and anticonvulsion treatment. In conclusion, the present rare case indicates that LPE should be considered as a potential diagnosis even at 4 weeks after delivery. Furthermore, clinicians should familiarize with the reversible radioimaging features of RPES, since early recognition and adequate treatment are important to the outcome of patients. PMID:27602098

  19. Imaging Findings in Pediatric Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES): 5 Years of Experience From a Tertiary Care Center in India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vivek; Bhatia, Vikas; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Singh, Paramjeet; Singhi, Pratibha

    2016-08-01

    This study sought to evaluate the radiological and clinical spectrum of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) in pediatric population. A retrospective evaluation of the pediatric patients with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome seen over the last 5 years in the authors' hospital was done. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings were analyzed, and a review of literature was performed. Out of 32 pediatric patients of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, 10 (31.25%) were males and 22 (68.75%) were females, with a mean age of 10.6 years. Renal disease (62.5%) was the most common primary disease, followed by chemotherapy for hemato-oncologic malignancies (15.6%). Hypertension was present in 81.2% of cases. Atypical MRI findings were seen in 62.5% cases. Frontal involvement was common and seen in 56% of the cases. Overall, MRI findings considered atypical in adults were found to be common in the series of pediatric posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. The understanding of the clinical settings and familiarity with radiological findings in pediatric posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome patients is important to adequately treat these patients and to avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:27071468

  20. [A case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome associated with Takayasu's arteritis].

    PubMed

    Wakida, Kenji; Morita, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Takeo; Nishida, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    A 75-year-old woman presented with a 4-month history of repetitive loss of consciousness, dizziness, and ear fullness. Fluid attenuation inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging showed high-intensity areas in the right occipital lobe, both frontal lobes, and parietal lobes, and the patient was therefore admitted to our department for further examination. Neurologic findings included a positive Barré sign (right upper extremity), impaired tandem gait, and positive left-sided Babinski reflex. The patient was diagnosed with Takayasu's arteritis owing to a difference in blood pressure between the left and right upper extremity, weakened pulse in the left upper extremity, as well as thickened arterial wall, and delayed enhancement on a contrast-enhanced computed tomography image. The head magnetic resonance imaging findings disappeared within 4 months and the patient was diagnosed with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome associated with elderly female Takayasu's arteritis is rare. ; the present case therefore offers valuable information. PMID:26912227

  1. Tacrolimus-associated posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome after solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qisi; Marescaux, Christian; Wolff, Valérie; Jeung, Mi-Young; Kessler, Romain; Lauer, Valérie; Chen, Yangmei

    2010-01-01

    Tacrolimus (TAC) is an immunosuppressant drug discovered in 1984 by Fujisawa Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd. This drug belongs to the group of calcineurin inhibitors, which has been proven highly effective in preventing acute rejection after transplantation of solid organs. However, neurotoxicity and nephrotoxicity are its major adverse effects. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is the most severe and dramatic consequence of calcineurin inhibitor neurotoxicity. It was initially described by Hinchey et al. in 1996 [N Engl J Med 1996;334:494-450]. Patients typically present with altered mental status, headache, focal neurological deficits, visual disturbances, and seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive imaging test to detect this. With the more deep-going studies done recently, we have learnt more about this entity. It was noted that this syndrome is frequently reversible, rarely limited to the posterior regions of the brain, and often located in gray matter and cortex as well as in white matter. Therefore, in this review, the focus is on the current understanding of clinical recognition, pathogenesis, neuroimaging and management of TAC-associated PRES after solid organ transplantation. PMID:20699617

  2. Diagnosing RCVS Without the CV: The Evolution of Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Nuri; Kaunzner, Ulrike; Dinkin, Marc; Safdieh, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    This is a case of a 52-year-old man with a past medical history of 2 episodes of coital thunderclap headaches as well as recent cocaine, marijuana, and pseudoephedrine use, who presented with sudden, sharp, posterior headache associated with photophobia and phonophobia. His initial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the head, and magnetic resonance venography (MRV) of the head were all normal as well as a normal lumbar puncture. Given the multiple risk factors for reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS), the patient was treated for suspected RCVS, despite the normal imaging. Repeat MRI brain 3 days after hospital admission demonstrated confluent white matter T2 hyperintensities most prominent in the occipital lobes, typical of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). Repeat MRA of the head 1 day after discharge and 4 days after the abnormal MRI brain showed multisegment narrowing of multiple arteries. This case demonstrates that RCVS may present with PRES on MRI brain and also exemplifies the need to treat suspected RCVS even if imaging is normal, as abnormalities in both the MRI and the MRA may be delayed. PMID:27366300

  3. Evidence for "Uner Tan Syndrome" as a human model for reverse evolution.

    PubMed

    Tan, Uner

    2006-12-01

    "Uner Tan Syndrome" was further studied in a second family. There was no cerebellar atrophy, except a mild vermial atrophy in MRI scans of the affected individuals. This is not, however, the pathogenesis of the "Uner Tan Syndrome", since in the first and second families there were bipedal men exhibiting very similar MRI scans. The second family may also be considered a live model for reverse evolution in human beings. The present work provided evidence for a reverse evolution: (i) quadrupedality; (ii) primitive mental abilities including language; (iii) curved fingers during wrist-walking of the quadrupedal woman; (iv) arm to leg ratios being close to those of the human-like apes. The quadrupedal individuals were raised in separate places, so that they could not imitate each other, excluding the socio-cultural factors contributing to the habitual quadrupedal gait. The results are consistent with the single gene theory, suggesting a single gene controlling multiple behavioral traits, and the psychomotor theory, and a co-evolution of the human mind, an emergent property of the motor system expressed by human language. PMID:17145687

  4. Anterior Spinal Artery Syndrome: Reversible Paraplegia after Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bredow, J.; Oppermann, J.; Keller, K.; Beyer, F.; Boese, C. K.; Zarghooni, K.; Sobottke, R.; Eysel, P.; Siewe, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Context. Percutaneous balloon kyphoplasty is an established minimally invasive technique to treat painful vertebral compression fractures, especially in the context of osteoporosis with a minor complication rate. Purpose. To describe the heparin anticoagulation treatment of paraplegia following balloon kyphoplasty. Study Design. We report the first case of an anterior spinal artery syndrome with a postoperative reversible paraplegia following a minimally invasive spine surgery (balloon kyphoplasty) without cement leakage. Methods. A 75-year-old female patient underwent balloon kyphoplasty for a fresh fracture of the first vertebra. Results. Postoperatively, the patient developed an acute anterior spinal artery syndrome with motor paraplegia of the lower extremities as well as loss of pain and temperature sensation with retained proprioception and vibratory sensation. Complete recovery occurred six hours after bolus therapy with 15.000 IU low-molecular heparin. Conclusion. Spine surgeons should consider vascular complications in patients with incomplete spinal cord syndromes after balloon kyphoplasty, not only after more invasive spine surgery. High-dose low-molecular heparin might help to reperfuse the Adamkiewicz artery. PMID:25210639

  5. Anterior spinal artery syndrome: reversible paraplegia after minimally invasive spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Bredow, J; Oppermann, J; Keller, K; Beyer, F; Boese, C K; Zarghooni, K; Sobottke, R; Eysel, P; Siewe, J

    2014-01-01

    Background Context. Percutaneous balloon kyphoplasty is an established minimally invasive technique to treat painful vertebral compression fractures, especially in the context of osteoporosis with a minor complication rate. Purpose. To describe the heparin anticoagulation treatment of paraplegia following balloon kyphoplasty. Study Design. We report the first case of an anterior spinal artery syndrome with a postoperative reversible paraplegia following a minimally invasive spine surgery (balloon kyphoplasty) without cement leakage. Methods. A 75-year-old female patient underwent balloon kyphoplasty for a fresh fracture of the first vertebra. Results. Postoperatively, the patient developed an acute anterior spinal artery syndrome with motor paraplegia of the lower extremities as well as loss of pain and temperature sensation with retained proprioception and vibratory sensation. Complete recovery occurred six hours after bolus therapy with 15.000 IU low-molecular heparin. Conclusion. Spine surgeons should consider vascular complications in patients with incomplete spinal cord syndromes after balloon kyphoplasty, not only after more invasive spine surgery. High-dose low-molecular heparin might help to reperfuse the Adamkiewicz artery. PMID:25210639

  6. Subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured intracranial aneurysm following posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nanba, Takamasa; Kashimura, Hiroshi; Saura, Hiroaki; Takeda, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Although posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is rarely associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage, to our knowledge, rupture of a concomitant cerebral aneurysm following PRES has not been reported. We describe a patient with atypical PRES involving the brainstem, thalamus, and periventricular white matter without cortical or subcortical edema of the parietooccipital lobe on magnetic resonance imaging, with rupture of a concomitant cerebral aneurysm. Preexisting extremely high blood pressure may trigger atypical PRES, and failure to lower blood pressure may lead to a concomitant aneurysm rupture. In the future treatment of hypertensive urgency with a recurrence of symptoms and mean arterial blood pressure >150 mmHg, it is advisable to immediately hospitalize the patient for aggressive blood pressure management, especially if PRES is suspected based on clinical and radiological features. PMID:27365964

  7. An unusual case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a patient being weaned from intrathecal morphine.

    PubMed

    Van Aalst, Jasper; Teernstra, Onno P; Weber, Wim E; Rijkers, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiological entity based on clinical signs, including headache, visual abnormalities, and seizures, and radiological abnormalities mostly consisting of vasogenic brain edema predominantly in the posterior parietal-temporal-occipital regions. PRES typically develops in the setting of a significant " systemic process", including preeclampsia, transplantation, infection/sepsis/shock, autoimmune disease, and cancer chemotherapy, in which hypertension often plays an important role. We present a case of PRES in a 63-year-old female patient with an infected intrathecal morphine pump on a cocktail of antibiotics, morphine, clonidine, diazepam, and amitriptyline. It is the first PRES case in a chronic pain patient, which illustrates that PRES can occur in the absence of any of the established risk factors. We hypothesize it may have been caused by antibiotic treatment in our patient. PMID:27274314

  8. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in the Emergency Department: Case Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Ryan J.; Sharp, Brian; Pothof, Jeffery; Hamedani, Azita

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) often has variable presentations and causes, with common radiographic features—namely posterior white matter changes on magnetic resonance (MRI). As MRI becomes a more frequently utilized imaging modality in the Emergency Department, PRES will become an entity that the Emergency Physician must be aware of and be able to diagnose. Case Report We report three cases of PRES, all of which presented to the emergency department of a single academic medical center over a short period of time, including a 53-year-old woman with only relative hypertension, a 69-year-old woman who ultimately died, and a 46-year-old woman who had a subsequent intraparenchymal hemorrhage. Conclusion PRES is likely much more common than previously thought and is a diagnosis that should be considered in a wide variety of emergency department patient presentations. PMID:25671001

  9. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome in childhood: report of nine cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gümüş, Hakan; Per, Hüseyin; Kumandaş, Sefer; Yikilmaz, Ali

    2010-04-01

    Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS) is recently described disorder with typical radiological findings in the posterior regions of the cerebral hemisphere and cerebellum. Its clinical symptoms include headache, decreased alertness, mental abnormalities, such as confusion, diminished spontaneity of speech, and changed behavior ranging from drowsiness to stupor, seizures, vomiting and abnormalities of visual perception like cortical blindness. RPLS is caused by various heterogeneous factors, the commonest being hypertension, followed by non-hypertensive causes such as eclampsia, renal diseases and immunosuppressive therapy. We presented nine patients with RPLS who had primary diagnoses such as acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, idiopathic hypertension, the performing of intravenous immunoglobulin for infection with crescentic glomerulonephritis, erythrocyte transfusion for severe iron deficiency, L: -asparaginase treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia and performing of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for ulcerative colitis due to neutropenia. Early recognition of RPLS as complication during different diseases and therapy in childhood may facilitate precise diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:19809787

  10. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome with multivessel cervical artery dissections and a double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Nouh, Amre; Ruland, Sean; Schneck, Michael J; Pasquale, David; Biller, José

    2014-02-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) has been associated with exposure to vasoactive substances and few reports with cervical arterial dissections (CADs). We evaluated a 32-year-old woman with history of depression, migraines without aura, and cannabis use who presented with a thunderclap headache unresponsive to triptans. She was found to have bilateral occipital infarcts, bilateral extracranial vertebral artery dissections, bilateral internal carotid artery dissecting aneurysms, and extensive distal multifocal segmental narrowing of the anterior and posterior intracranial circulation with a "sausage on a string-like appearance" suggestive of RCVS. Subsequently, she was found to have a distal thrombus of the basilar artery, was anticoagulated, and discharged home with no residual deficits. We highlight the potential association of CADs and RCVS. The association of RCVS and a double aortic arch has not been previously reported. PMID:24103665

  11. An unusual case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a patient being weaned from intrathecal morphine

    PubMed Central

    Van Aalst, Jasper; Teernstra, Onno P; Weber, Wim E; Rijkers, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiological entity based on clinical signs, including headache, visual abnormalities, and seizures, and radiological abnormalities mostly consisting of vasogenic brain edema predominantly in the posterior parietal-temporal-occipital regions. PRES typically develops in the setting of a significant “ systemic process”, including preeclampsia, transplantation, infection/sepsis/shock, autoimmune disease, and cancer chemotherapy, in which hypertension often plays an important role. We present a case of PRES in a 63-year-old female patient with an infected intrathecal morphine pump on a cocktail of antibiotics, morphine, clonidine, diazepam, and amitriptyline. It is the first PRES case in a chronic pain patient, which illustrates that PRES can occur in the absence of any of the established risk factors. We hypothesize it may have been caused by antibiotic treatment in our patient. PMID:27274314

  12. The reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome in association with venlafaxine and methenamine.

    PubMed

    Davies, G; Wilson, H; Wilhelm, T; Bowler, J

    2013-01-01

    The reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterised by thunderclap headache and multifocal vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries on angiography. It is often drug induced, but it can occur postpartum, and as a result of a number of other precipitants. To make the diagnosis, it is necessary to exclude other causes of severe headache (such as aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage, carotid dissection and primary angiitis of the central nervous system). However, it is also important to show that the vasoconstriction has resolved with repeat angiography at the 3-month stage. Here we report two cases of RCVS in association with venlafaxine and the urinary antiseptic, methenamine. Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors have recently been reported as a possible precipitant, but this is the first report to implicate methenamine. Although RCVS is relatively uncommon, it should be considered in the differential of those presenting with thunderclap headache. PMID:23771970

  13. Subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured intracranial aneurysm following posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nanba, Takamasa; Kashimura, Hiroshi; Saura, Hiroaki; Takeda, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Although posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is rarely associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage, to our knowledge, rupture of a concomitant cerebral aneurysm following PRES has not been reported. We describe a patient with atypical PRES involving the brainstem, thalamus, and periventricular white matter without cortical or subcortical edema of the parietooccipital lobe on magnetic resonance imaging, with rupture of a concomitant cerebral aneurysm. Preexisting extremely high blood pressure may trigger atypical PRES, and failure to lower blood pressure may lead to a concomitant aneurysm rupture. In the future treatment of hypertensive urgency with a recurrence of symptoms and mean arterial blood pressure >150 mmHg, it is advisable to immediately hospitalize the patient for aggressive blood pressure management, especially if PRES is suspected based on clinical and radiological features. PMID:27365964

  14. Reversing excitatory GABAAR signaling restores synaptic plasticity and memory in a mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Deidda, Gabriele; Parrini, Martina; Naskar, Shovan; Bozarth, Ignacio F; Contestabile, Andrea; Cancedda, Laura

    2015-04-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most frequent genetic cause of intellectual disability, and altered GABAergic transmission through Cl(-)-permeable GABAA receptors (GABAARs) contributes considerably to learning and memory deficits in DS mouse models. However, the efficacy of GABAergic transmission has never been directly assessed in DS. Here GABAAR signaling was found to be excitatory rather than inhibitory, and the reversal potential for GABAAR-driven Cl(-) currents (ECl) was shifted toward more positive potentials in the hippocampi of adult DS mice. Accordingly, hippocampal expression of the cation Cl(-) cotransporter NKCC1 was increased in both trisomic mice and individuals with DS. Notably, NKCC1 inhibition by the FDA-approved drug bumetanide restored ECl, synaptic plasticity and hippocampus-dependent memory in adult DS mice. Our findings demonstrate that GABA is excitatory in adult DS mice and identify a new therapeutic approach for the potential rescue of cognitive disabilities in individuals with DS. PMID:25774849

  15. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in malignant hypertension secondary to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Hafez Mohammad Ammar; Ullah, Waqas; Ahmad, Ejaz; Anwer, Faiz

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a neurological condition that occurs secondary to a variety of causes like autoimmune diseases, uncontrolled hypertension and immunosuppressive agents. We report an unusual association of PRES and malignant hypertension secondary to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in a young woman, presenting with sudden loss of vision and seizures. She had uncontrolled hypertension and a Glasgow Coma Scale of 6/15. Brain MRI revealed high signals in cortical and subcortical white matter and some involvement of the periventricular areas. She improved dramatically with antihypertensive and antiepileptic medications and was discharged home in a stable condition. It is important to have a high clinical suspicion for this uncommon condition in an appropriate clinical setting, because a timely intervention can prevent long-term complications. PMID:27535734

  16. [A case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome associated with coil embolization of a basilar apex aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Naito, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Yu; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Ochi, Kazuhide; Kiura, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2013-01-01

    About three weeks after successful coil embolization of a basilar apex aneurysm, a 66-year-old woman developed occipital headaches. T2 and FLAIR MRI brain images demonstrated multiple new hyperintense lesions in the posterior circulation territory including cerebellum, right superior cerebellar peduncle, left thalamus and bilateral temporo-occipital lobes and she was subsequently hospitalized. Findings suggestive of other underlying disease were not observed, although an increased protein level was noted in cerebrospinal fluid (69 mg/dl). Headache and clinical findings improved approximately 12 weeks after coil embolization. MRI findings also showed improvement. These clinical and radiological findings made this patient a distinctive case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) associated with coil embolization suggesting that clinicians should be aware that PRES can present as comparatively mild symptoms several weeks after coil embolization. PMID:23892962

  17. Rapid and sensitive detection of Taura syndrome virus by reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Kiatpathomchai, Wansika; Jareonram, Wansadaj; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut; Flegel, T W

    2007-12-01

    Reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay is a novel method of gene amplification that amplifies nucleic acid with high specificity, sensitivity and rapidity, which can be applied for disease diagnosis in shrimp aquaculture. The method is performed under isothermal conditions with a set of four specially designed primers that recognize six distinct sequences of the target. In this study, using the RT-LAMP method, a protocol for detecting Taura syndrome virus which is a causative agent of Penaeus vannamei was developed. Time and temperature conditions for detection of TSV were optimized for 60min at 63 degrees C. The nucleic acids of other shrimp pathogens (yellow head virus; YHV and white spot syndrome; WSSV) were not amplified by this RT-LAMP system. The detection of TSV using RT-LAMP was 10 times more sensitive than the RT-PCR but less sensitive than nested RT-PCR. However this system was more convenient, rapid, and does not require sophisticated PCR machine. PMID:17643501

  18. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome following acute pancreatitis during chemotherapy for acute monocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Mitsutaka; Koh, Hideo; Bingo, Masato; Yoshida, Masahiro; Nanno, Satoru; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Nakane, Takahiko; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Shimono, Taro; Hino, Masayuki

    2014-05-01

    We describe an 18-year-old man with acute leukemia who presented with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) shortly after developing acute pancreatitis. On day 15 after the third consolidation course with high-dose cytarabine, treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics was initiated for febrile neutropenia. On day 16, he developed septic shock, and subsequently, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). After adding vancomycin, micafungin and high-dose methylprednisolone (mPSL) to his treatment regimen, these manifestations subsided. On day 22, he received hemodialysis for drug-induced acute renal failure. On day 24, he developed acute pancreatitis possibly due to mPSL; the following day he had generalized seizures, and was intubated. Cerebrospinal fluid findings were normal. Brain MRI revealed hyperintense signals on FLAIR images and increased apparent diffusion coefficient values in the sub-cortical and deep white matter areas of the bilateral temporal and occipital lobes, indicative of vasogenic edema. Thus, we diagnosed PRES. Blood pressure, seizures and volume status were controlled, with MRI findings showing improvement by day 42. He was extubated on day 32 and discharged on day 49 without complications. Although little is known about PRES following acute pancreatitis, clinicians should be aware that this condition may develop. PMID:24881921

  19. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Complicating Traumatic Pancreatitis: A Pediatric Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sigurtà, Anna; Terzi, Valeria; Regna-Gladin, Caroline; Fumagalli, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    We are reporting a case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) developed in an unusual clinical scenario without the presence of the most described symptoms. PRES is a neurological and radiological syndrome described in many different clinical conditions. In children it has been mostly reported in association with hematological and renal disorders.Our patient was a 15 years old boy, admitted to our intensive care unit for pancreatitis after blunt abdominal trauma.During the stay in the intensive care unit, he underwent multiple abdominal surgical interventions for pancreatitis complications. He had a difficult management of analgesia and sedation, being often agitated with high arterial pressure, and he developed a bacterial peritonitis. After 29 days his neurological conditions abruptly worsened with neuroimaging findings consistent with PRES. His clinical conditions progressively improved after sedation and arterial pressure control.He was discharged at home with complete resolution of the neurological and imaging signs 2 months later.The pathophysiology of PRES is controversial and involves disordered autoregulation ascribable to hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. In this case both hypertension and endothelial activation, triggered by sepsis and pancreatitis, could represent the culprits of PRES onset. Even if there is no specific treatment for this condition, a diagnosis is mandatory to start antihypertensive and supportive treatment. We are therefore suggesting to consider PRES in the differential diagnosis of a neurological deterioration preceded by hypertension and/or septic state, even without other "typical" clinical features. PMID:27258506

  20. A School-Based Application of Modified Habit Reversal for Tourette Syndrome via a Translator: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilman, Rich; Connor, Nancy; Haney, Michelle

    2005-01-01

    A school-based modified habit reversal intervention was utilized with an adolescent diagnosed with Tourette syndrome who recently immigrated from Mexico. Because the student possessed little proficiency of the English language, an interpreter was needed to help implement the procedure. The frequency of motor tics markedly decreased from baseline…

  1. Reversion of a live porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus vaccine investigated by parallel mutations.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, H S; Oleksiewicz, M B; Forsberg, R; Stadejek, T; Bøtner, A; Storgaard, T

    2001-06-01

    A live attenuated porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) vaccine virus has been shown to revert to virulence under field conditions. In order to identify genetic virulence determinants, ORF1 from the attenuated vaccine virus and three Danish vaccine-derived field isolates was sequenced and compared with the parental strain of the vaccine virus (VR2332). This revealed five mutations that had occurred independently in all three vaccine-derived field isolates, indicating strong parallel selective pressure on these positions in the vaccine virus when used in swine herds. Two of these parallel mutations were direct reversions to the parental VR2332 sequence and were situated in a papain-like cysteine protease domain and in the helicase domain. The remaining parallel mutations might be seen as second-site compensatory mutations for one or more of the mutations that accumulated in the vaccine virus sequence during cell-culture adaptation. Evaluation of the remaining mutations in the ORF1 sequence revealed stronger selective pressure for amino acid conservation during spread in pigs than during vaccine production. Furthermore, it was found that the selective pressure did not change during the time period studied. The implications of these findings for PRRS vaccine attenuation and reversion are discussed. PMID:11369869

  2. Lithium reverses increased rates of cerebral protein synthesis in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong-Hua; Huang, Tianjian; Smith, Carolyn Beebe

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with fragile X syndrome (FXS), an inherited form of cognitive disability, have a wide range of symptoms including hyperactivity, autistic behavior, seizures and learning deficits. FXS is caused by silencing of FMR1 and the consequent absence of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP is an RNA-binding protein that associates with polyribosomes and negatively regulates translation. In a previous study of a mouse model of FXS (Fmr1 knockout (KO)) we demonstrated that in vivo rates of cerebral protein synthesis (rCPS) were elevated in selective brain regions suggesting that the absence of FMRP in FXS may result in dysregulation of cerebral protein synthesis. Lithium, a drug used clinically to treat bipolar disorder, has been used to improve mood dysregulation in individuals with FXS. We reported previously that in the Fmr1 KO mouse chronic dietary lithium treatment reversed or ameliorated both behavioral and morphological abnormalities. Herein we report that chronic dietary lithium treatment reversed the increased rCPS in Fmr1 KO mice with little effect on wild type mice. We also report our results of analyses of key signaling molecules involved in regulation of mRNA translation. Our analyses indicate that neither effects on the PI3K/Akt nor the MAPK/ERK 1/2 pathway fully account for the effects of lithium treatment on rCPS. Collectively our findings and those from other laboratories on the efficacy of lithium treatment in animal models support further studies in patients with FXS. PMID:22227453

  3. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) in a thirty-six-week gestation eclamptic.

    PubMed

    Powell, Emilie S; Goldman, Mitchell J

    2007-11-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a transient clinical neuroradiological entity characterized by clinical signs and symptoms including hypertension, generalized seizure activity, altered mental status, headache, and vision changes; along with characteristic findings on head computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scan. Albeit a rare condition, PRES is most commonly reported in the literature in association with obstetric patients suffering from pre-eclampsia or eclampsia. In the acute setting, it is important to recognize the characteristics of PRES and immediately treat the inciting conditions: the patient's hypertension and seizures. Although this condition is usually transient and completely reversible, ischemic injury and irreversible damage have been reported. In the event of early and effective treatment, cognitive function may be completely restored. The following case report reviews a pregnant patient who presented to the Emergency Department with generalized seizure activity and a clinical picture characteristic of PRES. The case demonstrates how appropriate treatment in the acute setting allows complete restoration of cognitive function in the long term. PMID:17976748

  4. Dramatic Intracerebral Hemorrhagic Presentations of Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome: Three Cases and a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Stary, Joel M.; Wang, Bonnie H.; Moon, Seong-Jin; Wang, Huan

    2014-01-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) refers to a number of disorders characterized by severe and sudden-onset (“thunderclap”) headaches and angiographic features of reversible, segmental, multifocal vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries. Although RCVS generally resolves without significant sequelae, a rare and possibly underrecognized hemorrhagic presentation has a worse potential course. We report three cases of hemorrhagic RCVS and review the literature. Three females (42, 54, and 33 years old, resp.) presented with severe headache, neurological deficits, and dramatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Patient 1 presented comatose with a 9 × 4 × 6.6 cm left deep intraparenchymal hemorrhage (IPH) and 1 cm midline shift. She underwent emergent surgical intervention. Patient 2 had a 3.3 × 1.5 cm left superior frontal IPH that enlarged to 4 × 2.5 cm within 12 hours with worsening headache and neurological deficits. She was successfully managed nonoperatively. Patient 3, after uncomplicated pregnancy and delivery, presented with a 1.5 cm left superior parietal IPH on postpartum day 7. Two days later, she acutely developed right hemiplegia. Repeat CT demonstrated a new 3.3 × 1.7 cm left frontal IPH. She was also successfully managed nonoperatively. Many diverse conditions are grouped within the category of RCVS. Dramatic ICH remains a rare and possibly underrecognized presenting feature. Prompt diagnosis and management are essential for obtaining the best outcome. PMID:24707417

  5. Segmental reversal of the small bowel as an alternative to intestinal transplantation in patients with short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Panis, Y; Messing, B; Rivet, P; Coffin, B; Hautefeuille, P; Matuchansky, C; Rambaud, J C; Valleur, P

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article reports the results of segmental reversal of the small bowel on parenteral nutrition dependency in patients with very short bowel syndrome. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Segmental reversal of the small bowel could be seen as an acceptable alternative to intestinal transplantation in patients with very short bowel syndrome deemed to be dependent on home parenteral nutrition. METHODS: Eight patients with short bowel syndrome underwent, at the time of intestinal continuity restoration, a segmental reversal of the distal (n = 7) or proximal (n = 1) small bowel. The median length of the remnant small bowel was 40 cm (range, 25 to 70 cm), including a median length of reversed segment of 12 cm (range, 8 to 15 cm). Five patients presented with jejunotransverse anastomosis, and one each with jejunorectal, jejuno left colonic, or jejunocaecal anastomosis with left colostomy. RESULTS: There were no postoperative deaths. Three patients were reoperated early for wound dehiscence, acute cholecystitis, and sepsis of unknown origin. Three patients experienced transient intestinal obstruction, which was treated conservatively. Median follow-up was 35 months (range, 2 to 108 months). One patient died of pulmonary embolism 7 months postoperatively. By the end of follow-up, three patients were on 100% oral nutrition, one had fluid and electrolyte infusions only, and, in the four other patients, parenteral nutrition regimen was reduced to four (range of 3 to 5) cyclic nocturnal infusions per week. Parenteral nutrition cessation was obtained in 3 of 5 patients at 1 years and in 3 of 3 patients at 4 years. CONCLUSION: Segmental reversal of the small bowel could be proposed as an alternative to intestinal transplantation in patients with short bowel syndrome before the possible occurrence of parenteral nutrition-related complications, because weaning for parenteral nutrition (four patients) or reduction of the frequency of infusions (four patients) was observed in the

  6. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome accompanying eclampsia: correct diagnosis using preoperative MRI.

    PubMed

    Ekawa, Yuka; Shiota, Mitsuru; Tobiume, Takako; Shimaoka, Masao; Tsuritani, Mitsuhiro; Kotani, Yasushi; Mizuno, Yoshiaki; Hoshiai, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS) is characterized by clinical symptoms such as seizures, visual disturbance, and altered mental status. It also presents abnormal findings on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicating cerebral edema in the white matter of the occipital, temporal, and parietal lobes. Both the clinical symptoms and abnormal imaging findings can be reversed by controlling blood pressure or treating the underlying condition including infection. This report describes a patient with RPLS that occurred secondary to eclampsia. A 26-year-old female, gravida 0 para 0, developed weakness and pain in her upper and lower extremities and gait disturbance during the 34th week of pregnancy, and severe pregnancy-induced hypertension near the end of the 37th week. On the first day of the 38th week, she developed constricted visual fields and complained of visual illusions. MRI revealed a high-signal-intensity area in the right occipital lobe. Immediately after MRI, the patient had a 10-sec tonic convulsion. Diagnosed with eclampsia, she underwent emergency cesarean section. MRI on the 2nd postoperative day showed that the high-signal-intensity area was slightly improved. Her visual illusions were diminished by the 4th postoperative day, and almost all subjective symptoms disappeared by the 7th postoperative day. The patient was discharged at 12th postoperative day. We recommend MRI not only for symptomatic patients with suspected RPLS, but also for asymptomatic patients with severe pregnancy-induced hypertension. If findings such as cerebral edema are observed on MRI, immediate delivery should be considered before eclamptic seizures or exacerbation of neurological symptoms. PMID:22186037

  7. The clinical and radiological spectrum of reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. A prospective series of 67 patients.

    PubMed

    Ducros, Anne; Boukobza, Monique; Porcher, Raphaël; Sarov, Mariana; Valade, Dominique; Bousser, Marie-Germaine

    2007-12-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by the association of severe headaches with or without additional neurological symptoms and a 'string and beads' appearance on cerebral arteries, which resolves spontaneously in 1-3 months. We present the clinical, neuroimaging and outcome data of 67 consecutive patients prospectively diagnosed over 3 years in our institution with an angiographically confirmed RCVS. There were 43 females and 24 males with a mean age of 42 years (19-70). RCVS was spontaneous in 37% of patients and secondary in the 63% others, to postpartum in 5 and to exposure to various vasoactive substances in 37, mainly cannabis, selective serotonin-recapture inhibitors and nasal decongestants. The main pattern of presentation (94% of patients) was multiple thunderclap headaches recurring over a mean period of 1 week. In 51 patients (76%), headaches resumed the clinical presentation. Various complications were observed, with different time courses. Cortical subarachnoid haemorrhage (cSAH) (22%), intracerebral haemorrhage (6%), seizures (3%) and reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy (9%) were early complications, occurring mainly within the first week. Ischaemic events, including TIAs (16%) and cerebral infarction (4%), occurred significantly later than haemorrhagic events, mainly during the second week. Significant sex differences were observed: women were older, had more frequent single-drug exposure and a higher rate of stroke and cSAH. Sixty-one patients were treated by nimodipine: 36% had recurrent headaches, 7% TIAs and one multiple infarcts. The different time courses of thunderclap headaches, vasoconstriction and strokes suggest that the responsible vasospastic disorder starts distally and progresses towards medium sized and large arteries. No relapse was observed during the 16 +/- 12.4 months of follow-up. Our data suggest that RCVS is more frequent than previously thought, is more often secondary particularly to

  8. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome associated with fingolimod treatment in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis three months after childbirth.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Markus; Weber, Ralph; Herold, Michèle; Berlit, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by acute thunderclap headache, evidence of vasoconstriction in conventional angiography or magnetic resonance angiography and reversibility of these phenomena within 12 weeks. Some triggering factors, for example drugs such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, sumatriptan, tacrolimus, cyclophosphamide and cocaine, or states such as pregnancy, puerperium or migraine have been described. We describe the case of a 29-year-old woman with RCVS associated with fingolimod three months after childbirth. This case represents the first report of RCVS in fingolimod treatment. PMID:26283695

  9. Reverse Transcription Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay for the Detection of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Abd El Wahed, Ahmed; Patel, Pranav; Heidenreich, Doris; Hufert, Frank T.; Weidmann, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in the eastern Mediterranean and imported cases to Europe has alerted public health authorities. Currently, detection of MERS-CoV in patient samples is done by real-time RT-PCR. Samples collected from suspected cases are sent to highly-equipped centralized laboratories for screening. A rapid point-of-care test is needed to allow more widespread mobile detection of the virus directly from patient material. In this study, we describe the development of a reverse transcription isothermal Recombinase Polymerase Amplification (RT-RPA) assay for the identification of MERS-CoV. A partial nucleocapsid gene RNA molecular standard of MERS-coronavirus was used to determine the assay sensitivity. The isothermal (42°C) MERS-CoV RT-RPA was as sensitive as real-time RT-PCR (10 RNA molecules), rapid (3-7 minutes) and mobile (using tubescanner weighing 1kg). The MERS-CoV RT-RPA showed cross-detection neither of any of the RNAs of several coronaviruses and respiratory viruses affecting humans nor of the human genome. The developed isothermal real-time RT-RPA is ideal for rapid mobile molecular MERS-CoV monitoring in acute patients and may also facilitate the search for the animal reservoir of MERS-CoV. PMID:24459611

  10. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a patient with a Chiari I malformation

    PubMed Central

    Hansberry, David R.; Agarwal, Nitin; Tomei, Krystal L.; Goldstein, Ira M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The authors describe a unique case of a patient who developed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) following postoperative treatment of a Chiari I malformation. Case Decsription: A 25-year-old female presented with complaints of left upper and lower extremity paresthesias and gait disturbances. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain and cervical spine showed a Chiari I malformation with tonsillar descent beyond the level of the C1 lamina. She underwent a suboccipital craniectomy and C1 laminectomy with cerebellar tonsillar cauterization and duraplasty. Postoperatively, an MRI showed bilateral acute infarcts of the cerebellar vermis. She was initially treated for cerebellar ischemia with hypertensive therapy with a subsequent decline in her neurologic status and generalized tonic–clonic seizure. Further workup showed evidence of PRES. After weaning pressors, the patient had a significant progressive improvement in her mental status. Conclusion: Although the mechanism of PRES remains controversial given its diverse clinical presentation, several theories implicate hypertension and steroid use as causative agents. PMID:24232171

  11. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome during sunitinib therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hadj, Jamal Oulad; Braven, Rogier DEN; Tillier, Corrine; Schrijver, Hans M; Verheul, Henk M W; VAN DER Vliet, Hans J

    2012-06-01

    Sunitinib is an oral receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor with potent antiangiogenic and antitumor activity that is approved for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC), malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumors and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Well-known side effects of sunitinib include hypertension, fatigue, thyroid dysfunction, cardiotoxicity, gastrointestinal toxicity and skin toxicity. In this study, we report the case of a 61-year-old male with papillary metastatic RCC who responded to sunitinib but developed generalized tonic-clonic seizures during the third cycle. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was compatible with reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS). After the administration of anti-epileptic drugs and the withdrawal of sunitinib there was rapid clinical improvement. Notably, radiological characteristics of RPLS persisted during second-line therapy with the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus and only resolved when everolimus was terminated due to disease progression. Although sunitinib-induced RPLS has been reported previously, our case is the first to additionally suggest that everolimus may sustain and therefore potentially contribute to the occurrence of RPLS. PMID:22783436

  12. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome due to High Dose Corticosteroids for an MS Relapse.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Sarah A; Rana, Robina; Lee, Donald; Paul, Terri; Mahon, Jeffrey L

    2015-01-01

    Increased blood pressure is a known adverse effect associated with corticosteroids but little is published regarding the risk with the high doses used in multiple sclerosis (MS). A 53-year-old female with known relapsing remitting MS presented with a new brainstem relapse. Standard of care treatment for an acute MS relapse, 1250 mg of oral prednisone for 5 days, was initiated. She developed an occipital headache and dizziness and felt generally unwell. These symptoms persisted after treatment was complete. On presentation to medical attention, her blood pressure was 199/110 mmHg, although she had no history of hypertension. MRI changes were consistent with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), demonstrating abnormal T2 signal in both thalami, the posterior occipital and posterior parietal white matter with mild sulcal effacement. As her pressure normalized with medication, her symptoms resolved and the MRI changes improved. No secondary cause of hypertension was found. This is the first reported case of PRES secondary to high dose corticosteroid use for an MS relapse without a history of hypertension and with no other secondary cause of hypertension identified. This rare complication should be considered in MS patients presenting with a headache or other neurological symptoms during treatment for a relapse. PMID:26101676

  13. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: temporary visual loss after spinal deformity surgery.

    PubMed

    Kueper, Janina; Loftus, Michael L; Boachie-Adjei, Oheneba; Lebl, Darren

    2015-11-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a rare cause of temporary postoperative visual loss (POVL) after spinal deformity surgery. We report on 2 patients diagnosed with PRES after spinal deformity surgery, who were closely examined postoperatively. A 78-year-old woman with severe disability due to degenerative lumbar spondylosis after laminectomy was treated with transpsoas lumbar interbody fusion from L1 to L4 and posterior spinal fusion from T10 to pelvis. She developed confusion and bilateral visual loss on postoperative day 7. A second patient, a 51-year-old woman with progressive pain and decompensation caused by adult scoliosis, was treated with posterior spinal fusion from T3 to pelvis and interbody fusion from L4 to S1 via a presacral interbody fusion approach. She developed bilateral visual loss on postoperative day 15. Both patients achieved a complete recovery of their vision after medical management of PRES. Timely diagnosis of PRES and prompt intervention allow for a good patient prognosis and complete recovery of eyesight. PMID:26566564

  14. Reverse transcription recombinase polymerase amplification assay for the detection of middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Abd El Wahed, Ahmed; Patel, Pranav; Heidenreich, Doris; Hufert, Frank T; Weidmann, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in the eastern Mediterranean and imported cases to Europe has alerted public health authorities. Currently, detection of MERS-CoV in patient samples is done by real-time RT-PCR. Samples collected from suspected cases are sent to highly-equipped centralized laboratories for screening. A rapid point-of-care test is needed to allow more widespread mobile detection of the virus directly from patient material. In this study, we describe the development of a reverse transcription isothermal Recombinase Polymerase Amplification (RT-RPA) assay for the identification of MERS-CoV. A partial nucleocapsid gene RNA molecular standard of MERS-coronavirus was used to determine the assay sensitivity. The isothermal (42°C) MERS-CoV RT-RPA was as sensitive as real-time RT-PCR (10 RNA molecules), rapid (3-7 minutes) and mobile (using tubescanner weighing 1kg). The MERS-CoV RT-RPA showed cross-detection neither of any of the RNAs of several coronaviruses and respiratory viruses affecting humans nor of the human genome. The developed isothermal real-time RT-RPA is ideal for rapid mobile molecular MERS-CoV monitoring in acute patients and may also facilitate the search for the animal reservoir of MERS-CoV. PMID:24459611

  15. Treatment of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome that Occurred in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus by Plasmapheresis.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Zehra İpek; Turna, Canan Kamile; Özerdem, Çiğdem Yasemin; Yavuz, Sara; Baykara, Nur; Solak, Mine

    2015-08-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is characterized by visual and mental disturbances, nausea and vomiting and generalized or focal convulsions and often represents itself with parietal and occipital oedema formation. We want to report the treatment of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome with plasmapheresis, which developed in a 35-year-old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus diagnosed by renal biopsy 3 years ago. She has been followed up in the intensive care unit three times. However, she had been transferred to the nephrology department of our university hospital because of her uncontrolled blood pressure. Oral antihypertensive therapy, corticosteroid 500 mg 1 × 1 and cyclophosphamide were started for the activation of lupus. After the detection of low complement levels, systemic lupus erythematosus activation was suspected. She developed mental deterioration after her first plasmapheresis treatment and was then consulted by the neurology and intensive care unit doctors. Diffusion cranial magnetic resonance imaging was found compatible with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. The patient was transferred to our intensive care unit. The patient gained consciousness after her second plasmapheresis. After 5 days of follow-up in our intensive care unit and after significant regression was observed in the magnetic resonance imaging analysis, the patient was transferred to the nephrology service conscious, cooperated and orientated. At the nephrology service, after a total of 13 times of plasmapheresis, complement levels were increased and she was discharged with corticosteroid therapy. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome can be observed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and intensive care unit treatment may be required. To control the hypertension, plasmapheresis should be kept in mind in addition to the multiple antihypertensive therapy in these patients. PMID:27366515

  16. Treatment of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome that Occurred in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus by Plasmapheresis

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Zehra İpek; Turna, Canan Kamile; Özerdem, Çiğdem Yasemin; Yavuz, Sara; Baykara, Nur; Solak, Mine

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is characterized by visual and mental disturbances, nausea and vomiting and generalized or focal convulsions and often represents itself with parietal and occipital oedema formation. We want to report the treatment of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome with plasmapheresis, which developed in a 35-year-old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus diagnosed by renal biopsy 3 years ago. She has been followed up in the intensive care unit three times. However, she had been transferred to the nephrology department of our university hospital because of her uncontrolled blood pressure. Oral antihypertensive therapy, corticosteroid 500 mg 1 × 1 and cyclophosphamide were started for the activation of lupus. After the detection of low complement levels, systemic lupus erythematosus activation was suspected. She developed mental deterioration after her first plasmapheresis treatment and was then consulted by the neurology and intensive care unit doctors. Diffusion cranial magnetic resonance imaging was found compatible with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. The patient was transferred to our intensive care unit. The patient gained consciousness after her second plasmapheresis. After 5 days of follow-up in our intensive care unit and after significant regression was observed in the magnetic resonance imaging analysis, the patient was transferred to the nephrology service conscious, cooperated and orientated. At the nephrology service, after a total of 13 times of plasmapheresis, complement levels were increased and she was discharged with corticosteroid therapy. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome can be observed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and intensive care unit treatment may be required. To control the hypertension, plasmapheresis should be kept in mind in addition to the multiple antihypertensive therapy in these patients. PMID:27366515

  17. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in cancer patients: a single institution retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Kamiya-Matsuoka, Carlos; Paker, Asif M; Chi, Linda; Youssef, Ayda; Tummala, Sudhakar; Loghin, Monica E

    2016-05-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-radiologic entity. Its management and outcome in the oncology population is limited because it is still difficult to identify despite an increasingly recognized occurrence. This is the largest retrospective study of PRES in cancer patients reported from a single institution. We explore the clinical manifestations and radiologic features to comprehensively assess PRES in order to prevent permanent neurologic deficits and mortality. We retrospectively identified 69 patients with cancer who developed PRES at MDACC between 01/2006 to 06/2012. Clinical and radiographic data were abstracted from their records and reviewed for our analysis. Mean age at PRES onset was 52 ± 17.8 years. Fifty-two (75 %; p < 0.001) patients were women. Most common diagnoses were leukemia (30 %) and lymphoma (12 %). Forty-eight (70 %) patients were treated with chemotherapy, 21 (30 %) bone marrow transplant and 14 (20 %) tacrolimus. Most common clinical presentation was seizures (67 %). PRES was associated with hypertension in 62 (90 %) patients. On brain MRI, 33 (44 %) patients had some evidence of hemorrhage, 22 (73 %) of these were thrombocytopenic. Thirty-five (51 %) patients fully recovered and 19 (28 %) had permanent neurological deficits. Morbidity and mortality were associated with continuation with offending agent, thrombocytopenia, variations in mean arterial pressure ≥20 mmHg, electrographic seizures at onset, atypical MRI pattern and delay in diagnostic imaging (7.4 ± 4.8 days vs. 1.9 ± 1.8 days; p = 0.031) as half of them did not receive a prompt intervention. Special attention should be given to patients who present with high-risk factors in order to prevent development of PRES or decrease patient morbidity and mortality. Management of PRES should be guided by the radiographic findings. Overall, early recognition, discontinuation of the offending agents, correction of thrombocytopenia

  18. Reversal of Handedness Effects on Bimanual Coordination in Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvey, G. M.; Ringenbach, S. D. R.; Jung, M. L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Research on unimanual tasks suggested that motor asymmetries between hands may be reduced in people with Down syndrome. Our study examined handedness (as assessed by hand performance) and perceptual-motor integration effects on bimanual coordination. Methods: Adults with Down syndrome (13 non-right-handed, 22 right-handed), along with…

  19. Acute intermittent porphyria leading to posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES): a rare cause of abdominal pain and seizures.

    PubMed

    Dagens, Andrew; Gilhooley, Michael James

    2016-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an inherited deficiency in the haem biosynthesis pathway. AIP is rare, affecting around 1 in 75 000 people. Acute attacks are characterised by abdominal pain associated with autonomic, neurological and psychiatric symptoms. AIP is rarely associated with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). PRES is a clinicoradiological condition caused by the failure of the posterior circulation to autoregulate, resulting in cerebral oedema, headaches, nausea and seizures. This association is important because drugs used in the management of seizures may worsen an attack of AIP. This article describes a case of AIP and PRES in a young woman. PMID:27277587

  20. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes and primary angiitis of the central nervous system: clinical, imaging, and angiographic comparison.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Aneesh B; Topcuoglu, Mehmet A; Fok, Joshua W; Kursun, Oguzhan; Nogueira, Raul G; Frosch, Matthew P; Caviness, Verne S

    2016-06-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes (RCVS) and primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) are invariably considered in the differential diagnosis of new cerebral arteriopathies. However, prompt and accurate diagnosis remains challenging. Here we compared the features of 159 RCVS to 47 PACNS patients and developed criteria for prompt bedside diagnosis. Recurrent thunderclap headache (TCH), and single TCH combined with either normal neuroimaging, border zone infarcts, or vasogenic edema, have 100% positive predictive value for diagnosing RCVS or RCVS-spectrum disorders. In patients without TCH and positive angiography, neuroimaging can discriminate RCVS (no lesion) from PACNS (deep/brainstem infarcts). Ann Neurol 2016;79:882-894. PMID:27043703

  1. Management of Refractory Noninsulinoma Pancreatogenous Hypoglycemia Syndrome with Gastric Bypass Reversal: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Bhavana B.; Click, Benjamin; Eid, George; Codario, Ronald A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is a commonly performed, effective bariatric procedure; however, rarely, complications such as postprandial hypoglycemia due to noninsulinoma pancreatogenous hypoglycemia syndrome (NIPHS) may ensue. Management of refractory NIPHS is challenging. We report a case that was successfully treated with RYGB reversal. Case Report. A 58-year-old male with history of RYGB nine months earlier for morbid obesity presented for evaluation of postprandial, hypoglycemic seizures. Testing for insulin level, insulin antibodies, oral hypoglycemic agents, pituitary axis hormone levels, and cortisol stimulation was unrevealing. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen was unremarkable. A 72-hour fast was completed without hypoglycemia. Mixed meal testing demonstrated endogenous hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia (EHH) and selective arterial calcium stimulation testing (SACST) was positive. Strict dietary modifications, maximal medical therapy, gastrostomy tube feeding, and stomal reduction failed to alleviate symptoms. Ultimately, he underwent laparoscopic reversal of RYGB. Now, 9 months after reversal, he has markedly reduced hypoglycemia burden. Discussion. Hyperfunctioning islets secondary to exaggerated incretin response and altered intestinal nutrient delivery are hypothesized to be causative in NIPHS. For refractory cases, there is increasing skepticism about the safety and efficacy of pancreatic resection. RYGB reversal may be successful. PMID:26523235

  2. Sheehan's syndrome with reversible dilated cardiomyopathy: A case report and brief overview.

    PubMed

    Islam, A K M Monwarul; Hasnat, Mohammad A; Doza, Fatema; Jesmin, Humayra

    2014-04-01

    Sheehan's syndrome is a rare condition characterized by post-partal panhypopituitarism due to necrosis of adenohypophysis resulting from severe post-partum hemorrhage. Lethargy, amenorrhea and failure of lactation are the usual presenting features. Cardiac involvement in Sheehan's syndrome is rare. The case presented here describes dilated cardiomyopathy in a 36-year-old lady who failed to respond adequately to the standard anti-failure treatment. Further investigation revealed the diagnosis of Sheehan's syndrome. Besides other manifestations, cardiac function reverted to normal after giving replacement therapy with glucocorticoid, levothyroxine and sex hormone. Physicians, specially those in developing countries, should have high index of suspicion for the diagnosis of Sheehan's syndrome while dealing with a case of 'peripartal dilated cardiomyopathy'. Persistent amenorrhea and failure of lactation may be important clues in this context. Timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment can lessen the sufferings of the patients. PMID:24719543

  3. Characteristics of reversible and nonreversible COPD and asthma and COPD overlap syndrome patients: an analysis of salbutamol Easyhaler data

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Veronika; Gálffy, Gabriella; Orosz, Márta; Kováts, Zsuzsanna; Odler, Balázs; Selroos, Olof; Tamási, Lilla

    2016-01-01

    The choice of inhaler device for bronchodilator reversibility is crucial since suboptimal inhalation technique may influence the result. On the other hand, bronchodilator response also varies from time to time and may depend on patient characteristics. In this study, patients with airway obstruction (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]/forced vital capacity [FVC] ratio <70% in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]; <80% in asthma) were included (n=121, age: 57.8±17.3 years). Bronchodilator reversibility (American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society criteria) was tested in patients with COPD (n=63) and asthma and COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS; n=12). Forty-six asthmatics served as controls. Reversibility was tested with 400 µg salbutamol dry powder inhaler (Buventol Easyhaler, Orion Pharma Ltd, Espoo, Finland). Demographic data and patients’ perceptions of Easyhaler compared with β2-agonist pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) were analyzed. American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society guideline defined reversibility was found in 21 out of 63 COPD patients and in two out of 12 ACOS patients. Airway obstruction was more severe in COPD patients as compared with controls (mean FEV1 and FEV1% predicted both P<0.0001). Average response to salbutamol was significantly lower in COPD patients compared with asthma controls (P<0.0001). Reversibility was equally often found in smokers as in never-smokers (33% vs 34%). Nonreversible COPD patients had higher mean weight, body mass index, and FEV1/FVC compared with reversible COPD patients. Most patients preferred Easyhaler and defined its use as simpler and more effective than use of a pMDI. Never-smokers and patients with asthma experienced Easy-haler somewhat easier to use than smokers and patients with COPD. In conclusion, a substantial part of patients with COPD or ACOS showed reversibility to salbutamol dry powder inhaler. Nonreversible patients with COPD were characterized by

  4. Characteristics of reversible and nonreversible COPD and asthma and COPD overlap syndrome patients: an analysis of salbutamol Easyhaler data.

    PubMed

    Müller, Veronika; Gálffy, Gabriella; Orosz, Márta; Kováts, Zsuzsanna; Odler, Balázs; Selroos, Olof; Tamási, Lilla

    2016-01-01

    The choice of inhaler device for bronchodilator reversibility is crucial since suboptimal inhalation technique may influence the result. On the other hand, bronchodilator response also varies from time to time and may depend on patient characteristics. In this study, patients with airway obstruction (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]/forced vital capacity [FVC] ratio <70% in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]; <80% in asthma) were included (n=121, age: 57.8±17.3 years). Bronchodilator reversibility (American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society criteria) was tested in patients with COPD (n=63) and asthma and COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS; n=12). Forty-six asthmatics served as controls. Reversibility was tested with 400 µg salbutamol dry powder inhaler (Buventol Easyhaler, Orion Pharma Ltd, Espoo, Finland). Demographic data and patients' perceptions of Easyhaler compared with β2-agonist pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) were analyzed. American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society guideline defined reversibility was found in 21 out of 63 COPD patients and in two out of 12 ACOS patients. Airway obstruction was more severe in COPD patients as compared with controls (mean FEV1 and FEV1% predicted both P<0.0001). Average response to salbutamol was significantly lower in COPD patients compared with asthma controls (P<0.0001). Reversibility was equally often found in smokers as in never-smokers (33% vs 34%). Nonreversible COPD patients had higher mean weight, body mass index, and FEV1/FVC compared with reversible COPD patients. Most patients preferred Easyhaler and defined its use as simpler and more effective than use of a pMDI. Never-smokers and patients with asthma experienced Easy-haler somewhat easier to use than smokers and patients with COPD. In conclusion, a substantial part of patients with COPD or ACOS showed reversibility to salbutamol dry powder inhaler. Nonreversible patients with COPD were characterized by higher

  5. Primary therapy for small cell lung cancer reversing the Eaton-Lambert syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kalter, S.; Dhingra, H.M.; Farha, P.

    1985-02-01

    A case report is presented of a patient with small cell carcinoma of the lung associated with the classic Eaton-Lambert syndrome. He received intermittent anticholinesterase therapy, with minimal improvement. Combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy for the primary neoplasm produced considerable improvement, with normal EMG findings after complete remission was achieved. 7 references, 1 table.

  6. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome of the midbrain and hypothalamus - a case report of uremic encephalopathy presenting with hypersomnia].

    PubMed

    Shiga, Yuji; Kanaya, Yuhei; Kono, Ryuhei; Takeshima, Shinichi; Shimoe, Yutaka; Kuriyama, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 73-year-old woman presenting with hypersomnia and loss of appetite. She suffered from diabetic nephropathy without receiving dialysis, in addition to hypertension, which was well controlled without marked fluctuation. There were no objective neurological findings. Her laboratory findings showed renal failure with 3.7 mg/dl of serum creatinine and decreased serum sodium and potassium. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) with vasogenic edema, which was distributed in the dorsal midbrain, medial thalamus, and hypothalamus. After we addressed the electrolyte imbalance and dehydration, her symptoms and MRI findings gradually improved, but faint high signals on MRI were still present 3 months later. Orexin in the cerebrospinal fluid was decreased on admission, but improved 6 months later. We diagnosed uremic encephalopathy with atypical form PRES showing functional disturbance of the hypothalamus. PMID:26640128

  7. Reversal of severe hepatopulmonary syndrome in chronic hepatic cirrhosis by living donor liver transplantation: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kefei; Li, Bo

    2011-03-01

    Severe hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a rare complication of decompensated liver cirrhosis and a relative contraindication for liver transplantation. This report describes the treatment of two cases with severe HPS resulting from chronic liver failure by living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). The clinical data of the two cases were reviewed. The parameters included the intrapulmonary shunt ratio as measured by (99m)Tc pulmonary scintigraphy, perioperative treatment and examination results, and the duration of post-transplant hypoxemia. Liver dysfunction was reversed in both patients 2-3 weeks after LDLT. Both patients experienced slightly increased intrapulmonary shunt ratios in the first postoperative month, followed by substantial decreases at postoperative days 90 and 361. These findings suggest severe HPS can be resolved by LDLT. Pulmonary infection requires proper treatment and may be anticipated during the early postoperative course. The differences in the intrapulmonary shunt ratio between these patients may contribute to the differences in the time required for rehabilitation. PMID:21365434

  8. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Resolving Within 48 Hours in a Normotensive Patient Who Underwent Thoracic Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Vakharia, Kunal; Siasios, Ioannis; Dimopoulos, Vassilios G.; Pollina, John

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) usually manifests with severe headaches, seizures, and visual disturbances due to uncontrollable hypertension. A patient (age in the early 60s) with a history of renal cell cancer presented with lower-extremity weakness and paresthesias. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the thoracic spine revealed a T8 vertebral body metastatic lesion with cord compression at that level. The patient underwent preoperative embolization of the tumor followed by posterior resection and placement of percutaneous pedicle screws and rods. Postoperatively, the patient experienced decreased visual acuity bilaterally. Abnormal MRI findings consisted of T2 hyperintense lesions and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery changes in both occipital lobes, consistent with the unique brain imaging pattern associated with PRES. The patient’s blood pressure was normal and stable from the first day of hospitalization. The patient was kept on high-dose steroid therapy, which was started intraoperatively, and improved within 48 hours after symptom onset. PMID:26858804

  9. Bay K 8644 induces a reversible spasticity-like syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Petersen, E N

    1986-11-01

    The dihydropyridine Bay K 8644 exerts a positive modulation of Ca2+ channels. Administration of Bay K 8644 3-5 mg/kg i.p. to rats induces within 15 min a severe spasticity syndrome consisting of stiff tail, arched back, stretching and twisting of forelimbs and hindlegs and backwards motility and rolling over. The syndrome was effectively antagonized by nifedipine 3-30 mg/kg but not by the other Ca2+ channel blockers flunarizine, diltiazem and verapamil. Diltiazem even enhanced the spasticity. Diazepam 10-30 mg/kg i.p. completely blocked the spasticity whereas the other muscle relaxants (-)-baclofen and the beta-carboline ZK 93423 were completely inactive. These findings with Bay K 8644 suggest that spasticity may be caused by changed Ca2+ homeostasis. PMID:2431919

  10. Evidence for partial pharmaceutical reversal of the cancer anorexia–cachexia syndrome: the case of anamorelin

    PubMed Central

    Anker, Stefan D; Coats, Andrew J S; Morley, John E

    2015-01-01

    A major component of the cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome is a decline in food intake. Up until now none of the drugs that improve appetite also improve skeletal muscle. Recent studies have suggested that the oral ghrelin-analog, anamorelin, increased food intake and muscle mass. Unfortunately, it does not increase muscle power. Its regulatory future is uncertain, although it has important clinical effects. PMID:26675382

  11. Calcineurin Inhibitors Associated Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Solid Organ Transplantation: Report of 2 Cases and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Song, Turun; Rao, Zhengsheng; Tan, Qiling; Qiu, Yang; Liu, Jinpeng; Huang, Zhongli; Wang, Xianding; Lin, Tao

    2016-04-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a rare neurologic side effect of calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) with poorly understood clinical features.We report cases of 2 patients with PRES developing after kidney transplantation and summarize PRES clinical features through a literature review.The 1st case was a 28-year-old man who received a kidney transplant from a deceased donor. Initial immunosuppressive therapy consisted of tacrolimus/mycophenolate mofetil/prednisolone. He developed headache and blurred vision with visual field loss15 days after transplantation and generalized seizures 4 days later. The 2nd case was a 34-year-old man who received a living kidney transplant. His initial immunosuppressive therapy comprised tacrolimus/mycophenolate mofetil/prednisolone. Two months after transplantation, he developed seizures. Both patients were diagnosed with PRES based on neurological symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings; they recovered after switching from tacrolimus to either a cyclosporine or a lower tacrolimus dose. CNI-associated PRES is an acute neurological syndrome with seizures, encephalopathy, visual abnormalities, headache, focal neurological deficits, and nausea/vomiting. It is always accompanied by hypertension. A fluid-attenuated inversion recovery signal MRI scan typically shows reversible subcortical white matter changes in the posterior cerebral hemisphere that usually occur within the 1st month after transplantation. CNI-associated PRES has a generally favorable prognosis with early diagnosis and prompt treatment including alternating or discontinuing CNIs and blood pressure control.CNI-associated PRES should be considered in patients exhibiting acute neurological symptoms after transplantation. Early diagnosis and immediate treatment are critical for a favorable prognosis. PMID:27057842

  12. A novel mutation (296 del G) of the SOX90 gene in a patient with campomelic syndrome and sex reversal.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, S; Yokoyama, Y; Teraoka, M; Mori, R; Inoue, C; Yamashita, S; Tamai, H; Funato, M; Seino, Y

    2000-09-01

    The human SOX9 gene is responsible for the campomelic syndrome (CMPS) and sex reversal. This gene encodes a transcription factor containing a DNA binding domain homologous to the SRY high mobility group (HMG) domain. A novel mutation of SOX9, i.e. a single G deletion in one allele at nt 296 from A of the first ATG in the open reading frame, was identified in a patient with CMPS with sex reversal. The deletion resulted in a frameshift mutation upstream of the HMG box and a stop codon 30 bp downstream of the HMG box. The predicted truncated SOX9 protein contained 108 amino acids instead of the 509 amino acids of the normal SOX9 protein, removing nearly 80% of the SOX9 protein, including the HMG and the C-terminal transactivation domain. Most patients with CMPS reported previously died within the neonatal period. Our findings that the patient has survived, although has been in daily need of mechanical ventilation support for 5 years and 3 months despite a severely impaired SOX9 protein, do not support a linear relationship between the type of mutation and severity of the clinical outcome. PMID:11076045

  13. Reversible Myocarditis and Pericarditis after Black Widow Spider Bite or Kounis Syndrome?

    PubMed

    Yaman, Mehmet; Mete, Turkan; Ozer, Ismail; Yaman, Elif; Beton, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Clinical manifestation of black widow spider bite is variable and occasionally leads to death in rural areas. Cases of myocarditis and pericarditis after black widow spider bite are rare and the associated prognostic significance is unknown. Kounis syndrome has been defined as an acute coronary syndrome in the setting of allergic or hypersensitivity and anaphylactic or anaphylactoid insults that manifests as vasospastic angina or acute myocardial infarction or stent thrombosis. Allergic myocarditis is caused by myocardial inflammation triggered by infectious pathogens, toxic, ischemic, or mechanical injuries, such as drug-related inflammation and other immune reactions. A 15-year-old child was admitted to the emergency department with pulmonary edema after spider bite. ST segment depression on ECG, elevated cardiac enzymes and global left ventricular hypokinesia (with ejection fraction of 22%), and local pericardial effusion findings confirmed the diagnosis of myopericarditis. After heart failure and pulmonary edema oriented medical therapy, clinical status improved. Patient showed a progressive improvement and LV functions returned to normal on the sixth day. Myopericarditis complicating spider bite is rare and sometimes fatal. The mechanism is not clearly known. Alpha-latrotoxin of the black widow spider is mostly convicted in these cases. But allergy or hypersensitivity may play a role in myocardial damage. PMID:26509087

  14. A reversible bilateral renal artery stenosis in association with antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Remondino, G I; Mysler, E; Pissano, M N; Furattini, M C; Basta, M C; Presas, J L; Allievi, A

    2000-01-01

    We describe a 26-year-old white female with a history of Raynaud phenomenon, erythema nodosum, polyarthralgias, migraine, vertigo, seizures, transient ischemic attacks, one fetal loss, and false positive VDRL, who developed milk hypertension without overt lupus nephritis. She had positive antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (dsDNA) antibodies. The lupus anticoagulant test (LAC) and cardiolipins antibodies (aCL) were positive. She was diagnosed as having a Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-like illness (SLE-like) with 'secondary' antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Renal spiral computed tomography (CT) with intravenous (IV) contrast showed bilateral renal artery stenosis. Anticoagulation with acenocumarol was started. She became normotensive without antihypertensive drugs five months later. A follow-up renal spiral CT showed complete recanalization of both renal arteries, making thrombosis the more likely culprit pathology in the stenosis. After two years follow up the patient is normotensive. She remains on acenocumarol. PMID:10713649

  15. Intervention with education and exercise reverses the metabolic syndrome in adults.

    PubMed

    Mujica, Verónica; Urzúa, Alberto; Leiva, Elba; Díaz, Nora; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo; Vásquez, Marcela; Rojas, Edgardo; Icaza, Gloria; Toro, Carla; Orrego, Roxana; Palomo, Iván

    2010-01-01

    About 29% of the adult population of Talca, Chile, suffers from the metabolic syndrome (MS), a value higher than the national prevalence. Evidence indicates that exercise and nutritional changes reduce the predominance of this syndrome. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of a structured interventional program of physical activity and nutritional counseling in adults with MS. Fifty-one subjects were studied: 27 were included in the interventional program (I-MS). The control group was formed by 24 individuals who did not participate in the program (NI-MS). We assessed body weight, corporal composition, arterial pressure, glycemia, and lipid profile at baseline and after 18 weeks of treatment. After this period, the I-SM group showed a significant decrease in triglycerides (geometric mean 202.2 to 110.5 mg/dL, P < .001), diastolic blood pressure (mean 85.4 to 79.6 mm Hg, P = .001), waist circumference (mean men 101.5 to 94.1 cm, P < .001; mean women 107.2 to 96.2 cm, P < .001), weight (mean 81.1 to 77.2 kg, P < .001), and body mass index (mean 31.8 to 30.2 kg/m(2), P < .001). In the NI-MS group, the individual parameters did not change significantly. Our results show that a non-pharmacological treatment based on exercise exerts an important beneficial effect in patients with MS, mainly on the waist circumference, blood pressure, and triglycerides. PMID:20471000

  16. Reverse pupillary block associated with pigment dispersion syndrome after in-the-bag intraocular lens implantation.

    PubMed

    Itagaki, Hideo; Kunikata, Toshio; Hiratsuka, Kentaro; Saito, Junichiro; Oshika, Tetsuro

    2013-12-01

    A 61-year-old man with high myopia who had received a systemic α1A-adrenoceptor antagonist had phacoemulsification and in-the-bag intraocular lens implantation in the right eye. One day postoperatively, marked pigment dispersion in the anterior chamber, posterior bowing of the iris, and iridodonesis were noted associated with a subsequent elevation in intraocular pressure (IOP). Pharmacological pupil dilation was effective in reducing pigment dispersion and IOP, and laser peripheral iridotomy was performed to alleviate posterior bowing of the iris. We hypothesize that dynamic changes in the aqueous humor flow by cataract surgery and latent flaccidity of the iris due to the systemic α1A-adrenoceptor antagonist caused reverse pupillary block. High myopia may be another risk factor for this complication. PMID:24140374

  17. R-Baclofen Reverses a Social Behavior Deficit and Elevated Protein Synthesis in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Mei; Huang, Tianjian; Kader, Michael; Krych, Leland; Xia, Zengyan; Burlin, Thomas; Zeidler, Zachary; Zhao, Tingrui

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common known inherited form of intellectual disability and the single genomic cause of autism spectrum disorders. It is caused by the absence of a fragile X mental retardation gene (Fmr1) product, FMRP, an RNA-binding translation suppressor. Elevated rates of protein synthesis in the brain and an imbalance between synaptic signaling via glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are both considered important in the pathogenesis of FXS. In a mouse model of FXS (Fmr1 knockout [KO]), treatment with R-baclofen reversed some behavioral and biochemical phenotypes. A remaining crucial question is whether R-baclofen is also able to reverse increased brain protein synthesis rates. Methods: To answer this question, we measured regional rates of cerebral protein synthesis in vivo with the L-[1-14C]leucine method in vehicle- and R-baclofen–treated wildtype and Fmr1 KO mice. We further probed signaling pathways involved in the regulation of protein synthesis. Results: Acute R-baclofen administration corrected elevated protein synthesis and reduced deficits on a test of social behavior in adult Fmr1 KO mice. It also suppressed activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, particularly in synaptosome-enriched fractions, but it had no effect on extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 activity. Ninety min after R-baclofen treatment, we observed an increase in metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 expression in the frontal cortex, a finding that may shed light on the tolerance observed in human studies with this drug. Conclusions: Our results suggest that treatment via activation of the GABA (GABA receptor subtype B) system warrants further study in patients with FXS. PMID:25820841

  18. Sclerostin Inhibition Reverses Skeletal Fragility in an Lrp5-Deficient Mouse Model of OPPG Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kedlaya, Rajendra; Veera, Shreya; Horan, Daniel J.; Moss, Rachel E.; Ayturk, Ugur M.; Jacobsen, Christina M.; Bowen, Margot E.; Paszty, Chris; Warman, Matthew L.; Robling, Alexander G.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis pseudoglioma syndrome (OPPG) is a rare genetic disease that produces debilitating effects in the skeleton. OPPG is caused by mutations in LRP5, a WNT co-receptor that mediates osteoblast activity. WNT signaling through LRP5, and also through the closely related receptor LRP6, is inhibited by the protein sclerostin (SOST). It is unclear whether OPPG patients might benefit from the anabolic action of sclerostin neutralization therapy (an approach currently being pursued in clinical trials for postmenopausal osteoporosis) in light of their LRP5 deficiency and consequent osteoblast impairment. To assess whether loss of sclerostin is anabolic in OPPG, we measured bone properties in a mouse model of OPPG (Lrp5−/−), a mouse model of sclerosteosis (Sost−/−), and in mice with both genes knocked out (Lrp5−/−;Sost−/−). Lrp5−/−;Sost−/− mice have larger, denser, and stronger bones than do Lrp5−/− mice, indicating that SOST deficiency can improve bone properties via pathways that do not require LRP5. Next, we determined whether the anabolic effects of sclerostin depletion in Lrp5−/− mice are retained in adult mice by treating 17-week-old Lrp5−/− mice with a sclerostin antibody for 3 weeks. Lrp5+/+ and Lrp5−/− mice each exhibited osteoanabolic responses to antibody therapy, as indicated by increased bone mineral density, content, and formation rates. Collectively, our data show that inhibiting sclerostin can improve bone mass whether LRP5 is present or not. In the absence of LRP5, the anabolic effects of SOST depletion can occur via other receptors (such as LRP4/6). Regardless of the mechanism, our results suggest that humans with OPPG might benefit from sclerostin neutralization therapies. PMID:24225945

  19. Reversibility of albuminuria and continuous positive airway pressure compliance in patients of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ning-Hung; Chou, Yu-Ting; Lee, Pei-Hsien; Lin, Shih-Wei; Chuang, Li-Pang; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Yang, Cheng-Ta

    2016-06-01

    A positive correlation between albuminuria and severity of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has been demonstrated, as indexed by urine albumin-to-creatinine ratios (UACRs). However, the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on albuminuria in OSAS patients has not been established.Sixty subjects, with apnea-hypopnea indices >15 events per hour and no other diagnoses associated with albuminuria, underwent overnight polysomnography for sleep apnea and were examined for UACR at baseline and after 6 months of CPAP therapy. CPAP compliance rates were also recorded.Significant improvement in UACR was found in OSAS patients with good compliance to CPAP treatment after 6 months of therapy (baseline vs 6-month follow-up, 32.0 ± 9.5 vs 19.2 ± 6.5 mg/g, respectively, P = 0.007), whereas slight worsening in UACRs was noted in patients with poor compliance to CPAP treatment (baseline vs 6-month follow-up, respectively, 16.7 ± 4.4 vs 19.1 ± 6.3 mg/g, respectively, P = 0.39). Change in UACR was significant between poor compliance versus good compliance groups (2.4 ± 2.7 vs -12.8 ± 4.4 mg/g, respectively, t = 2.9, P = 0.005). A significant correlation between improvement in UACR and CPAP compliance rates was also noted (Spearman's correlation coefficient: -0.37, P = 0.007). Baseline UACR, good CPAP compliance, and body mass index were independent predictors of changes in UACR.Adequate CPAP treatment improves albuminuria in OSAS patients. In addition to monitoring CPAP adherence and subjective sleepiness, UACR may offer an objective physiological index of CPAP therapeutic effectiveness. PMID:27368036

  20. Reversibility of albuminuria and continuous positive airway pressure compliance in patients of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ning-Hung; Chou, Yu-Ting; Lee, Pei-Hsien; Lin, Shih-Wei; Chuang, Li-Pang; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Yang, Cheng-Ta

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A positive correlation between albuminuria and severity of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has been demonstrated, as indexed by urine albumin-to-creatinine ratios (UACRs). However, the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on albuminuria in OSAS patients has not been established. Sixty subjects, with apnea-hypopnea indices >15 events per hour and no other diagnoses associated with albuminuria, underwent overnight polysomnography for sleep apnea and were examined for UACR at baseline and after 6 months of CPAP therapy. CPAP compliance rates were also recorded. Significant improvement in UACR was found in OSAS patients with good compliance to CPAP treatment after 6 months of therapy (baseline vs 6-month follow-up, 32.0 ± 9.5 vs 19.2 ± 6.5 mg/g, respectively, P = 0.007), whereas slight worsening in UACRs was noted in patients with poor compliance to CPAP treatment (baseline vs 6-month follow-up, respectively, 16.7 ± 4.4 vs 19.1 ± 6.3 mg/g, respectively, P = 0.39). Change in UACR was significant between poor compliance versus good compliance groups (2.4 ± 2.7 vs −12.8 ± 4.4 mg/g, respectively, t = 2.9, P = 0.005). A significant correlation between improvement in UACR and CPAP compliance rates was also noted (Spearman's correlation coefficient: −0.37, P = 0.007). Baseline UACR, good CPAP compliance, and body mass index were independent predictors of changes in UACR. Adequate CPAP treatment improves albuminuria in OSAS patients. In addition to monitoring CPAP adherence and subjective sleepiness, UACR may offer an objective physiological index of CPAP therapeutic effectiveness. PMID:27368036

  1. A Case of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Associated with Gilenya® (Fingolimod) Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lindå, Hans; von Heijne, Anders

    2015-01-01

    We describe posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) in a woman with multiple sclerosis treated with Gilenya® (Fingolimod). The first symptoms appeared after 21 months of fingolimod treatment. She experienced headache, altered mental status, cognitive deficits, seizures, and visual disturbances. Not at any time during the course of the disease could any signs of infection or rheumatic disorder be detected. Test for anti-neuronal antibodies was also negative. Her blood pressure was normal. MRI showed widespread cortical and subcortical changes with some mass-effect in the temporo-occipital-parietal lobes in the left hemisphere. Contrast enhancement was seen in the leptomeninges and, in addition, there were no areas with restricted diffusion and no signs of hemorrhage. Her condition deteriorated until fingolimod was discontinued. Slowly her condition improved and after 8 months, the only symptoms that remained were two small, non-corresponding, right inferior scotomas. We believe that all symptoms, the clinical course, and the MRI findings in this case can all be explained by considering PRES, a probably rare, but serious, side effect of fingolimod treatment. PMID:25788891

  2. A complex rearrangement associated with sex reversal and the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome: a cytogenetic and molecular study.

    PubMed Central

    Coles, K; Mackenzie, M; Crolla, J; Harvey, J; Starr, J; Howard, F; Jacobs, P

    1992-01-01

    We report a male infant referred with multiple congenital abnormalities consistent with the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. Cytogenetic analysis showed a chromosome complement of 46,XX with a deletion of 4p15.2----4pter and its replacement by material of unknown origin. The patient was positive for a number of Yp probes including SRY, the testis determining factor, and in situ hybridisation localised the Yp material to the tip of the short arm of one X chromosome. Using pDP230, a probe for the pseudoautosomal region, and M27 beta, which recognises a locus in proximal Xp, the material translocated on to 4p was identified as originating from the short arm of the paternal X chromosome. The most reasonable explanation for this complex rearrangement is two separate exchange events involving both chromatids of Xp during paternal meiosis. An aberrant X-Y interchange gave rise to the sex reversal and an X;4 translocation resulted in additional, apparently active Xp material and a deletion of 4p which produced the Wolf-Hirschhorn phenotype. Images PMID:1619635

  3. Habit reversal training and educational group treatments for children with tourette syndrome: A preliminary randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Yates, Rachel; Edwards, Katie; King, John; Luzon, Olga; Evangeli, Michael; Stark, Daniel; McFarlane, Fiona; Heyman, Isobel; İnce, Başak; Kodric, Jana; Murphy, Tara

    2016-05-01

    Quality of life of children with Tourette Syndrome (TS) is impacted greatly by its symptoms and their social consequences. Habit Reversal Training (HRT) is effective but has not, until now, been empirically evaluated in groups. This randomised controlled trial evaluated feasibility and preliminary efficacy of eight HRT group sessions compared to eight Education group sessions. Thirty-three children aged 9-13 years with TS or Chronic Tic Disorder took part. Outcomes evaluated were tic severity and quality of life (QoL). Tic severity improvements were found in both groups. Motor tic severity (Yale Global Tic Severity Scale) showed greatest improvements in the HRT group. Both groups showed a strong tendency toward improvements in patient reported QoL. In conclusion, group-based treatments for TS are feasible and exposure to other children with tics did not increase tic expression. HRT led to greater reductions in tic severity than Education. Implications, such as cost-effectiveness of treatment delivery, are discussed. PMID:27037483

  4. A small-molecule inhibitor of SHIP1 reverses age- and diet-associated obesity and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Neetu; Iyer, Sonia; Sudan, Raki; Youngs, Christie; Engelman, Robert W.; Howard, Kyle T.; Russo, Christopher M.; Chisholm, John D.; Kerr, William G.

    2016-01-01

    Low-grade chronic inflammation is a key etiological phenomenon responsible for the initiation and perpetuation of obesity and diabetes. Novel therapeutic approaches that can specifically target inflammatory pathways are needed to avert this looming epidemic of metabolic disorders. Genetic and chemical inhibition of SH2-containing inositol 5′ phosphatase 1 (SHIP1) has been associated with systemic expansion of immunoregulatory cells that promote a lean-body state; however, SHIP1 function in immunometabolism has never been assessed. This led us to investigate the role of SHIP1 in metabolic disorders during excess caloric intake in mice. Using a small-molecule inhibitor of SHIP1 (SHIPi), here we show that SHIPi treatment in mice significantly reduces body weight and fat content, improves control of blood glucose and insulin sensitivity, and increases energy expenditure, despite continued consumption of a high-fat diet. Additionally, SHIPi reduces age-associated fat in mice. We found that SHIPi treatment reverses diet-associated obesity by attenuating inflammation in the visceral adipose tissue (VAT). SHIPi treatment increases IL-4–producing eosinophils in VAT and consequently increases both alternatively activated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In addition, SHIPi decreases the number of IFN-γ–producing T cells and NK cells in VAT. Thus, SHIPi represents an approach that permits control of obesity and diet-induced metabolic syndrome without apparent toxicity. PMID:27536730

  5. Defective lamin A-Rb signaling in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome and reversal by farnesyltransferase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Marji, Jackleen; O'Donoghue, Seán I; McClintock, Dayle; Satagopam, Venkata P; Schneider, Reinhard; Ratner, Desiree; Worman, Howard J; Gordon, Leslie B; Djabali, Karima

    2010-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder caused by a de novo heterozygous point mutation G608G (GGC>GGT) within exon 11 of LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins. This mutation elicits an internal deletion of 50 amino acids in the carboxyl-terminus of prelamin A. The truncated protein, progerin, retains a farnesylated cysteine at its carboxyl terminus, a modification involved in HGPS pathogenesis. Inhibition of protein farnesylation has been shown to improve abnormal nuclear morphology and phenotype in cellular and animal models of HGPS. We analyzed global gene expression changes in fibroblasts from human subjects with HGPS and found that a lamin A-Rb signaling network is a major defective regulatory axis. Treatment of fibroblasts with a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor reversed the gene expression defects. Our study identifies Rb as a key factor in HGPS pathogenesis and suggests that its modulation could ameliorate premature aging and possibly complications of physiological aging. PMID:20559568

  6. Reversal of Acute Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Using the Practical Application of Neurodiagnostic Evaluation Process: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Karen E

    2013-01-01

    In 2005, a patient in my practice developed complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS 1) after bunion surgery. The condition was properly diagnosed within 4 weeks with a diagnostic technique that I routinely use to diagnose chronic musculoskeletal pain, and it was successfully treated. The tests, which are based on primitive and postural reflexes in infants, were adapted to reflect normal and abnormal motor behaviors in adults after provocation of reflexes of the autonomic nervous system (afferent C fibers in peripheral nerves). Approximately 60 days after my patient’s operation, the tests indicated a positive reflex at the posterior tibial nerve in the operated foot. Surgery to remove an accessory ossicle from the talus adjacent to this nerve resolved the CRPS 1 within 2 weeks. Since CRPS 1 is a dysfunctional state of the autonomic regulatory control of pain, it was postulated that a test based on autonomic nerve function could isolate the source of CRPS 1. The Practical Application of Neurodiagnostic Evaluation process was shown to be diagnostic for the cause of acute CRPS 1 and to allow its reversal. Further evaluation of the test for diagnosis and treatment of CRPS is needed. PMID:24355904

  7. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome after Surgical Resection of a Giant Vestibular Schwannoma: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Sorour, Mohammad; Sayama, Christina; Couldwell, William T

    2016-05-01

    Background Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a constellation of neurologic symptoms-seizures, headaches, altered mental status, and visual changes-associated with characteristic brain magnetic resonance imaging findings seen on T2 and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences. Classically, this condition is caused by hypertension, but several other risk factors have been described. The development of PRES after surgical resection of posterior fossa tumors has mostly been linked to the pediatric neurosurgical practice. Case Report We report the first case of PRES after resection of a giant vestibular schwannoma in an adult patient. This 57-year-old female patient underwent a retrosigmoid approach for total resection of her left-sided giant tumor. On the second postoperative day, she developed the classic clinical and radiologic characteristics of PRES. She was treated aggressively with antihypertensive and anticonvulsant medications and showed complete recovery without sequelae. Conclusion PRES is a potential yet rare complication of surgeries to posterior fossa tumors that are compressing the brainstem. Rapid diagnosis and aggressive management are essential for achieving the best outcome. PMID:26091111

  8. Omenn syndrome associated with a functional reversion due to a somatic second-site mutation in CARD11 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Pannicke, Ulrich; Lorenz, Myriam R.; Fisch, Paul; Jeelall, Yogesh; Rohr, Jan; Speckmann, Carsten; Vraetz, Thomas; Farmand, Susan; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Krüger, Marcus; Strahm, Brigitte; Henneke, Philipp; Enders, Anselm; Horikawa, Keisuke; Goodnow, Christopher; Schwarz, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Omenn syndrome (OS) is a severe immunodeficiency associated with erythroderma, lymphoproliferation, elevated IgE, and hyperactive oligoclonal T cells. A restricted T-cell repertoire caused by defective thymic T-cell development and selection, lymphopenia with homeostatic proliferation, and lack of regulatory T cells are considered key factors in OS pathogenesis. We report 2 siblings presenting with cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Pneumocystis jirovecii infections and recurrent sepsis; one developed all clinical features of OS. Both carried homozygous germline mutations in CARD11 (p.Cys150*), impairing NF-κB signaling and IL-2 production. A somatic second-site mutation reverting the stop codon to a missense mutation (p.Cys150Leu) was detected in tissue-infiltrating T cells of the OS patient. Expression of p.Cys150Leu in CARD11-deficient T cells largely reconstituted NF-κB signaling. The reversion likely occurred in a prethymic T-cell precursor, leading to a chimeric T-cell repertoire. We speculate that in our patient the functional advantage of the revertant T cells in the context of persistent CMV infection, combined with lack of regulatory T cells, may have been sufficient to favor OS. This first observation of OS in a patient with a T-cell activation defect suggests that severely defective T-cell development or homeostatic proliferation in a lymphopenic environment are not required for this severe immunopathology. PMID:26289640

  9. Omenn syndrome associated with a functional reversion due to a somatic second-site mutation in CARD11 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Pannicke, Ulrich; Lorenz, Myriam R; Fisch, Paul; Jeelall, Yogesh; Rohr, Jan; Speckmann, Carsten; Vraetz, Thomas; Farmand, Susan; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Krüger, Marcus; Strahm, Brigitte; Henneke, Philipp; Enders, Anselm; Horikawa, Keisuke; Goodnow, Christopher; Schwarz, Klaus; Ehl, Stephan

    2015-10-01

    Omenn syndrome (OS) is a severe immunodeficiency associated with erythroderma, lymphoproliferation, elevated IgE, and hyperactive oligoclonal T cells. A restricted T-cell repertoire caused by defective thymic T-cell development and selection, lymphopenia with homeostatic proliferation, and lack of regulatory T cells are considered key factors in OS pathogenesis. We report 2 siblings presenting with cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Pneumocystis jirovecii infections and recurrent sepsis; one developed all clinical features of OS. Both carried homozygous germline mutations in CARD11 (p.Cys150*), impairing NF-κB signaling and IL-2 production. A somatic second-site mutation reverting the stop codon to a missense mutation (p.Cys150Leu) was detected in tissue-infiltrating T cells of the OS patient. Expression of p.Cys150Leu in CARD11-deficient T cells largely reconstituted NF-κB signaling. The reversion likely occurred in a prethymic T-cell precursor, leading to a chimeric T-cell repertoire. We speculate that in our patient the functional advantage of the revertant T cells in the context of persistent CMV infection, combined with lack of regulatory T cells, may have been sufficient to favor OS. This first observation of OS in a patient with a T-cell activation defect suggests that severely defective T-cell development or homeostatic proliferation in a lymphopenic environment are not required for this severe immunopathology. PMID:26289640

  10. Specific complications of monochorionic twin pregnancies: twin-twin transfusion syndrome and twin reversed arterial perfusion sequence.

    PubMed

    Chalouhi, G E; Stirnemann, J J; Salomon, L J; Essaoui, M; Quibel, T; Ville, Y

    2010-12-01

    Monochorionic twins are subjected to specific complications which originate in either imbalance or abnormality of the single placenta serving two twins. This unequal placental sharing can cause complications including twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS), twin anemia-polycythemia sequence (TAPS), selective intrauterine growth restriction or twin reversed arterial perfusion sequence (TRAP). Monochorionicity also makes the management of these specific complications as well as that of a severe malformation in one twin hazardous since the spontaneous death of one twin exposes the co-twin to a risk of exsanguination into the dead twin and its placenta. The latter is responsible for the death of the co-twin in up to 20% of the cases and in ischemic sequelae in about the same proportions in the survivors. Although the symptoms of all these complications are very different, the keystone of their management comes down to either surgical destruction of the inter-twin anastomoses on the chorionic plate when aiming at dual survival or selective and permanent occlusion of the cord of a severely affected twin aiming at protecting the normal co-twin. This can be best achieved by fetoscopic selective laser coagulation and bipolar forceps cord coagulation respectively. PMID:20855238

  11. A case of acute reversible Charles Bonnet syndrome following postsurgical unilateral eye patch placement.

    PubMed

    Khadavi, Nicole Miriam; Lew, Helen; Goldberg, Robert Alan; Mancini, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    A fully alert 70-year-old male with no significant medical or psychiatric history presented for surgical follow-up after uncomplicated right lower eyelid cicatricial ectropion surgery with postoperative unilateral, eye patch placement complaining of visual hallucinations. Preoperative unaided visual acuity was 20/20 in each eye. The patient described simple, nonformed and complex, formed images that were both static and animated. The images included crystal-like formations that appeared to bubble, green leaves against a vivid magenta backdrop, and an isolated hallucination of a lifelike plant with trembling leaves. These hallucinations began 2 days postoperatively and persisted 2 days following eye patch removal. The patient perceived the hallucinations multiple times a day over the 7-day period, without a stereotyped pattern. The images occurred when the eyes were open and ceased when they were closed. They were prompted by looking at a blank wall or white surface. The patient consistently recognized these images as unreal. They typically persisted for 1 to 2 minutes and could be extinguished by looking away. There were no associated auditory hallucinations, psychosis, or delirium and no history of visual, cognitive, or neurological deficit. The patient denied the use of hallucinogenic medications, including analgesics, or the initiation of any new medications. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of acute reversible CBS following unilateral eye patch placement. CBS may be a frightening postsurgical consequence of eye patch placement. It is important that the ophthalmic surgeon be aware of the potential for development of CBS and offer appropriate referral and reassurance should it occur. PMID:20551853

  12. Targeting Translation Control with p70 S6 Kinase 1 Inhibitors to Reverse Phenotypes in Fragile X Syndrome Mice.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Aditi; Mamcarz, Maggie; Mullins, Caitlin; Choudhury, Ayesha; Boyle, Robert G; Smith, Daniel G; Walker, David W; Klann, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Aberrant neuronal translation is implicated in the etiology of numerous brain disorders. Although mTORC1-p70 ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) signaling is critical for translational control, pharmacological manipulation in vivo has targeted exclusively mTORC1 due to the paucity of specific inhibitors to S6K1. However, small molecule inhibitors of S6K1 could potentially ameliorate pathological phenotypes of diseases, which are based on aberrant translation and protein expression. One such condition is fragile X syndrome (FXS), which is considered to be caused by exaggerated neuronal translation and is the most frequent heritable cause of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). To date, potential therapeutic interventions in FXS have focused largely on targets upstream of translational control to normalize FXS-related phenotypes. Here we test the ability of two S6K1 inhibitors, PF-4708671 and FS-115, to normalize translational homeostasis and other phenotypes exhibited by FXS model mice. We found that although the pharmacokinetic profiles of the two S6K1 inhibitors differed, they overlapped in reversing multiple disease-associated phenotypes in FXS model mice including exaggerated protein synthesis, inappropriate social behavior, behavioral inflexibility, altered dendritic spine morphology, and macroorchidism. In contrast, the two inhibitors differed in their ability to rescue stereotypic marble-burying behavior and weight gain. These findings provide an initial pharmacological characterization of the impact of S6K1 inhibitors in vivo for FXS, and have therapeutic implications for other neuropsychiatric conditions involving aberrant mTORC1-S6K1 signaling. PMID:26708105

  13. Inhibiting farnesylation reverses the nuclear morphology defect in a HeLa cell model for Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mallampalli, Monica P; Huyer, Gregory; Bendale, Pravin; Gelb, Michael H; Michaelis, Susan

    2005-10-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a devastating premature aging disease resulting from a mutation in the LMNA gene, which encodes nuclear lamins A and C. Lamin A is synthesized as a precursor (prelamin A) with a C-terminal CaaX motif that undergoes farnesylation, endoproteolytic cleavage, and carboxylmethylation. Prelamin A is subsequently internally cleaved by the zinc metalloprotease Ste24 (Zmpste24) protease, which removes the 15 C-terminal amino acids, including the CaaX modifications, to yield mature lamin A. HGPS results from a dominant mutant form of prelamin A (progerin) that has an internal deletion of 50 aa near the C terminus that includes the Zmpste24 cleavage site and blocks removal of the CaaX-modified C terminus. Fibroblasts from HGPS patients have aberrant nuclei with irregular shapes, which we hypothesize result from the abnormal persistence of the farnesyl and/or carboxylmethyl CaaX modifications on progerin. If this hypothesis is correct, inhibition of CaaX modification by mutation or pharmacological treatment should alleviate the nuclear morphology defect. Consistent with our hypothesis, we find that expression in HeLa cells of GFP-progerin or an uncleavable form of prelamin A with a Zmpste24 cleavage site mutation induces the formation of abnormal nuclei similar to those in HGPS fibroblasts. Strikingly, inhibition of farnesylation pharmacologically with the farnesyl transferase inhibitor rac-R115777 or mutationally by alteration of the CaaX motif dramatically reverses the abnormal nuclear morphology. These results suggest that farnesyl transferase inhibitors represent a possible therapeutic option for individuals with HGPS and/or other laminopathies due to Zmpste24 processing defects. PMID:16186497

  14. [Unilateral Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome after Ventriculo-Peritoneal Shunt for Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Koizumi, Takayuki; Sato, Daisuke; Endo, Shin; Kato, Syunichi

    2016-06-01

    The patient, a 79-year-old man, experienced a Hunt & Kosnik grade IV subarachnoid hemorrhage, presenting with sudden-onset coma and severe left hemiplegia. We performed cranial clipping surgery for a ruptured aneurysm on the right middle cerebral artery the same day. Post-operative recovery proceeded smoothly, with gradual improvements in disturbed consciousness and left hemiplegia. Three weeks post-operation, CT revealed low-density areas in the right frontal and temporal lobe, believed to be due to subarachnoid hemorrhage, as well as hydrocephaly. We then performed a lumbo-peritoneal (L-P) shunt for the hydrocephaly. Two months later, the patient experienced shunt occlusion, and we performed a ventriculo-peritoneal (V-P) shunt revision (pressure: 6 cm H(2)O). Headaches, severe decline in cognitive function, and worsened left hemiplegia were observed seven weeks post-shunt revision. Cranial CT revealed widespread low-density areas in right posterior cerebral white matter. We suspected unilateral posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) after performing cranial MRI and cerebral angiography. Increasing the set pressure of the shunt improved the symptoms and radiographic findings. PRES is typically bilateral, and unilateral incidents are rare. This is the first report of unilateral PRES secondary to shunt operation. Its unilaterality appears to have been caused by unilateral brain damage or adhesions to the brain surface from the subarachnoid cerebral hemorrhage. Overdrainage post-shunt can also induce PRES. Diagnosis of PRES is more difficult in unilateral cases;practitioners must keep PRES in mind as a rare complication post-shunt operation. PMID:27270150

  15. Detection of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus using reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The first documented case of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) occurred in 2012, and outbreaks have continued ever since, mainly in Saudi Arabia. MERS-CoV is primarily diagnosed using a real-time RT-PCR assay, with at least two different genomic targets required for a positive diagnosis according to the case definition of The World Health Organization (WHO) as of 3 July 2013. Therefore, it is urgently necessary to develop as many specific genetic diagnostic methods as possible to allow stable diagnosis of MERS-CoV infections. Methods Reverse transcription-loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) is a genetic diagnostic method used widely for the detection of viral pathogens, which requires only a single temperature for amplification, and can be completed in less than 1 h. This study developed a novel RT-LAMP assay for detecting MERS-CoV using primer sets targeting a conserved nucleocapsid protein region. Results The RT-LAMP assay was capable of detecting as few as 3.4 copies of MERS-CoV RNA, and was highly specific, with no cross-reaction to other respiratory viruses. Pilot experiments to detect MERS-CoV from medium containing pharyngeal swabs inoculated with pre-titrated viruses were also performed. The RT-LAMP assay exhibited sensitivity similar to that of MERS-CoV real-time RT-PCR. Conclusions These results suggest that the RT-LAMP assay described here is a useful tool for the diagnosis and epidemiologic surveillance of human MERS-CoV infections. PMID:25103205

  16. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome due to hypocalcemia: a description of a case and an analysis of a pathogenic role of electrolyte disturbances].

    PubMed

    Dobrynina, L A; Kalashnikova, L A; Bakulin, I S; Kremneva, E I; Krotenkova, M V; Shamtieva, K V

    2016-01-01

    Afemale patient with recurrent posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, severe hypocalcemia due to extirpation of the parathyroid glands is described. The disease was characterized by the acute development of headache, seizures, cognitive and behavioral disorders, mental confusion, transitory blood pressure increasing. The vasogenic edema in the posterior parts of the brain, detected by CT at the first exacerbation,was completely regressed. The residual neurological deficit and MRI changes remained after the recurrent exacerbations. Main clinical features of PRESare explained by hypocalcemia and accompanying electrolyte disturbances.The reported case shows the necessity to study blood electrolytes in patients with PRES to clarify their pathogenic role and the necessity of drug correction. PMID:27500881

  17. Neurological PRESentations in Sickle Cell Patients Are Not Always Stroke: A Review of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Solh, Ziad; Taccone, Michael S; Marin, Samantha; Athale, Uma; Breakey, Vicky R

    2016-06-01

    Acute neurological changes in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients often raise the suspicion for stroke. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) can mimic stroke in its clinical presentation. We aimed to (i) review the PRES literature in SCD patients including clinical presentation, risk factors, pathophysiology, and management and (ii) elucidate the distinction between PRES and stroke in SCD. The exact pathophysiology of PRES in SCD remains elusive but is likely multifactorial and related to sickling, ischemia, and chronic anemia predisposing to vasogenic edema. PRES and stroke in SCD are distinguishable conditions. Our review may help elucidate a clinical approach to this distinction. PMID:26871763

  18. Novel Association Between the Reverse-Dipper Pattern of Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring and Metabolic Syndrome in Men But Not in Women.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bin; Yan, Hang; Sun, Lu; Yan, Xin; Peng, Liyuan; Wang, Yuhuan; Wang, Gang

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between nocturnal variations in blood pressure (BP) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in different gender.This cross-sectional study involved 509 hypertensive patients (254 males and 255 females, 45 to 75 years old) from September 2013 to March 2014. BP values were acquired from ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). The dipper pattern of BP was defined as 10% to 20% reduction of the mean systolic BP (SBP) values at night compared with the daytime values. The diagnosis of MetS was made according to NCEP ATP-III definition. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to explore the relationships between ABPM results and MetS.In our study, MetS were observed in 29.1% of male and 18.4% of female participants. The prevalence of MetS was higher in the patients with reverse-dipper pattern than in others. After multivariate logistic regression analysis, the reverse-dipper pattern of BP (odds ratio 2.298; P = 0.006) and 24-SBP (odds ratio 1.063; P = 0.021) were independently correlated with MetS in males. However, there was no association between MetS and BP reverse dipping in females.Our cross-sectional study showed that the reverse-dipper pattern of BP is associated with MetS in male, while the underlying mechanism deserves further investigation. PMID:26632731

  19. Prenatal diagnosis of Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome in a pregnancy with low maternal serum oestriol and a sex-reversed fetus.

    PubMed

    Bick, D P; McCorkle, D; Stanley, W S; Stern, H J; Staszak, P; Berkovitz, G D; Meyers, C M; Kelley, R I

    1999-01-01

    A cytogenetically normal male fetus was subsequently found to have female external genitalia, a cardiac malformation and mid-trimester intra-uterine growth retardation by ultrasound examination. The maternal serum oestriol level was low. The combination of low oestriol and sonographic findings suggested Smith Lemli Opitz syndrome (SLO), which was confirmed by a markedly increased amniotic fluid level of 7-dehydrocholesterol. We review the differential diagnosis of apparent sex reversal in a fetus and low maternal serum oestriol level. To further examine the specificity of low maternal oestriol level as a marker for SLO a follow-up study of 12141 pregnancies screened for Down syndrome using three biochemical markers: alpha-fetoprotein, beta-human chorionic gonadotrophin and oestriol was performed. 26 pregnancies had an oestriol level that was 0.25 MoM or less. SLO was not diagnosed clinically in any of the liveborn children ascertained through a low maternal oestriol level. Nine of the pregnancies ended in spontaneous miscarriage. Although the frequency of SLO in pregnancies with low maternal oestriol levels or sex-reversed fetuses is unknown, the diagnosis of SLO should, nevertheless, be considered in both clinical settings. PMID:10073912

  20. Ileal nutritional function after one-stage orthotopic ileum transplantation in the growing pig: reversal of lethal short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pakarinen, M; Kuusanmäki, P; Halttunen, J

    1996-05-01

    resulted in deficient intraluminal processing of maltose, whereas isolated proximal resection tended to enhance disaccharide absorption early after the surgery. The short bowel pigs were not able to preserve sufficient nutritional status, and demonstrated a marked decline in the hemoglobin, protein, and cholesterol levels. No biochemical signs suggestive of potential liver damage caused by portocaval graft vascularization were recognized. These findings suggest that one-stage ileum autotransplantation provides sufficent absoprtive capacity to reverse otherwise lethal short bowel syndrome in the growing pig. However, transplantation disturbs the in vivo absorptive function of the nonrejecting ileum. Long-term impairment in disaccharide absorption may be partially related to an altered intestinal adaptive response secondary to proximal resection when combined with simultaneous transplantation. The authors developed this ileal small bowel transplantation model using rapidly growing pigs, wherein body weight gain represents an objective parameter of intestinal absorptive function. Only this type of animal model can yield clinically relevant data in the evaluation of a transplant's ability to provide sufficient nutritional function in a growing recipient. PMID:8861482

  1. Reversal of Refractory Ulcerative Colitis and Severe Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Symptoms Arising from Immune Disturbance in an HLADR/DQ Genetically Susceptible Individual with Multiple Biotoxin Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Shelly R.; Gibson Gunn, G.; Mueller, Francis W.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 25 Final Diagnosis: Ulcerative colitis and chronic fatigue syndrome Symptoms: Colitis • profound fatigue • multi-joint pain • cognitive impairment • corneal keratitis Medication: — Clinical Procedure: VIP replacement therapy Specialty: Family Medicine Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Patients with multisymptom chronic conditions, such as refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), present diagnostic and management challenges for clinicians, as well as the opportunity to recognize and treat emerging disease entities. In the current case we report reversal of co-existing RUC and CFS symptoms arising from biotoxin exposures in a genetically susceptible individual. Case Report: A 25-year-old previously healthy male with new-onset refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) tested negative for autoimmune disease biomarkers. However, urine mycotoxin panel testing was positive for trichothecene group and air filter testing from the patient’s water-damaged rental house identified the toxic mold Stachybotrys chartarum. HLA-DR/DQ testing revealed a multisusceptible haplotype for development of chronic inflammation, and serum chronic inflammatory response syndrome (CIRS) biomarker testing was positive for highly elevated TGF-beta and a clinically undetectable level of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Following elimination of biotoxin exposures, VIP replacement therapy, dental extractions, and implementation of a mind body intervention-relaxation response (MBI-RR) program, the patient’s symptoms resolved. He is off medications, back to work, and resuming normal exercise. Conclusions: This constellation of RUC and CFS symptoms in an HLA-DR/DQ genetically susceptible individual with biotoxin exposures is consistent with the recently described CIRS disease pathophysiology. Chronic immune disturbance (turbatio immuno) can be identified with clinically available CIRS biomarkers and

  2. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome following combinatorial cisplatin and pemetrexed therapy for lung cancer in a normotensive patient: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    XIE, CHANGQING; JONES, VOVANTI T.

    2016-01-01

    Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS) is a rare neurological syndrome of the brain, causing symptoms such as headaches, seizures, altered mental status and visual disturbances. The condition is predominantly associated with hypertension, eclampsia, renal impairment, cytotoxic drugs, immunosuppressive agents and molecular targeted agents, but the precise underlying mechanism of RPLS is not fully understood. The present study describes the case of a 65-year-old female patient with stage IIA non-small cell lung cancer who received cisplatin/pemetrexed treatment at the Leo W. Jenkins Cancer Center. Following 3 cycles of this therapy, the patient was referred to the Emergency Department of Vidant Medical Center with an altered mental status, subsequently presenting with epileptic seizures, a fever and a headache. A neurological examination revealed generalized hyperreflexia and paraparesis, with extensor posturing of the bilateral lower extremities. The lumbar puncture and electroencephalography results were normal, but cranial computed tomography (CT) scans revealed attenuation abnormalities in the bilateral parietal region and the left occipital lobe, with suspected metastasis. Cranial T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicated bilateral regions of increased signal intensity in the occipital, temporal and periventricular white matter. The patient was treated with anticonvulsants, steroids and antihypertensive drugs, recovered gradually from the symptoms and regained full consciousness. However, the patient reported residual weakness, presenting with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group score of 3, reflective of an inability to independently perform daily activities and self-care. A brain MRI performed 10 days later demonstrated that the subcortical edema had partially subsided. The patient was discharged on day 15 post-admission. A follow-up cranial CT examination 1 month later indicated a partial resolution of the abnormalities. The

  3. A global amnesia associated with the specific variant of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) that developed due to severe preeclampsia and malignant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Borovac, Josip Anđelo; Božić, Joško; Žaja, Nikola; Kolić, Krešimir; Hrboka, Vedran

    2016-04-01

    A case is reported of a 26-year-old primiparous woman in the 32nd week of gestation who presented to the emergency department with the symptoms of a severe headache, nausea and vomiting. The patient was diagnosed with preeclampsia that later progressed to eclampsia. This state was characterized by a sudden onset of a headache and diplopia that advanced to cortical blindness and precipitated significant alterations in mental status, most notable being global amnesia that resolved within 48 h. A post-partum magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in FLAIR mode revealed multiple cortico-subcortical areas of hyperintense signals suggestive of edematous lesions that chiefly involved occipital and parietal lobes with additional atypical manifestations. Such radiologic findings suggested a posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome variant with the global amnesia as an extraordinary constituent. This unique feature should be acknowledged when treating a preeclamptic or hypertensive patient that exhibits neurological symptomatology and vision disturbances. PMID:27099774

  4. A global amnesia associated with the specific variant of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) that developed due to severe preeclampsia and malignant hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Borovac, Josip Anđelo; Božić, Joško; Žaja, Nikola; Kolić, Krešimir; Hrboka, Vedran

    2016-01-01

    A case is reported of a 26-year-old primiparous woman in the 32nd week of gestation who presented to the emergency department with the symptoms of a severe headache, nausea and vomiting. The patient was diagnosed with preeclampsia that later progressed to eclampsia. This state was characterized by a sudden onset of a headache and diplopia that advanced to cortical blindness and precipitated significant alterations in mental status, most notable being global amnesia that resolved within 48 h. A post-partum magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in FLAIR mode revealed multiple cortico-subcortical areas of hyperintense signals suggestive of edematous lesions that chiefly involved occipital and parietal lobes with additional atypical manifestations. Such radiologic findings suggested a posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome variant with the global amnesia as an extraordinary constituent. This unique feature should be acknowledged when treating a preeclamptic or hypertensive patient that exhibits neurological symptomatology and vision disturbances. PMID:27099774

  5. Probe-free real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays for the detection and typing of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Eschbaumer, Michael; Li, Wansi (May); Wernike, Kerstin; Marshall, Frank; Czub, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has tremendous impact on the pork industry in North America. The molecular diagnosis of infection with PRRS virus (PRRSV) is hampered by its considerable strain diversity. In this study, 43 previously published or newly developed primers for probe-free real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were evaluated on their sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, and repeatability, using a diverse panel of 36 PRRSV strains as well as other arteriviruses and unrelated porcine viruses. Three primer pairs had excellent diagnostic and analytical sensitivity on par with a probe-based reference assay, absolute specificity to virus genotype and species, as well as over 95% reproducibility and repeatability across a wide dynamic range. PMID:26130848

  6. Unusual posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a case of influenza A/H1N1 infection.

    PubMed

    Locuratolo, Nicoletta; Mannarelli, Daniela; Colonnese, Claudio; Pauletti, Caterina; Antonaci, Laura; Ferretti, Giancarlo; Fattapposta, Francesco

    2012-10-15

    Central nervous system involvement is an uncommon though potentially a severe complication during influenza infection; the pathogenic mechanisms of the neurological syndromes described in humans are largely unknown. We describe a case of a 51-year-old man who presented with fever and behavioral changes but no focal neurological deficits. The next day, the condition rapidly evolved into a severe neurological syndrome with recurrent focal motor seizures with secondary generalization. At the brain MRI, FLAIR disclosed a slight area of increased signal in the left mesial frontal cortex extending to the frontopolar area and insula. At DWI, a mild hyperintensity was evident in the mesial-frontopolar cortex, with normal ADC values. MR perfusion was indicative of severe hypoperfusion. Fungal, bacterial and viral cultures in CSF, blood and urine were negative. The nasopharyngeal swab PCR was positive for the H1N1-influenza A virus. The patient was thus treated and by day five the neurological examination results had returned to normal. A follow-up MRI, performed two weeks later, only revealed a residual slight hyperintensity in the left medial frontal cortex. The onset of a rapidly evolving encephalopathy syndrome, its close association with a MRI brain pattern of acute vasogenic edema and favorable outcome support a diagnosis of PRES during influenza A infection. However, the topographic characteristics of the cerebral lesion seem to define a PRES with an atypical pattern. PMID:22910147

  7. 9q33.3q34.11 microdeletion: new contiguous gene syndrome encompassing STXBP1, LMX1B and ENG genes assessed using reverse phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Nambot, Sophie; Masurel, Alice; El Chehadeh, Salima; Mosca-Boidron, Anne-Laure; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Lefebvre, Mathilde; Marle, Nathalie; Thevenon, Julien; Perez-Martin, Stéphanie; Dulieu, Véronique; Huet, Frédéric; Plessis, Ghislaine; Andrieux, Joris; Jouk, Pierre-Simon; Billy-Lopez, Gipsy; Coutton, Charles; Morice-Picard, Fanny; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Heron, Delphine; Rooryck, Caroline; Goldenberg, Alice; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Joly-Hélas, Géraldine; Calenda, Patricia; Kuentz, Paul; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie; Dupuis-Girod, Sophie; Callier, Patrick; Faivre, Laurence

    2016-06-01

    The increasing use of array-CGH in malformation syndromes with intellectual disability could lead to the description of new contiguous gene syndrome by the analysis of the gene content of the microdeletion and reverse phenotyping. Thanks to a national and international call for collaboration by Achropuce and Decipher, we recruited four patients carrying de novo overlapping deletions of chromosome 9q33.3q34.11, including the STXBP1, the LMX1B and the ENG genes. We restrained the selection to these three genes because the effects of their haploinsufficency are well described in the literature and easily recognizable clinically. All deletions were detected by array-CGH and confirmed by FISH. The patients display common clinical features, including intellectual disability with epilepsy, owing to the presence of STXBP1 within the deletion, nail dysplasia and bone malformations, in particular patellar abnormalities attributed to LMX1B deletion, epistaxis and cutaneous-mucous telangiectasias explained by ENG haploinsufficiency and common facial dysmorphism. This systematic analysis of the genes comprised in the deletion allowed us to identify genes whose haploinsufficiency is expected to lead to disease manifestations and complications that require personalized follow-up, in particular for renal, eye, ear, vascular and neurological manifestations. PMID:26395556

  8. Reversal of Refractory Ulcerative Colitis and Severe Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Symptoms Arising from Immune Disturbance in an HLA-DR/DQ Genetically Susceptible Individual with Multiple Biotoxin Exposures.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Shelly R; Gunn, G Gibson; Mueller, Francis W

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with multisymptom chronic conditions, such as refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), present diagnostic and management challenges for clinicians, as well as the opportunity to recognize and treat emerging disease entities. In the current case we report reversal of co-existing RUC and CFS symptoms arising from biotoxin exposures in a genetically susceptible individual. CASE REPORT A 25-year-old previously healthy male with new-onset refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) tested negative for autoimmune disease biomarkers. However, urine mycotoxin panel testing was positive for trichothecene group and air filter testing from the patient's water-damaged rental house identified the toxic mold Stachybotrys chartarum. HLA-DR/DQ testing revealed a multisusceptible haplotype for development of chronic inflammation, and serum chronic inflammatory response syndrome (CIRS) biomarker testing was positive for highly elevated TGF-beta and a clinically undetectable level of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Following elimination of biotoxin exposures, VIP replacement therapy, dental extractions, and implementation of a mind body intervention-relaxation response (MBI-RR) program, the patient's symptoms resolved. He is off medications, back to work, and resuming normal exercise. CONCLUSIONS This constellation of RUC and CFS symptoms in an HLA-DR/DQ genetically susceptible individual with biotoxin exposures is consistent with the recently described CIRS disease pathophysiology. Chronic immune disturbance (turbatio immuno) can be identified with clinically available CIRS biomarkers and may represent a treatable underlying disease etiology in a subset of genetically susceptible patients with RUC, CFS, and other immune disorders. PMID:27165859

  9. Transgene silencing of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation results in a reversible bone phenotype, whereas resveratrol treatment does not show overall beneficial effects.

    PubMed

    Strandgren, Charlotte; Nasser, Hasina Abdul; McKenna, Tomás; Koskela, Antti; Tuukkanen, Juha; Ohlsson, Claes; Rozell, Björn; Eriksson, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder that is most commonly caused by a de novo point mutation in exon 11 of the LMNA gene, c.1824C>T, which results in an increased production of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. In this study, we used a mouse model to study the possibility of recovering from HGPS bone disease upon silencing of the HGPS mutation, and the potential benefits from treatment with resveratrol. We show that complete silencing of the transgenic expression of progerin normalized bone morphology and mineralization already after 7 weeks. The improvements included lower frequencies of rib fractures and callus formation, an increased number of osteocytes in remodeled bone, and normalized dentinogenesis. The beneficial effects from resveratrol treatment were less significant and to a large extent similar to mice treated with sucrose alone. However, the reversal of the dental phenotype of overgrown and laterally displaced lower incisors in HGPS mice could be attributed to resveratrol. Our results indicate that the HGPS bone defects were reversible upon suppressed transgenic expression and suggest that treatments targeting aberrant progerin splicing give hope to patients who are affected by HGPS. PMID:25877214

  10. A BDNF loop-domain mimetic acutely reverses spontaneous apneas and respiratory abnormalities during behavioral arousal in a mouse model of Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kron, Miriam; Lang, Min; Adams, Ian T.; Sceniak, Michael; Longo, Frank; Katz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are thought to contribute to the pathophysiology of Rett syndrome (RTT), a severe neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). In Mecp2 mutant mice, BDNF deficits have been associated with breathing abnormalities, a core feature of RTT, as well as with synaptic hyperexcitability within the brainstem respiratory network. Application of BDNF can reverse hyperexcitability in acute brainstem slices from Mecp2-null mice, suggesting that therapies targeting BDNF or its receptor, TrkB, could be effective at acute reversal of respiratory abnormalities in RTT. Therefore, we examined the ability of LM22A-4, a small-molecule BDNF loop-domain mimetic and TrkB partial agonist, to modulate synaptic excitability within respiratory cell groups in the brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius (nTS) and to acutely reverse abnormalities in breathing at rest and during behavioral arousal in Mecp2 mutants. Patch-clamp recordings in Mecp2-null brainstem slices demonstrated that LM22A-4 decreases excitability at primary afferent synapses in the nTS by reducing the amplitude of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents and the frequency of spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents. In vivo, acute treatment of Mecp2-null and -heterozygous mutants with LM22A-4 completely eliminated spontaneous apneas in resting animals, without sedation. Moreover, we demonstrate that respiratory dysregulation during behavioral arousal, a feature of human RTT, is also reversed in Mecp2 mutants by acute treatment with LM22A-4. Together, these data support the hypothesis that reduced BDNF signaling and respiratory dysfunction in RTT are linked, and establish the proof-of-concept that treatment with a small-molecule structural mimetic of a BDNF loop domain and a TrkB partial agonist can acutely reverse abnormal breathing at rest and in response to behavioral arousal

  11. Long-term consequences of the posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in eclampsia and preeclampsia: a review of the obstetric and nonobstetric literature.

    PubMed

    Postma, Ineke R; Slager, Sjoerdtje; Kremer, Hubertus P H; de Groot, Jan Cees; Zeeman, Gerda G

    2014-05-01

    This review summarizes the long-term consequences of the posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) that have been described in the obstetric literature (eclampsia and preeclampsia) and compares these with data from the nonobstetric literature. Preeclampsia is characterized by new-onset hypertension and proteinuria after the 20th week of pregnancy. Neurological symptoms include headache; visual deficits; confusion; seizures; and, in the most severe cases, intracranial hemorrhage. Eclampsia is an acute cerebral complication of preeclampsia, defined as the occurrence of tonic-clonic seizures in pregnant or recently postpartum women. With severe preeclampsia, in conjunction with neurological symptoms, or eclampsia, neuroimaging changes consistent with PRES can be seen. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a specific clinicoradiological syndrome presenting with headaches, visual impairment, seizures, and altered mental status. Characteristic neuroimaging features are consistent with cerebral edema predominantly in the parietal and occipital lobes. In addition to preeclampsia/eclampsia, PRES has been associated with various conditions in the nonobstetric population, that is, severe hypertension, transplantation, or autoimmune disease, in combination with immunosuppressive therapy or high-dose chemotherapy for various malignant conditions. Long-term sequelae of both preeclampsia/eclampsia and other PRES-related conditions are poorly described. After eclampsia or preeclampsia, nonspecific white matter lesions may be found on magnetic resonance imaging, which may or may not be related to the PRES episode. Previously (pre)eclamptic women report cognitive failures; however, no neurocognitive impairment has been shown so far. Various nonobstetric PRES-related conditions have been described with long-term neuroimaging abnormalities as well as cognitive problems, epilepsy, or visual impairment. Although no firm conclusions can be drawn because of the

  12. Reversible Valproate Induced Pisa Syndrome and Parkinsonism in a Neuro-Oncology Patient with Depression and Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Botturi, Andrea; Silvani, Antonio; Pravettoni, Gabriella; Paoli, Riccardo Augusto; Lucchiari, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Neurological and psychiatric conditions frequently overlap in neuro-oncology. This overlapping negatively affects patients’ quality of life and decreases the ability of providers to manage specific symptoms by therapy modulation, especially when psychopharmacotherapy needs to be prescribed. We describe here a patient with recurrent brain tumor, symptomatic epilepsy and depression who developed Pisa syndrome and parkinsonism after several months of valproic acid use. An accurate recognition of symptoms and treatment side effect allowed an appropriate clinical approach so as to rapidly improve both movement disorder and depression without increasing the risk of developing seizure. This has improved the autonomy and quality of life in a patient with poor prognosis. PMID:27462241

  13. Reversible Valproate Induced Pisa Syndrome and Parkinsonism in a Neuro-Oncology Patient with Depression and Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Botturi, Andrea; Silvani, Antonio; Pravettoni, Gabriella; Paoli, Riccardo Augusto; Lucchiari, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Neurological and psychiatric conditions frequently overlap in neuro-oncology. This overlapping negatively affects patients' quality of life and decreases the ability of providers to manage specific symptoms by therapy modulation, especially when psychopharmacotherapy needs to be prescribed. We describe here a patient with recurrent brain tumor, symptomatic epilepsy and depression who developed Pisa syndrome and parkinsonism after several months of valproic acid use. An accurate recognition of symptoms and treatment side effect allowed an appropriate clinical approach so as to rapidly improve both movement disorder and depression without increasing the risk of developing seizure. This has improved the autonomy and quality of life in a patient with poor prognosis. PMID:27462241

  14. Reversal of mitochondrial defects with CSB-dependent serine protease inhibitors in patient cells of the progeroid Cockayne syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chatre, Laurent; Biard, Denis S. F.; Sarasin, Alain; Ricchetti, Miria

    2015-01-01

    UV-sensitive syndrome (UVSS) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) are human disorders caused by CSA or CSB gene mutations; both conditions cause defective transcription-coupled repair and photosensitivity. Patients with CS also display neurological and developmental abnormalities and dramatic premature aging, and their cells are hypersensitive to oxidative stress. We report CSA/CSB-dependent depletion of the mitochondrial DNA polymerase-γ catalytic subunit (POLG1), due to HTRA3 serine protease accumulation in CS, but not in UVsS or control fibroblasts. Inhibition of serine proteases restored physiological POLG1 levels in either CS fibroblasts and in CSB-silenced cells. Moreover, patient-derived CS cells displayed greater nitroso-redox imbalance than UVSS cells. Scavengers of reactive oxygen species and peroxynitrite normalized HTRA3 and POLG1 levels in CS cells, and notably, increased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, which was altered in CS cells. These data reveal critical deregulation of proteases potentially linked to progeroid phenotypes in CS, and our results suggest rescue strategies as a therapeutic option. PMID:26038566

  15. Possible Therapeutic Doses of Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptor Antagonist Reverses Key Alterations in Fragile X Syndrome Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Gomis-González, Maria; Matute, Carlos; Maldonado, Rafael; Mato, Susana; Ozaita, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common monogenetic cause of intellectual disability. The cognitive deficits in the mouse model for this disorder, the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 (Fmr1) knockout (KO) mouse, have been restored by different pharmacological approaches, among those the blockade of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor. In this regard, our previous study showed that the CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant normalized a number of core features in the Fmr1 knockout mouse. Rimonabant was commercialized at high doses for its anti-obesity properties, and withdrawn from the market on the bases of mood-related adverse effects. In this study we show, by using electrophysiological approaches, that low dosages of rimonabant (0.1 mg/kg) manage to normalize metabotropic glutamate receptor dependent long-term depression (mGluR-LTD). In addition, low doses of rimonabant (from 0.01 mg/kg) equally normalized the cognitive deficit in the mouse model of FXS. These doses of rimonabant were from 30 to 300 times lower than those required to reduce body weight in rodents and to presumably produce adverse effects in humans. Furthermore, NESS0327, a CB1 receptor neutral antagonist, was also effective in preventing the novel object-recognition memory deficit in Fmr1 KO mice. These data further support targeting CB1 receptors as a relevant therapy for FXS. PMID:27589806

  16. A Low-Glycemic Nutritional Fitness Program to Reverse Metabolic Syndrome in Professional Firefighters: Results of a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Mary G.; Al-Zaiti, Salah S.; Liao, Limei; Martin, Heather N.; Butler, Rachael A.

    2011-01-01

    Background The risk for cardiovascular events is higher for those with metabolic syndrome (MetS), and it is known that firefighters have a fourfold risk for cardiovascular events. The purpose of this study was to quantify MetS prevalence and evaluate the effect of a low glycemic nutritional fitness program on the reduction of MetS risk factors among firefighters. Methods Professional firefighters were screened for MetS then enrolled in a low glycemic nutritional fitness program for a 12-week period. Anthropometric and physiologic measurements were obtained at the start and end of the program. Subjects with ≥3 of the following were positive for MetS: waist ≥40 (men) or ≥35 inches (women), BP≥135 (systole) or ≥85 (diastole) mmHg, fasting blood sugar ≥100mg/dl, triglycerides ≥150mg/dl, and high-density lipoproteins <40 (men) or <50 mg/dl (women). Weekly training was provided with low glycemic nutrition and regular fitness and evaluation of individual progress. Results Seventy-five firefighters (age 42+8yrs, mostly Caucasian men) had a total MetS prevalence of 46.7% (p<0.05 vs normal population). One platoon (10 men, age 48±5yrs) was enrolled in the 12-week program. Most (7/10) had MetS at the baseline, but this prevalence decreased significantly after 12 weeks to 3 subjects (p=0.02). On average, subjects had 3.2±1.6 vs 1.9±1.7 MetS risk factors (p<0.01) at baseline and 12 week interval, respectively. Conclusions The prevalence of MetS and MetS risk factors are higher among professional firefighters compared to general population. A short-duration low glycemic fitness program can successfully improve anthropometric and physiologic measures and reduce the prevalence of MetS. PMID:21263343

  17. Reversing the reduced level of endometrial GLUT4 expression in polycystic ovary syndrome: a mechanistic study of metformin action

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Cui, Peng; Jiang, Hong-Yuan; Guo, Yan-Rong; Pishdari, Bano; Hu, Min; Feng, Yi; Billig, Håkan; Shao, Ruijin

    2015-01-01

    Conflicting results have been reported regarding whether or not insulin-regulated glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) is expressed in human and rodent endometria. There is an inverse relationship between androgen levels and insulin-dependent glucose metabolism in women. Hyperandrogenemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance are believed to contribute to endometrial abnormalities in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). However, it has been unclear in previous studies if endometrial GLUT4 expression is regulated by androgen-dependent androgen receptors (ARs) and/or the insulin receptor/Akt/mTOR signaling network. In this study, we demonstrate that GLUT4 is expressed in normal endometrial cells (mainly in the epithelial cells) and is down-regulated under conditions of hyperandrogenemia in tissues from PCOS patients and in a 5α-dihydrotestosterone-induced PCOS-like rat model. Western blot analysis revealed reduced endometrial GLUT4 expression and increased AR expression in PCOS patients. However, the reduced GLUT4 level was not always associated with an increase in AR in PCOS patients when comparing non-hyperplasia with hyperplasia. Using a human tissue culture system, we investigated the molecular basis by which GLUT4 regulation in endometrial hyperplasia tissues is affected by metformin in PCOS patients. We show that specific endogenous organic cation transporter isoforms are regulated by metformin, and this suggests a direct effect of metformin on endometrial hyperplasia. Moreover, we demonstrate that metformin induces GLUT4 expression and inhibits AR expression and blocks insulin receptor/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling in the same hyperplasia human tissues. These findings indicate that changes in endometrial GLUT4 expression in PCOS patients involve the androgen-dependent alteration of AR expression and changes in the insulin receptor/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling network. PMID:26045896

  18. Reversing the reduced level of endometrial GLUT4 expression in polycystic ovary syndrome: a mechanistic study of metformin action.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Cui, Peng; Jiang, Hong-Yuan; Guo, Yan-Rong; Pishdari, Bano; Hu, Min; Feng, Yi; Billig, Håkan; Shao, Ruijin

    2015-01-01

    Conflicting results have been reported regarding whether or not insulin-regulated glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) is expressed in human and rodent endometria. There is an inverse relationship between androgen levels and insulin-dependent glucose metabolism in women. Hyperandrogenemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance are believed to contribute to endometrial abnormalities in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). However, it has been unclear in previous studies if endometrial GLUT4 expression is regulated by androgen-dependent androgen receptors (ARs) and/or the insulin receptor/Akt/mTOR signaling network. In this study, we demonstrate that GLUT4 is expressed in normal endometrial cells (mainly in the epithelial cells) and is down-regulated under conditions of hyperandrogenemia in tissues from PCOS patients and in a 5α-dihydrotestosterone-induced PCOS-like rat model. Western blot analysis revealed reduced endometrial GLUT4 expression and increased AR expression in PCOS patients. However, the reduced GLUT4 level was not always associated with an increase in AR in PCOS patients when comparing non-hyperplasia with hyperplasia. Using a human tissue culture system, we investigated the molecular basis by which GLUT4 regulation in endometrial hyperplasia tissues is affected by metformin in PCOS patients. We show that specific endogenous organic cation transporter isoforms are regulated by metformin, and this suggests a direct effect of metformin on endometrial hyperplasia. Moreover, we demonstrate that metformin induces GLUT4 expression and inhibits AR expression and blocks insulin receptor/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling in the same hyperplasia human tissues. These findings indicate that changes in endometrial GLUT4 expression in PCOS patients involve the androgen-dependent alteration of AR expression and changes in the insulin receptor/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling network. PMID:26045896

  19. Administration of BMP2/7 in utero partially reverses Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome-like skeletal defects induced by Pdk1 or Cbp mutations in mice.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jae-Hyuck; Greenblatt, Matthew B; Singh, Anju; Brady, Nicholas; Hu, Dorothy; Drapp, Rebecca; Ogawa, Wataru; Kasuga, Masato; Noda, Tetsuo; Yang, Sang-Hwa; Lee, Sang-Kyou; Rebel, Vivienne I; Glimcher, Laurie H

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP) are a major cause of the human skeletal dysplasia Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS); however, the mechanism by which these mutations affect skeletal mineralization and patterning is unknown. Here, we report the identification of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) as a key regulator of CBP activity and demonstrate that its functions map to both osteoprogenitor cells and mature osteoblasts. In osteoblasts, PDK1 activated the CREB/CBP complex, which in turn controlled runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) activation and expression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2). These pathways also operated in vivo, as evidenced by recapitulation of RTS spectrum phenotypes with osteoblast-specific Pdk1 deletion in mice (Pdk1osx mice) and by the genetic interactions observed in mice heterozygous for both osteoblast-specific Pdk1 deletion and either Runx2 or Creb deletion. Finally, treatment of Pdk1osx and Cbp+/- embryos with BMPs in utero partially reversed their skeletal anomalies at birth. These findings illustrate the in vivo function of the PDK1-AKT-CREB/CBP pathway in bone formation and provide proof of principle for in utero growth factor supplementation as a potential therapy for skeletal dysplasias. PMID:22133875

  20. Preparation of His-Tagged Armored RNA Phage Particles as a Control for Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR Detection of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yangjian; Niu, Jianjun; Zhang, Yongyou; Huang, Jianwei; Li, Qingge

    2006-01-01

    Armored RNA has been increasingly used as both an external and internal positive control in nucleic acid-based assays for RNA virus. In order to facilitate armored RNA purification, a His6 tag was introduced into the loop region of the MS2 coat protein, which allows the exposure of multiple His tags on the surface during armored RNA assembly. The His-tagged armored RNA particles were purified to homogeneity and verified to be free of DNA contamination in a single run of affinity chromatography. A fragment of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) genome targeted for SARS-CoV detection was chosen for an external positive control preparation. A plant-specific gene sequence was chosen for a universal noncompetitive internal positive control preparation. Both controls were purified by Co2+ affinity chromatography and were included in a real-time reverse transcription-PCR assay for SARS-CoV. The noncompetitive internal positive control can be added to clinical samples before RNA extraction and enables the identification of potential inhibitive effects without interfering with target amplification. The external control could be used for the quantification of viral loads in clinical samples. PMID:17021082

  1. Low-Dose IL-17 Therapy Prevents and Reverses Diabetic Nephropathy, Metabolic Syndrome, and Associated Organ Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Riyaz; Jayakumar, Calpurnia; Chen, Feng; Fulton, David; Stepp, David; Gansevoort, Ron T; Ramesh, Ganesan

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure, accounting for >45% of new cases of dialysis. Diabetic nephropathy is characterized by inflammation, fibrosis, and oxidant stress, pathologic features that are shared by many other chronic inflammatory diseases. The cytokine IL-17A was initially implicated as a mediator of chronic inflammatory diseases, but recent studies dispute these findings and suggest that IL-17A can favorably modulate inflammation. Here, we examined the role of IL-17A in diabetic nephropathy. We observed that IL-17A levels in plasma and urine were reduced in patients with advanced diabetic nephropathy. Type 1 diabetic mice that are genetically deficient in IL-17A developed more severe nephropathy, whereas administration of low-dose IL-17A prevented diabetic nephropathy in models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Moreover, IL-17A administration effectively treated, prevented, and reversed established nephropathy in genetic models of diabetes. Protective effects were also observed after administration of IL-17F but not IL-17C or IL-17E. Notably, tubular epithelial cell-specific overexpression of IL-17A was sufficient to suppress diabetic nephropathy. Mechanistically, IL-17A administration suppressed phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, a central mediator of fibrosis, upregulated anti-inflammatory microglia/macrophage WAP domain protein in an AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent manner and favorably modulated renal oxidative stress and AMP-activated protein kinase activation. Administration of recombinant microglia/macrophage WAP domain protein suppressed diabetes-induced albuminuria and enhanced M2 marker expression. These observations suggest that the beneficial effects of IL-17 are isoform-specific and identify low-dose IL-17A administration as a promising therapeutic approach in diabetic kidney disease. PMID:26334030

  2. Clinical Utility of Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Diagnosis of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome after Stem Cell Transplantation in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Dandoy, Christopher E; Linscott, Luke L; Davies, Stella M; Leach, James L; Myers, Kasiani C; El-Bietar, Javier; Chima, Ranjit S; Pate, Abigail; Nelson, Adam; Wallace, Gregory; Wong, Hector R; Jodele, Sonata

    2015-11-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinical syndrome characterized by vision changes, altered mental status, and seizures, typically caused by an acute rise in blood pressure. PRES has been reported after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in association with hypertension from calcineurin inhibitors and corticosteroids. The imaging evaluation of PRES after HSCT in children and young adults has not been well described. We performed a retrospective review of all HSCT recipients presenting to the intensive care unit with new neurologic symptoms. A neuroradiologist reviewed all radiologic images and compared computed tomography (CT) versus magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings indicative of diagnosis of PRES. Alternative imaging diagnoses explaining the patients' symptoms were also recorded. Fifty-four transplant recipients were admitted to the intensive care unit with new neurologic symptoms. Thirty-nine percent (21 of 54) of subjects had imaging findings consistent with PRES, 24% (13 of 54) had imaging findings consistent with an alternative diagnosis, 9% (5 of 54) had a nonspecific finding, and 28% (15 of 54) had no acute imaging findings. PRES was diagnosed at a median of 49 days (interquartile range, 29 to 94) after HSCT. The presenting symptom for the majority of patients with PRES was seizures (86%), whereas 14% presented with acute encephalopathy. Ninety-five percent of subjects diagnosed with PRES (20 of 21) underwent a head CT as their initial imaging evaluation. CT scan was diagnostic of PRES in 40% (8 of 20). Subsequently, 16 patients underwent brain MRI with 12 additional patients being diagnosed with PRES on MRI. The median time elapsed between negative CT and a positive MRI examination was 20 hours (range, 3.6 hours to 9 days). CT serves as an excellent screening test for acute pathology, such as intracranial hemorrhage; however, it lacks sensitivity for the diagnosis of PRES. Patients with clinical symptoms

  3. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in the Intensive Care Unit after liver transplant: a comparison of our experience with the existing literature.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, N; Saraceni, E; Boccagni, P; Segato, M; Bortolato, A; Manara, R; Rossi, S; Ori, C

    2012-07-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a rare disease characterized by altered mental status, seizures, headache, vomiting and visual disturbances, most often described after transplantation and immunosuppressive therapy. PRES is commonly first diagnosed by the neuroradiologist, rather than the clinician, as it is characterized by very typical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features, i.e., hyperintense lesions in the territories of the posterior cerebral artery. Here we report our experience in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with a case of tacrolimus-related PRES after liver transplant, presenting with sudden neurological deterioration and diffuse and massive hyperintensities upon brain MRI. Discontinuation of tacrolimus, as prompted by the established literature, permitted the patient to eliminate tacrolimus-associated toxicity, whereas its substitution with everolimus and mycofenolic acid allowed the maintenance of immunosuppression while avoiding acute organ rejection and reducing the dosage of corticosteroids. The lowering of blood pressure with drugs reported in the literature for use in PRES proved to be effective but challenging, requiring the use of multiple drugs and only slowly leading to proper control of hypertensive peaks. Nonetheless, hypertension management and supportive therapy allowed for a complete neurological restitutio ad integrum of the patient. In conclusion, tacrolimus-related brain adverse events need to be promptly recognized, especially during the first months after transplantation. When tacrolimus-related PRES occurs, immunosuppressive therapy may be safely and efficiently switched to everolimus and mycofenolic acid. This strategy may help not only to avoid acute organ rejection but also to reduce the dosage of corticosteroids, which might interfere with proper control of hypertension. PMID:21701444

  4. Ciprofloxacin-associated posterior reversible encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Al Bu Ali, Waleed Hammad

    2013-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-neuroradiological syndrome characterised by numerous symptoms and of no specific aetiology. Headache, confusion, seizures, cortical visual disturbances or blindness are the key symptoms. As this syndrome is reversible and readily treated by interrupting or discontinuing the aetiology, it should sharply be acknowledged. Ciprofloxacin was associated with PRES in an adolescent male treated from chest infection. It was managed in a hospital intensive care unit and was observed until disappearance. PMID:23585504

  5. Novel agonists for serotonin 5-HT7 receptors reverse metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated long-term depression in the hippocampus of wild-type and Fmr1 KO mice, a model of Fragile X Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Costa, Lara; Sardone, Lara M; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Ciranna, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin 5-HT7 receptors are expressed in the hippocampus and modulate the excitability of hippocampal neurons. We have previously shown that 5-HT7 receptors modulate glutamate-mediated hippocampal synaptic transmission and long-term synaptic plasticity. In particular, we have shown that activation of 5-HT7 receptors reversed metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated long-term depression (mGluR-LTD) in wild-type (wt) and in Fmr1 KO mice, a mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome in which mGluR-LTD is abnormally enhanced, suggesting that 5-HT7 receptor agonists might be envisaged as a novel therapeutic strategy for Fragile X Syndrome. In this perspective, we have characterized the basic in vitro pharmacokinetic properties of novel molecules with high binding affinity and selectivity for 5-HT7 receptors and we have tested their effects on synaptic plasticity using patch clamp on acute hippocampal slices. Here we show that LP-211, a high affinity selective agonist of 5-HT7 receptors, reverses mGluR-LTD in wt and Fmr1 KO mice, correcting a synaptic malfunction in the mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome. Among novel putative agonists of 5-HT7 receptors, the compound BA-10 displayed improved affinity and selectivity for 5-HT7 receptors and improved in vitro pharmacokinetic properties with respect to LP-211. BA-10 significantly reversed mGluR-LTD in the CA3-CA1 synapse in wt and Fmr1KO mice, indicating that BA-10 behaved as a highly effective agonist of 5-HT7 receptors and reduced exaggerated mGluR-LTD in a mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome. On the other side, the compounds RA-7 and PM-20, respectively arising from in vivo metabolism of LP-211 and BA-10, had no effect on mGluR-LTD thus did not behave as agonists of 5-HT7 receptors in our conditions. The present results provide information about the structure-activity relationship of novel 5-HT7 receptor agonists and indicate that LP-211 and BA-10 might be used as novel pharmacological tools for the therapy of Fragile X Syndrome

  6. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair Using a Reverse Chimney Technique in a Patient With Marfan Syndrome and Contained Ruptured Chronic Type B Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Ketelsen, Dominik; Kalender, Guenay; Heuschmid, Martin; Syha, Roland; Mangold, Stefanie; Claussen, Claus D.; Brechtel, Klaus

    2011-10-15

    We report endovascular thoracic and abdominal aneurysm repair (EVAR) with reverse chimney technique in a patient with contained ruptured type B dissection. EVAR seems feasible as a bailout option in Marfan patients with acute life-threatening disease.

  7. Reversible lacrimal gland-protective regulatory T-cell dysfunction underlies male-specific autoimmune dacryoadenitis in the non-obese diabetic mouse model of Sjögren syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Scott M; Kreiger, Portia A; Koretzky, Gary A

    2015-06-01

    CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells are required to maintain immunological tolerance; however, defects in specific organ-protective Treg cell functions have not been demonstrated in organ-specific autoimmunity. Non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice spontaneously develop lacrimal and salivary gland autoimmunity and are a well-characterized model of Sjögren syndrome. Lacrimal gland disease in NOD mice is male-specific, but the role of Treg cells in this sex-specificity is not known. This study aimed to determine if male-specific autoimmune dacryoadenitis in the NOD mouse model of Sjögren syndrome is the result of lacrimal gland-protective Treg cell dysfunction. An adoptive transfer model of Sjögren syndrome was developed by transferring cells from the lacrimal gland-draining cervical lymph nodes of NOD mice to lymphocyte-deficient NOD-SCID mice. Transfer of bulk cervical lymph node cells modelled the male-specific dacryoadenitis that spontaneously develops in NOD mice. Female to female transfers resulted in dacryoadenitis if the CD4(+) CD25(+) Treg-enriched population was depleted before transfer; however, male to male transfers resulted in comparable dacryoadenitis regardless of the presence or absence of Treg cells within the donor cell population. Hormone manipulation studies suggested that this Treg cell dysfunction was mediated at least in part by androgens. Surprisingly, male Treg cells were capable of preventing the transfer of dacryoadenitis to female recipients. These data suggest that male-specific factors promote reversible dysfunction of lacrimal gland-protective Treg cells and, to our knowledge, form the first evidence for reversible organ-protective Treg cell dysfunction in organ-specific autoimmunity. PMID:25581706

  8. Reversible Sterilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Largey, Gale

    1977-01-01

    Notes that difficult questions arise concerning the use of sterilization for alleged eugenic and euthenic purposes. Thus, how reversible sterilization will be used with relation to the poor, mentally ill, mentally retarded, criminals, and minors, is questioned. (Author/AM)

  9. Reversible Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harsh; Madanieh, Raef; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vatti, Satya K; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies (CMs) have many etiological factors that can result in severe structural and functional dysregulation. Fortunately, there are several potentially reversible CMs that are known to improve when the root etiological factor is addressed. In this article, we discuss several of these reversible CMs, including tachycardia-induced, peripartum, inflammatory, hyperthyroidism, Takotsubo, and chronic illness–induced CMs. Our discussion also includes a review on their respective pathophysiology, as well as possible management solutions. PMID:26052233

  10. Pharmacogenetic Inhibition of eIF4E-Dependent Mmp9 mRNA Translation Reverses Fragile X Syndrome-like Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Gkogkas, Christos G.; Khoutorsky, Arkady; Cao, Ruifeng; Jafarnejad, Seyed Mehdi; Prager-Khoutorsky, Masha; Giannakas, Nikolaos; Kaminari, Archontia; Fragkouli, Apostolia; Nader, Karim; Price, Theodore J.; Konicek, Bruce W.; Graff, Jeremy R.; Tzinia, Athina K.; Lacaille, Jean-Claude; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the leading genetic cause of autism. Mutations in Fmr1 (fragile X mental retardation 1 gene) engender exaggerated translation resulting in dendritic spine dysmorphogenesis, synaptic plasticity alterations, and behavioral deficits in mice, which are reminiscent of FXS pheno-types. Using postmortem brains from FXS patients and Fmr1 knockout mice (Fmr1 −/y), we show that phosphorylation of the mRNA 5′ cap binding protein, eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E), is elevated concomitant with increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) protein. Genetic or pharmacological reduction of eIF4E phosphorylation rescued core behavioral deficits, synaptic plasticity alterations, and dendritic spine morphology defects via reducing exaggerated translation of Mmp9 mRNA in Fmr1 −/y mice, whereas MMP-9 overexpression produced several FXS-like phenotypes. These results uncover a mechanism of regulation of synaptic function by translational control of Mmp-9 in FXS, which opens the possibility of new treatment avenues for the diverse neurological and psychiatric aspects of FXS. PMID:25466251

  11. Reverse genetic manipulation of the overlapping coding regions for structural proteins of the type II porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dandan; Lv, Jian; Sun, Zhi; Zheng, Haihong; Lu, Jiaqi; Yuan, Shishan

    2009-01-01

    The overlapping genomic regions coding for structural proteins of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) poses problems for molecular dissection of the virus replication process. We constructed five mutant full-length cDNA clones with the overlapping regions unwound and 1 to 3 restriction sites inserted between two adjacent ORFs (ORF1/2, ORF4/5, ORF5/6, ORF 6/7 and ORF7/3' UTR), which generated the recombinant viruses. Our findings demonstrated that 1) the overlapping structural protein ORFs can be physically separated, and is dispensable for virus viability; 2) such ORF separations did not interrupt the subgenomic RNA synthesis; 3) the plaque morphology, growth kinetics, and antigenicity of these mutant viruses were virtually indistinguishable from those of the parental virus in cultured cells; and 4) these mutant viruses remained genetic stable in vitro. This study lays a foundation for further molecular dissection of PRRSV replication process, and development of genetically tagged vaccines against PRRS. PMID:18977502

  12. Heritable IUGR and adult metabolic syndrome are reversible and associated with alterations in the metabolome following dietary supplementation of 1-carbon intermediates.

    PubMed

    Seferovic, Maxim D; Goodspeed, Danielle M; Chu, Derrick M; Krannich, Laura A; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Pablo J; Cox, James E; Aagaard, Kjersti M

    2015-06-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS), following intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), is epigenetically heritable. Recently, we abrogated the F2 adult phenotype with essential nutrient supplementation (ENS) of intermediates along the 1-carbon pathway. With the use of the same grandparental uterine artery ligation model, we profiled the F2 serum metabolome at weaning [postnatal day (d)21; n = 76] and adulthood (d160; n = 12) to test if MetS is preceded by alterations in the metabolome. Indicative of developmentally programmed MetS, adult F2, formerly IUGR rats, were obese (621 vs. 461 g; P < 0.0001), dyslipidemic (133 vs. 67 mg/dl; P < 0.001), and glucose intolerant (26 vs. 15 mg/kg/min; P < 0.01). Unbiased gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) profiling revealed 34 peaks corresponding to 12 nonredundant metabolites and 9 unknowns to be changing at weaning [false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05]. Markers of later-in-life MetS included citric acid, glucosamine, myoinositol, and proline (P < 0.03). Hierarchical clustering revealed grouping by IUGR lineage and supplementation at d21 and d160. Weanlings grouped distinctly for ENS and IUGR by partial least-squares discriminate analysis (PLS-DA; P < 0.01), whereas paternal and maternal IUGR (IUGR(pat)/IUGR(mat), respectively) control-fed rats, destined for MetS, had a distinct metabolome at weaning (randomForest analysis; class error < 0.1) and adulthood (PLS-DA; P < 0.05). In sum, we have found that alterations in the metabolome accompany heritable IUGR, precede adult-onset MetS, and are partially amenable to dietary intervention. PMID:25757570

  13. Vasectomy reversal: a clinical update.

    PubMed

    Patel, Abhishek P; Smith, Ryan P

    2016-01-01

    Vasectomy is a safe and effective method of contraception used by 42-60 million men worldwide. Approximately 3%-6% of men opt for a vasectomy reversal due to the death of a child or divorce and remarriage, change in financial situation, desire for more children within the same marriage, or to alleviate the dreaded postvasectomy pain syndrome. Unlike vasectomy, vasectomy reversal is a much more technically challenging procedure that is performed only by a minority of urologists and places a larger financial strain on the patient since it is usually not covered by insurance. Interest in this procedure has increased since the operating microscope became available in the 1970s, which consequently led to improved patency and pregnancy rates following the procedure. In this clinical update, we discuss patient evaluation, variables that may influence reversal success rates, factors to consider in choosing to perform vasovasostomy versus vasoepididymostomy, and the usefulness of vasectomy reversal to alleviate postvasectomy pain syndrome. We also review the use of robotics for vasectomy reversal and other novel techniques and instrumentation that have emerged in recent years to aid in the success of this surgery. PMID:26975488

  14. Vasectomy reversal: a clinical update

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Abhishek P; Smith, Ryan P

    2016-01-01

    Vasectomy is a safe and effective method of contraception used by 42–60 million men worldwide. Approximately 3%–6% of men opt for a vasectomy reversal due to the death of a child or divorce and remarriage, change in financial situation, desire for more children within the same marriage, or to alleviate the dreaded postvasectomy pain syndrome. Unlike vasectomy, vasectomy reversal is a much more technically challenging procedure that is performed only by a minority of urologists and places a larger financial strain on the patient since it is usually not covered by insurance. Interest in this procedure has increased since the operating microscope became available in the 1970s, which consequently led to improved patency and pregnancy rates following the procedure. In this clinical update, we discuss patient evaluation, variables that may influence reversal success rates, factors to consider in choosing to perform vasovasostomy versus vasoepididymostomy, and the usefulness of vasectomy reversal to alleviate postvasectomy pain syndrome. We also review the use of robotics for vasectomy reversal and other novel techniques and instrumentation that have emerged in recent years to aid in the success of this surgery. PMID:26975488

  15. Vasectomy reversal.

    PubMed

    Belker, A M

    1987-02-01

    A vasovasostomy may be performed on an outpatient basis with local anesthesia, but also may be performed on an outpatient basis with epidural or general anesthesia. Local anesthesia is preferred by most of my patients, the majority of whom choose this technique. With proper preoperative and intraoperative sedation, patients sleep lightly through most of the procedure. Because of the length of time often required for bilateral microsurgical vasoepididymostomy, epidural or general anesthesia and overnight hospitalization are usually necessary. Factors influencing the preoperative choice for vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy in patients undergoing vasectomy reversal are considered. The preoperative planned choice of vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy for patients having vasectomy reversal described herein does not have the support of all urologists who regularly perform these procedures. My present approach has evolved as the data reported in Tables 1 and 2 have become available, but it may change as new information is evaluated. However, it offers a logical method for planning choices of anesthesia and inpatient or outpatient status for patients undergoing vasectomy reversal procedures. PMID:3811050

  16. A Dietary Medium-Chain Fatty Acid, Decanoic Acid, Inhibits Recruitment of Nur77 to the HSD3B2 Promoter In Vitro and Reverses Endocrine and Metabolic Abnormalities in a Rat Model of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bao Hui; Indran, Inthrani Raja; Tan, Huey Min; Li, Yu; Zhang, Zhiwei; Li, Jun; Yong, Eu-Leong

    2016-01-01

    Hyperandrogenism is the central feature of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Due to the intricate relationship between hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance in PCOS, 50%-70% of these patients also present with hyperinsulinemia. Metformin, an insulin sensitizer, has been used to reduce insulin resistance and improve fertility in women with PCOS. In previous work, we have noted that a dietary medium-chain fatty acid, decanoic acid (DA), improves glucose tolerance and lipid profile in a mouse model of diabetes. Here, we report for the first time that DA, like metformin, inhibits androgen biosynthesis in NCI-H295R steroidogenic cells by regulating the enzyme 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Δ5-Δ4-isomerase type 2 (HSD3B2). The inhibitory effect on HSD3B2 and androgen production required cAMP stimulation, suggesting a mechanistic action via the cAMP-stimulated pathway. Specifically, both DA and metformin reduced cAMP-enhanced recruitment of the orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 to the HSD3B2 promoter, coupled with decreased transcription and protein expression of HSD3B2. In a letrozole-induced PCOS rat model, treatment with DA or metformin reduced serum-free testosterone, lowered fasting insulin, and restored estrous cyclicity. In addition, DA treatment lowered serum total testosterone and decreased HSD3B2 protein expression in the adrenals and ovaries. We conclude that DA inhibits androgen biosynthesis via mechanisms resulting in the suppression of HSD3B2 expression, an effect consistently observed both in vitro and in vivo. The efficacy of DA in reversing the endocrine and metabolic abnormalities of the letrozole-induced PCOS rat model are promising, raising the possibility that diets including DA could be beneficial for the management of both hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance in PCOS. PMID:26465200

  17. Malabsorption Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome, your small intestine cannot absorb nutrients from foods. Causes of malabsorption syndromes include Celiac disease Lactose intolerance Short bowel syndrome. This happens after surgery to ...

  18. Isaac's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome (also known as neuromyotonia, Isaacs-Mertens syndrome, continuous muscle fiber activity syndrome, and quantal squander syndrome) is a rare neuromuscular disorder caused by hyperexcitability and continuous firing of ... which include progressive muscle stiffness, continuously contracting ...

  19. Performance and Cost Evaluation of One Commercial and Six In-House Conventional and Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR Assays for Detection of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, James B.; Petrich, Astrid; Louie, Lisa; Song, Xinyu; Chong, Sylvia; Smieja, Marek; Chernesky, Max; Loeb, Mark; Richardson, Susan

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated seven reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assays, including six in-house assays and one commercial assay for the detection of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) RNA in clinical specimens. RT-PCR assays targeted different genomic regions and included three conventional assays (one nested and two non-nested) run on a conventional heat block and four real-time assays performed in a LightCycler (LC; Roche Diagnostics). All in-house assays were optimized for assay parameters, including MgCl2, primer, and probe concentrations. The commercial assay was the RealArt HPA CoV RT-PCR assay (Artus), which was run in the LC. Testing serial dilutions of cultured SARS-CoV showed that the analytical sensitivity of the assays ranged from 10−8 to 10−6, corresponding to 1 and 100 copies of viral RNA, respectively. Significant differences in analytical sensitivities were observed between assays (P < 0.01, probit regression analysis for 50% sensitivity levels for the top two assays versus the others). Testing 68 clinical specimens (including 17 respiratory tract specimens, 29 urine samples, and 22 stools or rectal swabs) demonstrated that six of the seven assays detected at least 17 of 18 positives (defined as positive in at least two assays), and two of the assays had a sensitivity of 100%. There were no significant differences in sensitivity between the assays (P = 0.5 [Cochrance Q test, least sensitive 15 of 18 versus 18 of 18]). The specificities of the assays ranged from 94.0 to 100% without significant differences (P = 0.25 to 0.5 [McNemar test]). The reagent and technologist cost of performing the in-house PCR assays ranged from $5.46 to $9.81 Canadian dollars (CDN) per test. The commercial assay cost was considerably higher at $40.37 per test. The results demonstrated good performance for all assays, providing laboratories that need to do SARS RNA testing with a choice of assay formats. PMID:15070991

  20. Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Smyth, C M; Bremner, W J

    1998-06-22

    Klinefelter syndrome is the most common sex chromosome disorder. Affected males carry an additional X chromosome, which results in male hypogonadism, androgen deficiency, and impaired spermatogenesis. Some patients may exhibit all of the classic signs of this disorder, including gynecomastia, small testes, sparse body hair, tallness, and infertility, whereas others, because of the wide variability in clinical expression, lack many of these features. Treatment consists of testosterone replacement therapy to correct the androgen deficiency and to provide patients with appropriate virilization. This therapy also has positive effects on mood and self-esteem and has been shown to protect against osteoporosis, although it will not reverse infertility. Although the diagnosis of Klinefelter syndrome is now made definitively using chromosomal karyotyping, revealing in most instances a 47,XXY genotype, the diagnosis also can be made using a careful history and results of a physical examination, with the hallmark being small, firm testes. As it affects 1 in 500 male patients and presents with a variety of clinical features, primary care physicians should be familiar with this condition. PMID:9645824

  1. Dravet Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... NINDS Dravet Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Severe Myoclonic Epilepsy of Infancy (SMEI) Table of Contents (click to ... Dravet Syndrome? Dravet syndrome, also called severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI), is a severe form of ...

  2. Williams syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is a rare condition caused by missing a copy of several genes. Parents may not have ... history of the condition. However, a person with Williams syndrome has a 50% chance of passing the disorder ...

  3. Brown Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Does Brown syndrome cause eye problems besides abnormal eye movements? Some children with Brown syndrome have poor binocular ... In the congenital form of Brown syndrome, the eye movement problem is usually constant and unlikely to resolve ...

  4. Fahr's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Fahr's Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Familial Idiopathic Basal Ganglia ... is being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Fahr's Syndrome? Fahr's Syndrome is a rare, genetically dominant, ...

  5. Cushing syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cushing disease Cushing syndrome due to adrenal tumor Diabetes Ectopic Cushing syndrome Exogenous Cushing syndrome Kidney stones Pituitary tumor Rheumatoid arthritis Tumor Update Date 10/28/2015 Updated by: ...

  6. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  7. A novel mutation in the putative DNA helicase XH2 is responsible for male-to-female sex reversal associated with an atypical form of the ATR-X syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Ion, A.; Telvi, L.; Galacteros, F.; McElreavey, K.

    1996-06-01

    We describe a pedigree presenting X-linked severe mental retardation associated with multiple congenital abnormalities and 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis, leading in one family member to female gender assignment. Female carriers are unaffected. The dysmorphic features are similar to those described in the {alpha}-thalassemia and mental retardation (ATR-X) syndrome, although there is no clinical evidence of {alpha}-thalassemia in this family. In addition, the family had other clinical features not previously observed in the ATR-X syndrome, including partial optic-nerve atrophy and partial ocular albinism. Mutations in a putative DNA helicase, termed XH2, have been reported to give rise to the ATR-X syndrome. We screened the YCH2 gene for mutations in affected members of the family and identified a 4-bp deletion at an intron/exon boundary that removes an invariant 3{prime} splice-acceptor site. The mutation cosegregates with the syndrome. The genomic deletion causes missplicing of the pre-mRNA, which results in the loss of 8 bp of coding sequence, thereby generating a frameshift and a downstream premature stop codon. Our finding increases the range of clinical features associated with mutations in the XH2 gene. 17 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Reverse Correlation in Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringach, Dario; Shapley, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a review of reverse correlation in neurophysiology. We discuss the basis of reverse correlation in linear transducers and in spiking neurons. The application of reverse correlation to measure the receptive fields of visual neurons using white noise and m-sequences, and classical findings about spatial and color processing in…

  9. Quantum Operation Time Reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-03-25

    The dynamics of an open quantum system can be described by a quantum operation: A linear, complete positive map of operators. Here, I exhibit a compact expression for the time reversal of a quantum operation, which is closely analogous to the time reversal of a classical Markov transition matrix. Since open quantum dynamics are stochastic, and not, in general, deterministic, the time reversal is not, in general, an inversion of the dynamics. Rather, the system relaxes toward equilibrium in both the forward and reverse time directions. The probability of a quantum trajectory and the conjugate, time reversed trajectory are related by the heat exchanged with the environment.

  10. Central pain and dysesthesia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Berić, A

    1998-11-01

    This article presents recent observations about different recognized central pain syndromes (CPS) and discusses them in light of contemporary microelectrode and imaging findings. Different theories regarding the generation of CPS are reviewed, with an emphasis on difficulties in diagnosis and treatment. The author discourages destructive procedures for treatment of CPS, favoring, instead, reversible procedures such as stimulation techniques and drug delivery systems. PMID:9767069

  11. Behavioral features of CHARGE syndrome (Hall-Hittner syndrome) comparison with Down syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, and Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Graham, John M; Rosner, Beth; Dykens, Elisabeth; Visootsak, Jeannie

    2005-03-15

    CHARGE syndrome, or Hall-Hitner syndrome (HHS), has been delineated as a common syndrome that includes coloboma, choanal atresia, cranial nerve dysfunction (particularly asymmetric facial palsy and neurogenic swallowing problems), characteristic ear abnormalities, deafness with hypoplasia of the cochlea and semicircular canals, genital hypoplasia, and variable heart defects, orofacial clefting, tracheo-esophageal fistula, renal anomalies, thymic/parathyroid hypoplasia, spine anomalies, short broad neck with sloping shoulders, and characteristic facial features. We conducted behavioral and personality assessments in 14 boys with HHS syndrome aged 6-21 years, and compared their characteristics with similar data from 20 age-matched boys with Down syndrome (DS), 17 boys with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), and 16 boys with Williams syndrome (WS). We used the Reiss Profile of Fundamental Goals and Motivation Sensitivities, the Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), and the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC). All 14 boys with HHS were legally deaf, and 10 of the 14 were also legally blind. In comparison these other syndromes, boys with HHS had behavior that resembled autistic spectrum disorder. They were socially withdrawn, lacked interest in social contact, and manifested reduced seeking of attention from others, with hyperactivity and a need to maintain order. Though the boys with HHS showed decreased social interaction, they were not as socially impaired as in classic autism. Their language was delayed due to dual sensory impairment, cranial nerve deficits, and chronic medical problems, but their language style was not abnormal (no echolalia or jargon, no scripted phrases, and no pronoun reversal). Boys with HSS appeared frustrated, but they were not aggressive, or at risk for delinquency, manifesting few stereotypic behaviors or unusual preoccupations. They did not have a restricted repertoire of activities and interests. Their behavioral features appeared to be due

  12. Pseudoaminopterin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kraoua, Lilia; Capri, Yline; Perrin, Laurence; Benmansour, Abdelmajjid; Verloes, Alain

    2012-09-01

    Pseudoaminopterin syndrome or aminopterin syndrome-like sine aminopterin (ASSA syndrome--OMIM 600325] is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome defined by characteristic dysmorphic features, skeletal defects, limb anomalies, cryptorchidism, and growth retardation. The syndrome owes its name to the fact that patients resemble the children exposed to aminopterin or to methotrexate, two dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors used for chemotherapy, or as an abortificient in early pregnancy. Ten patients have been described with pseudoaminopterin syndrome. Their phenotype is variable, and differs from the phenotype resulting from folic acid deprivation, leading to the notion that the pathogenesis may be more complex than simple vitamin deficiency. We report on an Algerian patient with pseudoaminopterin syndrome, review the previously reported cases and confirm that pseudoaminopterin syndrome does not result from a detectable contiguous gene imbalance as high resolution CGH array was normal in this child. PMID:22811276

  13. Usher Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Usher syndrome is an inherited disease that causes serious hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, an eye disorder ... hearing and vision. There are three types of Usher syndrome: People with type I are deaf from ...

  14. Morquio syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... to have children and who have a family history of Morquio syndrome. Counseling is also recommended for families who have a child with Morquio syndrome to help them understand the condition and possible treatments. Prenatal testing is available.

  15. Asperger syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001549.htm Asperger syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Asperger syndrome is often considered a high functioning form ...

  16. Piriformis syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... sciatica; Hip socket neuropathy; Pelvic outlet syndrome; Low back pain - piriformis References Joseph RL, Alleva JT, Hudgins TH. Piriformis syndrome. In: Frontera: Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ...

  17. Pendred Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid gland. Pendred syndrome also can affect the vestibular system, which controls balance. Some people with Pendred syndrome will show vestibular weakness when their balance is tested. However, the ...

  18. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of ...

  19. Premenstrual syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;2:CD001396. Lentz GM. Primary and secondary dysmenorrhea, premenstrual syndrome, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder: etiology, diagnosis, management. In: Lentz GM, Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Katz VL, eds. ...

  20. Cushing syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cushing syndrome is called exogenous Cushing syndrome . Prednisone, dexamethasone, and prednisolone are examples of this type of ... Blood cortisol levels Blood sugar Saliva cortisol levels Dexamethasone suppression test 24-hour urine for cortisol and ...

  1. Cushing's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cushing's syndrome, also called hypercortisolism , is a rare endocrine disorder caused by chronic exposure of the body's tissues ... removing the tumor while minimizing the chance of endocrine deficiency or long-term ... for Cushing's Syndrome Clinical Trials ...

  2. Hurler syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hurler syndrome is a rare disease of metabolism in which a person cannot break down long chains of sugar molecules called glycosaminoglycans (formerly called mucopolysaccharides). Hurler syndrome belongs to a group of diseases called mucopolysaccharidosis, ...

  3. Bloom's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Glycogen Storage Disease, Type 1A Joubert Syndrome Maple Syrup Urine Disease and DLD Mucolipidosis IV (MLIV) Nemaline ... Glycogen Storage Disease, Type 1A Joubert Syndrome Maple Syrup Urine Disease and DLD Mucolipidosis IV (MLIV) Nemaline ...

  4. Angelman Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes developmental delay and neurological problems. The physician Harry Angelman first delineated the syndrome in 1965, when ... 202-534-3731 Prader-Willi Syndrome Association 8588 Potter Park Drive Suite 500 Sarasota, FL 34238 national@ ...

  5. Asperger syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Asperger syndrome is often considered a high functioning form of autism. It can lead to difficulty interacting socially, repeat behaviors, and clumsiness. Asperger syndrome is a part of the larger developmental disorder ...

  6. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and develop normally at first. ...

  7. Dumping Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Dumping Syndrome Page Content On this page: What is ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is dumping syndrome? Dumping syndrome occurs when food, especially sugar, ...

  8. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  9. Down syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Down syndrome is a genetic condition in which a person has 47 chromosomes instead of the usual 46. ... In most cases, Down syndrome occurs when there is an extra copy of chromosome 21. This form of Down syndrome is called trisomy 21. ...

  10. Oculocerebral hypopigmentation syndrome (Cross syndrome).

    PubMed

    Ozkan, H; Unsal, E; Köse, G

    1991-01-01

    A typical case of Cross syndrome with hypopigmentation, mental and psychomotor retardation, spasticity, bilateral optic atrophy and dental defects in a three-year-old boy is presented. The clinical features of this rare syndrome are discussed. PMID:1814043

  11. Reverse Transfer in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moodie, Gavin

    2004-01-01

    This article considers national Australian data on reverse transfer--the transfer of students from bachelor programs or higher to sub baccalaureate programs, institutions and sectors. It finds that previous studies have overstated the prevalence and perhaps also the significance of reverse transfer. The data are not good, but the best conclusion…

  12. Quantum reverse hypercontractivity

    SciTech Connect

    Cubitt, Toby; Kastoryano, Michael; Montanaro, Ashley; Temme, Kristan

    2015-10-15

    We develop reverse versions of hypercontractive inequalities for quantum channels. By generalizing classical techniques, we prove a reverse hypercontractive inequality for tensor products of qubit depolarizing channels. We apply this to obtain a rapid mixing result for depolarizing noise applied to large subspaces and to prove bounds on a quantum generalization of non-interactive correlation distillation.

  13. Justice and Reverse Discrimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Alan H.

    Defining reverse discrimination as hiring or admissions decisions based on normally irrelevant criteria, this book develops principles of rights, compensation, and equal opportunity applicable to the reverse discrimination issue. The introduction defines the issue and discusses deductive and inductive methodology as applied to reverse…

  14. Reverse Discrimination: Recent Cases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinhilber, August W.

    This paper discusses reverse discrimination cases with particular emphasis on Bakke v. Regents of University of California and those cases which preceded it. A brief history is given of court cases used by opponents and proponents in the discussion of reverse discrimination. Legal theory and a discussion of court cases that preceded Bakke follow.…

  15. Ultrasonic Time Reversal Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Mathias; Montaldo, Gabriel; Tanter, Mickael

    2004-11-01

    For more than ten years, time reversal techniques have been developed in many different fields of applications including detection of defects in solids, underwater acoustics, room acoustics and also ultrasound medical imaging and therapy. The essential property that makes time reversed acoustics possible is that the underlying physical process of wave propagation would be unchanged if time were reversed. In a non dissipative medium, the equations governing the waves guarantee that for every burst of sound that diverges from a source there exists in theory a set of waves that would precisely retrace the path of the sound back to the source. If the source is pointlike, this allows focusing back on the source whatever the medium complexity. For this reason, time reversal represents a very powerful adaptive focusing technique for complex media. The generation of this reconverging wave can be achieved by using Time Reversal Mirrors (TRM). It is made of arrays of ultrasonic reversible piezoelectric transducers that can record the wavefield coming from the sources and send back its time-reversed version in the medium. It relies on the use of fully programmable multi-channel electronics. In this paper we present some applications of iterative time reversal mirrors to target detection in medical applications.

  16. Reversible Shape Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing; Li, Qiaoxi; Turner, Sara; Brosnan, Sarah; Tippets, Cary; Carrillo, Jan-Michael; Nykypnachuk, Dmytro; Gang, Oleg; Dobrynin, Andrey; Lopez, Rene; Ashby, Valerie; Sheiko, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    Reversible shape memory has been achieved on various shapes, e.g. hairpin, origami, coil, robotic gripper and flow rate control device, allowing for multiple switching between encoded shapes without applying any external force. Also, the reversible photonic structure molded in dielectric elastomers has been designed. Maximum reversibility can be achieved by tuning the crosslinking density and the degree of crystallinity of semi-crystalline elastomers. Different crystallization protocols including isothermal and cooling crystallization have been applied to develop a universal picture integrating different shape memory (SM) behaviors: conventional one-way SM, two-way reversible SM, and one-way reversible SM. Acknowledge financial support from the NSF DMR-1122483, DMR- 1004576, and DMR-1206957.

  17. Hepatotoxicity of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Montessori, Valentina; Harris, Marianne; Montaner, Julio S G

    2003-05-01

    Hepatotoxicity is an adverse effect of all available classes of antiretrovirals, including nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI). A syndrome of hepatic steatosis and lactic acidosis has been recognized as a rare, potentially fatal complication since the advent of NRTI monotherapy in the early 1990s. Today, NRTI remain the backbone of antiretroviral combination regimens, and, with the success of current treatment strategies, exposure to two or more of these agents may occur over a number of years. Hepatic steatosis and lactic acidosis are accordingly being observed more frequently, along with a more recently recognized syndrome of chronic hyperlactatemia. These as well as other adverse effects of NRTI are mediated by inhibition of human DNA polymerase gamma, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction in the liver and other tissues. Early recognition and intervention are essential to avert serious outcomes. PMID:12800069

  18. Cushing's Disease Presented by Reversible Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Aydoğan, Berna İmge; Gerede, Demet Menekşe; Canpolat, Asena Gökçay; Erdoğan, Murat Faik

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Dilated cardiomyopathy is rarely reported among CS patients especially without hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy. Materials and Methods. We hereby report a Cushing's syndrome case presenting with dilated cardiomyopathy. Results. A 48-year-old female patient was admitted to our clinic with severe proximal myopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy without ventricular hypertrophy. Cushing's disease was diagnosed and magnetic-resonance imaging of the pituitary gland revealed a microadenoma. Under diuretic and ketoconazole treatments, she underwent a successful transnasal/transsphenoidal adenomectomy procedure. Full recovery of symptoms and echocardiographic features was achieved after six months of surgery. Conclusion. Cushing's syndrome must be kept in mind as a reversible cause of dilated cardiomyopathy. Recovery of cardiomyopathy is achieved with successful surgery. PMID:26649206

  19. Cushing's Disease Presented by Reversible Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Aydoğan, Berna İmge; Gerede, Demet Menekşe; Canpolat, Asena Gökçay; Erdoğan, Murat Faik

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Dilated cardiomyopathy is rarely reported among CS patients especially without hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy. Materials and Methods. We hereby report a Cushing's syndrome case presenting with dilated cardiomyopathy. Results. A 48-year-old female patient was admitted to our clinic with severe proximal myopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy without ventricular hypertrophy. Cushing's disease was diagnosed and magnetic-resonance imaging of the pituitary gland revealed a microadenoma. Under diuretic and ketoconazole treatments, she underwent a successful transnasal/transsphenoidal adenomectomy procedure. Full recovery of symptoms and echocardiographic features was achieved after six months of surgery. Conclusion. Cushing's syndrome must be kept in mind as a reversible cause of dilated cardiomyopathy. Recovery of cardiomyopathy is achieved with successful surgery. PMID:26649206

  20. Reversible shape memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheiko, Sergei; Zhou, Jing; White, Sarah; Ashby, Valerie

    2012-02-01

    An ``Achilles' heel'' of shape memory materials is that shape transformations triggered by an external stimulus are usually irreversible. Here we present a new concept of reversible transitions between two well-defined shapes by controlling hierarchic crystallization of a dual-network elastomer. The reversibility was demonstrated for different types of shape transformations including rod bending, winding of a helical coil, and widening an aperture. The distinct feature of the reversible shape alterations is that both counter-shapes are infinitely stable at a temperature of exploitation. Shape reversibility is highly desirable property in many practical applications such as non-surgical removal of a previously inserted catheter and handfree wrapping up of an earlier unraveled solar sail on a space shuttle.

  1. Tubal ligation reversal

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fernandez H, Gervaise A. Tubal anastomosis after tubal sterilization: a review. Arch Gynecol Obstet . 2011 May;283( ... Berger GS, Zerden ML. Pregnancy success after hysteroscopic sterilization reversal. Obstet Gynecol . 2014 Dec;124(6):1183- ...

  2. Giant rodlike reversed micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Z.J.; Neuman, R.D. )

    1994-05-04

    Herein we report that sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate, which is similar in structure to the classical surfactant sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT), forms very large rodlike reversed micelles and that their size can be even much larger if water is removed from the apolar solution. We further suggest that long-range electrostatic interactions are the primary driving force for the formation of giant reversed micelles. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Overgrowth Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Andrew C; Kalish, Jennifer M

    2015-09-01

    Numerous multiple malformation syndromes associated with pathologic overgrowth have been described and, for many, their molecular bases elucidated. This review describes the characteristic features of these overgrowth syndromes, as well as the current understanding of their molecular bases, intellectual outcomes, and cancer predispositions. We review syndromes such as Sotos, Malan, Marshall-Smith, Weaver, Simpson-Golabi-Behmel, Perlman, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba, PI3K-related, Proteus, Beckwith-Wiedemann, fibrous dysplasia, Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber, and Maffucci. PMID:27617124

  4. Lutembacher's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Sandhya S.; Sakaria, Amit K.; Mahajan, Sanket K.; Shah, Kuldeep B.

    2012-01-01

    The definition of Lutembacher's syndrome has undergone many changes. It refers to combination of congenital Atrial Septal Defect with acquired mitral stenosis. Lutembacher's syndrome is a very rare disease and in the past, it has been either overdiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Here, we will discuss a case of a pregnant lady who developed breathlessness during her third trimester of pregnancy and on detailed examination and investigation, she was found to be having Lutembacher's syndrome. PMID:22629045

  5. On thermodynamic and microscopic reversibility

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2011-07-12

    The word 'reversible' has two (apparently) distinct applications in statistical thermodynamics. A thermodynamically reversible process indicates an experimental protocol for which the entropy change is zero, whereas the principle of microscopic reversibility asserts that the probability of any trajectory of a system through phase space equals that of the time reversed trajectory. However, these two terms are actually synonymous: a thermodynamically reversible process is microscopically reversible, and vice versa.

  6. Sanfilippo syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... for families who have a child with Sanfilippo syndrome, to help them understand the condition and possible treatments. Prenatal testing is available. Alternative Names MPS III References Pyeritz ...

  7. Sheehan syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Postpartum hypopituitarism; Postpartum pituitary insufficiency; Hypopituitarism Syndrome ... Malee MP. Pituitary and adrenal disorders in pregnancy. In: Gabbe ... Problem Pregnancies . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ...

  8. Reversible collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H.

    2013-10-15

    Reversible magnetic reconnection is demonstrated for the first time by means of gyrokinetic numerical simulations of a collisionless magnetized plasma. Growth of a current-driven instability in a sheared magnetic field is accompanied by magnetic reconnection due to electron inertia effects. Following the instability growth, the collisionless reconnection is accelerated with development of a cross-shaped structure of current density, and then all field lines are reconnected. The fully reconnected state is followed by the secondary reconnection resulting in a weakly turbulent state. A time-reversed simulation starting from the turbulent state manifests that the collisionless reconnection process proceeds inversely leading to the initial state. During the reversed reconnection, the kinetic energy is reconverted into the original magnetic field energy. In order to understand the stability of reversed process, an external perturbation is added to the fully reconnected state, and it is found that the accelerated reconnection is reversible when the deviation of the E × B streamlines due to the perturbation is comparable with or smaller than a current layer width.

  9. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Connective tissue helps support all parts of your body. It also helps control how your body grows and develops. Marfan syndrome most often affects ... A mutation, or change, in the gene that controls how the body makes fibrillin causes Marfan syndrome. Fibrillin is a ...

  10. Tourette Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Look, Kathy

    Tourette Syndrome has a history of being misdiagnosed or undiagnosed due to its unusual and complex symptoms. This paper describes: the symptoms of Tourette Syndrome; its etiology; age of onset; therapeutic methods, such as drug therapy, psychotherapy, diet control, and hypnosis; educational implications; and employment prospects. Several…

  11. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... thin, and loose jointed. Most people with Marfan syndrome have heart and blood vessel problems, such as a weakness in the aorta or heart valves that leak. They may also have problems with ... diagnose Marfan syndrome. Your doctor may use your medical history, family ...

  12. Turner syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... at birth is often smaller than average. A child with Turner syndrome is much shorter than children who are the ... Growth hormone may help a child with Turner syndrome grow taller. ... started when the girl is 12 or 13 years old. These help trigger ...

  13. Sequential Polarity-Reversing Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaw, Clayton C.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed circuit reverses polarity of electric power supplied to bidirectional dc motor, reversible electro-mechanical actuator, or other device operating in direction depending on polarity. Circuit reverses polarity each time power turned on, without need for additional polarity-reversing or direction signals and circuitry to process them.

  14. Developmental Dynamics of Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Danielle; Banerjee, Abhishek; Sur, Mriganka

    2016-01-01

    Rett Syndrome was long considered to be simply a disorder of postnatal development, with phenotypes that manifest only late in development and into adulthood. A variety of recent evidence demonstrates that the phenotypes of Rett Syndrome are present at the earliest stages of brain development, including developmental stages that define neurogenesis, migration, and patterning in addition to stages of synaptic and circuit development and plasticity. These phenotypes arise from the pleotropic effects of MeCP2, which is expressed very early in neuronal progenitors and continues to be expressed into adulthood. The effects of MeCP2 are mediated by diverse signaling, transcriptional, and epigenetic mechanisms. Attempts to reverse the effects of Rett Syndrome need to take into account the developmental dynamics and temporal impact of MeCP2 loss. PMID:26942018

  15. Developmental Dynamics of Rett Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Danielle; Banerjee, Abhishek; Sur, Mriganka

    2016-01-01

    Rett Syndrome was long considered to be simply a disorder of postnatal development, with phenotypes that manifest only late in development and into adulthood. A variety of recent evidence demonstrates that the phenotypes of Rett Syndrome are present at the earliest stages of brain development, including developmental stages that define neurogenesis, migration, and patterning in addition to stages of synaptic and circuit development and plasticity. These phenotypes arise from the pleotropic effects of MeCP2, which is expressed very early in neuronal progenitors and continues to be expressed into adulthood. The effects of MeCP2 are mediated by diverse signaling, transcriptional, and epigenetic mechanisms. Attempts to reverse the effects of Rett Syndrome need to take into account the developmental dynamics and temporal impact of MeCP2 loss. PMID:26942018

  16. Craniofacial Syndrome Descriptions

    MedlinePlus

    ... with this syndrome do not have a smile). Miller syndrome Miller Syndrome is very rare condition characterized by downward ... dysplasia • Hemangioma • Hemifacial Microsomia / Goldenhar syndrome • Microtia/Atresia • Miller syndrome • Moebius syndrome • Nager syndrome • Pierre Robin Sequence • ...

  17. Intensive care unit syndrome: a dangerous misnomer.

    PubMed

    McGuire, B E; Basten, C J; Ryan, C J; Gallagher, J

    2000-04-10

    The terms intensive care unit (ICU) syndrome and ICU psychosis have been used interchangeably to describe a cluster of psychiatric symptoms that are unique to the ICU environment. It is often postulated that aspects of the ICU, such as sleep deprivation and sensory overload or monotony, are causes of the syndrome. This article reviews the empirical support for these propositions. We conclude that ICU syndrome does not differ from delirium and that ICU syndrome is caused exclusively by organic stressors on the central nervous system. We argue further that the term ICU syndrome is dangerous because it impedes standardized communication and research and may reduce the vigilance necessary to promptly investigate and reverse the medical cause of the delirium. Directions for future research are suggested. PMID:10761954

  18. Kounis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ntuli, P M; Makambwa, E

    2015-10-01

    Kounis syndrome is characterised by a group of symptoms that manifest as unstable vasospastic or non-vasospastic angina secondary to a hypersensitivity reaction. It was first described by Kounis and Zavras in 1991 as the concurrence of an allergic response with an anaphylactoid or anaphylactic reaction and coronary artery spasm or even myocardial infarction. Since then, this condition has evolved to include a number of mast cell activation disorders associated with acute coronary syndrome. There are many triggering factors, including reactions to multiple medications, exposure to radiological contrast media, poison ivy, bee stings, shellfish and coronary stents. In addition to coronary arterial involvement, Kounis syndrome comprises other arterial systems with similar physiologies, such as mesenteric and cerebral circulation resulting in ischaemia/infarction of the vital organs. The incidence of this condition is difficult to establish owing to the number of potential instigating factors and its relatively infrequent documentation in the literature.We report the case of an HIV-negative 39-year-old man with no coronary risk factors or family history of premature coronary artery disease, who developed Kounis syndrome after the administration of fluoroquinolone for dysuria. However, to the best of our knowledge,no data on the incidence and prevalence of Kounis syndrome in South Africa have ever been reported in the literature. The recent understanding of Kounis syndrome has led to the condition being classified into three syndrome variants. PMID:26636160

  19. Neurocutaneous syndromes.

    PubMed

    Klar, Nitasha; Cohen, Bernard; Lin, Doris D M

    2016-01-01

    Neurocutaneous syndromes (or phakomatoses) are a diverse group of congenital disorders that encompass abnormalities of neuroectodermal and, sometimes, mesodermal development, hence commonly involving the skin, eye, and central nervous system. These are often inherited conditions and typically present in early childhood or adolescence. Some of the abnormalities and clinical symptoms may, however, be progressive, and there is an increased risk of neoplastic formation in many of the syndromes. As a group, neurocutaneous syndromes are characterized by distinctive cutaneous stigmata and neurologic symptomology, the latter often representing the most devastating and debilitating features of these diseases. Many of these syndromes are markedly heterogeneous in nature as they affect many organ systems. Given the incurable nature of these conditions and the broad spectrum of pathologies they comprise, treatments vary on a case-by-case basis and tend to be palliative rather than curative. With the advances in molecular genetics, however, greater understanding of biologic functions of the gene products and the correlative phenotypic expression is being attained, and this knowledge may guide future therapeutic developments. This chapter focuses on the cutaneous and neurologic pathology with emphasis on neuroimaging of selective neurocutaneous syndromes, including tuberous sclerosis, Sturge-Weber syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, ataxia-telangiectasia, and incontinentia pigmenti. PMID:27432683

  20. Time reversal communication system

    DOEpatents

    Candy, James V.; Meyer, Alan W.

    2008-12-02

    A system of transmitting a signal through a channel medium comprises digitizing the signal, time-reversing the digitized signal, and transmitting the signal through the channel medium. The channel medium may be air, earth, water, tissue, metal, and/or non-metal.

  1. Justice and Reverse Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strike, Kenneth A.

    1976-01-01

    Although this article does not necessarily recommend policies of reverse discrimination, arguments indicating that such policies are not contradictory to accepted concepts of justice are presented. The necessity of dispersing any consequent injury to society as a whole rather than to individuals is stressed. (RW)

  2. Reversing Discrimination: A Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pati, Gopal; Reilly, Charles W.

    1977-01-01

    Examines the debate over affirmative action and reverse discrimination, and discusses how and why the present dilemma has developed. Suggests that organizations can best address the problem through an honest, in-depth analysis of their organizational structure and management practices. (JG)

  3. Andexanet: Effectively Reversing Anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2016-06-01

    Despite direct oral anticoagulants becoming a mainstay of anticoagulant therapy, the effective, timely, and safe reversal of their anticoagulant effect remains challenging. Emerging evidence attests that andexanet, a recombinant and inactive variant of native factor X (FXa), competitively inhibits and counteracts the anticoagulant effect of many inhibitors of native activated FXa. PMID:27048885

  4. Reversible Ising dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1985-01-01

    The author discusses a reversible deterministic dynamics for Ising spins. The algorithm is a variation of microcanonical Monte Carlo techniques and is easily implemented with simple bit manipulation. This provides fast programs to study non-equilibrium phenomena such as heat flow.

  5. Reverse Coherent Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Patrón, Raúl; Pirandola, Stefano; Lloyd, Seth; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2009-05-01

    In this Letter we define a family of entanglement distribution protocols assisted by feedback classical communication that gives an operational interpretation to reverse coherent information, i.e., the symmetric counterpart of the well-known coherent information. This leads to the definition of a new entanglement distribution capacity that exceeds the unassisted capacity for some interesting channels.

  6. Reverse Coherent Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Patrón, Raúl; Pirandola, Stefano; Lloyd, Seth; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2009-04-01

    We define a family of entanglement distribution protocols assisted by classical feedback communication that gives an operational interpretation to reverse coherent information, i.e., the symmetric counterpart of the well-known coherent information. This protocol family leads to the definition of a new entanglement distribution capacity that exceeds the unassisted entanglement distribution capacity for some interesting channels.

  7. Hubris syndrome.

    PubMed

    Owen, David

    2008-08-01

    Hubris syndrome is associated with power, more likely to manifest itself the longer the person exercises power and the greater the power they exercise. A syndrome not to be applied to anyone with existing mental illness or brain damage. Usually symptoms abate when the person no longer exercises power. It is less likely to develop in people who retain a personal modesty, remain open to criticism, have a degree of cynicism or well developed sense of humour. Four heads of government in the last 100 years are singled out as having developed hubris syndrome: David Lloyd George, Margaret Thatcher, George W Bush and Tony Blair. PMID:18724614

  8. LEOPARD Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sudip Kumar; Majumdar, Biswajit; Rudra, Olympia; Chakraborty, Sougat

    2015-10-01

    LEOPARD syndrome (LS) is an autosomal dominantly inherited or sporadic disorder of variable penetrance and expressivity. The acronym LEOPARD stands for its cardinal clinical features including Lentigines, Electrocardiographic conduction abnormalities, Ocular hypertelorism, Pulmonary stenosis, Abnormalities of genitalia, Retardation of growth, and Deafness. We present herein a patient with LEOPARD syndrome and distinctive features. It was noteworthy that our patient presented with the concern of generalized lentiginosis and subsequent evaluation revealed that the patient had LEOPARD syndrome. In this report we would like to highlight the importance of detailed clinical examination and appropriate imaging in patients with multiple lentigines. PMID:26632807

  9. [Aarskog's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Hromádková, L; Frána, L

    1991-05-01

    The authors described the rare Aarskog syndrome in a 6-year-old boy, associated with left-sided Brown's syndrome. Another 4-year-old boy came from an affected family where the brother suffered also from Aarskog's syndrome and in the mother some microsymptoms were detected. The authors recommend that patients who on examination of a refraction defect or strabism display uncommon features in the face or other parts of the body should be always subjected to a general examination incl. genetic examination. PMID:1913912

  10. [DRESS syndrome].

    PubMed

    Adamcová, Monika; Šturdík, Igor; Koller, Tomáš; Payer, Juraj

    2016-04-01

    DRESS syndrome (Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms) is severe drug-induced allergic-type reaction which occurs few days to weeks after taking a drug in a predisposed patient. Organ damage, eosinophilia and skin rash are typical at presentation. Corticotherapy is often necessary in severe cases. In this report we describe a case of 56-year old female with fever, elevated liver tests and skin rash. DRESS syndrome was diagnosed and allopurinol was indentified as a causative drug. Due to possible fatal outcome, DRESS syndrome should be considered in a differential diagnosis of all patients presenting with similar signs and symptoms. PMID:27250614

  11. Velocardiofacial syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Pike, A. C.; Super, M.

    1997-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome is a syndrome of multiple anomalies that include cleft palate, cardiac defects, learning difficulties, speech disorder and characteristic facial features. It has an estimated incidence of 1 in 5000. The majority of cases have a microdeletion of chromosome 22q11.2. The phenotype of this condition shows considerable variation, not all the principal features are present in each case. Identification of the syndrome can be difficult as many of the anomalies are minor and present in the general population. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9497944

  12. Alport syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... rarest type. Males and females have equally severe disease. Symptoms KIDNEYS With all types of Alport syndrome the kidneys are affected. The tiny blood vessels in the glomeruli of the kidneys are damaged. ...

  13. Nephrotic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Doctors & Hospitals Q&A Recipes En Español Teachers - Looking for Health Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the ... of certain legal and illegal drugs, or morbid obesity can lead to nephrotic syndrome. Symptoms Some kids ...

  14. Klinefelter syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... proportions (long legs, short trunk, shoulder equal to hip size) Abnormally large breasts ( gynecomastia ) Infertility Sexual problems Less than normal amount of pubic, armpit, and facial hair Small, firm testicles Tall height Exams and Tests Klinefelter syndrome may first be ...

  15. [Sneddon syndrome].

    PubMed

    Berchtold, B; Hunziker, T; Zala, L; Braathen, L R

    1991-05-01

    A 44-year-old female with Sneddon's syndrome, i.e. generalized racemose livedo and recurrent cerebrovascular disease, is presented. Significant levels of IgG anticardiolipin antibodies were found in her serum. PMID:1874623

  16. Proteus Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Our Blog Newsletter Home About Us The PSF Provides Board of Directors Medical Advisory Board International Affiliates Proteus Syndrome Diagnostic Criteria & FAQs Medical Research Glossary Donate Cash Donation Life Insurance Gift ...

  17. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone your body produces to help ... into energy for your body. If you are insulin resistant, too much sugar builds up in your ...

  18. Wallenberg's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some people with Wallenberg’s syndrome report that the world seems to be tilted in an unsettling way, which makes it difficult to keep their balance when they walk. Is there any treatment? Treatment ...

  19. Scheie syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... for families who have a child with Scheie syndrome, to help them understand the condition and possible treatments. Prenatal testing is available. Alternative Names Mucopolysaccharidosis type I S; MPS ...

  20. Apert syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... by ridging along sutures (craniosynostosis) Frequent ear infections Fusion or severe webbing of the 2nd, 3rd, and ... midface Skeletal (limb) abnormalities Short height Webbing or fusion of the toes Several other syndromes can lead ...

  1. Alport Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicines (medications to control high blood pressure) Diuretics (water pills) Limit sodium (salt) in your diet If you are approaching kidney disease because of Alport syndrome, a ... NY Register Now 2016 Orangeburg Kidney Walk Thu, ...

  2. Duane Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eye muscles. In Duane syndrome, the sixth cranial nerve that controls the lateral rectus muscle (the muscle ... abnormal innervation of a branch from the third cranial nerve, which normally controls the medial rectus muscle (the ...

  3. Behcet's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Behcet's syndrome is a disease that involves vasculitis, which is inflammation of the blood vessels. It causes problems in many parts of the body. The ... National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  4. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, blood vessels, and other organs. One of these proteins is fibrillin. A problem with the ...

  5. Paraneoplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to determine effective treatment strategies. NIH Patient Recruitment for Paraneoplastic Syndromes Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical Center Throughout the U.S. and Worldwide NINDS Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association 22100 ...

  6. Paraneoplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Stolinsky, David C.

    1980-01-01

    Neoplasms can produce a variety of remote effects on the host; these are referred to as paraneoplastic syndromes. The syndromes may affect any of the systems of the body, may precede or follow the diagnosis of the underlying neoplasm, and may or may not parallel the course of the neoplasm in severity. The diagnosis of and therapy for these syndromes can be challenging to a physician, but successful therapy may bring about worthwhile relief for the patient. In addition, the syndromes and the substances that cause them are sometimes useful in diagnosing and in following the course of certain neoplasms. Perhaps of greater importance, study of these remote effects of neoplasia may shed light on the nature of the neoplastic process itself. PMID:6990627

  7. Hunter syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hunter syndrome is a disease in which long chains of sugar molecules (glycosaminoglycans, formerly called mucopolysaccharides ) are ... of the enzyme iduronate sulfatase. Without this enzyme, chains of sugar molecules build up in various body ...

  8. Malabsorption Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... They often include chronic diarrhea, abnormal stools, weight loss, and gas. Your doctor may use lab, imaging, or other tests to make a diagnosis. Treatment of malabsorption syndromes depends on the cause.

  9. Compartment syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by repetitive activities, such as running. The pressure in a compartment only increases during that activity. Compartment syndrome is most common in the lower leg and forearm. It can also occur in the hand, foot, thigh, and upper arm.

  10. Sotos Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Sotos Syndrome Information ... News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | Privacy ...

  11. Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... or problems with their heart, stomach or eyes. Intelligence ranges from low normal to very retarded (slow ... a baby who has Down syndrome will be. Intelligence ranges from low normal to very retarded (slow ...

  12. Compartment syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jobe MT. Compartment syndromes and Volkmann contracture. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. ... and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, ...

  13. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... turnersyndrome. html • Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institutes of Child Health & Human Development (NIH): www. nichd. nih. gov/ health/ topics/ Turner_ Syndrome. cfm • Mayo Clinic: www. mayoclinic. com/ health/ turner- ...

  14. Reifenstein syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the gene will be affected. Every female child has a 50% chance of carrying the gene. Family history is important in determining risk factors. The syndrome is estimated to affect 1 in 99,000 people.

  15. [DIDMOAD syndrome].

    PubMed

    Alicanoğlu, R; Canbakan, B; Yildiz, N; Arikan, E; Kundur, H; Bahtiyar, K; Sayali, E

    1994-01-01

    The DIDMOAD or so called Wolfram syndrome is a hereditary disease with autosomal-recessive transmission showing 4 main features: diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, nervus opticus atrophia and deafness. Beside this it shows multiple organ involvement. Our 38-year old male patient, showing all above mentioned features except deafness had urinary tract involvement and neurological symptoms. EEG, cerebral MRI, tests with evoked potentials and HLA-typing were performed to discuss the aetiopathogenetic background in our patient. Almost all symptoms of the Wolfram syndrome can be mixed up with complications of diabetes mellitus, which is usually the first symptom of the Wolfram syndrome. Because of this, wrong diagnosis is not rare. Hence in differential diagnosis in any diabetes mellitus type I patient, the possibility of the Wolfram syndrome should be discussed. PMID:8023526

  16. Aase syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... make ribosomal proteins) This condition is similar to Diamond-Blackfan anemia, and the 2 conditions should not ... chromosome 19 is found in some people with Diamond-Blackfan anemia. The anemia in Aase syndrome is ...

  17. Piriformis syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... sciatica; Hip socket neuropathy; Pelvic outlet syndrome; Low back pain - piriformis ... or numbness in the buttock and along the back of the leg Difficulty sitting Pain from sitting that grows worse as you continue ...

  18. Menkes syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Menkes syndrome, cells in the body can absorb copper, but they are unable to release it. It ... makes it hard for the body to distribute copper in food from the intestines into the bloodstream ...

  19. Waardenburg syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions passed down through families. The syndrome involves deafness and pale skin, hair, and eye color. ... Symptoms may include: Cleft lip (rare) Constipation Deafness (more ... that don't match ( heterochromia ) Pale color skin, hair, and ...

  20. Aase syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Aase-Smith syndrome; Hypoplastic anemia - triphalangeal thumbs, Aase-Smith type ... Jones KL, Jones MC, Del Campo M, eds. Smith's Recognizable Patterns of Human Malformation . 7th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  1. HELLP syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... out of 1,000 pregnancies. In women with preeclampsia or eclampsia , the condition develops in 10 to ... have high blood pressure and are diagnosed with preeclampsia before they develop HELLP syndrome. In some cases, ...

  2. Hunter syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Genetic counseling is recommended for couples who want to have children and who have a family history of Hunter syndrome. Prenatal testing is available. Carrier testing for female relatives of affected males is available at a few centers.

  3. Down syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... their limitations, they may also feel frustration and anger. Many different medical conditions are seen in people ... syndrome and their families deal with the frustration, anger, and compulsive behavior that often occur. Parents and ...

  4. Sanfilippo syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome belongs to a group of diseases called mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS). Specifically, it is known as MPS III. ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 260. Spranger J. Mucopolysaccharidoses. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton ...

  5. [Heptopulmonary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cuadrado, Antonio; Díaz, Ainhoa; Iruzubieta, Paula; Salcines, José Ramón; Crespo, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome is characterized by the presence of liver disease, pulmonary vascular dilatations, and arterial hypoxemia. It is usually associated with cirrhosis of any origin, but has been described in other liver diseases, both acute and chronic, and not always associated with portal hypertension. The gold standard method to detect pulmonary vascular dilations is contrast enhancement echocardiography with saline and is essential for the diagnosis of hepatopulmonary syndrome. These dilatations reflect changes in the pulmonary microvasculature (vasodilatation, intravascular monocyte accumulation, and angiogenesis) and induce a ventilation/perfusion mismatch, or even true intrapulmonary shunts, which eventually trigger hypoxemia. This syndrome worsens patients' prognosis and impairs their quality of life and may lead to the need for liver transplantation, which is the only effective and definitive treatment. In this article, we review the etiological, pathophysiological, clinical and therapeutic features of this syndrome. PMID:25840463

  6. Joubert Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Joubert Syndrome Information ... News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | Privacy ...

  7. Beals Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... have many of the skeletal (bone) and aortic enlargement problems as people with Marfan syndrome, and treatments ... appearance to the top of the ear Aortic enlargement and/or mitral valve regurgitation (occasionally) People with ...

  8. Klinefelter Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Search" box. Then click "Submit Query". Organizations Organizations Listen Nonprofit support and advocacy groups bring together ... endorsement by GARD. Suggest an organization to add. Organizations Supporting this Disease American Association for Klinefelter Syndrome ...

  9. [Netherton syndrome].

    PubMed

    Serra-Guillén, Carlos; Torrelo, Antonio; Drake, Marta; Armesto, Susana; Fernández-Llaca, Héctor; Zambrano, Antonio

    2006-06-01

    Netherton syndrome is a rare disease inherited as an autosomal recessive trait due to mutations in the SPINK5 gene. It is characterized by the triad of ichthyosiform dermatosis, alterations of the hair shaft and immunological disorders. We present the case of a 12-year-old girl with the triad of ichthyosis linearis circumflexa, trichorrhexis invaginata and atopic dermatitis, characteristic of Netherton syndrome. PMID:16956571

  10. Noonan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Amy E; Allanson, Judith E; Tartaglia, Marco; Gelb, Bruce D

    2014-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic multisystem disorder characterised by distinctive facial features, developmental delay, learning difficulties, short stature, congenital heart disease, renal anomalies, lymphatic malformations, and bleeding difficulties. Mutations that cause Noonan syndrome alter genes encoding proteins with roles in the RAS–MAPK pathway, leading to pathway dysregulation. Management guidelines have been developed. Several clinically relevant genotype–phenotype correlations aid risk assessment and patient management. Increased understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease could help development of pharmacogenetic treatments. PMID:23312968

  11. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants shall be maintained in a safe and suitable condition for service. Reverse lever latch shall be...

  12. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants shall be maintained in a safe and suitable condition for service. Reverse lever latch shall be...

  13. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants shall be maintained in a safe and suitable condition for service. Reverse lever latch shall be...

  14. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants shall be maintained in a safe and suitable condition for service. Reverse lever latch shall be...

  15. Alagille syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Krantz, I D; Piccoli, D A; Spinner, N B

    1997-01-01

    Alagille syndrome (OMIM 118450) is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with abnormalities of the liver, heart, eye, skeleton, and a characteristic facial appearance. Also referred to as the Alagille-Watson syndrome, syndromic bile duct paucity, and arteriohepatic dysplasia, it is a significant cause of neonatal jaundice and cholestasis in older children. In the fully expressed syndrome, affected subjects have intrahepatic bile duct paucity and cholestasis, in conjunction with cardiac malformations (most frequently peripheral pulmonary stenosis), ophthalmological abnormalities (typically of the anterior chamber with posterior embryotoxon being the most common), skeletal anomalies (most commonly butterfly vertebrae), and characteristic facial appearance. Inheritance is autosomal dominant, but expressivity is highly variable. Sibs and parents of probands are often found to have mild expression of the presumptive disease gene, with abnormalities of only one or two systems. The frequency of new mutations appears relatively high, estimated at between 15 and 50%. The disease gene has been mapped to chromosome 20 band p12 based on multiple patients described with cytogenetic or molecular rearrangements of this region. However, the frequency of detectable deletions of 20p12 is low (less than 7%). Progress has been made in the molecular definition of an Alagille syndrome critical region within the short arm of chromosome 20. We will review the clinical, genetic, cytogenetic, and molecular findings in this syndrome. Images PMID:9039994

  16. Reverse genetics of mononegavirales.

    PubMed

    Conzelmann, K K

    2004-01-01

    "Reverse genetics" or de novo synthesis of nonsegmented negative-sense RNA viruses (Mononegavirales) from cloned cDNA has become a reliable technique to study this group of medically important viruses. Since the first generation of a negative-sense RNA virus entirely from cDNA in 1994, reverse genetics systems have been established for members of most genera of the Rhabdo-, Paramyxo-, and Filoviridae families. These systems are based on intracellular transcription of viral full-length RNAs and simultaneous expression of viral proteins required to form the typical viral ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP). These systems are powerful tools to study all aspects of the virus life cycle as well as the roles of virus proteins in virus-host interplay and pathogenicity. In addition, recombinant viruses can be designed to have specific properties that make them attractive as biotechnological tools and live vaccines. PMID:15298166

  17. Gridded electron reversal ionizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A gridded electron reversal ionizer forms a three dimensional cloud of zero or near-zero energy electrons in a cavity within a filament structure surrounding a central electrode having holes through which the sample gas, at reduced pressure, enters an elongated reversal volume. The resultant negative ion stream is applied to a mass analyzer. The reduced electron and ion space-charge limitations of this configuration enhances detection sensitivity for material to be detected by electron attachment, such as narcotic and explosive vapors. Positive ions may be generated by generating electrons having a higher energy, sufficient to ionize the target gas and pulsing the grid negative to stop the electron flow and pulsing the extraction aperture positive to draw out the positive ions.

  18. Cri du chat syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome who wish to become pregnant may consider genetic counseling. Alternative Names Chromosome 5p deletion syndrome; 5p minus syndrome; Cat cry syndrome References Bacino CA, Lee B. Cytogenetics. ...

  19. Holmes-Adie Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Holmes-Adie syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Adie's Syndrome, Adie's ... research is being done? Clinical Trials What is Holmes-Adie syndrome ? Holmes-Adie syndrome (HAS) is a ...

  20. Anesthesia & Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur in individuals with Down syndrome than their peers without Down syndrome. An awareness of these more ... of the eyes, ears, and joints - just like peers without Down syndrome. What About Down Syndrome Is ...

  1. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Job syndrome; Hyper IgE syndrome ... Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome is also called Job syndrome. It is named after the biblical character Job whose faithfulness was tested by an affliction with draining skin sores and pustules . ...

  2. Androgen insensitivity syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... at the tip Reifenstein syndrome (also known as Gilbert-Dreyfus syndrome or Lubs syndrome) Infertile male syndrome ... F, Leveno KJ, Bloom SL, et al., eds. Williams Obstetrics . 23rd ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, ...

  3. Sexuality and Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q&A for Kids Resources New & Expectant ... Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q&A for Kids Resources New & Expectant ...

  4. Tics and Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Tics and Tourette Syndrome Overview What is Tourette syndrome? Tourette syndrome is a type of tic disorder. Children who have Tourette syndrome will repeat both movements and ...

  5. Down Syndrome (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Down Syndrome KidsHealth > For Kids > Down Syndrome Print A A ... skills. continue Do a Lot of People Have Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is not contagious , so you can' ...

  6. Field reversed ion rings

    SciTech Connect

    Sudan, R.N.; Omelchenko, Y.A.

    1995-09-01

    In typical field-reversed ion ring experiments, an intense annular ion beam is injected across a plasma-filled magnetic cusp region into a neutral gas immersed in a ramped solenoidal magnetic field. Assuming the characteristic ionization time is much shorter than the long ({ital t}{approx_gt}2{pi}/{Omega}{sub {ital i}}) beam evolution time scale, we investigate the formation of an ion ring in the background plasma followed by field reversal, using a 21/2-D hybrid, PIC code FIRE, in which the beam and background ions are treated as particles and the electrons as a massless fluid. We show that beam bunching and trapping occurs downstream in a ramped magnetic field for an appropriate set of experimental parameters. We find that a compact ion ring is formed and a large field reversal {zeta}={delta}{ital B}/{ital B}{approx_gt}1 on axis develops. We also observe significant deceleration of the ring on reflection due to the transfer of its axial momentum to the background ions, which creates favorable trapping conditions. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Tevatron reverse injection

    SciTech Connect

    Saritepe, S.; Annala, G.

    1993-06-25

    In the new injection scenario antiprotons are injected onto a helical orbit in the Tevatron in order to avoid the detrimental effects of the beam-beam interaction at 150 GeV. The new scenario required changes in the tuning procedure. Antiprotons are too precious to be used for tuning, therefore the antiproton injection line has to be tuned with protons by reverse injecting them from the Tevatron into the Main Pang (MR). Previously, the reverse injection was performed in one supercycle. One batch of uncoalesced bunches was injected into the Tevatron and ejected after 40 seconds. Then the orbit closure was performed in the MR. In the new scheme the lambertson magnets have to be moved and separator polarities have to be switched, activities that cannot be completed in one supercycle. Therefore, the reverse injection sequence was changed. This involved the redefinition of TVBS dock event $D8 as MRBS $D8 thus marking it possible to inject 6 proton batches and eject them one at a time on command, performing orbit closure each time in the MR.

  8. Reversible DNA compaction.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    In this review we summarize and discuss the different methods we can use to achieve reversible DNA compaction in vitro. Reversible DNA compaction is a natural process that occurs in living cells and viruses. As a result these process long sequences of DNA can be concentrated in a small volume (compacted) to be decompacted only when the information carried by the DNA is needed. In the current work we review the main artificial compacting agents looking at their suitability for decompaction. The different approaches used for decompaction are strongly influenced by the nature of the compacting agent that determines the mechanism of compaction. We focus our discussion on two main artificial compacting agents: multivalent cations and cationic surfactants that are the best known compacting agents. The reversibility of the process can be achieved by adding chemicals like divalent cations, alcohols, anionic surfactants, cyclodextrins or by changing the chemical nature of the compacting agents via pH modifications, light induced conformation changes or by redox-reactions. We stress the relevance of electrostatic interactions and self-assembly as a main approach in order to tune up the DNA conformation in order to create an on-off switch allowing a transition between coil and compact states. The recent advances to control DNA conformation in vitro, by means of molecular self-assembly, result in a better understanding of the fundamental aspects involved in the DNA behavior in vivo and serve of invaluable inspiration for the development of potential biomedical applications. PMID:24444152

  9. [Reverse Chaddock sign].

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Kunio

    2011-08-01

    It is widely accepted that the Babinski reflex is the most well-known and important pathological reflex in clinical neurology. Among many other pathological reflexes that elicit an upgoing great toe, such as Chaddock, Oppenheim, Gordon, Schaefer, and Stransky, only the Chaddock reflex is said to be as sensitive as the Babinski reflex. The optimal receptive fields of the Babinski and Chaddock reflexes are the lateral plantar surface and the external inframalleolar area of the dorsum, respectively. It has been said that the Babinski reflex, obtained by stroking the sole, is by far the best and most reliable method of eliciting an upgoing great toe. However, the Chaddock reflex, the external malleolar sign, is also considered sensitive and reliable according to the literature and everyday neurological practice. The major problems in eliciting the Babinski reflex by stroking the lateral part of the sole are false positive or negative responses due to foot withdrawal, tonic foot response, or some equivocal movements. On the other hand, according to my clinical experience, the external inframalleolar area, which is the receptive field of the Chaddock reflex, is definitely suitable for eliciting the upgoing great toe. In fact, the newly proposed method to stimulate the dorsum of the foot from the medial to the lateral side, which I term the "reversed Chaddock method," is equally sensitive to demonstrate pyramidal tract involvement. With the "reversed Chaddock method", the receptive field of the Chaddock reflex may be postulated to be in the territory of the sural nerve, which could be supported by the better response obtained on stimulation of the postero-lateral calf than the anterior shin. With regard to the receptive fields of the Babinski and Chaddock reflexes, the first sacral dermatome (S1) is also considered a reflexogenous zone, but since the dermatome shows marked overlapping, the zones vary among individuals. As upgoing toe responses are consistently observed in

  10. Why Metabolic Syndrome Matters

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Why Metabolic Syndrome Matters Updated:Jul 24,2014 Metabolic syndrome may be ... Syndrome • Home • About Metabolic Syndrome • Why Metabolic Syndrome Matters • Your Risk for Metabolic Syndrome • Symptoms & Diagnosis • Prevention & ...

  11. Affirmative Action, or Reverse Discrimination?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dansby, Ike

    1996-01-01

    Determines the impact of affirmative action programs in response to charges that they are policies of reverse discrimination. Reviewing affirmative action programs submitted by Michigan State departments, researchers determined no reverse discrimination was apparent based on low numbers of reverse discrimination complaints filed by whites. (GR)

  12. Antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Crowther, Mark; Branch, Ware; Khamashta, Munther A

    2010-10-30

    The antiphospholipid syndrome causes venous, arterial, and small-vessel thrombosis; pregnancy loss; and preterm delivery for patients with severe pre-eclampsia or placental insufficiency. Other clinical manifestations are cardiac valvular disease, renal thrombotic microangiopathy, thrombocytopenia, haemolytic anaemia, and cognitive impairment. Antiphospholipid antibodies promote activation of endothelial cells, monocytes, and platelets; and overproduction of tissue factor and thromboxane A2. Complement activation might have a central pathogenetic role. Of the different antiphospholipid antibodies, lupus anticoagulant is the strongest predictor of features related to antiphospholipid syndrome. Therapy of thrombosis is based on long-term oral anticoagulation and patients with arterial events should be treated aggressively. Primary thromboprophylaxis is recommended in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and probably in purely obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome. Obstetric care is based on combined medical-obstetric high-risk management and treatment with aspirin and heparin. Hydroxychloroquine is a potential additional treatment for this syndrome. Possible future therapies for non-pregnant patients with antiphospholipid syndrome are statins, rituximab, and new anticoagulant drugs. PMID:20822807

  13. Preexcitation Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Atul; Sra, Jasbir; Akhtar, Masood

    2016-03-01

    The classic electrocardiogram in Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is characterized by a short PR interval and prolonged QRS duration in the presence of sinus rhythm with initial slurring. The clinical syndrome associated with above electrocardiogram finding and the history of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia is referred to as Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Various eponyms describing accessory or anomalous conduction pathways in addition to the normal pathway are collectively referred to as preexcitation syndromes. The latter form and associated eponyms are frequently used in literature despite controversy and disagreements over their actual anatomical existence and electrophysiological significance. This communication highlights inherent deficiencies in the knowledge that has existed since the use of such eponyms began. With the advent of curative ablation, initially surgical, and then catheter based, the knowledge gaps have been mostly filled with better delineation of the anatomic and electrophysiological properties of anomalous atrioventricular pathways. It seems reasonable, therefore, to revisit the clinical and electrophysiologic role of preexcitation syndromes in current practice. PMID:26897561

  14. Reversible brazing process

    DOEpatents

    Pierce, Jim D.; Stephens, John J.; Walker, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    A method of reversibly brazing surfaces together. An interface is affixed to each surface. The interfaces can be affixed by processes such as mechanical joining, welding, or brazing. The two interfaces are then brazed together using a brazing process that does not defeat the surface to interface joint. Interfaces of materials such as Ni-200 can be affixed to metallic surfaces by welding or by brazing with a first braze alloy. The Ni-200 interfaces can then be brazed together using a second braze alloy. The second braze alloy can be chosen so that it minimally alters the properties of the interfaces to allow multiple braze, heat and disassemble, rebraze cycles.

  15. Reversal bending fatigue testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Tan, Ting

    2014-10-21

    Embodiments for apparatuses for testing reversal bending fatigue in an elongated beam are disclosed. Embodiments are configured to be coupled to first and second end portions of the beam and to apply a bending moment to the beam and create a pure bending condition in an intermediate portion of the beam. Embodiments are further configured to cyclically alternate the direction of the bending moment applied to the beam such that the intermediate portion of the beam cyclically bends in opposite directions in a pure bending condition.

  16. Lemierre's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eilbert, Wesley; Singla, Nitin

    2013-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a condition characterized by thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and bacteremia caused by primarily anaerobic organisms, following a recent oropharyngeal infection. This has been an uncommon illness in the era of antibiotic therapy, though it has been reported with increasing frequency in the past 15 years. Lemierre's syndrome should be suspected in young healthy patients with prolonged symptoms of pharyngitis followed by symptoms of septicemia or pneumonia, or an atypical lateral neck pain. Diagnosis is often confirmed by identification of thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and growth of anaerobic bacteria on blood culture. Treatment involves prolonged antibiotic therapy occasionally combined with anticoagulation. We review the literature and a case of a child with Lemierre's syndrome. PMID:24152679

  17. Compartment syndromes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  18. [Kallmann syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mokosch, A; Bernecker, C; Willenberg, H S; Neumann, N J

    2011-10-01

    The Kallmann syndrome is a very rare congenital association of gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency and hyposmia or anosmia. Clinically it is characterized by low serum concentrations of testosterone and inadequate low levels of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone as well as incomplete sexual maturation, lack of secondary sexual features (facial and body hair growth, deepening of the voice), micropenis and sometimes even cryptorchidism. The reduced or absent sense of smell is typical for the Kallmann syndrome and distinguishes this syndrome from other causes of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Additional findings may include synkinesia, hearing loss, unilateral renal aplasia, brachy- or syndactyly, agenesis of corpus callosum, cleft palate and dental agenesis. A 19-year-old man presented to our male infertility clinic with delayed sexual maturation, eunuchoid habitus, micropenis, cryptorchidism, erectile dysfunction and absence of ejaculation, anemia and osteoporosis as well as low serum concentrations of luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and testosterone in combination with hyposmia. PMID:21918848

  19. SAPHO syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cotten, A; Flipo, R M; Mentre, A; Delaporte, E; Duquesnoy, B; Chastanet, P

    1995-09-01

    Palmoplantar pustulosis and severe acne are sometimes associated with peculiar aseptic skeletal conditions, but such skeletal lesions can be found without skin lesions. The term SAPHO syndrome has been coined for this cluster of manifestations. (The acronym SAPHO refers to synovitis, acne, palmoplantar pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis.) The most common site of the disease is the upper anterior chest wall, characterized by predominantly osteosclerotic lesions, hyperostosis, and arthritis of the adjacent joints. Osteosclerosis of the vertebral bodies, hyperostosis, and erosions of the vertebral plates can be encountered. Unilateral sacroiliitis is frequently observed. Long bone involvement consists of osteosclerosis or osteolysis with periosteal new bone formation. Peripheral arthritis can be present but is rarely associated with joint destruction. The pathogenesis of this syndrome remains unknown, but a link with seronegative spondyloarthropathies is probable. Radiologists should be aware of this unusual syndrome to avoid misdiagnosis (eg, tumor, infection), unnecessary surgery, and antibiotic therapy. PMID:7501856

  20. Flammer syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The new term Flammer syndrome describes a phenotype characterized by the presence of primary vascular dysregulation together with a cluster of symptoms and signs that may occur in healthy people as well as people with disease. Typically, the blood vessels of the subjects with Flammer syndrome react differently to a number of stimuli, such as cold and physical or emotional stress. Nearly all organs, particularly the eye, can be involved. Although the syndrome has some advantages, such as protection against the development of atherosclerosis, Flammer syndrome also contributes to certain diseases, such as normal tension glaucoma. The syndrome occurs more often in women than in men, in slender people than in obese subjects, in people with indoor rather than outdoor jobs, and in academics than in blue collar workers. Affected subjects tend to have cold extremities, low blood pressure, prolonged sleep onset time, shifted circadian rhythm, reduced feeling of thirst, altered drug sensitivity, and increased general sensitivity, including pain sensitivity. The plasma level of endothelin-1 is slightly increased, and the gene expression in lymphocytes is changed. In the eye, the retinal vessels are stiffer and their spatial variability larger; the autoregulation of ocular blood flow is decreased. Glaucoma patients with Flammer syndrome have an increased frequency of the following: optic disc hemorrhages, activated retinal astrocytes, elevated retinal venous pressure, optic nerve compartmentalization, fluctuating diffuse visual field defects, and elevated oxidative stress. Further research should lead to a more concise definition, a precise diagnosis, and tools for recognizing people at risk. This may ultimately lead to more efficient and more personalized treatment. PMID:25075228

  1. [Eisenmenger syndrome].

    PubMed

    Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Iversen, Kasper; Vejlstrup, Niels G; Hansen, Peter Bo; Søndergaard, Lars

    2009-04-01

    Congenital heart disease with left-to-right shunt can induce proliferation, vasoconstriction and thrombosis in the pulmonary vascular bed. Eventually, the patient may develop Eisenmenger syndrome defined as pulmonary arterial hypertension caused by high pulmonary vascular resistance with right-to-left shunt and cyanosis. Patients with Eisenmenger syndrome suffer a high risk of complications in connection with acute medical conditions, extra-cardiac surgery and pregnancy. This article describes the precautions that should be taken to reduce morbidity and mortality in these patients. PMID:19416617

  2. Reverse Quantum Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Jeffrey

    2010-02-01

    As preposterous as it might sound, if quantum waves travel in the reverse direction from subatomic particles, then most of quantum physics can be explained without quantum weirdness or Schr"odinger's cat. Quantum mathematics is unchanged. The diffraction pattern on the screen of the double slit experiment is the same. This proposal is not refuted by the Innsbruck experiments; this is NOT a hidden local variable theory. Research evidence will be presented that is consistent with the idea waves travel in the opposite direction as neutrons. If one's thinking shifts from forwards to backwards quantum waves, the world changes so drastically it is almost unimaginable. Quantum waves move from the mathematical to the real world, multiply in number, and reverse in direction. Wave-particle duality is undone. In the double slit experiment every part of the target screen is emitting such quantum waves in all directions. Some pass through the two slits. Interference occurs on the opposite side of the barrier than is usually imagined. They impinge on ``S'' and an electron is released at random. Because of the interference it is more likely to follow some waves than others. It follows one and only one wave backward; hitting the screen where it's wave originated. )

  3. Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lévy, Patrick; Kohler, Malcolm; McNicholas, Walter T; Barbé, Ferran; McEvoy, R Doug; Somers, Virend K; Lavie, Lena; Pépin, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a common clinical condition in which the throat narrows or collapses repeatedly during sleep, causing obstructive sleep apnoea events. The syndrome is particularly prevalent in middle-aged and older adults. The mechanism by which the upper airway collapses is not fully understood but is multifactorial and includes obesity, craniofacial changes, alteration in upper airway muscle function, pharyngeal neuropathy and fluid shift towards the neck. The direct consequences of the collapse are intermittent hypoxia and hypercapnia, recurrent arousals and increase in respiratory efforts, leading to secondary sympathetic activation, oxidative stress and systemic inflammation. Excessive daytime sleepiness is a burden for the majority of patients. OSAS is also associated with cardiovascular co-morbidities, including hypertension, arrhythmias, stroke, coronary heart disease, atherosclerosis and overall increased cardiovascular mortality, as well as metabolic dysfunction. Whether treating sleep apnoea can fully reverse its chronic consequences remains to be established in adequately designed studies. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the primary treatment modality in patients with severe OSAS, whereas oral appliances are also widely used in mild to moderate forms. Finally, combining different treatment modalities such as CPAP and weight control is beneficial, but need to be evaluated in randomized controlled trials. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/Lwc6te. PMID:27188535

  4. Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  5. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... If you already have metabolic syndrome, making these healthy lifestyle choices can help reduce your risk of heart disease and other health problems. If lifestyle changes alone can’t control your ... to help. Maintain a healthy weight Your doctor can measure your body mass ...

  6. Reye's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnosis and medical treatment of RS. NIH Patient Recruitment for Reye's Syndrome Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical ... Drug Administration (FDA) U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 5600 Fishers Lane, CDER-HFD-240 Rockville, MD ... Privacy Statement NIH...Turning Discovery Into Health ®

  7. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... from Nemours for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q&A School & Jobs Drugs & Alcohol Staying Safe Recipes En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot ... > Metabolic Syndrome Print A A A Text Size ...

  8. Dubowitz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, O L; Méhes, K

    1986-01-01

    Four children including two siblings with Dubowitz syndrome are presented. All four were preterm or small-for-dates. On the basis of their symptoms, it is suggested that infantile eczema is not an essential sign of the disorder, whereas the high frequency of hernia, strabism and upward slant of the palpebral fissures is underestimated in the literature. PMID:3730185

  9. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... is also possible that many genes with smaller effects and environmental factors may play a role in the development ... Publication No. 12-2163 Back to Tourette Syndrome Information Page See a list ... by: Office of Communications and Public Liaison National Institute of Neurological Disorders ...

  10. HELLP syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... get worse and be harmful to both the mother and child. Your health care provider may induce labor by ... treatment, a small number of women die. The death rate among babies born to mothers with HELLP syndrome depends on birth weight and ...

  11. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... binding protein 2 (MeCP2), which is needed for brain development and acts as one of the many biochemical ... the following criteria do not have Rett syndrome: brain injury secondary to ... abnormal psychomotor development in the first 6 months of life. Is ...

  12. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... organizations can help kids learn how to explain tics to others. How Should I Act Around Someone Who Has It? Kids who have Tourette syndrome want to be treated like everybody else. They can do regular stuff, just like other kids. In fact, Tim Howard grew up to be a soccer star. ...

  13. [Refeeding syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ševela, Stanislav; Novák, František; Kazda, Antonín; Brodská, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Despite being known more than 60 years, refeeding syndrome (RS) still bears many uncertainties. For example, its definition is not clear and definite, and the attitude to it varies from the complete neglect to over-prevention.The term "refeeding syndrome" refers to electrolyte and metabolic changes occurring in malnourished patients after the readministration of nutrition. These changes concern especially to phosphates and ions. Potassium, magnesium, naturism and fluids balance are involved. The changes lead to cell energetic metabolism and electric potential disturbances, with related clinical symptoms.Fully developed refeeding syndrome is quite rare; nevertheless it can be fatal for the patient. However, even its development can lead to many complications increasing the patient's morbidity and the length of stay in the hospital. Yet the refeeding syndrome is more or less predictable and if kept in mind also preventable.The aim of this article is to get the reader to know more about this metabolic phenomenon and possible attitudes towards it. PMID:27088791

  14. [SAPHO syndrome].

    PubMed

    Heldmann, F; Kiltz, U; Baraliakos, X; Braun, J

    2014-10-01

    The SAPHO syndrome, an acronym for synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis, is a rare disease which affects bones, joints and the skin. The main osteoarticular features are hyperostosis and osteitis. Osteoarticular symptoms predominantly occur on the anterior chest wall but the spine and the peripheral skeleton can also be involved. The most important skin affections are palmoplantar pustulosis and severe acne. The etiology of this syndrome remains unclear but infectious, immunological and genetic factors are involved. The diagnostic features of SAPHO syndrome are clinical and radiological. The most important diagnostic procedure is Tc-99 m bone scintigraphy but conventional x-rays as well as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can also contribute to the final diagnosis. Bone histology and positron emission tomography CT (PET-CT) may help to differentiate SAPHO syndrome from malignancies and infectious osteomyelitis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the cornerstone of treatment. The results obtained using antibiotics and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), such as sulfasalazine and methotrexate are inconsistent. Bisphosphonates and anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) drugs have shown promising results in small studies but further research is still necessary. PMID:25260820

  15. Morquio syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hearing test Slit-lamp eye exam Skin fibroblast culture X-rays of the long bones, ribs, and spine People with Morquio syndrome should have MRI of the lower skull and upper neck to determine if their upper vertebrae are underdeveloped.

  16. Sotos syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baujat, Geneviève; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2007-01-01

    Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth condition characterized by cardinal features including excessive growth during childhood, macrocephaly, distinctive facial gestalt and various degrees of learning difficulty, and associated with variable minor features. The exact prevalence remains unknown but hundreds of cases have been reported. The diagnosis is usually suspected after birth because of excessive height and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC), advanced bone age, neonatal complications including hypotonia and feeding difficulties, and facial gestalt. Other inconstant clinical abnormalities include scoliosis, cardiac and genitourinary anomalies, seizures and brisk deep tendon reflexes. Variable delays in cognitive and motor development are also observed. The syndrome may also be associated with an increased risk of tumors. Mutations and deletions of the NSD1 gene (located at chromosome 5q35 and coding for a histone methyltransferase implicated in transcriptional regulation) are responsible for more than 75% of cases. FISH analysis, MLPA or multiplex quantitative PCR allow the detection of total/partial NSD1 deletions, and direct sequencing allows detection of NSD1 mutations. The large majority of NSD1 abnormalities occur de novo and there are very few familial cases. Although most cases are sporadic, several reports of autosomal dominant inheritance have been described. Germline mosaicism has never been reported and the recurrence risk for normal parents is very low (<1%). The main differential diagnoses are Weaver syndrome, Beckwith-Wiedeman syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome and 22qter deletion syndrome. Management is multidisciplinary. During the neonatal period, therapies are mostly symptomatic, including phototherapy in case of jaundice, treatment of the feeding difficulties and gastroesophageal reflux, and detection and treatment of hypoglycemia. General pediatric follow-up is important during the first years of life to allow detection

  17. Reversed-polarity regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, F.

    1982-01-01

    It is found by a statistical study of 58 reversed-polarity regions (RPRs) covering the 11-year period 1969-1979 that RPRs (1) have a lifespan comparable to normal active regions, (2) do not show a tendency to rotate toward a more normal alignment, and (3) have stable configurations that do not suggest stress due to their anomalous magnetic alignment. As in normal regions, RPR magnetic complexity is found to be the primary factor in flare productivity. Weak-field RPRs produce no flares, and regions with complex spots produce more flares than regions with non-complex spots by a factor of five. The main difference between RPRs and normal regions lies in complex spot frequency, with less that 17% of normal active regions having such spots and fewer than 1.8% having long-lived complex ones, while 41% of RPRs have complex spots and 24% have long-lived complex spots.

  18. A reversible molecular valve

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thoi D.; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Celestre, Paul C.; Flood, Amar H.; Liu, Yi; Stoddart, J. Fraser; Zink, Jeffrey I.

    2005-01-01

    In everyday life, a macroscopic valve is a device with a movable control element that regulates the flow of gases or liquids by blocking and opening passageways. Construction of such a device on the nanoscale level requires (i) suitably proportioned movable control elements, (ii) a method for operating them on demand, and (iii) appropriately sized passageways. These three conditions can be fulfilled by attaching organic, mechanically interlocked, linear motor molecules that can be operated under chemical, electrical, or optical stimuli to stable inorganic porous frameworks (i.e., by self-assembling organic machinery on top of an inorganic chassis). In this article, we demonstrate a reversibly operating nanovalve that can be turned on and off by redox chemistry. It traps and releases molecules from a maze of nanoscopic passageways in silica by controlling the operation of redox-activated bistable [2]rotaxane molecules tethered to the openings of nanopores leading out of a nanoscale reservoir. PMID:16006520

  19. Multiple stimulus reversible hydrogels

    DOEpatents

    Gutowska, Anna; Krzyminski, Karol J.

    2003-12-09

    A polymeric solution capable of gelling upon exposure to a critical minimum value of a plurality of environmental stimuli is disclosed. The polymeric solution may be an aqueous solution utilized in vivo and capable of having the gelation reversed if at least one of the stimuli fall below, or outside the range of, the critical minimum value. The aqueous polymeric solution can be used either in industrial or pharmaceutical environments. In the medical environment, the aqueous polymeric solution is provided with either a chemical or radioisotopic therapeutic agent for delivery to a specific body part. The primary advantage of the process is that exposure to one environmental stimuli alone will not cause gelation, thereby enabling the therapeutic agent to be conducted through the body for relatively long distances without gelation occurring.

  20. Multiple stimulus reversible hydrogels

    DOEpatents

    Gutowska, Anna; Krzyminski, Karol J.

    2006-04-25

    A polymeric solution capable of gelling upon exposure to a critical minimum value of a plurality of environmental stimuli is disclosed. The polymeric solution may be an aqueous solution utilized in vivo and capable of having the gelation reversed if at least one of the stimuli fall below, or outside the range of, the critical minimum value. The aqueous polymeric solution can be used either in industrial or pharmaceutical environments. In the medical environment, the aqueous polymeric solution is provided with either a chemical or radioisotopic therapeutic agent for delivery to a specific body part. The primary advantage of the process is that exposure to one environmental stimuli alone will not cause gelation, thereby enabling the therapeutic agent to be conducted through the body for relatively long distances without gelation occurring.

  1. Reverse photoacoustic standoff spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Van Neste, Charles W.; Senesac, Lawrence R.; Thundat, Thomas G.

    2011-04-12

    A system and method are disclosed for generating a reversed photoacoustic spectrum at a greater distance. A source may emit a beam to a target and a detector measures signals generated as a result of the beam being emitted on the target. By emitting a chopped/pulsed light beam to the target, it may be possible to determine the target's optical absorbance by monitoring the intensity of light collected at the detector at different wavelengths. As the wavelength of light is changed, the target may absorb or reject each optical frequency. Rejection may increase the intensity at the sensing element and absorption may decrease the intensity. Accordingly, an identifying spectrum of the target may be made with the intensity variation of the detector as a function of illuminating wavelength.

  2. Reverse slapper detonator

    DOEpatents

    Weingart, Richard C.

    1990-01-01

    A reverse slapper detonator (70), and methodology related thereto, are provided. The detonator (70) is adapted to be driven by a pulse of electric power from an external source (80). A conductor (20) is disposed along the top (14), side (18), and bottom (16) surfaces of a sheetlike insulator (12). Part of the conductor (20) comprises a bridge (28), and an aperture (30) is positioned within the conductor (20), with the bridge (28) and the aperture (30) located on opposite sides of the insulator (12). A barrel (40) and related explosive charge (50) are positioned adjacent to and in alignment with the aperture (30), and the bridge (28) is buttressed with a backing layer (60). When the electric power pulse vaporizes the bridge (28), a portion of the insulator (12) is propelled through the aperture (30) and barrel (40), and against the explosive charge (50), thereby detonating it.

  3. Reverse Osmosis Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Duan, Xiaoli; Wendel, Emily M.

    2013-08-26

    This technology evaluation was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). ¬The technology evaluation assesses techniques for optimizing reverse osmosis (RO) systems to increase RO system performance and water efficiency. This evaluation provides a general description of RO systems, the influence of RO systems on water use, and key areas where RO systems can be optimized to reduce water and energy consumption. The evaluation is intended to help facility managers at Federal sites understand the basic concepts of the RO process and system optimization options, enabling them to make informed decisions during the system design process for either new projects or recommissioning of existing equipment. This evaluation is focused on commercial-sized RO systems generally treating more than 80 gallons per hour.¬

  4. Reverse Osmosis Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    2013-08-01

    This technology evaluation was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The technology evaluation assesses techniques for optimizing reverse osmosis (RO) systems to increase RO system performance and water efficiency. This evaluation provides a general description of RO systems, the influence of RO systems on water use, and key areas where RO systems can be optimized to reduce water and energy consumption. The evaluation is intended to help facility managers at Federal sites understand the basic concepts of the RO process and system optimization options, enabling them to make informed decisions during the system design process for either new projects or recommissioning of existing equipment. This evaluation is focused on commercial-sized RO systems generally treating more than 80 gallons per hour.

  5. Reversibility of skeletal fluorosis.

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, P; Thomsen, G

    1983-01-01

    At two x ray examinations in 1957 and 1967, 17 cases of skeletal fluorosis were identified among long term cryolite workers in Copenhagen. In 1982 four of these patients were alive, eight to 15 years after exposure had ended. Radiographs were obtained, and the urinary fluoride excretion was measured. A similar picture emerged in all four cases: extensive fading of the sclerosis of trabecular bone in ribs, vertebral bodies, and pelvis, whereas cortical bone thickening and calcification of muscle insertions and ligaments remained virtually unchanged. The fluoride excretion was increased in three cases (with the shortest exposure free period). These findings indicate that with continuous remodelling of bone tissue trabecular sclerosis is slowly reversible and the excess fluoride is excreted in the urine. Images PMID:6626475

  6. Reversibility of skeletal fluorosis.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, P; Thomsen, G

    1983-11-01

    At two x ray examinations in 1957 and 1967, 17 cases of skeletal fluorosis were identified among long term cryolite workers in Copenhagen. In 1982 four of these patients were alive, eight to 15 years after exposure had ended. Radiographs were obtained, and the urinary fluoride excretion was measured. A similar picture emerged in all four cases: extensive fading of the sclerosis of trabecular bone in ribs, vertebral bodies, and pelvis, whereas cortical bone thickening and calcification of muscle insertions and ligaments remained virtually unchanged. The fluoride excretion was increased in three cases (with the shortest exposure free period). These findings indicate that with continuous remodelling of bone tissue trabecular sclerosis is slowly reversible and the excess fluoride is excreted in the urine. PMID:6626475

  7. Biochemical Reversal of Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, John T. A.

    2006-03-01

    We cite our progress on biochemical reversal of aging. However, it may be circa 2 years before we have necessary substances at low cost. Meanwhile, without them, a number of measures can be adopted providing marked improvement for the problems of aging in modern societies. For example, enzymes are needed to excrete toxins that accelerate aging; Hg is the ultimate toxin that disables all enzymes (including those needed to excrete Hg itself). Low Hg level in the urine, due to loss of excretory ability, causes the diagnosis of Hg toxicity to almost always be missed. Hg sources must be removed from the body! Another example is excess sugar; hyperglycemia decreases intracellular ascorbic acid (AA) by competitively inhibiting the insulin- mediated active transport of AA into cells. Thus, immunity is impaired by low leucocyte AA. AA is needed for new proteins in aging tissues. Humans must supplement AA; their need same as in AA-synthesizing mammals.

  8. [Pasqualini's syndrome: hypoandrogenism with spermatogenesis].

    PubMed

    Valdés Socin, Hernán; Beckers, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Pasqualini and Bur published the first case of eunuchoidism with preserved spermatogenesis in 1950 in Revista de la Asociación Médica Argentina. The hypoandrogenism with spermatogenesis syndrome included: (a) eunuchoidism, (b) testis with normal spermatogenesis and full volume, with mature spermatozoa in a high proportion of seminiferous tubes and undifferentiated and immature Leydig cells (c) full functional compensation through the administration of chorionic gonadotropin hormone, while hCG is administered (d) total urinary gonadotrophins within normal limits (e) this definition supposes the normal activity of the pituitary and the absence of congenital malformations in general. A first step in the understanding of the physiopathogeny of Pasqualini syndrome or the so called "fertile eunuch" syndrome was the absence of LH in plasma and urine of patients. The second breakthrough was the functional and genetic studies that validated the hypothesis of a functional deficit of LH in these men: it will then also be described in some women. Different groups including ours demonstrated in these cases a LH with varying degrees of immunological activity but biologically inactive in most of the patients, due to one or more inactivating mutations in the LHB gene. Finally, the full comprehension of Pasqualini syndrome allowed to reverse the hypoandrogenic phenotype and to restore fertility in these patients through the use of chorionic gonadotropin and the modern in-vitro fertility techniques. This article is an historical review and a tribute to the memory of Rodolfo Q. Pasqualini. PMID:25637904

  9. Reducing Reversals in Reading and Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heydorn, Bernard L.

    1984-01-01

    Reversals can be remediated in a variety of ways that focus on single symbol reversals (e.g., by tracing overlarge letters or numerals) or whole word reversals (e.g., by using flash cards for identified reverse words). (CL)

  10. On time reversal mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fannjiang, Albert C.

    2009-09-01

    The concept of time reversal (TR) of a scalar wave is reexamined from basic principles. Five different time-reversal mirrors (TRMs) are introduced and their relations are analyzed. For the boundary behavior, it is shown that for a paraxial wave only the monopole TR scheme satisfies the exact boundary condition while for the spherical wave only the MD-mode TR scheme satisfies the exact boundary condition. The asymptotic analysis of the near-field focusing property is presented for two dimensions and three dimensions. It is shown that to have a subwavelength focal spot, the TRM should consist of dipole transducers. The transverse resolution of the dipole TRM is linearly proportional to the distance between the point source and the TRM. The mixed mode TRM has the similar (linear) behavior in three dimensions, but in two dimensions the transverse resolution behaves as the square root of the distance between the point source and the TRM. The monopole TRM is ineffective in focusing below the wavelength. Contrary to the matched field processing and the phase processor, both of which resemble TR, TR in a weak- or non-scattering medium is usually biased in the longitudinal direction, especially when TR is carried out on a single plane with a finite aperture. This is true for all five TR schemes. On the other hand, the TR focal spot has been shown repeatedly in the literature, both theoretically and experimentally, to be centered at the source point when the medium is multiple scattering. A reconciliation of the two seemingly conflicting results is found in the random fluctuations in the intensity of the Green function for a multiple scattering medium and the notion of scattering-enlarged effective aperture.

  11. Reverse Engineering Podkletnov's Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, B. T.

    Experiments reported by Podkletnov et al. suggest that gravity modification is within reach in our lifetimes. Solomon used process models to introduced the concept of non-inertia Ni fields and derived the massless gravitational acceleration formula g = τc2 that is consistent with Hooft's finding that absence of matter no longer guarantees local flatness. Solomon had also shown that many photon experimental results could be modeled without the use of quantum theory. This would imply that neither a quantum nor a relativistic type theory would be indispensible to formulating a theory on gravity modification. This paper, therefore, explores the use of Ni fields and process models to reverse engineer Podkletnov's experiments from first principles to determine a possible theoretical or at least an engineering basis for the observed gravity shielding effects. This paper scrutinizes and documents Podkletnov's papers for detailed experimental clues and applies them to new process models. The paper shows that it is possible to infer gravity modifying effects using non-inertia Ni fields, without taking into consideration the quantum mechanical properties of the ceramic superconducting disc. That is without considering how or why these fields are produced. The modeling suggests that there are two similar but different phenomena present, the stationary disc and spinning disc effects. The observed weight loss with the stationary disc is due to the asymmetric magnetic field and the observed weight loss with the spinning disc is due to the electromagnetic Ni field. There are several keys to reproducing Podkletnov's experimental results, asymmetric fields, dual layer disc, and the presence of both electric and magnetic fields. Finally the paper shows that if the magnetic field was not superconducting, but a regular magnetic field, that the observed weight change should be reversed, and therefore, a non-superconducting disc would lend itself to simpler and easier experimental

  12. The Source for Syndromes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Gail J.; Hoge, Debra Reichert

    Designed for practicing speech-language pathologists, this book discusses different syndrome disabilities, pertinent speech-language characteristics, and goals and strategies to begin intervention efforts at a preschool level. Chapters address: (1) Angelman syndrome; (2) Asperger syndrome; (3) Down syndrome; (4) fetal alcohol syndrome; (5) fetal…

  13. Reversal and Relapse of Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism: Resilience and Fragility of the Reproductive Neuroendocrine System

    PubMed Central

    Sidhoum, Valerie F.; Chan, Yee-Ming; Lippincott, Margaret F.; Balasubramanian, Ravikumar; Quinton, Richard; Plummer, Lacey; Dwyer, Andrew; Pitteloud, Nelly; Hayes, Frances J.; Hall, Janet E.; Martin, Kathryn A.; Boepple, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: A subset of patients diagnosed with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) later achieves activation of their hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis with normalization of steroidogenesis and/or gametogenesis, a phenomenon termed reversal. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the natural history of reversal and to identify associated phenotypes and genotypes. Design, Setting, and Subjects: This was a retrospective review of clinical, biochemical, and genetic features of patients with IHH evaluated at an academic medical center. Main Outcome Measures: History of spontaneous fertility, regular menses, testicular growth, or normalization of serum sex steroids, LH secretory profiles, brain imaging findings, and sequences of 14 genes associated with IHH were reviewed. Results: Of 308 patients with IHH, 44 underwent reversal. Time-to-event analysis estimated a lifetime incidence of reversal of 22%. There were no differences in the rates of cryptorchidism, micropenis, or partial pubertal development in patients with reversal vs IHH patients without reversal. Fifteen patients with reversal (30%) had Kallmann syndrome (IHH and anosmia); one had undetectable olfactory bulbs on a brain magnetic resonance imaging scan. Subjects with reversal were enriched for mutations affecting neurokinin B signaling compared with a cohort of IHH patients without reversal (10% vs 3%, P = .044), had comparable frequencies of mutations in FGFR1, PROKR2, and GNRHR, and had no mutations in KAL1. Five men did not sustain their reversal and again developed hypogonadotropism. Conclusions: Reversal of IHH may be more widespread than previously appreciated and occurs across a broad range of genotypes and phenotypes. Enrichment for mutations that disrupt neurokinin B signaling in patients who reversed indicates that, despite the importance of this signaling pathway for normal pubertal timing, its function is dispensable later in life. The occurrence of reversal in a

  14. FGFR2 mutation in 46,XY sex reversal with craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Bagheri-Fam, Stefan; Ono, Makoto; Li, Li; Zhao, Liang; Ryan, Janelle; Lai, Raymond; Katsura, Yukako; Rossello, Fernando J; Koopman, Peter; Scherer, Gerd; Bartsch, Oliver; Eswarakumar, Jacob V P; Harley, Vincent R

    2015-12-01

    Patients with 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis (GD) exhibit genital anomalies, which range from hypospadias to complete male-to-female sex reversal. However, a molecular diagnosis is made in only 30% of cases. Heterozygous mutations in the human FGFR2 gene cause various craniosynostosis syndromes including Crouzon and Pfeiffer, but testicular defects were not reported. Here, we describe a patient whose features we would suggest represent a new FGFR2-related syndrome, craniosynostosis with XY male-to-female sex reversal or CSR. The craniosynostosis patient was chromosomally XY, but presented as a phenotypic female due to complete GD. DNA sequencing identified the FGFR2c heterozygous missense mutation, c.1025G>C (p.Cys342Ser). Substitution of Cys342 by Ser or other amino acids (Arg/Phe/Try/Tyr) has been previously reported in Crouzon and Pfeiffer syndrome. We show that the 'knock-in' Crouzon mouse model Fgfr2c(C342Y/C342Y) carrying a Cys342Tyr substitution displays XY gonadal sex reversal with variable expressivity. We also show that despite FGFR2c-Cys342Tyr being widely considered a gain-of-function mutation, Cys342Tyr substitution in the gonad leads to loss of function, as demonstrated by sex reversal in Fgfr2c(C342Y/-) mice carrying the knock-in allele on a null background. The rarity of our patient suggests the influence of modifier genes which exacerbated the testicular phenotype. Indeed, patient whole exome analysis revealed several potential modifiers expressed in Sertoli cells at the time of testis determination in mice. In summary, this study identifies the first FGFR2 mutation in a 46,XY GD patient. We conclude that, in certain rare genetic contexts, maintaining normal levels of FGFR2 signaling is important for human testis determination. PMID:26362256

  15. Magnetic reversals and mass extinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raup, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a study of reversals of the earth's magnetic field over the past 165 Myr are presented. A stationary periodicity of 30 Myr emerges which predicts pulses of increased reversal activity centered at 10, 40, 70, . . . Myr before the present. The correlation between the reversal intensity and biological extinctions is examined, and a nontrivial discrepancy is found between the magnetic and extinction periodicity.

  16. Geomagnetic Reversals during the Phanerozoic.

    PubMed

    McElhinny, M W

    1971-04-01

    An antalysis of worldwide paleomagnetic measurements suggests a periodicity of 350 x 10(6) years in the polarity of the geomagnetic field. During the Mesozoic it is predominantly normal, whereas during the Upper Paleozoic it is predominantly reversed. Although geomagnetic reversals occur at different rates throughout the Phanerozoic, there appeaars to be no clear correlation between biological evolutionary rates and reversal frequency. PMID:17735224

  17. Reversible Acute Parkinsonism and Bilateral Basal Ganglia Lesions in a Diabetic Uremic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Nzwalo, Hipólito; Sá, Francisca; Capela, Carlos; Ferreira, Fátima; Basílio, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The syndrome of bilateral basal ganglia lesions in diabetic uremic patients is a rare disorder mostly reported in Asians. There are few reports of the syndrome in Caucasians. It manifests as an acute hyperkinetic or hypokinetic extrapyramidal disorder in association with uniform neuroimaging findings of bilateral symmetrical basal ganglia changes in diabetics undergoing hemodialysis. Its pathophysiology remains largely unknown. Thus, we report a typical case of the syndrome in a Caucasian patient who developed an acute and reversible akinetic rigid parkinsonism secondary to bilateral basal ganglia lesions. PMID:23185167

  18. ASYMMETRIC SOLAR POLAR FIELD REVERSALS

    SciTech Connect

    Svalgaard, Leif; Kamide, Yohsuke

    2013-01-20

    The solar polar fields reverse because magnetic flux from decaying sunspots moves toward the poles, with a preponderance of flux from the trailing spots. If there is a strong asymmetry, in the sense that most activity is in the northern hemisphere, then that excess flux will move toward the north pole and reverse that pole first. If there is more activity in the south later on, then that flux will help to reverse the south pole. In this way, two humps in the solar activity and a corresponding difference in the time of reversals develop (in the ideal case). Such a difference was originally noted in the very first observation of polar field reversal just after the maximum of the strongly asymmetric solar cycle 19, when the southern hemisphere was most active before sunspot maximum and the south pole duly reversed first, followed by the northern hemisphere more than a year later, when that hemisphere became most active. Solar cycles since then have had the opposite asymmetry, with the northern hemisphere being most active before solar maximum. We show that polar field reversals for these cycles have all happened in the north first, as expected. This is especially noteworthy for the present solar cycle 24. We suggest that the association of two or more peaks of solar activity when separated by hemispheres with correspondingly different times of polar field reversals is a general feature of the cycle, and that asymmetric polar field reversals are simply a consequence of the asymmetry of solar activity.

  19. [SAPHO syndrome].

    PubMed

    Chamot, A M; Kahn, M F

    1994-01-01

    The occurrence of musculoskeletal manifestations (including synovitis, chest wall arthroosteitis and multifocal osteomyelitis) in association with severe acne, palmoplantar pustulosis and perhaps with some presentations of psoriasis, have been described by many authors in the past 30 years. These different multifaceted descriptions have been designated by a variety of terms. More recently, a possible link between these conditions and spondarthritides has also been underlined by a slightly increased prevalence of HLA B27 and occasional occurrences of sacroiliitis, chronic inflammatory bowel disease and possibly psoriasis. An acronym, the SAPHO syndrome (which stands for Synovitis, Acne, Pustulosis Hyperostosis and Osteitis) is proposed for this group of diseases because of the similarity of musculoskeletal manifestations in patients with severe acne and pustulosis. The clinical, epidemiological, pathophysiological, immunogenetic and diagnostic aspects, as well as the management of this syndrome are reviewed. PMID:7975935

  20. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  1. Fluency Disorders in Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Borsel, John; Tetnowski, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of various genetic syndromes have included "stuttering" as a primary symptom associated with that syndrome. Specifically, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Tourette syndrome, Neurofibromatosis type I, and Turner syndrome all list "stuttering" as a characteristic of that syndrome. An extensive review of…

  2. Brachycephalic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dupré, Gilles; Heidenreich, Dorothee

    2016-07-01

    Animals presenting with brachycephalic syndrome suffer from multilevel obstruction of the airways as well as secondary structural collapse. Stenotic nares, aberrant turbinates, nasopharyngeal collapse, soft palate elongation and hyperplasia, laryngeal collapse, and left bronchus collapse are being described as the most common associated anomalies. Rhinoplasty and palatoplasty as well as newer surgical techniques and postoperative care strategies have resulted in significant improvement of the prognosis even in middle-aged dogs. PMID:27012936

  3. Brugada Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    ANTZELEVITCH, CHARLES

    2007-01-01

    First introduced as a new clinical entity in 1992, the Brugada syndrome is associated with a relatively high risk of sudden death in young adults, and occasionally in children and infants. Recent years have witnessed a striking proliferation of papers dealing with the clinical and basic aspects of the disease. Characterized by a coved-type ST-segment elevation in the right precordial leads of the electrocardiogram (ECG), the Brugada syndrome has a genetic basis that thus far has been linked only to mutations in SCN5A, the gene that encodes the α-subunit of the sodium channel. The Brugada ECG is often concealed, but can be unmasked or modulated by a number of drugs and pathophysiological states including sodium channel blockers, a febrile state, vagotonic agents, tricyclic antidepressants, as well as cocaine and propranolol intoxication. Average age at the time of initial diagnosis or sudden death is 40 ± 22, with the youngest patient diagnosed at 2 days of age and the oldest at 84 years. This review provides an overview of the clinical, genetic, molecular, and cellular aspects of the Brugada syndrome, incorporating the results of two recent consensus conferences. Controversies with regard to risk stratification and newly proposed pharmacologic strategies are discussed. PMID:17038146

  4. Roberts syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Baoshan; Lu, Shuai; Gerton, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    All living organisms must go through cycles of replicating their genetic information and then dividing the copies between two new cells. This cyclical process, in cells from bacteria and human alike, requires a protein complex known as cohesin. Cohesin is a structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) complex. While bacteria have one form of this complex, yeast have several SMC complexes, and humans have at least a dozen cohesin complexes alone. Therefore the ancient structure and function of SMC complexes has been both conserved and specialized over the course of evolution. These complexes play roles in replication, repair, organization, and segregation of the genome. Mutations in the genes that encode cohesin and its regulatory factors are associated with developmental disorders such as Roberts syndrome, Cornelia de Lange syndrome, and cancer. In this review, we focus on how acetylation of cohesin contributes to its function. In Roberts syndrome, the lack of cohesin acetylation contributes to nucleolar defects and translational inhibition. An understanding of basic SMC complex function will be essential to unraveling the molecular etiology of human diseases associated with defective SMC function. PMID:25054091

  5. Acrodysostosis syndromes.

    PubMed

    Silve, C; Le-Stunff, C; Motte, E; Gunes, Y; Linglart, A; Clauser, E

    2012-01-01

    Acrodysostosis (ADO) refers to a heterogeneous group of rare skeletal dysplasia that share characteristic features including severe brachydactyly, facial dysostosis and nasal hypoplasia. The literature describing acrodysostosis cases has been confusing because some reported patients may have had other phenotypically related diseases presenting with Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy (AHO) such as pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a (PHP1a) or pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP). A question has been whether patients display or not abnormal mineral metabolism associated with resistance to PTH and/or resistance to other hormones that bind G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) linked to Gsα, as observed in PHP1a. The recent identification in patients affected with acrodysostosis of defects in two genes, PRKAR1A and PDE4D, both important players in the GPCR-Gsα-cAMP-PKA signaling, has helped clarify some issues regarding the heterogeneity of acrodysostosis, in particular the presence of hormonal resistance. Two different genetic and phenotypic syndromes are now identified, both with a similar bone dysplasia: ADOHR, due to PRKAR1A defects, and ADOP4 (our denomination), due to PDE4D defects. The existence of GPCR-hormone resistance is typical of the ADOHR syndrome. We review here the PRKAR1A and PDE4D gene defects and phenotypes identified in acrodysostosis syndromes, and discuss them in view of phenotypically related diseases caused by defects in the same signaling pathway. PMID:24363928

  6. Down Syndrome: Eye Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... life expectancy. Do children with Down syndrome have eye problems? Individuals with Down syndrome are at increased ... When should children with Down syndrome receive an eye exam? The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that ...

  7. Reye syndrome - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - Reye syndrome ... The following organizations are good resources for information on Reye Syndrome : National Reye's Syndrome Foundation, Inc. -- www.reyessyndrome.org National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke -- www. ...

  8. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome is a rare, inherited disease. It causes problems with the skin, sinuses, lungs, bones, and teeth. ... Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome is also called Job syndrome. It is named after the biblical character Job whose faithfulness was ...

  9. National Down Syndrome Society

    MedlinePlus

    donate Entire Site Down Syndrome Resources Ways to Give #DSWORKS™ Buddy Walk® Advocacy About NDSS The National Advocate for People with Down Syndrome Since 1979 National Down Syndrome Society 8 E ...

  10. Genetic obesity syndromes.

    PubMed

    Goldstone, Anthony P; Beales, Philip L

    2008-01-01

    There are numerous reports of multi-system genetic disorders with obesity. Many have a characteristic presentation and several, an overlapping phenotype indicating the likelihood of a shared common underlying mechanism or pathway. By understanding the genetic causes and functional perturbations of such syndromes we stand to gain tremendous insight into obesogenic pathways. In this review we focus particularly on Bardet-Biedl syndrome, whose molecular genetics and cell biology has been elucidated recently, and Prader-Willi syndrome, the commonest obesity syndrome due to loss of imprinted genes on 15q11-13. We also discuss highlights of other genetic obesity syndromes including Alstrom syndrome, Cohen syndrome, Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy (pseudohypoparathyroidism), Carpenter syndrome, MOMO syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, cases with deletions of 6q16, 1p36, 2q37 and 9q34, maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 14, fragile X syndrome and Börjeson-Forssman-Lehman syndrome. PMID:18230893

  11. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Read in Chinese What is Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS)? Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) describes changes in ...

  12. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome? Tethered spinal cord syndrome is a neurological ...

  13. Heart and Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Associated Conditions » The Heart & Down Syndrome The Heart & Down Syndrome Abnormalities of the cardiovascular system are common in ... the Most Common Heart Defects in Children With Down Syndrome? The most common defects are Atrioventricular Septal Defect ( ...

  14. What is Down Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Down Syndrome: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What is Down syndrome? Down syndrome describes a set of cognitive and ...

  15. Spatial reversal learning is impaired by age in pet dogs.

    PubMed

    Mongillo, Paolo; Araujo, Joseph A; Pitteri, Elisa; Carnier, Paolo; Adamelli, Serena; Regolin, Lucia; Marinelli, Lieta

    2013-12-01

    Aged dogs spontaneously develop progressive decline in both cognitive and behavioral function, in addition to neuropathological changes, that collectively parallel several aspects of human aging and Alzheimer's disease progression and likely contribute to the development of canine cognitive dysfunction syndrome. In the current study, ethologically relevant spatial learning, retention, and reversal learning tasks were conducted, with the goal of expanding canine neuropsychological testing to pet dogs. Initially, dogs (N = 44, aged 7.8 ± 2.8 years, mean ± SD) had to learn which of two alternative routes successfully led out of a T-maze. Two weeks later, long-term memory retention was assessed, immediately followed by a reversal learning task in which the previously correct route out of the maze was reversed compared with the initial learning and memory retention tasks. No effects of age were evident on the learning or retention tasks. However, older (≥ 8 years) dogs were significantly impaired on the reversal learning task compared with younger ones (< 8 years). Moreover, trial response latency was significantly increased in aged dogs across both the initial and reversal learning tasks but not on the retention task, which suggests that processing speed was impaired by increasing age during the acquisition of novel spatial information but not during performance of previously learned responses. Overall, the current study provides a framework for assessing cognitive function in pet dogs, which should improve understanding of the effects of aging on cognition in the dog population. PMID:23529504

  16. Time Reversal Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, H; /SLAC

    2009-01-27

    This talk briefly reviews three types of time-asymmetry in physics, which I classify as universal, macroscopic and microscopic. Most of the talk is focused on the latter, namely the violation of T-reversal invariance in particle physics theories. In sum tests of microscopic T-invariance, or observations of its violation, are limited by the fact that, while we can measure many processes, only in very few cases can we construct a matched pair of process and inverse process and observe it with sufficient sensitivity to make a test. In both the cases discussed here we can achieve an observable T violation making use of flavor tagging, and in the second case also using the quantum properties of an antisymmetric coherent state of two B mesons to construct a CP-tag. Both these tagging properties depend only on very general properties of the flavor and/or CP quantum numbers and so provide model independent tests for T-invariance violations. The microscopic laws of physics are very close to T-symmetric. There are small effects that give CP- and T-violating processes in three-generation-probing weak decays. Where a T-violating observable can be constructed we see the relationships between T-violation and CP-violation expected in a CPT conserving theory. These microscopic effects are unrelated to the 'arrow of time' that is defined by increasing entropy, or in the time direction defined by the expansion of our Universe.

  17. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOEpatents

    Salzer, Leander J.; Foreman, Larry R.

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved.

  18. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOEpatents

    Salzer, L.J.; Foreman, L.R.

    1999-08-31

    This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved. 7 figs.

  19. Do you know this syndrome? Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Rogerio Nabor; Martins, Ligia Márcia Mario; Lopes, Vivian Cristina Holanda; Bittar, Rodrigo Antonio; Araújo, Fernanda Mendes

    2013-01-01

    Noonan Syndrome is one of the most common genetic syndromes and also an important differential diagnosis in children presenting with syndromic facies similar to Turner's syndrome phenotype. This syndrome is characterized by facial dysmorphism, congenital heart defects, short stature and also a wide phenotypic variation. This article discusses the case of a 10 year-old patient with Noonan syndrome that presented typical facies, cardiac defects (pulmonary dilatation and mitral regurgitation), dental malocclusion, micrognatism, short stature and a certain degree of learning disability. PMID:24068150

  20. Attempted reversible sympathetic ganglion block by an implantable neurostimulator

    PubMed Central

    Kopelman, Doron; Costa, Mario G.; Bejar, Jacob; Zaretsky, Asaph; Hashmonai, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Primary palmar hyperhidrosis is a pathological condition of excessive perspiration of the hands of unknown aetiology. The only effective treatment for permanent cure is the ablation of the sympathetic ganglia supplying the hands. One of the sequelae is compensatory sweating, namely increased perspiration in other parts of the body. Its mechanism is unknown. In a small proportion of patients, it may attend devastating proportions. It has practically no remedy, and the degree of compensatory hyperhidrosis is unpredictable prior to sympathectomy. The purpose of the present study was to obtain a reversible sympathetic block which may disclose subjects prone to develop severe compensatory hyperhidrosis and unfit for permanent ganglionic ablation. METHODS In three dogs, an experimental electrode was implanted via a left thoracotomy on the stellate ganglion, connected to a stimulator. The stimulation was activated after recovery. The contralateral ganglion served as control. Effect of the stimulation was assessed by observing the development of Horner's syndrome, which includes the appearance of miosis, ptosis and enophthalmus. Reversal of the sympathetic block was expected when the neurostimulation was discontinued and assessed by the disappearance of these signs. RESULTS Stimulation produced only a partial effect – an incomplete Horner's syndrome (miosis and sometime ptosis), which was not completely reversible after ceasing the stimulation. CONCLUSIONS Although neurostimulation achieved a partial sympathetic block, the present method failed to obtain a completely reversible effect. However, these results may indicate that different nervous pathways moderate the various components of the Horner's triad. Concerning the creation of a reversible sympathectomy; other approaches must be sought after. PMID:22316522

  1. Reverse genetics of avian metapneumoviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An overview of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) infection in turkeys and development of a reverse genetics system for aMPV subgroup C (aMPV-C) virus will be presented. By using reverse genetics technology, we generated recombinant aMPV-C viruses containing a different length of glycoprotein (G) gene or...

  2. Preference Reversal in Multiattribute Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsetsos, Konstantinos; Usher, Marius; Chater, Nick

    2010-01-01

    A central puzzle for theories of choice is that people's preferences between options can be reversed by the presence of decoy options (that are not chosen) or by the presence of other irrelevant options added to the choice set. Three types of reversal effect reported in the decision-making literature, the attraction, compromise, and similarity…

  3. Reverse Transfer Project, Summer 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reis, Elizabeth

    In 1986, a Reverse Transfer Project was initiated at Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC) in order to promote the summer school attendance at MVCC of "reverse transfer" students (i.e., students who attended another institution during the regular academic year). A mailing, containing a cover letter, informational brochure, summer catalog, and…

  4. Campylobacter-Associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Associated with Pulmonary-Renal Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Emily Elizabeth; Hangartner, Robert; Macdougall, Iain

    2016-03-01

    Common causes of pulmonary-renal syndrome include anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) disease anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) positive vasculitis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. We describe a case of life-threatening pulmonary hemorrhage associated with Campylobacter hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which we believe is a new disease entity. We hypothesize that the cause of this pulmonary-renal syndrome was an immunological reaction to Campylobacter; and that the initiation of high-dose steroids was responsible for the rapid reversal of the patient's pulmonary and renal impairment. The aim of this article is to raise awareness of this unusual cause of a pulmonary-renal syndrome, guiding physicians to recognize it as a potential complication, and to consider high-dose steroids in managing the condition. PMID:26001543

  5. Inherited ichthyosis: Syndromic forms.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Kozo

    2016-03-01

    Among diseases that cause ichthyosis as one of the symptoms, there are some diseases that induce abnormalities in organs other than the skin. Of these, diseases with characteristic signs are regarded as syndromes. Although these syndromes are very rare, Netherton syndrome, Sjögren-Larsson syndrome, Conradi-Hünermann-Happle syndrome, Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome, ichthyosis follicularis, atrichia and photophobia (IFAP) syndrome, and Refsum syndrome have been described in texts as representative ones. It is important to know the molecular genetics and pathomechanisms in order to establish an effective therapy and beneficial genetic counseling including a prenatal diagnosis. PMID:26945533

  6. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  7. Reversal of novel oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Abo-Salem, Elsayed; Becker, Richard C

    2016-04-01

    The development of a new generation of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants represents a potential breakthrough in the management of patients with thrombotic diseases, disorders and conditions. While a large and growing body of evidence from large-scale clinical trials and registries supports a favorable safety profile, having a means to rapidly reverse their anticoagulant effects represents an unmet need among practicing clinicians. Several targeted reversal agents are currently in development and the early results are promising. Idarucizumab is a monoclonal antibody that can immediately and specifically reverse dabigatran. Andexanet alfa is a recombinant modified factor Xa that can bind and reverse oral and parenteral factor Xa inhibitors, including rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban, and low molecular weight heparin. Aripazine is a small molecule that can reverse the action of factor Xa inhibitors and possibly dabigatran as well through non-covalent binding and charge-charge interactions. PMID:26939028

  8. Classical Analog to Entanglement Reversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitambar, Eric; Fortescue, Ben; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu

    2015-08-01

    In this Letter we study the problem of secrecy reversibility. This asks when two honest parties can distill secret bits from some tripartite distribution pX Y Z and transform secret bits back into pX Y Z at equal rates using local operation and public communication. This is the classical analog to the well-studied problem of reversibly concentrating and diluting entanglement in a quantum state. We identify the structure of distributions possessing reversible secrecy when one of the honest parties holds a binary distribution, and it is possible that all reversible distributions have this form. These distributions are more general than what is obtained by simply constructing a classical analog to the family of quantum states known to have reversible entanglement. An indispensable tool used in our analysis is a conditional form of the Gács-Körner common information.

  9. Parkinson's disease managing reversible neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Marty; Stein, Alvin; Cole, Ted; McDougall, Beth; Westaway, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the Parkinson's disease (PD) symptom course has been classified as an irreversible progressive neurodegenerative disease. This paper documents 29 PD and treatment-induced systemic depletion etiologies which cause and/or exacerbate the seven novel primary relative nutritional deficiencies associated with PD. These reversible relative nutritional deficiencies (RNDs) may facilitate and accelerate irreversible progressive neurodegeneration, while other reversible RNDs may induce previously undocumented reversible pseudo-neurodegeneration that is hiding in plain sight since the symptoms are identical to the symptoms being experienced by the PD patient. Documented herein is a novel nutritional approach for reversible processes management which may slow or halt irreversible progressive neurodegenerative disease and correct reversible RNDs whose symptoms are identical to the patient's PD symptoms. PMID:27103805

  10. The Geomagnetic Field During a Reversal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heirtzler, James R.

    2003-01-01

    By modifying the IGRF it is possible to learn what may happen to the geomagnetic field during a geomagnetic reversal. If the entire IGRF reverses then the declination and inclination only reverse when the field strength is zero. If only the dipole component of the IGRF reverses a large geomagnetic field remains when the dipole component is zero and he direction of the field at the end of the reversal is not exactly reversed from the directions at the beginning of the reversal.

  11. Reverse osmosis reverses conventional wisdom with Superfund cleanup success

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, M. ); Miller, K. )

    1994-09-01

    Although widely recognized as the most efficient means of water purification, reverse osmosis has not been considered effective for remediating hazardous wastewater. Scaling and fouling, which can cause overruns and downtime, and require membrane replacement, have inhibited success in high-volume wastewater applications. Despite this background, a reverse osmosis technology developed in Europe recently was used successfully to treat large volumes of contaminated water at a major Superfund site in Texas. The technology's success there may increase the chances for reverse osmosis to find wider use in future cleanups and other waste treatment applications.

  12. Functional Analysis Identified Habit Reversal Components for the Treatment of Motor Tics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufrene, Brad A.; Harpole, Lauren Lestremau; Sterling, Heather E.; Perry, Erin J.; Burton, Britney; Zoder-Martell, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    This study included brief functional analyses and treatment for motor tics exhibited by two children with Tourette Syndrome. Brief functional analyses were conducted in an outpatient treatment center and results were used to develop individualized habit reversal procedures. Treatment data were collected in clinic for one child and in clinic and…

  13. Morvan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Maskery, Mark; Chhetri, Suresh K.; Dayanandan, Rejith; Gall, Claire

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old gentleman was admitted to the regional neurosciences center with encephalopathy, myokymia, and dysautonomia. Chest imaging had previously identified an incidental mass in the anterior mediastinum, consistent with a primary thymic tumor. Antivoltage-gated potassium channel (anti-VGKC) antibodies were positive (titer 1273 pmol/L) and he was hypokalemic. Electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were in keeping with peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndrome, and an electroencephalogram was consistent with encephalopathy. A diagnosis of Morvan syndrome was made, for which he was initially treated with high-dose steroids, followed by a 5-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He also underwent thymectomy, followed by a postexcision flare of his symptoms requiring intensive care management. Further steroids, plasmapheresis, and IVIG achieved stabilization of his clinical condition, enabling transfer for inpatient neurorehabilitation. He was commenced on azathioprine and a prolonged oral steroid taper. A subsequent presumed incipient relapse responded well to further IVIG treatment. This case report documents a thymoma-associated presentation of anti-VGKC-positive Morvan syndrome supplemented by patient and carer narrative and video, both of which provide valuable further insights into this rare disorder. There are a limited number of publications surrounding this rare condition available in the English literature. This, combined with the heterogenous presentation, association with underlying malignancy, response to treatment, and prognosis, provides a diagnostic challenge. However, the association with anti-VGKC antibody-associated complexes and 2 recent case series have provided some scope for both accurate diagnosis and management. PMID:26740856

  14. Mazabraud syndrome

    PubMed Central

    John, Anulekha Mary; Behera, Kishore Kumar; Mathai, Thomas; Parmar, Harshad; Paul, Thomas V.

    2013-01-01

    A 25 year old lady presented with pain and swelling of left thigh. On examination she was found to have tenderness of left femur with a separate soft tissue swelling within the thigh muscle. Further evaluation revealed expansile bony lesion on X-ray of left tibia and multiple hot spots on bone scan suggestive of fibrous dysplasia. The soft tissue swelling on excision and histopathological examination was found to be intramuscular myxoma. The combination of the above two, called Mazabraud syndrome is being reported. PMID:23961498

  15. [Ascher's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Halling, F; Sandrock, D; Merten, H A; Hönig, J F

    1991-01-01

    Ascher's syndrome is composed of the triad blepharochalasis, double lip and goitre. In many of the cases reported in the literature this typical constellation of symptoms is not complete; particularly the struma is not mandatorily involved. A 58-year-old patient with this rare disease who exhibited blepharochalasis and double upper and lower lip is presented. Additionally, subclinical hypothyroidism and alopecia areata totalis were found. In differential diagnosis other causes of double lips or enlargement of the lips must be considered. PMID:1817784

  16. [Piriformis syndrome].

    PubMed

    Erauso, Thomas; Pégorie, Anne; Gaveau, Yves-Marie; Tardy, Dominique

    2010-09-20

    Sciatic pain is often misleading and establishing the link with a local muscular cause can be difficult and lead to errors, especially when faced with a young sportsman, with typical discogenic pain. Simple, specific and reproducible tests enable a better identification and treatment of a muscular cause or canal syndrome. Physiotherapy, or local infiltrations are generally very efficient, and sufficient. Surgery may be considered only in a very limited number of cases, lack of response to the first line treatment and then only if it is the absolute diagnosis, diagnosis which must remain a diagnosis of exception, more so of exclusion. PMID:21033479

  17. Griscelli syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ariffin, H; Geikowski, A; Chin, T F; Chau, D; Arshad, A; Abu Bakar, K; Krishnan, S

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of Griscelli Syndrome (GS). Our patient initially presented with a diagnosis of haemophagocytic lymphistiocytosis (HLH). Subsequent microscopic analysis of the patient's hair follicle revealed abnormal distribution of melanosomes in the shaft, which is a hallmark for GS. Analysis of RAB27A gene in this patient revealed a homozygous mutation in exon 6, c.550C>T, p.R184X . This nonsense mutation causes premature truncation of the protein resulting in a dysfunctional RAB27A. Recognition of GS allows appropriate institution of therapy namely chemotherapy for HLH and curative haemotopoeitic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25500851

  18. Ortner's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shahul, Hameed Aboobackar; Manu, Mohan K; Mohapatra, Aswini Kumar; Magazine, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    A 42-year-old man with a significant smoking history presented with chronic expectorative cough and exertional shortness of breath with recent-onset hoarseness. Chest examination was essentially normal and cardiovascular examination was suggestive of aortic regurgitation. Ears, nose and throat evaluation showed left vocal cord palsy and CT scan revealed an aortic arch aneurysm. Ortner's syndrome refers to hoarseness due to recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy secondary to a cardiovascular abnormality. Aortic aneurysms usually present with chest pain, back pain or epigastric pain, depending on the site of the aneurysm. An aortic arch aneurysm presenting as hoarseness is extremely rare. PMID:24618861

  19. Postmenopausal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Pronob K.; Agarwal, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Menopause is one of the most significant events in a woman's life and brings in a number of physiological changes that affect the life of a woman permanently. There have been a lot of speculations about the symptoms that appear before, during and after the onset of menopause. These symptoms constitute the postmenopausal syndrome; they are impairing to a great extent to the woman and management of these symptoms has become an important field of research lately. This chapter attempts to understand these symptoms, the underlying pathophysiology and the management options available. PMID:26330639

  20. Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Murray, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (Gilles de la Tourette disease) is a disorder of involuntary muscular tics, vocalizations and compulsive behavior. The tics and muscle movements vary in form and course; the complex repetitive patterns are eventually replaced by other patterns. The vocalization may be in the form of sounds, words or profanities and sometimes echolalia, echopraxia and palilalia. The onset may be from age two to 15 but is usually between ages eight and 12. Recent studies suggest that there is a hypersensitivity of dopamine receptors. Most patients respond well to haloperidol, but other drugs that may be of value include clonidine, pimozide, fluphenazine and trifluoroperazine. PMID:21286050

  1. How decision reversibility affects motivation.

    PubMed

    Bullens, Lottie; van Harreveld, Frenk; Förster, Jens; Higgins, Tory E

    2014-04-01

    The present research examined how decision reversibility can affect motivation. On the basis of extant findings, it was suggested that 1 way it could affect motivation would be to strengthen different regulatory foci, with reversible decision making, compared to irreversible decision making, strengthening prevention-related motivation relatively more than promotion-related motivation. If so, then decision reversibility should have effects associated with the relative differences between prevention and promotion motivation. In 5 studies, we manipulated the reversibility of a decision and used different indicators of regulatory focus motivation to test these predictions. Specifically, Study 1 tested for differences in participants' preference for approach versus avoidance strategies toward a desired end state. In Study 2, we used speed and accuracy performance as indicators of participants' regulatory motivation, and in Study 3, we measured global versus local reaction time performance. In Study 4, we approached the research question in a different way, making use of the value-from-fit hypothesis (Higgins, 2000, 2002). We tested whether a fit between chronic regulatory focus and focus induced by the reversibility of the decision increased participants' subjective positive feelings about the decision outcome. Finally, in Study 5, we tested whether regulatory motivation, induced by decision reversibility, also influenced participants' preference in specific product features. The results generally support our hypothesis showing that, compared to irreversible decisions, reversible decisions strengthen a prevention focus more than a promotion focus. Implications for research on decision making are discussed. PMID:23815456

  2. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    DOEpatents

    Fulton, J.L.; Smith, R.D.

    1993-11-30

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W[sub o] that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W[sub o] of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions. 27 figures.

  3. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    DOEpatents

    Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W.sub.o that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W.sub.o of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions.

  4. Molecularly Regulated Reversible DNA Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Niancao; Shi, Xuechen; Wang, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Natural polymers are synthesized and decomposed under physiological conditions. However, it is challenging to develop synthetic polymers whose formation and reversibility can be both controlled under physiological conditions. Here we show that both linear and branched DNA polymers can be synthesized via molecular hybridization in aqueous solutions, on the particle surface, and in the extracellular matrix (ECM) without the involvement of any harsh conditions. More importantly, these polymers can be effectively reversed to dissociate under the control of molecular triggers. Since nucleic acids can be conjugated with various molecules or materials, we anticipate that molecularly regulated reversible DNA polymerization holds potential for broad biological and biomedical applications. PMID:27100911

  5. Ferroelectric polarization reversal in single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stadler, Henry L.

    1992-01-01

    Research on the reversal of polarization in ferroelectric crystals is reviewed. Particular attention is given to observation methods for polarization reversal, BaTiO3 polarization reversal, crystal thickness dependence of polarization reversal, and domain wall movement during polarization reversal in TGS.

  6. Improving reversal median computation using commuting reversals and cycle information.

    PubMed

    Arndt, William; Tang, Jijun

    2008-10-01

    In the past decade, genome rearrangements have attracted increasing attention from both biologists and computer scientists as a new type of data for phylogenetic analysis. Methods for reconstructing phylogeny from genome rearrangements include distance-based methods, MCMC methods, and direct optimization methods. The latter, pioneered by Sankoff and extended with the software suites GRAPPA and MGR, is the most accurate approach, but is very limited due to the difficulty of its scoring procedure--it must solve multiple instances of the reversal median problem to compute the score of a given tree. The reversal median problem is known to be NP-hard and all existing solvers are extremely slow when the genomes are distant. In this paper, we present a new reversal median heuristic for unichromosomal genomes. The new method works by applying sets of reversals in a batch where all such reversals both commute and do not break the cycle of any other. Our testing using simulated datasets shows that this method is much faster than the leading solver for difficult datasets with only a slight accuracy penalty, yet retains better accuracy than other heuristics with comparable speed, and provides the additional option of searching for multiple medians. This method dramatically increases the speed of current direct optimization methods and enables us to extend the range of their applicability to organellar and small nuclear genomes with more than 50 reversals along each edge. PMID:18774904

  7. Myasthenic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, M E

    2011-03-01

    The neuromuscular junction is vulnerable to autoimmune attack both at the pre-synaptic nerve terminal and at the post-synaptic muscle membrane. Antibodies directed to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the muscle surface are the cause of myasthenia gravis in the majority of cases. Myasthenia gravis is an acquired condition, characterised by weakness and fatigability of the skeletal muscles. The ocular muscles are commonly affected first, but the disease often generalises. Treatment includes symptom control and immunosuppression. The thymus gland plays an important role in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis and thymectomy is indicated in certain subgroups. Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome is associated with antibodies directed to the voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies at the pre-synaptic nerve terminal. It is an acquired condition and, in some cases, may be paraneoplastic, often secondary to underlying small cell lung carcinoma. Clinical presentation is distinct from myasthenia gravis, with patients often first presenting with lower limb muscle fatigability and autonomic symptoms. Congenital myasthenic syndromes are inherited neuromuscular disorders due to mutations in proteins at the neuromuscular junction. Various phenotypes exist depending on the protein mutation. Treatment is directed towards symptom control and immunosuppression is not indicated. PMID:21365067

  8. Fragile X syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Martin-Bell syndrome; Marker X syndrome ... Fragile X syndrome is caused by a change in a gene called FMR1 . A small part of the gene ... to affect them more severely. You can have fragile X syndrome even if your parents do not have it. ...

  9. [Asthma-COPD overlap syndrome].

    PubMed

    Odler, Balázs; Müller, Veronika

    2016-08-01

    Obstructive lung diseases represent a major health problem worldwide due to their high prevalence associated with elevated socioeconomic costs. Bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are chronic obstructive ventilatory disorders with airway inflammation, however they are separate nosological entities based on thedifferent development, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, and prognostic features. However, these diseases may coexist and can be defined as the coexistence of increased variability of airflow in a patient with incompletely reversible airway obstruction. This phenotype is called asthma - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome. The syndrome is a clinical and scientific challenge as the majority of these patients have been excluded from the clinical and pharmacological trials, thus well-defined clinical characteristics and therapeutic approaches are lacking. The aim of this review is to summarize the currently available literature focusing on pathophysiological and clinical features, and discuss possible therapeutic approaches of patients with asthma - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(33), 1304-1313. PMID:27523313

  10. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Lemierre's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Paul N.; Soghikian, Maida V.; Bhangoo, Munveer S.

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an infectious disease defined by the presence of septic thrombophlebitis with associated embolic phenomenon, most commonly to the lungs. Here we present two cases from a single institution of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) developing as a result of Lemierre's syndrome in previously healthy young adult men. ARDS can occur as a consequence of pulmonary septic emboli and sepsis, both of which are well-described consequences of Lemierre's syndrome. We describe important diagnostic and management considerations in the care of patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure and Lemierre's syndrome. Essential components of management include prompt antibiotic therapy, lung-protective ventilation strategies, and supportive care. PMID:25143837

  11. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Lemierre's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hein, Paul N; Soghikian, Maida V; Bhangoo, Munveer S

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an infectious disease defined by the presence of septic thrombophlebitis with associated embolic phenomenon, most commonly to the lungs. Here we present two cases from a single institution of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) developing as a result of Lemierre's syndrome in previously healthy young adult men. ARDS can occur as a consequence of pulmonary septic emboli and sepsis, both of which are well-described consequences of Lemierre's syndrome. We describe important diagnostic and management considerations in the care of patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure and Lemierre's syndrome. Essential components of management include prompt antibiotic therapy, lung-protective ventilation strategies, and supportive care. PMID:25143837

  12. HAMARTOMATOUS POLYPOSIS SYNDROMES

    PubMed Central

    Gammon, Amanda; Jasperson, Kory; Kohlmann, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes are a diverse group of inherited conditions grouped together because they exhibit hamartomatous rather than epithelial polyp histology. Each syndrome exhibits characteristic polyp histology, gastrointestinal polyp distribution, gastrointestinal cancer risks, extra-intestinal benign findings and often extra-intestinal cancer risks. Identifying individuals at risk for these syndromes and accurately defining the precise diagnosis is necessary for planning surveillance and management in order to prevent the benign and malignant complications. Characteristic syndrome features including gastrointestinal findings, pathology, genetics, and management options for the three most common hamartomatous polyposis syndromes, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome, and juvenile polyposis will be presented in this review. PMID:19414148

  13. CORONAVIRUS REVERSE GENETIC SYSTEMS: INFECTIOUS CLONES AND REPLICONS

    PubMed Central

    Almazán, Fernando; Sola, Isabel; Zuñiga, Sonia; Marquez-Jurado, Silvia; Morales, Lucia; Becares, Martina; Enjuanes, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) infect humans and many animal species, and are associated with respiratory, enteric, hepatic, and central nervous system diseases. The large size of the CoV genome and the instability of some CoV replicase gene sequences during its propagation in bacteria, represent serious obstacles for the development of reverse genetic systems similar to those used for smaller positive sense RNA viruses. To overcome these limitations, several alternatives to more conventional plasmid-based approaches have been established in the last thirteen years. In this report, we briefly review and discuss the different reverse genetic systems developed for CoVs, paying special attention to the severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV). PMID:24930446

  14. Reverse Discrimination and Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Stephen D.

    1980-01-01

    White subjects were aggressive toward Black opponents when contest results appeared to reflect elements of reverse discrimination; but they showed less aggressive behavior toward Black opponents when they thought their loss was due to their opponents' superior ability. (RL)

  15. The evolution of vasectomy reversal.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Ryan M; Pastuszak, Alexander W; Hakky, Tariq S; Chandrashekar, Aravind; Ramasamy, Ranjith; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2015-06-01

    In the USA, about 500,000 vasectomies are performed each year, with up to 6% of men requesting reversal. The technique of vasectomy reversal has evolved from macrosurgical to the implementation of both microscopic and robotic technologies. The very earliest attempts at vasectomy reversal, the vasoepididymostomy and vasovasostomy, have remained central in the treatment of male infertility and will continue to be so for years to come. As seen throughout its history, urological microsurgery has consistently implemented advanced techniques and state-of-the art technology in its craft, and its continued refinement will allow for even more favorable outcomes in the lives of patients seeking restoration of fertility following vasectomy. Here, we review the evolution of vasectomy reversal and its current techniques. PMID:25980804

  16. Mass Spectrometric Characterization of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Interactions with Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Thammaporn, Ratsupa; Ishii, Kentaro; Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Uchiyama, Susumu; Hannongbua, Supa; Kato, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) have been developed for the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. HIV-1 RT binding to NNRTIs has been characterized by various biophysical techniques. However, these techniques are often hampered by the low water solubility of the inhibitors, such as the current promising diarylpyrimidine-based inhibitors rilpivirine and etravirine. Hence, a conventional and rapid method that requires small sample amounts is desirable for studying NNRTIs with low water solubility. Here we successfully applied a recently developed mass spectrometric technique under non-denaturing conditions to characterize the interactions between the heterodimeric HIV-1 RT enzyme and NNRTIs with different inhibitory activities. Our data demonstrate that mass spectrometry serves as a semi-quantitative indicator of NNRTI binding affinity for HIV-1 RT using low and small amounts of samples, offering a new high-throughput screening tool for identifying novel RT inhibitors as anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26934936

  17. Deciphering records of geomagnetic reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, Jean-Pierre; Fournier, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    Polarity reversals of the geomagnetic field are a major feature of the Earth's dynamo. Questions remain regarding the dynamical processes that give rise to reversals and the properties of the geomagnetic field during a polarity transition. A large number of paleomagnetic reversal records have been acquired during the past 50 years in order to better constrain the structure and geometry of the transitional field. In addition, over the past two decades, numerical dynamo simulations have also provided insights into the reversal mechanism. Yet despite the large paleomagnetic database, controversial interpretations of records of the transitional field persist; they result from two characteristics inherent to all reversals, both of which are detrimental to an ambiguous analysis. On the one hand, the reversal process is rapid and requires adequate temporal resolution. On the other hand, weak field intensities during a reversal can affect the fidelity of magnetic recording in sedimentary records. This paper is aimed at reviewing critically the main reversal features derived from paleomagnetic records and at analyzing some of these features in light of numerical simulations. We discuss in detail the fidelity of the signal extracted from paleomagnetic records and pay special attention to their resolution with respect to the timing and mechanisms involved in the magnetization process. Records from marine sediments dominate the database. They give rise to transitional field models that often lead to overinterpret the data. Consequently, we attempt to separate robust results (and their subsequent interpretations) from those that do not stand on a strong observational footing. Finally, we discuss new avenues that should favor progress to better characterize and understand transitional field behavior.

  18. Reversible Shape Memory Optical Gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiaoxi; Tippets, Cary; Fu, Yulan; Donev, Eugene; Turner, Sara; Ashby, Valerie; Lopez, Rene; Sheiko, Sergei

    2015-03-01

    Recent advancements in the understanding of the mechanisms that control shape memory in semi-crystalline polymers, has led to the development of protocols that allow for reversibility in complex shape transformations. The shifting between two programmable shapes is reversible without applying any external force. This is made possible by thermodynamically driven relaxation of extended polymer chains on heating is then inverted by kinetically preferred pathways of polymer crystallization on cooling. Reversible shapeshifting was applied to modulation of photonic gratings to create hands-free reversibly tunable optical elements. We have fabricated a sub-micron ratio optical square grating that presents reversible magnitude changes of its diffraction intensity (up to about 38% modulation) when subject to changes in temperature. This result is attributed to programmable changes in the grating height due to reversible shape memory and is repeatable over multiple cycles. Besides, roughness-induced variations in scattering signal observed upon heating-cooling cycles may offer another way to monitor kinetics of polymer melting and crystallization. Grants: NSF DMR-1407645,

  19. Metabolic Syndrome: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mortada, Rami; Williams, Tracy

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by androgen excess, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. It is the most common endocrinopathy among women of reproductive age, affecting between 6.5% and 8% of women, and is the most common cause of infertility. Insulin resistance is almost always present in women with PCOS, regardless of weight, and they often develop diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The Rotterdam criteria are widely used for diagnosis. These criteria require that patients have at least two of the following conditions: hyperandrogenism, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. The diagnosis of PCOS also requires exclusion of other potential etiologies of hyperandrogenism and ovulatory dysfunction. The approach to PCOS management differs according to the presenting symptoms and treatment goals, particularly the patient's desire for pregnancy. Weight loss through dietary modifications and exercise is recommended for patients with PCOS who are overweight. Oral contraceptives are the first-line treatment for regulating menstrual cycles and reducing manifestations of hyperandrogenism, such as acne and hirsutism. Clomiphene is the first-line drug for management of anovulatory infertility. Metformin is recommended for metabolic abnormalities such as prediabetes, and a statin should be prescribed for cardioprotection if the patient meets standard criteria for statin therapy. PMID:26280343

  20. Nodding Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sejvar, James J.; Riek, Lul; Vandemaele, Katelijn A.H.; Lamunu, Margaret; Kuesel, Annette C.; Schmutzhard, Erich; Matuja, William; Bunga, Sudhir; Foltz, Jennifer; Nutman, Thomas B.; Winkler, Andrea S.; Mbonye, Anthony K.

    2013-01-01

    An epidemic illness characterized by head nodding associated with onchocerciasis has been described in eastern Africa since the early 1960s; we summarize published reports and recent studies. Onset of nodding occurs in previously healthy 5–15-year-old children and is often triggered by eating or cold temperatures and accompanied by cognitive impairment. Its incidence has increased in Uganda and South Sudan over the past 10 years. Four case–control studies identified modest and inconsistent associations. There were nonspecific lesions seen by magnetic resonance imaging, no cerebrospinal fluid inflammation, and markedly abnormal electroencephalography results. Nodding episodes are atonic seizures. Testing has failed to demonstrate associations with trypanosomiasis, cysticercosis, loiasis, lymphatic filariasis, cerebral malaria, measles, prion disease, or novel pathogens; or deficiencies of folate, cobalamin, pyridoxine, retinol, or zinc; or toxicity from mercury, copper, or homocysteine. There is a consistent enigmatic association with onchocerciasis detected by skin snip or serologic analysis. Nodding syndrome is an unexplained epidemic epilepsy. PMID:23965548

  1. Antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    George, Diane; Erkan, Doruk

    2009-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune systemic disease that is diagnosed when there is vascular thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity occurring with persistently positive antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) (lupus anticoagulant test, anticardiolipin antibodies, and/or anti-beta(2)-glycoprotein I antibodies). Although International APS Classification Criteria have been formulated to provide a uniform approach to APS research, aPL may cause a spectrum of clinical manifestations, some of which are not included in these criteria. The main aPL-related cardiac manifestations include valve abnormalities (vegetations and/or thickening), myocardial infarction (MI), intracardiac thrombi, and myocardial microthrombosis. In this article, we will review the definition, etiopathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of aPL-related clinical events with emphasis on cardiac manifestations. PMID:19732604

  2. Nodding syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dowell, Scott F; Sejvar, James J; Riek, Lul; Vandemaele, Katelijn A H; Lamunu, Margaret; Kuesel, Annette C; Schmutzhard, Erich; Matuja, William; Bunga, Sudhir; Foltz, Jennifer; Nutman, Thomas B; Winkler, Andrea S; Mbonye, Anthony K

    2013-01-01

    An epidemic illness characterized by head nodding associated with onchocerciasis has been described in eastern Africa since the early 1960s; we summarize published reports and recent studies. Onset of nodding occurs in previously healthy 5-15-year-old children and is often triggered by eating or cold temperatures and accompanied by cognitive impairment. Its incidence has increased in Uganda and South Sudan over the past 10 years. Four case-control studies identified modest and inconsistent associations. There were nonspecific lesions seen by magnetic resonance imaging, no cerebrospinal fluid inflammation, and markedly abnormal electroencephalography results. Nodding episodes are atonic seizures. Testing has failed to demonstrate associations with trypanosomiasis, cysticercosis, loiasis, lymphatic filariasis, cerebral malaria, measles, prion disease, or novel pathogens; or deficiencies of folate, cobalamin, pyridoxine, retinol, or zinc; or toxicity from mercury, copper, or homocysteine. There is a consistent enigmatic association with onchocerciasis detected by skin snip or serologic analysis. Nodding syndrome is an unexplained epidemic epilepsy. PMID:23965548

  3. [Hepatopulmonary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Thévenot, Thierry; Weil, Delphine; Garioud, Armand; Lison, Hortensia; Cadranel, Jean-François; Degano, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is defined by the association of portal hypertension, increased alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient and intrapulmonary vascular dilations. Pathophysiological mechanisms of hypoxemia are characterized by ventilation-perfusion mismatch, oxygen diffusion limitation between alveolus and the centre of the dilated capillary, and right-to-left shunting. An excess of vasodilator molecules (like nitric monoxide) and proangiogenic factors (like VEGF) play an important role in the occurrence of HPS. Symptoms of HPS are not specific and dominated by a progressive dyspnea in upright position. Pulse oximetry is a simple non-invasive screening test but only detect the most severe forms of HPS. Medical treatment is disappointing and only liver transplantation may lead to resolution of HPS. Survival following liver transplantation is promising when hypoxemia is not severely decreased. PMID:27021476

  4. Antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khamashta, M; Taraborelli, M; Sciascia, S; Tincani, A

    2016-02-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune condition characterized by the occurrence of thrombosis (arterial and/or venous), often multiple, and/or pregnancy morbidity. Thrombosis is one of the major disease mechanisms, mainly caused by activating endothelial cells, monocytes, and platelets. At present, the management of APS patients with a history of thrombosis is based on long-term antithrombotic therapy, due to the high rate of recurrent thrombosis (29% per year without treatment). Obstetrical APS includes heterogeneous pregnancy complications whose pathogenesis has been increasingly elucidated in the past years. This is due to the current management and treatment, as 80% of APS patients achieve a live birth. The standard approach of APS is not supported by extensive evidence and the best options for refractory and incomplete cases need to be clarified. New and promising molecules are under investigation. PMID:27421221

  5. Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, E.E.J.; Pelc, K.; Dan, B.

    2012-01-01

    Rett syndrome is one of the most common causes of complex disability in girls. It is characterized by early neurological regression that severely affects motor, cognitive and communication skills, by autonomic dysfunction and often a seizure disorder. It is a monogenic X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder related to mutation in MECP2, which encodes the methyl-CpG-binding protein MeCP2. There are several mouse models either based on conditional knocking out of the Mecp2 gene or on a truncating mutation. We discuss the clinical aspects with special emphasis on the behavioral phenotype and we review current perspectives in clinical management alongside with perspectives in altering gene expression. PMID:22670134

  6. Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dragieva, G; Stahel, H U; Meyer, M; Kempf, W; Häffner, A; Burg, G; Hafner, J

    2003-08-01

    A 34-year-old male patient was referred with a recalcitrant leg ulcer overlying an extensive vascular malformation, which had led several times to septic soft tissue infections. During his infancy he had been diagnosed to have Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome. Clinical examination revealed asymmetric hypertrophy of the lower extremities, an extensive portwine stain on the more severely affected left limb as well as prominent venous varicosities of both legs. Hands and feet showed striking cerebriform palmoplantar hypertrophy, and macrodactily with syndactily of several fingers. All toes had been amputated in early childhood due to extreme overgrowth and currently the patient walked on his forefeet in a prominent pes equinus deformity. Further symptoms consisted in several lipomas at both arms, another portwine stain at the left hemithorax and a single café-au-lait spot at the left scapula. Angio-magnetic resonance imaging scans of both legs showed an extensive venous-lymphatic vascular malformation involving the whole subcutis and infiltrating the muscle. The chronic wound was interpreted as venous stasis ulceration. Local percutaneous sclerotherapy of the dilated veins underneath the ulcer was discussed, but considered to carry a relevant risk of skin necrosis with consecutive progression of the wound. A conventional split-skin graft led to complete wound healing. Since, the patient consequently wears custom-made compression stockings and remained free from recurrences. The syndromatic constellation of palmoplantar overgrowth, multiple lipomas, giant fingers and toes, limb overgrowth, venous-lymphatic malformation and a café-au-lait spot led to the diagnosis of Proteus syndrome. The possible aetiology, clinical manifestations, differential diagnosis and management of this rare disorder are discussed. PMID:14524037

  7. Treatment of Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kurlan, Roger M

    2014-01-01

    Tourette's syndrome (TS) consists of chronic motor and phonic tics and characteristically begins in childhood. The tics can be disabling and commonly associated behavioral comorbities such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), can also cause problems in daily functioning. The underlying etiology and neurobiology of TS remain unknown although genetic factors appear to be important, cortical control of basal ganglia motor function appears to be disturbed and neurochemical abnormalities, particularly involving dopamine neurotransmission, are likely present. The treatment of TS involves appropriate education and support. Tics can be treated with habit reversal cognitive behavioral therapy, medications (most commonly alpha agonists and antipsychotics), local intramuscular injections of botulinum toxin and some severe, refractory cases have responded to deep brain stimulation surgery (DBS). It is important to appropriately diagnose and treat comorbid behavioral disorders that are disrupting function. OCD can be treated with cognitive behavioral therapy, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and atypical antipsychotics. DBS has become a treatment option for patients with disabling OCD despite other therapies. ADHD is treated with appropriate classroom accommodations, behavioral therapy, alpha agonists, atomoxetine or methylphenidate-containing stimulant drugs. PMID:24043501

  8. Cerebral Specialization in Young Adults with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Digby; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Two groups of right-handed young adults with and without Down Syndrome (N=24) performed a rapid unimanual finger-tapping task under two conditions: alone and while sound-shadowing (repeating) single-syllable, high frequency words. Results provided no evidence for reverse (right hemisphere) lateralization of speech in individuals with Down…

  9. Reversal Transition Records from Intrusions: Implications for the Reversal Process.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, M. D.; Williams, I. S.

    2014-12-01

    The nature of reversals of the geomagnetic field and the details of the transition fields remain controversial. However, reversal records from the Agno batholith and Tatoosh intrusion confirm the suggestion of Valet et al., (2012) from studies of lava records, that there is a threefold division in reversal transition directions. In the Agno, the first phase, or precursor, consists of a CCW loop of the VGP moving from high southerly latitude reverse poles to reach North America. The second phase takes the VGP along a half CCW loop from the tip of South America to northern latitudes at the intensity minimum. The third phase, or rebound is a smaller CCW loop and the main intensity recovery begins. The first and third phases appear to be paleosecular variation loops analogous to present London-Paris secular variation loops. The Tatoosh intrusion gives a similar, but less complete record with the VGPs again confined to the East Pacific and the Americas. Away from the reversal region, secular variation loops in the Tatoosh were shown to be comparable in duration to the precursor in the transition record, consistent with the first phase being a paleosecular variation loop in the Agno. Using westward drift estimates from the present field, this should last about1800 years. This gives ~3300 for phase 2, in an intensity low of >16,000 years. A feature of R to N reversal field models is a low latitude magnetic field flux concentration of the same sign as the polar vortex of the south geographic pole. This is followed by northward flux flow, e.g. Shao et al., (1999). The reversal is achieved by northward motion of this flux feature. The feature is locked in longitudinal mantle coordinates and similarly the VGPs in the Agno and Tatoosh records are confined to the longitudes of the eastern Pacific and the Americas. Whether we are approaching a reversal remains to be seen, although judging by these intrusion records the field intensity would need to decrease much further before

  10. Gilles de la Tourette syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... cannot control. The condition is commonly called Tourette syndrome. ... Tourette syndrome ... fewer people have more severe forms of Tourette syndrome. Tourette syndrome is four times as likely to occur ...

  11. Burning Mouth Syndrome and "Burning Mouth Syndrome".

    PubMed

    Rifkind, Jacob Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is distressing to both the patient and practitioner unable to determine the cause of the patient's symptoms. Burning mouth syndrome is a diagnosis of exclusion, which is used only after nutritional deficiencies, mucosal disease, fungal infections, hormonal disturbances and contact stomatitis have been ruled out. This article will explore the many causes and treatment of patients who present with a chief complaint of "my mouth burns," including symptomatic treatment for those with burning mouth syndrome. PMID:27209717

  12. Ice ages and geomagnetic reversals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    There have been speculations on the relationship between climatic cooling and polarity reversals of the earth's magnetic field during the Pleistocene. Two of the common criticisms on this relationship have been the reality of these short duration geomagnetic events and the accuracy of their dates. Champion et al. (1988) have reviewed recent progress in this area. They identified a total of 10 short-duration polarity events in the last 1 Ma and 6 of these events have been found in volcanic rocks, which also have K-Ar dates. Supposing that the speculated relationship between climatic cooling and geomagnetic reversals actually exist, two mechanisms that assume climatic cooling causes short period magnetic reversals will be investigated. These two methods are core-mantle boundary topography and transfer of the rotational energy to the core.

  13. Time-reversed, flow-reversed ballistics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zernow, L.; Chapyak, E. J.; Scheffler, D. R.

    2001-01-01

    Two-dimensional simulations of planar sheet jet formation are studied to examine the hydrodynamic issues involved when simulations are carried out in the inverse direction, that is, with reversed time and flow. Both a realistic copper equation of state and a shockless equation of state were used. These studies are an initial step in evaluating this technique as a ballistics design tool.

  14. Marburg Virus Reverse Genetics Systems

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Kristina Maria; Mühlberger, Elke

    2016-01-01

    The highly pathogenic Marburg virus (MARV) is a member of the Filoviridae family and belongs to the group of nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses. Reverse genetics systems established for MARV have been used to study various aspects of the viral replication cycle, analyze host responses, image viral infection, and screen for antivirals. This article provides an overview of the currently established MARV reverse genetic systems based on minigenomes, infectious virus-like particles and full-length clones, and the research that has been conducted using these systems. PMID:27338448

  15. Marburg Virus Reverse Genetics Systems.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Kristina Maria; Mühlberger, Elke

    2016-01-01

    The highly pathogenic Marburg virus (MARV) is a member of the Filoviridae family and belongs to the group of nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses. Reverse genetics systems established for MARV have been used to study various aspects of the viral replication cycle, analyze host responses, image viral infection, and screen for antivirals. This article provides an overview of the currently established MARV reverse genetic systems based on minigenomes, infectious virus-like particles and full-length clones, and the research that has been conducted using these systems. PMID:27338448

  16. Stagnation point reverse flow combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinn, Ben T. (Inventor); Neumeier, Yedidia (Inventor); Seitzman, Jerry M. (Inventor); Jagoda, Jechiel (Inventor); Weksler, Yoav (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method for combusting a combustible fuel includes providing a vessel having an opening near a proximate end and a closed distal end defining a combustion chamber. A combustible reactants mixture is presented into the combustion chamber. The combustible reactants mixture is ignited creating a flame and combustion products. The closed end of the combustion chamber is utilized for directing combustion products toward the opening of the combustion chamber creating a reverse flow of combustion products within the combustion chamber. The reverse flow of combustion products is intermixed with combustible reactants mixture to maintain the flame.

  17. Nickel-hydrogen cell reversal characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Charles

    1994-01-01

    Nickel-hydrogen cell reversal characteristics are being studied as part of a TRW program directed towards development of a high current battery cell bypass switch. The following are discussed: cell bypass switch; nickel-hydrogen cell reversal characteristics; and nickel-hydrogen cell chemistry: discharge/reversal and overdischarge (reversal) with nickel and hydrogen precharge.

  18. Reversing: A Fundamental Idea in Computer Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armoni, Michal; Ginat, David

    2008-01-01

    Reversing is the notion of thinking or working in reverse. Computer science textbooks and tutors recognize it primarily in the form of recursion. However, recursion is only one form of reversing. Reversing appears in the computer science curriculum in many other forms, at various intellectual levels, in a variety of fundamental courses. As such,…

  19. Parkinsonian Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David R.; Litvan, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review The different parkinsonian conditions can be challenging to separate clinically. This review highlights the important clinical features that guide the diagnosis of Parkinson disease (PD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), multiple system atrophy (MSA), and corticobasal degeneration (CBD). Strategies for treatment and disease management are also discussed. Recent Findings Over the past decade there has been an increasing recognition of the broad clinical presentations of the neurodegenerative forms of parkinsonism. Nonmotor symptoms in these diseases, including psychiatric, cognitive, autonomic, and gastrointestinal dysfunction, appear to have a major impact on quality of life and disability. PSP and CBD are now considered pathologic diagnoses, with several different and varied clinical phenotypes, that overlap and share features with PDand frontotemporal dementia syndromes. PD is distinguished by its excellent response to dopaminergic medications that is maintained over many years, in contrast to the response seen in patients with MSA and PSP. New diagnostic criteria have been proposed for CBD. No new therapeutic interventions have emerged for PSP, MSA, or CBD. Infusional therapies and deep brain stimulation surgery are established therapies for advanced PD. Summary The “parkinsonian syndromes” encompass a number of nosologic entities that are grouped together on the basis of their shared clinical features but are separated on the basis of their different pathologies. Overall, the consideration of clinical signs, mode of disease onset, and nature of disease progression are all important to make a timely and definitive diagnosis. PMID:24092286

  20. Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kyllerman, Mårten

    2013-01-01

    Angelman syndrome combines severe mental retardation, epilepsy, ataxia, speech impairment, and unique behavior with happy demeanor, laughing, short attention span, hyperactivity, and sleep disturbance. Occurrence has been calculated at 1:20000 to 1:12000 constituting about 6% of all children with severe mental retardation and epilepsy. The physical "prototype" includes microcephaly with flat neck, fair skin and hair, wide-spaced teeth, and open mouth with tongue protrusion. Epilepsy is characterized by atypical absences, erratic myoclonus, and occasional tonic-clonic seizures. EEG demonstrates high-amplitude 2-3Hz delta activity with spike and slow-wave discharges and sleep-activated generalized epileptiform discharges. Sodium valproate, benzodiazepines, and priacetam are frequently used and effective. Development is generally slow, the majority attaining independent walking in the first 2.5-6 years. Vocabulary is limited to a few single words with superior speech and object apprehension. The condition is due to a lack of expression of the UBE3A gene on chromosome 15q. Maternal deletions of 15q11-13 produce the most pronounced phenotype (65-70% of probands), uniparental disomy and imprinting center mutations (10%), and UBE3A point mutations (11%) produce milder phenotypes. PMID:23622177

  1. Premenstrual syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yonkers, Kimberly Ann; O’Brien, P M Shaughn; Eriksson, Elias

    2011-01-01

    Most women of reproductive age have some physical discomfort or dysphoria in the weeks before menstruation. Symptoms are often mild, but can be severe enough to substantially affect daily activities. About 5–8% of women thus suffer from severe premenstrual syndrome (PMS); most of these women also meet criteria for premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Mood and behavioural symptoms, including irritability, tension, depressed mood, tearfulness, and mood swings, are the most distressing, but somatic complaints, such as breast tenderness and bloating, can also be problematic. We outline theories for the underlying causes of severe PMS, and describe two main methods of treating it: one targeting the hypothalamus-pituitary-ovary axis, and the other targeting brain serotonergic synapses. Fluctuations in gonadal hormone levels trigger the symptoms, and thus interventions that abolish ovarian cyclicity, including long-acting analogues of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) or oestradiol (administered as patches or implants), effectively reduce the symptoms, as can some oral contraceptives. The effectiveness of serotonin reuptake inhibitors, taken throughout the cycle or during luteal phases only, is also well established. PMID:18395582

  2. Boerhaave's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Janjua, K. J.

    1997-01-01

    Boerhaave's syndrome or spontaneous oesophageal perforation, is a potentially lethal and frequently elusive medical condition which presents not only a diagnostic but also a therapeutic challenge. It is insufficiently considered in diagnostic hypotheses, yet may be confirmed or excluded by simple methods such as an erect chest film and a contrast study of the oesophagus. Errors in diagnosis are usually caused by unawareness of its varied and atypical presentations or failure to consider its possibility in acute cardiothoracic and upper gastrointestinal conditions. Early aggressive surgical intervention in the form of open and wide mediastinal and chest drainage, with or without oesophageal repair, resection or exclusion, offers the patient the best chance of survival against this otherwise invariably fatal event. Nonoperative therapy consisting of antibiotics, nil oral regimen, nasogastric tube suction, pleural drainage, H2 receptor blockers and either a feeding enterostomy or total parenteral nutrition, may also be appropriate in selected patients. It is probable that the condition is more common than is generally supposed. All clinicians need to be aware of this lethal disease, its frequently unusual presentations and the importance of early diagnosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9196697

  3. Tourette's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Müller-Vahl, Kirsten R

    2009-01-01

    Tourette's syndrome (TS) is a chronic disorder characterized by motor and vocal tics and a variety of associated behaviour disorders. Because current therapy is often unsatisfactory, there is expanding interest in new therapeutic strategies that are more effective, cause less side effects and ameliorate not only tics but also behavioural problems. From anecdotal reports and preliminary controlled studies it is suggested that - at least in a subgroup of patients - cannabinoids are effective in the treatment of TS. While most patients report beneficial effects when smoking marijuana (Cannabis sativa L.), available clinical trials have been performed using oral Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). In otherwise treatment-resistant TS patients, therefore, therapy with THC should not be left unattempted. To date, it is unknown whether other drugs that interact with the endocannabinoid receptor system might be more effective in the treatment of TS than smoked marijuana or pure THC. Since it has been suggested that abnormalities within the endocannabinoid receptor system might underlie TS pathophysiology, it would be of interest to investigate the effect of substances that for example bind more selectively to the central cannabinoid receptor or inhibit the uptake or the degradation of different endocannabinoids. PMID:21104394

  4. Reversible logic gate using adiabatic superconducting devices

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, N.; Yamanashi, Y.; Yoshikawa, N.

    2014-01-01

    Reversible computing has been studied since Rolf Landauer advanced the argument that has come to be known as Landauer's principle. This principle states that there is no minimum energy dissipation for logic operations in reversible computing, because it is not accompanied by reductions in information entropy. However, until now, no practical reversible logic gates have been demonstrated. One of the problems is that reversible logic gates must be built by using extremely energy-efficient logic devices. Another difficulty is that reversible logic gates must be both logically and physically reversible. Here we propose the first practical reversible logic gate using adiabatic superconducting devices and experimentally demonstrate the logical and physical reversibility of the gate. Additionally, we estimate the energy dissipation of the gate, and discuss the minimum energy dissipation required for reversible logic operations. It is expected that the results of this study will enable reversible computing to move from the theoretical stage into practical usage. PMID:25220698

  5. Prader-Willi syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... chromosome 15 and none from the father These genetic changes occur randomly. Persons who have this syndrome ... Genetic testing is available to test children for Prader-Willi syndrome. As the child grows older, lab ...

  6. Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lennox-Gastaut syndrome is a severe form of epilepsy. Seizures usually begin before 4 years of age. ... broad program of basic and clinical research on epilepsy including Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. These studies are aimed ...

  7. Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome is a growth disorder that causes large body size, large organs, and other symptoms. It is ... Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome is caused by a defect in the genes on chromosome 11. About 10% of cases can ...

  8. Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Is Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome? Obesity hypoventilation (HI-po-ven-tih-LA-shun) syndrome (OHS) is ... e-DE-mah), pulmonary hypertension (PULL-mun-ary HI-per-TEN-shun), cor pulmonale (pul-meh-NAL- ...

  9. Milk-alkali syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000332.htm Milk-alkali syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Milk-alkali syndrome is a condition in which there ...

  10. HAMARTOMATOUS POLYPOSIS SYNDROMES

    PubMed Central

    Calva, Daniel; Howe, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Since the histological description of the hamartomatous polyp in 1957 by Horrilleno et al., several different syndromes have been described with the propensity to develop these polyps in the upper and lower GI tracts. These include Juvenile Polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome, and the PTEN hamartoma tumor syndromes (Cowden and Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndromes), which are autosomal-dominantly inherited, and Cronkhite-Canada syndrome, which is acquired. The clinical aspects, the molecular pathogenesis, the organ systems affected, the risks of cancer, and the management of these hamartomatous polyposis syndromes will be reviewed in this paper. Although the incidence of these syndromes is low, it is important for clinicians to recognize these disorders in order to prevent morbidity and mortality in these patients, and to perform presymptomatic testing in patients at risk. PMID:18672141

  11. Complex regional pain syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition that can affect any area of the ... Bailey A, Audette JF. Complex regional pain syndrome. In: Frontera ... of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, ...

  12. Sick sinus syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... chambers is a common cause of sick sinus syndrome. Coronary artery disease , high blood pressure, and aortic and ... pressure may be normal or low. Sick sinus syndrome may cause symptoms of heart failure to start or get worse. Sick sinus ...

  13. Riley-Day syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Riley-Day syndrome is an inherited disorder that affects nerves throughout the body. ... Riley-Day syndrome is passed down through families (inherited). A person must inherit a copy of the defective gene ...

  14. Dubin-Johnson syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Dubin-Johnson syndrome is a disorder passed down through families (inherited) in which a person has mild jaundice throughout ... Dubin-Johnson syndrome is a very rare genetic disorder. In order to inherit the condition, a child must get ...

  15. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... present at birth. The syndrome often involves port wine stains, excess growth of bones and soft tissue, ... Symptoms of Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome include: Many port wine stains or other blood vessel problems, including dark ...

  16. Fragile X Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Cruz, Felix F.

    1985-01-01

    Physical, psychological, and cytogenic characteristics of individuals with the Fragile X syndrome are reviewed. Prospects for therapy with folic acid, prenatal diagnosis, phenotype of heterozygote for the marker X, and unresolved issues about the syndrome are discussed. (CL)

  17. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... Neonatal RDS occurs in infants whose lungs have not yet fully ... disease is mainly caused by a lack of a slippery substance in ...

  18. Anisocoria and Horner's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... In children, Horner’s syndrome may be caused by neuroblastoma, a tumor arising in another part of the body. Although rare, the risk of neuroblastoma is significantly greater with acquired Horner’s syndrome than ...

  19. Riley-Day syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001387.htm Riley-Day syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Riley-Day syndrome is an inherited disorder that affects nerves ...

  20. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... typically present at birth. The syndrome often involves port wine stains, excess growth of bones and soft ... Symptoms of Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome include: Many port wine ... the skin Varicose veins (may be seen in early infancy, but are ...